Club Administration Manual

Club Administration Manual
Club Administration Manual
Chapter 5 – The Club President
CONTENTS
Contents.................................................................................................................................................................. 1
5
THE CLUB PRESIDENT ................................................................................................................................ 3
5.1
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................... 3
5.2
PROGRESSING TO PRESIDENT ........................................................................................................ 4
5.3
PREPARING TO BE PRESIDENT ........................................................................................................ 4
5.4
CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................ 5
5.5
THE BASIC INGREDIENTS WHICH ARE PRESENT IN ALL SUCCESSFUL CLUBS ......................... 5
5.5.1
A MAJOR SERVICE ACTIVITY ........................................................................................................ 5
5.5.2
A MAJOR FUND RAISING PROJECT .............................................................................................. 5
5.5.3
STRONG PUBLIC RELATIONS........................................................................................................ 5
5.5.4
WELL ORGANISED, ENJOYABLE MEETINGS ............................................................................... 6
5.5.5
ASSOCIATION SPIRIT ..................................................................................................................... 6
5.5.6
A STRONG MEMBERSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND RETENTION PROGRAM................................. 6
5.6
CLUB COMMITTEE STRUCTURE ....................................................................................................... 6
5.7
THE CLUB RESOURCE CENTRE ........................................................................................................ 7
5.8
ROLE OF THE PRESIDENT AT A MEETING ....................................................................................... 9
5.9
ORGANISE THE CLUB PROGRAM! .................................................................................................... 9
5.10
INVITATIONS TO GUEST SPEAKERS .............................................................................................. 10
5.11
DISTRICT GOVERNOR'S VISIT ......................................................................................................... 11
5.12
RUNNING MEETINGS ........................................................................................................................ 11
5.12.1
5.13
OVERVIEW OF CLUB ADMINISTRATION ......................................................................................... 14
5.13.1
CORRESPONDENCE ................................................................................................................ 15
5.13.2
LIAISON WITH DISTRICT .......................................................................................................... 15
5.13.3
SOCIAL ACTIVITIES .................................................................................................................. 16
5.13.4
HUMAN RELATIONS ................................................................................................................. 16
5.13.5
THE QUALITIES OF LEADERSHIP ........................................................................................... 16
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TYPICAL MEETING AGENDA ................................................................................................... 12
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5.14
OFFICIAL PROTOCOL ....................................................................................................................... 17
5.15
LOCAL PROTOCOL MD201 ............................................................................................................... 17
5.15.1
AUSTRALIAN CUSTOM ............................................................................................................. 19
5.16
INDUCTION OF A NEW MEMBER ..................................................................................................... 19
5.17
RECOGNITION OF MEMBERS .......................................................................................................... 19
5.18
NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE ............................................................................................................. 20
5.19
WHEN YOUR YEAR IS OVER ............................................................................................................ 20
5.20
RULES OF DEBATE ........................................................................................................................... 20
5.20.1
5.21
RULES OF CONDUCT ........................................................................................................................ 20
5.21.1
THE MOTION ............................................................................................................................. 21
5.21.2
AMENDMENTS .......................................................................................................................... 21
5.21.3
VOTING ...................................................................................................................................... 22
5.21.4
FORMAL MOTIONS ................................................................................................................... 22
5.21.5
POINT OF ORDER (NO SECONDER REQUIRED) ................................................................... 23
5.21.6
The Closure ................................................................................................................................ 23
5.21.7
ADJOURN THE MEETING ......................................................................................................... 23
5.21.8
THE PREVIOUS QUESTION ..................................................................................................... 23
5.21.9
PROCEED TO NEXT BUSINESS .............................................................................................. 23
5.21.10
ADJOURN THE DEBATE (SECONDER REQUIRED) ............................................................... 23
5.21.11
LIE ON THE TABLE.................................................................................................................... 23
5.21.12
RAISE MOTION FROM THE TABLE (SECONDER REQUIRED) .............................................. 23
5.21.13
RULES OF DEBATE - SUMMARY CHART ................................................................................ 23
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PRELIMINARY ........................................................................................................................... 20
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5 THE CLUB PRESIDENT
The Club President is the Chief Executive Officer of a Lions Club.
He/she presides at all meetings of the board of directors and the club. The president issues the call for regular
meetings and special meetings of the board of directors and the club, and appoints the standing and special
committees of the club while cooperating with chairpersons to ensure regular functioning and reporting of such
committees. He/she sees that officers are elected as provided for by the constitution and by-laws, and
cooperates as an active member of the district governor's advisory committee of the zone in which this club is
located.
The club president has no absolute authority. The president’s authority to act must come from directives from the
board of directors, the club as a whole, the club’s constitution and by-laws, or the Standard Form Lions Club
Constitution and By-Laws.
Most importantly, the Club President leads and guides the Club as part of a team that includes the First and
Second Vice-Presidents, the Club Secretary and Treasurer.
The Club President must be fully conversant with the Club Officers Manual. This manual “LA15” is available on
the Lions International website at http://www.lionsclubs.org/EN/common/pdfs/la15.pdf
5.1
INTRODUCTION
Being a Club President in Lions is a fantastic honour and a great deal of work. Your year as President can be
exciting and rewarding. It is up to you. There are many resources available to assist and many of these are on
the MD201 or LCI websites.
If you are a new President do not be concerned about any lack of experience. Rather understand that every job
in Lions is a learning experience and can be preparation for a further job.
Lions Club members depend on their President and Board for leadership and direction. The performance of the
President will be measured by the members' satisfaction and the enjoyment experienced at Club meetings. For
the President, success will be achieved through enthusiasm, vigour and dedication to the position, and from the
reaction of the Club members to his/her leadership.
The successful President will have prepared thoroughly and should work continually to gain knowledge. The
successful President is a leader, a motivator and an organiser and one who understands that there is a time to
lead, a time to follow and a time to have fun.
The success of any Club depends upon a President's good preparation and planning - and such preparation will
make the role so much easier.
Good preparation will make for a year of enjoyment, fellowship and achievement. The President should be a
good communicator who can clearly convey what needs to be done and ask for the help of the members to
achieve goals. Workable goals should be selected, and the membership asked to help achieve them.
Club Presidents should always remember that not only can their Club members assist them, but also that the
District Governor and cabinet officers can be called upon at any time as it is the District role to assist Clubs with
support and advice when requested to do so. Delegation is an important and worthwhile skill to develop.
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5.2
PROGRESSING TO PRESIDENT
We should not think of the Club President in isolation. It should be seen as part of a continuum, beginning with
third, second and first Vice Presidents and culminating in immediate past President. That last position is itself a
step towards a number of other avenues of service.
The process of moving through the Vice Presidents' positions gives the potential Lion President the best
opportunity to learn about his/her Club prior to assuming the major leadership role in the Club, always
remembering that no matter how much we know, we always have more to learn. At the same time, and whilst the
progressive method of reaching the President’s chair has many advantages; there have been many new Lions
who have reached the position and done the job successfully without any experience at all.
Often, new Lions Clubs are formed with officers who have no experience whatever. In many Clubs, the reality is
that the desirable progression through ‘the ranks’ is just not possible, due to transfers or other membership
movements.
5.3
PREPARING TO BE PRESIDENT
For most, it has already been said that experience as a Vice-President is excellent preparation. Spending a year
as Secretary or Treasurer is equally valuable. All these positions demand a degree of skill brought to the job by
the individual; but even more worthwhile is the knowledge and experience gained. They also provide opportunity
for honing and developing those skills further, and to extend one's knowledge of Lions Clubs.
Many districts conduct regular ‘Leadership Development Courses’. Those who attend these courses almost
invariably speak highly of the value and content of the program. They also admit to enjoying the company of
other Lions. Every potential President ought to participate in such a course. It is a way to boost self-confidence,
to clarify goals and ideas, and to remind those of us who have been through similar courses before of the things
stored away in the sub conscious.
Attendance at the District ‘Incoming Club Officers' Forum’ is essential. At these forums, the incoming District
Governor will often outline his policy for the year, and provide information that will assist the President elect.
There are a number of things you should consider in the months leading up to taking office:
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Prior to your year as President, ask your predecessor for the opportunity to chair one or two
meetings;
•
Set goals for yourself, and for the Club, and know what you want to achieve. Make sure that
your fellow Lions will understand those goals. They are more likely to work as a team if they all
share a common set of objectives;
•
Keeping the selected goals in mind, and with the Secretary and Treasurer elect, plan a
program and a budget for the year. Do not forget ongoing commitments that may have been
entered into by the existing or previous Club boards;
•
Make sure that every member of the Club will have a job. The load does not have to be shared
equally, but it is important to involve every member;
•
When goals have been set, the budget established, and the team selected; plan the complete
year. Share the plan with others so that every member will feel a part of your team with clear
objectives in mind;
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5.4
Of course, it is important that your planning does not interfere with your predecessor's activities
and plans for his year - you must allow him to finish before you take over!
CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL REQUIREMENTS
The more important constitutional and legal requirements for Lions Clubs are outlined in Chapter 4 of this
manual, but remember that these requirements differ in the various states and territories of Multiple District 201.
A Club President should be familiar with the club, District, Multiple District and International Constitution.
A President should also be aware of any special legal requirements affecting incorporated associations and
charitable institutions in your State or Territory. In many cases these requirements will be incorporated in the
Club constitution approved for your State or Territory, but further details can be obtained from your cabinet
Secretary or district constitution and by-laws officer.
There are several other publications that can assist both for preparation for your year as President and during
the year itself. All Presidents will need to use these from time to time as a reference library. Much useful
information can be found in the following:
5.5
•
This MD201 Club Administration Manual that includes chapters for key position holders;
•
The online “Club Resource Centre” on the Lions Clubs International website.
http://www.lionsclubs.org/EN/member-center/managing-a-club/club-resource-center.php
•
The district magazine or newsletter;
•
‘The Lion’ Magazine (Australia & Papua New Guinea Edition);
THE BASIC INGREDIENTS WHICH ARE PRESENT IN ALL SUCCESSFUL CLUBS
5.5.1 A MAJOR SERVICE ACTIVITY
Lions join Lions Club to participate in community service; not to participate in meetings. The club should look for
strong and worthwhile activities to motivate their members. Strong emphasis on a major activity will not only
build community support, but it will strengthen the unity of your membership and will enhance and increase
membership participation in all projects sponsored by the Club.
5.5.2 A MAJOR FUND RAISING PROJECT
Successful Lions Clubs often sponsor a major fund raising project in which the community can participate and
towards which the community can contribute. Again, each and every member should bear some degree of
responsibility for establishing, organising and affecting the program. Membership involvement is always the key
to Lions Club effectiveness. The fundraising activity must be of value to the entire community, for only with the
support of the community can it succeed.
5.5.3 STRONG PUBLIC RELATIONS
Public Relations is important to ensure that there will always be willing Lions to continue our humanitarian work.
Although most Lions are very happy to work quietly in the background, if we don’t tell our community what we do,
then we cannot inspire skilled members of the community to join us.
Every Club should have a strong public relations committee. Good public relations include a bright, ‘newsy’ Club
bulletin that reports on the progress of the Club and which recognises the efforts of individual members. A firm
relationship with local news media should be established and the media should be kept constantly informed on
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Club programs and activities. A good relationship with the local press will almost automatically assure a flow of
information to the community about the Club's service projects and thereby encourage community support.
5.5.4 WELL ORGANISED, ENJOYABLE MEETINGS
Club Meetings must be stimulating, informative and enjoyable. Club members that aren’t enjoying their meetings
and club life in general, won’t stay with our organisation. Fun, friendship, care and support for the Lions of your
own club ought to be a priority.
Meetings should be thoroughly planned beforehand and should be run according to their plan. Meetings that
start on time and finish on time show respect for the members and the families of those members who may have
other obligations. In this respect, remember that each of your club members may have different responsibilities
and obligations.
Lively, interesting meetings will help create the impetus for individual members to participate even more actively
in Club activities.
5.5.5 ASSOCIATION SPIRIT
Each Individual Lions Club Member should know that he/she is an important part of an organisation that is truly
dedicated to humanitarian service. As Club President, it is your responsibility to help members understand and
appreciate their connection to this broad organisation and the obligation of each members to ensure its
sustainability.
Members should be encouraged to take part in programs conducted at the Zone, Region, District, Multiple
District and International levels. The Club should participate in these programs as well, and the individual
member should be encouraged to suggest ways and means for the Club to contribute even more substantially to
the projects established at the different organisation levels. Each member should always know and be proud
that he/she is a ‘LION’.
5.5.6 A STRONG MEMBERSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND RETENTION PROGRAM
Caring for members is the essential key to high membership retention. Although Lions focussed its efforts
towards helping others, our first priority must be to those individuals who deliver our outcomes; our members.
Our Lions members are the ‘engine room’ of our Association and the highest priority should be given to
developing a fun, happy, friendly and productive club where each member feels supported.
If we achieve this, our members will want to stay as part of our Association and will be enthusiastic ambassadors
to draw others in.
5.6
CLUB COMMITTEE STRUCTURE
Generally, the Committee structure of an established Club stays much the same from year to year, but the
advent of a new President may well be the time to reconsider the management format for the Club, especially if
there have been large changes in membership numbers during the previous year. This subject is covered in
Chapter 4 of this manual.
The smaller Clubs, typically those with fifteen or fewer members frequently operate with limited emphasis on the
Board of Directors, in effect, allowing all members to be the Board. Committees do not often feature largely in the
scheme of management; even the planning of Club activities and projects is the property of all members in such
Clubs.
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The same system will not be suitable in larger Clubs. The medium and larger Clubs have a different situation,
and need a different management style.
As President of a larger the Club, it is important to delegates duties and roles. the more the President needs to
delegate. This not only means ensuring that the Vice Presidents have real responsibilities, but that there is an
efficient committee system in place to plan and coordinate the various activities of the Club.
Appointments should be made on merit; you will need skilled people for your committee to be successful. Note
however, that it is also important to give opportunities to new Lions and committee work can be a way of
identifying future potential in your new members.
This excerpt from the Club Officer Manual puts it well.
“In today’s rapidly changing world, individuals must blend their family demands, work commitments and
volunteer work. While the responsibilities of an individual club officer may be demanding, he/she is able
to share challenges, ideas and perspectives with fellow officers. This club officer team concept fosters
collaboration and provides a shared focus and approach to club administration. The club president,
secretary and treasurer comprise the core of the club officer team, working together to provide effective
club leadership. The club president, in addition to supervising overall club operations, is responsible for
developing team strategies, coaching and motivating the team members, and monitoring overall
performance of the team.
This collaborative team approach not only can improve club administration, but it also enables each
officer to be more confident and effective. Collaboration ensures more effective use of individual talents.
No individual Lion possesses all of the knowledge, skills and experience required to effectively operate a
club alone. By working together, the effectiveness of the club officers can be maximized as they take
advantage of the special knowledge and skills of each person. Collaboration is a source of stimulation
and creativity. Open, consistent communication and sharing of challenges, opportunities and ideas can
generate new insight or perspectives that an individual would not have discovered. Club officers can
assist each other as they tackle challenges and address issues. Collaboration supports the achievement
of goals in a timelier manner. By club officers communicating their specific objectives to each other,
each, while focusing on their own responsibilities, can supplement the efforts of the other. The result
can be attainment of club goals in a shorter time frame. As the key leader in each club, the president can
be extremely busy. Effectively delegating responsibilities as appropriate to club officer team members
can enhance the management and general operations of the club, while preparing them for future
leadership roles.”
5.7
THE CLUB RESOURCE CENTRE
Lions Clubs International provide resources for Club Officers on the International website. These resources are
routinely updated as programs change, decisions are made, and as new information becomes available.
It is critical that the Club Leadership Team, the Club President, First and Second Vice President visit this site
regularly.
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5.8
ROLE OF THE PRESIDENT AT A MEETING
The President is central to the success of every Club meeting. You must ensure that you:
5.9
•
Arrive early enough to greet your special guests and also to greet, and enjoy fellowship with
the members and their guests;
•
Are fully conversant with the background or activity involving the guest speaker or special
guests. A strong liaison is vital between the President and his program committee;
•
Use the correct protocol in effecting introductions of official Lions Guests. This aspect is
important and must never be ignored;
•
Arrange contact with each Lion who is programmed to do something at the next meeting. This
must take place several days prior to the event, to ensure availability and to advise on the time
allowed for his/her particular input;
•
Set and encourage correct dress standards to be used at every meeting. Remember that
meetings are generally held in a public place, and that the public perception of Lions, to a large
extent, depends on how we are seen at meetings or whilst engaged in projects.
ORGANISE THE CLUB PROGRAM!
One of the most effective ways to ensure success in a Club’s program for the year is to plan ahead. The
President should discuss plans and ideas for the year with the program Chairperson. Ensure there are
interesting guest speakers, partners' nights and Club visits.
Use a planner to organise the program of events for the whole year. Plan the operation - by days, weeks,
months, quarters, half year and full year. Use a day-by-day calendar and mark everything on it. A wall chart is
ideal for this purpose because it can be displayed at each meeting for the benefit of all members.
Firstly, enter all important dates like Club meetings, board meetings. You should then add the many
predetermined program items such as the District Convention, District Governor's visit, Region Chairperson's
visit, Zone Chairperson's visits, Conventions, zone meetings, partners' nights, etc. The President should consult
with the program Chairperson and committee rather than fixing the complete program.
The whole key to successful meetings is variety - even the best ideas must sometimes be changed! Try to
achieve both entertaining and educational meetings. Have fun and you will find that many problems disappear.
Give Lions’ partners several opportunities to visit the Club. In a yearly program of 24 meetings, ensure that
partners are welcomed to several, some Clubs consider 6 as the minimum number of partners' nights for the
year, whilst many Clubs now welcome partners at all meetings, or at all non-business meetings.
Organise at least one meeting a year at which an opportunity is given for members to constructively discuss their
own Club. Make sure that this meeting is closed to visitors, as robust argument may not promote the best view
of Lions to those outside our organisation.
Advance details of the program should be printed in the Club bulletin and made available to members at least a
week prior to the meeting. The name of the guest speaker and the names of the Lions who are to introduce and
thank the speaker must be published. Restrict introductions and votes of thanks to 2 minutes each.
Seek interesting guest speakers and ensure variety. Members need to be advised on the many aspects of our
Association - the educational and instructional areas should not be ignored when selecting guest speakers.
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Plan for a Greeter or Greeters to be on hand to meet everyone as they arrive. Greeters need to arrive in
sufficient time to allow for this to happen. Make members and visitors feel welcome at every meeting.
Avoid cliques by placing name cards on the table and rotating the cards each meeting to allow all members and
their guests the opportunity of meeting each other. If cliques emerge, discuss this with the members of those
cliques to encourage a more inclusive approach.
DINNER MEETINGS? Traditional clubs usually arrange two meetings a month. The
Board meeting; with a subset of all members, to deal with business and the Dinner
meeting; with all members, to review the business and to share a meal with Lions and
partners.
This works for traditional clubs but it is not a required structure. Modern clubs meet over
breakfast or lunch, and some clubs don’t meet over a meal at all.
The important thing is that the program is organised, business is conducted, and social
opportunities are arranged for Lions and their partners.
5.10 INVITATIONS TO GUEST SPEAKERS
Do send a formal letter to invite guest speakers to your Club. They will appreciate the gesture, and you will have
the opportunity to give directions to your meeting place and perhaps mention issues such as for how long you
wish them to speak; and what facilities are available such as projectors, video, etc.
Remember the following points and ensure that your program committee takes account of them:
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Nothing is more distressing to a guest speaker than for you to advise, when they arrive, that
you want them to speak for 15 minutes when they had a half hour presentation prepared and
rehearsed!
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Or for them to find that the required technical equipment is nowhere in evidence!
•
If a public address system is to be used, ensure well ahead of the starting time that it is in
excellent working order and is adequate for the needs of the particular meeting.
•
Where you do not know the speaker, do make sure that you request curriculum vitae, or at
least ensure that you have sufficient information for a proper introduction.
•
Rather than a lengthy talk, it is often better that the effective length of a presentation is
extended by questions from an audience interested in particular aspects of a subject. Always
provide the opportunity for questions.
•
If District Chairpersons are to be invited to visit the Club, give them plenty of notice - they are
just waiting to be asked – but not at 24 hours’ notice because another speaker let you down!
•
Maintain your proposed program as closely as possible and make necessary - but limited adjustments as the year progresses.
•
When the Club has visiting dignitaries, check with the official order of protocol to ensure correct
introduction of the guests.
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Ensure that a member of the Club is delegated to greet and introduce guests and visitors to the
members. The Immediate Past President is often asked to act as ‘Greeter’.
5.11 DISTRICT GOVERNOR'S VISIT
During the year your Club will receive a formal visit from a member of the District Governor Team (District
Governor, First and Second Vice District Governor). The Governor will be concerned to see how your Club is
operating, and will be interested in your projects.
Often, he/she may wish to meet with the Club's Board privately; or possibly check that the Club is complying with
policy and the constitutions. He/she is required to render a report on each Club to Lions Clubs International.
Your Governor should be introduced properly to each member of your Club, and you should ensure that any
member who wishes to raise any matters with the Governor is able to do so.
Normally, the District Governor's visit allows both formal and informal discussions with the Club and its members,
and no other speakers or guests should be invited unless the Governor has agreed.
In the majority of cases his/her partner will accompany the Governor, and it will be appropriate for partners to be
present at the meeting.
Often, it will be necessary for the Governor to stay overnight to avoid lengthy late night journeys; a considerate
Club will try to provide hospitality in this event - do remember to check this point beforehand.
It should be remembered that the District Governors have an important and time-consuming job to do on behalf
of the International President, and should receive an appropriate welcome and recognition.
He/she will be in a position to discuss the International President's program and his district policy for the year,
and any other matters that affect your Club's operation.
If your members have specific matters that they wish to discuss, or you wish your Governor to carry out special
duties such as the induction of new members or the presentation of awards, please take the trouble to advise
such matters/duties to the Governor in advance of the meeting.
5.12 RUNNING MEETINGS
There are many guides and resources to help Lions learn how to run meetings, and it is important. It is important
to be respectful of Lions time and ensure that things are organised and productive. It’s not an exaggeration to
say that some organisations have failed, in part, due to a lack of organisation.
There is no one way to Chair a meeting; everyone has their individual styles, however the best meeting
Chairpersons are respectful, polite, organised and timely.
START ON TIME AND FINISH ON TIME.
If meetings commence punctually members will arrive on time. One of the most common complaints about Lions
meetings is that they finish far too late.
Always have a written agenda. It is a plan for the meeting that will enable all the important business to be dealt
with correctly and yet still finish on time.
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KEEP CONTROL OF THE MEETING AT ALL TIMES.
Remember that as President (and Chairperson) you are the guardian of the time which your Club members
assign to Lions - do not allow their time to be wasted! Occasionally you will find it necessary to use the gong to
get your meeting back under control. Do it - be firm but fair and do not allow the floor to control the meeting. Do
not hesitate to wind up discussion on any matter once you feel that both sides have put their case fairly - avoid
needless repetition.
Use the rules of debate. It is necessary to be flexible in the interpretation of these rules. Some members are
intimidated by strict adherence to the rules. On the other hand, others may take advantage of the situation if you
are too generous. It is important that you know the rules, even if you do not always rigidly enforce them. (See
later in this Chapter for a basic set of rules).
5.12.1 TYPICAL MEETING AGENDA
The President must ensure that he/she has an agenda prepared for each meeting.
The agenda should have an approximate timing for each item.
The agenda serves as a control document for the meeting, enabling guests to be correctly acknowledged,
apologies to be submitted etc.; and if used properly will assist in keeping the meeting on schedule. The following
outline is a simple example:
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AGENDA
7.00 p.m.
Call to Order.
Invocation & Loyal Toast (remember that not all Lion members are Christians)
Loyal Toast and/or National Anthem.
7.05 p.m.
Greeter - Welcome to Visitors and Guests
7.08 p.m.
Apologies for absence.
7.15 p.m.
Tail Twister
7.30 p.m.
Ethics and/or Purposes.
7.35 p.m.
Club Announcements by Secretary
7.45 p.m.
Lions Information Talk
7.55 p.m.
Break
8.05 p.m.
Introduce Guest Speaker.
8.07 p.m.
Guest Speaker
8.20 p.m.
Vote of thanks to Guest Speaker
8.25 p.m.
Minutes of last meeting
8.30 p.m.
Matters arising
8.40 p.m.
Vice Presidents' Reports
8.55 p.m.
Other business
9.10 p.m.
Ethics and/or Purposes.
9.15 p.m.
Final announcements
9.25 p.m.
Close of Meeting
CLARIFICATION OF MOTIONS
One of the great traps in a poorly run meeting is that members do not know what matter is being voted on.
Always clarify the meaning of a motion from the chair if the mover (see under Motions) has not already done this.
Nothing is worse than to allow debate to proceed on a motion that is not clear to all the participants in the debate.
Always ensure that any motion is specific as to who or what is to take action before you allow it to be seconded
and thus brought to the floor of the meeting for debate.
Where any proposal involves financial expenditure ensure that the motion incorporates the amount or at least a
limit of expenditure. You should allow your Treasurer to say whether such expenditure is feasible, and in
addition, ensure that for insurance purposes, all Club activities are authorised by way of a motion, and duly
recorded in the minutes.
Remember that if you ensure that Motions are correct before they reach the floor for discussion, you will avoid
troublesome amendments later in the discussion!
If the motion is complex, ask the mover to write down the motion to ensure the Secretary has it correctly
recorded.
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This makes the Secretary's job easier, and allows the ensuing debate to proceed along logical lines without
arguments over semantics.
As President or Chairperson of the meeting, you should be impartial. However this is sometimes difficult in
smaller Clubs when the President or Chairperson will be involved in the matters under discussion. Where this is
the case, ensure that both sides of any question are discussed and avoid stating your personal views whenever
possible.
Where the President or Chairperson is known to favour a particular course of action, it is best to ensure that a
vote is taken on any critical issue; and if he/she wishes to take an active part in the debate, or is named in the
motion, he/she should vacate the chair during that debate.
The Chairperson of any meeting should use his/her vote with care. Under our constitution the President has only
one vote. Generally, it is better that the President or Chairperson does not vote unless it is necessary to maintain
the status quo. It is better to maintain the status quo, even against your personal judgement, rather than risk
splitting the Club over a matter where opinions are evenly divided. Remember that, for matters that may affect
the Club constitution, local legislation may require a 66% or 75% majority, depending on legislation in your state
or territory.
Empower the Board of Directors and the Club committees. Having delegated responsibility, trust the people to
whom responsibilities have been delegated.
Try to resolve queries outside the meeting rather than challenge your officers over matters, unless they are very
significant.
5.13 OVERVIEW OF CLUB ADMINISTRATION
It is strongly suggested that the Club President becomes familiar with both the Secretary's and Treasurer's
duties, which include membership reports, records, correspondence, 100% Attendance Awards finance
accounts, provision of regular financial reports, and the need to see that monies are banked regularly.
Remember that it is the President's responsibility to see that the Secretary and Treasurer perform their duties
effectively and efficiently. As President, you should ensure that the Club’s bank accounts are reconciled on a
monthly basis and that the independent audit for your year is promptly completed.
You should particularly note the requirements of District, Multiple District and International bodies so that you can
ensure these are carried out, and that the accounts are kept up to date for audit. Records of your meetings
should be kept in a bound minute book, and signed by the President as a true record of proceedings, once the
minutes have been approved at the following meeting.
Many Clubs now use computer systems for the maintenance of Club records.
Ensure that your Club has adequate backup systems in place, and that up to date ‘hard copy’ records are kept
as a precaution.
The majority of Clubs are incorporated under State law and you should ensure that Clubs comply with legislative
requirements.
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5.13.1 CORRESPONDENCE
You should ensure that, as President, you are aware of incoming and outgoing correspondence, and make the
necessary arrangements with your Secretary.
You should also expect to sign the monthly membership reports from the Secretary and bank reconciliations from
the Treasurer.
Club correspondence needs to be attended to immediately to avoid delays. Make sure the Secretary brings the
inwards and outwards correspondence files to each meeting, and that the mailbox is cleared regularly between
meetings.
E-mail: The majority of correspondence in you modern Lions Club is sent and received
by e-mail. It is very important that the Club Secretary has a method of bringing this to the
attention of Club members! There are many different systems, but it is important to have
a system. Think about:
•
Printing important e-mail to be brought to a club meeting.
•
Bringing a notebook computer or tablet to the meetings.
•
On-forwarding important e-mails to club members as they arrive.
•
Using a file sharing tool like Dropbox or Skydrive. The tools enable you to
file important e-mail in a shared folder “in the cloud” that can be accessed
by your club board and members.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_collaboration
Copies of correspondence should be distributed to relevant Vice Presidents and/or chairmen, and a record kept
of each item. Ensure that the Secretary retains the original of all correspondence, other than invoices,
statements and receipts, for the Club files. The originals of all invoices, statements, and receipts should be
passed to the Treasurer as supporting documentation for presentation to the Club auditor.
5.13.2 LIAISON WITH DISTRICT
Maintain regular contact with the zone Chairperson and attend the District Governor's Advisory Meetings for your
zone. Attendance is also a requirement for your President’s award at the end of the year.
These gatherings of Clubs in each zone are important, for they are part of the link between the Club, district and
Lions Clubs International.
Your Club may have ideas that other Clubs can use, and in exchange strategies may be borrowed from them.
The Secretary and membership Chairperson should accompany the President, and in many cases it is
appropriate that the Treasurer should also be present.
The general format for such meetings involves reports on Club status and activities from each President, and it is
a good idea that a number of copies of each Club's report should be available for the information of the other
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Clubs in your zone. You should report on such meetings at your Club, particularly in regard to the projects being
carried out by neighbouring Clubs.
5.13.3 SOCIAL ACTIVITIES
It is important to promote social activities in any Club.
Good fellowship promotes efficiency and good results - and the choice of program and social functions can be as
important as some of the Club's project activities.
Ensure that a member has the responsibility for the organisation of social functions, but remember to ensure that
the cost of such activities does not become a burden on members.
5.13.4 HUMAN RELATIONS
The President's skills as a leader and as a communicator will determine how effectively his/her objectives are
realised. At all times, the aim must be to achieve a harmonious and happy Club, working together in the spirit of
Lions Clubs and the motto, ‘We Serve’.
An important aspect of the President's task is to maintain that harmonious relationship. Be alert for any signs of
disharmony within the Club and act to defuse the problem.
In any group of people there will be times when personal differences develop. It would be naive to imagine that
all of these can be overcome, or indeed that there will never be disagreement between members. However,
much can be done to minimise such problems and persuade the members concerned to ‘agree to disagree’ in
the best interests of the Club. Remember that there are techniques for the resolution of conflicts, and do not
hesitate to seek advice from senior Lions if you feel the situation is getting out of control. The principle of
resolution is embodied in the Lions Ethics.
Many Clubs have a welfare officer designated, whose duties are to ensure that the welfare of Club members is
looked after - each of us from time to time suffers a personal disaster and needs the support of others - and who
better to come to the rescue than our Lions friends. Our concern for others should not blind us to our own
problems.
5.13.5 THE QUALITIES OF LEADERSHIP
Keep in mind that, at the end of their term of office, Presidents are asked report on the conduct of the Club's
affairs during the year.
They should build their Clubs, in every way possible, to be an example to other Clubs, and a credit to the
community, the district and Lions Clubs International.
A good definition of leadership is ‘the knack of getting other people to follow you and for them to readily do the
things you want them to do.’ As a good leader, you will be equipped with knowledge of the community, the Club
and the Association. Good leaders realise the greatest achievements are reached through a team effort, using
effective delegation.
It is essential for the President to be fully knowledgeable of all members. Getting to know members will assist
with building a team and the achievement of goals in fellowship and service.
A survey should be done to find out the wishes of members, their various talents and the time that each has
available to give to meetings, activities and projects.
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Making members feel needed is essential to build a year of success; and you should be aware that ‘Good
members will take on important tasks, if they see the importance of those tasks’. On every occasion the
members should be told what is required and asked for their support. Ensure that everyone is clear on the
completion date and reasons for their activity.
One major ingredient in the role of leadership is to be a good ‘time manager’ and this will earn respect from
members. Remember that the time of your members can never be replaced. Use it well!
5.14 OFFICIAL PROTOCOL
Protocol is about showing respect to your guests, officials and distinguished Lions. At its heart, it is ensuring that
respected individuals are announced and introduced.
At many Lions functions distinguished Lions are announced at the commencement of the function, and further
introductions use a shortened form, announcing only the most senior guests. E.g.” “District Governor, Club
President and Lions all”
This publication by Lions Clubs International explains protocol, however Lions Clubs International no longer
publishes a definite list since protocol varies from function to function.
Lions Clubs International Hosting and Protocol Guide
A version of the International Protocol can be found in “Celebrating the New Club” published by Lions Clubs
International. Document # tk26
5.15 LOCAL PROTOCOL MD201
Under normal circumstances the following order of precedence applies.
1. International President
2. Immediate Past International President
3. International Vice Presidents (according to rank)
4. International Directors (a)
a)
(Board Appointees)*
5. Past International Presidents (b)
6. Past International Directors (c)
7. Chairperson, Council of Governors (a)
8. District Governors
9. Association Executive Administrator
10. Association Secretary
11. Association Treasurer
12. Past Council Chairperson (a)
13. Immediate Past District Governor (a)
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14. First Vice District Governor
15. Second Vice District Governor
16. Past District Governor (a)
17. MD201 Executive Officer
18. MD201 National Treasurer
19. MD201 Legal Offficer
20. Region Chairperson (a)
21. Zone Chairperson (a)
22. District Chairperson and Coordinators and GMT/GLT Team Leaders (a)
23. Club Presidents (a)
24. Immediate Past Club Presidents (a)
25. Club Secretaries (a)
26. Club Treasurers (a)
27. Past Club Presidents (c )
28. Multiple District Secretaries (staff) (a)
29. Multiple District Treasurers (staff) (a)
EXPLANATION OF NOTES USED ABOVE:
* Appointees by the International President to committees of the International Board of Directors and the LCIF
Executive Committee shall be introduced and otherwise recognized before Lions who have held the same office.
During introductions, their appointment shall be mentioned.
** Single, sub and multiple district constitution and bylaws or local customs and practice may alter the order of
precedence and/or content of numbers 4, 5 and 13 through 30 and in order to include recognition of past board
appointees.
a) When more than one is present, they shall be recognized according to the alphabetic order of
the family name.
b) When more than one is present, the one who served most recently is given precedence.
c) When more than one is present, precedence should be the same as for Past International
Presidents (see (b) above). In the event more than one Past International Director who served
during the same term is present, then the criteria specified for (a) should be used.
For more details. Please refer to “Celebrating the New Club” published by Lions Clubs International. Document #
tk26
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5.15.1 AUSTRALIAN CUSTOM
Within Australia, it is normal to recognise the most senior person present first, and so on, in direct contradiction
of the official Lions Clubs International policy.
DON’T OVERDO PROTOCOL: Protocol is about showing respect to guests, however
overdoing protocol with continues, long-winded introductions is not necessary, and
boring for all those present.
Once the official protocol is given thereafter an abbreviated protocol recognising the
chair and most senior Lion or guest and then all others present, eg: District Governor,
Club President and Lions all.
Finally, please recognise that the world won’t end if protocol is given incorrectly. All Lions
try to do their best and Lions is about learning and stepping out of our comfort zone.
5.16 INDUCTION OF A NEW MEMBER
The Induction of a new member is very important. For most of us it is a once in a lifetime experience and ought
to be treated as such. Some Clubs ask a senior Lion or the Membership Chairperson to perform the actual
induction, whilst involving the President in the ceremony.
Any ceremony demands the attention of the whole Club. The best way to ensure that this happens is to ensure
that what is said and done is worth the attention of the whole Club.
Before you begin decide where you, as President or Chairperson, the sponsor, and the inductee will stand. Make
sure you have a visual focus to back up your presentation, such as your Club's flags, or bannerette displays.
Many Clubs like to involve the inductee's partner in the ceremony, by having him/her join the group before the
Club.
This, depending on circumstances, is a good idea, provided you give the partner an active role.
An Induction Ceremony Guide is available in the Club Resource Centre on the Lions Clubs International website.
Document #me22
You should not be afraid to vary the program to suit the needs of a particular Club, or a particular situation. For
example, it may be appropriate to shorten the format for a re-joining Lion, inducting a number of new members
5.17 RECOGNITION OF MEMBERS
At the end of the Lions year, and generally at the annual changeover and awards evening, it is customary for the
Club President to recognise the efforts put in by his Club members during the year. Generally, this is done by
way of certificates of appreciation, award plaques etc.
You will find a selection of suitable items in the Club Supplies catalogue, but there will generally be local sources
of supply as well.
It should be mentioned that such awards should not be a personal financial responsibility of the President, and
the costs should be met from the Club administration account.
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There will be occasions upon which special recognition is justified, and there are a number of ways in which this
can be achieved. Refer to Chapter 10 of this Manual for a description of Rewards for Service.
5.18 NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE
All too soon during your year of office, specifically in December/ early January, you will need to pay attention to
the election of your successor and his officers.
It is important that you follow the correct procedures, which are discussed in Chapter 4
5.19 WHEN YOUR YEAR IS OVER
Most Presidents have some feelings of regret, perhaps mixed with relief, when the year is completed. You should
be able to look back with satisfaction at your achievements.
Finish off a successful exercise by taking some time and care when handing over to your successor.
Make sure that all Club records are complete, and in particular ensure that your Club accounts have been
completed and submitted to the auditor.
Discuss the present position of the Club with the incoming President, and acknowledge the tasks that may not
have been completed.
Remember that good leaders encourage and prepare other good leaders to succeed them. Remember also that
whilst your year as President is over, there is still much to be done. Find new responsibilities, and do not be
tempted to hang on to the job you have finished.
As a retiring President, you may be asked by your District Governor elect to undertake the task of Zone
Chairperson for the new Lions year - this is one of the most rewarding jobs in Lions.
5.20 RULES OF DEBATE
5.20.1 PRELIMINARY
It is important that the President or Chairperson of a meeting has a clear knowledge and understanding of the
Rules of Debate but it is also equally important for each participating member to know the rules under which the
meeting is being conducted.
In a Lions Club the basic objective is to harness and direct the collective ‘know how’ of the group into meaningful
discussion, leading to effective and efficient decision making and action.
Lions International Multiple District 201 accepts as a standard ‘Law and Procedure at Meetings in Australia’ by
Joske. This book, however, has a legal background and is unnecessarily complicated for an ordinary Lions
meeting.
While still accepting Joske as the authority, the following abridged rules are recommended for use by Lions
Clubs.
The main objective is that a meeting is well-planned, organised, professional and democratic.
5.21 RULES OF CONDUCT
No member shall address the assembly without first obtaining permission and direction from the President or
Chairperson, and he shall address himself to the Chair.
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The President or Chairperson may remain seated during normal business, but members addressing the meeting
shall stand.
The exception is when the President is making a specific report or introducing guests.
Members speaking shall confine themselves to the question under debate and avoid personalities and
indecorous language.
The mover of a motion shall be allowed a maximum of 4 minutes, and his right of reply shall not exceed 3
minutes. All other speakers, including the seconder, shall be limited to 3 minutes, provided that an extension
may be given to any speaker by resolution of the meeting.
No new matter shall be introduced in the reply and all speakers should avoid tedious repetition and trivia.
Questions must be directed to the Chairperson and he/she may direct the mover to reply, provided such reply
must not exceed 2 minutes and shall be confined to the question alone and shall not be considered his right of
reply.
Members wishing to move a motion or address the meeting must advise the President before the meeting to
ensure that such intention has the approval of the President and is placed on the agenda.
5.21.1 THE MOTION
A motion is usually positive in nature beginning with the word ‘That’. It should be carefully researched and
worded, and where possible a copy submitted to the President and Secretary in writing.
The motion must be moved and seconded before discussion and the motion lapses if a seconder is not
forthcoming. It is acceptable for a member to second a motion in order to hear the proposal. He is not committed
to vote for the motion.
After the motion has been formally moved and seconded, the proposer may speak to the motion for a maximum
of four minutes.
The seconder shall then be invited to speak for a maximum of three minutes. He/she may request a deferment
but loses this right if the debate is terminated before he/she speaks.
If the above two speakers, i.e., mover and seconder, speak for the motion, the Chairperson must then call for two
speakers against the motion. Thereafter, speakers for and against must be selected alternately until the debate
is exhausted or terminated.
If there are no speakers against the motion, it may be put to the meeting immediately.
No person shall speak more than once on a question, but a motion and an amendment are considered to be
different questions. A member who has spoken to a motion may speak again to an amendment.
If any member feels more time or investigation is needed, provision is made later in these rules under formal
motions (Para 5.19.4) for the debate and consequent decision to be adjourned.
5.21.2 AMENDMENTS
Amendments are often the main cause of confusion at meetings, as members and even the Chairperson can
easily lose the thread of the debate. The Golden Rule therefore is one step at a time, and good sense suggests
only one amendment at a time.
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In matters of a complex nature, it helps if a copy of the motion is available to every member during the debate.
The simple rules governing amendments are:An amendment must not be a direct negative to the motion. The simplest way to negate a motion is to vote
against it and indicate your intention and reason for doing so in the course of the debate.
An amendment is an alteration to the wording of a motion. It may leave out certain words, change certain words
or add certain words, but the basic intention of the motion must remain and the amended motion must stand up
to common sense interpretation.
More than one amendment may be made to the original motion but amendments to amendments are not
permitted, for example: a motion may contain several elements such as a basic purpose or intention, a method, a
time, a place and a cost. While maintaining the basic purpose or intention, any or all of the other elements may
be altered by amendment either singly or collectively.
The wording of a motion may also be amended to assist common sense interpretation of its intent.
Further amendments (plural) may be foreshadowed to indicate a direction for debate, and the Chairperson in his
wisdom may decide the order of debate to ensure continuity.
After debate, each amendment must be voted upon, and if passed, the amended motion becomes the motion.
The mover of an amendment has no right of reply.
When all required amendments are in position, the amended motion is known as ‘The substantive motion’, and
this must be finally voted upon to become a resolution of the Club.
5.21.3 VOTING
Voting by proxy is not permitted within Lions Clubs International.
A quorum shall consist of a simple majority of members in good standing (i.e., more than half of the members of
the Club must be present). An affirmative vote shall consist of a simple majority of the members present,
providing they constitute a quorum.
However it should be noted that the requirements for quorums and affirmative votes at any General Meeting of
the Club held to comply with Australian State or Territory law may be different and you should ensure that you
comply with the relevant legislation. Normally, the Club constitution approved for use in your state or territory will
cover this requirement.
When a motion is passed it becomes a resolution. Most resolutions require action of some sort and before the
matter is closed, the President or Chairperson must ensure that responsibility for such action is clearly defined
and delegated. Most resolutions require action of some sort and before the matter is closed, the president or
chairperson must ensure that responsibility for such action is clearly defined and delegated.
5.21.4 FORMAL MOTIONS
When a debate is becoming tedious, time consuming or perhaps heated, or when a member feels more
investigation is required or more pressing business is on the agenda, several options are available in the form of
Formal Motions as follows.
All formal motions are subject to acceptance by the President or the Chairperson and are not open to debate.
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5.21.5 POINT OF ORDER (NO SECONDER REQUIRED)
No speaker shall be interrupted except on a ‘Point of Order when he shall sit down until the point of order is
settled by the President or Chairperson, whose decision shall be final in such matters.
5.21.6 THE CLOSURE
‘I move that the motion be now put.’ This motion has priority if accepted by the Chairperson and terminates the
discussion if passed.
5.21.7 ADJOURN THE MEETING
‘I move that the meeting be adjourned until.....’ This motion terminates the meeting and applies to motions and
amendments under discussion.
5.21.8 THE PREVIOUS QUESTION
‘I move that the question be not put now.’ This motion prevents a vote being taken and shelves the motion for
that meeting. It applies to motions - but not amendments.
5.21.9 PROCEED TO NEXT BUSINESS
‘I move that the meeting proceeds to the next business.’
5.21.10 ADJOURN THE DEBATE (SECONDER REQUIRED)
‘I move that the debate be adjourned’.
5.21.11 LIE ON THE TABLE
‘I move that the question lie on the table until.....’ Defers the matter to a more convenient time that may be later in
the same meeting or at a later date.
5.21.12 RAISE MOTION FROM THE TABLE (SECONDER REQUIRED)
‘I move motion (description) be raised from the table.’ Raises the motion that was previously laid on the table
and reintroduces it to the meeting. The President or Chairperson should have the Secretary read the motion and
then invite speakers to the motion.
The President can also usefully remind the members of the state of the discussion at the time the motion to lie on
the table was moved, and then call for the appropriate person to continue the debate.
5.21.13 RULES OF DEBATE - SUMMARY CHART
The following summary chart may be a useful quick reference for the new President. Also a new President may
find it useful to ask his predecessor to sit alongside him during his initial meeting, especially if it is expected that
controversial topics will arise.
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GUIDE TO ACCEPTANCE OF MOTIONS, AMENDMENTS & DEBATE
To do this
1 Introduce new
business for
discussion
2 Amend a motion
3 End debate on a
matter for a vote.
4 Suspend debate on a
matter for the,
present meeting
5 Suspend debate on a
matter either
indefinitely or until
later in the meeting.
6 Re-introduce debate
on a matter laid on the
table.
You say This
‘I move that the motion
be amended by
..................’
‘I move that the question
be now put’.
‘I move that the meeting
proceed to the next
business.
‘I move that the question
lie on the table’
‘I move that the question
of ............... be now
raised from the table’.
‘I move that debate on
this matter be adjourned
until’
‘I move that this meeting
adjourn until’
9 Ensure that a matter is I wish to give notice of
placed on the agenda motion to be
for a later meeting
moved[when] that’
11 Strike out or cancel a
motion previously
passed.
12 Withdraw a motion.
13 Have a matter
investigated further.
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Is a seconder
needed?
Is your motion
debatable?
Is your motion
amenable?
Vote Needed
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes, unless the
Chairman declares
otherwise
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
‘I move that...................’
7 Adjourn debate on a
matter until a later
time or later meeting
8 Adjourn a meeting.
10 Draw attention to a
breach of procedure.
May you interrupt
the speaker?
‘Point of order. [e.g.]
'There is no quorum
presents Mr Chairman’.
‘I move we rescind the
motion that
‘I request leave to
withdraw the motion’
‘I move we refer this
matter to a committee:
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