SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe

SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Jürgen Hauser, Andreas Deutesfield, Stephan Rehmann,
and Thomas Szücs
SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
®
®
Bonn � Boston
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Contents at a Glance
1
Introduction . ........................................................................... 17
2
Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe .................................. 23
3
Installation and Configuration ................................................ 63
4
Interface and Form Context .................................................... 115
5
Creating Form Templates . ....................................................... 175
6
Form Output ............................................................................ 229
7
Advanced Form Template Design ............................................ 289
8
Integration with Web Dynpro ABAP ....................................... 373
9
Internal Service Request . ........................................................ 501
10 ABAP Offline Infrastructure . ................................................... 605
11 ABAP PDF Object .................................................................... 635
12 Offline Scenarios via Web Services ......................................... 659
13 Advanced Installation and Configuration ................................ 695
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Contents
1 Introduction ............................................................................... 17
2 Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe . .................................. 23
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
PDF, PDF-Based Print Forms, and Interactive PDF Forms ............. 2.1.1
PDF File Format . ........................................................... 2.1.2
PDF-Based Print Forms .................................................. 2.1.3
Interactive PDF Forms ................................................... 2.1.4
Accessibility of PDF Forms ............................................. 2.1.5
Using Interactive PDF Forms .......................................... Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat Family . .................................. 2.2.1
Comparing Adobe Reader and Acrobat Professional . ..... 2.2.2 Selecting the Appropriate Adobe Reader Version ........... 2.2.3 Useful Settings of Adobe Reader . .................................. Examples of PDF-Based Print Forms and Interactive PDF Forms .... 2.3.1
Example for Print Output . ............................................. 2.3.2 Creating an Interactive PDF Form .................................. Using Interactive Forms in Business Processes .............................. 2.4.1
Online Scenarios . .......................................................... 2.4.2 Offline Scenarios . .......................................................... 2.4.3 Combining Online and Offline Scenarios ........................ 2.4.4 When Do You Use Online and Offline Scenarios? . ......... 2.4.5 Notes on the Use of Interactive Forms ........................... Software Components and Architecture ....................................... 2.5.1
Adobe LiveCycle Designer ............................................. 2.5.2 Adobe Document Services ............................................. 2.5.3 Interaction of Components ............................................ Summary ..................................................................................... 23
23
24
27
28
29
29
30
33
34
34
34
38
40
41
41
43
43
45
46
47
52
56
60
3 Installation and Configuration .................................................. 63
3.1
Prerequisites ................................................................................ 3.1.1
Credentials and Password for SAP Interactive Forms
by Adobe . ..................................................................... 63
64
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Contents
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.1.2
Adobe LiveCycle Designer 8.2 ....................................... Basic Configuration ...................................................................... 3.2.1
ADSUSER ...................................................................... 3.2.2 ADSCaller ...................................................................... 3.2.3 Web Service Test ........................................................... Scenario-Dependent Configuration .............................................. 3.3.1
RFC Destination . ........................................................... 3.3.2 Destination and ICF Service ........................................... 3.3.3 Web Service Proxy ......................................................... 3.3.4 ReaderRights Credential ................................................ 3.3.5 FPCONNECT . ................................................................ Configuration for Parallelization ................................................... 3.4.1
Web Service for Parallelization ....................................... 3.4.2 Web Service for Monitoring ........................................... 3.4.3 Connection Test for the Two Web Services ..................... 3.4.4 Assigning the Logical Port to the ADS Connection ......... Optional Configuration ................................................................ 3.5.1
Licensing ....................................................................... 3.5.2 Credentials, Trusted Anchors, Certificate Revocation
Lists . ............................................................................. 3.5.3 Service Properties .......................................................... 3.5.4 Number of Parallel Print Jobs ......................................... 3.5.5 Fonts ............................................................................. 3.5.6 XDCs ............................................................................. Error Analysis . ............................................................................. Using ADS ................................................................................... 3.7.1
Monitoring and Performance Tracing ............................. 3.7.2
Log Configurator . .......................................................... Installation of Adobe LiveCycle Designer ..................................... Automatic Configuration via CTC ................................................. ADS Hub ..................................................................................... Summary ..................................................................................... 64
64
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68
68
72
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82
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88
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91
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94
95
96
96
98
101
103
105
105
105
107
107
108
110
110
111
114
4 Interface and Form Context ...................................................... 115
4.1 Structure of a Form ...................................................................... 115
4.2 Interface of a Form ...................................................................... 116
4.2.1
ABAP Dictionary-Based Interface ................................... 119
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Contents
4.2.2 XML Schema-Based Interface ........................................ 4.2.3 Smart Forms-Compatible Interface . ............................... 4.2.4 Documentation of a Form Interface ............................... 4.3 Context of a Form . ...................................................................... 4.3.1
Creating a Form ............................................................. 4.3.2 Structure of a Form . ...................................................... 4.3.3 Structures ...................................................................... 4.3.4 Data Nodes ................................................................... 4.3.5 Text Nodes .................................................................... 4.3.6 Graphic Nodes . ............................................................. 4.3.7 Address Nodes .............................................................. 4.3.8 Alternatives ................................................................... 4.3.9 Tables or Loops . ............................................................ 4.3.10 Single Record Nodes . .................................................... 4.3.11 Conditions ..................................................................... 4.3.12 Folders .......................................................................... 4.4 Documentation of a Form ............................................................ 4.5 Summary ..................................................................................... 129
131
132
134
134
137
141
144
146
153
157
160
163
167
170
171
172
173
5 Creating Form Templates . ......................................................... 175
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
Adobe LiveCycle Designer ........................................................... 5.1.1
Menu Bar and Toolbar ................................................... 5.1.2
Script Editor .................................................................. 5.1.3
Hierarchy and Data View ............................................... 5.1.4
Library and Object Palette ............................................. 5.1.5
Form Design Area .......................................................... The Basic Principles of the Form Template Design ........................ 5.2.1
Getting Started .............................................................. 5.2.2 Using Text Fields . .......................................................... 5.2.3 Formatting Texts ............................................................ Data Binding for Form Fields ....................................................... 5.3.1
Defining the Data Binding ............................................. 5.3.2 Using Preview Data ....................................................... Structuring Form Templates with Subforms .................................. 5.4.1
Adding a Hierarchy ........................................................ 5.4.2 Extending the Form Template ........................................ Using Master Pages and Rich Text Fields ...................................... 5.5.1
Customizing the Master Page . ....................................... 175
177
177
178
180
182
182
184
187
193
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199
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Contents
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.5.2 Rich Text Fields . ............................................................ 5.5.3 Alternative Method for Adding the Footer ..................... 5.5.4 Activating Forms . .......................................................... Reusing Form Objects .................................................................. 5.6.1
Creating Your Own Libraries .......................................... 5.6.2 Adding Form Objects . ................................................... 5.6.3 Using Form Objects ....................................................... Implicit Data Binding ................................................................... 5.7.1
Creating Copies of Forms ............................................... 5.7.2
Implementing the Implicit Data Binding ........................ Useful Functions in Adobe LiveCycle Designer ............................. 5.8.1
Customizing the Toolbars . ............................................. 5.8.2 Object Editor ................................................................. 5.8.3 Spelling ......................................................................... 5.8.4 Hyphenation . ................................................................ 5.8.5 Managing Multiple Form Fields ..................................... 5.8.6 Managing Data Bindings ................................................ 5.8.7 Adobe Reader Target Version for a Form Template ......... 5.8.8 Defining the Tab Order .................................................. 5.8.9 PDF Structure ................................................................ Summary ..................................................................................... 210
213
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217
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218
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225
225
226
227
228
228
6 Form Output .............................................................................. 229
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
Print Program .............................................................................. 6.1.1
Data Selection ............................................................... 6.1.2
Determining the Generated Function Module . .............. 6.1.3
Opening a Print Job ....................................................... 6.1.4
Calling the Generated Function Module ........................ 6.1.5
Closing the Print Job . .................................................... 6.1.6
Form Output ................................................................. Spool System ............................................................................... Device Types for the Output ........................................................ Special Output Scenarios ............................................................. 6.4.1
Archiving ....................................................................... 6.4.2 Returning Documents .................................................... Error Analysis . ............................................................................. 6.5.1
Trace and PDF with Additional Information ................... 230
230
232
234
237
239
240
244
246
249
249
250
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254
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Contents
6.5.2
6.6
6.7
6.8
6.9
6.10
Activating and Retrieving the Trace in the Print
Program . ....................................................................... 6.5.3 More Detailed Error Messages ....................................... 6.5.4 ICF Recorder . ................................................................ Performance Optimization Through Bundling . ............................. 6.6.1
Bundling Forms ............................................................. 6.6.2 Activating Bundling ....................................................... 6.6.3 Deactivating Bundling ................................................... 6.6.4 Bundling Example .......................................................... 6.6.5 Bundling the PDF Return ............................................... Parallelization of Print Jobs .......................................................... 6.7.1
Activating Parallelization in the Print Program . .............. 6.7.2
Monitoring Requests ..................................................... 6.7.3
Tracing Using the SOA Manager . ................................... Translating Forms . ....................................................................... 6.8.1
Translating Short Texts ................................................... 6.8.2 Translating Long Texts . .................................................. 6.8.3 Output of a Translated Form .......................................... XFP Output ................................................................................. Summary ..................................................................................... 258
258
258
263
263
264
265
266
269
270
272
273
276
281
282
283
284
285
287
7 Advanced Form Template Design .............................................. 289
7.1
7.2
Advanced Techniques for Print Forms .......................................... 7.1.1
Preparations .................................................................. 7.1.2
Floating Fields ............................................................... 7.1.3
Using Tables .................................................................. 7.1.4
Page Breaks ................................................................... 7.1.5
Subform Set . ................................................................. 7.1.6
Using Patterns for Display Formatting ............................ 7.1.7
Conditional Page Breaks ................................................ 7.1.8
Form Output with Duplex Printing ................................ 7.1.9
Output of the Completed Form Template ...................... Interactive PDF Forms ................................................................. 7.2.1
Preparations .................................................................. 7.2.2
From PDF-Based Print Forms to Interactive PDF Forms . .. 7.2.3
Form Fields of Interactive PDF Forms . ........................... 7.2.4
Dynamic Properties ....................................................... 289
289
290
292
296
300
302
307
309
311
312
313
317
330
338
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Contents
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
Using Script Programs .................................................................. 7.3.1
First Script Program ....................................................... 7.3.2
Tips for Debugging Script Programs ............................... 7.3.3
Calculations via Script Programs . ................................... 7.3.4
Input Validation via Script Programs .............................. 7.3.5
Controlling the Ready-for-Input Status and
Visibility of Form Fields ................................................. 7.3.6
Determining the Recipient Address for an Email
Message at Runtime ...................................................... 7.3.7
Querying Reader Version Information ............................ 7.3.8
Access to Data Nodes and Form Fields .......................... 7.3.9
Dynamic Tables . ............................................................ Using Barcodes ............................................................................ 7.4.1
Properties of Barcodes ................................................... 7.4.2
Notes on the Output of Barcodes with
Zebra Label Printers ....................................................... Tips for Increasing Performance ................................................... 7.5.1
Merging Static Texts ...................................................... 7.5.2
Resolution of Used Images . ........................................... 7.5.3
Ensuring Correct Data Bindings . .................................... 7.5.4
Nesting Depth of Subforms . .......................................... 7.5.5
Gradient Fills for PostScript Level 2 . .............................. 7.5.6
Using Script Programs .................................................... 7.5.7
Enforcing Strict Scoping Rules in JavaScript . .................. 7.5.8
Limiting the Volume of Transferred Data for the
Form Output ................................................................. 7.5.9
Using Fonts ................................................................... Introduction to Accessible PDF Forms ......................................... 7.6.1
Creating Accessible PDF Forms ...................................... 7.6.2
Tips for Creating Accessible PDF Forms . ........................ Additional Information ................................................................ 7.7.1
Additional Information on the Internet .......................... 7.7.2
Adobe Designer Scripting Reference .............................. 7.7.3
XFA ............................................................................... 7.7.4
Acrobat JavaScript Reference ......................................... Summary ..................................................................................... 341
342
346
348
349
350
352
353
356
357
361
362
363
363
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364
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365
365
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371
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Contents
8 Integration with Web Dynpro ABAP ......................................... 373
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
Web Dynpro ABAP ...................................................................... 8.1.1
Initial Overview ............................................................. 8.1.2
Step by Step: Hello World ............................................. Scenarios for the Integration of Interactive Forms ........................ 8.2.1
Print Scenario ................................................................ 8.2.2 Online Scenario ............................................................. 8.2.3 Offline Scenario ............................................................. The InteractiveForm UI Element .................................................. Interaction with Form Builder ...................................................... 8.4.1
Using Form Templates ................................................... 8.4.2 The pdfOnly Case .......................................................... Implementing Scenarios Using Web Dynpro ABAP . ..................... 8.5.1
Print Scenario ................................................................ 8.5.2 Online Scenario ............................................................. 8.5.3 Offline Scenario ............................................................. 8.5.4 Migrating ACF to ZCI ..................................................... 8.5.5 Specialized Topics .......................................................... Summary ..................................................................................... 374
374
378
385
385
387
388
389
391
391
404
404
405
410
469
497
498
500
9 Internal Service Request . .......................................................... 501
9.1
Introduction ................................................................................ 9.1.1
Concepts in the ISR Framework ..................................... 9.1.2
Prerequisites .................................................................. 9.1.3
What Can Be Configured and Where Can It Be
Programmed? ................................................................ 9.2 SAP NetWeaver Portal Scenarios . ................................................ 9.2.1
Grouping of the Provided Scenarios ............................... 9.2.2 Calling the Request Form in the Portal ........................... 9.2.3 Applicant Role ............................................................... 9.2.4 Approver Role ............................................................... 9.2.5 Processor Role ............................................................... 9.2.6 Workflow or Worklist? ................................................... 9.3 Getting Started—Creating a Plain Scenario . ................................. 9.3.1
Preliminary Considerations for a New ISR Scenario ........ 9.3.2 ISR Wizard . ................................................................... 502
502
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506
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514
517
518
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520
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Contents
9.4 Customizing and Programming a Scenario . .................................. 9.4.1
General Details .............................................................. 9.4.2 Application and Version . ............................................... 9.4.3 Notification Type ........................................................... 9.4.4 Entry Type ..................................................................... 9.4.5 Characteristics ............................................................... 9.4.6 Activities and Automatic Updates in Notifications ......... 9.4.7 The Processor’s Activities from the Form ....................... 9.4.8
Processor Determination (BAdI QISR3) and Workflow .... 9.4.9 Service Costs and BAdI QISR2 ....................................... 9.4.10 Testing the Scenario . ..................................................... 9.5 Request Forms as Adobe Forms ................................................... 9.5.1
Specific Properties ......................................................... 9.5.2 Structure of the Interface and Form Context .................. 9.5.3 Generating Adobe Forms from Characteristics ................ 9.5.4 Generating New Characteristics from the Form .............. 9.5.5 ISR Library—Special Screen Elements . ........................... 9.6 Form Flow Logic .......................................................................... 9.6.1
Data Structures within the ISR Framework ..................... 9.6.2 Default Values for the MODE, USER_COMMAND,
and FORM_VIEW Parameters ........................................ 9.6.3 Programming Examples . ................................................ 9.6.4 Reading and Setting the Special Request Fields in
BAdI Methods ............................................................... 9.6.5 Error Handling During Checks ........................................ 9.6.6 Controlling the Field Layout . ......................................... 9.7 ISR Architecture . ......................................................................... 9.7.1
ISR as a Toolset . ............................................................ 9.7.2
Web Dynpro ABAP Component and How to Use It . ...... 9.7.3
Usage Options in SAP NetWeaver Portal . ...................... 9.7.4
ISR_PROCESS_EVENT RFC ............................................. 9.7.5
Additional Interfaces and Auxiliary Functions . ............... 9.8 ISR in the Application Basis (ABA) ............................................... 9.8.1
Basic Concept ................................................................ 9.8.2 Defining a Scenario . ...................................................... 9.8.3 Form Flow Logic ............................................................ 9.8.4 Architecture . ................................................................. 9.9 Summary ..................................................................................... 529
529
532
533
534
535
537
541
543
548
550
551
551
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554
556
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564
567
568
568
572
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588
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592
592
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596
600
603
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Contents
10 ABAP Offline Infrastructure . ..................................................... 605
10.1 Offline Scenarios Using Email Messages ....................................... 10.2 Address Updating in the Flight-Booking Model as a
Sample Scenario .......................................................................... 10.3 Configuring the Email Inbound .................................................... 10.4 Using ABAP Offline Infrastructure ................................................ 10.4.1 Creating the Offline Handler .......................................... 10.4.2 Interface and Context .................................................... 10.4.3 Creating the Form Template . ......................................... 10.4.4 Generating and Sending the Form . ................................ 10.4.5 Processing Forms Received ............................................ 10.5 Testing the Offline Scenario ......................................................... 10.6 Summary ..................................................................................... 605
606
608
609
609
610
612
618
623
628
633
11 ABAP PDF Object ...................................................................... 635
11.1 Overview ..................................................................................... 11.2 Instantiating the PDF Object . ...................................................... 11.3 Creating a PDF Document ........................................................... 11.3.1 Retrieving a Form .......................................................... 11.3.2 Transferring a Form via a Reference . .............................. 11.3.3 Creating an Interactive PDF Document .......................... 11.3.4 Usage Rights . ................................................................ 11.4 Processing an Interactive PDF Document ..................................... 11.4.1 Filling Out an Interactive PDF Document . ..................... 11.4.2 Data Extraction . ............................................................ 11.4.3 Validation of a Digital Signature . ................................... 11.5 Certifying PDF Documents ........................................................... 11.6 Job Profiles .................................................................................. 11.7 Additional Methods of the PDF Object ........................................ 11.8 Summary ..................................................................................... 635
636
639
640
641
642
645
647
648
650
651
653
657
657
658
12 Offline Scenarios via Web Services ........................................... 659
12.1 Overview ..................................................................................... 659
12.2 Using WSDL Data Connections .................................................... 660
12.2.1 Creating a Web Service Based on a BAPI . ...................... 660
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Contents
12.2.2 Creating a Form Template .............................................. 12.2.3 Testing the Form Template . ........................................... 12.3 Using the SOAP Object in JavaScript ............................................ 12.3.1 Creating a Web Service on the Basis of a
Function Module ........................................................... 12.3.2 Creating a Form Template .............................................. 12.3.3 Implementing the Web Service Calls .............................. 12.3.4 Testing the Form Template . ........................................... 12.4 Tips for Using Web Services ......................................................... 12.4.1 Calling the Web Service in the Click Event ..................... 12.4.2 Calling the Web Service Automatically When
Opening the Form ......................................................... 12.4.3 Calling Multiple Web Services Using a Button . .............. 12.5 Summary ..................................................................................... 668
674
678
678
684
685
690
692
692
692
692
693
13 Advanced Installation and Configuration . ................................ 695
13.1 Configuring a Secure Connection to ADS ..................................... 13.1.1 Setting Up Your Own Certification Authority ................. 13.1.2 Creating an SSL Client Identity in the ABAP System ....... 13.1.3 Configuring the Java System and ADS ............................ 13.1.4 Creating a Secure Connection in the ABAP System . ....... 13.2 Managing and Creating Job Profiles ............................................. 13.2.1 Calling the Job Profile Management . ............................. 13.2.2 Managing Job Profiles . .................................................. 13.2.3 Creating a New Job Profile . ........................................... 13.3 Installing and Using the XDC Editor ............................................. 13.4 Summary ..................................................................................... 695
696
698
709
727
730
730
731
731
734
735
The Authors ................................................................................................ 737
Index .......................................................................................................... 739
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This chapter introduces SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe and discusses
various application scenarios. It also specifies the software components used
and the architecture for integration with SAP NetWeaver.
2
Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
This chapter introduces you to the basic terminology associated with the use of
SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe, such as Portable Document Format (PDF)-based
print forms and interactive forms. A classification of online and offline application
scenarios is outlined for interactive forms; additionally, you are provided with support for deciding in which cases you should use interactive forms. Furthermore,
this chapter compares Adobe Acrobat® and Adobe Reader and explains why it is
sufficient to deploy Adobe Reader for the use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe.
Finally, this chapter introduces the software components of Adobe, Adobe LiveCycle Designer, and Adobe Document Services and their integration with the SAP
NetWeaver stack.
2.1
PDF, PDF-Based Print Forms, and Interactive PDF Forms
The following sections detail PDFs and the two main concepts of this book—
PDF-based print forms and interactive PDF forms.
2.1.1
PDF File Format
In the early 1990s, Adobe Systems launched the first version of PDFs. At that time,
Adobe was well known for its PostScript printer language, Adobe Illustrator (a
vector-based drawing tool), and Adobe Photoshop (image editing). The idea behind
PDF was to develop a platform-independent file format that enabled high-quality
exchange and printout of documents. The primary focus was on the exchange of
documents and not on an editable document format.
The specification of PDF is published; therefore, everyone can get an overview of
this file format. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) lists the
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2
Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
PDF format under Standard 32000. The PDF/A format for archiving documents is
already an ISO standard; however, it has not yet become a part of SAP Interactive
Forms by Adobe.
PDFs enable you to flexibly describe the structure of individual pages of a document.
PDF is a flat file format and knows only the concept of a page as the structuring
element. Compared to PostScript, it is a pure descriptive language and therefore
contains no programming language constructs.
The most commonly known use of PDF is high-quality print output: A document
is converted into a PDF file and can then be displayed or printed on different platforms and operating systems via Adobe Reader. The presentation of a document
as a PDF ensures that the document always has the same layout regardless of the
user’s operating system or platform. The user requires only a PDF display tool, for
example, Adobe Reader.
In addition to the pure display and printout, you can also use PDF documents for
data entry. To do this, forms that are based on PDF contain interactive form fields
that enable the user to interact with the PDF document. This way, you can enter
data and execute calculations that are based on this data directly during entry. For
this reason, Adobe Reader supports JavaScript as one of the scripting languages.
2.1.2
PDF-Based Print Forms
Forms are a well-known structuring method for data output (for example, a telephone bill) or data entry (for example, official application forms). One of the essential
aspects of forms is a uniform layout that enables and supports the recognition of
forms. The structure of each telephone bill is identical and the customer knows
where to find certain information on the bill—just like annual tax forms.
This feature requires the form designer to use a clear and comprehensible layout
for the form. The layout describes what information is located in which position
on the form. It must also specify how to handle a large number of data records,
which is usually done by distributing them throughout multiple pages.
The task of a form designer is to create form templates. Based on the form template,
a specific form is generated and—in most cases—filled with data during the generation process. Consequently, the form template plays a central role in all form-based
processes. Therefore, the form designer must be optimally supported in his task
with a user-friendly and intuitive tool.
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PDF, PDF-Based Print Forms, and Interactive PDF Forms
2.1
Forms can be output both on paper and electronically; however, the electronic output has significant advantages (for example, electronic transmission or archiving).
For this reason, SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe enables you to output forms in
different printer languages or as PDF files.
Supported Printer Languages
The printer languages supported include Adobe PostScript® (PS), Printer Command Language® (PCL) developed by Hewlett-Packard®, and Zebra Programming
Language® (ZPL) for printing barcodes on Zebra label printers. Printers must be
able to process one of the aforementioned printer languages to ensure that they
are supported by SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe.
Supported Printer Languages
SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe supports the following printer languages:
EE
Adobe PostScript Levels 2 and 3, where Level 3 is the default setting. To create Level
2, the corresponding XML Device Configuration (XDC) file must be copied and customized (see Section 3.5.6, XDCs).
EE
PCL 5 in monochrome and color.
EE
ZPL-II is supported in different resolutions, for example, 200, 300, and 600 Dots per
Inch (DPI).
The print output and the PDF file are created based on Adobe XML Forms Architecture (XFA) technology, which is a specification published by Adobe. This specification
describes the XML-based structure of a form template and the behavior of display
and conversion programs at runtime. The XFA specification is a very good source
of information and can be downloaded from the Adobe website (http://partners.
adobe.com/public/developer/xml/index_arch.html).
Support of Barcodes
Another important area supported by SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe is barcodes.
A barcode encodes information that can be read by a scanner and then processed.
You can find barcodes on virtually every product package read at a checkout counter. You can determine the scanned product and its price based on the information
encoded in the barcode.
SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe supports most of the common barcodes. Currently,
there are 34 different barcodes, including EAN8, EAN13, and Code 128, for example.
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2
Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
There are also barcodes that can be supported only by the printer itself. If this is
the case, the output is done as a PDF file, and a gray rectangle will be displayed
instead of the barcode. It is also possible to exclusively create a barcode and print
it on a barcode printer. Currently, this is supported for Zebra label printers.
There is no way to define barcodes yourself. For barcodes that are not supported,
you have to rely on their support in one of the more recent releases.
Simplex and Duplex Printing
The double-sided print output and paper tray selection are supported as of SAP
NetWeaver 7.0 Support Package 13. Simplex and duplex printing, that is, singlesided and double-sided printing, are controlled by means of the page sets and
master pages. The form designer assigns the individual form pages to master pages
to specify whether a page appears on the front side or the back side. Very complex
scenarios are possible here (for example, combining simplex and duplex prints in
one form) that require skillful use of master pages and conditional page breaks.
Paper Tray Control
The selection for the paper tray control requires multiple configuration steps because
the corresponding control codes need to be determined for the printer and assigned
to the available paper types. The control codes are contained in the XDC files, and
their assignment is carried out by editing the XDC files located on the server.
PDF-Based Print Forms, SAP Smart Forms, and SAPscript
The print output, which is based on PDF-based print forms, provides an alternative
to the SAPscript and SAP Smart Forms technologies provided by SAP. There is no
full equivalence with regard to functions and properties between the technologies
due to technological differences. The option to navigate to a callback of an ABAP
function during the layout creation is not possible for PDF-based print forms due
to technological reasons.
SAP Smart Forms versus SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
SAP Note 1009567 describes the functional differences between SAP Smart Forms and
SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe.
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PDF, PDF-Based Print Forms, and Interactive PDF Forms
2.1
SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe provides advanced and complex innovations, such
as enhanced layout options (for example, rectangles with rounded corners) or support of a scripting language (for instance, implementing calculations and validations
in interactive PDF forms). These enhanced options can impact performance and
file sizes; for example, shadings affect the output in PCL format.
Another innovation compared to the already-existing technologies is the option
to create interactive PDF forms. These are described in greater detail in the following section.
2.1.3
Interactive PDF Forms
PDF documents provide much more than just the known display and print functionality: They can contain interactive form fields. These fields are called “interactive”
because the user can make changes by means of the mouse or the keyboard.
Possibilities
Interactive form fields include input fields for text and numbers that are entered
via the keyboard. Moreover, you are provided with radio buttons or checkboxes,
which are primarily operated using the mouse. In addition, more complex fields,
such as the date selection field (a calendar appears for simplified selection), list
boxes, and dropdown lists are available. List fields or dropdown lists are particularly helpful if the user of the form is supposed to select an input value from a
predefined list. The list can display all list entries so that the user does not have to
remember all possible input options.
Interactive PDF forms are used for structured data entry by the user. If multiple users
enter data, this is called mass data entry. In this case, electronic support is especially
beneficial because the processing and saving of data can be automated.
Interactive form fields enable the user to interact directly with the document. Data
that are stored in the interactive PDF form are changed during the interaction. For
integration with electronic processes, you can extract or insert data on the server
side. In specific cases, this is also possible at the user’s work station, for example,
if only the data contained in the PDF form are to be sent by email.
For SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe, the XFA-based technology is used. Here, the
form template is stored in XML format and the data contained in the PDF form are
stored as an XML data record.
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Static and Dynamic PDF Forms
For interactive PDF forms, you can differentiate between static and dynamic PDF
forms depending on whether the form layout changes during the interaction or
not. An example is dynamic tables in which users can insert new rows or delete
old rows. Another example is to hide parts of the form depending on the previous
entries. This is possible only for dynamic PDF forms.
For dynamic PDF forms, the form layout is created directly in Adobe Reader. This
is done based on the form template and the data contained therein. As of Adobe
Reader version 8.1, the display of dynamic forms is considerably faster than in older
versions. It is recommended that you use Adobe Reader version 8.1 or higher if
you utilize dynamic functions intensively. It is recommended that you use the current Adobe Reader version. Nevertheless, it is possible that the use of frameworks
(for example, Web Dynpro frameworks) may result in restrictions or cause delays
in the support. If this is the case, the corresponding chapters of this book refer to
the relevant SAP note.
2.1.4
Accessibility of PDF Forms
Because you can use interactive PDF forms as a part of user interfaces, the accessibility of PDF forms is of significance. Interactive forms enable you to create accessible
PDF forms. Accessible means, for example, that visually handicapped users can
also utilize the PDF form. Although Adobe Reader provides a function for reading
PDF documents out loud (View • Read Out Loud), third-party software, such as
JAWS® from Freedom Scientific®, is usually used. Accessibility also means that
mobility-impaired users can work with an application or a document (for example,
by means of the voice control).
Accessibility impacts the size of the PDF file because additional information needs to
be added. This information must be generated on the server during the creation of
the PDF document, which also requires extra time. Therefore, you should consider
whether a PDF form should always be accessible or not. A user-specific control is
one option to avoid additional work. For example, you can use the user settings
for the print preview in SAP GUI.
The form layout does not always result in an accessible form. The design tool to
form templates supports you in the creation of accessible forms—for example, for
the positioning of form fields, which influences the sequence. However, if the layout
of the form is so complex that it is difficult to use, it is predictable that accessibility
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Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat Family
2.2
problems will occur. In such cases, it is extremely helpful to reconsider and revise
the form layout.
2.1.5
Using Interactive PDF Forms
You have been introduced to several significant properties of PDF forms:
EE
A PDF form may or may not be interactive. If not, it is a PDF-based print
form.
EE
In addition, a PDF form can be static or dynamic.
These properties are either determined by the individual frameworks that integrate
the PDF forms, for example, in Web Dynpro ABAP it is a preset that creates dynamic
PDF forms, or are available as parameters in the programming interfaces.
The benefit of interactive PDF forms in electronic business processes in the SAP
environment is that you just need Adobe Reader and a Web browser or email program to use them. The wide distribution of Adobe Reader and the common email
programs and Web browsers facilitates their use considerably.
2.2
Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat Family
Adobe offers two products for displaying PDF files: the free Adobe Reader and
the Adobe Acrobat family that is subject to charge. The Adobe Acrobat 9 family
comprises three separate products: Adobe Acrobat Standard, Adobe Acrobat Pro,
and Adobe Pro Extended.
Note on the Usage of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Adobe Reader is sufficient for the use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe! Most notably,
it is not necessary to purchase Adobe Acrobat licenses. Adobe Reader is distributed by
Adobe Systems and not by SAP; that is, Adobe Reader can be downloaded only from
the Adobe website (http://www.adobe.com/reader).
Adobe Reader 9.4.2 is used throughout this book. If you use an older version of
Adobe Reader, you should update Adobe Reader to this version or a higher version
after you have read this chapter.
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
The fee-based products of the Adobe Acrobat family provide more functionality
than the free Adobe Reader. Section 2.2.1, Comparing Adobe Reader and Acrobat
Professional, details why it is still sufficient to use Adobe Reader.
Interactive Forms on Mobile Devices
SAP Note 1002905 describes the supported mobile devices and the existing restrictions
from the point of view of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe. Currently, interactive forms
are supported by Adobe Reader for Pocket PC.
2.2.1
Comparing Adobe Reader and Acrobat Professional
Adobe Acrobat products provide more functionality than the free Adobe Reader.
This functionality includes, for example, the creation of PDF documents and their
manipulation. Adobe Acrobat Pro Extended enables the conversion of different 3D
formats into a PDF document.
Parts of this functionality are also included in Adobe Reader; however, they are
hidden and must first be activated. For their activation, a PDF document must be
provided with a corresponding ID, called usage rights, during their creation.
Figure 2.1 Interactive Forms in Adobe Reader (Without Embedded Usage Rights)
Figure 2.1 shows a simple interactive PDF form in Adobe Reader 9.4, which contains interactive form fields. After a change has been made in the first form field,
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Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat Family
2.2
the dialog shown in the figure appears. It notifies the user that the data entered
cannot be saved using Adobe Reader. In Adobe Acrobat, this functionality is always
activated.
Usage Rights for Adobe Reader
By embedding usage rights into the PDF itself, you can activate the following additional functions in Adobe Reader:
EE
Saving of interactive PDF forms
This eliminates the behavior of Adobe Reader described earlier, in which data
that were entered in an interactive PDF form cannot be saved.
EE
Digital signature If the PDF form includes a signature field, the user can digitally sign the PDF,
provided that this functionality has been activated.
The qualified digital signature required in Germany, for example, is not supported in the standard version of Adobe Reader. This functionality can be added
by using a plug-in.
EE
Add comments and markups
This functionality enables you to comment on the opened PDF document. To
do this, you are provided with sticky notes that allow you to enter free text (see
Figure 2.2). In addition, you can use custom stamps.
Commenting on dynamic PDF forms is not possible presently.
EE
Add PDF file attachments
You can add file attachments to PDF documents. Two types of file attachments
are distinguished here: document-wide file attachments and file attachments on
specific pages and in specific positions (also referred to as file attachment comments). A setting exists for these file attachments that prevents the file attachment
from opening at the click of a mouse. This setting can be found under Edit •
Preferences • Trust Manager.
For dynamic PDF forms, you are provided with only document-wide file
attachments.
EE
Call Web services
Calling Web services is also a functionality that can only be used with usage
rights.
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Figure 2.2
Enabled Menu for Comment & Markup
Figure 2.3
Information About the Opened PDF Document
Figure 2.3 shows the same PDF form that was displayed in Figure 2.1. The difference is that usage rights are now embedded. You are provided with additional
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Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat Family
2.2
information about the currently opened document if you click on the blue I symbol
in the top left corner. The information for the example shown in this figure indicates
that the document contains interactive form fields and lists the embedded usage
rights in descriptive form.
The intention behind SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe is to add usage rights to
interactive PDF forms. Therefore, Adobe Reader is sufficient for viewing.
For adding usage rights, you must install a credential in SAP NetWeaver together
with SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe. This credential is not required for PDF-based
print forms. Chapter 3, Installation and Configuration, describes how you can obtain
this credential and how it is installed in the SAP NetWeaver stack.
2.2.2
Selecting the Appropriate Adobe Reader Version
New releases of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe usually include new functions.
Because of this, there is a recommended minimum version number for every release
of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe to utilize the full functionality.
For a project that uses SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe, you must always determine
the Adobe Reader version(s) to be used. If you use different Adobe Reader versions,
it is recommended that you test them (for example, a new version of Adobe Reader
may correct errors in older versions).
Selecting the Adobe Reader Version
If you use functionality that was introduced together with a specific SAP NetWeaver
support package, you must consider the lowest version number. New Adobe Reader
versions are downward compatible; that is, you can always use a newer version of
Adobe Reader.
EE
If you use Adobe LiveCycle Designer 8.1 and SAP NetWeaver 7.0 Enhancement Package 1 (EHP1), Adobe Reader 8.2 is the minimum version.
EE
As of SAP NetWeaver 7.0 EHP2, and if you use Adobe LiveCycle Designer 8.2, you
should use Adobe Reader 9.4 or higher. You must also observe whether an integration
environment (such as Web Dynpro) specifies the Adobe Reader version to be used.
It is also useful to visit the Adobe Systems Web site (http://www.adobe.com/reader) to
obtain information about the latest Adobe Reader version. There you can find new versions if, for example, a security problem occurred that was remedied by a new version.
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
2.2.3
Useful Settings of Adobe Reader
In Adobe Reader, there are some preferences that enable you to customize the
behavior of Adobe Reader for the use of interactive forms. These preferences can
be found under the menu path Edit • Preferences….
EE
Under the Forms category you can find multiple options with regard to the
display and behavior for filling out an interactive PDF form. The Always Hide
Forms Document Message Bar option is particularly interesting. You can select
this option if document messages are sensitive (for example, if the document
contains interactive form fields) or if you want to provide more space for the
form itself.
EE
In the Internet category you can find the Display PDF in Browser option. This
option specifies whether Adobe Reader is started embedded in the browser.
Users frequently search for this option when they find out that Adobe Reader
always opens externally and want to change this setting.
2.3
Examples of PDF-Based Print Forms and
Interactive PDF Forms
If you have an SAP system at hand that is already installed and configured for
the use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe, you can continue to the following
two examples. If you do not have such a system, you can set up a test system as
described in Chapter 3 and then follow the examples. The first example demonstrates the print output; the second example creates an interactive PDF form that
is prefilled with data.
2.3.1
Example for Print Output
This example is intended to demonstrate the integration of the print output with
the SAP NetWeaver ABAP stack via PDF-based print forms. To do this, you call a
print program, enter the parameters, and then create a print output. You can display
the print output as a print preview instead of sending it to a printer.
The example assumes that the flight database is filled with data. If required, the
flight database can be filled by executing the SAPBC_DATA_GENERATOR program in
Transaction SE38.
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Examples of PDF-Based Print Forms and Interactive PDF Forms
2.3
The print output is viewed at runtime when the print program and the form design
have already been created. The print program performs the data retrieval and
preparation and then initiates the creation of the print output. The print output
can be either a printer language (PS, PCL, or ZPL) or a PDF.
1. Log on to the SAP system via the SAP GUI.
2. Start Transaction SE38 to open the ABAP Editor.
3. Enter FP_TEST_03 as the name of the program. Figure 2.4 shows what the screen
should look like.
Figure 2.4
Selecting and Starting a Print Program
4. Then, start the program by clicking on the corresponding icon in the toolbar
(the clock with the green checkmark) or by pressing the (F8) key.
5. The print program is now executed and the screen shown in Figure 2.5 is displayed. You can accept the displayed parameters. After you have run the example,
you can change the parameters.
6. You can also select another form by changing the Form parameter in this screen.
However, you cannot select just any form—only forms with the same interface.
Chapter 4, Interface and Form Context, provides detailed information on this
topic.
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Figure 2.5
Entering Parameters for the Print Program Example
For example, select FP_TEST_03 or FP_TEST_03_TABLE. Again, click on the clock
icon or press the (F8) key to run the program. This opens the Print dialog for
selecting the output device (see Figure 2.6).
Figure 2.6 Dialog for the Print Output
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Examples of PDF-Based Print Forms and Interactive PDF Forms
2.3
7. In this dialog, you must select an output device. You can enter “LP01” as text;
LP01 is a sample printer present in many SAP systems. If this printer is not available on your SAP system, you must search for an output device via the input
help or contact your system administrator.
8. Next, click on the Print Preview button (not Print) to obtain a preview of the
print output.
9. If all steps were performed correctly, Adobe Reader will be displayed in the SAP
GUI as shown in Figure 2.7. In this case, Adobe Reader displays the print output
as a PDF document. You can see an excerpt from the flight-booking database in
accordance with the selected form.
Figure 2.7
Print Preview of the Print Output via Adobe Reader
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
This example indicates which parts of the print output are identical for all forms. This
includes the form layout that describes the appearance of the formatted output and the
structure of data. The data quantity per form output is the only variable that is changeable and thus changes at runtime during the various calls. This is based on parameters
and therefore different data are selected from the database and processed.
2.3.2
Creating an Interactive PDF Form
The second example considers the creation of an interactive PDF form. SAP provides
a test program for this as well. You can test it as described here:
1. Go back to the initial screen of the ABAP Editor (see Figure 2.4).
2. In contrast to the print example, start the FP_TEST_IA_01 program. You can
change the parameters for the test in the following screen.
3. Do not make any changes in the Form area for the initial test.
4. In the Data area you can set individual parts of the form to Editable or Locked
(Read-Only).
5. You can change the values that are used for filling the individual form fields
during creation. You can accept these defaults or change them as shown in
Figure 2.8.
Figure 2.8
Screen for Entering Parameters
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Examples of PDF-Based Print Forms and Interactive PDF Forms
2.3
6. Start the program.
7. In the subsequent Print dialog, select a configured printer—just as in the print
example—and click on Print Preview to confirm.
An interactive PDF form as shown in Figure 2.9 is displayed in the preview of the
print output. This form is used for a change of address for an employee. Accordingly, the form includes an area that provides general information, such as name and
department, and an area with the old, currently saved address. The New Address
area contains interactive form fields for entering a new address.
Figure 2.9
Preview of the Interactive PDF Form Example
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Below the New Address area, there are two more form fields that you can test (you
may have to scroll down the visible area of the PDF form to see them).
EE
The first field is a date field that provides a convenient date selection screen.
EE
The second field is the field for a digital signature.
At this point, you may test the procedure for applying a digital signature. To do this,
a certificate must be installed on your PC. Adobe Reader indicates the certificates
available. You can also check which usage rights have been added to the form (see
Section 2.2.1 for more details).
2.4
Using Interactive Forms in Business Processes
The creation of interactive forms is the second important application area in addition to the print output. Interactive forms can be used to optimize individual steps
of a business process. In this case, optimizing processes means the following:
EE
Increasing the data integrity
Errors can occur whenever data are transmitted or processed manually. If,
for example, the handwriting on a paper form is illegible or cannot be read
entirely after transmission by fax, this may result in problems during further
processing.
So what are you supposed to do if you want to enter the data into the system?
In most cases, you would simply guess. Guessing may result in higher costs, if,
for example, electronic bank transfers fail or a second manual revision is necessary. Consistent electronic entry of data can remedy this problem.
EE
Eliminating manual steps
Manual entry of data must be carried out by a person. However, before this
person can start entering data, the data must be sent to the person in paper
form. The transfer of data to the entering person can be done by fax or by mail.
Frequently, the documents are scanned in and the data are then provided in
electronic form.
Another example is the entry of data during a telephone call (for instance, telephone orders). Usually, you cannot control the data entered on either side.
All of these manual steps result in processing delays. These delays ultimately
prolong the overall duration of the business process, which means, for example,
that products are delivered with a delay and suppliers receive their payment later.
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Using Interactive Forms in Business Processes
2.4
Consistent electronic processing can considerably accelerate business processes
by eliminating manual steps.
For the use of interactive forms in business processes, there are two different types
of scenarios: online scenarios and offline scenarios. In this case, the concepts online
and offline do not indicate whether the users have network access but whether the
users are logged on to an SAP system or not.
2.4.1
Online Scenarios
Online scenarios mainly feature the following two characteristics:
EE
Direct access to an SAP system is required and possible
During the use of a PDF form, it is possible to call an SAP system, for example,
to perform validations, implement a value help, or carry out complex calculations. This requires that the user is known in the system and that he is logged
on to an SAP system.
EE
Integration with other user-interface technology
PDF forms are never displayed alone. They are displayed in a Web browser and
are surrounded by other Web technology that calls Adobe Reader embedded
in an (HTML) page.
A typical online scenario may look like the following: The user is logged on to SAP
NetWeaver Portal. In the portal, he can view the pages of a Web Dynpro application in an iView. Web Dynpro enables you to integrate a PDF form with a view as
a user-interface element and supports the implementation of value helps, validations, etc., for PDF forms.
2.4.2
Offline Scenarios
Offline scenarios may be characterized as follows:
EE
Access to an SAP system is not possible or required
When the user processes a form, he cannot (and does not have to) call an SAP
system. Therefore, value helps, validations, and simple calculations must be contained in the PDF form by means of a scripting language. When the processing
of the PDF form is completed, it is transferred to an SAP system. This transfer
is done either indirectly (for example, via an email that contains the PDF form
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
as an attachment) or directly by logging on to the SAP system and uploading
the PDF form to an application.
For example, if the user is not logged on to the company intranet, it is usually
not possible to access an SAP system. If the user is logged on to the intranet,
he can send the PDF form, or the data contained therein, to an SAP system via
a Web service or HTTP call.
EE
Independence of other user-interface technologies
PDF forms are opened and processed with Adobe Reader exclusively. Therefore, integration with another technology for creating user interfaces is not
necessary.
These two characteristics require only that the PDF form contain all of the necessary information (such as value helps and data). This may result in larger PDF files,
which can impact the transfer time. This is important if the network connection
is slow, for example.
The fact that all necessary information is already contained in the PDF form and that
no access to an SAP system is required entails very interesting application options.
Consider the following implementation example of an offline scenario:
A user receives an email including a request to increase the budget of a cost center. The details of this request (currently approved budget, requested budget, and
already-spent budget) are contained in an interactive PDF form that has already
been sent to the user as an email attachment. Therefore, this interactive PDF form
provides all of the necessary information for making a decision. Additional access
to an SAP system is not required to fulfill the task. After the decision has been
made (approval, rejection, or approval of a different budget), the form, including
all changes, can be transferred as follows:
EE
EE
It is returned to the SAP system via email for further processing.
Or the PDF form can be sent to the user as an attachment to a proposal for an
appointment. At the customer’s site, you can then enter all of the relevant data
in the form. Subsequently, it is returned to the SAP system for updating.
EE
A portal can also provide the option to download an interactive PDF form, fill it
out, and start a process when it is returned to the SAP system.
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Using Interactive Forms in Business Processes
2.4
Example of Using a Portal for Transfer
An example of using a portal for transfer is when a customer places an order with a
mail-order business. If the user logs on to the system, the form should already be filled
in with important customer information. This information can be, for example, name,
address, customer ID, and the last order as an initial value. Filling in business data in
advance ensures that the user can conveniently use the interactive forms.
2.4.3 Combining Online and Offline Scenarios
Another approach is to provide the user with an option to go offline midway through
the process. This constitutes a mixture of offline and online scenarios. Examples of
this include the entry of travel expenses or working time.
When planning a business trip in the enterprise portal, you can prepare the entry
of travel expenses. One step of the business process could be the display of a PDF
form in which the user can enter the expenses. Depending on the process implementation, the user could download the form or receive it via email. During the
business trip, he can fill out the PDF form on his laptop. The user interface for travel
expenses enables the business traveler to upload the PDF form via a portal upon
his return. It is then displayed for checking, the entries are validated, and possible
confirmations are displayed. Corrections to the form can be done online.
2.4.4 When Do You Use Online and Offline Scenarios?
In addition to the question about the functioning and programming of the technology, you must also consider when you want to use interactive forms. To do this,
the following lists provide some support. Interactive forms are suitable as a method
for implementation if at least one of the following criteria applies:
EE
Imitating the layout of well-known forms
A well-known form implies that the user already knows how to handle it. This
familiarity enables a fast transfer of the former paper-based process into an electronic process. The (re)use of a well-known form can reduce training costs.
EE
Simple user interface for occasional SAP users
Interactive forms allow for the creation of simple interfaces for occasional users
of SAP systems. Instead of logging on to an SAP system, the user receives all of
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
the necessary information for the operation in a compact PDF form. This enables
a fast and convenient participation in the business process.
EE
Creating a document for archiving
In contrast to other technologies (for example, all HTML-based Web technologies), completed PDF forms are available for further use. This way, they can be
archived to fulfill regulatory requirements of traceability.
EE
Local print output of the form
PDF forms enable you to quickly create high-quality prints on site. For many
user-interface technologies (for example, HTML) this is possible only with some
difficulty and extra effort.
EE
Support of digital signatures
PDF forms can contain fields for digital signatures. However, country-specific
requirements must be taken into account. You can insert multiple digital signatures into a form within workflows (the respective fields must be contained
in the form).
EE
Several persons are required for data entry
PDF forms support data entry that cannot be implemented by one single person.
Frequently, forms cannot be completed by one person only because the required
information must be provided by several people (for example, information on
products and finances).
You should consider the implementation of an offline scenario if one of the following criteria is met:
EE
Integration of external users
A person who is not an employee of the enterprise is supposed to participate in
a business process but must not have access to the enterprise’s SAP systems.
EE
Offline use of a form
The user group of the form is in the service field or on a business trip and therefore has no access to the intranet and hence no access to the SAP system.
An alternative approach is the analysis of existing business processes. If you can
identify manual steps or detect intermediate statuses in processing that are similar
to the following two examples, you should consider the use of interactive forms
for process optimization:
EE
Conversion of existing paper-based processes
It is possible that today’s paper-based forms can be replaced with electronic
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Using Interactive Forms in Business Processes
2.4
versions. With the introduction of electronic forms, you can digitize parts of or
complete processes.
EE
Approval processes
In approval processes, you either change or create new system data, for example,
master data. However, this modification is supposed to become effective in the
system only after it has been approved. In this case, interactive PDF forms are
well suited as data containers. The data saved in the PDF form are transferred
to the SAP system only after approval.
If you compare the various options available in online and offline scenarios, you
will notice that the full efficiency of interactive PDF forms is utilized in offline scenarios. The need to integrate external users with business processes indicates that
an implementation using interactive forms makes sense. This ultimately results in
a faster execution of the business process and higher data quality—and therefore
optimized process costs.
2.4.5 Notes on the Use of Interactive Forms
“The why and the how” play a decisive role in the use of interactive forms in the
implementation of business processes.
Note for Offline Scenarios
In offline scenarios, the usability of interactive forms primarily depends on the forms’
size. The larger the forms are, the more difficult it is for the user to navigate within
the form. For this reason, it is useful to use the concepts of dynamic forms.
Depending on the data (for example, marital status, nationality, or answers to yes/
no questions), some parts of the forms can be either hidden or displayed. This way,
you can reduce the size and the complexity of the form. In extreme cases, you can
implement navigation with tabs that are similar to user interfaces.
A welcome side effect is that the behavior with regard to performance sometimes
considerably improves if, for example, large dynamic forms (more than ten pages)
do not have to be constantly re-created in Adobe Reader.
Notes for Online Scenarios
Online scenarios entail that you ensure a balance between the user interface parts
of the embedded technology (for example, Web Dynpro) and the interactive form.
Consider some extreme examples that illustrate this concept:
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
EE
If an interactive form with multiple pages is embedded in Web Dynpro and if
the Web Dynpro screen does not include any interface elements, the user faces
a complex navigation in the interactive form.
EE
Another extreme example is multiple dynamic tables—tables in which you can
insert or delete rows—which are distributed to multiple pages.
A possible solution for these cases is to reduce the complexity—just as for offline
scenarios. In both cases, you should check why interactive forms are used (see
Section 2.4.4, When Do You Use Online and Offline Scenarios?) to ensure that
interactive forms are not used just because they are easy to implement.
Interactive Forms are not a Replacement for Complex User Interfaces
SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe is a form technology that is oriented toward the creation
of forms. There are fewer functions provided, particularly in comparison to user-interface
technologies; for example, it is not possible to program a form entirely in JavaScript
without creating a form template in Adobe LiveCycle Designer.
Therefore, you should use SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe for form-based scenarios and
not as a replacement for a user-interface technology. You will encounter difficulties if
you still use forms as a replacement for user interfaces.
Notes for Combined Online/Offline Scenarios
If you combine online and offline scenarios, for example, to map the completing
and processing of a form, you should carefully consider whether you should use one
and the same form in both scenarios. Consider the notes provided in Section 2.4.4
to check whether an interactive form is required for the online scenario. Keep in
mind that the effort saved for the design and the implementation of the application
interface usually entails a greater development and maintenance effort.
2.5
Software Components and Architecture
Now that you have learned what PDF-based print forms and interactive forms are
and when they can be used, let us look at the required software components and
their integration with SAP NetWeaver. SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe mainly
consists of three software components, which can be used only after they have
been integrated with different SAP environments:
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Software Components and Architecture
EE
2.5
Adobe LiveCycle Designer
Adobe LiveCycle Designer is used at design and implementation time.
EE
Adobe Reader
Adobe Reader is required on the user’s PC at runtime.
EE
Adobe Document Services (ADS)
ADS must be installed and configured in the SAP NetWeaver stack at runtime.
Adobe Reader must be downloaded from the Adobe Website. ADS and Adobe
LiveCycle Designer are available directly from SAP. They are provided via the SAP
Service Marketplace (http://service.sap.com) or via SAP Solution Manager.
2.5.1
Adobe LiveCycle Designer
Adobe LiveCycle Designer is a tool that the form designer uses to create the layout of
forms. The layouts of PDF-based print forms and interactive forms are created in the same
way. The same tool, Adobe LiveCycle Designer, is used for both types of forms. Figure
2.10 shows how you can use Adobe LiveCycle Designer as a desktop application.
Figure 2.10 Adobe LiveCycle Designer
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Adobe LiveCycle Designer is a graphical interactive tool; many of the required steps
can be implemented using the mouse. The layout of the form is displayed graphically at design time (the window shown in the middle of Figure 2.10). Changes,
such as the positioning of form fields, are carried out using drag and drop.
In addition to the layout, Adobe LiveCycle Designer graphically displays the form
hierarchy and the data context:
EE
The form hierarchy indicates the structure of the pages that consist of the form
fields used and the subforms. Subforms are structuring elements that enable
you to create and maintain more complex forms. Nested subforms therefore
constitute a form hierarchy.
EE
The data context describes the data structure of the form. Technically, a form
is based on an XML data structure with a corresponding XML schema. In the
SAP environment, Adobe LiveCycle Designer is used almost exclusively in the
context of a framework. These frameworks create the XML schema at design
time. During runtime, the XML data required for form output are generated
automatically.
Adobe LiveCycle Designer provides all of the available form fields in a library.
From this library, you can insert new form fields into the form layout using drag
and drop. After a new form field has been added to the form, you can define additional properties using the palettes. Some examples are the appearance of buttons
or edit and display patterns. The appearance determines whether a button has a
border or a 3D effect. The edit and display pattern can be used to format figures,
times, or a date.
Very complex behavior of forms can also be implemented using script programming. Forms are based on an event model and you can create a script program
for many predefined events (for example, the initialize event for the time of
initialization of a field).
You can choose between two different scripting languages:
EE
JavaScript
The first option is JavaScript, a scripting language from Web programming. It
allows for easy access to script programming for form creation.
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EE
2.5
FormCalc
The second option is Adobe’s proprietary scripting language, FormCalc. FormCalc has a higher performance rate than JavaScript. In particular, calculations
that are based on tabular data structures can be implemented more easily with
FormCalc than with JavaScript.
Most PDF-based print forms can be used without any script programming. Interactive forms with dynamic behavior, however, often require scripts to implement
this dynamic behavior (for example, inserting or deleting table rows).
SAP Version of Adobe LiveCycle Designer
You must use the SAP version of Adobe LiveCycle Designer for the development of
PDF-based print forms and interactive forms, and not the version available from Adobe
(for example, as part of Adobe Acrobat Professional or other Adobe LiveCycle products). Therefore, you must download Adobe LiveCycle Designer from the SAP Service
Marketplace.
Embedding Adobe LiveCycle Designer in SAP Development Environments
Adobe LiveCycle Designer is already embedded in the development environments
for the use in the SAP environment. This results in the following benefits:
EE
Adobe LiveCycle Designer is integrated with the development process and can
be called at the right point and at the right time.
EE
Adobe LiveCycle Designer is always called in the context of the current development work. Therefore, the form to be processed is already opened and the data
view already displays the underlying data structure.
As a result, the form design must be saved in the surrounding development environments. Therefore, the embedded Adobe LiveCycle Designer does not provide any
File menu. You cannot find the menu item for file properties under File • Form
Properties… as is the case in the independent Adobe LiveCycle Designer; instead,
it is available under Edit • Form Properties...
Figure 2.11 shows the embedding of Adobe LiveCycle Designer in the SAP GUI.
Here, Adobe LiveCycle Designer is integrated with Form Builder. Form Builder is
the environment in the ABAP Workbench that bundles all of the development tools
required for the use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe.
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Figure 2.11 Adobe LiveCycle Designer Embedded in the SAP GUI
To check whether your installation is correct, you must call Form Builder and
navigate to the form template shown in Figure 2.11.
1. To do this, start the SAP GUI and call Transaction SFP. The screen shown in
Figure 2.12 should appear.
2. Enter the name of the form in the Form input field—in this case
FP_TEST_03_TABLE.
3. Then click on the Display button.
4. In the following screen, select the Layout tab to go to the screen shown in
Figure 2.11.
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Figure 2.12 Initial Screen of Transaction SFP
For the sake of completeness, Figure 2.13 shows how Adobe LiveCycle Designer is
embedded in the SAP NetWeaver Developer Studio. The SAP NetWeaver Developer
Studio is an Eclipse-based development tool that is usually used for development
in Java.
Figure 2.13 Adobe Designer Embedded in the SAP NetWeaver Developer Studio
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
In SAP’s Java world, there is only one integration of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe,
that is, the integration with Web Dynpro Java. This book focuses on development
using ABAP because multiple integrations exist here. For this reason, the main focus
is on integration with Web Dynpro ABAP and not with Web Dynpro Java.
2.5.2
Adobe Document Services
ADS is the server component installed on the SAP NetWeaver stack; strictly speaking, it is installed on the Java stack and comprises Java and C++ coding. It must
be configured after the installation and prior to the first usage. A configuration is
also necessary on the ABAP side. In a nutshell, the ABAP stack must be notified of
which ADS installation is to be used and how it can be reached. Only after these
two configurations have been completed can ADS be used by ABAP.
ADS and Adobe Document Server
ADS is a software component of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe. Do not confuse this
component with Adobe Document Server.
Adobe Document Server is an Adobe product that is maintained only within the framework
of warranty services and will be taken off the market soon. Adobe LiveCycle provides a
similar scope of functions.
First let us consider how you can use ADS within the ABAP and Java world (see
Figure 2.14). On both sides, there is a PDF object that represents the lowest usable
interface. The PDF object calls ADS.
SAP NetWeaver Application Server
ABAP Stack
Java Stack
ABAP PDF Object
Java PDF Object
Adobe Document Services
Figure 2.14 Main Components from the Developer’s View
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2.5
The PDF object is used exclusively whereby you can use only the functionality
existing in the respective PDF object. Currently, the PDF object in ABAP provides
considerably more functionality. The Java PDF object is mainly used in Web Dynpro
runtime; the ABAP PDF object, however, calls ADS from the Java stack. The Java
stack is still required for ADS for applications that are completely implemented
in ABAP.
ADS Requires the Java Stack
ADS constitutes an SAP NetWeaver solution extension that can be installed and operated only on the Java stack of SAP NetWeaver Application Server. Therefore, you need
a Java instance in your system landscape, even if the PDF forms are used only in the
ABAP world.
Using ADS
SAP ERP HCM
Internal Service Request
(ISR)
SAP NetWeaver
HCM Processes
& Forms
SAP ERP ECC
Figure 2.15 illustrates which frameworks are based on the two PDF objects or on
other frameworks.
Custom Applications
Web Dynpro ABAP
Web Dynpro Java
Forms Processing/Form Builder
ABAP PDF Object
Java PDF Object
Figure 2.15 Hierarchy of Integration and Frameworks
The PDF object is the lowest layer. Web Dynpro is based on the PDF object in
both worlds (ABAP and Java). In the ABAP world, you are also provided with
Form Builder and the Forms Processing runtime. You can also develop custom
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
applications that use the PDF object directly. In this case, Form Builder is used to
create the PDF forms and save them in the repository. This functionality is available
in SAP NetWeaver directly.
SAP Enterprise Core Component (ECC) contains the Internal Service Request
(ISR) framework, which is based on Web Dynpro. In more recent releases of SAP
NetWeaver, it is based on Web Dynpro ABAP; in the past, it utilized Web Dynpro Java. ISR supports the implementation of online scenarios using a workflow
integration.
This book considers all integrations that are displayed in gray in Figure 2.15. It
imparts the necessary basics that also apply to the frameworks and application
options not considered within the scope of this book. These are briefly explained
in the following text for the sake of completeness.
EE
HCM Processes & Forms is a framework that has been developed specifically for
personnel administration. It is part of SAP HCM and allows for the implementation of processes in personnel administration using interactive PDF forms. It is
a specialization and further development of the ISR framework. For this reason,
this book considers only the ISR framework because it provides all necessary
basics.
EE
SAP NetWeaver Business Process Management is the second framework that
is not considered. SAP NetWeaver Business Process Management is a complex
tool for creating business processes without any programming. This framework
includes an integration of interactive PDF forms for implementing individual
offline steps of a process. A process is either started by processing and sending
an interactive PDF form (to the SAP system) or an offline step is required midway through the process flow. In this case, an interactive PDF form is sent to
the user, who then participates in the process. The process is stopped until the
user has processed the PDF and returned it to the system. With regard to the
integration of interactive PDF forms, SAP NetWeaver Business Process Management provides functions similar to the older Guided Procedures.
EE
There is also indirect integration. Indirect integration includes all options in
which interactive PDF forms are not directly integrated with a technology or
framework; however, they can be integrated with an existing framework using
another technology. An example is the integration of a Web Dynpro application
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Software Components and Architecture
2.5
with SAP Business Workflow, with SAP NetWeaver Business Process Management,
or with Guided Procedures. This way, the mentioned frameworks can be used to
support online or offline scenarios. For the implementation of interactive PDF
forms in SAP Business Workflow, you need a working knowledge of the frameworks with which you want to integrate and of the integration of interactive PDF
forms with Web Dynpro. This book provides details about the latter. However,
it would go beyond the scope of this book to describe SAP Business Workflow,
SAP NetWeaver Business Process Management, or Guided Procedures.
Communication between PDF Objects and ADS
PDF objects are implemented either in Java or ABAP. The communication structure
with ADS is illustrated in Figure 2.16; it is identical for both languages.
PDF Object
Web Service Stub
to Call Document Services
Document Services Provided as Web Service
Document Services – Enterprise Java Bean
Core Adobe Document Services
Figure 2.16 Interaction of PDF Object and ADS
The communication between the PDF object and ADS is carried out by calling a
Web service. The PDF object implements a Web service stub, which is utilized to
call ADS.
The PDF object itself does not contain a lot of logic. Its main task is to correctly call
ADS via the Web service stub based on the parameters and the required functionality. Both the PDF objects and ADS are located on the SAP NetWeaver Application
Server (AS). ADS is always installed on the Java stack.
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Structure of ADS
ADS comprises two components: Document Services and Core Adobe Document
Services (see the lower part of Figure 2.16):
EE
Core Adobe Document Services provide the main functionality for the server
side. This includes, for example, the creation of a PDF or various printer languages, extraction of data from the PDF, insertion of a server-side signature, or
adding of usage rights for a PDF. Functions, such as the administration of fonts
or certificates stored on the server, are part of Core Adobe Document Services.
EE
Document Services are on the next abstraction level. These utilize the functions
made available by Core Adobe Document Services; however, they provide an
application programming interface that comprises more than just simple basic
functions. This enables you to perform multiple tasks in one Document Services call. Document Services ensure that basic functions are used in the correct
sequence and that you require only one Web service call. You can save a lot of
administration and communication effort with just one single call. This is particularly significant if you call multiple fast functions individually.
Interface to ADS
Document Services are combined and managed in an Enterprise JavaBean. The
interface of these JavaBeans is provided as a Web service and the interface of the
Web service via a Web Service Definition Language (WSDL file). The Web service
stub for the PDF objects can be created from the WSDL file. This is illustrated in
Figure 2.16.
The Web service of ADS is a public Web service that cannot be used directly. You
can find it in developer and administration tools within SAP NetWeaver without
any problems—the documentation of the Web service and its parameters, however,
is not published. Ultimately, it is the interface agreed upon by SAP and Adobe.
The PDF object abstracts from this Web service interface and is the lowest interface
to ADS that is released for application development. This abstraction provides SAP
and Adobe a wider scope for future developments.
2.5.3
Interaction of Components
Up to now, this chapter has described individual software components and the
interaction of PDF objects and ADS. The following sections detail the overall
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Software Components and Architecture
2.5
architecture of the integration at both development time and at runtime. You will
need this information when reading the following chapters, for example, to understand and solve problems or to comprehend why certain decisions were made in
frameworks.
Considering Development Time
First, development time is discussed. Figure 2.17 illustrates how you can use the
development environment to create a form template (which is based on a specific
context) and make it available for further use.
Form Builder/Framework
Embedded Adobe Designer
Is Used
Generates
Form
Template
(XDP)
ed
Us
Is
XML
Schema
Is Mapped to
Form Context
Figure 2.17 Interaction of Components at Development Time
1. At development time, Adobe LiveCycle Designer, which is integrated with the
SAP environments, is used to create form templates, which are then converted
into PDF documents or print outputs at runtime. This form template corresponds
to the description of a data structure.
2. All development environments have a form context (often also referred to as
context). In most cases, this context must be set up manually prior to the actual
form template creation. The context is the intermediary element between the
SAP framework and the Adobe components.
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
3. The development environment creates an XML schema based on the context. This
XML schema includes the description of the data structure, which is based on
the form template. This description is transferred to Adobe LiveCycle Designer
and is displayed in the data view of the form designer’s screen. This is done
automatically.
4. Now, the form designer creates the form template. To do this, Adobe LiveCycle
Designer, which is embedded in the development environment, is started. The
form template includes the form layout; for interactive PDF forms, you must
specify the behavior and integrate the form with the data structure. By integrating the form template with the data structure, you always create a form template
for a specific data structure.
If you change the data structure, you may also have to change the form template;
this is the case for structural changes of the data hierarchy. Adding new data
nodes does not require a modification of the form template; however, if you
want to use the data node, you must extend the form template accordingly.
5. When you save the form template, it is returned to the SAP development environment that embeds Adobe LiveCycle Designer. The development environment
then ensures that the form template is stored at the correct position with the
correct name (for example, in ABAP Repository). There are several reasons for
this automation, such as facilitating the form designer’s work or ensuring that
form templates can be referenced and retrieved.
Considering the Runtime
Every framework has a specific runtime environment in addition to a development
environment—for PDF-based print forms, it is the Forms Processing runtime and
for Web Dynpro the Web Dynpro runtime.
1. At runtime, form data must be created that corresponds to the data description
and therefore to the context and the XML schema. The data can be read from
the database or are already available in the framework, for example.
2. Before the data are transferred to the PDF object, they must be prepared and
converted into XML format, which must correspond to the XML schema.
3. In the next step, the runtime must locate the form template required for the
current task and transfer it to the PDF object.
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Software Components and Architecture
2.5
4. For the actual call of the PDF object, the runtime environment decides on the
required output format or whether usage rights should be added in case of an
interactive PDF form. It then calls ADS via the PDF object.
Figure 2.18 summarizes the steps at runtime up to the call of the PDF object.
Calls
Adobe Document Services
Form
Template
(XDP)
Is Used
Is Used
Is Basis for
Is Ba
XML
Schema
Is
B
PDF Object
as
is
sis fo
r
Calls
Form Data
in
XML Format
fo
r
Generates
Form
Data
As Input
Runtime of Forms Processing
or Other Frameworks
Figure 2.18 Interaction of Components at Runtime (Within the Framework)
Figure 2.19 summarizes how input data (form data and form templates) are transferred to ADS using the PDF object at runtime.
1. The PDF object uses the form data and form template that were provided by
the runtime environment.
2. In this process, the PDF object calls ADS. The data, the form template, and the
parameters are transferred to ADS in accordance with the interface definition.
3. ADS processes the data and form templates according to the parameters and
thus creates the required output format.
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Use of SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe
Form Data
in
XML Format
Is Used
PDF Object
Is Used
Form
Template
(XDP)
Calls
Adobe Document Services
Generates
Print Output
(PS, PCL, or
ZPL)
Generates
PDF File
Figure 2.19 Interaction at Runtime (Call of ADS)
2.6
Summary
This chapter briefly introduced you to the terminology used for PDFs. In this
context, two central concepts, PDF-based print forms and interactive forms, were
detailed.
Knowledge of the classification of application scenarios in offline and online scenarios enables you to select the correct framework for your implementation.
Furthermore, you were provided with decision support for assigning business
processes to scenarios. This chapter also provided support to answer the question
whether you should use interactive forms at all.
Users who participate in business processes comprising interactive forms must
install Adobe Reader on their computers. In this context, this chapter compared
Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat and pointed out the relevance of the various
versions. Adobe LiveCycle Designer was presented as a tool that you can use to
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Summary
2.6
create form templates during development. The form templates and data from the
SAP systems are converted into different output formats (printer languages and
PDF) at runtime using ADS.
Finally, you learned about the integration of ADS with SAP NetWeaver. This information is particularly useful for Chapter 3. It can also be beneficial for troubleshooting. If you already have an installed and configured system at your disposal,
you can skip Chapter 3.
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Index
$record, 197
1D barcode, 362
2D barcode, 362
A
ABAP
print program, 72, 89
ABAP Dictionary-based interface, 555
ABAP Editor, 38
ABAP Offline Infrastructure, 605
availability, 606
ABAP PDF object, 625, 635
ABAP Workbench, 115
Accessibility, 28
form, 369
Access permission, 503
Account assignment
true, 550
Account assignment object, 549
ACF, 411
integration with Web Dynpro, 427
Action launchpad, 542
Activation, 123, 523, 529
status, 523
Active Component Framework -> see ACF,
411
Activity, 503, 518, 519, 530, 534, 537, 539,
541
automatic, 518
programming, 539
Activity bar, 538, 592
Activity list, 519, 541
Activity type, 548
ADDITIONAL_DATA, 589
Address, 157
personal, 159
Address node, 157
Address number, 158
Address updating, 606
Administrator, 504
Adobe
Developer Connection, 369
integration, 46
PostScript, 25
Adobe Acrobat, 29, 30
JavaScript, 354
JavaScript reference, 370
Adobe Document Server, 52
Adobe Document Services -> see ADS, 52
Adobe LiveCycle Designer, 47, 63, 175, 177,
616
data view, 178
embedding in the development environment,
49
form design area, 182
function, 222
hierarchy, 178
installation, 110
library, 180
menu bar, 177
PDF preview, 193
SAP version, 49, 176
script editor, 177, 344
scripting reference, 369
toolbar, 177, 222
version, 33
ZCI script, 412
Adobe Reader, 29, 30, 33, 85, 88, 98, 504,
512, 576
document message bar, 34
error analysis, 414
error tolerance, 414
for pocket PC, 30
height adjustment, 414
rollout, 415
target version, 226
toolbar, 450
Version 8.1.2, 29
Web Dynpro feature, 413
width adjustment, 414
739
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Index
Adobe XML Forms Architecture -> see XFA, 25
ADS, 52, 55, 236, 579
basic functionality, 56
certificate, 713
configuration, 695
connection, 236
error analysis, 105
installation, 695
interaction with PDF object, 56
interface, 56
optional configuration, 96
scenario-dependent configuration, 72
secure connection, 695
structure, 56
usage, 53, 107
ADS_AGENT, 75, 78, 106
ADSCaller, 107
ADSCerts, 713
AD_SMTPADR, 610
ADS_SSL, 652, 695, 727
ADSSSL, 700
ADS_SSL_Client.crt, 708, 719
ADS_SSL_Client.pem, 706, 707
ADSUSER, 65, 66, 106, 107, 713
ADSUser-cert.crt, 716, 719
Alternative node, 161
AND operator, 162
Annotation, 658
Appearance, 188
Applicant, 503, 504, 508, 510, 513, 518, 519,
530, 535, 548, 592
Application, 374, 532
Application log, 625
Application/pdf
MIME-type, 471
Approval, 579
Approval form, 552
Approval step, 502, 519, 544
Approver, 503, 514, 519, 530, 538, 543, 544,
559, 579
Architecture
Adobe integration, 46
Archive, 249
index, 250
Archive information, 120
Archiving, 120, 249
Archiving mode, 236
Assignment, multiple, 564
Assistance class, 377
AttachFileToResponse, 486
Offline scenario, 488
Attachment
Web Dynpro integration, 454
Attribute, 375
Authentication
object, 685, 689, 691
transport level, 693
Web service, 688
Authenticator, 689
Authorization object
B_NOTIF, 505
I_QMEL, 505
S_BDS_DS, 505
S_USER_GRP, 505
Automatic kerning, 195
Auxiliary function, 590
Availability query, 112
B
Background fill, 293
BAdI
QISR1, 511, 526, 530,
559, 561, 564, 567,
591, 592, 596, 597,
QISR2, 548, 549, 592
QISR3, 543, 545, 592
QISR4, 517, 518, 539,
QISR6, 582, 592
BAPI, 660
Web Dynpro, 461
Barcode, 25, 361
1D, 362
2D, 362
property, 362
BAS, 157
Base64, 261
Baseline shift, 195
Basic Customizing, 564
BDS, 576, 577, 601
Binary format, 153
Binding
explicit, 364
537, 539, 552,
568, 576, 581,
600, 601
543, 592
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Index
expression, 196, 207, 208, 209, 217, 295
implicit, 364
Binding expression
$, 197
$record, 197
B_NOTIF, 505
Body image, 223
BSP, form, 577
BUA, 505, 508
Bundling, 263
bundling mode, 235
Business Address Services -> see BAS, 157
Business Application Programming Interface
-> see BAPI, 660
Business Communication Services, 605, 607
Business Document Service -> see BDS, 576,
601
Business logic, 377
Business object
BUS7051, 575, 600
Business process, 40
optimization, 40
Business Server Pages -> see BSP, 577
Business Unit Analyst -> see BUA, 505
Business Workplace, 514
Button, 332, 344
Send, 423
C
CA, 696
cacert.pem, 707
Cache, 75, 101, 102
Caching, 642
Calculation, 348
Calendar window, 326
Call, 237
direct, 508
dynamic, 237
indirect, 508
CA_private.p12, 709
Caption, 187
dynamic, 341
CA_public.der, 698, 703, 710, 725, 726
CellEditor, 440
Certificate, 653
Certificate entry, 710
Certificate list, 702
Certificate revocation list, 98
Certification, 98, 101, 627, 653
Certification authority, 696
create, 697
public key, 698
trusted, 698
Certification Authority -> see CA, 696
Change option, 642
Character format, 148
Characteristic, 530, 535, 551, 554, 555, 575,
590
uncategorized, 536, 556
Character spacing, 195
Check, 124, 569, 582
request data, 566, 598
Checkbox, 334
appearance, 334
state, 334
style, 334
Check script syntax, 345
Choice
subform set, 300
Choice section, 302
Class
CL_FP, 637
CL_FP_PDF_OBJECT, 636
CL_FP_WB_HELPER, 641
CL_ISR_DATA, 590
CL_WD_RUNTIME_SERVICES, 486
CL_FP_FEATURE_TEST, 112
CL_FP_INBOUND_HANDLER, 608, 624
Click event, 685, 687, 689
Client, 149, 374
certificate, 415
Client certificate, 700
CL_ISR_DATA, 590
Code
initialization, 125
Collection, 614
create, 614
Collection editor, 615
Collection list, 614
Comment, 31, 515, 558
Communication
PDF object and ADS, 55
741
398 Book.indb 741
8/8/11 3:57:58 PM
Index
Communication type, 608
Communication user, 665
Comparison
Adobe Reader and Acrobat Professional, 30
Component, 374
ComponentController, 376
ComponentInterface, 380
Component, use, 581
Condition, 170, 308
Conditional page break, 307
ConfigPort_Document, 83
Configuration, 110
SSL, 717
Connection, 637
SSL connection, 652
standard connection, 637
Console, 347, 348
activate, 347
console.println, 348
console.show, 348
Consumer proxy, 90
Contact management
Web Dynpro, 456
Contact partner address, 159
Container, 375
Container element, 546
ContainerFoundation_JS
version, 418
Content area, 210
Context, 115, 134, 375, 555, 610
Context attribute, 375
Context editor, 375
Context element
DATA, 441
Context evaluation, 286
Context field, 554
Context node, 375
ValueSet, 432
Control command, 151
Control level, 165
Controlling, 503, 530, 550
Controlling area, 548
Control type, 332, 616
submit, 616
Conversion routine, 169
Correspondence
manual, 533
Cost center, 548
monitor, 508
Cost factor, 548
Cost object, 548
Costs
estimated, 548
request, 503
Country, 120, 257
Credential, 33, 86, 98
CUKY, 127
CURR, 127
Currency, 127
Currency field, 127
Customer namespace, 531
Customizing
advanced, 537
D
Data, 471
check, 504
entry, 24
extraction, 650
formatting, 233
global, 124
initialization, 510, 519, 552, 565
integrity, 40
node, 144
output, 24
pattern, 307
record, 165
retrieval, 230
scenario, 544, 550
storage, 576
structure, 567
transfer, 263
view, 178, 204, 205
DATA, 589
Form Builder, 441
Database access, 230
Data binding, 145, 195, 204, 205, 209, 364,
554, 555, 556
correct, 364
define, 195, 197, 205
explicit, 217, 221
implicit, 217, 221
742
398 Book.indb 742
8/8/11 3:57:58 PM
Index
managing, 225
name, 196
performance comparison, 221
relative, 364
repeating data, 209
setting, 225
subform, 206
table, 295
Data connection, 179
define, 669
OLEDB-based, 180
WSDL-based, 180, 659, 665, 672, 693
XML schema-based, 180
Data Dictionary, 528, 535
Data quantity, 143
dataSource, 390
automatic binding, 391
Data structure, 179, 221
XML-based, 179
Data type
CUKY, 127
CURR, 127
QUAN, 127
UNIT, 127
Data view, 613
Data volume
limitation, 366
Date
display, 257
Date field, 326
formatting, 303
output formatting, 303
DDIC interface, 555
online scenario, 425
Web Dynpro, 399, 408
Decimal field, 325
usage, 325
Decimal place, 127
Default binding, 364
Default value, 504
Definition
global, 124
Design view, 182, 183
Desktop email application, 629
Destination, 72, 80, 106, 719
ADS_SSL, 727
cache, 101
create, 719
DestinationSi, 723
Detail
general, 529, 530, 594
Development time
consider, 57
Device
mobile, 30
Device type, 246
Dialog
document property, 367
print, 36
Dialog box, 235
Dictionary structure, 624
DIR_GLOBAL, 88
Display
error and message, 347
Display formatting, 302, 306
Display mode, 513
Display pattern, 305, 306, 307, 329
complex, 329
displayType
default value, 427
Docparams, 314
Document
creation, 229
signature, 336, 337
Documentation, 132, 172
form, 172
form interface, 132
Document services
font manager, 105
trust manager, 98, 107
Document Services Trust Manager, 88
Document style, 667
Domain, 169
Dots per Inch -> see DPI, 25
Downward compatibility, 111
DPI, 25
Drag and drop, 147
Dropdown
<sap-vhlist>, 438
Dropdown list, 337
dynamic, 438
dynamic population, 339
Numbered, 435
ZCI-based, 434
743
398 Book.indb 743
8/8/11 3:57:58 PM
Index
Dropdown list box, 566, 571, 598
Duplex printing, 26, 309, 310
configuration, 310
Dynamic, 314
Dynamic texts, 152
Dynamic XML form, 317
E
Easy Cost Planning, 548
Edit pattern, 327
Email address, 353
Email inbound, 608, 623
configuration, 608
Email message, 352, 629
Employee Self-Services -> see ESS, 505
Enabled, 389
default value, 407
Endpoint type, 661
Enhancement package (EHP), 17
Entry type, 530, 534, 578
Error, 124
Error analysis, 254
Error code, 260
Error handling, 232, 234, 574
Error message, 258, 511, 574
Error text, 258
ESS, 505
Evaluation, 519
Event, 342, 504, 566, 598
generate, 559
onSubmit, 447
EVENT, 569
Event type linkage, 544
EV_FUNCNAME_INBOUND, 624
Exception, 123, 637
class-based, 234
Exception class, 637
Exclusion group, 335
Expand
to fit, 319
Export binding, 673
Export parameter, 122
Express Planning, 532
Extensible markup language -> see XML, 48
F
F4 help -> see Input help, 135
Factory class, 637
FALSE, 160
Field
floating, 290, 291
initialization, 569
ISR_NEW_LONG_TEXT, 537
lock, 225
UI attribute, 554
Field layout control, 574
Field list, 138
Field symbol, 124
File, 129
File attachment, 254, 658
File attachment comment, 31
FileDownload, 471
supply function, 479
fileName, 471
Fillable, 314
Firefox
ACF, 411
ZCI, 411
Flight booking model, 119, 242, 606
Flight database, 34
Flowed, 207
Folder, 171
Font, 105, 366
Foreign key dependency, 163
Form, 115, 386, 519, 523, 535, 551, 555,
556, 559, 561, 571, 576, 577, 588, 601,
602
accessible, 28
activate, 213
API, 640
bundle, 89
check, 169
context, 552, 554, 558
copy, 217
definition, 522, 527
design area, 182
documentation, 281
embedding, 414
event, 552, 569
flow logic, 530, 539, 564, 565
744
398 Book.indb 744
8/8/11 3:57:58 PM
Index
form object, 115
fragment, 214
generated, 524
hierarchy, 221
interactive, 503, 504, 530, 579
interface, 611
ISR_FORM_STANDARD, 554
language, 230, 238
layout, 519, 522
number of, 240
online and offline use, 414
output, 229, 240
parameter, 553
process logic, 511
property, 316, 343
runtime environment, 232
selection, 230
simple, 532
storage, 674
table data, 517
use, 40
Formatting, 120, 195, 230, 241, 263
date, 241
date field, 241
number fields, 230, 241
Form Builder, 54, 115, 551, 554, 555, 556
Web Dynpro, 391
FormCalc, 49, 342, 370, 556
Form data, 578, 591
dropdown list, 437
table, 444
Web Dynpro, 437
Form designer, 24
task, 24
Form download
AttachFileToResponse, 486
FileDownload, 471
LinkToURL, 470
Form field, 180
access, 356
align, 190
arrange, 186
button, 332
changing the size, 185
checkbox, 334
date/time field, 326
decimal field, 325
document signature field, 336
dropdown list, 337
floating, 290
image, 184
image field, 334
import, 556
interactive, 180
interactive PDF form, 330
line, 185
list box, 337
name, 191, 192
password, 689
password field, 331
radio button, 335
ready-for-input status, 322
rectangle, 185
reference, 356
rich text field, 210
simultaneous editing, 189
static, 180
text, 184
text field, 187, 318
Form fields
position, 298
Form hierarchy, 48, 178, 201
Form interface, 119, 523, 535, 551, 554, 555
automatic update, 402
create, 668
Web Dynpro, 391
Web Dynpro context, 399
Form object, 215
add, 215
library, 214
reuse, 213
use, 216
Form properties
default, 366
Form routine, 126
Form template, 386, 618
control, 414
create, 182, 668, 684
repository, 58
test, 690
ViewDesigner, 395
Web Dynpro, 391
745
398 Book.indb 745
8/8/11 3:57:58 PM
Index
Web Dynpro component, 400
ZCI integration, 411
Form upload
confirmation of input, 488
online review, 492
Web Dynpro, 488
FORM_VIEW, 568
FP_CHECK_DESTINATION_SERVICE, 82
FPCONNECT, 88, 95
FP_FUNCTION_MODULE_NAME, 233, 624
FP_ICF_DATA_XXX, 721
FP_JOB_CLOSE, 239
FP_JOB_OPEN, 234
FP_PDF_TEST_00, 74
FpPrintRequestService, 89
FpQueueAdminService, 89, 93
FP_TEST_03, 36, 88
FP_TEST_03_TABLE, 36
FpXfaRequestProcessorBean, 103
Function, 540
Function group, 679
create, 679
QISR5, 591
Function module, 232, 678, 679
call pattern, 238
create, 679
generated, 232
interface, 121, 642, 644
ISR_PROCESS_EVENT, 551, 576, 588, 601,
602
remote-enabled, 679
G
Generation, 243, 552, 555
Adobe form, 554
characteristic, 556
GET_HIDE_TOOLBARS, 451
GET_INSTANCE, 623, 624
Gradient, 365
Gradient fill, 365
Graphic, 153
content, 156
format, 157
node, 153
reference, 155
type, 154
Grid, 190
grid line, 190
gs_docpar-fillable, 619
Guided Procedures, 54
H
HANDLE_PDF, 623
Header, 295
height, 398
Hierarchy, 115, 178
add, 200
HTTP/S
Web Dynpro integration, 415
Hub, 111
Hyphenation, 223
Hyphenation dictionary, 223
I
ICF
ICF Recorder, 258
ICF service, 72, 77, 106
ICM, 708, 716
restart, 708, 716
Identity management, 719
IF_FP_OFFLINE, 609
IF_FP_OFFLINE~GET_INSTANCE, 623, 624
IF_FP_OFFLINE~HANDLE_PDF, 623, 624
IF_FP_PDF_OBJECT, 636
IF_FP_PDF_USAGE_RIGHTS, 645
Image, 364
resolution, 364
Image field, 334
file format, 334
IMG activity, 529
Implementation
interactive offline scenario, 21
online scenario, 21
print output, 20
Import binding, 673
Import parameter, 119, 120, 610
746
398 Book.indb 746
8/8/11 3:57:59 PM
Index
Information
additional, 369
Initial display, 658
Initialization, 125
Initialization code, 167
Initial View, 733
Input help, 135, 504, 511, 519, 560, 566, 570
context attribute, 428
data binding, 430
dropdown list, 429
Dropdown list, 435
enhanced, 559, 571
programmed, 537, 552, 561
visibility, 428
Input screen, 504
Input validation, 349
Installation
Adobe LiveCycle Designer, 110
Instance manager, 358
AddInstance, 358
MoveInstance, 358
RemoveInstance, 358
Integration
architecture, 46
indirect, 54
Integrity, 653
Interaction event, 342
Interaction layer, 377
Interactive, 639
InteractiveForm, 389
onSubmit, 447
Interchange Text Format -> see ITF, 153
Interface, 115, 610
ABAP Dictionary-based, 117, 119, 555
DDIC, 555
Smart Forms-compatible, 117, 131
structure, 552
XFP, 285
XML, 551
XML-based, 555
XML schema-based, 117, 129
Internal order, 548
Internal Service Request -> see ISR, 501
International Organization for Standardization
-> see ISO, 23
Internet Communication Manager -> see ICM,
708
Internet Explorer
ACF, 411
ZCI, 411
INT_SERVICE_REQUEST_CHECK, 565, 566,
597, 598
I_QMEL, 505
IQS8, 518, 544
IQS22, 516, 517, 544, 558
ISO, 23
ISR, 501
architecture, 575
basic Customizing, 527, 529, 537, 550,
551, 558, 571
Customizing, 555, 560, 591
general data, 553
general field, 536
interface, 592
Launchpad, 508, 581, 583, 592
library, 552, 554, 556, 559, 571
scenario, 72, 501, 518, 529, 531, 547,
554, 555, 579, 580, 594, 595, 601
scenario group, 586
status overview, 513, 516, 537, 567, 591
toolset, 575, 592, 594
wizard, 520, 526
ISR_ACTIVITY_EXECUTE, 539
ISR_ACTOR_FOR_ROLE_GET, 591
ISR_CHECK_AT_POST, 550
ISR_GENERAL_DATA_GET, 590
ISR_NEW_LONG_TEXT, 537
ISR_NOTIF_REVERSE, 591
ISR_PROCESS_EVENT, 588
ISR_REQUEST_GET_RFC, 591
ISR_SCENARIO_PARAMS, 580
ISR_SPECIAL_DATA_GET, 572, 590
ISR_SPECIAL_DATA_TO_STRUC, 573, 591
ISR_STRUC_TO_SPECIAL_DATA, 591
Item row, 163
ITF, 153
iView, 581
iXML
data extraction, 490
747
398 Book.indb 747
8/8/11 3:57:59 PM
Index
J
JavaScript, 48, 99, 342, 556, 659
console, 347
Developing Acrobat applications using
JavaScript, 371
JavaScript for Acrobat API reference, 370
memory consumption, 365
strict scoping rule, 365
Java Server Pages -> see JSP, 577
Java system properties, 718
Job profile, 113, 236, 657, 695, 730
application example, 730
areas, 732
categories, 731
category overview, 731
create, 731
help, 734
manage, 731
management, 730
modify, 733
JSP, 577
JSP form, 577
K
Kerning, 195
Key Storage Views, 709
Knowledge Provider, 576, 601
L
Label printer, 247
Language, 120, 257, 281
Layout, 375, 576
element, 554, 570
information, 554
property, 557
type, 504, 552
Layout problem
solution, 299
Lead management, 18
legacyEditingEnabled, 426
Length restriction, 318
Library, 180
barcode library, 180, 361, 362
create, 214
Web Dynpro ActiveX, 423
Web Dynpro Native, 423
License, 96
License status, 97
Licensing, 96
LinkToURL, 470
FileDownload, 473
List box, 337
List entry, 337
define, 339
List item, 339
Locale, 257, 640
Lock icon, 142
Log configurator, 108
Logical Port, 723
Logo, 153
Log viewer, 109
Long text
field, 511, 518, 537, 558
formatting, 537
Loop, 163
LP01, 37
LPD_CUST, 542
M
Manager Self-Services -> see MSS, 505
Mandatory field, 557, 574
Markup, 31
Mass data entry, 27
Mass output, 264
Mass printing, 263
Master data monitor, 510
Master page, 182, 209, 299, 363
placement, 310
usage, 299, 309
Master pages, 309
Master password, 74
Memory requirement, 124, 143
Message box, 346
Method handler, 425
hide the Adobe Reader toolbar, 451
748
398 Book.indb 748
8/8/11 3:57:59 PM
Index
LegacyEditingEnabled, 426
MIME object
namespace, 406
MIME Repository, 406
MIME type, 157
MIME-type
Aapplication/pdf, 471
FileDownload, 471
MODE, 568, 599
Model View Controller -> see MVC, 374
Modification, 125
Monitoring, 93, 107, 273
Mozilla Firefox -> see Firefox, 411
MSS, 505
MVC
approach, 374
N
Namespace, 688
Navigation, 122, 246
PDF file, 407
view, 474
NetWeaver Administrator, 82, 109
Network speed, 263
Node, 375
Node property
active, 143
generated, 142
inactive, 143
Node type, 140
Notification, 503, 527, 537, 544, 566, 577
action, 522
notification number, 542, 543, 579, 580,
589, 590
notification transaction, 534, 538, 542
notification type, 530, 533, 534, 538, 550,
579, 595
processing, 522
Number format, 257
Number range assignment, 534
Numeric value
formatting, 304
output formatting, 304
O
Object
palette, 613
static, 225
Object category
BUS7051, 544
Object editor, 222
Object frame, 185, 194
Object Navigator, 115
Object palette
pagination, 307
submit, 616
Object Value Selector -> see OVS, 557
Occasional user, 503, 504
Official certification authority, 696
Offline handler, 609
create, 609
Offline mode, 502
Offline scenario, 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 388, 469,
605, 636, 643, 647
form download, 470
implementation, 469
security, 627
upload procedure, 495
Web Dynpro use, 496
Online form, 502
Online scenario, 41, 43, 45, 46, 387, 410
checklist, 416, 427
contact management, 456
page size, 417
value help, 428
onSubmit
data change, 450
difference, 450
event, 449
OpenSSL, 696
Optimization
business process, 40, 44
Original language, 137, 281
OR operator, 162
Outline paragraph, 148, 151
Output device, 235, 245
virtual, 287
Output pattern, 305
749
398 Book.indb 749
8/8/11 3:57:59 PM
Index
Output request, 245
Overflow footer, 309
Overflow header area, 309
Overhead cost controlling, 548
OVS, 557, 559, 571
P
Package assignment, 115, 117, 136, 137
Page break, 296, 307
conditional, 307, 310
edit, 307
notes, 309
usage, 296
Page break, 307
Page numbering, 299
Page protection, 148
Pages, 239
Page set, 309, 310
Pagination, 309, 310
Palette
accessibility, 367
border palette, 189
drawing aids palette, 190
expand layout to fit, 321
font palette, 291
Font palette, 194
layout palette, 189
library palette, 180
object palette, 180
paragraph palette, 305, 319, 320
paragraph palette, 194
PDF structure, 228
report palette, 346
report palette, 219
tab order, 227
warnings, 226
Paper form
barcode, 362
online scenario, 428
Paper tray control, 26
Paper type, 363
Paragraph format, 148
Paragraph palette, 305
Paragraph properties, 148
Parallelization, 89, 91, 235, 270
Parameter
default value, 568
Part list, 245
Partner, involved, 522
Partnership
Adobe/SAP, 17
Part number, 268
pass phrase, 697
Password, 688
field, 689
Password field, 331
Pattern, 126, 307, 327
category num, 305
date category, 304
dialog, 304, 327
time category, 306
zero value, 330
Pattern category, 330
Pattern dialog, 304, 327
Payload, 279
PCL, 247
PCL 5, 25
PCR, 578
PDF, 23, 386, 535, 576, 578
accessible form, 366, 367, 368
comment and markup, 31
data container, 45
digital signature, 31
display, 34
dropdown list, 432
dynamic, 415
dynamic form, 28
dynpro file, 405
file attachment, 31
file format, 23
hide toolbar, 453
Magnification Mode, 733
manipulation module, 88, 98, 102, 107
offline scenario, 478
PDF/A, 24
prepare preview, 316
preview, 182, 192, 316
return, 270
table, 439
text field example, 420
using the preview, 192
value help, 428
750
398 Book.indb 750
8/8/11 3:57:59 PM
Index
Web Dynpro, 408
PDF document
additional information, 254
create, 639
data extraction, 650
dynamic, 642
fill out, 648
interactive, 253, 642
process, 647
sign, 648
PDF form, 678
interactive, 27, 29, 38, 39, 312, 317
save, 31
static, 28
template, 386
PDF object, 53, 55, 56, 65, 98, 636
ABAP, 72
EXECUTE, 638, 640, 650, 652
GET_CERTIFICATION, 656
GET_DATA, 650
GET method, 638
GET_PDF, 640
GET_SIGNATURES, 652
Java, 82
RESET method, 638
SET_CERTIFICATION, 654
SET_DATA, 640
SET_DOCUMENT, 650, 652, 654, 655
SET method, 638
SET_TASK_EXTRACTDATA, 650
SET_TASK_GETCERTIFICATION, 656
SET_TASK_GETSIGNATURES, 652
SET_TASK method, 638
SET_TASK_RENDERPDF, 640
SET_TEMPLATE, 640
SET_USAGERIGHTS, 646
pdfOnly, 404
pdfSource, 390
change, 407
form template, 410
offline scenario, 494
online scenario, 495
performance, 410
PDF structure, 228
Performance, 107, 143, 240, 263, 363
attachment, 455
dropdown list, 438
online/offline form, 414
pdfSource, 410
table, 446
table column, 444
table row, 444
Web Dynpro, 415
Personnel Change Request -> see PCR, 578
Person number, 159
PFCG, 76
Placement
master pages, 310
subforms, 309
Placement restriction, 310
Platform independence, 374
Plus sign, 318
PoolMax, 102
Portable document format -> see PDF, 23
POST_NOTIF_POSITION, 566
PostScript, 23, 25, 247
Level 2, 186, 365
Pretty printer, 126
Preview data, 198
generate, 199, 314
Price
ISR, 548
Price list, 548
Print, 243
Print dialog, 241, 243
Printer, 235
Printer Command Language -> see PCL, 25
Printer language, 23, 25, 247, 253
Print form
PDF-based, 24
provided, 18
Print job, 234
Print output, 34, 38, 243
example, 34
local, 242
preview, 37
server-based, 243
Print preview, 37, 235, 239, 243
Print program, 230, 314, 618
data logic, 230
selection screen, 230
Print scenario, 385
Private key of the certification authority, 709
Processing speed, 263
751
398 Book.indb 751
8/8/11 3:57:59 PM
Index
Processor, 503, 506, 517, 518, 519, 530, 534,
538, 541, 542, 543
assign, 545
current, 591
determine, 519, 530, 543, 592
Program termination, 123
Property, 389
dynamic activation, 338, 339
Public key of certification authority, 703
Public sector, 533
Q
QISRACTIVITY, 543
QISRCONF, 527
QISRSCENARIO_OVS, 571
QISRSGENERAL_PARAM, 536
QISR_SM29, 534
QMNUM, 543
QUAN, 127
Quantity field, 127
Queue, 275
R
RABAX, 445
Radio button, 335
group, 335
Raw data interface, 285
Read condition, 167
ReaderRights credential, 64, 85, 107
ReaderRights Credential, 85
readOnly, 389
Read only, 323
Ready-for-input status, 325, 350, 557, 574
dynamic, 350
field, 558
form field, 322
procedure, 325
Recording, 260
Reference, 121, 641
Reference field, 127
Relational operator, 162
Replacement language, 120, 284
REPLACE_THIS, 436
Report
QISRACTIVITY, 543
Report Launchpad, 519, 542
Report palette, 346
warnings, 346
Request, 542
Adobe form, 551
change, 590
costs, 503, 530
form, 507, 519, 535, 565, 575, 581, 600
read, 590
start, 589
submit, 589
system user, 527
Request field
specific, 572
Request parameter, 659
ResolveNode, 357
Resource distribution, 271
Response parameter, 659
Responsibility, 547
Revenue management, 533
Reverse, 567, 591
REVERSE_NOTIF_EXTERNAL, 567
RFC destination, 72, 73, 88, 106
Rich text field, 210
Roadmap, 509, 579
Role, 503, 519, 542
applicant, 508
approver, 514
processor, 517
technical, 503
Root certificate, 99, 697
Root node, 138
ROOTUIELEMENTCONTAINER, 380
RSA private Key, 697
Runtime, 124, 556
consider, 58
S
SA38, 82
Sample data, 179
Sample form
FP_TEST_03, 36
FP_TEST_03_TABLE, 36
752
398 Book.indb 752
8/8/11 3:58:00 PM
Index
Sample program
FP_TEST_03, 35
FP_TEST_IA_01, 38
SAP_ADSCALLER, 68
SAPBC_DATA_GENERATOR, 34, 242
SAP Business Suite, 17, 18
SAP Business Workflow, 55, 518, 575
SAP ERP, 504, 533, 559, 562
SAP GUI, 110
SAP Help Portal, 101
SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe, 17, 23, 579
VPN/Web Dynpro integration, 418
Web Dynpro, 415
Web Dynpro integration, 415, 498
SAP Management Console, 716
SAP NetWeaver, 17, 575
solution extension, 17
SAP NetWeaver Administrator, 65, 730
SAP NetWeaver application server
ABAP, 63
Java, 63
SAP NetWeaver Application Server
Java, 53
SAP NetWeaver Business Process
Management, 54
SAP NetWeaver Developer Studio, 51
SAP NetWeaver Portal, 506, 542, 580
SAP Note 1122142, 735
SAPscript, 17, 26
include text, 146, 149
SAP Service Marketplace, 49, 64
SAP Smart Forms, 17, 26, 131
text module, 146, 212
Web Dynpro interface, 399
SAP system ID, 98
sap-vhlist, 438
S_BDS_DS, 505
Scaling, 195
Scanner, 25
Scenario, 523, 531, 555
activated, 527
characteristic, 528
Create Cost Center, 508
Customizing, 529, 551
definition, 527
grouping, 507
interactive, 29
key account, 388
test, 550
SCENARIO_AFTER_SUBMIT, 566
SCENARIO_FINAL_BEFORE_SUBMIT, 566
SCENARIO_PROCESS_USER_COMMAND,
566
SCENARIO_SET_ADDITIONAL_VALUES, 566,
598
SCENARIO_SET_FORM_VIEW, 566
Schema, 134, 644
Screen element, 556, 560
Script editor -> see Adobe LiveCycle Designer,
177
Script editor-> see Adobe LiveCycle Designer,
344
Scripting language, 48
Scripting Object Model -> see SOM, 357
Script language, 342
Script program, 341, 342, 365
abortion of execution, 346
access to data nodes and form fields, 356
calculation, 348
controlling of the visibility, 350
controlling the ready-for-input status, 350
debug, 346
validation, 349
Script programming, 48, 553, 554, 558
SDN, 64, 369, 734
Web Dynpro area, 498
SE38, 35, 674
SE80, 115
Search help -> see Input help, 135
Section, 302
Secure connection, 695
create, 727
Secure Sockets Layer -> see SSL, 101
Service
create, 682
Service costs, 520, 523, 548
Service link, 508
Service request, 502, 506, 530, 535, 538, 543,
548, 589, 590
Service_SSL, 710
SET_HIDE_TOOLBARS, 451
SFP, 50, 115, 254, 639
Short dump, 445
Short text, 282
753
398 Book.indb 753
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Index
SICF, 77, 79, 259
Sign, 648
Signature, 98, 101, 651
determine, 651
digital, 40, 651
digital Web Dynpro integration, 498
signature field, 648
Signature field, 614
Simplex printing, 26, 310
Single record node, 167
Single test, 170, 237
SM30, 88
SM59, 73, 727
SMICM, 709
SOA management, 89
SOA Manager, 276
SOAP header, 688
SOAP object, 659, 678, 685, 688, 693
connect, 686, 688
request, 688, 689
usage, 685
use, 678
Software components, 46
SOM
expression, 357
Sorting, 167
Source, 129
generated, 129
Source code editor, 624
Source language, 281
SP01, 244
SP02, 244
SPAD, 246
Special character, 148, 152
Spelling, 223
Spool administration, 246
Spool request, 236, 243, 244
number, 240, 245
Spool system, 244
SSL, 101
SSL client identity, 698
SSL connection, 101, 652, 698
Standard
library, 613
Standard application, 532
Standard connection, 637
Standard text, 149
Statement pattern, 126
Status, 143, 523, 527, 580, 591
Status field, 653
Status overview, 581
Step
completed, 513
manual, 40
process form, 509
send, 512
Storage mode, 250
Strict scoping rule, 365
Structure, 141
QISRSGENERAL_PARAM, 536
Structuring, 172
STRUSTSSO2, 698
Style, 148
SU01, 76
Subform, 199
content, 290, 296
data binding, 207
edit, 290
flow direction, 207
instance, 209
instance manager, 358
management, 290
name, 201
nested, 290
nesting depth, 364
repitition, 209
use, 200, 203
Subform set, 300, 301
choice, 300
normal, 300
Subitem, 163
Submit process, 619
Subtree, 138
Subwizard, 520, 527
Supply function
FileDownload, 486
PDF generation, 474
S_USER_GRP, 505
Syntax check, 345
Syntax error, 345, 346
remedy, 346
System event, 342
System field, 140
754
398 Book.indb 754
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Index
T
Tab
Draw, 184, 185
Execute, 672
Field, 188
Formatting, 223
Import/Export Bindings, 673
Layout, 182
Pagination, 307, 310
Preview PDF, 192
Subform, 207
Tabbing
order, 190
Table, 163, 292, 298
Adobe LiveCycle Designer help, 292
CellEditor, 440
choice section, 302
column, 358
column heading, 293
data binding, 295
data row, 295
display, 295
dynamic, 357, 358, 359
empty cell, 296
format, 293
FPCONNECT, 88
header, 295
LeadSelection, 447
master/detailed scenario, 447
navigation, 292
nested, 295
page, 446
page break, 298
row, 298, 444
section, 302
selection, 447
structure, 294
troubleshooting, 296
use, 292
wizard, 440
Table name, 631
Table type
generic, 552
Tab order, 227
Tabulator, 148
Tag structure, 366
Target version, 226
Tax management, 533
Template, allocation, 548
Template certificate, 710
templateSource, 390
form template, 391
Test application
ISR_LPD_START, 582
Test phase, 172
Test program, 638, 639
Text
dynamic, 146, 341
format, 193
formatted, 211
lock, 225
multiple line, 321
source, 146
static, 290, 363
text ID, 149
text module, 146
text node, 146
text object, 149
Text field, 187, 318
number of characters, 318
resizable, 320, 321, 322
use, 187
TextView, 381
Time field, 326
Time output
output formatting, 306
TOA_DARA, 250
Tool tip, 367
Total page count, 299
Trace, 254
Trace configuration, 278
Tracing, 276
Transaction
APB_ISR_CUST, 594
IQS8, 518, 544
IQS22, 516, 517, 544, 558
LPD_CUST, 542
PFCG, 76
QISRCONF, 520, 527
QISRLIST, 520
QISRSCENARIO, 529
QISRSCENARIO_OVS, 557, 560, 571
QISR_SM29, 534
755
398 Book.indb 755
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Index
SA38, 82
SCOT, 619
SE16, 631
SE24, 610
SE38, 35, 623, 628, 674
SE80, 115
SFP, 50, 115, 254, 639
SICF, 77, 79, 259
SM30, 88, 95
SM59, 73, 727
SMICM, 709
SO50, 608
SP01, 244
SP02, 244
SPAD, 246
STRUSTSSO2, 698
SU01, 76
Translation, 281
long text, 283
short text, 282
Transport, 243
Transport authentication, 678, 683, 685
Transport request, 117
Tray control, 310
TRM, 533
TRUE, 160
Trusted anchor, 98, 99, 653, 725
TrustedCAs, 709
Type, 124
Type assignment, 122
U
UI attribute
field, 554
UI element, 375
UNIT, 127
Unit of measurement, 190
Universal Worklist -> see UWL, 514
Update
automatic, 537, 539
UPDATE TASK, 243
Upload
input, 488
online review, 492
URL parameter, 542, 581
Usability
FileDownload, 479
Usage
direct, 580
Usage right, 31, 32, 40, 85, 102, 317, 639,
645
User administration, 66
USER_COMMAND, 568, 569, 600
User default, 241
User entered
optional, 323
required, 323
User Management Engine, 718
User name, 688
UWL, 514
V
Validation, 651
Validation pattern, 327, 328
Validation script, 349
Validity, 653
VALIDITY_DATE, 532
Validity period, 532
Value, 121
ValueSet, 432
Variable
naming, 349
Version, 532, 653
Version information, 353
View, 375
ViewController, 375
ViewDesigner, 375
Virtual Private Network -> see VPN, 418
Visibility, 350, 557, 574
Visual Administrator, 108
VPN, 418
Web Dynpro integration, 418
W
Warning, 169
wdDoInit
context, 392
PDF file, 405
756
398 Book.indb 756
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Index
wdDoModifyView
method handler, 426
Web Dynpro, 374, 575, 578, 581
ActiveX, 423
application, 374, 377
client, 374
component, 374
context, 401
Native, 423
PDF standard, 414
Web Dynpro ABAP, 72, 577
QISR_UI component, 578
Web Dynpro application
QISR_FORM, 542
QISR_UI_DISPLAY_ONLY, 513
QISR_UI_FORM, 508, 579, 580
QISR_UI_FORM_APPROVE, 579, 580
QISR_UI_FORM_DISPLAY_ONLY, 542, 580
QISR_UI_STATUSOVERVIEW, 513
Web Dynpro component
integrated, 508
ISR_LPD_START, 585
QISR_UI, 587
QISR_UI_DISPLAY_ONLY, 517
QISR_UI_FORM, 575, 600
Web Dynpro explorer, 374
Web Dynpro Java, 52, 72, 82
Component PCUI_GP~ISR, 578
Web service, 659, 660
authentication, 660, 688
automatic authentication, 691
binding, 673
call, 31, 685, 692
configuration, 664, 683
copy, 664
create, 660, 661, 678, 682
document style, 667
execute, 692
implement, 685
test, 674, 690
transport authentication, 664
URL, 683
usage note, 660
usage tip, 692
Web service proxy, 72, 82, 83, 106
Web services navigator, 68
WHERE condition, 165
Where-used list, 116
width, 398
Window, 376
WindowController, 376
WITH KEY condition, 167
Workbench object, 555
Workflow, 503, 519, 542, 543, 551
rule, 545
Workflow item, 579
Workflow template, 544, 591
WS03100019, 544
WS31000009, 544
Worklist, 518, 519, 522, 524, 526
WSADMIN, 665, 683
WSCONFIG, 665
WSDL data connection
enhanced function, 660
use, 660
WSDL file, 665, 667, 683, 688
X
XDC Editor, 695, 734
help, 735
XDC -> see XFA Device Configuration, 105
XFA, 25, 370
technology, 651
XFA device configuration, 105, 256
editor, 248
file, 25, 248
XFP interface, 285
XHTML, 211
XML, 48, 129
data structure, 48
form module, 102
XML Forms Architecture -> see XFA, 25
XML interface
ViewDesigner, 409
Web Dynpro, 399
XML structure, 644
XXXCTC, 110
757
398 Book.indb 757
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Index
Z
ZCI, 411
ZCI Layout, 504, 552, 556, 557
ZCI script, 411
Adobe LiveCycle Designer Cache, 420
ADS, 412
control, 413
current version, 418
form template, 412
PC, 420
project member, 412
support package, 412
version number, 419
ZCL_IFBA_BOOK_OFFLINE, 612
Zebra label printer, 26, 363
barcode, 363
Z_IFBA_BOOK_DDIC_02, 313
Z_IFBA_BOOK_FORM_01, 182
Z_IFBA_BOOK_FORM_01_IMPL, 217
Z_IFBA_BOOK_FORM_02, 290
Z_IFBA_BOOK_FORM_03, 313
Z_IFBA_BOOK_FORM_03_EMPTY, 317, 343
Z_IFBA_BOOK_FORM_04, 343
Z_IFBA_BOOK_FORM_05, 356
Z_IFBA_BOOK_INTERACTIVE, 314
z_ifba_book_offline, 628, 631
Z_IFBA_BOOK_OFFLINE_FORM, 611
Z_IFBA_BOOK_OFFLINE_INTERFACE, 610,
611
Z_IFBA_BOOK_PRINT, 292
Z_IFBA_BOOK_SQUARE, 679
Z_IFBA_BOOK_TIME, 682
Z_IFBA_BOOK_WS_FORM_01, 668
Z_IFBA_BOOK_WS_FORM_01.PDF, 676
ZPL, 247
ZPL-II, 25
758
398 Book.indb 758
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