course catalog 2016–2017 - College of the Atlantic

course catalog 2016–2017 - College of the Atlantic
COURSE CATALOG 2017–2018
College of the Atlantic
Convocation
Wednesday, 6, 2017
Fall Term
Thursday, September 7—Friday, November 17, 2017
Winter Term
Monday, January 8—Friday, March 16, 2018
Spring Term
Monday, April 2 —Friday, June 8, 2018
Commencement
Saturday, June 9, 2018
College of the Atlantic is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and
Colleges. In its employment and admission practices, COA is in conformity with all
applicable federal and state statutes and regulations and does not discriminate on the
basis of age, race, color, sex, marital status, religion, creed, ancestry, national or ethnic
origin, sexual preference, physical or mental disability.
This publication is printed on recycled paper. It is the most complete representation of
the current academic offerings and policies available. The college reserves the right to
make changes in course offerings, degree requirements, regulations, procedures, and
charges as new needs arise.
College of the Atlantic Course Catalog 2017–2018
Human Ecology: An Educational Approach
2
Satisfactory Academic Progress
16
What You Should Learn at COA
2
Academic Probation
16
Introduction
2
Transfer Credit
17
College of the Atlantic Mission and Vision
3
Credit by Exam of Military Experience
17
PART I
Academic Program and Policies
3
Degree Requirements
3
Graduation and Senior Year
18
Leave of Absence
19
Medical Leave
Additional Programs
19
19
First-Year Requirements
4
Educational Studies
19
Resource Area Requirements
4
Teacher Certification
20
Self-Directed Studies
5
Independent Study
5
Consortium Agreements
20
Group Study
5
Affiliation Agreements
21
Residency
6
Graduate Program
21
Tutorials
7
Immunization Requirement
23
Internship
7
Registration and Fees
23
Senior Project
8
Registration
23
Ethical Research Review Board (ERRB)
9
Add/Drop
23
Writing Requirement
9
Withdrawal
24
Human Ecology Essay
10
Auditors
24
Community Service
10
Non-Degree Seeking Students
24
Review and Appeals
11
Tuition
24
Advising
11
Payment of Bills
25
Student Responsibility
Consortium Agreements/Exchanges
20
11
Housing and Dining
25
Class Attendance
11
Student Activities Fee
25
Academic Integrity
12
Health Fee
25
Degree Progress
12
Lab Fees
25
12
Credit Balance Returns
25
Course/Faculty Evaluations
Contracts and Signatures
12
Course Withdrawals
26
Accommodating Students with Disabilities
12
Financial Aid and Work Study
27
Records and Evaluations
13
COA Faculty Members 2017–2018
28
Transcripts
13
COA Staff Members 2017–2018
31
Privacy
13
Instructor Evaluations
14
PART II
GPA
15
2017–2018 Course Listings
Mid-Term Evaluations
15
Incomplete Work
15
Index by Course Number
108
Academic Standing
16
Index by Course Title
114
33
HUMAN ECOLOGY: AN EDUCATIONAL APPROACH
Emboldened by human ecology as an educational philosophy, faculty and students at the College
of the Atlantic embrace the act of knowing about the world and knowing oneself deeply. One of the
touchstones of this philosophy is independent thinking that results in a diverse array of educational
trajectories and transformational processes.
The radicalism of an education in human ecology is a probing and determined search for the roots of
contemporary social, cultural, political, and environmental issues. By engaging the experimental and
pluralistic heritage of learning in the liberal arts traditions, we seek to inspire theoretically informed
and personally reflective learning.
Exploring human ecology requires the skills and dispositions necessary to live with commitment to a
community that is both local and global. To thrive and contribute to such a complex world, students
will become empowered through the mastery of intellectual and practical skills.
The habits of heart and mind necessary for this challenging education include:
•
To be passionate about and dedicated to learning
•
To bring both heart and mind to the tasks of learning and living
•
To live in the questions and to increase tolerance of uncertainty
•
To be playful, open and, creative
•
To act responsibly and with compassion
WHAT YOU SHOULD LEARN AT COA
1.
Creativity: In all endeavors the ability to imagine and construct novel approaches or perspectives, to be innovative and to invent. This includes the flexibility to use many different approaches
in solving a problem, and to change direction and modify approach, the originality to produce
unique and unusual responses, and the ability to expand and embellish one’s ideas and projects.
This also includes taking intellectual and creative risks and practicing divergent thinking.
2.
Critical Thinking: The ability to not only interpret and evaluate information from multiple sources
but also to induce, deduce, judge, define, order, and prioritize in the interest of individual and collective action. This includes the ability to recognize one’s self-knowledge and its limits, challenge
preconceptions, and work with imperfect information.
3.
Community engagement: A deep understanding of oneself and respect for the complex identities of others, their histories, their cultures, and the ability to lead and collaborate with diverse
individuals, organizations, and communities. This includes the ability to work effectively within
diverse cultural and political settings.
4.
Communication: The ability to listen actively and express oneself effectively in spoken, written,
and nonverbal domains.
5.
Integrative thinking: The ability to confront complex situations and respond to them as systemic
wholes with interconnected and interdependent parts.
6.
Interdisciplinarity: The ability to think, research, and communicate within and across disciplines
while recognizing the strengths and limitations of each disciplinary approach.
INTRODUCTION
College of the Atlantic is a small undergraduate college awarding a Bachelor of Arts and a Master of
Philosophy in Human Ecology. The college’s mission is to foster interdisciplinary approaches to complex environmental and social problems and questions in the face of rapid cultural change. The academic program encourages students to view the world as an interacting whole by bringing together
traditional disciplines through the unifying perspective of human ecology.
2
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
A human ecological perspective can most effectively be developed through an education that:
• encourages students to pursue their individual academic interests within the context of a broad
education in the arts, sciences, and humanities
• promotes the acquisition and application of knowledge through internships, independent research,
and group study projects
• offers a college self-governance system that develops active responsible citizenship and collaborative decision-making skills
This academic catalog is intended as a resource for all members of the college community. It is to be
used as a manual for academic policies and procedures and for meeting the college’s goals for education.
All academic requirements, guidelines, and regulations have evolved from lengthy discussions among
faculty, students, and staff. Members of the community are encouraged to use this catalog as a basis
for discussion of any clarification or revision to the policies and procedures of the academic program.
Students who wish to see a policy change should bring their suggestions up through one of the standing committees.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC MISSION AND VISION
College of the Atlantic enriches the liberal arts tradition through a distinctive educational philosophy—human ecology. A human ecological perspective integrates knowledge from all academic
disciplines and from personal experience to investigate—and ultimately improve—the relationships
between human beings and our social and natural communities. The human ecological perspective
guides all aspects of education, research, activism, and interactions among the college’s students,
faculty, staff, and trustees. The College of the Atlantic community encourages, prepares, and expects
students to gain expertise, breadth, values, and practical experience necessary to achieve individual
fulfillment and to help solve problems that challenge communities everywhere.
The faculty, students, trustees, staff, and alumni of College of the Atlantic envision a world where
people value creativity, intellectual achievement, and the diversity of nature and human cultures. With
respect and compassion, individuals will construct meaningful lives for themselves, gain appreciation
for the relationships among all forms of life, and safeguard the heritage of future generations.
ACADEMIC PROGRAM AND POLICIES
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The degree of Bachelor of Arts in Human Ecology is granted upon completion of thirty-six credits
specified below and of three requirements bearing no credit. Eighteen of the thirty-six credit units
must be earned at COA, and a minimum of six terms must be spent enrolled full- or part-time at COA.
One of those six terms may be a COA internship, but a minimum of five must be spent on campus. The
normal full-time annual load is nine credits, three in each of the three ten-week terms. One COA credit
unit is the equivalent of 3.3 semester hours; nine COA credits are the equivalent of 30 semester hours.
Courses that fulfill resource area and other requirements are indicated by resource area codes and
noted in the course descriptions: AD = Arts and Design, ED = Educational Studies, ES = Environmental
Sciences, HS = Human Studies, HY = History, QR = Quantitative Reasoning, WF = Writing-Focused, and
W = Writing.
Freshman Requirements
• Human Ecology Core Course HE
• one writing (W) course or two writing-focused (WF) courses courses within the first five terms of
attendance
• one history (HY) course within the first two years of attendance
• one quantitative reasoning (QR) course within the first two years of attendance
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
3
Resource Area Requirements
• AD two courses (taught by different COA faculty,
one must be a studio course)
• ES two courses (taught by different COA faculty)
• HS two courses (taught by different COA faculty)
Internship
• either non-credit satisfaction of the
requirement while a degree candidate or
• full-time, one term enrollment, earns three
credits
(Note: Both options require a proposal packet and
approval of the Internship Committee prior to
starting. The internship, whether for credit or not,
must be followed by at least one term of enrollment on campus.)
Senior Project
• three credits, either in a single term or split over
two or three terms
Additional Non-course Requirements
• human ecology essay
• community service
• writing portfolio
TIER 1: INTRODUCTORY, HUMAN ECOLOGY, AND
FOUNDATIONAL COURSES
COMPONENTS OF THE CURRICULUM
Small classes are the foundation of COA’s curriculum. With a faculty to student ratio of 1:10, individualized attention and a seminar format are the classroom norm. Average class size is 12.5. A normal
full-time student load is three courses per term; a normal full-time faculty teaching load is five courses
over three terms. Students design their own programs of study, with a few distribution requirements.
FIRST-YEAR REQUIREMENTS
The Human Ecology Core Course (HE) is a requirement for all first-year students. Additional freshman
course requirements which should be taken in the first two years of attendance include one writing
(W) course or two writing-focused (WF) courses, one history (HY) course and one quantitative reasoning (QR) course. Please refer to the Writing Requirement section for more information. These freshman requirements are waived for transfer students entering with the equivalent of 9 or more COA
credits.
RESOURCE AREA REQUIREMENTS
The curriculum is organized into three multidisciplinary resource areas: Arts and Design, Environmental Sciences, and Human Studies. A required “distribution” of two courses from each of the resource
areas helps a student become familiar with the methodology and perspective of each and incorporate
these perspectives into his or her own work. A student must take a minimum of two courses in each
resource area, each from a different COA faculty member. One of the Arts and Design courses must
be a studio class, listed as ADS. Amongst academic disciplines, studio art is the making of art contrasted to the study of art history and theory.
The resource area distribution enables a student to gain a broad foundational understanding of
approaches used in each resource area of the curriculum; courses satisfying the distribution requirement should be selected in consultation with academic advisors. A student combines course work
from all three resource areas to design programs of study which are interdisciplinary and individualized.
4
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
The following cannot be used to satisfy the resource area requirement: independent studies, practica,
tutorials (except for some music tutorials), group studies, or MD courses. While MD courses, which
are interdisciplinary by design, have validity and purpose, they are distinctly not appropriate for the
distribution requirement.
Transfer credits from other institutions may be used to fulfill resource area requirements. However,
only one AD, HS, or ES may be used in this manner. Approval of courses to fulfill resource area requirements from other institutions is handled by the registrar in consultation with representative faculty
and advisors; the student must provide the catalog descriptions of the courses to be used for this
purpose. AP and IB credits may not be used to satisfy resource area requirements.
SELF-DIRECTED STUDIES
Independent Study
An independent study provides an opportunity for the student to design his or her own course. It
is intended to be student-initiated and carried out under the supervision of faculty or community
sponsors. An independent study is appropriate for advanced or specially focused work not offered in
the regular course curriculum, for study in fields not offered by the college, or study requiring work
off-campus.
First-year students are not allowed to undertake an independent study. No more than two independent studies are permitted within one academic year (they cannot be banked). Transfer students with
9 or more COA credits are permitted to take two independent studies per year starting from the first
year they enroll at COA. Every independent study must have a project director. An on-campus sponsor
is required if the independent study project director is an off-campus resource. In the event that the offcampus project director fails to generate a grade and written evaluation, the on-campus sponsor is
responsible for providing this information.
A student is not allowed to undertake an independent study if they are on academic probation or if
a previous independent study is not complete. An independent study is considered incomplete until
the proposal has been completed and the student’s self-evaluation and description of the study have
been submitted to the registrar, along with the director’s grade and written evaluation.
A cover sheet needs to be submitted with the proposal. Proposals need to include educational goals,
anticipated learning resources, assessment criteria, and an approximate time-table of events. An
honorarium is available to off-campus project directors pending receipt of grade and evaluation of
student’s work. The cover sheet requires these signatures:
• student
• study director—COA faculty, staff or non-COA expert (non-COA directors must submit credentials
specific to the independent study, for instance a CV or resume, for review by the registrar)
• faculty or staff sponsor (required when the director is not a member of the COA faculty)
• advisor
• academic probation officer
Group Study
The group study is a student-initiated, one-term project, which provides an opportunity for collective
pursuit of specific academic problems, topics, or issues which are not offered in the regular curriculum. Key factors in the success of any student-designed study at COA are planning, goal-setting, and
evaluation. The content of group studies ranges widely. Some groups work on “hands-on” proj- ects
which have tangible products. Some groups are more seminar-like, with the objective being the sharing
of information among members. Group studies are taken for credit/no credit only. First-year students
and those on academic probation are not eligible. The group study administrator is required to submit
an evaluation of each student to the registrar within three weeks after the end of the term. Participants
decide how these evaluations will be done.
The requirement that students describe these plans clearly in a proposal is intentional. In addition to
review of the student’s planning, the Academic Dean and the Academic Probation Officer review the
students’ proposal for its content and relationship to the rest of the curriculum, as well as academic
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
5
eligibility. A group study must be approved prior to the registration period for the term when it will be
done; deadlines for submission of proposals are published in the back of this catalog and online.
For a group study to be established the following requirements must be met:
• a minimum group size of five and maximum of eight active participants
• at least three of the five should share responsibility for the design of the group study and the
preparation of the proposal
The proposal should:
• contain a clear description of the educational goals and methods of the study
• identify the tangible products
• include a syllabus based upon a minimum of three hours of regularly scheduled meetings per week
for a total of 150 academically engaged hours
• outline criteria for evaluation, being clear about what constitutes participation worthy of credit
• identify a faculty sponsor and any additional resource person
• identify a student administrator
• contain an itemized budget. Budget support is available from the college for expenditure such as
travel and supplies necessary to the learning activity. The maximum award is $300
Approval procedure:
• Proposals must be submitted to the academic dean by the published deadline (week three of the
term prior to registration) with an itemized budget that includes expenses, which are essential for
the learning to take place.
• The group study proposal cover sheet (available on the COA registration web page) must accompany
all proposals and have all required signatures.
• At midterm, representatives of the group are required to make a progress report to the academic
dean.
Students may not take two group studies in the same term or more than two per academic year.
Residency
A residency is a three-credit, term-long educational experience designed by an advanced student.
In order to do a residency students must have earned at least eighteen COA credits and be in good
academic standing. In addition, only two residencies may be used toward graduation requirements.
Residencies offer students the opportunity to put together their own cohesive program of study in
order to explore areas which may not be provided in either the content or structure of the regular academic curriculum.
• Students should have a developed interest in an area that cannot be satisfied by the regular
curriculum and have the motivation, work habits, and creativity necessary to pursue this interest in
an academically responsible manner. Students must have an excellent academic record and be in
good standing to participate in a residency.
• Students have used the residency term to explore topics as diverse as: women’s health issues; the
history of western thought; physical, cultural, and intellectual approaches to dance; and issues
in psychology and the treatment of mental illness. A recent residency used quilting as a theme
to explore color theory, organic and chemical fabric dyeing, computer aided design, and three
quilting cultures. A residency allows a student to learn first-hand the educational value inherent in
interdisciplinary study.
• A COA faculty member must be the primary director of a residency and have scheduled contact with
the student throughout the term. This may be done by office visits (if the residency is local or on
campus), via phone, or by e-mail. Any outside director to the project will assist the primary director
in completing final evaluations. Residencies are taken for credit/no credit only. While students are
encouraged to only do one, a maximum of two can be allowed.
• Students must submit a proposal to do a residency. The residency application form may be
downloaded from the registration page on line or picked up at the registrar’s office. The application
6
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
for the residency must be submitted to the Review and Appeals Committee by the registration
deadline for the term in which it is to occur. (See schedule of deadlines in the back of this catalog
and online.) Late residency applications will NOT be considered. Students are advised to register
for alternate classes in the event that their residency application is not approved. All residency
applications will be approved or rejected by Review and Appeals Committee before the end of the
term prior to when the residency is to occur.
TUTORIALS
Tutorials are faculty-initiated studies for one to five students which cover specialized material not
available within the regular curriculum. They differ from independent studies and group studies in
that faculty members, not students, are responsible for design and implementation. Tutorials cannot
be used to fulfill resource area requirements (with the exception of some music tutorials).
INTERNSHIP
An internship is an academic degree requirement. Internships are supervised work experiences in an
area compatible with a student’s academic focus, career paths and interests. One central goal of the
internship is to provide students with the experience of working for others in a professional setting
and being supervised and evaluated on their performance in a work environment. Internships are
typically off-campus and site-based, not remote work. The program director encourages students to
plan ahead for meeting the internship requirement. The internship committee will insure the central
goal of the internship is realized in a way that advances the student’s professional development.
Internships allow students to apply their knowledge and skills to the job market, develop new skills,
clarify future goals, and establish important career contacts. Internships also offer students opportunities to engage in identifying and seeking employment, developing resumes and support materials,
interviewing successfully and making informed decisions. Returning to a former employer, worksite,
or working with relatives may not be considered for an internship placement. Interns are encouraged
to take part in additional training, meetings, and workshops held at their worksite.
Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor and the director of the internship program as they
begin planning for their internship. Students must be enrolled for at least one full year on campus
prior to doing an internship. Transfer students should consider meeting with the internship program
director as soon as they arrive on campus. A student must be in good academic standing and have no
outstanding account balances prior to enrolling for an internship.
In order to integrate the internship with later academic experiences the internship cannot be during
the final term of enrollment. A student must spend at least one term enrolled (for at least one credit)
following the internship and prior to graduation. The following term may be the senior project.
The internship office maintains an active file of organizations, alumni mentors, and job contacts to
help students find internships that are appropriate to their career needs and interests. The director is
available to help students take advantage of the resources of the office. Often faculty have contacts
that produce internships in their fields.
Students may elect to do an internship for credit or non-credit. The successful completion of either an
eleven-week, full-time (440 hours total) credit internship or an eight-week, full-time (320 hours total)
non-credit internship satisfies the degree requirement. After accepting an internship, the student
develops a proposal and resume, and receives a letter of commitment from the internship sponsor/
supervisor which is submitted to the internship committee for review. Once approved by the committee the student may begin the internship. At the end of the term, the student must submit an internship report and an evaluation from the sponsor/supervisor, and prepare a poster presentation about
their experiences to the college community.
The internship director compiles a transcript evaluation which includes excerpts from the proposal,
report, and the sponsor’s evaluation. All internship documentation is filed in the internship office.
Current guidelines for writing proposals, resumes, and reports are available in the internship office
and on the college’s website.
In certain instances students may take up to two three-credit internships. Students wishing to take
a second for-credit internship must have strong support from their advisors, strong rationale for the
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
7
need of a second internship, and an approved proposal. Student teaching may be used to fulfill the
internship requirement. Students choosing this option must meet the standards set for both the Student Teaching Practicum and the internship. Students may complete multiple non-credit internships.
SENIOR PROJECT
The senior project is a three-credit independent effort required for the human ecology degree. It is
a significant intellectual endeavor, experiment, research project, or original work which is intended
to advance understanding in a particular academic area and bring together the skills and knowledge
acquired during the student’s college career. It is a major work at an advanced level, occupying at least
one term, earning three credits. The three credits of a senior project may be spread over two or more
terms if the research requires more than ten weeks or if the student wishes to combine the senior
project with course work in his or her final terms.
With the exception of the spring term just prior to graduation, senior project enrollment may be
combined with course enrollment even if the total load is four credits. If a student wishes to conduct
a senior project, in whole or in part, in the spring term and enroll for one or more classes, registering
for more than three credits total, he or she must gain approval through an appeal to Review and
Appeals Committee prior to the end of the add/drop period for the spring term.
Once a student registers for his/her senior project, he/she will have one year to complete it barring
extensions. If at the end of that time period the project is not completed the student will be
withdrawn from the institution. When a student re-enrolls to complete his/her project he/she must
reapply through the Office of Admission and pay all applicable admission fees, as well as a special onetime senior project registration fee. The project must be completed by the end of the term. If the
student does not complete the project in the allotted time, the next enrollment will be at the full rate
of three credits with a new proposal required and students have one year to complete the project.
A COA faculty member or a non-COA expert may serve as the senior project director. This person
is responsible for the final evaluation and may or may not be the faculty member on a student’s
permanent advising team. In addition, resource persons outside the college may be used, and in
certain cases a $400 honorarium will be provided to them. Some approved senior projects take place
primarily off campus.
Review and Appeals Committee posts deadlines for submission of senior project proposals; the
deadlines are listed on the back cover of this catalog and online. Students wishing to register for
senior project credits must obtain a signature from one of the co-chairs of the Review and Appeals
Committee on their registration form. In order to obtain a signature from a chair of Review and
Appeals, a student must have submitted a complete proposal to the committee for review.
Proposals should be readable by the general community and free of jargon. The relevance of the
project within the context of a COA education should be clear. A completed proposal or intent form
should be submitted to the Review and Appeals Committee before registering for senior project
credits. Project proposal cover sheets are available in the Registrar’s Office and online with a checklist
of required elements included.
The following elements must be included in a senior project proposal:
• statements describing purpose, methodology, schedule for completion, criteria for evaluation,
manner of final presentation, and the role of the project director;
• detailed description of the way in which this project is a culmination of the student’s work at COA,
including academic background, career goals, and qualifications to do this work;
• bibliography and/or other references which place the work in a theoretical context, demonstrating
what will be new learning or original; and
• a cover sheet bearing signatures of the permanent advising team members and the project director,
including the preliminary project title.
Note: senior projects without completed and approved proposals cannot receive credit, which may result in
a student not being able to graduate.
The completed senior project must be submitted to the library archivist no later than the end of the
ninth week of the spring term. Failure to meet this deadline will jeopardize the student’s ability to
graduate in June. The student is responsible for submitting his/her project in a format approved by
the library archivist, following the guidelines posted on the registrar’s webpage. This includes a brief
8
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
abstract (200–400 words, single spaced) describing the project. The project is cataloged by the library
and added to its permanent collection of senior projects for reference by future students.
Students must also submit a description and self-evaluation electronically to the Registrar’s Office; the
project director will submit an evaluation. Letter grades are not given for senior projects.
ETHICAL RESEARCH REVIEW BOARD (ERRB)
Research on human subjects is an integral part of human ecology at College of the Atlantic. The college’s policy on human subjects research is intended to foster an environment that supports and
encourages such research. In addition, the policy establishes mechanisms to assist those wishing to
undertake human subjects research. College of the Atlantic has in place a set of procedures concerning research involving human subjects to ensure the physical and psychological safety of participants
and to ensure that researchers follow appropriate ethical standards and comply with federal laws
protecting research subjects. Research that will be reviewed includes faculty research, senior projects,
and graduate theses. In addition a limited set of classroom projects, residencies, and independent
studies may also require review, especially if they are disseminated publicly.
An Ethical Research Review Board (ERRB) will be appointed by the academic dean at the beginning of
each academic year. The ERRB is charged with implementing this policy in a manner appropriate to the
interdisciplinary nature of COA and consistent with federal law. The ERRB will provide researchers with
materials and tools to determine if their project(s) fall under the category of human subject research.
The ERRB will assist researchers wishing to undertake research on human subjects to develop strategies for meeting ethical and legal standards appropriate to their research.
Students and faculty must seek approval for their research from the ERRB when they initially propose
their work. Student projects which do not gain approval, may not be granted college credit or count
as fulfilling graduation requirements. The application for approval, in the form of an ethical research
review form and accompanying narrative, will be forwarded for review and approval to the chair of
the ERRB who will convene to review proposals on a rolling basis. Researchers may appeal the ERRB’s
decision to the academic dean or her or his designee. The dean’s decision is final.
For further information or a full statement of the college’s policy and details on the process of application and review, contact the ERRB chair.
WRITING REQUIREMENT
There are two components to the writing requirement:
1. Writing Course: All students who enter COA with fewer than nine COA credits must take one
writing class or two writing-focused classes within their first five terms at COA. Writing courses are
designated W in the catalog: writing-focused classes are designated WF and classes with a writingfocused option are designated WFO. Students who have scored a four or five on the AP English
exam are exempted from this requirement. Students who receive a six or seven on the IB A1H exam
are exempted. The writing program director may also exempt entering students; these must be
documented in writing.
2. Writing Portfolio: The goal of the second phase of the writing requirement is to ensure that all
students write at an advanced collegiate level. Students who begin here as first-year students, or
with fewer than nine credits, must submit a writing portfolio once they have completed fifteen
COA credits, or have been in attendance for five terms. Transfer students with nine or more credits
are required to submit a portfolio by the end of their third term of residence. Failure to meet this
requirement may result in the student’s not being allowed to register for the following term.
The portfolio should be submitted to the faculty assistant at [email protected]
This portfolio, which is reviewed by a member of the team of faculty reviewers, should include:
• three essays written for courses—these essays should explain a concept or issue
• one must demonstrate that you can analyze an issue or argue a position
• one (that could be expository or argumentative) must be 5+ pages
At least one essay must demonstrate that you can use and document sources appropriately.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
9
These essays are reviewed to ensure that students meet the criteria specified in the writing rubric.
These criteria include the ability to:
• write coherently
• organize a paper so that the writing moves logically from sentence to paragraph to whole paper
• write sentences that do not interfere with the author’s intent or meaning and use sources
consistently and appropriately
When students demonstrate that they can clearly explain and/or address an issue and formulate and
support a coherent and logical argument without significant mechanical or grammatical errors, they
will have met the second component of the writing requirement.
Students whose writing is flawed by minor mechanical errors or minor errors in documentation will be
asked to work with a writing tutor until they have mastered the problem.
Students with more serious writing issues will meet with their advisor and the faculty reviewer and/or
the writing program director to collaboratively develop a plan to improve their writing. The development and implementation of the plan should not only be supportive but should allow the student to
achieve a higher level of writing competency. The written contract will not only articulate the specific
goals that must be met but also may include, but is not limited to, the following: taking other writing
or writing-focused courses, working on writing in other courses, or working on a regular basis in the
writing center.
HUMAN ECOLOGY ESSAY
The human ecology essay is a work of exposition, argumentation, extended description, or narration
and should be approximately 2,000 words long. By choosing and developing a subject of personal or
social significance, the student explores her or his perspective on human ecology. The human ecology
essay is not expected to be a paper done for a course, although it can evolve from such a paper or be
produced in a writing class. The human ecology essay must be clear, concise, and coherent. In some
cases a student may choose to do a nonverbal “essay,” or write a piece of fiction or poetry. If this is the
case, the student must submit a two- to four-page essay explaining how the project reflects her or his
notion of human ecology.
The student’s advisor and one additional faculty member will serve as readers for the human ecology
essay. A second faculty reader will be chosen together by the student and the advisor. Both readers
must be continuing faculty members. Both the readers must approve the essay in order for the essay
to be considered approved. Usually a student’s essay goes through several drafts and takes 3-6 weeks
to be approved. Students are strongly encouraged to work with the writing center on their essays;
their readers may require them to do so.
Students are strongly encouraged to begin work on their human ecology essay during the second half
of their junior year. The initial draft will be due toward the beginning of the fall term of the student’s
senior year, and the final draft will be due in mid-February. The initial draft and the final draft must be
submitted to the faculty assistant and the student’s advisor whose role is to oversee the human ecology essay process and ensure that deadlines are met.
Students who fail to meet human ecology essay deadlines will jeopardize their ability to graduate or
stand in June. Essays that are submitted after the deadline will not be eligible for inclusion in the human ecology essay publication.
COMMUNITY SERVICE
All students at COA are required to complete forty hours of community service prior to their last term
of enrollment. The college believes that community service provides valuable experience as well as
personal and educational opportunities that complement a student’s studies in human ecology. A
student can satisfy the community service requirement through on-campus or off-campus volunteer
work. On-campus service suggestions include committee membership, planning campus-wide activities such as Earth Day, or volunteering at Beech Hill Farm. Off-campus service includes activities that
strengthen the college’s ties to the local community such as coaching local athletic teams, tutoring
math in an after-school program, or volunteering at a nursing home. A combination of on-campus and
off-campus experiences is encouraged.
10
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Community service must be on a volunteer basis (not for pay or for credit) and consist of a minimum
of forty hours in total. Most students have an excess of community-oriented work and ultimately
need to decide which experience to use to fulfill the requirement. The director of internships and career services is responsible for assessing the adequacy of the student’s service. A one-page form with
a description of the activity, length of involvement, and reflections must be completed and returned
to the Internship Office prior to graduation. The required form is available on the college’s website. In
addition this office has resources for on and off campus community service opportunities.
REVIEW AND APPEALS
The Review and Appeals Committee, a subcommittee of Academic Affairs, considers student proposals for senior projects and residencies, petitions for exceptions to requirements, and unusual requests
for credit. This subcommittee also receives and reviews appeals for reconsideration of any other decisions regarding a student’s academic work, and assesses and evaluates fees related to the academic
program.
ADVISING
When students arrive at College of the Atlantic they are assigned an initial academic advisor. The
working relationship between student and advisor is very important because of the self-directed
nature of study at the college. The freedom of students to plan individual programs carries with it
the responsibility to develop coherent courses of study. The academic advisor serves as the primary
resource for this planning process.
The advising relationship is critical to the success of students’ academic programs and students are
encouraged to change advisors as their academic interests and needs evolve. Change of advisor forms
may be found on the COA website.
The best advisors are those who share intellectual and educational interests with their advisees. It is
hoped that through class contact and campus events, students will develop collegiality with one or
more faculty or staff. It is from these connections that they will choose an advisor best suited to their
educational and career pursuits.
The advisor serves as both professional mentor and guide as students work their way through their
college careers. Advising meetings may take the form of discussing resource area requirements, considering further educational or career planning, or simply serving as a sounding board for a student’s
academic and personal concerns. Students are highly encouraged to meet with their advisors regularly.
As there is an atmosphere of collaboration at College of the Atlantic, students are encouraged to seek
connections with other faculty, staff, and students to broaden their advising experience. For questions or further information on the advising system, please contact the academic dean.
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
College of the Atlantic’s advising system is set up to provide students with help and guidance in a
number of areas. However, a student’s education is ultimately her or his responsibility. In particular, it
is the responsibility of all COA students to adhere to the requirements and deadlines published in the
course catalog and other college materials.
CLASS ATTENDANCE
Students are expected to attend the first class meeting for any course in which they are enrolled. Students who do not attend on the first day of the class may be dropped from the course at the sole discretion of the instructor. Students may also be dropped if they enroll for a course without having met
the published prerequisites. Students do not need the instructor’s signature to drop a class during
the add/drop period. However, students are asked to inform the instructor of their decision to drop,
so that their seat in the class may be given to other students. College of the Atlantic does not have a
college-wide policy concerning class attendance. However, individual faculty members may—and usually do—set attendance expectations for their classes. In the event that a class is missed, the responsibility for making up any missed work lies with the student, in negotiation with the faculty member.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
11
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
By enrolling in an academic institution, a student is subscribing to common standards of academic
honesty. Any cheating, plagiarism, falsifying or fabricating of data is a breach of such standards. A
student must make it his or her responsibility to not use words or works of others without proper
acknowledgment. Plagiarism is unacceptable and evidence of such activity is reported to the academic
dean or his/her designee. Two violations of academic integrity are grounds for dismissal from the college. Students should request in-class discussions of such questions when complex issues of ethical
scholarship arise.
DEGREE PROGRESS
It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of his or her status as a degree candidate, and to utilize
his or her advisor to certify progress for graduation. To help make this certification clearer, students
should use their student portal to follow their academic progress.
REGISTRATION: CONTRACTS AND SIGNATURES
When a student submits his or her course registration, he/she has made a commitment to those
courses or other credit units. The student will owe tuition to match that registration, and the student’s
transcript will list the titles of those courses, whether or not credit is earned. Add/drop forms must be
filed by the deadlines set for each term in order to make changes to course registration. All financial
obligations must be cleared (or loan payments made current) with the college before a student may
register, receive a diploma or have a transcript sent. Lost library books are also considered financial
obligations to the college.
COURSE/FACULTY EVALUATIONS
At the end of a course, Personnel and Academic Affairs committees require course/faculty evaluations
from each student enrolled. Course evaluation forms ask questions regarding course organization,
idea synthesis and clarity, class-teacher rapport, importance of the course to the COA curriculum,
and recommendations for future classes. These forms are extremely important in evaluating teacher
performance. They provide a written history of faculty work critical to accurate assessment of teaching success.
Course evaluation forms are available either in paper format or online through the student portal by
choice of the instructor. Paper forms should be submitted to the Office of Academic and Administrative Services. All evaluations are held until faculty evaluations of students are in, then they are passed
to the Personnel Committee and the academic dean for use in continuing reviews of faculty work and
in periodic reviews for contract renewal. Faculty members are expected to read course evaluations,
but do not have access to them before writing evaluations of students.
ACCOMMODATING STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
To ensure that programs, activities and services are accessible to all matriculating students, College
of the Atlantic is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with documented
disabilities. Documented disabilities may include, but are not limited to: a learning disability; attention
deficit disorder; a visual, auditory, or mobility impairment; a physical or mental health illness.
COA’s policy and practice comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the state and local requirements regarding students with disabilities. Under these
laws, no qualified individual with a disability shall be denied access to or participation in services,
programs, and activities of the College of the Atlantic.
In compliance with federal and state regulations, reasonable accommodations are provided to qualified students with disabilities. A reasonable accommodation is one that is consistent with the academic standards of the college and does not fundamentally alter the nature of the course or program. COA
works directly and individually with students throughout the accommodation process. Final authority
for determining the most reasonable and effective accommodation rests with the college and is based
on the nature of the course or program and the individual student’s disability-related need(s). A qualified individual is a person who, with or without reasonable accommodations, can perform the essen-
12
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
tial functions of a program or course requirements. The essential requirements of an academic course
or program need not be modified to accommodate an individual with a disability.
COA’s designated Disability Support Services are located within the offices of Student Life in Deering
Commons. From this office students needing accommodation will be directed to academic, programmatic, or campus mobility specialists for assistance. Students are encouraged to meet with a Disability
Support Services professional to develop a plan for their academic accommodations. A request for
accommodation is deemed reasonable if it:
•
•
Is based on documented individual needs; in all cases of non-apparent disability
Allows the most integrated experience possible
and
•
•
•
•
Does not compromise essential requirements of a course or program
Does not pose a threat to personal or public safety
Does not impose undue financial or administrative burden
Is not of a personal nature
Students seeking reasonable accommodations must provide current documentation of the disability
either before or at the time they request accommodations. It is the responsibility of the student to
work with appropriate staff or faculty each term to ensure that appropriate accommodations are put
in place at the start of the term. COA does not provide assessment services for documentation of
Learning Differences—all testing is done by outside evaluators at the student’s expense.
RECORDS AND EVALUATIONS
Each unit of work completed at College of the Atlantic has a three-part evaluation consisting of a
course description, instructor evaluation, and a student self-evaluation. Evaluations serve a dual
purpose; they form an ongoing portfolio and permanent record for use by the student and advisors,
and they comprise the narrative transcript that may be read in conjunction with applications to other
schools and future employment. As a summary and synthesis of work over a period of years, the
transcript is an effective way to show how courses and projects mesh into a coherent education of the
student’s own design.
TRANSCRIPTS
An official College of the Atlantic transcript can include either a single page that lists all of the course
titles, credits attempted/earned, or a full transcript that also includes narrative evaluations and selfevaluations.
Unofficial transcripts are available on the student portal. To order an official transcript a student must
submit a signed release form to the Registrar’s Office (a signed letter of request or note is also acceptable). The request may be mailed to: Registrar, College of the Atlantic, 105 Eden Street, Bar Harbor, ME
04609. It can also be faxed to 207-288-2947, or scanned and emailed to the Registrar’s Office. It generally takes seven to ten work days to process a transcript request after receipt of the signed release/
request. All requests for transcripts must be prepaid in full. Transcripts will not be released if the
student has overdue bills in the Business Office and/or Thorndike Library.
Students have access to their own files in the Registrar’s Office during regular office hours. In keeping with policies under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (below), the college requires the
student’s release, in writing, before opening educational records to third parties.
PRIVACY
The college’s policies, consistent with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA),
are as follows:
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
13
This act is a Federal law, which provides that academic institutions will maintain the confidentiality of
student education records.
College of the Atlantic accords all the rights under the law to students who are declared independent.
No one outside the college shall have access to nor will the institution disclose any information from
students’ records without the written consent of students, except to persons or organizations providing student financial aid, to accrediting agencies carrying out their accreditation function, to persons
in compliance with a judicial order, and to persons in an emergency in order to protect the health or
safety of students or other persons. All these exceptions are permitted under the Act.
College of the Atlantic also requests, beyond the requirements of law, that all students, whether or
not declared independent, give their written consent in the sending of evaluations and transcripts to
parents and to officials of other institutions in which students seek to enroll. Within the COA community, only those members, individually or collectively, acting in the students’ educational interest are
allowed access to student educational records. These include personnel in the Financial Aid, Business,
Admission, Student Life, Internship, and Registrar’s offices, academic deans, advisors, and faculty,
within the limitations of their need to know.
At its discretion, the college may provide Directory Information in accordance with the provisions of
the Act to include: student name, address, phone number, date and place of birth, major field of study,
dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most recent previous educational institution
attended, and participation in officially recognized activities and sports. Students may withhold Directory Information by notifying the registrar in writing within two weeks after the first day of an academic term. Requests for non-disclosure will be honored until the end of an academic year; authorization to withhold Directory Information must therefore be filed annually.
The law provides students with the right to inspect and review information contained in their education records, to challenge the contents of their records, to have a hearing if the outcome of the challenge is unsatisfactory, and to submit explanatory statements for inclusion in their files if they feel the
decisions of the hearing panels are unacceptable. COA students have unrestricted access to their own
records; they may have copies made of their records at their own expense, with certain exceptions (in
cases of overdue bills in the Business Office and/or Thorndike Library).
Education records do not include employment records, alumni records, student health records, or
records of instructional, administrative, and other personnel which are the sole possession of the
maker and are not accessible or revealed to any individual. Health records, however, may be reviewed
by physicians of the student’s choosing.
Students who believe that their education records contain information that is inaccurate or misleading, or otherwise in violation of their privacy or other rights, may discuss their problems informally
with the registrar and/or the faculty member involved. If the decisions are in agreement with the
student’s request, the appropriate records will be amended. If not, students will be informed by the
registrar of their right to a formal hearing. Student requests for a formal hearing must be made to the
Review and Appeals Committee, which will inform students of the date, place, and time of the hearing.
INSTRUCTOR EVALUATIONS
The first part of an evaluation is written by the instructor (or by group study members or, for an independent study, by the student) and is an objective description of the course work and criteria used for
evaluation. The second part is also written by the instructor and addresses the student’s performance in
light of the stated criteria. The narrative evaluation is an opportunity for the instructor to discuss a
student’s work in a way that cannot be communicated through a letter grade alone.
Student grade options are credit/no credit or letter grades. For some courses (residencies, internships, and senior project), letter grades are not an option; the instructor may also choose to opt only
for credit/no credit. Request for a credit/no credit grade must be made in writing on the add/drop
form no later than the add/drop deadline. Grade options may not be changed retroactively. The grading option to be selected should be discussed thoroughly with advisors and faculty.
The COA faculty follow the following grading definitions:
14
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
For determining credit/no credit the following criteria are used.
Credit: Satisfactory completion of the requirements as stated in the course description. The
quality of the work may range from an excellent to an average comprehension of course material.
Equivalent to C or above in letter grade system.
No Credit: Failure to complete the requirements as stated in the course description or to
demonstrate satisfactory comprehension of the course material. A final status of “No Credit”
means that work was not sufficient for credit and/or that it is too late for credit to be considered.
For letter grades the following criteria are used.
A
Excellent: outstanding or superior insight extending beyond the normal requirements for the
course; exceeding expectations; completion of all required work
B
Good: conversant in all course topics; completion of all course work
C
Satisfactory: comprehension of the material and completion of basic requirements
D
Completion of minimal requirements and demonstration of minimal competence, academic
credit is awarded
F
Failure to complete minimal requirements or to demonstrate comprehension of key course
topics, recorded as a “No Credit” for those not opting for letter grades
GPA
COA does not provide/calculate GPAs for its students. However, upon special request, the registrar will
calculate a GPA based only on courses for which the student received letter grades, and include it in a
separate letter that also states the number of courses from which the GPA is calculated.
STUDENT SELF-EVALUATIONS
The third part of the evaluation is the student’s self-evaluation. While optional for most courses, it is
required for independent studies, residences, and senior projects. The self-evaluation is an important
component of the narrative transcript. It provides an opportunity to record the student’s assessment of the progress of his or her education and provides valuable insights to the reader about the
student’s performance in classes beyond what is conveyed by a letter grade. Instructions for submitting self-evaluations are distributed by the registrar at the end of each term and are available on the
student portal. Self-evaluations may be submitted for up to two weeks following the end of the term
and are posted after faculty have submitted their grades and evaluations. Late self-evaluations are
not accepted since they must remain independent of faculty evaluations.
MID-TERM EVALUATIONS
An in-class mid-term evaluation is done in every course and although this does not become part of a
student’s permanent academic record, it is an important means of student-teacher evaluation. Ideally,
the mid-term evaluation is a class-wide discussion of the students’ performance, class expectations,
and suggested enhancements for the remainder of the term. If students are under-performing at this
point in the term their academic advisor and the academic dean or his/her designee are notified.
INCOMPLETE WORK
Completing assigned work for classes in a timely manner is a necessary part of education just as effective time management is a necessary skill in the world beyond COA. If a student encounters difficulty
completing work by the specified deadline, s/he should speak with her/his instructor and/or advisor
to seek assistance. Similarly, if an instructor finds that a student repeatedly turns assignments in late
or not at all, s/he should speak with the student to determine how to help the student complete work
necessary for learning and academic credit. An incomplete grade will automatically turn to an “F”
three weeks into the subsequent term unless proper paperwork is filed with the registrar.
If a student has not completed all of the work necessary to meet the requirements of a course by the
end of the term, the student must either complete a written extension request (form available in Registrar’s Office and online) or be evaluated on the merit of work completed. A student who falls behind
in their work should speak to the instructor(s) as soon as possible to determine if an extension may be
approved. It is the student’s responsibility to request an extension and submit the form.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
15
When the faculty member has received a completed extension form, one of two conditions will apply.
The faculty member may deny the request and evaluate the student on the merit of work completed,
or grant an extension up to the end of the fourth week of the following term. The extension may be
lengthened beyond the end of the fourth week at the faculty member’s and academic probation officer’s discretion. Any extenuating circumstances requiring extensions beyond this deadline should be
determined jointly by the student, faculty member, and academic probation officer since such extensions impact grading, financial aid and billing
If by the contracted extension deadline the work still is not complete and there is no further extension, the faculty member will evaluate the student based on work completed to date. If the faculty
member does not assign a grade or credit, the extension will revert to a failing grade or no credit.
Students must file signed extension contracts with the Registrar’s Office (due three weeks after the
end of the term).
ACADEMIC STANDING
A COA student’s progress toward the degree is measured in credit units; to be considered in good
standing a student must be earning credits in satisfactory proportion to the number attempted. To be
considered in good standing a student cannot be on academic probation status for consecutive terms.
Each COA course is worth one credit, though amounts of commitment and effort required may vary.
With permission of an advisor, students other than first-term registrants may register for a maximum
of four credits in a term.
SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
Normal or satisfactory progress toward the degree is made through the equivalent of four full-time
years of study, or nine COA credits per year. The student must be aware of this definition of full-time
for various purposes of eligibility for financial aid and student loans, especially from sources such as
VA benefits: full-time enrollment is three credits per term and nine per year. The college recognizes
many good reasons for graduation timetables that differ from a traditional four-year program; it is a
student’s responsibility to discuss his or her program with advisors and to be aware of financial aid
implications.
Financial aid implications include the potential loss of all aid if the student does not maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). Generally, this means the student must maintain the equivalent of a
“C” average or GPA of 2.0 or higher (some exceptions may apply). If a student loses aid due to failure
to maintain SAP, he or she must reestablish SAP before aid can recommence, assuming the student is
otherwise eligible. The full SAP policy can be found on the COA website and in the Office of Financial
Aid.
Credit (CR) issued for any courses taken as P/F versus a grade is treated, for financial aid purposes, as
the equivalent of a “C” or 2.0 GPA. Students should be aware of the implications of this and the potential impact on their overall GPA at any given time.
ACADEMIC PROBATION
Any student who gets a D, F, or an NC (fails to receive credit in a class taken credit/no-credit) in a given
term is automatically placed on academic probation. Similarly a student who has two or more outstanding EX’s (extensions) at the beginning of a term is also placed on academic probation. There are
three levels of academic probation, and the changes to the criteria for getting off of academic probation require more consistent academic success in subsequent terms. Students on academic probation
are notified in writing (as are their advisors) and the students must attend a mandatory meeting with
the academic probation officer within the first three weeks of the subsequent term. Such meetings are
used to identify and address the issues causing the student to get probationary status and to ensure
successful future terms. Although academic probation is a serious issue, the tenor of this meeting is to
be constructive and supportive, not punitive.
In order to be removed from academic probation, the student must pass all of her or his classes in the
subsequent term with grades of C- or higher and receive no new extensions. Students on academic
probation are not considered in good academic standing. Students on academic probation are not eligible for independent studies, residences, or EcoLeague or other consortium exchanges. If a student
16
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
remains on academic probation for a second consecutive term, the student will have an academic
contract created for them. Academic contracts are individually constructed and have carefully defined
outcomes targeted to enhance the student’s success. Example contract conditions may include but
are not limited to:
• reduced course load for the subsequent term
• mandatory attendance at study skills group
• mandatory check-in meetings with advisors/teachers/counselors
• required work with a writing tutor
• requirements that students turn in no late work and/or miss no classes
Included in the academic contract will be clearly spelled out consequences for failing to meet the
terms of the contract. International students and the academic probation officer should be attentive
to the consequences academic probation has for maintaining F-1 student status and for eligibility to
remain in the United States.
After three consecutive terms on academic probation, or accumulating a total of five Fs, students will
be suspended from the college for one academic year.
The academic probation officer is appointed by the academic dean. The academic probation officer
has discretion to interpret the above procedures to support student success while maintaining high
academic standards. Decisions made by the academic probation officer may be appealed to the academic dean or her/his designee, whose decision is then final.
In order to be removed from academic probation, a student must pass his or her classes with a C- or
higher in the subsequent term with no extensions.
TRANSFER CREDIT
A student can transfer a maximum of eighteen credits to COA, the equivalent of sixty semester credit
hours or ninety quarter hours in systems commonly used at other institutions. One COA credit is
equivalent to 3.3 semester hours or five quarter hours. Work at another accredited institution is transferrable with a grade of C or above and approval by the Registrar, and will appear on the COA transcript with a grade of CR. Except for students receiving VA benefits, COA degree candidates may elect
not to use transfer credit toward the degree even though all work from previous institutions must be
submitted during the admission process. Transfer credits must be authorized by the student before
the registrar can apply them to the student’s transcript. Once transfer credit has been applied to a
student’s COA record, it cannot be removed.
A transfer student bringing in nine or more COA credits is exempt from the freshman requirements
(Human Ecology Core Course, History, Writing and QR courses). A student transferring in eighteen
credits is encouraged to begin planning for the completion of degree requirements and to select an
advising team as soon as possible. New transfer students should first make sure that the Registrar’s
Office has received final transcripts of all previous college course work; students are often accepted
for admission before the final transcript of previous work is available, and students must send for an
update to ensure that all transfer credits are applied.
First-time freshman students who have taken college courses while enrolled in high school may elect
to transfer in these credits after they have earned 9 COA credits. This transfer of credits does not
exempt them from the freshman requirements.
A COA student planning to take a course or a term of work as a visiting student at another college is
advised to get approval in advance from the registrar of its acceptability for credit. Credit is rarely
granted for work done at non-accredited institutions. Proposed study of this type must be evaluated
and approved for transferability in advance by Review and Appeals Committee.
CREDIT BY EXAM OR MILITARY EXPERIENCE
A maximum of one year (nine credits) may be given for credit by examination or military experience.
Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate and other successful examinations may serve as
prerequisites for COA courses.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
17
Advanced Placement (AP)
Scores of four or five on AP exams are acceptable for transfer. College credit earned while concurrently enrolled in secondary school is also limited to nine COA credits in transfer, the equivalent of
one year. A minimum of nine credit hours of college credit must be earned at College of the Atlantic
before AP credit may be applied to the permanent record. AP credits cannot be used to meet HY, QR,
or Resource Area requirements.
International Baccalaureate (IB)
Scores of five or above on IB Higher Level exams are acceptable for transfer. A minimum of nine credit
hours of college credit must be earned at College of the Atlantic before IB credit may be applied to the
permanent record. IB credits cannot be used to meet HY, QR, or Resource Area requirements.
DANTES
DANTES passing exam scores are eligible for credit under the American Council on Education recommendations. Requests for credit are handled on a case by case basis. Contact the Registrar’s Office for
more information.
Military training experience
Military training experience may be acceptable for credit under the American Council on Education
guidelines. As with DANTES, credit requests are handled on a case by case basis. Contact the Registrar’s Office for more information.
Official scores and transcripts must be mailed directly to the COA Registrar’s Office. Advanced standing credit earned while in high school is held in reserve and may not be recorded on the student’s
record until the beginning of the student’s second year. A student has the opportunity any time after
their first year to request the addition of these credits to their transcript. The amount of credit transferred affects the long term eligibility for Federal financial aid funds and speed of progress toward
graduation; a student is strongly advised to discuss his or her individual situation and timetable with
academic and financial advisors.
GRADUATION AND SENIOR YEAR
Students should submit intent to graduate forms in the winter term prior to the academic year in
which they intend to graduate. There are a number of important deadlines that fall during the student’s senior year—i.e., the human ecology essay, the senior project, and the certification of graduation requirements form. It is the student’s responsibility to adhere to all published deadlines, even in
the event that the student is away from campus.
In some cases students may “stand” at graduation even if they have not completed all graduation
requirements. Students who stand may participate in all graduation ceremonies and celebrations,
but will not receive a diploma nor be considered a graduate of the college until all graduation requirements are met. Students may participate in only one graduation ceremony.
Students who wish to stand must submit a completed standing contract form to the academic dean
for the privilege to do so. This contract must include a detailed plan, with clear deadlines, for completing all degree requirements.
A student may stand only if he or she has three or less COA credits remaining. If these credits are for
the senior project, the student must have their senior project proposal fully approved at the time he
or she petitions to stand. Students may not stand if they have not completed their human ecology essay, writing portfolio, community service or their internship.
The academic dean will decide on this request, in consultation with the student and her or his
advisor(s). The dean’s decision is final. If the standing contract is accepted, the student is required to
submit a $500 deposit, which is returned in full to the student upon completion of all work/graduation. Standing is not an option for graduate students.
18
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
A student may request a leave of absence for up to one calendar year or three consecutive terms.
Forms for this purpose are available in the Registrar’s Office and online. Approval depends upon
justification of the leave in the context of the student’s overall academic plan. The expected duration
of the leave must be stated at the time that the form is submitted. Failure to file a request for leave by
the end of add/drop period for any given term results in automatic withdrawal from the college.
A student who has either formally withdrawn from the college or lost matriculant status as stated
above, but desires to return to the college, must complete a short re-application form available from
the Office of Admission in order to be reconsidered as a candidate for matriculation.
For purposes of repayment of student loans, a student is considered to be withdrawn as of the end
of the last term of enrollment, even though he or she is on an approved leave of absence. For COA
purposes, the student can continue as a “degree candidate not enrolled.” For loan purposes, however,
a student is either a registered, tuition-paying student or not. This rule applies to students away on
non-credit internships and to seniors whose last enrollment (usually the senior project) takes place in
a term earlier than spring term prior to graduation.
A student who elects to take a leave of absence with pending incomplete or unsatisfactory work may
expect to meet with the academic dean upon return.
MEDICAL LEAVE
College of the Atlantic strives to maintain an environment that supports intellectual well-being and academic excellence. Nevertheless, unexpected circumstances can and do occur that affect a student’s
ability to succeed in COA’s rigorous intellectual climate. The following policy is intended to facilitate a
student’s necessary departure from and subsequent re-entry into the college.
A medical leave of absence is available for students who have medical or psychiatric conditions that
severely limit their ability to perform academic work. Students who need this type of leave of absence
must meet with the dean of student life and the academic dean. All medical leaves must have the written recommendation of a physician or mental health professional. Medical leaves are usually granted
for up to three terms.
Students who take a medical leave during a term will earn no academic credit for the term and their
class enrollments will show a grade of “W” (withdrawn). They will be refunded for tuition and room
as dictated by the refund policy detailed in this catalog. During the time of the leave, students must
actively engage in appropriate treatment as recommended by their physician or therapist.
Return and re-enrollment from a medical leave of absence are contingent on a written assessment by
a physician or therapist that is evaluated by the dean of student life in consultation with on-campus
health services staff. The dean of student life will then establish a re-entry plan (i.e. referral to a local
specialist, ongoing treatment plan) as necessary with the returning student to ensure that she/he is
fully aware of the resources available to support them. The academic dean will meet with the student
to review an appropriate academic course load upon their return to the college.
In the event that a student’s continuation at the college poses a significant risk to the well-being of
that student or to others in the community, the dean of student life can place a student on involuntary
medical leave. The student may appeal this decision (in writing) to the president of the college within
five working days.
ADDITIONAL PROGRAMS
Educational Studies
The Educational Studies Program at College of the Atlantic prepares students for teaching in a variety
of educational settings. Students may obtain Maine State teacher certification through our professional certification program or they may choose to specialize in non-traditional, field-based, and/or
outreach education. The program is highly selective, providing qualified students with a rich range
of pedagogical opportunities and intellectual resources. Students are challenged to translate the
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
19
environmental and social themes that form the basis of their education at College of the Atlantic into
effective and exciting educational experiences for others. The Educational Studies Program seeks to
expand students’ understandings of the professional possibilities in public and private schools as well
as informal educational settings.
The interactive and interdisciplinary nature of education at College of the Atlantic serves as a model
for the kind of education our students hope to create as teachers. Many graduates are teachers in
public and private schools; others have chosen careers as outdoor educators, interpretive naturalists,
and environmental educators.
Teacher Certification
COA has been granted the authority by the state of Maine to award teaching certification to its successful program graduates. This certification, which is reciprocal in forty-two other states, is available
in the following areas: elementary education (grades K–8); and secondary certification (grades 7–12) in
life science, social studies, and English language arts. Students electing to pursue professional teacher
certification may either do this as an internship or may take three additional credits beyond the COA
graduation requirement. COA has an excellent working partnership with the local public and private
schools. This relationship affords our students the opportunity to practice what they learn by getting
them abundant “hands-on” experiences in classrooms, after school programs, museums, alternative
educational settings, and summer camps.
The program standards are set by the State Board of Education and are interpreted by COA’s Educational Studies Committee. Courses satisfying the components are coded ED in the course description
section in this catalog. For further information and a complete list of program requirements see the
director of the Educational Studies Program or visit the COA website.
CONSORTIUM AGREEMENTS/EXCHANGES
CONSORTIUM AGREEMENTS
It is possible to set up a consortium with many accredited colleges/universities in the US and abroad.
Consortium agreements allow you to take courses at another school and still use your COA Federal
financial aid awards. Students must have completed a minimum of three terms at COA and be in good
academic and social standing. Credits will appear on your COA transcript as transfer credits. See the
Financial Aid Office for more information.
EcoLeague: The EcoLeague is a consortium of six colleges and universities that share similar missions
and value systems based on environmental responsibility, social change, and educating students to
build a sustainable future. The EcoLeague consists of small liberal arts institutions with strong environmental science, marine biology, outdoor studies, education, and other academic programs. These
colleges all stress experiential education so that students are prepared to take on real world challenges when they graduate. EcoLeague partners are Prescott College, Alaska Pacific University, Green
Mountain College, Northland College, Dickinson College, and College of the Atlantic.
How the EcoLeague works:
• EcoLeague exchanges are open to students studying any academic area.
• Students must have completed nine COA credits to be considered.
• COA students may spend up to two semesters at the host EcoLeague institution during their
sophomore and junior years.
• Students continue to pay full-time tuition to their home institution. Lab, course fees, room and
board, and any required fees are paid to the institution the student is visiting. Additional costs for
special programs and travel are covered by the student.
• Credits earned at EcoLeague institutions are accepted at the home institution as COA credits (not
transfer credits).
• Students must fill out an “intent to participate” form available from the Registrar’s Office, and once
approved, the participation/registration form.
20
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
• Students are expected to return to their home institution upon completion of the EcoLeague
semester(s).
See the registrar’s or dean’s offices for more details.
The New School: College of the Atlantic and The New School (TNS) have established an exchange program whereby students from COA may participate for up to two semesters at TNS. Students will pay
tuition to their home institution, and will pay course fees, room and board, and any additional fees to
the host institution. Students must have completed a minimum of three terms at COA and be in good
academic and social standing, and must apply for this exchange at least three months before the start
of the semester. Credits will be accepted as COA credits (not transfer credits). See registrar for more
information.
University of Maine: Any degree-seeking undergraduate student enrolled at COA or The University
of Maine at Orono (UMO) is eligible to participate in a cooperative exchange between COA and UMO,
after completing two terms as a full time student as defined by their home institution. College of the
Atlantic students may enroll for coursework at The University of Maine at Orono and UMO students
may enroll for coursework at COA. This exchange is contingent on a space available basis. See registrar for more information.
AFFILIATION AGREEMENTS
COA has affiliation agreements with a number of organizations, whereby COA agrees to award credit
for courses offered through their programs. In all cases, students must have completed a minimum
of three terms at COA and be in good academic and social standing to apply. Students must submit a
signed consortium agreement form to the Registrar’s Office prior to enrollment in the program, and
are charged an administrative fee ($500 per COA credit) to process the credits. See registrar for more
information.
Center for Ecological Living and Learning (CELL): College of the Atlantic will award credit for study
abroad programs offered by CELL. CELL programs focus on local and global solutions to environmental, social, and economic problems and are offered in Central America, East Africa, Iceland, and the
Middle East. Students apply directly to CELL and pay tuition and fees to CELL. Enrollment is limited to a
maximum of one semester worth of credit (16 semester credits, equivalent to 4.8 COA credits).
National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS): College of the Atlantic will award credit for semester
programs offered by NOLS. NOLS courses include field studies and practice of wilderness expedition
skills, leadership, group dynamics, safety and judgment development, and an introduction to environmental studies and ethics. Credit value depends on the length of the NOLS course (variable up to 16
semester credits, equivalent to 4.8 COA credits). Students apply directly to NOLS and pay NOLS fees.
SEA|mester: College of the Atlantic will award credit for academic courses taken on SEA|mester voyages. Students apply directly to SEA|mester and pay tuition and fees to SEA|mester. Enrollment is
limited to a maximum of one semester worth of credit (12 semester credits, equivalent to 3.6 COA
credits).
GRADUATE PROGRAM
Beginning in 1990 COA has offered the Master of Philosophy in Human Ecology degree. This program
is intended both for COA graduates who want to extend the type of work begun as undergraduates
and for students from elsewhere who want to add a human ecological focus to their research. The
MPhil is designed as a two-year program, involving nine credits of course work (from upper level
courses in the integrated curriculum and nine credits of thesis research). The Graduate Committee,
composed of the director of the graduate program and faculty representatives from each resource
area and the associate dean for advanced studies, is responsible for administering the MPhil program;
the director reports to the president and academic dean. Any graduate student requesting a waiver or
variance of any graduate degree requirements must submit a petition in writing to the Graduate Committee, which will discuss the matter as needed with the Academic Affairs Committee.
Enrollment: Students are expected to enroll full-time in each term of their first year of graduate study,
during which most or all of the nine required graduate course credits are to be completed. In second
or subsequent years, students are encouraged to maintain full-time status and study on campus until
graduation, but may petition their thesis committee and the director of the graduate program for
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
23
formal approval of part-time enrollment or leaves of absence in a given term. All degree requirements
must be completed within four years of first enrollment in the MPhil program. Newly admitted graduate students may begin their enrollment in any academic term.
Thesis Committee: Upon arrival at COA, each graduate student establishes a thesis committee composed of a chair, someone identified at the time of acceptance into the program and keenly interested
in the student’s research topic, plus at least one other COA faculty member, and an optional outside
practitioner or expert in the student’s field of inquiry. Working with the thesis committee, the student
designs his or her program, including a nine-credit thesis project and nine course credits relevant to
the thesis. During the thesis year, a faculty member from the Graduate Committee may join the thesis
committee to serve as a reader and to advise regarding general policy matters. Graduate students
are expected to schedule meetings of their committee as a group at least once a term. Following this
meeting the chair of the committee will report progress towards the degree to the graduate program
director.
Plan of Study and Thesis Proposal: Graduate students are required to turn in a plan of study at the
end of their first term of enrollment. A thesis proposal is due at the end of the third term. Individualized graduate programs should combine several academic disciplines, have a strong field or applied
component, or broaden current research in human ecology.
Graduate Courses: Graduate course credits may come from intermediate or advanced level courses
or tutorials ,independent studies. Expectations for graduate course credit are arranged in discussion
between each graduate student and the faculty member teaching a course. It is the responsibility of
each graduate student to initiate these discussions at the beginning of each term. Graduate credit
cannot be given for introductory level courses, group studies, courses in which the student does not
receive the equivalent of a ‘B-’ or better, or courses which are not completed within an academic year.
If a graduate student takes a course credit/no credit, the student must attain the equivalent of grade
‘B-’ or better to receive credit.
Transfer Credits: A maximum of three of the nine course credits may be transfer credits. All transfer
of credit is subject to approval by the thesis committee and director of the graduate program. Credits
from prior academic work must be upper level courses relevant to the student’s plan of study at COA,
earned within one calendar year prior to first enrollment in the MPhil program, and from academic
work above and beyond any courses that were a part of the student’s undergraduate program. Transfer of credits during graduate enrollment must be approved in advance.
Thesis Credits: During those terms in which thesis credits are taken, students are encouraged to be
in residence on campus and to meet with the chair of the thesis committee frequently for discussion,
direction, and advice. They should also meet regularly with other members of their committee. The
nine requisite thesis credits are not graded, but each is assessed as “satisfactory” or “unsatisfactory”
by the chair of the thesis committee and reported to the registrar. Students are expected to submit a
proposed plan of study for thesis credits at the beginning of each term where such credits are to be
taken. This plan will indicate the intended focus for that term (literature review, writing thesis sections, field, lab or studio work, etc). At the end of each term where thesis credits are to be awarded the
student will submit a short summary of what they have accomplished.
The Thesis: A thesis, required of all graduate students, investigates a specific area with rigor, allowing
the student to gain and demonstrate expertise in a particular topic and make an original contribution
to the field. The thesis is judged on rigor, relevance, and results. The thesis must have an interdisciplinary component; sections of a thesis may be rather specialized but at least part of it must be accessible
to a general audience. The college welcomes theses that take non-traditional forms, depending on
the student’s field and audience. Each thesis must be carefully documented and demonstrate a high
standard of scholarship. The form and structure of the thesis is to be shaped by consideration and
knowledge of similar theses in a student’s field, by the structure and design of the project, and suggestions of the thesis committee. A thesis of traditional form includes: a title page (with signatures),
acknowledgments, a table of contents, a list of figures, an abstract, the body of the thesis, a bibliography, end notes, and appendices. Three copies of the final version of the thesis, each on thesis bond
paper, must be submitted (bound or unbound) to the Graduate Committee prior to graduation. Note:
See the library archivist for information on formatting copies for the COA archives, due at the end of
week nine.
22
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Thesis Presentation: Each graduate student will arrange a public presentation of his/her thesis a
minimum of two weeks prior to the expected date of graduation. All thesis committee members are
expected to attend this presentation, and the student will be examined on the form and content of
the thesis.
Graduate Seminar: A graduate seminar is scheduled periodically to provide a forum for discussing issues in human ecology, sharing research skills, critiquing each other’s work, and fostering scholarship
and identity among graduate students. Participants in the graduate seminar include all graduate students and representatives of the Graduate Committee; thesis advisors and any invited participants.
IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENT
Maine state law requires that all students provide certification by a doctor, nurse, or other health
official of their immunity to rubella (“German measles”), rubeola (measles), diphtheria, and tetanus.
Evidence of immunity may be demonstrated with either a record of immunization with dates and dosages or a report of laboratory results of tests for immunity.
“MMR” (measles/mumps/rubella). Documentation must show that the student was immunized with
live vaccine, after 1968, and again after the student reached fifteen months of age.
“DT” or “Td” (diphtheria/tetanus). If the student’s most recent shot was over ten years ago, a booster is
required.
Certain exceptions do apply; the student may either provide a doctor’s statement that one or more
of these inoculations would be medically inadvisable, or the student may file a signed statement that
he or she has a religious or philosophical objection to such immunization. In either of these cases, the
student would be excluded from classes in the event of an outbreak of one of the diseases. One of
the above options must be followed before a student attends COA classes. If already immunized, the
student must send or bring a copy of the immunization record signed by the health professionals who
either administered the shots or have the records. Shots are available in Bar Harbor at the local health
facilities; the COA nurse can also administer the immunizations.
REGISTRATION AND FEES
Registration
Registration for an academic term takes place during week six of the preceding term. Registration
materials are available approximately one week prior to registration, students register online through
their student portal. Student accounts must be paid in full in order to access online registration.
Returning students registering for classes after the registration deadline will be assessed a $100 late
registration fee. If this “late registration” happens after the payment due date, the student will have
one week to settle his/her account with the Business Office. Failure to settle the account will result in
an additional $300 late payment fee. Students may not register for classes after the end of week two.
A student must have paid or made arrangements to pay all tuition and fees by the statement due
date. The college accepts payment plans with outside agencies, however these plans must be in place,
approved, and current by the statement due date. If previous payment plans were delinquent in the
past, COA reserves the right to refuse the establishment of a new payment plan.
Add/Drop
A student may make registration changes through the first week of the term by submitting an add/
drop form to the Registrar’s Office. After the add/drop period has ended, the student’s current registration can be viewed on their portal. If the student feels that an error has been made on the schedule, he or she should notify a staff member in the Registrar’s Office immediately.
Add/drop forms returned to the Registrar’s Office after the add/drop deadline will be assessed a $100
late fee. Appeals may be granted for extenuating circumstances; such appeals will be reviewed by the
Review and Appeals Committee.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
23
Withdrawal
A student may withdraw from a class up through the end of week four by submitting an add/drop
form specifying the request for withdrawal. A grade of “W” (withdrawal) will appear on the student’s
transcript. Students should be aware of the tuition reimbursement policy for withdrawals (refer to the
Refund section for more information). A student wishing to withdraw after the fourth week may only
do so with written consent from the course instructor and approval by an academic dean. Withdrawals are not permitted after week eight.
Auditors
Students are allowed to audit one course during a term with the instructor’s permission and with payment of the $150 audit fee. Auditing is entirely at the discretion of the instructor. Instructors cannot
accept auditors if they have had to turn away credit-seeking students. Appeal for conversion of “audit”
to “credit” in a case in which the student has actually participated in a course as a full-credit student
must be made to Review and Appeals Committee no later than the end of the fifth week of the term;
this action does require payment of additional for-credit fees on the part of the student. Audits show on
transcripts as AU.
Individuals from the Bar Harbor community may also audit a COA course with permission of the
instructor and payment of $150 plus any applicable lab fees, providing that no COA matriculant will be
displaced. Auditing is limited to one course per term. No refunds will be given for audited courses. All
fees are due the date of registration.
NON-DEGREE SEEKING STUDENTS
Persons desiring undergraduate credit may enroll as special students if they meet the pre-requisites
of the desired courses and have the permission of the instructor. Long-term residents of Hancock,
Washington, and Waldo counties may enroll for a limited number of courses, on a space-available
basis, at a reduced tuition rate. To to be eligible for this special rate Hancock County status must be
determined by the Office of Admission prior to registration. Other special students pay regular full
tuition rates. The number of Hancock County courses taken per student is restricted to three per year.
Only three Hancock County classes may apply toward matriculation. Special students are expected to
pay at the time of registration. Lab and activity fees apply. More information on policies and procedures for special students is available in the Registrar’s and Admission offices.
TUITION
• All fees are billed in June, July, November, and February, and must be paid by the specified due date.
• The total annual undergraduate tuition for 2017–18 is $42,993. Tuition is charged at a flat rate of
$4,777 per credit or $14,331 per term for full-time enrollment (plus housing/dining charges and
other fees). An additional fourth credit or less than full-time enrollment is calculated accordingly.
Costs for one year at COA, including tuition, housing, food, books and materials, and miscellaneous
expenses, may be estimated at $54,969.
• Summer enrollment is considered the first term of the next academic year.
• The fee for internships taken for credit, regardless of the length of the work period, is $14,331;
the internship is a full-time enrollment earning three COA credits. Senior projects are worth three
academic credits and therefore are also charged at the full tuition rate.
• COA alumni enrolling for student teaching after graduation will pay for three credits at the Hancock
County rate. Non-matriculating students wishing to complete student teaching at COA will be
charged for three credits—Hancock/Washington/Waldo county discount may apply if the student
meets the criteria.
• Members of COA staff families receive tuition reduction per defined policy guidelines, but pay
applicable community resource fees.
• Full-time graduate tuition rates are $9,555 per term. Additional associated fees and Peñalties apply
as outlined for undergraduates. Hancock County rates do not apply for graduate students.
• If a non-credit class or internship from a prior academic year is changed to credit, the costs of that
credit will be at the current year’s rates.
24
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
PAYMENT OF BILLS
Students have access to account statements on their student portal. Paper bills will not be mailed.
Students must have either paid or made arrangements to pay all tuition and fees by the payment due
dates. A late payment fee of $300 will be assessed on overdue accounts.
Payment due dates:
• Fall: August 7, 2017
• Winter: December 4, 2017
• Spring: March 19, 2018
• Summer 2018: July 9, 2018
• Fall 2018: August 6, 2018
COA accepts payment plans with an outside agency, however, the approved plan must be in place
and remain current. The college is usually able to assist students and/or their parents in working out
a payment plan. College of the Atlantic accepts Master Card and Visa for bill payments up to $1000 a
term. In the event that a check is returned to College of the Atlantic for insufficient funds, the student
account will be charged a $40 service fee. Online payments may be made through TMS at (https://coa.
afford.com). If wiring funds please request instructions from the Business Office. Bills for special term
enrollment (i.e. Yucatan/Cavilam), where the student starts the term before the regular COA term
begins, will be due before the student leaves for the program. International and special deposits are
non-refundable.
A late payment fee of $300 will be assessed on overdue accounts and on delinquent payment plans.
Students will not be allowed to register for the next term if there is an outstanding balance on their
account. If a student has had a late payment in a prior term, COA may unenroll the student from the
upcoming term if that payment is not paid by the due date. Transcripts, grades, or diplomas will not be
released until the student account is paid in full.
HOUSING AND DINING
The fee for a room in COA housing is $6,210 per year. There is a non-refundable $150 security deposit
charged to all students living in housing. The full meal plan is $3,537 per year (all first time students
living in COA housing are on the full meal plan). For those students living off campus and not opting
to be on the full meal plan, there are three additional meal plan options: ten meals/week for $2,667,
five meals/week for $1,494, and a $100 declining balance card. Meals/week plans are not transferable
from term to term. Declining meal plan balances can be used from term to term but expire at the end
of the academic year.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES FEE
A $90 student activities fee is charged each term for every enrolled student, whether the student is on
campus or not. These fees fund a budget administered by the Student Activities Committee.
HEALTH FEE
A $93 per term health fee is charged for all matriculated and visiting students. This pays for on-campus health services.
LAB FEES
Laboratory fees are charged by the term for courses in which expendable materials are used and/or
field trips are required. These fees usually range from $10 to $50, but may be higher depending on
the nature of the class (i.e. lab and art classes have more consumables). Amounts may or may not be
known in time for catalog printing, but will be listed on registration materials and billed with tuition.
Lab fees are not subject to refund after the add/drop period.
CREDIT BALANCE RETURNS
In the event a student’s bill has been overpaid, a Credit Balance Return (CBR) will be automatically isCOLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
25
sued to the student after add/drop has been completed and all financial aid for the student has been
received and applied to the student’s account each term. If the CBR is a result of a PLUS loan, overpayment by a parent, or from a parent payment plan (TMS), the refund will be returned to the parent unless a written (and signed) authorization from the parent is given to the Business Office to return the
funds directly to the student. Parent authorizations are needed each term. Credit Balance Returns will
not be automatically processed for overpayments from international payments, a 529 plan, or other
unique payment. Students will be notified when a CBR is available for pickup in the Business Office;
checks are not put in student mailboxes. If the credit is to be left on account for a future term, then
written authorization to the Business Office is required.
COURSE WITHDRAWALS
Full Course Withdrawal: Students who register for a term but withdraw from all courses, either for
medical or non-medical reasons, by 4:00 p.m. on the add/drop deadline will receive a full reversal
except for program fees, which are not refundable (and see health insurance below). Students who
withdraw from all classes in weeks two through week five will receive a daily pro-rated refund based
upon the cash amount paid for the current term. No additional billing adjustments are computed for
housing and meals as they are already included in the amount paid. There are no reversals after week
one for student activity fee, health fee, program fees or lab fees (and see health insurance below).
Federal Aid adjustments and outside scholarships will be adjusted per the laws of such aid.
If a student is enrolled in a COA sponsored international or off campus program and drops the
program after the deposit deadline but before the program begins, a $500 fee will be assessed. If a
student drops the program once the program begins, the standard reversal policy above applies.
Health Insurance for full course withdrawal: Students who elect to be on the health insurance plan
and withdraw from all classes within 30 days of the start of health coverage (August 15) are eligible for
a refund if they have not utilized the plan. If the student has accessed services and the insurance company has received the claim within the 30-day window, a premium reversal will not be granted. If the
student withdrawals from all classes after the 30 days of start of coverage, no health insurance refund
will be granted. If a student withdrawals from all classes within the 30-day window and a reversal of
health insurance premium was granted, any claims received after that time will be denied by the insurance company and the student will be responsible for all charges.
Dropping one or two courses (partial drop): Students who drop one or two courses will receive credit
toward tuition for a future term based upon the below chart. This credit must be used within the next
four consecutive terms and will be factored into computing that term’s financial aid award. The student may not apply the credit to a prior term balance. All balances must be paid prior to application of
this credit.
Reversal credit schedule per courses dropped:
Add/drop deadline:
Full tuition and lab fee reversal, excluding non-refundable program fees
Week 2:
$4,000 credit toward tuition for a future term
Week 3:
$2,500 credit toward tuition for a future term
Week 4:
$1,500 credit toward tuition for a future term
Week 5:
$500 credit toward tuition for a future term
Weeks 6–10:
No credit or reversal
The date that is used to determine the reversal amount is the date the completed paperwork is turned
into the Registrar’s Office.
26
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
FINANCIAL AID AND WORK STUDY
Financial aid information is available in COA’s Financial Aid Office. The financial aid program is explained in detail in the COA publication, Financial Planning Options, which is available from the Office
of Admission and Financial Aid. Students applying for financial assistance at COA must complete the
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and COA’s institutional application for financial aid.
New applicants should file online at www.fafsa.gov. Renewal applicants receive a renewal FAFSA from
the federal processor via email. COA’s application for financial aid is distributed to renewal financial
aid students’ mailboxes, usually before winter break. In a case where a student’s natural parents are
divorced or separated, the college requires that the non-custodial parent complete the non-custodial
parent’s statement (available from the Office of Admission and Financial Aid) in order for the student
to be considered for institutional sources of financial aid.
The timetable below applies for financial aid applications prior to the fall term:
• January 1–February 15
Financial aid applications should be completed and mailed.
• April 1–June 15
COA mails financial aid replies to on-time applicants.
While late application does not necessarily disqualify a student from financial aid, it may reduce the
student’s award if COA funds have already been allocated. Students who register on time receive priority in the awarding of COA institutional financial aid.
Financial aid awards are generally calculated assuming full-time enrollment. Adjustments to the award
are made if a student is enrolled less than full-time. Awards are also subject to adjustment if a student
receives additional outside resources after the award is tendered or if a student’s costs are lower
than originally projected. Students are expected to complete the requirements for their self-directed
programs within the thirty-six required COA credits and are generally not eligible to receive institutional financial aid beyond this credit limit. It is further required that a student maintain satisfactory
progress toward successful completion of the human ecology degree (see section on Satisfactory
Academic Progress).
Further details regarding COA’s Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy as well as general
financial aid policies and procedures are available in the Financial Aid Office and on the COA website.
Work-study assignments are managed by the Financial Aid Office. Once assigned, a student sets up his
or her work-study schedule with the job supervisor. The student and the work-study supervisor keep
records of hours worked, and the student is responsible for submitting their hours online every other
week.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
27
COA FACULTY MEMBERS 2017–2018
Anderson, John: BA, University of California,
Berkeley; MA, San Francisco State University;
PhD, University of Rhode Island. zoology,
behavioral ecology, anatomy, physiology
Andrews, Nancy: BFA, Maryland Institute College
of Art; MFA, The School of the Art Institute of
Chicago. performance art, video production
Baker, Jodi: BA, California State University,
Fresno; MFA, National Theatre Conservatory,
Denver Center for Performing Arts. performing
arts
Borden, Richard: BA, University of Texas; PhD,
Psychology, Kent State University. environmental
psychology, personality and social development,
contemporary psychology, philosophy of human
ecology
Hall, Sarah: BA, Hamilton College; PhD, University
of California, Santa Cruz. geology, earth science
Hess, Helen: BS, University of California,
Los Angeles; PhD, University of Washington.
invertebrate zoology, biomechanics
Hill, Kenneth: BA, University of Michigan; EdM,
Harvard University; MS, PhD, Cornell University.
education, psychology
Kozak, Anne: BA, Salve Regina College; MA, St.
Louis University. writing, literature
Letcher, Susan: BA, Carleton College; PhD,
University of Connecticut, Storrs. plant biology
Little-Siebold, Todd: BA, MA, University of
Massachusetts, Amherst; PhD, Tulane University.
history, Latin American studies
Carpenter, William: BA, Dartmouth College; PhD,
University of Minnesota. literature, creative
writing, comparative mythology
Mancinelli, Isabel: BS, Catholic University of
America; MLA, Harvard University. community
and regional planning, landscape architecture
Cline, Kenneth: BA, Hiram College; JD, Case
Western Reserve University. public policy,
environmental law
McKown, Jamie: BA, Emory University; MA,
Georgia State University; PhD, Northwestern
University. government, polity
Clinger, Catherine: BFA, University of Kansas;
MA, University of New Mexico; MPhil, University
College London; PhD, University of London. art
history, studio arts
Morse, Suzanne: BA, PhD, University of California,
Berkeley. applied botany, plant ecology,
agricultural ecology
Colbert, Dru: BFA, Auburn University; MFA, The
School of the Art Institute of Chicago. visual
communications, 3D art and design, museum
studies
Collum, Kourtney: BS, Western Michigan
University; MS, University of Maine; PhD,
University of Maine. food systems and
sustainable agriculture
Cooper, John: BA, Trenton State; MA, Trenton
State. music fundamentals, aesthetics of music,
improvisation
Cox, J. Gray: BA, Wesleyan University; PhD,
Vanderbilt University. philosophy, peace studies
and language learning
Feldman, David: BA, Carleton College; PhD,
University of California, Davis. mathematics,
physics
Petersen, Christopher: BA, University of
California, Santa Barbara; PhD, University of
Arizona. ichthyology, marine ecology
Ressel, Stephen: BS, Millersville University;
MS, University of Vermont; PhD, University of
Connecticut. vertebrate biology, environmental
physiology
Stabinsky, Doreen: BA, Lehigh University; PhD,
University of California, Davis. agricultural policy,
international studies,global environmental affairs
Tai, Bonnie: BA, Johns Hopkins University; EdM,
EdD, Harvard University. educational theory,
research, and practice
Taylor, Davis: BS, United States Military Academy;
MS, PhD, University of Oregon. environmental
and resource economics
Foley, Sean: BFA, Herron School of Art; MFA, Ohio
State University. drawing, painting
Todd, Sean: BSc, University College of
North Wales; PhD, Memorial University of
Newfoundland. marine mammal physiology and
behavior
Friedlander, John Jay: BA, Colgate University;
MBA, Olin Graduate School of Business at Babson
College. green business
van Vliet, Netta: BA, Lewis and Clark College; MA,
PhD, Duke University. cultural anthropology,
Israeli studies
28
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Visvader, John: BA, CUNY; PhD, University of
Minnesota. philosophy, philosophy of science,
history of ideas
Waldron, Karen: BA, Hampshire College; MA,
University of Massachusetts; MA, PhD, Brandeis
University. literature and writing; minority,
cultural, and feminist theory; American studies
EMERITUS
Beal, Elmer: BA, Bowdoin College; MA, University
of Texas at Austin. ethnology, anthropological
theory, traditional music
Carpenter, JoAnne: BA, University of
Massachusetts; MA, University of Minnesota;
MFA, University of Pennsylvania. art history,
architectural history, painting
Katona, Steven: BA, Harvard University, 1965;
PhD Harvard 1971. biology
Lerner, Susan: BA, University of Cincinnati;
California Institute of Arts
McMullen, Ernest: Art, University of Maryland,
Portland Museum School, Portland State
University. ceramics, visual studies
LECTURERS
Capers, Colin: BA, MPhil, College of the Atlantic.
writing, film
Lakey, Heather: BA, MPhil, College of the Atlantic;
PhD, University of Maine. women’s, gender, and
sexuality studies
Mahoney, Daniel: BA, California State University;
MFA, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
writing
Peña, Karla: MS in Teaching Spanish as a Foreign
Language, Antonio de Nebrija University, Madrid,
Spain.
Swann, Scott: BA, MPhil, College of the Atlantic.
ecology, ornithology
Turok, Katharine: BA, Wheaton College; MA,
Rutgers University. comparative literature
Winer, Josh: BA, College of the Atlantic; MFA,
Massachusetts College of Art and Design.
photography
LECTURERS EMERITUS
Demeo, Anna: BS, University of Colorado; MS,
PhD, University of Maine. sustainable energy
education and management
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Stover, Candice:B.A. Northeastern University,
1974; M.A. Pennsylvania State University, 1976.
writing, literature
ADJUNCT FACULTY
Alex, Joanne: BA Colby College; MEd, University of
Maine. education
Barter, Christian: BA, Bates College; MFA,
Vermont College. poetry
Beard, Ronald E.: BS, MS, University of Maine,
Orono. community leadership
Bennett, Michael A.: BM, University of Maine,
Orono. percussion
Donovan, Martha: BA, Williams College; MA,
Middlebury College. English, literature and
writing
Drennan, Matthew: BA, College of the Atlantic.
seabird ecology
Fingerhut, Larrance: BA, New England
Conservatory. improv, piano, music
Gallon, Robert: BS, Columbia University; Ph.D.,
City University of New York. clinical psychologist
Heckscher, Philip: BA, Harvard. literature, French
history, calligraphy
Leaverton, Lisa: BA, Peabody Conservatory
of Music; MFA, University of Iowa. music,
storytelling and performance
Lepcio, Andrea: BA, College of the Atlantic;
MFA, Carnegie Mellon University. writing, plays,
theatre
McNally, Jay: BA, College of the Atlantic. business
education
Moody, Paula: BA, Johnson College; MEd
University of Maine, Orono. primary and special
education
Olday, Fred: BA, Pennsylvania State University;
MA, Harvard University; PhD, University of
Massachusetts. botany, plant science
Poier, Salvatore: LLM, Facoltá di Giurisprudenza,
Universitá degli Studi Di Trento, Italy; MA, the
International Institute for the Sociology of Law;
PhD, Universitá degli Studi di Milano, Instituto di
Filosofia e Sociologia del Diritto. law
Ryan, Siobhan: BA, Boston College School of
Arts and Science; MLIS, Pratt Institute, School
of Information and Library Science. children’s
literature
29
Sanborn, Kelley Rush: BA, Boston College; MA,
Wheelock College. supporting students with
disabilities in the regular classroom
Jacobi, Charlie: BA, Middlebury College; MS,
Virginia Tech. Natural Resources Specialist,
Acadia National Park
Seddig, Robert: BA, Carleton College; MA, PhD,
Princeton University. politics
Jones, Leslie: BA, College of the Atlantic; MS/JD,
Vermont Law School. natural resources, land
conservation and the environment
Shepard, Jennifer: BA, University of Iowa. improv,
acting, directing
Weber, Jill: BA, University of Northern Colorado;
MS, University of Maine. botany
Wessler, Steve: BA, Harvard College; JD, Boston
University School of Law. human rights, law
FACULTY ASSOCIATES
Frank, Katherine: BA, University of Michigan; MA,
PhD, Duke University.
Honea-Fleming, Patricia: BA, MA, Georgia State
University; PhD, Purdue University.
Mainwaring, Alan: BS, Rochester Institute of
Technology; PhD, University of California,
Berkeley. computer science, wireless network
monitoring of habitats
Manski, David: BS, University of Arizona;
MS, Texas A&M. Chief, Division of Resource
Management, Acadia National Park
McGreavey, Bridie: BA, Bates College; MS Antioch
University of New England, PhD, University of
Maine, Orono; communication and sustainability
science,
Negoita, Luka: BA, College of the Atlantic.
Kates, Robert W.: MA, PhD, University of Chicago.
anthropology
O’Keefe, Susan; BA, Saint Petersburg; MS, Oxford
University; conservation and policy.
RESEARCH ASSOCIATES
Rock, Jennifer: BA, College of the Atlantic.
zoology, evolutionary biology
Anderson, Karen: Geographic Information
Systems Specialist, Acadia National Park
Blavascunas, Eunice: BS, BA The Evergreen
State College; MA University of Texas; MA , PhD,
University of California Santa Cruz
Cole-Will, Rebecca: BA, University of Maine; MA,
University of Alberta. anthropology
Connery, Bruce: Biologist, Acadia National Park
DenDanto, Dan: BA, College of the Atlantic.
population biology of fin whales using genetic
techniques
Guenther, Carla; BS, Worcester Polytechnic
Institute; PhD, University of California, Santa Cruz
Harris, Tanner: BA, College of the Atlantic, MS,
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Hazan Connery, Judy: Biologist, Acadia National
Park
Heth, Giora: BS, MS, PhD, The Hebrew University
of Jerusalem Chemical communication, evolution
of behavior, olfactory neuroscience
30
Springuel, Natalie: BA, College of the Atlantic; MS,
Antioch New England. environmental studies and
communication, forest practices
Stevick, Peter: BA, College of the Atlantic.
population biology of humpback whales
Todrank, Josephine; BA, College of the Atlantic;
MTS, Boston University School of Theology; MA
and PhD, University of Pennsylvania; evolution of
behavior, olfactory neuroscience.
Vaux, Peter: BS, University of London; PhD,
University of California, Davis; Aquatic ecology,
limnology, landscape theory
Watts, Dianna; MA, John Hopkins University;
PhD, University of Calfornia, Berkeley; business
administration
Weber, Jill; BA, University of Northern Colorado;
MS, University of Maine, Orono; botany
Zoidis, Ann: BA, Smith College; MS San Francisco
State University; behavioral observations and
data collections of several avian and mammalian
species
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
COA STAFF MEMBERS 2017–2018
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS
Darron Collins: President
Millard Dority: Director of Campus Planning,
Buildings, and Public Safety
Abigail Curless: Assistant to the President
ACADEMIC DEANS
John Barnes: Assistant Director of Buildings
and Grounds
Kenneth Hill: Academic Dean
and Co-Chair of Faculty Development Group
Robert Colson: Custodian
Chris Petersen: Associate Dean
and Co-Chair of Academic Affairs
James Houghton: Night Watchman
Judy Allen: Associate Dean
and Co-Chair of Academic Affairs
Robert Nolan: Buildings
Karen Waldron: Associate Academic Dean
and Co-Chair of Faculty Development Group
ACADEMIC SERVICES
Marie Stivers: Director of Academic and
Administrative Services
Barbara Carter: Assistant to the Faculty
Russel Holway: Head Custodian
Barbara Meyers: Gardener
Tom Strehan: Custodian
Bruce Tripp: Head of Grounds
Brent Walton: Night Watchman
BUSINESS OFFICE
Melissa Cook: Controller
Patricia Pinkham: Business Office Manager
ADMINISTRATIVE DEAN
Jenel Thurlow: Accounts Payable Representative
Andrew Griffiths
Shana Willey: Accounts Receivable/Student
Payroll Representative
ADMISSION OFFICE
Heather Albert-Knopp: Dean of Admission
Linda Black: Admission and Financial Aid
Assistant
Matt Shaw: Assistant Director of Admission
Donna McFarland: Associate Director of
Admission & Student Services
ALLIED WHALE
Tom Fernald: Allied Whale Research Associate
Rosemary Seton: Allied Whale Research
Associate, Marine Mammal Stranding
Coordinator
BEECH HILL FARM
Anna Davis: Farm Manager
David Levinson: Farm Manager
BOAT CAPTAIN
Toby Stephenson: Captain of the M/V Osprey
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
COMPUTER SERVICES
Pamela Mitchell: Director of Information
Technology
Jarly Bobadilla: IT Systems Manager
Eric Johnson: Desktop Support Manager
Sean Murphy: Assistant Director of Information
Technology
DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
Lynn Boulger: Dean of Institutional Advancement
Amanda Mogridge: Alumni Relations Coordinator
Lothar Holzke: Database Administrator
Jennifer Hughes: Manager of Donor Engagement
Kristina Swanson: Development Officer
Rebecca Hope Woods: Director of Creative
Services
EDUCATION STUDIES PROGRAM
Linda Fuller: Associate Director of Educational
Studies
33
FINANCIAL AID
STUDENT LIFE
Bruce Hazam: Director of Financial Aid
Sarah Luke: Dean of Student Life
Amy McIntire: Assistant Director of Financial Aid
Barbara Conry: Director of Student Support
and Wellness
FOOD SERVICES
Lise Desrochers: Co-Director of Food Services
Monica Hamm: Coordinator of International
Student Services
Ken Sebelin: Co-Director of Food Services
Ingrid Hill: Operations Manager
Jennifer Czifrik: Dining Hall Manager
Nick Jenei: Coordinator of Community
Engagement
Heather Halliday: Cook/Baker
Conor O’Brien: Cook
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Gordon Longsworth: Geographic Information
Systems Lab Director
GEORGE B. DORR MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
Carrie Graham: Museum Supervisor
INTERNSHIPS & CAREER SERVICES
Jill Barlow-Kelley: Director of Internships
and Career Services
SUMMER PROGRAMS
Laura Johnson: Director of Summer Programs
Renee Duncan: Director of Summer Field Studies
SUSTAINABILITY & ENERGY
Andrea Russell: Community Energy Center
Program Manager
THORNDIKE LIBRARY
Jane Hultberg: Director of the Thorndike Library
Trisha Cantwell Keene: Associate Director of the
Thorndike Library
LABORATORY MANAGEMENT
Wendy Kearny: Weekend Supervisor (nights)
Cristy Benson: Laboratory Manager
Catherine Preston-Schreck: Library Assistant/
Work Study Student Coordinator
PEGGY ROCKEFELLER FARMS
C.J. Walke: Farm Manager
COMMUNICATIONS
Hannah Stevens: Library Specialist for Archiving
and Cataloging
Zach Soares: Audio-Visual Technology Specialist
Donna Gold: Editor, COA Magazine
Rob Levin: Director of Communications
REGISTRAR’S OFFICE
Judy Allen: Registrar
Mindy Viechnicki: Assistant Registrar
32
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
2017–2018 COURSE LISTINGS
AD 1011: Introduction to Arts and Design
Faculty: Mamcinelli, Isable
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course is the fundamental course for students pursuing studies in Arts and Design, offering
insights into a range of issues addressed in the
arts and design curriculum. This course includes
studio, field, historical, and theoretical components.
Students learn how basic design principals are applied in garden design, historic architectural styles,
and planning. They also examine the history and
application of perspective drawing and color theory.
Students are expected to observe, document, analyze, and make recommendations for improvement
of the designed world. Studio work involves both
individual and team efforts which are presented for
class critique. Learning to give constructive critique
is an essential skill and an integral part of many arts
and design courses. The last two weeks are dedicated to final projects where students delve deeper
into any aspect of the course. Students are expected
to complete each project, read assigned books and
excerpts, and participate in class discussions and
critiques. All work is submitted at the end of term
and evaluations are based on attendance, participation, and submitted work. Offered every fall. Level:
Introductory. Limit: 25. Lab fee $30.
AD 1012: Introduction to Keyboard/Piano
Faculty: Cooper, John
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This is a learn-the-basics course in which the essentials of keyboard harmony are introduced in order
for the student to be able to play functional piano.
Areas of study include basic chords (major, minor,
diminished, and augmented and their inversions),
7th chords, basic fingering and scale patterns,
finger dexterity, rhythm drills, aural perception, and
reading lead sheets/sheet music. This is a practical, hands-on course for those interested in playing
not only piano, but also organ and synthesizers.
Introduction to MIDI is also included. Keyboard II
is a continuation of practical technique leading to
keyboard fluency. Level: Introductory. Limit: 20. Lab
fee: $20.
AD 1013: Jazz, Rock, and Blues: From Their
Origins to the Present
Faculty: Cooper, John
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
This course is a survey of the particular styles of
music that have had such a profound effect on
America, as well as the world in the twentieth
century. Students inquire of the social, cultural, and
aesthetic elements that led to the creation of each
style. The use of recorded examples provides a
chronological examination of the principal musicians and composers as well as an analysis of the
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
more influential soloists and groups. The course
includes technical background into the various common musical “bonds of union” between Jazz, Rock,
and Blues, as well as discussion concerning the
permeation of these characteristics into secular and
non-secular music of the 1900s. There is considerable study of the social significance of the music, exploration of the broad cultural and artistic aspects
of the music, how these styles changed and evolved,
and how their growth related to parallel changes in
fine art music. Level: Introductory. Class is open to
all students, regardless of musical experience. Lab
fee: $10.
AD 1014: Music Fundamentals: Intro to Reading/
Hearing/Writing/Playing
Faculty: Cooper, John
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This hands-on course deals with the aural, mental,
and physical elements of music and its production.
It is divided into instructional segments including:
Ear Training and Aural Perception, Music Theory,
Basic Keyboard Skills, Arranging and Composition,
and Basic Guitar Skills. [Detailed descriptions of segments available in Registrar’s office.] This course is
open to all students, regardless of musical experience. The sole prerequisite is a desire to make music
or simply to enrich one’s skills as a critical listener of
music. Efforts are made to accommodate the special
needs of the musical novice, as well as to challenge
the experienced performer. Emphasis is on popular
song styles, but analysis of Western Art Music forms
are included for comparison purposes. Level: Introductory. Limit: 20. Lab fee $20.
AD 1016: World Percussion
Faculty: Bennett, Michael
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This is a “hands on” class for learning and performing conga, snare drum, drum set, hand percussion
techniques, focusing on the role of percussion in
European, Latin American, African, and American
music. In addition to enjoying themselves and having a better understanding of the world of percussion, students master rhythmic notation, counting
and subdivision, time signature, and reading percussion music. Requirements include: test on notation,
composition of a percussion ensemble solo that
will be performed by the group, and a paper on a
percussion topic of student’s choice with approval
of the instructor. Level: Introductory. Limit: 12.
AD 1017: The History of Rock
Faculty: Cooper, John
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
The History of Rock… “We were just the spokesmen for a generation.” A social history of Rock and
33
Roll, from it’s origination in the Blues, through the
Rhythm and Blues of the 50’s, into the era of Little
Richard, Chuck Berry, and Elvis. From the British
invasion to heavy metal, rap, and even Dylan and
other poets like him that couldn’t sing either. We’ve
got it covered. You will listen to it, you will read
about it, you will watch it happen on videos (no
BeeGees or Tony Orlando)…we will connect it to the
times…and what turbulent times they were. If you
are interested in what happened culturally in this
country between 1950 and today, you need not look
any farther than this course. For “the music of the
people”, ROCK, accurately reflects the varying peaks
and valleys of much of the events of the past half
century. Level: Introductory. Limit: 20. Lab fee $10.
AD 1018: Introduction to Guitar
Faculty: Cooper, John
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course is a fundamental study in guitar chord
construction, note reading, chord symbol identification, fingerboard facility, theory as related
to guitar, chord inversions, and scale and mode
work. Students are expected to attain introductory
improvisational skills and basic facility in practical
guitar performance. Level: Introductory. Students
must provide own instruments (acoustic or electric).
Limit: 20. Lab fee: $10.
AD 1019: Four-Dimensional Studio
Faculty: Andrews, Nancy
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This class gives students an opportunity to investigate time-based art. 4-D art draws on the vast
and varied traditions of theatre, dance, media, and
music, often crossing boundaries to create hybrid
works. This course will focus on concepts and
processes related to representing and experiencing
events that take place in time. Strategies for planning, proposing, and producing work individually
or collaboratively will be discussed and practiced.
Some class periods will be workshop in style, and
include physical and vocal exercises and improvisations. The course will include basic instruction and
use of video cameras and sound recording devices.
A majority of the learning in this studio course will
happen as students make projects and reflect on
their work and the work of others. Documentation
and information about contemporary and historic
time-based art will be presented. Students will be
evaluated based on imaginative exploration of ideas
and materials, extent and depth of work processes
and research, completion of assigned projects, and
participation in class discussions. Level: Introductory. Lab fee $30. Limit: 12.
AD 1020: History of Western Music
Faculty: Cooper, John
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
This course covers the traditions of western “art”
music from the era of Renaissance (1450-1600)
34
through Baroque (1600-1750), Classical (1750-1820),
Romantic (1820-1900), Impressionism (early 1900s)
and into the 20th century primarily in Europe.
Through these five centuries of Eurocentric artistic
development the areas of music, art, literature,
philosophy, religion, and architecture continuously
merge. Extensive study is devoted to how this
“convergence of ideas” led to the advancement of
the western society and its direct descendant, the
Americas. Major composers covered include Gabrieli, Bach, Handel, Mozart, Schubert, Beethoven,
Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Wagner, Puccini, Chopin,
Strauss, Liszt, Rimsky-Korsakoff, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Debussy, Ravel, Ives, Copland. The course
requires extensive reading, listening to recordings,
and video observation. Level: Introductory. Limit:
20. Lab fee: $10.
AD 1022: Art Since 1900: Harmony and Conflict
Faculty: Clinger, Catherine
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
The artworks of Pablo Picasso and Hannah Höch;
both the well-known and lesser-known artist made
paintings and sculptures that facilitate our understanding of how people experienced the twentieth century. Cubism, Surrealism, Expressionism,
Minimalism, and more—these artist movements
were initiated through group declarations of common aesthetic purpose. This art history survey
looks at how their varied concerns with theories of
the unconscious, radical political programs, social
upheaval, and scientific discoveries were expressed
through artistic production. Anxiety, joy, curiosity,
and activist predilection combine to formulate a
rich amalgam of fresh and challenging visions of the
world. Level: Introductory. Lab fee: $65. Limit: 18.
AD 1025: Movement Training Basics
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
Meets the following requirements: ADS
An introduction to a wide variety of physical skills
useful for anyone interested in investigating their
own physical potential for self-expression. Techniques used will be derived from classical ballet,
clowning, mime, sports, acrobatics and improvisation. The work will promote a greater sense of
physical awareness and imaginative possibility and
will focus on mental and physical stamina, flexibility
and agility. Together we will challenge our own preconceptions about body image and body language
and work creatively and collaboratively to clarify abstract concepts through physical action. Evaluation
is based on class participation and engagement with
introduced topics and concepts. Students with any
or no movement experience are welcome. Default
grading option is Credit/No Credit. Level: Introductory. Course limit: 15. Lab fee: $20.
AD 1026: Introduction to Photography
Faculty: Winer, Josh
Meets the following requirements: ADS
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Photography is a common language spoken across
cultural, economic and geographical boundaries
used in new gathering, commerce and fine art.
Being able to use the camera as an effective tool
for self expression or in the pursuit of a documentary project is a skill which is applicable to a large
number of COA students. A broad introduction to
photography and digital printing, this course will
introduce the principles and applied techniques of
contemporary photographic practices. Designed to
put the student in charge of their camera, we’ll begin with basic camera controls such as aperture and
shutter speed and progress on to more advanced
topics such as the proper use of ‘flash’. Also covered
will be an introduction to Adobe Photoshop and/or
Adobe Lightroom as well as good printing practices
in a digital environment. Students will be evaluated
on the quality of finished prints included in a final
portfolio, their participation in class exercises and
critiques and individual growth over the course of
the term. Level: Introductory. Lab fee: $110. Limit:
13.
AD 1028: Chinese Calligraphy
Faculty: Heckscher, Philip
Meets the following requirements:
In this class students will develop brushwork skills
and an appreciation of the history and aesthetic of
Chinese calligraphy. The course will cover each of
the five styles of Chinese Calligraphy: seal, clerical,
regular, running, and grass. We will also discuss the
historical context in which Chinese written language
and calligraphy evolved, biographies of famous
calligraphers, and differences between Western
and Chinese calligraphy. Class sessions will consist
of a combination of demonstrations, discussion,
and class practice. Students will be evaluated on
participation in class discussions and critiques, skill
in brush techniques, finished calligraphic pieces,
and one or more projects. Projects may include calligraphy murals, finger-painted characters, calligraphy clothing, and cutting signature “chops”. Level:
Introductory. Prerequisites: None; no experience
with Chinese or calligraphy is required. Limit: 12.
Lab fee: $25
AD 1031: Drawing I
Faculty: Foley, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course provides an introduction to basic freehand drawing with an emphasis on drawing from
observation. The student is introduced to a wide
range of drawing methods, media and concepts,
while developing perceptual skills and an ability to
utilize drawing as a tool for thinking, expression,
invention, and communication. The learning in this
course is rooted in an intensive, studio based art
making experience through which one will gain the
necessary skills to begin creating works of art within
a historically and culturally aware context. This
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
studio course prepares each student for the careful
interpretation and evaluation of their own work,
that of their peers, and artwork of current or historical significance. This capacity for interpretation and
evaluation is made possible through an instructional emphasis on learning to see and translating what
is seen during the act of drawing. Students will be
evaluated on their studio work, participation, articulation of concepts, and degree of improvement over
the term. Level: Introductory. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $40.
AD 1033: Beginning Painting
Faculty: Foley, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Beginning Painting is the introductory course to
the art, craft, and history of painting. Students will
develop a basic understanding of the materials and
techniques of the painter and their application.
Through a sequence of exercises ranging from color
studies to observational still life painting to more
experimental projects focusing on the medium, the
student will gain a solid foundation towards making
paintings. This course is about painting in its most
basic and fundamental sense. Emphasis is placed
on learning a variety of painting skills, developing
a basic awareness of color theory and auxiliary
craftsmanship such as building stretchers, stretching canvas, priming, etc. Students will work towards
an informed perceptual and thoughtful expression
of a subject using the medium and techniques of
painting. Class time will also include lectures and
demonstrations directly pertaining to these concerns in order to provide art historical examples and
strategies for proceeding with painting exercises
and assignments. Students will be assigned readings and discuss them in relation to their development and the course in general. Evaluation will be
based on painting projects, participation and articulation of concepts as demonstrated in critiques and
short written responses that evidence engagement
with course topics. Level: Introductory. Prerequisites: Drawing I or permission of instructor based on
portfolio review of independent work. Limit: 12. Lab
fee: $180.
AD 1034: Ceramics I
Faculty: Mann, Rocky
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This beginning course in ceramics will explore the
making of objects with clay by using the potter’s
wheel, slab roller, coils and press molds. We will
explore surface design using slips, under glazes
and glazes and patterns. Through these methods
we will incorporate wax resist, tape resist, plastic
resist, sgraffito, slip and glaze trailing. Six hand-built
and twenty wheel-thrown works are required, with
reviews taking place during week five and week ten.
The default grade option for this class is Credit/No
Credit. Level: Introductory. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $95.
35
AD 1035: Introduction to Documentary
Photography
Faculty: Winer, Josh
Meets the following requirements: AD
This course is an exploration into the history of the
still image in reportage style work. Well explore the
ways news-gathering techniques, ethical considerations and the impact of the image itself have
changed over time. Well look at the work of iconic
documentary image-makers and read critical writings about the social, economic and other forces
at work. Well also look at the power relationships
established my market forces and political climates
that influenced what stories were told and by
whom. Well also explore the evolution
AD 1036: Figure Drawing
Faculty: Foley, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course introduces students to the techniques,
methods, and history of the depiction of the human
figure through direct observational drawing. We will
be working from a live, nude model to investigate
structure, anatomy, and the expressive nature of
the human form through a variety of traditional
and contemporary approaches. Students will also
be trained to look at the figure abstractly through
careful consideration of negative space surrounding
the figure, siting parallel visual relationships across
the body, and by considering lines of gravity as a
horizontal and vertical axis for comparative analysis. They will also develop a rudimentary understanding of anatomy (artistically) through skeletal
studies and muscle groups while developing both
traditional and unconventional ways of seeing and
drawing the figure. Students will expand and refine
their observational skills, become proficient with
a variety of drawing media and understand how
these concerns overlap to create representational
images. Understanding the integration of formal
elements of drawing and how they are combined to
achieve a sense of solidity, proportion, gravity, and
animation when representing the human figure are
our primary concern. Evaluation will be based on
active physical and verbal participation in both work
and in-class discussions or critiques, an increased
proficiency to accurately represent the human form,
individually designed projects, experimentation
with drawing media. A final digital portfolio of work
and self-evaluation is required. Level: Introductory.
Limit: 13. Lab fee: $200.
AD 1038: History of Video Art
Faculty: Capers, Colin
Meets the following requirements: AD
Today, many use the words ‘film’ and ‘video’ interchangeably. In fact, these words refer to different mediums which evolved at different times, in
different circumstances, and whose languages and
practices originally developed around very different sets of concerns and purposes. In what ways
36
is the distinction still useful in the digital age? This
course will critically interrogate the ways humans
use moving images to mediate our world, and the
repercussions of these uses on individuals, culture,
and the contents/subjects of the mediated messages. Many early video artists sought to distinguish
the medium from film in that they wanted to create
viewers who were active participants rather than
passive recipients. In this class we will explore the
political and self-expressive impulses in video art,
and trace its history from 1965—the year in which
previously established artists Andy Warhol and Nam
June Paik first publically exhibited video work—
through to the current moment when film is almost
extinct and video has become the world’s dominant
moving image medium. We will look at video art’s
ties to performance art and activism, and examine
how many multi-media artists have situated their
use of video in the context of their other practices.
Artists whose work and writing about their work will
be explored include: Vito Acconci, John Baldessari,
Dara Birnbaum, Tony Conrad, Hermine Freed, Joan
Jonas, Miranda July, Mariko Mori, Bruce Nauman,
Pipilotti Rist, Bill Viola, and William Wegman. We will
also examine the role and work of artists’ collectives
including Ant Farm, Broadside TV, Optic Nerve, and
Video Free America. Through secondary sources we
will look at the range of historical methodologies
and critical theories that have been brought to bear
on the works viewed. Evaluation will be based on
participation in class discussions and two research
papers. Students who come to class with experience
working in video will have the opportunity to create
their own original work in lieu of one of the two papers. Level: Introductory. Limit: 18. Lab fee: $35.
AD 2011: Graphic Design Studio I: Visual
Communication
Faculty: Colbert, Dru
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Visual communication is one of the most pervasive
means of human communication. Graphic design,
within the realm of visual communication, is a process used to effectively convey ideas and information visually through print, electronic media, products in the marketplace, and structural elements in
the built environment. Its application may be promotional, editorial, informational, expositional or
instigational. It may cater to, or critique—commercialism, colonialism, capitalism, and advertising—or
alternately be used to organize information and
visualize complex data, or concepts. Is it possible
to construct a visual message that will be received
through the din and noise of our overstuffed media
environment? Past other competing messages?
What are some of the contemporary issues surrounding design and the roles and responsibilities
of graphic designers in the workplace and in their
communities?
In this introductory/intermediate level studio
course you will become familiar with visual rhetoric
and the basic elements, principles, and processes
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
of graphic design that will help you to construct
effective visual messages. You will work on a variety
of conceptual visual communication projects in the
realms of information design, editorial design, and
promotional design. Lectures, demonstrations,
assignments and critiques will offer a balanced
framework for developing skills in creative perception, critical thinking and visual communication. An
emphasis is placed on these elements and evaluation will be weighted more heavily in these areas
than technical expertise on the computer. You will
however, be required to learn the basics of several
computer graphic applications (Adobe Photoshop,
Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign and/or
Quark) in order to complete coursework. You will
receive basic instruction in these programs in class,
but will be expected to refer to computer manuals
and guide books for specific tools and techniques
that may be required to visualize your ideas. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: Introduction to Arts and Design or Two Dimensional Design I
recommended. Limit: 12 + 2 w/personal lap tops and
appropriate software. Lab fee: $85.
AD 2012: 3D Studio: Introduction to ThreeDimensional Art and Design
Faculty: Colbert, Dru
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course is an introduction to three dimensional
design and sculpture. Through a variety of projects students will analyze and apply the classic
organizing principles of three dimensional design
work. Elements of form, space, line, texture, light,
color, scale and time (including sound, sensory
perceptions, movement and natural processes) will
be explored—with attention paid to how a work
functions, involves a viewer, activates a space, or
impacts an environment, physically, psychically or
socially. Projects in the class will progress from the
creation of objects, to investigations of the sensory
and objective aspects of space. Students will experiment with subtractive and constructive processes
using traditional as well as contemporary materials such as found, recycled and natural objects. A
diverse range of materials and techniques will be introduced and demonstrated. Discussion of historic
and contemporary artists’ work will augment the
course. Students will be evaluated based on completion of projects, participation in class discussions
and individual/group critiques. Level: Introductory/
Intermediate. Limit: 15. Lab fee $85.
AD 2013: Constructing Visual Narrative
Faculty: Colbert, Dru
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Narrative: n. & adj. N. a spoken or written account
of connected events in order of happening. The
practice or art of narration. Adj. in the form of, or
concerned with, narration (narrative verse).
How is meaning shaped by the images we create?
In all cultures, throughout time, artists have sought
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ways to tell stories about far ranging topics—the
unknown, the success of a hunt, gods and goddesses, historical events, wars, court tales, biblical
themes, social instruction, morals, politics, product
promotion, and personal imaginings. Historically,
artists have adapted visual story telling techniques
to exploit evolving technology and changing social
concerns, from ancient wall markings, tomb inscriptions, scrolls, illuminated manuscripts, pottery
decoration, carved totems, pictorial painting, to
sequential engraved prints, comic books, graphic
novels, graffiti and the web. In this studio course,
students will investigate “visual language”, symbolism, and some of the pictorial devices, materials,
and techniques employed by artists to tell stories
visually -particularly through sequential composition in the graphic arts.
Through focused assignments, discussion of
artists’ works (historic and across cultures), and
guided demonstrations in a variety of materials
and techniques, students will respond to select
historic forms of visual narrative to create unique
contemporary forms in which to tell their own
relevant stories. “Case Study” studio projects will
be selected to focus on key points in world history that mark technological transition in material,
technique and pictorial devices employed by artists
to render visual narratives. Projects will range from
the hands-on exploration of ancient wall painting
and low relief carving technique, through non-press
printing techniques such as linocut, image transfer, and potato prints, to collage of found images,
xerography, Polaroid print manipulation, digital
prints and “synthetic” imaging on the computer.
Students will be encouraged to explore and invent
new forms of sequential composition and utilize
new or previously unexplored materials or techniques. Concurrent investigations in visual studies
will focus on the meaning created through the use
of pictorial devices, signs and symbols, and the
creation of narrative structure through repeated
image/duplication, sequential composition, and
visual allegory. Students will be evaluated on writing
assignments, level of completion and analysis of
assigned readings, research and presentation, quality and completion of projects, and participation in
class activities and discussion. There are no prerequisites, however, the following courses are recommended: Intro to Arts and Design, or 2D courses in
drawing, painting, printmaking, or graphic design,
photography, or writing and/or literature courses.
Level: Introductory/intermediate. Limit: 15. Lab fee:
$85.
AD 2014: Curiosity and Wonder: Design &
Interpretation in the Museum
Faculty: Colbert, Dru
Meets the following requirements: ADS
From “cabinet of curiosity” to “exploratorium”, this
studio course surveys contemporary museum
activities and methods of communication through
visual display, space, and interaction. Students will
37
engage in a project-development process to refine
“big ideas”, determine educational goals, and learn
techniques to design and build their projects. Class
participants will gain an understanding of factors
that influence learning, media and modes that
may be utilized to communicate complex content,
and how meaning is constructed by the selection,
organization and layering of intellectual material
through the use of object, text, image, and experiential devices.
Projects and hands-on workshops will provide an
opportunity to gain skills and techniques in visualizing ideas by developing concepts in the form of
plans, sketches, models, and narrative description.
Students will have an opportunity to evaluate and
create interpretive material for the George B. Dorr
Natural History Museum at the College of the Atlantic. Students will be evaluated through participation
in class discussion and critiques, attendance, and
for completion and quality of assigned projects. This
course is appropriate for all students interested in
informal education in the museum environment, design, and visual communication. Level: Introductory/
intermediate. Prerequisite: One or more courses in
Arts and Design OR Educational Studies. Limit: 15.
Lab fee: $85.
AD 2015: The Reality Effect: Art and Truth in the
19th Century
Faculty: Clinger, Catherine
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
There are myriad realities described by artists
and authors. This course concerns itself specifically with the development of visual Realism from
1800-1945 in Europe and America. We will examine
the origin of artist methodologies of production as
they relate to modernity. Our concerns will include
the relation of art to significant political, sociological, and psychological programs of the nineteenth
and early twentieth centuries. The new realities
created through revolutions in political and social
structures, and in our understanding of the physical
composition of the world itself are made evident in
art that pictures social class, large historical moments, and a specific instant of time in a way that
changes how we visualize reality and challenges our
understanding of actuality. Students will be evaluated based on class participation, class discussion
leadership, reading notes, and written paper. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 16. Lab fee: $30.
AD 2016: Contemporary Artist as Researcher
and Activist
Faculty: Clinger, Catherine
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
The student will be introduced to the post-modern
stream of visual culture that places nature and our
relationship to it within the context of pressing
global issues. These artworks engage with nature
by their placement in site-specific locations, through
new modes of picturing, and/or through the ap38
propriation of natural materials. Many of the artists
we will examine make use of new tools designed for
industrial purpose, medical, technological or scientific research. Other artists utilize organic materials
to craft their designs. These artists appropriate
the role of “researcher” in order to bring attention
to ecologies that human beings have disrupted or
will disrupt. How these artists bring us to a deeper
understanding of our relationship with nature
through new media is our concern. Evaluation is
based on class participation, evidence of completion
of weekly readings, and a final paper and a class
presentation. The class will take at least one field
trip. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Lab fee: $50.
Limit: 15.
AD 2017: Drawing Mineral and Botanical Matter
in the Forest of Maine
Faculty: Clinger, Catherine
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Viewed as a regular practice, the descriptive power
of drawing can intensify the experience of observational fieldwork, provide the draughtsperson with a
richer understanding of the cycles within a landscape, and deepen our relationship with the natural
world. The primary setting for this studio course
is Mount Desert Island. The subject matter of our
visual attention includes trees, rock features, and
other indigenous plant life of the island. Students
will learn a variety of drawing methods in order to
document the natural history of a specific place.
Coursework includes: maintaining a field sketchbook, graphically recording the development of a
singular botanical life-form over the course of the
term, and producing visual notations in the sketchbook during a bi-weekly slide lecture on the history
of artistic representations of the natural world.
Evaluation is based on class participation, evidence
of completion of weekly assignments, and final project. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites:
permission of instructor. Lab fee: $65. Limit: 12.
AD 2019: Dramatic Mechanics: The Dynamics of
Difference and Power
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
Meets the following requirements: ADS
The psychology of power dynamics is the fundamental core of dramatic literature. This course will
focus on plays that deal with particular issues of
class, gender, race etc. and how modern playwrights
have used the medium to explore relationships
inherently based in power struggle. It’s also about
understanding the unique architecture of texts
written for performance and finding meaning within
specific historical and societal contexts. Playwrights
will include Howard Barker, Amiri Baraka, David
Mamet, Sarah Kane and others. Students will develop ideas for staging possibilities, learn the basic
language and concepts of dramaturgy and explore
the unique ways theatre artists can investigate the
nature of power dynamics. We will go on at least
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
one field trip. Evaluation is based on participation
in class activities and discussion, a series of short
playwriting assignments and a final presentation
and paper. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Course
limit: 12. Lab fee: $55.
AD 2020: History of Photography
Faculty: Winer, Josh
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
This introductory course charts the history of
photography from early nineteenth-century nascent
technologies (daguerreotypes and tintypes) through
to the diverse range of photographic media currently practiced by contemporary artists and photographers (film and digital). In this art history course,
we will consider how the new visual discourse of
photography was informed by both technological
and social developments. Photography cannot be
defined as a unified medium; therefore, this course
investigates both discontinuous as well as coalesced
conventions within its own history; in other words,
how and why photographs look different from each
other. In addition to noting external influences
upon the photographic object, we will explore how
photography helped to shape a variety of visual
disciplines from painting to zines. Accordingly, our
class will discuss formal photographic syntax (how
they are composed and the forms they appear
represent) and allied aesthetic practices as well as
the wider social and political issues that influenced
the content of its visual culture. We will study how
artists use photographic practices in the context of
social and activist functions to examine a diversity
of subjects: gender and class, ethnic and national
identity, among others; and, how categorical distinctions between mass culture and avant-garde art,
commercial and fine art photography are not
always stable. Course readings include writings
by historians, artists, and critics that reflect the
unstable status of the photographic object within
the intersections of science, technology and culture,
aesthetic discourse and everyday documentation.
We will look at many photographs. Students will be
evaluated on their participation in class discussions,
short essay assignments, and a final project or
paper. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
Lab fee: $30.
AD 2021: The Science of Comedy
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
Meets the following requirements: AD
This course explores the nature and history of
modern comedy and investigates the tools and
techniques of great comic performers. We’ll cover
the evolution of comedy aesthetics from vaudeville and silent film to contemporary stand up and
television and we’ll explore what, if any sort of
‘funny’ is timeless. The course uses film, video, live
performance and readings. Students gain practical
experience through work on classic routines, physical comedy skills and sketch development as well
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
as experimenting with the peculiar mathematics of
comic timing. Together, we will try to pinpoint what
actually makes something funny and as importantly,
why people crave laughter so much in the first
place. There will be at least one field trip. Evaluation
is based on participation in activities and discussion
as well as a portfolio of short topic responses and a
final presentation/paper. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Course limit: 12. Lab fee: $55.
AD 2022: Film Theory
Faculty: Capers, Colin
Meets the following requirements: AD WFO
How do motion pictures express ideas? Why do we
respond to them in the ways we do? Film theorists
have approached these questions from contexts
as diverse as formal composition (sound, mise-enscene, color, cinematography and editing), signs
and symbols (semiotics), cultural and/or gender
concerns, and psychoanalysis. In this class, we will
practice using these and other theories to understand and analyze moving pictures. Each week we
will screen one or two feature length movies as
well as a number of short films. Screenings will be
complemented by source texts from critics, theorists, artists/filmmakers and cinephiles. Students
may choose to take this course as writing intensive;
those who do will be required to write and revise
three or four critical response essays based in
analytical frameworks covered in the course. All students will be required to complete a final research
paper and presentation. Students should expect to
spend 7-9 hours a week in class meetings, labs and
screenings (in addition to writing, research). Students will be evaluated on papers, final project and
participation in discussions. Writing Focus option.
Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites:
Previous art class recommended. Limit: 12. Lab fee:
$35.
AD 2023: Actor Training I
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course is geared toward students with or
without performance experience. Together we will
establish a common language to define the most
important tools for an actor. Through a series of
games and exercises, students develop new skills
and practice making bolder, clearer choices within
improvised, devised or established scenes. The
goals are to create confidence in any sort of performance situation and to find ways of applying
acting skills to other academic and outside experiences. Evaluation is based on participation in class
activities and discussion, successful completion
of all performance projects, including productive
rehearsal time and an organized portfolio of written
responses. There will be at least one field trip. Default grading option for this course is CR/NC. Level:
Introductory/intermediate. Prerequisite: none.
Course limit: 12. Lab fee: $50.
39
AD 2025: Principles of Comedic Improvisation
Faculty: Fingerhut, Larrance; Shepard, Jennifer
This course teaches the underlying principles of improvisational comedy. Improv at its most basic level
is about agreement, cooperation, and collaboration
towards a common goal. Improvisers must offer
their support/agreement in a very real and active
way by listening to their fellow performers and by
offering their own ideas/initiations/creativity. In this
way people work together to build a scene/story out
of nothing but pure creativity and the willingness
to support and agree with one another. The most
fundamental idea of improvisational comedy is
captured in the phrase “Yes, and…” Every improviser
is responsible for saying “Yes…” to every idea he or
she receives and to add her or his own input and
ideas. Students will be taught the basic principles of
improvisation and will get a chance to improvise in
each class. Classes will consist of ensemble building
warm-ups, theatrical improvisational games, and
improv scene work that will encourage each participant to offer their ideas without judgment. We will
also explore The Harold which is the classic Chicago
long form structure. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
AD 2026: Illustration
Faculty: Colbert, Dru
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Illustrating magazines or books, envisioning scientific ideas, inventing characters and imaginary
worlds, representing natural subjects; this intermediate studio arts course in visual communication engages you in examining and creating images
that depict ideas, stories and information. Through
lectures and assignments students will investigate
the history of illustration, view the work of contemporary illustrators, and be instructed in traditional
and digital illustration techniques. Students will be
encouraged to explore a variety of mediums and
develop a unique and personal approach to image
making. Class members will learn and practice the
process of researching and developing ideas from
rough sketches to finished artwork that is publication-ready. Emphasis is on the elements that form
strong visual ideas. Exercises and workshops will
introduce techniques in various mediums including
gouache, watercolor, colored pencil, scratchboard,
and ink. Instruction will include, and encourage,
a wide variety of experimental hand-generated
techniques on a range of surfaces. Students will also
be instructed in the basics of digital applications
for image generation, assembly and alteration. A
final project will afford students an opportunity to
define their own content focus. Evaluation will be
based on attendance, participation in discussions
and critiques, timely completion of assignments,
quality of work produced, and their ability to clearly
communicate ideas through illustration. Offered in
alternate years. Level: Introduction/Intermediate.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Drawing, Painting 1,
40
Printmaking, or Graphic Design, and signature of
instructor. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $100.
AD 3010: Architectural Design Studio
Faculty: Mancinelli, Isabel
Meets the following requirements: ADS
In this design studio students are introduced to the
field of architectural design and the design process.
We examine various aspects of this functional art
including scale, texture, volume, void, light, rhythm,
and form. Basic principals of architectural structures and a brief historical overview are presented.
Students attempt to apply these principals in solving
practical problems. They are expected to develop
basic architectural drafting skills to represent three
dimensional space in two dimensions. The course
includes model building skills and an actual design
project. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Recommended Introduction to Arts and Design and/or
Two-Dimensional Design. Offered every other year.
Limit: 11. Lab fee: $25.
AD 3011: Landscape Architecture Design Studio
Faculty: Mancinelli, Isabel
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This studio course introduces students to the
profession of Landscape Architecture, the design
process and skills. Aspects to be covered include
site analysis, program development, design concept,
final site design and graphic representation. Evaluations are based on understanding and interpretation of the site program, application of the design
process and articulation of ideas and concepts
through graphics and oral presentation. Level:
Intermediate. Prerequisite: Introduction to Arts and
Design, Two-Dimensional Design, Trees and Shrubs,
or signature of instructor. Offered every other year.
Limit: 11. Lab fee $40.
AD 3012: Documentary Video Studio
Faculty: Andrews, Nancy
Meets the following requirements: ADS
A documentary video or film purports to present
factual information about the world. A documentary
may take a stand, state an opinion, or advocate a
solution to a problem. A documentary may function
in the realm of art. Documentaries may compile
images from archival sources, interview testimonies about social movements or events, record
an ongoing event “as it happens”, or synthesize
these and other techniques. We will look at various
documentaries both historic and contemporary, and
a number of strategies and styles, including; video
diaries/autobiographical works, cinema verite, propaganda, documentary activism, nature documentaries, and experimental genres. Students will learn
the basics of video production, including, using a
video camera, video editing, production planning,
lighting, microphone use, and interview techniques.
Students will make several documentary projects,
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
both collaboratively and individually. Students will
be evaluated on their participation in group discussions and critiques, and on the documentary projects they produce. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisite:
any introductory-level arts and design studio course
or film history course (previous video production
experience is not required). Lab fee: $30. Limit: 12.
AD 3013: Animation
Faculty: Andrews, Nancy
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course explores animation as a form of creative
expression, experimentation and personal vision.
Various techniques, such as drawing, cut-out, painting on film, and under-the-camera collage, will be
introduced. Students will create flip-books, video
pencil tests and 16mm animated films. Students will
be given exercises and assignments that guide them
through processes for making art. Various artists’
animated films will be screened and discussed.
History and concepts related to animation and film
will be introduced through screenings, readings and
discussions. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisite: Introduction to Art and Design, 2-D Design or Signature
of Instructor. Lab fee: $50. Limit: 12.
AD 3014: Soundscape
Faculty: Andrews, Nancy
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Soundscape may be defined as an environment
of sound (or sonic environment) with emphasis
on the way it is perceived and understood by the
individual, or by a society. It thus depends upon the
relationship between the individual and any such
environment. The term may refer to actual environments, or to abstract constructions such as musical compositions and tape montages, particularly
when considered as an artificial environment. In
this interdisciplinary course we investigate a broad
range of acoustic concepts, ranging from a scientific treatment of the nature and behavior of sound
both in air and underwater, the biology of hearing,
the use of sound by animals in communication,
and the cultural applications of sound and music in
human society. Students will explore methods of
composition using sounds as materials for assigned
projects. Various approaches to understanding and
experiencing sound will be examined, including
spoken word, radio shows, music, and experimental
forms. Labs will focus on understanding the nature
of sound, and practical application of sound equipment, technique and theory. Students will learn
about microphones, sound recording, amplification,
and the physics of sound. The course will culminate
in a performance to the community of student presentations that expresses the wide use of sound as
part of our culture. Evaluation will be based on class
participation and a set of assignments, including a
final project. Emphasis will be placed on an artistic
interpretation of soundscape, although students
will be expected to have a basic understanding of
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
the scientific basis of acoustic phenomena. Level:
Intermediate. Prerequisites: One AD and one ES
course. Limit: 12. Lab fee $60.
AD 3016: Land Use Planning I
Faculty: Mancinelli, Isabel; Longsworth, Gordon
Meets the following requirements: AD
In this course we will examine what key physical
aspects make communities desirable places to live,
work and visit and how principals of sustainability
can be integrated into the planning process. New
development often undermines a sense of place
and poses threats to environmental resources such
as water quality. Through analyzing a local town
in terms of its natural resources, cultural history,
scenic quality and the built environment, students
determine how new development and conservation
may be balanced. They learn how to use computerized geographic information systems (GIS) as a
planning tool in developing their recommendations.
Students present their final class project to local
community decision-makers. Offered every other
year. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Previous
coursework in GIS is not required. Limit: 12. Lab fee
$50.
AD 3017: Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen
Faculty: Lepcio, Andrea
This is an intermediate creative writing course
for students interested in writing for theater, film
and television. We will read published and unpublished plays, screenplays and tv shows from up
and coming writers currently off and on Broadway
and in film/television as well as selected plays and
screenplays/shows from the cannon based on student interest. Playwrights (and screenwriters), like
cartwrights and shipwrights, are all skilled builders
of vehicles meant to move people from one place
to another. We will explore dramatic structure from
the perspective of the audience. Whether writing
linear narratives, collage or non-linear plays and
films, there is a rhythm to dramatic writing that
can be studied. We will make a conscious study of
form to free us to write what we are driven to write.
Through reading, analysis and writing, we will investigate the dramatic elements of character, conflict,
language and theme. The course will include practical writing exercises to motivate and progress the
writing from first draft through revision to rehearsal
draft. Students will be encouraged to develop productive writer habits and self-discipline. Class time
will be divided between hearing students’ work and
discussing work we’ve read. We will develop our listening skills when hearing our own and colleagues’
work. We will explore the role of critique in new
script development and refine a process that works
for us. Students will be expected to bring new pages
in to each class building to a complete first draft
of a full-length play or screenplay (of any length)
by the end of the course. Evaluation will be based
on the student’s dedication to developing a writ-
43
ing practice as well as the submitted script. We will
conclude with a reading series to give each student
the opportunity to hear his or her work in front of
an invited audience. Evaluation is based on the quality of student’s written work and participation in
class discussion. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites:
Permission of instructor. Limit: 12.
AD 3019: Intermediate Drawing
Faculty: Foley, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Intermediate Drawing continues the technical and
perceptual issues covered in Drawing 1 as a foundation to investigate conceptual and process based
modes of drawing. The term will begin with observational drawing but move towards narrative, abstraction, and more independent projects that reveal
how drawing can be used as a way of exploring
concepts as well as subjects. Class time will also include lectures directly pertaining to these concerns
in order to provide a historical or methodological
context for proceeding with drawing projects and
assignments. This studio working environment will
be similar to a workshop where students will investigate and share ideas, techniques, and interpretations in an open collegial environment. A particular
emphasis will be placed on the student’s verbal
aptitude in meaningfully conveying conceptual,
technical, and pictorial concerns discussed in class
and in relation to their work. Students will be assigned readings, write about their work and deliver
a presentation focusing on the work of a contemporary artist relevant to their development. Evaluation
will be based on drawing projects, participation
and articulation of concepts as demonstrated in
critiques and engagement with course topics. Level:
Intermediate. Prerequisites: Drawing I, Two-Dimensional Design or instructor approval by evidence of
equivalent experience. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $80.
AD 3020: American Dreaming: Theatre and
Activism in the US
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
The course focuses on dramatic literature connected to historically relevant political and social
issues in the US Students will read ??plays and study
a variety of artists that have used theatre as a viable
force for change over the last century. Together we’ll
explore the mechanics and dynamics of particular
performances as well as the cultural context in
which these works were conceived. We will investigate significant periods in American history such
as the New Deal, the House Un-American Activities
Committee, the Civil Rights Movement, the emergence of the AIDS epidemic, the attack on the World
Trade Center and the economic crash of 2007-08—
and we will explore the impact of these events on
this particular form. Research will include Circuit
Chautauqua, Pat Chappelle, Hallie Flanagan and
The Federal Theatre Project, Susan Glaspell, Clifford
42
Odetts, Arthur Miller, Lorraine Hansberry, The Living Theatre, The Open Theatre, Adrienne Kennedy,
Marie Irene Fornes, The Wooster Group, Anna
Deavere-Smith, Luis Valdez, Tony Kushner, SuzanLori Parks, Young Jean Lee, Brandon Jacob Jenkins,
The TEAM, Radiohole and more. Evaluation is based
on full participation in class discussion, successful
completion of all short projects and assignments
and a major final project/paper. Level: Intermediate.
Pre-requisite: Successful completion of the writing requirement and at least one literature course.
Course limit: 12. Lab fee: $75.
AD 3022: Play Production Workshop
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course provides practical experience in the
processes required to build a theatrical production. Students research, rehearse and produce a
performance for the public in collaboration with a
faculty director. The number of students enrolled in
the course will vary depending upon the demands
of the play. Students with any or no experience in
theatre are welcome. In most cases, all assignments
(cast and crew) will be made the previous term,
through auditions and interviews. Those interested
in non-actor aspects of production (set design, light
and sound design, stage management etc.) are
especially encouraged. The course meets 4 days a
week and those enrolled must be available for a certain amount of additional collaborative work outside
class time (additional rehearsals, construction and
tech, and final performance dates). A production
schedule will be available by week one. Evaluation is
based on commitment to the particular demands of
the project as well as a final reflective paper based
on the experience. Default grading option is Credit/
No Credit. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Course limit: 15. Lab fee: $50.
AD 3024: Principles of Comedic Improvisation II
Faculty: Fingerhut, Larrance; Shepard, Jennifer
Principles of Comedic Improvisation II will review
The Harold and learn several other types of long
form improvisation including classic forms (the
Armando) and newer forms (the Improvised Musical). The class will also build skills toward developing
their own long form. Students will participate in at
least three performances both in class and other
venues. Evaluation will be based on participation in
class, engagement with class topics and in performances. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Principles of Comedic Improv. Limit: 12.
AD 3027: Intermediate Painting
Faculty: Foley, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Intermediate Painting simultaneously emphasizes
the technical and conceptual fundamentals of
painting in relationship to the cultivation of a stu-
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
dent’s developing personal aesthetics. Projects will
examine the evolution of modernist painting and
its emphasis away from representational, perspectival space towards abstract, optical flatness. More
generally, we will be examining the relationships
between form and content and ways that students
can develop a sustainable, serious and personalized
studio “practice”. The aim is to cultivate informed,
thoughtful perceptions and expression of a subject through the medium, techniques, culture, and
history of painting. The technical emphasis is on developing painting skills appropriate to the student’s
subject and a rigorous experimentation with media
and techniques. Auxiliary craftsmanship such as
creating mediums and grounds, building stretchers
and panels, as well as stretching and priming canvas
will be a significant part of this course. Students
will receive basic woodshop training and will be
required to make their own supports this term.
Students will be evaluated on the quality of their
construction, stretching, and priming in addition to
their participation, verbal articulation, and studio
work. This course will also feature demonstrations,
a field trip, art historical slide presentations and
readings of relevant artists and writers that provide
a historical and/or philosophical context for our
work this term. Scholarly research and constructive
questioning will be stressed, along with developing
a work ethic appropriate for pursuing painting in
serious manner. All students will be able to coherently articulate their ideas concerning their process,
technique, work, vision, and an art historical context
for their work. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites:
Permission of the instructor. Priority will be given
to students who have completed AD1033 Beginning
Painting. Limit: 10. Lab fee: $200.
AD 3028: Abstraction
Faculty: Foley, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course is designed to provide students with a
thorough experience with the issues of abstraction,
from the early days of modernism to current contemporary abstract art. The course seeks to discuss
the various strategies, sources and methods of
abstraction used by artists throughout history and
encourage an understanding that any form of representation is inherently an abstraction of reality.
Projects will encourage experimentation with a variety of drawing media, paints, supports, and methods of application. This course provides students a
nurturing and exploratory experience of the formal
and material issues unique to abstraction and its
contemporary manifestations. It will assist students
by providing contextual historical information with
corresponding studio demonstrations and projects
in order to demystify abstract art. A primary aim
of this course is encourage subjective accountability and a thoughtful relationship to abstraction. It
will emphasize that the conceptual possibilities of
abstraction not only assist a students’ emerging
artistic aesthetics but also can also positively affect
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
their relation to nature, science, and life in general.
This course will feature demonstrations, a mandatory field trip, art historical slide presentations and
readings of relevant artists and writers that provide
a historical and / or philosophical context for our
work this term. Scholarly research and constructive
questioning will be stressed, along with developing
a work ethic appropriate for pursuing art / inquiry in
serious manner. All students will be able to coherently articulate their ideas concerning their process,
technique, work, vision, and an art historical context
for their work through short written response and
in class one-on-one discussions. Evaluation will be
based on active physical and verbal participation
in both work and in class discussions or critiques,
an increased proficiency to accurately represent
the human form, individually designed projects,
experimentation with drawing media. A final digital
portfolio of work and self-evaluation is required.
Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: One of the following courses: Drawing 1, Intermediate Drawing,
Beginning Painting, 2-D Design, Drawing Mineral and
Botanical Matter; or permission from instructor.
Limit: 10. Lab fee: $200.
AD 3031: Storytelling and Performance
Faculty: Leaverton, Lisa
This studio arts course invites students to engage
multiple applications of storytelling as performance. Whether providing testimony and witnessing in community negotiations, seeking healing or
reconciliation among family and friends, prompting
topical discourse within the community, or honoring
a person or tradition through living thought, it is the
storyteller’s intentions that guide our methods of
preparing for and evaluating a given performance.
Through a progression of oral storytelling performance projects in combination with listening activities, reading activities, research assignments and
performance exercises, students will engage with
multiple storytelling applications and consider how
the stories we tell constitute meanings. Our exploration encompasses stories in daily communication,
personal stories (our own and others), and storytelling within the public sphere. In a final project
students will model a qualitative research project,
focusing on socio-cultural context of personal narratives and develop a story program to perform within
the COA community. Past research topics have included a variety of storytelling applications through
local and national movements and initiatives:
Restorative Justice, Truth & Reconciliation Commission, Veterans History Project, narrative health
communication and folk/oral art traditions. Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation
in class activities, including successful completion
of a series of group performance exercises, written
responses, three assigned performance projects
and an interview/research project. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Intro-level AD performance
art course and completion of writing requirement
recommended. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $30.
43
AD 3032: Intermediate Ceramics
Faculty: Mann, Rocky
This is a ceramics course for students with intermediate levels of skill. This course will focus on handbuilding, clay slab construction and advanced
throwing techniques. A basic level of skill on the
potters wheel is required. Glazing and decorating
processes, alternative firing techniques and ceramic
technology will be introduced, as well as artistic
concepts and design principles relevant to artistic
expression in the ceramic medium. Historical and
contemporary ceramic works and artists will be
studied. Students will be evaluated on class attendance, participation, completion of assignments and
sketch book entries. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Ceramics I, a similar course in another college
or high school, or permission of instructor. Limit: 12.
Lab fee: $95.
AD 3072: Redefining the Act: Contemporary
Theatre in Practice
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
Meets the following requirements: AD
This course offers students the opportunity to
explore the work of contemporary artists in the
field. Students research current trends and practices, roots and influences and consider how (and if)
contemporary performance fuels public discourse
and community action. The goal of the course is
to better understand the evolving function and
promise of theatre both culturally and politically in
the context of current circumstances. Primary
materials are recent theatrical texts, recorded and
live performances and curated forums on problems
in practice. Course topics include the resurgence
of small theatres and rural initiatives, site-specific
work, devising ensembles, training and research
methods, new investigations of historical forms and
subjects, new voices/new audiences and the impact
of current and future technologies. Students will
travel to New York for a portion of the 12th annual
Under The Radar Fest (An International festival of
new and experimental work housed at the Public
Theatre). From this experience, the class will narrow
a short list of current practitioners to research and
the rest of the term will be devoted to studying the
history, practices and the current body of work produced by these artists, to date. Evaluation is based
on commitment to the research, participation in
class discussion, 2-3 shared project presentations,
and a series of written responses. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; priority
will be given to seniors and/or those with significant
coursework completed in related topics. Limit: 10.
Lab fee: $240.
AD 4010: Improvisation in Music
Faculty: Cooper, John
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This “hands on” theory/performance course for
singers, instrumentalists, guitarists, pianists, drum44
mers, etc., deals with improvisation, a spontaneous
exchange or interplay of musical ideas and moods. It
offers the musician the opportunity to utilize his/her
technical ability to its fullest extent while enjoying
the creative freedom of spontaneous composition.
The class addresses technical and aesthetic aspects
of improvisation in all styles of music (jazz, rock,
blues, classical, folk, etc.), including the elements
of melodic development, melodic cliches, rhythmic
and melodic embellishment, harmonic substitutions, and development of the ear. It is multilevel
in format, allowing for students of all technical
proficiency to participate. In addition to two class
sessions weekly (where extensive time will is spent
in performance situation), each student also meets
with the instructor on a private basis. In short, this
course enables students to use the “tools of improvisation” to be able to make a “personal musical
statement” while playing, singing, “jamming,” etc.
Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Lab fee: $20.
AD 4012: Intermediate Video: Studio and
Strategies
Faculty: Andrews, Nancy
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course explores more sophisticated forms of
image making, editing, and theory. Students screen
and discuss documentary and video art works, and
study writing/criticism in the field, focusing on moving image theories, concepts, strategies, and a wide
range of aesthetic concerns. The class will engage
in various aspects of production and approaches to
cinematography, sound and editing/compositing.
Participants work on a project-oriented basis that
includes critiques and training in video production skills. Students should be both self-directed
and interested in developing a support system for
producing each other’s work. Students will be evaluated based on video projects (fiction or non-fiction),
critical writings, class participation and presentations. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites:
Documentary Video Studio, or Introduction to Video
Production. Limit: 12.
AD 4014: Graphic Design Studio II: Digital
Projects
Faculty: Colbert, Dru
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This studio course offers students an opportunity
for in-depth study of contemporary issues, applications and techniques in graphic design. Students will
pursue conceptual problem solving through creative
exercises and theoretical and applied studio projects. Particular emphasis will be placed on advancing skills in creative problem-solving, typography,
layout, image generation and preparing art for print.
Digital and hands-on methods (techniques such as
block print) for image generation will be explored to
create original illustrations. Projects will include typography and illustration exercises, identity design,
environmental design and interpretive information
design. Students will be encouraged to solicit a deCOLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
sign project from the local community and produce
it in the context of the class by engaging in the creative process from concept to production oversight
during the course of the 10-week term. In addition
to structured class assignments, students will have
an opportunity to propose and pursue their own
design projects.
This class will be conducted in seminar/studio
format. Emphasis will be placed on the design
process—from creation to production, the timely
completion of project phases, creative solutions and
advancing skill in typography, layout and image generation. The detailed schedule will depend largely
on the course make-up and individual project proposals. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites:
Signature of Instructor, Graphic Design Studio 1.
Limit: 12. Lab fee: $85.
AD 4015: Film Sound and Image
Faculty: Andrews, Nancy; Cooper, John
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This hands-on course will explore sound composition, editing, and mixing to create soundtracks for
video and/or film. Students who take this course
must have a background in music composition and/
or sound and video production in order to collaborate on creative video/sound projects. Sound
recordings will include music and voice as well as
everyday sounds and special sound effects. The
class will incorporate a number of group projects
as well as individual exercises to illustrate sound
recording and mixing strategies. We will also study
sound in relation to video/film through readings
and screenings. In addition to class assignments,
students will start developing sound tracks for their
independent projects. Students will be evaluated on
their success in creating compositions, recordings,
and mixes for video/film projects; and their ability
to bring together moving pictures with a soundtrack
to create a whole that is more than the sum of its
parts. Students will also be evaluated on their participation in class discussions and exercises. Level:
Intermediate/advanced. Prerequisites: Background
in music composition and/or sound and video production. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $40.
AD 4017: Art and Culture in Northern New
Mexico
Faculty: Clinger, Catherine
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
This course is part of a three-course sequence entitled “The Unexpected Journey: Art, Literature, and
History on the Road in Nuevo Mexico.” This course
examines the art and architecture of Northern New
Mexico including: painting, printmaking, photography, and other forms of cultural production (e.g. ceramics, textiles, ritual dance) from the 12th century
to the present. We examine New Mexico as both a
coalesced and contested historical and geographical
site and as the subject of representational, non-representational, sociopolitical, and symbolic imagery.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
How have artists depicted its varied landscapes,
both natural and cultural, as well as its complex
history of indigenous dwelling, colonial occupation, environmental stewardship, natural resource
exploitation, ethnic tension, and social discord? New
Mexico’s art is neither as singular nor unitary as the
tourist industry would like us to think. Much of this
course is field-based. We will be visiting numerous
places from large urban cities (Albuquerque), to
mid-sized cities (Santa Fe), to towns (Taos), villages
(Trampas, San Jóse), and Native American homelands (Taos Pueblo). Sites of interest include the
sacred (Santuario de Chimayó) and secular (Ghost
Ranch), educational (Hispanic Cultural Center) and
agrarian (Pecos River Valley). Students will learn to
apply a range of methodological strategies utilized
by art and cultural historians to examine, research,
analyze, critique, and interpret cultural objects.
Course readings will engage with key primary and
secondary sources written by selected historians,
cultural geographers, artists, and storytellers. Our
work in this course will demonstrate how art practice along with disciplined scholarship can generate
a critical awareness of an object’s ideological context. Evaluation will be based on class participation,
an oral presentation, and a research paper. Each
student will produce a research paper relevant to
his or her own critical and/or historical interests and
concerns.
All three courses must be taken concurrently:
Native American Literature: A Case Study of the Development of Literary Traditions with a New Mexico
Focus (Waldron), Art and Culture in Northern New
Mexico (Clinger), Processing the Unexpected Journey: Aesthetics, Experience, and the Creation of
an Interdisciplinary Project (Clinger and Waldron).
Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Limit: 8.
AD 4018: Movement Training Basics II
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Building on skills introduced in Movement Training
Basics, students will continue investigating their
physical potential and deepening their understanding of the movement theory and languages covered.
Techniques will be derived from classical ballet,
martial arts, acrobatics, improvisation, circus skills
and more. The work will promote a greater sense
of physical awareness and imaginative possibility. Advanced students will build strength, mental
and physical stamina and flexibility. Students will
translate the work into a variety of practical applications and performance pieces based on a series of
exercises and prompts. Evaluation is based on class
participation and engagement with introduced topics and concepts. Default grading option is Credit/
No Credit. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Previous completion of the basics course and/
or significant movement training or dance experience is required. Course limit: 15. Lab fee: $20
45
AD 4019: Studio Printmaking
Faculty: Clinger, Catherine
Meets the following requirements: ADS
AD 4021: Analog Photography: B&W
Faculty: Winer, Josh
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Printmaking is the process of transferring an image
from one surface to another. A print mirrors the
surface whence it came and also performs as a reflection of the physical and/or immaterial realms of
objects and ideas. Representing concepts clearly in
any medium requires an artist to engage in thoughtful collaboration with materials in order to realize
the potential of form as a means of expression. This
studio course will explore ways to address this aesthetic challenge through printmaking. Students will
acquire basic skills as printmakers with an emphasis
on relief (woodcut and linocut) and intaglio (line
etching, engraving and aquatint) techniques. They
will also develop a broad understanding of the history of prints; how they have functioned to communicate, document, and transmit information through
images on paper. Students will be evaluated on their
projects, participation in critiques, level of engagement with materials, ability to work in a collaborative studio, and final project. Level: Intermediate/
Advanced. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, Introduction to Arts and Design, and a drawing
class. Limit: 10. Lab fee: $100.
As digital photography became affordable and
proliferated, many business models, critics and
artists themselves spoke about the final death of
traditional, so called “wet” photography. Film was
supposed to be dead, once and for all. But film
wasn’t quite ready to die, and even as the economy
and common practice has shifted largely to digital
capture, film and photographic paper are still being
produced and consumed, albeit on a different scale.
This course is an introduction to traditional analog
darkroom processes and manual camera operation. Students will gain a basic understanding of
black and white photography through exercises and
assignments that emphasize fundamental camera
and darkroom skills including: proper metering,
evaluating quality of light, elements of composition,
good negative making and evaluation and good
print making and evaluation. Work will be critiqued
and evaluated based on both technical and aesthetic merit in a class critique format. Readings will
be assigned in conjunction with course content.
Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Intro
to Photography or permission of instructor. Limit: 8.
Lab fee: $250.
AD 4020: Object and Performance
Faculty: Andrews, Nancy; Baker, Jodi
Meets the following requirements: ADS
Objects have long been significant elements in
ritual, dance, theatre and performance art; they
might be props, body extensions, idols and avatars. Taught in a workshop format, this course will
explore a variety of techniques from traditional
theatre arts, as well as sculptural ideas that can be
integrated into performance. Goals will be to gain a
deeper understanding of the power of objects in a
performative context; to experiment with a variety
of building techniques; to practice, create and refine
personal and found objects as art; to explore an
object’s potential to spark narrative, illustrate relationship dynamics and fuel theatrical action. We’ll
also study the use of objects in connection with
certain forms of performance training and creative
collaboration strategies. The course will provide an
historic context of objects in performance and will
utilize improvisational exercises, personal writing,
movement and bodywork. Class topics may include:
relationship, scale, sound, duration, repetition,
archetype and viewer participation/performance.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in all group projects, in-class assignments and
discussions, demonstrated understanding and mastery of basic skills through the creation of projects,
timely completion of all assignments and readings
and effective participation in class critiques. Level:
Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Movement
Training (I or II) or 3D studio, and permission of
either instructor. Limit: 12. Lb fee: $50.
46
AD 5013: Advanced Projects: Art Practice and
Concepts
Faculty: Andrews, Nancy
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course is designed for students who have
taken at least two previous arts and design related
courses and are prepared to pursue an in-depth
project. This seminar combines academic study
and studio work, and explores theory and practice
related to various visual arts disciplines. The course
will provide individual guidance and group critiques
for students from various disciplines to meet, present and discuss their work. Contemporary critical
issues are addresses through readings, screenings/
slides and discussions. We will explore how an artist
builds a body of work, and discuss working processes and issues in art and society. The course will
include field trips and visiting artists, when available
and pertinent. Students will be evaluated on their
progress towards their goals, and participation in
discussions and critiques. Students may work in
video, painting, photography, installation, sculpture,
2-D, or hybrid forms, but students should already
have the basic skills required for their chosen
project(s). Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $100.
AD 5017: Animation II
Faculty: Andrews, Nancy
Meets the following requirements: ADS
The class further develops ideas, skills, and animation projects through a mix of: in-class projects/
demos/skill based activities, readings, discussions,
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
screenings, presentations, and individual meetings
with the instructor. Students will write a production
plan that will serve as an outline of each student’s
project(s) for the term. The instructor will provide
useful activities, information, resources, critiques
and guidance. A schedule of presentations of student works-in-progress will be created. Readings
will address ideas and theories related to animation
studies and processes. Advanced animation techniques may include camera work and sound design.
Work completed over the term may be a single
longer animation or a series of animated shorts
depending on the student’s preference and animation goals. However, all students will be expected
to produce advanced level work and encouraged to
experiment and push their work to the highest level.
Students will be evaluated on their projects, participation in critiques and discussions and overall level
of engagement with the course material and class.
Level: Advanced. Pre-requisite: Animation, signature
of instructor. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $80.
AD 5018: Carnet de Voyage: The Illustrated
Travel Journal
Faculty: Colbert, Dru
Meets the following requirements: ADS
In this advanced interdisciplinary arts course you
will explore the form and nature of the illustrated
travel journal or Carnet de Voyage and create a
personal record of travel abroad. The nature of the
Carnet de Voyage expresses a coherent narrative or
aesthetic beyond the logging of dates and events as
found in a field book or a ship’s log. Because of the
advanced nature of the course, you will be invited
to draw on previous courses and experience in the
arts to choose a media; drawing, sketching, painting, digital word and image, photography, video, or
sound, to create a comprehensive visual response
to, and documentation of, your travels that constitute an illustrated journal. You will be asked to focus
your carnet on a particular aspect of culture. For
example topics as broad as food, politics, industry,
or as narrowly defined as body marking or human/
animal interactions or the idea of waste.
Class presentations and discussion will surround
the visual display of culture, and the history of the
travel journal. We will survey the illustrated travel
journal as an art, and as a record of cultural interaction through historic and contemporary examples
shown in class, and through first hand observation in museums and other cultural institutions
in France. Readings will include travel literature,
Carnet de Voyages, and critical readings surrounding the representation of culture.
Class participants will be given technical guidance as needed on their projects and will share their
work during in-progress and final critiques. Students will be required to create a copy of their work
in final form for submission and evaluation. Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussions and activities; and in the thoroughness, level
of thought, creativity, and artistry in visual research
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
projects. This course is designed for students have
demonstrated ability to complete independent work
in the arts and are expected to have previously completed intermediate/advanced level courses in the
arts. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: Introductory
and intermediate level AD courses and permission
of instructor; this course is intended to complement
a term of language and film study in Vichy, France.
Limit: 12.
AD 5023: Romanticism: The Triumph of the
Imagination over Reason?
Faculty: Clinger, Catherine
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
Scholar Isaiah Berlin considered Romanticism to
be “the greatest single shift in the consciousness
of the West.” This advanced course will consider
the diverse body of Romantic Art through thematic
enquiry, case studies, critical and historical analysis.
Divergent aesthetic ideologies in Romantic Art will
be examined in relationship to both major trends
and minor currents of intellectual thought during
the period 1780-1840 in Europe, with an emphasis placed largely on German Romanticism. Taken
together, many of the literary and philosophical
texts associated with the movement have been
understood as fundamental critiques of rationality;
however, it is the less celebrated illustrations found
in scientific treatises and works of art not acknowledged in the canon of the visual arts, as well as images embedded in various forms of printed matter,
which effectually capsize Enlightenment aesthetic
theories and provide impetus to the development
of Realism. Although the body of scholarly work that
studies the interstices of Romantic art, literature,
and music is enormous, the course will narrow the
scope by focusing on certain works as sites of a particular pictorial kind of representational transdisciplinarity. The course proposes that the widespread
interconnectedness within the fine and popular
arts, through aesthetic and material production,
inform the conceptualization of Romantic imagery.
Excellent evaluations will based on a high level of
class participation, a consistent demonstration of
the close reading of assigned texts, and a commitment to generous listening during group discussions—along with timely submission of two short
essays and a final research paper. Level: Advanced.
Prerequisites: A minimum of one history, anthropology, or literature course and permission of instructor. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $30.
AD 5026: Negotiating Wonder
Faculty: Foley, Sean
Meets the following requirements: AD
Writer and ecologist Edith Cobb suggested, “The
ability to look upon the world with wonder is a
technique and essential instrument in the work of
the poet, the artist, or the creative thinker.” This
advanced course will explore wonder as the poetic
source of curiosity and knowledge. We will consider
wonder as a visual phenomenon and engage it
47
through transdisciplinary readings within the fields
of the arts, science, natural history, education and
philosophy in order to develop a structural means
to frame and personalize the slippery and subjective
experience of wonder as an antecedent to knowledge. Our discussions will be purposefully broad
in order to develop techniques, provocations and
general criteria to explore a wide variety of concepts
useful towards engaging the inexplicable. We will
discuss wonder in relation to its associated conditions of the marvelous, the fantastic, the uncanny,
the horrible, the terrible, and the abject. These
highly subjective and elusive concepts will be examined as “conditions” of wonder. We will not seek
to concretely “explain” these rich concepts but use
them actively, as immersive and interrogative tools
that students can exert to articulate or provoke a
sense wonder in service of developing better questions. The reading load for this course is heavy. A
high level of class participation, a consistent demonstration of the close reading of assigned texts, and
a commitment to thoughtful listening during group
discussions are the course standards for excellence.
Additional criteria include response papers and a
sustained final independent project to be presented
to the group. There will also be a required field trip
to the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary
Art in North Adams, MA to tour the art exhibition
“Explode Everyday: An Inquiry into the Phenomenon
of Wonder”. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and a minimum of one history,
anthropology, or literature course. Priority will be
given to students who completed AD5023 Romanticism. Limit: 10. Lab fee: $100.
AD 5027: Tutorial: Advanced Ensemble Project:
Hamlet
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
This group tutorial will build upon the advanced
course of study several students completed in Fall
2016. That work was focused on developing a small
practical ensemble suited to adapting, designing
and producing Shakespeare’s Hamlet. In Winter
term these same students will submit their current
draft to a more formalized rehearsal process with
the intention of sharing it with the greater community by term’s end. I will act as both research facilitator and artistic director of the project. The goals
for the course are a deeper understanding of the
text, personal artistic processes, physical training
practices, collaborative curation, and audience/actor dynamic. Beyond Shakespeare, source materials
will include works by Peter Brook, Harold Bloom, Tadashi Suzuki, Avital Ronell, Simon Critchley, Lisa Wolpe, Janet Suzman, Robert Wilson, Anne Bogart and
others. This tutorial will also serve as preparation
for a collaborative project in the spring between the
college, The Criterion and the local primary schools
(Criterion Kids Workshop—5th grade Hamlet). That
project has been funded by the Maine Arts Commission and will be managed by Eloise Shultz ‘16
and myself. All students in this tutorial intend to
be co-directors in that endeavor. Evaluation will
48
be based on engagement and commitment to the
study, including preparation, research, rehearsals,
as well as progress made during winter towards the
goals of this multi-term project. Level: Advanced.
Prerequisites: Acting Hamlet, Acting Hamlet II, and
permission of instructor. Limit: 3.
AD 5028: Tutorial: Criterion Kids Theatre
Project: Hamlet
Faculty: Baker, Jodi
This tutorial is the final phase in a long form advanced course of study funded by the Maine Arts
Commission. Several students completed preparatory work in prior terms focused on developing
a small practical ensemble, suited to adapting,
designing and producing Shakespeare’s Hamlet. In
this course, these same students will run a series
of workshop style rehearsals with a group of local
kids (aged 10-13) at the Criterion Theatre in Bar
Harbor. The primary course goal will be to help the
kids devise, build and perform their own adaptation of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The students enrolled
will be expected to effectively translate what they
have learned about the play, about actor training
methods and devising processes to a much younger
group of students, helping the kids explore and
better understand the text as well as helping them
create relevant and compelling choices in production. Beyond the Shakespeare, source materials will
include production histories and writings sourced
from contemporary artists and collectives that
incorporate work with children as part of their practice (Mammalian Diving Reflex, The Gob Squad, 600
Highwaymen etc.) Evaluation will be based on commitment to the goals of the study, including curriculum development, preparation and contributions
to all workshops and rehearsals as well as progress
made over the entirety of the multi-term project.
Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: Advanced Ensemble
Project: Hamlet, and permission of instructor. Limit:
3.
AD 5029: The Range of Sublimity in the Artist
Mind
Faculty: Clinger, Catherine
Meets the following requirements: AD HY
Edmund Burke’s chief contribution to aesthetics is
his exegesis on the contrary states that define the
Beautiful and the Sublime: these are the regular
and irregular, binaries of pleasure and pain, appeal and terror, knowingness and not-knowing.
Burke encourages the viewer of a ‘place’ to distance herself from the natural agencies that incite
emotional response to landscapes. In keeping a
distance; however, we risk participating in a lifeless, hegemonic practice that colonizes nature and
hinders aesthetic engagement. Proximity to nature
(rather than detachment from it) makes visible the
consequences of eighteenth-century imperial and
nineteenth-century nationalist missions masked
in many of the works of the Hudson River School.
Non-native forces in the Western Hemisphere took
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ownership of humans, places, resources, and in
the process, devastated whole peoples and ecologies. Through travel, study, research and creative
activity, students will learn to see and appraise the
transformation of peripatetic practice into art; as
well as witness how art can both reveal and conceal
the nature of place. How have the varied notions of
sublimity affected artist practice over the past 250
years? What are artists making now that counters a
narrative that privileges detachment over intimacy
and counters modernity’s embrace of indifference?
This course will consider the concept of sublimity,
both as subject and agent, in the work of visual
artists during the aforementioned epochs and the
present one. Students will be evaluated on class
participation, annotated bibliography, and research
paper. This course requires concurrent registration
with AD5030 Artist/Naturalist/Visionary (Foley)
and AD5031 Journey into Substance (Clinger/Foley).
Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: An art history, anthropology, or literature course, and permission of
instructor. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $100.
AD 5030: Artist/Naturalist/Visionary
Faculty: Foley, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course will explore artist materials, ideology
and techniques of the Hudson River School Painters
alongside contemporary post-studio practice that
critiques and expands our notions of the accomplishments of the Hudson River School artists. In
this mixed media course, students’ subjects and
methods will be inspired by the traditions of the
Hudson River School but can approached with
broader contemporary concerns that support,
complicate or interrogate the ideals held by this
uniquely original group of American artists. Students will create and prepare painting supports,
paper, etching plates and other base media in weeks
zero and one so that they will be ready to work upon
return from each field trip expedition. In the field
students will employ the documentary methods of
the Hudson River painters that includes journals,
drawing, watercolor, pastel and oil sketches. We
will also use photography as a source medium. On
campus students will learn about historical pigments and binders to mix their own paint. They
will develop their field sketches in ways similar to
the Hudson River School – where close observation
in the field will mingle with ambitious imaginative
interpretations of the landscape as a metaphor. We
will discuss the visual compositional strategies of
using atmospheric light, symbolism, allegory, representation of particular natural specimens, scale,
meteorological phenomena, color psychology, chiaroscuro, and active compositions. In the field we will
meet with internationally known and highly regarded contemporary artists that work within the milieu
of the Hudson River School these may include Mark
Dion, Walton Ford, Alexis Rockman, Fred Tomaselli
and Hope Ginsburg. They will discuss the issues that
arise for the students and expand our critical understanding of this iconic American period of artistic
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
production to provide even more creative models
and strategies for students’ work. Evaluations will
be based on the degree to which students are able
to coherently articulate their ideas concerning their
process, technique, work, vision, and context for
their work. This course requires concurrent registration with AF5029 The Range of Sublimity in the Artist
Mind (Clinger) and AD5031 Journey into Substance
(Foley/Clinger). Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: An
intermediate drawing or painting class, and permission of instructor. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $100.
AD 5031: Journey into Substance: Art of the
Hudson and New England
Faculty: Clinger, Catherine; Foley, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This course takes us on a series of short expeditions
to museum collections (Wadsworth Atheaneum,
Mass MoCA, Dia Beacon, Boston MFA), outdoor
parks (Storm King, deCordova Museum and Sculpture Garden), and other key sites (Hudson River,
Olana, Mount Katahdin, etc.) Our purpose in visiting
these places is not only to see works of art, but also
to retrace the journeys of those artists who have
produced the canon that includes well-known iconic
vistas that are in fact visual fiction. Through interrogation of these ophthalmic constructs at the very
site of their fabrication, the student will engage with
the prospect of vision, conjugation of imaginative
capacity, and create thoughtful work deeply sourced
through the context of place and experience.
Evaluation will be based on steadfast class participation and a final project that incorporates ideas
and experiences from the entire 3-credit program.
This course requires concurrent registration with
AD5029 The Range of Sublimity in the Artist Mind
(Clinger) and AD5030 Artist/Naturalist/Visionary
(Foley). Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission
of instructor. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $500.
AD 6010: Tutorial: Individual Music Instruction
Faculty: Cooper, John
Meets the following requirements: ADS
This tutorial offers small group instruction in a defined musical or media discipline. It involves at least
one 1 1/2 hour weekly meeting with the instructor, and independent or group time of at least 8-10
hours weekly, with more time for advanced work.
Requirements include an end of term project or performance. Level: Variable. Offered upon demand.
Lab fee: $20.
ED 1010: Experiential Education
Faculty: Tai, Bonnie
Meets the following requirements: HS ED
Even before John Dewey published Experience
and Education in 1938, experiential education had
been practiced in various forms around the world.
This course explores the philosophy of experiential
education and its diverse practices in the realms
of adventure education, service learning, work49
place learning, environmental education, museum
education, and school reform. Group activities and
fieldtrips will provide opportunities to participate
as both learner and teacher in a variety of teacherled and student-designed experiences. The final
project involves researching an existing experiential
education program, its philosophy, and its practices.
Evaluation is based on class and fieldtrip participation (including one multi-day fieldtrip), reflective
logs, curriculum design, service-learning journal, an
oral presentation of the service-learning, and a final
essay that articulates a philosophy of experience in
education. Level: Introductory. Offered every other
year. Lab fee: $100. Limit: 15.
ED 1011: Children’s Literature
Faculty: Ryan, Siobhan
Meets the following requirements: ED
This course is a broad overview of children’s literature and its place in the elementary school classroom. It examines the range and trends in literature
for children that includes all genres, prominent
authors, illustrators, awards, critical evaluation,
and integration into instruction across the curriculum. Students participate in and design lessons
which incorporate or extend children’s response
to literature. They survey poetry and media appropriate for elementary students. Students read
an extensive amount of children’s literature, keep a
response journal, develop an author study, and create a teaching unit using children’s literature. Level:
Introductory. Limit: 15.
ED 1013: Changing Schools, Changing Society
Faculty: Tai, Bonnie
Meets the following requirements: HS ED
How have schools changed and how should schools
change to ensure “the good life”? This interdisciplinary, team-taught course examines the potential
and limits of a human ecological education as an
instrument of enlightened progress and lasting
positive social, cultural, and environmental change.
It explores three essential questions about education and its relationship to human development and
social progress. Looking at the role of formal educational institutions and their relationship to government and other social institutions: What is the role
of schools in development and social change? Considering the role of teachers as agents of change:
What is the role of the teacher in school/organizational change and community development? And
finally, reflecting on our subjective motives for working in the field of education: Why do you want to
become an educator? Through course activities such
as service-learning in schools and group project
work on a contemporary educational phenomenon
(e.g., school choice, new technologies for learning,
single-sex education), students will learn how educational policy at the federal, state, and local levels
impacts teaching and learning, investigate the moral
dimensions of the teacher-student relationship,
and reflect on the construct of teacher-learners.
50
Students will be introduced to a variety of educational research methods (i.e, ethnography, case
study, quasi-experimental, correlational) that will
allow for critical analysis of the knowledge base that
strives to impact educational policy and practice.
Evaluation will be based on participation, reflective
writing, service learning, and group projects and
presentations. Level: Introductory. Limit: 15. Offered
every other year. Lab fee: $20.
ED 1014: Child Development
Faculty: Alex, Joanne
Meets the following requirements: ED
How does a child think? What causes him/her to
learn? What teaching approaches work best with
young children? These questions and more will be
explored through readings, lectures, field observations, and planned class activities. This course will
provide an introduction to early childhood education (preschool to eighth grade). Theorists such
as Piaget, Vygotsky, Montessori, Gardner, Erikson,
Maslow, Kohlberg, and Gilligan will be used to examine the physical, mental, emotional, moral, and social aspects of childhood growth and development.
Students will explore a range of curriculum models,
approaches, and strategies as they learn to apply
developmental theory to best practices. These best
practices will include the role of teachers in creating meaningful learning experiences and classroom
environments (curriculum), documenting learning,
assessment, inclusion, and family involvement. The
primary modes of instruction for this class will be
lectures, classroom discussions, field observations/
reflections, and cooperative hands-on learning
activities. Short reflective papers, an observational
journal, and class projects will be used to assess
learning. Level: Introductory. Limit: 15.
ED 1016: Introduction to Adolescent Psychology
Faculty: Hill, Kenneth
Meets the following requirements: HS ED
This course focuses on the segment of the human
life span from puberty to early adulthood. In this
class we will examine the physical, cognitive, social,
and moral aspects of adolescent growth and development. Issues to be considered include adolescent
relationships (peers, family, romantic), adolescent
issues (identity formation, at risk behavior, schooling, and stereotypes), and critical reflection on one’s
own adolescent experience. The main objectives
of this course are to: 1) provide students with a
working knowledge of the theories of psychology
which pertain to early adolescent development; 2)
help students develop the ability to critically analyze
information and common assumptions about the
development of adolescents; 3) consider contemporary issues and concerns of the field; and 4) to
afford students the opportunity to explore their
own adolescent development. Course work entails
lecture, discussion, extensive case analysis, and a
field component. Level: Introductory. Prerequisite:
None. Limit: 16.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ED 3012: Supporting Students with Disabilities
in the Reg. Classroom
Faculty: Sanborn, Kelley
Meets the following requirements: ED
This is an introductory course in special education.
We will explore the needs of children with disabilities and techniques for meeting these needs in the
regular classroom. The course will emphasize both
the social and instructional aspects of the concepts
of inclusion, differentiation and serving students
in the “least restrictive environment”. Participants
will be introduced to concepts central to understanding the role of regular classroom teachers in
meeting the academic, social, and emotional needs
of students with disabilities. Objectives: By the
end of the course students will be able to: identify
and describe current issues and trends in education related to individuals with disabilities and their
families; describe the Special education laws and
procedures impacting individuals with disabilities;
develop a working definition for each area of exceptionality in relation to achievement of educational
goals, and develop strategies and resources for
modifying, adapting and/or differentiating curriculum and instruction. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisite: Introductory course in Education. Limit: 15.
ED 3013: Intercultural Education
Faculty: Tai, Bonnie
Meets the following requirements: HS ED
Educators in and outside of the US teach in increasingly culturally heterogeneous classrooms,
schools, and communities. This course explores
some challenges and possibilities in education as a
result of historical inequities in the distribution of
power, knowledge, and resources, and the increasing mobility of peoples in a global economy. We will
consider questions such as: What is multicultural,
intercultural, and global education? How do culturally different teaching and learning styles impact
notions of academic achievement, school success,
and teacher quality? How can student assessments
and performance standards respond effectively to
cultural differences? How can educators effectively
communicate and partner with parents and community members across cultural differences? What
are the legal and moral obligations of teachers in
providing equal educational opportunity according
to federal and state laws? We will read theory and
research on educating across and about cultural difference, reflect on our own cultural affiliations, and
actively explore the dynamics of identity, culture,
and power in the teaching-learning relationship and
in educational institutions through case discussions
and other group activities. Investigations of the education of self and other will take place through class
activities, readings, autobiographical and fiction
writing, reflective logs, media analysis, and a field
research or curriculum project. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisite: An introductory sociology, anthropology, cultural psychology, or education course. Offered every other year. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $20.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ED 3014: Negotiating Educational Policy
Faculty: Fuller, Linda
Meets the following requirements: ED
Public schools are everyone’s concern. Shared ownership by diverse stakeholders often brings strong
interest in school policies. This course will explore
issues under debate by state and local policymakers through readings, full class and small group
discussions, guest speakers, and an extended simulation. We will also examine Maine’s Civil Rights Act
and its implementation in various school districts.
Our driving questions include: what are the ways
parents, teachers, business people and interested
community members might influence school policies given the common constraints of limited time
and energy? How do policy-makers sort through
various opinions and facts to create legislation? How
do those who implement policy integrate context
and experience with the spirit of an official state
statute? With the objective of understanding and
negotiating critical school policy issues that impact
the nation and beyond, evaluation will be based on
class participation (including one of two field trips),
reflection journal entries, a group interview and presentation, and a final personal analysis paper based
on one of the bills under deliberation by Maine
legislators this session. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Changing Schools, Changing Society and/
or a prior policy course or strong interest in policy
recommended. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $10
ED 3015: Education for Life
Faculty: Tai, Bonnie
Meets the following requirements: ES HS
At the start of the 21st century, average lifespans are
nearly double what they were a century ago. Many
countries now simultaneously enjoy and won- der
how to support a growing older adult popula- tion.
This changing demographic invites a deeper
understanding of adult development and education. Civil society and social movements recognize
the power of transformational learning and social
action. While many education programs support
and empower youth leaders as the drivers of social
change, older adults are also seeking out continuing opportunities to learn, mature, and develop—
whether intellectually, socially, or spiritually. Their
hunger for learning may be in the service of greater
self-knowledge, sustainable employability, greater
political participation, or activism and community
organizing for various causes; these individual and
collective pursuits may seek environmental sustainability, lasting peace, social and environmental justice, or individual freedom, economic stability, and
domestic tranquility. This course weaves a multidisciplinary study of adult development and curriculum
theory to consider the following questions: How do
adults learn and grow from the every day opportunities and challenges that life affords? What kinds of
informal education exists for adults beyond formal
secondary and tertiary education? And specifically,
what forms of adult education aim to value, pro51
tect, and sustain all life—human and non-human?
Through readings, guest speakers, fieldtrips, films,
and facilitated discussions, this course explores
theories of adult development, examines promising
models of adult education, and assesses the value
and feasibility of curriculum in service of an education for life. Evaluation will be based on mindful participation, an oral history or biographical research
on a respected elder, a proposal for a conceptual
framework, and a case study of a model program.
Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Prior coursework
in psychology or education. Limit: 13. Lab fee: $20.
ED 4012: Integrated Methods IA: Gr. K-4 Reading
and Writing
Faculty: Moody, Paula
Meets the following requirements: HS ED
This course is designed to prepare prospective
teachers with methods necessary to implement
a comprehensive literacy program for grades K-4
to include all aspects of literacy acquisition. Major
areas of focus will include oral, visual and technological communication, shared and interactive strategies, phonics, word study and spelling, independent
and guided reading, writing workshop and writing
in all content areas. The course content focuses on
an integrated approach to the acquisition of literacy
skills, current best practice, and lesson design,
questioning techniques, formative and summative assessment. Learning objectives address the
standards for Maine Initial Teacher Certification,
Common Core State Standards, and the Maine
Learning Results. There is a fieldwork component of
50 hours for this ten-week course. For example, 2
classroom observations for 3 hours each for a total
of 6 hours per week, excluding the week of school
vacation and week 10. There will be a weekly onehour lab, shared with Integrated Methods I: Gr 5-8.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of a course
portfolio to include class participation, curriculum
and assessment design, performance assessments,
cooperating teacher feedback, and reflections on
the fieldwork and required readings. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisite: Child Development, Integrated Methods I: Gr 5-8, and, if possible,
Children’s Literature. Limit: 12.
ED 4013: Integrated Methods IB: Gr. 5-8 Reading
and Writing
Faculty: Fuller, Linda
Meets the following requirements: HS ED
This course is designed to prepare prospective
teachers with methods necessary to implement a
comprehensive literacy program for grades 5-8 to
include: motivation and the middle school reader;
helping middle-school students develop their writing voice through knowledge of language, vocabulary acquisition and use, and working with a variety
of text; teaching critical, creative, and collaborative
technology use; using multiple tools to differentiate
instruction; creating and using rubrics for assessing
52
writing. The course content focuses on an integrated approach to the acquisition of literacy skills,
current best practice, lesson design, questioning
techniques, and formative and summative assessment. Learning objectives address Maine’s teaching
standards, the Common Core State Standards for
students, and the Maine Learning Results. There
is a field studies component of 50 hours for this
ten-week course. (For example, three classroom observations for two hours each for a total of six hours
per week, excluding school vacation week and week
10.) There will be a weekly one-hour lab, shared
with Integrated Methods IA: Gr K-4. Evaluation will
be based on the quality of a course portfolio to
include curriculum and assessment design, performance assessments, cooperating teacher feedback
on classroom performance, and reflections on the
fieldwork and required readings. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Pre- or co-requisite: Permission of
instructor, Child Development, Integrated Methods
IA: Gr K-4 Reading and Writing, and, if possible, Children’s Literature. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $20.
ED 5010: Curriculum Design and Assessment
Faculty: Tai, Bonnie
Meets the following requirements: HS ED
Human ecologists who educate, embrace not only
the interdisciplinarity of knowledge, but also the
complexity of individual student development in political school environments. This course focuses on
two essential nuts and bolts of teaching: curriculum
design and assessment. How can a teacher learn
what students know, how they think, and what they
have learned? How can a teacher use this knowledge of students and subject matter to plan learning experiences that will engage diverse interests,
adapt to a wide range of learning styles and preferences, accommodate exceptional needs, and meet
state-mandated curriculum standards? This course
is a required course for prospective secondary
school teachers that provides an introduction to the
backward design process and diverse assessment
strategies. Students will engage in examining theory
and practice designing and implementing curricula
and assessments. A service-learning component will
provide students with the opportunity to observe
and participate in a variety of assessment methods
in the subject they aim to teach. The final project will
be a collaboratively designed, integrated curriculum unit, including lesson plans and assessments.
Evaluation will be based on participation, reflective
writing, individually designed lesson plans and assessments, and the final project. Level: Advanced.
Prerequisite: Supporting Students with Disabilities
in the Regular Classroom. Limit: 12.
ED 5011: Integrated Methods II: Science, Math,
and Social Studies
Faculty: Fuller, Linda; Alex, Joanne; St. Denis, Kate
Meets the following requirements: HS ED
How can an integrated curriculum for elementary
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
school students help to deepen the relationships
children and young adolescents construct with the
natural and social worlds in a way that promotes
their capacity to know themselves and the communities in which they act? For those preparing
to be elementary school educators (grades K-8),
this three-credit residency approach provides an
intensive guided apprenticeship that prepares the
student-teacher with the necessary knowledge,
skills, and experience to design an integrated math,
science, and social studies curriculum, create and
maintain a constructive learning environment, teach
diverse learners using appropriate teaching methods and learning technologies, and assess student
learning. Learning objectives include all eleven of
Maine’s teaching standards as well as a working
knowledge of the Parameters for Essential Instruction (PEI) for Math, Science, and Social Studies. Students will participate in a ten-week field work practicum observing and participating in elementary
classrooms as well as planning and teaching weekly
in a lab environment. Readings, discussions, and
experiential learning in class will complement the
field work component. Evaluation will be based on
reflection on fieldwork, participation in discussions
of readings and field work, curriculum and assessment design and implementation, and professional
performance in lab school and at the practicum site.
Partial credit may be awarded based on completed
work and demonstrated learning. Level: Advanced, 3credit Residency. Prerequisites: Learning Theory,
Exceptionalities, and Integrated Elementary Methods: Reading and Writing and permission of instructor. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $25.
ED 5012: Secondary Methods: Life Science,
Social Studies and English
Faculty: Fuller, Linda
Meets the following requirements: ED
This course is designed to prepare secondary teacher candidates to meet the learning needs of diverse
populations of students. Students spend one day a
week in a local high school working with faculty in
the subject area in which they are being certified.
These school-based experiences are integrated
into class discussions where students analyze the
elements needed for successful teaching, learning,
and assessing in their own content area and across
disciplines. The purposes, problems, issues, strategies, and materials involved in teaching high school
students will be examined critically through class
discussions, individual and group work, reflections
on field experiences and peer teaching. Students
will incorporate the content, inquiry tools and structures of the discipline they will teach into a 4-week
unit that may be used in their student teaching.
Evaluation will be based on weekly reflective response journals, completion of the service learning
component (one day a week in classroom), completion of readings and entry slips, and the 4-week unit
of study. Level: Advanced. Limit: 12.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ED 5013: Student Teaching
Faculty: Fuller, Linda
Meets the following requirements: ED
The student teaching internship represents the
student teaching requirement for COA’S teacher
certification candidates. Success in this experience
is a pivotal criterion in the student’s certification
candidacy. The student is placed in a school, usually
in the immediate region, with a cooperating teacher
who teaches subjects and grade levels that match
the certification goals of the student. The roles
of student teacher, cooperating teacher, school
principal, and COA supervisor are discussed and
agreed upon in advance. Incrementally, the student
teacher becomes familiar with class routines and
gradually takes responsibility for teaching. Within
the 15-week experience, the student teacher must
take on a full load (all classes and all duties) for the
number of weeks agreed upon by all parties. This
period of time varies with subjects, grade level and
specific student goals. The COA supervisor visits the
schools in a liaison capacity, and also evaluates the
student teacher’s performance a minimum of eight
times in the term. Student teachers meet together
regularly to discuss such issues as curriculum planning, instruction, best teaching practices, classroom
learning environment and broader educational
issues. Students may use student teaching to fulfill
the COA internship requirement if it is completed
prior to graduation. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites:
Permission of Ed Studies Program Director.
ED 5018: Tutorial: Qualitative Program
Evaluation Methods
Faculty: Tai, Bonnie
Meets the following requirements:
Educational programs strive to improve access,
conditions, and quality of education for a variety of
individuals, groups, and communities. Not-for-profit
organizations and educational institutions target
a variety of objectives, not limited to the following: Broaden access to early childhood education;
strengthen health and nutrition education; prevent
school violence; foster youth empowerment and resilience; support and advocate for LGBTQI students;
promote adult literacy; raise awareness of domestic
violence; facilitate integration of immigrants and
language minorities; provide resources and assistance for migrant workers and their families;
innovate museum-based art education; integrate
garden- or farm-based education; individualize
teacher education; collaborate with schools for
leadership development. This course pivots around
the central questions: How do we know that a
program is achieving its intended outcomes? What
processes facilitate or impede the program’s objectives? Students will learn the principles and practices of qualitative research methods to determine
whether and how well an educational program
accomplishes its mission through collaborating on
the evaluation of a regional rural education proj-
53
ect. The major objective of the course is to develop
skills in document analysis, participant-observation,
questionnaire design, and interviewing. Students
will work closely and extensively (over the course of
two months) with an existing program and undertake all phases of a program evaluation: planning, data collection, data analysis, and reporting.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, four
analytic memos, an oral presentation on a program
evaluation design for an individual project, and a
co-authored draft report of a program evaluation.
Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: Prior coursework in
education, ethnography, or statistics recommended;
permission of instructor. Limit: 5. Lab fee: $30
ES 1014: Gardens and Greenhouses: Theory/
Practice of Organic Gardening
Faculty: Morse, Suzanne
Meets the following requirements: ES
This class offers a good foundation of knowledge for
a gardener to begin the process of organic gardening, as well as an understanding of what defines
organic gardening. The information presented
focuses on soil fertility and stewardship, the ecology of garden plants, soil and insects, and practical
management of the above. The garden is presented
as a system of dynamic interactions. Emphasis is
given to vegetable crops and soil fertility. Laboratories include soil analysis, tree pruning, seedling establishment, weed and insect identification, garden
design, covercropping, composting, and reclamation
of comfrey infested area. Evaluations are based on
participation in class and lab, written class work,
exam, and final individual garden design. Level:
Introductory. Pre-requisite: Signature of Instructor.
Limit: 15. Lab fee: $25.
ES 1016: Ornithology
Faculty: Swann, Scott
Meets the following requirements: ES
The study of ornithology is as old as human society
itself. Birds are particularly conspicuous elements
of our world, and figure prominently in our art,
religious symbolism, mythology, scientific endeavors and even sport. Birds appear in European
paleolithic cave paintings from 14,000 years ago,
domesticated fowl are known from India circa 3000
BC, and ancient scholars such as Aristotle and Pliny
the Elder devoted considerable time to ornithological observations. In this century great strides have
been made in the study of population biology and
ecology, navigation and migration, and human
induced ecological change (sometimes called human
ecology), all through the study of birds. This class
introduces the student to the ornithological world
by using both scientific literature and direct field
observation. Systematics and physiology will be
reviewed, but much of our effort will concentrate
on reproductive ecology, behavior and the environment, and population dynamics. There will be a
strong emphasis on field observation—learning how
to look at birds and their behavior in order to per54
haps make larger observations about their environment. Level: Introductory. Lab fee: $75. Limit: 12.
ES 1018: Physics I: Mechanics and Energy
Faculty: Benson, Cristy
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
This course is the first of a two course sequence
covering a range of standard introductory physics
topics. The goals of the course are: to introduce students to important physical ideas both conceptually
and mathematically; and to help students improve
their quantitative skills. The first part of the course
consists of a broad look at the three conservation
laws: the conservation of momentum, energy, and
angular momentum. Along the way, we’ll learn
about vectors, work, potential energy, thermal energy, and the energy stored in chemical bonds. We’ll
conclude with a treatment of Newton’s laws of motion. If time permits, we may briefly cover some topics from chaotic dynamics. Evaluations will be based
on participation in class and lab, weekly homework,
and two untimed, open-notes exams. This course
makes extensive use of algebra and trigonometry.
Potentially difficult math topics will be reviewed as
necessary. Prerequisites: Understanding Functions,
a strong high school algebra background, or consent
of the instructor. Level: Introductory. Limit: 20. Lab
fee: $40.
ES 1020: Chemistry I
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: ES
This is the first half of a two-term sequence designed to help students describe and understand
properties of materials. The course first explores
how our current pictures of atoms and molecules
can explain physical properties of materials (state,
color, density, specific heat). The course then uses
such pictures to explain how materials behave
when mixed together. What sorts of transformations occur? How fast do they occur? To what extent
do they occur? Why do they occur? Course material
is applied to better understand living systems, the
natural environment, and industrial products. The
course meets for three hours of lecture/discussion
and for three hours of lab each week. Students are
strongly urged to take both terms of this course.
Evaluations are based on class participation, lab
reports, and quizzes. Offered every year. Level:
Introductory. Lab fee: $75.
ES 1022: Introduction to Oceanography
Faculty: Todd, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ES
Planet Earth is misnamed. Seawater covers approximately 70% of the planet’s surface, in one giant allconnected ocean. This ocean has a profound effect
on the planet’s climate, chemistry, ecosystem, and
energy resources. Billions of years ago life began
there, in what now we regard as the last unexplored
frontier of this planet. In this course we examine the
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
various disciplines within oceanography, including
aspects of geology and sedimentology, chemical,
dynamic and biological oceanography. The course
concludes with an introduction to marine ecosystems examined at various trophic levels, including
phyto/zooplankton, fish and other macrofauna.
Fieldwork (weather dependent) includes trips on RV
Indigo, trips to intertidal and estuarine ecosystems,
and possible visits to the college’s islands, Mount
Desert Rock and Great Duck Island. Evaluation will
be by lab, quizzes and a final paper. Level: Introductory. Lab fee: $150. Limit: 20.
ES 1024: Calculus I
Faculty: Feldman, David
Meets the following requirements: QR
The goal of this sequence of courses is to develop
the essential ideas of single-variable calculus: the
limit, the derivative, and the integral. Understanding
concepts is emphasized over intricate mathematical
maneuverings. The mathematics learned are applied to topics from the physical, natural, and social
sciences. There is a weekly lab/discussion section.
Evaluations are based on homework, participation
in class and lab, and tests. Level: Introductory. Prerequisites: Precalculus or the equivalent or signature of the instructor. Limit: 20.
ES 1026: Introduction to Chaos and Fractals
Faculty: Feldman, David
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
This course presents an elementary introduction to
chaos and fractals. The main focus will be on using
discrete dynamical systems to illustrate many of
the key phenomena of chaotic dynamics: stable and
unstable fixed and periodic points, deterministic
chaos, bifurcations, and universality. A central result
of this study will be the realization that very simple
non-linear equations can exhibit extremely complex behavior. In particular, a simple deterministic
system (i.e., physical system governed by simple,
exact mathematical rules) can behave in a way that
is unpredictable and random, (i.e., chaotic). This result suggests that there are potentially far-reaching
limits on the ability of science to predict certain
phenomena. Students in this class will also learn
about fractals—-self-similar geometric objects—-including the Mandelbrot set and Julia sets. We
will also read about and discuss the development
of the field of chaos. In so doing, we will examine
the nature of scientific communities, with a particular eye toward how changes in scientific outlooks
occur. Throughout the course, students will be
encouraged to explore the relations between chaos,
fractals, and other areas of study such as literature,
art, and cultural studies. Students who successfully complete this class should gain a quantitative
and qualitative understanding of the basic ideas of
chaos and fractals, a greater understanding of the
cultural practice of science, and improved mathematical skills. Evaluation will be based on class and
lab participation, weekly problem sets several short
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
writing assignments and a final project. Level: Introductory. Prerequisite: A high school algebra course
or signature of instructor. Lab fee: $20. Limit: 15.
ES 1028: Marine Biology
Faculty: Petersen, Christopher
Meets the following requirements: ES
This is a broad course, covering the biology of organisms in various marine habitats (rocky intertidal,
mud and sand, estuaries, open ocean, coral reefs,
deep sea), and some policy and marine management and conservation issues. The largest part of
this course is focused on learning to identify and
understand the natural history and ecology of the
marine flora and fauna of New England, with an
emphasis on the rocky intertidal of Mount Desert Island. The course meets twice per week with
one afternoon for laboratory work or field trips.
Evaluations are based on the quality of participation in class, one in-class practical, several sets of
essay questions, and a field notebook emphasizing
natural history notes of local organisms. This class
is intended for first year students, who will have
priority during registration. Returning students may
take this course only with permission of the instructor. Level: Introductory. Prerequisites: Signature of
instructor for returning students. Offered at least
every other year. Limit: 20. Lab fee: $60.
ES 1030: Chemistry II
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
This is the second half of a two-term sequence
designed to help students describe and understand
properties of materials. This course begins with
a survey of how the internal structure of atoms
leads to the formation of different sorts of bonds
between them. It then considers how weaker forces
can arise between molecules and the sorts of
physical phenomena that such forces explain. The
class concludes by considering how to describe and
explain the rates at which (and the extents to which)
chemicals reactions occur and applies such descriptions and explanations to common types of reactions (acid/base and redox). Throughout the course,
examples are drawn from living systems, the
natural environment, and industrial products. The
course meets for three hours of lecture/discussion
and for three hours of lab each week. Chemistry 1
is a strongly recommended a prerequisite for this
course. Evaluations are based on class participation,
homework, midterm and final exams and a term
project or paper. Level: Introductory. Lab fee: $60.
Offered every year.
ES 1034: Physics and Mathematics of
Sustainable Energy
Faculty: Feldman, David
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
The aim of this course is to help students learn
some basic physics and quantitative and analyti55
cal skills so that they can participate intelligently
and responsibly in policy discussions, personal and
community decisions, and ventures in the area of
sustainable energy. We will begin with some basic
physics, including: the definition of energy, the
difference between energy and power, different
forms of energy, and the first and second laws of
thermodynamics. We will also provide students
with a basic scientific and economic introduction to
various alternative energy technologies. Along the
way, students will gain mathematical skills in estimation and dimensional analysis, and will learn to
use spreadsheets to assist in physical and financial
calculations. There will also be a weekly lab to help
students understand the physical principles behind
different energy technologies and gain experience
gathering and analyzing data.
Students who successfully complete this course
will be able to apply what they have learned to basic
issues in sustainable energy. For example, they will
be able to evaluate and analyze a proposed technolog y improvement by considering its dollar cost, carb
on reduction, return to investment, payback time,
and how all this might depend on, say, interest rates
or the cost of electricity or gasoline. Students will
also be able to analyze the potential of a technology
or energy source to scale up. E.g., they will be able
to consider not only the benefits to a homeowner of
a solar installation, but to also analyze the degree to
which solar power may contribute to Maine’s energy
needs.
This will be a demanding, introductory, class.
Evaluation will be based on weekly problem sets,
participation in class and lab, and a final project.
At least one college-level class in mathematics or
physical science is strongly recommended. Level:
Introductory. Limit: 15. Lab fee $50.
ES 1038: Geology of Mt. Desert Island
Faculty: Hall, Sarah
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course is designed to introduce students to
geological concepts, tools of the trade, and to the
geological history of Mount Desert Island. Throughout the course, students will learn skillsets (topographic and geologic map reading, orienteering,
field observation, note taking, field measurements)
and geologic principles (rock types, stratigraphy,
plate tectonics, earth systems, geologic time, surface processes) both in the classroom and in the
field. We will conduct multiple short field excursions
on MDI and one extended weekend field trip to
explore the regional geology. Students will submit
a term project complete with their own field data,
maps, photos, and analysis of the local and regional
geology. Students will be evaluated on the term
project, short quizzes, additional written assignments and lab reports. Offered every fall. Level:
Introductory. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $100.
56
ES 1040: Natural Resources
Faculty: Hall, Sarah
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course will focus on various types of natural resources we have on Earth including water, soil, rock
and mineral, and various energy resources (fossil
fuels, alternatives). Students will learn fundamental geologic principles through a discussion of the
processes forming and influencing these resources.
We will explore how each type is extracted/refined/
exploited/conserved for human use. We will also
discuss the many environmental issues associated
with each industry. Finally, we will look at the local
industries built on the many natural resources available in our region of Maine. This course will appeal
to students interested in geologic processes and
how they relate to our resource needs. This course
will also provide scientific grounding in the relevant
geology for students whose primary interests are in
the policy or politics of resources. Class time will be
spent as lectures, discussions, labs or demonstration, and occasionally visiting a local field site. Students will be evaluated based on weekly labs and/or
problem sets, a field trip report, and a final report.
Level: Introductory. Limit: 16. Lab fee: $60.
ES 1044: Physics II
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
This course is one of a pair of courses covering
a range of standard introductory physics topics.
The main topics of this course are electricity and
magnetism, light, and optics. As time permits, and
depending on student interest, we may also cover
basic astronomy and nuclear fission and fusion.
Emphasis will be on how these topics relate to real
world phenomena, with many hands-on lab opportunities exploring physical systems such as circuits,
generators, telescopes and microscopes, as well
as biological systems like the eye and the nervous
system. This course makes extensive use of algebra
to solve problems and mathematical formulas to explain physical phenomena. Evaluation will be based
on weekly homework assignments, class participation, lab work, and two exams. Level: Introductory.
Prerequisites: Understanding functions, a strong high
school algebra background, or consent of the
instructor. Physics I is not a prerequisite. Limit: 15.
Lab fee: $45.
ES 1046: Critical Zone I
Faculty: Hall, Sarah
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course will cover the foundational concepts
in Geology and Earth System Science such as plate
tectonics, rock and mineral classification, weathering and erosion, climate, and cycles: water, carbon,
nitrogen. Further, students will learn to use many
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
“tools of the trade” including using a Brunton
compass, geologic mapping (field and GIS), describing and identifying rocks through outcrop, handsample, and thin-section analysis, and describing
soils. The course will have lab and lecture components, but will also include field study at various
sites within the Northeast Creek watershed including the Peggy Rockefeller Farm and The Protectorate. Students will be evaluated based on weekly or
bi-weekly problem sets, quizzes, and a field project.
The students will also prepare a field-based project
proposal. They will work on this project proposal
throughout the term with multiple opportunities
for peer review and revision. Level: Introductory.
Prerequisites: none. Limit: 16. Lab fee: $65.
ES 1052: Biology: Cellular Processes of Life
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course introduces students to the molecular
and cellular processes that are essential for life. We
will initially cover some basic chemistry to develop
a common language for discussing the complex
molecular events that are the basis of the structure
and function of cells. This class will explore cellular
processes involved in metabolism, communication, growth, and reproduction. There is a strong
emphasis on the understanding the genetic basis
of these processes as well as how these processes
are controlled, and we will delve into the structure
and function of the DNA molecule in some detail.
We will examine how our understanding of genetic
processes and genome sequencing has led to applications in research, medicine, agriculture, and
industry, with time also devoted to discussion of the
social and ethical consequences attached to these
technological innovations. Students will be evaluated on participation, performance on problem sets
and quizzes throughout the term, and a final oral
presentation. Level: Introductory. Lab fee $25.
ES 1054: Biology: Form and Function
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: ES
This is one half of a 20-week, two-term introductory course in biology, providing an overview of
the discipline and prerequisite for many intermediate and advanced biology courses. The course will
emphasize biological structures at the level of whole
organisms and organs and their role in the survival
and reproduction of individuals and the evolution of
populations . We will explore principles of evolution,
classification, anatomy and physiology, epidemiology, behavior, and basic ecology. The primary focus
of the course is on vertebrate animals and vascular
plants, but we will make forays into other phylogenetic lineages at intervals. Weekly field and laboratory studies introduce students to the local range of
habitats and a broad array of protists, plants, and
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
animals. Attendance at two lectures and one lab
each week is required; course evaluation is based on
class participation, exams, preparation of a lab/field
notebook, and a mid-term presentation. It should
be stressed that this course emphasizes the unity
of the organism within its environment. Ideally students will subsequently enroll in Biology:Cells and
Molecules in order to further their exploration of issues in a more reductionist form, but neither course
is a pre-requisite for the other. Level: Introductory.
Offered every year. Lab fee $40. Binoculars and a
good pair of walking boots strongly advised.
ES 1058: Physics II: Introduction to Circuits
Faculty: Feldman, David
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
This course will provide students with a broad
introduction to circuits. Students with little or no
previous knowledge in electronics will learn the
fundamentals of circuits in both the analog and
digital realm. The course will cover topics such as
current, voltage, power, resistors, capacitors and
digital logic circuits, This is a hands-on course focusing more on the “how to” than the “why”. By the end
of the course students should be able to independently develop, implement, test and document basic
circuits. Evaluation will be based on problem sets,
participation in lab and class, and a final project or
exam. This course makes extensive use of algebra.
A college level math, physics, or chemistry class is
recommended but not required. Level: Introductory.
Prerequisite: High School Algebra. Limit: 15. Lab fee:
$50.
ES 2010: Ecology: Natural History
Faculty: Swann, Scott
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course emphasizes field studies of the ecology of Mount Desert Island, incorporating labs
and field trips. Each exercise focuses on a central
ecological concept. Topics include intertidal biology
and diversity, forest trees and site types, bedrock
geology, soil biology, insect diversity, pollination
ecology, freshwater biology, predation, herbivory,
and the migration of birds. Discussions include the
development of natural history as a science and the
role of natural selection in the evolution of diversity.
Students are expected to keep a field notebook or
journal, to undertake a project, and to write a term
paper. Class meets for two lecture sessions and one
lab session or two field/lab sessions per week. The
course is particularly appropriate for students concentrating in Environmental Education. This class
is intended for first year students, who will have
priority during registration. Returning students may
take this course with permission of the instructor.
Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites:
None; field work involves strenuous hiking. Limit: 11.
Lab fee: $75.
57
ES 2012: Introduction to Statistics and Research
Design
Faculty: Todd, Sean
Meets the following requirements: QR
This course introduces the basics of statistical
analysis that can be used in either a scientific or a
social science frame of reference. While this course
teaches you to perform both nonparametric and
simple parametric analysis both by hand and computer, an emphasis will be placed on understanding
the principles and assumptions of each test, rather
than mathematical ability per se. We will also learn
how to report statistical results in journal format,
and there will be plenty of lab time to sharpen
skills. Evaluation is based on lab participation, three
quizzes, and a team project. Level: Introductory/
Intermediate. Prerequisites: A college mathematics
course, or signature of the instructor. Limit: 20. Lab
fee: $40.
ES 2014: Trees and Shrubs of Mount Desert
Island
Faculty: Weber, Jill
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course introduces you to the native and ornamental shrubs and trees of Mount Desert Island.
Lectures will cover basics of plant taxonomy and forest ecology focusing on the dominant woody plant
species of the region. Laboratory and field sessions
will involve the identification of woody plants and
an introduction to the major woody plant habitats of the island. The course is designed to teach
botany and plant taxonomy for students interested
in natural history/ecology, forestry, and landscape
design. Evaluations are based on class participation,
weekly field/lab quizzes, a plant collection, and term
project. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Recommended: some background in Botany, Ecology.
Offered every year. Limit: 16. Lab fee: $40.
ES 2020: Art and Science of Fermented Foods
Faculty: Morse, Suzanne
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course will take an in depth look at the art
and science of fermented and cultured foods. The
first half of the class will focus on the microbiology
of fermentation with a specific focus on products
derived from milk and soybeans. Each week there
will be a laboratory portion in which students will
explore how the basic fermentation processes and
products change with different milk and soy qualities. These small-scale experiences and experiments will be complemented with field trips to commercial enterprises in Maine and Massachusetts.
In the second half of the term students will explore
the differences in flat, yeast, and sourdough breads.
Final projects will focus on a foodway of choice and
will culminate in presentations that explore the
historical and cultural context in which these different cultured foods were developed and how these
microbial-mediated processes enhance preserva58
tion, nutritional and economic value, and taste.
Evaluations will be based on class participation,
short quizzes, a lab report, journal, and a final project. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites:
Permission of instructor. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $75 (to
cover use of the community kitchen, one two-day
field trip to Massachusetts, to visit commercial soy
product companies and supplies.)
ES 2022: Introductory Entomology
Faculty: Graham, Carrie
Meets the following requirements:
Nearly 80% of all described species belong to the
class Insecta. Due to their abundance, diversity and
adaptability, insects are crucial components of terrestrial, freshwater and human-made ecosystems.
Students with a background in entomology can apply their knowledge of insects to many other fields,
including botany, ecology, anthropology, epidemiology and medicine, agriculture, climate change,
visual arts, history, and even the culinary arts. This
course will give students a sampling of entomological applications within these diverse fields. Students
will be given a solid introduction to insect biology, ecology, taxonomy and identification through
lectures, lab sessions and field trips. They will assemble their own insect collections and will learn to
identify all Maine insect orders and many common
insect families. Lectures, field trips and readings will
emphasize the important role of insects in human
lives and our impact on the environment. Students
will be evaluated on their insect collections, performance on lab quizzes, participation and one paper
with presentation. Level: Introductory/Intermedi- ate.
Prerequisites: Bio 1 or permission of instructor.
Limit: 15. Lab fee $35.
ES 2030: Marine Mammal Biology I
Faculty: Todd, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course provides an introduction to the biology
and natural history of marine mammals, specializing in species resident within the North Atlantic.
Topics covered include: phylogeny and taxonomy;
anatomy and physiology; behavior; sensory ecology; and management/conservation issues. The
course includes field trips to observe animals in
their natural habitat, dissection of specimens, and
exposure to the professional peer review field.
Students are expected to complete two individual
literature-based reviews, one species- and one
system-based, to be presented in class. Assessment
is based on class participation, presentations as well
as written submissions. Lab fee covers costs of field
trips, including potential boat and field station time,
and optional travel to a regional conference during
the term. Offered every other year. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisite: Biology I, II and a
writing-focused class or permission of instructor.
Limit: 15. Lab fee: $200.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ES 2031: Quantitative Geomorphology
Faculty: Hall, Sarah
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
ES 3010: Agroecology
Faculty: Morse, Suzanne
Meets the following requirements: ES
Various climatic and tectonic processes such as erosion and active mountain building are continuously
shaping Earth’s diverse landscapes. We can describe
these processes both qualitatively and quantitatively in order to understand the rates and timescales
over which different landscapes develop and evolve.
In this course, students will first learn about the
processes forming and shaping landscape features
(geomorphology) and then practice describing these
processes quantitatively using multiple types of
datasets. We will compare the iconic glacially carved
landscape of MDI and Acadia National Park with
other similarly formed landscapes (e.g. Yosemite
National Park), which are currently located in different climates/tectonics environments and therefore
are exposed to different active processes. Students
will learn about various isotopic dating methods
and use real data to calculate the rates of different geomorphic process: glacial advance/retreat,
tectonic activity along faults, mountain building.
Further, students will combine temporal and spatial
data to quantitatively and qualitatively describe the
different geomorphic hazards in a given region such
as mass-wasting events (landslides, debris flows,
rock falls, etc.). Students will be evaluated based
on their performance on problem sets, quizzes,
and a final project involving a more in depth study
of a particular landscape of interest. This course
does not have any prerequisites, however previous
introductory geology, chemistry, and math courses
will be beneficial. This course will make extensive
use of algebra, exponentials, logarithms, and digital
spreadsheets (using Excel or similar software). Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: Previous
introductory geology, chemistry, and math courses
will be beneficial; permission of instructor required.
Limit: 16. Lab fee: $20.
The global demand for food and fiber will continue
to increase well into the next century. How will this
food and fiber be produced? Will production be at
the cost of soil loss, water contamination, pesticide
poisoning, and increasing rural poverty? In this
course, we examine the fundamental principles and
practices of conventional and sustainable agriculture with a primary focus on crops. By examining
farm case studies and current research on conventional and alternative agriculture we develop a set
of economic, social, and ecological criteria for a critique of current agricultural practices in the United
States and that will serve as the foundation for the
development and analysis of new farming systems.
Evaluations are based on two exams, class presentations, participation in a conference on potato
production, and a final paper. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisites: Signature of the instructor and one
of the following: Biology I, Plant Biology, Ecology, or
Economics. Limit: 13. Lab fee: $40.
ES 2034: Weed Ecology
Faculty: Morse, Suzanne
Meets the following requirements: ES
This is a broad course covering the biology of
plants that follow humans and often flourish in
disturbed habitats. The aim of this course is to gain
an appreciation and understanding of the natural
history and ecology of Maine’s weedy flora, from the
coast to fields and forests. Laboratories will focus
primarily on agricultural weeds found on our farms
and gardens and will include weed identification,
experimental approaches for the analysis of weedcrop interactions, ecological approaches to the
management of “unwanted plants” and field trips.
Evaluations are based on the quality of participation
in class, in-class practical exams, a plant collection,
one paper, and an oral presentation. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: introductory
biology suggested. Limit: 15. Lab fee $25.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ES 3012: Calculus II
Faculty: Feldman, David
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
This course is the continuation of Calculus I. It
begins by considering further applications of the
integral. We then move to approximations and series; we conclude the course with a brief treatment
of differential equations. The mathematics learned
are applied to topics from the physical, natural, and
social sciences. There is a weekly lab/discussion section. Evaluations are based on homework, participation in class and lab, and tests. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisites: Calculus I or the equivalent. Lab fee
$10.
ES 3014: Ecology
Faculty: Anderson, John
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course examines ecology in the classic sense:
the study of the causes and consequences of the
distribution and abundance of organisms. We examine the assumptions and predictions of general
models of predator-prey interactions, inter- and
intra-species competition, island biogeography,
and resource use, and compare these models to
the results of experimental tests in lab and field. In
addition we discuss appropriate techniques used
by ecologists in collecting data in the field, notetaking and the appropriate collation and storage
of field data. Although this course is NOT a course
in Conservation Biology, we examine how ecological principles are applied to conservation questions. Readings include selections from the primary
literature. Students are evaluated on the basis
of class participation and two in depth problem
sets,drawing extensively on the primary literature.
59
Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Biology: Form
and Function, and signature of instructor. Limit: 12.
Lab fee $75.
ES 3018: Herpetology
Faculty: Ressel, Stephen
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the
biology of amphibians and reptiles. We cover the
systematics, physiology, behavior, and ecology of
each group, with particular emphasis on the important contribution amphibian and reptilian studies
have made to the fields of physiological, behavioral,
and community ecology. Readings are chosen from
a text and from primary literature. The course consists of two lecture/discussion sessions per week
and one lab/field trip every week. Weather dictates
the number and focus of field trips, but students
should expect to participate in both day and night
field trips throughout the term. Students are evaluated on class participation, exams, and a term-long
field project. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites:
Biology I and II or equivalent, and one Vertebrate
Biology course. Limit: 12. Offered every other year.
Lab fee: $75.
ES 3020: Invertebrate Zoology
Faculty: Hess, Helen
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course is a phylogenetic survey of the major
groups of animals without backbones. These animals range in size from single cells to giant squids,
and they include the vast majority of animals on
earth. Using text readings, assigned articles, and
one afternoon per week of field/lab work, students
gain an understanding of the classification, ecology, evolutionary relationships, and economic
significance of this remarkably diverse collection of
organisms. Students are evaluated on participation,
lab notebooks, and performance on weekly quizzes
and two tests. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites:
Biology I and II or signature of instructor. Offered
every other year. Limit: 16. Lab fee $25.
ES 3022: Differential Equations
Faculty: Feldman, David
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
Differential equations are an application of calculus
used to model a wide variety of physical and natural
phenomena. The rate at which a cup of coffee cools,
populations of predators and prey in ecosystems,
the spread of disease, and the behavior of electric
circuits, are all examples of systems that have been
described with differential equations. This course
is an introduction to ordinary differential equations, intended for students who have completed a
single-variable calculus course. The course covers a
variety of techniques for solving and understanding differential equations, including numerical and
qualitative solution methods. Students will learn to
solve and analyze differential equations using the
60
python programming language. Students will also
gain experience formulating mathematical models
using differential equations. To do so, we will discuss general modeling principles and also consider
several case studies. In addition to learning the
mathematics of differential equations, a central goal
of this course is to gain skills necessary for research
in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences.
This includes conceptualizing and framing a research question, conducing a literature review, giving a research presentation, and writing up results
in a style appropriate for publication.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, biweekly problem sets, and a term-long project
culminating in a presentation and short research
paper. Some computer work will be required, but no
computer experience is necessary. Level: Intermediate. PREREQUISITES: Calculus II or the equivalent or
permission of instructor.
ES 3024: Evolution
Faculty: Petersen, Christopher
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course provides students with the opportunity
to put their knowledge of ecology and diversity into
an evolutionary framework. The emphasis is on how
populations of organisms are currently evolving,
with a focus on the ecological context of natural
selection. Topics in the course include the genetic
basis of evolutionary change, selection and adaptation, reproductive effort, co-evolution, the ecology
and evolution of sex, behavioral ecology, speciation,
and applied evolutionary ecology. In addition to a
textbook, students read several original research
articles. The course has two lectures and one
discussion section per week. Evaluations are based
on exams and short essay sets. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisite: Biology I and II or equivalent. Offered
every other year. Limit: 20. Lab fee: $50.
ES 3028: Calculus III: Multivariable Calculus
Faculty: Feldman, David
Meets the following requirements: QR
The functions studied in Calculus I and II are one-dimensional. But the universe of everyday experience
is, at minimum, three-dimensional. In this course
we explore how Calculus can be extended so as to
apply to functions of more than one variable, and
thus apply to the three-dimensional world. We will
begin by reviewing vectors and functions of several
variables. We will then learn about partial derivatives and gradients and how apply these tools to
multivariable optimization. Turning our attention to
integral calculus, we will next cover double and triple integrals and their applications. We will conclude
with a treatment of line integrals, flux integrals, the
divergence and curl of a vector field, and Green’s,
and Stokes’s theorems. Evaluation will be based on
class participation and lengthy weekly problem sets.
Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Calculus II or the
equivalent or signature of instructor.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ES 3030: Environmental Physiology
Faculty: Ressel, Stephen
Meets the following requirements: ES
The manner in which animals survive in extreme
environments or function at levels that far exceed
human capacities has always fascinated us. In this
course, we examine how an animal’s physiology
fashions its functional capacities under various environmental conditions. We explore the interrelationships between physiology, behavior, and ecology
using an integrated and evolutionary approach in
order to understand regulatory responses in changing environments. Major areas to be covered include
thermoregulation, behavioral energetics, and
osmoregulation. Emphasis is placed on vertebrate
systems to elucidate general patterns in physiological attributes. This course has two lecture/discussion sessions per week and students are evaluated
on class participation, a series of take-home exams,
and a class presentation. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Biology I & II, or equivalent. Limit: 15. Lab
fee: $65.
ES 3032: Genetics
Faculty: Hess, Helen
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course will explore the many roles that genes
play in the biology of organisms, the molecular basis
of gene function, and the methodologies used in
genetic research and application. Students in this
course should already have a basic understanding
from an introductory biology course of the structure and function of genes and chromosomes, the
processes involved in gene expression, and patterns
of inheritance. This course will explore these phenomena more deeply as well as delve into a range of
other topics, including population genetics, quantitative genetics, genes in development, genomics, and using genetic data to understand human
evolution. We will also discuss the use of genetic
engineering in industry, agriculture, medicine, and
research. We will meet twice weekly for lectures and
once per week for discussion of readings and problem sets. Evaluation is based on short problem sets,
take-home exams, an oral presentation, and a final
paper. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of Biology I or permission of instructor.
Limit: 16.
ES 3036: The History of Natural History
Faculty: Anderson, John
Meets the following requirements: HY
Natural History can be regarded as the oldest
“science” -indeed, at one point within the Western
canon Natural History WAS science. Beginning with
discussion of early hunter-gatherers, working past
Ashurbanipal, King of Kings, Hellenistic Greece, the
Roman Empire, and into the herbals and magicians of the Middle Ages, this course will survey the
development and eventual fragmentation of Natural
History into more specialized branches. Once a
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
foundation has been established, we will engage
with the naturalists of the great age of exploration
and conquest during the 17th through the 19th centuries, ending with an examination of Natural History’s legacy in the rise of modern Ecology. Course
readings will draw heavily on original sources,
using translations where appropriate. Towards
the end of the term we will discuss the strengths
and limitations of inductive and deductive reasoning in science and the implications of the 20th and
21st centuries’ increased emphasis on theoretical
reasoning. Students will gain a better sense of EuroAmerican history overall and of the history of science in particular; the ability to use original sources;
understanding of the importance of comparing
multiple sources in arriving at historical conclusions
and of the importance of recognizing cultural and
historical biases in interpretation of information.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and
the spoken and written presentation of individually
chosen research on a person or topic important to
the development of natural history as a science.
Level: Intermediate. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $50.
ES 3044: Climate and Weather
Faculty: Hall, Sarah
Meets the following requirements: ES
This class will explore general weather and climate
patterns on global, regional, and local scales. We
will discuss the major forcings driving global climate
fluctuations—on both long (millions of years) and
short (days) timescales, including natural and
anthropogenic processes. We will also learn about
basic meteorology and the processes producing
some common spectacular optical weather phenomena (rainbows, coronas, cloud-types, etc).
Students will complete a term project comprising a
photo-documentary journal of the different weather
phenomena they observe during the 10-week
term. The field component of this course will be
self-guided through the observation and documentation of weather phenomena. Who should take
this course: No prior geology/science experience is
needed—but expect to do a bit of basic math in this
course! The Level is intermediate because it will not
cover foundational principles of geology (or other
sciences) but instead the course will be integrative
and require students to practice both their quantitative and qualitative skills. Take this course if you are
passionate or curious about climate change, but do
not know much about the science of climate and
weather! Level: Intermediate. Limit: 20. Lab fee: $10
ES 3048: Soils
Faculty: Morse, Suzanne
Meets the following requirements: ES
Soils are one of the most important natural resources that affect the sustainability of agricultural, recreational, forest, and disturbed soil (mining, urban)
systems. This course seeks to introduce students to
basics of soils science and contemporary issues in
soils science and management. The primary themes
63
running through this course are how soil properties
influence and are influenced by human activities.
Classes will cover the basic physical, chemical and
biological properties of soils and the processes
which create, maintain and transform them. Evaluation of students will be based on quizzes, problem
sets and a final presentation. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisites: At least one college level chemistry
and one college level biology class. Limit: 12. Lab
fee: $50
ES 3050: Organic Chemistry I
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course explores the physical, chemical, and
environmental properties of carbon-containing
materials such as plastics, solvents, dyes, as well
as all living things, and once-living materials. The
emphasis is on learning fundamental principles that
allow one to understand and to predict the behavior
of various types of organic substances. There is an
optional Lab section. Evaluations are based on midterm and final exam. The equivalent of this course is
a prerequisite for biochemistry. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisites: A previous chemistry course. Offered
every other year. Limit: 20. Lab fee: $20.
ES 3060: Marine Mammal Biology I: Field Studies
Faculty: Todd, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ES
This Fall course provides an introduction to the
biology and natural history of marine mammals,
specializing in species resident within the North Atlantic, in a field setting. Students spend the last two
weeks in August of the preceding summer at the
College’s Mt. Desert Rock Marine Research Station.
In addition to introductory topics in marine mammal biology that include phylogeny and taxonomy;
anatomy and physiology; behavior; sensory ecology; and management/conservation issues, students
also integrate themselves into the resident research
team and work on team projects that will include
observation of animals in their natural habitat. In
the Fall, students meet 3-4 further times for dissection of specimens, team project presentations,
and optional attendance at a regional conference.
Assessment is based on two individual literaturebased reviews, one species- and one system-based,
to be presented in class, participation in research
projects, and written submissions of their research.
Lab fee covers costs of field trips, including boat and
field station time, and conference costs. A $200 nonrefundable deposit is required by June 1. Offered
every other year. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisite:
Biology I, II and a writing-focused class or permission of instructor. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $600.
ES 3061: Functional Plant Morphology
Faculty: Morse, Suzanne
Meets the following requirements: ES
Despite uniform rules of development, seed plants
62
exhibit an incredible range of forms including succulent cacti, bug-eating sundews, dainty annuals,
and leafless parasites. These differences in form
often are correlated with habitat and life history
parameters such as nutrient and water availability,
herbivores, light quality, and modes of perennation.
In this course we begin by examining the morphological development and organization of seed plants
from inception in the seed to reproductive maturity.
With this general developmental framework, we
then examine whole plant and organ level patterns
of variation, modification, and ecological specialization that underlie the variation in form observed
today. Evaluations are based on laboratory quizzes,
paper, midterm, and final exam. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisites: Biology: Cellular Processes of Life or
permission of instructor. Limit: 20. Lab fee: $15.
ES 3063: Seminar in Climate Change
Faculty: Hall, Sarah
Meets the following requirements: ES
In this seminar-style class, students will learn about
climate change over multiple timescales. We will discuss the major forcings driving global climate fluctuations—on both long (millions of years) and short
(days) timescales, both natural and anthropogenic in
nature. Students will learn about the main paleoclimate methodologies being used today to quantify
and understand past climates over tens to millions
of years. We will also discuss current modeling efforts to predict future climate scenarios. This course
will use primary scientific literature to broadly
explore some of the major topics related to climate
change including: paleoclimate methods, modeling,
feedbacks, atmosphere-ocean interaction, and predicted environmental changes. We will discuss some
of the broader impacts of climate change (stresses
on resources, water, food, economies, land-use, etc.)
according to student interest and expertise. Beyond
discussions in class, students will be required to
attend lectures by a few visiting experts in the field.
Students will take turn leading discussions on specific topics at least twice during the term. Assessment
will be based on written responses to readings and
a final project and presentation. Level: Intermediate.
Limit: 16. Lab fee: $40.
ES 3065: Molecular Genetics Workshop
Faculty: Hess, Helen
Meets the following requirements:
This workshop teaches students how to apply
and use a variety of molecular genetic and cellular laboratory techniques at Mount Desert Island
Biological Laboratory. Students learn how to do
basic molecular genetic techniques, including some
subset of DNA extraction, RNA extraction, PCR,
RT-PCR, cloning, and bioinformatics. Students work
on how to carry out a research design around a
specific question, how to carry out the research and
interpret results. The material will be taught around
a research question that the group will work on for
a one-week period over spring break. The course is
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
taught by various MDIBL research staff. Successful
completion of the workshop requires attendance for
the entire week. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites:
One class in cellular and molecular biology (Biology
1 counts) or genetics, and permission of instructors.
Limit: 12.
ES 3069: Molecular and Cell Biology
Faculty: Hicks, Amy
In this introduction to modern cellular and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with
an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell
membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell
motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein
production, and genotype to phenotype relationship. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad
range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Where appropriate, lab demonstrations
will be incorporated into lecture and discussion
sessions. Evaluation of student performance will
be based on class participation, mid-term and final
examinations, and individual research and presentation projects. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites:
proficiency at college level biology and chemistry or
permission of the instructor. Limit: 15
ES 3071: Tutorial: Linear Algebra w Applications
to Diff. Equations
Faculty: Feldman, David
Meets the following requirements: QR
The first half of this tutorial will consist of a rapid
tour of the key elements of linear algebra. We
will cover vector and matrix algebra, linear vector
spaces and subspaces, basis and dimension, the
determinant, and eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
We will then consider first-order linear differential
equations—-first scalar equations and then systems of equations. We will see that linear algebra
is an indispensable tool for solving systems of
linear differential equations and understanding the
geometric structure of their solutions. In addition to
covering basic theory, we will consider a handful of
case studies that illustrate the power of the mathematical techniques we are learning. These case
studies will be drawn from across the sciences. The
particular case studies we examine will depend on
student interests.
Students who successfully complete this course
will gain a solid introduction to the calculational
techniques and key constructions and ideas of linear
algebra. Students will also learn techniques for solving and understanding systems of linear differential
equations. Additionally, this course serves as an
introduction to formal mathematics; students will
learn to work at a level of generality and abstraction
a bit above that encountered in a typical introductory calculus sequence.
Students will be required to read sections of the
text in advance of each class. Class sessions will
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
be devoted primarily to discussion and problem
solving. Evaluation will be based on class participation and weekly problem sets. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisites: Calculus III; Differential Equations
strongly recommended; permission of instructor. This is a fast-paced tutorial for students with a
strong preparation in mathematics. Limit: 5.
ES 3072: Introduction to Lichens and
Bryophytes
Faculty: Olday, Fred
Meets the following requirements: ES
This intermediate level course covers the biology of
two common, easily recognizable but often overlooked members of terrestrial ecosystems, lichens
and bryophytes. Lectures and assigned readings
will cover the morphology, life histories, physiology,
and ecology of these intriguing organisms. Particular emphasis will be given to field and laboratory
methods of identification, including field recognition
of important genera, micro-habitat preferences of
selected species, collection techniques, use of keys,
and methods of identification and proper curation.
A major goal of the course is to assist students in
developing the “hands on” skills and confidence
necessary to identify these organisms to the species
level. Two all-day Saturday field trips are planned,
one during the first week of class and another
mid-term, to introduce students to the diversity of
microhabitats in which these organisms are generally found and to introduce students to proper
collection techniques, writing accurate field notes,
and starting their personal collections. Students will
be evaluated on: class participation (10%), demonstrated capacity for doing independent work (20%),
performance on bi-weekly quizzes (30%), and a student final project consisting of a properly identified
and curated collection of 20 species of lichens and
15 species of bryophytes excluding taxa identified in
class as part of group keying exercises (40%). Level:
Intermediate. Prerequisites: A college level introductory biology or botany course and permission of
instructor. Limit: 8. Lab fee: $35.
ES 3074: E-STEM Professional Development
Seminar
Faculty: Hall, Sarah
Meets the following requirements:
This course is designed particularly for students
returning from the summer field geoscience course,
however it is open to any students that are interested in broadening their professional network in
Environmental STEM (E-STEM) fields, learning from
local stakeholders about what “work” they complete in their career, and learning what skills and
content knowledge is needed for different career
paths. Each week a different E-STEM professional
will engage with students both in the field (where
appropriate) and in the classroom to give students
a feel for what professionalism and professional
work means for different jobs. Some of the local
stakeholders will include professionals in fields
63
such as environmental consulting, environmental
policy, municipal planning, environmental education, energy and resource management, recreation,
research, and conservation. The main objectives
of this course are to: increase students’ awareness
of and access to a broad group of professionals
working in E-STEM fields, provide opportunities for
students to read and discuss scientific/technical
literature and reports, and to facilitate student understanding of potential pathways to future careers.
Beyond meeting and engaging with stakeholders,
students will practice re-world work that these
professionals engage in such as data management,
report preparation, budgeting, communicating science to the public, and dissemination of research
findings. They will learn to use software such as
excel required in many E-STEM jobs. Students will
also practice researching employment opportunities, preparing application material, and interfacing
with professionals to inquire about potential or
future opportunities. Students will be evaluated
based on their performance on weekly assignments,
interaction with the weekly stakeholder, and a final
project/report. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisite:
students must have taken at least two ES courses
prior to enrolling; permission of instructor. Limit: 11.
Lab fee: $30.
ES 4010: Biomechanics
Faculty: Hess, Helen
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
Why do we get shorter and wrinklier with age? Were
dinosaurs warm-blooded? How do grasshoppers
hop? These diverse questions are all within the
realm of biomechanics. A knowledge of biomechanics, or the ways in which plants and animals cope
with the laws of physics, can promote an understanding of organisms at all levels of organization,
from molecules to ecosystems. In this course we
explore several areas of physical science, including mechanical engineering, materials science, and
fluid dynamics, as a means of gaining insight into
the biological world. Students attend two lecture
sessions per week and one three-hour lab session
for discussions of current research in biomechanics,
review of homework assignments, and laboratory
observations or demonstrations. Evaluations are
based on participation in discussions, weekly problem sets, two term papers, and a final exam. Level:
Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: One collegelevel course in Biology and one college-level course
in Math or Physics or signature of instructor. Limit:
16. Offered every other year. Lab fee: $15.
ES 4012: Winter Ecology
Faculty: Ressel, Stephen
Meets the following requirements: ES
In higher latitudes and higher altitudes of the world,
up to nine months of each year can be spent locked
in winter. Although migratory species appear to
64
have a selective advantage over non-migratory species during the winter season, year-round resident
animals have evolved a remarkable array of physiological, morphological, and behavioral adaptations
that allow them to cope with potentially lethal environmental conditions. In this course, we focus on
the special challenges of animals wintering in northern latitudes. Some of the topics that we address
are: the physical properties of snow and ice, general
strategies of animals for coping with sub-freezing
temperatures, life in the subnivean environment,
animal energetics and nutrition, physiological acclimatization, and humans and cold. There are two
discussions/lectures and one field exercise every
week, as well as two weekend field trips. Students
should be prepared to spend a significant amount
of time outdoors in winter conditions. Students
are evaluated on class participation, exams, and a
student term project. Level: Intermediate/Advanced.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Limit: 14.
Lab fee $150.
ES 4014: Advanced Analysis in Biology
Faculty: Todd, Sean
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course builds on Basic Research Design and
Analysis in Biology, introducing more advanced
statistical techniques within the field of parametric statistics, in particular multiple regression and
advanced forms of analysis of variance used in
biologically oriented studies. Labs will focus on
computer assisted statistical analysis, and reporting
style. Evaluation is based on two quizzes, several
choices of take-home problems, and a team project.
Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisite: Basic Research Design and Analysis in Biology, or permission
of instructor. Lab fee $40
ES 4018: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Faculty: Anderson, John
Meets the following requirements: ES
This is the first course in a two-term sequence designed for students interested in pursuing medicine
or biomedical research examines aspects of human
anatomy and physiology, with particular emphasis
on the digestive system, reproductive physiology,
the circulatory system, immune response, and elements of nutrition and neurophysiology. This course
will emphasize the relationships between anatomy
and physiology and will focus on basic principles of
biochemistry, the musculoskeletal system, digestion, nutrition, osmoregulation, and circulation.
Readings include a standard pre-medical text and
some primary literature. Evaluation is based on a
number of in-class quizzes a term paper, participation in discussion and a final exam. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisite: Biology course work,
some background in chemistry and permission of
Instructor. Students are strongly encouraged to take
both terms. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $30.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ES 4020: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Faculty: Anderson, John
Meets the following requirements: ES
ES 4036: Wildlife Ecology
Faculty: Anderson, John
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
This two-term sequence designed for students
interested in pursuing medicine or biomedical
research examines aspects of human anatomy and
physiology, with particular emphasis on the digestive system, reproductive physiology, the circulatory
system, immune response, and elements of nutrition and neurophysiology. Readings include a standard pre-medical text and some primary literature.
Evaluation is based on a number of in-class quizzes
a term paper, participation in discussion, and a final
exam. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisite:
Biology course work, some background in chemistry
and permission of instructor. Students are strongly
encouraged to take both terms. Limit: 15. Lab fee
$10.
This course is intended to complement the overall
sequence of classes developed with a focus on
the landscape and ecology of the Northeast Creek
Watershed and is intended to provide students
with practical skills in observation, data collection, analysis and presentation. It is particularly
suitable for students wishing to pursue careers in
field biology with federal or state agencies or land
conservation NGOs. We will examine measures of
distribution and abundance in animals and relate
these to quantitative and qualitative measures of
habitat complexity. Much of this class will be field
based. Students will work in teams collecting data
on vegetation structure and topography, trapping
small mammals and estimating abundance through
mark/re-capture techniques, radio telemetry and
game cameras. Data will be analyzed using simple
statistics including ANOVA, regression analysis, and
means-separation tests. Spatial components will
be included in an on-going GIS for the watershed
region. Readings will come from a text and primary
sources. Students should expect to spend significant
amounts of time outside of formal class meetings in
data collection, analysis and write-up. Assessment
will be based on participation, a number of quizzes, and an end-of term team report/presentation.
Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Biology and Ecology and permission of the instructor.
Critical Zone 1, GIS, Statistics strongly encouraged.
Limit: 10. Lab fee: $50.
ES 4031: Costa Rican Natural History and
Conservation
Faculty: Ressel, Stephen
Meets the following requirements: ES
This team-taught, intensive, field-based course
examines the ecology and biotic diversity found
at several sites within Costa Rica and the implications of this diversity on concepts of conservation
biology. Whereas primary emphasis will be placed
on Central American herpetofauna and avifauna,
we will also discuss and examine issues of botanical, mammalian, etc. diversity and abundance, and
the significance of the full array of species in more
general studies of land-use and protective strategies. Students will meet during the winter term
to discuss a range of articles and book-chapters
dealing with aspects of conservation biology and
Costa Rican natural history and culture during the
winter term but the major emphasis of the course
will be a two-week immersion in key habitats within
Costa Rica itself during the March break. Non-travel
days will consist of early to late-morning fieldwork,
afternoon lectures/presentations followed by early
evening to late night fieldwork. The course is based
out of three field sites: lowland Caribbean slope
rainforest at Tirimbina ecological reserve in north
central Costa Rica, montane forest of the Arenal and
Tenorio volcanic region, and Pacific slope dry forest
of the Nicoya Peninsula. Evaluation will be based
on detailed field journals, course participation, and
a series of examinations testing students’ knowledge of species and concepts. Grading option for
this course is Credit/No Credit. Level: Intermediate/
Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
Course fee $1600 (covers food, transport and lodging in Costa Rica, students provide airfare to Costa
Rica). Limit: 15.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ES 4038: Ecology and Natural History of the
American West
Faculty: Anderson, John
Meets the following requirements: ES
The American West has played a key role in the
development of modern ecology and in our overall understanding of the Natural History of North
America. Researchers such as Joseph Grinnell,
Starker Leopold, Ned Johnson, Phillip Munz and Jim
Patton contributed enormously to our understanding of the interactions, distribution and abundance
of the enormous range of plants and animals occupying the western states, while the incredible variety of topography found between the Pacific slope
and Great Basin Desert, containing both the highest
and lowest points in the Lower 48, has provided an
ideal setting for both observation and experimentation. This intensive field-based course will provide
students with the opportunity to examine first-hand
some key habitats within Nevada, California, and
New Mexico, and to conduct a series of short projects on the fauna and flora in select sites. Areas to
be examined will include terminal saline lakes, open
deserts , montane meadows, pine forest, riparian
65
hardwoods, wetlands, and agricultural landscapes.
Readings will include primary sources and more
popular accounts of both locations and the peoples
who have lived in these lands over the past several
thousand years. Evaluation will be based on class
participation, a series of individual research projects
and presentations, a detailed field journal, a midterm and a final exam. This course will be integrated
with and requires co-enrollment in Reading the
West and Wilderness in the West. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Limit: 9.
ES 4040: Animal Behavior
Faculty: Anderson, John
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course reviews how simple and stereotyped actions may be built into complex behaviors and even
into apparently sophisticated group interactions.
Emphasis is placed on contemporary understanding
of Darwinian selection, ethology, behavioral ecology
and sociobiology. There are two classes a week. Extensive readings are chosen from a text and articles
from scientific and popular periodicals. Evaluations
are based on participation in discussions and several quizzes. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Requires
a previous intermediate-level course in species zoology, and signature of the instructor. Offered every
other year. Limit: 10. Lab fee $10.
ES 4041: Seeds
Faculty: Morse, Suzanne
Meets the following requirements: ES
Over 90% of today’s terrestrial flora are seed plants
and provide the majority of the ecological energy
across the world. Today the majority of the human population is dependent on the energy and
nutrients stored in the seed of a remarkably few
crops that arose through the breeding and saving of seeds. Today this critical interdependence is
rich with questions and at are at the center of the
food security and food sovereignty debates. Some
questions of this human-plant co-evolutionary story
to be addressed in this course are: How is crop
breeding done in different parts of the world? What
are the techniques for breeding, seed saving, and
storage? What traits are selected for in traditional
and modern breeding? What role do seed banks and
libraries play in our common future? What are the
current laws governing seed quality and ownership? How do these laws and treaties structure
corporate consolidation, community initiatives, and
possible mechanisms for developing crops in the
face of global climate change? What is the “free the
seed movement” and why might it be important?
The second major debate to be explored will be the
ethical and ecological implications of the “assisted
migration” of wild plants as a means of conservation
and adaptation to global climate change and the replacement of horticultural materials with wild plants
as means for expanding native habitat corridors. We
will contextualize these two major themes with an
66
in-depth look into the biology of seeds as well as the
ecological and evolutionary significance of seeds. In
preparation for required attendance at the Organic
Seed Alliance conference, laboratory exercises will
cover seed dormancy and germination, and build
skills in hand pollination and trait selection. Evaluation will be based on class participation, leadership
in seminar discussions, quizzes, a group report
on the Organic Seed Alliance Conference, and the
development of a final project based on one or
both of themes in the course. Level: Intermediate/
Advanced. Prerequisites: Strong understanding of
botany (at least two botany courses); one course
with an introduction to some kind of policy strongly
recommended; permission of instructor. Limit: 10.
Lab fee: $800.
ES 4043: Environmental Geoscience Field
Methods: Eastern CA
Faculty: Hall, Sarah
Meets the following requirements: ES
This 4-week summer field course will take place during the months of June-July (dates TBD). A maximum
of 8 COA students will join peers from University
of San Francisco and Mt San Antonio College for a
combined cohort of ~24 students and 4 faculty to
study and work in the eastern Sierra Nevada region
of California. In this field methods-based course,
topics will include hydrology, geomorphology, geology, ecology as well as the human dimension of
each topic (education, policy, hazards, resources).
This region of CA is a perfect natural laboratory for
students to engage in classic field activities such as
geologic and geomorphic mapping that are critical
to helping students develop geospatial skills. The region hosts major active faults, striking variations in
relief, a rich glacial history, a wide range of bedrock
lithologies spanning multiple timescales, as well
as resource availability (e.g. geothermal, salts) and
scarcity (e.g. water), and susceptibility to different
types of geohazards (e.g. rockfalls, volcanic, earthquakes, drought, fires). We will also take advantage
of the opportunities in the region to experience
applied geoscience through research opportunities
and engagement with local stakeholders (YNP and
SSCZO). Field exercises will be designed to capitalize on existing infrastructure at the Sierra Nevada
Aquatic Research Laboratory (SNARL), the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (SSCZO) and
Yosemite National Park (YNP). Field exercises and
exchanges with local stakeholders will provide opportunities to earn badges that represent mastery
of skills and content knowledge relevant to potential
environmental-STEM careers. Students will be assessed based on their performance on field exercises and a final field report. This course is linked to
a follow-up Professional Development Seminar that
students will take upon returning to COA in the fall
term. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites:
Two ES courses, one being an introductory geoscience course (Geology and Humanity, Geology of
MDI, Natural Resources, Rocks and Minerals, Quantitative Geomorphology, Critical Zone I or II); EcolCOLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ogy would be very helpful; permission of instructor.
Limit: 8. Lab fee: TBA.
ES 4045: Tutorial: Advanced Study of Corvidae
Faculty: Swann, Scott
Corvidae, the family that contains crows and ravens,
are a highly successful group of birds with some
118 species found world wide. Omnivorous, crows
and ravens are opportunistic scavengers and often
highly specialized. Crows and ravens are famous in
the bird world for their intelligence, being adept at
problem solving, tool use, having fun, learning new
tricks. Similar to humans, they are highly social,
monogamous (in human terms), and both male and
female raise the chicks sometimes with the help of
sitters. Topics will include: evolution and taxonomy,
anatomy, and intelligence, which will include several
subsections on foraging, tool use, vocalization and
learning. For reading material we will mostly utilize
primary literature and two books; Ravens in Winter
by Bernd Heinrich and Crows and Ravens by John
Marzluff and Tony Angell. Students will be evaluated
on their field research and research papers. Level:
Intermediate/advanced. Prerequisites: Ornithology
or equivalent experience suggested, and permission
of instructor. Limit: 6.
ES 4046: Tutorial: Marine Mammal Physiology
Faculty: Todd, Sean
This course provides an introduction to animal
physiology with a focus on physiological, anatomical, and biochemical adaptations in marine mammals. To support this learning, weekly dissections
will be held with a focus on a specific body system
as well as an optional field trip to the 22nd Biennial
Society for Marine Mammalogy Conference on the
Biology of Marine Mammals to expose students
to current research in the field of marine mammalogy. Each student is expected to moderate a
class discussions on an assigned topic. In addition,
students will give a final presentation and submit a
paper on a topic of choice. Grading will be based on
class participation in weekly discussions, quality of
work, and final presentation. Level: Intermediate/
Advanced. Prerequisites: Biology I, II, Marine Mammal Biology, and permission of the instructor. Limit:
5. Lab fee $350.
ES 5010: Biochemistry I
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: ES
This course’s goal is to develop the student’s ability
to understand the biochemical literature and to
relate the structures of biological chemicals to their
properties and by surveying the aims and designs
of the most important, basic metabolic processes.
Emphasis is on features common to all pathways
(enzyme catalysis and regulation) and purposes
unique to each (energy extraction, generation of
biosynthesis precursors, etc.) Most of the course
looks at processes that most organisms have in
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
common; some attention is paid to how these processes have been adapted to meet the demands of
unique environments. This course should be especially useful to students with interests in medicine,
nutrition, physiology, agriculture, or toxicology. The
class meets for three hours of lecture/discussion
each week. Evaluations are based on a midterm
exam and a final paper. Offered every other year.
Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: At least one term of
organic chemistry. Limit: 15.
ES 5014: Organic Chemistry II
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: ES
This class will continue to discuss the occurrence
and behavior of additional functional groups not
covered in Organic Chemistry I. Meeting twice a
week, we will work our way through the remainder
of the fall text and then apply the material by reading articles from the current literature of environmental organic chemistry. Assessment will be based
on keeping up with the reading, class participation,
and three take-home problem sets. Level: Advanced. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I. Offered
every other year. Lab fee: $50.
ES 5039: Tutorial: Advanced Geology of MDI
Faculty: Hall, Sarah
Advanced Geology of MDI is designed for students
who have already successfully completed the
introductory Geology of MDI course. In this course
students will conduct multiple mapping projects on
MDI using some of the methods and tools learned
in the introductory course (e.g. measuring faults,
folds, fractures with a compass and describing different lithologies). During the term, students will
also work on a class project: a groundwater survey
of the island and nearby regions targeting areas that
may contain elevated levels of metals. Further, each
student will conduct their own field-based research
project which will culminate in a report and presentation to their peers. While students will be in the
field every week on MDI, we will also take one weekend field trip off-island to explore some of the major
geologic structures associated with the Appalachian
Mountains of inland Maine. Students will be evaluated based on their performance on ~weekly field
exercises, their portion of the groundwater survey
project, and their personal field report and presentation. Level: Advanced. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor. Limit: 4. Lab fee: $40.
ES 5040: Fractals and Scaling
Faculty: Feldman, David
Meets the following requirements: ES QR
This course will give students a modern overview of
the mathematics and statistics of fractals and scaling and their interdisciplinary applications. We will
begin with mathematical fractals and use them to
define several different notions of dimension, standard ways for describing the nature of fractals’ self
67
similarity. Students will then learn modern statistical techniques for reliably estimating fractal dimensions and power law exponents. We will also look
more generally at “fat-tailed” distributions, a class
of distributions of which power laws are a subset.
Next we will turn our attention to learning about
some of the many processes that can generate fractals. Finally, we will critically examine some recent
applications of fractals and scaling in natural and
social systems, including metabolic scaling, finance,
and urban studies. These are, arguably, among the
most successful and surprising areas of application
of fractals and scaling; they are also areas of current
scientific controversy. This course can thus serve as
a case study of the promises and pitfalls of interdisciplinary mathematical research.
Students who successfully complete this course
will gain: a thorough, mathematically grounded
understanding of fractals and scaling; increased
skills in applied mathematics; experience using
modern statistical techniques (maximum-likelihood
estimators and goodness-of-fit-tests for discrete
and continuous data); and experience reading and
critiquing current literature in applied mathematics.
Course evaluation will be based on several problem
sets, participation in seminar-style class sessions,
a final pedagogical presentation, and a short final
report and annotated bibliography. Some computer
work in R will be required, but no prior R experience is necessary. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites:
Calculus II or the equivalent, and at least one of the
following: Linear Algebra, Differential Equations,
programming experience. A class in statistics will be
helpful, but is not required. Permission of instructor.
Limit: 10.
HE 1010: Human Ecology Core Course
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: HE
Human Ecology is the interdisciplinary study of the
relationships between humans and their natural
and cultural environments. The purpose of this
course is to build a community of learners that
explores the question of human ecology from the
perspectives of the arts, humanities and sciences,
both in and outside the classroom. By the end of the
course students should be familiar with how differently these three broad areas ask questions, pose
solutions, and become inextricably intertwined
when theoretical ideas are put into practice. In the
end, we want students to be better prepared to
create their own human ecology degree through a
more in-depth exploration of the courses offered at
College of the Atlantic. We will approach this central
goal through a series of directed readings and activities. Level: Introductory. Lab fee: $25.
HS 0952: Tutorial: Introductory Writing
Faculty: Kozak, Anne
This tutorial is designed to improve both writing and
speaking skills and is customized to each student’s
individual needs. In addition to writing papers for
68
other courses students are enrolled in, several short
papers will be assigned so students are always
writing and rewriting. Most classes will begin with
a free write, followed by work on reading comprehension, vocabulary, and grammar. Students will
meet with a writing tutor for a minimum of 2 hours
weeekly. Evaluations are based on student participation in and preparedness for weekly meeting and
conferences, essays, and a final essay examination.
This course carries only institutional credit. Level:
Introductory. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Limit: 5.
HS 1011: Environmental History
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
How has human history shaped and been shaped by
“the environment”? Environmental history is one of
the most exciting new fields in history. In this course
we examine world history from Mesopotamia to
the present to see the role such things as resource
scarcity, mythology, philosophy, imperialism, land
policy, theology, plagues, scientific revolutions, the
discovery of the new world, the industrial revolution, etc. on the natural, social, and built environments. Level: Introductory. Limit: 20.
HS 1012: Introduction to the Legal Process
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
The “law” affects every aspect of human activity.
As human ecologists we must garner some basic
understanding of how law is used (or misused) to
shape society and human behavior. This course examines two aspects of the American legal system: 1)
the judicial process or how we resolve disputes; and
2) the legislative process or how we enact policy.
Course readings cover everything from classic jurisprudence essays to the daily newspaper. We use
current environmental and social issues to illustrate
specific applications of the legal process. Legal brief
preparation, mock courtroom presentations, lobbying visits to the Maine legislature, and guest lectures
are used to give a practical dimension to course subjects. Students analyze Federal Election Commission
documents to understand the impact of campaign
financing on public policy and look closely at other
current issues facing the legislative and judicial
systems. Evaluation is based upon two papers and
several other exercises. Level: Introductory. Offered
every other year. Limit: 30. Lab fee $20.
HS 1013: From Native Empires to Nation States
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This course is a history of Latin America from Native
American contact cultures through the contemporary period covering socio-political processes. An
emphasis is placed on the fusion of pre-contact
societies into a new socio-cultural formation in the
colonial period, and then the shared yet divergent
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
history of the region after the collapse of colonial
rule. In the second half the class emphasizes the rise
of the nation state in Latin America with particular
emphasis on dictatorship and rebellions. The course
uses traditional texts, novels, and film to explore
this huge geographical and chronological expanse.
Level: Introductory. Limit: 20. HS
HS 1014: Feminist Theory in a Transnational
Frame
Faculty: van Vliet, Netta
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course introduces students to some of the central texts and genealogies of feminist thought, with
a focus on transnational feminist theory. We will
address periods of feminist thought that have been
significant in shaping the concerns of transnational
feminisms, including 1970s US feminism, French
feminism, postcolonial theory, and Marxist thought.
Over the course of the term, we will consider how
differences across national borders have informed
discussions about transnational feminist solidarity.
We will examine how feminist theory can help us
think about the following: kinship; reproduction; the
law and justice; human rights discourse, political
economy, racialized and other forms of difference;
existence and the subject; the relation between individual and group; the relation between terms such
as “gender” and “sex;” and the varied currencies the
terms “queer” and “feminist” have carried in different national and transnational contexts.
The course will explicitly address debates in
feminist theory about the following topics: the “sex/
gender distinction;” histories and politics of the
term “rape;” political representation, the juridical
and the nation-state in the contexts of religious and
cultural differences around practices such as veiling,
circumcision/genital mutilation; and questions of
labor, prostitution and sex work. The course draws
on work in French Feminist Theory, Queer Theory,
Postcolonial Studies, Psychoanalysis, Continental
Philosophy, Cultural Anthropology, and Diaspora
Studies. Readings will include texts by Gayle Rubin,
Luce Irigaray, Elizabeth Grosz, Simone de Beauvoir,
Ranjana Khanna, Monique Wittig, Judith Butler,
Gayatri Spivak, Sigmund Freud, Friedreich Engels,
Shulamith Firestone, Alexandra Kollontai, Emma
Goldman, bell hooks, Karen Engle, Catherine McKinnon, Drucilla Cornell, Ratna Kapur, Sarah Franklin,
Daniel Boyarin, Henry Louis Gates, Anne FaustoSterling, Shoshana Felman, Saba Mahmood, Diana
Fuss, and Chandra Mohanty. Level: Introductory.
Limit: 15. Lab fee: $15.
HS 1019: Beginning Spanish I
Faculty: Peña, Karla
This course is for students who have had no contact
with Latin American culture, do not possess basic
Spanish language structures and expressions, and
have no Spanish vocabulary. The emphasis is on
development of the basic skills required in any
language—listening, speaking, writing, and reading
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
comprehension. Objective: Students will be able to
express themselves orally and through writing, using vocabulary and simple construction of Spanish
in the indicative tense. This includes present tense
study, vocabulary, numbers, proper nouns, salutations and presentations, present perfect tense,
action verbs, the usage of “to be” and “is”, future
tense, vocabulary, and some usage of “for”. Evaluation Criteria: two Compositions, two auditory tests,
two writing tests covering grammar, two oral tests,
assignments/ homework, class participation. Level:
Introductory. Offered every fall. Limit: 10. Lab fee:
$20.
HS 1020: Beginning Spanish II
Faculty: Peña, Karla
This course is intended for students with a basic
knowledge of grammar, using common vocabulary
that is needed for every day situations. Objective:
The students will be able to express themselves
orally and through writing using subject-verb agreement, basic form in the indicative tense, and an introduction to the imperative moods. It includes a review of the present and future tenses, study of the
imperfect tense, action verbs, direct object, proper
nouns, the indicative tense, the use of the “to be”
and “is” verbs, and an introduction to prepositions.
Evaluation Criteria: two Compositions, two auditory
tests, two writing tests covering grammar, two oral
tests, assignments/ homework, class participation.
Level: Introductory. Offered every fall. Limit: 10. Lab
fee: $20.
HS 1021: History of the American Conservation
Movement
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This course provides students with an overview of
the American conservation movement from the
1600s through the present. Through an examination
of historical accounts and contemporary analysis,
students develop an understanding of the issues,
places, value conflicts, and people who have shaped
conservation and environmental policy in the
United States. They also gain an appreciation for the
relationship between the conservation movement
and other social and political movements. Students
should come away with a sense of the historical
and cultural context of American attitudes toward
nature. We also seek to apply these lessons to policy
debates currently underway in Maine. Working from
original writings, students do in-depth research on
a selected historical figure. Evaluation is based on
problem sets, group activities, participation, and a
final paper. Level: Introductory. Limit: 20.
HS 1025: Business and Non-Profit Basics
Faculty: Friedlander, Jay
Meets the following requirements: HS
Anyone who is involved with for profit or non-profit
enterprises needs to understand a wide variety of
69
interdisciplinary skills. This introductory course will
introduce students to marketing, finance, leadership, strategy and other essential areas of knowledge needed to run or participate in any venture.
This course is meant to build basic skills and expose
students to a variety of business disciplines and is
REQUIRED for all future business courses. Level:
Introductory. Limit: 18.
HS 1026: The Renaissance & the Reformation
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This class is an introductory exploration of the
transformations in Europe from roughly 1400 to
the sixteenth century wrought by the changing
religious, political, and social thought. Taking as its
point of departure the transformation of European
society provoked by the “new” ideas of the Renaissance, the course will focus on the phenomena of
humanism and the challenges to religious orthodoxy and political hierarchies it represented. The
course will use a wide range of secondary and
primary sources to examine the social, spiritual
and political implications of the challenges to the
Catholic Church’s preeminence in the Christian
west. We will examine the idea of the Renaissance
and its various expressions in the world of ideas,
art, and the emergent practice of “science.” Student
will develop an understanding of Catholic theology
and the various Protestant challenges to it as well
as developing a sense of the political reworking of
Europe provoked by the theological debates. We
will read social histories of the period, use films to
provide context, and read primary texts by thinkers
such as Erasmus of Rotterdam, Jean Calvin, Martin
Luther, Teresa of Avila, Galileo, and Bartolome de
las Casas. Students will be evaluated on mastery of
readings, class discussions, short essays, and a final
project. Level: Introductory. Limit: 20.
HS 1028: Introductory French I
Faculty: Staff
This course helps beginners develop basic proficiencies in all four skill areas—listening, speaking, reading and writing—using a workshop format drawing
on the internet resources and pedagogical methods
of the French language institute at CAVILAM in
Vichy, France. In addition, through readings and
discussions, students will learn some fundamental concepts about the cultures and literatures of
French-speaking areas of the world. The class meets
four times a week for 1.5 hours each day. Class time
will be devoted to lectures, pair work, small- and
large-group discussions, use of internet resources,
and extensive written and oral practice of structure
and vocabulary. Students will be evaluated through
written and oral tests, class participation, short
papers, and oral presentations. Level: Introductory.
Prerequisite: Placement exam required to confirm
level. Limit: 15. Course fee: $25.
70
HS 1032: Acadia: Exploring the National Park
Idea
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
Using Acadia National Park as a case study, this
course will explore the various facets of “the national park idea” and what it means for Americans
in terms of history and identity. Through direct
experiences in one of the “crown jewels” of the
park system, the class will examine the historical,
ecological, cultural, social, legal, economic, and
spiritual context in which national parks are formed
and continue to exist in the 21st century. We will
work with National Park Service professionals to
look at various aspects of park management and
day-to-day challenges of implementing the “national
park idea.” Through weekly field trips, journaling,
service learning opportunities, and projects, we will
be immersed in the management and experience
of Acadia. We will explore, through reading and
writing, the broader themes of wilderness preservation, attitudes toward nature, the history of conservation, and the commodification of nature. This
experiential class is specifically geared toward firstyear students and they will be given preference for
enrollment. Assignments will include journal writing, short exercises, a group project/service learning
opportunity, short presentations, and papers. Level:
Introductory. Limit: 24. Lab fee: $40.
HS 1033: Political Persuasion and Messaging
Fundamentals
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This class will provide a broad introductory overview of the history, practice, and core concepts that
encompass political messaging and persuasion
through an empirical examination of grounded applications of such strategies. In order to capitalize
on the saliency of the Fall election cycle, the course
materials will be based on a series of historical case
studies directly tied to American presidential campaigns. Instead of studying various theories of political persuasion in the abstract, we will extract principles that commonly appear in political messaging
from these case examples. In addition, students will
participate in two collaborative projects. The first
will involve tracking political persuasion techniques
in campaigns that are occurring in real time during
the term. The second will involve students working
in teams to produce their own political messaging
materials for a hypothetical campaign. The overall
goals of the course are three-fold. First, to provide
a broad survey of the history of political campaign
communication and advertising as it has developed
in the United States. Second, to confront some of
the pragmatic issues that go into producing messaging strategies for electoral candidates. Third, to
help students cultivate a more critical approach to
analyzing the political messages that they confront
in their daily lives. The class will be highly interactive
with discussion being the primary mode of instrucCOLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
tion. However, there will also lecture components
that provide the historical basis for the case studies
we are examining. Final evaluation will based on
a combination of class participation, several take
home essay assignments, the contemporary tracking assignment, and a final creative project in which
student produce their own campaign materials. The
class is open to all students, regardless of their experience in politics or their knowledge of American
history. It is well suited for introductory students
who are interested in politics, human persuasion,
and mass communication. However, it is also equally
valuable for advanced students seeking to deepen
their understanding of political persuasion. Level:
Introductory. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $25.
HS 1039: Writing Seminar I: Exposition
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: W
Designed to serve the overall academic program,
this course focuses on formal writing based on
rhetorical principles of exposition and concentrates
on the writing process: prewriting, writing, and
rewriting. Assigned readings both illustrate how to
use these principles and develop students’ analytical skills. Through a research paper or case study,
this course introduces students to library research
and documentation of an academic paper. Each
section emphasizes peer review, revision, regular
conferences, and some class presentations. Level:
Introductory. Limit: 12.
HS 1045: Politics of Israel
Faculty: van Vliet, Netta
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course focuses on the concept of Israel as a
Jewish state and as a liberal democracy. This means
that we will both be examining what is singular
about Israel, and addressing concepts of the nationstate and liberal democracy more broadly. How can
thinking about Israel help us think about the relationship between the nation-state and the concept
and treatment of difference? Asking this question
through the example of Israel will put other terms
into question, including citizen, origin, genocide,
value, rights, equality, individual, sovereignty and
subjectivity. As we examine these concepts, we will
address gender, ethnic, national, economic and linguistic difference in the contexts of Zionism, Israel,
and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Thus, while the
course does not focus explicitly on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, by the end of the semester students
should have gained critical thinking skills with which
to analyze it should they be so inclined.
The goal of this course is not to convince students to be more or less sympathetic to any of the
myriad political positions that exist with regard to
Israel/Palestine. Rather, the aim of this course is to
provide conceptual tools with which students can
think critically about the concepts through which
Israel/Palestine is not only represented but also
through which the place and the people who live
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
there come into being in all of their materiality and
affect. In particular, we will pay attention to questions of origin, representation, and how the relation
between individual and group is understood. Hopefully, such critical thinking skills will serve students
well not only in efforts to understand the different
forms of violence through which Israel is defined,
but also in addressing questions of intellectual,
social and political significance other than those
directly related to Israel/Palestine. This is an interdisciplinary course, and we will be drawing on work
in anthropology, feminist theory, literature, psychoanalysis, postcolonial studies, political theory, and
history. We will also be reading from novels, listening to music, and watching films.
The course is divided into three sections. The
first section is focused on the political context of
1890s-1930s Europe. We will situate the development of the Zionist movement by thinking about
it in relation to psychoanalysis and in relation to
the different forms of socialism and international
feminisms emerging at the time. The second section
is focused on World War II and its immediate aftermath. We will address the event of the Holocaust,
political and philosophical responses to it, questions
of origin, representation, the law and justice. The
third section focuses on the concept and contexts of
Israel post-1948. We will ask about the significance
of different forms of difference both in terms of
Israel’s contemporary contexts and in terms of the
weight of their genealogies. Students will be evaluated based on attendance, in-class participation,
one letter to the editor, reading responses, and two
short analytical essays. Level: Introductory. Prerequisites: None. Limit: 15. Lab fee: None.
HS 1046: Introduction to Economics & the
Economy
Faculty: Taylor, Davis
Meets the following requirements: HS QR
This course provides students with an introduction to both economic theory and the historical and
institutional background needed to understand the
context, functioning, and trajectory of 21st Century economies. On the theoretical side, students
will be introduced to explanations of the economic
behavior of individuals and firms (microeconomics) and the workings of national economies and
money (macroeconomics), including economic
development and international topics such as trade
and exchange rates. In addition to the standard
neoclassical approaches to these topics, we will
also introduce behavioral, feminist, Marxist, and
ecological economics perspectives. Complementing
these theoretical approaches will be a rich immersion in historical and institutional themes such as
the history of capitalism, the rise of corporations,
the institutional background of markets for stocks,
bonds, and derivatives, inequality and poverty,
state-led capitalism (e.g. as seen in China and Brazil)
and the events that led up to recent financial crises
in the United States and Europe. Evaluation will be
73
based on bi-weekly problem sets, a final exam, and
various forms of classroom participation. Learning
will be facilitated by a weekly lab session that will be
scheduled the first week of the term. Level: Introductory. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $15.
HS 1052: Ethnographic Methods
Faculty: van Vliet, Netta
Meets the following requirements: HS
Ethnographic research is based primarily on anthropology’s signature research method known as
“participant-observation fieldwork.” This course
introduces students to the main techniques,
questions, insights and debates that this research
method has historically involved in the formation of
the discipline of anthropology, and the contemporary relevance of these questions and debates for a
range of ethnographic and interdisciplinary projects. Over the term, students will view ethnographic
films and read classic and contemporary ethnographic texts, as well as social and political theory
that has informed ethnography. The course will
address questions about representation, authenticity, experience, evidence, familiarity and difference,
place and time, the everyday and the extraordinary, politics and ethics. Students will be asked to
participate in the central methods of ethnographic
research including taking fieldnotes, conducting formal and informal interviews with both familiar others and with strangers, formulating a research question, and analyzing qualitative data. Assignments
will include informal reading responses, a mid-term
mini-field project, and a final mini-field project that
builds on the mid-term. Evaluation will be based on
these assignments and on class participation and
final presentations of their projects. Level: Introductory. Limit: 12.
HS 1054: Climate Justice
Faculty: Stabinsky, Doreen
Meets the following requirements: HS
Climate change is one of the biggest and most difficult challenges faced by contemporary societies.
The challenge has multiple facets: environmental,
social, political, economic – each with its own complexities. This course focuses primarily on the social,
political and economic components of the climate
problem, framed by the concept of climate justice.
In the course students are introduced to basic
conceptions of justice, the latest findings of climate
science and possible impacts on regional scales,
and the global politics of climate change, principally
in the context of the UN Framework Convention on
Climate Change. Climate justice and its operationalization is the principal organizing theme for work
over the term, addressing questions such as: how
the costs of climate change impacts and efforts to
address climate change could or should be distributed between rich and poor, global north and global
south; and what are the possible means whereby
those costs might be addressed through collective
action at various levels: local, national, and global.
72
Students will be evaluated based on regular quizzes, several short papers, class participation, and a
final synthetic paper or project. Level: Introductory.
Limit: 25. Lab fee: $10.
HS 1055: Introduction to Journalism: Telling the
Story
Faculty: Levin, Robert
Meets the following requirements: W
The main goal of this course is to guide students to
produce interesting, accurate, well-written, compelling articles about people, processes, and events.
The course aims to give students an understanding of the principles of journalism, the structure of
journalistic writing, the techniques for identifying,
sourcing, and gathering information, and insight
into how news is disseminated and read, watched,
or listened to in the digital age. Students will
produce a number of short articles for the course,
learning the basics of story development, interviewing, research, and covering meetings and events.
Students will be tasked with thinking critically,
understanding and using news judgment, working
collaboratively and on their own, and developing
skills for efficiency and self-critique. They will be
introduced to the history of journalism, the ethics
and laws specific to the field, and the modern media
landscape. Students will also learn about visual
journalism and will incorporate both photography
and videography into their work. Areas covered will
include public relations, broadcast media, print and
online journalism, and social media. A final project
in the course will include significant research, along
with the other skills in interviewing, observation,
and documentation learned over the term. The
course will include as guests professional journalists, photographers, social media experts and
others. Students will be evaluated on the following
criteria: participation in class discussions and peer
review sessions, the quality of their reporting, and
the effectiveness of their revisions. Level: Introductory. Limit: 12.
HS 1056: Writing Seminar I: Exposition with a
Business Focus
Faculty: Lepcio, Andrea
Meets the following requirements: W
Designed to serve the overall academic program,
this course like other sections of Writing Seminar I
focuses on formal writing based on rhetorical principles of exposition. This course differs in that its
focus is business writing-the writing students in the
Hatchery Program and other sustainability-related
courses need to communicate effectively as professionals. Like other sections of Writing Seminar I, the
course concentrates on the writing process: prewriting, writing, and rewriting. Assigned readings both
illustrate how to use these rhetorical principles and
develop students’ analytical skills. Students learn
how to write clear, precise, and unambiguous business plans, cover letters, power point presentations,
crowdfunding websites, and tweets. The practiceCOLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
oriented approach gives students the opportunity
to acquire skills they will need as professionals to
communicate effectively and concisely to specific
audiences. Through a research paper or case study,
the course introduces students to library research
and academic documentation. The course emphasizes peer review, revision, regular conferences, and
class presentations. Evaluation is based on the quality of revised papers in the final portfolio and the
student’s participation in class discussions and peer
review sessions. Level: Introductory. Limit: 12.
HS 1058: Reason and Madness
Faculty: Lakey, Heather
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course offers an historical overview of the
dichotomies of Western philosophy: madness and
reason, knowledge and opinion, death and life, illusion and reality, good and bad, self and other, doubt
and certainty. Each week will be devoted to a different canonical philosopher such as Plato, Aristotle,
Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche,
Kierkegaard, Sartre, Foucault, and Heidegger. To
knit these various thinkers together, we will track
tensions and debates that drive the philosophical
tradition, and we will pay special attention to the
dialectic of reason and madness. In addition, secondary readings from feminist, post-structural, and
critical race scholars will help us to critically engage
the work of these philosophical giants and to reconsider the relationship between epistemology and
social privilege. Students will emerge from the class
familiar with core philosophical issues and with
the ability to critically scrutinize dense philosophical texts. This is a discussion course, and students
should be prepared to engage and discuss theoretical literature. Course requirements include weekly
writing assignments, a presentation, a midterm
exam, and a final paper. Level: Introductory. Limit:
15. Lab fee: $20.
HS 1062: Problems and Dilemmas in Bioethics
Faculty: Lakey, Heather
Meets the following requirements: HS
Bioethics studies ethical problems that occur in
medical practice and the life sciences. Contemporary bioethics is an expansive and fundamentally
interdisciplinary field, but this course will consider
key dilemmas in bioethics from a philosophical
perspective. We will begin by reviewing dominant
ethical frameworks, including teleological ethics,
deontological ethics, utilitarianism, natural law
theory, and virtue ethics. Next, we will discuss
specific ethical issues such as, abortion, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, life-sustaining
treatments, resource allocation, cloning, biotechnologies, animal research, and informed consent
and the doctor-patient relationship. In particular,
we will consider how different ethical frameworks
shape our assessment of specific ethical dilemmas.
My goal in this course is to introduce students to the
principles of ethical thinking, to familiarize students
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
with pressing debates in bioethics, and to consider
how ethical thinking impacts our response to issues
that are politically and socially contentious. Course
requirements include class participation, an in-class
presentation, a midterm exam, and a final paper.
Level: Introductory. Limit: 12.
HS 1063: Public Speaking Workshop
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
This class will be conducted as a workshop with
an emphasis on students producing increasingly
advanced speeches for public performance and/
or consumption. We will cover a wide variety of
areas including those related to constructing the
speech in advance (invention and arrangement), as
well as those related to the actual performance of
the text (style, memory, and execution). While the
primary goal of the class is to create an environment
in which students can improve these vital public
communication skills, another important goal is to
cultivate critical and respectful listening skills (which
are themselves vital public communication skills). A
wide variety of speaking genres will be covered during the term, though there will be a strong emphasis
on public advocacy and persuasion.
This class is designed for students with varying
levels of public speaking backgrounds. A diverse
array of experiences, skills, and strengths helps
foster a collaborative and supportive speaking
environment. Throughout the term students will
work on individual projects, in pairs, and in larger
collaborative groups. There will be a minimal focus
on theoretical questions in favor of a “hands on”
approach to constructing speeches. Students will be
evaluated on a number of “process” oriented assignments. Final evaluation will be relative to individual
participation in the process and not to an objective
scale of public speaking talent. As such, students
who feel that they are less proficient in the area of
public communication should not be worried that
this would somehow disadvantage them in terms of
grading. Level: Introductory. Limit: 10.
HS 2010: Literature, Science, and Spirituality
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: HS
A survey of Anglo-American literature from the
Scientific Revolution to the present. Focuses on the
ongoing debate about the role of science in Western culture, the potential benefits and dangers of
scientific experimentation, the spiritual, religious,
social and political issues that come about with the
Ages of Discovery and Reason, and their treatment
in literature. Specific debates include concerns over
what is “natural,” whether knowledge is dangerous,
the perils of objectivity, and the mind/body dichotomy; works include Shelley’s Frankenstein, Ibsen’s
An Enemy of the People, Brecht’s Galileo, Lightman’s
Einstein’s Dreams and Naylor’s Mama Day as well as
short stories and poems. Writing-focus ed option.
Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisite: Writing Seminar I. Offered every two or three years. Lab
73
fee: $10. Limit: 15.
HS 2011: Nineteenth Century American Women
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course studies the American novel as written
by women of the nineteenth century. It focuses
on how women’s issues and styles change over
the course of the century, with its revolutionary
economic, technological, social and political shifts,
as well as on enduring questions. As we read from
among the wide selection of nineteenth-century
American women novelists (who outnumbered and
outsold male authors)—such as Rowson, Foster,
Child, Cooke, Fern, Stowe, Phelps, Jewett, Chopin,
and Gilman—we consider how they have shaped the
tradition of the novel and social values Americans
encounter today. Level: Introductory/Intermediate.
Prerequisites: Writing Seminar I or signature of the
instructor. Offered every other year. Limit 15.
HS 2012: Personality and Social Development
Faculty: Borden, Richard
Meets the following requirements: HS ED
This course, part of the education sequence, provides a theoretical and practical look at the emotional, cognitive, social, and behavioral development
of humans. It covers the full life span of human
development with some special concentration on
school-age children. Topics of prenatal development and personality disorders are also presented.
In addition, the course focuses on several of the
more popular learning, social-learning, and educational theories. During the first part of the course,
readings are selected from original sources and
discussed (e.g. Erikson, Freud, Adler, Gilligan). Later
the discussions become directed more toward specific social and development issues (e.g. sex roles,
the family, education, personal growth, death and
dying). Participation in the discussions and three
papers are required. Offered every year. Level:
Introductory. Limit: 15. , ED
HS 2013: Philosophy of Nature
Faculty: Visvader, John
Meets the following requirements: HS
Because of the number of serious environmental
problems that face the modern world, the theories
and images that guide our interaction with nature
have become problematic. This course examines
various attempts to arrive at a new understanding
of our role in the natural world and compares them
with the philosophies of nature that have guided
other peoples in other times and other places. Topics range from taoism and native american philosophies to deep ecology and scientific ecological
models. Readings include such books as Uncommon
Ground, Walden, and Practice of the Wild. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Offered occasionally.
Limit 20.
74
HS 2015: The Age of Reason and the
Enlightenment
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This course represents a contextual approach to the
study of the history of philosophy and combines the
critical evaluation of philosophical theories with an
examination of the cultural conditions which either
influence or are conditioned by them. The course
examines the crucial role played by the philosophies
and institutions of 17th and 18th century Europe
in forming the nature of the modern world and
focuses in particular on those aspects of the culture
that are of special concern to contemporary critics
of modern culture. The work of Bacon, Hobbes,
Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant are
examined in the context of the development of the
scientific, industrial, and democratic revolutions.
Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 20.
HS 2016: Chinese Philosophy
Faculty: Visvader, John
Meets the following requirements: HS
This is a course in the study of Chinese philosophy
and culture. The philosophies of Confucianism,
Taoism, and Buddhism are examined in detail and
their influence on the arts and culture of China is
explored. Eastern and western views on nature,
human nature, and society are compared and contrasted. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 20.
Offered every other year.
HS 2019: Community Planning and Decision
Making
Faculty: Borden, Richard; Mancinelli, Isabel
Meets the following requirements: HS
Albert Einstein once observed that “no problem
can be solved from the same consciousness that
created it. We must learn to see the world anew”. If
Einstein’s idea is accurate about how humans understand the universe, it is likewise true of how we
plan and manage our relationships with the environment. One of the primary aims of human ecology
is to explore new ways to envision human environment relations. Within its integrative perspective,
scientific knowledge and human aesthetics can be
combined in ways that enrich human communities
as well as value and protect the rest of the living
world. The purpose of this course is to provide
students with a foundation of theory and practical
skills in ecological policy and community planning.
A broad range of ideas and methodologies will be
explored. Using real examples of current issues—
such as sprawl, smart growth, gateway communities, watershed based regional planning, land trusts,
and alternative transportation systems. We will be
joined by the actual leaders of these changes locally and state wide in Maine. We will also examine
emerging methodologies that emphasize participatory planning, community capacity-building, and
empowering marginalized groups. These models
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
and ideas will be further compared with prominent approaches and case studies from elsewhere
around the country. As a part of current ideas about
community planning and policy, the course also introduces small group collaboration techniques, and
the use of computers to enhance complex decision
processes. A field component will take advantage
of varied external opportunities—including town
meetings, conferences, and public events. Evaluations will be based on class participation, several
short research papers, and end of term small group
projects. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 20.
Lab fee: $40.
HS 2020: Geographic Information Systems I:
Foundations & Applications
Faculty: Longsworth, Gordon
Ever-rising numbers of people and their impact on
the Earth’s finite resources could lead to disaster,
not only for wildlife and ecosystems but also for
human populations. As researchers gather and
publish more data, GIS becomes vital to graphically
revealing the inter-relationships between human actions and environmental degradation. Much of what
threatens the earth and its inhabitants is placedbased. Solutions require tools to help visualize these
places and prescribe solutions. This is what GIS is
about. Built on digital mapping, geography, databases, spatial analysis, and cartography, GIS works as
a system to enable people to better work together
using the best information possible. For these reasons, some level of competency is often expected
for entry into many graduate programs and jobs,
particularly in natural resources, planning and
policy, and human studies. The flow of this course
has two tracts, technical and applied. The course
begins with training in the basics of the technology.
Then, skills are applied to projects that address realworld issues. Project work composes the majority of
course work and each student has the opportunity
to develop their own project. Because GIS provides
tools to help address many kinds of issues, GIS
lends itself well to the theory of thinking globally
and acting locally. Projects often utilize the extensive data library for the Acadia region developed by
students since the lab was founded in 1988. The GIS
Lab acts as a service provider to outside organizations and students can tap into the resources of a
broad network of groups and individuals working
towards a more sustainable future. Course evaluations are partially based on the on-time completion
of exercises and problem sets. Most of the evaluation is based on critique of student independent
final project work and related documentation. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate, Prerequisites: Basic
computer literacy. Limit: 8. Lab fee: $75.
HS 2021: Immersion Practica in Spanish and
Yucatecan Culture
Faculty: Peña, Karla
This course is intended to provide students with an
immersion experience in the language and culture
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
of Spanish speakers in the Yucatan Peninsula. The
objectives are to increase their abilities to navigate
the linguistic and cultural terrain of another society
in sensitive, ethical, and effective ways. Class sessions, visiting lecturers, field trips, and readings will
provide background on the history and anthropology of Yucatecan culture. Immersion experiences
and living with a family will provide one important
source of experiential learning. A second will be
provided by an independent project or activity
developed for each student based on the student’s
interests. This independent project will include a
practicum experience in some institutional setting
that might be a class room (e. g. an art class at the
local university), a bakery, an internet café, a church
group, or some other place for social service or
other work relevant to a student’s interests. This
practicum experience will involve weekly activities
during the term and more intensive work during the
last three weeks. Evaluation will be based on participation in weekly class discussions and on weekly
reflective papers written in Spanish. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 12. Lab fee: TBA
HS 2022: Introductory French II
Faculty: Staff
In this course students will continue to develop
their proficiency in spoken and written French
and will undertake a more sophisticated study of
literature and culture. Students will practice all
four skill areas*listening, speaking, reading and
writing*during each class meeting. In addition,
students will read, discuss and analyze literary texts
and cultural readings. Class time will be devoted to
lectures, pair work, small- and large-group discussions, and extensive written and oral practice of
structure and vocabulary. Students will be evaluated through written and oral tests, class participation, short papers and oral presentations. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisite: Placement
exam required to confirm level. Limit: 15.
HS 2023: Philosophy at the Movies
Faculty: Visvader, John; Capers, Colin
Meets the following requirements: WFO
The enormous success of movies has proven their
entertainment value, but movies have also been
used to explore concepts and situations that are on
the frontiers of imagination and serve as a unique
medium for articulating the limits of human possibility. Films can not only be taken as illustrations
of various philosophical issues but can also be seen
as a unique way of working through philosophical
issues that can hardly be stated in other media. This
class will examine a series of films that raise issues
dealing with the nature and limits of the human and
natural worlds. Besides the usual discussion classes,
there will be evening “lab” classes each week devoted to screening films of conceptual interest. A series
of short analytical papers will be required. May be
taken as a Writing Focus course. Level: Introductory/
intermediate. Limit: 20.
75
HS 2026: Practical Skills in Community
Development
Faculty: Beard, Ron
In rural areas throughout the world, citizens, nonprofit leaders, agency staff, and elected officials
are coming together to frame complex issues and
bring about change in local policy and practice. This
course will outline the theory and practice of community development, drawing on the instructor’s
experience with the Dùthchas Project for sustainable community development in the Highlands and
Islands of Scotland, Mount Desert Island Tomorrow,
and other examples in the literature. In short, community development allows community members
to frame issues, envision a preferred future, and
carry out projects that move the community toward
that preferred future. Students will gain practical
community skills in listening, designing effective
meetings, facilitation, framing complex public issues, project planning and development of local
policy. Readings, discussions and guests will introduce students to community development theory
and practice. Class projects will be connected to
community issues on Mount Desert Island including
the areas of community design/land use planning,
transportation, community health, housing, economic development, the arts and youth empowerment. Short written papers will provide opportunity
to reflect on class content, community meetings,
newspaper stories and reading assignments. This
class is designed to include both COA students and
community members. Evaluation will be based on
preparation for and participation in class discussion,
several short papers, participation in field work, and
contribution to a successful group project. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
HS 2034: Ethics: The History of a Problematic
Faculty: Cox, Gray
Meets the following requirements: HS
This is a course on the history of ethical thinking in
the West. It deals with ways that philosophers from
Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, to Aquinas, Bentham,
Kant, Marx, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, A. J. Ayer, Sartre,
de Beauvoir, Sara Ruddick, Gandhi, Nozick, Rawls,
and Alasdair MacIntyre have addressed questions
like the following: What is the best way to live as
individuals — and what does this imply about how
we should structure our society? Why are there so
many types of moral disagreements in modern societies? Why do these disagreements never seem to
end but go on indefinitely? Are there ways to resolve
these disputes that are persuasive between ethical
traditions and across cultures? The central text for
the course will be MacIntyre’s “After Virtue”, which
provides a systematic narrative for the history of
Western ethics that claims to diagnose its core problems and provide solutions. Key texts and passages
from the philosophers central to that narrative will
be examined in detail and interpreted in light of
their historical contexts using material from texts
76
such as W. T. Jones “History of Western Philosophy”
and Copleston’s “History of Philosophy”. Students
will develop skills to critically analyze philosophical
texts and arguments in both their theoretical and
historical contexts through class discussion, role
plays, and a series of short papers. There are no
prerequisite courses but students must be prepared
to deal with complex arguments that move between
philosophy, history and other disciplines. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: none. Limit:
15. Lab fee: $25.
HS 2043: Conflict Resolution Across Cultures
Faculty: Cox, Gray
Meets the following requirements: HS
How does conflict arise and how can we best deal
with it? This course combines a study of some major
theoretical perspectives with lab work practicing
skills and disciplines associated with different traditions of conflict resolution, conflict transformation
and peacemaking. We will look at case studies at
the intrapersonal and interpersonal through global
levels and in a variety of cross-cultural settings.
The goals of the course are to help each student:
1. develop the skills to better observe, analyse,
participate in and reform practices and institutions
that people use to deal with differences; 2. collaborate in teams in doing the research and planning needed to undertake such work effectively;
and 3. collaborate in teams to train others in such
skills. The formats of the class will alternate between lectures, discussions, films, role plays, group
exercises, interviews with guest visitors, and other
activities to practice skills and reflect on experiences. Readings for the course will include: “Getting
to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In” by
Bruce M. Patton, William L. Ury, and Roger Fisher;
“Preparing for Peace: Conflict Transformation Across
Cultures” by John Paul Lederach; and a selection of
other short texts. In “methods groups”, students will
form teams that will study a method of dealing with
differences (e.g. mediation, facilitation, non-violent
direct action, meditation, nonverbal communication, gaming strategies, etc.) and offer the rest of
the class a training session on this. Students will be
evaluated on: 1. ways in which their class participation, homework, methods group trainings, personal
training manual, and final reflective essay demonstrate progress on the three course goals; 2. the
ways they make appropriate use of the theories and
methods studied in the course; and 3. the clarity
and effectiveness of their oral and written presentations. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
Lab fee: $25.
HS 2049: Marvelous Terrible Place: Human
Ecology of Newfoundland
Faculty: Todd, Sean; Springuel, Natalie
Meets the following requirements: HS
Where is the largest population of humpback
whales in the world, the largest caribou herd in
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
North America, the only confirmed Viking settlement in North America, and Paleozoic water bottled
for consumption? The remote Canadian province of
Newfoundland and Labrador presents a stunning
landscape, an astoundingly rich ecological setting,
and a tragic history of poverty amidst an incredible natural resource, the northern cod fishery, that
was ultimately destroyed. The province has been
alternately invaded or occupied by different groups
of Native Americans along with Norseman, Basques,
French, British, and the US military, because of
its strategic location and rich fishing and hunting
grounds. One of the first and one of the last British
colonies, this richest of fisheries produced a very
class based society, composed of a wealthy few
urban merchants and an highly exploited population of fishing families often living on the edge of
survival. But within the past 50 years, Newfoundland society has been forced to evolve. The provincial government looks towards oil and mineral
exploitation to turn around the economy, while
ex-fishermen consider eco- and cultural tourism
with growing ambivalence. This then is our setting,
and background, for an intense examination of
the human ecology of this province; the relationship between humans and their environment,
sometimes successful, sometimes otherwise, the
struggle between the tenuous grasp of civilization
and this marvelous, terrible place. To do this we will
discuss various readings, examine case studies and
review the natural and human history of this unique
province. Our learning will culminate with a twoweek trip to Newfoundland to examine its issues
firsthand. Evaluation will be based on class and field
trip participation, responses to reading questions, a
field journal, and a final project. Level: Introductory/
Intermediate. Prerequisites: Signature of Instructor.
Lab fee: $950. Limit: 15.
HS 2050: Religious Intolerance in the United
States
Faculty: Wessler, Steve
This course will examine bias directed at religions
in the contemporary United States. In this course
we will examine our own religious identities as well
as the stereotypes we have about religions. We will
also probe the level and impact of bias toward a
number of religions in the US, including Jehovah’s
Witnesses, members of the Church of the Latter
Day Saints, Catholics, members of new religious
movements, Jews and Muslims. This course will address timely and controversial issues including the
relationship between religion and laws and policies
affecting the LGBTQ population, immigration and
terrorism. Finally, conflict resolution efforts both in
Kosovo, aimed at resolving tensions and violence
between Albanian Muslims and Serbian Orthodox
Christians, and in Northern Ireland, addressing
animosity and violence between Catholics and
Protestants, will prompt a discussion of approaches
for reducing anti-religious bias. Students will be
evaluated on 3 papers (a paper on each student’s
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
religious or non-religious identity, a research paper
on a topic chosen by each student and an opinion
editorial), class discussion and short written assignments relating to the readings for the course. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
HS 2052: Popular Psychology
Faculty: Borden, Richard
Meets the following requirements: HS
Humans have an inherent need to make sense of
their lives. Their search may be simply to improve
everyday experience or it may involve a life-long
quest for meaning and wisdom. Nonetheless, in every age, they have found written advice to address
these perennial needs: ranging from the BhagavadGita and the Bible, through Marcus Aurelieus’ Meditations and Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Self-Reliance
AF to the ever-popular, self-help book. In the past
half-century of the New York Times’ Best Sellers
List, there has usually been one or more popular
psychology books on the list. Hundreds of millions
have been sold and read. Some focus on how to improve relationships, raise children, or build wealth;
others promise ways to discover happiness, expand
memory, or find a deeper self. Their authors may be
serious scholars, well-known psychologists, insightful leaders, or shallow self promoters. The purpose
of this course is to critically examine the literature
of popular psychology: to explore why people are or
are not so drawn to this literary genre and to analyze its deeper psychological significance. A further
goal is to evaluate how and when they do work or
why they don’t. These questions will be guided by an
in depth evaluation of the implicit structure of each
book, as well as a comparative mapping of it within
the theories and methods of professional psychology. In order to investigate a broad cross-section
of styles and themes, we begin with several ‘classic’
popular books as a common foundation. Thereafter, we move on to more varied approaches within
small groups and individually. Evaluations will be
based on participation in class discussions, several
short papers, shared book reviews, and final paper
comparing popular and academic psychology. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $25
HS 2055: Writing Seminar II: Argumentation
Faculty: Staff
Meets the following requirements: W
A logical sequence to Writing Seminar I, this course
emphasizes argument and persuasion. The assigned
readings show students not only how others passionately and creatively argue points but how argument and persuasion are integral to writing effective
papers on topics ranging from the need to diversify
the student body to protecting Atlantic salmon. Like
Writing Seminar I, this course also requires library
research and an understanding of different forms of
documentation. Level: Introductory/Intermediate.
Prerequisites: none, Offered every year. Limit: 12.
77
HS 2056: Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and
Liberties
Faculty: Seddig, Robert
This course on US constitutional interpretation focuses on civil rights and liberties especially since the
“Due Process Revolution of the 1960s” and will emphasize the Bill of Rights and the 14th Amendment
using landmark Supreme Court decisions. Topics
include: speech, press, expressive conduct, religious
liberty, race-based and gender-based discrimination, personal autonomy (such as privacy and right
to die), and reproductive rights, marriage equality,
and the rights of the accused. With sufficient enrollment, all students will participate in a moot court
(simulated Supreme Court) decision, arguing a case
currently pending before the US Supreme Court.
Student evaluation will be based upon written quizzes, short papers, case briefing (case summary writing), and the moot court decision (either a lawyer’s
brief or justice’s opinion). This course is appropriate
for students interested in rights advocacy, rights
activism, diversity studies, public policy, and legal
studies. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
HS 2057: Fail Better: Writing Short Fiction
Faculty: Mahoney, Daniel
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course will serve as a workshop both for
creating our own short fictions as well as a forum
for reading and responding to work by established
authors. As a class we will get down to business;
we will read and discuss amazing short stories
and amazing authors; we will learn how to offer
constructive criticism of each other’s work; and we
will write, we will write, we will write. Class meetings will combine analysis of published work with
a discussion of how individual writers approach
their craft. We will study the conflict, character, plot
and music of prose. The focus of this class will be
literary fiction. I define literary fiction as work that
is concerned not just with what happened, but why
it happened. It is character driven and explores the
motivations, desires, drives and consequences of
the complex human experience. It is the stuff of
life. Representative authors: Jorge Luis Borges, Julio
Cortázar, Amelia Gray, Makoto Kawabata, Gish Jen,
Hemingway, Flannery O’Connor, Milan Kundera,
Mary Gaitskill, James Baldwin, Junot Diaz. Students
are expected to create four shorter and one longer
piece of fiction, respond to published writers, lead
weekly discussions, participate in class response
to fellow writers, and to revise their own work in
substantive ways. Level: Introductory/Intermediate:
Course limit: 12.
HS 2060: Philosophies of Liberation
Faculty: Cox, Gray
Meets the following requirements: HS
What is freedom, why might it be of value, how
78
might it be obtained, and what consequences might
liberation have for individuals, classes, genders,
ethnic groups, races, nationalities or species? In a
wide variety of political, social, religious and cultural
movements, the notion of freedom as achieved by
some kind of liberation is a central theme - and an
essentially contested concept which means quite
different things to different people. This course
focuses on the philosophical tasks of sorting out
those different meanings and critically analyzing the
frameworks of ideas people use to make sense of
their notions of freedom and projects of liberation.
It will adopt an intellectual history approach that will
include placing the texts in their social and historical as well as philosophical contexts. Readings will
include works from Gandhi, Paulo Freire, and writers from the open source and creative commons
movements as well as selections from feminist, Buddhist, neo-liberal, Marxist, existentialist, and other
traditions. Goals of the course are: 1.) to develop
students’ philosophical skills in the interpretation of
texts in their historical context and the critical analysis of frameworks of ideas, 2.) to develop their critical understanding of alternative visions of freedom
and liberation, and 3.) to develop their abilities to
communicate sophisticated philosophical analysis
in written and oral forms. Evaluations will be based
on the demonstration of progress on these goals
in class discussion, homework, short and medium
sized papers and problem sets. Level: Introductory/
Intermediate. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $20.
HS 2061: Indigenous America
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This course will provide an introduction to the history of indigenous peoples in the Americas. Using
a seminar style the class will combine some overview lectures, student-led discussion of books, and
project-based learning to provide an initial introduction to the diverse histories of native peoples
from Canada to the Andes. The course will focus on
both pre-contact societies as well as the processes
of interaction between Europeans and indigenous
peoples in the Americas. Using a selection of case
studies the course will highlight building an understanding of indigenous worldviews as well as
socio-political organization and the ways both were
transformed by colonialism. A range of books will
introduce students to the ethnohistorical literature
on native communities from Mesoamerica, North
America, and the Andes. A simultaneous component
of the course will be student’s research projects on
a topic of their choosing that explores a dimension
of native people’s histories. Students will be evaluated on attendance, course participation, short
analytical essays, and their final project. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: none, however,
student without any background in history should
expect to invest extra time with the readings and
writing assignments. Limit: 15.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 2063: Hate Crimes in the Contemporary US
and Europe
Faculty: Wessler, Steve
HS 2069: Sisters in Law: Women Justices and the
US Supreme Court
Faculty: Seddig, Robert
Students will learn what causes bias motivated violence in schools and communities, how to develop
effective prevention strategies, how to reduce police
violence toward traditionally targeted groups, and
why hate crimes have such destructive impacts on
individuals and communities. The course will focus
on hate crimes and police and community response
in the US and in Europe. The students will examine
their own ethnic, racial, gender, sexual orientation
and religious identities as victims and/or perpetrators of bias and violence. The course will examine
bias and violence in Europe toward traditionally
targeted groups such as LGBTQ, Muslim, Jewish,
migrant and Roma people. Finally, the course will
examine approaches to reducing bias motivated violence by police toward groups such as blacks, Muslims and Roma. Students will be evaluated based on
short written responses to readings, in-class discussion, two papers and a final project. The final project
will explore some aspect of bias motivated violence
through persuasive writing, fiction, poetry, art,
photography/film, advocacy or interviews. Course
readings will include scholarly writing, reports from
human rights NGOs, first person accounts and
one novel. Class sessions will involve discussions
led by me and at times by students, small group
discussions between students and occasional guest
presenters. The class will travel to Portland or Lewiston to meet with refugees from places in which
bias motivated violence has been significant. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
This course will be an exploration of the contributions of women justices to the development of
constitutional guarantees and rights, 1986 to the
present, based initially on Linda Hirshman, Sisters
in Law: How Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader
Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed
the World (2015). Of the current eight, three women
justices (Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena
Kagan) play an increasingly important role and powerful bloc in support of social justice issues, more so
with the departure of Justice Antonin Scalia. Have
these justices (including O’Connor, retired) “changed
the world,” as Hirshman suggests? Are their constitutional philosophies unique or “new” to the Court?
This course will attempt to answer such questions
by focusing on the intersection between gender and
jurisprudence, with a focus on rights and liberties.
Likely topic areas in this exploration will include:
reproductive rights, privacy, gender-based discrimination, freedom of expression, criminal procedures
and the death Peñalty, areas of constitutional
interpretation where the sisters-in-law have played
a critical role on the Supreme Court. In a more general sense, this course will serve as an introduction
to the United States Supreme Court and its role in
the federal judiciary and the larger political system,
focusing on the doctrines of judicial review and federal authority. The focus is from 1986 to the present, with Jeffrey Toobin’s, The Nine (2008), serving
as an additional—and complementary—resource,
as well as readings on judicial process and constitutional interpretation, more generally. The Nine,
with its detailed analysis of Supreme Court rights
interpretation in the most recent three decades, will
build upon and broaden the contributions of Linda
Hirschman’s Sisters in Law. In addition, the former
provides useful insight into the inner works of the
Supreme Court and interpersonal relations among
the justices, irrespective of their gender. Some case
reading and briefing required. Two short papers
and a summative research paper are required. The
course is recommended for students interested
in legal studies, law and society, political science,
gender studies, social justice, biography, and contemporary US history and constitutional law. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
HS 2065: Choice, Chance, and Tragedy
Faculty: Lakey, Heather
What makes a human life good? In this course we
will consider how Plato and Aristotle’s competing epistemologies produce different answers to
this question, and we will debate the relationship
between human character and “moral luck,” or the
elements of human existence that humans do not
control. In addition, we will read the tragedies of of
Aeschylus and Sophocles, as well as Martha Nussbaum’s more modern text The Fragility of Goodness
to explore ancient Greek responses to the question
of human goodness. This course will familiarize
students with major trends in Greek philosophy and
Greek ethics, and it will provoke students to consider the relationship between ancient Greek thought
and contemporary ethical problems. Students will
be evaluated on the basis of weekly writing assignments, a presentation, a midterm exam, and a final
exam. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: None required, but students should be prepared to read dense, philosophical texts. Limit: 15.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 2070: Transforming Food Systems
Faculty: Collum, Kourtney
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course centers on the questions: How do we
provide equal access to healthy, safe, and affordable food for all people? What does sustainability
and social justice look like in the context of food?
Through the lens of food justice, this course
79
explores possibilities for transformative change
throughout local and global food systems. The first
part of the course critically examines contemporary
food systems—including food production, distribution, and consumption—with particular attention to
the ways culture and politics shape our interactions
with food. Through readings and films we explore
issues such as worker safety, food security and access, contested agricultural and land use policies,
food sovereignty, and consumer and community
health. The second part of the course examines
case studies of transformative food movements
from around the world, from Growing Power in
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to La Via Campesina global
campaign for agrarian reform. The final third of the
course focuses on transformative work in Maine
and at COA. Students take multiple field trips to
participate in local food movements inaction, and to
learn about these movements’ philosophies, objectives, and activities. Students are evaluated based
on participation in class discussions and field trips,
a series of brief reflection papers, and a final class
project on a local “transformative food” project of
their choice. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit:
12. Lab fee: $40.
students to critically interrogate the meaning of sex,
gender, sexuality, power, and oppression. Along the
way, we will consider a host of arguments regarding
the sources of sexism, racism, and heteronormativity, the grounds of sexual dimorphism, and the
relationship between subjectivity and oppression.
Although this course will stress the many ways feminist theory and queer theory overlap, we will also
consider the emergence and development of queer
philosophy as a distinct and unique discipline. Some
of the principal questions for this course include:
Which categories are used to study the human
being and when are these categories potentially oppressive or violent? When is language a mechanism
for social and political oppression and when does
language facilitate liberation? How do multicultural,
intersectional, transgender, and queer approaches
inform feminist politics? How do queer philosophers
challenge the theoretical orthodoxies of identity,
gender, and sexuality? Students will be evaluated
on weekly writing assignments, a presentation,
a midterm exam, and a final paper. This will be a
discussion-driven course and students should be
prepared to engage and discuss philosophical literature. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
HS 2071: Little Magazines: Seminar in Contemp.
Literary Publishing
Faculty: Mahoney, Daniel
Meets the following requirements: HS
HS 2073: Environmental Psychology
Faculty: Borden, Richard
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course is an introduction to literary magazines
and the work of editing. We will examine the history of “little” magazines from the mid nineteenth
century to the present day. We will investigate the
impact of literary magazines on literary culture in
America and the world. This class will also be dedicated to surveying the current literary landscape,
both print and digital, with special emphasis on
BATEAU, the new literary magazine being published
at College of the Atlantic. Through the production of
BATEAU, the course will offer practical experience in
literary publishing: students will gain experience in
editing, layout and production, as well as publicizing
and promoting the finished product. Students will
be expected to respond to course readings on literary magazines and culture as well as keep detailed
response notes to submissions to the magazine. Student editors will recommend pieces for publication,
rejection and/or further consideration. In addition
to editorial duties, students will be expected to complete a midterm and a final project. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: Writing Seminar, a
creative writing or literature class. Limit: 12.
HS 2072: Sex, Gender, Identity and Power
Faculty: Lakey, Heather
This course offers an overview of feminist and
queer thinking. The purpose of this course is twofold. First, it will provide a snapshot of the ideas,
traditions, and debates that shape feminist and
queer philosophy. Second, this course will teach
80
This course explores the historical roots and contemporary themes of environmental psychology.
The major topics include: environmental stress and
human coping processes, crowding, personal space,
architectural influences on feelings and actions,
wilderness psychology, the development of environmental attitudes, and the determinants of environmental responsibility. We also examine some
of the recent ideas derived from ecology, and the
philosophy of nature as they apply to environmental
education, voluntary simplicity, and human ecologically informed architecture, technology, and living.
Evaluations are based on class participation and
two problem sets. Level: Introductory/Intermediate.
Limit: 20. Lab fee: $20.
HS 2074: Philosophy of Death and Dying
Faculty: Lakey, Heather
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course philosophically explores the concepts
of death, dying, killing, and life. Topics include the
soul, the afterlife, euthanasia, physician-assisted
suicide, evolving medical definitions of life and
death, hospice and end-of-life care, the ethics of
killing, biotechnologies, and cross-cultural conceptions of death and grief. Although this course is
primarily grounded in the Western philosophical
and bioethical traditions, we will also consider nonWestern perspectives in an effort to both clarify and
complicate our conceptions of death and dying. The
purpose of this course is not to articulate conclusive
answers, but rather to compel students to think
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
philosophically about the many profound questions
that arise in the face of death. This is a discussionbased course and students should be prepared
to engage and discuss challenging philosophical
literature. Students will be evaluated on the basis of
weekly writing assignments, a midterm, a final, and
class participation. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 15.
HS 2075: The Anthropology of Food
Faculty: Collum, Kourtney
Meets the following requirements: HS
Food is inextricably linked to cultural systems.
Indeed, the agricultural anthropologist Robert
Rhoades wrote that “few realms of human life touch
more components of culture—technological, economic, political, social and religious—than agriculture and its products.” This course uses food as a
tool with which to explore human origins, cultural
diversity, social structure, and human/environment
interactions. Through academic articles and films,
the course aims to expose students to the different
ways in which anthropologists think about food and
how they use different anthropological frameworks
to answer questions concerning the human experience. The course will also engage other disciplinary
perspectives such as those from history, economics,
and political ecology so as to make larger connections between food and society. These perspectives
will help foster students’ understanding of the ways
in which social, political, and economic processes
shape our interactions with food. Designed as a survey course to introduce students to the broad and
dynamic subfield of food anthropology, the course
is organized around four themes. The first theme—
human origins, diets, and biocultural evolution—
explores the uniqueness of cooking to the human
species, and how the evolution of human diets and
culture has shaped different groups’ dietary needs
and restrictions. The second theme—globalization
and international trade—looks at the flow of foods
and food practices around the world, from sugar
to sushi. The third theme—hegemony and difference—considers the ways in which race, gender, and
class are constructed and expressed through food.
The final theme—consumption and embodiment—
considers the relationship between eating and the
body; readings in this section focus on body image,
eating practices, and critical studies of the rhetoric
around obesity. Students will be evaluated based on
class participation, a recipe analysis, a dietary analysis, and a final class project. The final project will
be a shared meal. As a class students will develop a
menu including dishes that represent regional food
traditions and students’ individual backgrounds.
Students will then form small groups and select a
dish to prepare. They will work with staff at Blair
Dining Hall to prepare their dishes and present their
meal. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 20.
Lab fee: $30.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 2076: Life Stories: Memory, Family, and Place
Faculty: Donovan, Martha
One of the deepest human instincts is to tell our life
stories, to figure out who we are. This course will
use a workshop approach with a particular focus on
memoir writing rooted in an exploration of family
and place. We will study the writing process and
matters of craft by reading and responding to memoirs by contemporary writers (e.g., Terry Tempest
Williams’ When Women Were Birds: Fifty-Four Variations on Voice), practical guides to memoir writing
(e.g., Bill Roorbach’s Writing Life Stories), and essays
on memoir and memory (e.g., Patricia Hampl’s
I Could Tell You Stories: Sojourns in the Land of
Memory). Class time will include discussion of readings, writing exercises designed to help students
with matters of language and technique in their own
writing, and group critiques of work-in-progress.
Student work will be publicly shared through a reading and exhibit on campus. Students will be evaluated on the effort and quality of their writing, their
commitment to the writing process, their participation in peer review and workshops, a final portfolio
of all their writing, and a public presentation of their
finished work. Level: Introductory/Intermediate.
Limit: 12. Lab fee: $20.
HS 2078: College Seminar: City/Country in US
Literature 1860-1920
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: W HS
This class focuses on US fiction from the realist/
naturalist period (roughly 1860-1920), a time when
enormous changes were occurring in and on the US
landscape. Increasing urbanization, immigration,
and industrialization corresponded both with a desire for ‘realistic’ fiction of social problems, and nostalgic stories of a more ‘realistic’ rural life. For the
first time there was a national literature, resulting
from the capabilities of large publishing houses, urban centers and mass production—but this national
literature was acutely self-conscious of regional
differences, and especially of the tension between
city and country. Examining works that portray factory towns, urban tenements, midwestern prairies,
New England villages, and the broad spectrum of US
landscapes of the period, we look at how a complex,
turbulent, multi-ethnic, and simultaneously urban
and rural American culture defined itself, and thus
its gender, class, race, and social relations, and
sense of values, against these landscapes. There is
a strong emphasis on reading, writing, and discussion. Students will write and revise three critical
analyses over the course of the term. Given that
the class covers a lot of intellectual and historical
ground, students will also do a short fiction project and develop a research paper on their author,
landscape, and historical moment. Evaluation will be
based on class participation, the writing process for
the critical analyses, and the proposal, presentation,
83
and research paper for the short fiction project.
Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit: 12.
HS 2079: Plato and the Origins of the West
Faculty: Cox, Gray
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
Alfred North Whitehead once commented that the
“The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a
series of footnotes to Plato.” This course will explore
Plato’s original body of ideas and the methods he
used to develop them through careful reading of a
large number of dialogues and selections from key
philosophers’ responses to them. Key themes will
include the relationships between ethics, metaphysics and epistemology, the theory of Ideas, the nature of political life, the roles of friendship and Eros
in life, “philo-sophia” as a way of life, and the figure
of Socrates and Socratic method.
Readings will include Plato’s Lysis, Meno, Laches,
Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Symposium, Phaedrus,
Gorgias and selections from others such as The
Republic, Timaeus, and Parmenides. In parallel with
these texts we will also read very short selections
from thinkers such as the Pre-Socratics, Aristotle,
Descartes, Kant, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dewey, de
Beauvoir, Foucault, and Alyson Jaggar. For histori- cal
context we will also read selections from Pierre
Hadot and others and study selections from the art
and other key cultural documents including texts by
Aristophanes, Xenophon and Thucydides.
By the end of the course students should understand and be able to articulate key ideas and problematics in Plato and place them in their cultural
context. They should also be able to critically analyze texts and ideas in oral discussion and in short
written pieces by examining them for internal consistency and the adequacy with which they respond
to the challenges presented by the problematics of
their own cultural setting as well as the light cast
on them by critiques of subsequent philosophers.
Students will be evaluated on class participation,
a series of short papers providing careful textual
analysis, an in-class presentation on one of the dialogues and/or a subsequent philosopher’s response
to it, and participation in a performance of some
portion of one of the dialogues. Level: Introductory/
intermediate. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $25.
HS 3010: Autobiography
Faculty: Carpenter, William
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course uses autobiography as a literary form
to examine the lives of certain significant people
and then to examine our own lives, concentrating
particularly on understanding the effects of early
home and community environments. In the first
half of the term, students read and report on two
autobiographical works chosen from a list including
Beryl Markham, Carl Jung, Margaret Mead, Maya
Angelou, Leo Tolstoy, Virginia Woolf, Vincent Van
82
Gogh, W. B. Yeats, and Pete Rose. In the second half,
students write their own autobiographies, working
in small groups and frequent tutorial meetings with
the instructor. The product is an autobiographical
examination of the student’s own development.
This course should consume 15 hours per week
outside of class, more at the end of the term when
finishing the autobiography. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisite: Course involving literature and writing
and Instructor Signature. Offered every other year.
Limit: 8.
HS 3011: Bread, Love, and Dreams
Faculty: Carpenter, William
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course is an introduction to the unconscious.
It begins with the problem of knowing something
which by definition is unknown. It then proceeds to
examine two classic approaches to the unconscious:
dreams and love. Students are expected to keep
dream notebooks and to recognize their own unconscious life in the light of readings. Readings start
with the unconscious in its classical formulation
according to Freud and Jung. We read The Interpretation of Dreams and Two Essays in Analytical Psychology. We consider these themes in fiction using
Henry James’ The Beast in the Jungle. We then move
to more contemporary writers, particularly James
Hillman’s The Dream and the Underworld, Michel
Foucault’s History of Sexuality, and finally consider
some of the negative implications of the material
in Elaine Scarry’s The Body in Pain. The writing part
of this course is done in pairs, with groups of two
students cross-examining each other’s dream
notebooks and self-analysis. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisite: A course in literature or psychology.
Offered every other year. Limit: 20. Lab fee: $20.
HS 3012: Poetry and the American Environment
Faculty: Carpenter, William
Meets the following requirements: HS
Since Anne Bradstreet in the seventeenth century,
American poets have responded to the natural environment and its human transformation. Poets have
learned to see by their exposure to nature, then in
turn have used their techniques of vision, music and
metaphor to teach us how to see who and where we
are. This class considers poets of the Romantic and
Transcendental movements, spends some time with
Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, then focuses on
the twentieth century, especially T.S. Eliot, Wallace
Stevens, Robert Frost, Robinson Jeffers, and Elizabeth Bishop. We end with some contemporaries:
Robert Hass, Charles Simic, Gary Snyder, and Mary
Oliver. Students may write either an analytical paper
or a collection of their own poetry. Class meetings
are supplemented by additional workshop sessions
for student poets. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 15.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 3015: African American Literature
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: HS
This survey of African American literature from its
origins in the slave narrative to the present vivid
prose of some of America’s best writers considers
the impact of slavery and race consciousness on
literary form and power. Readings include letters,
essays, poems, short stories, and novels of some
of the following authors: Phillis Wheatley, Frederick
Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Pauline Hopkins, Langston
Hughes, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison. Level:
Intermediate. Prerequisite: A previous literature
course or signature of the instructor. Limit: 15. Offered every other year.
HS 3016: Global Environmental Politics: Theory
and Practice
Faculty: Stabinsky, Doreen
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course will cover the politics and policy of
regional and global environmental issues, including
many of the major environmental treaties that have
been negotiated to date (Montreal Protocol, Framework Convention on Climate Change, Convention on
Biological Diversity). Students will gain both practical
and theoretical understandings of how treaties are
negotiated and implemented, through case studies
of the climate change convention and the Cartagena
protocol on biosafety. We will draw on both mainstream and critical theories of international relations
when analyzing these negotiations. Students will
become familiar with the range of political stances on
different treaties of various nations and blocs, and
the political, economic, cultural, and scientific reasons for diverging and converging views. We will pay
special attention to the growing role played by nongovernmental organizations in global environmental
politics. We will conclude the course with discussions
of some current controversial areas in international
environmental politics. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 15.
Lab fee $10
HS 3019: Mountain Poets of China and Japan
Faculty: Visvader, John; Stover, Candice
Meets the following requirements: HS
There was a long standing tradition in both China
and Japan of wandering poets and mountain hermits
who expressed their experiences in nature in poetic
terms. In this class we take an overview of the major
styles of poetry in both of these countries and
sample some of the work of their major poets. After
a brief introduction to the use of dictionaries and
various language tools available in books and on the
internet, students will be invited to try their hand at
translating some of the Chinese poems and rendering them into good poems in english. Level: Intermediate. Students will be expected to take the course on
a Pass/Fail basis, with special arrangement made for
those needing to take it for a grade. Limit: 12.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 3020: Contemporary Social Movement
Strategies
Faculty: Cox, Gray
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
When groups organize others to promote social
change, what alternative strategies do they employ
and how effective are they in varying circumstances? Can any general principles or methods for social
change be gleaned from the successes and difficulties encountered in various social movements
around the world? We will use Bill Moyer’s “Doing
Democracy” and a series of other theoretical readings to look at general models and strategies. And
we will use a series of case studies including, for
instance, the Zapatistas, Moveon.org, the liberation
of Eastern Europe, the US Civil Rights Movement,
the anti-globalizaton movement, the Breast Cancer
Social Movement and the Gay and Lesbian movement. Students will write a series of short analyses
of cases considered in class and do extended case
studies on their own. Evaluation will be based on
the quality of class participation, research, and writing. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 15. Lab fee $25.
HS 3021: Intermediate Spanish I
Faculty: Peña, Karla
This course is for students who are competent in the
use of basic Spanish structures, of the simple and
compound of the indicative tenses, and some forms
of the imperative tense. Objective: The students will
be able to express themselves orally and through
writing using a variety of vocabulary, the indicative and imperative moods, and some applications
of the subjunctive mood. This includes a review of
the present, preterite, future imperfect, preterite
imperfect tenses, pronouns of object direct and
indirect, imperative mood, expanded use of the
“to be” and “is” verbs, the prepositions and simple
conditional, the study and practice of the compound
tenses of the indicative mood, present perfect, plus
perfect, and future perfect. They will also study the
subjunctive mood and verbs that express emotion.
Evaluation Criteria: two compositions, two auditory
tests, two writing tests covering grammar, two oral
tests, assignments/ homework, class participation.
Level: Intermediate. Offered every fall. Limit: 10. Lab
fee: $20
HS 3023: International Wildlife Policy and
Protected Areas
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
“Save the whales”; “save the tiger”; “save the rainforest”—increasingly wildlife and their habitats are
the subject of international debate with many
seeing wildlife as part of the common heritage of
humankind. Wildlife does not recognize the political
boundaries of national states and as a result purely
national efforts to protect wildlife often fail when
wildlife migrates beyond the jurisdiction of protection. This course focuses on two principle aspects of
83
international wildlife conservation: 1) the framework
of treaties and other international mechanisms set
up to protect species; and 2) the system of protected areas established around the world to protect
habitat. We begin with an examination of several
seminal wildlife treaties such as the International
Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, CITES,
migratory bird treaties, and protocols to the Antarctica Treaty. Using case studies on some of the more
notable wildlife campaigns, such as those involving
whales and elephants, we seek to understand the
tensions between national sovereignty and international conservation efforts. The Convention on
Biological Diversity and its broad prescriptions for
wildlife protection provide a central focus for our
examination of future efforts. Following on one of
the key provisions in the Convention on Biological
Diversity, the second half of the course focuses on
international and national efforts to create parks
and other protected areas. In particular we evaluate efforts to create protected areas that serve the
interests of wildlife and resident peoples. Students
gain familiarity with UNESCO’s Biosphere Reserve
model and the IUCN’s protected area classifications.
We also examine in some depth the role that NGO’s
play in international conservation efforts. The
relationship between conservation and sustainable
development is a fundamental question throughout the course. Level: Intermediate. Recommended
courses: Use and Abuse of Public Lands, Global
Politics and Sustainability, Global Environmental
Politics.
HS 3027: Microeconomics for Business and
Policy
Faculty: Taylor, Davis
Meets the following requirements: HS QR
What is the best way to insure that communities can
provide dependable, well-paying jobs to their citizens? Why does Coca Cola spend millions of dollars
to advertise a product with which most people are
already very familiar? What can the game of blackjack tell us about how industries are structured?
How can we get coal-burning power utilities to
reduce their carbon emissions while they save millions of dollars in the process? How can we provide
much better health care to all Americans, at much
less cost, while making it easier for small businesses
to grow? All of these questions, and many more like
them, are answered by microeconomic theory. This
intermediate-level course exposes students to basic
microeconomic theories, models, and concepts that
shed insight on the economic behavior of businesses, individuals, governments and politicians,
and international organizations. We will emphasize
approaches that have numerous overlapping applications to both business and policy evaluation: markets, pricing, firm structure and decision-making,
strategic behavior (using game theory), consumer
behavior, externalities (such as greenhouse gas
emissions) and the provision of public goods (such
84
as military, education, and environmental conservation). We will pay special attention to the economics
of asymmetrical information (adverse selection,
moral hazard, and principal-agent situations) that
have a wide range of applications, including issues
such as the ineffectiveness of the American health
care system, the structuring of business finance,
and the hiring and paying of employees. This will
be a non-calculus course, but will give students exposure to technical economic modeling, with heavy
emphasis on graphical modeling of complex social
phenomena. We will use a lab period to conduct
extensive experiments and games that illustrate
or test economic concepts and hypotheses. Level:
Intermediate. Prerequisite: Signature of instructor
or one course in economics or business. Limit: 15.
Lab fee: $30.
HS 3028: The Mystics
Faculty: Visvader, John
Meets the following requirements: HS
Mysticism is an important current in almost all
religions and marks an attempt on the part of the
mystic to experience a union with the deepest
nature of reality. This course offers an examination
of the nature and types of mystical experience with
a particular emphasis on the paradoxical language
that many mystics use. Language is thought to be inadequate to describe the nature of the real and yet
language is the only tool to communicate with others. Contradictory and paradoxical expressions and
descriptions are used in an attempt to point beyond
language directly at reality. While drawing primarily on Western religions of the Greek, Christian,
Islamic and Jewish traditions, questions are raised
concerning the degree to which Eastern traditions,
such as Buddhism, can be meaningfully regarded
as mystical. Some of the mystics examined in detail
include Plotinus, Ibn Arabi, Meister Eckhart, Marguerite Porete, St John and St. Teresa. Students will be
evaluated on their participation in discussions and
the ability to convey their understanding of mysticism in both mid-term and final take-home exams.
Level: Intermediate. Limit: 20.
HS 3029: Shakespeare: Character, Conflict, and
Cinematography
Faculty: Carpenter, William
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course will focus on Shakespeare’s tragedies as
a direct link between the birth of tragedy in ancient
Greece and the violence of contemporary cinema.
The class begins with a week of Shakespeare’s sonnets as an entry into the co-evolution of language,
metaphor and human emotion. We’ll then compare
“Hamlet” and Sophocles’ “Oedipus Rex” in the light
of Freudian theory to shed light on universal issues
of incest and domestic violence, and continue with a
play every week in two extended evening sessions,
4-9 Monday and Thursday, with pizza intermission.
The Monday sessions will be a complete dramatic
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
reading of the play involving the whole class, stopping to discuss salient points, with the aim of
complete understanding of language, structure and
meaning. The Thursday sessions will be a single or
double feature of contemporary and classic film
adaptations, followed by discussion of the relation between play and film. Sample pairings would
be “Romeo and Juliet” with Bernstein’s “West Side
Story; “Macbeth” with Geoffrey Wright’s “Macbeth”
and Kurosawa’s “Throne of Blood,” “King Lear” with
Moorhouse’s “A Thousand Acres.” Two written assignments will involve a choice of structural analysis
of a play, re-casting Shakespearean scenes or motifs
into original short fiction, or selecting and following
a Shakespeare play through all its cinematic variations. Texts will be individual editions of the plays,
along with Michael Greer’s “Screening Shakespeare”
for individual background. Intermediate: prior
writing or literature course recommended. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: prior writing or literature
course recommended. Limit: 16. Lab fee: $10.
HS 3031: Our Public Lands: Past, Present, and
Future
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
By definition “public lands” belong to all of us, yet
public lands in this country have a history of use
(and abuse) by special interests and a shocking
absence of any coherent management strategy for
long-term sustainability. This course is taught in
seminar format in which students read and discuss
several environmental policy and history texts that
concern the history and future of our federal lands.
We also use primary historic documents and texts
to understand the origins of public ownership and
management. We examine the legal, philosophical,
ecological, and political problems that have faced
our National Parks, wildlife refuges, national forests,
and other public lands. An effort is made to sort
out the tangle of laws and conflicting policies that
govern these public resources. Special attention is
given to the historic roots of current policy debates.
Evaluation is based upon response papers, a class
presentation, participation in class discussions, and
a group project looking closely at the historical context and policy implications of a management issue
facing a nearby public land unit. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisite: Introductory history or policy class
recommended. Limit: 20. Lab fee $15.
HS 3032: The Cold War: Early Years
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This course provides a broad historical overview of
the early years of the “Cold War” period that shaped
global politics generally and American foreign policy
specifically. Beginning in the 1940’s and leading up
to Richard Nixon’s election in 1968 we will examine
the diplomatic relationship between the United
States and the Soviet Union and how this relation-
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
ship has impacted state actors, economic policies,
cultural production, and conceptions of identity.
While there will be a heavy focus on traditional statelevel diplomatic history, students will also explore a
broad array of methodological approach- es. Class
sessions will include a mix of traditional lecture
formats, class discussion, and outside presentations.
An evening lab is scheduled in order to screen a
variety of cultural artifacts from the vari- ous periods
we will cover. The primary goal is to give students an
intensive 10-week crash course into key events,
concepts, figures, etc that defined the early decades
of Cold War diplomacy. At the same time there is also
time allocated for students to explore their own
independent research interests. Given the farreaching force of Cold War politics into everyday life,
individuals with widely varying academic inter- ests
will find the course informative and productive.
Evaluation will be based on a mix of class participation, individual research assignments, and exams.
All students, regardless of their backgrounds, previous coursework, or interests are welcome. Level:
Intermediate. Limit: 30.
HS 3033: Satanic Verses
Faculty: Carpenter, William
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course is a study of the figure of Satan in
classic and contemporary literature and visual art
including painting and film. We will view the Satanic
image in the light of Jung’s shadow archetype, an
unconscious compensatory figure in the evolution
of morality. It will also be related to ideas of nature
and civilization, to major religious structures and
to the political techniques of demonization and
projection. A centerpiece of the course will be a
close reading of Salman Rushdie’s “Satanic Verses”
and its relation to contemporary Islam. Other readings will be drawn from a list including the books
of Genesis and Job from the Old Testament, Jung’s
“Answer to Job”, Sura 46 of the Koran, selections
from Dante’s “Inferno” and Milton’s “Paradise Lost”,
Goethe’s “Faust”, William Blake’s “The Marriage of
Heaven and Hell”, Hawthorne’s “The Scarlet Letter,”
the Grand Inquisitor chapter from Dostoevsky’s
“Brothers Karamazov”, Nietzsche’s “The Antichrist”,
Elaine Pagel’s “The Origin of Satan”, and the Rolling
Stones’ “Sympathy for the Devil”. We will also take
time to study visual imagery from Bosch, Goya, and
the Dore illustrations to Dante. Halfway steering
clear of Hollywood, films may include “The Passion
of the Christ”, Pasolini’s “Gospel According to St.
Matthew”, “Rosemary’s Baby”, Godard’s “Sympathy
for the Devil” and Herzog’s “Nosferatu the Vampyr.”
Students will learn to analyze and understand
complex literary works in historical and cultural
context. Evaluations to be based on two papers (8 &
12 pages) plus one class presentation. The student
presentations will be expected to expand the course
into areas of popular culture, music, iconography
and social behavior. Level: Intermediate; Limit: 18;
Lab fee $10.
85
HS 3034: Conspiracy Theory and Political
Discourse
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
Meets the following requirements: HS
The fear of the “hidden” enemy that lurks behind
the shadows is a narrative theme that appears periodically in the political discourse of all democratic
societies. Yet, this narrative of fear (often labeled as
conspiracy theory) is regularly criticized as somehow being inherently antidemocratic, irrational, or
dangerous. At the same time, this form of argument
can also be “mainstreamed” and defended as a
legitimate response to the events of the moment.
How do we make sense of this tension? If conspiracy
theory as a mode of explanation is inherently
“irrational,” what does this mean for its enduring
presence in our political discourse? Is the only difference between a reasonable claim rooted in fear
and the conspiracy theories of “kooks” and “nutjobs”
simply a matter of which one is “correct?” This class
will address the role fear and anxiety plays in our
social and political lives. We will explore a variety of
topics related directly to how threats, conspiracies,
agents of “evil,” and “otherness” become manifest
in public discourse. Specific topics include: the possible tension between “rational” deliberative decision making and the cultivating of anxiety in public
governance; why we dismiss some claims as mere
conspiracy theory and yet have no problem accepting other similarly formed arguments; what role the
“outsider” plays in cementing cohesion within an
“in” group; and the disturbing possibility that fear is
actually a healthy component of democratic debate.
The class will look at both contemporary and historical examples from the United States and around the
world. There are three primary goals of the class:
first, to expose students to the analysis of primary
texts rooted in public fear and anxiety; second, to
provoke discussion about the role of conspiracy
and threats in democracies; and third, to provide
students with a survey of secondary work that seeks
to situate and make sense of these topics. Readings
will be a combination of primary artifacts for interpretation (such a speeches, manifestos, pamphlets,
and movies) as well as secondary analytical readings. In addition to the regular class meeting time,
students will be expected to attend a weekly evening lab session devoted to the screening of visual
works and/or presentations by speakers. Evaluation
will be based on readings driven discussion as well
as individual student writing assignments. Students
will produce several short length essay assignments
during the term as well as a longer research paper
at the end of the term. This class is open to students
of all interests regardless of their experience with
politics, government, or social theory. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 10.
86
HS 3035: Sustainable Strategies
Faculty: Friedlander, Jay
Meets the following requirements: HS
Business has tremendous societal ramifications.
Inventions and industries from the automobile to
the internet impact everything from air quality to
economic and political freedom. Entrepreneurs,
who are often at the forefront of business and thus
societal innovation, are changing the way business
is conducted by creating businesses that are beneficial to the bottom line, society and the environment.
Through cases, projects and present day examples,
the course will challenge students to understand
the impact of business on society and the challenges and pitfalls of creating a socially responsible
venture. In addition, it will offer new frameworks for
creating entrepreneurial ventures that capitalize on
social responsibility to gain competitive advantage,
increase valuation while benefiting society and the
environment. The final deliverable for the course is
an in-class presentation in which student teams will
either: (1) recommend ways to improve the social
and environmental impacts of a company, while increasing competitive advantage and bottom line; or
(2) benchmark two industry competitors, a socially
responsible company versus a traditional company.
Level: Intermediate. Limit: 15.
HS 3036: Oceans & Fishes: Readings in
Environmental History
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This course will explore the rapidly expanding
field of marine environmental history and historical studies that focus on fish and fisheries. Recent
methodological and conceptual work as well as
growing interest in the history of these topics driven
by conservation and policy issues has made this an
important and innovative field. Using the work of a
variety of scholars from different fields the class will
explore how historical accounts can be constructed
with an emphasis on the types of available sources,
the use of evidence, and how each author builds
their argument. We will explicitly compare the methods, use of evidence and other aspects of different
disciplinary approaches to the topic to highlight the
strengths and limitations of each approach. This
dimension of the class is particularly interesting
because of the dynamic and interdisciplinary nature
of scholarship right now that brings a wide range
of research into dialogue. Students will learn about
the history of oceans and fishes by looking at how
historians and other scholars frame their works and
make their arguments. Students will be evaluated
on their preparation for discussion, mastery of the
material, short written assignments, and a final
project made up of a presentation and essay. This
course is appropriate for students with interest in
history, community-based research, marine studies,
and environmental policy. Students who are just
curious and interested in lots of things are also most
welcome. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 15 Lab fee $75.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 3038: The Cold War: The Later Years
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
HS 3040: History of Agriculture: Apples
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This course provides a broad historical overview of
the early years of the “Cold War” period that shaped
global politics generally and American foreign policy
specifically. Beginning with the election of Richard
Nixon’s in 1968 and following up to today, we will
focus on the diplomatic relationship between the
United States and the Soviet Union/Russia and how
this relationship has impacted state actors, economic policies, cultural production, and conceptions
of identity. While there will be a heavy focus on traditional state-level diplomatic history, students will
also explore a broad array of methodological approaches. Class sessions will include a mix of traditional lecture formats, class discussion, and outside
presentations. An evening lab is scheduled in order
to screen a variety of cultural artifacts from the various periods we will cover. The primary goal is to give
students an intensive 10-week crash course into key
events, concepts, figures, etc that defined the later
decades of Cold War diplomacy. At the same time
there is also time allocated for students to explore
their own independent research interests. Given the
far-reaching force of Cold War politics into everyday
life, individuals with widely varying academic interests will find the course informative and productive.
Evaluation will be based on a mix of class participation, individual research assignments, and exams.
While this class is designed to compliment the topics
covered in The Cold War: Early Years, students are
not required to have had this earlier class. Both
courses are designed as “stand alone.” All students,
regardless of their backgrounds, previous coursework, or interests are welcome. Level: Intermediate.
Limit: 20.
This course will explore the history of agriculture
from the vantage point of Downeast Maine with a
focus on apples. The premise of the course is that
by exploring this fascinating crop in detail from the
local vantage point of Downeast Maine students
will be able to grasp the many historical processes
at work from the introduction of the fruit in the late
sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries to the
age of agricultural improvement in the eighteenth
on to the rise and fall of commercial orcharding as
a major component of Maine’s farm economy in the
early twentieth century. Using sources ranging from
secondary sources, historical atlases, aerial surveys,
and diaries, we will explore how the culture of apple
agriculture in Maine develops over time as part of
an interconnected Atlantic World where crops flow
back and forth between Britain and the colonies/
U.S. over hundreds of years. Course activities will
include fruit exploration and fieldtrips to track down
and identify antique varieties, as well as visits to the
local farms where a new generation of apple culture
is taking shape. The course will also engage students with the process of cider-making, both sweet
and hard, as well as exercises in the preparation,
storage, and processing of apples. Students will be
evaluated on their participation in discussion, how
they collaborate with others in class projects, and a
final individual or collaborative project. This course
is designed for students interested in history, farming and food systems, community-based research,
and policy/planning issues. It is also very appropriate for students who like apples and just want to
know (a lot) more. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 18. Lab
fee: $125.
HS 3039: Communicating Science
Faculty: Kozak, Anne
Meets the following requirements: W
HS 3041: Intermediate Atelier in French
Language and Conversation
Faculty: Staff
This course is designed for science students developing their research skills working on research
projects for a principal investigator; specifically this
course will improve the students’ writing ability and
introduce them to writing for the scientific community. The course involves not only learning to write
an abstract and literature review but also understanding the protocols for writing a scientific paper
based on lab or field data. In addition, students
will prepare a power point presentation on their
research to present at a meeting or conference such
as the Maine Biological Science Symposium or the
annual INBRE meeting. In addition to working with
the instructor, students will work on the content of
their writing with the principal investigator. Offered
every other year. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisite:
Signature of instructor. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $20.
This course helps intermediate level students increase proficiencies in all four skill areas—listening,
speaking, reading and writing—using a workshop
format drawing on the internet resources and pedagogical methods of the French language institute at
CAVILAM in Vichy, France. Classes will meet three
times a week for 1.5 hours each session and will
include discussions, readings, small and large group
activities, and a variety of other exercises that draw
on authentic language materials. This is for students
with sufficient background in French to engage in
basic conversations and learn in a workshop format—students who, using the Common European
Framework, are at an A2 to B1 level. Students will
be evaluated through written and oral tests, class
participation, short papers and oral presentations.
Level: Intermediate. Prerequisite: Placement exam
required to confirm level. Limit: 15. Course fee: $25.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
87
HS 3043: Democracy: Models, Theories,
Questions
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
Meets the following requirements: HS
Democracy is a word you hear constantly in contemporary political discourse. Most people seem
to think it’s a good thing, but they might not always
agree on what the “it” is. Perhaps we should take a
moment to unpack the idea of democratic governance in our world. What do we mean when we
call something a democracy? Why do we naturally
assume that democracy is a good thing? Is it? Should
we promote it? How is democratic governance
conceptualized across various societies and publics,
today and in the past? How are these various models of democracy encoded with certain assumptions
about the relationship of the individual subject to
the world around them? What does the discourse of
the democratic mean in contemporary society? This
seminar will cover all of these questions and more.
We start with some basic definitional questions and
from there springboard into a host of challenging
topics pertaining to how governance is conceptualized. We will cover theoretical conceptions of
governance and power, empirical observations of
the functioning of democratic forms, and grounded
questions of practice when applied to contemporary
problems. Along the way we will draw on concrete
examples from the international, national, local,
and (not surprisingly) the COA level. Evaluation will
be based on engagement with class discussion,
short-form response papers, literature reviews, and
various student-led presentations. Students with
a wide variety of interests in governance, politics,
policy, economy, theory, and other forms of social
analysis are encouraged to enroll. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 15.
HS 3049: City/Country II: American Literary
Landscapes 1900-1960
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: HS
This coursefocuses on American fiction of the
twentieth century. As those who have taken City/
Country I or a US History course should be aware,
the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries
were a time of dramatic change in the American
landscape. Over the twentieth century, increasing
urbanization, immigration and industrialization, the
development of large-scale and industrial agriculture, the construction of a national highway system
and the rise of the suburbs continue this trend. As
in the nineteenth-century, “realistic” fiction of social
problems and nostalgic stories of a more “realistic” rural life compete to represent the American
landscape in literary form. However, along with the
Depression there are new elements, representing
the intensity of economic and psychological despair
not only for the working poor but for the middle
and upper classes. During this period the national
literature found itself without a religious framework
88
while continuing to be self-conscious of regional differences, especially of the tension between city and
country. American literature from the period 19001960 shows ever more dramatic realistic representations of the changing social landscape as well as
innovative experimental structures aiming to represent the experience of and feeling for place in new,
intensely evocative and secular ways. Examining
works that portray the broad spectrum of American
landscapes, we will look at how a complex, turbulent, multicultural, and simultaneously urban and
rural American culture defines itself and its sense
of values including those of gender, class, race and
social relations against these landscapes. Authors
we may read include: Wharton, Fitzgerald, Yezierska,
Anderson, Cather, Faulkner, Hurston, Glasgow, Dos
Passos, Steinbeck, Petry, and O’Connor. There will be
two extra, evening classes during week 6 (Short
Fiction Week), and a modest lab fee. Evaluation will
be based on frequent response papers, two short
papers, and a short fiction project, as well as class
participation. Preference will be given to those students who have completed City/Country I: American
Literary Landscapes 1860-1920. Level: Intermediate
Prerequisite: Signature of instructor required. Offered upon request. Limit: 15.
HS 3053: Voyages
Faculty: Carpenter, William
Meets the following requirements: HS
From prehistoric times the journey into the unknown has been both a reality and a metaphor of
human experience. This course will follow the archetype of the voyage through major literary narratives
and road movies. Its written and class assignments
will draw from students’ own experience as travelers. Using Joseph Campbell’s Hero with a Thousand
Faces as a theoretical framework, we’ll move on
to Homer’s Odyssey (selections), Melville’s Moby
Dick, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Woolf’s To the
Lighthouse, Peter Mattheissen’s Far Tortuga and the
new “scroll” version of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road.
We’ll watch Apocalypse Now, Priscilla Queen of the
Desert, Stranger than Paradise, Powwow Highway,
Wild at Heart, The African Queen. Assignments will
include in-class reports on students’ own journeys
and a nonfiction creative writing section on travel
narrative. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 16
HS 3055: The Mayas of Yesterday and Today
Faculty: Peña, Karla
This is a course in the history and culture of the Yucatec Maya offered as part of the College’s Yucatan
Program in Mexico. It will cover key features of the
Pre-Hispanic, Colonial and Modern eras. Readings will include classic texts by and about them as
well as contemporary studies in archaeology and
anthropology. Themes will include social structure,
religion, politics, agricultural practices, language
and family life. Homework will include various short
writing assignments and oral project reports. Field
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
trips in and around Merida will be included both
to visit archaeological sites of special interest and
also to visit contemporary communities of Maya.
Each student will do a major final project which will
include research in texts and fieldwork which culminate in an extended study on site in a Maya village.
This course will be taught entirely in Spanish. Level:
Intermediate. Prerequisite: signature of Yucatan
program director and co-enrollment in HS6010
Spanish Language and HS2021 Immersion Practica.
Lab fee: TBA. Limit: 12.
HS 3057: Taking the Waters: The Politics &
Culture of Water in France
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
France is renowned for its waters. Whether it is the
spa cities like Vichy where people flocked to “take
the waters,” the marketing of Perrier that started
the global bottled water craze, the pilgrimages to
the sacred waters of Lourdes, the home of global
water giants like Suez Lyonnaise des Eaux, or the
rivers that define its various regions, water provides
a lens through which to understand France. This
course will look at the multiple dimensions of water
in France and Europe and ultimately at the question
of the meaning of water. This class will be taught
in conjunction with Doreen Stabinsky’s class and
the French language course at CAVILAM (Immersion Program in French Language and Culture). The
first five weeks of the course will be based in Vichy.
Vichy owes its existence to its mineral springs that
have drawn people since Roman times to “faire une
cure thermal.” Looking at both the mythology and
the current practice of thermal medicine, we will
examine the use of water for healing and renewal.
In addition, we will investigate the conflict between
efforts to commodify water globally and citizen efforts to build a “water democracy” around the idea
of water as a human right. The final three weeks
of the course will explore related issues through
excursions in France and to Brussels to understand
the history of humans’ relationship with water. From
ancient Roman water structures, to the engineering
marvel of Paris sewers, contested dam sites, and
multinational water conglomerates, the class will
experience the changes in water paradigms over
time. The class will also seek to assess the success
of Europe’s continent-wide attempt at holistic water
management. The EU Water Framework Directive
provides an excellent opportunity to investigate
the new federalism of Europe, ambitious efforts
to improve water quality, and the strengths and
weaknesses of Integrated Water Resource Management. Class readings and discussions will take place
in English, though some conversations with outside
experts may be in French. Students will be evaluated on response papers, projects, problem sets,
and class participation. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: At least one policy course, French language
course and permission of instructor. Limit: 12.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 3059: Native American Literature
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course is a challenging introduction to several
centuries of Native American literature, the relevance of historical and cultural facts to its liter- ary
forms, and the challenges of bridging oral and
written traditions. Authors include such writers as
Silko, Erdrich, Harjo, Vizenor, and McNickle as well as
earlier speeches and short stories. We also consider
non-native readings and appropriation of Native
American styles, material and world views. Level:
Intermediate. Limit: 15.
HS 3062: Solutions
Faculty: Friedlander, Jay
Meets the following requirements: HS
We live in a world of problems … global warming,
inequality, discrimination, child labor, slavery, waste,
species extinction, domestic violence and a myriad
of other issues occupy the headlines, courses and
can feel overwhelming at times. Unfortunately, we
rarely here about solutions, let alone have the opportunity to create our own solutions for the issues
that concern us and inspire us to action.
Changing the world takes more than a critical
eye for what is wrong, proselytizing a good idea and
hope. There are many factors which contribute to
creating social change and in this course we explore
what it takes to be a successful change maker in our
communities, and thus in the world. Reversing the
lens we use to approach the problems of the world
is part of what a Human Ecologist needs to do to
understand our challenges:
“…social entrepreneurs are uniquely suited to
make headway on problems that have resisted
considerable money and intelligence. Where governments and traditional organizations look at problems from the outside, social entrepreneurs come to
understand them intimately, from within.”—David
Bornstein, How To Change The World
In this experiential, project-based course students will select a specific problem they would like
to solve. Students will perform thorough research
into a problem of their choosing, understanding it
from within by identifying root causes and other
exacerbating factors as well as investigating positive
deviance and what people around the world are
doing to solve this issue. Through these projects
and other readings, students will examine a myriad
of problems around the world and look at different
strategies people are using to tackle them and create positive social change. The final project for the
course will be a concrete proposal for solving the
problem they selected. Students will be evaluated
based on their performance, participation and the
quality of the projects they produce over the course
of the term. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 12. Lab fee:
$50.
89
HS 3063: Contemporary Rhetorical Theory
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
Meets the following requirements: HS
This seminar will provide students with a very broad
introductory overview of the varying fields and
theories that encompass the contemporary study
of rhetoric and public discourse. This includes how
various authors have approached the questions of
text, speaker, form/content, audience, knowledge,
cultural context, and strategies of discourse. What
unites all of these diverse strands of thought is
how each approaches the nature and function of
symbols, linguistic or otherwise, as communicative
practices. While the central purpose of the course
is to introduce students to the field of rhetorical
theory, it also aims to do so in ways that will help
complement their individual advanced interdisciplinary projects. As such, while there will be a strong
foundational core set of readings, some elements
of emphasis will shift (within a limited range) from
term to term depending on the background and interests of the students enrolled. This might involve
drawing more heavily from fields closely related to,
and intertwined with, rhetoric such as argument
theory, semiotics, cultural studies, critical discourse
analysis, and linguistic anthropology. Some of the
theorists covered include: Burke, Farrell, Weaver,
Perelman, Gaonkar, Fisher, Foucault, Zarefsky,
Richards, Bakhtin, Leff, Toulmin, McGee, Saussure,
Barthes, Condit, Bitzer, and Vatz. Evaluation will be
based on participation in class discussion, short
analysis essays, and a final more extensive independent profile of a theorist, theory, or body of work.
This course is strongly recommended for students
planning to undertake more advanced work in
textual analysis, public address, rhetorical criticism, linguistic anthropology, or any other projects
involving close readings of public discourse. Level:
Intermediate. Limit: 14.
HS 3064: Possession and the Human
Faculty: van Vliet, Netta
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course examines the concept of the human
through an exploration of the concept of possession. Contemporary understandings of the human
have been influenced by the political frameworks of
European modernity and its philosophical roots, all
the way back to Aristotle’s claim that what differentiates the human from other animals is the capacity
for speech, which is also what, he argued, makes
the human a “political animal. “ Within this history,
categories of difference internal and external to European political community, including women, colonized, slaves, homosexuals, Jews, and the insane,
have been considered as less than fully human.
In contrast, the fully human has been historically
defined in terms of possession of one’s self through
the possession of reason, property, territory,
autonomy and the capacity for self-representation
through language.
Over the course of the term, we will examine
90
how those who have been defined as less than fully
human challenge oppositions through which the
idea of the self-possessed, autonomous human
has been defined – oppositions of mind and body,
reason and madness, thought and emotion, masculine and feminine, object and subject, religious and
secular, and thus also human and animal. Doing so
will allow us to rethink concepts such as “rights,”
“consent,” “self-representation,” “value,” “autonomy,” “transparency,” “equality,” “freedom,” and
“community.” What might it mean to rethink political
claims made in the name of “humanity” in terms of
notions of dispossession and being possessed (by
language, madness, desire, divine forces or other
forms of difference) ? What might it mean to think
about relating to others and the self through difference rather than sameness? What might it mean for
our understandings of the relation between art and
politics if we think about politics as based on translation rather than on self-representation and inclusion? Drawing on psychoanalysis, anthropology,
postcolonial studies, political economy, literature,
religion and feminist theory, this course considers
states such as hysteria, melancholia, speaking in
tongues, and ecstasy, as well as states of slavery,
colonialism, and poverty to consider the political,
social and environmental implications of how we define the human. Students will be evaluated based on
attendance, in-class participation, weekly reading
responses, and two short analytical essays. This is
an intermediate level course. Prior work in at least
one human studies or related arts course is strongly
recommended. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites:
Prior coursework in Human Studies or related Arts
courses is strongly recommended. Limit: 15. Lab
fee: $10.
HS 3068: Linguistics, Language & Culture:
Human Ecological Approach
Faculty: Cox, Gray
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course explores the basic questions concerning
the origins, nature, history, functions and philosophical significances of human languages. Comparisons to other species and to machine languages
will also be examined. Readings will include classics texts by Chomsky and others as well selected
materials from diverse disciplines such as linguistic
anthropology, psychology, ethology, aesthetics,
history of languages, and philosophy. Class sessions
will include a mix of discussion, lecture, and visiting
speakers. Each student will undertake a term-long
project examining some topic of interest and examine it from the point of view of the different disciplines and theories covered in the course. Project
topics might include, for example: the development
of identity, the articulation of gender, forms of representation, the expression of emotion, concepts of
rationality, relations between meaning and truth,
and communication in an age of artificial intelligences. The goals of the course are: 1) to familiarize
students with the range of phenomena associated
with language and the principal questions they raise
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
and the theories used to interpret them and 2) to
develop skills in researching interdisciplinary questions. Assignments will include two problem sets, a
series of weekly homework exercises, and the term
project which must be presented both orally and in
a major paper due at the end of the term. Evaluation
will be based on the extent to which in-class participation and work on the assignments demonstrates
substantive progress on the two goals of the course.
There are no specific prerequisites, but students
will be expected to be able to contribute insights,
information and questions from previous work in
relevant disciplines and/or studies of languages,
undertake challenging readings, and pursue a major
independent project. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 20.
Lab fee: $20.
HS 3069: Genocide, Resistance, Response and
Reconciliation
Faculty: Wessler, Steve
Students will learn what causes (and what allows)
genocide and ethnic cleansing; why people join
resistance groups; why other countries intervene
or fail to intervene to stop genocide; and whether
post genocide reconciliation is effective. The course
will focus on 5 experiences with genocide or ethnic
cleansing from different parts of the globe: for example, toward American Indians in the US, Chinese
in Nanking, Jews, Roma and other during the Holocaust, Muslims in Bosnia & Herzegovina and Tutsi in
Rwanda. Students will be evaluated based on short
written responses to readings, in class discussion,
two papers and a final project. The final project will
explore the topics in the course through fiction, poetry, art, film, advocacy, interviews or other forms
of expression. The course readings will be a mix of
scholarly writing about genocide, first person accounts and some fiction. We will also watch and discuss videos. Class sessions will involve discussions
led by me and at times by students, small groups
discussions between students and occasional guest
presenters. The focus on both resistance and reconciliation are important in their own right but also
will provide the students and me with the opportunity to temper the highly disturbing material on
genocide by focusing on the remarkable courage of
individuals both during and after genocide has run
its course. The class will travel to Portland to meet
with refugees who came to the US from countries
that experienced ethnic violence. Level: Intermediate. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $20.
HS 3070: Native American Law
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
From first contact through the confrontation surrounding the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and the
Dakota Access Pipeline, Native American law has
tried to reconcile two incommensurate legal systems and widely varying government policies. This
course examines the evolution of federal Native
American or “Indian” Law from colonization onward
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
as impacted by treaties, executive orders, congressional enactments, and major US Supreme Court
cases interpreting the US Constitution and statutes
as they involve Native American legal issues. This is
not a class about tribal law or the indigenous legal
systems that exist among the various tribes in the
US. Rather, it examines the legal system imposed on
tribes from the outside; a system that has evolved
over time and creates the legal framework which
tribes operate under today. Students will gain an
understanding of law as a policy tool and framework, and acquire the necessary skills to work on
policy issues affecting native peoples. We will focus
on primary legal material as well as secondary
interpretations of that material. There will be some
comparative law analysis from other countries and
an examination of how the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples relates to
US practices. Students will complete several analytical problem sets that require an application of
course concepts to fact scenarios as well as a major
paper on a legal topic of their choosing. A class visit
to a Maine reservation will allow conversation with
tribal leaders involved with current environmental
and Native American issues in Maine. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: None beyond proficiency
in college-level reading, writing, critical thinking, and
research skills; however, Indigenous America is
strongly recommended. Limit: 20. Lab fee: $20.
HS 3072: Macroeconomics: Theory and
Experience
Faculty: Taylor, Davis
Meets the following requirements: HS QR
This course seeks to give students knowledge of
macroeconomic theories, models, and outcomes.
Emphasis will be evenly placed on both formal
modeling and intuitive approaches to understanding economic phenomena. An understanding of the
relatively formal, abstract macroeconomic models of
neoclassical economics will be used to provide
a framework for discussion about contemporary
macroeconomic phenomena and policy responses.
Topics will include unemployment and inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, consumption and savings,
monetary theory and banking systems, balance
of payments and international macroeconomics,
exchange rate determination, financial crises and
bubbles, along with topics of student interest. Evaluation will be based on problem sets, a final exam,
and classroom participation. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisites: one term of college economics, or
instructor permission. Limit: 15.
HS 3073: Bees and Society
Faculty: Collum, Kourtney
Meets the following requirements: HS
In the last decade the plight of wild and domesticated bees has pervaded the media and public
discourse, yet bees remain largely misunderstood
in our society. This course examines the interconnected relationship between humans and bees and
99
asks what bees can teach us about ourselves and
our food systems. Through readings, fieldtrips, and
guest lectures, students will examine the social,
economic, and political dimensions of human-bee
interactions, investigating topics such as: historical and contemporary beekeeping practices; the
political economy of honey; the role of pollination
in agriculture and agroecosystems; domestication
and human-animal relationships; biodiversity loss
in agricultural systems; pollinator conservation and
policy; and cooperation and decision-making in
human and bee societies. A truly human-ecological
course, Bees & Society integrates the humanities,
natural sciences, and social sciences to examine the
applied problem of protecting pollinators in a time
of abrupt environmental change. Students will be
evaluated based on: (1) participation in class discussions, fieldwork, and field trips; (2) a series of short
reflection papers; and (3) a final class project. For
their final project, students will develop two native
bee conservation workshops—one for elementary
school students and one for farmers and gardeners—and host the workshops at COA’s farms. Level:
Intermediate. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $60.
HS 3074: Mapping the Ocean’s Stories
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course will examine how members of Maine’s
remote coastal and islands communities live in relationship to the ocean. Their connection to the nearby and distant waters is defined by everyday uses
such as fishing, lobstering, and wrinkle harvesting
as well as deeper historical relationships rooted in
many generations of people doing everything from
sailing schooners around the world to harvesting
shellfish in the same cove over centuries. This class
will teach students how to use multi-disciplinary
research methodologies to document, map, and
analyze both contemporary and historical uses of
the ocean. Using coastal and island communities as
sites for collaborative community-based research
the class will contribute to wider discussions about a
process known as Ocean Planning that seeks to create processes to plan how communities, stakeholders, industry and the government build a long term
vision of how the spaces of the Gulf of Maine might
be used. Students will work in teams to produce a
geo-referenced story about a particular place in the
ocean off the coast of Maine that has meaning and
an emotional connection to a community told in an
interesting and compelling way. This information
will help give island communities a stronger voice
in ocean policy and in decision making processes
for siting large scale projects in the nearby ocean
environment. The class will draw on methodologies developed around North America to document
the everyday uses and interactions people have
with the local environment using oral historical and
biographical mapping to provide a sort of snapshot
of current uses as well as soliciting histories of
92
how those patterns have changed over time. The
class will include a substantial fieldwork and field
trip component that will require additional times
outside of the class schedule. Students will be evaluated on class participation, active engagement in
field research settings, short assignments as well as
a final project. The class is appropriate for students
with a range of backgrounds, however, experience
with historical or community-based research or
GIS mapping would be helpful. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisites: Preference will be given to students
who have previous community-based research
experience or other academic background directly
relevant to the course. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $150.
HS 3075: Tutorial: Writing Feasibility Reports
and Proposals
Faculty: Kozak, Anne
Meets the following requirements: W
This tutorial has two goals: exploring strategies for
writing effective feasibility studies and using that
information to develop compelling proposals. In
addition to using technical writing texts and reading
a range of feasibility studies and proposals, students will research their project idea—research that
includes interviewing as well as library and online
research. Using the information in the feasibility
study they write, students research funding sources
and criteria of the funding organization to develop
a proposal. Students are evaluated on the overall effectiveness of both the feasibility study and
proposal—effectiveness that reflects the quality of
the research, understanding of audience, and ability
to use writing as process in crafting the feasibility
study and proposal. Since it is impossible to write a
proposal in a vacuum, students must come to the
tutorial with a specific project. Level: Intermediate.
Prerequisites: Previous writing course and a viable
proposal project, and permission of instructor.
Limit: 6.
HS 3076: US Farm and Food Policy
Faculty: Collum, Kourtney
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course offers a broad introduction to food and
farm policy in the United States. Food and farm policy encompasses laws, regulations, norms, decisions,
and actions by governments and other institutions
that influence food production, distribution, access,
consumption, and recovery. This course will focus
specifically on two key policy tools: the US Farm Bill
and US Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
The course will begin with an overview of the
evolution of food and farming technology in the
United States. Students will then be introduced to
the concepts, institutions, and stakeholders that
influence farm and food policy, and the will examine
examples of some of the most salient contemporary
issues. Topics covered will include: food production
and the environment; farm-based biodiversity con-
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
servation; international food and agricultural trade;
food processing, manufacturing, and retail industries; food safety; dietary and nutrition guidelines;
food labeling and advertising; food and biotechnology; food waste and recovery; food advocacy and
activism; and food insecurity and the Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Through
case studies and exercises students will examine
the policymaking process at the local, state, and
federal level and learn to evaluate various policy options. Finally, the course will compare and contrast
international perspectives on farm and food policies
and programs. Students will be evaluated based on:
participation in class discussions; a series of op-ed
essays; in-class briefs and debates; and a policy recommendation report on the upcoming US Farm Bill.
Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Must have taken
at least one course in food systems, economics, or
global politics. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $30.
HS 3077: Rethinking Mental Disorders
Faculty: Gallon, Robert
This course presents an alternative view of mental
disorders as an attempt to describe types of human
dysfunction rather than as medical diseases. We will
look at mental disorders as falling on dimensions
described as Dimensions of Dysfunction. We will
also develop an ‘ecological’ perspective on mental
disorders called the biopsychosocial model. Our discussions will be based on Gallon’s Nine Dimensions
of Madness: Redefining Mental Health. Students will
be evaluated on 1) demonstrating their timely reading and understanding of required reading from the
text; 2) researching and preparing a class discussion on additional issues on one of the nine dimensions and; 3) writing a 5 page paper showing how
you think your discussion topic does or does not fit
Gallon’s model of mental disorders. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Some social science course
background is desirable. Limit: 15.
HS 4010: Seminar in Human Ecology
Faculty: Borden, Richard
Meets the following requirements: HS
This seminar traces the historical development of
human ecology. We begin by reviewing the seminal
works in human ecology, the contributions from
biology, and the development of human ecology
as a multidisciplinary concept. Along these lines
we compare the various brands of human ecology
that have developed through sociology (the Chicago
school), anthropology and cultural ecology, ecological psychology, and economics, as well as human
ecological themes in the humanities, architecture,
design, and planning. This background is then
used to compare the COA brand of Human Ecology
with other programs in this country and elsewhere
around the world. Our final purpose is to look at
new ideas coming from philosophy, the humanities,
biological ecology, and other areas for future possibilities for human ecology. Evaluations are based on
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
presentations and papers. Advanced. Open only to
third and fourth level students. Offered every other
year. Limit limited to 15.
HS 4012: Contemporary Women’s Novels
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course selects from among the most interesting, diverse and well-written of contemporary
women’s fiction to focus on questions of women’s
writing (and how/whether it can be treated as a
literary and formal category), gender identity and
women’s issues, and the tension between sameness and difference among women’s experiences,
and narrations of women’s experience, around the
world. The course begins by examining two relatively unknown yet rather extraordinary novels from
earlier in the twentieth century: Alexandra Kollantai’s Love of Worker Bees (1927) and Sawako Ariyoshi’s The Doctor’s Wife (1967). After these, we read
from truly contemporary authors and quite varied
authors published within the last twenty years, like
Buchi Emecheta, Gloria Naylor, Ursula Hegi, Nawal
El Saadawi, Sue Grafton, Graciela Limon, Tsitsi
Dargarembga, Barara Yoshimoto, Dorothy Allison,
Rose Tremain, Julia Alvarez, Leslie Feinberg, April
Sinclair, and Achy Obejas. Students each choose an
additional author to study and read a novel outside
of class. An extensive list of authors is included in
the syllabus. Evaluation be based on class participation, either two short papers or one long paper on
works discussed in class, a presentation to the class
of the outside novel, and a final evaluation essay.
Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisite: a previous literature course and signature of the instructor.
Offered every other year.
HS 4013: Starting Your Novel
Faculty: Carpenter, William
Meets the following requirements: HS
This is an intermediate to advanced creative writing
class for those interested in an intensive approach
to writing longer fiction. It would also be useful
to the novel reader as a insider’s approach to the
structure and purpose of fiction, the relation of
author to character, and issues of intentionality. We
will be reading first chapters from current novels
and studying their opening strategies, then each
student will develop plot, character, style and setting ideas for a first novel, followed by writing and
revising fifty or sixty pages of their projected work.
Other concerns will be narrative viewpoint, handling
of time, levels of realism, dialogue techniques, writing habits, motivation & self-discipline, and the relation of fiction to personal experience. Background in
creative writing or narrative theory would be helpful
but not essential. Evaluation will be based on class
participation, strength of the concept, and the quality of the student’s writtern work. Level: Intermediate/Advanced Limit 10.
93
HS 4014: Contemporary Psychology: Body, Mind
and Soul
Faculty: Borden, Richard
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course explores current theories, research
and ideas in psychology. The core themes of ‘body’,
‘mind’ and ‘soul’ all have a long history of psychological inquiry associated with them. Yet they are every
bit as vital and important today. Some of the most
influential authors in the field continue to struggle
with these classical philosophical questions —- and
with ways to incorporate state-of-the-art research
on them. In this class, we will read and discuss at
least one major new book on each theme. Ideas
from these perspectives will be compared, contrasted and critiqued. In the final portion of the class, we
will look especially at ways in which all three themes
can be integrated—not only in academic psychology—but within our own experience. Evaluations
will be based on careful reading of all materials,
class participation, a series of short papers, and an
end-of-term presentation and final paper in each
student’s area of personal interest. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisite: Some background in
psychology. Lab fee: $25. Limit 15.
HS 4015: Creative Writing
Faculty: Carpenter, William
Meets the following requirements: HS
This class concentrates on the theory and practice
of poetry and short fiction, though there will also be
a place for “Starting Your Novel” students to finish
up. Our goal is to develop the skills of verbal craftsmanship and self-criticism. Class meetings combine
the analysis and critique of individual students’
writing with the discussions of published works by
other writers. We also frequently discuss matters of
standards, the creative process, and the situation
of the writer in the contemporary world. Students
are expected to submit one piece each week, to participate in class response to fellow writers, to make
revisions on all work, and to contribute their best
pieces to the printed class anthology at the end of
the term. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Limit: 12.
HS 4016: Ecology and Experience
Faculty: Borden, Richard
Meets the following requirements: HS
Ecology is sometimes considered a “subversive”
subject: the more humans learn about the living
world, the more we are challenged to re-examine
many of our fundamental beliefs. According to this
perspective, ecology provides a complex mirror
for humans. In its reflection we glimpse a different
understanding of our place in the world. Age-old
concerns return to consciousness: questions about
insight and responsibility, the relation of spirit and
matter, issues of meaning, purpose, and identity. In
short, the science of ecology has given birth to an
entirely new approach to psychology. The purpose
94
of this course is to examine a cross-section of new
ideas along this interface. Some ideas will draw on
clues from deep in our evolutionary past. Other
questions will explore what we know from ecology
about living more fully in the present—or ways that
ecology can enrich our imagination of the future.
Readings for this class will be drawn from primary
sources in a variety of fields with a pivotal focus on
the relationships of mind and nature. The course
will be taught in an interactive, seminar style with
participants sharing summaries of the readings—individually and in teams. Two short papers and one
end-of-term longer paper are required. Preference
will be given to students with background or strong
interests in psychology and/or ecology. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $25.
HS 4018: Histories of Power: States & Subalterns
in Modern Latin America
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS
This colloquium-style course will provide an intensive examination of the modern political history
of Latin America with a particular emphasis on
the specific mechanisms of power used by state
actors, local communities, and individuals. The
course seeks to provide students with appropriate
theoretical tools as well as concrete historical cases
from which to examine power dynamics in contemporary Mexico, Central America, and the Andes.
The course also highlights a concrete set of cases
through which students can examine the history
of political upheaval, revolution, and contestation
that has defined the region since independence.
The chronological scope of the class will be from the
early nineteenth century up to the late twentieth
century. Students will be asked to take theoretical works about state formation, nationalism and
power and examine how such questions could be
turned into research projects. Students will write a
series of analytical essays on the course readings to
problematize each author’s treatment of power and
the state. A final project on one author’s theoretical
and empirical contribution to the field will serve as a
capstone. The course will focus on discussion of the
texts, and students will be evaluated on their discussion skills, reading notes, and written work. This
course is intended for students with prior coursework on Latin American history (e.g. From Native
Empires to Nation States, Articulated Identities, and
Seminar in Guatemalan History and Culture), and
courses in social theory would also be helpful. Level:
Intermediate/Advanced. Limit: 15.
HS 4019: Technical Writing
Faculty: Kozak, Anne
Meets the following requirements: W
This intermediate-to-advanced level course, which is
interdisciplinary, teaches students not only to write
clear, precise, and unambiguous memos, reports,
executive sumaries, and National Environmental
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Policy Act (NEPA) documents, but also to write
collaboratively for an actual client. The practiceoriented approach gives students the opportunity
to acquire skills they will need as professionals
and to learn to communicate data effectively and
concisely to specific audiences. Offered every other
year. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisits:
An introductory writing course and signature of
instructor. Limit: 15. Lab fee: $25.
HS 4020: Environmentality: Power, Knowledge,
and Ecology
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
Meets the following requirements: HS
Bringing critical theory directly to the gates of human ecology, this class will approach the central
issue of how discourses of government, biopower,
and geopower have intertwined and infused themselves within the representations of “environments”
in popular debate. With a specific nod to Foucault,
Marx, Baudrillard, Luke, and other critical social
theorists, we will tackle the various complexities
that arise when “ecology” become a site for political
and economic expertization.
Topics to be covered include the formation of
knowledge/power/discourse, systems of environmentality, the rise of hyperecology, the valorization
of ecodisciplinarians, and, as Timothy Luke puts it:
“how discourses of nature, ecology or the environment, as disciplinary articulations of ecoknowledge,
can be mobilized by professional-technical experts
in contemporary polyarchies to generate geopower
over nature for the megatechnical governance of
modern economies and societies.” The class will also
address the question of “moving forward”, and how
these critiques can open productive spaces for new
ways of representing modernity and ecology. The
class will be highly interactive; discussion will be the
primary mode instruction, and students will have
considerable influence on the exact topics covered.
Final evaluation will based on a combination of class
participation, a series of analytical response papers,
and two long form essays. While the class is open to
all students, those with some background in critical
theory, philosophy, or economic theory are encouraged to attend. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Limit:
10.
HS 4021: Collaborative Leadership
Faculty: Beard, Ron
Meets the following requirements: HS
Leadership skills that help people come together to
solve problems and take advantage of opportunities
are essential in a complex world. This course will
provide a context for collaborative (or facilitative)
leadership, drawing examples from community settings, non-profit organizations and for-profit businesses. Collaborative leadership leads to productive
and supportive relationships, jointly developed
goals and structure and shared responsibility for
achievement. We will study useful strategies and
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
techniques for involving stakeholders, building
consensus, laying out a problem-solving process,
facilitation of that process and drawing in the full
experience, knowledge and wisdom of participants.
Students will write a final paper (or participate in a
group project) to integrate results from interviews
and opportunities to shadow local leaders, class
discussions with guests and the instructor, and
material from assigned readings. This course is
designed to include both COA students and community members. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Lab
fee: $20.
HS 4022: Launching a New Venture
Faculty: Friedlander, Jay
This course will cover the process of new venture
creation for students interested in creating businesses or non-profits with substantial social and
environmental benefit. It is designed for student
teams who have an idea and want to go through
the formal process of examining and launching the
enterprise. Topics covered in this course will include:
opportunity recognition, market research, creating
a business plan, producing financial projections and
venture financing. As part of the course, all students
will submit their ideas to the Social Innovation Competition. In addition, students will make a formal
business plan presentation. Level: Intermediate/
Advanced. Limit: 15
HS 4026: Environmental Law and Policy
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
his course provides an overview of environmental
law and the role of law in shaping environmental
policy. We examine, as background, the nature
and scope of environmental, energy, and resource
problems and evaluate the various legal mechanisms available to address those problems. The
course attempts to have students critically analyze
the role of law in setting and implementing environmental policy. We explore traditional common
law remedies, procedural statutes such as the
National Environmental Policy Act, intricate regulatory schemes, and market-based strategies that
have been adopted to control pollution and protect
natural resources. Students are exposed to a wide
range of environmental law problems in order to appreciate both the advantages and limitations of law
in this context. Special attention is given to policy
debates currently underway and the use of the legal
process to foster the development of a sustainable
society in the United States. Students are required
to complete four problem sets in which they apply
legal principles to a given fact scenario. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Introduction to
the Legal Process or Philosophy of the Constitution
strongly recommended. Offered at least every other
year. Limit: 20. Lab fee $10.
95
HS 4028: Cross-Cultural American Women’s
Novels
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: HS
This is an intermediate/advanced course in which
students will explore in depth the connections
between and among modern and cross-cultural
women’s novels, primarily those written in the now
very multi-cultural United States. We will strive to
make connections between texts so as to better understand the nature of and any patterns or themes
that shape women’s and cross-cultural fictional narration. Historical perspective, cultural differences,
and gender roles will all be taken into consideration
as we analyze relatively recent women’s fiction by
such authors such as Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong
Kingston, Gloria Naylor, Linda Hogan, Julie Shikeguni, Jamaica Kincaid, Nora Okja Keller, Cristina
Garcia, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Sigrid Nunez. Participants will read carefully, prepare and ask questions
of each other, write frequent response papers, and
carry out a sustained independent project to be
presented to the group. The outside project will
focus on one or more additional texts that may
be fictional, theoretical, cultural, or historic. The
group presentation will put outside texts into broad
cultural and historical perspectives and/or discuss
them in terms of trends in women’s literature, immigrant literature, women’s literature of the United
States, multicultural narratives, or some other
course theme. Selection of the outside text will give
participants the opportunity to fill in perceived gaps
in their reading or explore a particular narrative
or cultural form in depth. The reading load for this
course is relatively heavy. Evaluation will focus on
preparation, participation, insight, critical thinking,
response papers, and the outside project—both its
oral presentation and development in an appropriate form (visual, narrative, analytic, curricular,
etc.). Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites:
a previous literature course and permission of the
instructor; Contemporary Women’s Novels experience recommended. Limit: 15.
HS 4034: World Literature
Faculty: Turok, Katharine
Meets the following requirements: HS WFO
Using seminal works by Machado de Assis, Luís de
Azevedo, and Rabindranath Tagore as a starting
point, this course will present non-English twentieth- and twenty-first-century world literature in
the context of its relation to cultural, political, and
personal identity. One of the main objectives of the
course is to provide students with the critical tools
necessary for an informed reading and analysis of
texts, especially in light of questions of identity formation, an imagined or remembered sense of home
and displacement or exile, and cultural conflict in
today’s world. Acknowledging and becoming familiar with elements such as genre, period, style, and
theme are also goals of the course.
Fiction and nonfiction in translation, with some
96
attention to bilingual and parallel texts, will include
short and full-length prose works by writers such
as Lu Xun, Naguib Mahfouz, Tadeusz Borowski, Mahasweta Devi, Lydia Chukovskaya, Ingeborg Bachmann, Emile Habibi, Reza Baraheni, Gabriel García
Márquez, Nawal el Saadawi, Aimé Césaire, Carlos
Fuentes, Christa Wolf, Jaime Manrique, René Alomá,
Carme Riera, Alifa Rifaat, Octavio Paz, Abé Kobo,
Jack Agüeros, Empar Moliner, Ben-Zion Tomer, Francisco Goldman, Arundhati Roy, Shulamith Hareven,
Haruki Murakami, Roya Hakakian, Edwidge Danticat,
Pola Oloixarac, Abelardo “Lalo” Delgado, and Susana
Chávez-Silverman. Evaluations will be based on
discussion, three short papers, and one interpretive
essay. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Limit: 15.
HS 4036: Native American Literature with a
Focus on New Mexico
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course is part of a three-course sequence
entitled “The Unexpected Journey: Art, Literature,
and History on the Road in Nuevo Mexico.” Several
Native American tribes reside in the area of New
Mexico we will be visiting for two weeks; many Native writers have written about this landscape; and
as the written literature has emerged in a hostile
environment, it will be fruitful for students to have
a living example of this environment and to experience the land and multiple cultures of this region
firsthand. To that end, we will also read literary
representations of Native American lives and culture written by non-Native Americans. The course
has been designed so as to prepare us to enter the
landscape, reflect on it, and read and discuss short
works—while placing them in a larger history of
the continent and its peoples—while we are away.
Each student will write six response papers, keep
a journal, research and present an historical issue
or event to the class, and write a proposal with bibliography for their final course project. Evaluation
will be based on all these components of the course
plus class participation as another form of evidence
of close and careful reading and engagement in
learning to navigate different worldviews and literary conventions.
All three courses must be taken concurrently:
Native American Literature: A Case Study of the Development of Literary Traditions with a New Mexico
Focus (Waldron), Art and Culture in Northern New
Mexico (Clinger), Processing the Unexpected Journey: Aesthetics, Experience, and the Creation of
an Interdisciplinary Project (Clinger and Waldron).
Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Limit: 8
HS 4037: Processing the Unexpected Journey
Faculty: Waldron, Karen; Clinger, Catherine
Meets the following requirements: HS
The third course in a three-course sequence entitled
“The Unexpected Journey: Art, Literature, and His-
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
tory on the Road in Nuevo Mexico” will provide students concentrated time and attention on classic,
contemporary, and innovative texts of aesthetic and
place philosophy as well as sustained time devoted
to artistic, literary, and/or historical production. This
course will include program and project orientation
(Spring and early Fall 2013, as well as some summer reading), field trip debriefings while we are on
the road in New Mexico, and a sustained period
of study (in the literature of aesthetics), planning,
and production of a substantial project centering
on the literary and/or visual narrative or series of
narratives they have chosen. Components of the
course include: providing of faculty-assisted time to
prepare for, reflect on, and process what students
have seen and experienced; the reading of a variety
of texts on both the aesthetics and philosophies of
place; workshop time to conceptualize and develop
a design for the final project; frequent consultations
with the teaching faculty on the project’s development; supported studio and/or research time to
bring the project to completion; and checkpoints for
collaboration and critique. To the extent possible,
students will share their projects with the COA community at the completion of the term. Evaluation
will be based on all these components of the course
including class participation and the final project.
All three courses must be taken concurrently:
Native American Literature: A Case Study of the Development of Literary Traditions with a New Mexico
Focus (Waldron), Art and Culture in Northern New
Mexico (Clinger), Processing the Unexpected Journey: Aesthetics, Experience, and the Creation of
an Interdisciplinary Project (Clinger and Waldron).
Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Limit: 8. Lab fee: $1,000.
HS 4042: Reading the West
Faculty: Anderson, John; Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
The spectacular range of habitats between the
Pacific Ocean and the Great Basin and Sonoran
Deserts has generated some of the most significant
“place based” writing within American literature. In
this intensive field-based course students will be required to read a range of materials dealing with key
places. people, and events in the western landscape
during the summer prior to the formal start of the
course. The class will then convene in California and
begin a trek eastwards into the Great Basin Desert,
south to the Carson/Iceberg Wilderness, Yosemite,
the Hetch Hetchy Valley and Mono Lake, and then
finally southeastward across the Sonoran desert to
Albuquerque, New Mexico, where students and faculty will participate in a conference celebrating the
first 50 years of the Wilderness Act. Readings will include work by Muir, Didion, Steinbeck, and Fremont.
Evaluation will consist of class participation, a series
of essays and journal essays, and a final term paper
that will be completed following the end of the field
portion of the course. This course will be integrated
with and requires co-enrollment in Ecology and
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Natural History of the American West, and Wilderness in the West. Level: Intermediate/Advanced.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; camping/
backpacking ability. Limit: 9. Lab fee: $1,500.
HS 4043: Wilderness in the West: Promise and
Problems
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
Wilderness has been the clarion call for generations
of environmentalists. In a letter in support of the
Wilderness Act, writer Wallace Stegner characterized the importance of wilderness as an essential
“part of the geography of hope.” That single phrase
and the current controversy surrounding the concept of wilderness provide the central focus of our
explorations of wilderness in western lands. This
course examines the question of wilderness from
multiple perspectives in the hopes of providing an
understanding of both the concept and real spaces
that constitute wilderness. Through conversations
with wilderness managers, field work, and experience in federally designated wilderness areas in National Parks, National Forests, Wildlife Refuges and
on BLM lands, the course will also examine what
“wilderness management” means on the ground in
the varied landscapes of the western United States.
In this context, we look at historical and contemporary acco unts of the value of wilderness, ecological
and cultural arguments for wilderness, and the legal
and policy difficulties of “protecting” wilderness.
Considerable time is spent evaluating current criticisms of the wilderness idea and practice. The class
will culminate at a week-long national conference
celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness
Act. The 50th Anniversary National Wilderness
Conference provides an incomparable opportunity
for students to hear from and interact with federal
management agencies, academics, recreation experts, and environmental advocacy organizations.
Presenting their final course work at this conference
will also give students an opportunity to share their
ideas and to receive valuable feedback from this
sophisticated and well-informed audience of wilderness experts. Classwork emphasizes hands-on
service-learning projects as well as reading, writing,
and theoretical discussions. Students will be evaluated on journal entrie s, contributions to the class
discussions, response rapers, engagement in field
activities, questions in the field, and contributions
to group work. This course will be integrated with
and requires co-enrollment in Reading the West
and Ecology and Natural History of the West. Level:
Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Ecology,
Our Public Lands, and permission of instructor and
concurrent enrollment. Limit: 9.
HS 4046: Lincoln Before the Presidency
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
Perhaps one of the most widely evoked figures
in modern history, Abraham Lincoln is frequently
97
written about, quoted, and held up as an iconic
example in contemporary public debate. Yet most
people know little about Lincoln beyond a summary
biographical sketch and a short speech or two. This
is especially true as it relates to Lincoln’s political life
before the presidency despite the fact that these
early years that offer us a wealth of moments which
speak not only to the issues of the period, but also
to broader questions of political action, compromise, and idealism.
This class is an intensive exploration into Lincoln’s political career prior to his election to the
presidency in 1860. Students will explore Lincoln’s
activities as they relate to the debate over slavery,
the death of the Whig party, and the ascendancy of
the newly formed Republican Party. Class reading
and discussion will be driven by a threefold examination of broad historical contexts, biographical materials, and public speech texts. Students will spend
an extended period of time on the analysis of the
1858 Senate debates between Lincoln and Stephen
Douglas. While the class will focus intensely on the
political events of the 1850’s, the class will simultaneously track broader questions of political action
in the context of a democratic society. As a result,
students will have the opportunity both to acquire a
richer understanding the historical moment that led
to Lincoln’s rise to power, as well as an opportunity
to reflect on the larger issue of putting “truth” into
political practice.
This course is intended for students with an
interest in American history, political action, and
public debate. Familiarity with these issues is not
a prerequisite for the class. The class will be held
in a seminar style environment and will be driven
primarily by in-class discussion. There will be an
intensive reading load as well as an intensive writing component to the class. Final evaluation will be
based on a number of writing assignments, participation in class discussion, and an individual class
presentation. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Limit:
15.
HS 4048: Politics of World Trade
Faculty: Stabinsky, Doreen
Meets the following requirements: HS
Trade has always been an essentially political
endeavor, but it seems even more so in the last few
decades. Transatlantic trade wars and huge civil
society protests around the world have catapulted
the global trading system into the public eye and
popular discourse. What is this trading system and
how exactly do international trading agreements
come to have such influence over domestic policymaking?
In this course students will study key components of the global trading regime. We start with
the central institution of international trade, the
World Trade Organization, and the agreements that
established the institution. We will study several of
the WTO agreements that have been central to con-
98
troversy and conflict within the body, including the
Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs)
Agreement, the Agreement on Agriculture (AoA),
and the General Agreement on Trade in Services
(GATS). We will study the nexus between trade and
environment as it plays out through jurisprudence
on specific complaints brought to the trade body,
including the Shrimp-Turtle, Tuna-Dolphin, and Beef
Hormone disputes. We will also study some of the
most significant regional trade agreements, such
as the North American Free Trade Agreement, and
examine a few of the growing number of bilateral
agreements.
This is an intermediate-advanced level course for
students with some familiarity with international
treaties and treaty making. Evaluation will be based
on class participation, several class presentations,
and a final project. Level: Intermediate/Advanced.
Prerequisite: Signature of instructor. Course fee:
none. Limit: 15.
HS 4052: Economic Development: Theory and
Case Studies
Faculty: Taylor, Davis
Meets the following requirements: HS QR
Economic growth in the developing world has
lifted millions out of poverty at the same time that
misguided attempts at widespread application
of generic economic development theories has
impoverished millions. As a result of this tragedy,
new approaches and methodologies to economic
development are emerging, and represent some
of the most important, dynamic, and controversial
theories in all of economics. This course examines
these new perspectives on economic development.
We will briefly contextualize the new by reviewing “old” economic development, then move on to
theories that emphasize very place-based, countryspecific approaches to how economies develop; this
will involve examining the specific roles of capital
accumulation, capital flows (including foreign exchange, portfolio capital, foreign direct investment,
and microfinance), human capital, governance, institutions (especially property rights, legal systems,
and corruption), geography and natural resource
endowments, industrial policy (e.g. free trade
versus dirigiste policies), and spillovers, clustering,
and entrepreneurship. The course will involve a
rigorous mix of economic modeling, careful application of empirical data (including both historical
analysis and cross-sectional studies; students with
no exposure to econometrics will receive a brief
introduction) and country studies. Evaluation will
be based on classroom participation, responses to
reading questions, short essays, and a final project
consisting of an economic development country
study of the student’s choice that demonstrates
application of theoretical concepts to the real world.
Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: One
economics course. Limit: 15.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 4053: Economics of Cooperation, Networks
& Trust
Faculty: Taylor, Davis
Meets the following requirements: HS
Economics is slowly expanding from equilibriumbased, atomistic optimization, through dyadic strategic interaction, to the consideration of networks
and complexity. At the same time, it is beginning
to incorporate more complex human motivations
beyond simple optimization as means of explaining economic outcomes. This course captures
these trends by the study of the economics of
cooperation, networks, and trust. We will focus on
four major ways of understanding cooperation:
individual optimization, strategic optimization,
institutions, and embedded social relationships
(networks), and we will apply cooperation to the
contexts of commonly held resources (such as
fisheries and climate), networks and strategic alliances, and formal economic organizations (cooperatives). After an introduction to the relevant issues
and an examination of the standard neoclassical
approach of optimization (with cooperation as part
of the choice set), we will enrich our understanding
of group cooperation through the examination of
social capital, tacit knowledge, and common pool resources. We will then have a brief exposure to game
theoretic approaches to conceptualizing strategic
behavior, along with graph theory as a means of
conceptualizing networks. With these tools in hand,
we will examine the role of networks in economic
contexts such as the networks of Emilia Romagna,
the Mondragón complex, and worker-owned businesses in the United States and Canada. This course
will be of interest to students interested in business
and organizational management, natural resource
management, sociology, community development, globalization, social movements, economic
democracy, and a host of other topics. Evaluation
will be based on participation in classroom discussions, several major assignments, and responses
to reading questions. We will collaboratively decide
on a final project; possibilities poster presentations,
a community presentation, or a jointly produced
research or policy paper. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: One course in college or IB
economics. Limit: 20. Lab fee: $30.
HS 4054: Philosophies of Love
Faculty: Cox, Gray
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course investigates the intellectual history of
concepts of love that provide origins for notions of it
central in our time. Is love the key to giving meaning
to our individual lives? Is it a transformative power
that can empower and heal us and our societies?
How are the many different concepts of it related?
To what extent are these concepts grounded in
biological, historical, philosophical or spiritual
truths—or mere reflections of collective myths, self
delusions or manipulative deceptions? How can we
as individuals most fully realize ourselves? How can
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
our society best promote flourishing lives and how
can this be brought about? The theme of love winds
like an Ariadnean thread through the labyrinth of
the history of ideas about the nature of self, Other,
community, knowledge, reality and ethics. The class
uses overview materials from intellectual historians
like de Rougemont, Singer and May. It picks away
through central passages in that labyrinth by reading key selections from Plato, New Testament writers, Medieval poets, Nietzsche, de Beauvoir, Irigary,
Gandhi, King, Levinas, Thich Nhat Hanh, MortimerSandilands, pop culture and others. Class format
relies on seminar discussion with occasional short
lectures. Goals of the course are to advance students’ abilities to critically analyze texts in context in
intellectual history, and to advance understanding
of nuanced ways key ideas in epistemology, metaphysics, ethics and social-change theories inform
and are informed by concepts including: eros,
philia, agape, courtly love (fin amour), love force/
satyagraha, romantic love, ahimsa, and compassion.
Students will be responsible for leading seminar
sessions. There will be one problem set, two short
papers and a term project presented in class as well
as developed in a final paper of 15-20 pages. Includes a lab session for viewing films and television
and discussing student work. Level: Intermediate/
Advanced. Prerequisites: At least one prior course in
intellectual history, philosophy or comparable class
in human studies. Limit: 15.
HS 4055: Topics in Philosophical Psychology:
Other Minds
Faculty: Visvader, John
Meets the following requirements: HS
How do we know the minds of other people? Is it
possible that we can only know our own minds
and that we really can’t tell whether others have
the same thoughts and experiences that we have?
What is the justification for belief in other minds?
Do animals have minds, can computers and robots
possess consciousness? These and other similar
issues will be examined with the help of philosophers like Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Derrida, Austin
and Levinas and a review of some of the latest work
by neurophysiologists investigating the brain and
mirror neurons. Intermediate to advanced. Seminar
style class, several essay papers will be required.
Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Limit: 15.
HS 4056: Histories of Race
Faculty: Little-Siebold, Todd
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
Race as a concept was constructed in the western
world in the early modern era as commentary on
and explanation of human differences. This class
will examine the origins of the idea of race and
the ways it is central to the creation of the modern world. Drawing on histories of Europe and the
Americas this class will look at the different ways racialized thinking was deployed in colonial contexts.
99
Central themes of the course will be the history of
race as an idea, the nature and impact of the Atlantic slave trade, how indigenous peoples reshaped
European ideas of what it meant to be human, the
construction of whiteness, and the history of slavery
in the new world. The period covered by the class
spans from the origins of race as an idea to the late
nineteenth century. The course will be a hybrid of
a lecture course and a readings seminar. Students
will read major works in the field and develop an
understanding of the historical background of contemporary forms of structural inequality justified
and reinforced by racialized thinking. Students will
do a series of short assignments, lead discussion
of books, and undertake a major research paper.
The research projects will allow students to explore
topics beyond the chronological and spatial scope of
the course. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Limit: 12.
Lab fee: $45.
HS 4057: Tutorial: Climate Policy Practicum
Faculty: Stabinsky, Doreen
TBA
HS 5010: Advanced Composition
Faculty: Kozak, Anne
Meets the following requirements: W
This course has two goals: 1) to aid the student in
developing and refining a style and 2) to make the
student cognizant of the interaction between style,
content, and audience. To achieve these goals,
students write several short papers or one or two
longer ones, meet regularly with the instructor to go
over these, edit and discuss the exercises in Style:
Ten Lessons in Clarity and Grace by Joseph Williams,
and participate in review sessions. Level: Advanced.
Prerequisites: Signature of instructor. Offered every
winter. Limit: 12.
HS 5012: Wildlife Law Seminar
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
In his seminal essay on the “Land Ethic,” Aldo
Leopold explores the incongruity between man’s
legal structures and the natural world around him.
This incongruity is particularly acute in the area
of wildlife conservation. This course examines the
legal, philosophical, scientific, economic, and political problems surrounding man’s relationship with
other species on this planet. The far reaching goals
and impacts of the Endangered Species Act are a
central focus of the course. Significant time is also
dedicated to legal issues concerning marine mammals, Native American’s wildlife concerns, migratory birds, animal rights, and agencies entrusted to
manage wildlife. The growing role of international
agreements to protect migratory and commercially
valuable species is also covered. Special attention is
given to debates currently underway over reauthorizing the Endangered Species Act and pending
biological diversity legislation. Students are engaged
100
in a term-long project that attempts to apply the
principles of the course to a pressing wildlife issue
in Maine. Evaluation is based on class participation
and contribution to the group project. Level: Advanced. Prerequisite: Environmental Law and Policy
or permission of the instructor. Offered every third
year. Limit: 10. Lab fee: $15.
HS 5013: Methods of Teaching Writing Across
the Curriculum
Faculty: Kozak, Anne
Meets the following requirements: W ED
This course not only gives students knowledge and
understanding of rhetorical theory and practice so
they can work effectively with developing writers,
but also provides them with a review of grammar,
methods of evaluating writing, and strategies for
teaching exposition, argument, and persuasion. Students put this knowledge to practical use by working as peer tutors in the Writing Center. Students
participate in this course for one academic year and
receive one credit. In addition to Williams’ Style:
Ten Lessons in Clarity and Grace and Irmscher’s
Teaching Expository Writing, students read numerous articles from College Composition and Communication, College English, The Writing Instructor,
Language Arts, and English Journal, and Research
in the Teaching of English as well as a text dealing
with teaching writing in their specialty, e.g. Writing
Themes about Literature or a Short Guide to Writing
about Biology. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of grammar and usage, excellent
writing skills, ability to work closely with people, and
signature of faculty member in writing or education.
Limit: 15.
HS 5015: Hydro Politics in a Thirsty World
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course will look at the complex issues surrounding the development, distribution, use and
control of fresh water around the world. Focusing
primarily on developing countries, we will examine
three aspects of water use and control. First we will
look at the scope and impact of water development
projects; second we will examine the conflicts and
solutions related to transboundary river basins; and
third we will consider the implication of privatization of water resources. By way of background, we
will review the variety of demands placed on fresh
water and the political institutions related to water
development. Students will gain a solid background
in international environmental law as it relates to
multilateral and bilateral treaties, customary law,
multilateral institutions, and the guidance of international “soft law”. They will also understand the
allocation and equity issues surrounding the privatization of water and the political dimensions of this
shift. Ultimately, these issues will give a concrete
understanding of some aspects of the concept of
sustainable development. Evaluation will be based
on class participation, short analytical papers, and a
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
substantial term-long assignment. Level: Advanced.
Prerequisites: Solid background in international
politics, economics, human rights, or development
policy through coursework or personal experience.
Limit: 20. Lab fee: $15.
HS 5017: Advanced Spanish I
Faculty: Peña, Karla
This course is for students who are competent in
the principal grammatical forms of Spanish. In this
class, students increase their mastery and automatic command of grammar and nuances of idiomatic
usages, broaden their vocabulary in general and
deepen it in targeted areas, enrich their understanding of multiple dimensions of Hispanic culture,
and increase their ability to read, write, hear and
speak in a variety of rhetorical forms and genres.
Student are evaluated based on class participation, homework and their ability to work effectively
with multiple kinds of texts, interviews, conversations, formal interviews, oral presentations, writing
exercises in different styles, and non-verbal communication. Typically offered in fall or winter. Level:
Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
Limit: 10. Lab fee: $20
HS 5018: The Nature of Narrative
Faculty: Waldron, Karen
Meets the following requirements: HS WF
This is an advanced writing focused course in which
students practice the human ecology of literary
analysis. We explore the ‘mind’ or consciousness
of fictional writing (specifically, novels) by looking
at how narratives make meaning, and at how we
make meaning from narratives. The course surveys
some of the best modern fiction, with a particular
focus on works that highlight narrative technique,
stretch the boundaries of the imagination, have a
rich and deep texture, and push against the inherent limitations of textuality. Students also hone
their reading and analytic skills as they work closely
with twentieth century texts that broke new literary
ground. Some of the authors we may read include:
Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner,
Monique Wittig, John Dos Passos, Toni Morrison, N.
Scott Momaday, Bessie Head, Manuel Puig, and Margaret Atwood. We also study some narrative (and
possibly film) theory. Evaluation is based on class
participation, frequent short response and passage
analysis papers, and an independent project. Level:
Advanced. Prerequisite: Signature of Instructor. Offered every other year. Limit: 15.
HS 5020: Advanced International Environmental
Law Seminar
Faculty: Cline, Ken
Meets the following requirements: HS
This course is designed to provide an overview of
the use of international law in solving transnational
environmental problems and shaping international
behavior. We examine, as background, the nature
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
and limitations of international law as a force for
change. The course will then explore customary
law, the relationship between soft and hard law,
enforcement of international law, implementation
mechanisms, and the effectiveness of multilateral
environmental agreements. Special attention is
given to existing international environmental law
frameworks addressing climate change, Arctic and
Antarctic development, ozone depletion, biological
diversity, forest loss, export of toxic chemicals, and
the host of issues raised by the 1992 United Nations
Conference on the Environment and Development
and subsequent environmental fora. Students will
also consider the interface between international
environmental law and other important international forces such as the Bretton Woods institutions, human rights frameworks, and international
development entities. Students will be evaluated on
the quality of their classroom comments and several analytical problem sets given during the term.
Students will also be asked to complete a major
research project examining the effectiveness of a
treaty or a proposed international environmental
legal arrangement. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites:
Environmental Law and Policy, Global Environmental Politics, or Signature of Instructor. Limit: 10. Lab
fee: $10.
HS 5022: Hatchery
Faculty: Friedlander, Jay
The Hatchery is applied Human Ecology in action; it
offers students a bridge from coursework to actively
creating their vision of the future. The Hatchery
gives students from across the campus the opportunity to move from ideas to action. Hatchery students work either individually or in teams on a wide
array of enterprises. Past projects have included:
urban farming; international development; policy
and planning; photography and film; alternative
transportation; biofuel production; renewable energy; food systems; the arts; furniture production;
technology development; social enterprise. Ventures have been for-profit and non-profit, encompassing the range from local businesses to scalable
start-ups. Students selected for the Hatchery are
required to devote an entire term to launching their
venture. Each Hatchery enterprise, whether a team
or an individual, must take the course for a minimum of three credits. Along with weekly instructional meetings, students receive office space, supplies,
professional services, mentors and potential access
to seed capital to develop their ventures. After
the initial ten weeks of class, if students decide to
continue their enterprises, they have access to the
Hatchery space and resources for an additional nine
months.
The Hatchery takes place in three phases:
—Application: Students apply for a position in the
Hatchery over winter term.
—Rapid Prototype: The ten weeks of the Hatchery
course. Students create a rapid prototype to test
their ventures in the marketplace. These prototypes
101
vary widely depending on the type of ventures.
—Creating an Enterprise Structure: During the ten
weeks of the course, students will have weekly assignments that introduce key elements in an organizational structure and highlight operational considerations that are universal amongst enterprises.
—Development: The following 9-months. Students
have access to the Hatchery space and resources
to continue developing their enterprises. Level:
Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
Limit: 6.
HS 5026: Advanced Seminar in Ecological
Economics
Faculty: Taylor, Davis
Meets the following requirements: HS
This seminar explores selected themes in ecological
economics, which is both the economics of sustainability as well as a paradigmatic approach distinct
from the mainstream neoclassical approach to the
study of economic activity. We will use the first
several weeks of the term to define and outline
ecological economics. We will use the remainder of
the term to explore topics of student interest, focusing on three to five major themes; possible themes
include methodological issues (post-normal science,
transdisciplinarity), biophysical constraints to economic growth (entropy, technological pessimism,
capital substitution, critical natural capital, resource
peaks), sociocultural impacts of economic growth
(consumption, happiness studies), energy and
resource flow analysis (entropy), system dynamics (steady state economy, resiliency, degrowth),
measurement issues (growth versus development,
ecological footprint, Index of Sustainable Economic
Welfare), institutional arrangements (adaptations
of ideas from Douglass North), trade and development (embodied trade, pollution havens), community sustainability, philosophical issues (Buddhist
economics, homo economicus), historical issues
of sustainability (Malthusian perspectives, Jevon’s
Paradox). Evaluation will be via an exam at the end
of the introductory phase, article précis, and a final
poster presentation. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites:
two terms of intermediate neoclassical economics
or permission of instructor. Limit: 12.
HS 5031: Advanced Spanish II
Faculty: Peña, Karla
This course is for students who are competent in
the principal grammatical forms of Spanish and
have already completed Advanced Spanish I or the
equivalent. In this class, students further increase
their mastery and automatic command of grammar
and nuances of idiomatic usages, broaden their
vocabulary in general and deepen it in targeted
areas, and enrich their understanding of multiple
dimensions of Hispanic culture. A central focus of
the course is on increase of the student’s ability to
read, write, hear and speak in a variety of sophisticated rhetorical forms and genres as well as cultural
102
contexts. Student are evaluated based on class
participation, homework and their ability to work
effectively with multiple kinds of texts, interviews,
conversations, formal interviews, oral presentations, writing exercises in different styles, and nonverbal communication. Typically offered in fall or
winter. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission
of instructor. Limit: 10. Lab fee: $20.
HS 5034: Impact Investing
Faculty: Friedlander, Jay
Meets the following requirements: HS
Impact Investing focuses on the emerging field of
impact investing, which seeks to generate returns
for society, the environment and financial investors.
Impact investing seeks to create avenues for private
investment to work alongside existing efforts of
NGOs and others to help solve global and local
problems. Impact investing can be used to fund
solutions in areas as diverse as food systems, climate change, poverty, affordable housing and clean
technology among other issues.
This course will examine the strategy of various
impact investing mechanisms from crowdfunding
to “localvesting.” In addition, students will examine
case studies to understand the benefits and pitfalls
of different strategies and their potential to create
social and environmental change. During the course
students will learn how to create financial projections and evaluate the financial returns of enterprises. For their final project, students will have to
structure an investment platform that generates
returns financially, socially and/or environmentally.
Students will be evaluated based on class participation, written assignments and verbal presentations. This course will be integrated with and requires co-enrollment in Energy and Technology and
Islands: Energy, Economy and Community. Level:
Advanced. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission and
at least one of the following: Math and Physics of
Sustainable Energy (preferred), Energy Practicum,
Financials, Business Nonprofit Basics, Sustainable
Strategies or Launching a New Venture. Limit: 10
COA students and 5 Islanders.
HS 5037: Capitalism: Economics and Institutions
Faculty: Taylor, Davis
Meets the following requirements: HS
Capitalism is the dominant form of economic institutional arrangements and production in the world
today, along with a set of culturally inflected values
and an interpretive frame for understanding the
world around us that is a crucial context for work in
Human Ecology. The focus of this course is on the
economic imperatives of capitalism, the resulting
institutional arrangements, and the socioeconomic
outcomes that capitalism produces; we will also
dedicate some time to the (other) cultural dimensions of capitalism, largely through the incorporation of guest lecturers in the latter part of the term.
The foundational economic analysis will use both
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Marxist and what can be called “critical macroeconomic” theories to understand the economic
processes and results of capitalism. Our focus will
be on contemporary capitalism, but we will briefly
examine the historical development of capitalism as
a means of understanding contemporary patterns.
A major impetus for the course is Thomas Piketty’s
“Capitalism in the 21st Century”, and its focus on
inequality will be a major focus of the course. Other
prominent themes will be pre-capitalist modes of
production, the labor theory of value, markets and
processes of labor commodification and alienation,
the formal and informal institutions of capitalism,
money and other forms of debt, international capitalistic relations, crises, and variations of contemporary capitalism. Learning will be accomplished
via the reading, study, analysis, and discussion of
classic and contemporary theories of capitalism,
and applications to current local, national, and
international situations and events. Evaluation will
be based on four major problem sets (consisting
of short essay responses), a final poster presentation, and participation in classroom discussions
and other fora. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: One
course in intermediate economics and one additional intermediate course that closely relates to the
study capitalism (e.g. another economics course,
critical theory, etc.), and permission of instructor.
Limit: 10.
HS 5039: Equal Rights, Equal Voices: The
Rhetoric of Woman Suffrage
Faculty: McKown, Jamie
Meets the following requirements: HS HY
This seminar will provide an in-depth exploration of
public speech texts by a wide array of 19th century
woman suffrage activists in the United States. This
includes works by those individuals most often
associated with the first wave of the movement
including: Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sojourner Truth, Ernestine Rose, Lucy Stone,
Anna Dickinson, Lucretia Coffin Mott, Adelle Hazlett,
Victoria Woodhull, Anna Julia Cooper, and others.
There will be a heavy emphasis on the close reading
of primary source materials as students encounter these speakers “in their own words.” There are
five main goals of this seminar. First, to familiarize
students with the works of prominent suffrage and
equal rights activists from the period. Second, to
help illuminate how the ideas, choices, narratives,
and arguments reflected in these texts have some
relation to contemporary discourses of gender,
power, and equality. Third, to offer students the
opportunity to conduct close textual readings of
significant texts in the field of public address. This
seminar is rooted in what might be described as
an experiential, grassroots approach to rhetorical
criticism, one that is unconstrained by the needs
of overly deterministic reading strategies. We will
focus more on building a “theory of the case” from
the ground up and through the eyes of the seminar
participants, rather than subjecting each case to the
demands of a predetermined comprehensive model
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
of rhetorical action. The fourth goal of the class is to
offer students the first hand opportunity to conduct their own “recovery” projects with the aim of
locating, transcribing, documenting, and presenting
to the class new variations of texts from the period
that have been previously undocumented or left
unaccounted for. In doing so, students will learn
basic techniques for exploring the types of digitized
historical collections that have emerged in only the
past few years. The final goal for the seminar is to
prompt an even broader series of questions about
the relationship between text, society, and the “public.” These are questions that would obviously be salient for students of all interests. Class sessions will
be organized as a weekly three hour seminar and
will be predominantly discussion driven. Students
will be responsible for presenting certain works and
will also lead some of our discussions. Assignments
will emphasize critical, reflective and analytical writing. Evaluation will be based on participation in class
discussion, short written response papers, several
longer essays, individual presentations, and a final
“recovery” project. Level: Advanced. Limit: 12.
HS 5041: Tutorial: The UN Convention on
Biological Diversity
Faculty: Cline, Ken; Stabinsky, Doreen
This tutorial is an advanced course on the UN
Convention on Biological Diversity and its two subsidiary protocols: on biosafety and on access and
benefit sharing. Students in the course will become
familiar with the texts of the agreements, and examine in more legal and political detail a smaller set of
key issues within each agreement that are currently the focus of intergovernmental negotiations.
Each student will choose one or more elements of
the Convention or its protocols on which they will
develop significant expertise, which they will share
with other students in the class through regular
presentations. Students will be evaluated based
on several presentations, a briefing document on
a particular element of the agreement, and daily
written analysis of negotiating sessions during the
Conference of the Parties (COP) and Meetings of the
Parties (MOPs) to the agreements or a final research
paper for students choosing to not attend the meetings. The course will culminate in optional student
participation at the current COP and MOPs [in 2016,
Cancún, México]. Level: advanced. Prerequisites:
permission of instructor. Limit: 6. Lab fee: $10.
HS 5042: Tutorial: Implementing the Paris
Agreement (UNFCCC COP22)
Faculty: Stabinsky, Doreen
This is an advanced tutorial for students attending the 22nd Conference of the Parties to the UN
Framework Convention on Climate Change in
Marrakech, Morocco. The tutorial will focus on
the process of treaty implementation, specifically
examining the processes underway to bring the
Paris Agreement into force. We will work principally
with primary documents and focus on all the major
103
areas for implementation of the landmark new
agreement. Each student will choose one or more
elements of the Paris Agreement on which they will
develop significant expertise, which they will share
with other students in the delegation through regular presentations. Students will be evaluated based
on several presentations, a briefing document on a
particular element of the agreement, and daily written analysis of negotiating sessions during the COP.
Level: Advanced. Prerequisites: Background in multilateral environmental agreements and permission
of instructor. Limit: 6.
HS 5043: Introduction to the Counseling Process
Faculty: Hill, Kenneth
Meets the following requirements: HS
This is intended as a survey course that will overview the contemporary theories, issues, and techniques of professional counseling. In brief, topics
to be considered in this course include; a) legal and
ethical responsibilities associated with professional
counseling); b) assessments of differing therapeutic
approaches (theories and techniques) to the counseling process; and c) reflection on the changing
perspectives and practices in counseling including
pluralism and diversity models. Students will begin
to develop their own perspective of counseling
through lectures and discussion, demonstrations,
guest speakers, case studies, mock counseling
sessions, reading, and writing papers. Experiential
learning, through mock counseling sessions, with
feedback from classmates and the instructor, will
be stressed. Evaluation will be based on written
assignments, class participation, and independent
research. Level: Advanced. Limit: 15. Prerequisites: A
psychology class. Signature of instructor.
HS 5044: Diaspora and Unbelonging
Faculty: van Vliet, Netta
Meets the following requirements: HS
Etymologically, the word “diaspora” is traced to the
Greek dia meaning through, and speirein, meaning to scatter or to sow. Historically, the term has
been associated with narratives of exile, displacement, and migration, and with a sustained relation
to what is understood as an originary homeland.
Although Jewish diaspora is often the implicit or
explicit example through which diaspora is understood, the term has been important for other
cultural, ethnic and religious genealogies, as well
as for recent efforts to address political questions
posed by contemporary configurations of diasporic
and displaced populations. In this course, we will
use questions about Jewish difference as a point of
departure for thinking about questions of diaspora,
belonging and unbelonging more generally. Diasporic relations raise questions about what it means
to belong to political community, about borders
between self and other and between groups, about
difference internal and external to the polis, and
about the concepts of home, homeland, nation and
country. These questions in turn call attention to
104
the relation between different figures and categories central to understandings of home and abroad,
stasis and mobility, such as citizen and foreigner,
refugee, asylum seeker. This course examines different historical examples of conditions and processes
of diaspora by being attentive to conditions and
figures of unbelonging. In so doing, we will consider
contemporary problems of immigration, displacement, and asylum. We will be particularly attentive
to questions about racialization, colonialism, nationalism, gender, sexuality and sexual difference. The
course is interdisciplinary, and we will draw on work
in postcolonial studies, political theory, literature,
anthropology, religion and feminist theory. Students
will be evaluated based on attendance, in-class
participation, reading responses, and two short
analytical essays. Level: Advanced. Prerequisites:
Permission of instructor; ideally, students should
have taken at least 3 courses in Human Studies and/
or Arts and Design, or have other background in
thinking about politics and representation. Students
who have done independent research and internships that engage the topics addressed in the course
description will also be prioritized. Limit: 12. Lab fee:
$10.
HS 5045: Tutorial: Advanced Poetry Writing
Faculty: Carpenter, William
This tutorial meets once a week for workshop sessions in the writing and criticism of poetry. Students
pass in one to three original poems each week, to be
revised and discussed in later meetings. Final versions of each poem are assembled in a final portfolio for evaluation.
HS 5046: Tutorial: Financial Bubbles and Crises
Faculty: Taylor, Davis
Financial bubbles and crises, such as the one that
devastated the global economy in the first decade
of the 21st Century, are some of the most important and ubiquitous economic phenomena, yet the
standard body of intermediate macroeconomic
theory covers them indirectly at best. In addition to
their significance, financial bubbles are fascinating,
as apparently rational people engage in apparently
crazy financial behavior, and clearly untenable
situations persist at length, until they collapse with
often-disastrous results. This advanced tutorial
takes a focused look at financial bubbles and crises,
examining their history, microeconomic bases,
and macroeconomic implications. We will examine
competing theories of bubbles and use them to assess selected financial bubbles and crises from the
17th through the 21st Century, including the most
recent global tempest. Course themes will include
the psychological, informational, and sociocultural
foundations of bubbles (e.g. herd behavior, the
role of the media, the impact of economic theory
and economists), the nature of debt, credit cycles
(“Minsky Moments”), commercial and investment
banking, hedge funds, moral hazard, asset valuation, the development, use and abuse of complex
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
financial instruments, financial market regulation,
and central bank and fiscal responses to crises. The
tutorial will be useful for students with interests
in macroeconomics, the global economy, capitalism, and business. Evaluation will be based on oral
presentations, several quizzes, and a final poster
presentation. Level: Advanced: Prerequisites:
Intermediate macroeconomics and permission of
instructor. Limit: 5. Lab fee: $35.
HS 6012: Learning a Language on Your Own
Faculty: Cox, Gray
Meets the following requirements: HS
The goal of this course to help each student design
and implement an effective learning program for
the study of a language of her choice at whatever
level of learning she is currently at. A very wide
variety of general strategies, resources and practical advice for independent language learning
are reviewed in weekly class sessions along with
progress and reflection reports from each student
that can help guide and motivate independent work.
The core common text for this work will be Betty
Lou Leaver, Madeline Ehrman and Boris Shekhtman’s “Achieving Success in Second Language
Acquisition”. The primary focus of the class is on the
development and implementation of each student’s
individually designed plan for learning a language of
their choice. Materials for this will be identified by
each student as part of their work on their chosen
language. Progress in these plans are discussed
in one on one weekly meetings with the teacher.
Plans may include the use of software, peer tutors,
Skype, videos, standard texts, flash cards, specialized technical material, music, visual art, field trips,
and a wide variety of other materials as appropriate.
Evaluation will be based on the clarity, coherence
and effectiveness of the student’s developed plan
and the discipline with which they actually pursue it
and revise it appropriately as the term progresses.
Students will be asked to meet with the instructor
prior to the start of the term to discuss their motivation, aims, possible resources and possible plans
for language learning after the course is over. Level:
Variable. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
Limit: 10. Lab fee: $35.
HS 6016: Mandarin Chinese—Traditional
Characters
Faculty: Tai, Bonnie
Students interested in gaining proficiency in
listening and speaking Mandarin and in reading
and writing traditional Chinese characters will be
placed in the level most appropriate to their current proficiency. The beginner courses emphasize
the development of conversational proficiency,
including listening comprehension, pronunciation,
tone, and fluency, with increasing development of
vocabulary and reading/writing skills for daily use.
Units focus on authentic uses, such as getting sick/
staying healthy, directions, meals, telephone conversations, and residential life. Students interested
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
in being able to read and write traditional Chinese
characters will find it much easier to learn simplified
characters once they have been introduced to the
beauty and logic of traditional Chinese characters.
Students may also opt to participate in supplementary academic and cultural activities and events,
such as bookbinding, calligraphy, cooking, dance,
and martial arts. Evaluation will be based on class
participation, completion of written assignments,
quizzes, and two exams, including oral and written
components. Level: Variable, based on placement
exam. This course will be administered by the Chinese Language Center at Tzu Chi University (TCU) in
Hualien.
HS 6017: Immersion Program in French
Language and Culture
Faculty: Stabinsky, Doreen
This double credit course is offered through collaboration with CAVILAM university as part of
the COA program in Vichy, France. For ten weeks,
students take 20 hours a week of language classes
and workshops taught by immersion methods and
advanced audio-visual techniques. Students also
live with host families in homestays and take part
in a variety of cultural activities. They are carefully
tested and placed at levels appropriate to their ability and are expected to advance in all four language
skills—reading, writing, speaking and listening—as
gauged by the Common European Framework of
Reference for Languages scale of learning levels.
Level: Variable (depending on prior language level).
Requirements: Permission of instructor. Limit: 12.
Lab fee: TBA
MD 2011: Fisheries, Fishermen, and Fishing
Communities
Faculty: Petersen, Christopher
Downeast Maine, from the Penobscot River east to
the Canadian border, includes Hancock and Washington Counties, a region of extremes between
high levels of tourism, like Mount Desert Island, and
many coastal towns that are heavily reliant on fisheries for their economic existence. This long history
of cultural and economic dependence on fisheries
makes the region particularly vulnerable to fisheries
decline, such as the collapse of the sardine and cod
fisheries. Recent trends in the lobster, clam, scallop,
and elver fisheries, as well as aquaculture, show
various levels of instability and risk. At the same
time, numerous initiatives in the region focus on
revitalizing and stabilizing fisheries, while enhancing
community resilience. This class uses a variety of
inter-disciplinary approaches to examine the relationships among marine resources, fisheries policy,
harvesters, and communities. We are interested
in examining the relationships within this linked
social-ecological system, and use historical data,
current documents, interviews and oral histories to
examine the human-ecological relationships among
residents, policy, and resources. We also will examine new economic initiatives in these communities,
105
including ecotourism, aquaculture, and renewable
energy. We have several individuals coming to
campus to discuss issues with the class, and we will
take several field trips (including an overnight to
the Cobscook Bay area) to Downeast communities.
Evaluation will be based on several assignments
during the term, including an oral history, sets of
essay questions, and research on a fishery. Students
will also work on a small-group project examining
a research question using multiple methodologies,
with a presentation and paper due at the end of the
term. Active engagement during class, with guest
speakers, and on field trips will be expected. Level:
Introductory/Intermediate. Prerequisites: A class in
anthropology, marine biology, fisheries, or environmental policy, and permission of instructor. Limit:
15. Lab fee: $100.
MD 2012: Failure
Faculty: Friedlander, Jay; Baker, Jodi
Failure looms large in society. Is it a badge of honor,
an inextricable part of a process, a means to success
or rather something to be feared and ashamed of?
In this course, students will explore how notions of
failure align and contrast between gender, class and
culture. We will also explore if conceptions of failure
differ substantially among the artistic, business
and other communities. In divergence with historical attitudes, today’s entrepreneurs are implored
to “fail cheap and fail fast” and events, like FailCon,
celebrate failure as a badge of honor. In art failure
is simply inherent to process. And yet, the fear
and sting of failure is real for everyone. Through a
series of practicums, readings, guest lectures and
discussions this class will explore various aspects of
failure. Students will be evaluated on class participation, a series of solo and group projects, selections
from a failure journal and contributions to a shared
class blog. Level: Introductory/Intermediate. Limit:
15. Lab fee: $50.
MD 3010: Biology Through the Lens
Faculty: Ressel, Stephen
Photography is one of the primary means through
which scientific observation and research is conducted and presented to the public. But the most
provocative images of the natural world don’t just
happen; they are made by individuals skilled in both
photography and the life sciences. In this course,
students will develop technical, observational, and
aesthetic skills to extract relevant information from
the natural world and organisms collected from
nature. Through acquired skills, students will be
expected to conceive methods to document the
biological world and communicate concepts using
strong visual imagery. Photographic techniques and
historical examples will be learned and applied.
Students will be evaluated based on their successful completion of a series of project-based assignments, participation in critiques, and their ability to
effectively convey biological principles through
106
photography. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students will be
expected to provide their own camera for use in the
course; a digital camera with interchangeable lenses
is recommended. Limit: 12. Lab fee: $110.
MD 3011: COA Foodprint
Faculty: Morse, Suzanne; Collum, Kourtney
COA consistently tops the lists of “best college food”
in the country. But what are the elements that
make up our campus food system? Where does
COA’s food come from; under what conditions is
it produced, transported, and prepared; and who
is involved in this complex system? This course is
designed to provide students with the knowledge
and skills necessary to analyze local food systems,
beginning right here at COA. In collaboration with
COA’s kitchen and farm managers, vendors, and
food systems faculty, students will hone their
qualitative and quantitative research skills while
exploring questions such as: What are the impacts
of the food purchasing and consumption decisions
we make at COA? What would it take to transition
to a sustainable regional diet, and how could we do
that while being sensitive to individuals’ food needs
and diets? How do formal and informal policies
shape our dining decisions? By examining our campus food system through a human ecological lens,
students will develop their own set of standards for
assessing the sustainability and quality of campus
food, and develop a vision and set of recommendations for increasing the social and environmental
sustainability of our campus food system. At the
end of the course they will identify actionable items
to move COA towards our food vision, and identify
key actors to see those actions through to fruition.
The final critique of the course will address how
food systems analysis can be an effective tool for
resistance and social change, providing a basis for
increasing local food production and security on
MDI, in Hancock County, and throughout Maine.
Students will be evaluated based on: participation in
data collection activities; a final assessment for the
Food Systems Working Group, to be posted on the
website; and a presentation to the larger community. Level: Intermediate. Prerequisites: Must have
knowledge of food systems and some prior experience with qualitative OR quantitative methods. Prior
to enrollment, students are strongly encouraged to
discuss prerequisites with the instructors. Limit: 16.
Lab fee: $75.
MD 4012: National Park Practicum: Interpretive
Education and Design
Faculty: Ressel, Stephen; Colbert, Dru
This trans-disciplinary, project-based course is for
students interested in imagining creative and effective ways to convey science-based information to a
diverse audience. Participants will engage in a collaboration between students, Acadia National Park
staff, and COA faculty. Students will work both on-
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
and off-campus to examine current research and
concurrently explore innovative approaches in the
design of educational environments. Students interested in the life sciences, arts and design, experiential and informal education, and science education/
interpretation will work together to outline educational goals, generate ideas and potential plans for
exhibits and activities that will shape how visitors
perceive and interact with Acadia National Park.
Each student will build on their interests and
background while participating in a creative team
process that follows national park guidelines for
the development of interpretative media. While
engaging in this work, students will hone skills in
translating research, writing and editing for exhibits,
employing visual communication, and designing
educational spaces. Evaluation will be based on
level of collaboration and class participation; ability
to effectively communicate in writing and/or visual
terms; on quality of class projects and presentations. Level: Intermediate/Advanced. Prerequisites:
permission of instructor and one or more of the
following: Curiosity and Wonder; Experiential Education; Creating Effective Environments For Learning; Biology Through the Lens; Advanced Graphic
Design; or at least one ES course. Limit: 12. Lab fee:
$45.
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
107
INDEX BY COURSE NUMBER
Course number indicates level as follows: 1000 Introductory; 2000 Introductory/Intermediate; 3000
Intermediate; 4000 Intermediate/Advanced; 5000 Advanced; 6000 Independent work (Internships,
Residencies, Independent Studies); 8000 Graduate.
COURSE#
AD 1011
AD 1012
AD 1013
AD 1014
AD 1016
AD 1017
AD 1018
AD 1019
AD 1020
AD 1022
AD 1025
AD 1026
AD 1028
AD 1031
AD 1033
AD 1034
AD 1035
AD 1036
AD 1038
AD 2011
AD 2012
AD 2013
AD 2014
AD 2015
AD 2016
AD 2017
AD 2019
AD 2020
AD 2021
AD 2022
AD 2023
AD 2025
COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Arts and Design
Introduction to Keyboard/Piano
Jazz, Rock, and Blues: From Their Origins to the Present
Music Fundamentals: Intro to Reading/Hearing/Writing/Playing
World Percussion
The History of Rock
Introduction to Guitar
Four-Dimensional Studio
History of Western Music
Art Since 1900: Harmony and Conflict
Movement Training Basics
Introduction to Photography
Chinese Calligraphy
Drawing I
Beginning Painting
Ceramics I
Introduction to Documentary Photography
Figure Drawing
History of Video Art
Graphic Design Studio I: Visual Communication
3D Studio: Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art and Design
Constructing Visual Narrative
Curiosity and Wonder: Design & Interpretation in the Museum
The Reality Effect: Art and Truth in the 19th Century
Contemporary Artist as Researcher and Activist
Drawing Mineral and Botanical Matter in the Forest of Maine
Dramatic Mechanics: The Dynamics of Difference and Power
History of Photography
The Science of Comedy
Film Theory
Actor Training I
Principles of Comedic Improvisation
AD 2026
AD 3010
AD 3011
AD 3012
AD 3013
AD 3014
AD 3016
Illustration
Architectural Design Studio
Landscape Architecture Design Studio
Documentary Video Studio
Animation
Soundscape
Land Use Planning I
AD 3017
AD 3019
AD 3020
AD 3022
AD 3024
Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen
Intermediate Drawing
American Dreaming: Theatre and Activism in the US
Play Production Workshop
Principles of Comedic Improvisation II
AD 3027 Intermediate Painting
AD 3028 Abstraction
108
FACULTY
Cooper, John
Cooper, John
Cooper, John
Bennett, Michael
Cooper, John
Cooper, John
Andrews, Nancy
Cooper, John
Mancinelli, Isabel
Clinger, Catherine
Baker, Jodi
Winer, Josh
Heckscher, Philip
Foley, Sean
Foley, Sean
Mann, Rocky
Winer, Josh
Foley, Sean
Capers, Colin
Colbert, Dru
Colbert, Dru
Colbert, Dru
Colbert, Dru
Clinger, Catherine
Clinger, Catherine
Clinger, Catherine
Baker, Jodi
Winer, Josh
Baker, Jodi
Capers, Colin
Baker, Jodi
Fingerhut, Larrance;
Shepard, Jennifer
Colbert, Dru
Mancinelli, Isabel
Mancinelli, Isabel
Andrews, Nancy
Andrews, Nancy
Andrews, Nancy
Mancinelli, Isabel;
Longsworth, Gordon
Lepcio, Andrea
Foley, Sean
Baker, Jodi
Baker, Jodi
Fingerhut, Larrance;
Shepard, Jennifer
Foley, Sean
Foley, Sean
PAGE
33
33
33
33
33
33
34
34
34
34
34
34
35
35
35
35
36
36
36
36
37
37
37
38
38
38
38
39
39
39
39
40
40
40
40
40
41
41
41
41
42
42
42
42
42
43
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
3031
3032
3072
4010
4012
4014
4015
Storytelling and Performance
Intermediate Ceramics
Redefining the Act: Contemporary Theatre in Practice
Improvisation in Music
Intermediate Video: Studio and Strategies
Graphic Design Studio II: Digital Projects
Film Sound and Image
AD
AD
AD
AD
4017
4018
4019
4020
Art and Culture in Northern New Mexico
Movement Training Basics II
Studio Printmaking
Object and Performance
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
AD
4021
5013
5017
5018
5023
5026
5027
5028
5029
5030
5031
Analog Photography: B&W
Advanced Projects: Art Practice and Concepts
Animation II
Carnet de Voyage: The Illustrated Travel Journal
Romanticism: The Triumph of the Imagination over Reason?
Negotiating Wonder
Tutorial: Advanced Ensemble Project: Hamlet
Tutorial: Criterion Kids Theatre Project: Hamlet
The Range of Sublimity in the Artist Mind
Artist/Naturalist/Visionary
Journey into Substance: Art of the Hudson and New England
AD
ED
ED
ED
ED
ED
ED
ED
ED
ED
ED
ED
ED
ED
6010
1010
1011
1013
1014
1016
3012
3013
3014
3015
4012
4013
5010
5011
Tutorial: Individual Music Instruction
Experiential Education
Children’s Literature
Changing Schools, Changing Society
Child Development
Introduction to Adolescent Psychology
Supporting Students with Disabilities in the Reg. Classroom
Intercultural Education
Negotiating Educational Policy
Education for Life
Integrated Methods IA: Gr. K-4 Reading and Writing
Integrated Methods IB: Gr. 5-8 Reading and Writing
Curriculum Design and Assessment
Integrated Methods II: Science, Math, and Social Studies
ED
ED
ED
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
5012
5013
5018
1014
1016
1018
1020
1022
1024
1026
1028
1030
1034
1038
1040
1044
Secondary Methods: Life Science, Social Studies and English
Student Teaching
Tutorial: Qualitative Program Evaluation Methods
Gardens & Greenhouses: Theory/Practice of Organic Gardening
Ornithology
Physics I: Mechanics and Energy
Chemistry I
Introduction to Oceanography
Calculus I
Introduction to Chaos and Fractals
Marine Biology
Chemistry II
Physics and Mathematics of Sustainable Energy
Geology of Mt. Desert Island
Natural Resources
Physics II
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Leaverton, Lisa
Mann, Rocky
Baker, Jodi
Cooper, John
Andrews, Nancy
Colbert, Dru
Andrews, Nancy;
Cooper, John
Clinger, Catherine
Baker, Jodi
Clinger, Catherine
Andrews, Nancy;
Baker, Jodi
Winer, Josh
Andrews, Nancy
Andrews, Nancy
Colbert, Dru
Clinger, Catherine
Foley, Sean
Baker, Jodi
Baker, Jodi
Clinger, Catherine
Foley, Sean
Clinger, Catherine;
Foley, Sean
Cooper, John
Tai, Bonnie
Ryan, Siobhan
Tai, Bonnie
Alex, Joanne
Hill, Kenneth
Sanborn, Kelley
Tai, Bonnie
Fuller, Linda
Tai, Bonnie
Moody, Paula
Fuller, Linda
Tai, Bonnie
Fuller, Linda;
Alex, Joanne; St. Denis, Kate
Fuller, Linda
Fuller, Linda
Tai, Bonnie
Morse, Suzanne
Swann, Scott
Benson, Cristy
Staff
Todd, Sean
Feldman, David
Feldman, David
Petersen, Christopher
Staff
Feldman, David
Hall, Sarah
Hall, Sarah
Staff
43
44
44
44
44
44
45
45
45
46
46
46
46
46
47
47
47
48
48
48
49
49
49
49
50
50
50
50
51
51
51
51
52
52
52
52
53
53
53
54
54
54
54
54
55
55
55
55
55
56
56
56
109
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
ES
HE
HS
HS
HS
HS
110
1046
1052
1054
1058
2010
2012
2014
2020
2022
2030
2031
2034
3010
3012
3014
3018
3020
3022
3024
3028
3030
3032
3036
3044
3048
3050
3060
3061
3063
3065
3069
3071
3072
3074
4010
4012
4014
4018
4020
4031
4036
4038
4040
4041
4043
4045
4046
5010
5014
5039
5040
1010
0952
1011
1012
1013
Critical Zone I
Biology: Cellular Processes of Life
Biology: Form and Function
Physics II: Introduction to Circuits
Ecology: Natural History
Introduction to Statistics and Research Design
Trees and Shrubs of Mount Desert Island
Art and Science of Fermented Foods
Introductory Entomology
Marine Mammal Biology I
Quantitative Geomorphology
Weed Ecology
Agroecology
Calculus II
Ecology
Herpetology
Invertebrate Zoology
Differential Equations
Evolution
Calculus III: Multivariable Calculus
Environmental Physiology
Genetics
The History of Natural History
Climate and Weather
Soils
Organic Chemistry I
Marine Mammal Biology I: Field Studies
Functional Plant Morphology
Seminar in Climate Change
Molecular Genetics Workshop
Molecular and Cell Biology
Tutorial: Linear Algebra w Applications to Diff. Equations
Introduction to Lichens and Bryophytes
E-STEM Professional Development Seminar
Biomechanics
Winter Ecology
Advanced Analysis in Biology
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Costa Rican Natural History and Conservation
Wildlife Ecology
Ecology and Natural History of the American West
Animal Behavior
Seeds
Environmental Geoscience Field Methods: Eastern CA
Tutorial: Advanced Study of Corvidae
Tutorial: Marine Mammal Physiology
Biochemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Tutorial: Advanced Geology of MDI
Fractals and Scaling
Human Ecology Core Course
Tutorial: Introductory Writing
Environmental History
Introduction to the Legal Process
From Native Empires to Nation States
Hall, Sarah
Staff
Staff
Feldman, David
Swann, Scott
Todd, Sean
Weber, Jill
Morse, Suzanne
Graham, Carrie
Todd, Sean
Hall, Sarah
Morse, Suzanne
Morse, Suzanne
Feldman, David
Anderson, John
Ressel, Stephen
Hess, Helen
Feldman, David
Petersen, Christopher
Feldman, David
Ressel, Stephen
Hess, Helen
Anderson, John
Hall, Sarah
Morse, Suzanne
Staff
Todd, Sean
Morse, Suzanne
Hall, Sarah
Hess, Helen
Hicks, Amy
Feldman, David
Olday, Fred
Hall, Sarah
Hess, Helen
Ressel, Stephen
Todd, Sean
Anderson, John
Anderson, John
Ressel, Stephen
Anderson, John
Anderson, John
Anderson, John
Morse, Suzanne
Hall, Sarah
Swann, Scott
Todd, Sean
Staff
Staff
Hall, Sarah
Feldman, David
Staff
Kozak, Anne
Little-Siebold, Todd
Cline, Ken
Little-Siebold, Todd
56
57
57
57
57
58
58
58
58
58
59
59
59
59
59
60
60
60
60
60
61
61
61
61
61
62
62
62
62
62
63
63
63
63
64
64
64
64
65
65
65
65
66
66
66
67
67
67
67
67
67
68
68
68
68
68
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
1014
1019
1020
1021
1025
1026
1028
1032
1033
1039
1045
1046
1052
1054
1055
1056
1058
1062
1063
2010
2011
2012
2013
2015
2016
2019
Feminist Theory in a Transnational Frame
Beginning Spanish I
Beginning Spanish II
History of the American Conservation Movement
Business and Non-Profit Basics
The Renaissance & the Reformation
Introductory French I
Acadia: Exploring the National Park Idea
Political Persuasion and Messaging Fundamentals
Writing Seminar I: Exposition
Politics of Israel
Introduction to Economics & the Economy
Ethnographic Methods
Climate Justice
Introduction to Journalism: Telling the Story
Writing Seminar I: Exposition with a Business Focus
Reason and Madness
Problems and Dilemmas in Bioethics
Public Speaking Workshop
Literature, Science, and Spirituality
Nineteenth Century American Women
Personality and Social Development
Philosophy of Nature
The Age of Reason and the Enlightenment
Chinese Philosophy
Community Planning and Decision Making
HS
HS
HS
HS
2020
2021
2022
2023
Geographic Information Systems I: Foundations & Applications
Immersion Practica in Spanish and Yucatecan Culture
Introductory French II
Philosophy at the Movies
HS
HS
HS
HS
2026
2034
2043
2049
Practical Skills in Community Development
Ethics: The History of a Problematic
Conflict Resolution Across Cultures
Marvelous Terrible Place: Human Ecology of Newfoundland
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
2050
2052
2055
2056
2057
2060
2061
2063
2065
2069
2070
2071
2072
2073
2074
2075
2076
2078
2079
Religious Intolerance in the United States
Popular Psychology
Writing Seminar II: Argumentation
Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties
Fail Better: Writing Short Fiction
Philosophies of Liberation
Indigenous America
Hate Crimes in the Contemporary US and Europe
Choice, Chance, and Tragedy
Sisters in Law: Women Justices and the US Supreme Court
Transforming Food Systems
Little Magazines: Seminar in Contemp. Literary Publishing
Sex, Gender, Identity and Power
Environmental Psychology
Philosophy of Death and Dying
The Anthropology of Food
Life Stories: Memory, Family, and Place
College Seminar: City/Country in US Literature 1860-1920
Plato and the Origins of the West
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
van Vliet, Netta
Pena, Karla
Pena, Karla
Cline, Ken
Friedlander, Jay
Little-Siebold, Todd
Staff
Cline, Ken
McKown, Jamie
Staff
van Vliet, Netta
Taylor, Davis
van Vliet, Netta
Stabinsky, Doreen
Levin, Robert
Lepcio, Andrea
Lakey, Heather
Lakey, Heather
McKown, Jamie
Waldron, Karen
Waldron, Karen
Borden, Richard
Visvader, John
Little-Siebold, Todd
Visvader, John
Borden, Richard;
Mancinelli, Isabel
Longsworth, Gordon
Pena, Karla
Staff
Visvader, John;
Capers, Colin
Beard, Ron
Cox, Gray
Cox, Gray
Todd, Sean;
Springuel, Natalie
Wessler, Steve
Borden, Richard
Staff
Seddig, Robert
Mahoney, Daniel
Cox, Gray
Little-Siebold, Todd
Wessler, Steve
Lakey, Heather
Seddig, Robert
Collum, Kourtney
Mahoney, Daniel
Lakey, Heather
Borden, Richard
Lakey, Heather
Collum, Kourtney
Donovan, Martha
Waldron, Karen
Cox, Gray
69
69
69
69
69
70
70
70
70
71
71
71
72
72
72
72
73
73
73
73
74
74
74
74
74
74
75
75
75
75
76
76
76
76
77
77
77
78
78
78
78
79
79
79
79
80
80
80
80
81
81
81
82
111
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
3010
3011
3012
3015
3016
3019
Autobiography
Bread, Love, and Dreams
Poetry and the American Environment
African American Literature
Global Environmental Politics: Theory and Practice
Mountain Poets of China and Japan
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
3020
3021
3023
3027
3028
3029
3031
3032
3033
3034
3035
3036
3038
3039
3040
3041
3043
3049
3053
3055
3057
3059
3062
3063
3064
3068
3069
3070
3072
3073
3074
3075
3076
3077
4010
4012
4013
4014
4015
4016
4018
4019
4020
4021
4022
4026
4028
4034
4036
Contemporary Social Movement Strategies
Intermediate Spanish I
International Wildlife Policy and Protected Areas
Microeconomics for Business and Policy
The Mystics
Shakespeare: Character, Conflict, and Cinematography
Our Public Lands: Past, Present, and Future
The Cold War: Early Years
Satanic Verses
Conspiracy Theory and Political Discourse
Sustainable Strategies
Oceans & Fishes: Readings in Environmental History
The Cold War: The Later Years
Communicating Science
History of Agriculture: Apples
Intermediate Atelier in French Language and Conversation
Democracy: Models, Theories, Questions
City/Country II: American Literary Landscapes 1900-1960
Voyages
The Mayas of Yesterday and Today
Taking the Waters: The Politics & Culture of Water in France
Native American Literature
Solutions
Contemporary Rhetorical Theory
Possession and the Human
Linguistics, Language & Culture: Human Ecological Approach
Genocide, Resistance, Response and Reconciliation
Native American Law
Macroeconomics: Theory and Experience
Bees and Society
Mapping the Ocean’s Stories
Tutorial: Writing Feasibility Reports and Proposals
US Farm and Food Policy
Rethinking Mental Disorders
Seminar in Human Ecology
Contemporary Women’s Novels
Starting Your Novel
Contemporary Psychology: Body, Mind and Soul
Creative Writing
Ecology and Experience
Histories of Power: States & Subalterns in Modern Latin America
Technical Writing
Environmentality: Power, Knowledge, and Ecology
Collaborative Leadership
Launching a New Venture
Environmental Law and Policy
Cross-Cultural American Women’s Novels
World Literature
Native American Literature with a Focus on New Mexico
112
Carpenter, William
Carpenter, William
Carpenter, William
Waldron, Karen
Stabinsky, Doreen
Visvader, John;
Stover, Candice
Cox, Gray
Pena, Karla
Cline, Ken
Taylor, Davis
Visvader, John
Carpenter, William
Cline, Ken
McKown, Jamie
Carpenter, William
McKown, Jamie
Friedlander, Jay
Little-Siebold, Todd
McKown, Jamie
Kozak, Anne
Little-Siebold, Todd
Staff
McKown, Jamie
Waldron, Karen
Carpenter, William
Pena, Karla
Cline, Ken
Waldron, Karen
Friedlander, Jay
McKown, Jamie
van Vliet, Netta
Cox, Gray
Wessler, Steve
Cline, Ken
Taylor, Davis
Collum, Kourtney
Little-Siebold, Todd
Kozak, Anne
Collum, Kourtney
Gallon, Robert
Borden, Richard
Waldron, Karen
Carpenter, William
Borden, Richard
Carpenter, William
Borden, Richard
Little-Siebold, Todd
Kozak, Anne
McKown, Jamie
Beard, Ron
Friedlander, Jay
Cline, Ken
Waldron, Karen
Turok, Katharine
Waldron, Karen
82
82
82
83
83
83
83
83
83
84
84
84
85
85
85
86
86
86
87
87
87
87
88
88
88
88
89
89
89
90
90
90
91
91
91
91
92
92
92
93
93
93
93
94
94
94
94
94
95
95
95
95
96
96
96
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 4037 Processing the Unexpected Journey
HS 4042 Reading the West
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
4043
4046
4048
4052
4053
4054
4055
4056
4057
5010
5012
5013
5015
5017
5018
5020
5022
5026
5031
5034
5037
5039
5041
HS 5042
HS 5043
HS 5044
HS 5045
HS 5046
HS 6012
HS 6016
HS 6017
MD 2011
MD 2012
Wilderness in the West: Promise and Problems
Lincoln Before the Presidency
Politics of World Trade
Economic Development: Theory and Case Studies
Economics of Cooperation, Networks & Trust
Philosophies of Love
Topics in Philosophical Psychology: Other Minds
Histories of Race
Tutorial: Climate Policy Practicum
Advanced Composition
Wildlife Law Seminar
Methods of Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum
Hydro Politics in a Thirsty World
Advanced Spanish I
The Nature of Narrative
Advanced International Environmental Law Seminar
Hatchery
Advanced Seminar in Ecological Economics
Advanced Spanish II
Impact Investing
Capitalism: Economics and Institutions
Equal Rights, Equal Voices: The Rhetoric of Woman Suffrage
Tutorial: The UN Convention on Biological Diversity
Tutorial: Implementing the Paris Agreement (UNFCCC COP22)
Introduction to the Counseling Process
Diaspora and Unbelonging
Tutorial: Advanced Poetry Writing
Tutorial: Financial Bubbles and Crises
Learning a Language on Your Own
Mandarin Chinese - Traditional Characters
Immersion Program in French Language and Culture
Fisheries, Fishermen, and Fishing Communities
Failure
MD 3010 Biology Through the Lens
MD 3011 COA Foodprint
MD 4012 National Park Practicum: Interpretive Education and Design
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Waldron, Karen;
Clinger, Catherine
Anderson, John;
Cline, Ken
Cline, Ken
McKown, Jamie
Stabinsky, Doreen
Taylor, Davis
Taylor, Davis
Cox, Gray
Visvader, John
Little-Siebold, Todd
Stabinsky, Doreen
Kozak, Anne
Cline, Ken
Kozak, Anne
Cline, Ken
Pena, Karla
Waldron, Karen
Cline, Ken
Friedlander, Jay
Taylor, Davis
Pena, Karla
Friedlander, Jay
Taylor, Davis
McKown, Jamie
Cline, Ken;
Stabinsky, Doreen
Stabinsky, Doreen
Hill, Kenneth
van Vliet, Netta
Carpenter, William
Taylor, Davis
Cox, Gray
Tai, Bonnie
Stabinsky, Doreen
Petersen, Christopher
Friedlander, Jay;
Baker, Jodi
Ressel, Stephen
Morse, Suzanne;
Collum, Kourtney
Ressel, Stephen;
Colbert, Dru
96
97
97
97
98
98
99
99
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
101
101
101
101
102
102
102
102
103
103
103
104
104
104
104
105
105
105
105
106
106
106
106
113
INDEX BY COURSE TITLE
Course number indicates level as follows: 1000 Introductory; 2000 Introductory/Intermediate; 3000
Intermediate; 4000 Intermediate/Advanced; 5000 Advanced; 6000 Independent work (Internships,
Residencies, Independent Studies); 8000 Graduate.
COURSE#
AD 2012
AD 3028
HS 1032
AD 2023
ES 4014
HS 5010
HS 5020
AD 5013
HS 5026
HS 5017
HS 5031
HS 3015
ES 3010
AD 3020
AD 4021
ES 4040
AD 3013
AD 5017
AD 3010
AD 4017
ES 2020
AD 1022
AD 5030
HS 3010
HS 3073
AD 1033
HS 1019
HS 1020
ES 5010
MD 3010
ES 1052
ES 1054
ES 4010
HS 3011
HS 1025
ES 1024
ES 3012
ES 3028
HS 5037
AD 5018
AD 1034
ED 1013
ES 1020
ES 1030
ED 1014
ED 1011
AD 1028
HS 2016
HS 2065
114
COURSE TITLE
3D Studio: Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art and Design
Abstraction
Acadia: Exploring the National Park Idea
Actor Training I
Advanced Analysis in Biology
Advanced Composition
Advanced International Environmental Law Seminar
Advanced Projects: Art Practice and Concepts
Advanced Seminar in Ecological Economics
Advanced Spanish I
Advanced Spanish II
African American Literature
Agroecology
American Dreaming: Theatre and Activism in the US
Analog Photography: B&W
Animal Behavior
Animation
Animation II
Architectural Design Studio
Art and Culture in Northern New Mexico
Art and Science of Fermented Foods
Art Since 1900: Harmony and Conflict
Artist/Naturalist/Visionary
Autobiography
Bees and Society
Beginning Painting
Beginning Spanish I
Beginning Spanish II
Biochemistry I
Biology Through the Lens
Biology: Cellular Processes of Life
Biology: Form and Function
Biomechanics
Bread, Love, and Dreams
Business and Non-Profit Basics
Calculus I
Calculus II
Calculus III: Multivariable Calculus
Capitalism: Economics and Institutions
Carnet de Voyage: The Illustrated Travel Journal
Ceramics I
Changing Schools, Changing Society
Chemistry I
Chemistry II
Child Development
Children’s Literature
Chinese Calligraphy
Chinese Philosophy
Choice, Chance, and Tragedy
FACULTY
Colbert, Dru
Foley, Sean
Cline, Ken
Baker, Jodi
Todd, Sean
Kozak, Anne
Cline, Ken
Andrews, Nancy
Taylor, Davis
Pena, Karla
Pena, Karla
Waldron, Karen
Morse, Suzanne
Baker, Jodi
Winer, Josh
Anderson, John
Andrews, Nancy
Andrews, Nancy
Mancinelli, Isabel
Clinger, Catherine
Morse, Suzanne
Clinger, Catherine
Foley, Sean
Carpenter, William
Collum, Kourtney
Foley, Sean
Pena, Karla
Pena, Karla
Staff
Ressel, Stephen
Staff
Staff
Hess, Helen
Carpenter, William
Friedlander, Jay
Feldman, David
Feldman, David
Feldman, David
Taylor, Davis
Colbert, Dru
Mann, Rocky
Tai, Bonnie
Staff
Staff
Alex, Joanne
Ryan, Siobhan
Heckscher, Philip
Visvader, John
Lakey, Heather
PAGE
37
43
70
39
64
100
101
46
102
101
102
83
59
42
46
66
41
46
40
45
58
34
49
82
91
35
69
69
67
106
57
57
64
82
69
55
59
60
102
47
35
50
54
55
50
50
35
74
79
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS 3049
ES 3044
HS 1054
MD 3011
City/Country II: American Literary Landscapes 1900-1960
Climate and Weather
Climate Justice
COA Foodprint
HS
HS
HS
HS
Collaborative Leadership
College Seminar: City/Country in US Literature 1860-1920
Communicating Science
Community Planning and Decision Making
4021
2078
3039
2019
HS 2043
HS 3034
HS 2056
AD 2013
AD 2016
HS 4014
HS 3063
HS 3020
HS 4012
ES 4031
HS 4015
ES 1046
HS 4028
AD 2014
ED 5010
HS 3043
HS 5044
ES 3022
AD 3012
AD 2019
AD 3017
AD 1031
AD 2017
ES 3074
ES 3014
HS 4016
ES 4038
ES 2010
HS 4052
HS 4053
ED 3015
ES 4043
HS 1011
HS 4026
ES 3030
HS 2073
HS 4020
HS 5039
HS 2034
HS 1052
ES 3024
ED 1010
HS 2057
MD 2012
Conflict Resolution Across Cultures
Conspiracy Theory and Political Discourse
Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties
Constructing Visual Narrative
Contemporary Artist as Researcher and Activist
Contemporary Psychology: Body, Mind and Soul
Contemporary Rhetorical Theory
Contemporary Social Movement Strategies
Contemporary Women’s Novels
Costa Rican Natural History and Conservation
Creative Writing
Critical Zone I
Cross-Cultural American Women’s Novels
Curiosity and Wonder: Design & Interpretation in the Museum
Curriculum Design and Assessment
Democracy: Models, Theories, Questions
Diaspora and Unbelonging
Differential Equations
Documentary Video Studio
Dramatic Mechanics: The Dynamics of Difference and Power
Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen
Drawing I
Drawing Mineral and Botanical Matter in the Forest of Maine
E-STEM Professional Development Seminar
Ecology
Ecology and Experience
Ecology and Natural History of the American West
Ecology: Natural History
Economic Development: Theory and Case Studies
Economics of Cooperation, Networks & Trust
Education for Life
Environmental Geoscience Field Methods: Eastern CA
Environmental History
Environmental Law and Policy
Environmental Physiology
Environmental Psychology
Environmentality: Power, Knowledge, and Ecology
Equal Rights, Equal Voices: The Rhetoric of Woman Suffrage
Ethics: The History of a Problematic
Ethnographic Methods
Evolution
Experiential Education
Fail Better: Writing Short Fiction
Failure
HS 1014 Feminist Theory in a Transnational Frame
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Waldron, Karen
Hall, Sarah
Stabinsky, Doreen
Morse, Suzanne;
Collum, Kourtney
Beard, Ron
Waldron, Karen
Kozak, Anne
Borden, Richard;
Mancinelli, Isabel
Cox, Gray
McKown, Jamie
Seddig, Robert
Colbert, Dru
Clinger, Catherine
Borden, Richard
McKown, Jamie
Cox, Gray
Waldron, Karen
Ressel, Stephen
Carpenter, William
Hall, Sarah
Waldron, Karen
Colbert, Dru
Tai, Bonnie
McKown, Jamie
van Vliet, Netta
Feldman, David
Andrews, Nancy
Baker, Jodi
Lepcio, Andrea
Foley, Sean
Clinger, Catherine
Hall, Sarah
Anderson, John
Borden, Richard
Anderson, John
Swann, Scott
Taylor, Davis
Taylor, Davis
Tai, Bonnie
Hall, Sarah
Little-Siebold, Todd
Cline, Ken
Ressel, Stephen
Borden, Richard
McKown, Jamie
McKown, Jamie
Cox, Gray
van Vliet, Netta
Petersen, Christopher
Tai, Bonnie
Mahoney, Daniel
Friedlander, Jay;
Baker, Jodi
van Vliet, Netta
88
61
72
106
95
81
87
74
76
86
78
37
38
94
90
83
93
65
94
56
96
37
52
88
104
60
40
38
41
35
38
63
59
94
65
57
98
99
51
66
68
95
61
80
95
103
76
72
60
49
78
106
69
115
AD 1036 Figure Drawing
AD 4015 Film Sound and Image
AD 2022
MD 2011
AD 1019
ES 5040
HS 1013
ES 3061
ES 1014
ES 3032
HS 3069
HS 2020
ES 1038
HS 3016
AD 2011
AD 4014
HS 5022
HS 2063
ES 3018
HS 4018
HS 4056
HS 3040
AD 2020
HS 1021
AD 1038
AD 1020
ES 4018
ES 4020
HE 1010
HS 5015
AD 2026
HS 2021
HS 6017
HS 5034
AD 4010
HS 2061
ED 4012
ED 4013
ED 5011
Film Theory
Fisheries, Fishermen, and Fishing Communities
Four-Dimensional Studio
Fractals and Scaling
From Native Empires to Nation States
Functional Plant Morphology
Gardens & Greenhouses: Theory/Practice of Organic Gardening
Genetics
Genocide, Resistance, Response and Reconciliation
Geographic Information Systems I: Foundations & Applications
Geology of Mt. Desert Island
Global Environmental Politics: Theory and Practice
Graphic Design Studio I: Visual Communication
Graphic Design Studio II: Digital Projects
Hatchery
Hate Crimes in the Contemporary US and Europe
Herpetology
Histories of Power: States & Subalterns in Modern Latin America
Histories of Race
History of Agriculture: Apples
History of Photography
History of the American Conservation Movement
History of Video Art
History of Western Music
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Human Ecology Core Course
Hydro Politics in a Thirsty World
Illustration
Immersion Practica in Spanish and Yucatecan Culture
Immersion Program in French Language and Culture
Impact Investing
Improvisation in Music
Indigenous America
Integrated Methods IA: Gr. K-4 Reading and Writing
Integrated Methods IB: Gr. 5-8 Reading and Writing
Integrated Methods II: Science, Math, and Social Studies
ED
HS
AD
AD
AD
HS
AD
HS
ED
AD
ES
AD
HS
AD
HS
Intercultural Education
Intermediate Atelier in French Language and Conversation
Intermediate Ceramics
Intermediate Drawing
Intermediate Painting
Intermediate Spanish I
Intermediate Video: Studio and Strategies
International Wildlife Policy and Protected Areas
Introduction to Adolescent Psychology
Introduction to Arts and Design
Introduction to Chaos and Fractals
Introduction to Documentary Photography
Introduction to Economics & the Economy
Introduction to Guitar
Introduction to Journalism: Telling the Story
116
3013
3041
3032
3019
3027
3021
4012
3023
1016
1011
1026
1035
1046
1018
1055
Foley, Sean
36
Andrews, Nancy;
45
Cooper, John
Capers, Colin
39
Petersen, Christopher
105
Cooper, John
34
Feldman, David
67
Little-Siebold, Todd
68
Morse, Suzanne
62
Morse, Suzanne
54
Hess, Helen
61
Wessler, Steve
91
Longsworth, Gordon
75
Hall, Sarah
56
Stabinsky, Doreen
83
Colbert, Dru
36
Colbert, Dru
44
Friedlander, Jay
101
Wessler, Steve
79
Ressel, Stephen
60
Little-Siebold, Todd
94
Little-Siebold, Todd
99
Little-Siebold, Todd
87
Winer, Josh
39
Cline, Ken
69
Capers, Colin
36
Mancinelli, Isabel
34
Anderson, John
64
Anderson, John
65
Staff
68
Cline, Ken
100
Colbert, Dru
40
Pena, Karla
75
Stabinsky, Doreen
105
Friedlander, Jay
102
Cooper, John
44
Little-Siebold, Todd
78
Moody, Paula
52
Fuller, Linda
52
Fuller, Linda;
52
Alex, Joanne; St. Denis, Kate
Tai, Bonnie
51
Staff
87
Mann, Rocky
44
Foley, Sean
42
Foley, Sean
42
Pena, Karla
83
Andrews, Nancy
44
Cline, Ken
83
Hill, Kenneth
50
Cooper, John
33
Feldman, David
55
Winer, Josh
36
Taylor, Davis
71
Andrews, Nancy
34
Levin, Robert
72
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
AD
ES
ES
AD
ES
HS
HS
ES
HS
HS
ES
AD
AD
1012
3072
1022
1026
2012
5043
1012
2022
1028
2022
3020
1013
5031
Introduction to Keyboard/Piano
Introduction to Lichens and Bryophytes
Introduction to Oceanography
Introduction to Photography
Introduction to Statistics and Research Design
Introduction to the Counseling Process
Introduction to the Legal Process
Introductory Entomology
Introductory French I
Introductory French II
Invertebrate Zoology
Jazz, Rock, and Blues: From Their Origins to the Present
Journey into Substance: Art of the Hudson and New England
AD 3016 Land Use Planning I
AD
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
ES
ES
ES
HS
3011
4022
6012
2076
4046
3068
2010
2071
3072
6016
3074
1028
2030
3060
2049
Landscape Architecture Design Studio
Launching a New Venture
Learning a Language on Your Own
Life Stories: Memory, Family, and Place
Lincoln Before the Presidency
Linguistics, Language & Culture: Human Ecological Approach
Literature, Science, and Spirituality
Little Magazines: Seminar in Contemp. Literary Publishing
Macroeconomics: Theory and Experience
Mandarin Chinese - Traditional Characters
Mapping the Ocean’s Stories
Marine Biology
Marine Mammal Biology I
Marine Mammal Biology I: Field Studies
Marvelous Terrible Place: Human Ecology of Newfoundland
HS
HS
ES
ES
HS
5013
3027
3069
3065
3019
Methods of Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum
Microeconomics for Business and Policy
Molecular and Cell Biology
Molecular Genetics Workshop
Mountain Poets of China and Japan
AD 1025
AD 4018
AD 1014
MD 4012
Movement Training Basics
Movement Training Basics II
Music Fundamentals: Intro to Reading/Hearing/Writing/Playing
National Park Practicum: Interpretive Education and Design
HS
HS
HS
ES
ED
AD
HS
AD
3070
3059
4036
1040
3014
5026
2011
4020
Native American Law
Native American Literature
Native American Literature with a Focus on New Mexico
Natural Resources
Negotiating Educational Policy
Negotiating Wonder
Nineteenth Century American Women
Object and Performance
HS
ES
ES
ES
3036
3050
5014
1016
Oceans & Fishes: Readings in Environmental History
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Ornithology
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Cooper, John
Olday, Fred
Todd, Sean
Winer, Josh
Todd, Sean
Hill, Kenneth
Cline, Ken
Graham, Carrie
Staff
Staff
Hess, Helen
Cooper, John
Clinger, Catherine;
Foley, Sean
Mancinelli, Isabel;
Longsworth, Gordon
Mancinelli, Isabel
Friedlander, Jay
Cox, Gray
Donovan, Martha
McKown, Jamie
Cox, Gray
Waldron, Karen
Mahoney, Daniel
Taylor, Davis
Tai, Bonnie
Little-Siebold, Todd
Petersen, Christopher
Todd, Sean
Todd, Sean
Todd, Sean;
Springuel, Natalie
Kozak, Anne
Taylor, Davis
Hicks, Amy
Hess, Helen
Visvader, John;
Stover, Candice
Baker, Jodi
Baker, Jodi
Bennett, Michael
Ressel, Stephen;
Colbert, Dru
Cline, Ken
Waldron, Karen
Waldron, Karen
Hall, Sarah
Fuller, Linda
Foley, Sean
Waldron, Karen
Andrews, Nancy;
Baker, Jodi
Little-Siebold, Todd
Staff
Staff
Swann, Scott
33
63
54
34
58
104
68
58
70
75
60
33
49
41
40
95
105
81
97
90
73
80
91
105
92
55
58
62
76
100
84
63
62
83
34
45
33
106
91
89
96
56
51
47
74
46
86
62
67
54
117
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
3031
2012
2060
4054
2023
Our Public Lands: Past, Present, and Future
Personality and Social Development
Philosophies of Liberation
Philosophies of Love
Philosophy at the Movies
HS
HS
ES
ES
ES
ES
HS
AD
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
HS
AD
2074
2013
1034
1018
1044
1058
2079
3022
3012
1033
1045
4048
2052
3064
2026
2025
Philosophy of Death and Dying
Philosophy of Nature
Physics and Mathematics of Sustainable Energy
Physics I: Mechanics and Energy
Physics II
Physics II: Introduction to Circuits
Plato and the Origins of the West
Play Production Workshop
Poetry and the American Environment
Political Persuasion and Messaging Fundamentals
Politics of Israel
Politics of World Trade
Popular Psychology
Possession and the Human
Practical Skills in Community Development
Principles of Comedic Improvisation
AD 3024 Principles of Comedic Improvisation II
HS 1062 Problems and Dilemmas in Bioethics
HS 4037 Processing the Unexpected Journey
HS 1063 Public Speaking Workshop
ES 2031 Quantitative Geomorphology
HS 4042 Reading the West
HS
AD
HS
HS
AD
HS
ED
ES
ES
HS
HS
HS
HS
ES
HS
AD
HS
AD
ED
AD
ED
HS
HS
HS
118
1058
3072
2050
3077
5023
3033
5012
4041
3063
4010
2072
3029
2069
3048
3062
3014
4013
3031
5013
4019
3012
3035
3057
4019
Reason and Madness
Redefining the Act: Contemporary Theatre in Practice
Religious Intolerance in the United States
Rethinking Mental Disorders
Romanticism: The Triumph of the Imagination over Reason?
Satanic Verses
Secondary Methods: Life Science, Social Studies and English
Seeds
Seminar in Climate Change
Seminar in Human Ecology
Sex, Gender, Identity and Power
Shakespeare: Character, Conflict, and Cinematography
Sisters in Law: Women Justices and the US Supreme Court
Soils
Solutions
Soundscape
Starting Your Novel
Storytelling and Performance
Student Teaching
Studio Printmaking
Supporting Students with Disabilities in the Reg. Classroom
Sustainable Strategies
Taking the Waters: The Politics & Culture of Water in France
Technical Writing
Cline, Ken
Borden, Richard
Cox, Gray
Cox, Gray
Visvader, John;
Capers, Colin
Lakey, Heather
Visvader, John
Feldman, David
Benson, Cristy
Staff
Feldman, David
Cox, Gray
Baker, Jodi
Carpenter, William
McKown, Jamie
van Vliet, Netta
Stabinsky, Doreen
Borden, Richard
van Vliet, Netta
Beard, Ron
Fingerhut, Larrance;
Shepard, Jennifer
Fingerhut, Larrance;
Shepard, Jennifer
Lakey, Heather
Waldron, Karen;
Clinger, Catherine
McKown, Jamie
Hall, Sarah
Anderson, John;
Cline, Ken
Lakey, Heather
Baker, Jodi
Wessler, Steve
Gallon, Robert
Clinger, Catherine
Carpenter, William
Fuller, Linda
Morse, Suzanne
Hall, Sarah
Borden, Richard
Lakey, Heather
Carpenter, William
Seddig, Robert
Morse, Suzanne
Friedlander, Jay
Andrews, Nancy
Carpenter, William
Leaverton, Lisa
Fuller, Linda
Clinger, Catherine
Sanborn, Kelley
Friedlander, Jay
Cline, Ken
Kozak, Anne
85
74
78
99
75
80
74
55
54
56
57
82
42
82
70
71
98
77
90
76
40
42
73
96
73
59
97
73
44
77
93
47
85
53
66
62
93
80
84
79
61
89
41
93
43
53
46
51
86
89
94
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
HS
HS
HS
HS
ES
AD
HS
HS
HS
AD
AD
HS
AD
HS
HS
ES
AD
ES
HS
ES
HS
AD
HS
HS
AD
HS
ES
ES
ED
HS
2015
2075
3032
3038
3036
1017
3055
3028
5018
5029
2015
1026
2021
4055
2070
2014
5027
5039
5045
4045
4057
5028
5046
5042
6010
0952
3071
4046
5018
5041
The Age of Reason and the Enlightenment
The Anthropology of Food
The Cold War: Early Years
The Cold War: The Later Years
The History of Natural History
The History of Rock
The Mayas of Yesterday and Today
The Mystics
The Nature of Narrative
The Range of Sublimity in the Artist Mind
The Reality Effect: Art and Truth in the 19th Century
The Renaissance & the Reformation
The Science of Comedy
Topics in Philosophical Psychology: Other Minds
Transforming Food Systems
Trees and Shrubs of Mount Desert Island
Tutorial: Advanced Ensemble Project: Hamlet
Tutorial: Advanced Geology of MDI
Tutorial: Advanced Poetry Writing
Tutorial: Advanced Study of Corvidae
Tutorial: Climate Policy Practicum
Tutorial: Criterion Kids Theatre Project: Hamlet
Tutorial: Financial Bubbles and Crises
Tutorial: Implementing the Paris Agreement (UNFCCC COP22)
Tutorial: Individual Music Instruction
Tutorial: Introductory Writing
Tutorial: Linear Algebra w Applications to Diff. Equations
Tutorial: Marine Mammal Physiology
Tutorial: Qualitative Program Evaluation Methods
Tutorial: The UN Convention on Biological Diversity
HS
HS
HS
ES
HS
ES
HS
ES
HS
AD
HS
HS
HS
3075
3076
3053
2034
4043
4036
5012
4012
4034
1016
1039
1056
2055
Tutorial: Writing Feasibility Reports and Proposals
US Farm and Food Policy
Voyages
Weed Ecology
Wilderness in the West: Promise and Problems
Wildlife Ecology
Wildlife Law Seminar
Winter Ecology
World Literature
World Percussion
Writing Seminar I: Exposition
Writing Seminar I: Exposition with a Business Focus
Writing Seminar II: Argumentation
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC CATALOG 2017–2018
Little-Siebold, Todd
Collum, Kourtney
McKown, Jamie
McKown, Jamie
Anderson, John
Cooper, John
Pena, Karla
Visvader, John
Waldron, Karen
Clinger, Catherine
Clinger, Catherine
Little-Siebold, Todd
Baker, Jodi
Visvader, John
Collum, Kourtney
Weber, Jill
Baker, Jodi
Hall, Sarah
Carpenter, William
Swann, Scott
Stabinsky, Doreen
Baker, Jodi
Taylor, Davis
Stabinsky, Doreen
Cooper, John
Kozak, Anne
Feldman, David
Todd, Sean
Tai, Bonnie
Cline, Ken;
Stabinsky, Doreen
Kozak, Anne
Collum, Kourtney
Carpenter, William
Morse, Suzanne
Cline, Ken
Anderson, John
Cline, Ken
Ressel, Stephen
Turok, Katharine
Cooper, John
Staff
Lepcio, Andrea
Staff
74
81
85
87
61
33
88
84
101
48
38
70
39
99
79
58
48
67
104
67
100
48
104
103
49
68
63
67
53
103
92
92
88
59
97
65
100
64
96
33
71
72
77
119
DATES AND DEADLINES FOR 2017–2018
TERMS
FALL 2017
WINTER 2018
SPRING 2018
FALL 2018
First day of class
9/7/17
1/8/18
4/2/18
9/6/18
Last day of class
11/17/17
3/16/18
6/8/18
11/16/18
DATES
6/9/18
Commencement
BUSINESS OFFICE
Online statements available
7/7/17
11/03/17
2/28/18
7/06/18
Payment due dates
8/7/17
12/04/17
3/19/18
8/06/18
10/13/17
2/2/18
5/4/18
10/13/18
10/15/1710/20/17
2/11/182/16/18
5/6/185/11/18
Course withdrawal (no reversals)
REGISTRAR
Registration
Add/drop
9/13/17
1/12/18
4/6/18
Independent study proposals
9/13/17
1/12/18
4/6/18
Residency applications due
10/20/17
2/16/18
5/11/18
Advising forum
10/11/17
2/7/17
5/2/18
Student self-evaluations
12/1/18
3/30/18
6/22/18
Faculty grades & evaluations
12/8/17
4/6/18
6/29/18
9/8/17
11/10/17
3/9/18
(summer
6/8/18)
9/7/18
10/11/17
2/7/18
5/2/18
2/16/18
5/11/18
INTERNSHIP COMMITTEE
Proposals
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
Group study proposals
SENIORS
Watson Fellowship intent form
9/11/17
Human ecology essay draft
10/20/17
2/23/18
Final signed human ecology essay copy
Senior project proposal
9/13/17
10/20/17
Senior project, completed
6/1/18
2018 to graduate or stand
Completed: internships, degree
certification form, community service,
incompletes, standing contract, transfer
credit, extensions, writing portfolio
4/27/18
SUMMER 2018 BUSINESS OFFICE (2018–2019 Academic Year)
Bills available online
Bills due
6/8/18
7/10/18
COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC
105 Eden Street · Bar Harbor ME 04609
800-528-0025 · [email protected]
www.coa.edu
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement