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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts:
Kindergarten
A Colorful Time with Rhythm and Rhyme
Unit 1 - Number of Weeks: 6 – Sep.-mid Oct.
Essential Question: How does rhyme affect the way that we hear and read poetry?
Terminology: artist, author, description, illustration, illustrator, informational book, line, opinion, poem, poet, poetry, rhyme, rhythm,
stanza, story book, verse
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RI.K.4: With prompting
and support, ask and
answer questions about
unknown words in a text.
LITERARY TEXTS
Picture Books (Read Aloud)
Red, Green, Blue: A First Book of Colors
(Alison Jay)
Colors! Colores! (Jorge Lujan and Piet
Grobler)
Brown Bear, Brown Bear (Bill Martin Jr. and
Eric Carle)
If Kisses Were Colors (Janet Lawler and
Alison Jay)
My Many Colored Days (Dr. Seuss) (EA)
Mary Wore Her Red Dress (Merle Peek)
The Red Book (Barbara Lehman)
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom (Bill Martin Jr.,
John Archambault, and Lois Ehlert)
Rap a Tap Tap, Here’s Bojangles: Think of
That! (Leo and Diane Dillon)
RL.K.5: Recognize
common types of texts
(e.g., storybooks, poems)
.
RF.K.2: Demonstrate
understanding of spoken
words, syllables, and
phonemes.
RF.K.2(a): Recognize
and produce rhyming
words.
DIBELS
DRAS
POETRY/PRINT CONCEPTS
As students read a rhyme, ask them to focus on
listening for rhyming words and hearing the
rhythm of the lines. By using musical recordings
of the nursery rhymes, students can move to the
rhythm of the rhymes in song and recite the
words with ease. (RF.K.1, RF.K.3c)
POETRY/PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS
While reading (reciting) ‘‘Humpty Dumpty,’’ snap
your fingers on the word at the end of a line (e.g.,
wall’’). The children will snap when they hear the
word that rhymes with it (e.g., ‘‘fall’’).
(RF.K.2a)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
W.K.1: Use a
combination of drawing,
dictating, and writing to
compose opinion pieces
in which they tell a reader
the topic or the name of
the book they are writing
about and state an
opinion or preference
about the topic or
book
And the Dish Ran Away with the Spoon
(Janet Stevens and Susan Stevens
Crummel)
The Real Mother Goose (Blanche Fisher
Wright)
Red Is for Dragon: A Book of Colors
(Roseanne Thong and Grace Lin)
Clang! Clang! Beep! Beep! Listen to the City
(Robert Burleigh and Beppe Giacobbe)
A Colorful Time with Rhythm and Rhyme 5
Itsy Bitsy Spider (Iza Trapani)
Grandmother’s Nursery Rhymes: Las Nanas
de Abuelita (Nelly Palacio Jaramillo)
Poems (Read Aloud)
‘‘Halfway Down’’ (A. A. Milne) (E)
‘‘Singing Time’’ (Rose Fyleman) (E)
‘‘Mary Had a Little Lamb’’ (Sarah Josepha
Hale)
‘‘Time to Rise’’ (Robert Louis Stevenson)
‘‘Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star’’ (Ann and Jane
Taylor)
Nursery Rhymes (Read Along)
‘‘Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling’’
‘‘Early to Bed’’
‘‘Georgie Porgie’’
‘‘Hey Diddle Diddle’’
‘‘Humpty Dumpty’’
‘‘Jack and Jill’’
‘‘Jack Be Nimble’’
‘‘Little Bo Peep’’
‘‘Little Boy Blue’’
‘‘Little Jack Horner’’
‘‘Little Miss Muffet’’
POETRY/PRINT CONCEPTS
As students read a nursery rhyme (or poem) from
a chart or interactive whiteboard in the front of
the class, choose a student to come up and
follow the words from left to right with a
pointer.(RF.K.1a, RL.K.4, RL.K.5)
SL.K.1: Participate in
collaborative
conversations with
diverse partners about
kindergarten topics and
texts with peers and
adults in small and larger
groups.
SL.K.1(a): Follow
agreed-upon rules for
discussions (e.g.,
listening to others and
taking turns talking about
the topics and texts
under discussion).
L.K.5: With guidance and
support from adults,
explore word
relationships and
nuances in word
meanings.
INFORMATIONAL TEXT/LITERARY TEXT
As the class reads an informational or literary
book, introduce the idea of author and illustrator.
Describe their roles in the creation of a text. Do a
‘‘text walk”. As you read an informational text
such as All the Colors of the Rainbow, pause to
ask the children questions. Encourage them to
ask questions about the text and unfamiliar
words. (RI.K.4, RI.K.5, RI.K.6, RL.K.4)
CLASS DISCUSSION/POETRY
Arrange small groups of students and place an
object (e.g., a block) in the middle of each circle.
Instruct the students to discuss which poem in
this unit is their favorite. Students pick up the
block when ready to share. Ask them to put the
block back in the middle when finished. When
working with a group, ask the student who has
the floor to think of/share a word that rhymes with
the last word of a sentence in the chosen poem.
(SL.K.1, SL.K.1a)
ART/WRITING
Show students the Whistler and the Rivera. Ask
them to discuss how Whistler used a mostly
black and white palette, while Rivera used a wide
range of colors. Then ask them to choose to
draw their favorite of the two works, either in
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
L.K.5(a): Sort common
objects into categories
(e.g., shapes, foods) to
gain a sense of the
concepts the categories
represent.
‘‘Old Mother Hubbard’’
‘‘Pat-a-Cake’’
‘‘Ring Around the Rosey’’
‘‘Rock-a-bye, Baby’’
‘‘Roses Are Red’’
‘‘Simple Simon’’
‘‘Star Light, Star Bright’’
black and white or using a wide range of colors.
(W.K.2, SL.K.5)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books
My Five Senses (Aliki) (E)
Informational Books (Read Aloud)
All the Colors of the Rainbow (Rookie ReadAbout Science Series) (Allan Fowler)
The Magic School Bus Makes a Rainbow: A
Book About Color (Joanna Cole, Carolyn
Braken and Bruce Degan)
Colors and Shapes: Los colores y las figuras
(Gladys Rosa-Mendoza, Carolina Cifuentes,
and Michele Noiset)
I Spy Colors in Art (Lucy Micklethwait)
Colors (Learning with Animals) (Melanie
Watt)
Matisse: The King of Color (Laurence
Anholt)
A World of Colors: Seeing Colors in a New
Way (Marie Houblon)
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
Henri Matisse, The Dessert: Harmony in
Red (1908)
James Abbott McNeill Whistler,
Arrangement in Black and Gray: The Artist’s
Mother (1871)
LANGUAGE/VOCABULARY
Prepare a basket of colored objects. Invite
students to come to the basket and choose
something to tell the class about. This is the rule:
Each student must describe the object using at
least two ‘‘describing words’’ (i.e., adjectives).
Example: a bright red apple, a small green block.
Extend this activity by introducing opposites of
one of the adjectives. ‘‘You showed me a small
block. Now find a large block.’’ You could have
another vocabulary activity with the same
collection by sorting the same objects into color
categories such as ‘‘red’’ and ‘‘green’’ or by
asking the students to think of rhyming words
that describe. (L.K.5a)
ART/CLASS DISCUSSION/VOCABULARY
CONNECTION
Display the works by Matisse and Picasso. Ask
the students what color dominates each work.
Ask the students why they think Picasso chose
blue and Matisse chose red. Ask how the
paintings are the same (e.g., both figures are
preparing food and neither is looking at us) and
how they are different (e.g., we can see outside
in the Matisse, whereas Picasso’s is a close-up),
preparing the way for literature conversations in
comparing and contrasting texts. (SL.K.1,
SL.K.5)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Diego Rivera, Flower Day (1925)
Pieter Bruegel, The Hunters in the Snow
(1565) Helen Frankenthaler, Mountains and
Sea (1952)
Paul Gauguin, The Midday Nap (1894)
Pablo Picasso, Le Gourmet (1901)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts:
Kindergarten
Tell A Story, 1-2-3
Unit 2 - Number of Weeks: 6 – mid Oct.-Nov.
Essential Question: Why do we include a beginning, middle, and end when we tell stories?
Terminology: author, beginning, characters, end, illustration, illustrator, middle, number words, ordinal numbers, poem, retelling,
sequence, storybook, versions
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other
works identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.K.2: With prompting
and • support, retell
familiar stories, including
key details.
LITERARY TEXTS
Counting Books (Read Aloud)
Ten, Nine, Eight (Molly Bang) (EA)
Chicka Chicka 1, 2, 3 (Bill Martin, Jr.,
Michael Sampson, and Lois Ehlert)
Ten Apples Up on Top (Dr. Seuss
and Roy McKie) (EA)
One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab: A
Counting by Feet Book (April Pulley
Sayre, Jeff Sayre, and Randy Cecil)
Anno's Counting Book (Mitsumasa
Anno)
Traditional Stories & Variations
(Read Aloud)
Goldilocks and the Three Bears (Jan
Brett)
RL.K.9: With prompting
and support, compare
and contrast the
adventures and
experiences of
characters in familiar
stories.
RI.K.1: With prompting
and support, ask and
answer questions about
key details in a text.
DRA
DIBELS
CLASS DISCUSSION / LITERATURE
Arrange small groups of students and place an object
(e.g., a block) in the middle of the circle. As a class, tell
the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, having
students take turns telling the events in the story.
Students pick up the block when ready to fill in part of
the story and put the block back in the middle when
finished. Storytelling is shared with all the members of
the group. (RL.K.2,SL.K.1a, SL.K.1b)
LITERATURE / WRITING
Using a piece of paper folded into three sections, retell
(using a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing)
the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears showing the
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
5
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
SL.K.1: Participate in
collaborative
conversations with
diverse partners about
kindergarten topics and
texts with peers and
adults in small and larger
groups.
Horrible Harry Bugs the Three Bears
(Suzy Kline and Frank Remkiewicz)
The Three Billy Goats Gruff (Paul
Galdone)
The Three Cabritos (Eric A. Kimmel
and Stephen Gilpin)
Three Cool Kids (Rebecca Emberley)
The Three Little Pigs (James
Marshall)
The Three Pigs (David Wiesner)
The True Story of the Three Little
Pigs (Jon Sciezka and Lane Smith)
The Three Little Wolves and the Big
Bad Pig (Eugene Trivizas and Helen
Oxenbury)
The Three Little Javelinas/ Los Tres
Pequenos Jabalies: Bilingual (Susan
Lowell)
Stories (Read Along)
Pancakes for Breakfast (Tomie
DePaola) (E)
Ten Black Dots (Donald Crews) (EA)
The Very Hungry Caterpillar (Eric
Carle)
Poems (Read Aloud)
"Three Little Kittens" in The Oxford
Illustrated Book of American
Children’s Poems (Eliza Lee Follen)
“Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin” (Lloyd Moss
and Marjorie Priceman) (E)
“Mix a Pancake” in The Complete
Poems (Christina Rossetti) (E)
Nursery Rhymes / Songs (Read Along)
"Three Blind Mice"
beginning, middle, and end of the story. Encourage
students to include all the characters in the illustration
and to add as many details as they can remember.
(RL.K.1, RL.K.2, L.K.1a, L.K.1b, L.K.1c, L.K.2a, W.K.3,
W.K.5)
SL.K.1 (b): Continue a
conversation through
multiple exchanges.
W.K.3: Use a
combination of drawing,
dictating, and writing to
narrate a single event or
several loosely linked
events, tell about the
events in the order in
which they occurred, and
provide a reaction to
what happened.
L.K.2: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of standard
English capitalization
punctuation, and spelling
when writing.
L.K.2 (a): Capitalize the
first word in a sentence
and the pronoun "I."
LITERATURE
Using the book of illustrations Pancakes for Breakfast
(Tomie DePaola), have students look at the illustrations
and note how the pictures tell a story. Point out the
importance of looking very closely at the details in the
illustrations to tell what happened next. Encourage
active thinking by asking what might happen when the
page is turned to the next illustration. Because this is a
wordless book, it is interesting to point out how the
illustrator is telling a story without words. Even picture
books with words tell a story through the illustrations.
Write the students’ dictated story on sentence strips and
place in a pocket chart. (Extend this activity by reversing
this process: Read aloud the text of a simple book
without showing the illustrations. Ask students to
illustrate the story, creating their own wordless book.
The students’ illustrations can then be compared to the
book.) (RL.K.6, RL.K.5, RL.K.7)
ART / LITERATURE CONNECTION
To introduce “versions” of a story to your class, use
Millet’s First Steps as the original idea. Allow the class to
study the painting, giving plenty of time to notice details
and create a possible story surrounding the painting.
Then pull out Van Gogh’s First Steps, after Millet and
have the class note how the “original characters are still
in the story” but also that it all looks different. (Millet:
People are prominent. Van Gogh: People are no longer
the focus; everything appears equal in weight—the gate,
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
"One, Two, Buckle My Shoe"
"A Diller, A Dollar"
"Hot Cross Buns"
"Hickory, Dickory, Dock"
"Old King Cole"
"Baa, Baa, Black Sheep"
"This Little Pig Went to Market"
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Can You Count Ten Toes?: Count to
10 in 10 Different Languages (Lezlie
Evans and Denis Roche)
One Is a Drummer: A Book of
Numbers (Roseanne Thong and
Grace Lin)
Arlene Alda’s 1 2 3: What Do You
See? (Arlene Alda)
Moja Means One: Swahili Counting
Book (Muriel and Tom Feelings)
The Year at Maple Hill Farm (Alice
and Marin Provensen) (E)
Our Animal Friends at Maple Hill
Farm (Alice and Martin Provensen)
(EA)
Farm Animals (Young Nature Series)
(Felicity Everett)
Pigs (Gail Gibbons) (EA)
Beatrice’s Goat (Page McBrier and
Lori Lohstoeter)
Pigs (Animals That Live on the Farm)
(JoAnn Early Macken)
Goats (Animals That Live on the
Farm) (JoAnn Early Macken)
Sample Activities and Assessment
the wheelbarrow, the tree in the background. The baby
doesn’t even have a face anymore.) Picasso’s First
Steps will amaze the class with the same idea but in a
completely different setting, choice of color, and style.
(RL.K.9)
ART / WRITING CONNECTION
After looking closely at three art pieces with the same
name, “First Steps,” choose one of the paintings and
imagine it shows the end of a story. Pair students to
make up the beginning and middle of the story to share
with the class. Prompt: Choose one of the paintings and
write (or dictate) a sentence telling why you chose that
painting as your favorite. Be sure to begin your sentence
with a capital letter and put a period at the end. (W.K.1,
W.K.3)
LITERATURE
Read the traditional version of a story first. Then read a
different version of the story. For example, read the
Galdone version of “The Three Billy Goats Gruff” and
discuss the beginning, middle, and end of the story.
Then read one of the other versions discussing how the
beginning, middle, and end are similar, but the setting
and characters make it a different story. (RL.K.9)
READING FOUNDATIONS / WRITING
Create a counting book using the letters covered so far
this year. Each student will choose a favorite letter and
then brainstorm words that begin with that letter. Using
the numbers 1-5 and five different things that begin with
the chosen letter, create a book (e.g., A Counting Book
for T: 1 Tadpole, 2 Turkeys, 3 Toads, 4 Tigers, 5 Trout).
Title each student’s book “A Counting Book for
_______.” Be sure to write the name of the author and
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
7
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
ART
Jean-Francois Millet, First Steps
(1858-59)
Vincent van Gogh, First Steps, after
Millet (1890)
Pablo Picasso, Mother and Child
(First Steps) (1943)
Sample Activities and Assessment
illustrator (student) on the cover of the book. Place the
finished books in a basket for other students to enjoy.
(RF.K.1a, RF.K.1b, RF.K.1c, RF.K.1d, RF.K.3a)
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Today you will have to think, ask questions, and answer
questions while we read an informational counting book
titled One Is a Drummer: A Book of Numbers (Roseanne
Thong and Grace Lin). (RI.K.1, RI.K.6)
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Because pigs and goats are talking characters who have
personalities in these stories, students will enjoy reading
about real pigs and goats. Beginning with books and
digital resources on pigs or goats, keep a chart of animal
needs that are met on the farm. (RI.K.1, RI.K.6)
POETRY / ILLUSTRATING
“Mix a Pancake” is a poem written by Christina Rossetti.
Have students draw illustrations that match the words to
show the steps in making pancakes. When finished, they
can share the illustrations with a friend and read the
poem together.
(RL.K.5, RL.K.7, W.K.2)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts:
Kindergarten
Exploring with Friends in the Neighborhood
Unit 3 - Number of Weeks: 6 – Dec.-Jan.
Essential Question: How do question stems (who, what, where, when, why, and how) help us to find more information in books?
Terminology: character, compare, contrast, exclamation mark, fantasy, fiction, imaginary, key events, non-fiction, question mark,
questioning, real, setting, what, where, when, why, how
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.K.3: With prompting
and support, identify
characters, settings, and
major events in a story.
LITERARY TEXTS
Chapter Book (Read Aloud)
The Complete Tales of Winnie-thePooh (A.A. Milne) (EA)
Picture Books (Read Aloud)
Frog and Toad Together (Arnold Lobel)
(E)
Little Bear (series) Else Holmelund
Minarik and Maurice Sendak) (E)
The Story About Ping (Marjorie Flack
and Kurt Wiese)
Blueberries for Sal (Robert McCloskey)
Make Way for Ducklings (Robert
McCloskey)
Curious George (series) (H.A. and
Margaret Rey)
RL.K.4: Ask and answer
questions about unknown
words in a text.
RL.K.9: With prompting
and support, compare
and contrast the
adventures and
experiences of
characters in familiar
stories.
DIBELS
DRA
GRADE
CLASS DISCUSSION / INFORMATIONAL TEXT
While reading informational books about community
helpers, create a chart with the following headings:
who, what, where, when, and why. Encourage children
to listen for answers to those questions as you read
the book aloud. Remind the students to pay close
attention to the illustrations for details. To ensure each
child’s participation, give them Post-Its or white boards
on which to write or draw their ideas. Begin by talking
about the author, illustrator, front, back, and title page
of the book. Fill in the chart each time you read a new
book about community helpers. Use this chart as
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
9
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
RI.K.2: With prompting
and support, identify the
main topic and retell key
details of a text.
Officer Buckle and Gloria (Peggy
Rathmann)
Where the Wild Things Are (Maurice
Sendak)
Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale (Mo
Willems)
Owl Moon (Jane Yolen and John
Schoenherr)
Little Fur Family (Margaret Wise Brown
and Garth Williams)
Harold and the Purple Crayon
(Crockett Johnson)
The Snowy Day (Ezra Jack Keets)
The Jolly Postman (Allan and Janet
Ahlberg)
Stories (Read Along –Wordless Books)
A Dog, a Boy, and a Frog (Mercer
Mayer)
Trainstop (Barbara Lehman)
Poems (Read Aloud)
• "Us Two” in The Complete Tales &
Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh (A. A.
Milne) (EA)
• “The Swing” in A Child’s Garden of
Verses (Robert Louis Stevenson)
Songs (Read Along)
• "Do You Know the Muffin Man?”
• “The People in Your Neighborhood?”
(Jeff Moss)
• “What Shall We Do When We All Go
Out?”
inspiration to change the lyrics for “Do You Know the
Muffin Man?” for community helpers in your
neighborhood (e.g., “Do you know the fireman…That
works on 12th and Main!”) (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, RI.K.5,
RI.K.7, L.K.1d, SL.K.1, SL.K.3, SL.K.4)
W.K.2: Use a
combination of drawing,
dictating, and writing to
compose
informative/explanatory
texts in which they name
what they are writing
about and supply some
information about the
topic.
L.K.1: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of standard
English grammar and
usage when writing
orspeaking.
L.K.1(d): Understand
and use question words
(interrogatives) (e.g.,
who, what, where, when,
why, how).
MUSIC CONNECTION / LITERATURE
As a musical illustration of “comparing” and
“contrasting,” use the work of Henry Mancini (Baby
Elephant Walk) and Saint-Saens (Carnival of the
Animals, “The Elephant”) to compare and contrast two
musical compositions that are inspired by elephants.
Introduce the activity by telling the students that they
are going to hear two different musical pieces that are
based on elephants. As they listen to Baby Elephant
Walk and “The Elephant,” ask them to decide which
piece reminds them more of an elephant. Extend this
activity by having the students move to the music as
they listen, deciding whether the music makes them
want to dance or “lumber” like an elephant might walk.
(L.K.5d, RL.K.9)
LITERATURE
After reading the first story in the Little Bear collection
of stories, use a chart to organize ideas about each
story. Create headings for “character,” “setting,” and
“events.” Assign students one of the three categories
to think about each time you read, encouraging them
to write or draw ideas on Post-Its. Fill in the chart each
time you read a new Little Bear story. (Extension:
Create a similar chart to compare other fictional
explorations and adventures by characters such as
Frog and Toad, Curious George, and more.) (RL.K.3,
RL.K.9)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
10
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
• Fire! Fire! (Gail Gibbons) (E)
• The Post Office Book: Mail and How it
Moves (Gail Gibbons) (EA)
• Check It Out: The Book about Libraries
(Gail Gibbons) (EA)
• Community Helpers from A-Z (Bobbie
Kalman and Niki Walker)
• Whose Hat is This? (Katz Cooper,
Sharon Muehlenhardt, and Amy
Bailey)
• Whose Tools Are These? (Katz
Cooper, Sharon Muehlenhardt, and
Amy Bailey)
• Jobs Around My Neighborhood /
Oficios en me vecindario (Gladys
Rosa-Mendoza and Ann Iosa)
• A Day in the Life of a Police Officer
(First Facts: Community Helpers at
Work) (Heather Adamson)
• A Day in the Life of a Doctor (First
Facts: Community Helpers at Work)
(Heather Adamson)
• A Day in the Life of a Teacher (First
Facts: Community Helpers at Work)
(Heather Adamson)
• A Day in the Life of a Firefighter (First
Facts: Community Helpers at Work)
(Heather Adamson)
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
Sample Activities and Assessment
LITERATURE
Read Winnie-the-Pooh aloud to elicit multiple levels of
student understanding. To be sure that students are
following the story and understanding the words,
encourage students to monitor their own
comprehension. Tell the children that if they lose their
way, or a word is confusing them, they should put a
hand on their own shoulder. If you see a student do so,
stop reading at a good stopping place, reread the
confusing section, and allow other students to
participate in clearing up the confusion. (RL.K.4)
WRITING / LANGUAGE
Give students the following prompt: Draw a picture
showing an important person in your neighborhood
doing her/his job. Write (or dictate) a sentence about
that person’s job (e.g., a trash collector picks up stinky
garbage all over our city and takes it to the dump).
(W.K.2, L.K.1a, L.K.2a, L.K.2b, L.K.2c, L.K.5c)
LANGUAGE
Tell the students that they are going to practice giving
and following directions. Create directions that focus
on using prepositions such as to/from, on/off, and
in/out. Pull a child’s name out of a basket and then
give them a command. For example, “Tian, walk from
your desk to the teacher’s desk.” “Jaxton, put your
hand in the basket and then take it out.” Extend this
activity by placing the prepositions on cards and
having the students make up directions using the
words. You could also play the game of “Simon Says”
as you give the commands. As students develop
confidence, increase the commands by two or three
additional steps. (L.K.1e)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Music
• Henry Mancini, Baby Elephant Walk
(1961)
• Camille Saint-Saens, Carnival of the
Animals, Fifth Movement “The
Elephant” (1886)
Art
Romare Bearden, The Block (1972)
Pieter Brueghel, Netherlandish
Proverbs (1559)
Sample Activities and Assessment
LITERATURE / POETRY
Read a poem such as “The Swing.” Assign the
students the task of drawing an illustration for each
stanza of the poem. Do the same activity with other
poems, such as “Us Two.” Using key words such as
“who,” “what,” “where,” “why,” “when,” and “how,”
compare and contrast the two poems. (RL.K.9,L.K.1d)
CLASS DISCUSSION / INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Using two books that describe different jobs but are in
the same series of informational books (such as the
“Community Helpers at Work” series), create a graphic
organizer to compare and contrast the days of various
community helpers. Discuss the ways the jobs are
similar and different. Require each student to dictate,
draw, write, or act out something one of the community
helper does (e.g., a postman weighs packages). Ask if
the other community helper does something similar
(e.g., a nurse weighs patients). (RI.K.2, RI.K.9)
ART/CLASS DISCUSSION/ART MAKING
View the Bearden collage or the Brueghel painting. Try
to get the students to look closely at the work for as
long as possible. The following questions will help
guide a 15-minute discussion: What do you notice in
this collage? Where do you think this might be? What
do you see that makes it look like this place? Do you
notice people? What do you think they might be doing?
WRITING/ART CONNECTION
Students will be assigned a panel from The Block or a
section from Netherlandish Proverbs to work with.
They will be asked to identify a group of people to
study. Students will write one sentence describing
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
what the people seem to be doing, or who they think
they might be. Sentences will be shared in large group.
CLASS DISCUSSION/ART CONNECTION
Display the Bearden and Brueghel side-by-side. Note
that these works were created more than 400 years
apart. Ask the students to find similarities and
differences between the two works. This can be
documented on a chart for future discussion. (SL.K.1,
SL.K.2, SL.K.4, SL.K.5, SL.K.6)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts:
Kindergarten
America: Symbols and Celebrations
Unit 4 - Number of Weeks: 6 – Feb.-mid March
Essential Question: How will asking questions help us to learn more about celebrations and holidays?
Terminology: adding information, cause, composer, effect, gathering information, informational text, KWL chart, questioning
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RI.K.1: With prompting
and support, ask and
answer questions about
key details in a text.
LITERARY TEXTS
Picture Books (Read Aloud)
Duck for President (Doreen Cronin and
Betsy Lewin)
Clifford Goes to Washington (Norman
Bridwell)
This Land is Your Land (Woody Guthrie and
Kathy Jakobsen)
My Country, ‘Tis of Thee (Samuel Francis
Smith)
America the Beautiful (Katharine Bates,
Wendell Minor)
Pledge of Allegiance (Scholastic, Inc.)
I Pledge Allegiance (Bill Martin, Jr., Michael
Sampson, and Chris Raschka)
(Tailor to represent the cultures in your
classroom)
Apple Pie and the Fourth of July (Janet S.
W.K.7: Participate in
shared research and
writing projects (e.g.,
explore a number of
books by a favorite
author and express
opinions about them).
L.K.1: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of Standard
English grammar and
usage when writing or
DIBELS
DRAS
CLASS DISCUSSION/VOCABULARY
To introduce the concept of a symbol, choose a
symbol well known to the students in your class
(e.g., professional sports team logo or school
mascot). Discuss why a symbol is important for
unifying fans behind a team or school. Go on to
discuss the meaning behind the symbol as a
source of inspiration. (RI.K.4, SL.K.2, SL.K.3,
SL.K.4, L.K.4, L.K.6)
WRITING
Use a theme-related short sentence to begin
your unit, such as “The flag waves.” Challenge
the class to think of details to add to the sentence
to make it more interesting (e.g., “The red, white,
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
speaking.
Wong and Margaret Chodos-Irvine)
Family Pictures (Carmen Lomez Garza) (E)
Poems (Read Aloud)
“Celebration” in Song and Dance (Alonzo
Lopez) (E)
Selections from I Am America (Charles R.
Smith)
“Thanksgiving Day” in Flowers for Children,
Vol. 2 (Lydia Maria Child)
Songs (Read Along)
"America the Beautiful” (Katharine Lee Bates
and Samuel A. Ward)
“America (My Country, Tis of Thee)”
(Samuel Francis Smith)
“Yankee Doodle” (Traditional)
and blue flag waves”; “The red, white, and blue
American flag waves in the strong winds of
March”). (W.K.5, L.K.1f, L.K.1c, L.K.1b)
L.K.1(f): Produce and
expand complete
sentences in shared
language activities.
L.K.2: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of Standard
English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling
when writing.
L.K.2(d): Spell simple
words phonetically,
drawing on knowledge of
sound-letter
relationships.
SL.K.4: Describe familiar
people, places, things,
and events and, with
prompting and support,
provide additional detail.
“You‟re a Grand Old Flag” (George M.
Cohan)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Our Country (Emergent Reader) (Susan
Canizares and S. Berger)
The American Flag (Welcome Books) (Lloyd
G. Douglas)
The White House (Welcome Books) (Lloyd
G. Douglas)
The Statue of Liberty (Welcome Books)
(Lloyd G. Douglas)
The Bald Eagle (Welcome Books) (Lloyd G.
Douglas)
The Liberty Bell (Welcome Books) (Lloyd G.
Douglas)
Giving Thanks: The 1621 Harvest Feast
(Kate Waters and Russ Kendall)
READING/INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Create a KWL chart for American symbols and
holidays to set the stage for asking questions,
answering questions, and gathering information
under main topics. Teachers may need to model
the questioning until the students begin to
generate questions on their own. As the class
reads an informational book (e.g., The Liberty
Bell, Lloyd G. Douglas), look for information
about the main topic. Remind the students of the
importance of also studying the illustrations for
information. Add the information to the KWL
chart. Look for connections between ideas as
you add information to the charts. Use Post-Its or
white boards for students to fully participate in
adding information to the charts. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2,
RI.K.3, RI.K.7, RI.K.8)
WRITING/INFORMATIVE
Choose one of the symbols or holidays on your
KWL chart and write a complete sentence or two
about it. Be sure to use the information on your
chart as you write. Illustrate your ideas before
you write or after you are finished. (W.K.2,
W.K.8, SL.K.5, L.K.1a, L.K.2d)
CLASS DISCUSSION/ READING/LITERATURE
Introduce a book showing a diverse viewpoint of
an American holiday such as Apple Pie and the
Fourth of July (Janet Wong). As you read the
book, ask the students to look for ways that the
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Independence Day (Rookie Read-About
Holiday Series) (David F. Marx)
Martin Luther King Jr. Day (Rookie ReadAbout Holiday Series) (Trudi Strain Trueit)
Veterans Day (Rookie Read-About Holiday
Series) (Jacqueline S. Cotton)
John Philip Sousa: Getting to Know the
World’s Greatest Composers (Mike Venezia)
Example of a series of more books on
holidays celebrated locally by students in
your classroom:
El Dia De Los Muertos: The Day of the Dead
(Rookie Read-About Holiday Series) (Mary
Dodson Wade)
Cinco de Mayo (Rookie Read-About Holiday
Series) (Mary Dodson Wade and Nanci R.
Vargus)
Chinese New Year (Rookie Read-About
Holiday Series) (David F. Marx)
Kwanzaa (Rookie Read-About Holiday
Series ) (Trudi Strain Truett)
Christmas (Rookie Read-About Holiday
Series) (Trudi Strain Truett)
Diwali (Rookie Read-About Holiday Series)
(Trudi Strain Truett)
Chanukah (Rookie Read-About Holiday
Series) (David F. Marx )
Ramadan (Rookie Read-About Holiday
Series) (David F. Marx)
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
John Philip Sousa, Stars and Stripes
Forever (1896)
Sample Activities and Assessment
main character sees one of the traditional
American holidays. Encourage the students to
look closely at the illustrations and to listen
closely to the story. When you are finished
reading, discuss how people see holidays and
celebrations differently depending on their family
and ethnic experience. Before turning to wholegroup discussion, have students draw a picture
or “turn and talk” in preparation for sharing ideas.
(RL.K.3, RL.K.7, RL.K.10, SL.K.2)
WRITING ACTIVITY/HOME CONNECTION
Send a note to parents asking them to find a
photograph of the child taken during a family
celebration. Ask parents to name the celebration
and to tell what makes it special as their family
celebrates it. Use this information to create a
display of your class’s celebrations and to
prepare for the shared research project on
community celebrations. (SL.K.4, W.K.8)
CLASS DISCUSSION/SHARED
RESEARCH/WRITING ACTIVITY
Choose a holiday celebrated in your community.
Gather information about the holiday by reading
books and asking people in your community to
tell you why it is celebrated, when it is celebrated,
who celebrates, and how it is celebrated. Create
a large cube for the holiday and assign small
groups of students to prepare an illustration for
each face of the cube. Use the guiding questions
above to assign the faces of the cube. Repeat
this activity with several holidays celebrated by
the members of your classroom. (SL.K.4, L.K.5c,
W.K.2, W.K.7, W.K.8)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
John Philip Sousa, The Liberty Bell (1893)
John Philip Sousa, The Washington Post
(1889)
Sample Activities and Assessment
LANGUAGE/VOCABULARY
Tell the students that there are words that are
spelled the same and sound the same, but have
very different meanings. Listen to John Philip
Sousa’s music and “march” around the room.
Explain that in this case, “March” is an action
word. The name of this type of song is a “march,”
because you want to march to it. And you could
even do this “march” in the month of “March.”
The lesson: Some words are used differently to
mean different things. This activity can be
repeated with the word “flag,” using the word as a
verb and as a noun. (L.K.4a)
LANGUAGE/VOCABULARY
Create a word bank to collect new words from
this unit. These words can be used in discussion
and in journal writing to reinforce their proper
use. Use the word bank to practice making nouns
plural (e.g., statue, statues). (L.K.1c, L.K.6)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts:
Kindergarten
The Great Big World
Unit 5 - Number of Weeks: 6 – mid March-April
Essential Question: Why is it important for writers to describe settings carefully?
Terminology: antonyms, compare, contrast, details (most important), different, main idea, opposites, settings, similar
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.K.3: With prompting
and support, identify
characters, settings, and
major events in a story.
LITERARY TEXTS
Picture Books
1. Mr. Popper's Penguins (Richard
Atwater and Florence Atwater)
(E) (Read Aloud)
Africa
2. A Story, A Story (Gail E. Haley)
(E) (Read Aloud) Shadow
(Blaise Cendrars, translated by
Marcia Brown) (Read Aloud)
3. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in
People's Ears (Verna Aardema,
Leo Dillon, and Diane Dillon)
(Read Aloud)
Antarctica
4. Eve of the Emperor Penguin
(Mary Pope Osborne and Sal
Murdocca) (Read Aloud)
RL.K.9: With prompting
and support, compare
and contrast the
adventures and
experiences of
characters in familiar
stories.
RI.K.9: With prompting
and support, identify
basic similarities in and
differences between two
texts on the same topic
DRAS
DIBELS
GRADE
ART, NARRATIVE WRITING
Select two or three works to study that include
people or man-made structures (e.g., Cezanne,
Constable, Hiroshige, Linton Panel). Ask the
students to find the people or structures and
discuss how they compare, in scale, to the natural
elements in the works. Ask the students to write a
new title for the work that interests them the most.
Share titles in small groups and possibly post them
next to a reproduction of the work of art for future
sharing. (W.K.1, W.K.2)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
(e.g., in illustrations,
descriptions, or
procedures).
5. Something to Tell the
Grandcows (Eileen Spinelli and
Bill Slavin) (Read Aloud)
Asia
W.K.6: With guidance
and support, explore a
variety of digital tools to
produce and publish
writing, including in
collaboration with peers.
W.K.8: With guidance
and support, recall
information from
experiences or gather
information from provided
sources to answer a
question.
L.K.2: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of standard
English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling
when writing.
L.K.2(d): Spell simple
words phonetically,
drawing on knowledge of
sound-letter
relationships.
Common Core State
Standards, ELA
6. Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood
Story from China (Ed Young)
(E) (Read Aloud)
7. Once a Mouse… (Marcia
Brown) (Read Aloud)
8. The Fool of the World and the
Flying Ship (Arthur Ransome
and Uri Shulevitz) (Read Aloud)
9. The Paper Crane (Molly Bang)
(E) (Read Aloud)
Australia
10. Koala Lou (Mem Fox and
Pamela Lofts) (Read Aloud)
11. Lizzie Nonsense (Jan Ormerod)
(Read Aloud)
12. Possum Magic (Mem Fox and
Julie Vivas) (Read Aloud)
Europe
13. Little Red Riding Hood (Trina
Schart Hyman) (Read Aloud)
14. One Fine Day (Nonny
Hogrogian) (Read Aloud)
15. The Story of Ferdinand (Munro
Leaf and Robert Lawson)
(Read Aloud)
North America
16. Arrow to the Sun (Gerald
McDermott) (Read Aloud)
17. Song of the Swallows (Leo
Politi) (Read Aloud)
18. The Story of Jumping Mouse
Sample Activities and Assessment
VOCABULARY
Create a word bank of all of the words with rcontrolled vowels (ar, er, ir, ur, or) as you find them
in this unit. Create active listeners by encouraging
the students to listen for the words and act as
“sound detectives.” Sort the words by their
respective spellings, noting how the letter
combinations create similar sounds (e.g., “A W or
ld of W or ds”). (L.K.6)
VOCABULARY
Mr. Popper’s Penguins is filled with alliteration
based on the letter p. Encourage the children to
listen for p words that they hear as you read. The
vocabulary words will be challenging and fun to
use in classroom discussions. (L.K.6)
READING LITERATURE, READING
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Research, Speaking and Listening
Throughout this unit, read fictional stories set in a
continent and then read informational text (both
from books and digital sources) that describe the
continent. Students will develop an appreciation for
the setting of the story—the connection between a
fictional setting and a real place. Require students
to record what they have learned on either sticky
notes or a whiteboard to prepare for sharing with
the whole group. Following each reading, they
record new information, using these details to
compare one continent to another. Note the
opposites, such as cold and hot, or rainy and dry. If
possible, arrange a conversation via the internet
with a classroom or individual on another continent.
Prepare for the conversation by asking specific,
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
(John Steptoe) (Read Aloud)
South America
19. Morpha: A Rain Forest Story
(Michael Tennyson and
Jennifer H. Yoswa) (Read
Aloud)
20. Rain Player (David Wisniewski)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books (Read Aloud)
21. Africa (Rookie Read-About
Geography) (Allan Fowler)
(Read Aloud/Independent)
Antarctica (Rookie Read-About
Geography) (Allan Fowler) (Read
Aloud/Independent)
As the Crow Flies: A First Book of Maps
(Gail Hartman and Harvey Stevenson)
(Read Aloud) Asia (Rookie Read-About
Geography) (Allan Fowler) (Read
Aloud/Independent)
Australia (Rookie Read-About Geography)
(Allan Fowler) (Read Aloud/Independent)
Beginner’s World Atlas (National
Geographic) (Read Aloud)
Continents and Maps (Big Book, Pearson
Learning) (Read Aloud)
Count Your Way Through China…(series)
(Jim Haskins) (Read Aloud/Independent)
Europe (Rookie Read-About Geography)
(Allan Fowler) (Read Aloud/Independent)
Me on the Map (Joan Sweeney and
Annette Cable) (Read Aloud)
North America (Rookie Read-About
Geography) (Allan Fowler) (Read
child-generated questions about the continent.
(RI.K.9, L.K.1b, L.K.5b)
INFORMATIVE WRITING
Explain that Mr. Popper loved the idea of
“dreaming big.” Remind them that he daydreamed
about faraway places and that he wished he could
have visited Antarctica to explore all that was
there. Ask the students, “If you could choose to
visit any of the continents we studied, which one
would you choose? Be sure to support your choice
with one or two strong reasons.” Allow students to
choose one of the continents studied during this
unit that they might like to visit someday. To help
the children plan their work, use a program such as
Kidspiration to create a graphic organizer on each
of the continents chosen by the students. Students
can draw pictures of animals, people, and objects
one might find on that continent. Write two
sentences about the continent using a combination
of drawing, dictation, and writing. Share the work
with the class. (SL.K.6, W.K.1, W.K.5, W.K.6,
W.K.8, L.K.2d, RF.K.3d)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, SPEAKING
AND LISTENING
Choose two of the books (or maps) of the seven
continents. Read the books aloud to the students.
Students will then tell how these two books are the
same and how they are different. Students will
work with a partner or in a small group to discuss
similarities and differences between the books or
maps. Teachers will record students’ contributions
on a compare-and-contrast graphic organizer.
(RI.K.9)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Aloud/Independent)
South America (Rookie Read-About
Geography) (Allan Fowler) (Read
Aloud/Independent)
The Seven Continents (Rookie ReadAbout Geography) (Wil Mara) (Read
Aloud/Independent)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Africa
J.H. Pierneef, Trees in Woodland
Landscape (date unknown)
The Linton Panel (eighteenth or ninteenth
century)
Asia
Ando Hiroshige, panel from Famous views
of 53 stations of the Tōkaidō Road (1855)
Guo Xi, Early Spring (1072)
Australia
Emily Kam Kngwarreye, Earth’s Creation
(1994) Emily Kam Kngwarreye, The
Alhalkere Suite (1994)
Europe
John Constable, The Hay Wain (1821)
Paul Cézanne, Straße vor dem Gebirge
Sainte-Victoire (1898-1902)
North America
Albert Bierstadt, Valley of the Yosemite
(1864) Piet Mondrian, Broadway Boogie
Woogie (1942-1943)
Film
Jon Stone, dir., Big Bird in China (1983)
Luc Jacquet, dir., March of the Penguins
Sample Activities and Assessment
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
View the Mondrian.
Share the title and ask what clues it provides about
the painting’s subject. Ask the students what they
notice first in this work and what place they think
this might be. (“What do you see that makes it look
like this place?”) Ask whether the place looks busy
or slow and how the artist made it appear that way.
Compare this work to another painting (e.g., the
Kngwarreye), noticing similarities and differences
and focusing on the idea of both place and painting
style. Document responses on a chart. (SL.K.1,
SL.K.3, SL.K.4)
ART, VOCABULARY
View the Bierstadt and Guo Xi paintings. Note that
they were painted eight hundred years apart and
on opposite sides of the world. Ask the students to
describe what they see. Note similarities (e.g., the
monumentality of both works) and differences (e.g.,
different color palettes). This is an opportunity to
extend the idea of comparing and contrasting the
settings in stories to comparing and contrasting the
settings in paintings. (SL.K.2)
READING LITERATURE, NARRATIVE WRITING,
VOCABULARY
The literature in this unit is conducive to
storytelling. Pair students so that they can practice
retelling a favorite story from this unit. Ask them,
“Using illustrations and writing, retell
_______________. Be sure to focus on the
beginning, middle, and end of the story.” Introduce
the concept of major events, and ask them to focus
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
(2005)
Music
Mary F. Higuchi (compiled by),
“Geography Songs on the Continents”
(2000) (Read Along)
“London Bridge is Falling Down” Tinkerbell
Records), (Read Along)
“It’s a Small World” (Walt Disney), (Read
Along)
Sample Activities and Assessment
on major events and the most important details. To
make the activity more challenging, after retelling
the story, ask if they can retell a similar story with a
completely different setting and character. For
example, they may retell The Story of Ferdinand.
How would the story be different if it took place in
South America? Which animal would be the main
character? Extend this activity by doing a class
write: “Write a new version of The Story of
Ferdinand. Be sure to change the characters and
the setting. Illustrate the new story to create a class
book.” As students volunteer words for creating this
story, encourage them to provide letters for sounds
as you write. (RL.K.2, W.K.3, W.K.7 L.K.2d)
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING, PERFORMANCE
After reading two books, Little Red Riding Hood
and Lon Po Po, discuss how the two stories are the
same and how they are different. Generate ideas
from among the children through writing, drawing,
or acting out parts of each story. (RL.K.9, RL.K.10)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts:
Kindergarten
Wonders of Nature: Plants, Bugs, and Frogs
Unit 6 - Number of Weeks: 6 - May-June
Essential Question: How does nature inspire us as readers, writers, and artists?
Terminology: cause, creative process, different, effect, explanatory writing, revision, similar
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.K.10: Actively
engage in group reading
activities with purpose
and understanding.
LITERARY TEXTS
Picture Books (Read Aloud)
Days with Frog and Toad (Arnold Lobel)
(EA)
The Carrot Seed (Ruth Krauss and
Crockett Johnson)
The Tiny Seed (The World of Eric Carle)
(Eric Carle)
A Tree is Nice (Janice May Udry and
Marc Simont)
Time of Wonder (Robert McCloskey)
One Morning in Maine (Robert
McCloskey)
Jack and the Beanstalk (Steven Kellogg)
Kate and the Beanstalk (Mary Pope
Osborne and Giselle Potter)
There was an Old Lady Who Swallowed
a Fly (Simms Taback)
RI.K.9: With prompting
and support, identify
basic similarities in and
differences between two
texts on the same topic
(e.g., in illustrations,
descriptions, or
procedures).
RI.K.8: With prompting
and support, identify the
reasons an author gives
to support points in a
2. DRA
3. DIBELS
4. GRADE
CLASS DISCUSSION / READING /
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Create a cause-and-effect table (see below) to
record your class work. Read a book such as
Earth Day (Trudi Strain Trueit). As you read,
encourage the students to think about why we
need “Earth Day” and how celebrating this
special day helps the earth. Build in personal
accountability by asking students to draw, write,
dictate, or act out their ideas before adding them
to the chart. (RI.K.8, RI.K.10, SL.K.6)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
text.
Fireflies (Julie Brinckloe)
The Very Lonely Firefly (Eric Carle)
The Grouchy Ladybug (Eric Carle)
The Very Quiet Cricket (Eric Carle)
The Very Clumsy Click Beetle (Eric
Carle)
It’s Earth Day (Mercer Mayer)
Picture Books (Read Aloud / Independent)
Hi! Fly Guy (Tedd Arnold) (E)
Poems (Read Aloud)
“Two Tree Toads” in Orangutan Tongs: Poems
to Tangle Your Tongue (Jon Agee) (E)
Selections from Insectlopedia (Douglas Florian)
“Little Black Bug” (Margaret Wise Brown)
“The Caterpillar” in Rossetti: Poems (Christina
Rossetti) (EA)
“Trees” (Sarah Coleridge)
Over in the Meadow (John Langstaff and Feodor
Rojankovsky) (E)
Poems (Read Along)
“Wouldn’t You?” in You Read to Me,
I’ll Read to You (John Ciardi) (E)
Nursery Rhymes (Read Along)
“Mary, Mary Quite Contrary”
“Ladybug, Ladybug”
Songs (Sing Along)
“The Ants Go Marching One by One”
“Itsy Bitsy Spider”
Informational Text (Read Aloud)
Follow the Water from Brook to
Ocean (Arthur Dorros) (E)
“Our Good Earth” in National
Geographic Young Explorer!
(April 2009) (EA)
WRITING / NARRATIVE
Give students this prompt: Write (draw, dictate) a
story about something amazing you have seen in
nature. Be sure to include the name of what you
saw (e.g., a firefly), the setting (e.g., a dark night
in June, in my yard), and two events that
happened (e.g., I chased it and caught it). Tell
about how you reacted to the events (e.g., I
screamed because I had a bug in my hand and
didn’t know what to do with it!) (W.K.3, SL.K.4,
L.K.2d)
RF.K.4: Read emergentreader texts with purpose
and understanding.
W.K.6: With guidance
and support from adults,
explore a variety of digital
tools to produce and
publish writing, including
in collaboration with
peers.
L.K.4: Determine or
clarify the meaning of
unknown and multiplemeaning words and
phrases based on
Kindergarten reading and
content. (emphasis
original)
L.K.4 (b): Use the most
frequently occurring
inflections and affixes
(e.g., -ed, -s, re-, un-,
pre-, -ful, -less) as a clue
to the meaning of an
unknown word.
WRITING / REVISION
Claude Monet painted water lilies over and over
again. Tell the students to look at his paintings to
see how they changed with the shifting light in his
garden. Display the three paintings in
chronological order, but spend time on the first
one before showing the next one. Ask the
students if they think he was doing the same
painting over and over again or if he was painting
it differently each time. Ask them what changed.
Relate this idea to the revision process when
writing stories. Hand back the nature stories (see
Writing / Narrative) and ask the students to try
writing them again, but to make them a little
different this time by adding new details. Publish
the writing in a digital format by scanning the
student work and inserting it into a Power Point
presentation. Students will present the work to
parents as a culminating writing activity for the
year. (W.K.5, W.K.6)
WRITING / LITERARY / INFORMATIONAL
After reading a chapter from Days with Frog and
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
The Reasons for Seasons (Gail
Gibbons) (EA)
The Seasons of Arnold’s Apple
Tree (Gail Gibbons) (EA)
Red-Eyed Tree Frog (Joy Cowley
and Nic Bishop)
Informational Text (Read Aloud / Independent)
1. Living Sunlight: How Plants Bring the Earth to
Life (Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm) (EA)
2. A Tree is a Plant (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out
Science) (Clyde Robert Bulla and Stacey
Schuett) (E)
3. From Seed to Pumpkin (Let’s-Read-and-FindOut Science) (Wendy Pfeffer and James
Graham Hale) (E)
4. From Tadpole to Frog (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out
Science) (Wendy Pfeffer and Holly Keller) (E
Series)
5. From Caterpillar to Butterfly (Let’s-Read-andFind-Out Science) (Deborah Heiligman and Bari
Weissman) (E Series)
6. How a Seed Grows (Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out
Science) (Helene J. Jordan and Loretta
Krupinski) (E Series)
7. Frogs and Toads and Tadpoles, Too! (Rookie
Read-About Science) (Allan Fowler)
8. From Seed to Plant (Rookie Read-About
Science) (Allan Fowler)
9. Taking Root (Rookie Read-About Science)
(Allan Fowler)
10. Inside an Ant Colony (Rookie Read-About
Science) (Allan Fowler)
11. Maple Trees (Rookie Read-About Science)
(Allan Fowler)
12. Pine Trees (Rookie Read-About Science) (Allan
Toad (Arnold Lobel) and From Tadpole to Frog
(Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out-Science) (Wendy
Pfeffer and Holly Keller), lead the following
activity with the students: Work together to make
a list of the ways the frog in the fictional book
(Lobel) was similar to the frog in the non-fictional
book. Make a list of how the two frogs are
different. Students may be ready to create this
list themselves on their own personal graphic
organizer. (RL.K.3, RL.K.10, RI.K.10,SL.K.6)
CLASS DISCUSSION / READING /
INFORMATIONAL
Read a book such as From Tadpole to Frog
(Let’s-Read-and-Find-Out-Science) (Wendy
Pfeffer and Holly Keller) and then read Red-Eyed
Tree Frog. (These books are both non-fictional
books and they both talk about “toads.”) Ask
what the students noticed about how these books
were the same and how they were different.
(RI.K.9, RI.K.10, SL.K.6)
WRITING / EXPLANATORY
After reading an informational text detailing a
process, such as the life cycle of a butterfly or
frog, have the students create a four page
booklet showing the stages of growth in
illustrations. Have them do so in complete
sentences, as they are able. (W.K.2)
VOCABULARY / DRAMA
Create a word bank for “Ways Animals Move”
(e.g., dart, fly, hop, and swim). Use these verbs
to teach the -ed, -s, and -ing suffixes. Act out the
words, adding adverbs to make the actions
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Fowler)
13. Cactuses (Rookie Read-About Science) (Allan
Fowler)
14. It Could Still Be a Flower (Rookie Read-About
Science) (Allan Fowler)
15. Plants That Eat Animals (Rookie Read-About
Science) (Allan Fowler)
16. It’s a Good Thing There are Insects (Rookie
Read-About Science) (Allan Fowler)
17. Spiders Are Not Insects (Rookie Read-About
Science) (Allan Fowler)
18. Earth Day (Rookie Read-About Holidays) (Trudi
Strain Trueit)
Art
1. Claude Monet, Water Lilies (The Clouds)
(1903)
2. Claude Monet, Water Lilies (1906)
3. Claude Monet, Water Lilies (1916-1923)
Books (art-related)
1. The Magical Garden of Claude Monet
(Laurence Anholt)
2. A Blue Butterfly (Bijou LeTord)
Media
1. Linnea in Monet’s Garden (1999)
opposite in speed like “hopping slowly” or
“hopping fast.” (L.K.4b, L.K.5b)
READING / FLUENCY / INFORMATIONAL
Since students are reading, introduce them to the
easy science texts in this unit. Spend time having
the students read the books aloud with partners
or alone. (RF.K.4)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Kindergarten adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012 |
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Unit 1
Halfway Down
by A. A. Milne
Halfway down the stairs
is a stair
where i sit.
there isn't any
other stair
quite like
it.
i'm not at the bottom,
i'm not at the top;
so this is the stair
where
I always
stop.
Halfway up the stairs
Isn't up
And it isn't down.
It isn't in the nursery,
It isn't in town.
And all sorts of funny thoughts
Run round my head.
It isn't really
Anywhere!
It's somewhere else
Instead!
Singing Time
By Rose Fyleman
I wake in the morning early,
And always, the very first thing,
I poke my head and I sit up in bed
And I sing and I sing and I sing.
Mary Had a Little Lamb
By Sarah Josepha Hale
Mary had a little lamb,
Its fleece was white as snow,
And every where that Mary went
The lamb was sure to go;
He followed her to school one dayThat was against the rule,
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
It made the children laugh and play
To see a lamb at school
And so the Teacher turned him out,
But still he lingered near,
And waited patiently about,
Till Mary did appear.
And then he ran to her and laid
His head upon her arm,
As if he said-"I'm not afraid,
You'll shield me from all harm."
"What makes the lamb love Mary so,"
The little children cry;
"O, Mary loves the lamb you know,"
The Teacher did reply,
"And you each gentle animal
In confidence may bind,
And make them follow at your call,
If you are always kind."
Time to Rise
By Robert Louis Stevenson
A birdie with a yellow bill
Hopped upon my window sill,
Cocked his shining eye and said:
"Ain't you 'shamed, you sleepy-head!"
Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star
By Ann and Jane Taylor
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.
When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.
Then the traveler in the dark
Thanks you for your tiny spark,
How could he see where to go,
If you did not twinkle so?
In the dark blue sky you keep,
Often through my curtains peep
For you never shut your eye,
Till the sun is in the sky.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveler in the dark,
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.
Unit 1 Nursery Rhymes
Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John
Went to bed with his stockings on;
One shoe off, and one shoe on,
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John.
Early to Bed
Early to bed,
Early to rise.
Makes a man healthy,
Wealthy and Wise
Georgie Porgie
Georgie Porgie pudding and pie,
Kissed the girls and made them cry
When the boys came out to play,
Georgie Porgie ran away.
Hey Diddle Diddle
Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed to see such fun
And the dish ran away with the spoon!
Humpty Dumpty
Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the King's horses, And all the King's men
Couldn't put Humpty together again!
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Jack and Jill
Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water
Jack fell down and broke his crown
And Jill came tumbling after.
Up got Jack, and home did trot
As fast as he could caper
He went to bed and bound his head
With vinegar and brown paper.
Jack Be Nimble
Jack be nimble
Jack be quick
Jack jump over
The candlestick.
Little Bo Peep
Little Bo peep has lost her sheep
And doesn't know where to find them.
Leave them alone and they'll come home,
Bringing their tails behind them.
Little Bo peep fell fast asleep
And dreamt she heard them bleating,
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they were all still fleeting.
Then up she took her little crook
Determined for to find them.
She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they left their tails behind them.
It happened one day, as Bo peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails side by side
All hung on a tree to dry.
She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
And over the hillocks went rambling,
And tried what she could,
As a shepherdess should,
To tack again each to its lambkin.
Little Boy Blue
Little Boy Blue come blow your horn,
The sheep's in the meadow the cow's in the corn.
But where's the boy who looks after the sheep?
He's under a haystack fast asleep.
Will you wake him? No, not I - for if I do, he's sure to cry
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Little Jack Horner
Little Jack Horner sat in the corner
Eating his Christmas pie,
He put in his thumb and pulled out a plum
And said "What a good boy am I!"
Little Miss Muffet
Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet
Eating her curds and whey,
Along came a spider,
Who sat down beside her
And frightened Miss Muffet away
Old Mother Hubbard
Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard,
To fetch her poor dog a bone.
But when she got there, her cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.
She went to the baker's to buy him some bread;
When she got back, the dog was dead.
She went to the undertaker's to buy him a coffin;
When she got back, the dog was a-laughing.
She took him a clean dish to get him some tripe;
When she came back, he was smoking a pipe.
She went to the hatter's to buy him a hat;
When she came back, he was feeding the cat.
She went to the barber's to buy him a wig;
When she came back, he was dancing a jig.
She went to the fruiterer's to buy him some fruit;
When she came back, he was playing the flute.
She went to the tailor's to buy him a coat;
When she came back, he was riding a goat.
She went to the cobbler's to buy him some shoes;
When she came back, he was reading the news.
She went to the seamstress to buy him some linen;
When she came back, the dog was a-spinning.
She went to the hosier's to buy him some hose;
When she came back, he was dressed in his clothes.
The dame made a curtsy, the dog made a bow;
The dame said, "Your servant," the dog said, "Bow-wow."
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Pat-a-Cake
Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker’s man.
Bake me a cake as fast as you can;
Pat it and prick it and mark it with “B”,
Put it in the oven for baby and me.
Patty cake, patty cake, baker's man.
Bake me a cake as fast as you can;
Roll it up, roll it up;
And throw it in a pan!
Patty cake, patty cake, baker’s man.
Ring Around the Rosey
Ring around the rosy
A pocketful of posies
"Ashes, Ashes"
We all fall down!
Ring-a-Ring o'Rosies
A Pocket full of Posies
"A-tishoo! A-tishoo!"
We all fall Down!
Rock-a-bye, Baby
Rock a bye baby on the treetop,
When the wind blows the cradle will rock,
When the bough breaks the cradle will fall,
And down will come baby, cradle and all.
Baby is drowsing cozy and fair
Mother sits near in her rocking chair
Forward and back the cradle she swings
And though baby sleeps he hears what she sings
From the high rooftops down to the sea
No ones' as dear as baby to me
Wee little fingers, eyes wide and bright
Now sound asleep until morning light
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Roses Are Red
Lilies are white,
Rosemary's green,
When I am king,
You shall be queen.
Roses are red,
Violets are blue,
Sugar is sweet
And so are you.
Simple Simon
Simple Simon met a pieman going to the fair;
Said Simple Simon to the pieman "Let me taste your ware"
Said the pieman to Simple Simon "Show me first your penny"
Said Simple Simon to the pieman "Sir, I have not any!"
Simple Simon went a-fishing for to catch a whale;
All the water he had got was in his mother's pail.
Simple Simon went to look if plums grew on a thistle;
He pricked his fingers very much which made poor Simon whistle.
He went for water in a sieve but soon it all fell through;
And now poor Simple Simon bids you all "adieu"
Star Light, Star Bright
Star Light Star bright,
The first star I see tonight,
I wish I may, I wish I might,
Have the wish I wish tonight.
Unit 2
Three Little Kittens
By Eliza Lee Follen
Three little kittens lost their mittens;
And they began to cry,
O mother dear,
We very much fear
That we have lost our mittens.
Lost your mittens!
You naughty kittens
Then you shall have no pie
Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow.
No, you shall have no pie
Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
The three little kittens found their mittens,
And they began to cry,
O mother dear,
See here, see here;
See, we have found our mittens.
Put on your mittens,
You silly kittens,
And you may have some pie
Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r,
O, let us have the pie,
Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r.
The three little kittens put on their mittens,
And soon ate up the pie;
O mother dear,
We greatly fear
That we have soil'd our mittens.
Soiled your mittens!
You naughty kittens!
Then they began to sigh,
Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow.
Then they began to sigh,
Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow.
The three little kittens washed their mittens,
And hung them out to dry;
O mother dear,
Do not you hear,
That we have washed our mittens?
Washed your mittens!
O, you're good kittens.
But I smell a rat close by:
Hush! hush! mee-ow, mee-ow.
We smell a rat close by,
Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow.
Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin
By Lloyd Moss and Marjorie Priceman
A book
Mix a Pancake
By Christina Rossetti
Mix a pancake,
Stir a pancake,
Pop it in the pan;
Fry the pancake,
Toss the pancake, Catch it if you can.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Unit 2 Nursery Rhymes
Three Blind Mice
Three blind mice, three blind mice,
See how they run, see how they run,
They all ran after the farmer's wife,
Who cut off their tails with a carving knife,
Did you ever see such a thing in your life,
As three blind mice?
One, Two, Buckle My Shoe
One two buckle my shoe
Three, four, knock at the door
Five, six, pick-up sticks
Seven, eight, lay them straight
Nine, ten, a big fat hen
Eleven, twelve, dig and delve
Thirteen, fourteen, maids a-courting
Fifteen, sixteen, maids in the kitchen
Seventeen, eighteen, maids in waiting
Nineteen, twenty, my plates empty
A Diller, A Dollar
A diller, a dollar,
A ten o'clock scholar,
What makes you come so soon?
You used to come at ten o'clock,
And now you come at noon.
Hot Cross Buns
Hot cross buns! Hot cross buns!
One a penny two a penny - Hot cross buns
If you have no daughters, give them to your sons
One a penny two a penny - Hot cross buns
Hickory, Dickory, Dock
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The mouse ran up the clock.
The clock struck one,
The mouse ran down!
Hickory Dickory Dock.
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The cat ran round the clock,
The clock struck seven 7,
She wanted to get 'em,
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The bird looked at the clock,
The clock struck two 2,
Away she flew,
Hickory Dickory Dock
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The horse jumped over the clock,
The clock struck eight 8,
He ate some cake,
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The dog barked at the clock,
The clock struck three 3,
Fiddle-de-dee,
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The cow danced on the clock,
The clock struck nine 9,
She felt so fine,
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The bear slept by the clock,
The clock struck four 4,
He ran out the door,
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The pig oinked at the clock,
The clock struck ten 10,
She did it again,
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The bee buzzed round the clock,
The clock struck five 5,
She went to her hive,
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The duck quacked at the clock
The clock struck eleven 11,
The duck said 'oh heavens!'
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The hen pecked at the clock,
The clock struck six 6,
Oh, fiddle-sticks,
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Hickory Dickory Dock,
The mouse ran up the clock
The clock struck noon
He's here too soon!
Hickory Dickory Dock!
Old King Cole
Old King Cole
Was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe,
And he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three!
And every fiddler, he had a fine fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he.
"Twee tweedle dee, tweedle dee," went the fiddlers.
Oh, there's none so rare
As can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Baa, Baa, Black Sheep
Baa, Baa, black sheep,
have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir three bags full:
Baa, Baa, white sheep,
have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir three bags full:
Baa, Baa, striped sheep,
have you any wool?
No sir, no sir No bags full:
One for the master,
one for the dame,
And one for the little boy
that lives down the lane.
One for the master,
one for the dame,
And one for the little boy
that lives down the lane.
None for the master,
none for the dame,
And none for the little boy
that lives down the lane.
Baa, Baa, black sheep,
have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir three bags full.
Baa, Baa, white sheep,
have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir three bags full.
Striped sheep, why sheep,
have you no more wool?
Oh sir, because sir *pause* I'm a zebra!
This Little Pig Went to Market
This little piggy went to market,
This little piggy stayed at home,
This little piggy had roast beef,
This little piggy had none.
And this little piggy went...
"Wee wee wee" all the way home...
Unit 3
Us Two
By A. A. Milne
Wherever I am, there's always Pooh,
There's always Pooh and Me.
Whatever I do, he wants to do,
"Where are you going today?" says Pooh:
"Well, that's very odd 'cos I was too.
Let's go together," says Pooh, says he.
"Let's go together," says Pooh.
"What's twice eleven?" I said to Pooh.
("Twice what?" said Pooh to Me.)
"I think it ought to be twenty-two."
"Just what I think myself," said Pooh.
"It wasn't an easy sum to do,
But that's what it is," said Pooh, said he.
"That's what it is," said Pooh.
"Let's look for dragons," I said to Pooh.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
"Yes, let's," said Pooh to Me.
We crossed the river and found a few"Yes, those are dragons all right," said Pooh.
"As soon as I saw their beaks I knew.
That's what they are," said Pooh, said he.
"That's what they are," said Pooh.
"Let's frighten the dragons," I said to Pooh.
"That's right," said Pooh to Me.
"I'm not afraid," I said to Pooh,
And I held his paw and I shouted "Shoo!
Silly old dragons!"- and off they flew.
"I wasn't afraid," said Pooh, said he,
"I'm never afraid with you."
So wherever I am, there's always Pooh,
There's always Pooh and Me.
"What would I do?" I said to Pooh,
"If it wasn't for you," and Pooh said: "True,
It isn't much fun for One, but Two,
Can stick together, says Pooh, says he. "That's how it is," says Pooh.
The Swing
By Robert Louis Stevenson
How do you like to go up in a swing,
Up in the air so blue?
Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing
Ever a child can do!
Up in the air and over the wall,
Till I can see so wide,
River and trees and cattle and all
Over the countryside-Till I look down on the garden green,
Down on the roof so brown-Up in the air I go flying again,
Up in the air and down!
Unit 4
Celebration
By Alonzo Lopez
I shall dance tonight.
When the dusk comes crawling,
There will be dancing
and feasting.
I shall dance with the others
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
in circles, in leaps, in stomps.
Laughter and talk
Will weave into the night,
Among the fires
of my people.
Games will be played
And I shall be a part of it.
I Am America
By Charles R. Smith
A book
Thanksgiving Day
By Lydia Maria Child
Over the river, and through the wood,
To grandfather's house we go;
The horse knows the way
To carry the sleigh
Through the white and drifted snow.
Over the river, and through the wood—
Oh, how the wind does blow!
It stings the toes
And bites the nose
As over the ground we go.
Over the river, and through the wood,
To have a first-rate play.
Hear the bells ring
"Ting-a-ling-ding",
Hurrah for Thanksgiving Day!
Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground,
Like a hunting-hound!
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river, and through the wood,
And straight through the barn-yard gate.
We seem to go
Extremely slow,—
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood—
Now grandmother's cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie!
Unit 5
Unit 6
Two Tree Toads
By Jon Agee
A three-toed tree toad tried to tie
A two-toed tree toad’s shoe.
But tying two-toed shoes is hard
For three-toed toads to do,
Since three-toed shoes each have three toes,
And two-toed shoes have two.
“Please tie my two-toed tree toad shoe!”
The two-toed tree toad cried.
“I tried my best. Now I must go,”
The three-toed tree toad sighed.
The two-toed tree toad’s two-toed shoe,
Alas, remained untied.
Insectlopedia
By Douglas Florian
A book
Little Black Bug
By Margaret Wise Brown
Little black bug,
Little black bug
Where have you been?
I've been under the rug,
Said little black bug.
Bug-ug-ug-ug.
Little green fly,
Little green fly,
Where have you been?
I've been way up high,
Said little green fly.
Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.
Little old mouse,
Little old mouse,
Where have you been?
I've been all through the house
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Said little old mouse.
Squeak-eak-eak-eak-eak.
The Caterpillar
By Christina Rossetti
Brown and furry
Caterpillar in a hurry,
Take your walk
To the shady leaf, or stalk,
Or what not,
Which may be the chosen spot.
No toad spy you,
Hovering bird of prey pass by you;
Spin and die,
To live again a butterfly.
Trees
By Sarah Coleridge
The Oak is called the king of trees,
The Aspen quivers in the breeze,
The Poplar grows up straight and tall,
The Peach tree spreads along the wall,
The Sycamore gives pleasant shade,
The Willow droops in watery glade,
The Fir tree useful in timber gives,
The Beech amid the forest lives.
Over in the Meadow
By John Langstaff and Feodor Rojankovsky
A book
Wouldn’t you
By John Ciardi
If I
Could go
As high
And low
As the wind
As the wind
As the wind
Can blow—
I’d go!
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Unit 6 Nursery Rhymes
Mary, Mary Quite Contrary
Mary, Mary, quite contrary
How does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockleshells
And pretty maids all in a row.
Ladybug, Ladybug
Ladybug! Ladybug!
Fly away home.
Your house is on fire.
And your children all gone.
All except one,
And that's little Ann,
For she crept under
The frying pan.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Grade K Suggested Objectives
Unit 1
•Recognize the difference between a storybook and a poem.
•Understand that poems (poetry) are written by poets and that they often rhyme.
•Distinguish between a verse (stanza) and a line in a poem.
•Identify the author and illustrator of a storybook and of an informational book.
•Ask questions about unknown words in a text.
•Understand the organization and basic features of print.
•Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book; follow the words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page.
•Understand that words are separated by spaces in print.
•Use a combination of drawing, dictating, or writing to share an opinion.
•Listen to others and take turns speaking while discussing favorite rhymes.
•Expand vocabulary by sorting objects (e.g., by color, noticing colorful places in school and describing objects with “color” adjectives).
Unit 2
•Name the author and illustrator of both the fictional and informational texts in this unit.
•Orally retell familiar stories, including details and events at the beginning, middle, and end.
•Recite and produce rhyming words from nursery rhymes and rhyming texts.
•Use a combination of writing, drawing, and dictating to retell stories with a beginning, middle, and end.
•Distinguish shades of meaning among simple adjectives.
•Recognize the importance of sequence in storytelling, informational and fictional counting books, and nursery rhymes.
•Appreciate the difference between an original story and other versions of the same story.
Unit 3
•Use the words who, what, where, when, and why to explore informational texts.
•Ask questions about unknown words in both fictional and informational texts.
•Locate basic information in a nonfiction text.
•Identify characters, settings, and key events in a story.
•Compare and contrast the adventures of one character in a collection of stories.
•Compare and contrast the adventures of different characters in different books through the use of a graphic organizer.
•Understand the difference between real (nonfiction) and imagined (fiction) explorations.
•Use a combination of drawing, dictating, or writing to compose an informative text.
•Name and identify periods, question marks, and exclamation points.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
•Understand and correctly use the prepositions to/from, on/off, and in/out.
Unit 4
•Describe the connection between two events or ideas in a text.
•Recognize cause and effect relationships (e.g., the contributions of Martin Luther King Jr. and the holiday celebrating his life).
•Review characters, setting, and key events in fictional stories when retelling them.
•Answer questions about unknown words, details, and events in both fiction and informational texts.
•Gather information from text sources and experiences to answer questions about a given topic (e.g., about holidays).
•Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose an informative text on a given topic (e.g., about holidays).
•Ask questions to get information, to seek help, or to clarify something that is not understood.
•Produce and expand complete sentences in shared writing about a given topic (e.g., symbols in America).
•Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately (e.g., march—verb, March—month, march—musical piece).
•Use newly learned words in conversation (e.g., new words related to celebrations and symbols).
Unit 5
•Describe the connection between the settings of fictional works and informational books about the same place.
•Learn about the similarities and differences between fictional and informational texts on the same topic.
•Compare and contrast characters’ adventures that are set in different continents.
•Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to offer an opinion (e.g., about a continent to visit); include details that
explain/support the opinion.
•Demonstrate understanding of common verbs and adjectives by relating them to their opposites (e.g., in the context of describing
places).
Unit 6
•Articulate cause-and-effect relationships (e.g., as they occur in the natural world).
•Recognize the basic similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., when both are informational or when one
is fiction and one nonfiction).
•Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.
•Write, draw, or dictate a narrative (e.g., describing something that happened in nature and a subsequent reaction).
•Relate the idea of writing revision to a visual artist’s creative process (i.e., continuously improving the work).
•Use common affixes as clues to the meaning of an unknown word.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 1
Alphabet Books and Children Who Read Them
Unit 1 - Number of Weeks: 6 – September
Essential Question: Why is it important to ask questions while you are reading?
Terminology: alphabet books, author, capitalization, illustrator, informational, key details, periods, poems, question marks,
questions, research question, shared research, sort, stories, topic
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
RL.1.1: Ask and answer
questions about key
details and events in a
text.
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“Books Fall Open” (David
McCord) (Read Aloud) 1
“Books to the Ceiling” (Arnold
Lobel) (EA) (Read Aloud)
“Good Books, Good Times!”
(Lee Bennett Hopkins) 1
“How to Eat a Poem” (Eve
Merriam) (EA) (Read Aloud)
“Read to Me” (Jane Yolen)
(Read Aloud)
“You Read to Me, I’ll Read to
You” (Mary Ann Hoberman
and Michael Emberley) 1
Stories
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
DRA
DIBELS
GRADE
RI.1.1: Ask and answer
questions about key
details in a text.
W.1.7: Participate in
shared research and
writing projects.
SL.1.1: Participate in
collaborative
conversations with
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
As you read the book Tomas and the Library Lady, pause
periodically and encourage students to ask questions. By using
“I wonder” as the beginning of the question, have students
predict what is coming next in the story and clarify
understanding. Use sticky notes or whiteboards to keep each
child engaged in the questioning. (RL.1.1)
INFORMATIVE WRITING, RESEARCH
Using the ABC books as a model, generate some ideas for
writing a class ABC book. Work together as a class to come up
with potential research questions. Begin by asking questions
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
diverse partners about
Grade One topics and
texts with peers and
adults in small and larger
groups.
L.1.1: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of standard
English grammar and
usage when writing or
speaking.
L.1.1j: Produce and
expand complete simple
and compound
declarative, interrogative,
imperative, and
exclamatory sentences in
response to prompts.
Suggested
Works/Resources
A Kiss for Little Bear (Else
Holmelund Minarik and
Maurice Sendak) (EA)
Alphabet Mystery (Audrey
Wood and Bruce Wood) (Read
Aloud)
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
(Bill Martin, Jr., John
Archambault, and Lois Ehlert)
(Read Aloud)
Dr. Seuss’s ABC: An Amazing
Alphabet Book! (Dr. Seuss)
(EA) (Read Aloud)
I Can Read With My Eyes
Shut! (Dr. Seuss) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
Little Bear’s Visit (Else
Holmelund Minarik and
Maurice Sendak) (EA)
¡Marimba! Animales From A to
Z (Pat Mora and Doug
Cushman) (EA) (Read Aloud)
Morris Goes to School
(Bernard Wiseman)
Our Library (Eve Bunting and
Maggie Smith) (Read Aloud)
The Library (Sarah Stewart
and David Small) (Read
Aloud)
Tomas and the Library Lady
(Pat Mora and Raul Colon) (E)
(Read Aloud)
Sample Activities and Assessment
such as, “Is it possible to create an ABC book with Games to
Play as our title?” Allow the class to give some ideas (e.g.,
names, authors, books, plants, insects). After ideas have been
shaped into a research question, allow the children to vote on a
theme for the class ABC book. Once the theme is chosen,
gather information from a variety of texts and digital resources
for each letter of the alphabet. Decide on a design for the book.
Assign each student a letter in the book. Each page should
include an upper and lower case letter, the key word, an
illustration, and a sentence using the key word. Be sure to
have them follow rules for spelling and punctuating correctly.
(SL.1.1, W.1.7, W.1.2, W.1.8, L.1.1 a, L.1.1j, L.1.2b, L.1.2d,
L.1.2e, RF.1.1a)
LANGUAGE MECHANICS, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce the writing of declarative and interrogative sentences
by focusing on an informational ABC book, such as Eating the
Alphabet: Fruits and Vegetables from A to Z (Lois Ehlert). On a
chart, write a question such as “What is your favorite fruit?”
Teach the students to answer the question with a complete
declarative response, such as “My favorite fruit is a
strawberry.” Discuss the end punctuation. Continue this activity
to teach the expansion of sentences to include details, such as
“Strawberries are my favorite fruit because they are juicy,
sweet, and delicious.” (L.1.1j, L.1.2b, W.1.5, SL.1.6)
INFORMATIVE WRITING, LANGUAGE MECHANICS
Give students this prompt: “Children should eat healthy foods,
exercise, and take care of their bodies. Name one way to stay
healthy. Supply some facts about the topic you chose and
provide closure at the end of your writing.” As students write,
watch closely that they focus on just one way to stay healthy
and that they compose an essay supported by facts.
Encourage students to write complete sentences and to use
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
the correct end punctuation. (W.1.2, L.1.1j, L.1.2b)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
26 Letters and 99 Cents (Tana
Hoban) (EA)
A Good Night’s Sleep (Rookie
Read-About Health) (Sharon
Gordon) (Read Aloud)
Alphabet City (Stephen T.
Johnson)
An A to Z Walk in the Park
(R.M. Smith) (Read Aloud)
Eating the Alphabet: Fruits &
Vegetables from A to Z
(Harcourt Brace Big Book)
(Lois Ehlert) (Read Aloud)
Exactly the Opposite(Tana
Hoban) (EA)
Exercise (Rookie Read-About
Health) (Sharon Gordon)
Germs! Germs! Germs! (Hello
Reader Science Level 3)
(Bobbi Katz and Steve
Bjorkman)
I Read Signs (Tana Hoban)
(E)
I Spy: An Alphabet in Art (Lucy
Micklethwait) (Read Aloud)
Look Book (Tana Hoban) (EA)
Museum ABC (New York
Metropolitan Museum of Art)
(Read Aloud)
School Bus (Donald Crews)
(EA)
Reading Informational Text, Speaking and Listening
Tell the students that just because books are called “ABC
books” does not mean they are always easy to understand.
Therefore, to understand them, we have to be willing to ask
questions and to think deeply and look for key details. Tell the
students that they are going to look at The Graphic Alphabet.
Using a document camera for viewing this book would be
helpful. On each page, there is a letter, but there is something
more going on than just that letter. Look at A. Have the
students ask questions about the page and try to answer them
(e.g., “Why is the letter A crumbling? Could the letter be a
mountain? Is that an avalanche?”). As you go through the book
and throughout the unit, introduce the new vocabulary. (RI.1.1,
RI.1.7, L.1.1j, SL.1.2)
READING LITERATURE, READING INFORMATIONAL
TEXT, READING POETRY, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Throughout this unit, students read from a variety of texts:
stories, poems, and informational texts. When you have a tenminute block, play “I Spy” with the children (e.g., “I spy an
informational book,” “I spy a nonfiction book”). The students
then have to guess which book you are looking at in the display
of unit books. (RL.1.5, L.1.1)
READING POETRY, READING FLUENCY, PERFORMANCE
The theme of the poetry in this unit is the love of books and
language. By visually displaying the poems (i.e., an interactive
whiteboard, document camera, overhead projector, or chart
paper), students will review sight words and see the way the
poem is written (i.e., with lines and stanzas). Using a poem
such as “Good Books, Good Times!” (Lee Bennett Hopkins) or
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
3
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
The Graphic Alphabet (David
Pelletier) (Read Aloud)
The Hidden Alphabet (Laura
Vaccaro Seeger) (Read Aloud)
The Turn-Around, UpsideDown Alphabet Book (Lisa
Campbell Ernst) (Read Aloud)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Pieter Bruegel, Children’s
Games (1560)
Sample Activities and Assessment
“How to Eat a Poem” (Eve Merriam), encourage the students to
read with you repeatedly and to ask questions until they
understand the poem. Poetry is easily transformed into choral
reading (reciting) by highlighting lines from one punctuation
mark to the next, and then assigning groups to read those
highlighted sections. (SL.1.2, RF.1.4)
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Look at Children’s Games by Pieter Bruegel. Ask the students
to study it closely for a few minutes and write down any
questions they have about what they see. When the time is up,
have them ask their questions. As the students begin to ask
questions aloud, write all of the questions on a chart (e.g.,
“What are they doing? Is that like a hula hoop? Was this
painted a long time ago? . . .”). Talk about the value of asking
questions and how we begin to open our minds to think deeply
about something. (The painting was done in the sixteenth
century, and the artist was perhaps trying to show all of the
games he knew. You may want to note the few toys children
had—sticks, hoops, etc.) (SL.1.2)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 1
The Amazing Animal World
Unit 2 Number of Weeks: 6 – Oct.-mid Nov.
Essential Question: How can reading teach us about writing?
Terminology: categories, context clues, informative/explanatory, lesson, main topic, message, retell and revision
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
RL.1.2: Retell stories,
including key details, and
demonstrate
understanding of the
central message or
lesson.
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
"Fish" (Mary Ann Hoberman)
"I Know All the Sounds that
the Animals Make" in
Something Big Has Been Here
(Jack Prelutsky) (Read Aloud)
"The Fox's Foray" in The
Oxford Nursery Rhyme Book
(Anonymous) (E) (Read Aloud)
"The Owl and the Pussycat" in
The Complete Nonsense of
Edward Lear (Edward Lear)
(E) (Read Aloud)
"The Pasture" in The Poetry of
Robert Frost (Robert Frost)
(Read Aloud)
"The Purple Cow" in The
Burgess Nonsense Book
Being a Complete Collection of
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
DRA
DIBELS
GRADE
RI.1.2: Identify the main
topic and retell key
details of a text.
RL.1.5: Explain major
differences between
books that tell stories and
books that give
information, drawing on a
wide reading of a range
of text types.
L.1.5: With guidance and
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, RESEARCH,
INFORMATIVE WRITING
While reading a book such as What Do You Do with a Tail Like
This? (Steve Jenkins), make a chart to record the name of
each animal (main topic) mentioned. Record key details, such
as where the animal lives (i.e., its habitat), what the animal
eats (i.e., whether it is an herbivore, carnivore, or omnivore),
and an interesting fact (e.g., its method of adaptation) on the
chart. Ask students to supply at least one piece of information
on a sticky note when you are finished reading. Create and add
to similar charts about animal facts as you read to the children
and as they read independently. Use these charts to create
oral and written sentences about the animals. (RI.1.2, L.1.5b,
L.1.1j)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
support, demonstrate
understanding of word
relationships and
nuances in word
meanings.
the Humorous Masterpieces of
Gelett Burgess (Gelett
Burgess) (Read Aloud)
Stories
Are You My Mother? (Philip D.
Eastman) (E)
Finn Family Moomintroll (Tove
Jansson) (E) (Read Aloud) 1
Mouse Soup (Arnold Lobel)
(EA) Mouse Tales (Arnold
Lobel) (EA)
Uncle Elephant (Arnold Lobel)
(EA)
READING LITERATURE, VOCABULARY
Read a fictional animal story, such as Are You My Mother?
(Philip D. Eastman). Discuss the vocabulary in the story and
work on understanding unknown words. Ask the students (if,
for example, discussing Are You My Mother?), “What word was
funny in the story because of the way it was used?” (Possible
answer: “Snort.”) Then ask, “How did you know what it meant?”
Divide the students into groups of three and have them tell the
story to each other, taking turns as each tells a part. Let them
know that if they are stuck on a part of the story, you will allow
them to use the book to solve the problem. Encourage the
students to try to remember as many details as they can for
retelling the story because details are what make the story
interesting. When they are finished retelling the story, talk
about what lesson might be learned from the story and what
new words they learned. (L.1.4a, RL.1.2)
L.1.5(b): Define words by
category and by one or
more key attributes (e.g.,
a duck is a bird that
swims; a tiger is a large
cat with stripes).
W.1.2: Write
informative/explanatory
texts in which they name
a topic, supply some
facts about the topic, and
provide some sense of
closure.
SL.1.2: Ask and answer
questions about key
details in a text readaloud or information
presented orally or
through other media.
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
A Nest Full of Eggs (Let'sRead-and-Find…Science)
(Priscilla Belz Jenkins and
Lizzy Rockwell) (E series)
(Read Aloud)
Amazing Whales! (Sarah L.
Thomson) (E) (Read Aloud)
Big Tracks, Little Tracks:
Following Animal Prints (Let’sRead-and-Find…Science)
(Millicent E. Selsam and
Marlene Hill Donnelly) (E
series)
Biggest, Strongest, Fastest
(Steve Jenkins) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
Creature ABC (Andrew
Zuckerman) (Read Aloud)
READING LITERATURE, READING COMPREHENSION,
SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Choose a fantasy read-aloud, such as Finn Family Moomintroll
(Tove Jansson). Continuing to focus on the retelling of fiction,
give the children the opportunity to retell the previous chapters
by allowing them to choose an object to prompt the retelling.
For example, provide a number of props (e.g., a black hat
made of construction paper), and ask students to find the
appropriate object when it appears in the story and put it into a
“retelling basket.” Before each reading time, have the students
retell the story using the gathered objects as prompts for
remembering characters and events. By the time the book
ends, you will have an object for each chapter or key event in
the book—and the students will be efficient storytellers.
(RL.1.2)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
6
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Earthworms (Claire Llewellyn
and Barrie Watts) (E) (Read
Aloud)
How Animals Work (DK
Publishing) (Read Aloud)
Never Smile at a Monkey: And
17 Other Important Things to
Remember (Steve Jenkins)
(EA) (Read Aloud)
Starfish (Let's-Read-andFind…Science) (Edith Thacher
Hurd and Robin Brickman) (E)
What Do You Do When
Something Wants To Eat You?
(Steve Jenkins) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
What Do You Do With a Tail
Like This? (Steve Jenkins and
Robin Page) (E) (Read Aloud)
What Lives in a Shell? (Let'sRead-and-Find…Science)
(Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld
and Helen K. Davie) (E series)
What’s It Like to Be a Fish?
(Let’s-Read-andFind…Science) (Wendy
Pfeffer and Holly Keller) (E
series) (Read Aloud)
Where Are the Night Animals?
(Let’s-Read-andFind…Science) (Mary Ann
Fraser) (E series)
Where Do Chicks Come
From? (Let's-Read-and-
Sample Activities and Assessment
READING LITERATURE, LANGUAGE USAGE
Follow up on a book read previously in class, such as Are You
My Mother? (Philip D. Eastman). Go back and reread the story.
As you read it this time, read for the purpose of finding all of
the animals and things that baby bird thought might be his
mother. As students find the words, write them on index cards
(e.g., kitten, hen, dog, cow, boat, plane). Sort the words into
categories (e.g., animals, modes of transportation). Think of
more words for each of the categories. This activity could also
be done with a poem such as “The Pasture” or “I Know All the
Sounds the Animals Make.” After reading and rereading
(reciting) the poem, gather the nouns in the poem and sort
them according to categories (e.g., places, animals, sounds).
(L.1.5a, L.1.1b)
READING LITERATURE, LANGUAGE MECHANICS
As students read independently, remind them that different
characters often tell the story at different times in a book. Using
a book such as Mouse Tales (Arnold Lobel), allow the students
to reread parts of the text where the weasel speaks, where the
mouse speaks, and where the narrator tells the story. Provide
elbow macaroni at each table. Ask students to place the
macaroni on the quotation marks in the book, reminding them
that it means someone is speaking. Assigning the parts to
three readers will show others how dialogue works in literature.
(RL.1.6)
ART, INFORMATIVE WRITING
Since the students have now completed an artistic masterpiece
of their favorite animal, extend the work into a writing
assignment. Give the students this prompt: “Write about your
favorite animal. Be sure to include interesting facts about your
animal and include a catchy beginning, some facts, and a
strong ending.” Allow your students to begin by working in
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
7
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Find…Science) (Amy E.
Sklansky and Pam Paparone)
(E series) (Read Aloud)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Albrecht Dürer, A Young Hare
(no date)
Henri Matisse, The Snail
(1953)
Henri Rousseau, The
Flamingoes (1907)
Louisa Matthíasdóttir, Five
Sheep (no date)
Marc Chagall, I and the Village
(1945)
Paul Klee, Cat and Bird (1928)
Susan Rothenberg, Untitled
(Horse) (1976)
Sample Activities and Assessment
teams to gather information. Using nonfiction texts, remind
them to use the index or table of contents to locate more
information about the animal. When they have some basic
information, have them write the first draft. Ensure that adults
are available to help with revision of the writing. Display the
published writing with the Matisse-style artwork (see
Informative/Explanatory Writing [Art Connection]). (W.1.2,
W.1.5, RI.1.5, RI.1.10, RF.1.4)
ART, INFORMATIVE WRITING
Ask the students to draw an animal of their choice. They will
then color it using the animal’s real colors, or they could
choose to use other colors. Students may also choose to do
either a realistic or abstract version of their animal. Ask the
students to write an informative/explanatory text based on their
drawing, using their choice of realistic or creative coloring.
(W.1.2)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
Before beginning this lesson, ask students what they are
experts at doing (e.g., bike riding, roller skating, or back flips).
Allow some time to share. Remind the students that an author
is a real person who has worked hard to know the information
to fill a book such as What Do You Do with a Tail Like This?
(Steve Jenkins). Ask the students to think about how authors
become experts on a topic, such as the tails of animals. If
possible, invite a speaker who has expertise in something. Talk
about how they became an expert. Talk about why this makes
informational texts better and how having good information can
help improve one’s writing. (RI.1.2, SL.1.3)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Select three or four works to view (e.g., the Klee, Chagall, and
Dürer). Ask the students the following questions: What animal
do you see in this work? Does anyone see a different animal?
What color is the animal? Is this the real color of this animal?
Why do you think the artist chose the color he or she did?
Begin to introduce the concept of abstraction (versus realism)
by comparing the Dürer image with either the Klee or the
Chagall. Ask questions like: Is this exactly what a rabbit looks
like? What about a cat? A picture of a cow? How can we tell
the difference? What was the artist trying to do? (SL.1.1.b,
SL.1.3, SL.1.4)
ART, INFORMATIVE WRITING
Using a projector and computer, display the Tate’s website for
Matisse’s The Snail. Encourage students to comment about
the colors and what they see in the artwork. As you read the
background information and move through the site, students
will see the process Matisse used to create his work. Students
will then create a work of their favorite animal from this unit
using torn pieces of painted paper. Later, do a shared writing in
which the students explain the steps taken to create an art
piece in the style of Matisse. This activity could be a model for
a piece of informative/explanatory writing later. (W.1.7, SL.1.2)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 1
Life Lessons
Unit 3 Number of Weeks: 6 – mid Nov.-mid Jan.
Essential Question: How can stories teach us life lessons?
Terminology: adjectives, affixes, characters, complete sentences, declarative, end punctuation, exclamatory, fable, imperative,
interrogative, key events, lesson, message, moral, narratives, period, revision, setting, verbs
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
RL.1.3: Describe
characters, settings, and
major events in a story,
using key details.
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
"By Myself" in Honey I Love
and Other Poems (Eloise
Greenfield)
"I'm Making a List" in Where
the Sidewalk Ends (Shel
Silverstein) (Read Aloud)
"My Mother Says I’m
Sickening" in The New Kid on
the Block (Jack Prelutsky)
(Read Aloud)
"Ridiculous Rose" in Where
the Sidewalk Ends (Shel
Silverstein)
"Sharing" in Falling Up (Shel
Silverstein)
Goops and How to Be Them:
A Manual of Manners for Polite
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
DRA
DIBELS
GRADE
RL.1.2: Retell stories,
including key details, and
demonstrate
understanding of the
central message or
lesson.
RI.1.6: Distinguish
between information
provided by pictures or
other illustrations and
information provided by
the words in a text.
INFORMATIVE WRITING, LANGUAGE USAGE, SPEAKING
AND LISTENING
One of the life lessons focused on in this unit is manners. With
the students, create a list of “lunchroom manners” using a book
such as Manners (Aliki). Students should dictate the sentences
while you write them on sentence strips. In this writing lesson,
focus on writing complete sentences with subject-verb
agreement. To practice handwriting and correct sentence
construction, have the students copy some of the sentences.
Sentences such as these can be illustrated and compiled in a
book titled Lunchroom Manners. A follow-up to this lesson
would be a humorous list of lunchroom manners inspired by
Prelutsky and Silverstein and written in poetic form. (SL.1.6,
L.1.1c, L.1.1e, L.1.1j)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
W.1.3: Write narratives in
which they recount two or
more appropriately
sequenced events,
include some details
regarding what
happened, use temporal
words to signal event
order, and provide some
sense of closure.
Children (Gelett Burgess)
(Read Aloud)
Stories
Alexander and the Wind-up
Mouse (Leo Lionni) (Read
Aloud)
Fables (Arnold Lobel) (EA)
(Read Aloud)
Green Eggs and Ham (Dr.
Seuss) (E)
Inch by Inch (Leo Lionni)
Lousy Rotten Stinkin' Grapes
(Margie Palatini and Barry
Moser)
Punctuation Takes a Vacation
(Robin Pulver and Lynn Rowe
Reed) (Read Aloud)
Seven Blind Mice (Ed Young)
(EA) Swimmy (Leo Lionni)
(Read Aloud)
The Blind Men and the
Elephant (Karen Backstein
and Annie Mitra)
The Boy Who Cried Wolf (B.G.
Hennessy and Boris Kulikov)
(Read Aloud)
The Hare and The Tortoise
(Swahili) (Helen Ward) (Read
Aloud)
The Lion & the Mouse (Jerry
Pinkney)
The Little Red Hen (Paul
Galdone) (Read Aloud)
The Tortoise and the Hare
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, READING
COMPREHENSION, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce the book A Weed Is a Flower: The Life of George
Washington Carver. Explain that illustrations and text are both
very important in a book. Guide students as they read by
asking them first to think about what you can learn from the
illustrations. Create a two-column chart with “illustrations” on
one side and “text” on the other side. When students learn
something from studying the illustration, they will write it on a
sticky note and put it in the book. When students learn
something from the written words of the text, they will also note
it on a sticky note. When the students are finished reading the
book, use sticky notes to guide the discussion focusing on
learning from illustrations and learning from the text. (RI.1.6)
L.1.2: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of standard
English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling
when writing.
L.1.2 (b): Use end
punctuation for
sentences.
RF.1.4: Read with
sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support
comprehension.
RF.1.4 (b): Read on-level
text orally with accuracy,
appropriate rate, and
expression on
successive readings.
READING LITERATURE, INFORMATIVE WRITING,
SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Tell the students that the Indian fable “The Blind Men and the
Elephant” is the original telling of a fable more commonly
known in the United States as “Seven Blind Mice.” Read the
original story first and then read “Seven Blind Mice.” (Read
aloud to students, or they may read on their own if they are
able.) As the two fables are added to the fable story chart
(found elsewhere in this Unit 3 Activities and Assessments
Section), ask the students to explain how these two stories are
the same and how they are different. Use a digital camera to
take photographs of the process of creating the artwork. Use
these photographs to guide the writing of the shared
explanatory paper. (RL.1.9, RL.1.2)
READING LITERATURE, LANGUAGE MECHANICS
To introduce the relationship between punctuation and reading
expression, use the book Yo! Yes? Show the students the
cover of the book with its very simple title: Yo! Yes? Ask how
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
(Janet Stevens) (Read Aloud)
The Ugly Duckling (Hans
Christian Andersen and Jerry
Pinkney) (Read Aloud)
Town Mouse, Country Mouse
(Jan Brett) (Read Aloud)
Yo! Yes? (Chris Raschka)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
A Weed is a Flower: The Life
of George Washington Carver
(Aliki) (E)
Flick a Switch: How Electricity
Gets to Your Home (Barbara
Seuling and Nancy Tobin)
(Read Aloud)
George Washington Carver
(Rookie Biographies) (Lynea
Bowdish)
Georgia O’Keeffe (Getting to
Know the World’s Greatest
Artists) (Mike Venezia) (Read
Aloud)
Hello! Good-bye! (Aliki) (EA)
(Read Aloud)
Manners (Aliki) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
My Light (Molly Bang) (EA)
(Read Aloud)
Thomas Alva Edison (Rookie
Biographies) (Wil Mara)
Watch Out! At Home (Claire
Llewellyn and Mike Gordon)
Sample Activities and Assessment
someone would say those words. As you read the book with
the students, have the boys read one page, and the girls the
opposite page. As they focus on the illustrations and the way
the author ends each sentence, they will know how to read the
words, and a story will be created in their minds. Follow this
reading with other books so that the children learn how
important it is to read with the end punctuation in mind.
Extension: Reading (reciting) poetry with punctuated lines such
as “Sharing,” would be a way to extend this knowledge of
punctuation and dramatic expression into other literary forms.
Follow this activity with practice using different kinds of end
punctuation. (RL.1.6, RF.1.4b, L.1.2b, RL.1.7)
NARRATIVE WRITING, LANGUAGE USAGE
Assign this narrative prompt: “Think of a time when you learned
a lesson. Be sure to include at least two sequenced events,
use time cue words, provide some details, and include a sense
of closure.” Encourage the students to think about the lessons
learned in the fables as they write their own story. Be sure the
students focus on the beginning, middle, and end (where they
tell about the lesson learned). Edit to be sure that nouns
(singular and plural) match verbs and that verb tenses are
correct and consistent. (W.1.3, W.1.5, RL.1.2, L.1.1c, L.1.1e,
L.1.1j)
INFORMATIVE WRITING, SPEAKING AND LISTENING,
ORAL PRESENTATION
After reading several books about electricity, create a list of
rules for safety (e.g., avoiding electrical outlets with wet
hands). Divide the rules evenly among the students and assign
the task of creating a safety poster for each one. Each student
will write a rule neatly and show additional information (i.e., the
application of the rule) in his or her illustration. Create sets of
posters and allow students to present their rules to another
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
(Read Aloud)
What is Electricity? (Rookie
Read-About Science) (Lisa
Trumbauer)
Art, Music and Media
Art
Georgia O’Keeffe, Jack in the
Pulpit No. IV (1930)
Georgia O’Keeffe, Jimson
Weed (1936)
Georgia O’Keeffe, Oriental
Poppies (1928)
Georgia O’Keeffe, Red Poppy
(1927)
Georgia O’Keeffe, Two Calla
Lilies on Pink (1928)
Vincent van Gogh, Almond
Blossom (1890)
Vincent van Gogh, Butterflies
and Poppies (1890)
Vincent van Gogh, Irises
(1890)
Vincent van Gogh, Sunflowers
(1888-1889)
Sample Activities and Assessment
classroom or grade level. (W.1.2, RI.1.6, SL.1.5, SL.1.6)
READING LITERATURE, READING COMPREHENSION
Tell the students that fables are stories that teach us a lesson.
The characters in the story are usually animals and have one
main characteristic. Read the familiar fable “The Tortoise and
the Hare.” Ask students what they can tell you about the
tortoise. (He’s slow, but steady.) What can they tell about the
hare? (He’s fast, but undependable.) Create a chart with cells
for the title, characters (with one characteristic each), setting,
key events (i.e., from the beginning, middle, and end), and the
lesson learned (i.e., the moral of the story). As you read each
fable in this unit, continue to fill in the chart. Give students
more and more responsibility for filling in the characters,
setting, and key events of a fable. Assess understanding at the
end of the unit by reading a fable and then have each child
write or dictate the entries on his or her own chart. (RL.1.3,
RL.1.2)
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Show students images of van Gogh’s works in comparison to
O’Keeffe’s, and discuss the following as a class: Both of these
artists painted flowers. What is similar and different about their
paintings? Why do you think each painter chose to paint the
flowers they did? Was it because of their color or shape? Do
the flowers remind you of anything—like faces or groups of
people? (SL.1.3)
ART, INFORMATIVE WRITING
Consider showing both O’Keeffe and van Gogh works without
titles. Have students write a short description of what they see.
Which flower can you see actually growing and changing?
Which painter chose to make his or her works more abstract?
Who painted flowers realistically? (W.1.7, W.1.8)
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 1
Winds of Change
Unit 4 Number of Weeks: 6 – mid Jan.-mid March
Essential Question: How do you know what a character is feeling and when these feelings change?
Terminology: cause, effect, revision, verbs
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
RL.1.4: Identify words
and phrases in stories or
poems that suggest
feelings or appeal to the
senses.
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“Blow, Wind, Blow!”
(Traditional) (Read Aloud)
“Covers” in The Sun is So
Quiet (Nikki Giovanni) (E)
“Drinking Fountain” in Random
House Book of Poetry for
Children (Marchette Chute) (E)
“It Fell in the City” in
Blackberry Ink (Eve Merriam)
(E)
“Laughing Boy” in Haiku: This
Other World (Richard Wright)
(E)
“The Wind” in A Child’s
Garden of Verses (Robert
Louis Stevenson) (Read
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
DIBELS
DRA
GRADE
RI.1.8: Identify the
reasons an author gives
to support points in a
text.
W.1.5: With guidance
and support, focus on a
topic, respond to
questions and
suggestions from peers,
and add details to
strengthen writing as
READING LITERATURE, READING COMPREHENSION
Read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz aloud to the class. As
students meet each character in the text, guide them to think
about the character’s feelings and how the author shows us
how the character feels. Discuss how the author helps us use
our senses to see, smell, feel, hear, and even taste while we
are reading a book. As you read aloud, model the way you are
drawn to use your senses. For example, in the second
paragraph of Chapter One, the author describes Kansas so
that you can “see” the countryside clearly. Then he goes on to
describe Aunt Em, Uncle Henry, Toto, and Dorothy, with a
focus on their feelings. (RL.1.3, RL.1.4)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
needed.
Aloud)
“Who Has Seen The Wind?” in
Rossetti: Poems (Everyman’s
Library Pocket Poets)
(Christina Rossetti) (E) (Read
Aloud)
“Windy Nights” in A Child’s
Garden of Verses (Robert
Louis Stevenson) (Read
Aloud)
Stories
Alexander and the Horrible, No
Good, Very Bad Day (Judith
Viorst and Ray Cruz) (Read
Aloud)
Alexander, Who’s Not (Do You
Hear Me? I Mean It!) Going to
Move (Judith Viorst, Ray Cruz,
and Robin Preiss Glasser)
(Read Aloud)
Changes, Changes (Pat
Hutchins)
Frog and Toad All Year
(Arnold Lobel) (EA)
Goin’ Someplace Special
(Patricia C. McKissack and
Jerry Pinkney) (Read Aloud)
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie
(Laura Joffe Numeroff and
Felicia Bond) (Read Aloud)
My Name is Yoon (Helen
Recorvits and Gabi
Swiatkowska)
Owl at Home (Arnold Lobel)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, LANGUAGE USAGE
As you read books about the topic of wind or tornadoes, place
the word “tornado” in the center of a display board. Look for
causes of tornadoes (post on the left) and the effects of
tornadoes (post on the right), creating a visual graphic
organizer for cause and effect. Have students use the graphic
organizer to create sentences showing cause and effect (e.g.,
“The high winds of the tornado tore the roof from the top of the
Civic Center.”). Repeat this activity as you read other
informational books with a cause-and-effect structure, giving
students more of the responsibility for placing sticky notes on
the graphic organizer and writing out the sentences. (RL.1.10,
RI.1.8)
L.1.5: With guidance and
support, demonstrate
understanding of word
relationships and
nuances in word
meanings.
L.1.5(d): Distinguish
shades of meanings
among verbs differing in
manner (e.g., look, peek,
glance, stare, glare, and
scowl)
SL.1.4: Describe people,
places, things, and
events with relevant
details, expressing ideas
and feelings clearly.
NARRATIVE WRITING, LANGUAGE USAGE
Give students this prompt: “Write a story about a time you felt
happy. Be sure to include at least two sequenced events, use
time cue words, provide some details, and include a sense of
closure.” Combining the focuses of this unit (revision,
appealing to the senses with details, and using well-chosen
verbs), zero in on details and synonyms while the students
revise their stories. Help the students to watch for the proper
use of personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I,
me, my; they, them, their; anyone, everything) as they are
editing. (W.1.3, W.1.5, L.1.1d)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, INFORMATIVE
WRITING, POETRY WRITING
Introduce an informative article such as “Wind Power” (National
Geographic Young Explorers). First, ask students to think
about what wind causes and brainstorm with the children.
Then, have the students read the article independently, with
partners, or with the teacher to find out what the wind causes.
Continue this activity with more nonfiction articles and books,
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
(E)
Ten Apples Up on Top! (Dr.
Seuss) (EA)
The Bat Boy and His Violin
(Gavin Curtis and E.B. Lewis)
(Read Aloud)
The Wind Blew (Pat Hutchins)
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
(L. Frank Baum) (E) (Read
Aloud)
Twister on Tuesday (Mary
Pope Osborne and Sal
Murdocca) (EA) (Read Aloud)
When Sophie Gets Angry—
Really, Really Angry… (Molly
Bang) (EA)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
Wind Power (National
Geographic Young Explorers)
(November-December 2009)
(E)
Feelings (Aliki) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
Flash, Crash, Rumble, and
Roll (Franklyn M. Branley and
True Kelley) (Read Aloud)
How People Learned to Fly
(Fran Hodgkins and True
Kelley) (E) (Read Aloud)
Storms (National Geographic
Readers) (Miriam Goin)
Super Storms (Seymour
Sample Activities and Assessment
continually giving students more of the responsibility for
recording their own ideas. Throughout the unit, continue
reading and reciting the poems in the unit to build a love for
poetry. Blend the recording of ideas from the nonfiction works
into a creative writing activity by creating an illustrated freeform poem using the wind cause-and-effect chart as
inspiration. As a class, generate more effects of wind that
students may have witnessed. Begin and end the poem with
the word wind. (RL.1.10, RI.1.8, W.1.7, W.1.8)
LANGUAGE USAGE
To teach the use of a comma in a series, list the five senses on
the whiteboard. Give students a “setting” card (e.g., zoo, farm,
or beach) and have them dictate a sentence using one of the
senses, naming three things they sense in that setting. Explain
that when we use the word and we are using a conjunction. For
example, “At the zoo, I smell popcorn, elephants, and cotton
candy.” Write the dictated sentence and then challenge them to
write their own sentences using and in the sentences. (L.1.2c,
L.1.1g)
LANGUAGE USAGE, VOCABULARY
To reinforce the idea of a wide range of alternatives for a word
like “see,” write the words “look,” “peek,” “glance,” “stare,”
“glare,” and “scowl” on cards. Have the students arrange the
cards in order from the most to least cautious (e.g., peek
→glance →look →stare →glare →scowl). Use a thesaurus to
add other synonyms of “to see” and add them into the range of
words. (L.1.5d)
MUSIC, READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
Throughout the day, play some violin concerto music in the
background. Ask the students how the music made them feel.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Simon) (Read Aloud)
Tornadoes (Seymour Simon)
(Read Aloud)
Tornadoes! (Gail Gibbons)
(EA) (Read Aloud)
Twisters and Other Terrible
Storms: A Nonfiction
Companion to Twister on
Tuesday (Will Osborne, Mary
Pope Osborne, and Sal
Murdocca) (EA) (Read Aloud)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Richard Diebenkorn, Ocean
Park No. 115 (1979) 1
Richard Diebenkorn, Ocean
Park No. 38 (1971)
Richard Diebenkorn, Ocean
Park No. 49 (1972)
Richard Diebenkorn, Ocean
Park No. 54 (1972) Film
Victor Fleming, dir., The
Wizard of Oz, (1939) Music
Johann Sebastian Bach,
Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings,
and Continuo in D Minor
(Double Violin Concerto)
(1730-31)
Ludwig van Beethoven, Violin
Concerto in D Major, Op. 61
(1806)
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Violin
Concerto in D major, Op. 35
Sample Activities and Assessment
For example, ask them to finish this sentence: “During the
music, I felt _______________.” Continue to listen to the music
at any opportunity. Then, read the book The Bat Boy and His
Violin, which is the story of a boy who loved to play the violin.
After the students listen to the story, go back through the text
and have the children talk about how the author used words
and phrases to let the reader know how the characters in the
book felt. (RL.1.4, L.1.1i)
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Take time to have students look at each painting closely. What
changes in Diebenkorn’s series of Ocean Park works? Where?
Discuss together the use of one subject in this selection. What
aspects of the paintings stay the same? (SL.1.1, SL.1.3,
SL.1.4, SL.1.6)
ART, LANGUAGE USAGE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Show students a sampling of Richard Diebenkorn’s Ocean
Park series, which the painter began in 1967 and worked on for
the rest of his life. What do you see in these images—the
ocean? Clouds? Sand? What techniques has Diebenkorn used
to convey the look and feel of these objects? Use adjectives
and action verbs to describe what you see. (SL.1.3, L.1.1,
L.1.5)
LANGUAGE USAGE
Choose some verbs that are rather bland, such as “to walk.”
Ask the students to imagine that they are in the book (The
Wonderful Wizard of Oz) with Dorothy and that they are
walking on the yellow brick road. Have them imagine that they
are really happy (e.g., when they see the Emerald City). How
would they walk? (Possible answers: skip, run, dance.) Allow
students to show us how that kind of motion would look. Then,
have them imagine that they are feeling scared (e.g., when
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
(1878)
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart,
Violin Concerto No. 4 in D
Major (1775)
Sample Activities and Assessment
walking through the forest). How would they walk? (Possible
answers: tiptoe, creep.) Make a list of all the words that could
be used as a better choice than “walk.” This lesson on verbs
can be extended to cover tenses, roots, and affixes -ed, -s, ing. To make the extending lessons more fun, create a word
cloud (using a free online program like Wordle) for each verb
tense (i.e., present tense verbs for “walk,” past tense verbs for
“walk,” . . . ) (SL.1.4, L1.1e, L.1.5d, L.1.4b, L.1.4c)
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Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 1
American Contributions
Unit 5 Number of Weeks: 6 – mid March-April
Essential Question: How does learning about remarkable people help us learn about history?
Terminology: biography, compare, contrast, expression, opinion, reread, support, timeline, word bank, words in context
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
RI.1.10: With prompting
and support, read
informational texts
appropriately complex for
Grade One.
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“Hope” in The Collected Poetry
of Langston Hughes (Langston
Hughes) (EA) (Read Aloud)
“Washington” in The Random
House Book of Poetry for
Children (Nancy Byrd Turner)
(Read Aloud)
You’re a Grand Old Flag
(George M. Cohan and Norman
Rockwell) (Read Aloud)
Stories
A True Story About Jackie
Robinson (Testing the Ice)
(Sharon Robinson and Kadir
Nelson) (Read Aloud)
A. Lincoln and Me (Louise
Borden and Ted Lewin) (Read
Aloud)
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
DRA
DIBELS
GRADE
RI.1.3: Describe the
connection between two
individuals, events,
ideas, or pieces of
information in a text.
RF1.4: Read with
sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support
comprehension.
RF.1.4(c): Use context to
confirm or self-correct
word recognition and
ART, SPEAKING & LISTENING
Select several works to view -- for instance, you might choose
to compare the Copley with the Stuart. Ask the students to
turn to the person next to them and discuss such questions
as: "Who is this subject? How did the artist choose to
depict/portray this famous American?" Just by looking, search
the paintings or photographs for important clues to discover
who this person really is. (SL.1.1, SL.1.3, SL.1.4, SL.1.6)
READING LITERATURE, READING INFORMATIONAL
TEXT, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Create pairings of books that are literary and informational
(e.g., George Washington and the General’s Dog and The
Rookie Biography of George Washington). Discuss how
reading a story about a character/historic person differs from
reading a biography of the same person. Talk about how
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
understanding, rereading
as necessary.
W1.1: Write opinion
pieces in which
[students] introduce the
topic or name the book
they are writing about,
state an opinion, supply a
reason for the opinion,
and provide some sense
of closure.
SL.1.3: Ask and answer
questions about what a
speaker says in order to
gather additional
information or clarify
something that is not
understood.
Suggested
Works/Resources
Abe Lincoln Crosses a Creek:
A Tall, Thin Tale (Deborah
Hopkinson and John Hendrix)
(Read Aloud)
George Washington and the
General’s Dog (Frank Murphy
and Richard Walz) (Read
Aloud)
Little House in the Big Woods
(Laura Ingalls Wilder and Garth
Williams) (E) (Read Aloud)
Mr. Lincoln’s Whiskers (Karen
Winnick) (Read Aloud)
Rockwell: A Boy and His Dog
(Loren Spiotta-DiMare and Cliff
Miller) (Read Aloud)
The Hatmaker's Sign: A Story
by Benjamin Franklin (Candace
Fleming and Robert Parker)
(Read Aloud)
Willie Was Different: A
Children’s Story (Norman
Rockwell) (Read Aloud)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
A Picture Book of Benjamin
Franklin (David A. Adler, John
and Alexandra Wallner) (Read
Aloud)
A Picture Book of George
Washington (David A. Adler,
John and Alexandra Wallner)
(Read Aloud)
Sample Activities and Assessment
these two books connect to each other. For example, ask
questions like, “How were the books the same?” and “How
were they different?” In this unit are numerous potential book
pairings among the biographies, fictional stories, and even a
fictional story written by the historical person himself
(Benjamin Franklin). Pairing the readings presents an
opportunity to highlight the different characteristics of each
genre. (RL.1.5, RL.1.7, RI.1.3)
OPINION WRITING
Give students this prompt: “Choose one of the people from
this unit that you think is the most interesting. Write about the
person. Be sure to name the person and to give two or three
reasons why you think he or she is the most interesting.”
(W1.1)
MUSIC, VOCABULARY
Display the lyrics to each of the songs on an overhead
projector or interactive whiteboard. After singing the songs
together several times, allow the students to choose words
that are interesting to them and circle them. Help students
look for clues in the text to determine word meanings. Check
for the correct definitions in a dictionary. Collect these and
other words to add to the word bank from reading throughout
the unit. Continue reviewing the songs until the lyrics are well
known or memorized. (RF.1.4c)
READING LITERATURE, INFORMATIVE WRITING,
NARRATIVE WRITING
Read and discuss The Hatmaker’s Sign (Candace Fleming
and Robert Parker). Talk about how it relates to revision.
Instruct students to take a piece of their writing (such as the
“most interesting” piece) and carefully work on revising ideas.
Students should edit their pieces and publish them. (W1.5,
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
A Picture Book of Paul Revere
(David A. Adler, John and
Alexandra Wallner) (Read
Aloud)
Abraham Lincoln (Rookie
Biographies) (Wil Mara)
Benjamin Franklin (Rookie
Biographies) (Wil Mara)
Betsy Ross: The Story of Our
Flag (Easy Reader
Biographies) (Pamela Chanko)
(Read Aloud)
Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet,
Slave (Laban Carrick Hill and
Bryan Collier) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
George Washington (Rookie
Biographies) (Wil Mara)
Jackie Robinson (Rookie
Biographies) (Wil Mara)
John, Paul, George, and Ben
(Lane Smith) (Read Aloud)
Laura Ingalls Wilder (Rookie
Biographies) (Wil Mara)
Let’s Read About ... Cesar
Chavez (Jerry Tello)
Let’s Read About—Abraham
Lincoln (Scholastic First
Biographies) (Sonia Black and
Carol Heyer)
Let’s Read About—George
Washington (Scholastic First
Biographies) (Kimberly
Weinberger and Bob Doucet)
Sample Activities and Assessment
RL.1.2)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, READING FLUENCY,
SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Have students choose one of the biographies they enjoyed
reading. Have them practice reading the book until they can
read it well (i.e., with phrasing and expression). As students
read their biographies independently, look for opportunities to
use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and
understanding, encouraging the children to reread as
necessary. Take the books to a kindergarten class and have
students read the books aloud to students there. (RF.1.4a,
RF.1.4b, RF.1.4c, RI.1.4, RI.1.10)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
To help students make visual connections between events
and people during early American history, create a simple
timeline and record events as you read books on this topic
together or as students report back on what they read
independently. Students should understand that although
these informational texts focus on different people or topics, it
all happened at the same time in history. By extending the
timeline to include historical figures, students begin to
understand chronology and the connections between events
in informational texts. (RI.1.3, RI.1.10)
INFORMATIVE WRITING, LANGUAGE USAGE,
VOCABULARY
Give students this prompt: “Write three sentences about an
American person we’ve read about recently, using at least
three new words from our word bank in your work. Illustrate
each sentence to demonstrate the meaning of each word.” Do
a mini-lesson on articles (a, the) and demonstrative pronouns
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Paul Revere (Rookie
Biographies) (Wil Mara)
Pocahontas (DK Readers)
(Caryn Jenner)
The Man Who Walked Between
the Towers (Mordicai Gerstein)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Ben Wittick, Geronimo
(Goyathlay), a Chiricahua
Apache; full-length, kneeling
with rifle (1887)
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at
The Lincoln Memorial (1963)
George P. A. Healy, Abraham
Lincoln (1869)
Gilbert Stuart, Dolley Madison
(1804)
Gilbert Stuart, George
Washington (1796)
John Singleton Copley, Paul
Revere (1768)
Portrait of Harriet Tubman
(artist and date unknown)
Music
George M. Cohan, “Yankee
Doodle Boy”
George M. Cohan, “You’re a
Grand Old Flag”
Sample Activities and Assessment
(this, that, these, those) as the students write their sentences.
(L.1.1h, L.1.1j, L.1.6, L.1.5c, L.1.2a, L.1.2b, L.1.2d, L.1.2e)
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Show students Stuart’s portrait of Washington, the Martin
Luther King Jr. photograph, and the photograph of Geronimo.
Ask students to focus on the setting that surrounds each of
the subjects. In the case of Washington, how did the painter
place his subject in order to convey his importance? What
does the painter add to the scene? How does this differ from
the Martin Luther King Jr. photograph, where the
photographer had to instantly capture the setting? Can you
see a merging of these two qualities in the image of
Geronimo? (SL.1.1, SL.1.3, SL.1.4, SL.1.6)
SPEAKING AND LISTENING, INFORMATIVE WRITING
Invite a person from your community who has made a notable
contribution to visit your classroom. After the speaker has
shared his or her story, invite the students to ask questions to
gather additional information or to clarify understanding. Write
thank-you notes to guest speakers, telling the speaker one
new thing learned during the presentation. (SL.1.3, W.1.8)
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 1
Around the World with a Glass Slipper
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Unit 6 Number of Weeks: 6 – May-June
Essential Question: What can versions of the same story teach us about different cultures?
Terminology: act out, compare, contrast, culture, dialogue, fairy tales, fantasy, “Once upon a time . . .” scene, and setting
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
RL.1.9: Compare and
contrast the adventures
and experiences of
characters in stories.
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“Star Light, Star Bright”
(Traditional)
Stories
Cinderella (Charles Perrault,
Loek Koopmans, and Anthea
Bell) (Read Aloud)
Cinderella (Marcia Brown)
(Read Aloud)
Cinderella Penguin, or, The
Little Glass Flipper (Janet
Perlman and John Peterson)
(Read Aloud)
Cinderquacker (Mike Thaler
and Dave Clegg) (Read Aloud)
Fair, Brown & Trembling: An
Irish Cinderella Story (Jude
Daly) (Read Aloud)
James Marshall’s Cinderella
(Barbara Karlin and James
Marshall) (Read Aloud)
Little Gold Star: A Spanish
American Cinderella Tale
(Robert D. San Souci and
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
DRA
DIBELS
GRADE
RI.1.9: Identify basic
similarities in and
differences between two
texts on the same topic
(e.g., in illustrations,
descriptions, or
procedures).
W.1.1: Write opinion
pieces in which they
introduce the topic or
name the book they are
writing about, state an
opinion, supply a reason
for the opinion, and
provide some sense of
closure.
W.1.6: With guidance
and support from adults,
ART, LANGUAGE USAGE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Discuss how countries and continents, as depicted in the
literature in this unit, are very different. Introduce masks from
different continents. As they view each mask, ask the students
to think of describing words (i.e., adjectives) you would use to
tell someone about the mask. Ask such questions as: "What
materials do you think are used? Why do you believe each
culture chooses specific colors or textures in their works of art?
Can you guess how each object was used?" (L.1.5d, SL.1.4)
READING LITERATURE, OPINION WRITING, LANGUAGE
USAGE
Read many different versions of Cinderella. Then, give
students this prompt: “Choose your favorite version of the
Cinderella story. Tell at least two reasons why you liked this
version the most.” Students should include the title of the book,
at least two reasons why they thought it was their favorite, and
a strong ending. Revision should focus on word choice,
elaboration, or word order as they rewrite the paragraph.
(W.1.1, L.1.1j, L.1.2a, L.1.2b, L.1.2d, L.1.2e, RL.1.9)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
use a variety of digital
tools to produce and
publish writing, including
in collaboration with
peers.
L.1.5: With guidance and
support from adults,
demonstrate
understanding of word
relationships and
nuances in word
meanings.
L.1.5(d): Distinguish
shades of meanings
among verbs differing in
manner (e.g., look, peek,
glance, stare, glare, [and]
scowl) and adjectives
differing in intensity (e.g.,
large, gigantic) by
defining or choosing
them, or by acting out the
meanings.
SL.1.5: Add drawings or
other visual displays to
descriptions when
appropriate to clarify
ideas, thoughts, and
feelings.
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sergio Martinez) (Read Aloud)
Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters
(John Steptoe) (Read Aloud)
Prince Cinders (Babette Cole)
(Read Aloud)
The Egyptian Cinderella
(Shirley Climo and Ruth
Heller) (Read Aloud) The
Korean Cinderella (Shirley
Climo and Ruth Heller) (Read
Aloud)
The Turkey Girl: A Zuni
Cinderella Story (Penny
Pollock and Ed Young) (EA)
(Read Aloud)
The Way Meat Loves Salt: A
Cinderella Tale from the
Jewish Tradition (Nina Jaffe
and Louise August) (Read
Aloud)
Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story
from China (Ai-Ling Louie and
Ed Young) (EA) (Read Aloud)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
Africa (Pull Ahead Books
Continents) (Madeline
Donaldson)
Ancient Egypt: A First Look at
People of the Nile (Bruce
Strachan) (Read Aloud)
Antarctica (Pull Ahead Books
Continents) (Madeline
Sample Activities and Assessment
READING LITERATURE, VOCABULARY
As you begin the set of Cinderella stories, create a wall chart to
organize the similarities and differences among the versions.
Use categories that review the literary terms of this school
year, such as: characters, setting, beginning, events (middle),
and ending. (RL.1.1, RL.1.2, RL.1.9)
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING,
ORAL PRESENTATION
Ask the students to think about how all of the Cinderella stories
are different because of the time and place in which they
happen. Challenge the students to draw the “trying on the
slipper” scene as if it were happening right now and in the
place where they live. Scan the pictures and create a slide for
each image. Students present their drawings to the class,
explaining their adaptation of the “slipper scene.” (SL.1.5,
SL.1.6, RL.1.9)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
Choose two books about the same continent such as Australia
(Pull Ahead Books Continents, Madeleine Donaldson) and
Look What Came from Australia (Kevin Davis). Discuss how
the books are similar (because they are about the same
continent). Determine how they are also different (because
they are written by different authors and have different
purposes). Then, read the books as a class. Make a chart with
two columns, one for each book (e.g., Australia and Look What
Came from Australia). Work together to make a list of what is
learned in each book and then look for similar information in
both books. Challenge the students to do this activity with two
books, reading with a partner or reading one independently
and having the teacher read the other aloud. (RF.1.4, RI.1.2,
RI.1.3, RI.1.9, RI.1.10)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Donaldson)
Asia (Pull Ahead Books
Continents) (Madeline
Donaldson)
Australia (Pull Ahead Books
Continents) (Madeline
Donaldson)
DK First Atlas (Anita Ganeri
and Chris Oxlade) (Read
Aloud)
Europe (Pull Ahead Books
Continents) (Madeline
Donaldson)
Look What Came from Africa
(Miles Harvey) (Read Aloud)
Look What Came from
Australia (Kevin Davis) (Read
Aloud)
Look What Came from China
(Miles Harvey) (Read Aloud)
Look What Came from Egypt
(Miles Harvey) (Read Aloud)
North America (Pull Ahead
Books Continents) (Madeline
Donaldson) South America
(Pull Ahead Books Continents)
(Madeline Donaldson)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Captain Scaramouche
(Venice, Italy, date unknown)
Devil Dance mask (Aymara,
Bolivia, ca. 1974)
Display mask (East Sepik,
Sample Activities and Assessment
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, RESEARCH, ORAL
PRESENTATION
Partner students to research the contributions/inventions of a
country introduced to them in this unit. Tell them to work
together to gather information from several different sources.
Building knowledge of the contributions of various countries
that is gleaned from informational texts (e.g., the Look What
Came from . . . series), have students gather actual items that
represent the contributions (e.g., for China, writing paper, a
compass, and paper money). Ask them to communicate
findings by creating a museum of contributions by having the
students design information cards to go with each item.
Students could stand behind their table to explain the origins of
the items as visitors come through the museum. (SL.1.5,
RI.1.2, RI.1.5, RI.1.9, RI.1.10, W.1.7, W.1.8, L.1.2)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, READING
LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Have students read one of the nonfiction books about a
continent or country. After the students finish, have them find
and review a fairy tale that is set in a similar place or culture.
Discuss what students saw in both books (e.g., geography,
people, clothing, food, places, and customs). Discuss how the
books are different (e.g., one tells a story; the other gives
factual information). (RL.1.5, RL.1.7, RI.1.9)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Papua New Guinea, ca. 1980)
Mask (Dan, Ivory Coast, ca.
early twentieth century)
Puppet mask (Japan, ca. early
twentieth century)
Shaman’s mask (Inuit/Eskimo,
Alaska, ca. early twentieth
century)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 1 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Grade 1: Poems and Songs
Unit 1
Books Fall Open by David McCord
Books fall open, you fall in,
delighted where you've never been;
hear voices not once heard before,
reach world on world through door on door;
find unexpected keys to things locked up beyond imaginings.
What might you be, perhaps become,
because one book is somewhere?
Some wise delver into wisdom, wit,
and wherewithal has written it.
True books will venture, dare you out,
whisper secrets, maybe shout
across the gloom to you in need,
who hanker for a book to read.
Books To the Ceiling by Arnold Lobel
Books to the ceiling
Books to the sky
My piles of books are a mile high
How I love them
How I need them
I'll have a long beard by the time I read them
Good Books, Good Times by Lee Bennett Hopkins
Good books, good times
Good stories
Good rhymes
Good beginnings
Good ends
Good people
Good friends
Good fiction
Good facts
Good adventures
Good acts
Good stories
Good rhymes
GOOD books
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
GOOD times
How To Eat A Poem by Eve Merriam
Don’t be polite.
Bite in.
Pick it up with your fingers and lick the juice that
may run down your chin.
It is ready and ripe now, whenever you are.
You do not need a knife or fork or spoon
or plate or napkin or tablecloth.
For there is no core
or stem
or rind
or pit
or seed
or skin
to throw away.
Read to Me by Jane Yolen
Read to me riddles and read to me rhymes
Read to me stories of magical times
Read to me tales about castles and kings
Read to me stories of fabulous things
Read to me pirates and read to me knights
Read to me dragons and dragon-book fights
Read to me spaceships and cowboys and then
When you are finished- please read them again.
Unit 2
Fish by Mary Ann Hoberman
Look at them flit
Lickety-split
Wiggling
Swiggling
Swerving
Curving
Hurrying
Scurrying
Chasing
Racing
Whizzing
Whisking
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Flying
Frisking
Tearing around
With a leap and a bound
But none of them making the tiniest
tiniest
tiniest
tiniest
sound.
The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear
I
The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea
In a beautiful pea green boat,
They took some honey, and plenty of money,
Wrapped up in a five pound note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
And sang to a small guitar,
'O lovely Pussy! O Pussy my love,
What a beautiful Pussy you are,
You are,
You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!'
II
Pussy said to the Owl, 'You elegant fowl!
How charmingly sweet you sing!
O let us be married! too long we have tarried:
But what shall we do for a ring?'
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
To the land where the Bong-tree grows
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood
With a ring at the end of his nose,
His nose,
His nose,
With a ring at the end of his nose.
III
'Dear pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling
Your ring?' Said the Piggy, 'I will.'
So they took it away, and were married next day
By the Turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince, and slices of quince,
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
They danced by the light of the moon,
The moon,
The moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.
The Fox’s Foray
A fox jumped out one winter’s night
And begged the moon to give him light.
For he’d many miles to trot that night
Before he reached his den O!
Den O! Den O!
For he’d many miles to trot that night before he reached his den O!
The first place he came to was a farmer’s yard,
Where the ducks and the geese declared it hard
That their nerves should be shaken and their rest so marred
By a visit from Mr. Fox O!
Fox O! Fox O!
That their nerves should be shaken and their rest so marred
By a visit from Mr. Fox O!
He took the grey goose by the neck,
And swung him right across his back;
The grey goose cried out, Quack, quack, quack,
With his legs hanging dangling down O!
Down O! Down O!
The grey goose cried out, Quack, quack, quack,
With his legs hanging dangling down O!
Old Mother Slipper Slopper jumped out of bed,
And out of the window she popped her head:
Oh, John, John, the grey goose is gone,
And the fox is off to his den O!
Den O! Den O!
Oh, John, John, the grey goose is gone,
And the fox is off to his den O!
John ran up to the top of the hill.
And blew his whistle loud and shrill;
Said the fox, That is very pretty music still –
I’d rather be in my den O!
Den O! Den O!
Said the fox, That is very pretty music still –
I’d rather be in my den O!
The fox went back to his hungry den,
And his dear little foxes, eight, nine, ten;
Quoth they, Good daddy, you must go there again,
If you bring such god cheer from the farm O!
Farm O! Farm O!
Quoth they, Good daddy, you must go there again,
If you bring such god cheer from the farm O!
The fox and his wife, without any strife,
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Said they never ate a better goose in all their life:
They did very well without fork or knife,
And the little ones chewed on the bones O!
Bones O! Bones O!
They did very well without fork or knife,
And the little ones chewed on the bones O!
The Pasture by Robert Frost
I'm going out to clean the pasture spring;
I'll only stop to rake the leaves away
(And wait to watch the water clear, I may):
I sha'n't be gone long.—You come too.
I'm going out to fetch the little calf
That's standing by the mother. It's so young,
It totters when she licks it with her tongue.
I sha'n't be gone long.—You come too.
The Purple Cow by Gelett Burgess
I never saw a purple cow,
I never hope to see one;
But I can tell you, anyhow,
I'd rather see than be one!
Unit 3
By Myself by Eloise Greenfield
When I’m by myself
And I close my eyes
I’m a twin
I’m a dimple in a chin
I’m a room full of toys
I’m a squeaky noise
I’m a gospel song
I’m a gong
I’m a leaf turning red
I’m a loaf of brown bread
I’m a whatever I want to be
An anything I care to be
And when I open my eyes
What I care to be
Is me.
I’m Making a List by Shel Silverstein
“I'm making a list
I'm making a list of things I must say
For politeness,
And goodness and kindness and gentleness
Sweetness and rightness:
Hello
Pardon me
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
How are you?
Excuse me
Bless you
May I?
Thank you
Goodbye
If you know some that I've forgot,
Please stick them in your eye!”
MY MOTHER SAYS I’M SICKENING by Jack Prelutsky
My mother says I’m sickening,
my mother says I’m crude,
she says this when she sees me,
playing Ping-Pong with my food,
she doesn’t seem to like it
when I slurp my bowl of stew,
and now she’s got a list of things
she says I mustn’t doDO NOT CATAPULT THE CARROTS!
DO NOT JUGGLE GOBS OF FAT!
DO NOT DROP THE MASHED POTATOES
ON THE GERBIL OR THE CAT!
NEVER PUNCH THE PUMPKIN PUDDING!
NEVER TUNNEL THROUGH THE BREAD!
PUT NO PEAS INTO YOUR POCKET!
PLACE NO NOODLES ON YOUR HEAD!
DO NOT SQUEEZE THE STEAMED ZUCCHINI!
DO NOT MAKE THE MELON OOZE!
NEVER STUFF VANILLA YOGURT
IN YOUR LITTLE SISTER’S SHOES!
DRAW NO FACES IN THE KETCHUP!
MAKE NO LITTLE GRAVY POOLS!
I wish my mother wouldn’t make
so many useless rules.
Ridiculous Rose by Shel Silverstein
Her mama said, "Don't eat with your fingers."
"OK," said Ridiculous Rose,
So she ate with her toes!
Unit 4
Covers by Nikki Giovanni
Glass covers windows
to keep the cold away
Clouds cover the sky
to make a rainy day
Nighttime covers
all the things that creep
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Blankets cover me
when I’m asleep
The Drinking Fountain by Marchette G. Chute
When I climb up
To get a drink
It doesn't work
The way you'd think
I turn it up.
The water goes
And hits me right
Upon the nose.
I turn it down
To make it small
And don't get any
Drink at all.
It Fell in the City by Eve Merriam
It fell in the City
It fell through the night,
And the black rooftops
All turned white.
5 Red fire hydrants
All turned white.
Blue police cars
All turned white
10 Green garbage cans
All turned white.
Gray sidewalks
All turned white.
Yellow NO PARKING signs
15 All turned white
When it fell in the city
All through the night.
The Wind by Robert Louis Stevenson
I saw you toss the kites on high
And blow the birds about the sky;
And all around I heard you pass,
Like ladies' skirts across the grass-O wind, a-blowing all day long,
O wind, that sings so loud a song!
I saw the different things you did,
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
But always you yourself you hid.
I felt you push, I heard you call,
I could not see yourself at all-O wind, a-blowing all day long,
O wind, that sings so loud a song!
O you that are so strong and cold,
O blower, are you young or old?
Are you a beast of field and tree,
Or just a stronger child than me?
O wind, a-blowing all day long,
O wind, that sings so loud a song!
Who Has Seen the Wind? by Christina Rossetti
Who has seen the wind?
Neither I nor you:
But when the leaves hang trembling,
The wind is passing through.
Who has seen the wind?
Neither you nor I:
But when the trees bow down their heads,
The wind is passing by.
Windy Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson
Whenever the moon and stars are set,
Whenever the wind is high,
All night long in the dark and wet,
A man goes riding by.
Late in the night when the fires are out,
Why does he gallop and gallop about?
Whenever the trees are crying aloud,
And ships are tossed at sea,
By, on the highway, low and loud,
By at the gallop goes he.
By at the gallop he goes, and then
By he comes back at the gallop again.
Unit 5
Hope by Langston Hughes
He rose up on his dying bed
and asked for fish.
His wife looked it up in her dream book
and played it.
Washington by Nancy Byrd Turner
He played by the river when he was young,
He raced with rabbits along the hills,
He fished for minnows, and climbed and swung,
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
And hooted back at the whippoorwills.
Strong and slender and tall he grew —
And then, one morning, the bugles blew.
Over the hills the summons came,
Over the river’s shining rim.
He said that the bugles called his name,
He knew that his country needed him,
And he answered, “Coming!” and marched away
For many a night and many a day.
Perhaps when the marches were hot and long
He’d think of the river flowing by
Or, camping under the winter sky,
Would hear the whippoorwill’s far-off song.
Boy or soldier, in peace or strife,
He loved America all his life!
You're A Grand Old Flag by George M. Cohan
You're a grand old flag,
You're a high flying flag
And forever in peace may you wave.
You're the emblem of
The land I love.
The home of the free and the brave.
Ev'ry heart beats true
'neath the Red, White and Blue,
Where there's never a boast or brag.
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
Keep your eye on the grand old flag.
You're a grand old flag,
You're a high flying flag
And forever in peace may you wave.
You're the emblem of
The land I love.
The home of the free and the brave.
Ev'ry heart beats true
'neath the Red, White and Blue,
Where there's never a boast or brag.
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
Keep your eye on the grand old flag.
Yankee Doodle Boy by George M. Cohan
I'm the kid that's all the candy
I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy
I'm glad I am
(So's Uncle Sam)
I'm a real live Yankee Doodle
Made my name and fame and boodle
Just like Mister Doodle did, by riding on a pony
I love to listen to the Dixey [Dixie] strain
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
"I long to see the girl I left behind me"
And that ain't a josh
She's a Yankee, by gosh
(Oh, say can you see
Anything about a Yankee that's a phoney?)
I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy
A Yankee Doodle, do or die
A real live nephew of my Uncle Sam
Born on the Fourth of July
I've got a Yankee Doodle sweetheart
She's my Yankee Doodle joy
Yankee Doodle came to London
Just to ride the ponies
I am the Yankee Doodle Boy
Father's name was Hezikiah
Mother's name was Ann Maria
Yanks through and through
(Red, white and blue)
Father was so Yankee hearted
When the Spanish War was started
He slipped upon his uniform and hopped up on a pony
My mother's mother was a Yankee true
My father's father was a Yankee too
And that's going some
For the Yankees, by gum
(Oh, say can you see
Anything about my pedigree that's phoney
I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy
A Yankee Doodle, do or die
A real live nephew of my Uncle Sam
Born on the Fourth of July
I've got a Yankee Doodle sweetheart
She's my Yankee Doodle joy
Yankee Doodle came to London
Just to ride the ponies
I am the Yankee Doodle Boy
I'm the kid that's all the candy
I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy
I'm glad I am
(So's Uncle Sam)
I'm a real live Yankee Doodle
Made my name and fame and boodle
Just like Mister Doodle did, by riding on a pony
I love to listen to the Dixey [Dixie] strain
"I long to see the girl I left behind me"
And that ain't a josh
She's a Yankee, by gosh
(Oh, say can you see
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Anything about a Yankee that's a phoney?)
I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy
A Yankee Doodle, do or die
A real live nephew of my Uncle Sam
Born on the Fourth of July
I've got a Yankee Doodle sweetheart
She's my Yankee Doodle joy
Yankee Doodle came to London
Just to ride the ponies
I am the Yankee Doodle Boy
Father's name was Hezikiah
Mother's name was Ann Maria
Yanks through and through
(Red, white and blue)
Father was so Yankee hearted
When the Spanish War was started
He slipped upon his uniform and hopped up on a pony
My mother's mother was a Yankee true
My father's father was a Yankee too
And that's going some
For the Yankees, by gum
(Oh, say can you see
Anything about my pedigree that's phoney
I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy
A Yankee Doodle, do or die
A real live nephew of my Uncle Sam
Born on the Fourth of July
I've got a Yankee Doodle sweetheart
She's my Yankee Doodle joy
Yankee Doodle came to London
Just to ride the ponies
I am the Yankee Doodle Boy
Unit 6
Star Light, Star Bright
Star Light Star bright,
The first star I see tonight,
I wish I may, I wish I might,
Have the wish I wish tonight.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 2
A Season for Chapters
Unit 1 - No. of Weeks: 6 – Sept.-mid Oct.
Essential Question: When is language beautiful?
Terminology: alliteration, author, beginning, chapter, conclusion, digital graphic organizer, digital sources, ending, illustrator,
introduction, main idea, paragraph, poet, poetry, repetition, research, rhyme, rhythm, shared writing, spelling patter
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RI.2.2: Identify the main
focus of a multiparagraph text as well as
the focus of specific
paragraphs within the
text.
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“A Vagabond Song” (Bliss
Carman) in The Seasons (ed.
John N. Serio) (Read Aloud)
“Autumn” (Emily Dickinson) (E)
“Bed in Summer” (Robert
Louis Stevenson) (Read
Aloud)
“Knoxville, Tennessee” (Nikki
Giovanni) (E)
“Something Told the Wild
Geese” (Rachel Field) (E)
“Stopping by Woods on a
Snowy Evening” (Robert Frost)
(E)
“Summer Song” (John Ciardi)
in The Seasons (ed. John N.
Serio)
RL.2.5: Describe the
overall structure of a
story, including
describing how the
beginning introduces the
story and the ending
concludes the action.
SL.2.1: Participate in
collaborative
conversations with
diverse partners about
DRA
DIBELS
GRADE
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Artists often convey a sense of season in their depictions of
flowers or trees. Ask students to study the Tiffany image, van
Gogh’s Mulberry Tree, and the work titled Snow-Laden
Branches. Note that these works were created on three
different continents at around the same time period. Ask
students to discuss similarities and differences in these artists’
techniques for depicting the seasons. (SL.2.2)
ART, INFORMATIVE WRITING
Select a work to study—for instance, you might choose the
Seurat for a clear depiction of a season. Ask the students to
name the season that the artist has painted. Then have
students write a two-or-three-sentence explanation identifying
elements in the work that led them to their observation. (W.2.2)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Grade Two topics and
texts with peers and
adults in small and larger
groups.
“The Locust Tree in Flower”
(William Carlos Williams) in
The Seasons (ed. John N.
Serio) (Read Aloud)
“The Snowflake” (Walter de la
Mare) in The Seasons (ed.
John N. Serio) (Read Aloud)
“Weather” (Eve Merriam) (E)
“Who Has Seen the Wind?”
(Christina Rossetti) (E)
Stories
Every Autumn Comes the
Bear (Jim Arnosky)
Henry and Mudge and the
Snowman Plan (Cynthia
Rylant and Sucie Stevenson)
(EA)
Leaf Man (Lois Ehlert)
Peepers (Eve Bunting and
James Ransome)
Poppleton in Fall (Cynthia
Rylant and Mark Teague) (EA)
Poppleton in Spring (Cynthia
Rylant and Mark Teague) (EA)
Poppleton in Winter (Cynthia
Rylant and Mark Teague) (E)
Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf (Lois
Ehlert)
Snow (Uri Shulevitz)
Snowballs (Lois Ehlert)
The Days of Summer (Eve
Bunting and William Low)
The Little Yellow Leaf (Carin
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce and read the first chapter of Poppleton in Winter by
Cynthia Rylant. The following day, look at the chapter again.
Explain to the class that Cynthia Rylant is an author who
knows exactly how to write the beginning of a story and how to
wrap it up with a strong ending. Direct the students to look
closely at how the story begins. Reread the section where the
story is set up. Students will see the setting, characters, and
situation/problem in the first two sentences of the story:
“Poppleton’s house grew very long icicles in winter. Poppleton
was proud of them.” Create a bulleted list as the students
discuss what they see, finishing the sentence “A strong
beginning has . . .” Then turn to the end of the story and
discuss the attributes of a strong ending. Read Rylant’s final
sentences: “Poppleton was glad his icicles were knocked
down. Icicles always melted. But a new friend would stay.”
Continue the bulleted list, having students finish the sentence
“A strong ending has . . .” As the students read each
successive chapter independently, with a partner, or with the
teacher, make these charts a focus of discussion. Eventually
add a chart for the action in the middle of the story. (RL.2.5,
RF.2.4)
RL.2.4: Describe how
words and phrases (e.g.,
regular beats, alliteration,
rhymes, [and] repeated
lines) supply rhythm and
meaning in a story,
poem, or song.
W.2.7: Participate in
shared research and
writing projects.
SL.2.2: Recount or
describe key ideas or
details from a text read
aloud or information
presented orally or
through other media.
RESEARCH, INFORMATIVE WRITING
Follow the local community research with a new research
challenge. This time, organize small groups to research and to
write about a community in a contrasting climate and
geographical location. Focus on the seasons there, a sport (or
activity) that is important, and the way they affect their
community. Help students generate the research questions
that will guide their work. Ask them to gather information from a
variety of online sources and possibly hold a conversation via
the Internet with the Chamber of Commerce from the
community. Introduce a digital tool for organizing information.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Berger)
The Mitten (Jan Brett) (Read
Aloud)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
A River of Words: The Story of
William Carlos Williams
(Jennifer Bryant and Melissa
Sweet) (Read Aloud)
Cynthia Rylant: A Writer’s
Story (Alice Cary and Susan
Spellman)
Energy from the Sun (Rookie
Read-About Science) (Allan
Fowler)
How Do You Know It’s Fall?
(Rookie Read-About Science)
(Allan Fowler)
How Do You Know It’s Spring?
(Rookie Read-About Science)
(Allan Fowler)
How Do You Know It’s
Summer? (Rookie Read-About
Science) (Allan Fowler)
How Do You Know It’s Winter?
(Rookie Read-About Science)
(Allan Fowler)
Look How It Changes! (Rookie
Read-About Science) (June
Young)
Snowflake Bentley (Jacqueline
Briggs Martin and Mary
Sample Activities and Assessment
Model the organization of gathered information into broad
topics through webbing. Use one part of the graphic organizer
(web) to demonstrate to the class how to write one welldeveloped paragraph. Working in small groups, students
should use the webbed information to write the remaining
paragraphs. When the paragraphs are completed, combine
them into books. Students can add illustrations by drawing or
by collecting photographs from online sources. (RI.2.2, W.2.2,
W.2.6, W.2.7, L.2.2)
ART, LANGUAGE USAGE
View the Bruegel, Caillebotte, and Seurat images. As the class
studies each piece, ask the students how the artist creates a
sense of warmth or cold, dryness or wetness in the painting. As
the students use adjectives and adverbs in the conversation,
write them down under the appropriate category on a
whiteboard or chart paper. Use these words to create and
expand sentences (e.g., “The artist painted snow. The talented
artist painted snow with cool colors. Using an icy blue color, the
artist painted a snowy scene.”). Extend the activity by using the
word bank to create free-form poems to go with each painting.
(L.2.1e, L.2.1f)
RESEARCH, INFORMATIVE WRITING
Focus a discussion on the characteristics of seasons in your
local climate. Discuss activities that your students might
associate with each season. Talk about how one of the
season’s activities might help the local economy more than
others by generating research questions such as, “Which
season is most important to our community?" Use digital
resources and speakers who have visited to gather
information. Conclude the research and communicate findings
with a class write such as: “Research a sport or activity in your
community that relates to a specific season. Create a
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Azarian) (Read Aloud)
Snowflakes in Photographs
(W.A. Bentley) (Read Aloud)
Sunshine Makes the Seasons
(Franklyn M. Branley and
Michael Rex)
What Do Authors Do? (Eileen
Christelow)
What Do Illustrators Do?
(Eileen Christelow)
Why Do Leaves Change
Color? (Betsy Maestro and
Loretta Krupinski) Art, Music
and Media
Art
Artist unknown, Snow-Laden
Plum Branches (1098-1169)
Georges Seurat, Une
Baignade, Asnieres(18831884)
Gustave Caillebotte, Paris
Street, Rainy Day (1877)
Louis Comfort Tiffany,
Dogwood (1900-1915)
Maurice de Vlaminck, Autumn
Landscape (1905)
Pieter Bruegel, Hunters in the
Snow (1565)
Vincent van Gogh, Mulberry
Tree (1889)
Vincent van Gogh, Sunflowers
(1889)
Sample Activities and Assessment
nonfiction text about the season, the sport, and the way it
affects your community.” (RI.2.5, SL.2.1, SL.2.2, W.2.2, W.2.8,
L.2.3)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, LANGUAGE
MECHANICS
Use the informational book How Do You Know It’s Fall? to
introduce apostrophes. Discuss the concept of contractions by
creating sentences starting with “It is . . .” and then contracting
the words to “It’s.” Continue generating lists of contractions for
“he is,” “she is,” “they are,” “we are,” and so on. Ask the
students to create detailed sentences related to the season of
fall using a variety of contractions. Extend the lesson by
discussing apostrophes used to show possession. Staying with
the fall theme, generate a list of possessives focusing on
nature’s preparation for winter (e.g., a bear’s thick coat, a
squirrel’s collection of acorns, a tree’s slow growth.) (L.2.2c)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, INFORMATIVE
WRITING
This unit contains a wide variety of informational texts. To
introduce the work of organizing informational text, choose a
book with a variety of text features and strong paragraphs.
Explain to the children that as you read for information, you will
also be looking at the author’s craft. Guide students to look
closely at the way each informational book on the four seasons
is arranged (e.g., through the use of headings, subheadings,
and paragraphs). Choose one page to look for the purpose of
paragraphs in organizing the information in the text. You might
want to make a copy of the page for the students to examine
as you demonstrate the topical chunks of information in
paragraphs. Extend this lesson by listing text features in
multiple books on seasons and related topics. Focus on the
purposes of the text features in the books. Follow this reading
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
4
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Music
lesson with having students write a paragraph as a shared
write. Choose one topic related to the book read, and write a
paragraph with a strong topic sentence, detailed information,
and a satisfying conclusion. (RI.2.2, RF.2.4)
Antonio Vivaldi, “The Four
Seasons” (1723)
MUSIC, LANGUAGE USAGE, WRITING POETRY
Listen to one of the four concertos in Vivaldi’s The Four
Seasons. Instruct the students to write down words or phrases
that come to them as they are listening. After they are finished,
tell them to work together as a class to compile a list of words
and phrases they thought of while listening. Choose a
descriptive word or phrase and then challenge them to think in
simile or metaphor (e.g., falling leaves—like what? Like jewels
falling from the sky). Use the collection of words and phrases
to write a class poem titled “Spring,” “Summer,” “Autumn,” or
“Winter.” Be sure to use rhythm, rhyme, alliteration, and/or
repetition in your class poem. (RL2.4, L.2.5b)
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Ask students to pick a favorite book from the easy section of
the library. To introduce the characteristics of a good solid
beginning and ending of a story, ask the students to read aloud
to a partner just the first paragraph or two and then the last
paragraph. Later, allow students to share the books in small
groups to see what each child notices about these solid
beginnings and solid endings. For example, they may notice
things such as a clearly described setting with vivid words at
the beginning, the book coming full circle, and the ending
providing a sense of satisfaction. (RL.2.5)
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
After reading the fictional read-aloud picture books for each of
the seasons, have students ask and answer questions using
who, what, where, when, why, and how. Challenge students to
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
5
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
create questions from these stems that apply directly to the
books you are reading. Encourage students to answer the
questions on sticky notes under each question on the following
chart. (RL.2.1)
Who?
What?
Where?
When?
Why?
How?
READING POETRY, PERFORMANCE
The Seasons (ed. John N. Serio) is a book of collected poems
by different poets. Introduce the poem “Summer Song.” Ask
the students, “What did you notice about the first four lines of
the poem?” (Possible answer: Repetition of “By the . . .”) Note
the pattern of rhyme in the first four lines (i.e., ABAB) and how
it changes as it progresses through the poem (i.e., AABB).
Continue to look at the features of poetry as you read other
seasonal poems in this unit. Each of the poems from The
Seasons exemplifies at least one of the characteristics of the
Grade Two standards: rhyme, rhythm, alliteration, and
repetition. Encourage students to choose a poem to perform
(recite) for the class. (RL.2.4)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 2
The Wild West
Unit 2 - No. of Weeks: 6 – Oct.-Nov.
Essential Question: How does setting affect a story?
Terminology: biography, characters, collective nouns, compare, contrast, expression, fantasy, fluency, point of view, real, tall tale,
Venn diagram
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.2.9: Compare and
contrast two or more
versions of the same
story by different authors
or from different cultures.
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“Buffalo Dusk” (Carl Sandburg)
(Read Aloud)
“Home on the Range”
(Brewster Higley) (Read
Aloud)
How I Spent My Summer
Vacation (Mark Teague)
Stories
“The Princess and the Pea” in
Fairy Tales from Hans
Christian Anderson (Hans
Christian Anderson) (Read
Aloud)
A Boy Called Slow (Joseph
Bruchac)
Buffalo Before Breakfast (Mary
Pope Osborne and Sal
RL.2.2: Recount stories,
including fables and
folktales from diverse
cultures, and determine
their central message,
lesson, or moral.
RI.2.6: Identify the main
purpose of a text,
including what the author
wants to answer, explain,
or describe.
DRA
DIBELS
GRADE
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Explain to the students that George Catlin was a famous artist
who traveled west on horseback during the 1800s to paint
pictures of Native Americans. Display his works. Ask students
what they notice first in these paintings. What do they have in
common with other portraits they have seen? (For example,
Washington, Revere--see Unit Five in the section on first
grade.) Note the titles of the works. Explain that Catlin was
unique in his time because he painted Native Americans
individualistically. (SL.2.2)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
Bill Pickett: Rodeo-Ridin’ Cowboy (Andrea Davis Pinkney) is a
true story of an African American cowboy. After you have read
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
7
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
W.2.2: Write
informative/explanatory
texts in which they
introduce a topic, use
facts and definitions to
develop points, and
provide a concluding
statement or section.
Suggested
Works/Resources
Murdocca) (EA) Cowgirl Kate
and Cocoa (Erica Silverman
and Betsy Lewin) (E)
Cowgirl Kate and Cocoa:
Partners (Erica Silverman and
Betsy Lewin) (EA)
Crazy Horse’s Vision (Joseph
Bruchac, S.D. Nelson, Curtis
Zunigha, and Robert Tree
Cody)
Dancing with the Indians
(Angela Shelf Medearis)
Ghost Town at Sundown
(Mary Pope Osborne) (EA)
Gift Horse: A Lakota Story
(S.D. Nelson)
John Henry (Julius Lester and
Jerry Pinkney)
Johnny Appleseed (Steven
Kellogg)
Justin and the Best Biscuits in
the World (Mildred Pitts Walter
and Catherine Stock)
Little Red Cowboy Hat (Susan
Lowell and Randy Cecil)
Little Red Riding Hood (Trina
Schart Hyman) (Read Aloud)
Little Red Riding Hood: A
Newfangled Prairie Tale (Lisa
Campbell Ernst)
Paul Bunyan (Steven Kellogg)
Pecos Bill (Steven Kellogg and
Laura Robb)
Sample Activities and Assessment
the story, display the same kind of chart from the Unit One
segment on fiction (see the following sample). Again, remind
the students that these are only question stems and must be
amplified to focus on the story. Ask students to choose two
questions to answer and write on their whiteboards. Share the
responses from the students and add to the class chart.
(RI.2.1, SL.2.2)
Who?
What?
Where?
When?
Why?
How?
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
View the two Remington paintings of cowboys. Ask students to
look at the individual cowboys and see if they can find many
differences in their appearances. Was Remington depicting
cowboys individually (like Catlin) or more like types (like
Custis)? What can we learn about cowboy life by looking at
these works? (SL.2.3, SL.2.4, SL.2.5)
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Have students close their eyes and “turn on” their imaginations.
Tell them to imagine traveling back to the nineteenth century
as if they were artists studying the Native Americans. Ask
questions like: What do you see? What types of people are
there; plants, animals, landscapes? Have students write a few
sentences about their imagined picture, as well as sketch a
picture. If time permits, turn the sketched image into a
landscape image: add significant aspects, like characters, a
setting, and any meaningful details. Use listed artworks as
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
The Cowboy and the BlackEyed Pea (Tony Johnston)
The Gingerbread Cowboy
(Janet Squires and Holly
Berry)
The Gingerbread Man (Karen
Lee Schmidt)
The Tortoise and the
Jackrabbit (Susan Lowell)
The Toughest Cowboy: or
How the Wild West Was
Tamed (John Frank and
Zachary Pullen) (Read Aloud)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
B is for Buckaroo: A Cowboy
Alphabet (Louise Doak
Whitney and Sue Guy) (Read
Aloud)
Bill Pickett: Rodeo-Ridin’
Cowboy (Andrea D. and Brian
Pinkney) (Read Aloud)
Black Cowboy, Wild Horses: A
True Story (Julius Lester and
Jerry Pinkney) (Read Aloud)
Cactus Hotel (Brenda Z.
Guiberson) (Read Aloud)
Cowboys (Lucille Recht
Penner)
Cowboys and Cowgirls:
Yippee-Yay! (Gail Gibbons)
(EA) (Read Aloud)
Sample Activities and Assessment
inspiration for students. (SL.2.3, SL.2.4, SL.2.5)
ART, OPINION WRITING
Select one Curtis and one Catlin artwork to study. Have the
students compare Curtis’s and Catlin’s approaches to depicting
Native Americans. Does Curtis’s use of the environment
expand our understanding of the Native Americans in his
photographs? If so, how? (W.2.1, W.2.3)
READING POETRY, LANGUAGE USAGE, VOCABULARY
Create a running list of collective nouns in this unit (e.g., a herd
or drove of cows; a herd or band of horses; a flock of sheep;
and a band, tribe, or nation of Native Americans). Keep a
growing word bank of people, vocabulary, and phrases that
appear in this unit. Reading (reciting) poetry such as “Buffalo
Dusk” and “Home on the Range” will give the students rich
opportunities to collect vocabulary and to learn the words in
context. These words can be used in later student writing.
(L.2.1b, RI.2.4, L.2.4, L.2.4e, RL.2.4, RL.2.10)
INFORMATIVE WRITING, RESEARCH, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
By reading the informational books in this unit, students learn
about Native Americans, African Americans, and Caucasians
during the 1800s in the American Wild West. Give the students
this prompt: “Write about the person most interesting to you
from the Wild West days. Be sure to answer the questions
who, what, where, when, why, and how as you write about the
person you chose.” Using the question stems, students will
generate their own research questions. Encourage the use of a
variety of sources as they gather additional information using
online sources and books. When students are finished with
their research, pair them according to related choices to allow
sharing of organized gathered information. Have them practice
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
I Want to Be a Cowboy (Dan
Liebman)
The Very First Americans
(Cara Ashrose)
Wild Tracks! A Guide to
Nature’s Footprints (Jim
Arnosky) (E) (Read Aloud)
Wild West (DK Eyewitness
Books) (Stuart Murray) (Read
Aloud)
You Wouldn’t Want to Live in a
Wild West Town! (Peter Hicks,
David Salariya, and David
Antram) (Read Aloud)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Edward S. Curtis, A Smoky
Day at the Sugar Bowl-Hupa
(1923)
Edward S. Curtis, Cheyenne
Maiden (1930)
Frederic Remington, A Dash
for the Timber (1899)
Frederic Remington, Fight For
The Water Hole (1903)
George Catlin, The White
Cloud, Head Chief of the
Iowas (1830-1870)
Music
Traditional, “Git Along, Little
Dogies”
Sample Activities and Assessment
talking through the information to lay the groundwork for writing
focused paragraphs. Students write drafts. After the first draft is
written, have them spend time revising the work with peers or
the teacher. (RI.2.1, RI.2.5, RI.2.10, W.2.7, W.2.8, W.2.2,
W.2.5, SL.2.1, SL.2.2, SL.2.6, L.2.1, l.2.2, L.2.3)
READING LITERATURE, INFORMATIVE WRITING
After reading the fairy tale The Princess and the Pea, introduce
another version of the story, The Cowboy and the Black-Eyed
Pea. Before reading the book, challenge the students to think
about how the two stories are the same and how they are
different. Create a Venn diagram or other graphic organizer to
compare and contrast the two stories. Have the students use
sticky notes to add their ideas to the Venn diagram. When they
are finished, ask them to use the graphic organizer to construct
sentences that describe two ways in which the stories are the
same and two ways in which they are different. Continue this
activity with other traditional stories and their alternative
versions. (RL.2.9, SL.2.2)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, READING FLUENCY,
PERFORMANCE
Introduce the story about a modern-day cowgirl, Cowgirl Kate
and Cocoa (Erica Silverman). As they read the first chapter,
ask students to think about whether this story could really
happen or if it is a fantasy. Ask students to find evidence in the
text to support their choices. Use a whiteboard or sticky notes
to record their thinking. As they finish reading and writing, pair
students to discuss their ideas. After they are finished
discussing, ask them to remain partners and to experiment with
reading using different voices for different characters in the
book. Monitor the reading by listening for reading with
expression and character voices. (RL.2.6, RF.2.4)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Reading Literature, Reading Comprehension, Speaking
and Listening
Introduce the genre of tall tales by explaining that they are
stories about a special kind of hero who is bigger than life.
Even though the story is based on a real person, the person is
exaggerated to be stronger or bigger than any real hero can
ever be. Read about a hero from the 1800s named John
Henry. As you read the story, challenge the students to think
about the part of the story that is so amazing we know it is not
really true. After the students have read the story, go back
through the story and have the students write down one thing
that might be real and one thing they think is fantasy. Ask
questions such as, “Why do you think we have this tall tale?
Why do you think the story has a race between a machine and
a human? Why do you think the man beats the machine?”
(RL.2.2, SL.2.2)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, RESEARCH, SPEAKING
AND LISTENING
Remind students that when they are doing research in the
classroom, they start with a question. Similarly, authors of
informational books also begin their work with a question or the
desire to explain something. Have the students read an
informational book such as Cowboys and Cowgirls: YippeeYay! (Gail Gibbons). After they finish the book, ask students to
think about what question the author wanted to answer or what
she wanted to explain in this book. When they are finished
reading and writing down their questions, begin a discussion
on how authors base research in asking and answering
questions. (RI.2.6)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 2
Building Bridges with Unlikely Friends
Unit 3 - No. of Weeks: 6 – Dec.-Jan.
Essential Question: Why do authors use figurative language?
Terminology: body, capitalization, closing, compare, compound word, contrast, editing, informative/explanatory writing, figurative,
friendly letter, greeting, Haiku, how-to books, idiom, literal, metaphor, revision
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.2.7: Use information
gained from the
illustrations and words in
a print or digital text to
demonstrate
understanding of its
characters, setting, or
plot.
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“The Bridge Builder” (Will Allen
Dromgoole) (Read Aloud)
“I Am the Dog I Am the
Cat“(Donald Hall) (Read
Aloud)
“If Not for the Cat” (Jack
Prelutsky and Ted Rand)
(Read Aloud)
Stories
Charlotte’s Web (E.B. White
and Garth Williams) (E) (Read
Aloud)
Four Feet, Two Sandals
(Karen Lynn Williams, Khadra
Mohammed, and Doug
Chayka) (Read Aloud)
George and Martha: The
RL.2.3: Describe how
characters in a story
respond to major events
and challenges.
RI.2.6: Identify the main
purpose of a text,
including what the author
wants to answer, explain,
or describe.
DIBELS
GRADE
DRA
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce a book such as Snow in Jerusalem (Deborah da
Costa, Ying-Hwa Hu, and Cornelius Van Wright) by reviewing
how unlikely friends become friends by finding something in
common. Tell the students that they are going to read a book
about two children who were not friends but who found
something in common anyway. As they read the story have
the students focus on how the children find something in
common to make a friendship. Talk about how these two
characters faced a challenge and made a hard choice.
(RL.2.3, RL.2.7)
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Use the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Baltimore Museum of
Art's websites to explore the tradition of album quilts. Discuss
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
W.2.2: Write explanatory
texts in which they
introduce a topic, use
facts and definitions to
develop points, and
provide a concluding
statement or section.
L2.2: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of standard
English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling
when writing.
L.2.2(b): Use commas in
greetings and closings of
letters.
L.2.4: Determine or
clarify the meaning of
unknown and multiplemeaning words and
phrases based on grade
two reading and content,
choosing flexibly from an
array of strategies.
L.2.4(d): Use knowledge
of the meaning of
individual words to
predict the meaning of
compound words.
Suggested
Works/Resources
Complete Stories of Two Best
Friends (James Marshall)
Henry and Mudge: The First
Book (Cynthia Rylant and
Sucie Stevenson) (E)
Mackinac Bridge: The Story of
the Five-Mile Poem (Gloria
Whelan and Gijsbert van
Frankenhuyzen) (Read Aloud)
My Father’s Shop (Satomi
Ichikawa) (Read Aloud)
One Green Apple (Eve
Bunting and Ted Lewin) (EA)
(Read Aloud)
Pop’s Bridge (Eve Bunting and
C.F. Payne) (Read Aloud)
Silent Music (James Rumford)
(Read Aloud)
Snow in Jerusalem (Deborah
da Costa, Ying-Hwa Hu, and
Cornelius Van Wright) (Read
Aloud)
The Cricket in Times Square
(George Selden and Garth
Williams) (E) (Read Aloud)
The Day of Ahmed’s Secret
(Florence P. Heide, Judith H.
Gilliland and Ted Lewin) (Read
Aloud)
The Fire Cat (Esther Holden
Averill) (E)
The Little Painter of Sabana
Grande (Patricia Maloney
Sample Activities and Assessment
with students the reasons behind making such quilts. How
would quilting build strong friendships? What types of images
do you see in these quilts? What do the images tell us about
the people who made these quilts? (SL.2.4)
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Using paper squares and cut-out images, divide the class into
(unlikely) groupings of three to four students. Have them
discuss what type of album quilt they would like to produce as
a group—what event should they commemorate? Using
teamwork, each group should produce a small “quilt” of
images. (SL.2.1, SL.2.5)
NARRATIVE WRITING
To encourage communication among unlikely friends, arrange
for your students to communicate with students from another
class in a place far away. Begin an e-mail or pen-pal
correspondence with students from another class in a
contrasting location. Setting parameters for what can be
shared, ask students to write letters introducing themselves
and asking the other student about him/herself. The purpose of
this activity would be to find ways the students are similar and
the ways the students are different from one another. This
writing activity could also be done writing from whole class to
whole class instead of students writing to one another. (W.2.6,
W.2.5, L.2.2b)
READING LITERATURE, NARRATIVE WRITING
Read aloud the book Charlotte’s Web (E. B. White) to the
class. After you have finished the book, have the students
connect with the characters in the book by writing friendly
letters. Students should choose one of the characters in
Charlotte’s Web and write the character a letter. You may say,
”Write a letter to one of the characters in Charlotte’s Web.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Markun and Robert Casilla)
(Read Aloud)
Zen Shorts (Jon J. Muth)
(Read Aloud)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
Bridges (See More Readers)
(Seymour Simon) (EA)
Bridges Are To Cross
(Philemon Sturges and Giles
Laroche) (Read Aloud)
Bridges: Amazing Structures
to Design, Build & Test (Carol
A. Johmann, Elizabeth Rieth,
and Michael P. Kline) (Read
Aloud)
Owen and Mzee: The
Language of Friendship
(Isabella and Craig Hatkoff,
Paula Kahumbu, and Peter
Greste) (Read Aloud)
Owen and Mzee: The True
Story of a Remarkable
Friendship (Isabella and Craig
Hatkoff, Paula Kahumbu, and
Peter Greste) (Read Aloud)
Tarra and Bella: The Elephant
and Dog Who Became Best
Friends (Carol Buckley) (Read
Aloud)
Sample Activities and Assessment
Explain why you chose the character, what you like about him
or her, and ask the character a question.” Require proper use
of punctuation and form for the letters. Revise the letters and
edit for spelling and punctuation. Then, have the students trade
letters and write back to a classmate as if they were the
classmate’s chosen character. For example, if a child receives
a letter addressed to Wilbur, she would write a letter back as if
she were Wilbur and answer the question asked. (L.2.2b,
RL.2.7, W.2.5)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, LANGUAGE USAGE
After reading about bridges, have students predict the meaning
of compound words that contain the word “bridge”: footbridge,
drawbridge, flybridge, and bridgework. Repeat the activity
using another root word such as water: waterbed, watercolor,
watermelon, waterlog, watershed, waterproof, watertight,
rainwater, waterway, and waterspout. Extend this lesson by
discussing idioms using the word bridge such as “We’ll cross
that bridge when we come to it,” “that’s water under the
bridge,” and “don’t burn your bridges.” (L.2.4d)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, INFORMATIVE
WRITING, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Begin a class discussion by asking the students: “If a real
hippopotamus had no other companions, what other kind of
animal could you imagine her having for a friend?” Be sure to
require good reasons for their opinions as they answer. Read
the book Owen and Mzee: The True Story of a Remarkable
Friendship (Isabella Hatkoff) aloud. When you are finished
reading, have the students discuss what the author (a six-yearold girl) wanted to accomplish by publishing the book, using
questions such as: “What did she want to explain? Describe?
What questions did she want to answer? Why are there so
many photographs?” Ask students to write a paragraph
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Album Quilt (New York, 1853)
Album Quilts (Maryland, ca.
1840)
explaining how the two animals in the story became friends.
Writing prompt: “After reading about these unlikely friends (i.e.,
Owen and Mzee), write a paragraph explaining how the two
animals in the story became friends.” (SL.2.6, W.2.2, RI.2.6,
RI.2.3, RI.2.7)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, INFORMATIVE
WRITING
Introduce a chapter from Bridges: Amazing Structures to
Design, Build, and Test. This is an informational book, but it is
also a how-to book. It will teach how to build bridge structures
in the classroom or at home. Read the text to the children and
allow them to note that the how-to section is set up as a series
of steps to follow. Gather the supplies and allow the students to
follow the directions to experiment with building a bridge.
Discuss how diagrams help to explain the directions. Writing
prompt: “After building a bridge in the classroom or at home,
write an explanatory paragraph telling someone else how you
made your bridge.” (SL.2.6, W.2.2, RI.2.6, RI.2.3, RI.2.7)
READING POETRY, VOCABULARY, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
As you read from the poetry collection If Not for the Cat (Jack
Prelutsky), explain to students the Haiku style of poetry. Point
out to the students that these poems are very short, but they
make you think. As you read a poem, keep the accompanying
illustration hidden until students try to guess the animal being
described. These poems are filled with words that may be new
to your students. When you are finished reading (reciting) each
poem, ask students to choose one new word to save in the
word bank. (L.2.4e, L.2.5, RL.2.4)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
As students read the Henry and Mudge books, challenge them
to look closely at the characters. Before the first chapter, ask
the students to be ready to describe Henry and Mudge. Using
sticky notes or whiteboards, require each student to write down
two characteristics of each character. Although one of the
characters is a dog and one is a boy, they have a wonderful
friendship. Have students share at least two words to describe
Henry and two words to describe Mudge. Discuss what can be
learned about friendship through these stories. (RL.2.7, L.2.5b)
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce the idea of a bridge as a metaphor by reading the
book Pop’s Bridge (Eve Bunting). (Help the students think of
more metaphors to reinforce the meaning of this important
term.) In this book, a group of boys experience the sacrifice
involved in bridge building and the joy that comes with
friendship. Discuss the literal bridge in the book and the way
the bridge served as a link not only between two places, but
also between two people. Introduce the following Isaac Newton
quotation: “We build too many walls and not enough bridges.”
Discuss what Isaac Newton may have meant by his comment.
(RL.2.7)
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 2
A Long Journey to Freedom
Unit 4 - No. of Weeks: 6 – end Jan.-mid March
Essential Question: What is challenging about writing a narrative?
Terminology: action, autobiography, biography, conclusion, linking words, narrative, opinion piece, record, scan, time order, words
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.2.6: Acknowledge
differences in the points
of view of characters,
including by speaking in
a different voice for each
character when reading
dialogue aloud.
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“Harriet Tubman” (Eloise
Greenfield) (Read Aloud)
“Lincoln” (Nancy Byrd Turner)
(Read Aloud)
“Merry-Go-Round” (Langston
Hughes) (EA) (Read Aloud)
“Rosa” (Rita Dove) (Read
Aloud)
“Words Like Freedom”
(Langston Hughes) (EA)
Stories
A Sweet Smell of Roses
(1963) (Angela Johnson and
Eric Velasquez) (Read Aloud)
Dear Mr. Rosenwald (1920)
(Carole Boston Weatherford)
(Read Aloud)
RI.2.3: Describe the
connection between a
series of historical
events, scientific ideas or
concepts, or steps in
technical procedures in a
text.
RI.2.9: Compare and
contrast the most
important points
presented by two texts
DIBELS
GRADE
DRA
OPINION WRITING, MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION
Students can publish their opinion pieces by scanning the
drawing and putting it into a slide. Opinion pieces should be
recorded and played as the drawing is projected. These slides
and recordings could be posted on a web page to be viewed by
friends and relatives. Arrange the slides chronologically to
reinforce the linking of ideas in this long journey to freedom.
(W.2.6, SL.2.5)
OPINION WRITING, LANGUAGE USAGE
Give the students this writing prompt: “Choose one of the
people studied in this unit who you think is the greatest hero in
this long journey to freedom. Give two or three strong reasons
for choosing this person.” Students should be moving toward
writing paragraphs. Remind them to introduce the person and
give strong reasons why the person was chosen using words
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
on the same topic.
W.2.1: Write opinion
pieces in which they
introduce the topic of
book they are writing
about, state an opinion,
supply reasons that
support the opinion, use
linking words (e.g.,
because, and, also) to
connect opinion and
reasons, and provide a
concluding statement or
section.
W.2.3: Write narratives in
which they recount a
well-elaborated event or
short sequence of
events, include details to
describe action,
thoughts, and feelings,
use temporal words to
signal event order, and
provide a sense of
closure.
W.2.6: With guidance
from adults, use a variety
of digital tools to produce
and publish writing,
including in collaboration
with peers.
Suggested
Works/Resources
Finding Lincoln (1951) (Ann
Malaspina and Colin Bootman)
(Read Aloud)
Freedom on the Menu: The
Greensboro Sit-Ins (1960)
(Carole Boston Weatherford
and Jerome Lagarrigue) (Read
Aloud)
Freedom Summer (1964)
(Deborah Wiles and Jerome
Lagarrigue)
The Other Side (1950s)
(Jacqueline Woodson and E.B.
Lewis)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
A Picture Book of Jesse
Owens (1935) (David A. Adler
and Robert Casilla) (Read
Aloud)
Henry’s Freedom Box: A True
Story from the Underground
Railroad (1849) (Ellen Levine
and Kadir Nelson)
Lincoln: A Photobiography
(1809-1865) (Russell
Freedman) (E) (Read Aloud)
Martin Luther King, Jr. and the
March on Washington (1963)
(Frances E. Ruffin and
Stephen Marchesi) (E)
Martin’s Big Words: The Life of
Sample Activities and Assessment
like because and also to link ideas. Encourage the addition of
details to strengthen the writing and a strong statement to
close. (W.2.1, L.2.1f)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, NARRATIVE WRITING
After reading about Henry’s journey to freedom (in Henry’s
Freedom Box), introduce this narrative prompt: “Write a story
as if you are in the box headed for freedom. Begin your story
as you get into the box and end the story as the box is opened
at your destination. Be sure to describe the action in the story,
your thoughts, and feelings. Use words to show time order and
end with a strong wrap-up.” To help prepare students for
writing strong paragraphs, plan the writing using a sequential
graphic organizer (flow map or trifold paper) showing a
beginning, middle, and end. To help the students with thoughts
and feelings, you may want to have them journal after
spending several minutes in a well-ventilated, open box.
(W.2.3)
LANGUAGE USAGE
Revise the “stories from inside a box” (see Narrative Writing
activity) by focusing on action words. Discuss the present
tense and past tense of verbs, focusing particularly on irregular
verbs such as “I hide, I hid” and “I sit, I sat.” (L.2.1d)
LANGUAGE USAGE, VOCABULARY
As you have the students read the literature of this unit, look for
words that might lend themselves to a discussion of affixes and
roots. Teach the students that by knowing the root word, you
can approximate the meaning of another word that they may
not know. For example, if the children have learned the
meaning of prejudice and then come across the word
prejudicial, they may have an idea of its meaning, especially if
they see prejudicial in context as they read. Encourage
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
(1963) (Doreen Rappaport and
Bryan Collier)
Moses: When Harriet Tubman
Led Her People to Freedom
(c.1820-1913) (Carole Boston
Weatherford and Kadir
Nelson) (Read Aloud)
Rosa Parks (Rookie
Biographies) (1955) (Wil Mara)
Ruby Bridges Goes to School:
My True Story (1960) (Ruby
Bridges)
Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood
Up by Sitting Down (1960)
(Andrea D. and Brian Pinkney)
The Story of Ruby Bridges
(1960) (Robert Coles and
George Ford) (E) (Read
Aloud)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Norman Rockwell, The
Problem We All Live With
(1963)
Photograph of Ruby Bridges
(AP Photo, 1963)
Working Photograph of Ruby
Bridges (artist and date
unknown)
Sample Activities and Assessment
students to use dictionaries to determine accurate meanings
and to check spelling while writing. (L.2.4b, L.2.4c)
READING POETRY, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
The poems about Harriet Tubman (“Harriet Tubman,” Eloise
Greenfield) and Abraham Lincoln (“Lincoln,” Nancy Byrd
Turner) are narrative poems that tell a story. Read (recite) the
poems. Use these questions to discuss the poems:
How are the poems similar and how are they different?
What poetic elements do you hear/see in the poetry
(e.g., alliteration, repetition, regular beats, and rhyme)?
What is the message of each poem? Are they similar or
different?
Which of the poems uses formal English and which one
uses more informal English? (L.2.3a, RL.2.4)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
Read aloud the two supplied texts about Ruby Bridges (Ruby
Bridges Goes to School and The Story of Ruby Bridges).
Before reading, explain that one of the books is an
autobiography (Ruby Bridges Goes to School: A True Story)
that Bridges wrote about her own experiences. Explain that the
other book, The Story of Ruby Bridges, is biographical, which
means that an author wrote the book about Bridges’s life.
When you finish reading each book aloud, have the students
choose the most important parts of the story. Then, have them
compare how the books are similar and how they are different.
(There are several other opportunities to do this
compare/contrast activity, or assessment, with the Greensboro
Sit-In and Martin Luther King Jr. texts.) (RI.2.3, RI.2.9, SL.2.3)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Film
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
Read and discuss the book Henry’s Freedom Box (Ellen
Levine), a true story of a slave’s journey to freedom. Be sure to
discuss the characters, setting, plot, and message of the book.
Students may enjoy listening to the author read the story,
noting the way she changes her voice with the different
characters. (RL.2.6, RI.2.3, SL.2.2, W.2.)
Euzhan Palcy, dir., Disney's
Ruby Bridges: A Real
American Hero (1998)
ART, LANGUAGE USAGE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
While the class is focused on Ruby Bridges, show the students
some photographs of Bridges and the Rockwell, which was
painted after a photograph of her. What can you learn about
Bridges and the time in which she lived by looking at these
works? Compare the photo of Bridges walking to school with
that section of Rockwell’s painting. What has Rockwell added
or subtracted (e.g., the lunchbox, graffiti)? What tells us more
about Bridges’s character, the photograph or Rockwell’s
depiction of her? (Note: You should look for adjectives and
character vocabulary in the conversation.) (L.2.5b, L.2.6,
SL.2.3)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 2
Hand-Me-Down Tales From Around the World
Unit 5 - No. of Weeks: 6 - mid March-April
Essential Questions: How are stories and poems alike? How are they different?
Terminology: character, conclusion, folktale, index, legend, narrative poem, noun, plot, plural, setting
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.2.2: Recount stories,
including fables and
folktales from diverse
cultures, and determine
their central message,
lesson, or moral.
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“At the Seaside” (Robert Louis
Stevenson)
“Foreign Lands” (Robert Louis
Stevenson)
“My Bed is a Boat” (Robert
Louis Stevenson)
“The Land of Counterpane”
(Robert Louis Stevenson)
“The Land of Story Books”
(Robert Louis Stevenson)
”The Pied Piper of Hamelin”
(Robert Browning) (E) (Read
Aloud)
“Where Go the Boats?”
(Robert Louis Stevenson)
Stories
“How the Camel Got His
RI.2.7: Explain how
specific images (e.g., a
diagram showing how a
machine works)
contribute to and clarify a
text.
W.2.3: Write narratives in
which they recount a
well-elaborated event or
short sequence of
events, include details to
describe action,
DIBELS
GRADE
DRA
READING POETRY, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce the unit by asking students about using their
imaginations to go places. Introduce a poet who lived over one
hundred years ago and also loved to go places in his
imagination: Robert Louis Stevenson. As a child, he was
sometimes sick. While confined to his bed, he created
imaginary lands in his head, such as “The Land of
Counterpane”. He also loved the sea. As students read (recite)
his poems, have them think about his imagination and how he
loved to wonder about the world. (You may want to read and
reread his poetry throughout this unit, encouraging the
students to look for poetic elements. Most of all, direct children
to enjoy the idea of going places in their minds as you read
folktales from around the world. Having a large world map to
mark the place from which the story comes will give this unit a
stronger geography focus.) (RL.2.4)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
thoughts, and feelings,
use temporal words to
signal event order, and
provide a sense of
closure.
SL.2.4: Tell a story or
recount an experience
with appropriate facts
and relevant, descriptive
details, speaking audibly
in coherent sentences.
SL.2.3: Ask and answer
questions about what a
speaker says in order to
clarify comprehension,
gather additional
information, or deepen
understanding of a topic
or issue.
Suggested
Works/Resources
Hump” in Just So Stories
(Rudyard Kipling) (E) (Read
Aloud)
Bone Button Borscht (Aubrey
Davis and Dušan Petričić)
Caps for Sale: A Tale of a
Peddler (Esphyr Slobodkina)
Cuckoo/Cucú: A Mexican
Folktale (Lois Ehlert and Gloria
De Aragon Andujar)
Itching and Twitching: A
Nigerian Folktale (Patricia C.
and Robert L. McKissack, and
Laura Freeman)
Liang and the Magic
Paintbrush (Demi)
Martina the Beautiful
Cockroach, A Cuban Folktale
(Carmen Agra Deedy and
Michael Austin) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
Moon Rope/Un lazo a la luna:
A Peruvian Folktale (Lois
Ehlert and Amy Prince)
Not One Damsel In Distress:
World Folktales for Strong
Girls (Jane Yolen and Susan
Guevara) (Read Aloud)
Some Friends to Feed: The
Story of Stone Soup (Pete
Seeger, Paul Dubois Jacobs,
and Michael Hays)
Stone Soup (Ann McGovern
Sample Activities and Assessment
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
How can we view folktales in an artistic way? Have students
view clips of the ballets provided. After viewing clips of each
folktale ballet, discuss with students: “Can you see the
storytelling clearly in these works? If so, how? If not, how
would you, as a dancer or choreographer, make this clearer for
the viewer? Does viewing a folktale, rather than reading it,
change the meaning for the viewer? How so?” For background
on ballet, see the essay titled “The Ballet” at the Metropolitan
Museum. It may be helpful to introduce concepts of ballet
through the artworks listed previously. (SL.2.5)
MUSIC, ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Explain to the students that Sergei Prokofiev is a Russian
musical composer who wrote a musical rendition of the folktale
called “Peter and the Wolf.” Explain that he used different
musical instruments to represent the characters in the story.
Compare and contrast different productions of this piece (e.g.,
animated version, music-only CD, video of the ballet). (RL.2.2,
RL.2.6, RL.2.9, SL.2.2)
NARRATIVE WRITING, LANGUAGE USAGE, LANGUAGE
MECHANICS
Give the students this prompt: “All of the stories we read in this
unit were folktales of some kind. Why do you think stories are
handed down from one group of people to another? Be sure to
support your opinion with strong reasons.” Remind the
students that their sentences should have subjects, verbs, and
proper end punctuation. (W.2.1)
READING LITERATURE, NARRATIVE WRITING,
LANGUAGE MECHANICS
Give the students this prompt: “Write an imaginary narrative
telling about a time you passed through a mysterious door and
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
and Winslow Pinney Pels)
Stone Soup (Heather Forest
and Susan Gaber)
Stone Soup (Jon. J. Muth)
Stone Soup (Marcia Brown)
Stone Soup (Tony Ross)
The Thirteen Clocks (James
Thurber and Marc Simont) (E)
(Read Aloud)
The Enormous Turnip (Alexei
Tolstoy and Scott Goto)
The Five Chinese Brothers
(Claire Huchet Bishop and
Kurt Wiese) (Read Aloud)
The Girl Who Wore Too Much:
A Folktale from Thailand
(Margaret Read McDonald and
Yvonne Lebrun Davis)
The Lost Horse: A Chinese
Folktale (Ed Young and
Tracey Adams) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
The Pied Piper's Magic
(Steven Kellogg)
The Real Story of Stone Soup
(Ying Chang Compestine)
The Treasure (Uri Shulevitz)
(E)
The Village of Round and
Square Houses (Ann
Grifalconi) (Read Aloud)
Sample Activities and Assessment
ended up in a different country. The country may be from the
folktale unit, from a book you have read, or just a place you
want to visit. Be sure to say where you find the door, the
country where the door leads, and how you arrive back where
you began. Include details to describe action, thoughts, and
feelings. Be sure to end your story well, thinking about how
authors wrap up stories.” Remind the students that their
sentences should have subjects, verbs, and proper end
punctuation. (W.2.3, L.2.2a)
LANGUAGE USAGE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
After reading “The Pied Piper of Hamelin,” do a word activity
based on the poem. Collect some plural nouns from the poem.
Talk about the singular for each word and how it is made plural
(e.g., rats, babies, vats, children, tongues, shoes, and mice).
Extend this activity by collecting the plurals of irregular nouns
in particular. (L.2.1b)
READING LITERATURE, READING COMPREHENSION
Have students select a folktale to read. Provide each student
with a piece of plain white paper. Then, give these instructions:
"Read a folktale with a partner [a stronger reader can read to a
weaker reader, or they can take turns or read chorally]. When
you are finished reading the folktale, follow these directions:
Fold your paper into fourths.
Draw a picture of the main characters in one square.
Draw the setting in another square.
Draw your favorite part of the plot in another square."
In the last part, write a few sentences describing what
you think the folktale is teaching.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
Art Around the World
(Discovery World) (Heather
Leonard) (E)
Bread, Bread, Bread (Around
the World Series) (Ann Morris
and Ken Heyman)
Houses and Homes (Around
the World Series) (Ann Morris
and Ken Heyman)
How I Learned Geography (Uri
Shulevitz) (EA) (Read Aloud)
Hungry Planet: What the
World Eats (Peter Menzel and
Faith D'Aluisio) (Read Aloud)
If the World Were a Village: A
Book about the World’s People
(David Smith and Shelagh
Armstrong) (E) (Read Aloud)
Loving (Around the World
Series) (Ann Morris and Ken
Heyman)
On the Go (Around the World
Series) (Ann Morris and Ken
Heyman)
Shoes, Shoes, Shoes (Around
the World Series) (Ann Morris)
READING POETRY, PERFORMANCE
Revisit the Robert Louis Stevenson poems, reminding students
how they have used their imaginations to visualize the folktale
being read and the places being read about (see the first Class
Discussion/Poetry activity). Discuss how repeated readings
may deepen a poem’s meaning, and challenge the students to
memorize one of the poems to share in front of the class.
Record the students’ poetry performances with a video
camera. (RL.2.4, SL.2.5)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Dance
A Folk Tale (Et Folkesagn)
(Royal Danish Ballet, 2011)
READING POETRY, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce the poem “The Pied Piper of Hamelin” by Robert
Browning. This poem is a narrative based on a legend that is
thought to have happened in Hamelin, Germany. Remind
students that a legend is a story in which some things really
happened and other things have been exaggerated over time
as the story was passed down through generations. Ask the
students which parts of the legend are probably true and which
events have been exaggerated over time. Read the poem to
the children. Give the students an opportunity to retell the
story, confirming that they understand the main events of the
story. Using a program such as “Comic Life,” allow students to
create a comic strip of “The Pied Piper” story told in the
narrative poem. (The language in this poem is quite
sophisticated. Reading the Kellogg book first will scaffold
student comprehension of the poem. It will also provide
another opportunity to compare versions.) Ask questions such
as: “How many of you think this story could have really
happened? What was the story teaching?” (RL.2.2, SL.2.4.
L.2.4)
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Read the book Stone Soup (Marcia Brown) aloud to the
students. Introduce other versions of the book (e.g., by Muth,
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Peter and the Wolf (Royal
Ballet School, 1995)
The Firebird (Northwest Ballet,
2008)
Art
Edgar Degas, The Dancing
Class (1870)
Edgar Degas, The Little
Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer
(1879-1880)
Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo, A
Dance in the Country (1755)
Film
Suzie Templeton, dir., "Peter
and the Wolf" (2006)
Music
Sergei Prokofiev, "Peter and
the Wolf" (1936)
Sample Activities and Assessment
Seeger, and Davis). Compare and contrast the versions of the
story, using a teacher-created graphic organizer that
addresses who, what, where, why, when, and how questions or
a graphic organizer that addresses character, setting, plot, and
conclusion categories. Encourage student participation by
handing each child three sticky notes to use to post information
on the graphic organizers. (RL.2.2, RL.2.9)
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce the characteristics of folktales by reading one or two
and asking students what the tales have in common. Then,
invite speakers to read folktales from home countries. For
example, invite someone from Cuba or the Caribbean to read
Martina the Beautiful Cockroach: A Cuban Folktale (Carmen
Agra Deedy). As the visitor reads the story, have students
consider what message the folktale might teach. When the
story is over, the speaker could share some information about
the country from which the folktale comes. Give an opportunity
for students to ask questions about the folktale and the
country. (SL.2.3, RL.2.2)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, RESEARCH
If the World Were a Village: A Book About the World’s People
(David Smith) is an informational book packed with rich facts
about the world. One of the interesting things about this book is
that it shows the world as if it were a village of just one hundred
people. Although you may have time for just a few pages,
focus on how much information can be learned from the
illustrations and text. Keep a list of the information that the
students glean from the pages as you read. (RI.2.3, RI.2.6,
RI.2.7)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, SPEAKING AND
LISTENING
The informational books in this unit are based on themes like
shoes or bread. For example, the author of these books, Ann
Morris, studied interesting shoes from all around the world, had
photographs taken of them, and then published them in a book,
Shoes, Shoes, Shoes. As students read the books, ask them to
look at the way the book is organized and locate the
information about each photograph by using the index. As they
study the book, challenge them to find the location on a world
map from where those shoes came. To link to geography, give
each pair of students a world map to mark as the text moves
from one place to another. (After the students have had an
opportunity to study multiple books in this series, ask them why
they think the author wrote these books for children.) (RI.2.5,
RI.2.10, RI.2.6)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 2
Taking Care of Ourselves
Unit 6 - No. of Weeks: 6 – May-June
Essential Question: Why should we support our opinions with reasons?
Terminology: adjectives, dictionary, explanatory writing, fantasy, opinion writing, reflexive pronouns
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with
other works identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.2.4: Describe how
words and phrases (e.g.,
regular beats, alliteration,
rhymes, [and] repeated
lines) supply rhythm and
meaning in a story,
poem, or song.
LITERARY TEXTS
Poems
“Bananas and Cream” (David
McCord)
“Boa Constrictor” (Shel
Silverstein) (Read Aloud)
“Sick” (Shel Silverstein)
“The Pizza” (Ogden Nash)
“Turtle Soup” (Lewis Carroll)
(EA) (Read Aloud)
Chicken Soup with Rice: A
Book of Months (Maurice
Sendak) (EA)
Eats: Poems (Arnold Adoff and
Susan Russo) (Read Aloud)
Stories
Chato’s Kitchen (Gary Soto
and Susan Guevara) (Read
Aloud)
SL.2.5: Create audio
recordings of stories or
poems; add drawings or
other visual displays to
stories or recounts of
experiences when
appropriate to clarify
ideas, thoughts, and
feelings.
RI.2.10: By the end of
year, read and
DIBELS
GRADE
DRA
ART, INFORMATIVE WRITING
After students have drawn an object from the still life (see
Class Discussion/Art Appreciation activity in this section),
extend the activity by writing. Give the students this prompt:
“Write an explanatory how-to piece focused on how you
created your painting. Include a description of your still life, the
steps of setting up the display through creating your painting,
and a strong conclusion.” (W.2.2)
ART, CLASS DISCUSSION
Look at the Thiebaud versus the Bailey. How are the colors
different? Are we looking at the objects from above, below, or
straight on? Did the artists place the objects close together or
far apart? Why do you think Bailey chose to space the objects
in his painting asymmetrically, versus the symmetry of the
Thiebaud? Introduce the Arcimboldo painting into the
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
comprehend
informational texts,
including history/social
studies, science, and
technical texts, in the
grades 2 through 3 text
complexity band
proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at
the high end of the
range.
RL.2.10: By the end of
the year, read and
comprehend literature,
including stories and
poetry, in the grades 2
through 3 text complexity
band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at
the high end of the
range.
RI.2.8: Describe how
reasons support specific
points the author makes
in a text.
W.2.1: Write opinion
pieces in which they
introduce the topic of
book they are writing
about, state an opinion,
supply reasons that
Suggested
Works/Resources
Cloudy with a Chance of
Meatballs (Judi and Ron
Barrett)
Dim Sum for Everyone (Grace
Lin)
Everybody Bakes Bread
(Norah Dooley and Peter J.
Thornton) (Read Aloud)
Everybody Brings Noodles
(Norah Dooley and Peter J.
Thornton)
Everybody Cooks Rice (Norah
Dooley and Peter J. Thornton)
(Read Aloud)
Everybody Serves Soup
(Norah Dooley and Peter J.
Thornton)
Gregory the Terrible Eater
(Mitchell Sharmat, Jose
Aruego, and Ariane Dewey)
How My Parents Learned to
Eat (Ina R. Friedman and Allen
Say)
In the Night Kitchen (Maurice
Sendak) (EA) 1
My Mom Loves Me More Than
Sushi (Filomena Gomes and
Ashley Spires) (Read Aloud)
Something’s Happening on
Calabash Street (Judith Ross)
(Read Aloud)
Strega Nona (Tomie de Paola)
(Read Aloud)
Sample Activities and Assessment
discussion. Continue to talk about color, perspective,
symmetry, and detail and the many different ways in which
artists choose to paint, even when they are all painting a still
life. (SL.2.1, SL.2.2)
VOCABULARY
Have the students taste-test healthy snacks, fruits, and
vegetables. Encourage them to use adjectives by challenging
them to come up with at least three descriptive words between
each new taste. For example, “This apple is tangy, sweet, and
crunchy!” Encourage students to use a dictionary to check the
spelling of the words as needed. (L.2.2e, L.2.5a)
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce the book Everybody Cooks Rice (Norah Dooley and
Peter J. Thornton), which is about a girl who lives in an
ethnically diverse neighborhood. She makes a very interesting
discovery about her neighbors when she sees what each one
is cooking. Read the book aloud. When you are finished, ask
the children questions such as: “What do you think the author
wanted you to learn in this book? What are the clues from the
text that helped you come to that conclusion?” (RL.2.2)
READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT, RESEARCH
Have students independently read informational books to learn
about each body system. Students should record new learning
about each of the body systems in a notebook. They should
look for the ways the author supports the main idea. For
example, when reading a book about nutrition, ask students to
find reasons in the text for why a person should eat healthy
foods. (RI.2.10, RI.2.8)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
support the opinion, use
linking words (e.g.,
because, also) to
connect opinion and
reasons, and provide a
concluding statement or
section.
Suggested
Works/Resources
Tar Beach (Faith Ringgold)
The Magic School Bus Inside
the Human Body (Joanna Cole
and Bruce Degan) (Read
Aloud)
The Sweetest Fig (Chris Van
Allsburg) (Read Aloud)
Thunder Cake (Patricia
Polacco)
Too Many Tamales (Gary Soto
and Ed Martinez) (Read
Aloud)
Yoko (Rosemary Wells)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Nonfiction Books
“Bones” (Kids Discover
Magazine) (Read Aloud)
“Brain” (Kids Discover
Magazine) (Read Aloud)
“Muscles” (Kids Discover
Magazine) (Read Aloud)
“Nutrition” (Kids Discover
Magazine) (Read Aloud)
Bones: Our Skeletal System
(Seymour Simon) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
Break It Down: The Digestive
System (Steve Parker) (Read
Aloud)
Digestive System (Cheryl
Jakab) (Read Aloud)
Eat Your Vegetables! Drink
Sample Activities and Assessment
READING LITERATURE, READING FLUENCY, READING
COMPREHENSION
In order to stretch students’ reading skills and test for
comprehension and fluency, have students read a variety of
fictional texts independently. Although the books share the
common theme of food, they have very different messages.
For example, Tar Beach (Faith Ringgold), which includes a
picnic scene, is literally about rising above prejudice. Gregory
the Terrible Eater (Mitchell Sharmat, Jose Aruego, and Ariane
Dewey) is a funny book about a goat, but carries a message
about healthy eating. These books offer a range of reading in
the 2 through 3 band of grade level and stretch texts. (RL.2.10,
RL 2.2)
MUSIC, VOCABULARY
Explore text, rhythm, and rhyme in the song “Dry Bones.”
Discuss how bones are connected in the song. It’s fun, though
not necessarily accurate (e.g., the “toe bone” is not connected
directly to the “heel bone”). Then have the students research
the scientific names of the bones. Assign each pair of students
one of the bones in the song to research online or in an
encyclopedia. They should be sure to find out how the bones
are actually attached and note the real names for each of the
bones mentioned. For example, the twenty-six bones in the
foot and the toes are actually called “phalanges.” Extend this
activity to the stretch level by having the students sing the song
with the scientific names. (RL.2.4, RI.2.7)
OPINION WRITING, LANGUAGE USAGE
Ask the students to choose one thing that they think is most
important to do in order to stay healthy. Tell them to support
their opinions with facts that they learned from one of the
books they read. Remind them to stay on topic, include details,
use appropriate linking words between ideas, and provide a
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Your Milk! (Alvin and Virginia
B. Silverstein, and Laura
Silverstein Nunn) (Read
Aloud)
Good Enough to Eat: A Kid’s
Guide to Food and Nutrition
(Lizzy Rockwell)
Guts: Our Digestive System
(Seymour Simon) (EA) (Read
Aloud)
Healthy Eating Series (Susan
Martineau and Hel James)
(Read Aloud)
Muscles: Our Muscular
System (Seymour Simon) (EA)
(Read Aloud)
Showdown at the Food
Pyramid (Rex Barron) (Read
Aloud)
The Astounding Nervous
System: How Does My Brain
Work? (John Burstein) (Read
Aloud)
The Digestive System
(Christine Taylor-Butler) (Read
Aloud)
The Digestive System (Kristin
Petrie) (Read Aloud)
The Digestive System
(Rebecca L. Johnson)
The Food Pyramid (Christine
Taylor-Butler) (Read Aloud)
The Mighty Muscular and
Sample Activities and Assessment
strong conclusion. (W.2.1)
LANGUAGE USAGE, VOCABULARY
The title of this unit is Taking Care of Ourselves. Ask students
what other words they know that end with –self or –selves.
(Possible answers: myself, himself, herself, themselves,
yourself, and yourselves.) Practice using these special kinds of
pronouns in sentences: “I can do it __________.” “She climbed
the monkey bars by _____________.” “They went to the
playground by ___________________.” (L.2.1c, SL.2.6)
READING LITERATURE, SPEAKING AND LISTENING,
RESEARCH
Introduce the book The Magic School Bus Inside the Human
Body (Joanna Cole). Remind the students that this book is a
fantasy but contains information that is true. Use this book to
introduce the body systems for the informational side of this
unit: skeletal, muscular, digestive, and nervous systems. Begin
a chart for each of the body systems to add content learning
from other read-aloud and student-read books. Students can
post information from their own reading on a chart by using
index cards or sticky notes. (RI.2.4)
ART, SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Introduce the genre of still life to the students. As students view
the paintings, talk about the details, objects, and positions of
objects that they notice. Closely examine the works by Heda
and Claesz. Explain that these artists did “high-definition” work
almost two hundred years before photography was invented.
They called it trompe l’oeil, which is French for “deceive the
eye.” Students should notice how these paintings are “realer
than real.” Put cut fruit, a basket, or metalware on the table and
have students try to draw one of the objects precisely. (SL.2.1,
SL.2.2)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
30
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Skeletal Systems: How Do My
Muscles and Bones Work?
(John Burstein) (Read Aloud)
The Nervous System
(Christine Taylor-Butler) (Read
Aloud)
The Nervous System (Joelle
Riley)
The Skeleton Inside You
(Philip Balestrino and True
Kelley)
What Happens to a
Hamburger? (Paul Showers
and Edward Miller)
Sample Activities and Assessment
SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Why do our brains need good food? To begin this unit,
students will need to think about the relationship between good
food and brain function—how to nurture a healthy body.
Encourage the students to look at the figurative meaning of the
term good food. (SL.2.1)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Annibale Carracci, The
Beaneater (1584-1585)
Claes Oldenburg, Two
Cheeseburgers, with
Everything (1962)
Guiseppe Arcimboldo,
Vertumnus (1590-1591)
Michelangelo Merisi da
Caravaggio, Basket of Fruit
(ca.1599)
Pieter Claesz, Still Life with
Two Lemons (1629)
Wayne Thiebaud, Cakes
(1963)
Willem Claesz. Heda, Still Life
on a Table (1638)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
31
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested
Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
William Bailey, Still Life with
Rose Wall and Compote
(1973)
Music
Lionel Bart, “Food, Glorious
Food” (from Oliver)
Traditional, “Dry Bones”
Traditional, “I‘m Being
Swallowed by a Boa
Constrictor”
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 2 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
32
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Grade 2 Suggested Objectives
Unit 1
•Independently read chapter books according to ability.
•Distinguish between the roles of author and illustrator in chapter books.
•Ask the questions who, what, where, when, why, and how after reading fictional books.
•Study the beginnings and endings of chapters and stories.
•Use digital resources to research a seasonal activity.
•Use a computer-generated graphic organizer to organize class research.
•Create an informational class book from this shared research.
•Study art pieces to see the artist’s techniques in creating a sense of cold or warmth.
•Create a collection of adjectives and adverbs.
•Expand sentences by adding adjectives and adverbs from the class discussion on art.
•Write a paragraph using complete sentences.
•Write poetry based on music (e.g., Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons).
•Enjoy and analyze poetry related to the seasons, noting alliteration, rhyme, rhythm, and repetition.
•Study the organization of informational text, specifically the purpose of paragraphs.
Unit 2
•Create a list of collective nouns related to topics studied (e.g., “herd,” “flock,” etc. in this unit on the West).
•Read tall tales and learn the distinct characteristics of this type of tale.
•Compare and contrast an original fairy tale with one that has been rewritten in a different setting.
•Read multiple perspectives on a given topic.
•Research the life of a real person.
•Write an informational essay based on research about a real person.
•Read informational texts to answer the questions who, what, where, when, why, and how.
•Read chapter books in the fantasy genre, paying careful attention to the varied voices of the characters.
Unit 3
•Read a how-to book.
•Write an explanatory piece on how to do something.
•Discern the difference between the use of literal and figurative language.
•Discern authors’ techniques for describing characters.
•Write friendly letters to one of the characters in a book.
•Use commas correctly in the greeting and closing of a friendly letter.
•Write responses to a letter from a character’s point of view.
•Use knowledge of a root word, such as bridge, to predict the meaning of compound words and idioms.
•Describe the use of riddles and other language in Haiku poetry.
Unit 4
•Write a narrative imagining that you are a character in one of the stories.
•Select the correct verb form, particularly of irregular verbs, to show past tense in narrative writing.
•Note links between historical events, including parallel connections and sequential connections.
•Analyze narrative poetry to understand its elements, meaning, and the use of formal and informal English.
•Compare two texts (a biography and an autobiography) on the life of a famous person.
•Write an opinion piece, citing evidence for the opinion.
•Express an opinion by creating and displaying a PowerPoint slide.
•Record the opinion piece being read aloud to use for a class presentation or online web page
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Unit 5
•Read poetry, informational text, and literature on grade and stretch levels.
•Retell folktales from diverse cultures, determining their central message or lesson.
•Write imaginative narratives in which they tell a well-elaborated story.
•Ask and answer questions of a guest speaker.
•Use text features in nonfiction to aid comprehension of the text.
•Compare a variety of versions of the same story (e.g., versions of Stone Soup), contrasting the differences in
story elements and key details.
•Compare a poetry version and a prose version of the same story (e.g., the Pied Piper legend).
•Learn the irregular forms of plural nouns.
•Memorize a poem and record it
Unit 6
•Write an informative/explanatory piece describing the experience of painting.
•Use descriptive words (adjectives) to describe food they taste.
•Consult a dictionary on the spelling of descriptive words.
•Read to understand more on a specific topic (e.g., the systems of the body in a narrative informational text,
The Magic School Bus Inside the Human Body.)
•Read texts independently and fluently in both literary and informative genres, on grade level and into the
stretch 2 through 3 level of text.
•Read books with a common theme (e.g., food) to explore the treatment of themes in literature.
•Sing songs about a given topic, noting how the rhythm and rhyme of the music and lyrics might help
understanding of the topic.
•Use reference books to research a scientific topic (e.g., names of bones in the human body).
•Write a paragraph with an introductory sentence, at least one supporting sentence, and a conclusion.
•Write an opinion piece about a given topic (e.g., an important thing to do to stay healthy).
•Use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, yourself, and ourselves) correctly.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Second Grade ELA Pacing Guide Aligned With The Common Core
Six Week
Units
Common Core
Curriculum
Unit 1
A Season for
Chapters
th
Aug 30 th
October 5
When is
language
beautiful?
Unit 2
The Wild West
th
October 8 November
th
20
How does
setting affect a
story?
Unit 3
Houghton Mifflin Phonics
Houghton Mifflin
Spelling
Houghton Mifflin
Grammar/Writing
Theme 1-1
wk 1 - short a/i
wk 2 - base words and
endings
-s –ed –ing
Theme 1-2
wk 3 – short o/u/e
Theme 1-3
wk 4 – long vowels
CVCe a/i
Theme 1 Review
wk 5 –vccv pattern /
review short a/i
wk 6 - short o/u/e
Theme 1-1
wk 1 – short a/i
wk 2 – RWW frequently
misspelled words
Theme 1-2
wk 3 – short o/u/e
Theme 1-3
wk 4 – vowel consonant e
Theme 1 Review
wk 5 – words 1-10 w/ 1-3
challenge words
wk 6 – words 11-20 w/ 4-5
challenge words
Theme 1-1
wk 1 – what is a sentence?
wk 2 – homophones
Theme 1-2
wk 3 – naming parts of a
sentence
wk 4 – synonyms
Theme 1-3
wk 5 – actions parts of a
sentence
wk 6 – multiple meaning
words
Theme 2-1
wk 1 – long vowels
CVCe o/u/e
wk 2 – two sounds
for g/review long
vowels CVCe a/i
Theme 2-2
wk 3 – consonant
clusters (r, l, s)
Theme 2-3
wk 4– double consonants
Theme 2 Review
wk 5 – two sounds for c
wk 6 –VCV pattern/review
consonant clusters (r,l,s)
Theme 3-1
wk 1 – consonant
Theme 2-1
wk 1 – vowel consonant e
wk 2 – RWW frequently
misspelled words
Theme 2-2
wk 3 – words w/
consonant clusters
Theme 2-3
wk 4 – double consonants
Theme 2 Review
wk 5 – words 1-10 w/ 1-3
challenge words
wk 6 – words 11-20 w/ 4-5
challenge words
Theme 2-1
wk 1 – telling sentences and
questions
wk 2 – compound words
Theme 2-2
wk 3 – commands
wk 4 - antonyms
Theme 2-3
wk 5 – exclamations
wk 6 – multiple meaning
words
Theme 3-1
wk 1 – words w/ th, wh,
Theme 3-1
wk 1 – naming words –
Houghton Mifflin
Themes and Stories
- Back to School Review
- Theme 2
- Henry and Mudge and
the Starry Night
- Exploring Parks with
Ranger Dockett
- Around the Pond: Who’s
Been Here?
- Theme 4
- The Great Ball Game
- Theme 1
- Julius
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Building
Bridges with
Unlikely
Friends
November
th
26 December
s
21
Why do
author’s use
figurative
language?
Christmas
Vacation
rd
January 3 th
January 18
Unit 4
January
nd
22 February
th
15
A Long Journey
to Freedom
February
Vacation
What is
challenging
about writing a
narrative?
February
th
25 -March
th
8
digraphs th, wh,
sh, ch, tch
wk 2 - base words and
endings –er / -est
and review double
consonants
Theme 3-2
wk 3 – vowel pairs
ai/ay
Theme 3-3
wk 4 – vowel pairs
ow/ou
Theme 3-4
wk 5 – vowel pairs
ee/ea /syllables
-tion, -ture
Theme 3 Review
wk 6 – suffixes –ly, -ful/
review consonant
digraphs th, wh,
sh, ch, tch - ai/ay
- ow/ou
Theme 4-1
wk 1 – r-controlled ar
wk 2 – r-controlled or,
ore / review –tion
and –ture
Theme 4-2
wk 3 – words with nd,
nt, mp, ng, nk
Theme 4-3
wk 4 – vowel pairs
oa/ow
sh, ch, tch
wk 2 – RWW frequently
misspelled words
Theme 3-2
wk 3 – long a spellings
Theme 3-3
wk 4 – vowel sound in
cow
Theme 3-4
wk 5 – long e spellings
Theme 3 Review
wk 6 – words 1-20 w/ 1-5
challenge words
common nouns
wk 2 – dictionary abc order
to the third letter
Theme 3-2
wk 3 – specials nouns
wk 4 – dictionary: beginning,
middle, end
Theme 3-3
wk 5 – one and more than
one / using context
Theme 3-4
wk 6 – nouns that change
spelling in the plural /
dictionary: guide words
Theme 4-1
wk 1 – vowel + r sounds
in car
wk 2 – RWW frequently
misspelled words
Theme 4-2
wk 3 – words that end
with nd, ng, nk
Theme 4-3
wk 4 – long o spelling
Theme 4-1
wk 1 – words for nouns
wk 2 dictionary: entry words
Theme 4-2
wk 3 – singular possessive
nouns
wk 4 – using a thesaurus
Theme 4-3
wk 5 – plural possessive
nouns
wk 6 – dictionary: parts of a
dictionary entry
Theme 4 Review
wk 5 – base words and
endings –s, -es,
ies / review rcontrolled ar, or,
ore
Theme 4 Review
wk 5 – words 1-10 w/ 1-3
challenge words
wk 6 – words 11-20 w/ 4-5
challenge words
- Theme 4
- Officer Buckle and
Gloria
- Theme 6
- The School Mural
- Flat Stanley
- Habitats
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
wk 6 – review words
with nd, nt, mp,
ng, nk
Unit 5
Hand-Me-Down
Tales from
Around the
World
th
March 11 th
April 19
How are stories
and poems
alike? How are
they different?
April
Vacation
Unit 6
Taking Care of
Ourselves
th
April 29 th
June 7
Why should we
support our
opinions with
reasons?
Theme 5-1
wk 1 - er endings in
two-syllable words
wk 2 - review vowel
pairs oa/ow
Theme 5-2
wk 3 – contractions
Theme 5-3
wk 4 – sound of y at
the end of longer
words/ prefix –un
Theme 5-4
wk 5 – base words and
-ed, -ing endings
(double final consonant)
Theme 5 Review
wk 6 – le ending in
two-syllable words /
silent consonants
gh, k(n), b
wk 6 – review er
endings/ le endings
in two-syllable words/
y at the end of longer
words
Theme 5-1
wk 1 – words that end with
er
wk 2 – RWW frequently
misspelled words
Theme 5-2
wk 3 – contractions
Theme 5-3
wk 4 – final sound in
puppy
Theme 5-4
wk 5 – words that end
with –ed or –ing
Theme 5 Review
wk 6 – words 1-20 w/ 1-5
challenge words
Theme 5-1
wk 1 – verbs
wk 2 – word families
Theme 5-2
wk 3 – verbs that tell about
now
wk 4 – dictionary: word
meanings
Theme 5-3
wk 5 – verbs that tell about
the past / review
homophones
Theme 5-4
wk 6 – verbs is/are,
was/were
- dictionary: finding
words with endings
-Theme 4 Read-Aloud
- The Little Fly and the
Great Moose
Theme 6-1
wk 1 – vowel pairs oo,
ew, ue, ou
wk 2 – review base
words and endings
-ed, -ing
(double final consonant)
Theme 6-2
wk 3 – long i (igh and
Theme 6-1
wk 1 – vowel sounds in
moon and book
wk 2 – RWW frequently
misspelled words
Theme 6-2
wk 3 – words with long i
Theme 6-3
wk 4 – words with –ed
Theme 6-1
wk 1 – other irregular verbs
wk 2 – word families
Theme 6-2
wk 3 – adjectives including
a, an, and the
wk 4 – multiple meaning
words
Theme 6-3
- Theme 1
- Dragon Gets By
- Theme 5
- Jalapeno Bagels
- Theme 3
- Chinatown
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
ie)
Theme 6-3
wk 4 – base words and
endings -ed, -ing
(drop the final e)
Theme 6 Review
wk 5 – review vowel
pairs oo, ew, ue,
ou
wk 6 – review long i
(igh and ie)
th
June 10 last days of
school
and –ing
Theme 6 Review
wk 5 – words 1-10 w/ 1-3
challenge words
wk 6 – words 11-20 w/ 4-5
challenge words
wk 5 – comparing with
adjectives
wk 6 – using context
- DRAs
- Writing Prompt
- Read favorite HM stories
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 3
Stories Worth Telling Again and Again
Unit 1 - Number of Weeks: 6 – Sep.-mid Oct.
Essential Question: Why do we hand stories down to the next generation?
Terminology: author, character motivation, character traits, collective noun, editing, the fool, generational stories, illustrator internet search,
narrative writing, noun, problem, pronoun, revising, shared research, solution, the trickster, Trickster Tales, Verb, verb tenses
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.3.2: Recount stories,
including fables,
folktales, and myths from
diverse cultures;
determine the central
message, lesson, or
moral, and explain how it
is conveyed through key
details in the text.
LITERARY TEXTS
STORIES
Our stories:
The Stories Julian Tells (Ann Cameron and
Ann Strugnell) (E) (520L)
More Stories Julian Tells (Ann Cameron and
Ann Strugnell) (EA) (430L)
The Stories Huey Tells (Ann Cameron and
Roberta Smith) (EA) (470L)
Gloria’s Way (Ann Cameron and Lisa Toft)
(EA)
The Mask Makers
The Weaver’s Gift
The Best Older Sister
Grandparents’ stories:
Grandfather’s Journey (Allen Say) (EA)
(AD650L)
Tea with Milk (Allen Say) (EA) (AD450L)
Song and Dance Man (Karen Ackerman and
RL.3.3: Describe
characters in a story
(e.g., their traits,
motivations, or feelings)
and explain how their
actions contribute to the
sequence of events.
SL.3.1: Engage
MCAS
District GRADE testing
DRA
Dibels
Open response writing with Mass. Rubric
Group and class discussion
Participation
Journal responses to literature, art,
media,
non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems
Reflective essays with teacher/student
designed
rubrics
Short research projects
Comparing and contrasting
Spelling quizzes
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
1
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
effectively in a range or
collaborative discussions
(one-on-one, group, and
teacher-led) with diverse
partners on grade 3
topics and texts, building
on others’ ideas and
expressing their own
clearly.
Stephen Gammell) (780L)
Snowed in with Grandmother Silk (Carol
Fenner and Amanda Harvey) (690L)
Annie and the Old One (Miska Miles and
Peter Parnall)
Through Grandpa’s Eyes (Patricia
MacLachlan and Deborah Kogan Ray (EA)
(560L)
Knots on a Counting Rope (Bill Martin Jr.
John Archambault, Ted Rand) (480L)
The Memory String (Eve Bunting and Ted
Rand) (AD290L)
Grandma’sTable
The Ballad of Mulan (Song Nan Zhang)
The Keeping Quilt (Patricia Polacco)
Cultural trickster stories:
Tops & Bottoms (Janet Stevens) (E) (580L)
Bruh Rabbit and Tar Baby Girl (Virginia
Hamilton and James Ransome) (390L)
Love and Roast Chicken: A Trickster Tale
from the Andes Mountains (Barbara
Knutson) (AD570L)
Iktomi and the Buzzard (Paul Goble) (200L)
Iktomi and the Coyote (Paul Goble) (310L)
Iktomi and the Boulder (Paul Goble) (520L)
Iktomi and the Berries (Paul Goble) (220L)
Iktomi Loses His Eyes (Paul Goble)
Hungry Spiders (told by Pleasant DeSpain)
Rabbit Races (told by Gayle Ross)
Stories (Read Aloud)
The Apple and the Arrow (Mary Buff and
Conrad Buff) (750L)
Sign of the Beaver (Elizabeth George
Vocabulary quizzes
Teacher created assessments
Homework
The Stories Julian Tells –
First chapter: “The Pudding Like a Night on the
Sea”
SL.3.1(c): Ask questions
to check understanding
of information presented,
stay on topic, and link
their comments to the
remarks of others.
W.3.3: Write narratives to
develop real or imagined
experiences or events
using effective technique,
descriptive details, and
clear event sequences.
L.3.1: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of Standard
English grammar and
usage when writing and
speaking.
L.3.1(a): Explain the
function of nouns,
pronouns, verbs,
How would you describe Julian?
What are his character traits?
Why does he do what he does?
Students cite evidence from the text as they
answer the questions. Continue to focus on
character traits and motivation in this series.
Looking at not just Julian, but other characters as
well.
Compare and contrast the Julian stories.
NARRATIVE WRITING
Students are assigned: “Interview one of your
family members to learn a family story.
POETRY PERFORMANCE
“Choose one of Langston Hughes’s poems to
memorize or read interpretively. Be sure to
communicate the meaning of the poem in the
way you recite or read it.”
LITERARY RESPONSE
After reading Knots on a Counting Rope, review
the character traits of the boy and his
grandfather. Students should pair up and list
three characteristics for each.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
2
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
adjectives, and adverbs
in general and their
functions in particular
sentences.
Speare) (770L)
Poems
“Grandpa’s Stories” (Langston Hughes) (E)
“Aunt Sue’s Stories” (Langston Hughes)
(EA)
“Mother to Son” (Langston Hughes) (EA)
“By Myself” (Eloise Greenfield)
Poems (Read Aloud)
“Your World” (Georgia Douglas Johnson)
“The Telephone” (Robert Frost) (EA)
“Nani” (Alberto Rios)
“You Are Old, Father William” (Lewis Carroll)
(EA)
“For want of a nail, the shoe was lost…”
(Traditional)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books
Students will do Internet research on a culture
related to a favorite trickster tale.
African American slave culture
European culture (choose a specific country
Native American (Plains) culture
Andes Mountain culture
Informational Books (Read Aloud)
Throw Your Tooth on the Roof: Tooth
Traditions Around the World (Selby Beeler
and G. Brian Karas) (E) (AD770L)
Merry Go Round: A Book About Nouns
(World Language) (Ruth Heller) (NP)
Mine, All Mine: A Book About Pronouns
(World Language) (Ruth Heller) (NP)
A Cache of Jewels and Other Collective
Sample Activities and Assessment
Introduce another story that honors
grandparents: Through Grandpa’s Eyes.
Students list at least three characteristics of each
character in this story.
How are the grandparents similar and different?
How are the grandchildren similar and different?
What is the message of each book? What do
you think the author might have wanted you to
learn?
LITERARY RESPONSE
Trickster tales are stories that involve playing
tricks to solve problems. Remind students that
the story is not just in the text, but also in the
illustrations. The illustrations give hints about the
culture or origin.
Who is the trickster?
Who is the fool who gets tricked?
What is the problem in the story?
How did the trick solve the problem?
Think about why these stories have been told for
hundreds of years.
RESEARCH PROJECT
Students should focus on one of the cultures.
ART/CLASS DISCUSSION
Identify the story or event that has been passed
down through the generations in each of the
images. Discuss how these images also serve
as records.
What does the artist do to document the
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
3
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Nouns (World Language) (Ruth Heller) (NP)
Kites Sail High: A Book About Verbs (World
Language) (Ruth Heller) (NP)
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
Art
Jan van Eyck, Arnolfini Portrait (1434)
Pablo Picasso, Guernica (1937)
Jacopo Pontormo, Descent from the Cross
(1528)
Trojan’s Column, in Rome, Italy (completed
113CE) (detail)
Sample Activities and Assessment
importance of an event (e.g., include unique
elements or details)?
Why is there only one candle in the chandelier of
van Eyck’s image? Is that the artist’s signature in
the center of the painting? Other figures are
reflected in the mirror at center.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
4
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 3
Inspired by the Sea
Unit 2 - Number of Weeks: 6 – mid Oct.-Nov.
Essential Question: Why does the sea inspire us?
Terminology: adjectives, adverbs, author, comma, dialogue, illustrator, line, poem, poet, quotation marks, stanza, text evidence, text features
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RI.3.2: Determine the
main idea of a text;
recount the key details
and explain how they
support the main idea.
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories
Sarah Plain and Tall (Patricia MacLachlan)
(E) (560L)
The Storm (The Lighthouse Family Series)
(Cynthia Rylant and Preston McDaniels) (E)
(700L)
The Whale (The Lighthouse Family Series)
(Cynthia Rylant and Preston McDaniels)
(EA) (670L)
The Raft (Jim LaMarche) (E) (AD540L)
Amos & Boris (William Steig) (E) (AD810L)
Canoe Days (Gary and Ruth Wright
Paulsen) (AD840L)
Three Days on a River in a Red Canoe
(Vera B. Williams) (AD560L)
Seal Surfer (Michael Foreman)
Stories (Read Aloud)
“The River Bank” in The Wind in the Willow
(Kenneth Grahame) (300L)
RI.3.9: Compare and
contrast the most
important points and key
details presented in two
texts on the same topic.
RL.3.1: Ask and answer
such questions to
demonstrate
understanding of a text,
referring explicitly to the
text as the basis for the
answers.
DRA
Dibels
Open response writing with Mass. Rubric
Group and class discussion
Participation
Journal responses to literature, art,
media,
non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems
Reflective essays with teacher/student
designed
rubrics
Comparing and contrasting
Spelling quizzes
Vocabulary quizzes
Teacher created assessments
Homework
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
5
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
L.3.1: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of Standard
English grammar and
usage when writing or
speaking.
Paddle-to-the-Sea (Holling Clancy Holling)
Minn of the Mississippi (Holling Clancy
Holling)
Poems
“At the Seaside” (Robert Louis Stevenson)
“Sleepy Pearl” (Frances Gorman Risser)
“Do Oysters Sneeze?” (Jack Prelutsky)
“Undersea” (Marchette Chute)
“Beach Stones” (Lilian Moore)
“The Waves” (Gertrude M. Jones)
“A Sand Witch for a Sandwich” (Emily
Sweeney)
“A Wave” (Gussie Osborne)
Poems (Read Aloud)
“The Jumblies” (Edward Lear) (E)
“From the Shore” (Carl Sandburg) (EA)
“Seal Lullaby” (Rudyard Kipling) (EA)
“Song of a Shell” (Violet L. Cuslidge)
“The Barracuda” (John Gardner)
In reading the first chapter of Sarah Plain & Tall,
challenge students to look for specific places in
the text where they can prove that a character in
the story is “inspired by the sea.”
Discuss what motivates other characters.
L.3.1(a): Explain the
function of nouns,
pronouns, verbs,
adjectives, and adverbs
in general and their
functions in particular
sentences.
W.3.3: Write narratives to
develop real or imagined
experiences or events
using effective technique,
descriptive details, and
clear event sequences.
W.3.3(b): Use dialogue
and descriptions of
actions, thoughts, and
feelings to develop
experiences and events
or show the response of
characters to situations.
SL.3.1: Engage
effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions
(one-on-one, group, and
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books
Whales (Smithsonian) (Seymour Simond)
(EA)
Life in a Kelp Forest (Mary Jo Rhodes and
David Hall)
Sea Turtles (Mary Jo Rhodes and David
Hall)
Partners in the Sea (Mary Jo Rhodes and
David Hall)
Octopuses and Squids (Mary Jo Rhodes
and David Hall)
Seahorses and Sea Dragons (Mary Jo
Chapter 5 of Sarah Plain & Tall contains a
narrative about haystacks. Prepare students to
write well-developed narratives. Ask:
How many of you wanted to slide down the
haystack?
What was it in her writing that made you feel like
you were right there?
How did you know what the characters were
feeling?
How did the dialogue help you to be “right there”?
How did she communicate action? Thoughts?
Feelings?
How did she order the events?
How did she close the scene?
Students write a personal narrative about
something similar to the haystack slide, such as
riding a roller coaster, sledding down a hill, etc.
Be sure to show your actions, thoughts, and
feelings through dialogue and description.
POETRY
Dramatic interpretation and recitation of poetry in
this unit.
What’s the message of the poem? Cite
evidence.
How are these poems similar?
How are they different?
Which of the poems do you think is better? Why?
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
teacher-led) with diverse
partners on grade 3
topics and texts, building
on others’ ideas and
expressing their own
clearly.
Rhodes and David Hall)
Disasters at Sea (DK Readers) (Andrew
Donkin)
Titanic: Disaster That Rocked the World (DK
Readers) (Mark Dubowski)
Journey of a Humpback Whale (DK
Readers) (Caryn Jenner)
Shark Attack! (DK Readers) (Cathy East
Dubowski)
The Night of the Pufflings (Bruce MacMillan)
Trapped by the Ice (Michael McCurdy)
A Child’s Glacier Bay (Kimberly Corral)
Informational Books (Read Aloud)
A Drop of Water: A Book of Science and
Wonder (Walter Wick) (E)
A Drop Around the World (Barbara Shaw
McKinney and Michael S. Maydak)
John Muir: America’s Naturalist (Images of
Conservationists) (Thomas Locker)
Rachel Carson Preserving a Sense of
Wonder (Thomas Locker and Joseph
Bruchac)
The Lamp, the Ice, and the Boat Called Fish:
Based on a True Story (Jacqueline Briggs
Martin and Beth Krommes)
The Cod’s Tale (Mark Kurlansky and S.D.
Schindler) excerpts (e.g., informative
illustrations/text features)
Swimming with Hammerhead Sharks
(Kenneth Mallory)
Survival Secrets of Sea Animals (Mary Jo
Rhodes and David Hall)
Predators of the Sea (Mary Jo Rhodes and
David Hall)
SL.3.1(a): Come to
discussions prepared,
having read or studied
required material;
explicitly draw on that
preparation and other
information known about
the topic to explore ideas
under discussion.
Sample Activities and Assessment
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Read two books with similar topics: such as A
Drop of Water and A Drop Around the World.
Discuss the following:
Main idea
Key points used to create main idea
How are books similar? Different?
Text features
Purpose
Does one book teach more than the
other?
How could one of the books be
improved?
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
Create a list of text features.
Identify the purpose of the text
features in general.
WRITING
“You have read books about animals that live in
the sea. Think about which animal has been
most interesting to you. Write a paragraph about
what you have learned about a specific sea
animal: its habitat, its adaptations, and its diet.”
Give guidance in how to generate open-ended
questions about the specific animal, a plan for
locating the most relevant and useful information,
and how to organize the information into focused
paragraphs.
Students create a list of adjectives to describe
their sea animal. Create short sentences using
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Life on a Coral Reef (Mary Jo Rhodes and
David Hall)
Dolphins, Seals and other Sea Animals
(Mary Jo Rhodes and David Hall)
Crabs (Mary Jo Rhodes and David Hall)
Many Luscious Lollipops: A Book About
Adjectives (World Language) (Ruth Heller)
Up, Up and Away: A Book About Adverbs
(World Language) (Ruth Heller)
Sample Activities and Assessment
adjectives and adverbs.
Have students practice making new sentences
with comparative or superlative adjectives and
adverbs.
ART
Describe the differences among the works.
Which one depicts the sea most accurately? Is it
realistic or abstract?
Art
Edward Hopper, Ground Swell (1939)
Joseph Turner, Margate from the Sea (18351840)
Katsushika Hokusai, Mount Fuji Seen Below
a Wave at Kanagawa (1826-1833)
Richard Diebenkorn, Horizon: Ocean View
(1959)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 3
Creative, Inventive, and Notable People
Unit 3 - Number of Weeks: 6 – Dec.-Jan.
Essential Questions: How are the words creative and inventive similar? How are they different?
Terminology: biographies, complex sentence, compound sentence, coordinating, conjunction, note taking, presentation, research questions,
simple sentence, subordinating, conjunction
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RI.3.3: Describe the
relationship between a
series of historical
events, scientific ideas or
concepts, or steps in
technical procedures in a
text, using language that
pertains to time,
sequence, and
cause/effect.
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories
Emma’s Rug (Allen Say) (EA) (450L)
Rocks in His Head (Carol Otis Hurst and
James Stevenson) (440L)
Story (Read Aloud)
The Painter (Allen Say) (250L)
Poems
“Paper I” (Carl Sandburg) (EA)
“Paper II” (Carl Sandburg) (EA)
“The Folk Who Live in Backward Town”
(Mary Ann Hoberman)
“Jimmy Jet and his TV Set” (Shel Silverstein)
Poems (Read Aloud)
The Pot That Juan Built (Nancy AndrewsGoebel and David Diaz)
No One Saw: Ordinary Things Through the
Eyes of an Artist (Bob Raczka)
GUIDING THE CONVERSATION AT
BEGINNING OF UNIT:
What does it mean to be creative?
Whom do you know that is creative?
What other words can we make from the
base word create?
RL.3.1: Ask and answer
such questions to
demonstrate
understanding of a text,
referring explicitly to the
text as the basis for the
answers.
(creation, created, creating, recreate, uncreative,
and recreation)
Similar questioning for the words inventive and
notable.
How are the words creative and inventive
similar? Different?
Study the artists and musicians in the first half of
the unit, and then spend the last three weeks on
the inventors.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
SL.3.1: Engage
effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions
(one-on-one, group, and
teacher-led) with diverse
partners on grade 3
topics and texts, building
on others’ ideas and
expressing their own
clearly.
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books
My Name is Georgia: A Portrait (Jeanette
Winter) (AD580L)
Vincent van Gogh: Sunflowers and Swirly
Stars (Brad Bucks and Joan Holub)
The Yellow House: Vincent van Gogh and
Paul Gaugin Side by Side (Susan Goldman
Rubin) (810L)
When Marian Sang: The True Recital of
Marian Anderson (Pam Munoz Ryan and
BrianSelznick) (780L)
Ella Fitzgerald: The Tale of a Vocal Virtuoso
(Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney)
(520L)
Thomas Edison: A Brilliant Inventor (TIME
for Kids Biographies) (Editors of TIME for
Kids with Lisa DeMauro)
Henry Ford: Putting the World on Wheels
(TIME for Kids Biographies) (Editors of TIME
for Kids with Dina El Nabli)
Alexander Graham Bell: Inventor of the
Telephone (TIME for Kids Biographies)
(Editors of TIME for Kids with John Miklos
Jr.)
Amelia and Eleanor Go For a Ride (Pam
Munoz Ryan and Brian Selznick) (AD600L)
Hooray for Inventors! (Marcia Williams)
Informational Books (Read Aloud)
The Museum Book: A Guide to Strange and
Wonderful Collections (Jan Mark and
Richard Halland) (E)
Ah, Music! (Aliki) (E) (IG910L)
Paul Gauguin (Getting to Know the World’s
SL.3.1(a): Come to
discussions prepared,
having read or studied
required material;
explicitly draw on that
preparation and other
information known about
the topic to explore ideas
under discussion.
W.3.2: Write
informative/explanatory
texts to examine a topic
and convey ideas and
information clearly.
L.3.1: Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of Standard
English grammar and
usage when writing or
speaking.
Sample Activities and Assessment
DRA
Dibels
Open response writing with rubric
Group and class discussion
Participation
Journal responses to literature, art,
media, non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems
Reflective essays with teacher/student
designed
rubrics
Comparing and contrasting
Spelling quizzes
Vocabulary quizzes
Teacher created assessments
Homework
Informational Reading/Note Taking - Read
biographies of artists and musicians.
The title of a biography often contains the name
of the individual or a description of their main
contribution.
Using the graphic organizer - 5 W’s and How – in
small groups, students develop questions about
the famous person.
Research and Informative/Explanatory
Writing
Using the Time for Kids Biographies, students
take notes based on the key questions.
Students could create a PowerPoint.
Students formulate open-ended question/s to
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
L.3.1(h): Use
coordinating and
subordinating
conjunctions.
L.3.1(i): Produce simple,
compound, and complex
sentences.
Suggested Works/Resources
Greatest Artists) (Mike Venezia) (830L)
Here’s Looking at Me: How Artists See
Themselves (Bob Raczka)
Inventing the Future: A Photobiography of
Thomas Alva Edison (Marfe Ferguson
Delano and Jennifer Emmett) (1140L)
To Fly: The Story of the Wright Brothers
(Wendie Old and Robert Andrew Parker)
(780L)
Hidden Worlds: Looking Through a
Scientist’s Microscope (Stephen Kramer and
Dennis Kunkel) (1040L)
Fantastic! Wow! And Unreal! A Book About
Interjections and Conjunctions (Ruth Heller)
(NP)
Bill Melendez: an Artist in Motion
Bessie Coleman: Pioneer Aviator
Hank Greenberg: All Around All-Star
Sammy Sosa
Social Studies Massachusetts Biographies
Sample Activities and Assessment
guide their research:
“Choose an invention, an artwork, or song that
you love. Research to find out who invented it,
created it, or wrote it.
Photograph the object or artwork, or record the
song to use for an oral presentation of your
research results.” Make sure that students cite
their resource properly.
Poetry Reading/Recitation
Students could create an illustration to display
during their presentation.
Opinion Writing
“You began this unit with a discussion of three
words: creative, inventive, and notable. Choose
the person from this unit that you believe to be
the most creative, inventive, and notable. Give
reasons why you believe they are.”
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
Visual Artists
Pablo Picasso, Gertrude Stein (1906)
Vincent van Gogh, Self-Portrait (1887-1888)
Alice Neel, Faith Ringgold (1976)
Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait (1967)
Paul Gauguin, Self-Portrait (1889)
Musicians
Richard Avedon, Marian Anderson,
Contralto, New York (1955)
World Telegram staff photographer, Louis
Armstrong (1953)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Arnold Newman, Igor Stravinsky (1889)
Writers
Winold Reiss, Portrait of Langston Hughes
(no date)
Edoardo Gelli, The Last Portrait of Mark
Twain (1904)
Artist unknown, Helen Keller with Anne
Sullivan (1888)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 3
The People, the Preamble, and the Presidents
Unit 4 - Number of Weeks: 6 – Feb.-mid March
Essential Questions: Why is it important to choose words carefully?
Terminology: bio-poem, chronological order, cumulative choral, reading, dictionary, sequence, synonyms
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RI.3.4: Determine the
meaning of general
academic and domainspecific words and
phrases in a text relevant
to a grade 3 topic or
subject area.
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories
Woodrow for President: A Tail of Voting,
Campaigns, and Elections (Peter J and
Cheryl Shaw Barnes)
Arthur Meets the President: An Arthur
Adventure (Marc Brown) (480L)
Otto Runs for President (Rosemary Wells)
(570L)
The Garden on the Street (Meish Goldish)
(180L)
Vote! (Eileen Christelow) (420L)
Lily and Miss Liberty (Carla Stevens and
Deborah Kogan Ray) (550L)
In America (Marissa Moss) (440L)
The Dream Jar (Bonnie Pryor and Mark
Graham) (AD530L)
Annushka’s Voyage (Edith Tarbescu and
Lydia Dabcovich) (400L)
The Long Way to a New Land (Joan Sandin)
Introduce the unit by writing the key words on
the board: people, preamble, and presidency.
Give students a copy of a semantic map - using
dictionaries for reference.
RI.3.8: Describe the
logical connection
between particular
sentences and
paragraphs in a text
(e.g., comparison,
cause/effect, and
first/second/third in a
sequence.
SL.3.3: Ask and answer
questions about
DRA
Dibels
Open response writing with Mass. Rubric
Group and class discussion
Participation
Journal responses to literature, art,
media,
non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems
Reflective essays with teacher/student
designed
rubrics
Comparing and contrasting
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
information from a
speaker, offering
appropriate elaboration
and detail.
(340L)
Molly’s Pilgrim (Barbara Cohen and Daniel
Mark Duffy) (450L)
Make a Wish Molly (Barbara Cohen and Jan
Naimo Jones) (590L)
When Jesse Came Across the Sea (Amy
Hest and P.J. Lynch) (470L)
Hannah’s Journal: The Story of an
Immigrant Girl (Marissa Moss) (730L)
Oranges on Golden Mountain (Elizabeth
Partridge) (690L)
The Memory Coat (Elvira Woodruff and
Michael Dooling) (AD650L)
Together in Pinecone Patch (Thomas F.
Yezerski) (670L)
Hope in My Heart: Sofia’s Immigrant Diary,
Book 1 (Kathryn Lasky) (630L)
In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson
(Bette Bao Lord and Marc Simont) (730L)
The Orphan of Ellis Island (Elvira Woodruff)
(810L)
Grandfather’s Journey (650L)
Pepita Talks Twice
Across the Wide Dark Sea
The Golden Land
Poems (Read Aloud)
“The Star Spangled Banner” (Francis Scott
Key)
The Star Spangled Banner (Francis Scott
Key, illustrated by Peter Spier)
“The Flag Goes By” (H.H. Bennett)
“George Washington” (Rosemary and
Stephen Vincent Benet)
RF.3.4: Read with
sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support
comprehension.
RF.3.4(b): Read on-level
prose and poetry orally
with accuracy, at the
appropriate rate, and with
expression on
successive readings.
W.3.7: Conduct short
research projects that
build knowledge about a
topic.
L.3.4: Determine or
clarify the meaning of
unknown and multiplemeaning words and
phrases based on grade
3 reading and content,
choosing flexibly from a
range of strategies.
L.3.4(d): Use glossaries
and beginning
dictionaries, both print
Sample Activities and Assessment
Spelling quizzes
Vocabulary quizzes
Teacher created assessments
Homework
Students form groups of 3-4 and create a poster
using the key words – people, preamble, the
presidency. Students create symbols, pictures,
and words (synonyms) that illustrate the rich
meaning of each word.
Dramatic reading of the Preamble (students
could be encouraged to memorize the
Preamble).
Using the book, We the Kids (Catrow) discuss
the role of an illustrator in telling a story.
Encourage students to create the story before
showing them the text.
Choose two books about presidents to compare
and contrast.
RESEARCH
“From the books we’ve read about the
presidents, choose the president who interests
you most. Research that president using online
sources, an encyclopedia, and a biography of
him.”
Students then write an informative Bio Poem
based on the American president that was
researched.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
and digital, to determine
or clarify the precise
meaning of key words
and phrases.
Suggested Works/Resources
“Washington Monument by Night” (Carl
Sandburg) (EA)
“A Nation’s Strength” (Ralph Waldo
Emerson)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books
So You Want to be President? (Judith St.
George and David Small) (E) (840L)
14 Cows for America (Carmen Agr-a Deedy,
Thomas Gonzalez, and Wilson Kimeli
Naiyomah) (E) (AD540L)
Ellis Island (Elaine Landau) (740L)
Smart About the Presidents (Smart About
History) (Jon Buller, Susan Schade,
Maryann Cocca-Leffler, Dana Regan, and
Jill Weber) (NC760L)
Informational Books (Read Aloud)
Coming to America: The Story of
Immigration (Betsy Maestro and Susannah
Ryan) (AD890L)
We the Kids: The Preamble to the
Constitution (David Catrow)
Shh! We’re Writing the Constitution (Jean
Fritz and Tomie dePaolo) (950L)
…If You Were There When They Signed
The Constitution (Elizabeth Levy and Joan
Holub) (810L)
James Madison: Fourth President 18091817 (Mike Venezia) (810L)
The Presidency (True Books) (Patricia Ryon
Quiri)
The Presidency (True Books) (Christine
Taylor-Butler)
Sample Activities and Assessment
ART
Discuss how the style of depicting presidents has
changed over time – and how it has remained the
same. What elements can you identify in each
painting that have remained? Subjects, details,
themes?
What have modern artists chosen to omit or add
in more recent portraits – such as the portrait of
Bill Clinton by Chuck Close or Rauschenberg’s
portrait of J. F. Kennedy? How do these images
differ from previous presidential portraits?
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lives of the Presidents: Fame, Shame (and
What the Neighbors Thought) (Kathleen
Krull and Kathryn Hewitt) (1240L)
Remember the Ladies: 100 Great American
Women (Cheryl Harness)
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Art
Emanuel Leutze, Washington Crossing the
Delaware (1851)
Gilbert Stuart, George Washington (1796)
John Trumbull, John Adams (1792-1793)
Jean Antoine Houdon, Bust of Thomas
Jefferson (1789)
Daniel Chester French, Lincoln Memorial
(1922)
Aaron Shikler, Oil Portrait of John F.
Kennedy (official portrait) (1970)
Robert Raushenberg, Retroactive 1 (1964)
Artist unknown, Reagan Inaugural Parade
(1981)
Chuck Close, Portrait of Bill Clinton (2005)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 3
A Feast of Words on a Planet Called Earth – and Beyond
Unit 5 - Number of Weeks: 6 - mid March-April
Essential Questions: What makes a word or phrase the “right” word or phrase?
Terminology: idiom, Latin suffixes, thesaurus, word roots
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works identified
as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RI.3.7: Use information
gained from illustrations
(e.g., maps and
photographs) and the
words in a text to
demonstrate
understanding of the text
(e.g., where, when, why,
and how key events
occur).
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories
Amelia Bedelia (Peggy Parish and Fritz Siebel)
(140L)
Thank You, Amelia Bedelia (Peggy Parish and
Barbara Seibel Thomas) (410L)
Amelia Bedelia, Rocket Scientist (Herman
Parish and Lynn Sweat)
Dog Breath! The Horrible Trouble with Hally
Tosis (Dav Pilkey) (AD770L)
My Momma Likes to Say (Denise BrennanNelson and Jane Monroe Donavan) (AD830L)
Even More Parts: Idioms from Head to Toe
(Tedd Arnold)
Stories (Read Aloud)
The Search for Delicious (Natalie Babbitt) (E)
(910L)
Frindle (Andrew Clements and Brian Selznick)
(830L)
RF.3.3: Know and apply
grade-level phonics and
word analysis skills in
decoding words.
RF.3.3(b): Decode words
with common Latin
suffixes.
Group and class discussion
Journal responses to literature, art,
media,
non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems
Reflective essays with teacher/student
designed
rubrics
Comparing and contrasting
Spelling quizzes
Vocabulary quizzes
Teacher created assessments
Homework
`Display this list of words with a common Latin
suffix (e.g., -able, -ible, -ation, -fy, -ify, -ment, ty, -ity): likeable, readable, drivable, laughable,
and teachable. Ask students: What does each
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
L.3.4: Determine the
meaning of the new
words formed when a
known affix is added to a
known word.
RL.3.4: Describe the
meaning of words and
phrases as they are used
in a text, distinguishing
literal from nonliteral
language.
RL.3.5: Refer to parts of
stories, dramas, and
poems when writing or
speaking about a text,
using terms such as
chapter, scene, and
stanza; describe how
each successive part
builds on earlier sections.
W.3.1: Write opinion
pieces on topics or texts,
supporting a point of view
with reasons.
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Books About Idioms
In a Pickle and Other Funny Idioms (Marvin
Terban and Giulio)
Mad as a Wet Hen! And Other Funny Idioms
(Marvin Terban and Giulio)
Punching the Clock: Funny Action Idioms
(Marvin Terban and Thomas Huffman)
Raining Cats and Dogs: A Collection of
Irresistible Idioms and Illustrations to Tickle the
Funny Bones of Young People (Will Moses)
There’s a Frog in My Throat: 444 Sayings a
Little Bird Told Me (Loreen Leedy and Pat
Street)
Why the Banana Split: Adventures in Idioms
(Rick Walton and Jimmy Holder)
Ve Lo Que Dices/See What You Say:
Modismos en Espanol e Ingles/Spanish and
English Idioms (Nancy Maria Grande Tabor)
Birds of a Feather: A Book of Idioms (Vanita
Oelschlager and Robin Hegan)
Poems
“Eating While Reading” (Gary Soto) (E)
Candy Corn: Poems (James Stevenson)
Popcorn: Poems (James Stevenson)
Sweet Corn: Poems (James Stevenson)
“Catch a Little Rhyme” (Eve Merriam) (EA)
“Barefoot Days” (Rachel Field)
“The City” (Langston Hughes) (EA)
“Skyscrapers” (Rachel Field)
Poems (Read Aloud)
“I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” (William
Wadsworth)
“The Grass” (Emily Dickinson)
word have in common with the rest?
Then explain this is an example of a Latin
suffix.
What part of speech is read?
Explain that when we add the suffix –able, it
becomes a different part of speech, (i.e., an
adjective). Then use the new word in a
sentence.
VOCABULARY/THESAURUS
Have students look up the word know. Create
a horizontal line on the board with wonder at
one end and know at the other. To show
shades of meaning, discuss the placement of
other “state-of-mind” words on the scale.
Repeat this activity with verbs and/or
adjectives that come up in reading.
LANGUAGE/POETRY
Students read/recite poetry throughout the
unit. Students collect words of interest. Model:
“I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud.”
POETRY/COMPREHENSION
Use the poem, “Eating While Reading” to
illustrate how each new line builds meaning on
the preceding lines. Students read poetry
frequently explaining their understanding of
the poem, line by line and stanza by stanza.
LANGUAGE/WRITING
“Choose an idiomatic saying. Draw a picture of
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Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
“Spring Grass” (Carl Sandburg) (EA)
“The Grass on the Mountain” (Paiute American
Indian, transcribed by Mary Austin)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books
A Medieval Feast (Aliki) (E) (840L)
The Planets (Gail Gibbons) (EA) (800L)
Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 (Brian Floca)
(E) (AD990L)
Planets! (TIME for Kids) (Editors of TIME for
Kids with Lisa Jo Rudy)
The Solar System (Gregory Vogt) (430L)
Our Solar System (Revised Edition) (Seymour
Simond)
Mercury (News Nonfiction Readers) (Christine
Taylor-Butler)
Venus (News Nonfiction Readers) (Melanie
Chrismer)
Mars: The Red Planet (All Aboard Science
Reader) (Patricia Brennan Demuth)
Mars (News Nonfiction Readers) (Melanie
Chrismer)
Jupiter (News Nonfiction Readers) (Christine
Taylor-Butler)
Saturn (True Books) (Elaine Landau)
Uranus (News Nonfiction Readers) (Christine
Taylor-Butler)
Uranus (True Books) (Elaine Landau)
Neptune (News Nonfiction Readers) (Melanie
Chrismer)
Discover the Planets (Kids Can Read) (Cynthia
Pratt Nicholson and Bill Slavin)
Sample Activities and
Assessment
the literal and figurative meaning of the saying.
Write a short paragraph to explain to someone
like Amelia Bedelia why it is important to know
what the saying really means.”
FLUENCY/POETRY
“Choose one of the poems in this unit’s
collection. Memorize it (or read it) and perform
it for the class. Be sure to use your best
expression as you read.”
INFORMATIONAL TEXT/OPINION WRITING
Re: What the World Eats
Discuss the differences in the way people eat
around the world.
What do you think the author is trying to say in
this text?
Can you support your opinion with evidence
from the text?
How did the illustrations support the ideas in
the print part of the text? Do you think the
authors fairly described the way people in the
US eat?
INFORMATIVE/EXPLANATORY WRITING
“Generate questions to answer about a planet
other than the Earth. Write a report based on
the research.” Using the key words, 5W’s and
How, the students begin by creating a list of
open-ended questions they want to do
research on.
ART
Building on the use of verbs, idioms, and
dramatic reading, show students Number 31
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Pluto: From Planet to Dwarf (True Books)
(Elaine Landau)
Mercury (A True Book: Space) (Larry Dane
Brimner)
Venus (A True Book: Space) (Larry Dane
Brimner)
Mars (A True Book: Space) (Larry Dane
Brimner)
Jupiter (A True Book: Space) (Larry Brimner)
Saturn (A True Book: Space) (Larry Brimner)
Uranus (A True Book: Space) (Larry Brimner)
Neptune (A True Book: Space) (Larry Brimner)
Earth (A True Book: Space) (Larry Brimner)
Informational Books (Read Aloud)
What the World Eats (Faith D’Aluisio and Peter
Menzel) (E) (1150L)
It’s Disgusting and We Ate It! True Food Facts
From Around the World and Throughout
History (James Solheim and Eric Brace)
11 Planets: A New View of the Solar System
(David A. Aguilar)
When Is A Planet Not A Planet? The Story of
Pluto (Elaine Scott)
Next Stop Neptune: Experiencing the Solar
System (Alvin Jenkins, illus. by Steve Jenkins)
Resources for Students
Dictionaries
Online dictionaries
Thesaurus
Online thesauruses
Scholastic Dictionary of Idioms (Revised)
(Marvin Terban)
and Canyon. Ask:
What words come to mind when you see the
paintings? What words might you use to
describe the colors? The texture? What forms
do you see? Is there action in the paintings?
How so?
Review the difference between realism and
abstraction.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Art, Music, and Media
Art
Jackson Pollock, One: Number 31,1950 (1950)
Jackson Pollock, Number 1, 1950 (Lavender
Mist) (1950)
Morris Louis, Number 182 (1961)
Sam Gilliam, Red Petals (1967)
Helen Frankenthaler, Canyon (1965)
Helen Frankenthaler, Wales (1966)
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Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 3
Fantastic Adventures with Dragons, Gods, and Giants
Unit 6 - Number of Weeks: 6 - May-June
Essential Question: Why is it important to know mythology?
Terminology: fantasy, Mythology, narrative poem, summary
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works
identified as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RI.3.10: By the end of
the year, read and
comprehend
informational texts,
including history/social
studies, science, and
technical texts, at the
high end of the grades 23 text complexity band
independently and
proficiently.
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Stories
“Adventures of Isabel” (Ogden Nash) (NP)
“A Dragon’s Lament” (Jack Prelutsky) (NP)
“The Dragons Are Singing Tonight” (Jack
Prelutsky) (NP)
“Life Doesn’t Frighten Me At All” (Maya
Angelou) (NP)
Stories (Read Aloud)
Greek Myths for Young Children (Heather
Amery and Linda Edwards) (780L)
D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths (Ingri
D’Aulaire and Edgar Parin D’Aulaire)
The Gods and Goddesses of Olympus (Aliki)
Favorite Greek Myths (Mary Pope Osborne
and Troy Howell)
Classic Myths to Read Aloud: The Great
Stories of Greek and Roman Mythology
(William F. Russell)
RF.3.4: Read with
sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support
comprehension.
RF.3.4(c): Use context to
confirm or self-correct
word recognition and
District GRADE testing
DRA
Dibels
Open response writing with Mass. Rubric
Group and class discussion
Participation
Journal responses to literature, art,
media,
non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems
Reflective essays with teacher/student
designed
rubrics
Short research projects/Bio poems
Comparing and contrasting
Spelling quizzes
Vocabulary quizzes
Teacher created assessments
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
understanding, rereading
as necessary.
The Orchard Book of Roman Myths
(Geraldine McCaughrean and Emma
Chichester)
My Father’s Dragon (Ruth Stiles Gannett
and Ruth Chrisman Gannett)
The One-Eyed Gant (Mary Pope Osborne
and Troy Howell) (700L)
Could Be Worse! (James Stevenson)
(AD650L)
Dragon at Krakow
The Giant of Barletta
Raising Dragons
Poem (Read Aloud)
“The Tale of Custard the Dragon” (Ogden
Nash)
RL.3.2: Recount stories,
including fables,
folktales, and myths from
diverse cultures;
determine the central
message, lesson, or
moral and explain how it
is conveyed through key
details in the text.
RL.3.6: Distinguish their
own point of view from
that of the narrator or
those of the characters.
RL.3.10: By the end of
the year, read and
comprehend literature,
including stories, dramas,
and poetry, at the high
end of the grades 2-3
text complexity band
independently and
proficiently.
SL.3.5: Create engaging
audio recordings of
stories or poems that
demonstrate fluid reading
at an understandable
pace; add visual displays
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books
Boy Were We Wrong About Dinosaurs!
(Kathleen V. Kudlinski and S.D. Schindler)
(E)
If I Were a Kid in Ancient Greece (Ken
Sheldon, ed.)
Ancient Greece and the Olympics: A
Nonfiction Companion to Hour of the
Olympics (Magic Tree House Research
Guide 10) (Mary Pope Osborne, Natalie
Pope Bryce, and Sal Murdocca) (EA)
Ancient Rome and Pompeii: A Nonfiction
Companion to Vacation Under the Volcano
(Magic Tree House Research Guide 14)
(Mary Pope Boyce, and Sal Murdocca) (EA)
Rome: In Spectacular Cross Section
(Andrew Solway and Stephen Biesty)
Sample Activities and Assessment
Homework
Time may be spent on Gannet’s books before
starting unit because there is so much
mythology. It may be helpful to keep a list of
mythological gods, creatures and characters
CLASS DISCUSSION AND INFORMATIVE/
EXPOSITORY WRITING
As students read My Father’s Dragon, focus on
how each chapter builds on the last to tell the
story. As they finish each chapter, students
should write a short summary and illustrate.
Why was the myth told during the time of
the ancient Greeks?
Why is the myth still told today?
Create set of audio recordings
With students doing readings
Retelling with partner
OPINION WRITING
“Choose the most interesting mythical character.
Support your opinion with strong evidence from
the texts you have read and connect your writing
to specific parts of the myth. Be sure to use
linking words and phrases to connect your
opinion and reasons. Provide a concluding
statement.
Read about the Olympic Games.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 3 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Focus Standards
when appropriate to
emphasize or enhance
certain facts and details.
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and Assessment
Informational Books (Read Aloud)
Greece
Ancient Greece (DK Eyewitness Books)
(Anne Pearson)
I Wonder Why Greeks Built Temples and
Other Questions About Ancient Greece
(Fiona MacDonald)
If I Were a Kid in Ancient Greece: Children
of the Ancient World (Ken Sheldon, ed.)
Rome
If I Were a Kid in Ancient Rome: Children of
the Ancient World (Ken Sheldon, ed.)
Tools of the Ancient Romans: A Kid’s Guide
to the History & Science of Life in Ancient
Rome (Rachel Dickinson)
Science in Ancient Rome (Jacqueline L.
Harris)
Ancient Rome (DK Eyewitness Books)
(Simon James)
ART
Introduce Greek and Roman art collections.
Compare images of the Coliseum with the
Parthenon
ART, MUSIC AND MEDIA
Greek and Roman Art Collection (The
Metropolitan Museum of Art)
The Coliseum, Rome, Italy (80 AD)
The Parthenon, Athenian Acropolis, Greece
(438 BCE)
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Grade 3
Unit 1
Mother to Son
Well, son, I'll tell you:
Life for me ain't been no crystal stair.
It's had tacks in it,
And splinters,
And boards torn up,
And places with no carpet on the floor—
Bare.
But all the time
I'se been a-climbin' on,
And reachin' landin's,
And turnin' corners,
And sometimes goin' in the dark
Where there ain't been no light.
So, boy, don't you turn back.
Don't you set down on the steps.
'Cause you finds it's kinder hard.
Don't you fall now—
For I'se still goin', honey,
I'se still climbin',
And life for me ain't been no crystal stair.
Langston Hughes
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
By Myself
When I’m by myself
And I close my eyes
I’m a twin
I’m a dimple in a chin
I’m a room full of toys
I’m a squeaky noise
I’m a gospel song
I’m a gong
I’m a leaf turning red
I’m a loaf of brown bread
I’m a whatever I want to be
An anything I care to be
And when I open my eyes
What I care to be
Is me.
Eloise Greenfield
Unit 2
At the Sea-Side
By Robert Louis Stevenson 1850–1894
When I was down beside the sea
A wooden spade they gave to me
To dig the sandy shore.
My holes were empty like a cup.
In every hole the sea came up
Till it could come no more.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Do Oysters Sneeze?
Do oysters sneeze beneath the seas,
or wiggle to and fro,
or sulk, or smile, or dance awhile
…how can we ever know?
Do oysters yawn when roused at dawn,
and do they ever weep,
and can we tell, when, in its shell,
an oyster is asleep?
by Jack Prelutsky
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Undersea
Beneath the waters
Green and cool
The mermaids keep
A swimming school.
The oysters trot;
The lobsters prance;
The dolphins come
To jon the dance.
But the jellyfish
Who are rather small
Can't seem to learn
The steps at all.
By Marchette Chute
Sleepy Oyster
The storm is raging up above,
And waves are dashing high,
The sea birds, screaming, fly to land,
As thunder rocks the sky.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
But down below in waters calm
The oyster sleeps away;
Quite heedless of the wind and waves,
He snoozes, night and day.
He does not shout and rant and rave,
Nor bolts of lightning hurl,
He's dozing in the oyster bed,
And dreaming up a pearl!
Frances Gorman Risser
A Wave
I sat on the beach and a beautiful wave
Came tumbling right up to me.
It threw some pink shells on the sand at my feet,
Then hurried straight back out to sea.
It ran away swiftly and leaped up in foam;
It bumped other waves in its glee.
I think it was hurrying to gather more shells,
To bring as a present for me.
Gussie Osborne
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
A Sand Witch for a Sandwich
I walked the beach on a sunny day
And soon found a shell with which to play.
I made a castle, I made a moat,
I poured in water to sail my boat.
I made a farm and a racetrack, too,
And then a figure that sort of grew
Taller and taller as I piled more sand.
Then I shaped a face with one wet hand.
Oh, what a face—with an ugly beak
And a tall, tall hat that came to a peak!
I looked with pride at my ugly witch,
While all around I dug a ditch.
To keep her safe from the incoming tide,
I dug it deep on every side.
The waves rolled in and then slid back.
I waited for their we attack.
One little wave crept up the beach,
But my sand witch it could not reach.
One, two, three waves filled the ditch.
Another wave took a nip at the witch.
A whitecap pushed with all his might
And ate that witch in one big bite!
I laughed as the water swished round my feet,
For sandwiches are made to eat!
Emily Sweeney
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Beach Stones
When these small
stones
were
in clear pools and
nets of weed
tide-tumbled
teased by spray
they glowed
moonsilver,
glinted sunsparks on
their speckled
skins.
Spilled on the shelf
they were
wet-sand jewels
wave-green
still flecked with
foam.
Now
gray stones
lie
dry and dim.
Why did we bring them home?
---Lilian Moore
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Unit 3
The Folk Who Live in Backward Town
By Mary Ann Hoberman
The folk who live in Backward Town
Are inside out and upside down.
They wear their hats inside their heads
And go to sleep beneath their beds.
They only eat the apple peeling
And take their walks across the ceiling.
Jimmy Jet And His TV Set
I'll tell you the story of Jimmy Jet-And you know what I tell you is true.
He loved to watch his TV set
Almost as much as you.
He watched all day, he watched all night
Till he grew pale and lean,
From 'The Early Show' to 'The Late Show'
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
And all the shows in between.
He watched till his eyes were frozen wide,
And his bottom grew into his chair.
And his chin turned into a tuning dial,
And antennae grew out of his hair.
And his brains turned into TV tubes,
And his face to a TV screen.
And two knobs saying 'vert.' and 'horiz.'
Grew where his ears had been.
And he grew a plug that looked like a tail
So we plugged in little Jim.
And now instead of him watching TV
We all sit around and watch him.
Sheldon Allan Silverstein
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Unit 4
The Star Spangled Banner Lyrics
By Francis Scott Key 1814
Oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light
What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars thru the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?
And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.
Oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?
On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep,
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
In full glory reflected now shines in the stream:
'Tis the star-spangled banner! Oh long may it wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!
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And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
A home and a country should leave us no more!
Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave:
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!
Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
Between their loved home and the war's desolation!
Blest with victory and peace, may the heav'n rescued land
Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation.
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto: "In God is our trust."
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!
1694. The Flag Goes By
By Henry Holcomb Bennett
HATS off!
Along the street there comes
A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums,
A flash of color beneath the sky:
Hats off!
The flag is passing by!
Blue and crimson and white it shines,
5
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Over the steel-tipped, ordered lines.
Hats off!
10
The colors before us fly;
But more than the flag is passing by.
Sea-fights and land-fights, grim and great,
Fought to make and to save the State:
Weary marches and sinking ships;
15
Cheers of victory on dying lips;
Days of plenty and years of peace;
March of a strong land’s swift increase;
Equal justice, right and law,
Stately honor and reverend awe;
20
Sign of a nation, great and strong
To ward her people from foreign wrong:
Pride and glory and honor,—all
Live in the colors to stand or fall.
Hats off!
25
Along the street there comes
A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums;
And loyal hearts are beating high:
Hats off!
The flag is passing by!
Washington Monument by Night
Carl Sandburg (1922)
1
The stone goes straight.
A lean swimmer dives into night sky,
Into half-moon mist.
2
Two trees are coal black.
This is a great white ghost between.
It is cool to look at,
Strong men, strong women, come here.
3
Eight years is a long time
To be fighting all the time.
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4
The republic is a dream.
Nothing happens unless first a dream.
5
The wind bit hard at Valley Forge one Christmas.
Soldiers tied rags on their feet.
Red footprints wrote on the snow . . .
. . . and stone shoots into stars here
. . . into half-moon mist tonight.
6
Tongues wrangled dark at a man.
He buttoned his overcoat and stood alone.
In a snowstorm, red hollyberries, thoughts, he stood alone.
7
Women said: He is lonely
. . . fighting . . . fighting . . . eight years . . .
8
The name of an iron man goes over the world.
It takes a long time to forget an iron man.
9
.........
.........
Nation’s Strength
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1904)
What makes a nation’s pillars high
And its foundations strong?
What makes it mighty to defy
The foes that round it throng?
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
It is not gold. Its kingdoms grand
Go down in battle shock;
Its shafts are laid on sinking sand,
Not on abiding rock.
Is it the sword? Ask the red dust
Of empires passed away;
The blood has turned their stones to rust,
Their glory to decay.
And is it pride? Ah, that bright crown
Has seemed to nations sweet;
But God has struck its luster down
In ashes at his feet.
Not gold but only men can make
A people great and strong;
Men who for truth and honor’s sake
Stand fast and suffer long.
Brave men who work while others sleep,
Who dare while others fly...
They build a nation’s pillars deep
And lift them to the sky.
Unit 5
Catch a Little Rhyme
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Once upon a time
I caught a little rhyme
I set it on the floor
but it ran right out the door
I chased it on my bicycle
but it melted to an icicle
I scooped it up in my hat
but it turned into a cat
I caught it by the tail
but it stretched into a whale
I followed it in a boat
but it changed into a goat
When I fed it tin and paper
it became a tall skyscraper
Then it grew into a kite
and flew far out of sight...
Eve Merriam
Barefoot Days
By: Rachel Field
In the morning, very early,
That’s the time I love to go
Barefoot where the fern grows curly
And the grass is cool between each toe,
On a summer morning – O!
On a summer morning!
That is when the birds go by
Up the sunny slopes of air,
And each rose has a butterfly
Or a golden bee to wear;
And I am glad in every toe –
Such a summer morning – O!
Such a summer morning
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Skyscrapers by Rachel Field
Do skyscrapers ever grow tired
Of holding themselves up high?
Do they ever shiver on frosty nights
With their tops against the sky?
Do they feel lonely sometimes,
Because they have grown so tall?
Do they ever wish they could lay right down
And never get up at all?
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Unit 6
THE TALE OF CUSTARD THE DRAGON
By Ogden Nash
Copyright Linell Nash Smith and Isabel Nash Eberstadt
Belinda lived in a little white house,
With a little black kitten and a little gray mouse,
And a little yellow dog and a little red wagon,
And a realio, trulio, little pet dragon.
Now the name of the little black kitten was Ink,
And the little gray mouse, she called her Blink,
And the little yellow dog was sharp as Mustard,
But the dragon was a coward, and she called him Custard.
Custard the dragon had big sharp teeth,
And spikes on top of him and scales underneath,
Mouth like a fireplace, chimney for a nose,
And realio, trulio, daggers on his toes.
Belinda was as brave as a barrel full of bears,
And Ink and Blink chased lions down the stairs,
Mustard was as brave as a tiger in a rage,
But Custard cried for a nice safe cage.
Belinda tickled him, she tickled him unmerciful,
Ink, Blink and Mustard, they rudely called him Percival,
They all sat laughing in the little red wagon
At the realio, trulio, cowardly dragon.
Belinda giggled till she shook the house,
And Blink said Week!, which is giggling for a mouse,
Ink and Mustard rudely asked his age,
When Custard cried for a nice safe cage.
Suddenly, suddenly they heard a nasty sound,
And Mustard growled, and they all looked around.
Meowch! cried Ink, and Ooh! cried Belinda,
For there was a pirate, climbing in the winda.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Pistol in his left hand, pistol in his right,
And he held in his teeth a cutlass bright,
His beard was black, one leg was wood;
It was clear that the pirate meant no good.
Belinda paled, and she cried, Help! Help!
But Mustard fled with a terrified yelp,
Ink trickled down to the bottom of the household,
And little mouse Blink strategically mouseholed.
But up jumped Custard, snorting like an engine,
Clashed his tail like irons in a dungeon,
With a clatter and a clank and a jangling squirm
He went at the pirate like a robin at a worm.
The pirate gaped at Belinda's dragon,
And gulped some grog from his pocket flagon,
He fired two bullets but they didn't hit,
And Custard gobbled him, every bit.
Belinda embraced him, Mustard licked him,
No one mourned for his pirate victim
Ink and Blink in glee did gyrate
Around the dragon that ate the pyrate.
Belinda still lives in her little white house,
With her little black kitten and her little gray mouse,
And her little yellow dog and her little red wagon,
And her realio, trulio, little pet dragon.
Belinda is as brave as a barrel full of bears,
And Ink and Blink chase lions down the stairs,
Mustard is as brave as a tiger in a rage,
But Custard keeps crying for a nice safe cage.
1936
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 4
Tales of the Heart
Unit 1 - Number of Weeks: 4 – September
Essential Question: How do stories reveal what we have in common?
Terminology: (review of) poetic devices: rhyme scheme, meter, alliteration poetic terms: stanza, line, verse, bio-poem,
characters, dramatization, fluency, graphic organizer poetic devices: simile, metaphor, problem, solution semantic map
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works identified as
exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.4.2: Determine a
theme of a story, drama,
or poem from details in
the text; summarize the
text.
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories (Read Aloud)
Harriet the Spy (Louise Fitzhugh) (760L)
Stories
Love that Dog (Sharon Creech) (EA) (1010L)
Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing (Judy Blume)
(470L)
Clarice Bean Spells Trouble (Lauren Child)(340L)
Fourth Grade Rats (Jerry Spinelli) (340L)
Just Juice (Karen Hesse and Robert Andre
Parker)(690L)
Red Ridin’ in the Hood: and Other Cuentos (Patricia
Santos Marcantonio and Renato Alarco)(700L)
Porch Lies: Tales of Slicksters, Tricksters, and other
Wily Characters (Patricia McKissack and Andre
Carrilho)(790L)
RI.4.1: Refer to details
and examples in a text
when explaining what the
text says explicitly and
when drawing
inferences from the text.
RF.4.3: Know and apply
grade-level phonics and
word analysis skills in
MCAS
District GRADE testing
DRA
DIBELS
Open response writing with
Mass. Rubric
Group and class discussion
Participation
Journal responses to literature,
art, media,
non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems
Reflective essays with
teacher/student designed
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
1
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
decoding words.
RF.4.3(a): Use combined
knowledge of all lettersound correspondences,
syllabication patterns, and
morphology
(e.g., roots and affixes) to
read accurately unfamiliar
multisyllabic words in
context and out of context.
W.4.2: Write
informative/explanatory
texts to examine a topic
and convey ideas and
information clearly.
W.4.2(a): Introduce a
topic clearly and group
related information in
paragraphs and sections;
include formatting
(e.g., headings),
illustrations, and
multimedia when useful to
aid comprehension.
W.4.2(b): Develop the
topic with facts,
definitions, concrete
details, quotations, or
other information and
examples related to the
Tanya’s Reunion (Valerie Flournay) (AD600L)
Tomas and the Library Lady (Pat Mora)(440L)
Chalk Box Kid (Klyde Robert Bulla) (270L)
Poems (See Addendum A)
They Were My People (Grace Nichols) (E)
Monday’s Child Is Fair of Face (Mother Goose)
Dreams (Langston Hughes) (EA)
Humanity (Elama Stuckey)
On the Way to School (Charles Ghigna)
The Drum (Nikki Giovanni)
Honey, I Love: And Other Love Poems (Eloise
Greenfield and Leo and Diane Dillon)
Poems (Text about terms)
Skin Like Milk, Hair of Silk: What are Similes and
Metaphors? (Words are Categorical) (Brian P.
Cleary) (560L)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
About the body
The Heart: Our Circulatory System (Seymour Simon)
(1030L)
The Heart and Circulation (Exploring the Human
Body) (Carol Ballard)
The Circulatory System (Kristin Petrie) (690L)
The Amazing Circulatory System: How Does My
Heart Work? (Leo Burstein)(800L)
The Circulatory System (Scholastic, A True Book)
(Darlene R. Stille) (760L)
Lungs, Your Respiratory System (Seymour Simon)
The Respiratory System (Susan Glass) (750L)
The Respiratory System (Kristin Petrie)((750L)
The Remarkable Respiratory System: How Do My
Sample Activities and
Assessment
rubrics
Short research projects/Bio
poems
Comparing and contrasting
Spelling quizzes
Vocabulary quizzes
Teacher created assessments
Homework
Word study
Words that share roots are related in
their meanings. As individuals and as a
class, keep an index card file of new
words learned in this unit (i.e.
cardiovascular, cardiac, cardiology,
pulmonology, pulmonologist, etc.)
Keeping words on index cards allows
students to use and sort the words by
meaning and spelling features. (This
will be an ongoing activity all year.)
Students work in groups to create
semantic maps of the body systems in
order to explore your understanding of
the interconnectedness of the body
systems.
Reflective Essay
As a class, summarize what was
learned in this unit as it relates to the
essential question “How do stories
reveal what we have in common?”
Following class discussion, students
write a response and share it with the
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
2
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
topic.
Lungs Work? (John Burnstein)(NC704L)
The Respiratory System (Scholastic, A True Book)
(Darlene R. Stille)
The ABCs of Asthma: An Asthma Alphabet Book for
Kids of All Ages (Kim Gosselin and Terry Ravanelli)
The Endocrine System (Rebecca Olien)
The Exciting Endocrine System: How Do My Glands
Work? (John Burnstein) (900L)
Grossology and You: Really Gross Things about
Your Body (Sylvia Branzei and Jack Keely) (IG890)
What Makes You Cough, Sneeze, Burp, Hiccup,
Blink, Yawn, Sweat, and Shiver? (My Health) (Jean
Stangl)
I Wonder Why I Blink and Other Questions About My
Body (Brigid Avison) ((800L)
Biographies
Elizabeth Blackwell: Girl Doctor (Childhood of
Famous Americans) (Joanne Landers Henry)(930L)
Clara Barton (History Maker Bios) (Candice Ransom)
100 African Americans Who Shape History [chapter
on Daniel Hale Williams] (Chrisanne Beckner)
Biographies for
Advanced Readers or Read Alouds
The Mayo Brothers: Doctors to the World
(Community Builders) (Lucile Davis)(700L)
Charles Drew: Doctor Who Got the World Pumped
Up to Donate Blood (Getting to Know the World’s
Greatest Inventors and Scientists) (Mike
Venezia)(940L)
teacher.
SL.4.1: Engage effectively
in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one,
in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners
on grade 4 topics and
texts, building on others’
ideas and expressing their
own clearly.
SL.4.1(a): Come to
discussions prepared,
having read or studied
required material;
explicitly draw on that
preparation and other
information known about
the topic to explore ideas
under discussion.
SL.4.1(b): Follow agreedupon rules for discussions
and carry out assigned
roles.
L.4.4: Determine or clarify
the meaning of unknown
and multiple-meaning
words and phrases based
on grade 4 reading and
content, choosing flexibly
from a range of strategies.
Art
Examine how doctors are portrayed in
the various art selections. Determine
what adjectives could be used to
describe the doctors and patients.
Students choose a favorite painting and
write a conversation that could have
occurred between patient and doctor.
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
Art
Sir Luke Fildes, The Doctor (1891)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
3
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
L.4.4(a): Use context
(e.g., cause/effect
relationships and
comparisons in text) as a
clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Frederick Daniel, Playing at Doctors (1863)
Jan Steen, Doctor’s Visit (1663-1665)
Vincent van Gogh, Portrait of Dr. Gachet (1890)
Norman Rockwell, Doctor and Boy Looking at the
Thermometer (1954)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
4
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 4
Literature Settings: Weather or Not
Unit 2 - Number of Weeks: 6 – Oct.-mid Nov.
Essential Question: How does setting impact a story?
Terminology: (review of) poetic devices: rhyme scheme, meter, simile, metaphor; poetic terms: Stanza, line verse, context explicit
information, inference, prediction, setting
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works identified as
exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.4.1: Refer to details
and examples in a text
when explaining what the
text says explicitly and
when drawing inferences
from the text.
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories
Time of Wonder (Robert McCloskey) (940L)
Strawberry Girl (Lois Lenski) (650L)
The Long Winter (Laura Ingalls Wilder) (EA) (790L)
One Day in the Prairie (Jean Craighead George)
A Prairie Alphabet (ABC Our Country) (Jo
Bannatyne-Cugnet)
Rainbow Crow (Nancy Van Laan) (760L)
Hurricane Book and CD (Read Along) (David
Wiesner)
Hurricane (Jonathan London)
Skylark (Patricia MacLachlan) (470L)
Wildfires (Seymour Simon) (990L)
The Stranger (Chris Van Allsburg) (640L)
Heat Wave (Helen Ketteman) (AD610L)
Stories (Set in Kenya)
Safari Journal (Hudson Talbott) (780L)
RL.4.3: Describe in depth
a character, setting, or
event in a story or drama,
drawing on specific details
in the text (e.g., a
character’s thoughts,
words, or actions).
RI.4.3: Explain events,
procedures, ideas, or
concepts in a historical,
scientific, or technical text,
DRA
DIBELS
Open response writing with
Mass. Rubric
Group and class discussion
Participation
Writing poems
Comparing and contrasting
settings
Re-write stories with different
settings and analyze how it
affects the story
Spelling quizzes
Vocabulary quizzes
Summarization of fiction and non-fiction
texts using the “Somebody-Wanted-ButSo” strategy.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
5
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
including what happened
and why, based on
specific information in the
text.
Owen and Mzee: The True Story of a Remarkable
Friendship (CraigHatkoff)
Poems (See Addendum B)
Dust of Snow (Robert Frost) (E)
Fog (Carl Sandburg) (E)
A Visit to William Blake’s Inn: Poems for Innocent
and Experienced Travelers (Nancy Willard)
Clouds (Christina Rosetti)
The Storm Book (Charlotte Zolotow)
http://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/So
mebody-Wanted-But-So.html
RF.4.4: Read with
sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support
comprehension.
RF.4.4(a): Read on-level
text with purpose and
understanding.
RF.4.4(b): Read on-level
text orally with accuracy,
appropriate rate, and
expression on successive
readings.
W.4.2: Write
informative/explanatory
texts to examine a topic
and convey ideas and
information clearly.
SL.4.1: Engage effectively
in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one,
in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners
on grade 4 topics and
texts, building on others’
ideas and expressing their
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Reference
National Geographic Atlas for Young Explorers
Seasons and Weather
W is for Wind: A Weather Alphabet (Pat Michaels)
Hurricanes: Earth’s Mightiest Storms (Patricia
Lauber) (E) (930L)
Hurricanes (Seymour Simon) (EA)
The Everything Kids’ Weather Book (Joseph
Snedeker)
Do Tornadoes Really Twist? Questions and Answers
About Tornadoes and Hurricanes (Melvin and Gilda
Berger) (EA) (IG770L)
Weather Whys: Questions, Facts and Riddles About
Weather (Mike Artell) (860L)
Let’s Investigate Marvelously Meaningful Maps
(Madeline Wood Carlisle) (E)
If You’re Not from the Prairie (David Bouchard)
Can It Rain Cats and Dogs? Questions and Answers
About Weather (Scholastic Question and Answer
Series) (Melvin Berger) (EA) (710L)
Storms (Seymour Simon) (EA) (940L)
Cloud Dance (Thomas Locker) (AD490L)
Journal responses to literature,
art, media, non-fiction, poetry
Reflective essays with
teacher/student designed rubrics
Bio poems
Teacher created assessments
Homework
Compare and contrast the impact of
settings in poems or stories finding
explicit details from each.
JOURNAL RESPONSE
Following a class discussion of weather
and climate - students write about the
positive and negative effects of weather
on real life and real life in literature.
RESEARCH PROJECT
Write a Weather Forecast (Option 1):
Students write a weather forecast for
the area of choice. Include visual
displays in the presentation as
appropriate and share the report with
the class in the style of a meteorologist.
RESEARCH PROJECT
Q & A Report (Option 2):
Students read a variety of informational
texts, in print and online, about a
season or weather phenomenon of
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
6
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
own clearly.
The Cloud Book: Words and Pictures (Tomie
DePaola) (EA) (680L)
They Snowflake: A Water Cycle Story (Neil
Waldman)
Seasons and Weather (in Kenya)
Kenya’s Long Dry Season (Nellie Gonzalez Cutler)
(E)
choice. Write a report in question and
answer format where students write the
question and find the answers. Include
audio or visual displays in the
presentation, as appropriate.
SL.4.1(c): Pose and
respond to specific
questions to clarify or
follow up on information,
and make comments that
contribute to the
discussion and link to the
remarks of others.
SL.4.1(d): Review the key
ideas expressed and
explain their own ideas
and understanding in light
of the discussion.
L.4.5: Demonstrate
understanding of
figurative language, word
relationships, and
nuances in word
meanings.
L.4.5(a): Sort words into
categories (e.g., colors,
clothing) to gain a sense
of the concepts the
categories represent.
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
(Advanced Readers or Read Aloud)
The Weather Wizard’s Cloud Book: A Unique Way to
Predict the Weather Accurately and Easily by
Reading the Clouds (Louis D. Rubin Sr.)
ART
John Constable, Seascape Study with Rain Cloud
(1827)
Emile Nolde, Bewegtes Meer (1948)
Claude Monet, Rouen Cathedral: The Portal Sunlight
(1893)
Martin Johnson Heade, On the San Sebastian River
(1883-1890)
Thomas Hart Benton, July Hay (1943)
Tom Thompson, April in Algonquin Park (1917)
Edouard Manet, Boating (1874)
Wassily Kandinsky, Cemetery and Vicarage in
Kochet (1909)
WORD STUDY
Keep an index card file of words
learned in this unit (i.e. meteorology,
prediction, forecast, catastrophic ,
catastrophe, etc.) Students create an
individual semantic map to help explore
the understanding of the
interconnectedness of weather and
story events.
ART
Choose a favorite photo and write an
opening scene (with a partner) from a
story that would have the weather as its
setting, using at least one simile or
metaphor.
Following a class summarization of
what was learned in this unit as it
relates to the essential question “How
does setting impact a story?” students
write a response before discussing as a
class. After a class discussion,
students write an individual response to
share with the teacher.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
7
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 4
Animals are Characters, Too: Characters who Gallop, Bark and Squeak
Unit 3 - Number of Weeks: 8 – Nov.-Feb.
Essential Question: How do we portray animals in writing?
Terminology: character traits, first-person, third-person, limerick, narration, personification; poetic devices: rhyme
scheme, meter, simile, metaphor
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Lexile Framework for Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works identified
as exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.4.5: Explain major
differences between poems,
drama, and prose, and refer
to the structural elements of
poems (e.g., verse, rhythm,
meter) and drama (e.g.,
casts of characters,
settings, descriptions,
dialogue, stage
directions) when writing or
speaking about a text.
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories (General)
James Herriot’s Treasury for Children: Warm
and Joyful Tales by the Author of All Creatures
Great and Small (James Herriot)
It’s Raining Cats and Dogs: Making Sense of
Animal Phrase (Jackie Franza and Steve Gray)
Every Living Thing (Cynthia Rylant and S.D.
Schindler) (870L)
Nacho and Lolita (Pam Munoz Ryan and
Claudia Rueda)
The Mayor of Central Park (Avi and Brian Floca)
(570L)
Tacky the Penguin (Helen Hester and Lynn
Munsinger) (easier)
Stone Fox (John Reynolds Gardiner)(550L)
Akiak (Robert J. Blake) (590L)
RI.4.2: Determine the main
idea of a text and explain
how it is supported by key
details; summarize the text.
RF.4.4: Read with sufficient
accuracy and fluency to
DRA
Dibels
Open response writing with Mass.
Rubric
Group and class discussion
Participation
Journal responses to literature, art,
media,
non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems
Reflective essays with
teacher/student designed
rubrics
Short research projects/Bio poems
Comparing and contrasting factual
and
fictional information about animals
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
8
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
support comprehension.
Stories (Horses)
The Black Stallion (Walter Farley) (E) (680L)
Black Beauty: The Greatest Horse Story Ever
Told (DK Readers Level 4) (Anna Sewell and
Victor Ambrus) (650L)
Paint the Wind (Pam Munoz Ryan) (780L)
San Domingo: The Medicine Hat Stallion
(Marguerite Henry and Robert Lougbeed)
Gift Horse: A Lakota Story (S.D. Nelson)
(AD610L)
The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses (Paul
Goble)(670L)
Misty of Chincoteague (Marguerite Henry and
Wesley Dennis) (advanced) (750L)
Stories (Dogs)
Because of Winn Dixie (Kate ‘s DiCamillo)
(610L)
Shelter Dogs: Amazing Stories of Adopted
Strays (Peg Kehret and Greg Farrar) (940L)
Lewis and Clark and Me: A Dog’s Tale (Laurie
Myers and Michael Dooling) (470L)
The Trouble With Tuck: The Inspiring Story of a
Dog Who Triumphs Against All Odds (Theodore
Taylor) (880L)
Three Names (Patricia Maclachian and
Alexander Pertzoff) (AD690)
A Dog’s Life: Autobiography of a Stray (Ann M.
Martin)
Marley: A Dog Like No Other, A Special
Adaptation for Young Readers (John Grogan)
(760L)
Lassie Come-Home: Eric Night’s Original 1938
Classic (Rosemary Wells and Susan Jeffers)
RF.4.4(c): Use context to
confirm or self-correct word
recognition and
understanding, rereading as
necessary.
W.4.1: Write opinion pieces
on topics or texts,
supporting a point of view
with reasons and
information.
SL.4.5: Add audio
recordings and visual
displays to presentations
when appropriate to
enhance the development
of main ideas or themes.
L.4.5: Demonstrate
understanding of figurative
language, word
relationships, and nuances
in word meanings.
L.4.5(b): Define words by
category and by one or
more key attributes (e.g., a
duck is a bird that swims; a
tiger is a large cat with
stripes).
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Journal entry personifying an
animal
Spelling quizzes
Vocabulary quizzes
Teacher created assessments
Homework
Switcheroo Zoo
http://www.switcheroozoo.com/
Illustrate literal and figurative meanings for
animal idioms (e.g., It’s raining cats and
dogs.)
Internet4 Classroom –
Grade Level Help for the teacher, it
contains extension sites for students also.
http://www.internet4classrooms.com/gr
ade_level_help.htm
Compare and contrast how animals are
personified—identifying explicit examples
from texts
Journal entry personifying an animal;
students trade writing to see if they can
identify examples of personification
CREATE A CLASSBOOK
After reading and discussing
W is for Woof make an ABC book of
animal characters
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
9
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
L.4.5(c): Identify real-life
connections between words
and their use (e.g., note
places at home that are
cozy).
(780L)
Shiloh (Phyllis Reynolds Naylor and Barry
Moser) (advanced) (890L)
Stories (Mice)
Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a
Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup and a Spool of
Thread (Kate DiCamillo and Timothy Basil
Ering) (670L)
Ben and Me: An Astonishing Life of Benjamin
Franklin by His Good Mouse Amos (Robert
Lawson)
Ralph S. Mouse (Beverly Cleary and Tracy
Dockray) (860L)
The Mouse and the Motorcycle (Beverly Cleary)
(860L)
The Bookstore Mouse (Peggy Christian and
Gary A. Lippincott) (810L)
Ragweed (The Poppi Stories) (Avi and Brian
Floca) (690L)
The Race Across America (Geronimo Stilton)
The Story of Jumping Mouse: A Native
American Legends (John Steptoe) (AD500L)
Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH (Robert C.
O’Brien) (advanced) (790L)
Poppy (The Poppy Stories) (Avi and Brian
Floca) (advanced)
Poems (See Addendum C)
A Bird Came Down the Walk (Emily Dickinson)
E
The Rhinoceros (Ogden Nash)
The Erratic Rat (Traditional Limerick)
The Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear
(Edward Lear)
Illustrate literal and figurative meanings for
animal idioms after reading It’s Raining
Cats and Dogs and create a classbook
REPORT WRITING
Two students choose an animal to
research; write a report or do a multimedia presentation on that animal
DRAMA
Two or more classmates write two
additional scenes to a play about animals
(i.e. The Tacky Penguin)
WORD STUDY
Use new prefixes and suffixes learned so
far, create index cards with a definition, the
word in a sentence, and the word
SUMMARIES
Class summarizes what was learned about
the essential question “How is the
portrayal of animals similar and different
between fiction and non-fiction?”
Following, students write a response, edit
with a peer, then submit to teacher
ART AND MEDIA
students compare and contrast print and
film versions of stories (e.g. The Black
Stallion)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
10
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Scranimals (Jack Prelutsky)
The Beauty of the Beast: Poems from the
Animal Kingdom (Jack Prelutsky)
Poetry for Young People: Animal Poems (John
Hollander and Simona Mulazzani)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books (General)
Seeing Eye to Eye (National Geographic
Explorer!) (Leslie Hall) (E)
Good Pet, Bad Pet (Ranger Rick, June 2002)
(Elizabeth Schleichert) (E)
National Geographic Encyclopedia of Animals
(George McKay)
Informational Books (Veterinarians)
I Want to Be a Veterinarian (Stephanie Maze)
(NC1070L)
Veterinarian (Cool Careers) (William
Thomas)(700L)
Informational Texts (Horses)
Horses (Seymour Simon) (E) (930L)
H is for Horse: An Equestrian Alphabet (Michael
Ulmer and Gijsbert van Frankenhuyzen)
Your Pet Pony (Scholastic, A True Book) (Elaine
Landau)
Horse Heroes: True Stories of Amazing Horses
(DK Readers Proficient Readers, Level 4) (Kate
Petty)(840L)
Panda: A Guide Horse for Ann (Rosanna
Hansen and Neil Soderstrom)
The Kids’ Horse Book (Sylvia Funston)
Informational Text (Dogs)
Dogs (Smithsonian) (Seymour Simon)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
11
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
(EA)(870L)
W is for Woof: A Dog Alphabet (Ruth Strother
and Gijsbert van Frankenhuyzen)
Everything Dog: What Kids Really Want to Know
About Dogs (Kids FAQs) (Marty Crisp)
A Dog’s Gotta Do What a Dog’s Gotta Do: Dogs
at Work (Marilyn Singer) (870L)
Your Pet Dog (Scholastic, A True Book) (Elaine
Landau)
Why Are Dogs’ Noses Wet?: And Other True
Facts (Howie Dewin)
Informational Texts (Mice)
Outside and Inside Rats and Mice (Sandra
Markle) (820L)
The Mouse (Animal Life Stories) (Angela
Royston and Maurice Pledger)
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
Media
Black Stallion (1979)
Black Beauty (1994)
Black Beauty (1946)
Because of Winn Dixie (2005)
Tale of Despereaux (2008)
Babe (1995)
Ratatouille (2007)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
12
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 4
Revolutionaries from the Past
Unit 4 - Number of Weeks: 8 – Feb.–March
Essential Question: How do stories reveal what we have in common??
Terminology: (review of) audience, autobiography, biography, first-person point of view, third –person point of view,
informational text, structure, major character, minor character, point of view, primary source, secondary source, writing
style, speech
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works identified as
exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.5.6: Describe how a
narrator’s or speaker’s
point of view influences
how events are described.
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories (Read Aloud)
Poor Richard’s Almanack (Benjamin Franklin)
Stories
John Henry: An American Legend (Ezra Jack
Keats)
A Ride into Morning: The Story of Tempe Wick
(Ann Rinaldi)
The Secret of Sarah Revere (Ann Rinaldi) 530L
Heroes of the Revolution (David A. Adler and
Donald A. Smith) 890L
John Henry: An American Legend (Ezra Jack
Keats)
Navajo Long Walk (The Council for Indian
Education) (Nancy A. Armstrong and Paulette
Livers Lambert) 700L
Sleds on Boston Common: A Story from the
RI.5.3: Explain the
relationships or
interactions between two
or more individuals,
events, ideas, or concepts
in a historical, scientific, or
technical text based on
specific information in the
text.
RI.5.5: Compare and
contrast the overall
Pretest/s
Class participation & contributions
to group discussion
Self-reflection/evaluation
Exit Cards
Journal note-taking
Compare and contrast historical
fiction (story elements)
Comprehension quizzes
Spelling quizzes
Assessment of spelling in writing
Teacher observation & monitoring
of skills taught
Vocabulary quizzes
Accelerated Reader quizzes
Teacher made
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
structure (e.g.,
chronology, comparison,
cause/effect,
problem/solution) of
events, ideas, concepts,
or information in two or
more texts.
American Revolution (Louise Borden and Robert
Andrew Parker) 640L
The Madcap Mystery of the Missing Liberty Bell
(Real Kids, Real Places) (Carole Marsh) 770L
The Mystery of the Freedom Trail (Real Kids, Real
Places) (Carole Marsh)
Trail of Tears (Step-Into-Reading, Step 5) (Joseph
Bruchac) 610L
War Comes to Willy Freeman (Arabus Family
Saga) (James and Christopher Collier) 800L
Yankee Doodle (Gary Chalk)
Poems (See Addendum D)
“A Nation’s Strength” (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
“A Tragic Story” (William Makepeace Thackeray)
“Concord Hymn” (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
“George Washington” (Rosemary and Stephen
Vincent Benet)
RF.5.4: Read with
sufficient accuracy and
fluency to support
comprehension.
RF.5.4(a): Read on-level
text with purpose and
understanding.
W.5.3: Write narratives to
develop real or imagined
experiences or events
using effective technique,
descriptive details, and
clear event sequences.
SL.5.4: Report on a topic
or text or present an
opinion, sequencing ideas
logically and using
appropriate facts and
relevant, descriptive
details to support main
ideas or themes; speak
clearly at an
understandable pace.
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Biographies
Abigail Adams: Girl of Colonial Days (Childhood of
Famous Americans Series) (Jean Brown Wagoner)
How Ben Franklin Stole the Lightning (Rosalyn
Schanzer)
Now & Ben: The modern Inventions of Benjamin
Franklin (Gene Baretta)
In Their Own Words: Sojourner Truth (Peter and
Connie Roop)
Sojourner Truth: Ain’t I a Woman? (Scholastic
Biography) (Patricia C. and Frederick McKissack)
Paul Revere (In Their Own Words) (George
Sullivan)
Susan B. Anthony: Champion of Women’s Rights
Sample Activities and
Assessment
worksheets/assessments
Homework
OPINION WRITING –
Revolutionaries aren’t always popular
during the time that they live, but they
believe in something so passionately that
they are willing to go out on a limb to
express their beliefs. Think about a
current event and write an opinion.
Read and discuss the meaning of “The
Flag” by an unknown author. How does
the first- person point of view influence
your appreciation of the poem?
INFORMATIVE WRITING –
Students design and create a flag that
simultaneously represents their family,
the classroom, or the school.
Explain the symbolism of the flag in a
first-person narrative (similar to the
presentation of “The Flag”).
Summaries
Create a Timeline of historical events that
shows the chronology and cause/effect
relationship among them.
RESEARCH –
Read informational text about people and
events that are both firsthand (primary
sources) and secondhand (secondary
sources), and talk about how the
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
L.5.4: Determine or clarify
the meaning of unknown
and multiple-meaning
words and phrases based
on grade 5 reading and
content, choosing flexibly
from a range of strategies.
L.5.4(b): Use common,
grade-appropriate Greek
and Latin affixes and roots
as clues to the meaning of
a word (e.g., photograph,
photosynthesis).
Suggested Works/Resources
(Childhood of Famous Americans Series) (Helen
Albee Monsell)
The Secret Soldier: The Story of Deborah
Sampson (Scholastic Biography) (Ann McGovern,
Harold Goodwin, and Katherine Thompson)
Victory or Death!: Stories of the American
Revolution (Doreen Rappaport, Joan Verniero, and
Greg Call)
Nonfiction Books
If You Lived at the Time of the American
Revolution (Kay Moore and Daniel O’Leary)
Crispus Attucks: Black Leader of Colonial Patriots
(Childhood of Famous Americans) (Dharathula H.
Millender and Gary Morrow)
A History of US: From Colonies to Country (Joy
Hakim)
A is for America (Devin Scillian and Pam Carroll)
O, Say Can You See? America’s Symbols,
Landmarks, And Important Words (Sheila Keenan
and Ann Boyajian)
The American Revolutionaries: A History in Their
Own Words 1750-1800 (Milton Meltzer)
The Revolutionary War (True Books: American
History) (Brendan January)
Molly Pitcher: Young Patriot (Childhood of Famous
American Series) (Helen Albee Monsell)
Speeches (See Addendum D)
“Ain’t I a Woman? (Sojourner Truth, May 29, 1851
“Give Me Liberty, or Give Me Death” (Patrick
Henry, March 23, 1775)
“On a Woman’s Right to Vote” (Susan B. Anthony,
1873)
Sample Activities and
Assessment
differences in point of view affect
understanding.
Does the overall structure of the text
(chronology, cause/effect, etc.) affect your
understanding of events as they are
presented?
Students collect information such as:
Person or event
Where this took place
What is the historical significance
of the event?
From whose point of view is this
account written?
What other significant information
did you read about this person or
event?
Notes about story structure
(chronology, cause/effect, etc.)
Research an author who writes nonfiction
in the style of a story (such as Jean Fritz).
Conduct research about him/her and why
he/she chose to write about historical
topics.
If the internet is used, evaluate the site for
credibility.
ART/CLASS DISCUSSION
View the Copley and Wood paintings.
One work is a portrait painted while the
person was living; the second, the artist’s
interpretation a hundred years later.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
Art
Grant Wood, Midnight Ride of Paul Revere (1931)
John Singleton Copley, Paul Revere (1768)
Media
Rock and Revolution, “Too Late to Apologize”
(2010)
Notice the differences in perspective
(e.g., eye-level view v. bird’s-eye view).
Why do you think the earlier image
focuses more on the man and the later
one on the event that made him famous?
Compare Copley’s and Wood’s portrayals
of Paul Revere.
How are they different?
Do they have anything in common-aside
from both showing Revere?
What do you see first in each image?
Is it Revere or something else?
Each artist meant to tell a story through
his painting – describe the story.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 4
Stories of the Earth and Sky
Unit 5 - Number of Weeks: 4 – April
Essential Question: How are the Earth and Sky portrayed in fiction and non-fiction?
Terminology: artistic license, facts, details, legend, lore, myth, narrative writing, research, theme, word choice
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works identified as
exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.4.9: Compare and
contrast the treatment of
similar themes and topics
(e.g., opposition of good
and evil) and patterns of
events (e.g., the quest) in
stories, myths, and
traditional literature from
different cultures.
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories (Myths and Legends)
Children of the Earth and Sky: Five Stories About
Native American Children (Stephen Krensky and
James Watling) (AD670L)
Keepers of the Night: Native American Stories and
Nocturnal Activities for Children (Michael J. Caduto
and Joseph Bruchac)
Coyote Places the Stars (Harriet Peck Taylor) (780L)
Star Boy (Paul Goble) (AD660L)
The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses (Paul Goble)
(670L)
And Still the Turtle Watched (Sheila MacGillCallahan)(AD400L)
Thirteen Moons on Turtle’s Back (Joseph Bruchac)
(960)
The Earth Under Sky Bear’s Feet (Joseph Bruchac)
Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and
Environmental Activities for Children (Michael J.
RI.4.7: Interpret
information presented
visually, orally, or
quantitatively (e.g., in
charts, graphs, diagrams,
time
lines, animations, or
interactive elements on
Web pages) and explain
DRA
DIBELS
Open response writing with
Mass. Rubric
Group and class discussion
Participation
Journal responses to literature,
art, media,
non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems
Reflective essays with
teacher/student designed
rubrics
Short research projects/Bio
poems
Comparing and contrasting
Spelling quizzes
Vocabulary quizzes
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
how the information
contributes to an
understanding of the text
in which it appears.
Caduto and Joseph Bruchac)(880L)
The Woman Who Outshone the Sun/La mujer que
brillaba aun mas que el sol (Alejandro Cruz Martinez
and Fernando Olivera) (AD860)
A Pride of African Tales (Donna L. Washington and
James Ransome)(AD700L)
How the Stars Fell Into the Sky: A Navajo Legend
(JerrieOughton and Lisa Desimini) [easier to
read](Ad780L)
Ming Lo Moves the Mountain (Arnold Lobel) [easy]
(AD600L)
Moon Rope/Un lazo a la luna: A Peruvian Folktale
(Lois Ehlert and Amy Prince) [easier]
Moonstick: The Seasons of the Sioux (Eve Bunting
and John Sandford) [easier] (AD490)
Stories (General)
Common Ground: The Water, Earth, and Air We
Share (Molly Bang) (740L)
Butterfly Eyes and Other Secrets of the Meadow
(Joyce Sidman and Beth Krommes)
My Light (Molly Bang) [easier] (690L)
Midnight on the Moon (Magic Tree House Book 8)
(Mary Pope Osborne) [easier](320L)
Space Explorers (The Magic School Bus Chapter
Book, No. 4) (Eva Moore and Ted Enik)
[easier](560L)
Read Aloud/Advanced Readers
The Mission Possible Mystery at Space Center
Houston (Real Kids, Real Places) (Carole Marsh)
[advanced](720L)
They Dance in the Sky: Native American Star Myths
(Jean Guard Monroe and Ray A. Williamson)
[advanced]
W.4.3: Write narratives to
develop real or imagined
experiences or events
using effective technique,
descriptive details, and
clear event sequences.
SL.4.4: Report on a topic
or text, tell a story, or
recount an experience in
an organized manner,
using appropriate
facts and relevant,
descriptive details to
support main ideas or
themes; speak clearly at
an understandable pace.
L.4.3: Use knowledge of
language and its
conventions when writing,
speaking, reading, or
listening.
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Teacher created assessments
Homework
Partners research information about a
constellation on the Internet then write
what they learned about the
constellation’s name, what a
constellation is, what is unique about
their constellation and then draw a
picture of what it looks like
Students identify examples of artistic
license in A Pride of African Tales,
Butterfly Eyes and Other Secrets of the
Meadow
Word Study: keep index card file of
words studied in this unit (i.e. astronaut,
astronomer, constellation, eclipse, etc.)
Find prefixes (astro-) and suffixes
(ologist, ology) and discuss meaning;
students create semantic maps to
explore understanding of the
interconnectedness of words related to
Earth and sky
After class summarization students
write a response to the essential
question “How are the Earth and sky
portrayed in fiction and non-fiction?”
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Poems (See Addendum E)
Indian Names (Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney)
A Pizza the Size of the Sun (Jack Prelutsky)
Art
After looking at and choosing a painting,
write a story that could be illustrated by
the painting.
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books (Native Americans)
The Mound Builders of Ancient North America (E.
Barrie Kavasch) (E)
Mounds of Earth and Shell (Native Dwellings)
(Bonnie Shemie)
Informational Books (Space)
Discovering Mars: The Amazing Story of the Red
Planet (Melvin Berger and Joan Holub) (E) (670L)
Can You Hear A Shout In Space? Questions and
Answers About Space Exploration (Scholastic
Question and Answer) (Melvin Berger) (E) (IG770)
Space: A Nonfiction Companion to Midnight on the
Moon (Magic Tree House Research Guide, No. 6)
(Mary Pope and Wil Osborne, and Sal Murdocca)
Informational Texts (Earth, Sun, Moon and Stars)
Earth: Our Planet in Space (Seymour Simond)
Earth (Scholastic, A True Book) (Elaine Landau)
Earth (Picture Reference) (World Book) (Christine
Butler-Taylor) (420L)
G is for Galaxy (Janis Campbell, Cathy Collison, and
Alan Stacy)
Do Stars Have Points? (Scholastic Questions and
Answer) (Melvin Berger) (E) (700L)
I Wonder Why Stars Twinkle: And Other Questions
About Space (Carole Stott) (IG860L)
A Child’s Introduction to the Night Sky: The Story of
the Stars, Planets and Constellations—and How You
Can Find Them in the Night Sky (Michael Driscoll
Compare and contrast two works or art
that focus on either the Earth or the sky.
Students write a short essay.
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
and Meredith Hamilton) (NC1120)
Constellations (Scholastic, A True Book) (Diane M.
and Paul P. Sipiera)
Find the Constellations (H.A. Rey) (850L)
Zoo in the Sky: A Book of Animal Constellations
(Jacqueline Mitton and Christina Balit)
See the Stars: Your First Guide to the Night Stars
(Ken Crosswell)
Constellations (Scholastic, A True Book) (Flora Kim)
The Moon (Seymour Simond) (730L)
The Moon (Starting With Space) (Paulette
Bourgeois, Cynthia Pratt Nicholson, and Bill Slavin)
(760L)
The Sun (Seymour Simond) (870L)
The Sun (Scholastic, A True Book) (Elaine Landau)
The Sun (Starting With Space) (Cynthia Pratt
Nicholson and Bill Slavin) (740L)
Stars (Scholastic, True Books: Space) (Paul P.
Sipiera)
The Stars (Starting With Space) (Cynthia Pratt
Nicholson and Bill Slavin) (680L)
Informational Book
(Read Aloud/Advanced Readers)
A Walk Through the Heavens: A Guide to Stars and
Constellations and their Legends (Milton D. Heifetz
and Wil Tirion)
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
Art
John Constable, Study of Clouds (1882)
John Constable, Hampstead Heath, Looking
Towards Harrow at Sunset (1823)
Louisa Matthiasdottir, Gul (1990)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
El Greco, View of Toledo (c. 1595)
Vincent van Gogh, Starry Night (1889)
Alfred Stieglitz, Equivalents (1923)
Albert Pinkham Ryder, Seacoast in the Moonlight
(1890)
Piet Mondrian, View from the Dunes with Beach and
Piers (1909)
Vija Clemins, Untitled #3 (Comet) (1996)
Jean-Francois Millet, Landscape with a Peasant
Woman (early 1870’s)
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Curriculum Map – Ware Public Schools – English Language Arts: Grade 4
Fantastic Adventures with Dragons, Gods, and Giants
Unit 6 - Number of Weeks: 6 – May-June
Essential Question: Why How does what we read teach us about heroism?
Terminology: acrostic poem, character development, hero/heroine literary terms: novel, plot, setting, perspective, point of
view, unsung hero, villain
Focus
Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Lexile Framework for
Reading
http://lexile.com/fab/
(E) indicates a CCSS exemplar text
(EA) indicates a text from a writer with other works identified as
exemplar
(AD) Adult Directed
(IG) Illustrated Guide
(NC) Non-Conforming
RL.4.4: Determine the
meaning of words and
phrases as they are
used in a text,
including those that
allude to significant
characters found in
mythology (e.g.,
Herculean).
LITERARY TEXTS
Stories (Middle Ages)
King Arthur (Scholastic Junior Classics) (Jane B. Mason
and Sarah Hines Stephens) (790L)
The Knights of the Kitchen Table (John Scieszka and
Lane Smith) (630L)
The Story of King Arthur and His Knights (Classic
Starts) (Howard Pyle and Dan Andreasen) (NC920)
King Arthur (Troll Illustrated Classics) (Howard Pyle,
Don Hinkle, and Jerry Tiritilli) (910L)
The Kitchen Knight: A Tale of King Arthur (Margaret
Hodges and Trina Schart Hyman)
The Whipping Boy (Sid Fleischman and Peter Sis)
(570L)
Robin Hood:Tale of the Great Outlaw Hero (DK Readers
Proficient Readers, Level 4) (Angela Bull and Nick
Harris)(600L)
The Adventures of Robin Hood (Classic Starts) (Howard
RI.4.8: Explain how an
author uses reasons
and evidence to
support particular
points in a text.
W.4.7: Conduct short
research projects that
build knowledge
DRA
Dibels
Group and class discussion
Participation
Journal responses to literature,
art, media,
non-fiction
Dramatization of poems
Writing poems/acrostic poem for
a hero
Reflective essays with
teacher/student designed
rubrics
Short research projects/Bio
poems
Comparing and contrasting
heroes
Spelling quizzes
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus
Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
through investigation
of different aspects of
a topic.
Pyle and Lucy Corvino)(690L)
Favorite Medieval Tales (Mary Pope Osborne and Troy
Howell) (860L)
Days of the Knights: A Tale of Castles and Battles (DK
Readers Proficient Readers, Level 4) (Christopher
Maynard) (760L)
The Young Merlin Trilogy: Passager, Hobby and Merlin
(Jane Yolen) (780L)
Sir Cumference and the First Round Table: A Math
Adventure (Cindy Neuschwander and Wayne Geehan)
(AD600L)
Door in the Wall (Marguerite De Angeli) [easier to read]
(990L)
Christmas in Camelot (Magic Tree House Book 29)
(Mary Pope Osborne and Sal Murdocca) [easier] (420L)
Ella Enchanted (Gail Carson Levine) [advanced
readers] (670L)
The Grey King (The Dark is Rising sequence) (Susan
Cooper) E [advanced](930L)
The Mystery of the Alamo Ghost (Real Kids, Real
Places) (Carole Marsh) [advanced] (720L)
Lou Gehrig: The Luckiest Man (David A. Adler) (750L)
Happy Birthday, Dr. King! (Kathryn Jones)(800L)
Boss of the Plains (Laurie Carlson) (AD830L)
Number the Stars (Lois Lowry) (670L)
Stories (Other Time Periods)
The Children’s Book of Heroes (William J. Bennett,
Michael Hague, and Amy Hill) (820L)
Kaya’s Hero: A Story of Giving (American Girls
Collection) (Janet Beeler Shaw, Bill Farnsworth, and
Susan McAliley)(750L)
Adventures of the Greek Heroes (Anne M. Wiseman,
Mollie McLean, and Witold T. Mars) (520L)
SL.4.2: Paraphrase
portions of a text read
aloud or information
presented in diverse
media and formats,
including visually,
quantitatively, and
orally.
L.4.6: Acquire and use
accurately gradeappropriate general
academic and domainspecific words and
phrases, including
those that signal
precise actions,
emotions, or states of
being (e.g., quizzed,
whined, stammered)
and that are basic to a
particular topic (e.g.,
wildlife, conservation,
and endangered when
discussing animal
preservation).
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Vocabulary quizzes
Teacher created assessments
Homework
Use the Frayer Model
http://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/Fr
ayerModel.html to outline definitions,
characteristics, and examples and nonexamples of heroes
Students read Saint George and the
Dragon focusing on the Red Cross
Night. Next they read Merlin and the
Dragons focusing on Young Arthur;
after discussion, students write a
response to how their understanding of
the word “hero” changed or remained
the same after each story
Students choose a scene from a Middle
Ages story they are reading and re-write
the scene from another point of view
(i.e., if it’s in the first person, re-write in
the third; if it’s in the third person, rewrite in the first)
Persuasive writing: which legendary
character, King Arthur or Robin Hood, is
a better hero?
Write an acrostic poem about a favorite
hero or heroine
Discussion: how does point of view
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus
Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Welcome to the Globe: A Story of Shakespeare’s
Theatre (DK Readers Proficient Readers, Level 4) (Peter
Chrisp)
The Library Card (Jerry Spinelli) [advanced](690L)
Stories (Read Aloud)
Saint George and the Dragon (Margaret Hodges and
Trina Schart Hyman)(AD1080)
Merlin and the Dragons (Jane Yolen and Li Ming)(640L)
Poems (See Addendum F)
Why Dragons? (Jane Yolen)
Robin Hood and Little John (Anonymous)
Robin Hood and Maid Marian (Anonymous)
change the class definition of hero—or
not. (Use The True Story of the Three
Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka)
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS
Informational Books
England: The Land (Erinn Banting) (E) (IG1150L)
Illuminations (Jonathan Hunt)
Knights and Castles (Magic Tree House Research
Guide) (Mary Pope and Will Osborne and Sal
Murdocco)(690L)
Knights: Warriors of the Middle Ages (High Interest
Books) (Aileen Weintraub)
Adventures in the Middle Ages (Good Times Travel
Agency) (Linda Bailey and Bill Slavin)
The Middle Ages: An Interactive History Adventure (You
Choose: Historical Eras) (Allison Lassieur)
Women and Girls in the Middle Ages (Medieval World)
(Kay Eastwood)(IG1070L)
Biographies
Joan of Arc: The Lily Maid (Margaret Hodges and Robert
Rayevsky)(790L)
William Shakespeare & the Globe (Aliki)(AD850L)
George Washington: Soldier, Hero, President (DK
Read Foster Parents Are the Unsung
Heroes of Kids; students write a journal
entry and nominate someone they know
as an unsung hero
Multimedia: Work with a classmate to
edit and revise unsung hero
nominations including as many new
vocabulary words, phrases, and
figurative language descriptions as
make sense; add audio and visual to
enhance the nomination—host a
ceremony where students share their
presentations
Ware Public Schools Common Core Curriculum, ELA-Grade 4 adopted August 2012 from Common Core, Inc.; Jossey-Bass; San Francisco, CA, 2012
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Focus
Standards
Suggested Works/Resources
Sample Activities and
Assessment
Readers Reading Alone, Level 3) (Justine and Ron
Fontes)
Davy Crockett (Photo Illustrated Biographies) (Kathy
Feeney)
Booker T. Washington: A Photo-Illustrated Biography
(Photo Illustrated Biographies) (Margo McLoone)(520L)
Henry Ford: A Photo-Illustrated Biography (Photo
Illustrated Biographies) (Erika L. Shores)
Elizabeth Cady Stanton: A Photo Illustrated Biography
(Photo Illustrated Biographies) (Lucile Davis)
Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce: A Photo-Illustrated
Biography (Photo Illustrated Biographies) (Bill
McAuliffe)(480L)
ART, MUSIC, AND MEDIA
Art
The Unicorn Tapestries (late fifteenth century through
early sixteenth centuries)
Raphael, St. George the Dragon (1504-1506)
Donatello, St. George (1415-1417)
Media
The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)
Knights of the Round Table (1953)
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Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Unit 1- Addendum A
They Were My People by Grace Nichols
They were those who cut cane
to the rhythm of the sunbeat
They were those who carried cane
to the rhythm of the sunbeat
They were those who crushed cane
to the rhythm of the sunbeat
They were women weeding, carrying babies
to the rhythm of the sunbeat
They were my people, working so hard
to the rhythm of the sunbeat - - long ago
to the rhythm of the sunbeat.
"Monday's child is fair of face..."
by Mother Goose
Monday's child is fair of face,
Tuesday's child is full of grace;
Wednesday's child is full of woe,
Thursday's child has far to go;
Friday's child is loving and giving,
Saturday's child works hard for its living;
But the child that is born on the Sabbath day
Is bonny and blithe, and good and gay.
Dreams
by Langston Hughs
Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
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That cannot fly.
Hold fast to dreams
For when dreams go
Life is a barren field
Frozen with snow.
Humanity
by Elma Stuckey
If I am blind and need someone
To keep me safe from harm,
It matters not the race to me
Of the one who takes my arm.
If I am saved from drowning
As I grasp and grope,
I will not stop to see the face
Of the one who throws the rope.
Or if out on some battlefield
I’m falling faint and weak,
The one who gently lifts me up
May any language speak.
We sip the water clear and cool,
No matter the hand that gives it.
A life that’s lived worthwhile and fine,
What matters the one who lives it?
On The Way To School
By Charles Ghigna
I'll tell you why I'm tardy and I hope my excuse will do.
I stopped to view upon a leaf a spider and some dew.
She spun a web before my eyes with a soft and silver hue,
And when she looked, I looked at her and whispered, "Peekaboo!"
I think I may have startled her and so I waved good-bye,
But when I turned around to go, I met a butterfly!
I almost caught him in my hand to bring to class for you,
But when I tried to peek inside, away my treasure flew.
And that is how I'm tardy, but I had to tell you why.
It's all the fault of a spider's web and a sneaky butterfly!
.
The Drum
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by Nikki Giovanni
daddy says the world is
a drum tight and hard
and i told him
i'm gonna beat out my own rhythm
Unit 2- Addendum B
Dust of Snow
BY ROBERT FROST
The way a crow
Shook down on me
The dust of snow
From a hemlock tree
Has given my heart
A change of mood
And saved some part
Of a day I had rued.
Fog
The fog comes
on little cat feet.
It sits looking
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over harbor and city
on silent haunches
and then moves on.
Carl Sandburg
Clouds
By Christina Rossetti
White sheep, white sheep,
On a blue hill,
When the wind stops,
You all stand still.
When the wind blows,
You walk away slow.
White sheep, white sheep,
Where do you go?
Unit 3- Addendum C
A Bird came down the Walk
by Emily Dickinson
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A Bird came down the Walk—
He did not know I saw—
He bit an Angleworm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw,
And then he drank a Dew
From a convenient Grass—
And then hopped sidewise to the Wall
To let a Beetle pass—
He glanced with rapid eyes
That hurried all around—
They looked like frightened Beads, I thought—
He stirred his Velvet Head
Like one in danger, Cautious,
I offered him a Crumb
And he unrolled his feathers
And rowed him softer home—
Than Oars divide the Ocean,
Too silver for a seam—
Or Butterflies, off Banks of Noon
Leap, splashless as they swim.
The Rhinoceros
The rhino is a homely beast,
For human eyes he's not a feast.
Farwell, farewell, you old rhinoceros,
I'll stare at something less prepoceros.
Ogden Nash
The Erratic Rat
There was a ridiculous Rat
Who was awfully puffy and fat.
“I’ll carry,” he said,
“This plate on my head,
‘ Twill answer in place of a hat.”
Unit 4-Addendum D
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Ralph Waldo Emerson ( 1803-82) was a key early American philospher,
poet and writer, particularly known for his appreciation of individualism,
self-reliance and intuition. He wrote this poem, which was sung as a hymn
at a July 4, 1837 ceremony to mark the completion of the Concord
Monument, to immortalize the resistance of American Minutemen to
British forces on April 19, 1775. The poem's phrase "shot heard round the
world" is now internationally famous for its description of the
philosphical importance of the American revolution.
Concord Hymn
by Ralph Waldo Emerson
By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April's breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood,
And fired the shot heard round the world.
The foe long since in silence slept;
Alike the conqueror silent sleeps;
And Time the ruined bridge has swept
Down the dark stream which seaward creeps.
On this green bank, by this soft stream,
We set to-day a votive stone;
That memory may their deed redeem,
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When, like our sires, our sons are gone.
Spirit, that made those heroes dare
To die, and leave their children free,
Bid Time and Nature gently spare
The shaft we raise to them and thee.
A Nation’s Strength
by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1904)
What makes a nation’s pillars high
And its foundations strong?
What makes it mighty to defy
The foes that round it throng?
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It is not gold. Its kingdoms grand
Go down in battle shock;
Its shafts are laid on sinking sand,
Not on abiding rock.
Is it the sword? Ask the red dust
Of empires passed away;
The blood has turned their stones to rust,
Their glory to decay.
And is it pride? Ah, that bright crown
Has seemed to nations sweet;
But God has struck its luster down
In ashes at his feet.
Not gold but only men can make
A people great and strong;
Men who for truth and honor’s sake
Stand fast and suffer long.
Brave men who work while others sleep,
Who dare while others fly...
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They build a nation’s pillars deep
And lift them to the sky.
A Tragic Story
by William Makepeace Thackeray
There lived a sage in days of yore,
And he a handsome pigtail wore;
But wondered much and sorrowed more,
Because it hung behind him.
He mused upon this curious case,
And swore he'd change the pigtail's place,
And have it hanging at his face,
Not dangling there behind him.
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Says he, "The mystery I've found Says he, "The mystery I've found!
I'll turn me round," - he turned him round;
But still it hung behind him.
Then round and round, and out and in,
All day the puzzled sage did spin;
In vain - it mattered not a pin The pigtail hung behind him.
And right and left and round about,
And up and down and in and out
He turned; but still the pigtail stout
Hung steadily behind him.
And though his efforts never slack,
And though he twist and twirl, and tack,
Alas! Still faithful to his back,
The pigtail hangs behind him.
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On the birthday of the Father of Our Country it is proper to take a
moment and reflect that in all likelihood the United States of America
would not exist today but for the leadership shown by George
Washington during the Revolution. The poets Rosemary and Stephen
Vincent Benet explored long ago some of the many different paths the life
of Washington might have taken which would have altered our history so
profoundly. We call Washington the Father of Our Country not to honor
him, but as a simple statement of fact.
George Washington
by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benét
Sing hey! For bold George Washington,
That jolly British tar,
King George’s famous admiral
From Hull to Zanzibar!
No–wait a minute–something’s wrong–
George wished to sail the foam.
But, when his mother thought aghast,
Of Georgie shinning up a mast,
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Her tears and protests flowed so fast
That George remained at home.
Sing ho! For grave Washington,
The staid Virginia squire,
Who farms his fields and hunts his hounds
And aims at nothing higher!
Stop, stop it’s going wrong again!
George liked to live on farms,
But when the Colonies agreed
They could and should and would be freed,
They called on George to do the deed
And George cried “Shoulder arms!”
Sing ha! For Emperor Washington,
That hero of renown,
Who freed his land from Britain’s rule
To win a golden crown!
No, no, that’s what George might have won
But didn’t for he said,
“There’s not much point about a king,
They’re pretty but they’re apt to sting
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And, as for crowns–the heavy thing
Would only hurt my head.”
Sing ho! For our George Washington!
(At last I’ve got it straight.)
The first in war, the first in peace,
The goodly and the great.
But, when you think about him now,
From here to Valley Forge,
Remember this–he might have been
A highly different specimen,
And, where on earth would we be, then?
I’m glad that George was George.
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AIN'T I A WOMAN?
by Sojourner Truth
Delivered 1851 at the Women's Convention in Akron, Ohio
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Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something
out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the South and the women
at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty
soon. But what's all this here talking about?
That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages,
and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody
ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best
place! And ain't I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed
and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And
ain't I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I
could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman? I have borne
thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried
out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a
woman?
Then they talk about this thing in the head; what's this they call it?
[member of audience whispers, "intellect"] That's it, honey. What's that
got to do with women's rights or negroes' rights? If my cup won't hold but
a pint, and yours holds a quart, wouldn't you be mean not to let me have
my little half measure full?
Then that little man in black there, he says women can't have as much
rights as men, 'cause Christ wasn't a woman! Where did your Christ come
from? Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man
had nothing to do with Him.
If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world
upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it
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back , and get it right side up again! And now they is asking to do it, the
men better let them.
Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain't got nothing
more to say.
Patrick Henry
St. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia
March 23, 1775.
Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death!"
MR. PRESIDENT: No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as
well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed
the House. But different men often see the same subject in different
lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those
gentlemen if, entertaining as I do, opinions of a character very opposite to
theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely, and without reserve. This
is no time for ceremony. The question before the House is one of awful
moment to this country. For my own part, I consider it as nothing less
than a question of freedom or slavery; and in proportion to the
magnitude of the subject ought to be the freedom of the debate. It is only
in this way that we can hope to arrive at truth, and fulfil the great
responsibility which we hold to God and our country. Should I keep back
my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offence, I should
consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of
disloyalty toward the majesty of heaven, which I revere above all earthly
kings.
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Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We
are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of
that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men,
engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to
be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears,
hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For
my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the
whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it.
I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided; and that is the lamp of
experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past. And
judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of
the British ministry for the last ten years, to justify those hopes with
which gentlemen have been pleased to solace themselves, and the
House? Is it that insidious smile with which our petition has been lately
received? Trust it not, sir; it will prove a snare to your feet. Suffer not
yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss. Ask yourselves how this gracious
reception of our petition comports with these war-like preparations
which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies
necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves
so unwilling to be reconciled, that force must be called in to win back our
love? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir. These are the implements of war
and subjugation; the last arguments to which kings resort. I ask,
gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to
force us to submission? Can gentlemen assign any other possible motive
for it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for
all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are
meant for us; they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind
and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so
long forging. And what have we to oppose to them? Shall we try
argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we
anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing. We have held the
subject up in every light of which it is capable; but it has been all in vain.
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Shall we resort to entreaty and humble supplication? What terms shall we
find which have not been already exhausted? Let us not, I beseech you,
sir, deceive ourselves. Sir, we have done everything that could be done, to
avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned; we have
remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before
the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical
hands of the ministry and Parliament. Our petitions have been slighted;
our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our
supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned, with
contempt, from the foot of the throne. In vain, after these things, may we
indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation. There is no longer any
room for hope. If we wish to be free² if we mean to preserve inviolate
those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending²if
we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been
so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon
until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight! I
repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is
all that is left us!
They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so formidable an
adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the
next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British
guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by
irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual
resistance, by lying supinely on our backs, and hugging the delusive
phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot?
Sir, we are not weak if we make a proper use of those means which the
God of nature hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed
in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we
possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us.
Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God who
presides over the destinies of nations; and who will raise up friends to
fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to
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the vigilant, the active, the brave. Besides, sir, we have no election. If we
were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the
contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are
forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is
inevitable²and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come.
It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace,
Peace²but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that
sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms!
Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it
that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so
sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it,
Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me,
give me liberty or give me death!
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Unit 5- Addendum E
Indian Names
by Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney
Ye shall say they all have passed away,
That noble race and brave,
That their light canoes have vanish'd
From off the crested wave.
That 'mid the forests where they roam'd
There rings no hunter's shout;
But their name is on your waters,
Ye may not wash it out.
'Tis where Ontario's billow
Like Ocean's surge is curled;
Where strong Niagara's thunders wake
The echo of the world;
Where red Missouri bringeth
Rich tributes from the west,
And Rappahannock sweetly sleeps
On green Virginia's breast.
Ye say, their cone-like cabins,
That cluster'd o'er the vale,
Have fled away like wither'd leaves
Before the autumn gale:
But their memory liveth on your hills,
Their baptism on your shore;
Your everlasting rivers speak
Their dialect of yore.
Old Massachusetts wears it
Within her lordly crown,
And broad Ohio bears it
'mid all her young renown;
Connecticut hath wreathed it
Where her quiet foliage waves,
And bold Kentucky breathed it hoarse
Through all her ancient caves.
Wachuset hides its lingering voice
Within its rocky heart,
And Alleghany graves its tone
Throughout his lofty chart:
Monadnock on his forehead hoar
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Doth seal the sacred trust;
Your mountains build their monument,
Though ye destroy their dust
A Pizza the Size of the Sun
by Jack Prelutsky
I’m making a pizza the size of the sun,
a pizza that’s sure to weigh more than a ton,
a pizza too massive to pick up and toss,
a pizza resplendent with oceans of sauce.
I’m topping my pizza with mountains of cheese,
with acres of peppers, pimentos, and peas,
with mushrooms, tomatoes, and sausage galore,
with every last olive they had at the store.
My pizza is sure to be one of a kind,
my pizza will leave other pizzas behind,
my pizza will be a delectable treat
that all who love pizza are welcome to eat.
The oven is hot, I believe it will take
a year and a half for my pizza to bake.
I hardly can wait till my pizza is done,
my wonderful pizza the size of the sun.
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Unit 6- Addendum F
Why Dragons?
The smoke still hangs heavily over the meadow,
Circling down from the mouth of the cave,
While kneeling in prayer, full armored and haloed,
The lone knight is feeling uncertainly brave.
The promise of victory sung in the churches,
Is hardly a murmur out here in the air.
All that he hears is the thud of this faint heart
Echoing growls of the beast in its lair.
The steel of his armor would flash in the sunlight,
Except that the smoke has quite hidden the sky.
The red of the cross on his breast should sustain him,
Except - he suspects - it's a perfect bull's-eye.
The folk of the village who bet on the outcome
Have somehow all fled from the scene in dismay.
They'll likely return in a fortnight or longer,
He doubts that they'll be of much help on this day.
And then - with a scream - the fell beast of the cavern
Flings its foul body full out of the cave.
The knight forgets prayers and churches and haloes
And tries to remember just how to be brave.
The webs on the wings of the dragon are reddened,
With blood or with sunlight, the knight is not sure.
The head of the beast is a silver-toothed nightmare,
Its tongue drips a poison for which there's no cure.
He thrusts his sword and he pokes with his gauntlets,
He knees with he poleyn, kicks out with his greave.
He'd happily give all the gold in his pocket
If only the dragon would quietly leave.
There's smoke and there's fire, there's wind and there's growling.
There's screams from the knights, and his sobs and his cries.
And when the smoke clears, there's the sound of dry heaving
As one of the two of them messily dies.
Of course it's the knight who has won this hard battle,
Who wins in a poem beaten out on a forge
Of human devising and human invention.
BUT:
If there's no dragon - then there's no Saint George.
~ © 1993 by Jane Yolen
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Robin Hood and Little John: Introduction
Edited by Stephen Knight and Thomas H. Ohlgren
Originally Published in Robin Hood and Other Outlaw Tales
Kalamazoo, Michigan: Medieval Institute Publications, 1997
This ballad was printed by Child from a text in a 1723 London anthology, A
Collection of Old Ballads; he later found a copy printed by W. Onley in London
in 1680-85 (V, p. 297); this text is followed here. As with Robin Hood and the
Curtal Friar and The Jolly Pinder of Wakefield, there is clear evidence of the
much earlier existence of this story. A play called Robin Hood and Little
John was registered in 1594 but has not survived, and there was another from
1640, though they may of course have been general dramas based on sources
like the Gest or even Robin Hood and the Monk. A ballad with this title was
registered in 1624, and that date is quite possible for the original version of
this text. Dobson and Taylor (1976, p. 165) suggest that it has "every sign of
having been produced by a professional ballad writer" with the intention of
explaining how Little John came by his name and, long ago, joined the outlaw
band: this would be one of the "prequels" like Robin Hood's Progress
to Nottingham and Robin Hood and Will Scarlet which exploit and rationalize
an existing tradition about a character.
Child describes the ballad as having "a rank seventeenth century style" (III,
133), and its language and technique suggest something rather later than the
1624 date when the title at least was in existence, having in particular the
internal rhyme in the third line which is shared by most commercial Robin
Hood ballads of the later seventeenth and eighteenth century. Child is
convinced that all these ballads had the same tune, that of Arthur a
Bland or Robin Hood and the Tanner. The rhymes and meter are, compared to
earlier ballads, suspiciously smooth, and the language, which Dobson and
Taylor found "very bathetic" (1976, p. 166), bears traces of the hack-writer's
inkwell: passionate fury and eyre, line 71; I prithee, line 78; accoutrements,
line 106; And did in this manner proceed, line 129; and, most remarkably,
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when the outlaws leave their entertainments it says the whole train the grove
did refrain, line 152.
Nevertheless, this is a classic "Robin Hood meets his match" ballad, and bogus
as some of it may be, there is a sign that the language and mannerisms grow
more elaborate as the text proceeds, and there could be an earlier plainer ballad
embedded in this one, signs of which may appear in lines 1-9, 26-33, 58-73
(except 71), 86-89, 94-113 (except 106), 118-27. Commercial as it may be, this
ballad still outlines a focus of solidarity and tricksterism, presenting a central
event in the myth which has remained dear, even obsessive, in the hearts of
theatrical and film redactors over the centuries. In Hollywood, the same actor
(Alan Hale) played Little John in 1922, 1938 and 1946, always with the same
enduring portrayal of the ballad.
Go To Robin Hood and Little John
Robin Hood and Little John
Edited by Stephen Knight and Thomas H. Ohlgren
Originally Published in Robin Hood and Other Outlaw Tales
Kalamazoo, Michigan: Medieval Institute Publications, 1997
5
When Robin Hood was about twenty years old,
With a hey down, down, and a down
He happen'd to meet Little John,
A jolly brisk blade, right fit for the trade,
For he was a lusty young man.
(see note)
young man
Though he was call'd Little, his limbs they were large,
And his stature was seven foot high;
Whereever he came, they quak'd at his name,
For soon he wou'd make them to flie.
10
How they came acquainted, I'll tell you in brief,
If you will but listen a while;
For this very jest, amongst all the rest,
I think it may cause you to smile.
Bold Robin Hood said to his jolly bowmen,
(see note)
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15
20
25
"Pray tarry you here in this grove;
And see that you all observe well my call,
While thorough the forest I rove.
"We have had no sport for these fourteen long days,
Therefore now abroad will I go;
Now should I be beat, and cannot retreat,
My horn I will presently blow."
Then did he shake hands with his merry men all,
And bid them at present good by;
Then, as near a brook his journey he took,
A stranger he chanc'd to espy.
They happen'd to meet on a long narrow bridge,
And neither of them wou'd give way;
Quoth bold Robin Hood, and sturdily stood,
"I'll show you right Nottingham play."
30
35
40
45
With that from his quiver an arrow he drew,
A broad arrow with a goose-wing:
The stranger replyd, "I'll licker thy hide,
If thou offer to touch the string."
at once
God be with you (goodbye)
(see note)
true
tan (beat)
Quoth bold Robin Hood, "Thou dost prate like an ass,
For were I to bend but my bow,
I could send a dart quite through thy proud heart,
Before thou couldst strike me one blow."
"You talk like a coward," the stranger reply'd;
"Well arm'd with a long bow you stand,
To shoot at my breast, while I, I protest,
Have naught but a staff in my hand."
nothing
"The name of a coward," quoth Robin, "I scorn,
Wherefore my long bow I'll lay by;
And now, for thy sake, a staff will I take,
The truth of thy manhood to try."
Then Robin Hood stept to a thicket of trees,
And chose him a staff of ground oak;
oak sapling
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Now this being done, away he did run
To the stranger and merrily spoke:
50
55
60
65
"Lo! see my staff; it is lusty and tough,
Now here on the bridge we will play;
Whoever falls in, the other shall win
The battle, and so we'll away."
(see note)
"With all my whole heart to thy humor I yield,
I scorn in the least to give out."
This said, they fell to't without more dispute,
And their staffs they did flourish about.
(see note)
And first Robin he gave the stranger a bang,
So hard that it made his bones ring:
The stranger he said, "This must be repaid;
I'll give you as good as you bring.
"So long as I am able to handle my staff,
To die in your debt, friend, I scorn."
Then to it both goes, and follow'd their blows,
As if they'd been thrashing of corn.
(see note)
(see note)
The stranger gave Robin a crack on the crown,
Which caused the blood to appear;
Then Robin, enrag'd, more fiercely engag'd,
And follow'd his blows more severe.
70
75
80
So thick and so fast did he lay it on him,
With a passionate fury and eyre,
At every stroke he made him to smoke,
As if he had been all on a fire.
O then into a fury the stranger he grew
And gave him a damnable look,
And with it a blow that laid him full low
And tumbl'd him into the brook.
"I prithee, good fellow, O where art thou now?"
The stranger in laughter he cry'd;
Quoth bold Robin Hood, "Good faith, in the flood,
ire
(see note)
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And floting along with the tide.
85
"I needs must acknowledge thou art a brave soul;
With thee I'll no longer contend;
For needs must I say, thou hast got the day,
Our battle shall be at an end."
Then, then, to the bank he did presently wade,
And pull'd himself out by a thorn;
Which done, at the last, he blow'd a loud blast
Straitways on his fine bugle-horn.
90
95
(see note)
The eccho of which through the vallies did flie,
At which his stout bowmen appear'd,
All cloathed in green, most gay, to be seen;
So up to their master they steer'd.
"O what's the matter?" quoth William Stutely,
"Good master, you are wet to the skin."
"No matter," quoth he, "the lad which you see,
In fighting he tumbl'd me in."
"He shall not go scot free," the others reply'd;1
So straight they were seising him there,
100 To duck him likewise, but Robin Hood cries,
"He is a stout fellow, forbear.
"There's no one shall wrong thee, friend, be not afraid;
These bowmen upon me do wait;
There's threescore and nine; if thou wilt be mine,
105 Thou shalt have my livery strait.
"And other accoutrements fit for my train,
Speak up, jolly blade, ne'r fear;
I'll teach thee also the use of the bow,
To shoot at the fat fallow-deer."
110 "O here is my hand," the stranger reply'd,
"I'll serve you with all my whole heart;
My name is John Little, a man of good mettle;
Ne'r doubt me, for I'll play my part."
straightaway
attend
(see note)
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
"His name shall be alter'd," quoth William Stutely,
115 "And I will his godfather be;
Prepare then a feast, and none of the least,
For we will be merry," quoth he.
They presently fetch'd in a brace of fat does,
With humming strong liquor likewise;
120 They lov'd what was good, so in the greenwood,
This pritty sweet babe they baptize.
He was, I must tell you, but seven foot high,
And may be an ell in the waste;
A pritty sweet lad, much feasting they had;
125 Bold Robin the christ'ning grac'd,
(see note)
extremely
forty-five inches
(see note)
With all his bowmen, which stood in a ring,
And were of the Nottingham breed;
Brave Stutely comes then, with seven yeomen,
And did in this manner proceed:
130 "This infant was called John Little," quoth he,
"Which name shall be changed anon;
The words we'll transpose, so where-ever he goes,
His name shall be call'd Little John."
They all with a shout made the elements ring,
135 So soon as the office was o're;
To feasting they went, with true merriment,
And tipl'd strong liquor gallore.
galore (in plenty)
Then Robin he took the pritty sweet babe,
And cloath'd him from top to the toe
140 In garments of green, most gay to be seen,
And gave him a curious long bow.
"Thou shalt be an archer as well as the best,
And range in the green wood with us;
Where we'll not want gold nor silver, behold,
145 While bishops have ought in their purse.
(see note)
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
"We live here like esquires, or lords of renown,
Without e're a foot of free land;
We feast on good cheer, with wine, ale and beer,
And ev'ry thing at our command."
150 Then musick and dancing did finish the day
At length when the sun waxed low,
Then all the whole train the grove did refrain,
And unto their caves they did go.
And so ever after, as long as he liv'd,
155 Although he was proper and tall,
Yet nevertheless, the truth to express,
Still Little John they did him call.
(see note)
ever
grew
(see note)
Always
Robin Hood and Maid Marian: Introduction
Edited by Stephen Knight and Thomas H. Ohlgren
Originally Published in Robin Hood and Other Outlaw Tales
Kalamazoo, Michigan: Medieval Institute Publications, 1997
This ballad appears only once, in a broadside ballad collected by Wood which
may well be post-Restoration. Much about this ballad suggests that it was
deliberately constructed to add an element to the Robin Hood tradition. It is
the only ballad where Maid Marian plays a part; she is briefly mentioned
in Robin Hood and Queen Catherin and Robin Hood's Golden Prize. The diction
seems characteristic of popular literary style (gallant dame, line 5; Perplexed
and vexed, line 30; a shaded bower, line 63), while also having a distinctly
broadside element (With finger in eye, shee often did cry, line 28; With kind
imbraces, and jobbing of faces, line 56). The internal rhyme in the third line
indicates a late and popular production.
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Commentators have been severe on the ballad. Child calls it "this foolish ditty"
(III, 218), while Dobson and Taylor speak of its "complete lack of literary
merit" and call it an "extreme and implausible attempt" to combine Robin the
lover and fighter (1976, p. 176). The events of the ballad had already been
foreshadowed in Munday's play, where Matilda Fitzwater goes to the forest,
becoming Marian in the process, to meet the Earl of Huntington, alias Robin
Hood. The popularity of Robin Hood ballads was so great that several of these
"prequels" seem to have been produced, as in Robin Hood's Progress to
Nottingham and Robin Hood and Little John.
Structurally the interesting thing about Robin Hood and Maid Marian is that it
shows the only credible way to join the outlaw band is to fight a draw with the
leader: this is a "Robin Hood meets his match" ballad in a wider sense than
usual. Foolish as commentators have found it, the notion of the hero's fight with
his lover is a potent one, whether it testifies to the woman's possible martial
skill, or the enormity of mistreating woman, or both at once. Found in the
recent film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991), the motif is here taken quite
seriously, down to the length of the fight and the sight of blood, however
improbable it may be that Marian does not hear Robin's voice until he asks for
respite (line 50).
Robin Hood and Maid Marian clearly shows the gentrification process finding
its way into the popular genres, but it does not seem to have been very popular,
never appearing in the garlands and very little referred to or reworked even
after Ritson made it well known.
Go To Robin Hood and Maid Marian
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
Robin Hood and Maid Marian
Edited by Stephen Knight and Thomas H. Ohlgren
Originally Published in Robin Hood and Other Outlaw Tales
Kalamazoo, Michigan: Medieval Institute Publications, 1997
5
A bonny fine maid of a noble degree,
With a hey down down a down down
Maid Marian calld by name,
Did live in the North, of excellent worth,
For she was a gallant dame.
(see note)
For favour and face, and beauty most rare,
Queen Hellen shee did excell;
For Marian then was praisd of all men
That did in the country dwell.
10 'Twas neither Rosamond nor Jane Shore,
Whose beauty was clear and bright,
That could surpass this country lass,
Beloved of lord and knight.
(see note)
The Earl of Huntington, nobly born,
15 That came of noble blood,
To Marian went, with a good intent,
By the name of Robin Hood.
(see note)
With kisses sweet their red lips meet,
For shee and the earl did agree;
20 In every place, they kindly imbrace,
With love and sweet unity.
But fortune bearing these lovers a spight,
That soon they were forced to part;
To the merry green wood then went Robin Hood,
25 With a sad and sorrowfull heart.
dislike
(see note)
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
And Marian, poor soul, was troubled in mind,
For the absence of her friend;
With finger in eye, shee often did cry,
And his person did much comend.
30 Perplexed and vexed, and troubled in mind,
Shee drest her self like a page,
And ranged the wood to find Robin Hood,
The bravest of men in that age.
With quiver and bow, sword, buckler, and all,
35 Thus armed was Marian most bold,
Still wandering about to find Robin out,
Whose person was better then gold.
(see note)
But Robin Hood, hee, himself had disguisd,
And Marian was strangly attir'd,
40 That they provd foes, and so fell to blowes,
Whose vallour bold Robin admir'd.
(see note)
They drew out their swords, and to cutting they went,
At least an hour or more,
That the blood ran apace from bold Robins face,
45 And Marian was wounded sore.
"O hold thy hand, hold thy hand," said Robin Hood,
"And thou shalt be one of my string,
To range in the wood with bold Robin Hood,
To hear the sweet nightingall sing."
50 When Marian did hear the voice of her love,
Her self shee did quickly discover,
And with kisses sweet she did him greet,
Like to a most loyall lover.
When bold Robin Hood his Marian did see,
55 Good lord, what clipping was there!
With kind imbraces, and jobbing of faces,
Providing of gallant cheer.
For Little John took his bow in his hand,
reveal
embracing
thrusting
Preliminary Edition – August 2012
And wandring in the wood,
60 To kill the deer, and make good chear,
For Marian and Robin Hood.
A stately banquet they had full soon,
All in a shaded bower,
Where venison sweet they had to eat,
65 And were merry that present hour.
Great flaggons of wine were set on the board,
And merrily they drunk round
Their boules of sack, to strengthen the back,
Whilst their knees did touch the ground.
(see note)
sack (dry white wine)
70 First Robin Hood began a health
To Marian his onely dear,
And his yeomen all, both comly and tall,
Did quickly bring up the rear.
For in a brave veine they tost off the bouls,
75 Whilst thus they did remain,
And every cup, as they drunk up,
They filled with speed again.
manner; (see note)
At last they ended their merryment,
And went to walk in the wood,
80 Where Little John and Maid Marian
Attended on bold Robin Hood.
In sollid content together they livd,
With all their yeomen gay;
They livd by their hands, without any lands,
85 And so they did many a day.
But now to conclude, an end I will make
In time, as I think it good,
For the people that dwell in the North can tell
Of Marian and bold Robin Hood.
(see note)
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