getting started for adults

getting started for adults
 GETTING STARTED FOR ADULTS
A comprehensive curling club program to build membership through superior customer service
page 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
7.0
8.0
9.0
10.0
11.0
12.0
Introduction
Preparation
Program Selection
Instructors
Equipment
Promotion
Budget
Teaching Curriculum
Social Aspect
Special Events
Feedback
Getting Started
Appendix ‘A’
Detailed Weekly Curriculum
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4
Week 5
Week 6
Week 7
Week 8
Week 9
Week 10
Week 11-12
Week 13-22
Appendix ‘B’
Appendix ‘C’
Appendix ‘D’
Warm-Ups
Speaking Notes for Off-ice
Session in Week 1
Feedback Survey
Page 3
Page 4
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Page 5
Page 8
Page 10
Page 12
Page 13
Page 14
Page 15
Page 15
Page 15
Page 16
Page 18
Page 20
Page 23
Page 26
Page 30
Page 34
Page 38
Page 41
Page 43
Page 44
Page 45
Page 46
Page 50
Page 52
page 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION
1.1 WHAT IS THE GETTING STARTED FOR ADULTS PROGRAM?
Getting Started for Adults is a comprehensive curling club program to build membership through superior
customer service.
The goal of the Getting Started for Adults Program is to attract new curlers and to retain them as long-term
members. People are more likely to keep playing the sport if it is fun, reasonably priced and they master the
technique quickly. Unlike the traditional one-day clinic, this program helps entry level and novice curlers become
progressively better through continued weekly instruction and skill development.
1.2 WHY SHOULD YOUR CLUB HAVE A GETTING STARTED FOR ADULTS PROGRAM?
Traditionally people started curling because their parents or spouse was a curler and brought them to the rink, or
perhaps they “tried it once” at a work event or in high school. However what happens to adults without this
connection? Those who were persistent came to clubs and were often put on a teams with experienced curlers,
but with little or no formal training. New curlers usually quit as they become discouraged. Sound familiar?
What was needed was a supportive environment where adults could learn to curl with proper instruction.
Recognizing this need, the first Getting Started for Adults Program began at the Ottawa Curling Club in 2006.
This pilot program was a huge success and continues today at the Ottawa Curling Club. Every season the
program is over-subscribed with a waiting list! Many of the graduates of this program have continued to be
members at the club and some are now even board members. These new curlers are eager to get involved in
the club – they volunteer, play in club bonspiels and are the last people to leave at the end-of year party. New
curlers are excited to be a part of the club and the curling club has a new energy with new people and new
ideas.
The Ottawa Curling Club program has implemented several changes and improvements to the program since it
began and throughout this manual the Ottawa Curling Club program will be discussed as an example of best
practices.
The Getting Started for Adults Program is now operating at curling clubs across Canada with thousands of
people learning about this great sport. This manual provides curling clubs with a step-by-step guide to
implement this program.
1.3 WHY DO ADULTS LIKE THE GETTING STARTED FOR ADULTS PROGRAM?
The Getting Started for Adults Program offers superior customer service in the following ways:
1.
2.
3.
Enhanced instruction
Enhanced program
Enhanced equipment
EQUALS Enhanced Experience!
This program is an investment in the club’s future membership. In order to bring this enhanced experience to life,
the club must be willing to invest the time and money required to provide superior customer service. The three
main goals of the program are to provide:
ENHANCED INSTRUCTION: The Getting Started for Adults Program is not a clinic. Ideally this is a full-year
learn to curl program. The club needs to commit to having ice available and instructors available for the full
season. The club must be willing to pay the Program Coordinator (if an existing staff member cannot take on
this role) and pay the instructors. Volunteer instructors are not reliable and the program will fail without proper
instruction.
page 3 ENHANCED PROGRAM: Keeping new curlers means providing them with not just curling, but membership in
the club. The club needs to commit to making the new curlers feel welcome and doing everything possible to
make them feel they belong at the curling club.
ENHANCED EQUIPMENT: The better the equipment, the faster new curlers can learn skills. If the learning
process is taking a long time, new curlers get discouraged. Investing in rental equipment so that the new curlers
can experience curling with equipment that enhances their skills (i.e. using a slider, not tape under a running
shoe) will provide for a better learning experience. Providing equipment to new curlers will also make the
program more accessible, as there is no upfront cost to trying a new sport.
It is also important to ensure that the ice is well maintained for the program so that the new curlers are not
frustrated by bad ice conditions. This may mean paying the ice technician to come in before the start of the
program each week to prepare the ice.
Incorporating all of these elements guarantees an Enhanced Experience. The new curlers will feel that they
have joined a well-organized, quality curling club and at the end of the season they will be asking “where do I
sign up next year?”
This manual will provide the tools needed to successfully implement this program.
2.0 PRE-SEASON PREPARATION
To prepare for the program, the following is needed:
a) Designate a Program Coordinator. The Program Coordinator can be the club Manager or an outside hired
person. This person will be responsible for recruiting, scheduling and training the instructors. The Program Coordinator can act as a “head instructor” by relaying the curriculum to the instructors and overseeing the program
sessions each week. This position is critical as the new curlers need a point of contact for any questions that
may arise. The Program Coordinator does not need to be a “competitive” curler or a “professional” curler. This
person should be someone with curling experience who is very organized and is a good communicator.
b) Allocate regular weekly ice time. Keep the program at the same time each week to ensure that the curlers
are able to regularly attend. If possible, try to offer the program at a convenient time so that people will be more
likely to sign up and continue attending. The duration of each session should be two (2) hours.
c) Select a program. There are three different programs which a club can choose to run: eight week program;
half season program; and full season program (recommended).
3.0 PROGRAM SELECTION
Each program has its own benefits and caters to a certain target market.
3.1 EIGHT WEEK PROGRAM
This program is the most intensive, requiring a higher ratio of instructors to curlers in order to provide sufficient
and meaningful instruction in the shorter time allotted.
Target market: Since there is less time for novices to develop the skills, compared to longer versions of the
program, this program is best targeted towards novice curlers who already have a base level of understanding of
the game and are looking for instruction to improve their skills and further their understanding of the game. New
curlers can still benefit from this program.
page 4 Teaching Tip: If the program has many novice curlers sign up, equipment costs may be decreased as curlers
may already have their own equipment.
A USA club created what they tentatively called the eight week crossover membership. For a fee, people
could join an instruction league for the last four weeks of the season PLUS the first four weeks of the next
season. If they stayed on after the eight weeks, the fee was credited to the regular membership fee. They
advertised heavily during the spring when curling hype is at its highest.
3.2 HALF SEASON PROGRAM
This program runs for half of the season (October to December or January to March or both!) so it is more
intensive than the full season program but not as intensive as the eight week program. This program could also
work well as a lead-up to a beginner league that may run in the second half of the season or the second year of
their development.
Target market: This program targets new and novice curlers in addition to people who are only able to commit
to a program for half of the season. For example, university students whose school schedule allows them to be
involved in the program one semester but not the other.
3.3 FULL SEASON PROGRAM (RECOMMENDED)
This program is spans the entire curling season which allows curlers more time to develop their skills.
Target market: This program targets new and novice curlers but is especially beneficial for new curlers since
the program provides sufficient time to develop their skills. It also targets people who have time to commit to a
program that runs all season.
Teaching Tip: Engaging the new curlers attention for the entire season will provide them with a better
understanding of the sport and at the same time exposes them to the club’s facilities, curling leagues and
members – increasing the probability they will return for the next curling season.
Note: a detailed explanation of each program’s teaching curriculum can be found in the section titled Teaching
Curriculum. A “season” means an entire curling season (from about October to March).
4.0 INSTRUCTORS
The Program Coordinator is responsible for the recruitment, training and scheduling of instructors.
4.1 RECRUITMENT
4.1.1 Who to Recruit
The Program Coordinator will want to recruit enthusiastic, friendly, and qualified instructors. The instructors
do not need to be competitive curlers or have 20 years of experience – instructors should be good
communicators, who can work as a team and who love curling. If possible, it is good to have a combination of
both youth and experience, as different curlers will gravitate to different instructors. For example, a group of
women (aged 50+) signed up for the Ottawa Curling Club program and enjoyed learning from a 20-year-old
female instructor who had a lot of energy, while a 30-year-old man preferred being taught by an older instructor
“who was a lead his entire career”. Providing a variety of instructors allows people to gravitate to where they feel
comfortable. An ideal balance is older, experienced instructors, as well as younger, newly certified instructors
(many of whom may be competitive junior curlers who have recently graduated from juniors). Instructors who
have completed coaching or instructing certification are ideal, however the club may wish to offer to pay or
supplement the cost of a course for new instructors to become certified.
page 5 Potential instructors can be drawn from:
Former competitive curlers or former competitive juniors;
Existing coaches/instructors with an interest in expanding their involvement in teaching;
Existing course conductors with an interest in expanding their involvement in teaching;
Athletes with an interest in obtaining additional income while they pursue their competitive curling/
Olympic Dreams;
Retired curlers looking for a new activity.
Provincial/territorial members association may have a list of certified instructors.
4.1.2 How Many Instructors?
There are recommendations below as to how many instructors should be present on the ice at each session. A
minimum of one instructor to eight curlers is recommended. In addition to these numbers, the Program
Coordinator will also want to recruit a few extra instructors for their instructor pool as there will be times when not
all instructors will be available. Instructors can then be scheduled on a rotating basis or according to availability.
It is recommended that a schedule be generated and distributed to the instructors.
Teaching Tip: Having too few instructors will cause a lot of problems, especially in the first few lessons when
curlers need a lot of one-on-one help. At one club, the Program Co-ordinator received an email from a new
curler complaining that because of the lack of instructors her sheet had 10 curlers (and one instructor) and she
only got 15 practice slides, where on other sheets with a lower ratio, people were sliding 20+ times. New curlers
have high expectations that they will have an exceptional experience. If they are discouraged or feel the
program is not well organized, they will quit.
4.1.3 Recommended Number of Instructors
The charts below display the recommended number of instructors that should be present on the ice based on
the number of participants and the length of program. Since the eight week program is more intensive, it will
generally require more instructors than the half season and full season programs.
These recommendations are based on a balance between having enough instructors to provide superior
customer service and considering the financial implications of instructor fees. These are guidelines. Select the
number of instructors that works best for the situation.
4.1.4 First Half of the Program
In general, it is recommended that more instructors are present during the first half when there is a stronger
emphasis on technical skills and more personalized attention is needed.
page 6 Figure 4.1.2.2
Chart 1: Recommended Instructors for First Half of the Program
Number of
Sheets being
used
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Number of
Participants
Instructors needed for
8 Week Program
8
16
24
32
40
48
56
64
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
Instructors needed
for Half and Full
Season Program
2
4
6
8
9
10
12
14
Note: These numbers represent the actual number of instructors needed on the ice each week. The Program
Co-ordinator should recruit two to three additional instructors to allow for absences.
4.1.5 Second Half of the Program
Since the second half of the program consists mostly of games, the required number of instructors will be less,
as compared to the first half of the program. There should be at least one instructor per sheet plus an additional
instructor or instructors to float between sheets.
Chart 2: Recommended Instructors for Second Half of the Program
Number of
Sheets being
used
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Number of
Participants
Instructors needed for
8 Week Program
8
16
24
32
40
48
56
64
1-2
2-3
4
6
7
8
10
12
Instructors needed for
Half and Full Season
Program
1
2
3-4
4-5
6
7
9
10
4.1.6 How to Recruit Instructors
The Program Coordinator can contact potential instructors by phone, email or in person explaining the program,
the commitment required, and the pay rate.
4.1.7 When to Recruit Instructors
It is recommended that the Program Coordinator recruit instructors well in advance so that instructors can be
trained if needed. Recruiting could start as early as eight (8) months in advance, but no later than one (1) month
prior to the start of the season.
page 7 4.2 TRAINING
1
4.2.1 Club Coach Certification
It is strongly recommended that all instructors are at minimally certified as a Club Coach. A win-win method
used by clubs is to pay half of the course fee for instructors that were not already certified. This benefits the
instructors as they are able to obtain their certification without paying the full cost of the course. It also benefited
the program by ensuring that all instructors were knowledgeable and qualified.
4.2.2 Instructor Seminar
Before the start of the program, the Program Coordinator should organize a seminar with all of the instructors to
ensure that everyone understands how the program works and their role. The Program Coordinator should
review how the program will run and what instructors will be teaching for the first few sessions. This will also
give the instructors a chance to ask the Program Coordinator any questions they may have.
4.2.3 Weekly E-mail to Instructors
Each week the Program Coordinator should send out an email to all instructors outlining the lesson plan for that
session. This is essential at the beginning of the program when the curling delivery is being taught. By sending
out a step-by-step explanation of how the delivery should be taught, this will ensure that all instructors are
providing the participants with consistent instruction.
Teaching Tip: The instructors are likely (and hopefully!) coming from all different curling backgrounds. Some
may be very experienced while others have only been playing for a short time. At the seminar the Program
Coordinator should address this disparity and reinforce that everyone is going to teach the curriculum sent out
each week. A possible explanation could be:
“All of you have been asked to be instructors because you bring a different skill set to the program. Some of you
have been curling for a long time, while others may be relatively new to this game. You each have your own
style of delivery and technique, however, for this program we all need to ‘be on the same page’ and teach the
same curriculum. This is important for the curlers to feel they have a quality experience and an organized
program. We need to work as a team and deliver the program together, so all the new curlers enjoy their
experience and no curler is asking ‘why are they doing things differently with that instructor’.”
New curlers do not like inconsistency and they want to feel that they are getting “good value for the time/money”.
Having an organized program is the best way to provide a quality experience!
5.0 EQUIPMENT
5.1 EQUIPMENT STRATEGY
Many new curlers may be hesitant about making an investment in new equipment. To make signing up for the
program risk-free, in addition to a money-back guarantee, it is recommended to provide the participants with
rental equipment. The cost of this rental equipment can be recovered in one of the following ways:
a) As a built-in cost in the Getting Started for Adults Program registration fee (divided over three years since
most of the equipment can be re-used for at least an additional two years);
1
Contact the provincial / territorial member association for session dates. page 8 b) A rental fee charged to the users (divided over three years);
c) RECOMMENDED: A combination of the above options (only charge rental fees for the second half of the
program and include the rest in a hidden registration fee).
The club, however, may decide to simply incur the cost of some or all of the rental equipment as it is an
investment in improving the services offered by the club (equipment to offer one-time rentals) and also it would
help to minimize the cost to register in the Getting Started for Adults Program.
Equipment Needed
Brooms – supplied by club
Full Slip-on Sliders – supplied by club
Grippers for both feet – supplied by club
Clean running shoes (if curler is not using curling shoes) – supplied by curler
Warm, loose-fitting clothing (layered) – supplied by curler
Mitts or Gloves (that have a grip if possible) – supplied by curler
Throwing Aids/Stabilizers – supplied by club
Equipment Recommended
Curling shoes
Throwing Aids / Stabilizers – supplied by club
Teaching Tip: one way to offer an enhanced experience (and teach the curlers about equipment) is to provide an
equipment “seminar” or “demo”. On the third or fourth week of the program invite all the new curlers to come to
the club one hour prior to the curling lesson for an “equipment seminar” in the lounge. If the club has a proshop, invite the pro shop manager to give a brief discussion on the different types of shoes/brooms etc. If the
club does not have a pro-shop the Program Coordinator or one of the instructors can be the speaker. Bring lots
of different kinds of equipment (hair brooms, synthetic brooms, slip on sliders, different curling shoes etc – use
the instructors equipment if necessary). Remember, many new curlers have never been on the ice before and
do not know the difference between hair brooms and synthetic, slip on sliders and quarter inch sliders – so all
information is good!
If people do not want to come to the seminar entice them with food and prizes! Some baskets of snacks on
tables, a draw for a $10 gift certificate at the pro-shop or a new gripper – make it educational and fun.
5.2 EQUIPMENT RECOMMENDATIONS
The original Ottawa Curling Club program allowed participants to use all rental equipment free of charge for the
first half of the program. For the second half, participants were allowed to use the rental brooms, sliders, and
grippers free of charge but were charged for use of the rental curling shoes and stabilizers. This arrangement
worked very well and is recommended for the club if possible.
At a minimum, it is strongly recommended that all curlers in the program start with either a full slip-on slider or an
actual curling shoe. A step-on slider can feel unstable for many curlers and thus contradicts the feeling of safety
that we want to instil.
Tape does not work. It is very different from an actual slider so the curler would practically have to re-learn
everything they were taught once they switch from tape to slider. In addition, tape does not glide well and will
not allow the participant to slide as far or as smoothly. This can be frustrating for new curlers and may
discourage their continued participation.
It is also strongly recommended that all curlers in the program have grippers for both feet when they are
sweeping. This is also in line with instilling the feeling of safety as they will be less prone to slip when they are
sweeping down the ice.
page 9 To help minimize costs, ask current members if they have used brooms or sliders that they would be willing to
donate or sell for a small cost to the program.
If the budget allows, it is recommended that the club purchase a few performance brooms for the program –
even if it is only two or three. This will give the curlers an opportunity to try sweeping with a more technologically
advanced broom and potentially feel more confident in their sweeping. It may encourage them to purchase a
performance broom of their own.
Teaching Tip: A Throwing Aid/Stabilizer is essential. Every sheet should have one Throwing Aid, two if possible
(one for each end). If possible, the club should purchase these and they should be available at all times. (If left
at the end of each sheet permanently, other club members may try them as well and it will also help their
delivery – paint the Throwing Aids a bright colour with the name of the club emblazoned on it so they do not “go
missing”).
A frequent comment from new curlers is “I don’t want to throw with a Throwing Aid because Kevin Martin doesn’t
do it that way/my wife doesn’t do it that way/they look stupid.” Instructors need to insist that all curlers use the
Throwing Aid. New curlers will learn much faster and it is a safer way to learn the delivery. It is suggested that
the Program Coordinator make it a “rule” that all curlers use the Throwing Aid for the first half of the instruction.
That way when asked the instructors can say “it’s a rule, everyone has to use it”. If it is a rule, no one feels they
are being singled out because they “can’t” throw with a broom. After the first half of the season, instructors can
offer to teach curlers to throw with a broom – however once they try it and realize how unsteady they are, most
will not give up the Throwing Aid!
5.3 GATHER EQUIPMENT INFORMATION THROUGH THE REGISTRATION FORM
With regards to equipment, it is advised that the following questions are asked on the program registration form:
What is your shoe size? (to determine now many of each gripper and slider size to order.)
Are you right-handed or left-handed? (to determine how many right-footed and left-footed sliders to
order. Right-handed curlers will need a left-footed slider and left-handed curlers will need a right-footed
slider.)
Do you own any curling equipment? (to determine the amount of equipment to order.)
6.0 PROMOTION
6.1 ANALYZE THE ENVIRONMENT
The club will need to analyze its environment and the marketplace when developing an advertising strategy for
the Getting Started for Adults Program.
Consider if the club is:
Located in an urban or rural area. This will determine which types of advertising methods would be most
effective. For example, an outdoor sign would be more effective for an urban area club with more driveby and walk-by traffic.
A destination club (members tend not to come from the immediate vicinity) or a neighbourhood club
(members tend to come from nearby). The club may want to consider trying to draw in people from a
market that is not currently being utilized. For example, if the club is a destination club, it may want to
target advertising towards people who come from nearby towns since that market may currently be
underutilized.
6.2 ADVERTISING
page 10 6.2.1 Potential Advertising Methods
Some advertising methods that a club may consider are:
Open house (give out brochures, have a sign-up sheet & let people throw a rock!)
Club website (front & centre)
Google Ads
Create a Facebook page for the league and/or the club
Press release - local newspaper or large daily newspaper
Public service announcements targeted at radio, television (local cable channel with the rollover news &
ads) and newspapers
Outdoor sign
Direct mail
Sign in the club (especially helpful for targeting existing members, their family, friends & co-workers)
Bulletin Boards – club, school, local businesses (i.e. have members take brochures to their place of
work)
Word of mouth – have club members encourage their friends to join
6.2.2 Key Advertising Points
Stress the following points in the advertising:
100% money-back guarantee – if, within the first two weeks, the new curler is unsatisfied with the
program, the club will return their membership. This will encourage people to join since it is risk-free.
Safety – some people may have concerns about safety especially with a sport that is played on ice.
Reassure any prospect that safety is the prime concern in the program.
Instructors – emphasize that the league has professional, knowledgeable, paid instructors.
Social – the social aspect of the game is as important as the on-ice aspect.
Membership – their fees are for a membership at the club not just for the league.
Equipment – the equipment is either provided or available to rent or buy at the club for a reasonable
price (depending on which equipment option the club chooses).
6.3 WHERE TO RECRUIT
Some recruiting options are:
Summer sports leagues – many summer sports (baseball, ultimate, soccer, golf) are often social teams
that enjoy playing together and may be looking for a way to continue their recreational activity through a
social winter sport. Curling is the perfect solution for them.
University/college students – if there is a university or college nearby, draw on young people who are
likely looking for a way to be active, social and meet new people.
Existing members (novice curlers) – existing members who have had very little or no previous instruction
can greatly benefit from the program. Recruiting this segment can help to ensure that these existing
members continue to remain existing members since their skills will improve and thus they will be able to
get more enjoyment out of the game. Although this segment is a good one to draw from, the club will
also want to ensure that it tries to bring in new curlers as well through some of the other segments
mentioned.
6.4 EXAMPLES OF RECRUITING STRATEGIES
The following explains how the Ottawa Curling Club, as an urban area club, promoted the program:
Environment Analysis
The Ottawa Curling Club is an urban area destination club. The club decided to draw from their immediate
neighbourhood, thereby targeting a market that was not currently being utilized.
Advertising
page 11 Since the club is in a downtown urban area with substantial drive-by and walk-by traffic they opted for a one
month rental of a large sign at a cost of $200.00. They also used a direct, unaddressed mail campaign,
targeting a number of new condo buildings going up nearby. The cost of the direct mail campaign and sign was
$2,300.00 and proved to be successful.
Recruitment
The Ottawa Curling Club focused on recruiting local people who lived close to the curling club and were looking
for a winter activity. Recruiting from nearby new condos also targeted a group of people who were moving to a
new place and looking for a way to meet new people. The group, interestingly enough, ranged in ages from 25 to
60 years of age and was comprised of about an equal number of men and women.
7.0 BUDGET
7.1 SAMPLE BUDGET
The below example provides a budget based 20 new curlers paying $250.00 for a full year of curling.
Budget Item
Amounts
Membership for 20 new curlers (20 x $250.00)
+$5,000.00
Instructors (4 instructors per night, for 20 weeks, paid $25 per night)
-$2,000.00
Equipment
Brooms - $60 x 20 = $1,200
Sliders - $33 x 20 = $1,200
Grippers - $16 x 20 = $320
Throwing Aid - $80 x 4 = $320
Total Equipment - $2,820 Total
-$2,820.00
+$180.00
7.2 A FEW NOTES ON MAKING A PROFIT
Clubs may be tempted to try to find volunteer instructors to save money. The reality is, volunteer instructors will
cause the program to fail. Everyone is busy and even the most committed volunteers are occasionally
unreliable. By paying instructors it reinforces their commitment to the program. The instructors treat instructing
as a “responsibility” and the Program Coordinator should emphasize that if an instructor needs to be absent,
he/she must find a replacement for the evening (which is why it is important to have a roster with a few extra
instructors). We all know what it is like to wait in line when a store does not have enough staff or to receive poor
customer service. The key to the Getting Started for Adults Program is to provide enhanced experience and the
key to this is having good reliable instructors.
The equipment costs may also appear to be excessive however this equipment can be used in future years, so
this a one-time cost to the club.
Other miscellaneous costs may include paying the icemaker to maintain the ice or paying a bar tender. However
these are investments – good ice = happy curlers and happy curlers will spend more at the bar!
page 12 The club should also consider that on average, if a program is run well and successfully, at least 50% of new
curlers will be returning members. So while the first year of the program may incur a cost to the club, going
forward the club will have a steady supply of new members paying full membership fees.
8.0 TEACHING CURRICULUM
The following teaching curriculum is based on 10 weeks of lessons. Weeks 11 to 20 the curlers play games with
instructor supervision. A more detailed weekly curriculum is available at Appendix A of this manual.
FULL SEASON PROGRAM
Week 1:
Off-ice: Introduce the league, talk generally about curling
Season overview
Etiquette
Warm-up
Equipment
On-ice: Safety
Introduction to throwing a rock and sweeping
Week 2:
Off-ice: Warm-up
Equipment
On-ice: Introduce part of the curling sheet
Introduce three point delivery
Week 3:
Off-ice: Etiquette
Warm-up
On-ice: Review three point delivery
Introduce five point delivery
Sweeping
Week 4:
Off-ice: Warm-up
On-ice: Review five point delivery
Introduce curls and turns
Introduce grip and release
Week 5:
Off-ice: Game orientation session – part 1
Warm-up
On-ice: Line of delivery
Two end game
Week 6:
Off-ice: Warm-up
On-ice: Review five point delivery
Review line of delivery
Introduce advanced sweeping
page 13 Two-end game
Week 7:
Off-ice: Game orientation session – part 2
Warm-up
On-ice: Weight control
Reading the ice
Week 8:
Off-ice: Strategy session – the basics
Warm-up
On-ice: Delivery analysis and correction
Week 9:
Off-ice: Strategy session – beyond the basics
Warm-up
On-ice: Strategy session – beyond the basics
Game
Week 10:
Off-ice: Half Season Party
Warm-up
On-ice: Game
Week 11 & 12: Holiday/Half Season Break
Week 13 to 22:
Off-ice: Warm-up
On-ice: Games
9.0 SOCIAL ASPECT
Teaching new curlers about the social aspect of curling is just as important as learning the on-ice technique. If
new curlers have fun on and off the ice they are more likely to become regular members at the end of the
season. During the first session the Program Coordinator should explain that curling has a long history of being
a friendly game where we shake hands before and after the game and sit down together for a drink after the
game and enjoy each other’s company. Do not forget to explain to the curlers the tradition of the winning team
buying their opponents a drink, then their opponents buying a drink for them. This is one of the beauties of our
sport and our new curlers will then be prepared for the social traditions associated with league play and
bonspiels.
10.0 SPECIAL EVENTS
Offering special events is a great way to further enhance the experience of the curlers in the program. Below
are a few ideas of special events that can be initiated.
page 14 Holiday or Half-Season Party
At some point in the season, organizing a party is a great way to reinforce the social aspect of curling. The party
can be held at the end of the season, just before the Holiday break, or at any other time that works best for the
program. The Program Coordinator can organize it or better yet, encourage the involvement of the curlers to
create a committee to organize the party. The party can be held at the curling club and perhaps involve a dinner
served by the club or a pot-luck if the club does not have a kitchen.
Pro-Am Bonspiel
At some point in the second half of the program, organize an in-house pro-am type club bonspiel. Pair two
experienced curlers from the club with two curlers from the Getting Started for Adults Program. This will expose
the new curlers to a higher level of play, the fun to be had at a bonspiel as well as meeting other members of the
club.
11.0 FEEDBACK
It is important to get feedback about the program from both the curlers and instructors. Their feedback will
provide the club with valuable information such as what worked and what could be changed or improved.
The Program Coordinator should collect this feedback at the end of the program. It will also be a good
opportunity to find out how many curlers plan to return to the program or join a league next year. (Note: the first
year the Ottawa Curling Club ran the program it was so successful that there was a waiting list for the following
year.) Please see Appendix B for a copy of a sample Feedback Survey that can be distributed to the curlers.
The club can also collect feedback at the halfway point of the program. This is especially a good idea for the full
season program. Since it is longer, the Program Coordinator will want to make any necessary changes or
improvements before the second half of the program begins to ensure customer satisfaction. This feedback can
be collected formally through a survey or informally by having an open discussion with the curlers and
instructors.
12.0 GET STARTED!
The club is now ready to initiate the Getting Started for Adults Program. Through superior customer service, the
club will be providing new and novice curlers with an enhanced experience that will encourage long-term
involvement in curling as well as membership growth.
page 15 APPENDIX ‘A’
Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 1
Off-ice: Introduce the league, talk generally about curling
Provide an overview of the season
Etiquette
Warm-up
Equipment
On-ice: Safety
Introduction to throwing a rock and sweeping
OFF-ICE
A detailed script for the Off-Ice component of the Week 1 is available at Appendix C.
This off-ice component may be best done using PowerPoint slides if the equipment is available.
1. Introduction to the League
Please refer to detailed script available at Appendix C.
2. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up. The warm-up should last about 15 minutes.
3. Equipment
Assist curlers to put grippers on both of their shoes, locate brooms and prepare to go onto the ice.
ON-ICE
1. Safety
Before stepping down onto the ice surface, the curlers should be instructed on one of the most important safety
issues: how to step onto the surface in the safest manner. They should be directed to always step down with the
gripper foot first. They should also be directed to not to step or jump over any rocks to get onto the ice.
Curlers will be using grippers on both feet for sweeping. However, during the delivery they will be removing the
gripper to deliver the stone. They will need to know how to safely return to a standing position and move on the
ice after delivering a stone. The following exercise is a way for the curler to get comfortable with that:
A. Safety Drill
Drill:
Drill objective:
Setup:
Play:
Moving Safely on the Ice
To become comfortable moving safely on the ice.
None
1) Have curlers grasp the broom handle approximately at the mid-point with the non-dominant
hand and place the dominant hand slightly lower on the handle.
2) Place the head of the brush on the ice.
3) Place the majority of the body weight on the sliding foot. The curlers can check that the
sliding foot is under their centre of gravity by slowing lifting their gripper foot off the ice.
4) Give a small push with the gripper foot and slide on the sliding foot. The brush is used as an
aid to balance.
5) Gradually give bigger pushes with the gripper foot and take longer slides.
6) Have the Curlers move up and down the sheet until they feel comfortable.
page 16 B. Balance Drill
Drill:
Balance Drill
Drill objective: To obtain a “feel” for the curling slide position
Setup:
Have the curlers move into the final slide position, facing the boards with both hands on the
boards. The curler’s back leg should be fully extended (or as extended as they are capable of).
Play:
1) Once the curlers are comfortable in the slide position, have them lift their hands off the board
2-3 inches and find their balance point in the slide position.
2) Once the curlers are comfortably balanced, have them push off the backboard with their
hands so that they are sliding backwards (this way, they are activating the stabilization muscles
required for balance during a slide).
C. Sweeping Drill
Drill:
Introduce Sweeping
Drill objective: Introduce the concept of sweeping
Setup:
Have curlers put grippers on both shoes, with their brooms in hand have curlers line up along
the first third of the sheet.
Play:
1) Two instructors take-up the “sweeping position”, which is standing next to the wall/side of the
sheet at the Tee Line. Have another instructor throw a rock and let the two sweeping instructors
sweep the rock down the sheet.
2) Have the curlers put their dominant hand at the top of the broom and their other hand half
way down the broom (Teaching Trick: tell curlers to hold the broom like they would hold a
hockey stick).
3) Once the curlers are holding the broom correctly, have all curlers face the far end of the sheet
and “tip over” ie. bend at the waist and put the broom head on the ice. This is the “open”
sweeping position which will allow the curlers to face in the direction they are walking.
4) Instruct the curlers to begin walking down the ice, moving the broom back and forth in a
sweeping motion.
5) Once the curlers brush the entire length of the sheet, have the curlers apply some pressure
the broom (whatever is comfortable for each person) and then sweep back to the “home” end of
the sheet.
D. Rock Throwing Drill
Drill:
Introduce sliding from the hack
Drill objective: To allow each curler to throw one rock from the hack
Setup:
Divide the curlers equally between the sheets. With one instructor at each hack (Tip: if there
are enough instructors, use both ends of the sheet)
Play:
1) The instructor should demonstrate how to step into the hack. (Tip: the instructor should ask if
anyone is left handed to insure the curlers are throwing from the correct hack).
2) The instructor should “stretch” out of the hack in the slide position (the instructor’s gripper foot
should be extended, but should still be touching the hack).
3) Have each curler “stretch out fo the hack” (Tip: instructor should stay close – curlers will be
very unbalanced).
4) Once each curler has “stretched” 2-3 times, the instructor should return to the hack and
demonstrate how to “kick” out of the hack to generate momentum. The instructor should tell the
curlers to “push” with their hack foot. (Tip: the explanation of the full delivery will happen in week
2 – instructors should use this drill as an opportunity to get curlers comfortable with the ice).
5) Each curler should “kick” out the hack progressively (first to the backline, then the tee-line,
then the top of the house).
6) Once each curler has tried to reach the top of the house, the instructor should allow the
curlers to try to throw 1-2 rocks each. (Tip: don’t worry about form – this drill is to allow the
curlers to go home and tell everyone – “I threw a rock – I’m a curler!”)
page 17 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 2
Off-ice: Warm-up
Equipment
On-ice: Introduce Parts of a Curling Sheet
Introduce Three Point Delivery
OFF-ICE
1. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up.
2. Equipment
Like last week, help the curlers to get their equipment in order. Eventually this process will become routine and
they may not need help. However, for the first few weeks, have the instructors make sure that the curlers are not
having any problems with their equipment.
ON-ICE
1. Introduce Parts of a Curling Sheet
Introduce parts of the curling sheet. This should include discussing the different lines, including: hack, back line,
tee line, hog line, centre lines and the house (button, four-foot, eight-foot, twelve-foot, free guard zone).
2. Introduce Three Point Delivery
Introduce the 3 Point Delivery. This can be done individually by each instructor at a hack, or as a large group.
Steps in 3 Point Delivery [Insert pictures for each step]
1.
Approach hack from behind the hack
2.
Place the gripper foot in the hack, with toe about 1-2 inches from the end of the hack.
3.
Step forward with the sliding foot. Sliding foot should be in “heel-toe-position”. This means the heel of
the slider foot is a few inches in front of the hack foot. The slider foot should be perpendicular to the
hack foot (not directly in front of the hack foot).
4.
Squat (“Stance”)
5.
Organize the broom/throwing aid. Shoulders should be at a 140 degree angle from body.
6.
Hip elevation. Hips should lift until the thrower’s back is parallel to the ice.
7.
Slide
A. Three Point Delivery Drill – without a rock
Drill:
Three point delivery
Drill objective: To have curlers become comfortable with balance and executing the three point delivery without
a rock
Setup:
None
Play:
1) Instructors demonstrate Three Point Delivery without a rock. Emphasize that to throw well
without a rock they need to develop good balance, and to do this they need to learn to slide
without a rock. (if necessary, curler may place hand on the ice, or use two throwing aids).
2) Have curlers practice the Three Point Delivery doing progressive slides. This means each
curler will slide to a certain point on the ice and with each slide the curler will aim to slide farther.
i. Progressive slides
1. Slide to back line
2. Slide to tee line
page 18 3. Slide to top of house
4. Slide to hog (or as far as possible)
B. Sweeping Drill – one sweeper
Drill:
Sweeping
Drill Objective: Practice sweeping
Setup:
None
Play:
1) In the large group or in individual groups on each sheet have the curlers practice sweeping.
2) Instructor to review sweeping from week one.
3) Instructor to stand in hack and push a rock down the ice at “draw weight speed” for
each curler to sweep
C. Three Point Delivery Drill – with a rock
Drill:
Three point delivery
Drill objective: To have curlers become comfortable with balance and executing the three point delivery with a
rock
Setup:
None
Play:
1) Instructors demonstrate Three Point Delivery with a rock. Emphasize that to throw well
without a rock they need to develop good balance, and to do
2) Have curlers practice the Three Point Delivery doing progressive slides. This means each
curler will slide to a certain point on the ice and with each slide the curler will aim to slide farther.
ii. Progressive slides
1. Slide to back line
2. Slide to tee line
3. Slide to top of house
4. Slide to hog (or as far as possible)
D. Sweeping Drill – two sweepers
Drill:
Sweeping
Drill Objective: Practice sweeping
Setup:
None
Play:
1) In the large group or in individual groups on each sheet have the curlers practice sweeping.
2) Instructor to stand in hack and push a rock down the ice at “draw weight speed” for two
sweepers. To make the experience more authentic, the instructor can yell “hurry hard” as the
sweepers sweep down the ice.
page 19 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 3
Off-ice: Etiquette
Warm-Up
On-ice: Review Three Point Delivery
Introduce Five Point Delivery
Sweeping
OFF-ICE
1. Etiquette
Introduce the curlers to the etiquette of the game by covering the following points:
Club ice rules: Generally speaking most clubs dictate that food, beverages and smoking are not allowed the ice
surface.
Handshake before and after: In curling players from each team shake hands with all members of the opposing
team both before and after the game.
Coin toss for last rock advantage: It is an advantage to have last rock in an end, because, theoretically, the
team with last rock should score. At the beginning of the game the leads from each team toss a coin. The winner
chooses between last rock in the first end or the colour of the rocks they will throw.
Positioning of the delivering team: Skip - in the house at the far end holding the broom. Two sweepers – on
each side of the ice, near the sideline, and between the back line and the hog line ready to sweep the delivered
stone. Thrower – in the hack, ready to deliver the stone.
Positioning of non-delivering team: Skip – Behind the back line, standing motionless, with broom off the ice.
Two sweepers – standing still, in single file close to the side lines and between the hog lines. Thrower – standing
quietly, behind, and to the side of the person in the hack.
Hand and Knees on the Ice: Avoid resting hands and knees on the ice; this will prevent the ice/pebble from
melting. Melted spots are referred to as “flat spots” and they will usually adversely affect the path of a delivered
stone.
Some of these points may need to be reviewed as the season progresses. For example, when the curlers start
engaging in games, instructors may need to review the positioning of the delivering and non-delivering team.
2. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up.
ON-ICE
1. Review Three Point Delivery
Steps in Three Point Delivery [Insert pictures for each step]
1. Approach hack from behind the hack
2. Place the gripper foot in the hack, with toe about 1-2 inches from the end of the hack.
3. Step forward with the sliding foot. Sliding foot should be in “heel-toe-position”. This means the heel of the
slider foot is a few inches in front of the hack foot. The slider foot should be perpendicular to the hack foot
(not directly in front of the hack foot).
page 20 4.
5.
6.
7.
Squat (“Stance”)
Organize the broom/throwing aid. Shoulders should be at a 140 degree angle from body.
Hip elevation. Hips should lift until the thrower’s back is parallel to the ice.
Slide
A. Three Point Delivery Drill – with a rock
Drill:
Three point delivery
Drill objective: To have curlers become comfortable with balance and executing the three point delivery with a
rock
Setup:
None
Play:
1) Instructors demonstrate Three Point Delivery with a rock.
2) Have curlers practice the Three Point Delivery doing progressive slides. This means each
curler will slide to a certain point on the ice and with each slide the curler will aim to slide farther.
iii. Progressive slides
1. Slide to back line
2. Slide to tee line
3. Slide to top of house
4. Slide to hog (or as far as possible)
3) At the end of each slide have the curlers let go of the rock (note, instructors should not be
concerned about turns or release).
2. Introduce Five Point Delivery
The Five Point Delivery adds steps to the Three Point Delivery
Steps in Five Point Delivery [Insert pictures for each step]
1. Approach hack from behind the hack
2. Place the gripper foot in the hack, with toe about 1-2 inches from the end of the hack.
3. Step forward with the slider foot. Sliding foot should be in “heel-toe-position”. This means the heel of the
slider foot is a few inches in front of the hack foot. The slider foot should be parallel to the hack foot (not
directly in front of the hack foot).
4. Squat (“Stance”)
5. Position delivery arm (the one that would hold the rock) and throwing arm. The delivery arm should be in
front of the body, comfortably extended, with elbow in front of sternum. The broom arm (throwing aid arm) is
stretched out at about a 120 degree angle from body
6. Hip elevation. Hips and back should be “flat” and parallel to the ice.
7. Slide the sliding foot back to a reverse “heel-toe-position”. This means the toe of the sliding foot is a few
inches behind the heel of the hack foot. The slider foot should always be beside the hack, never behind the
hack.
8. As the slider foot moves into the heel-toe-position the hips should move with the foot. The hips should
always be directly above the slider foot.
9. The curler should make a slight “pause” or “park” once in the reverse heel-toe-position. When the pause
occurs the curler’s body weight should shift to the sliding foot (approximately 80% of the body weight should
be shifted to the sliding foot).
10. While the slider foot moves into the reverse heel-to-toe position, the rock should move as well. The rock
should slide back directly in front of the hack foot, but should not hit the toe of the hack foot.
11. Weight shifts back to hack foot and curler pushes with their hack leg (the momentum shift between slider
foot and hack foot is what generates a powerful kick and allows curlers to throw various types of weight).
12. Move rock forward.
page 21 13. Sliding foot forward.
14. Slide with back leg fully extended (or as extended as the curler is able).
A. Five Point Delivery Drill – with a rock
Drill:
Five point delivery
Drill objective: To have curlers become comfortable with balance and executing the Five Point Delivery with a
rock
Setup:
None
Play:
1) Instructors demonstrate Five Point Delivery with a rock. It may be necessary to breakdown
he delivery into stages. Instructors should emphasize the “park” step and the weight shift.
2) Have curlers practice the Five Point Delivery doing progressive slides. This means each
curler will slide to a certain point on the ice and with each slide the curler will aim to slide farther.
iv. Progressive slides
1. Slide to back line
2. Slide to tee line
3. Slide to top of house
4. Slide to hog (or as far as possible)
3) At the end of each slide have the curlers let go of the rock (note, instructors should not be
concerned about turns or release).
B. Sweeping Drill – two sweepers
Drill:
Sweeping
Drill Objective: Practice sweeping
Setup:
None
Play:
1) In the individual groups each sheet have the curlers practice sweeping.
2) A curlers should practice the Five Point Delivery and release the rock at the end of the
delivery.
3) Two sweepers will sweep the released rock.
4) Curlers rotates positions allowing each curler the opportunity to sweep and throw.
page 22 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 4
Off-ice: Warm-up
On-ice: Review Five Point Delivery
Introduce Curls and Turns
Introduce Grip on Rock
OFF-ICE
1. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up.
ON-ICE
1. Review Five Point Delivery
Steps in Five Point Delivery [Insert pictures for each step]
1. Approach hack from behind the hack.
2. Place the gripper foot in the hack, with toe about 1-2 inches from the end of the hack.
3. Step forward with the slider foot. Sliding foot should be in “heel-toe-position”. This means the heel of the
slider foot is a few inches in front of the hack foot. The slider foot should be parallel to the hack foot (not
directly in front of the hack foot).
4. Squat (“Stance”)
5. Position delivery arm (the one that would hold the rock) and throwing arm. The delivery arm should be in
front of the body, comfortably extended, with elbow in front of sternum. The broom arm (throwing aid arm) is
stretched out at about a 120 degree angle from body.
6. Hip elevation. Hips and back should be “flat” and parallel to the ice.
7. Slide the sliding foot back to a reverse “heel-toe-position”. This means the toe of the sliding foot is a few
inches behind the heel of the hack foot. The slider foot should always be beside the hack, never behind the
hack.
8. As the slider foot moves into the heel-toe-position the hips should move with the foot. The hips should
always be directly above the slider foot.
9. The curler should make a slight “pause” or “park” once in the reverse heel-toe-position. When the pause
occurs the curler’s body weight should shift to the sliding foot (approximately 80% of the body weight should
be shifted to the sliding foot).
10. While the slider foot moves into the reverse heel-to-toe position, the rock should move as well. The rock
should slide back directly in front of the hack foot, but should not hit the toe of the hack foot.
11. Weight shifts back to hack foot and curler pushes with their hack leg (the momentum shift between slider
foot and hack foot is what generates a powerful kick and allows curlers to throw various types of weight).
12. Move rock forward.
13. Sliding foot forward.
14. Slide with back leg fully extended (or as extended as the curler is able).
A. Five Point Delivery Drill – with a rock
Drill:
Five point delivery
Drill objective: To have curlers become comfortable with balance and executing the Five Point Delivery with a
rock
Setup:
None
page 23 Play:
1) Instructors demonstrate Five Point Delivery with a rock. It may be necessary to breakdown
he delivery into stages. Instructors should emphasize the “park” step and the weight shift.
2) Have curlers practice the Five Point Delivery doing progressive slides. This means each
curler will slide to a certain point on the ice and with each slide the curler will aim to slide farther.
v. Progressive slides
1. Slide to back line
2. Slide to tee line
3. Slide to top of house
4. Slide to hog (or as far as possible)
3) At the end of each slide have the curlers let go of the rock (note, instructors should not be
concerned about turns or release).
2. Introduce Curl and Turns
The instructor should explain the following to the curlers. This can be done in a large group or individually by
each instructor with a small group.
Curl: instructors should explain why a rock curls. Rocks curl because of the pebble on the ice. The small
bumps on the ice allow a rock to “bend” or “curl” as it moves down the ice. A curling rock will not move the same
way on a completely flat sheet of ice.
Turns: curlers want to direct a rock and force the rock to “curl” in the right direction. To do this, curlers turn the
rock in the direction they want it to travel.
Aim: the skip of the team provides a target for the curler to aim at (the broom). The curler aims at the broom
and the rock will curl to the point where the skip wants the rock to stop. On average, the rock will curl 3-4 feet for
a draw and about 6 inches to 1 foot for a takeout.
Teaching Tip: When explaining turns, refer to the rock as a clock. A straight handle points at 12 o-clock. For
turns, the curler turns the handle to 10 o-clock or 2 o-clock. [Insert picture] Do not use the term inturn or outturn
as this is different for right and left handed curlers and these are confusing terms for new curlers
3. Introduce Grip and Release
1. Instructors should show curlers how to property grip the rock. Curlers should throw with a high-wrist
delivery. This means that only the curlers fingers are touching the rock, not the entire palm of their hand.
[Insert picture]
2. The curler’s fingers should be slightly curled, enough to cradle the handle of the rock. [Insert picture]
3. Key points for the grip: Hand position on the handle (not too close to goose neck and not at bottom of
handle)
4. Rock handle should rest on second joint of fingers. V shape of thumb and index fingers. Firm grip. Fingers
together [Insert picture]
5. The curler’s thumb should be placed on the opposite side of the handle and pressure should be applied
between the fingers and thumb.
6. Arm should be bent, with elbow and hand placed in front of sternum.
7. As the curler releases the rock, the arm should move as if the curler was going to shake a person’s hand.
B. Curl and Turns Drill
Drill:
Curl and Turns
Drill objective: To teach curlers the proper way to turn a rock during release
page 24 Setup:
Play:
Instructor should have curlers work in pairs. One person from each pair will stand on the side of
the sheet, facing each other.
Curlers crouch on the ice, as if they were about to deliver a rock. In a stationary position (no
slide) curlers practice their 10 o-clock and 2 o-clock releases by playing “catch” with each other
across the sheet. [Insert picture]
C. Release Drill
Drill:
Releases
Drill objective: To teach curlers the correct way to release a rock
Setup:
None
Play:
1) Instructor explains to curlers that it should take the length of one broom to complete the
release of a rock (ie. in the length of a broom, the rock handle should go from, for example, 10
o-clock to 12 o-clock).
2) After the curler releases the rock, her hand should be a handshake position.
3) Have curlers practice the Five Point Delivery with a proper release and turn.
4) Allow curlers “watching” to be sweepers.
Teaching Tip: Instructors should watch for the following issues to correct:
Check for correct grip and 10 o-clock and 2 o-clock start, with a 12 o-clock finish
Does the curler have a high wrist? Palm should not touch the handle of the rock.
n Emphasize waiting for the release. Instructor can say out loud “wait…wait…wait…release” to confirm concept
of starting release one brush length from release point. Curlers should start the release before they start losing
momentum in their delivery.
n Look for curlers to complete release from start to finish in approximately one broom length.
n
n
page 25 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 5
Off-ice: Game Orientation Session – Part 1
Warm-up
On-ice: Line of Delivery
Two-End Game
OFF-ICE
1. Game Orientation Session – Part 1
This off-ice session may be best done using PowerPoint slides if the equipment is available. The Program
Coordinator should discuss the following points in the presentation:
Types of Shots:
Draw
Takeout
Guard
Freeze
Bump
Skip’s Signals for each shot
Basic Rules: Briefly review the basic rules of a game and also provide curlers with a handout that explains the
following rules so that they can review them.
Basic Rules for Curling:
A rock must clear the far hogline to remain in play, except if it hits another rock which is in play.
A rock which stops completely across the back line is out of play.
A rock which touches a sideline is automatically out of play.
Rocks may not be measured during an end for comparison or to determine if the rock is counting by means of
any physical device to aid the visual until the last rock of the end has come to rest, unless one of the following
two situations occur:
If the two skips cannot determine whether a rock has crossed the backline, when in close vicinity to the centre
line, the six foot measure stick can be used.
If after the delivery of any of the first three rocks of an end both skips cannot determine if a rock is in the Free
Guard Zone or touching the rings, the six foot measure stick can be used.
After the first end, the winner of the end throws first in the following end. (Remember in the first end, a coin flip
decides who throws first)
The skip has control of the game for his/her team and may deliver any position rocks they choose. However the
order of play, once established, may not be changed for that game.
Right-handed players shall deliver, from the left hack, left-handed players from the right hack.
In delivery the rock must be clearly released before it reaches the near hog line. If it is not, it shall be removed
from play by the delivering team.
If a running rock is touched by any member or equipment of the delivering team, it is removed from play by the
delivering team after the rock has come to rest.
page 26 The 4-rock Free Guard Zone rule is in effect, which means that any opposition rock coming to rest in the Free
Guard Zone may be moved, but may not be removed from play, until the fifth rock of the end (Free Guard Zone
is the area between the hog line and the tee line, excluding the “house”).
Between the tee lines a rock may be brushed by any one or more of the team members (although it is not good
practice to try to brush your own rock!). It may not be brushed by any opposition player.
Behind the tee line the delivering team shall have first privilege of sweeping their stone. A lead or second of the
delivering team may brush behind the tee line. Only the skip or vice skip of the non-delivering team have the
privilege of sweeping behind the tee line.
No player may start to brush an opponent’s rock until it reaches the tee line.
The sweeping motion shall be from side to side across the running surface in front of the rock and clearly finish
to either side of the rock.
A team may not play at any time with less than three players.
If a player delivers a rock of the wrong colour, a rock of the correct colour will be put in its place.
Rock Cleaning
Explain to the curlers that they should clean their rock before every shot so their rock does not “pick” on a piece
of debris. The instructors should demonstrate:
how to flip the rock up at the hack
clean the running surface with the hand
wipe the area under the rock (either with the hand or broom)
place the rock back down on the ice
Encourage the curlers to get into the habit of cleaning their rock before their shots.
2. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up.
ON-ICE
1. Line of Delivery
Line of delivery is the concept that describes “hitting the broom”. New curlers will gravitate to sliding straight
down the centre line. This lesson will teach new curlers to slide on a different line, away from the centre line.
Instructors should emphasize that curlers need to “ignore the centre line” and draw an imaginary line from the
toe of their hack foot to the skip’s broom.
The instruction on line of delivery has two components: Body alignment & Stone alignment
Related to line of delivery there are 4 recommended drills and one game drill. The key points to emphasize are:
Shoulders square, knee pointed to broom, rock back to middle toe, maintain balance, and arm straight.
Teaching Tip: Teaching Line of Delivery is a very difficult concept. A good way to visually show curlers the line
of delivery is as follows:
page 27 1) Place a rock in front of the left hack at one end and have an instructor hold a broom at the other end,
acting as the skip. Using a piece of coloured string or yarn the length of the sheet, attach one end of the
string to the rock in the hack and the end of the string to the skips broom (the string will run the entire
length of the sheet).
2) The string demonstrates the line a rock will travel on as it moves down the sheet. At some point, the
rock with “break” this line and start to curl.
3) Remove the string from the sheet and demonstrate using the same “line” as the string. The curlers
should be able to see the breaking point.
A. Line of Delivery Drill #1
Drill:
Line of Delivery – Strike the Cups
Drill objective: Emphasis on sliding foot
Key point:
Sliding foot should be under middle of chest and curler should be balanced.
Setup:
Position 4 plastic cups along line of delivery from T-line to hogline
Play:
Curler pushes out of the hack without a rock; sliding foot should strike each cup.
B. Line of Delivery Drill #2
Drill:
Line of Delivery – No Kleenex Please
Drill objective: Delivery of rock along line of delivery from hack to broom without touching Kleenex boxes.
Key point:
Balance and foot behind the rock
Setup:
From the hack to the broom, place four to six Kleenex boxes along two imaginary lines about
two feet apart. Between the two imaginary lines, one person holds the broom as the target.
Play:
Player delivers the rock aiming at the broom and should slide between the Kleenex boxes.
C. Line of Delivery Drill #3
Drill:
Line of Delivery – Takeout Through Port
Drill objective: To deliver a rock through a narrow port at the target rock without touching the plastic cups.
Key point:
Balance, foot behind the rock and clean release.
Setup:
Two plastic cups positioned five feet beyond the hog line and 1.5 rocks apart. Beyond the
plastic cups, one person holds the broom in the centre of the space between the cups.
Play:
Player delivers the rock aiming at the broom.
D. Line of Delivery Drill #4
Drill:
Line of Delivery – Centre Hit
Drill objective: To deliver a takeout at the centre of a target rock.
Key point:
Balance, foot behind the rock and clean release.
Setup:
One target curling rock positioned 10 feet beyond the hog line. One person holds the broom in
the centre of the target rock.
Play:
Player delivers the rock aiming at the broom. If the release and line of delivery is good, the
target rock with be directed straight down the sheet.
2. Two-End Game
A. Game Drill
The curlers have now developed the skills and knowledge to play their first game. They still have yet to learn
strategy but will be able to at least get a feel for what it is like to play a game and learn from this experience. Try
to have an instructor at each end so that an instructor can help the skip make the calls and the other instructor
can help direct curlers where to stand and help them to interpret the calls if they are unsure. Note: an end will
take approximately 30 minutes to play with new curlers.
page 28 page 29 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 6
Off-ice: Warm-up
On-ice: Review Five Point Delivery
Review Line of Delivery
Introduce Advanced Sweeping
Two-End Game
OFF-ICE
1. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up.
ON-ICE
1. Review Five Point Delivery
Steps in Five Point Delivery [Insert pictures for each step]
1. Approach hack from behind the hack.
2. Place the gripper foot in the hack, with toe about 1-2 inches from the end of the hack.
3. Step forward with the slider foot. Sliding foot should be in “heel-toe-position”. This means the heel of the
slider foot is a few inches in front of the hack foot. The slider foot should be parallel to the hack foot (not
directly in front of the hack foot).
4. Squat (“Stance”)
5. Position delivery arm (the one that would hold the rock) and throwing arm. The delivery arm should be in
front of the body, comfortably extended, with elbow in front of sternum. The broom arm (throwing aid arm) is
stretched out at about a 120 degree angle from body.
6. Hip elevation. Hips and back should be “flat” and parallel to the ice.
7. Slide the sliding foot back to a reverse “heel-toe-position”. This means the toe of the sliding foot is a few
inches behind the heel of the hack foot. The slider foot should always be beside the hack, never behind the
hack.
8. As the slider foot moves into the heel-toe-position the hips should move with the foot. The hips should
always be directly above the slider foot.
9. The curler should make a slight “pause” or “park” once in the reverse heel-toe-position. When the pause
occurs the curler’s body weight should shift to the sliding foot (approximately 80% of the body weight should
be shifted to the sliding foot).
10. While the slider foot moves into the reverse heel-to-toe position, the rock should move as well. The rock
should slide back directly in front of the hack foot, but should not hit the toe of the hack foot.
11. Weight shifts back to hack foot and curler pushes with their hack leg (the momentum shift between slider
foot and hack foot is what generates a powerful kick and allows curlers to throw various types of weight).
12. Move rock forward.
13. Sliding foot forward.
14. Slide with back leg fully extended (or as extended as the curler is able).
A. Five Point Delivery Drill – with a rock
Drill:
Five point delivery
Drill objective: To have curlers slide as far as possible while executing the Five Point Delivery with a rock
Setup:
None
page 30 Play:
1) Instructors demonstrate Five Point Delivery with a rock. It may be necessary to breakdown
he delivery into stages. Instructors should emphasize the “park” step and the weight shift.
2) Have curlers practice the Five Point Delivery, while sliding as far as possible. With each slide
the curler should slide farther down the ice.
2. Review Line of Delivery
Line of delivery is the concept that describes “hitting the broom”. New curlers will gravitate to sliding straight
down the centre line. This lesson will teach new curlers to slide on a different line, away from the centre line.
Instructors should emphasize that curlers need to “ignore the centre line” and draw an imaginary line from the
toe of their hack foot to the skip’s broom.
The instruction on line of delivery has two components: Body alignment & Stone alignment
Related to line of delivery there are 4 recommended drills and one game drill. The key points to emphasize are:
Shoulders square, knee pointed to broom, rock back to middle toe, maintain balance, and arm straight.
A. Line of Delivery Drill #1
Drill:
Line of Delivery – No Kleenex Please
Drill objective: Delivery of rock along line of delivery from hack to broom without touching Kleenex boxes.
Key point:
Balance and foot behind the rock
Setup:
From the hack to the broom, place four to six Kleenex boxes along two imaginary lines about
two feet apart. Between the two imaginary lines, one person holds the broom as the target.
Play:
Player delivers the rock aiming at the broom and should slide between the Kleenex boxes.
B. Line of Delivery Drill #2
Drill:
Line of Delivery – Takeout Through Port
Drill objective: To deliver a rock through a narrow port at the target rock without touching the plastic cups.
Key point:
Balance, foot behind the rock and clean release.
Setup:
Two plastic cups positioned five feet beyond the hog line and 1.5 rocks apart. Beyond the
plastic cups, one person holds the broom in the centre of the space between the cups.
Play:
Player delivers the rock aiming at the broom.
3. Advanced Sweeping
The Open-Stance Sweeping Technique is the preferred method of sweeping as it provides the best opportunity
for the sweeping to view the playing end and the footwork is very simple. Instructors should demonstrate
sweeping using the following explanation:
Open-Stance Sweeping Technique
Stance:
Grippers must be worn on both feet.
Feet are positioned parallel to the stone’s path, shoulder width apart.
Knees are bent with the weight on the balls of the feet, heels raised slightly off the ice.
A clear line of vision will assist with weight judgment and communication.
Grip:
Place the brush handle across the front of the body, grip the handle with both hands dividing the handle
into thirds.
Position your dominant hand 2/3 of the way up the handle. Palm of hand should be facing down. (If a
curler is right handed, generally the dominant hand is the right hand, but this will be different for each
person)
page 31 Position your non-dominant hand closest to the rock, 1/3 of the way up the handle from the brush head.
Palm of the hand should be facing up.
Position the top part of the handle under your arm.
Hold the handle against your rib cage with the upper part of your arm.
Bottom arm should be straight as it applies weight on to the brush.
Top arm guides the motion of the brush.
Foot Motion:
Knees are bent so that upper body weight is placed on the brush.
From there, use a cross-country ski shuffle to move down the ice.
Remember to remain on the balls of the feet, keeping your feet in contact with the ice always.
Scrubbing Motion:
Apply downward pressure onto the brush head through
your lower arm.
Using your top hand, implement a small push/pull
motion onto the brush handle.
Develop a series of short (6”) rapid strokes to scrub the
path of the stone.
Clean a 45 degree path in front of the stone.
The use of double grippers is mandatory when teaching
sweeping.
Instructors can teach sweeping using the following four steps:
Step #1 – Foot Motion
Position curlers on the left of the centre line facing down the sheet.
Have curlers assume the correct stance and the correct grip on the brush handle.
Have curlers place the brush head on the ice on the centre line.
Have curlers implement footwork action without scrubbing (cross country ski motion if using the open
stance technique, or the cross step motion if using the closed stance technique).
Curlers travel slowly down the ice, having curlers looking towards the end of the sheet periodically.
When the curlers reach the far end, have them remain on the same side of the centre line, but turn and
face the opposite end of the sheet.
Curlers simply adjust their grip, and travel down towards the opposite end of the sheet on the right side
of the centre line.
Note: This drill can also be done using two sheets, go up one sheet on the left side of centre line, and return on
the right side of centre line, down another sheet.
Step #2 – Stationary Sweeping
Position curlers on either the right or left side of the center line.
Instruct curlers to assume the proper stance and grip.
Instruct curlers to apply downward pressure through the lower arm onto the brush head.
Curlers should apply a slow to and fro motion with the top hand.
Vary the speed of the strokes; slow/medium/fast.
Ensure curlers are sweeping in short strokes (approximately 6”), to avoid wasting energy.
Have curlers repeat the stationary scrubbing on the opposite side of the centre line from which they
started.
Step #3 – Footwork and Scrubbing
Position curlers on either the right or left side of the centre line.
Instruct curlers to assume the proper stance and grip.
Instruct curlers to travel down the ice and incorporate the scrubbing motion as they travel.
page 32 Curlers should develop the habit of looking up while they brush, this aids in developing judging and
communication skills.
Ensure curlers repeat the drill on the opposite side of the centre line from which they started.
Step #4 – Add Stones
Group curlers into pairs, have one person push a stone at a realistic speed while the other curler
practices sweeping.
Each curler should get a chance to brush on both sides of the stone and to push the stone for their
partner.
Next, group the curlers into groups of three, have each curler brush on both sides and push the stone, to
become accustomed to sweeping with a partner.
Repeat the drill having a curler throw the stone, and have the brushers get a feel of traveling forward
with the stone, and merging to brush with a partner.
Tip: For the partner pushing the stone, it is much easier to control the stone if the handle is turned
sideways and the “pusher” places their brush head on the rock handle.
Teaching Tip: Explain to the curlers that, while it is the advantageous to have a sweeper on either side of the
rock due to the better line of vision and space for footwork, it is acceptable to have both sweepers on the same
side if that is how they feel most comfortable. You can encourage a curler to try out a different side later in the
season.
4. Two-End Game
The curlers can now play a game, incorporating their new sweeping skills. Note: an end will take approximately
30 minutes to play with new curlers.
page 33 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 7
Off-ice: Game Orientation Session – Part 2
Warm-up
On-ice: Weight Control
Reading the Ice
OFF-ICE
1. Game Orientation Session – Part 2
This off-ice session may be best done using PowerPoint slides if the equipment is available. The Program
Coordinator or Instructor will want to discuss the following points in the presentation:
Positions and Order of Play:
Lead – throws the first rock and “sets up the end”, throws mainly guards and draws
Second – throws mainly hits, with some draws
Third (Vice) – throws a variety of shots, including taps and “delicate” shots
Skip – throws a variety shots (must perform under pressure!)
Game Objectives and Scoring
Weight judgement is something that takes experience to become proficient. However, the instruction can point
out what will influence the curler’s judgement of weight and what tools are available. Intermediate and advanced
curlers could be introduced to the stopwatch tool and interval timing. However, the use of stopwatches is not
recommended for the beginner curlers. The instruction on weight judgement requires the definition of zones:
Zone 0
Zone 1
Zone 2
Zone 3
Zone 4
Zone 5
hogged rock
hogline to top of the rings
12 foot ring to top of 4 foot ring
4 foot ring
4 foot rings to back line
beyond back line (through house)
The key points that influence judgement of the weight are: Ice conditions – heavy vs. fast ice; temperature of the
ice; Path taken – have any rocks gone down this path; Changing ice conditions
2. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up.
ON-ICE
1. Weight Control
Related to weight judgement there are three recommend drills and two game drills.
A. Weight Control Drill #1
Drill:
Weight Judgement – Call out the Zone
Drill objective: To determine the final position of a rock before it stops
Setup:
None
Play:
One player delivers a rock to the house and players with their back to the house guess the zone.
Players will be positioned progressively at:
The far hog line
page 34 Midway between the two hog lines
The near hog line
B. Weight Control Drill #2
Drill:
Weight Judgement – Don’t stop in the rings
Drill objective: Player(s) try to prevent a rock from stopping in the rings
Setup:
None
Play:
One player delivers the rock for a draw into the rings. Another player positioned at the middle of
the sheet must decide whether to sweep the rock or not sweep the rock. The player can sweep
the rock through the rings or elect not to sweep and have the rock stop before the rings.
Variation:
Use two players positioned at near hogline as sweepers
C. Weight Control Drill #3
Drill:
Weight Judgement – Draw to the Zone
Drill objective: To draw a rock to a zone.
Setup:
None
Play:
The holder of the broom calls the zone to draw to and the other player with sweepers must have
the rock stop in that zone. Players should not be limited to drawing to the centre of the ice but
could draw from the centre to the outside.
Variation:
This drill could be used as a game where one team defines the zone and the other team must
execute. If the team executes the shot, it scores one point. If the team fails to execute the shot,
the other team scores one point.
D. Weight Control Game Drill #1
Game:
Centre line touch
Objective:
To deliver a rock so that when it comes to rest, it touches the centerline.
Setup:
None
Play:
With sweepers, each person throws two rocks in succession. All rocks stay in play until
everyone has thrown their two rocks.
Scoring:
Score one point for each rock that touches the hogline.
Variation:
Play one team against another. Constraint is that one team cannot remove another team’s rock
from play.
E. Weight Control Game Drill #2
Game:
Two Team Draw to the Button
Objective:
To draw as close to the button as possible
Setup:
None
Play:
With sweepers, each team alternates throwing one rock. Rocks remain where they come to rest
and a rock cannot be removed from play. After both teams have thrown all their rocks, the score
is tabulated.
Scoring:
12 foot – 1 point; 8 foot – 2 points; 4 foot – 3 points; button – 4 points; cover pin – 5 points.
2. Reading the Ice
Reading the ice is not only the skip’s responsibility but every team member. For example, players need to know
where there may be falls or runs in the ice, where the ice is heavy or keen and areas on the sheet where the
rock will curl more. The following drill will assist players in what to look for when reading the ice.
A. Reading the Ice Drill #1
Drill:
Reading the Ice
Drill objective: To understand how to read the ice
Setup:
None
Play:
A team of four players is given 10 minutes to assess a sheet of ice. At the end of 10 minutes,
they will each answer questions on how the sheet behaves. They will also discuss what
influences the condition of the ice.
page 35 Questions to ask about ice conditions:
1.
2.
3.
How much will a draw curl?
a. Outside in with broom on 4 foot.
b. Inside out with broom on 4 foot.
Where should the broom be positioned for a takeout of a rock in the 12 foot on the Tee-line.
Where are there any runs or straight spots or falls in the ice?
Discussions on ice conditions in general:
Question: What can influence the ice conditions?
Answer: Some of the variables are: Ice temperature; Humidity (causes frost); Outside temperature
Pebble – size and amount; Nipping or rocking the ice; Scrapping the ice or number of games played on a sheet
between scrapings; Debris on the ice; Hand / knee prints on the ice
Communication
Communication on the ice is everyone’s responsibility. Communication can be:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Between players;
Between the skip and the sweepers;
Between the thrower and the sweepers;
Between the thrower and the skip;
Between the sweepers.
Communication is not limited to voice but the use of hand signals can be employed. For example, the skip uses
hand signals to communicate the type of shot and the weight.
One tool that can assist in the communication on ice is the use of zones. As previously identified in the weight
judgement drills, there can be five zones:
Zone 0
Zone 1
Zone 2
Zone 3
Zone 4
Zone 5
hogged rock
hogline to top of the rings
12 foot ring to top of 4 foot rings
4 foot ring
4 foot ring to back line
beyond back line (through house)
The key points to communication are:
Good communication use both voice and body motions
There is a need to communication many times as a rock is delivered down the sheet
It is better to guess the weight instead of saying nothing
Emphasize that curlers are allowed to change their guess
B. Communication Drill
Drill:
Communication – I’m not saying a word
Level of Play: Beginner
Drill objective: To determine the effect of communication
Setup:
None
page 36 Play:
Discussion:
Part 1: One player holds the broom while another person delivers a draw and later a takeout to
the house. There are two sweepers. While the rock is delivered, no one speaks.
Part 2: Same as part 1 but everyone communicates.
After Parts 1 and 2 have taken place, ask the players how effective it is when players
communicate. Ask for examples of non-verbal communication.
C. Game Drill
Play a four end game. After two ends, have the people playing skip and third switch with the people playing lead
and second so that everyone has a chance to try their hand at strategy.
page 37 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 8
Off-ice: Strategy Session Basics
Warm-up
On-ice: Delivery Analysis and Correction
OFF-ICE
Off-ice: Warm-up
1. Strategy Session Basics
During the basic strategy session, the following topics would be discussed:
a.
Strength and weaknesses
b.
Styles of play
c.
Factors influencing shot selection
d.
Scoring concepts
e.
Tolerance
f.
Strategies when ahead on the scoreboard
g.
Strategies when behind on the scoreboard
The basic strategy session would take place off the ice.
Strength and Weakness
Curlers are asked to identify their strength and weaknesses in the areas of sweeping ability, sweeping
judgement, takeout ability, draw ability and finesse shot (freezes, tap back, and raise takeout) ability would be
discussed. [Note: ask curlers what they “like” to do?]
Styles of Play
The discussion on strengths and weaknesses would be a lead into the discussion on styles of play. Instructors
can explain that teams should be identified as having one of the following styles of play:
Offensive – characterized as aggressive; lots of rocks in play; typically employs the use of guards, raises,
freezes and come-around shots
Defensive – characterized as conservative; open; few rocks in play; takeout game
Balanced – can play the offensive and defensive styles of play
Instructor should explain that teams that are not strong hitters, should not adopt a defensive style of play.
Factors Influencing Shot Selection
The following six factors that will decide shot selection should be discussed:
a.
Free guard zone – the first four shots in the end
b.
What end is being played – early ends a team may be more aggressive than later ends
c.
Score – does the team “need” points? Or are they defending a lead?
d.
Who has last rock?
e.
Strength and weakness of own team and opponents
f.
Ice conditions
Scoring Concepts
Discuss strategy with last rock.
Goal is to score two or more
Offense
Use of the corner guards
Use of sides of sheet and keep four foot path clear
page 38 Discuss strategy without last rock.
Goal is to steal points or hold opposition to one point
Defence
Use of centreline guards
Play towards the centre of the sheet and block path to four foot
Discuss play in the early ends:
Familiarization with ice – this a team’s opportunity to learn about ice conditions
Discuss play in the middle to late ends:
Should be confident in reading of the ice and shot execution
Tolerance
When you think about the tolerance for a called shot, you are thinking about what are the possible results of the
shot. Both the skip and the thrower should be thinking of the tolerance. Discuss tolerance for different
situations. For example:
a.
b.
The tolerance for a called guard may be a long guard or a draw into the rings.
The tolerance for taking out a partial guarded rock may be to remove the guard.
Strategies When Ahead on the Scoreboard: Key points to this discussion would be:
a.
Usually a takeout game
b.
Try to minimize the number of rocks in play
c.
Try to minimize the guards
Strategies When Behind on the Scoreboard
a.
More a draw game
b.
Tendency is to have more rocks in play
c.
Usually need guards to score multiple point ends
d.
If early in the game, do not try to get all the points back at once
2. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up.
ON-ICE
1. Delivery Analysis and Correction
Now that the curlers have had time to develop their skills, it is a good time to do an analysis of their delivery and
make any necessary corrections. Refer back to the Five Point Delivery.
A. Skills Competition Drill
Game:
Skills Competition
Objective:
To get as many points as possible through the execution of four different shots
Setup:
None
Play:
With sweepers, each person throws:
a.
A draw to the button
b.
A hit and stick
c.
A hit and roll to the button
d.
A double takeout
Rock is scored and then removed.
Scoring:
A draw to the button
Three Points if touching the button
Two Points if touching Four foot
One Point if touching the Eight Foot
A hit and stick
page 39 Three Points if hit and stick
Two Points if hit and roll
One Point if hit the rock
A hit and roll to the button
Three Points if hit and roll to touch a part of the button
Two Points if hit and roll to touch a part of the Four Foot
One Point if hit
A double takeout
Three Points if both rocks are hit and removed
Two Points if both rocks are hit but both are not removed
One Point if one rock is hit
B. Game Drill:
Allow curlers to play a game for the remainder of the session. After each end the instructors should ask the
curlers what type of strategy was employed in the end.
page 40 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 9
Off-ice: Strategy Session – Beyond the Basics
Warm-up
On-ice: Strategy Session – Beyond the Basics (continued)
Game
OFF-ICE
1. Strategy Session – Beyond the Basics
During the Beyond the Basics session, the following topics should be discussed:
a.
Shot selections – early ends, middle ends and late ends
b.
Final end strategies
c.
What would you call – Situation Analysis
d.
Drag effect demonstration
During this session the shot selections and final end strategies will take place off the ice while the situation
analysis and drag effect demonstration will take place on the ice.
Shot Selections – Early, Middle and Late Ends
Some points to consider when discussing shot selections for early, middle or late ends are:
a.
Confidence in the ice
b.
Timing of risk versus reward shots
c.
Scoring in even ends
d.
When the probability of executing finesse shots (i.e. raise takeouts, freezes, etc.) is higher
e.
What shot would you like your skip to throw in the last end
f.
Would you rather be down one point with last rock or up one point without last rock?
g.
Would you rather be tied with last rock or up two points without last rock?
Final End Strategies
Discuss how a team might play the last end and what would a skip call for the lead’s rocks if:
a.
You are down one point without last rock;
b.
You are down two points with last rock;
c.
You are tied with last rock;
d.
You are tied without last rock;
e.
You are up four points without last rock.
2. Warm-up
Please refer to the Appendix “B”.
ON-ICE
On-ice: Strategy
1. Strategy Session – Beyond the Basics
What would you call - Situational Analysis
Have the instructors setup a different situation on each sheet. The curlers are told the end, the score, who has
last rock and who is the thrower. The curlers are then asked what the shot options are and what they would
call.
Drag Effect Demonstration
While on ice, the instructors could demonstrate the drag effect when two rocks are positioned very close to one
another and a takeout on the rocks is executed.
page 41 A. Game Drill:
Play a four end game. This will be a good chance for the curlers to focus on developing their strategy now that
they have been given more instruction on how to approach it. The instructors will want to ensure that they pay
close attention to the skip so that they can help them with their strategy.
page 42 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 10
Off-ice: Half Season Party
Warm-up
On-ice: Mix It Up Challenge
OFF-ICE
1. End of First Session Party
This is the last week before the holiday break. Therefore, this week will be an especially fun week. If someone
has planned a holiday dinner/party, it can go before or after the session.
2. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up.
ON-ICE
1. Mix It Up Challenge
Format: 6 ends
Rules:
a. Positions: Each curler will play skip, third, second and lead. Therefore, if a curler plays lead on the first
end, the next end the curler will play second, the next end third and the last end skip.
b. Scoring
End 1: Normal End
End 2: Everything counts
All rocks in or touching the rings count for a point. Subtract total blue minus total red to obtain the score.
End 3: Coneheads
Normal end except must shoot thru cones. Cannot touch cones or rock is pulled.
End 4: 10 o-clock turns
Curlers must only throw 10 o-clock turns.
End 5: Biters
All rocks fully in the rings count for one point. Each rock that is a biter (partially on the rings) counts for
two points. Subtract total blue minus total red to obtain the score.
End 6: Rock but don’t roll out
Cannot remove an opponent’s rock from play – whether the opponent’s rock is in or outside the rings.
2. Game
page 43 Detailed Program Curriculum: Week 11 & 12
No sessions these weeks for holiday/half season break
page 44 Detailed Program Curriculum: Weeks 13 – 22
These weeks, for the most part, will have the same format. This format is as follows:
Off-ice: Warm-up
On-ice: Games
OFF-ICE
1. Warm-up
Please refer to Appendix B for a detailed off-ice Warm-up.
ON-ICE
1. Games
Designate teams that will play together for the first five weeks (Weeks 13-17). For the remaining five weeks
(Weeks 18-22), designate a new set of teams that will play together for those weeks so that the curlers will have
the chance to play with some new people.
Although the focus has shifted to game play for this second half of the program, the instructors still need to be
present to help improve the skills of the curlers. The instructors can help by:
Providing strategy advice
Correcting any delivery errors. Be careful not to be too critical. There will be times when it is best that
the instructor let the curler play so that they are not worrying too much about the technicalities of their
delivery. The instructor will need to find the balance between letting the curler play and improving their
delivery. One way to do this is in the first two ends the instructor examines each person’s delivery and
gives them one correction to work on during the game.
Making suggestions on how to improve sweeping
Facilitating communication between team-mates.
2. Addition
Week 14: Player Assessment: While the players carry out a game, the instructors will make an assessment of
each curler’s technical skills. The assessment should address:
Delivery of rock (balance, line of delivery, release)
Weight control (ability to throw takeouts and accuracy of draw weight)
Weight judgement (knowing when to sweep)
Sweeping ability (proper technique, power)
Summary areas to improve
Summary areas accomplished
The assessment can be delivered to the curlers one-on-one or as a report card. Ensure that some positive
feedback is given in these assessments because, although we want the curlers to improve, we also want them
to feel encouraged.
Week 14 is the ideal week for this assessment because it is far enough along that the curlers have developed
their skills but also early enough for them to make improvements based on their assessment.
Week of Choice: Video Analysis (Optional)
If the club or an instructors has the equipment and capabilities to perform video analysis, do so during a week
that works best for the curlers (or perhaps over the span of two weeks). A video analysis can be very helpful for
curlers to see and understand a part of their delivery that may need to be corrected.
page 45 APPENDIX ‘B’
Warm-Up
Each week, always begin with a warm-up before going on the ice. Have an instructor lead the warm-up so that
the curlers have a guide to follow. The warm-up should last about 15 minutes. Making a warm-up a part of the
curler’s routine will be beneficial in the following ways:
1)
Activating the body’s circulatory system by enhancing blood flow will improve the body’s ability to
utilize oxygen and remove waste product. Blood vessels open up increasing blood flow thereby maintaining
muscle temperature.
2)
Engaging the musculoskeletal system will further warm-up muscles to reduce muscle stiffness, to
provide a more forceful contraction and to help prevent injuries.
3)
Exciting the neuromuscular system allows the brain to coordinate the nervous system’s ability to fire
muscles effectively and efficiently. It will also increase speed of contraction and relaxation of warmed muscles.
Explain these benefits to the curlers so that they are aware of the importance of a warm-up.
Warm-up Routine:
A “Step-Stretch-Slide” Approach
Curling, like other sports, requires players to perform skills using movements that go beyond normal everyday
activities. A warm-up provides a stepwise progression to prepare a player for the transition from pre-game to
game activity. Failure to properly warm-up can lead to discomfort, poor performance, and possible injury.
A proper warm-up has three components:
1.
Vigorous whole body aerobic exercises – affect the circulatory system.
2.
Dynamic stretching exercises – affect the musculoskeletal system.
3.
Simulation exercises – affecting the neuromuscular system.
Applying each of these three components in a curling warm-up routine is called a “step-stretch-and-slide”.
Step
The first phase of a proper curling warm-up is a whole body aerobic activity such as stepping exercises. The
purpose of these exercises is to generate body heat and to raise the level of function of the cardiovascular
system. These exercises should be done for approximately five to ten minutes just prior to the five to ten minutes
of stretching that should occur before going on the ice. The stepping movement should initially be light and
rhythmical and gradually progress in intensity, but not to the point of “breaking a sweat”.
The goal is to elevate the heart rate, increase blood flow, and heat the deep parts of the body such as the
muscles and joints. While warming up, the intensity should be mild, with a good rule of thumb being that the
curler should be able to maintain a regular conversation without working up too much of a sweat. Progressive
exercises such as skipping, stair climbing, jogging/marching on the spot, or full body callisthenics might be
suitable to a curling venue. The participant starts slowly and steadily increases the pace. The curler should be
provided the opportunity to develop his/her own routine as long as it meets the aerobic content requirement.
Here are a few activities that could take place in a club:
page 46 -
marching on the spot
alternating bum kicks on the spot
jogging on the spot
stepping up and down on a stair tread
stepping up and down on a low bench
hop scotching on the patterns of a rug
hop scotching over a number of brushes
walking rapidly backward, forward, and side ways in a limited space
dancing to music supplied on a personal listening device
rapid free movement exercises
shadow boxing while facing a glass trophy case
Stretch
Dynamic Stretching is defined as slow controlled movements through the full range of motion. Dynamic
stretching is the most appropriate form of exercises for the warm-up. By contrast, static stretches are more
appropriate for the Cool-down. Dynamic stretching involves moving parts of the body and gradually increasing
reach, speed of movement, or both. In dynamic stretches, there are no bounces or "jerky" movements. An
example of dynamic stretching would be slow, controlled leg swings, arm swings, or torso twists.
Dynamic stretching should be done immediately after the “step” portion of the warm-up and for five to ten
minutes before going on the ice. Perform exercises (leg raises, arm swings, etc…) in sets of six to ten
repetitions. If after a few sets the curler feels tired - stop. Tired muscles produce waste product, which causes a
decrease in the coordination of movements. Do only the number of repetitions that can be done without
becoming fatigued.
If static stretching is to be used at all as part of the warm-up, the static stretch should only be held for a few
seconds (three to five) or no longer than it would be used in the sport. Static stretches held longer than ten to
fifteen seconds will induce a relaxation response and will not allow powerful muscles to contract as forcefully at
the start of the game.
Dynamic Stretching and Mobility Exercises:
The following are examples of dynamic stretching and mobility exercises, which could form part of the warm-up.
Neck Mobility
Flexion/Extension - Tuck the chin into the chest and then lift chin upward as far as possible, without straining. Do
six to ten repetitions
Lateral Flexion - lower left ear toward left shoulder and then right ear to right shoulder. Do six to ten repetitions
Rotation - Turn chin laterally toward left shoulder and then rotate it toward right shoulder. Do six to ten
repetitions
Shoulder Rolls
Stand tall and relaxed
Raise shoulders towards ears, take them backwards, down and then up again in a smooth action
Repeat six to ten repetitions
Arm Circles
Stand tall and relaxed with hands twelve inches from sides
Keeping body still, move hands in small circles gradually increasing the speed up to ten repetitions. Reverse the
direction for ten repetitions.
page 47 Repeat the small arm circle action with arms straight out at 90 degree angle from sides. Ten repetitions.
Finally complete large arm circles both forwards and backwards for six to ten repetitions.
Overhead Reach
Stand tall with good posture, feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart.
Bend smoothly first to one side while reaching overhead with the arm on the side that is being stretched, then
repeat on the other side.
Repeat six to ten times on each side with a slow rhythm, breathing out while bent to the side, and when returning
to the centre.
Golfers Twist
Extend arms out to sides and twist torso and hips to the left, shifting weight onto the left foot. Then twist torso to
the right while shifting weight to the right foot. Six to ten repetitions on each side.
Leg Swings – Forward/Backward
Stand sideways to the wall place hand on the wall for balance.
Swing leg closest to the wall forward and backwards for six to ten repetitions.
Turn and repeat with the other leg.
Leg Swings – Side to Side
Leaning slightly forward with both hands on a wall
and weight on left leg, swing right leg to the left in
front of body, pointing toes upwards as foot reaches
its furthest point of motion.
Then swing the right leg back to the right as far as
comfortable, again pointing toes up as foot reaches
its final point of movement.
Six to ten repetitions on each leg.
Half Lunges
Standing tall both feet together (starting position).
Keeping the back straight lunge forward with the right leg approximately one metre.
page 48 Bend knees to slightly load the quadriceps muscles and return to start position.
Repeat with the left leg and alternate for six to ten repetitions on each leg.
Heel Raises
Leaning forward with hands on the wall and
weight on toes, raise and lower both heels in a
controlled manner.
Each time, lift heels one to two inches from the
ground while maintaining ground contact with the
balls of feet.
Six to ten repetitions.
Slide (on-ice)
The final phase of the curling warm-up is done on-ice using the sliding movements associated with the delivery
and sweeping skills. These are the most traditional of curling warm-up exercises. Sliding from the hack should
progress from an initial easy leg drive and high upper body position to a full takeout leg drive with the upper body
in the actual delivery position.
page 49 APPENDIX ‘C’
Speaking Notes for Off-Ice Session in Week 1
Welcome to the Getting Started For Adults League at the Our Town Curling Club
o We are very excited that you have decided to learn to curl
o And we have a great program to teach you to curl
o My name is [insert] and I am the Program co-ordinator.
What we’re doing tonight:
o We’re going to talk about curling generally
o I want to tell you about the league and the plan for the year.
o Talk about the Our Town Curling Club and a few things you need to know about the
club.
o Equipment
o Ice surface, playing area, terminology
o Tonight we are going to curl and you are going to throw your first rock
Curling!
About the League
o This program has been used across Canada to teach adults to learn how to curl
o This program is designed to teach you how to curl and introduce you to curling
generally.
o We will also introduce you to league curling in the club
o Focus is on instruction until December
Each week we will have a lesson combined with some drills and mini games to
show you how to use your skills in a curling game.
o January to March
Play games, with instructors on every sheet to help you develop your skills
Introduce instructors:
o How are we going to do this every week – we have a great group of instructors who are
going to be teaching you how to curl…
o Introduce all instructors individually, provide a bit of background information about their
curling career (ie. Gord has played in numerous bonspiels and likes to skip; Sarah
competed at a junior regional championship…)
o Emphasize that all instructors have received training
What we’ll do every week:
o Every week we will divide the group up onto each sheet
o Each instructor will work with a small group of curlers teaching a certain skill.
o It doesn’t matter what sheet you are on or what instructor you are with, the lesson will
be the same
o The curriculum we use was developed by Curling Canada.
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Ask: Has anyone curled before?
Ask: Why learn to curl? [wait for people to volunteer answer, then discuss the below]
Learn a new spot
Meet new people
Great exercise
Inexpensive
Play at any age
Leagues for everyone – mixed, open, ladies, seniors
It can be recreational or competitive
Winter weather is a non-factor
Social component
page 50 The Club
o
To learn more about curling, you may want to visit: www.curling.ca
o
o
Talk about your club and what every “curler needs to know” about the club
Ie. Where to park, where are the washrooms, locker rooms, can new curlers use
lockers, what time does the bar open, new curlers can visit the club when they are not
curling, practice ice availability, introduce the club manager and the ice maker….
Remember: some of these new curlers have never been in a curling club before – all
information will make them feel more welcome and less nervous!
o
Equipment
Ice surface, playing area, terminology
o Two safety rules:
The ice is slippery
Don’t step over the rocks when stepping onto the sheet
Ice is slippery!
It is not the same as hockey ice
It has little bumps on it that we’ll talk about called pebble. This makes
the rock curl
Without the pebble, the ice won’t respond the way it’s supposed to
If you lay the ice or you kneel on it, put your hands on it, you melt the
pebble this creates flat spots, curlers and ice makers hate flat spots!
We like to keep the ice really clean
Ask: Did everyone bring clean running shoes? (If not, help people clean
off their shoes)
Also try not bring dirt out onto the ice (Clothes and mitts can leave dirt
on the ice if they are not clean)
Rocks
Each rock is about $1,000.
Curlers do not have their own rocks. Despite the movies
We don’t lift rocks off the ice. When it comes time to clean rocks, we’ll
show you how to do it.
Questions?
o
o
o
Ask: Does anyone have curling shoes?
Bring the following equipment and briefly discuss (maximum 5 minutes) the different
equipment and what the new curlers should bring each week. This introduction should
include:
Broom
Full Slip-on Sliders
Grippers for both feet
Clean running shoes (Don’t wear these outside!)
Warm loose fitting clothing (layered)
Mitts or gloves (grip is good)
Throwing aid
Let’s hit the ice.
page 51 APPENDIX ‘D’
Feedback Survey
Getting Started for Adults Program
On behalf of the instructors let me say THANKYOU! It has been a great season and we have enjoyed working
with you and introducing you to curling! As discussed earlier, we are always looking ahead to next year and
would like to get a sense of how the league met your needs, how we did as instructors and whether you are
planning to join the club next year. In this regard, kindly take a few minutes to give us your feedback by
completing the survey below. Note: if you want to respond on-line to the survey – contact me via email (insert
Program Coordinator email here) and I will send you a copy of the survey.
Please circle the appropriate number (1 = Not satisfied, 5 = Very Happy)
Not Satisfied…………………………..Very Happy
1
2
3
4
5
The League
1.
Overall satisfaction with the league
The Instructors
1.
Quality of the instruction
2.
Ability of the instructors
3.
Progression of your development and ability
4.
Atmosphere (relaxed approach)
5.
Quality of program
1
2
3
4
5
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
Next Curling Season
No
1
1.
3.
4.
1
1
1
1
1
1
I will join the club next season
I would like to join the GSL next season
I would like to join a different league next season
I want to be on a fixed team
I am happy to pick the teams from a hat
I want some instruction during the league
Not sure Probably
2
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
Yes
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Recommendations for the league and general comments:
Name
E-mail
page 52 
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