Card Games - Cleave Books

Card Games - Cleave Books
Games with
Number Cards
Teacher's Notes
This is a collection of games and activities using a 50-card pack made up of 5 sets
of cards; each set (of 10 cards) bearing the digits 0 to 9. The aim is to encourage
practise in basic number work in a different context.
Suitable packs of cards can be obtained from educational suppliers. A master sheet
is included here printed with a set of the 10 cards. These could be photo-copied
onto card. While nowhere near as durable as commercially produced packs they
will serve the purpose. Certainly it would allow an assessment to be made as to
whether an investment in more permanent packs of cards would be worthwhile.
Most of the pages given here contain instructions for playing the various
games.These have been arranged and paginated in such a way that, using doublesided printing, then folding and stapling, a 16-page booklet can be made. Otherwise
the sheets can be printed on one side only, cut in half and used as A5 sheets.
Some assumptions are implicit in this work, and most of them are concerned with
what can best be described as “card ettiquette”. Some reminders:
• A full pack of 50 cards is always used unless otherwise stated.
• The pack is shuffled and cut at the start of any game.
• One player is the dealer, and all players take turns at this.
• Play always starts with the first player on the dealer's left, and moves
clockwise around the table. The dealer is the last to play in any
single round.
• The dealer is nearly always also a player but, in certain
circumstances, may not be.
• face-up means that the card lays flat on the table in such a way that
its value can be seen by all.
• face-down means that the card lays, or is held in such a way that its
value cannot be seen.
• must in the rules, means that the player has to do whatever it is the
particular rule states.
• may in the rules, means that the player can choose whether or not
carry out that particular instruction
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 1]
Some practical points.
• When groups are being made up, try to ensure that there is at least
one adequate reader in each group.
• If the reading ability generally is low: have all groups playing the
same game; do the necessary explanation “from the front”; and
monitor the first few games that are played very closely.
• Even with good readers misunderstandings do occur and it can
sometimes take a few games before these get ironed out.
• Do not leave one group playing the same game for too long. Either
change the group or change the game (or both).
• Since so much of the (correct) play depends upon arithmetic, all
players must be vigilant that cards laid down match the rules. For
example, if the rules require two cards to add up to 10, then players
must be on the lookout to ensure that there are two cards and that
they do add up to 10
• In the game 17 (which is a simpler version of “Pontoon” or “21”) it
might be better sometimes if the dealer is not a player - especially
if there are many players.
Note that the game Ordered Places does require each player to have an A4 sheet
with a pre-printed layout on it. The master for this is included in these pages.
A distinction is made here between games of Patience and Puzzles. They are both
games for one player. However, whether a game of Patience can be brought to a
successful conclusion depends to a large extent upon luck (plus a little bit of
skill). On the other hand, a Puzzle can always be resolved - eventually!
There is on this Web-site an article on Games in the Classroom. It can be found
from the CIMT Home Page under the general heading Games.
Games with
Number Cards
Teacher's Notes ~ 2
Much can be done to extend the use of these games by introducing some variations.
Here a just a few ideas, many others will suggest themselves as the games are
played.
Show Most
• Could be played with the smallest value winning = Show Least.
• Hands could be dealt at random.
17
• Could be played to some other total.
Addsnap
• Could be played dealing out 3 cards at a time.
• Could combine the cards with multiplication = Timesnap.
Call 10!
• To avoid the problems that can arise with players being ‘out’ of the
game, add the rule that “Any player holding no cards can still call
“Ten!” on seeing two piles whose topmost cards do add to 10 and
then, if correct, collects both piles.” But the call must involve the
card which has just been turned.
Magic 15
• Instead of requiring every line to produce the same total (of 15),
ask for every line to produce a different total = Anti-Magic.
Odds
• Use a 4 by 4 array and go for even totals = Evens.
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 2]
Other uses of Number Cards
There is another way of using Number Cards which introduces a “game-like”
dimension to the practise of mental arithmetic. It has the advantage of allowing
all responses to be seen from the front. It also allows every individual to make a
response and be checked rather than the ‘traditional’ single question/single answer
approach.
For this every pupil to be involved has 20 cards, made up of 2 each of the 10 digits
(0 to 9). A sum is called out, say “eight add seven”; pupils respond by holding up
the cards to display the answer, in this case a “1” and a “7” - the correct way round
of course. With this it is not a race to be“first” - but it must be correct.
Once started, there are lots of possibilities, much depending on the ability of the
group. There should be a mix of language as well as arithmetic; for instance
“divides”, “goes into”, “shared”, “is a factor of”, could all get a mention (at the
appropriate level).
“Show me an odd (even) number less (greater) than ten.”
“What are seven fours?”
“What is the product of three and two?”
“Hold up two cards whose total value is ten . . . is fifteen . . . is eight . .”
“Give me a two-digit number divisible by six.”
“Show the smallest (largest) two-digit number divisible by seven.”
“Give me a number that goes into twenty four.”
“Now show a number, not one, that is a factor of nineteen.”
“Hold up two numbers whose product is fifteen.”
“We will now count up in threes, starting with four . . . the next is . . .”
“Count down in twos, starting with twenty one . . . next is . . . next . . .”
“What is the remainder when fifteen is shared among four.”
Write on the board a (largish) number using all different digits,
or use a prepared OHP, and ask several questions on the lines of -
“Which digit is counting the thousands . . . units . . .?”
“Show me a two-digit prime number."
“Give me a prime number bigger than fifty.”
“Find a square number between thirty and forty.”
“What is the square root of sixty four?”
“What is the cube root of eighty one?”
Addsnap
(3, 4 or 5 players + dealer)
In this game the dealer is not a player but simply turns up two cards
at a time. The dealer then gives the two cards to the player who is
first to call their total value correctly.
Games with
Number Cards
When all the cards have been dealt, the winner is the player who
has collected the most cards.
Roll-Call
Hold the pack face-down and deal off one card at a time, turning it
face-up on the table.
Games for 2 and more players
Games of Patience
Puzzles
As each card is turned over, count ‘Nought’, ‘One’, ‘Two’, ‘Three’,
‘Four’, and so on up to ‘Eight’, ‘Nine’; then start the count again ‘Nought’, ‘One’, ‘Two’ and continue like that.
all played using a pack of 50 number cards
made up of 5 of each of the ten digits 0 to 9.
(A game for 1 player)
Whenever the card you have just turned over matches the number
being counted for that card then the card is put to one side.
4
9
5 6 7 8 9
6
5
sixteen
8
7
The object is to make each of those 6 totals an ODD number.
7
8
Check the totals of the 3 cards in each of the 3 columns (up and
down) and each of the 3 rows (across)
6
9
0
Continue until all 9 places are filled.
1
5
2
The card must then be placed so as to become part
of a 3 by 3 array like that shown on the right. Once
placed a card cannot be moved.
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 3]
3
2
0 1 2 3 4
(A game for 1 player)
Hold the pack face-down and take one card at a time
off the top, turning it face-up.
16
1
3
Odds
0
4
When the whole pack has been turned over, score 1 point for every
card which has put to one side. Rate your success using:
2 = Poor; 3 = Fair; 4 = Good; 5 = Very Good; 6 = Excellent
Ten Pair
Index
(2, 3 or 4 players)
Remove all the 0's from the pack.
Games for 2 or more players
(2 to 4) Ten Pair
Deal 7 cards to each player and put the remainder face-down in the
centre. Players take turns.
15
(2 to 4) Make a Difference
(2 to 4) Show Most
In one turn a player
3
4
(2 to 5) Ordered Places
(2 to 5) Call Ten!
13
5
(2 to 5 ) Rushten
(2 to 5) Number Building
7
6
(2 to 5) Prime Scramble
(2 to 6) Odds & Evens
11
14
(2 to 8) 17
(4 to 6) Addsnap
12
16
• takes one card from either of the piles in the centre
• looks among those held for any pairs of cards that
add together to make 10
• lays down all such pairs found, face-up on the table
• and then may throw away one card to a face-up pile in
the centre.
A player who lays down a pair of cards which do not add up to 10
must pick up all the cards laid down in that turn, including the one
thrown away. But this must be seen and pointed out by the other
players before play moves on to the next player.
The winner is the first player to be left holding no cards. If there is
no winner before all the face-down pack in the centre is gone, then
the winner is the player who has the most pairs of 10 laid down.
Games for 1
Ten-Out
14
Odds
16
Ten-Up
Roll-Call
15
16
Fifteen-Up
Prime Patience
4
10
Nine-Line
12
Ten - Up
(A game for ONE player)
Remove all the ‘0’s and one ‘5’ from the pack and put to one side;
these cards are not used. Deal out eight cards face-up in a line.
Keep the rest in your hand, face-down.
Puzzles
Counting-Out
Magic 15
10
5
Roundabout
Spaces
9
8
Order Please
Reductions
8
10
Stacking
Unrepeatables
7
3
2
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 4]
two
From this layout, any pair of cards that add up to 10 may be removed
and laid to one side. Then 2 more cards can be dealt from the top of
the pack in your hand to fill their places.
The object of this patience game is to see if you can get rid of all the
cards in your hand.
fifteen
15
Odds & Evens
(2 to 6 players)
Deal 8 cards to each player. The remainder of the pack is not needed.
Players may look at their cards.
For the first round, players put a card face-downwards in front of
them. When everyone has done this, the cards are turned over and
all of them are added up.
• If this total is even then players who laid an
even number in front of them score a point.
(2 to 4 players)
Deal 6 cards to each player and one extra to the dealer. The rest of
the pack is placed face-downwards in the middle. Players may look
at their cards.
The dealer now selects one card from his or her hand, which must
be either a 1, 2, 3, or 4, and places this card face-up for all to see.
This is the difference card.
Players take turns. In one turn a player • must take a card off the top of the pack in the middle
• If this total is odd then players who laid an
odd number in front of them score a point.
When these scores have been recorded, then that round is complete.
All the used cards are collected up and laid to one side.
All the following rounds are played in exactly the same way.
After eight rounds, when all the cards have been played, then the
winner is the player with the most points.
Ten - Out
Make a Difference
• may lay one pair of cards, face-up, from his or her
hand, and only one pair, whose difference (take the
smaller number from the larger) is the same value as
the difference card.
When all the pack in the middle has been used up, the winner is the
player who has laid down the most pairs.
Unrepeatables
(A game for ONE player)
Start by dealing out 16 cards to make an
arrangement of 4 rows in 4 columns. Hold the
remainder of the pack face-downwards in the
hand.
(A Puzzle)
Use four 1's, four 2's four 3's and four 4's. That
is a total 16 cards.
Put these 16 cards in a 4 by 4 array, that is in
4 rows by 4 columns.
If, in any row or any column, 2, 3 or 4 cards can
be found which add up to 10, then all 4 cards in
that row or column can be removed and put to
one side. Four more cards are then dealt from
the pack to fill the spaces.
They must be arranged so that in NO row or
column, nor in either of the two diagonals, does
any number appear twice.
So the game continues, removing rows or columns where possible,
filling the gaps from the pack in hand. The object is to get rid of all
the cards held in the hand. Remember that the cards adding up to
10 must all be in the same row or column.
14
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 5]
fourteen
three
3
Show Most
Ordered Places
(2 to 4 players)
Each player starts with an identical had of 10 cards covering the
values 0 to 9. The game is played over 10 rounds.
(2 to 5 players)
Each player needs a copy of the Ordered Places Layout.
In each round
thousands
• Players select a card from their hand and place it facedown on the table.
• When cards have been placed by all the players they
are turned over.
tens
units
The game is played over 5 rounds with a score being kept all the
time for each player. A round is made up of 3 bouts.
• The player who is showing the highest value card
collects the cards and lays them to one side.
• If there is NO SINGLE card of the highest value, then
no one collects any cards; they are all pushed to one
side.
After the 10 rounds are complete, the winner is the player who has
collected the greatest number of cards.
Fifteen - Up
hundreds
(A game for ONE player)
• Bout 1 (tens & units)
One card is dealt to each player who must place it on
either the 'tens' or 'units' space.
A second card is then dealt to each player who must
place it in the space not used before.
Each player has now made a 2-digit number. The
player with the highest number gets 2 points, the next
highest gets 1 point. Players with equal (highest)
numbers get the same amount of points.
Record those scores and clear the cards away, but do
not put them back in the pack.
Divide the pack into three roughly equal piles and place them face-up
in front of you. Though all the cards are face-up the piles should be
kept tidy all the time so that only the top card of the pile can be seen
at any time.
• Bout 2 (htu)
Similar to Bout 1 but, 3 cards are dealt out 1 at a time,
and are placed on the 'hundreds', 'tens' or 'units' space
as each card is received.
Remember that a card cannot be moved once it has
been placed.
The same scoring system is used.
If any two (or all three) of the top cards add up to 15 then those two
(or three) can be taken off and laid to one side.
• Bout 3 (all of them)
Now 4 cards are dealt out 1 at a time and placed on
any of the 4 spaces as each card is received.
The same scoring system applies
If no 15 can be made then you may move the top card from any one
pile and lay it on top of one of the other piles.
The object of this game is to have no cards left in any of the piles.
That is the end of a round. All the cards are gathered in and well
shuffled before starting the next round.
After 5 rounds the winner is the player with the most points.
4
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 6]
four
thirteen
13
17
Call 10
(2 to 8 players)
Deal 2 cards to each player. Players may look at their cards but do
not show what they are holding until the end.
Players are asked, in turn, whether they want another card. This is
repeated as often as necessary until everyone has refused, and the
game then stops.
The winner is the player whose card values in total are closest
to 17. Note that the total can be more or less than 17, and that
there might be more than one winner.
(2 to 5 players)
Remove all the 0's from the pack and put them to one side.
Deal out the remainder of the pack so that each player has the
same number of cards. Any cards left over are put to one side.
Players hold their cards in one complete pile, face-downwards and
must not look at any card before playing it.
Players take turns taking the top card off the face-down pile and
turning it over to make a face-up pile.
If anyone sees that a face-up card which, added to their own, makes
a total of 10, then they may call "Ten!" But note that this call must
involve the card which has been just turned up; it is too late to call
once the next card has been turned.
The call must use the top cards of the two face-up piles and not
some other card which may be seen further down.
The first player to call "Ten!" (and is correct) picks up both their own
pile and the other pile, turns them face-down and adds them to the
bottom of the pile already held in their hand.
Nine-Line
A player who has no cards left in their face-down pile is out of the
game. The face-up pile can still be won by those left in.
(A game for ONE player)
The winner is the player who is not out at the end.
Holding the pack face-down, take one card at a time and turn it
face-up to make a line of cards on the table.
Magic 15
Every time you see a group of cards (that is a run of cards lying
next to each other with no others in between) which add up to 9 or
a multiple of 9 (like 18, 27, 36 etc.) then that group can be removed
from the line and ‘thrown away’.
Cards can be moved along to close any gap that is made.
The object of this game is to have no cards left in the line at the end.
12
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 7]
twelve
(A Puzzle)
Take one of each of the cards 1 to 9 and lay them in
a 3 by 3 array.
Arrange them in such a way that every line of three
cards, up and down, across and diagonally (that is
eight different lines) adds up to 15.
five
5
Number Building
Prime Scramble
(2 to 5 players)
A complete game is made up of 5 ‘sets’ of 4 ‘rounds’ in each set.
Points are scored in each round and it is necessary to keep a record
of these.
To start a ‘set’ each player is dealt 10 cards. Any left over are not
needed. Players may look at their cards.
• Round 1
Each player selects 1 card and puts it face-down on
the table. When everyone has done this the cards are
turned over. The player showing the highest number
scores 1 point. If 2 or more players show the same
highest number, NO points are given. Record the score
and move the used cards out of the way. .
(2 to 5 players)
Remove all the 0's from the pack and put them to one side.
Deal out the remainder of the pack so that each player has the
same number of cards. Any cards left over are put to one side.
Players must not touch their cards until dealing is complete.
When every one is ready, players may pick up their cards and start
sorting them out.
Each player has to make as many prime numbers as possible, using
either a single card or a pair of cards placed side. So, for example,
a ‘7’ on its own would do, and so also would a ‘5’ and a ‘3’ which
could be arranged to make 53. As each prime is made it is laid on
the table.
When a player has made all the primes they think are possible from
that hand then they call “Stop!” and all other players must stop laying
down any more primes.
• Round 2
Each player now puts 2 cards face-down. When turned
over they are placed side-by-side to build a number.
So, for example, a ‘5’ and a ‘3’ would be 53. The player
with the highest number scores 2 points. Two identical
high numbers again means NO points. Record, and
clear the used cards away.
The next two rounds are played in a similar way.
The player who called “Stop!” is the winner provided that, when the
other players look, they confirm that all the numbers laid down are
primes, and also that the player is not holding any more possible
primes in the remaining cards. If the player fails on either of these
then the winner is the player who laid down the most primes.
To help, here is a list of all the prime numbers less than 100.
• Round 3
3 cards to score 3 points.
• Round 4
4 cards to score 4 points.
2
3
5
7
11
13
17
19
23
29
31
37
41
43
47
53
59
61
67
71
73
79
83
89
97
That is the end of a ‘set’. All the cards are gathered in and well
shuffled before starting the next ‘set’.
After 5 ‘sets’ the winner is the player who has scord the most points.
6
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 8]
six
eleven
11
Reductions
Rushten
(A Puzzle)
Take one of each of the cards 0 to 9 and lay them out in this order
1
7
3
8
0
9
4
6
2
5
Using only that rule, find a set of moves that will produce this -
1
2
3
Deal 5 cards to each player. The remainder of the pack is put facedown in the middle of the table.
In their turns players now
A card may be moved, either to the left or to the right, by jumping
over 2 cards to land on top of another card. The jump must be over
exactly 2 cards, neither more nor less, and no cards are removed.
0
(2 to 5 players)
• Take sets of cards from their hand which add up to
10 and lay them face-up on the table. (There may be
any number of cards in a set, and more than one set
can be laid down.) Then • draw, from the pack in the centre, the same number of
cards as was laid down.
4
• If unable to make a set of 10 at all, just draw 1 card
from the pack in the centre.
Prime Patience
(A game for 1 player)
When all the cards from the pack in the centre have been used the
winner is the player who has laid down the most cards.
Remove all the ‘0’s from the pack. Hold the remainder face-down.
Stacking
Deal 2 cards face-up. If they are both even then throw them away.
Otherwise, arrange them side by side to make a 2-digit number.
From the pack take out one each of the cards 0 to 4.
Decide whether the number you have made is a prime.
If it is, lay the 2 cards to your right, otherwise lay them to your left.
Deal another 2 cards, and treat them as before. Keep on doing that
until all the cards in your hand have been used.
In this game you have won if, at the end, the pile on your right (the
primes) is bigger than the pile on your left (the non-primes).
13
17
19
23
29
31
37
41
43
47
53
59
61
67
71
73
79
83
89
97
Stack them in the order 0, 3, 2, 1, 4 so that when held in your hand
face-downwards then the ‘0’ is on the top.
Start by spelling ‘one’ - saying ‘o’, ‘n’, ‘e’. As each letter is said the
top card of the stack is moved to the bottom. After the last card of
the spelling has been moved, take the next card off the top and say
“spells one” as you turn it face-up on the table.
Do the same thing for ‘two’ - saying ‘t’, ‘w’, ‘o’, with a top to bottom
for each letter, then saying “spells two” as the next card is placed on
the table face-up.
To help, here is a list of all the 2-digit prime numbers.
11
(A Puzzle)
Next is ‘t’, ‘h’, ‘r’, ‘e’, ‘e’; “spells three”. Then ‘f’, ‘o’, ‘u’, ‘r’, “spells
four”. The final card is now revealed as you say “and there is nothing
left!”
Find a way of stacking the cards ‘0’ to ‘9’ so that they can be produced
in order as each number is spelt out.
10
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 9]
ten
seven
7
Spaces
Roundabout (A Puzzle)
(A Puzzle)
Using two each of the cards 1 to 3 they can laid out like this
3
1
2
1
3
8
2
Notice that between the 1's there is 1 card, between the 2's there
are 2 cards, and between the 3's there are 3 cards.
5
In a similar way, use two each of the cards 1 to 4 and try to lay them
out so that between the 1's there is 1 card, between the 2's there
are 2 cards, between the 3's there are 3 cards and between the 4's
there are 4 cards.
3
7
6
4
2
Take one of each of the cards 0 to 9
and arrange them in the shape of a
hollow rectangle as shown on the left.
The object is to re-arrange them into
the order shown the right.
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
The object is to see how quickly you can get them into order, from
‘0’ to ‘9’.
The only move allowed is to change over any pair of cards at a time.
3
4
5
The cards may only be moved by 6 7 8
sliding them into a blank space,
without going outside the edges of the original rectangle - so there
is only ever one empty space that a card can be moved into. No
jumping is allowed.
1
Take one of each of the cards 0 to 9 shuffle them well and deal
them face-up in a straight line.
2
1
Counting - Out
Order Please (A Puzzle)
1
(A Puzzle)
Arrange the four cards ‘1’ to ‘4’ roughly in a circle.
Start counting on ‘1’ and, counting up to 5, move
from card to card in a clockwise direction. This
4
2 finishes on ‘1’, so that card is removed. Go
(clockwise) to the next remaining card (‘2’ in this
3
case) and start counting from there. Again count
to 5. This time the finish is on ‘3’ and that card is
removed. Only the even numbers remain.
Now arrange the cards ‘1’ to ‘6’ in a circle. Can you
find what number you must use for the count so as
to remove all the odd cards?
1
6
Remember that the count must start at 1; all 5
movement is clockwise; the same count must be
4
used every time; the card on which the count finishes
is removed; and the count re-starts on the next remaining
card.
2
3
If that is too easy you could try it for 8 cards, and . . . .
8
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 10]
eight
nine
9
0
1
2
3
4
01 2 3 4
56789
3
8
9
9
2
8
1
7
0
6
5
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 11]
7
4
6
5
Ordered Places Layout
thousands
© Frank Tapson 2004 [trolXD 12]
hundreds
tens
units
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement