BRIDGES KINDERGARTEN SUPPLEMENT CCSS Supplement Sets

BRIDGES KINDERGARTEN SUPPLEMENT CCSS Supplement Sets
NE
S PARA L
A
S
CO
S
M
TI
AT H
EMA
C
S
GE
S PA N IS H
E D IT IO N
MATIC A
B RID
IN
E
AT
N
E
IO
M
X
S
BRIDGES KINDERGARTEN SUPPLEMENT
CCSS Supplement Sets Spanish
Activities & Worksheets
Introduction
1–6
Unit Planners
7–26
Materials List
27–28
Set A1—Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line A1.1–A1.56
Set A4—Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
A4.1–A4.78
Set A6—Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
A6.1–A6.16
Set C1—Geometry: 3-D Shapes
C1.1–C1.14
Set C2—Geometry: Locations
C2.1–C2.12
Set C3—Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
C3.1–C3.10
Set C4—Geometry: Bear and Box Calendar Pattern
C4.1–C4.10
Set C5—Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
C5.1–C5.8
Set C6—Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern
C6.1–C6.8
Set D1—Measurement: Length D1.1–D1.8
Set D2—Measurement: Weight D2.1–D2.12
Set D8— Measurement: Measurement Tools Calendar Pattern
D8.1-D8.12
Bridges Correlations to Common Core State Standards,
Kindergarten
i–viii
BKSUPCCSS-BS P1211
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement Spanish
Common Core State Standards Sets
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2011 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
QP1239 BKSUPCCSS-BS P1211
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique blend
of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Common Core State Standards Sets
Introduction
The Bridges Kindergarten Supplement is a collection of activities written to help teachers address the Common Core State Standards published in 2010. These materials are available for free as downloadable files on The
Math Learning Center Web site at www.gotomlc.org/ccss. This supplement will continue to be refined and subsequent versions will also be available online at no charge.
The activities included here are designed to be used in addition to the sessions in Bridges Kindergarten
starting early in the fall, but can be implemented at teachers’ discretion any time during the school year.
All of the activities are listed on pages 2–4 in the order in which they appear in the Supplement. They
are listed in recommended teaching order on pages 5 & 6. On pages 7–26, you’ll also find a set of Planners that show how the Supplement activities can be inserted into the flow of Bridges instruction over
the course of the school year. These are revised versions of the Planning Guides found on pages 18–21
in Bridges, Volume 1 and pages 239–243 in Bridges, Volume 2. We suggest that you insert these sheets
into your Bridges guides so you can see at a glance when you need to teach the Supplement activities
throughout the school year.
Most of the activities in this supplement come in sets of three or more, providing several in-depth experiences around a particular grade level expectation or cluster of expectations. Each activity will take
20–30 minutes of instructional time. Some work best with small groups, but most can be conducted with
your whole class. Suggestions for optional literacy links and/or extensions to provide additional challenges have been included throughout the Supplement.
Most of the activities are hands-on and require various math manipulatives and/or common classroom
supplies. The blacklines needed to make any charts, game materials, and/or student sheets are included
after each activity. See pages 27 & 28 for a complete list of materials required to teach the activities in
each Supplement set.
Note Kindergarten Common Core standards not listed on pages 2–4 are adequately addressed in
Bridges and/or Number Corner sessions. For a full correlation of Bridges Kindergarten to the Common
Core State Standards, see pages i–viii.
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 1
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
Activities & Common Core State Standards
(Listed in Order of Appearance in the Supplement)
SET A1 NUMBER & OPERATIONS: COUNTING ON THE NUMBER LINE
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
A1.1
Activity 1: The Rainbow Number Line
A1.7
Activity 2: Kid Count Number Line
A1.9
Activity 3: Capture the Number
K.CC 1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
K.CC 2. Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence.
K.CC 5. Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20
things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10
things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out
that many objects.
K.CC 7. Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
K.NBT 1c. understand that the numbers 11 to 19 are composed of ten ones
and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
SET A4 NUMBER & OPERATIONS: ADDITION & SUBTRACTION
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
A4.1
Activity 1: Numbers & Combinations to Ten through
K.CC 2. Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence.
K.CC 3. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0–20.
K.CC 4a. When counting objects, say the number names in the standard
order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each
number name with one and only one object.
K.CC 5. Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20
things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10
things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out
that many objects.
K.CC 6. Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater
than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group.
K.CC 7. Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
K.OA 1. Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental
images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations,
expressions, or equations.
K.OA 2. Solve addition and subtraction word problems and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem.
K.OA 3. Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more
than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation.
K.OA 5. Fluently add and subtract within 5.
the School Year
A4.23
Activity 2: Butterfly Race
A4.35
Activity 3: Fives Up
A4.45
Activity 4: Frogs & Lilly pads
A4.53
Activity 5: Pond Game
A4.59
Activity 6: Spin, Add & Compare
A4.67
Activity 7: Bug Catchers
A4.73
Activity 8: Piggybanks
SET A6 NUMBER & OPERATIONS: ONE DOT, MANY DOTS CALENDAR PATTERN
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
A6.1
October Calendar Markers
K.CC 1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
K.CC 4a. When counting objects, say the number names in the standard
order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each
number name with one and only one object.
K.CC 4b. Understand that the last number name said tells the number of
objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their
arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
K.CC 4c. Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
K.CC 5. Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things
arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.
K.CC 6. Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater
than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group
2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
Activities & Common Core State Standards (cont.)
SET C1 GEOMETRY: 3-D SHAPES
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
C1.1
Activity 1: Mystery Bag Sorting
C1.5
Activity 2:Shape Detectives
C1.11
Activity 3: Three-D Shape Walk
K.G 1a. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes.
K.G 2. Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
K.G 4b. Analyze and compare three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes
and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts, and other attributes.
K.G 5. 5a. Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components
and drawing shapes.
SET C2 GEOMETRY: LOCATIONS
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
C2.1
Activity 1: The Bear in the Box
C2.5
Activity 2: Left & Right
C2.7
Activity 3: Little Frog’s Playground
K.G 1. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes and
describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above,
below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
SET C3 GEOMETRY: FLYING BUTTERFLIES CALENDAR PATTERN
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
C3.1
November Calendar Markers
K.G 1. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes and
describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above,
below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
SET C4 GEOMETRY: TEDDY BEAR & BOX CALENDAR PATTERN
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
C4.1
December Calendar Markers
K.G 1. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes and
describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above,
below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
C5.1
January Calendar Markers
K.G 2. Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
SET C5 GEOMETRY: GROWING SHAPES CALENDAR PATTERN
K.G 4a. Analyze and compare two- dimensional shapes, in different sizes and
orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences,
parts, and other attributes.
K.G 6. Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes.
SET C6 GEOMETRY: 3-D SHAPES AROUND US CALENDAR PATTERN
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
C6.1
February Calendar Markers
K.G 2. Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
K.G 4b. Analyze and compare three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes
and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts, and other attributes.
K.G 5. 5a. Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components
and drawing shapes.
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 3
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
Activities & Common Core State Standards (cont.)
SET D1 MEASUREMENT: LENGTH
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
D1.1
Activity 1: Longer, Shorter, or the Same?
D1.3
Activity 2: How Long is the Teacher’s Necklace or Necktie?
D1.5
Activity 3: Compare, Spin & Win
K.MD 1. Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight.
K.MD 2. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in
common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and
describe the difference.
SET D2 MEASUREMENT: WEIGHT
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
D2.1
Activity 1: Comparing Weights
D2.5
Activity 2: A Pound of Potatoes
D2.9
Activity 3: Spin & Compare Weights
K.MD 1. Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight.
K.MD 2. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in
common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and
describe the difference.
Page
Name
Common Core State Standards
D8.1
April Calendar Markers
K.MD 1. Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight.
SET D8 MEASUREMENT: MEASUREMENT TOOLS CALENDAR PATTERN
4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
Activities & Recommended Timings
(Listed in Recommended Teaching Order)
FALL
Page
Set, Strand & Topic
Name
Recommended Timing
A1.1
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting
on the Number Line
Activity 1: The Rainbow Number Line
First day of school through the end of the
school year during Number Corner
A4.1
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition
& Subtraction
Activity 1: Numbers & Combinations to
Ten through the School Year
First day of school through the end of the
school year during Number Corner
A4.23
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition
& Subtraction
Activity 2: Butterfly Race
In the Fall
A6.1
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot,
Many Dots Calendar Pattern
October Calendar Markers
Start during Number Corner on October 1
and continue through the entire month
C3.1
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
November Calendar Markers
Start during Number Corner on November
1 and continue through the entire month
C2.1
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Activity 1: The Bear in the Box
In the fall
FALL OR EARLY WINTER
Page
Set, Strand & Topic
Name
Recommended Timing
D1.1
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Activity 1: Longer, Shorter, or the Same?
In the fall or early winter
D1.3
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Activity 2: How Long is the Teacher’s
Necklace or Necktie?
After Set D1, Activity 1
D1.5
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Activity 3: Compare, Spin & Win
After Set D1, Activity 2
C4.1
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box
Calendar Pattern
December Calendar Markers
Start during Number Corner on December 1
and continue through the entire month
D2.1
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Activity 1: Comparing Weights
In the fall or early winter
D2.5
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Activity 2: A Pound of Potatoes
After Set D2, Activity 1
D2.9
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Activity 3: Spin & Compare Weights
After Set D2, Activity 1
WINTER
Page
Set, Strand & Topic
Name
Recommended Timing
C5.1
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes
Calendar Pattern
January Calendar Markers
Start during Number Corner right after
Winter Break and continue through the
entire month
A1.7
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting
on the Number Line
Activity 2: Kid Count Number Line
After December Number Corner
A1.9
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting
on the Number Line
Activity 3: Capture the Number
After December Number Corner
C6.1
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes Around Us
Calendar Pattern
February Calendar Markers
Start during Number Corner on February 1
and continue through the entire month
SPRING
Page
Set, Strand & Topic
Name
Recommended Timing
A4.35
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition
& Subtraction
Activity 3: Fives Up
In the spring
A4.45
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition
& Subtraction
Activity 4: Frogs & Lily Pads
In the spring
D8.1
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools
Calendar Markers
April Calendar Markers
Start during Number Corner on April 1
and continue through the entire month
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 5
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
Activities & Recommended Timings (cont.)
SPRING
Page
Set, Strand & Topic
Name
Recommended Timing
A4.53
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition
& Subtraction
Activity 5: Pond Game
In the spring
A4.59
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition
& Subtraction
Activity 6: Spin, Add & Compare
In the spring
C2.5
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Activity 2: Left & Right
In the spring
C2.7
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Activity 3: Little Frog’s Playground
In the spring
A4.67
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition
& Subtraction
Activity 7: Bug Catchers
In the spring
A4.73
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition
& Subtraction
Activity 8: Piggybanks
In the spring
C1.1
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 1: Mysery Bag Sorting
In the spring
C1.5
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 2: Shape Detectives
After Set C1, Activity 1
C1.11
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 3: Three-D Shape Walk
After Set C1, Activity 2
6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
August/September Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Sets A1 & A4)
Reminder Remember to start The Rainbow Number Line (Supplement Set A1, pages A1.1–A1.6) the
first day of school. Also, use Dots & Fingers (Supplement Set A4, pages A4.1–A4.2) in conjunction with
Our Month in School throughout the September Number Corner.
DAY 1
DAY 2
DAY 3
DAY 4
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
SESSION 2
SESSION 3
SESSION 4
SESSION 5
SESSION 1
Daily Routines
Shape Sorting, p. 27
SESSION 6
Daily Routines
Introduce Work Places
1A–1C, p. 30
Daily Routines
Geoboards & Geobands,
p. 35
Daily Routines
A Bucket of Bugs: Counting to 100, p. 40
Daily Routines
Sorting & Graphing
Shapes by Size, p. 44
Daily Routines
Introduce the Work Place
Menu Cards, p.47
Work Places
• Unifix Cubes
• Pattern Blocks
• Polydrons
Work Places
Add Geoboards &
Geobands
Work Places
Add Bucket of Bugs
Technology Connection
Work Places
SESSION 7
Daily Routines
Sorting & Graphing
Shapes by Name, p. 50
SESSION 8
SESSION 9
Daily Routines
Making Name Cards, p. 52
Daily Routines
Moving Along With Shapes
& Work Places, p. 55
SESSION 10
Daily Routines
Sorting Shapes: Sides &
Corners, p. 57
SESSION 11
Daily Routines
Goodbye Shapes! p. 60
Work Places
Home Connection 1
SESSION 12
Daily Routines
Goodbye Shapes! p. 64
SESSION 13
Daily Routines
More Cruising With Shapes
& Work Places, p. 65
Work Places
SESSION 14
Daily Routines
Triangles & Squares:
Making Blocks for a Class
Quilt, p. 66
SESSION 15
Daily Routines
Assembling the Shoo Fly
Quilt, p. 70
SESSION 16
Daily Routines
Which Bug Will Win? p. 74
Work Places
Home Connection 2
Technololgy Connection
SESSION 17
Daily Routines
Which Bug Will Win? p. 80
Work Places
Add Which Bug Will Win?
© The Math Learning Center
SESSION 18
Daily Routines
Bug Sorting, p. 84
SESSION 19
Daily Routines
Moving Along With Bugs
& Work Places, p. 101
Work Places
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 7
8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
October Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Sets A4 & A6)
Reminder Use Frames & Bunny Ears (Supplement Set A4, pages A4.2–A4.4) in conjunction with Our
Month in School throughout the October Number Corner.
SUPPLEMENT
DAY 2
DAY 3
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Supplement Set A6
Number & Operations:
One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern (Start today and
use throughout the month
during Number Corner.)
SESSION 22
SESSION 20
SESSION 21
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Bug Sorting & Graphing,
p. 105
Unifix Cube Patterns, Part
1, p. 108
Work Places
SESSION 23
SESSION 24
SESSION 25
SESSION 26
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Unifix Cube Patterns, Part
2, p. 110
Bugs to Ten, p. 115
Introduce Work Place
1H, p. 119
Popsicle Stick Tallying,
p. 123
Bugs, Tallies & Number
Bingo, p. 126
Home Connection 4
Work Places
Add Unifix Cube Patterns
Remove Unifix Cubes
SESSION 27
Work Places
Add Geoboard Shapes
Remove Geoboards &
Geobands
SESSION 28
SESSION 29
SESSION 30
SESSION 31
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Munch, Crunch, What a
Lunch! p. 129
Beat You to Ten, p. 132
Beat You to Ten, p. 136
Bugs, Tallies & Numbers
Bingo, p. 139
Butterfly Countdown,
p. 141
Work Places
Work Places
Add Beat You to Ten
Remove Pattern Blocks
Work Places
Add Bucket of Frogs
Remove Bucket of Bugs
Home Connection 5
SESSION 32
SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Moving Along with Butterflies & Work Places,
p. 143
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Activity 2: Butterfly Race
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Play Butterfly Race again with
the class, and then introduce it as Work Place S1.
Work Places
SESSION 33
Daily Routines
Introduce Work Place 1K,
p. 145
Work Places
Add Pattern Block Designs
Remove Which Bug Will
Win?
Home Connection 6
Work Places
Add Butterfly Race
Remove Polydrons
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Technology Connection
Note Session 34 has
been omitted.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 9
10 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
November Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Sets A4, C2, C3, D1 & D2)
Reminder Use More Frames & Bunny Ears (Supplement Set A4, page A4.4) in conjunction with Our
Month in School throughout the November Number Corner.
SUPPLEMENT
DAY 2
DAY 3
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Supplement Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern (Start today and
use throughout the month
during Number Corner.)
SESSION 36
Daily Routines
Hungry Caterpillars, p. 154
Work Places
Add Hungry Caterpillars
Remove Unifix Patterns
SESSION 37
SESSION 38
SUPPLEMENT
SESSION 35
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Supplement Set C2
Geometry: Locations
Activity 1: The Bear in
the Box
Hungry Caterpillars, p. 151
SESSION 39
Work Places
SESSION 40
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Moving Along With
Caterpillars & Work Places,
p. 157
The Butterfly Quilt, Part 1:
Making the Quilt Blocks,
p. 159
The Butterfly Quilt, Part
2: Assembling the Quilt,
p. 163
Count & Compare Butterflies, p. 166
Work Places
Home Connection 7
SESSION 41
SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Introduce Work Place
1M, p. 170
Supplement Set D1
Measurement: Length
Activity 1: Longer, Shorter,
or the Same?
Supplement Set D1
Measurement: Length
Activity 2: How Long is
the Teacher’s Necklace or
Necktie?
Supplement Set D1
Measurement: Length
Activity 3: Compare, Spin
& Win
Supplement Set D1
Measurement: Length
Activity 3: Compare, Spin
& Win (Repeat)
Work Places
Note This activity can be
used during Work Places
after you’ve introduced it
to the class.
Work Places
Add Count & Compare
Butterflies
Remove Geoboard Shapes
Work Places
Work Places
Note Session 42 has
been omitted
SESSION 43
Daily Routines
Bugs to Ten & Numeral
Cards: A Match Game,
p. 174
Home Connection 8
SESSION 44
SESSION 45
SESSION 46
Daily Routines
Pattern Block Puzzles,
p. 178
Daily Routines
Introduce Work Place
1N, p. 182
Daily Routines
Introduce Work Place
1O, p. 186
Technology Connection
Work Places
Add Pattern Block Puzzles
Remove Bucket of Frogs
Work Places
Add Which Numeral Will
Win?
Remove Beat You to Ten
SUPPLEMENT
Daily Routines
Supplement Set D2
Measurement: Weight
Activity 1: Comparing
Weights
Work Places
Note Session 47 has
been omitted
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 11
12 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
December Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Sets A4, C4 & D2)
Reminder Use Quick Fives (Supplement Set A4, pages A4.5–A4.6) in conjunction with Our Month in
School throughout the December Number Corner.
SUPPLEMENT
DAY 2
DAY 3
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Supplement Set C4
Geometry: Teddy Bear
& Box Calendar Pattern
(Start today and use
throughout the month
during Number Corner.)
Home Connection 9
SUPPLEMENT
SESSION 48
SESSION 49
SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Supplement Set D2
Measurement: Weight
Activity 1: Comparing
Weights (Repeat)
Supplement Set D2
Measurement: Weight
Activity 2: A Pound of
Potatoes
Note This activity can be
used during Work Places
after you’ve introduced it
to the class.
Note This activity can be
used during Work Places
after you’ve introduced it
to the class
SESSION 50
SESSION 51
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Supplement Set D2
Measurement: Weight
Activity 3: Spin & Compare Weights
Growing Patterns: These
Ladybugs Have Two
Spots, p. 193
A Growing Pattern of
Ladybugs, p. 197
Count & Compare Pennies, p. 201
Introduce Work Place 1P,
p. 205
Work Places
Add Count & Compare
Pennies
Remove Butterfly Race
Home Connection 10
Note This activity can be
used during Work Places
after you’ve introduced it
to the class
SESSION 52
SESSION 53
SESSION 54
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Ladybug Chart: Counting
by 1’s & 2’s, p. 208
There’s a Shape in My
Pocket, p. 212
There’s a Shape in My
Pocket, p. 215
Work Places
Work Places
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 13
14 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
January Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Sets A1, A4 & C5)
Reminder Use Combinations to 10 on Frames & Fingers (Supplement Set A4, pages A4.6–A4.7) in conjunction with Our Month in School throughout the January Number Corner. Also, do the Kid Count Number Line (Supplement Set A1, pages A1.7–A1.8) several times or more during Number Corner this month.
SUPPLEMENT
DAY 2
DAY 3
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Supplement Set C5
Geometry: Growing Shapes
Calendar Pattern (Start today
and use throughout the month
during Number Corner.)
SESSION 55
SESSION 56
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Bugs to Ten, Numeral
& Tally Cards: A Match
Game, p. 217
Which One is Covered
Up? A Memory Game,
p. 220
Home Connection 11
SESSION 57
SESSION 58
SESSION 59
SESSION 60
SESSION 61
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Beat You to 20, p. 249
Introduce Work Place
2A, p. 254
What’s in the Bag? A
Bucket of Sea Creatures,
p. 257
Introduce Work Place
2B, p. 273
Ten & More Sea Creatures,
Part 1, p. 275
Home Connection 12
Work Places
Add Beat You to 20
Remove Pattern Block
Designs
SESSION 62
SESSION 63
Introduce Work Place 2B,
p. 273
Work Places
Add Bucket of Sea Creatures
Remove Hungry Caterpillars
SESSION 64
SESSION 65
SESSION 66
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Ten & More Sea Creatures,
Part 2, p. 279
A Day of Work Places,
p. 283
Sock Boxes & Coins: Beat
You to 20¢, p. 285
Race You to 15¢, p. 289
Moving Along With Coins
& Work Places, p. 296
Work Places
Add Ten & More
Remove Count & Compare
Butterflies
Home Connection 13
Work Places
Add Sock Boxes & Coins:
Beat You to 20¢
Remove Pattern Block
Puzzles
SESSION 67
SESSION 68
SESSION 69
Work Places
Add Race You to 15¢
Remove Which Numera
Will Win?
SESSION 70
Work Places
SESSION 71
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Moving Along With Coins
& Work Places, p. 296
Mystery Numbers, p. 299
Introduce Work Place 2F,
p. 303
Assessment by Observation: Watching Children at
Work Places, p. 309
Assessment by Observation: Watching Children at
Work Places, p. 309
Work Places
Work Places
Work Places
Home Connection 14
© The Math Learning Center
Work Places
Add Spin & Write
Remove Count & Compare
Pennies
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 15
16 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
February Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Sets A1, A4 & C6)
Reminder Use How Many Empty Squares (Supplement Set A4, pages A4.7–A4.8) in conjunction with
Our Month in School throughout the February Number Corner. Also, do the Kid Count Number Line
(Activity 2, Supplement Set A1) several times or more during Number Corner this month.
SUPPLEMENT
DAY 2
DAY 3
DAY 100 ACTVITIES
DAY 100 ACTVITIES
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Day 100 Activities (See
February Number Corner,
pages 195–206)
Day 100 Activities (See
February Number Corner,
pages 195–206)
Supplement Set C6
Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Around Us Calendar
Pattern (Start today and
use throughout the month
during Number Corner.)
Home Connection 15
DAY 100 ACTVITIES
DAY 100 ACTVITIES
Day 100 Activities (See
February Number Corner,
pages 195–206)
Day 100 Activities (See
February Number Corner,
pages 195–206)
SESSION 72
SESSION 73
SESSION 74
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Shark, Seal & Whale Dra-
Shark, Seal & Whale Dramas, Part 2, p. 315
Shark, Seal & Whale Picture Problems, p. 319
mas, Part 1, p. 311
Work Places
SESSION 75
SESSION 76
SESSION 77
SESSION 78
SESSION 79
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Shark, Seal & Whale Picture Problems, p. 322
Making Sea Creature Picture Problems, p. 327
Making Sea Creature Picture Problems, p. 332
Making Sea Creature Picture Problems, p. 333
Solving Students’ Sea Creature Picture Problems, p. 335
Home Connection 16
Work Places
Work Places
Work Places
Work Places
Add Ten & More: Memory
Remove Ten & More
SESSION 80
Daily Routines
Solving More Sea Creature
Problems, p. 340
SESSION 81
Daily Routines
A Day of Work Places,
p. 346
SESSION 82
SESSION 83
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Sea Creature Problems:
Finishing Up, p. 347
Sea Creature Problems:
Finishing Up, p. 348
Work Places
Add Sock Boxes & Coins:
Beat You to Zero
Remove Beat You to 20¢
Work Places
Home Connection 18
Home Connection 17
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 17
18 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
March Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Sets A1 & A4)
Reminder Do Capture the Number (Supplement Set A1, pages A1.9–A1.12 ) several times or more during
Number Corner in March. This activity can be used during Work Places after you’ve introduced it to the class.
DAY 1
DAY 2
DAY 3
DAY 4
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
º
SESSION 84
Daily Routines
Bucket of Sea Creatures:
Handfuls, p. 353
SESSION 85
SUPPLEMENT
SESSION 87
SUPPLEMENT
SESSION 88
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Introduce Work Place 2I,
p. 359
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Activity 3: Fives Up
Introduce Work Place S2,
Fives Up (from Supplement Set A4)
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Activity 4: Frogs & Lilly
Which One Does Not
Belong, p. 366
Work Places
Add Fives Up
Remove Beat You to 20
pads
Frogs & Lilly pads (from
Supplement Set A4)
Work Places
Add Sea Creature Handfuls
Remove Bucket of Sea
Creatures
Work Places
Add Frogs & Lilly pads
Remove Ten & More:
Memory
Home Connection 19
Note Session 86 has
been omitted.
SESSION 89
Introduce Work Place S3,
SESSION 90
SESSION 91
SESSION 92
SESSION 93
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Sorting Sea Creatures,
p. 369
Sorting Sea Creatures: A
Worksheet, p. 371
Sorting Frogs, p. 373
Frog Handfuls, p. 377
Introduce Work Place 2J,
p. 382
Work Places
Work Places
Home Connection 20
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Work Places
Add Frog Handfuls
Remove Sea Creature
Handfuls
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 19
20 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
April Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Sets A1, A4 & D8)
Reminder Do Capture the Number (Supplement Set A1, pages A1.9–A.12) several times or more during
Number Corner in April. This activity can be used during Work Places after you’ve introduced it to the class.
SUPPLEMENT
DAY 2
DAY 3
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Supplement Set D8
Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern
(Start today and use
throughout the month
during Number Corner.)
SESSION 96
SESSION 97
SESSION 99
SESSION 94
SESSION 95
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Unifix Cube Measuring,
p. 401
Introduce Work Place
2K, p. 405
Work Places
Work Places
Add Unifix Cube Measuring
Remove Spin & Write
SESSION 100
SUPPLEMENT
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
A Day of Work Places,
p. 409
Count & Compare Unifix
Cubes, p. 411
Race You to 30¢, p. 418
A Day of Work Places,
p. 423
Home Connection 21
Work Places
Add Count & Compare
Unifix Cubes
Remove Race You to 15¢
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Activity 5: Pond Game
Work Places
Add Race You to 30¢
Remove Sock Boxes &
Coins: Beat You to Zero
Home Connection 22
Note Session 98 has
been omitted.
SUPPLEMENT
SESSION 101
SESSION 102
SUPPLEMENT
SESSION 103
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Introduce Work Place S4,
Pond Game (from
Supplement Set A4)
Patterns & Numbers, Part
1, p. 426
A Day of Work Places,
p. 433
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Activity 6: Spin, Count &
Compare
Patterns & Numbers, Part
2, p. 434
Work Places
Add Pond Game
Remove Frog Handfuls
SUPPLEMENT
Work Places
Add Patterns & Numbers
Remove Unifix Cube
Measuring
SUPPLEMENT
Work Places
Note Session 104 has
been omitted.
SESSION 105
SESSION 106
SESSION 107
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Activity 6: Spin, Count &
Compare (Repeat)
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Introduce Work Place S5,
Spin, Count & Compare
(from Supplement Set A4)
Frog Picture Problems, p. 439
More Frog Picture Problems, p. 445
Making Frog Problems,
Day 1, p. 450
Home Connection 23
Work Places
Add Spin, Count & Compare
Remove Fives Up
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 21
22 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
May Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Sets A4, C1 & C2)
Reminder Use Dot Card Subtraction (Supplement Set A4, page A4.9) in conjunction with Our Month in
School throughout the May Number Corner.
DAY 1
DAY 2
DAY 3
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
Introduce Number Corner
Daily Routines
SESSION 108
SUPPLEMENT
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Making Frog Problems,
Day 2, p. 454
Supplement Set C2
Geometry: Locations
Activity 2: Left & Right
Home Connection 24
SESSION 109
SESSION 110
SESSION 111
SESSION 112
SUPPLEMENT
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Solving Students’ Frog
Problems, p. 458
Solving More Students’
Frog Problems, p. 465
Introduce Work Place
2O, p. 468
A Day of Work Places,
p. 472
Work Places
Add Frog Problems
Remove Frogs & Lily pads
Home Connection 25
Supplement Set C2
Geometry: Locations
Activity 3: Little Frog’s
Playground
Work Places
SESSION 113
Daily Routines
Frog Jump Measuring,
p. 474
SESSION 114
Daily Routines
Introduce Work Place 2P,
p. 476
Work Places
Add Frog Jump Measuring
Remove Count & Compare
Unifix Cubes
SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT
SESSION 115
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Activity 7: Bug Catchers
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Introduce Work Place S6,
Bug Catchers (from
Supplement Set A4)
Where Do You See It?
p. 483
Work Places
Work Places
Add Bug Catchers
Remove Race You to 30¢
SESSION 116
SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT
SESSION 117
SUPPLEMENT
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Which One Does Not
Belong? p. 489
Supplement Set A4
Number & Operations:
Addition & Subtraction
Activity 8: Piggy Banks
Introduce Work Place S7,
Piggy Banks (from
Supplement Set A4)
Introduce Work Place
2Q, p. 493
Supplement Set C1
Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 1: Mystery Bag
Sorting
Work Places
Work Places
Add Piggy Banks
Remove Pond Game
Work Places
Add Polydrons: Can You
Build It?
Remove Patterns & Numbers
Home Connection 26
© The Math Learning Center
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 23
24 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
June Planner (Bridges & CCSS Kindergarten Supp. Set C1)
SUPPLEMENT
SUPPLEMENT
SESSION 118
SESSION 119
SESSION 120
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Supplement Set C1
Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 2: Shape Detectives
Supplement Set C1
Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 3: Three-D Shape
Walk
Introduce Work Place
2R, p. 498
Geoboards: Squares &
Triangles, p. 502
Geoboards: Squares &
Triangles, p. 506
SESSION 121
SESSION 122
Work Places
Add Fill It First!
Remove Frog Problems
SESSION 123
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Daily Routines
Continuing with Work
Places, p. 511
A Day of Work Places
A Day of Work Places
© The Math Learning Center
Work Places
Add Geoboards: Squares
& Triangles
Remove Frog Jump
Measuring
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 25
26 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
Kindergarten CCSS Supplement Materials Lists
MANIPULATIVES & PRINT MATERIALS
ITEM #
A1
A4
A6
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
Frogs (100)*
FROG
√
Bugs (100)*
BUG
√
Unifix cubes (1,000)
U1
√
Pattern Blocks (3 sets)
PPBT
Balance scale (1)
BPP
Polydrons, Squares (40)*
PDS
√
√
Polydrons, Triangles (100)*
PDT
√
√
Game Markers (100)
M100
√
Individual Chalkboards, chalk, erasers* (class set;
whiteboards and pens may be substituted)
MB10S
√
Calendar Grid Pocket Chart*
LCGPC
D2
D8
√
√
√
√
Month & Year Calendar Grid Cards*
Bridges Supplement Card Set*
• Kid Count Cards
• Ten Frame Bug Cards
• Ten & More Ten-Frame Cards
• Count & Compare Butterflies cards
• Count & Compare U Cubes cards
D1
QZ452
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
All manipulatives and print materials available from Math Learning Center. Those items marked with an asterisk are included in the Kindergarten
Bridges Grade Level Package.
GENERAL MATERIALS (PROVIDED BY THE TEACHER)
A1
A4
Overhead projector or document camera
√
Blank transparencies if you are using an overhead projector
4
“Helper Jar” (A popsicle stick for each student with his/her name
written on it, placed in a container)
√
8.5” x 11” copy paper, sheets per student
2
4
8.5” x 11” white cardstock, individual sheets
1
30
8.5” x 11” pastel cardstock, individual sheets
√
A6
C1
√
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
D1
D2
D8
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
16
16
16
18
1
2
16
1
20
3
√
√
17
1 ½” x 2” sticky notes
√
3” x 5” index cards
√
√
Construction paper in a variety of colors
√
Butcher paper
√
18” x 24” chart paper (lined and unlined)
√
Overhead pens (black, blue, red, green)
√
Dry wipe pens (black, blue & red)
√
Marking pens, including a highlighter pen
√
√
√
√
Glue sticks
√
Scissors, class set
√
Regular masking tape
√
√
String
Yardstick or pointer
√
√
√
Rug yarn or ribbon in 4-6 different colors
© The Math Learning Center
√
√
Crayons
Blue masking tape
√
√
www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • 27
Common Core State Standards Supplement Sets
Kindergarten CCSS Supplement Materials Lists (cont.)
GENERAL MATERIALS (PROVIDED BY THE TEACHER)
Rainbow sentence strips in 5 different colors
A1
A4
A6
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
D1
D2
√
Xylophone, keyboard, piano, or internet access
√
Teddy bear or other stuffed animal
√
√
Copy paper box with lid
√
√
Lunch sack or small gift bag
√
Grocery sack or large gift bag
√
Collection of 3-D objects from around the classroom
√
3/4” adhesive dots, red and blue
√
√
√
A necklace or necktie belonging to the teacher
√
1 pound of potatoes, onions, or carrots in a small sack with handles
√
8–12 common household or classroom items of varying weights
(between 8 ounces & 2 pounds)
√
Cafeteria tray
√
60 pennies
√
6 small paper cups (3 oz), 1 large paper cup (8 oz)
√
Measuring tools (e.g., a digital clock, a small analog clock, a medical
or scientific thermometer, a round outdoor thermometer, a digital
thermometer, a kitchen scale, a bathroom scale, a cloth measuring
tape, a carpenter’s tape measure, etc.)
Opt.
Clipboards (Class Set)
Opt.
CHILDREN’S BOOKS (PROVIDED BY THE TEACHER)
Splash! by Ann Jonas
All about Where by Tana Hoban
A4
A6
C2
Opt.
Opt.
D2
D8
Opt.
Left Hand, Right Hand by Janet Allison Brown
Opt.
Cubes, Cones, Cylinders & Spheres by Tana Hoban
Opt.
Stone Soup (any version)
Opt.
Length by Henry Pluckrose
Opt.
Weight by Henry Pluckrose
Opt.
How Long Is It? by Donna Loughran
Opt.
Millions to Measure by David Schwartz
Opt.
How Big Is a Foot? by Rolf Myller
Opt.
28 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
D8
www.mathlearningcenter.org
© The Math Learning Center
Kindergarten supplement
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Includes
Activity 1: The Rainbow Number Line Activity 2: Kid Count Number Line
Activity 3: Capture the Number
A1.1
A1.7
A1.9
Skills & Concepts
H locate numbers from 1 to at least 31 on a number line
H count by ones forward from 1 to 100
H count backward from 10
H read aloud numerals from 0 to at least 31
H identify ordinal positions through the 31st
H locate numbers on a number line
H count by ones and read numerals
H order numerals from 1 to at least 10
H rote count backward from any number in the range of 1 to at least 10
H identify ordinal positions
H locate numbers from 0 to at least 20 on a number line
H read numerals from 0 to at least 20
H rote count by ones forward from 0 to 39
H count objects in a set of up to at least 20 objects
H describe numbers from 1 to 9 using 5 as a benchmark number
P0709
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Set A1 Numbers & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2009 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0709
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Set A1 H Activity 1
Activity
The Rainbow Number Line
Overview
You’ll need
The teacher works with input from students to record
one number each school day on a colored sentence
strip posted on the classroom wall. New sentence strips
are added as needed, and the number line that results
can be used for many different counting and numeral
recognition activities through the year.
H 11 rainbow sentence strips in 5 different colors (see
Advance Preparation)
H a yardstick
H wide-tipped black felt marker
H red and blue dry wipe or overhead markers
H Coin and Bill cards (optional, pages A1.4–A1.6, run one
copy of each on cardstock)
Skills & Concepts
H locate numbers from 1 to at least 31 on a number line
H count by ones forward from 1 to 100
Advance Preparation You’ll need 3 of one color strip,
and 2 each of the other four colors. Write a 0 at the far left
side of one of the 3 identically colored strips, but leave
the rest of the strip unmarked otherwise. Laminate all 11
strips so you can reuse them in future years and also mark
on them with an overhead or dry wipe marker this year.
Post just the first strip before school starts. Place it near
your Number Corner display board where all the students
can see it easily.
H count backward from 10
H read aloud numerals from 0 to at least 31
H identify ordinal positions through the 31st
0
Instructions for The Rainbow Number Line
1. On the first day of school, call children’s attention to the single sentence strip you’ve posted. Explain
that this is a number line, and you’ll be writing a number on it for each school day that passes. Read the
numeral 0 with the class, and explain that you wrote this number on the line yesterday, before school
even started. Ask them what number you’ll need to write for today, and then use a black wide-tipped
marker to record the numeral 1 on the line. Gauge the amount of space you leave between the 0 and the
1 knowing that you’ll only be writing the numerals up through 9 before you switch to another strip.
2. The following day during Number Corner, record the numeral 2 on the line for the second day of
school. Continue each day in this fashion through the ninth day of school. Then attach a second strip
to the first, and add a new number to the strip each day until you’ve reached the 19th. Attach a third
strip for the numerals 20–29, a fourth for the numerals 30–39, and so on. Use a different color strip each
time, so each decade appears on a new color. When you’ve used all 5 colors, start over. Repeat the same
sequence of colors so children can anticipate what you’ll post next.
0
1
2
3
© The Math Learning Center
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.1
21
22
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Activity 1 The Rainbow Number Line (cont.)
Starting on about the 10th day of school, you can use the line for a variety of counting exercises and
activities, including the ones listed below.
• Point to each numeral as students count forward with you. When you get to the last recorded
numeral, ask students to predict what number you’ll be writing on the line the following day.
• Start at any number 10 or less and point to each numeral as students count backward with you to 0.
Have them practice counting from different numbers below 10 backwards to 0 on a regular basis.
• Have students take turns pointing on the line to specific numerals you name. You might also have
them point to numerals that correspond to events in your classroom (e.g., someone’s age, birth date,
the number of cans the class collected for the annual food drive, the number of muffins someone
brought to school for a special treat today, and so on).
• Have students practice counting by 2’s to 10. Point to the numbers, or underline them in red or blue,
as the students count along with you.
• Cover up the zero with a post-it note, and have students name the ordinal position of each numeral
on the line, first, second, third, fourth, and so on. (If you cover the zero, the ordinal numbers will
correspond to the cardinal numbers. That is, the 1 will be the first number on the line. The 2 will be
the second number, 3 will be the third number, and so on.)
• Cover up the zero with a post-it note and give different students a turn to point with the yardstick to
the first numeral on the line, the second, the third, the fifth, the tenth, and so on.
3. Have students practice counting by 1’s through 100 during the spring months. You can also continue
to have students practice counting backwards from 10 or other numbers less than 10. Once you reach
50 or 60, you might have students practice counting by 5’s or 10’s along the line. Point to the numbers or
circle them in red or blue as students count with you.
Extensions
• Prepare a collection of coin cards by running 1 copy each of the Coin and Bill Cards on cardstock.
Color the coins and the dollar bill, cut the cards apart, and laminate if desired. Post a penny card
below the number line for each day of school through the tenth. After that, post a dime card below
each multiple of 10 through 100, and a quarter card when under the numerals 25, 50, 75, and 100.
When you reach Day 100, post the dollar bill below the numeral 100. Reinforce the name and value of
the coins on a regular basis, and point to the dimes as students count by tens on the line.
• Use the fact that the sentence strips change color with every new decade to introduce and reinforce
the tens place, and the special role it plays in our number system. Several months into school, as you’re
starting into the 40’s or 50’s, you might introduce the idea that the 4 in 42 means 4 tens, while the 2
means 2 ones, that is, 42 means 4 tens and 2 ones. If you’re keeping the Link a Day paper chain, you can
use the loops that have been grouped into tens and ones to demonstrate what you mean. You might also
have students build collections of Unifix cubes grouped into tens and ones to match the number of days
you’ve been in school.
• Use the penny and dime cards to help students analyze the magnitude of digits through 99 on the
basis of their place values and represent the place value of each digit in a two-digit whole number. If
you reuse the penny cards for each decade and move the dimes ahead on the line as you go, you can
help students understand, for instance, that 43 is the same as 4 dimes and 3 pennies, and count the
amount with them by tens and ones, “ten, twenty, thirty, forty, forty-one, forty-two, forty-three”. Plan
A1.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Activity 1 The Rainbow Number Line (cont.)
to do this several times a week, if not daily, for some months running if your kindergarteners are
expected to develop place value understandings.
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
10¢
42
1¢
43
1¢
44
45
1¢
10¢
10¢
10¢
• Extend the number line through the last day of school to give students exposure to counting past 100
and reading 3-digit numerals.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.3
46
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Optional Run 1 copy on cardstock. Color and laminate if desired and cut apart.
Tarjetas de monedas y billetes página 1 de 3
1¢
1¢
1¢
1¢
1¢
1¢
1¢
1¢
1¢
A1.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Optional Run 1 copy on cardstock. Color and laminate if desired and cut apart.
Tarjetas de monedas y billetes página 2 de 3
© The Math Learning Center
1¢
10¢
10¢
10¢
10¢
10¢
10¢
10¢
10¢
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.5
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Optional Run 1 copy on cardstock. Color and laminate if desired and cut apart.
Tarjetas de monedas y billetes página 3 de 3
10¢
10¢
25¢
25¢
25¢
25¢
$1.00
A1.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Set A1 H Activity 2
Activity
Kid Count Number Line
Activity
Kid Count Number Line
Overview
The teacher gives half the students Kid Count cards and
the other half numbered index cards. Holding their cards,
students are seated in two parallel number lines, and then
practice counting forwards and backwards as they stand
up and sit down in turn.
Skills & Concepts
H locate numbers on a number line
You’ll need
H the Kid Count Cards (pages A1.18–A1.32, run one copy
of each on cardstock and cut apart.)
H blue masking tape (see Advance Preparation)
H half class set of index cards (see Advance Preparation)
H a ruler or pointer of some type
H a bell, chime bar, or your key ring
H Ten Frame Bug Cards and Ten & More Ten Frame Cards
(optional, pages A1.33–A1.38 and A1.39–A1.47, run
one copy of each on cardstock and cut apart.)
H count by ones and reading numerals
H order numerals from 1 to at least 10
H rote count backward from any number in the range of
1 to at least 10
H identify ordinal positions
Advance Preparation Use blue masking tape to create a
line in your classroom long enough to accommodate half
of your students standing side-by-side. An alternative is
to reserve the gym for 15–20 minutes the day(s) you do
this activity with your class. Write one numeral on each of
the index cards, starting with 1. You’ll need a half-class set
of Kid Count cards and half a class set of numbered index
cards. If you have 26 students, for instance, you’ll need
Kid Count cards 1–13, and numbered index cards 1–13.
Instructions for Kid Count Number Line
1. Gather the children into your discussion circle or in the gym, depending on where you’re going to
conduct the activity. Show them the line you’ve taped on the floor in your classroom, or the line you’re
planning to use in the gym. Explain that today the class is going to work together to make a kid-sized
number line, using the Kid Count cards from the Number Corner and some other cards you’ve made
especially for this activity.
2. Give half your students each a Kid Count card, and reassure the others that they’ll each get a
numbered index card in a minute or two. Call the numbers out one by one, starting with 1, as the
students holding Kid Count cards each stand up and arrange themselves along the tape line in order. As
you do this, use the language of ordinal numbers as well as the names of the numerals (i.e., “If you’re
holding the card that shows a 1, you’re first in line. The person holding the card that shows 2 will be
second in line. The number 3 card comes third in line. Yep, that’s you, Jesse!)
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.7
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Activity 2 Kid Count Number Line (cont.)
3. Once all the children holding cards are standing in order along the line, ask them to hold their cards
up in front of them for everyone to see. Walk along slowly behind the line, pointing to each student as
the rest of the class reads and counts along with you.
4. Repeat Step 3, but this time, name each child’s ordinal position in line (i.e., first, second, third, fourth,
fifth, etc.) as the class recites them with you. Reinforce the language of ordinal numbers by asking the
first child in line to hold up her hand, the third child in line to hop 3 times, the fourth child in line to
wave to his or her classmates, and so on. You can also ask your class to name the second child in line,
the eighth child in line, the thirteenth child in line, and so forth.
5. Give each of the students still seated a numbered index card. Tell them that when you give the signal,
they are going to walk, not run, to stand facing the person who is holding the matching Kid Count card.
Then they’re both going to sit down right where they are. Borrow one of the index cards from a student
and demonstrate how you expect the children to walk to their partner, stand in front of him or her, and
then both sit down. When everyone has found his or her partner, you will have two parallel lines of
children seated facing each other.
6. Ring your bell or jingle your keys and have the students holding numbered index cards find their
partners. When all the students are seated, have the class count from 1 to the last number as each
pair stands up. Then count backwards from the last number as each pair sits back down. Finally, have
each pair stand (and turn to face the door if you’re going back to the classroom) as the class recites the
ordinal numbers, first, second, third, fourth, and so on.
1
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
1
2
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
2
3
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
4
Number Corner Kid Count number cards
5
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
6
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
7
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
8
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
9
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
10
Number Corner Kid Count number cards
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Extensions
• Repeat the activity as described above, but use 10-frame cards from your Bridges Kit instead of
numbered index cards. (The Ten-Frame Bug 1–10 cards are first introduced in Bridges Session 23.
The Ten & More Ten Frames 11–20 cards are first introduced in Bridges Session 61.)
• Give all the students in your class a Kid Count card and have them arrange themselves in order
along the taped line. Walk along slowly behind the line, gently tapping each student on the shoulder
to call out his or her number and sit down on the line. Then have each student stand as the class
counts from 1 to the final number, in unison. Finally, have each child in line take one step forward
and wave as the class names his or her ordinal position in line, first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and
so on. This version of the activity is especially fun if you have an audience of parents, office staff, or
another kindergarten. If possible, have someone take a digital photo of the class to post beside your
classroom number line.
A1.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Set A1 H Activity 3
Activity
Capture the Number
Overview
You’ll need
The teacher divides the class into two teams. Students
from each team take turns drawing a ten-frame card
from a stack, finding the matching numeral on the class
number line, and marking it with a sticky note. After
playing the game several times with the class, the teacher
can introduce Capture the Number as a partner game for
children to play during Work Places.
H class number line from Set A1, Activity 1 (see Advance
Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H locate numbers from 0 to at least 20 on a number line
H read numerals from 0 to at least 20
H rote count by ones forward from 0 to 39
H count objects in a set of up to at least 20 objects
H describe numbers from 1 to 9 using 5 as a benchmark
number
H 11 ⁄2" × 2" sticky notes in 3 different colors (see
Advance Preparation)
H Ten Frame Bug Cards 0–10 (pages A1.33–A1.38, run
one copy of each on cardstock and cut apart.)
H Ten & More Ten-Frame Cards 10–20 (optional, pages
A1.39–A1.47, run one copy of each on cardstock and
cut apart.)
H Count & Compare Unifix Cubes Cards 10–27 (optional,
pages A1.48–A1.52, run one copy of each on
cardstock and cut apart.)
Advance Preparation Post the first four sentence strips
from Activity 1 on the whiteboard to form a number line
that runs from 0 to 39, at a height where the students can
easily reach it. Cut the sticky notes in half to form 1" by
11 ⁄2" rectangles. You’ll need 10 rectangles in one color, 10
in a second color, and 2 in a third color. Post 5 of one
color to the lower left of the number line, 5 of the other
color to the lower right, and 1 of the third color in the
middle. Keep the remaining notes in reserve for a second
round of the game
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
Instructions for Capture the Number
1. Gather children to your discussion area and seat them all facing the whiteboard. Point to each number
on the line as students count with you from 0 through 39. Then explain that you’re going to play a game
on the number line today. Divide the children into two teams, and assign each team a color to match
the colors of your sticky notes; yellow and blue, for example. Explain that the single sticky note in the
middle of the board is for you.
2. Show children the stack of Ten Frame Bug cards. Then mix up the cards and place them face-down in
a stack. Explain that members of each team are going to take turns pulling a card from the top of the stack,
finding the matching number on the number line, and marking it with a sticky note for their team.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.9
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Activity 3 Capture the Number (cont.)
3. Call on a student from one of the teams to take a card from the top of the stack. Ask him or her to
show it to the class, and have students determine how many bugs are on the card.
Students Jaimee got lots of bugs on her card!
Two butterflies, my best ones!
Nine, there are nine because I counted them.
There’s one missing so it must be 9.
Five and then 1, 2, 3, 4.
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 7, 8, 9…yep, it’s 9!
4. Then have that student locate and mark the matching numeral on the number line with a sticky note
in his or her team’s color. Encourage other students to help, and offer assistance as necessary.
5. Have students from each team take turns back and forth until all but one of the cards is gone. Take
the last card yourself and mark the corresponding numeral on the line with the odd-colored sticky note.
Then ask students to name the numerals each team captured as you record them on the board.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Yellow Team got 1, 2, 5, 7, and 10.
Blue Team got 0, 3, 6, 8, and 9.
Mrs. R. got 4.
6. Play the game again if time allows, or save the sticky notes for another day.
Extensions
• Repeat the game as described above, but have the class capture the numerals from 10 through 20 by
using the Ten & More Ten-Frame cards instead of the Ten-Frame Bug cards. You might also have
students capture the numerals from 10 through 27 by using the Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
cards.
• Set up Capture the Number as a Work Place, you’ll need
º Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–10 (page A1.13, run 1 half-class set plus a few extra)
º Zero Cards (page A1.17, one copy on cardstock, see Advance Preparation below)
º 3 sets of Count & Compare Butterflies Cards ( pages A1.53–A1.56, run three copies of each sheet on different color cardstock and cut apart.)
º Crayons in two different colors
A1.10 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
17
18
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Activity 3 Capture the Number (cont.)
º Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–20 (optional, page A1.14, run as needed)
º Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–10 Challenge (optional, page A1.15, run as needed)
º Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–20 Challenge (optional, page A1.16, run as needed)
º 3 sets of cards from Work Place 2C (Ten & More Ten-Frame, optional)
Advance Preparation To set Capture the Number up as a Work Place, run a half-class set of the
Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–10 blackline on page A1.13. Cut the sheets in half and place them
in a Work Place tub. Run 1 copy of the Zero Cards (page A1.17) on cardstock. Cut the cards apart and
laminate them. Add these to your Count & Compare Butterflies cards so that each set has 13 cards: 3
zeros, and 1 card each for 1–10. In addition to the record sheets and the 3 sets of cards, you’ll need to add
6 crayons or colored pencils, each a different color.
• Introduce Capture the Number as a partner game. In this game, students take turns drawing tenframe cards, locating the corresponding numerals on a number line, and coloring in dots above those
numerals on the line. The players each use a different color so they can tell who has captured each
numeral. Play continues until all the dots above the numbers are colored in. If a player draws a Zero
card and the 0 has already been marked, that player looses his or her turn. The player with the most
dots colored in at the end of the game wins. Choose a volunteer to play the game with you while the
other children watch, and then make it available during Work Places.
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
Mrs. R.
and Danny
DATE
Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–10
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
7
8
9
10
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Black
© The Math Learning Center
NAMES
Danny I won! I got 6 dots, and you only got 5, Mrs. R!
• Some students may enjoy counting out cubes in their color to match the numbers they capture,
forming these into trains, and setting them above the numbers on the line. At the end of the game,
each student can link his or her trains end-to-end to compare their winnings. The player with the
longer train wins the game.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.11
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line
Activity 3 Capture the Number (cont.)
• There are several different versions of the Capture the Number Record Sheet on pages A1.13–A1.16,
each a little more challenging. You can introduce these as needed. You may choose to use some of
them with small groups or individuals. Students playing Capture the Number, 0–20 can use a set of
the Ten & More Ten-Frame cards from Work Place 2C and just capture and color the numerals from
10–20. If they want to play for all the numerals on the line, they can combine a set of Count and
Compare Butterfly cards with a set of Ten & More Ten-Frame cards. • Capture the Number, 0–10 Challenge and Capture the Number, 0–20 Challenge are played like
the first two versions of the game, with a small twist. In the challenge games, students take turns
drawing a card, using the landmark numbers along the line to find the location of the matching
numeral, writing the numeral in themselves, and then coloring in the dot.
DATE
Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–10 Challenge
5
0
NAMES
10
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline
NAMES
DATE
Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–10 Challenge
DATE
Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–20 Challenge
5
0
0
5
10
10
NAMES
15
20
15
20
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline
NAMES
DATE
Capture the Number Record Sheet, 0–20 Challenge
0
5
A1.12 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
10
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
nombre
Hoja de anotaciones de Captura el número, 0 a 10
Fecha
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Hoja de anotaciones de Captura el número, 0 a 10
nombre
Fecha
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Run a half-class set plus a few extras and cut in half.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.13
Fecha
A1.14 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Fecha
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Hoja de anotaciones de Captura el número, 0 a 20
nombre
0
Hoja de anotaciones de Captura el número, 0 a 20
nombre
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Run as needed.
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
5
0
Hoja de anotaciones de Captura el número, 0 a 10 Reto
Fecha
nombre
5
0
Hoja de anotaciones de Captura el número, 0 a 10 Reto
nombre
Fecha
10
10
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Run as needed.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.15
A1.16 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
15
10
5
0
nombre
Hoja de anotaciones de Captura el número, 0 a 20 Reto
Fecha
15
10
5
0
Hoja de anotaciones de Captura el número, 0 a 20 Reto
nombre
Fecha
20
20
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Run as needed.
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
A1.17 Zero Cards
A1.17 Zero Cards
A1.17 Zero Cards
A1.17 Zero Cards
A1.17 Zero Cards
A1.17 Zero Cards
A1.17 Zero Cards
Tarjetas cero
A1.17 Zero Cards
A1.17 Zero Cards
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.17
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
A1.18 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
1
2
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 1 de 15
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
3
4
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 2 de 15
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.19
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
A1.20 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
5
6
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 3 de 15
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
7
8
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 4 de 15
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.21
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
A1.22 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
9
10
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 5 de 15
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
11
12
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 6 de 15
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.23
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
A1.24 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
13
14
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 7 de 15
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
15
16
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 8 de 15
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.25
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
A1.26 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
17
18
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 9 de 15
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
19 20
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 10 de 15
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.27
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
A1.28 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
21 22
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 11 de 15
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
23 24
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 12 de 15
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.29
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
A1.30 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
25 26
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 13 de 15
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
27 28
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 14 de 15
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.31
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
A1.32 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
ˇ† Number Corner Kid Count number cards
29 30
Tarjetas de Cuenta niño página 15 de 15
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de insectos en marcos de diez página 1 de 6
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.33
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de insectos en marcos de diez página 2 de 6
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
A1.34 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de insectos en marcos de diez página 3 de 6
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.35
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de insectos en marcos de diez página 4 de 6
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
A1.36 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de insectos en marcos de diez página 5 de 6
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.37
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de insectos en marcos de diez página 6 de 6
ˇ† Bridges in Mathematics Ten-Frame Bug Cards
A1.38 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on white
cardstock.
cardstock.
Cut apart
Cut on
apart
thinon
lines.
thin Laminate.
lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de marcos de diez y más de diez página 1 de 9
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.39
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on white
cardstock.
cardstock.
Cut apart
Cut on
apart
thinon
lines.
thin Laminate.
lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de marcos de diez y más de diez página 2 de 9
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
A1.40 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on white
cardstock.
cardstock.
Cut apart
Cut on
apart
thinon
lines.
thin Laminate.
lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de marcos de diez y más de diez página 3 de 9
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.41
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on colored
cardstock.
cardstock.
Cut apartCut
onapart
thin lines.
on thin
Laminate.
lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de marcos de diez y más de diez página 4 de 9
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
A1.42 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on colored
cardstock.
cardstock.
Cut apartCut
onapart
thin lines.
on thin
Laminate.
lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de marcos de diez y más de diez página 5 de 9
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.43
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on colored
cardstock.
white
cardstock.
cardstock.
Cut apart
CutCut
on
apart
apart
thinon
lines.
on
thin
thin
Laminate.
lines.
lines.
Laminate.
Laminate.
Tarjetas de marcos de diez y más de diez página 6 de 9
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
A1.44 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on colored
cardstock.
white
cardstock.
cardstock.
Cut apart
CutCut
on
apart
apart
thinon
lines.
on
thin
thin
Laminate.
lines.
lines.
Laminate.
Laminate.
Tarjetas de marcos de diez y más de diez página 7 de 9
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.45
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on colored
cardstock.
cardstock.
Cut apartCut
onapart
thin lines.
on thin
Laminate.
lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de marcos de diez y más de diez página 8 de 9
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
A1.46 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on colored
cardstock.
cardstock.
Cut apartCut
onapart
thin lines.
on thin
Laminate.
lines. Laminate.
Tarjetas de marcos de diez y más de diez página 9 de 9
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
ˇ† 2C/2G Ten & More Ten-Frame
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.47
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara cubos Unifix página 1 de 5
A1.48 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara cubos Unifix página 2 de 5
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.49
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara cubos Unifix página 3 de 5
A1.50 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara cubos Unifix página 4 de 5
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.51
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart on thin lines. Laminate.
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
ˇ† 2L Count & Compare Unifix Cubes
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara cubos Unifix página 5 de 5
A1.52 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 31 copy
copies
onon
cardstock.
white
different
cardstock.
Cut
color
apart
cardstock.
Cut on
apart
thinon
Cut
lines.
thin
apart
Laminate.
lines.
on Laminate.
thin lines.
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara mariposas página 1 de 4
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.53
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 31 copy
copies
onon
cardstock.
different Cut
color
apart
cardstock.
on thin Cut
lines.
apart
Laminate.
on thin lines.
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
A1.54 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara mariposas página 2 de 4
© The Math Learning Center
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 31 copy
copies
onon
cardstock.
different Cut
color
apart
cardstock.
on thin Cut
lines.
apart
Laminate.
on thin lines.
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara mariposas página 3 de 4
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A1.55
Set A1 Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line Blackline Make 31 copy
copies
onon
cardstock.
different Cut
color
apart
cardstock.
on thin Cut
lines.
apart
Laminate.
on thin lines.
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara mariposas página 4 de 4
A1.56 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Kindergarten supplement
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Includes
Activity 1: Numbers & Combinations to Ten through the School Year
Activity 2: Butterfly Race
Activity 3: Fives Up
Activity 4: Frogs & Lillypads
Activity 5: Pond Game
Activity 6: Spin, Add & Compare
Activity 7: Bug Catchers
Activity 8: Piggy Banks
A4.1
A4.23
A4.35
A4.45
A4.53
A4.59
A4.67
A4.73
Skills & Concepts
H use one-to-one correspondence to count sets of objects to 30, and produce sets of given sizes
H use one-to-one correspondence to compare sets of objects to 30 using phrases such as
“same number”, “more than”, or “less than”
H recognize the number of objects in a small set without counting
H identify the ordinal position of objects
H read and write numerals to 30
H model addition by joining sets of objects and model subtraction by removing objects
from sets for numbers less than 10.
H verbally describe mathematical relationships involving addition and subtraction situations
for numbers less than 10
H compose and decompose numbers from 2 to 10
H record mathematical thinking by writing simple addition and subtraction sentences
P0310
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Set A4 Numbers & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2010 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0310
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
Acknowledgements:
– Thanks go to Kindergarten teacher Lori Lawrence for her encouragement and support in
developing the activities in this supplement set.
– The work of Robert J. Wright, Garry Stanger, Ann K. Stafford, and James Martland, in
their Math Recovery publications (listed below) also inspired and informed some of
the activities in this supplement set. In particular, we are indebted to these authors for
reinforcing the important role played by visual models, including fingers (“bunny ears”),
domino dot formations, five frames, and ten frames, in helping young children learn to
combine and partition small numbers.
– Wright, Stanger, Stafford & Martland, Teaching Number in the Classroom with 4–8 YearOlds, 2006
– Wright, Martland, Stafford, and Stanger, Teaching Number: Advancing Children’s Skills &
Strategies, 2006
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Set A4 H Activity 1
Activity
Numbers and Combinations to Ten Through the School Year
Overview
Skills & Concepts
Below, you’ll find a set of exercises to add to your Number
Corner routines each month. These exercises involve the
numbers 1 through 10, and are designed to be taught from
the start of each month, in conjunction with the Our Month
in School workout. They are short and simple, and provide
a solid foundation on which to help kindergartners build
skills with early addition and subtraction.
H count objects in a set using one-to-one
correspondence and produce sets of given sizes
H recognize the number of objects in a small set without
counting
H read and write numerals to 10
H model addition by joining sets of objects and
model subtraction by removing objects from sets for
numbers less than 10.
H verbally describe mathematical relationships involving
addition and subtraction situations for numbers less
than 10
H compose and decompose numbers from 2 to 10
H record mathematical thinking by writing simple
addition and subtraction sentences
September: Dots & Fingers
You’ll need
H Five Plus Dot cards (pages A4.10 – A4.14, run 1 copy of
each sheet on white cardstock)
1. In addition to posting the number of days students have been in school on the Our Month in School
pocket chart each day, have children hold up the corresponding number of fingers. Also, post the
corresponding dot card.
Our Month in School
1
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.1
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 1 Numbers & Combinations to Ten Through the School Year (cont.)
2. Continue to post a dot card and have students show the number of days with their fingers through the
tenth day of school. After the first 3 to 4 days, vary the routine by doing one or more of the following:
• Point to a numeral card on the Our Month in School Chart and have children show that number of
fingers. Encourage students to begin showing the number without counting their fingers one by one.
• Show a number of fingers on your own hand(s) to represent the quantity on one of the dot cards
posted so far. Have students name the number of fingers they see.
• Point to one or more of the posted dot cards, and ask students to name the quantity and show that
many on their fingers. Encourage the group to find more than one way to show the quantity.
Students It’s 4!
I can make that on one hand!
I do it like this, 1 and then 3.
I do 2 and 2.
3. After you have been in school for 10 days, you will have posted all of the dot cards, 1-10. Continue
throughout the rest of the month with the activities described above. From time to time, take several of
the cards down, mix them up, and place them in a stack, face down. Turn the first card up and show it
to the students for about half a second before turning it face down again. Ask students to pair-share how
many dots they saw, and then have the group hold up their fingers to show the corresponding number of
dots. Show the card a second time so they can confirm their responses.
October: Frames & Bunny Ears
You’ll need
H Ten Frames sheet (page A4.15, run 1 copy on paper,
post on your calendar display board)
H 3/4” adhesive dots or marking pens in two different
colors
H Five Plus Dot cards (pages A4.10 – A4.14, run 1 copy of
each sheet on white cardstock)
1. In addition to posting a weather card each day during the Our Month in School workout, place an
adhesive dot, or make a colored circle on the Ten Frame sheet. Start in the upper left-hand corner of the
sheet, and work your way across the top row, using the same color dot for the first five school days in
October.
A4.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 1 Numbers & Combinations to Ten Through the School Year (cont.)
Our Month in School
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on paper, post on your calendar display board.
Ten Frames
2. Each day, have children show the number of days you’ve been in school so far this month with their
fingers, and name the quantity. Starting from the first day, ask them to place their fists on top of their
heads (like bunny ears) and show the number without looking at their fingers, if possible. While some
children may need to move their hands down to count or double-check the number of fingers they’re
holding up, others will begin to gain confidence at showing the correct number of fingers quickly, sight
unseen, as they develop a “feel” for the numbers one through ten.
Encourage them to explain how they can tell how many dots are on the Ten Frame Sheet.
Teacher We all agree that there are 3 dots so far on our Ten Frame Sheet. How do you know it’s 3?
Students I went 1, 2, 3!
I can just do 3 on my fingers
I can just see it’s 3!
There are 2 and then 1 more. That’s 3.
There’s 5 in the whole row, but 2 are empty, so that makes 3.
3. Continue in this fashion through the tenth day. (Switch dot colors on the sixth day, and move across
the second row of the first frame from left to right.)
4. From the eleventh day forward, count the dots on the sheet one by one with the children. Alternate colors each time you start a new row so that the groups of 5 show up as clearly as the groups of 10 on the sheet.
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on paper, post on your calendar display board.
Ten Frames
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.3
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 1 Numbers & Combinations to Ten Through the School Year (cont.)
5. Use your dot cards as described in September, Step 3, to have children practice recognizing, naming,
and showing quantities from 1 through 10 on their fingers through the rest of the month.
November: More Frames & Bunny Ears
You’ll need
H Ten Frames sheet (page A4.15, run 1 copy on paper,
post on your calendar display board)
H 3/4” adhesive dots or marking pens in one color
H Doubles Dot cards (pages A4.16–4.20, run 1 copy of
each sheet on pastel cardstock)
Repeat October’s activities, with the following modifications:
Ten Frames
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on paper, post on your calendar display board.
1. Post the Ten Frame Sheet sideways, and place the dots in rows of 2 instead of 5. Use a single color
throughout the month. This provides children with a slightly different model and may elicit counting
strategies based on pairs instead of 5’s. Continue through the month. Once past the tenth day, work with
the students to count the dots one-by-one each day, but ask students to share other counting strategies
as well.
Teacher We just counted to find out that there are 15 dots on our chart. Does anyone have a
different way to tell that there are 15?
Sara I see 10, and then 2 more, so that’s 11, 12. Then it goes 13, 14, 15.
2. After the tenth day, use the Doubles Dot cards to have children practice recognizing, naming, and
showing quantities from 1 through 10 on their fingers through the rest of the month.
A4.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 1 Numbers & Combinations to Ten Through the School Year (cont.)
December: Quick Fives
You’ll need
H Quick Fives Frame (page A4.21, run 1 copy on a
transparency)
H 10 translucent counters; 5 blue and 5 red
H overhead projector or document camera
H chart paper and markers in blue, red, and black
In addition to discussing the ten-frame dot cards you post on the Our Month in School pocket chart each
day, conduct the exercises described below a couple times a week.
1. Display the Quick Fives Frame on the overhead. Ask students how many squares they see, first
whispering to one another, and then reporting the number out loud.
2. Turn off the projector light, and place blue counters in 3 of the squares on the frame. Work from left
to right, leaving no empty squares between markers.
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on a transparency.
Quick Five Frames
3. Turn on the projector light. Ask students how many dots they see, and how many empty
squares. Have them raise their fists to their foreheads to make bunny ears, and then show
the number of dots on one hand, and the number of empty squares on the other. Ask them to
share observations.
Students There are 3 dots up there, and 2 empty boxes.
I made my fingers like that, 3 and 2.
This hand is for the dots, and this hand is for empty places.
4. Repeat this exercise several times during the first half of the month. During the latter half of the
month, modify it by turning off the projector light and filling the 5-frame with blue and red counters.
When you turn the light on, ask students to use their bunny ears to show what they see, and have them
share their observations.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.5
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 1 Numbers & Combinations to Ten Through the School Year (cont.)
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on a transparency.
Quick Five Frames
Students 2 blues and 3 reds, like this!
Now they all have dots.
I see 5 dots.
5. Make a quick sketch of the frame and dots on a piece of chart paper, and record students’
observations. Work with input from the class to write a number sentence reflecting the numbers of
counters.
2 blue dots
3 red dots
5 dots in all
5
2
3
2+3=5
6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 several times, keeping records on the same piece of chart paper if possible. By
the end of the month, you should have several combinations of 5 displayed on the chart.
January: Combinations to 10 on Frames and
Fingers
You’ll need
H Quick Tens Frame (page A4.22, run 1 copy on a transparency)
H 20 translucent counters; 10 blue and 10 red
H overhead projector or document camera
H chart paper and markers in blue, red, and black
In addition to discussing the ten-frame dot cards you post on the Our Month in School pocket chart each
day, conduct the exercises described below a couple times a week.
1. Display the Quick Tens Frame on the overhead. As students watch, place 5 blue counters in the top
row and 2 red counters in the bottom row. Ask:
A4.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 1 Numbers & Combinations to Ten Through the School Year (cont.)
Teacher How many blue markers do you see?
How many red markers do you see?
How many markers are there in all? How do you know?
Can you show this combination on your fingers? Right – 5 fingers on one hand and 2 on the other.
Keep your fingers showing and put your hands on your head, like bunny ears. Wiggle the hand that
has 5 fingers up. Wiggle the hand that has 2 fingers up How many fingers are you showing in all?
Can you figure it out without looking at your fingers?
2. Repeat with other “5-plus” combinations, such as 5 + 1, 5 + 3, 5 + 4, and 5 + 5.
3. Later in the month, place 4 blue counters in the top row of the Quick Tens frame, and 3 red counters
in the bottom row with the projector light turned off. Explain that you are going to show the frame for
just a moment, and ask children to watch carefully. Turn on the projector light for a little less than a
second, and then turn it off again. Ask:
Teacher How many blue markers did you see? Show it on your fingers.
How many red markers did you see? Show it on your fingers.
How many markers in all? How do you know?
4. Turn on the projector light so children can confirm the quantities and the total. Then make a quick
sketch of the frame and dots on a piece of chart paper, and record students’ observations. Work with
input from the class to write a number sentence reflecting the numbers of counters.
4 blue dots
3 red dots
7 dots in all
7
4
3
4+3=7
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 with other combinations for numbers between 6 and 10 that can be shown on
frames and fingers, such as 3 + 3, 4 + 2, 3 + 4, 4 + 4, and 4 + 5.
February: How Many Empty Squares?
You’ll need
H Quick Fives Frame (page A4.21, run 1 copy on a transparency)
H Quick Tens Frame (page A4.22, run 1 copy on a transparency)
H 10 red translucent counters
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.7
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 1 Numbers & Combinations to Ten Through the School Year (cont.)
H overhead projector or document camera
H white board and markers
H individual whiteboards/chalkboards, markers/chalk, and erasers for students (optional)
In addition to discussing the pennies and nickels you post on the Our Month in School pocket chart
each day, conduct the exercises described below a couple times a week.
1. Seat children so they can all see the screen. Place the Quick Fives Frame under the projector, light
turned off. Explain that you’re going to turn on the projector light for just a second so they can see the
picture, and then turn it off again, so they’ll need to watch carefully.
2. Show the frame for a little less than a second, and turn the projector light off again. Ask children to
show on their fingers how many empty squares they saw.
3. Tell the class that you’re going to put a red counter in 4 of the empty squares. How many of the
squares will still be empty? Working with the projector light still off, place the 4 counters while children
pair-share responses to your question. Then turn on the projector light so they can see if they were correct. Ask:
Teacher How many squares do you see in all? (5)
How many of the squares have counters in them? (4)
How many of the squares are empty? (1)
4. Work with input from the class to record the combination, as shown below:
5
4 1
4+1=5
5. Repeat with other partitions of 5 (2 + 3, 1 + 4, 3 + 2, 0 + 5)
6. Later in the month, repeat steps 1–4 with the ten frame instead of the five frame. Start with 8 counters. Repeat with other partitions of 10 (9 + 1, 7 + 3, 6 + 4, 5 + 5, and so on). You might also consider
giving students each an individual whiteboard or chalkboard, marker or chalk, and eraser later in the
month, and having them record the combinations with you when you get to that step in the exercise.
March & April: Our Month in School Workouts
The Our Month in School workouts in March and April provide many opportunities for children to verbalize, read, and write addition combinations to 10.
A4.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 1 Numbers & Combinations to Ten Through the School Year (cont.)
May: Dot Card Subtraction
You’ll need
H Doubles Dot Cards, 2 – 9 (pages A4.16–4.20, run 1 copy of each sheet on pastel cardstock
H Five Plus Dot Cards, 6 – 10 (pages A4.12 – A4.14, run 1 copy of each sheet on white cardstock)
H white board and markers
H individual whiteboards/chalkboards, markers/chalk, and erasers for students
In addition to counting by 5’s with the 5-pointed stars during the Our Month in School workout, do the
exercise described below a couple of times a week.
1. Place the Doubles Dot Cards in a stack face down. Turn the top card up and show it to the children for
about half a second. Ask them to use their bunny ears to show the number of dots they saw.
2. Show the card again so children can confirm the quantity and discuss what they see.
3. Cover one side of the card, and ask children how many dots they can still see. Where are the other
dots? (hiding under your hand) Are there still (4) dots on the card (yes) How many are you hiding? (2)
4. Make a record of the action with sketches, words, and an equation.
4 dots
2
2
Mrs. R. hid 2 dots
4–2=2
5. Repeat steps 1–4 with a couple more of the Doubles Dot cards.
6. Toward the middle of the month, mix the Five Plus cards into the stack. Also, give children each a
whiteboard/chalkboard, pen/chalk, and eraser, and ask them to record the subtraction equations with
you.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.9
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas Más de cinco Hoja 1 de 5
A4.10 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas Más de cinco Hoja 2 de 5
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.11
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas Más de cinco Hoja 3 de 5
A4.12 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas Más de cinco Hoja 4 de 5
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.13
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas Más de cinco Hoja 5 de 5
A4.14 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Marcos de diez
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.15
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas de dobles Hoja 1 de 5
A4.16 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas de dobles Hoja 2 de 5
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.17
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas de dobles Hoja 3 de 5
A4.18 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas de dobles Hoja 4 de 5
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.19
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on white cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas punteadas de dobles Hoja 5 de 5
A4.20 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on paper, post on your calendar display board.
Marcos rápidos de cinco
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.21
Set A4 Number
Conjunto
A4 Operaciones
& Operations:
& numéricas:
Addition &Suma
Subtraction
y resta Hoja
Blackline
reproducible
Run 1 copy
Reproduce
on a transparency.
1 copia en transparencia.
Marcos rápidos de diez
A4.22 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Set A4 H Activity 2
Activity
Butterfly Race
Overview
You’ll need
Butterfly Race is a simple game that provides practice with
a variety of counting skills. Introduce it to the whole class,
and play it with the group several times before adding it
to your current set of Work Places.
H Butterfly Race Card (from Work Place Menu Cards.
page A4.26, run 1 copy on cardstock, cut apart and
laminate if desired)
H Tree Boards (page A4.28, run 1 copy on a transparency
and 3 copies on cardstock)
Skills & Concepts
H count pictures in a set
H Count & Compare Butterflies Cards Overhead (pages
A4.29 & A4. 30, run 1 copy on transparency)
H read numerals to 10
H identify the ordinal position of objects
H 3 sets of Count & Compare Butterflies Cards (pages
A4.31–A4. 33, run 3 copies on different color
cardstock, cut apart and laminate if desired.)
H compose and decompose numbers from 2 to 10
H 6 translucent game markers, 3 red and 3 blue
Instructions for Introducing Butterfly Race
1. Gather children where they can all see the screen easily. Display a copy of the Tree Board, and give
students a minute or two to pair-share observations. Then ask volunteers to share observations about
the game board with the class.
8
1
5
4
10
6 3
START
2
7
6
5
2nd
9
3
7
4
1st
3rd
1
2 8
6 10
7 5
4 3 9
4th
FINISH
1
2
3
5th
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on a transparency. Run 3 copies on cardstock and laminate if desired.
Tree Board
2. Once they have shared some observations, explain that this is a racetrack for butterflies that are going
to fly from one tree to the next, starting with the first tree and moving in order to the fifth tree. The
first butterfly to reach the fifth tree is the winner. Then point to each tree and name its ordinal position
with the children: first, second, third, fourth, and fifth.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.23
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Actividad 2 Carrera de mariposas (continuación)
3. Place a red and a blue translucent counter near the board to the left of the first tree. Explain that the
blue marker is yours, and the red one is for the class. These are your butterflies. You’re going to race
them through the trees to see which team is the first to get to the finish (the fifth tree). 4. Mix the overhead Count & Compare Butterflies cards, stack them, and set the stack near the projector.
Take the top card and place it on the board. Ask students to show on their fingers the number of
butterflies they see on the card. Then explain that you get to move your “butterfly” to the first tree if it
has the numeral that matches the number of butterflies on your card.
2
7
8
1
5
4
10
6 3
START
6
5
2nd
9
3
7
4
1st
3rd
1
2 8
6 10
7 5
4 3 9
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
4th
FINISH
1
2
3
5th
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on a transparency. Run 3 copies on cardstock and laminate if desired.
Tree Board
Students You got a 6!
There are 3 and 3 on there. That’s 6.
I can show it on my fingers like 3 and then 3.
Teacher Can I move my blue butterfly marker to the first tree? Is there a 6 on that tree? Whisper to
your neighbor yes or no. Okay, now let’s hear from all of you.
Students Yes!
5. Call on a student volunteer to draw the next card from the stack and place it on the board. Ask
students to pair-share how many butterflies they see on the card, and then choose 2 or 3 volunteers to
share and explain their answers.
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
Students It’s 8 because I counted them.
It’s 5 on top, and then 6, 7, 8.
I know it’s 8 because there are 2 empty ones.
A4.24 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Actividad 2 Carrera de mariposas (continuación)
Teacher Can you move your red butterfly marker to the first tree?
Students No! There’s no 8 on that tree.
What about the next tree? See the 8 there?
But we have to go around in the right order, like first and then second.
6. Continue to take turns with the class until one team has reached the fifth tree. Remove the markers
from the board, re-shuffle the cards, and play a second round of the game if time allows. (If you run out
of cards before one team gets to the fifth tree, reshuffle and reuse the same cards.)
Work Place S1 Butterfly Race
This Work Place will need
H 3 Tree Boards (page A4.28, run 3 copies on cardstock.)
H 3 sets of Count & Compare Butterflies cards (pages A4.31–A4. 33, run 3 copies on different color cardstock, cut apart
and laminate if desired.)
H 6 translucent game markers, 3 red and 3 blue
Object of the Game
Be the first player to get your “butterfly” (game marker) to the fifth tree.
Work Place Instructions
1. Mix the Count & Compare Butterfly cards, stack them, and place the stack face down near the game
board. Each player takes a different color game-marker and sets it to the left of the first tree.
2. First player draws the top card from the stack, and determines how many butterflies there are on the
card. If the first tree on the game board has the corresponding numeral, the player can move his or her
marker to the tree and set it on top of that numeral. If the first tree doesn’t have that numeral, the first
player must leave his/her marker where it is.
3. Second player takes a turn to draw a card and move his/her marker to the first tree if possible.
Partners continue to take turns drawing cards and moving their markers ahead, one tree at a time. The
first player to reach the fifth tree wins the game.
Note If the players go through the entire stack of cards before one of them wins, mix the cards thoroughly, place
them in a facedown stack again, and continue playing.
Instructional Considerations for Butterfly Race
If some of your students need support recognizing the numerals, encourage them to use the “key” at the
bottom of the game board.
Questions to ask:
• Which tree are you on right now? (first, second, third, fourth, or fifth)
• How many butterflies are on the card you just picked? How do you know?
• Can you use bunny ears to show me how many butterflies are on your card?
• Which card do you hope you’ll get on your next turn?
• Are there any cards you don’t want to get on your next turn? Why not?
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.25
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart and laminate if desired.
A4.26 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
S4 Juego del estanque
S3 Ranas y nenúfares
5
S1 Carrera de mariposas
S2 Cinco arriba
Tarjetas de menú de Work Place Hoja 1 de 2
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart and laminate if desired.
© The Math Learning Center
S7 Resta de la alcancía
5 1
4
2
3
S5 Gira, suma y compara
S6 Cazadores de insectos
Tarjetas de menú de Work Place Hoja 2 de 2
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.27
3.o
10
7
8
4.o
2.o
4
5.o
4 3 9
1
2
3
A4.28 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
META
1.o
COMIENZO
Tablero de árbol
5
4
10
6 3
7 5
5
6
1
2
7
8
7
6
1
2 8
6 10
9
9
5
3
4
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart and laminate if desired.
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut apart and laminate if desired.
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara mariposas
Transparencia 1 de 2
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.29
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on transparency. Cut apart on thin lines.
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara mariposas
Transparencia 2 de 2
A4.30 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies of each on different color cardstock. Cut apart and laminate.
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara mariposas Hoja 1 de 3
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.31
A4.32 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies of each on different color cardstock. Cut apart and laminate.
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara mariposas Hoja 2 de 3
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies of each on different color cardstock. Cut apart and laminate.
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
ˇ† 1M Count & Compare Butterflies Cards
Tarjetas de Cuenta y compara mariposas Hoja 3 de 3
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.33
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
A4.34 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Set A4 H Activity 3
Activity
Fives Up
Overview
You’ll need
Fives Up is a partner or small group game in which
students search for combinations of dot cards and/or
numeral cards that total 5. Introduce it to the whole class,
and play it with the group several times before adding it
to your current set of Work Places.
H Fives Up Work Place Menu Card (from Work Place
Menu Cards. page A4.26, run 1 copy on cardstock, cut
apart and laminate if desired)
Skills & Concepts
H Fives Up Record Sheet (page A4.43, optional; run as
needed)
H Fives Up cards (pages A4.39–A4.42, see Advance
Preparation)
H read numerals to 5
H compose and decompose numbers to 5
H helper jar containing a popsicle stick for each child
with his/her name on it
H model addition by joining sets
H verbally describe mathematical relationships involving
addition situations
Advance Preparation Run 1 copy of each page,
A4.39–A4.42, on each of 3 different pastel colors
of cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if
desired. Collate so you have 3 decks of 32 cards,
each in a different color.
H use one-to-one correspondence to count and
compare sets of objects
Instructions for Introducing Fives Up
1. Gather children to your discussion circle, and explain that you have a new game to play with them.
Show them a deck of the Fives Up dot cards you have prepared, and then hold up 6 or 7 of the cards in
quick succession as children hold up their fingers to show how many dots they see on each card.
2. Explain that the object of the game is to find cards that can be combined to make a total of 5 dots. Use
the cards to show and discuss a couple of examples and counter-examples (e.g., 4 dots and 1 dot, 2 dots
and 3 dots, 4 dots and 3 dots). Tell the children that you are going to take your turn first, and then pick
a stick from your helper jar to choose a student to take the first turn for the class.
Teacher I’m going to take the first card from the stack and turn it up so we can all see it. How
many dots did I get? Three? You’re right!
3
Teacher I didn’t get 5, did I? So now it’s your turn. Imani, I picked your stick from the jar. Please
come turn up the next card in the stack for the class, and set it beside mine.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.35
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 3 Fives Up (cont.)
3
4
Teacher Can Imani use these two cards to make 5 for you? What happens if we put the two cards
together and count up all the dots? Talk to the person sitting next to you, and raise your hand when
you have an idea.
Students It makes 7 because it’s 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.
I know because 3 and 3 is 6, then 1 more is 7.
3. Take your next turn, and then choose a stick from your jar to choose the next student to turn over a
card for the class.
3
4
4
Teacher So far, neither team has been able to make a combination of 5. Jorge, I just picked your
stick. Before Jorge turns over the next card, let’s think. What card do you hope he gets for you?
Jon One with 5 dots!
Teacher Yep, if Jorge got one with 5 dots, you could take it. Is there any other card that would be
good for Jorge to pick for you?
Alicia If he gets 2 dots, he can put it with 3. That will make 5.
Teacher Do you all agree with Alicia? Thumbs up if you think 3 and 2 will make 5. Does anyone
else have an idea?
Dawn He should get a 1 because then he can put it with the 4.
4. Play back and forth with the class, picking sticks from the jar to choose children to turn the cards
over for the class, as you conduct a play-by-play discussion. At the end of the game, tell the class that
the team with the most cards will be the winner. Can they predict which team will win? How will you
know for sure? After a little discussion, work with the class to set out the two sets of cards side by side,
matching them one for one, so it is easy to see which team got more. Ask children to compare the two
sets using such phrases as “more than”, “less than”, or “the same as”. Then have the class count each set,
and compare the two in terms of how many more than, and how many less than.
A4.36 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
5
1
4
3
4
1
5
5
5
2
2
4
3
3
2
4
2
1
1
3
Activity 3 Fives Up (cont.)
5. Work with the children to count all the dot cards as you pick them up one by one and mix them in
preparation for another game.
6. Play Fives Up again with your group several times before making it available during Work Places.
Depending on the needs of your students, you might also play it with small groups before adding it to
your current set of Work Places. Work Place S2 Fives Up
You’ll need
Object of the Game
H 3 sets Fives Up Cards (dot cards only; numeral cards
are optional, see Instructional Considerations)
Collect pairs or sets of cards that total 5 (e.g., 2 dots and
3 dots; or 2 dots, 2 dots, and 1 dot; a single card with 5
dots). The player with the most cards at the end of the
game wins.
H Fives Up Record Sheets (optional; see Instructional
Considerations)
Work Place Instructions
1. The players mix up the cards and place them in a stack face down between them.
2. First player takes the card from the top of the stack, turns it face up and reports the number of dots.
If there are 5 dots, Player 1 can take the card. If there are fewer than 5 dots, Player 1 leaves the card
sitting out between him/herself and the other player.
3. Player 2 takes the next card from the stack, turns it face up and reports the number of dots. If there
are 5 dots, or if this card can be combined with the other card to make a total of 5, Player 2 gets to take
one or both the cards. If it is not possible to make a combination of 5, Player 2 leaves the cards sitting
out between him/herself and the other player.
4. Players take turns drawing one card at a time, reporting the number of dots on the card, and trying to
combine it with one or more of the cards that are sitting face up to make 5.
5. Play continues until no more cards can be combined to make 5.
6. When as many as possible of the cards have been used, partners lay their cards out in two lines, sideby-side, and count them to determine who got more.
Note No one gets extra turns in this game. If a player wins a set of cards, play still reverts to the other player.
Also, players can combine more than 2 cards to make 5, for instance, 2 + 2 + 1.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.37
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 3 Fives Up (cont.)
Challenge
Instructional Considerations
You can make the game more challenging for students who are ready by adding the numeral cards to
the deck. The game is played exactly the same, but some of the combinations will involve dot cards
only, some dot and numeral cards, and some just numerals. Some of your students might also enjoy
playing the game with numeral cards only.
1
3
4
1
2
3
1
Another way to extend a challenge is to ask students to record their game results, using the optional
Fives Up Record Sheet blackline. The sheet asks students to record the number of cards each partner
won, circle “yes” or “no” in response to three questions, and show three different ways to make 5 by
drawing pictures or recording combinations.
Name ____________________________________
Fives Up Record Sheet
I won ___________ cards. My partner won ___________ cards.
I won more cards than my partner.
YES
NO
I won less cards than my partner.
YES
NO
I won the same number of cards as my partner.
YES
NO
Here are three different ways to make 5:
Students who are ready might also be challenged to play for combinations of 6, 7, or 8 using just the dot
cards, or even the all the dot and numeral cards in the set.
Note The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) offers a collection of free online computer
activities for K-12 students on their Illuminations web site (http://illuminations.nctm.org/). One of the activities
on the web site is called Five Frame, and can be reached directly by going to the following URL:
http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=74
Five Frame allows children to count, build, and add quantities in five frames on screen, and provides
a nice way to reinforce and extend the skills introduced in Fives Up. You might consider adding Five
Frame to your Work Places, or linking parents to the activity so children can use it at home on their
own computer.
A4.38 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies, each on a different pastel color of cardstock. Cut apart and laminate.
Tarjetas de Cinco arriba Hoja 1 de 4
© The Math Learning Center
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.39
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies, each on a different pastel color of cardstock. Cut apart and laminate.
Tarjetas de Cinco arriba Hoja 2 de 4
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
A4.40 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies, each on a different pastel color of cardstock. Cut apart and laminate.
Tarjetas de Cinco arriba Hoja 3 de 4
© The Math Learning Center
5
5
5
5
0
0
1
1
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.41
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies, each on a different pastel color of cardstock. Cut apart and laminate.
Tarjetas de Cinco arriba Hoja 4 de 4
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
A4.42 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Conjunto
Set
A4 Number
A4 Operaciones
& Operations:
& numéricas:
Addition &Suma
Subtraction
y resta Blackline
Run as needed
Run as
and
needed
cut in and
half. cut in half.
Nombre ____________________________________
Hoja de anotaciones de Cinco arriba
Gané ___________ tarjetas. Mi compañero ganó ___________ tarjetas.
Gané más tarjetas que mi compañero.
Sí
Gané menos tarjetas que mi compañero.
No
Sí
No
Gané el mismo número de tarjetas que mi compañero.
Sí
No
Aquí hay cinco formas diferentes de llegar a 5:
Nombre ____________________________________
Hoja de anotaciones de Cinco arriba
Gané ___________ tarjetas. Mi compañero ganó ___________ tarjetas.
Gané más tarjetas que mi compañero.
Gané menos tarjetas que mi compañero.
Sí
No
Sí
No
Gané el mismo número de tarjetas que mi compañero.
Sí
No
Aquí hay cinco formas diferentes de llegar a 5:
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.43
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
A4.44 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Set A4 H Activity 4
Activity
Frogs & Lillypads
Overview
You’ll need
Frogs & Lillypads is a board game similar to Butterfly Race
that provides an opportunity to teach and reinforce the
skill of counting on. Introduce it to the whole class, and
play it with the group once or twice before adding it to
your current set of Work Places.
H Frogs & Lillypads Work Place Menu Card (from
Work Place Menu Cards. page A4.26, run 1 copy on
cardstock, cut apart and laminate if desired)
Skills & Concepts
H 3 Frogs & Lillypads Spinners (pages A4.50–A4.51, run
1 copy of each sheet on cardstock. Color each of the
number spinners green. Color the dot spinners light
blue. Cut sheet in half and laminate if desired.)
H 3 Lillypad Boards (page A4.49, run 3 copies on
cardstock)
H read numerals to 10
H identify the ordinal position of objects
H model addition for numbers less than 10 by joining
sets of objects
H 6 translucent game markers in several different colors
H helper jar containing a popsicle stick for each child
with his/her name on it
H count on to add two numbers
Instructions for Introducing Frogs & Lillypads
1. Pin one of the Lillypad boards to a display easel or whiteboard near your discussion area. Gather children
to the area, and seat them in a way that they can all see the game board. Explain that you have a new game
to share with them, and this is the playing board you will use. Give them a minute or two to pair-share
observations about the game board. Then ask volunteers to share their observations with the class.
4
8 6 1
7
9
5 4
3 7
2nd
START
1st
4th
FINISH
© The Math Learning Center
2
3rd
2 8
4
5 6
10
9 8 5
7
1
5
2 9
8 7
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies on cardstock.
Frogs & Lillypads Board
5th
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.45
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 4 Frogs & Lillypads (cont.)
2. Next, tell them that this game is called Frogs and Lillypads. It is similar to the Butterfly Race in that
the object of the game is to be the first player to reach the fifth lillypad. This time, instead of drawing
cards from a stack, you’re going to use a double spinner to help get from one lillypad to the next.
3. Ask children to form a circle. Place the spinner on the floor near enough for you to reach as you sit
in the circle, but far enough into the middle so children can see it. Give them a moment to examine
the spinner, and then spin the arrow on the first spinner. Ask children to name the numeral you spun
and show the corresponding quantity on the fingers of one hand. Then spin the arrow on the second
spinner. Ask children to identify the number of dots, and show the corresponding quantity on the
fingers of their other hand. What happens if they add the two quantities? Give them a moment to pairshare ideas, and then call on volunteers.
Frogs & Lillypads Spinner Sheet 1 of 2
5
4
3
3
4
5
4. While some students probably counted their fingers one by one to find a total of 8, others may have
counted on from 5 to get the answer. Reinforce the counting on strategy by modeling it and practicing it
with the group. Ask children to stretch the fingers on their first hand wide as they say the numeral that
was spun, and then tap their heads with each of the fingers on their other hand as they count on: five,
six, seven, eight!
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 several times. Then place the Lillypad board on the floor next to the spinner,
and play the game with the students, following the instructions on the next page. Use your helper jar
to select students to spin the spinner each time the class takes their turn. Model and reinforce the
counting-on strategy throughout.
6. Play Frogs and Lillypads again with your group at least once before making it available during Work
Places. Depending on the needs of your students, you might also play it with small groups before adding
it to your current set of Work Places. A4.46 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 4 Frogs & Lillypads (cont.)
Work Place S3 Frogs & Lillypads
This Work Place will need
Object of the Game
H 3 Lillypad boards
Be the first player to get your “frog” (game marker) to the
fifth lillypad.
H 3 Frogs & Lillypads spinners
H 6 translucent game markers in several different colors
Work Place Instructions
1. Each player takes a different color game marker and sets it to the left of the first lillypad on the game
board.
2. First player spins both spinners, names the number on the first spinner, and counts on the number
of dots spun on the second spinner to determine the total. If the first lillypad on the game board has a
numeral that matches the total, the player can move his or her marker to the lillypad and set it on top of
that numeral. If the first lillypad doesn’t have that numeral, the first player must leave his/her marker
where it is.
3. Second player takes a turn to spin both spinners, count on to find the total, and move his/her marker
to the first lillypad if possible. Partners continue to take turns spinning, adding, and moving their
markers ahead, one lillypad at a time. The first player to reach the fifth lillypad wins the game.
Instructional Considerations for Frogs & Lillypads
This game presents a good opportunity to teach and reinforce the strategy of counting on, instead of
counting one by one. While some of your students may already be proficient with this strategy, others
will need more support to develop the skill.
If you encourage children to show both quantities on their fingers each time, students who aren’t yet
able to count on will have recourse to one-by-one counting, which is fine, but you’ll also want to work
with those students, or have them play the game with a more capable classmate, older student, or parent
volunteer, so they can learn to count on as well.
Challenge
Students who are ready for more of a challenge can be asked to spin the numeral spinner twice, add
the two numbers, spin the dot spinner, and subtract that number of dots from the total by counting
backwards (e.g., 4 + 5 = 9 and 9 – 2 = 7).
Another way to extend a challenge is to have students roll two regular dice (dotted 1–6), and allow them
to use any of the four operations (add, subtract, multiply, or divide) to make a number that will allow
them to move their game marker to the next lillypad.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.47
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 4 Frogs & Lillypads (cont.)
4
8 6 1
7
9
5 4
3 7
2nd
START
1st
4th
FINISH
2
3rd
2 8
4
5 6
10
9 8 5
7
1
5
2 9
8 7
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies on cardstock.
Frogs & Lillypads Board
5th
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Jessica Hmmmm…..I got a 5 and a 4. If I add them, it makes 9, but there’s no 9 on the next lillypad.
I know! I could go 5 – 4, and that makes 1.
Josh I see something else you could do. You could subtract them and take that answer times 4. Five
minus four is one. One times four is four which is on the next lillypad.
A4.48 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
8
4
1
2
3
5.o
META
10
9 8 5
7
COMIENZO 1.o
5 4
3 7
9
Tablero de Ranas y nenúfares
5
6
7
4.o
2 8
4
5 6
2.o
4
8 6 1
7
9
10
3.o
5 9
2
8 7
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies on cardstock.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.49
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy of each sheet on cardstock. Color each of the number spinners
green. Color the dot spinners light blue. Cut sheet in half and laminate if desired.
Flecha giratoria de Ranas y nenúfares Hoja 1 de 2
5
4
3
3
4
5
Flecha giratoria de Ranas y nenúfares
5
4
3
3
4
5
A4.50 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy of each sheet on cardstock. Color each of the number spinners
green. Color the dot spinners light blue. Cut sheet in half and laminate if desired.
Flecha giratoria de Ranas y nenúfares Hoja 2 de 2
5
4
3
3
4
5
Spinner-Making Instructions
1. Poke a brass fastener through a
1
⁄4" length of drinking straw and a
paperclip. Be sure to insert the brad
and straw into the large end of the
paperclip, as shown.
2. Keeping the straw and the paperclip
on the brass fastener, insert it into
the midpoint hole of the spinner.
Once it has been pushed through to
the back side, bend each side of the
fastener flat against the underside of
the gameboard. The section of straw
should serve as a spacer so the brad
doesn’t push the paperclip flat against
the gamboard and prevent it from
spinning.
3. Give the paperclip a test spin to see
if it works.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.51
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
A4.52 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Set A4 H Activity 5
ACTIVITY
The Pond Game
Overview
You’ll need
The Pond Game provides an opportunity to teach
and reinforce the meaning of the addition and
subtraction signs while helping children develop lively
understandings of both operations. Introduce the game
to your whole class, and play it with the group once or
twice before adding it to your current set of Work Places.
H Pond Game Work Place Menu Card (from Work Place
Menu Cards. page A4.26, run 1 copy on cardstock, cut
apart and laminate if desired)
H 6 Pond boards (page A4.58, run 6 copies on
cardstock, laminate if desired.)
H 3 Add & Subtract spinners (page A4.59, run 1 copy on
cardstock, cut apart and laminate if desired.)
Skills & Concepts
H count objects using one-to-one correspondence
H Bucket of Frogs
H read the symbols for addition and subtraction, and
numerals to 10
H Splash! by Ann Jonas (optional)
H model addition by joining sets of objects and
model subtraction by removing objects from sets for
numbers less than 10
H verbally describe mathematical relationships involving
addition and subtraction situations
Instructions for Introducing The Pond Game
1. Pin one of the Pond boards to a display easel or whiteboard near your discussion area. Gather children
to the area, and seat them in a way that they can all see the game board. Explain that you have a new
game to share with them, and this is the playing board you will use. Give them a minute to pair-share
observations about the game board. Then ask volunteers to share their observations with the class.
1
6
© The Math Learning Center
2
7
3
8
4
9
5
10
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 6 copies on cardstock, laminate if desired.
Frogs & Lillypads Board
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.53
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 5 The Pond Game (cont.)
2. Now ask children to form a circle. Place the board on the floor near enough for you to reach as you sit
in the circle, but far enough into the middle so children can see it. Then count 10 frogs out of the bucket
as children count with you. Place 5 of them on the board, one on each of the first 5 lillypads, and set the
other 5 to the side of the board.
3. Explain that in this game, frogs are going to hop in and out of the pond, but they have to follow the
instructions on the game spinner to do so. Then show the spinner and discuss the numbers and symbols
on it briefly. Chances are, most of the children can read the numbers. What do those other symbols
mean?
Students The one that looks like a cross is for adding. It means you have to add.
The one that looks like a little line is for taking away, I think.
4. Spin the spinner and work with the class to carry out the action indicated by the spinner. Then ask
the children to report how many frogs are in the pond.
Teacher The spinner landed on subtract 2. What do I have to do?
Students You have to take 2 away!
You have to make 2 of those guys hop out of the pond.
Teacher Okay, I’ll subtract 2. Here they go! How many frogs are in my pond?
Students Three frogs! Now there are only 3 left! That’s not very many.
Can we put some more in?
1
Add
Subtract
3
1
Subtract
2
Add
2
6
Add
Subtract
1
3
2
7
3
8
4
9
5
10
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 6 copies on cardstock, laminate if desired.
Frogs & Lillypads Board
5. Repeat the step above several times, noting with the class that the number of frogs in the pond
changes each time, except if the spinner lands on subtract 0. Note too that sometimes it is not possible to
carry out the spinner’s instructions. If you only have 1 frog on the board, and spin – 2, you have to spin
again until you get something you can do. If you have 8 frogs on the board and spin + 3, you have to
spin again because you only have 2 frogs left to add, and 2 lillypads left to fill.
A4.54 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 5 The Pond Game (cont.)
6. Then place another Pond board on the floor next to yours. Ask students to help you count another 10
frogs out of the bucket, and set up both boards so there are 5 frogs on each, and another 5 frogs off to the
side for each team. Play the game with the students, following the instructions below. Use your helper
jar to select students to spin the spinner and hop the frogs in or out of the pond each time the class takes
their turn. Model and reinforce the meaning of the addition and subtraction sign, as well as the two
operations, as you play.
7. Play the Pond Game again with your group at least once before making it available during Work
Places. Depending on the needs of your students, you might also play it with small groups before adding
it to your current set of Work Places.
Work Place S4 The Pond Game
You’ll Need
Object of the Game
H 6 Pond boards
Be the first player fill your Pond board with ten frogs.
H 3 Add & Subtract spinners
H 10 frogs (or other game markers) for each player
Work Place Instructions
1. Each player gets a Pond board and 10 frogs. The players each place 5 frogs on their Pond board, on top
of the numerals 1–5, and set the other 5 frogs to the side.
2. The first player spins the Add & Subtract spinner, adds or subtracts that many frogs from his/her
board, and reports how many frogs are in the pond then.
Brianna I got a 2 with a minus. That means I have to take 2 frogs off my board. Now I only have
3 frogs in my pond.
1
Add
Subtract
3
1
Subtract
2
Add
2
Add
Subtract
1
3
6
2
7
3
8
4
9
5
10
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 6 copies on cardstock, laminate if desired.
Frogs & Lillypads Board
3. The second player spins, adds or subtracts the number of frogs indicated by the spinner, and reports
how many frogs there are in his/her pond.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.55
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 5 The Pond Game (cont.)
4. Players take turns spinning, adding or removing frogs from the pond, and reporting the results until
one player has collected exactly 10 frogs in his/her pond. That player wins the game.
Note If a player makes a spin that cannot be carried out, such as spinning –2 when there is only 1 frog left
on the board, or spinning +3 when there are 8 frogs on the board and only 2 available to be added, that player
loses his/her turn, and must wait until the next turn to make a move.
Instructional Considerations
Some children will definitely benefit from time spent playing this game with an older student or an
adult.
If children have difficulty keeping their frogs organized as they hop in and out of the pond, you might
want to provide each player with a 6” x 9” piece of brown construction paper to serve as the bank of the
pond, where the frogs that aren’t in the pond can sit and sun themselves. An alternative would be to
give each player a Counting Mat from your Bridges kit to serve as a resting place for the frogs that aren’t
in the pond.
Here are some questions you might ask, whether you are observing or playing with a small group of
children:
•
•
•
•
•
How many frogs do you have in your pond right now?
How many more frogs do you need to fill all 10 lillypads?
How many more frogs does your partner need?
Where do you want the spinner to land on your next turn? Why?
Do you think you can win the game? How many more turns do you think it might take? Why?
Either before or after you introduce this game, you might want to read Splash! by Ann Jonas to your
class. This delightful story is narrated by a little girl who has a pond in her backyard, along with a good
collection of pets. It provides a nice introduction to addition and subtraction as the text follows the ins
and outs of the pond-side animals.
A4.56 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
9
10
8
7
6
1
2
Tablero de Ranas y nenúfares
3
4
5
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 6 copies on cardstock, laminate if desired.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.57
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock, cut apart and laminate if desired.
Flechas giratorias para suma y resta
Suma
Resta
3
1
Resta
2
Resta
1
Suma
Suma
2
Resta
Suma
Resta
3
Suma
Resta
3
1
Resta
2
Suma
2
3
2
1
Suma
2
Suma
Resta
1
3
Spinner-Making Instructions
1. Poke a brass fastener through a 1⁄4” length of
drinking straw and a paperclip. Be sure to insert
the brad and straw into the large end of the paperclip, as shown.
Suma
Resta
1
3
2. Keeping the straw and the paperclip on the
brass fastener, insert it into the midpoint hole of
the spinner. Once it has been pushed through
to the back side, bend each side of the fastener
flat against the underside of the gameboard. The
section of straw should serve as a spacer so the
brad doesn’t push the paperclip flat against the
gamboard and prevent it from spinning.
3. Give the paperclip a test spin to see if it
works.
A4.58 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Set A4 H Activity 6
Activity
Spin, Add & Compare
Overview
In Spin, Add & Compare, children spin 2 number
spinners, build both quantities with Unifix cubes, add the
cubes, and write an equation to show the results. After 3
rounds, partners each snap all their cubes together and
compare their winnings. Although you will introduce an
abbreviated form of the game to the whole class, and
play it several times over a period of a few days, we
recommend that you play the full version of Spin, Add
& Compare with small groups before adding it to your
current set of Work Places.
You’ll need
H Spin, Add & Compare Work Place Menu Card (from
Work Place Menu Cards. page A4.27, run 1 copy on
cardstock, cut apart and laminate if desired)
H Introducing Spin, Add & Compare (page A4.64, run
1 copy on a transparency.)
H 3 Spin, Add & Compare Spinners (page A4.65, see
Advance Preparation.)
H Spin, Add & Compare Record Sheet (page A4.66, run
a class set)
Skills & Concepts
H Unifix cubes
H use one-to-one correspondence to count and
compare sets of objects to 30
H pencils
H read numerals to 5; write numerals to 30
H model addition by joining sets of objects for numbers
less than 10
H record mathematical thinking by writing simple
addition sentences
H crayons, felt markers, bingo daubers, or small stickers
(optional)
H helper jar containing a popsicle stick for each child
with his/her name on it
Advance Preparation Run 3 copies of page A4.65 on
cardstock. Color the left spinner green and right spinner
light blue. Cut page in half and laminate top half. Follow
directions on bottom half to create spinners if overlay
spinners are not available..
Instructions for Introducing Spin, Add & Compare
1. Gather children to your discussion area and seat them so they can all see the screen. Explain that
you have a new game to play with them called Spin, Add & Compare. Display the game introduction
transparency and give students a few moments to examine it quietly. Then tell them that the object of
the game is to win the most cubes, and that you will take the first turn so they can see how to play.
2. Spin both spinners, and read the results with the class. If you added the two numbers, what would
your total be? Give children a few moments to pair-share their ideas. Then work with input from the
class to build the first quantity in the top row of the first frame using Unifix cubes in a single color. Do
the same for the second quantity, using cubes of a different color. Ask children to add the cubes in the
two rows and whisper the total to their nearest neighbors.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.59
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 6 Spin, Add & Compare (cont.)
3. Work with input from the class to record the results of your turn by writing an addition equation on
the transparency.
4. Then have the class take their turn, pulling sticks from your helper jar to select children to spin the
spinners and count out the cubes onto the board. Work with input from the class to write an equation to
show their results.
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on a transparency.
Introducing Spin, Add & Compare
5 1
4
2
3
5 1
4
2
3
+
Teacher
4
+
2
6
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on a transparency.
Class
2
Introducing Spin, Add & Compare
5 1
4
2
3
Who won more cubes?
6
TEACHER
+
+
CLASS
5
5 1
7
4
2
3
TEACHER & CLASS WON THE SAME
7
The teacher won ________ cubes. The class won ________ cubes.
5. Next, ask children to compare the two quantities. Who won more cubes, the teacher or the class? How
do they know?
Teacher
4
Students We got more!
We got 7. You only got 6.
We got a whole row full but you didn’t.
Let’s count them!
+
2
6
Class
2
6. Finally, use your helper jar to select two children to snap the cubes into two trains. Hold up the two
trains side by side for the children to see, and work with their input
+ 5 to fill in the information at the
bottom of the game sheet.
7
Who won more cubes?
6
TEACHER
CLASS
TEACHER & CLASS WON THE SAME
7
The teacher won ________ cubes. The class won ________ cubes.
A4.60 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 6 Spin, Add & Compare (cont.)
7. Play this game several times with the class. Consider giving the children each 4 stacks of 5 cubes,
each stack a different color, and having them build and add the quantities along with you. When they
are familiar with the format, introduce and play the game as described below with small groups before
adding it to your current set of Work Places.
Work Place S5 Spin, Add & Compare
This Work Place will need
Object of the Game
H 3 Spin, Add & Compare spinners
Collect the most Unifix cubes in three turns.
H Spin, Add & Compare Record sheets
H six sets of 30 Unifix cubes; each set should include 5
cubes in each of 6 different colors
H pencils
H crayons, felt markers, bingo daubers, or small stickers
(optional)
Work Place Instructions
1. Each partner will need a record sheet, a set of Unifix cubes, and a pencil. Players will need a hard
writing surface, and should work at a table rather than the floor, if possible.
2. The first player spins both the top and bottom spinners on the Spin, Add & Compare spinner. Then
he/she sets out the specified quantity of Unifix cubes in the top and bottom row of the first frame on
his/her record sheet, using a different color for each row. Next, he/she records how many cubes there
are in each row, and their total when added.
Ramon
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies on cardstock. Color left spinner green and right spinner light blue.
Cut page in half and laminate top half. Follow directions on bottom half to create spinners if overlay spinners are not available.
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run a class set.
Spin, Add & Compare Spinner
Spin, Add & Compare Record Sheet
1
5
4
3
2
+
DATE
4
1
5
4
NAME
3
+
2
3
7
+
3. The second player takes a turn to spin, build, and record on his/her sheet.
4. Players each take 2 more turns spinning, building, and recording addition combinations on their own
sheets.
+
Who won more cubes?
© The Math Learning Center
I DID
MY PARTNER DID
MY PARTNER & I WON THE SAME
Bridges
in partner
Mathematics
Kindergarten
I won ________
cubes. My
won ________
cubes.
Supplement • A4.61
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 6 Spin, Add & Compare (cont.)
5. Each player then removes all the cubes from his/her sheet and snaps them together. Players set their
cube trains side by side to compare them, and record the results at the bottom of their sheets. Finally,
each player counts all the cubes in his/her train and records that information at the bottom of the sheet
as well.
Ramon
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run a class set.
NAME
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run a class set.
DATE
Spin, Add & Compare Record Sheet
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
SAM
NAME
DATE
Spin, Add & Compare Record Sheet
7
8
9
10
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
4
+
+
+
3
+
20
I DID
MY PARTNER DID
17
3
7
8
3
2
5
+
4
8
6
2
2
3
MY PARTNER & I WON THE SAME
I won ________ cubes. My partner won ________ cubes.
10
5
+
5
Who won more cubes?
9
1
3
Who won more cubes?
17
I DID
MY PARTNER DID
20
MY PARTNER & I WON THE SAME
I won ________ cubes. My partner won ________ cubes.
Instructional Considerations for Spin, Add & Compare
Although some of your students may have the skills to count the cubes in their train by pointing or
touching, they will probably get more accurate results if you encourage them to break their trains apart
one cube at a time, counting as they go.
You may need to simplify this game for some children by having each partner take just 2 or even 1 turn,
instead of 3.
As an extension to this activity, students can be asked once they have completed the game to use
crayons, felt markers, bingo daubers, or small stickers to show the number of cubes they got in each row.
This gives children an opportunity to picture what has been recorded numerically.
A4.62 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 6 Spin, Add & Compare (cont.)
Ramon
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run a class set.
NAME
DATE
Spin, Add & Compare Record Sheet
X
X
X
O
O
O
4
X
+
3
7
3
+
5
8
2
+
3
5
Who won more cubes?
20
I DID
MY PARTNER DID
17
MY PARTNER & I WON THE SAME
I won ________ cubes. My partner won ________ cubes.
Note The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) offers a collection of free online computer
activities for K-12 students on their Illuminations web site (http://illuminations.nctm.org/). One of the activities
on the web site is called Ten Frame, and can be reached directly by going to the following URL:
http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=75
Ten Frame allows children to count, build, and add quantities in ten frames on screen, and provides a nice way
to reinforce and extend the skills introduced in Spin, Add & Compare. You might consider adding Ten Frame to
your Work Places, or linking parents to the activity so children can use it at home on their own computer.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.63
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 1 copy on a transparency.
Introducción del Gira, suma y compara
5 1
4
2
3
+
5 1
4
2
3
Maestro
+
Clase
+
¿Quién ganó más cubos? MAESTRO
CLASE
MAESTRO Y LA CLASE GANARON
LO MISMO
El maestro ganó ________ cubos. La clase ganó ________ cubos.
A4.64 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies on cardstock. Color the left spinner green and right spinner light
blue. Cut page in half and laminate top half. Follow directions on the bottom half to create spinners (unless clear overlay spinners are available).
Flecha giratoria para Gira, suma y compara
1
5
4
3
2
+
1
5
4
3
2
Spinner-Making Instructions
1. Poke a brass fastener through a 1⁄4” length of drinking straw and a paperclip. Be
sure to insert the brad and straw into the large end of the paperclip, as shown.
2. Keeping the straw and the paperclip on the brass fastener, insert it into the
midpoint hole of the spinner. Once it has been pushed through to the back side,
bend each side of the fastener flat against the underside of the gameboard. The
section of straw should serve as a spacer so the brad doesn’t push the paperclip flat
against the gamboard and prevent it from spinning.
3. Give the paperclip a test spin to see if it works.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.65
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run a class set.
nombre
Fecha
Hoja de anotaciones de Gira, suma y compara
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
+
+
+
¿Quién ganó más cubos?
YO HICE MI COMPAÑERO HIZO
MI COMPAÑERO Y YO GANAMOS LO MISMO
Gané ________ cubos. Mi compañero ganó ________ cubos.
A4.66 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Set A4 H Activity 7
Activity
Bug Catchers
Overview
You’ll need
Bug Catchers is an individual activity rather than a partner
game, in which children set out a number of plastic bugs,
“catch” some of them, and write a subtraction equation to
represent the transaction.
H Bug Catcher Record Sheet (page A4.71, run a class set)
Skills & Concepts
H compose and decompose numbers to 10
H model subtraction by removing objects from sets for
numbers less than 10
H verbally describe mathematical relationships involving
subtraction situations for numbers less than 10
H record mathematical thinking by writing simple
subtraction sentences
H 6 Bug Catcher Spinners (page A4.72, run 3 copies on
cardstock. See Advance Preparation.)
H 6 Counting Mats (introduced in Bridges, Session 4)
H Bucket of Bugs
H Pencils
H individual chalkboard/whiteboard, chalk/pen, and
eraser for each student
Advance Preparation Run 3 copies of page A4.72 on
cardstock. Color each of the number spinners green.
Color each of the dot spinners pink. Cut sheet in half
and laminate. Follow directions on page A4.65 to create
spinners (unless clear overlay spinners are available).
Instructions for Introducing Bug Catchers
1. Ask children to each get a chalkboard/whiteboard, piece of chalk/pen, and an eraser, and join you in
the discussion area. Ask them to form a circle and place their writing materials on the floor in front of
them.
2. Explain that you are going to introduce a new Work Place called Bug Catchers. Set out a counting mat,
a handful of bugs, and a spinner. These are some of the materials you’ll need to do the activity. Let the
children know that this is an individual activity rather than a partner game, and will help them learn
more about subtraction.
3. As students watch, spin the numeral side of the spinner. Work with their help and input to read the
numeral and place that many bugs on the counting mat. Then spin the dotted side of the spinner. When
it lands, ask students to name the quantity, and explain that the dots show how many bugs you get to
catch. Place your hand dramatically over that many bugs and remove them from the counting mat,
holding them in your fist. How many bugs are still left on the mat? How many bugs are you holding in
your hand? Ask students to pair-share ideas, and then call on volunteers to share with the class. As they
share, encourage them to explain their answers.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.67
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 7 Bug Catchers (cont.)
Bug Catcher Spinner
10
9
5
8
Counting Mat
6
7
Maribel 6 bugs left, even the butterfly.
Teacher Maribel says there are 6 bugs left on the mat. Thumbs up if you agree. How do you know
for sure?
Students There are 5 on top and 1 on the bottom. That’s 6!
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6!
2 up and down, and 4 more. That’s 6!
Teacher How many bugs am I holding in my hand?
Gerald 4, I think, because there are 4 empty boxes on there.
Teacher Gerald says there are 4 bugs in my hand. Thumbs up if you agree. How do you know for
sure?
Students There are 4 empty boxes.
But there were only 9 bugs to start. I think teacher has 3.
Can we see?
4. Open your hand so students can see how many bugs you caught. Then work with input from the
children to re-enact the story.
Teacher I spun 9 so I put 9 bugs on the mat. Are there 9 here? Oh, okay. I guess I need to put these
3 bugs back on the mat. Are there 9 now? Okay! Then what happened? Right! I spun 3 dots, so I
caught 3 bugs and left the rest on the mat. Max, can you come and catch 3 bugs from the mat? How
many bugs are left? How many bugs does Max have in his hand?
5. Ask students to each draw a picture on their board to show the bug catching story you re-enacted.
Model as necessary at the whiteboard or on a piece of chart paper. Then work with the students to write
an equation that represents the transaction.
A4.68 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 7 Bug Catchers (cont.)
6. Repeat the teaching sequence described above several times over the course of a week or two, before
you introduce the Work Place and add it to your current collection of Work Places. Work Place S6 Bug Catchers
This Work Place will need
H Bug Catcher Record Sheet (page A4.71, run a class set)
H 6 Bug Catcher Spinners (page A4.72, run 3 copies on
cardstock.)
H 6 Counting Mats (introduced in Bridges, Session 4)
H Bucket of Bugs
H Pencils
Work Place Instructions
1. Get a spinner, a record sheet, a counting mat, 10 bugs, and a pencil. Work at a table instead of the floor
if possible because you need a hard writing surface.
2. Spin the number spinner, and place that many bugs on your counting mat. Write the number on your
record sheet.
3. Spin the dot spinner. Catch that many bugs and take them off the counting mat.
4. Record the number of bugs you caught and the number of bugs still left on your counting mat.
Bug Catcher Spinner
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run a class set.
10
9
5
8
© The Math Learning Center
BRIANNA
NAME
6
DATE
Bug Catchers Record Sheet
0
1
7
8
2
3
4
5
2
6
7
8
9
10
6
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.69
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Activity 7 Bug Catchers (cont.)
5. Repeat these steps four more times so that your record sheet is full.
Instructional Considerations for Bug Catchers
Even though this Work Place is an individual activity rather than a game, you might want to encourage
children to work in pairs so they can tell their bug catching stories to each other, as well as share and
compare their work.
Some children may need to work with support from older students or parent volunteers. Bug Catchers is
a good activity to use in a small group setting as well as during Work Places.
Questions to ask:
How do you know how many bugs to start with? How do you know how many you get to catch?
Can you tell me the story of your first equation? How many bugs did you put on your board to start?
How many bugs were left? What does this number at the end of the sentence mean? Oh, it’s the number
of bugs that were left on the mat? What happened to the other ones?
Note The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) offers a collection of free online computer
activities for K-12 students on their Illuminations web site (http://illuminations.nctm.org/). One of the activities
on the web site is called How Many Under the Shell, and can be reached directly by going to the following URL:
http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?ID=198
How Many Under the Shell features an animated Octopus who hides some bubbles under a shell, and then either adds more bubbles or takes some away. Students have to figure out how many bubbles are under the shell
once Okta has made the transaction. This online activity provides a nice way to reinforce and extend the skills
introduced in Bug Catchers. You might consider adding How Many Under the Shell to your Work Places, or
linking parents to the activity so children can use it at home on their own computer.
A4.70 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Conjunto
Set
A4 Number
A4 Operaciones
& Operations:
& numéricas:
Addition &Sum
Subtraction
y resta Run
Blackline
a class set.
Run a class set.
nombre
Fecha
Hoja de anotaciones de Cazador de insectos
0
1
© The Math Learning Center
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.71
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies on cardstock. Color each of the number spinners green. Color each
of the dot spinners pink. Cut sheet in half and laminate. Follow directions on page A.65 to create spinners (unless clear overlay spinners are available).
Flecha giratoria de Cazador de insectos
10
9
5
8
6
7
Flecha giratoria de Cazador de insectos
10
9
5
8
6
7
A4.72 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Set A4 H Activity 8
Activity
Piggy Banks
Overview
You’ll need
Piggy Banks is an individual activity rather than a partner
game, in which children set out a number of pennies,
drop some of them into a paper cup piggy bank, and
write a subtraction equation to represent the transaction.
H 6 Piggy Bank Spinners (page A4.77, run 3 copies on
cardstock)
Skills & Concepts
H composing and decomposing numbers to 10
H 6 small paper cups and 1 large paper cup (see
Advance Preparation)
H model subtraction by removing objects from sets for
numbers 10 or less
H 60 real pennies
H counting backwards to subtract
H verbally describe mathematical relationships involving
subtraction situations for numbers 10 or less
H record mathematical thinking by writing simple subtraction sentences
H Piggy Bank Record Sheet (page A4.78, run as needed)
H 6 Counting Mats (introduced in Bridges, Session 4)
H pencils
H a metal or plastic tray
Advance Preparation Cut a slot a little wider and longer
than a penny in the bottom of each paper cup. Decorate
the large cup by gluing on a pair of paper ears and drawing a piggy face on one side if you like.
Instructions for Introducing Piggy Banks
1. Ask children to join you in the discussion area and form a circle. Explain that you are going to introduce a new Work Place called Piggy Banks. Place the metal or plastic tray in the middle of the circle
where children can see it, but you can still reach it easily as you sit at the edge of the circle.
2. Show students the large paper cup, and explain that it is your piggy bank. Demonstrate that you can
drop a penny through the slot at the top. Then place the “bank” on the metal or plastic tray, bottom up,
so the slot is accessible.
3. Place the counting mat beside the tray and set 10 pennies onto the mat as the children count with
you. Explain that you are going to save some of these pennies by dropping them into your bank. Ask
students to close their eyes and listen for the sound of the pennies dropping into the bank; they’ll need
to be extra quiet! Remove 4 pennies from the counting mat one by one, dropping them into the bank as
you go.
4. Ask children to keep their eyes shut and show with their fingers how many pennies you dropped into
the bank. Then have them open their eyes. How many pennies did you put in the bank? How many
pennies do you have left on the mat? How do they know? Have them pair-share their ideas and then ask
a few volunteers to share with the group. Encourage them to explain their answers.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.73
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Counting Mat
Students You put 4 in the cup because I heard them.
It’s 6 on the mat ‘cause 3 and 3.
I know you did 4 because there are 4 empty spaces on the mat.
There were 10 but now only 6. That’s ‘cause 10 take away 4 is 6.
Can we see?
5. Lift up the cup and show children that you put 4 pennies in the bank. What will happen if you take
the pennies out of the bank and put them back on the mat? Will you have 10 again? Why?
Students Because 6 and 4 is 10.
It goes 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.
6. Return the pennies to the counting mat, and repeat steps 3–5 several times. Drop a different number
of pennies into the bank each time, but no more than 5.
7. Now clear all 10 pennies off the mat. Show children the Piggy Bank spinner. Explain that the spinner
will tell you how many pennies to start with on the counting mat, and how many to put in the bank.
Then spin the numeral side of the spinner. Read the numeral the spinner lands on with the students,
and call on a volunteer to count that many pennies onto the mat.
8. Now spin the dotted side of the spinner. How many pennies does it tell you to put into the piggy
bank? How many pennies will you have left on the mat? Ask children to pair-share their ideas, and then
call on a couple of volunteers to share. Then ask children to show on their fingers how many pennies
there are on the mat right now. Have them count backward from that number with you as you drop the
specified quantity of pennies into the bank. How many pennies are left on the mat? Does that number
match the last number they named as they were counting backwards? Why?
A4.74 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
Piggy Bank Spinner
10
9
5
8
Counting Mat
“ 7, 6, 5, 4 ”
6
7
9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 once or twice more, and promise to return to the activity the next day.
10. Prior to sending children out to do Work Places the following day, set up the spinner, counting mat,
piggy bank on the tray, and pennies again as the students join you in the discussion circle. Ask them
to each bring a chalkboard/whiteboard, piece of chalk/pen, and eraser to the circle. Repeat steps 7 and
8 several times, but this time, record an equation to show the transaction on the board, while children
work on their own boards.
11. Show children the Piggy Bank Work Place and make it available as one of the day’s choices. As soon
as students are settled, meet with the group of children who chose to go to the Piggy Bank activity to
help them get started. Call other small groups to join you at that Work Place over the next few days as
time allows.
Work Place S7
Piggy Banks This Work Place will need
H 6 Piggy Bank Spinners (page A4.77, run 3 copies on cardstock)
H Piggy Bank Record Sheet (page A4.78, run as needed)
H 6 Counting Mats (introduced in Bridges, Session 4)
H 6 small paper cups (see Advance Preparation)
H 60 pennies
H pencils
Work Place Instructions
1. Get a spinner, a record sheet, a counting mat, a paper cup, 10 pennies, and a pencil. Work at a table
instead of the floor if possible because you need a hard writing surface.
2. Spin the number spinner, and place that many pennies on your counting mat. Write the number on
your record sheet.
3. Spin the dot spinner, and write the number on the piggy bank’s nose because that is how many
pennies you will put into the bank.
4. Count backwards from the starting number as you drop each penny into the bank.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.75
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction
5. Record the number of pennies still left on the mat after you put some in the bank.
Piggy Bank Spinner
10
9
5
8
“ 6, 5, 4, 3 ”
Counting Mat
6
7
Maria
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run as needed.
NAME
DATE
Piggy Bank Record Sheet
0
1
2
3
6
4
5
6
3
7
8
9
10
3
6. Repeat these steps four more times so that your record sheet is full.
Instructional Considerations for Piggy Banks
Even though this Work Place is an individual activity rather than a game, you might want to encourage children to work in pairs so they can tell their piggy bank stories to each other, as well as share and
compare their work.
Some children may need to work with support from older students or parent volunteers, especially to
develop the skill of counting backwards to subtract. Piggy Banks can be used in a small group setting as
well as a Work Place.
A4.76 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A4 Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction Blackline Run 3 copies on cardstock. Color each of the number spinners green. Color each
of the dot spinners pink. Cut sheet in half and laminate. Follow directions on page A4.65 to create spinners (unless clear overlay spinners are available).
Flecha giratoria de la alcancía
10
9
5
8
6
7
Flecha giratoria de la alcancía
10
9
© The Math Learning Center
5
8
6
7
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A4.77
Set A4 Number
Conjunto
A4 Operaciones
& Operations:
& numéricas:
Addition &Suma
Subtraction
y resta Hoja
Blackline
reproducible
Run as needed.
Run as needed.
nombre
Fecha
Hoja de anotaciones de la alcancía
0
1
2
3
A4.78 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
© The Math Learning Center
Kindergarten supplement
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar
Pattern
Includes
October Calendar Pattern
A6.1
Skills & Concepts
H compare sets of objects and determine whether they have the same, fewer, or more
objects
H use and understand the words one/many, none/some/all, more/less, most/least, equal to/
more than/less than
H describe numbers using 5 as a benchmark
H describe and extend simple growing and repeating patterns
H count and read numerals to 31
H identify ordinal positions through the 31st
P0510
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2010 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0510
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
Set A6 H October Calendar Pattern
Calendar Grid
One Dot, Many Dots
Overview
You’ll need
This set of Calendar Grid markers replaces the studentmade markers in the month of October, and provides
opportunities for kindergartners to count and compare
sets to 31.
H Calendar Grid pocket chart
H Day, Month, and Year Calendar Grid cards
H compare sets of objects and determine whether they
have the same, fewer, or more objects
H One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Markers (available at
http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers) Print 1 copy of the
calendar marker sheets in color, single-sided, on white
cardstock. Cut the calendar markers apart and laminate
if desired.
H use and understand the words one/many, none/some/
all, more/less, most /least, equal to/more than/less than
H Comparison Word Resource Cards (pages A6.7–A6.11,
see Advance Preparation)
H describe numbers using 5 as a benchmark
H 2 pieces of lined chart paper (see Advance Preparation)
H describe and extend simple growing and repeating
patterns
H red and blue Unifix cubes
H count and read numerals to 31
H helper jar containing a popsicle stick for each child
with his/her name on it
Skills & Concepts
H chart paper or whiteboard near calendar display
Advance Preparation Run 1 copy of the Comparison
Word Resource Cards on paper or cardstock. Cut the
cards apart and laminate if desired. Post the 10 cards to
the left of your calendar grid, or in a pocket chart near
the grid if you don’t have room on the wall. Finally, draw
4 columns on both sheets of lined chart paper, as shown
below. Add a title and column labels to the first sheet,
and post the sheet next to your calendar grid pocket
chart. Keep the second sheet in reserve until the middle
of the month, and then attach it to the first so you can
continue to record observations through the entire month.
One Dot, Many Dots
How Many
Dots?
© The Math Learning Center
Red Blue
Comparison
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A6.1
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
October Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Background for the Teacher: Growing Patterns While we often introduce patterns as sequences composed
of core units (e.g., AB, ABB, ABC, and so on) that repeat over and over, it is important for young learners to
understand that patterns can also be sequences of shapes or numbers that grow in some predictable way. One
Dot, Many Dots is a simple growing pattern that adds 1 dot per day to a growing collection. However, if you
examine the first few markers in the sequence, you can observe a variety of other patterns as well.
October
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
You might notice, for instance, that there is an equal number of red and blue dots on every even–numbered
marker. Every fourth marker, starting with Marker 1, displays dots in only one color, and the colors alternate.
Marker 1 shows one red dot. Marker 5 shows five blue dots. Marker 9 shows nine red dots, Marker 13 shows
thirteen blue dots, and so on. Then there is the fact that the dots are looped in groups of 5 to make them easier
to count. As the month unfolds, students might notice that every fifth marker, starting with Marker 5, another
loop appears. While some of your students may benefit primarily from the daily opportunties to count and
compare sets, rest assured that others will discover some of the patterns mentioned here, as well as others, especially if you are alert to the many possibilities.
Introducing the One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Grid Pattern: Day 1
Open your first Number Corner lesson in October by directing students’ attention to the calendar
grid. Explain that you will put up a new calendar marker as each day of October passes. Place the first
marker in the correct pocket, and ask children to pair-share observations. What do they notice about
this marker? After a few moments, pull popsicle sticks from your helper jar to call on children to share
their observations with the class.
Students It’s a tiny little circle.
Red­—little red dot.
It’s so little I can hardly see it!
Then ask children to predict what they might see on the marker for the following day.
Students Maybe another dot!
It could be a blue or green one
Or maybe a square not a circle.
I think it will be two dots!
A6.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
October Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Teacher Why do you think we might see two dots tomorrow, Hannah?
Hannah Because today is number 1 and there’s 1 dot. Tomorrow will be 2, so maybe there will be
2 dots.
Introducing the One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Grid Pattern: Day 2
The next day, invite children to predict what Marker 2 will show, and then place it on display in the correct
pocket. Ask children to pair-share observations, and then call on a few volunteers to share with the group.
Students It is two dots—I was right!
One of them is red. The other one is blue.
First 1 dot. Now 2. Maybe there will be 3 tomorrow.
Maybe another color, too, like green.
Next, draw children’s attention to the word cards you have posted near the calendar grid. Explain that
these are words people use when they count and compare sets of objects. Choose 2 or 3 of the cards to
read to the children. As you read each, challenge the students to use it to describe the markers you have
posted so far.
© The Math Learning Center
one
many
none
some
all
equal
more
less
most
least
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A6.3
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
October Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Teacher So there are an equal number of reds and blues on this marker?
Justin Yes! One of red and one of blue.
Teacher Equal is on one of our word cards. Let’s see—here it is.
Continuing through October with the Calendar Grid
The next day, have children predict what Marker 3 will show, and then place it on display in the correct pocket. Have students pair-share observations, and then call on a few volunteers to share with the
group. During the discussion, introduce a couple more word cards, and challenge children to utilize
these words in their observations.
Students 3 dots today, I knew it!
There are more reds.
Some are red and one is blue.
All of them are round.
Then draw students’ attention to the recording chart you have prepared. Work with input from the class
to enter information about the first 3 markers.
One Dot, Many Dots
How Many
Red Blue
Dots?
Comparison
1
1
0
There is only 1 red dot
2
1
1
Red and blue are equal. 1 = 1
3
2
1
There are more reds than blues. 2 > 1
Over the next few days, introduce the rest of the word cards and encourage children to use them as
they make their predictions and observations about the markers. Once the marker for the day has been
posted, have students count the total number of dots on that marker, and compare the sets of reds and
blues that appear. Work with their input to record a comparison statement, along with the other information about the dots, on the chart.
Note Starting on the 4th or 5th day, ask a volunteer to set out 1 red or blue Unifix cube for each dot on the day’s
marker, and then link the cubes into stacks by color. Have the other students count along with your volunteer,
and then place the stacks on display for all to see. This will make it easier for students to see and compare the
quantities, and will become increasingly important as the number of dots increases through the month.
A6.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
October Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Students It’s 3 reds and 3 blues today!
They’re the same number.
The cubes come up to the same place.
They’re equal!
Here are some questions and prompts to use throughout the month:
• How many dots are there on the marker today? How many are red? How many are blue?
• Are there more blue or more red dots? How do you know?
• How many dots will we see on tomorrow’s marker? How do you know?
• Do you think there will be more reds, more blues, or an equal number of each color on our next
marker? Why?
• Are there any markers where all of the dots are the same color? Which ones? Do you think there will
be other markers like that this month? Can you point to where you think the next one will show up?
Why do you think it will be there?
• Which markers so far have an equal number of red and blue dots? Do you think we’ll see any other
markers like that this month? Which ones? How do you know?
• Which marker so far has the most blue dots? The least or fewest blue dots? The most red dots? The
least or fewest red dots?
Extensions
• After the fifth of the month, work with children to count the quantities of dots by 5’s and 1’s, as well
as 1 by 1 each day.
• In addition to recording a comparison statement for the marker each day, write an equation to reflect
the blues, the reds, and the total (e.g., 3 + 3 = 6).
• It won’t be long before some students discover that every other marker in the sequence is composed
of an equal number of red and blue dots. When this comes up, take the opportunity to introduce the
idea of even numbers as quantities where each member of the set has a partner.
• Encourage children to use red and blue Unifix cubes to build their predictions about upcoming markers. Prediction trains can be placed near the calendar grid and examined the following day as the
next marker is posted.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A6.5
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
October Calendar Pattern (cont.)
NOTE Below is a representation of the October calendar grid. The full-size calendar markers are
available at http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers.
octubre
domingo
lunes
martes
A6.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
miércoles
jueves
viernes
sábado
© The Math Learning Center
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
© The Math Learning Center
ninguno
una
Tarjetas con recursos de palabras comparaciones
página 1 de 5
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A6.7
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
A6.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
más
todos
Tarjetas con recursos de palabras comparaciones
página 2 de 5
© The Math Learning Center
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
© The Math Learning Center
muchos
mayor
Tarjetas con recursos de palabras comparaciones
página 3 de 5
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A6.9
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
A6.10 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
igual
algunos
Tarjetas con recursos de palabras comparaciones
página 4 de 5
© The Math Learning Center
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
© The Math Learning Center
menor
menos
Tarjetas con recursos de palabras comparaciones
página 5 de 5
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • A6.11
Set A6 Number & Operations: One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
A6.12 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Kindergarten supplement
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Includes
Activity 1: Mystery Bag Sorting Activity 2: Shape Detectives
Activity 3: 3-D Shape Walk
C1.1
C1.5
C1.11
Skills & Concepts
H identify, name, describe, and sort basic three-dimensional shapes
H recognize three-dimensional shapes in the environment
P0709
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2009 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0709
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Set C1 H Activity 1
Activity
Mystery Bag Sorting
Overview
You’ll need
The teacher pulls a collection of 3-dimensional objects
out of a grocery sack, placing all the objects with flat
faces (cubes and rectangular prisms) in one group and all
the objects with curved surfaces (cylinders, spheres, and
cones) in another. After several objects have been sorted,
students predict the group in which each new object
belongs as it comes out of the bag, trying to guess the
teacher’s sorting rule.
H grocery sack or gift bag containing 15–20 different 3-D
objects (see Advance Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H 2 pieces of 12˝ × 18˝ construction paper, one yellow
and one blue
Advance Preparation Place 3 or 4 examples of each of
these shapes in the sack or gift bag. Look in your block
corner, among your table toys and school supplies, and
perhaps in the gym to find the objects you need.
H identify, name, describe, and sort basic threedimensional shapes
H recognize three-dimensional shapes in the environment
Cube
Cylinder
Rectangular Prism
Sphere
Cone
Instructions for Mystery Bag Sorting
1. Gather children to your discussion circle. Place the pieces of yellow and blue paper in the circle where
you can reach them and all the students can see them. Let the children know that these are your sorting
mats. Then hold up the grocery or gift sack and explain that you are going to pull out some things for
them to see, one at a time. Each time you pull out a new object, you’re going to place it on either the
yellow or the blue mat. Their job is to figure out how you’re sorting the objects by watching very closely.
Let them know that you’re going to work in silence, and they’ll need to be very quiet as well.
2. Pull 4 or 5 objects out of the sack one at a time, placing those with flat faces on one mat and those
with curved surfaces on the other.
3. Pull the next object out of the sack, hold it up, and shrug your shoulders. Then motion for children to
point to the mat where they think it belongs. After a few moments, place it on the correct mat. Repeat
this with another object.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C1.1
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 1 Mystery Bag Sorting (cont.)
4. Pull another object out of the sack, hold it up, and motion for the children to indicate the mat of their choice
by pointing. Before placing the object where it belongs, ask several children to explain their thinking.
Teacher Jessica, I see you’re pointing to the yellow mat. Can you explain why you think my
alphabet block belongs there?
Jessica Because it’s yellow, so it goes on the yellow mat.
Teacher Zachary, you’re pointing to the blue mat. Can you explain why?
Zachary Because all the stuff on the yellow mat is kind of round, and that one’s not.
Teacher Alex, you seem to think my cube belongs on the blue mat. Why is that?
Alex Because it has squares on it, and there are lots of squares on the blue mat.
5. Without commenting on any of the explanations, place the object on the correct mat. Some students
may feel confirmed in their thinking, while others may still be puzzled as to how you’re sorting the
objects. Give them a few more clues by pulling another 2 or 3 objects out of the sack and placing them
correctly, asking students to silently point to the mat they believe is correct each time.
6. Pull another object out, have students to point to the mat they believe is correct, and ask a few to
explain their reasoning this time. After the object has been placed correctly, continue to sort silently,
as students point to one of the mats each time. If many still seem puzzled by the time you’re down to
the last few objects, ask for more explanations. You might also give them a few hints in the form of
questions: “Am I sorting these objects by their color?” or “Am I sorting these objects by the size—small
and large?” or “Am I sorting objects by their shape?”
7. When all the objects have been sorted onto the two mats, ask children to pair-share their
observations, and then call on volunteers to share their thinking with the class. Toward the end of the
discussion, confirm that you were sorting the objects by flat and curved surfaces, and then identify each
of the shapes by name. Kindergartners often refer to a cube as a “square” or a sphere as a “circle”. While
we don’t expect them to use the formal names for these 3-dimensional figures right away, the more
often we model the correct terms ourselves, the more quickly students will learn them.
C1.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 1 Mystery Bag Sorting (cont.)
Extensions
• Leave the collection of objects out for children to sort on their own. Other attributes by which they
might sort include: shapes that roll and shapes that slide; shapes that have square faces, rectangular
faces, or circular faces; shapes you can stack and shapes you can’t; and so on.
• Repeat this activity with a collection of shapes that includes cubes, rectangular prisms, triangular
prisms, and pyramids. (You can build pyramids and triangular prisms with your polydrons, and
there are usually several different types of triangular prisms in a set of building blocks.) Sort by
those that have triangular faces and those that have rectangular faces, bearing in mind that a square
is a special type of rectangle.
• Bring 3-dimensional shapes from home to put in your mystery sack. You’ll find that students are
even more engaged when the objects you’re pulling out of the sack come from the teacher’s house.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C1.3
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Set C1 H Activity 2
Activity
Shape Detectives
Overview
You’ll need
The teacher shows pictures and examples of 6 different
3-D shapes. Student pairs then hunt around the room to
find more examples of each.
H 3-D Shape Cards (pages C1.7–C1.9, one copy of each
card)
Skills & Concepts
H identify, name, describe, and sort basic threedimensional shapes
H recognize three-dimensional shapes in the environment
Recommended Timing
H one object to match each of the cards (see Advance
Preparation)
H polydrons (see Advance Preparation)
H six 12˝ × 18˝ pieces of construction paper, each a
different color
Advance Preparation Find a cube, a small box, a can,
and a ball in your classroom. You’ll probably be able to
find a triangular prism in your block corner, and you can
build a pyramid with polydrons if you can’t find anything
else. You’ll also want to divide your polydrons into smaller
baskets and set them out on several tables in preparation
for this lesson.
Anytime after Set C1 Activity 1
Instructions for Shape Detectives
1. Gather children to your discussion circle and tell them you are going to explore some new shapes
today. Hold up the 3-D Shape Cards one by one along with the matching 3-D objects, as you name each
shape and invite observations from the children.
Rectangular
Prism
Cube
Pyramid
Triangular
Prism
Sphere
Cylinder
Note In sharing observations, kindergartners are likely to talk about the faces of the objects and will most
likely refer to the sphere and cylinder as circles, the pyramid as a triangle, and so on. You’ll want to be careful
to use the correct terms consistently, drawing the distinction between a cube and a square, for instance, both to
model the language of geometry accurately and to avoid future misconceptions.
2. Once you’ve shared the cards and the objects, set 6 different colored sheets of construction paper in
the middle of the circle and place a shape card on each. Hand out the objects to 6 different children
around the circle.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C1.5
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 2 Shape Detectives (cont.)
Then call on them one by one to place their object on one of the colored sheets, next to the card that
names its shape, and explain why they’re putting it there.
Andrew I put this block here because it’s a square.
Teacher Where do you see a square on that block, Andrew?
Andrew There’s one on top, and another here, and another here. It’s got lots of squares.
Teacher You’re right. A cube has 6 square faces.
3. After all 6 objects have been placed where they belong, explain that the children are going to be
shape detectives today. You’re going to send them out in pairs to look around the room for one or
more of these 6 different shapes. Each time they find one, they’ll bring it to the circle and set it on the
piece of paper near the shape card that tells its name. Let them know that they have to stay with their
partners, walk at all times, and move quietly, like good detectives. They can only bring one object to the
circle at a time, and anything they bring has to fit on the paper. If they want, they can build one of the
shapes with polydrons and bring their construction to the circle. (It’s possible to build cubes, triangular
prisms, rectangular prisms, and pyramids with polydrons, though you may have a few students who are
convinced that they will be able to build a sphere.)
4. Send the children away from the circle, one pair at a time, complimenting the first few pairs to leave
on how quietly and carefully they’re walking. (Detectives can’t rush around, or they’ll never find what
they’re looking for!)
5. After a short work period, call children back to the circle to view the group’s discoveries and
constructions briefly.
Extensions
• If you’re able to leave the mats with the cards and objects still on them for a few days, you may find
that some children are interested in adding things or changing things around. Use the opportunity to
continue modeling the correct names and talking with children about the attributes of each shape.
• Leave the shape cards on the mats, but remove all the objects from the mats and put them in a
basket. Invite children to sort the objects back onto the correct mats.
• Ask students to bring things from home to place on the shape mats.
C1.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
Prisma
Rectangular
Figuras tridimensionales, página 1 de 3
Cubo
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut the cards apart and laminate if desired.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C1.7
C1.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Pirámide
Figuras tridimensionales, página 2 de 3
Prisma
Triangular
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut the cards apart and laminate if desired.
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
Esfera
Figuras tridimensionales, página 3 de 3
Cilindro
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut the cards apart and laminate if desired.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C1.9
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Set C1 H Activity 3
Activity
3-D Shape Walk
Overview
You’ll need
Students hunt for 3-dimensional shapes in the gym,
library, or on a walk around the school, keeping a record
of their discoveries as they go.
H 3-D Shape Walk Record Sheet (page C1.14, class set)
Skills & Concepts
H camera (optional)
H identify, name, describe, and sort basic threedimensional shapes
H 3-D Shape Cards (pages C1.7–C1.9)
H clipboards (optional, class set)
H Cubes, Cones, Cylinders, & Spheres by Tana Hoban
(optional)
H recognize three-dimensional shapes in the environment
Advance Preparation Walk around your school before
you conduct this activity to find a good variety of
3-dimensional shapes. One of the best locations we’ve
found is the gym, set up for obstacle course day, but this
varies from one school to another. Children will get more
out of the experience if they are able to talk with an adult,
so you’ll want to invite several parent volunteers or other
adults along with you, and you may even want to divide
your students into small groups before you leave the
classroom.
Recommended Timing
Anytime after Set C1 Activity 2
Instructions for 3-D Shape Walk
1. Gather children to your discussion circle and show the shape cards that illustrate the rectangular
prism, the triangular prism, the sphere, and the cylinder.
Rectangular
Prism
Triangular
Prism
Sphere
Cylinder
2. Review the names of these shapes and explain to children that you’re going to take a walk around the
school (or whatever location you’ve decided is best) to look for these shapes. Do they think they can find
examples of each of these shapes on your walk?
Alana It’s good that we’re going to the gym. There are lots of balls in there that are round like that
one shape on your card.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C1.11
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 3 3-D Shape Walk (cont.)
Teacher The sphere? Yes, you’re right that we should find plenty of those in the gym. Does anyone
see another shape we might find on our walk?
Maria Maybe that little slide will be out—you know, the one that the little kids use? It looks like that
triangle shape on your card.
Teacher Oh, the triangular prism. Yes, we may have to look really hard to find those.
DeShawn I think we can find lots of those box shapes.
Teacher Rectangular prisms do look like boxes. Where do you think we’ll find them?
Jenna Everywhere! Even our whole school is shaped like a big box.
3. Give each student a copy of the Shape Walk Record Sheet, along with a pencil and a clipboard (if you
have clipboards). Ask children to write their name on their sheet, and explain that they’ll get to use
pictures, numbers, and/or words to record some of their discoveries along the way. Some of them, for
instance, might want to keep a tally of how many times they see a cylinder on the walk. Others might
prefer to draw pictures of some of the things they see under the matching shapes and use their bestguess spelling to label their sketches.
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes Blackline Run a class set.
Name
Date
Shape Walk Record Sheet
Rectangular Prism
Triangular Prism
Cylinder
Sphere
4. Depending on the number of adult helpers you’ve been able to recruit, organize the students into
small groups and set out on your walk. If you have a digital camera, you might want to serve as a
roaming photographer, or ask one of the other adults to do so instead of supervising a group.
C1.12 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes
Activity 3 3-D Shape Walk (cont.)
5. When you return to the classroom, spend a few minutes talking about the things you saw. Which
shapes were easiest to find? Which were most challenging? Did students see any 3-dimensional shapes
that weren’t on their record sheets, like cubes or pyramids? Let students take their record sheets home
to share with their families.
Extensions
• Make a class chart or book showing some of the things students saw on the walk. Either could be
illustrated with photos if you had a camera along with you. You might even post some to your class
web site for families to view, along with text composed by the class.
• Share Cubes, Cones, Cylinders, & Spheres with your class either before or after you take your shape
walk. In this wordless book, photographer Tana Hoban identifies four 3-D shapes before showing
each in contexts that may be familiar to most children (alphabet blocks, ice cream cones) as well as
ones a child might encounter on a trip to the city, country or even Fantasy Land (traffic cones, bales
of hay, a castle).
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C1.13
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes Blackline Run a class set.
nombre
Fecha
Hoja de anotaciones de Caminata de figuras
tridimensionales
Rectangular prisma
Triangular prisma
Cilindro
Esfera
C1.14 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Kindergarten supplement
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Includes
Activity 1: The Bear in the Box Activity 2: Left & Right
Activity 3: Little Frog’s Playground
C2.1
C2.5
C2.7
Skills & Concepts
H describe the location of one object relative to another object using words such as in, out,
over, under, above, below, beside, between, next to, across from, behind, in front of, near,
and far
H identify the given information that can be used to solve a problem
H recognize when additional information is required to solve a problem
H use the directional words left and right to describe movement
P0709
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2009 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0709
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Set C2 H Activity 1
Activity
The Bear in the Box
Overview
You’ll need
Students learn to describe the location of one object
relative to another by following and giving directions
using positional terms such as in, out, over, under, above,
below, and so on.
H a teddy bear or other stuffed animal (see Advance
Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H chart paper and marking pens
H describe the location of one object relative to another
object using words such as in, out, over, under, above,
below, beside, between, next to, across from, behind,
in front of, near, and far
H identify the given information that can be used to
solve a problem
H recognize when additional information is required to
solve a problem
H a cardboard carton with a lid (see Advance Preparation)
H 15 Unifix cubes (see Advance Preparation)
H helper jar
H a piece of drawing paper for each student (optional)
H crayons (optional)
H All about Where, by Tana Hoban (optional)
Advance Preparation Find a cardboard carton large
enough to hold the teddy bear. An empty 10-ream paper
box with a lid is ideal. Place the teddy bear inside the
box, put the lid on the box, and tape it lightly in place.
Make three stacks of 5 Unifix cubes, each stack a single
color different from the other two.
Instructions for The Bear in the Box
1. Place the sealed cardboard carton in the middle of your discussion area. Gather children to your
discussion circle. When everyone is settled and can see the chart paper you’ve posted, explain that
you have hidden something in the box. In order to find out what’s in the box, they will have to ask you
questions, but only questions you can answer with a “yes” or a “no”.
2. Encourage your students to discuss the possibilities with one another. What are some of the things
that could be in the box? Can they think of anything it couldn’t be, just by looking at the box?
Students It probably can’t be really, really big like a tree or a bike because it couldn’t fit in there.
It could be a toy tree or a little bike.
Is it something to eat?
Is it a birthday cake?
3. Show students the three stacks of Unifix cubes you’ve prepared. Count the cubes with the children
and explain that you will remove a cube from one of the stacks for each question they ask. When all 15
cubes are gone, you will give them more clues if they haven’t already figured out what’s in the box. Can
one of them ask a question you can answer “yes” or “no” to get a clue right now? Guide the questioning a
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C2.1
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Activity 1 The Bear in the Box (cont.)
bit if necessary to steer children away from naming specific items and toward getting descriptive
information.
Eloise Do we get to eat it?
Teacher No.
Marco Is it something to play with?
Teacher Yes.
Sara Is it a doll house?
Teacher How could you find out if it’s a doll house? Talk to the person next to you, and then I’ll
call on someone with a hand up.
David Is it a place for dolls to live?
Teacher No.
Hiroko I know! It’s a toy car. Is it a toy car?
4. If students persist in naming specific items, brainstorm with them some of the information that
might help them figure out what’s in the box, such as color, shape, size, what people do with it, weight,
texture, what it’s made of, and so on. Then have them ask more questions. As you answer each question,
record the information on your chart paper. Count the remaining cubes with the class periodically to
help children determine how many questions they have asked and how many they have left.
What’s in the box?
Yes
can play with it
brown
bigger than a block
made of cloth
soft
No
cannot eat it
nat a place for dolls
not a vehicle
not made of plastic
not red
not blue
not hard
5. Continue in this way until the children have gathered 15 clues. If your class isn’t close to figuring out
what is in the box at that time, offer them 5 more questions and provide a clue or two to get them on
track. Finally, take the lid off the box and hold up the bear for everyone to see.
6. Explain that this bear has come to class to play a game with the children. Ask students to rearrange
themselves so everyone is sitting in a semi-circle facing the box. Place the bear in front of the box,
behind the box, in the box, near the box, far from the box, and beside the box. Turn the box over. Put the
bear under the box. Each time you change the bear’s location, tell the students what you are doing, for
instance, “I am putting Little Bear in front of the box,” “I am putting Little Bear near the box,” and so on.
C2.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Activity 1 The Bear in the Box (cont.)
7. Next, pull children’s names out of your helper jar one at a time to change the bear’s location as you
give directions such as:
• Put Little Bear between me and the box.
• Put Little Bear on top of the box.
• Put Little Bear across from the box.
• Hold Little Bear above the box.
8. Finally, place the bear in the box. Ask students to tell you where the bear is. Change the bear’s
location several more times, placing it in front of the box, behind the box, above the box, and under the
box. Each time, have students tell you where the bear is.
Extensions
• Later in the day, or the next day ask students to each draw a picture of a stuffed bear, or another
favorite stuffed animal and a box. Before you give out the drawing paper, have the class brainstorm
a list of possible locations. Where could they put the stuffed animal relative to the box in their
drawings? List their ideas on the board with simple illustrations. Circulate as students are working to
discuss their drawings with them. Ask them to describe the location of the stuffed animal, and work
with them to record a sentence that includes the animal’s position relative to the box, e.g., “My duck
is hiding behind the box”. Display the labeled drawings in the classroom or the hallway.
in the box
in front of the box
out of the box
behind the box
above the box
near the box
below the box
far from the box
beside the box
• Review some of the terms you introduced during this activity by reading All about Where, by Tana
Hoban, to the class. Other good books for reinforcing positional language include Over, Under, and
Through, by Tana Hoban and Becca Backward, Becca Frontward, by Bruce McMillan (optional).
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C2.3
C2.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Set C2 H Activity 2
Activity
Left & Right
Overview
You’ll need
Students use their hands to learn about right and left, and
practice the language of location and direction.
H 3 ⁄4" red adhesive dots OR a non-toxic red marking pen
Skills & Concepts
H use the directional words left and right to describe
movement
H describe the location of one object relative to another
object using words such as in, out, over, under, above,
below, beside, between, next to, across from, behind,
in front of, near, and far
H a piece of 12" x 18" drawing paper for each student
(optional)
H pencils and crayons (optional)
H Left Hand, Right Hand, by Janet Allison Brown
(optional)
Instructions for Left & Right
1. On the day you conduct this activity, label the back of each student’s right hand with a small red dot.
Use either a red adhesive dot or a non-toxic red marking pen to do this. As you do so, explain that the
hand with the red dot is their right hand, and the hand with no dot is their left hand.
2. Once every student has a dot on his or her right hand, gather the children to your discussion area. Seat
them in rows all facing the same way for this activity. Ask them to raise their right hand over their head.
Then ask them to raise their left hand. How do they know which one is right, and which one is left?
Students You gave us a red dot on our right hand.
Red for right!
How come we didn’t get a dot on our other hand?
So we can tell which one is right, and which one isn’t.
That other one is the left one.
3. Now have students place their right hand in different locations relative to their body, such as:
• in their lap
• on their right knee, on their left knee
• beside their right leg, beside their left leg
• above or over their head
• below their waist
• under their right foot, under their left foot
• behind their back
• in front of their chest
• near their right ear, near their left ear
• far away from their mouth
• between their knees
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C2.5
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Activity 2 Left & Right (cont.)
4. Have students repeat some of these actions with their left hand. Then have them stand up in place.
Stand in front of the class with your back turned to the children for a second. Extend your right arm to
the side and point to the right. Ask students to do the same, moving slowly and carefully so they don’t
bump into one another. Which direction are you all pointing? How do they know? With the class, take 3
side-steps to the right. Then put your right arm down, extend your left arm to the side, and take 3 sidesteps to the left.
5. Through the remainder of the day, talk with students about their right and left hands. Which hand do
they color with, write with, eat with? In which hand do they hold a pair of scissors, a crayon, a pencil? If
they are right-handed, how does their left hand help them at different times? When you leave the room
to go to the playground, the gym, or the library, do you have to turn right or left? How can they use
their hands to help find out? As you walk down the corridor with your class, ask them to identify the
direction of any turns you have to make.
Extensions
• Repeat some of the activities described above on other days so students begin to internalize right and
left, in terms of their own bodies and the directions they move throughout the day.
• Over a period of several days, trace each student’s right and left hand on a piece of 12" x 18" drawing
paper, and have the student label the paper with his or her name. Make a tracing of your own hands
as well. When you have a tracing for each student, return the papers to their owners, and post yours
on the board. Place your hands in the tracings at the board as students do so at their tables. Which is
the right hand? Which is the left? Can they remember and help one another?
Mrs. Roberts
Left
Right
Label your own hand tracings with the letters “R” and “L” or the words “right” and “left”, and ask
students to do the same on their papers. Ask students to make a red dot on the tracing of their
right hand. After that, you might have students color their hands to match their skin tone and add
bracelets, rings, thunderbolts, and various other decorations. Circulate and talk with students as they
work to reinforce the terms “right” and “left”.
• If you have access to Left Hand, Right Hand: A “Hands-On Book about Left and Right, by Janet Allison
Brown, read the book with your class. Another cute book that addresses the topic of left and right is
Bear’s Left & Right, by Keith Faulkner.
• When you’re in the gym with students or during organized games on the playground, make it a point
to reinforce directional words by having students move (walk, hop, jump, slide, and so on) forward,
backward, to the right, and to the left. You can also have them stand or hop on their right foot or
their left foot, and move their right and left hands or arms in a variety of ways.
C2.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Set C2 H Activity 3
Activity
Little Frog’s Playground
Overview
You’ll need
Students share observations about the names and
locations of 5 shapes on Little Frog’s Playground. Then
they each color a sheet and move a small plastic frog
around the playground in response to directions from you
and classmates.
H Little Frog’s Playground (page C2.11, run a class set plus
a few extra)
Skills & Concepts
H helper jar
H a plastic frog for each student from your bucket of
frogs
H crayons
H use the directional words left and right to describe
movement
H describe the location of one object relative to another
object using words such as in, out, over, under, above,
below, beside, between, next to, across from, behind,
in front of, near, and far
Instructions for Little Frog’s Playground
1. Post a copy of Little Frog’s Playground on an easel or the whiteboard near your discussion area.
Set C2 Geometry: Locations Blackline Run a class set plus a few extra.
NAME
DATE
Little Frog’s Playground
red
yellow
blue
purple
© The Math Learning Center
orange
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C2.7
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Activity 3 Little Frog’s Playground (cont.)
2. Then gather the students and seat them so they can all see the sheet. Show them one of the plastic
frogs and explain that today, they’re each going to color in a playground for a little frog. Once they’ve
done that, they’ll hear and tell some stories about Little Frog’s adventures on the playground.
3. Ask students to pair-share observations about the sheet. Then call on volunteers to share their ideas
with the class.
Students There’s a big circle in the middle.
Maybe that’s like a pond for the frog.
I see a square.
There’s a triangle at the top.
There are things like roads on that paper.
4. Name the five different shapes on the sheet with the class: rhombus, rectangle, square, triangle, and
circle. Then ask students to name the shape as you point to each of the following locations on the sheet:
• top right hand corner (rhombus)
• bottom right hand corner (rectangle)
• bottom left hand corner (square)
• top left hand corner (triangle)
• middle (circle)
5. Next, pull a name from your helper jar, and have that student to come up and point to one of
the 5 shapes on the sheet. Ask the rest of the children to name the shape and identify its location
(i.e., rhombus, top right-hand corner). Call on a different student to point to a second shape while the
class identifies it by name and location. Repeat until the class has identified all 5 shapes by name and
location.
6. Then read the color names on each shape, and explain that in a minute, you’re going to give students
each their own sheet to color according to the labels. What colors will they use for the two shapes on the
right-hand side of the sheet? (red and orange) What colors with they use for the two shapes on the lefthand side of the sheet? (yellow and purple) What about the shape in the middle? (blue). Let them know
that they can color the paths between the shapes any color they want. When students understand what
to do, hand out the sheets and let them go to work.
7. When most students have finished coloring their sheets, ask them to return to the discussion area.
Have them bring their sheets along, and give them each a plastic frog. When everyone is seated, tell
a story similar to the one below as students move their frog around the sheet in response to your
directions.
One day, Little Frog went to the playground. None of her friends was there, so she decided to stay
and play by herself. First, she sat on the shape below the pond to the left. Which shape is that?
You’re right. It’s the purple square.
Then she ran up the path between the purple and the yellow shape, and stopped on the yellow
shape. Which shape is that? Right, it’s the triangle.
Then she took a big hop and landed right in the middle of the blue circle. When she landed, she
found out it was actually a pond! The water was freezing cold, so she jumped back out as fast as
she could.
She sat beside the pond to dry off for a minute.
C2.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Activity 3 Little Frog’s Playground (cont.)
Then she took another giant hop and flew right over the red rhombus. She landed in the top right
hand corner of the playground, above the rhombus.
She was still a little cold, so she crawled under the paper for a minute to get warm. Then she got
back onto the paper and sat on the shape at the top of the sheet across from the triangle. Which
shape is that? Yep, it’s the red rhombus.
8. Finish your story by asking the students to pair-share ideas about how Little Frog might get from one
location to another on the sheet without going near the pond. Let students know that Frog has to stay on
the paths. After they’ve had a minute to talk, call on volunteers to share their ideas with the group.
Now Little Frog wants to get back to the purple square, but she doesn’t want to get near the pond.
How can she get from the red rhombus to the purple square without going through the pond and still
stay on the paths?
As students share their ideas, encourage them to use directional language. After each idea is shared,
have the children test it.
Johnny She can go to the triangle, and then go down to the square.
Teacher What direction will she have to go to get from the rhombus to the triangle?
Students Straight.
Across!
That way!
Teacher Will she have to go right or left across the sheet?
Shanti She has to go left to get to the triangle. Then she has to go down to get to the square.
Teacher Let’s all try that out with our frogs. Did it work? Okay, let’s put Little Frog back on the red
rhombus. Can someone tell us a different way she can get from the rhombus to the square without
going across the pond?
9. If student interest holds and time allows, pull a few names from your helper jar and have those
students continue your story as their classmates move their plastic frogs in response. If not, collect the
sheets for use again another day.
Extensions
• During another session, display your copy of Little Frog’s playground. Work with students to list
some of the words they might use to place the frog in various locations or help Little Frog move from
one location to another: in, out, over, under, below, above, beside, between, next to, across from,
behind, in front of, near, far, left, and right. Give students their playground sheets and plastic frogs.
Pull names from your helper jar and have those students tell their classmates where to place their
frogs on the sheet and how to move them from one location to another.
• Send the sheets home with students, along with a note about the activity. Ask families to continue
telling Little Frog stories at home with their children.
• If you have a computer in your classroom with Internet access, some of your kindergartners may
enjoy two of the applets found on the Utah State National Library of Virtual Manipulatives web site:
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C2.9
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
Activity 3 Little Frog’s Playground (cont.)
Ladybug Leaf and Ladybug Mazes. The web site is free to all, and can be accessed at http://nlvm.
usu.edu/. Follow the links to the Pre-K through 2 geometry section, where you’ll find a variety of
applets including Ladybug Leaf and Ladybug Mazes. Both of these activities involve programming
a ladybug around the screen to either hide behind a leaf (easier) or move through a maze (more
challenging). Both provide good spatial problem-solving challenges, as well as practice with
directional language and skills (forward, backward, right, left). Instructions are included with each
applet on the web site, along with suggestions for parents and teachers.
C2.10 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C2 Geometry: Locations Blackline Run a class set plus a few extra.
nombre
Fecha
Área de juego de la pequeña rana
rojo
amarillo
azul
morado
© The Math Learning Center
anaranjado
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C2.11
Set C2 Geometry: Locations
C2.12 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
KINDERGARTEN supplement
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
Includes
November Calendar Pattern
C3.1
Skills & Concepts
H model and use words indicating relative position, direction, and distance
H use the directional words left and right to describe movement
H identify, describe, and extend simple repeating patterns
P0510
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2010 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0510
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
Set C3 H November Calendar Pattern
Calendar Grid
Flying Butterflies
Overview
You’ll need
This set of Calendar Grid markers replaces the studentmade markers in the month of November, and provides
opportunities for kindergartners to use and model words
that indicate direction: up, down, to the right, and to the left.
H Calendar Grid pocket chart
H Day, Month, and Year Calendar Grid cards
H model and use words indicating relative position,
direction, and distance
H November Flying Butterflies Calendar Markers
(available at http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers) Print
1 copy of the calendar marker sheets, preferably
in color, single-sided, on white cardstock. Cut the
calendar markers apart and laminate if desired.
H use the directional words left and right to describe
movement
H The Monarch Poem (pages C3.7–C3.10, see Advance
Preparation)
H identify, describe, and extend simple repeating patterns
H 4 pieces of 6" × 9" yellow construction paper (see
Advance Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H helper jar containing a popsicle stick for each child
with his/her name on it
Advance Preparation Use pages C3.7–C3.10 to create
a wall chart or book of the Monarch Poem to share with
your students during the month. (You can also find this
poem in larger format in the Poems and Songs Portfolio
that came with your Number Corner kit.) Finally, write
the words up, down, to the right, and to the left on the
pieces of yellow construction paper, as shown below.
up
down
to the
right
to the
left
Introducing the Flying Butterflies Calendar Markers: Day 1
Open your first Number Corner lesson in November by directing students’ attention to the calendar
grid. Explain that you will put up a new calendar marker as each day of the month passes. Place the first
marker in the correct pocket, and ask children to pair-share observations.
November
Sunday
© The Math Learning Center
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C3.1
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
November Calendar Pattern (cont.)
What do they notice about this marker? After a few moments, pull popsicle sticks from your helper jar
to call on children to share their observations with the class.
Students It’s a butterfly!
There’s a number 1 on that card, too.
It has big wings!
Then ask children to predict what they might see on the marker for the following day.
Students Maybe another butterfly?
Or maybe a ladybug.
Some kind of bug, probably.
Introducing the Flying Butterflies Calendar Markers: Day 2
Before you post the calendar marker the following day, explain that the butterfly on the first marker is
a monarch. Then take a few minutes to read and discuss The Monarch Poem with your class. Here are
some questions you might pose to the children after you have read the poem through two or three times:
• What happened first?
• After the egg hatched into a caterpillar, then what happened?
• Once the butterfly came out of the chrysalis, what did it do?
• Where do you think the butterfly will go now?
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern Blackline Create a wall chart or book.
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern Blackline Create a wall chart or book.
The Monarch Poem page 1 of 4
The Monarch Poem page 2 of 4
The Monarch
by Donna Burk
illustrated by Tyson Smith
A little egg on some
Milkweed green,
Became a caterpillar,
Tiny and lean.
Next, post the second calendar marker, and invite students to make observations. What is the difference
between the butterfly on this marker and the one on the first marker?
C3.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
November Calendar Pattern (cont.)
November
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Students It looks like the first one, but it’s going a different way!
It’s going kind of sideways instead of straight.
It’s like the first one, but it’s turned a different way.
I think it’s going to find some flowers, like that butterfly in the poem.
Introducing the Flying Butterflies Calendar Markers: Day 3
The next day, post the third marker and invite students to pair-share observations. After a few
moments, pull sticks from your helper jar to call on children to share their observations with the class.
November
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Students It’s the butterfly again, but this time, he’s going upside down!
Maybe he got mixed up about which way to fly!
First it went up, then sideways, and now down.
It goes different every time!
Next, show children the word cards you have prepared.
up
down
to the
right
to the
left
Read the cards one by one with the class. Explain that these are direction words, words people use to tell
which way something is going.
Pull the calendar markers out of the pocket chart and set them on your chalk ledge. Ask the children
to help you find the card that best describes the direction each butterfly is headed, and place the card
beside that marker.
up
© The Math Learning Center
to the
right
down
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C3.3
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
November Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Then ask children to predict what they might see on the marker for the following day.
Students It’s probably going to be up again.
Maybe it’ll be a different bug, like a grasshopper or a ladybug.
Maybe it will be a butterfly going the way that other card says!
Continuing through November with the Calendar Grid
Post the word cards beside the calendar grid pocket chart for reference throughout the month. Each
day, have a helper point to the markers that have been posted so far as the class names the butterflies’
directions. Encourage the children to point up, to the right, down, and to the left with their fingers as
they go. Then ask students to predict what the next marker will show before you place it on the chart.
up
November
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
to the
right
Saturday
down
to the
left
Teacher Amy, will you please come up and point to the markers we have posted so far, while we
tell which direction the butterfly is flying on each marker? Let’s point with our fingers to show the
directions, too.
Students Up, to the right, down, to the left; up, to the right, down….
The next guy is going to be flying up!
No, to the left!
I think it goes up, sideways, down, and then sideways the other way.
Teacher Can you use your finger to point in the direction you think the next butterfly will be going?
Hmmmmm, I see a lot of children pointing to the left. Let’s check to see. Sam, will you please put the
next marker into the pocket chart?
November
Sunday
Monday
C3.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
© The Math Learning Center
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
November Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Students I knew it! That butterfly is going over to the left!
I think he’s going to turn and fly up on the next marker.
As the markers are posted, one each day, ask students to share their observations and predictions about
the pattern. Here are some questions and prompts to use through the month:
• Which way do you think the next butterfly will be going? Why?
• What about the butterfly on the marker for the day after tomorrow?
• How many butterflies are flying up (down, to the right, to the left) so far?
• What number marker do you think will show the next butterfly going up (down, to the right, to the
left)? Why?
Extensions
• Have children enact the pattern by gesturing with their hands as you point to the markers on the
calendar in sequence. You might even work with the class to make up a chant to accompany the
motions (e.g., Butterfly up, up; Butterfly to the right; Butterfly down, down; Butterfly to the left, and so on).
• Have students stand up and “dance” the pattern, moving 2 or 3 steps in each direction as a helper
points to the markers. (You might want to introduce and use the words forwards and backwards in
place of up and down if you choose to do this extension with your group.) • Have children pretend to be butterflies, and give them simple flight directions such as, “Fly 2 steps
forward. Now fly 3 steps to the right. Now fly 1 step backward.” challenge
Mark an x on the floor with blue masking tape somewhere in your classroom. Place a real, paper, or
plastic flower elsewhere in the room. Challenge interested students to figure out how to get from the
x to the flower, stepping only forwards, to the right, backwards, and/or to the left. Encourage them
to develop different routes and find some way to record their sets of directions using symbols and/or
simple sketch maps.
Alexandra
2s
3s
x
2s
2s
s = step
If some of your students are particularly interested in maps, you might share one or more of the books listed
below with the class, or pass the titles along to families who want to support their budding cartographers.
• Me on the Map by Joan Sweeny
• Where Do I Live? by Neil Chesanow
• As the Crow Flies: A First Book of Maps by Gail Hartman
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C3.5
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern
November Calendar Pattern (cont.)
NOTE Below is a representation of the November calendar grid. The full-size calendar markers are
available at http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers.
November
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
C3.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
© The Math Learning Center
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy. Create a wall chart or book.
El poema de la monarca página 1 de 4
La monarca
de Donna Burk
ilustrado por Tyson Smith
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C3.7
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy. Create a wall chart or book.
El poema de la monarca página 2 de 4
Un pequeño huevo
en una hoja de asclepia,
se hizo una oruga,
delgada y esbelta.
C3.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy. Create a wall chart or book.
El poema de la monarca página 3 de 4
Comió y comió,
de día y de noche,
se hizo una crisálida,
Ah! Tan brillante.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C3.9
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy. Create a wall chart or book.
El poema de la monarca página 4 de 4
Se quedó muy quieta,
parecía mucho tiempo,
pero ahora es una mariposa.
¡Adiós, hasta luego!
C3.10 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
KINDERGARTEN supplement
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern
Includes
December Calendar Pattern C4.1
Skills & Concepts
H describe the location of one object relative to another object using words such as inside,
outside, behind, in front of, to the left of, to the right of, above, and below
H place an object in a specified position
H identify, describe, and extend simple repeating patterns
H read numerals and identify ordinal positions
P0510
Bridges in Mathematics Grade K Supplement
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2010 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0510
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern
Set C4 H December Calendar Pattern
Calendar Grid
Teddy Bear & Box
Overview
You’ll need
This set of Calendar Grid markers replaces the studentmade markers in the month of December, and provides
opportunities for kindergartners to practice using key
prepositions and prepositional phrases as they describe
and discuss the position of a teddy bear relative to a box
on each marker.
H Calendar Grid pocket chart
Skills & Concepts
H describe the location of one object relative to another
object using words such as inside, outside, behind, in
front of, to the left of, to the right of, above, and below
H place an object in a specified position
H identify, describe, and extend simple repeating patterns
H read numerals and identify ordinal positions
H Day, Month, and Year Calendar Grid cards
H Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Markers (available at
http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers) Print 1 copy of the
calendar marker sheets, preferably in color, singlesided, on white cardstock. Cut the calendar markers
apart and laminate if desired.
H Preposition Word Resource Cards (pages C4.7–C4.10,
see Advance Preparation)
H a teddy bear
H a cardboard box large enough to hold the bear
H helper jar containing a popsicle stick for each child
with his/her name on it
H All About Where by Tana Hoban (optional)
Advance Preparation Run 1 copy of pages C4.7–C4.10 on
cardstock. Cut apart the Preposition Word Resource cards;
laminate if desired. Post the 8 cards on the wall to the left
of your calendar grid pocket chart.
Introducing the Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Markers
Ask children to join you near the Number Corner display in your classroom. Show them your teddy bear
and the cardboard box. Explain that the bear has come to school today to introduce the new calendar
markers for the month.
Ask students to arrange themselves so everyone is sitting in a semi-circle facing the box. Place the bear
in front of the box and then behind the box. Hold the bear above the box, and then put it under the
box. Put the bear inside the box, and then take it back out of the box. Each time you change the bear’s
location, tell the students what you are doing, for instance, “I am putting the teddy bear in front of the
box,” “I am putting the bear behind the box,” and so on.
Next, draw children’s attention to the word cards you have posted to the left side of the calendar grid
pocket chart. Read the cards to the students, and explain that these are some of the words people use to
tell where things are.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C4.1
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern
December Calendar Pattern (cont.)
inside
outside
above
below
behind
in front of
to the right of
to the left of
Now point to each word or phrase and read it to the class again. As you do so, pull a stick out of the
helper jar to choose a student to place the teddy bear accordingly.
Teacher The word on this card says above. Sydney, will you please come hold the bear above the box?
After you have reviewed all the cards, set the bear and the box aside, and post the first calendar marker
in the correct pocket. Ask children to pair-share observations. What do they notice about this marker?
After a few moments, pull sticks from your helper jar to call on children to share their observations
with the class.
Students It’s a teddy bear!
He’s sitting in the box, like it’s a little house for him.
That bear is in the box.
He looks kind of like Teacher’s teddy bear!
Finally, read the preposition cards to the class again, and ask students to choose the word or phrase that
best describes the location of the teddy bear relative to the box on the first marker. Post that card to the
right of the calendar grid pocket chart, but leave the others where they are for now.
inside
outside
December
above
below
behind
in front of
to the right of
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
to the left of
The following day, post the second marker on the calendar grid. Have children pair-share observations,
and then call on volunteers to share their ideas with the group. As students share, ask them to describe
the location of the teddy bear relative to the box.
C4.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern
December Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Students It’s a teddy bear again.
And there’s a box, too.
Teacher Is the bear still inside the box?
Students No! He’s out of the box.
He’s sitting outside.
He’s really close to the box.
He’s kind of in front of the box.
After students have volunteered several different descriptions, review the unused preposition cards one
by one. Which of the words or phrases describe the bear’s location? Which do not?
Teacher Let’s look at our word cards together and find the ones that tell where the bear is today.
The word on the first card says above. Can you put your hands above your head? Good! Is the bear
above the box?
Students No!
Teacher The word on the next card says below. Can you put your hands below your knees? Okay!
Is the bear below the box?
Continue until you have gone through all of the cards. Chances are, children will identify more than
one card that describes the bear’s location on the second marker, including outside, in front of, and to the
right of. Post all of these to the right of the pocket chart for now, and then ask students to choose the one
that is the opposite of the first. Move the other cards back to their original location, and explain that you
will need them in the days to come.
inside
outside
December
above
below
behind
in front of
to the right of
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
to the left of
Continuing through December with the Calendar Grid
Each day, have a helper point to the calendar markers that have been posted so far as the class names
the location of each teddy bear in the sequence. Have children predict what the next marker will show
before you place it on the chart.
Once the new marker has been posted, ask students to share their observations. Encourage them to
use any words and phrases they can to describe the position of the teddy bear each day. Some of the
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C4.3
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern
December Calendar Pattern (cont.)
pictures will elicit more responses than others. When they see the fifth marker, for instance,
children may say that the bear is beside the box, near the box, next to the box, or in front of the box.
Acknowledge all of these descriptions, and then work with the children to select the card from the
collection remaining on the left that best describes the bear’s location (to the left of).
inside
outside
behind
in front of
December
above
below
to the right of
to the left of
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Teacher You have so many different ways to tell where the bear is on the marker for last Saturday!
Jorge said the bear is in front of the box. Sari said the bear is next to the box. James said the bear is
beside the box. We only have 4 cards left in our collection, though. Let’s read them together and see if
any of them work.
By the time you have reached the eighth day, all the word cards should be posted to the right of
the calendar grid. Before you teach Number Corner the next day, remove all the cards, mix them
thoroughly, and post them on the left-hand side of the calendar grid again. Each day, from the 9th
through the 16th of the month, ask the children to choose a card from the set in order to predict the
location of the bear. You can also ask students to use the teddy bear and the cardboard box to show their
prediction before you post the marker for the day.
Begin the process again on the 17th, and continue through the last day of school before Winter Break.
Here are some questions and prompts to use through the month:
• Let’s name the position of each teddy bear as our helper points to the markers.
• Where do you think the teddy bear will be on the next marker? Why?
• Where is the bear on the 3rd (7th, 12th, 18th) marker?
• I see a teddy bear behind a box. Which marker(s) am I looking at?
• I see a teddy bear below a box. Which marker(s) am I looking at?
Extensions
Reinforce the language of position and location by reading All About Where by photographer Tana
Hoban. This concept book is uniquely rich and open-ended by virtue of the fact that Hoban has listed 15
prepositions on the first and last page of the book, and encouraged children to use as many of them as
possible to describe each photograph.
C4.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern
December Calendar Pattern (cont.)
challenge
If you have a computer in your classroom with Internet access, some of your kindergartners may enjoy
two of the applets found on the Utah State National Library of Virtual Manipulatives web site: Ladybug
Leaf and Ladybug Mazes. The web site is free and can be accessed at http://nlvm.usu.edu/. Follow the
links to the Pre-K through 2 geometry section, where you’ll find a variety of applets including Ladybug
Leaf and Ladybug Mazes. In both of these activities, children program a ladybug around the screen
to either hide behind a leaf (easier) or move through a maze (more challenging). Both provide good
spatial problem-solving challenges, as well as practice with directional language and skills (forward,
backward, right, left). Instructions are included with each applet on the web site, along with suggestions
for parents and teachers. Another applet some students may enjoy is Turtle Geometry, also found on the
National Library of Virtual Manipulatives web site.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C4.5
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern
December Calendar Pattern (cont.)
NOTE Below is a representation of the December calendar grid. The full-size calendar markers are
available at http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers.
December
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
C4.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
© The Math Learning Center
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
© The Math Learning Center
exterior
interior
Tarjetas con recursos de palabras de preposiciones
página 1 de 4
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C4.7
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
C4.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
enfrente de
detrás
Tarjetas con recursos de palabras de preposiciones
página 2 de 4
© The Math Learning Center
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
© The Math Learning Center
a la izquierda de
a la derecha de
Tarjetas con recursos de palabras de preposiciones
página 3 de 4
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C4.9
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut cards apart and laminate if desired.
C4.10 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
debajo
encima
Tarjetas con recursos de palabras de preposiciones
página 4 de 4
© The Math Learning Center
KINDERGARTEN SUPPLEMENT
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
Includes
January Calendar Pattern C5.1
Skills & Concepts
H identify, describe, and compare triangles, rhombuses, trapezoids, and hexagons
H combine shapes to create two-dimensional objects
H describe simple growing patterns with shapes
H analyze simple repeating and growing relationships to extend patterns
H use cardinal and ordinal numbers
P0510
Bridges in Mathematics Grade K Supplement
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2010 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0510
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique blend
of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
Set C5 H January Calendar Pattern
CALENDAR GRID
Growing Shapes
Overview
You’ll need
This set of Calendar Grid markers replaces the studentmade markers in the month of January. The first marker in
the sequence shows a green triangle pattern block. The
second shows a blue rhombus. The third shows a red
trapezoid. The fourth shows a red trapezoid and a green
triangle. The fifth shows a red trapezoid and a blue rhombus, and the sixth a hexagon. The figures grow larger from
one marker to the next, but the sequence does not stop
and then start over again. It just keeps growing. This may
puzzle kindergartners, because up until now, much of our
instruction has focused on repeating patterns, patterns
composed of a basic unit or “core,” such as AB or ABC,
or ABBC, that repeats over and over again. The markers
this month are designed to help children understand that
a pattern can also be a sequence of shapes or numbers
that grows or increases in a predictable way.
H Calendar Grid pocket chart
Skills & Concepts
H identify, describe, and compare triangles, rhombuses,
trapezoids, and hexagons
H combine shapes to create two-dimensional objects
H Day, Month, and Year Calendar Grid cards
H Growing Shapes Calendar Markers (available at
http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers) Print 1 copy of the
calendar marker sheets in color, single-sided, on white
cardstock. Cut the calendar markers apart and laminate
if desired.
H pattern blocks
H 2 pieces of lined chart paper (see Advance Preparation)
H helper jar containing a popsicle stick for each child
with his/her name on it
Advance Preparation Draw 3 columns on both sheets
of lined chart paper, as shown below. Add a title and
column labels to the first sheet, and post the sheet next
to your Calendar Grid pocket chart. Keep the second
sheet in reserve until the middle of the month, and then
attach it to the first so you can continue to record observations through the entire month.
H describe simple growing patterns with shapes
H analyze simple repeating and growing relationships to
extend patterns
Growing Shapes Pattern
Date Shapes
?
‘s
H use cardinal and ordinal numbers
Introducing the Growing Shapes Calendar Markers
Open your first Number Corner lesson in January by directing students’ attention to the calendar grid.
Explain that you will put up a new calendar marker as each day of the month passes. Place the first
marker in the correct pocket, and ask children to pair-share observations.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C5.1
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
January Calendar Pattern (cont.)
What do they notice about this marker? After a few moments, pull sticks from your helper jar to call on
children to share their observations with the class. As students share their observations, ask them to
identify the shape by name and explain how they know that it is a triangle.
Students It looks like one of those green pattern blocks.
It looks like a shark tooth!
It’s really little.
Teacher Sari mentioned that the shape on our calendar marker looks like one of our pattern
blocks. Sari, could you go over to the tub of pattern blocks and bring back the one you’re thinking of?
Sari It’s the same as this one, see?
Tomas That’s a triangle!
Teacher Tomas says the shape is a triangle. Do you agree? How do you know it’s a triangle, not a
circle or a square? Talk with the person next to you, and then we’ll have some folks share their ideas
with the class.
Students It’s not a circle because it isn’t round!
It’s a triangle because it looks like a mountain.
But it’s upside down!
It has 3 points on it, so it must be a triangle.
Summarize students’ observations. Then record the date and the name of the shape on the chart. Leave
the third column blank for now.
Teacher We seem to agree that this shape is a triangle. It looks like the green triangle in our pattern blocks. It has 3 sides and 3 corners. Let’s record the date and the name of the shape on our calendar chart.
Growing Shapes Pattern
January
Date Shapes
1st
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
?
‘s
1 triangle
Saturday
Repeat the process described above on the second and third day of the month. Unless children are very
familiar with the names of the pattern block shapes, you will probably have to introduce the shape
names rhombus and trapezoid. On the fourth day, children will notice that there are two shapes instead
of one on the marker. Discuss and record both on your chart.
Then ask the children if they think it would be possible to build a figure the same size and shape as
the one on the fourth marker using only green triangle pattern blocks. If so, how many green triangles
would it take? Discuss these questions with the class. Then ask a volunteer to replicate the figure on
C5.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
January Calendar Pattern (cont.)
marker 4 with pattern blocks, and have a second child build the figure again using just green triangle
blocks. If necessary, have the second child build directly on top of the first figure, and then move the
new figure to the right. Unless your class is very small, you might want to have the children build at the
document camera so everyone can clearly see their work.
Maya See, I just put 3 triangles together like this for the bottom part, and then 1 on top. It looks the
same as the one Justin made, but mine is made out of all triangles.
Record the results of this investigation on the chart. Then work backward with the class to determine
how many green triangles it would take to build each of the figures that have appeared so far: the trapezoid, the rhombus, and the triangle. Record each of these numbers on your chart as well.
Growing Shapes Pattern
January
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Date Shapes
Friday
Saturday
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
1 triangle
1 rhombus
1 trapezoid
1 trapezoid, 1 triangle
?
‘s
1
2
3
4
‘s
‘s
‘s
Continuing through January with the Calendar Grid
Each day, have a helper point to the markers that have been posted in the pocket chart as the class
names the shapes they see. Have children predict what the next marker will show before you place it on
the chart. As they share their predictions, press them to explain their thinking.
Teacher Today is Friday, January 5th. What do you think we’ll see on today’s calendar marker?
Talk it over with the person next to you, and then I’ll use the sticks to choose children to share their
ideas with the class.
Marcus I think maybe it will be one little green triangle.
Teacher Why?
Marcus Because maybe it will start over again.
Teacher Oh, so we’ve had a triangle, a rhombus, a trapezoid, and then a trapezoid plus a triangle,
and today, you think maybe the whole pattern will start over again?
Marcus Yep.
Teacher Any other predictions?
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C5.3
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
January Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Students I think it might be one of those yellow hexagons because the shapes keep getting bigger
and bigger.
Maybe it will be a trapezoid with a blue one on top, because yesterday it had a green one on top.
Maybe it will be one of those orange squares with a little triangle on top, like a house.
Ooohhh, maybe a red one and two green ones on top!
Once the new marker has been posted, ask students to share their observations, and work with the class
to find out how many green triangles it takes to build the new shape. Record the information on the
chart paper.
Growing Shapes Pattern
January
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Date Shapes
Friday
Saturday
?
‘s
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
1 triangle
1 rhombus
1 trapezoid
1 trapezoid, 1 triangle
1
3
4
‘s
‘s
‘s
5th
1 trapezoid, 1 rhombus
5
‘s
2
Students Maybe it will take 6 triangles to make the next shape!
Yeah, maybe it’ll be like the hexagon from the pattern blocks.
On the next page, you’ll find the calendar grid and chart filled in through the 17th of the month. As you
study it, what patterns can you find? Here are some questions to consider:
• How do the figures change from one marker to the next?
• How many triangles does it take to build each figure?
• How does the number of triangles required to build each figure relate to the date on the marker?
• Are there any repeating patterns to be found?
• What will the 18th marker in the sequence show? How do you know?
C5.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
January Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Growing Shapes Pattern
January
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Date Shapes
Friday
Saturday
?
‘s
1
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
1 triangle
1 rhombus
1 trapezoid
1 trapezoid, 1 triangle
3
4
‘s
‘s
‘s
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
1 trapezoid, 1 rhombus
1 hexagon
1 hexagon, 1 triangle
1 hexagon, 1 rhombus
1 hexagon, 1 trapezoid
5
6
7
8
9
‘s
‘s
‘s
‘s
‘s
1 hexagon, 1 trapezoid, 1 triangle
10
‘s
11
‘s
‘s
‘s
‘s
‘s
‘s
10th
11th
1 hexagon, 1 trapezoid, 1 rhombus
12th 2 hexagons
13th 2 hexagons, 1 triangle
14th 2 hexagons, 1 rhombus
15th 2 hexagons, 1 trapezoid
16th 2 hexagons, 1 trapezoid, 1 triangle
17th 2 hexagons, 1 trapezoid, 1 rhombus
2
12
13
14
15
16
17
‘s
If you predicted that 3 hexagons will appear on the 18th marker, you are correct. What enabled you to
make that prediction accurately? On which other days are the figures on the markers built entirely of
hexagons? How many more times will this happen before the end of the month? Why?
Here are some additional questions and prompts you might use to help your students investigate this
pattern through the month:
• Let’s say the names of the shapes on each marker so far.
• How many triangles did it take to build the figure on yesterday’s marker? How many triangles do
you think it will take to build the figure on today’s marker?
• Which shapes do you think we’ll see on the next marker? Why?
• Can you find any patterns in the markers so far? Are there any patterns you can see?
• Which of the markers so far have only hexagons on them?
• Can you show or tell the date for the next marker that will show only hexagons?
• If we mark one of the diagonals on our grid by placing a yardstick over markers 4, 10, and 16, do you
notice any patterns? What if we look at the diagonal formed by markers 5, 11, and 17?
Despite the fact that there are both repeating and growing patterns to be found in the sequence of markers this month, don’t be too surprised if some of your students can’t see them, or remain unconvinced
that there are any patterns at all. The leap from repeating to growing patterns is a big one, and students
will have other opportunities this year and next to build new understandings.
Extensions
• Each day from the middle of the month on, challenge interested students to build with pattern blocks
what they believe the next figure in the sequence will be. Invite them to leave the figures they create
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C5.5
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
January Calendar Pattern (cont.)
near the calendar so they can confirm their ideas the next day. Some children may be interested in
building several figures forward.
• At the end of the month, you might ask students to imagine what the markers would look like if
the patten continued beyond the 31st. Invite them to build the figures they think they would see on
markers 32, 33, and 34.
CHALLENGE
• A few of your students may be interested in investigating the number of pattern blocks there are in
each figure. For instance, the first three figures are built with 1 pattern block each. The next two figures are each comprised of 2 pattern blocks. The sixth figure only takes 1 pattern block. If you list
the number of pattern blocks per figure in a long column and circle the numbers that are the same,
you and the students may discover some interesting patterns as the month progresses. (It’s okay if
there is only 1 number in a circle; the key is to loop the identical numbers.)
How many pattern blocks are there
in each figure?
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
3
3
2
• Challenge your students to build their own growing patterns with pattern blocks or Unifix cubes. Can
they make a series of designs or trains that grows in a predictable manner from one arrangement to
the next?
C5.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes Calendar Pattern
January Calendar Pattern (cont.)
NOTE Below is a representation of the January calendar grid. The full-size calendar markers are
available at http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers.
January
Sunday
© The Math Learning Center
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • C5.7
C5.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
KINDERGARTEN supplement
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern
Includes
February Calendar Pattern C6.1
Skills & Concepts
H identify and name cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres
H describe and compare 3-D objects in the environment
H identify, describe, and extend repeating patterns
H read aloud numerals from 0 to 31
H identify ordinal positions through the 31st
P0510
Bridges in Mathematics Grade K Supplement
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2010 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0510
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern
Set C6 H February Calendar Pattern
Calendar Grid
3-D Shapes in the World
Overview
You’ll need
This set of Calendar Grid markers replaces the studentmade markers in the month of February, and provides
opportunities for kindergartners to recognize, name,
describe, and compare spheres, cylinders, cubes, and
cones as they appear in the world around us.
H Calendar Grid pocket chart
Skills & Concepts
H identify and name spheres, cylinders, cubes, and cones
H describe and compare 3-D objects in the environment
H identify, describe, and extend repeating patterns
H read aloud numerals from 0 to 31
H identify ordinal positions through the 31st
H Month and Year Calendar Grid cards
H February 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Markers
(available at http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers) Print
1 copy of the calendar marker sheets, preferably
in color, single-sided, on white cardstock. Cut the
calendar markers apart and laminate if desired.
H 3-D Shapes Labels (pages C6.6 & C6.7, see Advance
Preparation)
H 4 pieces of 18" × 24" chart paper (see Advance
Preparation)
H helper jar containing a popsicle stick for each child
with his/her name on it
H square and triangular polydrons
H Cubes, Cones, Cylinders & Spheres by Tana Hoban
(optional)
Advance Preparation Run 1 copy of the shapes labels.
Cut them apart, and glue each one to the top of a piece
of 18" × 24" chart paper. Post the 4 charts near your
calendar display area.
sphere
cube
cylinder
cone
Introducing the 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Grid Pattern
Open your first Number Corner lesson in February by directing students’ attention to the calendar grid.
Place the first marker in the correct pocket, and ask children to pair-share observations.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplament • C6.1
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern
February Calendar Pattern (cont.)
What do they notice about this marker? After a few moments, pull sticks from your helper jar to call on
children to share their observations with the class.
Students A soccer ball! I have one like that!
Me too!
I’m really good at soccer—it’s my favorite!
Teacher What shape is the soccer ball?
Students It’s round, like a circle!
It can roll.
A real soccer ball is round all the way around, so it can roll.
After the children have had a chance to share some of their observations, explain that the calendar
markers this month will feature several different 3-dimensional shapes. Have students look at the
shapes charts you have prepared. Read the name of each shape to the class, and ask students to identify
the one that matches the shape of the object on the first marker.
Students It’s a sphere! The picture on Marker 1 is a sphere!
It’s a soccer ball, and it looks like a circle.
A sphere is kind of the same as a circle.
Now ask students to look around the room very quietly. Can they see other examples of spheres from
where they are sitting? Ask them to raise a hand as soon as they spot something they think is a sphere.
After a few moments, pull sticks from your helper jar to choose a few children to share their ideas with
the class. As you call on each student, ask him or her to walk over to the object, point to it or bring it
back to the discussion area if it is small, and explain how he or she knows that the object is a sphere.
Students Here’s our playground ball. It’s round like the soccer ball.
I got a tennis ball from the recess basket. It’s a sphere because it’s round.
We have lots of those at my house.
This marble is from the marble roll set. It’s a little sphere because it’s round.
sphere
– playground ball
– tennis ball
– marble
C6.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplament
© The Math Learning Center
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern
February Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Repeat the process described above as you post the markers on the second, third, and fourth days of the
month. Each of these markers features a different shape: a cylinder on the second, a cube on the third,
and a cone on the fourth day. Take time to have students find examples of each of these shapes as each
new marker is posted, and record their discoveries on the shapes charts.
sphere
– playground ball
– tennis ball
– marble
cube
cylinder
– water bottle
– teacher’s cup
– marker pen
– building block
cone
– wood cube
– building block
– toy box
– Jay’s polydron cube
– toy clown’s hat
– water cup
– cone from the gym
– tip of Sara’s pencil
Continuing through February with the Calendar Grid
Each day, have a helper point to the markers that have been posted in the pocket chart as the class
names the shape of each object. Have children predict what the next marker will show before you place
it on the chart. Once the new marker has been posted, ask students to share their observations.
Teacher Let’s say the shape of the object on each marker we’ve posted so far, and then make some
predictions about what we’ll see on the markers for Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. Brianna, will
you point to the markers as we name the shape of each object?
February
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Students Sphere, cylinder, cube, cone;sphere, cylinder, cube, cone; sphere, cylinder, cube, cone....
Ball next—it has to be!
Maybe it’ll be a baseball. My cousin plays baseball with me sometimes!
Teacher Talk with the person next to you about what shape we might see on the marker for
Saturday. Put your thumbs up when you have an idea, and I’ll pull sticks from the jar to pick
children to share with the class.
Students It’s going to be round.
It’s going to be one of those spheres.
It should be a snowball ‘cause of all the snow outside!
As the month progresses, work with the class to list additional examples of each shape on your charts.
Summarize students’ descriptions of each shape as well.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplament • C6.3
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern
February Calendar Pattern (cont.)
sphere
– playground ball
– tennis ball
– marble
– basketball
– golf ball
– a purple grape
A sphere is round all the
way around. It’s like a
ball. It rolls.
cylinder
– water bottle
– teacher’s cup
– marker pen
– building block
– a jar
– a pencil can
A cylinder is round in the
middle. It is flat on the
top and bottom.
cube
– wood cube
– building block
– toy box
– Jay’s polydron cube
– a tissue box
– Jack-in-the-box
A cube is square
everywhere. It has 6
sides. It can’t roll.
cone
– toy clown’s hat
– water cup
– cone from the gym
– tip of Sara’s pencil
– tip of a crayon
– closed up umbrella
A cone is pointy at the
top. It has a circle on the
bottom. It rolls funny.
Here is a summary of the questions and prompts mentioned so far, as well as some others you might
use through the month:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Let’s name the shape of the object on each marker.
What shape do you think we’ll see on the next marker? Why?
Can you find objects around the room that are spheres (cylinders, cubes, cones)?
How can you tell if something is a sphere (cylinder, cube, cone)?
What is the difference between a cylinder and a sphere (a sphere and a cube, a cone and a cylinder)?
What shape do you see on the 4th (9th, 15th, 25st) marker?
I see a marker on the calendar grid that has a picture of something shaped like a sphere. This sphere
is orange, and it’s something you play a game with. Which marker am I thinking of?
• What shape do you predict we’ll see on the 23rd (25th, 28th, 30th) marker? How do you know?
• Is there a pattern in the markers this month? If so, what is it? How do you know it’s a pattern?
Extensions
• Work with the class to create a display for each of this month’s featured shapes by gathering objects
from around the classroom and bringing examples from home.
• Choose one shape each week as the focus of a school-wide shape search. Encourage students to look
for examples of the shape on the playground, the gym, the library, the cafeteria, and so on. Consider
snapping photos of some of the better examples to add to your shapes charts in class.
• Challenge children to build each of the shapes featured this month with polydrons, blocks, or other
construction materials (e.g., legos, construx, tinkertoys, and so on). Is it possible to build a sphere,
a cylinder, or a cone with polydrons? Why or why not? What about a cube? What is the largest cube
students can build with the collection of polydrons in your classroom?
• Share Cubes, Cones, Cylinders, & Spheres with your class sometime during the month. In this wordless
book, photographer Tana Hoban identifies four 3-D shapes before showing each in contexts that
are familiar to many children (alphabet blocks, ice cream cones) as well as contexts a child might
encounter on a trip to the city, country or even Fantasy Land (traffic cones, bales of hay, a castle).
C6.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplament
© The Math Learning Center
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern
February Calendar Pattern (cont.)
NOTE Below is a representation of the February calendar grid. The full-size calendar markers are
available at http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers.
February
Sunday
© The Math Learning Center
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplament • C6.5
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on paper.
C6.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplament
cono
cilindro
Rótulos de figuras tridimensionales página 1 de 2
© The Math Learning Center
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the World Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on paper.
© The Math Learning Center
cubo
esfera
Rótulos de figuras tridimensionales página 2 de 2
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplament • C6.7
C6.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplament
© The Math Learning Center
Kindergarten supplement
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Includes
Activity 1: Longer, Shorter, or the Same? Activity 2: How Long is the Teacher’s Necklace or Necktie?
Activity 3: Compare, Spin, & Win
D1.1
D1.3
D1.5
Skills & Concepts
H compare and order two or more objects according to length
P0709
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Set D1 Measurement: Length
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2009 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0709
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Set D1 H Activity 1
Activity
Longer, Shorter, or the Same?
Overview
You’ll need
Students compare the lengths of different pieces of
ribbon, yarn, or string.
H ribbon or rug yarn in 4–6 different colors (see
Advance Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H compare and order two or more objects according
to length
H lunch sack or small gift bag
H 12 index cards or 3" × 5" pieces of light-colored
construction paper
H wide-tipped felt marker
Advance Preparation Cut 6 different lengths of ribbon
or rug yarn, none shorter than 5" and none longer than 18".
Use a variety of colors. Then cut two 8" and two 12" lengths,
using a different color for each of the 4 lengths. Place all the
pieces in the sack or bag except the two 8" lengths.
Instructions for Longer, Shorter, or the Same?
1. Gather children to your discussion circle. Drop the two pieces of 8-inch ribbon or yarn in the middle
of the circle. Ask students to predict which is longer. Then ask them to help you find out for sure. What
do you need to do to compare these 2 lengths?
Students Hold them up together.
Put them down on the rug right together so you can see.
I can just tell. It’s the white one!
2. Use their suggestions to compare the 2 lengths. Don’t match them at the ends unless the children tell
you to do so. If they don’t correct you, press the issue.
Teacher You told me to put the ribbons side by side on the rug. Can we tell which is longer now?
Students The white one!
No, the blue one! You can see it’s longer because it sticks out more!
You have to make them the same at the end or you can’t tell.
3. Match the two ends of the ribbon or yarn and ask students to compare the length now. Which is
longer? Write a label on an index card and place it beside the pair of lengths.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D1.1
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Activity 1 Longer, Shorter, or the Same? (cont.)
the same
Students They’re the same!
You can see now for sure because you put them together at the end.
4. Now show students the bag of ribbon or yarn lengths you’ve prepared. Invite a helper to pull one from
the bag and stretch it out in the middle of the circle.
5. Ask a different helper to pull a second length from the bag and hold it up. Have students predict
whether it’s longer than, shorter than, or the same as the one on the rug. How can they find out for sure?
Students Put them together on the rug.
Make sure they’re the same at the end!
I can already tell that the red one is longer.
6. After the 2 lengths have been compared, write a label for each on an index card and have 2 helpers
set the labels where they belong.
shorter
longer
7. Repeat steps 4–6 until the class has compared and labeled all the lengths of ribbon or yarn in the bag.
8. Gather up all the lengths and put them back in the bag as helpers gather the labels for you. Ask 3
different helpers to pull a length from the bag, and then work with input from the class to order and
label them from shortest to longest.
shortest
longest
Extensions
• Make the bag of ribbon or yarn lengths and the labels available during Work Places so pairs of
students can play the game on their own. (You’ll want to add another “same as” label to the collection
in case students pull out both pairs of equal lengths.) • Invite students to place 4, 5, 6, or perhaps all of the strips in order from longest to shortest.
D1.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Set D1 H Activity 2
Activity
How Long is the Teacher’s Necklace or Necktie?
Overview
You’ll need
Students each cut a piece of string to approximate the
length of your necklace or necktie, compare it to find out,
and post it on a chart to show the results.
H a necklace or a necktie (see Advance Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H 3 pieces of 6" × 12" construction paper (see Advance
Preparation)
H compare and order objects according to length
H a ball of string for each group of 4 children
H scissors (class set)
H masking tape (see Advance Preparation)
Advance Preparation Label each piece of construction
paper as shown below. Then run a length of masking
tape, sticky side out, along the bottom of each sheet and
fasten the ends with short strips of tape. Post these on
the whiteboard where the children can reach them easily.
Wear a necklace or necktie to class the day you conduct
this activity.
shorter than
the same as
longer than
Instructions for How Long is the Teacher’s Necklace or Necktie?
1. Gather children to your discussion circle. Draw their attention to your necklace or necktie. Ask them
to use their arms to show how long they think it is.
2. Then remove the necklace or tie from your neck and stretch it out in the center of the circle where
everyone can see it. Invite the children to make new estimates, again using their arms to show how long
they think it is.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D1.3
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Activity 2 How Long is the Teacher’s Necklace or Necktie? (cont.)
3. Show the children a ball of string and a pair of scissors. Explain that each of them is going to cut a
piece of string they think matches the length of your necklace or tie. After they’ve cut their string,
they’re going to compare it to your necklace or tie and fasten it to one of the three charts you’ve posted at
the whiteboard.
4. Demonstrate the process yourself by cutting a piece of string you estimate to be about the same
length as your necklace or tie. Then work with input from the class to compare the two.
Teacher Is my string shorter than, longer than, or the same as my necklace?
Students It’s shorter!
Try it again!
Can I try?
5. Work with students’ help to caption the charts at the whiteboard, as shown below. Then fasten your
string to the appropriate chart by pressing it against the sticky-sided masking tape.
My piece of string is
shorter than
the necklace.
the same as
longer than
6. When students understand what to do, have them go back to their tables and help one another each
cut a length of string they think will match the length of your necklace or tie. As they finish, have them
hang the string they’ve cut around the back of their neck, just as a tailor might wear a measuring tape,
and go to one of the Work Places. Invite them a few at a time to compare their string to your necklace or
tie and hang the string on the appropriate chart.
7. Discuss the results with the class at a later time. How many students cut strings that were shorter
than, the same as, or longer than your necklace or tie? Which chart has the most strings? How can they
tell for sure?
Extension
• Repeat this activity later in the year with something else that might appeal to your students.
(Anything you wear or own is almost sure to interest them. You may even have a parent who’s
willing to bring a pre-crawling baby to class to be measured. If you use blue masking tape to mark
the length of the baby on the floor, students can cut string to approximate the length of the baby.)
D1.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Set D1 H Activity 3
Activity
Compare, Spin & Win
Overview
You’ll need
The teacher plays a whole-group game with the class to
give children more practice comparing lengths.
H Length Comparison Spinner (page D1.7, see Advance
Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H compare and order two or more objects according
to length
Recommended Timing
Anytime after Set D1 Activity 1
H the lengths of ribbon or rug yarn from Set D1 Activity 1
H lunch sack or small gift bag
Advance Preparation Follow the instructions on the
blackline on page D1.7 to prepare a spinner for this game.
Instructions for Compare, Spin & Win
1. Gather children to your discussion circle. Show them the bag containing lengths of ribbon or yarn,
and explain that you’re going to use them to play a game today. Pull one of the lengths out of the bag
and stretch it out in the middle of the circle. This is your string.
2. Ask a helper to pull a second piece of ribbon or yarn out of the bag for the class. Have students
predict whether their piece is longer than, shorter than, or the same as yours. Then ask the helper to lay
the students’ piece beside yours and have the class compare the two.
Students Ours is longer than yours.
It’s lots longer.
Yours is way shorter.
3. Now spin the spinner. If it lands on “longer than” the class (in the example shown above) gets both
lengths of ribbon or yarn. Give them to one of the students to hold. If it lands on “shorter than”, you get
both lengths. Pick them up and hold onto them. If it lands on “same as”, both lengths go back in the bag.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D1.5
Set D1 Measurement: Length
Activity 3 Compare, Spin & Win (cont.)
Set D1 Measurement: Length Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut out the spinner and laminate. Attach a spinner “arrow” as directed.
Length Comparison Spinner
Longer
Than
Same
As
Shorter
Than
Spinner-Making Instructions
Students It landed on shorter!
Poke
a brass fastener through a ⁄ "
Teacher gets to have both1.length
ribbons.
of drinking straw and a paperclip.
Be
sure to insert the brad and
Let’s do it again!
straw into the large end of the paper1
clip, as shown.
4
2. Keeping the straw and the paperclip
on the brass fastener, insert it into the
midpoint hole of the spinner. Once it
has been pushed through to the back
side, bend each side of the fastener
flat against the underside of the gameboard. The section of straw should
serve as a spacer so the brad doesn’t
push the paperclip flat against the gamboard and prevent it from spinning.
4. Repeat the steps above until you’ve used up all the lengths of ribbon or yarn. Lay all the lengths you
won in the middle of the circle and ask one of the children to help you put them in order from longest
to shortest. Then have the child who was holding the 3.students’
lengths place them in the middle of the
Give the paperclip a test spin to see
if it works.
circle, well apart from your set. Ask a couple of students to put the class strips in order from longest to
shortest. Finally, compare the longest of your lengths of ribbon or yarn to the longest of theirs. Spin the
spinner to determine who wins the game—you or the class. (If it lands on “shorter than”, the team with
the shorter length of ribbon or yarn wins the game. If it lands on “longer than”, the team with the longer length of ribbon or yarn wins. If the spinner lands on “same as”, spin again.) Put all the lengths back
into the bag so you can play the game again now or in the future.
Extension
• Set up the bag of ribbon or yarn lengths and the spinner as a Work Place, and let pairs of students
play the game on their own. D1.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D1 Measurement: Length Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut out the spinner and laminate. Attach a spinner “arrow” as directed.
Flecha giratoria para comparación de longitudes
Igual
que
Más larga
que
Más corta
que
Spinner-Making Instructions
1. Poke a brass fastener through a
1
⁄4" length of drinking straw and a
paperclip. Be sure to insert the brad
and straw into the large end of the
paperclip, as shown.
2. Keeping the straw and the paperclip
on the brass fastener, insert it into
the midpoint hole of the spinner.
Once it has been pushed through to
the back side, bend each side of the
fastener flat against the underside of
the gameboard. The section of straw
should serve as a spacer so the brad
doesn’t push the paperclip flat against
the gamboard and prevent it from
spinning.
3. Give the paperclip a test spin to see
if it works.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D1.7
D1.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Kindergarten supplement
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Includes
Activity 1: Comparing Weights Activity 2: A Pound of Potatoes
Activity 3: Spin & Compare Weights
D2.1
D2.5
D2.9
Skills & Concepts
H compare and order objects according to weight
H use nonstandard units to explore the measurement concept of weight
P0709
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Set D2 Measurement: Comparing Weight
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2009 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P0709
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Set D2 H Activity 1
Activity
Comparing Weights
Overview
You’ll need
Students share what they understand about the term
weight, and then work together to compare the weights
of several pairs of objects.
H Weight Comparison Labels (page D2.3, run 1 copy, see
Advance Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H compare and order objects according to weight
H 8 common household objects or classroom items (see
Advance Preparation)
H a grocery sack or gift bag
H 2 pieces of 12˝ × 18˝ construction paper
H a balance scale
Advance Preparation Cut the Weight Comparison Labels
apart and glue each to a 12˝ × 18˝ piece of construction
paper. Place 8 objects of varying weights (e.g., a building
block, a tennis ball, a box of crayons, a plastic toy, a
whiteboard eraser, a small book, a stuffed animal, and a
can of soup) in a grocery sack or gift bag and fold the top
over so children can’t see the contents.
h eav i e r
lig h te r
Instructions for Comparing Weights
1. Gather children to your discussion circle. Show them the balance scale and explain that you’re going to
use it to compare the weights of some objects today. Ask if anyone knows what the word weight means.
Students Is that how heavy something is?
My mom’s always saying she weighs too much.
That scale will show if something’s heavier or lighter.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D2.1
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Activity 1 Comparing Weights (cont.)
2. Now show students the bag of objects. Pull something out of the bag, and then ask a volunteer to pull out
a second object. Place both objects in the middle of the circle and ask children to pair-share which of the
two they think is heavier. After a few moments, invite volunteers to share their thinking with the class.
Students The can is heavier. I know because cans like that are always heavy.
But the boat is bigger, so maybe it’s heavier.
I think the can will make the scale go down more because that boat is just plastic.
3. Ask your helper to compare the two objects by holding one in each hand. Which one feels heavier?
Explain that you’re going to use the scale to check, and ask students to show with their arms how they
think the scale will look after you’ve placed one of the objects on each side of the scale.
K’Sondra Look! Marco’s side of the scale went down!
Teacher Now I’ll put the can on my side of the scale.
Students Wow! Teacher’s side is way down to the floor now. That can is heavy!
Teacher The can is heavier. The boat doesn’t weight as much—it’s lighter.
4. Show students the weighing mats you’ve prepared and place each object on the appropriate mat.
5. Repeat steps 2–4 with the other 3 pairs of objects in the sack. Be sure to use the terms “heavier” and
“lighter” throughout the discussion, and encourage students to do so as well. If two of the objects drawn
from the sack turn out to balance each other perfectly on the scale, take the opportunity to discuss the
idea that some objects weigh the same amount.
Extension
• Return the objects to the sack. Set up the sack, the balance scale, and the weighing mats as a Work
Place and let students revisit the activity on their own. You can keep children’s interest high by
periodically changing the objects in the sack. D2.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
más pesado
Etiquetas para Comparaciones de pesos
más liviano
Set D2 Measurement: Weight Blackline Run 1 copy. Cut labels apart and use to label 2 pieces of 12˝ × 18˝ construction paper.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D2.3
D2.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Set D2 H Activity 2
Activity
A Pound of Potatoes
Overview
You’ll need
Small groups of 8–10 of students find objects around the
classroom that are lighter than, the same as, or heavier
than 1 pound.
H Weight Graphing Labels (page D2.7, 1 copy, see
Advance Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H 1 pound of potatoes (or other produce such as onions
or carrots) in a small sack with handles
H compare and order objects according to weight
H use nonstandard units to explore the measurement
concept of weight
H 5-foot length of butcher paper (see Advance Preparation)
H a balance scale
H Stone Soup (optional, there are many versions of this
old folktale)
Advance Preparation Place the potatoes in one of the
paper sacks. Fold the butcher paper in thirds the long
way to form 3 columns, and glue one of the Weight
Graphing Labels to the top of each.
Lighter than 1 Pound
Exactly 1 Pound
Heavier than 1 Pound
Instructions for A Pound of Potatoes
1. Gather a small group of 8–10 children. Show them your sack and explain that you went shopping the
other day and bought a pound of potatoes. Take the potatoes out of the sack one by one so they can see
how many it took to make a pound when you weighed them on the scale at the store. Give the children
a minute or two to share similar experiences. Have they seen a scale in the produce department at the
store? Have they helped weigh potatoes, onions, apples, bananas, or other vegetables or fruits on one of
those scales? Do they know how much a pound weighs?
2. Put the potatoes back in the sack. Ask one of the children to lift the sack with the potatoes in it. How
does it feel? Light or heavy? Have that child leave the group, return with something he or she thinks
is about the same weight as the sack of potatoes, and sit back down in his or her spot, still holding the
object. Repeat this in quick succession with each child in the group. If some of the children feel that
they need to bring several objects in order to approximate a pound (i.e., 2 or 3 blocks, several plastic
toys, a couple of hardback books), that’s fine.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D2.5
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Activity 2 A Pound of Potatoes (cont.)
3. When all the children in the group are seated again with their objects, place the sack of potatoes on
one side of your balance scale. Then give each child a turn to place his or her object(s) on the other side
of the scale. How does (do) the object(s) compare? Is it/are they heavier, lighter, or exactly the same as
the sack of potatoes? How do the children know?
Students The block is heavier than the potatoes.
I knew it. Those really big blocks are heavy!
The scale is tipped down on the block’s side. That means it’s heavier.
4. After each child compares the weight of his or her object to the sack of potatoes, have him or her
place it in the appropriate column on your graph. When all the objects have been weighed and graphed,
take a minute or two to discuss the results. Are there more objects that are heavier than, lighter than, or
the same as the 1-pound sack of potatoes?
5. Repeat this activity with other groups until each child in class has had a chance to participate. You
can either remove the objects from the graph each time or leave them to create a cumulative graph.
Extensions
• Set up the sack of potatoes, the balance scale, and the graph as a Work Place. Clear the graph each
day and let students build it anew, finding objects around the room that are heavier than, lighter
than, or exactly the same as a pound.
• Ask students to find out how many of a particular object it takes to equal the weight of the potatoes
exactly. Can they find out how many alphabet blocks they have to place on one side of the balance
scale to equal the weight of the potatoes on the other? How many unit blocks does it take? How
many large plastic dinosaurs does it take? A few children might enjoy keeping a written record of
their discoveries.
• Bring in carrots, onions, and celery, and have students use the balance scale and the pound of
potatoes to weigh out a pound of each of these other ingredients. Then read Stone Soup and use all the
vegetables, along with any other ingredients you want, to make soup with the class.
D2.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
© The Math Learning Center
Más pesado que 1 libra
1 libra
1 libra
Exactamente 1 libra
Más ligero que 1 libra
Etiquetas para el gráfico de peso
1 libra
Set D2 Measurement: Weight Blackline Run 1 copy. Cut labels apart and use to label butcher paper graph.
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D2.7
D2.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Set D2 H Activity 3
Activity
Spin & Compare Weights
Overview
You’ll need
Students compare the weights of various pairs of objects.
H Weight Spinner (page D2.11, run 1 copy on cardstock,
see Advance Preparation)
Skills & Concepts
H compare and order objects according to weight
H 8, 10, or 12 common classroom or household items of
varying weight on a tray or in a basket
Recommended Timing
H a balance scale
Anytime after Set D2 Activity 1
Advance Preparation Follow the instructions on the
blackline page D2.11 to prepare a spinner for this game.
Instructions for Spin & Compare Weights
1. Gather children to your discussion circle. Place the balance scale and tray of objects in the middle of
the circle, but still within your reach. Explain that you’re going to play a weighing game with the class
and show them the spinner you’ve prepared. Note with them that one side says “heavier” while the other
says “lighter”.
2. Select an object from the tray and set it on one side of the balance scale. (Choose an object that’s
lighter than some of the items on the tray, but heavier than others.) Now explain that it’s the children’s
turn to choose an object, but they have to spin the spinner first. If it lands on “heavier”, they have to
choose an object from the tray that’s heavier than the one you just selected. If they spin “lighter”, they
have to find an object that’s lighter than yours. Pass the spinner to one of the children sitting near you
and ask him or her to spin it. When it stops spinning, ask the class to read it.
Set D2 Measurement: Weight Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut out the spinner and laminate. Attach a spinner “arrow” as directed.
Weight Spinner
lighter
heavier
Spinner-Making Instructions
© The Math Learning Center
1. Poke a brass fastener through a 1⁄4"
length of drinking straw and a paperclip. Be sure to insert the brad and
straw into the large end of the paperclip, as shown.
2. Keeping the straw and the paperclip
on the brass fastener, insert it into the
midpoint hole of the spinner. Once it
has been pushed through to the back
side, bend each side of the
fastenerin Mathematics
Bridges
flat against the underside of the gameboard. The section of straw should
serve as a spacer so the brad doesn’t
Kindergarten Supplement • D2.9
Set D2 Measurement: Weight
Activity 3 Spin & Compare Weights (cont.)
Students It landed on the rocks!
That’s the heavy side.
I like the feathers better. I thought it would land there instead.
3. Ask the children to examine the objects on the tray. Do they see any they think would be heavier
than the item you’ve already placed on one side of the balance scale? After some discussion, have one
of them choose an item and place it on the other side of the scale. Is it heavier? How do they know? If
it is, remove both objects from the scale and set them together off to one side. If it’s not, ask students to
experiment with other objects until they find one that works, and then remove both objects from the
scale to set off to the side.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3, but this time, let the students select an object from the tray first, while you spin
the spinner and do what it says.
5. Continue the game, taking turns with the class to set the first object on the scale or spin the spinner,
until all the objects have been removed from the tray. If you or the class spins something that’s not
possible, take another turn.
Teacher Oh dear, I think I’m stuck. Justin put that can of soup on the scale for the class and I spun
“heavier”. There’s nothing on the tray that’s heavier than the can of soup. I’ll have to spin again.
Extension
• Set up the tray of objects, the balance scale, and the spinner as a Work Place, and let pairs of students
play the game on their own. You can keep children’s interest high by periodically changing the
objects on the tray (or asking children to gather new collections). D2.10 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D2 Measurement: Weight Blackline Run 1 copy on cardstock. Cut out the spinner and laminate. Attach a spinner “arrow” as directed.
Flecha giratoria de peso
más liviano
más pesado
Spinner-Making Instructions
1. Poke a brass fastener through a
1
⁄4" length of drinking straw and a
paperclip. Be sure to insert the brad
and straw into the large end of the
paperclip, as shown.
2. Keeping the straw and the paperclip
on the brass fastener, insert it into
the midpoint hole of the spinner.
Once it has been pushed through to
the back side, bend each side of the
fastener flat against the underside of
the gameboard. The section of straw
should serve as a spacer so the brad
doesn’t push the paperclip flat against
the gamboard and prevent it from
spinning.
3. Give the paperclip a test spin to see
if it works.
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D2.11
D2.12 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Kindergarten supplement
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern
Includes
April Calendar Pattern
D8.1
Skills & Concepts
H identify the appropriate instruments used to measure time, weight, temperature, and length
H describe and extend simple repeating patterns
H read aloud numerals from 0 to 31
H identify ordinal positions through the 31st
P1210
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern
The Math Learning Center, PO Box 12929, Salem, Oregon 97309. Tel. 1 800 575–8130.
© 2010 by The Math Learning Center
All rights reserved.
Prepared for publication on Macintosh Desktop Publishing system.
Printed in the United States of America.
P1210
The Math Learning Center grants permission to classroom teachers to reproduce blackline
masters in appropriate quantities for their classroom use.
Bridges in Mathematics is a standards-based K–5 curriculum that provides a unique
blend of concept development and skills practice in the context of problem solving. It
incorporates the Number Corner, a collection of daily skill-building activities for students.
The Math Learning Center is a nonprofit organization serving the education community.
Our mission is to inspire and enable individuals to discover and develop their mathematical
confidence and ability. We offer innovative and standards-based professional development,
curriculum, materials, and resources to support learning and teaching. To find out more,
visit us at www.mathlearningcenter.org.
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern
Set D8 H April Calendar Pattern
Calendar Grid
Measuring Tools
Overview
You’ll need
This set of Calendar Grid markers replaces the studentmade markers in the month of April, and provides
opportunities for kindergartners to identify some of
the tools commonly used to measure time, weight,
temperature, and length.
H Calendar Grid pocket chart
Skills & Concepts
H identify the appropriate instruments used to measure
time, weight, temperature, and length
H describe and extend simple repeating patterns
H read aloud numerals from 0 to 31
H identify ordinal positions through the 31st
H Month and Year Calendar Grid cards
H April Measuring Tools Calendar Markers (available at
http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers) Print 1 copy of the
calendar marker sheets, preferably in color, singlesided, on white cardstock. Cut the calendar markers
apart and laminate if desired.
H Mini-Markers (pages D8.6–D8.11, see Advance
Preparation)
H 4 pieces of 18" × 24" chart paper (see Advance
Preparation)
H glue stick and marking pens
H helper jar containing a popsicle stick for each child
with his/her name on it
H measuring tools (optional, see Extensions on page D8.4)
H books about measurement to read aloud (optional,
see Extensions on page D8.4)
Advance Preparation Run 1 copy of the Mini-Markers
sheets on copy paper. Cut the mini-markers apart, stack
them in order from 1–31, and store them near your
calendar display in an envelope or small resealable bag.
Label the 4 sheets of chart paper as shown below.
© The Math Learning Center
Time
Weight
Temperature
Length
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D8.1
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern
April Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Introducing the Measuring Tools Calendar Grid Pattern
Open your first Number Corner lesson in April by directing students’ attention to the calendar grid.
Explain that as in previous months, you will put up a new calendar marker as each day of the month
passes. Place the first marker in the correct pocket, and ask children to pair-share observations. What
do they notice about this marker? After a few moments, pull popsicle sticks from your helper jar to call
on children to share their observations with the class. Guide them to discuss the fact that people use
watches to tell time.
Students It’s a watch!
My dad has one like that.
You can wear it.
It has numbers on it, like 1, 2, 3, 4.
Teacher Why do people wear watches?
Student To tell time.
So they can know what time it is.
Post the chart you have prepared with the word “Time” written at the top. Read the word with the class,
and explain that the calendar markers this month will show pictures of measuring tools. Some of the
tools, like the watch shown on today’s marker, are used to measure time.
Show students the collection of mini-markers you have prepared. Glue the first one to the Time chart,
and work with input from the children to label it. Then ask students to look around the room. Do they
see any other tools in the classroom that can be used to measure time.
April
Time
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
wristwatch
Students The clock over there!
My brother has a watch.
What about our play clock in the corner?
Teacher has a watch on so she can tell what time it is.
Continuing through April with the Calendar Grid
Each day throughout the month, display the new marker. Have children describe the tool shown on
the marker, identify it by name, and discuss how it is used. Reinforce the words and concepts of time,
weight, temperature, and length by gluing a mini-marker to the appropriate chart each day and labeling
the tool shown on the marker.
D8.2 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern
April Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Time
April
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Weight
wristwatch
balance scale
analog clock
kitchen scale
Temperature
Length
thermometer
ruler
thermometer
tape measure
Here are some questions and prompts to use through the month:
• Let’s say the name of each tool as our helper points to the markers.
• Let’s tell what each tool is used to measure as our helper points to the markers.
• Which kind of measuring tool do you think will come next in our pattern? Why?
• Which tool do you see on the 4th marker? (The 10th marker? The 16th marker?)
• Which markers so far show tools that are used to measure length (time, weight, temperature)? What
marker will be the next one to show a tool that measures length (time, weight, temperature)? How do
you know?
• Can you find tools around our room we could use to measure length (time, weight, temperature)? Toward the end of the month, ask students to share observations about the collections of mini-markers
you have glued to each of the charts. You might have them examine and discuss one of the charts every
2 or 3 days during the last two weeks of the month.
Teacher Let’s look at all the mini-markers we’ve glued to the time chart so
far. What do you notice? Talk with the person next to you for a minute, and
then I’ll pull some sticks out of our helper jar to choose children to share
their ideas with the class.
Students There are watches and clocks.
What’s that book thing?
That’s a planner book. You can write stuff for each day.
Everything on there can help you measure time.
Some of the things measure minutes and hours, but the calendars have
days on them.
They all have numbers.
Time
wristwatch
analog clock
week planner
digital clock
cuckoo clock
calendar
digital clock
mantle clock
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D8.3
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern
April Calendar Pattern (cont.)
Extensions
• Bring in and display examples of tools that can be used to measure time, weight, temperature, and
length (e.g., a digital clock, a small analog clock, a medical or scientific thermometer, a round outdoor
thermometer, a digital thermometer, a kitchen scale, a bathroom scale, a cloth measuring tape, a carpenter’s tape measure, and so on). Ask families to send in items to add to the collection.
• Set up a measuring station where children can use some of the tools to measure length or weight.
• Place an outdoor thermometer outside your classroom window, and encourage interested students to
read the temperature each day.
• Read books about measuring during the month. Some possibilities include Length and Weight, both by
Henry Arthur Pluckrose, How Long is It by Donna Loughran, Millions to Measure by David Schwartz,
and How Big is a Foot by Rolf Myller.
MEASURING TOOLS FEATURED ON THE CALENDAR MARKERS
Time
Weight
Temperature
Length
Marker 1
Digital wristwatch
Marker 2
Balance scale
Marker 3
Thermometer (cold)
Marker 4
12-inch ruler
Marker 5
Analog clock
Marker 6
Kitchen scale
Marker 7
Thermometer (warm)
Marker 8
Measuring tape
Marker 9
Weekly desk calendar
Marker 10
Bathroom scale
Marker 11
Thermometer (hot)
Marker 12
Measuring tape
Marker 13
Digital alarm clock
Marker 14
Hanging produce scale
Marker 15
Thermometer (cold)
Marker 16
12-inch ruler
Marker 17
Analog Cuckoo clock
Marker 18
Doctor’s scale
Marker 19
Thermometer (warm)
Marker 20
Measuring tape
Marker 21
Month calendar
Marker 22
Pan balance
Marker 23
Thermometer (hot)
Marker 24
Measuring tape
Marker 25
Digital outdoor clock
Marker 26
Pediatrician’s scale
Marker 27
Thermometer (cold)
Marker 28
12-inch ruler
Marker 29
Analog mantle clock
Marker 30
Truck scale
Marker 31
Thermometer (warm)
D8.4 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern
April Calendar Pattern (cont.)
NOTE Below is a representation of the April calendar grid. The full-size calendar markers are
available at http://gotomlc.org/calmarkers.
April
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
32 22
33
5
4
0
3
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
26
23
34
24
35
25
36
1
2
200
5
250
10
15
16
5 20
4
© The Math Learning Center
19
3
17
18
2
1
2
3
4
5
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D8.5
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on paper. Cut cards apart.
Mini marcadores Página 1 de 6
D8.6 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on paper. Cut cards apart.
Mini marcadores Página 2 de 6
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D8.7
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on paper. Cut cards apart.
Mini marcadores Página 3 de 6
5
4
0
3
1
2
D8.8 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on paper. Cut cards apart.
Mini marcadores Página 4 de 6
16
5 20
4
© The Math Learning Center
3
17
18
19
2
1
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D8.9
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on paper. Cut cards apart.
Mini marcadores Página 5 de 6
D8.10 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring Tools Calendar Pattern Blackline Run 1 copy on paper. Cut cards apart.
Mini marcadores Página 6 de 6
© The Math Learning Center
Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement • D8.11
D8.12 • Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten Supplement
© The Math Learning Center
BRIDGES KINDERGARTEN
PUBLISHER’S CORRELATIONS TO
COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS
FOR MATHEMATICS, KINDERGARTEN
P0810
© The Math Learning Center, Salem, OR 800 575-8130 www.mathlearningcenter.org
Taken from the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics 2010, pages 9 & 10.
(2) Students describe their physical world using geometric ideas (e.g., shape, orientation, spatial relations) and vocabulary. They identify, name, and describe basic two-dimensional shapes,
such as squares, triangles, circles, rectangles, and hexagons, presented in a variety of ways (e.g.,
with different sizes and orientations), as well as three-dimensional shapes such as cubes, cones,
cylinders, and spheres. They use basic shapes and spatial reasoning to model objects in their environment and to construct more complex shapes.
0810 Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten CCSS Correlations • i
Mathematical Practices
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Geometry
• Identify and describe shapes.
• Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.
Measurement & Data
• Describe and compare measurable attributes.
• Classify objects and count the number of objects in categories.
Number & Operations in Base Ten
• Work with numbers 11–19 to gain foundations for place value.
Operations & Algebraic Thinking
• Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and
understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.
Counting & Cardinality
• Know number names and the count sequence.
• Count to tell the number of objects.
• Compare numbers.
In Kindergarten, instructional time should focus on two critical areas: (1) representing and
comparing whole numbers, initially with sets of objects; (2) describing shapes and space.
More learning time in Kindergarten should be devoted to number than to other topics.
(1) Students use numbers, including written numerals, to represent quantities and to solve quantitative problems, such as counting objects in a set; counting out a given number of objects; comparing sets or numerals; and modeling simple joining and separating situations with sets of objects, or eventually with equations such as 5 + 2 = 7 and 7 – 2 = 5. (Kindergarten students should
see addition and subtraction equations, and student writing of equations in kindergarten is encouraged, but it is not required.) Students choose, combine, and apply effective strategies for
answering quantitative questions, including quickly recognizing the cardinalities of small sets of
objects, counting and producing sets of given sizes, counting the number of objects in combined
sets, or counting the number of objects that remain in a set after some are taken away.
Kindergarten Overview
Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, Kindergarten
Bridges Kindergarten Correlations to Common Core State Standards
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
Number Corner
Set A1, Number & Operations:
Counting on the Number Line,
Activities 1–3
Set A6, Number & Operations: One
Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
Bridges Practice Book, pp 1–7, 10,
11, 13–20, 27, 28, 30, 31, 32, 35–39,
45, 48, 49, 50, 51, 54, 59, 60, 61, 63,
67, 68
Supplement
COUNTING AND CARDINALITY K.CC
Sept–May Calendar Grid
Sept Our Month in School
Oct–May A Link Each School Day
Dec/Jan Kid Count
Dec/Jan Our Month in School
Feb Our Month in School
Feb Day 100 Activities
May Our Month in School
Bridges Practice Book, pp 1–11,
13–20, 22–28, 30–32, 35, 37, 38, 39,
41, 42, 44, 45, 48, 49, 50, 51, 54, 56,
60, 61, 62, 63, 68, 69
Dec/Jan Our Month in School
Feb Our Month in School
Feb–May A Link Each School Day
Sept. Our Month in School
Nov Writing Today’s Date
Feb–April Calendar Grid
Set A1, Number & Operations:
Counting on the Number Line,
Activity 1
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activity 4
Bridges Practice Book, pp 27, 35, 50, 70
Dec/Jan Kid Count
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment,* Tasks 1, 3, 9
* The Kindergarten Yearlong Skills
Assessment can be accessed on the
Bridges Support for K Teachers page
at www.mathlearningcenter.org
Informal
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Ten & More (Bridges Blackline 2.4)
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Sock Boxes & Coins: Beat You to 20¢
(Bridges Blackline 2.5)
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 9
Formal
Getting Started: Assessment
Worksheet 5 (Patterning & Numeral
Writing)
Informal
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Ten & More (Bridges Blackline 2.4)
Formal
Getting Started: Assessment Worksheet 3 (Matching Sets & Numerals)
0810 Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten CCSS Correlations • ii
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activities 1, 6–8
Bridges Practice Book, pp 1–7, 10, 11,
13, 14, 16, 18–20, 28, 30–32, 37, 38,
39, 48, 49, 60, 61, 63
Assessment
Bridges Kindergarten Correlations to Common Core State Standards (cont.)
Standard
Volume 1, Sessions 23, 26, 30, 43, 55
Volume 2, Sessions 68, 69, 92
Volume 2, Work Places 2F, 2J, 2N
Home Connections 10, 17
Volume 1, Session 46
Volume 1, Work Place 1O
Volume 2, Sessions 68, 69, 92
Volume 2, Work Places 2F, 2J, 2N
Home Connections 8, 11, 14, 15, 23
Volume 1, Sessions 25, 43, 50, 51, 55
Volume 1, Work Place 1P
Volume 2, Sessions 57, 58, 61, 63,
64, 69, 79, 80, 84, 85, 92, 97
Volume 2, Work Places 2A, 2D, 2F,
2G, 2H, 2I, 2J, 2L, 2N
Home Connections 15, 23
Volume 1, Session 4
Volume 2, Sessions 57–59, 84, 85,
92, 94, 95, 97, 99
Volume 2, Work Places 2A, 2B, 2I,
2J, 2K, 2L, 2M, 2N
Know number names and the count sequence.
1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
2. Count forward beginning from
a given number within the known
sequence (instead of having to
begin at 1).
3a. Write numbers from 0 to 20.
3b. Represent a number of objects
with a written numeral 0–20 (with 0
representing a count of no objects).
Home Connections 3, 14, 15, 21
© The Math Learning Center, Salem, OR 800 575-8130 www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
Number Corner
Home Connections 3, 4, 6, 8, 14, 15,
21, 23
Volume 1, Sessions 4, 7, 10, 14,
16–18, 20, 23, 25, 26, 28–30, 40, 41,
43, 49, 50, 51, 55
Volume 1, Work Places 1F, 1J, 1M, 1P
Volume 2, Sessions 55, 57–59, 61, 63,
64, 68, 69, 80, 84, 85, 92, 94, 95, 97
Volume 2, Work Places 2A, 2B, 2D,
2F, 2H, 2J, 2K, 2L, 2N
Dec/Jan Kid Count
Dec/Jan Our Month in School
Feb Our Month in School
Mar/Apr Our Month in School
May Here’s When We Were Born
© The Math Learning Center, Salem, OR 800 575-8130 www.mathlearningcenter.org
5a. Count to answer “how many?”
questions about as many as 20
things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as
10 things in a scattered configuration;
Home Connection 20
Formal
Getting Started: Interview 1
Getting Started: Interview 2
Getting Started: Assessment Worksheet 3 (Matching Sets & Numerals)
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Tasks 3, 9
Informal
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Beat You to 20 (Bridges Blackline 2.3)
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Ten & More (Bridges Blackline 2.4)
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Sock Boxes & Coins: Beat You to 20¢
(Bridges Blackline 2.5)
0810 Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten CCSS Correlations • iii
Set A1, Number & Operations:
Counting on the Number Line,
Activities 2, 3
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activities 1–8
Set A6, Number & Operations: One
Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
Bridges Practice Book, pp 2, 4–7,
10, 11, 13, 14, 16, 18, 19, 20, 28, 30,
32, 39, 48
Formal
Getting Started: Interview 3
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 3
Set A6, Number & Operations: One
Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
Bridges Practice Book, pp 22
Volume 1, Sessions 19, 23, 27, 49
Volume 2, Sessions 61, 68
c. Understand that each successive
number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
Oct–May A Link Each School Day
Dec/Jan Our Month in School
Feb Our Month in School
May Our Month in School
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 3
Set A6, Number & Operations: One
Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
Informal
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Beat You to 20 (Bridges Blackline 2.3)
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Ten & More (Bridges Blackline 2.4)
Home Connections 8, 15
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activities 1–8
Set A6, Number & Operations: One
Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
b. Understand that the last number
name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their
arrangement or the order in which
they were counted.
Dec,/Jan Our Month in School
Assessment
Formal
Getting Started: Interview 1
Getting Started: Interview 2
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 3
Volume 1, Session 55
Volume 2, Sessions 57–59, 63, 64,
84, 85, 92, 94, 95, 97
Volume 2, Work Places 2A, 2B, 2D,
2I, 2J, 2K, 2L, 2N
Supplement
Home Connections 3, 8, 14, 15
a. When counting objects, say the
number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one
and only one number name and
each number name with one and
only one object.
4. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
Count to tell the number of objects.
Standard
COUNTING AND CARDINALITY K.CC
Bridges Kindergarten Correlations to Common Core State Standards (cont.)
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
Set A1, Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line, Activities 2, 3
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activity 6
Set A6, One Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activities 3, 6
Set A6, Number & Operations: One
Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
Bridges Practice Book, pp 26, 28,
30, 31, 54, 67
Set A1, Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line, Activity 3
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Act 1, 5–8
Set A6, Number & Operations: One
Dot, Many Dots Calendar Pattern
(Extension 4)
Bridges Practice Book, pp 7, 15, 36, 54, 67
Supplement
COUNTING AND CARDINALITY K.CC
Number Corner
Mar/Apr Our Month in School
May Here’s When We Were Born
Nov. Writing Today’s Date
Number Corner
Supplement
OPERATIONS AND ALGEBRAIC THINKING K.OA
Home Connections 4, 8, 18, 19
Volume 1, Sessions 5, 7, 16–18, 20,
28, 29, 40, 41, 50, 51
Volume 1, Work Places 1F, 1J, 1M, 1P
Volume 2, Sessions 57, 58, 63, 64,
68, 80, 84, 85, 92, 97
Volume 2, Work Places 2A, 2D, 2H,
2I, 2J, 2L
Home Connections 11, 16, 23
Volume 1, Sessions 25, 28, 29
Volume 1, Work Place 1J
Volume 2, Session 57
Volume 2, Work Place 2A
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
Mar/Apr Our Month in School
Informal
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Beat You to 20 (Bridges Blackline 2.3)
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 3
Informal
S70 & S71 Observational Checklist:
Beat You to 20 (Bridges Blackline 2.3)
S70 & 71 Observational Checklist:
Sock Boxes & Coins: Beat You to 20¢
(Bridges Blackline 2.5)
Formal
Getting Started: Assessment Worksheet 4 (Comparing More & Less)
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 5
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 2
Assessment
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 10
0810 Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten CCSS Correlations • iv
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activities 1, 3–8
Bridges Practice Book, pp 22, 23, 24,
25, 40, 41, 44, 46, 53, 56, 57, 58, 62,
65, 69, 71
Assessment
Bridges Kindergarten Correlations to Common Core State Standards (cont.)
Standard
Count to tell the number of objects.
5b. given a number from 1–20,
count out that many objects.
Compare numbers.
6. Identify whether the number
of objects in one group is greater
than, less than, or equal to the
number of objects in another group,
e.g., by using matching and counting
strategies. (Include groups with up to
ten objects.)
7. Compare two numbers between
1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
Standard
Home Connection 6
Volume 1, Sessions 31, 32
Volume 2, Sessions 73–80, 82, 83,
105–111
Volume 2, Work Places 2H, 2O
Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.
1. Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps),
acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
© The Math Learning Center, Salem, OR 800 575-8130 www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
Number Corner
Supplement
Not Yet Addressed
Home Connection 20
4b. and record the answer with a
drawing or equation.
5. Fluently add and subtract within 5.
March/April Our Month in School
Mar/Apr Our Month in School
Mar/Apr Our Month in School
Mar/Apr Our Month in School
Dec/Jan Kid Count
Feb/Mar Link Each School Day
May Here’s When We Were Born
© The Math Learning Center, Salem, OR 800 575-8130 www.mathlearningcenter.org
Not Yet Addressed
Volume 2, Sessions 115, 116
Home Connection 6
Volume 1, Sessions 16, 17
Volume 1, Work Place 1F
Volume 2, Sessions 74–80, 82, 83,
105, 106, 109–111
Volume 2, Work Place 2O
Home Connection 6
Volume 2, Sessions 73–80, 82, 83,
105, 106, 109–111
Volume 2, Work Place 2O
4a. For any number from 1 to 9,
find the number that makes 10
when added to the given number,
e.g., by using objects or drawings,
3b. and record each decomposition
by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2
+ 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
3a. Decompose numbers less
than or equal to 10 into pairs in
more than one way, e.g., by using
objects or drawings,
2b. Add and subtract within 10,
e.g., by using objects or drawings to
represent the problem.
2a. Solve addition and subtraction
word problems.
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 8
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 8
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 10
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 10
Assessment
0810 Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten CCSS Correlations • v
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activities 1, 3–8
Bridges Practice Book, pp 41, 44, 53,
56, 57, 62, 69, 70, 71
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction,, Activities 1, 7, 8
Bridges Practice Book, pp 41, 44, 46,
53, 56, 57, 62, 65, 69
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activities 1, 3, 7, 8
Bridges Practice Book, pp 41, 44, 46,
53, 56, 57, 62, 65, 69
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activities 3–8
Bridges Practice Book, pp 22, 23, 24,
25, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 53, 54, 56,
57, 58, 62, 65, 69, 70, 71
Set A4, Number & Operations: Addition & Subtraction, Activities 4, 5, 7, 8
Bridges Practice Book, pp 43,
53, 54, 58, 59
Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.
Standard
OPERATIONS AND ALGEBRAIC THINKING K.OA
Bridges Kindergarten Correlations to Common Core State Standards (cont.)
Number Corner
Bridges Practice Book, pp 48, 49
Supplement
NUMBER AND OPERATIONS IN BASE TEN K.NBT
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
Dec/Jan Our Month in School
Set A1, Number & Operations: Counting on the Number Line, Activity 1
Bridges Practice Book, pp 48, 49
Supplement
October–May Link a Day
Dec/Jan Our Month in School
MEASUREMENT AND DATA K.MD
Number Corner
Set D1 Measurement: Length,
Activities 1–3
Set D2 Measurement: Weight,
Activities 1–3
Set D8 Measurement: Measuring
Tools Calendar Pattern
Bridges Practice Book, pp 47, 66, 67
Assessment
0810 Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten CCSS Correlations • vi
Set D1 Measurement: Length,
Activities 1–3
Set D2 Measurement: Weight,
Activities 1–3
Bridges Practice Book, pp 29, 30, 66, 67
Assessment
Bridges Kindergarten Correlations to Common Core State Standards (cont.)
Standard
Volume 2, Sessions 61, 62, 65, 68,
69, 84, 85, 92, 97
Volume 2, Work Places 2C, 2E, 2F,
2H, 2I, 2J, 2L
Work with numbers 11–19 to gain foundations for place value.
1a. Compose and decompose
numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones
and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings,
Volume 2, Sessions 84, 85, 92
Volume 2, Work Places 2I, 2J
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
Home Connection 15
Volume 2, Sessions 61, 62, 68, 69,
79, 84, 85, 97
Volume 2, Work Places 2C, 2F, 2G, 2I, 2L
1b. and record each composition
or decomposition by a drawing or
equation (e.g., 18 = 10 + 8);
1c. understand that these numbers
are composed of ten ones and
one, two, three, four, five, six, seven,
eight, or nine ones.
Standard
Volume 2, Sessions 94, 95, 113, 114
Volume 2, Work Places 2K, 2P
Describe and compare measurable attributes.
1a. Describe measurable attributes
Not Yet Addressed
Home Connections 21, 24
1b. Describe several measurable
attributes of a single object.
Volume 2, Sessions 113, 114
Volume 2, Work Place 2P
of objects, such as length or weight. 2. Directly compare two objects
with a measurable attribute in
common, to see which object has
“more of”/“less of” the attribute,
and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights
of two children and describe one
child as taller/shorter.
© The Math Learning Center, Salem, OR 800 575-8130 www.mathlearningcenter.org
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
Standard
Number Corner
GEOMETRY K.G
Oct/Nov Our Month in School
Mar/April Our Month in School
May Here’s When We Were Born
Oct/Nov Our Month in School
Mar/April Our Month in School
May Here’s When We Were Born
Number Corner
Supplement
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes,
Activities 2, 3
Bridges Practice Book, p 47
Supplement
Not Yet Addressed
Home Connections 1, 2, 13, 22, 26
© The Math Learning Center, Salem, OR 800 575-8130 www.mathlearningcenter.org
3. Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or
three-dimensional (“solid”).
Formal
Getting Started: Interview 1
Assessment
Formal
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 7
Assessment
0810 Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten CCSS Correlations • vii
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes,
Activities 1–3
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes
Calendar Pattern
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the
World Calendar Pattern
Sep Calendar Grid
Dec Calendar Grid
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes,
Activities 1–3
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the
World Calendar Pattern
2. Correctly name shapes regardless
of their orientations or overall size.
Volume 1, Sessions 7, 10, 14, 35, 36,
44, 45, 53, 54
Volume 1 Work Places 1L, 1N
Volume 2, Sessions 118–120
Volume 2, Work Place 2S
September Calendar Grid
Set C2 Geometry: Locations,
Activities 1–3
Set C3 Geometry: Flying Butterflies
Calendar Pattern
Set C4 Geometry: Teddy Bear & Box
Calendar Pattern
Home Connections 7, 9, 12, 22, 26
Volume 1, Sessions 2, 14, 15, 33, 35,
36, 38, 39, 44, 45
Volume 1, Work Places 1B, 1C, 1N
Volume 2, Sessions 117–120
Volume 2, Work Places 2Q, 2R
1b. and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms
such as above, below, beside, in
front of, behind, and next to.
1a. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes,
Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres).
Volume 1, Sessions 5, 7, 10, 18, 20
Volume 2, Session 72
Volume 2, Work Place 2B
Home Connection 2
Volume 1, Sessions 1, 5, 7, 10, 11, 18, 20
Volume 2, Session 72
Volume 2, Work Place 2B
3b. count the numbers of objects
in each category and sort the categories by count. (Limit category counts
to be less than or equal to 10.)
3a. Classify objects into given
categories;
Classify objects and count the number of objects in each category.
Standard
MEASUREMENT AND DATA K.MD
Bridges Kindergarten Correlations to Common Core State Standards (cont.)
Bridges (Sessions, WP, HC)
September Calendar Grid
Number Corner
Supplement
Formal
Getting Started: Interview 3
Getting Started: Assessment Work-
Assessment
sheet 1 (Shape Sorting)
Kindergarten Yearlong Skills Assessment, Task 4
0810 Bridges in Mathematics Kindergarten CCSS Correlations • viii
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes
Calendar Pattern
Bridges Practice Book, pp 12, 15, 17, 52
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes,
Activity 2
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the
World Calendar Pattern (Extension 3)
Set C1 Geometry: 3-D Shapes,
Activities 1–3
Set C6 Geometry: 3-D Shapes in the
World Calendar Pattern
Set C5 Geometry: Growing Shapes
Calendar Pattern
Bridges Practice Book, pp 8, 9, 33, 34
GEOMETRY K.G
Bridges Kindergarten Correlations to Common Core State Standards (cont.)
Standard
Volume 1, Sessions 14, 33, 35, 36, 44, 45
Volume 1, Work Places 1B, 1C, 1L
Volume 2, Sessions 117, 118
Volume 2, Work Places 2Q, 2R
Home Connections 7, 9, 12, 26
Volume 1, Sessions 14, 15, 33–35,
38, 39, 44
Volume 1, Work Places 1B, 1C, 1K, 1L, 1N
Volume 2, Session 117
Volume 2, Work Place 2Q
Home Connections 1, 2, 13
Volume 1, Sessions 1, 10–12, 44, 45
Volume 1, Work Place 1N
Volume 2, Sessions 119, 120
Volume 2, Work Place 2S
Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.
4a. Analyze and compare two-dimensional shapes, in different sizes
and orientations, using informal
language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number
of sides and vertices/“corners”) and
other attributes (e.g., having sides of
equal length).
4b. Analyze and compare three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes
and orientations, using informal
language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number
of sides and vertices/“corners”) and
other attributes (e.g., having sides of
equal length).
5a. Model shapes in the world by
building shapes from components
(e.g., sticks and clay balls)…
5b. and drawing shapes.
6. Compose simple shapes to form
larger shapes. For example, “Can
you join these two triangles with full
sides touching to make a rectangle?”
Home Connections 7, 9, 12, 26
© The Math Learning Center, Salem, OR 800 575-8130 www.mathlearningcenter.org
UNIT 2:
17 Sessions
Bugs
(Sorting, Graphing,
Numbers to 10)
SET A4: Addition
& Subtraction
Use during NC
and 2 Sessions
SET A6: One Dot,
Many Dots
Use during NC.
UNIT 1:
23 Sessions
Shapes
(2-D Shapes,
Sorting, Counting, Comparing
Sets)
SET A1:
Counting on
Number Line
Use during NC.
SET A4:
Addition &
Subtraction
Use during NC.
Bridges in Mathematics CCSS Grade Level Summaries
OCT
Counting by 1’s;
skip counting;
cardinal and
ordinal numbers;
repeating patterns;
picture graphs
SEP
Counting by 1’s;
numeral recognition and writing;
sorting; 2-D
shapes
NC = Number
Corner
OCT
19 SESSIONS
SEP
23 SESSIONS
Pacing Guide (177 Sessions Total)
K
NUMBER/OPS. IN BASE 10
Counting by 1’s;
counting by 10’s
and 1’s; skip
counting; picture
graphs
NOV
SET D2: Weight
1 Session
SET D1: Length
4 Sessions
Numeral recognition; counting by
1’s; counting by
10’s and 1’s; 2-D
shapes; picture
graphs
DEC
Set D2: Weight
3 Sessions
Set C4: Teddy
Bear & Box
Use during NC.
SET C2:
Locations
1 Session
SET C3:
Butterflies
Use during NC.
SET A4: Addition
& Subtraction
Use during NC.
UNIT 4:
10 Sessions
Ladybugs & Pennies (Skip Counting,
Add/Sub., Coins)
DEC
13 SESSIONS
1211b
Numeral recognition; counting by
1’s; and counting
by 10’s and 1’s;
yesterday, today,
and tomorrow
JAN
SET C5: Growing
Shapes
Use during NC.
SET A4: Addition
& Subtraction
Use during NC.
SET A1: Counting
on Number Line
Use during NC.
UNIT 5:
20 Sessions
New Games
(Numbers to 20,
Counting by 10’s
and 1’s, Comparing and Ordering
Sets
JAN
20 SESSIONS
MEASUREMENT & DATA
Counting by 1’s;
counting by 10’s
and 1’s; sorting;
yesterday, today,
and tomorrow
FEB
SET C6:
3-D Shapes
around us
Use during NC.
SET A4: Addition
& Subtraction
Use during NC.
SET A1: Counting
on Number Line
Use during NC.
UNIT 6:
19 Sessions
Sea Creatures
(Graphing Data,
Addition &
Subtraction, Word
Problems, Numbers to 20)
Counting by
1’s; counting
by 10’s and 1’s;
early addition;
2-D shapes; bar
graphs
MAR
SET A4: Addition
& Subtraction
3 Sessions
SET A1: Counting
on Number Line
Use during NC.
UNIT 7:
12 Sessions
Frogs & Toads
(Numbers to 20,
Skip Counting,
Estimating & Measuring Length)
MAR
15 SESSIONS
•Length & Weight
•Classify & Count Objects
Bridges Months: Sep, Oct, Mar–
May/June
Number Corner: Oct, Nov, Mar–
May/June
Supplement Sets: C1, D1, D2, D8
FEB
19 SESSIONS
•Compose & Decompose Numbers
11-19 into Tens & Some Ones
Bridges Months: Jan–Apr
Number Corner: Oct–May
Supplement Sets: A1
SET A4: Addition
& Subtraction
Use during NC.
UNIT 3:
14 Sessions
Butterflies (2-D Shapes, Patterning, Numbers
to 10, Comparing
Sets)
NOV
20 SESSIONS
OPS./ALG. THINKING
•Represent & Solve Addition & Subtraction Word Problems
•Add & Subtract within 10
•Add & Subtract Facts to 5
Bridges Months: Feb, Apr, May/June
Number Corner: Dec–May
Supplement Sets: A4
COUNTING & CARDINALITY
•Rote Count to 100 by 1’s & 10’s
•Read & Write Numbers to 20
•Count Objects to 20
•Compare Sets & Numbers
Bridges Months: Sep–Feb
Number Corner: Sep–May
Supplement Sets: A1, A4, A6
Bridges in Mathematics & the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) – Grade K
Units
CCSS Supplement Sets
Number Corner
GEOMETRY
Counting by 10’s
and 1’s; skip
counting; sorting;
morning, noon,
and night; time
to the hour
MAY/JUNE
SET C2:
Locations
2 Sessions
SET C1: 3-D
Shapes
3 Sessions
UNIT 9:
19 Sessions
Shapes & Story
Problems
(Addition &
Subtraction
Word Problems,
Length, Shapes)
MAY/JUNE
28 SESSIONS
© The Math Learning Center
Counting by 10’s
and 1’s; skip
counting; early
addition; 2-D
shapes; time to
the hour; bar
graphs
APR
SET D8:
Measuring Tools
Use during NC.
SET: A4:
Addition & Subtraction
5 Sessions
SET A1: Counting
on Number Line
Use during NC.
UNIT 8:
15 Sessions
More Games
(Numbers to
30, Addition &
Subtraction Word
Problems, Length,
Money)
APR
20 SESSIONS
•Identify & Describe 2-S & 3-D Shapes
•Use Positional Language
•Analyze, Compare, Create Shapes
Bridges Months: Sep, Nov, Dec, May/
June
Number Corner: Sep
Supplement Sets: C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement