Compliance Document for New Zealand Building Code Clause G12

Compliance Document for New Zealand Building Code Clause G12
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Compliance Document for
New Zealand Building Code
Clause G12
Water Supplies – Third Edition
Prepared by the Department of Building and Housing
This Compliance Document is prepared by the Department of Building
and Housing. The Department of Building and Housing is a Government
Department established under the State Sector Act 1988.
Enquiries about the content of this document should be directed to:
Department of Building and Housing
PO Box 10-729, Wellington.
Telephone 0800 242 243
Fax 04 494 0290
Email: [email protected]
Compliance Documents are available from www.dbh.govt.nz
© Department of Building and Housing 2011
This Compliance Document is protected by Crown copyright, unless indicated otherwise.
The Department of Building and Housing administers the copyright in this document.
You may use and reproduce this document for your personal use or for the purposes
of your business provided you reproduce the document accurately and not in an
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or reproduce it for sale or profit.
The Department of Building and Housing owns or has licences to use all images and
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featured in this document for any purpose (except as part of an accurate reproduction
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Status of Compliance Documents
Compliance Documents are prepared by the Department of Building and Housing in accordance with section 22 of the Building
Act 2004. A Compliance Document is for use in establishing compliance with the New Zealand Building Code.
A person who complies with a Compliance Document will be treated as having complied with the provisions of the Building Code
to which the Compliance Document relates. However, a Compliance Document is only one method of complying with the Building
Code. There may be alternative ways to comply.
Users should make themselves familiar with the preface to the New Zealand Building Code Handbook, which describes the status
of Compliance Documents and explains alternative methods of achieving compliance.
Defined words (italicised in the text) and classified uses are explained in Clause A1 and A2 of the Building Code and in the
Definitions at the start of this Compliance Document.
G12: Document History
Date
Alterations
First published
July 1992
Amendment 1
September 1993
pp. vi–viii, References
p. ix, Definitions
p. 15, Table 4
p. 16, 4.5.1, 4.5.3
p. 19, 5.2.2 b)
p. 22, Table 7
p. 26, Index
Amendment 2
19 August 1994
pp. i and ii, Document History
p. v, Contents
p. viii, References
p. 3, 2.2.1 e)
p. 6, 2.6, 2.6.1
p. 19, 4.13.1, 4.14, 4.14.1
p. 26, 29, Index
Amendment 3
1 December 1995
p. ii, Document History
pp. vi–viii, References
p. 5, Table 1
p. 6, 2.5.2
Second edition
published July 2001
Effective from
1 October 2001
Document revised –
Second edition issued
Amendment 4
6 January 2002
pp. 3–5 Code Clause G12
Amendment 5
25 February 2004
p. 2, Document History
p.7, Contents
pp. 9–11 References
pp. 23-38, 3.7.1, 3.7.4, 4.1,
6.2.1, 6.3.2–6.15, Figure 13
pp. 43-45 Index
Amendment 6
23 June 2007
p. 2, Document History, Status
pp. 9 and 11, References
p. 13, Definitions
p. 15, VM1 1.0.1
Third edition published
October 2007
Effective from
1 December 2007
Document revised –
Third edition issued
G12/AS1 amended:
p. 27, Table 5
p. 32, 6.5.1
p. 35, 6.9, 6.10
p. 36, 6.11.5
p. 37, 6.14.3
p. 38, 6.15 (deleted)
p. 40, 7.5.2
New Acceptable Solution
G12/AS2 included
Amendment 7
Published 30 June 2010
Effective from
30 September 2010
p. 2, Document History, Status
pp. 3 and 4, Code Clause G12
pp. 7–10, References
p. 17, G12/AS1 2.1.2, Table 1
p. 27, G12/AS1 Table 5
p. 32, G12/AS1 Table 6
p. 41, G12/AS1 9.3.2
Amendment 8
10 October 2011
p. 2, Document History, Status
pp. 7–10, References
p.12, Definitions
p. 21, G12/AS1 3.6.1
p. 23, G12/AS1 3.7.2
p. 41, G12/AS1 9.3.2
p. 43, G12/AS2 1.1.1
Note: Page numbers relate to the document at the time of Amendment and may not match page numbers in current document.
Document Status
The most recent version of this document, as detailed in the Document History, is approved by the Chief Executive
of the Department of Building and Housing. It is effective from 10 October 2011 and supersedes all previous versions
of this document.
People using this Compliance Document should check for amendments on a regular basis. The Department of Building
and Housing may amend any part of any Compliance Document at any time. Up-to-date versions of Compliance
Documents are available from www.dbh.govt.nz
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New Zealand Building Code
Clause G12 Water Supplies
C l a u s e G12
wat e r s u p p l i e s
The mandatory provisions for building work are contained in the New Zealand Building Code
(NZBC), which comprises the First Schedule to the Building Regulations 1992. The relevant
NZBC Clause for Water Supplies is G12.
Schedule
Building Amendment Regulations 2001
Schedule
New clause G12 substituted in First Schedule of
principal regulations
Clause G12–Water Supplies
Provisions
Limits on application
Objective
G12.1 The objective of this provision is
to–
(a) safeguard people from illness caused by contaminated water:
(b) safeguard people from injury caused by hot water system explosion, or from contact with excessively hot water:
(c) safeguard people from loss of amenity arising from–
(i) a lack of hot water for personal hygiene; or
(ii)water for human consumption, which is offensive in appearance, odour or taste:
(d) ensure that people with disabilities are able to carry out normal activities and functions within buildings.
Objective G12.1(d) shall apply only to
those buildings to which section 47A of
the Act applies.
Amend 7
Sep 2010
See Note
Functional requirement
G12.2 Buildings provided with water
outlets, sanitary fixtures or sanitary
appliances must have safe and adequate
water supplies.
Performance
G12.3.1 Water intended for human
consumption, food preparation, utensil
washing or oral hygiene must be potable
G12.3.2 A potable water supply system
shall be–
(a) protected from contamination; and
(b) installed in a manner which avoids the likelihood of contamination within the system and the water main; and
(c) installed using components that will not contaminate the water.
G12.3.3 A non-potable water supply system
used for personal hygiene shall be
installed in a manner that avoids the
likelihood of illness or injury being caused
by the system.
Performance G12.3.1 does not apply to
backcountry huts.
Amended
Oct 2008
G12.3.4 Water pipes and outlets provided
with non-potable water shall be clearly
identified.
NOTE:
Section 47A is in the Building Act 1991. The equivalent section in the Building Act 2004 is section 118.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
30 September 2010
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Clause G12
wat e r s u p p l i e s
Building Amendment Regulations 2001
Provisions
Schedule
Limits on application
Performance–continued
G12.3.5 Sanitary fixtures and sanitary
appliances must be provided with hot
water when intended to be used for–
(a) utensil washing; and
(b) personal washing, showering or bathing.
Performance G12.3.5(b) shall apply only
to housing, retirement homes and early
childhood centres.
G12.3.6 Where hot water is provided to
sanitary fixtures and sanitary appliances,
used for personal hygiene, it must be
delivered at a temperature that avoids the
likelihood of scalding.
G12.3.7 Water supply systems must be
installed in a manner that–
(a) pipes water to sanitary fixtures and sanitary appliances flow rates that are adequate for the correct functioning of those fixtures and appliances under normal conditions; and
(b) avoids the likelihood of leakage; and
(c) allows reasonable access to components likely to need maintenance; and
(d) allows the system and any backflow prevention devices to be isolated for testing and maintenance.
G12.3.8 Vessels used for producing or
storing hot water must be provided with
safety devices that–
(a) relieve excessive pressure during both normal and abnormal conditions; and
(b) limit temperatures to avoid the likelihood of flash steam production in the event of rupture.
G12.3.9 A hot water system must be
capable of being controlled to prevent the
growth of legionella bacteria.
G12.3.10 Water supply taps must be
accessible and usable for people with
disabilities.
Performance G12.3.10 applies only to
those buildings to which section 47a of
the Act applies.
Amend 7
Sep 2010
See Note
Clerk of the Executive Council.
NOTE:
Section 47A is in the Building Act 1991. The equivalent section in the Building Act 2004 is section 118.
30 September 2010
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
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C o n t e nts G12
wat e r s u p p l i e s
Contents
Page
6.8
Vent pipes 34
6.9
Alternative acceptable solutions 35
for the installation of open vented storage water heaters
References
7
Definitions
11
Verification Method G12/VM1
15
1.0Water Supply System
15
6.10 Alternative acceptable solutions 35
for the installation of unvented
(valve vented) storage water heaters
Acceptable Solution G12/AS1
17
6.11 Water heater installation
35
1.0
Scope
17
6.12 Hot water pipe sizes
36
2.0
Materials
17
6.13 Wet-back water heaters
36
2.1
Water quality
17
6.14 Safe water temperatures
37
2.2
Pipe materials
17
6.15 Solar water heaters
38
3.0Protection of Potable Water
18
7.0Installation Methods
38
3.1
Drawn water not to be returned
18
7.1
Pipe supports
38
3.2
Cross connections prohibited
18
7.2
Protection from freezing
38
3.3
Cross connection hazard
18
7.3
Protection from damage
39
3.4
Backflow protection
19
7.4
Installation of uPVC pipes
39
3.5
Air gap
20
7.5
Watertightness
40
3.6
Backflow prevention devices
20
40
3.7
Testing
23
8.0Usable Facilities for People with Disabilities
4.0
Non-potable Supply
23
9.0Equipotential Bonding
40
4.1
Protection of non-potable water supplies
23
9.1
General
40
4.2
Outlet identification
23
9.2
Installation of equipotential bonding 41
conductors
4.3
Pipeline identification
23
9.3
Earth bonding conductors
41
5.0Water Supply
24
Acceptable Solution G12/AS2
43
5.1
Water tanks
24
1.0
43
5.2
Water tank installation
24
1.1 Structural support limitations
43
5.3
Water pipe size
24
1.2 Exclusions
44
5.4
Maintenance facilities
26
2.0
Materials
44
6.0
Hot Water Supply System
27
2.1
Material selection
44
6.1
Water heaters
27
48
6.2
Water supply to storage water heaters
27
3.0 Solar Water Heater Requirements
Operating devices
28
Solar water heaters and components
48
6.3
3.1
6.4
Safety devices
32
3.2
Solar controller
48
6.5
Temperature control devices
32
3.3
Sizing of systems
48
6.6
Relief valves
32
3.4
Operating and safety devices
48
6.7
Relief valve drains
33
3.5
Protection from Legionella bacteria 48
3.6
Protection from frosts
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
Scope
49
1 December 2007
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Acceptable Solution G12/AS1
wat e r s u p p l i e s
Page
4.0Location of Solar Water Heaters
50
4.1
Location
50
4.2
Solar orientation and inclination
50
5.0Installation of Solar Water Heaters
51
5.1
Wetback water heaters 51
5.2
Weathertightness
52
5.3
Pipe installation
55
5.4
Pipe insulation
55
6.0 Structural Support for Solar Water Heaters
56
6.1 Scope
56
6.2
General requirements
56
6.3
Direct fixed solar collectors parallel to the roof
56
6.4
Elevated solar collectors parallel to the roof
59
6.5
Collector support rails
61
6.6
Mounting collectors at a different pitch to the roof cladding
62
7.0
Maintenance and Durability
64
7.1
Maintenance
64
7.2
Durability
64
Index
1 December 2007
65
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
R e f e r e nces G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
References
Amend 8
Oct 2011
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wat e r s u p p l i e s
For the purposes of New Zealand Building Code (NZBC) compliance, the Standards and
documents referenced in this Compliance Document (primary reference documents) must be
the editions, along with their specific amendments, listed below. Where these primary reference
documents refer to other Standards or documents (secondary reference documents), which
in turn may also refer to other Standards or documents, and so on (lower-order reference
documents), then the version in effect at the date of publication of this Compliance Document
must be used.
Where quoted
Standards New Zealand
Amend 8
Oct 2011
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Amend 8
Oct 2011
NZS/BS 1387:
1985
Specification for screwed and socketed steel tubes
and tubulars and for plain end steel tubes suitable
for welding or screwing to BS 21 pipe threads
Amend: 1
AS1 Table 1
NZS 3501: 1976
Specification for copper tubes for water, gas, and sanitation
Amends: 1, 2, 3
AS1 Table 1
NZS 3604: 2011 Timber framed buildings
AS2 1.1.1
NZS 3604: 1999 Timber framed buildings
AS2 1.1.1
NZS 3604: 1990 Timber framed buildings
AS2 1.1.1
NZS 4203:1992 Code of Practice for general structural design and design loadings for buildings
AS2 1.1.1
NZS 4602: 1988
Low pressure copper thermal storage electric water heaters
Amend: 1
AS1 Table 5
NZS 4603: 1985
Installation of low pressure thermal storage electric water heaters with copper cylinders
(open-vented systems)
Amend: 1
AS1 6.9.1, 6.11.5
NZS 4606:
Part 1: 1989
Part 2: 1989
Part 3: 1992
Storage water heaters
General requirements
Amends: 1, 2, 3
Specific requirements for water heaters with single shells
Amend: A
Specific requirements for water heaters with composite shells
Amend: A
NZS 4607: 1989
Installation of thermal storage electric water heaters: valve-vented systems
AS1 6.10.1
NZS 4608: 1992
Control valves for hot water systems
AS1 Table 6
NZS 4613: 1986 Domestic solar water heaters
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
AS1 Table 5
AS1 Table 5
AS1 Table 5
AS2 3.1.1, 7.2.3
10 October 2011
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References G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
wat e r s u p p l i e s
Where quoted
NZS 4614: 1986 Installation of domestic solar hot water heating systems
AS2 4.2.2
NZS 4617: 1989
Tempering (3-port mixing) valves
AS1 6.14.2 b)
NZS 5807: 1980
Part 2: 1980
Code of practice for industrial identification by
colour, wording or other coding
Identification of contents of piping, conduit and ducts
Amends: 1, 2
AS1 4.3.1
NZS 6214: 1988
Thermostats and thermal cutouts for domestic thermal storage electric water heaters
(alternating current only)
AS1 6.5.1
NZS 7601: 1978
Specification for polyethylene pipe (Type 3) for cold water services
AS1 Table 1
NZS 7602: 1977
Specification for polyethylene pipe (Type 5) for cold water services
Amend: 1
AS1 Table 1
NZS 7610: 1991
Specification for blue polyethylene pipes up to nominal size 63 for below ground use for
potable water
Amends: 1, 2, 3
AS1 Table 1
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Amend 8
Oct 2011
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Amend 7
Sep 2010
British Standards Institution
Amend 7
Sep 2010
BS EN 1490: 2000 Building valves. Combined temperature and pressure relief valves. Tests and requirements.
AS1 Table 6
BS EN 1491: 2000 Building valves. Expansion valves. Tests and requirements
AS1 Table 6
BS EN 1567: 1999 Building valves. Water pressure reducing valves and combination water reducing valves.
Requirements and tests.
AS1 Table 6
Suitability of non-metallic products for use in
BS 6920 contact with water intended for human consumption
with regard to their effect on the quality of the water
Part 1: 2000 Specification Part 2: 2000 Methods of tests Part 3: 2000 High temperature tests
10 October 2011
AS1 2.1.2
AS1 2.1.2
AS1 2.1.2
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
R e f e r e nces G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
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wat e r s u p p l i e s
Where quoted
Standards Australia
AS 1308: 1987
Electric water heaters – Thermostats and thermal cut-outs
Amend: 1
AS 1357:
Part 1: 2009
Part 2: 2005
Water valves for use with unvented water heaters
Protection valves
Amend: 1, 2
Control valves
Amend: 1, 2
AS 2845:
Part 3: 1993
Water supply – Mechanical backflow
prevention devices
Field testing and maintenance
Amend: 1
AS1 6.5.1
AS1 Table 6
AS1 6.14.2 b),
Table 6
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Amend 8
Oct 2011
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Amend 8
Oct 2011
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Amend 8
Oct 2011
Amend 8
Oct 2011
AS1 3.6.1 b),
3.7.2
Australia/New Zealand Standards
AS/NZS 1170: Part 0: 2002 Part 1: 2002 Part 2: 2002 Part 3: 2003 Structural Design Actions
General principles Amend: 1, 2 and 4
Permanent, imposed and other actions Amend: 1
Wind Actions Amend: 1
Snow and ice actions Amend: 1
NZS 1170: Part 5: 2004
Earthquake design actions – New Zealand
AS2 1.1.1
AS2 1.1.1
AS2 1.1.1
AS2 1.1.1
AS2 1.1.1
AS/NZS 1477: 2006PVC pipes and fittings for pressure applications
Amend: 1
AS1 Table 1
AS/NZS 2032: 2006 Installation of PVC pipe systems
Amend: 1
AS1 7.4.1, 7.5.2
AS/NZS 2642:
Part 1: 2007
Part 2: 2008
Part 3: 2008
Polybutylene pipe systems
Polybutylene (PB) pipe extrusion compounds
Polybutylene (PB) pipe for hot and cold water applications
Mechanical jointing fittings for use with polybutylene (PB) pipes for hot and cold water
applications
Amend: 1
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
AS1 Table 1
AS1 Table 1
AS1 Table 1
10 October 2011
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References G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
wat e r s u p p l i e s
Where quoted
AS/NZS 2712: 2002Solar and heat pump water heaters – design and
(until 1 July 2009) construction
AS2 3.1.1, 3.6.2
AS/NZS 2712: 2007Solar and heat pump water heaters – design and
construction
AS2 3.1.1, 3.6.1
Amend 8
Oct 2011
AS/NZS 2845:
Part 1: 2010
Water supply
Materials, design and performance requirements
Amend 7
Sep 2010
AS/NZS 3350.2.35: 1999 Safety of household and similar electrical appliances – Particular requirements –
Instantaneous water heaters
Amends: 1, 2
Plumbing and drainage
AS/NZS 3500:
Part 1: 2003
Water services
Amend: 1 Part 4: 2003
Heated water services
Amend: 1
Amend 7
Sep 2010
AS1 3.6.2
AS1 Table 5
VM1 1.0.1 a),
AS1 3.5.2
VM1 1.0.1 b)
AS1 6.15.1,
AS2 1.1.1, 4.2.2, 5.0.1
AS/NZS 4020: 2005 Testing of products for use in contact with drinking water
AS1 2.1.2
AS/NZS 4129: 2008 Fittings for polyethylene (PE) pipes for pressure applications
AS1 Table 1
AS/NZS 4130: 2009Polyethylene (PE) pipes for pressure applications
Amend: 1
AS1 Table 1
AS/NZS 4692:
Part 2: 2005
Electric water heaters
Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS)
requirements and energy labelling
AS2 3.1.2
AS1 9.3.2
Amend 7
Sep 2010
AS/NZS 5000.1 2005 Electric cables – Polymeric insulated – For working voltages up to and including
0.6/1 (1.2) kV Amend: 1
AS1 9.3.2
Amend 8
Oct 2011
AS/NZS 5000.2 2006 Electric cables – Polymeric insulated Part 2: For working voltages up to and including
450/750 v.
New Zealand Regulations
Gas Regulations 1993
AS1 Table 5
Master Plumbers, Gasfitters and Drainlayers NZ Inc
and Water New Zealand
Amend 8
Oct 2011
10
NZ Backflow testing standard 2011
Field testing of backflow prevention devices and
verification of air gaps
10 October 2011
AS1 3.6.1 b), 3.7.2
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
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D e f i n i tions G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
wat e r s u p p l i e s
Definitions
This is an abbreviated list of definitions for words or terms particularly relevent to this Compliance
Document. The definitions for any other italicised words may be found in the New Zealand
Building Code Handbook.
Adequate Adequate to achieve the objectives
of the Building Code.
Air gap The vertical distance through air
between the lowest point of the water
supply outlet and the flood level rim of the
equipment or the fixture into which the
outlet discharges.
Amenity means an attribute of a building
which contributes to the health, physical
independence, and well being of the
building’s users but which is not associated
with disease or a specific illness.
Backflow The unplanned reversal of flow of
water or mixtures of water and
contaminants into the water supply system.
See back-siphonage and back-pressure.
Backflow prevention device A device that
prevents backflow.
Back-pressure A backflow condition caused
by the downstream pressure becoming
greater than the supply pressure.
Back-siphonage A backflow condition caused
by the supply pressure becoming less than
the downstream pressure.
Building has the meaning ascribed to it by
sections 8 and 9 of the Building Act 2004.
Check valve A valve that permits flow in one
direction but prevents a return flow and is
part of a backflow prevention device.
Cladding The exterior weather-resistant
surface of a building.
Comment:
Includes any supporting substrate and, if applicable,
surface treatment.
Contaminant includes any substance
(including gases, liquids, solids, and microorganisms) or energy (excluding noise) or
heat, that either by itself or in combination
with the same, similar, or other substances,
energy, or heat
a) When discharged into water, changes or is likely to change the physical, chemical, or biological condition of water, or
b)
When discharged onto or into land or into air, changes or is likely to change the physical, chemical, or biological condition of the land or air onto or into which it is discharged.
This is the meaning ascribed to it by the
Resource Management Act 1991.
Cross connection Any actual or potential
connection between a potable water supply
and a source of contamination.
Diameter (or bore) The nominal internal
diameter.
EPDM (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer)
A thermosetting synthetic rubber used as a
resilient part of a sealing washer, or as a
roof membrane.
Fixture An article intended to remain
permanently attached to and form part
of a building.
Flashing A component, formed from a rigid
or flexible waterproof material, that drains
or deflects water back outside the
cladding system.
Flood level rim The top edge at which water
can overflow from equipment or a fixture.
Framing Timber members to which lining,
cladding, flooring, or decking is attached;
or which are depended upon for supporting
the structure, or for resisting forces applied
to it
Free outlet (push through) In the context
of storage water heaters means a water
heater with a tap on the cold water inlet
so designed that the hot water is
discharged through an open outlet.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
1 December 2007
11
wat e r s u p p l i e s
Household unit
a) means any building or group of buildings,
or part of a building or group of buildings,
that is:
i) used, or intended to be used, only or mainly for residential purposes; and
ii) occupied, or intended to be occupied, exclusively as the home or residence of not more than one household; but
b) does not include a hostel, boarding house or other specialised accommodation.
Masonry tiles Clay or concrete tile roof
cladding.
Membrane A non-metallic material, usually
synthetic, used as a fully supported roof
cladding, deck surface or, in conjunction with
other claddings, as gutters or flashings.
Network utility operator means a person who—
Amend 8
Oct 2011
a)
undertakes or proposes to undertake
the distribution or transmission by pipeline of natural or manufactured gas, petroleum,
biofuel, or geothermal energy; or
Open vented storage water heater A water
heater incorporating a vent pipe which is
permanently open to the atmosphere.
Potable (and potable water) Water that is
suitable for human consumption.
Purlin A horizontal member laid to span
across rafters or trusses, and to which the
roof cladding is attached.
Rafter A framing timber, normally parallel to
the slope of the roof, providing support for
sarking, purlins or roof cladding.
Sanitary appliance An appliance which is
intended to be used for sanitation, but
which is not a sanitary fixture. Included are
machines for washing dishes and clothes.
Sanitary fixture Any fixture which is intended
to be used for sanitation.
Sanitation The term used to describe the
activities of washing and/or excretion
carried out in a manner or condition such
that the effect on health is minimised, with
regard to dirt and infection.
i) telecommunication as defined in section 5 of the Telecommunications Act 2001; or
Specific design Design and detailing of a
proposed building or parts of a building,
demonstrating compliance with the building
code, that shall be provided to the building
consent authority for assessment and approval
as part of the building consent process.
ii) radiocommunications as defined
in section 2(1) of the Radiocommunications Act 1989; or
Buildings, or parts of buildings, requiring
specific design are beyond the scope of this
Acceptable Solution.
b) operates or proposes to operate a network for the purpose of—
c) is an electricity operator or electricity distributor as defined in section 2 of
the Electricity Act 1992 for the purpose
of line function services as defined in
that section; or
d) undertakes or proposes to undertake
the distribution of water for supply
(including irrigation); or
e) undertakes or proposes to undertake
a drainage or sewerage system.
Non-return valve A valve that permits flow in
one direction but prevents a return flow and
is part of a hot or cold water system.
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Definitions G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
10 October 2011
Storage water heater A water tank with an
integral water heater for the storage of
hot water.
Toxic environment An environment that
contains contaminants that can contaminate
the water supply in concentrations greater
than those included in the New Zealand
Drinking Water Standard 1995.
Valve vented storage water heater (Also
known as an unvented storage water
heater.) A storage water heater in which
the required venting to the atmosphere is
controlled by a valve.
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D e f i n i tions G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
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Vent pipe A pipe which is open to the
atmosphere at one end and acts as a
pressure limiting device.
Water heater A device for heating water.
Water main A water supply pipe vested in, or
is under the control, or maintained by, a
network utility operator.
Water supply system Pipes, fittings and
tanks used or intended to be used for the
storage and reticulation of water from a
water main or other water source, to
sanitary fixtures, sanitary appliances and
fittings within a building.
Water tank (vessel) A covered fixed container
for storing hot or cold water.
Weathertightness and weathertight Terms
used to describe the resistance of a
building to the weather.
Weathertightness is a state where water is
prevented from entering and accumulating
behind the cladding in amounts that can
cause undue dampness or damage to the
building elements.
Comment:
The term weathertightness is not necessarily the same
as waterproof.
However, a weathertight building, even under severe
weather conditions, is expected to limit moisture
ingress to inconsequential amounts, insufficient to
cause undue dampness inside buildings and damage to
building elements. Moisture that may occasionally enter
is able to harmlessly escape or evaporate.
Wind zone Categorisation of wind force experienced on a particular site as determined in NZS 3604, Section 5.
Comment:
Maximum ultimate limit state speeds are:
Low wind zone =
wind speed of 32 m/s
Medium wind zone = wind speed of 37 m/s
High wind zone
=
wind speed of 44 m/s
Very high wind zone = wind speed of 50 m/s.
Specific design is required for wind speeds greater
than 50 m/s.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
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Verification Method G12/VM1
Ve r i f i cation Method G12/VM1
wat e r s u p p l i e s
1.0Water Supply System
1.0.1 A design method for water supply
systems may be verified as satisfying the
Performances of NZBC G12 if it complies
with:
Amend 6
Jun 2007
Amend 6
Jun 2007
a) AS/NZS 3500.1 Section 2, Section 3 and
Appendix C (note that Appendix C is
part of this Verification Method even
though it is included in the standard as
an “Informative” Appendix), and
b)AS/NZS 3500.4.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
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Acceptable Solution G12/AS1
A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
wat e r s u p p l i e s
1.0 Scope
1.0.1This acceptable solution applies to below
ground and above ground piped water supply
systems.
2.0 Materials
2.1Water quality
2.1.1Components of the water supply system
shall not contaminate potable water.
Amend 7
Sep 2010
2.1.2Non-metallic components complying
with BS 6920 or AS/NZS 4020 materials
complying with Table 1 shall be acceptable.
2.2.2All pipes and pipe fittings used for the
piping of water shall be:
a) Suitable for the temperatures and pressures
within that system,
b)Compatible with the water supply and
environmental conditions in the particular
location, and
c) Where installed in an exposed situation,
resistant to UV light.
Note: Where fire hose reels are served by the
above ground cold water supply system the
pipe system shall comply with NZS 4503 as
referenced in C/AS1 Table 4.1.
2.2Pipe materials
2.2.1Pipe materials shall comply with Table 1.
Table 1: Pipe Materials for Hot and Cold Water
Paragraphs 2.1.2, 2.2.1 and 6.7.2
MaterialRelevant Standard
Hot and Cold
Copper
Galvanised steel
Polybutylene
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Amend 7
Sep 2010
NZS 3501
NZS/BS 1387
AS/NZS 2642: Parts 1, 2 and 3
Cold Only
PVC-U
Polyethylene
AS/NZS 1477
NZS 7601 for pressures up to 0.9 MPa (Type 3)
NZS 7602 for pressures up to 1.2 MPa (Type 5)
NZS 7610 for pressures up to 1.2 MPa
AS/NZS 4129 for fittings
AS/NZS 4130 for pressures up to 2.5 MPa
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
30 September 2010
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Acceptable Solution G12/AS1
wat e r s u p p l i e s
3.0Protection of Potable Water
l) Hose taps associated with High hazard situations like
mixing of pesticides
3.1 Drawn water not to be returned
m)Irrigation systems with chemicals
3.1.1Water drawn from the water main shall
be prevented from returning to that system by
avoiding cross connections or backflow.
n) Laboratories
3.2 Cross connections prohibited
q) Photography and X-ray machines
3.2.1The water supply system shall be
installed so that there is no likelihood of cross
connection between:
a) A potable water supply system and a nonpotable water supply system,
o) Mortuaries
p) Pest control equipment
r) Piers and docks
s) Sewage pumps and sump ejectors
t) Sluice sinks and bed pan washers
u) Livestock water supply with added chemicals
v)Veterinary equipment
b)A potable water supply system connected to
a water main, and any water from another
source including a private water supply,
Note: The examples given are not an exhaustive list.
Where there is doubt comparison must be made to the
hazard definitions.
c) A potable water supply system and any
bathing facilities including swimming, spa or
paddling pools, and
3.3.2Medium hazard
d)A potable water supply system and pipes,
fixtures or equipment (including boilers and
pumps) containing chemicals, liquids, gases
or other non-potable substances.
Any condition, device or practice which, in
connection with the potable water supply
system, has the potential to injure or
endanger health.
Comment:
Medium hazard may include but not necessarily be
limited to:
3.3 Cross Connection Hazard
a) Appliances, vehicles or equipment
3.3.1High hazard
b) Auxiliary water supplies such as pumped and nonpumped fire sprinkler secondary water
Any condition, device or practice which, in
connection with the potable water supply
system, has the potential to cause death.
c) Deionised water, reverse osmosis units and
equipment cooling without chemicals
d) Fire sprinkler systems and building hydrant systems
Comment:
High hazard may include but not necessarily be limited to:
a) Autoclaves and sterilisers
b) Systems containing chemicals such as anti-freeze,
anti-corrosion, biocides, or fungicides
c) Beauty salon and hairdresser’s sinks
d) Boiler, chiller and cooling tower make-up water
e) Car and factory washing facilities
f) Chemical dispensers
g) Chemical injectors
h) Chlorinators
i) Dental equipment
j) Direct heat exchangers
e) Hose taps and fire hose reels associated with
Medium hazard
f) Irrigation systems with underground controllers
g) Irrigation without chemicals
h) Livestock water supply without added chemicals
i) Untreated water storage tanks
j) Water and steam cleaning
k) Water for equipment cooling
l) Drink dispensers with carbonators
m)Swimming pools, spas and fountains
Note: The examples given are not an exhaustive list.
Where there is doubt comparison must be made to the
hazard definitions.
k) Fire sprinkler systems and fire hydrant systems that
use toxic or hazardous water
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D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
wat e r s u p p l i e s
3.3.3Low hazard
3.4.2Backflow protection shall be determined
by identifying the individual cross connection
hazard(s) and backflow protection required.
Water from each hazard shall be regarded as
non-potable until an appropriate backflow
protection is installed.
Any condition, device or practice which, in
connection with the potable water supply
system, would constitute a nuisance, by
colour, odour or taste, but not injure or
endanger health.
3.4.3Backflow protection shall be achieved by:
Comment:
Low hazard may include but not necessarily be
limited to:
a) An air gap, in accordance with Paragraph
3.5, or
a)Drink dispensers (except carbonators).
b)A backflow prevention device selected in
accordance with Paragraphs 3.4.4 and
3.4.5.
Note: The example given is not an exhaustive list.
Where there is doubt comparison must be made to the
hazard definitions.
3.4.4Backflow protection shall be appropriate
to the cross connection hazard contained in
Paragraph 3.3.
3.4 Backflow protection
3.4.1Backflow protection shall be provided
where it is possible for water or contaminants
to backflow into the potable water supply
system.
3.4.5The selection of the appropriate
backflow protection for the cross connection
hazard is given in Table 2.
Comment:
Comment:
Table 2 includes air gap separation.
The protection of non-potable water used for personal
hygiene is contained in Paragraph 4.1.
Table 2: Selection of Backflow Protection
Paragraph 3.4.5
Type of CROSS CONNECTION HAZARD
backflow
protection
HIGH
MEDIUMLOW
back-pressure back-siphonage back-pressure back-siphonage back-pressure back-siphonage
Air gap
(see Note 1)
Reduced
pressure zone
device
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Double check valve assembly
(see Note 2)
Pressure type
vacuum breaker
(see Note 3)
✓
✓
✓
Atmospheric vacuum breaker
(see Note 4)
✓
✓
✓
Note:
1. Air gaps must not be installed in a toxic environment.
2. Double check valves can be installed in a medium and low hazard toxic environment.
3. Pressure type vacuum breakers are designed to vent at 7 kPa or less. However, they require a significantly higher pressure
to reseat and must be installed only in systems which provide pressures sufficient to ensure full closing of the valve.
4. Hose outlet vacuum breakers are a specific type of atmospheric vacuum breaker.
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3.4.6All backflow prevention devices must
be testable in service to verify effective
performance.
3.5.3Air gaps shall not be used in a toxic
environment to prevent contaminated air
entering the water and piping system through
the air gap.
3.5 Air gap
3.5.4Where any fixture or tank has more than
one supply pipe, the air gap separation shall
be the greater of 25 mm or twice the sum of
the inlet pipe diameters and shall also comply
with Paragraph 3.5.2.
3.5.1An air gap shall be an unobstructed
distance between the lowest opening of a
water supply outlet and the highest level of
the overflow water. The air gap separation
shall be the greater of 25 mm or twice the
supply pipe diameter, as shown in Figure 1.
3.6 Backflow prevention devices
3.5.2To ensure the air gap distance is
maintained the overflow pipe discharge flow rate
shall be no less than the inlet pipe flow rate.
3.6.1Location
Comment:
a) As near as practicable to the potential
source of contamination, and
AS/NZS 3500.1.2 Appendix F may be used to calculate
the size of the overflow.
Backflow prevention devices and air gaps shall
be located:
Figure 1: Air Gap Separation
Paragraph 3.5.1
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
Amend 8
Oct 2011
b)In an accessible position for maintenance
and testing to AS 2845.3 or NZ backflow
testing standard.
3.6.2Manufacture
Backflow prevention devices shall be
manufactured as follows:
a) Reduced pressure zone devices to
AS/NZS 2845.1 Section 11 (see Figure 2 (a)),
b)Double check valve devices to
AS/NZS 2845.1 Section 10 (see Figure 2 (b)),
c) Pressure type vacuum breakers to
AS/NZS 2845.1 Section 9, (see Figure 2 (c)),
and
d)Atmospheric vacuum breakers to
AS/NZS 2845.1 Section 4 for atmospheric
vacuum breakers (see Figure 2 (d)), and
Section 5 for hose tap vacuum breakers.
3.6.3General installation requirements
Backflow prevention devices shall be:
a) Fitted with a line strainer upstream to
prevent particles and corrosion products
from the pipework rendering the device
ineffective,
b)A by-pass may only be fitted where the bypass contains another backflow prevention
device appropriate to the same hazard
rating,
c) Protected from the effects of corrosive or
toxic environments, and
d)Protected from damage.
Comment:
1.The device should be attached only after the
pipework has been flushed.
2.Corrosive environments may cause the malfunction
of the device. Polluted air from a toxic environment
may enter the piping system through the air gap
or open port vent thus negating the effective air
gap separation.
3.The device should be protected from physical and
frost damage and installed without the application
of heat.
wat e r s u p p l i e s
i) have free ventilation to the atmosphere
for the relief valve outlet at all times,
ii) be located in an area that is not subject
to ponding,
iii)have the relief drain outlet located not
less than 300 mm above the surrounding
surface, and
iv)be installed horizontally with the relief
valve discharge facing vertically down,
unless different orientations are
specifically recommended by the device
manufacturer.
b)Double check valve devices. There are no
additional requirements to those in
Paragraph 3.6.3.
c) Pressure type vacuum breakers. These
devices shall:
i)
be located not less than 300 mm above
the highest outlet, measured from the
highest outlet to the lowest part of the
valve body,
ii) be installed vertically with the air ports at
the top, and
iii)have free ventilation to the air ports at
all times.
d)Atmospheric vacuum breakers. These
devices shall:
i)
be located not less than 150 mm above
the highest outlet, measured from the
highest outlet to the lowest part of the
valve body,
ii) have no valves located downstream of
the vacuum breaker,
iii)under normal operation, not remain
continuously pressurised for more than
12 hours,
iv)be installed vertically with the air ports at
the top, and
v) Have free ventilation to the air ports at
all times.
3.6.4Specific installation requirements
Backflow prevention devices shall be installed
as follows:
a) Reduced pressure zone devices. These
devices shall:
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
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Figure 2: 22
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Acceptable Solution G12/AS1
Backflow Prevention Devices
Paragraph 3.6.2
1 December 2007
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3.7Testing
4.0 Non-potable Supply
3.7.1Backflow protection installations shall
have the following provisions to enable routine
testing of their operational effectiveness:
4.1Protection of non-potable water
supplies
a) Resilient seated isolating valves shall be
located immediately upstream and
downstream of a reduced pressure zone
device, double check valve assembly,
or a pressure vacuum breaker,
b)A resilient seated isolating valve shall be
located immediately upstream of an
atmospheric vacuum breaker, and
Amend 5
Feb 2004
4.1.1Where non-potable water supplies
are used for personal hygiene they shall be
protected from High and Medium hazards
(see Paragraph 3.3). Where backflow
protection is required it shall be in accordance
with Paragraphs 3.1 to 3.7 of this Acceptable
Solution.
Comment:
Full ported valves will provide the best flow
characteristics.
c) Reduced pressure zone devices, double
check valve assemblies and pressure
vacuum breakers shall have sufficient test
points to enable testing of each check valve
and relief valve.
Amend 5
Feb 2004
Amend 5
Feb 2004
Amend 8
Oct 2011
Comment:
Atmospheric vacuum breakers do not require test points.
4.2 Outlet identification
4.2.1NZBC F8 requires signs to be provided
to all potential hazards. Outlets for non-potable
water shall be identified non-potable, by
displaying the safety sign shown in Figure 3.
Figure 3: Non-potable Water Sign
Paragraph 4.2.1
3.7.2 Reduced pressure zone devices, double
check valves and pressure vacuum breakers
shall be tested and verified as meeting
the test requirements of AS 2845.3 or NZ
backflow testing standard.
3.7.3 Atmospheric vacuum breaker devices
shall comply with the following test:
a) Operate the device by turning on the
fixture or equipment and observe the
operation. The poppet or float must
close on increase in pressure, and
b)Operate the device by turning off the
fixture or equipment and observe the
operation. The poppet or float must open
on decrease in pressure.
3.7.4 Backflow prevention devices shall be
tested after installation or repair. Before testing
the strainer shall be cleaned, the pipework
flushed and the system commissioned.
Comment:
Amend 5
Feb 2004
Testing is also required annually in accordance with
Compliance Schedule CS 7, except for devices installed
in single residential dwellings.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
4.3Pipeline identification
4.3.1Where a non-potable water supply is
reticulated around the building, the potable
and non-potable pipelines shall be identified in
accordance with NZS 5807: Part 2.
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5.0Water Supply
5.1Water tanks
5.1.1To ensure the health and safety of
people in the event of the water main supply
being interrupted, buildings having the
classification of Community Care (e.g. hospitals,
old people’s homes, prisons) shall be provided
with cold water storage of no less than
50 litres per person.
5.2.4Covers
Comment:
5.2.5Access
1.Cold water storage is required only to maintain
adequate personal hygiene within buildings where
the principal users are legally or physically confined.
2.Refer to the NZBC A1 for classification of buildings.
3.Network utility operators cannot guarantee a
continuous supply of water. Building owners may
therefore wish to provide water storage to buildings
having a classification other than Community Care,
to enable continuation of a business, service,
industrial process or other reason.
Covers shall be provided to:
a) Potable water tanks to prevent
contamination and the entry of vermin, and
b)All tanks located in roof spaces to prevent
condensation damaging building elements.
Covers to water tanks shall be removable or
shall contain a covered opening to allow
access for inspection and maintenance.
A minimum height clearance of 350 mm
above the opening is necessary for easy access.
5.2.6Supporting structure
5.2Water tank installation
The supporting structure for water tanks
shall be protected from damage due to
condensation where durability of the supports
could be compromised by moisture.
A material such as H3 treated timber shall
be installed under the water tank.
5.2.1Location
5.2.7Structural support
Water tanks in roof spaces shall be located
and supported as detailed in Figure 4.
NZBC B1 requires water tanks to be
adequately supported including seismic
restraint. The method illustrated in Figure 4
is acceptable for water tanks up to 150 litre
capacity and the maximum height to breadth
ratio of 1:1.
4.The “litres per person” is based on a daily use of
20 litres WC, 25 litres washing, 5 litres drinking.
5.2.2Overflow pipes
Water tanks shall have an overflow pipe to
discharge any overflow to a visible place
within the same property that does not create
a nuisance or damage to building elements.
The overflow pipe shall be sized so that the
discharge capacity is no less than the
maximum inlet flow. The outlet of the
overflow pipe shall not permit the entry of
birds or vermin. Overflow from a WC cistern
may discharge internally into a WC pan.
5.2.3Safe trays
Performance E3.3.2 requires water to be
prevented from penetrating another household
unit within the same building. An acceptable
method of preventing water damage is to
locate a safe tray below the water tank (see
Figure 4). The safe tray shall incorporate an
overflow pipe with a minimum diameter of
40 mm. Where the tank overflow discharges
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into the safe tray the diameter of the drain
shall be greater than the overflow pipe from
the tank and comply with Paragraph 5.2.2.
1 December 2007
5.3Water pipe size
5.3.1Pipe sizing
Pipes shall be sized:
a) To achieve the flow rates given in Table 3, or
b)Using the sizes given in Table 4.
Comment:
Manufacturers’­ literature must be referenced for
pressure and flow information on tempering valves and
tapware. Outlets (e.g. shower mixers and showerheads)
must be appropriate for the available flow and pressure.
Note the limitations on lengths and pipe sizes given
in Table 3.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
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wat e r s u p p l i e s
Structural Support for Water Tanks (150 litre maximum capacity)
Paragraphs 5.2.1, 5.2.3 and 5.2.7
5.3.2Where a pressure reducing or pressure
limiting valve is installed, the available head
shall be taken as the outlet pressure of the
valve plus or minus the pressure to the outlet
or valve.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
Figure 5 illustrates how to determine available
head to the outlet or valve.
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Table 3: Acceptable Flow Rates to Sanitary Fixtures
Paragraph 5.3.1
Sanitary fixture
Flow rate and temperature
l/s and °C
How measured
Bath 0.3 at 45°C
Mix hot and cold water to achieve 45°C
Sink 0.2 at 60°C* (hot) and 0.2 (cold)
Flow rates required at both hot and cold taps
but not simultaneously
Laundry tub 0.2 at 60°C* (hot) and
0.2 (cold)
Flow rates required at both hot and cold taps
but not simultaneously
Basin 0.1 at 45°C Mix hot and cold water to achieve 45°C
Shower 0.1 at 42°C Mix hot and cold water to achieve 42°C
* The temperatures in this table relate to the temperature of the water used by people in the daily use of the fixture.
Note:
The flow rates required by Table 3 shall be capable of being delivered simultaneously to the kitchen sink and one other fixture.
Table 4: Tempering Valve and Nominal Pipe Diameters
Paragraphs 5.3.1 and 6.12.1
Amend 5
Feb 2004
Low pressureLow and medium
(i.e. header tank
pressure unvented
supply or low (valve vented) and
open vented
pressure)
Mains pressure
Pressure of water at
20 – 30 30 – 120 tempering valve (kPa)
over 300
Metres head (m)
2–3
>3 – 12 over 30
Minimum tempering valve size
25 mm 20 mm 15 mm
Pipes to tempering valve 25 mm 20 mm (see Note 3) 20 mm
(15 mm optional) (see Note 1)
Pipes to shower 20 mm 20 mm (see Note 4) 20 mm
(see Note 5)
(15 mm optional)
(see Note 1)
Pipes to sink/laundry (see Note 2) 20 mm 20 mm 15 mm
Pipes to bath (see Note 2) 20 mm 20 mm 15 mm
Pipes to basins (see Note 2) 15 mm 15 mm 10 mm
Notes:
1. If supplied by separate pipe from storage water heater to a single outlet.
2. This table is based on maximum pipe lengths of 20 metres.
3. 2 m maximum length from water heater outlet to tempering valve.
4. 15 mm if dedicated line to shower.
5. 10 mm if dedicated line to shower.
6. Table 3 pipe sizes have been calculated to deliver water simultaneously to the kitchen sink and one other fixture.
5.4 Maintenance facilities
5.4.1The water supply system shall be
provided with an isolating valve where a
supply pipe enters the building or at each
Dwelling unit within a Multi-unit dwelling.
5.4.2Where the water supply pipe serves a
Detached dwelling, the isolating valve required
by Paragraph 5.4.1 may be located at the
property boundary.
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1 December 2007
Comment:
Additional isolating valves may be provided for the
maintenance of storage water heaters, valves and
components.
5.4.3Provision shall be made for draining
storage water heaters in accordance with
Figure 7.
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Head of Water Available
Paragraph 5.3.2
6.0 Hot Water Supply System
6.1Water heaters
6.1.1Water heaters shall comply with Table 5.
6.1.2Hot water supply systems are given in
Figures 6 to 11. (Note: Pipe insulation is not
shown for clarity.)
6.2Water supply to storage water heaters
6.2.1 Storage water heaters shall be supplied with cold water at a pressure not exceeding their working pressure by means of a:
Amend 5
Feb 2004
a) Water tank,
b)Pressure reducing valve,
c) Pressure limiting valve, or
d)Mains pressure supply.
Table 5: Amend 7
Sep 2010
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Water Heaters
Paragraph 6.1.1
Water heater type Standard/Regulation
Electric low pressure copper storage water heater
Electric storage water heater
Electric instantaneous water heater
Gas storage water heater
Gas instantaneous water heater
Solar storage water heater
NZS 4602
NZS 4606: Parts 1, 2 and 3
AS 1056: Part 1
AS/NZS 3350.2.35
Gas Regulations
Gas Regulations
NZS 4613 (see G12/AS2)
AS/NZS 2712 (see G12/AS2)
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
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6.2.2 Storage water heaters supplied by other
than a water tank shall include a non-return
valve as shown in Figures 7, 8, 9 and 10 to
prevent the storage water heater emptying
and hot water flowing into the cold water
supply and thence from the cold water taps.
6.2.3Filters or strainers shall be installed
upstream of any valves that could be damaged
or malfunction due to solids in the water supply.
6.3.2Open vented storage water heaters shall
have a vent pipe complying with Paragraph 6.8.
6.3.3Valve vented (unvented) systems shall
have:
a) An expansion control valve
b)A vacuum relief valve to prevent collapse of
the storage water heater where it is not
designed to withstand a full vacuum, and
c) Valves complying with Table 6.
Amend 5
Feb 2004
6.3 Operating devices
6.3.1Electric and gas storage water heaters
shall have their temperature controlled by a
thermostat on each heating unit.
Figure 6: 28
Open Vented Storage Water Heater System – Water Tank Supply
Paragraphs 6.1.2, 6.8.2
1 December 2007
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
Amend 5
Feb 2004
A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
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Open Vented Storage Water Heater System – Pressure Reducing Valve
Paragraphs 5.4.3, 6.1.2, 6.2.1 b), 6.8.2 d)
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
Amend 5
Feb 2004
1 December 2007
29
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30
Figure 8: Mains Pressure Storage Water Heater System (unvented)
Paragraphs 6.1.2 and 6.2.1 b)
Figure 9: Low Pressure Valve – Vented Water Heater System – Temperature and Pressure Relief Valve
Paragraphs 6.1.2 and 6.2.1 b)
1 December 2007
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
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Figure 10: Low Pressure Valve – Vented Storage Water Heater System – Pressure Relief Valve
Paragraphs 6.1.2 and 6.2.1 b)
Figure 11: Free Outlet System (push through)
Paragraph 6.1.2
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
1 December 2007
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6.4 Safety devices
6.6Relief valves
6.4.1Valve vented (unvented) systems shall
have in addition to Paragraph 6.3.3 the
following safety devices:
6.6.1All valves shall have flow rates, pressure
and diameter compatible with the system they
serve.
a) Combined temperature/pressure relief valve
for systems with a working pressure
greater than 120 kPa,
6.6.2Pressure relief valves and expansion
control valves shall have:
b)Combined temperature/pressure relief valve
or a pressure relief valve for systems with a
working pressure less than 120 kPa,
c) An energy cut-off for each heating unit on
gas and electric systems, and
d)Valves complying with Table 6.
6.4.2Free outlet (push through) water heaters
shall have a relief valve. No relief valve drain
is required.
6.5Temperature control devices
Third Edition
Dec 2007
6.5.1Electric thermostats and energy cut-off
devices shall comply with NZS 6214 or AS 1308.
6.5.2Energy cut-off devices shall be designed
to:
a) Be reset manually, and
Amend 5
Feb 2004
b)Disconnect the energy supply before the
water temperature exceeds 95°C.
Table 6: a) A flow rate capacity of no less than the rate
of cold water supply, and
b)A maximum pressure rating of no more
than the working pressure of the hot water
storage vessel.
Comment:
The provision of cold water expansion valves satisfies
two objectives of the New Zealand Building Code:
1.Safety: Protects the pressure relief or combined temperature/pressure relief valve from blockage due to calcium and other similar deposits where hard water is frequently discharged through the valve.
2.Energy Efficiency (NZBC H1): Cold water instead of hot water is discharged to waste during the frequent warm up cycles.
6.6.3Expansion control valves shall have a
pressure rating of no less than that of the
water supply pressure to the storage water
heater, but less than the pressure rating of
the relief valve.
Storage Water Heater Valves
Paragraph 6.3.3 c) and 6.4.1 d)
Valve type
Standard
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Cold water expansion valves
NZS 4608
BS EN 1491
AS 1357: Part 1
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Temperature/pressure relief valve
NZS 4608
BS EN 1490
AS 1357: Part 1
Non-return valves
NZS 4608
AS 1357: Part 1
Vacuum relief valves
NZS 4608
AS 1357: Part 2
Pressure reducing valves and pressure limiting valves
NZS 4608
BS 6283: Part 4
AS 1357: Part 2
Pressure relief valves
NZS 4608
32
Amend 5
Feb 2004
30 September 2010
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
Amend 5
Feb 2004
A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
6.6.4The following valves shall have an
energy rating greater than that of the energy
sources heating the water:
a) Temperature/pressure relief valve, and
b)Pressure relief valve.
6.6.5Valve installation
a) Temperature/pressure relief valves shall be
located with their probe within the top 20%
of the water capacity and no more than
150 mm from the top of the container,
b)Pressure relief valves shall be located no
further than 1 metre from the storage water
heater, and
c) Valves shall be installed in a manner which
provides for easy access for replacement,
servicing or maintenance of devices.
6.6.6There shall be no valve or restriction
between the relief valve and the storage
water heater.
6.7Relief valve drains
6.7.1Relief valve drains (see Figures 12 and
13) shall be fitted to:
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g)Be connected to a relief valve in accordance
with the valve manufacturer’s specification,
h)Comply with Paragraph 6.7.3 when relief
valve drains are combined, and
i) Comply with Paragraphs 6.7.4 and 6.7.5
when freezing is likely.
6.7.3Combined relief valve drains
When relief valve drains are combined the
combined drain shall (see Figure 13):
a) Receive discharges from one temperature/
pressure relief valve or the pressure relief
valve and one expansion control valve,
b)Discharge via a minimum air break of
25 mm, and
c) Have a minimum size of 20 mm diameter
and be one size larger than the largest relief
valve outlet.
Comment:
The drain from the storage water heater may also be
connected into the combined relief valve drain.
6.7.4Water heaters located where freezing is likely
a) Temperature/pressure relief valves,
Additional requirements for relief valve drains
are (see Figure 12):
b)Pressure relief valves, and
a) Relieve one valve only, and
c) Expansion control valves.
b)Comply with Paragraph 6.7.5 when freezing
of the drain is likely.
6.7.2 Relief valve drains shall:
a) Be of copper pipe,
b)Have no restrictions or valves,
c) Have a continuous fall from the relief valve
to the outlet,
d)Discharge in a visible position which does
not present a hazard or damage to other
building elements (except when used in
association with free outlet storage water
heaters),
e)Have a minimum diameter of the same size
as the valve outlet,
f) Have the number of changes in direction
plus the length of the relief drain (in metres)
not exceeding 12,
Comment:
This paragraph applies to water heaters that are installed
outside the building’s thermal envelope in cold climates.
6.7.5 Relief drains located where freezing is likely
Additional requirements for relief drains
located where freezing is likely (see Figure 12)
are that:
a) Relief valve drain pipes shall discharge over a
tundish with a 25 mm air break before the
drain pipe enters a zone where freezing is
likely, and
b)Relief valve drains from a tundish shall be
one size larger than the outlet diameter of
the relief valve.
Amend 5
Feb 2004
Comment:
Amend 5
Feb 2004
For example: 7 metres of pipe allows the total number
of bends to be 5.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
1 December 2007
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Figure 12: Amend 5
Feb 2004
Relief Valve Drains – Freezing
Protection
Paragraphs 6.7.1, 6.7.4 and 6.7.5
6.8 Vent pipes
6.8.1Vent pipes for open vented storage
water heaters shall comply with the provisions
of Paragraphs 6.8.2 and 6.8.3.
6.8.2 Installation
a) Materials: The pipe material shall be copper complying with Table 1,
b)Diameter: The diameter of the vent pipe shall be no less than that of the hot water outlet fitting on the storage water heater and no less than 20 mm where the energy input rating is greater than 3 Kw,
c) Termination: The vent pipe (see Figure 6)
shall terminate either:
i) outside the building, or
ii) over a water tank supplying the storage water heater, and
d)Height: The vent pipe height, measured in
metres from the base of the storage water
heater, shall not exceed the height (in
metres) that equates to the maximum
pressure rating of the storage water heater,
and
e)
Comment:
This paragraph applies to storage water heaters located
inside the building’s thermal envelope with relief valve
drains discharging where freezing of the drain is likely.
Amend 5
Feb 2004
34
6.7.6 Closed cell foam polymer insulation or
fibre glass insulation which is preformed to
the shape of the pipe and not less than 13 mm
thick, is acceptable material for preventing
pipes less than or equal to 40 mm diameter
from freezing. Any insulation material that
absorbs moisture shall be protected in a
waterproof membrane.
1 December 2007
Water level: The normal standing water level in the vent pipe shall be a minimum of 3.0 metres above the highest outlet. The height of the vent pipe shall be:
i) 300 mm above the standing water level of the vent pipe, for tank fed systems, and
ii) 1.0 m above the standing water level, for pressure reducing valve fed systems.
Comment:
a)The 1.0 m height has been found to prevent hot water loss due to the pressure reducing valve creeping.
b)The 3.0 m height is measured from the highest fitting in order to ensure sufficient working head to that fitting.
c)9.81 kPa = 1 metre in head = 1 metre in height.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
Amend 5
Feb 2004
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Figure 13: wat e r s u p p l i e s
Relief Valve Drains – Combined
Paragraphs 6.7.1, 6.7.2 f) and 6.7.3
Amend 5
Feb 2004
6.8.3Insulation
6.11 Water heater installation
a)Where the vent pipe is likely to be
subjected to freezing, it shall be insulated
between the top of the storage water
heater, and a point no less than 300 mm
above the normal standing water level in
the vent pipe.
6.11.1Water heaters shall be installed in
accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
b)Insulation material is to comply with Paragraph 6.7.6.
Third Edition
Dec 2007
6.9 Another acceptable solution for
the installation of open vented
storage water heaters
6.9.1NZS 4603 is an acceptable solution
for open vented low pressure storage water
heaters, but may exceed the performance
criteria of NZBC G12.
Third Edition
Dec 2007
Amend 5
Feb 2004
6.10 Another acceptable solution for
the installation of unvented (valve
vented) storage water heaters.
6.10.1NZS 4607 is an acceptable solution
for unvented (valve vented) storage water
heaters, but may exceed the performance
criteria of NZBC G12.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
6.11.2Where heating units, sacrificial anodes,
thermostats, pipework connections, valves,
or other accessories being components of a
storage water heater are installed, they shall
be accessible for inspection, maintenance and
removal.
6.11.3 Storage water heaters shall have:
a) Safe trays complying with Paragraph 5.2.3
where water could penetrate another
household unit within the same building.
b) Connections compatible with the pipe
material used, and
c) Drain pipes (for every storage water heater
of more than 45 litres capacity) which:
i)
have a conveniently located isolating valve, and terminate with a cap or plug suitably located to easily empty the vessel for maintenance, or
ii) terminate outside the building with a
cap only.
1 December 2007
Amend 5
Feb 2004
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Amend 5
Feb 2004
Third Edition
Dec 2007
Figure 14: Seismic Restraint of Storage Water Heaters 90 – 360 litres
Paragraph 6.11.4
6.11.4 Structural Support
6.13Wet-back water heaters
NZBC B1.3.2 requires building elements
(including storage water heaters) to be
adequately supported including support
against earthquake forces. The method
illustrated in Figure 14 is acceptable for water
heaters up to 360 litre capacity. Where fittings
and pipework are attached to the water heater
through the supporting platform or floor a
50 mm minimum clearance shall be provided
between the fitting and the support structure.
6.13.1Wet-back water heaters shall be:
a) Connected only to open vented storage water heaters, or a water storage vessel (see Figure 15), and
b)Made of copper.
6.13.2Copper pipework shall be used
between the wet-back and the water tank.
6.11.5 Another acceptable solution for securing
storage water heaters against seismic forces
is given in Section 203 of NZS 4603.
Amend 5
Feb 2004
6.12 Hot water pipe sizes
Amend 5
Feb 2004
36
6.12.1The diameter of hot water supply pipes
from storage water heaters and to sanitary
fixtures shall be no less than those required
by Table 4.
1 December 2007
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
Figure 15: Amend 5
Feb 2004
Wet-back Installation – Open Vented
System
Paragraph 6.13.1 a)
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Figure 16: Tempering Valve Installation
Paragraph 6.14.2 a)
Amend 5
Feb 2004
6.14 Safe water temperatures
6.14.1Maximum temperatures
The delivered hot water temperature at any
sanitary fixture used for personal hygiene shall
not exceed:
a) 45°C for early childhood centres, schools, old
people’s homes, institutions for people with
psychiatric or physical disabilities, hospitals, and
b)55°C for all other buildings.
Comment:
1.At greatest risk from scalding are children, the elderly, and people with physical or intellectual disabilities, particularly those in institutional care.
2.Sanitary fixtures used for personal hygiene includes showers, baths, hand basins and bidets.
6.14.2Hot water delivered from storage
water heaters
Amend 5
Feb 2004
a) An acceptable method of limiting hot water temperature delivered from storage water heaters is to install a mixing device between the outlet of the water heater and the sanitary fixture (see Figure 16).
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
b)Tempering valves shall comply with
NZS 4617 or AS 1357.2.
6.14.3 Legionella bacteria
Irrespective of whether a mixing device is
installed, the storage water heater control
thermostat shall be set at a temperature
of not less than 60°C to prevent the growth
of Legionella bacteria.
1 December 2007
Third Edition
Dec 2007
Amend 5
Feb 2004
37
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Table 7: Water Supply Pipework Support Spacing
Paragraph 7.1.3
Pipe materialPipe diameter (mm)
Maximum distance between supports (m)
Vertical pipe
Graded and
horizontal pipe
Copper
10 – 15
20 – 25 1.5
2.0 1.2
1.5
Galvanised steel 15 – 20 25 2.0 3.0 1.5
2.5
uPVC 15 – 20 25 2.0 2.4 1.0
1.2
Polyethylene and polybutylene (cold water supply)
15 – 20 25 1.5 1.8 0.75
0.9
Polybutylene (hot water supply) 15 – 18 20 – 22 1.0 1.4 0.6
0.7
Note:
The spacing for these pipe materials is based on the pipes being located within the building structure.
Amend 5
Feb 2004
6.14.4 The water temperatures within flow and
return circulating systems shall be maintained at
not less than 60°C.
Comment:
Alternative methods of controlling Legionella within hot
water circulating or warm water systems may include
chlorine disinfection, UV sterilisation, high temperature
pasteurisation combined with system flushing as part of
a documented maintenance programme.
7.1.3Support spacing
Above ground water supply pipework shall be
securely supported at centres of no greater
than those given in Table 7.
7.1.4Anchor points
Anchor points shall be provided where:
a) Seal ring joints are used, and
b) The joint is not able to resist the thrust
imposed by the water pressure.
7.2Protection from freezing
7.2.1 Where there is the likelihood of
freezing, hot and cold water supply systems
shall be protected in the following manner:
Third Edition
Dec 2007
7.0Installation Methods
a) Piping outside of the building thermal
envelope shall be insulated,
7.0.1Water supply systems shall be installed
to comply with the durability requirements of
NZBC B2.
b)Piping buried in the ground shall be
insulated or installed below a level affected
by freezing, and
7.1Pipe supports
c) Storage water heater vent pipes shall be
insulated (see Figure 17).
7.1.1Pipes and their supports shall be
electrochemically compatible.
7.1.2Except where anchor points are necessary,
the pipes shall be installed and supported in a
manner which permits thermal movement.
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1 December 2007
7.2.2 In climates where freezing temperatures
are likely for a period of greater than 24 hours an
expansion control valve is required in addition
to vent pipe insulation (see Figure 17).
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
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Open Vented Storage Water Heaters in Climates Subject to Freezing
Paragraphs 7.2.1 c) and 7.2.2
7.3Protection from damage
7.3.3Movement in concrete or masonry
7.3.1Water supply pipes shall be protected
from the likelihood of damage.
Pipes penetrating concrete or masonry
elements shall be either wrapped with a
flexible material, or passed through a sleeve
or duct, to permit free movement for
expansion and contraction.
7.3.2Pipes below ground level
An acceptable method of protecting water
supply pipes is to provide the minimum covers
given below:
CoverLocation
600 mm Residential driveways and similar
areas subjected to occasional
heavy traffic
450 mm Gardens, lawns or other areas not
subjected to trafficTempering valve
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
Pipework in or under a concrete slab must
be installed in a manner to achieve a 50 year
durability.
7.4Installation of uPVC Pipes
7.4.1An acceptable method of installing uPVC
pipe is given in NZS 7643.
1 December 2007
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Figure 18: Usable Water Taps
Paragraph 8.0.1
Figure 19: Equipotential Bonding of Metallic
Water Supply Pipe
Paragraph 9.2.1 a)
7.5Watertightness
7.5.1The water supply system shall be tested
to ensure watertightness. An acceptable
testing method is to:
a) Subject the hot and cold system to a
pressure of 1500 kPa for a period of not
less than 15 minutes, and
b)Inspect the system to ensure that there are
no leaks.
a) Lever or capstan handles,
Comment:
c) The hot tap located to the left of the
cold tap.
1.Testing should be carried out before concealing
pipework behind interior linings, flooring or within
concrete, or before backfilling trenches.
2.All fixtures, appliances, water tanks, storage water
heaters and other equipment, which may be damaged
during pressure testing, should be isolated before
testing.
Third Edition
Dec 2007
7.5.2Another acceptable solution for testing
uPVC water piping systems is given in Section
9 of NZS 7643.
8.0Usable Facilities for People with
Disabilities
8.0.1Where taps are likely to be used for
personal hygiene or the washing of utensils
by people with disabilities, they shall have
(see Figure 18):
40
1 December 2007
b)50 mm clearances to wall surfaces, and
Comment:
This requirement does not apply to Housing, Outbuildings,
Ancillary buildings, and Industrial buildings employing
fewer than 10 people.
9.0Equipotential Bonding
9.1 General
9.1.1NZBC G9 requires any electrical
installation within a building to be constructed
to protect users from the dangers of contact
with parts of the building that may become
live during fault conditions.
9.1.2Equipotential bonding is required
where all of the following conditions are likely
to exist:
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
A c c e p table Solution G12/AS1
Figure 20: Equipotential Bonding of Metallic
Sanitary Fixtures
Paragraph 9.2.2 a)
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Comment:
No equipotential bonding is required if the water supply
piping is plastic.
9.2Installation of equipotential
bonding conductors
9.2.1Water supply pipe
a) Metallic water supply pipe shall be bonded
to the earth electrode with an equipotential
bonding conductor, as shown in Figure 19.
The connection to the water pipe shall be
as close as practicable to the point where
the pipe leaves the ground, and
b)Metallic hot and cold water supply pipes
shall be bonded together.
9.2.2Metallic sanitary fixtures
a) Metallic sanitary fixtures shall be bonded
to the metallic water supply pipe with an
equipotential bonding conductor, as shown
in Figure 20.
Comment:
Metallic sanitary fixtures are only required to be bonded
to metallic water supply pipes where it is possible for a
person to simultaneously touch the pipe (via a tap) and
the fixture.
b)The bonding conductor shall be connected
directly to the sanitary fixture. The bonding
conductor may connect to the waste pipe
where a metallic waste pipe is connected
to the sanitary fixture and a continuous
metallic link is formed between the waste
pipe and the fixture.
9.3Earth bonding conductors
a) Electricity is provided within a building,
9.3.1Earth bonding conductors shall be:
b)The water supply pipe is metallic,
a) Made of copper and have a cross-sectional
area no less than 4.0 mm2,
c) Building users are able to make contact
with exposed parts of metal water supply
pipe, or any metallic sanitary fixtures
connected to it, and
d)The metal pipe is in contact with the
ground, and forms a continuous metallic
link from the ground to those parts of the
pipe exposed to building users.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
b)Sheathed with insulating material coloured
green, and
c) Fixed at intervals of no greater than 300
mm with aluminium cable fixings.
9.3.2Earth bonding conductors shall comply
with AS/NZS 5000.1 or AS/NZS 5000.2
as appropriate.
10 October 2011
Amend 7
Sep 2010
Amend 8
Oct 2011
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Acceptable Solution G12/AS2
Solar Water Heaters
S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r S
A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
1.0 Scope
1.0.1 This Acceptable Solution applies to solar
water heaters installed in or on buildings.
1.0.2 To comply with this Acceptable Solution
solar water heaters must also comply with
the appropriate requirements of G12/AS1. This
Acceptable Solution meets the requirements
of NZBC Clauses B1, B2, E2, G12 and H1.
1.0.3 Text boxes headed ‘COMMENT’ occurring
throughout this document are for guidance
purposes only.
1.1 Structural support limitations
1.1.1 Where a building has not been
specifically designed to support a solar water
heater, this Acceptable Solution can be used
for the support and fixing of a solar collector
on buildings that meet the structural
requirements specified in any one of the
following:
• NZS 3604: 1990
• NZS 3604: 1999
Amend 8
Oct 2011
d)the roof has a pitch no steeper than 45°,
and
e)the building is in a wind zone where wind
speeds do not exceed 50 m/s (VH wind
zone defined in NZS 3604: 1999), and
f) the solar collector has an area no greater
than 4 m2, and
g)the design ground snow loading for the
building is less than:
(i) 0.5 kPa as determined by NZS 4203, or NZS 3604: 1990 or NZS 3604: 1999 Section 15, or
(ii)1.0 kPa as determined by AS/NZS 1170 or NZS 3604: 2011, Section 15, and
h)either:
i) the solar collectors are installed parallel to the roof cladding, or
ii) where solar collectors are installed
at a different pitch to the pitch of the roof:
– the pitch of the solar collector is not greater than 45° to the horizontal, and
–
– the solar collector faces in the same compass direction as the section of roof the solar collector is installed on.
• NZS 3604: 2011
• NZS 4203
• AS/NZS 1170: Parts 0, 1, 2, 3 and
NZS 1170: Part 5.
But only when all of the following
requirements are met:
a) the weight of solar collector, including
frames, fittings, and heat transfer fluid,
has a combined weight of no more than
22 kg per square metre (based on the gross
area of the solar collector), and
b)the hot water storage tank is not installed
on or above the roof, and
c) where the hot water storage tank is
located within a roof it has a maximum
size of:
i) 200 litres when installed in accordance with NZS 3604: 1999 Section 14, or
ii) 450 litres when installed in accordance with AS/NZS 3500 Part 4: 2003
Section 5, and
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
Amend 8
Oct 2011
the building is in a wind zone where wind speeds do not exceed
44 m/s (H wind zone defined in
NZS 3604: 1999), and
COMMENT:
1. The limitations described in Paragragh 1.1.1 are
necessary, because roofs are likely to have limited
capacity to support additional loads.
1.1.2 When any of the requirements
described in Paragraph 1.1.1 are not met,
specific engineering design is required.
COMMENT:
Specific engineering design will require a structure
assessment to be completed. This may result in either
an assessment that the roof structure is sufficient to
support the additional load or details of how to strengthen
the roof structure to support the additional load.
10 October 2011
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S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r s
1.2 Exclusions
1.2.1 If the solar water heater includes
connection to an application such as
underfloor heating, a swimming pool or any
similar application, this Acceptable Solution
applies only to the solar water heater and
its components and not to the application.
2.0 Materials
2.1 Material selection
.
2.1.1 All material used to install the solar
water heater must:
a) meet the durability requirements of
NZBC Clause B2, and
b)be suitable for their use, location and
environment as shown in Table 1, and
c) be compatible with adjoining materials
as shown in Table 2, and
d)be compatible with materials subject to
run-off as shown in Table 3 (except as
described in Paragraph 2.1.2).
2.1.2 Table 3 states that “butyl/EPDM”
to “steel, galvanized unpainted” is “not
permitted”; however, water flow from small
areas of EPDM will not significantly affect
the durability of the roofing. Therefore it is
acceptable to use unpainted EPDM boots
with unpainted galvanised steel roofing if:
a) the boots are small (for 60 mm pipe
diameter or smaller), and
b)there are no more than 10 boots used
for the solar water heater installation, and
c) the boots contain no greater than 15%
carbon black.
2.1.3 If the requirements described in
Paragragh 2.1.2 are not met then either the
EPDM boots or the galvanised roofing must
be painted with a suitable protective coating.
2.1.4 Table 2 shows that galvanized fixings
must be used rather than stainless steel
when in contact with galvanized cladding
and zinc/aluminium coated cladding.
(This includes mounting brackets and straps.)
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1 December 2007
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
Table 1: Material selection (reproduced from E2/AS1 Table 20)
This table must be read in conjunction with Tables 2 and 3 and Paragraphs 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3 and 2.1.4
Durability MaterialExposure
15 yrs
50 yrs
Aluminium, copper, lead, zinc, stainless steel
Hidden
Exposed to weather
Sheltered
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Aluminium-zinc coated steel AZ150 uncoated, or coated to NZS 4217 Hidden
Exposed to weather
Sheltered
✓
✓ (1)
✓ (3)
✓ (2)
✓ (4)
✓ (6)
Aluminium-zinc: AZ150 factory-coated to AS/NZS 2728
Hidden
✓
✓
Type 4
Exposed to weather
Type 5
Type 6
✓
✓
✓
✓ (4)
✓ (3)
✓ (1)
Type 4
Sheltered
Type 5
Type 6
✓ (3)
✓ (1)
✓
✓ (6)
✓ (5)
✓ (3)
Bituminous material, uPVC
Hidden
Exposed to weather
Sheltered
✓
✓
✓
✓
✘
✓
Butyl rubber
Hidden
Exposed to weather
Sheltered
✓
✓
✓
✓
✘
✘
Galvanized steel Z450 uncoated, or coated to NZS 4217
Hidden
Exposed to weather
Sheltered
✓
✓ (3)
✓ (5)
✓ (4)
✓ (6)
✓ (6)
Galvanized steel: Z275 factory-coated to AS/NZS 2728
Hidden
✓
✓
Type 4
Exposed to weather
Type 5
Type 6
✓ (1)
✓
✓
✓ (6)
✓ (4)
✓ (1)
Type 4
Sheltered
Type 5
Type 6
✓ (3)
✓ (1)
✓
✓ (6)
✓ (6)
✓ (4)
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓ (2)
✓ (4)
✓ (2)
✓ (6)
✘
FIXINGS: Aluminium, bronze, monel and stainless steel (Types 304 and 316)
*Hidden
Exposed to weather
Sheltered
FIXINGS: Hot-dipped galvanized steel to AS/NZS 4680
Hidden
Exposed to weather
Sheltered
Screws to AS 3566: Part 2
Class 3
Hidden
Class 4
✓
✓
✓ (2)
✓
Class 3
Exposed to weather
Class 4
✓ (2)
✓
✓ (6)
✓ (4)
Class 3
Sheltered
Class 4
✓ (4)
✓ (2)
✘
✘
LEGEND: ✓ Suitable for durability requirement in all NZS 3604 exposure zones, including sea-spray zones
✘
Not suitable for durability requirement
✓ (no.) Conditionally suitable – refer relevant acceptable zone number
*
Includes fixings protected by putty and an exterior paint system of primer undercoat and two top coats of paint.
Acceptable zones (1) Zones 1, 2, 3 and 4
as per NZS 3604: (2) Zones 1, 2 and 3
(3) Zones 2, 3 and 4
(4) Zones 2 and 3
(5) Zones 3 and 4
(6) Zone 3
Note: Durability may be improved by regular washing of sheltered materials.
The term “sheltered” is as defined in NZS 3604, Figure 4.2.
The term “hidden” is defined as concealed behind another element that would need to be removed to allow monitoring of performance or maintenance. A hidden flashing may be exposed to H2S in geothermal areas, but not to salt spray in coastal zones. If exposed to salt spray, it is classified as “sheltered”.
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S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r s
Aluminium, anodised ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘ ✓
or mill-finish
✘ ✘ ✘
Aluminium, coated (1) ✓ ✓ ✓ B ✓
✘ ✘ ✘
✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✓ ✘
Zinc/aluminium, (unpainted)
(1)
Zinc/aluminium coated
Zinc Steel, galvanized (unpainted) Steel, galvanised coil-coated
Stainless steel
Plastics
Lead (including lead-edged) unpainted
Glazed roof tiles
Glass
Copper/brass
Concrete green (unpainted)
Concrete old (unpainted)
Clay bricks (cement mortar)
Ceramic tiles (cement grout)
Cedar
Cement plaster (uncoated)
(2)
CCA-treated timber
Butyl rubber & EPDM
Aluminium, coated
(1)
Compatibility of materials in contact
This table must be read in conjunction with Tables 1 and 3 and Paragraphs 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3 and 2.1.4
Aluminium, anodised or mill-finish
Table 2: ✓ ✘ ✓ B ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
✘ ✓
✓ B ✓ B ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
Butyl rubber & EPDM ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
CCA-treated timber (2) ✘ B
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ B ✘
✘ B
✘
Cedar
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓ ✘
Cement plaster (uncoated)
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✘ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✘
Ceramic tiles (cement grout)
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✘
Clay bricks (cement mortar)
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✘
Concrete old (unpainted)
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
Concrete green (unpainted)
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘ ✓ ✓ ✘ ✘
✘ ✘
✘
Copper/brass
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ B ✓ B ✘ ✘
✘ ✘
✘
Glass
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
Glazed roof tiles
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
Lead (including lead- ✘ B
edged) unpainted
✓ ✓ ✓
✘ ✓ ✓
✓ ✘
B
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ B B B
B B
✘
Plastics
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
Stainless steel
B B
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓
B
✓ ✓ B ✓ ✓ B ✘
✘ B
Steel, galvanised
coil-coated
✓ ✓ ✓ B ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✘
✘
✓ ✓ B ✓ B ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
Steel, galvanized (unpainted)
✓ ✓ ✓ ✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✘
✘
✓ ✓ B ✓ ✘ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
Zinc ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✘
✘
✓ ✓ B ✓ ✘ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
Zinc/aluminium, coated (1)
✓ ✓ ✓ B ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✓ B ✓ B ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
Zinc/aluminium (unpainted)
✓ ✓ ✓ ✘ ✘
✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✓ ✘ ✓ B ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓
✘ ✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓
B
LEGEND:
✓ Materials satisfactory in contact.
✘ Contact between materials is not permitted. Minimum gap of 5 mm is required to prevent moisture bridging.
B Avoid contact in sea-spray zone or corrosion zone 1.
NOTES:
(1) Coated – includes factory-painted, coil-coated and powder-coated.
(2) Includes copper azole and copper quaternary salts.
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
Steel, galvanized (unpainted) Steel, galvanised coil-coated
Lead (including lead-edged) unpainted
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✓
✓
✘ ✓
✘
Zinc (1)
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
Stainless steel
✓
Plastics
✓
Glazed roof tiles
✘ ✓
Glass
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
Copper/brass
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
Concrete green (unpainted)
Zinc/aluminium, (unpainted)
Butyl
rubber & EPDM ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
CCA-treated
timber (2) ✘ ✘ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
Zinc/aluminium coated
Aluminium,
anodised ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
or
mill-finish
Aluminium,
coated (1) ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
Concrete old (unpainted)
Clay bricks (cement mortar)
Ceramic tiles (cement grout)
Cement plaster (uncoated)
Cedar
(1)
CCA-treated timber (2)
Material that
water flows
from
Aluminium, coated
Material that
water flows
onto
Butyl rubber & EPDM
Compatibility of materials subject to run-off
This table must be read in conjunction with Tables 1 and 2 and Paragraphs 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3 and 2.1.4
Aluminium, anodised or mill-finish
Table 3: ✘ ✘
✘
✘
Cedar
Cement plaster (uncoated)
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✘
✘
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ A
✓ ✘ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✘
✘
Ceramic
tiles (cement
grout)
Clay
bricks (cement
mortar)
Concrete old (unpainted)
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ A
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✘
✘
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ A
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✘
✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ A
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓
✓
✓
✓ ✓ ✓ A
✓ ✘ ✓ ✓ ✘ ✘
✘ ✘
✘
✘
✓
✘ ✘
Concrete
green (unpainted)
✘ ✘
Copper/brass
Glass
Glazed roof tiles
Lead
(including lead- edged)
unpainted
Plastics
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘ ✘
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✘
✓
✓
✘ ✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓
✘
✘
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✘
✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✓
✓
✓
Stainless
steel
Steel,
galvanised
coil-coated
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✓
✓
Steel,
galvanized (unpainted)
Zinc
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓
✓
✓
✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓
✓
✓
Zinc/aluminium
coated (1)
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✘
✘ ✓
✓
✓
Zinc/aluminium, (unpainted)
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓
✘ ✓
✓
✘
LEGEND:
✓ Materials satisfactory with water run-off as indicated.
✘ Water run-off is not permitted as indicated.
A Etching or staining of glass may occur with run-off.
NOTES:
(1) Coated – includes factory-painted, coil-coated and powder-coated.
(2) Includes copper azole and copper quaternary salts.
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S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r s
3.0 Solar Water Heater Requirements
3.1 Solar water heaters and components
3.1.1 Solar water heaters must comply with
one of the following:
• AS/NZS 2712: 2007, or
• AS/NZS 2712: 2002 (up to 1 July 2009), or
• NZS 4613 (up to 1 July 2008).
3.1.2 Tanks installed as part of a pumped
solar water heater where the tank is
separately mounted from the collector must
comply with the minimum tank insulation
requirements of AS/NZS 4692.2.
COMMENT:
AS/NZS 4692.2: 2005 specifies Minimum Energy
Performance Standard (MEPS) requirements for electric
water heaters. Clause 1.4 of this Standard excludes
solar water heaters. Paragraph 3.1.2 of this Acceptable
Solution modifies this exclusion so that hot water
tanks mounted separately from solar collectors used
in a solar water heater must now comply with the
MEPS requirements specified in AS/NZS 4692.2: 2005.
3.2 Solar controller
3.2.1 Where a solar water heater has a
controller, the controller must meet the
requirements specified in AS/NZS 2712:
2007 clause 6.3.
3.2.2 The controller or the solar water
heater design must minimise the use of
supplementary heating while meeting the
requirements described in Paragraph 3.5.
3.2.3 A solar water heater which meets the
requirements described in Paragraphs 3.2.1
and/or 3.2.2 satisfies NZBC Clause H1.3.4.
3.3 Sizing of systems
3.3.1 Solar water heaters must have a
minimum of 50 litres of hot water storage
per square metre of collector area.
COMMENT:
The sizing requirement described in Paragraph 3.3.1
is to prevent overheating of the system. The capacity
of the tank should not be less than one day’s expected
use. For most houses the expected hot water consumption
is 40–60 litres per person per day when stored at 60°C.
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3.4 Operating and safety devices
3.4.1 Storage tanks in solar water heaters
must have operating and safety devices that
meet the requirements of G12/AS1 Paragraph 6.
3.4.2 Water from the installed system must
not discharge onto the roof. Vent pipes and
outlets from pressure relief valves must be
plumbed to a suitable drain point.
3.5Protection from Legionella bacteria
3.5.1 To prevent the growth of Legionella
bacteria, solar water heaters must either:
a) have a continuously energised heating
element fitted within 55% of the bottom
of the water tank (by volume) and a
thermostat set to 60°C or higher, or
b)be controlled so that the water above the
element is heated to 60°C once a day, and
the element is in the bottom 20% of the
water tank (by volume) and no more than
150 mm from the bottom of the tank, or
c) be controlled so that all of the stored water
is heated to 60°C or higher, once a week
for not less than 1 hour. The temperature
must be measured by a probe in the bottom
20% of the water tank (by volume) and no
more than 150 mm from the bottom of the
water tank. For open loop systems the stored
water includes the water in the solar collector
and water must be circulated through the
collector during the heating period.
3.5.2Where the solar water heater stores
potable water and is used as a pre-heater
for an instantaneous water heater, either:
a) the hot water storage tank connected
to the solar collector must be fitted with
supplementary heating and a controller
operating to meet the conditions outlined
in Paragraph 3.5.1, or
b)the instantaneous water heater must heat
all water passing through it to not less
than 70°C.
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3.5.3Where the solar water heater supplies
inlet water to a storage water heater with
an element in the bottom 20% of the water
tank (by volume) and no more than 150 mm
from the bottom of the tank with a thermostat
set to no less than 60°C, no additional
Legionella control is required.
COMMENT:
Paragraph 3.5 of this Acceptable Solution provides
ways to demonstrate that the NZBC Clause G12.3.9
(i.e. “A hot water system must be capable of being
controlled to prevent the growth of Legionella bacteria”)
is satisfied. This is a heat disinfection method which is
considered the most effective method to control
Legionella.
The heating required to control the growth of Legionella
does not necessarily have to be achieved using
supplementary electric heating; it could also be achieved
using gas, solar or wood as a heating fuel.
3.6Protection from frosts
3.6.1 For protection from freezing, collectors
installed in climate zones 1 and 2 (as shown
in Figure 1) must:
a) pass the level 1 test described in
AS/NZS 2712: 2007 Appendix E, or
b)have an automatic drain-down system.
3.6.2 For protection from freezing, collectors
installed in climate zone 3 (as shown in
Figure 1) must:
a) pass the level 2 test described in
AS/NZS 2712: 2007 Appendix E, or
b)have an automatic drain-down system.
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S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r s
Figure 1: New Zealand climate zones for frost protection
Paragraph 3.6
NZS 4218:2004
Figure B1 – Climate zones
33
Zone 3 includes all of the South Island, Stewart Island and the Chatham Islands
Figure B1 from NZS 4218: 2004 is reproduced with permission of Standards New Zealand under Licence 684.
4.0Location of Solar Water Heaters
Figure 2:
4.1Location
High pressure wind zone
Paragraph 4.1
4.1.1 Solar water heaters must be located
away from the edge of a gable roof structure
outside the high pressure wind zone shown
in Figure 2.
0.2
4.2 Solar orientation and inclination
4.2.1 Solar collectors must face within +/- 90
degrees of geographic north (ie between east
and west) to satisfy the requirements of NZBC
Clause H1.3.4(a).
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B
0.2
W
W
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
4.2.2 Solar collectors must be inclined at an
angle within +/- 20 degrees of the angle of
latitude (from the horizontal) to satisfy the
requirements of NZBC Clause H1.3.4(a).
COMMENT:
1. The ideal orientation of a solar collector is geographic
north with an inclination angle from the horizontal
the same as the angle of latitude for the location.
Deviations from the ideal orientation will reduce
the performance of the solar water heater.
Details of the impact of changes in orientation and
inclination are provided in NZS 4614: 1986, and are
shown in the following diagram.
Inclination angle (degrees)
West
0°
20°40°60°80°90°
270 0.85
0.85 0.8
0.72 0.6
300 0.85
0.92 0.92
0.86 0.73 0.65
330 0.85
0.98 0.99
0.93 0.8
0.71
0
0.85
0.97 1
0.94 0.8
0.7
30
0.85
0.94 0.95
0.88 0.74 0.65
60
0.85
0.88 0.86
0.77 0.65 0.57
90
0.85
0.8
0.64 0.52 0.46
North
East
Good orientation
0.73
Moderate
orientation
0.53
Poor
orientation
The relative performance of flat-plate collectors in
different orientations is illustrated. It is clear that
collectors should face within about 45° of north, and
be fitted at an inclination angle between 20° and 50°.
If for some reason it were necessary to place the
collectors facing the west at 60° inclination, then to
avoid loss in performance, the collectors would have
to be 1/0.72 (or 1.4) as large (i.e. increased by 40%
in the collector area).
Where collectors other than flat-plate type (cylindrical
shape for instance) are used, similar optimum
requirements for orientation will apply (i.e. the axis
of the cylinder should be inclined at 20° to 50°).
The performance loss by using poorer orientation has
not been as fully explored as for the flat-plate case.
Significant shading between 9:00 am and 3:00 pm
will affect the performance of a solar water heater.
The solar altitude may be determined using a
commercial “sun locator” or a simple solar altitude
sight may be constructed using the diagrams given
in Appendix I of AS/NZS 3500.4: 2003.
5.0Installation of Solar Water Heaters
5.0.1 Solar water heaters must be installed
in accordance with the requirements of
AS/NZS 3500 Part 4: 2003, unless modified
by this Acceptable Solution.
5.0.2 Water storage tanks that form part
of a solar water heater must have drain
pipes that:
Factors for inclination and solar
orientation
Direction
(degrees)
Figure 12 from NZS 4614: 1986 is reproduced with
the permission of Standards New Zealand under
Licence 684.
2. Shading of solar collectors should be minimised
to ensure maximum performance of the system.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
a) have an easily reached isolating valve,
and terminate with a cap or plug to empty
the vessel for maintenance, or
b)terminate outside the building with a
cap only.
5.0.3 Fixings used for the installation of a
solar water heater must meet the
requirements described in Paragraphs 2.1.1,
2.1.2, 2.1.3 and 2.1.4.
5.0.4 All metal swarf from drilling or cutting
must be removed from the roof surface to
prevent corrosion. Care must also be taken
to avoid scratching of any roof cladding
protective coating.
5.1Wetback water heaters
5.1.1 Where water is heated by a wetback
water heater and a solar collector,
independent water pipe circuits must be
installed for each heat source.
5.1.2 A wetback water heater must have
an open-vent connected to the:
a) water tank, or
b) wetback water heater flow pipe
(see G12/AS1 Figure 5).
COMMENT:
In Paragraph 5.1.2 (b) a heat-exchanger is required
when the tank pressure is higher than the open-vented
wetback circuit.
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5.2Weathertightness
5.2.1 Any penetrations made in the building
cladding during the installation of a solar
water heater must be flashed, or sealed using
purpose-made sealing washers or boots to
prevent leaks.
5.2.3 Penetrations through masonry tile roofs
must be as shown in Figure 5.
5.2.4 Pipe penetrations in pressed metal tile
roofs must be flashed using EPDM or silicone
rubber boot flashings as shown in Figure 6.
5.2.2 Where roof penetrations are required
for large openings such as solar collectors
installed in or below the roof:
a) the edge of roofing penetrations over
200 mm wide must be supported in either
direction with additional framing as shown
in Figure 3, and
b)for the catchment area of the roof above
the penetration as shown in Figure 4,
the roof length must be limited to the
areas shown in Table 4.
Table 4: Maximum catchment areas above penetrations greater than 200 mm wide
Paragraph 5.2.2 b)
Penetration width
Maximum roof length above penetration in metres
Profiled metal
CorrugatedTrapezoidalTrough profile
Other roofs
800 to 1200 mm
4 m
8 m
16 m
4m
600 to 800 mm
6 m
12 m
18 m
6m
400 to 600 mm
8 m
16 m
18 m
8m
200 to 400 mm
12 m
18 m
18 m
10 m
Figure 3:
Support for penetration greater than
200 mm wide
Paragraph 5.2.2 a)
Figure 4:
Catchment area for penetrations
greater than 200 mm wide – see table 4
Paragraph 5.2.2 b)
NOTE: Profiled metalled roofing refer to
Table 4 for maximum roof lengths above
penetrations
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
Figure 5: Pipe penetration for masonry tile roof
Paragraph 5.2.3
Collar sealed to pipe
over lead flashing
Lead carried to top
edge of tile under the
overlap
Lead sleeve taken 100 mm
up pipe and soldered to
lead flashing below
Lead dressed down over
bottom edge of tile
Lead flashing dressed to
roofing tile min. 150 mm all
round and carried up to
top edge of tile
Concrete tiles
EPDM flexible boot sleeve fixed
and sealed to malleable soaker
flashing and dressed into
roofing profile
ALTERNATIVE BOOT SLEEVE
5.2.5 Roof penetrations in profiled metal roofs
must be flashed as follows.
5.2.6 Penetrations on roofs will require
specific design when:
a) Pipe penetrations up to 60 mm diameter
must be flashed using an EPDM boot
flashing as shown in Figure 6, and
a) the pitch is less than 15° for concrete tile or
pressed metal roofs, or
b) Rectangular penetrations up to 1200 mm
wide must be flashed using a soaker type
flashing as shown in Figure 7.
b) the pitch is less than 10° for profiled metal
roofs, or
c) the penetration is larger than 60 mm, or
d) the penetration requires specialised or
complex flashings.
COMMENT:
The cladding manufacturer may be able to provide
additional guidance.
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
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Acceptable Solution G12/AS2
S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r s
Figure 6:
Flashing for pipes, cables and other penetrations
Paragraphs 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 a)
Pipe
EPDM flexible boot
Malleable flange
screw or rivet fixed
and sealed to roofing
profile. Fit neophrene
washers to all screw
fixings
Flashing fixed
diagonally to roofing
profile to minimise
holding of discharge
water
NOTE:
(1) Max. roof pitch for this flashing 45˚,
minimum pitch 10˚. °
(2) For pipes up to 60mm diameter
Figure 7: °
Soaker flashings for penetrations (profiled metal roofs)
Paragraph 5.2.5 b)
NOTE: (1) X = 200 mm min.
(2) Suitable for penetrations up to 1200 mm wide.
(3) Suitable only for roof pitches of 10° or higher.
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
5.2.7Penetrations through membrane roofs
must be as shown in Figure 8.
Figure 8: Pipe penetration in membrane roofing
Paragraph 5.2.7
ARCHIVED
S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r S
The diameter of the conduit should be the
minimum practicable diameter to suit the cable
size and any electrical regulatory requirements.
COMMENT:
Alternatively, a nylon cable gland can be used on the
flat part of a profiled metal roof which meets or
exceeds IP55.
Other methods can also be used that meet the electrical
regulatory requirements and are weathertight.
5.2.9 Sealant used in the installation of solar
water heaters must be a neutral cure silicone
sealant and must be used in conjunction with
mechanical fasteners. The sealant must
comply with:
a) Type F, Class 2OLM or 25LM of ISO 11600, or
b) low modulus Type II Class A of Federal
Specification TT-S-00230C.
5.2.10 Acetic cured silicone sealants may
be used with stainless steel but must not be
used on zinc or aluminium-zinc coatings.
5.2.11 Sealants used on roof penetrations
must not be used as the primary method
of excluding the ingress of moisture. Joints
must be designed to allow the discharge
of water in the absence of any sealant.
5.2.12 All fixings or penetrations through the roof
must be through the crests of the roof cladding.
5.2.8One method of flashing penetrations
through roofs for electrical conduits or fittings
is shown in Figure 9.
Figure 9:
Flashed penetration for electrical
conduits
Paragraph 5.2.8
5.3Pipe installation
5.3.1 Pipes and their supports must be
electrochemically compatible or be
electrolytically separated (refer to Table 2).
5.3.2 Pipes must be installed and supported
to permit thermal movement, except where
anchor points are necessary.
5.3.3 Water supply pipe work must be
supported at centres of no greater than those
given in G12/AS1, Table 7: Water Supply
Pipework Support Spacing.
5.4Pipe insulation
5.4.1 Hot water pipes must be insulated
to satisfy the requirements of NZBC Clause
H1.3.4, except where connected to a heat
dissipation device.
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S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r s
5.4.2 Where closed cell elastomeric pipe
insulation is used outside the building
envelope, it must be painted or have
another form of protection to prevent rapid
deterioration due to exposure to UV radiation.
Pipe insulation must be protected and must
have a durability of not less than 5 years.
COMMENT:
COMMENT
6.2.5 Roof framing must not be reduced in
strength except for drilling for bolts or screws
for attaching solar collectors.
One way to meet the hot water pipe insulation
requirements referred to in Paragraph 5.4.1 is to comply
with NZS 4305: 1996 Domestic type hot water systems.
6.0 Structural Support for Solar
Water Heaters
For additional guidance on selection and application of
fastenings, refer to the roof cladding manufacturer.
6.2.4 Solar collectors must be supported at no
less than four points. The outermost support
points must be within 200 mm of the outside
edge of the solar collector.
6.2.6All screw and bolt fixings into roof
framing timber must be installed with
minimum distances from the centre of the
fixing to the edge of the timber of:
6.1 Scope
a) 20 mm for 8 gauge screws,
6.1.1 Paragraph 1.1.1 of this Acceptable
Solution describes when these structural
and fixing requirements can be used.
b)25 mm for 14 gauge screws,
c) 40 mm for 10 mm bolts.
6.2.7The centre of all fixings must be no
closer than 10 fixing diameters from the end
of a piece of timber.
6.2 General requirements
6.2.1 The installation of solar collectors
on roofs must not produce restrictions to
rainwater flow that could cause water to
accumulate or pond.
COMMENT:
End and edge distances for fixings are in accordance
with NZS 3603: 1993.
6.2.2 The installation of solar collectors must
not dent, bend or distort the roof cladding or
damage any protective coatings.
6.2.3 All fixings that penetrate metal cladding
must be provided with sealing washers or
boots to prevent leakage in accordance with
Paragraph 5.2.
6.3 Direct fixed solar collectors parallel to the roof
6.3.1 Solar collectors can be fixed directly to
the roof as shown in Figures 10 and 11 or
Figures 12 and 13, where the requirements
described in Paragraph 6.3 are met.
Figure 10: Direct fixed strap with rail – section
Paragraph 6.3.1
Collector rail
Butyl rubber
spacer block at
each fixing
Minimum 50 x 50 Purlin
Rafter
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
Figure 11: Direct fixed strap with rail – elevation
Paragraph 6.3.1
Butyl rubber spacer
block under strap
Fixing strap
Collector rail
Butyl rubber spacer
block under strap
Minimum
50 x 50
purlin
6.3.2 Solar collectors mounted on the roof
cladding must meet the materials
requirements described in Paragraph 2.
6.3.3 Solar collectors fixed directly to metal
roof cladding must be:
a) attached with 12 self-tapping 8 gauge
(4 mm) metal screws fixed to metal roof
cladding provided the weight of the solar
collector is spread over a sufficient number
of points of contact so that the average load
on any one point is not more than 15 kg, and
b)attached with 4 x 8 gauge (4 mm) screws
into purlins 50 mm wide or larger within
200 mm of each of the four corners of the
solar collector.
6.3.4 Solar collectors can be installed on
concrete or clay tiles with:
a) stainless steel straps inserted through the
joints between successive rows of tiles and
screw fastened to rafters, truss top chords
or under-purlins 75 x 45 mm or larger, and
b)support within 100 mm of the centre of
the underlying tile batten, and
c) the load distributed across as many tiles
as practicable.
COMMENT:
1. Cladding materials which need regular washing may
require solar collectors to be elevated above the roof
cladding. Refer to your roof cladding manufacturer
for specific advice. Elevated options are provided in
Paragraphs 6.4 to 6.6.
2. The susceptibility for concrete and clay tiles
to breakage means that special care must be
taken when working on and attaching systems
to these roofs.
3. Solar water heater manufacturers and installers
have developed proprietary mounting systems
which may have equivalent performance to this
Acceptable Solution.
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S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r s
Figure 12:
Direct fixed channel – section
Paragraph 6.3.1
Collector
Solar tubes
Butyl rubber
spacer block at
each fixing
Minimum 50 x 50 Purlin
Rafter
Figure 13:
Direct fixed channel – elevation
Paragraph 6.3.1
Collector
Solar tubes
Minimum 50 x 50
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
6.4Elevated solar collector panels parallel to the roof
6.4.1Solar collectors mounted parallel
to the roof that are elevated up to 50 mm
above the roof cladding must be fixed:
i) rafters, or
ii) truss top chords.
a) as shown in Figure 14, with 14 gauge
screws into one of the following:
i) purlins 70 x 45 mm or larger on their flat,
that span no more than 700 mm, or
ii) purlins 90 x 45 mm or larger on their flat,
that span no more than 900 mm, or
iii) rafters 90 x 45 mm or larger, or
iv)truss top chords 90 x 45 mm or larger, or
b) as shown in Figure 15, with 10 mm hot dip
galvanised bolts to purlins 90 x 45 mm or
larger that span no more than 900 mm, or
Figure 14:
c) as shown in Figure 16, with 12 mm bolts
welded to 3 mm plate, hot dip galvanised
after welding and screw fixed to either:
6.4.2 Solar collectors mounted parallel to the
roof that are elevated up to 50 mm above the
roof cladding must be supported by:
a) underlying purlins conforming to Paragraph
6.4.1 (a) or (b), or
b)underlying rafters or trusses with
connections conforming with Paragraphs
6.4.1 (a) or (c), or
c) collector support rails conforming to
Paragraph 6.5.
Screw fixing
Paragraph 6.4.1 b)
Panel support
bracket
14G x 125 or 150
‘type 17’ screw Hot
Galv washer
GalvDip
washer
16 OD x 2.0 WT
Galv
tube
Hot
Dip spacer
Galv
tube spacer
Neophrene
washer
EPDM flexible boot
Cladding
Minimum
90 x 45 Rafter
or truss member
75
mm
n5
mi
0m
m
25 O Hot
25
GalvDip
Galv washer
washer
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Bolt fixing
Paragraph 6.4.1 a)
Figure 15:
Support point for collector parallel to roof
Collector support
Collector
10 O Galv
boltGalv bolt
Hot Dip
Galv
washer
Hot Dip
Galv washer
16 OD x 2.0 WT Hot
GalvDip
tube
spacer
Galv
tube spacer
Neophrene
washer
45mm
EDPM
EPDM flexible boot
90 x 45 Purlin
25 O Galv
washer
Hot Dip
Galv washer
Rafter
Stud fixing
Paragraph 6.4.1 c)
Figure 16:
Cladding
12 O Hot Dip Galv rod
Support point for collector on frames (alternate)
m
0m
20
EPDM flexible boot
ma
x
Collector
12 O Galv rod
Hot Dip Galv rod
Rafter or
truss member
Collector support
20
mm
3 mm thick
Hot Dip Galv
plate
EDPM flexible boot
EPDM
m
0m
75
20
mm
mm
15
8 Ga screws
min 35 mm long
Support point for collector on frames
Elevation 60
1 December 2007
Rafter
8 Ga screws
min 35 mm long
Section
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
Figure 17: Collector support rails across roof slope
Paragraph 6.5.1 a)
Solar collector frames on roof
Figure 18: Collector frame up slope of roof
Paragraph 6.5.1 b)
each space between rafters or trusses that
have a solar collector above them. Rails may
cantilever up to 200 mm beyond a rafter or
truss. The collector support rails are to be
fixed to either:
a) each rafter or truss that they cross using
the details given in Figures 14 and 16, or
b)purlins, provided the purlins are a minimum
size of 90 x 45 mm on their flat and span
a maximum of 900 mm using the details
given in Figures 14 and 15.
Solar collector frames on roof
6.5 Collector support rails
6.5.1 Collector support rails may either:
a) run horizontally across the slope of the roof
as provided for in Paragraph 6.5.2 and
Figure 17, or
b)run up the slope of the roof as provided for
in Paragraph 6.5.3 and Figure 18.
6.5.2 Collector support rails running
horizontally across the roof slope, as shown
in Figure 17, must be in one piece and span
D E PA R T M E N T O F B U I L D I N G A N D H O U S I N G
6.5.3Collectors laid on support rails running
up the slope of the roof must be in one piece
and be supported as shown in Figure 18 by
either:
a) each purlin that is crossed of a minimum
size of 90 x 45 mm on their flat which
spans a maximum of 950 mm using the
connection details given by Figure 14, or
b)rafters or truss top chords at not more than
1500 mm centres and within 300 mm of each
end of the collector support rails using the
connection details given by Figure 14 or 16.
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S O L A R wat e r H E AT e r s
6.6 Mounting collectors at a different pitch to the roof cladding
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Acceptable Solution G12/AS2
Figure 19: Collector at different pitch to roof
Paragraph 6.6.1
6.6.1Solar collectors mounted at a different
pitch to the pitch of the roof must be installed
with no less than 8 fixing points and must
meet all the requirements described in
Paragraph 6.6 and Figure 19.
6.6.2Solar collectors must be mounted on
support rails running horizontally across the
roof slope that comply with Paragraph 6.5.2
except for the following differences:
a) they must be supported by four rafters
or truss top chords, and
Angle mounted solar collector frame on roof
b)they must be hot dip galvanised mild steel
or stainless steel angles with a minimum
section modulus about axes parallel to the
sides of the angle of 3.3 cm3 x 10 mm3, and
c) they must be connected to the rafters
or truss top chords with fixings as shown
in Figure 20, and
d)the connections between the struts and
the collector support rails must be mid-way
between the outer pair of collector support
rail fixings.
COMMENT:
1. A steel angle section 50 x 50 x 6 mm meets the
minimum strength requirements of Paragraph 6.6.2.
2. Other materials can be used for the support rails
which meet the materials requirements described
in Paragraph 2.0 and have equivalent strength to
the rails described in Paragraph 6.6.2 b).
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A c c e p table Solution G12/AS2
Figure 20: Stud fixing for panels at different pitch
Paragraph 6.6.2 c)
Cladding
Hot Dip
Galv rod
16 O Galv
rod
m
0m
20
EPDM flexible boot
x
ma
4 mm thick
Hot Dip
Galv plate
Galv
plate
20
mm
m
0m
25
Rafter or
truss member
75
mm
20
mm
8 Ga screws
min 35 mm long
6.6.3The edge of the panel elevated above
the roof plane is to be supported by hot dip
galvanized steel or stainless steel angle struts
which are:
a) 25 x 25 x 3 mm angle for struts up to
1.0 m long
6.6.5Connections between the struts, the
diagonal and support rails are to be:
a) for hot dip galvanized steel, one M8 hot
dip galvanized Class 4.8 bolt with nut and
washers at each intersection, or
b)30 x 30 x 3 mm angle for struts up to
1.4 m long, or
b)for stainless steel, one M8 stainless steel
bolt with nut and washers at each
intersection, or
c) 40 x 40 x 3 mm angle for struts up to
2.4 m long.
c) fully welded – any mild steel that is welded
must be hot dip galvanized after welding.
Cuts or holes made in steel after galvanizing
are to be protected from corrosion.
6.6.6Connections between the upper ends
of the struts and the collector must be of
equivalent strength to the those of
Paragraph 6.6.5
6.6.4A diagonal is to run from within 50 mm
of the top of one strut to within 50 mm of the
bottom of the other strut. It must be the same
size as the struts.
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6.6.7Alternatively, proprietary elevated frames
can be used which:
a) meet the requirements described in
Paragraphs 6.6.1 and 6.6.2
b)are subject to specific engineering design
c) result in the load on each collector support
rail being evenly distributed over each of
the four fixing points.
7.0 Maintenance and Durability
7.1 Maintenance
7.1.1 A permanent label must be fixed to a
prominent part of the system which includes
all markings required in the appropriate
Standard identified in Paragraph 3.1.1.
COMMENT
1. Solar water heaters should be installed so that they
can be easily maintained and owners should be
provided with adequate instructions on the
maintenance requirements.
2. Maintenance should be carried out to achieve the
required:
a) system performance, and
b) durability of the solar water heater and any affected building components and junctions.
7.2 Durability
7.2.1 Solar water heaters and their
components must meet the durability
requirements specified in NZBC Clause B2.
7.2.2 A solar water heater is easy to access
and moderately difficult to replace and
therefore the durability requirement is
15 years.
7.2.3 Some components of the system will
require maintenance and/or replacement.
Components requiring maintenance or
replacement before 15 years must be clearly
identified in the owner’s manual.
COMMENT:
NZS 4613:1986 states that:
“All materials used in the construction of solar equipment
must have an expected in-service life of at least 15
years unless specifically excluded by the manufacturer”
(Clause 103.2), and
“Collectors must have an expected service life of at
least 15 years with no loss of fitness for purpose or
rapid degradation during this period” (Clause 104.1).
NZS 4613: 1986 has been incorporated by reference
in the G12 Compliance Document since October 2001.
3. The maintenance required is dependent on the:
a) type of solar water heater,
b) materials and components used in the system manufacture and installation,
c) manufacturer’s recommendations,
d) position of the solar water heater on the building,
e) geographical location and specific site conditions.
COMMENT:
Washing by rain removes most accumulated
atmospheric contaminants from roof cladding, but
sheltered areas below solar collectors may be protected
from the direct effects of rain and therefore may require
regular manual washing. High pressure water must not
be directed at sensitive junctions such as penetrations
and other flashings. Care must be taken to avoid water
being driven past anti-capillary gaps and flashings.
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Index G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
I n d e x G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
wat e r s u p p l i e s
All references to Verification Methods and Acceptable Solutions are preceded by VM or AS
respectively.
Backflow protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.4
air gaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.5
backflow prevention devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.6
atmospheric vacuum breakers . . . AS1 3.6.2, 3.6.4, 3.7.1, Table 2
double check valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.6.2, 3.7.2, Table 2
pressure vacuum breakers . . . . . . AS1 3.6.1, 3.6.4, 3.7.1, Table 2
reduced pressure zone devices . . AS1 3.6.2, 3.6.4, 3.7.2, Table 2
installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.6.3, 3.6.4, 3.7.1
testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.7
Cold water expansion valves
(expansion control valves) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.3.3, 6.6.2, 6.6.3,
Figures 8 to 10, Table 6
installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.6.5
relief valve drains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.7, Figures 8 to 10, and 13
Cross connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.1,
hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.3
Energy cut-offs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.4.1 c), 6.5.2
Equipotential bonding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 9.0
earth bonding conductors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 9.3
installation of conductors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 9.2
metallic sanitary fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 9.2.2, Figure 20
metallic water supply pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.2.1, Figure 19
Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see Strainers
Hot water supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.0
pipe sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.12, Table 4
Identification of non-potable water supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 4.2.1
Isolating valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.7.1, 5.4.2
Legionella bacteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.14.3
Mixing devices
tempering valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.14.2, Figure 16
Non-potable water supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 4.1
outlet identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 4.2.1, Figure 3
Non-return valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 Figures 7 to 10, Table 6
Operating device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3
People with disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 8.0
usable water taps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 Figure 18
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Index G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
Potable water supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.0, 4.0
Pressure limiting valves . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.3.3, 6.2.1, Figure 8, Table 6
Pressure reducing valves . . . AS1 5.3.2, 6.2.1, Figures 7 and 9, Table 6
Pressure relief valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.4.1 b), 6.6, Table 6
installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.6.5
relief valve drains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.7, Figures 12 and 13
Relief valve drains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see Cold water expansion valves,
Temperature relief valves and
Temperature/pressure relief valves
Safe trays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2.3, 6.11.3
Safe water temperatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.14
Safety device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.4
Sanitary appliances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 8.0.1, Table 1
Sanitary fixtures . . . . . . . AS1 6.12.1, 6.14.2, Figure 20, Tables 1 and 3
safe water temperatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.14.1, 6.14.2
Solar water heaters
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 5.0
Pipe installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 5.3
Pipe insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 5.4
Weathertightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 5.2, Table 4, Figures 2–9
Wetback water heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 5.1
Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 4.0, 4.1
Solar orientation and inclination . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 4.2, Figure 2
Maintenance and durability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 7.0
Durability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 7.2
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 7.1
Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 2.0
Material selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 2.1, Tables 1, 2 and 3
Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 3.0
Operating and safety devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 3.4
Protection from frosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 3.6, Figure 1
Protection from Legionella bacteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 3.5
Sizing of systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 3.3
Solar controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 3.2
Solar water heaters and components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 3.1.1
Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 1.0
Exclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 1.2
Structural support limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 1.1
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Structural support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 6.0
Collector support rails . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 6.5, Figures 17 and 18
Elevated solar collectors parallel to the roof . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 6.4
Figures 14–16
General requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 6.2, Figures 10–13
Mounting collectors at different pitch to roof cladding . . AS2 6.6,
Figures 19 and 20
Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS2 6.1
Storage water heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.2, 6.3.1, 6.6.3, 6.6.5,
6.7.2, 6.8 to 6.11, Table 5
drain pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 4.10.3
open vented . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.3.2, Figures 6 and 7
free outlet type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.1.2, 6.4.2
mains pressure supply . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.2.1, Figure 8, Table 5
tank supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.1.1, Figure 6, Table 5
seismic restraint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.11.5, Figure 4
unvented . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see Storage water heaters, valve vented
valve vented . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.3 to 6.7, Figure 8
Strainers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.2.1
Temperature/pressure relief valves . . . . . AS1 6.4.1, Figure 8, Table 6
installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.6.5
relief valve drains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.7, Figures 12 and 13
Thermostats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.3.5, 6.5.1
Vacuum relief valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 Table 6
Vent pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.3.2, 6.8
diameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.8.2 b)
height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.8.2 d)
installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.9.1
insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.8.3
termination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.8.2 c)
Verification Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VM1 1.0
Water heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.1, Table 5
installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.11
instantaneous water heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.1.1, Table 5
storage water heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see Storage water heaters
wet-back water heaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 6.13, Figure 15
Water main . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.1.1, 3.2.1 b), 5.1.1
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Index G12/VM1 & AS1/AS2
Water supply systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VM1 1.0, AS1 5.0
installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2
anchor points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.1.2
electrochemical compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.1.1
in concrete or masonry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.3.3
pipe supports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.1
spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.1.3, Table 7
pipes below ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.3.2
protection from damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.3
protection from freezing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.2
protection from frosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 3.6.3
maintenance facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2
materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 2.0, Table 1
pressure limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 2.2.2 a)
temperature limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 2.2.2 a)
pipe size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.3, Table 4
flow rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.3.1, Table 3
watertightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 7.5
Water tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2, 6.2.1
access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2.5, Figure 4
covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2.4
location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2.1
overflow pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2.2, Figure 4
safe trays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2.3, Figure 4
seismic restraint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2.7, Figure 4
structural support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.2.7, Figure 4
water storage tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AS1 5.1
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