2014 Annual Report PDF
Teck 2014 Annual Report
Adaptability
Teck Resources Limited
Suite 3300, 550 Burrard Street
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
V6C 0B3
+1.604.699.4000 Tel
+1.604.699.4750 Fax
www.teck.com
Setting Possibilities in Motion
Adaptability
Teck 2014 Annual Report
Stock Exchanges
Our Class A common and Class B subordinate voting
shares are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange under
the symbols TCK.A and TCK.B, respectively.
Our Class B subordinate voting shares are listed on
the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol TCK.
Dividends declared on Class A and B shares
Amount per share
$0.45
$0.45
Payment Date
July 2, 2014
January 2, 2015
These dividends are eligible for both the federal and
provincial enhanced dividend tax credits.
Shares Outstanding at December 31, 2014
Proven Ability to Meet a Changing World
Class A common shares
Class B subordinate voting shares
9,353,470
566,794,741
Shareholder Relations
Karen L. Dunfee, Corporate Secretary
Annual Meeting
Our annual meeting of shareholders will be held
at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, April 22, 2015, in the
Waterfront Ballroom, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel,
900 Canada Place Way, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Transfer Agents
Inquiries regarding change of address, stock transfer,
registered shareholdings, dividends or lost certificates
should be directed to our Registrar and Transfer Agent:
CST Trust Company
1600 – 1066 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6E 3X1
CST Trust Company provides an Answerline Service
for the convenience of shareholders:
Toll-free in Canada and the U.S.
1.800.387.0825
Outside Canada and the U.S.
1.416.682.3860
Email: [email protected]
On the cover: The Rocky Mountains provide an impressive
backdrop to steelmaking coal mining underway at Teck’s
Greenhills Operations in southeast British Columbia, Canada.
American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC
6201 15th Avenue
Brooklyn, New York
11219
1.800.937.5449 or 718.921.8124
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.amstock.com
TTY: 866.703.9077 or 718.921.8386
Auditors
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Chartered Accountants
Suite 700
250 Howe Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6C 3S7
Annual Information Form
We prepare an Annual Information Form (AIF) that is
filed with the securities commissions or similar bodies
in all the provinces of Canada. Copies of our AIF and
annual and quarterly reports are available on request
or on our website at www.teck.com, on the Canadian
Securities Administrators website at www.sedar.com
(SEDAR), and on the EDGAR section of the United
States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
website at www.sec.gov.
Our Business
Teck is a diversified resource company committed to responsible mining and mineral
development with business units focused on steelmaking coal, copper, zinc and energy.
Headquartered in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, we own or have an interest
in 13 mines, one large metallurgical complex, a wind power facility, and several major
development projects in Canada, the United States, Chile and Peru. We have expertise
across a wide range of activities related to exploration, development, mining and
minerals processing including smelting and refining, safety, environmental protection,
materials stewardship, recycling and research.
Our strategic objective is to ensure Teck is the premier mining company in the business
in terms of building shareholder value, safety, sustainability, and mutually beneficial
relationships with all of our partners and stakeholders.
Mineral reserve and resource estimates for our properties are disclosed in our most recent Annual Information Form, which is
available on our website at www.teck.com, on the Canadian Securities Administrators website at www.sedar.com (SEDAR), and on
the EDGAR section of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) website at www.sec.gov.
Forward-Looking Statements
This annual report contains forward-looking statements. Please refer to the “Caution on Forward-Looking Information” on page 51.
All dollar amounts expressed throughout this report are in Canadian dollars unless otherwise noted.
In This Report
Operations Map
2
Copper21
2014 Highlights 3
Zinc26
Letter from the Chairman 4
Energy29
Letter from the CEO 6
Exploration31
Diversified Resources
8
Financial Overview
32
52
Health and Safety
10
Consolidated Financial Statements
Our People
11
Officers117
Sustainability12
Board of Directors
118
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
Corporate Information
120
13
Coal17
1
1
7
2
3
1
Vancouver
Corporate Head Office
Operations & Projects:
Copper
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Highland Valley Copper
Duck Pond
Antamina
Quebrada Blanca
Carmen de Andacollo
Relincho
Galore Creek
Mesaba
Zinc
1
2
3
1
2
3
2
3
Energy
1
2
3
Frontier
Fort Hills
Wintering Hills
Steelmaking Coal
1
2
3
Red Dog
Trail Operations
Pend Oreille
Cardinal River
Coal Sites in B.C.
· Fording River
· Greenhills
· Line Creek
· Elkview
· Coal Mountain
Quintette
We have operations focused on
steelmaking coal, copper, zinc and
energy in four countries, and offices
and exploration projects worldwide
2
2
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
3
4
6
5
2014 Highlights
Safety
Reduced High Potential Incident frequency rate by 22% compared to 2013.
•
Attained a 25% lower reportable injury frequency than 2013.
•
Financial
Revenue of $8.6 billion and gross profit before depreciation of $2.9 billion.
•
Cash flow from operations of $2.3 billion.
•
Profit attributable to shareholders of $362 million, or $0.63 per share. Adjusted profit of $452 million,
or $0.78 per share.
•
Over $5.0 billion of liquidity at the end of 2014. Cash balance of $2.0 billion and a US$3.0 billion unused line of credit.
•
Declared dividends at an annualized rate of $0.90 per share.
•
Operating and Development
Cost reduction program continues to exceed initial goals, with approximately $640 million of annualized reductions
realized to date.
•
Achieved record annual steelmaking coal production of 26.7 million tonnes.
•
Achieved record annual zinc production of 596,000 tonnes at Red Dog mine.
•
Completed the mill optimization project at Highland Valley Copper, with mill throughput averaging 140,000 tonnes
per day for the last nine months of 2014, exceeding the design rate of 130,000 tonnes per day.
•
Restarted Pend Oreille zinc mine on time and under budget. Full production of 44,000 tonnes on an annualized
basis expected in the second quarter of 2015.
•
Fort Hills oil sands project progressing on schedule and meeting all critical milestones.
•
Sustainability
Ranked as the top mining company worldwide on the Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations list by media and
investment research company Corporate Knights in January 2015, the third consecutive year we have been included.
•
Named to the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index (DJSI) for the fifth consecutive year. Our DJSI score placed
our sustainability performance in the top 10% of the world’s 2,500 largest public companies.
•
Revenue ($ in billions)
2014
2013
2012
$8.6
2010
$10.3
$11.5
$9.2
Cash Flow from Operations ($ in billions)
2014
2014
2013
$9.4
2011
Profit Attributable to Shareholders ($ in billions)
2012
$0.4
2013
$1.0
2012
$1.1
2011
2010
$2.7
$1.8
$2.3
$2.9
$3.4
2011
2010
$4.0
$3.3
2014 Highlights
3
Letter from the Chairman
Norman B. Keevil
Chairman of the Board
To the Shareholders
When the retired Governor General of Canada, the Right Honourable Roland Michener, was Chairman of Teck some
years ago, he would say he had learned “to speak in governor generalities”. With the balance of this annual report
covering your management’s exceptional work in sustainability, societal expectations, safety, production, profits and
cost control in challenging times, perhaps as Chairman I may retain the prerogative of speaking more of generalities
in this space.
Readers may tire of being reminded that there are two parts to the popular phrase ‘super-cycle’, and that the second
half has not been abolished. We are into it now for many commodities, although how deep and for how long is never
clear. That said, I do believe we are still into a long-term secular trend of increasing demand for most of our mined
products, as people in less developed parts of the world work to achieve their aspirations. It just will never be a straight
line up, and the pauses can be difficult, as well as ripe with opportunity.
It is a generally understood observation about the commodities business that it is cyclical. As Professor Lu Feng
of Peking University once said: “In a competitive environment, overcapacity is inevitable”. And, to paraphrase the
Canadian mining philosopher Ian Telfer: “Our business is like life; it is never as good as it seems, and it’s never as
bad as it seems”.
In fact, most businesses are cyclical. In what might be called “The Law of Entrepreneurial Folly”, periodic surpluses
have to be considered the norm, with their severity and duration generally reflecting the elasticity or non-elasticity of
supply in a sector.
Capital-intensive sectors such as mining may find it harder than some other sectors to make the obvious response to
such periods of oversupply, thus prolonging them. At times, we may tend to be our own worst enemies.
In this business we are all guilty, our peers and us, of perverse behaviour at times. Our institutional investors rarely tell
us we need to cut back production, instead taking us to task if we aren’t seen to be increasing production of gold, or
copper, or coal, or zinc, or whatever it is we produce, every year. We are encouraged to do almost anything to keep it up.
Recall that gold producers for years were valued more on the number of ounces they produced than on their profitability,
although that does seem to be changing recently. The iron producers may be guilty of the same behaviour today.
Our operations managers, across the industry, have a natural tendency to press continuously to produce more of
their stuff every year. They are generally rewarded for that, but it is also instinctive. Who takes great pride in reporting:
“I managed to get production down again this year”? Not many. And yet, each such “successful production year”
in a downturn exacerbates the problem. Maybe there is a better way?
But if I’m right that we are still into a long-term secular trend of growing demand, these low parts of the cycle can
present opportunities as well. The trick in building real value in this business has always been the ability to think and
act contra-cyclically, often against the pack, but at the right times and for the right assets.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
When at or near the peak and everyone else is acting profligately, the thoughtful observer might think about
squirreling something away, to be in position to take full advantage of the next downturn. And at or near the bottom,
rather than succumbing to fear, using some of those chestnuts to acquire and build even greater value for the
next upturn.
Successful bottom fishing has been done before in this company, leading to our Hemlo gold, Bullmoose coal and
Antamina copper-zinc mines. Each arguably transformational property was acquired and/or built in the middle of a
financial crisis, because we were prepared, and we were in a financial position to do so. Can we do that again?
We must, because we didn’t build this business just to be part of the pack.
Teck has never been immune to cycles and cannot be, but we have and will aim to build value for our owners
consistently over the medium to long term, irrespective of the inevitable fluctuations along the way. We will never
accept being just a “cyclical trading vehicle”.
Sometimes bold moves can be unpopular or nerve-racking for a while, as Antamina was until we proved it could be
financed and built successfully, and as Fort Hills may seem to some observers today. But rejuvenating through quality,
long-life assets like these is the key to building a good, sustainable mining company, and one has to grasp them when
one can. As always, this part of the cycle will turn.
Changing of the Guard
Your Board is in the process of rejuvenating as well, with Chris Thompson having chosen to retire from most of his
public company boards for personal reasons. Janice Rennie, who has served for eight years, has asked not to have her
name put forward in April, and Hugh Bolton will not be standing again, having passed the company’s mandatory
retirement age with one extension. Also, we lost a valued Board member in Jalynn Bennett in a tragic accident last
month.
Each has been a valued member of the Teck Board for a number of years, contributing in their own ways to the
company’s success, and their service and advice has been much appreciated.
Two new directors joined the Board late in 2014, Tracey McVicar and Laura Dottori-Attanasio, and each brings important
financial and analytical skills honed at CAI Capital and CIBC, respectively. I’m pleased to say as well that Tim Snider and
Ken Pickering, both well-known mining people with extensive experience in building and operating large mines for
industry-leading companies, have agreed to stand for election at the annual meeting in April. Their technological
and business input will be a huge asset to Teck as we go forward.
On behalf of the Board of Directors,
Dr. Norman B. Keevil
Chairman
Vancouver, B.C., Canada
February 17, 2015
Letter from the Chairman
5
Letter from the CEO
Donald R. Lindsay
President and Chief Executive Officer
To the Shareholders
2014 was a year marked by oversupply and declining prices for a number of key commodities across the mining sector.
Teck and its employees demonstrated resilience and adaptability in the face of these challenging market conditions,
generating positive cash margins and meeting or exceeding production guidance at each of our mines. Significant cost
savings were also achieved in each of our business units, helping to maintain our strong financial position.
Our operations continued to perform very well in 2014. We achieved record steelmaking coal production of 26.7 million
tonnes and sales of 26.2 million tonnes. In our copper business, Antamina set a record for throughput of approximately
138,000 tonnes per day. In our zinc business, we achieved record annual zinc production of 596,000 tonnes at our
Red Dog mine.
We successfully completed a number of major projects in 2014. The mill optimization project at Highland Valley Copper
significantly increased throughput and exceeded design capacity by approximately 10,000 tonnes per day. The new
acid plant at Trail Operations was completed in May 2014 and achieved design rates by June. Our Pend Oreille mine
was successfully restarted in December 2014 on time and under budget, to capitalize on improving zinc fundamentals.
Construction of the Fort Hills oil sands project also made substantial progress throughout the year, consistent with
the project schedule and budget.
Improving efficiency and reducing costs was a key focus in 2014. As a result, we have achieved annualized savings of
approximately $640 million to date.
We continued to build on our efforts to improve safety performance, with lower rates of High Potential Incidents and a
25% reduction in Total Reportable Injury Frequency compared to the previous year. Sadly, we had two fatalities in 2014
— one at our Coal Mountain Operation in March and one at an exploration project in Chile in November. These incidents
reinforce the importance of remaining vigilant and continuing to work towards our goal of everyone going home safe
and healthy every day.
We have maintained a strong financial position with approximately $5 billion of liquidity at the end of 2014, consisting of
cash on hand of $2 billion and US$3 billion available under our revolving credit facility that matures in 2019. In addition,
we have only US$300 million of long-term notes due until early 2017.
Prices declined for a number of our products throughout 2014, affecting profit. Oversupply of steelmaking coal caused
the average realized coal price to fall by US$34 per tonne to US$115 per tonne in 2014, a decrease of 23% over the year.
Average copper prices fell by US$0.21 per pound to US$3.11 per pound in 2014, a decrease of 6%, as a result of concerns
about a potential developing copper surplus. Early in 2015, prices declined by a further 15% and are now at five-year lows.
In contrast, average zinc prices rose by US$0.11 per pound to US$0.98 per pound in 2014, an increase of 13%.
Oil prices have also experienced a significant decline since mid-2014; however, this currently benefits Teck in the form
of lower operating costs at our existing operations equivalent to an increase of approximately $5 million in EBITDA for
every US$1 per barrel decrease. Further, the decline in oil prices has led other companies to reduce their drilling activities
and defer or cancel various capital projects. We believe this will lead to downward pressure on contractor costs and
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
increase the availability of experienced labour in the oil sands. This could result in reduced cost pressures during the
construction phase of Fort Hills, which is expected to begin production in 2017.
In addition, we benefit from the strengthening of the U.S. dollar, with each CAD$0.01 change in the exchange rate
affecting our EBITDA by approximately $52 million on an annualized basis.
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization in 2014 was $2.9 billion compared with $3.7 billion in 2013, with the
reduction due mainly to lower commodity prices. Annual revenue in 2014 was $8.6 billion, down 8% from the previous
year. In 2014 we declared annual dividends of $0.90 per share, returning $518 million to shareholders.
Meeting societal expectations around responsible resource development is essential to our continued ability to operate
and advance our projects. As such, we are focused on protecting the environment and building and maintaining strong
relationships with Indigenous Peoples, communities and other stakeholders.
In 2014, we continued to make progress towards achieving the goals outlined in our sustainability strategy, which are
organized around our most significant areas of risk and opportunity in sustainability. We are on track to achieve our
short-term 2015 sustainability goals on schedule. Teck was again named the top mining company worldwide on the
Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations list in January 2015, and we were also named to the Dow Jones Sustainability
World Index for the fifth consecutive year in 2014.
Looking ahead, we expect to meet or exceed the 2015 production and cost targets for each of our copper, steelmaking
coal and zinc operations. At the same time, we will embed the $640 million in cost savings we achieved over 2013 and
2014 in our operations and functional groups, and target an additional margin of $100 million for 2015 through operating
excellence and production maximization at our operations, while continuing to prudently manage our capital spending.
We will continue advancing our Quebrada Blanca Phase 2 project while working to achieve significant capital cost
reductions and considering opportunities to enhance the value of our projects through partnerships. We will maximize
learnings from the construction of Fort Hills and work on plans to market our share of bitumen.
We will maintain a strong balance sheet and access to a wide range of sources of capital and ensure that we are
appropriately positioned and resourced to identify and act on internal and external opportunities to enhance our portfolio
— from early stage exploration properties through to producing assets.
In the area of sustainability, with completion of all of our 2015 goals drawing near, we will review and update our
strategy and develop our next set of short-term goals to 2020 as we work towards our long-term 2030 goals.
The progress we have made in every aspect of our performance in 2014 is due to the quality of our people, and I want
to thank all Teck employees for their dedication and commitment over the year.
We were saddened by the passing in January 2015 of Jalynn Bennett, a 10-year member of our Board of Directors,
whose wisdom and insight will be greatly missed.
After 22 years with Teck, Doug Horswill, Senior Vice President, retired in April. Doug was one of the longest-serving
members of our senior management team, and his leadership has played a major role in shaping our company’s approach
to sustainability and social responsibility. We also welcomed two new members to our senior management team in 2014:
Shehzad Bharmal, Vice President, Strategy and Development, Copper; and Larry Davey, Vice President, Development, Coal.
The steps we have taken to increase production, reduce costs and build positive relationships with the communities
where we operate put us in a strong position as we head into 2015. Looking ahead, Teck will continue to deliver strong
operational performance and provide the materials essential to building a better quality of life for people around the world.
Donald R. Lindsay
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vancouver, B.C., Canada
February 17, 2015
Letter from the CEO
7
Diversified Resources
Steelmaking Coal
Copper
Teck is a major global producer of
seaborne steelmaking coal, with six
operations in Western Canada and over
100 years of high-quality steelmaking
coal reserves and resources.
Teck is a top 10 copper producer in the
Americas, with five operating mines and a
pipeline of copper development projects
in North and South America.
We are the world’s second-largest exporter and North
America’s largest producer of seaborne steelmaking
coal, with the capacity to produce 28 million tonnes
annually and options to expand production further if
market conditions change. We have implemented cost
reduction measures and upgraded infrastructure to
ensure our operations remain competitive during
challenging market conditions.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
We currently have the capacity to produce over
330,000 tonnes of copper annually, primarily from our
Highland Valley Copper Operations in Canada, the
Antamina mine in Peru, and from our Quebrada Blanca
and Carmen de Andacollo operations in Chile.
We are working to grow our copper business by
optimizing the production potential at our existing mines,
developing our extensive portfolio of potential long-life
copper resources and discovering new resources.
Pictured above: (left) Employees perform preventative maintenance on a haul truck at
Greenhills Operations (right) Marisol Muñoz, Plant Operator Trainee, Quebrada Blanca Operations
Zinc
Energy
Teck is the world’s third-largest producer
of mined zinc, and operates one of the
world’s largest fully integrated zinc and
lead smelting and refining facilities.
Teck is building an energy business unit
that will further diversify our resource
portfolio and generate significant longterm value.
We have the capacity to produce over 640,000 tonnes
of zinc in concentrate annually, primarily from our
Red Dog Operations and Pend Oreille Operations in the
United States, the Antamina mine in Peru, and over
280,000 tonnes of refined zinc from our Trail Operations
in Canada.
Our energy business unit includes a 20% interest
in the Fort Hills oil sands project currently under
construction, with production expected to start as early
as the fourth quarter of 2017. Additionally, we hold a
100% interest in the Frontier oil sands project, as well
as other interests in oil sands leases in the Athabasca
region of northeastern Alberta. We are also contributing
to the development of renewable power through our
49% interest in the Wintering Hills Wind Power Facility
in southeast Alberta.
Pictured above: (left) John May, Silver Refinery Furnace Operator, Trail Operations
(right) two employees discuss the Fort Hills oil sands project
Our Business
9
Health and Safety
Safety is a core value at Teck, and we believe it is possible to operate without serious
injuries. By providing our people with the best safety procedures, tools and practices and
by empowering each employee to be a Courageous Safety Leader, we know it is possible
to achieve our vision of everyone going home safe and healthy every day.
Building on Our Safety Performance
In 2014, we continued to build on our safety performance,
with reductions in our High Potential Incident (HPI)
frequency rate compared to 2013. Total reportable injury
frequency was 25% lower than in 2013; however, our
lost-time injury frequency increased by 10%, primarily
because of a higher proportion of more significant injuries
related to strains, sprains and fractures that required
time off work as directed by a medical professional.
Despite this progress, we were deeply saddened by two
incidents that resulted in fatalities at our operations in 2014.
An incident on March 16 at our Coal Mountain Operations
in Canada resulted in the death of Teck employee Miles
Lorenz, and an incident on November 15 at an exploration
project in Chile resulted in the death of contractor
Heriberto Rojas. These unfortunate events reinforce that
we cannot waver in our efforts to build a culture of health
and safety across Teck and to constantly improve our
management of safety hazards and risks at all levels.
Investigations were carried out for both incidents to learn
as much as possible and to implement any measures
possible to prevent a reoccurrence. These learnings have
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
been shared across all of our sites, as well as with our
industry peers.
Learning and Improving
Building on our focus in 2013 to identify root causes and
contributing factors for HPIs, in 2014 we developed and
implemented a new High Potential Risk Control strategy at
all operations across our company. This strategy aims to
identify High Potential Risks through analysis of performance
history and the application of activity-based risk assessment
tools. This includes identifying and evaluating the controls
that will most effectively prevent serious injury or loss of
life, and assessing the implementation and effectiveness
of these established controls.
Our Culture of Health and Safety
Courageous Safety Leadership is Teck’s values-based safety
philosophy and training program that aims to empower
every employee and contractor to be a safety leader.
Courageous Safety Leadership is foundational in building a
true culture of safety within our company. Since 2009, more
than 16,000 employees and contractors have participated
in Courageous Safety Leadership training at Teck.
Pictured above: Luc Coultry, Coordinator Safety and Loss Control, Greenhills Operations
Our People
Our people are at the centre of everything we do. They are our best ambassadors and
are essential to building and maintaining strong relationships with our communities of
interest. Through their actions and decisions, they convey Teck’s commitment to doing
the right thing for people, communities and future generations.
A Foundation for Success
We know that our people are the foundation of our
success. Every aspect of our business — from exploration
to production to environmental performance — depends
upon the more than 10,000 employees and contractors
who work at Teck around the world. That is why we are
focused on attracting and retaining a skilled, engaged
and diverse workforce by providing rewarding careers
and opportunities for growth and development.
Focused on Efficiency and Skill
Throughout 2014, we faced challenging market
conditions for the commodities we produce. In order
to maintain our competitiveness and emerge stronger
from the current price cycle, it was critical for us to
focus on ensuring our workforce was as efficient as
possible. Over the course of the year, we reduced our
global workforce by about 5%, which is equivalent
to a total of 600 positions. Wherever possible, these
reductions were achieved through attrition.
Pictured above: Dean Wright, Heavy Duty Mechanic, Line Creek Operations
At the same time, we know that demographic pressures
on the workforce, including an aging employee base and
skilled labour shortage, persist across the mining industry
and other business sectors. This makes it essential
that we continue to focus on attracting, retaining and
developing skilled employees. We support our employees
in continually developing their skills. We partner with a
number of post-secondary institutions on apprenticeship
programs and we focus our recruitment efforts on skilled
trades and professionals. In recent years, we have worked
to strengthen our apprenticeship programs and there
are now over 250 apprentices across our operations.
Supporting Our People
A motivated, effective workforce is also a healthy
workforce. To support the health of our employees, we
have developed a global Health and Wellness strategy
that provides resources and tools to promote physical,
mental, financial and social well-being.
Safety
11
Our People
Sustainability
Operating for over a century has given us a wealth of experience in socially and
environmentally responsible resource development, and we have pioneered innovative
technologies and approaches that have helped improve the sustainability of the
entire industry.
Our Commitment to Sustainability
The materials we produce are essential to building a
modern, sustainable society, and to improving the quality
of life for people living around the world. At the same
time, we know that meeting societal expectations
around the responsible development of those materials
is essential to maintaining our ability to operate and to
ensuring our long-term success. As such, sustainability
is a key part of everything we do, and it informs every
business decision we make.
Our commitment to sustainability is reflected in the
approach we take to a range of activities conducted
throughout every stage of the mining life cycle. This
starts with the earliest exploration stage when we work
to establish honest and respectful relationships with
communities, and to find opportunities to maximize
local benefits.
During mine operation, we focus on avoiding, minimizing
and mitigating any potential impacts, including maintaining
water quality, reducing water use, managing air quality,
protecting regional biodiversity and using energy
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
efficiently. Following the end of mining, we fully reclaim
disturbed areas to re-establish self-sustaining landscapes
and ecosystems.
Throughout, we depend on community support for our
activities, making communities the foundation of our
sustainability strategy. We are committed to building strong
relationships and collaborating with communities so they
genuinely benefit in a self-defined and sustainable manner
from our activities.
Our Sustainability Strategy
Throughout our over 100 years in business, responsible
mining and mineral development have been fundamental
to our long-term success. In 2011, we formalized this
approach with the launch of our sustainability strategy,
which identified six areas of focus: Community, Our People,
Water, Biodiversity, Energy, and Materials Stewardship.
Collectively, these areas represent the most significant
challenges and opportunities facing our company in the
area of sustainability. More information can be found in
Teck’s annual sustainability report at Teck.com.
Pictured above: Victoria Gehue, Environmental Officer, Fording River Operations
Management’s
Discussion and
Analysis
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
13
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
Our business is exploring for, acquiring, developing and producing natural resources. We are organized into business
units focused on steelmaking coal, copper, zinc and energy. These are supported by our corporate offices, which
manage our corporate growth initiatives and provide administrative, technical, financial and other assistance.
Through our interests in mining and processing operations in Canada, the United States (U.S.), Chile and Peru, we are
the world’s second-largest exporter of seaborne steelmaking coal, an important producer of copper and one of the
world’s largest producers of mined zinc. We also produce lead, molybdenum, silver, and various specialty and other
metals, chemicals and fertilizers. In addition, we own a 20% interest in the Fort Hills oil sands project, and interests
in other significant assets in the Athabasca region of Alberta. We also actively explore for copper, zinc and gold.
This Management’s Discussion and Analysis of our results of operations is prepared as at February 17, 2015 and
should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements as at and for the year ended
December 31, 2014. Unless the context otherwise dictates, a reference to Teck, Teck Resources, the Company, us,
we, or our refers to Teck Resources Limited and its subsidiaries including Teck Metals Ltd. and Teck Coal Partnership.
All dollar amounts are in Canadian dollars, unless otherwise stated, and are based on our consolidated financial
statements that are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). In addition, we
use certain financial measures, which are identified throughout the Management’s Discussion and Analysis in this
report, which are not measures recognized under IFRS in Canada and do not have a standardized meaning prescribed
by IFRS or Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) in the U.S. See “Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures”
on page 48 for an explanation of these financial measures and reconciliation to the most directly comparable financial
measure under IFRS.
This Management’s Discussion and Analysis contains certain forward-looking information and forward-looking
statements. You should review the cautionary statement on forward-looking information under the heading “Caution
on Forward-Looking Information” on page 51, which forms part of this Management’s Discussion and Analysis.
Additional information about us, including our most recent Annual Information Form, is available on our website at
www.teck.com, on the Canadian Securities Administrators website at www.sedar.com (SEDAR), and on the EDGAR
section of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) website at www.sec.gov.
14
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Business Unit Results
The table below shows a summary of our production of our major commodities for the last five years and estimated
production for 2015.
Five-Year Production Record and Our Expected Share of Production in 2015
Units
2015 (2)
(000’s) 20102011201220132014estimate
Principal Products
Steelmaking coal
tonnes
Copper(1) tonnes
313321373364333350
Contained in concentrate tonnes
645646598623660650
Refined tonnes
278291284290277285
23,10922,78524,65225,62226,69127,000
Zinc
Other Products
Lead
Contained in concentrate
tonnes110849597
12397
Refined tonnes
Molybdenum contained
in concentrate pounds
728688868288
8,55710,98312,692 8,322 5,8696,250
Notes:
(1) We include 100% of the production and sales from our Highland Valley Copper, Quebrada Blanca and Carmen de Andacollo mines in our production
and sales volumes, even though we own 97.5%, 76.5% and 90%, respectively, of these operations, because we fully consolidate their results in
our financial statements. We include 22.5% of production and sales from Antamina, representing our proportionate equity interest in Antamina.
(2) Production estimate for 2015 represents the mid-range of our production guidance.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
15
Average commodity prices and exchange rates for the past three years, which are key drivers of our profit, are
summarized in the following table.
US$
2014 % chg 2013 % chg 2012
CAD$
2014 % chg
2013 % chg
2012
Coal (realized — $/tonne)
115-23%149-23%193
Copper (LME cash — $/pound)
3.11 -6%3.32 -8%3.61
3.43
Zinc (LME cash — $/pound)
0.98+13%0.87 -1%0.88
1.08+20% 0.90 +2% 0.88
19-21% 24-23% 31
21 -16% 25-20% 31
Silver (LME PM fix — $/ounce)
Molybdenum (Platts — $/pound)
11+10% 10 -23% 13
(1)
Lead (LME cash — $/pound)
0.95 -2%0.97 +3%0.94
126 -18% 153-21% 194
–3.42 -5%3.61
12+20%
1.05
+5%
10 -23%
1.00
13
+6% 0.94
Exchange rate (Bank of Canada)
US$1 = CAD$
1.10 +7%1.03 +3%1.00
CAD$1 = US$
0.91 -6%0.97 -3%1.00
Notes:
(1) Published major supplier selling price in Platts Metals Week.
Our revenue and gross profit before depreciation and amortization by business unit are summarized in the following table.
Revenue
($ in millions) Coal Gross Profit Before
Depreciation and Amortization (1)
2014
2013
2012
2014
2013
2012
$3,335$
4,113$
4,647$913$
1,729$
2,405
Copper
Zinc 2,675
2,410
2,550
779
534
497
2,586
2,853
3,142
1,177
1,391
1,601
Energy
3 6 4 3 5 4
Total
$8,599$
9,382$
10,343$2,872$
3,659$
4,507
Notes:
(1) Gross profit before depreciation and amortization is a non-GAAP financial measure. See “Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures” section for
further information.
16
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Coal
In 2014, our coal operations produced a record 26.7 million tonnes of steelmaking coal, with sales of 26.2 million
tonnes. The majority of our sales are to the Asia-Pacific region, with lesser amounts going primarily to Europe and
the Americas. Our proven and probable reserves of more than 1 billion tonnes of steelmaking coal position us to
continue to meet global demand for many years. In addition, our measured and indicated resources now total over
3.6 billion tonnes and our inferred resources are approximately 2 billion tonnes of raw coal.
Our current production capacity is approximately 28 million tonnes. However, to align production rates with anticipated
demand and to effectively manage inventories, we plan to produce 26.5 to 27.5 million tonnes of coal in 2015.
In 2014 we deferred the restart of our Quintette project, based on the near-term outlook for the market. This project
is now fully permitted and able to proceed when market conditions improve, which would raise our total annual
production capacity to approximately 31 million tonnes of coal per year. Our actual production will be matched to
demand from our customers.
In 2014, our coal business unit accounted for 39% of revenue and 32% of gross profit before depreciation and
amortization.
($ in millions)
201420132012
Revenue
$3,335$
4,113$
4,647
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization
$913$
1,729$
2,405
Production (million tonnes)
26.7
25.6
24.7
Sales (million tonnes)
26.2
26.9
24.0
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
17
Operations
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization declined in 2014, primarily due to significantly lower coal prices.
Our average realized selling price in 2014 decreased to US$115 per tonne, compared with US$149 per tonne in 2013
and US$193 per tonne in 2012.
Coal sales volumes of 26.2 million tonnes in 2014 were our second highest on record due to strong demand from
contract customers, sales to new customers, good spot sales and the capability of our logistics chain, which benefited
from the expanded vessel loading capacity at Neptune Bulk Terminals.
Our 2014 production of 26.7 million tonnes increased by 1.1 million tonnes from 2013. This was due largely to the
efficient operation of our mines, taking advantage of our recent investments in mining equipment and plant capacity.
The cost of product sold in 2014, before transportation and depreciation charges, was $51 per tonne, compared
with $50 per tonne in 2013. This cost containment was achieved despite significant increases in input costs, primarily
through labour and equipment productivity improvements in mining, maintenance and processing, and further
reductions in the consumption of key inputs and minimizing the use of contractors. These improvements occurred as
part of an expanded cost reduction initiative across the company, which produced sustainable savings of $335 million
over two years in the coal business unit.
Excluding transportation costs, we expect our annual cost of product sold to be in the range of $49 to $53 per tonne
based on our current production plans, reflecting the continued focus on cost control at all our operating mines.
Capital spending in 2014 included $175 million for sustaining capital and $45 million for major enhancements to
increase productive capacity.
Elk Valley Water Management
The Elk Valley Water Quality Plan (Plan), prepared in accordance with an Order issued by the British Columbia (B.C.)
Minister of the Environment in April 2013, was completed and submitted to the B.C. Ministry of Environment in the
second quarter of 2014. It was approved in the fourth quarter of 2014. It is intended to address the management of
selenium as well as other substances released by mining activities throughout the Elk Valley watershed in the short,
medium and long term. The Plan establishes water quality targets designed to be protective of the environment and
human health while considering social and economic factors. The Plan was informed by scientific advice received
from a Technical Advisory Committee chaired by the B.C. Ministry of Environment, which included representatives
from Teck, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, State of Montana, Ktunaxa Nation, other provincial and federal
agencies, and an independent scientist. Input from the public, which was received through three phases of
consultation, was also included in the development of the Plan.
The implementation of the Plan will initially involve the construction of three active water treatment facilities and
diversions to reduce selenium and nitrates in the receiving environment. Previous cost estimates for water quality
management contemplated total capital spending of approximately $600 million over a five-year period, including the
$120 million already invested to build the facility at Line Creek Operations. In light of the approval of the Elk Valley
Water Quality Plan, we expect capital spending over that period to remain in this range. We now expect our long-term
costs of water management, including capital and operating costs, to average in the range of $4 per tonne of clean
coal produced (assuming annual production of 27.5 million tonnes), which is a reduction from our previous guidance
of $6 per tonne. In 2015, we expect to spend approximately $36 million (which is included in our estimate of
coal-sustaining capital), as we are in the midst of pre-construction studies for the second water treatment plant
contemplated by the Plan, at Fording River Operations. We expect construction of this water treatment plant to
commence in 2016, when spending on the Plan is expected to reach long-term average levels. New technologies
continue to be explored in an effort to reduce costs.
18
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
We expect that, in order to maintain water quality, water treatment will need to continue for an indefinite period after
mining operations end. The Plan contemplates ongoing monitoring of the regional environment to ensure that the
water quality targets set out in the Plan are in fact protective of the environment and human health, and provides for
adjustments if warranted by monitoring results. This ongoing monitoring, as well as our continued research into
treatment technologies, could reveal unexpected environmental impacts or technical issues or advances associated
with potential treatment technologies that could substantially increase or decrease both capital and operating costs
associated with water quality management.
Quintette Project
We received a Mines Act Permit Amendment for our Quintette project in northeast B.C. in June 2013, and all other
required permits in order to restart in 2014. The feasibility study contemplates an average clean coal production rate of
3.5 million tonnes per year over the estimated 12-year life of Quintette. Quintette was placed on care and maintenance
in early 2014, and the potential restart has been deferred until market conditions improve.
Rail
Rail transportation from our five steelmaking coal mines in southeast B.C. to our Vancouver port terminals is provided
under a 10-year agreement with Canadian Pacific Railway (CP Rail) that commenced in April 2011. This agreement
provides us with access to increased rail capacity to support our ongoing coal expansion and includes a commitment
by CP Rail to invest capital to increase its capacity to transport coal. The eastbound agreement with CP Rail covering
shipments to our North American customers expires at the end of February 2015. Discussions for contract extension
have commenced. Our Cardinal River mine in Alberta is served by Canadian National Railway, who transports this
product as required to our three ports on the west coast.
Port
A number of key initiatives have been undertaken to ensure that we have access to terminal loading capacity in
excess of our planned shipments. Neptune Bulk Terminals, in which we have a 46% ownership interest, expanded
its annual coal throughput capacity from 9 million tonnes to 12.5 million tonnes in 2013 with the addition of a new
stacker reclaimer, with time spent in 2014 to integrate this capacity into supply chain operations. The air permit
application for an expansion to 18.5 million tonnes was submitted to Metro Vancouver in December 2014. Metro
Vancouver will review the application and determine the form of public consultation required and, following this
process, a decision regarding approval is expected in 2015.
In addition, our contract with Westshore Terminals provides us with 19 million tonnes of annual capacity through to
March 2021, and we have contracted capacity at Ridley Terminals near Prince Rupert to provide for production from
our Cardinal River Operations in Alberta.
Sales
A major focus of our coal marketing strategy has been to maintain and enhance relationships with our traditional
customers while establishing new customers in markets where long-term growth in steel production and demand for
seaborne steelmaking coal will support our expansion efforts over the long term. We are continuing to build our
existing customer base and to establish important new customer relationships in China, India and other market areas
to assist in achieving our growth objectives. In 2014, we reduced our sales to China, diverting volume to market areas
with higher demand growth. In 2015, we are expecting demand for seaborne steelmaking coal to continue to grow,
led by traditional market areas in India and Eastern Europe.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
19
Markets
This year was characterized by an oversupply of all grades of seaborne steelmaking coal, with prices at their lowest
levels since 2007. We believe that such low pricing levels are unsustainable, and estimates indicate around one-third
of seaborne steelmaking coal production is operating at negative cash margins. Despite growing demand, mostly from
markets outside China, and more than 30 million tonnes of announced production curtailments, the market remained
oversupplied. Contributing factors leading to the oversupply of steelmaking coal included increased production and
exports from Australia and reduced imports by China, due to strong domestic production and destocking at the main
importing seaports. The benchmark price for our highest quality products decreased from US$143 per tonne earlier in
the year to US$117 per tonne for the first quarter of 2015.
Spot price assessments declined in the first quarter of 2014 and remained range-bound below US$115 per tonne,
as illustrated in the first graph below. The move to shorter term pricing continued in 2014, with steelmakers continuing
to price an increasing portion of coal purchases on a spot basis.
Expectations are that steel production will continue to increase in 2015 in a range similar to 2014, as a number of key
market areas are showing signs of improving demand. Nevertheless, curtailment on the steelmaking coal supply side
would be required to bring the market into a healthier balance.
The graphs below show key metrics affecting steelmaking coal sales: spot price assessments and quarterly
benchmark pricing, hot metal production (each tonne of hot metal, or pig iron, produced requires approximately
650–700 kilograms of steelmaking coal), and China’s steelmaking coal imports by source.
20
Daily Metallurgical Coal Assessments
Hot Metal (Pig Iron) Production
China Coking Coal Imports
Source: Argus
Source: World Steel Association,
China’s National Bureau of Statistics
Source: GTIS
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Copper
In 2014, we produced 333,000 tonnes of copper from our Highland Valley Copper Operations in B.C., from our
22.5% interest in Antamina in Peru, from Quebrada Blanca and Carmen de Andacollo in Chile, and from Duck Pond
in Newfoundland. Our operations performed well in 2014, with copper production at each site falling within
our most recent overall guidance of 330,000 to 340,000 tonnes. The mill optimization project at Highland Valley
Copper, together with improved blast fragmentation, resulted in significant increases in mill throughput averaging
140,000 tonnes per day since the start-up of the new flotation plant in the second quarter, exceeding the
average design capacity of 130,000 tonnes.
In 2015, we estimate copper production will be in the range of 340,000 to 360,000 tonnes, due mainly to higher
grades at Highland Valley Copper as we mine through a higher grade phase of the Valley pit over the next 18 months.
Antamina is expected to gradually increase production in 2015 as grades improve, which, together with higher
production from Highland Valley Copper, is expected to more than offset declines from the closure of Duck Pond in
mid-2015 and lower grades at Carmen de Andacollo. In 2016, copper production is expected to be closer to 2014
levels, with more normal grades at Highland Valley Copper, full closure of Duck Pond and further planned production
declines at our Chilean operations.
In 2014, our copper operations accounted for 30% of our revenue and 41% of our gross profit before depreciation
and amortization.
Gross Profit Before
Revenue
Depreciation and Amortization
($ in millions)
2014
2013
2012
201420132012
Highland Valley Copper
$943$882$
1,012$419$408$530
Antamina
659
822
897
450
596
682
Quebrada Blanca
375
422
499
118
121
115
Carmen de Andacollo
504
606
597
164
244
227
Duck Pond
96
113
130161942
Other
9 8 710 3 5
Total
$2,586$
2,853$
3,142$1,177$
1,391$
1,601
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
21
Production
Sales
(000’s tonnes) 2014
2013
2012
201420132012
Highland Valley Copper
121
113
116
124
112
117
Antamina
78
100
1017898
101
Quebrada Blanca
485662495562
Carmen de Andacollo 728180748377
Duck Pond
141414131415
Total
333
364
373
338
362
372
Operations
Highland Valley Copper
We have a 97.5% interest in Highland Valley Copper, located in south-central B.C. Gross profit before depreciation and
amortization was $419 million in 2014, compared to $408 million in 2013 and $530 million in 2012. Gross profit in 2014
remained similar to a year ago, as higher production and sales volumes were mainly offset by lower copper prices.
Highland Valley Copper’s 2014 production was 121,500 tonnes of copper in concentrate, compared to 113,200 in 2013.
The increase was primarily due to higher mill throughput following the commissioning of the mill optimization project,
offset by a slightly lower copper head grade and recovery. Molybdenum production was 15% lower than 2013 levels
at 5.2 million pounds, due to both a lower head grade and recovery.
As a result of completion of the mill optimization project at the end of the first quarter of 2014, mill throughput averaged
140,000 tonnes per day for the last nine months of 2014, exceeding the design rate of 130,000 tonnes per day. Further
process optimization efforts continue, but throughput rates and recoveries are dependent on the mix of ore sources.
Highland Valley Copper is expected to produce between 100,000 and 150,000 tonnes of copper per year, depending on
ore grades and hardness, for an average of 125,000 tonnes per year, until the end of the current expected mine life in
2026. Due to an increase in ore hardness as we mine the higher grade phase of the Valley pit, throughput is expected
to decline to 130,000 tonnes per day in 2015.
Ore is currently mined from the Valley, Lornex and Highmont pits. The Valley pit is the main source of feed to the
mill for the next 18 months while we continue the pre-stripping program to extend the Lornex pit, which will be an
important feed source for the remainder of the current mine life. In 2014, work continued on defining resources in
the Bethlehem area, and we commenced a prefeasibility study to assess the initial stage of a possible life extension
of two to three years. Additional drilling and engineering studies are planned in 2015.
Highland Valley Copper’s production in 2015 is expected to increase to between 140,000 and 145,000 tonnes of
copper and is then expected to be approximately 120,000 to 125,000 in 2016 as the current high-grade phase in
the Valley pit is completed. Copper production in the first quarter of 2015 is expected to be similar to 2014 levels
before increasing for the remainder of the year. Molybdenum production in 2015 is expected to be in the range
of 4.0 to 4.5 million pounds contained in concentrate.
Antamina
We have a 22.5% interest in Antamina, a copper-zinc mine in Peru. The other shareholders are BHP Billiton plc
(33.75%), Glencore plc (33.75%) and Mitsubishi Corporation (10%). In 2014, our share of gross profit before
depreciation and amortization was $450 million, compared with $596 million in 2013 and $682 million in 2012. The
decline in gross profit in 2014 was primarily due to lower copper prices and significantly lower grades, as planned.
Antamina’s copper production (100% basis) in 2014 was 344,900 tonnes, compared to 443,000 tonnes in 2013.
Zinc production decreased by 19% to 211,000 tonnes in 2014, primarily due to less copper-zinc ores being processed.
Molybdenum production totalled 3.1 million pounds, which was 69% lower than in 2013, due to lower grades and recoveries.
22
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Antamina is a complex deposit and grades can vary significantly, depending on which area of the open pit is being
mined. As 2015 progresses, a gradual return to higher production is expected as a result of continued process
improvements to enhance throughput rates, and higher grades due to mine sequencing and less low-grade stockpiled
material being processed.
Our 22.5% share of Antamina’s 2015 production is expected to be in the range of 80,000 to 85,000 tonnes of copper,
50,000 to 55,000 tonnes of zinc and approximately 2 million pounds of molybdenum in concentrate. There will be a
higher percentage of copper-zinc ores mined in the first half of the year, so zinc production is expected to be higher in
the first half. Copper production for the first half of the year is expected to be similar to the previous quarter, but then
increase for the second half.
Quebrada Blanca
Quebrada Blanca is located in northern Chile, 240 kilometres southeast of the city of Iquique. We own a 76.5%
interest in Quebrada Blanca; the other shareholders are Inversiones Mineras S.A. (13.5%) and state-owned agency
Empresa Nacional de Minería (ENAMI) (10%). ENAMI’s interest is a carried interest and, as a result, ENAMI is
generally not required to contribute further funding to Quebrada Blanca. The operation mines ore from an open pit
and leaches the ore to produce copper cathodes via a conventional solvent extraction and electrowinning (SX-EW)
process. Gross profit before depreciation and amortization was $118 million in 2014, compared with $121 million in
2013 and $115 million in 2012. Gross profit before depreciation and amortization was similar as a result of significant
cost improvements, despite lower copper prices and lower production.
In 2014, Quebrada Blanca produced 48,000 tonnes of copper cathode, compared to 56,200 tonnes in 2013. Despite
aging plant equipment and lower ore grades, the restructuring plan put in place for 2013 and a continued focus on
cost reduction, infrastructure refurbishment and production performance has enabled plans for continued and
profitable operation.
Production of approximately 45,000 to 50,000 tonnes of copper cathode is expected in 2015, similar to 2014.
Grades are forecast to continue to decline as the supergene deposit is gradually depleted, but this is expected to
be offset by an increase in throughput through the agglomeration and heap leach process.
Work progressed on updating the permits for the existing facilities for the supergene operation, with an anticipated
mine life that has some cathode production extending into 2020. We submitted the Social and Environmental Impact
Assessment (SEIA) for the supergene facilities to the regulatory authorities in the third quarter of 2014. The review,
response and consultation process by the relevant regulatory agencies is in progress.
Carmen de Andacollo
We have a 90% interest in the Carmen de Andacollo mine in Chile, which is located 350 kilometres north of Santiago.
The remaining 10% is owned by ENAMI. Gross profit before depreciation and amortization was $164 million in 2014,
compared with $244 million in 2013 and $227 million in 2012. Gross profit was lower in 2014 due to lower copper
prices and production.
Carmen de Andacollo produced 67,500 tonnes of copper contained in concentrate in 2014, compared to 76,800 tonnes
in 2013, as a result of lower grades and unplanned throughput disruptions, including a transformer failure in the third
quarter. Copper cathode production was 4,300 tonnes in 2014, compared with 4,400 tonnes in 2013. Gold production,
on a 100% basis, was lower at 47,500 ounces compared with 68,000 ounces in 2013, primarily due to lower grades.
Pursuant to an agreement made in 2010, 75% of the gold produced is for the account of Royal Gold Inc.
Consistent with the mine plan, copper grades are expected to continue to gradually decline in 2015 and in future years.
Carmen de Andacollo’s production in 2015 is expected to be in the range of 65,000 to 70,000 tonnes of copper in
concentrate and approximately 4,000 tonnes of copper cathode. Cathode production has been extended to the end of
2015. Further extensions could be possible, depending on economics and ore sources available, including the
possibility of reprocessing previous leached material.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
23
Duck Pond
We own 100% of the Duck Pond underground copper-zinc mine located in central Newfoundland and Labrador.
Duck Pond’s gross profit before depreciation and amortization was $16 million in 2014 compared to $19 million in 2013
and $42 million in 2012. Gross profit declined in 2014, primarily due to lower copper prices.
Copper production of 14,200 tonnes in 2014 was similar to the 2013 production of 14,000 tonnes. Weather-related
disruptions in the first quarter were offset by increased ore availability and improved plant performance as the year
progressed. Zinc production was 16,200 tonnes, compared with 12,700 tonnes of zinc production in 2013, as a result
of improved grades.
Ore reserves are expected to be exhausted in the first half of 2015, and the mine will be permanently closed in
July 2015.
Duck Pond’s production in 2015 is expected to be approximately 6,500 tonnes of copper and approximately
6,000 tonnes of zinc.
Quebrada Blanca Phase 2
Detailed design activities to support permitting for the Quebrada Blanca Phase 2 project continued in 2014, although
at a slower pace, aligned with permitting activities. Optimization efforts are focused on capital reduction opportunities
and mine planning using recent resource model updates.
We expect to resubmit the previously withdrawn SEIA for Quebrada Blanca Phase 2 once the SEIA for the existing
supergene facility is approved, likely not before the fourth quarter of 2015. Additional environmental baseline work will
be undertaken in 2015 to support this submission.
Relincho
A feasibility study was completed in the fourth quarter of 2013 on our 100% owned Relincho project in Chile, which
concluded that developing a 173,000-tonnes-per-day concentrator and associated facilities would cost approximately
US$4.5 billion (in August 2013 dollars, not including working capital or interest during construction), with an estimated
mine life of 21 years, based on mineral reserves.
In 2015, we will continue to work on optimization studies for the Relincho project that will focus on capital and
operating cost reductions, and explore other ways to enhance the value of the project.
Other Copper Projects
In 2014, focused engineering studies continued for our Galore Creek, Schaft Creek and Mesaba projects as we
further explore ways to enhance the value of these projects. In the third quarter, an 18-month prefeasibility program
commenced at our 50% owned Zafranal copper-gold project located in southern Peru. Our share of expenditures
for the prefeasibility study, which is planned to continue through 2015, will be US$15 million.
In 2014, our CESL hydrometallurgical facility, located in Richmond, B.C., continued to advance the commercialization
of our proprietary copper, nickel and copper-arsenic process technologies for internal and external opportunities.
Further, CESL expanded its support of Teck’s hydrometallurgical and water-based process needs at a number of its
core operations.
24
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Markets
Copper prices on the London Metal Exchange (LME) averaged US$3.11 per pound in 2014, down US$0.21 per pound
from the 2013 average.
Demand for copper metal grew by 5.6% in 2014 to reach an estimated 21.8 million tonnes globally. Growth outside
of China improved in several regions, with improved demand in the United States and relatively good growth in parts
of Europe, albeit off a lower base. Growth in copper cathode demand in China in 2014 is estimated at 8%. A lack of
available scrap, an increase in strategic reserves and good underlying demand combined to draw down bonded stocks
in the face of cathode imports being up 16% and refined production being up 12% over last year.
Copper stocks in the LME, Shanghai and COMEX warehouses decreased 38.3% or 194,100 tonnes during the year.
Total reported global stocks (which include producer, consumer, merchant and terminal stocks) stood at an estimated
19.8 days of global consumption versus the 25-year average of 28 days.
In 2014, global copper mine production increased 3.2% to reach 18.7 million tonnes. Copper scrap availability remained
tight globally in 2014, with Chinese imports down a further 10% over the previous year. We expect that scrap demand
will again outstrip scrap availability and therefore impact both raw material supply and refined cathode demand in 2015.
Production disruptions at mines continued to affect the market in 2014, with estimates of close to 1.3 million tonnes of
planned production lost during the year. This was equivalent to an 8.1% reduction in overall production in comparison
to the projected 11.3% increase at the beginning of the year.
Wood Mackenzie, a commodity research consultancy, is expecting a 4.4% increase in base case global mine
production in 2015 to 14.8 million tonnes as mining projects continue to ramp up. Wood Mackenzie is also forecasting
a net increase in planned smelter production of 5.8% to 18.4 million tonnes in 2015. Based on a history of mine
production shortfalls combined with the difficulties in bringing new mine production to market on time, we continue
to expect unplanned mine production disruptions to increase through 2015.
With global copper metal demand projected by Wood Mackenzie to increase by 3.9% in 2015, projected supply is
expected to exceed demand slightly, moving the refined market into a small surplus. If mine production continues to
disappoint in 2015 from current projections, the refined market could roughly balance or even slip into deficit in 2015.
Although copper demand fundamentals remain positive for 2015, recent price declines are reflecting the weakness
in oil prices and technical trading by hedge funds. With global metal stocks at well below historical averages, any
disruption in production could reduce physical inventories further.
Copper Price and LME Inventory
Global Demand for Copper
Source: LME
Source: Wood Mackenzie
Global Copper Inventories
Source: ICSG, LME, COMEX, SHFE
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
25
Zinc
We are one of the world’s largest producers of mined zinc, primarily from our Red Dog mine in Alaska, the Antamina
mine in northern Peru, and our Pend Oreille mine in Washington state. Our metallurgical complex in Trail, B.C.
is also one of the world’s largest integrated zinc and lead smelting and refining operations. In total, we produced
659,700 tonnes of zinc in concentrate, while our Trail Operations produced 277,400 tonnes of refined zinc in 2014.
In 2015, we estimate production of zinc in concentrate to be in the range of 635,000 to 665,000 tonnes and
production of refined zinc to be in the range of 280,000 to 290,000 tonnes.
In 2014, our zinc business unit accounted for 31% of revenue and 27% of gross profit before depreciation and amortization.
Revenue
($ in millions) Red Dog
2014
Gross Profit Before
Depreciation and Amortization
2013
2012
2014
2013
2012
$1,240$874$892$638$418$440
TrailOperations
1,699
1,751
1,865
142
11259
Other
1113 7 (1) 4 (2)
Inter-segment sales
Total
(275)
(228)
(214) – – –
$2,675$
2,410$
2,550$779$534$497
Production
Sales
2014
2013
2012
2014
2013
2012
Trail Operations
277
290
284
277
294
287
(000’s tonnes)
Refined zinc
Contained
in concentrate
Red Dog
596
551
529
594
504
510
Other business units
647269637468
Total
660
623
598
657578578
26
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Operations
Red Dog
Red Dog, located in northwest Alaska, is one of the world’s largest zinc mines. Red Dog’s gross profit before
depreciation and amortization in 2014 was $638 million, compared with $418 million in 2013 and $440 million
in 2012. The higher 2014 gross profit was mainly due to higher zinc prices and increased sales volumes as a result
of record production.
In 2014, zinc production at Red Dog was 596,000 tonnes compared to 551,300 tonnes in 2013. Annual mill throughput
was a record high at 4.3 million tonnes in 2014. This was due to softer baritic ore, increasing throughput at slightly
lower grades, which, combined with improved recoveries, resulted in the higher zinc production. Lead production in
2014 was 122,500 tonnes, compared to 96,700 in 2013, due to higher mill throughput.
Red Dog’s location exposes the operation to severe weather and winter ice conditions, which can significantly affect
production, sales volumes and operating costs. In addition, the mine’s bulk supply deliveries and all concentrate
shipments occur during a short ocean shipping season that normally runs from early July to late October. This short
shipping season means that Red Dog’s sales volumes are usually higher in the last six months of the year, resulting
in significant variability in its quarterly profit, depending on metal prices.
In accordance with the operating agreement governing the Red Dog mine between Teck and NANA Regional
Corporation, Inc. (NANA), we pay a 30% royalty of net proceeds of production to NANA. This royalty increases by
5% every fifth year to a maximum of 50%, with the next adjustment occurring in 2017. The NANA royalty charge in
2014 was US$195 million, compared with US$120 million in 2013. NANA has advised us that it ultimately shares
approximately 62% of the royalty, net of allowable costs, with other Regional Alaska Native corporations pursuant
to section 7(i) of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act.
Red Dog’s production of contained metal in 2015 is expected to be in the range of 540,000 to 565,000 tonnes of
zinc and 90,000 to 95,000 tonnes of lead.
Pend Oreille
Pend Oreille, located in Washington state, was successfully restarted on time and under budget in December 2014.
We expect the mine to reach full production in the second quarter of 2015. Based on current reserves, the mine has
an expected mine life of five years at a production rate of 44,000 tonnes of zinc in concentrate per year.
We expect 2015 production to be approximately 40,000 tonnes of zinc in concentrate.
Trail Operations
Our Trail Operations in B.C. is one of the world’s largest fully integrated zinc and lead smelting and refining complexes.
It also produces a variety of precious and specialty metals, chemicals and fertilizer products. Teck has a two-thirds
interest in the Waneta hydroelectric dam as well as ownership of the related transmission system. The Waneta Dam
provides low-cost, clean, renewable power to the metallurgical operations.
Trail Operations contributed $142 million to gross profits before depreciation and amortization in 2014, compared with
$112 million in 2013 and $118 million (before a one-time $59 million labour settlement charge) in 2012.
Refined zinc production totalled 277,400 tonnes in 2014, compared with 290,100 tonnes the previous year, as a result
of reduced acid plant reliability prior to the new plant coming online in the second quarter, as well as roaster stability
issues that have since been resolved.
Refined lead production decreased slightly from 2013 to 82,100 tonnes, while silver production decreased to
21.0 million ounces in 2014 compared with 22.8 million ounces in 2013. The decreased production was partially due
to the planned shutdown of the lead smelter facilities for 36 days in the fourth quarter to conduct scheduled
maintenance work in the KIVCET furnace and related equipment.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
27
Our recycling process treated 41,200 tonnes of material during the year, and we plan to treat about 44,000 tonnes
in 2015. Our focus remains on treating lead acid batteries and cathode ray tube glass, plus small quantities of zinc
alkaline batteries, fluorescent light bulbs and other post-consumer waste through our recycling program.
Construction was completed on the new acid plant, which replaced two existing plants and has delivered enhanced
operating reliability and flexibility as well as improved environmental performance.
In 2015, we expect to produce in the range of 280,000 to 290,000 tonnes of refined zinc, 85,000 to 90,000 tonnes
of refined lead and 22 to 25 million ounces of silver.
Markets
Zinc prices on the LME averaged US$0.98 per pound for the year, up US$0.11 per pound from the 2013 average.
In 2014, global mine production grew by 1.1% to 13.1 million tonnes of contained zinc, while global refined production
rose by 3.3% to 13.4 million tonnes. As a result of this, we believe the global concentrate market recorded a modest
deficit in 2014, equivalent to less than 2% of global mine production.
In 2015, we expect that the closures of large long-life mines that began in 2013 with the Brunswick and Perseverance
mines will continue with anticipated closures of the Century and Lisheen mines. These closures are expected to
reduce annual global mine production by more than 1 million tonnes of contained zinc, and while we expect zinc
mine production to continue to grow in 2016, the growth is not anticipated to be sufficient to meet world demand for
zinc metal.
In 2014, global zinc metal consumption was 13.9 million tonnes, which was an increase of 4.4% over 2013 levels.
Metal premiums remained well supported in North America and Asia as a result of good demand growth and limited
access to metal stocks. LME stocks fell by 241,875 tonnes, a 24% decline from 2013 levels, and finished the year at
691,600 tonnes. We estimate that total reported global stocks (which include producer, consumer, merchant and
terminal stocks) fell by approximately 345,000 tonnes in 2014 and at year-end were 1.3 million tonnes, representing
an estimated 35 days of global consumption compared to the 25-year average of 42 days.
Wood Mackenzie believes that 2015’s global zinc concentrate production will grow 7.0% over 2014, while smelter
production will be limited to a 6.3% increase over 2014 to 14.1 million tonnes, even with improved capacity utilization
in China. They are also forecasting an increase in global zinc demand of 4.5% to 14.5 million tonnes, exceeding current
estimates for global supply, keeping the refined market in deficit and further reducing global stockpiles of zinc metal.
28
Zinc Price and LME Inventory
Global Demand for Zinc
Source: LME
Source: ILZSG, Wood Mackenzie
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Global Zinc Inventories
Source: ILZSG, LME, SHFE
Energy
Located in the Athabasca oil sands region of northeastern Alberta, our energy assets include a 20% interest in the
Fort Hills oil sands project, a 100% interest in the Frontier oil sands project and a 50% interest in various other oil
sands leases in the exploration phase, including the Lease 421 Area. Our proven and probable reserves totalled
614 million barrels and our contingent bitumen resources totalled 3.1 billion barrels at the end of 2014. These valuable
long-term assets are located in a politically stable jurisdiction and are expected to be mined using conventional
technologies that build on our core skills in large-scale truck and shovel operations.
We recognize that there are concerns over the potential environmental effects of developing oil sands projects.
We are researching methods to improve extraction and processing to enhance the sustainability of our projects. We are
proud to be one of the founding members of Canada’s Oil Sands Innovation Alliance (COSIA) and are encouraged by
the progress of the industry towards improving environmental performance, reducing water consumption, improving
tailings management, and increasing land reclamation and revegetation.
In January 2015, we increased our interest in the Wintering Hills Wind Power Facility to 49%, and we continue to
examine opportunities to enhance our renewable energy portfolio.
The disclosure that follows includes references to reserves and contingent bitumen resource estimates. Further
information on these estimates, the related risks and uncertainties, and contingencies that prevent the classification
of resources as reserves is set out in our most recent Annual Information Form, which is available on our website at
www.teck.com, on the Canadian Securities Administrators website at www.sedar.com (SEDAR), and under cover of
Form 40-F on the EDGAR section of the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) website at www.sec.gov. There is
no certainty that it will be commercially viable to produce any portion of the contingent resources.
Fort Hills Oil Sands Project
The Fort Hills oil sands project is located approximately 90 kilometres north of Fort McMurray in northern Alberta.
We hold a 20% interest in the Fort Hills Energy Limited Partnership (Fort Hills Partnership), which owns the Fort Hills
oil sands project, with 39.2% held by Total E&P Canada Ltd. (Total) and the remaining 40.8% held by Suncor Energy
Inc. (Suncor). An affiliate of Suncor is the operator of the project.
Construction of the Fort Hills project is progressing substantially in accordance with the project schedule. Our share
of costs for 2014 was $616 million, including our earn-in commitments. We are required to contribute 27.5% of project
costs until aggregate project spending since the date of our earn-in agreement reaches $7.5 billion, which we expect
will occur in the second quarter of 2015. Our share of project costs will be 20% thereafter. Engineering activity is
progressing well, and is now over 65% complete. The capital cost and schedule outlook have not changed since we
announced the project sanction on October 30, 2013. Based on Suncor’s project cost estimates, our portion of the fully
escalated capital investment in Fort Hills from the date of project sanction is estimated at approximately $2.94 billion
over four years (2014–2017). The gross overall project costs for all partners since the project restart in 2011 are
estimated by Suncor at a capital intensity of approximately $84,000 per daily flowing barrel of bitumen, which is
within the range of similar recent oil sands projects.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
29
At December 31, 2014, our best estimate of our 20% share of the proven and probable reserves at Fort Hills is
614 million barrels, and our best estimate of our share of the incremental contingent bitumen resource is 28 million barrels.
The project is scheduled to produce first oil as early as the fourth quarter of 2017 and is expected to achieve 90%
of its planned production capacity of 180,000 barrels per day (bpd) of bitumen within 12 months of commissioning.
The Fort Hills partners have contracted with Enbridge to provide diluent pipeline capacity to Fort Hills and diluted
bitumen pipeline capacity to Hardisty, Alberta, where Teck will deliver its pro-rata share of Fort Hills production. Teck
is currently reviewing options, which may include the use of pipelines from Hardisty or rail to access U.S. Gulf Coast
refineries and tidewater ports, to sell diluted bitumen to the North American and overseas markets. Our share of
production is expected to be 36,000 bpd (13 million barrels per year) of bitumen.
While capital costs for oil sands mining projects are significant, Fort Hills’ operating costs, including sustaining capital,
are expected to average under $30 per barrel of bitumen over the life of the project. The bitumen produced sells at a
discount to crude oil prices, which fluctuate based on bitumen supply, heavy oil refining capacity and other factors.
Frontier Project
We hold a 100% interest in the Frontier project, which is located about 10 kilometres northwest of the Fort Hills oil
sands project in northern Alberta. In November 2011, the Frontier project application was submitted to regulators.
We have subsequently responded to three rounds of supplemental information requests, and review of the application
continues with the provincial and federal regulators. The regulatory review period is expected to continue into the
second half of 2015, making 2016 the earliest an approval decision is expected.
In 2014, we completed an exploration program at Frontier to provide additional data to support the regulatory review
process and ongoing engineering work.
As of December 31, 2014, our best estimate of contingent bitumen resources for the Frontier project is approximately
3.05 billion barrels. The project has been designed for a total nominal production of approximately 260,000 bpd
of bitumen.
Lease 421 Area
We hold a 50% interest in the Lease 421 Area, which is located east of the Fort Hills project in northern Alberta.
Imperial Oil and ExxonMobil jointly own the remaining 50%. To date, a total of 89 core holes have been completed in
the Lease 421 Area.
Wintering Hills Wind Power Facility
Wintering Hills Wind Power Facility is located near Drumheller, Alberta. In January 2015, we increased our interest
in Wintering Hills to 49% for a payment of $33 million, with Suncor, the project operator, holding the remaining 51%.
Our 30% share of power generation from Wintering Hills in 2014 was 83 GWh, enough power to provide 53,000 tonnes
of CO 2 -equivalent credits. Our share of expected power generation in 2015 is 135 GWh, although actual generation
will depend on weather conditions and other factors.
30
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Exploration
Throughout 2014, we conducted exploration around the world through our nine regional offices. Expenditures of
$60 million in 2014 were focused on copper, zinc and gold opportunities.
Exploration plays three critical roles at Teck: discovery of new orebodies through early stage exploration and
acquisition; pursuit, evaluation and acquisition of development opportunities; and delivery of geoscience solutions
and services to create value at our existing mines.
Our copper exploration is focused on porphyry copper deposits and, during 2014, we drilled several porphyry copper
projects in Canada, Chile and Peru. Significant exploration work was focused in and around our existing operations
and advanced projects in 2014. At our Highland Valley Copper Operations in Canada, we completed 30 kilometres of
drilling primarily focused on copper mineralization adjacent to the historical Bethlehem pits. In 2015, we plan to drill
copper projects in Canada, Chile, Peru and Turkey, and continue to explore around our existing operations and
advanced projects.
Zinc exploration remains focused on four areas: the Red Dog mine district in Alaska, central B.C., northeastern
Australia, and Ireland. In Alaska, Australia and Canada, the target type is a large, high-grade, sediment-hosted deposit
similar to major world-class deposits such as Red Dog in Alaska and Century or McArthur River in Australia. In 2014,
we completed an additional five holes to follow up the 2013 discovery at the Teena prospect on the Reward project in
Australia, a joint venture with Rox Resources Limited, in which Teck is earning up to a 70% project interest. We also
continued to drill on the Noatak project near our existing Red Dog mine, where we have been testing high-quality
targets with promising results. Exploration programs will continue in these regions in 2015.
In addition to exploring for copper and zinc, we are exploring for, and looking to partner in, new gold opportunities.
Our plan is to explore, find and advance gold resources through targeted exploration activity in select jurisdictions.
Once an opportunity has been recognized, the strategy is to optimize that opportunity or asset through further
definition drilling and engineering studies, then capture value through periodic divestitures. Our current exploration
efforts and drill testing for gold are primarily focused in Turkey, Canada and Peru. In 2014, we had more encouraging
results from several discoveries at the TV Tower project in Turkey, a joint venture with Pilot Gold Inc.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
31
Financial Overview
Financial Summary
($ in millions, except per share data)
2014
2013
2012
Revenue and profit
Revenue
$8,599$
9,382$
10,343
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization (1)
$2,872$
3,659$
4,507
EBITDA (1)
$2,348$
3,153$
3,295
Profit attributable to shareholders
$362$961$
1,068
Cash flow
Cash flow from operations
$2,278$
2,878$
3,418
Property, plant and equipment expenditures
$1,498$
1,858$
1,700
Capitalized production stripping costs
$715$744$732
Investments
$44$325$758
Balance sheet
Cash balances
$2,029$
2,772$
3,267
Total assets
$36,839$
36,183$
35,055
Debt, including current portion
$8,441$
7,723$
7,195
Per share amounts
Profit attributable to shareholders
Basic
$0.63$1.66$1.82
Diluted
$0.63$1.66$1.82
Dividends declared per share
$0.90$0.90$0.85
Notes:
(1) Gross profit before depreciation and amortization and EBITDA are non-GAAP financial measures. See “Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures”
section for further information.
Our revenue and profit depend on the prices for the commodities we produce, sell and use in our production
processes. Commodity prices are determined by the supply of and demand for those commodities, which are
influenced by global economic conditions. We normally sell the products that we produce at prevailing market prices
or, in the case of steelmaking coal, at negotiated prices under term contracts or on a spot basis. Prices for our
32
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
products, particularly for exchange-traded commodities, can fluctuate significantly and that volatility can have a
material effect on our financial results.
Exchange rate movements can have a significant effect on our results and cash flows, as a significant portion of our
operating costs are incurred in Canadian and other currencies, and most of our revenue and debt are denominated in
U.S. dollars. We report our financial results in Canadian dollars and, accordingly, our reported operating results and
cash flows are affected by changes in the Canadian dollar exchange rate relative to the U.S. dollar.
Profit attributable to shareholders for 2014 was $362 million, or $0.63 per share. This compares with $961 million or
$1.66 per share in 2013, and $1.1 billion or $1.82 per share in 2012, which included $784 million of after-tax debt
refinancing charges.
Our profit over the past three years has included items that we segregate for presentation to investors so that the
ongoing profit of the company may be more clearly understood. These are described below and summarized in the
table that follows.
In 2014, the only significant unusual item was a $58 million non-cash tax charge primarily as a result of a Chilean
tax reform bill being signed into law. In 2013, unusual items were minimal. In 2012, our profit included $784 million
of after-tax refinancing charges related to debt refinancing transactions completed during the year, $70 million of
collective agreement charges, $39 million of gains on asset sales and $98 million of gains on various derivatives.
The table below shows the effect of these items on our profit.
($ in millions, except per share data)
2014
2013
2012
$
362$961$
1,068
Asset sales and provisions
20 (9)(39)
Profit attributable to shareholders Add (deduct) the after-tax effect of:
Foreign exchange losses 81120
Derivative losses (gains) 4 –
(98)
Financing items – –
784
Collective agreement charges – –70
Asset impairments and other
–31 –
Tax items5810
(29)
Adjusted profit (1)
$452$
1,004$
1,776
Adjusted earnings per share (1)
$0.78$1.74$3.03
Notes:
(1) Adjusted profit and adjusted earnings per share are non-GAAP financial measures. See “Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures” section for
further information.
Cash flow from operations in 2014 was $2.3 billion, compared with $2.9 billion in 2013 and $3.4 billion in 2012.
The decline in cash flow from operations is mainly due to changes in sales volumes and commodity prices.
At December 31, 2014, our cash balance was $2.0 billion. Total debt was $8.4 billion and our net debt to net debtplus-equity ratio was 25%, compared with 21% at December 31, 2013 and 18% at the end of 2012.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
33
Gross Profit
Our gross profit is made up of our revenue less the operating, depreciation and amortization expenses at our
producing operations. Income and expenses from our business activities that do not produce commodities for sale
are included in our other operating income and expenses or in our non-operating income and expenses.
Our principal commodities are steelmaking coal, copper and zinc, which accounted for 39%, 27% and 18% of revenue
respectively in 2014. Silver and lead are significant byproducts of our zinc operations, accounting for 7% and 4% each,
respectively, of our 2014 revenue. We also produce a number of other byproducts including molybdenum, various
specialty metals, and chemicals and fertilizers, which in total accounted for 5% of our revenue in 2014.
Our revenue is affected by sales volumes, which are determined by our production levels and by demand for the
commodities we produce, commodity prices and currency exchange rates.
Our revenue was $8.6 billion in 2014, compared with $9.4 billion in 2013 and $10.3 billion in 2012. The reduction in
2014 revenue was due mainly to lower commodity prices, especially for steelmaking coal prices, partially offset by
increased volumes of zinc in concentrate and higher zinc prices. The reduction in 2013 over 2012 was due mainly to
lower commodity prices, partially offset by increased sales volumes of steelmaking coal and a stronger U.S. dollar.
Our cost of sales includes all of the expenses required to produce our products, such as labour, energy, operating
supplies, concentrates purchased for our Trail Operations’ refining and smelting operation, royalties, and marketing and
distribution costs required to sell and transport our products to various delivery points. Our cost of sales also includes
depreciation and amortization expense. Due to the geographic locations of many of our operations, we are highly
dependent on third parties for the provision of rail, port and other distribution services. In certain circumstances, we
negotiate prices and other terms for the provision of these services where we may not have viable alternatives to
using specific providers, or may not have access to regulated rate-setting mechanisms or appropriate remedies for
service failures. Contractual disputes, demurrage charges, rail and port capacity issues, availability of vessels and
railcars, weather problems and other factors can have a material effect on our ability to transport materials from our
suppliers and to our customers in accordance with schedules and contractual commitments.
Our costs are dictated mainly by our production volumes, by the costs for labour, operating supplies and concentrate
purchases, and by strip ratios, haul distances, ore grades, distribution costs, commodity prices, foreign exchange rates
and costs related to non-routine maintenance projects. Production volumes mainly affect our variable operating and
our distribution costs. In addition, production may also affect our sales volumes and, when combined with commodity
prices, it affects profitability and, ultimately, our royalty expenses.
In the second half of 2012 we implemented a cost reduction program at all of our sites, which has exceeded our initial
goals, with $640 million of annualized reductions realized to date.
Our cost of sales was $7.1 billion in 2014, compared with $7.0 billion in 2013 and $6.8 billion in 2012. Cost of sales
increased in 2014 from 2013 primarily due to higher depreciation and royalty expenses. This was partly offset by
2014 Revenue by Business Unit
2014 Gross Profit by Business Unit
2014 Revenue by Commodity
(Before depreciation and amortization)
31%
Zinc
39%
27%
27%
32%
Copper
Zinc
Coal
39%
Coal
Coal
18%
30%
Copper
34
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
41%
Copper
4%
Lead
Zinc
5%
Other
7%
Silver
reduced concentrate purchase costs at our Trail Operations, due to lower production levels and reduced silver
processed as a result of the planned 35-day shutdown of the KIVCET lead smelter, as well as savings arising from
our cost reduction program. Depreciation expense rose by $111 million, as depreciation started in 2014 on Highland
Valley Copper’s mill optimization project and on Antamina’s major mine expansion project, in addition to increasing
amortization of capitalized production stripping costs. Royalty costs increased by $90 million at Red Dog Operations
due to higher revenue linked to rising zinc prices and increased sales volumes.
Comparing 2013 with 2012, the higher costs were due primarily to substantially higher coal sales volumes and higher
depreciation and amortization expense. Coal sales volumes increased by 2.9 million tonnes in 2013, which accounted
for $275 million of the increase. Depreciation and amortization expense was $250 million higher than in 2012, partly as
a result of increasing amortization of capitalized production stripping costs and due to the effect of the higher coal sales
volumes. These items were partially offset by the results of our cost reduction program and by a $90 million reduction
in operating costs at Quebrada Blanca Operations as a result of the restructuring plan we put in place in 2013. In addition,
there was no labour agreement settlement charge in 2013, compared with $103 million incurred in 2012.
Other Expenses
($ in millions)
2014
2013
2012
General and administration
$119$129$137
Exploration6086
102
Research and development201819
Other operating expense (income)
281
21624
Finance income(4) (13)(33)
Finance expense
304
339
510
Non-operating expense (income)21 6
848
Share of losses of associates
3 210
$804$783$
1,617
We must continually replace our reserves as they are depleted in order to maintain production levels over the long
term. We try to do this through our exploration and development programs and through acquisition of interests in new
properties or in companies that own such properties. Exploration for minerals and oil is highly speculative and the
projects involve many risks. The vast majority of exploration projects are unsuccessful and there are no assurances
that current or future exploration programs will find deposits that are ultimately brought into production.
Our research and development expenditures are primarily focused on advancing our proprietary CESL hydrometallurgical
technology, the development of internal and external growth opportunities, and the development and implementation
of process and environmental technology improvements at operations.
Other operating income and expenses include items we consider to be related to the operation of our business,
such as final settlement pricing adjustments (which are further described in the next paragraph), share-based
compensation, gains or losses on commodity derivatives, gains or losses on the sale of operating or exploration assets,
and provisions for various costs at our closed properties. Significant items in 2014 include $130 million of negative
pricing adjustments, $32 million on environmental costs, $18 million on asset write-downs and $12 million for sharebased compensation. Significant items in 2013 included $62 million of negative pricing adjustments, $33 million on
asset write-downs, $27 million on environmental costs and a $22 million expense for share-based compensation.
Items in 2012 included $24 million from gains on the sale of assets, $45 million of positive pricing adjustments and
a $34 million expense for share-based compensation.
Sales of metals in concentrate or copper cathodes are recognized in revenue on a provisional pricing basis when the
rights, obligations, risks and benefits of ownership pass to the customer, which usually occurs upon shipment.
However, final pricing is typically not determined until a subsequent date, often in the following quarter. Revenue in a
quarter is based on prices at the date of sale. These pricing adjustments result in gains in a rising price environment
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
35
and losses in a declining price environment and are recorded as other operating income or expense. The extent of the
pricing adjustments also takes into account the actual price participation terms as provided in certain concentrate sales
agreements. It should be noted that these effects arise on the sale of concentrates, as well as on the purchase of
concentrates at our Trail Operations.
The table below outlines our outstanding receivable positions, which were provisionally valued at December 31, 2014
and 2013, respectively.
Outstanding at
December 31, 2014
(payable pounds in millions) Outstanding at
December 31, 2013
Pounds
US$/lb.
Pounds
US$/lb.
Copper
208
2.86
135
3.35
Zinc
117
0.99
109
0.94
Our finance expense includes the interest expense on our debt, financing fees and amortization, and the interest
components of our pension obligations and accretion on our decommissioning and restoration provisions, less any
interest that we capitalize against the cost of our development projects. Debt interest expense increased in 2014
due to the effect of the stronger U.S. dollar, as all of our debt and related interest expense is U.S. dollar denominated.
This was offset by additional capitalized interest in 2014 that totalled $183 million, compared with $134 million in
2013. Changes in the Fort Hills project agreements in the fourth quarter of 2013 changed the basis of accounting for
the project and, as a result, we now capitalize interest relating to our investment in the Fort Hills oil sands project.
Non-operating income (expense) includes items that arise from financial and other matters and includes such items
as foreign exchange gains or losses, debt refinancing costs, realized gains or losses on marketable securities, and
gains and losses on the revaluation of the call options on certain of our high-yield notes that were refinanced in 2012.
In 2014, other non-operating income included $8 million for provisions on marketable securities and $9 million of
foreign exchange losses. In 2013, other non-operating income included $42 million of gains on the sale of various
investments, $32 million of provisions taken against various marketable securities and $12 million of foreign exchange
losses. 2012 included $965 million of charges related to debt refinancing activities described in more detail below
under the heading “Financing Activities”, $119 million of gains on the revaluation of the call options on our high-yield
notes prior to their settlement and $29 million of gains on the sale of various investments.
Until October 29, 2013, we accounted for our investment in the Fort Hills Energy Limited Partnership using the
equity method. As a result of changes made to the agreements governing the project at the time of project sanction,
we are now accounting for our investment in Fort Hills by recording our share of the assets, liabilities, revenue,
expenses and cash flows. The majority of the activities on this project to date relate to capital expenditures, rather
than expenditures that affect profit.
Income and resource taxes were $342 million, or 47% of pre-tax profit. Our tax rate was affected by Chilean
and Peruvian tax reform in 2014, which together resulted in a deferred tax expense of $37 million. In addition, a
settlement with the Canada Revenue Agency regarding the treatment of gains realized in 2008 on the sale of our
interest in Fording Canadian Coal Trust resulted in an additional charge of $21 million. Without these items, our
combined income and resource taxes would be $284 million and our effective tax rate would be 39%. This rate is
higher than the Canadian statutory income tax rate of 26% due mainly to the effect of resource taxes and higher
taxes in foreign jurisdictions, including withholding taxes. The effect of resource taxes and higher taxes in foreign
jurisdictions tends to be magnified in periods when our operating earnings are lower relative to our administrative
and finance charges. This occurs because these costs are incurred in Canada and because resource taxes are
based on profits before these costs.
Profit attributable to non-controlling interests relates to the ownership interests that are held by third parties in our
Highland Valley Copper, Quebrada Blanca, Carmen de Andacollo and Elkview mines.
36
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Financial Position and Liquidity
Our financial position and liquidity remain strong. Our outstanding debt was $8.4 billion at December 31, 2014
compared with $7.7 billion at the end of 2013 and $7.2 billion at the end of 2012. As substantially all of our debt is
denominated in U.S. dollars, the increase is due primarily to the strengthening of the U.S. dollar that occurred in 2014.
Our debt positions and credit ratios are summarized in the following table.
December 31, December 31, December 31,
201420132012
Term notes $7,132$
7,124$
7,119
Other
144
137
113
Total debt (US$ in millions)
$7,276$
7,261$
7,232
Canadian $ equivalent at year-end exchange rate
8,441
7,723
7,195
Less cash balances (2,029)(2,772)(3,267)
Net debt $6,412$
4,951$
3,928
Debt to debt-plus-equity
31%29%29%
Net debt to net debt-plus-equity
25%
21%
18%
Average interest rate at year-end
4.8%4.8%4.8%
At December 31, 2014, the weighted average maturity of our consolidated indebtedness is approximately 14 years
and the weighted average coupon rate is approximately 4.8%.
The cost of funds under our credit facilities depends in part on our credit ratings. Moody’s currently rates us at Baa2
with a negative outlook, Standard & Poor’s rates us at BBB- with a stable outlook, Dominion Bond Rating Service rates
us as BBB with a negative trend and Fitch Ratings rates us as BBB with a negative outlook. These are all investment
grade credit ratings. The costs under our credit facilities would change if certain of our credit ratings were to change.
Our primary sources of liquidity and capital resources are our cash and temporary investments, cash flow provided
from operations, and funds available under our committed and uncommitted bank credit facilities, of which US$3 billion
is currently available.
Operating Cash Flow
Cash flow from operations was $2.3 billion in 2014, compared with $2.9 billion in 2013 and $3.4 billion in 2012.
The decreases in 2014 and 2013 compared to 2012 were due mainly to lower gross profits at our coal and copper
operations from lower commodity prices, particularly steelmaking coal.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
37
Investing Activities
Capital expenditures were $1.5 billion in 2014 and included $511 million on sustaining capital, $165 million on major
enhancement projects and $822 million on new mine development. In addition, $715 million was spent on production
stripping activities.
($ in millions)
Sustaining
Coal
$
175
Major New Mine Capitalized
Enhancement Development SubtotalStripping
$
45
$
15
$
235
$
443
Total
$
678
Copper 170 90 97 357 225 582
Zinc
154
Energy
–
Corporate
12
$
511
$
30
8
192
47
239
–702 702
– 702
–
– 12
165
–
$ 822
12
$ 1,498
$
715
$ 2,213
The largest components of sustaining capital expenditures were $175 million at our coal operations, primarily related
to equipment replacement and the water quality plan to reduce selenium levels in mine discharge water; $126 million
at Trail Operations, which included $49 million on construction of a new acid plant that replaced an aging facility and
$48 million on the KIVCET furnace rebuild; $47 million each at Highland Valley Copper and for our share of spending at
Antamina; and $52 million at Quebrada Blanca.
Major enhancement expenditures included $83 million at Highland Valley Copper, primarily for the completion of the
mill optimization project, and $44 million at Teck Coal to increase production capacity to 28 million tonnes.
New mine development included $75 million for Quebrada Blanca’s Phase 2 hypogene project, $16 million for Relincho,
$15 million for the potential restart of the Quintette project prior to being put on care and maintenance due to
unfavourable market conditions, $616 million for our share of spending on the Fort Hills project and $74 million on
the Frontier oil sands project.
Investments in 2014 were $44 million and included various investments in publicly traded marketable securities.
Investments in 2013 included $244 million for our share of the Fort Hills project until October 29, 2013. Beginning
October 30, 2013, we began accounting for our investment in Fort Hills as a joint operation, resulting in our share of
the project costs being included as part of our capital expenditures. Investments in 2012 were $432 million for the
acquisition of SilverBirch Energy Corporation, which gave us full ownership of the Frontier oil sands project, including
the Equinox property, $197 million for interests in a number of publicly traded companies and $122 million for our
share of the costs of our equity accounted investment in Fort Hills.
Cash proceeds from the sale of assets and investments were $34 million in 2014, $502 million in 2013 and $51 million
in 2012. In 2012, we sold various small non-core mining properties.
Financing Activities
We had no significant financings in 2014, but we did increase the amount of our U.S. dollar revolving line of credit to
US$3 billion, all of which was undrawn at the end of the year.
In 2012, we issued US$2.75 billion of long-term notes and used the proceeds to redeem the remaining outstanding
balance of the various high-yield notes issued in 2009 and to repay the US$200 million notes due in September 2012.
Class B subordinate voting shares repurchased for cancellation pursuant to normal course issuer bids included
200,000 shares at a cost of $5 million in 2014, 6.1 million shares for $176 million in 2013 and 3.9 million shares for
$129 million in 2012.
38
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Quarterly Earnings and Cash Flow
($ in millions except per share data)
20142013
Revenue
Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1
$2,256
$2,250
$2,009
$2,084 $
2,376$
2,524$
2,152$
2,330
Gross profit
416 412 295 405 546 597 582 701
EBITDA 582 651 558 557 766 815 670 902
Profit attributable
to shareholders
129
84
80
69 232 267 143 319
Earnings per share
$0.23$0.14$0.14$0.12 $0.40$0.46$0.25$0.55
Cash flow from operations
$743$554$436$545 $769$656$690$763
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization from our coal business unit declined by $118 million in the fourth
quarter, compared with a year ago primarily due to lower coal prices. The average realized coal price of US$110 per
tonne was 23% lower than the fourth quarter of 2013 and reflects oversupplied steelmaking coal market conditions.
The favourable effect of a stronger U.S. dollar in the fourth quarter partly offset the lower coal price, which weakened
by 17% in Canadian dollar equivalent terms compared with the same period a year ago. Coal production in the
fourth quarter of 6.8 million tonnes rose by 2% compared with the same period a year ago and set a new fourth
quarter record for the business unit. There was potential for higher production rates to have been achieved; however,
rail movement of coal to Vancouver ports has been underperforming and limiting our production rates since late
November. This led to temporary shutdowns at a number of the mines due to high site inventory levels in December.
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization from our copper business unit decreased by $110 million in the
fourth quarter compared with a year ago. This was primarily due to lower sales volumes and lower copper prices in
the quarter. These items were partially offset by the positive effect of the stronger U.S. dollar. Copper production
declined 22,000 tonnes compared to a year ago primarily due to lower ore grades. Our share of Antamina’s copper
production decreased by 10,400 tonnes, primarily due to significantly lower ore grades, as anticipated in the mine
plan. Copper production at Highland Valley Copper was 4,200 tonnes lower than a year ago due to lower grades and
recoveries, partially offset by a significant increase in mill throughput. Quebrada Blanca’s copper production declined
3,700 tonnes due to lower grades and less dump leach material processed while copper production declined
3,000 tonnes at Carmen de Andacollo primarily as a result of both lower grades and lower mill throughput due to
harder ore and unplanned maintenance downtime.
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization from our zinc business unit increased by $110 million in the
fourth quarter compared with a year ago and was primarily attributable to our Red Dog Operations. Contributing
to the increased gross profit was a 17% rise in zinc prices, the favourable effect of the stronger U.S. dollar and a
21% increase in both zinc and lead sales volumes from Red Dog. Refined zinc production from our Trail Operations
increased by 6% compared to last year due to improved operating efficiencies in the electrolytic plant and to the
improved reliability of the new acid plant, which led to higher throughput. At Red Dog, zinc in concentrate production
rose by 9% as mill throughput increased as a result of processing softer, more favourable ore types in the quarter.
Profit attributable to shareholders was $129 million, or $0.23 per share, in the fourth quarter compared with
$232 million, or $0.40 per share, in the same period last year. The decline in profit was primarily due to significantly
lower coal prices and a decline in copper sales volumes and prices. Cash flow from operations, before working
capital changes, was $522 million in the fourth quarter compared with $636 million a year ago, with the reduction
primarily due to significantly lower coal prices.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
39
Outlook
We continue to experience challenging markets for our products, and prices for some of our products have declined
significantly in 2014. Commodity markets have historically been volatile, prices can change rapidly and customers can
alter shipment plans. This can have a substantial effect on our business. Demand for our products, particularly coal,
remains strong. However, increased supply from Australian mines has put downward pressure on coal prices. While
we believe that the longer term fundamentals for steelmaking coal, copper and zinc are favourable, the weakness in
some of these markets may persist for some time. We are also significantly affected by foreign exchange rates. For
the 12 months to December 31, 2014, the U.S. dollar strengthened by approximately 9% against the Canadian dollar,
which has had a positive effect on the profitability of our Canadian operations. It will, to a lesser extent, put upward
pressure on the portion of our operating costs and capital spending that is denominated in U.S. dollars. Following
year-end and to the date of this report, the U.S. dollar has strengthened by a further 9% against the Canadian dollar.
We have approved an estimated $2.9 billion on the development of the Fort Hills oil sands project, of which
approximately $1.1 billion has been expended cumulative to date. We have access to cash and credit lines, which
are expected to be sufficient to meet our capital commitments and working capital needs over this period. We are
taking further steps to manage our capital spending profile, and we continuously monitor all aspects of our cost
reduction program, our capital spending and key markets as conditions evolve.
Commodity Prices and 2015 Production
Commodity prices are a key driver of our profit. On the supply side, the depleting nature of ore reserves, difficulties
in finding new orebodies, the permitting processes, the availability of skilled resources to develop projects,
as well as infrastructure constraints, political risk and significant cost inflation may continue to have a moderating
effect on the growth in future production for the industry as a whole. We believe that over the longer term, the
industrialization of emerging market economies will continue to be a major positive factor in the future demand
for commodities. Therefore, we believe that the long-term price environment for the products that we produce
and sell remains favourable.
Based on our expected 2015 mid-range production estimates and a Canadian/U.S. dollar exchange rate of $1.20,
the estimated sensitivity of our annual profit attributable to shareholders to the U.S. dollar exchange rate and the
indicated changes in commodity prices, before pricing adjustments, is as follows:
2015 Mid-Range
Estimated
Estimated
Production
Effect on
Effect on
(1)
Profit (2)
EBITDA (2)
Estimates Change
US$ exchange CAD$0.01
$ 32 million
$ 52 million
Coal (000’s tonnes)
27,000US$1/tonne
$ 21 million
$ 32 million
Copper (tonnes)
350,000US$0.01/lb.
$
5 million
$
Zinc (tonnes) 935,000US$0.01/lb.
$
8 million
$ 12 million
(3)
8 million
Notes:
(1) All production estimates are subject to change based on market and operating conditions.
(2) The effect on our profit attributable to shareholders and on EBITDA of commodity price and exchange rate movements will vary from quarter to
quarter depending on sales volumes. Our estimate of the sensitivity of profit and EBITDA to changes in the U.S. dollar exchange rate is sensitive
to commodity price assumptions.
(3) Zinc includes 285,000 tonnes of refined zinc and 650,000 tonnes of zinc contained in concentrate.
The decline in our estimated foreign exchange sensitivity from previous estimates is primarily due to the effect of
lower commodity prices, which are all denominated in U.S. dollars.
40
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Foreign exchange translation gains and losses on our U.S. dollar denominated debt arising from exchange rate
fluctuations may have some effect on our 2015 profit, as most our U.S. dollar debt is expected to be designated as a
hedge against our investments in U.S. dollar denominated foreign operations.
Steelmaking coal prices continue to trade at unsustainably low long-term levels and are currently trading at prices
approximately 7% lower than 2014 averages. Copper prices to date in 2015 are trading approximately 15% below 2014
average prices, while zinc prices have been trading at similar levels to 2014 average prices. The fluctuations in the
Canadian/U.S. dollar exchange rate can have a significant effect on our profit and financial position. The Canadian dollar,
to date in 2015, has averaged approximately $1.22 against the U.S. dollar, compared with $1.10 on average for 2014.
Our coal production in 2015 is expected to be in the range of 26.5 to 27.5 million tonnes. Our actual production will
depend primarily on customer demand for deliveries of steelmaking coal. Depending on market conditions and the
sales outlook, we may adjust our production plans. Our current production capacity is approximately 28 million tonnes,
but our actual production will ultimately depend on demand from our customers.
Our copper production for 2015 is expected to increase and be in the range of 340,000 to 360,000 tonnes,
compared with 333,100 tonnes produced in 2014. Highland Valley Copper is expected to increase their production
by approximately 20,000 tonnes as a result of the mining of higher ore grades. Antamina is expected to gradually
increase production as grades improve in the second half. These increases are expected to offset declines from
the closure of Duck Pond, with overall a weaker first quarter, but a strong final quarter in the year. However, most of
the increased copper production is expected in the last half of the year.
Our zinc in concentrate production in 2015 is expected to be in the range of 635,000 to 665,000 tonnes, compared
with 660,000 tonnes produced in 2014. Red Dog’s production is expected to decrease by approximately 45,000 tonnes
due to lower mill throughput. The restart of Pend Oreille is expected to add 40,000 tonnes to zinc production. Our
share of Antamina is expected to increase by approximately 5,000 tonnes and will partly offset the decline from the
closure of Duck Pond in mid-2015. Refined zinc production from our Trail Operations in 2015 is expected to be
in the range of 280,000 to 290,000 tonnes, compared with 277,000 tonnes produced in 2014.
Our mining operations use a significant amount of diesel fuel and our transportation costs are contractually linked
to diesel prices. The significant decline in oil prices that began in the fourth quarter of 2014 is also expected to have
a significant effect on our gross profit if current prices persist. Each US$1 change in the price of a barrel of oil has
a $5 million effect on our operating costs.
Capital Expenditures
Our forecast of approved capital expenditures for 2015, before capitalized stripping costs, is expected to be
approximately $1.6 billion and is summarized in the following table:
($ in millions)
Sustaining
Coal
$
100
Major New Mine Capitalized
Enhancement Development SubtotalStripping
$
Copper 200
Zinc
180
Energy
–
Corporate
10
$
490
$
45
$
–
$
145
$
490
Total
$
635
15105 320 225 545
–
–
180
60
240
–910 910
– 910
–
– 10
60
–
$ 1,015
10
$ 1,565
$
775
$ 2,340
New mine development includes $95 million for Quebrada Blanca Phase 2, $850 million for Fort Hills and $60 million
on the Frontier oil sands project. The amount and timing of actual capital expenditures is also dependent upon being
able to secure permits, equipment, supplies, materials and labour on a timely basis and at expected costs to enable
the projects to be completed as currently anticipated. We may change capital spending plans in 2015, depending on
commodity markets, our financial position, results of feasibility studies and other factors.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
41
Foreign Exchange, Debt Revaluation and Interest Expense
The sales of our products are denominated in U.S. dollars, while a significant portion of our expenses are incurred
in local currencies, particularly the Canadian dollar. Foreign exchange fluctuations can have a significant effect on our
operating margins, unless such fluctuations are offset by related changes to commodity prices.
Our U.S. dollar denominated debt is subject to revaluation based on changes in the Canadian/U.S. dollar exchange
rate. As at December 31, 2014, $6.5 billion of our U.S. dollar denominated debt is designated as a hedge against our
U.S. dollar denominated foreign operations. As a result, any foreign exchange gains or losses arising on that amount
of our U.S. dollar debt are recorded in other comprehensive income, with the remainder being charged to profit.
Other Information
British Columbia Carbon Tax
The Province of B.C. imposes a carbon tax on virtually all fossil fuels used in B.C. at a tax rate of $30 per tonne of
CO 2 -emission equivalent. For 2014, our seven B.C.-based operations incurred $51 million in provincial carbon tax,
primarily from our use of coal, diesel fuel and natural gas.
Financial Instruments and Derivatives
We hold a number of financial instruments and derivatives, which are recorded on our balance sheet at fair value
with gains and losses in each period included in other comprehensive income and profit for the period as appropriate.
The most significant of these instruments are marketable securities, foreign exchange forward sales contracts,
metal-related forward contracts, and settlements receivable and payable. Some of our gains and losses on metalrelated financial instruments are affected by smelter price participation and are taken into account in determining
royalties and other expenses. All are subject to varying rates of taxation, depending on their nature and jurisdiction.
Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments
In preparing consolidated financial statements, management makes estimates and judgments that affect the
reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses across all reportable segments. Management makes
estimates and judgments that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ
from our estimates. Our estimates and judgments are based on historical experience and other factors we consider
to be reasonable, including expectations of future events. Critical accounting estimates and judgments are those that
could affect the consolidated financial statements materially, are highly uncertain and where changes are reasonably
likely to occur from period to period. Management’s critical accounting estimates and judgments apply to the
assessment of the impairment of assets, including goodwill, joint arrangements, the estimated recoverable reserves
and resources, and the valuation of other assets and liabilities such as decommissioning and restoration provisions
(DRP) and the accounting for income taxes.
Impairment Testing
Judgment is required in assessing whether certain factors would be considered an indicator of impairment.
We consider both internal and external information to determine whether there is an indicator of impairment present
and, accordingly, whether impairment testing is required. Impairment testing is based on discounted cash flow
models prepared by internal experts with assistance from third-party advisors when required. Significant assumptions
used include commodity prices, mineral reserves and resources, operating costs, capital expenditures, discount rates,
foreign exchange rates, tax assumptions and inflation rates. The inputs used are based on management’s best
estimates of what an independent market participant would consider appropriate, and are reviewed by senior
management. Changes in these inputs may alter the results of impairment testing, the amount of the impairment
charges recorded in the statement of income and the resulting carrying values of assets.
42
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
We allocate goodwill arising from business combinations to the cash-generating unit or group of cash-generating units
acquired that is expected to receive the benefits from the business combination. When performing annual goodwill
impairment tests, we are required to determine the recoverable amount of each cash-generating unit or group of
cash-generating units to which goodwill has been allocated. The recoverable amount of each cash-generating unit or
group of cash-generating units is determined as the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use.
We have performed our annual goodwill impairment testing and did not identify any impairment losses. The recoverable
amounts for our goodwill impairment testing were determined based on a fair value less costs of disposal basis. The fair
value less costs of disposal was calculated using a discounted cash flow methodology taking account of assumptions
that would be made by market participants. Our annual goodwill impairment test resulted in the recoverable amount of
Carmen de Andacollo exceeding its carrying value by approximately $492 million. The recoverable amount is most
sensitive to commodity price assumptions and is based on an average of US$3.12 per pound for copper over the next
three years escalating to a real long-term copper price of US$3.50 per pound. A 12% decrease in the long-term price
assumption would result in the recoverable amount equalling the carrying value.
Our annual goodwill impairment test resulted in the recoverable amount of our coal operations exceeding their
carrying value by approximately $7.5 billion. The recoverable amount is most sensitive to the long-term commodity
price assumption and is based on a long-term coal price of US$185 per tonne. A 22% decrease in the long-term
price assumption would result in the recoverable amount equalling the carrying value.
The recoverable amount for Quebrada Blanca significantly exceeded the carrying amount at the date of our annual
impairment test.
Joint Arrangements
We are a party to a number of arrangements in which we do not have control. Judgment is required in determining
whether joint control over these arrangements exists and, if so, which parties have joint control and whether each
arrangement is a joint venture or joint operation. In assessing whether we have joint control, we analyze the activities of
each arrangement and determine which activities most significantly affect the returns of the arrangement. These activities
are determined to be the relevant activities of the arrangement. If unanimous consent is required over the decisions about
the relevant activities, the parties whose consent is required would have joint control over the arrangement. The
judgments around which activities are considered the relevant activities of the arrangement are subject to analysis by each
of the parties to the arrangement and may be interpreted differently. When performing this assessment, we consider
decisions about activities such as managing the asset during its life, acquisition, expansion and dispositions of assets and
financing, operating and capital decisions to be the most relevant. We may also consider activities including the approval
of budgets, appointment of key management personnel, representation on the Board of Directors, and other items.
If we conclude that we have joint control over the arrangement, an assessment of whether the arrangement is a
joint venture or joint operation is required. This assessment is based on whether we have rights to the assets,
and obligations for the liabilities, relating to the arrangement or whether we have rights to the net assets of the
arrangement. In making this determination, we review the legal form of the arrangement, the terms of the contractual
arrangement, and other facts and circumstances. In a situation where the legal form and the terms of the contractual
arrangement do not give us rights to the assets and obligations for the liabilities, an assessment of other facts and
circumstances is required, including whether the activities of the arrangement are primarily designed for the provision
of output to the parties and whether the parties are substantially the only source of cash flows contributing to the
arrangement. In such circumstances we may consider the application of other facts and circumstances to conclude
that a joint arrangement is a joint operation is appropriate. This conclusion requires judgment and is specific to each
arrangement. We have applied the use of other facts and circumstances to conclude that Antamina and Fort Hills
are joint operations for the purposes of our consolidated financial statements. The other facts and circumstances
considered for both of these arrangements are the provisions for output to the parties of the joint arrangements.
For both Antamina and Fort Hills, we will take our share of the output from the assets directly over the life of the
arrangement. We have concluded that this, combined with other factors, gives us direct rights to the assets and
obligations for the liabilities of these arrangements, proportionate to our ownership interests.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
43
Estimated Recoverable Reserves and Resources
Mineral reserve and resource estimates are based on various assumptions relating to operating matters as set forth
in National Instrument 43-101. These include production costs, mining and processing recoveries, cut-off grades,
long-term commodity prices and, in some cases, exchange rates, inflation rates and capital costs. Cost estimates are
based on feasibility study estimates or operating history. Estimates are prepared by appropriately qualified persons,
but will be affected by forecasted commodity prices, inflation rates, exchange rates, capital and production costs and
recoveries, amongst other factors.
Estimated recoverable reserves and resources are used to determine the depreciation of property, plant and
equipment at operating mine sites, in accounting for capitalized production stripping costs, in performing impairment
testing, and for forecasting the timing of the payment of decommissioning and restoration costs. Therefore, changes
in the assumptions used could change the carrying value of assets, depreciation and impairment charges recorded in
the income statement, and the carrying value of the decommissioning and restoration provision.
Decommissioning and Restoration Provisions
The DRP are based on future cost estimates using information available at the balance sheet date. These estimates
are based on engineering studies of the work that is required by environmental laws or public statements by
management that result in an obligation.
The DRP is adjusted at each reporting period for changes to factors such as the expected amount of cash flows
required to discharge the liability, the timing of such cash flows, and the discount rate. The DRP requires other
significant estimates and assumptions such as requirements of the relevant legal and regulatory framework, and the
timing, extent and costs of required decommissioning and restoration activities. To the extent the actual costs differ
from these estimates, adjustments will be recorded and the income statement may be affected.
Current and Deferred Income Taxes
We calculate current and deferred tax provisions for each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. Actual amounts
of income tax expense are not final until tax returns are filed and accepted by the relevant authorities. This occurs
subsequent to the issuance of financial statements and the final determination of actual amounts may not be
completed for a number of years. Therefore, subsequent periods will be affected by the amount that estimates differ
from the final tax return.
Judgment is required in assessing whether deferred tax assets and certain deferred tax liabilities are recognized on
the balance sheet and what tax rate is expected to be applied in the year when the related temporary differences
reverse. We also evaluate the recoverability of deferred tax assets based on an assessment of the ability to use the
underlying future tax deductions before they expire against future taxable income. Deferred tax liabilities arising from
temporary differences on investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates are recognized unless the reversal
of the temporary differences is not expected to occur in the foreseeable future and can be controlled. Assumptions
about the generation of future taxable profits and repatriation of retained earnings depend on management’s
estimates of future production and sales volumes, commodity prices, reserves and resources, operating costs,
decommissioning and restoration costs, capital expenditures, dividends and other capital management transactions.
These estimates and judgments are subject to risk and uncertainty and could result in an adjustment to the deferred
tax provision and corresponding credit or charge to profit. Judgment is also required on the application of income tax
legislation. We are subject to assessments by various taxation authorities who may interpret tax legislation differently.
These differences may affect the final amount or timing of the payment of taxes. We provide for these differences,
where known, based on management’s best estimate of the probable outcome of these matters.
44
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Adoption of New Accounting Standards and Accounting Developments
Adoption of New Accounting Standards
We adopted IFRIC 21, Levies (IFRIC 21) on January 1, 2014, with retrospective application. IFRIC 21 provides guidance
on the accounting for a liability to pay a levy, if that liability is within the scope of IAS 37, Provisions, Contingent
Liabilities and Contingent Assets. Levies are imposed by governments in accordance with legislation and do not include
income taxes, which are accounted for under IAS 12, Income Taxes, or fines or other penalties imposed for breaches
of legislation. The interpretation was issued to address diversity in practice around when the liability to pay a levy is
recognized. An example of a common levy is property tax.
IFRIC 21 defines an obligating event as the activity that triggers the payment of the levy, as identified by legislation.
A liability to pay a levy is recognized at the date of the obligating event, which may be at a point in time or over a
period of time. The fact that an entity is economically compelled to continue to operate in the future, or prepares its
financial statements on a going concern basis, does not create an obligation to pay a levy that will arise in a future
period as a result of continuing to operate.
The adoption of IFRIC 21 did not affect our financial results or disclosures, as our analysis determined that no changes
were required to our existing accounting treatment of levies.
Accounting Developments
New IFRS pronouncements that have been issued but are not yet effective are listed below. We plan to apply the
new standard or interpretation in the annual period for which it is first required.
Revenue from Contracts with Customers
In May 2014, the IASB and the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) completed their joint project to clarify
the principles for recognizing revenue and to develop a common revenue standard for IFRS and United States
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (U.S. GAAP). As a result of the joint project, the IASB issued IFRS 15,
Revenue from Contracts with Customers (IFRS 15) to replace IAS 18, Revenue and IAS 11, Construction Contracts
and the related interpretations on revenue recognition.
The new revenue standard introduces a single principles-based five-step model for the recognition of revenue when
control of a good or service is transferred to the customer. The five steps are: identify the contract(s) with the
customer, identify the performance obligations in the contract, determine transaction price, allocate the transaction
price, and recognize revenue when a performance obligation is satisfied. IFRS 15 also requires enhanced disclosures
about revenue to help investors better understand the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash
flows from contracts with customers, and improves the comparability of revenue from contracts with customers.
IFRS 15 will be effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2017, with early adoption permitted.
We are currently assessing the effect of this standard on our financial statements.
Financial Instruments
IFRS 9, Financial Instruments (IFRS 9), addresses the classification, measurement and recognition of financial assets
and financial liabilities. The IASB has previously issued versions of IFRS 9 that introduced new classification and
measurement requirements (in 2009 and 2010) and a new hedge accounting model (in 2013). The July 2014
publication of IFRS 9 is the completed version of the Standard, replacing earlier versions of IFRS 9 and superseding
the guidance relating to the classification and measurement of financial instruments in IAS 39, Financial Instruments:
Recognition and Measurement (IAS 39).
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
45
IFRS 9 requires financial assets to be classified into three measurement categories on initial recognition: those
measured at fair value through profit and loss, those measured at fair value through other comprehensive income,
and those measured at amortized cost. Investments in equity instruments are required to be measured by default
at fair value through profit or loss. However, there is an irrevocable option to present fair value changes in other
comprehensive income. Measurement and classification of financial assets is dependent on the entity’s business
model for managing the financial assets and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. For financial
liabilities, the standard retains most of the IAS 39 requirements. The main change is that, in cases where the fair value
option is taken for financial liabilities, the part of a fair value change relating to an entity’s own credit risk is recorded
in other comprehensive income rather than the income statement, unless this creates an accounting mismatch.
IFRS 9 introduces a new three-stage expected credit loss model for calculating impairment for financial assets. IFRS 9
no longer requires a triggering event to have occurred before credit losses are recognized. An entity is required to
recognize expected credit losses when financial instruments are initially recognized and to update the amount of
expected credit losses recognized at each reporting date to reflect changes in the credit risk of the financial instruments.
In addition, IFRS 9 requires additional disclosure requirements about expected credit losses and credit risk.
The new hedging section of the final IFRS 9 standard remains relatively unchanged from when the new hedging
accounting section of IFRS 9 was first introduced in November 2013. The new hedge accounting model aligns hedge
accounting with risk management activities undertaken by an entity. Components of both financial and non-financial
items will now be eligible for hedge accounting, as long as the risk component can be identified and measured. The
new hedge accounting model includes eligibility criteria that must be met, but these criteria are based on an economic
assessment of the strength of the hedging relationship. New disclosure requirements relating to hedge accounting will
be required and are meant to simplify existing disclosure. The IASB currently has a separate project on macro hedging
activities and until the project is completed, the IASB have provided a policy choice for entities to either apply the
hedge accounting model in IFRS 9 or IAS 39 in full. Additionally, there is a hybrid option to use IAS 39 to account for
macro hedges only and to use IFRS 9 for all other hedges.
The completed version of IFRS 9 is effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2018, with early
adoption permitted. We are currently assessing the effect of this standard and its related amendments on our
financial statements.
Other Information
Control Activities
For all changes to policies and procedures that have been identified relating to the above items, the effectiveness of
internal controls over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures has been assessed and any changes
have been implemented. We have identified and implemented accounting process changes relating to the above new
policies and these changes were not significant. We applied our existing control framework to the implementation of
the new standards. All accounting policy changes and financial effects are subject to review by senior management
and the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors.
Business Activities, Key Performance Measures and Information Systems
We do not expect the preceding changes to significantly affect our financial covenants or key ratios. The implementation
of the above IFRS pronouncements is not expected to significantly impact our information systems.
Outstanding Share Data
As at February 17, 2015, there were 566,847,793 Class B subordinate voting shares and 9,353,470 Class A common
shares outstanding. In addition, there were 16,162,748 employee stock options outstanding, with exercise prices
ranging between $4.15 and $58.80 per share. More information on these instruments and the terms of their conversion
are set out in the equity note to our 2014 consolidated financial statements.
46
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Contractual and Other Obligations
Less than
1–3
4–5
More than
($ in millions) 1 Year
Years
Years 5 Years
Total
Principal and interest payments on debt
$
773
$
1,449
$
1,839
$ 11,094
$ 15,155
Operating leases524819 6
125
Capital leases5614 946
125
Road and port lease at Red Dog (1)204141
239
341
Minimum purchase obligations (2)
Concentrate, equipment
and supply purchases
1,115
3663623
1,540
Shipping and distribution
291
14379
102
615
Pension funding (3)
31 – – –31
Other non-pension
post-retirement benefits (4)163540
377
468
Decommissioning and
restoration provision (5)638162
659
865
Other long-term liabilities (6)1537171079
Project commitments for the
Fort Hills oil sands project (7)
850
755 – –
1,605
$
3,282$
2,969$
2,142$
12,556$
20,949
Notes:
(1) We lease road and port facilities from the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority through which we ship metal concentrates
produced at the Red Dog mine. Minimum lease payments are US$18 million per annum and are subject to deferral and abatement for
force majeure events.
(2) The majority of our minimum purchase obligations are subject to continuing operations and force majeure provisions.
(3) As at December 31, 2014, the company had a net pension asset of $129 million based on actuarial estimates prepared on a going concern basis.
The amount of minimum funding for 2014 in respect of defined benefit pension plans is $31 million. The timing and amount of additional funding
after 2014 is dependent upon future returns on plan assets, discount rates and other actuarial assumptions.
(4) We had a discounted, actuarially determined liability of $468 million in respect of other non-pension post-retirement benefits as at
December 31, 2014. Amounts shown are estimated expenditures in the indicated years.
(5) We accrue environmental and reclamation obligations over the life of our mining operations and amounts shown are estimated expenditures in
the indicated years at fair value, assuming credit-adjusted risk-free discount rates between 6.61% and 7.61% and an inflation factor of 2.00%.
(6) Other long-term liabilities include amounts for post-closure, environmental costs and other items.
(7)In November 2005, we acquired a 15% interest in the Fort Hills Energy Limited Partnership, which is developing the Fort Hills oil sands project in
Alberta, Canada. In September 2007, we acquired an additional 5% interest, bringing our total interest to 20%. To earn our additional 5% interest,
we are required to contribute 27.5% of $5 billion of project expenditures after project spending reaches $2.5 billion. We are presently funding at
this level. Thereafter, we are responsible for our 20% share of development costs.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
47
Disclosure Controls and Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Disclosure Controls and Procedures
Disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be
disclosed in reports filed or submitted by us under U.S. and Canadian securities legislation is recorded, processed,
summarized and reported within the time periods specified in those rules and include controls and procedures designed to
ensure that information required to be disclosed in reports filed or submitted by us under U.S. and Canadian securities
legislation is accumulated and communicated to management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial
Officer, as appropriate to permit timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Management, including the Chief
Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure
controls and procedures, as defined in the rules of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Canadian
Securities Administrators, as at December 31, 2014. Based on this evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief
Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as at December 31, 2014.
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting.
Any system of internal control over financial reporting, no matter how well designed, has inherent limitations.
Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to
financial statement preparation and presentation. Management has used the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations
of the Treadway Commission (COSO) 2013 framework to evaluate the effectiveness of our internal control over
financial reporting. Based on this assessment, management has concluded that as at December 31, 2014, our internal
control over financial reporting was effective.
The effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP,
an independent registered public accounting firm, who have expressed their opinion in their report included with our
annual consolidated financial statements.
Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures
Our financial results are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). This
document refers to gross profit before depreciation and amortization, EBITDA, adjusted profit, adjusted earnings per
share, net debt, debt to debt-plus-equity ratio, and the net debt to net debt-plus-equity ratio, which are not measures
recognized under IFRS in Canada and do not have a standardized meaning prescribed by IFRS or Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles (GAAP) in the U.S.
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization is gross profit with depreciation and amortization added back.
EBITDA is profit attributable to shareholders before net finance expense, provision for income taxes, and depreciation
and amortization. For adjusted profit, we adjust profit attributable to shareholders as reported to remove the effect
of certain types of transactions that in our judgment are not indicative of our normal operating activities or do not
necessarily occur on a regular basis. Adjusted earnings per share is calculated by dividing the adjusted profit amount
by our reported weighted average shares outstanding. We believe that disclosing these measures assists readers in
understanding the cash-generating potential of our business in order to provide liquidity to fund working capital needs,
service outstanding debt, fund future capital expenditures and investment opportunities, and pay dividends.
Net debt is total debt less cash and cash equivalents. The debt to debt-plus-equity ratio takes total debt as reported
and divides that by the sum of total debt plus total equity. The net debt to net debt-plus-equity ratio takes net debt and
divides that by the sum of net debt plus total equity. These measures are disclosed as we believe they provide readers
with information that allows them to assess our potential financing needs and capacity and the ability to meet our
short- and long-term financial obligations.
48
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
These measures do not have standardized meanings under IFRS, may differ from those used by different issuers,
and may not be comparable to such measures as reported by others. These measures have been derived from our
financial statements and applied on a consistent basis as appropriate. We disclose these measures because we
believe they assist readers in understanding the results of our operations and financial position and are meant to
provide further information about our financial results to investors. These measures should not be considered in
isolation or used in substitute for other measures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS.
Reconciliation of Gross Profit Before Depreciation and Amortization
($ in millions)
2014
2013
2012
$1,528$
2,426$
3,524
Gross profit
Depreciation and amortization
1,344
1,233
983
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization
$2,872$
3,659$
4,507
Reported as:
Coal
$913$
1,729$
2,405
Copper
Highland Valley Copper
419
408
530
Antamina
450
596
682
Quebrada Blanca
118
121
115
Carmen de Andacollo
164
244
227
Duck Pond161942
Other10 3 5
$1,177$
1,391$
1,601
Zinc
Red Dog
638
418
440
Trail
142
11259
Other (1) 4 (2)
$779 $534 $497
Energy 3 5 4
Gross profit before depreciation and amortization
$2,872$
3,659$
4,507
Reconciliation of Profit Attributable to Shareholders to EBITDA
($ in millions)
2014
2013
2012
Profit attributable to shareholders
$362$961$
1,068
Finance expense net of finance income
300
326
477
Provision for income taxes
342
633
767
Depreciation and amortization
1,344
1,233
983
EBITDA
$2,348
$
3,153
$
3,295
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
49
Quarterly Reconciliation
($ in millions)
20142013
Profit attributable
to shareholders 129
$84
$80
$69$232$
267 $143$319
Finance expense
net of finance
income 80 78 74 68 71 82 86 87
Provision for
income taxes
32 151 66 93 134144 152203
Depreciation
and amortization
341338338327 329322289293
EBITDA
50
$
Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1
$582
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
$651
$558
$557$766$
815 $670$
902
Caution on Forward-Looking Information
This document contains certain forward-looking information and forward-looking statements as defined in applicable securities laws.
All statements other than statements of historical fact are forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements, principally
under the heading “Outlook”, but also elsewhere in this document, include estimates, forecasts and statements as to management’s
expectations with respect to, among other things, mine life, anticipated cost production at our business units and individual operations,
costs at our business units and individual operations, our expectation that we will meet our production guidance, sales volume and
selling prices for our products (including settlement of coal contracts with customers), our expectation that we should complete 2015
with over $1 billion in cash without any material change in our overall U.S. dollar debt level, plans and expectations for our development
projects, including resulting increases in forecast operating costs and costs of product sold, expected production, expected progress,
costs and outcomes of our various projects and investments, including, but not limited to, those described in the discussions of
our operations, the sensitivity of our profit to changes in commodity prices and exchange rates, the effect of potential production
disruptions, the effect of changes in currency exchange rates, our expectations for the general market for our commodities, future
trends for the company, costs associated with the Elk Valley Water Quality Plan and results of the initiative, timing of the closing of our
Duck Pond mine, projected increase in Antamina production, the economic and production estimates for our Relincho project, our
ability to continue our cost reduction initiative and the results of the initiative, timing of the re-filing of the SEIA for the Quebrada Blanca
Phase 2 project, projected capital and operating costs for Fort Hills, as well as timing of first oil from the Fort Hills project, timing
expectations regarding the Frontier review and permitting process, anticipated capital expenditures, the impact of the change in oil
price on our operating expenses, our expectation that we will have access to cash and credit lines sufficient to meet our capital
commitments and working capital needs, and demand and market outlook for commodities. These forward-looking statements
involve numerous assumptions, risks and uncertainties and actual results may vary materially.
These statements are based on a number of assumptions, including, but not limited to, assumptions regarding general business and
economic conditions, the supply and demand for, deliveries of, and the level and volatility of prices of zinc, copper and coal and other
primary metals and minerals as well as oil, and related products, the timing of the receipt of regulatory and governmental approvals for
our development projects and other operations, our costs and levels of production, as well as those of our competitors, power prices,
continuing availability of water and power resources for our operations, market competition, the accuracy of our reserve estimates
(including with respect to size, grade and recoverability) and the geological, operational and price assumptions on which these are
based, conditions in financial markets, the future financial performance of the company, our ability to attract and retain skilled staff,
our ability to procure equipment and operating supplies, positive results from the studies on our expansion projects, our coal and other
product inventories, our ability to secure adequate transportation for our products, our ability to obtain permits for our operations and
expansions, and our ongoing relations with our employees and business partners and joint venturers. Statements concerning timing of
the re-filing of our SEIA for the Quebrada Blanca Phase 2 project are based on assumptions regarding the permitting process of our
existing project. Our selenium management plans are based on the assumptions, and subject to the factors, described under “Elk Valley
Water Management”. Assumptions regarding the impact of operating costs to oil prices include assumptions regarding the amount of
diesel fuel used in our operations and transporting our products, as well as an assumed Canadian dollar exchange rate of $1.20 against
the U.S. dollar. The foregoing list of assumptions is not exhaustive. Events or circumstances could cause actual results to vary materially.
Factors that may cause actual results to vary materially include, but are not limited to, changes in commodity and power prices,
changes in market demand for our products, changes in interest and currency exchange rates, acts of foreign governments and the
outcome of legal proceedings, inaccurate geological and metallurgical assumptions (including with respect to the size, grade and
recoverability of mineral reserves and resources), unanticipated operational difficulties (including failure of plant, equipment or
processes to operate in accordance with specifications or expectations, cost escalation, unavailability of materials and equipment,
government action or delays in the receipt of government approvals, changes in tax or royalty rates, industrial disturbances or other
job action, adverse weather conditions and unanticipated events related to health, safety and environmental matters), union labour
disputes, political risk, social unrest, failure of customers or counterparties to perform their contractual obligations, changes in our
credit ratings, unanticipated increases in costs to construct our development projects, difficulty in obtaining permits, inability to
address concerns regarding permits or environmental impact assessments, and changes or further deterioration in general economic
conditions. Our Fort Hills project is not controlled by us and construction and production schedules may be adjusted by our partners.
The impact of the price of oil on operating costs will be affected by the exchange rate between Canadian and U.S. dollars.
Statements concerning future production costs or volumes, and the sensitivity of the company’s profit to changes in commodity prices
and exchange rates, are based on numerous assumptions of management regarding operating matters and on assumptions that
demand for products develops as anticipated, that customers and other counterparties perform their contractual obligations, that
operating and capital plans will not be disrupted by issues such as mechanical failure, unavailability of parts and supplies, labour
disturbances, interruption in transportation or utilities, and adverse weather conditions, and that there are no material unanticipated
variations in the cost of energy or supplies.
We assume no obligation to update forward-looking statements except as required under securities laws. Further information
concerning risks and uncertainties associated with these forward-looking statements and our business can be found in our Annual
Information Form for the year ended December 31, 2014, filed on SEDAR and on EDGAR under cover of Form 40-F.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
51
Consolidated
Financial
Statements
For the Years Ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
52
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Management’s Responsibility for Financial Reporting
Management is responsible for the integrity and fair presentation of the financial information contained in this annual
report. Where appropriate, the financial information, including financial statements, reflects amounts based on the
best estimates and judgments of management. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with
International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board. Financial
information presented elsewhere in the annual report is consistent with that disclosed in the financial statements.
Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Any
system of internal control over financial reporting, no matter how well designed, has inherent limitations. Therefore,
even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial
statement preparation and presentation. The system of controls is also supported by a professional staff of internal
auditors who conduct periodic audits of many aspects of our operations and report their findings to management
and the Audit Committee.
Management has a process in place to evaluate internal control over financial reporting based on the criteria
established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013), issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations
of the Treadway Commission (COSO).
The Board of Directors oversees management’s responsibility for financial reporting and internal control systems
through an Audit Committee, which is composed entirely of independent directors. The Audit Committee meets
periodically with management, our internal auditors and independent auditors to review the scope and results of
the annual audit, and to review the financial statements and related financial reporting and internal control matters
before the financial statements are approved by the Board of Directors and submitted to the shareholders.
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, appointed by the shareholders,
have audited our financial statements in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards and have
expressed their opinion in the auditor’s report.
Donald R. Lindsay
President and Chief Executive Officer
Ronald A. Millos
Senior Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
February 17, 2015
Consolidated Financial Statements
53
Independent Auditor’s Report
To the Shareholders of Teck Resources Limited
We have completed integrated audits of Teck Resources Limited’s (the “Company”) December 31, 2014 and 2013
consolidated financial statements and its internal control over financial reporting as at December 31, 2014. Our opinions,
based on our audits, are presented below.
Report on the Consolidated Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial statements of Teck Resources Limited, which comprise
the consolidated balance sheets as at December 31, 2014 and 2013 and the consolidated statements of income,
comprehensive income, cash flows and changes in equity for the years then ended, and the related notes, which
comprise a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information.
Management’s Responsibility for the Consolidated Financial Statements
Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these consolidated financial statements in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards
Board and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of consolidated
financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.
Auditor’s Responsibility
Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.
We conducted our audits as at December 31, 2014 and 2013 and for the years then ended in accordance with
Canadian generally accepted auditing standards and the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board
(United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether the consolidated financial statements are free from material misstatement. Canadian generally accepted
auditing standards also require that we comply with ethical requirements.
An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence, on a test basis, about the amounts and disclosures
in the consolidated financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the
assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to fraud or
error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Company’s preparation
and fair presentation of the consolidated financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate
in the circumstances. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting principles and policies used
and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation
of the consolidated financial statements.
We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained in our audits is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for
our audit opinion on the consolidated financial statements.
Opinion
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of
Teck Resources Limited as at December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013 and its financial performance and its
cash flows for the years then ended in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the
International Accounting Standards Board.
Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
We have also audited the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as at December 31, 2014 based on
criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring
Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).
54
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Management’s Responsibility for Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment
of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in Management’s Report on Internal Control
Over Financial Reporting.
Auditor’s Responsibility
Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our
audit. We conducted our audit of internal control over financial reporting in accordance with the standards of the Public
Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to
obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all
material respects.
An audit of internal control over financial reporting includes obtaining an understanding of internal control over
financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating
effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we consider
necessary in the circumstances.
We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our audit opinion on the Company’s internal control over
financial reporting.
Definition of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the
reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures
that: (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and
dispositions of the assets of the Company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary
to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that
receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and
directors of the Company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized
acquisition, use, or disposition of the Company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Inherent Limitations
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.
Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become
inadequate because of changes in conditions or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures
may deteriorate.
Opinion
In our opinion, Teck Resources Limited maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial
reporting as at December 31, 2014, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013)
issued by COSO.
Chartered Accountants
February 17, 2015
Vancouver, British Columbia
Consolidated Financial Statements
55
Consolidated Statements of Income Years ended December 31
(CAD$ in millions, except for share data)
20142013
Revenue
$8,599$9,382
(7,071)(6,956)
Cost of sales
1,5282,426
Gross profit
Other operating expenses
General and administration(119) (129)
Exploration (60) (86)
Research and development (20) (18)
Other operating income (expense) (Note 6)
(281) (216)
Profit from operations
1,0481,977
Finance income (Note 7)
4 13
Finance expense (Note 7)(304) (339)
Non-operating income (expense) (Note 8) (21)
(6)
(3)
(2)
Share of losses of associates and joint ventures
Profit before tax 7241,643
Provision for income taxes (Note 16)(342) (633)
Profit for the year $382$1,010
Profit attributable to:
Shareholders of the company
$362$ 961
Non-controlling interests
20 49
Profit for the year $382$1,010
Earnings per share (Note 19(g))
Basic
$0.63$ 1.66
Diluted
$0.63$ 1.66
Weighted average shares outstanding (millions)
576.2578.3
Shares outstanding at end of year (millions)576.1576.3
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
56
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income Years ended December 31
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Profit for the year
$382$1,010
Other comprehensive income (loss) in the year
Items that may be reclassified to profit
Currency translation differences (net of taxes of $82 and $64)
Change in fair value of available-for-sale financial instruments
(net of taxes of $nil and $nil)
Cash flow hedges (net of taxes of $nil and $1)
132 142
129 145
(1)
(2)
5
(2)
Items that will not be reclassified to profit
Remeasurements of retirement benefit plans
(net of taxes of $nil and $(110))
28 221
Total other comprehensive income for the year 157 366
$539$1,376
Total comprehensive income for the year
Total other comprehensive income attributable to:
Shareholders of the company
$149$ 360
Non-controlling interests
8
6
$157$ 366
Total comprehensive income attributable to:
Shareholders of the company
$511$1,321
Non-controlling interests 28 55
$539$1,376
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
Consolidated Financial Statements
57
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows Years ended December 31
(CAD$ in millions)
20142013
Operating activities
Profit for the year $382$1,010
Items not affecting operating cash flows:
Depreciation and amortization
1,3441,233
Provision for (recovery of) deferred income taxes
(55) 106
Share of losses of associates and joint ventures
3 2
Loss (gain) on sale of investments and assets
2 (43)
Foreign exchange losses 9 12
Finance expense 304 339
Other 15 (16)
Net change in non-cash working capital items
2,0042,643
274 235
2,2782,878
Investing activities
Purchase of property, plant and equipment
Capitalized production stripping costs
Expenditures on financial investments and other assets
Proceeds from the sale of investments and other assets
(1,498)(1,858)
(715) (744)
(44) (325)
34 502
(2,223)(2,425)
Financing activities
Issuance of debt 12
–
Repayment of debt (70) (39)
Debt interest paid(381) (355)
Issuance of Class B subordinate voting shares
– 1
Purchase and cancellation of Class B subordinate voting shares
(5) (176)
Dividends paid(518) (521)
Distributions to non-controlling interests
(23) (38)
(985)(1,128)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents 187 180
Decrease in cash and cash equivalents(743) (495)
2,7723,267
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year
$2,029$2,772
Supplemental cash flow information (Note 9)
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
58
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Consolidated Balance Sheets
December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Assets
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents (Note 9)
$2,029$2,772
Current income taxes receivable
100 71
Trade accounts receivable 1,0361,232
Inventories (Note 10)
1,7521,695
4,9175,770
Financial and other assets (Note 11) 894 746
32 24
Investments in associates and joint ventures
Property, plant and equipment (Note 12)
28,92527,811
Deferred income tax assets (Note 16) 361 164
Goodwill (Note 13)1,7101,668
$36,839 $36,183
Liabilities and Equity
Current liabilities
Trade accounts payable and other liabilities (Note 14)
$1,663$1,784
Dividends payable (Note 19(i))
259 259
Current income taxes payable
59 61
Debt (Note 15) 428 59
2,4092,163
Debt (Note 15)8,0137,664
6,0915,908
Deferred income tax liabilities (Note 16)
Retirement benefit liabilities (Note 17) 572 479
Other liabilities and provisions (Note 18) 9181,158
18,00317,372
Equity
Attributable to shareholders of the company
Attributable to non-controlling interests 18,60618,597
230 214
18,83618,811
$36,839 $36,183
Contingencies (Note 21)
Commitments (Note 22)
Approved on behalf of the Board of Directors
Hugh J. Bolton, FCAJanice G. Rennie, FCA
Chairman of the Audit CommitteeDirector
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
Consolidated Financial Statements
59
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity Years ended December 31
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Class A common shares (Note 19)
$7$
7
Class B subordinate voting shares (Note 19)
Beginning of year
6,5036,699
Share repurchases (Note 19(e))
(2) (73)
Issued on exercise of options 1 1
Provision for tax benefit (Note 19(h))
–(124)
6,5026,503
End of year
Retained earnings
11,85311,291
Beginning of year
Profit for the year attributable to shareholders of the company
362 961
Dividends declared(518) (518)
Share repurchases (Note 19(e))
(2) (102)
Remeasurements of retirement benefit plans
28 221
11,72311,853
End of year
Contributed surplus
Beginning of year 130 113
Share option compensation expense (Note 19(c))
20 18
Transfer to Class B subordinate voting shares on exercise of options
(1) (1)
End of year 149 130
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
attributable to shareholders of the company (Note 19(f))
Beginning of year 104 (35)
Other comprehensive income 149 360
Less remeasurements of retirement benefit plans recorded in retained earnings
(28) (221)
End of year 225 104
Non-controlling interests (Note 20)
Beginning of year
Profit for the year attributable to non-controlling interests
Other comprehensive income Other
Distributions
214 189
20 49
8 6
11 8
(23) (38)
End of year 230 214
$18,836 $18,811
Total equity
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
1. Nature of Operations
Teck Resources Limited and its subsidiaries (Teck, we, us, or our) are engaged in mining and related activities
including exploration, development, processing, smelting, refining and reclamation. Our major products are
steelmaking coal, copper, zinc and lead. We also produce precious metals, molybdenum, electrical power, fertilizers
and other metals. Metal products are sold as refined metals or concentrates. We also own an interest in a wind power
facility and in certain oil sands leases and have a partnership interest in an oil sands development project now
under construction.
Teck Resources Limited is a Canadian corporation and our registered office is at 550 Burrard Street, Vancouver,
British Columbia, Canada, V6C 0B3.
2. Basis of Preparation and New IFRS Pronouncements
a) Basis of Preparation
These annual consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards (IFRS) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).
These financial statements were prepared by management and were approved by the Board of Directors on
February 17, 2015.
b) Adoption of New IFRS Pronouncements
We adopted IFRIC 21, Levies (IFRIC 21) on January 1, 2014 with retrospective application. IFRIC 21 provides
guidance on the accounting for a liability to pay a levy, if that liability is within the scope of IAS 37, Provisions,
Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets. Levies are imposed by governments in accordance with legislation
and do not include income taxes, which are accounted for under IAS 12, Income Taxes or fines or other penalties
imposed for breaches of legislation. The interpretation was issued to address diversity in practice around when
the liability to pay a levy is recognized. An example of a common levy is property tax.
IFRIC 21 defines an obligating event as the activity that triggers the payment of the levy, as identified by legislation.
A liability to pay a levy is recognized at the date of the obligating event, which may be at a point in time or over a
period of time. The fact that an entity is economically compelled to continue to operate in the future, or prepares its
financial statements on a going concern basis, does not create an obligation to pay a levy that will arise in a future
period as a result of continuing to operate.
The adoption of IFRIC 21 did not affect our financial results or disclosures as our analysis determined that no changes
were required to our existing accounting treatment of levies.
c) New IFRS Pronouncements
New IFRS pronouncements that have been issued but are not yet effective are listed below. We plan to apply the
new standards or interpretations in the annual period for which it is first required.
Revenue from Contracts with Customers
In May 2014, the IASB and the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) completed their joint project to clarify
the principles for recognizing revenue and to develop a common revenue standard for IFRS and United States
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (US GAAP). As a result of the joint project, the IASB issued IFRS 15,
Revenue from Contracts with Customers (IFRS 15) to replace IAS 18, Revenue and IAS 11, Construction Contracts
and the related interpretations on revenue recognition.
Consolidated Financial Statements
61
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
2. Basis of Preparation and New IFRS Pronouncements (continued)
The new revenue standard introduces a single, principles based, five-step model for the recognition of revenue
when control of a good or service is transferred to the customer. The five steps are identify the contract(s) with the
customer, identify the performance obligations in the contract, determine transaction price, allocate the transaction
price and recognize revenue when the performance obligation is satisfied. IFRS 15 also requires enhanced disclosures
about revenue to help investors better understand the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash
flows from contracts with customers and improves the comparability of revenue from contracts with customers.
IFRS 15 will be effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2017, with early adoption permitted.
We are currently assessing the effect of this standard on our financial statements.
Financial Instruments
IFRS 9, Financial Instruments (IFRS 9), addresses the classification, measurement and recognition of financial assets
and financial liabilities. The IASB has previously issued versions of IFRS 9 that introduced new classification and
measurement requirements (in 2009 and 2010) and a new hedge accounting model (in 2013). The July 2014
publication of IFRS 9 is the completed version of the Standard, replacing earlier versions of IFRS 9 and superseding
the guidance relating to the classification and measurement of financial instruments in IAS 39, Financial Instruments:
Recognition and Measurement (IAS 39).
IFRS 9 requires financial assets to be classified into three measurement categories on initial recognition: those
measured at fair value through profit and loss, those measured at fair value through other comprehensive income
and those measured at amortized cost. Investments in equity instruments are required to be measured by default
at fair value through profit or loss. However, there is an irrevocable option to present fair value changes in other
comprehensive income. Measurement and classification of financial assets is dependent on the entity’s business
model for managing the financial assets and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. For financial
liabilities, the standard retains most of the IAS 39 requirements. The main change is that, in cases where the fair value
option is taken for financial liabilities, the part of a fair value change relating to an entity’s own credit risk is recorded
in other comprehensive income rather than the income statement, unless this creates an accounting mismatch.
IFRS 9 introduces a new three-stage expected credit loss model for calculating impairment for financial assets. IFRS 9
no longer requires a triggering event to have occurred before credit losses are recognized. An entity is required to
recognize expected credit losses when financial instruments are initially recognized and to update the amount of
expected credit losses recognized at each reporting date to reflect changes in the credit risk of the financial instruments.
In addition, IFRS 9 requires additional disclosure requirements about expected credit losses and credit risk.
The new hedging section of the final IFRS 9 standard remains relatively unchanged from when the new hedging
accounting section of IFRS 9 was first introduced in November 2013. The new hedge accounting model aligns hedge
accounting with risk management activities undertaken by an entity. Components of both financial and non-financial
items will now be eligible for hedge accounting, as long as the risk component can be identified and measured. The
new hedge accounting model includes eligibility criteria that must be met, but these criteria are based on an economic
assessment of the strength of the hedging relationship. New disclosure requirements relating to hedge accounting will
be required and are meant to simplify existing disclosure. The IASB currently has a separate project on macro hedging
activities and until the project is completed, the IASB has provided a policy choice for entities to either apply the
hedge accounting model in IFRS 9 or IAS 39 in full. Additionally, there is a hybrid option to use IAS 39 to account for
macro hedges only and to use IFRS 9 for all other hedges.
The completed version of IFRS 9 is effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2018, with early
adoption permitted. We are currently assessing the effect of this standard and its related amendments on our
financial statements.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
3. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
The significant accounting policies applied in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements are set out
below. These policies have been consistently applied to all periods presented, unless otherwise stated.
Basis of Presentation
Our consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Teck Resources Limited and all of its subsidiaries. Our
significant operating subsidiaries include Teck Metals Limited (TML), Teck Alaska Incorporated (TAK), Teck Highland
Valley Copper Partnership (Highland Valley Copper), Teck Coal Partnership (Teck Coal), Compañia Minera Teck
Quebrada Blanca S.A. (Quebrada Blanca) and Compañia Minera Teck Carmen de Andacollo (Carmen de Andacollo).
All subsidiaries are entities that we control, either directly or indirectly. Control is defined as the exposure, or rights,
to variable returns from involvement with an investee and the ability to affect those returns through power over the
investee. Power over an investee exists when we have existing rights that give us the ability to direct the activities
that significantly affect the investee’s returns. This control is generally evidenced through owning more than 50%
of the voting rights or currently exercisable potential voting rights of a company’s share capital. All of our intra-group
balances and transactions, including unrealized profits and losses arising from intra-group transactions, have been
eliminated in full. For subsidiaries that we control, but do not own 100% of, the net assets and net profit attributable
to outside shareholders are presented as amounts attributable to non-controlling interests in the consolidated balance
sheet and consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income.
Certain of our business activities are conducted through joint operations. Galore Creek Partnership (Galore Creek,
50% share), Fort Hills Energy Limited Partnership (Fort Hills, 20% share), Waneta Dam (66.7% share) and Wintering
Hills Wind Power Facility (30% share, which increased to 49% in January of 2015) all operate in Canada and
Compañia Minera Antamina (Antamina, 22.5%) operates in Peru. Our interests in these joint operations are accounted
for by recording our share of the respective assets, liabilities, revenue, expenses and cash flows.
All dollar amounts are presented in Canadian dollars unless otherwise specified.
Interests in Joint Arrangements
A joint arrangement can take the form of a joint venture or joint operation. All joint arrangements involve a contractual
arrangement that establishes joint control, which exists only when decisions about the activities that significantly
affect the returns of the investee require unanimous consent of the parties sharing control. A joint operation is a joint
arrangement in which we have rights to the assets and obligations for the liabilities relating to the arrangement. A joint
venture is a joint arrangement in which we have rights to only the net assets of the arrangement.
Joint ventures are accounted for in accordance with the policy “Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures.”
Joint operations are accounted for by recognizing our share of the assets, liabilities, revenue, expenses and cash flows
of the joint operation in our consolidated financial statements.
Consolidated Financial Statements
63
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
3. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)
Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures
Investments over which we exercise significant influence and which we do not control or jointly control are associates.
Investments in associates are accounted for using the equity method, except when classified as held for sale.
Investments in joint ventures as determined in accordance with the policy “Interests in Joint Arrangements” are also
accounted for using the equity method.
The equity method involves recording the initial investment at cost and subsequently adjusting the carrying value of
the investment for our proportionate share of the profit or loss, other comprehensive income or loss and any other
changes in the associate’s or joint venture’s net assets such as dividends.
Our proportionate share of the associate’s or joint venture’s profit or loss and other comprehensive income or loss is
based on its most recent financial statements. Adjustments are made to align any inconsistencies between our
accounting policies and our associate’s or joint venture’s policies before applying the equity method. Adjustments are
also made to account for depreciable assets based on their fair values at the acquisition date of the investment and
for any impairment losses recognized by the associate or joint venture.
If our share of the associate’s or joint venture’s losses equals or exceeds our investment in the associate or joint
venture, recognition of further losses is discontinued. After our interest is reduced to zero, additional losses will be
provided for and a liability recognized only to the extent that we have incurred legal or constructive obligations to
provide additional funding or make payments on behalf of the associate or joint venture. If the associate or joint
venture subsequently reports profits, we resume recognizing our share of those profits only after our share of the
profits equals the share of losses not recognized.
At each balance sheet date, we consider whether there is objective evidence of impairment in associates and joint
ventures. If there is such evidence, we determine if there is a need to record an impairment in relation to the associate
or joint venture.
Foreign Currency Translation
The functional currency for each of our subsidiaries and for joint operations, joint ventures and associates is the
currency of the primary economic environment in which the entity operates. Transactions in foreign currencies are
translated to the functional currency of the entity at the exchange rate in existence at the date of the transaction.
Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are retranslated at the
period end date exchange rates.
The functional currency of Teck Resources Limited, the parent entity, is the Canadian dollar, which is also the
presentation currency of our consolidated financial statements.
Foreign operations are translated from their functional currencies into Canadian dollars on consolidation. Items in the
statement of income are translated using weighted average exchange rates that reasonably approximate the exchange
rate at the transaction date. Items in the balance sheet are translated at the closing spot exchange rate. Exchange
differences on the translation of the net assets of entities with functional currencies other than the Canadian dollar,
and any offsetting exchange differences on net debt used to hedge those assets, are recognized in a separate
component of equity through other comprehensive income.
Exchange differences that arise relating to long term intra-group balances that form part of the net investment in a
foreign operation are also recognized in this separate component of equity through other comprehensive income.
On disposition or partial disposition of a foreign operation, the cumulative amount of related exchange differences
recorded in a separate component of equity is recognized in the statement of income.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Revenue Recognition
Sales of product, including by-product, are recognized in revenue when there is persuasive evidence that all of the
following criteria have been met: the significant risks and rewards of ownership pass to the customer, neither
continuing managerial involvement nor effective control remains over the goods sold, the selling price and costs to
sell can be measured reliably, and it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the sale will flow to us.
All of these criteria are generally met by the time the significant risks and rewards of ownership pass to the customer.
Royalties related to production are recorded in cost of sales.
For sales of steelmaking coal and a majority of sales of metal concentrates, significant risks and rewards of ownership
generally pass to the customer when the product is loaded onto a carrier specified by the customer. We generally
retain title to these products until we receive the first contracted payment, solely to protect the collectability of the
amounts due to us, which are typically received shortly after loading. A minority of metal concentrate sales are made
on consignment. For these transactions, significant risks and rewards of ownership pass to the customer at the time
the product is consumed in the customer’s processes.
For sales of refined metal, significant risks and rewards of ownership generally pass to the customer when the product is
loaded onto a carrier specified by the customer. For these products loading generally coincides with the transfer of title.
Steelmaking coal is sold under spot, quarterly or annual pricing contracts, and pricing is final when product
is delivered.
The majority of our cathode and metal concentrates are sold under pricing arrangements where final prices are
determined by quoted market prices in a period subsequent to the date of sale. For these sales, the price is determined
on a provisional basis at the date of sale and revenue is recorded at that time based on current market prices.
Adjustments are made to the customer receivable in subsequent periods based on movements in quoted
market prices up to the date of final pricing. As a result, the value of our cathode and concentrate sales receivables
changes as the underlying commodity market prices vary and this adjustment mechanism has the characteristics
of a derivative. Accordingly, the fair value of the embedded derivative is adjusted each reporting period by
reference to forward market prices and the changes in fair value are recorded as an adjustment to other operating
income (expense).
Financial Instruments
We recognize financial assets and liabilities on the balance sheet when we become a party to the contractual
provisions of the instrument.
Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents include cash on account, demand deposits and money market investments with maturities
from the date of acquisition of three months or less, which are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and are
subject to insignificant changes in value. Cash is designated as loans and receivables. Cash equivalents are classified
as available-for-sale.
Trade receivables and payables
Trade receivables and payables are non-interest bearing if paid on schedule and are recognized at face amount, except
when fair value is materially different, and are subsequently measured at amortized cost. Where necessary, trade
receivables are net of allowances for uncollectable amounts. We may enter into transactions to sell trade receivables
to third parties. If the risks and rewards of ownership of the receivables are transferred to the purchaser, we account
for the transaction as a sale and derecognize the trade receivables. If significantly all of the risks and rewards of
ownership of the receivables are neither transferred nor retained, we account for the transaction as a sale and
derecognize the trade receivables if we have not retained control over the receivables.
Consolidated Financial Statements
65
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
3. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)
Investments in marketable securities
Investments in marketable securities are designated as available-for-sale and recorded at fair value. Fair values are
determined by reference to quoted market prices at the balance sheet date. Unrealized gains and losses on availablefor-sale investments are recognized in other comprehensive income until investments are disposed of or when there is
objective evidence of an impairment in value. Investment transactions are recognized on the trade date with
transaction costs included in the underlying balance.
At each balance sheet date, we assess for any objective evidence of an impairment in value of our investments and
record such impairments in profit for the period. If an impairment of an investment in a marketable equity security has
been recorded in profit, it cannot be reversed in future periods prior to sale.
Debt
Debt is initially recorded at total proceeds received less direct issuance costs. Debt is subsequently measured at
amortized cost, calculated using the effective interest rate method.
Derivative instruments
Derivative instruments, including embedded derivatives, are recorded at fair value through profit or loss and,
accordingly, are recorded on the balance sheet at fair value. Unrealized gains and losses on derivatives held for trading
are recorded as part of other operating income (expense) or non-operating income (expense) in profit depending on
the nature of the derivative. Fair values for derivative instruments are determined using valuation techniques, with
assumptions based on market conditions existing at the balance sheet date or settlement date of the derivative.
Derivatives embedded in non-derivative contracts are recognized separately unless they are closely related to the
host contract.
Hedging
Certain derivative investments may qualify for hedge accounting. For fair value hedges, any gains or losses on both
the hedged item and the hedging instrument are recognized in profit.
For cash flow hedges, any unrealized gains and losses on the hedging instrument relating to the effective portion of
the hedge are initially recorded in other comprehensive income. Gains and losses are recognized in profit upon
settlement of the hedging instrument, when the hedged item ceases to exist, or when the hedge is determined to
be ineffective.
For hedges of net investments in foreign operations, any foreign exchange gains or losses on the hedging instrument
relating to the effective portion of the hedge are initially recorded in other comprehensive income. Gains and losses
are recognized in profit on the ineffective portion of the hedge, or when there is a disposal of a foreign operation
being hedged.
Inventories
Finished products, work in-process and raw materials inventories are valued at the lower of weighted average cost and
net realizable value. Raw materials include concentrates for use at smelting and refining operations. Work in-process
inventory includes inventory in the milling, smelting or refining process and stockpiled ore at mining operations.
For work in-process and finished product inventories, cost includes all direct costs incurred in production, including
direct labour and materials, freight, depreciation and amortization and directly attributable overhead costs. Production
stripping costs that are not capitalized are included in the cost of inventories as incurred. Depreciation and amortization
of capitalized production stripping costs are included in the cost of inventory.
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When inventories have been written down to net realizable value, we make a new assessment of net realizable value
in each subsequent period. If the circumstances that caused the write-down no longer exist, the remaining amount of
the write-down is reversed.
We use both joint-product and by-product costing for work in-process and finished product inventories. Joint costing is
applied where the profitability of the operations is dependent upon the production of a number of primary products.
Joint costing allocates total production costs based on the relative values of the products. Where by-product costing
is used, by-products are allocated only the incremental costs of processes that are specific to the production of
that product.
Supplies inventory is valued at the lower of weighted average cost and net realizable value. Cost includes acquisition,
freight and other directly attributable costs.
Property, Plant and Equipment
Land, buildings, plant and equipment
Land is recorded at cost and buildings, plant and equipment are recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation and
impairment losses. Cost includes the purchase price and the directly attributable costs to bring the assets to the
location and condition necessary for them to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management.
Depreciation of mobile equipment, buildings used for production, and plant and processing equipment at our mining
operations is calculated on a units-of-production basis. Depreciation of buildings not used for production, and plant
and equipment at our smelting operations is calculated on a straight-line basis over the assets’ estimated useful lives.
Where components of an asset have different useful lives, depreciation is calculated on each component separately.
Depreciation commences when an asset is available for use. Estimates of remaining useful lives and residual values
are reviewed annually. Changes in estimates are accounted for prospectively.
The expected useful lives are as follows:
Buildings and equipment (not used in production)
3–40 years
Plant and equipment (smelting operations)
4–30 years
•
•
Mineral properties and mine development costs
The cost of acquiring and developing mineral properties or property rights, including pre-production waste rock stripping
costs related to mine development and costs incurred during production to increase future output are capitalized.
Waste rock stripping costs incurred in the production phase of a surface mine are recorded as capitalized production
stripping costs within property, plant and equipment when it is probable that the stripping activity will improve access
to the ore body; the component of the ore body to which access has been improved can be identified; and the costs
relating to the stripping activity can be measured reliably. When the actual waste-to-ore stripping ratio in a period is
greater than the expected life-of-component waste-to-ore stripping ratio for a component, the excess is capitalized as
capitalized production stripping costs.
Once available for use, mineral properties and mine development costs are depreciated on a units-of-production basis
over the proven and probable reserves to which they relate. Since the stripping activity within a component of a mine
generally only improves access to the reserves of the same component, capitalized waste rock stripping costs
incurred during the production phase of a mine are depreciated on a units-of-production basis over the proven and
probable reserves expected to be mined from the same component.
Underground mine development costs are depreciated using the block depreciation method where development costs
associated with each distinct section of the mine are depreciated over the reserves to which they relate.
Consolidated Financial Statements
67
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
3. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)
Exploration and evaluation costs
Property acquisition costs are capitalized. Other exploration and evaluation costs are capitalized if they relate to
specific properties for which resources, as defined under National Instrument 43-101, exist or are near a specific
property with a defined resource and it is expected that the expenditure can be recovered by future exploitation or
sale. All other costs are charged to profit in the year in which they are incurred. Capitalized exploration and evaluation
costs are considered to be tangible assets. These assets are not depreciated as they are not currently available for
use. When proven and probable reserves are determined and development is approved, capitalized exploration and
evaluation costs are reclassified to mineral properties and leases within property, plant and equipment.
Development costs of oil sands properties
The costs of acquiring, exploring, evaluating and developing oil sands properties are capitalized when it is expected
that these costs will be recovered through future exploitation or sale of the property. Capitalized development costs of
oil sands properties are considered to be tangible assets. These assets are not depreciated as they are not currently
available for use. When proven and probable reserves are determined and development is approved, capitalized
development costs for oil sands properties are reclassified to mineral properties and leases within property, plant
and equipment.
Construction in progress
Assets in the course of construction are capitalized as construction in progress. On completion, the cost of
construction is transferred to the appropriate category of property, plant and equipment, and depreciation commences
when the asset is available for its intended use.
Impairment of non-current assets
The carrying amounts of assets included in property, plant and equipment are reviewed for impairment whenever
facts and circumstances suggest that the carrying amounts may not be recoverable. If there are indicators of
impairment, the recoverable amount of the asset is estimated in order to determine the extent of any impairment.
Where the asset does not generate cash flows that are independent from other assets, the recoverable amount of the
cash generating unit to which the asset belongs is determined. The recoverable amount of an asset or cash generating
unit is determined as the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. An impairment loss exists
if the asset’s or cash generating unit’s carrying amount exceeds the recoverable amount, and is recorded as an
expense immediately.
Value in use is determined as the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from continuing use of
an asset or cash generating unit in its present form. These estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present
value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks
specific to the asset or cash generating unit for which estimates of future cash flows have not been adjusted. Fair
value is the price that would be received from selling an asset in an orderly transaction between market participants
at the measurement date. Costs of disposal are incremental costs directly attributable to the disposal of an asset.
For mining assets, when a binding sale agreement is not readily available, fair value less costs of disposal is estimated
using a discounted cash flow approach. Estimated future cash flows are calculated using estimated future prices,
mineral reserves and resources and operating and capital costs. All inputs used are those that an independent market
participant would consider appropriate.
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Indicators of impairment and impairment of exploration and evaluation assets or oil sands development costs are
assessed on a project-by-project basis or as part of the existing operation to which they relate.
Tangible assets that have been impaired in prior periods are tested for possible reversal of impairment whenever
events or changes in circumstances indicate that the impairment has reversed. If the impairment has reversed, the
carrying amount of the asset is increased to its recoverable amount, but not beyond the carrying amount that would
have been determined had no impairment loss been recognized for the asset in the prior periods. A reversal of an
impairment loss is recognized into profit immediately.
Repairs and maintenance
Repairs and maintenance costs, including shutdown maintenance costs, are charged to expense as incurred, except
when these repairs significantly extend the life of an asset or result in an operating improvement. In these instances,
the portion of these repairs relating to the betterment is capitalized as part of plant and equipment.
Borrowing costs
We capitalize borrowing costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of an asset
that takes a substantial period of time to get ready for its intended use. We begin capitalizing borrowing costs when
there are general or specific borrowings, expenditures are incurred, and activities are undertaken to prepare the asset
for its intended use. The amount of borrowing costs capitalized cannot exceed the actual amount of borrowing costs
incurred during the period. All other borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.
We discontinue the capitalization of borrowing costs when substantially all of the activities necessary to prepare the
qualifying asset for its intended use or sale are complete. In addition, we cease capitalization of borrowing costs when
there is suspension of activities to prepare an asset for its intended use or sale. Capitalization recommences when the
activities are no longer suspended. Capitalized borrowing costs are amortized over the useful life of the related asset.
Leased assets
Leased assets in which we receive substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership of the asset are capitalized
as finance leases at the lower of the fair value of the asset or the estimated present value of the minimum lease
payments. The corresponding lease obligation is recorded within debt on the balance sheet.
Assets under operating leases are not capitalized, and rental payments are expensed based on the terms of the lease.
Goodwill
We allocate goodwill arising from business combinations to each cash-generating unit or group of cash-generating
units that are expected to receive the benefits from the business combination. Irrespective of any indication of
impairment, the carrying amount of the cash-generating unit or group of cash-generating units to which goodwill has
been allocated is tested annually for impairment. Testing is also performed when there is an indication that the
goodwill may be impaired. Any impairment is recognized as an expense immediately. Any impairment of goodwill is
not subsequently reversed.
Consolidated Financial Statements
69
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
3. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)
Income Taxes
Taxes, comprising both income taxes and resource taxes, are accounted for as income taxes under IAS 12, Income
Taxes and are recognized in the statement of income, except where they relate to items recognized in other
comprehensive income or directly in equity, in which case the related taxes are recognized in other comprehensive
income or equity.
Current taxes receivable or payable are based on estimated taxable income for the current year at the statutory tax
rates enacted or substantively enacted less amounts paid or received on account.
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized based on temporary differences (the difference between the tax and
accounting values of assets and liabilities) and are calculated using enacted or substantively enacted tax rates for the
periods in which the differences are expected to reverse. The effect of tax rate changes is recognized in the period of
substantive enactment.
Deferred tax assets are recognized only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profits of the relevant entity
or group of entities in a particular jurisdiction will be available against which the assets can be utilized.
Deferred tax liabilities are recognized for taxable temporary differences arising on investments in subsidiaries, joint
ventures and associates. However, we do not recognize such deferred tax liabilities where the timing of the reversal of
the temporary differences can be controlled and it is probable that the temporary differences will not reverse in the
foreseeable future.
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are not recognized if the temporary differences arise from the initial recognition of
goodwill or an asset or liability in a transaction, other than in a business combination, that affects neither accounting
profit nor taxable profit.
We are subject to assessments by various taxation authorities, who may interpret tax legislation differently than we
do. The final amount of taxes to be paid depends on a number of factors, including the outcomes of audits, appeals or
negotiated settlements. We account for such differences based on our best estimate of the probable outcome of
these matters.
Employee Benefits
Defined benefit pension plans
Defined benefit pension plan obligations are based on actuarial determinations. The projected unit credit method,
which sees each period of service as giving rise to an additional unit of benefit entitlement and measures each unit
separately to build up the final obligation, is used to determine the defined benefit obligations, the related current
service costs and, where applicable, the past service costs. Actuarial assumptions used in the determination of
defined benefit pension plan assets and liabilities are based upon our best estimates, including discount rates, salary
escalation, expected health care costs and retirement dates of employees.
Vested and unvested costs arising from past service following the introduction of changes to a defined benefit plan are
recognized immediately as an expense when the changes are made.
Actuarial gains and losses can arise from differences between expected and actual outcomes or changes in actuarial
assumptions. Actuarial gains and losses, changes in the effect of asset ceiling rules and return on plan assets are
collectively referred to as remeasurements of retirement benefit plans and are recognized immediately through other
comprehensive income and directly into retained earnings. Measurement of our net defined benefit asset is limited to
the lower of the surplus in the defined benefit plan and the asset ceiling. The asset ceiling is the funded status of the
plan on an accounting basis, less the present value of the expected economic benefit available to us in the form of
refunds from the plan or reductions in future contributions to the plan. We only have asset ceilings in our registered
pension plans.
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We apply one discount rate to the net defined benefit asset or liability for the purposes of determining the interest
component of the defined benefit cost. This interest component is recorded as part of finance expense. Depending on
their function, current service costs and past service costs are included in either operating expenses or general and
administration expenses.
Defined contribution pension plans
The cost of providing benefits through defined contribution plans is charged to profit as the obligation to contribute
is incurred.
Non-pension post-retirement plans
We provide health care benefits for certain employees when they retire. Non-pension post-retirement plan obligations
are based on actuarial determinations. The cost of these benefits is expensed over the period in which the employees
render services. These non-pension post-retirement benefits are funded by us as they become due.
Share-Based Payments
The fair value method of accounting is used for share-based payment transactions. Under this method, the cost of
share options and other equity-settled share-based payment arrangements is recorded based on the estimated fair
value at the grant date, including an estimate of the forfeiture rate, and charged to profit over the vesting period. For
employees eligible for normal retirement prior to vesting, the expense is charged to profit over the period from the
grant date to the date they are eligible for retirement.
Share-based payment expense relating to cash-settled awards, including deferred, restricted and performance share
units, is accrued over the vesting period of the units based on the quoted market value of Class B subordinate voting
shares. Performance share units have an additional vesting factor determined by our total shareholder return in
comparison to a group of specified companies. As these awards will be settled in cash, the expense and liability are
adjusted each reporting period for changes in the underlying share price. Our performance share units will additionally
be adjusted by our total shareholder return in comparison to a group of specified companies.
Provisions
Decommissioning and restoration provisions
Future obligations to retire an asset and to restore a site, including dismantling, remediation and ongoing treatment
and monitoring of the site related to normal operations are initially recognized and recorded as a provision based on
estimated future cash flows discounted at a credit-adjusted risk-free rate. This decommissioning and restoration
provision is adjusted at each reporting period for changes to factors including the expected amount of cash flows
required to discharge the liability, the timing of such cash flows and the discount rate.
The provisions are also accreted to full value over time through periodic charges to profit. This unwinding of the
discount is charged to finance expense in the statement of income.
The amount of the decommissioning and restoration provision initially recognized is capitalized as part of the related
asset’s carrying value. The method of depreciation follows that of the underlying asset. For a closed site or where the
asset which generated a decommissioning and restoration provision no longer exists, there is no longer any future
benefit related to the costs and, as such, the amounts are expensed. For operating sites, a revision in estimates or a
new disturbance will result in an adjustment to the provision with an offsetting adjustment to the capitalized
retirement cost.
Consolidated Financial Statements
71
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
3. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (continued)
Environmental disturbance restoration provisions
During the operating life of an asset, events such as infractions of environmental laws or regulations may occur. These
events are not related to the normal operation of the asset. The costs associated with these provisions are accrued
and charged to profit in the period in which the event giving rise to the liability occurs. Any subsequent adjustments to
these provisions due to changes in estimates are also charged to profit in the period of adjustment.
Other provisions
Provisions are recognized when a present legal or constructive obligation exists, as a result of past events, and it is
probable that an outflow of resources that can be reliably estimated will be required to settle the obligation. Where the
effect is material, the provision is discounted using an appropriate credit-adjusted risk-free rate.
Share Repurchases
Where we repurchase any of our equity share capital, the excess of the consideration paid over book value is
deducted from contributed surplus and retained earnings on a pro-rata basis.
Research and Development
Research costs are expensed as incurred. Development costs are only capitalized when the product or process is
clearly defined, the technical feasibility has been established, the future market for the product or process is clearly
defined and we are committed to, and have the resources to, complete the project.
Earnings per Share
Earnings per share is calculated based on the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the year.
For diluted earnings per share, dilution is calculated based upon the net number of common shares issued should
“in-the-money” options and warrants be exercised and the proceeds used to repurchase common shares at the
average market price in the year. Dilution from convertible securities is calculated based on the number of shares to
be issued after taking into account the reduction of the related after-tax interest expense.
4. Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments
In preparing these consolidated financial statements, we make estimates and judgments that affect the amounts
recorded. Actual results could differ from our estimates. Our estimates and judgments are based on historical
experience and other factors we consider to be reasonable, including expectations of future events. The estimates and
judgments that could result in a material effect in the next financial year on the carrying amounts of assets and
liabilities are outlined below.
Impairment Testing
Judgment is required in assessing whether certain factors would be considered an indicator of impairment. We
consider both internal and external information to determine whether there is an indicator of impairment present and
accordingly, whether impairment testing is required. Impairment testing is based on discounted cash flow models
prepared by internal experts with assistance from third-party advisors when required. Note 13 outlines the significant
inputs used when performing goodwill and other asset impairment testing. The inputs used are based on
management’s best estimates of what an independent market participant would consider appropriate and are
reviewed by senior management. Changes in these inputs may alter the results of impairment testing, the amount
of the impairment charges recorded in the statement of income and the resulting carrying values of assets.
72
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Joint Arrangements
We are a party to a number of arrangements in which we do not have control. Judgment is required in determining whether
joint control over these arrangements exists and if so, which parties have joint control and whether each arrangement is a
joint venture or joint operation. In assessing whether we have joint control, we analyze the activities of each arrangement
and determine which activities most significantly affect the returns of the arrangement. These activities are determined
to be the relevant activities of the arrangement. If unanimous consent is required over the decisions about the relevant
activities, the parties whose consent is required would have joint control over the arrangement. The judgments around
which activities are considered the relevant activities of the arrangement are subject to analysis by each of the parties to
the arrangement and may be interpreted differently. When performing this assessment, we generally consider decisions
about activities such as managing the asset during its life, acquisition, expansion and dispositions of assets and financing,
operating and capital decisions to be the most relevant. We may also consider activities including the approval of
budgets, appointment of key management personnel, representation on the board of directors and other items.
If we conclude that we have joint control over the arrangement, an assessment of whether the arrangement is a
joint venture or joint operation is required. This assessment is based on whether we have rights to the assets,
and obligations for the liabilities, relating to the arrangement or whether we have rights to the net assets of the
arrangement. In making this determination, we review the legal form of the arrangement, the terms of the contractual
arrangement, and other facts and circumstances. In a situation where the legal form and the terms of the contractual
arrangement do not give us rights to the assets and obligations for the liabilities, an assessment of other facts and
circumstances is required, including whether the activities of the arrangement are primarily designed for the provision
of output to the parties and whether the parties are substantially the only source of cash flows contributing to the
arrangement. In such circumstances, we may consider the application of other facts and circumstances to conclude
that a joint arrangement is a joint operation is appropriate. This conclusion requires judgment and is specific to each
arrangement. We have applied the use of other facts and circumstances to conclude that Antamina and Fort Hills
are joint operations for the purposes of our consolidated financial statements. The other facts and circumstances
considered for both of these arrangements are the provisions for output to the parties of the joint arrangements.
For both Antamina and Fort Hills, we will take our share of the output from the assets directly over the life of the
arrangement. We have concluded that this, combined with other factors, gives us direct rights to the assets and
obligations for the liabilities of these arrangements, proportionate to our ownership interests.
Estimated Recoverable Reserves and Resources
Mineral reserve and resource estimates are based on various assumptions relating to operating matters as set forth in
National Instrument 43-101. These include production costs, mining and processing recoveries, cut-off grades, long
term commodity prices and, in some cases, exchange rates, inflation rates and capital costs. Cost estimates are based
on feasibility study estimates or operating history. Estimates are prepared by appropriately qualified persons, but will be
affected by forecasted commodity prices, inflation rates, exchange rates, capital and production costs and recoveries
amongst other factors. Estimated recoverable reserves and resources are used to determine the depreciation of
property, plant and equipment at operating mine sites, in accounting for capitalized production stripping costs, in
performing impairment testing and in forecasting the timing of the payment of decommissioning and restoration costs.
Therefore, changes in the assumptions used could affect the carrying value of assets, depreciation and impairment
charges recorded in the income statement and the carrying value of the decommissioning and restoration provision.
Decommissioning and Restoration Provisions
The decommissioning and restoration provision is based on future cost estimates using information available at the
balance sheet date. The decommissioning and restoration provision is adjusted at each reporting period for changes
to factors such as the expected amount of cash flows required to discharge the liability, the timing of such cash flows
and the discount rate. The decommissioning and restoration provision requires other significant estimates and
assumptions including the requirements of the relevant legal and regulatory framework and the timing, extent and
costs of required decommissioning and restoration activities. To the extent the actual costs differ from these
estimates, adjustments will be recorded and the income statement may be affected.
Consolidated Financial Statements
73
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
4. Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments (continued)
Current and Deferred Taxes
We calculate current and deferred tax provisions for each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. Actual amounts
of income tax expense are not final until tax returns are filed and accepted by the relevant authorities. This occurs
subsequent to the issuance of financial statements and the final determination of actual amounts may not be completed
for a number of years. Therefore, profit in subsequent periods will be affected by the amount that estimates differ from
the final tax return.
Judgment is required in assessing whether deferred tax assets and certain deferred tax liabilities are recognized on the
balance sheet and what tax rate is expected to be applied in the year when the related temporary differences reverse.
We also evaluate the recoverability of deferred tax assets based on an assessment of the ability to use the underlying
future tax deductions before they expire against future taxable income. Deferred tax liabilities arising from temporary
differences on investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates are recognized unless the reversal of the
temporary differences is not expected to occur in the foreseeable future and can be controlled. Assumptions about
the generation of future taxable profits and repatriation of retained earnings depend on management’s estimates of
future production and sales volumes, commodity prices, reserves and resources, operating costs, decommissioning
and restoration costs, capital expenditures, dividends and other capital management transactions. Judgment is also
required on the application of income tax legislation. These estimates and judgments are subject to risk and uncertainty
and could result in an adjustment to the deferred tax provision and a corresponding credit or charge to profit.
5. Expenses by Nature
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Wages and salaries
$919$ 894
Wage-related costs 249 225
Bonus payments 126 141
Post-employment benefits and pension costs
67 85
Transportation
1,3551,350
Depreciation and amortization
1,3441,233
Raw material purchases 729 890
Fuel and energy 811 757
Operating supplies 620 498
Maintenance and repair supplies
585 649
Contractors and consultants 503 584
Overhead costs 243 239
Royalties 246 162
Other operating costs 87 99
7,8847,806
Less:
Production stripping and other capitalized costs
(718) (750)
Change in inventory 104 133
Total cost of sales, general and administration,
exploration and research and development expenses
74
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
$7,270$ 7,189
6. Other Operating Income (Expense)
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Settlement pricing adjustments (Note 24(b))
$(130)$
(62)
Share-based compensation (12) (22)
Environmental costs (32) (27)
Social responsibility and donations
(15) (30)
Loss on operating assets
(2) (33)
Care and maintenance (22) (10)
Commodity derivatives (Note 24(b))
Provision for closed properties
Impairment of operating assets (7)
2
2
1
(18)
–
Restructuring (11)
–
Other (34) (35)
$(281)$ (216)
7. Finance Income and Finance Expense
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Finance income
Investment income
$4$
13
$4$
Total finance income
13
Finance expense
Debt interest
$384$ 358
Financing fees and discount amortization
7
6
Net interest expense on retirement benefit plans
16 29
Accretion on decommissioning and restoration provisions (Note 18(a))
70 69
Other 10 11
487 473
Less capitalized borrowing costs (Note 12)
(183) (134)
Total finance expense
$304$ 339
Consolidated Financial Statements
75
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
8. Non-Operating Income (Expense)
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Gain on sale of investments
$1$
42
Provision for marketable securities
(8) (32)
Foreign exchange losses
(9) (12)
Other derivative losses
(1)
(2)
Other
(4)
(2)
$(21)$
(6)
9. Supplemental Cash Flow Information
December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Cash and cash equivalents
Cash
$378$ 174
Money market investments with maturities from
the date of acquisition of three months or less
1,6512,598
$2,029$2,772
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Net change in non-cash working capital items Trade accounts receivable and taxes receivable $239$ 199
Inventories 133 93
Trade accounts payable and other liabilities and taxes payable 76
(98) (57)
$274$ 235
Income taxes paid $406$ 425
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
10. Inventories
December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Raw materials
$197$ 295
Supplies 595 598
Work in-process 533 415
Finished products 486 444
Less long term portion (Note 11)
1,8111,752
(59) (57)
$1,752$1,695
Cost of sales of $7.1 billion (2013 – $7.0 billion) include $6.5 billion (2013 – $6.4 billion) of inventories recognized as
an expense during the year.
Total inventories held at net realizable value amounted to $105 million at December 31, 2014 (December 31, 2013
– $64 million). Cost of sales included $118 million (2013 – $11 million) of inventory write-downs during the year.
Long term inventories consist of ore stockpiles and other in-process materials that are not planned to be processed
within one year.
11. Financial and Other Assets
December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Long term receivables and deposits
$219$ 204
Available-for-sale marketable equity securities carried at fair value
270 260
Pension plans in a net asset position (Note 17(a))
233 111
Long term portion of inventories (Note 10)
59 57
Intangibles 81 85
Other 32 29
$894$ 746
Consolidated Financial Statements
77
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
12. Property, Plant and Equipment
Land, Capitalized
Exploration
Mineral Buildings, Production
and Properties
Plant and
Stripping Construction
(CAD$ in millions)
Evaluation and Leases Equipment
Costs In-Progress
Total
At December 31, 2012
Cost
$
1,853$
19,170$
9,690$
1,280$ 958$
32,951
Accumulated depreciation
Net book value
–
(2,903)
(4,768)(343)
–
(8,014)
$
1,853$
16,267$
4,922$ 937$ 958$
24,937
Year ended December 31, 2013
Opening net book value
$
1,853$
16,267$
4,922$ 937$ 958$
24,937
Additions161123627801
1,207
2,919
Fort Hills change in accounting
method (a) –850 19 –197
1,066
Disposals – – (4) – – (4)
Depreciation and amortization
–
(497)
(457)
(313)
Decommissioning and restoration
provision change in estimate
–
(337)
(24)
–
– (1,267)
–
(361)
Capitalized borrowing costs – 63 – – 71134
Other 11(12)(10) – –(11)
Exchange differences 41206126 15 10398
Closing net book value
$
2,066$
16,663$5,199$
1,440$
2,443$
27,811
At December 31, 2013
Cost
$
2,066$
20,090$
10,394$2,102$
2,443$
37,095
Accumulated depreciation
Net book value
78
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
–
(3,427)
(5,195)(662)
–
(9,284)
$
2,066$
16,663$5,199$
1,440$
2,443$
27,811
13. Property, Plant and Equipment (continued)
Land, Capitalized
Exploration
Mineral Buildings, Production
and Properties
Plant and
Stripping Construction
(CAD$ in millions)
Evaluation and Leases Equipment
Costs In-Progress
Total
Year ended December 31, 2014
Opening net book value
$
2,066$
16,663$5,199$
1,440$
2,443$
27,811
Additions108 59485775796
2,223
Disposals – –(14) – –(14)
Depreciation and amortization
–
(551)
(559)
(442)
– (1,552)
Transfers – –
1,054 –
(1,054) –
Decommissioning and restoration
provision change in estimate
–
(284)
(6)
–
–
(290)
Capitalized borrowing costs – 70 – –113183
Other – 41(60) – (3)(22)
Exchange differences 60302188 29 7586
Closing net book value
$
2,234$
16,300$
6,287$
1,802$
2,302$
28,925
At December 31, 2014
Cost
$
2,234$
20,349$
11,942$2,916$
2,302$
39,743
Accumulated depreciation
Net book value
–
(4,049)
(5,655)
(1,114)
–
(10,818)
$
2,234$
16,300$
6,287$
1,802$
2,302$
28,925
a) On October 30, 2013, the partners in Fort Hills announced that construction of the project would proceed. At that
date certain amendments were made to the Limited Partnership Agreement, Unanimous Shareholder Agreement
and the Fort Hills Oil Sands Project Operating Services Contract. The changes to these agreements required a
reassessment of the accounting for our investment in Fort Hills. As a result of the changes made to the agreements
for this arrangement, we have concluded that we now have rights to the assets and obligations for the liabilities of
Fort Hills. Accordingly, from October 30, 2013 forward, we have accounted for our interest in Fort Hills as a joint
operation and recorded our share of the assets, liabilities, revenue, expenses and cash flows of the operation. Prior
to the amendment of the project agreements on October 30, 2013, we accounted for our investment in Fort Hills
as an associate using the equity method. Our share of Fort Hills losses was nil to October 30, 2013.
b) The carrying value of property, plant and equipment held under finance lease at December 31, 2014 is $154 million
(2013 – $186 million). Ownership of leased assets remains with the lessor.
Borrowing costs are capitalized at a rate based on our cost of borrowing or at the rate on the project-specific debt, as
applicable. These projects are shown as part of mineral properties and leases, land, buildings, plant and equipment, or
construction in-progress. Our weighted average borrowing rate used for capitalization of borrowing costs in 2014 was
4.9% (2013 – 4.9%).
Significant exploration and evaluation projects include Relincho, Galore Creek and oil sands properties.
Consolidated Financial Statements
79
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
13. Goodwill
Coal Quebrada
Carmen de
(CAD$ in millions)Operations
Blanca Andacollo
Total
January 1, 2013$1,203$ 305$ 129$1,637
Foreign exchange translation
– 22
9 31
December 31, 2013$1,203$ 327$ 138$1,668
Foreign exchange translation
– 29 13 42
December 31, 2014$1,203$ 356$ 151$ 1,710
The allocation of goodwill to cash generating units or groups of cash generating units reflects how goodwill is monitored
for internal management purposes.
We have performed our annual goodwill impairment testing and did not identify any impairment losses. The recoverable
amounts for our goodwill impairment testing were determined based on a fair value less costs of disposal basis. The fair
value less costs of disposal was calculated using a discounted cash flow methodology taking account of assumptions
that would be made by market participants.
Cash flow projections are based on life of mine plans and exploration potential. For our coal operations, the cash flows
cover periods from 14 to 50 years with a steady state thereafter until reserves and resources are exhausted.
For Quebrada Blanca and Carmen de Andacollo, the cash flows cover periods of 45 years and 22 years, respectively,
with a steady state thereafter until reserves and resources are exhausted.
Given the nature of expected future cash flows used to determine the recoverable amount, a material change could
occur over time as the cash flows are significantly affected by the key assumptions described below.
The key inputs used to determine fair value less costs of disposal are as follows:
Commodity Prices
Commodity price assumptions are based on internal forecasts, which are based on a number of factors, including
forward curves in the near term, and are benchmarked with external sources of information, including information
published by our peers, to ensure they are within the range of values used by market participants. Reserves and Resources
Future mineral production is included in projected cash flows based on mineral reserve and resource estimates and
exploration and evaluation work, undertaken by appropriately qualified persons. These estimates are based upon
commodity price assumptions at or below the commodity prices noted in the sensitivity analysis below.
Operating Costs and Capital Expenditures
Operating costs and capital expenditures are based on life of mine plans and internal management forecasts. Cost
estimates incorporate management experience and expertise, current operating costs, the nature and location of each
operation and the risks associated with each operation. Future capital expenditures are based on management’s best
estimate of expected future capital requirements, which are generally for the extraction and processing of existing
reserves and resources. All committed and anticipated capital expenditures based on future cost estimates have been
included in the projected cash flows. Operating cost and capital expenditure assumptions are continuously subject to
on-going optimization and review by management.
80
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Discount Rates
Discount rates used are based on the weighted average cost of capital for a mining industry peer group and are
calculated with reference to current market information. Adjustments to the rate are made for any risks that are not
reflected in the underlying cash flows. A 5.9% real, 8.1% nominal, post-tax discount rate was used to discount
cash flow projections for our coal operations, Quebrada Blanca and Carmen de Andacollo.
Foreign Exchange Rates
Foreign exchange rates are benchmarked with external sources of information based on a range used by market
participants.
Inflation Rates
Inflation rates are based on average historical inflation rates for the location of each operation and long term
government bond yields. Inflation rates are benchmarked with external sources of information and are within a range
used by market participants.
Sensitivity Analysis
Our annual goodwill impairment test carried out as at October 31, 2014 resulted in the recoverable amount of
Carmen de Andacollo exceeding its carrying value by approximately $492 million. The recoverable amount is most
sensitive to commodity price assumptions and is based on an average of US$3.12 per pound for copper over the
next three years escalating to a real long term copper price of US$3.50 per pound. A 12% decrease in the long term
price assumption would result in the recoverable amount equalling the carrying value.
Our annual goodwill impairment test resulted in the recoverable amount of our coal operations exceeding their
carrying value by approximately $7.5 billion. The recoverable amount is most sensitive to the long term commodity
price assumption and is based on a long term coal price of US$185 per tonne. A 22% decrease in the long term
price assumption would result in the recoverable amount equalling the carrying value.
The recoverable amount for Quebrada Blanca significantly exceeded the carrying amount at the date of our annual
impairment test.
14. Trade Accounts Payable and Other Liabilities
December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Trade accounts payable and accruals
$793$ 890
Capital project accruals 287 366
Payroll-related liabilities 182 178
Accrued interest 155 144
Commercial and government royalties
146 113
Current portion of provisions (Note 18(a))
73 76
Current portion of derivative liabilities (Note 18)
18
Other
3
9 14
$1,663$1,784
Consolidated Financial Statements
81
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
15. Debt
(CAD$ in millions)December 31, 2014
December 31, 2013
Carrying Fair
Carrying Fair
ValueValueValueValue
5.375% notes due October 2015
(US$300 million) $ 348$ 358$ 318$ 342
3.15% notes due January 2017
(US$300 million) 347 356 318 330
3.85% notes due August 2017
(US$300 million) 345 360 315 338
2.5% notes due February 2018
(US$500 million) 577 569 528 537
3.0% notes due March 2019
(US$500 million) 577 567 527 530
4.5% notes due January 2021
(US$500 million) 576 581 528 538
4.75% notes due January 2022
(US$700 million)
807 796 739 753
3.75% notes due February 2023
(US$750 million)
859 788 787 745
6.125% notes due October 2035
(US$700 million) 796 752 729 731
6.0% notes due August 2040
(US$650 million) 750 672 688 668
6.25% notes due July 2041
(US$1,000 million)
1,1471,075
1,051
1,078
5.2% notes due March 2042
(US$500 million) 572 491 524 473
5.4% notes due February 2043
(US$500 million) 573 490 526 494
Antamina senior revolving credit
facility due April 2015 (a)
26 26 24 24
Other
141 141 121 121
Less current portion of long term debt
82
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
8,441
8,022
7,7237,702
(428) (438)(59)(59)
$8,013
$7,584$7,664$7,643
The fair values of debt are determined using market values, if available, and discounted cash flows based on our cost
of borrowing where market values are not available. The latter are considered Level 2 fair value measurements with
significant other observable inputs on the fair value hierarchy (Note 25).
All obligations under our notes are directly guaranteed by TML except for the 5.375% and 6.125% notes which are
supported by an arrangement similar in effect to a guarantee pursuant to which the trustee under these notes will,
in the event of a default under the governing indenture, have the right to make a demand against TML in an amount
equal to the amount due under the notes.
a) Antamina Facility
The Antamina revolving credit facility is our proportionate share of Antamina’s revolving term bank facility with
full repayment due at maturity in April 2015 and is the obligation of Antamina. The facility, which is denominated
in U.S. dollars, is non-recourse to us and the other Antamina project sponsors; advances may be prepaid and
re-borrowed during its term. The outstanding amount under the facility bears interest at LIBOR plus 1.9%.
b) Optional Redemptions
All of our outstanding notes are callable at any time by repaying the greater of the principal amount plus accrued
interest and the present value of the principal and interest amounts discounted at a comparable treasury yield plus
a stipulated spread. The 2023, 2042 and 2043 notes issued in 2012 are callable at 100% at any time on or after
November 1, 2022, September 1, 2041 and August 1, 2042 respectively. The 2022 and 2041 notes issued in 2011 are
callable at 100% at any time on or after October 15, 2021 and January 15, 2041 respectively. The 2021 notes are
callable at 100% on or after October 15, 2020 and the 2040 notes are callable at 100% on or after February 15, 2040.
c) Revolving Facilities
At December 31, 2014, we had an undrawn US$3.0 billion committed revolving credit facility that is available until
July 2019. Any amounts drawn under the revolving credit facility can be repaid at any time, are due in full at maturity
and are guaranteed by TML. Any outstanding amounts under the facility bear interest at LIBOR plus an applicable
margin based on our credit ratings. The facility requires that our total debt to total capitalization ratio not exceed
0.5 to 1. As at December 31, 2014, we were in compliance with all debt covenants and default provisions.
We also had $213 million of uncommitted demand revolving credit facilities at December 31, 2014. Net of $91 million
of letters of credit issued, the unused portion of these credit facilities is $122 million, which is available in the form
of cash borrowings or letters of credit. In addition, we have issued stand-alone letters of credit for $985 million at
December 31, 2014, for environmental and other financial security requirements.
At December 31, 2014 we had pledged $363 million (2013 – $113 million) as collateral for letters of credit. The cash
held as collateral is available for our use upon five business days’ notice to the letter of credit issuer.
d) Scheduled Principal Payments
At December 31, 2014 the scheduled principal payments during the next five years and thereafter are as follows:
($ in millions)
US$
CAD$
2015$ 369$ 428
2016
6
7
2017 604 701
2018 503 584
2019 503 583
Thereafter
5,358
6,216
$
7,343
$
8,519
Consolidated Financial Statements
83
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
16. Income Taxes
a) Provision for Income Taxes
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Current
Current taxes on profits for the year
$392$ 507
Adjustments for current tax of prior periods
Total current tax
5 20
$397$ 527
Deferred
Origination and reversal of temporary differences
$(108)$
Adjustments to deferred tax of prior periods
79
3 (54)
Tax losses not recognized (recognition of previously unrecognized losses)
13
6
Effect of newly enacted change in tax rates
37 75
Total deferred tax
$(55)$
106
$342$ 633
b) Reconciliation of income taxes calculated at the statutory rates to the actual tax provision is as follows:
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Tax expense at the Canadian statutory income tax rate of 26.12% (2013 – 25.95%)
$189$ 426
Tax effect of:
Resource taxes 62 150
Resource and depletion allowances
(83) (60)
Non-temporary differences including one-half of capital gains and losses 19
1
Tax losses not recognized (recognition of previously unrecognized losses)
13
6
Effect of newly enacted change in tax rates
37 75
Withholding taxes 30
Difference in tax rates in foreign jurisdictions
(2)
70 51
Tax settlements 21 (18)
Revisions to prior year estimates
Other
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
(2)
20
$342$ 633
The Canadian statutory tax rate increased to 26.12% due to changes in provincial allocation.
84
(14) (16)
c) The analysis of deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities is as follows:
December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Deferred tax assets
Expected to be reversed after more than a year
$329$ 152
Expected to be reversed within a year
32 12
$361$ 164
Deferred tax liabilities
Expected to be reversed after more than a year
$5,793$5,676
Expected to be reversed within a year
298 232
$6,091$5,908
Net deferred tax liabilities
$5,730$5,744
d) The amount of deferred tax expense charged (credited) to the income statement is as follows:
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Net operating loss carryforwards
$(108)$ (209)
Capital allowances in excess of depreciation
341 784
Decommissioning and restoration provisions
48 (41)
Amounts relating to phase out of partnership deferrals
(96) (86)
Unrealized foreign exchange losses
(92) (65)
Investments in associates
–(122)
Withholding taxes (78) (75)
Retirement benefit plans (40) (31)
Other temporary differences (30) (49)
$(55)$
106
Consolidated Financial Statements
85
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
16. Income Taxes (continued)
e) Temporary differences giving rise to deferred income tax assets and liabilities are as follows:
December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Net operating loss carryforwards
$479$ 621
Property, plant and equipment
(50) (466)
Decommissioning and restoration provisions 38 60
Amounts relating to phase out of partnership deferrals
(168) (165)
Unrealized foreign exchange
– 42
Retirement benefit plans 21
–
Other temporary differences 41 72
Deferred income tax assets
$361$ 164
Net operating loss carryforwards
$(787)$ (538)
Property, plant and equipment
7,3506,556
Decommissioning and restoration provisions
(240) (266)
Amounts relating to phase out of partnership deferrals
120 219
Unrealized foreign exchange(134)
–
Withholding taxes (20)
58
Retirement benefit plans (90) (71)
Other temporary differences(108) (50)
Deferred income tax liabilities
$6,091$5,908
f) The gross movement on the net deferred income tax account is as follows:
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
As at January 1
$5,744$5,377
Income statement change (55) 106
Amounts recognized in equity (Note 19(h))
Tax charge relating to components of other comprehensive income
(78)
Foreign exchange and other differences
119 104
As at December 31
86
– 124
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
33
$5,730$5,744
g) Deferred Tax Liabilities Not Recognized
Deferred tax liabilities of $635 million (2013 – $610 million) have not been recognized on the unremitted earnings
of controlled subsidiaries as the timing of remittance for these earnings is in our control and it is probable that these
earnings will not be repatriated for the foreseeable future.
h) Loss Carryforwards and Canadian Development Expenses
At December 31, 2014, we had $4.93 billion of Canadian federal net operating loss carryforwards (2013 – $4.43 billion).
These loss carryforwards expire at various dates between 2015 and 2034. We also had $1.5 billion of cumulative
Canadian development expenses at December 31, 2014 (2013 – $1.88 billion), which are deductible for income tax
purposes on a declining balance basis at a maximum rate of 30% per year. The deferred tax benefits of these pools
have been recognized.
i) Deferred Tax Assets Not Recognized
We have not recognized $224 million (2013 – $232 million) of deferred tax assets in jurisdictions and entities that do
not have established sources of taxable income.
j) Sale of Fording Canadian Coal Trust Units
During the year, we recorded a deferred tax charge of $21 million arising from a settlement with the Canada Revenue
Agency regarding the treatment of gains realized in 2008 on the sale of our interest in Fording Canadian Coal Trust.
17. Retirement Benefit Plans
We have defined contribution pension plans for certain groups of employees. Our share of contributions to these
plans is expensed in the year it is earned by the employee.
We have multiple defined benefit pension plans registered in various jurisdictions that provide benefits based
principally on employees’ years of service and average annual remuneration. These plans are only available to certain
qualifying employees. The plans are “flat-benefit” or “final-pay” plans and may provide for inflationary increases
in accordance with certain plan provisions. All of our registered defined benefit pension plans are governed and
administered in accordance with applicable pension legislation in either Canada or the United States. Actuarial
valuations are performed at least every three years to determine minimum annual contribution requirements as
prescribed by applicable legislation. For the majority of our plans, current service costs are funded based on a
percentage of pensionable earnings or as a flat dollar amount per active member depending on the provisions of
the pension plans. For these plans, deficits that are determined on an actuarial basis are funded over a period not
to exceed five years. All of our defined benefit pension plans were actuarially valued within the past three years.
While the majority of benefit payments are made from held-in-trust funds, there are also several unfunded plans
where benefit payment obligations are met as they fall due.
We also have several post-retirement benefit plans which provide post-retirement medical, dental and life insurance
benefits to certain qualifying employees and surviving spouses. These plans are unfunded and we meet benefit
obligations as they come due.
Consolidated Financial Statements
87
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
17. Retirement Benefit Plans (continued)
a) Actuarial Valuation of Plans
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
DefinedNon-Pension
DefinedNon-Pension
Benefit Post-Benefit Post
PensionRetirement
PensionRetirement
Plans Benefit Plans
Plans Benefit Plans
Defined benefit obligation
Balance at beginning of year
$1,851$ 407$1,984$ 500
Current service cost
43 10 47 12
Benefits paid
(118) (13) (103) (10)
Interest expense
84 19 77 19
Obligation experience adjustments
Effect from change in financial assumptions
6 (18)
23 (54)
202 53 (189) (62)
Effect from change in demographic assumptions
8
4
5
2
Foreign currency exchange rate changes
13
6
7
–
Balance at end of year
2,089 468
1,851 407
Fair value of plan assets
Fair value at beginning of year
1,991
–
1,729
–
Interest income
92
– 67
–
Return on plan assets, excluding amounts
included in interest income
187
– 156
–
Benefits paid
(118) (13) (103) (10)
Contributions by the employer
65 13 134 10
Foreign currency exchange rate changes
11
Fair value at end of year
2,228
Funding surplus (deficit)
8
–
–
1,991
–
–
139(468) 140 (407)
Effect of the asset ceiling
Balance at beginning of year
Interest on asset ceiling
Change in asset ceiling
Balance at end of year
Net accrued retirement benefit asset (liability)
101
–
–
–
5
–
(96)
10
–
–
– 101
–
– 101
–
$129
$(468)$
$233
$–$
39 $ (407)
Represented by:
Pension assets (Note 11)
Accrued retirement benefit liability
Net accrued retirement benefit asset (liability)
111$
–
(104) (468) (72) (407)
$129
$(468)$
39 $ (407)
A number of the plans have a surplus totaling $10 million at December 31, 2014 (December 31, 2013 – $101 million),
which is not recognized on the basis that future economic benefits are not available to us in the form of a reduction in
future contributions or a cash refund.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
We expect to contribute $31 million to our defined benefit pension plans in 2015 based on minimum funding
requirements. The weighted average duration of the defined benefit obligation is 15 years.
Defined contribution expense for 2014 was $42 million (2013 – $39 million).
b) Significant Assumptions
The discount rate used to determine the defined benefit obligations and the net interest cost was determined by
reference to the market yields on high-quality debt instruments at the measurement date with durations similar to
the duration of the expected cash flows of the plans.
Weighted average assumptions used to calculate the defined benefit obligation at the end of each year are as follows:
2014
2013
DefinedNon-Pension
DefinedNon-Pension
Benefit Post-Benefit Post
PensionRetirement
PensionRetirement
Plans Benefit Plans
Plans Benefit Plans
Discount rate
3.86%
3.94%
4.65%
4.77%
Rate of increase in future compensation
3.25%
3.25%3.25%3.25%
Initial medical trend rate
–
6.50%
–
7.00%
Ultimate medical trend rate
–
5.00%
–
5.00%
Years to reach ultimate medical trend rate
– 4
– 5
c) Sensitivity of the defined benefit obligation to changes in the weighted average assumptions:
2014
Effect on Defined Benefit Obligation
Change in Assumption
Increase in
Assumption
Decrease in
Assumption
Discount rate
1.0%
Rate of increase in future compensation
1.0%
Increase by 1%
Decrease by 1%
Medical cost claim trend rate
1.0%
Increase by 2%
Decrease by 2%
Decrease by 13%
Increase by 15%
2013
Effect on Defined Benefit Obligation
Change in Assumption
Increase in
Assumption
Decrease in
Assumption
Discount rate
1.0%
Decrease by 12%
Increase by 14%
Rate of increase in future compensation
1.0%
Increase by 1%
Decrease by 1%
Medical cost claim trend rate
1.0%
Increase by 2%
Decrease by 2%
The above sensitivity analyses are based on a change in each actuarial assumption while holding all other assumptions
constant. The sensitivity analyses on our defined benefit obligation are calculated using the same methods as those
used for calculating the defined benefit obligation recognized on our balance sheet. The methods and types of
assumptions used in preparing the sensitivity analyses did not change from the prior period.
Consolidated Financial Statements
89
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
17. Retirement Benefit Plans (continued)
d) Mortality Assumptions
Assumptions regarding future mortality are set based on management’s best estimate in accordance with published
mortality tables and expected experience. These assumptions translate into the following average life expectancies
for an employee retiring at age 65:
20142013
MaleFemale
MaleFemale
Retiring at the end of the reporting period85.0 years87.5 years84.8 years87.1 years
Retiring 20 years after the end of the reporting period86.1 years88.5 years86.3 years87.9 years
e) Significant Risks
The defined benefit pension plans and post-retirement benefit plans expose us to a number of risks, the most
significant of which include asset volatility risk, changes in bond yields and life expectancy.
Asset Volatility Risk
The discount rate used to determine the defined benefit obligations is based on AA-rated corporate bond yields.
If our plan assets underperform this yield, the deficit will increase. Our strategic asset allocation includes a significant
proportion of equities that increases volatility in the value of our assets, particularly in the short term. We expect
equities to outperform corporate bonds in the long term.
Changes in Bond Yields
A decrease in bond yields increases plan liabilities, which are partially offset by an increase in the value of the plans’
bond holdings.
Life Expectancy
The majority of the plans’ obligations are to provide benefits for the life of the member. Increases in life expectancy
will result in an increase in the plans’ liabilities.
f) Investment of Plan Assets
The assets of our defined benefit pension plans are managed by external asset managers under the oversight of the
Teck Resources Limited Executive Pension Committee.
Our pension plan investment strategies support the objectives of each defined benefit plan and are related to each
plan’s demographics and timing of expected benefit payments to plan members. The objective for the plan asset
portfolios is to achieve annualized portfolio returns over five-year periods in excess of the annualized percentage
change in the Consumer Price Index plus a certain premium.
Strategic asset allocation policies have been developed for each defined benefit plan to achieve this objective. The
policies also reflect an asset/liability matching framework that seeks to reduce the effect of interest rate changes on
each plan’s funded status by matching the duration of the bond investments with the duration of the pension liabilities.
We do not use derivatives to manage interest risk. Asset allocation is monitored at least quarterly and rebalanced if
the allocation to any asset class exceeds its allowable allocation range. Portfolio and investment manager performance
is monitored quarterly and the investment guidelines for each plan are reviewed at least annually.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
The defined benefit pension plan assets at December 31, 2014 and 2013 are as follows:
(CAD$ in millions)
20142013
Quoted
Equity securities
UnquotedTotal %
$1,094
Debt securities
Real estate and other
835
Quoted
Unquoted Total %
–49%
$
1,017
–51%
–38%703
–35%
88 211 13% 91 18014%
18. Other Liabilities and Provisions
December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Provisions (a)
$858$1,079
Derivative liabilities (net of current portion of $18 million (2013 – $3 million))
5
5
Other 55 74
$918$1,158
a) Provisions
The following table summarizes the movements in provisions for the year ended December 31, 2014:
(CAD$ in millions)
Decommissioning and
Restoration Provisions
At January 1, 2014
$
Settled during the year
1,089
Other
$
(26)
66
Total
$
1,155
(14)
(40)
Change in discount rate
(99)
–
(99)
Change in amount and timing of cash flows
(193)
10
(183)
Accretion 70
– 70
Exchange differences 24
4 28
At December 31, 2014 865 66 931
Less current provisions
Non-current provisions
(63)
$ 802$
(10)
(73)
56$ 858
Consolidated Financial Statements
91
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
18. Other Liabilities and Provisions (continued)
Decommissioning and Restoration Provisions
The decommissioning and restoration provision represents the present value of estimated costs for required future
decommissioning and other site restoration activities. The majority of the decommissioning and site restoration
expenditures occur at the end of the life of the related operation. Remaining lives of mines and infrastructure range
from less than a year to over 100 years. Therefore, it is anticipated that a portion of these costs will be incurred over a
period in excess of 100 years. In 2014, the decommissioning and restoration provision was calculated using nominal
discount rates between 6.61% and 7.61%. We also used an inflation rate of 2.00% in our cash flow estimates. The
decommissioning and restoration provision includes $102 million (2013 – $117 million) in respect of closed operations.
During the fourth quarter of 2014, we updated the cash flow estimates for our decommissioning and restoration provisions,
primarily relating to selenium management at our coal mines. As a result of the change in estimate and increase in discount
rate, the provision decreased by $331 million compared to the third quarter. The decrease of $161 million in the fourth
quarter was related to cash flows and a decrease of $170 million was due to a change in the discount rate.
19. Equity
a) Authorized Share Capital
Our authorized share capital consists of an unlimited number of Class A common shares without par value, an
unlimited number of Class B subordinate voting shares (Class B shares) without par value and an unlimited number
of preferred shares without par value issuable in series.
Class A common shares carry the right to 100 votes per share. Class B shares carry the right to one vote per share.
Each Class A common share is convertible, at the option of the holder, into one Class B share. In all other respects,
the Class A common shares and Class B shares rank equally.
The attributes of the Class B shares contain so-called “coattail provisions,” which generally provide that, in the event
that an offer (an Exclusionary Offer) to purchase Class A common shares, which is required to be made to all or
substantially all holders thereof, is not made concurrently with an offer to purchase Class B shares on identical terms,
then each Class B share will be convertible into one Class A common share.
The Class B shares will not be convertible in the event that an Exclusionary Offer is not accepted by holders of a
majority of the Class A common shares (excluding those shares held by the person making the Exclusionary Offer). If
an offer to purchase Class A common shares does not, under applicable securities legislation or the requirements of
any stock exchange having jurisdiction, constitute a “takeover bid,” or is otherwise exempt from any requirement that
such offer be made to all or substantially all holders of Class A common shares, the coattail provisions will not apply.
b) Class A Common Shares and Class B Subordinate Voting Shares Issued and Outstanding
Class A
Class B
Common
Subordinate
Shares (in 000’s)
Shares
Voting Shares
At December 31, 2012
9,353
572,913
Options exercised (c)
– 225
Acquired and cancelled pursuant to normal course issuer bids (e)
–
(6,233)
At December 31, 2013
9,353
566,905
Options exercised (c)
– 115
Acquired and cancelled pursuant to normal course issuer bids (e)
–
Other
– (25)
(200)
At December 31, 2014
9,353
566,795
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
c) Share Options
Under our current share option plan, 10 million Class B shares have been set aside for the grant of share options to
full-time employees, of which 2.9 million remain available for grant. The exercise price for each option is the closing
price for our Class B shares on the last trading day before the date of grant. Our share options are settled through the
issuance of Class B shares.
During the year ended December 31, 2014, we granted 3,205,905 Class B share options to employees. These share
options have a weighted average exercise price of $26.22, vest in equal amounts over three years and have a term
of 10 years.
The weighted average fair value of Class B share options granted in the year was estimated at $7.36 per option
(2013 – $9.77) at the grant date based on the Black-Scholes option-pricing model using the following assumptions:
2014
2013
Weighted average exercise price
$26.22$33.02
Dividend yield
3.43%2.43%
Risk-free interest rate
1.62%1.44%
Expected option life
4.2 years 4.2 years
Expected volatility41%43%
Forfeiture rate
2.44%2.89%
The expected volatility is based on a statistical analysis of historical daily share prices over a period equal to the
expected option life.
Outstanding share options are as follows:
2014
2013
WeightedWeighted
ShareAverage ShareAverage
OptionsExerciseOptionsExercise
(in 000’s)
Price
(in 000’s)
Price
Outstanding at beginning of year 8,318$ 33.196,853$32.65
Granted
3,20626.222,171
33.02
Exercised(115) 4.15 (225) 4.15
Forfeited(260)31.56 (240)39.26
Expired(517)36.25 (241)37.11
Outstanding at end of year
10,632$31.298,318$33.19
Vested and exercisable at end of year
5,803$33.04 5,102$30.87
The average share price during the year was $22.19 (2013 – $28.02), with the highest Class B share price at $29.10
(2013 – $37.85) and the lowest Class B share price at $12.82 (2013 – $21.18).
Consolidated Financial Statements
93
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
19. Equity (continued)
Information relating to share options outstanding at December 31, 2014 is as follows:
Outstanding Share Options (in 000’s)
Exercise
Price Range
Weighted Average Remaining Life
of Outstanding Options (months)
1,153
$ 4.15–$ 12.35 50
3,205
$ 12.36–$ 33.19 109
2,738
$33.20–$35.53
70
2,743
$35.54–$ 49.17 64
793
$ 49.18–$58.80
74
10,632
$ 4.15–$58.80
78
Total share option compensation expense recognized for the year was $20 million (2013 – $18 million).
d) Deferred Share Units, Restricted Share Units and Performance Share Units
We have issued and outstanding deferred share units, restricted share units and performance share units (collectively
referred to as Units).
Deferred Share Units (DSUs) and Restricted Share Units (RSUs) are granted to both employees and directors.
Preferred Share Units (PSUs) are granted to employees only. The DSUs and RSUs entitle the holder to a cash payment
equal to the market value of one Class B share at the time they are redeemed. The PSUs entitle the holder to a cash
payment equal to a percentage of the weighted average trading price of one Class B share over 10 consecutive trading
days prior to the time they are redeemed. The percentage varies from 0% to 200% and is based on our total
shareholder return ranking compared to a group of specified companies.
RSUs and PSUs vest in three years. DSUs vest immediately for directors and in three years for employees. On
retirement the units are pro-rated to reflect the period of vesting completed. Units vest on a pro-rata basis should
employees be terminated without cause and are forfeited if employees resign or are terminated with cause.
DSUs may only be redeemed within 12 months from the date a holder ceases to be an employee or director, while
RSUs and PSUs vest and are redeemed no later than three years measured from the date of the grant.
Additional units are issued to unit holders to reflect dividends paid on Class B subordinate voting share and other
adjustments to Class B shares.
In 2014, we recognized a net recovery of compensation costs of $8 million for our Units (2013 – $4 million
compensation costs recognized). The total liability and intrinsic value for vested Units as at December 31, 2014
was $31 million (2013 – $50 million).
At December 31, 2014, 1,454,338 DSUs (2013 – 1,415,621), 1,189,661 RSUs (2013 – 1,117,841) and 262,956 PSUs
(2013 – nil) were outstanding, of which 1,347,454 DSUs (2013 – 1,306,454), 557,071 RSUs (2013 – 501,396) and
77,138 PSUs (2013 – nil) have vested.
e) Normal Course Issuer Bid
On occasion, we purchase and cancel Class B subordinate voting shares pursuant to normal course issuer bids that
allow us to purchase up to a specified maximum number of shares over a one-year period.
Our current normal course issuer bid, which commenced on July 2, 2014, allows us to purchase up to 20 million
Class B subordinate voting shares until July 1, 2015 or an earlier date if we complete all such purchases. No shares
have been repurchased pursuant to our current issuer bid. During 2014, 200,000 shares were repurchased pursuant
to our previous normal course issuer bid, which expired in June 2014.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
f) Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) — beginning of year
$106$
(39)
Currency translation differences:
Unrealized gains on translation of foreign subsidiaries
682 573
Foreign exchange differences on debt designated as a hedge of our
investment in foreign subsidiaries (net of taxes of $82 and $64)
(550) (431)
132 142
Available-for-sale financial assets:
Unrealized gains (net of taxes of $nil and $(2))
– 11
Gains reclassified to profit (net of taxes of $nil and $2)
(1)
(6)
(1)
5
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges:
Unrealized losses (net of taxes of $6 and $5)
(19) (13)
Losses reclassified to profit on realization (net of taxes of $(6) and $(4))
17 11
(2)
Remeasurements of retirement benefit plans (net of taxes of $nil and $(110))
28 221
Total other comprehensive income 157 366
Less remeasurements of retirement benefit plans recorded in retained earnings
(28) (221)
Accumulated other comprehensive income — end of year
(2)
$235$ 106
The components of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) are as follows:
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Currency translation differences
$235
$103
Unrealized gains on available-for-sale financial assets (net of taxes of $nil and $nil)
4
5
Unrealized losses on cash flow hedges (net of taxes of $1 and $1)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (4)
(2)
$235
$106
Accumulated other comprehensive income attributed to:
Shareholders of the company
$225
$104
Non-controlling interests 10
2
$235
$106
Consolidated Financial Statements
95
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
19. Equity (continued)
g) Earnings Per Share
The following table reconciles our basic and diluted earnings per share:
(CAD$ in millions, except per share data)
2014
2013
Net basic and diluted profit attributable to shareholders of the company
$362
$
961
Weighted average shares outstanding (000’s) 576,192
578,299
Dilutive effect of share options
996
1,166
Weighted average diluted shares outstanding 577,188
579,465
Basic earnings per share
$0.63
$1.66
Diluted earnings per share
$0.63
$1.66
At December 31, 2014, there were 9,471,916 (2013 – 6,949,016) potentially dilutive shares that have not been
included in the diluted earnings per share calculation for the periods presented because their effect is anti-dilutive.
h) Provision for Tax Benefit
In 2013, the Canada Revenue Agency issued a proposed adjustment to our 2006 taxable income that would deny a
deduction of $346 million claimed in relation to a premium paid on the redemption of our Cominco exchangeable
debentures. The proposed adjustment would reduce the loss carryforward pools available to us to reduce taxes payable
in the future rather than have an immediate cash effect. In light of the uncertainty raised by the proposed adjustment
and as the original amount was credited directly to equity against our Class B subordinate voting shares, we recognized
a provision at December 31, 2013 of $124 million, which was charged directly to equity. There has been no change in
the provision for 2014 while we continue to discuss the proposed adjustment with the Canada Revenue Agency.
i)Dividends
We declared dividends of $0.45 per share in the second and fourth quarters of 2014 and $0.45 per share in the second and
fourth quarters of 2013. Dividends of $0.45 per share with a record date of December 15, 2014 were paid in January 2015.
20. Non-Controlling Interests
Set out below is information about our subsidiaries with non-controlling interests and the non-controlling interest
balances included in equity for all comparative periods presented:
Percentage of
Ownership
Interest and
Voting Rights
Held by Non Principal Place
Controlling December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)
of Business
Interest
2014
2013
Highland Valley CopperBritish Columbia, Canada
2.5%
Carmen de Andacollo
Region IV, Chile
10%
53 53
Quebrada Blanca
Region I, Chile
23.5%
95 88
Elkview Mine Limited
PartnershipBritish Columbia, Canada
5%
43 40
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
$39$
33
$230$ 214
21. Contingencies
We consider provisions for all our outstanding and pending legal claims to be adequate. The final outcome with respect
to actions outstanding or pending as at December 31, 2014, or with respect to future claims, cannot be predicted with
certainty. Significant contingencies not disclosed elsewhere in the notes to our financial statements are as follows:
Upper Columbia River Basin
Teck American Inc. (TAI) continues studies under the 2006 settlement agreement with the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) to conduct a remedial investigation on the Upper Columbia River in Washington State.
The Lake Roosevelt litigation involving TML in the Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Washington
continues. In September 2012, TML entered into an agreement with the plaintiffs, agreeing that certain facts were
established for purposes of the litigation. The agreement stipulates that some portion of the slag discharged from our
Trail Operations into the Columbia River between 1896 and 1995, and some portion of the effluent discharged from
Trail Operations, have been transported to and are present in the Upper Columbia River in the United States, and that
some hazardous substances from the slag and effluent have been released into the environment within the United
States. In December 2012, the Court found in favour of the plaintiffs in phase one of the case, issuing a declaratory
judgment that TML is liable under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act
(CERCLA) for response costs, the amount of which will be determined in a subsequent phase of the case.
In October 2013, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation filed an omnibus motion with the District Court
seeking an order stating that they are permitted to seek recovery from TML for environmental response costs, and in
a subsequent proceeding, natural resource damages and assessment costs, arising from the alleged deposition of
hazardous substances in the United States from aerial emissions from TML’s Trail Operations. Prior allegations by the
Tribes related solely to solid and liquid materials discharged to the Columbia River. The motion does not state the
amount of response costs allegedly attributable to aerial emissions, nor did it attempt to define the extent of natural
resource damages, if any, attributable to past smelter operations. In December 2013, the District Court ruled in
favour of the plaintiffs. The plaintiffs have subsequently filed amended pleadings in relation to air emissions. The
Court dismissed a motion to strike the air claims on the basis that CERCLA does not apply to air emissions in the
manner proposed by the plaintiffs, and a subsequent TML motion seeking reconsideration of the dismissal. TML has
sought leave to appeal both of these decisions in the Ninth Circuit on an interlocutory basis.
A hearing with respect to liability in connection with air emissions, if that claim survives, and past response costs is
now expected to take place in December 2015 and a subsequent hearing, with respect to claims for natural resource
damages and assessment costs, is expected to follow, assuming the remedial investigation and feasibility study
being undertaken by TAI are completed, which is now expected to occur in 2017.
There is no assurance that we will ultimately be successful in our defence of the litigation or that we or our affiliates
will not be faced with further liability in relation to this matter. Until the studies contemplated by the EPA settlement
agreement and additional damage assessments are completed, it is not possible to estimate the extent and cost, if
any, of remediation or restoration that may be required or to assess our potential liability for damages. The studies
may conclude, on the basis of risk, cost, technical feasibility or other grounds, that no remediation should be
undertaken. If remediation is required and damage to resources found, the cost of remediation may be material.
Consolidated Financial Statements
97
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
22. Commitments
a) Capital Commitments
As at December 31, 2014, we had contracted for $2.1 billion of capital expenditures that have not yet been incurred
for the purchase of property, plant and equipment. This amount includes $1.6 billion for our share of Fort Hills
capital commitments.
b) Operating Lease Commitments
We lease office premises, mobile equipment and railcars under operating leases. The lease terms are between
one year and 10 years.
The future aggregate minimum lease payments under non-cancellable operating leases are as follows:
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Less than one year
$53$
1 to 5 years
Thereafter
50
68 71
6 12
$127$ 133
Lease rentals amounting to $12 million (2013 – $10 million) for office premises, $32 million (2013 – $37 million)
for mobile equipment and $9 million (2013 – $8 million) for railcars are included in the statement of income.
c) Red Dog Commitments
In accordance with the operating agreement governing the Red Dog mine, TAK pays a royalty to NANA Regional
Corporation Inc. (NANA) on the net proceeds of production. A 25% royalty became payable in the third quarter of
2007 after we had recovered cumulative advance royalties previously paid to NANA. The net proceeds of production
royalty rate will increase by 5% every fifth year to a maximum of 50%. The increase to 30% of net proceeds of
production occurred in 2012. An expense of US$195 million was recorded in 2014 (2013 – US$120 million) in respect
of this royalty.
TAK leases road and port facilities from the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority through which it ships
all concentrates produced at the Red Dog operation. The lease requires TAK to pay a minimum annual user fee of
US$18 million for the next 27 years.
d) Antamina Royalty
Our interest in the Antamina mine is subject to a net profits royalty equivalent to 7.4% of our share of the mine’s free
cash flow. An expense of $19 million was recorded in 2014 (2013 – $19 million) in respect of this royalty.
e) Purchase Commitments
We have a number of forward purchase commitments for the purchase of concentrates, for shipping and distribution
of products and for other process inputs, which are incurred in the normal course of business. Over the last three years,
we have entered into arrangements for the purchase of 240 megawatts of power for the expansion of our Quebrada
Blanca Operations. These contracts contain monthly fixed prices and variable prices per hour and are effective from
dates between November 2016 and January 2018, extending for 21 years. The majority of these contracts are subject
to force majeure provisions.
f) Sale of Interest in Gold Reserves and Resources
In 2010, Carmen de Andacollo sold an interest in the gold reserves and resources of the Carmen de Andacollo
Operation to Royal Gold. Under the agreement, Royal Gold is entitled to 75% of the payable gold produced until total
cumulative production reaches 910,000 ounces of gold, and 50% thereafter.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
g) Fort Hills Energy Limited Partnership
In November 2005, we acquired a 15% interest in Fort Hills, which is developing the Fort Hills oil sands project in
Alberta, Canada. As consideration for our initial 15% interest, we contributed 34% of the first $2.5 billion of project
expenditures. In September 2007, we acquired an additional 5% interest, bringing our interest to 20%. In consideration
for our additional 5% interest, we are required to contribute 27.5% of project expenditures after project spending
reaches $2.5 billion and before project spending reaches $7.5 billion. Thereafter, we are responsible for contributing
our 20% share of project expenditures. In the event that the project is abandoned, all limited partners are required
to make additional contributions such that the aggregate contributions of all partners equal $7.5 billion and any
unexpended amount will be distributed to the partners according to their partnership interests. Our share of project
spending totalled $2.0 billion from November 2005 to December 31, 2014.
23. Segmented Information
Based on the primary products we produce and our development projects, we have five reportable segments — coal,
copper, zinc, energy and corporate — which is the way we report information to our Chief Executive Officer. The
corporate segment includes all of our initiatives in commodities, our corporate growth activities and groups that provide
administrative, technical, financial and other support to all of our business units. Other operating expenses include
general and administration costs, exploration, research and development, and other operating income (expense).
Sales between segments are carried out at arm’s-length prices.
(CAD$ in millions)
Segment revenue
Coal
Copper
Zinc
Energy Corporate
$
3,335$
2,586$
2,950$
Less: Inter-segment revenue
Revenue
December 31, 2014
3$
Total
–$
8,874
– –
(275) – –
(275)
3,335
2,586
2,675 3 –
8,599
Cost of sales (3,134)
(1,908)
(2,026) (3)
–
(7,071)
Gross profit 201678649 – –
1,528
Other operating
income (expenses)
(27)(144) (50) (6)(253)(480)
Profit from operations
174534599 (6)
(253)
1,048
Net finance expense
(40) (23) (32)
Non-operating
income (expenses)
Share of losses of associates
and joint ventures
–(205)(300)
17 (9) 12 (1) (40) (21)
– – – – (3) (3)
Profit before tax
151502579 (7)
(501)724
Capital expenditures
678582239702 12
2,213
Goodwill
1,203507 – – –
1,710
Total assets
$
20,928$
10,009$
3,892$
3,298$
(1,288)$
36,839
Consolidated Financial Statements
99
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
23. Segmented Information (continued)
(CAD$ in millions)
Segment revenue
Coal
December 31, 2013
Copper
Zinc
Energy Corporate
$4,113$
2,853$
2,638$
6$
Total
–$
9,610
Less: Inter-segment revenue – –
(228) – –
(228)
Revenue
4,113
2,853
2,410 6 –
9,382
Cost of sales (3,106) (1,865) (1,981)
(4)
– (6,956)
Gross profit 1,007988429 2 –
2,426
Other operating
income (expenses) (39)(113)
6 (12)(291)
(449)
(291)
1,977
Profit from operations968875435(10)
Net finance expense
(48)
(22)
Non-operating
income (expenses) 16 (2)
(35)
–
(221)
(326)
7 (2) (25) (6)
Share of losses of associates
and joint ventures – – – – (2) (2)
(539)
1,643
Profit before tax936851407(12)
Capital expenditures946
1,266234125 31
2,602
Goodwill
1,203465 – – –
1,668
Total assets
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
$
35,834$
11,406$
4,704$2,517$
(18,278)$
36,183
The geographical distribution of our non-current assets is as follows:
December 31, December 31,
(CAD$ in millions)20142013
Canada
$22,665 $22,260
Chile
5,9435,421
United States 933 861
Other1,126 961
$30,667 $29,503
Non-current assets attributed to geographical locations exclude deferred income tax assets and financial and
other assets.
Revenue is attributed to regions based on the location of the port of delivery as designated by the customer and
is as follows:
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Asia
China
$2,226$2,458
Japan
1,2311,461
South Korea 900 938
Other 727 778
Americas
United States1,1951,225
Canada 528 665
Latin America 272 289
Europe
Germany 372 624
Finland 267 215
Other881 729
$8,599$9,382
Consolidated Financial Statements
101
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
24. Accounting for Financial Instruments
a) Financial Risk Management
Our activities expose us to a variety of financial risks, which include liquidity risk, foreign exchange risk, interest rate
risk, commodity price risk, credit risk and other risks associated with capital markets. From time to time, we may use
foreign exchange, commodity price and interest rate contracts to manage exposure to fluctuations in these variables.
We do not have a practice of trading derivatives. Our use of derivatives is based on established practices and
parameters to mitigate risk and is subject to the oversight of our Hedging Committee and our Board of Directors.
Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk arises from our general and capital financing needs. We have planning, budgeting and forecasting
processes to help determine our funding requirements to meet various contractual and other obligations. Note 15
details our available credit facilities as at December 31, 2014.
Contractual undiscounted cash flow requirements for financial liabilities as at December 31, 2014 are as follows:
(CAD$ in millions)
Less Than
1 Year
2– 3 Years
4– 5 Years
More Than
5 Years
Trade accounts payable and other
liabilities and dividends payable
$
$
1,922
$
–
$
–
–
Total
$1,922
Debt (Note 15(d))428 7081,1676,2168,519
Estimated interest payments on debt$ 401$ 755$ 681$4,924$6,761
Foreign Exchange Risk
We operate on an international basis and therefore, foreign exchange risk exposures arise from transactions
denominated in a foreign currency. Our foreign exchange risk arises primarily with respect to the U.S. dollar and to a
lesser extent, the Chilean peso and Peruvian sole. Our cash flows from Canadian, Chilean and Peruvian operations
are exposed to foreign exchange risk as commodity sales are denominated in U.S. dollars and a substantial portion
of operating expenses are denominated in local currencies.
We hedge a portion of our U.S. dollar denominated future cash flows on a quarterly basis with U.S. dollar forward
sales contracts. We have elected not to actively manage other foreign exchange exposures at this time.
We also have various investments in U.S. dollar foreign operations, whose net assets are exposed to foreign currency
translation risk. This currency exposure is managed in part through our U.S. dollar denominated debt as a hedge
against net investments in foreign operations. As at December 31, 2014, $6.5 billion of U.S. dollar debt was
designated in this manner.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
U.S. dollar financial instruments subject to foreign exchange risk are comprised of U.S. dollar denominated items
held in Canada and are as follows:
(US$ in millions)
2014
2013
Cash and cash equivalents
$583$ 476
Accounts receivable and other assets
447 506
Accounts payable(301) (359)
U.S. dollar forward sales contracts not designated as hedging instruments
(227) (235)
U.S. dollar forward sales contracts designated as hedging instruments
(246) (245)
Long term debt
(7,200)(7,200)
(6,944)(7,057)
Net investment in foreign operations
Net U.S. dollar assets exposed
6,6847,716
$(260)$
659
As at December 31, 2014, with other variables unchanged, a $0.10 strengthening (weakening) of the Canadian dollar
against the U.S. dollar would have a $23 million (2013 – $39 million) decrease (increase) on profit before tax resulting
from our financial instruments. There would also be a $25 million (2013 – $25 million) increase (decrease) in other
comprehensive income from our U.S. dollar forward sales contracts designated as cash flow hedges and a $22 million
(2013 – $52 million) decrease (increase) in other comprehensive income from the translation of our foreign operations.
Interest Rate Risk
Our interest rate risk mainly arises from our cash and cash equivalents. Our interest rate management policy is
generally to borrow at fixed rates. However, floating rate funding may be used to fund short term operating cash flow
requirements or, in conjunction with fixed to floating interest rate swaps, be used to offset interest rate risk from our
cash. The fair value of fixed-rate debt fluctuates with changes in market interest rates, but the cash flows,
denominated in U.S. dollars, do not.
Cash and cash equivalents have short terms to maturity and receive interest based on market interest rates.
As at December 31, 2014 and 2013, with other variables unchanged, a 1% change in the LIBOR rate would not have a
significant effect on profit. There would be no effect on other comprehensive income.
Consolidated Financial Statements
103
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
24. Accounting for Financial Instruments (continued)
Commodity Price Risk
We are subject to price risk from fluctuations in market prices of the commodities that we produce. From time to time,
we may use commodity price contracts to manage our exposure to fluctuations in commodity prices. At the balance
sheet date, we had zinc and lead derivative contracts outstanding as described in Note 24(b) below.
Our commodity price risk associated with financial instruments primarily relates to changes in fair value caused by
final settlement pricing adjustments to receivables and payables and derivative contracts for zinc and lead.
The following represents the effect on pre-tax profit attributable to shareholders from a 10% change in commodity
prices, based on outstanding receivables and payables subject to settlement pricing adjustments at December 31, 2014.
There is no effect on other comprehensive income.
Change in Profit
Price on December 31, Attributable to Shareholders
(CAD$ in millions, except for US$/lb. data)2014201320142013
Copper
US$2.86/lb.US$3.35/lb. $41$
Zinc US$0.99/lb.US$0.94/lb.
Lead
US$0.84/lb.
US$1.01/lb.
1
$1$
29
–
1
Credit Risk
Credit risk arises from the non-performance by counterparties of contractual financial obligations. Our primary
counterparties related to our cash, money market investments and derivative contracts carry investment grade
ratings as assessed by external rating agencies. There is ongoing review to evaluate the creditworthiness of these
counterparties. We manage credit risk for trade and other receivables through established credit monitoring
activities. The only significant concentration of credit risk with any single counterparty or group of counterparties
relates to our investments in U.S. Government securities. Our maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date
is the carrying value of our cash and cash equivalents, receivables and derivative assets. While we are exposed to
credit losses due to the non-performance of our counterparties, we do not consider this to be a material risk.
b) Derivative Financial Instruments and Hedges
Sale and Purchase Contracts
Sales and purchases of metals in concentrates and cathodes are recognized on a provisional pricing basis when the
significant risks and rewards of ownership pass to the customer, which is generally when the product is loaded onto
a carrier specified by the customer. The final pricing for the product sold and purchased is contractually linked to
market prices at a subsequent date. Adjustments are made to the associated receivable and payable in subsequent
periods based on movements in quoted market prices up to the date of final pricing. These arrangements have the
characteristics of a derivative instrument as the value of our receivables and payables will vary as prices for the
underlying commodities vary in the metal markets. These settlement pricing adjustments result in gains (losses from
purchases) in a rising price environment and losses (gains from purchases) in a declining price environment and are
recorded as other operating income (expense). The profit effect of gains and losses on these contracts is mitigated
by smelter price participation, royalty interests, taxes and non-controlling interests. It should be noted that while
these effects arise on the sale of concentrates, we also purchase concentrates at our Trail Operations where the
opposite effects occur.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
The table below outlines our outstanding receivable and payable positions, which were provisionally valued at
December 31, 2014 and at December 31, 2013, respectively.
Outstanding at
December 31, 2014
Outstanding at
December 31, 2013
(Pounds in millions) PoundsUS$/lb.PoundsUS$/lb.
Receivable positions
Copper
208$ 2.86 135$ 3.35
Zinc
117$ 0.99 109$ 0.94
Lead
41$ 0.84
41$ 1.01
Zinc payable
68$ 0.99
85$ 0.94
Lead payable
9$ 0.84
22$ 1.01
Payable positions
At December 31, 2014, total outstanding settlements receivable were $886 million and total outstanding settlements
payable were $23 million, which are included in trade accounts receivable and trade accounts payable, respectively,
on the consolidated balance sheet.
Economic Hedge Contracts
We enter into commodity forward sales and purchase contracts to mitigate the risk of price changes for a portion
of our concentrate purchases and refined metal sales. These contracts effectively lock in prices for a portion of our
smelter sales. We do not apply hedge accounting to these commodity forward sales contracts.
Certain customers purchase concentrate and refined metal products at fixed forward prices from our operations.
Forward purchase commitments for these metal products are matched to specific fixed price sales commitments
to customers.
Zinc Swaps
Due to ice conditions, the port serving our Red Dog Mine is normally only able to ship concentrates from July to
October each year. As a result, zinc and lead concentrate sales volumes are generally higher in the third and fourth
quarter of each year than in the first and second quarter. During 2014, we purchased and sold zinc swaps to match
our economic exposure to the average zinc price over our shipping year, which is from July of one year to June of the
following year. We do not apply hedge accounting to the zinc swaps.
Consolidated Financial Statements
105
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
24. Accounting for Financial Instruments (continued)
The fair value of our commodity swaps and forward sales contracts is calculated using a discounted cash flow method
based on forward metal prices. A summary of our free-standing derivative contracts and related fair values as at
December 31, 2014 is as follows:
Quantity
Average Price
of Purchase
Commitments
Average Price
of Sale
Commitments
Fair Value
Asset (Liability)
(CAD$ in millions)
Derivatives not designated as
hedging instruments
Commodity swaps:
Zinc
156 million lbs.
US$1.03/lb.
US$0.99/lb.
$
(6)
Lead
36 million lbs.
US$0.91/lb.
US$0.84/lb.
(3)
Forward sales contracts U.S. dollar
US$227 million CAD$/US$1.14
(4)
(13)
Derivatives designated as
hedging instruments
U.S. dollar forward sales
contracts
US$246 million
CAD$/US$1.14
$
(5)
All free-standing derivative contracts mature in 2015.
Derivatives designated as hedging instruments in the amount of $5 million and derivatives not designated as hedging
instruments in the amount of $13 million are recorded in trade accounts payable and other liabilities on the
consolidated balance sheet.
In addition to the above, one of our road and port contracts contains a contingent zinc escalation payment that is
considered to be an embedded derivative. The fair value of this embedded derivative was $5 million at December 31, 2014
(2013 – $6 million), and is included in other liabilities and provisions on the consolidated balance sheet.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Derivatives Not Designated as Hedging Instruments
(CAD$ in millions)
Amount of Gain (Loss) Amount of Loss Recognized
Recognized in Other
in Other Non-Operating
Operating Income (Expense)
Income (Expense)
2014201320142013
Zinc derivatives
3 $–$
–
Lead derivatives
(4)
–
–
Copper derivatives
2
(1)
–
–
U.S. forward sales
–
–
–
(6)
–
–
$(5)$
Settlements receivable
and payable
Other
(130) (62)
–
$(137)$
–
–
(2)
(1)
(60)$(1)$
(8)
Losses on U.S. dollar forward sales are included in foreign exchange losses in non-operating income (expense)
(Note 8).
Hedges
Cash flow hedges
At December 31, 2014, U.S. dollar forward sales contracts with a notional amount of US$246 million remained
outstanding. The contracts matured in early 2015. These contracts have been designated as cash flow hedges of a
portion of our future cash flows from anticipated U.S. dollar coal sales. We have determined that they are highly
effective hedges from inception to December 31, 2014.
Unrealized gains and losses on our U.S. dollar forward sales contracts designated as cash flow hedges are recorded
in other comprehensive income. Realized gains and losses on these settled contracts are recorded in revenue at the
same time as the hedged transactions.
The following table provides information regarding the effect of U.S. dollar forward sales contracts that are derivative
instruments designated as cash flow hedges on our consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income
in 2014 and 2013:
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Losses recognized in other comprehensive income (effective portion)
$(25)$
Losses reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive
income into income (effective portion)
(18)
(23) (15)
Location of losses reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive
income into income
RevenueRevenue
Net investment hedge
Our hedges of net investments in foreign operations were effective, and no ineffectiveness was recognized in profit
for the period.
Consolidated Financial Statements
107
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
25. Fair Value Measurements
Certain of our financial assets and liabilities are measured at fair value on a recurring basis and classified in their
entirety based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. Certain non-financial
assets and liabilities may also be measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis. There are three levels of the fair
value hierarchy that prioritize the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value, with Level 1 inputs having
the highest priority. The levels and the valuation techniques used to value our financial assets and liabilities are
described below:
Level 1 — Quoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets
Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical, unrestricted
assets or liabilities.
Cash equivalents and marketable equity securities are valued using quoted market prices in active markets.
Accordingly, these items are included in Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy.
Level 2 — Significant Other Observable Inputs
Quoted prices in markets that are not active, quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, or inputs
that are observable, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.
Derivative instruments are included in Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy as they are valued using pricing models or
discounted cash flow models. These models require a variety of inputs, including, but not limited to, contractual terms,
market prices, forward price curves, yield curves, and credit spreads. These inputs are obtained from or corroborated
with the market where possible. Also included in Level 2 are settlements receivable and settlements payable from
provisional pricing on concentrate sales and purchases because they are valued using quoted market prices for
forward curves for copper, zinc and lead.
Level 3 — Significant Unobservable Inputs
Unobservable (supported by little or no market activity) prices.
We include investments in certain debt securities in Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy because they trade infrequently
and have little price transparency. We review the fair value of these instruments periodically and estimate an
impairment charge based on management’s best estimates, which are unobservable inputs.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
The fair values of our financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis at December 31, 2014
and 2013 are summarized in the following table:
(CAD$ in millions)2014
Level 1Level 2Level 3Total
2013
Level 1Level 2Level 3 Total
Financial assets
Cash equivalents $1,651
$
–
$
–
$1,651 $
2,598$ –$ –$
2,598
Marketable equity securities
270 – –
270
260 – –
260
Debt securities – –1616 – –1616
Settlements receivable –
886 –
886 –
695 –
695
Derivative instruments – – – – – 1 – 1
$1,921 $ 886 $
16 $2,823 $
2,858$696$ 16$
3,570
Financial liabilities
Derivative instruments
$ –$ 23$ –$23 $ –$ 10$ –$ 10
Settlements payable –23 –23 –42 –42
$
– $ 46 $
– $46 $ –$ 52$ –$ 52
For our non-financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis, no fair value measurements
were made during the years ended December 31, 2014 or 2013.
26. Capital Risk Management
The capital we manage is the total of equity and debt on our balance sheet. Our capital management objectives are to
maintain access to the capital we require to operate and grow our business, while minimizing the cost of such capital
and providing for returns to our shareholders. Our debt is rated investment grade by independent rating agencies
that assess, among other things, our ability to meet our financial obligations and policies. These policies include, on
average over time, a target debt to debt-plus-equity ratio of approximately 30% and a target ratio of debt to EBITDA of
approximately 2.5. These ratios are expected to vary from their target levels from time to time, reflecting commodity
price cycles and corporate activity, including the development of major projects. We also maintain a committed
revolving credit facility with strongly rated banks to ensure adequate liquidity.
As at December 31, 2014, our debt to debt-plus-equity ratio was 31% (2013 – 29%) and our debt to EBITDA ratio was
3.6 (2013 – 2.5). We manage the risk of not meeting our financial targets through the issuance and repayment of debt,
our dividend policy and the issuance of equity capital as well as through the ongoing management of operations,
investments and capital expenditures.
Consolidated Financial Statements
109
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
27. Key Management Compensation
The compensation for key management, which includes our directors and senior vice presidents, in respect of employee
services is as follows:
(CAD$ in millions)
2014
2013
Salaries, director fees and other short term benefits
$14$
16
Post-employment benefits
4
Share-based compensation
6 11
$
24
1
$28
28. Supplemental Guarantor Condensed Consolidating Financial Information
Teck Metals Ltd. (Teck Metals), a wholly owned subsidiary of Teck Resources Limited (Teck, or our), provides a full
and unconditional guarantee or the equivalent in respect of substantially all of our outstanding indebtedness for
borrowed money.
The following tables set forth condensed consolidating financial information for Teck Metals as at December 31, 2014
and December 31, 2013. The information is presented with separate columns for: (i) Teck; (ii) Teck Metals; (iii) our
other subsidiaries on a combined basis; (iv) consolidating adjustments; and (v) the total consolidated amounts. The
investments in subsidiaries held by Teck, Teck Metals and other non-guarantor subsidiaries have been accounted for
using the equity method of accounting. Antamina and Fort Hills are not considered subsidiaries and, as such, our share
of their results and balances are included in consolidation adjustments in the following tables.
During the period, we completed an internal reorganization that transferred certain mining assets previously held by
our wholly-owned subsidiaries to the parent company.
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Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
As at December 31, 2014
As Reported in IFRS (CAD$ in millions)
Teck
TeckNon-Guarantor Consolidating Consolidated
Metals SubsidiariesAdjustments
Totals
Condensed Consolidating
Balance Sheet Information
Cash and cash equivalents
$
413
$
152
$
1,388
$
76
$2,029
Current income taxes receivable 13 16 57 14 100
Trade accounts and
intra-group receivables
7,226 288
11,356
(17,834)
1,036
Inventories 27 3821,274 691,752
7,679
Financial and other assets
1,531
838 14,075 (17,675)
1,430
1,062
(3,129)
4,917
894
Investments in associates
32,929
3,680 946
(37,523) 32
Property, plant and equipment 219
1,206
24,027
3,473
28,925
Deferred income tax assets
– 343 18
– 361
Goodwill
–
–1,710
–1,710
$ 42,358
$
7,497
$ 41,838
$ (54,854)
$36,839
Trade accounts and intra-group
payables and other liabilities
$
$
8,485
$
$
$1,663
9,882
1,149
(17,853)
Dividends payable259
–
–
– 259
Current income taxes payable
2 52
5 59
–
Debt347
10,488
– 10 71 428
8,487
1,211 (17,777)
2,409
Debt
9,1521,184 834
(3,157)8,013
Deferred income tax liabilities
4,018
–
1,834 239
6,091
Retirement benefit liabilities 52 230 290
– 572
Other liabilities and provisions 42 139 688 49 918
23,752 10,040
4,857 (20,646) 18,003
Equity
Attributable to shareholders
of the company 18,606 (2,543) 36,751 (34,208) 18,606
Attributable to
non-controlling interests
–
– 230
– 230
18,606 (2,543) 36,981 (34,208) 18,836
$ 42,358
$
7,497
$ 41,838
$ (54,854)
$36,839
Consolidated Financial Statements
111
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
28. Supplemental Guarantor Condensed Consolidating Financial Information (continued)
Year Ended December 31, 2014
As Reported in IFRS (CAD$ in millions)
Teck
TeckNon-Guarantor Consolidating Consolidated
Metals SubsidiariesAdjustmentsTotals
Condensed Consolidating
Statement of Income Information
Revenue
$
99$1,709$6,408$ 383$8,599
Cost of sales(120)
(1,630)
(5,310) (11)(7,071)
Gross profit (21) 79
1,098 372
1,528
Other operating expenses
General and administration (97)
(7)
Exploration
(11)
–
Research and development
(5)
(9)
(30)
15
(119)
(45)
(4)
(60)
–
(6)
(20)
Other operating income (expense) (76)
(4) (163) (38) (281)
Profit (loss) from operations
59
(210)
Finance income 77 75
860
339
1,048
2(150)
4
Finance expense(472) (86) (75) 329 (304)
Non-operating income (expense)
(692)
16
(121)
776
(21)
Share of profit (losses) of associates
1,424
71
233
(1,731)
(3)
Profit before tax 127 135 899(437) 724
Provision for income taxes
235
Profit for the year
362
$
(200)
$
(65)
$
(147)
(230)
752
$
(667)
$382
732
$
(667)
$362
(342)
Profit attributable to:
Shareholders of the company
$
Non-controlling interests
Profit for the year
112
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
$
362
$
–
362
$
(65)
$
– 20
(65)
$
752
$
– 20
(667)
$382
Year Ended December 31, 2014
As Reported in IFRS (CAD$ in millions)
Teck
TeckNon-Guarantor Consolidating Consolidated
Metals SubsidiariesAdjustments
Totals
Condensed Consolidating
Statement of Cash Flows Information
Operating activities
$1,169$ 208$3,552$(2,651)$2,278
Investing activities
Purchase of property,
plant and equipment (13) (126) (689) (670)
(1,498)
Capitalized production
stripping costs
–
–
(652)
(63)
Expenditures on financial
investments and other assets (21)
(1) (21)
Proceeds from the sale
of investments and other assets
3
6
(31)
(121)
(715)
(1) (44)
25
–
(1,337)
34
(734) (2,223)
Financing activities
Issuance of debt
–
Repayment of debt
–
–
(30)
(40)
(70)
Debt interest paid
(379)
–
(2)
–
(381)
Issuance of Class B subordinate
voting shares
Purchase and cancellation of
Class B subordinate voting shares
–
(5)
– 12
–
–
– 12
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(518)
(23)
–
(23)
(3,153)
3,435
Dividends paid
(518)
Distributions to
non-controlling interests
–
–
Interdivision distributions
–
(282)
(902)
(282)
(3,196)
3,395
(5)
–
(985)
Effect of exchange rate changes
on cash and cash equivalents 24 19 140
4 187
Increase (decrease) in cash
and cash equivalents 260 (176) (841)
14 (743)
Cash and cash equivalents
at beginning of year 153 328
2,229 62
2,772
Cash and cash equivalents
at end of year
$ 413$ 152$1,388$
76$2,029
Consolidated Financial Statements
113
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
28. Supplemental Guarantor Condensed Consolidating Financial Information (continued)
As at December 31, 2013
As Reported in IFRS (CAD$ in millions)
Teck
TeckNon-Guarantor Consolidating Consolidated
Metals SubsidiariesAdjustments
Totals
Condensed Consolidating
Balance Sheet Information
Cash and cash equivalents
$ 153$ 328$2,229$
Current income taxes receivable
8 18 44
62$2,772
1 71
Trade accounts and
intra-group receivables
3,718 143
12,212
(14,841)
1,232
Inventories 20 4411,181 53
1,695
3,899
Financial and other assets
1,306
930 15,666 (14,725)
1,080
1,138
(2,778)
5,770
746
Investments in associates
31,590
24,792 882
(57,240) 24
Property, plant and equipment2671,131
23,782
2,631
27,811
Deferred income tax assets
–
– 10 154 164
Goodwill
–
–
1,668
–
1,668
$ 37,062
$ 27,933
$ 43,146
$ (71,958)
$ 36,183
Trade accounts and intra-group
payables and other liabilities
$
$
$
$
$
7,987
4,843
3,815
(14,861)
–
Current income taxes payable
–
1 41 19 61
Debt
–
– 12 47 59
8,246
4,844
–
1,784
Dividends payable259
– 259
3,868 (14,795)
2,163
Debt
8,702 906 867
(2,811)
7,664
Deferred income tax liabilities
1,450
2,285
1,852 321
5,908
Retirement benefit liabilities 32 213 234
– 479
Other liabilities and provisions 35 170 916 371,158
18,465
8,418
7,737 (17,248) 17,372
Equity
Attributable to shareholders
of the company 18,597
Attributable to
non-controlling interests
–
18,597
114
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
19,515 35,195 (54,710) 18,597
$ 37,062
– 214
– 214
19,515 35,409 (54,710)
$ 27,933
$ 43,146
$ (71,958)
18,811
$ 36,183
Year Ended December 31, 2013
As Reported in IFRS (CAD$ in millions)
Teck
TeckNon-Guarantor Consolidating Consolidated
Metals SubsidiariesAdjustments
Totals
Condensed Consolidating
Statement of Income Information
Revenue
$ 119$1,760$6,909$ 594$9,382
Cost of sales (131)
(1,695)
(5,084) (46)
(6,956)
Gross profit (12) 65
1,825 548
2,426
Other operating expenses
General and administration (29)
6
(129)
Exploration
(101)
(20)
(5)
–
(65)
(1)
(86)
Research and development
(2)
(16)
–
–
(18)
Other operating income (expense) (77)
Profit (loss) from operations
(212)
(1) (98) (40) (216)
43
1,633
513
1,977
Finance income 132 70 18(207) 13
Finance expense(440) (151) (85) 337 (339)
Non-operating income (expense) (511) (48) (117) 670
(6)
Share of profit (losses) of associates
(2)
1,993
1,055
339
(3,389)
Profit before tax962 9691,788
(2,076)
1,643
Provision for income taxes
Profit for the year
$
(1) (229) (121) (282) (633)
961
$
740
$
1,667
$
(2,358)
$
1,010
1,618
$
(2,358)
$
961
Profit attributable to:
Shareholders of the company
$
Non-controlling interests
Profit for the year
$
961
$
–
961
$
740
$
– 49
740
$
1,667
$
– 49
(2,358)
$
1,010
Consolidated Financial Statements
115
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
28. Supplemental Guarantor Condensed Consolidating Financial Information (continued)
Year Ended December 31, 2013
As Reported in IFRS (CAD$ in millions)
Teck
TeckNon-Guarantor Consolidating Consolidated
Metals SubsidiariesAdjustments
Totals
Condensed Consolidating
Statement of Cash Flows Information
Operating activities
$1,051$ 751$3,955$(2,879)$2,878
Investing activities
Purchase of property,
plant and equipment (54) (138)(1,521) (145)
(1,858)
Capitalized production
stripping costs
Expenditures on financial
investments and other assets
–
(280)
Proceeds from the sale of
investments and other assets497
163
–
(677)
(67)
(744)
–
(25)
(20)
(325)
–
(138)
5
(2,218)
– 502
(232)
(2,425)
Financing activities
Issuance of debt
–
–
Repayment of debt
–
–
(24)
(15)
(39)
Debt interest paid
(355)
–
(3)
3
(355)
Issuance of Class B subordinate
voting shares
–
–
–
(176)
–
–
–
(176)
Dividends paid
(521)
–
–
–
(521)
Distributions to
non-controlling interests
–
–
(38)
–
(38)
Interdivision distributions
–
(307)
(2,805)
3,112
–
(1,051)
(307)
(2,870)
3,100
(1,128)
Effect of exchange rate changes
on cash and cash equivalents
1
8 15 153
4 180
Increase (decrease) in cash
and cash equivalents 171 321 (980)
(7) (495)
Cash and cash equivalents
at beginning of year (18)
Cash and cash equivalents
at end of year
116
–
–
Purchase and cancellation of
Class B subordinate voting shares
1
–
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
7
3,209 69
3,267
$ 153$ 328$2,229$
62$2,772
Officers
Norman B. Keevil
Chairman of the Board
Warren S. R. Seyffert Q.C.
Deputy Chairman and
Lead Director
Donald R. Lindsay
President and Chief Executive
Officer
Timothy C. Watson
Senior Vice President,
Project Development
M. Colin Joudrie
Vice President,
Business Development
David R. Baril
Vice President, Copper,
Chile Operations
Robert J. Kelly
Vice President, Health and Safety
Shehzad Bharmal
Vice President, Strategy
and Development, Copper
Ian C. Kilgour
Executive Vice President and
Chief Operating Officer
Anne J. Chalmers
Vice President, Risk and Security
Dale E. Andres
Senior Vice President, Copper
Alex N. Christopher
Vice President, Exploration
Andrew J. Golding
Senior Vice President,
Corporate Development
Larry M. Davey
Vice President, Development, Coal
Ronald A. Millos
Senior Vice President, Finance
and Chief Financial Officer
Raymond A. Reipas
Senior Vice President, Energy
Peter C. Rozee
Senior Vice President,
Commercial and Legal Affairs
Robert G. Scott
Senior Vice President, Zinc
Marcia M. Smith
Senior Vice President,
Sustainability and External Affairs
Michael P. Davies
Vice President, Environment
Karen L. Dunfee
Corporate Secretary
Ralph J. Lutes
Vice President, Asia and
Chief Representative, China
Douglas J. Powrie
Vice President, Tax
Robin B. Sheremeta
Vice President, Operations, Coal
Keith G. Stein
Vice President, Projects
Andrew A. Stonkus
Vice President, Base Metals
Marketing
Gregory A. Waller
Vice President, Investor Relations
and Strategic Analysis
Mark Edwards
Vice President, Community
and Government Relations
Scott R. Wilson
Vice President and Treasurer
Réal Foley
Vice President, Coal Marketing
Dean C. Winsor
Vice President, Human Resources
John F. Gingell
Vice President and Corporate
Controller
Anthony A. Zoobkoff
Senior Counsel and Assistant
Secretary
Officers listed as at February 17, 2015. More information on our directors and officers can be found in our most recent
Annual Information Form or in our Management Proxy Circular, which are available on our website at www.teck.com,
on the Canadian Securities Administrators website at www.sedar.com (SEDAR), and on the EDGAR section of the
United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) website at www.sec.gov.
Officers
117
Board of Directors
Norman B. Keevil
Chairman of the Board
Director since: 1963 (1)
Warren S. R. Seyffert Q.C.
Deputy Chairman and Lead Director
Director since: 1989 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
Laura L. Dottori-Attanasio
Director since: 2014 (2)
Edward C. Dowling
Director since: 2012 (3) (5) (6)
Norman B. Keevil III
Director since: 1997 (5) (6)
Donald R. Lindsay
President and Chief Executive Officer
Director since: 2005 (1)
Takeshi Kubota
Director since: 2012 (5) (6)
Mayank M. Ashar
Director since: 2007 (3) (4) (5) (6)
Takashi Kuriyama
Director since: 2006 (5) (6)
Jalynn H. Bennett1
Director since: 2005 (2) (3) (4)
Tracey L. McVicar
Director since: 2014 (2)
Hugh J. Bolton
Director since: 2001(2) (4)
Janice G. Rennie
Director since: 2007 (2) (3)
Felix P. Chee
Director since: 2010 (2)
Chris M. T. Thompson2
Director since: 2003 (1) (3) (4) (6)
Jack L. Cockwell
Director since: 2009 (1) (6)
Notes:
(1) Member of the Executive Committee
(2) Member of the Audit Committee
(3) Member of the Compensation Committee
(4) Member of the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee
(5) Member of the Safety and Sustainability Committee
(6) Member of the Reserves Committee
1
2
Ms. Bennett passed away on January 23, 2015.
Mr. Thompson retired on January 31, 2015.
More information on our directors and officers can be found in our most recent Annual Information Form or in
our Management Proxy Circular, which are available on our website at www.teck.com, on the Canadian Securities
Administrators website at www.sedar.com (SEDAR), and on the EDGAR section of the United States Securities
and Exchange Commission (SEC) website at www.sec.gov.
118
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Teck’s Board of Directors
(from left to right, top to bottom) Norman Keevil, Warren Seyffert, Donald Lindsay, Mayank Ashar, Jalynn Bennett,
Hugh Bolton, Felix Chee, Jack Cockwell, Laura Dottori-Attanasio, Edward Dowling, Norman Keevil III, Takeshi Kubota,
Takashi Kuriyama, Tracey McVicar, Janice Rennie, Chris Thompson
Board of Directors
119
Corporate Information
2014 Share Prices and Trading Volume
Class B subordinate voting shares–TSX–CAD$/share
High
Low
Close
Volume
Q1$ 29.10$22.53$23.86125,094,073
Q2$ 26.11$23.03$24.36 96,221,432
Q3$26.98$20.80$ 21.21105,251,991
Q4$ 21.17$ 12.79$ 15.88185,316,903
511,884,399
Class B subordinate voting shares–NYSE–US$/share
High
Low
Close
Volume
Q1$26.44$ 19.99$ 21.68138,972,779
Q2$23.90$ 21.23$22.83143,666,710
Q3$25.03$18.59$18.89132,191,712
Q4$18.96$ 11.01$ 13.64252,756,194
667,587,395
Class A common shares–TSX–CAD$/share
High
Low
Close
Q1$30.72$24.30$25.33
120
Volume
121,279
Q2$ 27.51$24.05$ 25.76
99,494
Q3$ 28.10$22.40$22.82
106,126
Q4$22.52$ 15.88$18.41
209,674
536,573
Teck 2014 Annual Report | Adaptability
Stock Exchanges
Our Class A common and Class B subordinate voting
shares are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange under
the symbols TCK.A and TCK.B, respectively.
Our Class B subordinate voting shares are listed on
the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol TCK.
Dividends declared on Class A and B shares
Amount per share
$0.45
$0.45
Payment Date
July 2, 2014
January 2, 2015
These dividends are eligible for both the federal and
provincial enhanced dividend tax credits.
Shares Outstanding at December 31, 2014
Proven Ability to Meet a Changing World
Class A common shares
Class B subordinate voting shares
9,353,470
566,794,741
Shareholder Relations
Karen L. Dunfee, Corporate Secretary
Annual Meeting
Our annual meeting of shareholders will be held
at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, April 22, 2015, in the
Waterfront Ballroom, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel,
900 Canada Place Way, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Transfer Agents
Inquiries regarding change of address, stock transfer,
registered shareholdings, dividends or lost certificates
should be directed to our Registrar and Transfer Agent:
CST Trust Company
1600 – 1066 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6E 3X1
CST Trust Company provides an Answerline Service
for the convenience of shareholders:
Toll-free in Canada and the U.S.
1.800.387.0825
Outside Canada and the U.S.
1.416.682.3860
Email: [email protected]
On the cover: The Rocky Mountains provide an impressive
backdrop to steelmaking coal mining underway at Teck’s
Greenhills Operations in southeast British Columbia, Canada.
American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC
6201 15th Avenue
Brooklyn, New York
11219
1.800.937.5449 or 718.921.8124
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.amstock.com
TTY: 866.703.9077 or 718.921.8386
Auditors
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Chartered Accountants
Suite 700
250 Howe Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6C 3S7
Annual Information Form
We prepare an Annual Information Form (AIF) that is
filed with the securities commissions or similar bodies
in all the provinces of Canada. Copies of our AIF and
annual and quarterly reports are available on request
or on our website at www.teck.com, on the Canadian
Securities Administrators website at www.sedar.com
(SEDAR), and on the EDGAR section of the United
States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
website at www.sec.gov.
Teck 2014 Annual Report
Adaptability
Teck Resources Limited
Suite 3300, 550 Burrard Street
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
V6C 0B3
+1.604.699.4000 Tel
+1.604.699.4750 Fax
www.teck.com
Setting Possibilities in Motion
Adaptability
Teck 2014 Annual Report
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