excludes Hip and Knee Replacement surgery

excludes Hip and Knee Replacement surgery
A Guide for Patients Having
Hip or Knee Replacement
Please bring this
booklet to each
hospital visit,
including your
hospital stay.
Holland Orthopaedic & Arthritic Centre
43 Wellesley Street East
Toronto, Ontario M4Y 1H1
t: 416.967.8500
www.sunnybrook.ca
table of contents
Welcome to the Holland Orthopaedic & Arthritic Centre
1
Telephone Directory
2
Getting Ready for Surgery
3
Patient Partnership Contract
3
Pre-Operative Education Program (Pr.E.P)
5
Staying Active – Exercises & Activities
6
Exercises for Patients Preparing for a Knee Replacement
8
Exercises for Patients Preparing for a Hip Replacement
10
Prepare Your Home
12
Equipment Recommendations
13
Select a Coach
14
See Your Family Doctor/Specialist
15
Illness Before Surgery
16
Blood Conservation Clinic
17
Length of Stay
19
Patient Orientation Program
20
Protect Yourself From Falls
23
Useful Resources
25
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
i
Your Hospital Stay
27
Admission Information 27
Chlorhexidine Shower Before Surgery
28
Packing for the Hospital
30
On the Day of Your Surgery
32
Anesthesia and Surgery
33
Pain Management After Surgery
38
Potential Complications and How to Help Prevent Them
43
Hospital Information
50
After Your Hip Replacement
63
Follow-up Education Class
63
Safe Body Positions
64
Equipment Needs
65
Transfers and Mobility
67
Stairs
72
Activities of Daily Living
73
In the Bathroom 75
In the Kitchen
75
In the Bedroom
76
Homemaking Activities
77
Returning to Work
79
Sexual Activity
79
Community Activities
79
!
Resuming an Active Lifestyle
ii • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
82
After Your Knee Replacement
85
Transfers And Mobility
85
Stairs
85
Activities of Daily Living
85
In the Bathroom
86
In the Kitchen
87
Homemaking Activities
88
Returning to Work
89
Sexual Activity
89
Community Activities
90
!
Resuming an Active Lifestyle
91
Discharge Instructions and Follow-Up
95
Before You Go Home Checklist and Goals
!
95
Symptoms Requiring Immediate Attention
96
For Questions/Concerns After Discharge
97
Exercises and Activity
97
Caring For Your Incision
98
Managing Your Pain
99
Anticoagulants (Blood Thinner)
100
Dental and Other Medical Procedures
101
Follow-Up Appointments
102
Your Discharge Home
103
What to Expect After Joint Replacement
104
My Notes
107
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
iii
Welcome to the Holland Orthopaedic
& Arthritic Centre
On behalf of all the staff at the Holland
Orthopaedic & Arthritic Centre (Holland
Centre), we would like to welcome you.
The Holland Centre is a part of Sunnybrook
Health Sciences Centre. The Centre
is one of the largest hip and knee joint
replacement centres in Canada, performing
over 2,100 procedures annually. It is the
first government-designated Hip and Knee Replacement Centre of Excellence
in Canada, and is leading innovation in care models and new care provider
roles. It is also at the forefront of new surgical procedures such as less invasive
hip and knee replacement surgery. These leading edge procedures mean less
pain, faster recovery and a shorter hospital stay for patients.
This book will act as your guide before your surgery, during
your hospital stay, and throughout your recovery.
!
• Please review this information with your spouse, family, or
other caregivers.
• It is important to bring this book to the Hospital with you so
you may refer to it during your stay.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
1
Telephone Directory
This is a handy one pager of hospital telephone numbers you may need.
Please call the Holland Centre’s Main Telephone Number (416) 967-8500 if
the area you are trying to reach is not listed below.
• Admitting............................................................................ (416) 967-8543
• Blood Conservation Clinic..................................... (416) 480-6100 x 2061
• Business Office (Finance)................................................... (416) 967-8574
• Foundation
Holland Centre Site.................................................... (416) 967-8628
Bayview Site............................................................... (416) 480-4483
• Outpatient Department/Clinics.......................................... (416) 967-8617
• Patient Orientation Program.............................................. (416) 967-8532
• Office of the Patient Experience........................................ (416) 967-8566
• Pharmacy........................................................................... (416) 967-8625
• Pre-operative Education Program (Pr.E.P)......................... (416) 967-8626
• Privacy Office......................................................... (416) 480-6100 x 1236
• Social Work........................................................................ (416) 967-8566
• Sunnybrook Fracture Clinic................................................ (416) 480-4206
• Volunteer Resources.......................................................... (416) 480-4129
2 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
Getting Ready for Surgery
Patient Partnership Contract
Patients receive the best care when they are active participants in the care
process. Being prepared for surgery helps to improve recovery, decrease
anxiety, improve your satisfaction and make your transition to home smoother.
Preparation for surgery happens BEFORE you arrive at the hospital. You and
your family play a key role in ensuring your recovery goes smoothly.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
3
Getting Ready for Surgery
I agree to:
Tasks
Completed by
patient (mark
with a tick)
1. Read “A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee
Replacement”
2. Plan to:
• Attend the Holland Centre Preoperative Education
Class (Pr.E.P.), see page 5
• Watch the Hip & Knee Replacement Video
3. Keep active and improve my exercise tolerance as able.
4. Arrange for help at home following discharge for tasks
such as house cleaning, laundry, meal preparation, etc.
5. Prepare my home as suggested in the Pre-operative
video or on page 12.
6. Obtain the recommended assistive devices
(as described in the video or listed on page 13).
7. Complete the Chlorhexidine washes (as described on
pages 28 and 29).
8. My anticipated discharge home from hospital being
3 nights or less.
9. Make arrangements for someone to drive me home early
on the day of my discharge from the hospital.
My signature indicates that I have read, understood and ACCEPT my
responsibilities in preparing for my surgery.
Patient Signature:_____________________________ Date:__________________
Print Name:__________________________________________________________
4 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
Research shows that people manage their surgery and recovery period better
when they are prepared for their surgery. This book contains information
about what you can do before, during and after surgery so that your joint
replacement is as successful as possible.
Pre-Operative Education Program (Pr.E.P)
The Occupational Therapists and Physiotherapists at the Holland Centre
offer classes to patients who are waiting to have a hip or knee replacement.
This 90-minute class will help you prepare for your surgery and recovery. This
class is separate from your Patient Orientation Program visit.

You will learn:
¨¨ How to maintain or improve your strength and fitness before surgery
¨¨ Exercises and activities you will be doing immediately after surgery
¨¨ Necessary or helpful equipment
¨¨ How to manage your everyday activities
¨¨ How to plan for your discharge home
!
To register and learn more about the classes, please call
(416) 967-8626 to arrange a date for your attendance.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
5
Getting Ready for Surgery
Staying Active – Exercises & Activities
Being active while you wait for surgery is important. People with a painful hip/
knee joint are often afraid to be physically active because they worry they
may be doing more harm than good. This is not the case. In fact, research
has shown that exercise can help decrease pain, improve leg strength
and help keep your heart in good condition before surgery.
If you have not been regularly active, remember to speak to your family
doctor before starting to exercise. If you have any problems, please ask your
doctor or health care provider for help.
Endurance activities are good for your heart, lungs, circulation and muscles.
Some suggestions for endurance exercises include walking, swimming or use
of a stationary bike. If you have not been involved in any regular exercise, it is
important to start slowly. Your goal is to be physically active every day. Begin
with a few minutes and gradually progress until you can be active for at least
2.5 hours per week. Spread out the activities into sessions of 10 minutes or
more throughout each week.
For more information, go to:
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/hl-mvs/pa-ap/index-eng.php
6 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
Being involved in an exercise program before your surgery will help in
your recovery after surgery. After your surgery a team of physiotherapists,
occupational therapists and nurses will help you regain your strength,
endurance and improve your overall function. Walking and leg strengthening
exercises are an important part of your rehabilitation after your joint
replacement surgery.

Guidelines for Performing Your Strengthening Exercises
a. Repetitions
Each exercise should be repeated several times until you feel some
tiredness in your muscle. 10 repetitions is often best to start off with.
As you get stronger, you can add more repetitions, continuing to use
muscle tiredness as your guideline. If an exercise continues to cause
you excessive pain that doesn’t go away, stop doing that exercise.
b. Frequency
1 – 3 times per day
c. Duration
Hold desired position for 5 seconds before releasing.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
7
Getting Ready for Surgery
Exercises for Patients Preparing for a Knee Replacement
See page 7 for guidelines on repetitions, frequency and duration.
!
Please note: In the instructions, involved heel/leg indicates the leg
that will be undergoing surgery.
1. Knee Leg Press (beginner exercise)
• Sheet around heel of involved leg
• Bend knee using the sheet if needed
• Straighten your leg against resistance of
the sheet keeping your heel on the bed
2. Standing Hamstring
(with or without weights above the ankle)
• Hold on to a chair or place your hands on
a wall
• Bend knee so involved heel moves towards
buttock on the same side
3. Chair Push-Ups
• Sit with hands on arms of chair
• Push down on hands to lift buttocks off chair
8 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
4. Standing Hip Abduction
• Hold on to a chair or bathroom counter. It helps
to be in front of a mirror to make sure you don’t
lean to one side.
• Keep knee straight and toe pointing forward
• Move involved leg out to the side without
leaning over
5. Quarter Squat
• Feet shoulder width apart, 6 – 12 inches from the
wall
• Toes pointing straight ahead, and your back and
shoulders against the wall
• Slowly lower yourself ¼ of the way down the wall
• Do not allow your knees to go ahead of your toes
6. Toe Raises
• Rise up on your toes by lifting your heels as high
as possible
• You may want to use the back of a chair or
countertop for balance
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
9
Getting Ready for Surgery
Exercises for Patients Preparing for a Hip Replacement
See page 7 for guidelines on repetitions, frequency and duration.
!
Please note: In the instructions, involved knee/leg indicates the leg
that will be undergoing surgery.
1. Quads Over a Roll (Beginner
exercise)
• Place towel roll under your
involved knee
• Lift heel off bed until knee is straight
2. Quarter Squat
• Feet shoulder width apart, 6 – 12 inches from
the wall
• Toes pointing straight ahead, and your back and
shoulders against the wall
• Slowly lower yourself ¼ of the way down the wall
• Do not allow your knees to go ahead of your toes
10 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
3. Standing Hip Abduction
• Hold on to a chair or bathroom counter. It helps
to be in front of a mirror to make sure you don’t
lean to one side.
• Keep knee straight and toe pointing forward
• Move involved leg out to the side without
leaning over
4. Single Leg Stance
• Stand on involved leg
• Hands on table or back of chair for support
(if needed)
5. Chair Push-Ups
• Sit with hands on arms of chair
• Push down on hands to lift buttocks off chair
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
11
Getting Ready for Surgery
Prepare Your Home

There are a number of things you can do before your surgery to help get prepared:
¨¨ Install a hand railing along all stairs.
¨¨ Ask someone to help you with household tasks such as grocery
shopping, house cleaning and laundry.
¨¨ Arrange transportation to and from the hospital on day of surgery,
discharge day and first follow-up visit.
¨¨ You can not drive for the first 6 weeks after surgery, so make other
arrangements to get to appointments, etc.
¨¨ Tell your family and friends that you are having surgery and might need
their help during your hospital stay and after your discharge home.
¨¨ If possible, cook and freeze meals ahead of time.
¨¨ Be sure your shower or tub has a non-slip coating or mat.
¨¨ Obtain necessary equipment to help you manage your activities safely
(see next page for details).
12 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
Equipment Recommendations
Before your surgery, it is helpful to obtain and set-up some equipment so that
you can manage easier at home.
1. Locking Raised Toilet Seat
2. Long-handled Reacher
3. Long-handled Sponge/Brush
4. For Total Hip Replacement, you might also need a !
firm carry cushion – refer to page 65 for details.
While you are in hospital, your Occupational Therapist will assess
your need for any additional equipment. Please keep in mind that
your equipment may not look exactly as pictured here.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
13
Getting Ready for Surgery
Select a Coach
This optional program gives you an opportunity to choose a family member or a
friend as a “coach” who will help you before, during, and after your hospital stay.

Your Coach should:
• Attend the Patient Orientation Program (POP) and Pre-operative
Education Program (Pr.E.P) class with you.
• Help you plan for your admission to hospital.
• Help you prepare for your discharge home.
• Translate if English is not your first language.
• Be a “second set of ears” to help remember instructions.
• Come with you to the hospital on the day of surgery.
• Be available when you are discharged home to help you settle in,
and remind you of all your instructions.
Remember…your coach is there to be a “guide on the side”,
not to take over for you!
Please let your health care team know if you have
chosen a coach.
For more information about the Coach Program,
contact the Social Work Department at
(416) 967-8566.
14 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
See Your Family Doctor/Specialist
See your Family Doctor as soon as you decide to have surgery. It is
important to make sure you are as healthy as possible so that your surgery
and recovery goes smoothly. This will also help prevent your surgery from
being postponed because of any untreated or unstable medical conditions.
If you are being followed by a specialist, such as a cardiologist or
hematologist, it is important to see them and let them know you are having
surgery. This gives them time to organize any necessary tests to make sure
you can safely proceed with your surgery. Please bring the test results and
consult note (if available) to your Patient Orientation Program (POP) visit.
Nutrition and Weight Management
Eating a well-balanced diet, as recommended in “Eating Well with
Canada’s Food Guide” will help your body heal. Extra weight can also
affect your recovery by reducing your exercise tolerance. Talk to your
doctor about an appropriate weight loss program if needed. You can
access Dietitians of Canada at www.dietitians.ca and Canada’s Food
Guide at www.healthcanada.gc.ca/foodguide for more information about
healthy eating. EatRight Ontario offers a healthy eating website and tollfree dietitian consultation which is available to those who wish to ask
nutrition-related questions and receive feedback by phone or e-mail from
a Registered Dietitian. For more information go to www.eatrightontario.ca
or call 1-877-510-5102.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
15
Getting Ready for Surgery
Smoking
People who smoke are at a higher risk of developing
complications with their lungs and circulation. Talk to your
family doctor about ways to help you stop smoking. The
Holland Orthopaedic & Arthritic Centre is a smokefree environment. This includes the outdoor property.
Stopping smoking before surgery - even for a short time can reduce risks associated with surgery and improve your
surgical success.
Dentist
Remember, your dentist is an important part of your health care team. A
routine check up and cleaning by your dental team is advised prior to surgery.
Bacteria from an infection in your mouth can travel through your bloodstream
to your new joint causing infection there so make sure any tooth or gum
problems are treated.
Illness Before Surgery
If you develop a cold, flu, or gastric symptoms (such as diarrhea) before
your surgery, please call your surgeon’s office. If surgery must be postponed
because of illness, we will make every effort to arrange a new surgical date
as a priority. If these symptoms occur on the weekend prior to a Monday
surgery, please call the hospital at (416) 967-8500, select “0” and ask for the
Hospital Coordinator.
16 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
Blood Conservation Clinic
Building Up Your Blood
Patients having a hip or knee replacement procedure are encouraged to
start an oral iron supplement, unless you have been told to avoid iron. Iron
is the building block of red blood cells. Taking oral iron may improve your
hemoglobin before surgery so you feel better more quickly following your
surgery. We recommend either “Proferrin”, “Feramax” or “Palafer”.
Choose one of the following supplements and begin taking it 4 to 6 weeks
before your scheduled surgery. Your body absorbs iron better when taken on
an empty stomach along with a Vitamin C 500 mg tablet.
 Proferrin 11 mg (elemental iron) twice a day OR
Feramax 150 mg once a day
• Has minimal side effects and no constipation in most people
• Not covered by prescription plans, therefore you must pay
• It is an over-the-counter supplement, so no prescription is needed
OR
 Palafer 300 mg once a day
• May interfere with some prescription medication you are taking so
check with your pharmacist or doctor
• Has more gastric side effects such as constipation
• Stool softeners and laxatives may be needed. See your family
doctor if you have any concerns.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
17
Getting Ready for Surgery
• It is an over-the-counter supplement, so no prescription is needed.
It is, however, covered under most drug plans. You may want a
prescription from your doctor so you can be reimbursed.
People having a single hip or knee replacement for the first time generally
do not need a blood transfusion. However, the risk of needing a blood
transfusion increases if you are having bilateral hip replacement (both hips),
bilateral knee replacement (both knees), revision of a hip replacement or if
you have a history of anemia (low blood/low iron). In these cases, please
contact the Blood Conservation Clinic at (416) 480-6100 ext 2061 as soon as
you have your surgery date.
The blood conservation nurse will discuss other options available to build up
your blood and reduce the risk of blood transfusions.
These options include:
• Intravenous iron supplements
• Injections to help your body produce more red blood cells
Donating your own blood ahead of time (Autologous Blood Donation) is rarely
necessary. The Blood Conservation Clinic will contact you directly if you are a
candidate for Autologous Blood Donation.
You should also call the Blood Conservation Clinic if you have religious
beliefs concerning blood products.
18 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
Length of Stay
Patients manage their hospital stay and recovery better when they are
prepared for their surgery. New care plans have been introduced in Ontario,
based on evidence, to help you recover and return home for rehabilitation as
quickly and safely as possible. These care plans are quite different than what
you might have experienced in the past.
You can expect to be in hospital up to 3 days and then you will be
discharged home.
You may be referred to an outpatient rehabilitation program depending on the
type of surgery you have. If you have:
Hip Replacement Surgery: You will be given information that will allow you
to exercise and recover at home. You may be asked to attend a rehabilitation
class 6 weeks after your surgery to make sure that you are continuing to
make good progress.
Knee Replacement Surgery: You will normally be referred to an outpatient
physiotherapy program that will start after discharge. This will usually be a
group program, twice a week, for up to 6 weeks.
Your length of stay in hospital and the need for outpatient rehabilitation will be
assessed by the team regularly based on your progress.
You may be given a referral to be seen in your home by a health care provider
from a Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) in your area. If you qualify
for CCAC services, these will be arranged before you leave the hospital.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
19
Getting Ready for Surgery
Patient Orientation Program
The Patient Orientation Program (POP) is designed to assess your overall
health, provide information about your hospital stay and help you prepare
for your safe return home after surgery. This visit will take several hours. The
POP Secretary will contact you with an appointment.
!
This is a great place to ask questions so make
your list and bring it with you.
¨¨ Eat before you arrive, and bring a snack
¨¨ Bring your medications in their original containers
¨¨ Bring a list of vitamins, supplements and herbal products that you take
¨¨ Bring current reports from any specialist you may be seeing, such as a
cardiologist or hematologist
¨¨ Bring your Ontario Health Card and supplementary insurance information
with insurance company policy/certificate group plan/type of coverage
¨¨ If you use sign language or do not speak English, please bring in an
interpreter with you
¨¨ Bring a friend or family member if you have difficulty getting around
¨¨ Bring this booklet with you
20 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery

During this visit, you will meet with a team of health professionals:
• A nurse will review your health. They will also discuss what to expect
during your hospital stay, and ways to prepare for your discharge home.
• A medical internist will assess your general health. She/he will
review medications to stop before surgery and medications to take
on the day of your surgery.
• An anesthesiologist will discuss anesthetic options and pain
management after surgery.
• A laboratory technician will take your blood and do an
Electrocardiogram (ECG) of your heart.
• A Medical Radiation Technologist will perform X rays if ordered by
your surgeon.

You may meet with other members of the team if a need is
identified. They might include:
• A social worker to further discuss discharge planning and provide
supportive counselling and community resources as needed.
• A research nurse or research assistant might ask you to
participate in one of the hospital’s studies. This is completely
voluntary.
• A pharmacist to discuss any concerns you might have regarding
your medication.
• A physiotherapist might meet with you if there are significant concerns
about your mobility that might affect your progress after surgery.
• An occupational therapist might meet with you if there are
significant concerns about your home set up or equipment needs.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
21
Getting Ready for Surgery

At your Patient Orientation Program visit, please let us know the following:
¨¨ If you require overnight accommodation in Toronto before your
surgery. We can provide you with information about hotels in the area.
¨¨ Where you will be staying the night before surgery if it’s not your own
home, and provide a contact number where you can be reached.
¨¨ If you will be flying home from the hospital. We may need to arrange
for medical clearance with the airline. Your surgeon will also need to
be consulted to see when it is safe for you to fly.
22 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
Protect Yourself From Falls
Arthritis of the hip or knee can increase your risk of falls. There are a
number of things you can do to decrease this risk before and after your joint
replacement surgery.

Consider these practical suggestions:
1. In the kitchen, do not use a footstool to reach for objects. Move
frequently used items to lower shelves. Use a reacher for light items
that are out of arm’s reach.
2. In the bathroom, equipment such as a raised toilet seat, grab bars or a
tub seat may be helpful. An occupational therapist can help determine
which aids would be most helpful for you. Everyone should use a nonslip rubber mat or self-stick strips on the floor of the tub or shower.
3. Put a nightlight on the path from the bed to the bathroom if the area is
normally very dark.
4. In the bedroom, make sure there is a bedside lamp in easy reach so
that you can turn it on if you have to get up during the night.
5. Always get up slowly after sitting or lying down.
6. Take your time when going up or down the stairs. Be sure that
stairways are well lit, free of clutter, and have a secure handrail.
Stairway carpeting should be secure.
7. Remove throw rugs.
8. Pathways should be cleared of cords or wires by coiling or taping them
to the wall.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
23
Getting Ready for Surgery
9. If you have pets, consider removing your pet from the home during
your early recovery stage or arrange for family/friends to take your dog
out for walks. Be careful of active or sleeping pets as you walk. Place
a bell on their collar so you are aware of their movements. Try to keep
pet toys in a designated area to reduce the risk of tripping over them.
10. Never rush to answer the telephone. Ask friends/family to allow the
phone to ring many times, allowing you time to answer. An answering
machine or a cordless phone may be helpful.
11. Keep emergency numbers in large print near each phone.
12. In the garden, put tools away, wear supportive shoes and avoid
walking on wet grass.
13. Use your walking aid indoors and outdoors if one has been prescribed.
14. Be sure indoor and outdoor shoes fit properly. Footwear should have
support around the heel and rubber soles. Try elastic laces if you have
difficulty tying shoes.
15. Do not carry too many packages (use home delivery or pushcart).
16. When walking outdoors, avoid walking on poorly maintained
sidewalks, unlit streets and icy surfaces. Try to walk with a walking
partner. Consider other options such as walking in a mall for exercise.
!
Know your limitations. If you have had falls in the past,
think about possible causes and think about ways to
prevent falls in the future.
24 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Getting Ready for Surgery
Useful Resources
• For information about Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, go to
www.sunnybrook.ca. For direct access to information about the
Holland Centre, go to sunnybrook.ca/Holland. Our teaching videos can
be found under “Patient Education”.
• For comprehensive information on joint replacement surgery, go to:
www.myjointreplacement.ca
• For information on Arthritis, Arthritis programs and resources offered by
the Arthritis Society go to www.arthritis.ca or call (416) 979-7228.
• For information on physical activity, including guidelines and tips for
getting active, go to:
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/hl-mvs/pa-ap/index-eng.php
• There are two sites that can help you find a physiotherapy clinic:
1. To find a Physiotherapy clinic or Physiotherapist in your area, go to
the Ontario Physiotherapy Association website www.opa.on.ca and
select find-a-physio, or call (416) 322-6866.
2. For information on OHIP-covered Physiotherapy clinics or to
locate a Physiotherapy clinic in your area, go to the College of
Physiotherapists of Ontario website www.collegept.org and select
Find a Physiotherapist, or call 1-800-583-5885.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
25
Getting Ready for Surgery
• The Canadian Orthopaedic Foundation has a number of helpful
resources online, as well as, a peer support program that connects
orthopaedic patients with volunteers who have undergone similar
surgery. Click on “Patient Information Resources” at www.canorth.org.
• Go to Canada’s Occupational Therapy resource website www.otworks.ca
for information on assistive devices and falls prevention. Be sure to review
the “Tools for Living Well” pamphlets or call the Canadian Association
of Occupational Therapists at 1-800-434-2268.
• For information about healthy eating, you can access:
1. Dietitians of Canada at www.dietitians.ca
2. Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide at www.healthcanada.
gc.ca/foodguide
3. EatRight Ontario at www.eatrightontario.ca
26 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
All piercings and
jewelry (including
wedding rings) must be
removed before surgery.
Please see a jeweler to
have them cut off if
necessary.
Your Hospital Stay
Admission Information
To be completed by your nurse at your Pre-operative visit:
My scheduled surgery date is:_________________________________________
Admission time: Plan to be at the hospital for 6:15 am. This is a tentative
time that is subject to change. You will receive a call 2 days before your
surgery to confirm your admission time.
Expected discharge date is:___________________________________________
Medication to take the morning of surgery:_____________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Medication to stop before surgery:_____________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
!
Remember…
• Nothing to eat after midnight the night before your surgery. This means
no food, gum or candies.
• You may have clear fluids up to 2 hours before your scheduled admission
time. Clear fluids include water, clear apple or cranberry juice, carbonated
soft drinks, and black tea or black coffee with sweetener (no cream, milk, or
whitener). Clear fluids do not include milk, citrus fruit juices/drinks or alcohol.
POP nurse: ______________________________ Date: ________________
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
27
Your Hospital Stay
Chlorhexidine Shower Before Surgery
It is important to clean your skin before surgery to reduce the risk of infection.
The Chlorhexidine soap is to be used in the shower starting 2 evenings before
your surgery. The last shower is to be done on the morning of your surgery for
a total of 3 showers.
For your information:
• You will be given this soap at your Patient Orientation Program visit.
• Patients who do not attend the Patient Orientation Program can
purchase this soap at their local drug store.
• If it is not available, you can purchase another antibacterial body soap
as a substitute.
Using the Soap:
• Try the soap on a small patch of skin to make sure it doesn’t irritate you
before using it on the rest of your body
• Use a clean washcloth and towel with each shower
• Wash your body from neck to feet. Please note that the soap doesn’t
lather much.
• Finish with the groin and anal areas
• Rinse the soap off your body thoroughly
• Use your own soap on your face
• Use your own shampoo on your hair
• Dry your skin; finishing with the groin and anal areas
• Wear clean clothes or pajamas after each shower
• Change your bed sheets the evening before surgery
28 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
Stop using Chlorhexidine soap if skin irritation develops, and continue
with your regular soap following the same instructions.
Don’t:
• Don’t apply body/moisturizing lotion or powder after your shower.
• Don’t shave the hair at your surgical site.
• If you are having knee surgery – don’t shave your legs for 5 days
before surgery and until 2 weeks after surgery.
!
Important: Do not use this soap on your face. Chlorhexidine
soap should not come in contact with your eyes or ears.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
29
Your Hospital Stay
Packing for the Hospital

What to Bring:
¨¨ Ontario Health Card
¨¨ Current medications in their original containers
¨¨ Toothbrush/toothpaste
¨¨ Labeled eye glass case/denture cup/hearing aids case
¨¨ Razor
¨¨ Tissues (e.g. Kleenex)
¨¨ Soap/Shampoo
¨¨ Feminine Hygiene Products (if needed)
¨¨ Moist wipes for personal hygiene
¨¨ Short Nightgown/robe/pajamas
¨¨ Comfortable clothing (e.g. exercise clothing, track suits, etc.)
¨¨ Supportive shoes with a non-slip sole such as running shoes
¨¨ Slippers with a back and non-slip sole
¨¨ Assistive devices, e.g., reacher, cushion, long-handled sponge, long
shoehorn and sock aid
¨¨ Crutches or canes that you may already have
¨¨ Earphones to listen to education programs on closed circuit TV
¨¨ Electrical appliances, such as a hair dryer. These must be C.S.A.
approved and given to your nurse when you arrive to be checked for
electrical safety (optional item).
¨¨ Radio – with earphones only (optional item).
Please label your personal items.
30 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay

What to Leave at Home:
¨¨ Jewelry – All piercings and jewelry, including wedding rings must
be removed before your surgery. See a jeweler to have your rings
cut off if necessary.
¨¨ Perfume or scented items - The Holland Centre is a fragrance-free
facility.
¨¨ No nail polish on your finger or toe nails.
¨¨ Personal computer; television; cellular phone
¨¨ Valuables
!
Please be advised that the Holland Orthopaedic & Arthritic
Centre is not responsible for money, valuables or other personal
property including eyeglasses, dentures and hearing aids.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
31
Your Hospital Stay
On the Day of Your Surgery
Please use the east elevators by the cafeteria. Go to the Surgical
Patient Registration area, located on the 5th floor, room 554. Due to
space restrictions, only one person may accompany you. Other family
members or friends may wait in the Lobby or Cafeteria area. Staff will let
you know what time your surgery is scheduled.
!
Remember…
• If you use sign language or do not speak English, bring
an interpreter to the hospital with you. Your health care
team must be able to communicate with you.
•
Your personal belongings will be taken to your assigned
room by your family or a staff member.
A nurse will meet with you and get you ready for surgery. They will update
your health history and review your medications. Your blood pressure, pulse
and temperature will be taken and an intravenous will be started in your arm.
A staff member will accompany you to the Block Area. Your surgeon will initial
your operative site and you will meet your anesthesiologist. The Operating
Room nurse will get you ready for surgery.
Surgery usually takes 1 ½ to 2 ½ hours. You will be taken to the post
anesthetic care unit or PACU, where you will be monitored for about 1 hour.
You will then be taken to your room. Your family/friends will be able to visit
you once you have arrived in your room.
32 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
Anesthesia and Surgery
All surgery requires some form of anesthesia. Anesthesia falls into two
main categories:
1. “Regional” anesthesia, where part of your body is made numb with
a local anesthetic. This includes spinal and/or nerve blocks.
2. “General” anesthesia, where you are unconscious and a breathing
tube is placed in your throat.
All anesthesia and surgery have some risks. Fortunately, bad outcomes are rare.
Anesthesiologist
Your anesthesiologist is a specialized doctor responsible for giving you
sedation, anesthetic and pain medication. They monitor your vital signs and
are prepared to manage any problem that may arise during your surgery.
The POP clinic anesthesiology team consists of anesthesiologists and a nurse
practitioner. It will likely be a different anesthesiologist that gives you the
anesthetic for your surgery. All your information from the POP assessment will
be in your chart and reviewed by your anesthesiologist before your surgery.
Before the Anesthetic
It is important to have an empty stomach before your surgery. Under
anesthesia or sedation, food and drink can find its way out of your stomach
and into your lungs (aspiration) causing serious problems. Please follow the
instructions on page 27 to help prevent this complication.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
33
Your Hospital Stay
Types of Anesthesia
For hip and knee replacement procedures, the most common types of
anesthetic are spinal or general anesthesia. At the Holland Centre, most
patients choose a spinal anesthetic. You will have an opportunity to discuss
this with your anesthesiologist. The anesthetic that is best for you is
influenced by your general health and the type of surgery you are having.
General Anesthesia
With general anesthesia, several medications are given through your
intravenous so you are fully asleep and unconscious during surgery. A
breathing tube is placed in your throat and you are connected to a breathing
machine. Following your surgery, the breathing tube is removed once you are
breathing on your own. You are then taken to the post anesthetic care unit
(PACU), where you will wake up.

What are the Risks of General Anesthesia?
• A mild sore throat that lasts 1 to 2 days
• Tooth or airway damage may occur from the breathing tube
• Nausea or vomiting, which may last for 1 or 2 days
• Confusion or memory loss, particularly in older persons
• Aspiration of stomach contents into lungs
• Extremely rare: Allergic reactions, awareness during surgery, nerve
damage, death
34 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
Spinal Anesthesia
With spinal anesthesia, local anesthetic is injected near the spinal cord and
the nerves that connect to it. This “freezes” the nerves so that you have no
feeling or movement in your hips or legs. The numbness lasts 4 to 6 hours.
Medication is given through your intravenous to relax you and put you into a light
sleep. This is called “sedation”. You will not see or feel the surgery taking place.
Your anesthesiologist can also adjust your medication to reduce the chance of
you hearing anything during the surgery. Please discuss this if it is a concern.
You may also choose to stay awake during the surgery. Let your anesthesiologist
know if you wish to choose this option.

What are the Benefits of Spinal Anesthesia?
• Less nausea and vomiting
• Faster recovery and feeling less groggy
• Better pain control after surgery
• Less blood loss during surgery
• Decreased incidence of blood clots in the legs after surgery

What are the Risks of Spinal Anesthetics?
• Headache lasting 2 to 7 days (less than 1 in 100 chance)
• Mild lowered blood pressure in the operating room
• Inability to empty bladder (urinary retention), particularly in older
men with prostate problems
• Extremely rare: paralysis, nerve damage, death
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
35
Your Hospital Stay
Nerve Blocks
A nerve block is an injection of local anesthetic near the nerves that give
sensation to your surgical site, making it feel numb. It provides up to
24 hours of pain control and can be used along with a spinal or general
anesthetic.
Continuous Nerve Block
A continuous nerve block can be used to manage pain for longer than 24
hours. A small tube is secured in place to allow a continuous flow of local
anesthetic through a pain management pump.
Nerve blocks are done just before your surgery by the anesthesiologist.
Special equipment, such as an ultrasound or nerve stimulator, is used to
find the nerves. Most people don’t remember the nerve block because
medicine is given to relax you and the anesthesiologist numbs your skin first
with some local anesthetic. When the nerve block is being put in place you
will feel some twitching movements. This is normal and shows us we are
in the right spot. Your anesthesiologist will then inject local anesthetic. You
may notice a warm, tingling sensation. Your limb will become weak and feel
heavy and numb.
36 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay

Benefits of Nerve Blocks:
• Reduces the amount of strong pain medicine you may need
• Avoids the side effects associated with other pain medicine such as
nausea and drowsiness
• Provides long-lasting pain relief

Risks of Nerve Blocks:
• Less than 1% of patients have a “pins and needles” sensation in the area
that may last for 3 to 4 weeks; permanent nerve injury is extremely rare.
• In a small number of patients, local anesthetic may be injected into
the blood stream, causing ringing in the ears and a metallic taste in
the mouth - these symptoms are not harmful and will soon go away,
but please let your anesthesiologist know if you experience them.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
37
Your Hospital Stay
Pain Management After Surgery
Pain is an unpleasant sensation that is different for every person. There
are many words to describe pain, like “soreness”, “discomfort” or
“aching”. Assistance with pain management is provided by the Acute Pain
Service, which is run by the Department of Anesthesia. The team includes
anesthesiologists and nurse practitioners. Our goal is to make sure you are
as comfortable as possible. Good pain control allows you to exercise and
progress with your activity, which is important for a successful recovery.
When Do I Treat My Pain?
A pain rating scale helps us communicate and understand the level of pain
you are experiencing. It can also help you decide when to do something to
relieve your pain. This scale begins at “0” which is “No Pain” and goes up
to “10” which is the “Worst Pain”. If the level of pain you are experiencing is
preventing you from doing your exercises and being active, you should treat
your pain.
0
5
No Pain
!
10
Worst Pain
Remember…Managing your pain and being active is
important for your recovery.
38 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
Types of Pain Control Available
There are several methods of pain control available. Your anesthesiologist will
discuss which methods are best for you. We use many of these types of pain
medication together to minimize the pain you experience.

The most common pain medications include:
• Oral pain medication (opioids)
§§ Long acting / slow release opioids, such as HydromorphContin®,
OxyNEO®
§§ Shorter acting opioids, such as Oxycodone, Hydromorphone
(Dilaudid®)
• Additional oral pain medication (non-opioid), is also used to reduce
the amount of opioids you will need. These medications include:
§§ Acetaminophen (Tylenol®)
§§ Celebrex®
§§ Others
• Severe pain
§§ Intravenous opioids through a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA)
Opioid medications can cause side effects such as constipation, nausea,
drowsiness, dizziness and/or itchiness. Severe pain can also cause some of
these side effects, so it is important to treat your pain. If you are experiencing
side effects you may not want to eat, drink, or do your regular activities.
There are ways to manage these side effects, so let your nurse know if you
experience any of these problems. Refer to pages 43 to 49 for “Potential
Complications & How to Help Prevent Them”.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
39
Your Hospital Stay
What is PCOA?
Patient Controlled Oral Analgesia (PCOA) allows you to keep a dose of the
short-acting opioids medication at your bedside.
What Are the Benefits of PCOA?
• FASTER: You do not have to wait for your nurse to bring pain
medicine to you.
• CHOICE: You may choose one or more pain pills (as prescribed by
the Acute Pain Service team) to control your pain at times that work
best for you (e.g. before exercises).
• PREPARED: You may be better prepared to manage your pain at home.
How Does PCOA Work?
A labelled bottle with short-acting opioids will be given to you to keep at your
bedside. You can decide when and how many pills to take. Call your nurse for
a re-fill when the bottle is empty.
Things to Remember
The pain medicine takes at least 30 minutes to start to work after you have
taken them. Take them at the earliest sign you are becoming uncomfortable.
It is recommended that you take your pain medicine when your pain is
greater than 4 out of 10 on the pain scale. Failure to do so may result in
more severe pain, which is then harder to control. If the medicine does not
control your pain, please tell your nurse. Additional or different pain medicine
can be given.
40 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
What Will I Do?
You must complete a Patient Pain Diary. The diary will help you and the
healthcare team to know how effective your pain is managed.
1. Before you take your pills, fill out the Patient Pain Diary by circling your
pain score.
0 - 1- 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10
No pain
Worst pain
2. Write down the number of pain pills and what time you took them
(1, 2, or 3 pills).
2 pills at 9:30 am
3. One hour after you have taken your pills, circle your pain score on the
Patient Pain Diary.
0 - 1- 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10
No pain
Worst pain
4. When your pill bottle is empty, call your nurse to re-fill the bottle. The pain
service team will monitor your dosing and assess your progress daily.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
41
Your Hospital Stay
Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) for Severe Pain
Intravenous pain medication is sometimes required for severe pain. A pump
containing an opioid medication is connected to your intravenous. A dosage
of pain medication is delivered when you push a button attached to the
pump. The pain pump is programmed to allow you to receive pain medication
every 5 minutes if needed.
Side effects such as nausea or itchiness may occur. Medication can be given
to manage those side effects so let your nurse know if it is a problem. The
PCA may be used for the first 24 hours after your surgery.
!
It is important that only you push the button of the PCA
pump. Please do not allow family or friends to do this for
you because the safety features of the pump will not work.
Epidural Analgesia for Complex Procedures/Cases
An epidural is a tiny tube placed in your back by an Anesthesiologist. It is placed
in a space outside your spinal cord and will give a steady flow of medication to
help reduce your pain after surgery. Epidural analgesia is considered for patients
having bilateral hip or knee replacement procedures or other complex surgeries
or for people with challenging pain management issues.
To put the epidural in, your Anesthesiologist will ask you to lie on your side
or sit at the edge of the bed. They will freeze an area of your back. A needle
is placed into your back and the small epidural tube is inserted. The needle
42 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
is then removed while the tube remains in place. Medication is given through
the tube to provide pain relief. Epidurals are usually inserted before your
surgery. After your operation, your epidural will be connected to an epidural
pump, which will deliver a steady dose of pain medication.
The most common side effects include nausea, itching, and feeling dizzy.
Your legs may also feel heavy and numb. Let your nurse know if you
experience any of these symptoms.
!
Remember…Good pain control is important to allow
you to exercise and recover successfully.
Potential Complications and How to Help Prevent Them
Despite the success of total joint replacement, there is a small risk of
developing complications. These complications can develop because of
health problems, the anesthesia or the surgical procedure itself. Possible
local complications include: surgical site infection, damage to blood vessels
and nerves, blood loss possibly requiring blood transfusion, bone or implant
fracture, increased bone formation around the joint, dislocation of the joint,
altered limb length, early wear of the prosthesis, and persistent or worsened
pain and stiffness in the joint that was replaced. These complications may
require additional surgery to improve your function.
Other medical complications include the risk of developing a deep venous
thrombosis (see page 45), pulmonary embolism (see page 45), heart attack,
stroke and even death.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
43
Your Hospital Stay
Although the likelihood of such complications occurring is low, your surgical
team will make every effort to minimize the risk as much as possible. Your
surgeon, anesthesiologist and medical internist will discuss these issues with
you before surgery. Please make sure all your questions are addressed when
you meet with your surgical team.
Infection is a possible complication of any surgery. The risk is reduced
through careful surgical technique and the use of antibiotics before and after
your surgery. Bacteria can travel through your bloodstream from infection
elsewhere in your body to your new joint, i.e. from your throat, teeth, skin or
urine. This is why it is important to have all infections assessed and treated
before your surgery, as well as after surgery to protect your new joint.
On your POP visit, we will give you Chlorhexidine soap to use several days
before surgery. This will help reduce the risk of developing an infection. See
pages 28 and 29 for instructions.
Breathing problems such as pneumonia can occur after surgery. It is
important to do several deep-breathing and coughing exercises every half
hour when awake the first few days after surgery. This helps provide oxygen
to your lungs and keeps your airways clear. Sitting up, getting out of bed as
soon as possible and being active also helps prevent breathing problems.
Cardiovascular complications (heart problems) can occur due to the stress
of surgery. Surgery puts an additional workload on the heart. In patients with
known heart disease, this can increase the risk for abnormal heart beats,
44 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
chest pain or very rarely, heart attack. These complications can also happen
in patients with no known heart problems. This is why it is important to have a
thorough health assessment before your surgery.
Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) are blood clots which can develop in the
deep veins of your legs. This is often associated with lack of movement,
so early activity is encouraged. It is important to move your ankles up and
down several times an hour after surgery. This is called “ankle pumping”. You
are also encouraged to tighten and release the muscles in your legs. These
exercises promote good circulation. Anticoagulants (blood thinners) will also
be used to prevent blood clots. They are given in either a pill or needle form.
Pulmonary Embolism can occur when blood clots from the deep veins in
the legs or pelvis break off, travel up to the lung and lodge there. If the clot
is large enough, all circulation to the lungs may be cut off. This is a serious
complication. Anticoagulants (blood thinners) are given after surgery to
prevent clot formation. Ankle pumping and early activity will also help prevent
this complication.
Urinary Problems, such as difficulty passing urine, can happen following any
type of surgery. Sometimes a catheter (tube) is inserted into the bladder to
drain the urine. The catheter can be left in place for a few days or removed
immediately after the bladder has been emptied. Let your nurse know if you
have problems passing urine. Following spinal anesthesia you may pass
some urine without being aware of it. This is normal and can happen during
the first few hours until the spinal anesthesia wears off.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
45
Your Hospital Stay
Nausea is common after surgery. Medication may be given to settle your
stomach, so let your nurse know if you are experiencing this. In order to
minimize nausea, it is important to take your pain pills with food to protect
your stomach.
Paralytic Ileus is a distention of the bowel with gas. This can happen when
the bowels stop working properly. As a result, gas builds up and causes
abdominal discomfort, distention and vomiting. To prevent this, early activity
is important to stimulate your bowels to function normally.
Constipation is common and a potentially serious complication that can
occur because of pain medication, reduced activity and dehydration.
Constipation can lead to and aggravate other medical conditions. Stool
softeners and mobility agents are given daily to help prevent constipation.
If they are not effective, ask your nurse for a laxative or a suppository. Make
sure you have a bowel movement the day before your surgery to help prevent
problems after surgery. A high fibre diet, lots of fluids and being active are
important to help promote regular bowel movements.
Allergic reactions can happen after surgery and vary from a mild rash to an
intense reaction that can interfere with your breathing. Please let us know if
you have any allergies. They will be documented in your medical record. We
will also provide you with an allergy alert bracelet to be worn while you are in
the hospital.
46 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
Skin Irritation and bed sores are caused by pressure from lying in bed. It is
important to change your position frequently while in bed and to get up as
much as possible after surgery. The nurses and therapists will help you.
Confusion and Delirium can sometimes occur in older people after surgery.
You may behave differently, and see or hear things that aren’t really there.
This usually resolves in a few days, but can sometimes last for several weeks.
Many things can contribute to this, such as the anesthetic, pain medication,
lack of sleep, and alcohol withdrawal. It is important to let us know if you
have experienced this with previous surgeries. Wearing your glasses and
hearing aids can help if you experience this. We also recommend that you
reduce your alcohol intake several weeks before your surgery. If you have
experienced postoperative confusion in the past, it is helpful to have a relative
sit with you after surgery.
!
Remember…Getting out of bed and
walking as soon as you are able will help
prevent many of these complications and
allow for a smooth recovery. Please refer
to the next page for a listing of benefits
and strategies you can try.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
47
Your Hospital Stay

Benefits of Getting Out of Bed While in Hospital
1. Skin
2. Lungs
3. Nutrition
• Getting out of bed
can help prevent
bed sores
• Improved breathing
• Improved ability to
cough up secretions
• Improved ability to
fight infections
• Improved appetite
• Less risk of choking
when eating
4. Brain
5. Muscles/Bones
6. Heart
• Improved mood
• Improved sleep
• Less weakness
• Prevents loss of
strength
• Less pain in joints
• More stable
blood pressure
• Improved
circulation

Strategies
• Sit up for all your meals
• Sit up in a chair when you have visitors
• Walk around the unit either with help or if able to do so by yourself
• Do bed exercises on your own throughout the day
!
If you are not sure what you are safe to do, ask a
member of your healthcare team
Adapted from the University Health Network’s Patient Education Brochure with permission.
48 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
September, 2011
Your Hospital Stay

While you are in hospital, it is important to tell your health team if you have any of the following:
¨¨ Problems controlling your pain
¨¨ Difficulty breathing
¨¨ Chest pain, tightness or pressure
¨¨ Problems passing urine
¨¨ Problems with intravenous
¨¨ Upset stomach or dizziness
¨¨ Unusual feelings of numbness and/or tingling
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
49
Your Hospital Stay
Hospital Information
Patient Rights & Responsibilities
You have the right to:
• Receive effective care that is considerate, timely and respectful of
your diverse views, culture, spiritual traditions, gender identity, gender
expression, sexual orientation and abilities.
• Have your personal health information remain confidential and your
privacy respected.
• Have a Substitute Decision Maker act on your behalf if you cannot
make health care decisions for yourself.
• Make choices about treatments where choice is possible and
appropriate, and be informed of the health risks and benefits of
those decisions.
• Obtain a second opinion from another health professional.
• Receive information about your health care in a language you
understand, with an interpreter if desired, within reasonable limits.
• Know the name and roles of the members of your health care team.
• Be listened to and have time to ask questions.
• Express concerns about care/service and be informed of the process
for doing so.
• Expect that members of your health care team will collaborate to
ensure continuity of care.
50 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
You have the responsibility to:
• Provide complete and correct information as requested to your health
care team and notify them of any changes in your health.
• Let staff know if you do not understand any or all of the information
given to you, or if you have any concerns.
• Follow your treatment or care plan to the best of your ability.
• Make certain that the person you have chosen or who is designated
by law to make health care decisions on your behalf (when you
cannot) knows and understands your wishes.
• Respect the privacy and confidentiality of others.
• Respect the right of everyone to work together in a respectful and
abuse-free environment.
• Act in a safe and responsible manner.
Office of the Patient Experience
There may be times when you or your family members need help finding
information or voicing a concern. If members of your care team have not
been able to help address your concerns, you may ask to speak to the
Manager or contact the Office of the Patient Experience. The Consultant can
listen and help resolve patient concerns in a confidential setting. Call the
Office of the Patient Experience Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
(416) 967-8566.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
51
Your Hospital Stay
Patient Centered Care
The philosophy of Patient Centered Care guides the Holland Centre staff
and physicians to listen to, respect and understand each person as a unique
individual. We strive to promote timely access to services; to coordinate and
integrate your care; to promote physical comfort; provide emotional support
and to answer your questions so that you can make informed decisions about
your health care in partnership with your care provider.
In order to improve communication between the health care team and patients
and their families, we have implemented white communication boards in
each patient room at the Holland Centre. The information on these boards
contains: date, the names of your nurse, the charge nurse and the manager,
physiotherapist and occupational therapist, as well as, information on how
much weight you can put on your leg. Your nurse or another member of our
multidisciplinary team will update this information every shift. If you or your
family members have specific questions, you may use the board to write them
down.
In addition to the communication board, we have a program called “TOPS”
in which each team member is to check with you if there is anything else
they can do for you before leaving the room. TOPS stands for “Toileting,
Organization of Your Room, Pain Management and Support”.
52 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
Educational Resources for our Patients and their Families
Our patients have told us that sometimes it is confusing to find the right
information to help them manage their conditions. To help address this need,
we introduced a Patient and Family Education Centre which is located in the
Holland Centre Library on the 2nd floor (room 253). In the Centre, patients,
family members and caregivers can access a wide range of resources
including: interactive medical models, books, DVDs, brochures, and
computers with links to helpful educational websites such as those offered
by the Arthritis Society. We hope you will visit the Centre! We welcome any
feedback you have on how we can continue to meet your information needs.
Sunnybrook Website
The Sunnybrook website provides information for patients and visitors and an
in-depth look at our programs and services, education and research. You can
read about Sunnybrook special events, publications, internet resources and
more. Check us out today at www.sunnybrook.ca.
MyChart
MyChart is an online website where patients can create and manage their
personal health information based on clinical and personal information.
MyChart is accessible anywhere at any time through the internet. You can
learn more at www.mychart.ca.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
53
Your Hospital Stay
Visiting Hours
A maximum of 2 visitors at a time may come to your room between 8 a.m.
and 10 p.m. Children are welcome but must be supervised by an adult at
all times. Timely nursing care and therapy sessions are important for your
recovery so visitors may be asked to step out of your room at these times.
In certain areas, visiting is restricted:
• Visiting is not allowed in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU)
• For patients in the Special Care Unit, visits may be arranged through
the Special Care nurses on 3 East.
Nutrition and Food Services
Information about your special diets or food preferences will be collected when
you are admitted. This information helps the Food Services Department meet
your nutritional needs. Personal food requiring refrigeration is discouraged
because storage space is limited.
Meals are served at approximately:
Breakfast - 8 a.m.
Lunch
- 12 noon
Dinner
- 5 p.m.
Patients and visitors are welcome to purchase meals and snacks in our cafeteria.
The cafeteria hours are:
• Monday to Friday - 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
• Saturday, Sunday and Holidays - closed
• Vending services are provided in the cafeteria at all times.
54 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
Additional Costs
During your stay, there may be additional costs that are not covered by OHIP
or other health insurance.
Orthopaedic Equipment
The cost of canes, crutches, splints and orthotic devices (e.g. braces, special
footwear and supports) is not covered by OHIP. You will be responsible for
payment for any devices that you use and/or take home. Additionally, at
discharge, each patient is charged $20.00 to cover the cost of educational
materials and other products (e.g. Chlorhexidine soap) that are provided before
surgery and/or during your hospital stay as these are also not covered by OHIP.
All outstanding charges must be paid at the time of your discharge
unless prior arrangements have been made. A receipt will be provided for
reimbursement from your insurance company where applicable. If you have
any questions or need more information about our rates or billing procedures,
please contact the Business Office at (416) 967-8574.
Telephone
There is a charge of $4.00 per day for the use of a telephone. If you do not wish
to have a phone please inform the Admitting Department when you arrive.
• To make local calls, dial “9”, then the telephone number.
• To make long distance calls, dial “0” for the Hospital Operator. You
can then call collect or you may dial “9” and use your calling card.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
55
Your Hospital Stay
Television
Bedside televisions are available for a fee. You can order TV service from your
patient room by dialing 1999 from your bedside phone. You will require a Visa
or MasterCard to complete your order. Your family members or friends may
also call from any phone outside of the hospital to activate services for you
by calling 1-866-223-3686 between 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday to Friday
and 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays (excluding statutory
holidays). Educational health information on channel 74 is free of charge
and is available even if television services are not purchased.
Fire Safety
Our staff practice fire safety procedures regularly and the alarms are frequently
tested. Should a real emergency exist, you will be informed and a trained staff
member will assist you. Fire exits are clearly marked throughout the hospital.
Critical Incident Response
The hospital’s equivalent of 911 is 5555. This number is reserved for life
threatening or personal safety issues only. State the nature of your emergency
and provide your location so that help can arrive quickly.
Safety and Security
It is the responsibility of all staff, volunteers, visitors and patients to be the
“eyes and ears” of the hospital. Together we can reduce crime and make the
Holland Centre a safer place. At the Holland Centre, all staff are required to
wear a photo ID badge that identifies their name, position and unit/department.
56 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
If you are unsure of a person’s identity or purpose in your room, feel free to ask
them to show you their badge, or if necessary, call a nurse for assistance.
Mail, Parcels and Deliveries
Friends and family may send you flowers, gift baskets, or other gift
deliveries while you are in the hospital. No latex balloons please, as some
patients may have serious allergic reactions to them. All deliveries will be
brought to your room. We ask that you tell your friends or family of your
expected length of stay, so that your delivery is not returned to the sender
after you leave the hospital.
Newspapers
Daily newspapers are available in news boxes outside the main entrance of
the Holland Centre.
Parking and Transportation
While the Holland Centre does not have parking facilities, it is close to bus
and subway services at the Wellesley Station. Public parking is available west
of the Holland Centre on Wellesley Street and just south of Wellesley on the
west side of Church Street. Direct telephone lines to Royal Taxi are available
at no charge in the Holland Centre lobby.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
57
Your Hospital Stay
Spiritual and Religious Care
While we do not have a chapel in the Holland Centre, if you’d like privacy to
meditate and pray, this can be arranged upon request. Chaplaincy services
are limited. If you wish to be visited by a spiritual advisor, please arrange
this through your local religious community. If you wish to attend religious
services outside the hospital, you may do so with your doctor’s permission.
Smoke Free Environment
At Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, the health and safety of our staff,
volunteers, students, visitors and patient population are very important to
us. As a health care facility, we strive to assist in the prevention of medical
diseases such as lung cancer and chronic pulmonary diseases, asthma and
other respiratory conditions that can be caused by smoking and the effects
of second-hand smoke. As a result, smoking is prohibited in all areas of the
hospital, which includes, but is not limited to, the inside of the building in
its entirety, and exterior grounds. This policy will apply to staff, volunteers,
students, visitors and patient populations that are within the boundaries of
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.
Fragrance-Free Policy
In consideration of patients, staff and visitors who may suffer from chemical
sensitivities and allergies, we request that you refrain from wearing scented
personal products such as perfumes, colognes, hairspray or aftershave when
at the Holland Centre.
58 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
Cellular Phones and Wireless Devices
Patients, staff and visitors are asked not to use cellular phones or wireless
devices in patient areas as they may interfere with some patient care
equipment. They can be used in areas where direct patient care is not being
provided, such as the lobby or family waiting areas.
Complementary and Alternative Health Providers
Complementary therapies such as acupuncture and massage therapy have
not yet been integrated into the conventional health care model. Still, we
recognize that some patients may wish to receive complementary therapies
while in the hospital. Discuss your needs with your health care team. A
release of liability form must be signed prior to a complementary health
practitioner providing you with any treatment.
Teaching Hospital
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre has a strong relationship with the University
of Toronto and other institutions. For patients, this means that students will
often be involved in your care. All students work under the expert supervision of
members of our health care team. If you have any questions or concerns about
a student’s role in your care, please notify a member of your health care team.
Gift Shop and Cart
The Gift Shop, located in the Main Lobby, is open Monday to Friday from 10
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The shop offers a large selection of gifts and articles that
you may need during your stay. For your added convenience, a mobile cart is
brought to your room several times per week.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
59
Your Hospital Stay
Volunteer Services
Some of our services are organized and operated by
volunteers, many of whom are former patients. These
dedicated volunteers meet regularly through the
year, host fundraising events for the Holland Centre,
and add important “extras” to the services provided
by our staff. If you are interested in becoming a
volunteer for the Holland Centre, please call Volunteer
Resources at (416) 480-4129.
Protecting Your Personal Health Information
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre is taking a leadership position in the
promotion of personal information privacy rights and obligations on behalf of
all members of our staff and patient communities.
Personal information is anything that can identify you as an individual such as
your name, your social insurance number, or information that is specific to you
such as a test result with your name on it. Keeping personal information private
means you have the right to know how and where personal information is being
used within the hospital. It also means Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre has
an obligation to ensure that the information is kept confidential. Sunnybrook
is taking active steps to ensure that the hospital follows best practices in
respecting staff and patient personal information privacy rights.
60 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Your Hospital Stay
To ensure we comply with information privacy principles, Sunnybrook
Health Sciences Centre has appointed a Chief Privacy Officer to oversee
the activities involved with establishing comprehensive privacy management
policies and procedures.
For more information, or to make a comment or complaint regarding personal
health information privacy, you may email our Chief Privacy Officer at
privacy@sunnybrook.ca, or contact the Privacy Office at (416) 480-6100,
ext.1236.
The Hospital Foundation
The mandate of Sunnybrook Foundation is to raise funds to support the
essential growth and development of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
in the areas of facility development, equipment, education and research.
Your support is critical to the long-term delivery of quality health care for
the citizens of Toronto, the GTA, and Ontario. If you would like to make a
donation, you may contact the Sunnybrook Foundation at:
Sunnybrook Foundation
Sunnybrook Foundation
(Holland Centre Site)
(Bayview Site)
43 Wellesley Street East, Room 279
2075 Bayview Avenue, Room H332
Toronto, Ontario M4Y 1H1
Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5
Telephone: (416) 967-8628
Telephone: (416) 480-4483
www.sunnybrookfoundation.ca
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
61
After Your Hip Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
Follow-up Education Class
OK, so I’ve had my hip replaced…now what?
!
Attend the Holland Centre Hip Replacement
Follow-up Education Class
As part of your recovery, your surgeon expects you to attend one of our
Hip Replacement Follow-up Education Classes. You will learn:
¨¨ How and when to resume your normal activities,
¨¨ How to properly progress your walking and stair climbing,
¨¨ How to progress your exercises and maximize your function; and,
¨¨ You will have your questions/concerns addressed
How to Get an Appointment for a Class
Your Physiotherapist or Physiotherapy Assistant will give you an appointment
for an education class before you are discharged. The class date will be
scheduled to take place after your first follow-up visit with your surgeon or
Advanced Practice Physiotherapist. If you do not receive an appointment
date/time, please make sure you call (416) 967-8626 as soon as possible
to schedule an Education Class.
For patients who live outside the Greater Toronto Area, please refer to the
form stapled to your exercise booklet which you receive after surgery. This
includes information on how you can attend an education class on the same
day as your first follow-up visit.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
63
After Your Hip Replacement
Safe Body Positions
After your hip replacement surgery, you may be advised to temporarily avoid
certain movements. This depends on a number of factors and your surgeon
will make the decision. The following pictures show the most common
movements to avoid if your surgeon indicates this requirement for you.
1. DO NOT bend your operated hip beyond 90° when
sitting, standing or lying.
90° =
2. DO NOT cross your legs or bring them together.
3. DO NOT twist your body, especially at the hip or
waist. Maintain your body in a straight position. Keep
your knee pointing straight up when lying or straight
ahead when sitting.
64 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
Usually it is necessary for you to avoid these positions for 6 to 8 weeks
after your surgery; however, in some cases it may be longer. At your followup appointment, you will be advised when to discontinue these precautions.
Sometimes there may be additional precautions depending on your surgery.
Your surgeon and therapists will explain any other precautions to you.
Equipment Needs
The following equipment may be required after your operation. You may also
find the equipment is helpful to use prior to your surgery to improve your
quality of life. You can purchase these items from a medical supplier.
1. Long-handled reacher
2. Raised toilet seat
3. Carry cushion – This is a firm cushion with a hard base
and some Styrofoam used to raise up your seat
heights. Pillows and couch cushions are not
appropriate.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
65
After Your Hip Replacement
Other items you may want to purchase include:
1. Long-handled shoehorn
2. Elastic shoelaces
3. Sock aid
4. Long-handled sponge/brush
The reacher and cushion should be purchased before your surgery and
brought with you to the Hospital. They are available from any medical supplier,
or you can also purchase some of the equipment in the Hospital’s Gift Shop.
While you are in the Hospital, you and your Occupational Therapist will
discuss any other equipment you may need in your home. This includes
special bathroom equipment. The Occupational Therapist will assess
your specific needs for bathing equipment and teach you how to use the
equipment safely in preparation for going home.
This equipment may include:
• Hand-held shower head
• Bath bench/seat
• Clamp-on grab rail
66 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
Transfers and Mobility
For tips about how to move comfortably after your hip replacement; the
following website has video clips to assist you: sunnybrook.ca/holland/
video. If you have questions, please speak to your therapists.

Getting Out of Bed After Hip Replacement Surgery
1. Slide yourself to the side of the bed you will be
getting out by using a combination of your arm
strength and non-operated leg. Bending your
non-operated leg and pushing on your heel will
help you move over in the bed.
2. Slowly move your legs over the edge of the bed,
gradually coming into a seated position with your
arms providing support behind you.
3. Slide your hips to the edge of the bed.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
67
After Your Hip Replacement
4. Place your operated leg out in front of you.
5. As you stand, place one hand on your walker/
crutch/cane and push up from the bed with your
other hand.
68 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement

Getting Into Bed After Hip Replacement Surgery
1. Before you sit down, if you have an adjustable
bed, recline the head of the bed until it is flat.
2. Back up towards the bed until you feel the back
of your knees touching the bed. Make sure you
sit in the centre of the bed.
3. Place your operated leg out in front of you.
4. As you sit, place one hand on your walker/cane/
crutch and the other on the bed.
5. Once seated, place your hands behind you.
Pushing with your non-operated leg and using
your arm strength, move yourself backwards
across the bed until most of your operated leg is
on the bed.
6. Move your body towards the pillow by using
a combination of your arm strength and nonoperated leg. By bending your non-operated leg
and pushing on your heel it will help you to move
up in the bed.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
69
After Your Hip Replacement

Tips on How to Turn on Your Side
After your hip replacement surgery,
you can turn and sleep on either side
and can use a pillow or folded blanket
between your legs for comfort if desired.
1. If you have an adjustable bed, position the head of the bed to a flat or
nearly flat position.
2. Lie with your back flat on the bed and bend both knees (with or without a
pillow/blanket between your legs).
3. Grasp the edge of the mattress or side rail with arm closest to the side
you will be rolling towards (i.e., if rolling onto your left side, grasp the
edge of the mattress or side rail using your left arm).
4. Turn your legs and upper body at the same time as you roll onto your
side. This is called log rolling.
5. Avoid sleeping in a twisted position.
70 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
Sitting
Low seating surfaces may be difficult for you to rise up from. Avoid low, soft
sofas, and chairs, including lazy boy types and other recliner chairs. Ideally,
the best chair for you is a high, firm chair with armrests. A dining room chair
is an example of a good chair. A carry cushion may be used to make your
transfers in and out of a chair easier. Talk to your Occupational Therapist
about adjusting your chair and bed to the appropriate height.
Most toilets are too low to comfortably sit and rise from after your hip
replacement surgery. Do not sit in a position where your knees are higher
than your hips. A commode or raised toilet seat may be needed to raise the
sitting surface.

To Sit Down:
1. Back up toward the chair until you feel the
back of your knees touching the seat.
2. Keep your operated leg out in front of you.
3. Use the armrests to lower yourself down slowly.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
71
After Your Hip Replacement

To Stand Up:
1. Slide to the edge of the chair while keeping your operated leg out in front
of you.
2. Use your arms to push up off the chair armrests and push up with your
non-operated leg.
3. Avoid sitting for long periods of time to prevent stiffness and swelling of
your operated leg.
Stairs
While you are in the hospital, your physiotherapist will initially teach you how
to climb stairs one step at a time. To go up the stairs, you will be shown to
step up with your non-operated leg leading first. Next, you move your cane/
crutch and operated leg to the same step. To go down the stairs, you always
lead down with your cane/crutch and operated leg first. Then bring down
your non-operated leg.
It is advised that you have secure handrails on all staircases. Your
physiotherapist and surgeon will also advise you when you can resume stair
climbing (up and down) with either leg.
72 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
Activities of Daily Living
Bathing
An Occupational Therapist will teach you how to get in and out of your
shower or bathtub, help you decide whether a bath seat is needed for safety,
and provide you with information on various assistive devices. Use of a longhandled sponge/brush or reacher can help you wash and dry yourself.
Dressing
Dressing your lower body may be a challenge after your surgery. A reacher,
long-handled shoehorn and sock aid will help you to dress yourself. Your
Occupational Therapist will show you other assistive devices to try, if needed.
1. Remain seated in a chair or at the edge
of your bed. This increases your safety,
especially if you are not fully weight bearing
on your operated leg.
2. Use a reacher to place the article of clothing,
e.g., underpants, pants/skirt at the foot of
your operated leg.
3. Slide the article of clothing over your
operated leg and pull clothing up to knee
level using the reacher.
4. Then, dress your non-operated leg.
5. Stand up to pull up your clothing.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
73
After Your Hip Replacement

To Use the Sock Aid
1. Slip your sock over the sock aid. The heel of
the sock should be against the hard plastic
side of the sock aid.
2. Place talcum powder inside the sock aid.
This will allow your foot to slide easier.
3. Drop the sock aid to the floor and slide your foot inside the sock aid
while pulling on to the strap with both hands.
4. Pull the strap until the sock is fully on your foot and the sock aid pops loose.
5. You can use your reacher or long-handled shoehorn to adjust your socks
and/or to take them off.
Shoes
Your shoes need to give you good support but should be easy to put on
and take off. You can use slip-on shoes, elastic shoelaces or shoes with
Velcro straps.

To Put On Shoe
1. You can use a reacher to hold the top part of your shoe,
including the tongue.
2. Slide your foot in while using the shoehorn at the heel.

To Take Off Shoe
1. You can use the end of your reacher to push your
shoes off.
74 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
In the Bathroom
To reduce the risk of slipping, place a rubber mat or non-skid decals, treads,
or strips on the bottom of the tub or shower. When getting in and out of the
bathtub, do not use the soap dish, towel rack, or shower curtain rod for
assistance, as they are not designed to support your weight. Do not sit on
the bottom of the bathtub for at least 3 months. When you resume this
activity you must use grab bars to lower/raise yourself in/out of the bathtub.
Grab bars with suction cups are not recommended.
If you stand to shower, you may wish to place toiletries in a shower caddy or
plastic grocery bag and hang it from the showerhead for easy access. If you
are using a bath seat or bench, you need to place toiletries within safe reach.
For convenience, you may secure a mesh or plastic bag to your grab rail or
the arm of your bath seat.
In the Kitchen
You may find that walking and standing to make meals is difficult. Before your
surgery, you may want to arrange for pre-packaged foods or frozen meals to
save time and energy. You can also ask your therapist for the phone number
for “Meals on Wheels”.
To decrease standing during cooking and preparation time, use appliances
such as a blender, microwave oven or toaster oven. These appliances should
be left out on the counter. When you are preparing meals and beverages, sit
on a chair or high stool to avoid prolonged standing.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
75
After Your Hip Replacement
When working in the kitchen, rearrange commonly used items from
cupboards and refrigerator shelves to a level where you can easily reach. You
may also place plates, bowls, etc., on the counter. You may want to consider
just using the top rack of the dishwasher or avoid using deep freezers to
make your activities easier after your surgery.
To assist you in carrying meals and food items while you are using canes or
crutches, place your meals in a plastic container and drinks in a thermal mug
with a tight lid. Then they can be placed within a plastic bag along with your
cutlery and carried to the desired location for eating. You should carry the
plastic bag by inserting your hand through both handles to leave your hand
free to grip your cane or crutches. You could also wear an apron, knapsack or
clothing with large pockets to help carry items.
In the Bedroom
It is helpful if you move your night table(s) closer to your bed and directly
facing your bed. Arrange your commonly used items so that they are
located on top or in the top drawer. Ensure your bed is at a comfortable
height to make it easier to rise up to a standing position. If your bed is low
to the ground, your bed can be raised using blocks. Discuss this with your
Occupational Therapist.
76 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
Homemaking Activities
After your hip replacement surgery, you may be advised to temporarily
avoid certain movements or activities. This depends on a number of factors
and your surgeon will make the decision. If you have been instructed by the
team to avoid certain movements, you need to think and plan well before
you begin any homemaking activity to ensure that these safe body positions
are always maintained.
Shopping
Groceries can be ordered and delivered from a variety of sources. You can
try calling your supermarket or order from Internet sites such as www.
grocerygateway.com. You could also ask a relative or friend to do your
grocery shopping for you. If you are purchasing small amounts of food, you
can use a knapsack or bundle buggy instead of carrying the bags. Ask the
grocery clerk to put your items into the bundle buggy.
Child Care
You will need help with younger children (infants/toddlers). Arrange for
assistance from a friend or relative with bathing and, perhaps, dressing young
children. Also, avoid carrying a child as their weight puts additional load on
your operated hip and will affect your balance. Before walking in an area
where children are playing, make sure that all toys are cleared away, as they
increase your risk of tripping and falling.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
77
After Your Hip Replacement
Pet Care
You can use your long-handled reacher to more easily reach your pet’s food
and water bowls. Keep pet food stored at or above waist level for easy reach.
Consider arranging for friends/family to change cat litter or walk your dog.
Laundry
Try to do smaller, more frequent loads. Carry small loads downstairs in
a knapsack when you walk with canes/crutches. If your laundry room is
accessible without stairs, use a bundle buggy with a small load of laundry.
Only take the amount of detergent required for the load, to reduce carrying.
Reorganize your laundry room before surgery so that the detergent and
laundry basket(s), etc., are located at waist level for easy reach. Sort your
clothes on a tabletop rather than the floor. You can use your reacher to
retrieve clothing from the washer or dryer.
Cleaning
Avoid awkward positions and heavy indoor/outdoor household cleaning, such
as washing floors or windows, cleaning the bathroom (toilet and bathtub),
vacuuming, changing bed sheets, lawn mowing, snow removal, and heavy
garbage removal during your recovery. Arrange for family/friends to help you
with these tasks or hire temporary help from a community agency.
78 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
Returning to Work
When you return to work depends mainly on what type of duties you must
perform. Most patients do not return to work until at least 6 to 8 weeks
after their hip has been replaced. However, some patients return to work
earlier if their job is sedentary in nature, for example, computer work. If you
have made arrangements with your employer to return to work within the
first 6 to 8 weeks after your surgery, you may wish to speak to your employer
about modifying your work area and duties. Talk to any member of your care
team if you have any specific questions regarding returning to work post total
hip replacement.
Sexual Activity
Following your surgery, you may initially participate in sexual activity by
assuming a passive position (i.e. on your back with your legs spread apart).
Try this position gently. Progress your activity level as tolerated. If you would
like more information, please ask your Occupational Therapist.
Community Activities
Driving a Vehicle
It is recommended that you refrain from driving until hip precautions are
discontinued by your surgeon. Driving may be resumed after 6 weeks
unless advised otherwise by your surgeon. Check with your insurance
company about any concerns you may have regarding coverage when you
resume driving.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
79
After Your Hip Replacement
Passenger in a Vehicle
You will be able to sit in the front passenger seat of most vehicles. You will
need to take frequent rest breaks if you are traveling for long distances.
Getting Into the Car or Van
It is easier to get into a car if you and the car are on the same level (do
not stand on a curb or be too close to the curb). Have the driver slide the
passenger seat as far back as possible and recline the seat back.
Use a folded towel or clothing to fill in the back depression on the seat so the
seat is level front to back. You may need a carry cushion in the passenger’s
seat of a car. A carry cushion may not be needed in a van.
You need to back up to the car seat using your walking device until you feel the
car against the back of your legs. Then extend your operated leg directly out in
front of you. Sit down slowly holding on to 2 stable surfaces. These may be the
dashboard and the frame of the car (avoid holding onto the car door).
Slide back onto the seat so that the backs of both legs are fully supported on
the car seat. Slide your legs in, one at a time.
Once you are facing forward, the seat back may be raised to an upright position;
however, you may want to leave the seat back reclined slightly for comfort.
80 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement
Getting Out of the Car or Van
This process is an exact reverse of getting into the car or van. Recline the
seat back fully. Shift towards the driver’s side of the vehicle until you can slide
your legs out one at a time, until your feet are on the ground.
Slide to the edge of the car seat, extend your operated leg out in front of you
and push up off the car seat using your arms and good leg.
Outdoors
When walking outside in the winter, consider buying an “ice pick”. This is
a cleat that flips down and grips securely in snow and ice. It is attached
to the end of your cane and helps you to walk more safely. Speak to
your physiotherapist if you would like to see or buy one. Make sure that
someone keeps all outdoor walkways and stairs clear of ice or snow and
that they are well lit.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
81
After Your Hip Replacement
Resuming an Active Lifestyle
Resuming your leisure activities following surgery
depends on the physical demands of the activity and
your stage of recovery. For more information please
consult the exercise booklet provided to you by your
physiotherapist during your hospital stay.

Activities That May be Resumed Immediately
• Walking
• Swimming – Ask your surgeon. You may be able to swim or do exercises
in the pool if your incision is well healed and if you have access to a pool
with a graded entry (stairs and handrail) before the 6 week period. The
whip kick is never permitted, however, frog kick is allowed.

Activities That May be Resumed After 6 Weeks
• Swimming (no whip kick)
• Increase walking endurance
• Golfing – putting and chipping
• Stationary bike (upright or recumbent)
• Elliptical
• Weight training – upper body
• Treadmill with incline (walking only)
• Driving a car – unless surgeon has said otherwise
82 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Hip Replacement

Activities That May be Resumed After 3 Months
• Gardening
• Bowling/lawn bowling
• Outdoor cycling
• Curling
• Golfing

Activities to Discuss With Your Surgeon After 3 Months
• Downhill/cross country skiing
• Tennis (doubles)
• Weight training (lower body)
• Horseback riding
• Skating/snowshoeing
• Yoga/pilates
• Canoeing/kayaking (open kayak)
• Rowing

High Risk Activities That Are NEVER Permitted
• Jogging/running
• Squash/racquetball
• Whip kick or “egg beater” in swimming
• Contact sports
!
These lists only include some of the more common leisure
activities. Please consult with your surgeon if you are
interested in resuming an activity that isn’t listed here.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
83
After Your Knee Replacement
After Your Knee Replacement
After Your Knee Replacement
Transfers And Mobility
For tips about how to move comfortably after your knee replacement; the
following website has video clips to assist you: sunnybrook.ca/holland/
video. If you have questions, please speak to your therapists.
Stairs
While you are in the hospital, your physiotherapist will initially teach you how
to climb stairs one step at a time. To go up the stairs, you will be shown to
step up with your non-operated leg leading first. Next, you move your cane/
crutch and operated leg to the same step. To go down the stairs, you always
lead down with your cane/crutch and operated leg first. Then bring down
your non-operated leg.
It is advised that you have secure handrails on all staircases. Your
physiotherapist and surgeon will also advise you when you can resume stair
climbing (up and down) with either leg.
Activities of Daily Living
Dressing
Dressing your lower body (legs and feet) may be a challenge before you
obtain the movement needed to reach below your knee level. It is usually
easier to dress your operated leg first. A reacher, long-handled shoehorn, and
sock-aid may be helpful to get yourself dressed, especially if you have had
both of your knees replaced. Your Occupational Therapist will show you how
to use these assistive devices if needed.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
85
After Your Knee Replacement
In the Bathroom
Reduce the risk of slipping in the bathroom by using a rubber mat or non-skid
decals, treads, or strips on the bottom of the tub or shower. When you resume
this activity you must use grab bars to lower/raise yourself in and out of the
bathtub. Grab bars with suction cups are not recommended. Do not use the
soap dish, towel rack, or shower curtain rod for assistance when getting in and
out of the bathtub, as they are not designed to support your weight.
Bathing
An Occupational Therapist will teach you how to get in and out of your
shower or bathtub, help you decide whether a bath seat is required at home,
and advise you as to which bath seat is best. Bath seats are available at
medical supply stores for rental or purchase.
The use of a long-handled sponge or reacher may be
helpful. It allows you to reach below knee level and with
less effort and more comfort. These devices can be
purchased at the gift shop in the hospital or at your local
medical supply store.
86 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Knee Replacement
Using the Toilet
For some patients it may be easier to sit and rise from
a higher surface. A raised toilet seat with arm rests may
be recommended if you have difficulty getting on and
off the toilet. A raised toilet seat is especially useful if
you have had both of your knees replaced. Raised toilet
seats are available at your local medical supply store for
rental or purchase.
In the Kitchen
You may find the walking and standing required to make meals difficult at
first. Consider pre-packaged foods or frozen meals to save time. You can also
ask your therapist for the phone number for “Meals on Wheels”.
To decrease standing time during cooking and preparation, use appliances
such as a blender, microwave oven or toaster oven. These appliances should
be left out on the counter. Sit on a chair or stool to avoid prolonged standing.
To assist you in carrying meals and food items while you are using canes or
crutches, place your meals in a plastic container and drinks in a thermal mug
with a tight lid. Then they can be placed within a plastic bag along with your
cutlery and carried to the desired location for eating. You should carry the
plastic bag by inserting your hand through both handles to leave your hand
free to grip your cane or crutches. You could also wear an apron, knapsack or
clothing with large pockets to help carry items.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
87
After Your Knee Replacement
Homemaking Activities
Shopping
Groceries can be ordered and delivered from a variety of sources. You
can try calling your supermarket or order from Internet sites such as www.
grocerygateway.com. You could also ask a relative or friend to do your
grocery shopping for you. If you are purchasing small amounts of food, you
can use a knapsack or bundle buggy instead of carrying the bags. Ask the
grocery clerk to put your items into the bundle buggy.
Cleaning
Avoid heavy indoor/outdoor household cleaning, such as washing floors
or windows, cleaning the bathroom (toilet and bathtub), vacuuming, lawn
mowing, snow removal, and heavy garbage removal for 6 weeks after
your surgery. Arrange for family/friends to help you with these tasks or hire
temporary help from a community agency.
Laundry
Try to do smaller, more frequent loads of laundry. Carry small loads
downstairs in a knapsack when you walk with canes. If your laundry room is
accessible without stairs, use a bundle buggy with a small load of laundry.
Only take the amount of detergent required for the load to reduce the weight
you need to carry.
88 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Knee Replacement
Child Care
You will need help with younger children (infants/toddlers). Arrange for
assistance from a friend or relative with bathing and, perhaps, dressing young
children. Also, avoid carrying a child as their weight puts additional load on
your operated knee and will affect your balance. Before walking in an area
where children are playing, make sure that all toys are cleared away, as they
increase your risk of tripping and falling.
Returning to Work
Most patients do not return to work until at least 6 to 8 weeks after their
knee has been replaced. However, some patients return to work earlier if
their job is sedentary in nature. When returning to work, be sure your daily
work schedule allows time for your exercises. Talk to a member of your health
care team if you have specific questions regarding returning to work after
your surgery.
Sexual Activity
Following your surgery you may resume sexual activity in positions that
are comfortable for your knee. The position on your back may be the most
comfortable to start with.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
89
After Your Knee Replacement
Community Activities
Resumption of Driving
Driving may be resumed after 6 weeks unless advised otherwise by your
surgeon. Check with your insurance company about any concerns you may
have regarding coverage when you resume driving.
Getting Into the Car or Van
You will be able to sit in the front passenger seat of most vehicles. You will
need to take rest breaks if you are travelling for long distances.
It is easier to get into a car if you and the car are on the same level (do
not stand on a curb or be too close to the curb). Have the driver slide the
passenger seat as far back as possible and recline the backrest.
Back up to the car seat using your walking device until you feel the car
against the back of your legs. Extend your operated leg(s) directly out in front
of you. Sit down slowly holding onto 2 stable surfaces. These may be the
dashboard and the frame of the car (avoid holding onto the car door).
Using your arm strength, slide onto the seat so that both legs are supported
on the car seat. Slide your legs in, one at a time. Once you are facing forward,
the backrest of the seat may be raised back up.
90 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Knee Replacement
Getting Out of the Car or Van
Recline the backrest. Shift towards the driver’s side of the vehicle until you
can slide your legs out one at a time. Slide to the edge of the car seat, extend
your operated leg(s) out in front of you and push up off the car seat.
Resuming an Active Lifestyle
Resuming your leisure activities following surgery
depends on the physical demands of the activity and
your stage of recovery. For more information please
consult the exercise booklet provided to you by your
physiotherapist during your hospital stay.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
91
After Your Knee Replacement

Activities That May be Resumed Immediately
• Walking
• Swimming – Ask your surgeon. You may be able to swim or do exercises
in the pool if your incision is well healed and if you have access to a pool
with a graded entry (stairs and handrail) before the 6 week period. The
whip kick is never permitted, however, frog kick is allowed.

Activities That May be Resumed after 6 Weeks
• Driving
• Stationary biking (Note: May be used for range of motion exercises
beginning in Week 1)
• Swimming – in any type of pool
• Golf – begin at the driving range
• Gardening**
** Note for Gardening: It is recommended that patients use a
‘kneeling platform’ that is padded and has handles to allow
easy transition from kneeling to standing.

Activities That May be Resumed at 3 Months
• Golf
• Outdoor cycling (NOT Mountain Biking)
• Doubles tennis
92 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
After Your Knee Replacement

Activities to Discuss With Your Surgeon
• Skiing – downhill or cross-country
• Ice skating
• Sailing
• Canoeing
• Mountain biking
• When your legs are under water, side to side leg movements against
water resistance (e.g. jumping jacks)

High Risk Activities That Are NEVER Permitted
• Singles tennis
• Jogging/Running
• Squash/Racquetball
• High impact aerobics
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
93
Discharge Instructions
and Follow-up
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
Discharge Instructions and Follow-Up
Before You Go Home Checklist and Goals

You should have completed the following goals prior to discharge:
¨¨ Able to walk safely with the appropriate aid; i.e. cane, crutches, walker
¨¨ Have the necessary equipment to allow you to manage safely at home
(e.g. raised toilet seat, bath seat)
¨¨ Able to get in and out of bed on your own or with the help of your
caregiver or coach
¨¨ Safely manage stairs (unless no stairs)
¨¨ Know what exercises to continue at home and how to progress them
after discharge
¨¨ Know what activities you can perform safely
¨¨ Know what activities to avoid
¨¨ Review discharge instructions with your nurse

Ensure you have:
¨¨ Your prescriptions (e.g. pain medication, anticoagulant)
¨¨ Your own medications returned
¨¨ Your appointment card for follow-up visit
¨¨ Arranged for your escort to pick you up by 9:30 a.m.
¨¨ All your belongings
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
95
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
Symptoms Requiring Immediate Attention

Visit your nearest Emergency Department if you have any of
the following:
• New or worse shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
• New or worse pain, tightness or pressure in your chest
• A significant increase in pain, swelling or redness of your calf/calves
• A sudden, severe increase in pain in your new joint

Call your surgeon or the hospital immediately if you have any of
the following:
• Increased redness, swelling or a sudden increase in bruising around the
incision site
• Drainage from the surgical site for more than 4 days after discharge
from the hospital
• A foul odour or yellow or green drainage at the incision site
• Excessive bleeding
• Signs or symptoms of other infections (i.e., fever, chills, burning on
urination or a foul smelling urine, etc.)
• A persistent increase in your temperature (over 38°C)
96 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
For Questions/Concerns After Discharge
Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Contact your surgeon’s office.
After hours, Monday to Friday, weekends and holidays:
Call the Hospital Coordinator at (416) 967-8551. If you leave a voice mail
message, you can expect to receive a call back within 24 hours of your call.
Exercises and Activity
It is important to keep active after joint replacement surgery to keep yourself
strong and moving well. Balance your activity and exercise carefully with
periods of rest. Avoid becoming over-tired or over-working the site of your
operation. Gradually increase your activity, e.g. walking, household chores,
etc. Follow the instructions you were given by your therapists.
!
Until your 6 week follow-up visit, ONLY do exercises
that are listed in your exercise book, unless otherwise
instructed by the Holland Centre care team.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
97
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
Caring For Your Incision
• Inspect your incision daily for any redness or drainage. Call your surgeon
or family doctor if drainage continues for more than 4 days after discharge.
• Once your incision is dry, it can be left open to the air and you can shower
without covering it. If your incision is draining, cover it with a waterproof
dressing or plastic bag. Change the dressing after you shower.
• If you have steristrips, please leave them alone – they will eventually fall off
on their own. After 2 weeks, your skin should be completely healed and
you can gently remove any remaining steristrips.
• Once your incision is completely healed and the sutures/staples
have been removed, the incision and surrounding skin can be gently
massaged with creams.
Removal of Sutures/Staples
Have your sutures/staples removed by your family doctor or at a walk-in
clinic as follows:
Removal of Sutures
o
Date: ___________________
Removal of Staples
o
Date: ___________________
Dissolving Sutures
o
!
Remember…It is important that you don’t swim
until your sutures are removed and your incision is
completely healed to avoid infection.
98 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
Managing Your Pain
It is normal to have some pain after your hip or knee replacement
surgery. Keep in mind that each person feels pain differently. What is
moderately or very painful to some may be mildly painful to others.

Pain can be managed by:
• Balancing rest and activity.
• Using ice to help reduce pain and swelling – use it for 10 minutes at a
time only for maximum benefit.
• Lying flat and elevating your leg above your heart level to help reduce
swelling, pressure and pain.
Pain Medication:
1. ___________________________________________________________________
and/or
2. ___________________________________________________________________
and/or
3. ___________________________________________________________________
• Do not mix pain medication unless directed.
• Avoid alcoholic beverages while taking pain medication.
• When you are ready, talk to your family doctor or pharmacist about how to
reduce your use of medication.
• If your pain is not well controlled, call your surgeon’s office.
• Common side effects of pain medicine are constipation, nausea or
vomiting, and sleepiness.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
99
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
• CONSTIPATION: If you experience constipation, you should increase
your fluid intake, eat foods that are high in fibre and increase your activity.
Drinking prune juice may help. You may also need a laxative, such as
senokot or milk of magnesia, to get your bowels to move.
• STOMACH UPSET: If you experience nausea, take your pain medicine
with food. You can also take medication to settle your stomach. Talk to your
pharmacist or family doctor about what medication would be best for you.
• SLEEPINESS: If your pain medicine makes you sleepy you can try taking a
smaller dose, for example, 1 tablet instead of 2 tablets.
Anticoagulants (Blood Thinner)
o Yes
o No
If yes, drug name, dose, frequency:
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
!
Please take your medication as directed.
100 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
Dental and Other Medical Procedures
It is important to let your dentist and other health care providers know that
you have had a joint replacement as some procedures may expose you to the
risk of infection. In some circumstances, antibiotics should be taken prior to
the procedure.
Contact your dentist or doctor a few days before any procedure to establish if
any antibiotics should be prescribed and if so, to arrange that you are given a
prescription.

Suggested prescriptions for dental procedures:
• Amoxicillin 2g orally 1 hour before procedure
OR
• Clindamycin 600mg orally 1 hour before the procedure

For penicillin-allergic patients:
• Clindamycin 600mg orally 1 hour before procedure
!
Please speak to your surgeon about appropriate
timeframes for these recommendations.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
101
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
Follow-Up Appointments
For most visits you will be seen by an Advanced Practice Physiotherapist
who has a graduate degree, advanced clinical training and skills, and works
closely with your surgeon. If the examination shows that you would benefit
from seeing the surgeon, this will be arranged.
After hip and knee replacement, routine follow-up is very important. Although
long-term results are excellent, problems can develop related to wear and
loosening of the components. Sometimes these problems can be “silent” and
you may not experience any pain. Consistent follow-up and early detection
may prevent the need for complex revision surgery.
Appointment Date:
____________________________
Appointment Time:____________________________
Location: o Surgeon’s Office
o Holland Centre Outpatient Clinic (416) 967-8617
Follow-up Schedule
After hip or knee replacement surgery, you can expect to have 3
appointments in the first year and appointments at year 3, year 5 and
year 10. Please call (416) 967-8617 for all appointment enquiries or if you
are experiencing any new problems related to your joint replacement. Be
prepared to provide your hospital card and health care information.
102 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
Your Discharge Home
When you are ready to leave, your escort may park in the driveway in front of
the hospital. They should tell the security guard at the front desk that he/she is
here to take you home. Parking is only allowed for a few minutes in this area. If
your travel time is greater than 2 hours, plan on frequent stops to get out of the
car and stretch your legs. Consider filling prescriptions prior to leaving so that
you can take your pain medication, if needed, on the way home.
Settle Your Hospital Account
Stop at the Business Office on the second floor to pay for additional charges
such as the telephone. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.,
Monday to Friday.
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
103
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
What to Expect After Joint Replacement
Pain & Swelling
It is normal to experience pain, bruising and swelling at the surgical site.
Over the next 6 weeks, you should feel an improvement in these symptoms.
Be sure to take your pain medications as prescribed. You may be able to
gradually wean yourself off your pain medication. Use ice as needed through
the day (follow the advice of your physiotherapist about the use of ice). A bag
of frozen peas wrapped in a kitchen towel makes an ideal ice pack. To help
reduce swelling, make sure your lie flat with your leg elevated above the level
of your heart. Swelling can continue up to 12 months after surgery.
General Health
It is normal to feel generally tired and have a poor appetite in the first few
weeks after your surgery. Some patients also experience constipation from
certain medications. Try not to nap too much during the day so you will sleep
better at night. Drink plenty of water and eat fruits and vegetables to help you
feel more energetic and prevent constipation. Refer to page 26 for Canada’s
Food Guide website and Dietitians of Canada website.
Exercise & Activity
Stay active and do your exercise 2 or 3 times a day. During the first 6 weeks
you will begin to feel stronger and the exercises will become easier to do.
Increase repetitions or sets as you get stronger. Patients who have had knee
replacement surgery should continue to make improvement in their range
of movement. Continue with the exercises in your booklet – they have been
designed by Holland Centre staff to maximize your activity. You will experience
steady improvement in your new hip or knee up to 6 months following surgery.
Improvement is slower after that, but can continue up to 2 years.
104 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
Discharge Instructions & Follow-up
Walking
Continue to use your gait aid (e.g. cane, crutches, walker) as your Holland
Centre physiotherapists taught you before leaving the hospital. This will help
you to develop a normal walking pattern. It is better to walk normally with
a cane than to walk with a limp without a cane. Walking with a limp may
put more load on your joint replacement, be a hard habit to break even
when you have no pain, and your muscles will not strengthen in a pattern
that will improve your walking.
Skin Care
It is normal to have some numbness around the area of the surgical incision.
This should improve with time as the swelling subsides and the tissues heal.
The skin over your surgical site is sensitive so protect it from injury and the sun.
!
REMEMBER…Having a hip or knee replacement is
hard work. It’s a big surgery and takes time to recover.
Follow your health care team’s recommendations so
that your joint replacement is a success.
Copyright © 2007 – 2014 Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
All rights reserved by Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, operating as the Holland Orthopaedic &
Arthritic Centre. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted by any means, including
photocopying and recording, or stored in a retrieval system of any nature without the written permission of
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre: 43 Wellesley Street East, Toronto, Ontario M4Y 1H1
(416) 967-8500.
PR 99987 (2014/04/04)
A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
105
My Notes
My Notes
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A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement •
107
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108 • A Guide for Patients Having Hip or Knee Replacement
FOR GENERAL QUESTIONS/CONCERNS AFTER DISCHARGE
Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.:
Contact your surgeon’s office.
?
After hours, Monday to Friday, weekends and holidays:
Call the Hospital Coordinator at (416) 967-8551.
If you leave a voice mail message, you can expect
to receive a call back within 24 hours of your call.
Refer to page 94 for symptoms requiring immediate
attention and who to contact.
Copyright © 2007-2014 Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
All rights reserved by Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, operating as the Holland Orthopaedic & Arthritic Centre. No part of
this publication may be reproduced or transmitted by any means, including photocopying and recording, or stored in a retrieval
system of any nature without the written permission of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.
PR 99987 (2014/04/04)
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