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CHECK OUT
ENERGY
SAVINGS
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
ENERGY TRUST OF OREGON
CONGRATULATIONS!
Checking out a Kill A Watt® monitor starts you on the path to energy
savings. By finding out how much energy your electronics and appliances
are using, and then making adjustments, you can take charge of your
electricity use and decrease utility costs.
Saving energy helps lower energy costs and protects the environment
for all Oregonians.
What should you measure?
The Kill A Watt monitor can tell you the amount of electricity used by
small- to medium-sized electrical devices in your home. It will also help
you discover items that still draw power even when turned off—adding to
your energy bill.
The Kill A Watt can be used on most small household appliances that
operate between 110V and 120V, such as these:
Cable set-top box
Phone charger
Computer
Power strip
Coffee maker
Printer
DVD/VCR player
Refrigerator
Freezer
Space heater
Hair dryer
Stereo equipment
Lamp with incandescent light bulb
Television
Lamp with compact fluorescent light bulb
Toaster
Microwave oven
Video game system
Modem or router
Window A/C unit
The Kill A Watt cannot be used on larger, energy-intense appliances,
like ovens and clothes dryers, which operate at 220V or 240V. These
appliances can be recognized by the different plug and wall outlet they use.
USING THE KILL A WATT MONITOR
1
Plug the Kill A Watt into an electrical socket or power strip, and
then plug the device you want to measure into the Kill A Watt. If
the outlet is hard to reach, use an extension cord. If the outlet is not
grounded (only has two prongs), you can purchase an adapter at a
local hardware store.
Turn on the device. The voltage will appear on the display first, and
should be between 110V and 120V. The Kill A Watt cannot be used
to measure larger 220V appliances.
2
Push the “Watt/VA” button for an instant reading of the power, in
watts, that the device is drawing. If the monitor shows “VA” to the
right of the number, press the Watt/VA button again to toggle the
display. Write down the watts drawn by the device.
3
4
Leave the device plugged in for at least one hour to get a good
average reading. For appliances that cycle on and off, such as
refrigerators and coffee makers, leave it plugged in overnight to get
a more accurate idea of overall energy used. The Kill A Watt will
continuously measure the power used by a device starting from the
time you plug it into the monitor.
Push the “KWH/Hour” button once to see how many kilowatt
hours were consumed since the device was connected to the
monitor. Push it again to see the time, in hours, since the device was
plugged into the Kill A Watt. Write down the number of kWh used
and the number of hours the device has been plugged in.
5
Remove the meter from the outlet to reset it before measuring
a different device.
Check several devices and compare electricity use to help prioritize
which devices to unplug when not in use.
For example, a lamp with a 60W incandescent light bulb uses 1.44
kWh in 1 day, while an equivalent CFL uses only 0.36 kWh.
HOW MUCH ARE YOU SPENDING?
Calculate how much your appliances and electronics cost to operate by
using your measurements from the Kill A Watt:
Estimated monthly kWh consumed
If you left your device plugged in for an hour or more, you can calculate its
monthly energy consumption using the information gathered in Step 4.
Divide the kWh measurement by the number of hours it was plugged in
to get the kWh used in one hour. Use the equation below to determine the
monthly energy use:
number of kWh
hours used
x
used in 1 hr
per day
x
days used
= monthly kWh
per month
If you used the Kill A Watt for less than an hour, take the instantaneous
watt reading from Step 2 and divide it by 1,000 to get it to kWh. Use that
as your “number of kWh used in 1 hr” in the above equation to estimate
the device’s monthly kWh consumed.
Estimated monthly cost
Use the equation below to calculate the device’s monthly energy cost:
monthly kWh x
utility bill
rate
=
monthly energy
cost
Note: Refer to your electric utility bill or contact your local utility to determine your billing rate.
FINDING PHANTOM LOADS
While plugged into the Kill A Watt, turn a device off to see if any
electricity is being consumed when it is not in use (a phantom load).
Prevent phantom loads in your house and lower your utility bills by:
a. Unplugging items with phantom loads when they aren’t in use.
b. Grouping computers, printers, TVs and other electronics on a single
power strip that can be easily switched off.
COMPARE YOUR ELECTRICITY USE
Compare the wattage, average hours used and average energy
consumption of your appliances and electronics with those of a typical
family of four.
Monthly electricity usage in kilowatt hours
Appliance
Air conditioner
Typical
power use
(in watts)
Average
hours used
per month
Average
monthly
kWh
1,000
200
200
Ceiling fan
50
180
9
Christmas lights
70
150
11
Coffee maker
900
13
12
Dehumidifier
480
720
346
Dishwasher
1,000
20
20
DVD player
60
120
7
Freezer (17 cubic feet)
600
180
108
Hair dryer
1,500
10
15
Heater (portable)
1,500
75
112
Light bulb (incandescent)
100
240
24
Light bulb (CFL)
18
240
4
Microwave oven
1,500
10
15
509
180
92
Stereo
75
130
10
TV (19”)
100
120
12
TV (42” plasma)
375
120
45
1,500
25
38
Refrigerator (19 cubic feet)
Toaster oven
Create your own chart with items from your household and use the
equations to the left to track your electricity costs per month by product.
A sample chart is online at www.energytrust.org/checkoutsavings.
Caution
The maximum voltage that the Kill A Watt can handle is 125V (also
written as 125VAC). This allows for measurement of most household
electrical devices, but make sure to check the voltage of appliances
before plugging them into the Kill A Watt. You can usually find the
voltage of most appliances stamped on the bottom or back of the
appliance or on its nameplate.
Technical support
For additional information or technical support about the Kill A Watt
monitor (Model P4400), contact P3 International at 212.741.7289 or
email [email protected]
Energy Trust is not liable for any damage caused by a Kill A Watt
monitor. Operate only as instructed.
WHERE CAN YOU SAVE ENERGY?
Inefficient appliances like clothes washers, dishwashers and refrigerators use
more energy and water than the new energy-efficient models on the market.
Choose ENERGY STAR® models when you’re ready to replace older appliances.
Phantom loads are caused by appliances and electronics drawing power
while they are switched off or in standby mode. Between five and 1 5 percent
of household electricity consumption is wasted powering devices that are
turned off.
Common sources of phantom loads are battery chargers and almost any
product with an external power supply, remote control, digital display, LED
status light or digital clock. A typical home has around 40 devices that create
phantom loads.
Examples of devices with phantom loads
Cable box
On, TV on
On, TV off*
Off*
29.64W
24.65W
17.83W
On and charging
Sleep mode*
Off but
plugged in*
Charger plugged
in only*
44.28W
15.77W
8.90W
4.42W
“Ready” mode*
Off*
Laptop
Video game system
On and playing
27W
23.34W
1W
*Phantom load
Defining electrical terms
Watt (W): a unit of energy
Kilowatt (kW): 1,000 watts
Watts = Kilowatts
1,000
Kilowatt hour (kWh): A measurement of energy use over time; 1,000 watts
used for one hour.
• Example: a 60W light bulb operating for 20 hours uses 1.2 kWh:
(60W/1,000) x 20 hours
• A kilowatt hour is the billing unit your electric utility uses
A kilowatt is like the rate at which water moves through a pipe—gallons per
minute. A kWh is similar to the total volume of water that flows through the
pipe in a certain amount of time.
TAKE CHARGE OF YOUR
HOUSEHOLD ENERGY USE
The Kill A Watt monitor helps you see where you’re consuming too
much electricity, but did you know many homes can waste up to
60 percent of the energy used for heating and cooling due to leaky
ducts, inefficient equipment, poor insulation and air leaks? Increasing
your home’s energy efficiency can reduce energy costs, increase
comfort levels and improve indoor air quality.
Follow these no- and low-cost tips to get you started:
 Set your thermostat to 65-68 degrees during the day and 58-60
degrees at night during cooler months.
 Use shades or drapes to cover your windows.
 Replace furnace or heat pump filters once a month.
 Recycle your old fridge or freezer; Energy Trust may pick it up for
free and give you a cash incentive.
 Sign up for a Home Energy Review from Energy Trust and receive
a list of customized energy-saving recommendations.
When you’re ready, here are some larger energy-saving projects to add
to your to-do list:
 Replace inefficient appliances with ENERGY STAR models.
 Install or upgrade insulation in the attic, wall and floor to keep
your home at a more constant and controlled temperature.
 Upgrade your water heating system to a new energy-efficient
tank or tankless water heater.
+
Visit www.energytrust.org or call 1.866.368.7878 for more tips
and ideas on ways to save energy.
Energy Trust of Oregon
1.866.368.7878
851 SW Sixth Avenue, #1200
503.546.6862 fax
Portland, OR 97204
energytrust.org
Energy Trust of Oregon is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to helping utility customers benefit from
saving energy and tapping renewable resources. Our services, cash incentives and energy solutions have helped
participating customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas save on
energy costs. Our work helps keep energy costs as low as possible, creates jobs and builds a sustainable energy
future. Printed with vegetable-based inks on paper that contains 100% post-consumer waste. 03/11
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