Clover Kids Corner Activities - Missouri 4-H

Clover Kids Corner Activities - Missouri 4-H
Clover Kids Corner Activities
Table of Contents
The ABCs of Exercise ....................................................................................................................... 4
Apple Taste Testing ......................................................................................................................... 5
Balloons, Balls and Frisbees ............................................................................................................ 6
Bike or Scooter Games .................................................................................................................... 7
Blue Teeth ....................................................................................................................................... 8
Bouncy Balls .................................................................................................................................... 9
Bread in a Bag ............................................................................................................................... 10
Build a Tower ................................................................................................................................ 11
Butter – Made Easy! ..................................................................................................................... 12
Chocolate-Dipped Pretzel Rods .................................................................................................... 13
Clay Candy ..................................................................................................................................... 14
Crazy Crayons ................................................................................................................................ 15
Cricket Thermometer .................................................................................................................... 16
Crystal Garden............................................................................................................................... 17
Dandelion Fun ............................................................................................................................... 18
Do Different Colors Absorb Heat Better? ..................................................................................... 19
Dog Biscuits ................................................................................................................................... 20
Easy Soap Making ......................................................................................................................... 21
Exercise Spinners .......................................................................................................................... 22
Exploring Fabric............................................................................................................................. 23
Family Name Sign .......................................................................................................................... 24
Field Trip Ideas .............................................................................................................................. 25
Fingerprints ................................................................................................................................... 26
Food Safety ................................................................................................................................... 27
Football Pudding ........................................................................................................................... 28
Fresh Fruit Smoothies ................................................................................................................... 29
Frosty Pictures .............................................................................................................................. 30
Fun with Water ............................................................................................................................. 31
Garden Stones............................................................................................................................... 32
Graham Cracker Creation ............................................................................................................. 33
Grow Your Own Clovers ................................................................................................................ 34
Helper Hats ................................................................................................................................... 35
Homemade Granola ...................................................................................................................... 36
Homemade Toy ............................................................................................................................. 37
How Strong Is an Egg?................................................................................................................... 38
How to Grow Crystals ................................................................................................................... 39
Ice Cream in a Bag......................................................................................................................... 40
Ice Fun ........................................................................................................................................... 41
Ice Painting.................................................................................................................................... 42
Indoor Snow People ...................................................................................................................... 43
Invisible Secret Messages ............................................................................................................. 44
Irish Soda Bread ............................................................................................................................ 45
Leaf Rubbing ................................................................................................................................. 46
Lip Balm ......................................................................................................................................... 47
Lucky Smoothie ............................................................................................................................. 48
Magic Mixture—Apple Dunk ........................................................................................................ 49
Making Kazoos .............................................................................................................................. 50
Masquerade .................................................................................................................................. 51
Memory Boxes .............................................................................................................................. 52
Message Tiles ................................................................................................................................ 53
Mini Heart Box .............................................................................................................................. 54
More Ideas .................................................................................................................................... 55
Nature Scavenger Hunt ................................................................................................................. 58
Oobleck ......................................................................................................................................... 59
Painted Flowerpot......................................................................................................................... 60
Peanut Butter Balls ....................................................................................................................... 61
Penny Cleaning Factory................................................................................................................. 62
Salt and Pepper ............................................................................................................................. 63
Plant a Garden .............................................................................................................................. 64
Polishing Pennies .......................................................................................................................... 65
Page | 2
Rev 12/12 AC
Pop in a Bag................................................................................................................................... 66
Popcorn Taste Testing................................................................................................................... 67
Potato Prints ................................................................................................................................. 68
Produce Game............................................................................................................................... 69
Tasted Pumpkin Seeds .................................................................................................................. 70
Puffy Paint ..................................................................................................................................... 71
Pyramid Yogurt Sundae ................................................................................................................ 72
Reusable Tote Bag......................................................................................................................... 73
Rock Candy .................................................................................................................................... 74
Rock On—Fizzy Fun ....................................................................................................................... 75
Sand Clay Castles........................................................................................................................... 76
Science Experiments ..................................................................................................................... 77
Seed Sprouts: Does Light Make a Difference? .............................................................................. 78
Shaking Ice Cream ......................................................................................................................... 79
Sink or Float?................................................................................................................................. 80
Slime Time ..................................................................................................................................... 81
Soapy Snowman ............................................................................................................................ 82
Sounds Great—Bottled Music ...................................................................................................... 83
Snowflake Impressions ................................................................................................................. 84
Stained Glass Butterfly .................................................................................................................. 85
Stars .............................................................................................................................................. 86
Stuffed Apple ................................................................................................................................ 87
Thanksgiving Meal Placemats ....................................................................................................... 88
Thank You Notes Teach a Lifelong Skill ......................................................................................... 89
Valentine Cookie Pops .................................................................................................................. 90
Valentine Snack Pots ..................................................................................................................... 91
Water Balloon Toss ....................................................................................................................... 92
Watermelon Slush......................................................................................................................... 93
What’s a Hundred? ....................................................................................................................... 94
Wind and Air ................................................................................................................................. 95
Woodsy Vase................................................................................................................................. 96
Ziploc Fudge .................................................................................................................................. 97
Page | 3
Rev 12/12 AC
The ABCs of Exercise
Clover Kids can create every letter in the alphabet using their bodies. While participants wiggle,
squirm and problem solve they are also getting good exercise, enhancing flexibility, agility,
strength and awareness of their bodies.
Stir the Soup
Each participant finds a partner to do this stretching activity. Both partners sit on the floor,
face to face, with their feet touching in a wide straddle. They reach out and grab each other's
wrists and move side to side and forward and back. Remind youth to keep their knees straight!
Partners can make circles - small ones and then larger ones as muscles loosen.
Balloon Soccer
Material needed is a 10-inch round balloon. This activity can be played outdoors or indoors in a
wide, open room.
Youth stand in a circle, shoulder to shoulder, holding hands. Youth kick the balloon around the
circle passing to each player. After the balloon has been kicked around the circle, ask
participants to take a giant step back and kick the balloon around again (hands may need to be
dropped). Keep playing until there is no more space! Encourage youth to try kicking with the
other leg in the opposite direction or pass the balloon by bouncing it off their heads.
Source: Couch Potato Challenge: Physical Fitness Activities for 4-H Youth Development
Programs http://www.4h.missouri.edu/go/health/)
For another physical fitness idea, check out the Move Across Missouri featured on the 4-H
website http://4h.missouri.edu/programs/move/
Page | 4
Rev 12/12 AC
Apple Taste Testing
Supplies
• 6 different apple varieties (Tart varieties include McIntosh, Jonathon, Empire, Ida Red,
Granny Smith and Braeburn; sweeter varieties: Red Delicious, Winesap, Fuji, Gala,
Jonagold and Golden Delicious)
• Knife
• paper plates
• pencils
Directions
1. Wash each apple. Cut the apples so that each child has one slice of each variety. Assign
each variety a number.
2. Give each child a paper plate and pencil. Children should number their plates like the
face of a clock.
3. Give each child a slice of each variety and tell them to put the slice at the corresponding
number of on the plate.
4. Ask the children to taste each slice one at a time. Help them describe the taste. Is it
sweet? Sour? Juicy? Dry? Soft? Crunchy? Mushy? Crisp? How many like the taste? How
many dislike the taste?
5. Repeat the questions for each apple slice.
6. After all apples have been tasted, tally up the likes and dislike to learn which apples are
preferred.
Page | 5
Rev 12/12 AC
Balloons, Balls and Frisbees
Supplies
• Balloons
• Balls
• Frisbees
• Bed sheet
Balloons
1. Balloon balance – Each child can try balancing a balloon on the end of his/her finger for
as long as possible.
2. Balloon wind – While standing in a circle children try to keep a balloon in the air by
blowing on the ball.
3. Balloon volley – Standing together, children keep a balloon in the air using their hands
only. Try introducing several balloons at a time!
4. Catch the balloon – Stand in a circle, toss a balloon in the air and call someone’s name.
That person catches the balloon before it falls to the ground.
Balls
1. Sheet Bounce – By holding on the edges of a bed sheet, a group of children can bounce
balls in the air from the center of the sheet. Try seeing how many times they can bounce
a ball in the air before it falls to the ground.
2. Catch – A good, old fashioned game of catch!
3. Toss a Name Game – Children stand in a circle. A leader introduces the game by saying
his/her first name, then tosses a ball or something to the person on his/her right or left.
Continuing in one direction, each person says his/her first name and continues tossing
the ball in sequence until the leader again has the ball. The leader then calls out
someone’s name in the circle and lofts the ball to him/her, and that person calls another
individual’s name, etc., etc. After the ball has been flying a few minutes and participants
get a feel for names, introduce another ball or object, then a third ball just for fun.
4. Ball roll – Each child finds a partner. Sitting across from each other, the children roll the
ball back and forth.
Frisbees
1. Throw High – Encourage children to throw a Frisbee as high as possible.
2. Throw Low – Encourage children to throw a Frisbee as low as possible.
3. Catch – Play a game of catch.
4. Throw in a circle – Encourage children to stand in a circle and throw Frisbees to one
another.
Page | 6
Rev 12/12 AC
Bike or Scooter Games
Bike riding (or scooters) is a fun way for children to be physically active. Determine a safe area
large enough for riding bikes. Make sure it is a flat top area. Ask Clover Kid members to bring
a bike to the meeting and try these games (scooters work for those without bikes or unable to
ride a bike). Remind children to follow bike/scooter safety tips before riding:
1. Always wear a helmet
2. Obey all traffic laws
Line Biking
Draw a chalk line on the flat top surface for each child. Each child can then try to keep their
front and back wheels on his/her chalk line from start to finish.
Fun Obstacle Course
For each child, spread several carpet squares, paper, soda cans or other items in an obstacle
course arrangement. Tell children the beginning and ending points and have them ride their
bike or scooter through their own fun obstacle course.
Circle Biking
Draw a large chalk circle on the flat top surface. One or two at a time, encourage children to
keep their front wheel on the circle as they ride.
Other
Ask the children to think of other fun bike games to play.
Page | 7
Rev 12/12 AC
Blue Teeth
Find out how well you brush your teeth!
Test where you missed brushing by swirling food coloring that sticks to the plaque on your
teeth.
1. Swish a small amount of food coloring around in your mouth. Be sure to spit it into a
basin or sink and don’t swallow it.
2. The color sticks best to plaque so it will be darker where you missed brushing your
teeth. Now, look in a mirror!
3. The food coloring washes off your tongue and teeth easily.
Adapted from Ohio State University
Page | 8
Rev 12/12 AC
Bouncy Balls
•
Pour 1 tablespoon of glue into one cup–add a drop of food coloring and stir with a craft
stick
•
In a second cup, combine 2 tablespoons of water and ½ teaspoon of borax together and
mix with another craft stick
•
Add 1 tablespoon of cornstarch and ½ teaspoon of the borax solution to the glue and let
stand a minute
•
Stir with the craft stick until fully mixed together and the mixture becomes very difficult to
stir
•
Mold the ball in your hands. It will be sticky at first but will become more solid as you
mold it.
•
Store your ball in a baggie so it doesn’t dry out and crumble.
Page | 9
Rev 12/12 AC
Bread in a Bag
Ingredients
• 2 cups white flour
• 1 cup whole wheat flour
• 3 tablespoons powdered milk
• 3 tablespoons sugar
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1 package Rapid Rise yeast
• 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 1 cup hot water (125 to 130 degrees F)
• Extra flour to use during kneading process
Directions
Combine white flour, whole wheat flour, yeast, sugar, salt, and powdered milk in a 1-gallon
heavy duty Ziploc freezer bag.
Squeeze upper part of bag to force out the air. Shake and work bag with fingers to blend
ingredients. Add hot water and oil to dry ingredients. Reseal bag.
Mix by working bag with fingers until the dough is completely mixed and pulls away from the
bag.
On floured surface, knead dough 5 minutes or until smooth and elastic.
Put dough back into bag and let it rest 10 minutes.
If working in teams, divide dough in half and shape. Let rise until double in size.
Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes until golden brown.
Remove from pan and cool on wire rack or dish towels.
If time is limited and a stove is unavailable, children can take dough home to bake.
Source: http://www.montana.edu/wwwpb/yuth/recipe.html
Page | 10
Rev 12/12 AC
Build a Tower
Challenge: Working in teams of two, design and build a tower that is at least 12 inches tall.
Materials
• Toothpicks
• Gumdrops
• Ruler
Directions
Teams design and build a tower that is at least 12 inches tall.
Page | 11
Rev 12/12 AC
Butter – Made Easy!
What you need
• Whipping cream
• Glass jars with lids (any size) – one per youth
• Marbles – one per youth
• Plastic knives
• Variety of whole grain breads
What you do
1. Pour cream in the jar (any amount).
2. Place one marble in each jar. Cover the jar tightly with the lid.
3. Shake! Keep shaking until the cream turns into butter. Others may need to help
because it can take a while!
4. Remove the marble after the butter has set.
5. Spread the butter on different kinds of whole grain bread for a tasty treat!
Page | 12
Rev 12/12 AC
Chocolate-Dipped Pretzel Rods
Supplies
• One bag of pretzel rods
• 12-ounce bag semisweet or white chocolate chips
• 2 tablespoons butter
• Microwave-safe bowl
• Cookie sheet lined with waxed paper
• Spoon, flat spatula, and table knife
• Sprinkles (optional)
Directions
1. Put chocolate chips and butter in a microwave-safe bowl, and microwave on high for 1½
minutes. Stir with spoon. If the chips are not melted, heat for 30 more seconds and stir
again.
2. Dip the spatula into the melted chocolate. Roll the pretzel rod in the chocolate on the
spatula so it is half-covered. (Melted white chocolate can be a little lumpy, so you may need
to smooth it over the pretzel with the knife.). Add sprinkles if desired.
3. Lay each chocolate-dipped pretzel on the cookie sheet. Let the dipped pretzels sit for 30
minutes before serving. Do not refrigerate.
Page | 13
Rev 12/12 AC
Clay Candy
Supplies
• 3 cups powdered sugar
• ¼ cup corn syrup
• ½ teaspoon salt
• ½ stick (1/4 cup) margarine, softened and cut into pieces
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• Different colors of food coloring
• A large bowl
• Mixing Spoons
• Small Bowls
Steps
1. Begin by combining the powdered sugar, corn syrup, salt, margarine, and vanilla in a
large bowl.
2. Mix these ingredients until the dough is not sticky. More powdered sugar may need to
be added to make it less sticky (from ¼ to 1/3 cup). However, add the extra sugar in
slowly and be sure to stop when the dough feels dry.
3. Now divide the dough into balls and place each ball into separate bowls.
4. Add different colors of food coloring into each bowl.
5. Mix in the food coloring with a spoon to begin with. Once the coloring begins to blend,
use your hands to really blend it together.
6. Now you can make all kinds of sculptures out of your edible clay!
*Be sure to eat the sculptures soon after you make them so they do not turn into candy rock
sculptures!
Source: “Candy Clay.” Zoom 13 July 2006 - http://pbskids.org/zoom
Page | 14
Rev 12/12 AC
Crazy Crayons
When heat is applied to a crayon, it begins to melt. When crayons are chopped into small
pieces and baked, kids are able to combine different colors to make their own crazy color
combinations.
Supplies Needed
• A knife
• Crayons (a good way to get rid of old pieces of crayon)
• Mini-cake tins or any type of mold that come in different designs
Steps
1. Parents or leaders can chop up the crayons into small pieces (pea-sized). The crayons
can be kept in separate colors so the kids can mix the colors by themselves.
2. Preheat the oven to 150˚.
3. The kids can mix the different colors of crayons and place them in the design they want
by arranging them in the tin.
4. Bake until the waxes have melted, about 15 to 20 minutes.
5. After the wax has cooled, the shapes can be removed from the mold. If the crayon
doesn’t come out, stick the tray in the freezer for an hour and the crayons will release.
6. Now it is time to draw a picture with your brand new crayons!
Page | 15
Rev 12/12 AC
Cricket Thermometer
Crickets are sensitive to changes in air temperature and chirp at faster rates the temperature
rises. It is possible to use the chirps of cricket to gauge temperature.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Catch or buy a cricket and put it in a jar.
Count the number of times the cricket chirps in 15 seconds.
Add 40 to this number.
The number you get should be the air temperature in degrees Fahrenheit.
Source: Cricket thermometers, Field and Stream, July 1993, Vol. 98 Issue 3, p21
Page | 16
Rev 12/12 AC
Crystal Garden
Supplies (per child)
• 3 clean, dry sponges
• aluminum pie plate or cake pan
• 1/4 cup table salt
• 2 tbsp. ammonia
• 1/4 cup Laundry Bluing (you can buy this at a grocery store)
food coloring (any color)
Directions
1. Arrange the sponges in the pie plate (cutting them if necessary)
2. Pour the salt, water, bluing, and ammonia into a mixing bow and stir well
3. Pour the mixture over the sponges
4. Sprinkle drops of food coloring on the sponges
5. Let the pan sit. It may take hours, and sometimes several days to see the
transformation to crystals. Clover Kids can report about the success of their crystals at
the next meeting!
How does it work?
As water evaporates, some of the salt cannot be retained and crystals of salt form around the
bluing particles. Bluing is made of a very fine blue iron powder suspended in water. The
ammonia is added to speed up the evaporation process.
Children, with the help of caregivers, can add more bluing, salt and water from time to time to
keep beautiful crystal flowers blooming indefinitely.
Page | 17
Rev 12/12 AC
Dandelion Fun
Dandelion Search
What you need
• Magnifying glasses
• Whole pulled dandelions (with the roots)
What you do
Access prior knowledge by asking the children what the flower is. Ask them what they
know about dandelions? Where do they grow? How do they get there? What do we use
dandelions for?
Next, let them explore the dandelions by taking them apart – ask questions about what they
are doing and encourage them to use all their senses – what does it smell like? What does it
feel like? What does it sound like when you rub them together? Etc.
If you can, include a dandelion that is seeding – and let them blow them and plant the
seeds. Talk about how the seeds get around.
Dandelion Painting
What you need
• Dandelions
• Paint
• Paper
What you do
Paint a picture using the dandelion as the paint brush. You can talk about how the different
parts of the dandelions make different patterns, textures, etc in the art work.
Dandelion Seed Pictures
What you need
• Paper
• Markers
• Glue
• “Seeded” dandelions
What you do
Draw an “outdoors” picture on paper. As they draw, you can tell a story taking a walk in a
field and coming upon a HUGE patch of dandelions. All of the sudden a big wind came up
and blew the dandelion seeds around.
Fill in a few of the areas of the paper with glue and blow the dandelion onto the paper. It
takes a lot of dandelions to fill a whole sheet so consider using half sheets.
Source: May 2007 Newsletter, http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4H/Clover/materials.htm
Page | 18
Rev 12/12 AC
Do Different Colors Absorb Heat Better?
Materials
• 4 sheets of colored paper (white, yellow, red, black)
• Newspaper
• Scissors
• 4 Ice cubes
• Sunny day or heat lamp
• Notebook to record observations
Directions
1. Ask children to imagine that it is 100° outside. What kinds of thing will they do to stay
cool? What kinds of clothing will they wear? What about the color of the clothing?
2. Have pre-stenciled 5 sided boxes ready to cut out and assemble. You will need one per
color for a total of 4 colored boxes. See example above.
3. Lay newspaper down under the sunlight and place color boxes side by side with the
opening facing away from the sunlight so the youth can see inside.
4. Place 1 ice cube in each of the colored cubes.
5. Have the children check the ice cubes every few minutes and record on a notebook
which melted first, second, third and fourth.
Discuss the children’s observations. Why do ice cubes melt? How does the sun affect ice?
Which color absorbs heat the quickest in the sun? What kinds of clothes do people wear
outside in winter/summer?
Science and Engineering Connection
The study of light and its behavior is a major component in the design of optical instruments
such as cameras, microscopes, CD players and medical systems. Different sources of light carry
different quantities of energy. For example, lasers are very powerful and can cut through stone
or even metal. Using this information, engineers can improve existing equipment designs.
Source: Ohio State University Extension, Michelle Fehr, Program Coordinator, 4-H Youth
Development, OSU Extension, Belmont County, Ohio.
http://cloverbudconnections.osu.edu/summer2009.htm#story1
Page | 19
Rev 12/12 AC
Dog Biscuits
Mix
•
•
•
•
•
Add
•
•
•
•
2 cups wheat germ
1 cup cornmeal
3 cups wheat flour
3-4 cups white flour
4 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1 pkg. yeast
2 cups warm water
1 can condensed chicken broth
Knead ingredients together.
Use cookie cutters to make shapes.
Bake at 300 degrees F for 45 minutes.
Page | 20
Rev 12/12 AC
Easy Soap Making
Material
• Glycerin soap in many colors (this only works with glycerin soap)
• Soap or candy molds
• Microwave
• Microwavable cups or paper cups
• Plastic or metal spoons and/or wooden sticks or coffee stirrers
• Knife
Instructions
1. Cover table or work area with newspaper
2. Cut bars of soap into about three pieces each
3. Put a piece into a cup (cut the piece in half if you plan to mix colors)
4. Put soap in microwave and melt it on high for about 10-15 seconds (it may take longer
on low-wattage microwaves. If it doesn't change to liquid in 15 seconds or it starts to
bubble or boil, you may not have a pure glycerin soap bar)
5. Remove it using a potholder, and stir to mix thoroughly
6. Pour melted soap (work quickly, it hardens fast) into molds(to prevent sticking, oil the
molds with cooking spray or oil)
7. Wait about 5 minutes for it to harden and cool
8. Remove from molds and continue the process
9. Put soap in gift bags or bath bags to give as presents!
Page | 21
Rev 12/12 AC
Exercise Spinners
Materials
• paper plates, scissors
• thumbtacks
• construction paper strips (1 x 4”)
• crayons
Directions
Help children divide their paper plates into four sections. They can then write or draw an
exercise (toe touches, jumping jacks, etc.) in each section and decorate the sections with a
different color.
Give each child a construction paper strip and thumb tack. Help attach them to the center of
the plate. Spin it. Does it work? Help children make needed adjustments.
Have the children spread out. Let each child have a turn spinning a spinner and leading the
group in the exercise. If duplications occur, ask the child who spun to think of a special way
that the exercise could be done differently (backwards, in slow motion, etc.).
Source: “Fitness is Fun.” Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Curriculum, Ohio State University Extension
Page | 22
Rev 12/12 AC
Exploring Fabric
Exploring Fabric
What you need
Many different types of fabric (try to get some burlap, silk, cotton, satin, etc.)
What you do
Allow the children to “explore the fabric” by using their senses. Let them smell, see, feel,
etc. the difference in fabric types. After they have explored the fabric, let them guess what
each type is by only using their sense of smell or feel. What type of fabric do you think
would be hot? What would keep you warm?
What is Fabric Made Of?
What you need
• Many different types of fabric
• Scissors
What you do
Give the children several different types of fabric. Let them try to rip, cut, and otherwise
take the fabric apart.
What happens when you take the fabric apart? Are all the fabrics as easy to take apart as
the others? Which fabric was the easiest to rip? Would this be a good choice for a child to
wear? Why? What do you see when you take the fabric apart? What is the fabric made of?
(Etc.) You can graph the answers to visually show the children which fabric types were
sturdier than the others.
Making Fabric Dirty
What you need
• Different types of fabric cut into 12 inch squares
• Grass, dirt, markers, paint, ketchup, oil, etc. (ways to get the fabric dirty)
What you do
Let the children choose 3 different types of fabric to get dirty. Let them put different stains
on the fabric. Make sure to mark on the fabric what the stain is. This will be important if
you have washable and permanent markers etc.
Are all fabrics as easy to get dirty as others? Which were the most difficult to get grass
stains on? How about the marker? (Etc.) Which fabric would be good for a football player?
Would that make a good choice for a football player? Why?
Source: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4H/Clover/models.htm
Page | 23
Rev 12/12 AC
Family Name Sign
Materials
• Cardboard
• Twine or string
• Acorns. twigs, and leaves
• Tacky glue
Directions
• Punch two holes about 8-10 inches apart on the same side in a piece of cardboard. (If
your cardboard is smaller, just adjust the distance between the holes).
• Thread the twine through the holes; tie the two ends together.
• Collect acorns, twigs, and pretty leaves. Lay them out in whatever pattern you’d like.
Be sure to spell out your name on the sign!!
• Once it is the way you want it, attach the items to the cardboard with tacky glue.
• Let it dry for 15 minutes.
• Hang from a nail or hook on the wall, in the back yard, or even at a campsite.
Page | 24
Rev 12/12 AC
Field Trip Ideas
You don’t have to look for a place that is far away or costly. Many of the best trips are not the
first that come to mind. Take a moment and look in your area for:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small businesses, such as locally-owned stores and specialty shops
Parks, forests, and wildlife preservation areas
Large businesses, like regional, state and national companies
Manufacturing and Distributing sites
Service agencies, i.e. police, fire, transportation and medical facilities
Commercial recreation areas, i.e. pools, bowling alleys, video arcades, theaters
Community resources, i.e. museums, libraries, and historical spots
Your own backyard and neighborhood
How Field Trips Fit In
There are several ways field trips can fit into your plans:
1. Use the field trip as part of a regularly scheduled activity (i.e., have the children go to
the grocery store to buy their snack and cooking ingredients.)
2. Use the field trip as part of a long-term topic or theme activity (i.e., visit a local recycling
center as part of a month-long recycling project.)
3. Use the field trip as a one-time activity (i.e., visit the local leather shop before creating
your own leather works of art.)
4. Use the field trip to create awareness or spur an interest (i.e., watch the local papers for
“what’s happening.”)
5. Use the field trip to provide an otherwise unavailable opportunity (i.e., catch a special
performance at the local theater.)
6. Use the field trip as a means to involve families (i.e., plan visits to parent work sites.)
7. Use the field trip just for fun!!
Adapted from National Network for Child Care Connections Newsletter, Sandra Davin
School-age Connections, 1(6), pp 1-3. Urbana-Champaign, IL; University of Illinois Cooperative
Extension Service.
Page | 25
Rev 12/12 AC
Fingerprints
What do you always have but always leave behind? Your fingerprints! No two fingerprints are
exactly alike. Here is a way that you can look at your fingerprints. The Wind and Air activity
helps children explore, well, wind and air!
Supplies
• Pencil
• Paper
• Tape
Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Take a pencil and scribble on a piece of paper until you have a nice black mark.
Rub your index finger in the mark.
Put a piece of transparent tape over your finger, press down, and pull it off.
Stick the tape on a piece of paper.
Now you are looking at your very own, one of a kind finger print.
Source: http://pbskids.org/zoom/activities/sci/fingerprints.html
Page | 26
Rev 12/12 AC
Food Safety
Supplies
• 3 small dishes
• 3 packages dry yeast
• ¼ cup lukewarm water
• ¼ cup boiling water
• ¼ cup ice water
• Sugar (may not be needed, depending on the kind of yeast)
What you do
1. Read the yeast package to see if you need sugar to help the yeast grow.
2. Empty one package of dry yeast into each of the three bowls.
3. Put about ¼ cup of lukewarm water in one dish, ¼ cup boiling water in a second dish and
¼ cup ice water with an ice cube in the third.
In a few minutes, you will see the difference and be able to talk about how yeast grows faster
at room temperature than at hot or cold temperatures. That’s because you started with billions
of live yeast cells, and at the right temperature yeast produces a lot of gas (carbon dioxide) that
makes it bubble and rise.
Process: What happened to each of the bowls? Which grew fastest? What do you think can
happen to food that isn’t put in the refrigerator right away? Should you eat food that has been
sitting out all day?
Source: http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC3607.htm
Page | 27
Rev 12/12 AC
Football Pudding
Supplies
• Spoons, markers and liquid measuring cup
• Quart size sealable bags – 1/participant
• Gallon size sealable bags – 1 for every 2 participants
• Instant pudding – one package (3.4 oz.) for every 2 participants
• Milk – 2/3 cup for each participant
Directions
1. Each youth puts ½ the package of instant pudding in a quart size sealable bag.
2. Add 2/3-cup milk and seal bag WELL and mark with children’s names. Two youth can
place their WELL-SEALED quart bags into a gallon bag and close.
3. Have children toss the bag to each other GENTLY (best done outside) until pudding is
ready to eat.
4. Pass out spoons and participants can eat from plastic bags.
Source: Colorado State University Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development
Page | 28
Rev 12/12 AC
Fresh Fruit Smoothies
Ingredients
• 2 c. fresh strawberries or other fruit in season
• 2 c. vanilla yogurt
• 2 c. low-fat milk
Directions
1. Wash the strawberries and remove green caps.
2. Put all ingredients in a blender.
3. Blend on high speed until smooth.
4. Make ahead of time and store in the refrigerator until serving for a cool refreshing treat.
Serves 4 – 6.
Other simple ideas include celery stuffed with peanut butter and topped with raisins (ants on a
log), trail mix made from ready-to-eat whole grain cereals mixed with raisins or cranberries,
sliced fresh fruit, cheese and apple slices or air popped popcorn with 100% juice.
Source: Ohio 4-H Clover Buds Connection
http://cloverbudconnections.osu.edu/spring2008.htm#story3 Reference:
http://www.mypyramid.gov/kids/
Page | 29
Rev 12/12 AC
Frosty Pictures
What you need
• Construction paper
• Epsom Salts
• Water
• Paint Brushes
• Bowls
• Crayons
What you do
Have everyone draw a “winter” scene (i.e., snowman, holiday pictures, etc.) on a piece of
construction paper.
Mix up a solution of equal parts water and Epsom salts. Paint over the entire picture with the
solution.
As it dries, the solution makes shiny crystals over the pictures making it look like a winter
wonderland!
Page | 30
Rev 12/12 AC
Fun with Water
Invite children to play outside with water. Remind them to bring a swimsuit and towel!
Ideas include:
1. Water balloon toss
2. Water painting - provide paint brushes and water in a bucket. Encourage children to
"paint" with the water and watch how the water evaporates in the warm sun. Paint
rocks, trees, the sidewalk, anything!
3. Car wash - children can bring and wash toy cars and vehicles
4. Water sprinklers
5. Spray bottles
6. Frozen water - ice cubes are refreshing and feel good as they melt in your hands on a
hot summer day!
7. Watermelon - a fun snack after water play activities!
Page | 31
Rev 12/12 AC
Garden Stones
Supplies
• Model Magic (one tennis ball size amount per child)
• Flat gem stones and shiny beads (can be found in discount stores)
What to do
1. Shape model magic into a ball and flatten it to a half inch shape (circle, square, etc.).
2. Place gem stones and beads on the shape and let it dry overnight. The model magic
dries hard so the garden stone will withstand outdoor weather.
3. Once dry, place the garden stone in a garden or yard.
Source: Donna Garcia and CHOICES 4-H program in St. Louis County
Page | 32
Rev 12/12 AC
Graham Cracker Creation
Supplies Needed
• Graham crackers
• Creamy peanut butter (cake frosting for those with peanut allergies)
• Assorted foods for decorations: marshmallows, pretzel sticks, animal crackers, cereal,
candy
• Plastic Knives
• Disposable Plates
Show and tell your Clover Kids that you have brought some materials that they can use to
create a snack. Brainstorm about some of the things they could build with the ingredients - a
house, truck, animal, book, etc. Ask what they could use to hold the parts of their creation
together.
Let them use their imagination to create their snack. Invite them to talk about their creation
before they enjoy it. Consider serving ice cold milk as the beverage.
Source: Ohio 4-H Clover Bud Connection
http://cloverbudconnections.osu.edu/summer2009.htm#story5
Page | 33
Rev 12/12 AC
Grow Your Own Clovers
Supplies
• Clover seeds
• Potting soil
• Plastic cups (one per child)
• Plastic wrap
• Rubber bands
Directions
1. Fill cups half full with potting soil
2. Sprinkle clover seeds on top of potting soil
3. Cover seeds with potting soil, but only fill the cup ¾ full
4. Cover cups with plastic wrap and seal with a rubber band
5. When Children Get Home
6. Place cup in a warm, shaded location for the seeds to germinate (i.e., top of a
refrigerator)
7. After the first seed leaf pushes through the dirt remove the plastic cover and place cup
in a sunny area. It is important to keep the soil moist with fresh water.
8. After clovers begin growing transplant them into a bigger pot – either inside or outside
9. Encourage children to look through the clovers to see if they find the four leaf kind!
Page | 34
Rev 12/12 AC
Helper Hats
Materials/Supplies
• Foam or paper visors
• Glue
• Foam shapes - variety (animals, letters, etc.)
Directions
Choose a visor and decorate with foam shapes.
Tell the children, "People usually remember to help out at home or take care of their
responsibilities if they have a reminder. You can make your own special hat today and wear it
when you're helping out at home. Think of this "helper hat" as your reminder.
Page | 35
Rev 12/12 AC
Homemade Granola
What you’ll need
• ½ cup oatmeal
• 1/8 cup cinnamon
• ¼ cup sugar
• 1 cup crushed graham crackers
• ¼ cup melted butter
Mix together all of the ingredients. Enjoy!
Page | 36
Rev 12/12 AC
Homemade Toy
Materials
•
•
•
•
Balloon
CD
Spout from water or juice bottle
glue
Instructions
1. Glue the spout over the center of the CD. You can use craft glue, or a
hot glue gun. Masking tape or duct tape would work too, but be sure the
seal is air tight.
2. Push the spout down so that it is closed and no air can pass through.
3. Blow up the balloon. Don't tie it! Carefully stretch it so that it is over
the spout.
Hold the bottom of the balloon in place with one hand. With the fingers of the other hand,
carefully lift open the spout.
The air in the balloon with be forced out through the drinking spout. It will create a blanket of
air almost like a hovercraft. The CD, propelled by the balloon, will scoot all around the floor.
When it stops, just blow the balloon up again for more fun.
Page | 37
Rev 12/12 AC
How Strong Is an Egg?
Hens lay eggs and sit on them. They also turn the eggs several times a day to keep the baby
chicks from sticking to the inside of the shell. The egg shell must be strong enough to support
the hen’s weight but thin enough to let the chick break it and get out.
According to Ohio State University Extension Chick Quest teacher guide, “the dome shape gives
an egg incredible strength….It can support a heavy load because the weight is evenly
distributed both horizontally and vertically. When a load is placed on top of it (like a chicken
sitting on it), the heaviness is carried down along the curved walls to a wide base.”
Materials
• Two egg cartons
• Four eggs
• Hard-backed books
• Scissors
Instructions
1. Use scissors to cut the flap and lid off both egg cartons and discard them.
2. Set the remaining (bottom part) of the egg cartons side by side.
3. Place two eggs in each carton, equal distances apart. Since the books will sit on top of
the eggs, use a book to estimate and adjust the distance between the eggs. Each egg
should support the weight of one corner of the book.
4. Ask the children how many books they think the eggs will support without breaking.
5. Stack the books on top of the eggs.
6. Discuss the results. How many books could you place on top of the eggs before they
broke?
7. Will hard cooked eggs hold more or less eight than fresh eggs? Repeat this experiment
with hard cooked eggs to find out.
Source: Ohio State University Extension: Chick Quest Teacher Guide, Science Alive, 4-H
School Enrichment, Pages 25-26.
Page | 38
Rev 12/12 AC
How to Grow Crystals
Sugar Crystals
Supplies
• water
• sugar
• string
• 1 pencil per child
• 1 glass jar or other heat-proof container per child
Boil 1½ cups of water for each child. Add ¾ cup of sugar per child and stir until dissolved.
Pour the sugar solution into each jar. Tie a piece of string to a pencil. Lay the pencil over the
jar and submerge the string in the solution. The string can be weighted in at the end to hang
straight in the jar. Over a period of several days, sugar crystals will grow slowly on the
string.
Salt Crystals
Supplies
• water
• sugar
• string
• 1 pencil per child
• 1 glass jar or other heat-proof container per child
Boil 1 cup of water each child. Add ¼ cup of salt per child and stir until dissolved. Pour the
salt solution into the containers. Tie a piece of string to a pencil. Lay the pencil over the jar
and submerge the string in the solution. The string can be weighted in at the end to hang
straight in the jar.
Place the containers in warm location. Crystals will form over several days. The solution will
be supersaturated when salt crystals begin to collect on the string. Optional: A piece of
cardboard may be placed in the bottom of the container to act as a base for the crystals to
grow.
Page | 39
Rev 12/12 AC
Ice Cream in a Bag
Ingredients per child
• 1 Tbsp. sugar
• 1/4 tsp. vanilla
• 1/2 cup milk
• 6 tbsp. rock salt
• 2 sealable food storage bags (1-quart size and 1-gallon size)
• Ice
• Spoon
Instructions
1. Place sugar, vanilla and milk in small plastic bag and seal
2. Place small bag inside large bag
3. Place salt and ice in large bag
4. Seal large bag
5. Shake bags for approximately 15 minutes or until the mixture becomes thick or hard like
ice cream
6. Eat!
Page | 40
Rev 12/12 AC
Ice Fun
What you need
• Variety of containers of ice
• Rock Salt
What you do
Place the various sizes of ice in a large container.
Ask the children if they’ve ever slipped on the ice. What types of things do people use to make
it safer to walk on the ice?
Let the children predict what will happen if they pour rock salt on top of the ice, based on their
past experiences. Then let them try it. What happens?
Use the rock salt to make tunnels and different designs in the ice.
Source: Iowa 4-H Clover Kids, January 08 newsletter,
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4H/Clover/materials.htm
Page | 41
Rev 12/12 AC
Ice Painting
Materials
• Ice Cubes
• Craft Sticks
• Tempera Paint Powder (several colors)
• Spoon
• Heavy paper
Directions
To make an ice cube paintbrush, poke craft sticks into partially frozen ice cubes. Then continue
to freeze solid.
Take an ice cube paintbrush by its handle and rub it back and forth over the powdered color on
the paper. Try putting small amounts of other colors on the paper and rubbing those with
another ice cube paintbrush. Let dry.
Shaving Cream Snow: If real snow is not available, children can play with shaving cream and
pretend it is snow. Pile it up, make snowmen and other creations.
Snow Spray: Provide children with spray bottles containing colored water (i.e., tempera
paint powder colors like red, yellow and blue). Allow them to spray the snow and mix
colors.
Snow Bubbles: Blowing bubbles outside when it is really cold is interesting - bubbles won't
pop when it's minus-30 to minus-40 degrees below zero outside. Hopefully, it won't get
cold enough for this to happen!
Page | 42
Rev 12/12 AC
Indoor Snow People
If you have snow accumulation, try this activity.
Materials/Supplies
• Clean snow
• Plastic containers or plates
• Bucket for snow
• Mittens
• Small containers
• Colorful fabric for trim, buttons, raisins, etc.
Bring a bucket of clean snow inside. Have each child put on mittens or gloves and build snow
people in the plastic container or on the plate. Decorate with a strip of fabric for a scarf, and
add eyes and a nose.
For variations, create other snow creatures or spray paint the snow. If you don’t have snow
where you live, create “clean snow” by grating up bars of Ivory Soap. The gratings are easy to
mold into shapes.
Source: School-Age Notes, December 1997
Page | 43
Rev 12/12 AC
Invisible Secret Messages
Ingredients (per child)
• 1 small cup
• 2 tablespoons of lemon juice
• small brush or cotton swab
• sheet of white paper
• 1 wide dish or small cake pan
• 10 drops of iodine
• paper towels
• rubber gloves (optional)
To Write the Secret Message
Pour the lemon juice in the cup. Ask each child to dip the brush or swab into the lemon juice
and write a message or draw a picture on the paper. Let the paper dry completely (15
minutes). Ask them if they can you see the writing.
To Reveal the Secret Message
Fill dish or pan with 1/2 inch of water and mix in Iodine. Place the paper in the mixture and
completely submerge it. After a few minutes, remove the paper and let it dry on the paper
towels. Ask the children what the paper and writing looks like now.
Chemistry Tip
Iodine molecules combine with the starch molecules in the paper to form a dark blue
compound. When the Iodine combines with the Vitamin C in the lemon juice it forms a colorless
compound instead. The writing on the paper stays white, while the rest of the paper turns blue.
Source - www.museumtour.com
Page | 44
Rev 12/12 AC
Irish Soda Bread
Ingredients
• 4 cups flour (unsifted)
• 1 tsp. baking soda
• 2 tablespoons sugar
• 1 tsp. Salt
• 1 cup seedless raisins
• 1 cup buttermilk
• 4 tablespoons butter
Directions
1. Mix flour, soda, sugar and salt in large mixing bowl.
2. Stir in raisins.
3. Make a well in the mixture and pour in buttermilk. Stir until well blended.
4. Knead dough 8 to 10 times on floured wax paper. Roll dough into a ball.
5. Use 1 1/2 tablespoons of butter to grease cookie sheet.
6. Place dough ball on cookie sheet and pat into thick circle. Use floured knife to make an X
on top of loaf (keeps loaf from cracking). Spread remaining butter on tops and sides of
bread.
7. Bake loaf in preheated 375 degree oven for about 40 minutes.
8. Check periodically to see if top of loaf is golden brown.
Children can eat it with butter and green mint jelly!
Page | 45
Rev 12/12 AC
Leaf Rubbing
Materials
• White paper
• Crayons
• Charcoal
Directions
Leaf rubbings demonstrate that plants contain capillaries that transport water throughout the
plant to keep it hydrated. To make a leaf rubbing place a plain, white sheet of paper on top of a
fresh leaf, and color over the surface of the paper with a crayon or charcoal. The impression of
the leaf will show through onto the paper.
Page | 46
Rev 12/12 AC
Lip Balm
Materials/Supplies
• Double Boiler
• Empty film container (clean)
• ¼ tsp. flavoring like lemon, vanilla, orange
• Glass measuring cup
• Measuring spoons
• 3 Tbsp. olive oil
• 1 Tbsp. beeswax
• Food coloring
Directions
Purchase beeswax at a health food or craft store.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Put two to three cups of water in the bottom of a double boiler.
Measure oil and beeswax and pour into the top of the boiler.
With adult supervision heat the pan over medium heat until the wax melts.
Remove the pan from heat and let cool one to two minutes.
Add flavoring and one to two drops of food coloring.
Pour the liquid into a measuring cup and then pour into the film container.
Let cool at least 15 minutes.
Page | 47
Rev 12/12 AC
Lucky Smoothie
Make this healthful, green smoothie for St. Patrick's Day.
You Will Need
•
•
•
•
•
•
2 (peeled) kiwis
1 frozen banana
1/2 cup vanilla yogurt
Splash of milk
Dab of honey
Green food coloring (optional)
Here's How
Adults and youth work together to put all of the ingredients into a blender and puree until
smooth. Serve in a chilled glass.
Source: National Geographic http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/Activities/Recipes/Luckysmoothie
Page | 48
Rev 12/12 AC
Magic Mixture—Apple Dunk
You will need
• An apple
• Half of a lemon
• Shallow bowl
• Water
• Knife (ask a parent for help)
Here’s How
Peel and slice an apple. Cover one slice with water in a shallow bowl. Sprinkle a second slice
with the juice of half a lemon. Leave another slice exposed to the air. Wait about an hour, then
compare. The slice with nothing on it turns brown.
Why?
When an apple is cut open, chemicals inside the apple combine with oxygen from the air to
form a brown coating. The coating keeps oxygen from getting deeper into the apple. Water
protects the first slice from oxygen in the air so it stays white. Vitamin C in the lemon juice
binds with oxygen, keeping oxygen away from the second slice, so it stays white the longest.
Page | 49
Rev 12/12 AC
Making Kazoos
What you need
• Empty toilet
• Paper rolls
• Rubber bands
• Wax paper
• Markers
• Gummed stars
What you do
Show the children how to assemble their own kazoos by folding the wax paper several times so
that it covers the end of the paper roll. Rubber band it in place. Encourage the children to
decorate their kazoos with the markers and stars.
Test the kazoos. Place the end of the roll lightly to your mouth and sing or hum. The vibration of
the layers of wax paper should make your kazoos sound great!
Source: "Our Flag." Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Curriculum. Ohio State University Extension
Page | 50
Rev 12/12 AC
Masquerade
With this activity, children can make their own masks.
Supplies Needed
• Mask Pattern – children can make their own
• Any items can be used to decorate the mask (Examples: rhinestones, pom-poms,
feathers, glue, etc.)
• Foam paper (for mask and any attachments) (Examples: ears, noses)
• Hole Punch
• String
• Scissors
Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Cut out the mask shape from the foam paper.
Punch one hole on each side, to attach the string.
Allow the child to decorate his/her mask however he/she likes.
Let the mask sit to dry
Wear it with pride
Contributed by Danielle Roach, former Cass County 4-H member
Source: “Masks.” Sewing.org 2006, http://www.sewing.org/enthusiast/html/eo_mask.html
Page | 51
Rev 12/12 AC
Memory Boxes
Supplies
• Glue
• Scissors
• Construction paper
• Markers
• Foam shapes
• Sequins
• 1 large pizza box (clean and empty) per child (check local pizza restaurants for
donations)
• Other craft items
Directions
Glue construction paper to the lid of the pizza box and decorate with craft materials. Children
can add their photo or other items, too. Each child will then have a box to store artwork,
important papers and other items.
Idea submitted by Pat Forward, Rockbridge 4-H Clover Kids Leader, Boone County.
Page | 52
Rev 12/12 AC
Message Tiles
Materials
• White ceramic tiles (4¼ inch square tiles)
• Stickers
• Clear gloss glaze (found in craft stores)
• Felt
• Tacky glue
• Colored markers
• Scissors
• Small paint brushes
Directions
1. Lay a ceramic tile on a piece of felt and outline the tile with a marker.
2. Cut out the felt and glue it to the bottom of the ceramic tile.
3. Choose 2-4 small stickers to use and stick them in the corners of your ceramic tile.
Be creative and decorate as many corners of the tile as you want. (Remember to leave
room in the center of the tile for messages.)
4. Take a small paint brush and paint on the clear glaze over the stickers. Don't paint the
whole tile, just over the stickers.
5. Let dry.
6. Take a marker and write a message or draw a picture in the middle of the tile. It will
wipe off with a damp paper towel.
Put by the phone or on the kitchen counter and use it to write messages or notes to your
family!
Source – Iowa State University Extension, 4-H Clover Kids Electronic Newsletter. Fall, 2007
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4H/Clover/materials.htm
Page | 53
Rev 12/12 AC
Mini Heart Box
Supplies
• Mini Heart Boxes (cardboard boxes can be purchased at local craft stores)
• Red Paint
• Paint Brushes
• Ribbon/Lace
• Gemstones (can be purchased at local craft stores)
• Tacky glue
• Scissors
• Child’s Photo
Instructions
Each child paints a box. As the boxes are drying, help each child cut a heart shaped photo of
him/her to glue on the box lid. Decorate the box with ribbon, lace and gemstones.
Children can fill with candy or small treasures to give to someone for Valentines Day.
Page | 54
Rev 12/12 AC
More Ideas
Pick-a-Praise
Decorate a jar of some sort any way you want and when your child receives a compliment write
it down and place it in your pick-a-praise jar so that on those days they can take some out and
read them.
Yarn Dog
1. Trace a good picture of a dog or another animal on a piece of cardboard.
2. Cut yarn colors into strips of 1” to 2.” An egg cartoon works well to separate the
different colors.
3. The yarn strands are glued to make the animals’ outline, hair and tail.
4. Draw in a mouth, eyes, and anything else that needs to be drawn.
Homemade Play dough
1. Put 1 cup of salt and 1 cup of flour in a deep unbreakable bowl. Allow the child to mix
the dry ingredients with a wooden spoon or hands.
2. Slowly add 1 Cup of water and a few drops of food coloring.
3. Continue to mix and then knead until it is smooth and elastic but not sticky.
4. Dump the dough on a floured surface and roll it out with a rolling pin or a bottle. Let the
kids use cookie cutters or a variety of other tools such as plastic knives, bottle caps,
paperclips and so on.
Handprint Plaque
1. Grease pie plates and prepare plaster of paris.
2. Pour a small amount of paris into the pan.
3. Have the child set their hand in the center and let it sit for a few minutes or until the
paris sits.
4. Remove hand and let paris dry and set completely. A nail should be inserted while it is
still moist so that the handprint can be hung up.
Try adding food coloring to the paris. This idea can be used for footprints also.
Picture Punch
Give the children a half sheet of white paper and a hole punch. Let them make a design or a
picture with the hole punch. Let the kids be creative. When the child is finished, glue it on a
colored piece of paper. Allow the children to color in anything they want on their picture to
enhance the effect.
Paper Chain People
Fold white pieces of paper and have the kids cut out a person with the aims running off the
paper. Have them unfold the paper and color the people.
Maraca March
Gather long neck plastic bottles such as ketchup or other sauce bottles. Partly fill the bottle
with rice, beans, birdseed, macaroni, and any other small particles that you would like to add.
Page | 55
Rev 12/12 AC
Place lid back on it and seal it with masking tape. Wrap the masking tape around the bottle to
make a comfortable handle. Have the children make two and have them shake it to music or to
clapping.
Crinkle Crayon Print
1. Give your child a piece of paper and let them draw a picture with crayons.
2. Wade the paper up and dip it in water.
3. Squeeze the water out and spread the paper out on newspaper.
4. Paint over the picture with black or brown paint. Place another sheet of paper on top to
soak up the excess paint.
5. Separate the sheets and you will have a lithograph of the original picture.
Candle Wax Painting
Have the kids draw a picture with a wax candle. The picture will appear invisible. Then have
them paint over it with water colors. The original picture will show through after it dries.
Anatomy for Kids
Get a few long sheets of butcher paper and plenty of colors or markers. Pick a few volunteers
and trace their bodies. Let them get up and label the parts on the body such as nose, ears,
fingernails, teeth, hair, belly button, elbows, kneecaps, chin, and heels. For older kids you can
name and label other parts such as lungs, heart, and so forth.
Spoon People
Give each child a spoon and materials such as cotton balls, pipe cleaners, markers, construction
paper, tissue paper, scissors, glue, scrap material, and other craft materials. Cotton balls make
good hair and beards. Use pipe cleaners and other items to make clothing for the dolls. Leave a
little room at the bottom to hold on to the puppet with. Have the kids create a little play after
they get done with puppets.
Mr. Potato Head
Scrub and dry the potato. Make ears, nose, mouths, eyebrows, eyeballs, and any other features
the children would like to have. Break tooth picks in two and insert the blunt end into the clay
features. Have the child direct you to where the feature should go. Insert them into the potato
with the sharp end.
Cork Boats
Put Play dough on the bottom of corks to weigh them down. Cut sails out of a lightweight
paper. Attach the sails to the toothpick mast and stick it in the cork. Set the boat in the water
and adjust the Play dough so that the boat stays up right. Use straws to move the boats in the
water. Conduct races to see who is the best at propelling their boat.
Edible Jewelry
Cut pieces of yarn and let the kids thread them with lifesavers, cheerios, fruit loops, popcorn,
miniature marshmallows, dried fruits, and other soft foods that will go through a darning
needle.
Page | 56
Rev 12/12 AC
Dream Makers
Let the kids draw clouds and cut them out. Have them write their dreams on the clouds. Attach
the clouds to a hanger using string and glue and/or tape.
Page | 57
Rev 12/12 AC
Nature Scavenger Hunt
Supplies
• paper (index card works great for this)
• pencil or pen or marker
• small bags (paper or plastic)
Directions
Make a list of items for youth to search. You can include leaves, flowers, pebbles, moss and
other outdoor items. You can include insects and animals on the list but instruct them to check
them off instead of taking them. Give them small bags and a time limit to go exploring. Teach
them to recognize poisonous plants, such as poison ivy, mushrooms, and stinging nettle; tell
them not to touch them. Have people share their favorite items with the group.
Page | 58
Rev 12/12 AC
Oobleck
Supplies
• Corn Starch
• Water
• Bowls
• Measuring cups
• Table covering
What you do
COVER THE TABLE! Then, each child can measure ½ cup water with ¾ cup cornstarch and put
into a bowl. Have them mix it up with their fingers.
Let them explore it for a while and talk about how it changes from a solid to a liquid. Ask what
they think would happen if they changed the amount of either ingredient.
Let them try different combinations. Talk about their experience. What did they do? How did
that work? Did anything they did surprise them? Why? What changes did they make to the
experiment? What did they think would happen? Why? What did happen? Why?
Source – Iowa State University Extension, 4-H Clover Kids Electronic Newsletter. October, 2007
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4H/Clover/materials.htm
Page | 59
Rev 12/12 AC
Painted Flowerpot
Materials (per child)
• Unglazed clay (terracotta) flowerpot
• Acrylic paint
• Paintbrushes
• Optional - pack of flower seeds or a young plant and potting soil
• Optional - cellophane and ribbon to wrap the plant pot and plant
Directions
Using acrylic paints, each child decorates a clay plant pot. Butterflies, flowers, geometric
shapes, or polka pots are decorations to consider. Let dry completely.
Optional: Children can fill the plant pot with potting soil and plant the seed of a fast growing
flower (i.e., Marigold) or put in a small plant. Wrap with cellophane and tie with a ribbon.
Page | 60
Rev 12/12 AC
Peanut Butter Balls
Supplies
• Bowls, spatula, wax paper, liquid and dry measuring cups (1cup and ½ cup), and plastic
bags
• ½ cup peanut butter
• 1 cup oatmeal
• ½ cup honey (use liquid measuring cup)
• 1 cup dry milk
Directions
1. Have children mix ingredients together well.
2. Ask participants to use their hands and roll the mixture into balls.
3. Place balls on wax paper.
This recipe makes enough for four to six children. Have plastic bags available for children to
take home a snack.
Note: Be sure to ask parents ahead of time if children have peanut allergies.
Source: Colorado State University Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development
Page | 61
Rev 12/12 AC
Penny Cleaning Factory
Supplies
• Pennies, 2/participant
• Water
• Soap
• Baking Soda
• Vinegar
• Salt
Directions
Ask participants how they might be able to clean a penny. They may suggest water, soap,
vinegar, soda, salt. Have each participant develop a hypothesis (a guess as to what might work)
that he/she can test.
Give each participant two pennies. One will be a “control” penny with nothing done to clean it.
Participants test their hypotheses and then share results with the group.
Note: salt and vinegar will make the penny shine.
Source: Colorado State University Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development
Page | 62
Rev 12/12 AC
Salt and Pepper
Scatter some coarse salt onto a table and mix it with ground pepper. Will you be able to
separate the two again? Rub a plastic spoon with a wool cloth and hold it over the mixture.
The pepper jumps up to the spoon and remains sticking to it.
The plastic spoon becomes electrically charged when it is rubbed and attracts the mixture. If
you do not hold the spoon too low, the pepper rises first because it is lighter than the salt. To
catch the salt grains, you must hold the spoon lower.
Page | 63
Rev 12/12 AC
Plant a Garden
You don't need a huge patch of land to grow a garden. A small square of backyard or a
flowerpot on a balcony or sunny windowsill will do just fine! With a little bit of care children
and families can enjoy tomatoes or flowers that they grow together.
Materials
•
•
•
•
•
Seedling tomato, herb, or flower (look for these at supermarkets, garden centers, or
farmers' markets)
Trowel
Flowerpot, window box, or sunny patch of backyard
Potting soil (if you are using a flowerpot or window box)
Watering can
Directions
Fill the flowerpot or window box about three-quarters full with potting soil. With the trowel, dig
a hole deep and wide enough to hold the roots of your plant. Be sure the flowerpot will provide
enough space for the roots to grow. Place the plant in the hole, then fill in the dirt around the
roots. Pat the dirt down gently but don't pack it down too tightly.
Water the plant immediately after planting. A little water is best. If using a flowerpot or window
box, place the plant in a sunny spot near a window. Water it every few days or if the soil is dry.
Page | 64
Rev 12/12 AC
Polishing Pennies
Supplies
• Lemon juice
• Old, dull pennies
• Paper cups
• Paper towels
Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Put a penny into a paper cup.
Pour enough lemon juice into the cup so the penny is completely covered.
Wait five minutes, and then take the penny out of the lemon juice.
Rub the penny with a paper towel.
How does the penny look now? It is BRIGHT and SHINY!
What Happened?
A new penny is partly made from bright, shiny copper. But after a while, it loses its shine.
Why? The copper mixes with the oxygen in the air and makes a coating called an oxide. When
you put the penny in lemon juice, the acid in the lemon chemically removes the oxide, and
you’re left with a bright copper penny.
Source: Zoom. 13 July 2006 http://pbskids.org/zoom
Contributed by: Danielle Roach, former Cass County 4-H member
Page | 65
Rev 12/12 AC
Pop in a Bag
Supplies
• Measuring spoons
• Sealable plastic sandwich bags, 1/participant
• Cream of Tartar, 1 tsp./participant
• Baking Soda, 1 tsp./participant
• Water, 3 tsp./participant
Directions
1. Ask each child to put cream of tartar and baking soda into a sealable plastic sandwich
bag.
2. Seal bag and shake for 10 seconds.
3. Add three teaspoons of water.
4. Quickly reseal the bag.
Ask the children to use their senses and tell what happened.
Page | 66
Rev 12/12 AC
Popcorn Taste Testing
What you need
• Popcorn
• Salt
• Margarine
• Garlic Salt
• Parmesan Cheese
• Lawry’s Seasoning Salt
• Caramel popcorn
• Cheesy popcorn
What you do
Make several different “seasoned” popcorn types. Vote and graph the results. Which was the
group’s favorite?
Source – Iowa State University Extension 4-H http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4H/Clover/models.htm
Page | 67
Rev 12/12 AC
Potato Prints
What you need
• Potatoes
• Paint
• Cookie cutters
• Paper
• Knife
What you do
1. Cut a large potato in half.
2. You will need a cookie cutter that fits on the potato half. Press the cookie cutter into
the flat side of the potato.
3. Using a knife, cut the potato around the outside of the cookie cutter leaving a shaped
potato stamp.
4. Have the children dip the potatoes in the paint and press them firmly onto the paper.
If the potatoes are not cut evenly the shapes will not appear clearly.
Page | 68
Rev 12/12 AC
Produce Game
This game helps Clover Kids learn to identify fruits and vegetables, using only the sense of
touch. The game can also teach children that fruits and vegetables come from roots, stems,
leaves, or fruits of plants.
Items Needed
• 1 recycled copy paper or printer paper box with detachable lid (the kind that holds
about 10 reams).
• Pictures of fruits and vegetables from magazines, garden catalogues, etc.
• Small piece of felt or other cloth
• Variety of vegetables and fruits from garden or store (onions and ripe tomatoes not
recommended!)
Instructions
1. Cut out pictures of vegetables and fruits to decorate the outside of the box.
2. Cut small window (about 6 x 8 in) in one side of box. Glue or staple cloth over window
like a curtain, so players can't see inside.
3. Put produce in box (before the meeting so children won't see). A good mix includes bell
pepper, sweet potato, carrot, celery stalk, leaf lettuce, lemon or lime, kiwi fruit.
4. Children take turns reaching inside (no peeking!) and guessing one or more vegetables
or fruits, using only sense of touch and feeling shapes and textures of items inside.
Players can whisper their guesses to the leader.
5. After everyone has had a chance to guess, take lid off and reveal what is inside.
Wash fruits and vegetables and have a tasting party!
Page | 69
Rev 12/12 AC
Tasted Pumpkin Seeds
Don't toss those pumpkin seeds! Roast them to make a quick and crispy snack.
Supplies:
• Pumpkin seeds from your jack-o'-lantern
• Olive oil
• Salt
• Baking pan with raised edges
Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350º Fahrenheit
2. Separate the seeds from the pumpkin. Rinse and pat them dry with a paper towel. Put the
seeds in the baking pan.
3. Drizzle olive oil over the pumpkin seeds and then sprinkle them with salt. Stir the seeds to
coat them with oil, then spread them out evenly over the bottom of the baking pan.
4. Cook for 10 minutes, then remove the pan from the oven and stir the seeds. Return to the
oven for another 10 minutes until the seeds are golden brown.
5. Let the seeds cool, then transfer them to a plate lined with paper towels to soak up the
extra oil.
6. Experiment by adding other spices to see what flavor you like best!
Page | 70
Rev 12/12 AC
Puffy Paint
1. Mix equal parts flour, salt, and water in a bowl.
2. Add desired amount of tempera paint.
3. Pour the mixture into squeeze bottles.
4. Squeeze out paint onto paper to create a design or picture.
5. Mixture will harden into a puffy shape.
Page | 71
Rev 12/12 AC
Pyramid Yogurt Sundae
Ingredients
• 2 1/2 cups of nonfat vanilla flavored yogurt
• 3 bananas
• 1/2 cup coarsely crushed cereal
• 1/2 cup chopped nuts
Directions
1. Divide yogurt between 5 serving bowls.
2. Slice the bananas and place in a bowl.
3. Place crushed cereal in a bowl.
4. Place chopped nuts in a bowl.
5. Children can top their yogurt with bananas, cereal and nuts.
Enjoy! Serves 5.
Page | 72
Rev 12/12 AC
Reusable Tote Bag
Reusable Tote Bag
Decorate a canvas tote for your family to use at the grocery store in place of plastic bags. Be
creative and help the environment.
Supplies
• Canvas tote bag
• Cookie cutters
• Pencil
• Fabric paint
Directions
1. Lay the canvas bag flat.
2. Place a cookie cutter on the fabric and draw around it.
3. Paint the cookie-cutter shapes with fabric paint.
4. Allow paint to dry.
5. Give to a family member to use to use at the grocery store in place of plastic.
Page | 73
Rev 12/12 AC
Rock Candy
Supplies
• 4 cups sugar
• 2 cups water
• Small saucepan
• Wooden spoon
• Small, clean glass jar – one per child
• Measuring cup
• Cotton string – one per child
• Weight to hang on the string (Example: screw or galvanized washer) – one per child
• Waxed paper – one per child
• Pencil (to suspend the string in the jar) – one per child
Steps
1. Heat the water in a saucepan over medium-high heat until it comes to a boil. A hot
plate or microwave could be used.
2. Stir continuously with a wooden spoon to completely dissolve the sugar in the boiling
water. Continue to stir until the solution grows clear and reaches a rolling boil.
3. Remove the solution from the heat, and carefully pour some into each jar.
4. Cover each jar with a small piece of waxed paper.
5. Tie the weight to one end of the string, and then tie the other end to the middle of the
pencil. The string should be about two-thirds as long as the jar is deep. Dip the string
into the sugar solution, then remove it.
6. Lay it on a piece of waxed paper, straighten it out, and let it dry for a few days.
7. Gently suspend the prepared string in the solution and let sit at room temperature,
undisturbed for several days. You can check each day to see how much your crystals
have grown. Even though it is temping, don’t touch the jar until the experiment is
finished. (It usually takes about seven days.)
8. At the end of the week, the crystals on your string should be clearly defined, with sharp
right angles and smooth faces of various sizes. Now your rock candy is ready to eat.
Enjoy!
Source: “Rock Candy.” The Accidental Scientist—Science of Cooking. 13 July 2006.
www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/candy/recipe-rockcandy
Page | 74
Rev 12/12 AC
Rock On—Fizzy Fun
Materials
• Vinegar
• Glass
• Small chunk of limestone rock
• Several different rock types
Directions
Pour a half cup of vinegar into a glass. Add a small chunk of limestone rock. (Find limestone
outside using a rock identification book or buy a piece at a hobby shop). Watch closely. After a
few minutes the rock will start to fizz. Now try the same test with other rocks and minerals. You
may not see any bubbles.
Why?
Vinegar, an acid, dissolves bits of a material called calcium carbonate in the limestone. This
releases carbon dioxide, a gas that rises to the surface as a stream of bubbles. Rocks that don't
contain calcium carbonate won't fizz.
Source: National Geographic at
http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/Activities/FunScience/Rock-on
Page | 75
Rev 12/12 AC
Sand Clay Castles
What you need
• 1-cup sand
• 1/2-cup cornstarch
• 3/4-cup liquid starch
• Sand castle molds
• Sculpting tools-popsicle sticks etc.
What you do
1. Combine sand and cornstarch in an old pot.
2. Add liquid starch and mix.
3. Cook the mixture over medium heat while constantly stirring (make sure an adult
supervises). Eventually, the mixture will thicken and turn into dough.
4. Remove pot from the stove and let Sand Castle Clay cool.
5. Remove clay from the pot and knead it 20 - 30 seconds before putting it in the sand
castle molds.
6. Let Sand Castle Clay sculptures dry until hard.
Source: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4H/Clover/CKNewsletterJune03.doc
Page | 76
Rev 12/12 AC
Science Experiments
1. Fill a clear cup with club soda and add a few raisins. What happens?
2. Put milk in a dish. Add different colors of food coloring and dish soap. Watch closely to see
what happens to the colors.
3. Put popcorn seeds in a plastic bag with dirt. Seal and place near a window. What might
grow?
4. Collect various items that can be put in a tub of water. Discuss which items will sink and
which will float.
Source: School-Age Notes, April 2003
Page | 77
Rev 12/12 AC
Seed Sprouts: Does Light Make a Difference?
Materials
• Sandwich bags
• paper towels
• navy beans
• permanent marker
• sprayer or mist bottle with water
Directions
Give each child two bags, two paper towels, and six to eight navy beans. Help them label their
bags. Label one bag “with light” and label the other bag “without light.” Fold the paper towels
to fit inside each bag. Spray with water until the paper towels are saturated. Place several
seeds in each bag. Seal the bags.
Ask the children to take the bags home; tape one to a window and put the other one in a closet
or somewhere with no light. Keep the paper towels damp. Check on the seeds daily. What
happens?
Related activity: Take the children on a walk. Look under rocks or logs for seeds that have
sprouted without the help of sunlight. What do they look like? What do you think will happen
if they are kept in the sun?
Source: Cloverbud Program – Curriculum Instructional Materials, The Ohio State University
Extension, 1994
Page | 78
Rev 12/12 AC
Shaking Ice Cream
Yield: 1 small serving of ice cream
Materials
• ½ cup milk
• 1 tbsp. sugar
• ¼ tsp. vanilla extract (or strawberry or other flavoring)
• 2 cups crushed ice
• 3 tbsp. rock salt
Other Things
• Measuring cup
• Measuring spoons
• Pint-size baggie (Ziploc type)
• Gallon-size baggie (Ziploc type)
• plastic spoon
Directions
1. Help children measure ½ cup milk, 1 tbsp. sugar and ¼ tsp. vanilla extract (or other
flavoring) into a pint-size zip-able baggie. Squeeze out as much air as possible before
sealing the baggie.
2. Place the pint-size zip-able baggie inside the gallon-size zip-able baggie. Add 2 cups
crushed ice and 3 tbsp. rock salt to the gallon-size baggie. Squeeze the air out before
sealing.
3. Have children shake the gallon-size baggie vigorously for several minutes. Let them
problem solve the best way to do this: they may decide to work in teams, take turns
individually, wrap the baggie in something to keep their hands from getting too cold,
etc.
4. When the ice cream is of the desired consistency, remove the pint-size baggie from the
gallon-size baggie and rinse it in clean water to remove the salt. Open the bag and eat!
What happened?
Looking through the plastic baggies, the children can see the consistency of the milk mixture as
it changes from a liquid to a solid, demonstrating that the properties of matter can change.
Page | 79
Rev 12/12 AC
Sink or Float?
Materials
Bucket filled with water; masking tape; string or garbage bag ‘twisties’; various objects (paper
clips, spoons, marbles, ping pong balls, balloons…use your imagination!)
Directions
Drop different objects into the bucket; note how long it takes them to sink and note the
differences.
Drop several sinkers (marbles, paper clips, spoons) into the bucket. Then ask, “How might you
float a sinker?”
Drop the balloons or ping pong balls into bucket. Then ask, “How can we use this to make the
sinker float?”
Experiment with different ways to get the ‘sinkers’ to float: tape marble and ping pong
together; tie marble to inflated balloon; make a paper clip ‘hook’, attach to balloon to help lift
sinkers).
Page | 80
Rev 12/12 AC
Slime Time
Supplies
• Mixing bowl
• 4 envelopes of unflavored gelatin
• Hot water
• Square baking pan
• Vegetable oil
• Liquid dishwashing detergent
• 2 small bowls
• Stop watch or a watch with a second hand
• Measuring cup
* The supply quantity listed above is designed for approximately five children. If you have more
than five children you will need to increase the amount of materials and supplies. Don’t let
children eat the gelatin cubes after they’ve been handled or after they’re covered with liquid.
Directions
In a mixing bowl, dissolve the gelatin in two cups of hot tap water. Coat the inside of the pan
with vegetable oil. Pour the gelatin mixture into the pan and put it in the refrigerator until
firm. Cut the gelatin into cubes about 1 inch x 1 inch (approximately 64 cubes). Place 15 cubes
into one bowl. Place the second bowl about 6 inches away from the cube bowl.
Place the watch so that children can see it. Tell them that when you say go, they start picking
up the cubes one at a time using their thumb and index finger (caution them not to squeeze!).
See how many cubes they can transfer to the other bowl in 5 seconds.
Tell children to put all the cubes back in the first bowl. Pour ¼ cup dishwashing liquid over the
cubes. Gently mix the detergent and the cubes so that the cubes are well-coated. Using the
same method as before, ask children to transfer as many cubes as possible in 5 seconds.
Throw away the cubes and detergent and wash and dry both bowls. Put 15 new cubes into one
bowl and pour ¼ cup water over the cubes, again making sure the cubes are thoroughly coated.
Ask children to see how many cubes they can transfer in 5 seconds.
Again, throw away the cubes and water. Put 15 new cubes into one bowl. Pour ¼ cup of
vegetable oil over the cubes. Make sure they are well coated. Again, ask children to see how
many cubes they can transfer in 5 seconds.
Ask children to answer the following questions:
1. With which liquid were they able to transfer the most cubes?
2. With which liquid were they able to transfer the fewest cubes?
3. Which liquid was the best lubricant (the slipperiest)? Which was the worst?
Page | 81
Rev 12/12 AC
Soapy Snowman
Materials/Supplies per person
• ½ cup water
• Mixer
• 2 cups Ivory Snow Detergent (not liquid!)
• Toothpicks, buttons, sticks, beads, felt scraps, yarn, chenille sticks, etc.
Instructions
1. Mix Ivory Snow Detergent with water until it is a dough consistency (a mixer works
well).
2. Right away, shape the dough into 3 different sized balls.
3. Use toothpicks to hold the balls together as you stack them.
4. Add the decorations – arms, scarf, hat, etc.
Source: Iowa State University Extension, 4-H Clover Kids Electronic Newsletter. December, 2007
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4H/Clover/materials.htm
Page | 82
Rev 12/12 AC
Sounds Great—Bottled Music
Supplies:
•
•
Five identical plastic bottles
Water
Here’s How
Fill five identical plastic bottles with varying amounts of water. Arrange the bottles in order
from most to least full. Blow across the top of each bottle and compare the different sounds
you make.
Why?
Changing the amounts of air and water in the bottles lets you change the pitch—how high or
low the sound is. When you blow across the tops of the bottles, you are making the air inside
vibrate. In bottles with more air, vibrations are slower, so the pitch is lower.
Page | 83
Rev 12/12 AC
Snowflake Impressions
Materials
• A large piece of glass (an 8” x 10” picture frame works well)
• Can of hair spray
• Magnifying glass
• Falling snow
Directions
Chill the glass and the hair spray before doing this activity. Putting both in the freezer for about
an hour before this activity works well.
While snow is falling, take the glass and hair spray outside. Hold the can about 10 inches away
from the glass and spray it with a quick sweeping motion. Spray from side to side once, then up
and down. Use very little spray; only spray 1-2 seconds. Collect some snowflakes on the
sprayed glass.
Go back indoors and let the glass dry for 15-20 minutes. Ice crystals should have formed on the
glass. Look at the results with a magnifying glass.
Page | 84
Rev 12/12 AC
Stained Glass Butterfly
Materials/Supplies
• Wax paper
• Crayon shavings - variety of colors
• Paper towels
• Iron
• Hole-punch
• String or yarn
Directions
1. Place wax paper butterfly shape on a flat surface.
2. Put crayon shavings inside the butterfly shape (sparingly because too much makes it too
hard to melt).
3. Cover the wax paper with another piece of wax paper.
4. Iron the two layers of wax paper together on low heat placing a paper towel on top of
the wax paper while ironing. Have an adult do the ironing.
5. Cut out the butterfly and punch a hole near the top. Put a string/yarn in the hole and
hang it in a window.
Page | 85
Rev 12/12 AC
Stars
What you need
• Juice can lid
• Hammer
• Tape
• Flashlight
• Nail
What you do
Talk about stars in the sky (i.e., some are brighter than others, some nights it is easier to see
stars than others, etc.).
Help children hammer a few holes with a nail into a juice can lid. Ask children to tape the lid to
a flashlight and shine it on a wall or ceiling. Talk about what you see!
Page | 86
Rev 12/12 AC
Stuffed Apple
Ingredients
• 2 apples
• 1 cup peanut butter
• 1/2 cup nonfat dry milk
• 2 tablespoons crushed cereal
• 2 tablespoons corn syrup or honey
Directions
Wash apples. Using an apple corer remove the core. Set the apples aside. Place all of the other
ingredients in a small resealable freezer bag, close tightly.
Children can mix the ingredients in the bag until thoroughly blended. Cut off one corner of the
bag. Squeeze the filling into the center of the apples. Slice apples crosswise. Enjoy
Source: http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/cloverbuds/family/03summer-family.html - University
of Illinois Extension
Page | 87
Rev 12/12 AC
Thanksgiving Meal Placemats
Materials
• Large construction paper
• Markers or crayons
• Brown, orange, and yellow finger paints
• Paper plates
• Clear contact paper
Directions
• Draw a turkey on a white piece of construction paper
• Children can color or decorate the turkey with markers and crayons
• Pour the finger paint in a paper plate
• Have each child place their hand into the paint and use the handprint as the turkey's tail
feathers
• When the paint is dry, cover both sides of the paper with the contact paper to create an
easy-to-clean placemat
• Repeat steps 1 through 4 to create a placemat for each dinner guest
• Ask each child to talk about things for which they are thankful
Page | 88
Rev 12/12 AC
Thank You Notes Teach a Lifelong Skill
Have you considered helping your Clover Kids write and send handwritten thank you notes?
Teaching children to write thank you notes is a simple act that goes a long way in the
development of good social skills. Here are a couple of suggestions to help you get your Clover
Kids going:
•
•
•
•
Be positive. Briefly explain that the gift-giver will feel good knowing the present is
appreciated. The way you talk about thank you notes will influence whether your
children think of writing them as a chore or as something thoughtful they can do for
someone who has done something thoughtful for them.
Give choices and help make writing thank you notes fun. For children that don’t yet
write encourage them to draw pictures. Provide a variety of interesting and colorful
paper, pens/pencils, crayons/markers, glitter and glue. Let them choose the ones they
will use.
Make the handwritten note a special message from the heart. Help children understand
the effort they put into creating a thank you is just as valuable as the gift itself.
Be a good example and write letters! Children learn to be courteous and responsible by
watching other adults.
Ideas for Making Thank You Stationery
• Stamps and pads
• Stickers
• Decorate plain note cards
• Stencils
• Use decorative-edged scissors
• Cut thank you postcards from card stock
• Make thumbprints with washable ink pads (make balloons, flowers, patterns, people,
words, or a clover)
Source: Kirk Bloir, M.S., Extension Associate, Human Development & Family Science, Ohio State
University Extension
Page | 89
Rev 12/12 AC
Valentine Cookie Pops
Ingredients for a group of 10 children
• 20 vanilla wafer cookies
• ½ cup peanut butter (substitute frosting for children with peanut allergies)
• 1 six ounce bag white chocolate chips
• 1 six ounce bag semi sweet chocolate chips
• colored candy sprinkles, gummy bears (red, white and pink)
• cake decorating writer gel (green, pink, red, black and white)
• cake decorator frosting with flower tip (white, red, and pink)
• red food coloring
• ice cream or lollipop sticks
• wax paper or paper plates
Instructions
1. Spread peanut butter (or frosting) onto the flat side of the cookies.
2. Place an ice cream stick into the peanut butter on half the cookies.
3. Top with another cookie so the stick is sandwiched between the two cookies.
4. Melt the two bags of chocolate chips separately (i.e., white and semi sweet) and stir
until smooth.
5. Separate the white chocolate in two bowls and add a few drops of red food coloring to
make pink chocolate.
6. Dip cookie pops in the melted chocolate, covering completely.
7. Roll pops in red and white sprinkles and lay or stand on waxed paper or paper plate.
8. Place in refrigerator to chill.
Variations
Writing – Write fun Valentine shorts on plain pops such as “love” and add a gummy bear
Hearts – Use the decorator gel to draw on hearts and hearts with arrows
Flowers – Using the flower tip, pipe on colorful flowers with icing. Use the green gel to add
steams and leaves.
Source: http://www.thefamilycorner.com/family/kids/recipes/cookie pops valentine.shtml
Page | 90
Rev 12/12 AC
Valentine Snack Pots
What you need
• Terra cotta clay pots
• Pencils
• Acrylic paints
• Spray sealer
• Valentine stickers
• Ribbon
• Paint brushes
• Newspaper
• Pencil (With new eraser)
• Sponge
• Plastic terra cotta pot liner
What you do
Lay the newspaper on a work space. First, show the children all the supplies and tell them to
think about what they want their finished pot to look like.
Paint the inside and the outside of the pot and let it dry. It may need more than one coat to
cover it. Decorate the pot.
Try different methods: polka dots can be made by dipping the pencil eraser in paint and
dabbing it on the pot. Stickers are easy to use. Conversation hearts can be glued on. Use a
sponge to add another color on top of the old one. (Get the sponge wet, wring out the water,
and dab it into the paint. Wipe off the extra paint on the newspaper. Dap it lightly onto the first
color.)
When it is all finished, spray with acrylic sealer and let it dry.
Put the liner in and fill with a nutritious snack (or conversation hearts!).
Source: Iowa 4-H Clover Kids, February 07 newsletter,
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/4H/Clover/materials.htm
Page | 91
Rev 12/12 AC
Water Balloon Toss
Beat the heat with this cool game!
You Will Need
•
•
•
An even number of people
Water balloons (at least one for every two people)
Clothes that can get wet or messy
Here’s How
1. Divide all players into groups of two and give each pair a balloon.
2. Players should line up in two lines, with partners facing each other. Every player should then
take one big step backwards.
3. Each player holding a balloon gently tosses it to their partner. If the other player catches it
successfully, the partners each take another step backwards. If the balloon breaks, it's game
over!
4. If you're playing with a group of people, keep playing until only one pair is left. If you're
playing with a friend, see how far apart you can get before the balloon breaks. Try to beat your
record!
Page | 92
Rev 12/12 AC
Watermelon Slush
Supplies
• Watermelon
• 6 crushed ice cubes
• Knife
• Spoon
• Plastic bag
• Blender
• Rubber spatula
• Drinking glasses
Steps
1. Cut a watermelon in half with a knife (adult help).
2. Use a spoon to scoop out the pink part of the watermelon. You need about two cups of
watermelon to make four slushes. (Be careful to remove seeds.)
3. Crush the ice by hitting ice in a bag.
4. Add the watermelon and crushed ice to the blender and blend for about 20 seconds.
5. Pour your Watermelon Slush into your glass and take a drink!
Source: “Watermelon Slush.” Zoom. July 13, 2006. http://pbskids.org/zoom.
Contributed by Danielle Roach, former Cass County 4-H member
Page | 93
Rev 12/12 AC
What’s a Hundred?
Collect Cans for Charity
Set a goal of collecting 100 cans of food to donate to a charity.
Be Quiet for 100 Seconds
See if children can do it!
Make a Paper Clip Chain with 100 Paper Clips
Ask each child to count out 100 paper clips and hook them together to make a chain. Compare
a chain that is 100 clips long to one that is only 10 clips long, 20 clips long, and other lengths.
Parents or older youth may need to assist.
Simple Math with 100 Small Items
Ask each child to bring 100 small items from home in a zip lock bag (dried beans, pennies, paper
clips, buttons, pebbles, etc. - you may want to avoid edibles like jelly beans or m&m's).
Investigate how 100 items look, how you can divide them into 10 groups of 10, 5 groups of 20,
4 groups of 25, or 2 groups of 50.
Parents or older youth may need to assist.
Make a Necklace with 100 Cheerios
Ask each child to count out 100 cheerios (or other doughnut-shaped cereal) and string them
onto a short length of yarn or string.
Parents of older youth may need to assist.
Page | 94
Rev 12/12 AC
Wind and Air
Supplies
• Ping Pong balls
• Straws
• Table
What you do
Place ping pong balls on the table. Have children stand on all sides of the table. Challenge
them to see how fast they can get all the ping pong balls off the table by working together.
Encourage them to share and try different ideas.
Page | 95
Rev 12/12 AC
Woodsy Vase
Supplies
• Sticks (about 1/4 inch in diameter)
• Clippers
• Glue
• Empty plastic jar
• Thick rubber bands
• Raffia or ribbon (optional)
Directions
Break or cut sticks to about an inch longer than the jar. Put two rubber bands around the jar,
one inch from the top and one inch from the bottom. Tuck sticks under both rubber bands
placing them as close together as possible.
Once the jar is surrounded with sticks, slide the rubber bands together in the middle of the jar
and cover the banks with a bow.
Page | 96
Rev 12/12 AC
Ziploc Fudge
1/2 Stick Butter
1/2 Cup unsweetened cocoa
1 pound powdered sugar (1 box)
3 oz Cream Cheese
1-tsp vanilla
1 Large Freezer Zip Lock Bag
Combine all in zip lock bag. Hand from person to person smishing bag (don't allow throwing)
Cut open bag.
Makes @ 30 piece
Page | 97
Rev 12/12 AC
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