proposed grey district plan

GREY DISTRICT

PLAN

NATU

REALLY

AMAZING

THE GREY DISTRICT

2005

UPDATED 16 JULY 2015

F O R EW O R D

F O R EW O R D

F O R EW O R D

F O R EW O R D

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART 1

– SCOPE AND LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK OF THE PLAN

THE GREY DISTRICT

1 SCOPE AND LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK OF THE PLAN ................................ 1

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.6

1.7

1.8

1.9

HISTORY OF THE PLAN .................................................................................................................... 1

PLAN ADMINISTRATION ................................................................................................................. 1

PURPOSE OF THE DISTRICT PLAN................................................................................................. 1

CONTENTS OF THE DISTRICT PLAN ............................................................................................. 3

RELATIONSHIP WITH OTHER PLANS AND POLICY DOCUMENTS: ........................................ 3

MONITORING ..................................................................................................................................... 4

TERM OF THE PLAN .......................................................................................................................... 4

CROSS BOUNDARY ISSUES ............................................................................................................. 4

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS .............................................................................. 5

2 HOW TO READ AND USE THE PLAN ....................................................................... 9

2.1

2.2

2.3

INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................. 9

PART 1 - SCOPE AND LEGISLATIVE PROCEDURE ..................................................................... 9

PART 2 - HOW TO READ AND USE THE PLAN ............................................................................. 9

PART 3 - DISTRICT WIDE ISSUES, OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES .............................................. 9 2.4

2.5

PART 4 - ENVIRONMENTAL AREA - ISSUES, OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES (INCLUDES

RULES) ............................................................................................................................................................ 12

2.6

PART 5 - APPENDICES, SCHEDULES AND DEFINITIONS ........................................................ 14

2.7

2.8

PART 6 – PLANNING MAPS: ........................................................................................................... 14

OTHER MATTERS: ........................................................................................................................... 14

3 UTILITIES ...................................................................................................................... 18

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 18

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 18

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 18

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 18

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 20

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 20

4 LANDSCAPE .................................................................................................................. 21

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

RESOURCES, ACTIVITIES AND VALUES .................................................................................... 21

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 21

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 21

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 22

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 23

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 24

5 SIGNIFICANT INDIGENOUS VEGETATION AND SIGNIFICANT HABITATS

OF INDIGENOUS FAUNA................................................................................................... 25

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

5.6

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 25

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 26

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 26

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 27

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 27

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 29

6 WATERWAYS AND MARGINS ................................................................................. 30

6.1

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 30

F O R EW O R D

6.2

6.3

6.4

6.5

6.6

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 31

OBJECTIVES...................................................................................................................................... 31

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 32

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 33

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 34

7 THE COASTAL ENVIRONMENT .............................................................................. 35

7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

7.5

7.6

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 35

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 36

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 36

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 36

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 37

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 37

8 SIGNS ............................................................................................................................... 38

8.1

8.2

8.3

8.4

8.5

8.6

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 38

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 38

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 38

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 38

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 39

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 39

9 NATURAL HAZARDS .................................................................................................. 40

9.1

9.2

9.3

9.4

9.5

9.6

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 40

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 41

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 41

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 41

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 42

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 43

10 TANGATA WHENUA ................................................................................................... 44

10.1

10.2

10.3

10.4

10.5

10.6

10.7

10.8

STATEMENT OF IDENTITY ............................................................................................................ 44

TANGATA WHENUA AND THE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ACT ........................................ 44

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 44

STATUTORY ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AREAS ............................................................................ 45

OBJECTIVES...................................................................................................................................... 45

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 46

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 46

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 47

11 HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ...................................................................................... 48

11.1

11.2

11.3

11.4

11.5

11.6

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 48

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 48

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 48

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 48

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 48

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 50

12 TRANSPORT .................................................................................................................. 51

12.1

12.2

12.3

12.4

12.5

12.6

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 51

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 51

OBJECTIVES...................................................................................................................................... 52

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 52

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 53

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 54

13 SUBDIVISION ................................................................................................................ 55

F O R EW O R D

13.1

13.2

13.3

13.4

13.5

13.6

13.7

13.8

13.9

13.10

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 55

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 55

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 55

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 55

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 56

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 56

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 58

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 59

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 60

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 61

14 HERITAGE ..................................................................................................................... 62

14.1

14.2

14.3

14.4

14.5

14.6

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 62

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 62

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 63

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 63

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 64

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 65

15 FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS ................................................................................. 66

15.1

15.2

15.3

15.4

15.5

15.6

15.7

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 66

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 66

OBJECTIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 66

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 66

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 67

FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS PURPOSES .................................................................................. 67

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 73

16 RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREA ............................................................. 75

16.1

16.2

16.3

16.4

16.5

16.6

16.7

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 75

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 75

OBJECTIVES...................................................................................................................................... 76

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 76

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 77

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 78

RULES - RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS .................................................................. 79

17 TOWNSHIP ENVIRONMENT ..................................................................................... 88

17.1

17.2

17.3

17.4

17.5

17.6

17.7

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 88

ISSUES ................................................................................................................................................ 88

OBJECTIVES...................................................................................................................................... 89

POLICIES ........................................................................................................................................... 89

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ..................................................................................................... 90

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ......................................... 90

RULES - TOWNSHIP ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS ....................................................................... 91

18 RURAL RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENT .............................................................. 100

18.1

18.2

18.3

18.4

18.5

18.6

18.7

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 100

ISSUES .............................................................................................................................................. 100

OBJECTIVE ...................................................................................................................................... 100

POLICIES ......................................................................................................................................... 100

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ................................................................................................... 101

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ....................................... 102

RULES – RURAL RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREA ................................................... 103

19 RURAL ENVIRONMENT .......................................................................................... 112

19.1

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 112

F O R EW O R D

19.2

19.3

19.4

19.5

19.6

19.7

ISSUES .............................................................................................................................................. 113

OBJECTIVES.................................................................................................................................... 114

POLICIES ......................................................................................................................................... 114

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ................................................................................................... 115

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ....................................... 116

RULES - RURAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREA .............................................................................. 117

20 COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS ................... 132

20.1

20.2

20.3

20.4

20.5

20.6

20.7

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 132

ISSUES .............................................................................................................................................. 133

OBJECTIVE ...................................................................................................................................... 134

POLICIES ......................................................................................................................................... 134

IMPLEMENTATION METHODS ................................................................................................... 135

ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING ....................................... 136

RULES - COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREA .............................. 137

21 APPENDIX 1- UTILITIES RULES ............................................................................ 151

22 APPENDIX 2- SIGNS RULES .................................................................................... 159

23 APPENDIX 3- HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RULES ........................................... 163

24 APPENDIX 4 - TRANSPORTATION RULES ......................................................... 170

24.1

24.2

24.3

24.4

24.5

24.6

24.7

24.8

24.9

COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................. 170

PARKING AND LOADING ............................................................................................................. 170

ACCESS ............................................................................................................................................ 174

ASSESSMENT MATTERS FOR RESOURCE CONSENTS .......................................................... 178

REASONS FOR RULES ................................................................................................................... 179

SCHEDULE 1 - CAR PARKING SPACE LAYOUTS .................................................................... 181

SCHEDULE 2 -TURNING CIRCLES .............................................................................................. 183

SCHEDULE 3 - CROSSINGS .......................................................................................................... 185

SCHEDULE 4 - GREY DISTRICT ROADING HIERARCHY ....................................................... 196

25 APPENDIX 5 - SUBDIVISION RULES ..................................................................... 200

25.1

25.2

25.3

25.4

25.5

25.6

25.7

PERMITTED ACTIVITIES .............................................................................................................. 200

CONTROLLED ACTIVITIES .......................................................................................................... 200

MATTERS WHICH COUNCIL RESERVES CONTROL OVER ................................................... 204

DISCRETIONARY ACTIVITIES .................................................................................................... 204

ASSESSMENT MATTERS FOR CONTROLLED AND DISCRETIONARY MATTERS ............ 204

REASONS FOR RULES ................................................................................................................... 212

SCHEDULE 1 -CODE OF PRACTICE FOR SUBDIVISION ......................................................... 217

26 APPENDIX 6 - HERITAGE RULES .......................................................................... 221

26.1

26.2

26.3

SCHEDULE 1 - HERITAGE ITEMS AND HISTORIC AREAS .................................................... 223

SCHEDULE 2 - HISTORIC TREES REGISTER............................................................................. 227

SCHEDULE 3 - ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES ................................................................................ 230

27 APPENDIX 7 - APPLICATION PROCEDURE ....................................................... 239

27.1

INFORMATION REQUIRED .......................................................................................................... 239

28 APPENDIX 8 - RECESSION PLANES ...................................................................... 242

28.1

28.2

28.3

DEFINITION OF RECESSION PLANE .......................................................................................... 242

RECESSION PLANE INDICATOR ................................................................................................. 242

HILL SITES ...................................................................................................................................... 243

29 APPENDIX 9 - AERODROME FLIGHT PATH PROTECTION AREA ............. 244

29.1

HEIGHT CONTROL GENERAL ..................................................................................................... 244

30 APPENDIX 10 - SCHEDULE OF DESIGNATIONS ............................................... 245

F O R EW O R D

31 APPENDIX 11 – NOHOANGA ................................................................................... 255

32 APPENDIX 12 – OUTLINE DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR KAIATA PARK ..... 256

33 DEFINITIONS .............................................................................................................. 257

F O R EW O R D

F O R EW O R D

FOREWORD

DISCUSSION

The purpose of the Act is to promote the sustainable management of natural and physical resources. Managing the use, development and protection of the natural and physical resources is critical to the well being of the people and communities of the Grey District. The

District has an abundance of natural and physical resources, which has provided, and continues to provide, the people of the District with a unique and satisfying lifestyle.

At the same time, the management of the use, development and protection of resources should not compromise the community’s environmental safeguards in terms of the potential use of resources for future generations, the life supporting capacity and ecosystems, and the avoidance, remedy and mitigation of adverse effects.

The implications of this for the Grey District are that the plan enables people to carry out activities, which are only controlled where their adverse environmental effects are likely to undermine the environmental standards in the District. The environmental standards that the plan seeks to safeguard reflect the growth and development aspirations and values of the community.

To this end, Council encourages the management of resources that will maximise long term economic and environmental benefits to the District. The District is rich in natural resources such as forests, minerals, coal, rivers and mountains that lend themselves to achieving this.

These resources, regardless of tenure, management, or stewardship should be managed in this manner.

The theme of the District Plan therefore, is to promote the sustainable management of resources by enabling people to manage the use, development and protection of natural and physical resources as they see fit, within a framework of environmental standards determined by the community.

F O R EW O R D

PART 1

SCOPE AND LEGISLATIVE

FRAMEWORK OF THE

PLAN

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

SC O PE AN D L EG I SL AT I V E F R AM EW O R K O F T H E P L AN

1 SCOPE AND LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK OF THE

PLAN

1.1 HISTORY OF THE PLAN

This Plan reviews and replaces the following district schemes prepared under the Town and Country

Planning Act 1977 and deemed to be the Grey Transitional District Plan under the Act :

Grey County District Scheme:

Greymouth Borough District Scheme:

Extensive consultation was undertaken prior to, and during, the preparation of this Plan, to ensure it reflects the concerns and aspirations of the community and addresses Council's obligations under the

Act .

The Council's initial mechanism for consultation was the Resource Management Issues and Options

Report to which submissions were made. In addition, the Council has consulted with government and other statutory agencies, special interest groups and Tangata Whenua, and produced draft plans for consultative purposes.

1.2 PLAN ADMINISTRATION

This Plan belongs to the community and not the Council . The Council shall undertake administration of the Plan in an open and transparent manner, fully consulting with, and involving, the public in its processes. Provisions of the Plan will be monitored to assess their effectiveness and efficiency.

1.3 PURPOSE OF THE DISTRICT PLAN

The purpose of the Grey District Plan (

the "Plan"

) is to assist the Grey District Council (

the “

Council

) to undertake its functions to achieve the purpose of the Resource Management Act 1991 (

the “Act”

),

(

Section 72

of the Act refers).

1.3.1 FUNCTIONS OF THE GREY DISTRICT COUNCIL

The functions of the Council under the Act are set out in

Section 31

-

Every territorial authority shall have the following functions for the purpose of giving effect to this Act in its district: i. The establishment, implementation, and review of objectives, policies, and methods to achieve integrated management of the effects of the use, development, or protection of land and associated natural and physical resources of the district: ii. The control of any actual or potential effects of the use, development, or protection of land, including for the purpose of the avoidance or mitigation of natural hazards and the prevention or mitigation of any adverse effects of the storage, use, disposal, or transportation of hazardous substances:] iii. The control of subdivision of land: iv. The control of the emission of noise and the mitigation of the effects of noise: v. The control of any actual or potential effects of activities in relation to the surface of water in rivers and lakes:

vi.

Any other functions specified in this Act.

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1.3.2 PURPOSE OF THE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ACT

Section 5

of the Resource Management Act 1991 sets out the purpose of the Act -

1. The purpose of this Act is to promote the sustainable management of natural and physical resources.

2. In this Act, ``sustainable management'' means managing the use, development, and protection of natural and physical resources in a way, or at a rate, which enables people and communities to provide for their social, economic, and cultural well being and for their health and safety while- a) Sustaining the potential of natural and physical resources (excluding minerals) to meet the reasonably foreseeable needs of future generations; and b) c)

Safeguarding the life-supporting capacity of air, water, soil, and ecosystems; and

Avoiding, remedying, or mitigating any adverse effects of activities on the environment.

1.3.3 PRINCIPLES OF THE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ACT

Part II, Sections 6, 7 & 8

of the Act sets out the principals to achieve the purpose of sustainable management (as set out in Section 5 of the Act ). These principles are:

Section 6

“Matters of national importance”-

“In achieving the purpose of this Act, all persons exercising functions and powers under it, in relation to managing the use, development, and protection of natural and physical resources, shall recognise and provide for the following matters of national importance:

(a) The preservation of the natural character of the coastal environment (including the coastal marine area), wetlands, and lakes and rivers and their margins, and the protection of them from inappropriate subdivision, use, and development:

(b) The protection of outstanding natural features and landscapes from inappropriate subdivision, use, and development:

(c) The protection of areas of significant indigenous vegetation and significant habitats of indigenous fauna:

(d) The maintenance and enhancement of public access to and along the coastal marine area, lakes, and rivers:

(e) The relationship of Maori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral lands, water, sites, wa ahi tapu, and other taonga.”

Section 7

“Other matters”-

“In achieving the purpose of this Act, all persons exercising functions and powers under it, in relation to managing the use, development, and protection of natural and physical resources, shall have particular regard to-

(a) Kaitiakitanga:

(aa)The ethic of Stewardship:

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2

SC O PE AN D L EG I SL AT I V E F R AM EW O R K O F T H E P L AN

(b) The efficient use and development of natural and physical resources:

(c) The maintenance and enhancement of amenity values:

(d) Intrinsic values of ecosystems:

(e) Recognition and protection of the heritage values of sites, buildings, places, or areas:

(f) Maintenance and enhancement of the quality of the environment:

(g) Any finite characteristics of natural and physical resources:

(h)

The protection of the habitat of trout and salmon.”

Section 8

“Treaty of Waitangi” -

“In achieving the purpose of this Act, all persons exercising functions and powers under it, in relation to managing the use, development, and protection of natural and physical resources, shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Wai tangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi).”

1.4 CONTENTS OF THE DISTRICT PLAN

The Act provides at

Section 75

that certain matters, amongst others, must be included in the

District Plan -

a) The significant resource management issues of the district; and b) The objectives sought to be achieved by the plan; and c) The policies in regard to the issues and objectives, and an explanation of those policies; and d) The methods being or to be used to implement the policies, including any rules; and e) The principal reasons for adopting the objectives, policies, and methods of implementation set out in the plan; and f) The information to be submitted with an application for a resource consent, including the circumstances in which the powers under section 92 may be used; and g) The environmental results anticipated from the implementation of these policies and methods; and h) The processes to be used to deal with issues which cross territorial boundaries; and i) The procedures to be used to review the matters set out in paragraphs (a) to (h), and to monitor the effectiveness of the plan as a means of achieving its objectives and policies; and j) Any other information that the territorial authority considers appropriate; and k) Such additional matters as may be appropriate for the purpose of fulfilling the territorial authority's functions, powers, and duties under this Act.

1.5 RELATIONSHIP WITH OTHER PLANS AND POLICY

DOCUMENTS:

1.5.1 CONSISTENCY

In preparing and reviewing the Plan, consistency with other plans and policy documents relating to the District is required. The Act , (

Section 75(2)

), states that the Plan

“shall not be inconsistent with

,

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

3

SC O PE AN D L EG I SL AT I V E F R AM EW O R K O F T H E P L AN

a) b) c)

Any national policy statement or New Zealand coastal policy statement; or

Any water conservation order; or

The regional policy statement, or any regional plan of its region in regard to any matter of regional significance or for which the regional council has primary responsibility under Part IV.”

The Council will undertake Plan Changes, if necessary, where these plans or policy documents are prepared subsequent to this Plan.

In order to maintain consistency with other statutory documents, during the preparation of this plan, the Council in addition to its requirements under

Section 75(2)

, has had regard to the following documents, as required by

Section 74(2)

of the Act :

(a) the provisions of the former regional planning schemes for the district where these are not inconsistent with Part II of the Act (s 367)

(b) the proposed West Coast Regional Policy Statement and regional plans proposed;

(c) management plans and strategies prepared under other Acts, such as the West Coast

Conservation Management Strategy;

(d) Iwi authority considerations;

(e) district plans of adjacent local authorities (Section 74(2)).

(f) New Zealand Historic Places Trust Register

1.6 MONITORING

The Council also has a

“duty to gather information, monitor, and keep records”

in order to effectively carry out its function under the Act (

Section 35)

). Undertaking this, the Plan, resource consents and the various environments that comprise the District will be monitored.

Appropriate monitoring and review data is specified in Parts 3 and 4.

1.7 TERM OF THE PLAN

The Act (

Section 73

) requires the Grey District Council to have a District Plan. It is also a requirement of the Act (

Section 79

) that a full review of the District Plan is commenced not later than 10 years after the plan becomes operative. The life of the entire operative document, therefore, is 10 years before a comprehensive assessment is required.

It is not, however, a requirement that the plan remain in its original form for the 10 year period. Over time resource management issues may change and it is for this reason that provision is made under the Act for Changes to the Plan. Changes to the Plan may be initiated by individuals or the District Council.

1.8 CROSS BOUNDARY ISSUES

Resource Management issues will, from time to time, occur which cross District Boundaries.

Where such situations occur joint processes will be utilised and consultation will be held with the appropriate District or Regional Council to ensure integration of all relevant information for decision making utilising joint processes.

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4

SC O PE AN D L EG I SL AT I V E F R AM EW O R K O F T H E P L AN

The Councils currently discuss issues of common interest and where appropriate joint courses of action for attending to resource management matters will be considered.

Regular consultation will be undertaken with the Districts and Regional Council in order to maintain a clear understanding of issues which may impact on resource management in the

Grey District.

1.9 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

The Act requires the Council to observe national environmental standards and enforce them to the extent to which their powers enable them to do so (

Sections 44(A)(7) and (8))

. A local authority may amend a District Plan to include a reference to a national environmental standard without using the process in Schedule 1 of the Act .

The National Environmental Standard for Assessing and Managing Contaminants in Soil to

Protect Human Health came into effect on 1 January 2012. Notes are included in the rules sections of the District Plan to enable the Council to implement this national regulation.

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SC O PE AN D L EG I SL AT I V E F R AM EW O R K O F T H E P L AN

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

6

H O W T O R E AD AN D U S E T H E PL AN

PART 2

HOW TO READ AND USE

THE PLAN

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

7

H O W T O R E AD AN D U S E T H E PL AN

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

8

H O W T O R E AD AN D U S E T H E PL AN

2 HOW TO READ AND USE THE PLAN

2.1 INTRODUCTION

The matters which must be included in the District Plan under Section 75 (Refer to 1.4) have been incorporated into this plan as follows:

Part 1 Scope And Legislative Framework Of The Plan

Part 2 How To Read And Use The Plan

Part 3 District Wide Issues, Objectives and Policies

Part 4 Environmental Area, Issues, Objectives, Policies and Rules

Part 5 Appendices, Schedules and Definitions

Part 6 Planning Maps

These are referred to in detail below. In particular the range of methods is set out in 2.4 and application of the rules is set out in 2.5.

2.2 PART 1 - SCOPE AND LEGISLATIVE PROCEDURE

Part 1 contains the relevant sections of the Act relevant to the preparation of the Plan and

Council’s

legal obligations.

2.3 PART 2 - HOW TO READ AND USE THE PLAN

This explains how to use the Plan’s various statutory procedures and outlines the procedures when applying for a resource consent.

2.4 PART 3 - DISTRICT WIDE ISSUES, OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES

The District wide provisions in Part 3 apply to the following:

Utilities

Landscape

Indigenous vegetation and habitats of fauna

Waterways and Margins

Coastal Environment

Signs

Natural Hazards

Tangata Whenua

Hazardous Substances

Transport

Subdivision

Heritage

Financial Contributions

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H O W T O R E AD AN D U S E T H E PL AN

Part 3 identifies significant resource management issues which apply throughout the District and the objectives and policies which are intended to address these issues. The reasons and explanation for adopting the objectives and policies is given.

Methods of implementing the objectives and policies are then identified. In this respect a number of methods, both regulatory and non-regulatory, are used which are summarised below.

i.

Promotion of Guidelines, Standards and Good Management Practices:

There are a number of guidelines and codes of practice available, such as New Zealand Forest

Code of Practice, building design and sign guidelines, and regional council publications.

Some organisations have their own management guidelines including accreditation with internationally recognised standards. Council encourages their use by practitioners while

Council will also work with groups such as Iwi, community organisations and environmental and landholder groups to further develop codes of practice.

ii.

Encouraging Use of Covenants:

Grey District has large areas of covenanted land particularly as it relates to indigenous areas of vegetation. Council believes methods such as these should be encouraged given the acceptance and commitment of landowners.

iii.

Co-operation with other Parties:

Favourable outcomes can be achieved by cooperation with other groups and agencies. For example, co-operation with parties such as Iwi, landowners and the Department of Conservation in respect of strategies, works and programmes can give practical effect to achieving sustainable management.

iv.

Consultation/Information:

Potential problems arising from resource management can be solved within the community by consultation and ultimately agreement.

Dissemination of information is part of this process. An example of this is the SNA

(Significant Natural Area) Study, which over the next two years will identify areas of significant indigenous vegetation and habitats of fauna on the West Coast and the appropriate methods of sustaining their values. This is a co-operative exercise between such diverse organisations as Department of Conservation, district councils, regional council, Timberlands, Federated Farmers, Farm Forestry Association, MAF, landowners and Royal Forest and Bird Society and other conservation groups and individuals. An earlier example is the West Coast Accord in respect of indigenous forests.

v.

Use of other legislation and powers of the authorities:

The use of legislation and powers of other regulatory authorities are an effective method of achieving sustainable management, particularly when district council input will only cause a duplication, or overlap, of controls. Examples of this are the

Maritime New Zealand’s powers in respect of activities on the surface of water and the 1993 Forest Amendments Act which applies to the sustainable management of privately owned forests The Regional Council also has a considerable array of controls which are referred to in (vii) below.

vi.

Use of Rules in the District Plan:

Rules may allow, restrict and regulate activities.

Refer to 2.5 for more details on how they are applicable in the plan.

vii.

Regional Council Planning Documents:

The West Coast Regional Council has a regional policy statement as well as a number of regional plans which contain rules regulating activities which affect land use activities. These plans address Regional

Council functions in such matters as the control of the use of land for the purpose of soil conservation and water quality, and coastal management and discharges to land, air or

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water. Grey District sees little point in duplicating these types of rules as it will only lead to confusion, delay and added expense for councils and the public alike. All of the five plans have been publicly notified and therefore have statutory effect. The regional documents are set out below:

West Coast Regional Policy Statement

While not containing any rules the policy statement sets the framework for the integrated management of natural and physical resources of the West Coast region, addressing issues relating to heritage, Maori values, soil, water, natural habitats, the coastal environment, natural hazards, wastes, air quality, network utilities , energy and minerals.”

Soil Conservation and Erosion Control Plan.

This plan has rules controlling activities such as disturbance of land surface and earthworks, including vegetation clearance and works in proximity to waterbodies.

Regional Air Quality Plan.

This plan has rules controlling discharges to air and includes odour, dust and industrial emissions.

Control of the Discharge of Contaminants to Land.

This plan has rules controlling discharges to land and includes stormwater, effluent, leachate, farm wastes etc.

Regional Coastal Plan.

This plan has rules controlling discharges from land, structures, deposition and excavation etc, as they affect the Coastal marine area.

Activities such as forestry, mining, factory farming , coastal works and land development are all affected by the above plans, and may require consent from the Regional Council as well as any consents from the District Council.

viii.

Designations:

These generally provide for existing or future public works. Refer to

2.8.3.

ix.

Conditions of Resource Consents:

Council can impose conditions on resource consents, including financial contributions, to avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects.

x.

Enforcement and Abatement Notices:

Council and in some cases, other parties, can initiate an enforcement or abatement notice if the Act or a rule is contravened or if any activity is likely to have an adverse effect on the environment.

xi.

Monitoring:

Monitoring enables Council to review significant resource management issues in the district and the appropriateness of their methods to deal with such issues.

Finally, Part 3 includes anticipated environmental results setting out the consequences of implementing the Plan’s objectives, policies and methods and how those results will be monitored.

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2.5 PART 4 - ENVIRONMENTAL AREA - ISSUES, OBJECTIVES AND

POLICIES (INCLUDES RULES)

Part 4 contains five environmental areas as follows:

i. Residential:

Greymouth, Karoro, Paroa, Runanga, Cobden, Blackball, Kaiata, Kaiata Park , Mitchells,

Iveagh Bay, Moana, Dobson, Punakaiki, Boddytown, Sumner Road, and Blaketown.

ii. Township:

Camerons, Nelson Creek, Ahaura, Ngahere, Stillwater, Taylorville, Gladstone, Rapahoe,

Barrytown, Totara Flat, and Blackball.

iii. Rural-Residential:

Golden Sands, parts of Dobson, Kaiata Park , Blackball and Paroa.

iv. Commercial/Industrial:

Stillwater, Greymouth, Cobden, Runanga, Rapahoe, Blaketown, Karoro, Paroa, Gladstone,

Kaiata, Kaiata Park , Dobson, Ngahere, Moana, and Mitchells.

v. Rural:

All that area not previously mentioned.

Each of the management areas generally contain similar natural and physical resources which make each area distinct from one another. Essentially as you move between those areas the performance standards vary, i.e. from the more stringent residential standards to the more flexible Commercial/ Industrial standards. This could generally be represented in graphic form as:

HIGH

PERFORMANCE

STANDARDS

LOW

COMMERCIAL/

INDUSTRIAL

RURAL RURAL-

RESIDENTIAL

TOWNSHIP RESIDENTIAL

As with Part 3, each Environmental Area contains significant resource management issues, objectives and policies, implementation methods, anticipated environmental results and monitoring techniques. The management areas also contain the district plan rules referred to in the methods. The rules implement both District wide objectives and policies and also the

Area wide objectives and policies

(this emphasises the need to take into account all sections of the plan so that the plan is read as a whole).

The Rules are set out in columns as follows and should be read across:

i. Item:

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This describes the item or activity that is subject to control. In every environmental area, activities not regulated by a rule are allowed without a resource consent. Each item should be assessed to ensure that all potential effects are addressed in an integrated manner.

ii. Permitted Activities:

If the item or activity complies with the conditions or standards specified then it is a permitted activity that does not require resource consent. Unless specifically stated, an activity must comply with all of the items listed to qualify as a permitted activity.

iii. Controlled Activities:

A resource consent is required for this activity. Provided the activity complies with the standards the application will be processed as a controlled activity in which council must grant consent subject to the imposition of conditions. The matters that council will exercise control over are listed.

iv. Discretionary Activities:

A resource consent is required for this activity. A discretionary activity will normally arise when an activity fails to meet the conditions for a permitted activity or controlled activity.

v. Assessment Criteria:

Assessment criteria do not form part of the rules but are matters for consideration by applicants and council when assessing a resource consent. While they provide some guidelines

Council will not necessarily be limited to the matters stated

and will have regard to all of the matters set out under Section 104 of the Act .

vi. Explanation:

This provides an explanation of the rules.

Note:

i.

There are not any “non-complying” or “prohibited activities” in the District Plan. ii. The Environmental Area Rules refer the reader onto Appendices 1-6 in respect of

Utilities , Signs , Hazardous Substances , Transport, Subdivision and Heritage Rules.

To establish the status of a proposed activity the following should be carried out:

Identify the site of the proposed activity on the Planning Maps, and note which environmental area the site is located in.

Refer to the relevant environmental area rules and examine the lists of permitted, controlled and discretionary activities for the environmental area.

If an activity is a controlled or discretionary activity apply for resource consent (refer 2.8.1).

This is illustrated below.

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Does the proposal comply with permitted conditions (a & b) etc of the Rules

Yes

Permitted activity - No resource consent required

No

Does the proposal comply with controlled conditions

(a & b)

Yes

No

Controlled activity -

Resource consent required

Discretionary

Activity Resource

Consent Required

Application assessed by matters over which control is reserved

Assessment criteria will guide but not limit assessment of effects, conditions, etc.

2.6 PART 5 - APPENDICES, SCHEDULES AND DEFINITIONS

Part 5 contains the Appendices which relate to the utilities , signs , hazardous substances , transport, subdivision and heritage rules and the definitions.

2.7 PART 6

– PLANNING MAPS:

Part 6 contains the Planning Maps which are in a separate volume.

2.8 OTHER MATTERS:

There are a number of other matters which are also relevant in using the plan. These are:

2.8.1 RESOURCE CONSENTS:

As indicated in 2.5, a resource consent is required if an activity is a controlled or a discretionary activity.

Two types of resource consents are issued under this plan

– “ land use” and “subdivision”.

Resource Consents may also be required from the West Coast Regional Council who issue discharge permits (discharge of contaminants onto and into land , water and air); water permits

(taking, using damming or diverting of water), coastal permits (use or occupation of the coastal marine area), and land use consents (use of land and beds of lakes and rivers) (Refer to

2.4(vii)).

An application for resource consent must be made in accordance with Section 88 of the Act .

Forms for land use and subdivision consent applications are available from the Council

Offices. The application procedure is set out in Appendix 7.

Further information, pursuant to

Section 92

of the Act , may be required from an applicant where it is considered necessary to better understand the nature of the activity or the effect it may have on the environment, or the ways in which adverse effects may be mitigated. The

Council may also commission a report, at the applicant’s expense, on any matters raised in relation to the application or on any environmental assessment of effects.

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Section 94

of the Act provides opportunity for applications for resource and subdivision consents to be non-notified in certain circumstances, as set out in the Act . A publicly notified application is open to public submission in accordance with

Section 96

of the Act .

Decisions on resource consent applications are made pursuant to

Section 105

of the Act .

When making a decision those matters to be considered are set out in

Section 104

of the Act .

When considering an application for subdivision consent the Act specified circumstances under which the Council

shall not

grant consent. These circumstances are set out in

Section

106

of the Act .

The ability to impose conditions on resource consents is provided by

Section 108 and

Section 220

of the Act .

2.8.2 EXISTING USE RIGHTS:

Sections 10 and 10A of the Act provide for the existing and continued use of land and the surface of water in a manner which contravenes a rule in the Plan, subject to the following:

The use was lawfully established (including by designation) before the Plan became operative; and

The effects of the use are of the same or similar character, intensity and scale to those which existed before the Plan became operative or the designation was removed; and

If the activity involves the use of the surface of water in lakes and rivers where previously no consent was required, the person carrying out the activity applies for a resource consent within 6 months of the Plan becoming operative.

Existing use rights to not apply if:

The use of land (or the surface of water) has been discontinued for a continuous period of more than 12 months, unless the Council has granted an extension by way of application; or

Reconstruction, alteration or extension of any building that contravenes a rule in the Plan increases its degree of non-compliance.

2.8.3 DESIGNATIONS:

A designation is a provision made in the Plan to give effect to a requirement made by a requiring authority. These requirements apply to a public work or a particular project or public utility operation. Every designation shall have the force of a rule as required under

Section

175

of the Act .

Any Minister of the Crown or local authority is automatically a requiring authority. Other network utility operators (as defined in

Section 166

of the Act ) may apply to the Minister for the Environment for approval as a requiring authority. A requiring authority may give notice to the Council in respect of a requirement. Although the Council has called for such notices in preparing the Plan, the Act makes provision for similar procedures in relation to the operative plan. Such procedures require public notification with any person having the opportunity to lodge a submission in support or opposition to a requirement for designation. A minor

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alteration to an existing designation may not be required to be publicly notified if the consent of affected parties is obtained.

Designations are shown on the Planning Maps, with an indication of the requiring authority that has benefit of the designation. These designations limit the use of the land , overriding the provisions of the Plan and any resource consent, in favour of the designated purpose. No person, without the consent of the authority, shall do anything that hinders the designation.

The underlying environmental area indicates the purposes for which the land may be used if not for the designated work.

The requiring authority must submit an outline plan of the work to Council prior to any construction commencing

Section 176A

. When processing an outline plan of works for the formation of legal road , Council shall have reasonable regard to the adverse effects from clearance of indigenous vegetation.

Designations are not the only means of providing for public works or public utility operations.

The Plan contains general rules for public utilities not designated, providing for these in a manner similar to activities in general.

Unless otherwise specified in the designation, or the Council determines on application that substantial progress is being made, and is being made toward giving effect to the designation, a designation lapses on the expiry of 5 years from the date on which it is included in the

District Plan.

Designations are listed in Appendix 10.

2.8.4 HERITAGE PROTECTION ORDERS

A heritage order is a provision in the Plan to give effect to a requirement made by a heritage protection authority (

Section 187

). Heritage protection authorities include the Minister of

Conservation, local authority and the New Zealand Historic Places Trust and have similar powers as requiring authorities. A heritage order is issued to protect features or places of special interest, character, intrinsic or amenity value or visual appeal, or of special significance to the Tangata Whenua, and such area of land surround these places as is necessary to protect and afford reasonable enjoyment of them. No person may undertake work in a manner contrary to the heritage order without the written consent of the relevant protection authority.

2.8.5 ENFORCEMENT:

The Council is required to uphold the Plan and use its powers under

Part XII

of the Act in requiring persons to cease or not commence any activity that is, or is likely to:

Contravene the Act , any regulations, a rule in the Plan, or any resource consent; or

Be noxious, dangerous, offensive, objectionable to such an extent that it is, has or is likely to have an adverse effect on the environment.

Any person in breach of the Plan is liable to prosecution. The Act provides substantial penalties, including fines of up to $200,000 or 2 years imprisonment for certain offences

(

Section 339

).

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PART 3

DISTRICT WIDE ISSUES,

OBJECTIVES AND

POLICIES

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3 UTILITIES

3.1 INTRODUCTION

The provision of utilities enables people to undertake their everyday activities and provide for their social and economic well being, health and safety. Such utilities include power generation and supply facilities, water, electricity and sewage reticulation, telecommunications, radio communications, weather recording facilities and waste disposal facilities. Generally, transport utilities such as roading are dealt with in more detail under the

Transport Section.

Some of the providers of utilities have status as requiring authorities under the Act and are able to provide for their utilities by designation. Requiring authorities include a Minister of the

Crown, a local authority or an approved network utility operator. The National Policy

Statement on Electricity Transmission also requires specific recognition of the national grid electricity transmission network.

3.2 ISSUES

1. The adverse effects the location and operation of environment. utilities can have on the

2.

While utilities provide significant social and economic benefits to the community (such as the provision of a secure and efficient electricity transmission network, water or telecommunications), they can also result in the generation of adverse effects. For example, the erection of structures and overhead services can have an adverse visual impact on the character of an area. Similarly, utilities such as landfills and roads can have potentially adverse effects such as odour and noise.

Effects of activities adversely impacting on the safe and efficient operation of utilities .

Utilities are essential for the welfare of the community. Activities can have an adverse effect on, and compromise, the operation of these facilities by restricting their operation (e.g. residential uses adjacent to oxidation ponds , unsafe accesses onto roads and structures too close to National Grid Transmission lines) and needs to be considered in the establishment of utilities . There is therefore a need to balance the importance of the utilities in providing community services against the environmental effects.

3.3 OBJECTIVE

1. The installation and operation of utilities in a manner which maintains and enhances the well-being of the community while avoiding, remedying or mitigating adverse effects on the environment.

3.4 POLICIES

1. Adjoining activities should not have an adverse effect on the operation of utilities .

2. Utilities should, among other matters, provide for:

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3.

4. a) b) c)

Disposal of sewage in a manner that maintains public health and does not adversely affect water quality, ground condition, habitats and air quality.

Adequate water supplies for drinking and firefighting.

Disposal of stormwater that does not affect water quality and avoids inundation.

The operation of landfills in an acceptable environmental manner. d) e) f)

Supply of electricity streetlighting and telecommunications using a method that is appropriate to amenity values of the area including visual impact, landscape and habitat value.

The operation of and supply of electricity via the National Grid Electricity

Network. g) Their operation in an environmentally acceptable manner in such matters as air quality, noise, traffic and visual impact.

Where operationally feasible, utilities should be jointly located at one site or on one structure wherever possible.

To recognise the benefits of a secure and efficient electricity supply network while taking into account: a) b)

The operational and technical constraints of the network;

The extent to which adverse effects (including existing) can be avoided, remedied or mitigated by the route, site and method selection; and c) The avoidance of adverse effects on outstanding natural landscapes, significant natural areas, areas of high recreational value and existing sensitive activities.

3.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Due to the importance of the role of utilities to the community, their often-high capital cost and long life expectancy, it is appropriate to provide for their establishment, ongoing functioning, maintenance and upgrading. Utilities may have a variety of impacts depending on their characteristics. It is important to protect the quality and amenity of the environment by minimising potential adverse effects. Utilities are important for the well being of the community. Utilities should therefore be allowed to operate without unreasonable restriction from adjoining activities provided their operation itself does not lead to effects which cannot be avoided, remedied or mitigated.

Policy 2 sets out how utilities should be developed while having regard to their operation in an environmentally acceptable manner. (See also Appendix 5 - Subdivision for more details.)

Where operationally feasible, utilities should be co-located in order that their visual impact is minimised, congestion for repairs and servicing is lessened and public safety enhanced. In particular, the road reserve offers the opportunity to co-locate services.

The National Policy Statement for Electricity Transmission (NPSET) provides direction for local authorities in recognising the vital role the efficient transmission of electricity on the national grid has for the wellbeing of New Zealand, its people and the environment. The

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NPSET includes policies which recognise the national benefits of electricity transmission, managing the environmental effects of electricity transmission and managing the adverse effects of third parties on the transmission network. These policies have been adapted and incorporated into the District Plan to assist in the network utility operator being able to access, maintain and enhance National Grid Transmission Lines while controlling potential effects, including existing, and ensuring that activities are not undertaken which may create safety risks for those parties undertaking an activity or the users of that infrastructure.

3.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Rules in the district plan allowing for utilities , including their maintenance, protection, and upgrading, subject to controls on their location, size and bulk of utilities .

3.

4.

5.

6.

2. Undergrounding of new reticulated services by rules and the replacement of existing overhead lines as the opportunity arises.

Co-location of utility structures.

Conditions of resource consents.

Education and advice on good practices e.g. landfill sites.

Design of utilities which avoids, remedies or mitigates adverse effects (e.g. on environmentally managed landfill, structures compatible with landscapes etc).

7. Identification of the National Grid Transmission Line network on the planning maps.

3.5.1 REASONS

There are a number of methods that can be utilised including rules to provide for and control structures, conditions of resource consent (particularly subdivisions) and the replacement of existing overhead lines if financially feasible and allowable. Rules allowing for maintenance and upgrading can be an effective method of controlling potential adverse effects. The colocation of structures results in a reduced visual impact and congestion (particularly in the road reserve) and public safety is enhanced. Good design of utilities can reduce adverse effects while education and guidelines are also important. To assist in the planning, operation and maintenance of the National Grid Electricity Transmission Network the network is shown on the planning maps and setback rules are included to control development within close proximity to the network.

3.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Provision of utilities consistent with local, regional and national needs, the nature of the local environment and local amenities, operational needs, and the cost and scale of facilities.

Complaints regarding the adverse effects of utilities .

Expenditure of authorities on utilities

Feedback to the Annual Plan in respect of utility provision.

Maintained and enhanced public health, safety and welfare.

Residents' views regarding the effect of utilities on local amenity values.

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4 LANDSCAPE

4.1 RESOURCES, ACTIVITIES AND VALUES

The landscape of the District is a unique resource providing identity, recreation, economic, and conservation values.

The general components of the Grey District landscape are:

the extensive forest clad mountain ranges and foothills forming the eastern backdrop to the District, and the coastal Paparoa Range.

the lowland plateau area Southeast of the Grey Valley and inland of the southern coast, characterised by a mixture of indigenous and exotic forests.

the sweeping beaches and rugged coastline forming the District's western boundary.

the Lake Brunner visual catchment, a substantial waterbody surrounded by a mixture of productive lowlands, forest covered mountains and urban areas.

the productive farmland and moderate settlement of the expansive Grey Valley and its tributary river valleys.

the highly settled coastal plain between Camerons and Cobden bounded particularly in the Greymouth urban area by low bush covered hills.

the Twelve Apostles Range and Peter Ridge.

The quality of the District's landscape is of importance to people who live in, work in, or visit the area. It is a key factor in the West Coast's growing tourism industry, which is now a major contributor to the local economy.

While landscapes are an integral part of the district, the Resource Management Act places emphasis on outstanding landscapes.

Section 6(b)

of the Act places an obligation on

Council to recognise and provide for the protection of outstanding natural features and landscapes from inappropriate subdivision, use and development.

Council has carried out an exercise in identifying outstanding landscapes. Over 90% of these landscapes are located in Department of Conservation lands or covenanted in some other way and therefore their protection is effectively provided for (e.g. Southern Alps, Paparoa

Range and Hohonu Range). Other landscapes, while not formally protected are not under any threat because of their isolation, the absence of any valuable resource (e.g. minerals) the uneconomic costs of development and the nature of the land , (e.g. natural hazards) which would prevent or make any development extremely difficult.

4.2 ISSUES

1. Outstanding natural features and landscapes can be adversely affected by development pressures.

While a significant proportion of the outstanding landscapes in Grey District have protection, some of the remaining areas have the potential to be degraded. Potential threats include inappropriate building, subdivision and development.

4.3 OBJECTIVE

1. The protection of outstanding natural features and landscapes in the Grey District from inappropriate subdivision, use and development.

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4.4 POLICIES

1. To recognise areas of outstanding natural features and landscapes in accordance with the criteria listed below:

2. a) b) c)

Naturalness (Intactness)- The landscape is natural, open and spacious and is largely unmodified by human activity or development (relative to other landscapes).

Coherence - The area is complete and in intact as an integrated unit thereby producing a high visual coherence or pleasantness.

Distinctiveness - The area has one or more of the following i) outstanding size, shape, diversity or pattern of natural features or landforms ii) iii) outstanding area of predominantly indigenous vegetation outstanding or popular accessible viewpoints/key views d) e) f)

Sensitivity - the area is high in visual sensitivity to change

Visibleness - The area is visible from public places such as roads , tourist routes etc.

Scientific, Historic or Cultural value - The area is of significant scientific (e.g. geopreservation site), historic or cultural value.

Proposed subdivision, use and development should be undertaken in accordance with Objective 4.3, and in a manner that avoids, remedies, or mitigates adverse effects on outstanding natural features and landscapes identified in Table 4.1 or outstanding natural features and landscapes that through a resource consent process are determined by Council to exist within the areas identified in Table 4.2 having regard to the criteria in Policy 4.4.1(a)

– (f).

4.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

The following applies to both policies 4.4(1) and (2). Outstanding natural features and landscapes are integral in defining the character of Grey District, and any development should take this into account in order that adverse effects are avoided, remedied or mitigated on landscape values. The objective reflects

Section 6 (b)

of the Act .

Council commissioned a landscape study to identify outstanding landscapes and natural features. This study focussed on areas outside of public conservation lands administered by the Department of Conservation given that these areas have some level of protection.

Accordingly it should not be assumed that areas administered by the Department of

Conservation but not identified in the Councils landscape study do not include outstanding natural features and landscapes. Areas that were identified as outstanding in the

Council’s landscape study are set out in Table 4.1. The areas in Table 4.2 have not been the subject of a landscape study.

TABLE 4.1

Bush clad hills behind Greymouth and Cobden from Jamieson Road to Point Elizabeth.

Coastal area from Nine Mile Creek to Seventeen Mile Bluff between the sea and 200m east of SH 6.

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Kiwi Point

– Grey Valley generally described as the cliffs on the true north bank of the

Grey River from opposite Kiwi Overbridge to Taylorville and the historic Brunner Mine site on both banks of the Grey River.

Coastal area from Paroa to New River between the Coast and SH 6.

Lake Brunner including adjoining land up to 150m from the boundary of the lake edge road reserve excluding Moana township and urban zoned land at Iveagh Bay.

The west facing slopes of the Barrytown hills behind the flats between Razorback Point and Seventeen Mile Flat to the east of SH 6.

Area on the flats to the south of the Punakaiki River upstream of the SH 6 Bridge.

Area North of Waiwhero Road to Razorback Point between the coast and SH 6.

TABLE 4.2

Land administered by Department of Conservation.

Crown land in the Paparoas

When considering resource consent applications in the areas identified in Table 4.1, the effects on outstanding natural features and landscapes need to be weighed up and assessed having regard to the criteria in Policy 4.4(1).

When considering resource consent applications in the areas identified in Table 4.2, a determination is first required as to whether an area is an outstanding natural feature or landscape in accordance with the criteria in Policy 4.4(1). If the area is determined to be an outstanding natural feature or landscape, then similar to the process for those areas in Table

4.1, the effects of the application on the area needs to be weighed up and assessed having regard to the criteria.

When assessing or considering a site all of the criteria do not need to be satisfied.

4.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Other legislation to control effects i.e. Conservation Act.

Encourage landowners to consider informal / formal protection options such as covenants, reserves etc.

Consult and liaise with owners in the management of outstanding areas.

District Council and Regional Council rules including those areas identified and included as “Areas of Outstanding Landscape” in the Rural Environmental Area of the

District Plan.

To adopt sign design guidelines based on those prepared for the West Coast Tourism

Development Group and West Coast Regional Council.

To carry out landscaping and planting at the Grey River Mouth.

Decisions on resource consent applications.

4.5.1 REASONS

There are a variety of methods available to Council . The Conservation Act provides protection for landscapes located in Department of Conservation land . There are also a

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number of information measures such as encouraging landowners to set aside areas by way of covenant and design guidelines. In some cases, rules are used in respect of those areas that are highly visual, under some development pressure and not formally protected. The areas in the District that are subject to these rules are the hills around Cobden and are identified on the planning maps as “Areas of Outstanding Landscape”.

Council also requires development within 100m of the MHWS to obtain resource consent in certain circumstances.

The criteria referred to in Policy 4.4(1) should be used when assessing resource consents in the identified areas outlined in Tables 4.1 and 4.2. Regional Council rules may also be relevant as it relates to vegetation clearance, earthworks on sloping land and in the vicinity of waterways. Various sign and building guidelines have been developed over time and potential developers will be encouraged to consider these. The Council is also part of a joint project which will enhance the Grey River mouth.

4.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental

Results

Monitoring and Review Data

Retention of those areas identified as areas of outstanding

Site inspections

Resource consents landscape.

Feedback from the public and landowners

Landscapes that are recognised by awards

Covenanted and reserve land

Retention of a variety of types

Site inspections and qualities of throughout the District. landscapes

Resource consents

Feedback from the public and landowners

Landscapes that are recognised by awards

Covenanted and reserve land

Land use, buildings and structures constructed or carried

Site inspections

Resource consents out in harmony with the landscape.

Feedback from the public and landowners

Landscapes that are recognised by awards

Covenanted and reserve land

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M AR G I N S

5 SIGNIFICANT INDIGENOUS VEGETATION AND

SIGNIFICANT HABITATS OF INDIGENOUS FAUNA

5.1 INTRODUCTION

The district is characterised by widespread indigenous forests. While the river valleys and certain lower altitude areas have been cleared of forest and converted to agriculture, extensive native forests are located in the more remote ranges and river valleys.

Approximately 80% of the district’s native forests are managed by the Department of

Conservation. Most of the remaining area is administered by Timberlands West Coast Limited, who in accordance with the West Coast Accord and the Forests Amendment Act manage the forests for long term sustained yield to meet contractual demands for saw logs. There is comparatively little indigenous forest in private hands outside of the two organisations identified above.

Grey District also contains many areas of valuable wetlands . Some major areas include Paroa

Wetland, Lake Ahaura, Lake Haupiri, Lake Hochstetter and Blaketown Lagoon. Wetlands provide habitats for fauna, are an important recreational resource and have important water retention and purification functions. They have been drained and developed indiscriminately in the past, which has lead to the situation where they are a threatened ecosystem.

Birdlife in the district is rich, achieving both numbers and diversity not generally found elsewhere in New Zealand. Native birds found in the forest include, the owl, New Zealand falcon, native pigeon, tui, bellbird, silver eye, grey warbler, rifleman, robin, tom-tit, fan-tails and the flightless weka and kiwi. Rarer birds include the red and yellow crowned parakeet, kaka, blue duck and spotted kiwi. Shags, white fronted terns, various gulls, oystercatchers and banded-cotterills occupy coastal breeding grounds. A colony of burrowing Westland black petrels occupy coastal hills south of the Punakaiki River and are the only mainland-breeding colony of this bird.

Seals are regularly seen on rocky headlands and islands off Point Elizabeth. The seastacks between Point Elizabeth and Motukiekie are special coastal features of the Grey District.

These seastacks support a diversity of indigenous flora and fauna, including rare and threatened plant species and birds. Important coastal sites for indigenous vegetation exist, such as areas of coastal vegetation at New River Estuary and important sites for the habitat of indigenous fauna such as skink habitat at Cobden beach.

In addition to the native species of eels, smelt, bullies, and torrent fish, the coast is perhaps best known for its whitebait. Flows of whitebait move upstream through the estuaries on rising tides generally between August and November. Regulations regarding fishing for whitebait are currently enforced by the West Coast Regional Council (

WCRC

) and the Department of

Conservation (

DOC

).

The provisions of

Section 6(c)

of the Act place an obligation on Council to recognise and provide for the protection of areas of significant indigenous vegetation and significant habitats of fauna. Given that a substantial percentage of these significant areas are public conservation lands, this materially assists in providing for their protection. For example there are 205,000 hectares of indigenous forest of which 85% is held by DOC.

As noted above, there is a relatively small amount of indigenous forest on private land

(12.5%). Evidence available to Council indicates that there is little removal of the indigenous

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forests taking place. This is partly due to the steepness of the slopes, the requirements of the

Forest Amendment Act and the conservation ethic now adopted by many landowners.

Sustainable forest management on private land effectively means that indigenous timber can only be milled under an approved plan or permit or a specific approval from the Director

General of Agriculture and Forestry as provided for under Part III A of the Forest Act

Amendment. Unfenced stock also have a major impact on indigenous vegetation in some localities.

It is also apparent that pests such as possums are having a major effect on indigenous vegetation and the protection of the forests will be enhanced by pest management programmes that are properly funded. Council is also aware of difficulties in identifying significant areas on private land in terms of their “significance” and their exact location given that typically they have not been accurately surveyed. Council , with other local authorities on the West Coast, has obtained Sustainable Management Funding (SMF) to carry out a district wide survey of such resources. This study entitled “A Cost effective Approach To

Section 6(c)

RMA Responsibilit ies” will establish criteria for significant natural (SNA) areas, define particular areas and provide a range of mechanisms for protection of the areas. Conservation groups input will be part of the study.

Resources such as wetlands can be affected by drainage, land development and sphagnum moss harvesting. Again however, it is clear that a significant proportion of wetlands are already administered by DOC. Many wetlands are adjacent to lakes and any drainage is likely to be impracticable in terms of cost and scale. The West Coast Regional Council also have a number of controls in place designed to protect waterbodies such as wetlands . These controls are also applicable to activities relating to indigenous forests and specifically relate to earthworks , soil disturbance and vegetation clearance.

5.2 ISSUES

1. Some of the areas of indigenous vegetation and habitats of fauna can be susceptible to damage from: a) pest and predators, including; i) ii) the presence of possums, mustelids, feral cats and pigs the spread of weed species iii) escape or release of feral species land development activities such as farming, forestry and mining b) c) stock grazing

While large areas of indigenous vegetation and fauna in the Grey District have some kind of protection, those areas that are not protected have the potential to be degraded. It is noted however, that pests and predators do not respect the boundary between protected/non protected lands.

5.3 OBJECTIVE

1. The protection and where possible enhancement of areas of significant indigenous vegetation and habitats of indigenous fauna.

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5.4 POLICIES

1. To identify areas of significant indigenous vegetation and significant habitats of indigenous fauna.

2. To recognise such areas in accordance with the following criteria:

Representativeness

– a measure of the current extent of a vegetation type/ ecosystem compared to its extent at some fixed point in history.

Rarity/ Distinctiveness

– a measure of the presence pf rare species (using appropriate threatened species classifications) or of a distinctive species feature (e.g. a species at a distributional level.

Ecological Context

– a measure of the ecological role played by an area in the health of the wider ecosystems in its environment.

Sustainability

– a measure of the ability of the identified areas to remain viable or their potential to become viable in the long term.

(Refer to the report “West Coast SNA Project: SNA Assessment and Protection”, August

2001 for a more detailed explanation.)

3. To avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects on the ecological integrity, functioning and habitat values and natural character of areas of significant indigenous vegetation and habitats of indigenous fauna.

4. To reduce the effect that pests, including the introduction of new pests, can have on significant areas of indigenous vegetation and habitats of fauna.

5.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Past development in particular has resulted in the depletion of areas of ecosystems in Grey

District. Remaining significant areas should be protected where possible, given their value in contributing to the natural character of the district and the requirements of

Section 6(c)

of the

Act . The policies implement the objective and in particular a coordinated approach to dealing with the matters in the Grey District is adopted. The Council is committed to a joint process with other authorities on the West Coast to develop a cost effective approach to dealing with areas of significant indigenous vegetation and significant habitats of indigenous fauna through the SNA study. The objectives of the project will essentially fulfil the

Council’s

policies. The criteria that make an area significant are set out in order to provide certainty in respect of meeting obligations under the Act . Pests are having detrimental effects and while pest management is not a primary area of District Council responsibility, the Council supports efforts to reduce such effects.

5.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1) Regional Council objectives, policies and rules

2) Forest Amendment Act.

3) Encourage the implementation of a Pest Management Strategy.

4) Educate and encourage landowners to protect areas by fencing and other appropriate land management techniques.

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5) Encourage landowners to consider informal/formal protection options such as conservation covenants/Kawena through such programmes as Nature Heritage Fund, Nga

Whenua Rahui, and Queen Elizabeth II Covenants.

6) Co-operate with Department of Conservation and the West Coast Regional Council in the implementation of their programmes.

7) Council seeks to encourage those individuals and groups interested in the conservation of indigenous vegetation and fauna to contribute towards its protection by a variety of means, including funds for the purchase of land .

8) To actively participate in and put in place the outcomes of the Sustainable Management

Fund project, “A Cost Effective Approach To Section 6(c) RMA Responsibilities”.

9) Rules controlling the clearance of indigenous vegetation in riparian areas and in

Significant Natural Areas (SNAs).

5.5.1 REASONS

There are a variety of non-regulatory and regulatory methods to implement objectives and policies. The protection of the majority of significant habitats and indigenous fauna are by

DOC stewardship. Council is however currently undertaking a project to identify Significant

Natural Areas (SNAs) on all land not administered by DOC within the District. Any SNAs will be incorporated into the District Plan by way of plan change following consultation with landowners.

Clearance of vegetation in identified SNAs will require resource consent. Until a site had been assessed as to whether it contains an SNA, a general vegetation clearance rule will apply to that site and also DOC land . Once a site is assessed resource consent will not be required for vegetation clearance outside of the SNA.

However, notwithstanding the outcomes of the SNA Study, indigenous vegetation clearance in proximity to waterbodies and wetlands will require resource consent.

There are a raft of WCRC objectives, policies and rules relating to earthworks , land disturbance in proximity to waterbodies, drainage and diversion for waterbodies. To avoid duplication, resource consent is not required where the WCRC has granted a resource consent to an application that addresses an issue that is common to the functions of both councils.

A Pest Management Strategy, which is the responsibility of the Regional Council, is the primary mechanism for the control of those pests that are a major threat to habitats. On-going pest programmes are in place. Council will also, where appropriate, cooperate with other agencies in promoting awareness of pests including referral of enquiries to appropriate agencies and distribution of information on good practices and pest threats.

Council will also pursue other methods which rely on a voluntary approach, and to date have used this approach of informing landowners of options. Purchase of land and the use of covenants are a real option. Council also encourages fencing to control stock although it is acknowledged this is also a funding issue.

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5.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Monitoring and Review Data Anticipated Environmental Results

Identification and protection of significant areas of indigenous vegetation and habitats.

Management of existing areas of significant indigenous vegetation and significant habitats of indigenous fauna.

SMF Study

Maintaining records of

 protection by the Crown

Consultation land under reserve or

Awards recognising protection of areas.

Resource Consents

Feedback

Consultation

Monitoring records of land under reserve

Awards recognising management of areas.

Increased knowledge and participation of public and property owners.

Feedback

Correspondence

Consultation

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6 WATERWAYS AND MARGINS

6.1 INTRODUCTION

The major components of the District's open waterways include:

 the Grey River and its main tributaries (the Ahaura and Arnold Rivers) together forming the fourth largest valley system in New Zealand.

 the Taramakau and Punakaiki Rivers forming the southern and northern boundaries of the

District.

A large number of glacial lakes that contain significant natural habitats and provide for recreational use. These lakes are mainly concentrated around the Brunner/Haupiri area and include the following lake systems: Lake Brunner, Lake Haupiri, Lake Hochstetter,

Lady Lake, Lake Ahaura and Lake Poerua. There lakes are largely contained within land managed by the Department of Conservation (DOC).

Wetlands , which have diminished in area with development of land for farming and other activities have significant water retention and purification functions and provide habitats for fauna.

While these are the larger systems it is recognised smaller waterbodies are also important in maintaining the life supporting capacity of ecosystems.

The responsibilities in respect of waterways are shared between the Regional Council and

District Council. The former is responsible for water quality, water quantity (including takes, diversions and discharges) and activities in the beds of lakes and rivers as well as activities on land which may effect waterways, i.e. erosion and sediment. The District Council has responsibility in respect of activities in relation to the surface of water in rivers and lakes and also the “ land

” part of margins of lakes and rivers and also wetlands . It is acknowledged that this somewhat artificial “distinction” requires consultation with the Regional Council.

The surface of waterways are valued for:

 recreation (boating, picnicking, walking, swimming, camping etc.) cultural, scenic and heritage values industrial use such as port activities, hydropower utilities and gold mining

Margins are valued for a variety of functions including:

 landscape qualities ecological values of wildlife and fish habitats prevention of natural hazards where vegetation cover is retained or flood mitigation structures erected water retention and purification function access to lakes, rivers or the coastline landbased recreational use

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 economic value as farmland, for mining, forestry or gravel extraction the presence of heritage sites

Spiritual and cultural value

The preservation of the natural character of lakes, rivers and wetlands from inappropriate subdivision, use and development and the maintenance and enhancement of public access to and from lakes and rivers are identified as matters of national importance.

6.2 ISSUES

1. Conflict between activities on the District’s waterways.

The availability of waterbodies and the general low levels of use mean that there is little conflict between different uses or between recreation uses and amenity values. The general exception to this is Lake Brunner which is subject to significant recreational use, particularly during the summer months with such activities as yachting, water-skiing, powerboating, fishing and jet skis. Conflict has occurred between these different uses, particularly where intensive and commercial operations are proposed. Potential adverse effects include a reduction in public access and water quality and an increase in noise.

2. Activities on lakes, rivers and wetlands and their margins can adversely affect the natural character, habitats of indigenous fauna and flora, Iwi values, bank stability and amenity and recreation values.

Activities on waterways, including wetlands and their margins, such as the erection of structures, excavation and deposition or material, the removal of vegetation and also weed invasion can have a number of adverse effects on ecological and amenity values. These effects can include a reduction in:

 water quality

 fish passage

 bank stability

 habitats and vegetation

 public access

 recreational value

 heritage sites

6.3 OBJECTIVES

1. To avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects arising from conflicting activities on the surface of waters.

2. Preservation of the natural character of lakes, rivers and wetlands and their margins from inappropriate use, development and subdivision.

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6.4 POLICIES

1. Activities should be separated on the surface of water where there is a potential for conflict.

2.

3. a) b) c) d)

Activities on the surface of water should not adversely affect public access, water quality and amenities such as quietness.

The adverse effects of activities on natural character of margins should be avoided, remedied or mitigated in terms of: recreation values conservation values continued public access retention of indigenous vegetation and habitats

4. e) f) water quality heritage sites g) cultural and spiritual values

Structures that do not have a operational reason to be located on the margins of rivers and lakes, and in wetlands , should avoid this location, particularly in unmodified areas.

5. Any modification of wetlands is undertaken in a manner that protects their natural character and, in particular, those components of the natural character that comprise indigenous vegetation, habitat for indigenous fauna, life supporting capacity for indigenous ecosystems and ecological functioning.

6.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Objective 1 and Policies 1 & 2 are intended to allow conflicting activities to operate without effecting each other. This is particularly applicable to recreation activities such as at Lake

Brunner.

In respect of margins of waterbodies Council is required to recognise and provide for the items in Objective 2 in terms of

Section 6(a)

of the Act as a matter of national importance. Policy 3 sets out these matters which contribute to the natural character and the effects of activities which should be avoided, remedied or mitigated. In particular, wetlands are a natural resource that have diminished and adverse effects on them should be avoided, remedied or mitigated.

It is recognised in Policy 4 that structures such as bridges, culverts, launching ramps etc. may have an operational reason to locate near waterbodies. Other structures should not locate in these areas, particularly where there are significant natural values

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6.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. To promote public awareness of the requirements of the Water Recreation Regulations

(or their replacement) for lakes and rivers within the District as promulgated by

Maritime New Zealand.

2. To liaise with other parties with statutory and cultural interests regarding the lakes and rivers including Council , Iwi and in particular, Maritime New Zealand in respect of Lake

Brunner.

3. To advocate appropriate speed restrictions for Lakes and Rivers within the District to relevant controlling authority.

4. Provisions in Regional Council Plans relating to vegetation clearance, earthworks and discharge of contaminants, and in the District Plan provisions relating to buildings , forestry and indigenous vegetation clearance.

5. Esplanade Reserves /Strips to be set aside as conditions of subdivision consents.

6. Encourage landowners to protect natural values by private agreement, conservation covenants, fencing and planting of margins.

7. To promote the benefits of riparian management and wetlands protection, including in respect of streams less than 3 metres wide, through education by such means as pamphlets and education days in conjunction with the Regional Council, DOC and Fish and Game and Royal Forest and Bird Society.

8. To continue the investigation of the rationalisation of road reserve on the foreshore of parts of Lake Brunner that adjoin areas containing natural values.

6.5.1 REASONS

There are a variety of methods available to implement the objectives and policies. In respect of regulating recreational activities the Maritime Safety Regulations administered by Maritime

New Zealand applies at Lake Brunner where jet and ski lanes are gazetted. Given the presence of an existing authority Council sees little point in implementing rules in the District

Plan. While there has been a lack of enforcement of the regulations this is a resourcing of people issue which requires further discussions with Maritime New Zealand and Iwi. Council does consider there should be speed restrictions.

The Regional Council already have controls in place restricting activities in and in proximity to waterbodies e.g. Proposed Land and Riverbed Plan. Many of the threats and impacts of the removal of vegetation from the margins of waterbodies are related to bank stability, water quality and in-stream values, i.e. discharges, sediment, temperature, light, oxygen demand. It is considered that for an integrated approach to be achieved the appropriate place for such matters is regional plans. This concept is already borne out through the current regional plans.

There are also rules in the District Plan in respect of forestry and removal of indigenous vegetation from riparian margins. However, to avoid duplication with the Regional Council, resource consent is not required for these matters from the District Council where the

Regional Council has granted resource consent to an application that addresses an issue that is common to the functions of both councils. Generally these plans do not control the location of buildings and it is therefore appropriate the District Plan has provisions in respect of this matter as it relates to rivers and lakes.

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The setting aside of esplanades/strips on subdivision is also available to Council . These can be set aside for a variety of purposes relating to conservation, public access or recreational values. (See Section 13 - Subdivision for more details on Council policy for esplanade reserves /strips).

Non-regulatory methods such as covenants, guidelines, education etc. are also important

(Method 6). These methods can be highlighted by awards to good practice.

Small streams (less than 3 metres wide) are particularly valuable habitats for invertebrates and fish. Maintaining or restoring indigenous vegetation assists in maintaining or increasing habitat values through the provision of shade and shelter.

Council and DOC are continuing discussions on the rationalisation of the Lake Brunner foreshore.

6.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Existing natural character of the margins of waterbodies is retained including provision for public access.

Monitor the physical state of margins.

There is no conflict between activities on the surface of water.

Monitor existing controls in respect of activities on the surface of water.

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7 THE COASTAL ENVIRONMENT

7.1 INTRODUCTION

Grey District has approximately 60km of coastline forming the western boundary of the district. The coastline is characterised by rugged natural features, including estuaries behind low-lying dunes, gnarled rocky outcrops and isolated sandy beaches. Mixed sand and gravel beaches dominate the coastline south of Cobden and in the vicinity of Barrytown Flats, it is well supplied with sediments from the Grey, Taramakau, and Punakaiki Rivers which flow to the coast. With the exception of Blaketown Beach to Karoro these coastal beaches are typically prone to erosion.

All of the Greymouth coast is characterised by steep headrock outcrops and the Paparoa and Rapahoe Ranges largely resist the sea

’s force. The sand and gravel beaches interrupt this otherwise rugged coastline.

Coastal settlements include Greymouth, Cobden, Southbeach, and Rapahoe. A number of bodies have a role to play in the management of the coast. The District Council is responsible for the area above mean high water springs and the Regional Council is responsible for the management of the area below this mark, which is known as the Coastal

Marine Area. The Regional Council has prepared a coastal plan for this area. The Minister of Conservation has prepared the New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement (NZCPS) identifying national policies, which the District Plan cannot be inconsistent with. This Act places special emphasis on the coast by way of

Section 6(a)

which states that a matter of national importance is the preservation of the natural character of the coastal environment and its protection from inappropriate subdivision, use and development.

The term “coastal environment” is not defined in the

Act . However it can be said that coastal environment is an environment in which the coast is a significant part and generally will include the coastal marine area, all tidal waters and foreshore above the mean high water springs, dunes, beaches, areas of coastal vegetation, areas subject to coastal erosion and flooding, salt-marshes, and estuaries.

Again the Act does not define natural character but the NZCPS suggests some important elements that contribute to it, including:

1. The level of existing modification.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Significant indigenous species of flora and fauna.

Landscape, seascapes, and landforms.

Coastal processes.

Special spiritual values and significant historic and cultural places.

6. Water quality.

The Grey Coastline has all of these elements present to a greater or lesser degree depending on location. The critical matter is the impact (if any) that use, development and subdivision will have on the coast. Public access to and along the coast is generally good although Council proposes to take, where appropriate, esplanade reserves on subdivisions of less than four hectares.

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7.2 ISSUES

1. The adverse affects of inappropriate use, development and subdivision affecting the natural character of the coastal environment.

Activities such as buildings , structures and earthworks in the coastal environment can create adverse effects in terms of visual impact, risk of natural hazards, obstruct public access, damage Iwi sites and heritage sites and modify flora and fauna.

7.3 OBJECTIVE

1. To preserve the natural character of the coastal environment and the protection of it from inappropriate subdivision, use or development.

7.4 POLICIES

1. Development, use or subdivision affecting the natural character of the coastal environment shall have particular regard to the following: a) The extent of existing and likely potential modification as a result of human presence in the area, such as port development and operation.

2.

3. b) c) d) e)

The presence of significant indigenous vegetation or natural habitats.

The life supporting capacity of ecosystems.

The presence of distinctive landscapes, seascapes and landforms.

The presence of special spiritual, heritage, cultural values including those of significance to Maori. f) g)

The maintenance and enhancement of high water quality.

Coastal natural hazard areas.

Any development within the coastal area should take place in modified areas such as existing settlements in preference to unmodified areas.

Development in unmodified areas should only take place where the setting is integral to the development proposal and adverse effects on those items identified in Policy 1 can be avoided, remedied or mitigated.

4. Improvement and enhancement of public access by taking of, where appropriate, esplanade reserves on coastal subdivision.

7.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Council is required to preserve the natural character of the environment and protect it from inappropriate use and development. The policies stated above give guidance as to how this can be achieved by specifying particular criteria, all of which are integral to the natural character. It is noted that in respect of 1(a) an existing port operates at the mouth of the

Grey River and a deep sea port is proposed at Rapahoe, which has been recognised by the

Regional Plan.

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7.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Rules are included in the plan that require development located in proximity to mean high water springs to obtain resource consent.

2. Rules that require esplanade reserves on coastal subdivision.

3. Liaison and co-operation under relevant management agencies such as the West Coast

Regional Council and Department of Conservation.

4. Reference to the West Coast Regional Coastal Plan particularly on cross boundary issues relating to habitats, landscape and coastal hazards.

7.5.1 REASONS

Council will require activities to obtain resource consent if they are within a specified distance

(100m) of the coastline.

This will enable the effects on the natural character of the coastline to be assessed particularly as it relates to visual impact, ecosystems and the presence of natural hazards.

Generally those areas contained in the Commercial and Industrial Environmental Areas are modified to the extent that natural character does not exist.

Liaison with other agencies such as the Regional Council will also be critical in dealing with activities that potentially cross mean high water springs. This will primarily be by way of the

Regional Coastal Plan.

7.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Preservation of the natural character, coastal environment and the establishment of appropriate uses, subdivision and development.

Resource consents and conditions

Regional Council records

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8 SIGNS

8.1 INTRODUCTION

The purpose of signs is to convey information to the general public including the identification of properties, information on upcoming events, direction of traffic and information on the availability of goods and services. As such they are necessary to many activities in the district.

The ability of the environment to accommodate signs may differ considerably between the rural and urban context. The highest concentration of signage is found in commercial or industrial areas where a greater number and/or size of signs is acceptable provided they are generally in keeping with the scale and nature of the property and activity. In rural or residential areas perceived as having a consistent and uncluttered visual amenity, signage is usually viewed more critically.

8.2 ISSUES

1. Signs and outdoor advertising have the potential to compromise the visual amenity and traffic safety of an area.

Signage can have an adverse effect as a result of poor location, poor legibility, cluttering or inappropriate colours and lighting. In addition, the design and location of signs can often have a snowballing effect as competitors seek to have bigger and bolder signs than each other.

8.3 OBJECTIVE

1. Traffic safety and the visual amenity of the District are not adversely affected by signs and outdoor advertising.

8.4 POLICIES

1.

Visitor/Information Signs should be in accordance with the West Coast Development

Group (WCDG) and West Coast Regional Council and New Zealand Transport

Agency sign design guidelines.

2.

3.

Signs should relate to a particular activity or use of land or buildings on the site and have dimensions that are appropriate to the surrounding environment.

Signs should be simple, clear in the message conveyed, and not cluttered and should be located according to safety criteria.

8.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

While signs and other forms of outdoor advertising are a necessary part of the community's social and economic activities, they should be controlled in order to minimise the adverse effects on traffic safety and amenity values in the District.

While providing for signs in the District, it is the Council's intent that these be controlled in terms of dimensions, location, message materials, location, etc.

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The West Coast's tourism sector is one for which more signs may be required in the future, for the information and convenience of travellers. The WCDG, WCRC and New Zealand

Transport Agency sign design guidelines provide the parameters of such signs and should be adhered to.

It is recognised that signs may be required for activities carried out on a site . However, the potential adverse effects of a proliferation of off-site signs can undermine

Council’s

objective.

8.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1.

Rules to control the location, number, size and type of outdoor advertising and signs in all zones.

2.

Encourage the use of the guidelines for signs established by the West Coast

Development Group and West Coast Regional Council and New Zealand Transport

Agency.

8.5.1 REASONS

The Council considers that rules controlling the erection of outdoor advertising and signs in the District is one of the most effective methods to avoid any potential adverse effects on traffic safety and visual amenity. The use of established design guidelines will also reduce adverse effects.

8.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Traffic safety and the visual amenity are not adversely affected by signage that is inappropriately located or of excessive size and numbers.

Monitoring of the establishment of outdoor advertising in the District to ensure compliance with the rules on outdoor advertising in the Plan.

Reviewing records of traffic accidents to determine if any adverse effects of outdoor advertising were a causative factor in any accidents.

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9 NATURAL HAZARDS

9.1 INTRODUCTION

Natural hazards are those atmospheric, earth or water related occurrences which pose a potentially adverse effect on human life, property or other aspects of the environment. Within the Grey District these include; flooding, coastal erosion, land instability and seismic hazard.

Natural hazards can also be taken to include the outcome of human induced hazards such as a poorly constructed dam or unconsolidated landfill.

The

Council’s

function under

Section 31

of the Act , is to control any actual or potential effects of the use, development or protection of land , including for the purpose of avoiding or mitigating natural hazards. Therefore, it is not

Council’s

role to reduce the probability of a natural hazard event occurring, rather it is the responsibility of Council to ensure that the effects of such an event are minimised.

In view of the historical building patterns on the West Coast, much of the district’s population is in close proximity to natural hazard prone areas (flood prone areas, steep hillsides, adjacent to the main divide, etc). Such development is therefore particularly at risk to the effects of a natural hazard event.

The West Coast Regional Council has provided the following information for natural hazards specific to Grey District:

1. Flooding: Within the Grey River catchment, much of the settlement of Greymouth, farmland up the Grey valley and the lower reaches of its tributaries, farmland south and east of Lake Brunner, and around Flagstaff Flat and Lake Haupiri in the upper catchment. The flood hazard maps published by the West Coast Regional Council give an indication of the areas known to have flooded.

2.

3.

Coastal Erosion: Long-term erosion of between 0.6m and 3.5m annually, north of the

Grey River and particularly high on the Barrytown Flats and at Cobden and Rapahoe.

Harbour and river mouth works have resulted in sediment accumulation or accretion south of the Grey River mouth, although localised erosion still occurs (19m in late

1980’s - early 1990’s at Karoro). Protection against erosion and sea level rise can be provided by “natural systems” in particular the gravel beach ridges along the

Greymouth Coast and the hard rock shores of the District.

Land Instability: An assessment of land suitability for urban development based on its inherent stability has been undertaken for the hills behind Greymouth and Cobden.

Heavy rainfalls, a lack of protection by vegetation and steep topography (over 12

) are major factors influencing land instability and erosion. Extensive areas of potentially unstable land arise from mining operations where unconsolidated material has been spread back into mined areas.

4. Seismic Activity: The Grey District is situated adjacent to the Alpine Fault. The most active part of the Fault is the central section, which forms the western boundary of the

Southern Alps from Haast to the Taramakau River at Inchbonnie. Further north the fault becomes progressively less active as movement is transferred to numerous branch faults within Marlborough. The next Alpine Fault earthquake is likely to produce very strong shaking in locations close to the Southern Alps. Greymouth will also be strongly shaken. Other faultlines in the District are generally more remote

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from human settlement, including to the east of Hohonu Range and in the Paparoas, although it is noted the Paparoas commence immediately north of Greymouth.

Additionally, land may be particularly susceptible to natural hazard events that have been altered in the past by human activity such as underground mines.

It is anticipated that the threat of certain natural hazards will accentuate under changing climatic conditions. An example of this is potential sea level rise that may result in a requirement to amend policies and rules.

9.2 ISSUES

1. Natural hazards such as flooding, storm surge, tsunami, coastal erosion, landslides, subsidence and earthquakes are natural phenomena that have the potential to compromise human safety and place property, infrastructure, and the natural environment at risk of damage.

The District is a relatively dynamic landscape with potential hazards existing in various situations throughout the District. These hazards have the potential to impact on landowners and development.

9.3 OBJECTIVE

1. The adverse effects of natural hazards on people, property and the environment are avoided, or mitigated.

9.4 POLICIES

1. To adopt an integrated approach to minimising the potential adverse effects of natural hazards on the community.

2.

3.

To gather and make available information regarding natural hazards to assist resource management decisions.

Development should not occur in areas that are prone to natural hazards, unless the applicant has shown adequate avoidance or mitigation of natural hazards.

4. An assessment by an appropriately qualified person will be required, where appropriate, for resource consent applications.

9.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Council is under an obligation in terms of the Act to avoid or mitigate the effects of natural hazards which are prevalent in the District. The Regional Policy Statement, Regional Plans

(such as the Coastal Plan) and the New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement (coastal hazards only) also contain provisions on natural hazards.

The policy of adopting an integrated approach recognises the natural and long-term effects of natural hazards and ensures the best defence against potential adverse effects. Another aspect of the integrated approach to natural hazards is enhanced cooperation and liaison between the West Coast Regional Council and the Grey District Council. This should provide additional knowledge and information on natural hazards for the District which can be made

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available to property owners and developers so that they are informed of the natural hazard risks relating to a site .

Council does not consider it reasonable to apply an arbitrary ban on activities within areas identified as being prone to natural hazards, although it is considered necessary to control some forms of development unless adequate precautions have been provided by the developer. The first priority, is to avoid potential hazards and if avoidance is unrealistic, then mitigation of the adverse effects of such hazards is required.

9.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Land use and subdivision consent applications will require an assessment of natural hazards by an appropriately qualified person as part of the resource consent process where natural hazards are a risk.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Where risk from natural hazards can be mitigated, conditions will be imposed on consents and in the case of subdivision, notices will be placed on the certificate of title where appropriate.

In terms of building consent under the Building Act, Council will require a certificate from a suitably qualified person when a potential problem with a natural hazard is identified, so it can be shown that it can be adequately avoided, remedied or mitigated.

Provision of information through Land Information Memoranda (LIM) and Project

Information Memoranda (PIM) to those who will potentially use, develop or protect land .

Develop, maintain and make available a hazards register to provide information to the public, including the monitoring of sea level rise and coastal shoreline changes, as provided by the Regional Council.

6. Develop on-going consultation and liaison with the West Coast Regional Council in order to provide for enhanced natural hazard cooperation between councils, including the provision of a hazards register.

Where appropriate regulate by rules in the District Plan and Regional Plans. 7.

9.5.1 REASONS

Where land use, subdivision and building consents are applied for, an assessment of natural hazards must form part of the application and if necessary shall be undertaken by a qualified person. This is considered appropriate given the dearth of readily available information.

Council is able to impose conditions on these consents addressing the effects of natural hazards or in the alternative refuse to grant or issue the consent.

Information is also an important method and this can be obtained from a hazards register developed by the District and Regional Councils and disseminated through documents such as LIMs and PIMs. Effects arising from sea level rise are not known with any certainty at this stage and will therefore continue to be monitored to enable a change to the Plan if necessary. The District Plan contains a rule which requires assessment of buildings within

100m of the coast which will allow an assessment of natural hazards. Some of the regional plans such as the Regional Coastal Plan and Soil Conservation and Erosion Control Plan

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also contain rules to manage activities that could potentially exacerbate the adverse effects of natural hazards.

9.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Increased understanding and enhanced decision making, of the threat posed by natural hazards.

Land use, subdivision and development applications will be assessed against the possibility of being affected by natural hazards.

Gathering and dissemination of information about natural hazards

Improved decision making when natural hazards are involved

Resource consent process - compliance with conditions etc.

Building Act requirements

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10 TANGATA WHENUA

Toitu te whenua he whakangarongaro te tangata.”

“The people may perish but the land will remain.”

10.1 STATEMENT OF IDENTITY

Tangata Whenua (Poutini Ngai Tahu) are those Iwi, or Hapu that hold mana whenua

(customary authority) over the area of the Grey District.

10.2 TANGATA WHENUA AND THE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ACT

The Act contains specific obligations in relation to the Treaty of Waitangi and Maori interests.

The Act identifies, as a matter of national importance, the relationship of Maori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral lands, water, sites, waahi tapu and other taonga.

The Act also states that the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi must be taken into account when managing the use, development and protection of natural and physical resources.

In relation to the Plan, the most significant principle of the Treaty of Waitangi is that of partnership. An integral aspect of this is the

Council’s

obligation to consult with local Maori to achieve an ongoing working relationship with the Tangata Whenua. The Council must also have regard to the Treaty principle of active protection of Maori people in the use of their traditional resources. This could be reflected by Tangata Whenua involvement in decision making, regarding those natural resources important to them.

10.3 ISSUES

1. There are many places throughout the District which have been used, occupied and are of value to Tangata Whenua, including places where people have been buried.

Accordingly, the District remains spiritually and culturally important to Tangata

Whenua, who have a general concern for the natural integrity of the District’s environment.

Areas of concern to Tangata Whenua may include: a) b)

Natural and physical resources such as coastal areas, inland waterways and indigenous vegetation have an importance to Tangata Whenua which has not in the past been adequately recognised.

Tangata Whenua view the overall integrity of the District’s natural environment as in need of retention and in some places restoration. c) There have been past and present threats to traditional food gathering sites

(mahinga kai) which have precluded Maori from having sufficient access to this resource. d) e) f)

Public access to mahinga kai is an important cultural consideration.

Protection of burial grounds, tapu sites and other taonga is considered by

Tangata Whenua as an important requirement in the District.

The Resource Management Act and Treaty of Waitangi make provision for

Tangata Whenua to have involvement in resource management in the District.

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g) Many of the issues identified in relation to Tangata Whenua overlap with general concerns regarding the quality of the environment, especially in relation to water quality and public access to waterways. These concerns show that there is much common ground shared between Maori and many non-Maori in the District. Where issues overlap they should be dealt with in the appropriate sections of the Plan.

10.4 STATUTORY ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AREAS

The Settlement between Ngai Tahu and the Crown resulted in the creation of a number of instruments to recognise Ngai Tahu's relationship to a range of sites and areas, and provide for this to be reflected in the future management of those sites.

The aim of the Statutory Acknowledgement 'instrument' is to improve the effectiveness of

Ngai Tahu's participation under the Resource Management Act (RMA).

To achieve this recognition Statutory Acknowledgements are shown on the Planning maps.

This then ensures that Ngai Tahu are notified whenever an application is received which relates to or impacts on a Statutory Acknowledgement Area.

There are two Statutory Acknowledgement Areas in the Grey District, these being

Kotuku - Whakaoho (Lake Brunner/ Moana)

Taramakau River.

The traditional concept of mobile camping sites for use in seasonal food gathering has been given effect in the Ngai Tahu Settlement Act whereby a number of nohoanga sites have been provided, a total of five in Grey District. Nohoanga are temporary campsites adjacent to lakes and rivers, to facilitate customary fishing and the gathering of other natural resources.

The sites with the Grey District are:

Kotuku Whakaoho (Lake Brunner/Moana)

Taramakau River

Lake Haupiri

Punakaiki River

Lady Lake.

The concept of nohoanga is shown in Appendix 11.

10.5 OBJECTIVES

1. To recognise and provide for the identification and management of those natural and physical resources which are considered important to Tangata Whenua, including

Statutory Acknowledgement Areas and nohoanga sites.

2.

3.

To recognise and provide for Tangata Whenua access to their traditional food gathering sites and the adequate protection of these from any use or development that may threaten such resources.

To protect culturally significant sites, such as burial grounds, tapu sites and other taonga throughout the District.

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To encourage Tangata Whenua to participate in the development and implementation of resource management decisions in the District.

10.6 POLICIES

1. Natural and physical resources that are important to Tangata Whenua including

Statutory Acknowledgement Areas and nohoanga sites, will be identified and managed to avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects that could affect such resources.

2. Where landuse activities have the potential to adversely affect the natural environment, Council will look to ensure the restoration and retention of the natural environment as a condition of Council consent.

3.

4.

5.

The protection of Maori food-gathering sites (mahinga kai) and access to such sites, will be a consideration in the resource consent process.

Council will endeavour to provide for the protection of all culturally significant sites.

An on-going and active relationship between Tangata Whenua and Council will be sought to further Iwi input into resource management decisions.

10.6.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

The Resource Management Act contains specific obligations in relation to the Treaty of

Waitangi and Maori interests which require the Council to recognise the relationship of the

Tangata Whenua with the District’s natural resources.

Ongoing consultation between the Tangata Whenua and Council representatives will ensure the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi are clarified and given the recognition they require under the Act . It will allow the Council to make informed management decisions over natural and physical resources of the District.

The Ngai Tahu Settlement also has resource management implications in recognising and providing for management of significant areas.

10.7 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. To develop a system for consultation with the Tangata Whenua regarding all resource management issues which are of interest to Tangata Whenua.

2.

3.

4.

5.

To develop procedures to be implemented in consultation with Tangata Whenua should there be any request to build a marae in the District.

To promote, through education and information, public awareness of Tangata

Whenua interests and concerns within the District.

To identify these areas where there was traditional and customary Maori use of lands and waterways within the District and implement procedures for Tangata Whenua involvement regarding any proposal to disturb ground in and around the identified areas.

To implement procedures, in conjunction with the Tangata Whenua, where any burial sites or Maori artifacts are unearthed or disturbed.

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6. To maintain and enhance, where able, public a ccess to the District’s public forests and significant waterways, wetlands and coastal areas, having regard to their traditional importance as mahinga kai.

7. To provide for Statutory Acknowledgement Areas and nohoanga sites in the

Resource Management processes.

10.7.1 REASONS

There are a variety of methods which will be implemented, many of which will depend on a series of protocols and consultative procedures to be developed between the Tangata

Whenua and Council .

10.8 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Recognition of the importance of Tangata

Whenua as a Treaty partner having input into resource management decision making.

Increased consultation with Tangata

Whenua as a part of resource consent applications.

Development of a partnership between the

Council and Tangata Whenua in resource management decision sustainable development. making for

Active on-going consultation between the

Council and local Iwi.

Increased recognition and protection of culturally significant sites.

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SU B ST AN C ES

11 HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

11.1 INTRODUCTION

Hazardous substances are any substances which may impair human, plant or animal health or may adversely affect the life supporting capacity of air, water, soil and ecosystems. Well known substances that are hazardous to people or the environment include petrol, pesticides, explosives, acids or radioactive substances.

11.2 ISSUES

1. Hazardous substances can have significant and long-term effects on human life and water, soil and wildlife if they are not adequately stored, used, disposed or transported.

Grey District is fortunate that many classes of hazardous substances are not used extensively in the District. Nevertheless, the Council would like to ensure that the manufacture, use, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous substances in the District are carried out in an appropriate manner. Potential threats include oil spillage and the escape of hazardous substances in manufacturing and extractive operations and during disposal.

11.3 OBJECTIVE

1. To prevent or mitigate the actual and potential effects arising from the storage, use, disposal and transportation of hazardous substances .

11.4 POLICIES

1. Hazardous substance s should be securely contained during their use, storage and transport so as to prevent escape.

2. Hazardous substances should be disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner.

11.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Under the Act the Council is responsible for ensuring that the potential adverse effects of hazardous substances in the District are prevented or mitigated to protect the life-supporting capacity of air, water, soil and ecosystems and to ensure the health and safety of the District's residents and visitors.

Secure containment and disposal in an environmentally acceptable manner are critical in achieving the objective.

1.

11.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

Compliance with all legislation dealing with hazardous substances including the

Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996, Dangerous Goods Act 1962 and

Building Act 1991.

2. Provision of rules to control the manufacturing, use and storage of quantities of hazardous substances in the District.

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SU B ST AN C ES

3.

4.

5.

Objectives, policies and rules in the Regional Council Plans to control the discharge of contaminants to land, water and air.

Use of the enforcement provisions under the Act where hazardous substances are manufactured, used, stored, transported or disposed of in such a way that is or is likely to be either noxious, dangerous, offensive or objectionable to such an extent as to cause adverse effects on the environment.

In conjunction with the Regional Council and other local authorities on the West Coast the Grey District Council will encourage and support: a) b)

The establishment and regularly updating of a hazardous substances inventory for the Grey District recording the amounts and patterns of hazardous substance manufacture, use, storage, transportation and disposal in the

District.

Develop methods and facilities for the safe collection and disposal of unwanted hazardous substances and hazardous wastes, including: i) promoting the disposal of hazardous substances at these facilities in a manner that minimises any adverse effects on the environment; and

6. ii) ensuring that any hazardous substances that can not be disposed of safely are totally contained in an appropriate storage facility; and investigate transporting hazardous wastes out of the District. iii)

Prepare an emergency response plan, in conjunction with other appropriate agencies, to deal with any spillages of hazardous substances or hazardous waste in the District.

7.

8.

Compliance with appropriate Codes of Practice, any regional/national standards or guidelines, and relevant regulations.

Increase public awareness on the potential environmental effects of hazardous substances such as through the issue of LIMs and PIMs for known potentially contaminated sites.

11.5.1 REASONS

A variety of methods will be used. Rules in the District Plan will be used to set thresholds for the storage of substances depending on the sensitivity of a particular area. In addition, any new manufacturing processes that are involved in the production of hazardous substances can only be established via the resource consent process. Objectives, policies and rules in the

Regional Council Plans control the discharge of hazardous substances .

The Council does not consider that any consent is necessary specifically for the transportation of hazardous substances in the District as this is covered by separate legislation.

The Council recognises that the safe disposal of many types of hazardous substances and hazardous wastes is difficult, and in some cases impossible. Accordingly, the Council will promote safer disposal practices through public education and advice. Use of industry guidelines is also encouraged as well as contingency plans. The Regional Council holds a register of potentially known contaminated sites such as former sawmilling, fuel storage and gold recovery sites and Council will advise of their presence, where known, on documents such as LIMs and PIMs.

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SU B ST AN C ES

The control of hazardous substances will only be made possible with a good information base, research, and with the co-operation of people of the District. Accordingly, the establishment of a hazardous substances inventory will be encouraged and supported. Liaison with other agencies and educative or advisory methods will be utilised as appropriate. The hazardous substances inventory will record the amounts of and patterns of hazardous substances manufactured, used, stored, transported and disposed of, thereby enabling the monitoring of hazardous substances in the District. Both the Regional Council and the three district councils on the West Coast have responsibilities under the Act for the collection, storage and disposal of hazardous wastes. The Regional Council will co-ordinate with territorial authorities and others who are involved with hazardous substances to develop a regional approach to management and disposal systems for hazardous substances .

11.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

A low level of risks from hazardous substances

Recording and reporting on any spillages, pollution or other hazards including use of hazardous substances inventory.

Increased public awareness from the public of adverse effects of hazardous substances .

Recording and reporting of any spillage, pollution or other hazardous substances including use of hazardous substances inventory.

Surveys e.g. Ratepayers, commercial ratepayers.

Assess situation at McLeans landfill and other district landfills by reference to site management records and monitoring conditions.

Establishment of a method to dispose of hazardous substances in an environmentally acceptable manner.

Liaison with Regional Council.

Volume of hazardous substances waiting to be disposed of.

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12 TRANSPORT

12.1 INTRODUCTION

Grey District has a well-established transport infrastructure that includes:

1. Two State Highways: Coastal State Highway (SH6) and State Highway (SH7) up the

Grey Valley to Nelson, Westport and Canterbury.

2.

3.

4.

5.

A network of sealed district arterial and collector roads providing access to and from the State highway system and also providing access to adjoining properties.

A network of sealed and unsealed local roads primarily providing access to adjoining properties.

A rail system consisting of: the Midland Railway from Canterbury via Moana; the Grey

Valley Stillwater / Westport Line; the coastal Greymouth / Hokitika Line and the

Greymouth / Rapahoe Railway.

The port area in Greymouth, which predominantly has a trade in fishing and coal exports.

6. The Greymouth aerodrome facility.

The District's transport system is an important physical resource, providing for the movement of people and goods and thus contributing to the social and economic welfare of residents and visitors.

12.2 ISSUES

1. Transport networks have obvious advantages to the community in convenience, mobility and the ability to distribute people and goods but can have the following adverse effects on the environment:

Noise.

Safety, both to pedestrian and other traffic.

Demands on land for transport routes and parking areas, and potential disruption to land uses and habitats.

Spillage of effluent and other materials during transportation.

While transport provides a service to the community it can create a number of effects which can affect amenities.

2. The safe and efficient operation of the District's transport infrastructure can be affected by: the traffic generating potential of land uses. the number, design and location of access points, especially onto State highways.

 the function of the road in terms of its importance in providing for access to property or through movement of traffic.

 the potential impact of land uses such as tall buildings on the operational requirements of the aerodrome and the port.

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Operational difficulties with the existing port at Greymouth.

There is a need to control the effects of development within the District to avoid conflicts with the safe and efficient utilisation of the transportation resources. For example, heavy vehicle generation uses and accesses to State highways can interfere with traffic flows affecting convenience and safety. New Zealand Transport Agency administers a section of State

Highway 6 between South Beach Overbridge and Taramakau River (8.6km) as Limited

Access Road (LAR). (Refer to Planning Maps). This is a recognition of the need to provide additional protection for this part of State Highway 6 from the effects of the subdivision and new property accesses .

The aerodrome is an important link whose operation could be affected by inappropriate structures. Access to the Greymouth port, particularly for heavy transport, is a vital consideration and one that is being considered through the development of the Greymouth

Township Traffic Management Plan. The condition of the Greymouth port however does limit some shipping because of its size, the state of the bar and flooding. An alternative deepwater multi-use port at Rapahoe is under investigation, particularly to handle bulk cargo such as coal. Cobden may also be a viable alternative.

12.3 OBJECTIVES

1.

2.

The operation of transport infrastructure in a manner that avoids, remedies or mitigates adverse effects.

The safe and efficient use of the D istrict’s transport infrastructure.

12.4 POLICIES

1. Access , off-street parking and loading, and the intensity of activities should not adversely affect vehicle and pedestrian safety and efficiency.

2.

3.

4.

To implement a hierarchy of roads in the District with associated design and access standards based on intended function, and to use this as a framework to enhance transport efficiency and the amenity of sensitive areas.

Transport infrastructure should be located and designed in a manner that avoids, remedies or mitigates adverse effects on neighbouring activities as far as practically possible having regard to the sensitivity of those activities.

To consider the development of alternative port facilities if constraints on the existing

Greymouth port cannot be overcome.

5. Development in the vicinity of the Greymouth aerodrome should not compromise flight paths and take steps to mitigate the adverse effects of aircraft noise.

12.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

The objectives promote the safe and efficient use of the D istrict’s infrastructure but recognises that at the same time their operation should not result in undue adverse effects.

Activities associated with vehicle movements such as parking, loading and manoeuvring should not adversely affect the transport structure. As part of this a roading hierarchy is implemented. Controls on development in proximity to the Greymouth aerodrome are necessary to protect its operation.

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Transport infrastructure will be related to adjoining land use and its sensitivity. For example, a new road through adjoining residential areas is likely to have more impact in respect of noise, whereas it may not be so critical in a rural area with a more sparse population.

Given that the existing port area at Greymouth does have constraints an alternative site may have to be considered.

12.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Rules in the Plan, including the use of a roading hierarchy.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

The development of Greymouth Township Traffic Management Plan.

Investigation into an alternative port areas at Rapahoe and Cobden.

Consultation with transport authorities and organisations, such as New Zealand

Transport Agency and where appropriate the utilisation of their guidelines.

Design of transport infrastructure that avoids, remedies or mitigates adverse effects.

Utilisation of documents such as the Regional Land Transport Strategy.

Should the portion of legal road from a Northern location adjacent to Lot 3 DP 3957,

CT 8C/1264 Westland Land Registry through to a Southern location adjacent to an un-named stream in opposite Lots 1010 DP 3779, Certificate of Title 8C/726-

28C/735 Westland Land Registry be closed in the future, Council will consider all practical options for the status of the land at the time of closure.

Whatever such options may be they shall not interfere with ongoing public access to the area which will be provided as a matter of principle.

12.5.1 REASONS

Implementation methods include rules in the Plan controlling access , parking and loading etc. in which a roading hierarchy will be utilised . The development of a transport strategy will assist in resolving issues such as access to the Greymouth port. An alternative port at

Rapahoe is under investigation to provide for bulk freight such as coal and Cobden is also a possible alternative. Consultation with transport authorities are also useful, including utilisation of guidelines such as those developed by New Zealand Transport Agencyin respect of access . Where appropriate these have been integrated into the rules. The design of infrastructure such as roads is a vital method of reducing adverse effects by the delineation of alignment, buffers, earthworks etc. Reference should also be made to documents such as the Regional Land Transport Strategy which covers the management and development of all transport modes on the West Coast.

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ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Safe, efficient transport systems. and accessible

Minimal adverse effects on the environment from transportation.

Periodically reviewing the Ministry of Transport's accident records, and assessing the need for traffic safety improvements to the District's roading network.

Construction of any new roads , accessways and parking areas to appropriate use and safety standards.

Review information sources regarding the utilisation of the District’s transportation relating to land use activities on adjoining sites and activities.

Note:

This section has some overlap with the

Environments sections.

Utilities and Commercial / Industrial

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13 SUBDIVISION

13.1 INTRODUCTION

The control of subdivision is a specific function of Council under the Act . Subdivision results in the creation of new parcels of land for which separate certificate of title can be obtained and freely sold. It can therefore facilitate the sustainable management of resources, assisting development, activities and conservation. Subdivision provides for a range of different opportunities to all sectors of the community.

Subdivision also provides the main means for ensuring the adequate provision of services to land including roading, water supply, sewage disposal, energy and telecommunications.

Subdivision is also the main mechanism for the provision of esplanade reserves , and strips and access strips and is therefore significant in the context of ensuring public access to waterways; contributing to the protection of esplanade values; and enabling public recreational use.

13.2 ISSUES

1. Subdivision should not give rise to adverse effects in terms of subsequent uses.

2.

3.

New allotments created by subdivision should be suitable for subsequent land uses in terms of such matters as: (i) an adequate allotment size or shape, (ii) adequate services, (iii) access and egress onto roads , (iv) natural hazards, (v) protection of natural values (vi) protection of public health, and (vii) avoidance of reverse sensitivity conflicts.

The requirement generated by new development to expand or upgrade existing infrastructure and services.

Development facilitated by subdivision adds incrementally to demands on the infrastructure of the District. Each new subdivision should contribute a fair and reasonable sum towards the cost of meeting that demand.

Subdivision occurring along the margins of the coast, rivers and lakes can compromise conservation values, public access and recreational uses.

Subdivision has the potential to adversely affect the margins of waterbodies by the nature of its development. Subdivision mechanisms do provide the opportunity to protect such values by the creation of esplanade reserves .

13.3 OBJECTIVE

1. To ensure that sites that are created by subdivision do not subsequently result in adverse effects on the environment which cannot be avoided, remedied or mitigated.

13.4 POLICIES

1. That sites created should be able to accommodate any subsequent land use having regard to the characteristics of that use and the rules of the Management Area.

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2.

3.

Any subdivision should avoid, remedy or mitigate the likely adverse effects on significant indigenous vegetation and habitats, outstanding landscape features, and the natural character of waterbodies and the coastal environment.

To restrict subdivision in areas of known natural hazard unless the effects of those natural hazards can be adequately avoided or mitigated.

4. Sites that include or are close to National Grid Infrastructure shall be designed and positioned to accommodate any subsequent land use while maintaining an adequate setback or buffer from National Grid Infrastructure. This shall include the avoidance of sensitive activities within the National Grid Buffer Area .

13.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Subdivision is a legal method for defining cadastral boundaries and therefore does not have a direct effect on the environment. Nevertheless given the expectations that are raised by subdivision, allotments should be able to accommodate subsequent uses without creating an adverse effect.

Any adverse effect in terms of natural values and natural hazards should also be identified at the initial subdivision stage given that it is the first step in development.

Subdivision design needs to be managed to avoid the incompatibility between activities and

National Grid Infrastructure including the avoidance of reverse sensitivity effects, ensuring activities do not interfere with the operation and maintenance of National Grid Infrastructure and/or endanger people and property. In addition, subdivision shall not enable sensitive activities to be located close to National Grid Infrastructure.

13.5 OBJECTIVE

1. The adequate provision of services, infrastructure and access for sites created by the subdivision in a manner that avoids, remedies or mitigates adverse effects.

13.6 POLICIES

1. Subdivision should provide for: a) Safe and effective vehicular and pedestrian access, including reasonable access to infrastructure. b) c) d) e) f) g) h)

Adequate water supplies for drinking and firefighting.

Potable water for drinking.

Disposal of sewage in a manner that maintains public health and avoids, remedies and mitigates effects such as soil and water contamination.

Disposal of stormwater in a manner that does not affect water quality and avoids inundation.

Supply of electricity, street lighting and telecommunications using a method that is appropriate to the subdivision/development and the amenity value of the area.

Connections into reticulated systems where they are available.

Adequate provision for open space and reserves , including pedestrian linkages.

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i) j)

The design and layout of a subdivision shall provide for any potential building or structure to be erected on the site while maintaining an appropriate separation distance from the National Grid Infrastructure. This shall include the avoidance of sensitive activities within the National Grid Buffer Area.

In the Residential, Rural-residential, Township and Commercial Environmental

Areas, the following: i) ii)

Roads to a sealed standard

Underground reticulation of services iii) Kerb and channelling and sealed footpaths.

13.6.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

As subdivision is often the basis for land development it is logical, in relation to the provision of services, that this provision be co-ordinated at the time of subdivision to avoid piecemeal provision of services upon individual properties being developed. Co-ordinated and standardised servicing of subdivisions ensures that the purchasers of sections and the community can expect to achieve an acceptance level of services and amenity and protection of the natural and physical resources.

The provision of services should not result in an adverse effect on the environment. Services such as roading, water supply, sewage disposal, electricity and telecommunications are generally important for the well being of people and communities and their health and safety.

The way in which these services are provided will vary because of differences within the

District including such factors as amenities, availability of services, sparseness of population etc. as indicated below.

Notwithstanding, the type of methods for providing services should be provided without creating an adverse effect as indicated below.

ROADING

Roading and access standards within subdivisions, particularly in rural areas, will reflect the anticipated traffic volume and type. Applying standards for roading and access provides the opportunity to create a variety of vehicle and access standards for the safe and efficient management of the transport network. Subdivision of land adjoining SH6 from South Beach overbridge to Taramakau River is also controlled by New Zealand Transport Agency by way of a Limited Access Road . Any proposed subdivision of land requires formal approvals from

New Zealand Transport Agency.

WATER SUPPLY

Water supply must be potable and reliable. In addition, where life and property needs to be protected, ready access to sufficient water supplies must be available for fire fighting purposes.

EFFLUENT DISPOSAL

Proper treatment and disposal of sanitary sewage is significant in terms of the protection of the quality of surface water and groundwater, and that of receiving waters. A reticulated sewage system is provided in part of Greymouth, Runanga and Moana. In other areas where connection is impractical, care must be taken to protect surface and ground water quality from onsite disposal of effluent and wastewater, including cumulative effects of development.

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STORMWATER

Disposal of stormwater is an important issue for subdivision in the Grey District given rainfall and the importance of disposal without causing associated flooding problems. The options for stormwater disposal need to be resolved at the time of application for a subdivision.

The standards of stormwater disposal must ensure that any possible adverse effects on neighbouring land are prevented by remedial works installed by the subdivider. Recognition and enhancement of the values of natural waterways and receiving waters is a necessary part of subdivision and subsequent land use developments. Open waterways can be visually attractive and generally provide an opportunity for enhancement through suitable landscape treatment. Preservation of natural waterway systems is ecologically and environmentally desirable.

ENERGY & TELECOMMUNICATIONS

The supply of energy and communications facilities, in particular electricity and telephone are regarded as essential services particularly for residential, commercial and industrial subdivision. The supply of these services to individual sites will require reticulation systems which are either located above or below ground. While underground reticulation is more desirable, particularly in residential and commercial areas, with appropriate planning the adverse effects of overhead lines may be able to be mitigated to a certain degree. The cost of underground reticulation is recognised, and therefore underground reticulation is not required in rural and industrial areas where environmental and economic considerations make it unjustified. In some instances it will not be possible to provide either of these services, mainly in rural situations, although it is expected that it will be shown by the applicant that such services can be obtained if required.

If there is existing National Grid Infrastructure on or adjacent to the land being subdivided then the applicant must ensure that provision is made for buildings and structures to be setback an appropriate distance, based on the type of activity, from the National Grid Infrastructure.

CONNECTION INTO RETICULATED SYSTEMS

Reticulated systems are generally preferred because of reliability, they provide a better quality of service and have less environmental effect.

RESERVES

Ensuring that adequate reserve areas are provided is a responsibility of the Council in order that the quality of the environment is maintained. Reserve contributions will be required on subdivisions so as the Council can purchase suitable land , or more importantly that existing reserves can be maintained and enhanced. Other reserves such as esplanade reserves also play important roles and will be dealt with at the subdivision stage (See Table 13.1 below).

13.7 OBJECTIVE

1. To contribute to the protection of conservation values and enable public access and recreational use of rivers, lakes and the coastal environment by the creation of esplanade addressing. reserves and strips in locations where the above matters require

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13.8 POLICIES

1. To generally require esplanade reserves or strips to be set aside for allotments of less than four hectares in accordance with the criteria set out in Table 13.1 below.

13.8.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Under the Act , conditions of subdivision consent include the provision of an esplanade reserve or strip along the edges of rivers or margins of lakes or the Mean High Water Springs of the coastal environment. The purpose of the esplanade reserve as set out in

Section 229

of the

Act is to contribute to the protection of conservation values and to enable public access and recreational use. All of these elements are present in the Grey District in varying degrees but the creation of esplanade reserves and strips may not be appropriate in all cases.

Under the Resource Management Act, all subdivisions which create allotments under 4 ha are required to have esplanade reserves of 20 metres in width created along the edges of rivers and lakes or the coast which the allotment includes or adjoins, except as provided by any rule in a District Plan or a resource consent.

While Council will generally set aside reserves , particularly as it relates to the coast, it does not believe that all of the circumstances set out in

Section 229

will necessarily apply to all areas. It therefore wishes to retain discretion as to whether the reserve should be set aside in accordance with the specified criteria in Table 13.1. Esplanade strips provide an option to esplanade reserves by enabling the subdivider to retain ownership with Council having an easement over the land .

Council does not believe there is a general need to require esplanade reserves to be set aside on allotments greater than four hectares given the density of subdivision and the availability of such reserves in terms of existing Crown land .

TABLE 13.1

1.

2.

Esplanade a) b) c) d) e) f) reserves and strips may be set aside if:

Ecological or natural values would be protected or enhanced.

Public access would be enhanced having regard to the existing level of access available.

Recreational use would be protected or enhanced.

Water quality or aquatic habitat value would be protected or enhanced.

The land is within a natural hazard area or where there is an identified risk from one or more natural hazards (such as coastal erosion).

The creation of an esplanade reserve would complete or promote the marginal protection of a river, lake or coastline.

The width of an esplanade reserve and strip may be varied from 20 metres or waived if: a) The natural values warrant a wider or narrower esplanade strip or esplanade reserve ; or b) c)

Topography, or the siting of any building or other feature, renders the 20metre width inadequate or excessive; or

The protection of waahi tapu, mahinga kai and other taonga requires an

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j) d) e) f) g) h) i) esplanade reserve or esplanade strip of greater or lesser width than 20 metres; or

The protection or enhancement of water quality requires an esplanade reserve or esplanade strip of greater or lesser than 20 metres; or

The land is within a natural hazard area of where there is an identified risk from one or more natural hazards (such as coastal erosion); or

The costs of the provision and maintenance of a 20 metre wide esplanade reserve or esplanade strip are more than the potential public benefits of the purposes of esplanade reserves or strips; or

Where the creation of a 20 metre wide esplanade reserve or esplanade strip would create result in risks to public safety or the security of property; or

There is adequate alternative public access; or

There is adequate means of protecting water quality and conservation values; or

There is adequate provision for public recreational use of the area of coast, river or lake in question.

13.9 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Rules in the Plan stating development and servicing standards for subdivision.

2.

3.

Financial contributions to ensure the sustainable management of public infrastructure.

Innovative designs of subdivisions.

4. Creation of esplanade reserves and strips as a condition of resource consents.

13.9.1 REASONS

Rules are included in the Plan to avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects and to provide subdividers and developers with certainty. Financial contributions will be imposed to ensure specified standards are met. Subdividers also have a part to play by innovative design which can overcome potential adverse effects. Esplanade reserves and strips can be taken as a condition of resource consents.

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13.10 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND

MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

The environmental results expected upon subdivision are:

Safe, convenient allotments . access to and from subdivided

Cost effective provision and sustainable management

Continued provision of esplanade reserves or strips in

A pattern of subdivision consistent with planned density,

Subdivisions that are provided with adequate levels of service having regard to their location.

Maintenance of amenity standards and the quality of the environment. of services and infrastructure for redevelopment and growth of the District without additional financial burdens on District rate payers. appropriate locations where enhancement of habitats and/or access can be achieved.

A pattern of subdivision complementary and appropriate to the character of the land uses in the area concerned. roading patterns and open space requirements appropriate in residential environments.

Innovation in subdivision design.

Avoidance of potential risk from natural hazards.

Monitoring implementation conditions subdivision of placed consents the of on to determine whether these are effective in achieving creation of lots appropriate to the environmental area in which they are situated, and their proposed use.

Monitoring of the demands for any extension of reticulated services or any servicing improvements to determine whether existing service infrastructure is being efficiently utilised, and that suitable contributions to the cost of these services are being made upon subdivision.

Monitoring occurrence of natural hazards and effects on land use.

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14 HERITAGE

14.1 INTRODUCTION

Heritage is the community's link to its past. It is important in generating a greater understanding of history and identities, which are features that are also valued by visitors.

Heritage may be represented in land , sites, trees, places, buildings, monuments, archaeological sites, and sacred sites, in either public or private ownership.

The heritage resources of Grey District include features of significance to both Maori and non-Maori. A number of archaeological sites and historic buildings have been identified throughout the District by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT). Registration of buildings and places with the Trust does not however in itself afford protection of those items.

An authority is however required from the Trust for the disturbance of archaeological sites.

In brief, the recognised heritage values of the District as contained in the Trust's Register and the New Zealand Archaeological Association file of sites, include:

Maori archaeological sites, places of occupation, resource extraction, historic mahinga kai

(a food source), Taramakau Valley, Grey Valley, Lake Brunner and coastal areas.

Non-Maori archaeological sites associated with the major extractive industries of coal mining, gold mining and timber harvesting, tributaries of the Grey Valley, Brunner Coal

Mine, Kumara/Haupiri Junction and Blackball Creek.

Historic buildings or sites within the District.

Historic trees are identified in a register.

Historic trees, buildings and sites, and archaeological sites are itemised in Appendix 6 and shown on the planning maps.

The Resource Management Act requires Council to have regard to the recognition and protection of the heritage values of sites, buildings, places or areas. The protection of heritage is important not only for the current generations and as an attraction to visitors, but also for future generations. However historic buildings and sites are sometimes seen as having limited value to owners, particularly if they are in a state of disrepair or non-utilisation.

14.2 ISSUES

1. Heritage features may be threatened by land use changes, land and building development, fire or vandalism as well as lack of maintenance.

Heritage features can be important for the community and also provide economic benefits (such as for tourism) and should therefore be protected. However, there are a number of physical activities that can detrimentally affect heritage items. There may also be financial factors which affect the sustainability of heritage features, such as a lack of maintenance. The ability of individuals, groups and the community to afford the retention of heritage features is therefore an important consideration when dealing with issues that arise.

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14.3 OBJECTIVE

1. The recognition and protection of buildings, sites, places and objects which contribute to people's appreciation and understanding of the District's heritage.

14.4 POLICIES

1.

2.

3.

4.

To identify heritage buildings, places and sites, waahi tapu, archaeological sites and historic trees, through consultation with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust,

Tangata Whenua, the Department of Conservation and the local community.

To promote public awareness of the importance of heritage resources, through the provision of information and consultation of interested parties and owners of such resources.

To encourage the use of protected buildings, sites and features in the District, while ensuring that their valued heritage features are not altered or destroyed.

Demolition, alteration, disturbance of identified items should not be allowed unless it can be demonstrated that: a) b) c) the item is in a state of disrepair and the costs to repair are significantly greater than other development alternatives on site. any alteration will not detract from its heritage value. relocation of the item is able to be accommodated without having a significant adverse effect. d) practical utilisation of the item is not possible. e) regard has been had to cultural and spiritual significance of Tangata Whenua. f) circumstances exist where the heritage item and land it is sited on is in different ownership and following investigation into practical options for the retention of the heritage item, it is unreasonable for the building to remain.

14.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Council is required to have regard to the recognition and protection of District heritage items in accordance with

Section 6(f)

of the Act . Retention of these items contributes to the character of the District.

The listing and grading of heritage features is considered to be effective in prioritising resources. Policies have been aimed at the management of activities that would detrimentally affect heritage features, while recognising that alternative uses may be found or the value placed on these features by the community may change over time. Council wishes to ensure that all practical opportunities for the use of the heritage item are explored. While a current use may not be readily apparent, future uses should not be discounted although

Council acknowledges any such use should be realistic and practical.

In Greymouth a number of heritage buildings are located on land which is owned by

Mawhera Incorporation. The buildings are however owned by a different party who lease the land from Mawhera Incorporation.

This somewhat unique situation can result in Mawhera Incorporation, at the expiry of a lease, retaining buildings which they do not own and for which they did not have previous responsibility. There is also not the same incentive for owners of buildings to maintain their

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buildings when they do not have an interest in the land and even if a party able to maintain a heritage building is found Mawhera may be unable to dispose of the property. These factors need to be considered when considering resource consent applications for these buildings.

14.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Inclusion of an inventory of heritage items and historic areas, historic trees, archaeological sites as schedules in the District Plan.

Require resource consents for activities which may adversely affect heritage items or historic places.

Financial instruments such as the purchase of heritage items, consideration of rates relief and varying of development contributions.

Consultation with owners / guardians of heritage features / public, particularly in respect of meaningful alternative uses.

Use of Heritage Protection Orders under the Resource Management Act.

Alert the public to the location of known archaeological sites, and to the provisions of the Historic Places Act which control the modification or destruction of archaeological sites.

Provision of a photographic record of scheduled items to Council and NZHPT as a condition of resource consent if the item is to be demolished or relocated.

14.5.1 REASONS FOR METHODS

The Council considers that the inclusion of a schedule of heritage features in the District Plan is a practical method of recording heritage features and forming a basis for their management. The Schedules include heritage items and trees subject to rules (Schedules 1 and 2), while Schedule 3 contains archaeological sites. The items subject to rules in

Schedule 1 are generally those registered as Category I and II places in the NZ Historic

Places Trust Register. Rules in the Plan provide means of assessing the effects on heritage features of varying significance and allow for the maintenance and minor alteration of these features as a permitted activity. The resource consent process allows Council to assess the merits of any changes to a heritage feature and does not necessarily imply that Council will contribute financially to the retention of that feature.

Alternative mechanisms, such as offering financial incentives (possibly in terms of rates relief) for heritage management are available in circumstances where the protection of a heritage feature compromises the potential use of a site , and recognises the public benefit obtained from the protection of heritage features. Financial incentives would also be linked to the maintenance of heritage features. Consideration will also be given to waiving development contributions where property development incorporates heritage features.

Purchase of items is also a possibility.

It is considered by the Council that the essential element of the sustainable management of heritage features is consultation and education of owners, developers and other interested parties in order to achieve solutions that provide for recognition of heritage values.

The Council may consider applying the "heritage order" provisions of the Act , as a heritage protection authority (

Section 187

). Where it is considered a heritage order could be appropriate the Council may encourage another recognised heritage protection authority to apply heritage orders, in an attempt to ensure the sustainable management of significant

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heritage resources of the District when these features may be under threat from demolition, removal or major modification.

There is also other legislation. The Historic Places Act 1993, provides protection for archaeological sites, in which it is an offence to disturb such sites without obtaining appropriate authorisation. The Plan indicates a schedule of archaeological sites which alerts landowners / developers to the requirements of the Act . The schedule does not cover all sites and many areas will not have been surveyed for sites.

14.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Retention and management of a representative range of heritage features (buildings, sites, places, trees, objects) of significance to both

Maori and non-Maori, as a link with the District's past.

Maintenance or improvements to and alternative use of heritage features in a manner that will not detract from their heritage value.

The recording of any complaints or problems which may arise following the application of the management methods above.

Annually review the schedule of features identified in the Plan, and modify this schedule in response to new information about heritage features in the

District.

Report on the circumstances surrounding the loss of any protected features in the District, and make recommendations regarding amended process for such issues.

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C O N T R I B U T I O N S

15 FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS

15.1 INTRODUCTION

The Act empowers the Council to require a financial contribution as a condition of a resource consent for purposes specified in the document. Financial contributions provide the opportunity to avoid, remedy, mitigate or offset any adverse effects relating to activities. A financial contribution may be in the form of money or land or a combination of them.

15.2 ISSUES

1. The requirement generated by new development to expand or upgrade existing infrastructure and services.

2. The provision of physical resources such as infrastructure needs to be in a fair and equitable manner.

Development can result in a necessity to create or upgrade infrastructure (e.g. roads and reticulation) and other facilities such as reserves in order that adverse effects such as inadequate sewerage disposal or access are avoided, remedied or mitigated.

Development can also result in the creation of adverse effects such as noise and visual impact. These adverse effects can be overcome by the imposition of a financial contribution from the developer. Any costs therefore associated with avoiding, remedying or mitigating effects should lie with the developer rather than subsidisation by the community. The Council , however, may decide to encourage development in certain areas through the provision, or assistance with costs, of servicing. This can be viewed as a non-regulatory method of controlling development.

15.3 OBJECTIVE

1. To ensure that the costs of adverse effects arising from subdivision and development is included in the cost to the developer in a fair and equitable manner.

15.4 POLICIES

1. To ensure that the costs of avoiding, remedying and mitigating or offsetting the adverse effects of any activity on the environment including the provision or upgrading of services and infrastructure, are met by developers.

2. To meet increased demand for services and infrastructure arising from the activity and to avoid, mitigate or remedy any adverse effects from new activities through the utilisation of financial contributions.

3. To consider financial incentives in areas where development is to be encouraged, when considering contribution levels.

15.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Some activities generate adverse effects that are required to be avoided, remedied or mitigated or offset.

Any costs associated with development generally should lie with the developer rather than the community.

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C O N T R I B U T I O N S

New development may generate use of existing services and infrastructure provided by

Council which requires them to be upgraded or extended. This includes infrastructure such as roading, water supply, stormwater and services such as reserves and community services. Financial contributions from developers will therefore be directed to the provision and expansion of services where this is attributable to the new development, rather than the rate payers’ subsidising development. Major developments can also lead to a strain on social facilities which may require a contribution.

Financial contributions are also utilised to avoid, mitigate or remedy the adverse effects of activities offsite by, for example, requiring fencing or landscaping to screen an unsightly activity.

The Council however recognises that costs of service provision can be onerous on potential developers. While the Council does not seek to direct development there are areas where the Council is more favourable to development such as that which consolidates development, is in proximity to existing services, and there is a reasonable level of existing services. In these areas the Council will consider not charging the full financial contribution.

15.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Implementation of financial contribution as conditions of resource consents.

2.

3.

Development of Draft Growth Strategy.

Annual Plan process and Special Consultative Procedure.

15.5.1 REASONS

Financial contributions will be imposed through conditions of resource consents. Council is also undertaking an exercise to identify preferred direction and areas of growth for the urban and township areas which will take into account the availability and capacity of existing services. This will enable Council to prioritise spending requirements on services. The Plan sets out the policies that will be used to determine and require the levels of financial contribution payable on subdivision and development. It is proposed to set relevant figures where available through the Annual Plan and Special Consultative Methods under the Local

Government Act. This enables the matter to be dealt with through a public process inviting submission, and also reviewed annually to ensure accurate and up to date figures are used, taking into account the many related issues. It also provides interested parties the ability to submit to Council on a regular basis regarding the quantum of such contributions.

15.6 FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS PURPOSES

A financial contribution may be imposed as a condition of resource consent for the following purposes.

1. To avoid, remedy, or mitigate any identified adverse effects on the environment or natural and physical resources.

2. To ensure a positive effect on the environment to offset adverse effects.

In particular these purposes may include:

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C O N T R I B U T I O N S

15.6.1 UPGRADING OF ROADS

Circumstances and Purposes

To meet the needs of extra traffic likely to be generated by the land use or subdivision, and to provide for the needs of road users where existing roads are of inadequate capacity and or standard, width, formation or construction to cater for the increased usage caused by the land use or subdivision. Upgrading of roads and the forming of newly created separate frontages, kerb and channel, berms, footpaths, crossings and street lighting adjacent to the land use or subdivision may be required.

Maximum Amount

Fifty percent of the cost of the upgrading works (valued at established market rate) necessary to meet the required standard to make roading suitable for increased traffic including, where appropriate, the cost of forming the road and acquiring and vesting any land as road for widening purposes.

The full cost of the work required for newly created separate frontages , kerb and channel, berms, footpaths, crossings and street lighting.

15.6.2 ACCESS AND NEW ROADS

Circumstances and Purposes

To provide suitable formed access to the site from a formed road or proposed formed road . Where access cannot be achieved from existing formed roads , new road s may be required.

Maximum Amount

The full cost of providing suitable formed access to the site . Access to the roads is to be formed in accordance with Appendix 5 Schedule 1- Code of Practice for Subdivision

Where one or more new roads are required, the full actual cost of constructing the new road , including the cost of the vesting in the Council of the necessary land for the road .

Reciprocal rights of way in residential environmental areas are to be sealed.

15.6.3 SEWERAGE

Circumstances and Purposes

To maintain the health and public safety and amenity of inhabitants or occupants and to protect the natural environment from indiscriminate and harmful disposal of sewage where new allotments , sites and buildings are intended for human habitation or occupation.

Maximum Amount

Where a sewerage system is available and has adequate capacity for meeting the proposed additional sewage, the full actual cost of connecting the allotments or buildings to that sewerage system. When the design capacity of the system is likely to need to be upgraded as a result of the subdivision a contribution towards the upgrading of the system shall be required.

Where a sewerage system is not available, the full actual cost of disposal, including design and investigation, acquiring sufficient land for onsite disposal and treatment of effluent likely from activities on the site , and the cost of increasing the capacity if necessary, together with the full actual cost of providing sewerage within the subdivision or buildings .

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15.6.4 STORMWATER

Circumstances and Purposes

To prevent damage and loss of property and amenity from the indiscriminate and uncontrolled run-off of stormwater where new allotments , roads and/or other impervious surfaces are created by subdivision or land use and create a need for extra stormwater disposal.

Maximum Amount

Where a piped outfall is available, the full actual cost of reticulation control structures within the subdivision or land use. Where a piped outfall is not available or the capacity of an existing system is inadequate, the full actual cost of providing for the disposal of stormwater and increasing the capacity if necessary, together with the full actual cost of reticulation and control structures within the subdivision or building .

15.6.5 SUPPLY OF WATER

Circumstances and Purposes

To provide a supply of potable drinking water for human consumption, (complying with the

NZ Standard for Drinking Water) for industrial and commercial activities, or for fire fighting and irrigation where proposed allotments , sites or buildings are intended for human habitation or occupation.

Maximum Amount

Where a water supply is available and sufficient to meet the needs of the proposed activity, the full actual costs of providing all the necessary reticulation to serve the proposed allotments , sites and buildings .

Where no supply is available, or the capacity of the supply is inadequate, the full cost of providing a supply and increasing the capacity, if necessary, together with the cost of reticulation within the subdivision or land use.

15.6.6 EARTHWORKS

Circumstances and Purposes

To provide safe and adequate building areas and road access sewerage disposal and treatment stormwater control, land stability; to enable better utilisation of land , where the subdivision or land use involves re-contouring land to create roading services, site design and building areas; and to ensure that earthworks do not adversely affect significant natural habitats, indigenous vegetation ecosystems, landscapes and natural features.

Maximum Amount

The full actual cost of carrying out the earthworks to the appropriate standard, retaining significant areas where required. The full actual cost of clearing, cleaning, filling or compacting land in order to mitigate the effects of former activities and make the site suitable for its proposed activity.

15.6.7 RESERVE CONTRIBUTIONS

Circumstances and Purposes

A cash contribution for the provision of land for open space in the locality and for recreational facilities and maintenance of recreational facilities and open space. Utilities

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will only be required to make a contribution in those circumstances when the purpose of the utility , being the purpose for which it was originally built, creates a demand for, or maintenance of, recreational facilities and open space.

Maximum Amount

Two percent of the value of each additional allotment in a subdivision or, in the case of a subdivision in the Rural or Rural Residential Environmental Area, 2% of the value of each additional allotment or the value of 4000 square metres of each additional allotment in a subdivision, whichever is the lesser. Allotments has the meaning in

Section 218

of the Act and includes those created by cross lease.

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15.6.8 ESPLANADE RESERVES AND ESPLANADE STRIPS

Circumstances and Purposes

TABLE 15.1

1.

2.

Esplanade reserves and strips may be set aside if: a) Ecological or natural values would be protected or enhanced. b) c) d)

Public access would be enhanced having regard to the existing level of access available.

Recreational use would be protected or enhanced. e)

Water quality or aquatic habitat value would be protected or enhanced.

The land is within a natural hazard area or where there is an identified risk from one or more natural hazards (such as coastal erosion). f) The creation of an esplanade reserve would complete or promote the marginal protection of a river, lake or coastline.

The width of an esplanade reserve and strip may be varied from 20 metres or waived if: a) b) c)

The natural values warrant a wider or narrower esplanade strip or esplanade reserve ; or

Topography, or the siting of any building or other feature, renders the 20metre width inadequate or excessive; or

The protection of waahi tapu, mahinga kai and other taonga requires an esplanade reserve or esplanade strip of greater or lesser width than 20 metres; or d) e) f)

The protection or enhancement of water quality requires an esplanade reserve or esplanade strip of greater or lesser than 20 metres; or

The land is within a natural hazard area of where there is an identified risk from one or more natural hazards (such as coastal erosion); or

The costs of the provision and maintenance of a 20 metre wide esplanade reserve or esplanade strip are more than the potential public benefits of the purposes of esplanade reserves or strips; or g) h) i) j)

Where the creation of a 20 metre wide esplanade reserve or esplanade strip would create result in risks to public safety or the security of property; or

There is adequate alternative public access; or

There is adequate means of protecting water quality and conservation values; or

There is adequate provision for public recreational use of the area of coast, river or lake in question.

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C O N T R I B U T I O N S

Maximum Amount

The full actual costs of vesting or contributing a reserve or strip of not greater than 20 metre width (width to be determined in accordance with the esplanade reserve provisions in the section relating to subdivision) including the value of the land or interest in land and the costs of survey and conveyancing.

15.6.9 PROTECTION OF HERITAGE ITEMS

Circumstances and Purposes

To enable protection of heritage items or Waahi tapu where subdivision and/or land use consent is sought.

Maximum Amount

The full actual costs of carrying out the protection works.

15.6.10 OFF-STREET PARKING

Circumstances and Purposes

To provide for parking spaces onsite , or in the near vicinity of the site where off-street parking requirements of the Plan cannot be met.

Maximum Amount

The actual cost of providing 25m

2

for a carpark calculated at the current market value of the land subject to development. and construction costs required by NZS 4404: 1981. This amount being to a maximum of $1,500.00 plus GST per carpark.

15.6.11 DEVELOPMENT CONTRIBUTIONS

Circumstances and Purposes

While major commercial and industrial activities have the potential to greatly benefit the

District, they can also lead to a strain on recreational and social resources. Where a development occurs, an additional contribution over and above that provided for any of the purposes in 15.6.1 - 15.6.11 above may be required where there is a demonstrated need created by the development for recreational and community facilities. The financial contribution upgrading shall only be spent by Council on the provision and development of

Council’s reserves , recreational facilities and community facilities in an area of locality affected by any such development.

Maximum Amount

Developments of a value of over $500,000 shall be subject to a financial contribution of up to 0.5% of the value of the building work. The value of other financial contributions conditional on the development will be considered with regard to the amount of development contribution required. The financial contribution shall be paid at the time of the issue of the building consent.

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15.7 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Adverse effects are avoided, remedied, mitigated and offset by the payment of development contributions.

Conditions of resource consents.

Survey of standard of servicing.

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PART 4

ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS

- ISSUES, OBJECTIVES,

POLICIES AND RULES -

16 - RESIDENTIAL

17 - TOWNSHIPS

18 - RURAL-RESIDENTIAL

19 - RURAL

20 - COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL

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16 RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREA

16.1 INTRODUCTION

The residential environmental areas are typically comprised of the housing areas of

Greymouth, Karoro, Paroa, Runanga, Cobden, Blaketown, Kaiata, Kaiata Park , Mitchells,

Dobson, Punakaiki, Boddytown, Iveagh Bay and Moana. These areas account for the majority of Grey’s resident population.

Although Census statistics reveal there has been an urban to rural trend, a majority of the

District's population still resides in residential environments. Regardless of any population decline, residential housing stock is increasing, a reflection of a decreasing average number of people per unit.

Within the Residential Environmental Area is also infrastructure which services activities in the local and wider areas. This includes roading and National Grid Infrastructure.

16.2 ISSUES

1. Loss of use and enjoyment of residential properties and a loss of environmental pleasantness and coherency of residential areas as a consequence of the effects of activities such as: bulk and location noise visual impact traffic appearance

2.

Residential environments have their own particular amenity values. The values include coherent residential areas served by community facilities (e.g. schools, churches, playgrounds etc.), a relative quietness and a general absence of intrusive or nuisance developments. Certain activities can lead to a detraction of these qualities. For example it is noted that in Moana and Iveagh Bay the current intensity of use and development is not commensurate with the small areas of the allotments thereby affecting the amenities of these areas.

People’s choices in their types of housing can be constrained by traditional types of regulation.

In the past, a significant proportion of residential development has taken the form of single unit development on larger sections, which is reinforced by street development criteria.

It is recognised today that people have different needs and preferences in terms of the cost, location, design, style and size of housing and residential sections. The needs of residents may include detached dwellings, rental accommodation, flats or elderly persons housing . These opportunities should be made available but concurrently maintain the quality of environment valued by those living within it.

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16.3 OBJECTIVES

1.

2.

3.

To enable a diversity of living environments expressed in built form, density of development, housing types and location.

To enable a range of nonresidential activities in which any adverse effects on the residential environment are avoided, remedied or mitigated.

To retain the amenities and character of the residential areas.

16.4 POLICIES

1. A choice of building forms, densities and site development for residential purposes should be allowed provided that any development:

2. a) b) maintains open space and landscaping as a feature according to the type of development.

Nonresidential activities should be allowed provided that: a) does not adversely impact on neighbouring properties or the character of an area. the adverse effects on residential amenities are avoided, remedied or mitigated, particularly as it relates to scale, glare, odour, and vehicle movements.

3. b) they do not lead to a breakdown in community coherence.

Housing and property should be maintained at a reasonable standard and appearance in order there is not a detraction of neighbourhood amenities.

4. Activities and buildings shall not limit or impede the ability for existing public and

National Grid Infrastructure to be operated, upgraded, developed and maintained.

This includes that sensitive activities shall not be located within the National Grid

Buffer Area.

16.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

The residential areas are integral to the well-being of the Grey community given that they provide residential opportunities as well as employment, education, commercial and recreational opportunities in a compact and convenient form. The maintenance and enhancement of these areas providing for a wide variety of activities without creating adverse effects is in the interests of the community.

A variety of activities and building and development forms and densities is therefore permitted, provided adverse effects on the residential amenities are avoided, remedied or mitigated. Housing and property should be maintained at a reasonable standard and appearance in order there is no detraction of neighbourhood amenities. For example, there may be a difference between ‘suburban areas’ and holiday areas with the latter localities requiring larger areas to accommodate activities and preserve the lakeside amenities.

Different types of housing also have different requirements and hence standards.

Public and National Grid Infrastructure is a common feature of residential areas and is necessary in order to service both the immediate and wider areas. The ability to access and maintain infrastructure is necessary as is the importance of ensuring activities are not undertaken which may create safety risks for those parties undertaking an activity or the

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users of infrastructure. Sensitive activities , and incompatible buildings should not be located in close proximity to National Grid Infrastructure.

16.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Rules in the Plan relating to performance standards.

2. Through the Annual Plan, Asset Management Plans, Strategic Plan and Long Term

Financial Plan process, progressively undertake:

3.

4. a) b) c) d) improvements to reticulated sewage, water supply and stormwater services; a programme of street improvements and plantings; a programme of local traffic improvements; upgrading of the quality of public open space.

Encouragement of community initiated programmes for enhancement of residential amenity.

Enforcement action to ensure compliance with prescribed standards including action for unsightly properties.

5.

6.

Other legislation and bylaws.

Reference to other Statutory Documents including the NZ Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical Safe Distances.

16.5.1 REASONS

Rules are considered to be the most efficient method of ensuring the protection of amenities.

Council expenditures will also enhance the areas although a fair and equitable financial contribution will be required to recover costs where the development benefits.

Council’s finances are limited and community enhancement programmes represent effective methods of improving amenity standards. Enforcement and abatement action will be taken to maintain residential amenity, particularly in respect of run-down properties.

In the imposition of District Plan Provisions, other requirements are also applicable and where appropriate direction to these requirements can be included in the plan. Examples include National Environmental Standards and Codes of Practice.

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16.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Adequate land for future residential development.

Efficient use of infrastructure assets.

Provision for diversity in housing, built form and lifestyle types.

Assessment through analysis of complaints laid with the Council regarding unacceptable environmental standards resulting from activities undertaken in residential areas.

Assessment of the number of sections created per year and the amount of vacant land remaining to ensure there will always be adequate land for future development.

Compliance monitoring of resource.

Surveys of community well being.

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16.7 RULES - RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS

Note: The National Environmental Standard for Assessing and Managing Contaminants in Soil to Protect

Human Health applies to any piece of land on which an activity or industry described in the current edition of the Hazardous Activities and Industries List (HAIL) is, has been, or is more likely than not to have been undertaken. Refer to the “Grey District Council NES Contaminants in Soil Process Guide” to determine if these regulations are applicable to the activity proposed.

16.7 ITEM

1. Permitted Activities

General

2. Minimum Residential

Unit Area

3. Building Coverage

4. Set Backs

PERMITTED

(i) Any activity is a permitted activity provided that it does not contravene any other rule in this Environmental

Area.

(i) Residential units are permitted if

(a) the minimum net site area is 350m

2

exclusive of access ; except: a) 300m

2

where two or more adjoining sites are developed. b) 200m

2

for each elderly persons housing unit with a gross floor area less than 65m

2

. c) 1500 m

2

in Kaiata Park

Note: In non-sewered areas a discharge consent from the

West Coast Regional Council may be required which could effect the minimum site area.

(i) Buildings are permitted if the maximum site coverage is 50%; except: in Kaiata Park where the maximum site coverage is 30%.

(i) Buildings are permitted if:

(a) the minimum building setback from road boundaries is 4.5 metres.

(b) The minimum building setback from internal boundaries for non- residential activities shall be 3m;

(c) No buildings shall be erected within 100 metres of

MHWS .

(d) No buildings for residential or commercial purposes shall be erected within 150 metres of the boundary of any oxidation pond and no oxidation pond is located within 150 metres of a residential or commercial building .

Note: No setback from internal boundaries is required for residential buildings .

CONTROLLED

(ii)Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii)Not applicable.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Not applicable.

(i) The area of the residential unit .

(ii) The number of residential units in the vicinity.

(iii) How the residential units relate to one another.

(iv) The disposal of effluent.

(v) Whether the site size will adequately provide for the outdoor needs of the activities on the site , and retain a dominance of open space over buildings .

(vi) The intended use of the residential unit .

(i) The extent to which the character of the site will remain dominated by open space and garden plantings, rather than buildings .

(ii) The ability to provide adequate outdoor space on the site for all outdoor activities associated with residential and other activities permitted on the site .

(i) The effect on adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, noise and privacy.

(ii) The effect on road safety.

(iii) The effect on the provision of services.

(iv) The extent to which the intrusion towards the road is necessary in order to allow more efficient, practical and/or pleasant use of the remainder of the site .

(v) The extent to which alternative practical locations are available for the building .

(vi) The extent to which the proposed detract from the pleasantness, building will coherence, openness and attractiveness of the site as viewed from the street and adjoining sites .

(vii)The degree to which existing or proposed landscaping, including plantings, mitigate the effects of limited building setback from a road .

(viii)The extent to which the intrusion towards the internal boundary is necessary to enable more efficient, practical and/or pleasant use of the remainder of the site .

(ix) The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of the proposal on adjoining sites , including through the provision of landscape plantings.

(x) The effect on the natural character of the coastline and if any natural hazard (such as erosion, sea level, etc.) will create an impact.

(xi) The actual or potential adverse effects of the oxidation pond .

EXPLANATION

Any activity is allowed in the

Residential Environmental

Area provided the rules are not contravened.

The scale and intensity of residential units should be such that a level of amenity is retained in terms of openness and privacy. Development on adjoining sites offers more scope for integrated development.

Elderly person housing is permitted on a smaller area given the type of units and the reduced demands.

Site coverage is controlled to ensure that open space and other servicing requirements and neighbourhood amenities are met. It also assists in maintaining an area that is adequate for onsite disposal.

Setbacks from internal boundaries enable a reasonable separation distance to be retained in order the effects on neighbours

’ properties are minimised.

Control of buildings in the coastal area allows Council to assess the effects on the natural character of the coastline and also the threat to development of natural hazards.

Restrictions on building in proximity to oxidation ponds

(as shown on Planning Maps

25, 34, 36 & 48) enable these facilities to operate without unduly effecting adjoining landowners and vice versa.

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16.7 ITEM

4A National Grid

Infrastructure

PERMITTED

(i)(a) Within the National Grid Buffer Area a building , or the change of use of a building, shall comply with the following standards:

(i) From National Grid Poles

(a) Building s (excluding fences up to 2.5m in height) shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres

(b) Fences up to 2.5m in height shall be:

Setback a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire; and

Fences setback between 1.5m and 5.0m from a pole or stay wire shall be of a non-conductive design and readily removable for the purposes of operator access to National Grid Infrastructure .

(ii) From National Grid Power Lines (as measured from the centre line):

(a) Pi Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from Pi Poles

(b) Single Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of

10 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from single poles

(c) Except that the following activities are exempt from the above National Grid Power Line setback standards:

A fence of up to 2.5 metres in height;

The physical alteration of an existing building where the degree of non-compliance does not increase;

Uninhabitable horticultural or farm buildings (this does not include a commercial greenhouse, a milking and/or dairy shed, a wintering barn or a factory farm building).

(b) From a National Grid Substation, buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres. The setback requirement is to be measured from the edge of the substation designation or where the substation is not designated, the secured fence of the substation.

(c) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area must:

(i) Be no deeper than 300mm within 5m of a pole or stay wire;

(ii) Not result in a reduction in a ground to conductor clearance distance less than 6.5m;

(ii) Not compromise National Grid support structure stability; and

(iv) Not limit or impede vehicular access to a pole or stay wire.

Except that the requirement in (c)(i) above shall not apply to:

Earthworks given dispensation by the National Grid

Operator under Clause 2.2.1 of NZECP34:2001;

The agricultural or domestic cultivation of land;

Agricultural land drainage no closer than 2.2 metres from a pole or stay wire (provided it is no deeper than

750mm when between 2.2m and 5m of a National

Grid pole or stay wire);

The repair, sealing or resealing of a road, footpath, driveway or farm track; or

Vertical holes not exceeding 500mm in diameter and located a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire.

Note: If you propose to undertake any new activity, alter an existing activity or construct a structure including fences and irrigation units within 20m of a National Grid Infrastructure it is recommended that the National Grid operator is consulted with.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity unless otherwise specified as a non-complying activity.

NON-COMPLYING

(iv) From 10 July

2018, any activity that contravenes one of the following permitted conditions is a non-complying activity:

16.7.4A(i)(a)

16.7.4A(c)(ii)-(iv)

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Setback from National Grid Substations:

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Substations

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Reverse sensitivity effects on National Grid substations

Technical advice by the National Grid operator.

(ii) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area :

The risk to the stability of the National Grid

Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade the National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid operator

Any impact on the ability of the National Grid operator to access the National Grid.

(iii) Setback from Poles:

The risk to the stability and structural integrity of the

National Grid Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

(iv) Setback from Lines

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

EXPLANATION

EXPLANATION

Setback distances from

National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National

Policy Statement on Electricity

Transmission and Policy

16.4.4 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the

New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical safe

Distances and the Electricity

(Hazards from Trees)

Regulations 2003.

Compliance with the District

Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

Setback distances from National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National

Policy Statement on Electricity Transmission and Policy 16.4.4 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for

Electrical safe Distances and the Electricity (Hazards from Trees) Regulations 2003.

Compliance with the District Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

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16.7 ITEM

5. Height of

Buildings &

Structures

6. Building Design and Appearance

PERMITTED

(i) Buildings and structures are permitted if:

(a) No building projects beyond a building envelope defined by recession planes as described in Appendix 8 and

(b) No building or structure projects beyond an envelope in the Aerodrome Flight Path Protection Area as described in Appendix 9.

(i) Relocated buildings onto a site are permitted if:

(a) they are constructed within the last ten years and

(b) they are constructed of new materials and

(c) they are established on foundations complying with the building code at the time of relocation .

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable

7. Light Spill &

Glare

8. Fencing

(i) No activity shall result in a greater than 2.5 lux spill

(horizontal and vertical) of light onto any adjoining property, measured at any point more than 2m inside the boundary of the adjoining property or the closest window to the adjoining property, whichever is the closest.

(i) Fences are a permitted activity provided:

(a) They are not more than 2.0 metres high.

(i) Heavy vehicles are permitted to be stored if:

(a) No more than one heavy vehicle is stored on any site , provided that this does not apply to fire stations.

9. Heavy Vehicle

Storage

10. Utilities

11. Signs

12. Hazardous

Substances

13. Parking,

Loading &

Access

14. Subdivision

(i) Refer to Appendix 1

(i) Refer to Appendix 2

(i) Refer to Appendix 3

(i) Refer to Appendix 4

15. Heritage Items &

Historic Trees

16. Noise Insulation

Kaiata Park

(i) Refer to Appendix 5

(i) Refer to Appendix 6

(i) Any dwelling constructed between State Highway 7 and

Kaiata Creek within Kaiata Park shall be built to a standard whereby the traffic noise as measured within any bedroom at the time of first occupancy of the dwelling does not exceed

35dBA Leq (24 hours) and in any other habitable room does not exceed a level of 40dBA Leq (24 hours) with ventilating windows open.

Where windows are required to be closed to achieve the design goal, alternative ventilation must be provided. In these cases, the above noise levels must be achieved with any ventilating fans operating

(ii) Relocated buildings not meeting conditions of the a permitted activity are a controlled activity in which Council reserves control over the design and appearance of the buildings .

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Refer to Appendix 1

(ii) Refer to Appendix 2

(ii) Refer to Appendix 3

(ii) Refer to Appendix 4

(ii) Refer to Appendix 5

(ii) Refer to Appendix 6

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Not applicable.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition of a activity is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Refer to Appendix 1

(iii) Refer to Appendix 2.

(iii) Refer to Appendix 3

(iii) Refer to Appendix 4

(iii) Refer to Appendix 5

(iii) Refer to Appendix 6

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) The effect on adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, outlook and privacy.

(ii) The effect of the increased height in terms of visual dominance by buildings of the outlook from other sites , roads and public open space in the surrounding area, which is out of character with the local environment.

(iii) The extent to which there is a need for the increased height or intrusion through the recession lines, in order to undertake the proposed activities on the site and alternatives which may have less effect on the environment.

(iv) The extent to which the proposed buildings will be compatible with the character of the local environment, including the scale of other buildings in the surrounding area.

(v) The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of increased height or exceedence of the recession planes, such as through increased separation distances between the building and adjoining sites or the provision of screening.

(i) The proposed location of the building on the site and its visibility from off the site .

(ii) Any other matters relating to visual character of the building , proposed alterations to the building , its proposed surroundings, such as topography, proximity to public areas and proposed plantings.

(i) The extent, frequency and intensity of light spill and glare.

(i) Whether the height of the proposed fence will adversely effect the safe and efficient operation of the intersection.

(i) The effects on neighbourhood amenities in terms of noise, fumes and change of residential character.

EXPLANATION

Height controls allow a two-story building . Beyond this limit control is required to protect neighbours amenities of adjoining properties.

The recession plane protects sunlight and privacy of adjoining properties.

Buildings and structures are also required to comply with flight protection path for the

Greymouth aerodrome to protect its operation.

This will ensure that older relocatable buildings are brought up to a suitable standard. Relocatable buildings are often substandard in appearance.

Lighting and glare can detrimentally impact on a person's enjoyment of their property.

Fences should not be of excessive height , as they will affect neighbourhood amenity.

One heavy vehicle is considered reasonable given the amenities of the

Residential Environment.

Refer to Appendix 1 Refer to Appendix 1

Refer to Appendix 2

Refer to Appendix 3

Refer to Appendix 4

Refer to Appendix 5

Refer to Appendix 6

(i) the effects of state highway traffic movements on residential living and amenity.

(ii) the level and character of the traffic noise, particularly at night.

Refer to Appendix 2

Refer to Appendix 3

Refer to Appendix 4

Refer to Appendix 5

Refer to Appendix 6

The noise provision provides for the mitigation of any adverse effects on residents in

Kaiata Park resulting from their location near a State

Highway

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16.7 ITEM

17. NonResidential

Activity

PERMITTED

(i) Nonresidential activities are permitted if:

(a)

No goods, materials or equipment associated with the activity are stored outside a building ; and

(b)

All manufacturing, altering, repairing, dismantling or processing of any materials, goods or articles shall be carried out within a building .

(c)

Maximum floor area for any nonresidential activity shall be a maximum of 50m

2

, or 33% of the gross floor area of all buildings on the site ; whichever is the larger, provided that fire stations shall be permitted a maximum floor area of 50% of the site area.

(d)

Any activity shall be limited to the following hours of operation:

A maximum total number per week of 50 hours, and

From 0800 to 1700 Monday to Friday and 0900 to 1200 on

Saturday and Sunday, except where:

The entire activity is located within a building ; and

Each person engaged in the activity outside the above hours resides permanently on the site ; and

There are no visitors, customers or deliveries to the activity outside the above hours.

Provided that this does not apply to fire stations.

(e)

Any activity shall be conducted such that the following noise limits are not exceeded within the boundary of any site in the residential environment area:

Monday - Friday

2100 hrs to 0700 hrs 45dBA L10

0700 hrs to 2100 hrs 55dBA L10

Saturday

1700 hrs to 0800 hrs 45dBA L10

0800 hrs to 1700 hrs 55dBA L10

Sundays

45dBA L10

75dBA Lmax all days between 2100 hrs and 0700 hrs

Except where expressly provided elsewhere in this rule, sound shall be measured in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6801:1999 Acoustics

– Measurement of Environmental Sound and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6802:1991 Assessment of Environmental Sound

Nothing in the foregoing shall apply to:

(i) Intermittent residential activities , such as lawn mowers, machinery or equipment operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer

’s specifications and used on an intermittent basis (e.g. spraying, harvesting, etc). All such

(ii)

(iii) equipment shall be operated and maintained in accordance with the requirements of

Section 16

of the Resource Management

Act 1991.

Any warning device used by emergency services.

People noise at recreational activities, such as sporting events

(iv) or the noise from children at school. This does not include any amplified noise.

Any residential activity on the same site as a noise source being assessed.

Construction Noise

Construction noise shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6803: 1999 Acoustics-Construction Noise.

Noise associated with helicopter landing areas.

Noise associated with helicopter landing areas shall not exceed the limits in Table 1 of, and shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6807:1994 Noise management and land use planning for helicopter landing areas

Blasting

Vibration from any site due to blasting shall not exceed a peak particle velocity of 5mm/sec measured in the frequency range 3-12 Hz at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

Airblast over pressure from blasting shall not exceed a peak sound pressure level of 120 dBC at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

(f) The maximum number of permitted vehicle trips generated by an activity on a site are:

• Heavy vehicles 2 per day

• Other vehicles 10 per day

Provided that this does not apply to fire stations.

Or (g) They are temporary activities.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a condition permitted is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) The effects on adjoining residential sites in terms of odour, visual impact and noise.

(ii) The volume and type of traffic which may be generated to the site and the ability of the site to accommodate parking, loading, manoeuvring and access requirements.

(iii) The effect on adjoining properties.

(iv) The type of activities and the reason for it operating outside the specified hours.

(v) The level and character of the noise, particularly at night.

(vi) The proximity and type of adjoining uses.

(vii)The soundscape of the area.

(viii)The reason for the additional vehicle generation.

(ix) The ability to avoid, remedy or mitigate any adverse effects arising as a result of the extra generation.

EXPLANATION

Storage and processing of materials associated with nonresidential activities could detract from the amenities of the Residential Environment.

Hours of operation of nonresidential activities are restricted to ensure the quiet nature of settlement areas during night time hours is maintained and not disrupted by activities which operate for extended hours.

The noise provision provides protection from unreasonable noise particularly from nonresidential activities and adverse effects on health.

Inappropriate levels of heavy vehicle generation are not consistent with residential amenity and can detract from the level of existing amenity and cause adverse effects on health.

Fire stations are exempted from the rules relating to floor area, hours of operation, vehicle trips and vehicle storage given the important service they provide in the community.

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17 TOWNSHIP ENVIRONMENT

17.1 INTRODUCTION

Townships are the small rural settlements, located principally along the coast and up the Grey

River Valley as follows:

Camerons Stillwater

Gladstone

Blackball

Ngahere

Ahaura

Taylorville

Rapahoe

Barrytown

Totara Flat

Nelson Creek

They differ from Greymouth and its environs, because of their small scale and low intensity of development. They make an important contribution to the housing needs and social and economic well being of the local population. They provide the opportunity for persons to live close to their source of employment, and are valued by residents and visitors alike for their amenity, services and facilities.

Townships comprise a mixture of residential, commercial, recreational, rural, community and other uses, generally interspersed and without a clear pattern or definition of an "urban" boundary.

It is noted that places such as Taramakau/Hohonu, Kopara, Roa and Greigs which once would have been regarded as settlements by the local community, today are typically little more than a few houses. As such, these localities retain a more "rural" amenity than characteristic of the true small town, and can be incorporated into the greater rural area without compromising their amenity or importance to the local community. As such, they do not share the characteristics of the other townships that are included in this section.

Within the Township Environmental Area is also infrastructure which services activities in the local and wider areas. This includes roading and National Grid Infrastructure .

17.2 ISSUES

1. A mix of uses such as residential, industrial and commercial can increase the potential of adverse effects leading to the loss of amenities through matters such as;

Increased traffic including access problems at State highways

Noise intrusion

Visual intrusion

The amenities of townships is influenced by the prevailing mixture of uses, large section sizes (which is partly a reflection of servicing requirements), intensity of development and informal appearance.

The mix of uses is generally allowed for and encouraged given historical influences, limited area and their provision as major sources of employment. Loss of amenity values may however occur and these should be avoided remedied or mitigated where

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2. possible. The amenity values are likely to be of a lower standard than say in the urban environments where different activities will be segregated to a greater extent.

Servicing constraints in some of the townships restrict the ability of some settlements to accommodate increased or expanded development.

The extent of public services in some of the townships is limited. While Stillwater has a reticulated water supply, Ahaura has a stormwater disposal system, and Blackball a reticulated water supply and stormwater disposal scheme, the remaining settlements have no reticulated servicing, reliant on the use of septic tanks and individual collection and tapping of domestic water supplies. Further development could lead to groundwater and surface water contamination and compromise existing water supply systems.

17.3 OBJECTIVES

1. The management of the resources in the townships in a manner that provides for the social and economic well being of the people and communities without creating adverse effects.

17.4 POLICIES

1. Residential subdivision and development should ensure that the open appearance of the townships is retained.

2.

3.

A wide range of activities should be permitted within the townships, provided the adverse effects, particularly on the residential amenities of townships are avoided, remedied or mitigated having regard to the mix of uses present.

Development should provide for the disposal of sewage and stormwater in a manner that does not affect public health or water quality and provide an adequate and safe water supply.

4. Activities and buildings shall not limit or impede the ability for existing public and

National Grid infrastructure to be operated, upgraded, developed and maintained. This includes that sensitive activities shall not be located within the National Grid Buffer

Area .

17.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

The Council has developed objectives and policies that are intended to maintain the character of the District's townships as environments containing a mixture of activities (the dominant usually being residential) and low intensity of development. The health implications of closer settlement in the absence of sewage reticulation, also support large lot residential subdivision.

All activities will be subject to performance standards to ensure people, particularly in residential areas, are not subject to the adverse effects of neighbouring activities. The standards and range of activities permitted is a reflection of more liberal amenity expectations of local residents particularly having regard to the mix of existing uses.

Given the existing constraints in terms of effluent disposal and water supply in some of the settlements, development should ensure that effluent and stormwater can be disposed of and water supplied without affecting the health and well-being of the community.

Public and National Grid Infrastructure is a common feature of township areas and is necessary in order to service both the immediate and wider areas. The ability to access and

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maintain infrastructure is necessary as is the importance of ensuring activities are not undertaken which may create safety risks for those parties undertaking an activity or the users of that infrastructure. Sensitive activities , and incompatible buildings should not be located in close proximity to National Grid Infrastructure .

17.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1.

2.

3.

Environmental Areas to provide for township environments and associated compatible activities.

Rules relating to matters including the design and siting of development ( building height , coverage, etc.), subdivision, on site carparking and noise standards.

Capital works programs to upgrade/install water/sewerage and stormwater systems by either Council or private developers.

4. Reference to other Statutory Documents including the NZ Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical Safe Distances.

17.5.1 REASONS

Zoning and rules, including development standards, are considered to be the most effective method in the management of township environments. Council will also consider providing and upgrading services where those can be justified taking into account other works required elsewhere, and the ability of the local community to sustain the required costs. New development in particular may require developers to meet minimum standards for services.

In the imposition of District Plan provisions, other regulatory requirements are also applicable and where appropriate direction to these requiremets can be included in the Plan. Examples include National Environmental Standards and Codes of Practice.

17.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Small rural towns comprising a mixture of land uses and with a low intensity of development.

Pleasant living and working environments within these towns.

Assessment through analysis of complaints laid with the Council regarding unacceptable environmental standards resulting from activities undertaken in townships.

Assessment of the number of sections created per year and the amount of vacant land remaining to ensure there will be adequate development. land for future

Assessment of any increased need for services in any township.

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17.7 RULES - TOWNSHIP ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS

Note: The National Environmental Standard for Assessing and Managing Contaminants in Soil to Protect

Human Health applies to any piece of land on which an activity or industry described in the current edition of the Hazardous Activities and Industries List (HAIL) is, has been, or is more likely than not to have been underta ken. Refer to the “Grey District Council NES Contaminants in Soil Process Guide” to determine if these regulations are applicable to the activity proposed.

17.7 ITEM

1. Permitted Activities

General

2. Residential Density

3. Building Coverage

4. Set Backs

PERMITTED

(i) Any activity is a permitted activity provided that it does not contravene any other rule in this Environmental

Area.

CONTROLLED

(ii)Not applicable.

(i) Residential units are permitted if:

(a) the minimum net site area is 1000 m2 where public sewage reticulation and treatment is not available to the site ; or

(b) the minimum net site area is 500 m2 where public sewage reticulation and treatment is available to the site .

Note: In non-sewered areas a discharge consent from the

West Coast Regional Council may be required which could effect the minimum site area.

(i) Buildings are permitted if:

(a) The maximum site coverage by buildings is:

40% for residential activities .

(i) Buildings are permitted if:

(a) The minimum building setback from road boundaries is 4.5 metres.

(b) The minimum building setback from internal boundaries for non- residential activities shall be 3m

(c) No buildings are erected within 100 metres of

MHWS .

(d) No buildings for residential or commercial purposes shall be erected within 150 metres of the boundary of any oxidation pond , and no oxidation pond shall be located within 150 metres of a residential or commercial building .

Note: No setback from internal boundaries is required for residential buildings .

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii)Not applicable.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Not applicable.

(i) The area of the residential unit .

(ii) The number of residential units in the vicinity.

(iii) How the residential units relate to one another.

(iv) The disposal of effluent.

(v) Whether the site size will adequately provide for the outdoor needs of the activities on the site , and retain a dominance of open space over buildings .

(vi) The intended use of the residential unit .

(i) The extent to which the character of the residential rather than buildings requirements.

. site will remain dominated by open space and garden plantings,

(ii) The ability to provide adequate outdoor space and servicing

(i) The effect on adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, noise and privacy.

(ii) The effect on road safety.

(iii) The effect on the provision of services.

(iv) The extent to which the intrusion towards the road is necessary in order to allow more efficient, practical and/or pleasant use of the remainder of the site .

(v) The extent to which alternative practical locations are available for the building .

(vi) The extent to which the proposed building will detract from the pleasantness, coherence, openness and attractiveness of the site as viewed from the street and adjoining sites .

(vii)The degree to which existing or proposed landscaping, including plantings, mitigate the effects of limited building setback from a road .

(viii)The extent to which the intrusion towards the internal boundary is necessary to enable more efficient, practical and/or pleasant use of the remainder of the site .

(ix) The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of the proposal on adjoining sites , including through the provision of landscape plantings.

(x) The effect on the natural character of the coastline and if any natural hazard (such as erosion, sea level etc) will create an impact.

(xi) The actual or potential adverse effects of the oxidation pond .

EXPLANATION

Any activity is allowed in the Township

Environmental Area provided the rules are not contravened.

The scale and intensity of residential units should be such that a level of amenity is retained in terms of openness and privacy.

Site coverage is controlled to ensure that open space and other servicing requirements are met. It also assists in maintaining an area that is adequate for onsite disposal. A greater area is allowed for non-residential buildings in recognition that such activities have typically located in townships.

Setbacks from internal boundaries enable a reasonable separation distance to be retained in order the effects on neighbours properties and streetscapes are minimised, particularly as it affects residential activities .

Control of buildings in the coastal area allows Council to assess the effects on the natural character of the coastline and also the threat to development of natural hazards.

Restrictions on building in proximity to oxidation ponds (as shown on

Planning Maps 25, 34, 36

& 38) enable these facilities to operate without unduly effecting adjoining landowners and vice versa.

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17.7 ITEM

4A National Grid

Infrastructure

PERMITTED

(i)(a) Within the National Grid Buffer Area a building , or the change of use of a building, shall comply with the following standards:

(i) From National Grid Poles

(a) Building s (excluding fences up to 2.5m in height) shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres

(b) Fences up to 2.5m in height shall be:

Setback a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire; and

Fences setback between 1.5m and 5.0m from a pole or stay wire shall be of a non-conductive design and readily removable for the purposes of operator access to

National Grid Infrastructure .

(ii) From National Grid Power Lines (as measured from the centre line):

(a) Pi Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from Pi Poles

(b) Single Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of

10 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from single poles

(c) Except that the following activities are exempt from the above National Grid Power Line setback standards:

A fence of up to 2.5 metres in height;

The physical alteration of an existing building where the degree of non-compliance does not increase;

Uninhabitable horticultural or farm buildings (this does not include a commercial greenhouse, a milking and/or dairy shed, a wintering barn or a factory farm building).

(b) From a National Grid Substation, buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres. The setback requirement is to be measured from the edge of the substation designation or where the substation is not designated, the secured fence of the substation.

(c) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area must:

(i) Be no deeper than 300mm within 5m of a pole or stay wire;

(ii) Not result in a reduction in a ground to conductor clearance distance less than 6.5m;

(iii) Not compromise National Grid support structure stability; and

(iv) Not limit or impede vehicular access to a pole or stay wire.

Except that the requirement in (c)(i) above shall not apply to:

Earthworks given dispensation by the National Grid

Operator under Clause 2.2.1 of NZECP34:2001;

The agricultural or domestic cultivation of land;

Agricultural land drainage no closer than 2.2 metres from a pole or stay wire (provided it is no deeper than 750mm when between 2.2m and 5m of a National Grid pole or stay wire);

The repair, sealing or resealing of a road, footpath, driveway or farm track; or

Vertical holes not exceeding 500mm in diameter and located a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire.

Note: If you propose to undertake any new activity, alter an existing activity or construct a structure including fences and irrigation units within 20m of a National Grid Infrastructure it is recommended that the National Grid operator is consulted with.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity unless otherwise specified as a non-complying activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Setback from National Grid Substations:

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Substations

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Reverse sensitivity effects on National Grid substations

Technical advice by the National Grid operator.

(ii) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area :

The risk to the stability of the National Grid

Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade the National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid operator

Any impact on the ability of the National Grid operator to access the National Grid.

(iii) Setback from Poles:

The risk to the stability and structural integrity of the

National Grid Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

(iv) Setback from Lines

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

NON-COMPLYING

(iv) From 10 July 2018, any activity that contravenes one of the following permitted conditions is a non-complying activity:

17.7.4A(i)(a)

17.7.4A(c)(ii)-(iv)

EXPLANATION

Setback distances from

National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National

Policy Statement on Electricity

Transmission and Policy

17.4.4 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the

New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical safe

Distances and the Electricity

(Hazards from Trees)

Regulations 2003.

Compliance with the District

Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

EXPLANATION

Setback distances from National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National Policy Statement on Electricity

Transmission and Policy 17.4.4 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for

Electrical safe Distances and the Electricity (Hazards from

Trees) Regulations 2003. Compliance with the District Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

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17.7 ITEM

5. Height

Buildings &

Structures

6. Building

Design and

Appearance

7. Light Spill &

Glare

8. Utilities

9. Signs

of

10. Hazardous

Substances

11. Parking,

Loading &

Access

12. Subdivision

PERMITTED

(i) Buildings are permitted if:

(a) A building does not project beyond a building envelope defined by recession planes as described in Appendix 8.

(b) A building or structure does not project beyond an envelope in the

Aerodrome Flight Path Protection Area as described in Appendix 9.

(i) Relocated buildings onto sites are permitted if:

(a) they are constructed within the last ten years and

(b) they are constructed of new materials and

(c) they are established on foundations complying with the building code at the time of relocation .

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable

(ii) Relocated buildings not meeting the conditions of a permitted activity are a controlled activity in which Council reserves control over the design and appearance of the buildings .

(ii) Not applicable. (i) No activity shall result in a greater than 2.5 lux spill (horizontal and vertical) of light onto any adjoining property, measured at any point more than 2m inside the boundary of the adjoining property or the closest window on the adjoining property, whichever is closest.

(i) Refer to Appendix 1

(i) Refer to Appendix 2

(i) Refer to Appendix 3

(i) Refer to Appendix 4

(ii) Refer to Appendix

1

(ii) Refer to Appendix

2

(ii) Refer to Appendix

3

(ii) Refer to Appendix

4

13. Heritage

Items &

Historic

Trees

(i) Refer to Appendix 5

(i) Refer to Appendix 6

(ii) Refer to Appendix

5

(ii) Refer to Appendix

6

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Not applicable.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) The effect on adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, outlook and privacy.

(ii) The effect of the increased height in terms of visual dominance by buildings of the outlook from other sites , roads and public open space in the surrounding area, which is out of character with the local environment.

(iii) The extent to which there is a need for the increased height or intrusion through the recession lines, in order to undertake the proposed activities on the site and alternatives which may have less effect on the environment.

(iv) The extent to which the proposed buildings will be compatible with the character of the local environment, including the scale of other buildings in the surrounding area.

(v) The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of increased height or exceedence of the recession planes, such as through increased separation distances between the building and adjoining sites or the provision of screening.

(i) The proposed location of the building on the site and its visibility from off the site .

(ii) Any other matters relating to visual character of the building , proposed alterations to the building , its proposed surroundings, such as topography, proximity to public areas and proposed plantings.

(i) The extent, frequency and intensity of light spill and glare.

EXPLANATION

The recession plane protects sunlight and privacy of adjoining properties.

Buildings and structures are also required to comply with flight protection path for the

Greymouth aerodrome to protect its operation.

This will ensure that older relocatable buildings are brought up to a suitable standard. Relocatable buildings are often sub-standard in appearance.

Lighting and glare can detrimentally impact on a person's enjoyment of their property.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a condition of a permitted activity is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Refer to

Appendix 1

(iii) Refer to

Appendix 2

(iii) Refer to

Appendix 3

(iii) Refer to

Appendix 4

(iii) Refer to

Appendix 5

(iii) Refer to

Appendix 6

Refer to Appendix 1

Refer to Appendix 2

Refer to Appendix 3

Refer to Appendix 4

Refer to Appendix 5

Refer to Appendix 6

Refer to Appendix 1

Refer to Appendix 2

Refer to Appendix 3

Refer to Appendix 4

Refer to Appendix 5

Refer to Appendix 6

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17.7 ITEM

14. Non-

Residential

Activity

PERMITTED

(i) Nonresidential activities are permitted if:

(a) There shall be a strip of landscape planting of minimum depth of 2 metres along all road boundaries except where access to the site is gained.

(b) Maximum floor area for any nonresidential activity shall be a maximum of 150m

2

, or 33% of the gross floor area of all buildings on the site ; whichever is the larger, provided that fire stations shall be permitted a maximum floor area of 50% of the site area.

(c) Any activity shall be limited to the following hours of operation:

0600 to 2200 Monday to Friday and 0700 to 1700 on Saturday and Sunday; except where:

 the entire activity is located within a each person engaged in the activity outside the above hours resides permanently on the site , and building ; and

 there are no visitors, customers or deliveries to the activity outside the above hours.

Provided that this does not apply to fire stations.

(d) Any activity shall be conducted such that the following noise limits are not exceeded within the boundary of any site in the township environment area,

Monday - Friday

2100 hrs to 0700 hrs 45dBA L10

0700 hrs to 2100 hrs 55dBA L10

Saturday

2100 hrs to 0800 hrs 45dBA L10

0800 hrs to 2100 hrs 55dBA L10

Sundays

45dBA L10

75dBA Lmax all days between 2100 hrs and 0700 hrs

Except where expressly provided elsewhere in this rule, sound shall be measured in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6801:1999 Acoustics Measurement of

Environmental Sound and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS

6802:1991 Assessment of Environmental Sound.

Nothing in the forgoing shall apply to: i) Intermittent residential activities , such as lawn mowers, agricultural vehicles, vehicles, machinery or equipment operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacture’s specifications and used on an intermittent basis (e.g. ii) iii) spraying, harvesting, etc). All such equipment shall be operated and maintained in accordance with the requirements of

Section 16

of the

Resource Management Act 1991.

Any warning device used by emergency services.

People noise at recreational activities, such as sporting events or the noise iv) from children at school. This does not include any amplified noise.

Any residential activity

Construction Noise

on the same site as a noise source being assessed.

Construction noise shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6803: 1999 Acoustics-Construction Noise.

Noise Associated With Helicopter Landing Areas.

Noise associated with helicopter landing areas shall not exceed the limits in Table

1 of, and shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provisions of

NZS 6807:1994 Noise management and land use planning for helicopter landing areas

Blasting

Vibration from any site due to blasting shall not exceed a peak particle velocity of

5mm/sec measured in the frequency range 3-12 Hz at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

Airblast over pressure from blasting shall not exceed a peak sound pressure level of 120 dBC at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

(e) The maximum number of permitted vehicle trips generated by an activity on a site are:

Heavy Vehicles 10 per day

Other Vehicles 30 per day

Provided that this does not apply to fire stations.

Or (f) They are temporary activities .

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) The effects on adjoining residential sites in terms of odour, visual impact and noise.

(ii) The volume and type of traffic which may be generated to the site and the ability of the site to accommodate parking, loading, manoeuvring and access requirements.

(iii) The effect on adjoining properties.

(iv) The type of activities and the reason for it operating outside the specified hours.

(v) The level and character of the noise, particularly at night.

(vi) The proximity and type of adjoining uses.

(vii)The soundscape of the area.

EXPLANATION

While nonresidential activities are prevalent in the townships some standards are required to protect the amenities of the

Township

Environment.

Hours of operation of nonresidential activities are restricted to ensure the quiet nature of settlement areas during night time hours is maintained and not disrupted by activities which operate for extended hours.

The noise provision provides protection from unreasonable noise levels, particularly from nonresidential activities and adverse effects on health.

Fire stations are exempted from the rules relating to floor area, hours of operation and vehicle trips, given the important service they provide to the community.

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18 RURAL RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENT

18.1 INTRODUCTION

Rural residential development has occurred in proximity to Greymouth, Blackball, Golden

Sands, Kaiata Park and Dobson, and provides a low-density residential environment and a transition between close urban development and the more open rural environment.

Within the Rural Residential Environmental Area is also infrastructure which services activities in the local and wider area. This includes roading and National Grid Infrastructure .

18.2 ISSUES

1. Loss of use and enjoyment of rural residential properties and a loss of environmental pleasantness as a consequence of: bulk and location noise visual impact traffic more intensive subdivision and development

Rural residential environments have their own particular amenity values in which low density development in rural surroundings is valued. Effects of activities can lead to a deterioration of those qualities.

2. Demands for servicing can result in an inefficient use and uneconomic use of resources and ultimately a detraction from rural residential amenities.

As rural residential developments are of a low density, the provision of services to urban standards, particularly in terms of water supply and disposal of effluent, is likely to be uneconomic if a connection to existing infrastructure is expected. Provision of full services also leads to a demand for further subdivision thereby undermining the open space qualities associated with such developments.

18.3 OBJECTIVE

1. The management of resources in a manner that enables low-density development to be carried out without creating adverse effects.

18.4 POLICIES

1.

2.

3.

4.

Allotments should be of a sufficient area, and buildings set back and restricted in size in order to maintain amenities relating to open space and privacy.

Activities should be allowed provided they do not result in adverse effects relating to such matters as noise, vehicle movements and odour.

The economic and environmental costs of providing roading, water and sewerage infrastructure shall be taken into account.

Activities and buildings shall not limit or impede the ability for existing public and

National Grid Infrastructure to be operated, upgraded, developed and maintained. This

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includes that sensitive activities shall not be located within the National Grid Buffer

Area .

18.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

Rural residential development enables a lifestyle opportunity in which certain characteristics dominate

– openness, quietness and privacy. These characteristics can be retained by appropriate policies controlling the effects of activities that could undermine these features.

Servicing of rural residential areas should be in such a manner than an unfair economic burden is not placed on the ratepayers of the District by an extension of services or an upgrade beyond what normally could be expected. Any services that are provided should also have regard to environmental factors, particularly as it relates to water supply and effluent disposal. While the latter is primarily a Regional Council function, on site effluent disposal could determine the layout and area of allotments .

Public and National Grid Infrastructure is a common feature of rural residential areas and is necessary in order to service both the immediate and wider areas. The ability to access and maintain infrastructure is necessary as is the importance of ensuring activities are not undertaken which may create safety risks for those parties undertaking an activity or the users of that infrastructure. Sensitive activities and incompatible buildings should not be located in close proximity to National Grid Infrastructure .

18.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Rules in the Plan relating to performance standards.

2.

3.

Objectives, policies and rules in the Regional Council Plans relating to odour, discharge of contaminants, etc.

Reference to other statutory documents including the NZ Electrical Code of Practice for

Electrical Safe Distances.

18.5.1 REASONS

Objectives, policies and rules in both the District and Regional Council Plans are considered to be the most efficient method of ensuring the protection of amenities.

In the imposition of District Plan provisions, other regulatory requirements, other regulatory requirements are also applicable and where appropriate direction to these requirements can be included in the Plan. Examples include National Environmental Standards and Codes of

Practice.

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18.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Opportunity for rural lifestyles in the District. residential

Efficient use of infrastructure assets.

Assessment through analysis of complaints laid with Council regarding unacceptable environmental standards resulting from activities undertaken in rural residential areas.

Assessment of the number of sections created per year and the amount of vacant land remaining to ensure there will always be adequate land for future development.

Reviewing the ability of communities to provide for their servicing requirements.

Compliance monitoring of resource consents in the Rural Residential Zones.

Surveys of community well being.

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18.7 RULES

– RURAL RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREA

Note: The National Environmental Standard for Assessing and Managing Contaminants in Soil to Protect

Human Health applies to any piece of land on which an activity or industry described in the current edition of the Hazardous Activities and Industries List (HAIL) is, has been, or is more likely than not to have been undertaken. Refer to the “Grey District Council NES Contaminants in Soil Process Guide” to determine if these regulations are applicable to the activity proposed.

18.7 ITEM

1. Permitted Activities

General

2. Minimum Residential

Unit Area

PERMITTED

(i) Any activity is a permitted activity provided that it does not contravene any other rule in this Environmental Area.

CONTROLLED

(ii)Not applicable.

3. Building Coverage

4. Set Backs

(i) Residential units are permitted if:

(a) A residential unit is contained within a site with a minimum net area of 0.4 hectares exclusive of access .

Note: In non-sewered areas a discharge consent from the West

Coast Regional Council will be required which could effect the minimum site area.

(i) Buildings are permitted if:;

(a) The maximum site coverage by buildings is 30% or 750 square metres, whichever is the lesser.

(i) Buildings and forestry are permitted if:

(a) The minimum building setback from road boundaries shall be 10 metres except that this shall not apply to buildings less than 5 square metres in gross floor area .

(b) The minimum building setback from internal boundaries

 shall be:

8m for principal residential buildings

5m for other buildings greater than 5m

2

in gross floor area

3m for buildings less than 5m

2

in gross floor area .

(c) No buildings shall be erected within 100 metres of MHWS .

(d) No buildings for residential or commercial purposes shall be erected within 150 metres of the boundary of any oxidation pond and no oxidation pond is located within 150 metres of a residential or commercial building .

(e) The minimum setbacks for forestry activities is:

5m for forestry activities, provided that:

A setback is not required where land on either side of

the boundary is owned by the same person.

A minimum distance of 35 metres shall be provided between a new forestry activity and an existing dwelling

on adjoining sites and between an existing forestry activity and a new dwelling on adjoining sites .

20 metres from the road boundary .

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii)Not applicable.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Not applicable.

(i) The number of residential units in the vicinity.

(ii) How the residential units relate to one another.

(iii) The disposal of effluent.

(iv) Whether the site size will adequately provide for the outdoor needs of the activities on the site , and retain a dominance of open space over buildings .

(v) The intended use of the residential unit .

(i) The extent to which the character of the site will remain dominated by open space and garden plantings, rather than buildings .

(ii) The ability to provide adequate outdoor space on the site for all outdoor activities associated with residential and other activities permitted on the site .

(i) The effect on adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, noise and privacy.

(ii) The effect on road safety.

(iii) The effect on the provision of services.

(iv) The extent to which the intrusion towards the road is necessary in order to allow more efficient, practical and/or pleasant use of the remainder of the site .

(v) The extent to which alternative practical locations are available for the building .

(vi) The extent to which the proposed building will detract from the pleasantness, coherence, openness and attractiveness of the site as viewed from the road and adjoining sites .

(vii) The degree to which existing or proposed landscaping, including plantings, mitigate the effects of limited building setback from a road .

(viii)The extent to which the intrusion towards the internal boundary is necessary to enable more efficient, practical and/or pleasant use of the remainder of the site .

(ix) The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of the proposal on adjoining sites , including through the provision of landscape plantings.

(x) The effect on the natural character of the coastline and if any natural hazard (such as erosion, sea level, etc.) will create an impact.

(xi) The actual or potential adverse effects of the oxidation pond .

(xii) The effect on heritages sites.

EXPLANATION

Any activity is allowed in the

Rural Residential Environment provided the rules are not contravened.

The scale and intensity of residential units should be such that a level of amenity is retained in terms of openness, space and privacy.

Any development should therefore be of a low density.

Site coverage is controlled to ensure that open space and other servicing requirements and neighbourhood amenities are met. It also assists in maintaining an area that is adequate for onsite disposal.

Setbacks from internal boundaries enable a reasonable separation distance to be retained in order that the effects on neighbour’s properties are minimized and to encourage low density.

Control of buildings in the coastal area allows Council to assess the effects on the natural character of the coastline and also the threat to development of natural hazards.

Restrictions on building in proximity to oxidation ponds

(as shown on Planning Maps

25, 34, 36 & 38) enable these facilities to operate without unduly effecting adjoining landowners and vice versa.

Forestry should be set back in order that trees do not create shading, a fire risk, or adversely affect amenities.

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18.7 ITEM

4A National Grid

Infrastructure

PERMITTED

(i)(a) Within the National Grid Buffer Area a building , or the change of use of a building, shall comply with the following standards:

(i) From National Grid Poles

(a) Building s (excluding fences up to 2.5m in height) shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres

(b) Fences up to 2.5m in height shall be:

Setback a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire; and

Fences setback between 1.5m and 5.0m from a pole or stay wire shall be of a non-conductive design and readily removable for the purposes of operator access to

National Grid Infrastructure .

(ii) From National Grid Power Lines (as measured from the centre line):

(a) Pi Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from Pi Poles

(b) Single Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of

10 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from single poles

(c) Except that the following activities are exempt from the above National Grid Power Line setback standards:

A fence of up to 2.5 metres in height;

The physical alteration of an existing building where the degree of non-compliance does not increase;

Uninhabitable horticultural or farm buildings (this does not include a commercial greenhouse, a milking and/or dairy shed, a wintering barn or a factory farm building).

(b) From a National Grid Substation, buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres. The setback requirement is to be measured from the edge of the substation designation or where the substation is not designated, the secured fence of the substation.

(c) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area must:

(i) Be no deeper than 300mm within 5m of a pole or stay wire;

(ii) Not result in a reduction in a ground to conductor clearance distance less than 6.5m;

(iii) Not compromise National Grid support structure stability; and

(iv) Not limit or impede vehicular access to a pole or stay wire.

Except that the requirement in (c)(i) above shall not apply to:

Earthworks given dispensation by the National Grid

Operator under Clause 2.2.1 of NZECP34:2001;

The agricultural or domestic cultivation of land;

Agricultural land drainage no closer than 2.2 metres from a pole or stay wire (provided it is no deeper than 750mm when between 2.2m and 5m of a National Grid pole or stay wire);

The repair, sealing or resealing of a road, footpath, driveway or farm track; or

Vertical holes not exceeding 500mm in diameter and located a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire.

Note: If you propose to undertake any new activity, alter an existing activity or construct a structure including fences and irrigation units within 20m of a National Grid Infrastructure it is recommended that the National Grid operator is consulted with.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity unless otherwise specified as a non-complying activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(vi) Setback from National Grid Substations:

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Substations

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Reverse sensitivity effects on National Grid substations

Technical advice by the National Grid operator.

(vii) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area :

The risk to the stability of the National Grid

Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade the National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid operator

Any impact on the ability of the National Grid operator to access the National Grid.

(viii) Setback from Poles:

The risk to the stability and structural integrity of the

National Grid Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

(ix) Setback from Lines

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

NON-COMPLYING

(iv) From 10 July 2018, any activity that contravenes one of the following permitted conditions is a non-complying activity:

18.7.4A(i)(a)

18.7.4A(c)(ii)-(iv)

EXPLANATION

Setback distances from

National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National

Policy Statement on Electricity

Transmission and Policy

18.4.4 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the

New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical safe

Distances and the Electricity

(Hazards from Trees)

Regulations 2003.

Compliance with the District

Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

EXPLANATION

Setback distances from National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National Policy Statement on Electricity

Transmission and Policy 18.4.4 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for

Electrical safe Distances and the Electricity (Hazards from

Trees) Regulations 2003. Compliance with the District Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

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18.7 ITEM

5. Height of Buildings &

Structures

PERMITTED

(i) Buildings and structures are permitted if:

(a) The maximum height of any building shall be 10 metres and

(b) No building or structure shall project beyond an envelope in the Aerodrome Flight Path Protection Area as described in

Appendix 9.

(i) Relocated buildings onto sites are permitted if:

(a) they are new buildings constructed within the last ten years and

(c) they are constructed of new materials and

(d) they are established on foundations complying with the building code at the time of relocation .

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable

6. Building Design and

Appearance

7. Light Spill & Glare

8 Heavy Vehicle Storage

(i) No activity shall result in a greater than 2.5 lux spill (horizontal and vertical) of light onto any adjoining property, measured at any point more than 2m inside the boundary of the adjoining property or the closest window on the adjoining property whichever is the closest. ii) No more than one heavy vehicle shall be stored on any site , provided this shall not apply to fire stations.

(i) Refer Appendix 1 9 Utilities

10

11.

Signs

Hazardous Substances

12. Parking, Loading &

Access iii) Subdivision

14. Heritage Items & Historic

Trees

(i) Refer Appendix 2

(i) Refer appendix 3

(i) Refer appendix 4

(i) Refer appendix 5

(i) Refer appendix 6

(ii) Relocated buildings not meeting the conditions of a permitted activity are a controlled activity in which

Council reserves control over the design and appearance of the buildings .

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Refer Appendix 1

(ii) Refer Appendix 2

(ii) Refer Appendix 3

(ii) Refer Appendix 4

(ii) Refer Appendix 5

(ii) Refer Appendix 6

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Not applicable.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Refer Appendix 1

(iii Refer Appendix 2

(iii) Refer Appendix 3

(iii) Refer Appendix 4

(iii) Refer Appendix 5

(iii) Refer Appendix 6

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) The effect on adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, outlook and privacy.

(ii) The effect of the increased height in terms of visual dominance by buildings of the outlook from other sites , roads and public open space in the surrounding area, which is out of character with the local environment.

(iii) The extent to which there is a need for the increased height or intrusion through the recession lines, in order to undertake the proposed activities on the site and alternatives which may have less effect on the environment.

(iv) The extent to which the proposed buildings will be compatible with the character of the local environment, including the scale of other buildings in the surrounding area.

(v) The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of increased height or exceedence of the recession planes, such as through increased separation distances between the building and adjoining sites or the provision of screening.

(i) The proposed location of the building on the site and its visibility from off the site .

(ii) Any other matters relating to visual character of the building , proposed alterations to the building , its proposed surroundings, such as topography, proximity to public areas and proposed plantings.

(i) The extent, frequency and intensity of light spill and glare.

EXPLANATION

Height controls generally allow a two-story building . Beyond this limit control is required to protect neighbours amenities of adjoining properties.

The recession plane protects sunlight and privacy of adjoining properties.

Buildings and structures are also required to comply with flight protection path for the

Greymouth aerodrome to protect its operation.

This will ensure that older relocatable buildings are brought up to a suitable standard. Relocatable buildings are often substandard in appearance.

Lighting and glare can detrimentally impact on a person’s enjoyment of their property.

One heavy vehicle per site is considered reasonable given the amenities of the Rural

Residential Environment.

(i) The effects on neighbourhood amenities in terms of noise, fumes and change of residential character.

Refer Appendix 1

Refer Appendix 2

Refer Appendix 3

Refer Appendix 4

Refer Appendix 5

Refer Appendix 6

Refer Appendix 1

Refer Appendix 2

Refer Appendix 3

Refer Appendix 4

Refer Appendix 5

Refer Appendix 6

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18.7 ITEM

15. Non- rural Activity

PERMITTED

(i)Nonrural activities are permitted if:

(a) Maximum floor area for any nonrural activity shall be a maximum of 100m2, provided that this shall not apply to fire stations, and

(b) Any activity shall be limited to the following hours of operation:

0800 to 1700 Monday to Friday and 0900 to 1200 on Saturday

 and Sunday; except where: the entire activity is located within a building ; and each person engaged in the activity outside the above hours resides permanently on the site , and

 there are no visitors, customers or deliveries to the activity outside the above hours.

Provided that this shall not apply to fire stations

(c) Any activity shall be conducted such that the following noise limits are not exceeded within the notional boundary of any dwelling in the Rural, or Rural-Residential Environmental Area and at the boundary of any site in the Township Environmental Area. :

Monday

– Friday

2200 hrs to 0700 hrs 45dBA L10

0700 hrs to 2200 hrs 55dBA L10

Saturday

1700 hrs to 0800 hrs 45dBA L10

0800 hrs to 1700 hrs 55dBA L10

Sundays

45dBA L10

75dBA Lmax all days between 2200 hrs and 0700 hrs

Except where expressly provided elsewhere in this rule, sound shall be measured in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6801:1999

Acoustics Measurement of Environmental Sound and assessed in accordance with the provision of NZS 6802:1991 Assessment of

Environmental Sound.

Nothing in the foregoing shall apply to:

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not Applicable.

(i) Intermittent residential activities, such as lawn mowers, rural activity vehicles, machinery or equipment operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacture’s specifications and used on an intermittent basis (e.g. spraying, harvesting, etc). All such equipment shall be operated and maintained in accordance with the requirements of Section 16 of the Resource

Management Act 1991.

(ii) Any warning device used by emergency services.

(iii) People noise at recreational activities, such as sporting events or the noise from children at school. This does not include any amplified noise.

(iv) Any residential activity on the same site as a noise source being assessed.

Construction Noise

Construction noise shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6803: 1999 Acoustics-

Construction noise.

Noise associated with helicopter landing areas.

Noise associated with helicopter landing areas shall not exceed the limits in Table 1 of, and shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6807:1994 Noise management and land use planning for helicopter landing areas

Blasting

Vibration from any site due to blasting shall not exceed a peak particle velocity of 5mm/sec measured in the frequency range 3-

12 Hz at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

Airblast over pressure from blasting shall not exceed a peak sound pressure level of 120 dBC at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

(d) The maximum number of permitted vehicle trips generated by an activity on a site are:

Heavy Vehicles 10 per day

Other Vehicles 30 per day

Provided this shall not apply to fire stations.

Or (e) They are temporary activities.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i)

(ii)

The effects on adjoining sites in terms of visual impact and noise.

The volume and type of traffic which may be generated to the site and the ability of the site to accommodate parking, loading, manoeuvring and access requirements.

(iii) The effect on adjoining properties.

(iv) The type of activities and the reason for it operating outside the specified hours.

(v) The level and character of the noise, particularly at night.

(vi) The proximity and type of adjoining uses.

(vii) The soundscape of in the area.

(viii) The reason for the additional vehicle generation.

EXPLANATION

Nonrural activities have the potential to detract from the amenities of the Rural

Residential Environment.

Hours of operation of nonrural activities are restricted to ensure the quiet nature of settlement areas during night time hours is maintained and not disrupted by activities which operate for extended hours.

The noise provisions provide protection from unreasonable noise levels, and adverse effects on health.

Inappropriate levels of vehicle generation are not consistent with rural residential amenity and can detract from the level of existing amenity and cause adverse effects on health.

Fire stations are exempted from the rules relating to floor area, hours of operation and heavy vehicles given the important service they provide in the community.

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19 RURAL ENVIRONMENT

19.1 INTRODUCTION

The rural environments of the Grey District contain extensive resources, which on a per capita basis must be as great as anywhere else in New Zealand. These resources include indigenous forest, exotic forest, farmland, minerals, rivers, lakes, buildings and infrastructure.

They are all used to a greater or lesser extent to provide social, economic and cultural well being of the community.

The National Water and Soil Conservation Organisation's Land Resource Inventory shows the District to be predominantly Class V-VIII land, of low to negligible suitability for arable farming, general pastoralism and forestry. Grey District does not contain any high quality

Class I and II land. Class III and IV lands of general suitability are largely confined to the river and stream valleys of the District. Class III land is restricted to the Grey River Valley between

Ngahere and Totara Flat, Haupiri, on the eastern shores of Lake Brunner, and Taramakau settlement.

The District is characterised by its widespread indigenous forests, and in comparison, rather limited pastoral farming areas. The Grey River catchment is perhaps indicative of the whole

District, having 85% vegetation cover of native bush in 1985. Parts of the river valleys and certain lower altitude areas have been cleared of native forests and have been sown in introduced grass species for productive agriculture. In areas found to be sub-marginal for agricultural use regeneration of scrub and weed species has occurred. These latter areas accounted for 10% of the catchment

’s vegetation cover in 1985.

The boggy pakihi soils of the District are largely treeless, supporting only stunted manuka, sedges, water fern and bracken but often fringed by rimu and beech forests. The pakihi forests offer ideal growing conditions for sphagnum moss, which is harvested on a sustainable basis by picking areas and allowing regeneration over approximately a five-year period. Such soils are also available for exotic forestry.

Wetlands are a valuable recreational resource and have an important water retention and purification function. In the past some of these have been modified by drainage and development and this may have had the effect of increasing flood intensities and reducing biological diversity.

The principal activities associated with the forest resources are the felling and processing of trees, although harvesting of sphagnum moss is increasing in significance. Forestry activities have been mainly confined to the lowland forests. Approximately 80% of the District's native forests are State owned, managed mainly by the Department of Conservation. The remaining area is largely administered by Timberlands West Coast Ltd. In accordance with Ministry of

Forestry policy, Timberlands manage these forests on a long-term sustainable yield basis.

Private foresters are also required to carry out operations on a sustainable basis. Native production forests of podocarp and beech are situated in the Kopara/Haupiri area, between

Lady Lake and Lake Haupiri, and on the foothills north, south and east of the Grey River.

Exotic forestry now occupies approximately 15,200ha of land within the District, the major plantation blocks being Paparoa, Hochstetter, Mawhera and Omoto/Nemona.

Timber processing industries, whilst generally in the rural environment, have in most cases had towns spring up beside them and have become part of the town environment. Small portable sawmill operations have also established in the District.

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The principal activities associated with farmland are sheep and beef farming, dairying, deer, and to a lesser extent pigs and horticulture. Farmland is scattered in relatively small discontinuous strips adjoining the coast or in river valleys. Historically the Barrytown Flats, coastal areas south of Greymouth, Grey Valley and flats around Lake Brunner and

Taramakau have been developed extensively for sheep and beef farming, and more recently, dairying has grown in significance.

The main agricultural industries of the Phoenix Meat Plant at Kokiri and the Nelson Creek

Abattoir are both established in the rural environment.

In addition to those industries above, the rural area has traditionally supported a diverse range of rural service industries, such as contractors’ depots or trucking companies among other things. These are typically situated within or adjoining rural settlements.

Tourism has increased significantly over recent years, much of it based on the resources of the rural area such as the forests, rivers and lakes and heritage items. Tourist attractions in the District include tramping, fishing, boating, sailing, white and blackwater rafting, gold panning, horse trekking, nature and historic site viewing, which are able to utilise the natural resources of the District, such as the coast and back country.

The principal activities associated with mineral resources are coal mining, gold mining, and gravel and limestone. There are also ilmenite mining and petroleum resources that have potential for future development. There are several coalmines presently operating, both State and private, and other projects are being progressed. Much of the gold and bituminous coal resources of the West Coast are contained in the Grey District.

Underground hydromining and open cast mining are the most commonly used methods of extraction, with mines having crushing and screening facilities onsite.

Extraction of gold from alluvial fans and terraces is the principal means of gold recovery in the Grey District.

Although the presence of hard rock gold has been identified in the Grey River catchment, present prospective areas are few.

The size of operations varies, from the large dredging operations to recreational or hobby mining using cradles, sluice boxes and other handheld equipment. The majority of operators mining alluvial deposits use hydraulic diggers and rotary screens that either float in a pond or are skid mounted.

Limestone is quarried in a number of places in the District and used mainly as agricultural lime. Gravel for roading aggregate is extracted from various rivers within the District, predominantly the Grey and export of some gravel from the Greymouth Port commenced at the beginning of 1998.

Within the Rural Environmental Area is also infrastructure which services activities in the local and wider areas. This includes roading and National Grid Infrastructure .

19.2 ISSUES

1. Potential adverse effects of activities in the rural area may include the following: the lowering of water quality through the discharge of contaminants. a reduction in the natural character of wetlands , the lakes and rivers and their margins by a loss of riparian vegetation, intrusive structures and earthworks in proximity to the waterbody.

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 reduction in the landscape value of areas by the renewal of vegetation, major earthworks and increased activity. increased traffic and shading of roads . increase in erosion and instability of sites . disturbance and loss of areas of vegetation and wildlife habitats. a general reduction in rural amenities in respect of quietness, privacy, spaciousness and polluted air and water. conflict between new activities and established activities which can potentially inhibit the operation of the latter.

While many activities in the rural environment such as farming, mining and forestry enable people to provide for their economic, social and cultural well being, potential adverse effects may be generated.

Given the area of the District, the abundance of resources (many of which are protected or sustainably managed) and a relatively low population, sustainable management can be approached in a manner differing from that in areas of the country where resources are severely depleted or under pressure. In particular, less restrictive measures may be adopted and non-regulatory methods implemented.

19.3 OBJECTIVES

1. The management of resources in the rural environment in a manner that enables people and communities to carry out a variety of activities while ensuring that the resource base is sustainable for future generations and maintaining the life supporting capacity and healthy functioning of ecosystems.

2. The retention of the character of the rural environment in which existing amenities include its openness and spaciousness, natural features and presence of indigenous vegetation.

19.4 POLICIES

1. Activities should not significantly reduce the long-term potential or availability of the natural and physical resource.

2.

3.

4.

5.

New activities should not adversely impact on the operation of established activities provided that any effect generated by the established activity does not give rise to a nuisance that would not normally be expected in a rural working environment.

A wide range of activities are carried out in a manner that avoids, remedies or mitigates adverse effects, including those referred to in Policies 4 - 5.

Patterns of subdivision and development should ensure that the openness of the rural environment is retained. The bulk and location of structures should not effect the character of the rural area or affect the amenities of adjoining properties.

Activities should not adversely affect the amenities of the rural area or adjoining properties in terms of such matters as effluent disposal, noise, traffic generation, air emissions, odour, shading and visual impact.

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6. Activities and buildings shall not limit or impede the ability for existing public and

National Grid Infrastructure to be operated, upgraded, developed and maintained.

This includes that sensitive activities shall not be located within the National Grid

Buffer Area .

19.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

The rural area of the Grey District is important to the economic, cultural, social and recreational well being and thus the lifestyle of the community. The resources in the rural area should therefore be managed so as to ensure their life supporting capacity is safeguarded and so they can meet the foreseeable needs of future generations.

The rural area is characterised by an openness and natural features that are of importance to the community. Components include the coastline, water features, vegetation and the absence of built up areas. The maintenance and enhancement of amenity values is in accordance with

Section 7(c)

of the Act .

The rural area contains resources including soil, water, gravel, rock and wildlife habitats that can be limited in extent. It is important that activities do not compromise the potential of resources to meet the reasonably foreseeable needs of future generations including their lifestyle. Provided adverse effects can be avoided, remedied or mitigated a wide range of activities should be permitted.

Public and National Grid Infrastructure is a common feature of rural areas and is necessary in order to service both the immediate and wider areas. The ability to access and maintain infrastructure is necessary as is the importance of ensuring activities are not undertaken which may create safety risks for those parties undertaking an activity or the users of that infrastructure.

3.

4.

5.

19.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Rules in the District Plan.

2. Rules in Regional Council Plans, such as:

Regional Air Quality Plan

Soil Conservation and Erosion Control Plan

Control of the Discharge of Contaminants to Land

Consult with the rural communities and other bodies and organisations.

Education and guidelines.

Reference to other Statutory Documents including the NZ Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical Safe Distances.

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19.5.1 REASONS

A number of methods are available. Regulatory controls are provided through the District

Plan. In addition, there are a number of effects generated by activities that are dealt with by

Regional Council Plans. As indicated in 2.4(vii) the effect of these provisions are not duplicated in this Plan as it would create additional delay and costs, and detract from integrated management. The three Regional Plans identified in 19.5 deal with such matters as:

control of erosion

vegetation clearance

activities in proximity to waterways

discharge of odour

discharge of contaminants to land

erosion

water quality

These rules are likely to effect activities such as farming, forestry, mining and factory farming . Also relevant are non-regulatory methods such as guidelines and education for such matters as riparian management.

In the imposition of District Plan provisions, other regulatory requirements are also applicable and where appropriate direction to these requirements can be included in the Plan.

Examples include National Environmental Standards and Codes of Practice.

19.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

Maintenance and enhancement of the natural character and amenity of the rural environment while providing for a diverse range of activities.

Monitor rural dwelling numbers and the length and condition of roading and bridges to ensure that areas are not developed beyond their capacity to be accessed.

Use, development and protection of resources within the District, providing that the scale of each activity and its effects, both short and long-term, are appropriate to its environment and community needs.

Monitor the area of land under indigenous forest, exotic forest and farming so that changes in the intensity and level of rural practices can be effectively monitored.

Consultation will be used as an effective monitoring tool to ensure that objectives, policies and rules are appropriate for the rural environment.

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19.7 RULES - RURAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREA

Note: The National Environmental Standard for Assessing and Managing Contaminants in Soil to Protect

Human Health applies to any piece of land on which an activity or industry described in the current edition of the Hazardous Activities and Industries List (HAIL) is, has been, or is more likely than not to have been undertaken. Refer to the “Grey District Council NES Contaminants in Soil Process Guide” to determine if these regulations are applicable to the activity proposed.

19.7 ITEM

1. Permitted Activities

General

2. Minimum

Residential Unit Site

Area

PERMITTED

Any activity is a permitted activity provided that it does not contravene any other rule in this Environmental Area.

(i) Residential units are permitted if:

(a) The residential unit is contained within a minimum net area of 1 hectare exclusive of access ; and

(b) The minimum net area referred to in (a) is a physically contiguous parcel of land.

(c) Part (b) of this rule does not apply to non-contiguous sites (of 1 hectare or greater net area exclusive of access) legally established prior to 16 August 2006.

(d) A residential unit can be established on a title created by the following subdivision applications:

PL 1401-06 Beechwater, Kokiri

PL 1344-05 Tiller Bay, Rapahoe

PL 1417-06 Inchbonnie Road, Mitchells

PL 1447-06 Brunner Road, Lake Poerua

Note: In non-sewered areas a discharge consent from the West Coast

Regional Council may be required which could effect the minimum site area.

CONTROLLED

(ii)Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii)Not applicable.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Not applicable.

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

The area of the residential unit

The number of residential units in the vicinity

How the residential units relate to one another.

The disposal of effluent. (iv)

(v)

(vi) over buildings .

The intended use of the

In respect of 19.7.2)i)(b) residential unit

(vii) The number and scale of dwellings on noncontiguous parcels of land.

(viii)

Whether the site size will adequately provide for the outdoor needs of the activities on the site , and retain a dominance of open space

The effects, both positive and adverse, of residential units located on non-contiguous parcels of land, particularly if the residential units are grouped or clustered, on

The natural character of waterbodies and wetlands including their margins, and the coastal environment

Areas of outstanding natural features and landscapes and significant natural areas

Provision of services, including roading and the disposal of effluent and stormwater

Spaciousness and openness of the rural area, including the potential effect of structures

Natural and coastal hazards

The function of the state highway network, including the appropriateness of the access with respect to but not limited by, location and standard of access.

(ix) The reasons for the non-contiguous nature of the site

EXPLANATION

Any activity is allowed in the Rural

Environment provided the rules are not contravened.

The scale and intensity of residential units should be such that a level of rural amenity is retained in terms of openness and privacy.

Sites that are made up of noncontiguous parcels can result in clustering of residential units. This layout can have an effect on rural openness and spaciousness, detract from the natural character of the coastline and waterbodies and their margins and result in over domestication of the rural area. While there may also be benefits in the clustering of residential units

– including more efficient provision of services, avoidance of natural hazards and trade off protection of landscapes

– it is considered appropriate that

Council maintain discretion over this type of development to control potential adverse effects.

A small number of non-contiguous 1 hectare subdivisions were being processed at the time of a change to the plan being introduced. It is reasonable to allow these proposals to proceed as per the provisions in place when they were lodged. Therefore these sites have been given an exemption in regard to Rule 19.7.2

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19.7 ITEM

3. Setbacks

PERMITTED

(i) Buildings and forestry are permitted if:

(a) the minimum setback from internal boundaries is:

5m for principal residential

5m for other

3m for other buildings buildings buildings

greater than 5m

less than 5m

2

2

in

in gross floor area .

10m for forestry activities, provided that gross floor area setbacks are not required where land on either side of the boundary is owned by the same person; and

(b) the minimum setback from the road boundary is:

10m for buildings except that this shall not apply to buildings less than

5m

2

in gross floor area

20m for forestry activities

(c) The following setbacks are complied with:

No building is erected within 100 metres of MHWS .

No building for residential or commercial purposes is erected within

150 metres of the boundary of any oxidation pond and no oxidation ponds are located within 150 metres of a residential or commercial building .

No building is erected within 20m of a margin of a lake or within 25m of a wetland greater than 2 ha.

No building is erected within 10m of a is more than 3m in width. bank of a river or stream which

Forestry is not to be undertaken within:

25m of a wetland greater than 0.5 hectares

20m of a lake

10m of rivers and streams with an average bed width greater than

3m adjacent to the activity provided that this does not apply to the retrieval or removal of unavoidable logging debris, including logs, and aerial cable suspension logging.

For the purposes of setbacks from the margin of a lake or wetland and the bank of a river or stream, a building does not include a jetty bridge, culvert or stream crossing.

Rule 19.7.3 does not apply to those aspects of forestry where there is a common function as defined by the provisions of sections 30 and 31 of the

Resource Management Act 1991 between the West Coast Regional

Council (WCRC) and the Grey District Council (GDC) and the WCRC has granted a resource consent (not including a certificate of compliance issued under Section 139 of the RM Act) and that resource consent application raises the same issues for consideration by both authorities in relation to that aspect of the forestry activity .

If any aspects of forestry within the areas described in Rule 19.7.3(i)(c) fifth bullet point are not subject to a resource consent from the WCRC or issues arise for determination beyond the proper exercise of the WCRC decisionmaking process and a resource consent is otherwise required from the

GDC, the activity will require a resource consent from the GDC, unless the activity is otherwise permitted under these rules.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

(v)

(vi)

(vii)

(viii)

(ix)

(x)

(xi)

The effect on adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, noise and privacy.

The effect on road safety

The extent to which the intrusion towards the road is necessary in order to allow more efficient, practical and/or pleasant use of the remainder of the site .

The extent to which alternative practical locations are available for the building .

The extent to which the proposed building will detract from the pleasantness, coherence, openness and attractiveness of the site as viewed from the street and adjoining sites .

The degree to which existing or proposed landscaping, including plantings, mitigate the effects of limited building setback from a road .

The extent to which the intrusion towards the internal boundary is necessary to enable more efficient, practical and/or pleasant use of the remainder of the site .

The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of the proposal on adjoining sites , including through the provision of landscape plantings.

The effect on the natural character of the coastline and if any natural hazard (such as erosion, sea level etc) will create an impact.

The actual potential adverse effects of the oxidation pond .

The effects on natural character, life supporting capacity, ecological and amenity values, natural hazards and public access associated with lakes, rivers, wetlands and their margins.

EXPLANATION

Setbacks from internal boundaries enable a reasonable separation distance to be retained in order all the streetscapes effects on neighbours properties are minimised.

Control of buildings in the coastal area allows Council to assess the effects on the natural character of the coastline and also the threat to development of natural hazards.

Restrictions on building in proximity to oxidation ponds (as shown on

Planning Maps 25, 34, 36 & 38) enable these facilities to operate without unduly effecting adjoining landowners and vice versa.

Forestry should be setback from boundaries in order that trees do not create shading, a fire risk or adversely affect amenities.

Buildings and forestry are required to be set back from waterways for amenity, natural character and natural hazards reasons.

To avoid duplication of process, resource consent for forestry setbacks from the GDC is not required where the WCRC has granted a resource consent for an application which addresses an issue that is common to the functions of both councils and properly arises for determination within the WCRC decision making process.

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19.7 ITEM

3A National Grid

Infrastructure

PERMITTED

(i)(a) Within the National Grid Buffer Area a building , or the change of use of a building, shall comply with the following standards:

(i) From National Grid Poles

(a) Building s (excluding fences up to 2.5m in height) shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres

(b) Fences up to 2.5m in height shall be:

Setback a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire; and

Fences setback between 1.5m and 5.0m from a pole or stay wire shall be of a non-conductive design and readily removable for the purposes of operator access to

National Grid Infrastructure .

(ii) From National Grid Power Lines (as measured from the centre line):

(a) Pi Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from Pi Poles

(b) Single Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of

10 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from single poles

(c) Except that the following activities are exempt from the above National Grid Power Line setback standards:

A fence of up to 2.5 metres in height;

The physical alteration of an existing building where the degree of non-compliance does not increase;

Uninhabitable horticultural or farm buildings (this does not include a commercial greenhouse, a milking and/or dairy shed, a wintering barn or a factory farm building).

(b) From a National Grid Substation, buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres. The setback requirement is to be measured from the edge of the substation designation or where the substation is not designated, the secured fence of the substation.

(c) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area must:

(i) Be no deeper than 300mm within 5m of a pole or stay wire;

(ii) Not result in a reduction in a ground to conductor clearance distance less than 6.5m;

(iii) Not compromise National Grid support structure stability; and

(iv) Not limit or impede vehicular access to a pole or stay wire.

Except that the requirement in (c)(i) above shall not apply to:

Earthworks given dispensation by the National Grid

Operator under Clause 2.2.1 of NZECP34:2001;

The agricultural or domestic cultivation of land;

Agricultural land drainage no closer than 2.2 metres from a pole or stay wire (provided it is no deeper than 750mm when between 2.2m and 5m of a National Grid pole or stay wire);

The repair, sealing or resealing of a road, footpath, driveway or farm track; or

Vertical holes not exceeding 500mm in diameter and located a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire.

Note: If you propose to undertake any new activity, alter an existing activity or construct a structure including fences and irrigation units within 20m of a National Grid Infrastructure it is recommended that the National Grid operator is consulted with.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity unless otherwise specified as a non-complying activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Setback from National Grid Substations:

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Substations

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Reverse sensitivity effects on National Grid substations

Technical advice by the National Grid operator.

(ii) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area :

The risk to the stability of the National Grid

Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade the National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid operator

Any impact on the ability of the National Grid operator to access the National Grid.

(iii) Setback from Poles:

The risk to the stability and structural integrity of the

National Grid Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

(iv) Setback from Lines

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

NON-COMPLYING

(iv) From 10 July 2018, any activity that contravenes one of the following permitted conditions is a non-complying activity:

19.7.3A(i)(a)

19.7.3A(c)(ii)-(iv)

EXPLANATION

Setback distances from

National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National

Policy Statement on Electricity

Transmission and Policy

19.4.6 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the

New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical safe

Distances and the Electricity

(Hazards from Trees)

Regulations 2003.

Compliance with the District

Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

EXPLANATION

Setback distances from National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National Policy Statement on Electricity

Transmission and Policy 19.4.6 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for

Electrical safe Distances and the Electricity (Hazards from

Trees) Regulations 2003. Compliance with the District Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

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19.7 ITEM

4. Building design and

Appearance

5. Indigenous

Vegetation

Clearance

PERMITTED

(i) Relocated buildings onto sites are permitted if:

(a) they are constructed within the last ten years and

(b) they are constructed of new materials and

(c) they are established on foundations complying with the building code at the time of relocation.

(i) Indigenous vegetation clearance is permitted if the SNA process has not been undertaken for a site or Step 3 below is not completed for that site provided the area subject to vegetation clearance:

(a) Is less than 2000 m

2

per 5 years per site or

(b) Is more than 2000 m

2

per 5 years per site provided:

The indigenous vegetation to be cleared is not contiguous with any land

 managed for conservation purposes, or

The area of indigenous vegetation is less than 5 hectares in area

The area is not a wetland, or

(ii) Indigenous vegetation clearance is permitted if it is for the following:

(a) clearance of indigenous vegetation understorey beneath exotic forest areas

(b) clearance of vegetation for farm tracks and of regrowth vegetation to maintain existing tracks and stock crossings

(c) the incidental clearance of vegetation to control gorse, broom, or other exotic plant pests

(d) the management of vegetation necessary for the safe and efficient operation of any formed road and the ongoing operation, maintenance and upgrading of existing lines for conveying electricity, or

(iii) Indigenous vegetation clearance on any site is permitted if it is outside an

SNA included in Schedule 1 after the SNA process is completed for that site , or an SNA has not been included in Schedule 1 after the completion of the Plan

Change process, or

(iv) Indigenous vegetation clearance is a permitted activity if it is exempt under

Rule 19.7.5(xi)

(v)Indigenous vegetation clearance is permitted if it is not undertaken within:

(a) 25m of a wetland greater than 0.5 hectare

(b) 20m from a lake

(c) 10m of rivers and streams with an average bed width greater than 3m adjacent to the activity.

Rule 19.7.5(v) does not apply to the following which are permitted activities:

The incidental clearance of vegetation to control gorse, broom, or other exotic plant pests.

Fencing.

In respect of rivers and streams, construction of access points to water on the basis of either one per site or one every 400m of linear measure for stock and vehicles and structures such as whitebait stands.

The management necessary for the ongoing operation, maintenance and upgrading of existing lines for electricity.

Indigenous vegetation clearance or an activity that will have the effect of clearing vegetation where there is a common function as defined by the provisions of

Sections 30 and 31

of the Resource Management Act 1991 between the West Coast Regional Council (WCRC) and the Grey District

Council (GDC) and the WCRC has granted a resource consent (not including a certificate of compliance issued under

Section 139

of the RM

Act) and that resource consent application raises the same issues for consideration by both authorities in relation to the indigenous vegetation clearance.

If any aspects of indigenous vegetation clearance within the areas described in

Rule 19.7.5(v)(a), (b) or (c) are not subject to a resource consent from the

WCRC or issues arise for determination beyond the proper exercise of the

WCRC decision-making process and a resource consent is otherwise required from the GDC, the activity will require a resource consent from the GDC, unless the activity is otherwise permitted under these rules.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Relocated buildings not meeting the conditions of permitted activity are a controlled activity in which Council reserves control over the design and appearance of the buildings.

(vi) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Not applicable.

NB: Refer to SNA steps below

.

Indigenous vegetation clearance is a discretionary activity as defined in Rules 19.7.5(vii)-(x) unless exempt by Rule 19.7.(xi) below.

(vii) Indigenous vegetation clearance where an SNA study has not been undertaken or Step 3 is not completed and conditions (a) and (b) of Rule 19.7.5(i) are not met.

(viii) Indigenous vegetation clearance within or on any part of a site where an SNA is identified at Step 3.

(ix) Indigenous vegetation clearance within or on any part of a site where an SNA is identified at Step 5.

(x) Indigenous vegetation clearance within an SNA identified in Schedule 1 after the SNA process is completed (Steps 1-9).

(xi)(a) Indigenous vegetation clearance is exempt from

Rule 19.7.5(viii) if the SNA process up to and including

Step 3 below, has been undertaken for a site, and a DOC ecologist has certified in writing that there is no SNA on that site or

(b) Indigenous vegetation clearance is exempt from Rule

19.7.5(ix) if the SNA process up to and including Step 5 below, has been undertaken for a site, and a DOC ecologist has certified in writing that there is no SNA on that site.

The steps relative to the determination of SNAs defined in

Rules 19.7.5(vii-xi) are as follows:

1. Council ecologist undertakes SNA desktop study and consults with DOC ecologist. When carrying out the

SNA assessment/ certification process the criteria defined in Policy 5.4.2 shall be applied by the Council ecologist and the DOC ecologist.

2. The SNA sites are refined from the roadside and public viewpoints.

3. The SNA sites are peer reviewed by a DOC ecologist who will provide written confirmation of SNAs on sites and written certification of all sites that do not contain

SNAs.

4. Landowners are contacted for a site visit by Council ecologist.

5. The extent of SNAs are confirmed with the landowner on site. Where an SNA is not confirmed, a landowner has the right to request a DOC ecologist to provide written certification that there is no SNA on site .

6. Council ecologist report is prepared and sent to landowner for comment.

7. Council signs off SNAs.

8. SNAs are entered into the SNA Schedule by way of

Plan Change process.

9. SNAs are confirmed in Schedule when Plan Change process complete.

In terms of Rule 19.7.5(v):

(xii)Any activity that contravenes a permitted activity is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) The proposed location of the building on the site and its visibility from off the site.

(ii) Any other matters relating to visual character of the building, proposed alterations to the building, its proposed surroundings, such as topography, proximity to public areas and proposed plantings.

(i) Not Applicable

EXPLANATION

This will ensure that older relocatable buildings are brought up to a suitable standard.

Relocatable buildings are often sub-standard in appearance.

Council is currently undertaking a project to identify Significant

Natural Areas (SNAs) on all land not administered by DOC within the District. The steps undertaken to identify SNAs are outlined in

Rule 19.7.5. The criteria used to identify the SNAs are set out in

Policy 5.4.2.

Until the SNA process is completed to Step 3, a resource consent is required to clear any indigenous vegetation except for areas identified in Rule 19.7.5(i)(a) and (b) and (ii). If after Step 3 an

SNA has not been identified on a site , and a DOC ecologist has provided written certification there is no SNA on that site , resource consent is not required to clear indigenous vegetation. However, if an SNA is identified then resource consent is required for indigenous vegetation clearance on site , including within the SNA.

Vegetation clearance on a site is also permitted if further investigation at Step 5 establishes that there is not an SNA on the site .

Once an SNA is confirmed by way of Plan Change process (Step 9), vegetation clearance on that site will require resource consent only if it is within the confirmed SNA, but not if it is outside the area.

Rule 19.7.5(v) must also be complied with.

Indigenous vegetation clearance is discretionary in the margins of waterbodies and wetlands to help protect riparian values.

To avoid duplication of process, resource consent for indigenous vegetation clearance in riparian areas from the GDC is not required where the WCRC has granted a resource consent to an application which addresses an issue that is common to both

Councils and properly arises for determination with the WCRC decision making process.

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19.7 ITEM

6. Landscape

Areas

PERMITTED

(i) Activities are permitted in areas identified on the planning maps as “Area of Outstanding Landscape” if:

(a) they are buildings which do not exceed 2m in height or 5m

2

in area, and

(b) Any indigenous vegetation that is removed does not exceed

100m

2

in area in any one hectare, and

(c) The activity is not forestry.

(i) Buildings are permitted if:

(a) The site coverage does not exceed 10% of the site area or

1500m

2

whichever is the greater.

CONTROLLED

(i) Not applicable.

7. Building

Coverage

8. Maximum

Height of

Buildings and

Structures

9. Lighting

10. Utilities

11. Signs

12. Hazardous

Substances

13. Parking,

Loading &

Access

(ii) Not applicable.

(i) Buildings and structures are permitted if:

(a) The maximum height of any building is 10m and

(b) All buildings and structures comply with the Aerodrome Flight

Path Protection Area rules contained in Appendix 9

(i) No activity shall result in a greater than 2.5 lux spill (horizontal and vertical) of light onto any adjoining property, measured at any point more than 2m inside the boundary of the adjoining property or the closest window on the adjoining property whichever is the closest.

(i) Refer Appendix 1

(i) Refer Appendix 2

(i) Refer Appendix 3

(i) Refer Appendix 4

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Refer Appendix

1

(ii) Refer Appendix

2

(ii) Refer Appendix

3

(ii) Refer Appendix

4

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Refer Appendix

1

(iii) Refer Appendix

2

(iii) Refer Appendix

3

(iii) Refer Appendix

4

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Effects on view.

(ii) Visibility of activities

(iii) Effect on indigenous flora and fauna

(iv) Mitigation measures proposed.

(i) The extent to which the character of the site will remain dominated by open space and garden plantings, rather than buildings .

(ii) The ability to provide adequate outdoor space on the site for all outdoor activities associated with residential and other activities permitted on the site .

(i) The effect on outlook and privacy.

(ii) The effect of the increased dominance by buildings of the outlook from other sites , roads and public open space in the surrounding area, which is out of character with the local environment.

(iii) The extent to which there is a need for the increased height or intrusion through the recession lines, in order to undertake the proposed activities on the alternatives which may have less effect on the environment.

(iv) The extent to which the proposed compatible with the character of the local environment, including the scale of other buildings in the surrounding area. adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, height in terms of visual site and buildings will be

(v) The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of increased height or exceedence of the recession planes, such as through increased separation distances between the building and adjoining sites or the provision of screening.

(i) The extent, frequency and intensity of light spill and glare.

EXPLANATION

Certain areas in the district have been identified as

“Outstanding Landscape

Area” which are sensitive to change. Accordingly, resource consent is required to assess these changes.

Site coverage is controlled to ensure that open space and other servicing requirements and neighbourhood amenities are met. It also assists in maintaining an area that is adequate for onsite disposal.

Height controls allow a twostory building . Beyond this limit control is required to protect neighbours amenities of adjoining properties.

The recession plane protects sunlight and privacy of adjoining properties.

Buildings and structures are also required to comply with flight protection path for the

Greymouth aerodrome to protects its operation

Lighting and glare can detrimentally impact on a person’s enjoyment of their property.

Refer Appendix 1

Refer Appendix 2

Refer Appendix 3

Refer Appendix 4

Refer Appendix 1

Refer Appendix 2

Refer Appendix 3

Refer Appendix 4

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19.7 ITEM

14. Subdivision

15. Heritage

Items & Historic

Trees

16. NonRural

Activity

PERMITTED

(i) Refer Appendix 5

(i) Refer Appendix 6

(i) Non rural activities

(a) The maximum floor area for any nonof 100m

2

are permitted if: rural activity is a maximum

provided that this shall not apply to fire stations.

(b) The maximum number of permitted vehicle trips generated by an activity on a site is:

Heavy Vehicles 20 per day

Other Vehicles 100 per day

(c) Any activity shall be conducted such that the following noise limits are not exceeded at any point within the notional Boundary of any dwelling in the Rural or Rural Residential Environmental Area and at the boundary of a site in the Residential and Township environment areas, other than the site from which the noise is created.

(i) Rural Environmental to Rural Environmental and Township

Environmental

Monday to Saturday

0700 hrs to 2200 hrs 55dBA L10

2200 hrs to 0700 hrs 45dBA L10

Sunday

45dBA L10

75 dBA Lmax all days between 2200 hrs and 0700 hrs and

(ii) Rural Environmental to Residential Environmental and Rural-

Residential Environment

Monday

– Friday

2200 hrs to 0700 hrs 45dBA L10

0700 hrs to 2200 hrs 55dBA L10

Saturday

1700 hrs to 0800 hrs 45dBA L10

0800 hrs to 1700 hrs 55dBA L10

Sundays

45dBA L10

75dBA Lmax all days between 2200 hrs and 0700 hrs

Except where expressly provided elsewhere in this rule, sound shall be measured in accordance with the provisions of NZS

6801:1999 Acoustics Measurement of Environmental Sound and assessed in accordance with the provision of NZS 6802:1991

Assessment of Environmental Sound.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Refer

Appendix 5

(ii) Refer

Appendix 6

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Refer Appendix 5

(iii) Refer Appendix 6

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Refer Appendix 5

Refer Appendix 6

(i) The effects on adjoining sites in terms of visual impact and noise.

(ii) The volume and type of traffic which may be generated to the site and the ability of the site to accommodate parking, loading, manoeuvring and access requirements.

(iii) The effect on adjoining properties.

(iv) The type of activities and the reason for it operating outside the specified hours.

(v) The level and character of the noise, particularly at night.

(vi) The proximity and type of adjoining uses such as dwellings.

(vii)The reason for the additional generation.

(viii)the ability to avoid, remedy or mitigate any adverse effects arising as a result of the extra generation.

(ix) The proximity and type of adjoining uses.

(x) The soundscape of the area.

EXPLANATION

Refer Appendix 5

Refer Appendix 6

Nonrural activities have the potential to detract from the amenities of the

Rural Environment.

Hours of operation of nonrural activities are restricted to ensure the quiet nature of settlement areas during night time hours is maintained and not disrupted by activities which operate for extended hours.

Inappropriate levels of vehicle generation are not consistent with rural amenity and can detract from the level of existing amenity.

The noise provision provides protection from unreasonable noise levels, particularly from nonrural activities .

Fire stations are exempted from the rules relating to floor area, given the important service they provide to the community.

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19.7 ITEM PERMITTED

Nothing in the foregoing shall apply to:

(i) Activities such as rural activity vehicles, machinery or equipment operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacture’s specifications and used on an intermittent basis (e.g. spraying, harvesting, etc). All such equipment shall be operated and

(ii) maintained in Resource Management Act 1991.

Any warning device used by emergency services.

(iii) People noise at recreational activities, such as sporting events or the noise from children at school. This does not include any amplified noise.

(iv) Temporary military training activities provided that they shall be conducted so that the following noise limits are not exceeded when assessed at any point within the notional boundary of any dwelling.

Timelimits(dBA)

(Any Day) L10 L95 Lmax

0630-0730 60 45 70

0730-1800 75 60 90

1800-2000 70 55 85

2000-06 30 55

Impulse noise resulting from the use of ammunition, explosives or explosive simulators shall not exceed 122 dBC (peak).

(v) Any activity on the same site as a noise source being assessed.

Construction Noise

Construction noise within the District shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6803: 1999

Acoustics-Construction Noise.

Noise associated with helicopter landing areas

Noise associated with helicopter landing areas shall not exceed the limits in Table 1 of, and shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provision of NZS 6807:1994 Noise management and land use planning for helicopter landing areas.

Blasting

Vibration from any site due to blasting shall not exceed a peak particle velocity of 5mm/sec measured in the frequency range 3-

12 Hz at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

Airblast over pressure from blasting shall not exceed a peak sound pressure level of 120 dBC at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

Or (d) They are temporary activities .

CONTROLLED

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DISCRETIONARY ASSESSMENT CRITERIA EXPLANATION

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20 COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL

ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS

20.1 INTRODUCTION

The Commercial and Industrial Environmental Areas generally apply to those areas of

Greymouth which contain a range of government and corporate regional headquarters, retail outlets, professional offices , and industrial activities serving the rural hinterland and fisheries sector. It is the only business area in the District that is of sufficient area to justify a separate environmental area although similar activities are displayed throughout the District.

1 The area bordered by the Grey River, Lagoon Dock, Blaketown, Whall Street, Smith Street and Tainui Street comprises the following:

a compact central retail area around Mackay Street, providing a convenient and safe environment for shoppers;

an outer ring of larger retail and service industrial uses which may generate significant vehicular traffic;

a suburban retail centre bounded by High Street, Marlborough Street, Cowper

Street and Raleigh Street (Greymouth South);

an industrial area between Blaketown, the dock and the railway line, characterised by heavier industry and processing activities; and

A port area consisting of activities associated with the fish industry, coal and timber exports; and

scattered commercial and industrial development along SH 6.

2 The area known as Kaiata Park is centrally located between Kaiata and Dobson on SH7.

The area is comprised of industrial and commercial activities. It was designed to enable current and future industrial activities to have an appropriately zoned and serviced area to locate.

This overall area is divided into two areas for the purposes of the plan - Commercial and

Industrial Areas.

The Commercial Area consists of;

1. the central “Commercial Core” which is delineated in the plan for amenity and parking reasons; and

2.

3. the established business areas to the south and west of the commercial core; and the small suburban commercial areas in Greymouth; and

4. the commercial areas of Kaiata Park .

Uses include retail, service and commercial activities.

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The Industrial Area consists of the traditional industrial areas to the west of the “Commercial

Core” area, as well as the new industrial area in

Kaiata Park and includes heavier types of industry, port activities and the railway.

Within the Commercial and Industrial Environmental Are is also infrastructure which services activities in the local and wider areas. This includes roading and National Grid Infrastructure .

20.2 ISSUES

1. In providing for commercial and industrial activities there is a need to ensure they will not have unreasonable adverse effects beyond the boundaries of their sites , particularly as it relates to residential environments. These effects include: visual intrusion of buildings and structures, including signs ; conflict between pedestrians and vehicular traffic; noise; compromising of road safety and the efficient flow of traffic caused by high traffic generating activities, poor access and onsite parking provision, and visual distractions such as advertising signs .

2.

3.

The efficiency of the commercial/industrial area could be adversely affected by more sensitive activities.

Given the vital role commercial/industrial activities play in respect of the well being of the community, efficient use should be made of their resources by restricting activities such as residential development that could inhibit their operation.

The sustainability of the Commercial Area of Greymouth could be constrained by flood risk and land tenure.

The commercial area of Greymouth is susceptible to flooding from the Grey River although the construction of the floodwall has alleviated most of these concerns. In addition a high proportion of the commercial area is situated on leasehold land which is held by one landowner. This is a perceived barrier to investors wanting to increase the value of property.

A long term alternative to address some of these issues could be the gradual provision of an area less susceptible to flooding and which may concurrently reduce the land tenure constraints presently experienced by potential developers. One such potential area is the High Street, Marlborough Street, Cowper Street and Raleigh Street retail block in South Greymouth which would provide services to this area and a focus for this development other than sporadic or haphazard development.

4. Insufficient parking, loading, manoeuvring and access can restrict the efficiency of the commercial and industrial areas.

Commercial and industrial areas are characterised by high volumes of vehicles including heavy trucks. A safe and efficient transport network requires:

offstreet parking and limited access to avoid conflict between traffic associated with a particular property and through traffic;

circulation of traffic to avoid conflict between pedestrians, cars and heavy vehicles .

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5.

In deciding the appropriate location and development standards for commercial and industrial activities, regard must be given to the function of streets in the road hierarchy and the capacity or level of service of each.

Activities and buildings shall not limit or impede the ability for existing public and

National Grid Infrastructure to be operated, upgraded, developed and maintained. This includes that sensitive activities and incompatible buildings should not be located in close proximity to National Grid buffer Area .

Public and National Grid Infrastructure is a common feature of Commercial and

Industrial areas and is necessary in order to service both the immediate and wider areas. The ability to access and maintain infrastructure is necessary as is the importance of ensuring activities are not undertaken which may create safety risks for those parties undertaking an activity or the users of that infrastructure. Sensitive activities and incompatible buildings should not be located in close proximity to

National Grid Infrastructure .

20.3 OBJECTIVE

1. The efficient use of commercial and industrial areas including the port area, to serve the needs of the District in a manner that maintains a standard of amenity appropriate to the area and which will not compromise the amenity of adjoining areas.

20.4 POLICIES

1. Activities that could conflict with the efficient use of commercial and industrial areas should not be located in these areas.

2. Activities should not create adverse effects beyond the boundaries of the commercial and industrial areas particularly in respect of residential environments.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Activities in the commercial and industrial area should not be adversely affected by a shortfall in parking, loading or access .

Pedestrian orientated areas should be located in the central area of Greymouth and the Greymouth South area, and those areas more dependent on vehicles for access and servicing located in the areas around the central area.

Public use of the port area and adjoining land , including the floodwall for recreational and tourism purposes should be allowed where there is not conflict with port related activities.

The establishment of an alternative commercial area to the central area in the south of

Greymouth to enable further retail development opportunity and to overcome any long term constraints of the central area.

7. Further industrial areas, particularly for the port should not be compromised by activities that could preclude use of that space.

20.4.1 EXPLANATION AND REASONS

The Commercial and Industrial areas are integral to the well being of the Grey District community. As the commercial and industrial areas are limited as to their location their operation should not be inhibited by less sensitive activities. While the efficient use of these areas for a variety of activities is in the interests of the community they should not have an adverse effect on amenities, particularly as it relates to the adjoining amenities of residential areas.

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In general, the central retail area and the Greymouth South Area should be enhanced in favour of pedestrians to improve its amenity. As a consequence vehicle orientated uses should be located beyond this area. Adequate provision should be made for vehicles in terms of access and parking to offset adverse effects.

A commercial area located in the High Street, Cowper Street, Marlborough Street and Raleigh

Street block provides an alternative to the central area. Similarly future port areas such as at

Cobden and Rapahoe could be required in the long term. The public use of the port area is also likely to be more long term but the above are matters which require addressing at present.

20.5 IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

1. Environmental Areas and rules in the District Plan which provide for commercial and industrial performance standards.

2.

3.

4.

Objectives, policies and rules of the Regional Council Plans which control the effects of discharge to air and water.

Consultation with resource users.

Programmes for street enhancements and public facilities within commercial and industrial areas.

5.

6.

Undertake investigations for future port areas such as at Cobden and Rapahoe.

Reference to other statutory Documents including the NZ Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical Safe Distances.

20.5.1 REASONS FOR IMPLEMENTATION METHODS

Environmental Areas and rules are considered to be the most effective method of ensuring the provision and protection of commercial and industrial environments. Rules are also important in ensuring the preservation of amenity in adjoining Environmental Areas, particularly residential environmental areas. Objectives, policies and rules in the Regional Council Plans also control effects relating to odour, pollutants, etc. Consultation is a key component in ensuring the sustainability of resources to provide for the well being of the community. Street programmes will continue as a means of enhancing the central area. Future development of the port areas is acknowledged to be a long-term issue but nevertheless it is appropriate some investigations are undertaken within the life of this plan. At this stage no regulatory controls are proposed.

In the imposition of District Plan Provisions, other regulatory requirements are also applicable and where appropriate direction to these requirements can be included in the Plan. Examples include National Environmental Standards and Codes of Practice.

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20.6 ENVIRONMENTAL RESULTS ANTICIPATED AND MONITORING

Anticipated Environmental Results Monitoring and Review Data

A range of commercial and industrial activities development in central Greymouth.

Amenity values appropriate to commercial and industrial (including port) environments as places to visit and work in.

Adequate carparking, loading and vehicular access in relation to business activities, to preserve road safety and efficiency in traffic flows.

Enhanced street appearance, pedestrian access, public facilities and open space around the central commercial area and where appropriate the port area.

Assessment through analysis of complaints laid with the

Council regarding unacceptable standards environmental resulting from activities undertaken in the commercial and

Environmental Area. industrial

Assessment of land available for development

Commercial and

Environmental Areas. in the

Industrial

Pedestrian areas with minimal exposure to traffic danger, noise and fumes.

Pleasant living environments where any adverse impacts of adjoining commercial and industrial premises and operations are avoided, remedied or mitigated.

Assessment consent of resource applications for commercial activities. and industrial

Identification of potential sites for future port areas.

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20.7 RULES - COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENVIRONMENTAL

AREA

Note: The National Environmental Standard for Assessing and Managing Contaminants in Soil to Protect

Human Health applies to any piece of land on which an activity or industry described in the current edition of the Hazardous Activities and Industries List (HAIL) is, has been, or is more likely than not to have been undertaken. Refer to the “Grey District Council NES Contaminants in Soil Process Guide” to determine if these regulations are applicable to the activity proposed.

20.7 ITEM

1. Permitted Activities

General

2. Residential Units

3. Set Backs

PERMITTED

(i) Any activity is a permitted activity provided that it does not contravene any other rule in this Environmental Area.

(i) Residential units are a permitted activity provided that:

(a) in the Industrial Environmental Area they are ancillary to a commercial or industrial activity on site .

(b) Where residential units are not ancillary to a commercial or industrial activity the minimum net site area for a residential unit shall be 300m

2.

(i) Buildings are a permitted activity if:

(a) Where a site adjoins a Residential Environmental Area site the minimum setback of buildings from the

Residential Environmental Area boundary shall be

4.5m.

(b) No buildings for residential or commercial purposes shall be erected within 150 metres of the boundary of any oxidation pond , and no oxidation pond is located within 150 metres of a residential or commercial building .

(c) No buildings shall be erected within 100 metres of

MHWS .

CONTROLLED

(ii)Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Not applicable.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Not applicable.

(ii) The effect a residential unit operation of an industrial

(iii) The intended use of the

will have on the efficient

or commercial activity residential unit .

.

(i) The effect on adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, noise and privacy.

(ii) The effect on the provision of services.

(iii) The extent to which alternative practical locations are available for the building .

(iv) The extent to which the proposed building will detract from the pleasantness, coherence, openness and attractiveness of the site as viewed from the street and adjoining sites .

(v) The extent to which the intrusion towards the internal boundary is necessary to enable more efficient, practical and/or pleasant use of the remainder of the site .

(vi) The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of the proposal on adjoining sites , including through the provision of landscape plantings.

(vii)The actual potential adverse effects of the oxidation pond .

(viii)The effect on the character of the coastline and if any natural hazard (such as erosion, sea level etc) will create an impact.

EXPLANATION

Any activity is allowed in the Commercial or

Industrial Environment provided the rules are not contravened.

Legitimate Industrial activities should not be inhibited by sensitive land uses such as residential units.

A minimum area is set for residential units to ensure that amenities for the units are retained.

Setbacks from the residential environmental area enables a reasonable separation distance to be retained in order to ensure the potential adverse effects are reduced.

Restrictions on building in proximity to oxidation ponds (as shown on

Planning Maps 25, 34, 36 &

38) enable these facilities to operate without unduly effecting adjoining landowners and vice versa.

Control of buildings in the coastal area allows Council to assess the effects on the natural character of the coastline and also the threat to development of natural hazards.

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20.7 ITEM

3A National Grid

Infrastructure

PERMITTED

(i)(a) Within the National Grid Buffer Area a building , or the change of use of a building, shall comply with the following standards:

(i) From National Grid Poles

(a) Building s (excluding fences up to 2.5m in height) shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres

(b) Fences up to 2.5m in height shall be:

Setback a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire; and

Fences setback between 1.5m and 5.0m from a pole or stay wire shall be of a non-conductive design and readily removable for the purposes of operator access to

National Grid Infrastructure .

(ii) From National Grid Power Lines (as measured from the centre line):

(a) Pi Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from Pi Poles

(b) Single Poles

– Buildings shall be setback a minimum of

10 metres from the centreline of transmission lines suspended from single poles

(c) Except that the following activities are exempt from the above National Grid Power Line setback standards:

A fence of up to 2.5 metres in height;

The physical alteration of an existing building where the degree of non-compliance does not increase;

Uninhabitable horticultural or farm buildings (this does not include a commercial greenhouse, a milking and/or dairy shed, a wintering barn or a factory farm building).

(b) From a National Grid Substation, buildings shall be setback a minimum of 12 metres. The setback requirement is to be measured from the edge of the substation designation or where the substation is not designated, the secured fence of the substation.

(c) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area must:

(i) Be no deeper than 300mm within 5m of a pole or stay wire;

(ii) Not result in a reduction in a ground to conductor clearance distance less than 6.5m;

(iii) Not compromise National Grid support structure stability; and

(iv) Not limit or impede vehicular access to a pole or stay wire.

Except that the requirement in (c)(i) above shall not apply to:

Earthworks given dispensation by the National Grid

Operator under Clause 2.2.1 of NZECP34:2001;

The agricultural or domestic cultivation of land;

Agricultural land drainage no closer than 2.2 metres from a pole or stay wire (provided it is no deeper than 750mm when between 2.2m and 5m of a National Grid pole or stay wire);

The repair, sealing or resealing of a road, footpath, driveway or farm track; or

Vertical holes not exceeding 500mm in diameter and located a minimum of 1.5m from the outer edge of a pole or stay wire.

Note: If you propose to undertake any new activity, alter an existing activity or construct a structure including fences and irrigation units within 20m of a National Grid Infrastructure it is recommended that the National Grid operator is consulted with.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity unless otherwise specified as a non-complying activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Setback from National Grid Substations:

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Substations

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Reverse sensitivity effects on National Grid substations

Technical advice by the National Grid operator.

(ii) Earthworks within the National Grid Buffer Area :

The risk to the stability of the National Grid

Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade the National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid operator

Any impact on the ability of the National Grid operator to access the National Grid.

(iii) Setback from Poles:

The risk to the stability and structural integrity of the

National Grid Infrastructure

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

(iv) Setback from Lines

The effects on the ability to operate, maintain and upgrade National Grid Infrastructure

The risk of electrical hazards affecting public or individual safety, and risk of property damage

Technical advice by the National Grid Operator

NON-COMPLYING

(iv) From 10 July 2018, any activity that contravenes one of the following permitted conditions is a non-complying activity:

19.7.3A(i)(a)

19.7.3A(c)(ii)-(iv)

EXPLANATION

Setback distances from

National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National

Policy Statement on Electricity

Transmission and Policy

20.2.5 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the

New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical safe

Distances and the Electricity

(Hazards from Trees)

Regulations 2003.

Compliance with the District

Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

EXPLANATION

Setback distances from National Grid Infrastructure are based on a horizontal distance measurement.

In considering appropriate setback requirements regard shall be had to the National Policy Statement on Electricity

Transmission and Policy 20.2.5 of this Plan.

In addition to National Grid setback standards, persons are also required to comply with other legislative requirements including the New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for

Electrical safe Distances and the Electricity (Hazards from

Trees) Regulations 2003. Compliance with the District Plan does not ensure compliance with these other legislative requirements.

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20.7 ITEM

4. Height of

Buildings &

Structures

PERMITTED

(i) Buildings are a permitted activity if:

(a) The maximum height of any building is 20 metres.

(b) A building does not project beyond a building envelope defined by recession planes as described in Appendix 8 where a site in the

Commercial and Industrial environmental area adjoins a Residential

Environmental Area provided that the building shall only comply with the recession planes adjacent to the common boundary.

(c) No building or structure shall project beyond an envelope in the

Aerodrome Flight Path Protection Area as described in Appendix 9.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable

5. Building

Design and

Appearance

6. Light Spill &

Glare

7. Outdoor storage and

Landscaping

(i) Every building facing a road in the Commercial Core shall, on its erection or on being reconstructed or altered in any way that substantially changes the exterior appearance, be provided with a verandah; and

(ii) The verandah shall be constructed along the full length of all parts of the building facing the road . The height , width and fascia of the verandah shall relate to any adjoining verandahs to provide continuity of verandah coverage.

Every verandah erected shall be of cantilever or similar construction and not be supported by posts; and

(iii) The verandah shall extend from the shop frontage to be 400mm inside the kerbline. The verandah, if on a corner, shall be splayed so as to be 400mm back from the kerbline.

(iv) Relocated buildings onto a site are permitted if:

(a) they are constructed within the last ten years and

(b)

(c) they are constructed of new materials and they are established on foundations complying with the building code at the time of relocation .

Provided that (iv) does not apply to the Industrial Environmental Area.

(i) All exterior lighting shall be directed away from adjacent properties and roads so as to avoid any adverse effects on the neighbourhood and on traffic safety. and

(ii) No activity shall result in greater than a 10 lux spill (horizontal and vertical) of light on to any adjoining property within the Commercial Environmental

Area, measured 2m inside the boundary of any adjoining property. and

(iii) For sites adjoining a Residential Environmental Area, no activity shall result in greater than a 2.5 lux spill (horizontal and vertical) of light, measured 2m inside the boundary of any adjoining residential property or the closest window in the adjoining property, whichever is the closest.

(i) Outdoor storage areas that are visible from the road shall be screened by planting or fencing.

(ii) All sites shall be landscaped along road boundaries and shall be to a minimum depth of 2m except for the Commercial core Area and the

Greymouth South Commercial Area.

(iii) A landscaped area with a minimum width of 2m shall be established and maintained along internal boundaries adjoining Residential Environmental

Areas, and shall be planted with species, which at maturity, will screen the buildings from the adjoining sites . In addition, a solid wall or close-boarded fence with a minimum height of 2.0m shall screen any outdoor storage or parking areas adjacent or visible from a Residential Environmental Area..

(v) Relocated buildings meeting conditions not the of permitted activity are a controlled activity in which

Council reserves control over the design appearance the buildings . and of

(iv) Not applicable. iv) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity except as provided for in (v) Controlled

Activities.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) The effect on adjoining properties in terms of sunlight, outlook and privacy.

(ii) The effect of the increased height in terms of visual dominance by buildings of the outlook from other sites, roads and public open space in the surrounding area, which is out of character with the local environment.

(iii) The extent to which there is a need for the increased height or intrusion through the recession lines, in order to undertake the proposed activities on the site and alternatives which may have less effect on the environment.

(iv) The extent to which the proposed buildings will be compatible with the character of the local environment, including the scale of other buildings in the surrounding area.

(v) The ability to mitigate any adverse effects of increased height or exceedence of the recession planes, such as through increased separation distances between the building and adjoining sites or the provision of screening.

(i) The effect the absence of a verandah would have in terms of shelter and appearance.

(ii) The proposed location of the relocated building on the site and its visibility from off the site .

(iii)Any other matters relating to visual character of the relocated building , proposed alterations to the building , its proposed surroundings, such as topography, proximity to public areas and proposed plantings.

(i) The extent, frequency and intensity of light spill and glare.

(ii) The effect any reduced landscaping or screening will have on the surrounding amenities, particularly upon Residential Environmental

Areas.

EXPLANATION

Height controls allow a 20 metre high building. Beyond this limit control is required to protect neighbours amenities of adjoining residential properties.

The recession plane protects sunlight and privacy of adjoining properties.

Buildings and structures are also required to comply with flight protection path for the

Greymouth aerodrome to protect its operation.

Verandahs improve the amenities for pedestrians in the commercial core area by providing shelter as well as assisting in providing a common design theme.

The controls on relocated buildings will ensure that older relocatable buildings are brought up to a suitable standard. Relocatable buildings are often substandard in appearance. The rule does not apply to the

Industrial Environmental Area given that amenity is not a significant issue in the area.

Lighting and glare can detrimentally impact on a person’s enjoyment of their property particularly in respect of residential areas.

Screening of outdoor storage areas and car parking areas in the commercial and industrial areas can improve the amenity in these areas and particularly in adjoining residential environmental areas.

While landscaping enhances sites and the streetscape landscaping of frontages is not considered appropriate in the two identified commercial areas given their function and location.

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20.7 ITEM

8. Utilities

9. Signs

10. Hazardous

Substances

11. Parking,

Loading and

Access

12. Subdivision

13. Heritage

Items &

Historic

Trees

PERMITTED

(i) Refer to Appendix 1.

(i) Refer to Appendix 2

(i) Refer to Appendix 3

(i) Parking, loading and access of vehicles and transport matters associated with any activity shall be in accordance with Appendix 4. In addition the following shall apply in the Commercial Core Area:

(a) No onsite carparking shall be provided except carparking for the convenience of persons working on site may be provided to the rear of any building at a rate of one space per 100m

2 gross floor area .

Note:

Within the Commercial Core Area onsite parking shall be required on a cash in lieu basis based on the actual cost of providing

25m

2

for a carpark calculated at the current market value of the land and construction costs required by NZS 4404:1981. This amount being to a maximum of $1,500.00 plus GST per carpark.

(b) Where available all vehicle access is to be from service lanes.

(i) Refer to Appendix 5

(i) Refer to Appendix 6

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable.

(iii) Refer to

Appendix 2

(ii) Refer to

Appendix 3

(ii) Refer to

Appendix 4

(ii) Refer to

Appendix 5

(ii) Refer to

Appendix 6

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Refer to Appendix 1

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Refer to Appendix 1

(iii) Refer to Appendix 2

(iv) Refer to Appendix 3

(iii) Refer to Appendix 4

Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

Refer to Appendix 2

Refer to Appendix 3

Refer to Appendix 4

EXPLANATION

Refer to Appendix 1

Refer to Appendix 2

Refer to Appendix 3

Refer to Appendix 4

Aggregated carparking areas are appropriate in the central area rather than individual site car parks which will reduce the compactness of the area.

Cash contributions will be used for centralised public carparks.

Refer to Appendix 5 (iii) Refer to Appendix 5

(iii) Refer to Appendix 6

Refer to Appendix 5

Refer to Appendix 6 Refer to Appendix 6

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20.7 ITEM

14. Noise

EN V I R O N M EN T AL AR E AS - C O M M ER C I AL AN D I N D U S T R I AL

PERMITTED

(i) Any activity shall be conducted such that the following noise levels are not exceeded within the boundary of any site and environment area, other than the site from which the noise is created:

(a)

Commercial

Monday to Sunday

0700 - 2200 hrs 60dBA L10

2200 - 0700 hrs 50dBA L10

(Note:

Any activity sensitive to noise must be designed to take into account higher night-time noise levels.

(b)

Refer also to rule 20.7.14(ii))

75 dBA Lmax all days between 2200 hrs and 0700 hrs

(i) Commercial Environment to Residential Environment and Rural-

Residential Environment

Monday - Friday

2200 hrs to 0700 hrs 45dBA L10

0700 hrs to 2200 hrs 55dBA L10

Saturday

1700 hrs to 0800 hrs 45dBA L10

0800 hrs to 1700 hrs 55dBA L10

Sundays

45dBA L10

75dBA Lmax all days between 2200 hrs and 0700 hrs

(ii) Commercial Environment to Township Environment and Rural

Environment

Monday to Saturday

0700 hrs to 2200 hrs 55dBA L10

2200 hrs to 0700 hrs 45dBA L10

Sunday

45dBA L10

75 dBA Lmax all days between 2200 hrs and 0700 hrs

Industrial

Monday to Sunday

2200 - 2200 hrs 65dBA L10 (

Note:

Any noise sensitive activity must be designed to take into account higher night-time noise levels. Refer also to rule 20.7.14(ii))

(i) Industrial Environment to Residential Environment and Rural-

Residential Environment

Monday - Friday

2200 hrs to 0700 hrs 45dBA L10

0700 hrs to 2200 hrs 55dBA L10

Saturday

1700 hrs to 0800 hrs 45dBA L10

0800 hrs to 1700 hrs 55dBA L10

Sundays

45dBA L10

75dBA Lmax all days between 2200 hrs and 0700 hrs

(ii) Industrial Environment to Township Environment and Rural

Environment

Monday to Saturday

0700 hrs to 2200 hrs 55dBA L10

2200 hrs to 0700 hrs 45dBA L10

Sunday

45dBA L10

75 dBA Lmax all days between 2200 hrs and 0700 hrs

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable.

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) The effects on adjoining residential sites in terms of noise.

(ii) The duration, level and character of the noise, particularly at night.

(iii) The proximity and type of adjoining uses.

(iv) The existing ambient noise level in the area.

EXPLANATION

Excessive noise can detract from the amenities of the area, particularly in respect of residential environmental areas.

The prescribed limits allow industrial and commercial activities to operate within reasonable limits.

Noise sensitive activities are those activities that by their nature can be affected by noise generated by other activities. As higher night-time noise levels are permitted it is a requirement that sensitive activities are designed such that they are not adversely affected by the higher nighttime noise levels.

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20.7 ITEM

EN V I R O N M EN T AL AR E AS - C O M M ER C I AL AN D I N D U S T R I AL

PERMITTED

(iii) Industrial Environment to Commercial Environment

Monday to Sunday

0700 - 2200 hrs 60dBA L10

2200 - 0700 hrs 50dBA L10

(Note: Any noise sensitive activity must be designed to take into account higher night-time noise levels)

75 dBA Lmax all days between 2200 hrs and 0700 hrs

Except where expressly provided elsewhere in this rule, sound shall be measured in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6801:1999

Acoustic Measurement of Environmental Sound and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6801:1991 Assessment of

Environmental Sound.

(ii) In Kaiata Park an acoustic design report from a suitably qualified acoustic engineer is required to be provided for residential activities

(including residential units ) occurring on the site that are sensitive to noise. This report is to confirm that the part of the building used for residential activity is designed to achieve a noise level inside any habitable room not exceeding 30dBA L10 between the hours of

10:00pm

– 7:00am and 35dBA L10 between the hours of 7:00am –

10:00pm. Where windows must be closed to achieve the design limit alternative ventilation must be provided. The above design level must be achieved with any ventilation system operating.

Nothing in the foregoing (i) and (ii) shall apply to:

(i) Any warning device used by emergency services.

(ii) People noise at recreational activities, such as sporting events or the noise from children at school. This does not include any amplified noise.

Construction Noise

Construction noise within the district shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6803: 1999

Acoustics/construction noise.

Noise associated with helicopter landing areas.

Noise associated with helicopter landing areas shall not exceed the limits in Table 1 of, and shall be measured and assessed in accordance with the provisions of NZS 6807:1994 Noise management and land use planning for helicopter landing areas.

Blasting

Vibration from any site due to blasting shall not exceed a peak particle velocity of 5mm/sec measured in the frequency range 3-12

Hz at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

Airblast over pressure from blasting shall not exceed a peak sound pressure level of 120 dBC at the notional boundary of any dwelling, resthome, hospital or school.

CONTROLLED

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DISCRETIONARY ASSESSMENT CRITERIA EXPLANATION

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AP P E N D I C E S

PART 5

APPENDICES AND

DEFINITIONS

APPENDIX 1 - UTILITIES RULES

APPENDIX 2 - SIGNS RULES

APPENDIX 3 - HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RULES

APPENDIX 4 - TRANSPORTATION RULES

APPENDIX 5 - SUBDIVISION RULES

APPENDIX 6 - HERITAGE RULES

APPENDIX 7 - APPLICATION PROCEDURE

APPENDIX 8 - RECESSION PLANES

APPENDIX 9 - AERODROME FLIGHT PATH PROTECTION AREA

APPENDIX 10 - DESIGNATIONS

APPENDIX 11

– NOHOANGA

APPENDIX 12 - OUTLINE DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR KAIATA PARK

DEFINITIONS

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AP P E N D I X 1 - U T I L I T I E S

21 APPENDIX 1- UTILITIES RULES

21 ITEM

1. Permitted Activities

General

2. The installation of new lines for conveying electricity and telecommunications at a voltage up to and including 110kV per circuit

Note: Where appropriate, these rules and requirements are to be applied in conjunction with the Resource

Management (National

Environmental Standards for Electricity

Transmission Activities)

Regulations 2009

(NESETA)which contains rules for the operation, maintenance, upgrading, relocation or removal of existing transmission lines that are part of the

National Grid that existed as of 14 January 2010

3. Telecommunication and radiocommunication facilities

PERMITTED

The following activities (21.1

– 21.14) shall be permitted throughout the district and the rules contained in this section

(Appendix 1) apply, and override any rules of any other section.

(i) The installation of new lines for conveying electricity at a voltage up to and including 110kV per circuit and lines as defined by Section 2(1A) of the Telecommunications Act

1987, and ancillary equipment, insulators, transformers, regulators, and associated support structures including towers, masts and poles, are permitted activities if:

(a) the lines are underground when located within a

Residential, Rural Residential, Township, or

(b)

(c)

Commercial Environmental Area or; the lines are on support structures up to a maximum height of 25m in Rural and Industrial

Environmental Areas only and; the lines are located outside of areas identified on the Planning Maps as Area of Outstanding

Landscape or a Significant Natural Area. Provided that this does not apply to lines that are undergrounded and any land that is disturbed is restored to its existing condition.

(i) Telecommunication and radiocommunication facilities are permitted if

(a) there is a maximum height above ground level of:

20m in Residential, Township and Rural-Residential

Environmental Areas.

25m in Commercial or Industrial Environmental

Areas.

30m in Rural Environmental Area.

This maximum height is not to be exceeded by the support structure, aerial or antenna mounting or the aerial or antenna whether affixed to the land , a building or an existing mast, tower or pole. Notwithstanding that home television aerials in the Residential, Rural Residential or Township

Environmental Areas shall be subject to the rules for height of buildings in the respective Environmental Area standards.

(b) The facilities are located outside of areas identified on the Planning Maps as Area of Outstanding Landscape.

Provided that this does not apply to lines that are undergrounded and any land that is disturbed is restored to its existing condition.

(c) A dish antenna shall not exceed 3m diameter in any

Environmental Area.

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CONTROLLED

(ii) Not Applicable

(ii) Not Applicable

(ii) Not Applicable

AP P E N D I X 1 - U T I L I T I E S

DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Not Applicable

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Not Applicable

(iii) (a) The installation of new lines and support structures for conveying electricity at a voltage exceeding 110 kV is a discretionary activity.

(b) Any lines in 21.2(i) that contravene a permitted condition are a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any telecommunication and radiocommunication facility which contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(i) The following is applicable to all utilities : a) The degree to which the utility will affect the visual amenities of the district, including the extent to which the utility can be seen from a wide area, public places or significant outlooks and its impact against the skyline or open landscape. b) The extent of any adverse effect created through a reduced setback from boundaries on the surrounding environment including the potential to affect the privacy and outlook of residents. c) The degree to which the proposed choice of site or route for the utility will affect the environment and the reasons for that choice of site or route. d) The extent of any additional costs imposed by requiring compliance with any performance standard listed including the cost of placing lines underground or requiring design modifications to a utility . e) The degree to which the proposed utility may affect the welfare, health or safety of the community including positive effects from the operation of the utility . f) The degree to which the proposed utility may affect values held by the Tangata Whenua. g) The potential for co-siting utilities and the extent to which the provider of the utility has investigated this potential. h) The degree to which glare may affect the enjoyment, character or amenity of the surrounding environment or the safety of adjoining roads and i) the effect of measures to mitigate any such adverse effect.

The degree to which public access to the coast and waterbodies is affected. j) The degree to which heritage sites are affected. k) The degree to which ecological values are l) affected.

The extent to which substantial upgrades of

National Grid Infrastructure can be used as an opportunity to reduce adverse effects. m) The effects of electric and magnetic field in accordance with

the ‘International Commission on Nonionising Radiation protection guidelines’

for Limiting Exposure to Time- Varying Electric and Magnetic Fields (1Hz-100kHz). Health

Physics 99(6):818-836; 2010 and recommendations from the World Health

Organization monograph Environmental Health

Criteria (No 238, June2007) or revisions thereof and any applicable New Zealand standards or national environmental standards. n) The benefits from the establishment of a new transmission line. o) Any technical, operational or locational constraints.

EXPLANATION

Any activity is allowed providing the rules are not contravened.

By controlling the type of lines and associated support structures by way of voltage and definition in an empowering Act it is anticipated that the likely size of the utility and its visual impact on the environment will have been identified and is considered acceptable. Lines and support structures not encompassed within these definitions are not considered to be appropriate in every situation from a visual perspective and in the case of electricity lines, from a safety and health concern to the public from electromagnetic radiation and danger from high voltage lines.

Overhead lines have been identified as having an adverse effect on the visual amenities and character of the environment. This effect can be mitigated by requiring undergrounding in locations where this is practicable, economically feasible and where the benefits are appreciated by a significant proportion of the District's population, namely urban areas and areas of concentrated residential activity and areas of outstanding landscape.

The maximum height limit of telecommunication and radiocommunication facilities is intended to achieve a scale of development which is consistent and compatible with the character of the surrounding area and to limit the extent of overshadowing and dominance of surrounding sites .

Dish antennas differ from other antennae in that they have a circular form and therefore require additional width controls to ensure that the character and amenity of surrounding environments is not adversely affected.

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21 ITEM

4. Utility buildings and buildings ancillary to utilities other than those specified in Rules 21.6

12 and poles, masts and antennas specified in

Rule 21.3.

Note: Where appropriate, these rules and requirements are to be applied in conjunction with the Resource

Management (National

Environmental Standards for Electricity

Transmission Activities)

Regulations 2009

(NESETA)which contains rules for the operation, maintenance, upgrading, relocation or removal of existing transmission lines that are part of the

National Grid that existed as of 14 January 2010

5. Pipe networks for the conveyance and drainage of water, sewage or gas

6. Automatic weather stations or weather recording devices

7. Reservoirs, wells and supply intakes for the reticulation or provision of water supply.

8. Irrigation and stock water races, open drains and channels.

9. Telephone call boxes.

PERMITTED

(i) Utility buildings and buildings ancillary to utilities are permitted activities if:

(a) the building does not exceed 50m

2

in gross floor area and

4.0m in height in the Residential, Township and Rural

(b)

Residential Environmental Areas or in the Rural and

Commercial and Industrial Environmental Areas the building complies with height and floor area rules.

Buildings for utility purposes shall comply with the setback requirements of the environmental area within which they are situated, except that this shall not apply to buildings which are no greater than 1.8 metres high and have a floor area no greater than 5 square metres.

(c) All outdoor storage shall be screened from public view by landscaping or solid fencing at least 2m in height.

(d) Sites containing buildings more than 15m

2

in ground floor area and/or over 4.0m in height shall provide a landscaped area within the building setback a minimum width of 2m

 along the road boundary , provided that:

In the Industrial Environmental Area this requirement does not apply except where a site fronts a state Highway, or adjoins or is opposite a Residential or Township

Environmental Area.

In the Rural Environmental Area this requirement does not apply.

(e) They are located outside Areas of Outstanding Landscape indicated on the Planning Maps.

(i) Pipe networks for the conveyance and drainage of water, sewage or gas and any ancillary equipment are permitted activities provided they are:

(a) Underground.

(i) Automatic weather stations or weather recording devices are permitted activities if:

(a) any mast, aerial or pole shall not exceed 25m in height .

(i) Reservoirs, wells and supply intakes for the reticulation or provision of water supply are permitted activities if:

(a) the reservoir does not exceed the height limits specified in the Environmental Areas and

(b) the reservoir is finished in a colour that is similar to the surrounding background.

(i) Irrigation and stock water races, open drains and channels are permitted activities.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not Applicable

(ii) Not Applicable

(ii) Not Applicable

(ii) Not Applicable

(ii) Not Applicable

(ii) Not Applicable

10. Marine navigational aids and beacons.

(i) Telephone call boxes are permitted activities.

(i) Marine navigational aids and beacons are permitted activities. (ii) Not Applicable

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AP P E N D I X 1 - U T I L I T I E S

DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any utility buildings and buildings ancillary to utilities that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule 21.2

EXPLANATION

A maximum gross floor area and height has been included for buildings in all Environmental Areas in order to maintain the character and amenity of the environment. Utility buildings or buildings ancillary to utilities are often different in appearance and character from those in the surrounding environment and have a very stark or utilitarian appearance with blank walls. To minimise any adverse effect on the visual amenity or character of certain environments (those characterised by open space or residential amenity) a limitation has been placed on the size of the building .

Buildings are required to be setback a minimum distance from roads , in order to provide for an attractive street scene or rural scene; to avoid obstructing views of the street from adjoining properties; and to allow adequate daylight admission to roads . This however does not apply to smaller cabinet type structures typically found on road reserve. These structures should be located as close as possible to the boundary to avoid obstructions.

Buildings are required to be setback a minimum distance from internal boundaries , in order to ensure adequate sunlight admission, prove access for emergency services, ensure a degree of visual and aural privacy and protection from noise from neighbouring properties and limit the dominance of adjoining sites by utility buildings .

The effects of these utilities are however generally minor and may in some cases, be a very common or necessary feature of the environment, such as drainage channels or telephone call box. It is therefore appropriate that these utilities are given status as permitted activities.

(iii) Any pipe networks for the conveyance and drainage of water, sewage or gas that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any automatic weather stations or weather recording devices that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any reservoir that contravenes a permitted activity is a discretionary activity.

(ii) Not Applicable

(iii) Not Applicable

(iii) Not Applicable

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule 21.2

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule 21.2

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule 21.2

(i) Not Applicable

(i) Not Applicable

(i) Not Applicable

A number of utilities have very specific functions that are of importance or value to the community.

These facilities however do not fall within the general groupings that have been created for the majority of utility facilities or developments such as buildings , lines or telecommunication or radiocommunication facilities .

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AP P E N D I X 1 - U T I L I T I E S

21 ITEM

11. Upgrading, replacement or removal of existing electricity and telecommunication lines

Note: Where appropriate, these rules and requirements are to be applied in conjunction with the Resource

Management (National

Environmental Standards for Electricity

Transmission Activities)

Regulations 2009

(NESETA)which contains rules for the operation, maintenance, upgrading, relocation or removal of existing transmission lines that are part of the

National Grid that existed as of 14 January 2010

12. Roads

PERMITTED

(i)The upgrading, replacement or removal (subject to reinstatement of disturbed vegetation and ground), of existing electricity lines are permitted activities.

Note: Upgrading in respect of this rule means an increase in the carrying capacity, efficiency or security of electricity and associated telecommunication lines , utilising the existing support structures or structures of a similar scale and character, and includes:

(a) the addition of circuits and conductors

(b) the reconductoring of the line with higher capacity conductors

(c) the resagging of conductors

(d) the addition of longer or more efficient insulators

(e) the addition of earthwires which may contain telecommunication lines , earthpeaks and lightning rods.

Note: Upgrading shall not include:

(a) an increase in the voltage of the line unless the line was originally constructed to operate at the higher voltage but has been operating at a reduced voltage.

(b) The utilisation of a locally operated transmission line for National Grid purposes.

(i) Reconstruction and maintenance of existing formed roads , including culverts, bridges and associated protection works are permitted activities if they are.

(a) within the legal road reserve or 10m of the existing formation.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not Applicable

(ii) The construction of unformed legal roads and the reconstruction of existing formed roads beyond the legal road reserve or 10m of the existing formation, including bridges and associated protection works undertaken by a road controlling authority are controlled activities with control reserved over the effects on:

Outstanding natural features

 and landscapes.

Significant areas of indigenous vegetation and habitats of fauna.

(ii) Not applicable 13. Modification to a built power station or any associated dam, spillway, control structure or tunnel

(i)The operation, maintenance, refurbishment, enhancement and upgrading of a power station and any associated dam, spillway, control structure or tunnel is permitted if:

(a) Any external modification or addition of a structural component does not exceed 50 square meters in gross floor area or 4m in height .

Power station operations shall include the operation of penstocks, turbines, generators and switchyards.

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AP P E N D I X 1 - U T I L I T I E S

DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Not Applicable

(iii) The construction of unformed legal roads and the reconstruction and maintenance of existing formed roads beyond the legal road reserve or 10m of the existing formation, including bridges and associated protection works undertaken by parties other than a road controlling authority are restricted discretionary activities with

Council’s

discretion limited to the following matters:

 the effects on: outstanding natural features and

 landscapes

Significant areas of indigenous vegetation and habitats of fauna.

Natural character of the coastal environment

Wetlands , lakes and rivers and their margins

Historic and archaeological amenity values, and sites ,

Wilderness/ remote experience values.

The provision of legal and practical access to a site and or/an area.

(iii) Modification to a built power station or any associated dam spillway, control structure or tunnel that contravenes a permitted activity is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT

CRITERIA

For all other lines see the assessment criteria listed under Rule 21.2

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule

21.2

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule

21.2

EXPLANATION

This rule applies to existing electricity lines in the District, however there are also specific rules in the NESETA that apply to existing

National Grid transmission lines.

Transmission lines are defined under the

NESETA as

The facilities and structures used for, or associated with, the overhead or underground transmission of electricity in the national grid; and

Includes transmission line support structures, telecommunication cables, and telecommunication devices to which paragraph (a) applies; but

Does not include an electricity substation

Existing transmission lines that were operating , or able to be operated at 14

January 2010 (the commencement of the

NESETA regulations.

Legal road roads works.

External modifications to existing power stations are in scale permitted if they are not extensive l.

Any works involving a power station in the actual bed of a river is within the jurisdiction of the Regional Council and not the District

Council.

provide a vital access function in the district. In achieving the purpose of the

reserve however it is important to manage the potential effects of any formation

Where outstanding natural features and landscapes and SNAs have not been identified, they shall be assessed through the resource consent process.

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21 ITEM

14. Noise

15. Light Spill & Glare

16. Other standards for utilities :

17. Other utilities

PERMITTED

(i) The noise provisions of the Environmental

Area shall apply to the operation of utilities depending on the area the utility is located in.

Note:

Where two Environmental Areas adjoin the noise standards shall be those of the area that has the lower (more restricted) specified noise standard.

(i) No activity shall result in a greater than 2.5 lux spill (horizontal and vertical) of light onto any adjoining property, measured at any point more than 2m inside the boundary of the adjoining property or the closest window to the adjoining property, whichever is the closest.

(i) The provisions of the following shall apply to Utilities :

23. Appendix 2

Signs Rules

24. Appendix 3

– Hazardous rules

25. Appendix 4

– Transportation rules

26. Appendix 5

– Subdivision rules

27. Appendix 6

– Heritage Rules

28. Appendix 9

– Aerodrome Flight Path

Protection Area

Provided that in respect of parking:

- where sites are unstaffed no parking shall be required;

- where sites are staffed (in accordance with the parking standards set out in

Appendix 4) shall be provided on the basis of one space per person normally working on the site .

(i) Not Applicable

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

(ii) Refer to Appendices

(ii) Not Applicable

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AP P E N D I X 1 - U T I L I T I E S

DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition are a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition of a activity is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Refer to Appendices

(iii) Any other utility not listed as a permitted or controlled activity is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) The duration and frequency of the noise.

(ii) The proximity and type of adjoining uses.

(ii) The existing ambient noise level in the area.

(i) The extent frequency and intensity of light spill and glare.

(iii) Refer to Appendices

EXPLANATION

This provision provides protection from excessive noise levels generated by utilities .

Lighting and glare can detrimentally impact on a person's enjoyment of their property.

See the assessment criteria listed under

Rule 21.2

Compliance with the specified general standards will avoid, remedy or mitigate any adverse effects or utilities . It is recognised that some departure from these standards should be made for parking given the different nature of utilities .

Other utilities are listed as discretionary activities in order to provide for utilities which do not fall within a generic grouping of activities but require consent for their establishment due to the nature of their adverse effects on the environment

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AP P E N D I X 2 - SI G N S

22 APPENDIX 2- SIGNS RULES

Note:

Rule 22.1 should be applied separately to the other rules in this section. If a sign activity is addressed in Rule 22.1 then Rules 22.2 and 22.3 are not applicable. If the sign activity is not addressed in Rule 22.1 then the Environmental Area Rules 22.2 or 22.3 shall apply.

22 ITEM PERMITTED CONTROLLED

1. Applicable to signs through the district

(i) The following signs are permitted throughout the District if:

(a) they are nationally approved traffic signs , including New

Zealand Transport Agency signs approved for service and tourism activities or signs denoting the name of a street or the street number of premises.

(b) they are temporary signs for community, educational and recreational events and during building construction, provided that the:

Signs

Signs

shall not exceed 2m

2

in area.

shall not be erected more than six months prior to the date of the commencement of the activity advertised nor remain erected more than one week following completion of that activity.

Confirmation is provided, from the relevant road controlling authority, that traffic safety is not compromised as a result of the erection of the sign .

(c) they are signs for any public purpose or in connection with and on the same site as any utility , community facility or public reserve , provided that they shall not exceed 1m

2

in area, where they are visible from any public road , public land or adjoining or neighbouring property.

(d) they are signs advertising that the property, on which the

(e) sign is located, is for sale, provided that they shall not exceed 0.6m

2

in area.

Signs erected under (b) - (d) shall also comply with the

 following:

 the height requirements for buildings in the relevant environmental area.

 do not obstruct the line of sight of any corner, bend, intersection or vehicle crossing.

 do not obstruct, obscure or impair the view of any traffic sign or signal.

 do not resemble or be likely to be confused with any traffic sign or signal.

 do not use reflective materials that may interfere with a road user's vision. do not use flashing or revolving lights. are not affixed to vehicles or trailers, and parking in a public place, road , public property or private property so as to be visible from a public place. This does not apply to advertising painted, or attached directly, onto vehicles or trailers and incidental to the primary use of that vehicle or trailer.

(ii) Not Applicable

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AP P E N D I X 2 - SI G N S

DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

The assessment criteria shall be used for all applications for resource consent for signs :

(i) The extent to which the sign will have any adverse effects on traffic safety or the visual amenities of the locality.

(ii) The extent to which the sign in Kaiata Park will have any adverse effects on traffic safety.

(iii) The need for any extra signage in addition to the permitted signage for the zone.

(iv) In relation to general traffic safety:

the extent to which the signs may cause an obstruction to driving sight distances, traffic signs or signals, or unnecessarily intrude into a drivers field of view, and

the extent that any sign resembles a traffic control sign or signal, or may make a traffic control sign or signal difficult to discern, with respect to both colour and shape, when considered from all possible driving angles.

(v) Whether public convenience will be reduced.

(vi) Any likely cumulative effects of allowing the sign to be erected.

(vii)The need to impose conditions relating to the location, design and appearance of the sign and the period for which it may be erected, or operated.

(viii)Compliance with sign design guidelines developed for the West Coast Development Group and West

Coast Regional Council.

(ix) The need for offsite signage, and the distance from the site to which the sign relates.

EXPLANATION

To meet the Council's objectives relating to signs and outdoor advertising the method of stating permitted and discretionary forms of signage is considered the most appropriate and effective to mitigate the potential adverse effects of signage in the District.

Those types of signs which are generally accepted as essential for the provision of information throughout the

District have been listed as permitted activities with some restrictions on size and location. This allows certainty throughout the

District as to what signage is permitted for different activities.

Forms of signage that may be undesirable because of their potential to cause distraction to drivers, and thus adversely affect traffic safety are considered as discretionary activities in the

District. Other types of signage have been listed as discretionary activities because of their potential adverse effect on visual amenities, public health and safety and public convenience. This enables

Council to consider their suitability with respect to matters of traffic safety, visual amenity, and the objectives and policies of the

Plan.

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22 ITEM

2. Signs in

Commercial,

Industrial and

Township

Environmenta l Areas

3. Signs in

Residential,

Rural-

Residential and Rural

Environmenta l Areas

PERMITTED

(i) Signs in the Commercial, Industrial and Township Environmental Areas are permitted if:

(a)

(d)

Signs attached to buildings do not exceed the highest point of the roof.

(b) Signs attached to, but under, street verandahs shall be:

 no closer than 2.5 metres to the footpath below setback at least 500mm from the kerb of the road

 at least 1.5 metres away from any other under verandah sign

(c) Street verandah

’s fascia signs do not protrude below the verandah.

Signs above verandahs but attached to the verandah do not exceed 1.2m in height above the top of the verandah and shall be setback at least 500mm from the fascia line.

(e) Signs attached to a structure or the face of a building do not:

 project onto or over a road if the sign is less than 2.5m above the road , or

 project more than 150mm onto or over a road if the sign is 2.5m or more above the road .

(f) The maximum size of a sign permitted in the Township Environmental Area is 3m

2

.

(g) Signs comply with the environmental area. height requirements for buildings for the relevant

(h) In areas where the speed limit is greater than 70 km/hr, signs have a minimum lettering height of 160mm, and all signs and their messages are static.

(ii) In addition to (i) above, signs within the Commercial and Industrial areas of

Kaiata Park are permitted provided that:

(a) No free-standing signs in Kaiata Park within 50m of State Highway 7 shall be directed at State Highway 7.

(b) No free-standing signs in Kaiata Park in the industrial and commercial environment area shall be directed at the residential, rural-residential and rural environmental areas.

(i) Signs in the Residential, Rural-Residential and Rural Environmental Areas are permitted if:

(a) They are limited to advertising a legally established activity, located on the site on which the activity occurs, and advertise only services, products or events available or occurring on the site .

(b) They are placed no more than 3 metres above ground level or be no higher than the eaves of a building to which they relate, whichever is the lesser.

(c) The total area of signs on any site shall not exceed the following maximum areas:

0.5m

2

in Residential Environmental Areas; and

1.4m

2 in Rural-Residential Environmental Areas; and

2m

2

in Rural Environmental Area.

For the purposes of measuring the area of any sign , a doublesided sign shall be measured as the area of one side only.

(d) Signs in Residential Environmental Area are limited to a single sign for each road frontage of any site .

(e) Where adjoining a State highway in the Rural-Residential or Rural environmental areas they are limited to a maximum of six words and/or symbols, with a maximum of 40 characters and are located at right angles to the State highway.

Signs comply with the height requirements for buildings for the relevant (f) environmental area.

(g) In areas where the speed limit is greater than 70 km/hr, signs have a minimum lettering height of 160mm, and all signs and their messages are static.

CONTROLLED

(ii) Not

Applicable

(ii) Not

Applicable

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AP P E N D I X 2 - SI G N S

DISCRETIONARY

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule 22.1

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule 22.1

EXPLANATION

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule

22.1

See the assessment criteria listed under Rule

22.1

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AP P E N D I X 3 - H AZ AR D O U S SU B ST AN C E S

23 APPENDIX 3- HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RULES

23 ITEM

1. Use or Storage of

Hazardous Substances

2. Manufacture of

Hazardous Substances

PERMITTED

(i) The use or storage of hazardous substances are permitted activities if they ;

(a) are not listed in Schedule 1 or

(b) are listed in Schedule 1 but their quantities are below those specified in Column A of Schedule 2 for Permitted

Activities in the relevant Environmental Area; and

(c) comply with all legislation and regulation requirements

Provided that:

The use or storage of hazardous substances is permitted if it is a consequence of temporary military training (no longer than twenty eight days at any one time) and complies with relevant NZ Defence Force “Codes of

Practice”.

(i) Not Applicable

NB:

1.

2.

The treatment, discharge and disposal of hazardous substances are controlled by

Regional Council Plans.

These rules do not apply to the transport of hazardous substances , which is covered by separate legislation.

CONTROLLED

(ii)Not Applicable

(ii) Not Applicable

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DISCRETIONARY

(iii) The use or storage of hazardous substances that contravene a permitted condition are a discretionary activity.

(iii)The manufacturing of hazardous substances is a discretionary activity

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(i) Applicable to all activities:

(a) The extent to which the proposed activity and the proposed site poses a risk to the environment, and in particular:

(i) The sensitivity of the surrounding natural and physical environment. Depending on the scale of the proposal this may include separation distances to people sensitive activities

(particularly activities such as schools, rest homes, hospitals, shopping centres etc.) or to sensitive natural resources (e.g.. aquifers, streams, wetland, habitats).

(ii) The number of people potentially at risk from the site .

(iii) The risk to adjacent property.

(iv) Cumulative effects of hazardous facilities in the area.

(v) Site drainage and off site infrastructure (e.g. stormwater, sewer type and capacity).

(vi) Transportation safety including method of transportation, quantities and types of hazardous substances proposed transport routes. transported, and

(b) The extent to which the proposed activity can avoid or mitigate any undue risk. Methods can include site configuration and location of materials, site management and spill contingency planning, transport methods and routes, monitoring and maintenance schedules.

(c) The ability of the proposed activity to be established at an alternative location or for the activity to undertake alternative methods, when it is likely that an activity will result in any significant adverse effects on the environment.

(d) The extent to which the proposed site is accessible from the major roading network to avoid heavy traffic volumes in local

(particularly residential local roads roads

); and the extent to which the proposed site's entry and exit points may pose a problem with existing intersections.

EXPLANATION

The Council has determined the types and quantities of hazardous substances that can be used as of right in the various

Environmental Areas of the

District. If an operator uses quantities of hazardous substances greater than which have been prescribed in

Schedule 2, a consent is required The following matters were considered when compiling

Schedule 2:

Schedule 1 and

(i) the types of substances hazardous that are commonly used or stored in the District and pose a risk to the community or the environment;

(ii) the use of rules to ensure containment of hazardous substances stored as of right in the District;

(iii) the controls that are in place from existing legislation such as the Dangerous Goods Act and the Explosives Act.

Irrespective of Schedule 1 and

Schedule 2, the Council considers that the manufacturing substances of will hazardous require a consent. This is because the manufacturing of hazardous substances is often a complex process that involves using large quantities of substances . hazardous

In addition to restricting the volumes of hazardous substances to be used and stored, and the introduction of appropriate site standards, the

Council considers it should retain the right to use enforcement provisions where the manufacturing, use, storage, disposal of, and transportation of hazardous substances is likely to have an adverse effect on the District's environment.

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23.1.1 SCHEDULE 1 - CLASSIFICATION OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

Class

1.

EXPLOSIVES

2. GASES

Characteristics Examples

Including but not limited to:

1 Explosives

1a

An explosive substance or waste is a solid or liquid that is, in itself, capable by chemical reaction of producing gas at such a temperature and pressure and at such speed as to cause damage to the surroundings (other than those specified in 1b below).

1a

Nitrate mixtures, nitro compounds, chlorate mixtures, ammunition/ detonators

(excluding those for small arms use).

1b

as in 1a but with restricted use in the manufacture or reloading of small arms cartridges; or for the storage of flares.

1b

gunpowder, compound or adapted nitro and exclusively used for cartridges for small arms; or for flares.

2.1

Flammable Gases

2.1a

LPG

2.1a

LPG

2.1b

Any other Gases which at 20 o

C and a standard pressure of 101.3 kPa:

2.1b

Acetylene, methane. hydrogen,

*are ignitable when in a mixture of 13% or less by volume with air, or

*have a flammability range with air of at least 12% regardless of the lower flammability limit.

This class includes aerosols containing flammable propellants if the contents include more than 45% by mass or more than 250g of flammable components.

2.2

Toxic Gases

2.2

Chlorine, sulphur dioxide, ammonia, methyl bromide Gases which are known or are presumed to be toxic or corrosive to humans because they have an LC

50

value equal to or less than 5,000 ml/m

3

(ppm) when tested in accordance with procedures defined in Para 6.5(c) of the United Nations

Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods,

7th revised edition, or its subsequent revisions.

2.3 Non-flammable, Non-toxic Gases

2.3

Argon, helium, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, freons, nitrous oxide.

Gases which are stored or transported under a pressure not less than 280kPa at 20oC, or as refrigerated liquids, and which:

are asphyxiant- gases which dilute or replace the oxygen normally in the atmosphere, or

are oxidising- gases which may, generally by providing oxygen, cause or contribute to the combustion of other material more than air does, or

have neither asphyxiant nor oxidising characteristics.

3 FLAMMABLE

LIQUIDS

3 Flammable Liquids

Liquids, or mixtures of liquids, or liquids containing solids in solution or suspension, having the following flammability limits:

3a

Flash point <23 o

C

3a

Petrol, adhesives, ethyl and methyl alcohols, acetone, benzene, butylamine, MIBK.

3b

Flash point ³23 o

C; <61oC

3b

Kerosene, styrene monomer, cyclohexanone, turpentine, butyl methacrylate, chlorobenzene,

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3c

Flash point >61 o

C

3u

Storage of 3a, b and/or c in underground tanks ethoxyethanol.

3c

Diesel, petroleum oils.

4 FLAMMABLE

SOLIDS

4.1

Flammable Solids

Solids or wastes other than those classified as explosives, which under suitable conditions, i.e. impact, friction, heat, ignition, will burn or self react with extreme intensity

(excludes coal).

4.1

Red phosphorus, ammonium picrate, picric acid, monomethyamine nitrocellulose, nitrate, trinitrobenzene, magnesium alloys.

4.2

Substances or wastes liable to spontaneous combustion

4.2

Yellow or white phosphorus, magnesium alkyls, dithionites.

Substances or wastes that are liable to spontaneous heating during transport, or heating up on contact with air, and then being liable to catch fire.

4.3 Substances which in contact with water, emit flammable gases

Substances or wastes that by interaction with water are liable to become spontaneously flammable or give off flammable gases in dangerous quantities.

4.3

Alkali metals e.g. sodium, potassium, magnesium, lithium; metal carbides metal calcium, hydrides,

5 OXIDISING

SUBSTANCES

5.1

Oxidising Substances

Substances or wastes which, in themselves, are not necessarily combustible, but may, generally by yielding oxygen, cause or contribute to the combustion of other materials.

5.2

Organic Peroxides

5.1

Chromates, chlorates, chlorites, permanganates. bromates, nitrates,

Organic substances or wastes which contain the bivalent

O=O structure and are thermally unstable substances which may undergo exothermic self-accelerating decomposition.

5.2

Any organic peroxide

(includes peroxy and per compounds). Perdicarbonates, butyl peroxyphthalate, cumene hydroperoxide, bezoyl peroxide.

6 TOXIC AND

INFECTIOUS

SUBSTANCES

6.1 Poisonous (toxic) Substances

These are substances liable either to cause death or serious injury or to harm human health if swallowed or inhaled or by skin contact, and which are confirmed to fall within the following toxicity classification:

Oral toxicity LD

50

(mg/kg)

6.1

cadmium

Arsenic compounds, compounds, lead salts, mercury amalgams, salts cyanides, and methyl bromide, acrylamide, phenols, chlorophenols, aniline, oxalates, chlorinated solvents.

Solids <200

Liquids <500

Dermal toxicity LD50 (mg/kg) < 1000

Inhalation toxicity dust/ mist LC

50

(mg/l) <10

Inhalation toxicity vapours: If > 0.2 LD

50

and LD

50

< 5,000 ml/m

3

7

AGRICHEMICA

LS

Note:

LC

50

, LD

50 and “V” are defined in Chapter 6 of the

United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of

Dangerous Goods, 7th revised edition, or its subsequent revisions.

7 Agrichemicals

Substances having a toxicity as specified in 6, but formulated specifically for agricultural and forestry activities, (including aquaculture), and including but not limited to herbicides,

7

Biprydyls, di-nitrophenols, phenoxy compounds, organophosphates, carbamates, organochlorines.

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8

CORROSIVES

fungicides, pesticides.

8 Corrosives

Substances or wastes which by chemical action, will cause severe damage when in contact with living tissue or, in the case of leakage will damage or destroy other material and goods or cause other hazards

8

Acids such as; nitric, sulphuric, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric acids; tricholoro acetic acid. Alkalis such as; sodium, potassium and lithium hydroxides. Zinc chloride, zirconium tetrachloride, sulphur chlorides, silicon tetrachloride, phosphorus pentoxide, ferric chloride. Phenolsulphonic acid, hydroxlamine hexyltrichlorosilane, sulphate, ethanolamine

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SCHEDULE 2 - QUANTITY LIMITS FOR HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES IDENTIFIED IN

SCHEDULE 1.

TOWNSHIP, RESIDENTIAL AND RURAL-RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS

Schedule 1 Class Column A

1a

1

storage only

1b

1

storage only

2

3a

3b, 3c

3u

4.1

4.2, 4.3

5.1

5.2

6

7 Township, Residential & Open Space Only

7 Rural Residential Only

8

COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS

Nil

15kg

250 litres

50 litres

2

1200 litres

Nil

10 kg

100 kg

100 kg

5 kg

1 kg

10 litres

50 litres

20 litres

7

8

5.1

5.2

6

Schedule 1 Class

1a

1

storage only

1b

1

storage only

2

3a

3b, 3c

3u

4.1

4.2, 4.3

Column A

25 g

50 kg

250 litres

3,000 litres

3,000 litres

20,000 litres

50kg

1,000 kg

1,000 kg

25 kg

200 litres

500 kg

1000 kg

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7

8

5.2

6

RURAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS

Schedule 1 Class

1a

1

storage only

1b

1

storage only

2

3a

3b

3c

3u

4.1

4.2, 4.3

5.1

Notes

Column A

2.5 kg

15 kg

250 litres

2,000 litres

3,000 litres

5,000 litres

10,000 litres

10 kg

1,000 kg

1,000 kg

10 kg

200 litres

300 kg

400 litres

1. The use of high explosives is a permitted activity in all Environmental Areas, but is subject to the Explosives Act and any subsequent legislation.

2. The 50 litre restriction does not apply to petrol and other 3a flammable liquids contained in a fuel tank of an internal combustion engine.

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24 APPENDIX 4 - TRANSPORTATION RULES

24.1 COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS

The following provisions shall apply where:

1. an activity seeks to be established on a site , or

2.

3. there is a change in the scale, nature or intensity of an activity, or a building (s) is constructed, substantially reconstructed, altered or added to.

Nothing in these provisions shall limit the power of the Council to require or impose conditions or standards in respect of applications for resource consent.

All permitted activities shall comply with the following Parking, Loading and Access Rules.

All activities that do not comply with either the

Parking and Loading Rules

or the Access

Rules

and all developments within Kaiata Park that are not in general conformity with the

Kaiata Park Outline Development Plan (attached as Appendix 12) shall be a Discretionary

Activity in relation to those matters of non-compliance.

24.1.1

That roading within, and State Highway access from, the Kaiata Park development shall be in general accordance with the Outline Development Plan (attached as appendix 12).

Note:

See Section 24.9 - Schedule 4 for Grey District Roading Hierarchy.

24.2 PARKING AND LOADING

24.2.1 MINIMUM PARKING SPACE REQUIREMENTS

The following shall be the minimum number of parking spaces to be provided at all times for its particular use, in respect of any activity.

If any activity is not listed below the activity closest in nature to the activity should be used, or where there are two or more similar activities, the activity with the higher parking rate shall apply.

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TABLE 24.1 MINIMUM PARKING SPACE REQUIREMENTS

ACTIVITY PARKING SPACES REQUIRED

RESIDENTIAL 1 space per residential unit except that in the Residential

Environmental Areas in Moana and Iveagh Bay, 3 spaces per residential unit are required.

VISITOR

PREMISES

ACCOMMODATION 1 space per unit (where applicable) or 1 space per 5 beds plus 1 space per 2 staff

COMMERCIAL

INDUSTRIAL

5 spaces per 100m

2 gross floor area

2 spaces per 100m

2 gross floor area

MEETING PLACES AND

ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES

10 spaces per 100m

2

public area or 1 per 10 seats, whichever is greater

SPORTS FIELDS

HOSPITALS

HEALTH CARE SERVICES

OFFICES

EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES

15 spaces per hectare

1 space per 5 beds plus 1 space per 2 staff

2 spaces per professional plus 1 space per 2 staff

2 spaces per 100m

2 gross floor area

1 space per 2 staff plus 1 space per 10 students over 15 years of age

CAR SPACES FOR PEOPLE

WITH DISABILITIES

Car parking areas shall include spaces for people with disabilities provided at the rate of:

1 for up to 10 total spaces provided,

2 for up to 100 total spaces provided, plus 1 more for every additional 50 spaces.

Carparking for people with disabilities shall be located as close as practicable to the building entrance. The spaces should be on a level surface and be clearly signed.

24.2.2 ASSESSMENT OF PARKING AREAS

Where an assessment of the required parking standards results in a fractional space, any fraction under one half shall be disregarded and any fraction of one half or more shall be counted as one space.

The area of any parking space or spaces provided and of vehicular access drives and aisles provided within a building shall be excluded from the assessment of gross floor area of that building for the purpose of ascertaining the total number of spaces required or permitted.

Refer to Financial Contributions Section 15.10 where a financial contribution may be taken where the carparking requirements cannot be met.

24.2.3 SIZE OF PARKING SPACES

All required parking spaces other than for residential units , and associated manoeuvring areas are to be designed to accommodate a 90 percentile design motor car (refer Section

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24.6 - Schedule 1) and shall be laid out in accordance with the parking space dimensions in the Table below.

TABLE 24.2 PARKING SPACE DIMENSIONS

TYPE

USER

Class 2

(2)

OF

Casual Users

PARKING

ANGLE

Class 1

(1)

Regular Users

90

0

90

0

STALL

WIDTH

(3)

2.4

2.5

2.6

2.5

2.6

2.7

3.6 People disabilities with 90

0

All 0

0

(Parallel) 2.5

All

All

All

30

45

60

0

0

0

2.5

2.5

2.7

2.5

2.7

2.9

AISLE WIDTH STALL

DEPTH

7.0

6.6

6.2

8.0

7.0

6.6

8.0

3.5

(4)

5.5

(5)

3.5

3.8

3.5

4.5

4.0

3.5

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

6.1

4.4

5.0

5.0

5.4

5.4

5.4

OVERHANG

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.6

0.7

0.7

0.8

0.8

0.8

NOTES

:

1. Class 1 regular users are people whose regular use gives them a familiarity with the building that permits smaller safe clearances between vehicles and parts of buildings .

2.

3.

Class 2 casual users are people (usually short-term visitors) who would not be familiar with the building layout.

Stall widths shall be increased by 300mm where they abut obstructions such as columns or walls.

4.

5.

One-way aisle only.

Two-way aisle.

6. All dimensions are in metres.

24.2.4 GRADIENT OF CAR PARKS

Car parking areas shall have a gradient of no more than 1 in 20 in any one direction.

24.2.5 REVERSE MANOEUVRING

Onsite manoeuvring for a 90 percentile car (refer Section 24.7 - Schedule 2) shall be provided to ensure that no vehicle is required to reverse either onto or off a site where:

1. Any development has access to a district arterial or strategic route;

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2. Any development is required to provide 4 or more car spaces having access onto a collector route;

Any development is required to provide 10 or more parking spaces ; 3.

4. Two or more residential units share a common driveway where any driveway exceeds

15m in length;

5. There is a right-of-way of over 15m serving the site .

Onsite manoeuvring for a 90 percentile truck shall be provided to ensure that no truck is required to reverse onto or off a site where any development requires loading areas or trade vehicle storage having access onto an arterial or a collector road .

24.2.6 QUEUING

To permit free flow of traffic into the car parking area without adversely affecting traffic flows in surrounding streets, the queuing space shall be no less than that given in Table 24.3:

TABLE 24.3 QUEUING SPACE

Storage Capacity of Car Park

(Number of Vehicles)

0 - 20

21 - 50

Length of Queuing Space

(m)

6.0

10.5

51 - 100 15.0

101 - 150

151

– 200

19.0

24.0

24.2.7 ACCESS TO SITE

Where the storage capacity of a carpark is greater than 50 vehicles the adjoining road onto which egress and ingress is obtained shall be capable of accommodating a turning lane in a manner that does not disrupt traffic flow.

24.2.8 LOADING AREAS

The following provision shall be made for loading:

24.2.8.1 General Requirements

Provision shall be made in respect of all buildings , and land uses for loading and unloading of goods, and for the use of land and buildings . All such activity shall take place on the site and access shall be such that visibility of traffic entering and leaving the site shall not be impaired. Vehicles shall be able to enter and leave the site in a forward direction.

24.2.8.2 Counting of Parking Spaces

A loading space shall be counted as a parking space according to the number of vehicles the bay is capable of accommodating conveniently when in use as a loading bay.

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24.2.8.3 Surface of Parking and Loading Areas

The surface of all parking, loading and trade vehicle storage areas (except parking areas for residential units requiring less than three spaces) shall be formed, sealed or otherwise maintained so as not to create a dust or noise nuisance.

The first 5.5m of such areas (as measured from the road boundary ) shall be formed and surfaced to ensure that material such as mud, stone chips or gravel is not carried onto any footpath, road or service lane.

All stormwater from parking areas shall be collected on site and piped or channelled to an approved stormwater disposal system.

24.2.8.4 Landscaping

Landscaping shall not adversely affect the visibility of motorists leaving a site or create an unsafe environment for persons using the car park or the adjacent footpath.

Where parking areas for five or more vehicles are provided within or adjoining residential areas, such parking shall be effectively screened on all sides.

24.3 ACCESS

24.3.1 STANDARDS OF VEHICLE CROSSING

Vehicle crossing to any site shall be by way of a vehicle crossing constructed pursuant to

Council standards as set in Schedule 3 (Figures 6

– 8 and 24.8.3 - Diagrams A-E).

24.3.2 VEHICULAR ACCESS TO CORNER SITES

Access to, or outlet from a corner site shall not be located nearer to the corner of a strategic route, district arterial or collector route than 8 metres. Council may refuse approval absolutely if access or an outlet more distant from the corner could be provided.

24.3.3 ACCESS SIGHT DISTANCES

Any access constructed shall be able to provide the following minimum sight distances:

TABLE 24.4 MINIMUM ACCESS SIGHT DISTANCES

MINIMUM SIGHT DISTANCE (metres)

FRONTAGE ROAD CLASSIFICATION

COLLECTOR ARTERIAL

DRIVEWAY

CLASSIFICATION

LOW VOLUME

Up to 200 vehicle manoeuvres per day

HIGH VOLUME

More than 200 vehicle manoeuvres per day

*Operating

Speed (km/h)

50

70

80

100

50

70

80

100

45

85

105

160

90

140

175

250

90

140

175

250

90

140

175

250

Also refer to Section 24.3.4.1 - Figure 1 for determining sight distance from an accessway .

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24.3.4 ACCESS TO STRATEGIC ROUTES

An access to a Strategic Route shall comply with the following:

(i) No legal access is available from another road .

(ii) The traffic generated through the access to the Strategic Route is less than 100 equivalent car movements per day (ecm/d).

(iii) Compliance with the performance criteria given in Table 24.5 below, regarding sight distance, clearance from intersections, and minimum access spacing.

(iv) For an access with less than 30 equivalent car movements per day (ecm/d), the vehicle crossing is to be designed and formed in accordance with Diagram C in

24.8.6.

(v) For an access with between 30 and 100 emc/d, the vehicle crossing and localised road widening is to be designed and formed in accordance with Diagram D in 24.8.6.

(vi) Provision for manoeuvring on site , so that reverse manoeuvring onto the State highway is not required.

(vii)

Any subdivision and/or development in the Kaiata Park area will require the Fairhall

Road intersection with State Highway 7 to be upgraded in accordance with the design specifications published in the Austroads document ‘Guide to Traffic Engineering

Practice Part 5: Intersection at Grade’ to provide a full T-Junction Intersection with left turn and right turn lanes from both state highway approaches to the intersection.

TABLE 24.5:

Property access performance criteria where traffic generation is less than 100 equivalent car movements per day (ecm/d).

Posted (Legal

Speed Limit

(km/h)

Required Sight

Distances (m)

See Diagram

A in 24.8.6

Location of Property Access

Relative to Intersection.

See Diagram B in 24.8.6

Minimum Spacing

Between Adjacent

Property Accesses

Distance N on Diagram

B in 24.8.6 (m)

Minimum

Distance K

(m)

Minimum Side

Road Distance

M (m)

50

60

70

80

100

85

115

140

170

250

30

50

100

120

200

20

30

45

60

60

-

-

-

100

200*

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AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

there shall be no more than 5 individual accesses along any 1 km section of State highway (on both sides), measured 500m either side of a proposed access .

(viii) Any subdivision and/or development in Paroa Developments will require the Clough

Road and State Highway 6 intersection to be upgraded in accordance with the intersection standard attached as Diagram F in Appendix 4.

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176

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.3.4.1 Figure 1 - Sight Distances

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177

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.3.5 ROADING HIERARCHY

The Council has adopted a roading hierarchy for roads in the District that is listed in

Schedule 4. The categories of roads and their characteristics are:

1. Strategic Routes: are roads and motorways which form part of a network of national strategic importance, which are a significant element in the national economy, for which a high level of user service must be provided at all times and are a significant element in the regional economy.

2.

3.

District Arterials: are roads which serve as links of strategic district importance within or between districts, are a significant element in the local economy and often also serve as local roads .

Collector Routes: are roads which are locally preferred routes between or within areas of population or activity and complement district arterials but have property access as a higher priority.

4. Local Roads : are all other appropriate for the traffic use. roads servicing land use activities with standards

24.4 ASSESSMENT MATTERS FOR RESOURCE CONSENTS

In considering whether or not to grant consent or impose conditions for discretionary activities, the Council shall have regard to, but not be limited by, the following assessment matters:

24.4.1 PARKING, LOADING AND ACCESS

(i)

Whether it is physically practicable to provide the required parking or loading spaces on the site in terms of the existing location of topography and utility location. buildings , access to the road ,

(ii)

Whether there is an adequate alternative supply of parking or loading spaces vicinity. In general on-street parking is not considered an alternative.

in the

(iii)

Whether a demonstrably less than normal incidence of parking or loading will be generated by the proposal, such as due to specific business practice, type of customer, bus transportation.

(iv)

Whether the Council is anticipating providing public carparking that would serve the vicinity of the activity, and whether a cash payment towards such public carparking can be made in lieu of part or all of the parking requirement, or loading space .

(v)

Whether a significant adverse effect on the character and amenity of the surrounding area will occur as a result of not providing the required parking or loading space .

(vi)

The extent to which the safety and efficiency of the surrounding roading network and the vehicles and pedestrians who use it, would be adversely affected by parked and manoeuvring vehicles on the roads .

(vii)

Any cumulative effect of the lack of onsite parking and loading spaces in conjunction with other activities in the vicinity not providing the required number of parking or loading spaces .

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AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

(viii)

(ix)

To what extent the safety and efficiency of the adjoining road would be compromised by additional access points, oversized access points or an access point located closer to an intersection than is permitted by the Plan.

The adequacy of available site distances having regard to the 85 th

percentile speed of vehicles on the road , and whether particular mitigation measures such as deceleration or turning lanes are required due to speed or volume of vehicles on the road .

(x)

The extent to which the safety and efficiency of the State Highway is compromised by non-compliance with the Outline Development Plan for Kaiata Park (attached as appendix 12).

24.5 REASONS FOR RULES

24.5.1 PARKING AND LOADING SPACE REQUIREMENTS

The provision of off-street parking and loading for each activity minimises the adverse effects on the safety and efficiency of the road from on-street parking, loading and manoeuvring vehicles. It also enables the retention of on-street parking for short-term visitors to an area.

Provision of off-street parking also improves the visual amenity of streets by reducing the level of long-term on-street vehicle parking.

The parking requirements have been categorised under broad activity headings each of which generate different parking requirements. Surveys of the parking generation of different activities provide a basis for the standards for calculating the number of parking spaces required. The parking standards for most activities have been set at a level which provides for the off street parking requirements for all but the very busiest times. Three carparking spaces are required in Moana and Iveagh Bay to ensure that there is available parking onsite for trailers and boats, given that these items can obstruct the road carriageway if parked on the road .

It is not always appropriate to require the full provision of off-street parking needed to satisfy demand. Cultural, conservation and educational facilities often provide large areas of open space and high amenity values that would be lost if large areas were turned into formed carparking.

24.5.2 PARKING AND LOADING AREA DESIGN

The design of the parking and loading areas are based on 90 percentile design vehicles. The dimensions of these vehicles and their associated turning circle requirements are such that

90 percent of the vehicles in New Zealand comply with their requirements. Critical manoeuvre areas have been calculated to allow 99 percent of vehicles to use them. These areas are bounded by immovable objects such as walls and columns and it is therefore important to provide the space to allow vehicles to manoeuvre easily.

Controls over the surfacing of parking and loading areas have been included to protect the amenity of surrounding properties and public places from noise and dust nuisance. The controls are also intended to avoid deterioration of road and footpath surfaces or vehicle and pedestrian safety through loose surfacing material being carried onto footpaths, roads or service lanes.

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AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.5.3 REVERSE MANOEUVRING

Onsite manoeuvring is required for all site s on arterial roads , shared access and where a large number of vehicle movements onto and off a site are expected. This helps to protect the efficiency and safety of the roads by minimising the number of vehicles required to reverse onto or off a site , which is the cause of approximately 10% of accidents at driveways.

Strategic, arterial and collector roads have the most protection applied to them as their function is to carry the largest volumes of traffic at the highest level of efficiency.

24.5.4 QUEUING SPACES

A queuing space length is required at the entrance to larger carparking and loading areas to provide an area off the street for cars to queue while waiting for manoeuvring vehicles, or for a parking space . This protects the safety and efficiency of the frontage road from the effects of vehicles required to queue on the street, blocking traffic lanes.

24.5.5 DISTANCES OF VEHICLE CROSSINGS FROM INTERSECTIONS

In order to simplify the driving task by reducing potential conflict points and areas of distraction, there is a requirement to locate entrances at a suitable distance from intersections of roads carrying reasonable volumes of traffic.

24.5.6 VEHICLE CROSSINGS

Vehicle crossings should be of a suitable standard in terms of their construction and also their intersection with roads in order that there is sufficient pull off area for safety reasons.

24.5.7 SIGHT DISTANCE FOR ACCESSWAYS

Accessways should have reasonable sight distances depending on the speed of the roads in order to reduce the potential for vehicle collisions. Strategic, arterial and collector roads are subject to the rule given their higher volumes of traffic.

24.5.8 INTERSECTION STANDARD

For the purposes of rule 24.3.4(viii) any development within Paroa Developments will need to pay the full cost of upgrading the Clough Road and State Highway 6 intersection and the financial contribution policy section 15.6.1 of the Plan does not apply.

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AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.6 SCHEDULE 1 - CAR PARKING SPACE LAYOUTS

24.6.1 FIGURE 2 - CAR PARKING SPACE - 90° ANGLE

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AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.6.2 FIGURE 3 - CAR PARKING SPACE - 30°, 45°, 60° ANGLES

Overhang Wheelstop Depth

Aisle Width

Interlock Depth

Parking Angle

Stall Depth

Stall Width

Aisle Run

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AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.7 SCHEDULE 2 -TURNING CIRCLES

24.7.1 FIGURE 4

– VEHICLE DIMENSIONS AND SINGLE LANE TURNING CIRCLES

FOR MOTOR CARS

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183

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.7.2 FIGURE 5 - VEHICLE DIMENSIONS AND SINGLE LANE TURNING CIRCLES FOR

TRUCKS AND BUSES

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AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.8 SCHEDULE 3 - CROSSINGS

24.8.1 DROP CROSSING

For normal circumstances the entranceway design is the drop crossing ( See Figure 6).

24.8.2 ALTERNATIVE OPTIONS

24.8.2.1 Bridge Crossing

For areas where a drop crossing is not practical (normally where ground levels are too steep),

and

there is likely to be a large amount of foot traffic moving across the crossing, a bridge crossing will be used (See figure 7). These areas are likely to be places of assembly such as hotels, schools, churches, sports grounds, etc.

The preferred standard for the crossing is one that uses a galvanised steel grill.

The disadvantage with this type of crossing is that they become a maintenance problem.

Litter that ends up in the gutter that is not removed by street cleaning is washed under the bridge crossing and causes blockages. With the types of bridge crossing that are presently used (timber and steel), it is not practical to check each bridge crossing to see if there is a blockage.

The proposal to use a see-through galvanised grill will allow blockages to be quickly identified by Council staff and removed. It is also considered that property owners who are gaining the benefit of the crossing are more likely to assist Council in keeping the bridge crossing clear if blockages are visible.

24.8.2.2 Gap Crossing

For areas where a drop crossing is not practical (normally where ground levels are too steep),

and

there is

not

likely to be a large amount of foot traffic moving across the crossing, a gap crossing will be used (See figure 7). These areas are likely to be residential streets where the main use of the crossing is for vehicle entrance and exit. In these areas foot traffic is most likely to be moving along the footpaths.

The advantage with this type of crossing is that they are not likely to become a maintenance problem. The flushing action of water will actually assist in keeping the crossing clear of litter rather than in the case of the bridge crossing where water actually compounds the problem by wedging the litter in and creating damming effects.

The disadvantage with this type of crossing is that there is a potential danger to pedestrians and cyclists getting their feet or wheels caught in the gap. This danger exists but is not considered to be any more significant than other road hazards. Road users must remain alert when using any part of the carriageway .

It should also be noted that, as stated above, the normal drop crossing is the preferred option so bridge crossings and gap crossings will be the exception rather than the rule.

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AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.8.3 FIGURE 6 DRAWING 1 -STANDARD KERB AND CHANNEL AND DROP

CROSSING

Top of kerb

(to be removed)

Outer edge

Inner edge

25mm bullnose

Fender

Line of cut to form cut down in existing kerb and channel

25mm bullnose

RESIDEN TIAL

CASE A: for cast in situ channel

Base of kerb and channel

CASE B: for extrusion machine

NOTES:

1 type channel

Reinforcement – 4 D12 bars with R6 stirrups at 600 centres

2

Reinforcement beam to extend 1.5m from base of cutdown at each end

.

COMMERCIAL

25mm bullnose

STANDARD DROP CROSSING

NOTES:

1. Residential vehicle crossings can be chip seal or 120mm depth unreinforced concrete on 30mm mini fine granular material on compacted fill.

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186

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

2. Crossings for commercial sites and joint ownership accessways to be 150mm depth concrete reinforced with 2 layers of HRC 665 or equivalent. Minimum cover to steel 40mm.

3. All concrete to be 20MPA at 28 days.

4. All Dimensions in millimetres.

5. Where angle of road carriageway vehicle crossings such that vehicles may scrape, a bridge or gap crossing is to be installed.

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187

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.8.4 FIGURE 7 BRIDGE AND GAP CROSSINGS

Web grating, draincover or similar approved by

Engineer (200mm wide minimum)

For reinforcing details, refer to standards for kerb and channel drop crossing details.

30mm sand blinding on compacted hardcore base.

Standard kerb and channel

STANDARD BRIDGE CROSSING

NOTES:

1 All concrete to be 20 MPa at 28 days.

2 Cover to steel 40mm minimum

3 All dimensions in millimetres

150mm concrete slab reinforced with 2 layers of HRC 665 mesh or equivalent. Main cover 40mm.

Length varies (300mm minimum).

Standard kerb and channel

STANDARD GAP CROSSING

(where approved by Engineer)

30mm sand blinding on compacted hardcore base.

STANDARD BRIDGE & GAP CROSSINGS

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AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.8.5 FIGURE 8 HOUSE DRAIN SUMP AND KERB ENTRY

10mm SD galvanised perforated cover plate.

Drill 12mm

ø holes at 50mm centres

50mm wide x 13mm rebate all round

PLAN

HOUSE DRAIN SUMP

UPVC kerb entry adaptor where specified

Kerb and flat channel

PLAN

ELEVATION

HOUSE DRAIN SUMP

UPVC kerb entry adaptor

Kerb

Channel

Cut kerb on slope

Top of kerb

Lay adaptor on

10mm bed of mortar

KERB EN TRY

HOUSE DRAIN SUMP & KERB ENTRY

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189

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.8.6 RURAL ROAD PROPERTY ACCESS

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

190

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

191

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

192

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

193

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

194

DIAGRAM F

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

195

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

24.9 SCHEDULE 4 - GREY DISTRICT ROADING HIERARCHY

24.9.1 STRATEGIC ROUTES

Planning Map

Numbers

Locality

Maps 23, 24,

25, 26, 29, 31,

32, 34, 36, 37,

38, & 51

State Highway 6

Maps 31, 40,

41, 43, 44, &

45

State Highway 7

24.9.2 DISTRICT ARTERIALS

Planning Maps

Numbers

Locality

Maps 41, 42,

43, & 47

North side of Grey River

Description from the northern abutment Punakaiki

River Bridge (RS 388) through

Greymouth to northern abutment

Taramakau River Bridge (RS 445).

From Northern abutment Big Grey

River Bridge (RS 224) to the junction with SH6 at Greymouth

Description

Map 7 Nelson Creek Road

Maps 8, 9, 10,

15, 16, 48, 49,

& 50

The Lake Brunner Road

Map 38 Rutherglen Road

Maps 32, 33, &

35

Marsden Road, GM

Maps 27, 28, &

29

Bright Street, Cobden

Map 27 Domett Esplanade, Cobden

Map 31 Mawhera Quay, GM from State Highway 6 Coal Creek to

Rough River Bridge (encompassing:

Taylorville Road, County Road, Taylor

Street, Taylorville Blackball Road,

Atarau Road) from State Highway 7 Ngahere to

Nelson Creek from State Highway 7 Stillwater to south side Sir Stanley Gooseman

Bridge (encompassing: Arnold Valley

Road, Moana Rotomanu Road,

Crooked River Road, Inchbonnie

Rotomanu R oad, Jackson’s

Inchbonnie Road) from State Highway 6 Paroa to

Shantytown from Shakespeare Street to Sawyers

Creek Bridge, Boddytown

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196

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

Maps 30 & 31

Map 30

Maps 30 & 32

Map 31

Map 31

Map 31

Boundary Street, GM

Preston Road, Blaketown

Raleigh Street

Tainui Street, GM

Herbert Street, GM

Murray Street, GM

Map 31

Map 31

Alexander Street, GM

Willis Street, GM

Maps 31, 32 &

33

Shakespeare Street, GM

Maps 31 & 33

Map 33

Heaphy Street, GM

Franklin Street, GM

Map 32 Buccleugh Street, GM

Map 31 Puketahi Street, GM

24.9.3 COLLECTOR ROUTES

Planning Maps

Map 13

Map 45

Locality

Waipuna Road

Napoleon Street, Ahaura

Maps 13 & 45 Orwell Creek Road, Ahaura

Map 13 Ahaura Kopara Road

Maps 7 &14 Nelson Creek Bell Hill Road

Maps 14, 15 &

19

Haupiri Road

Maps 14 & 15 Bell Hill Road

Maps 8 & 14

Map 8

Amor Road (Deep Creek Road)

Blair Road from Preston Road to High Street from Mawhera Quay to Whall Street from Herbert Street to Alexander

Street from Shakespeare Street to High

Street from Shakespeare Street to High

Street from Alexander Street to Tainui Street

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

197

Description from State Highway 7 to Waipuna from Clifton Street to Orwell Creek

Road from Napoleon Street to Ahaura

Kopara Road from Orwell Creek Road to Ahaura

River from Nelson Creek Road to Bell Hill

Road from Bell Hill Road to Ahaura Amuri

Road from Haupiri Road to Crooked River

Road from Nelson Creek Bell Hill Road to

Blair Road from Arnold Valley Road, Kokiri, to

Arnold Valley Road, Kotuku

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

Map 4, 9 & 10

Maps 4 & 10

Map 3

Maps 3 & 9

Map 3

Maps 46 & 47

Map 46

Kumara - Inchbonnie Road

Map 46 Hilton Street, Blackball

Maps 27, 28 &

29

Ward Street, Cobden

Map 28

Map 27

Map 28

Map 30

Map 30

Map 31

Maps 31 & 32

Maps 32 & 33

Map 33

Map 33

Map 33

Map 33

Map 32

Maps 32 & 33

Map 33

Map 33

Map 33

Map 37

Map 37

Taramakau Settlement Road

Rutherglen Road

Maori Creek Road

Marsden Road

Main Road, Blackball

Hart Street, Blackball

Hall Street, Cobden

Firth Street, Cobden

Sturge Street, Cobden

Steer Avenue, Blaketown

Swift Street, Blaketown

Turumaha Street, Greymouth

Cowper Street, Greymouth

Marlborough Street, Greymouth

Sinnott Road, Greymouth

Nancarrow Street, Greymouth

Josephine Street, Greymouth

Bidgood Street, Greymouth

Geraldine Street, Greymouth

Lydia Street, Greymouth

Winnie Street, Greymouth

Perotti Street, Greymouth

Kilgour Road, Greymouth

Clough Road, Paroa

Coulson Road, Paroa

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

198 from Inchbonnie Rotomanu Road to south side William Stewart Bridge,

Kumara from Shantytown to Maori Creek Road from Rutherglen Road to Dunganville from Sawyers Creek Bridge,

Boddytown, to Rutherglen Road

(from Domett Esplanade to Sturge

Street)

(from Bright Street to Firth Street)

(from Lynch Street to Hall Street)

(from Bright Street to Ward Street)

(from Josephine Street to Geraldine

Street)

(from Lydia Street to Shakespeare

Street)

(from Perotti Street to Shakespeare

Street)

(from State Highway 6 and Clough

Road intersection to Coulson Road)

(from end of Clough Road south along

Coulson Road to Gadd Road

– Note:

Map 26

Map 26

Map 26

Map 25

Map 25

Map 25

Map 25

Map 25

Map 25

AP P E N D I X 4 - T R AN S PO R T

Seddon Street, Runanga

McGowan Street, Runanga

Ward Street, Runanga

Hall-Jones Street, Runanga

Cromarty Street, Dunollie

MacDougall Avenue, Dunollie

Argyle Street, Dunollie

Inverness Street, Dunollie

Somerled Avenue, Dunollie does not include south of Gadd Road or north of Clough Road/Coulson

Road intersection)

(from Seven Mile Road to McGowan

Street)

(from Seddon Street to Ward Street)

(from McGowan Street to Hall-Jones

Street)

(from Ward Street to Cromarty Street)

(from Hall-Jones Street to MacDougall

Avenue)

Avenue to (from MacDougall

Inverness Street)

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

199

AP P E N D I X 5 - SU B D I VI S I O N

25 APPENDIX 5 - SUBDIVISION RULES

Note: The National Environmental Standard for Assessing and Managing Contaminants in Soil to Protect

Human Health applies to any piece of land on which an activity or industry described in the current edition of the Hazardous Activities and Industries List (HAIL) is, has been, or is more likely than not to have been undertaken. Refer to the “Grey District Council NES Contaminants in Soil Process Guide” to determine if these regulations are applicable to the activity proposed.

25.1 PERMITTED ACTIVITIES

Subdivision is not a permitted activity.

25.2 CONTROLLED ACTIVITIES

Any Subdivision is a controlled activity if it complies with the following standards:

25.2.1 ALLOTMENT SIZE

No allotment created by subdivision consent, including balance titles shall be less than the minimum specified for each Environmental Area in Table 25.1 below except as provided for in

1 and 2 below.

TABLE 25.1 ALLOTMENT SIZE

Environmental Area Area of Minimum Net Site

(excluding the Accessway )

Rural

1 hectare, and

The minimum net site area is a physically contiguous parcel of land

4,000m

2

Rural-Residential

Township

where public sewage is available

where public sewage reticulation is not available

500 m

2

1,000 m 2

Residential (excluding Kaiata Park , Moana & Iveagh

Bay)

350m 2

where public sewage reticulation is available

1,000m

2

where public sewage reticulation is not available

Residential (Moana and Iveagh Bay)

Residential ( Kaiata Park )

350 m

2 with an average area of

500 m

2

1500m

2

1. Rural Environmental Area Boundary Adjustments

Where there are two or more separately saleable existing allotments within a Rural

Environmental Area, which have separate Certificates of Title, any adjustment of the

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200

AP P E N D I X 5 - SU B D I VI S I O N

boundaries shall be a controlled activity provided that the resultant allotments are not less than the smallest that existed before subdivision.

Access , Utilities , Roads , and Reserves 2.

There shall be no specified minimum allotment sizes in any Environmental Area for allotments created for access , utilities , reserves or roads .

25.2.2 WATER SUPPLY

1.

2.

All new allotments shall be provided with the ability for the respective potential land uses to connect to a safe potable water supply.

Each allotment shall be provided with the ability to connect to the

Council’s

reticulated system where such a system is available and a connection shall be laid to the boundary of each lot created by a subdivision.

3.

4.

Where such a system is not available the applicant shall demonstrate that a water supply suitable for the proposed use of the allotment is available.

That any subdivision within Kaiata Park development shall connect into a reticulated potable water supply.

25.2.3 STORMWATER

1. All allotments shall be provided with a means of disposing of collected stormwater from the roof of all buildings and impermeable surfaces to an approved system.

2.

3.

4.

Where a reticulated stormwater disposal system is available each lot of subdivision shall be provided with a connection from the boundary of that lot to the system.

Where no system is available stormwater shall be disposed of in an approved manner.

5.

That any subdivision within the Kaiata Park development area shall connect into an approved stormwater management system (where such system shall include provision for ongoing maintenance).

That Kaiata Park development shall be in general accordance with the Kaiata Outline

Development Plan (attached as Appendix 12). Note that where reference is made to reserves these include stormwater management areas.

25.2.4 SANITARY SEWAGE DISPOSAL

1. All allotments shall be provided with a means of disposing of sanitary sewage for the potential land uses that could be established on the respective allotments .

2. Where a reticulated system is available for connection with the capacity to serve the potential land uses that could be established on the allotment , each lot of subdivision shall be provided with a piped sewage system outfall laid to the boundary of that lot.

3.

4.

Where a reticulated system is not available the applicant shall provide evidence that effluent can be satisfactorily disposed of onsite .

That any subdivision within the Kaiata Park development area shall connect into an approved sewerage reticulation system.

25.2.5 ENERGY SUPPLY AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS

1. All allotments shall be provided with the ability to connect an electric supply system and telecommunications to the boundary of each of the lots.

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AP P E N D I X 5 - SU B D I VI S I O N

25.2.6 ROADING AND ACCESS STANDARDS

1. All roads shall be constructed in accordance with the Code of Practice (refer Section

25.7 - Schedule 1).

2. All vehicular access to fee simple title allotments , cross lease, unit title, or leased premises, shall be in accordance with the standards set out below and shall be constructed, where applicable, in accordance with the Code of Practice (refer Section

25.7 - Schedule 1)

.

TABLE 25.2 PRIVATE

WAY, VEHICULAR ACCESS

PROVISIONS (NOT INCLUDING LEGAL ROADS)

AND

Environmental

Area

Residential

Township

Residential

Township

Residential

Township

Potential

No of

Units

Length Legal

Width

0-4 All

Lengths

4

5-10

5-10

0-50 4

Over 50 4.5

Carriage

-way

Width

3.0

3.5

4.0

Turning

Area

MISCELLANEOUS

Passing

Bay

Required if

50m length over in

Optional

Required Required

Required Required

Footpaths

Optional

Optional

Required

All Other

Environmental

Areas

0-10

All Environmental

Areas

Service

Lanes

All

Lengths

All

Lengths

6.0

6.0

4.0

4.0

2.1

Required Optional

Required if end. blind

Optional

N/A N/A

Optional

Optional

N/A All Environmental

Areas

Pedestria n Access

All

Lengths

2.1

2.1 All Environmental

Areas

Access

Ways and

Cycle

Ways

All

Lengths

2.1 N/A N/A N/A

Minimum Height Clearances Vehicular Access and Service Lanes

3.

4.

3.5m

The maximum number of lots that may be served by a private way or access lots is 10.

5.

Every lot shall be of sufficient size and frontage to be capable of providing a complying access (Refer to Rule 24.3).

That any subdivision within the Kaiata Park development area shall be in general accordance with the Kaiata Outline Development Plan (attached as Appendix 12).

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AP P E N D I X 5 - SU B D I VI S I O N

6.

7.

Any subdivision and/or development in the Kaiata Park area will require the Fairhall

Road intersection with State Highway 7 to be upgraded in accordance with the design specifications published in the Austroads document ‘Guide to Traffic Engineering

Practice Part 5: Intersection at Grade’ to provide a full T-Junction Intersection with left turn and right turn lanes from both state highway approaches to the intersection.

Any subdivision and/or development in Paroa Developments will require the Clough

Road and State Highway 6 intersection to be upgraded in accordance with the intersection standard attached as Diagram F in Appendix 4.

25.2.7 ROADING AGREEMENTS

Where during the course of the subdivision it is necessary to make provision for future roads that cannot be formed or vested immediately, until other land becomes available or are separated from the frontage road by intervening properties, a caveat will be registered on the subject land , supported by roading agreement, stipulating that when the other land becomes available, the Council may call upon the restrictive owners to form and vest and pay the cost to form and vest the required land for road . The cost of construction will be the current prices at the time that the Council calls upon the respective owner to form and vest the land .

25.2.8 POINT STRIPS

SITE STANDARDS

Where in the course of subdivision a new road is constructed and vested that will or could provide frontage to other land , that other land will be separated from the new road by a point strip, and an agreement will be entered into by the first subdivider with the Council , to ensure the benefiting owner pays a fair share towards the cost of providing the frontage road . The point strip agreement sets the amount to be paid, which will be updated from the date of signature of the agreement by the Consumers Price Index. Such agreements will be held by the Council and can be identified by the point strip separating the subsequent property from frontage to the road .

Point Strips may also be required where access to any road would be unsafe.

A point strip of no less than 100mm in width shall be created along the State Highway 7 frontage of any new allotment , or balance allotment created within the Kaiata Park development area and fronting State Highway 7 including any allotment created to contain the wetland area. Such point strip shall vest in Her Majesty the Queen for Use in Connection with a road (point strip).

25.2.9 NATURAL HAZARDS

That the site is not subject to any actual or potential natural hazards.

25.2.10 ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION NETWORK

The subdivision of a site containing or within 14m of National Grid Infrastructure shall meet all of the following standards:

1. It is demonstrated that any allotment created can contain a 15m x 15m area of land which: a) b) c)

Is located entirely outside of the National Grid Buffer Area

Has reasonable physical and legal access; and standards for the Environmental area it is located in.

; and

Could accommodate a building which can comply with all District Plan activity

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4.

2.

3.

The subdivision maintains any existing access to National Grid Infrastructure .

Written documentation is provided which demonstrates consultation has occurred with the National Grid Operator. This shall include any response received from the

Operator.

The minimum lot size for any allotment which contains any part of the National Grid

Buffer Area shall be 1 ha.

25.3 MATTERS WHICH COUNCIL RESERVES CONTROL OVER

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Financial contributions (refer to section 15).

Effects of natural hazards.

Design and layout of subdivisions.

Protection of natural features

– vegetation, heritage items, landscapes.

Access and roading.

Earthworks .

Siting of buildings .

Provision of services.

Esplanade reserves .

Effects of and on Public Infrastructure.

25.4 DISCRETIONARY ACTIVITIES

Any subdivision that contravenes a controlled standard, and is not otherwise specified as a non-complying activity under rule 25.4A is a discretionary activity.

25.4A NON-COMPLYING ACTIVITIES

From 1 July 2018, any subdivision which contravenes Rules 25.2.10(1) or (2) is a noncomplying activity.

25.5 ASSESSMENT MATTERS FOR CONTROLLED AND

DISCRETIONARY MATTERS

In considering whether or not to grant consent or impose conditions, the Council shall have regard to, but not be limited by, the following assessment matters for the respective standards:

25.5.1 ALLOTMENT SIZE

1. Whether the allotment is of sufficient area to effectively fulfil the intended purpose or activity, having regard to the relevant Environmental Area standards and general standards for activities.

2.

3.

4.

Whether the proposed lot sizes are sufficient for operational and maintenance requirements.

The relationship of the proposed allotments and their compatibility with the pattern of the adjoining subdivision and land use activities, and access arrangements.

Where a parcel is less than 1 hectare and is part of a non-contiguous title, the following:

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2. a) b)

The number and scale of non-contiguouse parcels of land.

Whether it is intended or likely that the site will contain a dwelling. c) d)

The effects, both positive and adverse, of non-contiguous parcels of land, particularly if they are grouped or clustered, on

The natural character of waterbodies and wetlands including their margins and the coastal environment

Areas of outstanding natural features and landscapes and significant natural areas

Provision of services, including roading and the disposal of effluent and stormwater

Spaciousness and openness of the rural area, including the potential effect of structures

Natural and coastal hazards

The function of the state highway network, including the appropriateness of the access with respect to, but not limited by, location and standard of access.

The reasons for the non-contiguous nature of the site.

25.5.2 PROPERTY ACCESS AND ROADING

1. Whether the frontage road is of sufficient width to cater for the expected traffic generated by the possible activities that will be established on the allotments being created, and whether there is any need to upgrade the frontage road .

Any impact of roading and access on waterways, ecosystems, drainage patterns or the amenities of adjoining properties.

3.

4.

5.

6.

The application of the requirements of Section 106(1)(c), Resource Management Act

1991, to any subdivided allotment .

The provisions of the Code of Practice for Subdivisions (Section 25.7 - Schedule 1).

The practicality of providing access elsewhere for vehicles, particularly where alternative access to the State highway is available.

The provisions of the roading hierarchy, the account taken of pedestrian movement, provision of space for cyclists, amenity values of the street, opportunities for tree planting in the open space of the road way to enhance the character and identity of the neighbourhood.

7.

8.

9.

10.

The need to provide cycleways in circumstances where the roading network does not supply sufficient or direct cycle routes through the locality.

The degree to which proposed new roads make adequate provision for vehicle movements, car parking and property access .

The need to provide pedestrian accessway facilities in circumstances where the roading network does not provide sufficient or direct access or easy walking access to facilities in the vicinity.

The need to provide alternative access for car parking and vehicle loading in commercial or industrial Environmental Areas by way of vested service lanes at the

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11.

12.

13.

14.

15. rear of properties having regard to alternative means of access and performance standards for activities within such Environmental Areas.

Any need to require provision be made in a subdivision for the vesting of road reserves for the purpose of facilitating connections to future roading extensions to serve surrounding land , or planned road links that may need to pass through the subdivision and the practicality of creating such easements during the time of subdivision application in order to facilitate later development.

The need to provide for appropriate standards of street lighting having regard to the classification of the road or the right of way, and the Council's Code of Practice for

Subdivision (Section 25.7 - Schedule 1).

Roading layout and access to the State Highway for the Kaiata Park development area are to be undertaken in accordance with Appendix 12. The provision of the Outline

Development Plan for Kaiata Park will provide assurance that access is provided to an adequate standard and that the internal roading layout and bridges are positioned in general accordance with that plan

.

The need for and extent of any financial contribution to achieve the above matters.

Whether the vehicle access to the allotment will provide adequate visibility to adjoining roads .

25.5.3 NATURAL HAZARDS

1. Any information held on the Grey District Council's and the West Coast Regional

Council’s Hazard registers.

2.

3.

Information obtained by suitably qualified experts, whose investigations are required to be supplied for all subdivision applications, unless the site or property has previously been certified as suitable for the proposed land use.

Potential adverse effects on other land that may be caused by the subdivision or anticipated land use activities.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Any report from a suitably qualified and experienced expert, detailing the measures that have been or will be taken to avoid, remedy or mitigated any hazard that may occur on the property.

In relation to potential for inundation from any source, Council shall have regard to the following factors: a) b) c)

The effects of any proposed filling being undertaken to avoid inundation and the consequential effects on the natural drainage pattern and adjoining land .

The erection of sea walls and their environmental effects.

Any proposed boundary drainage to protect surrounding properties. d) e)

The adequacy of existing outfalls and any need for upgrading.

Any need for retention basins to regulate the rate and volume of surface runoff.

In relation to potential for erosion, falling debris or slippage the need for ongoing conditions aimed at avoiding, remedying or mitigating future potential adverse effects, and any need for registration of consent notices on the allotment’s

Certificate of Title.

In relation to potential for subsidence, the provision of suitability certificates, such as

NZS 4431, or if not appropriate, the setting of ongoing conditions, with consent notices registered on the Certificates of Title.

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8.

2.

In relation to a contaminated site , any soil tests, establishing suitability, and methods to avoid mitigate or remedy the effects, including removal to approved disposal points.

In relation to proposed land filling and excavation operations, the following factors: 9. a) b)

The effects on surrounding properties.

The natural pattern of surface drainage. c) d)

The type of and placement of fill material.

Mitigation, or avoidance, of adverse effects caused by dust or siltation affecting neighbouring properties. e) Remedies necessary during emergencies.

25.5.4 WATER SUPPLY

1. Where there is no urban water supply or a Council restricted flow rural type water supply available for connection, whether it would be appropriate to allow a private restricted flow rural type water supply system.

The suitability of the proposed water supply for fire fighting purposes. A Fire Fighting

Water Supplies Code of Practice is included in 25.7 Schedule 1 and the Council may obtain a report from the Fire Service.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

The provisions of the Code of Practice (Schedule 1)in respect to installation of all necessary water supply pipe lines, and ancillary equipment necessary for the subdivision, including extensions to existing supply systems, and including mains, submains, service links and fire hydrants.

Whether the existing water supply systems, to which the connection will be made, have sufficient capacity to service the subdivision and if no,t that the subdivider contribute towards the upgrading of the system based on the cost of supplying the incremental increase in demand by the additional lots, in addition to installing the extensions of the supply within the subdivision.

Whether it may be necessary to provide new reservoirs, pumping stations and rising mains, or increasing pipe sizes leading to the subdivision in existing streets, and the level of contribution a subdivider should contribute toward this.

Whether because of increased demand that the potential land users may impose upon the system, an upgrading contribution should be made for a programmed plan for installation of new wells, reservoirs and pumping units.

The extent of the water supply headworks upgrading contributions taking account of the likely use of water by the subdivision and the potential land use activities that could be permitted on the land .

The extent of any financial contribution toward the provision and upgrading of any public water supply system.

The need for a local purpose reserve to be set aside and vested in the Council as a site for a public utility .

10.

11.

Where it is necessary to upgrade the reticulated water supply system in order to cater for the subdivision, any costs to be borne by the subdivider, calculated on the cost of supplying the increase in demand as a result of the additional allotments .

The provisions of the Council's Code of Practice (Section 25.7 - schedule 1).

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12.

25.5.5 STORMWATER

1. The provisions of the Code of Practice for Subdivisions (Schedule 1).

2.

The suitability of any proposed water supply that is supplied by a developer for drinking.

3.

The adequacy of any proposed means for screening out litter, the capture of chemical spillages, the containment of contamination from roads and paved areas and of siltation.

The ability to retain open natural waterway systems for stormwater disposal in preference to piped or canal systems and any adverse impacts on existing waterways.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Demonstration that there is sufficient capacity available in the Council's outfall stormwater system to cater for increased runoff from the proposed allotments .

The availability of an approved outfall where stormwater can be directed to, where such an outfall is capable of absorbing increased runoff.

Where an existing outfall is not capable of accepting increased runoff, proposals and solutions for disposing of runoff; the necessity to provide an onsite retention basin to contain surface runoff where the capacity of the outfall is incapable of accepting flows, and where the outfall has limited capacity, any need to restrict the rate of discharge from the subdivision to the same runoff coefficient that existed on the land before subdivision takes place.

Any adverse effects of the proposed subdivision on drainage on, or from, adjoining properties and mitigation measures proposed to control any adverse affects.

8.

9.

10.

For stormwater pipes and open waterway systems, the provision of appropriate easements in favour of either the registered user or in the case of the Council , easements in gross, to be shown on the survey plan for the subdivision, including private connections passing over other land protected by easements in favour of the user.

Where stormwater disposal cannot be obtained by gravity outfall, the need to ensure the land is not filled against the fall of the country, solely to obtain such outfall, and whether it is practical to provide easements through adjoining owners’ land to other frontage outfall systems.

As part of the Kaiata Park development a stormwater management system, including provision for its ongoing maintenance, is required to be established that will mitigate any adverse effects on the surrounding environment.

11.

12.

The need for and extent of any financial contribution to achieve the above matters.

The need for a local purpose reserve to be set aside and vested in the Council as a site for a public utility for stormwater disposal purposes.

25.5.6 SEWAGE DISPOSAL

1.

The capacity, availability, and accessibility of the reticulated system to serve the proposed subdivision.

2.

3.

The installation of all new reticulation.

The provisions of the Code of Practice (Schedule 1).

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4.

5.

The relevance of any existing cost sharing scheme and whether the proposed reticulation will benefit other property owners.

Where a reticulated system is not available, or a connection is impractical, provision of septic tank or other disposal systems in accordance with either a general authorisation or a discharge permit issued by the Regional Council.

6.

7.

Where a reticulated system is not immediately available but is likely to be in the near future, the appropriateness of temporary systems.

Provision made by the applicant for monitoring mechanisms to ensure contaminants are not discharged into the environment from septic tank or other disposal systems, together with any consent notices to ensure compliance.

8.

9.

25.5.7 ENERGY SUPPLY AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS

1. Where the subdivision involves construction of new roads or formed rights of way, the installation of an extended reticulation system (at the subdivider's responsibility) with regard to the Subdivision

Code of Practice and the network operator’s requirements.

2.

3.

The adequacy of the proposed reticulated system to be installed by the subdivider.

Where the proposed system will serve other land that is not part of the subdivision, whether the network operator is providing sufficient capacity, and the cost of such provision.

4.

5.

The Kaiata Park Outline Development Plan indicates the location of the sewage treatment plant and stand of trees (approximately 4.5 hectares) which will provide a buffer between the treatment plant and the Rural Residential Environmental Area. At the time of any subdivision application with the potential to enable a dwelling to be constructed within 150m of the Kaiata Park sewage treatment area, confirmation will be required that a building platform can be located at a distance of greater than 150m from the edge of the sewage treatment area. Should land use consent be required for the establishment of the treatment plant consideration of future ownership shall be undertaken and the potential need for designation reviewed.

The extent of any financial contribution toward the provision and upgrading of sewage reticulation and services.

The practical ability to connect to available systems.

Appropriate separation distances are required for buildings and structures from

National Grid infrastructure ; refer to the Environmental Area and the subdivision rule sections of this District Plan.

Where National Grid Infrastructure passes through, or close to, a property proposed to be subdivided, consideration shall include:

Whether the subdivision design has incorporated measures, including suitable setbacks, to ensure an allotment is of sufficient dimensions to effectively fulfil the intended purpose or activity, having regard to the relevant Environmental Area standards and general standards for activities.

The relationship of the proposed allotments and their compatibility with the National

Grid Infrastructure including any necessary access arrangements for the maintenance of the network.

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Whether the proposal includes reference to other regulatory requirements including safe separation distances in the NZ Electrical Code of Practice for Electrical Safe

Distances (NZECP34:2001)

Technical comment provided by the Network Utility Operator.

Note: The presence of other 66kV transmission lines shown on Planning Maps 2, 3, 4, 7, 8,

10, 12, 13, 16, 31, 33, 34, 35, 37, 40, 41, 43, 46 and 47 is drawn to the attention of persons proposing to subdivide. If any subdivision is proposed within 20m of these transmission lines,

Transpower New Zealand Ltd should be contacted to obtain details on the necessary safe clearances between transmission lines and building , structures, vegetation and activities such as the operation of mobile plant. Council shall be advised on the outcome of any discussion.

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25.5.8 ESPLANADE RESERVES AND STRIPS

TABLE 25.3

1.

2.

Esplanade reserves and strips may be set aside if: a) Ecological or natural values would be protected or enhanced. b) c) d)

Public access would be enhanced having regard to the existing level of access available.

Recreational use would be protected or enhanced. e)

Water quality or aquatic habitat value would be protected or enhanced.

The land is within a natural hazard area or where there is an identified risk from one or more natural hazards (such as coastal erosion). f) The creation of an esplanade reserve would complete or promote the marginal protection of a river, lake or coastline.

The width of an esplanade reserve and strip may be varied from 20 metres or waived if: a) b)

The natural values warrant a wider or narrower esplanade strip or esplanade reserve ; or

Topography, or the siting of any building or other feature, renders the 20metre width inadequate or excessive; or c) d) e)

The protection of waahi tapu, mahinga kai and other taonga requires an esplanade reserve or esplanade strip of greater or lesser width than 20 metres; or

The protection or enhancement of water quality requires an esplanade reserve or esplanade strip of greater or lesser than 20 metres; or

The land is within a natural hazard area of where there is an identified risk from one or more natural hazards (such as coastal erosion); or f) g) h) i) j)

The costs of the provision and maintenance of a 20 metre wide esplanade reserve or esplanade strip are more than the potential public benefits of the purposes of esplanade reserves or strips; or

Where the creation of a 20 metre wide esplanade reserve or esplanade strip would create result in risks to public safety or the security of property; or

There is adequate alternative public access; or

There is adequate means of protecting water quality and conservation values; or

There is adequate provision for public recreational use of the area of coast, river or lake in question.

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25.5.9 RESERVE CONTRIBUTIONS

NB:

As indicated in Section 15.6.7 Financial Contributions Council will generally take 2% as a maximum amount of the value of each new allotment in a subdivision.

1. Where, within the preceding 5 years, the subdivision creating the allotment made provision for reserves in excess of the previous subdivision assessment, or where a development levies, as the case may be, shall be taken into consideration when the new assessment is made.

2. Where the contribution towards the provision of land or open space and recreation is not to be paid to the Council before a Conditions certificate is issued pursuant to

Section 224

of the Act , a requirement for the applicants to enter into a bond.

Note:

documentation will be registered against the Certificates of Title issued for the allotment(s) , preventing their sale until contribution is paid, and subject to the following: a) b) payment of the prescribed fee, including all legal costs. the assessment amount for payment being adjusted in accordance with the valuation NZ index if not paid within two years of the assessment. c) d) payment shall be either: i) ii) the total assessment being paid on the sale of half the number of allotments in the subdivision less one; or an instalment system based on the assessment being divided by the total number of allotments less one, with payment commencing at the first transfer. whether the undertaking of works, including the planting of trees or the regrading or levelling of reserve land that will vest in the Council , or the setting aside of a reserve to protect any natural features, should be taken into account when assessing the value of the contribution towards land for open space and recreation.

25.6 REASONS FOR RULES

25.6.1 STATUS OF SUBDIVISION ACTIVITIES

Because of the location and great variety of site characteristics of subdivision, both modified and natural, it is not considered possible to predetermine what conditions may need to be applied to any subdivision. All subdivisions therefore are at least controlled activities. Failure to meet specific site or Environmental Area standards will require a controlled or discretionary resource consent.

25.6.2 GENERAL PURPOSE OF SUBDIVISION CONTROL

As subdivision is often the basis for land development it is logical, in relation to the provision of services, that this provision be co-ordinated at the time of subdivision to avoid piecemeal provision of services upon individual properties being developed. Coordinated and standardised servicing of subdivisions ensures that the purchasers of sections and the community can expect and achieve an acceptance level of services and amenity and protection of the natural and physical resources. Rules for subdivision have as far as possible been written to address effects, not the type of tenure chosen.

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25.6.3 SUBDIVISION DESIGN

The purpose of controls on subdivision design are to ensure that allotments are appropriately located in relation to each other and to available sunshine for energy conservation purposes, that walkways provide logical links with adjacent areas, that buildings are located where there is the minimum risk of damage from natural hazards, and that natural stormwater channels and wetland areas are used for the benefit of both residents and the natural values of the area.

25.6.4 ALLOTMENT SIZE AND DIMENSIONS

The Rural Areas Objectives and Policies address the reasons for the minimum lot sizes required in the Rural Environmental Area.

There is a requirement for rural sections to be a minimum size of 1 hectare. A site or title can be made of separate parcels of land (a non-contiguous layout) but each parcel must meet the minimum 1 hectare requirement. If a smaller site or parcel of land is proposed then discretionary resource consent is required.

The 1 hectare minimum size requirement has been set in order to retain the openness and spaciousness of the rural environment and to protect the natural character of the coastline and waterbodies and their margins, and to address the provision of services.

The creation of small parcels and sites in the rural environment and the subsequent erection of dwellings can result in a clustering effect. While there may be benefits in the clustering of parcels or sites

– including the efficient provision of services, the avoidance of natural hazard areas and retention of areas without built intrusions

– it is considered appropriate that Council maintain discretion over this type of development.

While many of the effects will arise from the erection of dwellings, it is considered appropriate that subdivisions are assessed given the expectations raised by subdivision and the likely subsequent land use. Sites and non-contiguous parcels of land that are smaller than 1 hectare will potentially have a more significant effect if it is proposed or intended that a dwelling be erected on them.

A small number of non-contiguous 1 hectare subdivisions were being process at the time of a change to the plan being introduced. It is reasonable to allow these proposals to proceed as per the provisions in place when they were lodged. Therefore these sites have been given an exemption in regard to Rule 19.7.2.

The minimum area requirements for Residential, Rural-Residential and Township

Environmental Areas are also addressed in the objectives and policies for these areas, and reflect a balance between a need for urban consolidation and the protection of character and amenity on the other hand. In general, the lot sizes aim to maintain the character of previous development and enable a variety of complying development.

However, in recognition that many sites are subdivided and built on simultaneously, and that therefore the siting of the buildings is finalised at the subdivision stage, the rules permit a reduction in minimum area where there is a building commitment and that building will comply with all relevant standards for the Environmental Area. In

Moana and Iveagh Bay a larger average area is required to recognise the special amenity of these areas. In Kaiata Park , a larger minimum net site area is required to remain in keeping with residential properties in the Kaiata and Dobson area and to retain the overall character of the area.

The larger minimum area for unserviced lots is required to enable sewage to be adequately collected and disposed onsite .

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The boundary adjustment provisions recognise that the effects of such alterations are minor provided no additional allotments are vested.

Allotment dimensions are specified to ensure that, in residential areas in particular, allotments are of a shape that permits some flexibility in placing a complying building onsite at a later stage.

The subdivision of a site containing or in close proximity to National Grid Infrastructure shall include in its design, provision for existing and future buildings or structures to be erected in compliance with national Grid setback requirements as applied for the relevant Environmental Area.

25.6.5 TRADE WASTE DISPOSAL

Trade Waste Disposal bylaws are currently being drafted. Council also has the power to place conditions on subdivisions that set standards for such disposal to avoid contamination of ground or surface water and to maintain the efficiency and capacity of general sewage treatment and disposal systems of the District.

25.6.6 WATER SUPPLY

To ensure that a safe and adequate supply of potable water is available, all allotments in or adjoining areas with Council reticulated water supplies will be required to connect to such supplies. Financial contributions towards water supply upgrading or the provision of new water supply infrastructure ensure that the costs of maintaining or extending water supplies of an acceptable standard are apportioned according to the demands placed on water supplies by new subdivisions. The assessment matters enable the consideration of the adequacy of water supply provision on any subdivision for reasons of public health, convenience and efficient use of supply infrastructure.

25.6.7 STORMWATER

The controls on the disposal of stormwater have the primary purpose of avoiding adverse effects of stormwater on adjacent land . Stormwater can also impact on the quality of surface water. In general these concerns are most relevant within settlement areas where the density of development can result in stormwater flowing onto adjacent land , or more rapid or contaminated runoff into natural watercourses. Financial contributions towards stormwater disposal system upgrading or the provision of new stormwater infrastructure ensure that the costs of maintaining or upgrading stormwater systems to an acceptable standard are apportioned according to the demands place on stormwater disposal by new subdivisions.

25.6.8 SEWAGE DISPOSAL

The subdivision rules on sanitary sewage disposal complement the West Coast

Regional Council controls which have the purpose of protecting the quality of ground and surface water. In the settlement areas where Council reticulated disposal systems are available the subdivision rules require that all lots be provided with a means of disposal, being a minimum diameter piped outfall connected onto the Council system.

Because subdivisions in rural areas do not necessarily involve residential use and because there are few reticulated disposal systems, requirements for sanitary sewage disposal in other areas would be implemented through building consents. Financial contributions towards sewage disposal system upgrading or the provision of new sewage disposal infrastructure, ensure that the costs of maintaining or upgrading sewage systems to an acceptable standard are apportioned according to the demands place on sewage disposal by new subdivisions.

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The stand of trees in Kaiata Park has been specifically cited because this provides a buffer and helps to ensure that the 150 metres separation of residential buildings from any sewage treatment plant is maintained, and that the effects on the environment are minimal. It is vital when allowing development to occur around the treatment site that new development is not located in a position where it will be sensitive to the operation.

Where land use consent is required and ownership is proposed to be transferred to the

Council the alternative of designation of the site may be appropriate for review at the time of subdivision and development.

25.6.9 ELECTRIC AND TELEPHONE SUPPLY

The rules require that as a minimum all lots, other than in Rural Environmental Areas

(but including lots principally for residential or other non rural purposes), have the ability to connect to an electric supply and telephone system at the boundary of the site . This requirement ensures that services expected by subsequent owners will be available. In addition, the adequacy of the standard of energy and telecommunications installations and their co-ordination can be ensured by conditions on the subdivision.

25.6.10 PROPERTY ACCESS

The rules specifying widths for roads and the assessment matters regarding roads are to ensure that all new roads and property access are created with the capacity to provide access for residents of the area and link up with the adjoining road network safely and efficiently, avoiding congestion, and providing for on street parking and pedestrian/cycle movement.

The rules for private vehicular access are to ensure the accesses can adequately cater for likely anticipated volumes of traffic. Provision for turning areas and passing bays also relate to the likely number of users and have the purpose of avoiding hazardous and inconvenient reverse manoeuvres. Footpaths are required to promote pedestrian safety. Where more than ten residential units are likely to be served a road is considered necessary to ensure safe and efficient vehicle movement.

Corner roundings are required to facilitate pedestrian movement and safety. Naming of streets is provided for to enable ready identification and efficient delivery of services to all properties including emergency services.

Road upgrading costs have the purpose of ensuring that costs of providing roads of an acceptable standard is apportioned in accordance with the demands placed on those roads by development of subdivisions. Point strips can ensure that contributions to roading will be made in the future as required.

For the purposes of rule 25.2.6.7 any subdivision within Paroa Developments will need to pay the full cost of upgrading the Clough Road and State Highway 6 intersection and the financial contribution policy section 15.6.1 of the Plan does not apply.

25.6.11 NATURAL HAZARDS

The controlled activity provision enables the Council to place conditions on the need for works, the location of services, earthworks and the location of buildings , with the purpose of limiting likely damage from natural hazards such as erosion, flooding, landslip and unconsolidated fill. This provision is needed to enable the extent of natural hazards to be fully ascertained for each site at the time of subdivision as this information is not always available at the time the District Plan is prepared. Within areas of high flood risk or high risk of coastal erosion, the discretionary activity

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provision enables the Council to assess the effect of the subdivision in increasing the amount of property at risk from natural hazards or in increasing the severity of the hazard.

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25.7 SCHEDULE 1 -CODE OF PRACTICE FOR SUBDIVISION

The Code of Practice for subdivision is comprised of the following documents.

Document Status Application

Land Development and Subdivision

Engineering NZS 4404:2004 (and any NZ Standard that supersedes this document and is adopted by the

Council)

New Zealand

Standard

Land Development,

Subdivision

Engineering

Activities

Implementation

Date

2004

May 1994 Bridge Manual

Waterways Design Austroads 1994

Highway Surface Drainage - Design guide for Highways with a Positive

Collection System NRB 1997

Guide to Cycle Facilities NRB/UTC

1985

Guideline

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Guideline

Guideline

Local Roads

State Highways

All Roads

All Roads

All Roads

June 1994

November 1977

1985 Approx

1985 Approx Rural Roads: Guide to Geometric standards for Rural Roads NRB

1985

Guideline

State Highways: Rural Road Design

Guide to the Geometric Design of

Rural Roads Austroads 1989

Guideline (M)

Guideline

New or Upgrade

Projects on Local

Roads Included in

NLTP

State Highways

Recommended for

Local Authority

Roads

State Highway

New or Upgrading

Works

Guidelines for Two Lane Rural State

Highways: Changes to Widths

Section 7.1.2(1) and App VII.I of

SHPPM and General Circular 93/8

Cross for State Highways

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Safety Barriers and Median Barriers

3.4.0.7 State Highway Control

Manual

Guideline

Guide to Traffic Engineering Practice

Pt 5 Intersections at Grade NAASRA

1988 with Roading Design

Guidelines RD-1 Intersections at

Grade Transit 1991

Guideline (M)

Guideline

State Highways

State Highways

All New or

Upgrading Works

1989

2 July 1993

1994

1991

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

217

AP P E N D I X 5 - SU B D I VI S I O N

Document Status Application Implementation

Date

Guide to Traffic Engineering Practice

Pt 6 Roundabouts Austroads 1993 with Roading Design Guidelines RD-

2 I 1991

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Bituminous Sealing Manual Transit

1993

Guideline (M)

Guideline

State Highways

All New or

Upgrading Works

State Highways

All New Seals and

Reseals

State Highways Austroads Guide to Structural

Design of Road pavements in NZ

(1992) plus NZ Supplement (Nov

1995

Design Guide for Assessing Freeze

Thaw Effects on Pavements

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Guideline

Standard Land Transport Programme

Development and Management

Manual

TR 11 Recommended Practice for

Pedestrian Crossings

Guidelines for Planting for Road

Safety

Guideline

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Manual of Traffic Signs and

Markings Pt1 Traffic Signs Transit/

MOT 1992 for RG, RP, RH, TW and

PW Series Signs Manual of Traffic

Signs and Markings NRB 1975 (for

Information Signs Not yet

Republished)

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Manual of Traffic Signs and

Markings Pt2 Markings, Transit/

LTSA 1994

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Local Roads

State Highways

Local Roads

State Highways

Local Roads

State Highways

All Road Controlling

Authorities and

Regional Councils

All Roads

State Highways

Local Roads

General Circular No 95/10

Guidelines for the Implementation of an Urban Route System

Guideline Local Authority

Roads

1991

1993

July 1995

July 1995

1 July 1994

1988

1991

Ongoing

New and refurbished installations after

June 1994

24 February

1992

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

218

AP P E N D I X 5 - SU B D I VI S I O N

Document Status Application

RTS 1 Guidelines for the

Implementation of Traffic Control at

Crossroads MOT

RTS 2 Guidelines for Street name

Signs MOT

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Guideline

State Highways

Local Roads

State Highways

Local Roads

RTS 5 Guidelines for Rural Road

Marking and Delineation

MOT/Transit 1992

RTS 2 Guidelines for Visibility at

Driveways MOT

RTS 7 Advertising Signs and Road

Safety

RTS 8 Guidelines for Safe Kerbline

Protection

RTS 9 Guidelines for the Signing and Layout of Slip Lanes

Standards Criteria and guidelines

Manual

Guideline

Guideline

Guideline

Guideline

Local Authority

Roads

State Highways

State Highways

State Highways

Guideline (M)

Guideline

NZS 6701: 1983 Code of Practice for

Road Lighting

Guideline (M)

Guideline

Traffic Signals - A Guide to the

Design of Traffic Signal Installations

NAASRA 1987 with Road and Traffic

Standards No 11 MOT 1990

Guideline (M)

Guideline

New Zealand Fire Service Fire

Fighting Water Supplies Code of

Practice SNZ PAS 4509:2003

New Zealand

Standard

State Highways

New Zealand

Transport

Agencyand Local

Authorities

State Highways

Local Roads

State Highways

Local Roads

Suitability of water supplies for fire fighting purposes

Implementation

Date

Progressive from

November 1990

Progressive from

November 1990

Progressive from

October 1990

August 1994

August 1994

August 1994

August 1994

December 1993

Progressive from

1983

From June 1990

2003

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

219

AP P E N D I X 5 - SU B D I VI S I O N

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

220

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

26 APPENDIX 6 - HERITAGE RULES

26 ITEM

1. Listed Heritage Features

PERMITTED

(i) The alteration to a listed heritage item or item in a historic area listed in Schedule 1 and shown on the planning maps is permitted if:

(a) the work is for the purpose of maintenance, repair or restoration and the types of materials are the same or similar as that originally used and the works retain the original design. the work is internal that does not result in changes to the (b) exterior design or form of the building , or

(ii) The erection, alteration or removal of accessory buildings where the works do not effect any part of a structure listed as requiring protection in the schedule.

2. Listed Historic Trees (i) Work involving a historic tree, listed in Schedule 2, is permitted if:

(c)

(d) it does not involve the removal or felling of the tree; and a building or underground servicing are not constructed

(e)

(f)

(g) or laid within 5 metres of the base of the tree; and paving is not laid within 0.5 metres of the tree; and it does not involve pruning at a height greater than one third of the total height of the tree and does not include any branches greater than 50 mm in diameter below this level; and

Trimming is required to ensure the security of supply to or from an existing high voltage transmission line.

NB:

There are no rules in this plan in respect of archaeological sites.. A schedule of listed archaeological sites is listed in Section 26.3 - Schedule 3 to inform the public of the approximate

CONTROLLED

(iii)(a) The alteration of a

Category II item in Schedule 1 that contravenes a permitted condition or the addition to a

Category II item is a controlled activity with

Council’s

control limited to the location, external design and appearance of the building .

(b) Historic Areas:

The erection of any new building within a historic area or the addition or alteration

(other than in 26.1(i)) to a nonscheduled item in a historic area is a controlled activity with

Council’s

control limited to the location, external design and appearance of the building , including building material.

NB: In terms of (iii)(a) and (b) above, Council will only require the written approval of the NZ Historic Places Trust.

(ii) Not Applicable location of known sites and to alert them to the requirements of the Historic Places Act 1993 (HPA).

Archaeological sites, whether recorded or unrecorded, are protected under Section 10 of the HPA, which makes it unlawful to destroy damage or modify an archeological site without first being granted an authority to do so from the NZ Historic Places Trust.

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

221

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

DISCRETIONARY

(iv) The alteration of a Category I item in Schedule 1 that contravenes a permitted condition and the addition to a Category I item is a discretionary activity, and

(v) The demolition or removal of a listed heritage item or item in a historic area in Schedule 1 is a discretionary activity.

(iii) Any activity that contravenes a permitted condition is a discretionary activity.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

(a) The ability of the owner to manage and maintain the feature.

(b) The heritage significance of the feature.

(c) The extent to which any alterations are visually dominant, having regard to the scale, character and style of the heritage item or historic area.

(d) Assessment of alternative uses and sources of funding for the continued maintenance of the feature.

(e) Whether the allowance of a six-month period to arrange for alternatives to the demolition of the building or feature is appropriate.

(f) Any cultural or spiritual significance placed on the feature by the Tangata Whenua.

(g) In the case of relocation , the appropriateness of the location to which it is proposed to be removed.

(h) Ability to retain the feature or parts of the feature in the proposed development or use, including moving the feature, where possible, on the site to accommodate the proposed use.

(i) Any immediate or cumulative effects of the loss, removal, alteration or addition to the feature on local or

District-wide heritage with regard to the reasons for its listing being taken into account.

(j) Whether the consent of the Historic Places Trust is obtained.

(k) Where a feature is part of a group of similar features, any adverse effect on the integrity of the group in the vicinity shall be considered.

(l) Circumstances relating to a heritage item owned separately from the land .

(a) Whether the applicant has the ability to undertake a permitted activity without removal or any major trimming of the tree.

(b) The condition of the tree including any hazard potential.

(c) The effect of any trimming or disturbance of the root system, of the tree on the appearance and/ or health of the tree.

(d) The effect of any building on the visibility of the tree from a road or public place.

(e) Whether the tree or trees are currently causing, or are likely to cause, significant damage to buildings , services or property, whether public or privately owned.

(f) Any substitute or compensating tree planting or landscaping proposed.

(g) Whether the tree or trees are currently causing, or are likely to cause, obstruction to road visibility or constitute a road safety hazard.

EXPLANATION

This rule provides protection for heritage sites and buildings . Consent is required for works other than those that are minor.

The protected considered trees worthy are of recognition because of their ecological, environmental, landscape, heritage or cultural role. The number of trees protected is only a very small proportion of the total trees in the District, but are those that standout for their particular contribution environment. to their

Removal, significant trimming or potential damage to such trees is considered to warrant special consideration by the

Council as discretionary activities with a view to assessing alternative courses of action and the degree to which the protection of the tree is warranted in each circumstance.

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

222

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

26.1 SCHEDULE 1 - HERITAGE ITEMS AND HISTORIC AREAS

HERITAGE ITEMS

Register

No.

4996

5005

5006

1695

5016

1696

VNZ Legal

Description

Site Land Owner/

Administrator

Category

25590

44000

25430

20424

25430

20424

25620

49900

25620

13503

RS 6362 Blk X

Arnold SD,

Brunner Historic

Reserve,

RS 6708, Pt

Sec 2A Sq 119

& Crown Land

Survey

Plan 4. office

Pt Res 1070

Lease 3740 &

Tramway

Leases Blks I &

II Mawheranui

SD

Pt Res 1070

Lease 3740 &

Tramway

Leases Blks I &

II Mawheranui

SD

Lots 5-7 DP 22,

Pt Sec 203A

Secs 203B-E

Lot 1 DP 488

Sec 286 Blk X,

Pt M Res 31

Brunner Industrial

Site incorporating the remnants of

16 buildings including the chimney

Taylorville

GREYMOUTH

Blackball Coal

Mine Chimneys

BLACKBALL

Blackball Return

Air Vent and Fan

Chamber

BLACKBALL

Dispatch Foundry

36 Lord Street

GREYMOUTH

Courthouse

8 Guinness Street

GREYMOUTH

West Coast Region

Conservancy Department of Conservation

Private Bag 701 HOKITIKA

West Coast

Region

Conservancy

Department of

Conservation

Private Bag

701

HOKITIKA

Commerce

Ministry, Energy and resources

Division.

PO Box 1473

WELLINGTON

I

Commerce Ministry,

Energy and resources

Division.

PO Box 1473

WELLINGTON

Dispatch and Garlick Ltd

PO Box 26

GREYMOUTH

Courts Department

PO Box 29

GREYMOUTH

I

I

I

I

25620

08500

Lot 1 DP 2696

SO 11689 Gaz

5/94-826

Government

Building (Former)

2 Customs Street

& Mawhera Quay

GREYMOUTH

Government Prop.

Services PO Box 1690

CHRISTCHURCH

I

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

223

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

3039

5004

7232

7236

[Not registered with

NZHPT]

7399

1682

1694

1697

5018

5040

25620

1050

25440

2750

25440

25900

25620

41600

25640

05200

25450

17600

Ppty ID 81182

LO 2313/2 L

48570

Ppty ID 76167

Lot 2 LO 35112 on LO 3638 RL

52588 & Pt Sect

1 SO 392560

Reserve 698 Blk

II Brunner SD

Greymouth

Railway Station

Mackay Street

GREYMOUTH

Moana Railway

Station Trans-

Alpine Line

MOANA

Model Bungalow

Jacks Mill School

KOTUKU

New Zealand Rail Ltd

PO Box 2493

WELLINGTON

New Zealand Rail Ltd PO

Box 2493

WELLINGTON

Ppty ID 72317,

Railway

Reserve XI SO

877

Ruru Railway

Station, Lake

Brunner Road

RURU

Harbour Board

Building

GREYMOUTH

Brunner

Suspension

Bridge

Dobson

Monument

DOBSON

Lot 3 DP 2780

Pt Secs 82-85

Sec 382 Town of Ahaura

Catholic

Presbytery Chapel

Street

GREYMOUTH

Gilmer Hotel 43

Gresson Street

GREYMOUTH

Clough Road

Railway Beam

Bridge

Clough Road

PAROA

Ahaura Post

Office (Former)

Camp St

AHAURA

Justice Ministry

Office of Treaty

Settlements PO Box 142

WELLINGTON

New Zealand Rail Ltd

PO Box 2493

WELLINGTON

Grey District Council

PO Box 382

GREYMOUTH

Grey District Council

PO Box 382

GREYMOUTH

Grey District Council

PO Box 382

GREYMOUTH

Grey District Council

PO Box 382

GREYMOUTH

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

224

I

I

I

I

II

II

II

II

II

II

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

5042

5043

5058

5059

5060

5061

5062

5064

5069

5070

25440

25301

25430

21701

25620

08200

25620

13600

25620

12900

25620

12800

25620

12400

25630

08400

25430

20422

Lot 1 DP 3630

Lot 1 DP 1181

Secs 8&9 Blk 5

Maori Reserve

31

Sec 77 Maori

Reserve 31

Sec 85 Maori

Reserve 31

Revingtons

Buildings

47 Tainui Street

GREYMOUTH

Lots 1-3 DP 368 Waitaiki House

37-45 Tainui St

GREYMOUTH

Lots 1&2 DP

1327

Hannahs Building

Tainui St & cnr

Mackay St

GREYMOUTH

Secs 296&297,

Pt 295, Lot 1

DP 3086

Ppty ID 72317,

Railway

Reserve X SO

877

Rural

5077

Section

High Street Auto

Centre (former)

78 High St

GREYMOUTH

Ruru Drying Kiln

Lake Brunner

Road

RURU

Miners Bath

House

BLACKBALL

Kotuku Timber

Drying Kiln

KOTUKU

Blackball

Community

Centre Stafford St

& Hilton St

BLACKBALL

Royal Hotel

128-130 Mawhera

Quay

GREYMOUTH

Carruthers,

Weatherall & KS

Jeffrey Bldg

24-26 Guinness

St

GREYMOUTH

New Zealand Rail Ltd

PO Box 2493

WELLINGTON

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

225

II

II

II

II

II

II

II

II

II

II

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

7115 25430

41300

Lots 51-56 DP

84

Blackball Hilton

Hart St

BLACKBALL

HISTORIC AREAS

REGISTER

NUMBER

NAME

PART OF

7053

7434

ADDRESS

GREYMOUTH

RAILWAY

STATION

HISTORIC

AREA

GREYMOUTH

JACKS

SCHOOL

MILL

HISTORIC

AREA

JACKS MILL

SCHOOL,

KOTUKU

7054

DESCRIPTION

II

INCLUDING STATION; ENTIRE

PLATFORM, VERANDAH AND CANOPY,

SIGNAL BOX ON FLOODWALL

INCLUDING CONCRETE PATHS &

LAWN; STATUE; FLAGPOLE; ORGINAL

SCHOOL BUILDING WITH SHOWER

BLOCK ADDITION; THREE

CONNECTED SHEDS; MODEL

BUNGALOW; CONCRETE COURTYARD

& THE FORMER PLAYGROUND

GREYMOUTH

INCLUDING MOANA RAILWAY

STATION; GOODS SHED; FOOTBRIDGE

AND STATION MASTERS HOUSE

7051

MOANA

RAILWAY

STATION

HISTORIC

AREA

MIDLAND LINE

MOANA

BRUNNER

COAL MINING

REMAINS

HISTORIC

AREA

BRUNNER INCLUDING THE TWIN COKE OVENS,

FAN

HOUSE

HOUSING,

SITE,

COMPRESSOR

SMITHY

BOILER

SITE,

SITE,

SITE,

CARPENT

ER’S SHOP SITE, ENGINE

AIR

CHIMNEY

FIRECLAY MINE ENTRANCE, PUG MILL,

BRICK SHED, BRICK KILNS, BEEHIVE

COKE OVENS, TYNESIDE CHIMNEY,

TYNESIDE FOUNDATION, BRUNNER

SUSPENSION BRIDGE

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

226

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

26.2 SCHEDULE 2 - HISTORIC TREES REGISTER

No. Species Location Score Date

4

Age

92

Reason for

Protection

A,S,H

9

10

12

16

18

20

23

26

27

28

31

Agathis

KAURI australis

Araucaria heterophylla

NORFOLK

ISLAND PINE

Coronation Park

Dixon Park

Cedrus deodara

HIMALAYAN

CEDAR

Dixon Park

Corynocarpus laevigatus

KARAKA

Coronation Park,

Devon Street end

3072

3576

4608

3072

1902

1950

1902

1900 or b

Fraxinus excelsior

"Pendula"

WEEPING ASH

Dixon Park

Knightia excelsa

REWAREWA

Coronation Park

1536

1728

1950

1902

Magnolia soulangeana

Metasequola glyptostroboides

DAWN

REDWOOD

Metrosideros excelsa

POHUTUKAWA

X John Paul Grounds, formerly Sisters of

Mercy gardens

McGeady Farm,

Coal Creek

Coast Health Care

Grounds, Grey Base

Hospital, adc Admin

3072

2048

9216

Metrosideros excelsa

POHUTUKAWA

Metrosideros excelsa

POHUTUKAWA

High Street Road

Reserve

2592

Metrosideros excelsa

1925

1951

1953

1950

Corner SH 7 and

Smith

Street/Mawhera

Quay

12288 1920

Tai Poutini

Polytechnic, Tainui

2592

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

227

1930

44

92 unknown

A,H,C,S

44

92

69

43

41

44

74

64

A,L

A,S,L,H

A,S

S,H,A

H,C,A,S

S,A,H

H,L,A

L,H,A

L,H,A

L,H,A,S

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

No.

33

34

37

41

42

43

48

49

50

60

63

Species Location Score Date Age Reason for

Protection

POHUTUKAWA

Nothofagas menziesii SILVER

BEECH

Coronation Park

Nothofagus solandrii cliffortioides

MOUNTAIN

BEECH

Street

South Bank

Sawyers Creek/High

Street

2034

5184

Phoenix canariensis

CANARY ISLAND

DATE PALM

Tainui Street

Median Strip

6912

Phoenix canariensis

PHOENIX PALM

Te Tai Poutini

Polytechnic frontage, Tainui

Street

Phoenix canariensis

/Quercus robur

PHOENIX PALM &

OAK

Cenotaph, Tainui

Street between

Frederick and

Ngarimu Street

Phoenix canariensis

PHOENIX PALM

Corner Main South

Road and Nelson

Street

Prunus serrulata

"Kanzan"/"Hokusal

"

Road/Rail Reserve,

SH7 Dobson

Quercus robur

ENGLISH OAK

Greymouth Croquet

Club

1843

2

1843

2

9216

2187

1843

2

1902 poss

1950 un- known

1928

1918-

25

1930

11.11.

191

1937 Quercus robur and

Betula pendula

OAK AND SILVER

BIRCH

Former Aratika

School Site, Moana

Road

Tilia x europaea

EUROPEAN LIME

Pitman farm,

Rotomanu

6912

5184

Ulmus glabra

"Horizontalis"

HORIZONTAL

ELM

Dixon Park 1536

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

228

1920

1920

92

66

64

30+

74

74

L,H,S,A

L,H,S,A

L,A

L,A,H,S

C,H,L,A

L,A,H

A,H

C,H,A,S

H,A,S

A,S,H,L

A,H,L

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

No. Species Location Score Date Age

85+

Reason for

Protection

A,S,H,L 111

115

116

117

118

Sophora microphylla

SOUTH

KOWHAI

ISLAND

37 Alexander St,

Greymouth Child

Care Centre

Juglans

PERSIAN

/ENGLISH

WALNUT regia Southern Bank

Slatey Creek, Leaf

Property Rotomanu

Tiliax europea

COMMON or

EUROPEAN LIME

Clifton Rd, Ahaura

3456

1944

1382

4

Metrosideros umbellata

SOUTHERN RATA

Northern Corner

Main Coastal

Highway & Beach

Rd. Barrytown

Corynocarpus

Laevigata

KARAKA TREES

Greymouth

Westport Coast

Road at Kararoa (12 miles)

1228

8

Prob.

1910

1905 90

A 100 unknown

Unknown

A,S,H,L,I,N

L,A,S,H

L,A,S

Significance to iwi

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

229

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

26.3 SCHEDULE 3 - ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES

NB: The following grid references give the location of sites, but do not delimit their extent. The location of sites is usually only recorded to within about the nearest 100 metres.

Site Description Planning Map

Number

Metric Map

Sheet

1

1

2

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

28

8

8

31

1

31

28

6

6

1

3

3

3

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J31

J32

J32

J32

Site

Number

13

14

15

16

17

18

9

10

11

12

7

8

5

6

3

4

1

2

19

20

21

1

5

8

Metric

Easting

2369200

2368200

2368100

2368100

2368100

2366900

2366900

2363400

2363500

2363300

2368100

2363200

2361900

2362100

2369500

2369400

2369900

2369900

2367500

2359300

2355900

2366800

Metric

Northing

5862600

5863000

5863100

5863100

5862900

5873700

5873800

5867300

5867400

5867000

5875400

5860600

5861100

5861750

5861300

5862400

5880000

5880000

5874400

5852800

5847300

5847800

Burial Cave

Settlement

Village

Village

Burial site

Cemetery

Old Gold Claims

Goldmining

Goldmining

Gold Workings

Gold Workings

Gold Workings

Gold Workings

Midden In Cave

Findspot In Cave

Dam/ Water Race

Tailings

Tailings

Midden

Midden

Midden

Village

Settlement

Gold Mining

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

230

Planning Map

Number

Metric Map

Sheet

4

34

4

34

3

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

9

3

3

3

3

4

39

3

3

3

4

3

3

3

2

3

5

5

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

J32

K30

K30

Site

Number

44

56

57

60

61

40

41

42

43

33

37

38

39

9

23

24

25

26

27

70

74

79

80

62

63

65

69

81

8

9

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

Metric

Easting

2365900

2364900

2367000

2365000

2364600

2360600

2364500

2362500

2366100

2366800

2363800

2360100

2363300

2368700

2358200

2358200

2369500

2368700

2365000

2366300

2366300

2369200

2369000

2367900

2364600

2361000

2369200

2368500

2371700

2371700

Metric

Northing

5841100

5841200

5840400

5840600

5841100

5857500

5841400

5841600

5847300

5847100

5848300

5851100

5850200

5839800

5850800

575477

5838900

5840200

5840500

5847900

5848500

5847800

5859800

5848200

5840200

5844500

5847500

5851600

5893900

5893900

Site Description

Mining Claim

Mining Township

Mining Township

Hotel Site

Gold Mining

Mining Camp

Settlement

Miners Track

Gold Workings

Gold Workings

Gold Sluicing

Tailings

Tailings

Sawmill

Tailings

Findspot

Chinese Camp

Gold Workings

Gold Workings

Gold Workings

Gold Workings

Miner’s Camp

Miner’s Track

Gold Mining

Gold Mining Dam

Track/ Oil Bore

Tailings

Track

Oven

Midden

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

231

Planning Map

Number

Metric Map

Sheet

5

5

5

5

K30

K30

K30

K30

Site

Number

10

11

12

13

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

Metric

Easting

2371600

2371500

2371500

2371600

Metric

Northing

5893900

5893900

5893900

5893800

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

14

15

45

46

47

48

24

42

43

44

49

50

51

52

54

20

21

22

23

16

17

18

19

55

56

57

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

232

2371600

2371500

2371300

2372000

2371900

2371800

2371800

2371800

2371800

2371800

2371500

2371500

2371500

2371600

2371600

2371500

2371400

2371500

2371800

2371800

2371800

2371700

2371300

2371300

2371400

2371400

5893700

5893700

5892800

5894900

5895000

5895000

5895000

5894800

5894700

5894500

5893700

5893600

5893600

5893400

5893400

5893300

5893100

5893000

5894500

5894400

5894400

5894100

5893200

5893000

5893000

5893000

Site Description

Midden

Midden

Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Shell Midden

Charcoal Lens

Oven Stones

Stone Flaking

Fireplace

Fireplace

Stone Working

Fire Stones

Fire Stones

Midden

Oven Site

Oven

Fire Stones

Raised Rim Pit

Terraces

Midden

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

Planning Map

Number

Metric Map

Sheet

5

5

5

5

5

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

Site

Number

58

59

60

61

62

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5 & 51

5

5

5 & 51

5

5

5

41

8

13

7

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K31

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K30

K31

K31

K31

Metric

Easting

2371500

2371500

2371300

2371200

2371300

Metric

Northing

5893300

5893200

5892800

5892700

5892700

63

76

77

78

79

72

73

74

75

82

83

84

85

1

68

69

70

71

64

65

66

67

2

3

4

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

233

2371400

2371900

2371300

2371300

2371300

2371200

2371200

2371200

2371900

2371500

2371800

2371900

2371900

2371900

2372000

2371700

2371800

2371900

2372700

2372800

2372900

2370800

2374800

2388900

2388800

5892800

5894500

5893300

5892800

5892800

5892300

5892300

5892000

5890300

5892800

5896700

5895500

5895500

5895400

5894800

5894500

5894400

5896700

5895200

5895100

5895000

5860700

5862500

5872900

5873200

Site Description

Midden

Midden

Midden

Midden

Midden

Midden

Midden

Rock Shelter

Water Races

Water Race

Water Race

Water Race

Water Race

Track

Hut Site

Water Race

Saw Pit

Saw Pit

Gold Workings

Water Race

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

Pack Track

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

Water Race

Fishing Station

Midden

Findspot/ Pits

Findspot

7

7

8

7

7

8

6

6

6

7

7

13

13

13

13

13

8

6

6

13

13

13

13

13

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

Planning Map

Number

Metric Map

Sheet

13

13

7

13

6

6

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

Site

Number

7

8

5

6

9

10

Metric

Easting

2390900

2389600

2388800

2390400

2380200

2379200

Metric

Northing

5872000

5873900

5871900

5874300

5881500

5882700

Site Description

?Pa

Adze Cache

Adze Findspot

Oven

Miner’s Camp

Quartz Battery

24

25

26

27

20

21

22

23

28

29

30

31

32

15

16

18

19

11

12

13

14

33

34

35

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

234

2382700

2383000

2378000

2377400

2382200

2377800

2377800

2377800

2371200

2370500

2399400

2401800

2398700

2403600

2393400

2372200

2383000

2377900

2378400

2401100

2402100

2401900

2401900

2402100

5880500

5880400

5874300

5863100

5860800

5874500

5876400

5874500

5886600

5884000

5870500

5870800

5876500

5873700

5864300

5862500

5880300

5873100

5865000

5870500

5870700

5870800

5871300

5871600

Findspot

Findspot

Settlement

Township

Mining Township

Mining Township

Mining Camp

Brunner Mine etc

Mining Settlement

House/ Water Race

Mining Battery

Mining Settlement

Mining Township

Hotel & Hut Sites

Hotel & Hut Sites

Sluicing & Race

Cemetery

Pack Track

Artifacts

Mining Track

Hut Site

Mining Track

Track

Sluice Claim

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

Planning Map

Number

Metric Map

Sheet

13

13

13

13

13

8

51 & 7

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

Site

Number

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

7

7

6

23

6

6

6

6

8

7

7 & 51

7 & 51

6

7

6

6

6

6

6

6

7 & 51

7 & 51

7

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

Metric

Easting

2401000

2401500

2402700

2402000

2401300

2374900

2401100

56

57

58

59

51

53

54

55

60

61

64

65

47

48

49

50

43

44

45

46

66

67

68

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

235

2378900

2374700

2378600

2377400

2377600

2377700

2380700

2371200

2381800

2381800

2381000

2379300

2381800

2380800

2380900

2377200

2376000

2385000

2388000

2388000

2388100

2388600

2388600

5879200

5878100

5878400

5878000

5875200

5876300

5881200

5883300

5881300

5881600

5881300

5882200

5881600

5881400

5881400

5876700

5862000

5873700

5866000

5866000

5865900

5865900

5865900

Metric

Northing

5870700

5870100

5870800

5870600

5870600

5863100

5870500

Site Description

Sluice Claim

Sluice Claim

Gold Workings

Cemetery

Mining Claims

House Site

Swing Bridge

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

Hut Site

Hut Sites

Gold Mining

Hut Sites

Gold Mining

Gold Mine

Gold Mine/ Battery

Gold Mine

Hut Sites

Hut Site

Alluvial Claims

Saw Mill

Gold Mining

Cemetery

Canoe Find

Pack Track

Old Gold Claims

Hut Site

Tunnels

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

13

7

13

7

6

13

13

13

8

7

8

7

6

6

6

Planning Map

Number

Metric Map

Sheet

7

7

7 & 51

7 & 51

7

7

7 & 51

12

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

Site

Number

69

70

71

72

73

74

75

76

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

Metric

Easting

2388000

2388600

2388300

2388500

2388600

2388700

2388500

2394800

Metric

Northing

5866000

5865700

5865700

5865600

5865600

5865500

5865600

5889700

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

88

89

90

91

83

85

86

87

78

79

80

81

99

100

101

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

236

2406300

2388600

2396300

2371300

2381000

2379000

2378800

2379100

2379500

2378700

2378200

2382400

2385000

2382300

2380300

2383800

2401300

2391900

2404200

2370900

2371200

2372200

5865300

5865700

5868600

5871700

5872900

5871300

5871400

5871400

5870900

5870700

5871200

5860700

5867300

5860600

5864200

5879900

5871700

5864200

5865900

5889700

5889900

5887400

Site Description

Old Gold Claims

House Site

Track

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

House Site

Tunnels

Tramway

Track

Miner’s Road

Miner’s Track

Locomotive

Sawmill Site

Miner’s Track

Water Race

Stock Route

Sawmill

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

Coal Mine

Tailings

Chimney

Chimney

Water Supply

Water Supply

Coal Mine

Bridge

Gold Mining

Hut Site

Hut Sites

9

9

10

9

9

9

10

10

9

9

9

9

10

10

9

9

9

9

10

9

10

Planning Map

Number

Metric Map

Sheet

8

8

7

8

8

8

14

9

48

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K31

K32

K32

Site

Number

102

103

104

105

106

107

108

1

2

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

Metric

Easting

2387400

2382500

2382400

2382400

2381800

2381700

2393300

2384600

2384400

Metric

Northing

5865600

5860300

5860200

5860100

5861700

5860800

5861700

5842200

5846700

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

15

16

17

18

19

20

11

12

13

14

7

8

9

10

5

6

3

4

21

22

23

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

237

2382700

2382400

2374300

2374600

2374700

2374000

2370100

2371400

2371800

2376300

2384000

2379900

2384500

2383800

2383600

2384000

2382700

2382700

2370300

2374800

2370300

5842300

5832500

5850300

5849700

5850000

5850000

5837900

5848500

5849100

5849900

5846800

5842900

5842800

5849100

5848800

5850100

5832000

5832300

5836300

5838800

5837800

Site Description

Tailings

Tailings

Tailings/ Campsite

Tailings

Gold Workings

Gold Mining

Miner’s Hut Site

Village

Canoe

Occupation

Ovens

Village

Workshop

Adze Finds

Artefact Findspot

Ovens

Oven

Ovens

Ovens

Mining Claims

Mining Claim

Mining Claim

Mining Claim

Sluicing Claim

Mining Town

Mining Township

Hotel Site

Gold Mining

Water Races

Water Race

9

14

14

8

9

9

9

9

8

8

8

Planning Map

Number

Metric Map

Sheet

8

8

8

8

9

9

9

9

15

14

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

Site

Number

30

31

32

33

24

25

26

27

28

29

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

K32

38

39

40

41

34

35

36

37

42

43

44

AP P E N D I X 6 - H E R I T AG E

Metric

Easting

2379000

2371900

2371800

2375100

23953000

2397600

2382900

2380300

2374700

2385400

2370900

2379600

2377000

2371900

2374100

2391000

2390900

2381900

2381900

2381700

2382000

5848600

5844900

5849600

5850100

5845600

5856800

5856600

5859000

5858800

5859600

5857700

Metric

Northing

5842400

5842900

5838300

5849000

5849600

5859700

5859200

5857800

5854500

5859400

Site Description

Tram Terminus

Timber Mill

Timber Mill

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

Mining Dam

Dams

Miner’s Track /Dam

Gold Dredge

Tunnels

Cemetery

Track

Track

Track

Track

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

Mining Dam

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

Gold Mining

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

238

AP P E N D I X 7 - AP P L I C AT I O N PR O C ED U R E

27 APPENDIX 7 - APPLICATION PROCEDURE

27.1 INFORMATION REQUIRED

27.1.1 DETAILS

The following information shall be submitted with any application for a resource consent:

1. a description of the site including existing activities, including information on the extent and nature of any fill on the site , any indication of earth movement and a description of any habitats (e.g.. bush areas, wetlands and streams) that the activity may adjoin or modify; buildings , topography and vegetation,

2.

3.

4. the siting, design and exterior materials and colours to be used in respect of any proposed building and fence; a description of the activity for which consent is sought;

5. a statement specifying all other resource consents that the applicant may require from any consent authority in respect of the activity to which the application relates, and whether or not the applicant has applied for such consents; an assessment of any actual or potential effects that the activity may have on the environment and the ways in which those adverse effects may be mitigated:

The assessment shall: a) be in such detail as corresponds with the scale and significance of the actual or potential effects that the activity may have on the environment; and

6. b) be prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Fourth Schedule to the Act;

Certificates of title for the subject site (s);

7. Information on any natural hazards affecting the site (amongst others: flooding, subsidence, erosion, etc.).

27.1.2 DRAWINGS

In addition to the above information, any application for land use consent shall include a set of drawings, at a specified scale, illustrating the proposal. Two copies of each drawing are required.

The drawings must include the details set out below, as applicable:

1. a drawing showing the location of the point; site , with road name, property number and north

2. a site plan of the property (at a scale of not less than 1:500) showing: a) site boundary lengths and other dimensions in metres. b) c) location with distances to site boundaries , of all existing buildings which are to remain on the site , and all proposed buildings and structures (including where applicable, eaves, balconies, courts and verandas). proposed use of each building .

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

239

AP P E N D I X 7 - AP P L I C AT I O N PR O C ED U R E

d) e) f) g) h) i) position of any easement over the site . position, location and dimensions of every parking and loading space . kerb lines adjacent to the site and the position of any street trees. levels on the site boundaries and around any buildings except in cases where the site is less than 1000m

2

, or has a uniform grade of less than 1 in 10. proposed retaining walls, excavations and landfill. existing trees and proposed landscaping (particularly where this is a requirement of the rules for the Environmental Area). Dimensioned areas of the landscaping should be shown together with all existing and proposed sealed areas. j) k) l) where relevant, recession line diagrams. watercourses and drainage and sewerage pipes within and adjacent to the site . the means proposed to deal with all stormwater and sanitary drainage. m) the position of entrances and exits to the site . a floor plan of each building (at a scale of not less than 1:200) showing: 3. a) use of all parts of the building , including basements, storage or service areas. b) room layout of the building , if this is known, and a clear identification of the use of different rooms or parts of a floor.

Where several floors are of the same area and use, a standard floor plan may be shown. 4.

5. elevations of each building (at a scale not less than 1:200) showing: a) external appearance of the building including doors and windows. b) c) number of floors and their proposed usage. building heights and height in relation to any boundary .

The following type of information shall accompany subdivision consent applications:

(a) The position of all new boundaries .

(b) Except in the case of a subdivision to be effected by the grant of a cross lease or company lease or by the deposit of a unit plan, the areas of all new allotments .

(c) The location and areas of new reserves to be created, including any esplanade reserves to be set aside on a survey plan under

Section 231

.

[(ca) The location and areas of esplanade strips to be created under

Section 232

.

[(cb) The location and areas of any existing esplanade reserves , esplanade strips, or access strips:]

(d) (The location and areas of any land below mean high water springs of the sea, or of any part of the bed of a river or lake, which is required under section 237A to be shown on a survey plan as land to be vested in the Crown.

(e) The location and areas of land to be set aside as new road .

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

240

AP P E N D I X 7 - AP P L I C AT I O N PR O C ED U R E

In addition Council requires the following:

(a) The location of transmission lines with a voltage of 50kV and greater, including any National

Grid Infrastructure on or adjacent to the application site.

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

241

AP P E N D I X 8 - R E C E S SI O N PL AN E S

28 APPENDIX 8 - RECESSION PLANES

28.1 DEFINITION OF RECESSION PLANE

A recession plane is a plane constructed from points on or above a boundary surface or a road surface, the angle of inclination of which is measured from the horizontal, at right angles to a site boundary and in towards the site . No building features shall protrude through or above the recession plane except the following:

Chimneys, ventilation shafts, roof water tanks, lift and stair shafts and spires, poles and masts less than 9m above ground level , provided the maximum dimension thereof measured parallel to the boundary under consideration shall not exceed 3m, and provided for buildings over three storeys, such features are contained within or are sited directly against the outside structural walls; and

Where a single gable end with base (excluding eaves) of 7.5m or less faces a boundary and a recession plane strikes no lower than half way between the eaves and ridge line, a gable end may penetrate the recession; and

Where the land immediately adjoining the site boundary forms part of a right-of-way or access strip, the recession plane shall be calculated from the far side of the right of way or access strip; and

Where buildings on adjoining sites have a common wall along an internal boundary , no recession line shall be applied along that part of the boundary covered by such a wall.

2.5m

28.2 RECESSION PLANE INDICATOR

Applicable to buildings within the Residential and Township Environmental Areas and buildings within the Commercial and Industrial Environmental Areas where it adjoins a

Residential Environmental Area in respect of the common boundary .

55°

Boundary

51°

45°

36°

30°

Ground Level

Place Diagram B on the inside of boundary .

The angle tangential to the boundary is the angle of the recession plane. The recession

Plane angle shall be applied as per Diagram

A.

49°

51°

53°

55°

53°

51°

49°

47°

45°

47°

45°

42°

North

39°

36°

33° 30°

33°

36°

42°

39°

Diagram A

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

242

Diagram B

AP P E N D I X 8 - R E C E S SI O N PL AN E S

28.3 HILL SITES

On very steep sites the recession plane control can be unduly restrictive. In these circumstances owners may opt to comply with the following alternative control:

Maximum Height - 2 metres plus the horizontal distance to the nearest boundary , up to a maximum of 8 metres; where "height" means the vertical distance between any part of a building (excluding chimneys and aerials) and the ground level prior to any excavation or filling.

(The control is illustrated in the attached Figure 1 below.

Figure 1

It should be noted that each part of a building must comply (except chimneys and aerials) and the height of each part is measured from the original ground level vertically below that part of the building . In practice however, the critical points of a building will normally be the eaves or the ridge of a roof, depending on the ground slope and the pitch of the roof.

Elevations prepared for resource consent/ building consent applications must show accurate ground levels along the exterior walls of proposed buildings , particularly if buildings are intended to extend close to the height limits. In the case of buildings with complex roofs, it may be necessary to provide cross-sections of the buildings with ground levels to demonstrate compliance.

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

243

AP P E N D I X 9 - AE R O D R O M E F L I G H T P AT H PR O T EC T I O N AR E A

29 APPENDIX 9 - AERODROME FLIGHT PATH

PROTECTION AREA

29.1 HEIGHT CONTROL GENERAL

29.1.1 APPROACH SLOPES (MAIN STRIP)

There is an approach slope at each end of the main strip. Each such approach slope rises at a gradient of 1 in 40 from its origin at the strip end and has sides which diverge outwards at the rate of 1 in 10 extending from the end corners of the strip. Each approach slope extends for a horizontal surface at a height of 45.7m. Each such slope is symmetrically disposed about the centreline of the strip.

In addition to the normal straight approach slopes, the NNE end of the strip is subject to the curved flight path shown for a horizontal distance of 610m on the centreline of the strip at which point it turns westward as shown on Planning Maps 28, 30, 32 and 34.

29.1.2 APPROACH SLOPES (GRASS STRIP)

There is an approach slope at each end of the grass strip. Each such approach slope rises at a gradient of 1 in 20 from its origin at the strip end and has sides which diverge outwards at the rate of 1 in 20 extending from the end corners of the strip. Each approach slope extends for a horizontal distance of 1200m. Each such slope is symmetrically disposed about the centreline of the strip.

In addition to the normal straight approach slopes, the NNE end of the strip is subject to the curved flight path shown for a horizontal distance of 610m on the centreline of the strip at which point it turns westward as shown on Planning Maps 30, 31 and 32.

29.1.3 TRANSITIONAL SLOPES (MAIN STRIP)

These extend upwards and outwards from the sides of the main strip and from the sides of the approach slopes (where these are below the main level of the horizontal surface) at a gradient of 1 in 5 to a height of 10m (see Maps 28, 30, 32 and 34).

29.1.4 TRANSITIONAL SLOPES (GRASS STRIP)

These extend upwards and outwards from the sides of the grass strip and from the sides of the approach slopes (where these are below the main level of the horizontal surface) at a gradient of 1 in 4 to a height of 2m (see Maps 30, 31 and 32).

29.1.5 HORIZONTAL SURFACE

The horizontal surface is a horizontal plane described at a height of 45.7m above the centre point of the aerodrome and extending outwards for a radius of 4,000m (see Map 2 or for more detail Maps 27, 29, 36a, 37 and 40).

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

244

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

30 APPENDIX 10 - SCHEDULE OF DESIGNATIONS

Refer to 2.8.3 Designations for background to the designations.

The schedule below details the designations received by Council . The schedule sets out:

the number of the designation which corresponds to that shown on the planning maps;

the requiring authority responsible for the designation;

the purpose of the designation;

 site and legal description;

the lifetime of the designation;

the underlying management area which indicates which management area applies if the site is used for a purpose other than the designated purpose. The underlying management area corresponds to the area shown on the Planning M aps. “Various” indicates that the site has more than one management area. In these cases the actual

Planning Map should be referred to determine the actual management area.

The following abbreviations are used;

COM = COMMERCIAL

RU = RURAL

R-R = RURAL RESIDENTIAL

TSP = TOWNSHIP

IND = INDUSTRIAL

RES = RESIDENTIAL

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

245

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

MAP REF.&

PLANNING MAP

AUTHORITY

RESPONSIBLE

PURPOSE

1

MAPS 3, 7, 8, 9,

10, 12, 13, 15, 16,

24, 25, 26, 28, 30,

31, 32, 34, 36, 37,

39, 40, 41, 42, 43,

44, 45, 48, 49 53

MINISTER FOR

STATE OWNED

ENTERPRISES

RAILWAY PURPOSES

2

MAPS 1, 2, 3, 5, 6,

7, 8, 12, 13, 23, 25,

26, 28, 31, 32, 36,

37, 38, 39, 40, 41,

42, 43, 44, 45, 51,

53,

NEW ZEALAND

TRANSPORT

AGENCY

STATE HIGHWAYS.

3

MAP 31

MINISTER OF

POLICE

POLICE STATION

SCHEDULE OF DESIGNATIONS

SITE/LEGAL DESCRIPTION AND CONDITIONS

AS SHOWN ON THE PLANNING MAPS.

Please note: designations 1 (New Zealand rail) & 2

(State highways) are an indication only. The dimensions of these designations on the planning maps should not be relied upon for planning purposes.

LIFETIME OF

DESIGNATION

HAVE BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

UNDERLYING

ENVIRONMENTAL

AREA

VARIOUS

SH6: FROM THE NORTHERN ABUTMENT PUNAKAIKI

RIVER BRIDGE (RS 388) THROUGH GREYMOUTH TO

NORTHERN ABUTMENT TARAMAKAU RIVER BRIDGE

(RS 445).

SH7: FROM NORTHERN ABUTMENT BIG GREY RIVER

BRIDGE (RS 224) TO THE JUNCTION WITH SH6 AT

GREYMOUTH.

AS SHOWN ON THE PLANNING MAPS.

DESIGNATION TO INCLUDE OVERBRIDGE AT SOUTH

BEACH.

Please note: designations 1 (New Zealand rail) & 2

(State highways) are an indication only. The dimensions of these designations on the planning maps should not be relied upon for planning purposes

WHERE NOT

GIVEN EFFECT

TO, 10 YEARS.

VARIOUS

47-57 GUINNESS STREET, GREYMOUTH. LOTS 1-3 DP

408, LOTS 1, 2 DP 248 AND SECS 259-261, 2288, TOWN

OF GREYMOUTH.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

COM

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

246

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

6

MAP 31

7

MAP 31

8

MAP 32

9

MAP 30

10

MAP 48

14

MAP REF.&

PLANNING MAP

4

MAP 31

5

MAP 41

AUTHORITY

RESPONSIBLE

PURPOSE

MINISTRY OF

DEFENCE

SCHEDULE OF DESIGNATIONS

SITE/LEGAL DESCRIPTION AND CONDITIONS

DEFENCE PURPOSES

LIFETIME OF

DESIGNATION

ARMY HALL, GRESSON STREET. PT R1930 AND PT LOT

1 DP 1005, PT SEC 473, TOWN OF GREYMOUTH.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

UNDERLYING

ENVIRONMENTAL

AREA

IND

TRANSPOWER

NEW ZEALAND

LIMITED

ELECTRICITY

SUBSTATION

MINISTER FOR

COURTS

COURTHOUSE

MINISTER OF

CORRECTIONS

PERIODIC DETENTION

AND PROBATION

REPORTING CENTRE.

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

SECONDARY SCHOOL

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

PRIMARY SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

DOBSON SUBSTATION, TAUPO TERRACE, DOBSON.

SEC 448, TOWN OF DOBSON AND SECS 218-222 AND

SECS 241-245, TOWN OF DOBSON, BLK X, ARNOLD SD.

SECS 223-227 AND SECS 237, 238, 239, 446 AND 447,

TOWN OF DOBSON.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

GUINNESS STREET, GREYMOUTH, SEC 286, BLK 10,

MAWHERA MAORI RESERVE 31.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

IND

COM

JOHNSTON STREET, GREYMOUTH, SEC 1, SO 11910,

BLK XII, GREYMOUTH SD.

GREYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL, MARLBOROUGH

STREET, GREYMOUTH, RES 2108, PT SECS 390.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

IND

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RES

BLAKETOWN PRIMARY SCHOOL, BLAKE STREET,

GREYMOUTH, PT RES 1427, RES 1805, LOT 92, DP 455.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

LAKE BRUNNER PRIMARY SCHOOL, AHAU STREET,

LAKE BRUNNER (MOANA) SECS 52-56.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

GREY MAIN PRIMARY SCHOOL, JOYCE CRES,

GREYMOUTH, LOTS 81-90, DP 847, PT LOT 3 DP 704,

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

RES

RES

RES

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

247

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

MAP REF.&

PLANNING MAP

MAP 32

16

MAPS 18, 29

17

MAP 45

18

MAP 23

19

MAP 46

21

MAP 41

23

MAP 34

AUTHORITY

RESPONSIBLE

PURPOSE

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

PRIMARY AND PRE-

SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

SCHEDULE OF DESIGNATIONS

SITE/LEGAL DESCRIPTION AND CONDITIONS LIFETIME OF

DESIGNATION

UNDERLYING

ENVIRONMENTAL

AREA

PT LOT 24, DP 510, PT LOT 1, DP 738

COBDEN PRIMARY SCHOOL, SECS 249-258, TOWN OF

COBDEN, SO 11536, LOT 1 DP 262.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

AWAHONO-GREY VALLEY SCHOOL,

NAPOLEAN/GROVE STREETS, AHAURA. SEC 5, SECS

241-253, 269-271, 186, 193, 272-303, SECS 1 351389,

SEC 1 SO 12100, SEC 1 SO 11906, LOTS 3 & 4 DP 2150.

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RES

TSP

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

PRIMARY SCHOOL

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

PRIMARY SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

BARRYTOWN PRIMARY SCHOOL, CARGILL ROAD/SH6,

BARRYTOWN PT RES 1376.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

BLACKBALL PRIMARY SCHOOL, CHAMBERLAIN

STREET, BLACKBALL, LOT 1 DP 696.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

RU

BRUNNERTON PRIMARY SCHOOL, MAWHERA/HERALD

STREETS. RES 259, LOT 2 DP 1643.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RES

KARORO PRIMARY SCHOOL, RATA STREET, KARORO.

RES 1964.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RES

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

248

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

25

MAP 38

28

MAP 15

30

MAP 26

31

MAP 38

33

MAP 7

34

MAP 6

35

MAP 41

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

MINISTER OF

EDUCATION

PRIMARY SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

PAROA PRIMARY SCHOOL, MAIN SOUTH ROAD,

PAROA. R1242, R1810, R224, R1841.

ROTOMANU PRIMARY SCHOOL,

INCHBONNIE/ROTOMANU/CROOKED RIVER ROADS.

SEC 13 BLK X, TE KINGA SD.

RUNANGA PRIMARY SCHOOL, WARD/MCGOWAN

STREETS, RUNANGA. PT RES 357.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RES

TELECOM NEW

ZEALAND

LIMITED

TELECOMMUNICATION

AND RADIO

COMMUNICATION AND

ANCILLARY PURPOSES.

PAROA EXCHANGE, SH6, PAROA. SEC 1, SO 4750, BLK

XVI, GREYMOUTH SD (91SQM).

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

TELECOM NEW

ZEALAND

LIMITED

TELECOMMUNICATION

AND RADIO

COMMUNICATION AND

ANCILLARY PURPOSES.

SEWELL PEAK RADIO STATION. PART SECTION 231

RES, BLK V AND PT 2A, BLK V MAWHERANUI SD. PT

SEC 1, BLK V, COBDEN SD AND BLK IX, MAWHERANUI

SD (4047SQM).

TELECOM NEW

ZEALAND

LIMITED

TELECOMMUNICATION

AND RADIO

COMMUNICATION AND

ANCILLARY PURPOSES.

BARRYTOWN EXCHANGE, SH6, BARRYTOWN. PT RS

3175, BLK V, WAIWHERO SD (293SQM).

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

TELECOM NEW

ZEALAND

LIMITED

TELECOMMUNICATION

AND RADIO

COMMUNICATION AND

ANCILLARY PURPOSES.

DOBSON EXCHANGE, MAHINAPUA ROAD, DOBSON,

LOT 1 DP 3003, BLK X, ARNOLD SD (852SQM).

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

COM

RU

RU

COM

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

249

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

36

MAP 31

37

MAPS 30, 31

39

MAP 44

44

MAP 2

45

MAP 7

46

40

MAP 36

41

MAP 48

42

MAP 25

43

MAP 3

TELECOM NEW

ZEALAND

LIMITED

TELECOMMUNICATION

AND RADIO

COMMUNICATION AND

ANCILLARY PURPOSES.

GREYMOUTH EXCHANGE, GUINNESS/TAINUI

STREETS, GREYMOUTH, GREY VALLEY 4 PROJECT,

PT SEC 286, BLK 10 MAWHERA MAORI RES 31

(2,902SQM).

TELECOM NEW

ZEALAND

LIMITED

TELECOMMUNICATION

AND RADIO

COMMUNICATION AND

ANCILLARY PURPOSES.

GREYMOUTH LINE DEPOT AND WORKSHOPS. 26

ARNEY STREET, GREYMOUTH. PT SEC 506, SECS 507

AND 99, TOWN OF GREYMOUTH (13,964SQM).

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

COM

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

IND

TELECOM NEW

ZEALAND

LIMITED

TELECOMMUNICATION

AND RADIO

COMMUNICATION AND

ANCILLARY PURPOSES.

NGAHERE EXCHANGE (MUX) SH7. NGAHERE PT LOT 1

DP 395, BLK VII, MAWHERANUI SD (278SQM).

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

SEWAGE DISPOSAL KARORO SEWAGE TREATMENT PONDS HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

SEWAGE DISPOSAL MOANA SEWAGE TREATMENT PONDS

SEC 4968, PT 5346, SO 5814, SO 4968

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

RU

RU

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

SEWAGE DISPOSAL RUNANGA SEWAGE TREATMENT PONDS HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

LANDFILL AND REFUSE

DISPOSAL

GLADSTONE CEMETERY (GREY DISTRICT MEMORIAL

PARK) PT 2511 (18.6705HA) RS 4986, RS 4985, SO 5135,

SO 5131

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

MCLEANS PIT LANDFILL SITE. PT R2092 (17.8988HA) 5 YEARS

RU

RU

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

LANDFILL AND REFUSE

DISPOSAL

REDJACKS ROAD LANDFILL SITE

GREY DISTRICT AERODROME AERODROME ROAD

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

250

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

RU

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

52

MAP 31

53

MAP 30

54

MAP 28

55

MAP 41

MAPS 2, 30 & 32

47

MAP 28

48

MAP 31

49

MAP 31

50

MAP 31

51

MAP 7

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

LANDFILL AND REFUSE

DISPOSAL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

PROPOSED

PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY

SERVICE LANE

(PROPOSED)

SERVICE LANE

COBDEN ISLAND TRANSFER STATION R1428

SECTIONS 40 AND 42 BLOCK 1 MAORI RESERVE 31

B/W HERBERT STREET AND TARAPUHI STREET

B/W MACKAY STREET AND GUINNESS STREET

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

COM

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

COM

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

COM

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

KORDIA™

GROUP

LIMITED

TELECOMMUNICATION

AND RADIO

COMMUNICATION AND

ANCILLARY PURPOSES

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

PEDESTRIAN MALL

PAPAROA PEAK TRANSMISSION STATION PT SEC 2A

SQ 119 PT RS 5390 BLK V IX MAWHERANUI SD

ALBERT STREET B/W MACKAY AND GUINNESS

STREETS

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

SEWAGE DISPOSAL GREYMOUTH SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT &

WETLANDS PT RES 91 GREYMOUTH

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

5 YEARS

COM

IND

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

SEWAGE DISPOSAL

LANDFILL AND REFUSE

DISPOSAL

COBDEN SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT & WETLANDS

NELSON QUAY RES 1327 BLK IV COBDEN

DOBSON TRANSFER STATION

5 YEARS

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

RU

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

251

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

56

MAP 7

62

MAP 4

63

MAP 8

64

MAPS 4, 7

65

MAP 8

57

MAPS 32, 34

58

MAP 47

59

MAP 43

60

MAP 13

61

MAP 23

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

LANDFILL AND REFUSE

DISPOSAL

BLACKBALL LANDFILL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY KARORO CEMETERY

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY BLACKBALL CEMETERY

STILLWATER CEMETERY GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY

AHAURA CEMETERY

BARRYTOWN CEMETERY

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

CEMETERY

GREENSTONE CEMETERY

MAORI GULLEY CEMETERY

NGAHERE/ NELSON CREEK CEMETERY

NOTOWN CEMETERY

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

252

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

TSP

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

66

MAP 26

67

MAP 49

68

MAP 30

69

MAP 31

70

MAPS 30, 31, 32

71

MAP 32

72

MAPS 30, 31, 32

73

MAP 28

74

MAP 8

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

LANDFILL AND REFUSE

DISPOSAL

LOCAL PURPOSE

RESERVE

WILDLIFE RESERVE

RECREATION RESERVE

RECREATION RESERVE

RECREATION RESERVE

RECREATION RESERVE

RECREATION RESERVE

TRUSTPOWER

LTD

HYDRO ELECTRIC

POWER PURPOSES

RUNANGA LANDFILL

IVEAGH BAY RECREATIONAL AND AMENITIES AREA

BLAKETOWN LAGOON WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT

RESERVE

DIXON PARK

CORONATION PARK

RECREATION PLAYING FIELDS PT RES 994

PLAYING FIELDS CT 2C 835

PLAYING FIELDS PT MCLEAN PARK

ARNOLD POWER SCHEME

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

RU

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

COM

RES

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RES

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RES

RU

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

RU

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

253

75

MAP 31

76

MAP 47

ALL MAPS

AP P E N D I X 1 0 - SC H E D U L E O F D E SI G N AT I O N S

MINISTRY FOR

COURTS

COURTHOUSE

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

SEWAGE DISPOSAL

GREY DISTRICT

COUNCIL

PUBLIC ROADING

CORNER GUINNESS STREET,HERBERT & TARAPUHI

STREETS GREYMOUTH, SECS 125 - 131, BLK 12,

MAWHERA 31 MAORI RESERVE. & LOT 4 DP 787

BLACKBALL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT,

SECTIONS 1, 3, 4 AND 5 SO 11853, REFER TO LU

1245-05 FOR CONDITIONS

AS SHOWN ON PLANNING MAPS

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

HAS BEEN

GIVEN EFFECT

TO.

CARRIED

FORWARD

WHERE NOT

GIVEN EFFECT

TO, 10 YEARS

COM

RU

VARIOUS

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

254

N O H O AN G A

31 APPENDIX 11

– NOHOANGA

NOHOANGA DIAGRAM

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

255

O U T L I N E D E V EL O PM EN T PL AN F O R K A I A T A P AR K

32 APPENDIX 12

– OUTLINE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

FOR KAIATA PARK

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

256

D E F I N I T I O N S

33 DEFINITIONS

Access

: means that portion of a site which legal vehicular and/or pedestrian access is obtained to a legal road . This land includes an access leg, private way, common land as defined on a cross lease or company lease, or common property as defined in Section 2 of the Unit Titles Act 1972.

Accessory Building

: in relation to any site means any separate building the use of which is incidental to that of any other principal building , or use on that site , and for residential activities includes a sleepout, garage or carport, garden shed, glasshouse, swimming pool, mast, shed used solely as a storage area, or other similar structure, provided that any garage or carport which is attached to or a part of any other building shall be deemed to be an accessory building.

Accessway

: means accessway as defined in Section 315 of the Local Government Act

1974.

Act

: means the Resource Management Act 1991.

Adjoining

: land shall be deemed to be adjoining other land , notwithstanding that it is separated from the other land only by a road , railway, drain, water race, river or stream.

Allotment

: has the same meaning as Section 218 of the Act .

Archaeological Site

: has the same meaning as defined in the Historic Places Act as follows:

Any place in New Zealand that: a) Either i) was associated with human activity that occurred before 1900; or ii) is the site of the wreck of any vessel where that wreck occurred before 1900; and b) it may be able through investigation by archaeological methods to provide evidence relating to the history of New Zealand.

Bank

: means the outer edge of the bed (as defined by Section 2 of the Act )

Boundary

: means any boundary of a site and includes any road boundary, side or internal boundary. Site boundary shall have the same meaning as boundary.

Internal Boundary

: means any boundary of a site other than a road boundary, and includes a side boundary.

Road Boundary

: means any boundary of a site abutting a legal road (other than an accessway or service lane) or contiguous to a boundary of a road designation.

Frontage or road frontage shall have the same meaning as road boundary.

Side Boundary

: means any boundary of a site generally at right angles to a road boundary.

Building

: means any structure or part of a structure whether temporary or permanent, movable or immovable, but does not include: a) Any scaffolding or falsework erected temporarily for maintenance or construction purposes. b) Fences, walls of 2m or retaining walls of 1.5m in height or less not used for advertising or for any purpose other than as a fence, retaining wall or wall.

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

257

D E F I N I T I O N S

c) Structures less than 5 m

2

in area and in addition less than 1.2m in height . d) Masts, poles, radio and television aerials excluding dish antennae for receiving satellite television, less than 6.3m above mean ground level . e) Any vehicle, trailer, tent, caravan or boat whether fixed or movable unless such vehicle, trailer, tent, caravan or boat shall be used as a place of accommodation, business or storage.

Building Coverage

: means that portion of a site which is covered by buildings or parts of buildings , including overhanging or cantilevered parts of buildings , expressed as a percentage.

The following shall not be included in Building Coverage: a) Pergolas. b) That part of eaves and/or spouting or bay windows projecting 1m or less horizontally from any exterior wall. c) Satellite dishes.

Camping Ground

: means camping ground as defined in the Camping Ground Regulations

1985.

Carriageway

: means that portion of a road devoted particularly to the use of motor vehicles, inclusive of shoulders.

Commercial Activity

: means the use of land and buildings for the display, offering, provisions, sale or hire of goods, equipment, or services, and includes shops, markets, showrooms, restaurants , takeaway food bars, professional, commercial and administrative offices , service stations , motor vehicle sales, the sale of liquor and associated parking areas; but excludes recreational and service activities and visitor accommodation .

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

258

D E F I N I T I O N S

Conductor Clearance

: The minimum safe distance for National Grid transmission lines from the ground and water including the minimum safe distance for excavations or other alterations.

Council

: means the Grey District Council or any Committee, Subcommittee, Community

Board, Commissioner or person to whom the Council's powers, duties or discretions under this Plan have been lawfully delegated pursuant to the provisions of the Act . District Council shall have the same meaning.

Earthworks

: means the disturbance of land surfaces by the removal or depositing of material, excavation, filling or the formation of roads , banks or tracks, but excludes the cultivation of land .

Elderly Persons Housing

: means one of a group of residential units developed solely for the accommodation of elderly persons (male or female greater than sixty years in age) and which, where not owned by the Crown or Local Authority, is encumbered by a bond or other appropriate instrument which ensures that the use of the unit is limited to elderly persons.

Factory Farming

: means the production of plant, animal and aquatic creatures, where the predominant productive processes are not dependent on the soil characteristics of the site on which it is situated.

GREY DISTRICT PLAN

259

D E F I N I T I O N S

Family Flat

: is included within the meaning of Residential Unit and means a self contained residential building not exceeding 65m

2

located on the same site as a residential unit , and occupied by dependent relatives of the household living in the residential unit .

Forestry Activity

: means the use of land primarily for the purpose of planting, tending, managing and harvesting of trees for timber production in excess of on site domestic or farm wood supply.

Formed Road

: means a road with a carriageway constructed to an all-weather standard with a minimum carriageway width of 3m.

Frontage

: means the road boundary of any site .

Garage

: is included within the meaning of Residential Unit , and means a building or part of a building used for housing motor vehicles and other miscellaneous items owned by persons living on the site .

Gross Floor Area

: means the sum of the gross area of the several floors of all buildings on a site , measured from the exterior faces of the exterior walls, or from the centre lines of walls separating two buildings .

Ground Level

: means the finished ground level when all works associated with any prior subdivision of the land were completed.

Hardsurfacing

: in relation to any site means any part of that site which is impermeable and includes: a) Any area used for parking, manoeuvring, access or loading of motor vehicles. b) Any area paved either with a continuous surface or with open jointed slabs, bricks, gobi or similar blocks.

The following shall not be included in Hardsurfacing: a) paths of less than 1m in width.

Hazardous Substance

: includes, but is not limited to, any substance defined in Section 2 of the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 as a hazardous substance.

Section 2 of the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 defines a hazardous substance as:

“unless expressly provided otherwise by regulations, any substance-

I.

A.

With one or more of the following intrinsic properties:

Explosiveness:

B.

C.

D.

E.

Flammability:

A capacity to oxidise:

Corrosiveness:

Toxicity (including chronic toxicity):

F. Ecotoxicity, with or without bioaccumulation; or

Which on contact with air or water (other than air or water where the temperature or pressure has been artificially increased or decreased) generates a substance with one or more of the properties specified in paragraph (a) of this definition.

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D E F I N I T I O N S

Heavy Vehicle

: means a motor vehicle (other than a motor car that is not used, kept or available for the carriage of passengers for hire or reward) the gross laden weight of which exceeds 3500kg; but does not include a traction engine or vehicle designed solely or principally for the use of fire brigades in attendance at fires. (The Heavy Motor Vehicle

Regulations 1974).

Height

: in relation to a building means the vertical distance between the ground level at any point and the highest part of the building immediately above point.

For the purpose of calculating height, account shall be taken of parapets but not of poles, towers, turrets, chimneys, ventilation shafts, radio or television aerials and other telecommunication antennas that are no more than 1 square metre in area or 1200mm in diameter, lift towers, machinery rooms, stair wells, water towers, cooling towers or finials, provided that such features:

1. Do not exceed the maximum height normally permitted in the zone by more than

3.0m.

2. Do not exceed an aggregate floor area of 20 sq. m or 10% of the area of the roof to the storey immediately below such structures, whichever is the lesser.

3. Do not exceed a dimension of 6m, measured in any direction.

Industrial Activity

: means the use of land and buildings for the primary purpose of manufacturing, fabricating, processing, packing, or associated servicing, maintenance, repair, distribution and storage of goods.

Internal Boundary

: of a site means any boundary of a site other than a road boundary .

Kaiata Park and Kaiata Park Development Area

: is the area between Kaiata and Dobson, bounded on the North and West by State Highway 7 and Fairhall Road respectively. It is bounded on the South by Lot 1 DP 3813, and on the east by Lot 1 DP 2772 and RSs 5704 &

5049. The eastern boundary primarily follows Kaiata Creek. Kaiata Park is limited to the

Industrial, Commercial, Rural Residential and Residential Environment Areas as shown in

Appendix 12.

Land

has the same meaning as in Section 2 of the Resource Management Act 1991.

Livestock

: means animals, birds or aquatic creatures kept for the purpose of providing food for humans or animals.

Commercial Livestock

: means livestock bred, reared and/or kept on a property either primarily or partly for the purpose of commercial gain, but excludes domestic livestock.

Domestic Livestock

: means a) Not more than 2 sows and their progeny up to weaner stage or not more than 5 weaned pigs, and not more than 12 adult poultry in a Township or Residential

Zone or not more than 50 adult poultry in a Rural or Rural-Residential Zone; bred, reared and/or kept on a property; and b) Any number of livestock bred, reared and/or kept on a property for family consumption, or as pets, or for hobby purposes and from which little or no financial gain is derived.

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D E F I N I T I O N S

Living Area

: means any room in a residential unit other than a room used principally as a bedroom, laundry or bathroom.

Loading Space

: means a portion of a site , whether covered or not, clear of any road or service lane upon which a vehicle can stand while being loaded or unloaded. Such loading space shall have vehicular access to a road or service lane.

Manufacturing of Hazardous Substances

: means any industrial process that produces a substance that is hazardous under the United Nations Transportation of Dangerous Goods

Code; and includes any process that includes the mixing of material or making a compound product that is hazardous under the United Nations Transportation of Dangerous Goods

Code.

Meteorological Activity

: means any facilities, buildings , and installations or equipment to measure, collect and distribute meteorological information, and includes any radio communication, telecommunication and satellite links associated with a meteorological activity.

MHWS

: means Mean High Water Springs.

National Grid Infrastructure

: means the high voltage electricity transmission network owned and/or operated by Transpower New Zealand Ltd. This includes the system of transmission lines, support structures, substations and other works operated as part of the network. National Grid Infrastructure has been identified on the Grey District Plan Maps and is labelled as “

National Grid Infrastructure

”.

National Grid Buffer Area

means:

The area located 12 metres in any direction from the outer edge of a National Grid support structure; and

The area located 10 metres either side of the centreline of any National Grid line where it is underground or there are single poles at both ends of a span; or

The area located 12 metres either side of the centreline of any overhead National Grid line where pi poles are at either or both ends of a span.

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D E F I N I T I O N S

Single Pole Pi Pole

Net Site Area

: means the total area of the site ; less any area subject to proposed road widening or designated for a public work; or any area used as an access strip, access lot, right-of-way, common land or common property; or any area with a width less than 6m.

Office

: means any of the following: a) Administrative offices where the administration of an organisation, whether trading or non-trading is conducted; b) Commercial offices such as banks, insurance agents, typing services, duplicating services and real estate agents, being places where trade (other than that involving the immediate exchange of money for goods or the display or production of goods) is transacted; c) Professional office such as the offices of accountants, solicitors, architects, surveyors and engineers, where a professional service is available and carried out.

Outdoor Storage

: means land used for the purpose of storing vehicles, equipment, machinery, natural and processed products, outside a fully enclosed building for periods in excess of 4 weeks in any one year.

Oxidation Pond

: means a pond used for the primary treatment of sewage.

Parking Space

: means a space on a site available at any time for accommodating one stationary motor vehicle. Such parking space shall not be located on any access or outdoor living space and shall have vehicular access to a road or service lane.

Paroa Developments:

is located west of Coulson Road, east of Keith Road,, north of Gadd

Road and south of Ashley Drive. It is limited to the re-zoned Residential Environmental Area as shown in planning map 37.

Physically contiguous parcel of land

: means a singular piece of land.

Radiocommunication facility

: means any transmitting/ receiving devices such as aerials, dishes, antenna, cables, lines, wires, and associated equipment/ apparatus, as well as support structures such as towers, masts and poles, and ancillary buildings .

Relocation of a Building

: means the removal and resiting of any building from any site to a new site .

Reserve

: means a reserve in terms of the Reserves Act 1977.

Residential Activity

: means the use of land and buildings by people for the purpose of permanent living accommodation, including all associated accessory buildings , leisure activities and the keeping of domestic livestock . For the purposes of this definition, residential activity shall include emergency and refuge accommodation, the use of holiday homes which is not commercial and provision of accommodation to a maximum of four travellers at a tariff where the registered proprietors reside on site .

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D E F I N I T I O N S

Residential Unit

: means a residential activity which consists of a single self contained housekeeping unit, whether of one or more persons, and includes accessory building

s

and a family flat . Where more than one kitchen facility is provided on the site , other than a kitchen facility in a family flat , there shall be deemed to be more than one residential unit.

Restaurant

: means a commercial activity which consists of the regular sale of meals to the general public for consumption on the premises, including the sale of liquor associated with the meals.

Retail Sales

: means the direct sale or hire to the public from any site and/or the display or offering for sale or hire to the public on any site of goods, merchandise or equipment, but excludes recreational activities.

Road

: means road as defined in Section 315 of the Local Government Act 1974.

Road Boundary

: of a site means a boundary of a site contiguous to a boundary or proposed final boundary of any legal road (other than an accessway or service lane).

Rural Activity

: means the use of land or buildings for the purposes of agricultural, horticultural or pastoral farming, factory farming , boarding or training of animals, outdoor recreation activity, or forestry and shall include residential units, and per residential unit, the provision of accommodation to a maximum of four travellers at a tariff where the registered proprietors reside on site .

Sensitive activities

: in respect of National Grid Infrastructure are early childhood centres, schools, residential units, retirement villages, residential care facilities and hospitals.

Service Station

: means any site where the dominant activity is the retail sale of motor vehicle fuels (including petrol, LPG, CNG, and diesel), and may also include any one or more of the following:

the sale of kerosene, alcohol based fuels, lubricating oils, tyres, batteries, vehicle spare parts and other accessories normally associated with motor vehicles;

mechanical repair and servicing of motor vehicles (includes motor cycles, caravans, boat motors, trailers);

warrant of fitness testing;

carwashes;

the sale or rental of other goods where this is an ancillary activity to the main use of the site ;

truckstops.

Setback

: means the distance between a building and the boundary of its site . Where any building is required to be setback from any site boundary , no part of that building , unless specifically permitted by the Rules in the Plan, shall be closer to the site boundary than the minimum distance specified. Where any road widening is required by this Plan, the setback shall be calculated from the proposed final site boundary . A setback can also include the distance between a building and/or structure and a specifically identified feature, such as

National Grid Infrastructure .

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D E F I N I T I O N S

Sign

: means any sign or device of whatever nature for the purpose of specific identification of any site or building , for providing directions or information, or for promoting any goods, services or forthcoming events, and which is visible from any public place or thoroughfare.

Such sign may consist of a specially constructed device, structure, erection or apparatus, or may be painted, written, printed, carved, embossed, inscribed, projected onto, placed or otherwise fixed to or upon any site , wall, hoarding, pole, fence, rock, stone, tree, stationary vehicle or structure or erection of any kind whatsoever.

Site

: means an area of land

- comprised in a single certificate of title, or;

- contained in a single allotment as an approved survey plan of subdivision for which a separate certificate of title could be issued without further consent of the Council ; or

- an area of land which is composed of two or more certificates of title where such titles are : i) subject to a condition imposed under Section 75 of the Building Act 2004 or Section

653 of the Local Government Act 1974; or ii) held together in such a way that they cannot be dealt with separately without prior consent of the Council .

Except in the case of land subdivided under the Unit Titles Act 1972 or the cross lease system, "site" shall be deemed to be the whole of the land subject to unit development or cross lease.

In determining the area of rear sites any access strip shall not be included in the calculation for that site.

Provided that in determining “minimum net site area

” in terms of Rules 16.7.2, 17.8.2, 18.7.2,

19.7.2 and 20.7.2, the site area is not required to be contained in the above types of tenure.

Site Boundary

: means any boundary of a site and includes any rear boundary, road boundary , side boundary, internal boundary or zone boundary which crosses within the site .

SMF

: means Sustainable Management Fund.

Subdivision of Land

: The definition of Subdivision of Land shall be as set out in Section

218, Resource Management Act, 1991. Changes to, or adjustments of any boundary of a fee simple title, or on a cross lease or unit title, the alteration to the outline of a building or unit, or the erection of new units or garages , or reallocation of garages , or car spaces, or the alteration of any restricted user land , or common land , or common property, are deemed to be a subdivision requiring subdivision consent, and the relevant rules shall apply.

Telecommunication Facility

: means any telecommunication line , telephone exchange, telephone booth, telephone cabinet or pay phone, or any other structure, facility or apparatus such as aerials, dishes, antennae and associate equipment and support structures and equipment shelters, such as towers, masts and poles, and equipment buildings intended for the purpose of effecting telecommunication.

Telecommunication Line

: means a wire or conductor of any other kind (including a fibre optic cable) used or intended to be used for telecommunication; and includes any pole, insulator, casing, minor fixture, tunnel, or other equipment or material used, intended to be used for supporting, enclosing, surrounding or protecting any such wire or conductor; and also includes any part of a line.

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D E F I N I T I O N S

Temporary Activity

: means Any land use or structure of a short-term duration relating to sporting events, exhibitions, shows, galas, public meetings and uses of similar character provided that such activities are only for a period not exceeding three days at any one time and for no more than 3 times in any one year at any one site provided that any activity shall comply with the noise rules of the Environmental Management Area the activity is located in and;

Ancillary activities to a building construction project, provided that any such building does not exceed 50m

2

in area, or remain on the site for longer than the duration of the project or twelve months, whichever is the lesser.

Utility

: means facilities, structures and works necessary for and associated with providing the following:

the generation and transmission of energy;

transportation networks and navigational aids;

the storage, treatment and conveyance of water and sewage;

the disposal of waste;

radiocommunications and telecommunications;

the protection of the community from natural hazards;

meteorological activities;

 undertaking a project or work described as a ‘network utility operation’ by regulations made under the Resource Management Act 1991.

Vegetation Removal

: means the felling, clearing or modification of trees, or any vegetation by mechanical, chemical, burning or other means. Clearance of vegetation shall have the same meaning, provided the above does not apply to Forestry Activity .

Vehicle Trip

: means a single journey to or from a particular site by a person or persons in a motor vehicle.

Visitor Accommodation

: means the use of land and buildings for short-term living accommodation and which may include some centralised services or facilities, such as food preparation, dining and sanitary facilities, conference and recreation facilities, for the use of those living on the site .

Wetlands

: means a collective term for permanently or intermittently wet areas, shallow water and land-water margins that support a natural ecosystem of plants and animals that are adapted to wet conditions. Wetlands may be fresh, brackish or saline.

For the purposes of the District Plan, “wetlands” include a) wetlands which are part of a river, stream or lake margins; b) natural ponds, swamps, marshes, fens, bogs, seeps, brackish areas, mountain wetlands, and other naturally wet areas that support vegetation adapted to living in wet conditions, and provide a habitat for wildlife; c) coastal wetlands above mean high water springs;

For the purposes of the District Plan “wetlands” do not include: a) wet pasture or area where water temporarily ponds after rain, or pasture containing patches of rushes;

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D E F I N I T I O N S

b) oxidation ponds ; c) artificial wetlands used for wastewater or stormwater treatment; d) artificial farm dams and detention dams; e) land drainage ditches and farm drains; f) reservoirs for fire fighting or community water supply.

The edge of a wetland (i.e. where the wetland becomes land ) is where the terrestrial plant species becomes dominant and where the substrate changes from being permanent or intermittently wet to “dry land

”. Where plants can be used as an indicator, a wetland becomes dry land where terrestrial plant species characterise the area.

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