HomeVision-Phone/CID (Version II) Add-On

HomeVision-Phone/CID (Version II) Add-On
HomeVision-Phone/CID
(Version II)
Add-On Card
Installation and Operation Manual
Custom Solutions, Inc.
P.O. Box 33905
Indialantic, FL 32903
E-mail: [email protected]
Internet: www.csi3.com
HomeVision-Phone/CID
INTRODUCTION
HomeVision-Phone/CID is an add-on phone interface with caller ID for the HomeVision home automation controller.
It provides the following capabilities:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Detects touchtone (DTMF) inputs from users to trigger any actions (X-10, infrared, macros, thermostat,
etc.)
User can input values into variables (for example, to set the temperature with the phone!)
Can transmit DTMF signals as notification to user or to dial out
Detects phone on-hook and off-hook conditions
Detects and counts phone rings
Can answer and hang up the phone
Works with phones inside and outside the house
Detects caller ID and displays it on your TV
Note that this device (version II) requires HomeVision PROM and PC software versions 2.8 or higher.
CONNECTIONS
Hardware connections must be made with the power removed from the HomeVision unit.
Ribbon Cable Connections
The provided ribbon cable provides power and communications from/to HomeVision. Connect it as follows:
•
Connect one end of the ribbon cable to either of the 14-pin headers on HomeVision-Phone/CID. The cable
edge with the red wire faces towards the center of the HomeVision-Phone/CID board.
•
Connect the other end of the ribbon cable to the 14-pin header on HomeVision. You must remove the
HomeVision rear panel to access the header, which is located near the TW-523 jack. The cable edge with
the red wire must face towards the closest edge of the card (nearer the heatsink).
The HomeVision connector can connect multiple devices simultaneously, including:
•
•
•
2 HomeVision-Serial devices
1 HomeVision-Phone/Serial or HomeVision-Phone/CID device
2 Multifunction Expansion Boards
To connect multiple devices, “chain” them together using the two 14-pin headers on each device or on the
Multifunction Expansion Board(s). When doing this, any Multifunction Expansion Board(s) must be connected at
the end opposite HomeVision. In other words, this is OK:
HomeVision
HomeVisionSerial
HomeVisionPhone/ CID
HomeVisionSerial
Multifunction
Expansion
Board
HomeVision
HomeVisionSerial
HomeVisionPhone/ CID
Multifunction
Expansion
Board
HomeVisionSerial
but this is not:
1
Serial Bus Terminator
Included with this board is a very small (less than 1 inch square) device we call the “Serial Bus Terminator”. If you
have a Multifunction Expansion Board connected to HomeVision, you don’t need this device. However, if you don’t
have a Multifunction Expansion Board, you do need this device. It plugs into one of the 14-pin connectors on the
last board in the chain of ribbon cables. The device end with the number “1” goes on the corresponding pin 1 end of
the connector (also noted by the number “1” on the circuit board). If you do not use this device when required, or
use it when you shouldn’t, HomeVision might not communicate with the boards properly.
HomeVision-Phone/CID Enclosure
HomeVision-Phone/CID comes standard in a custom plastic enclosure. This is a two-piece enclosure that snaps
together. Opening or closing the enclosure is a little difficult. To open it, you must pry it apart at the seam on one of
the long edges. A small screwdriver is helpful. It may take a bit of force to completely separate the two pieces, but
the enclosure is tough and can handle it. Joining the two pieces also takes a bit of force and requires bending the
side of the top piece out slightly while sliding it onto the bottom piece.
Phone Connections
Connect a standard two or four wire phone cable from your phone line to the HomeVision-Phone/CID phone jack.
SOFTWARE SETUP
You must configure the HomeVision-Phone/CID device using the HomeVision software, as described below:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Open the Expansion Boards Configuration Screen under the Configure menu
Select the "Other" tab
Check the “HomeVision-Phone/xxx” box to enable it
Select the “Caller ID” option in the "Second function" box
Select “II” in the “Board Version” box.
Select the button to use as the initiator of touchtone sequences (discussed in the “TouchTone Initiator”
section)
Click "Done"
Open the Controller Settings Screen under the Configure menu
Select the "Event Reporting" tab
Check the “Phone Events” box to enable reporting to the PC (this is required for the Phone Control Screen
to work)
At this point, you can load the schedule into HomeVision. However, to actually make use of HomeVisionPhone/CID's capabilities, you want to add other commands to your schedule, as described in the rest of this
document.
USING HOMEVISION-PHONE/CID
Once you’ve connected and configured HomeVision-Phone/CID, you can use it in your schedule.
LED
The unit has an LED which indicates phone status as follows:
•
•
•
On when all phones, and this device, are on-hook.
Off when any phone, or this device, is off-hook.
Blinks off each time the phone rings.
2
Using the Caller ID Functions
For caller ID to actually do something, you must next create a new macro using the macro summary screen (you
may want to name it "Handle Caller ID" or something similar). This macro will be run automatically whenever caller
ID information is received. To display the caller ID information, the macro must contain one of the following two
commands:
Display Caller ID Screen On Solid Background
or
Display Caller ID Screen On External Video
These are the commands that actually start the controller's video system and display the caller ID information. The
first command displays the information on a solid background, while the second command overlays it onto any
incoming video. These commands are described in greater detail in the HomeVision owners manual.
You will probably want to include other commands in this macro. For example, if the controller's video output is
connected to your TV's A/V input 1, you could transmit the infrared signals necessary to switch to that input.
Otherwise, the controller would be sending out the video data, but your TV might not be displaying it. You will
probably also want to have the macro automatically turn the display off after a certain amount of time. For example,
these commands will shut it off after 15 seconds:
Wait 00:00:15.00 with timer #0 (Caller ID Timer), Then:
Stop Video Mode
End Wait
After creating the macro, do the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Open the Caller ID Configuration Screen under the Configure menu
Select the "HomeVision-Phone/CID" option
Select the phone number display format to use
Select the macro you created above
Click "OK"
Load the schedule into the controller
Using the Other Phone Functions
Detecting Events and Performing Actions
To perform actions when a “phone event” occurs (such as when the phone rings or a user presses a phone
key), enter them in the Phone Event under the Objects/Events menu. Use an If-Then statement to check for
the event or condition you’re interested in, then do your actions, like this:
If
EVENT: Phone starts ringing
Then
DO WHATEVER YOU WANT
End If
If
Received phone touchtone sequence is "#123"
Then
DO WHATEVER YOU WANT
End If
3
Touchtone Initiator
One of the main features of the phone device is to allow users to enter commands with the phone. Users do
this by pressing a sequence of keys on the phone. Your schedule can detect the sequence and perform any
actions.
HomeVision-Phone/CID uses a “sequence initiator” tone to begin each sequence. The initiator can be either
the # (pound) key or the * (star) key. The key is user-selectable, and is selected as described in the “Software
Setup” section. Its purpose is to prevent ordinary phone dialing from triggering actions. For example, if you set
up the sequence “123” to turn on a light, you don’t want the light going on if “123” happens to be part a phone
number you’re dialing. By using the initiator key, you can minimize the chances of this happening.
You should choose the initiator key so that it doesn’t interfere with your normal phone usage. For example, if
you have a speed-dialing phone that works by pressing the # key, then entering a number, you don’t want to use
this for your initiator, so select the * key.
How Received Touchtone Sequences Work
Whenever a touchtone is received, HomeVision stores the tone number in an 8-byte buffer. It then runs the
“Phone Event”, performing any actions you’ve specified. You can use an If-Then statement to determine if the
received sequence matches one you’re using, and perform the desired actions. Whenever the “sequence
initiator” tone is received, HomeVision resets the buffer to the beginning and puts the initiator tone in the first
location. Any subsequent tones are added to the end of the buffer, until it reaches it’s 8-byte limit. Thus, your
sequences are limited to 7 tones plus the initiator. If you make a mistake entering tones from the phone, simply
press the initiator key and start over.
Note that you cannot have a sequence that is a “subset” of another sequence. For example, if you use the
sequence “#123”, you can’t have a sequence “#1234”. Whenever the sequence “#123” is received, your
actions will be run and the buffer will be cleared, preventing you from receiving the “#1234” sequence.
Phone Control Screen
There is a Phone Control Screen in the PC software that can:
•
•
•
Take the phone off-hook or put it on-hook
Dial a phone number
Show phone status (hook status, ring count, and received touchtones
PHONE COMMANDS
The following phone commands can be used anywhere in your schedule.
Take Phone Off-Hook
This command takes the phone device off-hook. Some time after taking the phone off-hook, you should put it
back on-hook. Note that picking up another phone in the house and putting it back on-hook does not put the
phone device on-hook. You still need a command in your schedule to put it back on-hook.
To protect against accidentally leaving the phone device off-hook, it will automatically go back on-hook after
approximately 30 seconds of no activity. "Activity" means transmitting or receiving DTMF tones, or performing
the off-hook command. The device will remain off-hook so long a tone is transmitted or received every 30
seconds. If you need to keep the device off-hook longer than 30 seconds without any DTMF tone activity,
simply repeat the off-hook command before 30 seconds elapse.
4
Put Phone On-Hook
This command puts the phone device on-hook.
Dial Phone Number '#####'
This command dials the specified digit(s) by transmitting a short (51ms) tone for each. This can be used to dial
a phone number or as an audible message to the listener. '#####' can be from 1 to 20 digits in length.
Transmit "OK" Tone to Phoneline
This command transmits a sequence of three short beeps onto the phoneline. This is intended as a simple way
for you to send an audible confirmation to a user. For example, if the user enters a tone sequence to trigger an
action, you can transmit the "OK" tone as confirmation that the command was performed.
Transmit "Error" Tone to Phoneline
This command transmits a steady, 3-second long tone onto the phoneline. This is intended as a simple way for
you to send an audible warning to a user. For example, if the user enters a tone sequence to trigger an action,
but for some reason the command cannot be performed, you can transmit the "Error" sequence as an alert.
Start Transmitting DTMF Tone # to Phoneline
This command starts transmitting the specified tone onto the phoneline. The tone can be any of the standard
12 phone keys (the numbers 0 - 9, #, and *). Note that this command starts the tone but does not stop it. After
starting it, you should wait the desired time using a "Delay" or “Wait Timer” command, then perform the "Stop
DTMF Tone Transmission" command. Normally, the delay would be for a few seconds or less. In the event
you do not stop the tone within 5 seconds, it will be automatically shut off to prevent interference with the
phoneline. If you need to transmit for longer than 5 consecutive seconds, repeat the command before 5
seconds elapse.
Stop DTMF Tone Transmission
This command stops any tone transmission currently in process. It is normally only used after a “Start
Transmitting DTMF Tone # to Phoneline” command. You do not need to use this after a “Dial Phone Number
'#####'” command.
Put Received DTMF Tone # Value Into Variable XXX
This command takes the value of a tone received from the phoneline and puts it into the specified variable.
indicates which tone in the received sequence should be used (i.e., the first tone received is number one,
second is number two, and so on). The value placed into the variable depends on the received tone. For
buttons 0 through 9, the variable will be set to the corresponding value. For the "*" button, the value will be
and for the "#" button, the value will be 12.
"#"
the
the
11,
This command allows users to enter numeric commands. For example, assume you want the user to be able
to change the thermostat setpoint through the phone. You can set up a sequence whereby the user transmits 5
keys, like this:
*2275
* is the button that you've selected to start all sequences, and "22" are the keys corresponding to the letters "A"
and "C", which is short for Air Conditioning. Following this are two keys to enter the new setpoint (75 in this
case). The following example checks for the sequence of "*22??" ( where the question marks are wild-card
characters), then puts the last two digits into separate variables (1 and 2). Finally, it combines those two
5
variables into a single variable (3) by multiplying the first digit by 10 and adding the second digit. This gives the
desired temperature.
If
Received phone touchtone sequence is "*22??"
Then
Put received DTMF tone digit 4 variable #1 (first digit)
Put received DTMF tone digit 5 variable #2 (second digit)
Var #3 (Desired temperature) = var #1 (first digit)
Var #3 (Desired temperature) = var #3 (Desired temperature)
Var #3 (Desired temperature) = var #3 (Desired temperature)
var #2 (second digit)
End If
X
+
10
PHONE EVENTS
Several types of “events” are associated with the phone interface. Your schedule can determine when one of these
events occurs and take any action you desire. The events are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The phone goes on-hook
The phone goes off-hook
The phone starts ringing
The phone rings
The phone stops ringing
A touchtone is received from the phoneline
To detect when one of these events occurs and perform actions, use the Phone Event screen under the
Objects/Events menu. This event will run whenever any of the phone events occur, performing the actions you’ve
specified. To determine which event occurred, use an If-Then statement with the event as the condition. For
example, to do something whenever the phone goes off-hook, enter this in the Phone Event:
If
EVENT: Phone goes off-hook
Then
DO WHATEVER YOU WANT
End If
The events you can check for in an If-Then statement are described in detail below. These events can only be used
inside the Phone Event.
EVENT: Phone goes on-hook
This event occurs once, and only once, each time the phone goes on-hook. This event can be used in an IfThen condition, allowing you to perform actions whenever the phone goes on-hook. This If-Then condition can
only be used in the "Phone Event" actions section (if you need to know elsewhere in your schedule whether the
phone is on-hook, use the "Phone is on-hook" condition).
When the phone goes on-hook, the Phone Event will run once, and this condition will be TRUE. After the
Phone Event is finished running, this condition will be false. This ensures that the condition is TRUE only once
for each on-hook event.
EVENT: Phone goes off-hook
This event occurs once, and only once, each time the phone goes off-hook. This event can be used in an IfThen condition, allowing you to perform actions whenever the phone goes off-hook. This If-Then condition can
only be used in the "Phone Event" actions section (if you need to know elsewhere in your schedule whether the
phone is off-hook, use the "Phone is off-hook" condition).
6
When the phone goes off-hook, the Phone Event will run once, and this condition will be TRUE. After the
Phone Event is finished running, this condition will be false. This ensures that the condition is TRUE only once
for each off-hook event.
EVENT: Phone starts ringing
This event occurs once, and only once, when the phone first starts ringing. This event can be used in an IfThen condition, allowing you to perform actions whenever the phone starts ringing (but not on subsequent rings
from the same caller). This If-Then condition can only be used in the "Phone Event" actions section.
When the phone first rings, the Phone Event will run once, and this condition will be TRUE. After the Phone
Event is finished running, this condition will be false. This ensures that the condition is TRUE only once after
the phone starts ringing.
EVENT: Phone rings
This event occurs once each time the phone rings. This event can be used in an If-Then condition, allowing you
to perform actions whenever the phone rings. This If-Then condition can only be used in the "Phone Event"
actions section.
Each time the phone rings, the Phone Event will run once, and this condition will be TRUE. After the Phone
Event is finished running, this condition will be false. This ensures that the condition is TRUE only once for
each ring of the phone.
If you want to perform an action after a certain number of phone rings, put the following in the Phone Events
action section:
If
EVENT: Phone rings
And Phone ring count = 3
Then
DO WHATEVER YOU WANT
End If
EVENT: Phone stops ringing
This event occurs once, and only once, after the phone stops ringing (actually, it occurs 5 to 6 seconds after the
last ring). This event can be used in an If-Then condition, allowing you to perform actions whenever the phone
stops ringing. The event will occur (i.e., the condition will be TRUE) regardless of why the phone stopped
ringing (the phone was answered by someone in the house, the HomeVision phone device answered the
phone, or the caller hung up). This If-Then condition can only be used in the "Phone Event" actions section.
When the phone stops ringing, the Phone Event will run once, and this condition will be TRUE. After the Phone
Event is finished running, this condition will be false. This ensures that the condition is TRUE only once after
the phone stops ringing.
PHONE CONDITIONS
The following phone conditions can be checked in an If-Then statement anywhere in your schedule (they are not
limited to use in the Phone Event, like the phone events are). Note that some of these conditions may look the
same as similarly named phone events, but are different. For example, the condition “Phone is on-hook” will be
TRUE whenever the phone is on-hook. The event “Phone goes on-hook” will be TRUE only when the phone first
goes on-hook. Use the event to perform an action when the phone goes on hook, and use the condition to
determine if the phone is currently on-hook.
7
Phone is on-hook
This condition is true any time the phone is on-hook.
Phone is off-hook
This condition is true any time the phone is off-hook (it will be off-hook if the phone device takes itself off-hook
upon a command in your schedule, or if any phone in the house goes off-hook).
Phone ring count = #
This condition is true while the phone ring count is equal to the specified value (which can be 0 to 15, where 15
is the upper limit the device counts to). Note that the ring count may not always increment by one with each
ring. If the controller happens to be tied up performing a long sequence of commands (such as X-10), the
phone could ring again before the controller can perform your If-Then condition. In this case, the ring count
could, for example, go from 1 to 3 and never be at 2. Therefore, if you check for a ring count of exactly 2, you
could miss it. If you want to answer the phone after a specified number of rings, you should use the "ring count
>= #" condition rather than this condition.
Phone ring count >= #
This condition is true while the phone ring count is greater than or equal to the specified value (which can be 0
to 15, where 15 is the upper limit the device counts to).
Received touchtone count = #
This condition is true while the number of received touchtones is equal to the specified value (which can be 0 to
8). Refer to the condition "Received phone touchtone sequence is XXXXXXXX" for an explanation of how this
count gets reset to zero. Also note that if the user presses the touchtone "initiator" key, that key will be placed
at the start of the buffer and the buffer count will then be one.
Received touchtone count >= #
This condition is true while the number of received touchtones is greater than or equal to the specified value
(which can be 0 to 8).
Received phone touchtone sequence is "XXXXXXXX"
This condition is used to determine when the user has entered a certain touchtone sequence. The sequence
can be from 1 to 8 tones in length. The condition will be TRUE when the specified sequence matches the tones
in the receive buffer. The tones can be any valid telephone key (numbers 0-9, *, and #). You can also you a
question mark (?) as a wild-card character, which will be true no matter what the tone is. You can use the wildcard character to allow users to easily input numeric values (without resorting to using separate "Received
phone touchtone sequence is XXXXXXXX" conditions for each possible entry value). See the description of the
"Put Received DTMF Tone # Value Into Variable XXX" command for an example.
Note that the touchtone “initiator” button, if the user presses it, will always be the first tone in the buffer.
Therefore, your sequence condition should always include the initiator as the first tone. (It is actually possible to
have a sequence that doesn't start with the initiator, but this is not recommended, as there's no way for a user to
correct an invalid entry except for the initiator key.)
Also note that the received tone buffer gets cleared (and the tone count reset to zero) in the following situations:
1) After the condition "Received phone touchtone sequence is XXXXXXXX" is TRUE. Thus, you cannot
have one sequence that is a subset of another (i.e., you can't have both "#12" and "#123").
8
2) After the buffer fills up (i.e., 8 tones are received that don't match one of your "Received phone
touchtone sequence is XXXXXXXX" conditions).
3) The phone goes on-hook.
Caller’s phone number is "###-###-####"
This condition is used to check the phone number of the caller detected by caller ID. The condition can be from
1 to 15 characters in length. The condition will be TRUE when the specified sequence matches the caller’s
phone number. You can also you a question mark (?) as a wild-card character, which will be true no matter
what the character is. If you have HomeVision configured to display the number formatted per the U.S.
standard (###-###-####), you must also include the hyphens (-) in the condition. For example, to check for
the phone number 321-555-1234, do this:
If
Caller’s phone number is “321-555-1234”
Then
DO WHATEVER YOU WANT
End If
To check for any phone number from area code “407”, do this:
If
Caller’s phone number is “407”
Then
DO WHATEVER YOU WANT
End If
This condition would normally be used inside your caller ID macro (the macro you’ve selected to run each time
caller ID is detected).
Caller’s phone number is "Out of area"
This condition is used to check the phone number of the caller detected by caller ID. This condition is TRUE if
the caller ID indicated the number was “out of area” or “unknown”. This condition would normally be used inside
your caller ID macro (the macro you’ve selected to run each time caller ID is detected).
Caller’s phone number is "Private"
This condition is used to check the phone number of the caller detected by caller ID. This condition is TRUE if
the caller ID indicated the number was “private” or “blocked”. This condition would normally be used inside your
caller ID macro (the macro you’ve selected to run each time caller ID is detected).
PHONE DEVICE USAGE EXAMPLES
This section provides examples for several phone applications.
Answering the Phone
If you want to control HomeVision while away from home, you must dial in to your home and have something
answer the phone (presumably, either HomeVision or an answering machine). To have HomeVision automatically
answer the phone, put the following code in the phone event:
If
EVENT: Phone rings
And Phone ring count >=3
And Flag #1 (Auto-answer phone) is set
Then
Take phone off hook
Delay for 2.000 seconds
9
Dial phone number '111111'
Set flag #2 (HomeVision answered this call)
End If
If
EVENT: Phone goes on-hook
Then
Clear flag #2 (HomeVision answered this call)
End If
The flag “Auto-answer phone” determines whether HomeVision should answer the phone (it will answer if SET, and
not if CLEAR). This makes it easy for you to enable or disable phone answering. This example answers after three
rings. It then delays 2 seconds to allow the connection to be made, then transmits 6 digits (or beeps) to alert the
caller that HomeVision has answered the phone. The flag “HomeVision answered this call” is then SET in case
other parts of the schedule need to know this. Finally, the second event detects when the user hangs up (i.e., the
phone goes on-hook), and clears the “HomeVision answered this call” flag.
Note that answering a call can be affected by an answering machine. Be sure you understand how any such device
works to ensure compatibility.
Picking Up the Phone Only Upon Command
The previous example shows how to have HomeVision automatically answer the phone. However, if you have an
answering machine, you may not want to do this. Here’s an alternate approach that allows your answering machine
to answer and allows you to command HomeVision to pick up the phone:
If
Received phone touchtone sequence is "#9999"
Then
Take phone off hook
Delay for 0.500 seconds
Dial phone number '111111'
End If
This works well with answering machines that will hang up when another extension picks up. You dial in and the
answering machine answers normally. You then press “#9999” to tell HomeVision to pick up the phone. This
causes the answering machine to hang up, allowing you to communicate with HomeVision without interference from
the answering machine.
Dialing a Phone Number
To have HomeVision dial a number, you must take the phone off-hook, wait a short time for a dial tone, and then
dial the number. Here's an example:
Take phone off hook
Delay for 2.000 seconds
Dial phone number '5551234'
Performing Actions Based on Touchtone Inputs
One of the main features of the phone device is to allow users to enter commands with the phone. You will set this
up by entering If-Then statements in the Phone Event, where each statement checks for a specific sequence. We
recommend you place all these If-Then statements inside another If-Then statement, as shown in the example
below. This makes it very easy to enable or disable phone control by setting or clearing a single flag.
If
Flag #1 (Allow phone commands) is set
Then
If
Received phone touchtone sequence is "#123"
10
Then
DO WHATEVER YOU WANT
End If
If
Received phone touchtone sequence is "#99"
Then
DO WHATEVER YOU WANT
End If
If
Received phone touchtone sequence is "#66666**"
Then
DO WHATEVER YOU WANT
End If
End If
11
FCC Rules Part 15 - Digital Devices
The United States Federal Communications Commission has specified that the following notice be brought to the
attention of users of this product.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15
of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However,
there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause
harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on,
the user is encouraged to try and correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
•
•
•
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
The user may find the following booklet, prepared by the Federal Communications Commission, helpful: How to
Identify and Resolve Radio/TV Interference Problems. This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, Stock No. 004-000-00345-4.
Any changes or modifications to this equipment not expressly approved by Custom Solutions, Inc. may cause
harmful interference and void the FCC authorization to operate this equipment.
12
FCC Rules Part 68 - Phone Interface Devices
This equipment complies with FCC rules, Part 68. On the top side of this equipment enclosure is a label that
contains, among other information, the FCC Registration Number and Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) for this
equipment. If requested, provide this information to your telephone company.
The (REN) is useful to determine the quantity of devices you may connect to your telephone line and still have all of
those devices ring when your number is called. In most, but not all areas, the sum of the REN`s of all devices
should not exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number of devices you may connect to your line, as determined by
the REN, you should call your local telephone company to determine the maximum REN for your calling area.
If this equipment causes harm to the telephone network, the Telephone Company may discontinue your service
temporarily. If possible, they will notify you in advance. But if advance notice isn't practical, you will be notified as
soon as possible. You will be advised of your right to file a complaint with the FCC.
Your telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures that could affect
the proper operation of your equipment. If they do, you will be given advance notice so as to give you an
opportunity to maintain uninterrupted service.
If you experience trouble with this equipment, please contact the manufacturer for warranty/repair information. The
telephone company may ask that you disconnect this equipment from the network until the problem has been
corrected or until you are sure that the equipment is not malfunctioning.
This equipment may not be used on coin service provided by the telephone company. Connection to party lines is
subject to state tariffs.
FCC rules prohibit the use of non-hearing aid compatible telephones in the following locations or applications:
(1) All public or semipublic coin-operated or credit card telephones.
(2) Elevators, highways, tunnels (automobile, subway, railroad or pedestrian) where a person with impaired
hearing might be isolated in an emergency.
(3) Places where telephones are specifically installed to alert emergency authorities such as fire, police, or
medical assistance personnel.
(4) Hospital rooms, residential health care facilities, convalescent homes, and prisons.
(5) Workstations for the hearing impaired.
(6) Hotel, motel, apartment lobbies; in stores where telephones are used by patrons to order merchandise; in
public transportation terminals where telephones are used to call taxis, or to reserve lodging or rental cars.
(7) Hotel and motel rooms. At least ten percent of the rooms must contain hearing aid compatible telephones;
or jacks or plug-in hearing-aid compatible telephones which will be provided to hearing impaired customers
upon request.
13
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement