Series Rules v2.0 - Multi

Series Rules v2.0 - Multi
Series Rules v2.0
Hasbro and its logo, Avalon Hill, and Panzerblitz are
trademarks of Hasbro, Inc., ©2009 Hasbro, Inc. Used
under license. All Rights Reserved. Manufactured
and Distributed by Multi-Man Publishing, Inc.
Table of Contents
1.0 Introduction.................................................................................. 2
1.1 Using the Rules....................................................................... 2
1.2 Rules Conventions................................................................. 2
2.0 Game Components and Scale.................................................... 2
2.2 Map......................................................................................... 2
2.3 Playing Pieces........................................................................ 2
2.4 OPS Chits............................................................................... 3
2.5 Game Scale............................................................................ 3
3.0 Game Turn................................................................................... 3
3.1 Sequence of Play.................................................................... 4
3.2 Victory..................................................................................... 4
4.0 Movement..................................................................................... 4
4.1 Details of Movement............................................................... 4
4.2 Terrain Effects on Movement................................................. 5
4.3 Transport and Passenger Units.............................................. 5
4.4 Amphibious Movement........................................................... 6
5.0 Line of Sight (LoS)....................................................................... 6
5.1 General Rule........................................................................... 6
5.2 Elevation and LoS ................................................................. 6
5.3 Obstacles................................................................................ 6
5.4 Determining LoS..................................................................... 6
5.5 Inherent Terrain and LoS........................................................ 7
5.7 Reciprocity.............................................................................. 7
6.0 Spotting........................................................................................ 7
6.1 Spotting Conditions ............................................................... 7
6.2 Spotting Effects...................................................................... 8
6.3 Spotted Status........................................................................ 8
7.0 Combat and Direct Fire................................................................ 8
7.1 General Procedures................................................................ 8
7.2 Determining the Type of Attack.............................................. 8
7.3 Target Selection...................................................................... 8
7.4 Anti-Personnel (AP) Fire Resolution:..................................... 8
7.5 Anti-Tank (AT) Resolution....................................................... 8
7.6 Die Roll Modifiers . ................................................................. 8
7.7 Combat Results and CRT....................................................... 9
7.8 Opportunity Fire ..................................................................... 9
7.9 Reaction Fire . ........................................................................ 9
7.10 Assault Fire............................................................................ 9
8.0 Overruns...................................................................................... 9
8.1 Overrun Attack Procedure...................................................... 9
8.2 Overrun Attack Restrictions................................................... 10
9.0 Close Assault Tactics (CAT)........................................................ 10
9.1 CAT Procedures...................................................................... 10
9.2 CAT Restrictions..................................................................... 10
10.0 Panzer Blitz Assaults................................................................. 10
10.1 Panzer Blitz Assault Procedure............................................ 10
10.2 Panzer Blitz Assault Restrictions......................................... 10
11.0 Indirect Fire and Artillery Units................................................... 11
11.1 Artillery Request (AR) Markers............................................. 11
11.2 Forward Observers (FO)...................................................... 11
11.3 Indirect Fire Resolution . ...................................................... 11
11.4 Mortars ................................................................................. 11
11.5 Pre-registered Hexes ........................................................... 11
12.0 Smoke........................................................................................ 11
12.1 Smoke Firing Procedure....................................................... 11
12.2 Effects of Smoke.................................................................. 11
13.0 Efficiency.................................................................................... 12
13.1 Recovering from Disruption.................................................. 12
13.2 Efficiency Rolls..................................................................... 12
14.0 Terrain........................................................................................ 12
14.1 Clear Terrain ........................................................................ 12
14.2 Towns and Cities.................................................................. 12
14.3 Roads.................................................................................... 12
14.4 Woods................................................................................... 13
14.5 Swamp ................................................................................. 13
14.6 Gullies, Streams and Rivers................................................. 13
14.7 Bridges and Fords................................................................ 13
14.8 Lakes, Oceans and Beaches .............................................. 13
14.9 Slopes................................................................................... 14
14.10 Orchards ............................................................................ 14
15.0 Artificial Terrain and Positional Defenses.................................. 14
15.1 Wrecks ................................................................................. 14
15.2 Minefields ............................................................................ 14
15.3 Blocks .................................................................................. 15
15.4 Improved Positions (IPs)...................................................... 15
2
15.5 Fortifications ........................................................................ 15
15.6 Hull-Down ............................................................................ 15
16.0 Air Support ................................................................................ 15
16.1 General Procedures.............................................................. 16
16.2 Observation Aircraft............................................................. 16
16.3 Attack Aircraft Types............................................................ 16
16.4 Anti-Aircraft Defense (AA).................................................... 16
17.0 Engineers.................................................................................... 16
17.1 Clearing Mines...................................................................... 16
17.2 Bridge Demolitions . ............................................................. 16
17.3 Blocks . ................................................................................. 17
17.4 Close Assault Tactics............................................................ 17
18.0 Play Notes.................................................................................. 17
19.0 Designer’s Notes........................................................................ 17
20.0 Credits........................................................................................ 17
1.0 Introduction
The WWII Russian Front game in the distinctive black and orange box
was introduced to the retail market in 1970 by The Avalon Hill Game
Company (TAHGC). Originally designed as Tactical Game 3, and
distributed in Issue #22 of Strategy & Tactics Magazine (1969), Panzer
Blitz took the gaming community by storm. TAHGC, soon after S&T 22,
acquired the rights to Tactical Game 3. They knew they had a winner on
their hands, and pumped the supply chain full of copies. It is estimated
that over 300,000 copies of Panzer Blitz were sold over the print life of
the game, making it the most widely owned simulation board game in history. Panzer Blitz also inspired the creation of two other games: Panzer
Leader, which covered Western Front action in the last year of World War
II; and The Arab-Israeli Wars, which dealt with the more recent Middle
East conflicts.
This iteration of Panzer Blitz-Hill is the result of many years of effort
by many people. You may already be familiar with the rich heritage of
gaming that its parent game, Panzer Blitz, spawned. It is hoped that this
new iteration of fast-paced, exciting tactical combined arms warfare will
engender a new era of games.
1.1 Using the Rules
It is suggested to read through the rules once - don’t try to digest in
great detail, just get the feel for them. Set up a Situation, and then walk
through Section 3.0 Game Turn. You may not get all the nuances on the
first pass, but hopefully you will get a feel for the mechanics of play, and
with this in hand, refer to sections as needed.
1.2 Rules Conventions
1.2.1 When a Combat rule states that attack or defense factors are to
be halved and the combat involves multiple units, fractions are
dropped after all values are added for AT fire and retained for AP
fire.
1.2.2 In all other cases where numbers are halved (i.e. movement
points, ranges, etc.) remaining fractions are dropped.
1.2.3 Words that describe key concepts of components of the game
are capitalized.
2.0 Game Components and Scale
2.2 Map
The PB - Hill of Death game map is a representation of the terrain on
which the historical battles depicted in the game took place. A hexagonal
grid has been superimposed over the map to regulate movement and to
facilitate measurement of range for combat resolution.
A four-digit number is printed in each hex. This number is used to direct
the setup of the units for the situations, and to allow players to record
locations of the units, as well as defining play areas.
2.3 Playing Pieces
The die-cut cardboard counters are the game’s playing pieces. Each
counter represents a unit, an artificial terrain marker, or a game function
marker.
2.3.1 Units
Each unit counter represents a battery, platoon, or half-company-sized
military unit of one of the combatant nations of World War II and is
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
color-coded for identification. Each unit’s ability to attack, survive enemy attacks, fire range, and movement capability is expressed by the
numbers and symbols printed on the unit counter. (See sample below)
2.3.3 ‘Combat’ Units - Most unit counters in Panzer Blitz are Combat
units. Combat units are any unit with either or both AP and AT values.
2.3.3.1 An Armored Fighting Vehicle (AFV) is a Combat unit that has
a silhouette of the vehicle, as well as either or both AT and AP attack
values, and black (armored) defense strength.
2.3.3.2 Infantry units have a silhouette of troops and have a red (nonarmored) defense value.
2.3.4 Information Markers
Information markers indicate artificial terrain, or note a condition of a
hex or the units in the hex.
2.3.4.1 Unit Status Markers
Spent/Disrupted: The ½˝ counters with ‘Spent/Disrupted +3’ on one
side and are used to mark Combat units that have become Disrupted
as a result of combat or have failed to recover when making an Efficiency roll. (13.2)
Most units are printed on both sides. The front face represents the unit
at full strength while the reverse represents the unit at step-reduced
strength, denoted by a yellow stripe.
2.3.2 The printed information on the counters represents the following:
Attack AT (Anti-Tank) - Attack Strength used against Armored Targets.
(7.5)
Attack AP (Anti-Personnel) - Attack Strength used against Non-Armored Targets. (7.4)
Stacking Value - The black rectangles represents the number of Stacking Points the unit is worth. (2.3.5)
Range - The maximum distance away (in hexes) that the unit can attack an enemy unit using its AT or AP Attack Strength (Exception: 7.2.4
Long Range Fire).
Example: A unit with a range of 8 could use its Attack Strength to attack an enemy unit that is 8 hexes away or closer, but could not attack
an enemy unit 9 or more hexes away.
Special Capability - This code shows what special capabilities the
Combat unit has per the table below.
Unit Function
Spent: These ½˝ counters are used to mark Combat units which have
performed an action during the current game turn.
Disrupted: These ½˝ counters are used to mark Combat units that are
disrupted.
Unspotted: These ½˝ counters are used to mark units (or stacks of
units) that have not been Spotted. (6.0)
2.3.5 Stacking
Multiple Combat units may occupy the same hex at the same time. This
is called ‘stacking.’ Units totaling no more than six (6) friendly ‘Stacking
Points’ may occupy a hex at any one time (Exception: Towns and Cities
14.2).
2.3.5.1 Artificial Terrain Markers and Stacking
All artificial terrain markers are worth zero Stacking Points (Exception: Wrecks 15.1)
2.3.5.2 Transporting Units and Stacking
When a unit transports another unit, the Passenger and Carrier are
considered one unit for stacking purposes, using the stacking point
value of the Carrier unit. The transporting unit must have a stacking
value that is greater than or equal to the Passenger unit.
2.3.5.3 Violation of Stacking Limits
Code
Capability
Identification
IF
Indirect Fire (11.0)
Red Range Value
AA
Anti-Air (16.4)
Blue Stripe behind Unit Name
M
Mortar (11.4)
M superscript next to range
C
Carrier (4.3)
© on counter
AMP
Amphibious (4.4)
Blue Superscript next to Movement
OVR
Overrun (8.0)
Red Underlined Movement
Defense Strength - The ability of a unit to survive an enemy attack,
expressed as a number of Defense Strength points. The number is
color-coded to denote whether the unit is non-armored (red) or armored
(black).
Movement - The unit’s movement ‘allowance’ represents the maximum
number of movement points (MP) the unit can expend in a single turn.
The number is shown inside a colored shape, which denotes the movement ‘mode’ the unit uses, as shown in the table below. Red Underlined
Movement denotes overrun capability.
Movement Codes
Unit Movement Mode
Colored Shape
Wheeled
White Circle
Tracked
Trapezoid
Leg
Clear Circle
Towed
T/.. T/.
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
Any hex that is found to contain more than six Stacking Points is
considered “overstacked”. If at any time, a hex is found to be overstacked, the opposing player may immediately choose and move
units from that hex into an adjacent, non-enemy occupied, enterable
hex, until stacking limitations are met. Relocated units are marked
with a Spent/Disrupted marker. If they are already Disrupted, they
suffer a step loss. If no such hex is available, the owning player must
immediately choose which units to step-reduce or eliminate in order
to meet stacking requirements.
2.4 OPS Chits
The radius of an Op chit is the number listed on the front of the counter.
Op0 only affects units in its own hex; Op1 affects units in the selected
hex and all units within one hex, etc.
2.5 Game Scale
Each hexagon (hex) on the HOD map represents terrain that is 250 yards
from side to opposite side.
Each turn represents approximately fifteen minutes of real time.
All Combat Units represent formations equal to a platoon, and are therefore not marked as such on the counters, as in most other wargames.
3.0 Game Turn
One game turn in Panzer Blitz consists of multiple separate and random
player Operations. An Operation (determined by a ‘chit pull’) will activate
a type of unit (i.e. Air unit), reinforcements or group of units within a
certain area.
Players randomly pull Operations chits from a pool composed chits
belonging to both players. The owning player then conducts Operations
as detailed in sections 3.1.2.1 thru 3.1.2.3. A ‘chit pool’ is any opaque
container (i.e. coffee mug) from which chits can be randomly drawn.
3
3.1 Sequence of Play
The sequence of play is as follows:
1) Pre Operations Segment (3.1.1)
2) Chit Pull Segment (3.1.2)
a. Operations Chit
i. Artillery Request (11.1)
ii. Fire (7.0)
iii. Move (4.0)/Overrun (8.0)/Assault Fire (7.10)
iv. CAT (9.0)/Panzer Blitz Assault (10.0)
v. Recover Disrupted Units (13.1)
b. Reinforcements Chit (3.1.2.3) Place units and Conduct Operations
c. Air Support Chit (16.0) Place and/or conduct Air attacks
3) Administration Segment (3.1.3)
Each game turn has three segments:
3.1.1 Pre-Operations Segment
At the beginning of each turn the players assemble their Operations
Chits as per Situation instructions and combine them in the Chit Pool.
Also include in the Chit Pool any Reinforcement chits for that turn, additional Ops chits just entering the game (per the turn record track on
the Situation card), and Air Support chits. Place “No Move” counters,
Clear/Set, or remove Minefields, Blocks, etc.
3.1.2 Chit Pull Segment
Either player randomly and blindly draws a single chit from the Chit
Pool. The player who owns the chit declares the Operations area
(according to the radius number) by placing the chit on any hex in the
play area (thereby becoming the ‘Phasing Player’), or they may pass
performing no action. In either case, the chit is not returned to the
Chit Pool but set aside with the other used chits. Players repeat this
sequence until all chits are drawn. There is no limit to how many of one
or the other players’ own chits may be drawn consecutively. When the
last chit is drawn, the Chit Pull Segment is over. There are no actions
performed for the last chit that is drawn, this is to create some “Fog or
War”. (Exception: 3.1.2.3)
When an Air Support chit is drawn the owning player may place or
move their air support counter and conduct an attack with that Air support unit or leave the air support marker in a hex to conduct opportunity
fire at any enemy unit within its range.
3.1.2.1 Operations
Each Operations chit initiates what is essentially a mini-turn. The
Phasing Player (the player who owns the chit) designates a hex as
the activation hex. The Operations Chit just drawn is placed in that
hex to serve as a reminder. Any units that are within the effective
radius of the Ops chit, and not currently marked Spent become active
and may conduct one of the following Operations.
1. Request Artillery (marked No Move) (11.1)
2. Perform Direct/Indirect Fire (7.0)
3. Move (4.0) (Exception: Forward Observer 11.2)
a. Assault Fire (7.10)
b. Overrun–capable units Overrun (8.0)
c. Infantry may use Close Assault Tactics (CAT) (9.0)
d. Perform Panzer Blitz (PB) Assault (10.0)
4. Attempt to Recover from Disruption (13.0)
Operations may only be performed in the sequence outlined in Section
3.1 Sequence of Play.
All units within a chit’s radius do not need to perform the same action–
each may perform different action types or no action.
After conducting operations, mark units with a Spent or Spent/Disrupted
marker per the specific Operation performed. At the conclusion of the
Operation, remove the Operations Chit and set it aside.
3.1.2.2 Air Support Operations
After playing the Air Chit, the Phasing Player places or moves any Air
Support and/or Observation Aircraft units on the board. The nonPhasing Player may conduct any Anti-Aircraft Fire (16.4). The Phasing Player may then resolve Air attacks.
3.1.2.3 Reinforcement Operations
Reinforcements (units not designated as “at start”) always enter the
game by the drawing of a Reinforcement Chit during an Operations
4
Segment. After playing the Reinforcement Chit, the Phasing Player
may enter or place any and all scheduled reinforcements for the turn,
under the conditions outlined by the Situation. Only the reinforcing
units may perform normal Operations (3.1.2.1). If the Reinforcement
chit is not drawn, then that chit is automatically used as the first chit
for the next turn (3.1.2). If the Situation-designated entry hex for
reinforcements is blocked, then they may enter on any adjacent accessible hex.
Reinforcements entering the game across a range of hexes (i.e.
“North edge of the map”) need not maintain proximity to each other,
as if activated by a normal Op chit. They may enter individually on
any hex(es) allowed by the Situation. The first 6 stacking points (1-6)
of units that enter the map into the same hex pay the terrain cost of
that hex to enter it. The second 6 stacking points (7-12) of units to
enter that hex must pay the terrain cost plus 1 additional movement
point. The third 6 stacking points (13-18) to enter that hex must pay
the terrain cost plus 2 additional movement points. Continue in this
manner (i,e. adding 1 additional movement point for every 6 additional
stacking points) until all the reinforcements for the turn have entered
the map using that hex. Units entering the map into a road hex may
use the road movement bonus.
3.1.3 Administration Segment
Perform the following steps in order:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
All Spent/Disrupted markers are replaced with Disrupted markers.
Remove all SMOKE 2 markers, and flip any and all SMOKE 1
markers to their SMOKE 2 side.
Remove all HE markers from previous turn’s AR resolution
All onboard artillery request markers are resolved (The owner
of the last chit in the cup resolves their AR first. All effects occur
simultaneously).
Players remove any Spent markers from the board.
Mark all eligible units with an unspotted marker.
Finally, move the turn record marker ahead one turn.
3.2 Victory
Each Situation will define a set of victory conditions that must be met for
one side to win. If the stated side cannot meet these conditions in the
allotted number of turns, then the other player has won.
Some Situations will require that one side Control specific hexes (strategic locations) in order to win. For a side to Control a hex they must have
been the last player to have a non-Disrupted unit occupying that hex. It is
not necessary to have a unit continuously occupy the hex.
4.0 Movement
During an Operation, after placing Artillery Requests and conducting all
Fire Operations, a player may move any activated unit as outlined below.
4.1 Details of Movement
4.1.1 No enemy movement is allowed during friendly movement.
4.1.2 A unit that is marked with a Spent, Disrupted, Spent/Disrupted, or
FO (No Move) marker may not move.
4.1.3 Each unit has a printed movement allowance which shows the
number of movement points that unit may spend each turn. Unused
movement points may not be saved or carried over from one turn to
another. No unit may “lend” movement points to another unit.
4.1.4 Units move one at a time (Exception: Transport and Passenger
Units 4.3), tracing a path of movement through adjacent hexes, expending movement points as they move. The player must complete the
movement of one unit before beginning the movement of another. Once
the player has started moving the next unit, the moves of any already
moved units may not be adjusted.
4.1.5 During a unit’s move, the opponent may declare an Opportunity
Fire attack (7.8) against the moving unit. Once an Opportunity Fire
attack has been declared, the moving unit must stop and the moving
player may not change or otherwise adjust the movement of the unit.
After resolution of the Opportunity Fire attack, the unit may continue
moving if it is not Disrupted and has movement allowance remaining.
4.1.6 The distance a unit can travel is determined by its movement allowance and the cost to enter each hex. Each unit expends a number of
movement points to enter each hex, based on the Terrain Effects Chart
(TEC) and/or any Situation Note(SN).
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
4.1.7 Minimum Move - A unit that wishes to enter an adjacent enterable
hex for which the entry cost of which would exceed the unit’s entire
movement allowance, may enter that hex, provided the unit has not
expended movement points within its current hex (i.e. exiting an IP),
and has not previously entered a new hex during that turn.
4.1.8 Units may move through hexes containing other friendly units.
Units may not, however, enter or move through a hex if such movement would violate stacking limits for that hex while the moving unit is
in it. If the overstack is discovered after the hex has been entered, the
unit is moved back to the hex entered immediately prior to entering the
overstacked hex. Movement commences from that location, with the
unit having expended as many movement points as required to reach
that point originally.
4.1.8.1 Units may not pass through or enter hexes containing enemy
units. (Exception: Empty Transports 4.1.8.2)
4.1.8.2 Units other than truck or wagon units may pass through or enter hexes containing only empty enemy truck or wagon units. In such
cases, the truck or wagon units in the hex passed through or entered
are eliminated.
4.3.5 Unit Transport Table - The Carrier unit must pay movement costs
as outlined in the following table:
Transport Table
Transport
Type
LG2/Inf
½ MA
HG3
All MA4
LG/Inf
½ MA
HG
All MA
British Carrier
LG/Inf
½ MA
Wagon
Any
All MA
Inf only
½ MA
Recon-Inf/
LG only
½ MA
Recon-Inf
Only
All MA
Truck
Half-Track
AFV
5
6
4.1.9 Any unit that exits the board may not reenter play unless otherwise indicated by SN.
Jeep
4.1.10 Once a unit has completed its movement, mark it with a Spent
marker.
Motorcycle
4.2 Terrain Effects on Movement
Terrain movement costs are outlined in Section 14.0 and are summarized
on the TEC.
4.2.1 Terrain costs for movement are cumulative. If a unit lacks sufficient movement points to enter a hex, it may not do so. (Exception:
4.1.7)
4.2.2 Hexsides may also affect movement by adding movement point
expenditures or prohibiting movement altogether when units attempt to
cross the hexside.
4.3 Transport and Passenger Units
Those units designated as “Carriers” © for their Special Capability have
the ability to transport non-vehicular units (i.e. infantry and guns). Each
Carrier unit may be used to transport one or more units whose total
number of Stacking Points does not exceed the Carrier unit’s capacity. A
Carrier unit’s capacity is equal to the Carrier unit’s own Stacking Points.
Example: A Truck worth 2 Stacking Points can transport any combination of guns and infantry units that do not exceed 2 Stacking Points. This
combined stack of transport and transported units count as 2 Stacking
Points. (2.3.5.2) Also note that although one Carrier unit may be used to
transport multiple Passengers, multiple Carrier units may not be used to
transport a single Passenger unit.
Towed units such as guns are denoted by a ‘T/..’ or ‘T/.’ denoting the size
of transport required. The number of dots designates the size of the gun:
either light (single dot) or heavy (two dots). Guns are treated the same as
passengers in all other ways.
4.3.1 Loading and unloading of Passengers takes place as part of the
movement of the Carrier unit and takes place in the same hex as the
Carrier unit. The Passenger need not be activated during that turn but
is considered Spent after being transported. The unit to be transported
may not be marked with a Spent, Disrupted or Spent/Disrupted marker
prior to being loaded.
4.3.2 Depending on what type of unit they are carrying, it may cost
a Carrier half or all of its Movement Allowance to load or unload the
Passenger(s). (See Unit Transport Table, 4.3.5) Obviously, if it takes
all of its Movement Allowance, both Carrier and Passenger units must
begin and end their movement in the same hex.
4.3.3 When transporting Passengers that only cost half of a Carrier’s
Movement Allowance to load/unload, the Carrier may do any of the following provided it does not exceed its movement allowance:
a) Move and then load/unload or
b) Load/unload and then move or
c) Move and then load/unload and then move again.
4.3.4 A Passenger unit cannot move by itself, nor attack on the turn it
loads/unloads. (Exception: Panzer Blitz Assault 10.0) The transported
unit is marked as Spent after unloading.
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
Passenger Load/Unload
Type
Costs1
6
1 Reflects
the movement point cost paid by the CARRIER unit to load/
unload its units.
2LG = Light Gun (less than or equal to 82mm) T/.
3HG = Heavy Gun (greater than 82mm) T/..
4 MA = Movement Allowance.
5AFVs may only act as a Carrier as directed by the specific nationality
rules.
6Unarmed Jeeps and Motorcycles cannot move without a passenger.
4.3.6 Passenger units suffer the same combat result as the Carrier unit
if attacked while loaded. If a Disrupted result is obtained, then the Passenger must unload in the current hex and both Passenger and Carrier
are marked Disrupted. If unloading violates the stacking limits (2.3.5.3),
then the Passenger unit is placed, by the opposing (non-owning) player, in an adjacent, non-enemy occupied, enterable hex. If no such hex
exists, the passenger is step reduced or eliminated in order to get the
stack within stacking limits of the hex. If more than one Passenger unit
is unloaded in this manner (by virtue of the same attack) in violation of
stacking limits, the opposing player may choose which Passenger units
are to be placed in an adjacent non-enemy occupied enterable hex.
If no such hex exists, the owning player must step-reduce/eliminate
passenger units in order to meet stacking requirements. (2.3.5.3) If a
step-loss result is obtained as a combat result, then both the Passenger and the Carrier suffer a step-loss (potentially doubling the step loss
in this situation).
4.3.7 German, American, and Russian units have the ability to use their
AFVs (tanks, assault guns, and tank destroyers, but not armored cars
or self-propelled artillery) to transport infantry units (not guns).
4.3.7.1 Infantry being carried by AFVs may be attacked separately
from the AFV with no adverse affect to the AFV. Use a Red Defense
Factor of one (1) for the infantry if attacked separately in this manner.
The -1 for Opportunity Fire vs. Infantry is not applied.
4.3.7.2 Infantry loaded as Passengers on AFVs do not modify the
Defense Factor of those AFVs, yet they suffer the same result as the
AFV if the AFV is attacked.
4.3.7.3 If an AFV or its Passenger is Disrupted by an attack, the effects of 4.3.6 are followed. Any AFV Passenger unloaded in this fashion is also Disrupted, even if not specifically targeted for that attack.
4.3.7.4 Passengers being carried by AFVs and/or half-tracks unload
as part of the movement cost paid by the Carrying unit when conducting a Panzer Blitz Assault. (10.0)
4.3.8 A Carrier unit may not load Passengers if the Carrier unit or the
Passengers are Disrupted.
4.3.9 Units may never voluntarily unload in violation of stacking limits.
(2.3.5)
4.3.10 Opportunity Fire may be declared against either the
Passenger(s) or the Carrier unit individually once a voluntary unloading
action has been declared and the movement cost has been paid. This
applies whether the Carrier unit has moved or not.
5
4.3.11 Units being transported may not fire in combat, though the transporting unit may participate in Direct Fire (DF) and Overrun attacks
(Also see Panzer Blitz Assaults 10.0).
rather the Slope is considered the meeting of differing elevations at the
mutual hex spine.
4.4 Amphibious Movement
Some vehicles were capable of movement on both land and in water
obstacles (Lakes and Oceans (14.8) or Rivers (14.6)) or those defined by
SN. Such vehicles, known as Amphibious vehicles, will have this ability
denoted by the inclusion of a blue superscripted number (Aquatic Movement Rate) next to their movement point value.
4.4.1 The Aquatic Movement Rate represents the speed at which an
Amphibious vehicle can move in a water obstacle. Each water obstacle
depicted on a map shall have the movement cost to enter listed in SN.
If not specifically stated by SN, then the cost is one aquatic movement
point per water hex entered.
4.4.2 Exiting a water obstacle will cost the vehicle twice the movement
point cost of the hex being entered. Additional cost due to steep slopes,
muddy banks, or other special terrain will be detailed in SN.
4.4.3 Aquatic vs. Land Movement - The number of aquatic movement
points available after entering a water obstacle is equivalent to the
proportional amount of remaining land movement points (fractions
rounded up).
Example: If an Amphibious vehicle has 10 land and 3 aquatic movement points and enters an obstacle after expending 3 land movement
points, it would have 2 aquatic movement points remaining.
• Amount of Land MP used was 3 of 10, or 3/10
• The 3 Land MP already expended are worth 1 Aquatic MP because
3/10 of 3 equals 1 (after rounding):
3/10 * 3 = 0.9 = (round up to) 1 aquatic MP used so far, thus leaving 2
Aquatic MP remaining for use.
The same is true for vehicles exiting water obstacles. If the above vehicle used 2 of its 3 Aquatic MP it would have 3 Land MP remaining.
• Amount of Aquatic MP used was 2 of 3, or 2/3
• The 2 Aquatic MP already expended are worth 7 Land MP because
2/3 of 10 equals 7 (after rounding):
2/3 * 10 = 6.66 = (round up to) 7 land MP used, thus leaving 3 Land
MP for use.
It would, of course, cost 2 for tracked and 4 for wheeled vehicles to
enter an open ground hex since they would be crossing to a higher
elevation.
4.4.4 Not all bodies of water will be navigable by Amphibious vehicles.
Non-navigable water obstacles will be noted in SN.
5.0 Line of Sight (LoS)
In Panzer Blitz, Line of Sight (LoS) is used to determine whether a unit
can see, and therefore attack another unit. A unit must have an unobstructed LoS to the unit it wishes to attack (unless using Indirect Fire
11.0).
5.1 General Rule
Although a unit may have a LoS to an enemy hex, the enemy may still be
Unspotted (6.0), and incurs an Unspotted penalty (6.2.3).
If the LoS does not cross any hex or hexside containing a terrain depiction capable of blocking the LoS (i.e. an ‘Obstacle’), the LoS is considered unobstructed. LOS may potentially be obstructed by an Obstacle in
two ways: by passing through any portion of the hex, possibly including
the hex spine (See Inherent Terrain 5.5) or by passing through the actual
depiction of the terrain on the map (i.e. Woods).
5.3 Obstacles
Certain terrain features are considered potential obstacles to LoS. These
are denoted as such throughout section 14. If so denoted, they may block
a LoS that goes through them. 5.2)
5.3.1 Combat units, game function markers, and artificial terrain markers in a hex are not considered obstacles and thus do not block LoS
(Exception: Smoke 12.0).
5.3.2 Obstacle Height - Certain terrain features (Towns, Cities, Woods,
Orchards, and Swamp) and counter contents (Smoke, etc.) add one to
the elevation level of a hex they occupy for LoS purposes. Example: a
Level 1 hex containing Woods is considered to be a Level 2 obstacle for
any LoS tracing through the Woods depiction. A unit occupying such a
hex would still be considered to be at Level 1.
5.4 Determining LoS
A straight line (use a string, edge of a card, or some other straight edge)
between the center dots of two hexes is used to verify LoS.
5.4.1 Obstacle higher than both units
An intervening elevation/obstacle higher in elevation than both units
always blocks LoS.
5.4.2 Obstacle higher than one unit
An intervening elevation/obstacle equal in elevation to one unit and
higher in elevation than the other unit always blocks LoS.
5.4.3 Obstacle lower than both units
An intervening elevation/obstacle lower in elevation than both units
never blocks LoS.
5.4.4 Obstacle is higher than the lower unit, and lower than the
higher unit
If one unit is in a hex that is at a higher elevation than the other unit,
and there is an intervening elevation/obstacle that is higher than the
lower unit but lower than the higher unit, then refer to the chart below.
5.2 Elevation and LoS
All mapboard hexes exist at one of six elevation levels, numbered Levels
1 through 6. These elevations are differentiated by colors, the darkest
color being Level 1.
5.2.1 Combat units are considered to be at the same elevation as the
hex they occupy (Exception: Air Support 16.0).
5.2.2 When more than one elevation exists in a hex, the elevation
depiction that encompasses the center dot of that hex determines that
hex’s elevation.
5.2.3 A Slope is formed wherever two elevation levels meet, and is depicted on the map as in the below illustration. There is no “Slope hex”,
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5.4.5 - LoS Chart
LoS Chart
Height of Intervening obstacle
relative to lower unit
5.6.3 Units in a gully/stream hex may Spot or attack and be Spotted/
attacked by units in another gully/stream hex ONLY if the straight line
drawn between the two hexes crosses only gully/stream hexsides.
Units in non-straight-line-connected gullies/streams may not trace LoS
to each other.
A can see B, C, and D
B can see A but not D or C
Unit Height
Differential
1
2
3
4+
1
Blocks
Blocks
Blocks
Blocks
2
½D
Blocks
Blocks
Blocks
3
2
/3D
Blocks
Blocks
¼D
Blocks
/3D
4
¾D
5
4
/5 D
1
½D
/5 D
3
/5 D
2
C can see A and D, but not B
D can see A and C, but not B
/5 D
1
Unit Height Differential = Height of HIGHER of UNIT – HEIGHT of LOWER UNIT
Height of Intervening Obstacle: See 5.3.2
xD = the fraction (x) multiplied by the whole distance (D) yields the furthest
number of hexes (rounded down) an obstacle can be from the higher unit and
still allow a clear LoS. Obstacle must be equal to or less than this distance in
hexes to have clear LoS.
5.4.6 LoS between two adjacent hexes is never blocked (Exception:
Gullies and Streams 5.6).
5.5 Inherent Terrain and LoS
Any terrain defined as inherent blocks LOS through any portion of the
hex, including the hexsides. Examples of inherent terrain are Towns, Cities, Swamps and Smoke. See individual terrain descriptions for a which
types of terrain are considered inherent.
Orchards are a special case of inherent terrain which do not block LOS
along the hexspine unless a second orchard hex lies on the opposite
side of the hexspine, i.e. hexspines common to adjacent orchards block
LOS.
LOS. See Example.
5.7 Reciprocity
Unless otherwise noted, all LoS are considered reciprocal. That is, if a
friendly unit can trace a LoS to an enemy unit, that enemy unit also possesses a LoS to the friendly unit.
6.0 Spotting
While Line of Sight and Spotting are similar concepts, they provide differing degrees of information about enemy units.
Spotting an enemy unit, or stack, gives more accurate information as
to precise unit location within the area defined by a hex, as well as unit
composition. A player may DF on an enemy unit to which only Line of
Sight is possessed, but at a penalty (6.2.3) to reflect the lack of increased intelligence that Spotting provides.
The status of a unit as ‘Spotted’ or ‘Unspotted’ affects all attacks against
that unit. By definition, a unit is always considered Spotted unless
marked with an Unspotted marker. Unspotted units can be attacked, suffering a +4 DRM to all attacks until that unit qualifies as Spotted. Once
a unit is Spotted by an enemy unit it is considered Spotted by all enemy
units.
6.1 Spotting Conditions
The following section details the manner in which units are determined to
be Spotted.
6.1.1 All units at the start of a Situation are considered Unspotted and
marked as such.
6.1.2 A target’s spotting status is always determined at the time an action is taken against it, be it an attack, targeting for Overrun, etc. For IF,
the action is when the fire is resolved, not when the AR is placed.
6.1.3 An enemy unit is considered Spotted if either of the following
criteria is met:
•
Example Key: v = LoS is not blocked, X = LoS is blocked
5.6 Gullies and Streams
Units in a gully or stream hex (and not on a Bridge) are considered to be
in the gully or stream and modify the LoS rules slightly as outlined below.
5.6.1 Units in gullies or streams are treated as if they are at the elevation level of the hex for purposes of LoS if attacked by units in a hex at
least one elevation level higher than the gully or stream hex.
A non-Disrupted Combat unit (2.3.3) is adjacent to the enemy
unit, regardless of the terrain the target occupies. (Exception:
Units in Gully/Stream 5.6.3)
• A non-Disrupted Combat unit (2.3.3) has a valid LoS to the
enemy unit and one or more of the following conditions are met:
a. the enemy unit is in a City, Town, Woods or Swamp hex within
three hexes of the Combat unit possessing LoS;
b. the enemy unit is in a Orchard hex and within five hexes of a
combat unit possessing LoS;
c. the enemy unit is marked with a Spent, Disrupted, or Spent/Disrupted marker;
d. the enemy unit occupies a Clear hex regardless of the elevation
level, at a range of 20 hexes or less.
5.6.2 Units in gullies or streams may Spot or attack and be Spotted/
attacked by units at the same elevation level but not in a gully or stream
only if such units are adjacent to the gully/stream hex.
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6.2 Spotting Effects
7.3 Target Selection
The following take effect due to Spotted/Unspotted status:
The following details which units may or must be attacked in a Combat:
6.2.1 An Unspotted stack of units in a hex may not be inspected by the
enemy player.
6.2.2 Spotted and Unspotted units may be attacked as a combined
group but use separate die roll modifiers (DRM) for DF resolution.
6.2.3 Unspotted units receive a +4 DRM on the DF table.
6.3 Spotted Status
At the end of the current turn, during the Administration segment (3.1.3)
all un-marked, (non-Spent, non-Disrupted, non-Labor, etc.) units in City,
Town, Woods or Swamp hexes are marked with an Unspotted marker (if
none of the conditions in 6.1.3 are met).
7.0 Combat and Direct Fire
There are several types of combat in the game. They are detailed in
the following rule and include: Anti-Personnel Direct Fire (AP), AntiTank Direct Fire (AT), Indirect Fire (IF), Overrun (OVR), Close Assault
Tactics (CAT), Opportunity Fire, Minefield attacks, and Panzer Blitz (PB)
assaults. The two DF procedures are detailed in this section, while the
other types are explained in their own sections.
7.1 General Procedures
7.3.1 Non-Armored Units: The attacker may choose any combination
of non-Armored units in the defending hex as a target(s). (Exceptions:
Fortifications 15.5, Defenders occupying Woods 14.4, or Towns and
Cities 14.2.) Any units within that hex that are not selected are not affected by the DF combat results.
7.3.2 Armored Units: The attacker may only attack a single armored
defender (Exception: Overrun (8.1.3) and CAT (9.1.5)).
7.3.3 Transported Units: A unit being transported by a Carrier class
unit defends with the transporting unit’s Defense Strength and Class
and suffers any result the transporting unit suffers. An infantry unit
transported as a rider on an AFV (any non-Carrier class unit) may be
attacked separately from the transporting unit and defends with a nominal, non-Armored (red) Defense Strength of 1.
7.4 Anti-Personnel (AP) Fire Resolution:
The attacker sums up the values of all attacking units with a clear LoS to
determine the Final Attack Strength. The defender sums up the defense
values of all defending units to determine the Final Defense Strength.
The Final Attack Strength divided by the Final Defense Strength to
calculate the Combat Odds Ratio. Round fractions/odds in favor of the
defender
7.1.2 Units may not split their attack strength amongst different targets.
(Exceptions: 8.1.5; 9.1.7)
Example: Odds of ‘eleven to four’ (11:4) reduces to ‘two to one’ (2:1);
‘seven to four’ (7:4) reduces to ‘three to two’ (3:2). The attacker then rolls
two dice, and applies all Direct Fire DRMs as well as Range Modifiers.
Cross-reference the final modified die-roll with the Combat Odds Ratio
on the DFT to obtain a result. Once combat is resolved, all attacking
units are marked with a Spent marker.
7.1.3 All attacks must be made at the appropriate time during an Operation (3.1).
7.5 Anti-Tank (AT) Resolution
The following details the procedures for conducting Combat:
7.1.1 The Phasing Player declares and indicates which units will fire on
which target(s) and announces the type of attack.
7.1.4 A player may not attack with any unit marked with a Disrupted,
Spent, or Spent/Disrupted marker on it. (Exception: 7.9)
7.1.5 A unit may only attack once per turn (Exception: 7.9). There is
no limit to how many times a defending unit can be attacked in a turn,
however, for each type of attack (Direct Fire, Overrun, CAT, IF, etc.) a
unit can only be the target once for each such attack type per Operation (3.1.2.1).
7.1.6 The attacking player determines if a clear LoS exists between all
attacking unit(s) and the defending unit(s) as well as Spotted status. If
no LoS exists between an attacker and its declared target, the attacking unit does not participate in the attack. Any such unit is dropped
from an attack and is not marked Spent. If none of the attacking units
have a LoS, then the attack does not take place. However, as long as
one of the attacking unit(s) has a LoS, then the attack is resolved, and
all participating units are marked Spent.
7.1.7 If a defending stack contains both Spotted and Unspotted units
only one attack roll is made with each category of units using the appropriate DRM.
7.1.8 A Natural die roll of 2 will always have the best result for that
column.
7.1.9 A Natural die roll of 12 always misses and has no effect on the
defending unit. The attacker is still marked spent.
7.2 Determining the Type of Attack
The following instructs how to determine which type of attack the Combat
is:
7.2.1 Anti-personnel (AP) attack strength (red) is used against NonArmored targets (red defense values) using the AP Fire line of the
Direct Fire Table (DFT).
7.2.2 Anti-tank (AT) attack strength (black) is used against Armored
targets (black defense value) using the AT line of the DFT.
7.2.3 Infantry (2.3.3.2) may only attack Armored units using CAT attacks or at half attack strength when conducting Reaction Fire versus
Overrunning Armor (8.0).
The Final Attack Strength for DF Armored combat is the highest AT value
of the attacking units modified by +1 for each additional attacking AT
unit. The Defense Strength of the target unit is subtracted from the Final
Attack Strength and a Combat Differential is calculated.
Example: Three units with AT attack values of 2, 2, and 3 attack an
Armored target with a defense strength of 2. The attacker’s highest value
AT factor is 3, so the attack strength of the combined units is 5 (3 for the
highest unit, plus one point for each of the two other units present in the
attack). The 5 attack value minus the defender’s 2 gives a Differential of
3.
The attacker then rolls two dice, and applies all Direct Fire DRMs as
well as Range Modifiers. Cross-reference the final modified die-roll with
the Combat Differential on the DFT to obtain a result. Once combat is
resolved, all attacking units are marked with a Spent marker.
7.6 Die Roll Modifiers
7.6.1 If equal to or greater than half of the units within the attacking
group qualify for a die roll modification, then that modification applies to
the entire group. Example: To qualify a group of attackers for the Height
Advantage DRM, at least half of the attacking units must qualify for the
modification or the group does not qualify.
Example: Three units attack a single tank. One attacks from range 4
(+1), one attacks from range 7 (+2), and one attacks from range 10
(+3). At least half the units do suffer a +2 or better modifier so the DRM
would be +2 for range.
7.6.2 If equal to or greater than half of the units within the defending
units qualify for a die roll modification, then that modification applies to
the entire group.
7.6.3 By the above rules, groups of attacking and defending units may
qualify for both positive and negative modifiers. Such modifiers are
cumulative, and may cancel each other out.
7.6.4 The combat die roll is modified by two sets of modifiers: those
found on the Direct Fire Dice Roll Modifiers table and the Range Modifiers table, both found on the player aid card and on the map.
7.2.4 Long Range Fire: Infantry type units can fire one hex beyond their
printed range value at half firepower.
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7.7 Combat Results and CRT
The Combat Results Table (CRT) is used to resolve all types of combat
except Anti-Aircraft combat. (16.4) The possible results are:
“—“ Attack has no effect on the defender.
“D” The defender(s) is Disrupted. Place a Spent/Disrupted marker on
top of the defending unit(s).
“DD” Any defenders that were already Disrupted before the attack suffer a step-loss. All defenders suffer disruption and are marked with a
Spent/Disrupted marker.
“#X” The defender must remove the (#) number of unit steps from the
target units. Each step loss is fulfilled by either flipping a full-strength
unit or removing a reduced unit. All targeted units must take an equal
amount of step losses if possible. All other remaining targeted units
suffer a DD, i.e. already disrupted the units take a step loss. Finally all
remaining targeted units are marked Spent/Disrupted.
Example: Two disrupted British Mechanized Infantry platoons, defense
14, are sitting in a woods hex. The Germans attack with three PxKW IV
IIs with a height advantage, for an AP strength of 21. The odds ratio on
the AP table is 21:14 which is 3:2. The German player rolls a 5 which is
modified by -2, -1 for defender being disrupted and -1 for attacker height
advantage, for a final die roll of 3. The result is an X. The British player
must reduce one platoon to satisfy the 1X result and the other “remaining” platoon suffers a DD and is therefore reduced. Both British units, two
reduced platoons, are marked Spent/Disrupted.
7.8 Opportunity Fire
7.8.1 Opportunity Fire differs from DF in that it takes place only while
the Phasing Player’s units are moving. The non-Phasing Player stops
the Phasing Player during any point of the unit’s movement to announce Opportunity Fire attacks by any unit that would be eligible to
conduct a DF attack. The attack is resolved before any further movement is conducted.
7.8.2 Opportunity Fire Modifiers
•
Opportunity fire vs. a unit using Road Movement Bonus receives
a -1 DRM.
• Opportunity fire vs. a moving vehicle receives +1 DRM.
• Opportunity fire vs. infantry in open receives -1 DRM.
7.8.3 After an Opportunity Fire attack is declared, all attacking units are
identified. The LoS for each attacking unit is then checked. If the LoS
for any unit is blocked, that unit may not contribute to the attack and is
not considered to have fired.
7.8.4 In a given Operation, a moving unit may be attacked any number
of times by Opportunity Fire but only one attack can be performed per
hex entered.
7.9.1 Any unit Disrupted as the result of Reaction Fire may not participate in the Overrun or CAT attack.
7.9.2 A unit that is not Spent or Disrupted, is marked Spent after the
conclusion of their Reaction Fire against an Overrun CAT attack.
7.10 Assault Fire
Assault fire is allowed only for AFVs (2.3.3.1).
7.10.1 AFVs using Assault Fire may move up to half of their movement
allowance and still attack using Direct Fire.
7.10.2 AFVs using Assault Fire suffer a two-column shift to the left on
the Direct Fire Table
7.10.3 Assault Fire completes the unit’s movement and fire action. That
unit is marked with a Spent marker.
8.0 Overruns
Overrun attacks are special attacks that can be made by Armored units
only, and are made during the Phasing Player’s movement. In these attacks the attacking vehicles attempt to overwhelm an enemy position at
very close range. Only activated, armored units identified as capable of
Overrun attacks (red under-lined movement factor) may participate in an
Overrun attack.
8.1 Overrun Attack Procedure
The following shows the proper procedure to execute an Overrun attack:
8.1.1 All activated units intending to Overrun move as outlined in the
Movement rules (4.0) during the Phasing Player’s movement. These
units must stop their movement adjacent to an enemy occupied hex
and are marked with an Overrun marker(s). As each participating unit
moves adjacent to the target hex, it must expend 2 movement points
plus the movement point cost to enter the hex to be Overrun, and is
placed beneath the Overrun marker. If a unit does not have sufficient
remaining movement points or is Disrupted by Opportunity Fire, it may
not perform an Overrun attack and is placed above the Overrun marker
and marked Spent or Spent/Disrupted as appropriate. The Overrun attack is resolved immediately after all units involved in the Overrun have
moved adjacent to the target of the overrun.
8.1.2 After the resolution of any Reaction Fire (7.9), the attacker assigns Overrunning units to defenders using the following criteria.
8.1.2.1 All defending Non-armored units must be attacked as a combined defense using DF rules.
8.2.2.1 Any defending armored units must be attacked singly using
DF rules.
7.8.5 Loading and unloading Passengers counts as movement for Opportunity Fire purposes (Exception: Panzer Blitz Assaults 10.0)
8.1.3 If more than one attacking unit is involved in the Overrun attack,
the attacking units may be assigned to attack different types of units.
When there are multiple attacking units, no attacking units may split
their attack values among different types of defending units.
7.8.6 Units that use Opportunity Fire are marked with a Spent marker.
A unit may only Opportunity Fire ONCE per turn, and may not later
participate in DF, or any other offensive combat.
8.1.4 If there is only a single attacking unit, that single attacking unit
may (attacker’s choice) split its attack equally (dropping all fractions) to
each relevant value for each defending type of unit(s).
7.9 Reaction Fire
All units in the target hex of an Overrun (8.0) or Close Assault Tactics
attack (CAT, 9.0) may perform a single Reaction Fire versus attacking
units in one hex immediately prior to the Overrun or CAT attack being
conducted regardless of status. Reaction Fire is a form of DF and is
subject to the rules and restrictions of DF, with the following cumulative
modifications:
a. Infantry AT values are halved (7.2.3).
b. If the Reaction firing unit is Spent or Disrupted, their attack
strength is halved (non-compounding effect, i.e. not halved twice
for Spent/Disrupted).
c. If half or more of the Reaction firing unit steps are Disrupted, the
stack suffers a one-column shift to the left on the DFT.
d. Range is considered to be 1.
e. Units defending against Reaction Fire receive TEM for the hex in
which they are located (exception IP).
f. All applicable DRMs apply.
g. If a unit is subject to both an Overrun attack and a CAT (whether
separately or via a Panzer Blitz Assault), the unit may reaction
fire against both the unit(s) conducting the Overrun Attack and
against the units conducting the CAT, assuming the defending
unit survives the Overrun Attack.
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
8.1.5 Overrun Reaction Fire: One Overrunning hex is subject to Reaction fire. (7.9)
8.1.6 The attack is resolved using the DF combat resolution methods.
One die roll is used to resolve both types of combat if both attack types
are made versus a single hex, with appropriate DRM’s applied to the
die roll for each type of combat.
8.1.7 The Overrun attack receives a net -2 DRM (-1 for Overrun, and -1
for range 1). Additionally Infantry being overrun in Open terrain suffer
an additional -1 DRM (net DRM -3)
8.1.8 The results of the attack are applied normally.
8.1.9 If, as a result of an Overrun attack, all defending units in a hex are
eliminated, any or all Overrunning units may move into the target hex.
Stacking limits must be met immediately after such movement and before the resolution of any other Overruns. There is no additional movement point cost. Because there is no movement cost associated with
this movement, it does not trigger Opportunity Fire. Units participating
in the Overrun may continue to move (and may even Overrun again) if
they have remaining movement allowance.
8.1.10 If an armor unit that starts adjacent to a target cannot Overrun
a hex due to the 2 additional movement point cost, that unit may Overrun the adjacent hex as long as the Overrunning unit could enter that
hex using normal movement, no road bonus, but suffers a +1 die roll
9
modifier per additional movement point required for a normal Overrun.
The Overrunning unit may move no further and is marked Spent upon
resolution of the Overrun.
8.2 Overrun Attack Restrictions
The following section contains various restrictions on Overrunning units.
8.2.1 Attacker Restrictions
There are certain restrictions on attacking units participating in an
Overrun attack:
8.2.1.1 All of the units involved in an Overrun attack must move one
after the other, followed immediately by the resolution of the attack
after the last unit has moved. Once the first attacking unit is moved,
only other units involved in the attack may move until that attack is
resolved.
there is more than one attacking unit, no attacking units may split their
attack values among different types of defending units.
9.1.7 If there is only a single attacking unit, that single attacking unit
may (attacker’s choice) split its attack factors in half (dropping all fractions) applying the relevant value to each defending type of unit(s).
9.1.8 CAT Reaction Fire: One hex containing attacking CAT units is
subject to Reaction fire. (7.9)
9.1.9 Combat odds/difference are determined as in DF and resolved
on the DFT with all applicable DRMs. CAT attacks receive a -3 overall
DRM (-1 for CAT, -2 for range 0).
9.1.10 If at least one Engineer unit participated in the attack, an additional -1 DRM is applied.
9.1.11 If armor is attacked in a town or city hex, an additional -1 DRM is
applied.
8.2.1.2 All attacking units must have a LoS to the target hex before
moving, and at least one unit in the target hex must have been Spotted before any of the attacking units have moved.
9.1.12 One dice roll is used to resolve both types of combat if both attack types are made versus a single hex.
8.2.1.3 Overrunning units may not use Road Movement bonus in
the Movement in which they conduct the Overrun attack. This also
precludes the use of roads to negate other terrain costs.
If, as a result of CAT attack all of the defending units are eliminated,
any attacking units that participated in the CAT attack may move into
the target hex and occupy any IP or Fortification. Stacking limits must
be met immediately after such movement and before the resolution of
any other CAT attacks. There is no movement point cost for this movement; therefore it does not trigger Opportunity Fire.
8.2.1.4 All of the units involved in an Overrun attack must be Overrun
capable as defined above.
8.2.1.5 AFVs may not carry passengers into an Overrun attack. (Exception: 10.0 Panzer Blitz Assault).
8.2.1.6 Overrunning units may originate from different hexes and
enter/exit the Overrun attack through different hexes, but the Overrun
must be combined into one attack event.
8.2.1.7 Units conducting an overrun may not overrun an enemy unit
adjacent to a bridge from a bridge hex or bridge hexside
Example: A unit in 4114 may not pass through 4315 to Overrun a unit
in 4316. If the target was in 4317 it would be permissible to use the
bridge. A unit starting in 4106 could overrun via 4105-4104 to a target
in 4203 because the bridge would not actually have been crossed.
8.2.2 Target Hex and Terrain Restrictions
There are certain restrictions to Overrun attacks based on the target
hex and terrain within it:
8.2.3 An Overrun attack may not be initiated against units in a Woods,
Town, City, or Swamp hex.
8.2.4 An Overrun attack may not be initiated against units in a hex with
a Minefield, Block, Fortification counter, Gully, or non-enterable terrain.
8.2.5 No hex may be the target of an Overrun attack more than once in
a single Operation. Mark the Overrun hex with an OVR marker.
9.0 Close Assault Tactics (CAT)
CAT attacks represent ‘infantry only’ attacks at close quarters in which
they attempt to overwhelm an enemy position. This often includes handto-hand combat.
9.1 CAT Procedures
The general procedures for CAT attacks are as follows:
9.1.1 Units move one at a time as per normal movement rules. Upon
completion of each unit’s movement, if that unit is participating in a CAT
attack, the player must declare their intent and mark the unit with a CAT
marker.
9.1.2 Each CAT attack is resolved at the end of movement.
9.1.3 All attacking units must be adjacent to the defending hex, having
expended one or less movement points.
9.1.3.1 Units in an Improved Position (IP) must spend 1 MP to exit that
IP in order to execute a CAT attack. If at the conclusion of the CAT attack, the attacking unit does not advance into the CAT target hex, the
attacking unit may re-enter the IP position just exited.
9.1.4 After the resolution of any Reaction Fire, the attacker may then
select which type or types (AP or AT) of units to be attacked.
9.1.5 All defending units of a given type must be attacked as a combined defense using the DF rules (7.0).
9.1.6 If more than one attacking unit is involved in the CAT attack, the
attacking units may be assigned to attack different types of units. When
10
9.1.13 Advance After Combat
9.2 CAT Restrictions
The following restrictions apply to all CAT attacks.
9.2.1 A unit that was a Passenger at any time during Movement cannot
participate in a CAT attack (Exception: 10.0).
9.2.2 A unit that uses Road Movement during the Movement cannot participate in a CAT attack. (This also precludes use of Roads to
negate other terrain costs.)
9.2.3 A unit in a Minefield hex cannot participate in a CAT attack.
9.2.4 A CAT attack may not be made against a unit in a Minefield hex.
9.2.5 CAT attacks may not be made across a bridge if that bridge is
impassible.
10.0 Panzer Blitz Assaults
Panzer Blitz assaults are a style of Blitzkrieg warfare, where infantry
units riding on armored fighting vehicles (AFVs) and half-tracks CAT attack hexes immediately after the Carrier units have Overrun them.
10.1 Panzer Blitz Assault Procedure
Infantry units riding on armored fighting vehicles or in half-tracks may
unload adjacent to the enemy hex in the hex occupied by the transporting unit at no cost in movement points. The AFV or half-track unit(s)
must then conduct an Overrun attack on the hex, followed by the unloaded infantry making a CAT attack, which is immediately resolved.
10.1.1 Panzer Blitz assaults must be declared before the first participating unit conducts its movement.
10.1.2 Like other Passengers, infantry riding on AFVs during a Panzer
Blitz assault have a Defense Strength of 1 and may be attacked separately from the transporting unit until the moment they unload. (Exception: Infantry riding on half-tracks may not be attacked separately from
the half-tracks.)
10.1.3 Infantry in half-tracks use the armored defense value of the
transporting unit.
10.1.4 Stacking limitations must be observed at all times during the
conduct of a Panzer Blitz assault. Any units found in violation must
apply 2.3.5.3
10.1.5 If the AFV or half-track units eliminate all the enemy units in the
target hex, the transported infantry can still advance (with or without
the armor) even though they did not perform a CAT attack.
10.2 Panzer Blitz Assault Restrictions
In all other respects the restrictions, procedures, and movement costs of
Overruns and CAT are followed.
10.2.1 Only German and Russian infantry may Panzer Blitz assault
from AFV units. Any nationality may Panzer Blitz assault from half-track
Carriers. Panzer Blitz assaults are not allowed from non-Overruncapable units.
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
11.0 Indirect Fire and Artillery Units
Indirect Fire (IF) represents the use of artillery fire delivered from rear
area units at long ranges. Forward Combat units that are directly observing the target often call in this type of fire. IF also represents close-support mortar fire from attached units. The unit executing an IF attack is not
required to have a clear LoS to the target, but if they do not have a clear
LoS, then a Spotter is required. Only units that have an ‘IF’ (red range
number) or ‘M’ shown as their Special Capability may conduct IF attacks.
11.1 Artillery Request (AR) Markers
Indirect Artillery attacks are a two-step process. First each attack is
‘requested’ by a Forward Observer (11.2) during an Operation (Artillery
Request) and, second, the attack is resolved during the Administration
segment of the same turn.
11.1.1 To request Indirect Artillery fire, the Phasing Player places an AR
marker on the desired hex. The type of mission requested is determined by the reverse side of the AR marker and is either an ‘HE’ for
a normal IF attack using High Explosive, or ‘Smoke’ for requesting a
Smoke attack. (12.0) The type of marker selected at the time of request
determines the type of attack to be resolved. AR markers are placed
with AR side up.
11.1.2 Restrictions on AR Placement
There are three restrictions on where the AR markers may be placed:
a. A spotter or FO (11.2) who is allowed to spot for the artillery
piece must have a clear LoS to the target hex (but any enemy
units in the target hex don’t necessarily have to be Spotted).
b. The target hex must be in range of the artillery unit
c. Neither the artillery unit nor the unit spotting for it may be
marked with a Spent or Disrupted marker at the time of AR
placement.
11.1.3 Onboard attacking units are marked with a Spent marker when
the attack is declared.
11.2 Forward Observers (FO)
Forward Observers are Combat units that are capable of directly observing a target.
11.2.1 Forward Observers (FO) can be any Infantry type units or those
designated by SN.
11.2.2 FO units are free to conduct DF but may not move, participate in
CAT, or participate in Panzer Blitz attacks in the turn in which they act
as a FO. Mark the FO unit with a No Move marker, which is removed at
the end of the turn.
11.2.3 A Spent unit may not act as a FO.
11.2.4 Using a unit as a FO does not cause the unit to become Spent
or Spotted.
11.2.5 Each AR requires a separate Forward Observer.
11.2.6 The elimination or disruption of an FO does not stop the IF attack.
11.3 Indirect Fire Resolution
IF is resolved in the Administration segment of the current turn in which
the AR Marker was placed. Resolve IF as follows:
1. Determine Accuracy (11.3.1)
2. Resolve the Attack (11.3.2)
11.3.1 Accuracy
Example: A Mortar (M) unit uses IF against a hex within its range
containing 2 infantry units and an AFV, the units in the hex having been
spotted by a FO. To resolve, the Mortar attacks the hex three times twice using AP against the infantry units, and once using AT.
11.3.3 Residual Effects of HE
After resolving an HE attack on a hex through IF, place an HE marker
on the hex (found on the reverse side of the Block marker). This marker
stays in place until the beginning of the next Administration segment.
Units attacking from a hex with an HE marker in place suffer a +1 to all
Direct Fire
11.3.4 Multiple Firing Units
Normally, each Indirect Firing unit has its attack resolved separately.
However, in certain cases, multiple IF attackers may combine their
attacks into one attack. In order to do this, the IF units must be in the
same or adjacent hexes and they must use the same FO. The combining of attack factors is calculated as in DF. (7.0) Multiple Off-board
artillery may not be combined into one attack.
11.3.5 Cancellation
An IF attack may be cancelled either voluntarily or involuntarily during
the Phasing Player’s Administration segment, before any adjustments
or resolution, by simply removing the AR marker.
11.3.6 Involuntary Cancellation
If at any time between the Artillery Request marker placement and the
resolution of the IF attack the participating attacking unit(s) is Disrupted, takes a step loss, or is eliminated, the attack is cancelled and the
corresponding AR marker is removed.
11.3.7 SMOKE: Some units are allowed to fire SMOKE instead of a
normal IF attack. (See Smoke, 12.0)
11.3.8 Self-Observed Indirect Fire: An artillery unit with a red range
number may direct its own fire if it can trace a LoS to a SPOTTED unit
within 6 hexes. The attack is resolved using DF resolution (7.0) immediately.
11.3.9 All units that conduct IF are marked with a Spent marker.
11.4 Mortars
Mortars (Combat units with a Special Capability of ‘M’) are, in all respects, treated as artillery; with two exceptions:
11.4.1 Mortars that can trace a direct LoS to a target within its range
may attack that target with DF.
11.4.2 Mortars using a FO as a spotter resolve their IF immediately
during Step 2-a of the sequence of play; that is, with no delay between
the Artillery Request and the resolution of the attack. All other rules
regarding IF still apply.
11.5 Pre-registered Hexes
Situation Notes may allow a player to select a number of hexes as
pre-registered hexes. These hexes are considered to have been under
observation for considerable time before the Situation, and artillery has
been registered to fire on these hexes. This gives some benefits to the IF
attacks.
11.5.1 IF attacks against pre-registered hexes are resolved immediately as requested, during Step 2-a of the sequence of play - similar to
mortars. The requirements for placing an Artillery Request marker are
the same as normal IF, and the fire is resolved normally.
Artillery Request markers may become scattered and/or drift. To
determine if they do, roll two dice for each AR marker placed and refer
to the Indirect Fire Scatter Chart to obtain the results. Add appropriate
modifiers.
12.0 Smoke
11.3.2 Resolution
Certain artillery units have the capability to fire a Smoke concentration
when using IF. These units are identified with an ‘S’ symbol or by SN.
The hex with the AR marker is now attacked with IF, and the attack
strength is applied separately, with its own dice roll, against each unit in
the target hex using the Anti-Personnel or Anti-Tank Combat Procedures. The results of these attacks are applied individually, as they occur. (Note: An X result only affects targeted units in the hex, non-target
units are not affected by the DD) If the result of one IF attack disrupts a
unit in the target hex, that unit is considered Disrupted for the resolution
of any following IF attacks that turn.
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
11.5.2 Pre-registered hexes are available by SN only or in Do-it-Yourself Situations.
12.1 Smoke Firing Procedure
Smoke attacks are handled in exactly the same manner as normal IF
attacks except for the following:
12.2 Effects of Smoke
Smoke counters stay on the board, and are in effect for two game turns.
11
12.2.1 When an unscattered Smoke counter is first placed, it is placed
with its ‘Smoke 1’ side showing, while scattered smoke is placed with
its ‘Smoke 2’ side showing. During the Administration Segment of every
turn, all SMOKE 2 counters are removed and all SMOKE 1 counters are
flipped to their SMOKE 2 side.
12.2.2 Smoke counters are an Obstacle to LoS and are considered
Inherent Terrain. They are considered to be obstacles at ALL elevations
and LoS can NEVER be traced through them, regardless of elevation.
12.2.3 Smoke counters may not be placed in All-water, Swamp or Situation defined River hexes.
12.2.4 Units in a Smoke hex are considered to be in a non-Clear hex
for spotting purposes. (i.e. Units can see into smoke hexes and attack
units therein.)
12.2.5 Entering a smoke hex cost 1 extra movement point per hex.
12.2.6 All DF into a SMOKE hex receives a +1 DRM on the DFT. All fire
originating from a SMOKE hex suffers a +2 DRM on all fire tables.
13.0 Efficiency
Efficiency represents a combination of many things: training, coordination, cohesion, quality of leadership, and morale of the formations fighting in the Situation. Each side in a Situation is given an Efficiency Rating
from 5 (Green) to 9 (Elite). This rating affects a player’s ability to recover
units from disruption, and perform various other game functions.
13.1 Recovering from Disruption
During an Operation, the phasing player may attempt to recover Disrupted units by making a Recovery roll. The Phasing Player rolls two dice
for each Disrupted unit within the range of the Ops chit drawn. If the die
roll is less than or equal to the Efficiency rating of the unit, the recovery
attempt is successful.
•
If the unit was Disrupted (not Spent/Disrupted), they become
fresh and the Disrupted marker is removed from the unit.
•
If the unit was marked with a Spent/Disrupted marker and recovers, then the unit is marked with a Spent marker.
•
If the unit fails its Recovery roll, it is marked with a Spent/Disrupted marker (if not already so marked).
13.1.1 Units may not attempt to recover during an Operation in which
they become disrupted.
13.1.2 Units that are marked Spent/Disrupted receive a +3 on their
Recovery rolls.
13.1.3 Units in terrain with a positive DRM to DF receive a -1 on their
Recovery rolls. (Exception: IPs and Hull Down markers do not count as
terrain for this rule)
13.1.4 Catastrophic Result - Any unit that rolls a natural die roll of 12
(double-six) while trying to recover from disruption takes a step-loss
and is marked Spent/Disrupted. If the unit is already reduced, it is
eliminated instead.
13.2 Efficiency Rolls
To perform certain actions, a unit may be required to pass an Efficiency
Roll. By passing the roll, the unit may perform the action. (Section
15.4.3.1)
14.0 Terrain
The map boards are a two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional area. The various types of terrain affect movement, line of sight,
spotting, and combat, and various other factors, explained below.
14.1 Clear Terrain
Clear terrain consists of any hex devoid of other terrain or artificial terrain
features.
14.1.1 Movement: All wheeled vehicles pay a cost of 2 movement points
to enter Clear hex. All other units enter a Clear hex at a cost of 1 movement point.
14.1.2 Stacking: No effect.
14.1.3 LoS: No effect.
(30 hexes for an Observation Aircraft)
14.1.8 Target Selection: No effect.
14.1.9 Artificial Terrain: No effect.
14.2 Towns and Cities
In game terms, a Town hex is any hex with urban terrain (i.e. buildings)
represented in brown. A City hex is any hex with urban terrain (i.e. buildings) represented in black.
14.2.1 Movement: Entering a Town/City hex from an adjacent Town/
City hex or from a hex using the Road movement bonus costs ½ movement point. Otherwise it costs 1 movement point to enter a Town/City
hex.
Units may not use the Road bonus rate through City/Town hexes on the
same turn they conduct an Overrun attack.
14.2.2 Stacking: City hexes have the same stacking limit as other
hexes, but all vehicle units in a City/Town hex count as double the
Stacking Points. (E.g. A full strength Vehicle platoon counts as TWO
full strength platoons.)
14.2.3 LoS: Town and City hexes are considered a Level One obstacle
to LoS.
Town and City hexes are considered Inherent Terrain. (5.5)
14.2.4 Overrun: Overrun attacks may not be executed against units in
a Town or City hex.
14.2.5 Terrain Effects Modifier (TEM): Town hexes give defenders
a +2 DRM against all attacks. City hexes give defenders a +3 DRM
against all attacks.
14.2.6 CAT TEM: CAT attacks from City hexes against vehicular units
in City hexes receive an additional -1 DRM.
14.2.7 Spotting: To be spotted an enemy unit must be within three
hexes (5 for Observation Aircraft)
14.2.8 Target Selection: Attacking units must select a single target
type. If an armored type unit is chosen, then only one armored unit
can be attacked. (See 7.3.2) If a non-Armored unit is chosen, then all
non-Armored units in the hex must be attacked as one target.
Example: A Town hex is occupied by two infantry and one armored
unit. The attacker must attack either BOTH infantry together or the armored unit. The attacker may not target a single infantry unit; rather,
both must be selected.
14.2.9 Artificial Terrain: No effect.
14.3 Roads
Units traveling along Roads do so at the Road movement cost regardless
of other terrain in the Road hexes traversed. Units may thus enter hexes
containing Prohibited terrain as long as entry of those hexes qualifies
as Road movement as outlined below. Roads do not alter the defensive
effects of other terrain in a hex.
14.3.1 Movement: Units may freely switch between Road and nonRoad movement, as long as such a switch would not violate entry into
prohibited terrain.
14.3.1.1 All units expend ½ movement point per Road hex while using
Road movement. A unit is considered moving along the Road if it
enters the Road hex crossing a hexside that is also crossed by the
Road that is being utilized.
14.3.1.2 Units entering a Road hex through a non-Road hexside or
that wish to switch from one road to another non-connected road in
the same hex must pay the movement cost of other terrain in the hex
in addition to any costs for the hexside crossed and is not considered
to be moving along the Road.
14.3.2 Stacking: No effect.
14.3.3 LoS: No effect.
14.3.4 Overrun: Units may not use road movement bonus in the Operation in which they conduct and Overrun attack.
14.3.5 TEM: No effect.
14.1.4 Overrun: No effect.
14.3.6 CAT TEM: Units may not use road movement bonus in the Operation in which they conduct and CAT attack.
14.1.5 TEM: No effect.
14.3.7 Spotting: No effect.
14.1.6 CAT TEM: No effect.
14.3.8 Target Selection: No effect.
14.1.7 Spotting: To be spotted, an enemy unit must be within 20 hexes
14.3.9 Artificial Terrain: Units may not use Road movement costs to en-
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©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
ter hexes containing Blocks or Fortifications. Entering a Minefield using
Road movement does not negate the Minefield attack.
14.4 Woods
Units in Woods hexes are subject to the following restrictions.
14.4.1 Movement: The movement cost for wheeled units to enter a
Woods hex from a non-Woods hex is 3 movement points. Tracked units
pay a movement cost of 2 movement points. Leg units pay a movement
cost of 1 movement point.
14.4.1.1 Wheeled units may not enter a second Woods hex from an
initial Woods hex unless it is using Road movement.
14.4.1.2 Tracked units may enter a second Woods hex from a nonroad Woods hex only by expending their entire movement allowance.
14.4.2 Stacking: No effect.
14.4.3 LoS: Woods are considered a level one obstacle for LoS
purposes, and are not Inherent Terrain. For Woods to block LoS, the
string stretched between the two hexes must pass through the Woods
depiction.
14.4.4 Overrun: Overrun attacks may not be executed against units in
a Woods hex.
14.4.5 TEM: Units defending in a Woods hex receive a +1 DRM to the
combat die roll for all non-IF attacks. Infantry (Leg), Truck, and Wagon
units in a Woods hex defending against IF attacks receive a -1 DRM to
the combat roll, all others receive a +1 DRM.
14.4.6 CAT TEM: No effect.
14.4.7 Spotting: To be spotted, an enemy unit must be within three
hexes (five for an Observation Aircraft).
14.4.8 Target Selection: If the target is an armored type unit, then only
one armored unit can be attacked. (See 7.3.2) When attacking nonArmored targets, all non-Armored units must be attacked as one unit.
Example: A Woods hex occupied by two infantry and an armor unit.
The attacker must attack either BOTH infantry or the armor. The attacker may not target a single infantry unit; rather, both must be selected.
14.4.9 Artificial Terrain: No effect.
14.5 Swamp
Units in Swamp hexes are subject to the following restrictions.
14.5.1 Movement: No vehicle unit (tracked or wheeled) may enter or
exit a Swamp hex except when using Road movement.
The movement cost for infantry units to enter a Swamp hex is all of their
movement allowance per hex entered. (In other words, one hex per
turn.)
14.5.2 Stacking: No effect.
14.5.3 LoS: Swamp hexes are considered a level one obstacle to LoS.
Swamp hexes are considered Inherent Terrain. (5.5)
14.5.4 Overrun: Overrun attacks may not be made against units defending in a Swamp.
14.5.5 TEM: Non-vehicular units defending in a Swamp hex receive a
+1 DRM to the combat roll.
The movement cost to exit a Gully is an additional 2 movement points
for wheeled vehicles and an additional 1 movement point for all others. This cost is in addition to any terrain costs for the hex entered.
14.6.1.2 Stream Movement: The cost to enter or exit a stream hex
while not crossing the stream hex side is the same as other terrain in
that hex. The cost to cross a stream hexside is all of a unit’s movement points.
14.6.1.3 Deep Stream Movement: Only foot units may cross a Deep
Stream hexside, expending all their movement points.
14.6.1.4 River Movement: No unit may enter a scenario-defined River
hex except using Fords or undestroyed Bridges unless the unit is
Amphibious.
14.6.1.4.1 River Hexsides: Hexside water obstacles can be Situation defined as rivers and have the same limitations as Rivers, see
section 14.6.1.4. Hexes containing situation defined river hexsides
are not considered river hexes, their type is determined by the hex
center dot.
14.6.2 Stacking: No effect.
14.6.3 LOS:
14.6.3.1 Gullies and Streams only affect LoS as in section 5.6. However, other terrain in their hex may affect LoS.
14.6.3.2 Treat units on River hexes as in Clear terrain for LoS purposes.
14.6.4 Overrun: No effect.
14.6.5 TEM: Units defending in a Gully, Stream, or Deep Stream hex
(and not on a Bridge) receive a +1 DRM from any attack. (Exception:
Minefields 14.2).
14.6.6 CAT TEM: No effect.
14.6.7 Spotting: No effect.
14.6.8 Target Selection: No effect.
14.6.9 Artificial Terrain: No effect.
14.7 Bridges and Fords
Permanent and temporary Bridges and Fords are equivalent to Clear terrain for all purposes, except as defined below.
14.7.1 Movement: For purposes of movement, Bridges and Fords
are considered as other terrain in the hex If any Roads through them
are unusable for Road rate purposes due to the presence of Wrecks,
Blocks or other units then use of road rate is not allowed. Units may
choose either road rate or normal rate to cross a bridge.
14.7.2 Stacking: No effect.
14.7.3 LoS: No effect.
14.7.4 Overrun Bridges may be crossed while moving towards an Overrun, but a bridge may not be in the last hex entered before the units
being overrun. (See 8.2.1.7)
14.7.5 TEM: Any hex containing a destroyed Bridge is considered to be
the defined Stream type or River as defined by SSR or a normal Stream
hex if not defined.
14.5.6 CAT TEM: No effect.
14.7.6 CAT TEM: CAT attacks may NOT be made across Bridge hexes
if the bridged obstacle is impassable.
14.5.7 Spotting: To be spotted, an enemy unit must be within three
hexes (five for an Observation Aircraft).
14.7.7 Spotting: No effect.
14.5.8 Target Selection: No effect.
14.7.9 Artificial Terrain: No effect.
14.5.9 Artificial Terrain: No effect.
14.6 Gullies, Streams and Rivers
Gullies, Streams, and small Rivers are often characterized by steepsided meanders and silted bottoms. Further, they form depressions and
support heavy vegetation offering excellent concealment. While not
always exceptionally swift, the depth of slow moving waters makes most
Streams unfordable by vehicles.
Deep Streams: Units in Deep Stream or River hexes may not conduct an
attack in any manner.
14.6.1 Movement
14.6.1.1 Gully Movement: The movement cost to enter a Gully is the
same as other terrain in that hex. The contiguous Gully-to-Gully cost
is 1 MP.
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
14.7.8 Target Selection: No effect.
14.8 Lakes, Oceans and Beaches
Units in Lake, Ocean, or Beach hexes are subject to the following restrictions.
14.8.1 Movement
14.8.1.1 Lake and Ocean Movement: Lake and Ocean hexes may
only be entered by Amphibious vehicles and those units being transported by Amphibious vehicles or landing craft.
14.8.1.2 Beach Movement: The movement cost for wheeled vehicle
units to enter a Beach hex is 3 movement points and 2 movement
points for tracked vehicles. Leg units pay a movement cost of 1 movement point.
14.8.2 Stacking: No effect.
13
14.8.3 LoS: No effect.
14.8.4 Overrun: No effect.
14.8.5 TEM (Beach): Units defending in a Beach hex receive a -1 DRM
from any attack. (Exception: 14.2.3 Minefield attack).
14.8.6 CAT TEM: No effect.
14.8.7 Spotting: No effect.
14.8.8 Target Selection: No effect.
14.8.9 Artificial Terrain: No effect.
14.9 Slopes
Slope hexsides have the following characteristics.
14.9.1 Movement: Any unit crossing a Slope hex side to arrive at a hex
with a center dot at a higher elevation by any means other than using
Road movement rate must pay an additional cost in movement points.
Wheeled units pay an additional 2 movement points and Tracked units
pay an additional 1 movement point. Infantry units pay no additional
movement cost. This is in addition to any other terrain costs for entering
the hex.
Note: The Churchill tank and its variants do not pay additional movement points to cross a Slope. This includes Churchills, Avres, and
Crocodiles.
14.9.2 Stacking : No effect.
14.9.3 LoS: Slope hexsides block line of sight when that line of sight
passes along (but not across) the Slope depiction.
or a fortification counter, place a reduced strength Wreck counter worth 1
stacking point. If the unit was reduced strength or a fortification counter,
place a reduced strength Wreck counter worth 1 stacking point. Wrecks
count as vehicles for stacking purposes.
15.1.1 Wrecks may not be moved or removed from play.
15.1.2 Units in a wreck location receive a +1 DRM on all attacks.
15.1.3 Any unit entering a hex containing a Wreck counter pays an additional 1 movement point in addition to any other terrain costs.
15.1.4 Any hex containing a wreck counter has its stacking capacity
reduced by the value of that Wreck counter.
15.1.5 A Wreck counter negates road movement cost benefits (14.3).
15.1.6 No more than two Stacking Points of Wrecks may occupy a hex.
Subsequent Wrecks within a hex are not placed.
15.2 Minefields
A Situation may, as part of its initial units, give one or both players Minefield counters. Minefield counters are marked ‘Minefield’ on the front and
have one of 4 strengths on the reverse side (1-1, 2-1, 3-1 or Dummy).
15.2.1 During the initial placement of the Minefield counters, a player
may exchange Minefields for different types, only as described below:
Mine Exchange Chart
Existing Mine
Trade For
14.9.4 Overrun: No effect.
2-1 (x1)
1-1 (x2)
14.9.5 TEM
2-1 (x2)
3-1 (x1)
14.9.5.1 Height Advantage: Any attack, using DF mechanics, in which
the firing unit has a height advantage over the defender receives a -1
DRM.
14.9.5.2 Height Disadvantage: Any DF Fire attack in which the firer is
at a lower elevation than the target receives a +1 DRM.
Note: Dummy Minefields may not be traded.
15.2.2 Placement Restrictions - Only one Minefield counter may be
placed per hex.
14.9.7 Spotting: No effect.
15.2.2.1 Minefield counters may not be placed in All-water hexes,
Swamp hexes, Stream hexes or in hexes containing Fortifications or
Improved Positions unless designated by SN.
14.9.8 Target Selection; No effect.
15.2.2.2 Once placed, Minefields may not be moved
14.9.9 Artificial Terrain: No effect.
15.2.2.3 Minefields have no friendly side and affect units from either
player equally.
14.9.6 CAT TEM: No effect.
14.10 Orchards
Units in Orchard hexes are subject to the following restrictions.
14.10.1 Movement: The movement cost for Wheeled units to enter an
Orchard hex is 2 movement points. All other units pay 1 movement
point.
14.10.2 Stacking: No effect.
14.10.3 LoS: Orchards are considered a level one obstacle for LoS
purposes and block LOS through any part of the interior of the hex,
not the hexside unless the hexside is common to two adjacent orchard
hexes. (See 5.5.3)
14.10.4 Overrun: No effect.
14.10.5 TEM: Units in an Orchard hex defending against DF, Close Assault, and Overrun attacks receive a +1 DRM to the combat roll. There
is no modifier for IF.
14.10.6 CAT TEM: No effect.
14.10.7 Spotting: To be spotted, an enemy unit must be within five
hexes (five hexes for an Observation Aircraft).
14.10.8 Target Selection: No effect.
14.10.9 Artificial Terrain: No effect.
15.0 Artificial Terrain and Positional Defenses
Many terrain features are manmade and temporary in nature and therefore not printed on the mapboard. In this case, counters symbolizing the
features are provided. All artificial terrain and positional defenses use the
spotting rules for the terrain in which they are placed, except fortifications
which are treated as towns.
15.1 Wrecks
Whenever an Armored unit or Fortification counter is destroyed in a
Road/Bridge, City or Town hex, it is removed and replaced with a Wreck
counter. If the unit was reduced strength, or full strength losing one step,
14
15.2.2.4 Minefields may only be removed by Engineer units (17.1).
15.2.3 Minefield Attack Resolution - As soon as a unit moves onto a
Minefield counter, it must stop and end its movement.
15.2.3.1 If previously unrevealed, the owning player now reveals the
strength of the Minefield counter by flipping it. If it is a dummy, it is
immediately removed from play and the moving unit may continue to
move. If the Minefield revealed is not a dummy, the Minefield attack
is resolved immediately. The moving unit is immediately attacked
using the strength listed on the Minefield counter as the combat odds
column on the DFT. There are no DRMs to this attack, both armor
and infantry are attacked using the indicated column. Surviving, nonDisrupted units are stacked beneath the Minefield counter and may
move out of the hex in any following turn without being attacked by
the Minefield again.
15.2.3.2 Units Disrupted by Minefields that do not recover from
disruption may not move out of the Minefield hex until they recover.
Units do not suffer additional Minefield attacks while Disrupted in a
Minefield, but once they recover from disruption and attempt to exit
the hex, they are immediately attacked by the Minefield prior to moving. If they survive non-Disrupted, they may proceed to move as they
are able.
15.2.3.3 Minefield attacks take precedence over other attacks in the
same hex (Example: Opportunity Fire).
15.2.3.4 If a Carrier unit is forced to unload passengers due to results
of Opportunity Fire, this ‘movement’ triggers a new Minefield attack
versus the unloading passengers, which is resolved immediately.
15.2.4 A Minefield is never “used up” and remains active until removed
by an engineer unit.
15.2.5 Minefield counters do not count toward the stacking limit of a
hex.
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
15.3 Blocks
15.4.7 Improved Positions are not an obstacle to LoS.
Block counters represent tank traps, roadblocks, barbed wire, felled
trees, and other manmade impediments to movement. They are given to
one or both players in the Situation setup. (Exception 15.3.4)
15.4.8 It costs one movement point to enter or exit an Improved Position.
15.3.1 Blocks may be placed anywhere within a player’s set-up area
with the following restrictions:
15.3.1.1 Blocks may not be set-up in All-Water hexes or hexes containing Improved Positions or Fortifications, unless directed by SN.
15.3.1.2 No more than one Block may be set up in a hex.
15.3.2 Only infantry units may enter a Block hex if it begins its movement adjacent to the hex containing the Block, and as long as it is
otherwise allowed to enter the hex per other restrictions. Upon entering
the hex, the unit must stop and may move no further that turn. NonDisrupted units are placed beneath the Block counter. In any following
movement Operation, any non-Disrupted unit under a Block marker
may continue normal movement if otherwise allowed.
15.3.2.1 Blocks do not obstruct LoS and have no effect on combat.
15.3.2.2 Blocks count as 2 full-strength platoons (4 Stacking Points)
and negate road movement rate.
15.3.2.3 A Block counter on a Bridge or Ford likewise negates any
roads used in that hex. The movement effects of the Block (15.3.2)
are utilized instead of the normal terrain costs.
15.3.3 Blocks may only be removed by engineer units. (17.3.2)
15.3.4 During a Situation, Engineer units may create’ blocks. (17.3.1)
15.4 Improved Positions (IPs)
Improved Positions (IPs) represent hastily constructed defensive positions including temporary foxholes, felled trees, and similar modifications
to the natural terrain. The Situation card may allot either player with IP
counters to place during situation setup. A player may also create IPs
during play. A unit is considered to be within the IP when it is placed
beneath the IP counter.
15.4.1 Improved Positions can be placed or created anywhere within
a player’s set-up area except in Swamp, All-Water, Beach, Gully, and
Stream hexes. They cannot be placed or created in hexes with Blocks,
Mines, or Fortifications. Once placed, IPs cannot be moved.
15.4.9 Guns with zero MPs may enter/exit an IP in lieu of firing and are
marked Spent.
15.5 Fortifications
Fortifications represent larger, more permanent, manmade defenses
such as pillboxes and bunkers. They are given to one or both players in
the Situation setup and come in various strengths.
15.5.1 Fortifications can be placed anywhere within a player’s set-up
area except in Swamp, All-water, Beach, Town, City, Gully, and Stream
hexes. They cannot be placed in hexes with Blocks, Minefields, or Improved Positions. (Exception: Placement based on SN) Once placed,
Fortifications cannot be moved.
15.5.2 Units in a hex with a Fortification, as with IPs, may be IN or OUT
of the Fortification. Place units that are in the Fortification under the
Fortification counter and those not in it on top of the counter. Fortifications do not count toward the stacking limits of a hex, but like a Carrier
Unit, a Fortification does have a capacity that reflects the maximum
number of Stacking Points that may be in the Fortification at any one
time. This stacking capacity is shown on the counter. Unlike a Carrier,
the number of Stacking Points within a Fortification does count toward
the stacking limits of a hex.
15.5.3 Units in a Fortification defend using the Defensive Strength of
the Fortification in place of their own. All defending units must be attacked together as one unit and may not be targeted individually. They
may not combine their defense strength with units outside the Fortification. Fortifications are treated as Armored targets. In addition, units
defending in a Fortification receive a +2 DRM to all attack die rolls.
15.5.4 Units in a fortification are treated as if in a town for spotting
purposes (see 6.0)
15.5.5 Combat results are applied normally to units inside a Fortification. A Fortification is not removed/destroyed in combat unless an
unmodified 3 or lower is rolled on a positive AT attack roll. In such
cases, they are replaced with a Wreck counter (15.1).
15.5.6 No more than one Fortification may occupy a hex.
15.4.2 Improved Position counters do not count toward the stacking
limits of a hex, however only one IP may exist in a hex. The Stacking
capacity within an IP is 4 Stacking Points
15.5.7 Overrun attacks may not be made against a units in a Fortification. Units in a hex containing a Fortification, but not in the Fortification, may be overran.
15.4.3 Improved Position Creation and Removal: An IP may be created
by non-vehicular units only.
15.5.8 Units in a Fortification may not participate in CAT attacks.
15.4.3.1 An IP may only be created by a non-Disrupted unit that
is not marked with a Spent marker, and that has not yet expended
any movement points in that Operation. To create an IP, the player
declares that an activated unit is building an IP at the beginning of an
Operation (prior to Artillery Requests) and expends all of the unit’s
movement allowance in its current hex. The unit must then pass an
Efficiency Roll. (13.0) An IP is then placed in that hex at the end of
that Operation, after Disruption Recovery. The creating unit may
immediately be placed below the IP counter as well as any friendly
non-Spent units occupying the same hex up to the stacking limit of
the IP. Once it is created (regardless of which player created it), an IP
may be entered by any non-vehicular unit.
15.4.3.2 An IP is removed in a similar fashion. A unit must begin its
turn in the hex with the IP, be non-Disrupted, not marked with a Spent
marker, and must expend its entire movement allowance to remove
the IP. It does not need to be the same unit that created the IP, but no
unit may be currently occupying the IP when it is removed. The same
procedure (in regards to Phases and markers) is followed as above in
Creation of an IP.
15.4.4 Units defending in an IP receive a +1 DRM to all attacks made
against them.
15.4.5 Both the creation and the removal of an IP qualify as movement
for the purpose of Opportunity Fire. In both cases, any Opportunity Fire
attack must be declared immediately after the announcement that a
unit is building/removing an IP, and the attack is resolved WITHOUT
the defensive benefit of the IP. If the creating unit is Disrupted, Reduced, or Eliminated, the IP is not placed/removed.
15.5.9 It costs one movement point to enter or exit a Fortification.
15.6 Hull-Down
Only vehicular units may enter Hull-Down status. This represents the unit
finding preferable firing/defense positions in the small elevation undulations that exist in real life but are too minor to display on the map as a
slope or depression.
15.6.1 To enter Hull-Down status, a vehicle must expend 1/2 of its
Movement Allowance and pass an Efficiency Roll. (13.0), only one
roll can be made per turn. Any such unit is marked with a Hull-Down
marker. The process of obtaining Hull Down status does qualify for
drawing Opportunity Fire from the enemy. Units defending against such
Opportunity Fire do not receive the DRM for Hull-Down status.
15.6.2 Defending vehicles with a Hull Down status receive a +1 DFT
DRM. Units may not take advantage of Hull Down status when subject
to IF or attacks by Minefields.
15.6.3 A unit loses Hull Down status as soon as it expends any movement points for any purpose.
15.6.4 Hull down may only be created in Clear, Woods, Orchard, Town,
and City terrain. Ignore artificial terrain markers, except minefields, for
determining HD eligibility.
16.0 Air Support
Because of the time-space scale of the game, Aircraft units and their
performance and interactions with ground units perform in a somewhat
abstracted manner.
15.4.6 Improved Positions are neutral counters and may be occupied
by either side, regardless of which side created or placed the counter.
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
15
16.1 General Procedures
16.4 Anti-Aircraft Defense (AA)
During any Air Operation (3.1.2.2) the Phasing Player may place or move
any available Aircraft Marker to any location on the map, they are not
marked with a spent marker for moving. Aircraft Markers are not considered units, cannot block entry into a hex, and may not spot for other units
(Exception: Observation Aircraft).
Anti-Aircraft (AA) Fire is a type of DF initiated in the opposing player’s Air
Operation before the Aircraft initiate their attacks. AA Fire is resolved in
a similar manner as DF except that the AA Table is used instead of the
normal DFT.
16.1.1 Recalled aircraft are removed from play during the immediately
following Administration segment. They do not count towards victory
points unless noted by SN
16.1.2 Terrain has no effect on the movement of Aircraft units.
16.1.3 During an Air Operation an available non-Spent Air Support unit
may conduct a DF attack versus any unit on the board. (7.0) If a DF
attack is conducted, the Air Support unit is marked Spent, or recalled if
directed by SN.
16.1.4 Any Air units not marked Spent and in play may conduct Opportunity Fire versus moving units. The Air Support unit is then marked
Spent and may not conduct any further DF or Opportunity attacks that
turn.
16.1.5 Spent markers are removed from Air Support units during the
Administration segment.
16.1.6 Aircraft are not allowed to use the Height Advantage bonus.
16.1.7 Range modifiers do not apply to aircraft in Fighter mode (F).
Bomber (B) aircraft do apply range modifiers to their attacks. Only
Bombers designated as Dive Bombers (superscript D) may attack at
range 0 and use the -2 DRM.
16.1.8 Rules governing blocking terrain do apply for LoS from Aircraft
to ground units and vice-versa. For purposes of LoS, all Aircraft are
considered to be at an elevation two levels greater than highest terrain
depicted on the play area map.
16.1.9 Aircraft automatically spot any unit that is not in a City, Town,
Woods, Swamp, or Orchard hex or within a Fortification that are within
normal range of the aircraft.
16.1.10 AA fire may only be conducted versus aircraft making an attack
prior to resolving that attack. (See 16.4)
16.2 Observation Aircraft
Observation Aircraft are used to spot enemy units and act as a Forward
Observer to fulfill spotting for IF attacks. The maximum distance that an
Observation Aircraft may spot a unit is 30 hexes unless the enemy unit is
in a Town, City, Woods, Orchard or Swamp hex. Units in those hexes can
only be Spotted by Observation Aircraft within five hexes.
16.3 Attack Aircraft Types
16.3.1 ‘B’ type Aircraft denote Bombers. Bomber attacks are carried
out against all units in the defending hex and are resolved in the same
manner as IF in normal range of the aircraft. Once these Aircraft perform an attack, they are removed from play.
16.3.2 ‘BD’ type Aircraft denote Dive Bomber capable Bombers. They
conduct attacks as normal bombers (16.3.1) but may attack at range
0 and receive the -2 range modifier. Like with Bombers, once these
Aircraft perform an attack, they are removed from play.
16.4.1 Only units with a Special Capability of AA (blue stripe) can
participate in AA Fire.
16.4.2 After all Aircraft have been placed and before any Air Support
attacks are resolved, the defending player may declare AA Fire. Each
AA capable unit not already marked Spent may engage ONE attacking
or spotting Aircraft.
16.4.3 AA Fire is conducted as DF, with the following exceptions:
16.4.3.1 The range of all AA capable units is one half of their normal
range.
16.4.3.2 Only range die roll modifiers apply.
16.4.3.3 All Aircraft are considered Spotted while on board.
16.4.3.4 AA units may not combine their Attack Strengths and may
only attack one Aircraft unit
16.4.4 Units conducting AA fire are marked with a Spent marker.
16.4.5 AA fire is resolved using the AA Artillery results table. Rather
than the AP or AT attack factors, AA fire is achieved by using an
Anti-Aircraft Equivalency factor, which is determined by the type of AA
capable unit. The AA equivalency of the firing unit is located below the
Anti-Aircraft Table. Two dice are rolled and modified for range, yielding
one of the following results:
X Aircraft Destroyed. Aircraft is immediately removed from play and
the Aircraft’s attack is not carried out.
DD Aircraft is Disrupted. The Aircraft’s attack is carried out, but at
a +3 penalty. After the Aircraft’s attack, the aircraft is Recalled (removed from play).
D# The Aircraft’s attack is Disrupted. Add the # to the die roll. Aircraft
remains in play.
17.0 Engineers
Engineers are specially trained combat infantry units that are used to
clear Minefields, create and remove Blocks, demolish Bridges, and
increase the effectiveness of CAT attacks.
17.1 Clearing Mines
17.1.1 Minefields are cleared in a three-part process over three turns as
follows:
17.1.1.1 Turn 1: During an Operation, an activated, non-Disrupted Engineer unit moves adjacent to a Minefield and declares intent to clear;
the engineer is then placed on top of the Minefield (no Minefield attack or Op Fire occurs.) The unit is marked with a ”No Move” counter.
17.1.1.2 Turn 2: During the next Pre-Operations Segment the ”No
Move” counter is flipped to the “Clear/Set” side and the Engineer unit
is placed beneath the Minefield counter.
17.1.1.3 Turn 3: During the Pre-Operations segment of the third turn,
the Minefield marker is removed from the hex.
16.3.3 ‘F’ type Aircraft denote fighters. Fighter attacks are conducted in
the same manner as DF attacks and may target any unit or units within
the range printed on the Aircraft. They remain in play until destroyed by
AA fire or recalled by SN. If an ‘F’ type unit rolls a 10 or higher on any
attack they are re-called at the end of the current turn.
17.1.2 Engineers must remain Non-Disrupted throughout this process.
If the engineer becomes Disrupted at any time during this process, the
process is halted. When the engineer recovers from Disruption, the
process may be restarted at turn 2 of the Minefield clearance sequence. (17.1.1.2)
16.3.4 ‘FB’ type Aircraft denote Fighter-Bombers. Fighter-Bombers
conduct their initial attack as ‘B’ type Aircraft and then are flipped to
their ‘F’ side. They remain in play as ‘F’ type Aircraft until recalled or
destroyed as outlined in 16.3.3 or SN. If an ‘FB’ type unit rolls a 10 or
higher on their first attack roll they are re-called at the end of the current turn.
17.1.3 Minefields marked with a Clear/Set marker are still eligible to
attack other units entering the hex.
Some ‘FB’ type aircraft will be noted by Scenario Note as being
equipped with rockets. Such units are treated as normal ‘FB’ with the
following exception. The ‘B’ type attack is treated as normal direct fire
attack following the rules in section 7.0 Combat and Direct Fire.
16.3.5 Aircraft declare their target immediately after being placed, and
prior to any AA Defense.
17.1.4 An Engineer unit may not fire or move in any manner during the
minefield removal process.
17.2 Bridge Demolitions
Engineers were critical in WWII in the destruction of Bridges to impede
enemy movement.
17.2.1 To destroy a Bridge, an Engineer unit must begin and end two
consecutive Operations Segments in the Bridge hex non-Disrupted.
17.2.1.1 Turn 1: Mark the Engineer with an “No Move” Counter.
17.2.1.2 Turn 2: During the Pre-Operations segment of the second
turn flip the “No Move” counter to its Clear/Set side.
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©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
17.2.1.3 On any subsequent turn move the Engineer to an adjacent
hex and roll 2D6, on roll of 8 or less this indicates the Bridge is
destroyed, place a Destroyed Bridge marker in the hex. A Destroyed
Bridge is treated as a normal Stream or Gully hex for the remainder of
the game. (Use a Block marker as a Destroyed Bridge marker).
17.2.2 Demolition Failure: Die rolls greater than 8 indicate demolition
failure. In case of failure, the Engineer unit may move back onto the
Bridge hex and immediately gain an “No Move” counter. The demolition
sequence then advances in the next turn, use a second Labor marker
to keep track. There is a -1 DRM per additional demolition attempt.
17.2.3 If an Engineer becomes Disrupted at any time during this
process, the process is temporarily halted and restarted when the
Engineer is capable of continuing. Likewise, any process started by
an Engineer unit must be finished by that same Engineer unit and may
not be assumed by another Engineer unit process if the initiating unit
becomes Disrupted.
17.3 Blocks
You get the idea. Then of course there is the issue of allocation of resources. Do I use that chit to recover my units or drive on and leave the
cowards behind? The decision is in your hands.
The Combat System was the hardest to update, with several go rounds
and many revisions. Too many ‘what ifs’ and ‘how comes’. The hope is
that what is left is enjoyable and captures your attention at every engagement.
20.0 Credits
Panzer Blitz - Hill of Death
Designer/Developer: Darren Emge
Play Testers: Kevin Valerian, Ken Dunn, Dave Schubert, Bob Bassin, and
Buck Karpowitz
Special Thanks: Eric Miller and Armando Signore
Map and Counter Graphics: Nicolas Eskubi
Rules Editing: Lewis J. Goldberg
The following details the abilities of Engineer units to create and remove
Blocks.
17.3.1 Creating Blocks: To create a Block, an Engineer must be activated and may not move from its initial hex. Blocks may only be created
in Road, Woods, City, or Town Hexes. Like Clearing Mines, Creating
Blocks is a three-turn process:
17.3.1.1 Turn 1: During an Operations, mark the activated Engineer
with an “No Move” Counter.
17.3.1.2 Turn 2: During the Pre-Operations segment of the second
turn, flip the “No Move” counter to its Clear/Set side.
17.3.1.3 Turn 3: During the Pre-Operations segment of the following
turn place a Block counter in the same hex as the Engineer unit.
17.3.2 Removing Blocks The procedure for clearing a Block is the same
as used for Bridge demolition (including requiring a successful die roll).
17.3.3 The presence of one Engineer unit in a hex with a Block will
never violate stacking limits.
17.4 Close Assault Tactics
Engineers are equipped with many powerful, short-range weapons that
are very useful in Close Assault Tactics.
17.4.1 If there are any Engineers participating in CAT attacks, modify
the die roll of all attacking units by -1.
17.4.2 No additional modifiers are granted if more than one Engineer
unit participates in a CAT attack.
18.0 Play Notes
Wargames inherently allow the players far more information than their
real-life counterparts had. In Panzer Blitz, the sequence of play contains
random elements, which introduces a bit of uncertainty into the game
situation.
Instead of the cumbersome command rules seen in some tactical level
games, Panzer Blitz utilizes the activation of Combat units within only a
certain, randomly determined hex/radius. While choosing a ‘central hex’
is artificial, it removes the requirement of any leader/headquarters rules
and may result in the players not being able to activate according to their
Perfect Plan as well as placing bulls-eyes on command units.
19.0 Designer’s Notes
Now that you’ve read the rules, you may hate what we have done to the
old classic. The attempt was to keep feel of the original Panzer Blitz while
updating, correcting, and streamlining the game. Some people will hate
it - others will love it, and then others won’t really care.
Let’s start with the new counters. We attempted to keep the spirit of the
old Panzer Blitz counters while adding relevant information. The hope
was to remove the need to consult a unit capabilities charts. Some will
view this as destroying the clean simplicity of the original Panzer Blitz
counters. The hope is you will find it a step in the right direction.
The chit pull system was introduced to remove the gaminess found in
IGO-UGO mechanics, to add more to the decision process, and to immerse the player in the fog of war.
Will the left flank advance with the center or will they stay under cover a
little longer? ... where are those bloody reinforcements? ... why can’t the
fly-boys ever be on time?
©2011 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
17
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