APL Rule Book - Amateur Pool League

APL Rule Book - Amateur Pool League
www.amateurpoolleague.com
Official Team Manual
"A Pool League That Offers Modern Day Pool
Designed For The Amateur Player"
2001-2010
Dear APL Member:
First of all I would like to welcome you to the Amateur Pool
League, Inc. The Amateur Pool League offers modern day pool
for the amateur pool player. This rulebook contains most of the
rules that you would need to enjoy playing either 8-ball or 9-ball in
the APL. We understand that there will be instances that are not
covered in this manual. If there is a situation that needs more
clarification we ask that you use good judgment, contact your
Division Rep, or your League Operator.
Good sportsmanship is treating your opponents with the same
respect that you would like to be treated with. Everyone wants to
win however, having fun and playing pool with family and friends
is what the APL is all about.
Please take the time to know the rules and take this manual to all
of your league matches. Let's play pool, have fun and help
promote the game we all love…Pool Everybody's Game…
Sincerely,
Joe Ferris
League Operator
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Many of our members have been playing organized league pool
for years; however, some find themselves participating in league
play for the first time. In either case, following these simple rules
of conduct will make your league experience, as well as those of
your teammates, as enjoyable as possible.
1. Before being allowed to compete in an APL-sponsored event or
league, you must be a member in good standing with the APL and
be willing to play under our General Rules as listed in this booklet.
For example, membership includes filling out a complete
membership application; paying your annual membership dues,
league fees and tournament fees; and staying active for any
events, sessions, or tournaments for which you or your team may
have entered or qualified.
2. When you sign up to play in a league, you make a commitment
to your league and teammates to play the entire league session.
League pool is a team effort, and only through this commitment
can we foster the type of fellowship and sportsmanship that we
are looking to develop through active participation in the APL.
Remember, the time to stop playing is not until you have
completed your obligations and events for that session. Also, try
your best to stay committed to the team you started with: changing
teams is sometimes needed, but should be done only early in the
session. Decisions regarding the ability of a player to switch from
one team to another will be made at the discretion of the League
Operator. Abuse of this privilege will not be tolerated.
3. Teams should make it a point to be on time to play league
contests. It is a matter of common courtesy not to keep
opponents waiting to start league play. If you do not start on time,
your match could be forfeited. You can start your league contest
with only one player from your team present, and league play can
start no later than 15 minutes from scheduled start time.
Individual matches are to start no later than (2) minutes after the
proceeding one ends.
4. Always be courteous and polite to your opponents and fellow
players. While we foster a competitive environment, we don’t
want competition to take precedence over the rights that all
players have to enjoy themselves.
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5. Abusive behavior and foul language will not be tolerated, and
may be cause for suspension or revocation of your APL
membership. Suspended players cannot participate in any APL
events.
6. The APL does not condone gambling during league play.
7. Every member has an obligation to pay his/her share of league
fees. You should remember that if you do not pay, the people
who suffer are your fellow team members, as your shortages may
result in your team being ineligible for post-session league play or
other APL sponsored events. Also, your shortages will be posted
on the weekly league rosters for other league teams to view: a
team or player that is current in all fees may refuse to play any
team or member not current in all fees.
8. If there is something that you don’t understand about the way
your league is being run, we encourage you to approach your
League Operator or call your Division Rep. All inquiries will be
answered.
9. Always respect the house rules of the sites in which you play.
10. The APL has the right to revoke your membership at any time
and modify our rules to benefit the league.
11. The APL recognizes that not all rules can be covered in a
rulebook. Situations arise that require interpretation on the spot.
The League Operator has the right to interpret the rules during
league play and make decisions on situations not covered in this
book. Sometimes your League Operator or Division Rep may not
be available: if this is the case, take good sportsmanship into
account. Both players should mutually agree on the situation or
declare a stalemate and just re-rack that game and start over.
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Table of Contents
General Rules for 8-Ball and 9-Ball
Accidental Movement of
Balls 12
Adding/Dropping Players 15
Bad Hit 11
Ball-in-hand defined 10
Ball off Table 24
Ball Frozen on the Rail 13
Bank Shot 22
Between Matches 8
Break and Run 20
Break Shot 21
Byes 18
Call pocket 23
Calling multiple balls 23
Calling Shots 23
Carom Shots 23
Categories Balls 22
Changing cue 13
Changing roster data 14
Cheating 14
Choosing Line-ups 8
Coin toss 6
Coaching 8
Coaching Foul 13
Combination Shots 24
Concession 14
Condensed 8-ball rules 6,7
Continuing play after break
22
Cue-ball-in-hand 11
Def/Safety 20
Defensive Shots 10
Designated coach 8
Disputes 14
Disrupts a ball 12
Double Hit 12
8-ball shots
Early 8-ball 21
8-ball break, Break & Run 21
8-ball not neutral 23
8-ball shot 23
Off-table 23
Equipment Foul 13
Failure to field 25 point Lineup 15
Fielding a Team 15
Foot Foul 11
Forfeits 17
Fouls 11
45-second shot clock 7
Under 5 player line-up 14
Frozen ball 13
Gambling 3
Games Won / Lost 20
General 8-ball Rules 20
Getting Started 8
Good Hit 23
Handicapping 14
Head string 21
House rules 3
Inactive team members 15
Incorrect data 17
Inquiries 3
Interpret rules 3
Introduction 2, 3
Judgment to shooter 10
Keeping Score 19,21
Kick 23
Known Player Rule 16
Lagging for Break 10
League fees 17
League Session/ Playoffs 19
Legitimate players 14, 15
Left on Table 20
Make-up Matches 18
Manipulate rules 17
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Mark the pocket 23
Match 8, 20
Match (s) players’ 8, 14
Membership 2
Moving ball 12
Neutral balls 22
New Players 16
No refunds 15
Not marked 23, 21
Object balls, eligible 22
Object of the Game 21
Object to mark pocket 23
Obviously declare shots 23
Offensive behavior 9
Official clock 13
One-minute limit 8
Open table defined 22
Option to re-break 21
Physically impaired 11
Player Name and ID# 19
Player conduct 2
Player time-out refusal 8
Playoffs 17
Post Season Tournaments 18
Professional Players 17
Protests / Disputes 14
Push shot/Double Hit 12
Race grid 19
Race To 19
Racking the Balls (8-ball) 22
Rankings 14
Re-rack request 21
Referee 11, 13
Refusal of time-out 7
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Return balls to position 12
Revoking membership 3
Roster 14
Safety (Def. Shot) 10
Safety not declared 10
Scorekeeping 18, 20
Scratch 12
Shooting the 8-ball 24
Shot Clock 13
Side Line Coaching 9
Skill Shot 23
Slop 23
Slow Play 13
Solid/stripes count 20
Solids/stripe/low/high 20
Split Hit 12
Sportsmanship 3, 9
Spotted ball 22
Stalemate 14
Switch teams 2
Team drop-out 16
Team qualification 17
Team tardy 2
Time-outs 7
Time remaining 13
Undeclared shot 23, 11
Unmarked pocket 23
Unscrewing cue 13
Unsportsmanlike 9
Violation of team 25 point
rule 15
Warning slow play 13
Welcome Letter 1
The 9-Ball League
Official Rules and Guidelines
General 9-Ball Rules 25
Order of break 25
Push Shot 27
Fouls 26
Coaching foul 28
Forfeits 28
Adding/dropping players 27
End of game 29
Disputes 29
Conduct 30
No Rail 25
Balls jumped off table 26
Post-season tournaments/
Playoffs 29
Racking the balls 25
Three foul rule 26
Legal Break Shot 25
Split Hits 26
Coaching 27
Make up matches 27
League fees 28
25 rule handicap 28
Playoffs 28
Bad Hit 26
Cue ball-in-hand 25
Scoring 26
Push Out 25
Condensed APL Rules for 8-Ball
Coin flip determines which team calls the first player.
The Match cannot start until the captain that is supposed to call a player in fact
calls his/her player. Then the captain on the opposing team can call their player.
If a Captain is not present the match can start if only one-(1) player is present.
Captain or attending player if Captain is not there has 2 minutes to call a player
once the match starts.
Lag shot determines first breaker, then the winner breaks. If the lag hits the side
rail or scratches in any pocket it is a loss of the lag. If the two balls collide, the
players must lag again.
Racking: The 8-ball is placed in the middle of the rack and the two back corners
cannot have the same category balls. Break must have 4 balls to rails or one to
pocket. Failure to do this will give the opponent a choice to have the same
breaker break again or choose to break. Miscuing or not hitting the cue ball on
an attempted break is considered a failed break.
The table is always open after break.
If a player calls a shot after the break and completes that shot, and scratches,
the table is still open for the opponent.
Skill level 2-3-4 has two, 1-minute time-outs per game. Skill level 5-6-7 has one
1-minute per game. This rule is in effect for the “Best Of The Rest” playoffs as
well.
A player cannot refuse a time-out; a coach cannot refuse a time out.
The coach can place cue ball for the player in a ball-in-hand situation.
No sideline coaching, except anyone can remind to “mark the pocket”.
If a marker is down near the selected pocket, the player that originally marked
the pocket does not have to touch it again before he/she shoots the 8-ball.
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If both players are on the 8-ball and one player marked the pocket and misses
the opponent must then mark the pocket.
Safeties must be declared, or the shot will be the opponent’s judgment.
Fouls are cue ball-in-hand to opponent. Except on the break where the cue ball
must be placed 100% behind the head string.
Only the player, captain or coach can call a foul. Please pay attention to your
game.
Moving ball foul, possible replacement of balls if movement did not have outcome
on the game being won or lost. If the moving ball (s) had an outcome in the
game it is a loss of game.
Frozen ball must be declared frozen prior to opponent shooting at the frozen ball.
Each shot should be 45 seconds or less.
Handicapping (Rankings). Ranking limit 25 for 5-player team, 21 for 4, 18 for 3.
Your roster must be able to show that 5 players shooting a match on league night
cannot exceed 25 points.
A team can put up a player not present and forfeit that match. A player does not
have to be present to forfeit that player’s match.
New players come in at skill level 4 for males, 3 for females unless known player.
6 matches are needed for new players to play in any higher level APL
tournament and 4 matches are needed for veteran players.
Professionals not allowed. A professional is a player that has an active pro-card.
League Operator or the “Board” assigns known Players ranking.
The 8-ball is never neutral. It can be used in a multiple ball combination if it is
not the first ball hit.
Call shot & pocket only, the shot does not have to go clean.
Opponent determines the intent (safety) if the shot was not declared.
All balls driven off table stay down except the 8-ball, which is a loss of game.
Game loss: scratch, unmarked 8-ball or 8-ball off the table.
Forfeits: There can be NO team forfeits in the last (2) weeks of a session, due to
a team dropping or make-up matches not being played. This will result in the
team receiving 3 points not 5 and all dues would still have to be paid.
Make-up matches: Make-up matches must be rescheduled within 2 weeks of the
scheduled match. If not, the team attempting to schedule the match must inform
the league office, who will schedule the match. If the league office and opposing
team Captain are given 48 hour notice, a make up will be scheduled. If less then
48 hours notice, both team Captains must call the office and agree to the makeup, otherwise the scheduled match time will stand.
When playing the make-up match both teams must use the current weekly roster
regardless of when the original match was scheduled.
Playoffs/Higher level tournaments: Your team must stay active before and during
the time of any Higher Level team or singles playoffs sponsored by The Amateur
Pool League. Players that qualify for an end of session Vegas Qualifier must be
active in their yearly membership dues. Players that qualify for a yearly Vegas
qualifier must be active and on a team during the time the yearly Vegas qualifier
is held.
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Getting Started
Choosing Line-ups
League play contests commence with opposing Team Captains
(or players) flipping a coin, with the winner of the coin toss
deciding which team will first declare players for the upcoming.
At the beginning of each match each captain declares one
player. The match can start if only one player is present and it
does not have to be the captain.
A player may compete on only one table at a time. Both multipleday and multiple-division play by teams and players are
acceptable and encouraged.
Between Matches
After the latest-commenced match has been completed each
team has 2 minutes to select and field another player or the
succeeding match is subject to forfeit.
Time-Outs
A player with a skill level of 2-3-4 is allowed two- (2) one-minute
time outs and players with a skill level of 5-6-7 are allowed one(1) one-minute time out per game. These are the only times when
advice of any kind can be given while that player is at the table. In
higher-level tournaments only (1) 1-minute time out is allowed.
The “Best of the Rest” playoffs time outs will be the same as in
regular weekly session play.
Coaching/Time-Outs/Fouls
Prior to the start of each match, a player's teammate must be
designated as the sole coach for that match who may give
coaching to that player. This designation may not be changed
during that match unless approved by the opposing team.
Teammates may have unlimited communication while an
opponent has control of the table except in post-season
tournaments. A coach cannot refuse a time out from a player and
a player cannot refuse a time out from a coach. This will eliminate
the problem of anyone “asking” if a time out should be taken in a
questionable situation. It is a cue-ball-in-hand foul if during a timeout if the coach touches any object balls on the table. The coach
can place the cue ball for the player. It is also a foul to mark the
playing area of the table, but simply touching the table is not a
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foul. Once a time-out's one minute expires, the coach must cease
communication with the player and the shooter must execute
his/her shot in the remainder of the 45-second shot clock if
applicable. If the 1-minute time limit is exceeded and called by the
opposing team, the shooter can take an additional one-minute at
the cost of another time-out if available. An outside player on the
team can talk to the coach, who can then relay information to the
player during a present time-out within the time limit except in post
season tournaments. The link to the player is through the coach;
no other passages to that player are allowed, including notifying a
player that an opponent has fouled. If a Captain and or coach
give signals of any kind during a match to any player while player
is shooting it will result in ball-in-hand foul to the opponent. If the
Captain and or coach show any displeasure to their player while
they are shooting or getting ready to shoot by rolling the eyes,
crossing their arms, looking up to the ceiling in disgust, or any
show of displeasure will be given a first warning. Any subsequent
shows of displeasure will result in ball-in-hand foul to the
opponent. If the Captain, coach and or player from the team that
has a player shooting approach the table with no time outs left and
give the player help will a ball-in-hand foul to the opponent. If a
Captain, coach or player from the team that has a player shooting
ask if there are any timeouts left in a voice loud enough for his/her
player to hear, will be given a first warning. Any subsequent signs
that the Captain is giving these signals by asking if there are time
outs, when there are none, will result in ball-in-hand foul to the
opponent. In 9-ball, the player can shoot the 9-ball in with the cue
ball or any other ball then the cue ball and it is not loss of game. If
the player uses the tip or any part of their stick to knock in the 9ball it is loss of game. It is a foul if during a time-out a coach
touches any object ball or marks the table in any way. The table
may be touched, and the coach may place the cue ball for the
player during a time out.
“Sideline” Coaching
Any player on either team who interferes with the course of the
match by offering advice, distracting a player, or otherwise
disturbing play can subject the shooter to a foul. In this instance,
the opposing Captain must warn the individual/s involved, that
player’s Team Captain/Coach, and the shooter. After the warning,
any reoccurrence of the offensive behavior results in a cue-ball-in-
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hand foul. However, anyone can call "mark the pocket" for an 8ball shot as long as a certain pocket is not specified. As a team
player on the sideline we encourage support for the player;
however there is always the responsibility to provide it in a
sportsmanlike manner.
Lagging for the Break
Once two opponents have been selected for a match, they must
“lag” for the break. The winner of the lag has the option of
selecting which opponent breaks in that match’s first game; each
game’s winner breaks for the remainder of the match. The “lag
shot” is executed by striking a ball which is 100% behind the head
string, bouncing it off the foot cushion and having it come to rest
as close as possible to the head cushion. The winner of the lag is
the player whose ball stops closest to the head cushion, whether
or not the ball makes contact with the head cushion. If a lagged
ball is pocketed or contacts a side cushion it is disqualified. If both
lagging balls are disqualified as above or contact each other, the
players must re-lag. The cue ball should not be used for lagging.
Defensive Shots
A player must declare a defensive shot (or “safety”) whenever
he/she is about to perform a shot with the intent to have the
opponent shoot next. That player must surrender the table after
the safety, and any object balls (either category) pocketed by slop
play stay down. If the opposing player feels that a defensive shot,
successful or not, was intended but not declared, he/she must
direct the scorekeeper to record that shot as a defensive shot.
Repeatedly failing to declare or note defensive shots the Def
column on the score sheet is unsportsmanlike, and disciplinary
actions could be taken against that player or team. The players
should work out any disputes first, but if necessary the League
Operator or Division Rep has the final say. The following example
is a defensive shot: A player can purposely call a pocket and
make the ball and call safe. Other examples of a defensive shot:
Fouling on purpose, such as when the shooter has a difficult
chance of making a good hit and decides to hit the opponent’s ball
to tie them up and avoid opponent from completing the rack. In
this case the opponent will have ball in hand. It is not
automatically a defensive shot when a shooter is in a situation
with very little chance of completing a skill shot and/or not fouling.
The player should still call some low-chance pocket. Fouling on
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purpose is always defensive, and the opponent has the final say
on whether a shot was defensive, especially if it was undeclared.
Fouls
A player committing a foul must relinquish his/her turn at the table
and is penalized by having to at least give his/her opponent cueball-in-hand. (As noted elsewhere in these rules, some fouls are
also penalized by loss of game, ball replacement, re-rack, etc.) If a
player is shooting a questionable shot a third party should be
asked to watch the shot. If a third party is not called to watch the
shot and there is a discrepancy the call will go to the shooter.
Cue-ball-in-hand
Is defined as placing the cue ball anywhere on the playing surface
without any part of the shooter touching another ball. The player
may continue to adjust the position of the cue ball by hand or by
cue stick until shooting. If any other balls are touched when
placing the cue ball or if the shooter is in position and touches the
cue ball while stroking it is a foul and the incoming player has ball
in hand; for a foul on the break in 8-Ball, the placement must be
100 % behind the head string. If the opponent places the ball
below the head string and pockets a ball he must be told
immediately after the shot that he fouled giving the breaker ball in
hand. If the opponent was not informed he placed the cue ball
below the head string and is allowed to shoot a second ball the
balls that are shot will be their category of balls.
The opponent has the final judgment of whether a shot was
defensive and/or fouled on purpose, especially if it was
undeclared.
The following are examples of commonly occurring fouls:
Foot Foul
A shooter has fouled if during any shot he/she does not have at
least one foot touching the floor. (Note: This rule does not apply
to players who are applicably physically impaired.)
Bad Hit
If the first ball contacted by the cue ball is not of the player’s
category, or if no balls are contacted, the shot is a bad hit and
considered a foul. If an opponent suspects that a player is about
to play a shot that might foul by not achieving a proper hit, the
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opponent must stop play and ask that a league official, referee, or
another mutually-accepted third party observe the shot. In this
instance, it would be that individual’s duty to watch and, if
necessary, judge the hit. If the opponent fails to stop play or find
an observer, the judgment will go to the shooter if a controversy
should arise. Split hits go to the shooter and are not a foul.
Scratch
If a player causes the cue ball to leave the playing surface, either
by pocketing it or launching it off the table, it is a foul. In an 8-Ball
game, if this occurs during any 8-ball shot or while pocketing the
8-ball on the break, the shooter loses the game.
Push Shot / Double Hit
As long as the shooter hits the cue ball with a stroke, and not a
push, is no foul when the cue ball and the target object ball are
touching (frozen) or the distance (width) of a piece of chalk. A
push is when the shooter lays the cue tip onto the cue ball and
does not bring his/her arm back before the stroke and pushes the
cue ball rather then stroking it. There is no foul if a shooter strokes
the cue ball no matter where it is in relation to the object ball.
Split Hit
If a player’s cue ball shot makes simultaneous first contact with
both a proper ball and an improper ball, this does not constitute a
foul, but steps should be taken to have close hits observed by a
third party. A split hit goes to the shooter.
Accidental Movement of Balls
Except after a ball-in-hand award, a shooter commits a foul if
he/she in any way causes the cue ball to move prior to the shot. It
is not considered a foul if a player moves any resting non-cue ball,
but the opponent has discretion to return a moved ball to where
he/she thinks it was or leave it as moved.
It is a foul if the player disrupts any moving ball immediately after
a shot. If a ball, which was inadvertently moved, makes contact
with a moving ball it is a cue-ball-in-hand foul. If the shooting
player inadvertently bumps a ball into a pocket (for example with
his/her arm or the side of the cue), the opponent has the option of
leaving the ball down (this includes the 8-ball which would be loss
of game) or having it returned to its original position. Any cost of
retrieving such a ball is to be paid by the offending player. Player
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moves a ball with stick during shot and causes the ball to move
out of the way keeping the cue ball from striking the ball when it
should have: This is a foul since the cue ball moved into an area
where the moved ball originally was. The outcome of the shot has
been affected and restoration at this point is impossible. Player
has ball in hand and while positioning the cue ball he drops it and
moves an object ball: This is a foul since the rule is very strict on
placement. When placing the cue ball into position the hand
becomes live and anything moved or touched with the ball or hand
is considered a foul.
Coaching Foul
It is a foul if during a time-out a coach touches any object ball or
marks the table in any way. The table may be touched, and the
coach may place the cue ball for the player during a time out.
Equipment Fouls
The APL does not prohibit any equipment a player might elect to
use to play pool, subject to house rules. This includes the general
principle that any cues, including jump sticks may be used. A
player cannot break down their cue and use the shaft to jump a
ball. A player moves any ball while positioning the bridge into
shooting position either before or after the shot: This is a foul.
Ball Frozen on the Rail
This is when an object ball is touching a cushion or touching
another ball, which is touching a cushion. If the opponent
correctly declares a ball frozen before the shot is commenced,
then to prevent a ball-to-rail foul on that shot the shooter must (1)
move the frozen ball to a different cushion and/or (2) contact the
frozen ball and then move any ball(s), including the cue ball, to
any cushion(s). If the two players do not agree whether a ball is
frozen, a third non-team party must be consulted for
determination.
Shot Clock / Slow Play
There is a 45-second time limit to every shot. The time
measurement commences when the shooter’s shot ends and all
the balls come to rest. If a player is taking a significantly long
amount of time to execute a shot, the opposing player or coach
has the right to direct a league official or the player’s coach to
administer a slow-play warning. If after being warned the player
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continues to play past the 45-second limit, the player has fouled
and the opponent will immediately receive cue-ball-in-hand after
each violation. In all matters concerning slow play, the decision of
the League Operator and or Division Rep will be final.
Stalemate Game
If both players hand the cue ball back and forth to each other 3
times and agree they have reached a point in the game where
progress toward completion cannot be made, they have the option
of mutually declaring a stalemated game and then re-racking and
replaying the game with the same player breaking.
Concession
A player loses the game if he/she concedes or takes some action,
which could distract an opponent who is attempting a gamewinning shot. For example, the unscrewing of a jointed cue stick,
except to change a shaft, is considered to be a concession unless
undisruptive prior notification was provided to the opponent. Also
grabbing the rack before the 8-ball is shot.
Protests and Disputes
In our league the match belongs to the two players at the table.
With this comes their responsibility of paying attention to each
shot no matter who else is observing. Both have a right to protest
a situation, but any protest needs proof in order to be evaluated.
If a protest cannot be substantiated with proof, the protesting
player can lose a match point for a frivolous protest. If both
players are paying attention and sportsmanship and common
sense are utilized, there will be no reason for protests or disputes.
Handicapping
Players’ league rankings range from 2 up to 7. These rankings
are based on data taken from score sheets for each league
match. Complete, clear, and accurately marked score sheets are
a must! Players, Team Captains, League Representatives,
League Operators and Division Reps do not have the right to
change any data on the official roster. (The forging of rosters is a
serious violation that will be dealt with.) There is always the
possibility that an error has been made when posting data. If this
seems to be in question, the matter should be called to the
attention of the League Operator, who will be responsible for
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addressing the matter. Ranking reviews (audits) of any players
may be requested by contacting the League Operator.
The handicapping formula developed by the APL is copyrighted,
and as such is proprietary property belonging to the APL.
Fielding a Team
(The 25 Rule)
To field a legitimate five-player line-up for a specific 5-match
contest, the sum total of the 5 players’ rankings (from the roster of
up to 8 players) may not exceed 25. A team can play its players
in any order it chooses as long as the 25 Rule is not violated, and
each player is disclosed to the opposing team only as the
individual matches commence. A team cannot shoot (3) skill level
7’s in any one match
Violation of the team 25 point rule
If a team’s roster cannot supply a legitimate 5-player line-up
according to the 25 Rule, the team must then field the line-up as
follows. This rule applies when the totaled rankings of the roster’s
5 lowest-ranked players exceed 25: totaled rankings for a 4-player
line-up cannot exceed 21, totaled rankings for a 3-player line-up
cannot exceed 18.
Failure to Field a Legitimate 5-Player Line-up
The team must also show they are within the 25 point team
handicap with 5 players on the score sheet. At the end of the 3rd
or 4th match a team must show they can make the 25 point team
handicap. If they cannot they loose the entire match. (Example: if
a team uses 20 handicap points in the first 3 matches they must
have a 3 and a 2 or two 2’s left on their roster or they will loose the
entire match. If a team uses 23 handicap points in the first 4
matches they must have a 2 left on their roster or they will loose
the entire match.
Adding and Dropping Players
A team can have no more than 8 players on its roster. A team has
4 weeks to add or drop a player from its roster. A player must be
added before the match starts and the opposing captain must be
informed of the addition before the match starts. If a player is
added after the match starts and the opposing captain was not
informed they lose that match. Teams competing in higher-level
APL events for which they qualified during the session are to keep
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at least 4 players from the original team that qualified that session.
In the End of Session Vegas Qualifier tournament held after each
session, the team that qualified is the team that plays! Keep in
mind that new players to the league needs (6) matches to
compete in any higher-level tournament and if they are veteran
players they need (4) matches to compete in any higher-level
tournament. When choosing players, a team must make sure all
teammates understand they are expected to complete the session
and associated session events. When players come in too late in
the session that team could lose all points contributed by that
player and the team could lose its qualification from session
events. Choosing teammates is the responsibility of the team, not
the league players or the League Operator. There are no refunds
for any league events due to a team’s inability to field that team or
be present at the events for which it qualified or if the team drops
before the end of the session.
Teams That Drop Before End of Session
Teams that drop before the end of the session will be charged for
the remaining weeks left in the session and forfeit any awards
such as trophies or qualifications for any tournament sponsored
by the APL until all monies due are paid in full.
Known Player Rule
The League Operator or the Handicap Review Board may assign
a player who is brought into the league a ranking if his/her skill
level is already known. This is regardless of whether he/she has
previous ranking or league experience.
New Players
Unless the Known Player Rule applies, a player (male) joining the
league who has not had a previously established ranking will
come in a 4 a female as a 3. If a player has established a
handicap in another league they must bring that ranking with them
into the APL. After his/her first match, the new player’s ranking
will be subject to the same criteria as all other players and will be
evaluated based on his/her performance in subsequent league
matches and the also by the Handicap Review Board.
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Professional Players
Individuals who hold current membership by way of a pro card in a
professional billiards association is not allowed to compete in APL
handicapped league events.
League Fees
All teams and individual players are responsible for the payment
of league fees. League fees can change during the course of
time, please ask your operator what the weekly fees are before
starting the session. Forfeit matches are no exception. If a team
forfeits a match you may put up a player and that player will
receive the win. The full amount agreed upon should be paid
weekly at the end of play. If a team stays at a negative balance
for (2) consecutive weeks they will be penalized (1) point each
week, until the balance is paid, from their team standings, as well
as losing the opportunity to participate in any event that the team
or player(s) is qualified for, regardless of when the teams or
divisions qualified. If a team does not turn in paper work by the
deadline they will be penalized (1) point from their team standings.
Forfeits
A team can forfeit an individual match during regular weekly
league play if the player is not present. This is not the case in
higher level tournament play.
(1) A scheduled team match does not commence within 15
minutes of the contest time and 5 minutes thereafter for
each match until all five matches are forfeited (Up to five
points can be awarded to the team present with no less
than 5 players); (2) a team is unable to field a player
whose ranking is eligible for the given match as described
by the criteria set forth under the Team Total Ranking
Criteria clause; (3) a team does not post a player within
the required 2-minute time frame (that sole match can be
forfeited); (4) unsportsmanlike conduct; (5) a shooting
player is not current with league fees; (6) willful
submission of incorrect data; and (7) any form of cheating.
A forfeiting team is not required to declare in advance
when forfeits will occur and may use a forfeit for any
match. All forfeits must be properly marked on the score
sheets. For a team to claim a forfeit a Player’s Name
must be listed for the winning team and as Forfeit for the
losing team. Forfeited matches do not count toward any
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new player’s (6) required matches. Only (1) forfeited
match can count toward an established player’s required
matches (Note: Forfeited match league fees are still due.)
There can be no team forfeits the last (2) weeks of play. If
a team forfeits more matches then the amount of weeks in
their schedule they will be dropped from the league. An
example is: If there are 14 weeks in a session and a team
has forfeited their 14th match they will be dropped.
There will always be players who, for whatever reason, try to
test the system and manipulate the rules to their advantage.
The League will take the appropriate steps necessary to ban a
team or player from post session tournaments. In these cases
the APL has the right to drop these teams and or players from
the league.
Post-season tournaments/playoffs
Teams competing in higher-level APL events for which they
qualified during the session are to keep at least 4 players from the
original team that qualified to keep their team qualification. In the
End of Session Vegas Qualifier tournament held after each
session, the team that qualified is the team that plays! These
teams must field the team with the same players that were on the
team when they qualified. In addition, if they are a new player to
the league they need (6) matches to compete in any higher-level
tournament and if they are veteran players they need (4) matches
to compete in any higher-level tournament. Your team and or
players must be active to participate in any Higher Level team or
singles playoffs sponsored by The Amateur Pool League. In any
post-season tournament your player must be present to forfeit
their individual match! This is not the case in regular weekly
league play. If there are any additional post-season tournaments,
other then the End of Session Vegas Qualifier, the rules and
qualifications will be posted before the tournament.
Byes
In some leagues there will be an uneven number of teams
competing during a league session. When this happens, a “Bye”
will be written into the schedule to even it out. On a night when a
team is scheduled to receive a bye it will be credited with a 3-2
match with no league fees due.
Make-up Matches
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All make-up matches should be completed within 2 weeks of the
date of the scheduled match, and no matches can be made up
within the last two weeks of regular-session play. There can be
NO team forfeits in the last (2) weeks of a session, due to a makeup match not being played or due to a team dropping. This will
result in the team receiving 3 points not 5 and all dues would still
have to be paid. Make-up matches must be rescheduled within 2
weeks of the scheduled match. If not, the team attempting to
schedule the match must inform the league office, who will
schedule the match. The league office will give the opposing
team Captain 48 hour notice to make up the match. If less then
48 hours notice, both team Captains must call the office and agree
to the make-up, otherwise the scheduled match time will stand.
When playing the make-up match both teams must use the
current weekly roster regardless of when the original match was
scheduled. When a new division is starting, the League Operator
may offer new team make-ups to allow that team to catch up.
League Session / Playoffs
A league session consists of a specified number of weekly
contests, meeting on a designated day and consisting of two
opposing teams playing a specified number of consecutive
matches. The winning team of each match is awarded 1 point.
Keeping Score
A league score sheet must be fully completed for every team
contest played. This is the vehicle, which determines rankings,
making it extremely important that these forms be completed
accurately and neatly. Please record all defense shots!
Once the sheets have left the site they cannot be altered except
by a League Official making corrections. As a rule, each team
should assign a scorekeeper. It is a matter of courtesy during
league play that a player never be forced to keep his/her own
score because of the need to concentrate on the game. However,
it is suggested that after a player shoots he/she keeps score for
the next team player. Team Captains must review and/or
compare the sheets before signing the score sheet and leaving a
match site.
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Score Sheet Categories
It is the scorekeeper’s and Captains responsibility to make sure
the scoring totals are correct and legible in the appropriate areas
for data entry. This applies to all of the categories on score
sheets. If a player wins games with totals, which aren’t possible,
the team could be flagged for using improper scoring to cheat.
Player Name and ID#
In the proper spaces on the score sheet, please clearly print each
player’s first and last names along with the membership number
as found on the roster. If a player is new, print N/P instead in the
Player ID# section of the score sheet.
Ranking (Handicap) and Race To
Use the Ranking (Handicap) / Race Grid on score sheet to
determine the number of games each player needs to win the
match. The races vary depending on the skill level rankings of the
players involved. Simply mark the rankings and resulting number
of games needed to win in the appropriate areas on the score
sheet. If a player is a 5 skill level 5/4 should be placed in the race
grid box.
Time-Outs
Mark time-outs in an area near players name.
Innings
The inning ends with the player that looses the lag, even if he is
the home team. This player will end the inning throughout the
match. After this player misses it should be marked as an inning.
If they have more then (8) innings you do not stop keeping track of
innings. Place the total innings in the “Total Inning” box. If the
player that ends the inning wins the game an inning is not added
since that player did not miss.
Def (Defense)
When a player shoots a defensive shot, you must mark it in the
defense column and if it ends the inning the inning but be marked
as well. The opponent always has the final say on whether a shot
is defensive, also known as a safe shot. Place the total amount of
defenses in the “Defense” box.
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Left on Table
This column refers to the number of category balls that each
player has left on the table at the end of a game. (If a game ends
on an early 8-ball, probably there will be balls left on the table for
both the winner and the loser.) Count the number of category
balls and mark that number in this column (for both players if
necessary). If a player makes the 8-ball on the break, LOT needs
to be marked for both players. Place the total amount of balls left
on table from each game in the “Total Left on Table” box.
8-B and B&R (8 ball on the Break and Break and Run)
8 on the break and break and runs must be noted to clarify ball
totals for later audits. An 8-B is accompanied by up to 14 LOT
marks between the two players, and B-R would have up to 7 LOT
for the loser. Because categories of object balls were never
assigned in an 8-B game, the higher number, if any, of solids or
stripes becomes the loser’s LOT. Print the ID# of the player that
records an 8-B or B-R on the bottom of the score sheet.
Matches/Games Won and Lost
Indicate who wins the game by placing a “W” in the appropriate
small box of each inning. When the match is over, the number of
wins/losses in these blocks needs to be totaled. Write the total
number of games won/lost in the score column. Indicate a “W for
a win or an “L” for a loss in the W/L column.
Rules for APL Team 8-Ball
Object of the Game
The game of APL Team 8-Ball is played with the cue ball plus
fifteen object balls numbered 1 to 15. The usual method to win
the game is to pocket either all of the solids (numbers 1-7) or all of
the stripes (numbers 9-15), after which the player is entitled to win
by pocketing the 8-ball in a marked pocket. Pocketing the 8-ball
before all category of balls are legally pocketed is called an Early
8-ball (E-8), or scratching (S-8), and is loss of game. Pocketing
the 8-ball on the opening break wins the game immediately,
except that it is an immediate loss of game is the cue ball
scratches or leaves the table. Any time a player scratches while
pocketing the 8-ball, or while attempting to pocket a called 8-ball is
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a loss of game. You must mark the pocket you are going to
shoot the 8-ball in. A player only has to mark the same pocket
once. If opposing player is shooting the 8-ball in the same marked
pocket they must mark that pocket with their marker. Any time a
player marks the wrong pocket and pockets the 8-ball it is a loss
of game.
Racking the Balls
The fifteen object balls are racked in the standard triangular
pattern and oriented in the customary placement on the foot spot.
The 8-ball must be in the center of the third row; the fifth row must
have a solid ball at one end and a stripe at the other. The other
12 balls are distributed throughout the rack at the racking player’s
discretion. Loose racking is not allowed, before breaking the rack
the breaking player may request a re-rack by the racking player.
Break Shot
The player entitled to break the rack, either by the lag decision or
by winning a preceding game, has cue-ball-in-hand anywhere
100% behind the head string. To accomplish a legal break the
breaking player must drive the cue ball directly into the first or
second row of racked balls causing at least any 4 balls to hit any
cushions, or causing at least one object ball to be pocketed.
Otherwise, the opposing player has discretion to re-rack and may
also elect to break. If on any break shot any object balls leave the
playing surface, either by pocketing or launching off of the table,
they are out of play. On any shot if the cue ball leaves the playing
surface this is a foul and the incoming player is awarded cue-ballin-hand, but on a scratch break the cue ball is placed 100%
behind the head string. In this case, the player shooting after the
break can shoot at his/her choice of any non-8-ball that is at least
50% outside the head string. As mentioned under Object of the
Game, a player pocketing the 8-ball during a legal break wins the
game. If the breaking player also scratches on that same break,
that player loses the game instead. If the player launches the 8ball off the table during any shot, he/she loses the game. If a
player pockets the 8-ball and launches a non-cue ball off the table,
the player wins the game.
Continuing Play After the Break
If a player pockets one or more category balls on the break
without fouling, that player shoots again. The categories remain
unassigned (the table is open) until a shooter has completed a
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skill shot by pocketing a called ball in a called pocket. If that
player scratches on the completed skill shot, after the break, the
table is still open. Multi-category combination shots (Except
hitting the 8-ball first) are legal on an open table until the players’
categories have been determined. Once categories of balls have
been assigned, players continue shooting their categories until
they miss, foul, play defense, or win/lose the game. Accidentally
pocketing balls (slop) does not allow a shooter to continue. If a
player doesn’t win/lose, the opponent assumes control of the table
and does the same until the game ends.
Skill Shot / Good Hit
The APL 8-ball league is a call your pocket format to improve a
players’ game (also known as skill play). Once a player’s
particular category of balls is determined, the player must make
contact with that category with the cue ball first. For a shot to be
judged a good hit, it must make proper contact, and then at least
one ball of that player’s category, their opponent’s category or the
cue ball must make contact with a cushion or be pocketed. It is a
bad hit if the cue ball first strikes the 8-ball prematurely, the
opponent’s category of balls, or if no balls are struck. A bad hit
means a foul has been committed; the opponent comes to the
table with cue-ball-in-hand anywhere on the table, except on the
break where the cue ball must be placed 100 % behind the head
string. If the player pockets any object balls other than the called
shot (slop), those balls stay pocketed. (If the 8-ball is pocketed
out of turn it is loss of game.) During play uninterrupted by fouls,
a player successfully pocketing the declared called ball in the
called pocket, regardless of how the ball is pocketed in that
pocket, is considered to have completed the shot and continues
shooting until he/she wins or loses; otherwise play passes to the
opponent for him/her to shoot the cue ball where it stopped. This
means that the pocketed ball can touch any balls and cushions on
the table, but if it went into the called pocket it is a legally called
and completed shot.
Calling Shots; Bank, Kick, and Carom Shots
Because this is a call pocket league, it is not necessary to predict
cushions or secondary balls to be used in bank, kick, and carom
shots. If a player does not call the pocket his opponent could
determine that the simplest shot was a slop shot. For these rules,
players should protect themselves by calling all their pockets.
23
NOTE: Please remember we are all out to have a good time. If a
shot is evident and a player does not call it please do not construe
the above statement as a means to cheat the player out his shot.
The game goes to the best pool player not the best interpreter of
rules.
Combination Shots
Combination shots are legal during league play. The shooter
must strike his/her category of balls first to execute such a skill
shot, and if the categories have not been determined all
solid/stripe balls are neutral. The only call the shooter must make
is which ball will be pocketed in which pocket, and if the table was
open the pocketed ball becomes the first of the shooter’s
category. The 8-ball is never neutral for first cue ball contact but
can be used as part of a combination as long as it is not the first
ball in the combination chain.
Ball Off the Table
In 8-Ball games, if a player launches one or more of the
opponent’s balls off the table, except for the 8-ball, those balls
stay down. Unless a completion was achieved, the opponent then
shoots from where the cue ball came to rest. The shooter loses
the game immediately if the launched ball is the 8-ball, but a game
is not lost if a completed 8-ball shot is accompanied by some
other object ball being launched off the table.
Shooting the 8-ball
When shooting the 8-ball to win the game, the shooter must use
an object to physically mark the pocket called, and this object
must be visible to the opponent and something other than a
generic cube of pool chalk. That player wins as long as the 8-ball
goes in that marked pocket during a good, non-foul hit. It is a loss
of game if there is a scratch on this shot, or if the 8-ball goes into
an unmarked pocket, or if the shooter touches any ball preventing
these two occurrences. With other fouls the game continues with
a cue-ball-in-hand award plus the opponent’s replacement of any
balls, which were illegally moved due to a pre-contact foul.
Without using a time-out, anyone may remind the shooter to mark
an unspecified pocket. If a marker, placed by the original shooter
is at the intended pocket, they do not have to remark that pocket.
If the opponent is shooting the 8-ball in the same pocket they have
24
to mark the pocket. The pocket closest to the marker is the
designated pocket.
Rules for APL Team 9-Ball
General 9-Ball Rules
Object of the game
Nine-Ball is played with nine object balls numbered one through
nine and a cue ball. On each shot, the first ball the cue ball
contacts must be the lowest numbered ball on the table, but the
balls need not be pocketed in order. If a player pockets any ball on
a legal shot, he remains at the table for another shot, and
continues until missing, committing a foul, or wining the game by
marking and pocketing the 9-ball. After a miss, the incoming
player must shoot from the position left by the previous player, but
after any foul the incoming player may start with the cue ball
anywhere on the table. Players are not required to call any shot,
however, the shooter must mark the pocket when shooting the 9ball. The 9-ball must be marked when shooting the 9-ball
including combinations on the 9-ball. A coaster or something
visible (not chalk) can be used as a marker. A match ends when
one of the players has won the required number of games needed
to win.
Racking the balls
The object balls are racked in a diamond shape, with the 1-ball at
the top of the diamond and on the foot spot, the 9-ball in the
center of the diamond, and the other balls in random order, racked
as tightly as possible. The game begins with cue ball in hand
behind the head string.
Order of break
Winner of the lag has the option to break. In APL 9-Ball, the
winner of each game breaks next.
Legal break shot
The rules governing the break shot are:
1. The breaker must strike the1-ball first and drive at least four
numbered balls to the rail or pocket a ball. If the requirements of
25
the break are not met, the incoming player has a choice of
breaking or having the same player break over.
2. If the cue ball is pocketed or driven off the table, it is a foul, and
the incoming player has cue ball in hand anywhere on the table.
3. If on the break shot, the breaker causes an object ball to jump
off the table, it is not a foul and the object ball stays down, except
the 9-ball, which is spotted. If no balls are pocketed on the break
the incoming player shoots next.
Push out
There is no push after the break.
Fouls
When a player commits a foul, he must relinquish his run at the
table and any balls pocketed on the foul shot are not re-spotted
(exception: if a pocketed ball is the 9-ball, it is re-spotted). The
incoming player is awarded ball in hand; prior to his first shot he
may place the cue ball anywhere on the table. If a player commits
several fouls on one shot, they are counted as only one foul.
A player must have one foot on the floor while shooting a shot. If
he/she does not the incoming player has ball in hand. (This rule
does not apply to the physically impaired).
Bad hit
If the first object ball contacted by the cue ball is not the lowest
numbered ball on the table, the shot is foul.
No rail
If no object ball is pocketed, failure to drive the cue ball or any
numbered ball to a rail after the cue ball contacts the object ball is
a foul.
Cue ball-In-hand
When the cue ball is in hand, the player may place the cue ball
anywhere on the bed of the table. The player may continue to
adjust the position of the cue ball by hand or by cue stick until
shooting. If any other balls are touched when placing the cue ball
or if the shooter is in position and touches the cue ball while
stroking it is a foul and the incoming player has ball in hand.
26
Balls jumped off table
An un-pocketed ball is considered to be driven off the table if it
comes to rest other than on the bed of the table. The jumped
object ball(s) is not re-spotted (exception: if the object ball is the 9ball, it is re-spotted) and the incoming player shoots where the cue
ball came to rest.
Touching object ball foul
If an object ball is moved by the player while shooting it is not a
foul (regardless of whether it was moved by a hand, cue stick
follow-through). The opponent has the option to let the ball stay
where it came to rest or have the shooter place the object ball
where it was. (Exception: if the moving ball/s caused the 9-ball to
be pocketed in a marked pocket it is then a foul, the 9-ball must be
spotted, and the opponent has cue ball in hand from anywhere on
the table.
Scoring
Please keep track of innings, ball count, defensive shots and
games won and lost. If the innings are longer then (8) innings you
still must keep track of the innings for the remainder of the game.
Three consecutive fouls
If a player fouls three consecutive times on three successive shots
without making an intervening legal shot, the game is NOT lost.
Push Shot / Double Hit
As long as the shooter hits the cue ball with a stroke, and not a
push, is no foul when the cue ball and the target object ball are
touching (frozen) or the distance (width) of a piece of chalk. A
push is when the shooter lays the cue tip onto the cue ball and
does not bring his/her arm back before the stroke and pushes the
cue ball rather then stroking it. There is no foul if a shooter strokes
the cue ball no matter where it is in relation to the object ball.
Split hits
When a player hits both the lowest number ball on the table and
the 9-ball at the same time it is not a foul. It is best to have a
neutral player or referee observe the shot. If no one has observed
the shot and there is a controversy the call will go to the shooter.
27
Coaching foul
If the coach moves the balls, marks the table or touches any
object ball with the cue ball it is ball in hand to the opponent. The
coach may place the cue ball for the shooter. The coach may
touch the table. Any person who coaches from the sidelines or
distracts a player will be given a warning. If the offense occurs
again the incoming player will be given ball in hand. Any one on
the team can tell the shooter to mark the 9-ball in a sportsmanlike
manner. If a player or coach calls a time out and the coach
comes to the table and starts to talk to the player, when there are
no time outs left, is a ball in hand foul to opponent.
Coaching
A player with a skill level of 2-3-4 is allowed two- (1) one-minute
time outs and players with a skill level of 5-6-7 are allowed one(1) one-minute time outs. A player must keep the coach they
started with for the remainder of their match unless agreed by
both captains. (See 8-ball rule for time-outs during higher level
tournaments).
Forfeits
If there are no players from the opposing team within 15 minutes
from the starting time the first match will go the team that has their
players present. After every 5 minutes if a shooter is not available
it is a loss of a match until all 5 matches are forfeited. If the match
starts then a team only has (2) minutes to call their next shooter.
Please remember all reasonable efforts must be made before
taking the forfeit.
Make up matches
All matches must be made up within two- (2) weeks unless your
league operator has made other arrangements. No make up
matches can be made up within the last two- (2) weeks of regular
session play. This will result in the team receiving 3 points not 5
and all dues would still have to be paid. (See 8-ball rule). There
can be NO forfeits the within the last (2) weeks of the session.
Same rule applies.
Adding/dropping players
New players can be added to your roster or dropped from your
roster during the first four- (4) weeks of the session.
28
League fees
All teams and players are responsible for payment of league fees
(forfeits are no exception). The league fees are subject to change
in the course of time. Please ask your league operator what the
league fees are before you start the session. (See 8-ball ruling)
End of game
The game ends when a legal shot pockets the 9-ball, or when a
player forfeits the game as the result of a foul. You must mark the
pocket when shooting the 9-ball. If a player does not mark the
pocket when shooting the 9-ball and makes the 9-ball it is loss of
game. If the player marks the pocket when shooting the 9-ball
and makes the 9-ball in another pocket (not the marked pocket)
the 9-ball is spotted and the incoming player must shoot from the
position (cue ball) left by the previous player. If the player marks
the pocket on a 9-ball combination and makes the 9-ball in
another pocket the 9-ball is spotted for the incoming player. If the
player marks the pocket on a 9-ball combination and makes the 9ball in another pocket and makes the lower number ball he is
shooting, the 9-ball is spotted but the player continues to shoot. If
a player marks the pocket and makes the 9-ball and scratches the
9-ball is spotted and the opposing player has cue ball-in-hand. In
9-ball the player can shoot the 9-ball in with the cue ball or any
other ball and it is not loss of game. If the player uses the tip of
their cue or any part of their stick or their hand to knock in the 9ball it is loss of game.
A player cannot call safe and pocket a ball. If they do they must
shoot again.
25-rule handicap
A team of (5) players must not go over the sum total of 25 points
when playing a match. (See 8-ball ruling)
Disputes
Not all rules and situations can be covered in a rulebook. Using
common sense and being courteous can settle most disputes.
The players involved and the Captains should make every effort to
settle the dispute using good sportsmanship. If the dispute cannot
be resolved the Division Rep or League Operator should be
contacted and their decision is final.
Post-season tournaments/playoffs
29
Teams competing in higher-level APL events for which they
qualified during the session are to keep at least 4 players from the
original team that qualified to keep their team qualification. In the
End of Session Vegas Qualifier tournament held after each
session, the team that qualified is the team that plays! These
teams must field the team with the same players that were on the
team when they qualified. In addition, if they are a new player to
the league they need (6) matches to compete in any higher-level
tournament and if they are veteran players they need (4) matches
to compete in any higher-level tournament. Your team and or
players must be active to participate in any Higher Level team or
singles playoffs sponsored by The Amateur Pool League. In any
post-season tournament your player must be present to forfeit
their individual match! This is not the case in regular weekly
league play. If there are any additional post-season tournaments,
other then the End of Session Vegas Qualifier, the rules and
qualifications will be posted before the tournament.
Conduct
Verbal abuse consists of threats, name-calling, harassment or just
being a generally argumentive person. This can result in loss of
game, match or suspension. Physical contact is strictly prohibited.
Any player who initiates physical violence will be banned from the
league for life. Other penalties regarding law enforcement
agencies may be applied. League Management is not a judge
and cannot consider who started the problem and if retaliation was
justified. If a problem occurs League Management must take
action on one or both teams.
Conduct toward the APL
Derogatory remarks or argumentive behavior toward the APL
office, staff, Division Reps, referees or players will result in
ejection from the league. Any actions that would be considered
detrimental or harmful to the APL will result in ejection from the
league.
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Amateur Pool League, Inc.
PO Box 603
Downingtown, PA 19335
610-269-8302
Fax: 610-269-5608
www.amateurpoolleague.com
© Amateur Pool League, Inc. 2001-2010 All Rights Reserved
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