VIKINGS: GAME RULES
VIKINGS: GAME RULES
Version 2.0, May 2002
Rules and scenarios by Yves Fagherazzi and Duccio Vitale; Design and drawing of the maps:
Jean-Michel Clement. Copyright Duccio Vitale and Eurogames 1990. Translation into English by
Terry Ford and Bob Gingell.
This translation contains everything in the Rules Booklet and the Game Aid Charts. The scenarios
for this game are translated separately (as ‘Vikings Scenarios’).
Translator’s note: The game “Vikings” is based on the game “Viking Raiders” published by
Standard Games and Publications of England in 1987. Although the box cover art, ships and
character counters are the same, the rules have been substantially re-written and there are
completely different maps, scenarios and game pieces (e.g. the rowboats and grappling hooks).
INFORMATION SHEET
VIKINGS: The knights of the sea. Dragon ships in sight! The fury of the Norsemen bursts upon
the coasts of England. Naval combats, boarding, raids, pillage: the incursions of the Vikings spare
no-one. Will the Anglo-Saxon Earls succeed in repulsing these intrepid knights of the sea?
Across 7 scenarios this game recreates the era of the Scandinavian peoples of the 9th and 10th
centuries [“Viking Raiders” states 9th-11th centuries]. Completely compatible with the other games
of the medieval series (Cry Havoc, Siege, Samouraï and Croisades), as well as with those in the
Dragon Noir series, VIKINGS develops in particular movement and combat at sea, and describes
with a stunning realism the tactics of coastal raids. There will be an extension, “The Fortified
Harbour” (Le Port Fortifié: to be published in February 1991), which will introduce additional
maps, ships, rules and scenarios. [Note: This extension was never published.]
A tactical simulation for 2 players or more, aged 14 and over.
Game complexity: Medium, graded ‘4’ on a chart of 1 = very easy to 7 = very difficult.
[The Information Sheet also includes a list of material supplied with the game reproduced below.]
CONTENTS
1. Introduction
1. The game contents
2. The maps
3. The counters
2. General rules
1. Course of play
2. Structure of the game turn
3. Missile fire
4. Restrictions on shooting and cover
5. Movement
6. Stacking of counters
7. Combat
3. Special rules for shooting and combat
1. Berserkers
2. Huscarls
3. Combat with the two-handed axe
4. Horses
4. Rules concerning boats
1. Descriptions of the boats
Rules booklet page no.
(1)
(1)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(9)
(9)
(11)
(11)
(11)
(12)
(12)
(13)
(13)
1
Translation page no.
3
4
11
13
2. Assignment of crew tasks
(13)
3. Determining speed
(15)
4. Moving the boats
(17)
5. Collisions
(18)
6. Grappling
(21)
7. Recording damage points
(23)
8. Movement and combat on boats
(24)
5. Optional rules
(26)
24
1. Errare humanum est
(26)
2. Patching a leak
(27)
3. The toughness of hemp
(27)
4. Is there a pilot on board?
(27)
5. Special rules from the scenarios
(Scenarios Booklet)
6. Drakkar chart
(29)
26
7. Saxon galley chart
(30)
27
(The contents page is on the back cover of the rules booklet)
8. Game Aid charts: Side 1
28
1. Shooting die roll modifiers
2. Missile Results Tables: Mounted characters and characters on foot
3. Characters that have a two-handed axe
4. Characters in armour
5. Types of terrain
6. Effect of terrain on combat
7. Combat against mounted characters
8. Combat against characters on foot
9. Infiltration of enemy lines (challenges)
9. Game Aid charts: Side 2
31
1. Using the counters
2. Boarding and disembarkation
3. Drowning test
4. Grappling
5. Ship Characteristics Table
6. Collision Table
[A rules numbering system has been added to simplify reference to individual rules. The “End of
page” number marks the end of each page in the rules booklet or the nearest end of paragraph.]
Supplementary rules and scenarios for “Vikings”
Some additional supplements for the game have been translated from French magazines:
• ‘Vikings Supplement’: additional rules and 8 extra scenarios.
• ‘Viking Raid’: a campaign consisting of 5 scenarios.
• ‘Irish and Scottish Armies Extension’: additional rules using characters from “Vikings” and
from other games in the series, with 10 extra scenarios.
• ‘Byzantine and other Medieval Ships Extension’: variant rules using the ships from
“Vikings” to represent vessels of the Medieval period of the rest of the “Cry Havoc” series.
Maps and characters from this game are also used in some of the other supplementary scenarios
and extensions for the “Cry Havoc” series that have been translated from French magazines.
2
1.
INTRODUCTION
VIKINGS is a game of historical simulation on the Era of the Vikings during the 9th and 10th
centuries. The game system is entirely compatible with the other games of the medieval series:
CRY HAVOC, SIEGE, SAMOURAÏ, and CROISADES, as well as with those of the series
DRAGON NOIR. It will have an extension, THE FORTIFIED PORT, which will introduce
additional maps, boats, rules and scenarios *. (* Planned to appear in February 1991.)
Do not be frightened if the rules seem to you a little long: the majority of them are easy to
remember because they were directly inspired by reality. It is explained there, for example, that to
mount a horse, it is necessary to be beside it, and to enter a house, it is easiest to go in through a
doorway.... So, read them quickly and begin immediately to play the first scenario. In the course of
play, you will find help in the Game Aid charts. If you have difficulty with a particular point, refer
to the detailed summary that appears in the back of this booklet.
1.1
THE GAME CONTENTS
The game VIKINGS contains:
- One 10-sided die (numbered 0 to 9, the 0 counting as 10).
- 2 Sea maps and 4 Coast maps (2 small and 2 large).
- 1 sheet of pre-cut counters representing the characters of the time.
- 1 sheet of 6 pre-cut boats (3 drakkars: Viking longships, and 3 galiotes: Saxon galleys).
- 1 sheet of 6 rowboats (to be cut out).
- 1 sheet of pre-cut markers for treasure, speed, grappling hook, axe and bucket.
- 2 game aid charts with shooting and combat tables on one side, and an explanation of the use of
the counters and a summary of the naval rules on the other side.
- A rules booklet.
- A booklet on the history of the Vikings illustrated by 7 scenarios.
[This list comes from the one-page “Information Sheet” that is also supplied with the game, since
that list is more accurate.]
1.2
THE MAPS
These are of two types:
- maps of the coast. These contain both sea hexes and land hexes. Each map edge is identified by
a number. To create different game boards, they can be joined either along the width, or along
the length. The two large maps are compatible with all the other maps of the games of the
medieval series. It will be noted that it is the dominant terrain that determines the nature of a
hex. In other words, a hex containing 2/3 sea and 1/3 sand will be treated as a sea hex for game
purposes.
- maps of the sea. These contain only sea hexes and are used only for the movements of boats
and naval actions.
At the beginning of each scenario will be found a diagram which shows the exact layout of the
maps forming the game board, as well as the map edges through which the ships and characters of
each side will enter (see the ‘History & Scenarios’ booklet).
(End of page 1)
1.3
THE COUNTERS
In VIKINGS, one finds three kinds of counters: counters representing the characters, counters
representing the boats and special markers. The way of using these counters is explained later in the
rules. One also finds a detailed description of various counters representing the characters in the
historical booklet.
1.31
Counters representing the characters
3
In Vikings, each counter represents a character and each game turn represents a very short duration
of real time: a few tens of seconds at most. Just enough time to draw an arrow, to strike a blow with
a sword and to travel a few metres. The width of a hexagon is equivalent to two metres, a space
sufficient for a character on foot to wield his weapon but not enough for a rider. This is the reason
why a character on horseback occupies two hexes.
Each character on foot is represented by two counters printed on both sides. The first shows an
illustration of the character in full health and the reverse the character stunned. The second counter
shows the same character when he is wounded and ... dead. Characters that own a horse are
represented by four counters: two represent them on foot and two others on horseback. On the
reverse of the counters representing the mounted character can be found illustrations of the horse
without a rider and the dead horse. This is explained in more detail on the back of the Game Aid
Card (Side 2 of the ‘Fiche de jeu’).
Each character counter contains:
- A black number: [Top left] This represents the strength of the character in attack. Its value is
determined by the length and weight of the weapon, and the skill and physical condition of the man
who uses it.
- A red number: [Top left] This represents the strength of the character in defence. Its value is
determined by the skill that the character has to avoid and dodge blows, as well as by his physical
condition.
- The name of the character: [Bottom left]
- Troop type identified by 1 or 2 letters: [Top right] Here Jl indicates that in this case he is a Jarl.
- A blue number: [Bottom right] This represents the movement allowance of the character, in other
words the number of points of movement that he can use each game turn. Its importance is
determined by mode of transport – on foot or on horseback, the weight of the armour and the
physical condition of the character.
1.32
Boat counters: see page 13 of the Rules Booklet (Rule 4).
1.33 Special markers: [pictured – the sheet of 250 small markers also includes 7 blanks]
Treasure [8]; Grappling Hook (rope + hook) [2x16]; Speed marker [153]; Axe [26]; Bucket [24]
(End of page 2)
2.
GENERAL RULES
2.1
COURSE OF PLAY
The players initially choose one of the suggested scenarios to play. Before beginning the scenario,
they must lay out the maps in the way indicated and select the characters presents in the scenario.
The game itself is composed of a number of successive game turns. Each game turn is composed of
four phases: 2 phases of naval movement, and 2 phases of character movement each giving the
initiative to one or the other side. During the Naval Movement Phases, the players move their boats
simultaneously. During his phase of character movement, each player makes his characters shoot,
move and fight. When there are several players on each side, the characters on the same side shoot,
move and fight at the same time. As we will see, a player can also intervene with defensive missilefire during the phase of his opponent.
2.2
STRUCTURE OF THE GAME TURN
Each game turn occurs in the following way:
1)
First Phase of Naval Movement.
4
1.
CREW TASKS: Each player allocates a task to each character on his boats.
2.
SPEED: Each player indicates, in secrecy, the speed of each one of his boats for the phase in
progress. A speed marker is placed, face down, beside each boat.
3.
BOAT MOVEMENT & THROWING GRAPPLING HOOKS: The speed markers are
turned over. Each player moves his boats one hex at a time, in accordance with the speed indicated.
Initiative always remains with the boat that moves the fastest. After each hex of movement at sea,
resolve any collisions, throws of grappling hooks and attempts to cut grapples.
4.
PULLING THE BOATS TOGETHER: Once all the movement is finished, the players can
try to bring closer those boats held by grappling hooks.
5.
RECORDING DAMAGE POINTS: Each player adds up the total of the damage points
inflicted on his boats during the phase which has just taken place.
2)
Phase of Player A
1. OFFENSIVE FIRE: All the archers of Side A can fire missiles, with the exception of those that
are in contact with an enemy character.
2 MOVEMENT AND DEFENSIVE FIRE: All of the characters of Side A can move. Side B can
fire missiles during the movement of characters from Side A, using characters that are not in contact
with the enemy.
3. COMBAT: All the characters of Side A that are in contact with enemy characters can attack.
4. STUNNED CHARACTERS. All the characters of Side A that were stunned during the phase of
Player B or one of the preceding naval phases are stood up (turn over the counters concerned).
(End of page 3)
3)
Second Phase of Naval Movement
This occurs exactly like the first.
4)
Phase of Player B
This is played exactly in the same way as that of player A, but this time it is Side B that has the
initiative and which plays instead of Side A. Player A can intervene in Phase 2 with defensive fire.
When Phase 4 is finished, a new Game Turn starts with the first Naval Movement Phase.
Note: It is important to keep strictly to the order of sequence of the Phases. Do not start a new Phase
until the preceding one is finished.
2.3
SHOOTING WITH A BOW
Each character that possesses a bow can fire once during each Shooting Phase. It is possible to fire
several times on the same target with different archers. Remember that a character cannot fire if he
is in a hex adjacent to an enemy character at the time of shooting. It is assumed that he is occupied
in hand-to-hand fighting. This rule does not apply if the enemy character is not in a position to
attack the hex occupied by the archer (see Restrictions on Combat page 11 (Rule 2.76)).
Note: Wounded archers can continue to fire, even if depicted without a bow or with a damaged
bow.
2.31 Line of Fire
A character can shoot at an enemy character if there is a Line of Sight between the hex of the archer
and his target. The Line of Sight consists of an imaginary straight line traced from the centre of the
hexagon of the archer to the centre of the hexagon of the target. If this Line of Sight crosses either a
character, or a different type of ground than flat ground, the shooting undergoes restrictions or
modifiers explained later (see Restrictions on shooting, Rule 2.4).
2.32 Resolution of Missile Fire
Although it is the die roll that is most important in determining the result of a shot, there are
5
however several other factors that can modify the effects of a shot. Look at the Game Aid Card. On
this card, to the left of the Types of Terrain Table (8.5) are all the tables needed for the resolution of
missile fire. The first table (8.1) indicates the possible modifications to apply to the number
obtained on the die as a consequence of the range of the shot and the state of health of the shooter.
The two tables that follow (8.2) deal with two categories of targets: mounted and on foot.
Depending on the circumstances, players refer to one of the two tables, and roll the die once. Follow
horizontally the line of that number after modifications. In the column matching the cover of the
target – none, light, medium or heavy – will be found the result of the shot: A, B, C, D, E or F. The
explanation of those results is given with each table. [Note that results E and F are not possible for
the short bows in this game: more powerful missile weapons appear in other games of the series.]
The cover that each type of terrain offers is indicated in the centre table (8.5). For more realism, you
can also adopt the optional rule proposed at the end of the booklet (see "Errare humanum est" page
26 Rule 5.1).
Note: It should be remembered that an archer has 1 point added to the result of his shot when he is
wounded or when the target character is wearing armour.
(End of page 4)
2.33 Defensive Fire
Contrary to Offensive Fire, which is carried out against a motionless character, Defensive Fire takes
place while the enemy is in motion. The player who is initiating his defensive shooting can interrupt
the movement of a character in any hex at any moment and decide to shoot at him with one or more
shooters. It is not possible to carry out Defensive Fire against a character who has not yet started to
move, unless the enemy player does not intend to move that character during his turn.
2.4
RESTRICTIONS ON SHOOTING AND COVER
1) Trees (arbres): If there are trees or branches of trees between the shooter and his target,
shooting is impossible. It is possible, on the other hand, to shoot at a character in a tree hex if the
Line of Fire does not cross any other tree hex. A character on a tree hex benefits from light cover.
2) Boats (bateaux): It is possible to shoot at a boat hex, but not through it. A character in a boat has
the benefit of medium cover when rowing or when holding the steering oar. In all the other cases,
the benefit is only light cover. Results of ‘retreat’ are ignored. When the shooter is in the same boat
as the target, he can fire without restrictions and the target does not benefit from any cover. Because
of the rolling of the boat, a shooter on a boat adds one point to his die roll.
3) Scrub (broussailles): It is possible to shoot into and through scrub hexes. A character benefits
from light cover if he is in a scrub hex.
4) Riders (cavaliers): A character on a horse occupies two hexes. If the two hexes do not offer the
same cover, consider that he always benefits from the strongest cover. Example: a mounted
character occupying a flat terrain hex and a scrub hex will benefit from light cover.
5) Water (eau): A character in a water hex (sea or river) never blocks a Line of Fire. He benefits
from light cover but he cannot shoot.
6) Huscarls (housecarls): When they are in their special formation, Huscarls benefit from heavy
cover if the Line of Fire crosses their front line (see the special rule on page 11 – Rule 3.2).
7) Houses (maisons)
7.1) Shooting through windows: a) From the interior: a character inside a building can only fire at
the exterior from a window hex. The Line of Sight is then from the middle exterior edge of the
window and not from the centre of the hexagon. b) From the exterior: a character located on the
6
exterior can only shoot through a window if the target is immediately behind the window. The Line
of Fire must be able to reach the centre of the window hex without touching the walls, otherwise the
shot is impossible. Special situation: An archer in the hex adjacent to the window-sill can fire into
the interior of the building. His field of fire is however limited solely to those hexes that form the
room. His Line of Sight runs from the middle of the interior edge of the window.
7.2) Shooting through doorways. A character that is either outside or inside a building can shoot
through a doorway so long as a section of wall does not block his Line of Sight. The calculation of
the Line of Fire is done normally. However, when a character shoots from a doorway hex, his Line
of Sight starts from the middle of the opening and not from the centre of the hexagon.
7.3) Cover: Characters in the interior of a building benefit from medium cover when shot at
through a doorway or a window.
(End of page 5)
8) Arrow-slits (meurtrières): When a character in an arrow-slit hex shoots through it, his Line of
Fire runs from the slit of the arrow-slit. To shoot from the exterior at a character behind an arrowslit, the shooter must be in an exact straight line to the arrow-slit. A character in an arrow-slit hex
benefits from heavy cover when the Line of Fire passes through the slit of the arrow-slit.
9) Walls (murs): Walls block Lines of Sight. A character behind a wall without an opening benefits
from infinite cover. It is thus impossible to shoot at him over the wall.
10) Characters (personnages): With a shortbow, if the Line of Fire passes has through a hex
occupied by a standing character (whether human or animal), shooting is impossible. Stunned and
dead characters do not block Lines of Fire. On the other hand, if the target is at medium or long
range, the archers can shoot over intervening characters. Exceptions: 1) a character in a water hex
never blocks the Line of Fire; 2) when a shooter on a slope cannot see a character located below
him, he can shoot freely over him (see the rules for ‘Slope’ below).
11) Slope (talus): Slope hexes do not block a Line of Sight so long as it does not pass over the lip
of the slope. When the Line of Sight passes over the lip of a slope, shooting is only possible if the
character below is at least as far away from the slope hex as is the character above. If he is closer,
no shooting is possible between them because they cannot see each other. Exception: shooting is
possible when the character below is on the slope hex itself. He can then shoot but he can also be
shot at since he is considered to be in the middle of the slope. A character on a slope hex benefits
from medium cover when the Line of Fire passes over the lip of the slope.
2.5
MOVEMENT
Each character has a number of movement points marked on the counter representing him (the blue
number). Each hex entered makes him spend a number of movement points corresponding to the
difficulty of the terrain (see the table of the types of terrain on the Game Aid card). On each turn, a
player can move all or some of his characters, by using the whole or part of the movement
allowance of each one. The movement points used cannot be transferred between characters, nor
can they be held in reserve for the following turns.
2.51 Restrictions on Movement
1) Characters cannot pass through hexes containing enemy characters unless these are stunned or
dead. On the other hand, crossing hexes containing friendly characters causes no problem.
2) Characters on horseback cannot pass through a tree hex, a building interior hex, a deep water
hex*, or a boat hex. Horses without a rider and led by the bridle can cross tree hexes, enter or leave
a ship, and cross water hexes.
7
(End of page 6)
3) Armoured characters, whether on foot or mounted, can never cross a deep water hex *. If they are
forced to do so, for example as a result of combat, they will drown.
(* Sea and river hexes are all deep water hexes unless they are adjacent to a beach hex. In effect
this treats characters very close to the shore as if they are wading.)
4) Walls are impassable. To enter a building, a character must be on foot and cross through a
doorway or a window.
5) Hexes containing three dead persons or one dead horse cost one movement point more than the
normal cost. Hexes containing six dead persons or two dead horses become impassable. (The same
rule applies if a hex contains three dead persons and one dead horse).
2.52 How to clear a hex that has become impassable
Two characters on foot can move three dead persons or one dead horse by one hex. The two characters
cannot do anything else during their turn, neither move nor shoot nor fight. If the corpses are thrown
into the water they will sink into the depths and the counters representing them are removed from the
map.
Note: This action is impossible if there is an enemy in a position to attack on an adjacent hex.
2.53 How to carry a stunned character
A character on foot that moves through a hex containing a stunned character may carry that character
on his back, but his remaining movement points will be divided by two (rounding down if necessary).
At the end of his movement he drops the stunned character onto one of the hexes beside his own.
Note: This action is impossible if there is an enemy in a position to attack on an adjacent hex.
2.54 Infiltration of enemy lines (Challenges)
When a character crosses a hex during his movement, which is adjacent to one or more enemies in a
position to attack, the player concerned rolls the die for each enemy and consults the table on the Game
Aid card (8.9). This rule only applies to hexes that are crossed. A character ending movement in a hex
adjacent to an enemy does not cause a die-roll.
Special situations: 1) Only roll the die once for mounted characters, even though they occupy two
hexes. It is the front part of the counter that is used for the infiltration rule. 2) The infiltration rule does
not apply when the hex crossed is a boat hex and the enemy is on another boat, in the sea, or on land. It
does apply, however, when the hex crossed is a land or sea hex and the enemy is on an adjacent boat
hex. 3) The infiltration rule does not apply when the enemy is on the other side of a window or arrowslit.
2.55 Special movement rules for mounted characters
The arrow drawn on the counters of mounted characters shows the general direction of movement. To
advance into the hex towards which the arrow is pointing or into one of the two hexes adjacent, the
rider spends movement points (MPs) normally. However, once the rider turns his horse greater than
this, he spends 1, 2 or 3 points more than the normal cost for the hex, as shown on the diagram that
follows.
(End of page 7)
The numbers on the hexes show the cost of entering
Tree
Scrub
Terrain
each one from the initial position of the rider.
|
| X | 3 (+1)| 2 ä |
|
1
x tree
The arrows show the direction of the hexes
|
| 4 (+3)| RIDER > | 1 à |
| 2 x scrub
that form the frontal arc of the rider.
|
| 3 (+2)| 2 (+1)| 1 æ |
|
rest flat
Note: A rider who makes a complete half-turn on the spot (a 180° turn) spends 3 MPs.
2.56
Mounting and dismounting from a horse
8
To be able to mount a horse, a character must be on one of the hexes adjacent to the horse. Neither
the rider nor the horse can be adjacent to an enemy in a position to attack. Replace the counters for
the rider on foot and the horse with the single counter representing that same rider mounted. Only
riders can later mount horses belonging to other characters. When a character dismounts, replace
him with the counter for the horse and place the counter for the rider on foot on an adjacent empty
hex. There is no special restriction on dismounting.
To mount or dismount from a horse, a light cavalryman (unarmoured) spends 2 Movement Points
and a heavy cavalryman (armoured) spends 3 MPs. These points are deducted from the Movement
Allowance shown on the counter before the character mounts or dismounts. The remaining
Movement Points can be used as follows:
- If the character is mounting the horse, double the character’s remaining Movement Points on
foot and this gives the mounted Movement Allowance that remains.
- If the character is dismounting from the horse, halve the character’s remaining mounted
Movement Points and this gives the foot Movement Allowance that remains. If the character is
wounded, divide by four. In these two situations, round down to the lower number if necessary.
Example: Ragnar moves 4 hexes on horseback, then dismounts. He then has remaining a Movement
Allowance of 15 minus 6 = 9 points. Divide this by 2, which gives 4.5 rounded down to 4. Ragnar
now has 4 Movement Points available after getting off his horse. Another example: Edwin is
wounded and moves 6 hexes on horseback, then dismounts. He has left 12 minus 9 = 3 Movement
Points. Divided by 4, this gives less than 1. So he ends his movement beside his horse, without
being able to go any farther.
2.57 Horses without a rider
Horses without a rider stay immobile until they are mounted or led by the bridle. To lead a horse by the
bridle it is enough for a character (even a wounded one) to pass through one of the hexes adjacent to
the horse *. The character can continue on his route, followed by the horse, which is treated as a simple
extension of the counter leading it. (* This action is impossible if there is an enemy in a position to
attack next to the horse.)
A horse without a rider stays under the control of the original player so long as he has a living character
who is not stunned next to the horse. When this is not so, the horse will belong to the first player who
takes control of it. A mounted character holding another horse by the bridle will automatically lose
control of it if he engages in combat or is attacked. A character on foot can lead up to three horses by
the bridle. A mounted character can only lead one.
(End of page 8)
2.6
STACKING OF COUNTERS
During the game it is possible for characters to pass through hexes containing a friendly character, a
stunned character or a dead character. But at the end of each movement phase there must be no more
than one living character on any hex.
2.7
COMBAT
When two characters, or more, are on adjacent hexes, they can fight each other. Each combat is
optional. The decision whether or not to attack rests with the player whose turn it is [the active player].
His/her characters are called the attackers. In the following player-turn they will defend against the
opponent's attackers. Each character can only make one attack per turn, but a defender can be attacked
several times by different attackers.
To resolve a combat, divide the attack strength (black number) by the defence strength of the character
being attacked (red number). This will give an odds ratio which matches a column of possible results
on the relevant Combat Table. The attacker then rolls the die to determine the exact result of the
9
combat in question. On Game Aid card No. 1 there are two Combat Tables - one is used to resolve
combats against mounted characters, the other against characters on foot.
When calculating the odds ratio, the number obtained must be rounded, if necessary, in favour of the
defender. Thus an attacker with a strength of 8 against a defender with a strength of 3 gives a ratio of
2.6 against 1 which rounds down to 2 against 1 (2:1). Attacks attempted at odds of less than 1 against 1
(1:1) are impossible.
2.71 Effects of terrain on combat
The odds ratio of a combat can be modified by the nature of the terrain occupied by each character
involved. You can see from the Terrain Types Table (see the Game Aid card 8.5) that a terrain can
influence combat in two ways: it can be neutral (0), or disadvantageous to the character occupying it
(-).
According to the terrain that each occupies, the odds ratio may need to be modified by shifting the
column of possible results to the left or to the right. This is shown on the table above the two Combat
Tables on the Game Aid card.
A mounted character is considered to occupy the least advantageous terrain of the two hexes
occupied.
2.72 Combat against more than one character
When a character occupies a hex adjacent to several opponents, he can choose to fight some, all or
none. If he decides to attack more than one, he must add their defence strengths to make one single
total factor, which is then used with his attack strength to calculate the odds.
When two characters (or more) decide to attack one enemy character, they can attack individually, or
alternatively they can add their attack points to create a single total factor which is used to calculate the
odds against the defender's strength. If they attack together, they may, as a bonus, shift the odds
column so obtained by one column to the right (see example below). This rule does not apply to a
mounted character unless he is attacked by several riders.
(End of page 9)
When the combat result shows that an attacker or defender has been stunned or wounded, the player of
the side affected decides which of the characters receives the blow. However, the result "Attacker
retreats" or "Defender retreats" applies to all the characters that participated in the attack or defence.
If the attackers decide to attack jointly and they are on different types of terrain, the least advantageous
terrain will be counted to compare with that occupied by the defender. Example: Assume that two
characters attack an enemy at 4 against 1 (4:1). If one is on terrain (0) and the other on terrain (-), the
two attackers are considered to be on terrain (-). If the defender occupies terrain (0), the Terrain Effects
table (see the Game Aid card) shows that the odds ratio must be shifted one column to the left (4:1
becomes 3:1). But if they attack together they can shift the odds ratio one column to the right. The
combat will thus be resolved at 4:1, the number of attackers having counterbalanced the terrain
disadvantage.
2.73 Combat against a defender in armour
When a character attacks a defender in armour (a defence strength with a circle around it), he adds 1
point to the number rolled on the die. It is this modified number which indicates the result of the
combat. If there are several defenders and not all are in armour, this rule does not apply but any
resulting injuries will be inflicted on an unarmoured character.
10
2.74 Combat across a doorway or window
When a combat takes place across a doorway, the defender is always in favourable terrain (+), whether
inside or outside the building. When a combat takes place through a window, the defender is always in
favourable terrain (+) and the attacker in unfavourable terrain (-), whatever their respective locations.
2.75 Advance after combat
If at the end of a combat the attacker or the defender have been forced to retreat (or if one or the other
has been stunned or killed) the victorious player can advance one of his/her characters by 2 hexes if on
foot or by 3 hexes if mounted. The first hex crossed must always be one of the hexes evacuated by the
enemy (or the hex of the stunned or killed character).
Advance after combat is not obligatory but it must be carried out immediately, without waiting for the
resolution of the other combats in process.
Only a character involved in the combat can benefit from the advance after combat. The MPs used
during the advance after combat do not prevent the character concerned from moving normally during
the next game turn.
Note: The advance after combat must take account of the rules for infiltration of enemy lines
[challenges] (Rule 2.54), but with the following restriction: an enemy character adjacent to the hex
crossed cannot roll the die if he is simultaneously engaged in combat, either in attack or defence.
Whether the combat has or has not already taken place is irrelevant.
(End of page 10)
2.76 Restrictions on combat
As a general rule, any combat is impossible if the attacker could not move into the hex that he is
attacking. Examples: A rider cannot attack a character in a tree hex; an armoured character cannot
attack a character in deep water; no character can attack through an arrow-slit.
3.
SPECIAL RULES FOR SHOOTING AND COMBAT
3.1
BERSERKERS
All berserkers in contact with an enemy character must attack, whether alone or as part of a multiple
attack. If the result of the combat is unfavourable to the defender (retreat, stun, wounded or killed),
the berserker must take advantage of the opportunity for advance after combat if this will place him
adjacent to an enemy, whether it be the one who has retreated or another. If, however, the result of
the combat favours the defender, the berserker ends his game turn.
Once all the combats have been resolved, the Viking player rolls a die for each Berserker victorious
in a combat: 1-3 and the Berserker calms down and ends his turn; 4+ and the Berserker enters a
berserk rage and starts a new combat. All enraged Berserkers then fight afresh, folowing the same
procedure as for the first combat. This second round of combats for Berserkers is resolved
immediately and applies solely to the Berserkers. They can attack alone, or in combination if their
locations allow. At the end of these combats, roll the die again for each victorious Berserker. All the
Berserkers still enraged then enter a third round of combat, and this procedure is repeated until all
the Berserkers have calmed down. Proceed in the same way in each of the Viking player’s game
turns. Note: The only movement permitted during these extra rounds are those achieved by this
group by advances after combat; no other movement is possible. A Berserker who ends his advance
without coming into contact with an enemy will automatically calm down.
3.2
HUSCARLS (SHIELDWALL)
Huscarls are armed with very large shields. During battles, their training allowed them to adopt a
11
special formation based on this weapon of defence. They stand in solid ranks with their shields
upright so as to form a continuous barrier. Such a formation does not allow them to attack or move
while they maintain the formation. This was, however, a very good protection against missiles and
enemy attacks.
In this game, the Anglo-Saxon player can adopt such a formation with his Huscarls by lining them
up side by side in groups of at least 3 characters (see diagram).
The two hex-sides that point to the front of each counter will
Diagram:
---Front line--form the front line. All the Huscarls forming the line are treated
^ ^ ^
as being in heavy cover in relation to missile-fire, and in favourable
Side | H | H | H |
terrain when they are attacked, whatever the type of terrain that they
^
^ ^ ^
occupy. However, these advantages only benefit them if the line of fire
------Rear-----or attack is made from the front; shooting and attacks from the sides and rear are resolved normally.
(End of page 11)
3.3
THE TWO-HANDED AXE
This rule allows certain characters to use a special fighting skill: combat with the two-handed axe.
This is limited to experienced warriors, but such a skill confers an extraordinary strength in attack
balanced by the fact that it also renders that character vulnerable in defence since he cannot use a
shield. In this game only those Viking and Anglo-Saxon characters carrying an axe and belonging
to one of the following troop types can use the rule: for the Vikings Jarls, Hirdmen and Berserkers,
and for the Anglo-Saxons Earls and Huscarls. Two other conditions must also be satisfied: the
character must be on foot and in full health.
At the time of starting the combats, the player concerned identifies those warriors who will attack
using their axes with both hands. On each of them he places an “axe” (‘hache’) marker in such a
way that it can be clearly seen. The marked characters will have their attack strength doubled during
the current combat phase. This also applies to the repeated attacks of Berserkers during that same
Combat Phase (see the special rule above). During the enemy player’s turn, the same characters will
be treated as being in an unfavourable situation (-) if they are attacked, a disadvantage which is
added to the calculation resulting from the type of terrain (+, 0 or -). When a shooter takes one as a
target, he subtracts 1 point from the die roll result before consulting the missile-fire results table.
The protection given by armour remains. When his game turn comes round again, a player can
decide to remove the axe marker from a character, or alternatively to leave it. If the axe marker is
removed, the character’s attack strength returns to normal and he no longer suffers any of the
defence disadvantages (for missile-fire and combat) consequent on this method of fighting.
3.4
HORSES AND THEIR RIDERS
When a rider is dismounted following combat or missile fire, the player to whom he belongs places the
appropriate counter - rider stunned, wounded or dead - on one of the hexes adjacent to his horse. In the
event that all the adjacent hexes are occupied, a friendly character is shifted one hex to make room for
the dismounted rider. If he is completely surrounded by enemies, a dismounted rider is automatically
killed. The horse itself remains in the same place and must be represented by its own counter (dead or
alive according to the result shown).
If a player decides to attack a riderless horse or a draft horse, he resolves the combat or missile fire in
the same way as for a mounted character. However, the results C, D, E and F for missile fire, and E, F,
G and H for combat, cause the death of the horse.
(End of page 12)
12
4.
RULES CONCERNING BOATS
4.1
DESCRIPTIONS OF THE BOATS
To make the visualisation of play easier, you can find on each boat: - a hex for the bow, designated
by an arrow indicating the usual direction of movement; - a hex for the stern, containing the helm
and designated for that by "G" (for ‘Gouvernail’), although there is an exception for Rowboats
which do not need a steersman; - a centre hex, indicated by a black spot, which is used as axis of
rotation when the ship changes course. All the hexes containing part of a boat can contain a
character, even if a majority of that boat hex shows a representation of water.
In VIKINGS, three types of boats are represented:
- The Drakkar - The Dragon Ship (Viking Longship): Very superior to the other ships of its
time, the Long ship combines robustness and speed. The bow and the stern are interchangeable
besides, which makes it possible for the Longship to be as fast going in reverse as it can go forward.
The only drawback from its size is its inertia: the Longship takes a fair amount of time to stop. Its
surface area occupies 22 hexes.
- The Galiote (Anglo-Saxon Ship): Made for the coastal traffic along the coasts, the galiote is a
relatively solid boat and easy to operate. Its principal handicap compared with the drakkar, is its low
speed. Its surface area occupies 16 hexes.
- The Rowboat: Intended as a fishing boat for rivers or very close to shore, the Rowboat is
obviously very handy but easy to capsize. Its surface area occupies 3 hexes.
[Note: The word ‘Ship’ has been used in this translation to refer to the Viking drakkar and the
Saxon galiote, while the word ‘Boat’ is used to cover all types of vessel including the Rowboats.]
4.2
ASSIGNMENT OF CREW TASKS
At the beginning of each naval phase, the players assign each character presents in their boats to one
of the following positions:
- Oarsman: To be able to row, a character must be in an edge hex of the boat, except for the bow
and stern hexes of the Viking longships and Anglo-Saxon ships. The character counters that
represent those manning the oars are faced towards the front of the boat (see diagram).
- Steersman: To be able to steer, a character must be in the helm hex (marked "G"). The character
is faced towards the front of the boat (see diagram). There can only be one steersman in a ship. A
Rowboat does not need a steersman to operate normally.
- Boarding party: These are characters in the boat that are ready to board. Those counters that are
in an edge hex of the ship are, however, faced outwards in order to distinguish them from the
oarsmen and the steersman (see diagram).
(End of page 13)
- Grappler: To be able to throw, recover or pull in a grappling hook, a character must be in an edge
hex of the boat containing a hook and its rope. When a character is ready to throw a grappling hook,
the hook marker is placed on him (see diagram). When a character is recovering a rope or pulling
on a grappled rope, the corresponding coil of rope marker is placed on him.
- Bailer: Any character present in the boat can bail out water. A "bucket" counter is placed on the
character. A character that is bailing cannot be given any other task.
Diagram of Assignment of the Crew: 1 steersman, 4 oarsmen, 1 grappler, 3 boarding party.
It is important not to confuse the assignment of tasks to characters (in the Naval Phases) with
the right to move them (in each player phase). The naval phases concern only the movements of
the boats and actions with the grappling hooks. During a Naval Phase, no character can move or
fight. Movement and combat involving boarding parties are carried out during the phases of each
player turn, at the same time as movement and combat on land.
During either Naval Phase, it is possible to change the current assignment of a character if his
13
position in the boat allows it. Example: a character can stop rowing to prepare for boarding. On the
other hand, a character that is bailing in the middle of the boat cannot start rowing. To do that, the
player concerned would have to first move him to a ship edge hex during his own player turn.
4.21 How does the assignment of character tasks influence the conduct of the game?
The assignment of the characters is significant in three fields:
1) The speed of the boat. The maximum speed of the ship is calculated, in fact, from the number of
characters assigned to the oars (see later the section on Determination of Speed Rule 4.3).
2) Missile-fire. Only characters ready to board can shoot. In addition, the cover of the characters
changes according to their assignment. Those that row and those that steer benefit from medium
cover (due to protection from the sides of the ship and the shields lined along the hull). The others
benefit only from light cover because they are necessarily more exposed.
(End of page 14)
3) Combat. During combats that occur after a naval phase, characters in the boarding party are
considered to be in an advantageous position (+), in both attack and defence. All others are in a
disadvantaged position (-) in defence, and neutral (0) in attack. Not also that only a character in the
boarding party can try to cut a grappled rope (see cutting the grappling hooks, page 22 Rule 4.64).
Boat characteristics
Maximum number of oarsmen
Maximum speed forwards
Maximum speed backwards
Actual speed
Acceleration and
+1 **
deceleration conditions needed
+2 or -2
Viking Drakkar
Saxon Galiote
14
10
8
5
8
2
Equal to the number of pairs of oarsmen *
At least 1 pair of
At least 1 pair of
oarsmen
oarsmen
Rowboat
2
2
2
At least 1
oarsman
At least 3 pairs of
oarsmen
+3 or -3
At least 6 pairs of
oarsmen
Effect of different types of movement on ship speed
Straight line
None
Sideways movement
Speed –1
Turning: Speed
Speed –2
At least 3 pairs of
oarsmen
-
2 oarsmen
None
None
Speed –1
None
None
None
Restrictions
Number of points of hull
damage before a ship sinks
Effect of damage on speed
Max 60°, 2 per phase
11
No restrictions
1
Max 60°, 1 per phase
19
-
-1 per 3 points of hull damage
Effect of damage on
-1 per 6 points of hull damage
acceleration
* A drakkar can move at a speed of 8 with 7 pairs of Viking oarsmen rowing.
** A ship with no-one rowing will lose speed at 1 Movement Point per phase.
4.3
SPEED DETERMINATION
After having assigned their crews, the players allot a speed to each one of their boats. To allot a
speed to a boat, a player must take into account three factors: the characteristics of the boat
concerned, the number of oarsmen and the speed of the boat at the end of the preceding naval phase.
(End of page 15)
4.31 Characteristics of various types of boat
The table above summarizes the characteristics of the various types of boats present in the game.
14
These characteristics show movement under oar. Taking into account the scale of size of the
scenarios, movements under sail do not have to be taken into account.
4.32 The number of oarsmen
The number of oarsmen influences the maximum speed of the boat as well as its ability to
accelerate or to decelerate. For the drakkar and the galiotes, count the number of oarsmen that are in
the boat and form pairs with a character on each edge hex of the boat: one on the port side and the
other on the starboard side. The maximum speed of the drakkar or the galiote for the naval phase in
progress is equal to the number of pairs thus obtained. The two characters forming each pair do not
need to be set up symmetrically, but they must always be on opposite boat hex edges. Any extra
oarsmen on one side are not taken into account. Example: a galiote with 4 oarsmen on one side and
2 oarsmen on the other side will only count as two pairs of oarsmen. Its speed cannot thus be greater
than 2.
Two special rules apply: 1) A drakkar can reach a maximum speed of 8 if it has 7 pairs of Viking
oarsmen on the boat edge hexes. This represents the performance of the boat as well as that of the
crew. 2) The speed of Rowboats is calculated as follows: - 1 oarsman in a Rowboat hex: speed and
acceleration/deceleration of 1. - 2 oarsmen: speed and acceleration/deceleration of 2. Oarsmen can
be placed in any of the three Rowboat hexes. Note: Wounded characters and elderly characters can
row and steer normally. Female characters can only row in Rowboats.
4.33 Speed of the boat at the end of the preceding naval phase
Each boat has a capacity of acceleration and deceleration, which enables it to modify its acquired
speed. Thus a drakkar, with 6 pairs of oarsmen and a speed of 2 during the preceding phase, can
either accelerate to a speed of 5, or decelerate to -1. The player can thus select any speed ranging
between -1 and +5. Note! A boat that is damaged or held by grappling hooks sees its speed and its
capacity to change speed reduced or even cancelled (see the table above and the section on
"Movement and Grappling Hooks" page 22 Rule 4.63).
4.34 How to use the speed markers
The players select in secrecy the speed marker counter corresponding to the selected speed for each
boat and place it face down on the marker for the preceding phase. When all the markers have been
placed, they are turned over. The players then can thus verify the speed of each boat to see if it is
compatible with its characteristics, the number of pairs of oarsmen and its speed in the preceding
turn. The markers corresponding to the speed of the preceding turn are not removed until the end of
each phase because they may need to be used for calculation of the effective speed in the event of
collision (see Collisions page 18, Rule 4.5).
(End of page 16)
4.4
MOVING THE BOATS
4.41 Initiative
The fastest boat - that which has highest effective speed (see calculation of effective speed page 19
Rule 4.52) - moves first. In the event of equal speeds, the drakkar takes priority over the galiote,
which takes priority over the Rowboat. If the two boats are of same type, roll a die. The boat that
obtains the higher number will move first.
4.42 How to move the boats?
Each phase of movement is divided into sequences. Within each sequence, each boat carries out a
move (the various types of movement are explained later). The number of sequences that a boat can
carry out is related to its speed. Continue in this way until all the boats have used as many
movement points as indicated on their speed marker.
Example: 2 drakkars (speed 5 and 8), a galiote (speed 4) and 2 boats (speed 1 and 2) are presents
during a Naval Phase. Sequence 1: both drakkars are moved one hex in a straight line, then the
15
galiote, then the 2 Rowboats. Sequence 2: As before, but only the second Rowboat is moved (the
first having reached the speed selected). Sequences 3 and 4: As before, but without the second
Rowboat. Sequence 5: Only the two drakkars are moved one hex because the galiote has reached its
indicated speed. Sequence 6: The second drakkar carries out a turn, which decreases its speed by 2
points to him (see below) and thus leaves it on 6. The Naval Phase is now finished. Continue in the
same way with each new Naval Phase, taking account of any changing of speed.
4.43 Various types of movement
Three types of movement are possible:
1 - Movement in straight line: This movement can be forwards or backwards (see diagram). It
causes no loss of speed.
2 – Sideways (lateral) movement: This is always carried out in the direction of the travel (see
diagram). Galiotes and Rowboats: no loss of speed. Drakkars: speed reduced by one point *.
3 - Change of course: This is carried out by a turn on the axis of the hex marked with a black spot
(see diagram). Speed is reduced by 1 point for the galiotes and 2 points for the drakkars *, with a
maximum rotation of 60 degrees. There is no reduction of speed and turns are free for Rowboats.
* The speed marker counter is changed immediately.
Note: Lateral movements and changes of course are prohibited if they lead to an immediate
collision with another boat, except if that other boat is a Rowboat, in which case it is pushed. Two
Rowboats cannot push each other.
Straight line (forward / back) Lateral move (left or right)
| | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | |è |
| ç| G | | | l | | > |è |
| |G| | |l| | > |
| | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | |è |
Abbreviations: G = stern; l = centre axis (mast); > = bow;
èø = bow after movement; G = stern after turn.
|
|
|
|
Turn (60º left or right)
| | |G| | | | | |
| | | | | |ö| | |
| | | | | | | | |
| |G| | |l | | >| |
| | | | | | | | |
| | | | | |ø| | |
| | |G| | | | | |
(End of page 17)
Within each movement sequence, the players are free to choose one of the three possible moves for
each one of their boats. However, as seen above, certain moves cause a loss of speed. To carry out a
move, a boat must thus still have sufficient speed points: the modified speed must not be less than
the sequence in progress. If this is not the case, movement is impossible and the player must choose
another move. Example: A drakkar has a speed of 7. It carries out 3 moves in a straight line, then a
turn of 60 degrees. Its speed is altered to 5 (7-2). For its last movement, it has no choice: it must
move one hex forwards in a straight line.
Important: When ships change from forward movement to reverse movement (or vice versa),
during a single Naval Phase, it cannot start its move until the second sequence of movement. This
takes account of the inertia from the preceding naval phase.
4.44 Running aground
To run aground on a beach, it is essential for a boat to reach the first beach hex with its bow or its
stern, and possibly at the same time a boat side hex may also reach the beach (see the diagram
below). A boat which has a speed equal to or lower than 3 will automatically stop in the first beach
hex that it enters. A ship which has a speed higher than 3 will not stop until the second beach hex.
But watch out for rocks! A boat that ends its move on a slope hex (or a rocks hex on ‘The Coast’
map) runs full tilt onto the rocks. Treat this situation as if it were a frontal collision with a boat
travelling at the same speed (see the later section on Collisions Rule 4.5).
16
4.45 Launching into the water
To launch or re-launch a boat into the water is a movement that must be carried out in a straight line
as long as any boat hex is on the beach. The speed of a boat that has been launched into the water
cannot be higher than 1 as long as not all of the boat hexes are on sea hexes. Launching a drakkar or
a galiote requires at least 4 characters to push it. For a Rowboat, one character pushing is enough.
|
|
|
|
|
| P1 | P2b |
b |
b The characters who push must be set
out on both sides of the boat, on beach
hexes or on sea hexes adjacent to the
beach (i.e. shallow water hexes) (as
with the characters marked with a "P"
in the diagram to the left).
|
|
| s | s | s | s | s | b | b |
|
| G | s | s | l | s | > | b | b
|
|
| s | s | s | s | s | P3b | b |
|
|
|
|
|
| P4 | b | b | b
Abbreviations: s = ship, b = beach, blank = deep water.
P1 + P4 are pushing in shallow water, P2 + P3 on beach.
4.5
COLLISIONS
There is a collision each time that a ship carries out a move in a straight line and enters with its bow
or its stern into a hex occupied by another ship. A collision can be voluntary or involuntary, in
particular when a ship has acquired too high a speed. A ship cannot cause a collision by a lateral
move or a change of course.
(End of page 18)
4.51 Various types of collision
- Bow (Frontal) Collision: This occurs between two boats navigating along the same axis and in
opposed directions (diagram 1). When the damage is calculated, it is the sum of the speeds of the
two boats that is counted.
- Stern (Rear) Collision: This occurs between two boats navigating along the same axis and in the
same direction (diagram 1). Here, it is the difference in speeds between the two boats which is taken
into account for the calculation of damage.
- Side (Lateral) Collision: This occurs when one boat strikes another boat at an angle of 60 or 120
degrees (diagram 2). Only the speed of the boat that hits will be taken into account during the
calculation of damage.
Special situations: It can happen that movement in a straight line leads to a collision with a hex
other than the bow or the stern. In this case, instead of carrying out a move in a straight line, the
boat makes lateral move (diagram 3). So the two boats scrape past one another. This special move
does not decrease the speed of the boat, even if it involves a drakkar.
Diagram 1
| | | | | | | |
| | ð | | >á< | | ï |
| | | | | | | |
|
|
|
|
|ð|
|
|
|
|
|
| >áG |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|ð|
|
|
Diagram 2
Diagram 3
| | |
|
|
| |
| |
| | | | | | | | |
| | |
|
| |
|
| |
| | | | |è| | | |
|ø| |
|
|
| |÷|
| |ð| |> | | | |
|
|
| | |
|
| |
|
| |
| | | | |< | |ï| |
|
|
|
|↘|
|
|
|↙|
|
| s |á| s | s |á| s | s |
17
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|ç|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
ð = direction of travel of ship; > or ↘ = bow of ship; G = stern of ship; s = side of ship
á = impact; è = bow of ship after lateral move
4.52 Calculating the damage
1. Calculation of the Effective Speed. To know the results of each collision, it is necessary to first
determine the Effective Speed of each boat at the time of the impact.
Two situations may occur:
a)
The boat has no change of speed at the beginning of the phase. In the case of a boat with a
constant speed, the Effective Speed is equal to that shown on its speed marker, irrespective of the
particular moment during the phase that the collision occurred.
b)
The boat changed its speed at the beginning of the phase. The new speed dose not become
effective immediately. To keep it simple, consider that a boat reaches its new speed once it travels a
number of hexes at least equal to the acceleration or deceleration chosen. In other words, for each
hex crossed, a boat increases or decreases its speed by 1 point until it reaches its new speed. For a
collision, the Effective Speed will thus be calculated from the number of hexes crossed before the
collision occurred. If this number is equal to or higher than the difference between the new speed
and the speed during the preceding phase, the Effective Speed is the same as that shown on the
speed marker. If this number is less than that difference, the Effective Speed is the same as the
speed of the preceding turn plus the number of hexes crossed in the event of acceleration, or minus
the number of hexes crossed in the event of deceleration.
(End of Page 19)
Examples: A galiote has a speed of 4, after having had a speed of 2 in the preceding Naval Phase.
During its second move, it hits a drakkar laterally. Its Effective Speed is 3 (2+1), because it only
crossed one hex before entering into the collision. Another example: a drakkar has a speed of -1 in
the preceding phase and +1 this phase. Motionless at the time of the first move, it moves forward in
the second sequence and hits a boat laterally. As its Effective Speed is 0, there is no true collision
but merely a blocking of its movement.
2. Calculation of the Speed Factor (SF*) depending on the type of collision. The speed factor is
always calculated from the Effective Speed of each boat at the time of the collision (see above).
Depending on the type of collision, the Speed Factor (SF) is calculated as follows, A being the boat
which rams and B the boat that is rammed. [* In French this is called ‘Fv’ for “facteur vitesse”.]
Frontal collision:
SF = (Speed of Boat A + Speed of Boat B) x 2
Rear collision:
SF = (Speed of Boat A - Speed of Boat B) x 2
Lateral collision:
SF = Speed of Boat A x 2
3. Calculation of the damage. The player concerned rolls one die and adds to the number on the
die the Speed Factor obtained by the calculation above *. The total thus obtained will correspond to
a line of results in the Collision Table on the Game Aid Card. This result is applied immediately to
the boats concerned. Each player notes the damage inflicted on his boat on a separate sheet (see
Section 7 - Marking the Damage Points). In the event of lateral collision, the boat which rams is less
affected: it applied the result from the line above that applied to the rammed boat and the damage
that should affect the hull is not taken counted **.
* If the Speed Factor is 0, the collision has no effect.
** Exception: A boat whose bow or stern is already damaged (with 1 Damage Point or more) will
suffer damage to its hull whatever the type of collision if it rams a boat again with that same hex.
Let us see now in more detail what can be the consequences of a collision. A collision affects the
crew, the hull and may also affect the speed of the boats.
- The crew. Depending to the strength of the impact, the two characters located one in the hex that
18
rams and the other in the hex that is rammed, may be stunned, wounded or killed. Some other
members of the crew will also be affected. The result is applied to the crew of each boat before
continuing with the remaining naval movement for that phase. If, because of the collision, the
number of oarsmen no longer matches the speed indicated, the speed is modified as a result.
- The state of the hull. The hex that rams and the hex that is rammed will suffer 1 to 6 points of
damage. However, in the event of a lateral collision, only the hull of the rammed boat suffers
damage (Exception: see ** above). Above one Damage Point, a leak is declared. After this, the
water level inside the boat increases during each Naval Phase (see Section 7 – Recording Damage
Points). A hex that has suffered one Damage Point (or more) cannot be used any more for rowing or
steering. Characters can, however, continue to make normal use of it during their movement.
- The speed of the boat. Depending on the type of collision, the speed of each boat is decreased or
even reduced to zero (see the Collision Table on the Game Aid Card). When the speed of a boat has
been reduced to zero, it cannot hit a different boat if that were possible until it has crossed at least
one more hex before the new collision (see above Calculation of Effective Speed Rule 4.52.1).
(End of Page 20)
The Rowboat. If a drakkar or a galiote hits a Rowboat, the Rowboat capsizes automatically (it is
removed from the game board) and the characters fall into the water (the player responsible for the
collision places them on the hexes previously occupied by the boat or, if there is no room, on an
adjacent sea hex). The drakkar or the galiote does not undergo any damage but its speed is reduced
by 1 point. If a Rowboat hits a drakkar, a galiote or another Rowboat, the collision has no effect.
4.6
GRAPPLING
The grappling hook is an essential weapon used to bring naval actions closer. It is used to stop the
functioning of an enemy ship, by decreasing its capacity of operation, and is used by a member of
the boarding party. In this game, grappling hooks can be thrown up to a maximum distance of 5
hexes. Count the target hex (the edge hex of the enemy boat), but do not count the starting hex, in
other words that of the thrower.
Important: The rules that follow explain how to throw, or pull in the rope from a grappling hook.
All these actions are not possible if there is an enemy in an adjacent hex to the grappler and in
the same boat. On the other hand, the presence of an enemy on another boat has no effect, even if
on an adjacent hex.
4.61 Description of the markers
Each grappling hook is represents by two markers. One represents the hook itself, the other the rope
that is attached to it. For greater realism, we recommend that, before starting play, you connect each
hook marker to a rope marker with a piece of sewing thread 5 hexes long (make a small hole in the
circle already provided with this in mind on each marker). In this way you will be able to
immediately visualise the influence of the hooks on the movement of the boats.
At the beginning of each scenario, each hook is placed in the location chosen by the player
concerned. A hook marker is always placed on top of a rope marker. There can only be one hook
stored in one hex. One can, however, try to grapple a hook onto a hex where another hook is stored.
4.62 Throwing and recovering the grappling hooks
Only a character on a hex containing a hook and given that task can throw it. A character can only
make one attempt per Naval Phase. The exact moment to throw each hook can be decided freely by
each player. Throwing the hook always takes place between two movement sequences, i.e. after all
boats have carried out one move and before they start the next. It is not possible to throw several
hooks into the same hex. You can, however, try to throw several hooks into different hexes.
19
(End of Page 21)
To determine if the attempt succeeds, roll the die: if the number obtained is a equal to or higher
than twice the distance that separates the thrower from the target hex, the throw is successful
(remember that the 0 on the die counts as 10). Places the hook marker on the relevant hex. If the
number is lower, the throw fails. The hook marker is placed on a sea hex adjacent to the target hex.
During the next Naval Phase, the character (or another that may have taken his place) will be able to
recover the hook. This action is treated as being completed at the end of the Phase. The hook
marker is then placed back on the relevant rope marker. The hook is now ready for a new attempt.
Note: When he throws a hook, a wounded character, elderly character or female character must
deduct 2 points from the number obtained on the die. It is the modified number that is used in
relation to the double distance test.
4.63 Grappled movement
During a Naval Phase in which a grapple succeeds, the roped boats can continue their movement up
to a maximum stretch of the rope of 2 hexes more than the distance separating the boats at the time
of the throw. However, the distance between the two boats cannot exceed the total length of the
rope, i.e. 5 hexes. During the following Phases, the two grappled boats continue to move normally
but the length of the rope can never exceed its length during the preceding Phase. If a straight line
move breaks this rule, the move is replaced by a lateral move, without any speed penalty for
drakkars. If a lateral move is also impossible lateral without breaking this rule, the boat stops. For
greater realism, you can adopt the optional rule proposed at the end of the booklet (see "The
toughness of hemp" page 27 Rule 5.3).
Note: When a Rowboat grapples onto a galiote (Anglo-Saxon Ship) or a drakkar (Viking Longship),
the latter carries on its course with its speed reduced by 1 point, pulling the Rowboat behind it.
Here are two examples of throwing a hook. The first shows a galiote grappling at a range of 2 hexes
a drakkar sailing close by and in the same direction. The second shows a drakkar grappling at a
range of 4 hexes a galiote sailing in the opposite direction. In the first case, the drakkar carries on its
way normally stretching the rope to a length of 4 hexes (i.e. 2 at the time of the throw + 2). Then, it
must copy the speed of the galiote. In the second example, as soon as the galiote has moved one
hex, it is forced to move laterally to the left, all other movement being impossible.
Diagram 1: same direction
Diagram 2: different directions
| | | | | | | s| s | s| s | s | s|s |
| | | | | | | s | s | s| s | s | s|s |
| | | | | |G| | | |l| | 7|
| | | | | |ï|3 | |l| | |G|
|
ð|
| | | | | | | s| s | s| s | s | s|s |
| | | | | | | s | s | gs | s | s | s | s |
| s | s | s | s | s | // | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | // |
| | | |
|
|
| | | | |
| G | | | l | 4 | gð| | | | | | | | | | | | | G | s | | // |
| s | s| s | s| s | | | | | | | |
| | | | s | | s | // | |
| | | |
|
|
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | s | |s | |
| | | | |
| | | | | | | | | | | | |
| | | | | s |l|s | |
| | | |
|
|
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | s |5 |s |
| | | | |
| | | | | | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | s |ø| |
| | | |
|
|
4 ð = speed, bow and direction of travel; l = mast; G = stern; s = ship side; g = grappler; // = rope
4.64 Cutting the grapples
If a character given the task of boarding is in the hex where a hook has been thrown, he can try to
20
cut the rope. The player concerned rolls the die:
- 1, 2 or 3: the cord is cut (and the grappling hook is removed from the game) and the two boats can
now move normally, so long as there are no other hooks;
- 4 and above: the rope is not cut and the boats remain grappled together.
A character can only carry out one attempt per Naval Phase. A character given a task other than
boarding cannot cut the grapple. A wounded character, elderly character or female character adds 1
point to the result of the die roll. It is the modified number that is taken into account to determine if
the action succeeds.
(End of Page 22)
Note: For tactical reasons, a character can freely try to cut a hook that a character of its own side
has thrown. The attempt is carried out under exactly same conditions as above.
4.65 Pulling the boats together
At the end the Naval Phase, each player can try to use the grappling hooks that he has thrown
successfully to decrease the distance between the boats concerned. To be able to pull a grapple,
a character must be on the hex containing the corresponding rope marker and have been given
that task. The result of this action is a function of the number of hooks that connect the two
boats, although the ropes that are not being pulled by anyone are not taken into account. It is
always the lightest boat that moves: a Rowboat is lighter than a galiote which is lighter than a
drakkar. In the event of equality, it is the boat which is pulling that moves. The boat that moves
keeps its initial orientation. Movement is one hex for 1 grapple, 2 hexes for 2 grapples and 3
hexes for 3 grapples or more (see diagram 1).
Special situation: When the two boats are already one hex apart and the angle of the rope is
equal to 60º, pull the boat concerned round so that the two boats lie side by side (see diagram 2).
Diagram 1: Two grapples
|
|
|
|1 |1 |1 |1 |1 |
|
|
|
|
|1 |
|
|
|
|1 |
|
|
|
| 2 | 12 r| 12 | 12 r| 12 | 1 |
|
|
Diagram 2: Pulling round
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|1 |1 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|1 |
|1 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| 1 r|
|1 |
|
|
|
|
|
| 2 | 2 r| 12 | 2 | 12 |
|
|
|
|
| 2 | r|
|
r|
| 2 |
|
|
| t | t | 2 r| 2 | 2 r| 2 | 2 |
|
|
|
t |
| t r|
|
r|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| 2 | r|
|1 |
| 12 |
|
|
| t |
| t |
r|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| 2 r| 2 | 2 | 12 | 12 |
|
|
|
|
| t |
| t r|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| t | t r| t | t | t | t | t |
|
|
|
| t |
| t |
|
|
|
|
|
| t |
|
|
|
|
|
| t |
|
|
|
|
| t | t |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| t | t | t | t | t | t | t |
|
|
t = edges of target / non-moving boat; 1 / 2 = first and second position of moving boat; r = rope
Note: Due to the tension of the rope, it is not possible to unhook a grapple. You can only cut it!
4.66 Special rules
A character can tip a grappling hook (hook marker + rope marker) overboard so as not to leave
it for the enemy. To do this, he must be given this task at the beginning of a Naval Phase (put
the hook and rope markers on top of him). A character can also carry a grappling hook, e.g. into
another boat. In this case, his Movement Allowance is reduced by 2 points while carrying it.
21
4.7
RECORDING DAMAGE POINTS
During the Naval Phase, the players note on a separate sheet the damage suffered by their boats in
each collision. To make things easier, you can photocopy the boat charts that are at the end of this
booklet (sections 6 and 7). To identify each boat, write the name of the Jarl or Earl commanding it,
or if there is none, the name of the strongest warrior on board. Two types of damage can occur at
the time of a collision:
- When there is only 1 Damage Point, the hex is damaged but there is no leak. The hex becomes
unusable for rowing or steering. Characters can, however, enter it normally during their movement.
(End of Page 23)
- When there are 2 Damage Points or more, the affected hex suffers the same restrictions as above,
but, in addition, a leak is declared. When a leak is declared, it requires the player to add that same
number of Damage Points at the end of each new Naval Phase. This represents the fact that the level
of water on board will continue to rise during each Phase. Characters on board that are bailing can
limit the damage. For each pair of characters given the task of bailing, the player can subtract one
Damage Point from the total. However, this total can never be less than the number of collisions
suffered by the boat during the game.
The total of the damages suffered by a boat will influence its maximum speed and its capacity to
accelerate. This is logical: the water rises and weighs down the boat. For each 3 points of damage,
the maximum speed is decreased by 1 point. For each 6 points, acceleration is decreased by 1 point.
Example: a drakkar with 10 points of damage has a maximum speed of 5 and an acceleration of 2.
When a drakkar reaches 20 points of damage, a galiote 12 points, and a Rowboat 2 points, the boat
sinks. The boat counter is removed from the game board. The characters on board are placed in the
sea hexes corresponding to the boat hexes that they occupied before. If it is in this situation, a boat
that runs aground does not sink, but it cannot be refloated: it remains immobilised until the end of
the game.
A boat attached by one or more grappling hooks to a boat that sinks suffers 5 extra Damage Points
per Naval Phase once the boat has sunk. The characters on board should obviously try to cut the
grapples before it is too late.
When a hex that has suffered one Damage Point receives a second Damage Point from another
collision, a leak is declared. Take account of this in the recording of damage.
Example of Calculating Damage Points: The galiote (Anglo-Saxon ship) commanded by Earl
Edwin has been grappled and caught by two drakkars (Viking longships). During the current Naval
Phase, it suffered a collision and collected 2 Damage Points. In the preceding Naval Phase, it had
suffered a collision and collected 1 Damage Point. Two Naval Phases previously, it had suffered a
collision resulting in 3 Damage Points by a drakkar at full speed! Its Damage Points add up as
follows:
Points of damage from preceding phases: 3+3+1 = 7
Points of damage in the phase that is just finishing: 3+2 = 5.
Total Damage Points taken by the boat: 12
As you can see, the collisions resulting in more than one point of damage are counted afresh in each
new phase because the water rises in the boat. Meanwhile, our Anglo-Saxon has put 6 characters to
work bailing out, which enables him to subtract 3 Damage Points from the total, giving 12 minus 3
= 9. That is just as well, since without it the boat would sink… But this is only a delay, because the
galiote from now on will gets 5 additional Damage Points in each phase because of the two serious
collisions that it suffered. In other words, if the number of characters bailing remains unchanged,
the galiote will sink two Naval Phases later.
(End of Page 24)
22
4.8
MOVEMENT AND COMBAT ON BOATS
4.81 Assignment of character tasks
Whatever the assignment of tasks during the Naval Phase, all the characters of one player can
move and fight during the phase of the player concerned. Even if it does not have an influence
on movement, the task of the characters does however have an influence on combat:
the affected characters in the boarding party are considered to be in a favourable
situation (+) both in attack and in defence.
the affected characters on any other task than boarding are considered to be in a neutral
situation (0) for attack and in an unfavourable situation (-) in defence.
These differences in situation are counted during combat in the same way as the advantages or
disadvantages due to terrain (see Terrain Effects on Combat page 9 Rule 2.71).
4.82 The speed of the boats
Movements and combat are not possible between two boats unless the difference between their
respective speeds is nil or at most equal to 1. In the same way, movements and combat between
a boat and land, or between a boat and sea hexes adjacent to a beach, are not possible unless the
speed of the boat is 0, 1 or -1.
4.83 Boarding and disembarkation
In the majority of cases, embarking onto or disembarking from a boat costs some additional
Movement Points. All these modifiers are listed in the Boarding and Disembarkation Table on
the Game Aid card (9.2).
1) Helping a character to climb on board. A character that does not have enough Movement
Points to climb up into a boat edge hex can be helped by a friendly character. This character
must be adjacent at the beginning of his turn to both the climbing character and to the boat hex
concerned. The helping character will not be able to move during the player turn.
Note: This action is impossible if the character who needs assistance is wounded, or if the
character offering assistance is adjacent to an enemy in a position to attack, or even if there is an
enemy in the boat adjacent to the boat hex into which the character wants to climb.
2) Loading a horse aboard. It is possible to make a horse go into or out of a galiote or a
drakkar, subject to the following restrictions:
- the boat must be totally stopped (speed = 0);
- the horse must be without a rider and led by the bridle; it must enter or leave by a boat edge
hex, except the bow (arrow) and stern ("G") hexes. During navigation, it is mandatory that the
horse must be in the hexes located in the middle of the boat. A horse cannot enter a Rowboat.
4.84 Infiltration (challenges)
The infiltration rule (see page 7 Rule 2.54) does not apply when the hex crossed is a boat hex
and the enemy is located on another boat, in the sea or on land. It does apply, on the other hand,
when the hex crossed is a land or sea hex and the enemy is on an adjacent boat hex.
(End of Page 25)
4.85 Characters in deep water
All characters in a deep water hex at the beginning of their turn must pass a Drowning Test
before being able to move. The player concerned rolls the die: on 1 or 2 the character drowns, 3
or more and the character floats and carries on swimming. Once the test has been successfully
passed, the character is moved normally. The test is repeated each game turn of the player
concerned so long as the character remains in deep water. Wounded characters add 1 to the dieroll result, and the modified number is counted.
Note: Remember that characters in armour will drown automatically when they fall into the
water, unless the water hex is adjacent to a beach. Wounded characters that do not have
23
sufficient movement points to enter another water hex will also drown.
4.86 Combat
Ship/Ship: As soon as the respective speeds of the ships allow, characters can freely fight from
one ship to another. The ship hexes on which they stand will have no effect on combat. The only
factor to count is the crew task chosen during the previous Naval Phase. [“Ship” in this context
also applies to rowboats.]
Ship/Land: When attacked by enemy characters that are on land, a character on a ship is always
treated as being in favourable terrain (+). The character on land merely takes account of the type
of terrain on which he stands. Note: If one of the attackers is also on the ship, the advantage
from the ship does not apply. When a character on a ship attacks a character on land, the ship
does not offer any special advantage.
Ship/Sea: When involved in combat with a character in the sea, a character on a ship is always
treated as being in favourable terrain (+) in both attack and defence. Characters in the sea are
always in unfavourable terrain (-). A character in deep water can never attack a ship hex
belonging to a drakkar or Saxon ship. He can, however, attack a character in a rowboat.
Remember that a character in the sea can attempt to pull himself up into an empty ship hex, if
the speed of the ship allows.
5.
OPTIONAL RULES
Before starting a game, the players can agree to apply one or more of the following rules to the
scenario.
5.1
Errare humanum est
To err is human... There is great confusion during combats. To simulate this state of events, each time
that a shooter misses his target, the player concerned rolls the die a second time to see if he has
wounded a character nearby by mistake. If he rolls a number from 1 to 6, the projectile will end its
flight in one of the 6 hexes around the target and wound any character there. Characters in armour will
not be wounded but will immediately retreat 2 hexes. Obviously if the line of fire is blocked by an
obstacle, the character cannot be hit.
Note: Before rolling the die, allocate a number to each of the 6 hexes around the target. For mounted
targets take as the centre the front part of the counter containing the little black arrow.
(End of page 26)
5.2
Patching a leak
With the help of skins, oakum and pieces of wood, it is possible to patch up a breach sufficiently
until the ship can be repaired properly in a dry dock. This is a delicate operation, much more
difficult to carry out if combats are raging on board. In the game, a character standing on a damaged
ship hex can attempt to patch the leak in question. To do this, he must be given this task in the
Naval Phase and must not be adjacent to an enemy until the end of the subsequent Naval Phase (in
other words, the Naval Phase when he is given the task, a player turn, and the Naval Phase that
follows). The player concerned rolls the die and adds to the number obtained the damage points
affecting the breach minus 1 (e.g. a breach with 3 damage points adds 2 points to the die-roll). If the
result is:
• 2 or 3: The hole is repaired and the relevant damage points are not carried forward to each new
Phase.
• 4 or 5: The hole is temporarily repaired. The relevant damage points are not counted in this
Phase.
• 6 or more: The pressure of water foils the attempt. The relevant damage is carried forward
normally on the Ship Chart.
24
So long as there is no contact with an enemy character, the character can continue his attempts in
each new Naval Phase until a successful repair is made.
5.3
The toughness of hemp
In this period, ships’ ropes were manufactured from vegetable fibres, generally from woven hemp.
Although very strong, they cannot compare to steel cables. Thus, when a grappling hook is thrown
between two ships that are moving in opposite directions (at 120° or 180°), the strength of the rope
should be tested. This is the situation where the rope is placed under the greatest tension while the
inertia of the ships continues in contrary directions. To determine the result, roll the die and add the
sum of the speeds of the two ships. If the result is equal to or greater than 15, the rope breaks and
the two ships continue normally on their original course (and the grappling hook is removed from
the game).
5.4
Is there a pilot on the drakkar?
A drakkar or Saxon galley without a steersman can only move in a straight line and cannot increase
its speed. A drakkar or Saxon galley whose steering hex has been damaged loses 1 extra point of
speed each time that it moves other than in a straight line. It can, however, increase or decrease its
speed normally.
(End of page 27: final page of rules booklet.)
5.5
Special rules from the Scenarios
(1) Treasure (scenarios 2 and 3): To seize a treasure a character only has to move onto the hex
containing a treasure marker during his Movement Phase. If he stops, he will be able to pick up the
treasure (if there is one) in the next Movement Phase, so long as he is not adjacent to an enemy able
to attack. A character who is carrying a treasure has his Movement Allowance reduced by 2
Movement Points. If a character carrying a treasure attacks or is attacked, he must drop his treasure.
To pick it up again, he must not be adjacent to an enemy able to attack. One of the scenarios
includes dummy markers: if the character passes through a treasure hex without stopping, the
marker can be turned over (revealing whether it is a dummy marker or a real treasure).
(2) Good swimmers (scenario 3): All the Peasant characters are good swimmers. They do not have
to take the drowning test.
(3) Goats and pigs (scenario 3): Movement of goats and pigs is the same as that of riderless horses.
Their defence strength is 1. These animals cannot swim. A character can cross a hex containing a
pig or goat; he can even stop there. In such a case he is considered to be in unfavourable terrain
during combat (cumulative with the terrain type of the hex and the crew task of the character).
(4) Movement of women (scenario 6): The character Hilda is given a Movement Allowance of 8.
(5) Low tide (scenario 6): A sandbar is revealed by the tide for a period of 11 complete game turns.
The designated sea hexes become ordinary beach hexes. Boats cannot cross these hexes, and a boat
on one of these hexes will be automatically beached until the first Naval Phase of the turn that the
tide rises again. For characters, the relevant hexes become shallow water hexes on the 12th turn and
then normal deep water hexes (subject to the standard rules for deep water) on the 13th turn.
Following page 27, the Rules Booklet has one blank page headed “NOTES” (page 28) and two
pages of Ship Charts that are shown below: one contains diagrams of 3 Viking drakkars, and one
has 3 Saxon galleys. The back cover contains the index (see the contents page at the beginning of
this translation).
On the Ship Charts on the next two pages the letter ‘G’ stands for ‘Gouvernail’, the French word
for Helm; the Steersman stands in this stern hex to operate the steering oar.
25
6.
VIKING DRAKKAR CHART
x
ç
x
G
l
x
x
x
x
ç
G
l
x
x
x
x
ç
G
l
x
x
(End of page 29)
26
7.
SAXON GALLEY CHART
x
x
x
x
ç
G
l
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
ç
G
l
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
ç
G
l
x
x
x
(End of page 30)
27
x
8.
GAME TABLES: SIDE 1
8.1
Shooting die roll modifiers
Range
Distance
Die Roll Modifier
Short
1-10 hexes
Normal die roll
Shooter wounded
Medium
11-25 hexes
+1 on die roll
+1 on die roll
Shooter on a boat
Target in armour
+1 on die roll
+1 on die roll
Long
26-50 hexes
+2 on die roll
Other modifiers
8.2
Missile Results Tables
Die roll
Target on horseback: cover type
Target on foot: cover type
None
Light
Medium
None
Light
Medium Heavy
1
D
C
B
C
B
B
A
2
C
B
A
B
B
A
3
B
A
B
A
A
4
A
A
A
5
A
6+
Explanation of results: mounted characters
Shot misses. No effect
A
Offensive fire: Rider immediately retreats 4 hexes (*)
Defensive fire: Rider’s movement is reduced by 4 hexes this turn
B
Horse unharmed, rider stunned and dismounted
C
Offensive fire: Horse unharmed, rider wounded
Defensive fire: As above plus A – Rider wounded and movement is reduced by 4 hexes
D
Horse killed, rider wounded and dismounted
Explanation of results: characters on foot
Shot misses. No effect
A
Offensive fire: Character immediately retreats 2 hexes (*)
Defensive fire: Character’s movement is reduced by 2 hexes this turn
B
Offensive fire: Character wounded
Defensive fire: Character wounded and can only move half remaining movement (rounded
down)
C
Character is killed
(*) The target character must retreat immediately. For more details, see the note below the table for
combat against characters on foot (8.8).
8.3
Characters that have a 2-handed axe
VIKINGS
Jarls
Hirdmen
Berserkers
Svein, Eirik
Hallstein, Klemet, Skule, Tjodolv,
Tormod, Tor
Blotolf, Brynjolf, Dag, Hildebrand,
Ragnvold, Torgrim, Torkjel, Ulv,
Olav, Ragnar
28
ANGLO-SAXONS
Earl
Huscarls
Aethelwulf
Edmund, Wulfgar,
Hygeberht,
Edward, Aethelred,
Aelfwine, Ceoldred
8.4
Characters in armour
VIKINGS
ANGLO-SAXONS
8.5
All the Jarls (Jl) and all the Hirdmen (Hd).
All the Earls (E), all the Thanes (T) and all the Huscarls (H).
Types of terrain
Name
Cost in Movement Points
Cover
Flat
(Terrain plat)
Scrub
(Broussailles)
Slope
(Talus)
Tree
(Arbre)
Beach (sand)
(Plage)
Shallow water
(Hauts Fonds)
Deep water
(Eaux Profondes)
Boat
(Bateau)
Building interior
(Intérieur de
bâtiment)
Window
(Fenêtre)
Doorway
(Porte)
Arrow slit
(Meurtrière)
1
None
Combat
Effect
0
2
Light
-
2; 4 to horses
Medium or None
-
2; Impassable to horses
Light
-
1
None
0
2
Light
-
4; Impassable to horses and to
armour
2
Light
-
Light, Medium or None *
1; Impassable to horses
Medium or None *
See rules p.26
Rule 4.86
+
+3; Impassable to horses
Medium or None *
Att: -; Def: +
1; Impassable to horses
Medium or None *
Def: +
1; Impassable from outside
Heavy or None *
Impossible to
cross
* depending on the position of the shooter or target.
The type of cover affects missile-fire.
Terrain advantage (+) or disadvantage (-) affects hand-to-hand combat.
8.6
Influence of terrain on combat
- : Unfavourable terrain;
0 : Neutral terrain;
+ : Favourable terrain
Attacker in
Defender in
Effect on the odds column
+
shift 2 columns to left
0
shift 1 column to left
0
+
shift 1 column to left
0
shift 1 column to right
+
0
shift 1 column to right
+
shift 2 columns to right
If the two sides are on equivalent terrain, the column does not change and the odds remain the
same.
29
8.7
Combat against mounted characters
If there are several mounted attackers, shift the odds one column to the right.
Add +1 to die roll if defender is in armour (10+1=10).
Die
Odds
1-1
2-1
3-1
4-1
5-1
6-1
7-1
8-1
9-1
10-1 11-1
1
C
D
D
E
E
F
F
G
G
H
H
2
C
C
D
D
E
E
F
F
G
G
H
3
C
C
C
D
D
E
E
F
F
G
G
4
B
C
C
C
D
D
E
E
F
F
G
5
B
B
C
C
C
D
D
E
E
F
F
6
A
A
B
C
C
C
D
D
E
E
F
7
A
B
C
C
C
D
D
E
E
8
A
B
C
C
C
D
D
E
9
A
B
C
C
C
D
D
10
B
B
C
C
C
D
Explanation of results
No effect
E
Horse unharmed, rider wounded.
A
Attacker wounded.
F
Horse killed, rider wounded and
dismounted.
B
Attacker retreats one hex (*).
G
Horse unharmed, rider killed.
C
Defender retreats one hex (*).
H
Horse and rider killed.
D
Horse unharmed, rider stunned and dismounted.
8.8
12-1+
H
H
H
G
G
F
F
E
E
D
Combat against foot characters
If there are several attackers, shift the odds one column to the right.
Add +1 to die roll if defender is in armour (10+1=10).
Die
Odds
1-1
2-1
3-1
4-1
5-1
6-1
7-1
8-1
9-1
1
D
E
E
E
F
F
F
F
F
2
C
D
D
E
E
F
F
F
F
3
C
C
D
D
E
E
E
F
F
4
B
C
C
D
D
E
E
E
F
5
B
C
C
C
D
D
E
E
E
6
A
B
C
C
C
D
D
E
E
7
B
C
C
C
C
D
D
E
8
A
B
C
C
C
C
D
D
9
A
B
C
C
C
C
D
10
B
B
C
C
C
C
Explanation of results
No effect
A
Attacker wounded.
D
Defender stunned.
B
Attacker retreats one hex (*).
E
Defender wounded.
C
Defender retreats one hex (*).
F
Defender killed.
10-1
F
F
F
F
F
E
E
E
D
D
11-1
F
F
F
F
F
F
E
E
E
D
12-1+
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
E
E
(*) Retreats apply to all the defenders or attackers involved. A character may retreat across hexes
containing friendly characters. It is also possible to displace friendly characters that are in the hex
needed as the end point at the required distance from the starting point of the retreat. But if the
retreating character, or one of the displaced characters, is forced to pass through or stop on a hex
adjacent to an enemy, he must submit to the consequences of the Infiltration Table (although this
situation does not apply if the enemy in question is already engaged in combat during that same phase
30
of the game).
Note: In the event of retreat after combat, it is impossible to retreat into a hex adjacent to an enemy that
participated in the combat. A character that cannot retreat without breaking one of the rules above stays
put and suffers a wound.
Important: A stunned or wounded character is considered dead if he is wounded or stunned afresh. A
stunned character that is required to retreat is also considered dead.
8.9
Infiltration of enemy lines (Challenges)
When a character crosses a hex adjacent to an enemy who is in a position to attack, the
player concerned rolls the die: 1 to 7: no damage; 8 or 9: Character wounded; 10: Character dead.
Die roll modifiers: Type of character trying to infiltrate: Rider: -1 to die roll;
Character in armour: -1; Rider in armour: -2; Wounded character: +2. Character trying to oppose
the infiltration: Rider: +1; Character in armour: +1; Rider in armour: +2; Wounded character: -2.
9.
9.1
GAME TABLES: SIDE 2
Using the counters
A: Front A: Back
B: Front B: Back
C: Front C: Back
D: Front D: Back
Character Horse
Character Dead
Character Stunned
Character Dead
mounted
without
mounted
horse
on foot
character on foot
character
and in full rider
and
and in full
and
health
wounded
health
wounded
Note that a stunned character can neither move nor attack, and that his Defence Strength is reduced
to the passive protection of the equipment carried.
9.2
Boarding & Disembarkation
Action
Getting into a boat from:
Getting out of a boat onto:
9.3
Effect
The character drowns.
Die Roll
3 or more
Effect
The character floats.
Grappling
Throwing a grappling hook
Thrower succeeds if die roll is equal to or
higher than twice the distance separating the
thrower and the target hex *.
* Wounded, women and old men: +2 on the die.
9.5
Cost in additional points of movement
+0
+1
Into a rowboat
+0
+2
Into a rowboat
+1
+4
Into a rowboat
+2
+1
From a rowboat +0
+0
Drowning Test
Die Roll
1 or 2
9.4
- an adjacent boat
- a land hex
- a shallow water hex
- a deep water hex
- a land hex
- a sea or river hex
Cutting free of a grapple
1, 2 or 3: The rope is cut *.
4 or more: See the knife-sharpener *.
* Wounded, women and old men: +1 on the die.
Ship characteristics table
31
Maximum number of oarsmen
Maximum speed forwards
Maximum speed backwards
Actual speed
Acceleration and
+1 **
deceleration conditions needed
+2 or -2
Viking Drakkar
Saxon Galiote
14
10
8
5
8
2
Equal to the number of pairs of oarsmen *
At least 1 pair of
At least 1 pair of
oarsmen
oarsmen
At least 3 pairs of
oarsmen
+3 or -3
At least 6 pairs of
oarsmen
Effect of different types of movement on ship speed
Straight line
No effect
Sideways (lateral) movement
Speed –1
Turning: Speed
Speed –2
Restrictions
Number of points of hull
damage before a ship sinks
Effect of damage on speed
Rowboat
2
2
2
At least 1
oarsman
At least 3 pairs of
oarsmen
-
2 oarsmen
No effect
No effect
Speed –1
No effect
No effect
No effect
-
Max 60°, 1 per phase Max 60°, 2 per phase No restrictions
19
11
1
-1 per 3 points of hull damage
Effect of damage on
-1 per 6 points of hull damage
acceleration
* A drakkar can move at a speed of 8 with 7 pairs of Viking oarsmen rowing.
** A ship with no-one rowing will lose speed at 1 Movement Point per phase.
9.6
Collision Table
Calculation of the Speed Factor (SF)
Bow collision: SF = 2x (Speed of A + Speed of B)
Stern collision: SF = 2x (Speed of A – Speed of B)
Side collision: SF = 2x Speed of A
A = The ship that strikes / B = the ship that is struck.
Damage
SF + Die roll Hull damage Characters on impact hexes *
3-5
None
No damage
6 - 11
1D
Wounded
12 - 17
2D
Killed
18 - 23
3D
Killed
24 - 29
4D
Killed
30 - 35
5D
Killed
36 +
6D
Killed
* The hex that strikes and the hex that is struck.
Other crew members
No damage
1 Stunned
1 Wounded, 2 Stunned
2 Wounded, 3 Stunned
1 Killed, 2 Wounded, 3 Stunned
1 Killed, 3 Wounded, 4 Stunned
2 Killed, 3 Wounded, 4 Stunned
RDG: Vikings Rules, version 2.0, May 2002
32
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