Access Control Rules: Network-Based

Access Control Rules: Network-Based

Access Control Rules: Network-Based

The following topics describe how to configure network traffic logging and handling:

Introduction to Network-Based Access Control Rules, page 1

Access Control Rules: Security Zone Conditions, page 2

Access Control Rules: Network and Geolocation Conditions, page 3

Access Control Rules: VLAN Tag Conditions, page 5

Access Control Rules: Port Conditions, page 7

Introduction to Network-Based Access Control Rules

Access control rules within access control policies exert granular control over network traffic logging and handling. Network-based conditions allow you to manage which traffic can traverse your network, using one or more of the following criteria:

• source and destination security zones

• source and destination IP addresses or geographical locations

• a packet’s innermost VLAN tag

• source and destination port, which also includes transport layer protocol and ICMP code options

You can combine network-based conditions with each other and with other types of conditions to create an access control rule. These access control rules can be simple or complex, matching and inspecting traffic using multiple conditions.

Hardware-based fast-path rules, Security Intelligence-based traffic filtering, SSL inspection, user identification, and some decoding and preprocessing occur before access control rules evaluate network traffic.

Note

The system builds a separate network map for each leaf domain. In a multidomain deployment, using literal IP addresses to constrain this configuration can have unexpected results.

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Access Control Rules: Network-Based

Access Control Rules: Security Zone Conditions

Access Control Rules: Security Zone Conditions

Zone conditions in access control rules allow you to control traffic by its source and destination security zones.

A security zone is a grouping of one or more interfaces, which may be located across multiple devices. An option you choose during a device’s initial setup, called its detection mode, determines how the system initially configures the device’s interfaces, and whether those interfaces belong to a security zone.

As a simple example, when you register device with an Inline detection mode, the Firepower Management

Center creates two zones: Internal and External, and assigns the first pair of interfaces on the device to those zones. Hosts connected to the network on the Internal side represent your protected assets.

To extend this scenario, you could deploy additional identically configured devices—managed by the same

Firepower Management Center—to protect similar resources in several different locations. Like the first device, each of these devices protects the assets in its Internal security zone.

Tip

You are not required to group all internal (or external) interfaces into a single zone. Choose the grouping that makes sense for your deployment and security policies.

In this deployment, you may decide that although you want these hosts to have unrestricted access to the

Internet, you nevertheless want to protect them by inspecting incoming traffic for intrusions and malware.

To accomplish this using access control, configure an access control rule with a zone condition where the

Destination Zone is set to Internal. This simple access control rule matches traffic that leaves the device from any interface in the Internal zone.

To ensure that the system inspects matching traffic for intrusions and malware, choose a rule action of Allow, then associate this rule with an intrusion and a file policy.

Requirements for Security Zone Conditions

You can add a maximum of 50 zones to each of the Source Zones and Destination Zones in a single zone condition:

• To match traffic leaving the device from an interface in the zone, add that zone to the Destination Zones.

Because devices deployed passively do not transmit traffic, you cannot use a zone comprised of passive interfaces in a Destination Zone condition.

• To match traffic entering the device from an interface in the zone, add that zone to the Source Zones.

• If you add both source and destination zone conditions to a rule, matching traffic must originate from one of the specified source zones and egress through one of the destination zones.

All interfaces in a zone must be of the same type (all inline, all passive, all switched, or all routed). All zones used in a zone condition for an access control rule must also be of the same type. You cannot write a single rule that matches traffic to or from zones of different types.

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Access Control Rules: Network-Based

Controlling Traffic by Security Zone

Controlling Traffic by Security Zone

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Classic License

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Supported Devices Supported Domains Access

Any Any Admin/Access

Admin/Network

Admin

Procedure

Step 1

In the access control rule editor, click the Zones tab.

Step 2

Find and select the zones you want to add from the Available Zones. To search for zones to add, click the

Search by name prompt above the Available Zones list, then type a zone name. The list updates as you type to display matching zones.

Step 3

Click to select a zone, or right-click and then select Select All.

Step 4

Click Add to Source or Add to Destination, or drag and drop.

Step 5

Save or continue editing the rule.

What to Do Next

• Deploy configuration changes; see Deploying Configuration Changes .

Access Control Rules: Network and Geolocation Conditions

Network conditions in access control rules allow you to control traffic by its source and destination IP address.

You can either:

• explicitly specify the source and destination IP addresses for the traffic you want to control, or

• use the geolocation feature, which associates IP addresses with geographical locations, to control traffic based on its source or destination country or continent

Requirements for Network and Geolocation Conditions

When you build a network-based access control rule condition, you can manually specify IP address and geographical locations. Alternately, you can configure network conditions with network and geolocation

objects, which are reusable and associate a name with one or more IP addresses, address blocks, countries, continents, and so on.

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Access Control Rules: Network-Based

Controlling Traffic by Network or Geolocation

Tip

After you create a network or geolocation object, you can use it not only to build access control rules, but also to represent IP addresses in various other places in the system’s web interface. You can create these objects using the object manager, or while you are configuring access control rules.

If you want to write rules to control traffic by geographical location, to ensure you are using up-to-date geolocation data to filter your traffic, Cisco strongly recommends you regularly update the geolocation database (GeoDB).

You can add a maximum of 50 items to each of the Source Networks and Destination Networks in a single network condition, and you can mix network and geolocation-based configurations:

• To match traffic from an IP address or geographical location, configure the Source Networks.

• To match traffic to an IP address or geographical location, configure the Destination Networks.

If you add both source and destination network conditions to a rule, matching traffic must originate from one of the specified IP addresses and be destined for one of the destination IP addresses.

Controlling Traffic by Network or Geolocation

Smart License

Any

Classic License

Any

Supported Devices

Any

Supported Domains Access

Any Admin/Access

Admin/Network

Admin

Procedure

Step 1

In the access control rule editor, click the Networks tab.

Step 2

Find and select the networks you want to add from the Available Networks, as follows:

• Click the Networks tab to display network objects and groups to add; click the Geolocation tab to display geolocation objects.

To add a network object on the fly, which you can then add to the condition, click the add icon ( ) above the Available Networks list and proceed as described in Creating Network Objects .

• To search for network or geolocation objects to add, select the appropriate tab, click the Search by name

or value prompt above the Available Networks list, then type an object name or the value of one of the object’s components. The list updates as you type to display matching objects.

Step 3

Click Add to Source or Add to Destination, or drag and drop.

Step 4

Add any source or destination IP addresses or address blocks that you want to specify manually. Click the

Enter an IP address prompt below the Source Networks or Destination Networks list; then type an IP address or address block and click Add.

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Access Control Rules: Network-Based

Access Control Rules: VLAN Tag Conditions

Note

The system builds a separate network map for each leaf domain. In a multidomain deployment, using literal IP addresses to constrain this configuration can have unexpected results. Using override-enabled objects allows descendant domain administrators to tailor Global configurations to their local environments.

Step 5

Save or continue editing the rule.

Example

The following graphic shows the network condition for an access control rule that blocks connections originating from your internal network and attempting to access resources either in North Korea or on 93.184.216.119

(example.com).

In this example, a network object group called Private Networks (that comprises the IPv4 and IPv6 Private

Networks network objects, not shown) represents your internal networks. The example also manually specifies the example.com IP address, and uses a system-provided North Korea geolocation object to represent North

Korea IP addresses.

What to Do Next

• Deploy configuration changes; see Deploying Configuration Changes .

Access Control Rules: VLAN Tag Conditions

VLAN conditions in access control rules allow you to control VLAN-tagged traffic. The system uses the innermost VLAN tag to identify a packet by VLAN.

When you build a VLAN-based access control rule condition, you can manually specify VLAN tags. Alternately, you can configure VLAN conditions with VLAN tag objects, which are reusable and associate a name with one or more VLAN tags.

Tip

After you create a VLAN tag object, you can use it not only to build access control rules, but also to represent VLAN tags in various other places in the system’s web interface. You can create VLAN tag objects either using the object manager or on-the-fly while you are configuring access control rules.

You can add a maximum of 50 items to the Selected VLAN Tags in a single VLAN tag condition.

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Access Control Rules: Network-Based

Controlling VLAN-Tagged Traffic

Controlling VLAN-Tagged Traffic

Smart License

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Classic License

Any

Supported Devices

Any

Supported Domains Access

Any Admin/Access

Admin/Network

Admin

Procedure

Step 1

In the access control rule editor, click the VLAN Tags tab.

Step 2

Find and select the VLANs you want to add from the Available VLAN Tags, as follows:

To add a VLAN tag object on the fly, which you can then add to the condition, click the add icon ( ) above the Available VLAN Tags list and proceed as described in Creating VLAN Tag Objects .

• To search for VLAN tag objects and groups to add, click the Search by name or value prompt above the Available VLAN Tags list, then type either the name of the object, or the value of a VLAN tag in the object. The list updates as you type to display matching objects.

Step 3

Click Add to Rule, or drag and drop.

Step 4

Add any VLAN tags that you want to specify manually. Click the Enter a VLAN Tag prompt below the

Selected VLAN Tags list; then type a VLAN tag or range and click Add. You can specify any VLAN tag from 1 to 4094; use a hyphen to specify a range of VLAN tags.

Note

The system builds a separate network map for each leaf domain. In a multidomain deployment, using literal VLAN tags to constrain this configuration can have unexpected results. Using override-enabled objects allows descendant domain administrators to tailor Global configurations to their local environments.

Step 5

Save or continue editing the rule.

Example

The following graphic shows a VLAN tag condition for an access control rule that matches traffic on public-facing VLANs (represented by a VLAN tag object group), as well as the manually added VLAN 42.

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Access Control Rules: Network-Based

Access Control Rules: Port Conditions

What to Do Next

• Deploy configuration changes; see Deploying Configuration Changes .

Access Control Rules: Port Conditions

Network conditions in access control rules allow you to control traffic by its source and destination port. In this context, “port” refers to one of the following:

• For TCP and UDP, you can control traffic based on the transport layer protocol. The system represents this configuration using the protocol number in parentheses, plus an optional associated port or port range. For example: TCP(6)/22.

• For ICMP and ICMPv6 (IPv6-ICMP), you can control traffic based on its Internet layer protocol plus an optional type and code. For example: ICMP(1):3:3.

• You can control traffic using other protocols that do not use ports.

Requirements for Port Conditions

When you build a port-based access control rule condition, you can manually specify ports. Alternately, you can configure port conditions with port objects, which are reusable and associate a name with one or more ports.

Tip

After you create a port object, you can use it not only to build access control rules, but also to represent ports in various other places in the system’s web interface. You can create port objects either using the object manager or on-the-fly while you are configuring access control rules.

You can add a maximum of 50 items to each of the Selected Source Ports and Selected Destination Ports lists in a single network condition:

• To match traffic from a port, configure the Selected Source Ports.

If you add only source ports to a condition, you can add ports that use different transport protocols. For example, you can add both DNS over TCP and DNS over UDP as source port conditions in a single access control rule.

• To match traffic to a port, configure the Selected Destination Ports.

If you add only destination ports to a condition, you can add ports that use different transport protocols.

• To match traffic both originating from specific Selected Source Portsand destined for specific Selected

Destination Ports, configure both.

If you add both source and destination ports to a condition, you can only add ports that share a single transport protocol (TCP or UDP). For example, if you add DNS over TCP as a source port, you can add

Yahoo Messenger Voice Chat (TCP) as a destination port but not Yahoo Messenger Voice Chat (UDP).

Keep the following points in mind when building a port condition:

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Controlling Traffic by Port and ICMP Codes

• When you add a destination ICMP port with the type set to 0 or a destination ICMPv6 port with the type set to 129, the access control rule only matches unsolicited echo replies. ICMP echo replies sent in response to ICMP echo requests are ignored. For a rule to match on any ICMP echo, use ICMP type 8 or ICMPv6 type 128.

• When you use the GRE (47) protocol as a destination port condition, you can only add other network-based conditions to the access control rule, that is, zone, network, and VLAN tag conditions. You cannot save the rule if you add reputation or user-based conditions.

Controlling Traffic by Port and ICMP Codes

Smart License

Any

Classic License

Any

Supported Devices Supported Domains Access

Any Any Admin/Access

Admin/Network

Admin

Procedure

Step 1

In the access control rule editor, click the Ports tab.

Step 2

Find and select the ports you want to add from the Available Ports, as follows:

To add a port object on the fly, which you can then add to the condition, click the add icon ( ) above the Available Ports list and proceed as described in Creating Port Objects .

• To search for port objects and groups to add, click the Search by name or value prompt above the

Available Ports list, then type either the name of the object, or the value of a port in the object. The list updates as you type to display matching objects. For example, if you type 80, the Firepower Management

Center displays the system-provided HTTP port object.

To select an object, click it, or right-click and then select Select All.

Step 3

Click Add to Source or Add to Destination, or drag and drop.

Step 4

Add any source or destination ports that you want to specify manually.

• For source ports, select either TCP or UDP from the Protocol drop-down list under the Selected Source

Ports list. Then, enter a Port. You can specify a single port with a value from 0 to 65535.

• For destination ports, select a protocol (including All for all protocols) from the Protocol drop down list under the Selected Destination Ports list. You can also type the number of an unassigned protocol that does not appear in the list.

If you select ICMP or IPv6-ICMP, a pop-up window appears where you can select a type and a related code. For more information on ICMP types and codes, see http://www.iana.org/assignments/ icmp-parameters/icmp-parameters.xml

and http://www.iana.org/assignments/icmpv6-parameters/ icmpv6-parameters.xml

.

If you do not want to specify a protocol, or if you specified TCP or UDP, enter a single Port from 0 to

65535.

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Controlling Traffic by Port and ICMP Codes

Step 5

Click Add.

Step 6

Save or continue editing the rule.

What to Do Next

• Deploy configuration changes; see Deploying Configuration Changes .

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Controlling Traffic by Port and ICMP Codes

Access Control Rules: Network-Based

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