STUDENT PROFILE

French 101i Novice Abroad Intensive (Paris BIA only)

STUDENT PROFILE:

This course is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of the language.

By the end of the course, the successful student will have built a solid foundation in the five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening, and speaking to accomplish a variety of everyday needs in the host culture as described in the learning outcomes below and should be capable of entering the Emerging Independent Abroad level.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve the outcomes for the Novice

Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will be able to meet simple everyday needs with some confidence using verbal and nonverbal communication, and they will be able to use compensatory strategies when they do not know the word or expression (paraphrasing, repetition, talking around the point, body language, etc.).

B. Students can recognize some appropriate and inappropriate expressions, topics, and behaviors in the host language.

C. Students will be able to distinguish between simple representations of formality and informality in the language.

D. Students will identify some differences between cultural stereotypes and generalizations between the home culture and the host culture.

E. Students will start to make informed comparisons between their host culture and the home culture.

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to understand simple statements, requests, descriptions, and questions in specific cultural context relevant to them (interactions with hosts,

Center interactions, activities with friends, studying, shopping, transportation, meals).

B. Students will be able to use context to understand the gist of some spoken language they overhear, including the media, conversations between others, and announcements.

III. Speaking

A. Students will be able to use simple phrases appropriately and with some confidence in everyday situations with increasing accuracy (home, friends, the IES Abroad

Center, the community).

B. Students will be able to express simple needs by asking questions, and get what they need in everyday situations.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to understand simple sentences and deduce meaning from context if it is relevant to their studies.

B. Students will be able to interpret main ideas in short passages and news headlines if they are relevant to them.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to write short texts about concrete topics, such as themselves, their families, their friends, their likes, their dislikes, plans, experiences, and their daily routines.

B. Students will be able to send simple emails and text messages, fill out some simple forms, and complete short essays on familiar subjects.

C. Students will be able to write with increased accuracy, although using some native language structures.

201 Novice Abroad III

STUDENT PROFILE:

This course is designed for students with little prior knowledge of the language. Students who can already use a few basic words and phrases, and who can understand very simple requests and responses are appropriate for this level. Students entering this course are also able to read and interpret the basic meaning of simple sentences and phrases. Students who have studied basic language in high school or in college but never continued to build their skills may find this level appropriate. Students who have studied or speak another

Romance language may also be capable of entering this level. The language assessment process will determine the appropriate level for each individual student.

By the end of the course, the successful student will have built a solid foundation in the five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening, and speaking to accomplish a variety of everyday needs in the host culture as described in the learning outcomes below and should be capable of entering the Emerging Independent Abroad level.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve the outcomes for the Novice

Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication a. Students will be able to meet simple everyday needs with increasing confidence using verbal and nonverbal communication, and they will be able to use compensatory strategies when they do not know the word or expression

(paraphrasing, repetition, talking around the point, body language, etc.). b. Students can recognize a variety of appropriate and inappropriate expressions, topics, and behaviors in the host language. c. Students will be able to distinguish between simple representations of formality and informality in the language. d. Students will identify some differences between cultural stereotypes and generalizations between the home culture and the host culture. e. Students will make some informed comparisons between their host culture and the home culture.

II. Listening a. Students will be able to understand some statements, requests, descriptions, and questions in specific cultural context relevant to them (interactions with hosts,

Center interactions, activities with friends, studying, shopping, transportation, meals).

b. Students will be able to use context to understand the gist of some spoken language they overhear, including the media, conversations between others, and announcements.

III. Speaking a. Students will be able to use simple phrases appropriately and with some confidence in everyday situations with increasing accuracy (home, friends, the IES Abroad

Center, and the community). b. Students will be able to express simple needs by asking and answering questions, and get what they need in everyday situations.

IV. Reading a. Students will be able to understand simple sentences and deduce meaning from context if it is relevant to their studies. b. Students will be able to interpret main ideas in short texts (news articles and headlines, leaflets, simple website materials, etc.) if they are relevant to them.

V. Writing a. Students will be able to write short texts about concrete topics, such as themselves, their families, their friends, their likes, dislikes, plans, experiences and their daily routines. b. Students will be able to send simple emails, text messages, and fill out some simple forms, and they can complete short essays on familiar subjects. c. Students will be able to write with increased accuracy, although using some native language structures.

251i Novice Abroad II Intensive (Paris French Studies)

STUDENT PROFILE:

This course is designed for students with some prior knowledge of the language. Students who can already use some basic words and phrases, and who can understand simple requests and responses are appropriate for this level. Students entering this course are also able to read and interpret the basic meaning of sentences and phrases. Students who have studied basic language in high school or in college may find this level appropriate. The language assessment process will determine the appropriate level for each individual student.

By the end of the course, the successful student will have built a solid foundation in the five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening, and speaking to accomplish a variety of everyday needs in the host culture as described in the learning outcomes below and should be capable of entering the Emerging Independent Abroad level.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve the outcomes for the Novice

Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will be able to meet simple everyday needs with increasing confidence using verbal and nonverbal communication, and they will be able to use compensatory strategies when they do not know the word or expression

(paraphrasing, repetition, talking around the point, body language, etc.).

B. Students can recognize a variety of appropriate and inappropriate expressions, topics, and behaviors in the host language.

C. Students will be able to distinguish between the most common representations of formality and informality in the language.

D. Students will identify some differences between cultural stereotypes and generalizations between the home culture and the host culture.

E. Students will make some informed comparisons between their host culture and the home culture.

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to understand some statements, requests, descriptions, and questions in specific cultural context relevant to them (interactions hosts, Center interactions, activities with friends, studying, shopping, transportation, meals).

B. Students will be able to use context to understand the gist of some spoken language they overhear, including the media, conversations between others, and announcements.

III. Speaking

A. Students will be able to use uncomplicated phrases appropriately and with some confidence in everyday situations with increasing accuracy (home, friends, the IES

Abroad Center, the community).

B. Students will be able to express their most common needs by asking and answering questions, and get what they need in everyday situations.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to understand uncomplicated sentences and deduce meaning from context if it is relevant to their studies.

B. Students will be able to interpret main ideas in short texts (news articles and headlines, leaflets, simple website materials, etc.) if they are relevant to them.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to write short texts about concrete topics, such as themselves, their families, their friends, their likes, their dislikes, plans, experiences, and their daily routines.

B. Students will be able to send emails, text messages, and fill out some simple forms, and they can complete short essays on familiar subjects.

C. Students will be able to write with increased accuracy, although using some native language structures

301 Emerging Independent Abroad I (Paris BIA)

STUDENT PROFILE:

Students entering this level must be able to fulfill the learning outcomes of the Novice

Abroad level, as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. Specifically, they should already be able to express themselves on a variety of concrete, everyday topics and meet their basic needs in the language. Although students may have been exposed previously to certain competencies taught at this level, they need additional practice and instruction to move toward mastery of these competencies.

As students gain more self-awareness and self-confidence, they will attempt more in the community. Paradoxically, this means they may also experience more miscommunications and frustration. Students will develop cultural awareness and skills to work through the

challenges of adaptation the local culture and learn to recognize their autonomy with the language. They will begin to appreciate the value of these language and intercultural skills.

This course builds upon skills introduced in Novice Abroad. By the end of the course, the successful student will have begun to develop some communicative and cultural selfconfidence necessary to attempt moderately complex tasks in the language, as described in the learning outcomes below.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students who are placed in this level should be capable of achieving the outcomes in the

Novice Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication.

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve some of the outcomes for the

Emerging Independent Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will be able to solve some daily unexpected situations and meet needs with limited help.

B. Students will be able to make some informed comparisons between the host culture and the students’ home cultures.

C. Students will be able to distinguish between verbal and nonverbal communication that reflects politeness, formality, or informality.

D. Students will be able to recognize simple patterns of intonation and their meaning.

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to understand some interactions (media, speeches, music, conversations, etc.), especially if the speaker is used to interacting with non-native speakers.

B. Students will be able to understand direct requests, questions, and simple conversations on familiar and concrete topics.

III. Speaking

A. Students will be able to talk to a certain extent about persons and things in their immediate environment, as well as their plans and their experiences.

B. Students will be able to address moderately complicated situations (unexpected questions, small group discussions, etc.) involving familiar subjects.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to read passages and short texts (notes, detailed instructions, websites, etc.) on familiar topics and understand the general meaning.

B. Students will be able to support their understanding of texts through the use of context, visual aids, dictionaries, or with the assistance of others in order to facilitate comprehension.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to communicate with limited effectiveness through notes, emails, and simple online discussions.

B. Students will be able to write short essays on concrete topics of limited levels of complexity, with reliance on the communicative patterns of their native language.

302 Emerging Independent Abroad II

STUDENT PROFILE:

Students entering this level must be able to fulfill the learning outcomes of the Novice

Abroad level, as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. Specifically, they should already be able to express themselves on a variety of concrete, everyday topics and meet their basic needs in the language. Students who enter this level may be more proficient in reading and writing skills than oral communication, especially if they have never traveled or studied abroad previously.

Although students may have been exposed previously to certain competencies taught at this level, they need additional practice and instruction to move toward mastery of these competencies. Students at this level may succeed in partner university courses as long as such courses are primarily designed for international students and/or require passive student linguistic participation (art studios, dance, etc.).

As students gain more self-awareness and self-confidence, they will attempt more in the community. Paradoxically, this means they may also experience more miscommunications and frustration. Reading and writing require effort, and many students will need to make a special effort in this regard. Students will also develop cultural awareness and skills to work through the challenges of adaptation in the local culture and learn to recognize their autonomy. They will begin to appreciate the value of these language and intercultural skills.

By the end of the course, the successful student will have developed some communicative and cultural self-confidence necessary to attempt moderately complex tasks in the language, as described in the learning outcomes below.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students who are placed in this level should be capable of achieving the outcomes in the

Novice Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication.

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve some of the outcomes for the

Emerging Independent Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will be able to solve many daily unexpected situations and meet needs with limited help.

B. Increasingly, students will be able to make informed comparisons between the host culture and the students’ home cultures.

C. Students will be able to distinguish and begin to imitate verbal and nonverbal communication that reflects politeness, formality, or informality.

D. Students will be able to recognize some patterns of intonation, their meaning, and cultural implications.

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to understand some interactions of growing complexity

(conversations, speeches, etc.), especially if the speaker is used to interacting with non-native speakers, and increasingly comprehend other types of verbal production

(media, music, etc.).

B. Students will be able to understand many direct requests, questions, and basic conversations on familiar and concrete topics.

III. Speaking

A. Increasingly, students will be able to talk about persons and things in their immediate environment, as well as their plans and their experiences, and they can provide a limited amount of supporting details.

B. Students will be able to address and attempt to resolve moderately complicated situations (unexpected questions, small group discussions, etc.) involving familiar subjects.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to read passages and short texts (advertisements, newspaper articles, recipes, etc.) and understand overall meaning.

B. Students will be able to support their understanding of texts through the use of context, dictionaries, or with the assistance of others at times.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to communicate with some effectiveness through notes, emails, and simple online discussions and chats with sympathetic native speakers.

B. Students will be able to write short essays on concrete topics of reasonable levels of complexity with some reliance on the communicative patterns of their native language.

303 Emerging Independent Abroad

STUDENT PROFILE:

Students entering this level must be able to fulfill the learning outcomes of the Novice

Abroad level, as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. Specifically, they should already be able to express themselves on a variety of concrete, everyday topics and meet their basic needs in the language. Although students may have been exposed previously to certain competencies taught at this level, they need additional practice and instruction to move toward mastery of these competencies.

Students at this level may succeed in partner university courses as long as such courses are primarily designed for international students and/or require passive student linguistic participation.

As students gain more self-awareness and self-confidence, they will attempt more in the community. Paradoxically, this means they may also experience more miscommunications and frustration. Reading and writing require effort, and many students will need to make a special effort in this regard. Students will also develop cultural awareness and skills to work through the challenges of adaptation in the local culture and learn to recognize their autonomy. They will appreciate the value of these language and intercultural skills.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students who are placed in this level should be capable of achieving the outcomes in the

Novice Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication.

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve the outcomes for the Emerging

Independent Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will be able to solve most daily unexpected situations and meet needs with limited help.

B. Students will be able to make informed comparisons between the host culture and the students’ home cultures.

C. Students will be able to distinguish and to imitate verbal and nonverbal communications that reflect politeness, formality, or informality.

D.

Students will be able to recognize patterns of intonation, their meaning, and cultural implications.

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to understand some interactions of growing complexity, especially if the speaker is used to interacting with non-native speakers

(conversations, speeches, etc.), and increasingly comprehend other types of verbal production (media, music, etc.).

B. Students will be able to understand direct requests, questions, and basic conversations on familiar and concrete topics.

C. Students sometimes will understand commonly-used colloquial expressions and popular phrases.

III. Speaking

A. Students will be able to talk about persons and things in their immediate environment, as well as their plans and their experiences, and they can provide some supporting details.

B. Students will be able to resolve moderately complicated situations involving familiar subjects.

C. Students will respond to some questions that ask for an opinion or a belief on a topic with assistance and practice.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to read passages and short texts (newspapers, lyrics, letters, short stories, etc.) and understand overall meaning.

B. Students will be able to support their understanding of texts through the use of context, dictionaries, or with the assistance of others at times.

C. Students will be able to read and understand most text messages on everyday topics.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to communicate with increasing effectiveness through notes, emails, and simple online discussions and chats with sympathetic native speakers.

B. Students will be able to write short essays on concrete topics of limited levels of complexity and with less reliance on the communicative patterns of their native language.

C. Students will be able to describe things, relate ideas and emotions, and express simple opinions in concrete language.

352 French Language in Context: Independent Abroad I

STUDENT PROFILE:

Students who enter this level are able to accomplish nearly all everyday needs required to live in a new culture. In this course, students will begin to develop independence and

autonomy so that, when communication does break down, they have some tools at their disposal to resolve these challenges independently. Students should welcome and seek correction and guidance from their instructors, hosts, and others in the community as they progress. They will also begin to recognize their own and their peers’ errors.

By the end of this course, students will begin to converse at a rate of speed approaching normal conversation. They will be creative, spontaneous, and self-reliant as they solve problems, interpret texts, negotiate, and express their opinions, likes, and dislikes in the culture. Although students will still make errors and experience communication breakdowns, they are sometimes able to resolve these on their own. Students will understand some colloquial expressions and slang, and are starting to understand a wider variety of native speakers from different backgrounds. By the end of this level, students will be capable of achieving the learning outcomes outlined below.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students who are placed in this level should be capable of achieving the outcomes in the

Emerging Independent Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and

Intercultural Communication.

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve some of the outcomes for the

Independent Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will be able to identify and describe at a basic level key host cultures, subcultures, habits, norms, and behaviors in a variety of settings, and they will be aware of the risk that generalizations can lead to stereotypes.

B. Students will be able to describe their own cultural beliefs, behaviors, and values by contrasting and comparing them with the host cultures.

C. Students will be able to describe gestures and body language, and they will integrate some of those nonverbal actions into their interactions with native speakers.

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to understand a variety of spoken communications of moderate complexity (media and film, speeches, music, conversations, etc.) on a wide range of concrete everyday topics as well as abstract topics covered in classes.

B. Students will be able to understand certain native speakers from a variety of backgrounds and experience with non-native speakers, and they will comprehend common colloquial expressions and slang.

III. Speaking

A. Students will be able to speak on and discuss a range of concrete everyday and personal topics, abstract topics covered in classes, as well as other topics of particular interest to them.

B. Students will be able to participate, initiate, and respond actively in a variety of interactions.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to read and understand articles, stories, and online texts using background knowledge to aid their comprehension.

B. Students will be able to read and understand the main ideas and supporting arguments of academic texts with assistance.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to meet most everyday writing needs (notes, text messages, letters, emails, chats, online forums).

B. Students will be able to write short essays for class that narrate, describe, report, compare, contrast, and summarize on a wide range of topics with a moderate degree of grammatical and lexical accuracy.

C. Students will be able to edit their own and their peers’ writing for common errors.

353 Independent Abroad III

STUDENT PROFILE:

Students who enter this level are able to accomplish everyday needs required to live in a new culture. In this course, students will develop independence and autonomy so that, when communication does break down, they have enough tools at their disposal to resolve these challenges on their own. Students should welcome and invite correction and guidance from their instructors, hosts, and others in the community as they progress. They will also begin to recognize their own and their peers’ errors.

By the end of this course, students will begin to converse at a rate of speed approaching normal conversation. They will be creative, spontaneous and self-reliant as they solve problems, interpret texts, negotiate, and express their opinions, likes, and dislikes in the culture. Although students will still make errors and experience communication breakdowns, they are much more likely to resolve these on their own. Students will understand a variety of colloquial expressions and slang, and will be able to understand a wider variety of native speakers from different backgrounds. By the end of this level, students will be capable of achieving the learning outcomes outlined below.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students who are placed in this level should be capable of achieving the outcomes in the

Emerging Independent Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and

Intercultural Communication.

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve the outcomes for the Independent

Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will be able to identify and describe some key host cultures, subcultures, habits, norms, and behaviors in a variety of settings, and they will be aware of the risk that generalizations can lead to stereotypes.

B. Students will be able to discuss the validity of their own cultural beliefs, behaviors, and values by contrasting and comparing them with the host cultures.

C. Students will be able to interpret gestures and body language, and they will integrate some of those nonverbal actions into their interactions with native speakers.

D. Students will recognize and at times conform to socio-cultural norms in almost any transactional event.

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to understand most spoken communications of moderate complexity (media and film, speeches, music, conversations, etc.) on a wide range of concrete everyday topics as well as abstract topics covered in classes.

B. Students will be able to understand native speakers from a variety of backgrounds and limited experience with non-native speakers, and they will comprehend common colloquial expressions and slang.

III. Speaking

A. Students will be able to speak on and discuss a wide range of concrete everyday and personal topics, abstract topics covered in classes, as well as other topics of particular interest to them.

B. Students will be able to participate, initiate, and respond actively in a wide variety of interactions.

C. Students will be able to narrate sequences of events with some degree of accuracy.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to read and understand a wide variety of articles, stories, and online texts using background knowledge to aid their comprehension.

B. Students will be able to read and understand academic texts with assistance.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to meet their everyday writing needs (notes, text messages, letters, emails, chats, online forums).

B. Students will be able to write papers for class that narrate, describe, report, compare, contrast, and summarize on a wide range of topics.

C. Students will be able to edit their own and their peers’ writing.

401 Emerging Competent Abroad I

STUDENT PROFILE:

Students who enter this course will have mastered most of the outcomes of the

Independent Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. Among other characteristics, these students are able to converse at a rate of speed approaching normal conversation. They are creative, spontaneous, and self-reliant as they solve problems, interpret texts, negotiate, and express their opinions, likes, and dislikes in the culture. Although they still make errors and experience communication breakdowns, these students tend to resolve these challenges on their own. Students who enter this level can already understand a variety of colloquial expressions and slang.

Students entering this level can succeed in a range of moderately complex university courses designed for native speakers. Before registering, they should consult with the appropriate IES Abroad academic advisor on course selection.

By the end of this course, students will have started to acquire the subtlety of expression and control of complex structures that characterize Competent Abroad learners. However,

Emerging Competent Abroad learners have only partial mastery of these structures and quite often resort to simpler and more direct modes of expression, particularly when negotiating linguistically difficult or unfamiliar situations. Students at this level begin to understand some local cultural attitudes, values, beliefs, and behavior patterns. However, there will be numerous gaps and inconsistencies in their knowledge, and they lack the depth of understanding and sophistication of those who have spent more time living and working in the local context.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students who are placed in this level should be capable of achieving the outcomes in the

Independent Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication.

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve some of the outcomes for the

Emerging Competent Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will begin to recognize and describe key host cultures, subcultures, habits, norms, and behaviors in a variety of settings, and they will be aware of the risk that generalizations can lead to stereotypes.

B. Students will be able to reflect on and discuss the validity of their own cultural beliefs, behaviors, and values by contrasting and comparing them with those of the host cultures.

C. Students will demonstrate openness toward different beliefs and styles even when they do not agree with them.

D. Students will accept responsibility for their own learning by defining their linguistic goals and demonstrating independence in their exploration of the culture.

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to understand many complex communications on a wide range of everyday topics as well as abstract topics covered in classes.

B. Students will be able to understand a variety of native speakers and non-native experts and comprehend an array of moderately complex interactions.

III. Speaking

A. Students will participate reasonably well in most academic and social interactions using when appropriate complex language including slang, colloquial expressions, double meaning, and humor with increasing confidence.

B. Students will be able to make arguments and form opinions on almost any topic of their interest.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to read and understand textbooks and academic articles for classes taught in the host language as well as some popular texts for enjoyment.

B. Students will be able to read and understand authentic materials including newspapers, advertisements, brochures, instruction manuals, etc. on abstract and unfamiliar topics with some assistance at times.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to write for certain native audiences (resumes, applications, administrative documents) and express themselves somewhat clearly and effectively.

B. Students will be able to write essays for classes incorporating aspects of appropriate academic style with some assistance at times.

402 Emerging Competent Abroad II

STUDENT PROFILE:

Students who enter this course will have mastered most of the outcomes of the

Independent Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication, as well as the more basic outcomes defined in Emerging Competent

Abroad. Among other characteristics, these students are able to converse at a rate of speed approaching normal conversation. They are creative, spontaneous and self-reliant as they solve problems, interpret texts, negotiate, express their opinions, likes and dislikes in the culture. Although they still make errors and experience communication breakdowns, these students tend to resolve these challenges on their own. Students who enter this level can already understand a variety of colloquial expressions and slang.

Students entering this level can succeed in a range of moderately complex university courses designed for native speakers. Before registering, they should consult with the appropriate IES Abroad academic advisor on course selection.

By the end of this course, students will have started to acquire the subtlety of expression and control of complex structures that characterize Competent Abroad learners. However,

Emerging Competent Abroad learners have only partial mastery of these structures and quite often resort to simpler and more direct modes of expression, particularly when negotiating linguistically difficult or unfamiliar situations. Emerging Competent Abroad speakers understand local cultural attitudes, values, beliefs, and behavior patterns well enough to make an informed choice about which cultural features they would like to adopt or need to adopt in order to live harmoniously in the local culture. There may, however, be some gaps and inconsistencies in their knowledge, and they lack the depth of understanding and sophistication of those who have spent more time living and working in the local context.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students who are placed in this level should be capable of achieving the outcomes in the

Independent Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication.

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve some of the outcomes for the

Emerging Competent Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural

Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will be able to recognize and describe key host cultures, subcultures, habits, norms, and behaviors in a variety of settings, and they will be aware of the risk that generalizations can lead to stereotypes.

B. Students will be able to reflect on and discuss the validity of their own cultural beliefs, behaviors, and values by contrasting and comparing them with the host cultures.

C. Students will demonstrate openness and acceptance of different beliefs and styles even when they do not agree with them.

D. Students will accept responsibility for their own learning by defining their linguistic goals and demonstrating independence in their exploration of the culture

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to identify a fairly wide range of social and cultural dialects of the spoken language.

B. Students will be able to understand many native speakers and non-native experts and comprehend a reasonably wide array of moderately complex interactions.

III. Speaking

A. Students will participate actively in most academic and social interactions using, when appropriate, complex language including slang, colloquial expressions, double meaning, and humor with increasing confidence.

B. Students will be able to make arguments and form opinions on topics of their interest.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to read and understand textbooks and academic articles for classes taught in the host language as well as a range of popular texts for enjoyment.

B. Students will be able to read and understand authentic materials including newspapers, advertisements, brochures, instruction manuals, etc. on abstract topics with some assistance at times.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to write for a range of native audiences and express themselves clearly and effectively.

B. Students will be able to write essays for classes incorporating aspects of appropriate academic style with limited assistance.

451 Competent Abroad

STUDENT PROFILE:

Students who enter this course will already be capable of achieving the outcomes of the

Emerging Competent Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and

Intercultural Communication. Students who take this level should already be familiar with most of the complex structures and linguistic functions that will be covered. They should not be surprised, however, to find that they will need to review these aspects of the language to develop greater fluency and more sensitivity to subtle and underlying linguistic and cultural meanings.

Students entering this level can succeed in a wide range of university courses designed for native speakers, provided they have met any prerequisites. Before registering, they should consult with the appropriate IES Abroad academic advisor on course selection.

By the end of this course, students will be fully able to meet the demands of living and working in the host culture. They will be able to communicate accurately, vividly, and expressively with their hosts on most topics. Students who succeed in this course will be able to function in a professional setting and to undertake further personal or professional projects in the host culture. Students will be able to understand local cultural attitudes, values, beliefs, and behavior patterns well enough to make informed choices about which cultural features they would like to adopt or need to adopt in order to live harmoniously in the local culture.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students who are placed in this level should be capable of achieving the outcomes in the

Emerging Competent Abroad level as defined by the IES Abroad MAP for Language and

Intercultural Communication.

By the end of the course, students will be able to achieve the outcomes for the Competent

Abroad level as defined by the MAP for Language and Intercultural Communication. The key learning outcomes from the MAP are summarized below:

I. Intercultural Communication

A. Students will be able to express their own ideas, perspectives, and arguments thoroughly and yet tactfully, using language proficiency, sociolinguistic skills, and cultural knowledge.

B. Students will be able to perform any activity (social, academic, professional) a local student of their age, skills, and background would do with a reasonable degree of success.

II. Listening

A. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate the beauty and richness of language when they hear it.

B. Students will be able to understand native speakers on a wide range of complex topics, including their digressions, side comments, and humor.

III. Speaking

A. Students will be able to talk about abstract ideas and concepts, engage in agreement or disagreement, and defend their opinions with supporting evidence.

B. Students will be able to use the language for a wide range of creative and presentational purposes.

C. Students will be able to use an extensive variety of colloquial expressions and humor effectively.

D. Students will be capable of varying their language to make subtle and complex distinctions (e.g. formality and informality) with a wide array of native speakers.

IV. Reading

A. Students will be able to read and understand a wide range of academic resources and popular texts (print or online).

B. Students will be able to understand the main ideas and supporting details when reading many works of literature and nonfiction with some assistance at times.

C. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate the beauty and the richness of the written word.

V. Writing

A. Students will be able to write academic texts that describe, relate, report, compare and contrast, analyze, and summarize with a high degree of precision and accuracy on a wide range of topics.

B. Students will be able to distinguish between the written style and the spoken style, and will be able to use the written style effectively with some support.

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