iSBC 86/14 and iSBC 86/30 Single Board Computer

iSBC 86/14 and iSBC 86/30 Single Board Computer
iSBC® 86/14 AND iSBC® 86/30
SINGLE BOARD COMPUTER
HARDWARE REFERENCE MANUAL
Order Number: 144044-001
I
Copyright © 1982 Intel Corporation
Intel Corporation, 3065 Bowers Avenue, Santa Clara, California 95051
I
REV.
PRINT
DATE
REVISION HISTORY
-Dl
Original Issue
1/82
Additional copies of this manual or other Intel literature may be obtained from:
Literature Department
Intel Corporation
3065 Bowers Avenue
Santa Clara, CA 95051
The Information in this document is subject to change without notice.
Intel Corporation makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this material, including, but not limited
to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Intel Corporation
assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document. Intel Corporation makes no
commitment to update nor to keep current the information contained in this document.
Intel Corporation assumes no responsibility for the use of any circuitry other than circuitry embodied in
an Intel product. No other circuit patent licenses are implied.
Intel software products are copyrighted by and shall remain the property of Intel Corporation. Use,
duplication or disclosure is subject to restrictions stated in Intel's software license, or as defined as
ASPR 7-104.9(a)(9).
No part of this document may be copied or reproduced in any form or by any means without the prior
written consent of Intel Corporation.
The following are trademarks of Intel Corporation and its affiliates and may be used only to identify Intel
products:
BXP
CREDIT
ICE
iCS
1m
iMMX
Insite
Intel
intel
Intelevision
Intellec
iOSP
iRMX
iSBC
iSBX
Library Manager
MCS
Megachassis
Micromainframe
Micrornap
Multibus
Multimodule
Plug·A-Bubble
PROMPT
RMX!~O
System 2000
l'P[
PREFACE
This manual provides general information, installation and setup
instructions, programming guidelines for the on-board, programmable
devices, board level principles of operation, and service information for
the iSBC 86/14 and iSBC 86/30 Single Board Computers. Related
ihformation is provided in the following publications:
Manual
Number
The 8086 Family User's Manual
iSBC· Applications Manual
Intel Multibus· Specification
Intel Multibus· Interfacing, Application Note
MCS-86 Assembly Language Programming Manual
PL/M 86 Programming Manual
Intel iSBX· Bus Specification
Designing iSBX· Multimodule- Boards, Application Note
Using the iRMX· 86 Operating System, Application Note
Intel Component Data Catalog
The 8086 Primer, by Stephen P. Morse. Hayden Book Company, Inc.,
Rochelle Park, N.J., 1980. ISBN: 0-8104-5165-4
9800722
142687
9800683
AP-28A
9800640
9800466
142686
AP-96
AP-86
NOTE TO READERS
This hardware reference manual utilizes a visual scheme to denote section
levels, rather than a numerical scheme used in many technical documents.
This visual scheme allows you to more readily identify which section
headings are sub-sections. The visual distinction among the different
sizes used in the paragraph headings indicates what level or order a
particular paragraph occupies. The following example illustrates how
this system is used in this manual:
3-27.
8259A PIC PROGRAMMING
1st Order Heading
3-28.
INTERRUPT PRIORITY MODES
2nd Order Heading
3-29.
Fully Nested Mode
3rd Order Heading
By glancing through this manual before you start reading, the visual
method of paragraph ordering should be apparent. You may also refer to
the Contents on page iv, to see how the paragraph levels compare to each
other.
This manual documents both the iSBC 86/14 Single Board Computer and the
iSBC 86/30 Single Board Computer. The design and operation of the two
boards is similar enough to allow doing so. Throughout the manual, the
title of the two boards has been condensed to be, simply, the
iSBC 86/14/30 board. Where this type of name occurs, you may assume that
the boards are operating identically. Where the two boards do not
operate identically, their names are separated and the descriptions of
their operation are also separated.
iii
CONTENTS
Page
CHAPTER 1
GENERAL INFORMATION
1-1. Introduction..................................................
1-2.
'Description...................................................
1-3.
1-4.
1-5.
1-6.
1-7.
Optional RAM and ROM/EPROM Expansion..........................
System Software Development...................................
Equipment Supplied............................................
Equipment Required............................................
Specifications................................................
CHAPTER 2
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-1. Introduction ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-2. Unpacking And Inspection ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-3. Installation Considerations •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-4.
2-5.
2-6.
2-7.
Power Requirements ••.•.•••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••
Cooling Requirements •••.•.••••••••.•••••••••••.••••••••.••••
Physical Dimensions ........................................ .
User-Furnished Components •••••••••••••••••••.•••..••••••••••
2-8. User-Furnished Component Installation •••••••••••••••••••••••
2-9. EPROM Device Installation •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-10. Line Driver Installation •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-11. Jumper/Switch Configuration ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-12. RAM Address Configuration Jumpers ••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-13. iSBC 86/14 Board RAM Address Configuration •••••••••••••
2-14. iSBC 86/30 Board RAM Address Configuration •••••••••••••
2-15. Dual Port RAM Size Selection •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-16. Size Select For iSBC 86/14 Board •••••••••••••••••••••••
2-17. Size Select For iSBC 86/30 Board •••••••••••••••••••••••
2-18. Ready Circuitry Jumper Configuration •••••••••••••••••••••
2-19. 8253-5 PIT Jumper Configuration ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-20. 8255A PPI Jumper Configuration •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-21. 8259A PIC and Interrupt Jumper Configuration •••••••••••••
2-22. Multibus Vectored Interrupts •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-23. 8251A PCI and Serial Interface Jumper Configurations •••••
2-24. Failsafe Timer Jumper Configuration ••••••••••••••••••••••
2-25. Status Register Jumper Configurations ••••••••••••••••••••
2-26. iSBX Bus Interface Jumper Configuration ••••••••••••••••••
2-27. Multibus Interface Jumper Configuration ••••••••••••••••••
2-28. Bus Arbitration Jumper Configurations ••••••••••••••••••
2-29. Multibus Interface Specifications ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-30. Signal Characteristics .•..•..•..•.••••.••••..••...•.••.••••
2-31. Multibus Priority Resolution •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-32. Serial Priority Resolution •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-33. Parallel Priority Resolution •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-34. Auxiliary (P2) Interface Specifications ••••••••••••••••••••
iv
1-1
1-2
1-7
1-7
1-8
1-8
1-8
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-2
2-2
2-7
2-8
2-10
2-11
2-23
2-24
2-26
2-30
2-30
2-31
2-32
2-33
2-34
2-41
2-45
2-46
2-46
2-46
2-47
2-48
2-49
2-50
2-51
2-62
2-62
2-63
2-64
CONTENTS (continued)
Page
CHAPTER 2 (continued)
2-35. Parallel I/O Interface ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-36. Parallel I/O Cabling Requirements ••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-37. Serial I/O Interface •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-38. Serial I/O Cabling Requirements ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-39. Current Loop (TTY) In terface ......•.................•.•••
2-40. Connector Pin Numbering Information ••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-41- iSBX Bus Interface ..................•..........•......•....
2-42. Power Fail Battery Backup Provisions •••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-43. iSBC Multimodule Board Installation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-44. iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board ••••••••••••••••••
2-45. iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board •••••••••••••••••
2-46. iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-47. iSBC 303 Parity Generator/Checker Multimodule Board
Installation •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-48. iSBX Multimodule Board Installation ••
2-49. iRMX 86 System Software ••••.•••••••••.•••.•••••••.•••.•••••••
2-50. Final Installation •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
CHAPTER 3
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
3-1- In troduction .••...••..........•.•..........•••.•.•.•••••••...•
3-2. Memory Addressing .•........••••...••..•..•...•.......•••.....•
3-3. iSBC 86/14 Board Memory Addressing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-4. iSBC 86/30 Board Memory Addressing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-4. I/O Addressing ..........................................•...
3-5. 8253-5 Pit Programming .....••..•.•...........•..........•.....
3-6. Mode Control Word and Count •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-7. Addressing ................................................. .
3-8. Initialization ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-9. Operation •..•.•...•.....•.......................•..........•
3-10. Counter Read ..•••.......••...•...•.•••....••..•..•.•...•.
3-11. Clock Frequency/Divide Ratio Selection •••••••••••••••••••••
3-12. Rate Generator/Interval Timer ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-13. Interrupt Timer .....•.•......••••.•••••••..••.••.•••••...•.
3-14. 825lA PCI Programming .••••..••...••.•..•..•..•......•.••..••.
3-15. Mode Instruction Format ..•.•••••.•..•.•••...•.•••••••••.•••
3-16. Sync Characters .....•.••••....•••••.•.••.•.•.....•.•.•.•.•.
3-17. Command Instruction Format •.•.•..••.•..•.•..••.••.•••.••.••
3-18. Re se t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-19. Addressing ...••.•..•.•.••.......•.........•....•.•.•.•.•.
3-20. Initialization •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-21- 8255A PPI Programming ••.•.•.•••.•.•••.......••.•.•...••.•.••.
3-22. Control Word Format ...•.•.....••..•••..••••..••..••..•.••••
3-23. Addressing ••••••••..•...•....•.••......•..•.......•..•••...
3-24. Initialization •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-25. Operation .•...•.•••.••••••••.••••.•.••••••••.•...•••.....••
v
2-68
2-69
2-70
2-70
2-72
2-73
2-73
2-76
2-77
2-77
2-77
2-78
2-78
2-78
2-80
2-81
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-3
3-3
3-8
3-8
3-12
3-12
3-13
3-13
3-16
3-16
3-17
3-18
3-18
3-21
3-21
3-22
3-22
3-22
3-28
3-29
3-29
3-30
3-30
CONTENTS (continued)
Page
CHAPTER 3 (continued)
3-26. 8259A PIC Programming ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-27. Interrupt Priority Modes •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-28. Fully Nested Mode ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••
3-29. Special Fully Nested Mode ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-30. Automatic Rotating Mode ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-3l. Specific Rotating MOde •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-32. Special Mask Mode ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-33. Poll Mode .•.....••.•.•....•..•.•.••..•.•...••....••..•...
3-34. Status Read ....•..•..••.•.•.•••.•.••••••....•.•.••••••..•••
3-35. Initialization Command Words •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-36. Operation Command Words ••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••
3-37. Addressing .................•....•...........•....•....•....
3-38. Initialization •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-39. Operation .••.........•••.•..............•.......•....•...
3-40. 8086-2 Interrupt Handling ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-41. Non-Maskable Interrupt (NMI) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-42. Maskable Interrupt (INTR) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-43. Master PIC Byte Identifier •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-44. Slave PIC Byte Identifier ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-45. Status Register Programming ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-46. Edge-Triggered Interrupt Sense Latch Programming •••••••••••••
CHAPTER 4
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-l. In t roduc t ion •••••••••.•.•••••.••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••
4-2. Functional Description •.••••.••.•.•••••••.•••.••••••••••••••••
4-3. 8086-2 Microprocessor •••.•••••••••••••••.••••.••••••••••••••
4-4. On-Board Titning .•••.•••••••...••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•
4-5. Random Access Memory (RAM) Array ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-6. Eraseable Programmable Read Only Memory (EPROM) Array •••••••
4-7. Address Decoding ••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••
4-8. Memory Address Decoding ••.•••••••••••.•••••.••••••••.•••••
4-9. I/O Address Decoding •••••••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••
4-10. Interval Timer •••••••••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-11. Serial I/O Control Circuitry •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-12. Parallel I/O Control Circuitry •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-13. Interrupt Control and Timing Circuitry •••••••••••••••••••••
4-14. 8203 Dynamic Ram Controller ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-15. Dual Port Size/Address Decode PROM •••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-16. Bus Struc ture ••••••••••••••..••••••••••••.•••••••••••••••••
4-17. Multibus In terf ace ••••••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-18. iSBX Bus Int erf ace •••.•••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••.••
4-19. Detailed Circuit Analysis ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-20. Power-On Initialization Operation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-21. CPU Operation •••••••..•••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••
4-22. Multibus Data Transfer Modes •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-23. Even Byte Transfer Operation •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-24. Odd Byte (Swap) Transfer Operation •••••••••••••••••••••••
4-25. 16-bit Transfer Operation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
vi
3-33
3-34
3-34
3-34
3-35
3-35
3-35
3-36
3-36
3-36
3-41
3-41
3-41
3-43
3-48
3-48
3-48
3-49
3-49
3-50
3-50
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-8
4-9
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-12
4-12
4-13
4-15
4-18
4-18
4-18
CONTENTS (continued)
Page
CHAPTER 4 (continued)
4-26. Dual Port RAM Access Control Logic •••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-27. Dual Port RAM Access Operation •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-28. Dual Port RAM Access Cycle H"ithout Contention (Not Busy).
4-29. Dual Port RAM Access Cycle With Contention •••••••••••••••
4-30. RAM Controller Operation Timing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-31. On-Board EPROM Access Sequence •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-32. EPROM READ Operation ....••••••.••..•••......••••••••.••.•
4-33. Static RAM WRITE Operation •••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-34. On-Board I/O Access Operation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-35. iSBX Bus Access Operation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-36. Typical Local Access to Multibus Resource ••••••••••••••••••
4-37. Interrupt Operation •••••••••••.•••.••••••••.•••••••••••••••
4-38. NBV Interrupt Sequence ••••••••••.•••••••••••••••••.••••••••
4-39. BV Interrupt Sequence ..••.••••••.•.•••••••••••.•.•.•••.••
4-40. Failsafe Timer Operation •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-41. Chip Select Circuit Operation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-42. I/O Chip Select Operation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-43. EPROM Chip Select Operation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-44. RAM Chip Select Operation .•.•••.•••••••••.•••.•••.•••••••
4-45. Bus Control Operation •••..•••.•.•.••••.••.••••.••••..•.••
4-18
4-19
4-19
4-20
4-22
4-24
4-25
4-25
4-26
4-27
4-27
4-28
.t.-28
4-31
4-32
4-32
4-33
4-36
4-38
4-40
CHAPTER 5
SERVICE INFORMATION
5-1. Introduction .•.••........••..................•...••.......•...
5-2. Replaceable Parts ••••••.••••••••.•••.•••.•••••••••••••••••••••
5-3. Service Diagrams •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••••••
5-4. Service and Repair Assistance •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
5-1
5-1
5-1
5-4
APPENDIX A
iSBC 300A RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
A-i.
A-2.
A-3.
A-4.
A-5.
Introduction ••••.•.•••••••.••.•••••••••...••.•••••••••••.•••••
iSBC 300A Installation ••••••.•.••..•••••.••••.•..•••.•••••••••
Service Information •••••.•••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••
Replaceable Parts •••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••
Service Diagrams •••••••••.••••.•.•••••••..••••••••••••••••.•••
A-1
A-1
A-2
A-2
A-2
APPENDIX B
iSBC 304 RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
B-1.
B-2.
B-3.
B-4.
B- 5.
Introduction .•••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••
iSBC 304 Installation .••••••.•••••••••••••.••••••••.••••••••••
Service Information •••••••.••••••••••.•.•..•••••••••••••••••••
Replaceable Parts •••.•••••••.•••••.••••••••••••••••.•••.••••••
Service Diagrams •••.•••••••..•••••••••••••••.•.•••••.•••••••••
vii
B-1
B-1
B-2
B-2
B-2
CONTENTS (continued)
Page
APPENDIX C
iSBC 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
Content s •..•.•••••••••.•••••••••••.•....••......•••••••.••••••.•..•
C-l. Chapter 1. General Information ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
1-1. Introduc tion ...........................................•....
1-2. Description .......••..........................•.............
1-3. Equipment Supplied ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
1-4. Specifications ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
C-2. Chapter 2. Preparation For Use ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-1. Introduction ..................•..........•.••..•••.••.•.....
2-2. Unpacking & Inspection ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-3. Installation Considerations •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-4. Power Requirements ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-5. Cooling Requirements ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-6. Physical Dimensions •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-7. Connector Configuration •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-8. Jumper Configuration ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-9. Installation Procedure ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-10. Installation Onto Base Board •••••
2-11. Installation Onto iSBC 303 Board.
C-3. Chapter 3. Programming Information ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-1. In troduction ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-2. Programming Considerations ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
C-4. Chapter 4. Principles of Operation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-1. Introduction ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-2. Functional Description ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-3. Parity Generator/Checker ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-4. Parity Memory •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-5. Parity Generation •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-6. Parity Checker ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-7. Memory Refresh Control ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-8. Da ta Bus ~ tches ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-9. Cotnmand I>e: cod e ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-10. Error Interrupts .....•..•.•••••.•••.•..••..•••••••.•.••••
4-11. INTR ....•.•..•.••......•.••••.••••.•••.•.••••.•......••
4-12. NMI ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-13. Visual Error Indicators ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-14. Error Indicator Signals ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-15. Ci rcui t AIla lys is •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-16. Parity Memory ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-17. Parity Ge.nera ti on ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-18.
4-19.
4-20.
4-21.
4-22.
4-23.
Parity Checker •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Data Bus I..a.tches •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
INTR In terrupt •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
NMI Interrupt ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
HI/LO Indicators •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Address and Command Decode •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
viii
C-1
C-2
C-2
C-2
C-3
C-3
C-5
C-5
C-5
C-5
C-5
C-5
C-6
C-6
C-6
C-8
C-8
C-11
C-14
C-14
C-14
C-15
C-15
C-15
C-16
C-16
C-16
C-16
C-16
C-16
C-17
C-17
C-17
C-17
C-17
C-18
C-18
C-18
C-18
C-19
C-19
C-19
C-19
C-19
C-20
CONTENTS (continued)
Page
APPENDIX C (continued)
C-5. Chapter 5. Service Information ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
5-1. Introduction .............................•.......••.....•...
5-2. Diagnostic Test ..................................•....••.••.
5-3. Replacea ble Part s .................•...•..•.•...•.••..•......
5-4. Se rvice Diagrams ..•...•••..••.•.....•..•.•.•.•.......••••••.
5-5. Service and Repair Assistance •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
5-6. Internal Signals ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
C-21
C-21
C-21
C-21
C-22
C-22
C-23
APPENDIX D.
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
D-l. In troduc tion .•..•....•......•...•.............•..•.•.••.....•.
D-2. Functional Differences •••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
D-3. Software Compatibility ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
D-4. Power Requirements •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••
D- 5. Timing ....••..•...•...•.....•.•.....•••.••...•.•••...•••••••
D-6. Memory •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.
D-7. I/O Port Addressing •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
D-8. Pin Assignment/Signal Definition Differences ••••••••••••••••
D-9. Jumper Post Numbering •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
D-10. Interrupt Differences ••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••••
D-ll. Physical Differences •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
D-l
D-l
D-l
D-2
D-3
D-4
D-4
D-6
D-7
D-11
D-12
FIGURES
1-1.
iSBC 86/14/30 Single Board Computer ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
1-2
2-1.
2-2.
2-3.
2-4.
2-5.
2-6.
2-7.
2-8.
2-9.
2-10.
2-11.
2-12.
2-13.
2-14.
iSBC 86/14/30 Board User-Furnished Component Locations •••••••
EPROM Device Installation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Typical Memory Configuration •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
iSBC 86/14 Board Multibus Address Configuration Example ••••••
iSBC 86/30 Board Multibus Address Configuration Example ••••••
Typical Mater/Salve PIC Interconnect Example •••••••••••••••••
Bus Exchange Timing (Master Mode) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Bus Exchange Timing (Slave Mode) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Serial Priority Resolution Scheme ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Parallel Priority Resolution Scheme ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Spacer Installation Technique ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
iSBX Multimodule Board Orientation •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
2-3
2-9
2-10
2-28
2-29
2-45
2-60
2-61
2-63
2-64
2-70
2-73
2-79
2-80
3-1.
3-2.
3-3.
3-4.
3-5.
3-6.
PIT
PIT
PIT
PCI
PCI
PCI
3-9
3-10
3-16
3-19
3-19
3-20
Serial Cabling Diagram •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Pin Numbering Conventions ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Control Word Forma.t ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Programming Sequence Examples ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Counter Register Latch Control Word Format •••••••••••••••
Synchronous Mode Instruction Word Format •••••••••••••••••
Synchronous Mode Transmission Format •••••••••••••••••••••
Asynchronous Mode Instruction Word Format ••••••••••••••••
ix
CONTENTS
FIGURES (continued)
3-7. PCI Asynchronous Mode Transmission Format ••••••••••••••••••••
3-8. PCI Command Instruction Word Format ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-9. Typical PCI Initialization and Data I/O Sequence •••••••••••••
3-10. pcr Status Byte Format ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-11. PPI Control Word Format ••••••••••••••.••..••.•••.••.•.•.••••
3-12. PPI Port C Bit Set/Reset Control Word Format ••••••••••••••••
3-13. Initialization Command Word (ICW) Formats •••••••••••••••••••
3-14. Operation Command Word (OCW) Formats ••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-15. Data Byte Format For Status Register ••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
4-4.
Page
3-20
3-21
3-24
3-27
3-29
3-32
3-37
3-40
3-51
iSBC 86/14/30 Board Block Diagram ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
4-2
Internal Bus Structure •.•••.••••••.•••••••••••••••••.••••••••
4-11
READ and WRITE Operation Timing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Slave Mode Dual Port Access (CPU Lockout) ••••••••••••••••••••
Master Mode Dual Port Access (Multibus Lockout) ••••••••••••••
Typical Dynamic RAM Operation Sequence •••••••••••••••••••••••
4-17
4-21
4-22
4-24
4-30
4-5.
4-6.
4-7.
Multibus access Timing ••••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
iSBC 86/14/30 Board Jumper Location Diagram ••••••••••••••••••
iSBC 86/14/30 Single Board Computer Parts Location Diagram •••
iSBC 86/14/30 Single Board Computer Schematic Diagram
(16 Sheets) .••••••....•.....••.••...•••.••......•....••....
5-7
5-9
5-11
TABLES
1-1.
2-1.
2-2.
2-3.
2-4.
2-5.
2-6.
2-7.
2-8.
2-9.
2-10.
2-11.
2-12.
2-13.
2-14.
2-15.
2-16.
2-17.
2-18.
2-19.
2-20.
2-21.
2-22.
Specifications ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
User-Furnished Components ••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••••••
User-Furnished Connector Information •••••••••••••••••••••••••
EPROM Socket Address Assignments •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
User-Configurable Jumper Functions •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Jumper Listing By Numerical Order ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Megabyte Address Select ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
128k Page Selection for iSBC 86/14 Board •••••••••••••••••••••
8k Ending Address Boundary Select for iSBC 86/14 Board •••••••
256k Page Selection for iSBC 86/30 Board •••••••••••••••••••••
32k Ending boundary Select for iSBC 86/30 Board •••••••••••••
iSBC 86/14 board Dual Port RAM Size Select ••••••••••••••••••
iSBC 86/30 Board Dual Port RAM Size Select ••••••••••••••••••
Wait-state Jumper Configuration •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
PIT Output Signal Jumper ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Parallel Port Jumper Configuration ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Interrupt Source and Level Selecting Options ••••••••••••••••
Multibus Interface Jumper Options •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Multibus Interface Arbitration Options ••••••••••••••••••••••
Connector P1 Pin Assignments ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Connector P1 Signal Descriptions ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
P1 Connector DC Characteristics •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
P1 Connector AC Characteristics •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
x
1-8
2-4
2-6
2-9
2-11
2-18
2-25
2-25
2-26
2-27
2-27
2-30
2-32
2-33
2-34
2-35
2-42
2-48
2-50
2-51
2-53
2-55
2-58
CONTENTS
TABLES (continued)
2-23.
2-24.
2-25.
2-26.
2-27.
2-28.
2-29.
2-30.
2-31.
2-32.
P1 Connector AC Characteristics •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Auxiliary Connector P2 Pin Assignments ••••••••••••••••••••••
Auxiliary Connector P2 DC Characteristics •••••••••••••••••••
Parallel I/O Connector J1 Pin Assignments •••••••••••••••••••
Parallel I/O Connector J1 DC Characteristics ••••••••••••••••
Parallel I/O Cabling Information ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Serial I/O Connector J2 Pin Assignments •••••••••••••••••••••
RS232C Types ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
iSBX Bus Connector J3 and J4 Pin Assignments ••••••••••••••••
iSBX Bus Signal Descriptions ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
3-LA.
3-1B.
3-2.
3-3.
3-4.
3-5.
3-6.
3-7.
3-8.
3-9.
3-10.
3-11.
3-12.
3-13.
3-14.
3-15.
3-16.
3-17.
3-18.
3-19.
3-20.
3-21.
3-22.
3-23.
3-24.
3-25.
3-26.
3-27.
3-28.
3-29.
3-30.
iSBC 86/14 Board Memory Map •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
iSBC 86/30 Board Memory Map •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
RAM Address Range Configuration •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
I/O Port Address List •••..•••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••••.•
PIT counter Operation Vs. Gate Inputs •••••••••••••••••••••••
Typical PIT Control Word Subroutine •••••••••••••••••••••••••
Typical PIT Counter Value Load Subroutine •••••••••••••••••••
Typical PIT Counter Read Subroutine •••••••••••••••••••••••••
PIT Rate Generator Frequencies and Timer Intervals ••••••••••
PIT Time Intervals Vs. Timer Counts •••••••••••••••••••••••••
PCl Address Assignments ••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••••••••.••
Typical PCI Mode or Command Instruction Subroutine ••••••••••
Typical PCI Data Character Read Subroutine ••••••••••••••••••
Typical PCI Data Character Write Subroutine •••••••••••••••••
Typical PCI Status Read Subroutine ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Parallel Port Configurations ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Parallel Port I/O Address •••.•••••••••••.••.••.•••••••••••••
Typical PPI Initialization Subroutine •••••••••••••••••••••••
Typical PPI Port Read Subroutine ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Typical PPI Port Write Subroutine •••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Parallel I/O Interface Configurations •••••••••••••••••••••••
Interrupt Type Pointers •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Typical PIC Initialization Subroutine (NBV Mode) ••••••••••••
Typical Master PIC Initialization Subroutine (BV Mode) ••••••
Typical Slave PIC Initialization Subroutine (BV Mode) •••••••
PIC Operation Procedures ••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••
Typical PIC Interrupt Request Register Read Subroutine ••••••
Typical PIC In-Service Register Read Subroutine •••••••••••••
Typical PIC Set Mask Register Subroutine ••••••••••••••••••••
Typical PIC Set Mask Register Read Subroutine •••••••••••••••
Typical PIC End-Of-Interrupt Command Subroutine •••••••••••••
xi
Page
2-59
2-66
2-67
2-68
2-69
2-69
2-71
2-72
2-74
2-75
3-2
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-12
3-14
3-15
3-15
3-17
3-18
3-22
3-25
3-25
3-26
3-27
3-28
3-30
3-31
3-31
3-31
3-33
3-38
3-42
3-42
3-43
3-44
3-46
3-46
3-47
3-47
3-47
CONTENTS
TABLES (continued)
Page
4-1.
4-2.
4-4.
4-5.
8086-2 Status Bid Decodes •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Data Transfer Modes •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••
EPROM Static Access Time Vs. Wait-state Selection •••••••••••
I/O Access Time Vs. Wait-state Selection ••••••••••••••••••••
iSBX Bus Width Select .•..••••••.••••.•..•••.•••••••..•...•••
4-6.
PAL U36 Operation ••••••••••••••.•••••••••••.••••••••••••••••
4-7.
4-8.
EPROM Chip Capacity Select ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
PAL U45 Operation ••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
RAM Array Capacity Select .••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••
PAL U46 Operation •.•••.••••••.•••••••••.••.•••••••••••••••••
4-3.
4-9.
4-10.
4-11.
5-1.
5-2.
PAL U25 Operation ••.••••••....••••••••.•.•.•..••••••••..••••
Replaceable Parts •••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
'Ma.nuf ac ture r 's Code s .••••••.•....•.•.••.••••••••.•.••.••..••
xii
4-14
4-16
4-25
4-26
4-33
4-34
4-36
4-37
4-39
4-39
4-41
5-2
5-4
CHAPTER 1.
1-1.
GENERAL INFORMATION
INTRODUCTION
The iSBC 86/14 and the iSBC 86/30 Single Board Computers, members of
Intel's complete line of 8-bit and 16-bit single board computer products,
are an enhanced version of the iSBC 86/12A board that is contained on a
single printed circuit board. The iSBC 86/14 and iSBC 86/30 boards
provide a maximum of 64k bytes and 256k bytes of dynamic dual port RAM,
respectively, and feature 8 MHz CPU operation with Mu1timodu1e board
expansion via two iSBX Bus connectors.
The iSBC 86/14 board and iSBC 86/30 board (hereafter referred to jointly
as the iSBC 86/14/30 board) provide a complete computer system that is
designed around the 16-bit iAPX 86/10 HMOS microprocessor (8086-2 CPU),
the main processing device on the boards. The iAPX 86/10 microprocessor
may be operated at either a 5 MHz clock rate or an 8 MHz clock rate on
the iSBC 86/14/30 board in performing both 8-bit and 16-bit data
transfers to/from the single board computer.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board provides a direct iSBC 86/12A board replacement
that is shipped with 32k bytes (maximum on the iSBC 86/14 board) or 128k
bytes (maximum on the iSBC 86/30 board) of dynamic RAM, 4 sockets for
installation of up to 64k bytes of user-provided EPROM devices, a serial
communications port providing an RS232C interface, three parallel I/O
ports providing 24 individual I/O lines, two iSBX Bus connectors
providing interface to either 8-bit or 16-bit Mu1timodu1e board
expansion, two independently programmable interval timers, and nine
levels of interrupt priority supporting bus-vectored interrupts.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board is fully Mu1tibus interface compatible and is
configurab1e for operation in a mu1ti-master system environment. The
on-board RAM is expandable via addition of the plug-in memory expansion
boards available from Intel: the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Mu1timodu1e
Board (86/14) and the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Mu1timodu1e Board (86/30).
As shipped, the each version of the board configures the RAM totally as a
dual port resource. The RAM may be removed from the dual port
configuration in increments of one-fourth of the total RAM size.
Compatibility of the iSBC 86/14/30 board with the iSBC 86/12A board
includes compatibility with the processing expansion features available
in the iSBC 337 Numberic Data Processor, and the iSBC 303 Parity
Generator/Checker Mu1timodu1e Board (86/14 only). Appendix D at the end
of this manual contains a brief description of the major functional and
operational differences between the iSBC 86/14/30 board and the iSBC
86/12A board.
1-1
GENERAL INFORMATION
1-2.
DESCRIPTION
The iSBC 86/14/30 Single Board Computer, shown in Figure 1-1, is a memory
intensive processor board designed around the 16-bit Intel iAPX 86-10
Microprocessor (8086-2 CPU). The iSBC 86/14/30 board can be configured
for full compatibility with the software and hardware functions provided
by the iSBC 86/12A board; this includes compatibility with time dependent
code execution when the iSBC 86/14/30 board operates at a 5 MHz clock
rate.
Figure 1-1.
iSBC· 86/14/30 Single Board Computer
The iSBC 86/14/30 board uses an internal bus during all on-board memory
and I/O operations, and uses the Multibus interface during all off-board
memory and I/O operations. Hence, local (on-board) operations do not
involve the Multibus interface and allow true parallel processing in a
multi-master system. The features of the iSBC 86/14/30 board are listed
and described in the following text.
1-2
GENERAL INFORMATION
*
8086-2 CPU (iAPX 86/10) providing operation at either 5 or 8 MHz
clock frequency.
*
Fully software compatible with the iSBC 86/12A Single Board Computer.
*
32k bytes of dual port RAM available on the iSBC 86/14 board;
expandable to 6~ bytes maximum with on-board refresh.
*
128k bytes of dual port RAM available on the iSBC 86/30 board;
expandable to 256k bytes maximum with on-board refresh.
*
Four JEDEC compatible 24/28 pin sockets for installation of up to 64k
bytes of EPROM onto either version of the board.
*
Two iSBX Bus connectors providing either 8-bit or 16-bit interfaces
to Multimodule boards.
*
+5 volt only power requirement, unless using an RS232C interface or
certain Multimodule boards.
*
*
24 programmable parallel I/O lines via the 8255A PPI.
9 levels of interrupt priority via the 8259A PIC, expandable to 65
levels.
*
I serial I/O port provided via the 8251A PCI.
*
two user-programmable 16-bit BCD or binary event timers/counters via
the 8253-5 PIT.
*
Full Multibus interface compatibility.
*
*
8203 Dynamic RAM Controller.
20-bit addressing with bank-select, allowing for access of up to
16-megabytes of System memory.
The iAPX 86/10 CPU is a 40-pin LSI device providing an interface with
either 8-bit or 16-bit systems. The iAPX 86/10 CPU is configured on the
iSBC 86/14/30 board for MAXIMUM mode operation which allows the iSBC
86/14/30 board the ability to control the 8288 Bus Controller and the
8289 Bus Arbiter devices.
The 8086-2 CPU contains four 16-bit general purpose registers that may be
addressed as eight 8-bit registers. Additionally, the CPU contains two
16-bit pointer registers and two 16-bit index registers. The four 16-bit
segment registers in the 8086-2 allow extended access to a full
megabyte-page of memory addresses. The 8086-2 CPU supports a wide range
of addressing modes and data transfer operations, signed and unsigned 8and 16-bit arithmetic operations including multiply and divide functions,
and logical and string operations. The architecture of the 8086-2 CPU
provides several data transfer features including instruction look-ahead,
dynamic code relocation, and reentrant code execution.
1-3
GENERAL INFORMATION
Two iSBX Bus interfaces are available on the iSBC 86/14/30 board via the
J3 and J4 connectors. Each is capable of accepting either an 8-bit or a
16-bit iSBX Multimodule board. The iSBX Bus connectors allow expansion
of the functionality of the iSBC 86/14/30 board in small increments by
installing Multimodule boards such as the iSBX 311 Analog Input
Multimodule Board, the iSBX 328 Analog Output Multimodule Board, the iSBX
350 Parallel I/O Multimodule Board, the iSBX 351 Serial I/O Multimodule
Board, the iSBX 331 Fixed/Floating Point Math Multimodule Board, the iSBX
332 Floating Point Math Multimodule Board, and others.
Dual port control logic is included to interface the dynamic RAM with the
Multibus interface so that the iSBC 86/14/30 board can function as a
slave RAM device when not in control of the Multibus interface. The
8086-2 CPU has priority when accessing on-board RAM. After the CPU
completes its read or write operation, the controlling bus master is
allowed to access RAM and complete its operation. Where both the CPU and
the controlling bus master have the need to write or read several bytes
or words to or from on board RAM, their operations are interleaved
(unless restricted via Multibus interface control signals).
The slave RAM feature on the iSBC 86/14 board can be configured to allow
either Bk, 16k, 24k, or 32k byte access by another bus master. If the
iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board is installed the dual port
memory increments are 16k, 32k, 4Bk, or 64k. The slave RAM feature on
the iSBC 86/30 board can be configured to allow either 3Zk, 64k, 96k or
12Bk byte access by another bus master. If the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion
Multimodule Board is installed the dual port memory increments are 64k,
12Bk, 192k, or 256k. Thus, the iSBC 86/14/30 board can be configured to
allow other bus masters to access a segment of the on-board RAM and still
reserve another segment strictly for on-board use. The addressing scheme
accommodates 16-bit, 20-bit, and 24-bit addressing.
Four 28-pin IC sockets are included to accommodate user-installed read
only memory. Configuration jumpers allow read memory to be installed in
Zk, 4k, Bk, or 16k byte increments. The memory address decoding scheme
on the iSBC 86/14/30 board assumes that the two ROM/EPROM sockets,
providing the low byte and high byte of any word access, contain the same
memory capacity.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board includes 24 programmable parallel I/O lines
implemented by means of an Intel 8255A-5 Programmable Peripheral
Interface (PPI). Software configures the I/O lines in any combination of
unidirectional input/output and bidirectional ports. The I/O interface
may be customized to meet specific peripheral requirements and, in order
to take full advantage of the large number of possible I/O
configurations, IC sockets are provided for interchangeable I/O line
drivers and terminators. Hence, the flexibility of the parallel I/O
interface is further enhanced by the capability of selecting the
appropriate combination of optional line drivers and terminators to
provide the required sink current, polarity, and drive/termination
characteristics for each application. The 24-programmable I/O lines and
signal grou~d lines are brought out to a 50-pin edge connector (J1).
1-4
GENERAL INFORMATION
The RS232C-compatible serial I/O port at connector J2 is controlled and
interfaced by an Intel 8251A PCI (Programmable Communications Interface)
chip. The PCI is individually programmable for operation in most
synchronous or asynchronous serial data transmission formats (including
IBM Bi-Sync). In the synchronous mode the following features are
programmable:
a.
b.
c.
Character length,
Sync character (or characters), and
Parity.
In the asynchronous mode the following features are programmable:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Character length,
Baud rate factor (clock divide ratios of 1, 16, or 64),
Stop bits, and
Parity.
In both the synchronous and asynchronous modes, the serial I/O port
features half- or full-duplex, double buffered transmit and receive
capability on an RS232C compatible interface. In addition, PCI error
detection circuits can check for parity, overrun, and framing errors.
The PCI transmit and receive clock rates are supplied by a programmable
baud rate/time generator. These clocks may optionally be supplied from
an external source. The RS232C command lines, serial data lines, and
signal ground lines are brought out to a 26-pin edge connector (J2).
Three independent, fully programmable 16-bit interval timer event
counters are provided by an Intel 8253-5 Programmable Interval Timer
(PIT). Each counter is capable of operating in either BCD or binary
modes; two of these counters are available to the systems designer to
generate accurate time intervals under software control. Routing for the
outputs and trigger inputs of two of these counters may be independently
configured in the interrupt jumper matrix. The gate/trigger inputs of
the two counters may be routed to I/O terminators associated with the
8255A PPI or as input connections from the 8255A PPI. The third counter
is used as a programmable baud rate generator for the serial I/O port.
In using the PIT counters on the iSBC 86/14/30 board, the systems
designer simply configures, via software, each counter independently to
meet system requirements. Whenever a given time delay or count is
needed, software commands to the 8253-5 PIT select the desired function.
The contents of each counter may be read at any time during system
operation with simple operations for event counting applications, and
special commands are included so that the contents of each counter can be
read "on the fly".
The iSBC 86/14/30 board provides vectoring for bus vectored (BV) and
non-bus vectored (NBV) interrupts. An on-board Intel 8259A Programmable
Interrupt Controller (PIC) handles up to eight BV or NBV interrupts. By
using external PIC's slaved to the on-board PIC (master), the interrupt
structure can be expanded to handle and resolve the priority of up to 64
BV sources.
1-5
GENERAL INFORMATION
The PIC, which can be programmed to respond to edge-sensitive or
level-sensitive inputs, treats each true input signal condition as an
interrupt request. After resolving the interrupt priority, the PIC
issues a signle interrupt request to the CPU. Interrupt priorities are
independently programmable under software control. The programmable
interrupt priority modes are:
a.
Fully Nested Mode. Each interrupt request has a fixed priority:
input 0 is highest, input 7 is lowest.
b.
Special Fully Nested Mode. This mode is the same as nested mode,
except that when a slave PIC is being serviced, it is not locked
out from the master PIC priority logic and when exiting from the
interrupt service routine, the software must check for pending
interrupts from the slave PIC just serviced.
c.
Auto-Rotating Priority Mode. Each interrupt request has equal
priority. Each level, after receiving service, becomes the
lowest priority level until the next interrupt occurs.
d.
Specific Priority Mode. Software assigns lowest priority.
Priority of all other levels is in numerical sequence based on
lowest priority.
e.
Special Mask Mode. Interrupts at the level being serviced are
inhibited, but all other levels of interrupts (higher and lower)
are enabled.
f.
Poll. The CPU internal interrupt enable is disabled. Interrupt
service is acheived by programmer initiative using a Poll command.
The CPU includes a non-maskable interrupt (NMI) and a maskable interrupt
(INTR). The NMI is intended to be used for catastrophic events such as
power failures that require immediate action of the CPU. The INTR
interrupt is driven by the 8259A PIC which, on demand, provides an 8-bit
identifier of the interrupting source. The CPU multiplies the 8-bit
identifier by four to derive a pointer to the service routine for the
interrupting device.
Interrupt requests may originate from 28 sources without the necessity of
external hardware. Two jumper-selectable interrupt requests can be
automatically generated by the Programmable Peripheral Interface (PPl)
when a byte of information is ready to be transferred to the 8086-2 CPU
(e.g., input buffer is full) or a byte of information has been
transferred to a peripheral device (e.g., output buffer is empty). Two
jumper-selectable interrupt requests can be automatically generated by
the PCl when a character is ready to be transferred to the 8086-2 CPU
(e.g., receive channel buffer is full) or when a character is ready to be
transmitted (e.g., transmit channel data buffer is empty). A
jumper-selectable interrupt request can be generated by two of the
programmable counters and eight additional interrupt request lines are
available to the user for direct interfaces to user-designated peripheral
devices via the Multibus interface. One interrupt request line may be
jumper routed directly from a peripheral via the parallel I/O
driver/terminator section and one power fail interrupt may be input via
auxiliary connector.P2.
1-6
GENERAL INFORMATION
The iSBC 86/14/30 board includes the resources for supporting a variety
of OEM system requirements. For those applications requiring additional
processing capacity and the benefits of multiprocessing (e.g., several
CPU's and/or controllers logically sharing systems tasks with
communication over the Mu1tibus interface), the iSBC 86/14/30 board
provides full bus arbitration control logic. This control logic allows
up to three bus masters (e.g., combination of iSBC 86/14 board, DMA
controller, diskette controller) to share the Multibus interface in
serial (daisy-chain) priority fashion or up to 16 bus masters to share
the Multibus interface using an external parallel priority resolving
network.
The Multibus interface arbitration logic operates synchronously with the
bus clock, which is derived either from the iSBC 86/14/30 board or can be
optionally generated by some other bus master. Data, however, is
transferred via a handshake between the controlling master and the
addressed slave module. This arrangement allows different speed
controllers to share resources on the same bus, and transfers via the bus
proceed asynchronously. Thus, the transfer speed is dependent on
transmitting and receiving devices only. This design prevents slower
master modules from being handicapped in their attempts to gain control
of the bus, but does not restrict the speed at which faster modules can
transfer data via the same bus. The most obvious applications for the
master-slave capabilities of the bus are multiprocessor configurations,
high-speed direct memory access (DMA) operations, and high-speed
peripheral control, but are by no means limited to these three.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains programmable resources for sending and
receiving a 4-bit bank select address with any 20-bit Multibus address.
This feature allows access to one of 16 megabytes of Mu1tibus address
space and mapping of on-board dual Port RAM into anyone of 16 megabytes
of Mu1tibus address space.
1-3.
OPTIONAL RAM AND ROM/EPROM EXPANSION
Adding the optional iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodu1e Board onto the
iSBC 86/14 board allows the on-board RAM to be expanded by 32k bytes (for
an on-board total of 64k bytes). If the optional iSBC 304 RAM Expansion
Mu1timodu1e is installed onto the iSBC 86/30 board, the amount of
on-board RAM can be expanded by 128k bytes (for an on-board total of 256k
bytes).
1-4.
SYSTEM SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT
The development cycle of iSBC 86/14/30 Single Board Computer based
products may be significantly reduced using an Intel Intellec
Microcomputer Development System with the optional MDS-311 8086 Software
Development package.
1-7
GENERAL INFORMATION
The MDS-311 8086 Software Development package includes Intel's high level
programming language, PL/M 86. PL/M 86 provides the capability to
program in a natural, algorithmic language and eliminates the need to
manage register usage or allocate memory. PL/M 86 programs can be
written in a much shorter time than assembly language programs for a
given application.
1-5.
EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED
Each iSBC 86/14/30 board is shipped with a current revision of the
schematic diagram. Insert the drawing into this manual if it is a later
revision level than the contained drawing. No other equipment is
provided with the iSBC 86/14/30 board.
1-6.
EQUIPMENT REQUIRED
Because the iSBC 86/14/30 board is designed to satisfy a variety of
applications, the user must purchase and install only those components
required to satisfy his particular needs. A list of components required
to configure the iSBC 86/14/30 board is provided in Chapter 2.
1-7.
SPECIFICATIONS
Specifications of the iSBC 86/14/30 Single Board Computer are listed in
Table 1-1.
Table 1-1.
WORD SIZE
Instruction:
Data:
SYSTEM CLOCK SPEED:
INSTRUCTION CYCLE TIME
8 MHz:
5 MHz:
Specifications
8, 16, 24, 32, 40, or 48 bits.
8/16 bits.
5.00 MHz or 8.00 MHz, jumper selectable.
750 nanoseconds.
250 nanoseconds (assumes instruction is in the
queue) •
1.2 microseconds.
400 nanoseconds (assumes instruction is in the
queue) •
MEMORY CYCLE TIME
RAM:
750 nanoseconds.
1-8
GENERAL INFORMATION
Table 1-1.
EPROM:
MEMORY ARRAY
On-board EPROM:
Specifications (continued)
500 to 875 nanoseconds, jumper selectable.
4 chip sockets; user-provided EPROM device in
2k by a-bit, 4k by 8-bit, 8k by 8-bit, or 16k
by 8-bit capacity.
On-board Dynamic RAM:
iSBC 86/14 Board
iSBC 86/30 Board
Off-board Expansion:
MEMORY ADDRESS RANGES
On-board EPROM:
On-board Dual
Port RAM (local
CPU Acces s ) :
iSBC 86/14 Board
iSBC 86/30 Board
32k bytes of dynamic RAM (64k bytes if iSBC
300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board is
installed); data integrity maintained during
power failure with user-furnished batteries.
128k bytes of dynamic RAM (256k bytes if iSBC
304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board is
installed); data integrity maintained during
power failure with user-furnished batteries.
Up to 16 megabytes of user-specified
combination of RAM, ROM, and EPROM.
FEOOO-FFFFFH
EPROMs) ,
FCOOO-FFFFFH
EPROMs ),
F8000-FFFFFH
EPROMs),
FOOOO-FFFFFH
EPROMs).
(using 2k by 8 bit Statics or
(using 4k by 8-bit Statics or
(using 8k by 8-bit Statics or
(using 16k by 8-bit Statics or
00000-07FFFH, as-shipped configuration.
OOOOO-OFFFFH (if iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule Board is installed).
00000-lFFFFH, as-shipped configuration.
00000-3FFFFH (if iSBC 304 RAM Expansion
Multimodule Board is installed).
On-board RAM (Multi bus
Interface Access):
Jumpers allow the board to act as slave RAM
device for access by another bus master.
1-9
GENERAL INFORMATION
Table 1-1.
iSBC 86/14 Board
Specifications (continued)
Default Multibus address of the dual port RAM
is set at 9FFFFH through 98000H; all on-board
RAM is dual ported.
Multibus addresses (for dual port RAM) may
begin at any 8k boundary of any 1-megabyte
segment of 16 megabytes of system address
space. RAM is removed from the dual port in
increments of 8k (e.g., either a Ok, 8k, 16k,
24k, or 32k). The dual port addresses must not
overlap a 128k byte boundary.
iSBC 86/30 Board
Default Multibus address of the dual port RAM
is set at BFFFFH down through AOOOOH; all
on-board RAM is dual ported.
Multibus addresses (for dual port RAM) may
begin at any 32k boundary within any 1-megabyte
segment of 16 megabytes of system address
space. RAM is removed from the dual port in
increments of 32k (e.g., either a Ok, 32k, 64k,
96k, or 128k). The Multibus address for the
dual port RAM must not overlap a 256k byte
boundary.
I/O CAPABILITY
Parallel:
24 programmable I/O lines using the 8255A PPI.
Serial:
1 programmable RS232C interface using the 8251A
PCI.
Expansion:
2 iSBX Bus Connectors providing expansion via
either single-wide or double-wide, 8-bit or
16-bit, Multimodule boards.
SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS
CHARACTERISTICS
Synchronous:
5 to 8 bit characters; internal or external
character synchronization; automatic sync bit
insertion.
Asynchronous:
5 to 8 bit characters; break character
generation; 1, 1 1/2, or 2 stop bits; false
start-up detection.
1-10
GENERAL INFORMATION
Table 1-1.
Specifications (continued)
Baud Rates:
Frequency
(kHz)
153.6
76.8
38.4
19.2
9.6
4.8
2.4
1.76
TIMER OPERATIONS
Input Frequencies:
PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Width:
Height:
Depth:
Weight:
Baud Rate (Hz)
Asynchronous
Synchronous
divide by 16 divide by 64
2400
9600
1200
4800
-2400
600
38400
1200
300
19200
150
9600
600
4800
75
300
150
2400
-1760
110
--
--
2.46 MHz + 0.1% Reference
1.23 MHz +" 0.1%
153.6 kHZ-+ 0.1%
12.00 in. (30.48 cm.)
6.75 in. (17.15 cm.)
0.70 in. (1.78 cm.)
14 oz. (388 gm.)
ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS
Operating Temp:
o to
55 0 c
Relative Humidity:
to 90%, non-condensing
ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS
DC Power Requirements:
Configuration
+5V Current Requirements
(All voltages +/- 5%J
1
Without EPROM
5.1 amps
2
Battery Back-up
RAM for 86/14
RAM for 86/30
600 milliamps (additional)
900 milliamps (additional)
3
With 8k EPROM
(using 2716)
1-11
5.4 amps
GENERAL INFORMATION
Table 1-1.
Specifications (continued)
Configuration
+5V Current Requirements
(All voltages +/- 5%)
3
With 16k EPROM
(using 2732)
I
5.5 amps
3
With 32k EPROM
(using 2764)
5.6 amps
3
With 64k EPROM
(using 27128)
5.7 amps
iSBC 300A Board
256 milliamps (additional)
iSBC 304 Board
640 milliamps (additional)
Notes:
1.
2.
3.
Excludes power requirements for
optional EPROM devices and I/O
driver/terminator devices.
RAM only being powered by auxiliary
power bus (power fail mode).
Includes 4 EPROM devices and I/O
driver/terminator devices for 16
I/O lines; all terminator inputs
LOW.
1-12
PREPARATION FOR USE
CHAPTER 2.
2-1.
PREPARATION FOR USE
INTRODUCTION
This chapter provides instructions for preparing the iSBC 86/14 and the
iSBC 86/30 Single Board Computers (hereafter referred to together as the
iSBC 86/14/30 board) for use in a user-defined environment. Included in
this chapter are instructions on unpacking and inspection; installation
considerations; component installation; jumper configuration; interface
configuration for the Multibus, the iSBX bus, and the serial bus
interfaces; connector information; serial I/O cabling information; board
installation information; and the differences between the iSBC 86/12A and
the iSBC 86/14/30 boards. Ensure that you have a firm understanding of
the contents of Chapters 1 and 4 of this manual before beginning the
configuration and installation procedures contained in this chapter.
2-2.
UNPACKING AND INSPECTION
Inspect the shipping carton immediately upon reciept for evidence of
mishandling during transit. If the shipping carton is severely damaged
or waterstained, request that the carrier's agent be present when the
carton is opened. If the carrier's agent is not present when the carton
is opened and the contents of the carton are damaged, keep the carton and
the packing material for the agent's inspection.
For repair to a product damaged in shipment, contact the Intel Technical
Support Center to obtain a Return Authorization Number and further
instructions. A purchase order will be required to complete the repair.
A copy of the purchase order should be submitted to the carrier with your
claim.
It is suggested that the salvageable shipping cartons and packing
material be saved for future use in the event that the product must be
shipped.
2-3.
INSTALLATION CONSIDERATIONS
Installation considerations such as power, cooling, and physical size
requirements, are outlined in the following paragraphs.
2-1
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-4.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
The iSBC 86/14/30 board requires only a +5 volt power source unless an
RS232C interface or a Multimodule board that needs +12 volts is added to
the system. In such an instance the iSBC 86/14/30 board passes +12 volt
power from the Multibus interface to the Multimodule board. The-current
requirement for the +5 volt supply varies according to the type and
number of user-furnished EPROM or static RAM devices installed on the
board, according to the types of iSBC memory expansion Multimodule boards
installed onto the iSBC 86/14/30 board, and according to the
configuration of the serial interfaces. Table 1-1 lists the various
current requirements for each type of memory device and for each
interface configuration.
2-5.
COOLING REQUIRMENT S
The iSBC 86/14/30 board dissipates 450.14 gram-calories of heat per
minute (1.96 BTU per minute) and adequate circulation of air must be
provided to prevent a temperature rise above 55 0 C (131 0 F). The
system chassis units available from Intel include fans that provide
adequate intake and exhaust of ventilating air.
2-6.
PHYSICAL DIMENSIONS
The outside dimensions of the iSBC 86/14/30 board are as follows:
a.
b.
c.
Width:
Length:
Thickness:
30.48 cm (12.00 inches)
17.15 cm (6.75 inches)
1.78 cm (0.70 inch).
Greater detail of the outside dimension of the iSBC 86/14/30 board may be
obtained from the INTEL MULTIBUS INTERFACE SPECIFICATION.
2-7.
USER-FURNISHED COMPONENTS
The user-furnished components required to configure all intended
applications of the iSBC 86/14/30 board are listed in Table 2-1. Table
2-2 contains a list of the connector manufacturers from which the user
may obtain parts to interface with the P1, P2, J1, J2, J3, and J4
connectors on the iSBC 86/14/30 board. Cable configuration information
for serial I/O connector J2 as parallel I/O connector J1 are listed in
paragraph 2-35 through 2-38. Figure 2-1 shows the mounting locations on
the iSBC 86/14/30 board for each of the user-provided components. Only
those components required to satisfy the application need be installed.
When installing the integrated circuit packages into the sockets on the
iSBC 86/14/30 board, ensure that pin 1 of the chip is oriented closest to
the white dot (indicating pin 1 of the socket) that is silk-screened onto
the board. If installing 24-pin devices into the 28-pin EPROM sockets,
2-2
PREPARATION FOR USE
refer to paragraph 2-9 for more detailed information. The grid location
on the assembly drawing (Figure 5-1) is listed for each of the user
installed components, as are the grid locations on the schematic drawings.
LINE DRIVER OR
TERMINATOR SOCKETS
ROM, EPROM,
STATIC RAM, OR
PSEUDOSTATIC RAM
SOCKETS
iSBX MULTIMODULE BOARD
INSTALLATION SITE
iSBC300AOR
iSBC304 RAM
EXPANSION MULTIMODULE
INSTALLATION SITE.
DECODE PROM
REQUIRED WITH
iSBC 304 BOARD.
iSBC337 BOARD INSTALLATION
SITE.
Figure 2-1.
iSBC m 86/14/30 Board User-Furnished Component Locations
2-3
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-1.
Item
No.
Item
User-Furnished Components
Description
Function
1
iSBC 604
Modular Backplane and Cardcage
includes four slots with bus
terminators.
2
iSBC 614
Modular Backplane and Cardcage. Provides four-slot extension
Includes four slots without
of iSBC 604 cardcage.
bus terminators.
3
Connector See Multibus Connector details
(mates
in Table 2-2.
with PI)
Power inputs and Multibus
signal interface. Not
required if iSBC 86/14/30
board is installed into an
iSBC 604/614 cardcage.
4
Connector See Auxiliary Connector
(mates
details in Table 2-2.
with P2)
Auxiliary battery backup
and associated protection
functions.
5
EPROM
Chips
Up to four each of the
following types:
EPROM
2716
2k by 8 bit
2732
4k by 8 bit
2764
8k by 8 bit
27128 16k by 8 bit
Ultraviolet Erasable PROM
(EPROM).
6
RAM
One of the following types:
Static or Pseudo-static
Random Access Memory (RAM)
for development and
dedicated program.
Chips
Static
2k by
4k by
8k by
7
or Pseudo
8 bit
8 bit
8 bit
Connector See Serial Connector cable
(mates
details in Table 2-2.
with J2)
2-4
Provides power input and
Multibus signal interface
between iSBC 86/14/30 board
and three additional boards
in a multiple board system.
Provide compatible cables
for serial I/O interface
to the 8251A PCI device.
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-1.
Item
No.
8
9
Item
User-Furnished Components (continued)
Function
Description
Connector See Parallel Connector cable
(mates
details in Table 2-2.
with J1)
Line Driver
SN7403
SN7400
SN7408
SN7409
Type
I, OC
I
NI
NI, OC
Interface parallel I/O
ports CA and CC with Intel
8255A PPI device. Requires
two line drivers for each
8-bit parallel output port.
Current
16 mA
16 mA
16 mA
16 mA
10 Line
Terminators
Intel iSBC 901 Divider or iSBC 902
Pull-Up:
o +5V
I
ISSC 901
ISSC
~
220
2
Provide compatible cables
for parallel I/O signal
interface to the 8255A PPI
device.
0
Interface parallel I/O
ports CA and CC with IntI
8255A PPI device. Requires
two iSBC 901 Dividers or
two iSBC 902 Pull-Ups for
each 8-bit parallel input
port.
90~'
------------------------- ---.----..- - -.- _._._------------11 iSBC 300A RAM
Multimodule Board
12 iSBC 304 RAM
Multimodule Board
32k bytes of RAM
expansion capability
128k bytes of RAM
expansion capability
2-5
Provides the capability to
expand the on-board RAM to
64k bytes (86/14 only).
Provides the capability to
expand the on-board RAM to
256k bytes (86/30 only).
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-2.
Function
# of
Pins
Multibus
Connector 43/86
(P1)
User-Furnished Connector Information
Vendor #
Intel II
2KH43/9AMK12
BS1562D43PBB
102247-001
EDAC
ELFAB
337086540201
BW1562D43PBB
102248-001
EDAC
Wire Wrap
With .128 Dia ELFAB
Mounting Holes
337086540202
BW1562A43PBB
102273-001
Centers Connector
Inches
Type
0.156
Vendor
VIKING
Soldered 1
PC Board Mount ELFAB
Wire Wrap
Without Ears
Auxiliary
Connector 30/60
(P2)
iSBX Bus
Connector 36
16-bit
(J3, J4)
Serial 10 13/26
Connector
(J2)
Soldered
ELFAB
EDAC
97169001
34060524300
N/A
Wirewrap
No Ears
ELFAB
EDAC
BW1020D30PBB
345060540201
102241-001
Wirewrap
ELFAB
EDAC
BS1020A30PBB
345060524802
102238-001
Wirewrap
With .128 Dia
TI
Viking
H42ll21-30
3KH30/9JNK
N/A
0.1
Soldered
Viking
000292-0001
iSBX960-5
0.100
Wirewrap1,2
EDAC
345026540201
N/A
Soldered
EDAC
345026500201
3M
3462-0001
88373-5
0.1
Flat Crimp
AMP
Parallel I/O
Connectors (J1) 25/50
0.100
Flat Crimp
3M
3M
AMP
ANSLEY
2-6
102210-001
3415-0001 w/ears 102211
3415-0000 w/o ears -0003
88083-1
609-5015
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-2.
User-Furnished Connector Information (continued)
Function # of Centers Connector
Pins Inches
Type
Vendor
Vendor II
Soldered
Pierced Tail
GTE
Masterite
Viking
6ADOl-25-1A1-DD
NDD8GR25-DR-H-X
3KH25/9JN5
Wire Wrap
Viking
TI
ITT Cannon
3KH25/JND5
H421011-25
EC4A050A1A
Intel II
102237
-001
N/A
Notes:
1.
2.
2-8.
Connector heights are not guaranteed to conform to Intel
packaging equipment.
Wirewrap pin lengths are not guaranteed to conform to Intel
packaging equipment.
USER-~URNISHED
COMPONENT INSTALLATION
Instructions for installing the user-provided components (EPROM and line
driver/terminator devices) onto the iSBC 86/14/30 board is contained in
the following paragraphs. When installing these components, ensure that
pin 1 of the chip is closest to the white dot indicating pin 1 of the
respective IC socket. The text provides grid references on the parts
location diagram (see Figure 5-2) for locating the sockets for each
component. Grid references listed in the text may be located in Figure
5-2.
CAUTION
All MOS devices such as EPROM and RAM
devices are highly succeptible to
damage from static electricity. Use
extreme caution when installing MOS
devices in a low humidity environment.
Always ground yourself before handling
MOS devices to ensure that a static
charge build-up is not dissipated
through or around the MOS devices.
2-7
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-9.
EPROM Device Installation
As shipped from the factory, the iSBC 86/14/30 board contains no EPROM
devices. The user may install one of several different types of EPROM
device, including static RAMs, into the EPROM sockets on the iSBC 86/14/30
board. However, the memory address configuration depends on the type of
memory device selected; refer to the jumper configuration section of this
chapter for more information.
The EPROM devices on the iSBC 86/14/30 board must be installed into sockets
U39, U40, US7 and US8; situated on the iSBC 86/14/30 board as shown in
Figure 2-1. Socket U39 accommodates the Bank 0, high byte memory
locations; US7 contains the Bank 0, low byte memory locations; U40 contains
the Bank 1, high byte memory locations; and US8 contains the Bank 1, low
byte memory locations.
CAUTION
The iSBC 86/14/30 board is designed to
accommodate both 24- and 28-pin Intel
EPROM/RAM chips in the same socket.
The 24-pin integrated circuit must be
installed as shown in Figure 2-2; pin 1
of the integrated circuit should line
up with pin 3 of the socket.
A maximum of 32k bytes of EPROM may be installed into sockets U39, U40,
US7, and US8 on the iSBC 86/14/30 board. A summary of the memory space
provided by the various device types at each socket is contained in Table
2-3. The sockets must contain only one type of EPROM device; a mixture of
various EPROM devices is not allowed. Sockets U40 and US8 will accept
EPROM, static RAM, and pseudo-static RAM (both sockets must contain the
same type of device). Empty sockets at U40 and US8 are allowed if their
memory space is never accessed. After selecting the memory device type to
best suit your application, carefully insert each device into its socket.
CAUTION
Never insert MOS devices into a board
when power is applied. Doing so could
damage the devices.
On power-up, the 8086-2 CPU jumps to a bootstrap routine located at
memory location FFFFOH through FFFFFH in the top-most portion of the
on-board EPROM address space. These EPROM locations are contained in the
memory chips at sockets US8 and U40.
As shipped from the factory, the iSBC 86/14/30 board contains default
jumpers enabling installation of 2k by 8-bit (2716) EPROM devices. If a
different type of memory device is installed into the sockets,
reconfigure the memory addressing jumpers as described later in this text
(in Table 2-7). Figure 2-3 shows some examples of memory configurations
that are possible using various capacities of memory devices.
2-8
PREPARATION FOR USE
You can install an additional 32k bytes of static RAM onto the iSBC
86/14/30 board by replacing the EPROM devices in sockets u40 and US8 with
RAM devices. By inserting two Intel 2186 Pseudo-static RAM devices into
EPROM sockets U40 and R58, you can expand the RAM space, however, the
address space would not be fully contiguous with the dual port RAM.
Table 2-3.
EPROM Socket Address Assignments
o Memory
Memory
Device
Device
Capacity
2716 EPROM,
2k by 8
FEOOO-FEFFFH
FFO OO-F FFFFH
2732 EPROM,
4k by 8
FCOOO-FDFFFH
FEOOO-FFFFFH
2764 EPROM,
8k by 8
F8000-FBFFFH
FCOOO-FFFFFH
27128 EPROM
16k by 8
FOOOO-F7FFFH
F8000-FFFFFH
Bank
Locations
US7 and U39
Bank 1 Memory Locations
US8 and U40
Notes: All address entries are listed in hexadecimal notation. Substitution of static RAM devices is allowed for use with ICE products.
24-PIN POSITION
f.1 ~w
PROMO
HIGH
i~
PROM 1
HIGH
28-PIN POSITION
rr=v==A
~
n
#Ii
J i / I N 28
)1
II
US7
.~
n)
!1
IT
IT PROM 0 ~
g
~i~~
LOW
J1
r'
Figure 2-2.
~
rr'1
IT
pJ1
J1
USB
Z
~
,D
JJ: PROM 1 ~
gLOW
n
r'
g
11
'1
EPROM Device Installation
2-9
PREPARATION FOR USE
2Kx8 EPROM
Socket
Jumpers
8Kx8 EPROM
4Kx8 EPROM
Socket
Jumpers
U40 2716
E108-E109
2k E111-E112
U58 2716
2k
E96-E97
U40 2764 8k E112-E113
E96-E102
U58 2764 8k E96-E102
U39 2716
2k
U39 2764 8k
U39 2732 4k
U57 2716
2k
U57 2764 8k
U57 2732
E112-E113
U40 2732 4k E108-E109
U58 2732 4k
4k
4Kx8 MIX
8Kx8 MIX
Socket
Jumpers
Jumpers
Socket
E96-E97
U40 2764 8k E112-E113
E101-E107
U58 2764 8k E96-E102
U40 2732
U58 2732
E112-E113
4k E108-E109
E101-E107
4k E112-E113
U39 8Kx8 8k
U39 4Kx8 4k
U57 8Kx8 8k
U57 4Kx8 4k
Figure 2-3.
2-10.
Jumpers
Socket
Typical Memory Configuration
Line Driver Installation
As shipped, the iSBC 86/14/30 board contains RS232C interface driver and
receiver devices for the J2 connector interface and an 8287 Octal Bus
Transceiver for interfacing Port A to the Jl connector.
The Jl connector interface includes four 8-pin chip sockets (U18, U19,
U20, and U21) for installation of user provided line drivers and
terminators in configuring the I/O port signals for Port B and Port C of
the 8255A PPI device. Table 2-1 lists some of the common types of line
drivers and terminators that may be installed into chip sockets U18, U19,
U20, and U21 for the parallel I/O interface. The iSBC 86/14/30 board
includes an 8287 Octal Bus Transceiver device (U17) that interfaces the
Port A I/O signals for the 8255A PPI.
Factory installed line driver devices at chip locations U23 and U24 on
the board configure the serial I/O interface at the J2 connector for
operation as an RS232C interface.
2-10
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-11.
JUMPER/SWITCH CONFIGURATION
The iSBC 86/14 and iSBC 86/30 boards provide a variety of jumperselectable options to allow the user-configuration of the board for a
particular application. Table 2-4 lists the jumper options according to
the function performed on the iSBC 86/14/30 board. The jumper
configurations for the two versions of the board are identical except for
the configuration of the memory capacity jumpers. Table 2-5 lists all
jumpers in numerical order and provides a functional description of
each. Appendix D lists all configuration differences between the
iSBC 86/14 board, the iSBC 86/30 board, and the iSBC 86/12A board.
Table 2-4.
Jumper
Function
User-Configurable Jumper Functions
Jumper
Pair
Description and Connection
No Dual Port
Memory Option
E199-E200
Selects operation with no dual
port RAM resources; all RAM is
reserved strictly for on-board use
only.
Dual Port
Size Select
E234 through E237
Allows selection of either 0, 32k,
64k, 96k, or 128k bytes of dual
port RAM on the iSBC 86/30 board
or 0, 8k, 16k, 24k, or 32k bytes
of dual port RAM on the iSBC 86/14
board. Refer to paragraph 2-15
for more details on jumper
configurations.
Bank
Select
E220,E221,E222,E224
Allows user select in of one of 16
possible megabytes of memory space
by configuring the state of the
upper 4 memory address bits
(ADR14/ through ARD17/).
Configured for megabyte page
when shipped.
°
Multibus
Address
Select
E218-E223
Selects the megabyte address on
the Multibus interface to which
the board will respond; for
off-board access to local memory.
2-11
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-4.
Jumper
Function
User-Configurable Jumper Functions (continued)
Jumper
Pair
Description and Connection
Multibus
Address
Select
E38-E39
Enables loading the upper 4-bits
of address into the megabyte
address register for local CPU
access to off-board.
128k Page
Select
E225, E226, E227
Selects one of eight 128k pages of
memory within the 1-megabyte of
memory address space (iSBC 86/14
board only).
256k Page
Select
E225, E226
Selects one of four 256k pages of
memory within the 1-megabyte of
memory address space (iSBC 86/30
board only).
EPROM Size
Selection
E123, E124, E125
Allows user installation of four
different sizes of EPROM device,
depending on the configuration of
the jumpers, as follows:
U40, U58, U39, and U57
Memory Type
Jumpers Required
2716* or other 2k by 8-bit device
non required
2732 or other 4k by 8-bit device
E124-E125
2764 or other 8k by 8-bit device
E123-E124
27128 or other 16k by 8-bit device
E124-E125, E123-E124
EPROM
Address Select
E96,E97,E100,E109,
EllO,E112,E113
2-12
Allows user selection of the
address lines for accessing memory
space at each 28-pin socket.
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-4.
Jumper
Function
User-Configurab1e Jumper Functions (continued)
Jumper
Pair
Description and Connection
EPROM Select (continued)
Memory Type
Address Range
Jumpers Required
2716* or other 2k
by 8-bit device
FEOOO-FFFFF
E108-E109*, E111-El12*
2732 or other 4k
by 8-bit device
FCOOO-FFFFF
E108-109*, El12-El13
2764 or other 8k
by 8-bit device
F8000-FFFFF
E96-E97, E96-E102, El12-E113
27128 or other 16k
by 8-bit device
FOOOO-FFFFF
E96-E97, E96-EI02, EI09-E110,
E112-E113
RAM Size Select
E118,E119,E120
Allows user configuration of the
amount of on-board RAM that is
accessible, as follows:
Total RAM Capacity On-board
Jumpers Required
32k bytes (iSBC 86/14 board only)
none required *
64k bytes (iSBC 86/14 with iSBC 300A board)
E119-E120
128k bytes (iSBC 86/30 board only)
E118-E119 *
256k bytes (iSBC86/30 with iSBC 304 board)
E118-E119, E119-E120
8-bit or
16-bit iSBX Bus
Connector Select
E172,E173,E175
2-13
Configuration of the jumpers makes
the iSBX Bus interfaces at
connectors J3 and J4 either 8-bit
or 16-bit I/O interfaces, as
follows:
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-4.
Jumper
Function
User-Configurable Jumper Functions (continued)
Jumper
Pair
Description and Connection
iSBX Bus Select (continued)
iSBX Bus Interface Affected
Configu ra tion
Jumpers Required
iSBX Bus Connector J4
16-bit operation
E172-E173
iSBX Bus Connector J3
l6-bit operation
E173-E174
iSBX Bus Connector J4
8-bit operation
none required
iSBX Bus Connector J3
8-bit operation
none required
Clock Rate
Select
Common Bus
Request
Any Bus
Request
E36-E37
5 or 8 Mhz clock frequency
selection; Installation of E36-E37
generates the basic clock at a
rate of 5 MHz. The jumper must be
installed for operation with
either an iSBC 337 Numeric Data
Processor or an ICE product.
E212,E213
E214
CBRQ/j Common Bus Request signal
generation; Refer to Table 2-17
for configuration information.
E201,E202,
E203
ANYRQST/; Any Bus Request signal
generated for the Multibus
interface. Refer to Table 2-17
for more information.
Bus
Priority
E210-E211*
BPRO/j Routes the Bus Priority
Output signal to the Multibus
interface. Remove the jumper only
in those systems requiring a
parallel priority bus resolution
scheme.
Bus
Clock
E205-E207*
BCLK/j Routes the BCLK/ signal to
the Multibus interface. Remove
the jumper only if BCLK/ is
provided by another master in the
system.
2-14
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-4.
User-Configurable Jumper Functions (continued)
Jumper
Function
Jumper
Pair
Constant
Clock
E208-E209*
CCLK/; Routes the CCLK/ signal to
the Multibus interface. Remove
the jumper only if CCLK/ is
provided by another master in the
system.
Dual Port
Lock
E204-E206
LOCK/; Routes the LOCK/ signal
onto the Multibus interface.
Install the jumper only if the
iSBC 86/14/30 board is to generate
the signal onto the bus for
controlling another dual ported
board.
Interrupt
Options
Description and Connection
E126 through E169
and
E244 through E253
Jumpers configure the various
interrupt capabilities of the iSBC
86/14/30 board. Refer to Table
2-16 for more details.
Non-maskable
Interrupt
E144-E145*
NMI; Disables the NMI interrupt to
the 8086-2 CPU when installed.
Remove the jumper to connect NMI
to an interrupt request.
Type of
Interrupt
Operation
Select
E33-E34*
Enables on-board generation of
either a bus vectored or non-bus
vectored interrupt cycle from the
8259A PIC when installed. Remove
the jumper for operation
exclusively in a non-bus vectored
interrupt scheme.
iSBX Bus
Connector J4
Option
E170
OPTO; Option 0 line access for
iSBX Bus Connector J4.
OPT1; Option 1 line access for
iSBX Bus Connector J4.
El71
2-15
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-4.
Jumper
Function
iSBX Bus
Connector J3
Option
User-Configurable Jumper Functions (continued)
Jumper
Pair
E121
E122
Failsafe Timer
Enable
Description and Connection
OPTO; Option 0 line access for iSBX
Bus Connector J3.
OPT1; Option I line access for iSBX
Bus Connector J3.
E38-E39*
Enables generation of a READY signal
if the on-board 8086-2 CPU addresses a
nonexistent system resource.
HALT
E279
Eliminates false restarts from the
failsafe timer if the software enters
a HALT condition. When in a HALT
condition under iRMX-86 operation, the
iSBC 86/14/30 board could failsafe
timeout and re-boot the system. By
combining the TIMEOUT INTR/ signal
with E279 via the interrupt-oR
function (U31), the possibility is
eliminated.
8255A Port A
Options
E52-E61*
Provide user configuration of the
direction control for the 8289 Octal
Bus Transceiver interfacing Port A of
the 8255 PPI. When installed, the
jumper configures the 8289 for
operation as an output device; Port A
must be programmed as an output port.
8255A Port C
Configurations
E53 through E60
I/O signals for Port C of the 8255A
PPI device, as follows:
Failsafe
Interrupt
Disable When
E53-E44*
E54-E45*
E55-E46*
E56-E47*
E57-E48*
E58-E49*
E59-E50*
E60-E51*
2-16
connects
connects
connects
connects
connects
connects
connects
connects
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
PC7
PC6
PC5
PC4
PCO
PC1
PC2
PC3
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
J1
J1
J1
J1
J1
J1
J1
J1
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-4.
User-Configurable Jumper Functions (continued)
Jumper
Function
Jumper
Pair
8251A PCI
Configuration
E186-E190
Description and Connection
Enables generation
for the 8251A from
Transmit Clock.
Enables generation
for the 8251A from
2 output.
Enables generation
for the 8251A from
Transmit Clock.
Enables generation
for the 8251A from
2 output.
E190-E194*
E187-E191
E191-E195*
Serial
Interface
Configuration
E76-E77
of TxC clock
the PIT counter
of RxC clock
the Secondary
of RxC clock
the PIT counter
Enables connection of the
Request-To-Send (RST) signal and
the Clear-To-Send (CTS) signal
together for the RS232C interface.
Provides the Data Terminal Ready
signal from the RS232C interface
as an input to the Data Set Ready
pin on the 8251A PCI.
E193-E189*
E188, E192, E196,
E78, E79, E80, E81
8253-5 PIT
Clock Input
Frequency
Selection
of TxC clock
the Secondary
E175-E176*
E184-E185*
E178-E179*
El77
Allow amplifying and transferring
of the TxC or RxC clock for the
8251A PCI over the RS232C
interface via either the Secondary
CTS, the Secondary Receive Signal,
or the Transmit Signal Element
Timing signal line.
1.23 MHz clock to PIT counter 0
153.6 KHz clock to PIT counter 1
1.23 MHz clock to PIT counter 2
User-defined clock input signal
from parallel I/O port.
2.46 MHz clock to PIT.
Counter 1 output signal
Counter 0 output signal
E183
E180
E181
2-17
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-4.
Jumper
Function
User-Configurable Jumper Functions (continued)
Jumper
Pair
Status Latch
Configurations
Description and Connection
E22 through E32
and E35
Configuration of the jumpers
allows more flexibility in
applying the status latches to an
application. Refer to paragraph
2-25 for more information.
Status Register
and Interrupt
Latch Disable
E43-E44
Table 2-5.
Jumper
Number
El-E2
E2-E3*
E4 through El4
E15-El6
E17-El8
E19
E20, E2l
E22-E23*
E24-E25
E26-E27*
E28-E32*
Installation of the jumper
disables access to the Status
Register, the Megabyte Page Select
Register, and the Edge Interrupt
Sense flipflop circuits.
Jumper Listing By Numerical Order
Description
Connects 5 MHz clock to EFI input on 8284A.
Connects 8 MHz clock to EFI input on 8284A.
Wait-state selection jumpers for ready circuitry.
Test jumper.
Test jumper.
Input pin to output interrupt signal driver U11 in the
interrupt jumper matrix.
Enable either the EXT INTR 0/ signal or +5 volts into
the interrupt jumper matrix.
Enables the OVERRIDE/ signal from the status register
to control the locking of dual port RM1 when installed.
Enables BUS INTR OUT 1 signal from status register to
interrupt jumper matrix.
Enables NMI mask signal from status register to control
the NMI interrupt input to the 8086-2 cpu.
Provides continual enable on GATE input for 8253-5 PIT
timer O.
E28-E29
E30-E3l*
Provides programmable control of the GATE input to
8253-5 PIT timer O.
Provides continual enable on GATE input for 8253-5 PIT
timer 1.
2-18
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-5.
Jumper
Number
E31-E35
E33-E34
E36-E37
E38-E39
E40-E41*
E42-E43*
E44-E53*,
E45-E54* ,
E46-E55*,
E4 7-E56*,
E48-E57*,
E49-E58* ,
E50-E59*,
E51-E60*
E52-E61*
E62
E63
E65, E66
E67
E68
E69
E70-E71
E72-E74
E73-E75
E76-E77
E78, E80, E81
E79
Jumper Listing By Numerical Order (continued)
Description
Provides programmable control of the GATE input to
8253-5 PIT timer 1.
Selects operation of the interrupt circuitry in a bus
vectored system when installed; remove for exclusively
non-bus vector operation.
Selects either 5 MHz clock (installed) or 8 MHz clock
(removed) operation for the 8086-2 CPU.
Enables generation of the failsafe timeout interrupt
request to the 8259A PIC when installed.
Not user configurable.
Disables status latch and edge interrupt flipflop when
installed.
Connects the 8255A PPI Port C I/O signals to the J1
connector.
Connects the direction control for the 8255A PPI port A
I/O signal buffer to ground, selecting output mode when
installed.
TEST signal to 8086-2 CPU
PA INTR signal input from the parallel port to the
interrupt jumper matrix.
I/O signals to the parity generation Multimodule board.
EXT CLK input from the parallel port to the 825lA PCI
or 8253-5 PIT device.
STXD signal from the parallel I/O port to either the
serial I/O port or the clock genertor circuitry.
PFSN/ single input from the P2 connector to the
parallel I/O port.
Enables +5 volts onto the auxiliary connector at pin 23
when installed.
Enables -12 volts onto the auxiliary connector at pin
19 when installed.
Enables +12 volts onto the auxiliary connector at pin
22 when installed.
Enables generation of CTS signal from RTS signal on the
serial I/O interface.
Configurable I/O line access on the serial I/O
interface.
Output of a signal amplifier; for use when configuring
an output onto the serial I/O interface.
2-19
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-5.
Jumper
Number
E82-E83
E84-E85
E86-E87
E88 through El13
El14-El15
El16-El17
Ell8, Ell9, E120
E121, E122
E123,E124,E125
E126
E127,E131,E138
E139, E140, E142
E129
E128, E130
E132
E133
E134
E135
E136
E137
E141
E143
E144-E145*
E146
E147-E158*
E148,E149,E150,
E151,E159,E160,
E16l,E162
E151-E152*
Jumper Listing By Numerical Order (continued)
Description
Reserved.
Test jumper.
Reserved.
EPROM address and controls; refer to Table 2-4.
Connects +5 volt battery back-uip to +5 volt supply.
Reserved.
Selects the on-board RAM capacity.
Provide access to the option signals, OPTO and OPT1, on
iSBX Bus connector J3.
Selects the on-board EPROM capacity.
Provides access to the interrupt line, MINTRl, on iSBX
Bus connector J3.
Input signals to the interrupt "OR"ing functin in the
interrupt jumper matrix.
Output pin from interrupt signal driver U1l.
OR gate output signals from the interrupt "OR"ing
function.
PA INTR interrupt signal to interrupt jumper matrix
from parallel port I/O.
TIMEOUT INTR signal to interrupt jumper matrix from
failsafe timer.
Input to IR7 interrupt level of PIC.
Input to edge-interrupt latching flipflop U32.
Input to IR3 interrupt level of PIC.
SBX2 INTO interrupt signal to the interrupt jumper
matrix.
TIMER 1 INTR interrupt signal to interrupt jumper
matrix from PIT counter 1.
PB INTR interrupt signal to the interrupt jumper matrix
from parallel port.
Disables NMI interrupt input to 8086-2 CPU when
installed.
LEVEL INTR interrupt signal to the interrupt jumper
matrix from the edge-to-level interrupt conversion
flipflop U32.
connects the TIMER 0 INTR interrupt signal from the
counter 0 output of the 8253-5 PIT to the IR2 interrupt
level in the PIC.
Output jumpers from the octal 3-state line
driver/receiver device interfacint the Multibus
interrupt signals to the jumper interrupt matrix.
Input to IR5 interrupt level of PIC.
2-20
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-5.
Jumper
Number
E153
E154
E155
E156
E157
E163
E164
E165
E166
E167
E168
E169
E170
E171
E172,E173,E174
E175-E176*
E178-E179*
E180
E181
E182
E183
E184-E185*
E186,E187
E188
E189-E193*
E190-E104*
E191-E195*
E192
Jumper Listing By Numerical Order (continued)
Description
RxRDY interrupt signal to the interrupt jumper matrix
from the 8251A PCI device.
TxRDY interrupt signal to the interrupt jumper matrix
from the 8251A PCI device.
Input to IR6 interrupt level of PIC.
SBX1 INTO interrupt signal to the interrupt jumper
matrix from iSBX connector J4.
Input to IR4 interrupt level of PIC.
POWER LINE CLOCK signal from P2 connector.
Input to IR1 interrupt level of PIC.
Input to IRO interrupt level of PIC.
MINT interrupt signal input to the interrupt jumper
matrix from the iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor.
PARITY INTR signal to the interrupt jumper matrix from
the iSBC 303 Parity Generator/Checker Multimodule board.
PFI input signal from the power fail sense circuitry.
SBX1 INT1 interrupt signal input to the interrupt
jumper matrix.
OPTO option signal from the iSBX Bus connector J4.
OPT1 option signal from the iSBX Bus connector J4.
Select either 8-bit or 16-bit operation of the iSBX Bus
interfaces at Multimodule conectors J3 and J4.
Selects 1.23 MHz clock input frequency for counter 0 of
the 8253-5 PIT device.
Selects 1.23 MHz clock input frequency for counter 2 of
the 8253-5 PIT device.
Output from counter 1 of the 8253-5 PIT.
Output from counter 0 of the 8253-5 PIT device.
EXT CLK signal to the Port C output of the 8255A PPI
device.
2.46 MHz clock signal.
Selects 156.3 KHz clock input frequency for counter 1
of the 8253-5 PIT device.
Secondary Transmit Clock input signal to the serial I/O
logic from the serial interface connector J2.
Provides access to the Receive Clock (RxC) signal at
the 8251A PCI device.
Connects the Data Terminal Ready signal from the serial
interface to the Data Set Ready input on the 8251A PCI.
Selects the Transmit CLock (TxC) from counter 2 of the
PIT for operating the 8251A PCI.
Selects the Receive Clock (RxC) from counter 2 of the
PIT for operating the 8251A PCI.
Input to the signal amplifier U24 for the serial
interface.
2-21
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-5.
Jumper
Number
E196
E197-E198
E199-E200
E202-E201,
E202-E203*
Jumper Listing By Numerical Order (continued)
Description
Provides access to the STDX signal on the serial I/O
port.
Reserved.
Reserves access to all on-board RAM; no on-board RAM is
allowed to be dual port memory when installed.
E213-E212
Configures a Mu1tibus arbitration scheme by providing
options for ANY REQUEST signal input to 8289.
Provides the ability to drive the on board LOCK/ signal
onto the Mu1tibus interface if required.
Provides BCLK/ system clock onto the Mu1tibus interface
when installed.
Provides CCLK/ system clock onto the Mu1tibus interface
when installed.
Connects BPRO/ signal generated on-board to the
Mu1tibus interface when installed.
Conncts the CBRQ/ signal generated on-board to the
Mu1tibus interface when installed.
Connects the on-board CBRQ/ input to ground.
E215,E216,
E217, E219
Ground connections for the megabyte page select jumpers.
E204-E206
E205-E207*
E208-E209*
E210-E211*
E213-E214*
E220, E221,
E222,E224
E218-E223
Selects the megabyte page address at which the on-board
memory is located.
E228-E229
Enables access of a 16 megabyte address range of
off-board resources.
Configures the state of ADR13/ in generating an
off-board RAM select.
Configures the state of ADR12/ in generating an
off-board RAM select.
Configures the state of ADR11/ in generating an
off-board RAM select (iSBC 86/14 board only).
Factory configured jumpers; non-user configurab1e.
E230-E231,
E232-E233,
E240-E241,
E242-E243
Select the ending dual port RAM address.
E225
E226
E227
E234-E235,
E236-E237
E238-E239
Selects the amount of dual port memory on-board that is
accessible from the Mu1tibus interface.
Enables loading the upper 4-bits of a 24-bit address
into the megabyte page select register when installed.
2-22
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-5.
Jumper
Number
Jumper Listing By Numerical Order (continued)
Description
E246 through
E253
E254 through
E262
E263 through
E276
Provides access to the inputs to the 3-state octal
transceiver buffering the Mu1tibus interrupt lines
(INTO/ through INT7/).
Non-user configurab1e jumpers that select the address
decode mode for the 3625A Decode PROM.
Non-user configurb1e jumpers that select the 8203 RAM
Controller mode of operation.
E277-E278*
Connects the +5v bus to the +5v battery backup bus when
installed.
E279
Provides more conditions on generation of the TIME OUT
INTR/ signal for use with iRMX 86 software. The ORing
of E279-E133 via the "OR" function provided in the
interrupt jumper matrix disables a failsafe timeout
restart when executing a HALT instruction under iRMX 86
software.
2-12.
RAM Address Configuration Jumpers
The RAM on the iSBC 86/14/30 board is assigned two addresses; hereafter
referred to as the local address and the Mu1tibus address. The local
address is a 16-bit address that must be used by the local processor to
access the local RAM; the Mu1tibus address is a 24-bit address that must
be used by a system bus master (other than the on-board CPU) to access
the dual port portion of the local RAM.
the iSBC 86/14 and iSBC 86/30 boards provide several jumper options for
assigning a Mu1tibus address to the dual port RAM and for selecting the
amount of dual port RAM on the board. The jumper posts are the same for
the iSBC 86/14 and the iSBC 86/30 boards, however, the configuration of
the jumpers on the two boards is different because of the memory chip
capacity differences. So, the following text separates the jumper
configuring descriptions for each board. Configuration of the Mu1tibus
address select jumpers is described in the following text.
2-23
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-13. iSBC 86/14 BOARD RAM ADDRESS CONFIGURATION. As shipped from the
factory, the iSBC 86/14 board is configured with 32k bytes of RAM at
Multibus addresses 09FFFFH through 098000H. You can relocate the 32k
bytes of dual port RAM to any 8k ending boundary within any 128k byte
page in the selected megabyte of memory space. Jumper post
configurations select one of sixteen one-megabyte sections of Multibus
address space in which to reside, select a 128k byte page within the
megabyte, select an 8k ending boundary within the page, and select the
amount of RAM available as a Multibus resource (in increments of 25% of
the total RAM available).
The megabyte selection jumpers (E220, E221, E222, E224) assign the
Multibus address (of the dual port RAM) to one of 16 one-megabyte blocks
of system address space. Table 2-6 lists the jumpers required for each
of the 16 configurations.
Within the selected megabyte, the Multibus address is further assigned
via jumper posts E225, E226, and E227 to one of 8 possible 128k pages;
that is, you can select one of 8 possible 128k pages for starting the
Multibus address sequence. Table 2-7 provides the jumper connections
that select the pages.
Within the selected 128k page, you can select any 8k boundary to be the
ending address; that is, you can select one of 16 possible 8k boundaries
within the 128k page at which to end the Multibus address sequence (of
the dual port RAM). Jumpers E230 through E233 and E240 through E243
provide the selection. Table 2-8 provides the jumper connections that
select the 8k ending boundaries.
NOTE
You must select the 8k boundary such
that the Multibus address sequence for
the dual port RAM does not increment
across a 128k byte page boundary.
Failure to do so makes the memory
locations beyond the 128k page boundary
inaccessible.
Figure 2-4 provides a Multibus address configuration example for an
iSBC 86/14 board providing 8k bytes of dual port RAM at Multibus address
locations OCBFFFH through OCAOOOH.
2-24
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-6.
Megabyte Address Select
Jumpers Installed
E217-E222
E2l6-E221
E219-E224
E215-E220
Megabyte
Selected
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Notes: 1.
2.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X = jumper installed.
The configuration of the megabyte requires the installation
of jumper E218-E223 to connect the address lines to the
decoder.
Table 2-7.
Jumpers
E225-Gnd
128k Page Selection for iSBC· 86/14 Board
Installed
E226-Gnd
E227-Gnd
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Note:
X
X
X
X
X
128k Page
Address Range
000000-01FFFFH
020 000-03F FFFH
040000-05FFFFH
060000-07FFFFH
080000-09FFFFH
OAOOOO-OBFFFFH
OCOOOO-ODFFFFH
OEOOOO-OFFFFFH
Installation of jumper E218-E223 is required to access a
particular megabyte.
2-25
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-8.
E232-E233
8k Ending Address Boundary Select for iSBC· 86/14 Board
Jumpers Installed
E240-E241
E230-E231
E242-E243
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Notes: 1.
2.
3.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
8k Ending
Boundary
x1FFFFH
x1DFFFH
x1BFFFH
x19FFFH
x17FFFH
x15FFFH
x13FFFH
x11FFFH
xOFFFFH
xODFFFH
xOBFFFH
x09FFFH
x07FFFH
x05FFFH
x03FFFH
x01FFFH
Multibus address for dual port RAH = (Megabyte Address
Select) + (128k Page Address Select) + (8k Ending Address
Selec t).
Dual port memory cannot cross a 128k byte boundary and still
be functional in the system.
X = Jumper installed.
2-14. iSBC 86/30 BOARD RAM ADDRESS CONFIGURATION. As shipped, the
iSBC 86/30 board is configured with 128k bytes of RAM at Multibus
addresses OBFFFFH through OAOOOOH. You can relocate the 128k bytes of
dual port RAM to any 32k ending boundary within any 256k page of Multibus
address space.
The megabyte selection jumpers (E220, E221, E222, E224) assign the
Multibus address (of the dual port RAM) to one of sixteen 1-megabyte
blocks of system address space. Table 2-6 lists the jumpers required for
each of the 16 configurations.
The 256k page selection is performed within a 1-megabyte memory address
space; that is, you can select one of 4 possible 256k pages within the
megabyte of system memory space in which to place the dual port RAM.
Table 2-9 provides the jumper connections that select the pages.
2-26
PREPARATION FOR USE
Within the selected 256k page, you can select any 32k boundary to be the
ending Multibus address (of the dual port RAM); that is, you can select
one of 8 possible 32k boundaries within the 256k page at which to end
your Multibus address sequence. Jumpers E230 through E233 and E240
through E243 provide the selection as listed in Table 2-10. Ensure that
your address selection allows access to all useable memory locations; the
Multibus address cannot be incremented across a 256k page boundary.
Figure 2-5 provides an address configuration example for the iSBC 86/30
board that places 96k bytes of dual port RAM into Multibus addresses
6FFFFH through 58000H.
256k Page Selection for iSBC m 86/30 Board
Table 2-9.
Jumpers
E225-Gnd
-
X
-
X
X
X
Table 2-10.
E232-E233
X
X
Installed
E226-Gnd
E227-Gnd
256k Page
Address Range
not
not
not
not
000000-3FFFFH
040000-7FFFFH
080000-BFFFFH
OCO OOO-FFFFFH
used
used
used
used
32k Ending Boundary Select for iSBC m 86/30 Board
Jumpers Installed
E230-E231
E240-E241
-
-
-
X
X
X
X
-
X
X
X
-
E242-E243
not
not
not
not
not
not
not
not
used
used
used
used
used
used
used
used
32k Ending Boundary
Offset in 256k Page
03FFFFH
037FFFH
02FFFFH
027FFFH
01FFFFH
017FFFH
OOFFFFH
007FFFH
Notes: Multibus address (of dual port RAM) = (Megabyte Address Select) +
(256k Page Select) + (32k Ending boundary Select).
X = Jumper installed.
2-27
PREPARATION FOR USE
o
SYSTEM
128K BYTE
SEGMENT
EXPLANATiON
JUMPER
Jumper ConfiguratIOn
E225
E226
E227
GND
GND
GND
EOOOO FFFFF
GND
GND
NC
COOOO DFFFF,/
GND
NC
GND
AOOOO BFFFF
GND
NC
NC
80000 9FFFF
NC
GND
GND
60000 7FFFF
NC
GND
NC
40000 5FFFF
NC
NC
GND
20000 3FFFF
NC
NC
00000 1FFFF
NC
~
X PARAMETER
Jumper
E237
E234
E235
,/>K
OUT
OUT
16K
OUT
IN
24K
IN
OUT
32K
IN
IN
E236
/
/
SELECTS X PARAMETER{128K BYTE SEGMENT)
B
SELECTS Z PARAMETER{MEMORY AVAILABLE TO BUS)
C
SELECTS Y PARAMETER (LOCATION WITHIN 128K SEGMENT)
ADDRESS (UPPER) X + Y
ADDRESS (LOWER) X + Y Z
~
~
~
~
~
~
V
DUAL PORT
RAM
AVAILABLE
TO BUS
ConfIguration
?
A
IN THE EXAMPLE SHOWN IN THE SHADED PATH X
0;;
coooo,
Y
:=
OBFFF, AND Z-
8K (01FFF). THUS
COODO oj.
OBFFF
CBFFF
~
CAODO
:=
Y
ADDRESS{UPPER)
Z(8K)
ADDRESS(LOWER)
IMPORTANT
THE SELECTED MEMORY SPACE CANNOT EXTEND ACROSS A 128K BYTE BOUNDARY,
THAT IS. X· Y -Z MUST BE EQUAL TO OR GREATER THAN THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF X.
~
~
®
A
/
tTOP'/'~
,
ALL
'---y--J
Z PARAMETER
8KENDING
ADDRESS SELECT
xFFFFF
©
Jumper Configuration
E232
E230
E240 E242
E243
E233 E231
E241
IN
IN
IN
IN
01FFF
IN
IN
IN
OUT
03FFF
IN
IN
OUT IN
05FFF
IN
IN
OUT OUT
07FFF
IN
OUT IN
IN
IN
OUT IN
OUT
IN
OUT OUT IN
IN
OUT OUT OUT
~:?1Z>
MULTIBUS
ADDRESS
RANGE
"-
IN
IN
11FFF
OUT IN
IN
OUT
13FFF
OUT IN
OUT IN
15FFF
OUT IN
OUT OUT
17FFF
OUT OUT IN
IN
19FFF
OUT OUT IN
OUT
1BFFF
OUT OUT OUT IN
lDFFF
OUT OUT OUT OUT
1FFFF
86/14 DUAL PORT
RAM SPACE
"- ,,-C4~
"-
,
OFFFF
OUT IN
Cefc
fcfc
CAOOO~CBFFF
ODFFF
xooOOO
07FFF
' ....
8K
06000
05FFF
8K
04000
03FFF
8K
LOCAL
ADDRESS
RANGE
02000
1FFFF
8K
00000
~
Y PARAMETER
Figure 2-4.
iSBC· 86/14 Board Multibus Address Configuration Example
2-28
PREPARATION FOR USE
SYSTEM
256K BYTE
SEGMENT
0
JUMPER
Jumper Configuration
E225
E227
E226
NC
NC
DC
00000 ·3FFFF
NC
GND
NC
40000 ·7FFFF
GND
NC
NC
GND
GND
NC
A
SELECTS X PARAMETER (256K BYTE SEGMENn
B
SELECTS Z PARAMETER (MEMORY AVAILABLE TO BUS)
C
SELECTS Y PARAMETER (LOCATION WlTH!N 256K SEGMENn
ADDRESS(UPPER)X + Y
ADORE 55 (LOWER) X + y. Z
IN THE EXAMPLE SHOWN IN THE SHADED PATH, X
= 96K (1 ;'FFF). THUS
=
40000, Y
2FFFF. AND
Z
40000 _
2FFFF
t
6FFFF
~
58000::;
DUAL PORT
RAM
AVAILABLE
TO BUS
Y
ADDRESS (UPPER)
Z(96K)
ADDRESS\LOWER)
IMPORTAI'IT
THE SELECTED MEMORY SPACE CANNOT EXTEND ACROSS A 256K BYTE BOUNDARY
THAT IS X Y·Z MUST BE EQUAL TO OR GREATER THAN THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF X.
Jumper
Configuration
E236
E234
E237
E235
32K
OUT
OUT
64K
OUT
IN
IN
OUT
IN
IN
ALL
32K ENDING
ADDRESS SELECT
xFFFFF
Jumper ConfiguratIon
E232
E230
E231
E240
E242
E233
E241
E243
IN
IN
IN
IN
IN
OUT IN
OUT IN
OUT IN
OUT
OUT IN
OUT OUT
OUT OUT IN
IN
OUT OUT IN
OUT
OUT OUT OUT IN
OUT
OUT OUT OUT
07FFF
OFFFF
17FFF
MULTIBUS
ADDRESS
RANGE
lFFFF
27FFF
~~FfFzq
86/30 DUAL PORT
6FFFF
58000·6FFFF
RAM SPACE
lFFFF
\
37FFF
\
3FFFF
32K
\
xOOOOO
Y PARAMETER
18000
17FFF
\b
\0&
32K
10000
09FFF
\
\
32K
~
LOCAL
ADDRESS
RANGE
08000
07FFF
32K
00000
Figure 2-5.
iSBC· 86/30 Board Multibus Address Configuration Example
2-29
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-15. DUAL PORT RAM SIZE SELECTION. When configured as-shipped, the
iSBC 86/14/30 board places all of its RAM into the lowest 1-megabyte of
Multibus address space in the system (effectively, all of the RAM is a
dual port resource). You may wish to change the amount or RAM that is a
dual port resource (i.e., that is available to another bus master via the
Multibus interface). RAM may be protected from off board access in
increments of 25% from a minimum of none to a maximum of all of the
on-board RAM. The following paragraphs and Tables 2-11 and 2-12 provide
the jumper configurations for selecting the amount of dual port RAM on
the iSBC 86/14 and the iSBC 86/30 boards.
2-16.
SIZE SELECT FOR iSBC 86/14 BOARD. The dual port RAM space on the
iSBC 86/14 board may be reduced in 8k byte increments from a maximum of
32k bytes to a minimum of 0 bytes. Jumpers E234 through E237 are used to
make the selection as listed in Table 2-11.
NOTE
If the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule Board is installed onto the
iSBC 86/14 board, the dual port size
may be doubled from 32k to 64k bytes;
the incremental size selection is
doubled from 8k bytes to 16k bytes.
Note that the on-board address of the dual port memory on the iSBC 86/14
board is always located within the range from 07FFFH through 00000 (from
OFFFFH through 00000 with an iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board).
Table 2-11.
iSBC· 86/14 board Dual Port RAM Size Select
Dual Port RAM
Size Selected
Address Range For
Local CPU Access
8k bytes; top 1/4
06000H-07FFFH
E234-E235 removed, E236-E237
removed.
16k bytes; top 1/2
04000H-07FFFH
E234-E235 installed, E236-E237
removed.
24k bytes; top 3/4
02000H-07FFFH
E234-E235 removed, E236-E237
installed.
32k bytes; all
OOOOOH-07FFFH
E234-E235 installed, E236-E237
installed (the maximum dual
port RAM capacity); the
as-shipped configuration.
2-30
Jumper Configuration Required
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-11.
iSBC M 86/14 board Dual Port RAM Size Select (continued)
Dual Port RAM
Size Selected
Address Range For
Local CPU Access
16k bytes; top 1/4
with iSBC 300A RAM
Multimodule Board
OCOOOH-OFFFFH
E234-E235 removed, E236-E237
removed; the as-shipped
configuration.
32k bytes; top 1/2
with iSBC 300A RAM
Multimodule Board
08000H-OFFFFH
E234-E235 installed, E236-E237
removed.
48k bytes; top 3/4
with iSBC 300A RAM
Multimodule Board
04000H-OFFFFH
E234-E235 removed, E236-E237
installed.
64k bytes; all
with iSBC 300A RAM
Multimodule Board
OOOOOH-OFFFFH
E234-E235 installed, E236-E237
installed; the maximum dual
port RAM capacity.
Jumper Configuration Required
2-17.
SIZE SELECT FOR iSBC 86/30 BOARD. The size of the dual port RAM
on the iSBC 86/30 board may be reduced in 32k byte increments from a
maximum of 128k bytes to a minimum of 0 bytes. Jumpers E234 through E237
are used to make the selection as listed in Table 2-12.
NOTE
If the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion
Multimodule Board is installed onto the
iSBC 86/30 board, the dual port size
may be doubled from 128k to 256k bytes
and the incremental size selection is
increased from 32k bytes to 64k bytes.
Note that the on-board address of the dual port memory on the iSBC 86/30
board is always located within the range from 1FFFFH through 00000 (from
3FFFFH through 00000 with an iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board).
2-31
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-12.
iSBC· 86/30 Board Dual Port RAM Size Select
Size of On-board
Dual Port RAM
Address Range For
Local CPU Access
32k bytes; top 1/4
l8000H-lFFFFH
64k bytes; top 1/2
10000H-lFFFFH
96k bytes; top 3/4
08000H-1FFFFH
l28k bytes; all
00000H-1FFFFH
64k bytes; top 1/4
with iSBC 304 RAM
Multimodule Board
30000H-3FFFFH
E234-E235 removed, E236-E237
removed; the as-shipped
configuration.
l28k bytes; top 1/2
with iSBC 304 RAM
Multimodule Board
20000H-3FFFFH
E234-E235 installed, E236-E237
removed.
192k bytes; top 3/4
with iSBC 304 RAM
Multimodule Board
10000H-3FFFFH
E234-E235 removed, E236-E237
installed.
256k bytes; all
with iSBC 304 RAM
Multimodule Board
00000H-3FFFFH
E234-E235 installed, E236-E237
installed; the maximum dual
port RAM capacity.
2-18.
Jumper Configuration Required
E234-E235 removed, E236-E237
removed.
E234-E235 installed, E236-E237
removed.
E234-E235 removed, E236-E237
installed.
E234-E235 installed, E236-E237
installed (the maximum dual
port RAM capacity); the
as-shipped configuration.
Ready Circuitry Jumper Configuration
The ready circuitry on the iSBC 86/14/30 board contains several jumpers
(E4 through E14) for use in selecting the number of wait-states that are
inserted into the CPU execution cycles during EPROM and I/O accessing
operations. The jumpers allow selection of from zero to three
wait-states, depending on the operation and the type of device involved.
I/O accesses require from 1 to 2 wait-states, EPROM access require from 0
to 3 wait-states for a EPROM access and from one to two wait-states for
an I/O access.
2-32
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-13.
Wait-state Jumper Configuration
Jumpers Required
EPROM Configuration
I/O Configuration
Function
---
o Wait-state inserted
Remove E7-E11
Install E4-E8
1 Wait-state inserted
Remove E7-E11
Install E5-E9
Remove E13-E14
Install E12-E13
2 Wait-states inserted
Install E7-E11*
Install E13-E14*
3 Wait-states inserted
Remove E7 -E 11
Install E6-E10
Notes:
2-19.
---
* indicates as-shipped configuration.
8253-5 PIT Jumper Configuration
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains an 8253-5 PIT device providing three
user configured counter/timer output signals. The user configurable
jumper options for the 8253-5 PIT device consist of selecting the input
clock frequencies, enabling generation of an external clock either from
or to the Port C parallel I/O, and configuring the output signals from
the 8253-5 PIT device.
Configured as shipped, the iSBC 86/14/30 board contains jumpers
connecting E178-E179, E184-E185, and E175-E176. These jumpers place a
1.23 MHz clock frequency on the CLK2 and CLKO input pins and a 153.6 KHz
clock frequency onto the CLK1 input pin. If other frequencies are
desired, reconfigure the jumpers.
Jumper posts E180, E181, and E182 allow user configuration of the
iSBC 86/14/30 board to drive a clock onto the J1 connector interface via
the external clock signal (EXT CLK). Each output signal (OUTO, OUT1 and
OUT2) is routed to jumper posts to allow easy integration of the
counter/timer output signals into the configuration of the iSBC 86/14/30
board. Table 2-14 lists the jumper posts at which the output signals are
located and the signal names for ech output signal.
NOTE
Since the output from PIT Counter 2 is
dedicated to performing a specific
on-board function, reconfiguration of
the OUT2 signal from the PIT is not
recommended.
2-33
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-14.
PIT Output Signal Jumper
Jumper
Signal
Direction
Function Performed
E158
TIMER 0 INTR
Out
Counter 0 output signal, input to the
interrupt jumper matrix, function and
frequency are user-defined.
E181
CLKO
Out
Output connection for CLKO.
E141
TIMER 1 INTR
Out
Counter 1 output signal, input signal
to the interrupt jumper matrix,
function and frequency are user-defined.
E180
CLK1
Out
Output connection for CLK1.
E195
OUT2
Out
Counter 2 output signal; Receive Clock
(RxCLK) input to the 825LA PCI,
frequency is user-defined.
E194
CLK2
Out
Counter 2 output signal; Transmit Clock
(TxCLK) input to the 825LA PCI,
frequency is user-defined.
2-20.
8255A PPI Jumper Configuration
The 8255A PPI device provides three 8-bit ports of parallel I/O signals
that are configurable for operation as inputs or outputs. Table 2-15
lists the operating modes available for each port of the 8455A PPI, the
functions performed by each bit of each port, and the required jumper
installation or removal to enable the functions. More information on the
operating modes of the 8255A PPI is available in the Programming
Information section of this text.
Jumper post E52 provides access to the direction control input of the
8287 Octal Bus Transceiver provided as a buffer/driver for the Port A I/O
signals. Any bit from Port C may be used as an output to control the
state of the direction control signal to the device.
2-34
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-15.
Port Mode
C8
C8
C8
° Input
° Output
Driver (0)/
Terminator (T)
8287 Ul7
Parallel Port Jumper Configuration
Jumper Configuration
Effect
Delete
Add
E52-E6l*
8287 U17
(latched)
8287 U17
1 Input
(strobed) T: U18
0: U19
E52-E32
E52-E6l*
E52-E6l*
E46-E55*
and
E60-E5l*
2-35
E52-E32
8287 =
input
enabled
8287 =
output
enabled
8287 =
input
enabled.
E47-E56
Connects
Jl-26 to
STB A/
input.
E55-E5l
Connects
IBFA
output to
Jl-18.
Restrictions
Port
CA
None; can be in
mode
or 1,
input or output.
CC
None; can be in
Mode 0, input or
output, unless
Port CA is in
Mode 1.
CA
None; can be in
Mode
or 1,
input or output.
CC
None; can be in
Mode 0, input or
output, unless
Port CA is in
Mode 1.
CA
None; can be in
Mode
or 1,
input or output.
CC
Port CC bits
perform the
following:
°
°
°
• Bits 0,1,2,-Control for
Port CA if Port
CA is in Mode 1.
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-15.
Port Mode
Parallel Port Jumper Configuration (continued)
Driver (D)/
Terminator (T)
Jumper Configuration
Effect
Delete
Add
E63-E60
Restrictions
Port
Connects
INTA
output to
interrupt
matrix.
• Bit 3--Port C8
Interrupt (PA
INTR) to interrupt jumper
matrix.
• Bit 4--Port C8
Strobe (STB/ )
input.
• Bit 5--Port C8
Interrupt
Buffer Full
(IBF) output.
• Bits 6,7--Port
CC input or
output (both
must be in same
direction) •
C8
1 Output 8287 U17
(latched) T: U18
D: U19
E60-E51*
and
E53-E44*
E52-E61*
8287=
output
enabled.
CA
None; can be in
Mode 0 or 1, input
or output.
E54-E45*
Connects
ACKA/
input.
CC
Port EA bits
perform the
following:
E53-E51
Connects
OBFA/
output to
Jl-18.
• Bits 0,1,2-Control for Port
CA if Port CA
is in Mode 1.
E63-E60
Connects
INT A/
output to
interrupt
matrix.
• Bit 3--Port CB
Interrupt (PA
INTR) to interrupt jumper
matrix.
• Bits 4, 5--Port
CC input or
output (both
must be in same
direction) •
2-36
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-15.
Port Mode
Parallel Port Jumper Configuration (continued)
Driver (D)
Jumper Configuration
Add
Effect
Terminator (T) Delete
Restrictions
Port
• Bit 6--Port C8
Acknowledge
(ACK/) inpu t.
• Bit 7--Port C8
Output Buffer
Full (OBF /)
output.
C8
8287 U17
2
T: U18
(bidirectional) D: U19
E61-E52*
E55-E46*
and
E57-E48*
E53-E44*
and
E60-E51*
E54-E52
CA
Allows
ACKA/
input to
control
8287 in/out
direction.
None; can be in
Mode 0 or 1,
input or output.
E56-E47'1c Connects
J1-26 to
STBA/
input.
• Bit O--Can only
be used for jumper
option (see Figure
5-2 zone 9ZC6).
E55-E48
Connects
IBFA to
J1-24.
• Bits 1,2--Can be
used for input or
output if Port CC
is in Mode O.
E5l~-E45'1c
Connects
J1-30 to
ACKA/
input.
• Bit 3--Port C8
Interrupt (PA
INTR) to interrupt
jumper matrix.
E53-E51
Connects
OBFA/
output to
J1-18.
• Bit 4--Port C8
Strobe (STB/)
input.
E63-E60
Connects
INTA
output to
interrupt
matrix.
• Bit 5--Port C8
Input Buffer Full
(IBF) output.
• Bit 6--Port C8
Acknowledge
(ACK/) input.
2-37
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-15.
Port Mode
Parallel Port Jumper Configuration (continued)
Driver (D)
Jumper Configuration
Terminator (T) Delete
Effect
Add
Restrictions
Port
• Bit 7--Port C8
Output Buffer
Full (OBF/)
output.
CA
CA
CA
o
Input
T: U20,U21
o
D: U20, U21
Ouput
(latched)
None
None
T: U18,U21
1 Input
U20
(strobed)
D: U19
None
None
E58-E49~
E53-E44*
and
E59-E50*
Connects
IBFB to
J1-22
C8
None.
CC
None; Port
be in Mode
or output,
C8 is also
O.
C8
None.
CC
None; Port
be in Mode
or output,
C8 is also
O.
C8
None.
CC
Port CC bits perform
the following:
CC can
0, input
i f Port
in Mode
CC can
0, input
i f Port
in Mode
E44-E59
Connects
J1-32 to
STB B/
input.
• Bit O--Port CA
Interrupt (PB
INTR) to interrupt
jumper matrix.
E57-E64
Connects
INTB
output
interrupt
matrix.
• Bit O--Port CA
Interrupt (PB
INTR) to interrupt
jumper matrix.
2-38
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-15.
Port Mode
Parallel Port .Jumper Configuration (continued)
Driver
Terminator
Jumper Configuration
Delete
Add
Effect
Restrictions
Port
• Bit 1--Port CA
Input Buf~er Full
(IBF) output.
• Bit 2--Port CA
Strobe (STB/ )
inpu t.
• Bit 3--If Port C8
is in Mode 0, bit
3 can be input or
output.
Otherwise, bit 3
is reserved.
• Bits 4,5--Depends
on Port C8 mode.
• Bits 6,7--Input
or output (both
must be in same
direction).
CA
E58-E49; Connects
OBFB/
output to
Jl-22.
1 Output T: U18
(latched) D: U19,U20
U2l
C8
None.
CC
Port CC bits perform the following:
E53-E44*
and
E59-E50*
E~·4-E59
Connects
Jl-32 to
ACKB/
input.
• Bit O--Port CA
interrupt (PB
INTR to interrupt
jumper matrix.
E57-E48*
ES,7-E64
Connects
INTB
output to
interrupt
matrix.
• Bit 1--Port CA
Output Buffer Full
(OBF/) output.
• Bit 2--Port CA
Acknowledge
(ACK/) input.
2-39
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-15.
Port Mode
Parallel Port Jumper Configuration (continued)
Driver (D)
Jumper Configuration
Terminator (T) Delete
Add
Effect
Restrictions
Port
• Bit 3--If Port CB
is in Mode 0, bit
3 can be input or
output.
Otherwise, bit 3
is reserved.
• Bits 4,5--Input
or output (both
must be in same
direction) •
• Bits 6,7--Depends
on Port CB mode.
o Input
CC
(upper)
T: U18
None
E56-E47* Connects
E55-E46* bit 4 to
E54-E45* to JI-2B
E53-E44*
CB
Port CB must be in
Mode o for all four
bits to be available
Connects bit:
5 to JI-2B
6 to JI-30
7 to JI-32
CC
o Input
(10wer)
T: U19
None
E57-E4B*
E5B-E49*
E59-E50*
E60-E51*
CA
Port CA must be in
Mode o for all four
bits to be available
CB
Port CB must be in
Mode o for all four
bits to be available
Connects bit:
1 to JI-24
1 to JI-22
2 to JI-20
3 to JI-IB
CA
2-40
Port CA must be in
Mode o for all four
bits to be available
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-15.
Port Mode
Parallel Port Jumper Configuration (continued)
Jumper Configuration
Driver (D)
Terminator (T) Delete
Add
Effect
Restrictions
Port
CC
o Output D: U18
(up- (latched)
per)
None
Same as for Port
CC (upper) mode 0
Input.
C8
Same as for Port CC
(upper) mode 0 input
CC
o Output D: U19
(10- (latched)
wer)
None
Same as for Port
CC (lower) mode 0
Input.
CC
Same as for Port CC
(lower) mode 0 input
Notes:
2-21.
*
indicates the as-shipped configuration.
8259A PIC and Interrupt Jumper Configuration
The iSBC 86/14/30 board can accept an interrupt request for the 8086-2
CPU from one of several sources, including: timer interrupts from the
on-board 8253-5 PIT device, iSBX bus interface interrupts, serial I/O
interface line interrupts, Multibus interface interrupts, 8251A PCI
interrupts, PLC or the PFIN interrupts from the auxiliary connector P2,
PARITY INTR interrupt from the iSBC 303 Parity Generation Multimodule
Board, MINT interrupt from the iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor, and EXT
INTRO/ interrupt on pin-50 of the J1 connector. The interrupt sources
and priority levels are completely user selectable and configurable.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board sends and receives interrupt request signals on
Multibus interrupt request signals INTO/ through INT7/. Table 2-16 lists
the jumper numbers for the Multibus interrupt request input signals, for
the interrupt signals on the PIC, and for the I/O interrupt request
signals.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board provides an "OR"-function for combining 2 or 4
interrupt request signals into one signal. The feature is designed for
use in applications that require additional interrupt signal handling
capability. Jumpers E127, E131, E138, E139, E140, and E142 are inputs to
the OR-function; the inputs are "OR"ed together to condense up to 6 input
signals into 2 output signals. The outputs of the OR-function are the OR
INTR1 signal on jumper post E130 and the OR INTR2 signal on jumper post
E128.
2-41
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-16.
Interrupt Source and Level Selecting Options
INTERRUPT SOURCES
Interrupt Source
Notes:
*
**
Name
Post
INTERRUPT INPUTS
Interrupt Name Post
indicates that the signals must not be connected to IRO
through IR7.
allows AEN/ to disable the failsafe timeout during execution
of a HALT instruction by iRMX 86.
2-42
PREPARATION FOR USE
iSBX Mu1timodu1e Interrupts (SBX1 INTO, SBX1 INT1, SBX2 INTO, SBX2 INT1)
Two interrupt request lines are available for each iSBX Mu1timodu1e board
installed on the iSBC 86/14/30 board.
Interval Timer Outputs (TlMEROINTR, TIMER 1 INTR) These two lines come
directly from the 8253-5 PIT. The timer
line is jumpered at the
factory to interrupt request line INT2 (123-124). The timer 1 output is
not connected at the factory.
°
Parallel Port Interrupts A, B (PA INTR and PB INTR) Essentially these
two lines are software programmable interrupt lines. connect each line
to the desired interrupt request input. Refer to Table 2-15 for
instructions on installing the parallel port matrix jumpers required for
this option.
Transmit and Receive Interrupts (TxRDY and RxRDY) These signals
originate at the 825lA Programmable Communications Interface (PCI)
device. The signal TxRDY interrupt from the PCI indicates that the PCI
is ready to accept a data character from the CPU. Likewise, the RxRDY
interrupt from the PCI indicates that the PCI contains a data character
to be read by the CPU. Refer to the Intel Component Data Catalog for
additional PCI information.
Power Line Clock (PLC) This external signal is supplied by the
iSBC 665/666 Modular Chassis, or similar circuit. It enters the board
via auxiliary connector pin P2-31 and is specified at 120 Hz (double the
AC line frequency).
Math Interrupt (MINT) This signal originates from the optional iSBC 337
Numeric Data Processor and is used only in conjunction with this option.
Refer to paragraph 2-46 for additional iSBC 337 board information.
Power Fail Interrupt (PFIN/) Furnished by the iSBC Power Supply (or
equivalent), this signal indicates that an AC line power failure has
occurred and DC voltage loss is imminent. Typically, this signal is
connected to the NMI input on the 8086-2 CPU and is used in conjunction
with a user written power down routine and battery backup scheme. Refer
to paragraph 2-42 for additional battery backup information.
2-43
PREPARATION FOR USE
External Interrupt 0 (EXT INTRO/) This external interrupt signal enters
the board via parallel port connector Jl-50. The incoming signal is
inverted y the iSBC 86/14/30 board. Therefore, a LOW signal level
activates the interrupt request (if the 8259A PIC is in level mode), or a
HIGH-to-LOW transition activates the interrupt request (if the 8259A PIC
is in edge-sensitive mode).
Single Request Edge Sensitive Feature (LEVEL INTR) The iSBC 86/14/30
board is equipped with special circuitry that senses an edge-type
interrupt signal and converts it to a level-type interrupt signal, while
the 8259A PIC is in either the level or edge-level mode. This feature is
extremely useful when the PIC operates in the level mode and a critical
edge-type interrupt signal must be monitored. The use of the
edge-to-Ievel conversion circuitry eliminates the possibility of loosing
an edge-type interrupt request signal that, typically, expires before the
controller can acknowledge or service the request.
To enable EDGE INTR, two jumper connections are required: first install
a jumper from the desired interrupt request line to jumper post E135
(edge converter circuit input); then install a jumper between interrupt
jumper post E146 and the desired PIC input post. As an example, to
implement the Failsafe Timer interrupt, install the first jumper at
E133-E135; then install jumper E146-E164 to select the desired interrupt
level (IR1) in the PIC.
Non-Maskable Interrupt Input Mask The 8086-2 CPU NMI input may be
configured to be software selectable. This feature is called the
Non-Maskable Interrupt Input Mask on the iSBC 86/14/30 board. The
feature is programmable via the status register and hardware enabled via
jumper E26-E27. A HIGH state on the NMI MASK/ line (E26-E27 installed)
enables the mask gate to sense the condition of NMI. A LOW state
disables the mask gate, preventing all non-maskable interrupts from
reaching the 8086-2 CPU.
Multibus Interrupt Output Option (BUS INTR OUT 1 and BUS INTR OUT 2) The
iSBC 86/14/30 board has an optional status register configuration which
provides two software programmable interrupt outputs. These signals
allow you to issue an interrupt request on a system Multibus line via
software by programming the contents of the status register at all odd
port address from C8 through DF.
As shipped, the board fully enables BUS INTR OUT 2 to the interrupt
matrix, however, a jumper must be installed connecting E245 to one of the
Multibus interrupt lines (E246 through E253).
The BUS INTR OUT 1 signal, when configured as shipped, requires an
additional jumper to enable it to reach the interrupt matrix (E24-E25),
and a jumper connecting E244 to one of the Multibus interrupt lines (E246
through E253).
2-44
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-22.
Multibus Vectored Interrupts
The iSBC 86/14/30 board has the capability to service interrupt requests
which originate with a request to a slave (off-board) 8259A PIC. The slave
INTR output is connected to the master PIC on the iSBC 86/14/30 board via
the Multibus lines, as shown in Figure 2-6. This type of interrupt request
is called a Bus Vectored Interrupt. In general, a bus vectored interrupt
should be of lower priority than interrupt requests which are input
directly to the master PIC. The iSBC 86/14/30 board is configured at the
factory to accept either bus vectored or non-bus vectored interrupts. In
this mode, the iSBC 86/14/30 board requests the use of the Multibus
interface for all interrupt cycles. To disable the bus vectored interrupt
feature, remove jumper E33-E34. In this mode, the iSBC 86/14/30 board does
not use the Multibus interface to perform interrupt cycles.
Figure 2-6 shows, as an example, the on-board PIC (master) interfaced with
two slave PIC devices. This arrangement leaves the master PIC with six
inputs (IRO through IR5) that can be used to handle the various on-board
interrupt functions. The example scheme is implemented by programming the
master PIC to handle IR6 and IR7 as bus vectored interrupts.
Each interrupt input (IRO through IR7) to the master PIC may be
individually programmed to be bus vectored or non-bus vectored. When
programmed into the bus vectored mode, the slave PIC identifies the
interrupt type for the 8086-2 CPU; when programmed into the non-bus
vectored mode, the master PIC identifies the interrupt type for the 8086-2
CPU.
Slave PIC devices must be identified as such during their initialization
sequences (with ICW3). The master PIC must also be initialized to support
slave PIC devices. Paragraph 3-26 describes 8259A PIC programming and
provides initialization examples.
r-------------------------l
1- - -
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
80862
CPU
MASTER
8259A
PIC
86114130
I
I
I
E134 E159
MUL T1BUS
INTERFACE
r"""--INT31
IR7
40
E155 E150
IRS
E152
INTR
INTR
IR3
0--
E136
_---0
0----
E147
0--
IR2
INPUTS FROM
ON·BOARD (NBV)
INTERRUPT
SOURCES
E164
IRl
(r--
I
INTO;
:
I
INT2/
39
INT4,
I
INTS/
I.
I
0--
42
~
L _________________________ J
Figure 2-6.
35
INT1!
I
E165
IRO
INTSI
11
E157
IR4
I
0----
IRS
I
I
I
I
I
ISBC
37
38
INT7/
36
L.,....--
~
-
PIC I
IRO
<l-
I
I
I
I
I
I
IR7
--<:}-
INTR
l
-
f'--
•
•
•
•
•
•
1
I
I
I
-
f--;
I
I
I
8
•
•
•
•
•
•
IR7 r-- 16
BUS VECTORED (BV)
INTERRUPT SOURCES
L _________ J
Typical Mater/Salve PIC Interconnect Example
2-45
INTR
SLAVE
PIC 'IRO
I
I
I
I
--;L-;-V;- -
I
i
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-23.
8251A PCI and Serial Interface Jumper Configurations
The 8251A Programmable Communications Interface (PCI) device contains
jumper posts for configuration of the Transmit Clock (TxC), the Receive
Clock (RxC), the Clear-To-Send (CTS), the Data Terminal Ready (DTR), and
the Data Set Ready (DSR) inputs.
The TxC signal may be derived from one of two sources: either from the
Secondary Transmit Clock input signal from the RS232C interface via
E186-E190 or from the OUT2 clock from the PIT device via E190-E194 (the
as shipped configuration).
The RxC signal may be derived from one of two sources: either from the
Secondary Transmit Clock input signal from the RS232C interface via
E187-E191 or from the OUT2 clock from the PIT device via E191-E195 (the
as shipped configuration).
The DTR signal from the RS232C interface contains a jumper option
E189-E193. The jumper allows user selection of the source signal for
generating the Data Set Ready input to the PCI device. Available sources
are the Request-To-Send signal (RTS), configured via E76-E193, and
ground, configured via E62-E193.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains several jumper options for configuring
the operation of RS232C signals on the serial interface. Signals that
may be configured include the Request-To-Send input (E76), the
Clear-To-Send output (E77), the Transmit Signal Element Timing output
(E80), the Secondary Receive output (E78), and the Secondary
Clear-To-Send output (E81). The as-shipped configuration of the iSBC
86/14/30 board contains no jumpers on these signals.
2-24.
Failsafe Timer Jumper Configuration
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains one jumper option for configuration of
the Failsafe Timer feature of the board. Jumper connection E38-E39
enables a bus timeout signal (TIME OUT INTR/) to input a timeout signal
to the READY input of the on-board 8086-2 CPU when an expected response
from another device (in the form of an XACK/ signal) is too late in
arriving at the iSBC 86/14/30 board. A description of operation is
contained in paragraph 4-40.
As shipped, the iSBC 86/14/30 board contains a jumper connecting
E38-E39. If you do not desire the use of the feature, remove the jumper.
2-25.
Status Register Jumper Configurations
The Status Register on the iSBC 86/14/30 board contains 8 programmable
functions, five of which are user configurable (three are dedicated).
The functions performed are as follows: bit 0 is a user configurable
output that may be used to provide GATE control for Counter 0 of the
8253-5 PIT, bit 1 provides GATE control for Counter 1 of the 8253-5 PIT,
2-46
PREPARATION FOR USE
bit 2 is a user configurable output providing the NMI MASK/ signal, bit 3
is a user configurable output providing the OVERRIDE/ signal, bit 4 is a
user configurable output providing the BUS INTR OUT 1 signal as an
interrupt request to the Multibus interface, bit 5 is dedicated to
generation of BUS INTR OUT 2 and to driving the LED labeled DS2, bit 6 is
dedicated to controlling the LED labeled DS3 on the board, and bit 7 is
dedicated to enabling the latch. The uses of the jumper selectable bits
of the Status Register are described in the following paragraphs.
As shipped, the iSBC 86/14/30 boards contain jumpers E28-E32 and E30-E31
tieing the GATE inputs to the PIT at a HIGH level. If control 0 the GATE
inputs to the PIT is required, connect the GATE signals (at E28 and E31)
to the output signals from the status register (jumper posts E29 and E35)
and program the status register via I/O port addresses C8 through DF (all
odd addresses) to output the proper signal level.
The NMI mask enable jumper E26-E27 is installed into the iSBC 86/14/30
board, when configured as shipped. Since the contents of the status
register bit 3 is zero initially, the jumper masks the NMI interrupt,
thereby disabling the NMI interrupt from reaching the 8086-2 cPU. By
programming a 1 into status register bit 3, you can enable the 8086-2 to
receive an NMI interrupt.
The OVERRIDE/ signal jumper E22-E23 is installed into the iSBC 86/14/30
board, when configured as shipped. The OVERRIDE/ signal from the status
register operates in the same manner as the NMI/ signal does; the
contents of status register bit 4 is zero initially. This fact plus the
jumper E22-E23 activates the OVERRIDE/ signal, thereby disabling the
LOCK/ signal from locking the dual port RAM on the Multibus interface.
By programming a 1 into status register bit 4, you can assert the LOCK/
signal.
The BUS INTR OUT 1 signal enable jumper E24-E25 is not installed into the
iSBC 86/14/30 board, when configured as shipped. Since the contents of
the status register bit 5 is zero initially, the jumper must be installed
and bit 5 must be programmed to output a HIGH if the BUS INTR OUT 1
signal is to generate a Multibus interrupt output (INTO/ through INT7/).
Additional jumper configuration is required at the interrupt jumper
matrix to place the signal onto the Multibus interface.
2-26.
iSBX Bus Interface Jumper Configuration
The iSBX bus interfaces on the iSBC 86/14/30 board contain only four
signals that may be configured via user installed jumpers. Those signals
are the Multimodule option signals (OPTO/ and OPT1/) and the Multimodule
interrupt signals (MINTRO/ and MINTR1/) from each iSBX Bus connector.
Configuration of the jumpers should take into account the requirements of
the Multimodule boards as specified in the respective Multimodule board
hardware reference manual.
2-47
PREPARATION FOR USE
The interrupt signals are input to jumper posts E137 (MINTRO from
connector J4), E126 (MINTR1 from conector J4), E156 (MINTRO from
connector J3), and E169 (MINTR1 from connector J3). The option signals
can be found on jumper posts E121 (OPTO from conector J3), E122 (OPT1
from connector J3), E170 (OPTO from connector J4), E171 (OPT1 from
connector J4). The 8-bit or 16-bit interface select jumpers (E172, E173,
and E174) allow user selection of either 8-bit or 16-bit operation for
each iSBX Bus interface connector. As shipped from the factory, none of
the jumper posts are connected.
2-27.
Multibus Interface Jumper Configuration
Jumpers are provided on the iSBC 86/14/30 board to allow user
configuration of the following Multibus interface signals: BCLK/, CCLK/,
BPRO/, CBRQ/, LOCK/, and ANYRQST. These signals handle requests for the
on-board processor section as well as requests for the dual-port RAM from
the Multibus interface. The functions performed by each of these signals
is listed in Table 2-17.
Table 2-17.
JUMPER
Multibus· Interface Jumper Options
DESCRIPTION
SIGNAL NAME
E205-E207*
BCLK/ Bus clock
Synchronizes all Multibus
interface control transfers
between bus masters in a system.
E208-E209*
CCLK/ Constant clock
Provides a common Multibus timing
source to all devices on the
Multibus interface.
E204-E206
LOCK/ Bus Lock
Allows only the generating board
to access the Multibus interface.
E2l0-E2l1*
BPRO/ Bus Priority Out
Indicates to lower priority bus
masters that a higher priority
device is requesting the bus;
used only in serial priority
resolution schemes.
E202-E203*
E213-E214*
ANYRQST and CBRQ/
Refer to Table 2-18 and
associated explanation.
2-48
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-28. BUS ARBITRATION JUMPER CONFIGURATIONS. Table 2-18 lists the
jumper configurations for the 8289 Bus Arbiter; i.e., the operation
states of the CBRQ/ and ANYRQST signals on the Multibus interface, and
the interfacing modes selected by each.
The Common Bus Request (CBRQ/) signal, a bidirectional Multibus interface
signal, improves bus access time by allowing a bus master to retain
control of the Multibus interface without contending for it on each
transfer cycle, as long as no other master is requesting control of the
bus. The CBRQ/ signal from the iSBC 86/14/30 board operates identically
in parallel and serial priority resolution schemes.
The Any Request (ANYRQST) signal is an 8289 Bus Arbiter input signal
generated either HIGH or LOW, depending on the iSBC 86/14/30 board jumper
configuration. The signal indicates whether or not the iSBC 86/14/30
board will allow a lower priority device to gain access to the Multibus
interface via the CBRQ/ signal. When ANYRQST is inactive, a lower
priority device cannot gain control of the bus until it gains priority
via BPRN/. When ANYRQST is active, a lower priority device may gain
control of the bus by activating the CBRQ/ signal.
The ANYRQST and CBRQ/ signals provide the mode select inputs to the 8289
Bus Arbiter. When jumper E212-E213 is installed to conect a ground to
the CBRQ/ pin from the 8289 Bus Arbiter (effectively, removing it from
the Multibus interface), Multibus interface control is surrendered after
each transfer cycle. A jumper from E213-E214 allows the iSBC 86/14/30
board to hang onto control of the Multibus interface between transfers
(provided that there are no ther CBRQ/ requests).
2-49
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-18.
Multibus· Interface Arbitration Options
Interface Jumper
State
Connect State
1
2
3
2-29.
E213-E214
E202-E201
E213-E214
E202-E203
E212-E213
E202-E203
State
Description
LOW
LOW
HIGH
LOW
LOW
HIGH
The Bus Arbiter that controls the
Multibus interface surrenders control to
the Bus Arbiter that is pulling CBRQ/
low, regardless of its priority, upon
completion of the current bus cycle.
HIGH
HIGH
The Bus Arbiter controlling the Multibus
interface retains control until another
Bus Arbiter pulls CBRQ/ low. When CBRQ/
goes low, the conditions are as
described above.
LOW
HIGH
The Bus Arbiter controlling the Multibus
interface surrenders the use of the
Multibus interface after each transfer
cycle.
The Bus Arbiter that has control of the
Multibus interface retains control
unless a higher priority master
deactivates BPRN/ or unless the next
machine cycle does not require the use
of the Multibus interface. It may then
relinquished to a lower priority device.
The Bus Arbiter that has control of the
Multibus interface retains control until
another Bus Arbiter pulls CBRQ/ low.
When CBRQ/ goes low, the conditions are
as described above.
MULTIBUS INTERFACE SPECIFICATIONS
For systems applications, the iSBC 86/14/30 board is designed for
installation in a standard Intel iSBC System Modular Backplane and
Cardcage. The iSBC 86/14/30 board can interface to a user-designed
system backplane by means of an 86-pin connector. Multibus interface
signal characteristics and methods of implementing a serial or parallel
priority resolution scheme for resolving bus contention in a multiple bus
master system are described in the following paragraphs.
2-50
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-30.
Signal Characteristics
As shown in Figure 1-1, connector P1 interfaces the iSBC 86/14/30 board
to the Multibus interface. Connector P1 pin assignments are listed in
Table 2-19 and descriptions of the signal functions are provided in Table
2-20.
Signal names indicate the active state of the signal on the Multibus
interface. If the signal name ends with a slash (/), the signal is
active when LOW; if the signal does not end with a slash, the signal is
active when HIGH.
DC characteristics for the P1 interface on the iSBC 86/14/30 board are
provided in Table 2-21. Tables 2-22 and 2-23 contains the ac
characteristics for the P1 interface when the board is operating as a bus
master and as a bus slave. Each parameter in the ac characteristics
appears on the bus master or bus slave mode timing diagrams shown in
Figure 2-7 and Figure 2-8.
Table 2-19.
Connector P1 Pin Assignments
(COMPONENT SIDE)
PIN* MNEMONIC DESCRIPTION
POWER
SUPPLIES
BUS
CONTROLS
BUS
CONTROLS
AND
ADDRESS
1
3
5
7
9
GND
+5V
+5V
+12V
11
(CIRCUIT SIDE)
PIN* MNEMONIC DESCRIPTION
GND
Signal GND
+5 Vdc
+5 Vdc
+12 Vdc
Reserved
Signal GND
2
GND
4
+5V
+5V
6
+12V
8
10
12 GND
Signal GND
+5 Vdc
+5 Vdc
+12 Vdc
Reserved
Signal GND
13
15
17
19
21
23
BCLK/
BPRN/
BUSY/
MRDC/
IORC/
XACK/
Bus Clock
Bus Priority In
Bus Busy
Mem Read Cmd
I/O Read Cmd
XFER Acknowledge
14 INIT/
16 BPRO/
18 BREQ/
20 MWTC/
22 roWC/
24 INH1/
Initalize
Bus Priority Out
Bus Request
Mem Write Cmd
I/O Write Cmd
Inhibit 1 Disable RAM
25
27
29
31
33
LOCK/
BHEN/
CBRQ/
CCLK/
INTA
Bus Lock
Byte High Enable
Common Bus Request
Constant Clk
Interrupt Ack
26
28 AD10/
30 AD 11/
32 AD12/
34 AD13/
Reserved
2-51
Address
Bus
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-19.
Connector P1 Pin Assignments (continued)
(COMPONENT SIDE)
PIN* MNEMONIC DESCRIPTION
35
37
INTERRUPTS 39
41
INT6/
INT4/
INT2/
INTO/
ADDRESS
43 ADRE/
45 ADRC/
47 ADRA/
49 ADR8/
51 ADR6/
53 ADR4/
55 ADR2
57 ADRO/
DATA
59
61
63
65
67
69
71
73
DATE/
DATC/
DATA!
DAT8/
DAT6/
DAT4/
DAT2/
DATO/
75
GND
77
POWER
SUPPLIES
79
81
83
85
-12V
+5V
+5V
GND
(CIRCUIT SIDE)
PIN* MNEMONIC DESCRIPTION
Paral1e1
Interrupt
Requests
36
38
40
42
Address
Bus
44 ADRF/
46 ADRD/
48 ADRB/
50 ADR9/
52 ADR7/
54 ADR5/
56 ADR3/
58 ADR1/
60
62
64
66
68
70
Data
Bus
72
74
Signal GND
Reserved
-12 Vdc
+5 Vdc
+5 Vdc
Signal Gnd
INT7/
INT5/
INT3/
INTl/
DATF/
DATD/
DATB/
DAT9/
DAT7/
DAT5/
DAT3/
DATl/
76 GND
78
80 -12V
82 +5V
84 +5V
86 GND
2-52
Paral1e1
Interrupt
Requests
Address
Bus
Data
Bus
Signal GND
Reserved
-12 Vdc
+5 Vdc
+5 Vdc
Signal GND
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-20.
Signal
Connector PI Signal Descriptions
Functional Description
ADRO/-ADRF/
ADRIO/-ADR13/
Address. These 20 lines transmit the address of the
memory location or I/O port to be accessed. ADR13/ is the
most significant address bit.
BCLK/
Bus Clock. Used to synchronize the bus contention logic on
all bus masters. When generated by the iSBC 86/14/30
board, BCLK/ has a period of 102.5 nanoseconds (9.83 MHz)
with a 50 percent duty cycle.
BHEN/
Byte High Enable. Used to select the upper byte (bits 8
through F) of a 10-bit word. The signal is functional only
in systems that incorporate 16-bit memory and I/O devices.
BPRN/
Bus Priority In. Indicates to a particular bus master that
no higher priority master is requesting use of the bus.
BPRN/ is synchronized with BCLK/.
BPRO/
Bus Priority Out. In serial (daidy chain) priority
resolution schemes, BPRO/ must be connected to the BPRN/
input of the bus master with the next lower bus priority.
Bus Request. In parallel priority resolution schemes,
BREQ/ indicates that a particular bus master requires
control of the bus for one or more data transfers. BREQ/
is synchronized with BCLK/.
BUSY/
Bus Busy. Indicates that the bus is in use and prevents
all other bus masters from gaining control of the bus.
BUSY/ is synchronized with BCLK/.
CBRQ/
Common Bus Request. Indicates that a bus master wishes
control of the bus but does not presently have control. As
soon as control 0 the bus is obtained, the requesting bus
controller releases the CBRQ/ signal.
CCLK/
Constant Clock. Provides a clock signal of constant
frequency for use by other system modules. When generated
by the iSBC 86/14/30 board, CCLK/ has a period of 102.5
nanoseconds (9.83 MHz) with a 50 percent duty cycle.
DATO/-DATF/
Data. These 16 bidirectional data lines transmit and
receive data to and from the addressed memory location or
I/O port. DATF/ is the most-significant bit.
INRI/
Inhibit RAM. For system application, allows iSBC 86/14/30
board dual port RAM addresses to be overlaid by another RAM
in the system.
2-53
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-20.
Connector Pi Signal Descriptions (continued)
Signal
Functional Description
INIT/
Initialize.
state.
INTA/
Interrupt Acknowledge. Generated by the bus master in
response to an interrupt request. The signal freezes the
interrupt status and requests that an interrupt vector be
placed onto the Multibus data lines.
Resets the entire system to a known internal
IORD/
I/O Read. Indicates that the address of an I/O port is on
the Multibus interface address lines and that the output of
that port is to be read (placed) onto the Multibus
interface data lines.
IOWT/
I/O Write. Indicates that the address of an I/O port is on
the Multibus interface address lines and that the contents
on the Multibus interface data lines are to be accepted by
the addressed port.
Loa/
Lock. When a Multibus master accesses the on-board dual
port RAM and activates the LOCK/ signal, the on-board
resources are locked out of the dual port RAM until the
LOCK/ signal is removed by the Multibus master. LOCK/ can
be enabled onto the Multibus interface to perform the same
function on another dual ported RAM board.
MRDC/
Memory Read Command. Indicates that the address of a
memory loction is on the Multibus interface address lines
and that the contents of that location are to be read
(placed) on the Multibus interface data lines.
MWTC/
Memory Write Command. Indicates that the address of a
memory location is on the Multibus interface address lines
and that the contents on the Multibus interface data lines
are to be written into that location.
Transfer Acknowledge. Indicates to the bus master that the
read or write operation is completed by the generating
device and that valid data is available on the Multibus
interface.
2-54
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-21.
Signals
XACK/
Symbol
Vol
Voh
Vi1
Vih
Ii1
lih
*C1
AD RO/-ADRF /
ADR10/-ADR13/
Vol
Voh
Vil
Vih
Ii1
lih
Ilh
III
*C1
BCLK/
Vol
Voh
Vi1
Vih
Ii1
lih
*C1
BHEN/
Vol
Voh
Vi1
Vih
Ii1
lih
*C1
P1 Connector DC Characteristics
Parameter
Description
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Input Current at
High V
Capacitive Load
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Input Current at
High V
Output Leakage High
Output Leakage Low
Capacitive Load
Output Low voltage
Output High Voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Input Current at
High V
Capacitive Load
Output Low Voltage
Output High voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Input Current at
High V
Capacitive Load
2-55
Test
Conditions
101=16 mA
Ioh=-3 mA
Min
Max
.04
2.0
0.8
2.0
Units
V
V
V
V
Vin=0.4V
-2.2
mA
Vin=2.4V
-1.4
mA
15
pF
101=32 mA
Ioh=3 mA
0.55
2.4
0.8
2.0
V
V
V
V
Vin=0.45V
-0.50
mA
Vin=5.25V
50
uA
Voh=5.25V
Vo1=0.45
-0.50
-0.50
18
mA
mA
101=59.5 mA
2.7
Ioh=-3 mA
0.5
0.8
2.0
pF
V
V
V
V
Vin=0.45V
-0.5
mA
Vin=5.25V
40
uA
15
pF
101=16 mA
Ioh=-2.0 mA 2.4
0.4
0.8
2.0
V
V
V
V
Vin=0.4V
1.6
mA
Vin=2.4V
40
uA
15
pF
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-21.
Signals
BPRN/
PI Connector DC Characteristics (continued)
Symbol
ViI
Vih
IiI
BREQ/
BUSY/, CBRQ/,
INTROUT/
(OPEN COLLECTOR)
DATO/-DATF/
LOCK/
Min
Vol
Voh
*CL
Output Low voltage
Output High voltage
Capacitive Load
101=5.0 rnA
Ioh=-0.4 rnA 2.4
Vol
Voh
*CL
Output Low voltage
Output High voltage
Capacitive Load
101=50 rnA
Ioh=-0.4 rnA 2.4
Vol
ViI
Vih
IiI
101=20 rnA
*Cl
Output Low Voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Input Current at
High V
Capacitive Load
Vol
Voh
*Cl
Output Low voltage
Output High voltage
Ca pac i ti ve Load
101=60 rnA
Ioh=-3 rnA
Vol
Voh
ViI
Vih
IiI
101=32 rnA
Ioh=-5 rnA
Ilh
*Cl
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Output Leakage High
Capaciti ve Load
101
Ioh
*Cl
Output Current Low
Output Current High
Capacitive Load
2-56
Max
0.8
*Cl
Iih
CCLK/
Test
Conditions
Input Low Voltage
Input High voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Input Current at
High V
Capacitive Load
Iih
BPRO/
Parameter
Description
2.0
Units
V
V
Vin=0.4V
-0.5
rnA
Vin=5.25V
50
uA
18
pF
0.45
V
V
pF
15
0.45
10
V
V
pf
0.45
0.4
V
V
V
Vin=0.45V
10.5
rnA
Vin=5.25V
40
uA
20
pF
0.5
V
V
pF
2.4
2.7
15
0.45
2.4
0.80
2.0
V
V
V
V
Vin=0.45V
-0.20
rnA
Voh=5.25V
100
30
uA
32
rnA
rnA
300
pF
-2.0
pF
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-21.
Signals
INH1/
Symbol
ViI
Vih
IiI
Iih
*Cl
INIT/ ,
Vol
(SYSTEM RESET 1 Voh
ViI
Vih
IiI
Iih
*Cl
INTO/-INT7/
ViI
Vih
IiI
INTA/, MRDC/ ,
MWTC/
Parameter
Description
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at Low
Input Current at High
Capaci ti ve Load
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Input Current at
High V
Capacitive Load
Test
Conditions
101=44 mA
OPEN
COLLECTOR
V
V
mA
uA
pF
V
0.8
V
V
Vin=0.4V
-4.2
mA
Vin=2.4V
-1.4
mA
IS
pF
0.8
101=32 mA
Ioh=-S mA
Voh=S.2SV
Vol=0.4SV
Vol
Vol
ViI
Vih
IiI
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Input Current at
High V
Ca paci ti ve Load
101=30 mA
Ioh=-S mA
2-S7
Units
0.4
2.0
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Output Leakage High
Output Leakage Low
Capacitive Load
* Capacitive load values are approximations.
-2.0
SO
18
Vin=O.SV
Vin=2.7V
Vol
Voh
Ilh
III
*Cl
*Cl
Max
0.8
*Cl
Iih
Min
2.0
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at
Low V
Input Current at
High V
Capacitive Load
Iih
IORC/ , IOWC/
PI Connector DC Characteristics (continued)
2.0
V
V
Vin=0.4V
-1.6
mA
Vin=2.4V
40
uA
18
pF
0.4S
V
V
100
-100
IS
uA
uA
0.45
V
V
V
V
2.4
2.4
0.20
2.0
pF
Vin=0.4SV
-2.0
mA
Vin=S.25
1000
uA
25
pF
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-22. PI Connector AC Characteristics
(iSBC· 86/14/30 Board Accessing System Bus)
Min.
Parameter (ns)
tAS
tAM
tDS
tCY
tCMDR
tCMDW
tCSWR
tCSRR
tCSWW
tCSRW
tXACKl
tSAM
tDHR
tDXL
tXKH
tSKD
tSWS
tBS
tDBY
tCBRQ
tCBRQS
tNOD
tDBQ
tDBO
tBCY
tBW
tINIT
Max.
(ns)
85
90
53
125
210
210
400
400
400
400
-208
125
o
200
200
-87
o
o
35
23
o
55
60
35
30
35
40
101
103
35
74
3000
Description
Assress setup time to command
Address hold time from command
Data setup to write CMD
CPU cycle time
Read command width
Write command width
Read-to-write command separation
Read-to-write command separation
Write-to-write command separation
Write-to-read command separation
Command to XACK first sample point
Time between- XACK samples
Read data hold time
Read data setup to XACK
XACK hold time
XACK turn of delay
Bus clock low or high intervals
BPRN to BCLK setup time
BCLK to BUSY delay
BCLK to CBRQ
CBRQ to BCLK setup time
BPRN to BPRO delay
BCKL/ to bus request
BCLK/ to bus priority out
Bus clock period (BCLK)
Bus clock low or high interval
Initialization width
2-58
Remarks
With 1 wait-state
With 1 wait-state
In override mode
In override mode
In override mode
In override mode
In override mode
In override mode
Supplied by system
From CPU board
when terminated
From CPU board
when terminated
After all
voltages have
stabilized
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-23. PI Connector AC Characteristics
(Dual Port RAM Accessed Via System Bus)
Min.
Parameter (ns)
tAS
tDS
tOBD
tACK
tCMD
tAH
tDHW
tDHR
tXKH
Max.
(ns)
50
-200
tACC
tIH
tIPW
tCY
tRD
tDXL
tCS
tIS
NOTES: 1.
2.
3.
4.
877
630
655
0
0
0
0
57
488
50
100
915
500
30
100
50
Description
Address setup to command
Write data setup to command
on-board memory cycle delay
Command to XACK
Command width
Address hold time
Write data hold time
Read data hold time
Acknowledge hold time
Read to data valid
Inhibit hold time
Inhibit pulse width
Cycle time of board
Refresh delay time
Read data setup to XACK
Command separation
Inhibit setup time
No refresh, dual port RAM not busy.
Maximum = tRD + tOBD + tACK.
Maximum access = tACC + tOBD + tRD.
Maximum cycle = tCY + tOBD + tRD.
2-59
Remarks
From address to command
Note 1
No refresh
Notes 1 and 2
Note 1
Acknowledge turnoff
delay
Note 3
Note 4
PREPARATION FOR USE
1
1BCY
I--
--jIBWI-
BCLKI
TRANSFER
REQUEST I
MASTER A
(LOW PRIORITY)
BREal
BPRN/
TRANSFER
REQUEST/
MASTER B
(HIGH PRIORITY)
BREa/
BPRN/
MASTER B
ON BUS
"NOTE: BUS PRIORITY MUST BE RESOLVEO
WITHIN ONE BCLK/ PERIOO.
BUSY/
ADDRESS/
MASTER A
COMMAND/
DRIVER
ENABLE/
ADDRESSI
MASTER B
COMMAND/
DRIVER
ENABLEI
Figure 2-7.
Bus Exchange Timing (Master Mode)
2-60
PREPARATION FOR USE
~--------_--------ICMD-----------------~
~-------------IACK-------------~~
I
r-----+--------------------------r-----r----~
STABLE ADDRESS
ADDRESS
MWTC
XACK
I
IDS
--------~)<:r-----------------------S-T-A-B-L-E-D-A-T-A-----------------------
DATA
DUAL PORT RAM WRITE
STABLE ADDRESS
ADDRESS
MRDC
~-------------IACK--------------~
XACK
~-----------IACC------------~
DATA
INHl
1'"1.._______________________
",
IIPW
-------------------------I·~I
DUAL PORT RAM READ
Figure 2-8.
Bus Exchange Timing (Slave Mode)
2-61
""+
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-31.
MULTIBUS PRIORITY RESOLUTION
The iSBC 86/14/30 board is designed to be a "full master" board on the
Multibus interface. That is, the board is equipped with bus arbitration
logic that can acquire and release control of the Multibus interface. In
order for the board to interact effectively in your system, you must
enable the board priority scheme by configuring the BPRO/ and BPRN/
signals on the Multibus interface.
If the iSBC 86/14/30 board is the only bus master in the system (the only
board capable of controlling the Multibus interface control signals),
install it into the top-most cardcage slot (slot J2 on the iSBC 604/614
cardcage) or into any slot that contains a jumper connecting BPRN/ to
ground.
If there are more bus masters in your system, you must configure a
priority scheme for accessing the shared resources in the system. The
two priority methods available, serial and parallel, are described in the
following paragraphs.
NOTE
If your system includes more than one
bus master, ensure that the BCLK/ and
CCLK/ signals are generated on
theMultibus interface by only one bus
master. All bus masters contain
provisions for disabling the BCLK/ and
CCLK/ signals to the Multibus interface.
2-32.
Serial Priority Resolution
Serial priority resolution is implemented by arranging the board sequence
in the cardcage slots. The top priority board must be installed into
cards Ito J2 (in an iSBC 604/614 Cardcage). The next hghest priority
board must be installed into card slot J3, and card slot J4 contains the
lowest priority board in the system. Due to the propogation delays on
the BPRo/ signal, this priority scheme is limited to containing up to 3
bus master boards. Figure 2-9 shows a serial priority configuration
example in which the iSBC 604/614 cardcage is used and the highest
priority master is installed into cardslot J2.
NOTE
The top priority card slot is the only
one in this priority scheme that
connects the BPRN/ signal to ground on
the backplane.
2-62
PREPARATION FOR USE
If the bus master in slot J2 desires control of the 11ultibus interface, it
drives its BPRO/ output HIGH and inhibits the BPRN/ input to all
lower-priority bus masters. When finished using the Multibus interface,
the J2 bus master pulls its BPRO/ output LOW and gives the J3 bus master
the opportunity to take control fo the Multibus interface. If the J3 bus
master does not desire to control the Multibus interface at this time, it
pulls its BPRO/ output LO\\l· and gives the lowest priority bus master in slot
J4 the opportunity to assume control fo the Multibus interface.
The serial pri.ori.ty scheme can be implemented into a user-designed system
bus if the signal chaining scheme implemented via the iSBC 604/614 Cardcage
jumper configuration shown in Figure 2-9 is adhered to.
HIGHEST
PRIORITY
MASTER
BPRN/
LOWEST
PRIORITY
MASTER
BPRN/
BPRN/
BPRO/
Figure 2-9.
2-33.
Serial Priority Resolution Scheme
Parallel Priority Resolution
A parallel priority resolution scheme, using external logic, allows up to
16 bus masters to acquire and control the Multibus interface. Figure 2-10
illustrates one method of implementing such a scheme for resolving bus
contention in a system containing eight bus masters installed in an iSBC
604/614 Modular Backplane and Cardcage. Notice that the two highest and
two lowest priority bus masters are shown installed in the iSBC 604 Modular
Backplane and Cardcage.
In the scheme shown in Figure 2-10, the priority encoder is a 74148 and the
priority decoder is an Intel 8205. Input connect ins to the priority
encoder determine the bus priority, with input 7 having the highest
priority and input 0 having the lowest priority. Here, the J3 bus master
has the highest priority and the J5 bus master has the lowest priority.
In a parallel priority resolution scheme, the BPRO/ output must be disabled
on all bus masters. On the iSBC 86/14/30 board, disable the BPRO/ output
signal by removing jumper E210-E211. A similar jumper should be removed on
the other bus masters in the system.
2-63
PREPARATION FOR USE
NO 2
PRIORITY
,-0
BPRN/
NO.1
,-0
NO.8
NO.7
PRIORITY
PRIORITY
(HIGHEST)
SPAN!
,-0
PRIORITY
(LOWEST)
---<l BPRN!
BPRN/
BRED/ 0 - -
BREDI
BREa/1
cr---
BREO/
Fr-
BUS
PRIORITY
RESOLVER
Le7
7(}-6 (}---
6
~;~TEERR
INPUTS
(~'
--<:
-<
.--<:
-
Figure 2-10.
2-34.
P E
R N
Ie
P 0
R E
Ie
00
4
00
3
R 0
2
~
I E
R 0
I E
R
R
~
r<'
'~)
4 ~;~T~~
0---
3 0--
OUTPUTS
2C>-1
f--<O
0
Parallel Priority Resolution Scheme
AUXILIARY (P2) INTERFACE SPECIFICATINS
A mating connector can be installed in the iSBC 604/614 Modular Cardcage
and backplane to accomodate auxiliary connector P2 (refer to Figure
1-1). Table 2-2 lists some 60-pin connectors that are compatible; both
solder and wirewrap connector types are listed. Table 2-24 lists the pin
assignments for the P2 connector. Table 2-25 lists the dc
characteristics of the P2 connector signals.
The P2 connector contains only 6 output signals; all other signals are
customer supplied inputs with the exception of the POWERLINE CLOCK signal
supplied by the Intel iSBC 645 Power Supply, if used. The functions of
each signal on the P2 interface are outlined in the following paragraphs.
a.
PFIN/. the power fail interrupt (PFIN/) signal is an externally
generated input signal that can be used to interrupt the 8086-2 CPU
upon power failure.
b.
PFSN/. The power fail sense (PFSN/) signal is an externally
generated input signal indicating to the iSBC 86/14/30 board that the
data in memory (RAM) is still valid after a recovered power failure;
i.e., the battery backup contains a sufficent charge to guarantee
that data integrity was maintained. On the iSBC 86/14/30 board,
PFSN/ is implemented as a general purpose input signal.
2-64
PREPARATION FOR USE
c.
MPRO/. the memory protec (MPRO/) signal is an externally generated
input signal that can be used by the iSBC 86/14/30 board to prevent
inadvertent access to the protected memory during the power down
sequence.
d.
AUX RESET/. The auxiliary reset signal is an externally generated
input signal that can be used to reset the entire system.
e.
POWERLlNE CLOCK. The powerline clock input signal is generally used
in conjunction with the Intel iSBC 645 power supply which supplies a
100 or 120 Hz signal that can be used for real time counting. On the
iSBC 86/14/30 board, the POWERLINE CLOCK signal is implemented as a
general purpose input.
f.
ALE. The address latch enable (ALE) output signal can be used to
monitor the status of the system.
g.
ADR14/ through ADR17/. The upper address I/O signals provide the
highest 4 address bits in a 24-bit addressing system. The signals
are used to access up to 16 megabytes of memory space, when required.
h.
VPP. The EEPROM voltage required to re-program an electrically
eraseable ROM is generated externally and must conform to the
requirements of the chips, as described in the data sheet for each.
2-65
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-24.
PIN
1
3
5
7
9
Auxiliary Connector P2 Pin Assignments
(COMPONENT SIDE)
MNEMONIC
DESCRIPTION
GND
+5V AUX
Ground
+5 volt battery
PFSN/
PFIN/
GND
Power Fail Sense
P Fail Interrupt
Ground
PLC
Power Line Clock
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
49
51
53
55
57
59
ADR16/
ADR14/
NOTES: 1.
2.
Addrss Bus
Address Bus
PIN
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
(CIRCUIT SIDE)
MNEMONIC
DESCRIPTION
GND
+5V AUX
VPP
Ground
+5 volt battery
EEPROM VPP
MPRO/
GND
Memory Protect
Ground
ALE
Bus Master ALE
AUX RESET/ Reset Switch
ADR17/
ADR15/
Address Bus
Address Bus
All odd-numbered pins (1,2,5, etc.) are on component side of
the board. Pin 1 is the left-most pin when viewed from the
component side of the board with the extractors at the top.
Cable connector numbering convention may not agree with board
connector numbering convention.
2-66
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-25.
Signals
ALE
Symbol
Auxiliary Connector P2 DC Characteristics
Test
Conditions
Parameter
Description
Vol
Voh
*Cl
Output Low voltage
Output High voltage
Capacitive Load
Vil
Vih
IiI
Iih
*Cl
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at Low V
Input Current at High V
Capactive Load
ViI
Vih
IiI
Iih
*Cl
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at Low V
Input current at High V
Capacitive Load
AUX RESET/ ViI
Vih
IiI
Iih
*Cl
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at Low V
Input Current at High V
Capacitive Load
PFIN/
MPRO/
ADR14/ADR17/
PLC
EEVPP
Min.
101=8 rnA
Ioh=-1.0 rnA 2.4
Units
0.45
V
V
pF
20
0.8
2.4
Vin=0.4V
Vin=2.4V
Vin=0.45V
Vin=5.25V
rnA
0.80
V
V
-6.0
250
15
rnA
uA
0.8
2.6
-0.25
10
10
Vin=0.45V
Vin=5.25V
0.8
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at Low V
Input Current at High V
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Output Low Current
Output High Current
ViI
Vih
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
2.0
Vil
Vih
Ipp
Ipp
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Write Input Current
Standby Input Current
23.(
30
12
2.7
Vin=0.4V
Vin=2.7V
101=24 rnA
-0.8
40
0.5
2.4
23.2
23.2
Vin=22 V
Vin=22 V
* Capacitance load values are approximations.
V
V
-0.4
20
20
2.0
ViI
Vih
IiI
Iih
Vol
Voh
101
Ioh
2-67
Max.
u
pF
pF
V
V
rnA
uA
uF
V
V
rnA
uA
V
V
rnA
rnA
0.8
V
V
21.0
V
V
rnA
rnA
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-35.
PARALLEL I/O INTERFACE
The parallel I/O interface at the Jl connector on the iSBC 86/14/30 board
is controlled by the 8255A PPI device (U35). Table 2-26 provides a list
of the parallel I/O interface pin assignments and Table 2-27 provides a
listing of the dc characteristics for the signals found on the Jl
connector. The pin assignments on conector Jl can be readily modified
via the jumpers included on the iSBC 86/14/30 board; refer to Table 2-4
for more information.
Table 2-26.
Pin Number
1
3
5
7
9
Parallel I/O Connector Jl Pin Assignments
Function
Pin Number
Function
13
15
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
CA,
CA,
CA,
CA,
CA,
CA,
CA,
CA,
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
CC,
CC,
CC,
CC,
CC,
CC,
CC,
CC,
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
3
2
1
0
4
5
6
7
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
CE,
CE,
CE,
CE,
CE,
CE,
CE,
CE,
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
49
Ground
50
EXT INTRO/or +5
volts if required.
11
NOTES: Reference Figure 2-12 for important pin numbering considerations.
Cable and connector pin numbering conventions may not agree with
the pin numbering conventions used on the board edge connectors.
2-68
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-27.
Signals
Parallel I/O Connector Jl DC Characteristics
Test
Conditions
Parameter
Description
Symbol
Min.
Max.
Units
0.45
V
V
V
V
Port C8
Vol
Bidirectional Voh
Drivers
ViI
Vih
IiI
*Cl
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at Low V
Capacitive Load
101=31
Ioh=-9.2 rnA 2.4
8255A
Driver/
Receiver
Vol
Voh
ViI
Vih
IiI
Iih
*Cl
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at Low V
Input Current at High V
Capacitive Load
101=31 mA
Ioh=9.2 rnA
ViI
Vih
IiI
lih
*CI
Input Low Voltage
Input High Voltage
Input Current at Low V Vin=0.4V
Input Current at High V Vin=27
Capacitive Load
EXT INTRO/
0.9
2.0
-5.25
18
Vin=0.45V
0.45
2.4
2.0
Vin=0.45
Vin=5.0
pF
0.8
V
V
2.0
-1.0
-0.8
30
Table 2-28 contains part numbers of types of cable that may be used to
interface the parallel port I/O to a user application. Any functional
and electrical equivalent may be substituted. Compatible Jl connector
information was presented earlier in the text in Table 2-2. To obtain
maximum reliability, limit the length of the parallel I/O cable to 3
meters (about 10 feet) or less.
Parallel I/O Cabling Information
Cable Type
Mfr
Part Number
Flat Cable, 50 conductor, w/o ground plane
3M
3M 3306-50
Flat Cable, 50 conductor, with ground plane
3M
3M 3306-50
Woven cable, 25-pair
3M
3M 3321-25
2-69
V
V
V
V
uA
Parallel I/O Cabling Requirements
Table 2-28.
pF
18
*Capacitive load values are approximations.
2-36.
rnA
rnA
uA
pF
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-37.
SERIAL I/O INTERFACE
The serial I/O interfaces on the iSBC 86/14/30 board at connector J2
provide EIA RS232C standard interfacing capability. Connector J2 is a
13/26-pin connector providing an RS232C-compatible interface. The ac
characteristics of the serial interface at connector J2 are contained in
Table 2-29. Table 2-29 also lists the corresponding RS232C connector pin
numbers at which the same signal may be located. Notice that the J2
connector may be used only as an RS232C interface.
2-38.
Serial I/O Cabling Requirements
The iSBC 86/14/30 board requires a serial I/O cable and connectors for
the J2 connector. The configuration of the cable and connectors depends
on the type of interfacing application, however, an RS232C interface
requires a 26-pin edge connector, a 25-conductor flat cable, and a 25-pin
RS232C connector.
Table 2-30 lists some recommended types of cables and connectors that
maybe used for interfacing the serial I/O signals. Any functionally and
electrically equivalent parts may be substituted.
When assembling the RS232C interface cable, ensure that pin-26 of the
edge connector is not connected to a conductor in the flat cable, and
ensure that pin 2 of the edge connector is connected to pin 1 of the J2
connector on the iSBC 86/14/30 board. Refer to Figure 2-11 for RS232C
interface cabling diagram; refer to Figure 2-12 for edge connector pin
numbering information.
o
CONNECTOR PIN 1
Figure 2-11.
Serial Cabling Diagram
2-70
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-29.
Pin
J2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Note:
Number
RS232C
14
1
15
2
16
3
17
4
18
5
19
6
20
7
21
8
22
9
23
10
24
11
25
12
N/C
13
Serial I/O Connector J2 Pin Assignments
RS232C Function
PCI Function
Not Used
Ground
Not Used
Transmit Data
Sec Receive
Receive Data
External Clock
Request To Send
Not Used
Clear To Send
Not Used
Data Set Ready
Data Terminal Ready
Ground
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
-12 volts DC
Not Used
Tran Sig E1e Timing
+12 volts DC
+5 volts DC
Not Used
Ground
Secondary CTS
Not Used
Ground
Not Used
RxD input
Selectable
TxD Output
TxC/RxC Input
CTS/ Input
Not Used
RTS/ Output
Not Used
DSR/ Input
DTR/ Output
Ground
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Connected
Not Used
Selectable
Not Connected
Not Connected
Not Used
Not Connected
Selectable
Refer to Figure 2-12 for a description of connector pin numbering
conventions. Board edge connector pin numbering and connector
pin numbering conventions may not agree.
2-71
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-30.
Configuration
Model
RS232C Cable Types
Edge Connector
Cable
Connector
RS232C
DTE
26-pin 3 ,
3M-3462-0001
3M 2-3349/25
25-pin4 ,
3M-3482-1000
RS232C
DCE
26-pin 3 ,
3M-3462-0001
3ML 3349/25
25-pin 4 ,
3M-3483-1000
Notes: 1. DTE - Data Terminal Equipment mode (male connector).
DCE - Data Set Equipment mode (female connector).
2. Cable is tapered at one end to fit the 3M-3462 connector.
3. Pin 26 of the edge connector is not connected tD the flat
cable.
4. May be used with the cable housing 3M-3485-1000.
2-39.
Current Loop (TTY)
Inte~face
To adapt your iSBC 8b/14/30 board to a 20 mA current loop (TTY)
interface, optional jumper connections are required.
CAUTION
Current limiting is not provided for
these outputs. If improperly
connected, damage to the board and
power supply could result.
2-72
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-40.
CONNECTOR PIN NUMBERING INFORMATION
The serial and parallel I/O connectors on the iSBC 86/14/30 boards are
assigned pin numbers that may not conform to pin numbering standards used
by commerical connector manufacturers. Figure 2-12 shows the differences
between the Intel pin numbering conventions used on the printed circuit
board edge connectors and other numbering conventions.
2
4
8
10
11
12
14
13
16
15
18
17
20
19
22
21
24
23
26
25
COMMERCIAL VENDOR PIN
NUMBERING CONVENTION
INTEL PIN NUMBERING CONVENTION
Figure 2-12.
2-41.
Pin Numbering Conventions
iSBX BUS INTERFACE
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains two iSBX (single board expansion) bus
connectors (J3 and J4) that allow on-board expansion using iSBX
Multimodule boards. The connectors are situated on the iSBC 86/14/30
board so as to allow installation of either 2 single-wide Multimodule
boards, one single- and one double-wide Multimodule board, or one
double-wide Multimodule board. The connectors accommodate either 8-bit
or 16-bit Multimodule boards.
2-73
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-31 provides the iSBX bus connector pin assignments, and Table
2-32 provides descriptions of iSBX bus signals as found on both J3 and
J4. Each of the connectors has identical pin assignments, functions, and
physical layout.
Table 2-31.
Pin
Mnemonic
1
3
5
7
9
+12V
GND
MRESET
MA2
MAl
MAO
IOWRT/
IORD/
GND
MD7
MD6
MD5
MD4
MD3
MD2
MD1
MDO
GND
MDE
MDC
MDA
MD8
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
iSBX M Bus Connector J3 and J4 Pin Assignments
Description
+12 volts
Ground
Module Reset
Address Bit 2
Address Bit 1
Address Bit 0
I/O Write Command
I/O Read Command
Ground
Module Data Bit 7
Module Data Bit 6
Module Data Bit 5
Module Data Bit 4
Module Data Bit 3
Module Data Bit 2
Module Data Bit 1
Module Data Bit 0
Ground
Module Data Bit E
Module Data Bit C
Module Data Bit A
Module Data Bit 8
Pin
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
2-74
Mnemonic
-12V
+5V
MCLK
MPST/
MINTR1
MINTRO
MWAIT/
+5V
MCS1/
MCSO/
OPT1
OPTO
+5V
MDF
MDD
MDB
MD9
Description
-12 volts
+5 volts
Module Clock
Module Present
Reserved
Module Interrupt 1
Module Interrupt 2
Wait-state Request
+5 volts
Module Chip Select 1
Module Chip Select 0
Reserved
Reserved
Option Line 1
Option Line 0
Reserved
Reserved
+5 volts
Module Data Bit F
Module Data Bit D
Module Data Bit B
Module Data Bit 9
PREPARATION FOR USE
Table 2-32.
Signal
IORD/
IOWT/
RESET
MCSO/
MCS1/
A1,A2,A3
MPST/
MINTRO,
MINTR1
MWAIT/
MCLK
OPTO,OPT1
MDO-MDF
iSBX· Bus Signal Descriptions
Description
Multimodule READ command. Commands the Multimodule board
to perform the READ operation.
Multimodule WRITE command. Commands the Multimodule board
to perform the WRITE operation.
Multimodule RESET signal. Initializes the Multimodule
board to a known internal state.
Multimodule chip select. Selects even I/O addresses from
80 to 8FH for either 8-bit or 16-bit devices on the J4
Multimodule connector and even I/O addresses from AO to AFH
for either 8-bit or 16-bit devices on the J3 Multimodule
connector.
Chip select. Selects even I/O addresses from 90 to 9F (for
8-bit devices only) on the J4 Multimodule connector,
selects odd I/O addaresses from 80 to 8FH (for a 16-bit
device) on the J4 Multimodule connector, selects even I/O
addresses from 80 to 8FH (for an 8-bit device) on the J3
Multimodule connector, and selects odd I/O addresses from
AO to AFH (for a 16-bit device) on the J3 Multimodule
connector.
Least three bits of the I/O address. The least significant
address bit (ABO) is not supplied to the iSBX connectors,
and thus installed modules respond to even-numbered I/O
ports. Used in conjunction with the chip select and
command lines.
Multimodule board present indicator. Informs the iSBC
86/14/30 board that a Multimodule board(s) is installed.
Two interrupt request lines from the Multimodule boards to
the iSBC 86/14/30 board interrupt matrix.
Multimodule wait-state request to the CPU. Causes iSBC
86/14/30 board to execute wait states until the Multimodule
board is ready to respond.
9.22 MHz timing reference from the iSBC 86/14/30 board for
the Multimodule board.
Optional use lines. May be used for additional interrupt
request lines.
16 bidirectional data lines.
2-75
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-42.
POWER FAIL BATTERY BACKUP PROVISIONS
In an optional mode, the iSBC 86/14/30 board may be configured for
battery backup operation. This means you may connect a dc battery to the
board to perserve mamory during an ac power failure. In order for the
battery backup scheme to function, your power supply must provide the
following signals:
a.
PFIN/
Power Fail Interrupt. Asserted at least 8 milliseconds
before dc voltages are lost.
b.
MPRO/
Memory Protect. Asserted at least 50 microseconds before
dc voltages are lost.
c.
PFSN/
Power Fail Sense. The output of an external, battery
powered latch which indicates a power failure has
occurred.
To implement a typical battery backup scheme on the iSBC 86/14/30 board,
the following connections are required:
a.
Connect +5 Volt battery positive leads to auxiliary connector
pins P2-3 and P2-4.
b.
Connect battery return leads to auxiliary connector pins P2-1,
P2-2, and P2-22.
c.
Remove jumper connections E114-E115 and E277-E278.
d.
Connect the power supply PFIN/ line to auxiliary connector P2-19.
e.
Remove interrupt jumper E144-E145 and install jumper E145-E168.
This routes the PFIN/ input to the NMI input on the 8086-2 CPU.
f.
Ensure that the NMI signal is not masked by programming a 1 into
the Status Register, bit 2.
g.
Connect the power supply MPRO/ line to auxiliary connector P2-20.
h.
Connect the PFSN/ line to auxiliary connector P2-17. PFSN/ is
the output of an external, battery powered latch which indicates
that a power failure has occurred.
In this typical battery backup configuration, if a power failure occurs,
the power supply asserts PFIN/, which in turn initiates the NMI
interrupt. The interrupt request causes the 8086-2 CPU to store the
contents of the various internal registers into RAM, and the interrupt
software stores any other information that must be saved. When the MPRO/
signal is asserted, all accesses to the RAM are disabled. When the power
is restored, the PFSN/ signal indicates that a power failure has
occurred. Your power-on routine could then read the contents of RAM
before executing, thereby minimizing data loss.
2-76
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-43.
iSBC MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
The following paragraphs describe the procedures for installing iSBC
Multimodule boards onto the iSBC 86/14/30 board. The iSBC 86/14 board
accepts the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board, and the iSBC 303
Parity Generator/Checker Multimodule Board. The iSBC 86/30 board accepts
the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board. Both accept the iSBC 337
Numeric Data Processor.
More information on the iSBC 300A, iSBC 303, and iSBC 304 Multimodule
boards is contained in Appendices A, B, and C of this manual. Included
are photographs of the boards, specifications for the boards, schematic
diagrams, parts lists, and parts location diagrams.
2-44.
iSBC 300A RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD
The iSBC 86/14 board is shipped with 32k bytes of RAM in place (in
locations U75 through U82 and U98 through U104). Sixteen Intel 2118
devices (16k by 1-bit) are installed when the board is configured as
shipped. To expand the iSBC 86/14 board memory capacity to 64k bytes,
install the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board. Appendix A
provides more information on the installation of an iSBC 300A RAM
Expansion Multimodule Board.
2-45.
iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board
NOTE
The iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule
Board is compatible with only the
iSBC 86/30 board.
The iSBC 86/30 board is shipped with 128k bytes of RAM (in locations U75
through U82 and U98 through U104). The iSBC 86/30 board contains sixteen
Intel 2164 devices (64k by 1-bit capacity). To expand total on-board
memory to 256k bytes, install the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule
board onto the iSBC 86/30 board. Appendix B at the end of this text
provides more information on the installation of an iSBC 304 RAM
Expansion Multimodule Board.
2-77
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-46.
iSBC 337
Nume~ic
Data Processor
The iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor is a high-speed, floating-point math
board which allows a quick and easy upgrade to floating-point math for
the iSBC 86/14/30 board.
The iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor is designed to be mounted in the
existing 8086-2 CPU machine socket (U48). Refer to the iSBC 337 NUMERIC
DATA PROCESSOR BOARD HARDWARE REFERENCE MANUAL, Order Number 142887, for
more information on the board. The following steps describe the method
of installing the iSBC 337 board onto the iSBC 86/14/30 board.
1.
Unpack the iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor.
2.
Inspect the iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor for damage. If
damage exists, follow the instructions for repairs in Section 5
of this manual.
3.
Turn system power off.
4.
Remove the iSBC 86/14/30 board from the backplane and place it on
a soft surface (preferably a piece of foam), component side up.
S.
Remove the 8086-2 CPU from socket U48.
6.
Insert the iSBC 337 board mating pins into socket U48 and the
other mating pin (P2) into the jack (JS) on the iSBC 86/14/30
board. Ensure that pin 1 of the iSBC 337 board is aligned with
pin 1 of socket U48.
7.
After ensuring the seating is firm, insert the previously removed
processor into the socket pins of the iSBC 337 board. Ensure
that pin 1 of the processor is aligned with pin 1 of the socket.
2-47.
iSBC 303 Parity Generator/Checker Multimodule Board Installation
The iSBC 86/14 board accepts an iSBC 303 Parity Generatory/Checker
Multimodule Board; the iSBC 86/30 board does not. The installation
procedure is contained in the manual for the iSBC 303 board, contained in
this manual as Appendix C. No jumper configuration is required, other
than the interrupt priority level configuration. The iSBC 303 board is
installed over the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board if both are
required in the configuration.
2-48.
iSBX MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
The iSBC 86/14/30 board provides two iSBX Multimodule connectors (J3 and
J4). When an iSBX Multimodule board is installed, the iSBC 86/14/30
board's power requirement will increase by the amount specified in the
iSBX Multimodule board manual. Install the Multimodule boards as follows:
2-78
PREPARATION FOR USE
1.
With a nylon 1/4-inch x 6/32 screw, secure the 1/2 inch spacer
(Figure 2-13) to the iSBC 86/14/30 board in the mounting hole for
the Multimodule board being installed (refer to Figure 2-14) for
hole location). If installing a double-wide Multimodule board
onto the iSBC 86/14/30 board, mount 2 spacers as shown in Figure
2-13.
2.
Locate pin 1 on the iSBX bus connector (P1) and align it with pin
1 of the iSBX connector on the iSBC 86/14/30 board that the
Multimodule board is to mount on.
3.
Align the Multimodule board mounting hole with the spacer(s) on
the iSBC 86/14/30 board.
4.
Gently press the two boards together until the connector seats.
5.
Secure the Multimodule board to the top of the spacer with the
other 1/4-inch x 6/32 nylon screw. (Refer to Figure 2-13).
~
I
E::.3
~=~
MULTIMODULE'M BOARD
E_~~
1/2" THREADED NYLON SPACER
c...-_-""
c.=:;::J
l
"-,,
c_"
t::.:1
I--:...~
MICROCOMPUTER BOARD
"-.rJ
1/4" x 6/32 NYLON SCREW
Figure 2-13.
Spacer Installation Technique
2-79
PREPARATION FOR USE
MUL TIMODULE
FASTENING HOLES (5)
Figure 2-14.
2-49.
iSBX- Multimodule- Board Orientation
iRMX 86 SYSTEM SOFTWARE
The iSBC 86/14/30 board is compatible with Intel's iRMX 86 Real-Time
Multitasking Operating System. For more information about iRMX 86
features and capabilities, contact your local intel Field Applications
Engineer or Sales Office.
2-80
PREPARATION FOR USE
2-50.
FINAL INSTALLATION
In an iSBC single board computer based system, install the iSBC 86/14/30
board in any card slot that has not been wired for a dedicated function.
In an Intellec System, install the iSBC 86/14/30 board in any slot except
slot 1 or 2. Ensure that auxiliary edge connector P2 (if used) is
correctly installed. Attach the appropriate cable assemblies to parallel
and serial connectors J1 and J2 and install any required Multimodule
boards and their interfacing connectors at Multimodule connectors J3 and
J4.
CAUTION
Always turn off the computer system
power supply before installing or
removing the iSBC 86/14/30 board and
before installing or removing interface
cables. Failure to take these
precautions can result in damage to the
iSBC 86/14/30 board.
2-81
CHAPTER 3.
\
3-1.
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
INTRODUCTION
The Intel iSBC 86/14/30 Single board computer contains several
programmable devices, including an 8255A Programmable Peripheral
Interface, an 8251A Programmable Communications Interface (PCI), an
8253-5 Programmable Interrupt Timer, and an 8259A Programmable Interrupt
Controller. This chapter provides the necessary programming information
for the devices and provides typical programming examples for each.
Memory and I/O port addresses are provided in table form.
3-2.
MEMORY ADDRESSING
The addresses used by the local CPU in accessing the EPROM and the dual
port RAM are referred to in the text as local addresses, and those used
by the Multibus devices in accessing the dual port RAM are referred to as
Multibus addresses (of dual port RAM). The relationship between the
addresses is listed in Tables 3-1 and 3-2 and described in the text.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board provides you with the ability to relocate the
on-board RAM and EPROM to anyone of 16 megabytes of system memory, with
some limitations. In order for the dual port RAM to be accessible by
both a local and an off-board processor, the dual port RAM must be placed
into Multibus addresses ranging between xFOOOOH and x3FFFFH (86/30 with
maximum EPROM and RAM) or between xFOOOOH and xOFFFFH (86/14 with maximum
EPROM and RAM).
3-3.
iSBC 86/14 BOARD MEMORY ADDRESSING
As shipped, the iSBC 86/14 board accommodates up to 32k bytes of RAM and
up to 64k bytes of EPROM. By installing an iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule Board, the on-board RAM capacity can be doubled. Table 3-lA
provides the memory address ranges for various EPROM and RAM
configurations of the iSBC 86/14 board, including a configuration with
the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board.
Table 3-1A shows that the Multibus address range for
from xFOOOOH to xFFFFFH and the local address always
highest possible address (xFFFFFH) regardless of the
The factory default condition is for installation of
providing memory from xFEOOOH through xFFFFFH.
3-1
accessing EPROM is
ends with the
size of the memory.
four 2716 devices
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
iSBC· 86/14 Board Memory Map
Table 3-1A.
System CPU
Access Address
On-board CPU
Access Address
Function
xFFFFFH
xFFFFFH
Highest on-board ROM/EPROM address
xFEOOOH
xFEOOOH
Lowest EPROM address with 2716 devices
xFCOOOH
xFCOOOH
Lowest EPROM address with 2732 devices
xF8000H
xF8000H
Lowest EPROM address with 2764 devices
xFOOOOH
xFOOOOH
Lowest EPROM address with 27128 devices.
Selected Megabyte
of System Addresses
Dual Port Location
(As-shipped)
System memory space
Local RAM
Addresses
FFFFH
Highest RAM address with iSBC 300A board,
and highest dual port RAM address with
iSBC 300A board installed.
COOOH
Lowest Dual Port RAM address with iSCB
300A board and 16k bytes of on-board Dual
Port RAM selected.
8000H
Lowest Dual Port RAM address with iSBC
300A board and 32k bytes of on-board Dual
Port RAM selected.
7FFFH
Highest RAM address without iSBC 300A
board.
6000H
Lowest Dual Port address with 8k bytes of
dual port RAM on-board.
4000H
Lowest Dual Port address with 12k bytes of
dual port RAM on-board; also the lowest
Dual Port RAM address with iSBC 300A
board and 48k bytes of on-board Dual Port
RAM selected.
2000H
Lowest Dual Port address with 16k bytes of
dual port RAM on-board.
OOOOH
Lowest Dual Port address with 32k bytes of
dual port RAM on-board; also the lowest
Dual Port RAM address with iSBC 300A
board and 64k bytes of on-board Dual Port
RAM selected.
8K
8K
8K
8k
3-2
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
The as-shipped configuration of the iSBC 86/14 board includes dual port
RAM at local CPU addresses x07FFFH through xOOOOOH. Of the 32k bytes of
RAM, you can selectively assign the memory space to be dual port RAM. As
Table 3-1A shows, the Multibus address of the dual port RAM may be
selected as required for the application. The default configuration of
Multibus address for the dual port RAM places the 32k bytes of memory at
Multibus addresses x9FFFFH through x98000H. User configuration of
jumpers as described in paragraph 2-13 allows moving of the dual port RAM
to another Multibus address.
3-4.
iSBC 86/30 BOARD MEMORY ADDRESSING
As shipped, the iSBC 86/30 board accommodates up to 128k bytes of RAM and
up to 64k bytes of EPROM. By installing an iSBC 304 RAM Expansion
Multimodule Board, the on-board RAM capacity can be doubled. Table 3-1B
provides the memory address ranges for various EPROM and RAM
configurations of the iSBC 86/30 board, including a configuration with
the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board.
Table 3-1B shows that the Multibus address range for
from xFOOOOH to xFFFFFH and the local address always
highest possible address (xFFFFFH) regardless of the
The factory default condition is for installation of
providing memory from OFEOOOH through xFFFFFH.
accessing EPROM is
ends with the
size of the memory.
four 2716 devices
The as-shipped configuration of the iSBC 86/30 board includes dual port
RAM at local CPU addresses x1FFFFH through xOOOOOH. Of the 128k bytes of
RAM, you can selectively assign the memory space to be dual port RAM. As
Table 3-lB shows, the Multibus address of the dual port RAM may be
selected as required for the application. The default configuration of
Multibus address for the dual port RAM places the 128k bytes of memory at
Multibus addresses xBFFFFH through xAOOOOH. User configuration of
jumpers as described in paragraph 2-14 allows moving of the dual port RAM
to another Multibus address.
3-3
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-1B.
iSBC· 86/30 Board Memory
Map
System CPU
Access Address
On-board CPU
Access Address
Function
xFFFFFH
xFFFFFH
Highest on-board ROM/EPROM address
xFEOOOH
xFEOOOH
Lowest EPROM address with 2716 devices
xFCOOOH
xFCOOOH
Lowest EPROM address with 2732 devices
xF8000H
xF8000H
Lowest EPROM address with 2764 devices
xFOOOOH
xFOOOOH
Lowest EPROM address with 27128 devices_
Selected Megabyte
of System Addresses
System memory space
3FFFFH
Highest RAM address with iSBC 304 board,
and highest dual port RAM address with
iSBC 304 board installed_
30000H
Lowest Dual Port RAM address with iSBC
304 board and 64k bytes of on-board Dual
Port RAM selected.
20000H
Lowest Dual Port RAM address with iSBC
304 board and 128k bytes of on-board Dual
Port RAM selected.
1FFFFH
Highest RAM address without iSBC 304
board.
18000H
Lowest Dual Port address with 32k bytes of
dual port RAM on-board.
10000H
Lowest Dual Port address with 64k bytes of
dual port RAM on-board; also the lowest Dual
Port RAM address with iSBC 304 board and
192k bytes of on-board Dual Port RAM
selected.
08000H
Lowest Dual Port address with 96k bytes of
dual port RAM on-board.
OOOOOH
Lowest Dual Port address with 128k bytes
of dual port RAM on-board; also the lowest
Dual Port RAM address with iSBC 304 board
and 256k bytes of on-board Dual Port RAM
selected.
Dual Port
Location
(As-shipped)
Local RAM
Addresses
32K
......- - - - - -.... xOOOOO
32K
32K
32K
3-4
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-2.
RAM Address Range Configuration
Dual Port
RAM
Capacity
Lo cal Addresses
Type of Board Configuration
8k bytes
16k bytes
24k bytes
32k bytes
06000H
04000H
02000H
OOOOOH
to
to
to
to
07FFFH
07FFFH
07FFFH
07FFFH
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
86/14
86/14
86/14
86/14
Board
Board
Board
Board
16k
32k
48k
64k
OCOOOH
08000H
04000H
OOOOOH
to
to
to
to
OFFFFH
OFFFFH
OFFFFH
OFFFFH
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
86/14
86/14
86/14
86/14
Board
Board
Board
Board
32k bytes
64k bytes
96k bytes
128k bytes
18000H
10000H
08000H
OOOOOH
to
to
to
to
1FFFFH
1FFFFH
1FFFFH
1FFFFH
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
86/30
86/30
86/30
86/30
Board
Board
Board
Board
64k bytes
128k bytes
192k bytes
256k bytes
38000H
20000H
18000H
OOOOOH
to
to
to
to
3FFFFH
3FFFFH
3FFFFH
3FFFFH
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
86/30
86/30
86/30
86/30
Board
Board
Board
Board
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
with
with
with
with
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
300A
300A
300A
300A
with
with
with
with
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
iSBC
304
304
304
304
Multimodule
Multimodule
Multimodule
Multimodule
Multimodule
Multimodule
Multimodule
Multimodule
NOTES: The iSBC 86/14 board requires the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule Board; the iSBC 86/30 board requires the iSBC 304 RAM
Expansion Multimodule board.
3-4.
I/O ADDRESSING
The on-board 8086-2 CPU communicates with the programmable devices and
other I/O devices via I/O READ and I/O WRITE commands that are issued to
the I/O port address assigned to that particular device. Each I/O device
is assigned one (and in some cases, more than one) I/O port address
through which data, commands, and status are transferred. Table 3-3
lists all of the legal I/O port addresses for the iSBC 86/14/30 board.
In addition to the programmable devices, the iSBC 86/14/30 board contains
some other devices, such as a status latch and an edge-sensitive
interrupt sensing circuit, that are also assigned I/O port addresses.
3-5
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-3.
I/O Port
Addresses
Device Selected
I/O Port Address List
Function Performed
CO or C4
8259A PIC
Byte Read
Byte Write
Status and Poll
ICWl, OCW2, OCW3
C2 or C4
8259A PIC
Byte Read
Byte Write
OCWl
ICW2, ICW3, ICW4, OCWl
C8
8255A PPI
Read
Write
Port A
Port A
CA
8255A PPI
Read
Write
Port B
Port B
CC
8255A PPI
Read
Write
Port C
Port C
CE
8255A PPI
Read
Write
Control Word
none
DO
8253-5 PIT
Read
Write
Counter 0
Counter 0
D2
8253-5 PIT
Read
Write
Counter 1
Counter 1
D4
8253-5 PIT
Read
Write
Counter 2
Counter 2
D6
8253-5 PIT
Read
Write
Control Word
none
D8 or DC
825lA PCI
Read
Write
Data
Data
DA or DE
825lA PCI
Read
Write
Mode or command Word
Status
Word Read
Word Write
None
Clear Register
.
CO, C2, C4,
or C6
Edge Interrupt
Sense Register
3-6
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-3.
I/O Port
Addresses
C9, CB, CD,
CF ,D1,D3,
D5,D7,D9,
DB,DD,DF
I/O Port Address List (continued)
Device Selected
Function Performed
Status Latch/
Megabyte Reg
Read
Write
none
Load upper 4-bit Address,
Override, NMI mask, Mu1tibus
interrupts, gate control.
80,82,84,
86,88,8A,
8C,8E
iSBX Connector J4
Read/Write Low byte transfer (both
8-bit and 16-bit boards), or
word transfer (16-bit boards
only) • Activates MCSO/ for
Mu1timodu1e boards.
81,83,85,
87,89,8B,
8D,8F
iSBX Connector J4
Read/Write High byte transfer (16-bit
boards only). Activates
MCS1/ for Mu1timodu1e boards.
90,92,94,
96,98,9A,
9C,9E
iSBX Connector J4
Read/Write Byte tranfer (8-bit boards
only) • Activates MCS1/ for
Mu1timodu1e boards.
AO,A2,A4,
A6,A8,AA,
AC,AE
iSBX Connector J3
Read/Write Low byte transfer (both
8-bit and 16-bit boards), or
word tans fer (16-bit boards
only) • Activates MCSO/ for
Mu1timodu1e boards.
A1,A3,A5,
A7,A9,AB,
AD,AF
iSBX Connector J3
Read/Write High byte transfer (16-bit
boards only). Activates
MCS1/ for Mu1timodu1e boards.
BO,B2,B4,
B6,B8,BA,
BC,BE
iSBX Connector J3
Read/Write Byte transfer (8-bit boards
only) • Activates MCS1/ for
Mu1timodu1e boards.
3-7
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
3-5.
8253-5 PIT PROGRAMMING
Two frequencies are input to the 8253-5 PIT (CLKO and CLK2 = 1.23 MHz;
CLK1 = 153.6 KHz). The default (factory connected) and optional jumpers
for selecting the clock inputs to the three counters are listed in Table
2-5. Jumpers allow counters 0 and 1 to provide real time interrupts to
the 8259A PIC.
Before programming the 8253-5 PIT, ascertain the input clock and output
function of each of the counters to be used. These factors are
determined and established by the user during installation.
3-6.
MODE CONTROL WORD AND COUNT
Each counter must be initialized prior to its use.
for each counter consists of two steps:
The initialization
a.
A mode control word (Figure 3-1) is written to the control
register for each individual counter.
b.
A count number is loaded into each counter. The count number is
in one or two 8-bit bytes as determined by the mode control word.
The mode control word (Figure 3-1) does the following:
a.
Selects counter to be loaded.
b.
Selects counter operating mode.
c.
Selects one of the following four counter read/load functions:
(1) Counter latch (for stable read operation).
(2) Read or load most-significant byte only.
(3) Read or load least-significant byte only.
(4) Read or load least-significant byte first, then
most-significant byte.
d.
Sets counter for either binary or BCD count.
The mode control word and the count register bytes for any given counter
must be entered in the following sequence:
a.
Mode control word.
b.
Least-significant count register byte (if programmed by mode
control word).
c.
Most-significant count register byte (if programmed by mode
control word).
3-8
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
II
(BINARY/BCD)
o
Binary Counter (1 6-bltS)
Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) Counter
(4 Decades)
Figure 3-1.
M2
M1
MQ
0
0
X
X
0
0
0
Mode
Mode
Mode
Mode
Mode
Mode
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
(MODE)
0
1
2
3
4
5
Use Mode 1 for
Programmable One Shot
RL 1
RLO
0
0
1
0
Read/Load most significant byte only.
0
1
Read/Load least significant byte only.
1
1
Read/Load least significant byte first.
then most significant byte.
(READ/LOAD)
-
Counter latching operation (refer
paragraph 3-9)
SC1
SCQ
0
0
Select Counter 0
0
1
Select Counter 1
1
0
Select Counter 2
1
1
Illegal
(SELECT COUNTER)
PIT Control Word Format
As long as the preceding procedure is followed for each counter, the chip
can be programmed in any convenient sequence. For example, mode control
words can be loaded first into each of the three counters, followed by
the least-significant byte, most-significant byte, etc. Figure 3-2 shows
the two proramming sequences described previously.
Since all counters in the PIT chip are down counters, the value loaded in
the count registers is decremented. Loading all zeros into a count
register results in a maximum count of 2 16 for binary numbers or 10 4
for BCD numbers.
3-9
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
PROGRAMMING FORMAT
ALTERNATE PROGRAMMING FORMAT
Step
Step
1
Mode Control Word
Counter n
1
Mode Control Word
Counter 0
2
LSB
Count Register Byte
Counter n
2
Mode Control Word
Counter 1
3
MSB
Count Register Byte
Counter n
3
Mode Control Word
Counter 2
Figure 3-2.
4
LSB
Counter Register Byte
Counter 1
5
MSB
Count Register Byte
Counter 1
6
LSB
Count Register Byte
Counter 2
7
MSB
Count Register Byte
Counter 2
8
LSB
Count Register Byte
Counter 0
9
MSB
Count Register Byte
Counter 0
PIT Programming Sequence Examples
When a selected count register is to be loaded, it must be loaded with
the number of bytes programmed in the mode control word. One or two
bytes can be loaded, depending on the appropriate count. These two bytes
can be programmed at any time following the mode control word, as long as
the correct number of bytes is loaded in order.
The count mode selected in the control word controls the counter output.
As shown in Figure 3-1, the PIT chip can operate in any of six modes:
a.
Mode 0: Interrupt on terminal count. In this mode, the counters can
be used for auxiliary functions, such as generating real-time
interrupt intervals. After the count value is loaded into the count
register, the count output goes low and remains low until the
terminal count is reached. The output then goes high until the count
register is reloaded or the mode word is rewritten.
b.
Mode 1: Programmable one-shot. In this mode the output of the
counters will go low on the count following the rising edge off the
gate input. The output will go high on the terninal count. If a new
count value is loaded while the output is low, it will not affect the
duration of the one-shot pulse until the succeeding trigger. The
current count can be read at any time without affecting the one-shot
pulse. The one-shot is retriggerable, hence the output will remain
low for the full count after any rising edge of the gate input.
3-10
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
c.
Mode 2: Rate generator. In this mode, the output of the counters
will be low for one period of the clock input. The period from one
output pulse to the next equals the number of input counts in the
count register. If the count register is reloaded between output
pulses, the present period will not be affected, but the subsequent
period will reflect the new value. The gate input, when low, will
force the output high. When the gate input goes high, the counter
will start from the initial count. Thus, the gate input can be used
to synchronize the counter. When mode 2 is set, the output will
remain high until after the count register is loaded; thus, the count
can be synchronized by software.
d.
Mode 3: Square wave generator. In this mode, the counter output
remains high until one-half of the count value in the count register
has been decremented (for even numbers). The output then goes low
for the other half of the count. If the value in the count register
is odd, the counter output is high for (N+1)/2 counts, and low for
(N-1)/2 counts.
e.
Mode 4: Software triggered strobe. After this mode is set, the
output will be high. When the count is loaded, the counter begins
counting. On terminal count, the output will go low for one input
clock period and then go high again. If the count register is
reloaded between output pulses the present count will not be
affected, but the subsequent period will reflect the new value. The
count will be inhibited while the gate input is low.
f.
Mode 5: Hardware triggered strobe. The counter will start counting
on the rising edge of the gate input and the output will go low for
one clock period when the terminal count is reached. The counter is
retriggerable. The output will not go low until the full count after
the rising edge of the gate input.
Table 3-4 provides a summary of the counter operation versus the gate
inputs. The gate inputs are pulled-up to a high level. These gates may
optionally be controlled by port CC or the status register.
3-11
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-4.
Signal
Status
Modes
0
1
2
3
PIT counter Operation Vs. Gate Inputs
Low
or Going
Low
Disables counting
--
1) Disables counting
2) Sets output
immediately high
5
3-7.
-I) Initiates counting
2) Resets output
after next clock
High
Enables counting
--
Initiates counting
Enables counting
Initiates counting
Enables counting
1) Disables counting
2) Sets output
immediately high
4
Rising
Disables counting
--
-Initiates counting
Enables counting
--
ADDRESSING
As listed in Table 3-3, the PIT uses four I/O addresses. Addresses OODO,
00D2, and 00D4, respectively, are used in loading and reading the count
in counter 0, 1, and 2. Address 00D6 is used in writing the mode control
word to the desired counter.
3-8.
INITIALIZATION
To initialize the PIT chip, perform the following:
a.
Write a mode control word for counter 0 to 00D6. Note that all mode
control words are written to 00D6, since the mode control word must
specify which counter is being programmed. (Refer to Figure 3-1.)
Table 3-5 provides a sample subroutine for writing mode control words
to all three counters.
3-12
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
b.
Assuming the mode control word has selected a 2-byte load, load
least-significant byte of count into counter 0 at OODO. Table 3-6
provides a sample subroutine for loading a 2-byte count value.
c.
Load most-significant byte of count into counter 0 at OODO.
NOTE
Be sure to enter the downcount in two
bytes if the counter was programmed for
a two-byte entry in the mode control
word. Similarly enter the downcount
value in BCD if the counter was so
programmed.
d.
Repeat steps band c for counters 1 and 2.
3-9.
OPERATION
The following paragraphs describe operating procedures for a counter
read, clock frequency/divide ratio selection, and interval timer counter
selection.
3-10.
Counter Read
There are two methods that can be used to read the contents of a
particular counter. The first method involved a simple read of the
desired counter. TIle only requirements with this method is that, in
order to ensure stable count readings, the desired counter must be
inhibited by controlling its gate input.
The second method allows the counter to be read on-the-fly. The
recommended procedure is to use a mode control word to latch the contents
of the count register. This ensures that the count reading is accurate
and stable. The latched value of the count can then be read.
NOTE
If a counter is read on the fly, it is
mandatory to complete the read
procedure. That is, if two bytes were
programmed to the counter, then two
bytes must be read before any other
operations are performed with that
counter.
To read the count of a particular counter, proceed as follows (a typical
counter read subroutine is given in Table 3-7):
3-13
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
a.
Write counter register latch control word (Figure 3-3) to port 00D6.
The control word specifies the desired counter and selects the
counter latching operation.
b.
Perform a read operation of the desired counter (refer to Table 3-3
for counter addresses).
NOTE
Be sure to read one or two bytes,
whichever was specified in the
initialization mode control word. For
two bytes, read in the order specified.
Table 3-5.
Typical PIT Control Word Subroutine
INTTMR INITIALIZES COUNTERS 0,1,2. COUNTERS 0 AND 1 ARE INITIALIZED AS
INTERRUPT TIMERS. COUNTER 2 IS INITIALIZED AS A SQUARE WAVE GENERATOR.
ALL THREE COUNTERS ARE SET UP FOR 16-BIT OPERATION. DESTROYS-AL.
INTTMR:
PUBLIC
INTTMR
MOV
AL,30H
;MODE CONTROL WORD FOR COUNTER 0 Mode O.
OUT
MOV
OD6H,AL
AL,7OR
;MODE CONTROL WORD FOR COUNTER 1 Mode O.
OUT
MOV
OD6H,AL
AL,B6H
;MODE CONTROL WORD FOR COUNTER 2 Mode 1.
OUT
RET
OD6H,AL
END
3-14
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-6.
Typical PIT Counter Value Load Subroutine
LOADO LOADS COUNTER 0 FROM CX, CH IS MSB, CL IS LSB. USES-D,E:
DESTROYS-AL. CX MUST BE LOADED PRIOR TO CALLING THE ROUTINE.
LOADO:
PUBLIC
LOADO
MOV
OUT
MOV
OUT
RET
END
AL,CL
ODOH,AL
AL,CH
ODOH,AL
Table 3-7.
:GET LSB
:GET MSB
Typical PIT Counter Read Subroutine
READ1 READS COUNTER 1 ON-THE-FLY INTO CX, MSB IN CH, LSB IN CL:
DESTROYS-AL,CX.
READ1:
PUBLIC
READ 1
MOV
AL,4OH
OUT
IN
MOV
IN
MOV
RET
OD6H,AL
AL,OD2H
CL,AL
AL,OD2H
CH,AL
jMODE WORD FOR LATCHING COUNTER 1
VALUE
jLSB OF COUNTER
jMSB OF COUNTER
END
3-15
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
ISC1jSCOj
0 j 0 j X
T
L....-_ _
Figure 3-3.
3-11.
IX
j X
j X
I
I
I
Loon't Care
Selects Counter Latching
Operation
Specifies Counter to be Latched
PIT Counter Register Latch Control Word Format
CLOCK FREQUENCY/DIVIDE RATIO SELECTION
The default timer input frequency to counters 0 and 2 is 1.23 MHz.
Counter 1 is 153.6 KHz. The timer input frequency is divided by the
counters to generate TIMER 0 INTR and TIMER 1 INTR.
Each counter must be programmed with a count value N. When count value N
is loaded into a counter, it becomes the clock divisor. To derive the
output frequency (modes 2,3) or time interval (modes 1,4,5) for any given
count, use the following formula:
F
Output frequency
=
N
N
Time interval
=
F
Where N
F
3-12.
= count value
= 1.2288 MHz,
the timer clock frequency (counters 0 and 2)
RATE GENERATOR/INTERVAL TIMER
Table 3-8 shows the maximum and minimum rate generator frequencies and
timer intervals for the counters. The table also provides the maximum
and minimum generator frequencies and time intervals that may be obtained
by connecting two counters in series.
3-16
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-8.
PIT Rate Generator Frequencies and Timer Intervals
Single Timer1
(Counter 0)
Minimum
Rate
18.75 HZ
Generator
(frequency)
Real-Time
Interrupt
Single Timer 2
(Counter 1)
Dual Timer 3
(0 and 1 in Series)
Maximum
Maximum
Minimum
Maximum
Minimum
614.4kHz
2.344Hz
76.8 kHz
0.00029 Hz 307.2 kHz
13 usec
426.67 msec 3.26 usec
1.63 usec 53.3 msec
58.25
minutes
NOTES:
1. Assuming a 1.23 MHz clock input.
2. Assuming a 153.6 KHz clock input.
3. Assuming Counter o has 1.23 MHz clock input and Counter 1 has 153.6
KHz clock input.
3-13.
INTERRUPT TIMER
To program an interval timer for an interrupt on terminal count, program
the appropriate timer for the correct operating mode (mode 0) in the
control word. Then load the 'count value (N), which is derived by:
N = TF
Where:
N
T
F
count value for counter.
desired interrupt time interval in seconds.
= input clock frequency.
Table 3-9 shows the count value (n) required for several time intervals
(T) that can be generated for the counters.
3-17
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-9.
10
100
1
10
50
PIT Time Intervals Vs. Timer Counts
T
N
usec
usec
msec
msec
msec
12
123
1229
12288
61440
*Count Values (N) assume clock is 1.23 MHz.
decimal.
3-14.
Count Values (N) are in
8251A PCI PROGRAMMING
The 8251A Programmable Communications Interface (PCI) converts parallel
output data into virtually any series output data format (including IBM
Bi-Sync) for half-or full-duplex operation. The PCI also converts serial
input data into parallel data format.
Prior to transmitting or receiving data, the PCI must be loaded with a
set of control words. These control words, which define the complete
functional operation of the PCI, must imediately follow a reset (internal
or external). The control words include a Mode instruction and Command
instructions.
3-15.
MODE INSTRUCTION FORMAT
The Mode instruction word defines the general characteristics of the PCI
and must follow a reset operation. Once the Mode instruction word has
been written into the PCI, sync characters or command instructions may be
inserted. The Mode instruction word defines the following:
a.
For Sync Mode:
( 1)
(2)
(3)
(4 )
( 5)
b.
Character length
Parity enable
Even/odd parity generation and check
External sync detect
Single or double character sync
For Async Mode:
(1) Baud rate factor (X16-X64)
( 2) Character length
3-18
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
(3) Parity enable
(4) Even/odd parity generator and check
(5) Number of stop bits
Instruction word and data transmission formats for synchronous and
asynchronous modes are shown in Figures 3-4 through 3-8.
I I I I I
scs
ESD
EP
PFN
L21
L,
I I I
0
0
I
CHARACTER LENGTH
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
5
6
BITS
BITS
7
BITS
BITS
8·
PARITY ENABLE
11 ENABLE)
(0 - DISABLE)
EVEN PARITY GENERATtON/CHE CK
1 EVEN
ODD
0
EXTERNAL SYNC DETECT
1 SYNDET IS AN INPUT
0
SY"JDET IS AN OUTPUT
SINGLE CHARACTER SYNC
SINGLE SYNC CHARACT£ R
DOUBLE SYNC CHARACTER
NOTE IN EXTERNAL SYNC MODE. PROGRAMMING DOUBLE CHARACTER
SYNC WILL AFFECT ONLY THE TI(
Figure 3-4.
PCI Synchronous Mode Instruction Word Format
CPU BYTES (5 8 BITS'CHAR)
r - - - - - - ; I ...
, ----,
OAT A CHARACTf RS
L -_ _ _ _I ....
, _ _ _ _...J
ASSEMBLED SERIAL DATA OUTPUT 1T..01
SYNC
CHAR 1
SYNC
CHAR 2
DATA CH::ACTERS
11·
... - - - -......
RECEIVE FORMAT
SERIAL DATA INPUT IRllDI
SYNC
CHAR 1
SYNC
DATA CHA:RA
...C_T_E_RS_ _---'
CHAR 2
CPU BYTES (5 8 BITS/CHAR)
...------;,
;-1- - - - - ,
DATA CHARACTERS
L-_ _ _ _
...
, --_---'
~I
Figure 3-5.
PCI Synchronous Mode Transmission Format
3-19
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
IS, /
s, /
l
EP /PENll,ll,
B,l B,
I
L
BAUD RAT[ FAcrOH
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
SYNC
(lX)
( 16X)
164XI
MODE
1
CHARACTER LENGTH
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
BITS
6
7
BITS
BITS
8
BITS
PARITY ENABLE
1 ENABLE
0
1
DISABLE
EVEN PARITY GENERATION,'CHE
1 EVEN
0 ODD
NUMBER OF STOP BITS
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
1',
2
BIT
BITS
BITS
INVALID
1
(ONLY EFFECTS TX; RX NEVER
REQUIRES MORE THAN ONE
STOP BIT)
Figure 3-6.
PCI Asynchronous Mode Instruction Word Format
GENERATED
BY8251A
TRANSMITTER OUTPUT
STt!
BITS
L
TXD
f t ~f-.---.:.....-~
START
RXD
DOES NOT APPEAR
- -Ox ON THE OAT A BUS
DO D,
RECEIVER INPUT
DATA;BITS
---
BIT
' - -_
_--L._ _--;
STofL
BITS
PROGRAMMED
CHARACTER
LENGTH
TRANSMISSION FORMAT
CPU BYTE (58 BITS/CHARI
DATA
C~~RACTER
ASSEMBLED SERIAL DATA OUTPUT (TkO)
(lATA CHARACTER
STOO
BITS
~----~----~-4
RECEIVE FORMAT
SERIAL DATA INPUT (RIlOI
sloD
OAT A CHARACH R
L-____~__________~~------~------~---B~'TS
CPU BYTE (58 BITS/CHARI'
r---------~I ~j------~
DATA CHARACTER
'-------41 1-1_ _ _...J
-NOTE
Figure 3-7.
IF CHARACTER LENGTH IS DEFINED AS 56 OR 7
BITS THE UNUSED BITS ARE SET TO ·'ZERO··
PCI Asynchronous Mode Transmission Format
3-20
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
I
D1
D6
EH IIR
I
RTS \
4
ER \SBRK\ RXE \ DTR ITXEN
L
TRANSMIT ENABLf
1
=
enable
o = disable
'----
DATA TERMINAL
READY
"high" ...... 11 force DTR
output to lero
RECEIVE ENABLE
1 " enable
0 disable
SEND BREAK
CHARACTER
1 " forces TXD "low"
o : : normal operation
ERROR RESET
1 = reset error flags
PE. OE. FE
REQUEST TO SEND
"high" will force
Rfs
output to letO
INTERNAL RESET
"hIgh" returns 8251A to
Mode Instruction Format
ENTER HUNT MODE"
1 '" enable search for Sync
Characters
" (HAS NO EFFECT
IN ASVNC M'ODE)
Note: Error Reset must be performed whenever RXEnable
and Enter Hunt are programmed.
Figure 3-8.
3-16.
PCI Command Instruction Word Format
SYNC CHARACTERS
Sync characters are written to the PCI in the synchronous mode only. The
PCI can be programmed for either one or two sync characters; the format
of the sync character is at the option of the programmer.
3-17.
COMMAND INSTRUCTION FORMAT
The Command instruction word shown in Figure 3-8 controls the opertion of
the addressed PCI. A Command instruction must follow the mode and/or
sync words and, once the Command instruction is written, data can be
transmitted or received by the PCI.
3-21
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
It is not necessary for a Command instruction to precede all data
transactions; only those transactions that require a change in the
Command instruction. An example is a change in the enable transmit bit
or enable receive bit. Command instructions can be written to the PCI at
any time after the mode instruction.
After initialization, always read the PCI status and check for the TxRDY
bit prior to writing either data or command words to the PCI. This
ensures that any prior input is not overwritten and lost. Note that
issuing a Command instruction with bit 6 (IR) set will return the PCI to
the Mode instruction format.
3-18.
Reset
To change the Mode instruction word, the PCI must receive a Reset
command. This can be either a hardware reset or a reset generated by bit
6 of the Command Instruction. The next word written to the PCI after a
Reset command is assumed to be a Mode insturction. Similarly, for sync
mode, the next word after a Mode instruction is assumed to be one or more
sync characters. All control words written into the PCI after the mode
instruction (and/or the sync character) are assumed to be Command
instructions.
3-19.
Addressing
The PCI device uses two consecutive pairs of addresses. The lower of the
two addresses in each pair is used to read and write I/O data; the upper
address in each pair is used to write mode and command words and to read
the PCI status (refer to Table 3-10).
Table 3-10.
I/O Address
(hexadecimal)
DA
DB
DA
DB
3-20.
or
or
or
or
DE
DC
DE
DC
PCI Address Assignments
Command
Function
Direction
OUTPUT
OUTPUT
INPUT
INPUT
CONTROL
DATA
STATUS
DATA
CPU
CPU
PCI
PCI
-
PCI
PCI
CPU
CPU
INITIALIZATION
A typical PCI initialization and I/O data sequence is presented in Figure
3-9. The PCI device is initialized in four steps:
3-22
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
a.
Write 80H to the PCI followed by OOH.
known state.
This places the PCI into a
b.
Write 40H to the PCI.
c.
Write Mode instruction word. One function of mode word is to specify
synchronous or asynchronous operation.
d.
If synchronous mode is selected write one or two sync characters as
required.
e.
Write Command Instruction word.
This resets the PCI to Mode instruction format.
To avoid spurious interrupts during PCI initialization, disable the PCI
interrupt. This can be done by either masking the appropriate interrupt
request input at the 8259A PIC or by disabling the 8086-2 microprocessor
interrupts by executing a CLI instruction.
First, reset the PCI device by writing a Command instruction to Port OODA
(or OODE). The Command instruction must have bit 6 set (IR = 1); all
other bits are immaterial.
NOTE
This reset procedure should be used
only if the PCI has been completely
initialized, or the initialization
procedure has reached the point where
the PCI is ready to receive a Command
word. For example, if the reset
command is written when the initialization sequence calls for a sync
character, then subsequent programming
will be in error.
Next write a mode instruction word to the PCI. (See Figures 3-4 through
3-7.) A typical subroutine for writing both Mode and Command
instructions is given in Table 3-11.
3-23
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
ADDRESS
RESET
OOODA
MOOE INSTRUCTION
OOODA
SYNC CHARACTER 1
OOODA
SYNC CHARACTER 2
OOODA
COMMAND INSTRUCTION
00008
DATA I/O'
OOODA
COMMAND INSTRUCTION
00008
I/O DATA
OOODA
COMMAND INSTRUCTION
}
SYNC MODE
ONLY'
*The second sync character is skipped if Mode instruction has
programmed USART to single character internal sync mode.
Both sync characters are skipped if Mode instruction has
programmed USART to async mode.
Figure 3-9.
Typical PCI Initialization and Data I/O Sequence
IMPORTANT: During initialization, the 8251A PCI requires a minimum
recovery time of 6.5 microseconds (16 PCI clock cycles) between
back-to-back writes in order to set up its internal registers. This
recovery time can be satisfied by the CPU performing several dummy
instructions between back-to-back writes to the 8251A to create a minimum
delay of 6.5 microseconds. The following example will create a delay of
approximately 8 microseconds.
TAG:
MOV
OUT
MOV
LOOP
MOV
OUT
AL,04EH
ODAH,AL
CX,1
TAG
AL,037H
ODAH,AL
jPCI MODE WORD
jFIRST PCI WRITE
jDELAY
jDELAY
jPCI COMMAND WORD
jSECOND PCI WRITE
This precaution applies only to the PCI initialization and does not apply
otherwise.
3-24
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-11.
Typical PCI Mode or Command Instruction Subroutine
CMD2 OUTPUTS CONTROL WORD TO USART FROM AL REGISTER. USES-AL, STATO:
DESTROYS-NOTHING. CALLING ROUTINE PASSES CONTROL WORD TO AL BEFORE
CALLING CMD2.
CMD2:
LP:
51INT:
PUBLIC
EXTRN
CMD2
STAT 0
PUSH
PUSHF
CALL
AND
JZ
AX
POPF
POP
OUT
RET
STATO
AL,l
LP
j CHECK TXRDY.
jTXRDY MUST BE TRUE TO ENSURE
THAT PREVIOUS DATA IS NOT
DESTROYED.
AX
ODAH,AL
jENTER HERE FOR INITIALIZATION
END
Table 3-12 shows a typical PCI Data Character Read Subroutine.
3-13 shows a typical PCI Data Character Write Subroutine.
Table 3-12.
Table
Typical PCI Data Character Read Subroutine
RXl READS DATA CHARACTER FROM USART AND RETURNS DATA IN AL REGISTER.
USES-STATOj DESTROYS-AL, FLAGS.
RXl:
RXAl:
PUBLIC
EXTRN
RXl
STATO
CALL
AND
JZ
STATO
AL,2
RXl
; CHECK FOR RXRDY TRUE
IN
RET
AL,OD8H
;ENTER HERE IF RXRDY IS TRUE
END
3-25
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-13.
Typical PCI Data Character Write Subroutine
;TX1 WRITES DATA CHARACTER FROM REG AL TO USART.
;USES-AL, STATO: DESTROYS-FLAGS.
;CALLING ROUTINE PUTS DATA INTO AL BEFORE CALLING TX1.
TX1:
TXll:
TXA1:
PUBLIC
EXTRN
TX1
STAT 0
PUSH
CALL
AND
JZ
POP
OUT
RET
AX
STATO
AL,1
TXll
: CHECK FOR TXRDY TRUE
AX
OD8H,AL
;ENTER HERE IF TXRDY IS TRUE
END
The TxRDY
interrupt
the 8259A
TxRDY and
and RxRDY outputs of the PCI are available at the priority
jumper matrix. If, for instance, TxRDY and RxRDY are input to
PICX, the PIC resolves the priority and interrupts the CPU,
RxRDY are also available in the status word.
3-26
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Status Read. The CPU can determine the status of a serial I/O port by
issuing an I/O Read Command to the upper port (OODA or OODE) of the PCI.
The format of the status word is shown in Figure 3-10. A typical status
read subroutine is given in Table 3-14.
01
DSR
I
SYNDET
I
FE
I
DE
I
~E
I
I
HE
RIRDY
I
OVERRUN ERROR
TIll DE IIIV il 1.' whln Ih. C~U dOli
not rlld I chlrlctlr b.fare thl nlll
ani blcamll IVlillbl •. It il rll.t by
tbl ER bit allh. Commlnd inltruction.
DE dOli nat Inhibit op.ration 01 the
1251: hOWIVlr, thl pr.vlously overrun
thuleter II lost.
DC
I
TXRDY
I
L-
Y
TRANSMITTER READY
Indicates USART il rudy 10 Iccept I
dltl chlrlcler or commlnd.
-
RECEIVER READY
Indlcltes USART has received a char·
aeter on lis serial Input and IS rudy
to transler It to the CPU
FRAMING ERROR (ASYNC ONLY)
FE IIlg II lit when. valid stop bit IS not
detected .t end 01 every character. It ,s
IS rnet by ER bit 01 Command instrue·
lion. FE do .. not Inhlb,t ope raton 01
8251
TRANSMITTER EMPTY
Indicates that parallel to stnal
PARITY ERROR
PE flag IS set when a panty error IS
detected It IS roset by ER bit 01 Com·
SYNC DETECT
When set tor Intemal sync detect.
mand Instruction PE does not Inhibit
Indl'
operation 01 8251
cates th.t character sync has been
achlfved and 8251 IS rlldy lor data
DATA SET READY
DSR IS general purpose. Normally
used to lest modem conditions such
JS
Dlta Set Ready.
Figure 3-10.
Table 3-14.
PCI Status Byte Format
Typical PCI Status Read Subroutine
;STATO READS STATUS FROM USART.
;DESTROYS-AL.
STATO:
con·
verter In transmitter IS empty
PUBLIC
STATO
IN
RET
AL,ODEH
;GET STATUS
END
3-27
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
3-21.
8255A PPI PROGRAMMING
The iSBC 86/14/30 board has a total of 24 parallel I/O lines, grouped
into three ports: C8, CA, and CC. All lines exit the board via
connector J1. One 8255A PPI device is used to control all three ports.
Line identification is provided in Table 2-20.
Each of the three parallel I/O ports may be programmed independently.
However, as implemented on the iSBC 86/14/30 board, some lines have
restricted use in certain modes due to the input and output line driver
configuration. The modes allowed on the iSBC 86/14/30 board are listed
in Table 3-15. Notice that each half of port CC may be programmed
independently. These configurations are shown in Table 3-15, along with
configurations for ports C8 and CA.
Default jumpers set the port C8 transceivers to the output (transmit)
mode. Optional jumper connections allow the bus transceivers to be set
to either the input mode or a bit-programmable input-output mode. Refer
to Table 2-15 for complete jumper information.
Ports CA and CC do not have bus transceivers installed at the factory.
Line drivers or terminators can be installed for these ports as described
in paragraph 2-10.
In order to use any of the parallel port lines, the 8255A PPI device must
first be initialized and programmed for the desired mode and direction of
data flow as described in paragraphs 3-24 and 3-25.
Table 3-15.
Parallel Port Configurations
Mode
Mode
Mode
Mode
Mode
Port C8
0, input
0, output (latched)
1, input (strobed)
1, output (latched)
2, bidirectional
Mode
Mode
Mode
Mode
Port CA
0, input
0, output (latched)
1, input (strobed)
1, output (latched)
Port CC*
Mode 0, 8-bit input
Mode 0, 8-bit output (latched)
Mode 0, split (4-bit input, 4-bit output)
*Control mode may depend on mode of other ports; see Table 2-10.
3-28
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
3-22.
CONTROL WORD FORMAT
The control word format shown in Figure 3-11 is used to initialize the
PPI port. Group A (control word bits 3 through 6) defines the operating
mode for Port A and the upper four bits of Port C. Group B (control word
bits 9 through 2) defines the operating mode for Port B and the lower
four bits of Port C. (Refer to Table 3-16 for port identification). Bit
7 of the control word controls the mode set flag. Control words are sent
to port address CE (Table 3-16). There are restrictions associated with
the use of certain ports in modes 1 and 2. Refer to the INTEL COMPONENT
DATA CATALOG for more information.
CONTAOL WORO
I 0, I 0,
0,
I 0·1 0) I 0, I 0, I 0, I
LJ
-
/
CROu' B
\
PORT C (LOWER)
l·IN'uT
O·OunuT
II'CHn B
,.
1~'uT
0- ounuT
MODE SElECTION
MODE 0
,- MODE 1
Q.
/
CROU' A
II'OI'IT C (u"ERJ
, . I~'UT
0* OUnUT
II'OAT A
, . I~'UT
0- DUTIIUT
MODE SElECTlO~
00· MOOE 0
01- MODE'
1X. MODE 1
MOD( SET HAC
1 • ACTIVE
Figure 3-11.
3-23.
PPI Control Word Format
ADDRESSING
The PPI uses four consecutive even addresses (OOCS through OOCE) for data
transfer, obtaining the status of Port C (OOCC), and for port control
(refer to Table 3-16).
3-29
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-16.
Parallel Port I/O Address
8255A Device Port
8255A
8255A
8255A
8255A
3-24.
Eight-Bit I/O Address
(hexadecimal)
C8
CA
CC
CE for I/O write only
Port (A)
Port (B)
Port (C)
Control
INITIALIZATION
To initialize the PPI, write a control word to port OOCE. Refer to
Figure 3-11 and Table 3-17 and assume that the control word is 92
(hexadecimal). The example in Table 3-17 initializes the PPI as follows:
a.
Mode Set Flag active
b.
Port A (00C8) set to Mode 0 Input
c.
Port C (OOCC) upper set to Mode 0 Output
d.
Port B (OOCA) set to Mode 0 Input
e.
Port C (OOCC) lower set to Mode 0, Output.
After RESET each port of the PPI is initialized to Mode 0, Input.
3-25.
OPERATION
The primary considerations in determining how to operate each of the
three I/O ports are:
a.
Choice of operating mode (as defined in Table 3-15);
b.
Direction of data flow (input, output or bidirectional), (see Table
3-15);
c.
Choice of driver/terminator networks.
After the PPI has been initialized, the operation is completed by simply
performing a read or write to the appropriate port.
A typical read subroutine for Port A is given in Table 3-18.
write subroutine for Port C is given in Table 3-19.
3-30
A typical
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-17.
Typical PPI Initialization Subroutine
jINTPAR INITIALIZES PARALLEL PORT MODES.
jDESTROYS-AL.
INTPAR:
PUBLIC
INTPAR
MOV
OUT
RET
AL,92H
OCEH,AL
jMODE WORD TO PPI PORT A&B IN,C OUT
END
Table 3-18.
Typical PPI Port Read Subroutine
jAREAD READS A BYTE FROM PORT A INTO REG AL.
jDESTROYS-AL.
ARE AD
AREAD:
IN
RET
AL,OC8H
jGET BYTE
END
Table 3-19.
Typical PPI Port Write Subroutine
jCOUNT OUTPUTS A BYTE FROM REG AL TO PORT C.
jUSES-AL: DESTROYS-NOTHING.
jTHE CALLING ROUTINE PASSES THE DATA BYTE TO AL BEFORE CALLING COUT.
COUT:
PUBLIC
COUT
OUT
RET
OCCH,AL
jOUTPUT BYTE
END
Single Bit Set/Reset Feature
Any of the eight bits of Port C (board port CC) can be Set or Reset using
a single output instruction (see Figure 3-12). This feature reduces
software requirements in Control-based applications.
3-31
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
When Port C is being used as status/control for Port A or B, Port C I/O
bits and INTE bits can be set or reset by using the Bit Set/Reset
operation. The IBF, OBF and INTR outputs will not be modified by either
a write to Port C or a bit set/reset command.
CONTROL WORD
I I I I I I I I I
D,
D6
Ds
D.
D3
D2
D,
L
I I I
I x
x
Do
x I
I
BIT SET /R ESET
1 = SET
0= RESET
DON'T
CARE
BIT SELECT
o 1 2 3 45 6 7
o 1 o 1 o 1 o 1 Bol
o 0 11 o 0 11 B,l
o 0 o 0 11 11 B2l
BIT SET/RESET FLAG
0= ACTIVE
Figure 3-12.
PPI Port C Bit Set/Reset Control Word Format
Mode Combinations
Table 3-20 summarizes the various mode combinations possible with ports A
and B of the PPI, and indicates how each port C bit can be used. This
table can serve as a useful starting point for selecting your particular
configuration. Once you select the desired mode combination and the port
C bit assignments are made, refer to the jumper configuration table (2-5)
for implementation details.
3-32
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-20.
PPI
Port A
(C8)
Configuration
Number
Parallel I/O Interface Configurations
PPI
Port B
(CA)
CO
1
2
3
4
5
6
14
15
16
17
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
NOTES:
I
0
I/O
B
R
U
-
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
3-26.
O-IN
O-OUT
O-IN
O-IN
O-oUT
O-oUT
I-IN
I-IN
l-oUT
l-oUT
I-IN
I-IN
l-oUT
l-oUT
2-B
2-B
2-B
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
MODE
0-1/0
0-1/0
I-I/O
I-I/O
I-I/O
I-I/O
0-1/0
0-1/0
0-1/0
0-1/0
I-I/O
I-I/O
I-I/O
I-I/O
0-1/0
0-1/0
I-I/O
PPI
Port C
(CC)
Lower
Cl
C2
-R
R
R
R
I
0
I
0
R
R
R
R
U
U
R
--
R
R
R
R
I
0
I
0
R
R
R
R
I
0
R
C3
I/O -I/O
R
R
R
R
I
0
I
0
R
R
R
R
I
0
R
--
C4
PPI
Port C
(CC)
Upper
C5
C6
--
--
I
0
I
0
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
0
I
0
I
R
R
0
I
R
R
I
0
R
R
R
0
I
0
I
R
R
0
I
R
R
I
0
R
R
R
I/O
I/O
0
I
0
I
0
I
R
R
I
0
R
R
R
R
R
C7
---
U
U
U
U
0
I
R
R
I
0
R
R
R
R
R
INPUT
OUTPUT
INPUT OR OUTPUT
BIDIRECTIONAL
Reserved for status control of ports A or B
No unused drivers/terminators available. These bits may be
used, however, to connect to the serial I/O interface or the
Interval Timer.
8259A PIC PROGRAMMING
The 8259A PIC functions as an overall manager in an interrupt-driven
system environment. It accepts requests from the peripheral equipment,
determines which of the incoming requests is of the highest importance
(priority), ascertains whether the incoming request has a higher priority
value than the level currently being serviced, and may issue an interrupt
to the CPU based on this determination.
3-33
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
The on-board master 8259A PIC handles up to eight vectored priority
interrupts and has the capability of expanding the number of priority
interrupts by cascading one or more of its interrupt input lines with
slave 8259A PIC's (refer to paragraph 2-22).
The basic functions of the PIC are to (1) resolve the priority of
interrupts requests, (2) issue a single interrupt request to the CPU
based on that priority, and (3) send the CPU an interrupt type number for
servicing the interrupting device.
3-27.
INTERRUPT PRIORITY MODES
The PIC can be programmed to operate in one or more of the following
modes:
a.
Fully Nested Mode
b.
Special Fully Nested Mode
c.
Automatic Rotating Mode
d.
Specific Rotating Mode
e.
Special Mask Mode
f.
Poll Mode
3-28.
Fully Nested Mode
In this mode, the PIC input signals are assigned a priority from 0
through 7. The PIC operates in this mode unless specifically programmed
otherwise. Interrupt IRO has the highest priority and IR7 has the lowest
priority. When an interrupt is acknowledged, the highest priority
request is available to the CPU. Lower priority interrupts are
inhibited; higher priority interrupts generate an interrupt that is
acknowledged if the CPU has enabled its own interrupt through software.
The End-Of-Interrupt (EOI) command from the CPU is required to reset the
PIC for the next interrupt (unless the Auto-EOI Mode is used).
3-29.
Special Fully Nested Mode
This mode is used only when one or more PICs are slaved to the master
PIC, in which case the priority is conserved within the slave PICs.
The operation in the special fully nested mode is the same as the fully
nested mode except as follows:
3-34
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
a.
When an interrupt from a slave PIC is being serviced, that particular
PIC is not locked out from the master PIC priority logic. That is,
further interrupts of higher priority within this slave PIC will be
recognized and the master PIC will initiate an interrupt to the CPU.
b.
When exiting the interrupt service routine, the software must check to
determine if another interrupt is pending from the same slave PIC.
This is done by sending an End-Of-Interrupt (EOI) command to the slave
PIC and then reading its In-Service (IS) register. If the IS register
is clear (empty), and EOI command is sent to the master PIC. If the IS
register is not clear (interrupt pending), no EOI command should be
sent to the master PIC.
3-30.
Automatic Rotating Mode
In this mode, the interrupt priority rotates. Once an interrupt on a given
input is services, that interrupt assumes the lowest priority. Thus, if
there are a number of simultaneous interrupts, the priority will rotate
among the interrupts in numerical order. For example, if interrupts IR4
and IR6 request service simultaneously, IR4 will receive the highest
priority. After service, the priority rotates so that IR4 has the lowest
priority and IR5 assumes the highest priority. In the worst case, seven
other interrupts are serviced before IR4 again has the highest priority.
Of course, if IR4 is the only request, it is serviced promptly. The
priority shifts when the PIC receives an End-Of-Interrupt (EOI) command.
3-31.
Specific Rotating Mode
In this mode, the software can change interrupt priority by specifying the
bottom priority, which automatically sets the highest priority. For
example, if IR5 is assigned the bottom priority, IR6 assumes the highest
priority. In specific rotating mode, the priority can be rotated by
writing a Specific Rotate at EOI (SEal) command to the PIC. this command
contains the binary code of the interrupt being serviced; that interrupt is
rest as the bottom priority. In addition, the bottom priority interrupt
can be fixed at any time by writing a set priority command to the PIC.
3-32.
Special Mask Mode
In the fully nested mode all Interrupt Register levels of priority equal to
or below the interrupt in service are inhibited. To enable lower priority
interrupts in this situation, the Special Mask Mode must be used.
Working in conjunction with the Interrupt Mask Register (IMR), the special
mask mode enables interrupts from all levels except the level in service.
This is done by masking the level that is inservice and any other unwanted
interrupt levels with OCW1 and then issuing the special mask mode command.
To terminate the special mask mode (see Figure 3-14), OCW3 is written with
ESMM = 1 and SMM = O.
3-35
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
3-33.
Poll Mode
In this mode the CPU internal Interrupt Enable flip-flop is clear
(interrupts disabled) and a software subroutine is used to initiate a Poll
command. In the Poll mode, the addressed PIC treats an I/O Read Command as
an interrupt acknowledge, sets its In-Service flip-flop if there is a
pending interrupt request, and reads the priority level. This mode is
useful if there is a common service routine for several devices.
3-34.
STATUS READ
Interrupt request inputs are handled by the following three internal PIC
registers:
a.
Interrupt Request Register (IRR), which stores all interrupt levels
that are requesting service.
b.
In-Service Register (ISR), which stores all interrupt levels that are
being serviced.
c.
Interrupt Mask Register (IMR), which stores the interrupt request lines
which are masked.
These registers can be read by writing a suitable OCW3 command word and
then performing a read operation. No OCW3 is required for reading the
IMR. There is no need to write an OCW3 before each identical status read
operation.
3-35.
INITIALIZATION COMMAND WORDS
The on-board master PIC and each slave PIC requires a separate
initialization sequence to work in a particular mode. The initialization
sequence requires three Initialization Command Words (ICW's) for a single
PIC system and requires four ICW's for a master PIC with one to eight
slaves. The ICW formats are shown in Figure 3-13.
The first Initialization Command Word (ICWl), which is required in all
modes of operation, consists of the following:
a.
Bits 0 and 4 are both l's and identify the word as ICWI for an 8086-2
CPU operation.
b.
Bit 1 denotes whether or not the PIC is employed in a multiple PIC
configuration. For a single master PIC configuration (no slaves), bit
1 = 1; for a master with one or more slaves, bit 1 = o.
NOTE
Bit 1 = 0 when programming a slave PIC.
3-36
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
ICW'
, - ICW4 NEEDED
2 - NO ICW4 NEEDED
, - SINGLE
o - CASCADE
MODE
CALL ADDRESS INTERVAL
1 - INTERVAL OF 4
o - INTERVAL OF 8
A, - As OF INTERRUPT
VECTOR ADDRESS
(MCS-80 85 MODE ONLY)
ICW2
A,..A. OF INTERRUPT
VECTOR ADDRESS
(MCS80 - 85 MODE)
t,-T3 OF INTERRUPT
VECTOR ADDRESS
(8086 - 8088 MODE)
ICW3 (MASTER DEVICE)
, - IR INPUT HAS A SLAVE
L...--'_-'-_.L...--'_-'-_.L--L_-! 0 - IR INPUT DOES NOT HAVE
A SLAVE
ICW3 (SLAVE DEVICE)
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
1 1 I 0 I 0 I 0 I 0 I 0 1102110, 1100
I
SLAVE 10'
I
o , 2
o , o
3 4 5 6 7
1 o , o 1
0 0
o 0
0 0 0 o , , 1 1
,,
,,
ICW4
A.
07
11 I 0
D.
I
D.
0 I 0
D.
03
D.
0,
Do
ISFNIBU~M.SIAEOIIJPMI
, • 8088 - 8086 MODE
o • MCS-80/86 MODE
, • AUTO E ON
o • NORMAL E ON
~
,
0
• NON BUFFERED MODE
• BUFFERED MODE/SLAVE
1
1
• BUFFERED MODE/MASTER
1 • SPECIAL FULLY NESTED
MODE
O· NOT SPECIAL FULLY
NESTED MODE
NOTE 1: SLAVE 10 IS EQUAL TO THE
CORRESPONDING MASTER R INPUT.
Figure 3-13.
Initialization Command Word (ICW) Formats
3-37
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
c.
Bit 3 establishes whether the interrupts are requested by a positive
true level input or requested by a low-to-high input. This applies
to all input requests handled by the PIC. In other words, if bit 3
0, a low-to-high transition is required to request an interrupt on
any of the eight levels handled by the PIC.
The second Initialization Command Word (ICW2) represents the interrupt
type (identifier) and is required by the 8086-2 CPU during interrupt
processing. The 8086-2 CPU can handle 256 diferent interrupt types.
ICW2 consists of the following:
a.
Bits D3-D7 (T3-T7) represent the five most significant bits of the
interrupt type. These are supplied by the programmer.
b.
Bits DO-D2 represent the interrupt level requesting service. These
bits are provided by the 8259A during interrupt processing and make
up the lower significant bits of interrupt type. These bits should
be programmed as O's when initializing the PIC.
NOTE
The 8086-2 CPU multiplies the vector
byte by four. This value is then used
by the CPU as the vector address.
Table 3-21 lists the interrupt type pointer contents for interrupts
IRO-IR7.
Table 3-21.
Interrupt Type Pointers
Content of Interrupt Vector Byte for iAPX 86 System Mode
Bits
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
DO
IR7
T7
T7
T7
T7
T7
T7
T7
T7
T6
T6
T6
T6
T6
T6
T6
T6
T5
T5
T5
T5
T5
T5
T5
T5
R4
T4
T4
T4
T4
T4
T4
T4
T3
T3
T3
T3
T3
T3
T3
T3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1M
IR5
IR4
IR3
IR2
IR1
IRO
The third Initialization Command Word (ICW3) is required only if bit 1=0
in ICW1, specifying that multiple PIC's are used; i.e., one or more PIC's
are slaved to the on-board master PIC. ICW3 programming can be in one of
two formats: master mode format and slave mode format.
3-38
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
a.
For master mode, the DO-D7 (SO-S7) bits correspond to the IRO-IR7
bits of the master PIC. For example, if a slave PIC is connected to
the master PIC IR3 input, code bit S3=1.
b.
For a slave PIC, the DO-D2 (IDO-ID2) bits identify the master IR line
that the slave PIC is connected to during an interrupt cycle. The'
slave compares its cascade input (generated by the master PCI with
these bits and, if they are equal, the slave releases an interrupt
type pointer upon the reception of the second INTA during interrupt
procesing. For example, if a slave is connected to the master
interrupt line IRS, code bits IDO-ID2=101B.
The fourth Initialization Command Word (ICW4), which is required for all
modes of operation, consists of the following:
cpu.
a.
Bit DO is a 1 to identify that the word is for an 8086-2
b.
Bit D1-(AEO) programs the end-of-interrupt function. Code bit 1=1 if
an EOI is to be automatically executed (hardware). Code bit 1=0 if
an EOI command is to be generated by software before returning from
the service routine.
c.
Bit D2 (M-S) specifies if ICW4 is addressed to a master PIC or a
slave PIC. For example, code bit 2=1 in ICW4 for the master PIC.
bit D3 (BUF) is zero, bit D2 has no function.
d.
If
Bit D3 (BUF) must be 1 (selecting buffered mode).
NOTE
The master PIC in an iSBC 86/14/30
board with or without slaves, must be
operated in the buffered mode.
e.
Bit D4 (SFN) programs the fully nested or special fully nested mode
(refer to paragraphs 3-28 and 3-29).
In summary, three or four ICW's are required to initialize the master and
each slave PIC. Specifically
o
Master PIC - No Slaves
ICW1
ICW2
ICW4
o
Mater PIC - With Slave(s)
ICW1
ICW2
ICW3
ICW4
o
Each Slave PIC
ICW1
ICW2
ICW3
ICW4
3-39
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
OCW3
07
l
0
D,
0,
IESMMJ SMM
1
0
J
1
I
P
I ERIS I RIS
I
READ IN-SERVICE REGISTER
I
D1T
CARE
!
0
1
I
0
1
0
1
1
READ
IR REG
ON NEXT
AD PULSE
READ
ISREG
ON NEXT
AD PULSE
0
NO ACTION
POLLING
A HIGH ENABLES THE NEXT RD PULSE
TO READ THE BCD CODE OF THE HIGHEST lEVEL REQUESTING INTERRUPT.
SPECIAL MASK MODE
I
!
0
0
1
0
0
NQACTION
1
1
1
RESET
SPECIAL
MASK
SET
SPECIAL
MASK
OCW'
D7
I
R
De
D5
D4
ISEO~ EOII
D3
D,
D,
DO
01 T T T I
0
L,
L,
lO
I
BCD lEVEL TO BE RESET
OR PUT INTO LOWEST PRIORITY
a
a
a
0
,
,
5
2
3
4
,
1
0
,
6
a
1
0
0
1
a a
0
1
1
0
0
7
,
,
, ,
l r
.to,*"
o , r,lOr,1 1
r,-
1 0
tt
I*-
~~~
r1-~~
,Q."!",,,£,,
Figure 3-14.
Non-speCific EO!
SpeCific EO! Lo-L2 code 01 IS FF to be reset
Rotate at EOI Automatically
Rotate ,at EOl LG-L2 code of Ime
Sel Rotate A F F
Clear Rotate A FF
Rotate Pflorlty mdependently of EOI
No Operation
Operation Command Word (OCW) Formats
3-40
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
3-36.
OPERATION COMMAND WORDS
After being initialized, the master and slave PIC's can be programmed at
any time for various operating modes. The Operation Command Word (OCW)
formats are shown in Figure 3-14.
3-37.
ADDRESSING
The master PIC uses Port OOCO or OOC2 to write initialization and
operation command words and Port OOC4 or OOC6 to read status, poll, and
mask bytes. Addresses for the specific funcitons are provided in Table
3-3.
Slave PIC's, if employed, are accessed via the Multibus interface and
their addresses are determined by the hardware designer.
3-38.
INITIALIZATION
Table 3-22 provides a typical PIC initialization subroutine for a PIC
operated in the non-bus vectored mode; Table 3-23 and 3-24 are typical
master PIC and slave PIC initialization subroutines for the bus vectored
mode. To initialize the PIC's (master and slaves), proceed as follows:
a.
Disable system interrupts by executing a CLI (Clear Interrupt Flag)
instruction.
b.
Initialize master PIC by writing ICW's in the following sequence:
(1) Write ICW1 to Port OOCO and ICW2 to Port OOC2.
(2) If slave PIC's are used, write ICW3 and ICW4 to Port OOC2. If no
slave PIC's are used, omit ICW3 and write ICW4 only to Port OOCZ.
c.
Initialize each slave PIC by writing ICW's in the folowing sequence:
ICW1, ICW2, ICW3, and ICW4. Write OCW's as necessary to mask
unwanted interrupts, alter priority or read registers.
d.
Enable system interrupts by executing an STI (Set Interrupt Flag)
instruction.
NOTE
Each PIC independently operates in the
fully nested mode (Section 3-Z9) unless
programmed otherwide by ICW4.
3-41
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-22.
Typical PIC Initialization Subroutine (NBV Mode)
INT59 INITIALIZES THE PIC. A 32-BYTE ADDRESS BLOCK BEGINNING WITH
00020H IS SET UP FOR INTERRUPT SERVICE ROUTINES. PIC MASK IS SET,
DISABLING ALL PIC INTERRUPTS, PIC IS IN FULLY NESTED MODE, NON-AUTO
EOI, SINGLE PIC, EDGE TRIGGERED, BUFFERED MODE MASTER. USES SMASKj
DESTROYS-A.
INT 59
PUBLIC
EXTRN
INT59
SMASK
MOV
OUT
MOV
OUT
MOV
OUT
MOV
CALL
RET
AL,13H
OCOH,AL
AL,OSH
OC2H,AL
AL,ODH
OC2H,AL
AL,OFFH
SMASK
jSEE TABLE 3-31
jICW1 TO PIC
j ICW2 TO PIC
jICW4 TO PIC
END
Table 3-23.
Typical Master PIC Initialization Subroutine (BV Mode)
INTMA INITIALIZES MASTER PIC WITH A
LEVEL INTERRUPT INPUT, VECTOR TABLE
MASK IS SET WITH ALL PIC INTERRUPTS
SPECIAL FULLY NESTED, NON-AUTO EOI,
USES SMASKj DESTROYS AL.
INTMA
PUBLIC
EXTRN
INTMA
SMASK
MOV
OUT
MOV
OUT
MOV
OUT
Mov
OUT
MOV
CALL
RET
END
AL,llH
OCOH,AL
AL,OSH
OC2H,AL
AL,20H
OC2H,AL
AL,lDH
OC2H,AL
AL,OFFH
SMASK
3-42
SINGLE SLAVE ATTACHED TO THE 5
FOR MASTER PIC IS AT 00020H. PIC
DISABLED. MASTER PIC IS IN
EDGE TRIGGERED, BUFFERED MODE.
jSEE TABLE 3-2S
jICW1
jICW2
jICW3
jICW4
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-24.
Typical Slave PIC Initialization Subroutine (BV Mode)
INTSL INITIALIZES A SLAVE PIC LOCATED AT ADDRESS BLOCK BEGINNING WITH
00040H. PIC IS FULLY NESTED, NON-AUTO EOI, EDGE TRIGGERED, BUFFERED
MODE. PIC IS IDENTIFIED AS SLAVE 5. DESTROYS-AL.
INTSL:
PUBLIC
INTSL
MOV
OUT
MOV
AL,llH
OCOH,AL
AL,lOH
OC2H,AL
AL,05H
OC2H,AL
AL,09H
OC2H,AL
oill
MOV
OUT
MOV
OUT
RET
; ICWl
;ICW2
; ICw3
; ICW4
END
3-39.
Operation
After initialization, the master PIC and slave PIC's can independently be
programmed at any time by an Operation Command Word (OCW) for the
following ooperations:
a.
Auto-rotating priority.
b.
Specific rotating priority.
c.
Status read of Interrupt Request Register (IRR).
d.
Status read of In-Service Register (ISR).
e.
Interrupt mask bits are set, reset, or read.
f.
Special mask mode set or reset.
Table 3-25 lists details of the above operations. Note that an
End-of-Interrupt (EOI) or a Specific End-of-Interrupt (SEOI) command is
required at the end of each interrupt servie routine to reset the ISR
(unless in auto EOI). The EOI command is used in the fully nested and
autorotating priority modes and the SEOI command, which specifies the bit
to be reset, is used in the specific rotating priority mode. Tables 3-26
through 3-30 provide typical subroutines for the following:
a.
Read IRR (Table 3-26).
b.
Read ISR (Table 3-27).
3-43
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
c.
Set mask register (Table 3-28).
d.
Read mask register (Table 3-29).
e.
Issue EOI command (Table 3-30).
Table 3-25.PIC Operation Procedures
Operation
Procedure
Auto-Rotating
Priority Mode
To set Auto-Rotating mode with AEOI
(requires AEOI to be set in ICW1): In OCW2,
write a Rotate In Automatic EOI mode (set)
command (BOH) to Port OOCOH.
To clear Auto-Rotating mode, with AEOI: In
OCW2, write a Rotate In Automatic EOI mode
(clear) command (OOH) to Port OOCOH.
To terminate interrupt and rotate priority
(Non-Auto EOI mode): (AEOI not set in ICW1)
In OCW2, write a Rotate On Non-specific EOI
command (OAOH) to Port OOCOH.
Specific Rotating
Priority Mode
To rotate/set priority without EOI:
I
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
DO
1
1
0
0
0
L2
L1
LO
I
Binary value of lowest priority IR line
To terminate interrupt (EOI) and rotate/set
priority:
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
DO
I1
1
1
0
0
L2
L1
LO
I
Binary value of IR level to be reset and IR
line to be lowest priority.
3-44
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-25.
PIC Operation Procedures (continued)
Operation
Procedure
Interrupt Request
Register (IRR) Status
The IRR stores a "1" in the associated bit
for each IR input line that is requesting an
interrupt. To read the IRR (refer to
footnote):
(1) Write OAH to Port OOCO. (Write OeW3)
(2) Read Port ooeo. Status is as follows:
IR Line:
In-Service Register
(ISR) Status
[D7
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
The ISR stores a "1" in the associated bit
for priority inputs that are being
serviced. The ISR is updated when an EOI
command is issued. To read the ISR (refer
to footnote):
( 1) Write OBH to Port OOCO.
Interrupt Mask Register
[ D7
06
05
04
03
02
01
DO
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
I
To set mask bits in OeW1, write the
following mask byte to Port 00e2:
06
02
01
00
M2
M7
M5
M4
M3
M6
1 = Mask Set (inhibited)
o = Mask Reset (enabled)
M1
MO
[ D7
IR Bit Mask:
(Write OeW3)
Status is as follows:
(2) Read Port ooeo.
IR Line:
I
05
04
03
To read mask bits, read Port 00e2.
3-45
I
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-25.
PIC Operation Procedures (continued)
Operation
Procedure
Special Mask
The Special Mask Mode enables lower level
interrupts than the one in service. To set,
write 68H to Port OOCO.
To reset, write 48H to Port OOCO.
NOTE:
If previous operation was addressed to the same register, it
is not necessary to rewrite the OCW.
Table 3-26.
Typical PIC Interrupt Request Register Read Subroutine
RRO READS PIC INTERRUPT REQUEST REGISTER; DESTROYS-AL.
RRO:
PUBLIC
RISO
MOV
OUT
IN
RET
AL,OAH
OCOH,AL
AL,OCOH
;OCW3 RIR INSTRUCTION TO PIC
END
Table 3-27.
Typical PIC In-Service Register Read Subroutine
RISO READS PIC IN-SERVICE REGISTER;
RISO:
PUBLIC
RISO
MOV
OUT
IN
RET
AL,OBH
OCOH,AL
AL,OCOH
END
3-46
DESTROYS-A.
;OCW3 RIS INSTRUCTION TO PIC
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Table 3-28.
Typical PIC Set Mask Register Subroutine
SMASK STORES AL REG INTO PIC MASK REG. A ONE MASKS OUT AN INTERRUPT,
A ZERO ENABLES IT. USES-AL, DESTROYS-NOTHING. CALLING ROUTINE
PLACES MASK IN AL REGISTER BEFORE CALLING SMASK.
SMASK:
PUBLIC
SMASK
OUT
RET
OC2H,AL
END
Table 3-29.
Typical PIC Set Mask Register Read Subroutine
RMASK READS PIC MASK REG INTO AL REGISTER: DESTROYS-AL.
RMASK:
PUBLIC
RMASK
IN
RET
AL,OC2H
END
Table 3-30.
Typical PIC End-Qf-Interrupt Command Subroutine
EOI ISSUES END-oF-INTERRUPT TO PIC; DESTROYS-AL.
EOI:
PUBLIC
EOI
MOV
OUT
RET
AL,20H
OCOH,AL
END
3-47
;NON-SPECIFIC EOI
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
3-40.
8086-2 INTERRUPT HANDLING
The 8086-2 CPU has two interrupt input request lines: Interrupt Request
(INTR) and Non-Maskable Interrupt Request (NMI). All of the interrupt
requests handled by the 8259A PIC are passed to the 8086-2 CPU via the
INTR line. The NMI input on the iSBC 86/14/30 board is not used in the
factory default configuration, but can be reconfigured. Refer to Chapter
2 for complete jumper instructions. Programming examples for bus
vectored and non-bus vectored interrupt operations are provided
previously in Tables 3-22, 3-23, and 3-24.
Paragraph 3-41 provides a summary of the NMI input functions and
paragraph 3-42 summarizes INTR functions. For a complete discussion of
8086-2 CPU interrupt handling, refer to the INTEL COMPONENT DATA CATALOG,
and INTEL APPLICATION NOTE AP-59.
3-41.
NON-MASKABLE INTERRUPT (NMI)
The NMI interrupt request input to the 8086-2 CPU is of a
than the INTR input. A low-to-high transition on the NMI
serviced at the end of the current instruction or between
a block type instruction. The worst case response to NMI
multiply, divide, or variable shift instruction.
higher priority
input will be
whole moves of
is during a
When the NMI input is active, the CPU performs the folowing:
a.
Pushes the flag registers into the stack (same as PUSHF)
b.
Clears the Interrupt Flag (same as CLI).
interrupts.
c.
Transfers control with an indirect call through vector location 00008.
This disables all maskable
The NMI input is intended mainly for catastrophic error handling, such as
a system power failure interrupt. Upon completion of the service
routine, the CPU automatically, restores the flags and returns to the
main program.
3-42.
MAS KABLE INTERRUPT (INTR)
The INTR input has a lower priority than that of the NMI interrupt
input. A high level on the INTR input will be serviced at the end of the
current instruction or at the end of a whole move for a block-type
instruction.
When INTR goes active, the CPU performs the following (assuming the
Interrupt Flag is set):
a.
Issues two acknowledge signals; upon receipt of the second
acknowledge signal, the interrupting device (master or slave PIC)
will respond with a one-byte interrupt identifier.
3-48
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
b.
Pushes the Flag registers onto the stack (same as a PUSHF
insturction).
c.
Clears the Interrupt Flag, thereby disabling further maskable
interrupts.
d.
Multiplies by four (4) the binary value (X) contained in the one-byte
identifier from the interrupting device.
e.
Transfers control with an indirect call through location 4X.
Upon completion of the service routine, the CPU automatically restores
its flags and returns to the main program.
3-43.
Master PIC Byte Identifier
The master (on-board) PIC responds to the second acknowledge signal from
the CPU only if the interrupt request is from a non-slaved device; i.e.,
a device that is reporting through another PIC device. The master PIC
has eight IR inputs numbered IRO through IR7, which are identified by a
3-bit binary number. ICW2 determines the five most significant bits of
the interrupt type passed to the 8086-2 CPU. Thus, if an interrupt
request occurs on IR5, and ICW2 was written with a value of 20H (Table
3-24), the master PIC responds to the second acknowledge signal from the
CPU by outputting the byte 00100101B (25H). The CPU multiplies this
value by four and transfers control with an indirect call through
10010100B (94H).
3-44.
Slave PIC Byte Identifier
Each slave PIC is initialized with a 3-bit identifier (ID) in ICW3. The
slave PIC requests an interrupt by driving the associated master PIC IR
line. The master PIC, in turn, drives the CPU INTR input high and the
CPU outputs the first of two acknowledge signals. In response to the
first acknowledge signal, the master PIC outputs a 3-bit binary code to
the slave PIC via the cascade lines; this 3-bit code allows the
appropriate slave PIC to respond to the second acknowledge signal from
the CPU.
Assume that the slave PIC has the ID code 101B (assigned in ICW3) that
the ICW2 was programmed with a value of 40H, and that the device
requesting service is driving the IR2 line of the slave PIC (010). Thus,
in response to the second acknowledge signal, where the slave PIC has
previously put its ID code 101B on its cascade lines, the slave PIC
outputs 01000010B (42H). The CPU multiplies this value by four and
transfers control with an indirect call through 100001000B (108H).
3-49
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
3-45.
STATUS REGISTER PROGRAMMING
The Status Register is a write-only register implemented by addressing an
8-bit latch addresses via I/O port addresses C9H through DFH (all odd
addresses). In order to load the register, the 8086-2 CPU must provide a
data byte in the format as shown in Figure 3-15.
The functions performed by each bit of the Status Register are as follows:
*
Bits 0,1
control the GATE inputs for Counters 0 and 1 of the
8253-5 PIT. A 1 bit enables the GATE.
*
Bit 2
controls the NMI Mask bit operation. A 1 bit enables
NMI; NMI is sensed by the 8086-2 CPU.
*
Bit 3
activates the OVERRIDE/ signal for access to on-board
dual port RAM. A 1 bit asserts the OVERRIDE/ signal.
*
Bits 4,5
generate two independent Multibus interrupt request
signals onto the INTO/ through INT7/ lines. A 1 bit
asserts the interrupt request signals and extinguishes
DS1.
*
Bit 6
implement an LED DS3 for a user-selected function.
bit extinguishes DS3.
*
Bit 7
load a megabyte page address into the register used when
accessing another system resource in a different megabyte
of memory (port address D7). A 1 bit disables the
Megabyte Select Register from loading a megabyte address
from the data lines.
3-46.
A 1
EDGE-TRIGGERED INTERRUPT SENSE LATCH PROGRAMMING
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains an edge-sensitive flip-flop that senses an
edge-type interrupt, latches it, and converts it to a level-type interrupt
signal for the interrupt sensing logic. After sensing an interrupt, the
register remains set until reset by the CPU. The reset function must be
performed by the 8086-2 CPU when the interrupt service routine is
completed; the CPU resets the register by writing any word of data to one
of I/O port address C1H through C7H (any odd address).
3-50
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
Bits
6
5
4
3
2
1
o
ADR16/
ADR15/
ADR14/
AS
LA2
LA1
LAO
7
Data Word Format ADR17/
~----------~v~----------~
v
1
Latch Bit Select
000
001
010
011
100
101
110
111
Load
Load
Load
Load
Load
Load
Load
Load
Reg.
Reg.
Reg.
Reg.
Reg.
Reg.
Reg.
Reg.
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Data value desired in
selected register bit.
Megabyte address data; required only if
changing the megabyte address in the
Megabyte select register.
Figure 3-15.
Data Byte Format For Status Register
3-51
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
CHAPTER_4.
4-1.
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
INTRODUCTION
This chapter of the text provides a functional description and a detailed
circuit analysis for the iSBC 86/14/30 board. The description of the
board begins by presenting in Figure 4-1 a block diagram of the
iSBC 86/14/30 board and by presenting a brief functional description of
each of the major components of the block diagram. In addition to the
functional descriptions, the text presents a detailed circuit analysis of
operation of some of the more complex operations performed by the board,
including: local memory accessing, Multibus memory accessing, local I/O
accessing, interrupt handling, and bus timeout circuit operation.
4-2.
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
Figure 4-1 shows the eleven major functional blocks of the iSBC 86/14/30
boards. Each functional block is described in paragraphs 4-3 through
4-18. A detailed circuit analysis for the more complex portions of the
iSBC 86/14/30 board begins at paragraph 4-19.
4-3.
8086-2 MICROPROCESSOR
The central processor for the iSBC 86/14/30 board is Intel's 8086-2
Microprocessor (referred to hereafter as the CPU) operating at either 5
or 8 MHz. The CPU architecture includes four 16-bit memory base pointer
registers, and two 16-bit index registers. All registers are accessed by
a total of 24 operand addressing modes for comprehensive memory
addressing and for high level language and assembly language data
structure support.
The 8086-2 instruction repertoire includes variable length instruction
format (including double operand instructions), 8-bit and 16-bit signed
and unsigned arithmetic operators for binary, BCD and unpacked ASCII
data, and interative word and byte string manipulation functions.
Additional information on CPU timing and instruction set is available in
the INTEL 8086 FAMILY USER'S MANUAL, and the INTEL DATA CATALOG.
4-1
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
CONNECTOR
D"""'' '
"",00'
INTERFACE
~').
L_
'-If-~
V
TWO
PROGRAMMABLE
INTERFACE
PROGRAMMABLE
TIMERS
INTERRUPT
CONTROLLER
(8255A)
(2138253·5)
18259A)
U35
~
~
ON BOARD LOCAL BUS
~ ~~
SERIAL
INTERFACE
PROGRAMMABLE
BAUD RATE
(USART)
(8251A)
GENERATOR
U14
.~
I
I
7
8086-2
CPU
U48
MUL TIBUS
MUL TfMASTER
USa. U85. U44
V
32K BYTES
8284A CLOCK
GENERATOR
RAM
(128K BYTES)
<
U4
8-
I-
MULTI BUS' SYSTEM BUS
Figure 4-1.
STATUS
REGISTER
U37
/~
0
I
--.J
(11382535,
U38
64K BYTES
EPROM/ROM
U39. 40, 57. 58
'6
~
__
I
I
--
.~
8203 RAM
CONTROLLER
U72
____
I
V
U34
U37
~
--
INTERRUPT
MATRIX
U46
I
0
POWER FAIL -----.
U36 45
BOARDS
1:-- - - - - I
ISBX BUS
ISBX BUS
MUl TIMODULE
I MULTlMODULE
CONNECTOR
CONNECTOR
I
RS232C
IN rERFACE
INTERFACE
U17. 18. 19.21.20
CHIP
MUL TIMODULE
DEVICE
--~
DRIVER/TERMINATOR
PROGRAMMABLE
PERIPHERAL
CONNECTOR
J4
D D""'" D"'u
J2
110 LINES
SELECT
CONTROL
CONNECTOR
J3
CONNECTOR
J1
--
_'6
V
iSBC· 86/14/30 Board Block Diagram
4-2
MEGABYTE
ADDRESS
REGISTER
U65
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-4.
ON-BOARD TIMING
The CPU may be clocked at a frequency of either 8 MHz or 5 MHz. The
latter provides the ability for the iSBC 86/14/30 board to operate
compatibly with the iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor and with the ICE 86
products. If neither is required in the system, the iSBC 86/14/30 should
be configured for 8 MHz operation.
On-board timing for the CPU is provided by an 8284A Clock Generator
device (U4). This device provides either a 5 or 8 MHz clock output for
the CPU clock input. The RESET and READY functions for the CPU are also
generated by the 8284A device.
Another timing circuit consisting of a crystal oscillator and two 4-bit
counter devices, generates clock signals for the 8253-5 Programmable
Interval Timer and produces the BCLK/ and CCLK/ Multibus clock signals
and the MCLK/ iSBX Bus clock signal at a frequency of 9.83 MHz.
The 8253-5 Programmable Interval Timer generates timing for the serial
port (RxC and TxC baud rate clock), and genrates inputs to the interrupt
controller.
4-5.
RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY (RAM) ARRAY
As shipped from the factory, the iSBC 86/14 board contains sixteen 2118-4
RAM devices with 32k bytes enabled as dual port RAM. The local address
of the dual port RAM (as-shipped configuration) for the iSBC 86/14 board
is OOOOOH through 07FFFH (32k bytes), the default configuration. When
the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board is installed, the local
address is relocated to OOOOOH through OFFFFH (64k bytes) and the amount
of dual port RAM doubles.
As shipped from the factory, the iSBC 86/30 board contains sixteen 2164
RAM devices with 128k bytes enabled as dual port RAM. The local address
of the dual port RAM (as-shipped configuration) for the iSBC 86/30 board
is OOOOOH through 1FFFFH (128k bytes). When the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion
Multimodule Board is installed, the local address is relocated to OOOOOH
through 3FFFFH (256k bytes).
The dual port control logic interfaces the RAM with the Multibus
interface and the on-board bus. This allows the Multibus interface
resources to access the dual port RAM when not in use by the iSBC
86/14/30 board. The dual port logic is designed to maximize the on-board
CPU throughput by defaulting control of the dual port RAM to the local
CPU when not being accessed via the Multibus interface. Each time a bus
master generates a memory request to the dual port RAM via the Multibus
interface, control of the RAM must be taken away from the on-board CPU.
When the memory request is completed, the control of the RAM returns to
the on-board CPU.
The dual port logic consists of CPU address and'data buffers and
decoders; bidirectional address and data bus (Multibus interface)
drivers; slave RAM address decoder/translator; control logic; and the RAM
array.
4-3
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
The dual port RAM can be accessed in a word-wide fashion from the
Multibus interface; byte-swap logic allows both 8-bit and 16-bit product
compatabi1ity. The dual port RAM is inhibited when another memory device
generates INH1/ (which causes an overlay of the dual port RAM by another
System resource).
The dual port bus can be locked to either the local bus or the Mu1tibus
interface; this is typically required in a read-modify-write semaphore
operation to prevent the other processor(s) from accessing the dual port
memory between the read and write. The iSBC 86/14/30's CPU locks the
dual port to the local bus via the LOCK prefix facility of the 8086-2
inRtruction set. When a LOCK XCHG instruction is being executed on a
byte in dual port RAM, the dual port bus will be locked to the local bus,
blocking Mu1tibus interface access.. Conversely, when the Mu1tibus
interface LOCK/ line is active during a Mu1tibus interface access to the
iSBC 86/14/30 dual port RAM, the dual port bus will be locked to the
Mu1tibus interface, blocking local bus access.
4-6.
ERASEABLE PROGRAMMABLE READ ONLY MEMORY (EPROM) ARRAY
The iSBC 86/14/30 board has four sockets for use with EPROM or static RAM
devices. The board is compatible with four sizes of EPROM devices;
either 2k, 4k, Sk, or 16k by 8-bit. These are summarized in Chapter 2.
The default configuration is for installation of 24-pin, 2k byte by 8-bit
EPROM devices. EPROM addressing ranges depend on the size of the device
and the number of devices installed. Table 2-1 specifies the address
range for each socket, according to device size.
NOTE
The memory devices installed into the
chip sockets operate in pairs (one
device provides the high byte and
another provides the low byte).
Therefore, the related chip sockets
should contain the same type of memory
device.
4-7.
ADDRESS DECODING
When the CPU issues an address it also outputs three status bits (SO, Sl,
and S2) which are latched by the on-board 74S373 Octal Three state
Buffer. This generates the MEM/IO signal to indicate whether the address
should be examined by the memory decade circuitry or by the I/O decode
circuitry. When MEM/IO is a "1", the memory decode circuitry (devices
U45 and U46) is enabled; conversely, when MEM/IO is a "0", the I/O decode
circuitry (device U36) is enabled.
4-4
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
When enabled, the Programmable Array Logic (PAL) devices U45 and U46
decode the address input to activate one of the RAM or EPROM chip select
signals for the memory array. The PAL device U36 provides the address
decode that generates chip select terms for the iSBX Bus interfaces, for
the status register, and for each of the LSI devices on the board,
including the 8255A PPI, the 8253-5 PIT, the 8259A PIC, and the 825lA PCI
device.
4-8.
Memory Address Decoding
Memory addressing on the iSBC 86/14/30 board takes 3 general forms: local
addressing for access to Multibus resources, local addressing for access
to local resources and Multibus address decoding for access to local
resources. The local and Multibus address decoding is performed in two
stages. First, the source of the memory operation request is determined
and the address is modified if from the Multibus interface. Then, the
local address is used to generate chip select signals (where applicable).
Local Address to Multibus Resource
During a local CPU access of Multibus resources, the local CPU can place a
24-bit address onto the Multibus interface. The upper 4-bits of address
(ADR14/, ADR15/, ADR16/, and ADR17/) are programmed into the Megabyte
Select Register via the Status Register (U65). After the local CPU
acquires Multibus interface control, a signal labeled BUS AEN/ from the
Bus Arbiter (U84) enables outputting the upper 4-bit address with the
ADRO/ through ADR13/ lines from U90, U9l, and U92.
Local Address to Local Resource
During a local CPU access of on-board RAM or EPROM, the local CPU outputs
status onto SO, Sl, and S2, and a local RAM address onto ADO through
AD13. The status and address are decoded by PAL devices U45 (EPROM) and
U46 (RAM) to generate the required chip select terms. The PAL devices
generate PROM ACCESS and RAM ACCESS signals required for the local
operations.
The RAM ACCESS and MEM CMD signals start arbitration for local access to
the dual port RAM. The dual port control logic activates the ON BD CMD/
and DP ACCESS/ signals required during a local RAM accessing sequence.
The ON BD CMD/ signal gates the local commands (LOCAL DP RD/ or LOCAL DP
WT/) from PAL U46 to the RAM controller. The RAM controller then
multiplexes the address to the RAM array and completes the operation.
The PROM ACCESS and PROM chip enable signals (PROM 0 HIGH, PROMO 0 LOW,
PROM 1 HIGH, and PROM 1 LOW) start the local access to EPROM. The PROM
ACCESS signal generates an enable (via CENPR) to 8288 Bus Controller U44,
allowing it to decode the status lines from the CPU. U44 outputs the
MRDC/ signal to the EPROM array, enabling the array to decode address
lines Al through AF.
4-5
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Multibus Address to Local Resource
During a Multibus interface access of on-board RAM, the Multibus
interface master can address the iSBC 86/14/30 board as a slave RAM
device. The bus master first places the address onto the multibus
interface and then asserts MRDC/ or MWTC/. Address ,bits ADRD/ through
ADRIO/ present a 10-bit address to a special PROM (U66); address bits
ADRll/ through ADR17/ are decoded by a series of X-oR gates (U87/88).
The output signals from U66 ATRO/ through ATR2/, which are multiplexed by
U70 (14ZB3) into memory address bits ABD-ABll when the OFF BD ADR EN/
signal is subsequently activated by the dual port control logic. The
pin-II output from U66 is driven through U29 (when the l28k boundary and
the megabyte address matches) to develop the OFF BD ADR REQ signal to the
dual port control logic. If no CPU access is in progress, the dual port
control logic then enters the slave mode and develops the DP ACCESS/ and
SLAVE CMD/ signals. DP ACCESS/ enables RAM controller U72 and SLAVE CMD/
gates the BUS RD CMD/ or BUS MWTC/ signal (11ZB8) to the RAM controller.
The RAM controller then mUltiplexes the address to the RAM array and
completes the required operation.
NOTE
Local EPROM is not accessible to
another Bus Master.
4-9.
I/O Address Decoding
The I/O decode circuitry consists of PAL device U36, and logic gates U13,
U16, U29, U53, and U59. The I/O decode circuitry examines address lines
AO and A3-AF to determine if the address is a valid on-board I/O address
and to enable the proper chip select signal. If the address is a valid
ACCESS signal; conversely if not a valid on-board address, the ON BD
ADDR/ signal will be false.
I/O addressing is discussed in paragraph 3-4. When the CPU issues an I/O
address, one of nine chip select signals is enabled. Each signal
corresponds to one of the on-board I/O devices:
8251
8253
8255
8259
SBX2
SBX2
SBXl
SBXl
CS/ to the PCI device
CS/ to the PIT device
CS/ to the PPI device
CS/ to the PIC device
CSO/ to iSBX Bus Connector
CSI/ to iSBX Bus Connector
CSO/ to iSBX Bus Connector
CSI/ to iSBX Bus Connector
3
3
4
4
Notice that each iSBX Bus connector has two chip select signals
associated with it. Both signals may not necessarily be used on all iSBX
Multimodule boards. Refer to the iSBX board reference manual for exact
addressing.
4-6
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-10.
INTERVAL TIMER
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains an 8253-5 Programmable Interval Timer
(PIT) at chip location U37. The PIT device contains three software
selectable counters. Each counter has its own input pin and output pin.
Input frequencies are determined by jumper selection. The boards default
configuration for the inputs is as follows:
CLKO Input
CLK1 Input
CLK2 Input
1.23 MHz
153.6 KHz
1.23 MHz
Chapter 2 provides :instructions for alternative jumper input selections.
All inputs must be 2.5 MHz or less.
The complete functional definition of the interval timer is programmed by
system software. A set of control words must be sent out by the CPU to
initialize each counter with the desired mode and count information.
Each counter consists of a single, 16-bit, presettable, down-counter.
The counter can operate in either binary or BCD and its input gate and
output are configured by the selection of modes stored in the control
word register. Refer to Chapter 3 for additonal programming
information. Compete PIT information is provided in the INTEL DATA
CATALOG.
4-11.
SERIAL I/O CONTROL CIRCUITRY
The iSBC 86/14/30 board uses an Intel 8251A Programmable Communications
Interface (PCI) device (U38) to handle serial communications through
connector J2. On-board jumpers are used to select the clock source for
transmission and reception of data. The RS232C interface may be
configured with jumpers as described in Table 2-5.
The complete functional definition of the PCI is programmed by system
software. A set of control words must be sent out by the CPU to
initialize the PCI to support the desired communications format. These
control words program the baud rate, character length, number of stop
bits, synchronous or asynchronous operation, even/odd parity and other
parameters. In the synchronous mode, options are also provided to select
either internal or external character synchronization.
Once programmed, the PCI is ready to perform its communications
functions. The TxRDY output activates to indicate that the PCI is ready
to receive a data character from the CPU. The TxRDY signal is reset
automatically when the CPU writes a character into the PCI. When the PCI
receives serial data from a modem or I/O device, the RxRDY output is
activated to indicate that the PCI has a complete character for the CPU
to fetch. RxRDY is reset automatically upon the CPU data read
operation. The PCI cannot begin transmission until the Tx Enable bit is
set in the Command Instruction byte, and it has received a Clear-To-Send
(CTS/) input. The TxD output is held in the marking state upon reset.
Refer to Chapter 3 for additional programming information.
information is provided in the INTEL DATA CATALOG.
4-7
Complete PCI
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-12.
PARALLEL I/O CONTROL CIRCUITRY
The iSBC 86/14/30 board provides 24 programmable parallel I/O lines
implemented with a single In~el 8255A-5 Programmable Peripheral Interface
(PPI) device in socket U35. The lines are grouped into three software
programmable 8-bit I/O ports. On-board usage of each line is variable,
depending on mode selection and jumper s~atus. Chapter 2 provides
parallel port jumper configurations. Device programming is discussed in
Chapter 3.
There are three basic modes of operation which can be selected by system
software:
Mode 0 - Basic Input/Output
Mode 1 - Strobed
Input/Ou~put
Mode 2 - Bi-Directional Bus
When the reset input gate goes high all ports in the 8255A PPI are set to
the input mode (i.e., all 24 lines enter the high impedance state).
After the reset is removed, the 8255A can remain in the input mode with
no additional initialization required. During the execution of the
system program any other modes may be selected using a single output
instruction.
The modes for Port A and B can be separately defined, while Port C is
divided into two portions as required by the Port A and Port B
definitions. All of the output registers, incluing the status
flip-flops, will be reset whenever the mode is changed. Modes may be
combined so that their functional definition can be tailored to almost
any I/O structure.
Any of the eight Port C bits can be set or reset using a single output
instruction. When Port C is being used as status/control for Port A or
B, these bits can be set or reset by using the bit-Set/Reset operation
just as if they were data output ports.
For additional 8255A PPI information refer to the INTEL PERIPHERAL DESIGN
HANDBOOK, or the INTEL DATA CATALOG.
4-13.
INTERRUPT CONTROL AND TIMING CIRCUITRY
Interrupt circuitry on the iSBC 86/14/30 board consists of an interrupt
source jumper matrix, an 8259A Programmable Interrupt Controller (PIC),
and the interrupt acknowledge logic. The 8259A Programmable Interupt
Controller (PIC) handles up to eight bus vectored or non-bus vectored
priority interrupts. Interrupt requests to the iSBC 86/14/30 board can
originate from 28 sources without external hardware.
The board can experience three basic types of interrupts: a direct CPU
input non-maskable interrupt (~MI); an on-board (non-bus vectored)
interrupt through the PIC; and an off-board (bus vectored) im:errupt.
Bus vectored interrupts are cascaded from another (slave) PIC device.
4-8
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Bus vectored (BV) interrupts require additional response time as compared
to non-bus vectored interrupts. Bus vectored interrupts from the
Multibus interface are enabled when the iSBC 86/14/30 board is in its
factory defa.ult configuration. When operating in bus vectored mode, the
iSBC 86/14/30 board must gain control fo the Multibus interface for each
interrupt; this causes the CPU to execute additional wait-states and may
create system contention for use of the Multibus interface. Remove
jumper connection E33-E34 to enable only NBV operation (refer to Chapter
2 for more information). If enabled, the bus vectoring sequence inserts
wait-states into the CPU instruction execution timing automatically.
4-14.
8203 DYNAMIC RAM CONTROLLER
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains an 8203 Dynamic RAM Controller that
provides multiplexed addresses, address strobes, and refresh/access
arbitration for the on-board RAM array. The operation of the 8203
Dynamic RAM Controller is configured at the factory before shipment and
should not be changed. The memory refresh cycles are internally
requested and internally generated by the 8203 device.
In response to chip select terms and an address, the 8203 Dynamic RAM
Controller generates the ROW address select signal (RAS/), the COLUMN
address select signal (CAS/), and the 8-bit cell address required to
access the memory array during READ, WRITE, and REFRESH operaLions.
At any given instant, the 8203 Dynamic RAM Controller may be found in one
of the following states: IDLE, WRITE cycle, READ cycle, or REFRESH
cycle. In IDLE, the Dynamic RAM Controller monitors internal and
external cycle requests and counts toward generation of an internal
refresh cycle for the RAM chips.
4-15.
DUAL PORT SIZE/ADDRESS DECODE PROM
The size and ending address of the dual port RAM on the iSBC 86/14/30
board is defined via U66, a 3625 decode PROM. The PROM device uses an
internal program to combine address bits ADRD/ through ADRIO/ on the iSBC
86/14 board (ADRD/ through ADR11/ on the iSBC 86/30 board) with the
starting dual port RAM address (as placed into jumper E230 through E233
and E240 through E243), and with the user-selected dual port RAM size (as
placed into jumpers E234 through E236). The resulting OULPUt signals
from the 3625 PROM provide the high order address bits (ADRD/ through
ADR11/) for all RAM accesses. The PROM device also genraLes the
off-board address indication (the OFF BD ADD REQ signal) to indicate
whether the address is located in the dual port RAM accessible via local
addresses or located elsewhere in the Multibus address space. The OFF BD
ADD REQ signal allows the off-board CPU to begin dual port arbitration.
4-9
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-16.
BUS STRUCTURE
The iSBC 86/14/30 board architecture is organized around a three-bus
hierarchy: the local bus, the dual port bus, and the Multibus interface
(refer to Figure 4-2). Each bus can communicate only within itself and
an adjacent performance of the iSBC 86/14/30 board is directly related to
which bus it must go to in performing an operation; that is, the closer
to the local bus you can keep the instruction execution, the better the
performance.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board operates at a 5 or 8 MHz CPU clock frequency and
requires wait-states for all on-board system accesses (exception: EPROM
accesses can be jumpered for zero, one, two, or three wait states).
However, the pipeline effect of the CPU instruction queue effectively
hides these wait-states.
The core of the iSBC 86/14/30 board bus architecture is the local bus
(ADO through ADF), which connects the CPU to all on-board I/O devices,
EPROM, RAM, iSBX Bus interfaces, and the dual port RAM bus. Activity on
this bus does not require control of the outer busses, thus permitting
independent execution of on-board activities. Activities on the local
bus require no bus overhead and provide maximum board performance.
The next bus in the hierarchy is the dual port bus (ABO through AB11).
This bus controls the dynamic dual port RAM and communicates with the
local bus and the Multibus interface. The dual port bus can be in one of
three states:
a.
State 1 -
The local bus is controlling the dual port bus but not
using it (the dual port bus is considered to be not
busy).
b.
State 2 -
The local bus is controlling the dual port bus and
using it (the dual port bus is considered to be busy).
c.
State 3 -
The system bus is controlling the dual port bus and
using it (the dual port bus is considered to be busy).
State 1, as described above, is the idle state of the dual port bus. The
dual port bus is left in control of the local bus to minimize delays when
the on-board CPU needs the dual port bus. When the local bus requires
the dual port bus in order to access dual port RAM, the dual port bus
contol logic moves from state 1 to state 2 (if the dual port bus is busy,
the local bus waits until it is available). Activity at this level
requires a minimum bus-overhead and the RAM performance is designed to
equal that of protected RAM accesses (when the dual port bus is not bound
to be busy). The dual port bus control logic returns to state 1 when the
on-board CPU completes its operation. This level of bus activity
operates independently of the Multibus interface activity (if the
Multibus interface does not need the dual port bus).
4-10
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
MULTIBUS'"
INTERFACE
DUAL· PORT
BUS
LOCAL BUS
Figure 4-2.
Internal Bus Structure
When the Multibus interface requests the dual port bus, the control logic
goes from state 1 to state 3 (it will wait if busy). Activity at this
level requires a minimum of 150 nanoseconds and, upon completion, the
Multibus interface returns the dual port bus to state 1. The use of the
dual port bus by the Multibus interface is independent of the local bus
activity.
When the local bus needs the Multibus interface, it must gain access
through the dual port bus. The local bus uses the dual port bus only to
communicate with the Multibus interface and leaves the dual port bus in
state 1. Activity at this level requires a minimum of 200 nanoseconds of
overhead for Multibus interface exchanges.
4-17.
Multibus Interface
The Multibus interface is the system interface. The iSBC 86/14/30 board
communicates with other boards in the system over the Multibus lines.
The,Multibus lines adhere to a design standard, as specified in the INTEL
MULTIBUS SPECIFICATION, and as summarized in Table 2-5.
Three 8286 Octal Bus Transceivers (U93, U71, and U94) provide the data
line interface buffering to the Multibus interface. Two 8287 Octal Bus
Transceivers and multiplexer (U90, U91, and U92) provide the address line
interface.
In a typical application, the iSBC 86/14/30 board
board in the system. This means the iSBC 86/14/30
Multibus arbitration with all bus master boards in
board would have a specific priority as controlled
jumper selection.
4-11
would be a master
board could perform
the system. Each
by board placement and
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Multibus control circuitry includes the 8289 Bus Arbiter device (U84), two
8288 Bus Controllers (U44 and U85), bi-directional data bus and address
bus drivers (U90, 91, 92, 93, 94, and 71), and interrupt driver/receiver
(U89). The Bus Arbiter allows the iSBC 86/14/30 board to operate as a bus
master in the system in which the CPU can request the Multibus lines when
a resource is required. Multibus timing for the iSBC 86/14/30 board is
discussed in Chapter 2.
4-18.
iSBX Bus Interface
Essentially, the iSBX bus is an extension of the local internal bus. This
bus is interfaced to optional plug-in modules with a single iSBX
connector. Two such connectors reside on the iSBC 86/14/30 board (J3 and
J4). All necessary power lines, data lines, address lines, and control
lines are routed through the two iSBX connectors. The CPU treats the iSBX
board as another on-board I/O location. Addressing is discussed in
paragraph 3-3. Pin assignments and signal descriptions for the iSBX bus
connectors are given in Chapter 2. For additional iSBX Multimodule
information, refer to the INTEL iSBX BUS SPECIFICATION.
4-19.
DETAILED CIRCUIT ANALYSIS
The circuit analysis presented in the following text provides more
detailed information on the internal operation of the iSBC 86/14/30
board. The schematic diagram for the iSBC 86/14/30 board is provided as
Figure 5-3. The schematic diagram consists of 16 sheets, each of which
includes grid coordinates. When a logic term is referenced, its grid
coordinates on the schematic diagram are presented in parenthesis.
Both active HIGH and active LOW signals are used. A signal mnemonic that
ends with a virgule (e.g., DAT7/) denotes that the signal is active LOW
(less than 0.4 volts). Conversly, a signal mnemonic without a virgule
(e.g., ALE) denotes that the signal is active HIGH (greater than 2.0
volts).
4-20.
POWER-ON INITIALIZATION OPERATION
When power is applied in a start up sequence, the 8284A Clock Generator
device outputs a reset pulse that provides a reset signal (RST) for
several devices on the iSBC 86/14/30 board. The characteristics of the
RST pulse are determined by the time constant created via C10, R33, and
CR1. The pulse is typically 100 milliseconds in duration.
The RST and RST/ signals provide the reset function for the reset table
devices on the iSBC 86/14/30 board, including the CPU, the 8289 Bus
Arbiter, the 8251A PCI, the 8255A-5 PPI, the interrupt control logic, the
iSBX Bus connectors, the status register, the megabyte page select
register. The net effect of a power-up sequence is to set the CPU, Bus
Arbiter, I/O ports, and any iSBX modules attached to the iSBC 86/14/30
board to a known internal state from which orderly operation can commence.
4-12
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
When power is initially applied to the iSBC 86/14/30 board, capacitor C62
(lZB7) maintains the Schmitt trigger input at U4 pin-II (lZB6) in the
logic low state, which causes an active high reset output on U4 pin 10.
This active high reset output is inverted by the open-collector driver U3
(2ZB6), generating INTT/ out to the Multibus interface (via connector PI,
pin-14) to set the entire system to a known state. The output of U3 is
inverted by U11 to generate the RESET signal. The RESET signal
automatically sets the CPU code segment register to FFFFO and clears the
interrupt enable flip-flop; resets the parallel I/O ports to the input
mode; resets the bus arbiter (outputs are tristated), and resets any iSBX
Multimodules attached.
The initialization just described can be performed at any time by
activating the AUX RESET/ signal via auxiliary connector P2 pin-38.
After the power-on sequence, the iSBC 86/14/30 board is configured with
all zeroes in the Status Register (U14) and zeroes in the Megabyte Select
Re gis ter (U65).
4-21.
CPU OPERATION
The CPU is internally divided into two processors, the Bus Interface Unit
(BIU) and an Execution Unit (EU). The BIU is used to constantly monitor
the EU and an internal queue for memory or I/O operations. Each time the
BIU accesses the iSBC 86/14/30 internal bus, the CPU must execute at leat
four major cycles, called T-States. The timing required for each T-State
is discussed in the follOWing sub-sections and shown in a typical READ
and WRITE operation timing diagrm in Figure 4-3.
Tl STATE: The first T-State indicates the type of access and the
location of the transfer participant. The CPU first activates its status
lines SOl, Sl/, and S2/ indicating the type of operation to be performed
for the bus cycle, as listed in Table 4-1. When the status lines become
active, the 8288 controller will activiate its Address Latch Enable (ALE)
signal, and enable the address buffers. While ALE is active, the address
for the bus cycle is presented on the 8086-2 multiplexed address/data bus
lines.
Before the end of Tl, ALE goes inactive, and the address is latched. ALE
is also inverted and used to clear the wait state generator. The ALE/
term is used to disable commands from the 8288 controller until the
rising edge of T2. The only exception to this sequence occurs if the
board is exeeuting an Interrupt Acknowledge (INTA/) cycle. In this case,
the 8288 Bus Controller (U44) activates the MCE output with ALE to
generate the INT CYCLE signal that activates the off-board address enable
term (OFF BD AEN/ on 10ZA6). The MCE signal is deactivated early in T2.
4-13
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Table 4-1.
8086-2 Status Bid Decodes
S2/
Sl/
SOl
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
NOTE:
0
1
CPU MACHINE CYCLE
Interrupt Acknowledge
Read I/O Port
Write I/O Port
Halt
Code Access
Read Memory
Write Memory
Passive
= LOW signal
= HIGH signal
T2 STATE: During T2 the address presented during Tl is removed from the
CPU's address/data bus. There are four types of subsequent bus cycles
during T2 following address removal: read cycle, write cycle, interrupt
acknowledge cycle, and halt or passive cycles.
If a read cycle is to be performed, either MRDC/ or IORC/ becomes active
from one of the 8288 bus controllers. The CPU removes its address from
the bus, and sets the lines to the receive mode. The chip enable terms
are activated by the PAL devices if the address is a valid on-board
location. After the rising edge of the CPU clock, the commands become
active. The 8288 Bus Controller enables the data buffers, by setting the
DT/R line low and the DEN line high, after the clock's rising edge.
During the write the CPU drives
removed, the data is put on the
and AIOWC/, and the chip enable
cycle. The 8288 Bus Controller
the data lines. After the address is
multiplexed bus. The command, AMWTC/,
terms become active as during a read
activates the DEN signal for the transfer.
An interrupt acknowledge cycle is initiated in the CPU whenever it senses
an interrupt request on the INTR line from the 8259A PIC and interrupts
are enabled. The CPU generates an interrupt acknowledge status on SO,
Sl, and S2, that begins the interrupt acknowledge cycle. The status bits
allow the 8288 Bus Controller to activate the INTA/ signal output in a
series of two pulses. The first INTA/ pulse causes the 8259A PIC to
freeze the state of the interrupts for priority resolution and, if
performing a bus vectored interrupt cycle, place the slave ID onto the
CASO through CAS2 lines. The second pulse causes the CPU to retrieve the
interrupt ID byte (an 8-bit pointer) from the PIC. The CPU uses the
pointer as an address at which to begin the interrupt service routine.
4-14
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
If a HALT or PASSIVE state is indicated on the status lines, no commands
will be issued. Ship enable terms will still be generated, and data
integrity will be maintained.
T3 STATE: During this state, the data transfer is consummated if the
access time of the peripheral device has been met. This mechanism is
called acknowledge signalling, and is indicated by the READY signal to
the 8284A Clock Generator. If the peripheral has not sent the
acknowledge by the rising edge of the previous clock, the CPU enters
wait-states until the CPU receives a READY signal via the 8284A.
There are two sources for READY signals:
the wait-state generator (U6 on schematic
off-board commands uses the XACK/ and the
U25 on 10ZC3). When the CPU receives the
output, the status lines are forced to an
allowed to proceed to state T4.
one for on-board commands uses
sheet 10ZC6), and one for
US TIMEOUT signals (PAL device
synchronized 8284A READY
inactive mode and the CPU is
T4 STATE: During the T4 state all command lines are placed in their
inactive mode. All control and direction lines also become inactive,
until the CPU status lines are asserted.
HOLD SEQUENCES: A CPU hold is initiated by pulsing the RQ/GT line.
Typically this would only be done by a co-processor device such as the
8087 on the iSBC 337 Numberic Data Processor. The co-processor would
pulse the RQ/GT line to obtain control of the local bus. The CPU then
sends a return pulse on the same RQ/GT line to indicate that it is ready
to relinquish control of the local bus, and places its address and data
lines in the inactive state. When the co-processor is finished, it
issues a third pulse which enables the CPU to resume normal operation.
4-22.
MULTIBUS DATA TRANSFER MODES
Each iSBC 86/14/30 board containes three 8286 Bidirectional Octal Bus
Transceiver devices at chip locations U7l, U93, and U94 to buffer the
input and output data for the boards. As Table 4-2 shows, the
transceiver devices provide the interface between the Multibus structure
and the on-board memory. The transceiver devices also provide a buffer
for performing a data swap operation; i.e., they place the HIGH order
data byte from memory onto the LOW order Multibus interface lines during
an odd byte output operation, and place the LOW order data byte from the
Multibus interface onto the HIGH order memory during an odd byte input
operation. When not in use, the transceivers are held in a high
impedance state to minimize the loading effects on the Multibus interface.
4-15
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
The bidirectional transceivers are enabled via the WORD EN/, SWAP EN/,
and DT/R BUS signals generated by PAL device U25. When the pin-9 input
to the transceiver is HIGH, a transceiver is held in a high impdance
state (inactive). When the pin-9 input (WORD EN/ or SWAP EN/) is LOW,
the pin-II (DT/R Bus) input to each transceiver is enabled to control the
direction in which the device passes data. If pin-II (DT/R Bus) is HIGH,
the transceivers are enabled to transmit data onto the Multibus
structure; if pin-II is LOW the transceivers receive data from the
Multibus interface.
The three 8286 octal transceivers provide the iSBC 86/14/30 board
the flexibility to operate in any of three types of data transfer
even byte transfer, odd byte transfer, or 16-bit transfer. Table
lists the modes selected by the ADO and BHE/ signals from the CPU
shows a typical transfer path for each type of operation.
Table 4-2.
Transfer Description
BHE/
Master
Multibus Signal
with
mode;
4-2
and
Data Transfer Modes
ADO
Signal
Enable Terms and
Operations Performed
HIGH
HIGH
Not used.
HIGH
LOW
8-bit transfer, low byte
to/from even addresses (via
DATO/ through DAT7/). The
signal WORD EN/ = 0; the
signal SWAP EN/ = 1.
LOW
HIGH
8-bit transfer, high byte
(swap byte) to/from odd
addresses (via DATO/ through
DAT7/). The signal WORD EN/
= 1; the signal SWAP EN/ = O.
LOW
LOW
16-bit transfer, 2 bytes on
DATO/ through DATF/. The
signal WORD EN/ = 0; the
signal SWAP EN/ = 1.
DATO! -OATU
OAT8! ·OATF
OATOI -OAT71
Notes:
The signal DT/R BUS = 0 for input,
4-16
=1
for output.
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
"
8-MHZ ClK
I
T1
I
/\
so
/\
I
14
T3
/\
1\
~
,-
~
S2. Sl .
I
T2
\
STATUS
1\
I
VALID
BHEN. AD16-AD19
.
-
'- -FLOAT
ALE
ADDRESS
ADO·AD15
DT
,
J
DATA IN
FLOAT
R
MRDC
IORC
DEN
[
~
S21. SL SOl
\.
STATUS
\
I
VALID
BHENI. AD16·AD19
1---
FLOAT
ALE
ADDRESS
DATA OUT
\'(NOTE
FLOAT2)
ADO-AD15
\
DEN
AMWT
AIOWC
MWTC
IOWC'
NOTES:
1. INTA. IORC. MRDC. DT R
VOH.
2. FLOATS ONLY IF ENTERING A "HOLD" CONDITION.
DENOTES CPU INPUT OR OUTPUT
DENOTES STATUS DECODER AS1 OUTPUT
Figure 4-3.
READ and WRITE Operation Timing
4-17
I---
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-23.
Even Byte Transfer Operation
An even byte transfer is required when a byte of data is read from or
written into an even memory location. To initiate an even byte transfer,
the CPU must ADO (ASO is always low for an even byte) and raise BRE/ (for
8-bit operations, BRE/ is always false). The ADO and BRE/ signals from
the CPU generate write enable terms for the memory array (WE1/ and WE2/)
to select a row of RAM chips to decode the address on OUTO through OUT6
from the Dynamic RAM Controller. ADO also enters into the chip select
logic as ABO to generate the required data transfer buffer control terms
and chip select terms (WORD EN/, and SWAP EN/ from PAL U25 on 10ZC3);
refer to Table 4-2.
In performing an even byte READ or WRITE operation, the iSBC 86/14/30
board uses the low order data buffer (U71 on 13ZC6) to transfer the even
data byte via Multibus data lines DATO/ through DAT7/.
4-24.
Odd Byte (Swap) Transfer Operation
An odd byte transfer is required when a byte of data is read from or
written into an odd memory location. To initiate an odd byte transfer,
the iSBC 86/14/30 board must raise ADO and BRE/. In performing an odd
byte READ operation, the iSBC 86/14/30 board uses the swap buffer (U94 on
13ZC6) to transfer the odd data byte to Multibus data lines DATO/ through
DAT7/. In performing an odd byte WRITE operation, the iSBC 86/14/30
board uses the swap buffer (U94) to transfer the odd data byte from the
Multibus data lines (DATO/ through DAT7/).
4-25.
16-bit Transfer Operation
The 16-bit word transfer is initiated when the iSBC 86/14/30 board lowers
the ADO signal and activates the BRE/ signal. This condition causes
transfer of the odd byte of data on the DAT8/ through DATF/ data li.nes
and transfer of an even byte of data via DATO/ through DAT7/.
In performing a 16-bit operation, the iSBC 86/14/30 board uses both 1)
the high order data buffer (U93 on 13ZD6) to transfer the odd data byte
across Multibus data lines DAT8/ through DATF/ and 2) the low order
buffer (U71 on 13ZC6) to transfer the even data byte across Multibus data
lines DATO/ through DAT7/.
4-26.
DUAL PORT RAM ACCESS CONTROL LOGIC
The dual port RAM access control logic (schematic sheet 12) allows the
dual port RAM on the iSBC 86/14/30 board to be shared by both the local
CPU and another bus master operating on the Multibus interface. When
accessing the dual port RAM, the local CPU request is granted priority
over an off-board CPU's request for access. In a situation where both
CPUs issue a request for dual port RAM access at the same instant, the
4-18
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
off-board CPU access is held off until the local CPU has completed its
particular read or write operation. When an off-board CPU access is in
progress, the dual port control logic enters the slave mode and any
subsequent local CPU request will be held off until the slave mode is
terminated. Figure 4-4 and 4-5 show timing diagrams of the signal
sequences occurring within the dual port control logic for master mode
operation (local CPU access) and slave mode operation (off-board CPU
access).
4-27.
DUAL PORT RAM ACCESS OPERATION
The iSBC 86/14/30 board is designed to handle on-board RAM cycles
asynchronous to the operation of the CPU (via the 8203 RAM Controller).
When the CPU attempts to access on-board RAM, it can be found in one of
two states; either not busy or busy. Both sequences are described in the
following paragraphs.
4-28.
Dual Port RAM Access Cycle Without Contention (Not Busy)
If the CPU attempts to access the RAM and finds it not being used by
another bus master and not being requested for use, then the bus
Arbitration logic grants the access to the local CPU immediately.
The RAM access cycle begins when the CPU outputs the status and address.
The 8288 Bus Controller decodes the status bits and provides a memory
READ or memory WRITE command (LOCAL DP RD/ or LOCAL DP WT/) to the memory
array, and the address decode logic (PAL U46 on 4ZB4) decodes the address
bits on ADF through AD13 to activate the RAM ACCESS signal and the ON BD
ADDR/ signal from U22 (4ZC3).
The ON BD ADDR/ signal allows the CPU to enter a wait-state cycle (either
one or two required for an on-board RAM access) and disable the 8289 Bus
Arbiter from arbitrating for access to the Multibus interface.
The RAM ACCESS signal enters the dual port arbitration logic (schematic
sheet 12) and locks the dual port RAM into an on-board access condition.
As such, the dual port logic asserts the ON BD CMD/ signal and the DP
ACCESS/ signal and disables the SLAVE CMD/ signal. The DP ACCESS/ signal
provides the PCS/ input required to enable the 8203 RAM Controller to
accept a READ or WRITE command; the commands are from the PAL device U46
and are provided to the 8203 RAM Controller via U68 (11ZB7).
When the RAM access cycle is completed by the 8203 RAM controller, the
8203 activates the dual port transfer acknowledge signal (DP XACK/). The
DP XACK/ signal generates a RAM XACK/ signal that enters the on-board
ready control circuitry on schematic sheet 10. Since the RAM XACK/
signal is not synchronized with the wait-state generator, the ON BD CMD/
signal is activated, the RAM XACK/ signal immediately generates ON BD RDY
to the 8284A, thereby allowing the CPU to continue processing data.
4-19
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-29.
Dual Port RAM Access Cycle With Contention
When the CPU attempts to access the on-board RAM and finds it being used
by another bus master, then the Bus Arbitration logic enters an
arbitration cycle to gain access to the dual port RAM.
The bus arbitrtion begins when the dual port logic recognizes that
another bus master is presently accessing the dual port RAM. In this
condition, the remote bus master is asserting its commands to the dual
port RAM via the BUS MRDC/ and BUS MWTC/ signals from the Multibus
interface. When either command is active, the result is the generation
of an off-board RAM request signal (OFF BD RAM REQ on schematic sheet
14ZC3) to the dual port RAM arbitration logic. The OFF BD RAM REQ signal
locks the dual port arbitration logic (schematic sheet 12) into an
off-board access mode in which the local command and grant signals (ON BD
CMD/ and ON BD GNT/) are inactive, and the SLAVE DEN signal, the SLAVE
CMD signal, the OFF BD ADR EN/ signal, and the DP ACCESS/ signal are
active. Each of the signals is instrumental in inhibiting an on-board
access to dual port RAM while an off-board access is occurring.
When the on-board CPU requires access to on-board dual port RAM resources
that are being accessed by another bus master, the on-board CPU must
begin the access by asserting the status and address as for other types
of operations. PAL U46 decodes the address as before, and activates the
ON BD ADR/ signal to the 8289 Bus Arbiter (U84 on 3ZA4). The ON BD ADR/
signal prevents the 8289 Bus Arbiter from requesting the Multibus
interface.
The local CPU does not gain access to the dual port RAM until the remote
bus master has completed its operation. At that time, the 8203 RAM
Controller asserts the DP XACK/ signal and the remote bus master
deactivates the bus command signals (BUS MRDC/ and BUS MWTC/). The
inactive OFF BD RAM REQ Signal enters the dual port arbitration logic and
allows the pending on-board request to acquire the dual port RAM access
rights.
The latched status lines from the CPU are decoded through PAL U46 to
activate the local commands (LOCAL DP RD/ OR LOCAL DP WT/), the on-board
RAM access signal (RAM ACCESS), and the memory command signal (MEM CMD)
to the dual port arbitration logic.
The RAM ACCESS and MEM CMD signals enter the dual port arbitration logic
(schematic sheet 12) and lock the dual port arbitration logic into an
on-board CPU access condition. In this state, the dual port logic
asserts the ON BD CMD/ signal, the DP ACCESS/ signal and disables the
SLAVE CMD/ signal.
The ON BD CMD/ signal allows the local commands from the 8288 Bus
Controller (U44) to be passed to the 8203 RAM Controller. The DP ACCESS/
signal provides the PCS/ signal required to enable the 8203 RAM
Controller to accept a READ or WRITE command; the commands are from PAL
U46 and are passeed to the 8203 RAM Controller via U68 (11ZB7).
4-20
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
When the local CPU completes its RAM access cycle, the 8203 RAM
Controller activates the dual port transfer acknowledge signal (DP
XACK/). The DP XACK/ signal generates a RAM XACK/ signal that enters the
READY control circuitry (schematic sheet 10). Since the RAM XACK/ signal
is not synchronized with the wait-state generator and the ON BD CMD/
signal is active, the RAM XACK/ signal immediately generates ON BD RDY to
the 8284A. ON BD RDY allows the local CPU to continue processing as soon
as the RAM Controller completes the RAM cycle. The number of wait-states
required for any RAM access cycle depends on the current dual port
activity and depends on whether or not a refresh cycle is in process. A
typical RAM access operation at 8 MHz requires 2 wait-states; at 5 MHz it
requires 1 wait-state.
PO
I
P1
I
P2
I
P3
I
P4
1
1
P13
I
P14
I
P15
I
I
P16
P17
I
P18
1
P19
DUAL PORT ClK
P·PERIOOS
\
ON BD DP REOI
OFF BO RAM REO
ADV OP REOI
!\
...,
CPU ACCESS HOlD·OFF
I
1
1
1
/
<b
J
V'~\
ON SO OPGNTI
I
U2·9
U15
I
I
I
SLAVE CMO!
1
OP RDI OR OP WRTI
1
~I
~
1
1\
RAM XACKI
I
ON BO CMDI
I
I
8086 CPU CONTROL
I
,,
I
I
I
I
1
1
~
il
I
i ;1 \
i
1
,
'i-
~~
1
I
., I
LL
,,
I
\1
I
I
I
1
I
1
1
1
~f I
if
I
MULTI BUS INTERFACE CONTROL
Figure 4-4.
1I
!
I
,...1
UH
I
,....
1
I
I
I
I
\
f
;f
\
\
1/1-
~
~
lOCAL CPU CONTROL
Slave Mode Dual Port Access (CPU Lockout)
4-21
1
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
DUAL PORT ClK P·PERIODS
PO
Pl
P2
I
P12
I
P13
I
PO
I
Pl
P2
P3
I
P4
24 MHZ CLOCK
ON BD DP REOI
CPU ACCESS HOLDOFF
OFF BD RAM REO
BOS
~CCESS HOLDOFF
ADV DP REOI
,.
Ul·8
ON BD DP GNTI
SLAVE MODE
----~------~--------_T,~«-------------U2·9
Ul·5
ON BD CMDi
SLAVE CMDI
DP RDI OR DP WRTI
;
RAM XACKI
8086 CPU CONTROL
Figure 4-5.
4-30.
«
L'I--------'
CPU CONTROL
MUL TlBUS INTERFACE CONTROL
Master Mode Dual Port Access (Multibus Lockout)
RAM Controller Operation Timing
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains an 8203 Dynamic RAM Controller that
provides multiplexed addresses, address strobes, and refresh/access
arbitration for the on-board RAM array. The operation of the 8203
Dynamic RAM Controller is configured at the factory before shipment and
should not be changed. The memory refresh cycles are internally
requested and internally generated by the 8203 device.
In response to chip select terms, commands, and address, the 8203 Dynamic
RAM Controller generates the ROW address select signal, the COLUMN
address select signal (CAS/), and the 8-bit cell address required to
access the memory array during READ, and WRITE operations.
4-22
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
A WRITE cycle is initiated when the WT/ input to the Dynamic RAM
Controller (pin-3l) is driven LOW. During the WRITE cycle, an address is
input on ABI through ABII to generate the ROWand COLUMN addresses for
the memory array. The Dynamic RAM Controller generates ROWand COLUMN
address strobe signals (RAS/ and CAS/) when the ROWand COLUMN address on
OUTO/ through OUT7/ are valid. The chip select logic generates the
condition of ADO and BHE/ (operation of ADO and BHE/ is provided in Table
4-2). With the RAS/, CAS/, WEI/, and WE2/ signals, the RAM array begins
the data storage opertion. Shortly thereafter, the Dynamic ~1
Controller generates XACK/ to indicate that the data storage opertion is
completed. If a REFRESH cycle request is generated during a write
operation, the REFRESH cycle is allowed to occur immediately following
the WRITE cycle.
The READ cycle operation within the Dynamic RAM Controller is identical
to that of the WRITE cycle except that the RD/ input to the 8203 is
driven LOW and the write enable signals (WEI/ and WE2/) on the RAM board
are not activated, implying a READ operation. If a REFRESH cycle request
is received during a READ operation, a REFRESH cycle will occur
immediately following the READ cycle.
The Dynamic RAM Controller contains an internal Refresh Timer that
performs the REFRESH cycle automaticlly. In generating a REFRESH cycle,
the Dynamic RAM Controller activates the RAS/ signal to enable access to
the memory array as for the READ or WRITE operation, however, the CAS/
signal is not activated and a COLUMN address is not generated. The
timing required for an internal REFRESH cycle is identical to that of a
READ or WRITE cycle, as shown in Figure 4-6. More information on the
opertion of the 8203 Dynamic RAM Controller is available in the INTEL
PERIPHERAL DESIGN HANDBOOK.
4-23
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
READ OR WRITE
COMMAND
DPACCESSI
OUT Ol-OUT-?I
_______________......JX AD~~~SS
\
SACKI
X
)(~________R_O_W_A_D_D_R_______
COLUMN ADDRESS
DELAYED SACK MODE
-----------\,
I
\'-________________..J!
RASI
PRECHARGE
\
WEI
I
~
CASI
;1
\
XACKI
DBO-DBF (WRITE)
DBO-DBF (READ)
--------'t
4-31.
DATA VALID
X
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _..;..I_ _..........
Figure 4-6.
\ ' -___________
I
I
DATA V.ALlD
X~
_______________
)(~_ _ _ _ _ _ __
Typical Dynamic RAM Operation Sequence
ON-BOARD EPROM ACCESS SEQUENCE
Accesses to the various types of EPROM devices begin when the CPU asserts
status on SO through S2. The status from the CPU is decoded by the 8288
Bus Controller to initiate an operation and condition the I/O busses, if
required. For an EPROM access, the 8288 decodes a memory read operation
and the CPU places a memory address onto the local bus (ADO through
AD1S). As a result of decoding the status bits, the 8288 Bus Controller
(U44 at 3ZD4) generates an ALE signal to strobe the address into the
address latches (U47, US1, and US2 on 3ZB3) and a MRDC/ or an AMWTC
command. The Programmable Array Logic (PAL) device (U4S on 4ZDS) decodes
address bits ADC through AD13 to generate 3 signals: one signal, (EPROM
ACCESS), defines the memory address as an EPROM access enable term
(either PROM 0 LOW/, PROM 1 LOW/, PROM 0 HIGH/, or PROM 1 HIGH/).
4-24
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
The operation that is to occur with the EPROM is further defined via the
ADO and BRE/ signals from the CPU. These signals provide enables to the
2-to-4 line decoder (U56 at 4ZD3), effectively providing an 8-bit or
16-bit operation selection (refer to Table 4-2).
4-32.
EPROM READ Operation
Commands for an EPROM READ operation are delayed by logic devices U43 and
U42 that control the enable input to the 8288 Bus Controller (U44 on
3ZD4). The various types of EPROM devices have standard access times
that may, in some cases, require installation of mandatory wait-states
into the instruction execution cycles within the CPU. Depending on the
clock frequency selected for operation of the board, the EPROM access
times could vary from 228 nanoseconds to 1000 nanoseconds, as listed in
Table 4-3. The jumper configuration required for each condition is
listed in Chapter 2.
Table 4-3.
CPU
Clock Frequency
EPROM Static Access Time Vs. Wait-state Selection
Typical Access
Time Required
Typical Number of
Wait-states Required
8
8
8
8
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
228
353
478
603
nS
nS
nS
nS
None
One wait-state.
Two wait-states.
Three wait-states.
5
5
5
5
MHz
MHz
MHz
}1Hz
393
593
793
993
nS
nS
nS
nS
None
One wait-state.
Two wait-states.
Three wait-states.
4-33.
STATIC RAM WRITE Operation
A Static RAM device may be installed into the EPROM chip sockets on the
iSBC 86/14/30 board. When these devices are installed, the write
function to the devices is performed as described in the following
paragraph.
Static RAM devices in IC sockets U58 and U40 require installation of
jumper E106-E107 to connect the write enable signal. Static RAM devices
in IC sockets U57 and U39 require jumper E101-E107.
4-25
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-34.
ON-BOARD I/O ACCESS OPERATION
I/O cycle operations are similar to READ cycles in EPROM; that is, status
and addresses are provided by the CPU, and the 8288 Bus Controller (U44
at 3ZD4) provides an IORe/ signal for an I/O READ cycle and an AIOWC/
signal for an I/O WRITE cycle. Both IORC/ and AIOWC/ are delayed as was
the MROC/ signal for the EPROM READ operation. The PAL device (U36 on
4ZA4) decodes the address on ADO through ADF and activates the I/O ACCESS
signal from U29 (4ZB3) and the on-board address indication (ON BD ADDR/
signal from U22 at 4ZC3). The PAL device also generates a specific chip
select for the device to be accessed during the operation. On receiving
a select signal, an address, and a command, the I/O device begins
performing the operation.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board must be configured to allow a specific number of
wait-states to occur, during which the I/O device is allowed to complete
its cycle. After a certain period of time, the iSBC 86/14/30 board
begins operation by activating the ON BD ROY signal to release the CPU
from its wait-state execution. The jumper configuration for selection of
the number of wait-states is contained in Chapter 2. Table 4-4 provides
the relationship between the I/O access time and the number of
wait-states inserted into the I/O operation for each clock rate on the
iSBC 86/14/30 board.
NOTE
The as-shipped configuration of the
wait-state jumpers assumes that the
board is clocked at 8 MHz. If the
board is operated at 5 MHz, reconfigure
the wait-state jumpers.
Table 4-4.
CPU
Clock Frequency
I/O Access Time Vs. Wait-state Selection
Typical Access
Time Required
Typical Number of
Wait-states Required
8 MHz
438
Two wait-states.
5 MHz
558
One wait-state.
4-26
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-35.
iSBX BUS ACCESS OPERATION
Accesses to devices on the iSBX Bus interface are similar to I/O cycles
in that the CPU provides status and address, the 8288 Bus Controller
provides the command decode (either IORC/ or AIOWC/). However, PAL
device U36 decodes the address on ADO through ADF to activate one of the
chip select terms for one of the iSBX Bus connectors. The iSBC 86/14/30
board must be configured to allow a specific number of wait-states to
occur, during which the iSBX bus device is allowed to complete its cycle.
After a certain period of time, the iSBC 86/14/30 board re-initiates
operation by activating the ON BD RDY signal to release the CPU from its
wait-state execution. The jumper configuration for selection of the
number of wait-states is contained in Chapter 2. The relationship
between the wait-states and the access time is as listed in Table 4-4.
4-36.
TYPICAL LOCAL ACCESS TO MULTIBUS RESOURCE
Figures 4-5 and 4-6 show the timing for a Multibus access by the local
CPU; the accesses are performed asynchronous to CPU operation. The local
CPU places status onto the SO through S2 lines and an address onto ADO
through ADF. The address is strobed into the address buffers (U47, U51,
and U52 on schematic sheet 2ZC3) AO through A13 by activation of ALE.
The address decode logic decodes the addresses and drives ON BD ADR/ high
if the address is not a valid local address.
The 8289 Bus Arbiter decodes the status bits (SO, S1, and S2) and, since
ON BD ADR/ is high, a Multibus access cycle is requestd. When the
iSBC 86/14/30 board obtains priority (BPRN/ is LOW) and the Multibus
interface is not busy (BUSY/ is HIGH), the 8289 Bus Arbiter assumes
control of the Multibus interface. After acquiring the Multibus
interface, the iSBC 86/14/30 board transmits the address and data. The
device that is accessed on the Multibus interface signals the completion
of the operation by asserting the XACK/ signal.
If the Multibus interface is found to be busy when the iSBC 86/14/30
board attempts to perform a Multibus access operation, the 8289 Bus
Arbiter (U84 at 3ZA4) asserts the BREQ/ and CBRQ/ signals to begin
arbitration for the use of the bus. One effect that assertion of BREQ/
has on the iSBC 86/14/30 board is to unLOCK the on-board dual port RAM
immediately. This eliminates the possibility that another us master is
holding the Multibus interface while waiting to gain access to the LOCKed
on-board dual port RAM.
If the LOCK/ or OVERRIDE/ signals are active, or if the BPRN/ signal is
active and the CBRQ/ signal is inactive, the local CPU will retain
control of the Multibus interface on completion of the access. The
Multibus interface remains in this condition 1) until LOCK is
deactivated, or 2) until CBRQ/ goes active and the CPU completes a
Multibus cycle. Refer to paragraph 2-28 for more information of CBRQ
oryeration.
4-27
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-37.
INTERRUPT OPERATION
The iSBC 86/14/30 board supports both bus vectored and non-bus vectored
interrupt generation through the use of an 82S9A PIC device. In both
types of operation, the on-board PIC (U34 on 8ZC3) must be the master PIC
in the configuration.
When an interrupt request is sensed by the master PIC, it activates the
INTR line to initiate an interrupt cycle in the CPU. Figure 4-7 provides
the timing for a typical bus vectored interrupt and for a typical non-bus
vectored interrupt cycle and the following paragraphs describe the
operation of a bus vectored (BV) and a non-bus vectored (NBV) interrupt
on the iSBC 86/14/30 board.
4-38.
NBV Interrupt Sequence
A non-bus vectored interrupt is one in which the interrupt vector is
generated by the on-board PIC. A non-bus vectored interrupt does not
require sending an interrupt vector across the Multibus interface.
Assume for explanation purposes that a NBV interrupt is initiated by an
on-board device activating the IRS interrupt request signal to the PIC.
The interrupt sequence occurs as follows.
If no other higher prioriuty interrupt is currently being serviced, the
IRS input causes the PIC to activate the INTR output to suspend the
current code execution in the CPU. The CPU then executes an interrupt
acknowledge cycle that places status onto SO, Sl, and S2 (all hits LOW);
the status begins an interrupt acknowledge cycle in the 8288 Bus
Controller.
The status lines are decoded by the 8288 Bus Controllers which, in turn,
activate the MCE and INTA/ signal outputs. The 8288 activates the MCE
signal which activates the INTA CYCLE signal. The active INTA CYCLE
signal is "AND"ed with the jumper E33-E34 and is responsible for enabling
or disabling the 8289 Bus Arbiter from arbitrating for control of the
Multibus interface.
For an NBV interrupt with jumper E33-E34 installed, the status lines from
the CPU are decoded by the Bus 8288 (U8S) which activates the BUS INTA/
signal when the board gains control of the Multibus interface. During
the local operation, the ON BD ADR/ signal is HIGH; the BUS AEN/ and BUS
INTA/ signals cause the LOCAL INTA signal to go active; and the CPU
activates the LOCK/ signal to the Multibus interface to ensure that the
Multibus interface is controlled throughout the interrupt cycle.
For an NBV interrupt with jumper E33-E34 removed, the status lines from
the CPU are decoded by the local 8288 (U44) which activates the local
INTA/ signal; the acquisition of the Multibus interface is not required.
During the local operation, the ON BD ADR/ signal is LOW. The ON BD ADR/
and local INTA signals cause the LOCAL INTA signal to go active.
4-28
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
On receipt of an INTA/ signal from one of the 8288 Bus Controllers, the
on-board PIC freezes the state of its internal priority resolution
logic. The first INTA/ signal is used by PAL device U25 (lOZC3) to
activate LOCAL INTA. This signal generates a FIRST INTA/ signal to
indicate that this is the first of two INTA cycles and to prepare for the
next INTA cycle. The FIRST INTA/ signal and T43 activate the OFF BD RDY
signal from the PAL device to allow the CPU to complete the first INTA
cycle.
On receipt of the second INTA/ pulse from the 8288 Bus Controller, the
PIC places an 8-bit interrupt ID for IR5 onto the local data bus (DO
through D7) and activates its EN/ output. The EN/ signal activates 59
DEN to the PAL device (U25 on lOZC3) to indicate that the INTA cycle is a
local one. An OFF BD RDY signal is generated from the PAL device as a
result of the 59 DEN and T43 signal inputs. At that time the CPU reads
the interrupt vector from the 8259A PIC. The CPU must then multiply the
vector. by 4 to obtain an interrupt service routine address for IR5.
After the interrupt service routine is completed, the CPU automatically
restores the affected flags and returns to normal program execution.
4-29
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
ClK
MCE
~
),"
"
I,
INTA
READY
INTACYClE
(~a=
~
"
II
READY
CIRCUIT
L
...J
INTERRUPT TYPE FROM MASTER PIC
(
ADO·?
NOTE: Assumes
jumper E33 . E34
removed.
)-
VALID
NON BUS VECTORED INTERRUPT SEQUENCE
I
T1
I
T3
Tw
I
Tw
I T4
I
T1
I
T2
I
T3
I
Tw
T4
I T1
LrL
ClK
MCE
BUSAENI
_: ___
--11_
I
~~~__________________~rL
WAIT FOR BUS ACQUISITION
'
r
BUS INTAI
READY
L~
----II~
I
'~
I
FROM
ON·BOARD
READY
CIRCUIT
FROM XACKJ ON
BUS
CASO·CASl
--------------------i,~~_____________S_lA_V_E_I_D_TO__Sl_A_V_E_P_IC____________..,}---
ADR8·11
----------------I--~'~j'~----------------~'~~____
I
C_A_SO_._2_0_N_B_US
__
___________________....,,_---------------------------1'[email protected] TYPE FROM SLAVE PIC
ADO·?
~--J~
PI
NOTE: Assumes
jumper E33·E34
installed.
-
,
BUS VECTORED INTERRUPT SEQUENCE
Figure 4-7.
Multibus access Timing
4-30
VALID
DATA
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-39.
BV Interrupt Sequence
The bus vectored interrupt sequence appears to the 8086-2 PU to be
similar to the non-bus vectored interrupt sequence with the jumper
E33-E34 removed. However, in this case, the interrupt vector comes to
the CPU from a slave PIC rather than from the master (on-board) PIC.
Assume for explanation purposes that the master PIC receives an IR6
interrupt request from a slave PIC. The sequence of events that follows
is described in the following paragraphs.
A typical bus vectored sequence begins when an interrupt request is
sensed on an interrupt line (IR6). Provided that no other higher
priority request is being serviced, the master PIC responds by generating
an interrupt request signal (INTR) to the CPU. The CPU responds by
executing an interrupt acknowledge cycle that places status onto its
status lines (SO, S1, and S2).
The status lines are decoded by the U85 8288 Bus Controller. The 8288
activates the MCE signal which activates the INTA CYCLE signal and
generates a HIGH on ON BD ADR/. The inactive ON BD ADR/ signal enables
the 8289 Bus Arbiter, allowing the 8289 to begin arbitration for control
of the Multibus interface.
When the 8289 obtains control of the bus, it activates BUS AEN/ which
generates a BUS INTA/ signal from the 8288 Bus Controller (U85). The BUS
INTA/ signal goes onto the Multibus interface and causes the slave PIC to
freeze the internal state of its priority resolution logic. Locally, the
BUS INTA/ signal generates the FIRST INTA/ and 8259A INTA/ signals to
perform functions as follows.
*
The 8259A INTA/ signal allows the master PIC to place the interrupt
ID byte onto the CASO through CAS2 lines.
*
The FIRST INTA/ signal and the T43 signal generate the OFF BD RDY
signal to provide a READY input to the CPU, allowing the CPU to
complete the first interrupt acknowledge bus cycle.
The second interrupt acknowledge bus cycle activates the MCE signal
again, and generates a second INTA/ pluse from th 8288 Bus Controller
(U85) onto the Multibus interface. The functions performed by each are
as follows.
*
The MCE signal latches the slave ID byte (on CASO through CAS2) and
gates the byte onto the Multibus address lines ADR8/ through ADRA/.
*
The INTA/ pulse causes the slave PIC to recognize its slave ID on AD8
through ADA, read the interrupt ID byte, place an interrupt vector
onto the Multibus data lines DATO/ through DAT7/, and activate the
XACK/ line on the Multibus interface.
By activating the XACK/ signal, the slave device indicates that the
interrupt vector is available on the Multibus data lines. The XACK/
signal generates another READY signal (OFF BD RDY) to the CPU via PAL
device U25, allowing the CPU to read the interrupt vector, terminate the
interrupt, and begin servicing the interrupt request.
4-31
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-40.
FAILSAFE TIMER OPERATION
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains a Failsafe Timer that generates a bus
timeout signal (TIME OUT INTR/) when an expected response from another
device (in the form of an XACK/ signal) is too late in arriving to the
iSBC 86/14/30 board.
When the jumper E38-E39 is installed and the timeout interval has
elapsed, logic device U1S activates the TIME OUT INTR/ signal to enable
generation of the local interrupt signal (LOCAL INTA). The LOCAL INTA
signal generates a READY signal to the CPU via the OFF BD RDY signal from
PAL device U2S.
The timeout is generated by logic device UlS and components R13 and C7
(lOZBS) and the ALE signal on the iSBC 86/14/30 board. As the board
operates, the ALE signal is pulsed for every instruction cycle. If the
ALE signal is idle for more than approximately 4 milliseconds, UlS
activates the TIME OUT INTR/ signal. Jumper connections on the
iSBC 86/14/30 board allow use of the TIME OUT INTR/ signal (if jumpered
properly within the interrupt logic) to interrupt the CPU, indicating
that a timeout condition has occurred.
4-41.
CHIP SELECT CIRCUIT OPERATION
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains Programmable Array Logic (PAL) devices
that provide address and command decoding to generate the required chip
select terms for the opration to be performed. The PAL devices are fused
program devices whose output signals are dependent: on the factory
programming performed before shipping the board. The iSBC 86/14/30 board
contains 4 PAL devices that provide several functions required for
operation of the board that have been performed on previous types of
single board computers via discrete logic components.
The internal operation of the PAL devices, to this point, has been
handled as though the device where a black box; when a certain input
signal combination occurs, a consistent output results. However, in
certain cases, the internal operation of the PAL devices must be known
The following paragraphs provide the details of internal operation of
each of the 4 PAL devices on the iSBC 86/14/30 board, and includes a
formula for each PAL that allows prediction of a resultant signal for a
determined input signal combination.
Tables 4-6 through 4-12 describe operation of each PAL, including Boolean
equations describing the logic signal flow through the device. The
Boolean equations are listed such that the active level of_the input
signals (whether active-high or active-low) and the required state of the
input signals (whether the signal must be true or false) can be
determined by the equation. A slash (/) after a signal name indicates
that the signal is active-low; a bar over the signal name indicates that
the false condition of the signal is required in the operation.
4-32
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-42.
I/O Chip Select Operation
PAL device U36 decodes the address lines to provide the I/O chip select
terms required for the iSBX Bus interfaces, the status register, the
8259A PIC, the 8255A-5 PPI, the 8251A PCI, and the 8253-5 PIT on the iSBC
86/14/30 board. The PAL device is a 20-pin IC that accepts 12 input
signals and provides 6 active-LOW output signals.
Two of the inputs are not labeled on the schematic drawing. However,
they provide the PAL with an indication as to whether the installed
devices on the iSBX Bus interfaces are 8-bit or l6-bit devices. The
signals enter the PAL on pins 8 and 9, one signal for each connector.
The functions of each signal on the iSBC 86/14/30 board are listed in
Table 4-5. Table 4-6 lists separately each of the 6 output signals from
U36 and the conditions required to activate each.
Table 4-5.
PAL INPUT
Pin 9
Pin 8
Low
High
Low
Low
Low
High
High
High
iSBX~
Bus Width Select
Interface Operation Selected
l6-bit operation for both connectors.
8-bit operation for connector J4, l6-bit
operation for connector J3.
l6-bit operation for connector J4, 8-bit
operation for connector J3.
8-bit operation for both connectors.
4-33
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Table 4-6.
PAL U36 Operation
Output Signal
Name
Input Signal Combination
PIO CS/
A7 and A6 and A5
and 10 ADDR
SBX2 CSO/
A7 and A6 and A5 and A4
and iffiE/ and 10 ADDR and
SBX2 8-BIT and MPRES2/
or
SBXl CSO/
Provides the chip select term
for accessing the status
register, the 825lA, the
8253-5, the 8259A, and the
8255A-5 devices.
A7 and A6 and A5 and A4
and AD and 10 ADDR and
MPRES2/
SBX2 CSl/
Output Signal Functions
Provides the MCSO/ chip select
term for I/O addresses AO
through AE (even addresses
only) to an 8- or l6-bit iSBX
Bus device on J3.
Provides the MCSl/ chip select
term for I/O addresses Al
through AF (odd addresses
only) to a l6-bit iSBX Bus
device on J 3.
A7 and A6 and A5 and
A4 and AO and I/O ADDR
and SBX2 8-BIT and ~MP~RE~S~2/ Provides the MCSl/ chip select
term for I/O addresses BO
through BF (even addresses
only) to an 8-bt iSBX Bus
device on J 3.
A7 and A6 and AS and A4
and AD and 10 ADDR and
MPRESl/
4-34
Provides the MCSO/ chip select
term for I/O addresses 80
through 8E (even addresses
only) to an 8- or l6-bit iSBX
Bus device on J4.
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Table 4-6.
PAL U36 Operation (continued)
Output Signal
Name
Input Signal Combination
SBX1 CS1/
A7 and A6 and AS and A4
and
and 10 ADDR and
SBX1 8-BIT and MPRES1/
Output Signal Functions
BRE/
or
I/O ACCESS EN
or
or
A7 and A6 and As and A4
and AO and I/O ADDR and
SBX1 8-BIT and MPRES1/
Provides the MCS1/ chip select
term for I/O addresses 81
through 8F (odd addresses
only) to a 16-bit iSBX Bus
device on J 4.
Provides the MCS1/ chip select
term for I/O addresses 90
through 9E (even addresses
only) to an 8-bit iSBX Bus
device on J 4.
Provides the I/O ACCESS signal
and I/O bus conditioning for
accesses to I/O port address
CO through DFH; the on-board
LSI devices.
A7 and A6 and AS/
A7 and A6 and AS
and MPRES1/
Provides the I/O ACCESS and
I/O bus conditioning for
access to I/O port address 80
through 9FH, the iSBX Bus I/O
address of J4.
A7 and A6 and AS
and MPRES2/
Provides the I/O ACCESS and
I/O bus conditioning for
access to I/O port address AO
through BFH, the iSBX Bus I/O
address of J3.
4-35
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-43.
EPROM Chip Select Operation
PAL device U45 decodes the address lines to provide the PROM chip enable
terms required for accessing the on-board EPROM. The PAL device is a
20-pin IC that accepts 11 input signals and provides 3 active-HIGH output
signals.
Two of the inputs to the PAL are not labeled on the schematic drawing.
The output signals BANKO and BANK1 are used by U56, a 2-to-4 decoder, to
selectively activate the PROM chip enable signals. However, they provide
the PAL with an indication as to which of four possible device types are
being used; including 2k by 8-bit, 4k by 8-bit, 8k by 8-bit, or 16k by
8-bit devices. The signals enter the PAL on pins 1 and 2 and function on
the iSBC 86/14/30 board as listed in Table 4-7. Table 4-8 lists
separately each of the 3 output signals from the PAL device and the
conditions required to activate each.
Table 4-7.
PAL INPUT
Pin 1 (SIZO)
Low
Low
High
High
EPROM Chip Capacity Select
Pin 2 (SIZ1)
Low
High
Low
High
Chip Size Selected
16k by 8-bit capacity; 27128 chips.
8k by 8-bit capacity; 2764 chips.
4k by 8-bit capacity; 2732 chips.
2k by 8-bit capacity; 2716 chips.
4-36
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Table 4-S.
PAL U45 Operation
Output Signal Input Signal Combination
Name
PROM ACCESS
or
or
or
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and AE
and AD and SIZO and SIZ1
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and AE
and SIZO and SIZ1
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF
and SIZO and SIZ1
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and SIZO
and SIZ1
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and AE
and AD and AC and
SIZO and SIZ1
BANK 0
(pin 14)
or
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and AE
and AD and SIZO and SIZ1
-
or
--
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and AE
and SIZO and SIZ1
4-37
Output Signal Functions
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FEOOO through FFFFF (2k by
S-bit devices).
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FCOOO through FFFFF (4k by
S-bit device s ).
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FSOOO through FFFFF (Sk by
S-bit devices).
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FOOOO through FFFFF (16k by
S-bit devices).
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FEOOO through FEFFF.
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FCOOO through FDFFF.
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FSOOO through FBFFF.
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Table 4-8.
PAL U45 Operation (continued)
Output Signal Input Signal Combination
Name
or
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and
SIZO and SIZl
BANK 1 (pin 15) MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and AE
and AD and AC and
SIZO and SIZl
or
or
or
4-44.
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and AE
and AD and SIZO and SIZl
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and AE
and SIZO and SIZl
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF and
SIZO and SIZl
Output Signal Functions
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FOOOO through F7FFF.
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FEOOO through FEFFF.
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FCOOO through FDFFF.
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
F8000 through FBFFF.
Decodes the address as being
within the PROM address space
FOOOO through F7FFF.
RAM Chip Select Operation
PAL device U46 decodes the address and status lines to provide the access
control signals required for accessing the dual port RAM. The PAL device
is a 20-pin IC that accepts 11 input signals and provides 4 active-HIGH
output signals.
Two of the inputs to the PAL (SIZO on pin-2 and SIZl on pin-3) are not
labeled on the schematic drawing. However, they provide the PAL with an
indication as to which of four possible capacities of the RAM array are
present on the board. The functions performed by the signals are listed
in Table 4-9. Table 4-10 lists separately each of the 4 output signals
from the PAL device and the conditions required to activate each.
4-38
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Table 4-9.
RAM Array Capacity Select
PAL INPUT
Pin 2 (SlZO)
Pin 3 (SIZ1)
Low
Low
High
High
Low
High
Low
High
Table 4-10.
Array Capacity Selected
256k byte capacity.
l28k byte capacity.
64k byte capacity.
32k byte capacity.
PAL U46 Operation
Output Signal Input Signal Combination
Name
Output Signal Functions
MEM CMD
CMD Q2 and MEM and LSl
Decodes the command from the
CPU or the 8288 Bus Controller
as being a memory READ command.
CMD Q2 and MEM and LSO
Decodes the command from the
CPU or the 8288 Bus Controller
as being a memory WRITE
command.
or
LOCAL DP WT/
CMD Q2 and MEM and LSl
and LSO
LOCAL DP RD/
CMD Q2 and MEM and LSl
RAM ACCESS
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and A10 and AF
and SIZO and SIZl
4-39
Decodes the command as being
one to WRITE to dual port RAM.
Decodes the command as being
one to READ from dual port RAM.
Decodes the address as being
within the dual port RAM
memory address space (local
addresses 00000 through 07FFF,
or 32k); iSBC 86/14 board only.
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Table 4-10.
PAL U46 Operation (continued)
Output Signal Input Signal Combination
Name
or
or
or
4-45.
MEM and A13 and A12 and
All and Ala and
SI20 and SI21
MEM and A13 and A12 and
AIT and SI20 and SI21
MEM and A13 and A12 and
SI20 and SI21
Output Signal Functions
Decodes the address as being
within the dual port RAM memory
address space (local addresses
00000 through OFFFF, or 64k);
iSBC 86/14 board with iSBC 300A
board only.
Decodes the address as being
within the dual port RAM memory
address space (local addresses
00000 through 1FFFF, or 128k);
iSBC 86/30 board only.
Decodes the address as being
within the dual port RAM memory
address space (local addresses
00000 through 3FFFF, or 256k);
iSBC 86/30 board with iSBC 304
board only.
Bus Control Operation
PAL device U25 provides control over the Mu1tibus and local bus activity
on the iSBC 86/14/30 board. The PAL device is a 20-pin IC that accepts 13
input signals and provides 4 output signals. Table 4-11 lists the 4
output signals and the conditions required on the inputs to activate each.
4-40
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
Table 4-11.
PAL U25 Operation
Output Signal Input Signal Combination
Output Signal Functions
~~
LOCAL INTA
BUS AEN/ and BUS INTA/
Provides the INTA input to the
master PIC for a BV or NBV
interrupt cycle (with jumper
E33-E34 installed).
ON BD ADR/ and INTA/
Provides the INTA input to the
master PIC for a NBV interrupt
cycle.
BUS AEN/ and BUS RD CMD/
Conditions the data bus buffers
to the Multibus to the output
direction for the data transfer.
BUS AEN/ and ON BD DTR
Conditions the data bus buffers
to the Multibus to the input
direction for the data transfer.
FIRST INTA/ and T43
Provides the CPU with READY
after the first INTA cycle of
either a BV or a NBV interrupt.
or
59 DEN and T43
Provides the CPU with READY
after the second INTA cycle of a
NBV interrupt operation.
or
XACK and BUS AEN/
Provides the CPU with READY
after the second INTA cycle of a
BV interrupt operation.
or
TIME OUT INTR/
Provides the CPU with READY if a
failsafe timeout occurs.
ABO
Enables the data bus buffers to
perform a word operation when
address is even.
or
DT/R BUS
or
OFF BD RDY
WORD XMIT
or
INTA CYCLE and 59 DEN
and BUS AEN/
4-41
Enables the data bus buffers to
perform a byte operation if the
3 signal conditions are present
during a BV interrupt cycle.
SERVICE INFORMATION
CHAPTER 5.
5-1.
SERVICE INFORMATION
INTRODUCTION
This chapter provides a list of replaceable parts, a parts location
diagram, a jumper location diagram, service diagrams, and service and
repair assistance instructions for the iSBC 86/14/30 Single Board
Computer.
5-2.
REPLACEABLE PARTS
Table 5-1 provides a list of replaceable parts for the iSBC 86/14/30
board. Table 5-2 identifies and locates the manufacturers specified in
the MFR CODE column in Table 5-1. Intel parts that are available on the
open market are listed in the MFR CODE column as "COML"; every effort
should be made to procure these parts from a local (commercial)
distributor.
5-3.
SERVICE DIAGRAMS
Figure 5-1 provides the location of each jumper on the iSBC 86/14/30
board. The parts location diagram and schematic diagram for the
iSBC 86/14/30 board are provided in Figures 5-2 and 5-3, respectively.
On the schematic diagram, a signal mnemonic that ends with a slash (e.g.,
ALE/) is active LOW. Conversely, a signal mnemonic without a slash
(e.g., ALE) is active HIGH.
5-1
SERVICE INFORMATION
Table 5-1.
Reference
Replaceable Parts
Description
Mfr. Part No.
Mfr. Code
Qty
IC, 8255A-5 PPI
IC, 8259A PIC
IC, 8286 Bus Transceiver
IC, 8287 Bus Transceiver
IC, 8288 Bus Controller
IC, 8289 Bus Arbiter
IC, 8284A Clock Gen.
IC, 8086-2 16-bit CPU
IC, 8253-5 PIT
IC, 8203 RAM Controller
IC, 8251A PCI
IC, 1k by 4 bit Progr. PROM
IC, 16k by 1 Dynamic RAM
for iSBC 86/14 Board
IC, 64k by 1 Dynamic RAM
for iSBC 86/30 Board
8255A-5
8259A
8286
8287
8288
8289
8284A
8086-2
8253-5
8203
8251A
144108
Intel
Intel
Intel
Intel
Intel
Intel
Intel
Intel
Intel
Intel
Intel
Intel
1
1
5
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2118-4
Intel
16
2164
Intel
16
U1 0, 30 , 4 2 , 5 9
U29
U28,62
U11,55
U3
U27
U12,54
U7,8,9
U13,26,63
U31,60
U1,2
U32
U5,43
U15
U33,67
U83
U64
U16,56
U6
U89
U14
U53
U87,88
U61,86
U68, U69
IC, Quad 2-in pos-NAND
IC, Quad 2-in pos-NOR
IC, Hex inverter
IC, Hex inverter
IC, Hex buffer/driver
IC, Quad 2-i n pos-AND
IC, Quad 2-in pos-AND
IC, Tri 3-in pos-NAND
IC, Quad 2-in pos-NOR
IC, Quad 2-in pos-NOR
IC, Dual D-type flipflop
IC, Dual D-type flipflop
IC,Dual J/K flipflop
IC, Dual multivibrator
IC, Quad tri-state buffer
IC, Quad driver
IC, Quad 2-in pos-NAND
IC, 3-to-8 line mux
IC, Quad D-type flipflop
IC, Octal D-type flipflop
IC, Presettable latch
IC, Dual 5-input NOR
IC, Quad 2-in X-NOR
IC, Hex bus driver
IC, Octal D-type latch
74s00
74S02
74S04
74LS04
7406
74S08
74LS08
74S10
74S32
74LS32
74S74
74LS74
74S112
74LS123
74LS125
74128
74LS1.32
74S139
74S17.5
74LS240
74LS259
74LS260
74LS266
74367
74LS373
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
4
1
2
2
1
1
2
3
3
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
U47,51,52,
73,95
IC, Octal D-type latch
74S373
TI
5
U35
U34
U49,50,71,93,94
U17,74,91,92,96
U44,85
U84
U4
U48
U37
U72
U38
U66
U70-73,91-94
U70-73,91-94
5-2
SERVICE INFORMATION
Table 5-1.
Reference
Replaceable Parts (continued)
Description
Hfr. Part No.
U41
U22
U65
U23
U24
IC,
IC,
IC,
IC,
IC,
U25,45,46
U36
IC, Prog. logic array
IC, Prog. logic array
RP4,5
RP2,3,6,8,10
RP1
RP7,9
Res
Res
Res
Res
C8,25,32,33,
41,42
Dual Binary Counter
Or-invert gates
4-bit D-type register
Line Driver, RS232C
Line Receiver, RS232C
Pack,
Pack,
Pack,
Pack,
10k, 8 pin
2.2k, 10 pin
5.6k, 10 pin
1.0k, 10 pin
Capacitor, .1uF, RDL, 50V,
+80% 20%
Cl-7,9-24,26-31, 34,37,39,40,45 Capacitor, .1uF, AXIAL,
50V, +80% 20%
C38,43,61
C36,44
C62
C46-60
R34
R1,2,9,23
28-30,32
R3-5, 15,16,
20-22,24,26,
27,31
R33
R6-8
R13
R17, 18, 25
Qty
74LS393
74S64
74LS173
75189A
75188
TI
TI
TI
TI
TI
1
1
1
1
1
PAL14H4
PAL12L6
MMI
MMI
3
1
OBD
OBD
OBD
OBD
COML
COML
COML
COML
2
5
1
2
OBD
COML
6
OBD
COML
34
OBD
COML
3
Capacitor, Tant, 22uF,
15V, + 10%
Capacitor, Tant, 2.2uF,
20V, + 10%
Capacitor, Tant, 10uF ,
20V, + 10%
OBD
COML
2
OBD
COML
1
Capacitor, DIP, .1uF,
50V, +80% 20%
OBD
COML
15
Resistor, 100, 1/4W, 5%
OBD
COML
1
Resistor, 1k, 1/4W, 5%
OBD
COML
8
OBD
OBD
OBD
OBD
OBD
OBD
OBD
COML
COML
COML
COML
COML
COML
COML
12
1
3
1
3
2
2
OBD
M15A
COML
CRYS
1
1
10k, 1/4\~, 5%
lOOk, 1/4W, 5%
220, 1/4W, 5%
22Ok, 1/4W, 5%
470, 1/4W, 5%
510, l/SW, 5%
10k, 1/8W, 5%
R12,19
Resistor,
Resistor,
Resistor,
Resistor,
Resistor,
Resistor,
Resistor,
CR1
Y1
Diode, 1N4148
Crystal, 1511Hz
RlO,l1
Mfr. Code
5-3
SERVICE INFORMATION
Table 5-1.
Replaceable Parts (continued)
Mfr. Part No.
Reference
Description
G1
Crystal Oscillator,
9.8304 MHz
Crystal Oscillator, 24 MHz
Diode, LED, Red
Socket, 18-pin DIP
Socket, 20-pin DIP
Socket, 28-pin DIP
Socket, 40-pin DIP
Socket, 14-pin DIP
Socket, 20-pin DIP
Plug, shorting
Post, wirewrap
G2
DSl-3
XU66
XU45,46,73,95
XU39,40,57,58
XU48,72
XU18,19,20,21
XU17
1-230
Table 5-2.
Mfr. Code
Qty
DAL
CTS
HEW
AUG
AUG
AUG
RNI
BURN
BURN
AMP
I
XO-33D
MXO-50-1-24
HLMP-0301
518-AG37D
520-AG37D
528-AG37D
ICA-406-S-T
DILB14P-108
DILB20P-108
530153-2
87623-1
AMP
Manufacturer's Codes
Manufacturer
Address
AMP
AUG
BURN
CRYS
CTS
DAL
INTEL
HEW
MMI
RNI
TI
Amp, Inc.
Augat, Inc.
Burndy Corp.
Crystek Crystals Corp.
CTS Knights, Inc.
Dale Electronics, Inc.
Intel Corp.
Hewlett Packard
Monolithic Memories, Inc.
Robinson Nugent, Inc.
Texas Instruments
OBD
Order by description;
any commercial (COML) source.
5-4.
Mfr. Code
Harrisburg, PA
Attelboro, MA
Norwalk, CT
Fort Meyer, FL
Elkhart, IN
Columbus, NE
Santa Clara, CA
Cupertino, CA
Sunnyvale, CA
New Albany, IN
Dallas, TX
SERVICE AND REPAIR ASSISTANCE
United States customers can obtain service and repair assistance by
contacting the Intel Product Service Hotline in Phoenix, Arizona.
Customers outside the United States should contact their sales source
(Intel Sales Office or Authorized Distributor) for service information
and repair assistance.
5-4
1
3
1
4
4
2
4
1
39
230
SERVICE INFORMATION
Before calling the Product Service Hotline, you should have the following
information available:
a.
Date you received the product.
b.
Complete part number of the product (including dash number).
number is usually silk-screened onto the board.
c.
Serial number of product.
board.
d.
Shipping and billing addresses.
e.
Purchase order number for billing purposes if your Intel product
warranty has expired.
f.
Extended warranty agreement information, if applicable.
This
This number is usually stamped on the
Use the following numbers for contacting the Intel Product Service
Hotline:
Telephone Number
All U.S. locations,
except Alaska, Arizona, & Hawaii:
(800) 528-0595
All other locations:
(602) 869-4600
TWX Number
910 - 951 - 1330
Always contact the Product Service Hotline before returning a product to
Intel for repair. You will be given a repair authorization number,
shipping instructions, and other important information which will help
Intel provide you with fast, efficient service. If you are returning the
product because of damage sustained during shipment or if the product is
out of warranty, a purchase order is required before Intel can initiate
the repair.
In preparing the product for shipment to the Repair Center, use the
original factory packing material, if possible. If this material is not
available, wrap the product in cushioning material such as Air Cap
TH-240, manufactured by the Sealed Air Corporation, Hawthorne, N.J. Then
enclose in a heavy duty corrugated shipping carton, and label "FRAGILE"
to ensure careful handling. Ship only to the address specified by the
Product Service Hotline Personnel.
5-5
SERVICE INFORMATION
5-6
SERVICE INFORMATION
c
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SERVICE INFORMATION
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APPENDIX A.
A-1.
iSBC M 300A RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
INTRODUCTION
This appendix provides information for installing the iSBC 300A RAM
Expansion Multimodule Board that may be installed onto the iSBC 86/14
Single Board Computer.
A-2.
iSBC 300A INSTALLATION
The following steps explain how to unpack and install the iSBC 300A board.
1. Unpack the iSBC 300A board.
2. Inspect the iSBC 300A board for damage. If damage exists, follow
the instructions for repairs as described in Chapter 5 of this
manual.
3. Remove the iSBC 86/14 board from the backplane and place it
(component side up) on a soft surface (preferably a piece of
foam).
4. Remove IC 8203 at U72 from the iSBC 86/14 board.
5. Remove IC's (74S373) at U73 and U95 from the iSBC 86/14 board.
NOTE
Save these IC's. They will be
reinstalled at a later step.
6.
Insert the iSBC 300A board mating pins into socket U72 and other
mating pins, orienting the board as shown in figure A-I.
7.
Ensure the mating pins are aHgned and carefully press the iSBC
300A board into place by applying pressure at U1 of the iSBC
300A board.
8.
Place nylon spacer between the iSBC 86/14 board and the iSBC
300A board at one of the holes shown in Figure A-1.
9.
Insert screw from solder side through the iSBC 86/14 board, the
spacer, and the iSBC 300A board.
10.
Attach nut and tighten finger tight.
11.
Repeat steps 8 through 10 for the other two holes.
12.
Tighten all three screws, using a screw driver.
A-1
iSBC M 300A RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
CAUTION
Do not overtighten the screws.
to the board could result.
Damage
13.
Insert 8203 IC (removed in step 4) into location Ul on the iSBC
300A board (should be directly above chip location U72 on the
iSBC 86/14 board).
14.
Insert the two 74S373 IC's (removed in step 5) into locations U2
and U11 on the iSBC 300A board.
CAUTION
Ensure that the IC's are properly
oriented in their sockets or they could
be damaged when power is applied.
A-3.
15.
Remove one IC from the iSBC 86/14 board at location U66.
16.
Insert new IC, part number 142672-xxx, at location U66.
17.
Install jumper E119-E120 onto the iSBC 86/14 board.
SERVICE INFORMATION
The follOWing paragraphs provide a list of replaceable parts and service
diagrams for the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board.
A-4.
REPLACEABLE PARTS
Table A-1 provides a list of replaceable parts for the iSBC 300A board.
Intel parts that are available on the open market are listed in the MFR
CODE columns as "COML"; every effort should be made to procure these
parts from a local (commercial) distributor.
A-5.
SERVICE DIAGRAMS
The iSBC 300A board parts location diagram and schematic diagram are
provided in Figures A-2 and A-3 respectively.
A-2
iSBC'" 300A RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
NYLON MOUNTING HARDWARE
(3 PLACES)
(SUPPLIED WITH Isac 300A OPTION)
Figure A-l.
iSBC'" 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board Orientation
Table A-l. Replaceable Parts,
iSBC'" 300A Expansion RAM Multimodule Board
Reference
Designation
Description
Mfr Part
No.
Mfr
Code
Qty
U3-10,
12-19
IC,Intel 2118, Dynamic RAM
2118-4
COML
16
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13 5D Vu"
tEl
b:I
UI·l.1
UI-ll.
UI-D
UI-U
o
~
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Z
en
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.
t""
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o
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o ....
"--------7
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r
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o
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u'l.-"'I
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c
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OM'
DMl
LL.~Jli--~~--lU--~~--Jru~~~--~~--!L-----lll-L--~f=====~'~~ ~C~,II'
t;
~
CIl
""B
OM'
p~iO~M~"±===1
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OM~1
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o
o
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en
b:I
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ell
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UI -15UI-tl
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A
A
N
'-"
.,..,f)OR€.
8
7
6
5
4
3
1
CAUTION: These schematic diagrams may have been revised. See ·Service Information- chapter for details.
o
Z
iSBC· 300A RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
A-10
APPENDIX B.
B-1.
iSBC'" 304 RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
INTRODUCTION
This appendix provides information for installing the iSBC 304 RAM
Expansion Multimodule Board that may be installed onto the iSBC 86/30
Single Board Computer.
B-2.
iSBC 304 INSTALLATION
The following steps explain how to unpack and install the iSBC 304 board.
1. Unpack the iSBC 304 board.
2. Inspect the iSBC 304 board for damage. If damage exists, follow
the instructions for repairs as described in Chapter 5 of this
manual.
3. Remove the iSBC 86/30 board from the backplane and place i t
(component side up) on a soft surface (preferably a piece of
foam) •
4. Remove IC 8203 at U72 from the iSBC 86/30 board.
5. Remove IC's (74S373) at U73 and U95 from the iSBC 86/30 board.
NOTE
Save these IC's. They will be
reinstalled at a later step_
6.
Insert the iSBC 304 board mating pins into socket U72 and other
mating pins, orienting the board as shown in Figure B-1.
7.
Ensure the mating pins are aligned and carefully press the
iSBC 304 board into place by applying pressure at U1 of the
iSBC 304 board.
8.
Place nylon spacer between the iSBC 86/30 board and the iSBC 304
board at one of the holes shown in Figure B-1.
9.
Insert screw from solder side through the iSBC 86/30 board, the
spacer, and the iSBC 304 board.
10.
Attach nut and tighten finger tight.
11.
Repeat steps 8 through 10 for the other two holes.
12.
Tighten all three screws, using a screw driver.
B-1
iSBC m 304 RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
CAUTION
Do not overtighten the screws.
to the board could result.
Damage
13.
Insert 8203 IC (removed in step 4) into location Ul on the iSBC
304 board (should be directly above chip location U72 on the
iSBC 86/30 board).
14.
Insert the two 74S373 IC's (removed in step 5) into locations U2
and Ull on the iSBC 304 board.
CAUTION
Ensure that the IC's are properly
oriented in their sockets or they could
be damaged when power is applied.
B-3.
15.
Remove one IC from the iSBC 86/30 board at location U66.
16.
Insert new IC, part number 144109-xxx, at location U66.
17.
Install jumper El19-E120 onto the iSBC 86/30 board.
SERVICE INFORMATION
The following paragraphs provide a list of replaceable parts and service
diagrams for the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board.
B-4.
REPLACEABLE PARTS
Table B-1 provides a list of replaceable parts for the iSBC 304 board.
Intel parts that are available on the open market are listed in the MFR
CODE columns as "C0l1L"; every effort should be made to procure these parts
from a local (commercial) distributor.
B-5.
SERVICE DIAGRAMS
The iSBC 304 board parts location diagram and schematic diagram are
provided in Figures A-2 and A-3, respectively, of Appendix A. Note that
the differences between the boards are also called out Figure A-3 (Table 1).
B-2
iSBC· 304 RAM EXPANSION MULTIMODULE BOARD INSTALLATION
NYLON MOUNTING HARDWARE
(3 PLACES)
(SUPPLIED WITH ISBC 304 OPTION)
Figure B-1.
iSBC· 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board Orientation
Table B-1. Replaceable Parts,
iSBC· 304 Expansion RAM l1ultimodule Board
Reference
Designation
Description
Mfr Part
No.
Mfr
Code
Qty
A3-10,
12-19
IC,Intel 2164, Dynamic RAM
2164-20
COML
16
Cl-2,12-19,
20,28-34
Cap/.Cer.,0.01uF,+80 -20% :50V
OBD
COML
18
C36
Cap.,tant,22uF,+10%,15V
OBD
COML
1
B-3
APPENDIX C.
iSBC· 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
Page
CHAPTER 1
GENERAL INFORMATION
Introduction •••••••••
..............................................
Description ..•......................•..................•..•......•.
Eq ui pmen t Summary ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Specifications •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
C-2
C-2
C-3
C-3
CHAPTER 2
PREPARATION FOR USE
Introduction_ ............•......•..................•.•.......•.•••.
Unpacking & Inspection •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Installation Considerations ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Powe r Req ui remen t s •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Cooling Requirements •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Physical Dimensions ...........•..............•..•.••.............
Jumper Configurations •••.••••••••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Installation Procedure .•.................•....................•..
C-4
C-4
C-4
C-5
C-5
C-5
C-5
C-8
CHAPTER 3
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION PAGE
Introduction .•.....•.....•....•........................•...........
Programming Considerations .........................•.....•.....•...
CHAPTER 4
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
...................................
Introduction .•..•...............
Functional Description ...................•.........................
Circui t An.alysis .•...........•.............•..................•...•
CHAPTER 5
SERVICE INFORMATION
Introduction ••••••••••••
...........................................
Diagnostic Test •.................•....•......•..................•..
Replaceable Parts ..............•...............•.....•........•....
Service Diagrams .......•...•.•........................•.•...•......
C-13
C-13
C-14
C-15
C-17
C-20
C-20
C-20
Service & Repair Authorization •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
C-21
C-21
External Signals ...............•.....•.................•.•.........
C-22
C-l
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
C-l.
CHAPTER 1.
GENERAL INFORMATION
1-1.
INTRODUCTION
The iSBC 303 Parity Generator/Checker Multimodule Board (Figure 1-1)
generates and checks the parity for up to 64K of iSBC 86/14-based
on-board dynamic RAM. It is designed to be used in systems that require
minimal error checking. There is no degredation in the operating speed
of the base board when using the iSBC 303 Parity board.
Figure 1-1.
1-2.
iSBC m 303 Parity Generator/Checker Multimodule Board
DESCRIPTION
The iSBC 303 Parity board is software controlled thus requiring few
interconnections not already provided by the base board interface.
Parity error indication is provided by two interrupt lines as well as two
on board indicators. On a write operation, the parity bit is established
and stored in the iSBC 303 Parity board for each byte of data. On a read
operation, each byte of data that is read is checked for proper parity.
If an error exists, a visual as well as an interrupt indication is given.
The addition of an iSBC 303 Parity board does not preclude the adding of
other Multimodule boards.
C-2
iSBC· 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
1-3.
EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED
The following is supplied with the iSBG 303 Parity board.
Two 20 pin spacer sockets (for use when an iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule board is installed)
One 40 pin spacer socket (for use when an iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule board is installed)
Two socket pins (for use when an iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule
board is installed)
Three long nylon spacers (for use when an iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule board is installed)
Three short nylon spacers
Three long nylon screws (for use when an iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule board is installed)
Three short nylon screws (for use when an iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule board is not installed)
Three nylon nuts
The spacers, screws, sockets, and nuts are used for mounting the iSBC 303
Parity board as described in Chapter 2.
1-4.
SPECIFICATIONS
Specifications for the iSBC 303 Parity board are listed in Table 1-1.
C-3
iSBC M 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
Table 1-1.
Specifications
PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Width:
6.096 cm (2.40 inches)
Length:
15.875 cm (6.25 inches)
Height:
0.594 cm (0.234 inches) iSBC 303 Parity board only
1.82 cm (0.718 inches) iSBC 303 Parity board and
iSBC base board
2.667 cm (1.05 inches) iSBC 303 Parity board,
iSBC 300A Multimodule RAM board, and iSBC base
board.
Weight:
70 gm (2.5 oz)
ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS
Operating Temperature:
Relative Humidity:
00 to 55 0 C (32 0 to 131 0 F)
To 90% without condensation
POWER REQUIREMENTS (Maximum)
Vcc
= +5V +5%
Icc = 605 rnA (Does not include current for the Dynamic RAM Controller
and Memory Latches as they are considered part of the base board power.)
C-4
iSBC'" 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
C-2.
CHAPTER 2.
2-1.
INTRODUCTION
PREPARATION FOR USE
This chapter provides instructions for installing the iSBC 303 Parity
board. These instructions include unpacking and inspection, installation
considerations, physical dimensions, and installation procedures.
2-2.
UNPACKING & INSPECTION
Inspect the shipping carton inunediately upon
mishandling during transit. If the shIpping
or water-stained, request that the carrier's
carton is opened. If the carrier's agemt is
is opened and the contents are damaged, keep
material for the agent's inspection.
receipt for evidence of
carton is severely damaged
agent be present when the
not present when the carton
the carton and packing
For repairs to a product damaged in shlpment contact the Intel Product
Service HOTLINE to obtain a return authorization number and further
instructions (see paragraph 5-2). A purchase order will be required to
complete the repair. A copy of the purchase order should be submitted to
the carrier with your claim.
2-3.
INSTALLATION CONSIDERATIONS
The iSBC 303 Parity board is designed to mount on an iSBC 86/14 board
with or without an iSBC 300A board. Installation considerations such as
power, cooling, mounting and physical size requirements, are outlined in
the following paragraphs.
2-4.
Power Requirements
The board requires +5V (+O.25V) at 605 mA maximum. This power
requirement does not include current for the Dynamic RAM Controller and
Memory Latches as they are considered part of the base board power. All
power is drawn from the host board through the mounting connectors.
2-5.
Cooling Requirements
The iSBC 303 Parity board dissipates 43.1 gram-calories/minute (0.174
BTU/minute) and adequate circulation of air must be provided to prevent a
temerpature rise above 550 C (131 0 F). If operation to 60 0 C is
required, a minimum air flow of 200 linear feet/minute will be required.
C-5
iSBC M 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
2-6.
Physical Dimensions
Physical dimensions of the iSBC 303 Parity board are as follows:
a. Width:
6.096 cm (2.40 inches)
b. Length:
16.193 cm (6.375 inches)
c. Height:
0.594 cm (0.234 inches) iSBC 303 Parity board only.
1.82 cm (0.718 inches) iSBC 303 Parity board and iSBC base
board.
2.667 cm (1.05 inches) iSBC 303 Parity board, iSBC 300A
board, and iSBC base board.
d. Weight:
70 grams (2.5 ounces).
2-7.
Connector Configuration
Connector J2 provides the user interface to the base board. Table 2-1
lists the recommended mating shells and pins. The signals found on each
pin of the J2 connector are listed in Table 2-2 and the descriptions of
the signal functions are also listed. Table 2-3 lists the DC
characteristics of each of the signals on the J2 connector. Table 2-4
lists the AC characteristics of each of the signals on the J2 connector
and Figure 2-1 shows the timing of each of these signals.
2-8.
Jumper Configuration
The iSBC 303 Parity board includes three jumper-selectable options to
allow the user to configure the board for his particular application.
Table 2-5 summarizes these options and lists the grid reference locations
of the jumpers as shown in Figure 5-2 (schematic diagram). For
convenience, all the jumper connections are made on connector J1.
Study Table 2-5 carefully while making reference to Figure 5-2. If the
default (factory configuration) jumpers are appropriate for a particular
function, no further action is required. If however, a different
configuration is required, reconfigure the jumpers as specified in Table
2-5.
Table 2-1.
Recommended J2 Mating Connector Components
Shells
Reeled
Pins
Loose
Pins
AMP 87456-4
86491-3
87045-2
BERG 65043-033
47564
47744
C-6
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
Table 2-2.
Pin
Mnemonic
1
2
INTR
3
4
NMI
5
LOW
6
NHlMASK
7
HI
8
PFIN
Connector J2 Pin Assignments
Functional Description
Reserved
Interrupt Request - Indicates that a maskable
interrupt has occurred
Reserved
Nonmaskable Interrupt - Indic.ates that a nonmaskable
interrupt has occurred
Low Check Bit - Indicates the status of the low
check bit
Nonmaskable Interrupt Enable - This signal is used
to enable/disable the nonmaskable interrupt
High Check Bit - Indicates the status of the high
check bit
Power Fail Interrupt - This externally generated
signal may be OR'ed into the NMI interrupt logic to
provide a power fail interrupt input to the NMI
interrupt of the base board
Table 2-3.
DC Characteristics
Signals Symbol
Parameter Description
Test Conditions
Min
HI
LOW
Vol
Voh
*Cl
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Capacitive Load
101
= 20 mA
Ioh = -1 mA
2.5
Vol
Voh
*Cl
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Capacitive Load
101
= 12 rnA
Ioh
= -800
Vol
Voh
*Cl
Output Low Voltage
Output High Voltage
Capacitive Load
101
INTR
NMI
0.5
V
V
pF
0.5
uA
2.5
15
= 8mA
Ioh = -400 uA
Ioh = -2.30 uA
Output High voltage
Input Current at HIGH V Vih = 2.4V
Input Current at LOW V Vin = 0.4V
Capacitive Load
PFIN
Input Current at HIGH V Vin = 2.4V
Input Current at LOW V Vin = 0.5V
Capacitive Load
*Capacitive load values are approximations.
C-7
Units
15
NMlMASK Voh
Iih
Iil
*Cl
Iih
Iil
*Cl
Max
0.4
2.4
15
2.4
V
V
pF
V
V
pF
V
-1.4 mA
40
uA
15
pF
-0.4 mA
50
uA
15
pF
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
Table 2-4.
Parameter
Minimum
(ns)
AC Characteristics
Maximum
(ns)
70
112
104
tl
t2
t3
t4
ts
t6
t7
ts
30
-400
-390
10 ms
-391
Jumper
Installed
J1-1
Jl-3
JI-3
Jl-7
2-9.
to
to
to
to
Jl-2
Jl-4
Jl-5*
J1-S
WEll high to INTR, HI, LOW clear
WEll high to NMI clear
NMIMASK high to NMI clear
NMIMASK pulse width
DPRDI high to INTR out
DPRDI high to NMI out
Power up to first access
DPRDI high to HI, LOW out
72
so
Sl
Table 2-5.
Description
Jumper Options
Grid
Function
Ref.
Selects address OOOOH
Enables the use of PFIN
Disables the use of PFIN
Inverts the NMIMASK function
1ZD7
1ZB4
1ZB4
IZB6
Installation Procedure
The iSBC 303 Parity board is designed to be mounted atop the iSBC S6/14
board by way of socket pins that provide both the mechanical and
electrical interface. The majority of the pins plug into IC sockets U72
(J1), U73 (J2), and U9S (J3) of the base board. The two write enable
signals (WEll and WE2/) are provided via isolated socket pins J5 and J6
respectively. There are two configurations that must be considered when
installing the iSBC 303 Parity board. The first configuration that will
be described is when the iSBC 303 Parity board is being mounted directly
on the base board. The second configuration that will be described is
when the iSBC 303 RAM Parity board is being mounted on top of an
iSBC 300A Expansion Multimodule Board.
2-10.
Installation Onto Base Board
The following steps explain how to install the iSBC 303 Parity board
directly on the base board (iSBC 300A board not installed).
C-S
iSBC~
303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
CAUTION
Always turn off power before removing
or installing any boa.rd.
1.
Remove the base board from the backplane and place it on a oft
surface (preferably a piece of foam), component side up.
2.
Remove IC 8203 at U72 from the base board.
3.
Remove IC's (74S373) at U73 and U95 from the base board.
NOTE
Save these IC's, they will be
reinstalled at a later step.
4.
Insert the iSBC 303 Parity board mating pins into socket U72 and
other mating pins, orienting thE~ board as shown in Figure 2-2.
5.
Ensure the mating pins are aligned and carefully press the
iSBC 303 Parity board into place by applying pressure at U1 of
the iSBC 303 Parity board.
6.
Place nylon spacer (use short slPacers) between the base board and
the iSBC 303 Parity board at om~ of the holes shown in Figure 2-2.
7.
Insert screw (use short screws) from the solder side through the
baseboard, the spacer, and the :iSBC 303 Parity board.
8.
Attach a nut and tighten finger tight.
9.
Repeat steps 6 through 8 for th4E! other two holes.
10.
Tighten all three screws.
CAUTION
Do not overtighten the screws as damage
to the board could result.
11.
Insert 8203 IC (removed in step 2) into location U1 on the
iSBC 303 Parity board.
12.
Insert the two 74S373 IC's (removed in step 3) into locations U2
and U10 on the iSBC 303 Parity board.
C-9
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
CAUTION
Ensure that the IC's are properly
oriented in their sockets or they will
be damaged when power is applied.
h
--~y
HI. LOW
WE11
I
I
I
I
!
II
,
I
INTR
/
II
I
\
I
f-- 11 -
V
NM I
I
J
DPRD I
~18'"
I
~15~
!\
~-12---
I
I
I
~16~
~~="
\
i
.
I
-~
Ir-------------~
NMIMASK
+ 5V
DC
POWER
DPRDI
OR
DPWRI
Figure 2-1.
User Interface Timing Relationship
C-10
I
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
2-11.
Installation Onto iSBC 303 Board
The following steps explain how to install the iSBC 303 Parity board on
top of an iSBC 300A board that is installed on the base board.
1.
Remove the base board (with the iSBC 300A board) from the
backplane and place it on a soft surface (preferably a piece of
foam), component side up.
2.
Remove IC 8203 at location Al on the iSBC 300A board.
3.
Remove IC (74S373) at location A2 on the iSBC 300A board.
4.
Remove IC (74S373) at loction All on the iSBC 300A board.
NOTE
Save these IC's, they will be
reinstalled at a later step.
5.
Insert 40 pin spacer socket in location Al on the iSBC 300A board.
6.
Insert 20 pin spacer sockets in locations A2 and All on the
iSBC 300A board.
7.
Place a socket spacer pin on P5 on. the iSBC 300A board.
8.
Place a socket spacer pin on P6 on. the iSBC 300A board.
9.
Remove the three screws holding the iSBC 300A board in place
(leave spacers in place).
10.
Insert the iSBC 303 Pairty board mating pins into socket Al and
other mating pins fo the iSBC 300A board, orienting the board as
shown in Figure 2-3.
11.
Ensure the mating pins are aligned and carefully press the
iSBC 303 Parity board into place by applying pressure at U1 of
the iSBC 303 Parity board.
12.
Place a nylon spacer (use long spacers) between the iSBC 300A
board and the iSBC 303 Parity board at one of the holes shown in
Figure 2-3.
13.
Insert a nylon screw (use long screws) from the solder side
through the base board, through the iSBC 300A board, through the
spacer, and the iSBC 303 Parity board.
14.
Attach a nut and tighten finger tlght.
15.
Repeat steps 12 through 14 for thEl other two holes.
16.
Tighten all three screws.
C-ll
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
CAUTION
Do not overtighten screws as damage to
the board could result.
17.
Insert 8203 IC (removed in step 3) into location U1 on the
iSBC 303 Parity board.
18.
Insert the two 74s373 IC's (removed in steps 3 and 4) into
locations U2 and U10 on the iSBC 303 Parity board.
CAUTION
Ensure that the IC's are properly
oriented in their sockets or they will
be damaged when power is applied.
MEMORY LATCHES
(FROM iSBC 86/14)
NYLON MOUNTING HARDWARE
(3 PLACES)
(SUPPLIED WITH iSBC 303 OPTION)
Figure 2-2.
iSBC m 303 Parity Board Orientation
C-12
iSBC· 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
SPACER SOCKETS
iSBC 86/14
REPLACEMENT
MEMORY ADDRESS
DECODE PROMS
(SUPPLIED WITH
iSBC 300A OPTION)
/r~
NYLON MOUNTING HARDWARE
(3 PLACES)
(SUPPLIED WITH iSBC 303 OPTION)
Figure 2-3. iSBC· 303 Parity and
iSBC· 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board
C-13
iSBC~
C-3.
CHAPTER 3.
3-1.
INTRODUCTION
303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
This chapter provides the programming information for the iSBC 303 Parity
board.
3-2.
PROGRAMMING CONSIDERATIONS
The four functions of the iSBC 303 board are controlled by a control byte
that is stored in RAM. This control byte is written by the programmer
any time the functions are to change or when the board is initialized.
The on board address of the control port is selectable for either OH
(Jl-2 to J1-1 jumpered) or 400H (Jl-2 to J1-1 not jumpered) where the
default address is 400H. This corresponds to address Base + 0 or Base +
400H for dual port access. Base is the lowest dual port RAM address as
seen from the Multibus interface. If it is desired to access the control
byte from the Multibus interface, there must be no protected RAM (i.e.,
all base board memory must be available to the Multibus interface.
Figure 3-1 shows the control byte format. Note that four simultaneous
functions may be performed by writing one byte. On power-up, this
control byte is cleared which clears and masks both interrupts, clears
and masks the LED indicatiors, and places the parity logic in the odd
parity mode. The RAM address corresponding to the control byte address
is also written when a command is written. As a result a copy of the
current command byte is always stored in RAM automaticlaly. Note that on
power up the command image in RAM is not initialized.
7
6
5
4
x
x
x
x
3
2
1
o
1 Odd Parity
Parity
o Even
1 LED Cleared
Enabled
o LED
1 INTR Clear
o INTR Enabled
1 NMI Clear/Mask
Enabled
o NMI
Figure 3-1.
Control Byte Format
C-14
iSBC· 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
C-4.
CHAPTER 4.
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
4-1.
INTRODUCTION
This chapter provides a functonal description and a circuit analysis of
the iSBC 303 Parity board. Figure 4-1 is a simplified block diagram of
the iSBC 303 Parity Board.
COMMAND
DECODE
1
HIGH Parity
t
I--
I
ERROR
INTERRUPTS
~ NMI
~ INTR
BASE BOARD
ADDRESS
CONTROL
BUS
MEMORY
REFRESH
CONTROL
~
~
~
t
BASE BOARD
DATA BUS
PARITY
GENERATOR/
CHECKER
PARITY
MEMORY
LOW Parity
VISUAL
ERROR
INDICATOR
I
DATA
BUS
LATCHES
PFIN
--
NMIMASK
Figure 4-1.
4-2.
iSBC· 303 Parity Board Block Diagram
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
A brief description of the functional blocks of logic comprising the
iSBC 303 Parity board is given in the following paragraphs. An
operational circuit analysis is given bE~ginning with paragraph 4-15.
C-15
~ HI
~ LOW
iSBC~
4-3.
303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
Parity Generator/Checker
This block includes three major functions that are described in the
following paragraphs.
4-4.
Parity Memory
The parity memory is the heart of the operation of the iSBC 303 board.
It contains 64k bit of dynamic RAM divided into two 32k bit banks. Its
purpose is to store one parity bit for each byte written on a memory
write operation and to provide a parity check bit for each byte read
during a memory read operation.
4-5.
Parity Generation
The parity generate mode is entered during a memory write cycle. The WR/
signal going active forces one input on each of the parity generate
circuits U3 and Ull to go low. The input bits from the data bus latches
are also input to the parity generate circuits. A parity bit is then
generated and written into the parity memory at the completion of the
memory write cycle.
4-6.
Parity Checker
The parity check mode is entered during a memory read cycle. In this
mode WR/ is high (inactive) which enables one leg of each of the input
ANDs to the parity check circuits U3 and Ull. This allows the parity bit
stored in memory to appear at one input of the parity check circuits. In
addition, data from the data bus latches appears at the remaining inputs
of the check circuits. The check circuits then produce a check bit which
is latched by the error latches on the rising edge of CAS/. If the check
bit that was latched was a high, it indicates an error and the
corresponding error indicator (HIPAR or LOPAR) will be turned on.
4-7.
Memory Refresh Control
The parity memory (U13,U14,U15,U16) is refreshed by a Dynamic RAM
Controller (Ul). This controller automatically refreshes the parity
memory.
4-8.
Data Bus Latches
The data bus latches (U2,UIO) latch the data from the base board data
bus. They are under control of the base board.
C-16
iSBC M 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
4-9.
Command Decode
The command decode circuitry is basically an address decoder and a 4-bit
latch. The address bits from the address: bus are applied to the address
decoder. All the bits must be zero except for the AMA bit. The AMA bit
is applied to U6 which acts as a programmable inverter. Depending on
the address selection jumper (Jl-l - Jl-2), the address selected will be
OR or 40OH. The output of the decoder enables the 4-bit latch US on the
rising edge of WEll. US latches the command data from the data bus
(DMO-DM3). The output from the 4-bit latch determines the functions
that are performed.
4-10.
Error Interrupts
There are two interrupt lines available to the base board.
described in the following paragraphs.
They are
4-11. INTR. The INTR error interrupt line indicates to the base board
that a parity error was detected. It is designed to be used in
conjunction with a base board interrupt that is maskable. Therefore no
onboard mask is provided on the iSBC 303 Parity board. The INTR latch,
once set, will remain set until it is cleared by a software command or
power on reset.
4-12. NMI. The NMI error interrupt line indicates to the base board
that a parity error was detected. It can also be jumpered to allow an
external power fail interrupt to activate this circuit. It is designed
to be used in conjunction with a base board interrupt that is
nonmaskable. Therefore onboard mask circuitry is provided on the iSBC
303 Parity board. The NMI latch, once set, will remain set until it is
cleared by a software command, power on reset, or by use of the mask pin.
4-13.
Visual Error Indicators
Two LEDs are provided on the iSBC 303 Parity boards to indicate when a
parity error has occurred. One LED indlcates parity check errors from
the high byte of data and the other indlcates check errors from the low
byte of data. The LED latches, when set, will remain set until cleared
by a software command or power on reset.
C-17
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
4-14.
Error Indicator Signals
Two error indicator status signals are available to the base
These signals can be checked by the base board when an error
occurs. The two signals reflect the same information as the
on the board. The error indicator status latches, when set,
set until cleared by a software command or power on reset.
4-1S.
board.
interrupt
LEDs mounted
will remain
CIRCUIT ANALYSIS
The schematic diagram for the iSBC 303 Parity board is given in Figure
S-2. The schematic diagram consists of two sheets, each of which
includes grid coordinates. Signals that traverse from one sheet to
another have a letter assigned in a box that appears at the source and
the destination.
Both active-high and active-low signals are used. A signal mnemonic that
ends with a virgule (e.g., PCS/) denotes that the signal is active low (
0.4V). conversly, a signal mnemonic without a virgule (e.g., LOW)
denotes that the signal is active high ( 2.0V).
4-16.
Parity Memory
The parity memory consists of U13,U14,U1S, and V16. V13 and VIS contain
the parity bits for 0-32k of memory and V14 and V16 contain the parity
bits for 33-64k of memory. The RASO/ signal from the dynamic RAM
controller (VI) selects V13 and VS and RAS1/ selects V14 and V16.
4-17.
Parity Generation
When the WR/ signal goes active, it places a low signal on V8-S,10. This
low on the inputs to V8 causes a low to be placed on one input of each of
the parity generate circuits V3-4 and Ull-4. The other inputs to the
parity generate circuits come from data bus latches V2 and V10. If there
are an odd number of bits on he input to V3, then the output of V3-S will
be low. If there are an even number of bits on the input to V3, then the
output of V3-S will be high. The same is true for VII. These outputs
from the parity generation circuits are applied to the inputs of
exclusive-GR gate V6. If the iSBC 303 Parity board has been programmed
for odd parity and the inputs to V6-4,9 are low, the outputs of V6 will
be low indicating odd parity. This low is written into the parity memory
at the end of the memory write cycle.
C-18
iSBC'" 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
4-1S.
Parity Checker
During a read cycle the WR/ signal remains high (inactive) which enables
one leg of each of the input ANDs (US) to the parity check circuit. This
allows the parity bit stored in memory (U13,U14,U1S,U16) to appear at one
input of the parity check circuits (U3, U11). In addition, data from the
data bus latches appears at the remaining inputs of the check circuits.
The check circuits then produce a check bit which is applied to one input
of U6. I~ the iSBC 303 Parity board had been programmed for odd parity
and the inputs to U6-4,9 are low, the outputs of U6 will be low
indicating no parity error. If the output of U6-6 or U6-S is high, it
indicates an error and the U17 latches will be set. In addition, one of
the U1S latches will be set to indicate that the error was on the high
byte or the low byte.
4-19.
Data Bus Latches
The information on the data bus is latched into the data bus latches
(U2,U10) when XACK/ goes high. The output of the data bus latches is
enabled when DPRD/ goes low. XACK/ and DPRD/ are generated on the base
board.
4-20.
INTR Interrupt
I f either the LOPAR or HIPAR signal on OR U9 pins 4 and S is high, latch
U17-S will be set when CAS/ goes high at the end of a read cycle. Latch
U17-S setting creates the INTR interrupt signal.
4-21.
NMI Interrupt
If either the LOPAR or HIPAR signal on OR U9 pins 4 and S is high, latch
U17-9 will be set when CAS/ goes high at the end of a read cycle if the
latch is not masked by NMIMASK. The NMIMASK signal is controlled by the
base board. If jumper Jl-7 to J1-S is: not installed, NMIMASK going high
will reset latch U17-9 and hold it reset until the signal goes low.
Holding NMIMASK high prevents an NMI interrupt from being generated. If
jumper Jl-7 to J1-S is installed, the NMIMASK signal functions are
inverted.
4-22.
HI/LO Indicators
When an INTR interrupt occurs, the value of LOPAR and HIPAR is clocked
into latches U1S. If either signal is high the latch will be set and the
corresponding LED will be set. The outputs of U1S are also available to
the base board for sensing which byte contained the parity error.
C-19
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
4-23.
Address and Command Decode
Address bits AMl-AMF are decoded by U6, U12, and U4. The two addresses
that are valid for the iSBC 303 Parity board are Base OOOOH and Base
0400H. If address OOOOH is to be used jumper Jl-l - Jl-2 must be
installed. When an address of all zeros is applied to the iSBC 303
Parity board and jumper Jl-l to Jl-2 is installed, the output of U7-6
will go low and enable latch US. If any address bit is not zero, the
output of U7-6 will remain high and latch US will not be enabled. When
jumper Jl-l to Jl-2 is not installed, the AMA bit must be one to enable
latch US (this corresponds to address 0400H). Exclusive OR U6 acts as an
inverter when the jumper is not installed.
When latch US is enabled, it allows the command byte to be latched. The
output from the command byte determines the conditions that the iSBC
Parity board will operate under.
C-20
iSBC'" 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
C-5.
CHAPTER 5.
SERVICE INFORMATION
5-1.
INTRODUCTION
This chapter provides a list of replaceable parts, service diagrams, and
service assistance instructions for the iSBC 303 parity board.
5-2.
DIAGNOSTIC TEST
The EVEN/ODD signal on the iSBC 303 Parity board may be used as a forced
error signal for diagnostic purposes. To force an error, the EVEN/ODD
signal must be inverted (with respect to the normal operating level),
under program control, during a memory write. After the data has been
written, the EVEN/ODD signal should be returned to its normal operating
state. When the forced error location is subsequently read, a parity
error should occur allowing a check of the parity circuitry.
Note that whenever a command is written to the iSBC Parity board, the
corresponding RAM address is written including a parity bit. In the
diagnostic mode when error forcing is c:omplete, the EVEN/ODD signal must
be returned to its normal state which i.nvolves a memory write. This will
force a bad parity bit at the command address. If the command address is
subsequently read, a parity error will occur. Therefore, it is
recommended that after exiting the diagnostic mode, a new command'byte be
written to the iSBC 303 Parity board to correct the bad parity bit.
In the diagnostic mode when forcing errors, any writes to the base board
memory will generate a bad parity bit. This includes CALL's, PUSH's and
any instructions which automatically pe:rform writes that are hidden to
the user. If after one of these instructions is executed, the user
returns the EVEN/ODD bit to its normal state before the corresponding
read (RET, POP, etc.) a parity error will occur. Therefore, caution must
be used when using these types of instructions in the diagnostic mode.
A suggested method of preventing this problem, is to repeat the same
programming steps with the parity set to its normal state.
5-3.
REPLACEABLE PARTS
Table 5-1 provides a list of replaceable parts for the iSBC 303 Parity
board. Table 5-2 identifies and locates the manufacturers specified in
the MFR CODE column in Table 5-1. Intel parts that are available on the
open market are listed in the MFR CODE column as "COML"j every effort
should be made to procure thse parts from a local (commercial)
distributor.
C-21
iSBC~
5-4.
303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
SERVICE DIAGRAMS
The iSBC 303 Parity board parts location diagram and schematic diagram
are provided in Figures 5-1 and 5-2, respectively. On the schematic
diagram, a signal mnemonic that ends with a slash (e.g., PCS/) is active
low. Conversly, a signal mnemonic without a slash (e.g., INTR) is active
high.
5-5.
SERVICE AND REPAIR ASSISTANCE
United States Customers can obtain service and repair assistance by
contacting the Intel Product Service Hotline in Phoenix, Arizona.
customers outside the United States should contact their sales source
(Intel Sales Office or Authorized distributor) for service information
and repair assistance.
Before calling the Product Service Hotline, you should have the following
information available:
a.
Date you received the product.
b.
Complete part number of the product (including dash number).
This number is silk-screened onto the board.
c.
Serial number of product.
d.
Shipping & billing addresses.
e.
If your Intel product warranty has expired, you must provide a
purchase order number for biling purposes.
f.
If you have an extended warranty agreement, be sure to advise the
Hotline personnel of this agreement.
This number is stamped on the board.
Hotline:
Telephone Number
All U.S. locations,
except Alaska, Arizona, & Hawaii:
(800) 528-0595
All other locations:
(602) 869-4600
TWX Number
910 - 951 - 1330
C-22
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
Always contact the Product Service Hotline before returning a product to
Intel for repair. You will be given a repair authorization number,
shipping instructions, and other important information which will help
Intel provide you with fast, efficient service. If you are returning the
product because of damage sustained during shipment or if the product is
out of warranty, a purchase order is required before Intel can initiate
the repair.
In preparing the product for shipment to the Repair Center, use the
original factory packing material, if possible. If this material is not
available, wrap the product in cushioning material such as Air Cap
TH-240, manufactured by the Sealed Air Corporation, Hawthorne, N.J. Then
enclose in a heavy duty corrugated shipping carton, and label "FRAGILE"
to ensure careful handling. Ship only to the address specified by the
Product Service Hotline Personnel.
5-6.
INTERNAL SIGNALS
Internal board signals which traverse from one sheet to another in Figure
5-2 are identified by a single alpha character within a box (e.g., C).
The signal mnemonic is shown adjacent to the boxed character, along with
the source or destination sheet number (,e.g., SH 2, PCS/ B). Signals
coming into the sheet are shown on the left side of the diagram.
Conversely, signals leving the sheet are shown on the right side.
To follow a signal from one sheet to another, read the sheet number and
boxed character, then look for the same boxed character on the indicated
sheet. For example, if you are going to trace the path of WEll when it
exits sheet 2, the first step would be to turn to the indicated sheet.
Since WEll will be entering sheet 1, as shown on sheet 2, look for the D
symbol on the left side of the sheet. Notice that the inputs also list
the source sheet number (sheet 2 in this example).
Each signal will keep the same boxed character throughout Figure 5-2.
This will enable you to trace the signal to any sheet with minimal effort.
The internal board signal mnemonics are listed and defined in Table 5-3.
The signals are listed according to boxed code alphabetical order.
C-23
iSBC~
303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
Table 5-1.
Reference
Designation
Replaceable Parts
Mfr.
Part No.
Description
Cl-4,6-11,13,14 Cap., Cer. 0.10 uF,
MA205E104ZAA
+80 -20%, 50V
C5
TllOB226K015AS
Cap., Tant, 22 uF,
+10%, 15V
C12
T110B106K20AS
Cap., Tant, 10 uF,
+10%, 20V
CR1
IN4148
Diode, IN914B, 25W, 75V
550-2406
CR2,3
Diode, LED, RED
E1,4
2010B
Term, PCB, Turret switch
J1,2
Header, 8-pin
Rl-4
Res., Carb, 10k, 1/4W, +5%
CB1035
R5
Res., Carb, lOOk, 1/4W,-~5% CB1045
R6,7
CB2715
Res., Carb, 270 ohms,
1/4W, +5%
U3,1l
IC, 74S280, Odd/Even Parity SN74S280N
Generator/Checker
U4,12
IC, 7425, Positive NOR-Gate SN7425N
U5
IC, 74LS173, 4-Bit Register SN74LS173N
U6
IC, 74S86, Exclusive
SN74S86
OR-Gate
U6
SN74S86
IC, 74S86, Exclusive
OR-Gate
U7
SN7413
IC, 7413, Postive NAND
Schmitt Trigger
U8
SN74LS08
IC, 74LS08, Quad 2-Input
AND Gate
U9
IC, 74LS32, Quad 2-Input
SN74LS32
OR Gate
U13-16
2118
IC, 2118, Dynamic RAM
U17,18
IC, 74S74, Dual D-Type
SN74S74
Edge-Triggered Flip-Flop
LSG-1AG-38-1
Socket Pin, Spc 1
C-24
Mfr.
Code
Qty
AVX
12
KEM
1
KEM
1
FAIR
DIALC
USECO
1
2
2
2
AB
AB
4
AB
1
2
TI
2
TI
TI
TI
2
1
1
TI
1
TI
1
TI
1
TI
1
INTEL
4
TI
2
AUG
82
iSBC· 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
Table 5-2.
List of Manufacturer's Codes
Mfr. Code
Manufacturer
AB
AUG
AVX
DIALC
FAIR
INTEL
Allen-Bradley Co.
Highland Htso, OH
August Inc.
Attleboro, MA
AVX Ceramics
Myrtle Beach, SC
Brooklyn, NY
Dialight
Fairchild Ind. Prod. Divo
Commack, NY
Intel Corp.
Santa Clara, CA
Kemet
Greenville, SC
Dallas, TX
Texas Instruments, In.c.
Useco, Divo, Litton Indo
Van Nuys, CA
Available from any commercial source
Order by description (OBD)
KEM
TI
USECO
COML
Table 5-3.
Address
Glossary of Internal Signal Mnemonics
Code
Signal
Mnemonic
De!scription
A
B
C
D
F
G
H
I
AMI-AMF
PCS/
DMO-DM3
WEll
LPAR
RTD/S1
CAS/
EVEN/ODD
Memory Address bits I-F
Protected Chip Select
Memory Bus data Bits 0-3
Write Enable 1
Low Parity Bi t
&~ad /Status Bi t 1
Column Address Strobe
Even/Odd Parity Selection
C-25
iSBC m 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
C-26
iSBC~
303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
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iSBC~
303 Parts Location Diagram
C-27
"
iSBC M 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
C-28
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303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
C-30
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iSBC· 303 PARITY GENERATOR MULTIMODULE BOARD
C-32
APPENDIX D.
D-1.
iSBC'" 86/l2A DIFFERENCES
INTRODUCTION
The iSBC 86/14 and iSBC 86/30 Single Board Computers are designed to be
downward compatible with the iSBC 86/12A Single Board Computer, except
for differences in the RAM capacity. Differences between the boards are
due mainly to the enhancements and added features on the iSBC 86/14 and
iSBC 86/30 boards. This appendix provides a description of the major
hardware and software differences between the boards and summarizes the
considerations for performing a direct replacement of the iSBC 86/12A
board with an iSBC 86/14 or iSBC 86/30 board.
D-2.
FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENCES
The differences between the iSBC 86/14/30 board and the iSBC 86/12A board
are divided into functional categories as follows:
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Software Compatibility
Power Requirements
Board, Bus, and CPU Timing
Memory
I/O
Pin Assignments/Signal Definitions
Jumper Post Numbering
Interrupts
Physical Characteristics
Each of these differences is discussed In the following paragraphs.
D-3.
SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY
Complete software compatibility is maintained in moving from an iSBC
86/12A board to an iSBC 86/14/30 board. However, the additional I/O port
address recognition and wait-state seleetion of the iSBC 86/14/30 board
must be taken into account. The additional I/O port addresses that are
useable on the iSBC 86/14/30 board are described later in this appendix.
D-1
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
The wait-state selection on the iSBC 86/12A board allows configuration
for 0 or 1 wait-state during an EPROM access, 1 wait-state during an I/O
access, and 1 (typical) during a RAM access. The iSBC 86/14/30 board
allows configuration for 0 to 3 wait-states during an EPROM access, 1 or
2 wait-states during an I/O access, and 1 (typical at 5 MHz) or 2
(typical at 8 MHz) during a RAM access (refer to paragraph 4-31 for more
information).
0-4.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
The power requirements for the iSBC 86/12A board and the iSBC 86/14/30
board are compared in Table D-l. Note that: the iSBC 86/14/30 board
requires only a +5 volt supply unless the RS232C interface is used, or
unless a Multimodule board needs + 12 volts. This feature of the iSBC
86/14/30 board eliminates the need for battery back-up of the other
voltages; only the +5 volt power source requires batter back-up.
Table D-1.
iSBC 86/14/30 BOARD
CONFIGURATION
Power Requirement Comparison
VCC=+5+5%
VDD=+12V+5%
VBB =-5V+5%
VAA=-12V+5%
--.
--
--
-_.
-_.
--
--
--
--
-_.
--
--
640 rnA
--
--
--
With 8k EPROM3
(Using 2716)
5.4A
--,
--
--
Wi th 16k EPROM
(Using 2732)
Wi th 32k EPROM3
(Using 2764)
Wi th 64k EPROM 3
(Using 27128)
5.5A
--
--
5.6A
--
---
5.7A
--
--
Without EPROM 1
5.1A
Battery Back-up
86/14 (additional) 600 rnA
86/30 (addi tional) 900 rnA
With iSBC 300A RAM 256 rnA
(additional)
With iSBC 304 RAM
(additional)
D-2
---
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
Table D-1.
Power Requirement Comparison (continued)
iSBC 86/12A BOARD
CONFIGURATION
Without EPROM 1
Battery Back-up
86/12A 2 (additional)
With iSBC 300 RAM
(additional)
With iSBC 340 1 EPROM
(additional)
With 4k EPROM3
(Using 2758)
With 8k ROM 3
(Using 2316E)
With 8k EPROM 3
(Using 2716)
With 16k ROM 3
(Using (2332A)
With 16k EPROM3
(Using 2732)
5.2A
350 mA
--
40 mA
390 mA
1mA
40 mA.
24 mA
--
1.0 mA
--
120 mA
--
--
--
40 mA
40 mA
1mA
5.5A
350 mA
6.1A
350 mA
---
5.5A
350 mA
--
40 mA
5.4A
350 mA
40 mA
5.4A
350 mA.
---
40 mA
Notes:
1.
2.
3.
D-5.
Does not include power required for optional ROM/EPROM, I/O
drivers, and I/O terminators.
Does not include power for optional ROM/EPROM, I/O drivers, and
I/O terminators. Power for the iSBC 530 TTY Adapter is supplied
via serial port connector.
Includes power required for four ROM/EPROM chips, and I/O
terminators installed for 16 I/O lines; all terminator inputs low.
TIMING
The iSBC 86/14/30 board operates at an 8 MHz clock rate in its as-shipped
configuration. Optional jumper configuration on the iSBC 86/14/30 board
can enable operation at 5 MHz for compatibility with the iSBC 337 Numeric
Data Processor board or with the ICE 86 products. The iSBC 86/12A board
operates at 5 MHz.
The operating speed difference between the 8 MHz clock rate on the iSBC
86/14/30 board and the 5 MHz clock rate on the iSBC 86/12A board provides
a cycle time difference (for execution of the fastest executable
instruction) of 150 nS (250 nS for the :[SBC 86/14/30 board as compared to
a 400 nS for the iSBC 86/12A board).
0-3
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
The clock generator on the iSBC 86/14/30 board provides a BCLK/ and a
CCLK/ signal to the Multibus interface at a rate of 9.83 MHz rather than
at the 9.2 MHz rate generated by the iSBC 86/12A board. The frequency
change provides a clock period reduction from 108 ns to 102 ns.
D-6.
MEMORY
The iSBC 86/12A board is shipped with sixteen 2117 Dynamic RAM devices
installed. These devices provide 32k bytes of on-board RAM that is
expandable via the iSBC 300 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board to a maximum
of 64k bytes of memory.
The iSBC 86/14 board is shipped with sixteen 2118-4 Dynamic RAM devices
installed. These devices provide 32k bytes of on-board RAM that is
expandable via the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodule Board to a maximum
of 64k bytes of memory.
The iSBC 86/30 board is shipped with sixteen 2164 Dynamic RAM devices
installed. These devices provide 128k bytes of on-board RAM that is
expandable via the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board to a maximum
of 256k bytes of memory.
The ROM/EPROM chip sockets on the iSBC 86/14/30 board are 28-pin
locations that comply with the JEDEC standard. The sockets accept both
24-pin and 28-pin EPROM, Static RAM, and Pseudostatic RAM devices; the
sockets on the iSBC 86/12A board accept only 24-pin devices.
The memory addressing for the iSBC 86/14/30 board includes 4 bits that
provide a bank select option. Address linE!s ADR14/, ADR15/, ADR16/, and
ADR17/, are used to select one of sixteen 1-megabyte sections of memory
space to access and to reside in.
D-7.
I/O PORT ADDRESSING
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains several registers that are not on the
iSBC 86/12A board and accesses the registers via I/O port addresses that
are considered on the iSBC 86/12A board to be illegal. The iSBC 86/14/30
board includes an 8-bit Status Register, a 4-bit Megabyte Select
Register, an edge-to-Ievel interrupt latch control function, and two iSBX
Bus interface connectors (J3 and J4). Table D-2 lists the I/O port
addresses and the functions performed by ea.ch on the iSBC 86/14/30
board. By removing jumper E42-E43 from the iSBC 86/14/30 board, you can
disable the I/O port addresses on the iSBC 86/14/30 board that provide
access to the Status Register, the Megabyte Select Register, and the Edge
Interrupt Sense Register.
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
Table D-2.
Port Address
CO,C2,C4,
or C6
Device Name
1/0 Addressi.ng Differences
Function on 86/12A
Edge Interrupt
Sense Register
Function on 86/14/30
Read
Write
(Word)
Off board
none
Off board
Clear Register
Read
Write
Off board
Off board
None
Load Upper 4-bit
Address, control
OVERRIDE I , NMI MASK/,
Mu1tibus interrupts,
timer gate enable, and
LED DS1 and DS3 control
C9,CB,CD,
CF ,D1,D3,
D5,D7,D9,
DB,DD,DF
Status Latch
80,82,84,
86,88,8A,
8C,8E
iSBX Connector J4
Off board
Low byte transfer (both
8-hi t and 16-bi t
boards), or word
transfer (16-bit boards
only). Activates MCSOI
for Mu1timodu1e boards.
81,83,85,
87,89, 8B,
8D,8F
iSBX Connector J4
Off board
High byte transfer
(16-bit boards only).
Activates MCS11 for
Mu1timodu1e boards.
90,92,94,
96,98,9A,
9C,9E
iSBX Connector J4
Off board
Byte tranfer (8-bit
boards only). Activates
MCS11 for Mu1timodu1e
boards.
AO, A2,A4,
A6,A8,AA,
AC,AE
iSBX Connector J3
Off board
Low byte transfer (both
8-bit and 16-b!t
boards), or word
transfer (16-bit boards
only). Activates MCSOI
for Mu1timodu1e boards.
I>-5
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
Table D-2.
Port Address
I/O Addressing Differences (continued)
Device Name
Function on 86/12A
Function on 86/14/30
A1,A3, AS,
A7 ,A9,AB,
AD,AF
iSBX Connector J3
Off board
High byte transfer
(16-bit boards only).
Activates MCS1/ for
Multimodule boards.
BO,B2,B4,
B6,B8,BA,
BC,BE
iSBX Connector J3
Off board
Byte transfer (8-bit
boards only). Activates
MCS1/ for Multimodule
boards.
D-8.
PIN ASSIGNMENT/SIGNAL DEFINITION DIFFERENCES
Table D-3 provides the connector pin assignment and signal definition
differences between the iSBC 86/14/30 board and the iSBC 86/12A board.
The pin assignments on the P1 connector for each board are exactly the
same. The P2 (auxiliary) connector, however, contains seven additional
signals.
D-6
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
Table D-3.
Interface Differences
Signal
Name
Function
(86/12A)
P1/26
INH2/
Inhibit ROM
Operation
Reserved
P2/5
EEVPP
Not Used
The EEVPP signal provides the
EEPROM voltage required to
re-program an electrically
eraseable ROM.
P2/17
PFSN/
Not Used
The power fail sense (PFSN/)
s.ignal.
P2/31
PLC
Not Used
1be power line clock input signal
is a clock signal operating at
the frequency of the power line
(either 50 or 60 Hz).
P2/55
ADR16/
Not Used
P2/56
ADR17/
Not Used
P2/57
ADR14/
Not Used
P2/58
ADR15/
Not Used
Connector/Pin
Function (86/14/30)
The high-order four address bits
on the Multibus interface.
The pin assignment on the J1 and J2 connector interfaces for the iSBC
86/14/30 board is exactly as defined for the iSBC 86/12A board.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains two Nultimodule board sockets that are
assigned connector numbers J3 and J4. Each conforms to the iSBX BUS
INTERFACE SPECIFICATION.
D-9.
JUMPER POST NUMBERING
There is no correlation between the jumper numbering sequence used on the
iSBC 86/14/30 board and the iSBC 86/12A board. However, the boards are
configured to perform the same functions when in the as-shipped
configuration. The as-shipped jumper configurations for each board are
listed in Table D-4. For more information on reconfiguring the jumpers,
refer to Chapter 2 of this manual.
D-7
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
Table D-4.
iSBC 86/14/30
Jumper Pair
iSBC 86/12A
Jumper Pair
E2-E3*
None
E7-Ell
E14-E13
E22-E23*
None
E24-35*
E26-E27*
None
E28-E32*
E7-E8*
E30-E31*
E7-E10*
E33-E34
E38-E39
E40-E41*
E42-E43*
None
E5-E6
None
None
E44-E53*,
E45, E54*,
E46-E55*,
E48-E57* ,
E49-E58*,
E50-E59* ,
E51-E60*
E13-E14*
E17-E18*
E19-E20
E26-E27
E28-E29
E30-E31*
E32-E33*
E52-E61*
E21-E25*
E88-E89,
E90-E91,
E92-E93,
E94-E95,
E104,E105,
E98,E99
E97,E98,E99,
E94,E95,E96
Jumper Differences
Function
Connects 8 MHz clock to EFI input on
8284A.
Wait-state configuration.
Enables the OVERRIDE/ signal to control
the locking of dual port RAM when
installed.
Enables NMI mask signal from status
register to control the NMI interrupt
input to the 8086-2 cpu.
Enables continually active GATE input
for 8253-5 PIT timer O.
Enables continually active GATE input
for 8253-5 PIT timer 1.
BVI
Failsafe timeout sense enable.
Not user configurable.
Disables status latch and edge interrupt
flipflop on the iSBC 86/14/30 board when
installed.
Connects the 8255A PPI Port C I/O
signals to the J1 connector.
Connects the direction control for the
8255A PPI port A I/O signal buffer to
ground, selecting output mode.
Inputs to EPROMs
E108-E109
E11-El12
E121, E122
None
Provide access to the iSBX Bus connector
J3 OPTO and OPT1 signals.
E123,E124,
E125
Sl 8-9,Sl 10-7
EPROM size select.
E126
None
Provides access to the iSBX Bus
connector J3 interrupt line, MINTR1.
D-8
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
Table D-4.
iSBC 86/14/30
Jumper Pair
iSBC 86/12A
Jumper Pair
E127, E131,
E138,E139,
E140,E142
None
E128, E130
None
E135
None
E137
None
E146
None
E144-E145*
E87-E89*
E147-E158*
E79-E83*
E151-E152*
E68-E76*
E156
None
E163
None
E166
E1
E167
None
E168
E68
E169
None
E170
None
El71
None
E172,E173,E174
None
Jumper Differences (continued)
Function
Input signals to the interrupt "OR"ing
functicln in the interrupt jumper matrix.
OR gatE! output signals from the
interrupt "OR"ing function.
Input to edge-interrupt latching
flipflop U32.
SBX2 INTO interrupt signal to the
interrupt jumper matrix from iSBX Bus
connector J3.
LEVEL INTR interrupt signal to the
interrupt jumper matrix from the
edge-to-Ievel interrupt conversion
flipflop U32.
Disables NMI interrupt input to 8086-2
CPU when installed.
TIMER 0 INTR interrupt signal input to
the interrupt jumper matrix from the
counter 0 output of the 8253-5 PIT
connected to the IR2 interrupt level in
the PIC.
Connects INT5/ interrupt signal on the
Multibus interface to the IR5 interrupt
level on the PIC.
SBX1 INTO interrupt signal to the
interrupt jumper matrix from iSBX
connector J4.
POWER LINE CLOCK signal from P2
connec:tor.
MINT :l.nterrupt signal input to the
interrupt jumper matrix from the iSBC
337 Numeric Data Processor Board.
PARITY INTR signal to the interrupt
jumper matrix from the iSBC 303 Parity
Generator/Checker Multimodule board.
PFI input signal from the power fail
sense circuitry.
SBX1 INTl interrupt signal input to the
interrupt jumper matrix.
OPTO option signal from the iSBX
connector J4.
OPTl option signal from the iSBX
connector J4.
Select either 8-bit or 16-bit operation
of the iSBX Bus interfaces at
Multitnodule connectors J3 and J4.
0-9
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
Table D-4.
Jumper Differences (continued)
iSBC 86/14/30
Jumper Pair
iSBC 86/12A
Jumper Pair
E175-E176*
E56-E578
E178-E179*
E54-E55*
E184-E185*
E59-E60*
E189-E193*
None
E190-E194*
E42-E43*
E191-E195*
E39-E40*
E193-E189
None
E202-E203*
E129-E130*
E204-E206
None
E205-E207*
E105-E106*
E208-E209*
E103-E104*
E210-E211*
E151-E152*
E213-E214*
E143-E144*
E215,E216,
E217,E219
None
Ground connections for the megabyte page
selet jumpers.
E220,E221,
E222,E224
None
E218-E223
None
E277-E278*,
E114-E115*
Selects the megabyte page address at
which the on-board memory is located.
Enables access of a 16 megabyte address
range of off-board resources.
W4 A-B*
E240-E243,
E230-233,
E234-237
S1 4-13,S1 3-14, Dual Port address and size select.
S1 2-15,S1 1-16,
S1 5-12, S1 6-11
Function
Selects 1.23 MHz clock input frequency
for counter 0 of the 8253-5 PIT device.
Selects 1.23 MHz clock input frequency
for counter 2 of the 8253-5 PIT device.
Selects 156.3 KHz clock input frequency
for counter 1 of the 8253-5 PIT device.
Connects the Data Terminal Ready signal
from the serial interface to the Data
Set Ready input on the 8251A PCI.
Selects the Transmit Clock (TxC) from
counter 2 of the PIT for operating the
8251A PCr.
Selects the Receive Clock (rxC) from
counter 2 of the PIT for operating the
8251A PCI.
Configure a Multibus arbitration scheme
by providing options for ANY REQUEST
signal input to 8289.
Provides the ability to drive the
on-board LOCK/ signal onto the Multibus
i f required.
Provides BCLK/ system clock onto the
multibus interface when installed.
Provides CCLK/ system clock onto the
Multibus interface when installed.
Connects BPRO/ signal generated on-board
to the Multibus interface when installed.
Connects the CBRQ/ signal generated
on-board to the Multibus interface when
installed.
Connects the +5v bus to the +5v battery
backup bus when installed.
D-lO
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
Table n-4.
iSBC 86/14/30
Jumper Pair
iSBC 86/12A
Jumper Pair
E279
None
E125-E126
None
None
None
W7 A-B
W6 A-B*
None
W5 A-B*
Note:
D-10.
Jumper Differences (continued)
*
Function
Provides more conditions on generation
of the TIME OUT INTR/ signal for use
with iRMX 86 software. The ORing of
E279-E133 via the "OR" function provided
in the interrupt jumper matrix disables
a failsafe timeout restart when
executlng a HALT instruction under iRMX
86 software.
Multibus address select for Dual Port.
Advance memory write feature.
Connects the +12v bus to the +12v
battery backup bus when installed.
Connects the -5v bus to the -5vdc
battery backup bus when installed.
indicates as-shipped configuration.
INTERRUPT DIFFERENCES
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains several jumper options within the
interrupt jumper matrix that are not available on the iSBC 86/12A board.
Each is described in the following paragraphs.
Jumper Post E26-E27 provides the ability to disable through hardware the
masking of the NMI interrupt on the iSBG 86/14/30 board. And, unlike the
iSBC 86/12A board, the iSBC 86/14/30 board allows program control of the
masking or non-masking of the NMI interrupt to the CPU when the jumper is
configured as shipped.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board provides two Multibus interrupt output signals
rather than one (as done by the iSBC 86/12A board). The second interrupt
signal (BUS INTR OUT 2 at E245) may be c.onnected to anyone of the
Multibus interrupt request lines (INTO/ through INT7/).
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains an interrupt "ORing" feature that allows
combining six or less input interrupts into one or two interrupt request
signals. The feature is implemented via jumpers E127, E131, E138, E139,
E140, and E142 (the inputs to OR gate U31), and via jumpers E128 and E130
(the outputs from the OR gate to the interrupt matrix).
The iSBC 86/14/30 board is capable of s4~nsing an edge-type interrupt
request signal and converting it into a level-type interrupt request
signal. Jumper E136 in the interrupt jumper matrix provides the input to
the conversion circuit (flipflop U32) and jumper E146 provides the output
of the conversion as an input to the interrupt jumper matrix.
D-ll
iSBC 86/12A DIFFERENCES
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains a jumper (E33-E34) that configures the
board to sense and respond to both bus vectored an non-bus vectored
interrupts when installed. By removing the jumper, the iSBC 86/14/30
board is enabled to sense and respond to only non-bus vectored
interrupts; all bus vectored interrupts acre disabled.
D-11.
PHYSICAL DIFFERENCES
The printed circuit boards for each devic.e are the standard
Multibus-compatible dimensions. However, the iSBC 86/14/30 board makes
use of the areas on the J1 and J2 connector side of the board that are
cut-away on the iSBC 86/12A board.
The iSBC 86/14/30 board contains three re.d LEDs that provide visual
indictions of board status, as follows:
*
DS1 - The function is user-defined and programmable via I/O port
addresses C9 through DF (all odd addresses).
*
*
DS2 - The LED indicates that the CPU is "running" when ON.
DS3 - The LED indicates that the BUS INTR OUT 2 signal is
inactive when ON.
Each board accepts a different subset of the iSBC Multimodule board
family. The iSBC 86/14 board is compatible with the iSBC 303 Parity
Generator/Checker Multimodule Board, the iSBC 300A RAM Expansion
Multimodule board, and the iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor Board. No
ROM/EPROM expansion is available.
The amount of memory on the iSBC 86/30 board precludes the use of the
iSBC 303 Parity Generator/Checker Multimodule Board and the iSBC 300 and
iSBC 300A RAM Expansion Multimodlue Boards. However, the iSBC 86/30
board is compatible with the iSBC 337 Numberic Data Processor Board and
the iSBC 304 RAM Expansion Multimodule Board. No ROM/EPROM expansion is
available.
The iSBC 86/12A board is compatible with the iSBC 300 RAM Expansion, the
iSBC 340 ROM/EPROM Expansion, the iSBC 303 Parity Generator/Checker, and
the iSBC 337 Numeric Data Processor Multimodule boards.
D-12
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