HV-ProNet Manual - Custom Automation Technologies, Inc.

HV-ProNet Manual - Custom Automation Technologies, Inc.
HV-ProNet
Revision A 07/30/03
Part Number HVPNM
Copyright and Trademark
© 2003, Custom Automation Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of the contents
of this book may be transmitted or reproduced in any form or by any means without the
written permission of Custom Automation Technologies, Inc. Printed in the United States of
America.
Ethernet is a trademark of XEROX Corporation. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open
Group. Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows 2000, Windows NT, and
Windows XP are trademarks of Microsoft Corp. Netscape is a trademark of Netscape
Communications Corporation.
Custom Automation Technologies, Inc.
1267 Bayboro Drive
New Albany, OH 43054, USA
Phone: 614-939-4228
www.customautomationtech.com
Disclaimer and Revisions
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference in which case
the user, at his or her own expense, will be required to take whatever measures may be
required to correct the interference.
Attention: This product has been designed to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device pursuant to Part 15 of FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against such interference when operating in a
commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio
frequency energy, and if not installed and used in accordance with this guide, may
cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Changes or modifications to this device not explicitly approved by Custom Automation
Technologies will void the user's authority to operate this device.
The information in this guide may change without notice. The manufacturer assumes no
responsibility for any errors which may appear in this guide.
Date
07/30/03
Rev. Author
A
DDH
Comments
Initial release
Warranty
Custom Automation Technologies warrants each HV-ProNet product to be free from defects
in material and workmanship for a period of one year (or for the period specified on the
product warranty registration card) after the date of shipment. During this period, if a
customer is unable to resolve a product problem with Custom Automation Technologies
Technical Support, a Return Material Authorization (RMA) will be issued. Following receipt
of a RMA number, the customer shall return the product to Custom Automation
Technologies, freight prepaid. Upon verification of warranty, Custom Automation
Technologies will -- at its option -- repair or replace the product and return it to the customer
freight prepaid. No services are handled at the customer's site under this warranty. This
warranty is voided if the customer uses the product in an unauthorized or improper way, or in
an environment for which it was not designed.
Custom Automation Technologies warrants the media containing its software product to be
free from defects and warrants that the software will operate substantially according to
Custom Automation Technologies specifications for a period of 60 DAYS after the date of
shipment. The customer will ship defective media to Custom Automation Technologies.
Custom Automation Technologies will ship the replacement media to the customer.
In no event will Custom Automation Technologies be responsible to the user in contract, in
tort (including negligence), strict liability or otherwise for any special, indirect, incidental or
consequential damage or loss of equipment, plant or power system, cost of capital, loss of
profits or revenues, cost of replacement power, additional expenses in the use of existing
software, hardware, equipment or facilities, or claims against the user by its employees or
customers resulting from the use of the information, recommendations, descriptions and
safety notations supplied by Custom Automation Technologies. Custom Automation
Technologies liability is limited (at its election) to:
1) refund of buyer's purchase price for such affected products (without interest)
2) repair or replacement of such products, provided that the buyer follows the above
procedures.
There are no understandings, agreements, representations or warranties, expressed or implied,
including warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, other than those
specifically set out above or by any existing contract between the parties. Any such contract
states the entire obligation of Custom Automation Technologies. The contents of this
document shall not become part of or modify any prior or existing agreement, commitment or
relationship.
Contents
Table of Contents
1. Introduction...................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.1 Network Protocols .............................................................................................. 1-1
1.1.1 Packing Algorithms ............................................................................ 1-1
1.1.2 Ethernet (MAC) Address .................................................................... 1-1
1.1.3 Internet Protocol (IP) Address ............................................................ 1-1
1.1.4 Port Numbers ...................................................................................... 1-2
2. HV-ProNet ........................................................................................................................ 2-1
2.1 Layout and Dimensions ...................................................................................... 2-1
2.2 Connectors .......................................................................................................... 2-2
2.3 Ethernet Interface................................................................................................ 2-3
2.4 Status LEDs ........................................................................................................ 2-4
2.5 Product Information Label.................................................................................. 2-5
2.6 Technical Specifications ..................................................................................... 2-6
3. Getting Started (Assign IP) ............................................................................................. 3-1
3.1 Addresses and Port Number................................................................................ 3-1
3.2 Physically Connecting the Unit .......................................................................... 3-2
3.3 Methods of Assigning the IP Address ................................................................ 3-3
3.3.1 DHCP.................................................................................................. 3-4
3.3.2 AutoIP................................................................................................. 3-4
3.4 DeviceInstaller .................................................................................................... 3-5
3.4.1 Install the DeviceInstaller ................................................................... 3-5
3.4.2 Assign IP Address and Network Class ............................................... 3-5
3.4.3 Test the IP Address ........................................................................... 3-10
3.5 ARP and Telnet................................................................................................. 3-11
4. Configuration ................................................................................................................... 4-1
4.1 Configuring via Web Browser ............................................................................ 4-1
4.2 Using DeviceInstaller ......................................................................................... 4-1
4.3 Web Manager Page ............................................................................................. 4-4
4.3.1 Unit Configuration.............................................................................. 4-6
4.3.2 Server Properties................................................................................. 4-7
4.3.3 Port Properties..................................................................................... 4-7
4.3.4 Update Settings ................................................................................. 4-10
HV-ProNet
i
Contents
4.4 Configuring via the Setup Mode Window.........................................................4-11
4.4.1 Using a Telnet Connection ................................................................4-11
4.5 Server Configuration (Network Configuration) ................................................4-13
4.5.1 IP Address .........................................................................................4-13
4.5.2 Set Gateway IP Address ....................................................................4-13
4.5.3 Netmask: Number of Bits for Host Part ............................................4-13
4.5.4 Change Telnet configuration password .............................................4-14
4.5.5 DHCP Naming ..................................................................................4-14
4.6 Channel 1 Configuration (Serial Port Parameters) ............................................4-15
4.6.1 Baudrate ............................................................................................4-15
4.6.2 I/F (Interface) Mode ..........................................................................4-15
4.6.3 Flow...................................................................................................4-16
4.6.4 Port Number ......................................................................................4-16
4.6.5 Connect Mode ...................................................................................4-18
4.6.6 Remote IP Address............................................................................4-23
4.6.7 Remote Port.......................................................................................4-23
4.6.8 DisConnMode ...................................................................................4-23
4.6.9 Flush Mode (Buffer Flushing)...........................................................4-23
4.6.10 Pack Control ....................................................................................4-25
4.6.11 DisConnTime (Inactivity Timeout).................................................4-26
4.6.12 Send Characters...............................................................................4-26
4.6.13 Telnet Terminal Type......................................................................4-26
4.6.14 Channel (Port) Password .................................................................4-26
4.7 Expert Settings ..................................................................................................4-27
4.7.1 TCP Keepalive time in s....................................................................4-27
4.7.2 ARP Cache timeout in s ....................................................................4-27
4.8 Security Settings................................................................................................4-27
4.8.1 Disable SNMP...................................................................................4-27
4.8.2 SNMP Community Name .................................................................4-27
4.8.3 Disable Telnet Setup .........................................................................4-28
4.8.4 Disable TFTP Firmware Upgrade .....................................................4-28
4.8.5 Disable Port 77FE (Hex) ...................................................................4-28
4.8.6 Disable Web Setup ............................................................................4-28
4.8.7 Enable Encryption .............................................................................4-28
4.8.8 Enable Enhanced Password...............................................................4-28
4.9 Factory Defaults ................................................................................................4-29
4.10 Exit Configuration Mode.................................................................................4-29
4.11 Get Configuration............................................................................................4-29
4.12 Set Configuration ............................................................................................4-30
5. Redirector..........................................................................................................................5-1
5.1 Installing Redirector ............................................................................................5-1
ii
HV-ProNet
Contents
5.1.1 Install Redirector................................................................................. 5-1
5.1.2 Setup ................................................................................................... 5-2
5.2 Uninstalling Redirector....................................................................................... 5-5
6. Jumper Settings................................................................................................................ 6-1
6.1 Serial Port #1 ...................................................................................................... 6-1
6.1.1 No revision number ............................................................................ 6-1
6.1.2 Revision “A” and later ........................................................................ 6-1
6.2 Serial Port #3 ...................................................................................................... 6-2
6.3 Serial Port #4 ...................................................................................................... 6-2
7. Making the Connection ................................................................................................... 7-1
8. Updating Firmware ......................................................................................................... 8-1
8.1 Obtaining Firmware ............................................................................................ 8-1
8.2 Reloading Firmware ........................................................................................... 8-1
8.2.1 Via Device Installer ............................................................................ 8-2
8.2.2 Via TFTP ............................................................................................ 8-4
8.2.3 Via Another Unit ................................................................................ 8-5
9. Troubleshooting ............................................................................................................... 9-1
9.1 Technical Support ............................................................................................... 9-1
9.1.1 Technical Support ............................................................................... 9-1
10. Monitor Mode............................................................................................................... 10-1
10.1 Monitor Mode ................................................................................................. 10-1
10.1.1 Entering Monitor Mode Via the Network Port ............................... 10-1
10.1.2 Monitor Mode Commands.............................................................. 10-1
11. Network Configuration using UDP ............................................................................ 11-1
11.1 UDP Datagrams .............................................................................................. 11-1
11.2 Configuring Multiple Devices ........................................................................ 11-3
11.2.1 Acquiring a Valid Setup Record ..................................................... 11-3
11.2.2 Sending a Setup Record .................................................................. 11-5
11.2.3 The Intel Hex Format...................................................................... 11-5
11.2.4 Calculating the Checksum .............................................................. 11-6
11.2.5 Calculating the Two’s Complement ............................................... 11-6
11.3 Setup Records ................................................................................................. 11-7
11.3.1 Channel Parameters ........................................................................ 11-8
11.3.2 Interface Mode................................................................................ 11-9
11.3.3 Baud Rate...................................................................................... 11-10
11.3.4 Flow Control ................................................................................. 11-10
11.3.5 Connect Mode............................................................................... 11-11
11.3.6 Disconnect Mode .......................................................................... 11-12
HV-ProNet
iii
Contents
11.3.7 Flush Mode (Buffer Flushing).......................................................11-13
11.3.8 Pack Control ..................................................................................11-13
11.4 IP Addresses ..................................................................................................11-14
11.4.1 Network Portion ............................................................................11-14
11.4.2 Subnet Portion ...............................................................................11-15
11.4.3 Host Portion...................................................................................11-15
11.4.4 Network Address...........................................................................11-15
11.4.5 Broadcast Address.........................................................................11-15
11.4.6 Private IP Networks and the Internet.............................................11-16
11.4.7 Network RFCs...............................................................................11-16
12. Binary to Hex Conversion............................................................................................12-1
12.1 Connect Mode Options....................................................................................12-2
12.2 Disconnect Mode Options ...............................................................................12-5
12.3 Flush Mode (Buffer Flushing) Options ...........................................................12-7
12.4 Interface Mode Options.................................................................................12-13
12.5 Pack Control Options ....................................................................................12-14
13. Glossary of Terms ........................................................................................................13-1
iv
HV-ProNet
Contents
List of Figures
Figure 1 - HV-ProNet, Top View .......................................................................................... 2-1
Figure 2 - HV-ProNet, Connector End View......................................................................... 2-2
Figure 3 - HV-ProNet Connectors ......................................................................................... 2-2
Figure 4 - RJ-45 Ethernet Connector ..................................................................................... 2-3
Figure 5 - HV-ProNet Status LEDs ....................................................................................... 2-4
Figure 6 – HV-ProNet Connected to HomeVision-Pro and Network.................................... 3-2
Figure 7 - DeviceInstaller Window........................................................................................ 3-5
Figure 8 - Assign IP Address Window .................................................................................. 3-8
Figure 9 - Ping Device Window .......................................................................................... 3-10
Figure 10 – HV-ProNet Web-Manager settings .................................................................... 4-5
Figure 11 - Server Properties Configuration on the Web Browser ........................................ 4-7
Figure 12 - Setup Mode Window......................................................................................... 4-12
Figure 13 - Hostlist Option .................................................................................................. 4-20
Figure 14 – Ports 1 and 3 network enabled............................................................................ 6-2
Figure 15 – Ports 1 and 4 network enabled............................................................................ 6-3
Figure 16 - Device Installer ................................................................................................... 8-2
Figure 17 - Search Network Window .................................................................................... 8-3
Figure 18 - Devices in a Group.............................................................................................. 8-3
Figure 19 - Upgrade Firmware .............................................................................................. 8-4
Figure 20 - TFTP Dialog Box................................................................................................ 8-5
Figure 21 - Sample Setup Record in Intel Hex Format........................................................ 11-3
HV-ProNet
v
Contents
List of Tables
Table 1 – HV-ProNet Connector Pinouts ...............................................................................2-3
Table 2 – HV-ProNet Status LEDs ........................................................................................2-4
Table 3 - Technical Specs.......................................................................................................2-6
Table 4 - Standard IP Network Netmasks ............................................................................4-13
Table 5 - Netmask Examples................................................................................................4-14
Table 6 - Interface Mode Options ........................................................................................4-16
Table 7 - Common Interface Mode Settings ........................................................................4-16
Table 8 - Flow Control Options............................................................................................4-16
Table 9 - Connect Mode Options .........................................................................................4-18
Table 10 - Manual Connection Address Example................................................................4-19
Table 11 - Modem Mode Commands...................................................................................4-22
Table 12 - Disconnect Mode Options...................................................................................4-23
Table 13 - Flush Mode Options............................................................................................4-24
Table 14 - Pack Control Options ..........................................................................................4-25
Table 15 – Firmware Examples..............................................................................................8-1
Table 16 - Problems and Error Messages...............................................................................9-2
Table 17 - Monitor Mode Commands ..................................................................................10-1
Table 18 -Command Response Codes..................................................................................10-2
Table 19 - UDP Configuration .............................................................................................11-1
Table 20 - Block Types ........................................................................................................11-6
Table 21 - Setup Record Construction .................................................................................11-7
Table 22 - Channel Parameters.............................................................................................11-8
Table 23 - Interface Mode Options ......................................................................................11-9
Table 24 - Common Interface Mode Settings ......................................................................11-9
Table 25 - Baud Rate Settings ............................................................................................11-10
Table 26 - Flow Control Options........................................................................................11-10
Table 27 - Connect Mode Options .....................................................................................11-11
Table 28 - Disconnect Mode Options.................................................................................11-12
Table 29 - Flush Mode Options..........................................................................................11-13
Table 30 - Pack Control Options ........................................................................................11-13
Table 31 - Network Portion of IP Address .........................................................................11-14
Table 32 - Available IP Addresses .....................................................................................11-14
Table 33 - Standard IP Network Netmasks ........................................................................11-15
Table 34 - Netmask Examples............................................................................................11-16
Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table ..........................................................12-1
Table 36 - Connect Mode Options .......................................................................................12-2
Table 37 - Connect Mode Options for Modem Emulation...................................................12-4
vi
HV-ProNet
Contents
Table 38 - Disconnect Mode Options .................................................................................. 12-5
Table 39 - Flush Mode Options ........................................................................................... 12-7
Table 40 - Interface Mode Options .................................................................................... 12-13
Table 41 - Pack Control Options ....................................................................................... 12-14
HV-ProNet
vii
HV-ProNet
1. Introduction
This manual provides the information needed to use the Custom Automation Technologies
HV-ProNet product in conjunction with HomeVision-Pro.
1.1 Network Protocols
The HV-ProNet uses the IP protocol for network communications. The supported protocols
are ARP, UDP, TCP, ICMP, Telnet, TFTP, DHCP, HTTP, SNMP, AutoIP and BOOTP. For
connections to the serial port, TCP, UDP or Telnet protocols are used. Firmware updates can
be performed using TFTP.
The Internet Protocol (IP) defines addressing, routing, and data block handling over the
network. The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) assures that no data is lost or duplicated,
and that everything sent to the connection arrives correctly at the target.
For typical datagram applications in which devices interact with other devices without
maintaining a point-to-point connection, User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is used.
1.1.1 Packing Algorithms
Two selectable packing algorithms define how and when packets are sent to the network. The
standard algorithm is optimized for applications in which the HV-ProNet is used in a local
environment, allowing for small delays for characters while keeping the packet count low.
The alternate packing algorithm optimizes the timing sequence in which a packet will be
transmitted. Adjusting parameters in this mode can economize the network data stream.
1.1.2 Ethernet (MAC) Address
The Ethernet address is also referred to as the hardware address or the MAC address. The
first three bytes of the Ethernet Address are fixed (e.g., 00-20-4A), identifying the unit as a
Custom Automation Technologies product. The fourth, fifth, and sixth bytes are unique
numbers assigned to each HV-ProNet.
00-20-4A-62-01-18 or 00:20:4A:62:01:18
1.1.3 Internet Protocol (IP) Address
Every device connected to an IP network must have a unique IP address. This address is used
to reference the specific HV-ProNet. See IP Addresses on page 11-14 for more information
on IP Addressing.
HV-ProNet
1-1
HV-ProNet
1.1.4 Port Numbers
Every TCP connection and every UDP datagram is defined by a destination IP address and a
port number. For example, a Telnet application commonly uses port 23. A port number is
similar to an extension on a PBX system. See Port Number on page 4-16 for more
information.
1-2
HV-ProNet
HV-ProNet
2. HV-ProNet
The HV-ProNet integrates into the HomeVision-Pro quickly and easily. Interfacing is
accomplished via a ribbon cable that goes between HV-ProNet and the header on the bottom
of the HomeVision-Pro board. The header is located on the bottom of the HomeVision-Pro
board so that it will not interfere with the future HomeVision-Pro expansion board. If the
future expansion board (not yet available) is installed, the HV-ProNet will need to be
mounted in a new location.
The HV-ProNet requires 5 volts DC of regulated power with a maximum current draw of
200mA.
The HV-ProNet’s well-developed IP firmware supports protocols such as ARP, UDP, TCP,
Telnet, BOOTP, ICMP, SNMP, DHCP, TFTP, AutoIP, and HTTP, as well as other custom
protocols. The HV-ProNet also supports a variety of user-configurable options such as buffer
control and packetization, which make it easy to use in most applications.
2.1 Layout and Dimensions
The following drawing is a top view of the HV-ProNet.
O .130 3 places
.100
.330
.620
.100
.830
1.375
1.575
.724
.120
.095
Use this hole for chassis ground
.100
.050
.100
.739
.100
1.530
1.935
Figure 1 - HV-ProNet, Top View
HV-ProNet
2-1
HV-ProNet
The following drawing shows the connector end view of the board with the LEDs, RJ-45
connector, and reset button. The drawing on the right shows the dimensions for CON1 (DIL 2
x 6).
.200
.400
O .115
(Note 1)
.200
.068
.465
.170
.087
.065
.265
.360
.480
.625
.400
.150
.060
CONNECTOR END VIEW
1. This is the highest component on the board.
Figure 2 - HV-ProNet, Connector End View
2.2 Connectors
The HV-ProNet has four connectors: a 12-pin header (CON1), and a 10BASE-T RJ45
Connector (CON2). The CON3 connector is not used. The CON4 connector has 4 status
LEDs attached.
CON2
(RJ45)
CON1
(TTL)
12
11
4
3
2
1
8
7
CON3
2
1
CON4
(LEDs)
2
1
S1
Figure 3 - HV-ProNet Connectors
2-2
HV-ProNet
HV-ProNet
Refer to the following table for a listing of connector pinouts.
Table 1 – HV-ProNet Connector Pinouts
CON1
Serial Ports & Power
(DIL 2 x 6 Pins)
Pin
Signal
CON2
10BASE-T
(RJ45)
Pin
Signal
1
+5VDC
1
Tx+
2
GND
2
Tx3
RxA (input)
3
Rx+
4
TxA (output)
4
None
5
RTSA (output)
5
None
6
DTRA (output)
6
Rx7
CTSA (input)
7
None
8
DCDA (input)
8
None
9
Reserved
10
RESET (pull low to reset)
11
RxB (input)
12
TxB (output)
A = Port (Channel) 1 – used for port 1 on HomeVision-Pro
B = Port (Channel) 2 – used for port 3 or 4 on HomeVision-Pro
2.3 Ethernet Interface
1
8
1 - TX+
2 - TX3 - RX+
6 - RX-
Figure 4 - RJ-45 Ethernet Connector
HV-ProNet
2-3
HV-ProNet
2.4 Status LEDs
The HV-ProNet has four status LEDs: serial port (Channel) 1 status, serial port (Channel) 2
status, diagnostics, and network link status. See the following table for a complete description
of status LED pinout location and function.
Green
1
4
Green
Red
3
2
Yellow
Figure 5 - HV-ProNet Status LEDs
Table 2 – HV-ProNet Status LEDs
LED
Description
Location
LED Functions
1
Serial Port
(Channel) 1
Status
Serial Port
(Channel) 2
Status
Diagnostics
CON 4, Pin 4
Lights solid green to indicate Channel 1 is idle. Blinks green to
indicate Channel 1 is connected to the network and active.
CON 4, Pin 7
Lights solid yellow to indicate Channel 2 is idle. Blinks yellow to
indicate Channel 2 is connected to the network and active.
CON 4, Pin 3
Blinks or lights solid red in combination with the green (Channel
1) LED to indicate diagnostics and error detection.
2
3
Red solid, green (Channel 1) blinking:
1x: EPROM checksum error
2x: RAM error
3x: Network controller error
4x: EEPROM checksum error
5x: Duplicated IP address on the network*
6x: Software does not match hardware*
Red blinking, green (Channel 1) blinking:
4x: Faulty network connection*
5x: No DHCP response received*
4
Network Link
Status
*non-fatal error
2-4
CON 4, Pin 8
Lights solid green to indicate network port is connected to the
network.
HV-ProNet
HV-ProNet
2.5 Product Information Label
The HV-ProNet ships with a product information label. The product label contains
information about your specific unit, such as its bar code, serial number, product ID (name),
product description, and Ethernet address (also referred to as hardware address or MAC
address).
S/N:7401362
CO-E2-11AA
00-20-4A-62-05-52
Rev. D13
Made in China
HV-ProNet
Serial Number
Part Number
MAC ID
Revision
2-5
HV-ProNet
2.6 Technical Specifications
Table 3 - Technical Specs
Category
Description
Memory
Serial Flash
Serial Interface
128K RAM, 512 Bytes NVRAM
128K
2 TTL serial interfaces (Async). 5V-level signals. Through-hole
plated pins, DIL
Height: 1.575in (40.00 mm)
Width: 1.935in (49.15 mm) (See Drawing)
0.7 ounces
Operating range: 0° to +70° C (32 to 158° F)
Storage range: -40° to +85° C (-40 to 185° F)
ARP, UDP, TCP, Telnet, ICMP, SNMP, DHCP, TFTP, AutoIP, and
HTTP
RJ-45 10Base-T
300 bps to 115.2 Kbps
Characters: 7 or 8 data bits
Stop bits: 1 or 2
Parity: odd, even, none
DTR, DCD, CTS, RTS
XON/XOFF (software), XON/XOFF Pass Characters to Host
CTS/RTS (hardware, port 1 only)
None
HTTP
SNMP (read only)
Serial login
Telnet login
Flash ROM standard: downloadable from a TCP/IP host (TFTP) or
over serial port
Channel 1 (solid Green = idle, blink = active)
Channel 2 (solid Yellow = idle, blink = active)
Diagnostics (Red, in combination with Channel 1)
Network Link (Green)
Ethernet: Version 2.0/IEEE 802.3
5VDC (±5%) regulated @ 200mA
Board Dimensions
Weight
Temperature
Protocols Supported
Network Interface
Data Rates
Serial Line Formats
Modem Control
Flow Control
Management
System Software
LEDs
Compatibility
Power Requirements
2-6
HV-ProNet
Getting Started
3. Getting Started (Assign IP)
This chapter covers the required steps to get the HV-ProNet on-line and working (assign it an
IP address). There are two basic methods used to log into the HV-ProNet and setup the IP
address:
•
•
Network Port Login: Make a Telnet connection to the network port (9999).
Use the DeviceInstaller utility (recommended).
It is important to consider the following points before logging into and configuring the HVProNet:
•
•
•
The HV-ProNet IP address must be configured before a network connection is available.
Only one person at a time may be logged into the network port. This eliminates the
possibility of several people simultaneously attempting to configure the HV-ProNet.
Network port logins can be disabled. The system manager will not be able to access the unit.
This port can also be password protected.
3.1 Addresses and Port Number
The Ethernet address is also referred to as the hardware address or the MAC address. The
first three bytes of the Ethernet Address are fixed and read 00-20-4A, identifying the unit as a
Custom Automation Technologies product. The fourth, fifth, and sixth bytes are unique
numbers assigned to each unit.
00-20-4A-74-05-52 or 00:20:4A:74:05:52
Every device connected to an IP network must have a unique IP address. This address is used
to reference the specific unit.
Every TCP connection and every UDP datagram is defined by a destination IP address and a
port number. For example, a Telnet application commonly uses port number 23. A port
number is similar to an extension on a PBX system.
The unit's serial channel (port) can be associated with a specific TCP/UDP port number. Port
number 9999 is reserved for access to the unit's Setup (configuration) Mode window.
HV-ProNet
3-1
Getting Started
3.2 Physically Connecting the Unit
The following diagram shows a properly installed HV-ProNet.
Figure 6 – HV-ProNet Connected to HomeVision-Pro and Network
1. Connect the ribbon cable from the bottom of HV-ProNet to the header on the bottom of
the HomeVision-Pro board. The red tracer on the ribbon cable denotes pin 1. Pin 1 on
HV-ProNet is the pin closest to the 4 LEDs. Pin 1 on HomeVision-Pro is directly below
the HV-ProNet pin 1, which is the pin closest to the X-10 connector.
2. Connect an Ethernet cable to the RJ-45 Ethernet port.
3-2
HV-ProNet
Getting Started
3.3 Methods of Assigning the IP Address
The unit's IP address must be configured before a network connection is available. You have
the following options for assigning an IP to your unit:
Method
Description
DHCP
A DHCP server automatically assigns the IP address and network
settings. See DHCP on page 3-4.
You manually assign the IP address using a graphical user interface
(GUI) on a PC attached to the network.
See DeviceInstaller on page 3-5.
You manually assign the IP address and other network settings at a
command prompt using a UNIX or Windows-based system. Only one
person at a time can be logged into the configuration port (port 9999).
This eliminates the possibility of several people simultaneously
attempting to configure the unit. See ARP and Telnet on page 3-11.
This automatic method is appropriate when you have a small group of
hosts rather than a large network. This method allows the hosts to
negotiate with each other and assign addresses, in effect creating a
small network. See AutoIP on page 3-4.
DeviceInstaller
(Recommended)
ARP and Telnet
AutoIP
These methods above are described in the remaining sections of this chapter.
Note: In most installations, a fixed IP address is desirable. The systems administrator
generally provides the IP address. Obtain the following information before starting to set up
your unit:
IP Address:
___ ___ ___ ___
Subnet Mask: ___ ___ ___ ___
Gateway:
___ ___ ___ ___
HV-ProNet
3-3
Getting Started
3.3.1 DHCP
The unit ships with a default IP address of 0.0.0.0, which automatically enables DHCP.
Provided a DHCP server exists on the network, it will provide the unit with an IP address,
gateway address, and subnet mask when the unit boots up. The unit has acquired an IP
address if the red LED stops flashing and the green Status LED is on continuously. (If no
DHCP server exists, the unit responds with a diagnostic error: the red Diagnostic LED blinks
continuously, and the green Status LED blinks five times. This blinking only continues for
about 15 seconds.)
You can use the DeviceInstaller software to search the network for the IP your unit has been
assigned by the DHCP server and add it to the managed list. See Add the Unit to the Manage
List later in this chapter.
Note: This DHCP address will not appear in the unit’s standard configuration screens.
3.3.2 AutoIP
The unit ships with a default IP address of 0.0.0.0, which automatically enables AutoIP
within the unit. AutoIP is an alternative to DHCP that allows hosts to automatically obtain an
IP address in smaller networks that may not have a DHCP server. A range of IP addresses
(from 169.254.0.1 to 169.254.255.254) has been explicitly reserved for AutoIP-enabled
devices. The range of AutoIP addresses is not to be used over the Internet.
If your unit cannot find a DHCP server, and you have not manually assigned an IP address to
it, the unit automatically selects an address from the AutoIP reserved range. Then, your unit
sends out a (ARP) request to other nodes on the same network to see whether the selected
address is being used.
•
•
If the selected address is not in use, then the unit uses it for local subnet communication. 
If another device is using the selected IP address, the unit selects another address from the
AutoIP range and reboots itself. After reboot, the unit sends out another ARP request to see if
the selected address is in use, and so on.
AutoIP is not intended to replace DHCP. The unit will continue to look for a DHCP server on
the network. If a DHCP server is found, the unit will switch to the DHCP server-provided
address and reboot.
Note: If a DHCP server is found, but it denies the request for an IP address, the unit does not
attach to the network, but waits and retries.
AutoIP can be disabled by setting the unit’s IP address to 0.0.1.0. This setting enables DHCP
but disables AutoIP.
You can use the DeviceInstaller software to search the network for the IP your unit has been
assigned by AutoIP and add it to the managed list. See Add the Unit to the Manage List later
in this chapter.
3-4
HV-ProNet
Getting Started
3.4 DeviceInstaller
You can manually assign the IP address using the DeviceInstaller software, which is on the
product CD. If you did not receive a CD then it can be downloaded from
www.customautomationtech.com.
3.4.1 Install the DeviceInstaller
Run the DeviceInstaller.exe program in order to install the DeviceInstaller on to your PC.
3.4.2 Assign IP Address and Network Class
Click the Start button on the Task Bar and select Programs \Device Installer \Device
Installer. The Device Installer window displays.
Figure 7 - DeviceInstaller Window
The following steps require that the HomeVision-Pro has been powered up, the HV-ProNet
has been connected to the network, and the HV-ProNet LEDs indicate a successful startup
with no errors.
HV-ProNet
3-5
Getting Started
3. Click the SEARCH icon
. The Search Network window displays.
4. Select the proper class for your network, usually “Class C”, and click the START
SEARCH button to search the network for the HV-ProNet. The HV-ProNet should be
found and its IP address displayed in the window. The example below shows that a HVProNet was found that had been assigned an IP address of 169.254.172.119 by the
AutoIP feature.
3-6
HV-ProNet
Getting Started
5. Click the SAVE button and then the BACK button to return to the main DeviceInstaller
window. This window should now display the IP address, MAC address, and firmware
version of the HV-ProNet as shown below.
The remaining steps below are used to assign a fixed IP address to HV-ProNet. In most
cases this will be desired. If you want to have the HomeVision software connect to
HomeVision-Pro via a network connection to HV-ProNet then you MUST continue and
assign a fixed IP address.
HV-ProNet
3-7
Getting Started
6. Click the IP icon
. The Assign IP Address window displays.
Figure 8 - Assign IP Address Window
7. In the Enter the Hardware or Ethernet Address field, enter the Ethernet address (MAC
address), which is listed on the Product Information Label included with HV-ProNet.
This value should already be correct if the desired HV-ProNet device was selected in the
main DeviceInstaller window.
8. In the Enter IP Address to assign field, enter the unit’s IP address in
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX format. In this example, the IP address is being set to an Intranet
IP of 192.168.0.110.
9. In the PC Network Class section, select the class (subnet mask). (Most users select Class
C).
10. Click the Set IP Address button.
11. Confirm that the “Successful” message displays and click OK. In some cases a failure
message may be displayed even though the IP address was successfully changed. If this
happens, try again. Even if it never succeeds, continue on and use the PING feature to
verify the new IP address.
3-8
HV-ProNet
Getting Started
12. Click the Back button to return to the DeviceInstaller window. It should now display the
new IP address of the HV-ProNet.
Now you can manage (configure) the HV-ProNet unit so that it works with HomeVision-Pro
on the network.
The DeviceInstaller main window will list all compatible Custom Automation Technologies
network interfaces when the above procedure is performed for each device. Configuration of
each device is accomplished by selecting the device in the list and then performing the
desired operation.
HV-ProNet
3-9
Getting Started
3.4.3 Test the IP Address
1. Click the Ping icon
click the Ping icon.
. The Ping Device window displays. Enter the IP Address and
Figure 9 - Ping Device Window
2. Confirm that “Reply received” messages display in the window, indicating that the IP
address has been entered successfully.
Note: If you do not receive “Reply received” messages, make sure the unit is properly
attached to the network and that the IP address assigned is valid for the particular
network segment you are working with. If you are not sure, check with your systems
administrator.
3. Click the Back button to return to the Device Installer window.
The HV-ProNet is now able to communicate on your network. The next chapter will describe
how to configure HV-ProNet’s serial ports so that HomeVision-Pro can be accessed over the
network.
3-10
HV-ProNet
Getting Started
3.5 ARP and Telnet
If you have already configured the HV-ProNet IP address using the DeviceInstaller as
described in the previous sections, then you can skip this section and go on to chapter 4.
The unit’s IP address must be configured before a network connection is available. If the unit
has no IP address, you can use Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) method from UNIX and
Windows-based systems to assign a temporary IP address. If you want to initially configure
the unit through the network, follow these steps:
1. On a UNIX or Windows-based host, create an entry in the host's ARP table using the
intended IP address and the hardware address of the unit, which is found on the product
label on the bottom of the unit.
arp -s 191.12.3.77 00:20:4a:xx:xx:xx
Note: For the ARP command to work on Windows 95, the ARP table on the PC must have at
least one IP address defined other than its own.
2. If you are using Windows 95, type ARP -A at the DOS command prompt to verify that
there is at least one entry in the ARP table. If the local machine is the only entry, ping
another IP address on your network to build a new entry in the ARP table; the IP address
must be a host other than the machine on which you are working. Once there is at least
one additional entry in the ARP table, use the following command to ARP an IP address
to the unit:
arp -s 191.12.3.77 00-20-4a-xx-xx-xx
3. Open a Telnet connection to port 1. The connection will fail quickly, but the unit will
temporarily change its IP address to the one designated in this step.
telnet 191.12.3.77 1
4. Finally, open a Telnet connection to port 9999, and press Enter within three seconds to go
into Setup Mode. If you wait longer than three seconds, the unit will reboot.
telnet 191.12.3.77 9999
5. Set all required parameters
Note: The IP address you just set is temporary and will revert to the default value when the
unit 's power is reset unless you log into the unit and store the changes permanently. Refer to
the chapter on configuration for instructions on permanently configuring the IP address.
HV-ProNet
3-11
Configure
4. Configuration
You must configure the unit so that it can communicate on a network with your serial device.
For example, you must set the way the unit will respond to serial and network traffic, how it
will handle serial packets, and when to start or close a connection. You can configure your
unit locally or remotely using the following procedures:
•
•
Use a standard Web browser to access the unit’s internal Web pages and configure the unit
over the network. This is the easiest and preferred method.
Use a Telnet connection to configure the unit over the network.
The unit’s configuration is stored in nonvolatile memory (NVRAM) and is retained without
power. You can change the configuration at any time. The unit performs a reset after the
configuration has been changed and stored.
Note: The menus in this section show a typical device. Your device may have different
configuration options.
4.1 Configuring via Web Browser
Open your JAVA enabled web browser and enter the HV-ProNet IP address. The Custom
Automation Technologies Web Manager page will display. Go to the Web Manager Page for
a summary of the menu selections.
4.2 Using DeviceInstaller
DeviceInstaller is a powerful software utility for configuring a HV-ProNet from a network
connection. This section uses the utility to demonstrate the various methods of configuring
the device. The Device Management window is a common page for gaining access to
different menus.
Use the DeviceInstaller to locate the network device and automatically open a web page. If
the device you want to configure is already listed in the DeviceInstaller window then select it
and skip the following 3 steps.
. The Search
1. Start DeviceInstaller. Click the Search for network for devices icon
Network window displays.
2. Click the Start Search button. A list of all active units displays.
3. Click the Save button. Click OK for the confirmation message. Click the Back button.
HV-ProNet
4-1
Configure
4. Click the Manage device configuration icon
window.
to open the Device Management
Note: To assign Expert settings and Security settings, you must use the Setup Mode
window in a Telnet session.
•
To configure the unit via a Web browser, click the Web Configuration icon
. The
Custom Automation Technologies Web-Manager window displays in your browser. For Web
Configuration, see Web Manager Page on page 4-4
•
To configure the unit via a Telnet session, click the Telnet to Device icon
. The Setup
Mode window displays. For Telnet Configuration, see Using a Telnet Connection on page 411
5. For Web configuration, click the Web Configuration icon to start your browser. (A
small Web Configuration window appears, showing the IP address.)
Go to Web Manager Page on page 4-4 for a summary of the menu selections.
4-2
HV-ProNet
Configure
Note: If your unit already has an IP address (see Methods of Assigning the IP Address),
you can log into it using a standard Web browser that is Java enabled. Type the unit's IP
address into the Web browser's URL (Address/Location) field.
Note: The Get Configuration icon on the Device Management window allows you to save
a configuration locally on your computer as a file. The Set Configuration icon sends a
saved file to the unit.
To Get Configuration information see Get Configuration on page 4-29. To Set
Configuration of a specific device see Set Configuration on page 4-30.
6. For Telnet configuration, click the Telnet to Device icon. A small Telnet to Device
window appears, showing the IP Address and the Port address.
Go to Using a Telnet Connection on page 4-11 for a summary of the menu selections.
7. To Get device configuration information see Get Configuration on page 4-29.
Configuration information can be read from a device and saved in a file.
8. To Set the configuration of a specific device see Set Configuration on page 4-30.
A device can be configured by reading a configuration file and sending the information to
the device.
HV-ProNet
4-3
Configure
4.3 Web Manager Page
When the browser connects to the device, the Web Manager page displays.
Use the menu (pushbuttons on the left) to navigate to other sub pages where you can
configure additional server settings. See explanations of the configuration parameters later in
this chapter.
When you are finished, click the Update Settings button to save your settings.
Configuration for HomeVision software:
1. Click the Port Properties button
2. Click the Channel1 button
3. Make changes so that your Web Manager looks like the figure below. If your
HomeVision-Pro’s serial port #1 is not using the default speed of 19200, then set the
Speed value in the Web Manager to match what you are using.
The Local Port value should be between 14001 and 14009. The default value of
14001 will work in most cases. This port value must be 11000 more than the port
used on the PC by the Redirector software (discussed later). Thus, if you use 14001
here, then the Redirector software will need to be setup to use 3001. If port 3001 is
not available on your PC, then you will need to use a different port value here in the
range of 14001 to 14009, which will correspond to a port on your PC in the range of
3001 to 3009.
4. Click the Update Settings button to save your changes
4-4
HV-ProNet
Configure
Figure 10 – HV-ProNet Web-Manager settings
HV-ProNet
4-5
Configure
4.3.1 Unit Configuration
This page contains the Server Configuration and the Port Configuration settings. These are
static settings read from the device.
Note: The following screen shots represent the web page shown when the device is loaded
with Web Manager version 3.30.
4-6
HV-ProNet
Configure
4.3.2 Server Properties
You can change the server properties by editing any of the fields. Lingering over one of the
fields will display operator messages. Changing the IP address will require you to enter the
new IP address in the browser to reload the page.
Note: The IP Address will only be displayed if HV-ProNet is configured with a fixed IP.
Figure 11 - Server Properties Configuration on the Web Browser
Telnet Password
In the Telnet Password field, enter a password to prevent unauthorized access to the Setup
Mode via a Telnet connection to port 9999. The password is limited to 4 characters. (An
enhanced password setting of 16 characters is available under Security Settings on the Telnet
Setup Mode window.)
4.3.3 Port Properties
Serial Protocol: RS232, RS422/485 4-wire, RS485 2-wire
Speed: 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, 115200
Character Size: 8, 7
Parity: None, Even, Odd
Stop Bit: 1,2
Flow Control: None, XON/XOFF, XON/XOFF Pass Characters to Host, CTS/RTS
(Hardware)
HV-ProNet
4-7
Configure
UDP Datagram Mode: Enable, Disable
UDP Datagram Type: (User selectable)
Incoming Connection: Accept unconditional, Accept Incoming/DTR (Inactive), Never accept
incoming
Response: Nothing (quiet), Character response
Startup: No active startup, with any character, with active DTR (Inactive), with CR (0x0D)
only, Manual Connection, Autostart, Modem Mode
Remote IP Address: (user selectable)
Remote Port: (user selectable)
Local Port: 10001 (default 10001, user selectable)
4-8
HV-ProNet
Configure
On Active Connection: Enable, Disable
On Passive Connection: Enable, Disable
At Time of Disconnect: Enable, Disable
Packing Algorithm: Enable, Disable
Idle Time: Force transmit 12 ms, Force transmit 52 ms, Force Transmit 250 ms, Force
Transmit 5000 ms
Trailing Characters: None, One, Two
Send Immediate After Sendchars: Enable, Disable
Send Define2-Byte Sequence: Enable, Disable
Send Character 01: (User Selectable)
Send Character 02: (User Selectable)
HV-ProNet
4-9
Configure
Disconnect Mode: with DTR Drop, Ignore DTR
Check for CTRL-D to Disconnect: Enable, Disable
Port Password: Enable, Disable
Telnet Mode: Enable, Disable
Inactivity Timeout: Enable, Disable
Inactivity Timer: (User Selectable)
Port Password: (User Selectable. Port Password must be enabled)
4.3.4 Update Settings
Click the Update Settings button to send all changed settings to the device.
4-10
HV-ProNet
Configure
4.4 Configuring via the Setup Mode Window
4.4.1 Using a Telnet Connection
To configure the unit over the network, establish a Telnet connection to port 9999.
Note: If you use the Telnet to Device icon on the DeviceInstaller Device Management
window then skip steps 1and 2.
1. From the Windows Start menu, click Run and type the following command, where
x.x.x.x is the IP address and 9999 is the unit’s fixed network configuration port number.
telnet x.x.x.x 9999
(Example: telnet 192.168.100.123 9999)
Note: Be sure to include a space between the IP address and 9999.
2. Click OK.
3. The Custom Automation Technologies HV-ProNet window displays.
*** Universal Device Server ***
Serial Number 7401362 MAC address 00:20:62:63:05:52
Software version 04.5 (010322)
Press Enter to go into Setup Mode
4. To enter the Setup Mode, you must press Enter within 5 seconds. The configuration
settings will appear. See Figure 12 - Setup Mode Window.
5. Select an option on the menu by entering the number of the option in the Your choice ?
field and pressing Enter.
6. To enter a value for a parameter, type the value and press Enter, or to confirm a current
value, just press Enter.
7. When you are finished, save the new configurations (option 9). The unit will reboot.
HV-ProNet
4-11
Configure
*** basic parameters
Hardware: Ethernet Autodetect
IP addr 0.0.0.0/DHCP, no gateway set
***************** Security *****************
SNMP is
enabled
SNMP Community Name: public
Telnet Setup is
enabled
TFPT Download is
enabled
Port 77Feh is
enabled
Web Server is
enabled
Enhanced Password is disabled
***************** Channel 1 *****************
Baudrate 9600, I/F Mode 4C, Flow 00
Port 10001
Remote IP Adr: --- none ---, Port 00000
Connect Mode : C0 Disconn Mode: 00
Flush
Mode :00
***************** Channel 2 *****************
Baudrate 9600, I/F Mode 4C, Flow 00
Port 10002
Remote IP Adr: --- none ---, Port 00000
Connect Mode : C0 Disconn Mode: 00
Flush
Mode :00
***************** Expert *****************
TCP Keepalive :45s
Change Setup
:0
1
2
5
6
7
8
9
Server configuration
Channel 1 configuration
Channel 2 configuration
Expert settings
Security
Factory defaults
Exit without save
Save and exit
Your choice ?
Figure 12 - Setup Mode Window
4-12
HV-ProNet
Configure
4.5 Server Configuration (Network Configuration)
These are the unit’s basic network parameters. The following parameters are displayed when
you select Server configuration.
IP Address : (000) .(000) .(000) .(000)
Set Gateway IP Address (N)
Netmask: Number of Bits for Host Part (0=default)
Change telnet config password (N)
(00)
4.5.1 IP Address
The IP address must be set to a unique value in your network. See IP Addresses on page 1114 for more information about IP addressing.
4.5.2 Set Gateway IP Address
The gateway address, or router, allows communication to other LAN segments. The gateway
address should be the IP address of the router connected to the same LAN segment as the
unit. The gateway address must be within the local network.
4.5.3 Netmask: Number of Bits for Host Part
A netmask defines the number of bits taken from the IP address that are assigned for the host
section.
Note: Class A: 24 bits; Class B: 16 bits; Class C: 8 bits.
The unit prompts for the number of host bits to be entered, then calculates the netmask, which
is displayed in standard decimal-dot notation when the saved parameters are displayed (for
example, 255.255.255.0).
Table 4 - Standard IP Network Netmasks
Network Class
Host Bits
Netmask
A
24
255.0.0.0
B
16
255.255.0.0
C
8
255.255.255.0
HV-ProNet
4-13
Configure
Table 5 - Netmask Examples
Netmask
Host Bits
255.255.255.252
2
255.255.255.248
3
255.255.255.240
4
255.255.255.224
5
255.255.255.192
6
255.255.255.128
7
255.255.255.0
8
255.255.254.0
9
255.255.252.0
10
255.255.248.0
11
...
...
255.128.0.0
23
255.0.0.0
24
4.5.4 Change Telnet configuration password
Setting the Telnet configuration password prevents unauthorized access of the setup menu via
a Telnet connection to port 9999 or via Web pages. The password is limited to 4 characters.
An enhanced password setting of 16 characters is available under Security Settings for Telnet
access only.
4.5.5 DHCP Naming
A DHCP name is a unique identifier used for managing multiple DHCP hosts on a network.
Your unit ships with a default DHCP name of Cxxxxxx, where xxxxxx are the last six digits
of the Mac address.
You can change the DHCP name (up to eight characters) when configuring the server on the
Setup Mode window. Change the DHCP name to LTXdd, where 0.0.0.dd is the IP address
assigned (dd should be a number between 1 and 99). For example, if the IP address is set to
0.0.0.5, the resulting DHCP name is LTX05. DHCP gives the unit a DHCP address when a
LTX05 name is given.
4-14
HV-ProNet
Configure
If you give the unit an IP of 0.0.0.0, you then have the option to assign an 8-character DHCP
name.
Change DHCP device name (not set) ? (N) Y
Enter new DHCP device name : LTRXYES
4.6 Channel 1 Configuration (Serial Port Parameters)
Using this option, define how the serial port will respond to network and serial
communications.
Baudrate (9600)
I/F Mode (4C)
Flow (00)
Port No (10001)
ConnectMode (C0)
Remote IP Address : (000).(000).(000).(000)
Remote Port (00000)
DisConnMode (00)
FlushMode
(00)
DisConnTime (00:00) :
SendChar 1 (00)
SendChar 2 (00)
4.6.1 Baudrate
The unit and attached serial device, such as a modem, must agree on a speed or baud rate to
use for the serial connection. Valid baud rates are 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 (default),
19200, 38400, 57600, and 115200 bits per second.
4.6.2 I/F (Interface) Mode
The Interface (I/F) Mode is a bit-coded byte that you enter in hexadecimal notation.
Note: If you do not want to convert the binary numbers to hexadecimals yourself, look up the
values in Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table in the Binary to Hexadecimal
chapter.
HV-ProNet
4-15
Configure
Table 6 - Interface Mode Options
I/F Mode Option
RS-232C
RS-422/485
RS-485 2-wire
7 Bit
8 Bit
No Parity
Even Parity
Odd Parity
1 Stop bit
2 Stop bit
7
6
5
4
3
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
The following table demonstrates how to build some common Interface Mode settings:
Table 7 - Common Interface Mode Settings
Common I/F Mode Setting
Binary
Hex
RS-232C, 8-bit, No Parity, 1 stop bit
RS-232C, 7-bit, Even Parity, 1 stop bit
RS-485 2-Wire, 8-bit, No Parity, 1 stop bit
RS-422, 8-bit, Odd Parity, 1 stop bit
0100 1100
0111 1000
0100 1111
0101 1101
4C
78
4F
5D
4.6.3 Flow
Flow control sets the local handshake method for stopping serial input/output.
Table 8 - Flow Control Options
Flow Control Option
Hex
No flow control
XON/XOFF flow control
Hardware handshake with RTS/CTS lines
XON/XOFF pass characters to host
00
01
02
05
4.6.4 Port Number
The setting represents the source port number in TCP connections, and is the number used to
identify the channel for remote initiating connections. Default setting for Port 1 is 10001.
Range: 0-65535 except for the following reserved port numbers:
4-16
HV-ProNet
Configure
Port Numbers
Reserved for
14000-14009
9999
77FE (Hex)
7
80
Redirector
Telnet setup
Configuration
Echo
Web server
The port number functions as the TCP/UDP source port number for outgoing packets.
Packets sent to the unit with this port number are received to this channel. The port number
selected is the Incoming TCP/UDP port and Outgoing TCP/UDP source port. Port 0 is used
when you want the outgoing source port to change with each connection.
HV-ProNet
4-17
Configure
4.6.5 Connect Mode
Connect Mode defines how the unit makes a connection, and how it reacts to incoming
connections over the network. Enter Connect Mode options in hexadecimal notation.
Note: See Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table.
Table 9 - Connect Mode Options
Connect Mode Option
7
6
5
Incoming Connection
Never accept incoming
Accept incoming with DTR
Accept unconditional
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
Response
Nothing (quiet)
Character response (C=conn,
D=disconn, N=unreachable)
Startup
No active startup
With any character
With active DTR
With CR (0x0D) only
Manual connection
Autostart
Hostlist
4
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
Datagram Type
Directed UDP
Modem Mode
Full Verbose
Without Echo
1-character Response
3
1
0
1
Manual Connection: When you use manual connection, you are not required to enter the
entire IP address if the IP is already configured as the remote IP address in the unit. For
example, if the remote IP address already configured in the unit is 129.1.2.3, then an example
command string would be C3/7. (This would connect to 129.1.2.3 and port 7.) You may also
use a different ending for the connection string. For example, C50.1/23 would connect you to
129.1.50.1 and port 23.
4-18
HV-ProNet
Configure
Table 10 - Manual Connection Address Example
Command String
Result if remote IP is 129.1.2.3 and remote port is 1234
C121.2.4.5/1
C5
C28.10/12
Complete override; connection is started with host 121.2.4.5, port 1
Connect to 129.1.2.5, port 1234
Connect to 129.1.28.10, port 12
Autostart (Automatic Connection): If autostart is enabled, the unit automatically connects
to the remote IP address and remote port specified.
Datagram Type: When selecting this option, you will be prompted for the Datagram type.
Enter 01 for directed or broadcast UDP.
HV-ProNet
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Configure
Hostlist: If you enable this option, the Custom Automation Technologies unit scrolls through
the hostlist until it connects to a device listed in the hostlist table. Once it connects, the unit
stops trying to connect to any others. If this connection fails, the unit continues to scroll
through the table until it is able to connect to another IP in the hostlist.
Change Setup
:0
1
2
5
6
7
8
9
Baudrate (9600)
I/F Mode (4C)
Flow (00)
Port No (10001)
ConnectMode (21)
Hostlist
01. IP :
02. IP :
03. IP :
Server configuration
Channel 1 configuration
Channel 2 configuration
Expert settings
Security
Factory defaults
Exit without save
Save and exit
:
010.010.010.001
010.010.010.002
010.010.010.003
Change Hostlist ? (N)
Hostlist Retrycounter
Hostlist Retrytimeout
DisConnMode (00)
FlushMode
(00)
DisConnTime (00:00) :
SendChar 1 (00)
SendChar 2 (00)
Your choice ?
Port : 00023
Port : 00023
Port : 00023
(3)
(250)
Figure 13 - Hostlist Option
4-20
HV-ProNet
Configure
To use the Hostlist option, follow these steps:
1. To enable the hostlist, enter a Connect Mode of 0x20 (2X). The menu shows you a list of
current entries already defined in the product.
2. To delete, modify, or add an entry, select Yes. If you enter an IP address of 0.0.0.0, that
entry and all others after it are deleted.
3. After completing the hostlist, repeat the previous step if necessary to edit the hostlist
again.
4. For Retrycounter, enter the number of times the Custom Automation Technologies unit
should try to make a good network connection to a hostlist entry that it has successfully
ARPed.
5. For Retrytimeout, enter the number of seconds the unit should wait before failing an
attempted connection.
Modem (Emulation) Mode: In Modem Mode, the unit presents a modem interface to the
attached serial device. It accepts AT-style modem commands, and handles the modem signals
correctly.
Normally there is a modem connected to a local PC and a modem connected to a remote
machine. A user must dial from the local PC to the remote machine, accumulating phone
charges for each connection. Modem Mode allows you to replace modems with HV-ProNets,
and to use an Ethernet connection instead of a phone call, without having to change
communications applications and make potentially expensive phone calls.
To select Modem Mode, set the Connect Mode to C6 (no echo), D6 (echo with full verbose),
or D7 (echo with 1-character response).
Note: If the unit is in Modem Mode and the serial port is idle, the unit can still accept
network TCP connections to the serial port if Connect Mode is set to C6 (no echo), D6 (echo
with full verbose), or D7 (echo with 1-character response).
In Modem Mode, echo refers to the echo of all of the characters entered in command mode; it
does not mean to echo data that is transferred. Quiet Mode (no echo) refers to the modem not
sending an answer to the commands received (or displaying what was typed).
HV-ProNet
4-21
Configure
To disconnect a connection using Modem Mode commands:
•
•
•
•
•
There must be 1-second guardtime (no data traffic) before sending +++. 
There must not be a break longer that 1 second between +s.
There must be another 1-second guardtime after the last + is sent.
The unit acknowledges with an OK to indicate that it is in command mode.
Enter ATH and press Enter. It is echoed if echo is enabled. ATH is acknowledged by
another OK.
Table 11 - Modem Mode Commands
Modem Mode
Command
Function
ATDTx.x.x.x,pppp or
ATDTx.x.x.x/pppp
Makes a connection to an IP address (x.x.x.x) and a remote port
number (pppp).
Makes a connection to an IP address (x.x.x.x) and the remote port
number defined within the unit.
Forces the unit into monitor mode if a remote IP address and port
number are defined within the unit.
Forces the unit into monitor mode if a remote IP address and port
number are not defined within the unit.
Makes a connection to an IP address (x.x.x.x) and the remote port
number defined within the unit.
Hangs up the connection (Entered as +++ATH ).
Makes a connection to an IP address (x.x.x.x) and a remote port
number (pppp).
Enables or disables connections from the network going to the serial
port.
n=0 disables the ability to make a connection from the network to
the serial port.
n=1-9 enables the ability to make a connection from the network
to the serial port.
n>1-9 is invalid.
Enables or disables character echo and responses.
n=0 disables character echo and responses.
n=1 enables character echo and responses.
Enables 1-character response or full verbose.
n=0 enables 1-character response.
n=1 enables full verbose.
ATDTx.x.x.x
ATD0.0.0.0
ATD
ATDx.x.x.x
ATH
ATDTx.x.x.x,pppp or
ATDTx.x.x.x/pppp
ATS0=n
ATEn
ATVn
Note: These AT commands are only recognized as single commands like ATE0 or ATV1;
compound commands such as ATE0V1 are not recognized. All other AT commands with
Modem Mode set to full verbose acknowledge with an OK, but no action is taken.
4-22
HV-ProNet
Configure
4.6.6 Remote IP Address
This is the destination IP address used with an outgoing connection.
4.6.7 Remote Port
The remote TCP port number must be set for the unit to make outgoing connections. This
parameter defines the port number on the target host to which a connection is attempted.
Note: To connect an ASCII terminal to a host using the unit for login purposes, use the
remote port number 23 (Internet standard port number for Telnet services).
4.6.8 DisConnMode
In DisConnMode (Disconnect Mode), DTR drop either drops the connection or is
ignored.
Note: If you do not want to convert the binary numbers to hexadecimals yourself, look up the
values in Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table in the Binary to Hexadecimal
chapter.
Table 12 - Disconnect Mode Options
Disconnect Mode Option
7
Disconnect with DTR drop
Ignore DTR
Telnet mode and terminal
type setup (1)
Channel (port) password (2)
1
0
6
5
3
2
1
0
1
1
(3)
Hard disconnect
Disable hard disconnect
State LED off with connection
0
1
1
(4)
Disconnect with EOT (^D) (5)
4
1
1. The HV-ProNet will send the "Terminal Type" upon an outgoing connection.
2. A password is required for a connection to the serial port from the network.
3. The TCP connection will close even if the remote site does not acknowledge the disconnection.
4. When there is a network connection to or from the serial port, the state LED will turn off instead of blink.
5. When Ctrl D or Hex 04 are detected, the connection is dropped. Both Telnet mode and Disconnect with EOT must be enabled
for Disconnect with EOT to function properly. Ctrl D will only be detected going from the serial port to the network.
4.6.9 Flush Mode (Buffer Flushing)
Using this parameter, you can control line handling and network buffers with connection
startup and disconnect. You can also select between two different packing algorithms.
Note: See Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table.
HV-ProNet
4-23
Configure
Table 13 - Flush Mode Options
Function
7
6
5
4
3
2
Input Buffer (Serial to Network)
Clear with active
1
connection (from
serial)
Clear with passive
connection (from
1
network)
Clear with
1
disconnect
Output Buffer (Network to Serial)
Clear with active
connection (from
serial)
Clear with passive
connection (from
network)
Clear with
1
disconnect
Alternate Packing Algorithm (Pack Control)
Enable
1
4-24
1
0
1
1
HV-ProNet
Configure
4.6.10 Pack Control
Two firmware-selectable packing algorithms define how and when packets are sent to the
network. The standard algorithm is optimized for applications in which the unit is used in a
local environment, allowing for very small delays for single characters while keeping the
packet count low. The alternate packing algorithm minimizes the packet count on the network
and is especially useful in applications in a routed Wide Area Network (WAN). Adjusting
parameters in this mode can economize the network data stream.
Pack control settings are enabled in Flush Mode. Set this value to 00 if specific functions are
not needed.
Note: See Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table.
Table 14 - Pack Control Options
Option
Idle Time
Force transmit: 12ms
Force transmit: 52ms
Force transmit: 250ms
Force transmit: 5sec
Trailing Characters
None
One
Two
Send Characters
2-Byte Send Character
Sequence
Send Immediately After
Send chars
7
6
5
4
3
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
Idle Time: Idle time to "Force transmit" defines how long the unit should wait before
sending accumulated characters. This wait period is between characters. If there is an idle
period between characters equal to the force transmit set, then the device will package up the
serial data currently in the buffer and send it to the network.
Trailing Characters: In some applications, CRC, Checksum, or other trailing characters
follow the end-of-sequence character; this option helps to adapt frame transmission to the
frame boundary.
HV-ProNet
4-25
Configure
Send Characters: If 2-Byte Send Character Sequence is enabled, the unit interprets the
sendchars as a 2-byte sequence; if not set, they are interpreted independently.
If Send Immediately After Characters is not set, any characters already in the serial buffer
are included in the transmission after a "transmit" condition is found. If set, the unit sends
immediately after recognizing the transmit condition (sendchar or timeout).
Note: A transmission might occur if status information needs to be exchanged or an
acknowledgment needs to be sent.
4.6.11 DisConnTime (Inactivity Timeout)
Use this parameter to set an inactivity timeout. The connection is dropped if there is no
activity on the serial line before the set time expires. Enter time in the following format:
mm:ss, where m is the number of minutes and s is the number of seconds. To disable the
inactivity timeout, enter 00:00.
4.6.12 Send Characters
You can enter up to two characters in hexadecimal representation in the parameters
"sendchar." If a character received on the serial line matches one of these characters, it is sent
immediately, along with any awaiting characters, to the TCP connection. This minimizes the
response time for specific protocol characters on the serial line (for example, ETX, EOT,
etc.). Setting the first sendchar to 00 disables the recognition of the characters. Alternatively,
the two characters can be interpreted as a sequence (see Pack Control on page 4-25).
4.6.13 Telnet Terminal Type
This parameter appears only if the terminal type option is enabled in Disconnect Mode (see
DisConnMode on page 4-23 above). If this option is enabled, you can use the terminal name
for the Telnet terminal type. Enter only one name.
If the terminal type option is enabled, the unit also reacts to the EOR (end of record) and
binary options, which can be used for applications like terminal emulation to IBM hosts.
4.6.14 Channel (Port) Password
This parameter appears only if the channel (port) password option is enabled in Disconnect
Mode (see DisConnMode on page 4-23). If set, you can set a password on the serial port.
4-26
HV-ProNet
Configure
4.7 Expert Settings
Note: You can change these settings via a Telnet connection only, not on the Web-Manager.
Note: These parameters should only be changed if you are an expert.
These parameters should only be changed if you are an expert
and definitely know the consequences the changes might have.
TCP Keepalive time in s (1s – 65s; 0s=disable): (0)
4.7.1 TCP Keepalive time in s
This option allows you to change how many seconds the unit will wait during a silent
connection before attempting to see if the currently connected network device is still on the
network. If the unit then gets no response, it will drop that connection.
4.7.2 ARP Cache timeout in s
Whenever the unit communicates with another device on the network, it will add an entry
into its ARP table. The ARP Cache timeout option allows you to define how many seconds
(1-600) the unit will wait before timing out this table.
Note: This option may not be available in some versions.
4.8 Security Settings
Note: You can change these settings via a Telnet connection only, not on the Web-Manager.
We recommend that you set security over the dedicated network. If you set parameters over
the network (Telnet 9999), someone else could capture these settings.
Disable SNMP (N)
SNMP Community Name (public):
Disable Telnet Setup (N)
Disable TFTP Firmware Update (N)
Disable Port 77FEh (N)
Disable Web Server (N)
Enable Enhanced Password (N)
4.8.1 Disable SNMP
This setting allows you to disable the SNMP protocol on the unit for security reasons.
4.8.2 SNMP Community Name
This option allows you to change the SNMP Community Name on the unit. This allows for
ease of management, and possibly some security. If someone tries to violate security but
HV-ProNet
4-27
Configure
doesn’t know what community to connect to, that person will be unable to get the SNMP
community information from the unit.
4.8.3 Disable Telnet Setup
This setting defaults to the N (No) option. The Y (Yes) option disables access to this
Configuration Menu by Telnet (port 9999). It only allows access via the Web pages and the
serial port of the unit.
4.8.4 Disable TFTP Firmware Upgrade
This setting defaults to the N (No) option. The Y (Yes) option disables the use of TFTP to
perform network firmware upgrades. With this option, firmware upgrades can be performed
only by using a *.hex file over the serial port of the unit.
4.8.5 Disable Port 77FE (Hex)
Port 77FE is a setting that allows DeviceInstaller, Web Pages, and custom programs to
configure the unit remotely. You may wish to disable this capability for security purposes.
The default setting is the N (No) option, which enables remote configuration. You can
configure the unit by using DeviceInstaller, Web pages, Telnet, or serial configuration. The Y
(Yes) option disables remote configuration and Web pages.
4.8.6 Disable Web Setup
This setting defaults to the N (option). The Y (Yes) option disables the use of the Web Page
Configuration tool that is built into the unit.
4.8.7 Enable Encryption
Currently, the encryption feature is not supported. It may be supported in a future release of
HV-ProNet.
4.8.8 Enable Enhanced Password
This setting defaults to the N (option), which allows you to set a 4-character password that
protects the Configuration Menu via Telnet and Web pages. The Y (Yes) option allows you
to set an extended security password of 16-characters for protecting Telnet access.
4-28
HV-ProNet
Configure
4.9 Factory Defaults
Select 7 to reset the unit’s Channel 1, Channel 2, Expert Settings, and Enhanced Security to
the factory default settings. The server configurations (IP address information) remain
unchanged.
4.10 Exit Configuration Mode
Select 8 to exit the configuration mode without saving any changes or rebooting. Select 9 to
save all changes and reboot the device. All values are stored in nonvolatile memory.
4.11 Get Configuration
The device configuration information is stored in flash memory and can be read and saved in
a configuration file (filename.cfg). To get the configuration information, click the Get
Configuration icon button on the Device Management window. The following dialog appears.
The Device IP Address is shown in the first field. This is the device selected in the
DeviceInstaller main window. In the Configuration File field, click the Open File button to
select a filename for the configuration file. Click the Get button and the file information is
read from the device and saved in the selected file.
HV-ProNet
4-29
Configure
4.12 Set Configuration
Device configuration information can be saved in a file and later used to set the configuration
of one or several devices. To set the configuration of a device from a saved file, click the Set
Configuration button on the Device Management window. The following dialog appears.
The Device IP Address is shown in the first field. This is the device selected in the
DeviceInstaller main window. In the Configuration File field, click the Open File button to
select a configuration file. Click the Set button and the file information is read and stored in
the device.
4-30
HV-ProNet
Redirector
5. Redirector
Custom Automation Technologies has licensed the use of the Lantronix Redirector software,
a Windows based COM port redirector software utility. Its function is to redirect customer
application data destined for a local serial (COM) port to the PC’s network port. Rather than
going out the local port, the data is transmitted across the Ethernet network port using the
TCP/IP protocol.
An HV-ProNet attached to the network receives the data and presents it on its serial port.
Conversely, data into the serial port of the HV-ProNet is sent back over the network to the
Redirector. The Redirector then presents the data to the HomeVision software as if it were
from a local serial COM port.
Application
(hv software)
Serial Data
Redirector
Local
Serial
(COM)
Port
Ethernet Network
HV-ProNet
Serial Data
to/from
HV-Pro
PC
Using simple on-screen menus, users can map up to 64 COM ports directly to IP addresses
assigned to HV-ProNets. Once COM ports are mapped, any networked PC with Redirector
software installed can access devices on the network via Custom Automation Technologies’
HV-ProNets. Both the software application and the serial device operate normally as if they
were still directly connected - the HV-ProNet and the Redirector utility do all the work in
between to keep data flowing smoothly.
5.1 Installing Redirector
The Redirector software is included on the product CD. If you did not receive a CD then it
can be downloaded from www.customautomationtech.com.
5.1.1 Install Redirector
Run the “red32bit-211.exe” program in order to install the Redirector on to your PC. The
filename may be slightly different if installing a newer version than 2.1/1.
HV-ProNet
5-1
Redirector
5.1.2 Setup
1. Click the Start button on the Task Bar and select Programs \Lantronix
Redirector\Configuration. The Redirector window displays.
2. Click on the “Com Setup” button. The Port Setup window displays. Enable the port(s)
you want redirected to the network. The enabled ports DO NOT have to physically exist
on the PC. Typically, ports that do not exist would be chosen. In this example, the PC
has 2 serial ports, COM 1 and COM 2, but COM 5 is configured for redirection. This
allows the HomeVision software (or any other HomeVision compatible software) to use
COM 1 and a serial cable directly connected to HomeVision-Pro, or COM 5 to connect
via the network.
5-2
HV-ProNet
Redirector
3. Click OK to close the Port Setup window.
4. Select COM5 in the dropdown list in the Port Configuration section of the Redirector
main window.
5. Click the “Add IP” button. The IP Service Setup window displays. Enter the IP address
of the HV-ProNet into the “Host” field. Enter the HV-ProNet port number MINUS
11,000. The HV-ProNet port number was configured in the Web Manager’s “Local Port”
field. The default value in HV-ProNet is 14001. If you used 14001 for HV-ProNet, then
enter 3001 for the TCPPort value here.
If port 3001 is in use on your PC then you will need to choose another port in the range of
3001 to 3009. You will then need to change the Web Manager setting to a value 11,000
MORE than what you set here.
6. Click OK to close the IP Service Setup window. The Redirector window should now
display COM5 being redirected to the HV-ProNet IP address. The port number here
MUST be 11,000 less than the port configured in the HV-ProNet Web Manager.
HV-ProNet
5-3
Redirector
7. Click the “Save” button.
Note: You will be required to reboot your system when enabling COM ports. You may
want to set them all up at one time and then reboot. This may be required, for example, if
you have multiple HomeVision-Pro units, each with their own HV-ProNet network
interface, or if you will be network enabling port 3 or port 4 on the HomeVision-Pro.
8. Leave the “Silent Mode” option disabled for now. With this option disabled, the
Redirector will display a popup status window when connecting and disconnecting to a
serial port. This is useful when first starting. Once everything is working, this option can
be enabled if you no longer want to see the popup status window.
9. Click the “Advanced” button for advanced configuration. No changes should be required
here. Below is a picture of what the default settings should be.
10. Click OK to close the Advanced Settings window.
11. Click the “Port Settings” button to display the Port Settings window. No changes should
be required here. Below is a picture of what the default settings should be.
12. Click OK to close the Port Settings window.
5-4
HV-ProNet
Redirector
13. Click the “Close” button to complete the setup. You will be asked to reboot the PC,
which is required in order for the configured serial ports to be redirected to the network.
No other setup is required. In the above example, all data sent to COM5 will be sent across
the network to the HV-ProNet at “192.168.0.110”, port “14001”.
5.2 Uninstalling Redirector
The recommended steps to uninstall Redirector are:
1. Open Redirector and disable port redirection for all ports
2. Restart the PC
3. Uninstall Redirector
HV-ProNet
5-5
Troubleshooting
6. Jumper Settings
The last step in getting your HomeVision-Pro on the network is to route its port 1 TX and RX
signals to HV-ProNet instead of the DB9 connector on the HomeVision-Pro.
Note: Before moving the jumpers from their default locations, ensure proper operation of
HomeVision-Pro’s serial port #1 and the HomeVision-Pro software by using a serial cable
between your PC and HomeVision-Pro. Once you have verified that this “standard”
configuration works properly, then you can change the jumpers and enable HV-ProNet.
The H4 header labeled “Serial Configuration” on the HomeVision-Pro board is used to route
the HomeVision-Pro serial signals to their desired locations. Refer to the HomeVision-Pro
manual for proper jumper settings when using the on-board RS-232, RS-485, and USB ports.
If a jumper is already in place on a specified pin, it will need to be removed.
Note: Remove power to the HomeVision-Pro board before making any jumper changes.
6.1 Serial Port #1
The jumper settings are different depending on the revision of your HomeVision-Pro board.
Please check the revision before proceeding.
6.1.1 No revision number
Install jumpers from pins:
o
o
2 to 4 (use the supplied yellow jumper wire)
1 to 20
6.1.2 Revision “A” and later
Install jumpers from pins:
o
o
HV-ProNet
3 to 4
1 to 20
6-1
Troubleshooting
6.2 Serial Port #3
Connect the 2 wires from the HV-ProNet ribbon cable as follows:
o
o
HV-ProNet pin 12 wire (white tracer) to Serial Config Header pin 6
HV-ProNet pin 11 wire to Serial Config Header pin 18
Each of these wires is also labeled as to which Serial Configuration header pin it needs to go
to depending on whether you are network enabling port 3 or port 4.
Figure 14 – Ports 1 and 3 network enabled
6.3 Serial Port #4
Connect the 2 wires from the HV-ProNet ribbon cable as follows:
o
o
HV-ProNet pin 12 wire (white tracer) to Serial Config Header pin 13
HV-ProNet pin 11 wire to Serial Config Header pin 12
Each of these wires is also labeled as to which Serial Configuration header pin it needs to go
to depending on whether you are network enabling port 3 or port 4.
6-2
HV-ProNet
Troubleshooting
Figure 15 – Ports 1 and 4 network enabled
HV-ProNet
6-3
Troubleshooting
7. Making the Connection
Once the HV-ProNet has been assigned an IP address, had its serial port(s) configured, and
the Redirector software has been installed and configured on the PC, you are ready to run the
HomeVision software and have it connect to the HomeVision-Pro via the network.
Start the HomeVision-Pro software. Select Configure/Serial Interface from the menu and set
the Comm port to 5 (or whatever comm port you configured in Redirector). Make sure the
Baud rate setting matches what you configured in the HV-ProNet. The default is 19200.
Click OK to close the Serial Port Configuration window. A popup window should appear
indicating that Redirector is connecting to the HV-ProNet. when the popup window goes
away you should be able to use the HomeVision software just as if it was connected via a
serial cable.
HV-ProNet
7-1
Troubleshooting
8. Updating Firmware
8.1 Obtaining Firmware
You can obtain the most up-to-date firmware and release notes for the unit from the Custom
Automation Technologies, Inc. web site (www.customautomationtechnologies.com).
8.2 Reloading Firmware
There are several ways to update the unit's internal operational code (*.ROM or *.HEX): via
Device Installer (the preferred way), via TFTP, or via another unit. You can also update the
unit's internal Web Manager interface (*.COB) via TFTP or Device Installer.
Table 15 – Firmware Examples
Folder Name
HV-ProNet
HV-ProNet
ROM File
ltx45.rom
COB
cbxw330.cob
8-1
Troubleshooting
8.2.1 Via Device Installer
After downloading the firmware to your computer, you can use DeviceInstaller to install it. If
you haven’t already installed DeviceInstaller then do so at this time.
1. Download the updated firmware files from www.customautomationtechnologies.com or
and store them in a subfolder on your computer.
2. Click the Start button on the Task Bar and select Programs\DeviceInstaller\Device
Installer. The Device Installer window displays. If the device you want to configure
appears in the list, then go to step 8.
Figure 16 - Device Installer
8-2
HV-ProNet
Troubleshooting
3. Click the Search the network for devices icon
displays.
. The Search Network window
Figure 17 - Search Network Window
4.
5.
6.
7.
Click the Start Search button. A list of all active units on the local network displays.
Click the Save button. A confirmation message displays.
Click OK.
Click the Back button to return to the Device Installer window. The Device Installer
window now lists all of the devices in the group, including the unit you are updating.
Figure 18 - Devices in a Group
HV-ProNet
8-3
Troubleshooting
8. Select the desired unit and click the Upgrade Firmware file (.ROM) icon
Upgrade Firmware window displays.
. The
Figure 19 - Upgrade Firmware
9. In the Existing Firmware list box, select the new firmware type to be upgraded. This
selection must match the Firmware file type or an error message will be displayed.
10. In the Source FW File field, locate the firmware file from the software CD or the file
you downloaded from the Custom Automation Technologies web site.
11. Click the Update FW File button. Upgrade status process messages display in the lower
part of the window. When the process is complete, the “File upgrade successful” message
displays.
12. Click OK.
Note: You can update the unit’s Web pages by clicking the Upgrade Web files (.COB) icon.
Though it would be rare to need to update both the firmware and Web pages at the same
time, you can do so by clicking the Update the firmware files and Webpages in one step
icon.
8.2.2 Via TFTP
To download new firmware from a computer:
1. Use a TFTP client to send a binary file to the unit (*.ROM to upgrade the unit 's internal
operational code and *.COB to upgrade its internal Web interface).
Note: TFTP requires the .ROM (binary) version of the unit's internal operational code.
2. Make sure the Put and Binary options at the top of the window are selected.
3. Enter the full path of the firmware file in the Source File field.
4. In the Destination File field, type 3Q for the internal operational code or WEB6 for the
internal Web interface.
8-4
HV-ProNet
Troubleshooting
5. In the Remote Host field, enter the IP address of the unit being upgraded.
6. Click the Put button to transfer the file to the unit.
Figure 20 - TFTP Dialog Box
The unit performs a power reset after the firmware has been loaded and stored.
8.2.3 Via Another Unit
To distribute firmware to another unit over the network:
1. Enter the host unit's Monitor Mode (see Monitor Mode on page 10-1).
2. Send the firmware to the receiving unit using the SF command, where x.x.x.x is the
receiving unit's IP address.
SF x.x.x.x
The receiving unit performs a power reset after the firmware has been loaded and stored.
Note: You can only update your unit 's internal Web interface using TFTP or Device
Installer.
HV-ProNet
8-5
Troubleshooting
9. Troubleshooting
9.1 Technical Support
This chapter discusses how you can diagnose and fix errors quickly without having to contact
a dealer or Custom Automation Technologies, Inc.
It helps to connect a terminal to the serial port while diagnosing an error to view summary
messages that may be displayed. When troubleshooting, always ensure that the physical
connections (power cable, network cable, and serial cable) are secure.
Note: Some unexplained errors might be caused by duplicate IP addresses on the network.
Make sure that your unit's IP address is unique.
9.1.1 Technical Support
If you are experiencing an error that is not described in this chapter, or if you are unable to fix
the error, you may:
•
E-mail us at E-mail: [email protected]
Firmware downloads, FAQs, and the most up-to-date documentation are available at:
http://www.customautomationtechnologies.com
When you report a problem, please provide the following information:
•
Your name, and your company name, address, and phone number
•
HV-ProNet serial number
•
HV-ProNet firmware version (on the first screen shown when you Telnet to port
9999, or as displayed in the Web Manager)
•
Description of the problem
•
Status of the unit when the problem occurred (please try to include information on
user and network activity at the time of the problem)
When troubleshooting the following problems, make sure that the HV-ProNet is powered up
and the Link LED is lit. If the Link LED is not lit, then the physical network connection is
bad. Confirm that you are using a good network connection.
HV-ProNet
9-1
Troubleshooting
Table 16 - Problems and Error Messages
Problem/Message
Reason
Solution
When you issue the ARP –S
command in Windows, “The
ARP entry addition failed: 5"
message displays.
When you attempted to assign
an IP address to the HV-ProNet
via the ARP method, the “Press
Enter to go into Setup Mode”
error (described below)
displayed. Now when you
Telnet to the device, the
connection fails.
When you Telnet to port 9999,
the message “Press Enter to go
into Setup Mode” displays.
However, nothing happens
when you press Enter, or your
connection is closed.
When you Telnet to port 1 to
assign an IP address to the HVProNet, the Telnet window does
not respond for a long time.
Your currently logged-in user
does not have the correct rights
to use this command on this PC.
Have someone from your IT
department log you in with
sufficient rights.
When you Telnet into port 1 on
the HV-ProNet, you are only
assigning a temporary IP
address. When you Telnet into
port 9999 and do not press Enter
quickly, the HV-ProNet will
reboot, causing it to lose the IP
address.
You did not press Enter quickly
enough. You only have 5
seconds to press Enter before
the connection is closed.
Telnet back into Port 1. Wait for it
to fail, then Telnet to port 9999
again. Make sure you press Enter
quickly.
You may have entered the
Ethernet address incorrectly with
the ARP command.
Confirm that the Ethernet address
that you entered with the ARP
command is correct. The Ethernet
address may only include
numbers 0-9 and letters A-F. In
Windows and usually in Unix, the
segments of the Ethernet address
are separated by dashes. In some
forms of Unix, the Ethernet
address is segmented with
colons.
Confirm that your PC has an IP
address and that it is in the same
logical subnet that you are trying
to assign to the HV-ProNet.
Make sure that the Link LED is lit.
If the Link LED is not lit, then the
HV-ProNet is not properly
plugged into the network.
Double-check the parameters that
you specified. Tip: You cannot
assign an IP address to a HVProNet through a router.
The IP address you are trying to
assign is not on your logical
subnet.
The HV-ProNet may not be
plugged into the network
properly.
When you try to assign an IP
with Device Installer, you get
the following message:
“No response from device!
Verify the IP, Hardware
address and Network Class.
Please try again.”
9-2
The cause is most likely one of
the following:
The Hardware address you
specified is incorrect.
The IP address you are trying to
assign is not a valid IP for your
logical subnet.
You did not choose the correct
subnet mask.
Telnet to port 9999 again, but
press Enter as soon as you see
the message “Press Enter to go
into Setup Mode.”
HV-ProNet
Troubleshooting
Problem/Message
Reason
Solution
No LEDs are lit.
The unit or its power supply is
damaged.
Various
Test the power source and
replace if faulty.
Consult the LEDs section in the
Introduction chapter or the Quick
Start for the LED flashing
sequence patterns. Call Custom
Automation Technologies
Technical Support if the blinking
pattern indicates a critical error.
The serial settings for the serial
device and the HV-ProNet must
match. The default serial settings
for the HV-ProNet are RS232,
9600 Baud, 8 Character Bits, No
Parity, 1 Stop Bit, No Flow
Control.
Double-check everything in the
problem above. Confirm that
Caps Lock is not on.
The HV-ProNet will not power
up properly, and the LEDs are
flashing.
The HV-ProNet is not
communicating with the serial
device it is attached to.
The most likely reason is the
wrong serial settings were
chosen.
When you try to enter the setup
mode on the HV-ProNet via the
serial port, you get no
response.
You can ping the HV-ProNet,
but not Telnet to the HV-ProNet
on port 9999.
The issue will most likely be
something covered in the
previous problem, or possibly
you have Caps Lock on.
There may be an IP address
conflict on your network
You are not Telneting to port
9999.
The Telnet configuration port
(9999) is disabled within the HVProNet security settings.
With Device Installer you get
the “Wrong Password” error
when you try to upgrade the
firmware.
HV-ProNet
You have chosen the incorrect
setting for the Existing
Firmware field.
Turn the HV-ProNet off and then
issue the following commands at
the DOS prompt of your
computer: ARP -D X.X.X.X
(X.X.X.X is the IP of the HVProNet)
PING X.X.X.X (X.X.X.X is the IP
of the HV-ProNet).
If you get a response, then there
is a duplicate IP address on the
network (the LEDs on the HVProNet should flash a sequence
that tells you this). If you do not
get a response, use the serial port
to verify that Telnet is not
disabled.
Try upgrading the firmware again,
but make sure to use the correct
setting in the field of Existing
Firmware field.
9-3
Troubleshooting
Problem/Message
Reason
Solution
The HV-ProNet appears to be
set up correctly, but you are not
communicating with your serial
device attached to the HVProNet across the network.
If you are sure that the serial port
setting is correct, then you may
not be connecting to the correct
socket of the HV-ProNet.
You can check to see whether
there is a socket connection to or
from the HV-ProNet by looking at
the Status LED.
Another possibility is that the HVProNet is not set up correctly to
make a good socket connection
to the network.
If the Status LED is blinking
consistently, or is completely off,
then there is a good socket
connection.
When connecting to the WebManager within the HV-ProNet,
the message “No Connection
With The xxx” displays.
9-4
Your computer is not able to
connect to port 30718 (77FEh)
on the HV-ProNet.
If the Status LED is solid green,
then the socket connection does
not exist. Use the Connect Mode
option C0 for making a connection
to the HV-ProNet from the
network. Use Connect Mode
option C1 or C5 for a connection
to the network from the HVProNet. See the full list of
Connect Mode Options in the
Binary to Hexadecimal chapter.
Make sure that port 30718
(77FEh) is not blocked with any
router that you are using on the
network. Also make sure that port
77FEh is not disabled within the
Security settings of the HVProNet.
HV-ProNet
Monitor Mode
10. Monitor Mode
10.1 Monitor Mode
Monitor Mode is a command-line interface used for diagnostic purposes (see Table 17 Monitor Mode Commands on page 10-1).
10.1.1 Entering Monitor Mode Via the Network Port
To enter Monitor Mode using a Telnet connection:
1. First establish a Telnet session to the configuration port (9999). The following message
appears:
Serial Number 1400280 MAC address 00:20:4A:14:01:18
Software Version 4.3 (xxxxxx)
Press Enter to go into Setup Mode
2. Type M (upper case).
A 0> prompt indicates that you have successfully entered Monitor Mode.
10.1.2 Monitor Mode Commands
The following commands are available in Monitor Mode. Many commands have an IP
address as an optional parameter (xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx). If the IP address is given, the command
is applied to another HV-ProNet with that IP address. If no IP address is given, the command
is executed locally.
Note: All commands must be given in capital letters, with blank spaces between the
parameters.
Table 17 - Monitor Mode Commands
Command
Command Name
Function
DL
Download
SF x.x.x.x
Send Firmware
VS x.x.x.x
Version
GC x.x.x.x
Get Configuration
SC x.x.x.x
Send Configuration
Download firmware to the HV-ProNet via the
serial port in hex format
Send firmware to HV-ProNet with IP address
x.x.x.x
Query software header record (16 bytes) of HVProNet with IP address x.x.x.x
Get configuration of HV-ProNet with IP address
x.x.x.x as hex records (120 bytes)
Set configuration of HV-ProNet with IP address
x.x.x.x from hex records
HV-ProNet
10-1
Monitor Mode
PI x.x.x.x
Ping
AT
TT
ARP Table
TCP Connection
Table
Network Connection
Reset
Send/Set IP
Address
NC
RS
SI
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx:
yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy
QU
G0, G1, ....,Ge,
Gf
S0, S1,...,Se, Sf
Quit
Get configuration
from memory page
Set configuration to
memory page
Ping HV-ProNet with IP address x.x.x.x to check
device status
Show the HV-ProNet’s ARP table entries
Shows all incoming and outgoing TCP
connections
Shows the HV-ProNet’s IP configuration
Resets the HV-ProNet’s power
Remotely assign an IP address to a HV-ProNet,
where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the IP address, and
yyyy.yyy.yyyy.yyy is the two-part identification
number at the bottom of the label, converted to
decimal, and written twice.
Exit diagnostics mode
Gets a memory page of configuration information
from the device.
Sets a memory page of configuration information
on the device.
Note: Entering any of the commands listed above will generate one of the following command
response codes:
Table 18 -Command Response Codes
Response
Meaning
0>
1>
2>
OK; no error
No answer from remote device
Cannot reach remote device or no
answer
Wrong parameter(s)
Invalid command
8>
9>
10-2
HV-ProNet
UDP
11. Network Configuration using
UDP
11.1 UDP Datagrams
The unit can also be configured or queried over the network using UDP datagrams. The unit
has a UDP listener set for port 30718 (77FE Hex). Responses from the unit are returned to the
source port of the UDP packet.
The first three bytes of the UDP data block should be set to zero. The fourth byte selects the
function as described in the following table:
Table 19 - UDP Configuration
Byte Command
Parameters
Notes
03
Node Reset
2 bytes, software
type
F6
Query for
Firmware
Version
Firmware
Information
None
These 2 bytes are used to prevent
accidental reset of the HV-ProNet. (Value
for standard firmware: 33 51 [Hex], 3Q)
The HV-ProNet responds with the F7 block
below.
F7
F8
F9
Query for
Setup Record
Configuration
Readback
FA
Set
Configuration
FB
Configuration
Change
Acknowledge
HV-ProNet
First 16 bytes of the
firmware image,
and 4 bytes device
information and
serial number.
None
120 byte setup
record (see Setup
Records on page E7)
120 byte setup
record (see Setup
Records on page E7)
None
The first 16 bytes of the firmware image
contain the software type (offset 4,5) and
checksum (offset 14,15). The last two bytes
of the device information contain the serial
number.
The HV-ProNet responds with the F9 block
below.
n/a
The IP address (byte 0-3) will not be
overridden using FA. See FD for this
functionality.
This block is sent back to the host
requesting a configuration change (FB).
After sending out this block, the HV-ProNet
resets and uses the new configuration sent
with the FA command.
11-1
UDP
Byte Command
Parameters
Notes
FC
First 8 bytes must
be set to the string
IP-SETUP (Hex 49
50 2D 53 45 54 55
50).
This block can be sent as a broadcast,
because the serial number is unique. It
provides one method to set the IP address
of the unit if is on the local network and the
serial number is known. Remember,
broadcasts are only ‘heard’ on the subnet
on which they are generated. No reply is
sent by the Unit, which restarts using the
new IP address after the block is received.
Set IP Address
Next 2 bytes have
to be set to 00.
Next 2 bytes must
contain the serial
number.
FD
11-2
Set
Configuration
and IP Address
Next 4 bytes have
to be the new IP
address.
Same as FA, but
changes IP address
as well (bytes 0-3).
Example (all in Hex):
49 50 2D 63 45 54 55 50 00 00 2A 12 81
00 01 02
IP address of the node with serial number
42-18 set to 129.0.1.2
n/a
HV-ProNet
UDP
11.2 Configuring Multiple Devices
When configuring a number of Units identically, it is useful to create a template setup record.
The setup record can then be sent to the “target” Units from a “master” Unit via “cut and
paste” or UDP (see Network Configuration Using UDP on page E-1).
HV-ProNets use a 120-byte setup record in Intel Hex format. This format facilitates the
transfer of binary data using ASCII characters. See Setup Records on page E-7and The Intel
Hex Format on page E-5 for information about setup records and converting them to Intel
Hex format.
:20000010AC10C81D0000100000000000AC10010B4C0200001127000000000000C000
000011
:20002010000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
0000B0
:200040104C0200001227000000000000C00000000000000000000000000000000000
000049
:1800601000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000078
:00000001FF
Figure 21 - Sample Setup Record in Intel Hex Format
11.2.1 Acquiring a Valid Setup Record
There are a number of ways to acquire a valid setup record:
•
•
•
•
Copy the setup record of a properly configured HV-ProNet via Monitor Mode (easiest
method).
Request the setup record of a properly configured HV-ProNet via another HV-ProNet on the
network.
Build the setup record in software.
From a host PC, request the setup record of a properly configured HV-ProNet via UDP.
To copy the setup record of a properly configured HV-ProNet:
1. Configure a “master” HV-ProNet with the desired parameters.
2. Enter Monitor Mode on the master HV-ProNet (see Monitor Mode on page B-1).
3. At the prompt, enter GC followed by a carriage return. The HV-ProNet will respond with
its setup record in Intel Hex format.
4. Copy the setup record into a text file and save it for future use.
HV-ProNet
11-3
UDP
To request the setup record of a properly configured HV-ProNet via another HV-ProNet on
the network:
1. Configure a “master” HV-ProNet with the desired parameters and place it on the
network.
2. Place another HV-ProNet (the “target”) on the network. (Use the master and SC “Send
Configure” command to set the target unit.
3. Enter Monitor Mode (with network support enabled) on the target HV-ProNet (see
Monitor Mode on page B-1).
4. At the prompt, enter GC x.x.x.x followed by a carriage return, where x.x.x.x is the IP
address of the master HV-ProNet. The master HV-ProNet responds by sending its setup
record to the target HV-ProNet, and the target HV-ProNet reboots with the new
configuration.
To build the setup record in software:
1. Create a 120-byte setup record.
2. Convert it to an Intel Hex record (see The Intel Hex Format on page E-5).
3. Copy the setup record into a text file and save it for future use.
To request the setup record of a properly configured HV-ProNet via UDP:
1. Configure a HV-ProNet with the desired parameters and place it on the network.
2. From a host PC, send the F8 datagram to the HV-ProNet (see Network Configuration
Using UDP on page E-1). The HV-ProNet responds with the F9 datagram, which
includes its setup record.
3. Send a previously saved setup record from a host PC via UDP.
11-4
HV-ProNet
UDP
11.2.2 Sending a Setup Record
There are also a number of ways to send a setup record to a HV-ProNet:
•
•
•
Send a previously saved setup record via Monitor Mode (easiest method).
Send the setup record of a properly configured HV-ProNet to another HV-ProNet on the
network.
Send a previously saved setup record from a host PC via UDP.
To send a setup record via Monitor Mode:
1. Configure a “master” HV-ProNet with the desired parameters and place it on the
network.
2. Place another HV-ProNet (the “target”) on the network.
3. Enter Monitor Mode (with network support enabled) on the master HV-ProNet (see
Monitor Mode on page B-1)
4. At the prompt, enter SC, the IP address of the target, and a carriage return.
5. Send the setup record to the target HV-ProNet.
Note: For example, using Hyperterminal, copy the setup record and select “Paste to Host” to
send it to the HV-ProNet. The HV-ProNet reboots with the new configuration.
To send a previously saved setup record to a HV-ProNet via UDP from a host PC, send the
FA (or FD) datagram to the “target” HV-ProNet .
Note: The HV-ProNet responds with the FB datagram. Refer to the table.
11.2.3 The Intel Hex Format
With this format, 8-bit binary data can be sent and received as ASCII text. The transmission
is blocked in records, and every record has its own checksum.
The record begins with a colon (:) and consists of a block length (2-character Hex), a 16-bit
address (4-character Hex), and a block type (2-character Hex). It is built by adding all binary
8-bit values and taking the complement, so adding all byte values (including length, address,
and type) should yield zero.
Example:
00000001FF
End record, type 01, length 00, address 00 00, checksum FF.
01002000805F
Data record consisting of one byte (value 80 Hex) for address 0020 (32 decimal).
HV-ProNet
11-5
UDP
For communication with the node, the following block types are defined:
Table 20 - Block Types
Option
Hex
Data block program memory (firmware)
End record
Data block configuration memory
00
01
10
To get and set the node configuration, 120 bytes should be exchanged at once in 32-Byte
records. The IP address in the record (bytes 0 to 3) will be ignored (unless the UDP FD
command is being used).
11.2.4 Calculating the Checksum
As mentioned in Table 20 - Block Types above, the last two characters of an Intel Hex setup
record represent a checksum of the data in the line. Since the checksum is a two-digit
hexadecimal value, it can represent a value from 0 to 255.
The checksum is calculated by summing the value of the data on the line and taking the two’s
complement of the sum.
Note: Do not include the leading colon or the checksum byte in the sum.
Example:
0300300002337A1E
Record length: 03 (3 bytes of data)
Address: 0030 (the 3 bytes will be stored at 0030, 0031, and 0032)
Record Type: 00 (normal data)
Data: 02, 33, 7A
Checksum: 1E
03 + 00 + 30 + 00+ 02 + 33 + 7A = E2
The two’s complement of E2 is 1E. See Calculating the Two’s Complement below.
11.2.5 Calculating the Two’s Complement
The two’s complement of a number is the value that must be added to the number to reach a
Hexadecimal value of 100 (256 in decimal). In the example above, E2 + 1E = 100.
You can also calculate the two’s complement by subtracting the sum from 100. Using the
example above again, 100 - E2 = 1E. It may help to use a scientific calculator.
11-6
HV-ProNet
UDP
11.3 Setup Records
A setup record consists of 120 bytes. They are transmitted at once from and to the node.
Unused bytes should be initialized as 00. Table 21 - Setup Record Construction defines the
structure of a setup record:
Table 21 - Setup Record Construction
Byte(s) Function
00-03
04
05
06
07
08-11
12-15
16-63
64-111
112-119
HV-ProNet
IP address of the unit (x.x.x.x)
Reserved (0)
Flag BYTE
Bit 7: Reserved (0)
Bit 6: Set 1 for AUI, 0 for 10BASE-T (HV-ProNet only)
Bits 5-0: Reserved (0)
Number of host bits for subnetting; if 0, matching standard netmask for Class A,
B, C is used.
Reserved (0)
Telnet configuration password (0 if not used)
Gateway IP address (0,0,0,0 if not used)
48-byte Channel 1 parameters; parameter setup Channel 1 (see Table E-4:
Channel Parameters)
48-byte Channel 2 parameters; parameter setup Channel 2 (see Table E-4:
Channel Parameters))
Reserved (0)
11-7
UDP
11.3.1 Channel Parameters
Use the following table to select setup record parameters for Channels 1:
Table 22 - Channel Parameters
Byte(s)
(Channel 1)
16
17
18
19
20-21
22-23
24-27
28
29
30
31
32-33
34
35
36-47
48-63
Function
Interface Mode (see Table 23 - Interface Mode Options)
Line Speed
Bits 7-5: Reserved
Bits 4-0: Baud Rate (see Table 25 - Baud Rate Settings)
Flow Control (see Table 26 - Flow Control Options)
Reserved
Own TCP port low-byte, high-byte (Intel)
Remote TCP port low byte, high-byte (Intel)
Remote IP address (low/high low/high)
Connect Mode (see Table 27 - Connect Mode Options)
Disconnect Mode (see Table 28 - Disconnect Mode Options)
Disconnect w/ inactivity time-out, minutes (00 if unused)
Disconnect w/ inactivity time-out, seconds (00 if unused)
Characters to trigger send immediately (sendchar)
Flush mode (see Table 29 - Flush Mode Options)
Pack Control (see Table 30 - Pack Control Options)
Reserved (0)
a) Terminal name for Telnet terminal type option (15 characters
max), 0-terminated. If set and Bit 6 in Disconnect Mode is set,
Telnet connection will be assumed.
b) Password for Passworded Socket Connection (Bit 4 in
Disconnect Mode Set).
11-8
HV-ProNet
UDP
11.3.2 Interface Mode
The Interface (I/F) Mode is a bit-coded byte entered in hexadecimal notation. Use the
following table to select Interface Mode settings:
Table 23 - Interface Mode Options
I/F Mode Option
RS-232C
RS-422/485
RS-485 2-wire
7 Bit
8 Bit
No Parity
Even Parity
Odd Parity
1 Stop bit
2 Stop bit
7
6
5
4
3
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
Note: Embedded units require external serial drivers to support RS-232 or RS-485.
The following table demonstrates how to build some common Interface Mode settings:
Table 24 - Common Interface Mode Settings
Option
Binary
Hex
RS-232C, 8-bit, No Parity, 1 stop bit
RS-232C, 7-bit, Even Parity, 1 stop bit
RS-485 2-Wire, 8-bit, No Parity, 1 stop bit
RS-422, 8-bit, Odd Parity, 2 stop bits
0100 1100
0111 1000
0100 1111
1101 1101
4C
78
4F
DD
Note: See Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table for more information on
converting binary values to hexadecimal format.
HV-ProNet
11-9
UDP
11.3.3 Baud Rate
The HV-ProNet and attached serial device must agree on a speed or baud rate to use for the
serial connection. Use the following table to select Baud Rate settings:
Table 25 - Baud Rate Settings
Speed
(bps)
Hex
38400
19200
9600
4800
2400
1200
600
300
115200
57600
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11.3.4 Flow Control
Flow control sets the local handshaking method for stopping serial input/output. Generally,
flow control is not required if the connection is used to pass a blocked protocol with block
sizes less than 1k (ACK/NAK) and/or speeds of 19200 or less. Use the following table to
select Flow Control options:
Table 26 - Flow Control Options
Option
Hex
No flow control
XON/XOFF flow control
Hardware handshake with RTS/CTS lines
XON/XOFF pass characters to host
00
01
02
05
11-10
HV-ProNet
UDP
11.3.5 Connect Mode
Connect Mode defines how the HV-ProNet makes a connection, and how it reacts to
incoming connections over the network. Use the following table to select Connect Mode
options:
Table 27 - Connect Mode Options
Connect Mode Option
7
6
5
Incoming Connection
Never accept incoming
Accept incoming with DTR *
Accept unconditional
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
Response
Nothing (quiet)
Character response (C=conn,
D=disconn, N=unreachable)
Startup
No active startup
With any character
With active DTR
With CR (0x0D) only
Manual connection
Autostart
Hostlist
4
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
Datagram Type
Directed UDP
Modem Mode
Full Verbose
Without Echo
1-character Response
3
1
0
1
*DTR is an output signal on a DTE serial port. The DTE device is the HV-ProNet. On DTE
devices, use DCD (input) instead of DTR.
Note: See Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table for more information on
converting binary values to hexadecimal format.
HV-ProNet
11-11
UDP
11.3.6 Disconnect Mode
In Disconnect Mode, DTR drop either drops the connection or is ignored. Use the following
table to select Disconnect Mode Options:
Table 28 - Disconnect Mode Options
Disconnect Mode Option
7
Disconnect with DTR drop
Ignore DTR*
Telnet mode and terminal
type setup (1)
Channel (port) password (2)
1
0
6
5
3
2
1
0
1
1
(3)
Hard disconnect
Disable hard disconnect
State LED off with connection
0
1
1
(4)
Disconnect with EOT (^D) (5)
4
1
1. The HV-ProNet will send the "Terminal Type" upon an outgoing connection.
2. A password is required for a connection to the serial port from the network.
3. The TCP connection will close even if the remote site does not acknowledge the disconnection.
4. When there is a network connection to or from the serial port, the state LED will turn off instead of blink.
5. When Ctrl D or Hex 04 are detected, the connection is dropped. Both Telnet mode and Disconnect with EOT must be enabled
for Disconnect with EOT to function properly. Ctrl D will only be detected going from the serial port to the network.
*DTR is an output signal on a DTE serial port. The DTE devices are the HV-ProNet. On
DTE devices, use DCD (input) instead of DTR.
Note: See Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table for more information on
converting binary values to hexadecimal format.
11-12
HV-ProNet
UDP
11.3.7 Flush Mode (Buffer Flushing)
Using this parameter, you can control line handling and network buffers with connection
startup and disconnect. You can also select between two different packing algorithms. Use
the following table to select Flush Mode options:
Table 29 - Flush Mode Options
Function
Input Buffer (Serial to Network)
Clear active connection (from serial)
Clear passive connection (from
network)
Clear at disconnect
Output Buffer (Network to Serial)
Clear active connection (from network)
Clear passive connection (from serial)
Clear at disconnect
Alternate Packing Algorithm
Enable
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Note: See Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table for more information on
converting binary values to hexadecimal format.
11.3.8 Pack Control
Alternate packing algorithm settings are enabled in Flush Mode. Use the following table to
select Pack Control options:
Table 30 - Pack Control Options
Option
Idle Time
Force transmit: 12ms
Force transmit: 52ms
Force transmit: 250ms
Force transmit: 5sec
Trailing Characters
None
One
Two
Send Characters
Sendchars Define 2-Byte Sequence
Send Immediately After Sendchars
HV-ProNet
7
6
5
4
3
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
11-13
UDP
11.4 IP Addresses
Each TCP/IP node on a network host has a unique IP address. This address provides the
information needed to forward packets on the local network and across multiple networks if
necessary.
IP addresses are specified as x.x.x.x, where each x is a number from 1 to 254; for example,
192.0.1.99. The HV-ProNet must be assigned a unique IP address to use TCP/IP network
functionality.
IP addresses contain three pieces of information: the network, the subnet, and the host.
11.4.1 Network Portion
The network portion of the IP address is determined by the network type: Class A, B, or C.
Table 31 - Network Portion of IP Address
Network Class
Network Portion of Address
Class A
Class B
Class C
First byte (2nd, 3rd, and 4th bytes are the host)
First 2 bytes (3rd and 4th bytes are the host)
First 3 bytes (4th byte is the host)
In most network examples, the host portion of the address is set to zero.
Table 32 - Available IP Addresses
Class Reserved
Available
A
1.0.0.0 to 126.0.0.0
B
C
D, E
0.0.0.0
127.0.0.0
128.0.0.0
191.255.0.0
192.0.0.0
223.255.255.0
224.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.254
255.255.255.255
128.1.0.0 to 191.254.0.0
192.0.1.0 to 223.255.254.0
None
Consider the IP address 36.1.3.4. This address is a Class A address; therefore, the network
portion of the address is 36.0.0.0 and the host portion is 1.3.4.
11-14
HV-ProNet
UDP
11.4.2 Subnet Portion
The subnet portion of the IP address represents which sub-network the address is from. Subnetworks are formed when an IP network is broken down into smaller networks using a
subnet mask.
A router is required between all networks and all sub-networks. Generally, hosts can send
packets directly only to hosts on their own sub-network. All packets destined for other
subnets are sent to a router on the local network.
11.4.3 Host Portion
The host portion of the IP address is a unique number assigned to identify the host.
11.4.4 Network Address
A host address with all host bits set to 0 addresses the network as a whole (for example, in
routing entries).
192.168.0.0
11.4.5 Broadcast Address
A host address with all host bits set to 1 is the broadcast address, meaning for “for every
station.”
192.168.0.255
Network and broadcast addresses must not be used as a host address; for example,
192.168.0.0 identifies the entire network, and 192.168.0.255 identifies the broadcast address.
IP Subnet Mask
An IP subnet mask divides IP address differently than the standards defined by the classes A,
B, and C. An IP subnet mask defines the number of bits to be taken from the IP address as the
network or host sections. The HV-ProNet prompts for the number of host bits to be entered
and then calculates the netmask, which is displayed in standard decimal-dot notation (for
example, 255.255.255.0) when saved parameters are displayed.
Table 33 - Standard IP Network Netmasks
Network Class
Network Bits
Host Bits
Netmask
A
B
C
8
16
24
24
16
8
255.0.0.0
255.255.0.0
255.255.255.0
HV-ProNet
11-15
UDP
Table 34 - Netmask Examples
Netmask
Host Bits
255.255.255.252
255.255.255.248
255.255.255.240
255.255.255.224
255.255.255.192
255.255.255.128
255.255.255.0
255.255.254.0
255.255.252.0
255.255.248.0
...
255.128.0.0
255.0.0.0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
...
23
24
11.4.6 Private IP Networks and the Internet
If your network is not and will not be connected to the Internet, you may use any IP address.
If your network is connected or will be connected to the Internet, or if you intend to operate
the HV-ProNet on an intranet, you should use one of the reserved sub-networks. Consult your
network administrator with questions about IP address assignment.
11.4.7 Network RFCs
For more information about IP addresses, refer to the following documents, which can be
located on the World Wide Web using one of the following directories or indices:
•
•
•
•
11-16
RFC 950
RFC 1700
RFC 1117
FC 1597
Internet Standard Subnetting Procedure
Assigned Numbers
Internet Numbers
Address Allocation for Private Networks
HV-ProNet
Integration
HV-ProNet
11-1
Binary to Hex
12. Binary to Hex Conversion
Many of the HV-ProNet’s configuration procedures require you to assemble a series of
options (represented as bits) into a complete command (represented as a byte). The resulting
binary value must be converted to a hexadecimal representation.
Hexadecimal digits have values ranging from 0 to F, which are represented as 0-9, A (for 10),
B (for 11), etc. To convert a binary value (for example, 0010 0011) to a hexadecimal
representation, the upper and lower four bits are treated separately, resulting in a two-digit
hexadecimal number (in this case, 4C).
Use the following table to convert values from binary to hexadecimal.
Table 35 - Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion Table
Decimal Binary Hex
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
HV-ProNet
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
12-1
Binary to Hex
12.1 Connect Mode Options
Note: Character response codes are C=conn, D=disconn, N=unreachable
Table 36 - Connect Mode Options
Accept
Incoming
Connections
Serial
Response
Upon
Connection
Active Connection
Startup
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
N/A
1
2
3
4
5
C
10
11
12
13
14
15
1C
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
40
41
42
43
44
45
4C
50
51
52
53
54
55
N/A
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
C0
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
CC
12-2
Hostlist
Hex
HV-ProNet
Binary to Hex
Accept
Incoming
Connections
Serial
Response
Upon
Connection
Active Connection
Startup
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
Never
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
N/A
21
22
23
N/A
25
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
N/A
61
62
63
N/A
65
N/A
N/A
71
72
73
N/A
75
N/A
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
None (quiet)
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
N/A
E1
E2
E3
N/A
E5
N/A
HV-ProNet
Hostlist
Hex
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
DC
N/A
31
32
33
N/A
35
N/A
12-3
Binary to Hex
Accept
Incoming
Connections
Serial
Response
Upon
Connection
Active Connection
Startup
Hostlist
Hex
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
Character
No active startup
Any character
Active DTR
CR (0x0D)
Manual connection
Autostart
UDP
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
Hostlist
N/A
F1
F2
F3
N/A
F5
N/A
The following connect mode options are for when you use modem emulation:
Table 37 - Connect Mode Options for Modem Emulation
Accept Incoming
Connections
Response
Hex
Never
Never
Never
Echo
Without echo
1-character response
16
6
7
With DTR
With DTR
With DTR
Echo
Without echo
1-character response
56
46
47
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Unconditionally
Echo
Without echo
1-character response
D6
C6
C7
12-4
HV-ProNet
Binary to Hex
12.2 Disconnect Mode Options
Table 38 - Disconnect Mode Options
Disconnect
with DTR
Drop
Telnet Mode and
Terminal Type
Setup
Channel (port)
Password
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
A0
B0
C0
D0
E0
F0
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
E1
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
F1
Enable
Disable
Disable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
HV-ProNet
Enable
Enable
Hex
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Disconnect
with EOT (^D)
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
State LED
Off with
Connection
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Hard
Disconnect
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
1
11
21
31
41
51
61
71
81
91
A1
B1
C1
D1
8
18
Disable
Enable
28
Disable
Enable
38
Disable
48
12-5
Binary to Hex
Disconnect
with DTR
Drop
Telnet Mode and
Terminal Type
Setup
Enable
Channel (port)
Password
Hard
Disconnect
Enable
Disable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
68
Disable
Enable
78
Enable
Disable
Disable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
12-6
B8
C8
Disable
D8
Disable
Enable
E8
Disable
Enable
F8
Enable
Disable
Enable
Enable
29
Disable
Enable
Enable
39
Disable
Enable
Disable
Enable
Disable
Enable
Enable
69
Enable
Disable
Enable
Enable
79
Enable
Disable
Disable
Enable
Enable
Enable
89
99
Disable
Enable
Enable
A9
Disable
Enable
Enable
B9
Disable
Enable
Disable
Enable
Disable
Enable
Enable
E9
Disable
Enable
Enable
F9
Enable
Enable
Enable
A8
Enable
Disable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Disable
Enable
Enable
Enable
Disable
Disable
Enable
Enable
Enable
88
98
Disable
Enable
Enable
58
Enable
Enable
Enable
Hex
Enable
Enable
Enable
Disconnect
with EOT (^D)
Disable
Enable
Enable
State LED
Off with
Connection
Enable
Enable
9
19
49
59
C9
D9
HV-ProNet
Binary to Hex
12.3 Flush Mode (Buffer Flushing) Options
Table 39 - Flush Mode Options
Serial to Network
Network to Serial
Clear input buffer
upon:
Clear output buffer upon:
Alternate
Packing
Algorithm
None
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
HV-ProNet
Hex
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
80
90
A0
B0
Enable
Enable
C0
D0
Enable
E0
Enable
F0
Active connection
Active connection
Active connection
Active connection
1
11
21
31
Active connection
Active connection
41
51
Active connection
61
Active connection
71
12-7
Binary to Hex
Serial to Network
Network to Serial
Clear input buffer
upon:
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Hex
Clear output buffer upon:
Alternate
Packing
Algorithm
Active connection
Active connection
Active connection
Active connection
Enable
Enable
Enable
Enable
81
91
A1
B1
Active connection
Active connection
Enable
Enable
C1
D1
Active connection
Enable
E1
Active connection
Enable
F1
Passive connection
2
Active connection
Passive connection
12
Passive connection
Passive connection
22
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
32
Passive connection
42
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
52
Passive connection
62
Passive connection
72
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
12-8
Passive connection
Enable
82
Passive connection
Passive connection
Passive connection
Enable
Enable
Enable
92
A2
B2
Passive connection
Passive connection
Enable
Enable
C2
D2
Passive connection
Enable
E2
Passive connection
Enable
F2
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
3
13
23
HV-ProNet
Binary to Hex
Serial to Network
Network to Serial
Clear input buffer
upon:
Clear output buffer upon:
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Alternate
Packing
Algorithm
Hex
33
43
53
63
73
Enable
83
Enable
93
Enable
A3
Enable
B3
Enable
C3
Enable
D3
Enable
E3
Enable
F3
Disconnect
4
Active connection
Disconnect
14
Passive connection
Disconnect
24
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Disconnect
34
Disconnect
44
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Disconnect
54
Disconnect
64
Disconnect
74
Active connection
Passive connection
HV-ProNet
Disconnect
Disconnect
Disconnect
Enable
Enable
Enable
84
94
A4
12-9
Binary to Hex
Serial to Network
Network to Serial
Clear input buffer
upon:
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Hex
Clear output buffer upon:
Alternate
Packing
Algorithm
Disconnect
Enable
B4
Disconnect
Disconnect
Enable
Enable
C4
D4
Disconnect
Enable
E4
Disconnect
Enable
F4
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
12-10
5
15
25
35
45
55
65
75
Enable
85
Enable
95
Enable
A5
Enable
B5
Enable
C5
Enable
D5
Enable
E5
Enable
F5
6
HV-ProNet
Binary to Hex
Serial to Network
Network to Serial
Clear input buffer
upon:
Clear output buffer upon:
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
HV-ProNet
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Alternate
Packing
Algorithm
Hex
16
26
36
46
56
66
76
Enable
86
Enable
96
Enable
A6
Enable
B6
Enable
C6
Enable
D6
Enable
E6
Enable
F6
7
17
27
37
47
12-11
Binary to Hex
Serial to Network
Network to Serial
Clear input buffer
upon:
Clear output buffer upon:
Active connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Disconnect
Passive connection
Disconnect
Active connection
Passive connection
Disconnect
12-12
Alternate
Packing
Algorithm
Hex
57
67
77
Enable
87
Enable
97
Enable
A7
Enable
B7
Enable
C7
Enable
D7
Enable
E7
Enable
F7
HV-ProNet
Binary to Hex
12.4 Interface Mode Options
Table 40 - Interface Mode Options
Interface
Bits
Parity
Stop
Bits
Hex
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
RS-232C
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
No
No
Even
Even
Odd
Odd
No
No
Even
Even
Odd
Odd
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
48
C8
78
F8
58
D8
4C
CC
7C
FC
5C
DC
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
RS-422/485
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
No
No
Even
Even
Odd
Odd
No
No
Even
Even
Odd
Odd
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
49
C9
79
F9
59
D9
4D
CD
7D
FD
5D
DD
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
RS-422/485 2-Wire
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
No
No
Even
Even
Odd
Odd
No
No
Even
Even
Odd
Odd
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
4B
CB
7B
FB
5B
DB
4F
CF
7F
FF
5F
DF
HV-ProNet
12-13
Binary to Hex
12.5 Pack Control Options
Table 41 - Pack Control Options
Sendcharacter
Defined by a:
Trailing
Characters
Idle Time
Force
Transmit:
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
No
No
No
No
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
No
No
No
No
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
1-Byte Sequence
No
No
No
No
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
No
No
12ms
52ms
Yes
Yes
30
31
12-14
Send
Immediately
after
Sendcharacter
Hex
HV-ProNet
Binary to Hex
Sendcharacter
Defined by a:
Trailing
Characters
Idle Time
Force
Transmit:
Send
Immediately
after
Sendcharacter
Hex
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
2-Byte Sequence
No
No
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
250ms
5sec
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
12ms
52ms
250ms
5sec
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
HV-ProNet
12-15
Glossary of Terms
13. Glossary of Terms
Address space
A linear array of locations that a thread can access. Simple processors have only one, and these
processors are referred to as `linear' addressing.
AutoIP
AutoIP is an alternative to DHCP that allows hosts to automatically obtain an IP address in smaller
networks that may not have a DHCP server. A range of IP addresses (from 169.254.0.1 to
169.254.255.254) has been explicitly reserved for AutoIP-enabled devices. The range of AutoIP
addresses is not to be used over the Internet.
Auto-Negotiate:
Clause 28 of the IEEE 802.3u standard specifies a MAC sublayer for the identification of the speed
and duplex mode of connection being supported by a device. Support of this feature is optional for
individual vendors.
Auto-sense:
Ability of a 10/100 Ethernet device to interpret the speed or duplex mode of the attached device and to
adjust to that rate. Official term is Auto-Negotiation in Clause 28 of the IEEE 802.3u standard.
AUI:
Attachment Unit Interface. A 15-pin shielded, twisted pair Ethernet cable used (optionally) to connect
between network devices and a MAU.
Autobaud:
Automatic determination and matching of transmission speed.
Backbone:
The main cable in a network.
Bandwidth on Demand:
Feature that allows a remote access device to initiate a second connection to a particular site to increase
the amount of data transferred to that site to increase the desired threshold. The network manager
configuring the remote access server will specify a number of bits or a percentage of connection
bandwidth threshold which will trigger the secondary connection. Multilink PPP is an emerging
standard to allow this feature to be interoperable, but right now the only way to ensure correct
operation is to use devices on both end from the same vendor.
HV-ProNet
13-1
Glossary of Terms
Baseband LAN:
A LAN that uses a single carrier frequency over a single channel. Ethernet, Token Ring and Arcnet
LANs use baseband transmission.
Baud:
Unit of signal frequency in signals per second. Not synonymous with bits per second since signals can
represent more than one bit. Baud equals bits per second only when the signal represents a single bit.
Binaries:
Binary, machine readable forms of programs that have been compiled or assembled. As opposed to
Source language forms of programs.
Binary:
Characteristic of having only two states, such as current on and current off. The binary number system
uses only ones and zeros.
Bit:
The smallest unit of data processing information. A bit (or binary digit) assumes the value of either 1
or 0.
Block
A block is a variable-size piece of memory that a task can acquire. Blocks are allocated from heaps.
[Related: Buffer, heap]
BNC:
A standardized connector used with Thinnet and coaxial cable.
BOOTP:
A TCP/IP network protocol that lets network nodes request configuration information from a BOOTP
"server" node.
bps:
Bits per second, units of transmission speed.
Bridge:
A networking device that connects two LANs and forwards or filters data packets between them, based
on their destination addresses. Bridges operate at the data link level (or MAC-layer) of the OSI
reference model, and are transparent to protocols and to higher level devices like routers.
13-2
HV-ProNet
Glossary of Terms
Broadband:
A data transmission technique allowing multiple high-speed signals to share the bandwidth of a single
cable via frequency division multiplexing.
Broadband Network:
A network that uses multiple carrier frequencies to transmit multiplexed signals on a single cable.
Several networks may coexist on a single cable without interfering with one another.
Brouter:
A device that routes specific protocols, such as TCP/IP and IPX, and bridges other protocols, thereby
combining the functions of both routers and bridges.
Bus:
A LAN topology in which all the nodes are connected to a single cable. All nodes are considered equal
and receive all transmissions on the medium.
Byte:
A data unit of eight bits.
Channel:
The data path between two nodes.
CHAP:
(Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol) Authentication scheme for PPP where the password
not only is required to begin connection but also is required during the connection - failure to provide
correct password during either login or challenge mode will result in disconnect.
Coaxial Cable:
An electrical cable with a solid wire conductor at its center surrounded by insulating materials and an
outer metal screen conductor with an axis of curvature coinciding with the inner conductor - hence
"coaxial." Examples are standard Ethernet cable and Thinwire Ethernet cable.
Collision:
The result of two network nodes transmitting on the same channel at the same time. The transmitted
data is not usable.
Collision Detect:
A signal indicating that one or more stations are contending with the local station's transmission. The
signal is sent by the Physical layer to the Data Link layer on an Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 node.
HV-ProNet
13-3
Glossary of Terms
Communication Server:
A dedicated, standalone system that manages communications activities for other computers.
Cut-through:
Technique for examining incoming packets whereby an Ethernet switch looks only at the first few
bytes of a packet before forwarding or filtering it. This process is faster than looking at the whole
packet, but it also allows some bad packets to be forwarded.
CSMA/CD:
Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection is the Ethernet media access method. All
network devices contend equally for access to transmit. If a device detects another device's signal
while it is transmitting, it aborts transmission and retries after a brief pause.
Data Link:
A logical connection between two nodes on the same circuit.
Data Link Layer:
Layer 2 of the seven-layer OSI reference model for communication between computers on networks.
This layer defines protocols for data packets and how they are transmitted to and from each network
device. It is a medium-independent, link-level communications facility on top of the Physical layer,
and is divided into two sublayers: medium-access control (MAC) and logical-link control (LLC).
DHCP
Short for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, a protocol for assigning dynamic IP addresses to
devices on a network. With dynamic addressing, a device can have a different IP address every time it
connects to the network. In some systems, the device's IP address can even change while it is still
connected. DHCP also supports a mix of static and dynamic IP addresses.
Dynamic addressing simplifies network administration because the software keeps track of IP
addresses rather than requiring an administrator to manage the task. This means that a new computer
can be added to a network without the hassle of manually assigning it a unique IP address. Many ISPs
use dynamic IP addressing for dial-up users.
DHCP client support is built into Windows 95 and NT workstation. NT 4 server includes both client
and server support.
Dial on Demand:
When a router detects the need to initiate a dial-up connection to a remote network, it does so
automatically according to pre-defined parameters set by the network manager.
13-4
HV-ProNet
Glossary of Terms
Dialback:
A security feature that ensures people do not log into modems that they shouldn't have access to. When
a connection is requested, the system checks the user name for validity, then "dials back" the number
associated with that user name.
Distributed Processing:
A system in which each computer or node in the network performs its own processing and manages
some of its data while the network facilitates communications between the nodes.
Domain Name:
A domain name is a text name appended to a host name to form a unique host name across internets.
Download:
The transfer of a file or information from one network node to another. Generally refers to transferring
a file from a "big" node, such as a computer, to a "small" node, such as a terminal server or printer.
End Node:
A node such as a PC that can only send and receive information for its own use. It cannot route and
forward information to another node.
Ethernet:
The most popular LAN technology in use today. The IEEE standard 802.3 defines the rules for
configuring an Ethernet network. It is a 10 Mbps, CSMA/CD baseband network that runs over thin
coax, thick coax, twisted pair or fiber optic cable.
FDDI:
Fiberoptic Data Distribution Interface. A cable interface capable of transmitting data at 100 Mbps.
Originally specified for fiber lines, FDDI can also operate over twisted-pair cable for short distances.
Fiber-Optic Cable:
A transmission medium composed of a central glass optical fiber cable surrounded by cladding and an
outer protective sheath. It transmits digital signals in the form of modulated light from a laser or LED
(light-emitting diode).
File Server:
A computer that stores data for network users and provides network access to that data.
HV-ProNet
13-5
Glossary of Terms
Filtering:
Process whereby an Ethernet switch or bridge reads the contents of a packet and then finds that the
packet does not need to be forwarded, drops it. a filtering rate is the rate at which a device can receive
packets and drop them without any loss of incoming packets or delay in processing.
Firmware:
Alterable programs in semipermanent storage, e.g., some type of read-only or flash reprogrammable
memory.
Forwarding:
Process whereby an Ethernet switch or bridge reads the contents of a packet and then passes that
packet on to the appropriate attached segment. A forwarding rate is the time that it takes the device to
execute all of the steps.
Flash ROM:
See ROM.
Framing:
Dividing data for transmission into groups of bits, and adding a header and a check sequence to form a
frame.
FTP:
File Transfer Protocol, a TCP/IP protocol for file transfer.
Full-Duplex:
Independent, simultaneous two-way transmission in both directions, as opposed to half-duplex
transmission.
Gateway:
A device for interconnecting two or more dissimilar networks. It can translate all protocol levels from
the Physical layer up through the Applications layer of the OSI model, and can therefore interconnect
entities that differ in all details.
Hardware Address:
See Network Address.
Header:
The initial part of a data packet or frame containing identifying information such as the source of the
data, its destination, and length.
13-6
HV-ProNet
Glossary of Terms
Heartbeat:
Ethernet defined SQE signal quality test function.
Hertz (Hz):
A frequency unit equal to one cycle per second.
Host:
Generally a node on a network that can be used interactively, i.e., logged into, like a computer.
Host Table:
A list of TCP/IP hosts on the network along with their IP addresses.
HTTP
Short for HyperText Transfer Protocol, the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web. HTTP
defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions Web servers and browsers
should take in response to various commands. For example, when you enter a URL in your browser,
this actually sends an HTTP command to the Web server directing it to fetch and transmit the
requested Web page.
HTTP is called a stateless protocol because each command is executed independently, without any
knowledge of the commands that came before it. This is the main reason that it is difficult to
implement Web sites that react intelligently to user input. This shortcoming of HTTP is being
addressed in a number of new technologies, including ActiveX, Java, JavaScript and cookies.
IEEE 802.3:
The IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) standard that defines the CSMA/CD
media-access method and the physical and data link layer specifications of a local area network.
Among others, it includes 10BASE2, 10BASE5, 10BASE-FL and 10BASE-T Ethernet
implementations.
Internet:
A series of interconnected local, regional, national and international networks, linked using TCP/IP.
Internet links many government, university and research sites. It provides E-mail, remote login and file
transfer services.
Internetworking:
General term used to describe the industry composed of products and technologies used to link
networks together.
IP Address:
See Network Address.
HV-ProNet
13-7
Glossary of Terms
IPX:
Internetwork Packet eXchange, a NetWare protocol similar to IP (Internet Protocol).
ISDN:
(Integrated Services Digital Network): All digital service provided by telephone companies. Provides
144K bps over a single phone line (divided in two 64K bps "B" channels and one 16K bps "D"
channel).
ISO Layered Model:
The International Standards Organization (ISO) sets standards for computers and communications. Its
Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) reference model specifies how dissimilar computing devices such
as Network Interface Cards (NICs), bridges and routers exchange data over a network. The model
consists of seven layers. From lowest to highest, they are: Physical, Data Link, Network, Transport,
Session, Presentation and Application. Each layer performs services for the layer above it.
Jabber:
Network error caused by an interface card placing corrupted data on the network. Or, an error
condition due to an Ethernet node transmitting longer packets than allowed.
Kbps:
Kilobits per second.
Kermit:
A popular file transfer and terminal emulation program.
LAN:
Local Area Network, a data communications system consisting of a group of interconnected
computers, sharing applications, data and peripherals. The geographical area is usually a building or
group of buildings.
LAT:
Local Area Transport, a Digital Equipment Corporation proprietary network communication protocol.
The protocol is based on the idea of a relatively small, known number of hosts on a local network
sending small network packets at regular intervals. LAT will not work on a wide area network scale, as
TCP/IP does.
Latency:
The delay incurred by a switching or bridging device between receiving the frame and forwarding the
frame.
13-8
HV-ProNet
Glossary of Terms
Layer:
In networks, layers refer to software protocol levels comprising the architecture, with each layer
performing functions for the layers above it.
Line Speed:
Expressed in bps, the maximum rate at which data can reliably be transmitted over a line using given
hardware.
Local Network Interconnect (LNI):
A Port Multiplier, or concentrator supporting multiple active devices or communications controllers,
either used standalone or attached to standard Ethernet cable.
Logical Link:
A temporary connection between source and destination nodes, or between two processes on the same
node.
MAU:
Medium Attachment Unit, a device used to convert signals from one Ethernet medium to another.
Mbps:
Megabits per second.
MIB:
Management Information Base, a database of network parameters used by SNMP and CMIP (Common
Management Information Protocol) to monitor and change network device settings. It provides a
logical naming of all information resources on the network that are pertinent to the network's
management.
MII:
Media Independent Interface, New standard developed for Fast Ethernet in IEEE 802.3u specification.
The Fast Ethernet equivalent to the AUI in 10 Mbps Ethernet, allowing different types of Fast Ethernet
media to be connected to a Fast Ethernet device via a common interface.
MJ:
Modular Jack. A jack used for connecting voice cables to a faceplate, as for a telephone.
MMJ:
Modified Modular Jack. These are the 6-pin connectors used to connect serial terminal lines to
terminal devices. MMJs can be distinguished from the similar RJ12 jacks by having a side-locking tab,
rather than a center-mounted one.
HV-ProNet
13-9
Glossary of Terms
Modem:
A modulator-demodulator device for changing transmission signals from digital to analog for
transmission over phone lines. Used in pairs, one is required at each end of the line.
MOP:
Maintenance Operations Protocol, a DEC protocol used for remote communications between hosts and
servers.
Multicast:
A multicast is a message that is sent out to multiple devices on the network by a host.
Multilink PPP:
The ability of a dialup device to allocate more than one channel of bandwidth to a particular
connection. Generally, this is termed to be the ability of an ISDN device to bond two B-channels
together into a single data pipe, but some vendors can perform the same function with asynchronous
dial-up connections over modems by having a second connection initiated to support the additional
bandwidth requirements.
Multiplexer:
A device that allows several users to share a single circuit. It funnels different data streams into a
single stream. At the other end of the communications link, another multiplexer reverses the process by
splitting the data stream back into the original streams.
Multiplexing:
Transmitting multiple signals simultaneously on a single channel.
Multiport Repeater:
A repeater, either standalone or connected to standard Ethernet cable, for interconnecting up to eight
Thinwire Ethernet segments.
Name Server:
Software that runs on network hosts charged with translating (or resolving) text-style names into
numeric IP addresses.
NetWare:
A Novell developed Network Operating System (NOS). Provides file and printer sharing among
networks of Personal Computers (PCs). Each NetWare network must have at least one file server, and
access to other resources is dependent on connecting to and logging into the file server. The file server
controls user logins and access to other network clients, such as user PCs, print servers, modem/fax
servers, disk/file servers, etc.
13-10
HV-ProNet
Glossary of Terms
NetBIOS/NetBEUI:
Microsoft's networking protocols for it's LAN Manager and Windows NT products.
Network:
An interconnected system of computers that can communicate with each other and share files, data and
resources.
Network Address:
Every node on a network has one or more addresses associated with it, including at least one fixed
hardware address such as "ae-34-2c-1d-69-f1" assigned by the device's manufacturer. Most nodes also
have protocol specific addresses assigned by a network manager.
Network Management:
Administrative services for managing a network, including configuring and tuning, maintaining
network operation, monitoring network performance, and diagnosing network problems.
NIC:
Network Interface Card, an adapter card that is inserted into a computer, and contains the necessary
software and electronics to enable the station to communicate over the network.
Node:
Any intelligent device connected to the network. This includes terminal servers, host computers, and
any other devices (such as printers and terminals) that are directly connected to the network. A node
can be thought of as any device that has a "hardware address."
NOS:
Network Operating System, the software for a network that runs in a file server and controls access to
files and other resources from multiple users. It provides security and administrative tools. Novell's
NetWare, Banyan's VINES and IBM's LAN Server are NOS examples.
Open System Interconnect (OSI):
See "ISO."
Packet:
A series of bits containing data and control information, including source and destination node
addresses, formatted for transmission from one node to another.
HV-ProNet
13-11
Glossary of Terms
PAP:
(Password Authentication Protocol) Authentication scheme for PPP links. A password can be specified
for both devices on a remote link. Failure to authenticate will result in a dropped connection prior to
start of data transmission.
Physical Address:
An address identifying a single node.
Physical Layer:
Layer 1, the bottom layer of the OSI model, is implemented by the physical channel. The Physical
layer insulates Layer 2, the Data Link layer, from medium-dependent physical characteristics such as
baseband, broadband or fiber-optic transmission. Layer 1 defines the protocols that govern
transmission media and signals.
Point-to-Point:
A circuit connecting two nodes only, or a configuration requiring a separate physical connection
between each pair of nodes.
Port:
The physical connector on a device enabling the connection to be made.
Port Multiplier:
A concentrator providing connection to a network for multiple devices.
PostScript:
A printer/display protocol developed by Adobe Corp. PostScript is an actual printing and programming
language to display text and graphics. Unlike line/ASCII printers, which print character input verbatim,
PostScript printers accept and interpret an entire PostScript page before printing it.
PPP:
Point-to-Point Protocol. The successor to SLIP, PPP provides router-to-router and host-to-network
connections over both synchronous and asynchronous circuits.
Print Server:
A dedicated computer that manages printers and print requests from other nodes on the network.
PROM:
Programmable ROM, a read-only memory whose data content can be altered.
13-12
HV-ProNet
Glossary of Terms
Protocol:
Any standard method of communicating over a network.
Remote Access:
Access to network resources not located on the same physical Ethernet. (Physical Ethernet here refers
to an entire site network topology.)
Remote Control:
Form of remote access where a device dialing in assumes control of another network node - all
keystrokes on the remote are translated into keystrokes on the network node. Used primarily with IPX
protocol.
Remote Node:
Form of remote access where the device dialing in acts as a peer on the target network. Used with both
IP and IPX protocols.
Repeater:
A repeater is a network device that repeats signals from one cable onto one or more other cables, while
restoring signal timing and waveforms.
Ring:
A network topology in which the nodes are connected in a closed loop. Data is transmitted from node
to node around the loop, always in the same direction.
RMON:
SNMP-based standard for reporting various network conditions. RMON has 10 different management
groups which provide detailed information about a network.
Rlogin:
Rlogin is an application that provides a terminal interface between UNIX hosts using the TCP/IP
network protocol. Unlike Telnet, Rlogin assumes the remote host is (or behaves like) a UNIX machine
ROM:
Read-Only Memory, a memory device that retains its information even when power to it is removed. A
ROM version of a network device does not need to download, since the ROM contains the entire
executable code and thus never needs to reload it. Frequently the ROM is provided as "flash ROM",
which can be reprogrammed by downloading if the user chooses.
HV-ProNet
13-13
Glossary of Terms
Router:
Device capable of filtering/forwarding packets based upon data link layer information. Whereas a
bridge or switch may only read MAC layer addresses to filter, routers are able to read data such as IP
addresses and route accordingly.
RTEL:
Custom Automation Technologies' "reverse Telnet" software allows hosts using TCP/IP to establish a
session with a device attached to a terminal server port.
Server:
A computer that provides resources to be shared on the network, such as files (file server) or terminals
(terminal server).
Session:
A connection to a network service.
Shared Ethernet:
Ethernet configuration in which a number of segments are bound together in a single collision domain.
Hubs produce this type of configuration where only one node can transmit at a time.
SLIP:
Serial Line Internet Protocol, a protocol for running TCP/IP over serial lines.
SNA:
Systems Network Architecture. IBM's layered protocols for mainframe communications.
SNMP:
Simple Network Management Protocol, allows a TCP/IP host running an SNMP application to query
other nodes for network-related statistics and error conditions. The other hosts, which provide SNMP
agents, respond to these queries and allow a single host to gather network statistics from many other
network nodes.
Source Code:
Programs in an uncompiled or unassembled form.
Spanning Tree:
An algorithm used by bridges to create a logical topology that connects all network segments, and
ensures that only one path exists between any two stations.
13-14
HV-ProNet
Glossary of Terms
Store and Forward:
Technique for examining incoming packets on an Ethernet switch or bridge whereby the whole packet
is read before forwarding or filtering takes place. Store and forward is a slightly slower process than
cut-through, but it does ensure that all bad or misaligned packets are eliminated from the network by
the switching device.
SPX:
Sequential Packet exchange. Novell's implementation of SPP (Sequential Packet Protocol).
SQE:
Ethernet-defined signal quality test function, frequently called "heartbeat."
Switch:
Multiport Ethernet device designed to increase network performance by allowing only essential traffic
on the attached individual Ethernet segments. Packets are filtered or forwarded based upon their source
and destination addresses.
T-Connector:
A T-shaped device with two female and one male BNC connectors.
TCP/IP:
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and Internet Protocol (IP) are the standard network protocols in
UNIX environments. They are almost always implemented and used together and called TCP/IP.
Telnet:
Telnet is an application that provides a terminal interface between hosts using the TCP/IP network
protocol. It has been standardized so that "telnetting" to any host should give one an interactive
terminal session, regardless of the remote host type or operating system. Note that this is very different
from the LAT software, which allows only local network access to LAT hosts only.
10BASE2:
Ethernet running on thin coax network cable.
10BASE5:
Ethernet running on Thickwire network cable.
10BASE-T:
Ethernet running on unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable. Note that 10BASE-T is a point-to-point
network media, with one end of the cable typically going to a repeater/hub and the other to the network
device.
HV-ProNet
13-15
Glossary of Terms
Terminal Server:
A concentrator that facilitates communication between hosts and terminals.
Terminator:
Used on both ends of a standard Ethernet or Thinwire Ethernet segment, this special connector
provides the 50 ohm termination resistance needed for the cable.
TFTP:
Trivial File Transfer Protocol. On computers that run the TCP/IP networking software, TFTP is used to
quickly send files across the network with fewer security features than FTP.
Thickwire:
Half-inch diameter coax cable.
Thinwire:
Thin coaxial cable similar to that used for television/video hookups.
Throughput:
The amount of data transmitted between two points in a given amount of time, e.g., 10 Mbps.
Token:
The character sequence or frame, passed in sequence from node to node, to indicate that the node
controlling it has the right to transmit for a given amount of time.
Token Ring:
Developed by IBM, this 4 or 16 Mbps network uses a ring topology and a token-passing access
method.
Topology:
The arrangement of the nodes and connecting hardware that comprises the network. Types include
ring, bus, star and tree.
Transceiver:
The actual device that interfaces between the network and the local node. The term generally refers to
any connector, such as a MAU, that actively converts signals between the network and the local node.
Transceiver Cable:
Cable that attaches a device either to a standard or thin coax Ethernet segment.
13-16
HV-ProNet
Glossary of Terms
Twisted-Pair Cable:
Inexpensive, multiple-conductor cable comprised of one or more pairs of 18 to 24 gauge copper
strands. The strands are twisted to improve protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency
interference. The cable, which may be either shielded or unshielded, is used in low-speed
communications, as telephone cable. It is used only in baseband networks because of its narrow
bandwidth.
Unix:
A multitasking, multiuser computer operating system developed by AT&T. Several versions exist, e.g.,
the Berkeley version.
UTP:
Unshielded twisted pair, one or more cable pairs surrounded by insulation. UTP is commonly used as
telephone wire.
Wide Area Network (WAN):
A network using common carrier transmission services for transmission of data over a large
geographical area.
Workgroup Switching:
Configuration in which a number of users are connected to an Ethernet network via a switch.
Switching allows each user to get greater throughput than would be available through a hub.
X.25 Gateway Access Protocol:
Allows a node not directly connected to a public data network to access the facilities of that network
through an intermediary gateway node. X.25 is the protocol standard governing packet-switched
networks.
HV-ProNet
13-17
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