Napoleon`s Last Battles (NLB) 2015

Napoleon`s Last Battles (NLB) 2015
Napoleon’s
Last Battles
Napoleon’s Last Battles
Fourth Edition
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Contents
Credits
Fourth Edition
Development: Chris Perello
Maps: Joseph Youst
Counters: Trevor Holman
Rules Layout: Lisé Patterson
& Callie Cummins
Box Design: Chris Dickson
©2015 Decision Games, Inc. Made
and printed in USA. All rights
reserved.
Third Edition
(Decision Games, 1995)
Rules Editing: Jack Werth and Mike
Taber
Rules v2.0: Martin Gallo
Grand Scenarios: Rev. Jack A.
Werth
The Grand Waterloo and Historic
Wavre scenarios were first published
in James P. Werbaneth’s wargaming
quarterly Line of Departure.
Second Edition (TSR, 1984)
First Edition (SPI, 1976)
Design: Kevin Zucker
Development: J.A. Nelson
Parts
Inventory
•T his 32-page Rules Booklet.
•Two 22 x 34 inch maps.
•Two die-cut cardboard sheets
containing 400 playing pieces.
•One six-sided die.
•Storage bags.
If any parts are missing or damaged,
please write to:
Decision Games
P.O. Box 21598,
Bakersfield, CA 93390-1598
Please register this game purchase
on-line at:
www.decisiongames.com
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8.0 Chateaux
8.1 Effects on All Units
8.2 Effects on Defending Infantry
1.0 Introduction
2.0 Components
2.1 Fourth Edition Rules
2.2 Maps
2.3 Charts,Tables, and Tracks
2.4 Counters
9.0 Army Morale
9.1 Disintegration
9.2 Demoralization
9.3 Demoralization Effects
3.0 Scenarios
3.1 General Course of a Game
3.2 Setting Up
3.3 Turns
3.4 Winning a Game
10.0 Leaders
10.1 Leader Movement
10.2 Leader Combat
11.0 Command
11.1 Leaders and Command
11.2 Tracing Command
11.3 Command Effects
4.0 Sequence Of Play
4.1 Turn Sequence
4.2 Night Turns
4.3 Rain Turns
5.0 Movement
5.1 Movement Limitations
5.2 Effects of Terrain on Movement
5.3 Enemy Units and Zones of Control
5.4 Movement and Friendly Units
5.5 Exiting the Map
5.6 Entering the Map
6.0 Combat
6.1 Which Units Attack and Defend
6.2 Calculating the Odds
6.3 Terrain Effects on Combat
6.4 Combat Results
6.5 Elimination and Exchange
6.6 Retreating After Combat
6.7 Advancing After Combat
7.0 Artillery
7.1 Bombardment
7.2 Combined Attacks
7.3 Line of Sight
7.4 Adjacent Artillery in the Attack
7.5 Artillery in Defense
12.0 Reorganization
12.0 Reorganization Limitations
12.2 Reorganization While
Demoralized
13.0 Corps Morale
13.1 Allied Nationalities
13.2 Corps Demoralization Effects
13.3 Recovery
14.0 Supply
14.1 Supply Sources
14.2 Blocking Supply
15.0. Optional Rules
15.1 Combined Arms Attacks
15.2 Imperial Guard
15.3 Mounted Retreat Before Combat
15.4 French Late Start
15.5 Cavalry Impetus
15.6 Leader Advance Advantage
16.0. Variant Rules
16.1 Variant Counters
16.2 Dawn
16.3 Observation
16.4 Modified Terrain Effects
16.5 Rain Effects
16.6 Hidden Movement
16.7 Combined Effects
16.8 Cavalry Charge
16.9 Sustained Bombardment
16.10 Heavy Artillery
16.11 Chateaux Garrisons
16.12 La Garde Vielle
16.13 Leader Combat Bonus
16.14 Army Headquarters
16.15 Out Of Command Effects
16.16 Modified Reorganization
16.17 Supply Trains
16.18 Out Of Supply Effects
17.0 Notes
Scenarios
18.0 Ligny
19.0 Quatre Bras
20.0 Wavre
21.0 La Belle Alliance
22.0 The Campaign
23.0 Qb Variant
24.0 Grand Ligny
25.0 Historic Wavre
26.0 Lba Variant
27.0 Grand Waterloo
28.0 Campaign Variant
Historical Background
The Waterloo campaign was the culmination
of Napoleon’s return from exile on Elba. The other
nations of Europe formed the Seventh Coalition to
remove him from power once again. By early June,
an invasion of France was imminent. Napoleon
forestalled it by attacking into Belgium, hoping a
victory over the British-led Allied army and the main
Prussian army would lead to a negotiated peace.
The sudden French offensive on 15 June caught
the Coalition unprepared. The Prussians concentrated behind Ligny Creek, near Sombreffe, where
Napoleon attacked the following day. Hours of
bloody fighting set up a final attack by the Imperial Guard but the victory was incomplete because
French reinforcements failed to arrive.That failure
was due to another battle farther west at Quatre
Bras, where the French left wing became embroiled
with the gathering Allied army. One French corps
spent the day marching back and forth between the
battles, contributing to neither.
On 17 June, Napoleon intended to defeat the
Allies and march on Brussels. The Allies retreated to
Mont St. Jean, just south of the town of Waterloo,
where they took a strong position on a ridge protected by several strong chateaux. The expected to
be joined by the Prussians, who dodged Grouchy and
retreated north, rather than east as expected.
The climax of the campaign came on 18 June.
Grouchy hurried to catch up to the Prussians, eventually striking them at Wavre, but too late to prevent
the bulk of the army from marching toward Mont St.
Jean.
Napoleon, meanwhile, launched repeated assaults on the Allied ridge, while fending off the growing Prussian threat to his right flank. A final attack by
his Old Guard in the evening was thrown back, and
the French army routed off the field, not stopping
until it was deep inside France.
Napoleon abdicated four days later, bringing
an end to one of the most dramatic and decisive
campaigns in European history.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
1.0 Introduction
Napoleon’s Last Battles (NLB) is a simulation of the Waterloo campaign in
Belgium, the culmination of Napoleon’s return from exile on the island of Elba.
The game is intended for two players—one commanding the French Army of
the North, the other commanding forces belonging to the Seventh Coalition:
the Prussian Army of the Lower Rhine and the multi-national (Allied) Army
of the Low Countries—but can be played solitaire or by teams. There are 11
scenarios, each representing the whole campaign or a portion of it, the portions including individual scenarios for the main battles of the campaign: Ligny,
Quatre Bras, Wavre, and La Belle Alliance (Waterloo).
2.0 Components
This section describes the various game components.
2.1 Fourth Edition Rules
The first edition of NLB featured four separate games, one covering each of the
main battles, with a set of “Campaign Rules” linking them together. This edition presents the campaign as the primary focus, with the battles as scenarios.
Some rules have been renumbered for the purpose, but all the original rules are
present and complete. They are divided into five broad areas:
• Standard Rules (1.0 through 9.0) form the basic mechanics needed to portray a Napoleonic battlefield. They apply in all scenarios unless specifically
superseded by another rule.
• Campaign Rules (10.0 through 14.0) cover the mechanics needed to
portray Napoleonic warfare at the operational level. They are required for
the campaign game, and may be used in other scenarios at the discretion of
the players.
• Optional & Variant Rules (15.0 and 16.0) present players with alternative or additional rules and playing pieces. They may be used individually,
completely, or not at all.
• Notes (17.0) offer insight into the rationale for certain rules and how to play
the game successfully.
• Scenarios (18.0 through 27.0) present the various portions of the entire
campaign, including set up and how to win.
2.2 Maps
The two maps, north and south, portray the area over which the campaign was
conducted. It may be necessary to back-fold them against the creases the first
few times to make them lie flat. Each scenario will use both maps, or one map,
or a portion of one map.
The hexagonal grid is superimposed over the terrain features to regularize
movement and positioning of the counters. Each hex has a four-digit number;
the first two indicate the hex column, the second two the hex in that column.
The hex numbering is continuous across the two maps; for example, Maison du
Roi is in hex 1022, while Quatre Bras is in hex 1641. A few hexes are duplicated
at the south edge of the north map and the north edge of the south map.
• Map Scale. Each hex represents 525 yards (480 meters) from side to side.
• Half Hexes. When using only one map there will be some half hexes. These
are out of play.
• Extra Numbers. There are a few numbers below the southernmost hexes
on the south map. This is for reference only; they are not hexes and are out
of play.
Napoleon’s Last Battles How to Read the Rules
These rules are numbered for ease of location and reference. They are
divided into sections, indicated by the number to the left of the decimal
(1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and so on). Each section presents one major element of
the game rules.
General Rules and Procedures. Many sections begin with a general
statement about the rule, usually summarizing key portions. Some sections also have a “Procedure” explaining the process to be followed to
carry out the rule.
Cases. Most sections have sub-parts, called cases, describing details,
conditions, exceptions, or prohibitions applicable to the section. The
number to the right of the decimal (1.1, 1.2, ...) indicates a primary case.
A letter to the right of the primary case (1.3A, 1.3B, ...) is a secondary case, generally used to clarify and restrict the application of the
primary.
Learning & Understanding the Rules. Read the general rules and
primary cases first, skipping over the secondary cases. If any confusion arises concerning intent or interpretation, go back and read the
pertinent secondary cases.
2.3 Charts, Tables & Tracks
The following are used to carry out or record certain game functions.
A) Turn Record Track (TRT) located along the west edge of each map. The
track is used with a marker to indicate the current turn (see 4.0).
B) Terrain Key, located on the south map, indicates the symbols used to
identify each type of terrain on the map. Each also indicates the movement
cost associated with the terrain (see 5.2)
C) Terrain Effects Chart (TEC), located on page 32 of this booklet, summarizes the effects of each type of terrain on observation, movement, and
combat.
D) Combat Results Table (CRT), located on page 32 of this booklet, is used
to resolve combat (6.0).
2.4 Counters
Separate the counters from the die-cut sheets using scissors or a sharp knife;
if desired, use scissors or a fingernail clipper to trim the corners. Most of the
counters represent the combat units that took part in the campaign, with
others representing senior leaders and other command assets, and still others
being markers used to carry out specific game functions. The types of counters
are shown on page 4, along with the rule describing its use. Not all counters
are used in every scenario.
3.0 Scenarios
Each scenario is a complete game. The instructions for each specifies what
map or maps are to be used, which counters are available to each side, how
long the game lasts, and what each player has to do to win.
3.1 General Course of a Game
After choosing the scenario to be played and who will play each side, decide
what if any optional rules—either those in the scenario or those in sections
15.0 and/or 16.0—will be used. Set up the map and forces according to the
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Counter Types
COMBAT UNITS
British
Allies
Brunswicker
Hanoverian
Prussian
King’s German
Legion (KGL)
Nassauer
French
Imperial
Guard
Netherlander
Line
Infantry
(2.5 and
throughout)
Cavalry
(2.5 and
throughout)
Artillery
(2.5 and
throughout)
Officer
(10.0 & 11.0)
Orders of Battle (OB) for each army, located on pages
27-29, list every counter and show the command
hierarchy.
Commander
(10.0 & 11.0)
MARKERS
Turn
(3.3 & 4.0)
Out of
Command
(11.0)
Out of Play
(3.1)
Prussian
French
Prussian
Hidden
Movement
(16.6)
Allied
Garrison
(16.11)
Army
Headquarters
(16.14)
Control (3.4)
French
VARIANT COUNTERS
Allied
Supply
Trains
(16.17)
SAMPLE COMBAT UNIT
Out of
Supply
(16.18)
Reduced Strength
(back)
Full Strength
(front)
Identification (ID)
Command Designation (aka Organization)
Combat Strength
Movement Allowance
Identification (ID): the unit’s official designation, usually a number or the name of
its commander. Abbreviations are noted in the orders of battle.
Command Designation: the higher command organization to which the unit
belongs, also shown on the orders of battle.
Combat Strength: the unit’s relative strength when attacking and defending in
combat (see 6.0 and 7.0), expressed in terms of strength points (SP). Infantry and
cavalry SP represent between 350 and 750 men; each artillery SP represents a
battery of six or eight cannon.
Reverse Printing. Most combat units are
back-printed with a white band and a
lower combat strength, indicating the unit
has suffered significant losses in combat.
Some units start a scenario at reduced
strength. Eliminated units may be
reorgainzed during play if rule 12.0 is being
used. A unit without a reduced side cannot
be reorganized.
Movement Allowance: the unit’s ability to move across the map (5.0), expressed
in movement points (MP).
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Napoleon’s Last Battles
scenario instructions (3.2). The game will consist of a specified number of turns
(3.3), during which each player moves friendly forces, then resolves combat
initiated by the moves. Each player is trying to win by eliminating enemy units
and/or capturing key terrain (3.4).
If you are new to gaming or to this system, we recommend playing the Quatre
Bras (19.0) scenario with no optional or variant rules. Once you are familiar
with the general flow of the game system, move on to larger scenarios and try
out the additional rules.
3.2 Setting Up
Scenario instructions specify what components are needed. Set each up as
described below. Set aside any not being used.
A) Map. Each scenario will require both maps, just one map, or half of one of
the maps. When one map is being used, just lay it out in a location convenient to both players.
• If both maps are used, place them so the duplicated hexes of one are obscured by those on the other. Check the hex numbering in several columns to
ensure they are numbered continuously, with no duplications or omissions.
• If a half map is needed, lay out the map to be used, then place Out of Play
markers in the hex column indicated in the instructions.
B) Turn Marker. Place the turn marker in the box of the TRT indicated by the
scenario instructions.
C) Sort the Counters. Sort the counters to be used and place them as follows.
3.4 Winning a Game
Scenario instructions will specify what each player needs to do to win. Games
sometimes end with an event, such as a particular number of casualties being
suffered. In most cases, the winner is determined at the end of the last turn by
counting victory points (VP), gained by each player for eliminating enemy units
and/or controlling specified hexes. The specific goals for each player are noted
in the scenario instructions.
A) Eliminated Units. Players generally receive VP for eliminated units based
on the unit’s combat strength.
B) Hex Control. A hex is generally controlled by the player whose units
last moved through it. Some scenarios will indicate a hex to be under
one player’s control at the beginning of the game, or will require a unit to
remain in (occupy) the hex to retain control. Control of a hex may move back
and forth between players any number of times in a game as the units of
each enter it. If necessary, place a control marker in an unoccupied hex to
indicate its current control.
4.0 Sequence of Play
The game is played in game turns composed of alternate player
turns. During each player turn, the active player maneuvers
units and resolves combat in a specified sequence and within
the limits set by the movement and combat rules.
• Time Notation. A complete notation for a turn includes two digits for the
day, a slash mark, and a four-digit hour using military (24-hour) time. For
example, 16/1400 is 1400 hours (2:00 p.m.) on 16 June, while 17/1000 is
10:00 a.m. on 17 June.
• Deployed units are those beginning play on the hex grid. Each will be
listed by a four-digit hex number; place the counter in the appropriate hex
with its full-strength side showing unless the unit ID is followed by “(r),” indicating it is set up with its reduced side showing. If the set up hex number
is preceded by the notation “w/#,” the counter(s) may be placed on the set
up hex or in any other hex up to that distance (#) away. When determining
distance, do not count the hex indicated, do count the hex of placement.
If the instructions indicate the units are “unstacked,” only one unit can be
placed in each hex. If there is no such notation, one or two units can be
placed in a hex.
• Time Scale. Daylight turns represent one hour. Night turns represent three
hours.
• Reinforcements are units entering the map (5.7) after the game is underway. The scenario instructions identify the units and specify the hex and
turn of entry.
A. French Command Phase. This phase is not used in some scenarios; in
those cases, skip to the movement phase.
• Organizations sometimes set up or enter the map all at once. This is
indicated by identifying all units with their command designation rather
than listing each unit. If any units are detached, it will be indicated with the
notation “less (unit ID).”
Examples. “3167 at 16/0900” means the unit will enter the map at hex 3167
in the 0900 turn of 16 June. In the Quatre Bras scenario, the Allies receive
(among others) the following reinforcements: 16/1700 at 0136: All [1] ; and
16/1600 at 0136: All [3] less Omptda. The first indicates all three units of
the Allied 1st Division (Mait, Byng, Adye) enter at hex 0136 during the 1700 turn
of 16 June. The second means all the units of 3rd Division (Halk, Omptda, Kiel,
Wllmsn) except Omptda enter at hex 0136 during the 1700 turn of 16 June.
3.3 Turns
During a turn, each player moves units across the map (5.0) based on their
movement allowance. After movement is complete, units adjacent to enemy
units must attack (6.0). Combat is resolved by comparing the attack strength
to the defense strength and rolling the die to determine the outcome.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
4.1 Turn Sequence
Each turn is divided into a French player turn and a Coalition player turn. The
player whose player turn is currently in progress is termed the active or phasing player. The activities listed below may be carried out only in the appropriate phase.
1. French Player Turn
• Command Segment. The French player determines which combat units
are in command (see 11.0). Units not in command are marked with out of
command (OOC) markers.
• Morale Segment. Check the morale state of French units (9.0 or 13.0).
• Reorganization Segment. The French player may reorganize eligible
combat units previously destroyed in combat (12.0). Adjust the morale state
of the unit’s organization if necessary.
B. French Movement Phase. The French player may move all, some, or none
of the French units within the limits and restrictions of the movement rules
(5.0). French reinforcements, identified by the scenario instructions, may be
brought onto the map (5.7). Coalition units may not be moved.
C. French Combat Phase. French units attack opposing units according to
the rules for combat (6.0) and artillery (7.0). No units of either side may
move except when called for by the combat resolution procedure.
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2. Coalition Player Turn
A. Coalition Command Phase. Same as the French command phase, but for
Coalition units.
B. Coalition Movement Phase. Same as the French movement phase but
with Coalition units moving and French units stationary.
C. Coalition Combat Phase. Same as the French combat phase but with
Coalition units attacking French units.
3. Turn Record Interphase
If the final turn has been played, the game ends and victory is determined. If
more turns remain, advance the turn marker to the next box on the TRT and
start the next turn.
4.2 Night Turns
Night turns are indicated by dark blue shading on the TRT. Night turns are the
same as day turns with the following exceptions:
• There is no command phase in either player turn.
• A moving unit may not enter an enemy-controlled hex (5.3).
• There is no combat phase in either player turn. Opposing adjacent units
do not engage in combat; they just remain in place. Artillery units may not
bombard.
4.3 Rain Turns
Rain turns are indicated by scenario instructions. The turn
marker has rain and clear sides. On clear turns, flip the marker
so the “Clear” side is showing; on rain turns, flip it so the
“Rain” side is showing. Rain turns are the same as night turns
except the command phase is conducted normally.
5.0 Movement
During a movement phase, the phasing player may move as many or as few
units as desired.
Movement Procedure. Units are moved one at a time. A unit moves from
hex to hex, tracing a path of contiguous hexes through the hex grid, in any
direction or combination of directions. As it enters each hex, it must pay
one or more movement point (MP) from its movement allowance (MA),
depending on the terrain in the hex entered and/or the hexside crossed. It
may move freely through friendly units but must stop after moving adjacent
to an enemy unit.
5.1 Movement Limitations
Only the phasing player’s units may move, and the number of MP expended by
each unit may not exceed its MA.
A) Unused Movement Points may not be accumulated for use in a later
movement phase or transferred to another unit.
B) No Combat takes place during a movement phase.
C) End of Movement. Once a unit has been moved and the player’s hand
is taken from it, its move may not be changed or continued without the
consent of the opposing player. The movement phase as a whole ends once
the phasing player begins resolution of combat.
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5.2 Effects of Terrain on Movement
The basic movement point cost is 1 MP per hex entered. The cost to enter
certain hexes and/or cross certain hexsides may be more or less than 1 MP, as
described below and summarized on the Terrain Effects Chart (TEC).
A) Hexsides. Certain terrain types exist on a hexside rather than inside a hex.
They affect movement only for units crossing the hexside. The moving units
pays MP to cross the hexside over and above the cost to enter the hex being
entered; this is indicated by the “+” on the TEC. River hexsides may not be
crossed except at bridges.
B) Road & Trail Movement. Roads and trails exist in a hex along with the
basic terrain type. A moving unit gets the benefit of using the road or trail
(1/2 MP or 1 MP, respectively), only if it moves from one hex containing the
path to another hex containing the path, across a hexside crossed by the
path. The moving unit may combine road/trail movement with non-road/trail
movement; when using roads, retain MP fractions until the end of the unit’s
movement.
C) Cumulative Effects. Terrain effects are cumulative for movement purposes. If a unit lacks the MP to enter a hex, it cannot enter the hex.
5.3 Enemy Units & Zones of Control
The six hexes immediately surrounding a hex constitute the zone of control
(ZOC) of a unit in that hex. A unit may not exit an enemy ZOC (EZOC) during a
movement phase. ZOC never extend through non-bridge river hexsides or into
chateau hexes.
A) Constant ZOC. All units exert a zone of control throughout the turn,
regardless of the phase or player turn. The presence of zones of control is
never negated by units, enemy or friendly.
B) Mutual ZOC. If a unit is in an enemy controlled hex, the enemy unit is also
in its controlled hex. They are equally and mutually affected.
C) Coexisting Zones of Control. Enemy and friendly ZOC exerted into the
same hex coexist, and that hex is mutually controlled by both players. There
is no additional effect from having more than one unit exerting a ZOC onto
a single hex.
D) No MP Cost. Units do not pay additional MP to enter an EZOC.
E) Exiting a Zone of Control. A unit may not move out of an EZOC during its
movement phase. It may exit the EZOC by advancing or retreating during
combat. The EZOC ceases to affect the unit if the enemy unit is eliminated
or moved away by a combat result.
F) Night & Rain Turns. Units may not enter enemy controlled hexes during
night or rain turns, nor may units already in enemy controlled hexes exit
them.
Zones of Control
The purple arrows indicate opposing units exerting ZOC on one
another. Some of the ZOC of Soye,
Kempt, and Campi are blocked by
the lake hexsides.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
5.4 Movement & Friendly Units
A unit generally may move freely through hexes occupied by friendly units. A
maximum of two friendly units may be stacked in a single hex at the end of any
phase.
A) No MP Cost. There is no additional MP cost to enter or leave a friendlyoccupied hex.
B) No Hex Limits. There is no limit to the number of friendly units which may
pass through a single hex in a movement phase.
C) Friendly Controlled Hexes do not inhibit the movement of friendly units.
5.5 Exiting the Map
A player may exit units from the map only at hexes specified in the scenario
instructions. Units exited at any other time and place, to include those forced
to retreat off the map after combat, are eliminated (see 6.5). To exit the map, a
unit must expend a number of movement points equal to the MP cost to enter
the map-edge hex from which the unit exits the map (it may use a road or trail).
A) Exiting the Game. An exited unit is removed from play and may not return
to the game.
B) No Exit Limit. A unit may exit from a hex regardless of the number of
enemy and/or friendly units already exited from the same hex.
C) Not Eliminated. An exited unit is not considered eliminated for victory
point or morale purposes. It may count toward the owning player’s victory
point total if scenario instructions so indicate.
5.6 Entering the Map
Scenario instructions may indicate a player is to receive reinforcements during
the course of the game. The instructions will state the turn and hex of entry.
Reinforcements enter the map during the movement phase of the indicated
turn, paying the normal MP cost to enter the indicated hex. They may use road
or trail movement.
A) Multiple Reinforcements. If more than one unit enters the same hex on
the same turn, the owning player determines the order of arrival. They may
stack. Each stack must pay additional MP to enter the map; visualize the
reinforcements as a column of units extending into a chain of off-map hexes.
For example, if the first stack expends 1 MP to enter, the second expends
2 MP, the third 3 MP, and so on. If the entry hex is a road, each succeeding
stack expends an additional 1/2 MP.
B) Timing of Entry. Reinforcements may enter at any time during the owning
player’s movement phase.
(see 7.0). The phasing player is termed the attacker and the non-phasing player
the defender, regardless of the overall situation. Within the constraints of this
section, the attacker determines which units are involved in each combat, and
the order in which combats are resolved. All combats must be resolved during
that combat phase.
Combat Procedure. For each combat, conduct the following steps in order.
• Determine which units will be involved in the combat (6.1).
• Calculate the odds (6.2 and 6.3) by dividing the total strength of all attackers by the total strength of all defenders, expressing the result as a ratio.
Simplify the result to one of the odds ratios on the combat results table
(CRT).
• Roll the die to get a line on the CRT. Cross index the line with the final odds
to get the combat result.
• Apply the result (6.4 through 6.7) immediately to the involved units.
6.1 Which Units Attack & Defend
All phasing units beginning a combat phase in an EZOC must attack during that
phase. All non-phasing units in the ZOC of a phasing unit at the beginning a
combat phase must be attacked during that phase. The phasing player chooses
which attacking units attack which defending units as long as all units required
to take part in combat do so.
A) Adjacency. Attacking units may only attack adjacent defending units (but
see 7.0 for artillery bombardment).
B) One Combat Per Unit Per Phase. No attacking unit may attack more than
once per combat phase, and no defending unit may be attacked more than
once per combat phase.
C) Combat Strength Unity. Each unit taking part in a combat must contribute
its entire combat strength to the combat; the combat strength may not be
divided among different combats.
D) Stacked Units must participate in the same combat.
E) Multi-Hex Combat. Attacking units in more than one hex and/or defending
units in more than one hex may take part in the same combat.
• A defending hex may be attacked by as many units as can be brought to
bear in any or all adjacent hexes (and by as many bombarding artillery units
as are within range; see 7.0).
• Attackers in one hex may attack any and all adjacent defenders.
C) Movement After Entry. Once a unit has entered the map, it may continue
moving to the limit of its MA and may attack in the subsequent combat
phase.
• Attackers in multiple hexes may attack defenders in multiple hexes as long
as all attacking units are adjacent to all defending units (but see 7.2).
D) Blocked Entry. Reinforcements blocked by enemy units or EZOC may enter
at the closest available board edge hex.
F) Diversionary Attacks. The phasing player may deliberately allocate units
to make attack at low odds to enable other units to combine for a higher
odds attack.
E) Delayed Entry. The owning player may delay the arrival of reinforcements;
they may enter during any subsequent friendly movement phase.
6.0 Combat
All phasing units exerting a zone of control on an enemy (non-phasing) unit
at the beginning of a combat phase, in a non-rain daylight turn, must attack.
All non-phasing units with phasing units in their zones of control must be attacked. Artillery units may attack enemy units to which they are not adjacent
Napoleon’s Last Battles 6.2 Calculating the Odds
All units involved in a combat must contribute their entire strength to that
combat. Modify combat strengths as needed for terrain effects (6.3) before
calculating the odds. Total the modified combat strengths of all attackers into
the attacker total, and the combat strengths of all defenders into the defender
total. Divide the attacker total to get the defender total. Express the result as a
ratio, then simplify the result to one of the odds ratios on the CRT.
7
A) Rounding Odds. Odds are always rounded in favor of the defender.
B) Maximum and Minimum Odds. Attacks executed at greater than “6- 1”
are treated as “6-1;” attacks executed at worse than “1-5” are treated as
“1-5.”
C) Voluntary Reduction of the Odds. Prior to the resolution of any attack,
the attacking player may reduce the odds to any column left of the calculated odds. The decision may not be altered once the combat die is rolled.
6.3 Terrain Effects on Combat
Certain types of terrain multiply or divide a unit’s combat strength; see the TEC
for details. Apply the modification to the unit’s current printed combat strength
before calculating the combat odds.
A) Streams and Bridges. A defending unit receives the doubling effect
of streams and/or bridges only if all attacking units are attacking across
stream and/or bridge hexsides. If even one adjacent attacker is attacking
across a non-stream/bridge hexside, the defender loses the doubling effect.
B) Halving. Round up fractions of a combat strength after halving. If more
than one unit is to be halved, total all their strengths before halving, and
round once.
C) Not Cumulative. Terrain effects are not cumulative for combat purposes.
Use the single terrain bonus giving the greatest benefit to the defender.
6.4 Combat Results
There are five possible combat results:
Ae = Attacker Eliminated.
Ar = Attacker Retreat.
Ex = Exchange.
Dr = Defender Retreat.
De = Defender Eliminated.
Each requires some combination of elimination or retreat of the participating
units. The specific requirements of each are listed on the combat results table
on page 32, and explained in the following cases.
6.5 Elimination & Exchange
Eliminated units are removed from the map. Designate an off-map space for
each army’s eliminated units to ease the task of keeping a running total of losses. If used, reorganization (12.0) allows an eligible unit to return to the map.
A) Exchange Strengths. When calculating the total strength loss for attackers in an exchange, use the current combat strengths of all involved units;
ignore modifications due to terrain (or rule 16.18, if used).
6.6 Retreating after Combat
A unit required to retreat after combat must be moved into an eligible adjacent
hex. A unit unable to retreat is eliminated.
A) Ineligible Hexes. A retreating unit may not retreat off the map, into or
across prohibited terrain, into an enemy occupied hex, or into a hex in EZOC.
B) Retreat Direction. If there are multiple eligible hexes, the owning player
may decide which the retreating unit enters. Stacked retreating units may
retreat in different directions.
C) Retreating into Friendly-Occupied Hexes. If the retreat hex contains
one friendly unit, the retreating unit may stack with it. If the retreat hex
has two friendly units, one must be displaced (see D below); a unit may be
8
displaced only if no other retreat option is available to the retreating unit. If
the retreat hex is bombarded by enemy artillery in a subsequent combat in
the same combat phase, the retreated unit does not contribute its combat
strength to the defense (see 6.1), but does suffer the result of the attack.
D) Displacement. If a unit retreating into a hex causes it to be overstacked,
it takes the place of one of the units already in the hex. The displaced unit
then conducts a retreat. The displaced unit must be able to retreat safely;
if it would be eliminated by retreating, it remains in place and the original
retreating unit is eliminated. A displaced unit may displace another friendly
unit, which may displace another, and so on. If any unit in the chain cannot
displace without being eliminated, all displaced units remain in place and
the original retreating unit is eliminated. A unit may be displaced more than
once per combat phase, but only once by a single combat. If a displaced unit
is artillery yet to engage in combat, it may not fire during that combat phase.
One retreating unit displaces only one unit in a stack; two retreating units
displace two.
6.7 Advancing after Combat
Whenever a hex is vacated as a result of combat, one participating, adjacent
victorious unit may advance into the vacated hex. Ignore EZOC during the
advance. The option to advance must be exercised immediately, before any
other combat resolution.
A) Advance is Voluntary. A unit is never forced to advance.
B) Advance Limits. Only one unit may advance per combat, regardless of the
number of participating units or the number of hexes vacated. A unit may
not advance more than one hex.
C) No Combat After Advance. An advancing unit may neither attack nor
be attacked later in that same combat phase, even if the advance places it
next to an enemy unit still to be attacked in that phase or an enemy unit not
involved in combat at the beginning of the phase.
7.0 Artillery
An artillery unit adjacent to an enemy unit must participate in combat normally.
An artillery unit not adjacent to an enemy unit may bombard (attack) an enemy
unit two hexes away. Bombardment may be made alone or in combination with
other units adjacent to the bombarded hex.
Bombardment Procedure. The bombarding artillery’s combat strength is
added to the total attack strength before calculating odds. Bombarding artillery generally is not affected by combat results.
7.1 Bombardment
A bombardment is an attack by an artillery unit against an enemy unit two
hexes away. The bombarding artillery may not be in an EZOC, must be able to
reach the defender’s hex, and must have a clear line of sight to the defender. It
may bombard a single enemy occupied hex.
A) Voluntary. An artillery unit is not required to bombard an enemy unit just
because it is possible. If multiple defenders are in range, the attacking
player may choose which to bombard.
B) Range. When counting the range from the bombarding artillery unit to the
target hex, do not include the artillery’s hex, do include the target hex.
C) Stacked Bombarding Artillery must bombard the same target.
D) Multiple Bombarding Artillery. Artillery in more than one hex may
bombard the same target; total all bombarding artillery when calculating the
odds.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
Combat Example
mp/
It is the French combat phase and four attacks are being made. Three
units are attacking Bylandt (1) in hex 1643. Pelletier is not bombarding
because it is adjacent to the defender. Total attack strength is 17, divided
by Bylandt’s strength of 4, yields odds of 4.25 to 1, rounded down to 4-1.
The units attacking van Opstal in Gemioncourt (2) are crossing a stream
and attacking into a town, but van Opstal’s strength is only doubled. The
odds are 13 to 2, rounded down to the maximum odds of 6-1; the French
player reduces the odds to 3-1 to avoid the risk of an exchange. Campi
and Husson are attacking Pireaumont at 1-1 odds; Weimar is doubled
because of the town (if the town was not present, Weimar would not
be doubled for the stream because Husson is not attacking across a
stream). Marcillac is in range of both Bylandt and van Opstal, but cannot
attack either because its line of sight is blocked by crests. In the last
attack, Piré attacks Pack (the French player could have had Gauthier join
this attack instead of having attack Bylandt). The odds are 1-2 because
Piré is a cavalry unit and is halved attacking into woods.
The French player chooses to resolve the attack against van Opstal
first. A die roll of “4” yields a “Defender Retreat.” Van Opstal pulls back
to 1143. Baudin advances into 1643, cutting off Bylandt’s retreat.
The attack on Bylandt is next. A die roll of a “6” results in an “Attacker Retreat.” All the attackers pull back, but Gauthier has no safe hex
to enter and is eliminated. Bylandt elects not to advance.
E) Bombarding Artillery Combat Results. Bombarding artillery is not
affected by combat results; it is not eliminated or retreated, and may not advance. However, the owning player may voluntarily elect to suffer “Attacker
Retreat” if it is the combat result.
7.2 Combined Attack
Bombarding artillery may attack alone or in concert with other friendly units
adjacent to the target hex. Add the bombarding artillery’s combat strength to
the attack. If friendly units are attacking defenders in more than one hex, the
bombarding artillery need only be within range of one defending hex.
Combat Results. Bombarding artillery in a combined attack does not suffer
combat results, but adjacent units, infantry, cavalry, or artillery, do.
7.3 Line of Sight
The straight line from the center of the bombarding artillery’s hex to the center
of the target hex is the artillery’s line of sight (LOS). The LOS may be blocked
by terrain in the intervening hex and/or an intervening hexside. If the LOS is
blocked, the artillery unit may not make the bombardment. The terrain in a
bombarding unit’s hex and in the target hex does not block the LOS.
A) Blocking Terrain consists of forest, town, chateau hexes, and crest
hexsides.
B) Congruent Hexsides. If the LOS runs congruent to a hexside, the LOS is
blocked if
• the hexside is a crest hexside.
• if both hexes adjacent to the hexside have blocking terrain.
C) Blocked Junctions. If the LOS passes through the juncture of two or more
blocked hexsides, or the juncture of a blocked hexside and a blocked hex,
the LOS is blocked.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
4
1
2
3
The third attack result is a “1” giving a “Defender Retreat.” Weimar
cannot enter 2044 because of Campi’s ZOC, so retreats northeast, and
Husson advances.
In the final attack, Piré gets a “3” for another “Attacker Retreat.”
Pack declines to advance.
D) Adjacent Blocked Hexsides. Blocking hexsides block all bombardment
attacks, even if the blocking hexside forms part of the bombarding unit’s hex
and/or the target unit’s hex.
7.4 Adjacent Artillery in the Attack
When in an EZOC, artillery units must participate in an attack against adjacent
enemy units.
A) No Bombardment. Artillery in an EZOC may not bombard; it attacks like
an infantry or cavalry unit. It may not bombard a non-adjacent enemy unit
even if the enemy unit exerting the EZOC is being attacked by other friendly
units.
B) Normal Combat Results. Artillery units attacking from an enemy controlled hex suffers all combat results normally.
D) No Blocking Terrain. Blocking terrain (see 7.3) does not relieve an artillery unit from the necessity of making adjacent attacks.
E) Rivers. Artillery adjacent to an enemy unit but separated by a non-bridged
river hexside, may bombard (since the artillery is not in an EZOC; see 5.3).
7.5 Artillery in Defense
Artillery may not bombard defensively. When attacked, it suffers all combat
results normally, even when bombarded by enemy artillery.
8.0 Chateaux
Chateaux were walled farms dotting the Belgian landscape that could be used
as small fortresses.
8.1 Effects on All Units
Chateaux affect all units in the following ways.
9
A) No stacking is permitted; only one unit may be in the chateau at the
end of any phase. Retreating units may not enter an occupied chateau; a
chateau defender may not be displaced.
B) No Advance. No unit may advance after combat into a chateau after
defending infantry has been eliminated or retreated.
C) Bombardments may not be made into or through a chateau hex.
8.2 Effects on Defending Infantry
Only undemoralized infantry in a chateau hex receive the following benefits;
cavalry, artillery, and demoralized infantry (9.0) are not affected.
A) Zones of control extend out of chateaux but do not extend into them.
Units adjacent to a chateau are required to attack an enemy unit in the
chateau, but a unit in a chateau is not required to attack adjacent enemy
units. If a unit in a chateau elects to attack, all adjacent enemy units must
be attacked.
B) Maximum Odds. Attacks on the chateau at odds greater than “4-1” are
resolved on the “4-1” column of the CRT.
C) Modified Combat Results. A chateau defender may but is not required to
ignore “Defender Retreat” (Dr) results. “Attacker Retreat” (Ar), “Exchange”
(Ex), and “Elimination” (Ae or De) results take effect normally.
9.0 Army Morale
This section deals with the cumulative effect of combat losses on the morale
of an army. Scenario instructions give each army demoralization and disintegration levels, measured in strength points eliminated. Keep a running total of
losses for each army. Once an army’s losses reach the appropriate level, the
army becomes demoralized or disintegrates altogether. Demoralization prevents an army’s units advancing after combat. Disintegration generally means
defeat in the scenario.
9.1 Disintegration
Disintegration occurs the instant an army surpasses its disintegration level.
Scenario instructions indicate the effects; in most cases, disintegration of
a Coalition army results in a French victory, while the French army never
disintegrates (French demoralization constitutes a Coalition victory in most
scenarios).
9.2 Demoralization
Demoralization occurs the instant an army reaches or surpasses its demoralization level.
A) Mutual Demoralization. Any or all armies in any game may be demoralized at any given time. An army is not prevented from becoming demoralized
because another army is demoralized, though it is possible that one army’s
demoralization level may increase due to an opposing army’s demoralization
(see scenario instructions).
B) Simultaneous Demoralization. If two armies reach or exceed their
demoralization levels at the same instant through an “Exchange” combat
result, the non-phasing player is considered to have been demoralized first.
9.3 Demoralization Effects
The units of a demoralized command suffer the effects described below. The
effects begin at the instant of demoralization and continue to the end of the
game.
10
• No unit of the demoralized army may advance after combat.
• Demoralization affects victory conditions in some scenarios.
10.0 Leaders
Leaders represent the senior leaders in each army. They generally move like
combat units, but stack freely. They have no combat strength and cannot
engage in combat. Their purpose is to give command (11.0) to combat units
to allow the units to move and fight effectively. Leaders are divided into commanders and officers. Commanders represent the highest level leaders in each
army, able to provide command to officers or individual combat units. Officers
are commanders of subordinate organizations within the army and provide
command only to units within their organization.
10.1 Leader Movement
Leaders movement is governed by all standard rules except as modified below.
In general, leaders move more freely than combat units and do not affect the
movement of enemy combat units.
A) Entering the Game. Depending on scenario instructions, a leader may
start the game on the map or enter later as a reinforcement. In both cases,
unless specified otherwise by scenario instructions, each leader may be
stacked with a combat unit of the same organization or army.
B) Stacking. Leaders are not considered combat units. Any number of friendly
leaders therefore may occupy a hex, with zero, one, or two friendly combat
units. A leader may stack with any friendly combat unit, even one not
belonging to the same organization.
C) Movement. Leaders move during each friendly movement phase, paying
MP costs as if they were cavalry units. If the leader provides command during a movement phase, the leader receives only half his normal MP. Leaders
belonging to a demoralized organization pay 2 MP to enter clear hexes (see
13.2).
D) EZOC Effects. Leaders may not enter an EZOC unless it is occupied by a
friendly combat unit. If an EZOC hex is occupied by a friendly combat unit, a
leader may enter and exit the EZOC freely.
E) Moving Enemy Units. Leaders have no combat strength and do not project
a ZOC. A leader or leaders in a hex without a combat unit do not affect the
movement of an enemy combat unit during the enemy movement phase. The
instant they are placed in an EZOC, move the leader(s) in that hex to the
nearest hex occupied by a friendly combat unit. The leaders do not move
through the hexgrid and do not expend any MP; just place them on the nearest eligible hex.
10.2 Leaders & Combat
A leader alone in a hex may not attack or defend alone during combat. If
stacked with a friendly combat unit engaged in combat, either as attacker or
defender, they do not add strength to the unit or affect the combat in any way.
If all friendly combat units stacked with a leader are eliminated or forced to
retreat, roll one die for each leader in the hex. On a die roll of “1” or “2,” the
leader is eliminated and removed from play. Eliminated leaders never return
to play. If the leader is not eliminated, he is moved to the nearest friendly unit
(see 10.1E).
11.0 Command
Command represents the ability of an army’s command structure to give orders
to combat units. Units outside the command structure, called out of command
(OOC), have limitations on their operations. All command originates with commanders through their command capacity rating (CCR). Officers magnify that
Napoleon’s Last Battles
capacity when transmitting command to their organizations. A commander’s
CCR represents the number of officers (and therefore entire organizations) that
may receive command from the commander, and the number of individual units
which receive command directly from the commander.
Command Procedure. During a player’s command segment of the command
phase, determine the command status of all the player’s combat units. An
officer or unit receiving command from a commander must be within five
hexes of the commander. A unit receiving command from an officer must
be within three hexes of the officer. Place an OOC marker on any unit not
receiving command. The OOC status lasts until the player’s next command
phase.
11.1 Leaders & Command
Each leader belongs to, and can only give command to, units belonging to the
same army. A commander can give command to subordinate officers and/or
units. An officer can only transmit command to units with the same command
designation.
A) Commanders. Each commander has a command capacity
rating(CCR) indicating the maximum number of officers
and the maximum number of combat units that commander
may command. The number applies separately to officers
Command Capacity
and units. A commander may give command to any and all
officers and combat units in the commander’s army up to the limit of the
CCR, and out to a distance of five hexes from the commander’s hex.
11.2 Tracing Command
The range of hexes described for command is traced through the hex grid from
the commanding leader’s hex to the hex occupied by the officer or combat unit
being commanded; do not count the commanding leader’s hex, do count the
commanded leader’s/unit’s hex. Command may not be traced into or through
• prohibited terrain.
• an enemy occupied hex.
• an EZOC unless it is occupied by a friendly combat unit.
11.3 Command Effects
Units and officers in command function normally for all
purposes until the next friendly command segment. OOC units
and leaders are out of command for all purposes until the next
friendly command segment. OOC units have the following
restrictions.
A) OOC Movement. OOC units and leaders move normally but may not enter
an EZOC. OOC units beginning a movement phase in an EZOC cannot move.
B) OOC Attackers. OOC units in an EZOC at the beginning of a friendly
combat phase must attack. The combat odds are calculated normally, but
a “De” or “Dr” combat result is converted to an “Ar” result. If a single attack involves both in-command and OOC units, treat all attackers as OOC.
OOC attackers cannot advance after an “Ex” result. OOC artillery may not
bombard.
B) Officers. Each officer has a command designation matching
the command designation of the combat units in that officer’s
organization. If the officer is placed in command by a commander, the officer may transmit command to all units in his
organization.
C) OOC Defenders. OOC defenders defend normally, but an “Ae” combat
result is converted to an “Ar” result. OOC defenders cannot advance after
combat.
• In the French and Prussian armies, officers represent corps leaders; in the
Allied army they represent divisional leaders.
An eliminated full strength combat unit with a reduced side (see 2.4) may be
returned to play at its reduced strength through the reorganization process.
Officers of the appropriate command carry out reorganization under specific
circumstances.
C) Coalition Commanders. Prussian and Allied units are friendly to one
another for all purposes, but Allied commanders may not give command to
Prussians, and vice versa.
12.0 Reorganization
Reorganization Procedure. Designate a second area next to each army’s
deadpile for eliminated units eligible for reorganization. When a full strength
unit with a reduced strength side is eliminated in combat, place it in the
Command
Example
The Allies have a surfeit of command capacity. Willem activates Perponcher—who provides command
to all [N2] units except Weimar, which is too far
away. Willem commands Weimar directly. Wellington activates Picton [5]) and the Duke of Brunswick
[Bw], and commands Merlen [NC] and Pack [5]
directly. Note he still has the capability of activating
two more officers and two more units.
Not all the French units can be placed in command.
Ney activates only one leader and one unit. He activates Reille, who provides command to all Second
Corps [2] units except Piré, who is four hexes away
from him. Ney can provide command to a single unit,
which could be Piré, or Lf-Ds, or any one of the [3c]
units.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
11
appropriate army’s reorganization area. When a reduced strength unit,
or a full strength unit without a reduced side is eliminated, place it in the
deadpile. After one complete game turn has passed, the unit is available for
reorganization. During any subsequent friendly reorganization segment, if
the unit’s officer is at least ten hexes from all enemy units, the reorganizing
unit may be placed in the officer’s hex.
12.1 Reorganization Limitations
A) Organizational Integrity. Reorganization may not be attempted by an
officer of a different organization than the reorganizing unit.
B) Enemy Proximity. Reorganization may not be attempted by an officer
within ten hexes of an enemy combat unit.
C) No Command Needed. An officer need not be in command to attempt
reorganization.
D) Loss of Command. An officer conducting reorganization loses all command functions for the remainder of that player turn. Other units belonging
to the officer’s organization may receive command directly from a commander.
E) Stacking Limits apply during reorganization; thus no more than two units
of a given command may be reorganized in a given reorganization segment.
F) Movement. The reorganizing officer and reorganized unit(s) may move during the movement phase of the player turn of reorganization.
12.2 Reorganizing While Demoralized
When attempting to reorganize the units of a demoralized corps (13.0), roll one
die for the reorganizing officer. On a roll of “5” or “6,” the unit or units being
reorganized are eliminated; place them in the appropriate deadpile. The officer
is unaffected, but cannot attempt to reorganize any other units in the same
segment.
13.0 Corps Morale
Corps morale replaces the demoralization levels for an entire army
with individual morale levels for each corps (or nationality in the
case of the Allied army). Each corps’s losses are tracked separately, and each corps becomes demoralized individually, generally
without affecting or being affected by the morale state of any
other corps. Demoralized corps may recover from demoralization through the
reorganization process.
Corps Morale Procedure. Keep track of losses separately for each corps
(but continue to keep a single total for the entire Allied army; see 13.1).
When losses reach or exceed a corps’ demoralization level, it is demoralized, signified by flipping the appropriate officer to his demoralized side. If
reorganization of eliminated units reduces losses below the corps’ demoralization level, good morale is recovered and the officer is flipped back to his
good morale side.
13.1 Allied Nationalities
Instead of using demoralization levels for Allied corps or commands, each
Allied nationality becomes demoralized when total Allied losses from all Allied
nationalities (British, Brunswicker, Hanoverian, KGL, Nassauers, and Netherlanders) reaches the specified total. For purposes of this rule, read “corps” as
including the phrase “or Allied nationality.”
12
13.2 Corps Demoralization Effects
A demoralized corps suffers the effects described below. The effects begin at
the instant of demoralization and continue to the end of the game, or until good
morale is recovered.
• No unit of the demoralized corps may advance after combat.
• Officers and combat units of the demoralized corps pay 2 MP to enter clear
hexes. All other movement costs remain the same.
• An eliminated unit of a demoralized entity may be destroyed when attempting reorganization (see 12.2).
13.3 Recovery
A demoralized corps may recover from demoralization through the reorganization of eligible units. When a unit is reorganized, reduce its corps’ losses by
its full combat strength. When reorganization drops the total losses from the
corps below its demoralization level, the corps recovers good morale. Flip the
corps’ officer to his undemoralized side. Units of the corps function normally.
If the reorganized unit is eliminated again, increase the corps’ losses by its full
combat strength, not the reduced combat strength.
14.0 Supply
Supply is determined once per day on the first daylight turn of each day.
Units not in supply are removed from the map and placed in the appropriate
destroyed units box; they may not be reorganized. Supply has no effect on
leaders.
Supply Procedure. A line of supply is traced as a series of contiguous hexes
of any length. The first five hexes may be terrain of any type; the remainder
must be connected road and/or trail hexes leading to an appropriate map
edge hex.
14.1 Supply Sources
All French supply is traced to any southern map edge hex. All Prussian supply
is traced to any hex on the eastern map edge. All Allied supply is traced to any
hex on the western map edge.
14.2 Blocking Supply
Supply lines may not be traced through prohibited terrain or enemy occupied
hexes. EZOC do not block supply lines.
15.0 Optional Rules
These rules address additional facets of Napoleonic warfare at the sacrifice of
slightly increased complexity. Players may add all, some, or none when playing
any scenario. The notes (17.0) include rationales for many of these rules.
15.1 Combined Arms Attacks
A combined arms attack is an attack against a single hex in which at least
one infantry, one cavalry, and one artillery unit (bombarding or adjacent) is
participating. The final odds is increased (shifted to the right) by one column:
a “1-1” attack becomes a “2-1,” a “2-1” becomes and “3-1,’ and so on. A “6-1”
attack remains a “6-1.”
15.2 Imperial Guard
If any French Imperial Guard (command designation [G]) infantry unit is
involved in an attack during the French player’s combat phase and the result of
that attack is “Ae,” “Ar,” or “Ex,” the French demoralization level is immediately reduced by 20. Exception 1: If the attack made by the Guard infantry
succeeds in demoralizing or disintegrating either the Allied or Prussian Armies,
then the French demoralization is not reduced. Exception 2: This rule works
Napoleon’s Last Battles
only with army morale (9.0); if using corps morale (13.0), rule 22.5B supersedes
this one.
15.3 Mounted Retreat Before Combat
Any cavalry or horse artillery (artillery with an MA of 6) unit which begins any
combat phase (friendly or enemy) in an EZOC, and is adjacent to no enemy
cavalry units (it may be adjacent to horse artillery), may but is not required
to retreat one hex before combat (see 6.5). Opposing enemy units may not
advance (6.7).
15.4 French Late Start
At the beginning of the 0600 turn of each day, flip all French commanders to
show their reverse (inactive) side. An inactive commander may not move or
provide command until released, which occurs after any of the following:
• Die Roll. Roll one die for each inactive commander during the French
command phase. On a roll of “1” the commander is released and functions
normally until the next 0600 turn.
• Other Released Commander. If an active French commander moves into
or through the hex occupied by an inactive commander, the inactive commander is released during the command phase of the next turn.
• Enemy Activity. If an enemy unit moves into a French EZOC within ten
hexes of an inactive commander, the commander is instantly activated.
15.5 Cavalry Impetus
In any combat involving cavalry where the cavalry might normally exercise the
option to advance after combat, roll one die and consult the following:
• 1-2: the owning player maintains control and may advance any unit type, or
not advance at all.
• 3-4: no advance by any unit type may take place.
• 5-6: one cavalry unit must advance after combat (within the restrictions of
6.7).
15.6 Leader Advance Advantage
If a leader occupies a hex with two friendly combat units engaged in combat
and the combat result allows the leader’s side to advance, the leader and both
combat units may advance together. The advance is not mandatory; the owning player may decide to advance just one unit or not to advance at all, but if
both units advance the leader must accompany them. Rule 15.5, if used, takes
precedence over this rule.
16.0 Variant Rules
This section offers new rules or alternative versions to the original rules. They
are designed as a complete set but players may use any or all at their discretion. The notes (17.0) include rationales for many of these rules.
16.1 Variant Counters
The following counters may be used to supplement or replace the standard
counters.
A) Substitute Units. Combat units with an asterisk next to the unit ID have
associated substitute counters with a gold flag in the upper left corner. Substitutions reflect a variety of purposes, among them different unit strengths
based on new research, breaking up overly large units for either increased
flexibility or reduced combat impact, or combining small units for the opposite effect. Pages 30-31 detail all the substitutions for each army.
• 3rd Netherlands Division. Add the two 2-4 infantry units (Det and D’Aub)
to [N3]. They enter the with the rest of [N3], or set up stacked with or
adjacent to its original units.
• Allied Rifle Units. The Allied army possessed large numbers of British and
German riflemen who often were grouped for special missions. The three
2-5 units operate like other infantry, but may stack freely with one or two
other units and are always in command. They enter with the commands
designated on page 29.
• Hal Force. Wellington left a large detachment west of the game map. The
Coalition player has the option of bringing it into play in certain scenarios
at the cost of additional requirements to win. The units are: Leader Frederik,
Leader Stedman, two British units (Johnstone and Hawker), one KGL unit
(2 Huss), two Hanoverian units (Lyon and Estorff ), and seven Netherlander
units (Wynand, and a pair each of Hauw, Eerens, and Anthing).
C) Additional Leaders. The ten new leader counters comprise the following.
• The “Sick” (?) Napoleon. One of many theories about the French defeat
postulates a Napoleon at less than his traditional energy. If desired, players
may substitute the “?” Napoleon for the original. When moving Napoleon,
roll two dice to determine his movement rate, with a maximum of 10 MP.
During the French command phase, roll one die and halve the result (rounding up) to determine his command capacity for that turn.
• Army Chiefs of Staff. The French and Prussian armies had chiefs of staff
with actual authority: Soult and Gneisenau, respectively. They function as
part of the army headquarters (see 16.14).
• Prussian Corps Chiefs of Staff. The Prussians are under-led compared
to the two other armies in the game, though their command structure was
the most sophisticated. Four of the new leaders (Reiche, Aster, Clausewitz,
Valentini) represent the corps chiefs of staff and operate just like the corps
officers; in effect, each Prussian corps has two officers. Each of a corps’
officers may be given command separately, but if both are within the appropriate range of a Prussian commander, both may be activated as a single
command.
• Seconds in Command. The Prussian and Allied armies had designated
seconds-in-command: Bülow and Uxbridge, respectively. If Blücher or
Wellington is killed and the second-in-command is still in play, replace his
officer counter with his commander counter. There is no replacement officer
for either.
• Gen. Rowland Hill commanded Wellington’s Second Corps, and there was
no good reason to leave him out of the game. He may enter or deploy with
any unit of the Allied 2nd or 4th Divisions.
16.2 Dawn
Make the 0600 turn of each day a daylight turn. It remains three hours long.
16.3 Observation
This is a new rule incorporating both 7.3 and 12.1B. The maximum distance
of observation is ten (10) hexes during daylight hours, five (5) hexes during
rain turns, and one (1) hex during night turns. When counting the distance, do
not count the observer’s hex, do count the observed hex. Observation is only
possible if the observer has a line of sight (LOS; 7.3) to the observed. The LOS
is blocked by woods, town, and chateau hexes, and by crest hexsides. LOS is
never blocked between adjacent hexes. A unit or leader is observed by any
enemy unit or leader with an unblocked LOS no longer than current maximum
observation distance.
B) Additional Units. The following are units added to the countermix rather
than being substituted for others.
Napoleon’s Last Battles 13
• Dawn & Dusk Option. The maximum observation distance is five (5) hexes
during the 2000 turn and (if 16.2 is used) the 0600 turn.
16.4 Modified Terrain Effects
This rule alters the effects of certain terrain types.
Forest Hex. Artillery attacking into a forest hex, whether adjacent or by
bombardment, is halved. It defends normally.
Town Hex. Any unit attacking or bombarding into a town hex is halved.
Cavalry defending a town hex is halved; infantry and artillery defend with
their printed strengths.
Chateau Hex. See 16.11.
Road and Trail Hexes. In addition to the effects on the TEC, units using road
and trail movement have the follwoing additional restrictions.
B) Moving HM Markers. HM markers move like any other unit. Move both
markers of a pair using the slowest movement allowance, and highest
terrain costs, of the units it represents. Neither marker may be moved into
a hex where it would be observed. An HM marker may stack with its mate,
but may not stack with any other unit at any time, to include during placement and movement: it may not move through another unit or be moved
through by one. Leaders may stack with a marker freely.
C) Revealing Hidden Units. An HM marker may be revealed voluntarily or involuntarily; see below. When either marker of a pair is revealed, flip both to
reveal which has the real units and which is the dummy. Deploy all the units
(and officers) in the marker’s holding area back onto the map, in or adjacent
to the real marker’s hex; stacking limits apply.
• Voluntary. Hidden units may be revealed voluntarily by the owning player
during any subsequent friendly command phase. No command is required.
• No Entry into ZOC. A unit using road or trail movement may not enter an
EZOC; it must use the movement cost of the underlying terrain.
• Involuntary. Hidden units must be revealed the instant either marker of a
pair comes under enemy observation. If this occurs while an enemy unit is
in motion, temporarily halt the moving unit, reveal the marker, deploy any
units, then complete the enemy movement.
• No Stacking. A unit using road or trail movement may not enter a hex
containing another friendly unit, not may another moving unit enter its hex
(when in doubt, use a control marker or some other covenenient device to
indicate units using road or trail movement).
Rationale. Hidden movement allows players to obscure the location of certain
units, and with them, intentions. Its value in any game is high; in an operational
game like the campaign scenario, it is priceless.
Stream & Bridge Hexsides. Units defending behind a stream or bridge are
unaffected. Instead, a unit attacking across a stream or bridge is halved,
even if another friendly unit is attacking the same defender across a nonstream/non-bridge hexside. Artillery bombarding across the hexside is not
affected. Bridges, but not streams, block ZOC just like river hexsides, so
opposing units on either side are not required to attack one another.
16.5 Rain Effects
This rule supersedes rule 4.3.
Rain Turns. Players may use either the scenario instructions or a die roll to
determine which turns are rain turns.
Rain Effects on Observation. The maximum observation distance is five (5)
hexes.
Rain Effects on Movement. All movement costs are doubled, but a unit may
always move a minimum of one hex.
Rain Effects on Combat. All units attack at half-strength. Cavalry may not
charge (16.8). Artillery may not bombard except in a combined attack (7.2).
16.6 Hidden Movement
New rule. Each army receives a six or eight pairs of hidden movement (HM)
markers. One of each pair acts as a substitute for hidden units, while the other
is a dummy. For each pair, set aside an off-map location to store units.
16.7 Combined Effects
This rule supersedes rule 15.1. When different arms (infantry, cavalry, and/or
artillery) combine for an attack on enemy infantry (only) in clear terrain (only),
the combat strength of one or more of the arms may be enhanced. In each of
the following combinations, at least one of each type of unit must be present.
The defender chooses which arm receives the enhancement; in all cases,
double or triple the printed combat strength of each involved unit of the arm to
be enhanced.
• Infantry and Artillery. Double one arm or the other.
• Infantry and Cavalry. Double one arm or the other.
• Cavalry and Artillery. Double the cavalry or triple the artillery.
• Infantry, Cavalry, and Artillery. Triple one arm and double another; the
third uses its printed strength.
16.8 Cavalry Charge
New rule. A cavalry unit may charge if it meets the requirements listed below.
The combat strength of the charging cavalry is doubled. If the defender’s hex
is cleared by the attack, all charging cavalry must advance. The cavalry is
considered “blown;” during the following enemy player turn and the ensuing
friendly player turn, it exerts no ZOC, its combat strength is halved, and it may
not voluntarily enter an EZOC.
Charge Prerequisites. A charge may be conducted
A) Place HM Markers on eligible units during set up, or during
a friendly command phase for units on the map or entering as
reinforcements. The units may not be under enemy observation
(16.3); reinforcements are assumed to be out of observation
range until they enter the map. If command (11.0) is being
used, the units must be in command, and must be accompanied by an officer or officers capable of transmitting command
to all hidden units. Place both markers of a pair, face up, in a
hex. Remove any or all eligible units (and their officers) in or adjacent to the
hex. Place the units in the marker holding area; units in the holding area may
be examined by the opposing player.
14
• by one or two cavalry units in one hex; if 16.13 is being used, a leader may
participate.
• against enemy infantry only.
• out of, through, and into clear hexes only, and across only clear or crest
hexsides.
• by expending at least one and no more than 2 MP (cavalry in an EZOC at the
start of its move may not charge).
Napoleon’s Last Battles
• in conjunction with bombarding artillery in a combined attack; if 16.8 is
being used, double the cavalry for the charge before enhancing either the
cavalry or artillery.
Player Note. Mark charging/charged cavalry with a control marker or other
convenient device, or rotate it to an agreed direction to indicate its status
before and after.
16.9 Sustained Bombardment
New rule. An artillery unit that does not move in a movement phase and is
not taking part in a combined attack (7.2) doubles its combat strength for the
bombardment.
16.10 Heavy Artillery
New rule. The three French heavy artillery units (those with an
“H” between the combat and movement factors) operate like
other artillery and have the following additional capabilities:
• Range. They have a range of three hexes.
• Tripled for Sustained Bombardment. When firing a sustained bombardment, the combat strength of heavy artillery is tripled.
Player Note. Mark non-moved artillery with a control marker or other convenient device, or rotate it to an agreed direction to indicate eligibility.
16.11 Chateaux Garrisons
This rule supersedes rule 8.0. Except for the following rules
concerning garrisons, treat chateaux hexes as forest hexes
for all purposes: movement, combat (attack and defense),
and observation.
Garrison
(front)
A) Forming a Garrison. Only one infantry unit can garrison
a chateau. To form a garrison, an infantry unit must begin
a friendly movement phase on a chateau hex; it may be
stacked with another unit, but that unit does not form part
Preparing
(back)
of the garrison. Place a garrison marker on the infantry
unit with its “forming” side showing. The unit may not
move or attack for one complete player turn. If attacked
during an enemy combat phase, it defends the hex at one-half its printed
combat strength; any unit stacked with it also defends at one-half strength.
On any result other than “Ae,” remove the garrison marker before applying
the result. If the garrison marker is still in place on the following friendly
movement phase, even if the hex is in an EZOC, flip it to its garrison side. A
unit need not be in command to form a garrison.
B) Stacking With a Garrison. A garrisoned chateau hex is still treated as a
forest hex by all other units. One or two friendly units may stack in the hex,
even after a retreat; place the garrison unit and marker at the bottom of the
stack. The other units operate as though in a forest hex, ignoring the garrison for all movement and combat purposes. The stacked units may attack
and be attacked normally. If the stacked units are eliminated or forced to
retreat, the garrison is not affected in any way.
C) Garrison Operations. While in garrison, the infantry unit may not move or
attack, exerts no ZOC, and ignores EZOC. The unit may come out of garrison
during any movement phase by removing the marker. Reforming the garrison
requires meeting all the requirements of (A) above.
D) Attacking a Garrison. A garrison cannot be attacked until it is alone in
the hex. Its printed combat strength is not modified. Enemy infantry attacks
at full strength; cavalry and artillery are halved. Artillery cannot bombard,
it must be adjacent to attack. All combat results apply normally, but the
Napoleon’s Last Battles
defender has the option to ignore a “Dr” result. If the defender chooses to
retreat, or if the defender is eliminated by a “De” or “Ex” result, remove the
garrison marker before apply the result. No units may advance into the hex
after it is vacated as a result of combat.
16.12 La Garde Vielle
This rule supersedes both rule 15.2 and rule 24.5B. The French Old Guard
consists of the four infantry units with the [G] command designation and an
ID including Gr (Grenadier) or Ch (Chasseur). Each attack involving at least
one Old Guard unit resulting in an attacker retreat (Ar) or elimination (Ae), but
not an exchange (Ex), forces a die roll for every French line infantry unit (any
command designation other than [G]) within observation distance of victorious
defender’s hex(es). On a roll of 1-3, the French unit routs; it must retreat three
hexes immediately. For each routed, unit subtract one (-1) from the demoralization level of its higher organization, whether corps or army.
16.13 Leader Combat Bonus
New rule, incorporating 5.6. A leader, either an active commander or an incommand officer, may take command of any one stack (the officer must have
authority over both) in a combat, either during an attack or a defense. Shift
the combat two columns in favor of the leader. For example, attackers with
a leader and 2-1 odds attack at 1-4; if the 2-1 attack was against a defender
with a leader, it would be resolved at 1-2. A successful attacking leader must
advance; all units stacked with him must advance with him. If the leader’s
stack is eliminated through an exchange, the leader does not advance. After
the combat is resolved, roll one die for the leader; on a roll of “6” he is killed.
16.14 Army Headquarters
New rule, incorporating parts of 15.4. Each army has a
headquarters (HQ) counter, representing the locus of its staff
and communications.
A) Status. The HQ is either active or inactive. When active it
enables the army’s commanders (see C) but cannot move.
When inactive it moves but does not provide command. Its
status may be changed voluntarily only at the end of the
owning player’s command phase.
B) Operations. Treat it like a leader counter for all operational purposes (10.1). If it ends up in an EZOC, it becomes
inactive.
Active
(front)
Inactive
(back)
C) Effects. All commanders must trace a line of communications (LOC) to
the active HQ to be active. The LOC is traced like the supply line, but is
not restricted to roads and trails and may not exceed 24 MP (not hexes) in
length. Check the LOC during each friendly command phase. Roll one die for
a commander unable to trace an LOC to his active HQ. On a roll of “1-3” the
commander becomes inactive; flip him to his reverse side. While inactive, he
may move but cannot give command to an officer or unit. He becomes active
only by one of the three events listed in 15.4. If 15.4 is being used, all French
commanders flip at 0600 whether they have an LOC or not, but may move;
the no-move clause of 15.4 is superseded.
D) Chiefs of Staff. The French and Prussian armies have chiefs of staff (Soult
and Gneisenau, respectively). They are commanders but may not give command to an officer or unit while the army HQ is active. As soon as a chief of
staff leaves the HQ or gives command, the HQ becomes inactive.
16.15 Out of Command Effects
This rule supersedes rule 11.3. OOC units and leaders suffer the following
constraints.
A) OOC Movement. They move normally but pay 2 MP to enter a clear hex; all
other terrain costs remain the same. They may enter EZOC freely
15
B) OOC Attackers. OOC units attack normally, but
• Dr results are treated as no effect; both attacker and defender remain in
place, and they may not advance.
• They may not advance.
C) OOC Defenders. OOC defenders defend normally, but
• Ae and Ar results are treated as no effect; both attacker and defender
remain in place.
• They may not advance.
16.16 Modified Reorganization
This rule modifies rule 12.0.
A) Reorganization Proximity. In lieu of the ten-hex requirement of 12.1B,
reorganization may be attempted by any officer not currently observed by
the enemy.
B) Reorganization by Commander. A commander may reorganize one unit
for each command capacity point expended. The reorganized units must be
stacked with the commander, and stacking limits do apply.
C) Reorganization Supply. Both unit and leader must be in supply to reorganize.
16.17 Supply Trains
This rule supersedes rule 14.1. Each army has a single supply
trains counter. It is the sole supply source for the army: units of
its army may trace a supply line to it for purposes of general supply (14.0 & 16.18) and reorganization supply (16.16C). It operates like any other
units with the following differences.
A) Movement. It may move only on roads and trails. It may not move at night,
and may expend only 1 MP on rain turns. It may not enter an EZOC.
B) Stacking. Its may not stack with any other unit at any time; other units
may not move through it, even to retreat or advance after combat.
C) Combat. It has no combat strength and exerts no ZOC. Any enemy attack
on it, to include a bombardment, destroys it.
16.18 Out of Supply Effects
This rule supersedes the portion of rule 14.0 requiring the elimination of out of
supply (OOS) units. An OOS unit is marked with an OOS marker. It remains OOS
until the next supply check the following morning. OOS units operate normally
in all ways except the following.
A) OOS Movement. Roll one die just before moving each OOS
unit. The die roll is the unit’s movement allowance for than
movement phase, but may not exceed its printed movement
allowance.
B) OOS Combat. Just before calculating the odds of a combat in which an
OOS unit takes part, roll one die for each OOS unit and apply the effects
listed below. Add one to the die roll if the unit is stacked with a commander
or its officer.
• 1-2: The unit retreats from combat immediately; if all OOS units retreat, the
opposing enemy unit may advance.
• 3-4: The unit’s combat strength is halved; if already halved due to terrain, it
is halved again, but never below a strength of one (1).
• 5-6: the unit engages in combat normally.
16
17.0 Notes
17.0 Notes
NLB is a tried-and-true game with a solid system, and has been left intact
in this edition (the notes to the first edition and to the grand battle scenarios,
along with graphic setups and an expanded order of battle, can be found on
our website http://decisiongames.com/wpsite/e-rules/ ). Getting rid of the
counter duplications in the four-folio arrangement opeed myriad possibilities
for presentation of units and markers to effectuate optional rules. The following are explanatory notes for some of the new rules (see 16.1 and pages 30-31
for notes regarding the new units).
16.2 Dawn. A June day in Belgium has considerably more than 12 hours of
daylight, but keeping the turn 3 hours long reflects the tendency for armies of
the period to start slowly.
16.4 Modified Terrain Effects. The essence of these changes is to make
terrain affect attackers rather than defenders, and to show more differences
between combat arms. It also properly shows the effects of streams and
bridges, unlike the original all-or-nothing rule.
16.7 Combined Effects. The “rock-paper-scissors” interrelationships of
Napoleonic combat arms is oversimplified in 15.1; it was about more than just
having some of each arm.This new rule represents the formation choices available to infantry, each ideal for defense against a particular kind of attack, none
proof against them all. It was the combination of the effects of each attacking
arm that would undo an infantry formation.
16.10 Heavy Artillery. Napoleon’s 12-pounder belles filles (beautiful daughters) formed the basis of his grand batteries. The Prussian position batteries
were supposed to fill the same purpose, but had not acquired the expertise
needed to put doctrine into practice. The Allies had no heavy guns in the field.
16.11 Chateaux Garrisons. The original chateau rule (8.0) appropriately
emphasized an important terrain type, but ignored key points regarding noninfantry, and made too much of their effects. At La Belle Alliance, for example,
the French can take Hougoumont from Byng only by surrounding it with the
12 strongest units in the army, and then with only a 1-in-3 chance of success.
The new rule tones down the effects: the real key to taking one now, as it was
historically, is to isolate it.
16.12 La Garde Vielle. Rules 15.2 and 22.5B are falsely based on the French
rout after the defeat of the Guard’s final attack. They actually fled because
they were being overwhelmed all along the line. That said, there would be an
effect if the Old Guard suffered a repulse, and the French player should be cautious in committing them to an attack.
16.14 Army HQ. Simply put, you can keep the chief-of-staff with the HQ so it
stays active, or gain a brief additional command capacity by using him, at the
cost of inactivating the HQ in the following turn.
16.17 & 16.18 Modified OOS. The original supply rule is a Draconian version
more appropriate to WWII (and even then units wouldn’t die). The short duration of the campaign made supply largely a non-issue. The men themselves,
plus company, battalion, and regimental wagons, carried enough for several
days. At worst, men might go hungry for a day, or could have to ration their
firing momentarily, but they would not be destroyed as effective units. The
Prussians, for example, were in supply difficulties on 18 June but still turned in
a strong performance at Waterloo.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
18.0 Ligny
The Prussians occupy a strong line anchored by stout villages along Ligny
Creek, facing the French right wing. The burden of attack is on the French, who
must drive into the Prussian line to start, and win, a battle of attrition.
18.1 Rules
Use rules 1.0 through 9.0. If desired, rules 10.0 and 11.0 may be used, along
with any cases from 15.0 and/or 16.0.
18.2 Set Up
A) Playing Area. Use the south map from hex column 29xx and eastward;
place out of play markers along hex column 28xx.
B) Turns. 16/1400 through 16/2000.
C) Forces. See the set up chart and 18.5.
18.3 Morale Levels
•French Demoralization: 35
•Prussian Demoralization: 55
•Prussian Disintegration: 74
A) Effect of Prussian Demoralization. The French can be demoralized only
if the Prussians are not; once the Prussians are demoralized, French losses
have no effect.
B) Ligny & St. Amand. Decrease both Prussian levels by three for French
control of each town hex listed below. All seven hexes start the game in
Prussian control. The French gain control of each hex the moment a French
unit enters it, for any reason, and lose control the instant a Prussian unit
reenters it, for any reason. Use control markers if needed when a hex is
unoccupied.
Ligny: 3755, 3854, 3855, 3955
St. Amand: 3256, 3357, 3457
18.4 Victory Conditions
A) French Victory. The French player wins by achieving either of the following.
•The Prussians disintegrate, regardless of French losses.
•T he Prussians are demoralized and French losses are less than 35 strength
points.
B) Prussian Victory. The Prussian player wins by achieving either of the
following.
•T he French are demoralized before the Prussians.
•T he French fail to achieve a victory.
18.5 Force Options
Players are free to use any one or all of the following options.
Napoleon’s Last Battles Ligny Set Up
HexUnit
HexUnit
HexUnit
French
3065 3064 3163 3164 3261 3262 3264 3363 3364 3264 Fri/Gr
Rog/Gr
Mrnd/Ch
Mich/Ch
Chrt/Y
Guye/Y
Guyot
Lall
St. Maur
Duch [G]
4260 4361 4261 Strolz
Chstl
God
3662 3763 3663 St Al
Del
Duch [4c]
3951
4051
3649
3650
3550
3750
3751
23/8
3E/8
Thum
Sohr
Schul
Rohl
Horse [2]
2956 2957 Vill/7
Piat/7
3258
3158
2960
2961
3158
3058
2954
3258
Bill/8
Cors/8
Gen/10
Dup/10
Duf/11
Lag/11
Dom
Dogr
4558
4759
4759
4351
4450
4554
4654
4751
4651
4752
5454
5555
4952
4852
8/9
30/9
1K/9
27/10
2K/10
3K/11
4K/11
31/12
5K/12
6K/12
Mar
Lott
Mohn
Horse [3]
3857
4056
3858
4057
4257
4359
Rome/12
Schf/12
Cap/13
Desp/13
Hul/14
Touss/14
3760
3658
4560
4761
4561
Maur
Baltus
Soult
Sbrvie
Coth
Prussians
3256
3256
3457
3253
3453
3155
3656
3657
3657
3754
3853
3653
3753
3655
3656
12/1(r)
24/1
1W/1
6/2
28/2 (r)
2W/2
7/3
29/3
3W/3
19/4
4W/4
Tresk
Lutz
Lehmn
Horse [1]
3554
3653
3554
3955
3855
3854
3449
3450
3450
3851
2/5
25/5
5W/5
9/6
26/6
1E/6
14/7
22/7
2E/7
21/8
A) Prussian Losses on 15 June. Several Prussian units had been damaged
the day before the battle, indicated by the reduced status of 12/1 and
28/2. In lieu of the automatic deduction, roll one die for each unit in the 1st
and 2nd Brigades; each unit is reduced on a roll of “1-2.”
B) French Sixth Corps [6] historically reached Fleurus too late to take part,
but could have reached the field sooner had Napoleon’s orders been more
emphatic. Roll one die at beginning of each French movement phase beginning in the 16/1600 turn. If a “1” or “2” is rolled, Sixth Corps enters at hex
3167 during that movement phase. Increase both Prussian morale levels by
three (+3) for each turn the corps is in the game.
C) French First Corps [1] spent the day marching back and forth between
Ligny and Quatre Bras; clear orders would have brought it to one or the
other. Roll one die at beginning of the French movement phase of the
16/1700 turn. On a roll of 1-3, the corps enters, unstacked, at hex 2952
during that movement phase. On a roll of 4-6, the corps enters the following turn. The French can win only by causing Prussian disintegration. Write
down the option and reveal it only when the first roll is made.
17
19.0 Quatre Bras
The French left wing under Marshal Ney, moving north toward Quatre Bras,
faces a lone Netherlander division, but Allied reinforcements are on the way.
The French must seize the crossroads and inflict losses before the weight of
numbers turns against them.
19.1 Rules
Use rules 1.0 through 9.0. If desired, rules 10.0 and 11.0 may be used, along
with any cases from 15.0 and/or 16.0.
19.2 Set Up
A) Playing Area. Use the south map from hex column 29xx and westward;
place out of play markers along hex column 30xx
B) Turns. 16/1400 through 16/2000.
C) Forces. See the set up chart and 19.5.
19.3 Morale Levels
•French Demoralization 1400-1500: 10
•French Demoralization 1600 & later: 25
•Allied Demoralization: 25
•Allied Disintegration: 40
19.4 Victory Conditions
A) French Instant Victory. The game ends with a French victory the instant
the Allies disintegrate.
B) Allied Instant Victory. The game ends with an Allied victory the instant
French are demoralized.
C) Victory on Points. If neither player wins an instant victory, play continues
to the end of the game and victory is awarded to the player with the most
VP from the following schedule.
•1 VP per enemy strength point eliminated.
•1 VP to a player controlling Quatre Bras (1641) at the end of each friendly
player turn (not game turn).
•5 VP to the player controlling Quatre Bras at the end of the game.
19.5 Force Options
Players are free to use any one or all of the following options.
Quatre Bras Set Up
HexUnit
HexUnit
French
Allies
1451 Lf-Ds
1647 1648 1754 1755 1751 1752 1847 1753 Huss/5
Camp/5
Baud/6
Soye/6
Gauth/9
Jamin/9
Pire
Pell
1553 1454 1356 LHer
DUrb
Marc
1545 1845 1744 0738 Blndt
Wmar
Opstl
Mrln
16/1400 at 1634
All [5] then All [Bw]
16/1600 at 0136
All [3] less Omptda
16/1700 at 0136
All [1]
C) French Cavalry. Ney’s authority over the Guard Light Cavalry (Lf-Ds) and
Third Cavalry Corps (LHer, DUrb, Marc) was uncertain. If rule 10.0 and 11.0
are not used, the units are immobile until released. A unit may be released
by die roll—roll once per unit each French movement phase, releasing the
unit on a roll of “1”—or if an enemy unit enters its ZOC for any reason.
Once released, a unit operates normally.
D) French First Corps [1] could have arrived (see 18.5C). Roll one die at
the beginning of each French movement phase starting with the 16/1600
turn. On a roll of “1,” the corps appears at Villers Perwin (2152). Treat it
like an entry hex (5.6), with units entering one at a time, each paying one
additional MP to enter the hex. Units not entering on the first turn of entry
enter in following turns. The Allies receive 2 VP each turn the corps is in
play.
E) Substitute N2 Deployment. If the expanded OB is used for N2 (see 16.1),
deploy the division as follows:
1845 Blndt (3-4)
1644 Blndt (2-4)
1443 2 Nass (3-4)
1642 OrNass (2-4)
1744 Opstl (2-4)
A) Buttlar’s Brunswicker Brigade left behind two battalions to guard a
wagon train; flip the counter to its reduced side.
B) Best’s Hanoverian Brigade camped near 5th Division and accompanied
it to the battle, while Vincke’s Brigade was too far away to join them.
Replace Vincke with Best.
18
Napoleon’s Last Battles
20.0 Wavre
The Prussians are grouped around Wavre, while Grouchy’s French right wing is
driving north toward them. Each player must try to gets units off the west edge
(toward Waterloo) while preventing the other from doing the same.
20.1 Rules
Use rules 1.0 through 9.0. If desired, rules 10.0 and 11.0 may be used, along
with any cases from 15.0 and/or 16.0.
20.2 Set Up
A) Playing Area. Use the north map from hex column 29xx and eastward;
place out of play markers along hex column 28xx.
Wavre Set Up
HexUnit
French
4617 4617 4718 4719 4719 4820 4921 •French Demoralization: 30
5523 5523 5524 5524 5525 5625 5726 5726 •Prussian Demoralization: 40
•Prussian Disintegration: 50
5214 5214 B) Turns. 18/1200 through 18/2000.
C) Forces. See the set up chart.
20.3 Morale Levels
A) French Morale Increase. The French demoralization level is raised by the
current number of French VP. For example, if the French Player has accumulated 15 VP by the 18/1400 turn, the French demoralization level is 45.
20.4 Victory Conditions
A) French Instant Victory. The game ends with a French victory the instant
the Prussians disintegrate.
5212 5212 4317 4314 4613 HexUnit
Prussians
3709 12/1 (r)
3808 24/1 (r)
3909 1W/1 (r)
3810 6/2 (r)
3910 28/2 (r)
3909 2W/2 (r)
4008 7/3 (r)
4108 29/3 (r)
19/4 (r)
Rome/12 (r) 4207 3609 Tresk (r)
Schf/12
3810 Lutz
Cap/13
Lehmn (r)
Desp/13 (r) 4008 4307 Horse
Hul/14
Touss/14
4609 2/5 (r)
Maur
4609 5W/5 (r)
Baltus
4508 9/6 (r)
4608 26/6 (r)
Laf/21
4407 14/7
Pen/21
4407 22/7
4508 2E/7
Soult
4709 21/8 (r)
Coth
5008 23/8 (r)
4710 Thum (r)
Strolz
5110 Sohr (r)
Chastel
4910 Schul (r)
Godet
4710 Rohl
4910 Horse (r)
Bill/8 (r)
Cors/8 (r)
Gen/10
Dup/10
Duf/11 (r)
Lag/11
Dogr
HexUnit
4308 4308 4405 4205 4205 4105 4105 4405 4305 4305 4206 4505 4404 4404 8/9
30/9
1K/9
27/10
2K/10
3K/11
4K/11
31/12
5K/12
6K/12
Mar
Lott
Mohn
Horse [3]
B) Prussian Instant Victory. The game ends with a Prussian victory the
instant the French are demoralized.
C) Victory on Points. If neither player wins an instant victory, play continues
to the end of the game and victory is awarded to the player with the most
VP from the following schedule:
•1 VP per enemy strength point eliminated.
•5 VP to the French player for each French strength point exited from the
western map edge north of hex 0145 (inclusive) at any point in the game.
•1 VP to the French player for each Prussian strength point still on the map
at the end of the game.
•1 VP to the Prussian player for each Prussian strength point exited from the
western map edge north of hex 0145 (inclusive) on or before the 18/1500
turn.
Napoleon’s Last Battles 19
21.0 La Belle Alliance
La Belle
Alliance Set Up
HexUnit
HexUnit
HexUnit
French
0820 0820 1020 1020 0921 0921 0620 1219 0821 1021 0620 1018 Sbrvie (r)
0720 0520 0720 LHer (r)
DUrb (r)
Marc
0215 0314 0215 1017 1017 1118 1118 1217 1318 1317 1317 1416 1217 Quiot/1
Bourg/1
Schmtz/2
Aulard/2
Nogues/3
Grenr/3
Pegot/4
Brue/4
Jacq
Desal
0818 0818 0519 0519 0719 0719 0319 0619 Huss/5 (r)
Camp/5 (r)
Baud/6
Soye/6
Gauth/9 (r)
Jamin/9
Pire
Pell
1018 Dom (r)
0919 0919 0920 0920 0819 20
Fri/Gr
Roug/Gr (r)
Mrnd/Ch
MichCh
Chrt/Y
Guye/Y
Guyot
Lf-Ds
Lall
St Maur
Duch [G]
Bell/19
Thev/19
Bony/20
Trom/20
Noury
1218 1119 1119 StAl
Del
Duch [4c]
Allies
0616 0617 0716 Mait
Byng
Adye
0516 0614 0514 0516 Adam
du Plat
Halk [2]
Gold
0716 0916 0815 0815 Halk [3] (r)
Omptda
Kiel
Wllmsn
0517 Mitch
0915 1115 1214 0915 Kempt (r)
Pack
Vincke (r)
Heisse
0811 1214 0615 0811 Lamb
Best
Kruse
Bruck
1015 1315 Blndt (r)
Wmar (r)
Detm
D’Aub
Smiss
The Allied army must stave off the French attack until the Prussians can arrive
to turn the tide. The French must hit hard before that happens, then be ready to
turn on the Prussians when they arrive. Time is not on Napoleon’s side.
21.1 Rules
Use rules 1.0 through 9.0. If desired, rules 10.0 and 11.0 may be used, along
with any cases from 15.0 and/or 16.0.
21.2 Set Up
0715 0715 0613 0613 Bttlr
Specht
Cramm
Mahn
0814 1014 0615 1314 0616 1513 0714 0914 1314 Somerset
Pons
Drnbrg
Vand
Grant
Vivian
Arnts
Hake
Frazer
0813 0914 0714 Trip
Ghngy
Mrln
Prussians
18/1300 at 2912 or
2914
Schw
Watz
Sydow
A) Playing Area. Use the north map from hex column 29xx and westward;
place out of play markers along hex column 30xx.
B) Turns. 18/1200 through 18/2000.
C) Forces. See the set up chart.
21.3 Morale Levels
•French Demoralization: 60
•Anglo-Allied Demoralization: 45
•Anglo-Allied Disintegration: 55
•Prussian Demoralization: 25
•Prussian Disintegration: 35
A) French Morale Increase. If either the Allied or Prussian army is demoralized, the French demoralization level increases by 10.
B) Allied Morale Changes. If a French unit enters any hex of Waterloo
(0606, 0607, 0708, 0709), both Allied levels decrease by 20. At the instant
the first combat occurs between Prussian and French units, both Allied
levels increase by 10.
21.4 Victory Conditions
18/1400 at 2912 or
2914
18, 3S, 4S/15
15, 1S, 2S/16
18/1500 at 2912 or
2914
10, 2N, 3N/13
11, 1P, 2P/14
Brdlbn
A) French Victory. The French player wins by achieving either of the following.
•Both the Allies and Prussians are demoralized.
•T he Allies disintegrate.
B) Coalition Victory. The Coalition player wins by achieving either of the
following.
•T he French are demoralized.
•The French fail to win.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
22.0 The Campaign
The French offensive has split the Coalition armies. The Prussians have
concentrated at Sombreffe, while the Allies race toward Quatre Bras. Over the
course of the following three days, the French must wreck the Coalition armies,
minimize French losses, and open the road to Brussels, while the Coalition
forces must hang together long enough to deny Napoleon the victory he needs
to retain his throne.
22.1 Rules
Use rules 1.0 through 14.0, plus 22.5. If desired, any cases from 15.0 and/or
16.0 and/or 22.6 may be used.
22.2 Set Up
A) Playing Area. Use both maps, laying one over the other so the duplicated
hexes are obscured on the lower one. Check the hex numbering in several
columns to ensure they are numbered continuously, with no duplications or
omissions.
B) Turns. 16/1400 through 18/2100.
C) Forces. Set up the Quatre Bras and Ligny scenarios plus the forces listed
on the set up chart. Officers set up or enter with any unit under their command. All commanders set up active.
22.3 Morale Levels
Use corps morale (13.0). Corps and nationality demoralization levels are noted
in the morale box.
22.4 Victory Conditions
Each player earns VP according to the schedules below. Keep a running total of
French VP minus Coalition VP. If at any time the net total (French minus Coalition) reaches 230 or more, the game ends with a French victory. If the French
player fails to win by the end of the game, the Coalition player wins.
A) VP Schedule.
•1 VP per enemy strength point eliminated.
•2 VP to the French player for each French strength point exited from hex
from hex 0605 and meeting the requirements in 22.4B. If at least 20 SP
have been exited, double the total VP awarded for exiting, including those
awarded for the first 20 SP.
B) Exiting Conditions. An exited French unit counts for VP if a French line of
supply exists at the end of the game from 0605 to a French supply source,
and sufficient commanders and officers have been exited to put the exited
unit in command (they are all considered within the appropriate command
distance).
C) Levels of Victory—Optional. The victory conditions are demanding on
the French player, requiring the kind of decisive victory Napoleon needed
to remain in power. For gaming purposes the players may agree to use the
following victory level determination.
Napoleon’s Last Battles Campaign Set Up
HexUnit
HexUnit
HexUnit
French
1563 1564 1464 1465 1366 1266 Quiot/1
Bourg/1
Schmtz/2
Aulard/2
Nogues/3
Grenr/3
3N/13
11/14
1P/14
2P/14
16/1700 at 0136
All [1]
3561 1751 3760 Napoleon
Ney
Grouchy
16/1400 at 1167
Pegot/4
Brue/4
Jacq
Desal
16/2000 at 3167
All [6]
Prussians
3552 Blucher
17/2100 at 5712
Schw
Watz
Sydow
16/2400 at 0605
Kruse [6]
17/2400 at 5712
18/15
3S/15
4S/15
15/16
1S/16
2S/16
Brdlbn
Allies
1633 1532 1632 1531 1430 1429 1328 1329 Kempt [5]
Pack [5]
Vincke [5]
Heisse [5]
Buttlr [Bw]
Specht [Bw]
Cramm [Bw]
Mahn [Bw]
1943 1641 Wellington
Willem
16/1600 at 0136
All [3] less Omptda
18/0300 at 5712
10/13
2N/13
17/0600 at 0124 or
0136
All [N3]
17/0600 at 0114
All [C]
17/0600 at 0124 or
0136
Trip [NC]
Ghngy [NC]
17/0900 at 0124 or
0136
Omptda [3]
Mitch [4]
17/1000 at 0124 or
0136
All [2]
18/0900 at 0605
Best [6]
18/1100 at 0605
Lamb [6]
Bruck [6]
Corps Demoralization
Levels
French
[G] Guard
20
[1] First
15
[2] Second
19
[3] Third
13
[4] Fourth
12
[6] Sixth
8
[1c] First Cav
3
[2c] Second Cac 4
[3c] Third Cav 4
[4c] Fourth Cav. 4
Prussians
[1] First
[2] Second
[3] Third
[4] Fourth
20
20
14
19
Allies
British40
Brunswick10
Hanoverian12
KGL33
Nassauers8
Netherlands7
21
French VP
- Coalition VP
Victory Level
230+
French Decisive
190-229
French Tactical
150-189
French Marginal
100-149
Coalition Marginal
50-99
Coalition Tactical
less than 50
Coalition Decisive
22.5 Special Rules
A) Proximity of Demoralized Corps. During a player’s demoralized corps
proximity segment, reduce each corps’ demoralization level by two (-2) if
its officer is within five hexes of one or more friendly demoralized leaders.
If this results in the checking leader’s corps to become demoralized, flip
the leader to indicate that fact. This process continues if there is another
friendly undemoralized officer within five hexes of the newly demoralized
corps.
Exception 1: Demoralized French Cavalry Corps do not affect nor are
affected by the demoralization level or losses of other corps.
Exception 2: Allied nationalities do not affect nor are affected by the
demoralization level or losses of other nationalities.
B) Defeat of the Old Guard. This rule precludes the use of 15.2. If any units
of the Imperial Guard bearing the designations Gr [G] or Ch [G] suffer any
adverse combat result (Ar, Ae, or Ex) during a French combat phase, the
demoralization levels for all French corps within 10 hexes of the affected
Guard unit are immediately reduced by seven (-7). Check demoralization
levels immediately. No reduction is incurred if the attack demoralizes the
British nationality or a Prussian corps.
B) Hal Force. The Allied player may decide to use the Hal force (see 16.1B).
The decision to use it must be made during the Allied command phase
of 17/2100; write the decision and the choice of entry hex on a piece of
paper and place it face down by the map. It must enter together, and may
enter only at one of the times and locations below. If used, shift the level
of victory one level in favor of the French (for example, a French Marginal
becomes a French Tactical).
18/1100 at 0114
18/1300 at 0124
18/1300 at 0136
F) Missing British Leaders. Colville [4] remained with the bulk of his division at Hal; Cole [6] was on detached duty in Brussels. Neither took an
active role in the campaign. Leave Colville out unless the Hal Force is used
(22.5E). Leave Cole out altogether. Use rule 16.16.
23.0 QB Variant
The original Quatre Bras scenario portrays only the historical fighting. Both
commanders in reality were aware of the fighting at Ligny and had to take it
into account for their battle. This scenario allows for that wider view.
A) Rules. Use 1.0 through 7.0, 9.0 through 11.0, and all applicable cases of
16.0.
B) Forces. Use all units from 19.0 plus the French First Corps [1]. Options
19.5A (Buttlar reduced), 19.5B (Best in place of Vincke), and the substitute
units from 16.1 are recommended, except the French 6-4 Desales [1] and
Pelletier [2] artillery units remain in play (do not use the Left heavy artillery
and horse artillery substitutes).
•French Set Up. As in 19.2C, plus Ney and Reille set up with any [2] unit(s),
Kellermann with any [3c] units. Set up [1], with D’Erlon, per the Campaign
Variant scenario (28.0).
C) Rain Turns. The following turns are rain turns.
•Allied Set Up. All units of [N2] set up within five (5) hexes of Quatre Bras
(1641); they must be unstacked and not in a French ZOC. Wellington, Willem, and Perponcher set up with any unit. Allied leaders Cooke [1], Alten
[3], Picton [5], and the Duke of Brunswick [Bw], arrive with any unit of their
respective commands.
•17/1500 through 17/1900
•18/0900
22.6 Optional Rules
Players may use any or all of the following.
A) Variable Rain Turns. The weather is clear at the start of the game. Starting with the 17/1200 turn and ending with the 18/1100 turn, roll one die
at the beginning of each command phase and consult the following. The
weather is automatically clear starting with the 18/1200 turn.
Current Weather
22
Clear
Rain
1
Clear
Clear
2
Clear
Clear
3
Clear
Rain
4
Clear
Rain
5
Clear
Rain
6
Rain
Rain
C) Morale Levels. Quatre Bras is controlled by the Allied player at the start.
Thereafter, each time an army loses control of the town, its morale level(s)
decrease by five (-5). Each time an army gains control of the town, its
level(s) are increased by five (+5).
D) Victory Conditions. The instant victory conditions remain as in 19.4. A
victory on points is determined using the following schedule.
•1 VP per enemy strength point eliminated.
•10 VP to the player controlling Quatre Bras at the end of the game.
•1/5 (one-fifth) VP to the French player per strength point exited from an
east edge hex north of 2952 on or before the 1800 turn. Total all SP exited
and divide by five; round any fraction up.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
24.0 Grand Ligny
This scenario covers all the fighting on 16 June, covering the historical battles
of Ligny and Quatre Bras.
24.1 Rules
Use rules 1.0 through 11.0, plus the special rules below. Any cases from 15.0
and/or 16.0 and/or 24.5 may be used.
A) Changes to Standard Rules.
•11.2 Tracing Command. When tracing command along road and/or trail
hexes, treat them as one-half (½) hex for command distance.
•11.3B Attacks by Out of Command Units. Attacks by OOC units in EZOC
do not suffer the altered combat results; treat all results normally.
•22.1B Defeat of the Old Guard is in effect, but exchange results against
a demoralized enemy unit do not trigger the morale reductions.
B) French First Corps [1] units may not move or enter the map until the corps
is activated. Roll one die at the beginning of each French movement phase
until the corps is activated. Activation takes places as follows:
•1400 Die Roll of “1”
•1500 Die Roll of” 1 “ or “2”
•1600 Die Roll of “I”, “2” or “3”
•1700 Automatically Activated
C) Grouchy Rule— Optional. Grouchy may count each cavalry corps as
one-half against his command capacity. If the cavalry corps is demoralized,
it counts as one.
A) French Morale Reductions. The first time (only) an in-command Allied
unit attacks a French unit east of the 28xx hex column, the French demoralization level is reduced by the total in-command Allied combat strength
involved in the combat.
B) French Control of Ligny & St. Amand. Both Prussian morale levels are
lowered by five (-5) while the French control all the town hexes of Ligny
(3755, 3854, 3855, 3955). Both Prussian morale levels are lowered by
five (-5) while the French control all the town hexes of St. Amand (3256,
3357, 3457). Recapture of even one hex of a controlled town reverses the
reduction, but once the Prussian army is demoralized recapture no longer
has that effect.
C) French Control of Quatre Bras. Both Allied morale levels are lowered by
five (-5) while the French control Quatre Bras (1641). Recapture of the town
reverses the reduction, but not after the Allied army is demoralized.
D) Allied Withdrawal. Once the Allied army is demoralized, remove all it
units from the map (it has withdrawn to regroup).
24.4 Victory Conditions
A) French Victory
•Decisive: Demoralize both the Prussian and Allied armies, or disintegrate
the Prussian army.
•Marginal: Demoralize the Prussian army.
B) Coalition Victory
•Decisive: Demoralize the French army or eliminate Napoleon.
•Marginal: Avoid any type of French victory.
24.2 Set Up
A) Playing Area. Use the entire south map.
B) Turns. 16/1400 through 16/2000.
C) Forces. Set up all the forces for both the Ligny (18.0) and Quatre Bras (19.0)
scenarios, plus the First Corps and commander set ups from the campaign
scenario (22.0). Officers may be deployed with any unit having the same
command designation.
24.3 Morale Levels
Keep track of total army losses in addition to corps losses (use both 9.0 and
13.0). Use the corps demoralization levels fromt he campaign scenario. Army
morale levels are:
•French Demoralization: 60
•Prussian Demoralization: 55
•Prussian Disintegration: 75
•Allied Demoralization: 25
24.5 Options
A) Increase the value of St. Amand and Ligny from five (±5) to seven (±7)
for purposes of 24.4B.
B) Ney’s Caution. During the French Command pahse of the 1400 and 1500
turns, roll a die for Ney. He is active only on a roll of “1” or “2.” He is
permanently active starting with the 1600 turn.
C) Combat Odds Modification. Subtract one (-1) from a combat die roll for
each odds ratio greater than 6-1. Add one (+1) to a combat die roll for each
odds ratio less than 1-5.
25.0 Historical Wavre
The original Wavre scenario was based on what the armies should have been
doing given the situation at Waterloo. In reality, Marshal Grouchy was pursuing what he thought was his proper mission. The objectives in this scenario are
built on that assumption. Fighting generally focuses on Wavre and Limale, with
balancing the forces at each being the key to victory. All rules in 20.0 apply
except as altered below.
A) Prussian Player Moves First. The Coalition player turn is the first player
turn in each game turn, the French player turn is second.
Napoleon’s Last Battles 23
B) Prussian Forces. Set up only the units of Third Corps [3], plus the 6/2 (r)
and Lutzow units from First Corps [1]. (The rest of the Prussian army is
heading west to Waterloo.)
C) Morale Levels.
•Prussian Demoralization: 15
•Prussian Disintegration: 28
La Belle Alliance Variant Set Up
French
Place Napoleon and
Ney with any unit.
1022 0922 1022 0922 0721 1021 0821 0821 1021 1219 0721 Fr/Gr
Rog/Gr (r)
Mrnd/Ch
Mich/Ch
Guyot
Res (3-H-3)
Gr (3-4)
Ch (3-4)
Yng (3-4)
Lt [G]
Hvy [G]
1217 Grenr/3
1417 Jacq
1117 Desal
0418 Lt/6 (r)
0619 Lt 9 (r)
1019 Sbrvie (r)
1019 Coth
0620 DUrb (not r)
1117 Left (3-H-3)
1018 Left (2-6)
HexUnit
Allies
Place Wellington,
Willem, and Hill with
any unit.
0616 0515 0515 0716 0715 Adye
du Plat
Halk [2]
Wllmsn
Kruse
0815 Drmmnd
1115 Blndt (2-4, r)
1415 OrNass
1015 Opstl (r)
0215 0315 0315 0214 Detm (2-4)
D’Aub (3-4)
D’Aub (2-4)
Smiss
0513 Gd (r)
0713 Bttlr (r)
0713 Specht
0715 0615 0614 0913 Drnbrg
Grant
Hake
Frazer
0914 Trip
1013 Ghngy
0813 Mrln
24
•French Decisive: The Prussians disintegrate.
•French Marginal: Control all Wavre city hexes at end of game
•Prussian Decisive: The French are demoralized.
•Marginal: Avoid a French victory.
E) Options.
•French Double Move. The movement allowance of all units of the French
Fourth Corps [4] are doubled during the 1200 turn. (Historically they were
engaged in combat earlier than the setup permits).
•French Demoralization 30
HexUnit
D) Victory Conditions.
HexUnit
Prussians
Place Blucher with
any unit.
2312, 2313, 2412:
15th Brigade (one
per hex)
2713, 2812, 2712:
16th Brigade (one
per hex)
All reinforcements
enter one at a time,
unstacked.
18/1100 at 2912
14th Brigade
18/1200 at 2912
Brdlbn
18/1300 at 2912
Schw, Watz, Sydow
18/1400 at 2912
13th Brigade
18/1500 at 2909
1st Brigade, Tresk
(all r)
18/1500 at 2912
2/5, 5W/5, 9/6, 26/6,
Thum (all r)
•Bridge Hexsides Block ZOC, so opposing units on either side of a bridge
are not required to attack.
26.0 LBA Variants
Much research has been done since La Belle Alliance (21.0) was designed. This
section provides a number of changes to the scenario. Players may use any or
all. Unless specifically changed, all rules in 21.0 remain in effect.
A) Rules. Use 1.0 through 11.0. Use of all appropriate cases in 16.0 is recommended.
B) Turns. 18/1100 through 18/2100. The 1100 turn is a mud turn (see D below).
The French Fourth Division 4/[1] may not move until 1200.
C) Optional Early Start. Turns 18/0900 through 18/2100. The 0900, 1000,
and 1100 turns are mud turns (D). No unit of the French Second Corps [2],
Fourth Cavalry Corps [4c], or the infantry of the Imperial Guard [G] may
move until 1100, and the Fourth Division 4/[1] may not move until 1200. The
Prussian 15th Brigade enters 0900 at 2912, the 16th Brigade 1000 at 2912.
D) Mud turns have the same effects as rain turns (4.3 or 16.5) but the maximum observation distance is 10 hexes.
E) Forces. The set up chart indicates changes to the set up in 21.0. All substitutions and additions in 16.1 are used. Officers set up with any unit in their
command.
F) Prussian Morale Levels. Prussian morale levels are changed as listed
below. Once demoralized, the Prussians remain demoralized.
•Prussian Demoralization: 13; add 4 each turn through the 1500 turn (to
the maximum of 29). If the early start is used, start with a level of 5 and
add 4 during the 0900 and 1000 turns.
•Prussian Disintegration: 20; add 6 each turn through the 1500 turn (to
the maximum of 44). If the early start is used, start with a level of 8 and
add 6 during the 0900 and 1000 turns.
G) Additional Victory Condition. The Coalition can also win by controlling
Maison du Roi (1022).
Napoleon’s Last Battles
27.0 Grand Waterloo
27.1 Rules
Use rules 1.0 through 11.0, the modifications listed in 24.1A, and the special
rules below. Any cases from 15.0 and/or 16.0 may be used.
A) French Wings. For command and morale purposes, the French army is
divided into two wings, separated by the 29xx hex column. All units west
of the line constitute the left (Napoleon’s) wing, all those east of the line
are the right (Grouchy’s) wing. Track the losses and morale state of each
separately until combined. Demoralization of the left wing before combination is a Coalition victory.
•Combining the Wings. The wings are combined as soon as a unit of the
right wing attacks an Allied unit, providing Grouchy provides command to
the attacking unit and he is himself within command range of Napoleon.
The combined army has a demoralization level of 90, as modified by 27.4A.
If the right wing is demoralized, it recovers good morale after combination
as long as the combined army is not demoralized.
B) Exiting the Map. French units (only) may exit the map from 3701 (see
27.4B).
Grand Waterloo Set Up
French
0922 Napoleon [CR]
1118 Ney [CR]
4921 Grouchy
Place all officers with
any unit in the same
command, except:
•Reille [2] and
Mouton [6] must
be with the left
wing.
•Vandamme [3] and
Pajol [1c] must
be with the right
wing.
Prussian
4306 Blucher
Deploy Fourth Corps
[4] in the hexes listed
below; units may
stack.
2912-3011 Cavalry
3209-3309 all /13
3309-3509 all /14
3109-3110 all /15
3010-3110 all /16
3309 Bardeleben
Allied
0915 Wellington [CR]
1114 Willem
All officers may be
placed with any unit
having the same command,. The Duke of
Brunswick [Bw] is not
deployed.
Place all officers with
any unit in the same
command.
C) Grouchy may count each cavalry corps as one-half against his command
capacity.
D) Restricted Prussian Movement. No Prussian units or leaders may move
during the 1200 turn.
E) Bulow is always in command.
•+10 if either the Prussians or Allies are demoralized.
•-20 if a Coalition unit enters Maison du Roi (1022).
B) Prussian Morale Modifications.
•-10 if the French occupy all Wavre hexes (4206, 4306, 4307).
27.2 Set Up
B) Turns. 18/l200 through 18/2100.
C) Allied Morale Modifications.
•+10 if Prussians attack any unit of the French left wing.
•-20 if a French unit enters any hex of Waterloo (0606 through 0709).
•-10 if any French unit exits the map from 3701.
C) Forces. Set up all the forces for the Wavre (20.0) and La Belle Alliance
(21.0) scenarios, plus the additional units listed in the box.
D) Prussian Disintegration. If the Prussian army disintegrates, remove all
its units from the map immediately.
27.3 Morale Levels
Track army morale (9.0) only, but keep a separate count for each French wing
until/if they combine.
27.4 Victory Conditions
A) Playing Area. Use the entire north map.
•Prussian Demoralization: 35
•Prussian Disintegration: 50
•Allied Demoralization: 45
•Allied Disintegration: 55
•French Left Wing (Napoleon) Demoralization: 60
•French Right Wing (Grouchy) Demoralization: 30
A) French Morale Modifications. The follow apply only to the French left
wing, or to the entire army if the wings combine. The right wing morale
level is unaffected.
Napoleon’s Last Battles A) French Victory. The French player wins if either of the following occurs:
•Both the Prussian and Allied armies are demoralized.
•T he Allied army disintegrates.
B) Coalition Victory. The Coalition player wins if either of the following
occurs:
•The French left wing is demoralized, or, if the wings have combined, the
French army is demoralized.
•The French do not win.
25
Waterloo Campaign Early Start Set Up
HexUnit
French
1647 Lf-Ds, Ney (inactive)
1856 1856 2863 2863 1366 1366 1762 Huss/5
Camp/5
Vill/7
Piat/7
Gauth/9
Jamin/9
Pire
w/1 0955 All [3c]
All entry choices must be
made before play begins.
16/0900 at 3167, move
one-half [or 1/2] MA
All [1c]
All [2c]
16/1000 at 3167, move
one-half [or 1/2] MA
All [3]
Napoleon, Soult, French
HQ
16/1200 at 1167, move
one-half [or 1/2] MA
Baud/6
Soye/6
Pell
16/1200 at 3167 or
16/1400 at 1167
All [4]
16/1300 at 3167 or
16/1600 at 1167
All [G] less Lf-Ds
16/1400 at 1167 or
16/1600 at 3167
All [1]
French supply train
16/1400 at 3167 or
16/1600 at 1167
All [4c]
26
16/2000 at 3167 or
16/2000 at 1167
All [6]
Prussians
w/5 3454
All [1]
Blucher, Gneisenau, Prussian HQ, and Prussian
supply train.
16/0900 at 5756,
unstacked, all [2] units
must enter before any
[3] units
All [2]
All [3]
17/2100 at any east
map edge road or
trail hex; location must
be selected 17/0900.
All [4]
Allies
w/2 1744
All [N2] and Willem
28.0 Campaign Variants
16/2400 at 0605
Kruse [6]
This scenario brings together all the new units and rules, and adds
an early start time to the campaign. You will find it has both more
opportunities and greater dangers.
17/0600 at 0124 or
0136 *
All [N3]
All [NC] less Merlen
A) Rules. Use rules 1.0 through 14.0, plus any desired cases of
15.0. All cases in 16.0 are recommended, but 16.14 (Army HQ)
and 16.17 (Trains) must be used. The optional victory levels
(22.4C) are recommended. Use all the options in 22.6.
17/0600 at 0114
All [C] less Drnbrg
and Hake
B) Turns. 16/0900 through 18/2100.
17/0900 at 0124 or
0136*
Omptda [3]
Mitch [4]
Vincke [5]
17/1000 at 0124 or
0136*
All [2], Hill
C) Forces. See the set up box. Commander locations are indicated.
Officers may be deployed with any unit bearing the same command designation.
D) Entry Choices. When given a choice of entry hexes, it is
recommended players either write down the choices and keep
them secret until the turn of entry, or use hidden movement
with one HM counter of the pair targeted to each entry hex.
The set up box indicates the deadline for making each choice.
E) Exited French Units. Trace the LOS from 0605 to the French
trains. The train may exit, in which case all French units trace
supply from 0605.
18/1100 at 0605
Lamb [6]
Bruck [6]
*0124/0136 decision must
be made 17/0300.
16/1000 at 0605
All [5] less Vincke
Best [6]
Wellington, Allied HQ
16/1100 at 0605
All [Bw]
16/1300 at 0136
Mrln [NC]
16/1600 at 0136
All [3] less Omptda
16/1700 at 0136
All [1]
16/1800 at 0605, may
only move half their MA
Drnbrg [C]
Hake [C]
Napoleon’s Last Battles
French
Army of the North
Napoleon
Marshal
Ney
Marshal
Grouchy
IMPERIAL GUARD [G]
Napoleon
variant
(see 16.1C)
ID should be “Rogt/Gr”
Chief of Staff
Marshal
Soult
(see 16.1C)
FIRST CAVALRY
CORPS [1c]
Gen.
Drouot
Friant’s
Grenadiers
4/2,375
Morand’s
Chasseurs
4/2,350
Old Guard
Roguet’s
Grenadiers
3/1,700
Michel’s
Chasseurs
4/2,275
“Middle” Guard
Chartrand’s
1st
4/2,275
Guye’s
3rd
4/1,975
Young Guard
LefebvreDesnoëttes’
Light Cavalry
10/2/075
Guyot’s
Heavy
Cavalry
9/1,725
Lallemand’s
Reserve
(4/32)
St. Maurice’s
Foot
(6/48)
Duchand’s
Horse
(4/24)
FIRST CORPS [1]
Gen.
D’Erlon
Quiot
4/2,125
Gen.
Pajol
Soult’s
4th Cavalry
Division
12/1,225
Subervie’s
5th Cavalry
Division
11/1,075
Bourgeois
4/1,875
1st Infantry Division
Schmitz
5/2,925
Aulard
4/2,200
2nd Infantry Division
Nogues
4/2,050
Grenier
4/1,975
3rd Infantry Division
Pegot
4/2,125
Brue
4/1,725
4th Infantry Division
Jacquinot’s
1st Cavalry
Division
11/1,525
Desales
6/46
Cothereau
2/12
SECOND
CAVALRY CORPS [2c]
SECOND CORPS [2]
Gen.
Exelmans
Gen.
Reille
Husson
6/3,200
Campi
5/2,100
5th Infantry Division
Baudin
5/3,000
Soye
6/3,600
6th Infantry Division
A swap of Husson’s 2nd Light (4/2,225) and Baudin’s
3rd Line (2/1,200) is built into the counter strength.
THIRD CORPS [3]
Asterisk is missing.
de Villiers
3/1,475
Piat
5/2,400
7th Infantry Division
Some sources give
de Villiers greater strength.
Gauthier
5/2,700
Jamin
6/2,700
9th Infantry Division
Pire’s
2nd Cavalry
Division
15/2,075
Pelletier
6/46
Strolz's
9th Cavalry
Division
16/1,575
Chastel’s
10th Cavalry
Division
16/1,675
Should not have an asterisk.
Godet
2/12
Gen.
Vandamme
Billiard
6/2,950
Corsin
5/2,100
8th Infantry Division
Gengoult
6/2,750
Dupeyroux
6/2,875
10th Infantry Division
Dufour
4/2,475
Lagarde
4/2,050
11th Infantry Division
Domon’s
3rd Cavalry
Division
9/1,100
Dogereau
5/38
THIRD
CAVALRY CORPS [3c]
FOURTH CORPS [4]
Gen.
Gerard
Röme
6/2,375
Schaeffer
4/1,775
12th Infantry Division
Le Capitaine
4/2,025
Desprez
4/1,950
13th Infantry Division
Hulot
4/2,325
Toussaint
4/1,875
14th Infantry Division
Maurin’s
4th Cavalry
Division
14/1,575
SIXTH CORPS [6]
Gen.
Mouton
(Comte de
Lobau)
Bellair
5/2,150
Should not
have an
asterisk.
Thevenet
4/1,775
19th Infantry Division
Napoleon’s Last Battles
Baltus
5/38
Bony
5/2,325
Tromelin
2/725
20th Infantry Division
Lafitte
2/950
Penne
3/1,475
21st Infantry Division
Noury
5/38
FOURTH
CAVALRY CORPS [4c]
Gen.
Kellermann
Gen.
Milhaud
L’Hertier’s
11th Cavalry
Division
13/1,850
St. Alphonse’s
13th Cavalry
Division
11/1,175
D’Urbal’s
12th Cavalry
Division
12/1,650
Delort’s
14th Cavalry
Division
13/1,800
Marcillac
2/12
Duchet
2/12
Numbers below each counter indicate its complement, for infantry in
battalions/men, for cavalry in squadrons/men, and for artillery in
batteries/cannon. Red indicates errata on a counter, while text on a gold
background indicates a variant counter.
27
Prussian
Army of the Lower Rhine
Blücher
Gen. von
Bülow as
army commander
(see 16.1C)
Chief of Staff
Gen. von
Gneisenau
(see 16.1C)
FIRST CORPS [1]
1st Brigade
Gen.
von Zieten
Chief of Staff
von Reiche
(see 16.1C)
SECOND CORPS [2]
2nd Brigade
Chief of Staff
Aster
(see 16.1C)
4th Brigade
6th Line
3/2,650
7th Line
3/2,450
19th Line
3/2,050
Treskow
13/1,375
Lehmann
8/64
24th Line
3/2,400
28th Line
3/2,625
29th Line
3/2,625)
4th
Westphalian
Landwehr
3/2,650
Lützow
14/1,350
Horse
3/24
1st
Westphalian
Landwehr
3/2,675
2nd
Westphalian
Landwehr
3/2,500
3rd
Westphalian
Landwehr
3/2,400
5th Brigade
Gen.
von Pirch
3rd Brigade
12th Line
4/3,075
(includes
Jager Bn.)
6th Brigade
7th Brigade
8th Brigade
2nd Line
3/2,950
9th Line
3/2,600
14th Line
3/2,525
21st Line
3/2,525
Thümen
12/1,325
Röhl
7/56
25th Line
3/2,525
26th Line
3/2,025
22nd Line
3/2,100
23rd Line
3/1,850
Sohr
12/1,300
Horse
3/24
5th
Westphalian
Landwehr
3/2,475
1st
Elbe
Landwehr
3/2,450
2nd
Elbe
Landwehr
3/2,450
3rd
Elbe
Landwehr
3/2,450
Schulenburg
14/1,300
31st Line
3/2,550
Marwitz
15/1,500
Mohnhaupt
3/24
5th
Kurmark
Landwehr
3/2,150
Lottum
9/1,075
Horse
3/24
Bardeleben
12/96
THIRD CORPS [3]
9th Brigade
Gen.
von Thielemann
Chief of Staff
von Clausewitz
(see 16.1C)
10th Brigade
11th Brigade
8th Line
3/2,800
27th Line
3/2,250
3rd
Kurmark
Landwehr
3/2,325
30th Line
3/2,475
2nd
Kurmark
Landwehr
3/2,150
4th
Kurmark
Landwehr
3/2,325
12th Brigade
1st
Kurmark
Landwehr
3/2,175
6th
Kurmark
Landwehr
3/2,175
FOURTH CORPS [4]
13th Brigade
Gen.
von Bülow
Chief of Staff
von Valentini
(see 16.1C)
14th Brigade
16th Brigade
10th Line
3/2,400
11th Line
3/2,150
18th Line
3/2,400
15th Line
3/2,450
Schwerin
12/1,800
2nd
Neumark
Landwehr
3/2,075
1st
Pomeranian
Landwehr
3/2,450
3rd
Silesian
Landwehr
3/1,950
1st
Silesian
Landwehr
3/1,825
Watzdorf
15/1,825
3rd
Neumark
Landwehr
3/2,375
2nd
Pomeranian
Landwehr
3/2,425
4th
Silesian
Landwehr
3/1,775
2nd
Silesian
Landwehr
3/1,850
Sydow
16/1,850
Numbers below each counter indicate its complement, for infantry in
battalions/men, for cavalry in squadrons/men, and for artillery in
batteries/cannon. Red indicates errata on a counter, while text on a gold
background indicates a variant counter.
28
15th Brigade
ID should be “2S/16”
Napoleon’s Last Battles
Allied
Army of the Low Countries
Wellington
1st Division [1]
Gen. Hill
(see 16.1C)
Prince Willem
of Orange
2nd Division [2]
3rd Division [3]
4th Division [4]
Gen. Uxbridge
as army
commander
(see 16.1C)
5th Division [5]
6th Division [6]
Gen.
Cooke
Gen.
Clinton
Gen.
Alten
Gen.
Colville
Gen.
Picton
Gen.
Cole
Maitland’s
1st Guards
2/2,075
Adam’s
3rd (Light)
3½/2,775
C.Halkett’s
5th
4/2,350
Mitchell’s
4th (Light)
3/2,025
Kempt’s
8th
4/2,100
Lambert’s
10th
3/2,050
Byng’s
2nd Guards
2/2,300
Du Plat’s
2nd KGL
4/1,975
Ompteda’s
1st KGL
4/2,150
Pack’s
9th
4/1,850
Best’s
4th Hanoverian
4/2,500
Adye
2/12
H.Halkett’s
3rd Hanoverian
4/2,550
Kielmansegge’s
1st Hanoverian
5½/3,325
Vincke’s
5th Hanoverian
4/2,575
Kruse’s
1st Nassau
3/2,975
Gold
2/12
Williamson
2/12
Heisse
2/12
Bruckmann
2/12
Johnstone’s
6th
4/2,650
Lyon’s
6th Hanoverian
5/3,150
Hawker
2/12
Hal Force
(See 16.1B)
Rifles
(See 16.1B)
Rifles
(See 16.1B)
Not a substitute
unit
Rifles
(See 16.1B)
Not substitute
units
Netherlands
1st Division
[N1]
Brunswick
Corps [Bw]
Duke of
Brunswick
ID should
be “Bttlr”
Prince Frederik
of Orange, with
Hal Force
(see 16.1B)
Netherlands
2nd Division
[N2]
Hal Force
(See 16.1B)
Gen.
Stedman
Netherlands
3rd Division
[N3]
Netherlands
Cavalry Division
[NC]
Gen.
Perponcher
Gen.
Chassé
Gen.
Coallert
Buttlar’s
(Light)
5/3,500
d’Hauw’s
1st
6/3,475
Bylandt’s
1st
5/3,225
Detmer’s
1st
6/3,100
Tripp’s
Heavy
9/1,225
Specht’s
(Line)
3/2,100
de Eerens’
2nd
5/3,175
Weimar’s
2nd
5½/4,425
D’Aubreme’s
2nd
6/3,575
Ghingy’s
1st Light
7/1,075
Cramm
4/925
Anthing’s
(Indian)
5/3,500
van Opstal
2/16
Smissen
2/16
Merlen’s
2nd Light
7/1,025
Mahn
2/16
Buttlar’s Light Brigade
includes the Advance
Guard and Leib
battalions.
Numbers below each counter indicate its complement, for infantry in
battalions/men, for cavalry in squadrons/men, and for artillery in
batteries/cannon. Red indicates errata on a counter, while text on a gold
background indicates a variant counter.
Napoleon’s Last Battles
ID should be
“Somerset”
Wynand
2/16
Additional
Counters
(See 16.1B)
Hal Force
(See 16.1B)
2nd KGL Hussar
(from Arentsschildt)
4/600
Estorff’s
Hanoverian (-)
8/1,250
Cavalry
[C]
Gen.
Uxbridge
Somerset’s
1st (Household)
13/1,300
Ponsonby’s
2nd (Union)
9/1,400
Dornberg’s
3rd
11/1,375
Vandeleur’s
4th
9/1,325
Grant’s
5th
9/1,275
Vivian’s
6th
10/1,500
Arentsschildt’s
7th (-)
4/700
Hake’s
Hussars
(from Estorff)
4/500
Frazer
6/35
29
French Substitutions
Prussian
The Guard Light Cavalry (Lf-Ds) is understrength relative to its actual combat power; it
was, for example, the same size as the Pire’s 2nd (Line) Cavalry Division but was more
powerful due to the higher quality of mounts and men.
for
for
for
for
The two substitutions to the right account for a pair of anomalies in the French order
of battle. Noury’s Sixth Corps artillery had five batteries: one heavy, three foot, plus
one horse, though the corps lacked a cavalry division. Duchet commanded a brace of
horse batteries. For some reason the first edition gave the additional horse battery to
Duchet; it should have gone to Noury.
for
for
The Guard horse artillery was a single strong counter in the first edition
due to countermix limitations, making it much stronger than the rest of the
French horse artillery. In reality, the batteries were split between the two
cavalry divisions. Deploy these new units with or adjacent to their
associated division: Lt with Lf-Ds, Hvy with Guyot.
There are discrepancies among sources
as to the exact number of batteries
assigned to First Corps; this
substitution reflects the more
commonly accepted total.
for
for
One of the strengths of the original game
was the way combat strengths reflected
quality as well as quantity of soldiers.
Several units, however, were made overly
strong or weak because of their numerical
strength. The four sets of infantry
substitutions here are done to keep all French
line infantry at strengths of 3, 4, or 5,
reflecting their good general quality. The
“Light” units represent a collection of light
battalions and skirmishers but operate
normally in all ways. The 21st counter
represents both brigades of the 21st Division,
collectively about the size of an average
French brigade.
for
for
for
for
for
The powerful French artillery units are historically
accurate in that French doctrine supported the idea of
massed batteries. On the other hand, fewer, larger units
decreases flexibility and suppresses differences in
artillery types: heavy, light (foot), and horse. The
substitutions to the left (for the Guard) and below (for
the line) give the French player the option of adding
flexibility for the loss of concentration.
for
for
All Prussian artillery units in the original were
too powerful (see below), but the Fourth
Corps artillery was the worst offender, being
the single strongest unit in the game. This
almost certainly was a countermix issue and
is easily remedied by the substitution at right.
for
for
The “Left” and “Right” artillery
units are in command if stacked
with or adjacent to any other
unit that is in command.
for
for
30
Napoleon’s Last Battles
Substitutions
The 1st Brigade turned in a strong
performance throughout the campaign,
but nevertheless is presented as too
powerful relative to the other brigades.
These two weaker units bring it into line
with the others.
Allied Substitutions
The brigades at left are understrength in game terms as
all of them were large and included excellent light
infantry units. These substitutions better reflect their
actual strength on the ground. (See also 16.1 for the
new Rifle units.)
for
for
The units on the right present the opposite problem to those above,
being poor quality units given strong combat factors owing to their size.
In reality, Best was a militia brigade like Halk/2 and Vincke/5, while the
Brunswickers were the least experienced troops in the campaign. The
former is remedied by a simple substitution, while the latter is served
by dividing the over-strong Light Brigade into two weaker units; the Gd
unit represents the Advance Guard and Leib (Lifeguard) battalions.
The Prussian cavalry in the original
game is about the right in total strength
compared to the French, but it was
divided incorrectly among the corps. The
substitutions at left will bring them into
better balance.
for
for
for
for
The superb British horse artillery is both under- and over-represented.
Several batteries are missing, while the single counter (again,
probably a countermix issue in the original) is too strong. This
substitution solves both problems.
The Allied cavalry generally is
understrength compared to the French
(574 troopers per strength point vs. 382
French; the French were better overall, but
not that much better). The excellent
British light cavalry, well-trained and
well-mounted, suffers especially. These
new units give them more appropriate
combat power.
for
for
for
for
for
for
The strong Prussian artillery units in
the original game give them an
unwarranted concentration of combat
power. Prussian doctrine called for such
concentration, but they had not yet
developed the expertise to put it into
action. The three substitutions at left
separate the heavy batteries to split
Prussian firepower.
for
The Netherlanders (and their hired Nassauers) are more poorly
represented in game terms than any other force. The infantry was
numerous but included large numbers of inadequately trained militia.
For this reason, they, like the Brunswickers above, are better
presented by more but weaker units. The brigades of 2nd Netherlands
Division (at left) are broken up accordingly; those of 3rd Netherlands
Division each receive an additional counter (see 16.1B).
for
for
The Netherlander cavalry and
artillery, on the other hand, are
clearly underpowered and require
only a straightforward substitution of
stronger units.
for
for
for
Napoleon’s Last Battles
31
Combat Results Table
1
2
3
4
5
6
1-5
or
less
Ar
Ar
Ae
Ae
Ae
Ae
1-4
Ar
Ar
Ar
Ar
Ae
Ae
1-3
Dr
Ar
Ar
Ar
Ar
Ae
1-2
Dr
Dr
Ar
Ar
Ar
Ar
1-1
Dr
Dr
Dr
Ar
Ar
Ar
2-1
3-1
Dr
Dr
Dr
Dr
Ar
Ar
Dr
Dr
Dr
Dr
Dr
Ar
4-1
De
Dr
Dr
Dr
Dr
Ex
5-1
De
De
Dr
Dr
Ex
Ex
6-1
or
more
De
De
De
Dr
Ex
Ex
Explanation of Results
Ae=Attacker Eliminated. All attacking units are
eliminated. One defending unit may advance.
1
2
3
4
5
6
Terrain
Type
MP to Enter
or cross
Combat
Effect
ZOC
Effect
Effect on
Line of
Sight
Clear Hex
1 MP
No effect
none
none
Forest Hex
Cavalry & Horse
Artillery: 4 MP
Infantry & Artillery: 2 MP
Cavalry halved
defending or
attacking into.
All others: No
effect.
none
Blocked
Road in Hex
Cavalry & Horse
Artillery: 4 MP
Infantry & Artillery: 2 MP
Cavalry halved
defending or
attacking into.
All others: No
effect.
none
1/2 MP across
road hexside
Use other terrain in hex
none
De=Defender Eliminated. All defending units are
eliminated. One attacking unit may advance.
Chateaux Hex 2 MP
Defender
tripled
none
Blocked
Crest Hexside No additional MP No effect
none
Blocked
Stream
Hexside
2 MP additional
to cross.
Defender
none
doubled if
attacked exclusively across
bridges
River Hexside
P except across
bridge
P except across Blocked none
bridge; artillery
may bombard
across
Bridge
Hexside
+0 MP
Defender
none
doubled if
attacked exclusively across
bridges
none
none
Trail in Hex
1 MP across trail
hexside
Use other terrain in hex
none
none
Town Hex
1 MP
Defender
doubled
none
Blocked
32
Ex=Exchange. All defending units are eliminated.
Attacking units of at least equal strength must
be eliminated. One surviving attacking unit may
advance.
Dr=Defender Retreat. All defending units must
retreat. One attacking unit may advance.
TERRAIN EFFECTS CHART
Marsh Hex
Ar=Attacker Retreat. All attacking units must
retreat. One defending unit may advance. .
none
none
Napoleon’s Last Battles
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