Automated Characterization Suite (ACS)

Automated Characterization Suite (ACS)
w w w. k e i t h l e y. c o m
Automated Characterization Suite (ACS)
Reference Manual
ACS-901-01 Rev. E / December 2011
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G R E A T E R
M E A S U R E
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C O N F I D E N C E
Automated Characterization Suite (ACS)
Reference Manual
© 2009-2011, Keithley Instruments, Inc.
Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A.
All rights reserved.
Any unauthorized reproduction, photocopy, or use the information herein, in whole or in part,
without the prior written approval of Keithley Instruments, Inc. is strictly prohibited.
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The Lua 5.0 software and associated documentation files are copyright © 1994-2008, Tecgraf,
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Document number: ACS-901-01 Rev. E / Dec 2011
Safety Precautions
The following safety precautions should be observed before using this product and any associated instrumentation. Although
some instruments and accessories would normally be used with nonhazardous voltages, there are situations where hazardous
conditions may be present.
This product is intended for use by qualified personnel who recognize shock hazards and are familiar with the safety precautions
required to avoid possible injury. Read and follow all installation, operation, and maintenance information carefully before using
the product. Refer to the user documentation for complete product specifications.
If the product is used in a manner not specified, the protection provided by the product warranty may be impaired.
The types of product users are:
Responsible body is the individual or group responsible for the use and maintenance of equipment, for ensuring that the
equipment is operated within its specifications and operating limits, and for ensuring that operators are adequately trained.
Operators use the product for its intended function. They must be trained in electrical safety procedures and proper use of the
instrument. They must be protected from electric shock and contact with hazardous live circuits.
Maintenance personnel perform routine procedures on the product to keep it operating properly, for example, setting the line
voltage or replacing consumable materials. Maintenance procedures are described in the user documentation. The procedures
explicitly state if the operator may perform them. Otherwise, they should be performed only by service personnel.
Service personnel are trained to work on live circuits, perform safe installations, and repair products. Only properly trained
service personnel may perform installation and service procedures.
Keithley Instruments products are designed for use with electrical signals that are rated Measurement Category I and
Measurement Category II, as described in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard IEC 60664. Most
measurement, control, and data I/O signals are Measurement Category I and must not be directly connected to mains voltage or
to voltage sources with high transient over-voltages. Measurement Category II connections require protection for high transient
over-voltages often associated with local AC mains connections. Assume all measurement, control, and data I/O connections are
for connection to Category I sources unless otherwise marked or described in the user documentation.
Exercise extreme caution when a shock hazard is present. Lethal voltage may be present on cable connector jacks or test
fixtures. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) states that a shock hazard exists when voltage levels greater than
30 V RMS, 42.4 V peak, or 60 VDC are present. A good safety practice is to expect that hazardous voltage is present in any
unknown circuit before measuring.
Operators of this product must be protected from electric shock at all times. The responsible body must ensure that operators
are prevented access and/or insulated from every connection point. In some cases, connections must be exposed to potential
human contact. Product operators in these circumstances must be trained to protect themselves from the risk of electric shock. If
the circuit is capable of operating at or above 1000V, no conductive part of the circuit may be exposed.
Do not connect switching cards directly to unlimited power circuits. They are intended to be used with impedance-limited
sources. NEVER connect switching cards directly to AC mains. When connecting sources to switching cards, install protective
devices to limit fault current and voltage to the card.
Before operating an instrument, ensure that the line cord is connected to a properly-grounded power receptacle. Inspect the
connecting cables, test leads, and jumpers for possible wear, cracks, or breaks before each use.
When installing equipment where access to the main power cord is restricted, such as rack mounting, a separate main input
power disconnect device must be provided in close proximity to the equipment and within easy reach of the operator.
For maximum safety, do not touch the product, test cables, or any other instruments while power is applied to the circuit under
test. ALWAYS remove power from the entire test system and discharge any capacitors before: connecting or disconnecting
cables or jumpers, installing or removing switching cards, or making internal changes, such as installing or removing jumpers.
Do not touch any object that could provide a current path to the common side of the circuit under test or power line (earth)
ground. Always make measurements with dry hands while standing on a dry, insulated surface capable of withstanding the
voltage being measured.
The instrument and accessories must be used in accordance with its specifications and operating instructions, or the safety of
the equipment may be impaired.
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Do not exceed the maximum signal levels of the instruments and accessories, as defined in the specifications and operating
information, and as shown on the instrument or test fixture panels, or switching card.
When fuses are used in a product, replace with the same type and rating for continued protection against fire hazard.
Chassis connections must only be used as shield connections for measuring circuits, NOT as safety earth ground connections.
If you are using a test fixture, keep the lid closed while power is applied to the device under test. Safe operation requires the use
of a lid interlock.
If a
screw is present, connect it to safety earth ground using the wire recommended in the user documentation.
The ! symbol on an instrument means caution, risk of danger. The user should refer to the operating instructions located in the
user documentation in all cases where the symbol is marked on the instrument.
symbol on an instrument means caution, risk of electric shock. Use standard safety precautions to avoid personal
The
contact with these voltages.
The
The
symbol on an instrument shows that the surface may be hot. Avoid personal contact to prevent burns.
symbol indicates a connection terminal to the equipment frame.
If this Hg symbol is on a product, it indicates that mercury is present in the display lamp. Please note that the lamp must be
properly disposed of according to federal, state, and local laws.
The WARNING heading in the user documentation explains dangers that might result in personal injury or death. Always read
the associated information very carefully before performing the indicated procedure.
The CAUTION heading in the user documentation explains hazards that could damage the instrument. Such damage may
invalidate the warranty.
Instrumentation and accessories shall not be connected to humans.
Before performing any maintenance, disconnect the line cord and all test cables.
To maintain protection from electric shock and fire, replacement components in mains circuits — including the power
transformer, test leads, and input jacks — must be purchased from Keithley Instruments. Standard fuses with applicable national
safety approvals may be used if the rating and type are the same. Other components that are not safety-related may be
purchased from other suppliers as long as they are equivalent to the original component (note that selected parts should be
purchased only through Keithley Instruments to maintain accuracy and functionality of the product). If you are unsure about the
applicability of a replacement component, call a Keithley Instruments office for information.
To clean an instrument, use a damp cloth or mild, water-based cleaner. Clean the exterior of the instrument only. Do not apply
cleaner directly to the instrument or allow liquids to enter or spill on the instrument. Products that consist of a circuit board with
no case or chassis (e.g., a data acquisition board for installation into a computer) should never require cleaning if handled
according to instructions. If the board becomes contaminated and operation is affected, the board should be returned to the
factory for proper cleaning/servicing.
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Table of Contents
Introduction to ACS Software.................................................................................... 1-1 Reference manual content................................................................................................... 1-1 ACS software overview ........................................................................................................ 1-2 ACS software utilities ........................................................................................................... 1-2 KITE .......................................................................................................................................... 1-2 KTEI .......................................................................................................................................... 1-2 KULT ......................................................................................................................................... 1-2 KCON........................................................................................................................................ 1-3 KXCI.......................................................................................................................................... 1-3 ACS testing hierarchy .......................................................................................................... 1-3 ACS Software Installation .......................................................................................... 2-1 ACS software introduction ................................................................................................... 2-1 ACS pre-installation ............................................................................................................. 2-2 ACS installation.................................................................................................................... 2-3 ACS post-installation............................................................................................................ 2-9 ACS USB license key........................................................................................................... 2-9 Updating a temporary USB key............................................................................................... 2-11 License key modes ................................................................................................................. 2-14 S530 equipment and system ............................................................................................. 2-16 Equipment startup ................................................................................................................... 2-16 Initial equipment startup .......................................................................................................... 2-18 System shut down................................................................................................................... 2-19 System startup ........................................................................................................................ 2-19 Emergency Off (EMO) button.................................................................................................. 2-19 ACS Software Overview ............................................................................................. 3-1 Before starting the ACS software......................................................................................... 3-1 Starting the ACS software ......................................................................................................... 3-2 Creating new user accounts...................................................................................................... 3-4 User accounts security .............................................................................................................. 3-7 Scanning the hardware configuration...................................................................................... 3-11 ACS software GUI.............................................................................................................. 3-12 Operation toolbar .................................................................................................................... 3-13 Vertical toolbar ........................................................................................................................ 3-14 Menu bar elements ................................................................................................................. 3-18 Edit panel ........................................................................................................................... 3-21 Wafer description .................................................................................................................... 3-21 Test setup ............................................................................................................................... 3-22 Prober control.......................................................................................................................... 3-24 Automation panel .................................................................................................................... 3-25 Statistics panel ........................................................................................................................ 3-25 Summary report ...................................................................................................................... 3-26 Log message dialog box .................................................................................................... 3-27 Table of Contents
Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
Wafer Description ....................................................................................................... 4-1 Wafer introduction ................................................................................................................ 4-1 Circle-shaped wafer description panel................................................................................. 4-3 Wafer pattern ............................................................................................................................ 4-4 Display wafer pattern ................................................................................................................ 4-5 Circle-shaped wafer map .......................................................................................................... 4-6 Erased sites .............................................................................................................................. 4-8 Logical sites .............................................................................................................................. 4-9 Site collection by dragging ...................................................................................................... 4-12 Circle-shaped wafer map advanced settings........................................................................... 4-12 Square-shaped wafer description ...................................................................................... 4-18 Square-shaped wafer description panel.................................................................................. 4-18 Square-shaped wafer map ...................................................................................................... 4-19 Site selection by dragging ....................................................................................................... 4-20 Square-shaped wafer map advanced settings ........................................................................ 4-20 Wafer description limits and status tab .............................................................................. 4-21 Wafer limits tab ....................................................................................................................... 4-21 Wafer description tab .............................................................................................................. 4-24 Test Setup.................................................................................................................... 5-1 Test tree introduction ........................................................................................................... 5-1 Test process flow summary ................................................................................................. 5-2 Working with projects ................................................................................................................ 5-3 Building a test plan............................................................................................................. 5-23 Add a new pattern ................................................................................................................... 5-24 Add a new subsite................................................................................................................... 5-27 Add a new device.................................................................................................................... 5-29 Interactive Test Module (ITM) configuration ...................................................................... 5-45 Open an ITM ........................................................................................................................... 5-45 ITM status tab ......................................................................................................................... 5-48 ITM definition tab..................................................................................................................... 5-48 ITM test configuration.............................................................................................................. 5-76 Model 4200 ITM configuration................................................................................................. 5-83 Script Test Module (STM) configuration ............................................................................ 5-92 Open a STM............................................................................................................................ 5-92 Understanding a STM script.................................................................................................... 5-96 Create a TSP GUI file ........................................................................................................... 5-102 C language Test Module (CTM) configuration................................................................. 5-112 Classic CTM configuration .................................................................................................... 5-112 Advanced CTM configuration ................................................................................................ 5-115 Python language Test Module (PTM) configuration ........................................................ 5-120 Understanding a python script............................................................................................... 5-122 PTM with the .xrc GUI file ..................................................................................................... 5-128 Global data support in PTM and UAP ................................................................................... 5-130 General module test in a PTM............................................................................................... 5-130 PTM configuration ................................................................................................................. 5-137 Script editor tool ............................................................................................................... 5-146 Script editor dialog box.......................................................................................................... 5-146 Understanding the module identification area ....................................................................... 5-147 Understanding the module code entry area .......................................................................... 5-148 ii
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Table of Contents
Understanding the tab areas ................................................................................................. 5-148 Understanding the toolbar ..................................................................................................... 5-153 Script editor tutorials ........................................................................................................ 5-156 Tutorial 1: Create and run a new TSP................................................................................... 5-157 Tutorial 2: Create and run a new PTM .................................................................................. 5-164 Executing a project plan................................................................................................... 5-170 Executing a project pattern.................................................................................................... 5-170 Executing individual subsite plans......................................................................................... 5-173 Executing individual device plans.......................................................................................... 5-175 Executing individual tests ...................................................................................................... 5-176 Append and clear append ..................................................................................................... 5-177 Data plot........................................................................................................................... 5-178 Open a graph sheet .............................................................................................................. 5-179 Controlling graph properties .................................................................................................. 5-180 Formulator data plot .............................................................................................................. 5-181 Accessing the graph settings menu ...................................................................................... 5-207 Define a graph and plotting ................................................................................................... 5-209 User Access Points (UAP) ............................................................................................... 5-216 Understanding UAP .............................................................................................................. 5-216 Handling the UAP tree .......................................................................................................... 5-217 Editing a UAP........................................................................................................................ 5-218 Add an attribute using UAP ................................................................................................... 5-221 Prober Control............................................................................................................. 6-1 Prober control functions ....................................................................................................... 6-1 Wafer map indicator in Prober Control mode ............................................................................ 6-1 Prober control panel............................................................................................................. 6-3 Moving to a site ......................................................................................................................... 6-4 Moving to a subsite ................................................................................................................... 6-4 Automation .................................................................................................................. 7-1 Automation functions............................................................................................................ 7-1 Automation panel ................................................................................................................. 7-2 Automatic test information......................................................................................................... 7-2 Automatic test options ............................................................................................................... 7-3 Advanced toolbar ...................................................................................................................... 7-3 Cassette information box ................................................................................................... 7-17 Preference settings ............................................................................................................ 7-18 Preference settings path tab ................................................................................................... 7-20 Miscellaneous (Misc) tab......................................................................................................... 7-21 Automation setting tab ............................................................................................................ 7-21 Advanced tab .......................................................................................................................... 7-23 Read current test data........................................................................................................ 7-25 Wafer map indicator ........................................................................................................... 7-26 Starting an automation test ................................................................................................ 7-28 Automation process example............................................................................................. 7-30 Example 1: Binning and post-inking ........................................................................................ 7-30 Example 2: Stress migration ................................................................................................... 7-37 Example 3: Save a .csv file ..................................................................................................... 7-41 ACS-901-01 Rev. 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Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
Statistics ...................................................................................................................... 8-1 Statistics introduction ........................................................................................................... 8-1 Required files ....................................................................................................................... 8-2 Statistics limitations.............................................................................................................. 8-2 Statistics settings ................................................................................................................. 8-2 Statistics configuration .............................................................................................................. 8-2 Statistics operations .................................................................................................................. 8-4 Plot types .................................................................................................................................. 8-5 Wafer Mapping plot ................................................................................................................... 8-6 Trend plot ................................................................................................................................ 8-12 BOX plot.................................................................................................................................. 8-16 Histogram................................................................................................................................ 8-21 Cumulative distribution function (CDF).................................................................................... 8-27 Summary Report ......................................................................................................... 9-1 Summary report panel.......................................................................................................... 9-1 Generating a summary report .............................................................................................. 9-2 Understanding the lot summary report ...................................................................................... 9-3 Understanding raw data ............................................................................................................ 9-6 Customize user data path and convert data.............................................................................. 9-6 ACS Hardware Configurations ................................................................................ 10-1 ACS hardware configurations introduction......................................................................... 10-1 ACS hardware configuration utility..................................................................................... 10-2 Configuration navigator ........................................................................................................... 10-3 Scan hardware ........................................................................................................................ 10-4 Add and delete an external instrument.................................................................................... 10-6 Instrument system configuration ...................................................................................... 10-13 KI system configuration ......................................................................................................... 10-13 Series 2600A system properties ........................................................................................... 10-14 Series 2400 system properties.............................................................................................. 10-15 Series 3400 system properties.............................................................................................. 10-16 Series 3700 system properties.............................................................................................. 10-17 Models 707A/707B and 708A/708B switch matrices............................................................. 10-21 S530 Configuration ............................................................................................................... 10-26 Model 4200 system properties .............................................................................................. 10-26 Model 590 CV analyzer ......................................................................................................... 10-28 Capacitance meter configuration........................................................................................... 10-29 Save function ........................................................................................................................ 10-30 Checking the configuration.................................................................................................... 10-30 Prober station configuration .................................................................................................. 10-30 Configuration file locations ............................................................................................... 10-31 Server Solution ......................................................................................................... 11-1 Server solution introduction ............................................................................................... 11-1 Install and configure an FTP server ................................................................................... 11-1 Install the FTP server .............................................................................................................. 11-1 Configure the FTP server ........................................................................................................ 11-2 iv
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Configure ACS as a network.............................................................................................. 11-7 Update online .......................................................................................................................... 11-9 Build an ACS project on the server.................................................................................. 11-10 Access test data in network mode......................................................................................... 11-10 Upload test data to the server ............................................................................................... 11-10 KTE conversion to ACS tool .................................................................................... 12-1 KTE conversion tool introduction ....................................................................................... 12-1 Process overview ............................................................................................................... 12-1 Configuration...................................................................................................................... 12-3 KTE test plan location ............................................................................................................. 12-3 Hardware mapping from KTE to ACS ..................................................................................... 12-3 ACS PTM or STM? ................................................................................................................. 12-5 Additional adjustments ....................................................................................................... 12-5 Limitations of the conversion tool....................................................................................... 12-7 Test macro conversion ............................................................................................................ 12-7 UAP modules .......................................................................................................................... 12-8 Limits file ................................................................................................................................. 12-8 Cassette plan mode ................................................................................................................ 12-9 ACS Command line execution................................................................................. 13-1 ACS Commands introduction............................................................................................. 13-1 ACS Commands ................................................................................................................ 13-2 Start ACS command ............................................................................................................... 13-2 Automatic execution................................................................................................................ 13-2 Start KTE conversion tool ....................................................................................................... 13-3 Load an ACS project ............................................................................................................... 13-3 Hide the ACS GUI ................................................................................................................... 13-3 Show the ACS GUI ................................................................................................................. 13-3 Ultra-Fast BTI ............................................................................................................ 14-1 UF BTI Introduction ............................................................................................................ 14-1 UF BTI general notes ......................................................................................................... 14-2 UF BTI hardware configuration .......................................................................................... 14-4 UF BTI descriptions............................................................................................................ 14-8 UF BTI project information ............................................................................................... 14-28 UF BTI data...................................................................................................................... 14-30 ACS Sample WLR projects ...................................................................................... 15-1 Model 237-HV RTM ........................................................................................................... 15-1 Hardware configuration ........................................................................................................... 15-2 Model 237-HV TDDB .............................................................................................................. 15-2 Model 237-HV VRamp ............................................................................................................ 15-4 Model 237-HV JRamp ............................................................................................................. 15-5 Model 237-HV HCI .................................................................................................................. 15-6 Charge pumping test module............................................................................................. 15-7 ACS-901-01 Rev. 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Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
Connection .............................................................................................................................. 15-8 Test modules settings ........................................................................................................... 15-10 Pulse stress-measure loop project................................................................................... 15-14 Example connection of DUT.................................................................................................. 15-14 Project setting ....................................................................................................................... 15-16 Test flow................................................................................................................................ 15-21 Test result data ..................................................................................................................... 15-21 Stress migration project–resistance batch measurement................................................ 15-21 Instument connection ............................................................................................................ 15-22 Test flow and settings ........................................................................................................... 15-22 ACS example hardware configurations and connections .................................... 16-1 Test and control connections ............................................................................................. 16-1 Basic configuration.................................................................................................................. 16-6 Typical S530 system configuration........................................................................................ 16-11 vi
ACS-901-01 Rev. E / Dec 2011
Section 1
Introduction to ACS Software
If you have any questions after reviewing this information, contact your local Keithley Instruments
representative or call one of our applications engineers at 1-888-KEITHLEY (1-888-534-8453) within
the U.S. and Canada. You can also visit the Keithley Instruments website at www.keithley.com for
updated worldwide contact information.
In this section:
Reference manual content ....................................................... 1-1
ACS software overview ............................................................ 1-2
ACS software utilities................................................................ 1-2
ACS testing hierarchy............................................................... 1-3
Reference manual content
This manual contains information about the ACS software only. It includes information about how to
install, configure, and operate the ACS software, as well as full details of software features such as
prober control, wafer setup, summary reports, and building, loading, and executing test projects.
For more information about instruments that can be used with the ACS software, refer to the
documentation for each specific Keithley Instruments model:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
S530 Integrated Test System
Model 707A/707B Switching Matrix
Model 708A/708B Switching Matrix
Series 2400 SourceMeter
Series 2600A System SourceMeter
Series 3700 System Switch/Multimeter
Model 4200-SCS Semiconductor Characterization Suite
Also, refer to the supplied documentation that is located on the Keithley Instruments Complete
Reference CD-ROM that was shipped with your purchase. You can also visit the Keithley Instruments
website at www.keithley.com to search for updated information by model number.
Section 1: Introduction to ACS Software
Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
ACS software overview
The Keithley Instruments Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) software supports semiconductor
characterization at the cassette, wafer, and device level, using multiple test instruments and
automatic parametric testing with semiautomatic and automatic probe stations.
ACS software controls hardware on the Keithley Instruments Model 4200-SCS Semiconductor
Characterization System and supports other external instruments controlled through the GPIB, such
as the Keithley Instruments Series 2600A System SourceMeter® instruments. It also provides a
combined test-execution engine that supports Model 4200-SCS and Series 2600A group testing.
ACS can perform multisite parallel I-V testing using a Series 2600A as the primary instrument. You
can have as many as 16 groups of source-measure units (SMUs) on a single GPIB card, for a total of
16 parallel test sites (contact Keithley Instruments if you need more than 16 parallel sites). Each
group can support up to 64 Series 2600A instruments, or 128 channels.
ACS supports the following probers:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Micromanipulator 8860/P300A
Suss Micro Tech PA200/PA300
Cascade 12000/S300/R19S
Tokyo Semitsu (TSK) UF200/UF3000/APM60/70/80/90
Electroglas EG2X/EG4X
TEL P8/P12/19S
Wentworth Pegasus S200/300S Prober
ACS software utilities
The following Keithley Instruments software utilities are included in the ACS software installation:
KITE
Keithley Interactive Test Environment (KITE) is the main Model 4200-SCS device characterization
application. KITE is a versatile tool that facilitates both interactive characterization of an individual
device and automated testing of an entire semiconductor wafer. Tests are organized into individual
projects, which are managed and executed by KITE.
KTEI
The Keithley Test Environment Interactive (KTEI) is a suite of software utilities that control the Model
4200-SCS. KTEI increases throughput for leading-edge circuit materials testing and incorporates
improvements in parallel test routines used for lab and production applications.
KULT
The Keithley User Library Tool (KULT) allows test engineers to integrate custom algorithms (user
modules) into KITE. KULT is used to create and manage libraries of user modules for both KITE and
ACS.
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Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
Section 1: Introduction to ACS Software
KCON
The Keithley CONfiguration (KCON) utility allows test engineers to define the configuration of external
GPIB instruments, switch matrices, and analytical probers connected to the Model 4200-SCS. KCON
also provides basic diagnostic and troubleshooting functions.
KXCI
The Keithley External Control Interface (KXCI) allows the use of an external computer to remotely
control the SMUs, pulse generator cards, and a scope card over the GPIB (IEEE-488) or Ethernet.
You can do this in either of two modes: the full-featured Model 4200 extended mode, which provides
access to most of the Model 4200-SCS commands and ranges, or the Model 4145 emulation mode.
KXCI also provides a command set that executes user modules created in KULT.
ACS testing hierarchy
ACS provides a combined test execution engine that supports Series 2600A and Model 4200 SMUs
through Interactive Test Modules (ITMs). An ITM allows you to define a test interactively using a
graphical user interface(GUI).
An STM supports Test Script Processor (TSP®) files. A TSP file is written to customize tests for a
Series 2600A instrument or Model 3706 Switch/Multimeter instrument. Also, Python programming
language test modules (PTMs) can be written to control any GPIB instrument. A script editor is
included with ACS for editing script test modules (STMs) and PTMs.
ACS supports semiautomatic and automatic testing, multi-pattern wafer maps, and Series 2600A
multi-group tests. Common transistor parameter testing (for example, Vds-Id, Vgs-Id, Vg-Ig) and life
testing (TDDB, NBTI, HCI) are supported using various procedures.
ACS organizes tests in the hierarchy below (from the cassette-level down), consistent with
semiconductor-wafer organization, allowing for a one-time setup when managing cassette-level tests:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Cassette: Automate multiple wafers tests
Wafer: Define test patterns
Pattern: Multiple sites (nonexclusive) for each pattern
Device: Perform one or more tests (single or multi-group) can be performed
Subsite: Perform one or more tests on devices
Test: Four types: ITM, STM, PTM, and CTM
ACS-901-01 Rev. E / Dec 2011
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Section 2
ACS Software Installation
In this section:
ACS software introduction........................................................ 2-1
ACS pre-installation ................................................................. 2-2
ACS installation........................................................................ 2-3
ACS post-installation ................................................................ 2-9
ACS USB license key............................................................... 2-9
S530 equipment and system.................................................. 2-16
ACS software introduction
The Keithley Instruments Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) software is distributed on a CDROM and can be installed on any computer or Keithley Instruments Model 4200 Semiconductor
Characterization System (SCS) with a Microsoft® Windows® XP Professional operating system.
The Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) software supports these system configuration
arrangements:
•
•
ACS software on a system computer/laptop for the Series 2600A System SourceMeter® units.
•
ACS software on Model 4200-SCS for the Model 4200-SCS system and the Series 2600A
System SourceMeter units.
ACS software on Model 4200-SCS for Model 4200-SCS system (includes all instruments and
equipment that are supported by KITE).
For detailed configuration information, refer to ACS Example hardware configurations (see "ACS
example hardware configurations and connections" on page 16-1).
NOTE
ACS software starts in one of three modes (see Operating modes). If you want to start in online
(standard) mode, a USB license key file is needed (see ACS USB license key).
Section 2: ACS Software Installation
Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
ACS pre-installation
NOTE
It is recommended that you back up your system before installing new software.
If you are installing the Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) software on a computer, the
following system requirements apply:
Minimum computer configuration:
•
Operating System: Microsoft Windows XP Professional Service Pack 3 (SP3) or Windows 7 x 86
(32 bit) and Windows 7 x 64 (64 bit)
•
•
•
•
•
CPU: Pentium 4, 2.4GHz+ or equivalent
System Memory (RAM): 1GB
Hard Disk: 700MB free space
Graphics Card: 16MB of VRAM
Screen: 1024 x 768, 32-bit True Color
Recommended computer configuration computer:
•
Operating System: Microsoft Windows XP Professional Service Pack 3 (SP3) or Windows 7 x 86
(32 bit) and Windows 7 x 64 (64 bit)
•
•
•
•
•
CPU: Intel® dual core class or AMD Athlon® class or higher
System Memory (RAM): 2GB
Hard Disk: 1GB free space
Graphics Card: 64MB of VRAM
Screen: 1280 x 1024, 32-bit True Color
NOTE
If you install ACS directly onto your computer without KITE, the elements related to KITE will not be
available for you to use with ACS.
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Section 2: ACS Software Installation
ACS installation
NOTE
Before installing ACS software on a computer, make sure you have read and completed all the preinstallation requirements (see Pre-installation).
To install ACS software:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Restart your computer or Model 4200-SCS.
Log on as an administrator.
Insert the ACS software setup disk into the CD-ROM drive.
The setup process should start automatically. If setup does not start automatically, click My
Computer and then open the CD-ROM device folder.
5. Click setup.exe to start the process.
NOTE
During the setup process, you can click Cancel to end the installation.
6. In the ACS software Setup Wizard dialog box, click the Next function (see next Figure):
Figure 2-1: Setup wizard
Figure 1: Setup wizard
7. In the License Agreement dialog box, click I accept the agreement (see next Figure).
Figure 2-2: License Agreement
ACS-901-01 Rev. E / Dec 2011
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Section 2: ACS Software Installation
Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
Figure 2: License Agreement
8. In the Destination Location dialog box, Browse to a destination to install the ACS software
(C:\ACS is recommended)(see next Figure).
Figure 2-3: Installation destination
Figure 3: Installation destination
9. Click Next to continue.
10. In the Select Start Menu Folder dialog box, you can create ACS program shortcuts in the Start
Menu folder, or you can Browse to a different location to install the shortcuts (see next Figure).
Figure 2-4: Start Menu Folder
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Figure 4: Select Start Menu Folder
11. Click Next to continue.
12. The Select Additional Tasks dialog box (see next Figure) will allow you to Create a desktop icon
and Create a Quick Launch icon.
Figure 2-5: Select Additional Tasks
Figure 5: Select Additional Tasks
13. Click Next to continue.
14. The Ready to Install dialog box opens. You must click the Install function to continue the
installation process (see next Figure).
Figure 2-6: Ready to Install
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Figure 6: Ready to Install
15. Click Next to continue.
16. After clicking Install, the Installing dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 2-7: Installing
Figure 7: Installing
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NOTE
You can cancel the installation of the ACS software by clicking Cancel in the Installing dialog box.
17. Once the installation process is completed, the Temp License Generation Setup Wizard dialog
box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 2-8: Temporary License Generation
Figure 8: Temporary License Generation
Once you choose the type of license you desire, and you click Next, the Completing the ACS V4.2
Setup Wizard dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 2-9: Completing the ACS Setup Wizard
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Figure 9: Completing the ACS Setup Wizard
To complete the ACS software installation process, click Yes, restart the computer now, then click
Finish. If you want to restart your computer later, click No, I will restart the computer later.
NOTE
After you have installed your version of ACS software, and before you set up any projects or run any
tests, it is recommended that you review the Release Notes. The Release Notes contain valuable
information about known issues and provide guidance on how to handle issues that you may
encounter. The Release Notes can be found by clicking on your Windows® Start button then finding
ACS in All Programs. The Release Notes are located in the Reference area (see next Figure).
Figure 2-9: Release Notes location
Figure 10: Release Notes location
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ACS post-installation
If ACS software is controlling a Series 2600A or Model 3706, you can determine the instrument
configuration by running a scan in the ACS hardware configuration module.
If you have other GPIB instruments that you want configured in the ACS software, you will need to
use the Keithley Configuration (KCON) utility. This can be accomplished by running the ACS
hardware configuration module.
You can also add the prober station to the configuration and it is preferred that you use the ACS
hardware configuration module. Although, you can use the KCON utility.
If you want to use the KCON utility to add the prober station:
1. Locate the Model 4200-SCS base directory (typically C:\S4200), and go to the “sys\dat”
subfolder.
2. Locate the prbcnfg_XXX.dat files.
3. Depending on the prober Model, edit and save the appropriate prbcnfg_XXXX.dat file.
4. Run the KCON utility on the Model 4200-SCS.
5. If the probe station PRBR1 does not exist, then click Tools and then click Add External Instrument
and Prober Station.
6. Click Prober Station PRBR1 and click the appropriate prober Model in the Prober Properties area.
ACS USB license key
NOTE
You must obtain an ACS USB license key in order to use the ACS software in online (standard)
mode. If you have not obtained a license key, you will only have access to the ACS software in demo
mode, and you will not have full functionality, such as using the hardware configuration option.
The ACS SafeNet Sentinel USB license key is similar to a standard flash drive (see next Figure). The
USB license key is included with the ACS software and shipped with the S530 Integrated Test
System. The USB license key allows you to operate ACS in the standard mode, and can be moved
from computer to another (multiple installations) without buying additional licenses.
NOTE
There are two types of USB Keys. One is a permanent key that you can use repeatedly. The other is
a temporary key that you can use for 30 days.
Figure 2-10: USB SafeNet Sentinel license key
Figure 11: USB SafeNet Sentinel license key
Figure 2-11: ACS in Demo mode
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Figure 12: ACS in DEMO mode
Before you start running the ACS software, insert your USB license key into the computer’s USB
interface. The computer and ACS software will automatically detect the USB key. If you have the
permanent key, ACS will start in the standard mode (see next Figure).
Figure 2-12: ACS in STANDARD mode
Figure 13: ACS in STANDARD mode
If you have the temporary key, ACS will start in the standard mode. However, you will have a limited
number of days to use the temporary key (see next Figure). If you are using the temporary USB key,
the amount of days that you have available is displayed while running ACS.
Figure 2-13: ACS in STANDARD mode with 30 Day evaluation license
Figure 14: ACS in STANDARD mode with 30 Day evaluation license
CAUTION
DO NOT remove the USB key from the computer while you are using the ACS software in the
standard mode. If the key is removed, you will receive a warning message that indicates you have 30
seconds to insert the USB key back in the computer (see next Figure). After the key is reinserted in
the computer, you must click Continue in order to keep the ACS software functioning. If the key is not
inserted in the computer before the time has elapsed, the software will close and you will lose all data
from your current session.
Figure 2-14: USB Warning message
Figure 15: USB Warning message
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Updating a temporary USB key
If your temporary USB license key has expired, you can request an update from Keithley Instruments.
To avoid an interruption in your operations and continue using the ACS software in standard mode,
perform the following steps to obtain an updated license key file.
To update a USB key:
1. In the ACS Help menu, click Update License (see next Figure).
Figure 2–15: Update License
Figure 16: ACS Update License
2. After you select Update License, the Secure Update Utility dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 2-16: Generate Request Code
Figure 17: Generate Request Code
3. In the Secure Update Utility dialog box, click the Generate Request Code button to generate a file
and save it to your computer (see next Figure).
Figure 2-17: Save generated file
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Figure 18: Save generated file
4. E-mail the generated file to the following address: [email protected]
5. After you send the generated file to Keithley Instruments, an updated file will be generated and
returned to you by e-mail.
6. The newly generated file be named ACS_4.3 update.upw, or something similar.
7. After you receive the updated file for your USB key, save it to a location on the computer.
8. In the ACS Help menu, click Update License.
9. In the Secure Update Utility dialog box, click the folder icon to Browse and locate the file you
received. Select the file and click Open to upload it.
Figure 2-18: Browse update file
Figure 19: Browse update file
10. In the Secure Update Utility dialog box, click the Apply Code button (see next Figure).
Figure 2-19: Success update
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Figure 20: Success update
NOTE
After your temporary USB license key expires, you will need to request another update.
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License key modes
The ACS software starts in one of three different modes, depending on your USB license key status
and the hardware setup. The three possible operating modes are:
•
•
•
Demo
Evaluation
Standard
Demo mode
If ACS software starts in demonstration mode, then the USB license key is not correctly installed or
has expired (see the Updating a temporary USB key topic).
Demo mode is suitable for developing test projects and for reviewing results.
NOTE
In Demo mode, ACS software cannot communicate with the test and measurement hardware.
Evaluation mode
If the ACS software starts in evaluation mode, the USB license key is correct, but the physical
hardware configuration does not match the configuration on file. The physical instruments,
communications interconnect, and grouping must be identical to the configuration on file to enter
standard mode. Any detected difference will result in an evaluation condition. In the evaluation mode,
you can set up a test process and control prober stations, and the test modules will be executed in
Demo mode.
If the ACS software detects a different hardware configuration compared to the currently saved
configuration, a verification dialog box will open. In the verification dialog box, you can click standard
mode to set the new hardware configuration, or you can click evaluation mode to maintain the original
configuration on file. Test modules will run in evaluation mode, however, evaluation mode does not
allow for live instrument connection.
Standard mode
When the ACS software starts in standard mode, it is an indication that the software has a valid USB
license key and is able to communicate with the test and measurement hardware. ACS software may
indicate that the default project requires hardware that is not available when starting in standard
mode. In the standard mode, you can set up a testing process to control the prober station.
The next Figure shows the ACS software startup flow. The software modes are based on the USB
license key.
Figure 2-20: ACS license key software modes
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Figure 21: ACS license key software modes
Once the scan has completed, the software determines the state of the configured hardware. If
nothing has changed, ACS will automatically go to standard or evaluation mode depending on your
license key. However, if the configuration has changed, you will see a dialog box where you are
presented with three different options:
1. You can choose to click Exit, which will close ACS.
2. You can choose to click on Re-scan, which will cause ACS to scan the hardware again and check
the configuration.
3. You can choose to click on Continue and ACS will determine the next action depending on your
license key.
NOTE
If you change your hardware configuration and you decide to Re-scan, the software will give you a
visual presentation of the changes (see next Figure).
Figure 2-20: Hardware Change Info
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Figure 22: Hardware Change Info
S530 equipment and system
Equipment startup
If you have a Keithley Instruments S530 Integrated Test System, the following information will provide
the necessary instructions needed to startup and shutdown your instrument-based system.
All of the S530 system instruments in the equipment rack are connected to one power distribution unit
(PDU), which is located at the back of system cabinet (see next Figure)(the LO patch panel and the
interlock are shown for reference only; they are located behind behind the SMUs). For more
information regarding the S530 system, refer to the S530 Administrative Guide (part number PA-992;
this guide is located on the Keithley Instruments CD-ROM that was shipped with your purchase). You
can also visit the Keithley Instruments website at www.keithley.com to search for updated information
by model number.
Figure 2-20: S530 system cabinet rear view
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Figure 23: S530 system cabinet rear view
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NOTE
Make sure that all line cords for the system cabinet are connected to the AC power line receptacles.
Make sure that the PDU unit circuit breaker is in the ON position. Also, make sure the computer and
monitor are turned ON.
On the front of the system, turn the POWER switch to the ON position. The POWER switch is located
on the front door of the cabinet (see next Figure). Make sure the system computer and monitor are
also turned on before attempting to use the S530 system and any software.
Initial equipment startup
All of the instruments in the equipment rack are connected to one PDU, which is located at the back
of the cabinet.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Check that all the line cords for the system cabinet are connected to AC power.
Make sure that the circuit breaker on the PDU is in the ON position.
Press the power/standby button on the computer and monitor.
Set the power button on the front door of the system to the ON position.
Figure 2-20: S530 system cabinet front view
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System shut down
NOTE
You must have administrator rights in ACS software in order to shut down the S530 system.
1. Double-click the Shutdown icon on the computer desktop. On the dialog box that opens, click Yes
that you want to Shutdown the S530 Tester.
NOTE
The following message opens after you click Yes to Shutdown the S530 (see next Figure). You must
wait until the Model 4200-SCS and the system computer shut down before you press the power
button on the system cabinet. It may take several minutes for the system to shut down
Figure 2-20: Shut down the S530
2. Once the ACS host computer has shut down, or the shut down message opens, press the power
button on the front door of the system cabinet.
System startup
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Make sure that the power switch on the PDU is set to on.
Set the power button on the front door of the system to the ON position.
Open the front cabinet door and press the Power/STANDBY switch on the ACS host computer.
Wait for all the instruments to power up.
Login to your computer and start the ACS software.
Emergency Off (EMO) button
An Emergency Off (EMO) button is located on the system cabinet door (see previous Figure). If you
push the Emergency Off button, it removes power to all system instruments. However, it will not
remove power to the ACS host computer.
The EMO TRIPPED indicator light (located on the cabinet door) turns on when the system has
undergone an emergency shut down.
Emergency shut down procedure
Press the red Emergency Off Button on the front of the system cabinet. The instruments will power
down and a red Emergency Off indicator will illuminate.
Recovering from an emergency shut down
1. Verify that a hazardous condition or emergency situation is no longer present.
2. Rotate the Emergency Off button to release it.
3. Toggle the power switch from ON to OFF, and then back to ON again. All of the system
instruments should power up.
4. Open the front cabinet door and press the power/standby switch on the ACS host computer.
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ACS Software Overview
In this section:
Before starting the ACS software ............................................. 3-1
ACS software GUI.................................................................. 3-12
Edit panel ............................................................................... 3-21
Log message dialog box ........................................................ 3-27
Before starting the ACS software
1. Make sure that all of the instruments are connected with a GPIB cable (instrument to system
computer or Model 4200-SCS) and have a TSP-Link® connection between any Series 2600A
SourceMeter® instruments. For more information about setting up the hardware, refer to ACS
Example hardware configurations (see "ACS example hardware configurations and connections"
on page 16-1).
2. Assign GPIB addresses and node numbers (see ACS Example hardware configurations (see
"ACS example hardware configurations and connections" on page 16-1)).
3. Make sure that all the instruments are turned on and self-testing is finished.
NOTE
Always start the “child” machines first, and then the “master” machine. Because the master scans
through all the linked child machines, it must be started after all the child machines are turned on, or
errors may occur when you start the ACS software.
4. Start ACS on a system computer or a Model 4200-SCS.
CAUTION
FATAL ERROR POSSIBLE. To avoid fatal errors to instruments, never start the ACS software until all
instruments finish self-testing.
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Starting the ACS software
Before opening the ACS software, make sure that all instruments are turned on and all self-tests have
completed. You must establish a new user account when you open the ACS software for the first
time.
NOTE
You must obtain an ACS software USB license key in order to start the software in online mode. If
you have not obtained a USB license key, you must click the Login In Demo Mode function. This will
allow you to start the ACS software without a software license.
To start the ACS software:
1. Select the ACS software icon on your PC’s desktop. The User Login dialog box opens (see next
Figure).
Figure 3-1: User login
Figure 24: User login
2. Type a user name and password in the User Name and Password fields. The default user name
is ACSADMIN, however, there is no password for ACSADMIN.
NOTE
More than one new user account can established at this time. You can establish new accounts by
clicking the New User button. To change the password, click the Change Password button.
3. Click OK; the ACS software start window appears (see next Figure).
Figure 3-2: ACS software start window
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Figure 25: ACS software start window
ACS software starts in one of three different modes (demo, evaluation, standard), depending on the
USB license key file and hardware setup. Refer to ACS USB license key in Section 2 for more startup
modes and licensing information.
The following flowchart (see next Figure) gives an example of the software’s internal process flow
during the ACS software startup sequence.
Figure 3-3: ACS software operating modes
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Figure 26: ACS license key software modes
NOTE
If you change your hardware configuration and you decide to Re-scan, the software will give you a
visual presentation of the changes. Also, note that you can skip the Re-scan and go straight to
Continue in order to enter standard or evaluation mode.
NOTE
If you have not obtained an ACS software USB license key, then ACS will start in Demo mode.
Creating new user accounts
1. Click the New User icon in the User Login dialog box and the Supervisor Login dialog box
appears (see next Figure).
Figure 3-4: Supervisor login
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Figure 27: ACS Supervisor login
2. Enter a password for the supervisor (default account user name and password is ACSADMIN).
3. Click OK: the New User dialog box appears (see next Figure).
Figure 3-5: New user
Figure 28: ACS New user account
4. Click the type of account desired: Operator or Engineer (see previous Figure).
•
Operator: This account allows loading and running test projects and generating summary reports.
•
Engineer: This account allows access to all the ACS software functions.
•
Type an account name and password in the Account name and Password fields.
•
Type the password again in the Confirm field.
•
Click OK. The new user account process is complete.
Initialize multiple user accounts in Windows® environment
CAUTION
If you try to run ACS on a computer that has more than one Windows user account and you have not
initialized all of the accounts to run ACS, you will receive an error and you will not be able to use ACS
software with all of the user accounts. Refer to the following information in order to establish multiple
user accounts in a Windows environment.
NOTE
This information is for those who have more than one user account when logging in to a Windows
account (see next Figure). If you have more than one user account on your computer, make sure that
you have logged off the previous user account and have logged on the correct user account. If you do
not have multiple user accounts, you do not need to know this information.
Figure 3-5: Windows User Accounts
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Figure 29: Windows User Accounts
NOTE
If one of the user accounts (Admin1, User1, or User2) has already installed ACS software, none of
the other users need to install the software, however you do need to initialize the user account to
access and use the ACS software. Additionally, if the Admin1 account is the user who installed ACS
software on the computer, then Admin1 will not have to follow this procedure to access and use ACS.
After selecting a user account (in this example, User1) and your desktop is loaded, click on your
Windows Start button and find ACS in All Programs (see next Figure).
Figure 3-5: Windows Start function
Figure 30: Windows Start function
Click the Initialize User function (see next Figure).
Figure 3-5: Initialize User account
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Figure 31: Initialize User account
After you click the Initialize User function, you will receive a dialog box that states you must restart
your computer (see next Figure).
Figure 3-5: Restart your computer to Initialize User account
Figure 32: Restart your computer to Initialize User account
Once your computer reboots, you can log in to your account and run ACS software.
NOTE
If you have other user accounts in your Windows environment who need to access and use ACS
software, you will need to initialize the account for each user.
User accounts security
ACS software provides three types of user accounts (or operating modes) and each has different
rights and security features.
1. Engineer: The engineer (or administrator) user type account has unrestricted rights to create and
edit test projects, including test parameters within ACS. It can also edit or delete operator
accounts. The default administrator account user name is ACSADMIN.
NOTE
There can be other engineer uses accounts, however, there is only one engineer administrator.
2. Engineer: The engineer user type account has unrestricted rights to create and edit test projects,
including test parameters within ACS. However, this engineer account cannot edit or delete
operator accounts.
3. Operator: The operator user type account can open and run available test projects that were
created by either the engineer or administrator.
Account management
Click Tools on the standard toolbar. On the drop-down menu select User Accounts (see next Figure).
NOTE
Only engineer accounts can access the User Accounts in the Tools drop-down menu. Further, only
the engineer administrator account ACSADMIN will see the complete list of user accounts. Other
engineer accounts will only see their own account. Operators do not have access to this feature.
Figure 3-4: User Accounts location
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Figure 33: User Accounts location
The dialog box that opens for both the engineer default administrator account ACSADMIN and
another engineer account is in the next Figure. The User Type column lists whether the user is an
Engineer or Operator. Notice that the ACSADMIN User Name account shows all of the user
accounts.
Figure 3-4: User Accounts information
Figure 34: User Accounts information
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Add new user
NOTE
Only the engineer default administrator account ACSADMIN has the necessary rights to add a new
operator or engineer account.
When logged in to ACS in the ACSADMIN account, select the Add function in the User Accounts
dialog box in order to create a new account (see previous Figure). Once you click Add, you will see
the the New User dialog box (see next Figure).
Figure 3-4: New User account
Figure 35: New User account
Click the type of account desired: operator or engineer (see previous Figure).
•
•
•
Type an account name and password in the Account name and Password fields.
Type the password again in the Confirm field.
Click OK; the new user account process is complete.
Change password
NOTE
Only the engineer default administrator account ACSADMIN has the necessary rights to change a
password for all of the user accounts. An engineer account can change their own password, but not
any other accounts. An operator does not have access to this function.
When logged in to ACS in the ACSADMIN account, or an engineer account, select the account that
will have the password changed (see next Figure).
Figure 3-4: Select a user account
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Figure 36: Select a user account
Click the Edit function to open the Change password dialog box. Enter the current password of the
account, enter a new password, and then confirm in the appropriate fields (see next figure)
Figure 3-4: Change user account password
Figure 37: Change user account password
Click Ok to complete the process.
Delete user account
NOTE
Only the engineer default administrator account ACSADMIN has the necessary rights to delete user
accounts. The engineer and operator account do not have access to this function
Select the account you want to delete and click the Delete function. To complete the process click
Yes when asked if you want to delete the account (see next Figure).
Figure 3-4: Select user account to delete
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Figure 38: Select user account to delete
Scanning the hardware configuration
The first time you log in to the ACS software, it will be necessary to scan the current hardware
configuration, which is accomplished in the evaluation mode. When starting the ACS software, if the
hardware in the current system is different from the previous system, the hardware change
information dialog box opens (see next Figure). This dialog box shows the hardware information of
both the current and previous systems.
Figure 3-6: Hardware change information
Figure 39: Hardware change information
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Once you have the hardware configuration established in the evaluation mode, make sure the
configuration has been saved. Once saved, you should close the ACS software. Once closed, you will
need to open the ACS software and the saved hardware configuration will be available and the
standard mode operation will also be available.
For more information on scanning and saving the hardware configuration in the ACS software, refer
to the following section: ACS Example hardware configurations (see "ACS example hardware
configurations and connections" on page 16-1).
NOTE
When the ACS software is started in the standard mode, the startup time depends on the number of
instruments in the hardware configuration group. For example, if there are several instruments, the
startup time is longer.
•
The Re-scan function will scan the hardware again.
•
The Continue function will continue to start ACS
•
The Exit function will exit the current process
ACS software GUI
Once the ACS software has started, the ACS software graphical user interface (GUI) opens. The next
Figure shows the GUI in engineer mode and the following Figure shows the operator mode:
Figure 3-7: ACS software in engineer mode
Figure 40: ACS software in engineer mode
Figure 3-8: ACS software in operator mode
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Figure 41: ACS software in operator mode
Operation toolbar
The Operation toolbar is located at the top of the ACS software Main dialog box and contains a set of
project file management functions that allow you to perform various tasks (see the next three
Figures).
Figure 3-9: Operation toolbar
Figure 42: Operation toolbar
Project file management functions
Figure 3-10: New, Open, Save, and Save All functions
Figure 43: New, Open, Save, and Save All functions
The New, Open, Save, and Save All functions allow you to create and manage project files. New
opens a new project; Open opens an existing project; and Save saves an operation to the Test Tree.
Save All saves all project settings and all test results data.
NOTE
In order to make sure that all test results are saved for later use, viewing, etc., the Save All function
must be used when testing is completed. This will ensure that the test results are saved and available
in the data file.
Test control functions
Figure 3-11: Run, Repeat, Append, Pause, Stop, and Clear Append functions
Figure 44: Run, Repeat, Append, Pause, Stop, and Clear Append functions
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The Run, Repeat, Pause, and Stop functions allow you to actively work with tests. Run initiates the
test procedure. Repeat continues test execution until Stop is selected. Append allows manual testing
of a test module in append data mode. Pause allows a temporary stop of the test flow (the test will
pause right after the current operation is finished; the next test will not execute). When utilized, the
Stop function will immediately end testing. Clear Append will delete all appended data.
Vertical toolbar
On the vertical edit toolbar, when you make a selection in the edit panel and the tabs of each will
change in the vertical toolbar based on your selection (see the next five Figures for examples of the
edit toolbar and the vertical toolbar ).
NOTE
You will need to fully expand the test setup panel to view the vertical tool bar.
Figure 3-12: Recipe Level with tabs available
Figure 45: Recipe Level with tabs available
Figure 3-13: Pattern Level with tabs available
Figure 46: Pattern Level with tabs available
Figure 3-14: Subsite Level with tabs available
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Figure 47: Subsite Level with tabs available
Figure 3-15: Device Level with tabs available
Figure 48: Device Level with tabs available
Figure 3-16: Test Level with tabs available
Figure 49: Test Level with tabs available
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Test setup functions
Project management functions
Rename icon: You can rename function your pattern, subsite, device, or test modules.
Delete icon: You can delete a selected pattern, subsite, device, or test module.
Copy icon: You can copy a pattern, subsite, device, or test module.
Cut icon: You can cut a pattern, subsite, device, or test module.
Up and Down icon: You can move a pattern, subsite, device, or test module up or down which will
also change the test and device node sequence. These two functions can be displayed or hidden
depending on the current node location (for examples of the Project management functions, see the
following graphics).
NOTE
Not all of the test setup and project management function components will be available for all node
levels (such as, Pattern (Site), Subsite, Device and Test) found in the Test Tree, but will be added or
removed as you click on the items that are present.
PATTERN, SUBSITE, DEVICE, ITM, STM, CTM, and PTM
These functions are enabled or disabled depending on the active test functions. The following text
also includes the graphic of the function.
Pattern icon: Pattern function allows wafer test set up site patterns (see next Figure).
Figure 3-16: Pattern Edit toolbar icons
Figure 50: Pattern Edit toolbar icons
Subsite icon: Subsite function allows wafer subsites definition (see next Figure).
Figure 3-16: Subsite Edit toolbar icons
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Figure 51: Subsite Edit toolbar icons
Device icon: Device function allows a choice of devices to be tested (see next Figure).
Figure 3-16: Device Edit toolbar icons
Figure 52: Device Edit toolbar icons
ITM, CTM, STM, and PTM icons (in this order): ITM, CTM, STM, and PTM functions allow the classes
of tests or test modules definition (see next Figure).
Figure 3-16: Subdevice Edit toolbar icons
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Figure 53: Subdevice Edit toolbar icons
Hardware configuration function
Configure Hardware icon: Configure Hardware function configures the hardware (see next Figure):
Figure 3-16: Configure hardware icon
Figure 54: Configure hardware icon
Scan Hardware icon: Scan hardware function scans and updates the hardware information (see next
Figure):
Figure 3-16: Scan Hardware icon
Figure 55: Scan hardware icon
Menu bar elements
NOTE
The New, Open, Save, and Save All functions in the Operation toolbar are identical to the Menu Bar
in the File menu drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 3-17: File drop-down menu
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Figure 56: File drop-down menu
NOTE
The Copy, Cut, and Delete functions in the Operation toolbar are identical to the Menu Bar in the Edit
menu drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 3-18: Edit menu drop-down list
Figure 57: Edit drop-down list
NOTE
The Run, Repeat, Append, Pause, Stop, and Clear Append functions in the Operation toolbar are
identical to the Menu Bar in the Operation menu drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 3-19: Operation menu drop-down list
Figure 58: Operation drop-down list
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Tools menu
Figure 3-20: Tools drop-down list
Figure 59: Tools drop-down list
You can use the Tools menu to access many different functions that are related to the ACS software.
KULT: You can click KULT to integrate custom algorithms (user modules) into KITE.
KCON: You can click KCON to define the configuration of external GPIB instruments, switch matrices,
and analytical probers connected to the Model 4200-SCS. KCON also provides basic diagnostic and
troubleshooting functions.
Test Script Builder: You can click Test Script Builder to orchestrate a sequence of events and
program the language for scripting.
Preferences: You can click Preferences to open the advanced Preferences dialog (see Log message
dialog box (on page 3-27) for more information).
User Accounts: You can click User Accounts to view the dialog box that contains all of the configured
user information.
Configure Hardware: You can click Config Hardware to access the hardware configuration utility (see
ACS Example hardware configurations (see "ACS example hardware configurations and connections"
on page 16-1) for more information).
Firmware Refresh Kit: You can click Firmware Refresh Kit to refresh the 2600A SourceMeter
instruments firmware. This utility verifies the firmware on your Series 2600A instruments connected to
the ACS software, and allows you to update the firmware with the latest files from www.keithley.com.
Offline Data Plotting: You can click Offline Data Plotting to access the data plot tool (see Data plot (on
page 5-178) for more information).
Custom Test GUI Designer (.xrc): You can click the Custom Test GUI Designer (.xrc) to access the
graphical user interface (GUI) builder (see Create a TSP GUI file (on page 5-102) for more
information).
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Script Editor: You can click the Script Editor to access the script editor tool (see Script editor tutorials
(on page 5-156) for more information).
Convert Data: Selecting this option displays the dialog box which facilitates the conversion from a
KDF file to either a NDF or NBF file format.
Graphically Define a New Device: You can click Graphically Define a New Device to access the
device editor tool.
Help menu
There are many items that you can access from the Help drop-down list, such as documentation of
the ACS software and instrument documentation (see next Figure).
Figure 3-21: Help menu drop-down list
Figure 60: Help drop-down list
Edit panel
The left-side of the ACS Main dialog box contains the edit panel. The following functions are on the
edit panel:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Wafer description
Test setup
Prober control
Automation
Summary report
Statistics
The test setup flow and details of each step are discussed in the following Sections of this manual.
Wafer description
Click the Wafer Description function on the edit panel and the Wafer Description panel opens (see
next Figure).
Figure 3-22: Wafer description panel
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Figure 61: Wafer Description panel
The wafer description panel is where you edit wafer information; the results immediately display in the
work area to the right of the ACS Main dialog box (see next Table for a description of editable wafer
characteristics).
Description of wafer characteristics
Wafer Description Elements Description
Dia
Dia Unit
Die X
Die Y
Die Unit
Axis
Flat
Orient
Margin Size (mm)
Offset Setting
Clicks the diameter of the wafer (inches or millimeters) from a drop-down list.
When Dia is changed, the wafer map is redrawn and all dies previously selected
are cleared.
Clicks the unit of diameter (inches or millimeters). When Dia Unit is changed, the
content of Dia is automatically converted.
Enters the X die size (millimeters or mils). When Die X is changed, the wafer
map is automatically redrawn and all dies selected previously are cleared.
Enters the Y die size (millimeters or mils). When Die Y is changed, the wafer
map is redrawn automatically and all dies selected previously are cleared.
Clicks the unit of die (millimeters or mils). When Die Unit is changed, the X and
Y die size values are converted automatically, as well as the X and Y of the
subsite.
Sets the direction in which the X and Y coordinates increase.
Sets whether the wafer has a flat or notch edge.
Specifies the flat or notch position to be 0, 45, 90, 135, 180, 225, 270, or 315
degrees on the wafer.
Enters the width of the wafer margin (millimeter).
There are four direction functions: left, up, down, right. When an offset function is
selected, the wafer moves to the corresponding direction.
Test setup
Click the Test Setup function on the Edit Panel and your test tree appears in the edit panel (see next
Figure).
Figure 3-23: Test tree panel
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Figure 62: Test Tree panel
The test tree panel displays your test flow characteristics. For example, it shows what kind of device
is going to be tested and what test is to be performed.
General editing
With the Test Setup panel active, you can make general edits to test patterns, subsites, devices, and
test modules using the Copy, Paste, Cut and Rename commands (see next Table). To make
modifications, click the desired node in the Test Setup panel, and then click the node to choose the
desired editing command. For example, to make edits to a Subsite, click on the Subsite node, then
click your desired command (see next Figure).
NOTE
You must click the node to get the correct operation.
Figure 3-24: Subsite edit example
Figure 63: Subsite right-click edit drop-down list
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Test setup panel: available editing commands
Edit command
Description
Copy
Click and Copy the desired pattern, subsite, device, or test modules.
Cut
Paste
Rename
Click and Cut the desired pattern, subsite, device, or test module.
After you copy or cut the desired pattern, subsite, device, or test module, click the place
where you want to paste it. Click the desired location then click the Paste command.
Click the desired pattern, subsite, device, or test module, then click Rename to change the
name of the selected node. Available characters for naming are A-Z, a-z, 0-9, and the “_”.
The first character must be A-Z or a-z.
Prober control
Click the Prober Control function on the edit panel, and the Prober Control panel appears in the edit
panel (see next Figure).
Figure 3-25: Prober Control panel
Figure 64: Prober Control panel
Prober Control is used for semiautomatic tests where you control the probers manually. The next
table gives a description of the commands available to control probers.
Commands available
Prober command
Description
Initialize
Home
Load
Unload
Establishes communication with the chosen prober.
Moves to the target site.
Loads a new wafer, but unloads the currently loaded wafer first.
Unloads a wafer. If no wafer is loaded, no action is taken.
Moves to the next site in the corresponding direction. The function in the middle
controls the chuck to be moved up and down.
Moves to and touches all sites in every pattern to be tested and verifies that the
wafer is correctly loaded, but does not run the test(s).
Time delay between every prober movement.
Moves to desired subsite.
Step Move
Probe Sites
Interval
Move To Subsite
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Automation panel
Click the Automation function on the edit panel, and the Automation panel appears in the edit panel.
The automation panel allows you to run automation tests on an entire cassette. To run an automation
test, click the Automation function, then click the Run function. The progress of the test appears, and
is refreshed, in realtime in the autotest information table (see next Figure).
Figure 3-26: Automation panel
Figure 65: Automation panel
Statistics panel
The Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) software provides statistical features for you in order to
view data trends and plot distribution curves. You can do simple analysis and make necessary
adjustments in order to modify test conditions, if needed (see next Figure).
You can create an output file with a Keithley data file (KDF) which also supports multi-KDF files, if
desired, for analysis. Additionally, you can view the online data plot result while ACS testing is in
progress (see the Statistical features section for more information).
Figure 3-27: Statistics panel
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Figure 66: Statistics panel
Summary report
You can display a Summary Report by clicking the Summary Report function on the edit panel. After
clicking the Summary Report function, the Summary Report appears in the edit panel.
When the data file and limits file (optional) are imported, a report of the entire test can be generated.
To generate a report of the entire test, click the Generate Report function (see next Figure). The
report appears in the ACS work area. If sorting by limits, your limit inputs will be compared to the
results. The results that exceed your limits will be indicated in the report.
Figure 3-28: Summary Report panel
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Figure 67: Summary Report panel
Log message dialog box
The log dialog box is located below the main ACS GUI (see next Figure). The log message is
displayed in the log dialog box in realtime.
You can configure the information of the log message dialog box by clicking Tools in the Menu Bar
where you will see a drop-down list. Make sure you choose Preferences, then Advanced, where you
will see three choices: INFO, WARNING, or ERROR. This is where you can choose the type of log
message you desire to view.
Figure 3-29: Log message
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Figure 68: Log message window
To access the Log dialog box Display Level setup function, use the following directions in order:
1. Click Tools in the Menu Bar where you will see a drop-down list.
2. Click Preference from the list and the Preferences dialog box appears (see next Figure).
Figure 3-30: Preferences Advanced tab
Figure 69: Preferences Advanced tab
3. Choose the Advanced tab.
4. In the Log dialog box Display Level section, click either INFO, WARNING, or ERROR.
Additionally, you can click View in the Menu Bar where you will see a drop-down list and where you
can select or deselect the Show Log dialog box (see next Figure).
NOTE
You can select the Show Log Window by clicking the item and you can deslect by clicking again.
When selected you will see a checkmark and when deselected, the item will not have a checkmark.
Figure 3-31: View drop-down list
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Figure 70: View drop-down list
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Section 4
Wafer Description
In this section:
Wafer introduction .................................................................... 4-1
Circle-shaped wafer description panel ..................................... 4-3
Square-shaped wafer description........................................... 4-18
Wafer description limits and status tab................................... 4-21
Wafer introduction
The Keithley Instruments Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) software supports two kinds of
wafers: circle-shaped and square-shaped. The circle-shaped wafer is the most common while the
square-shaped wafer is used for special cases.
Select a wafer shape for a new project:
1. Click the Preferences item in the Tool menu and the Preferences dialog box opens (see the next
two Figures).
Figure 4–1: Preferences Tools drop-down
Figure 71: Preferences in Tools drop-down
Figure 4–2: Preferences miscellaneous tab
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Figure 72: Preferences Misc tab
2. In the Preference miscellaneous tab dialog box, you will need to click the Wafer Shape (the
shape will take affect once you create your new project).
3. Click OK.
4. In the Preferences dialog box within the Misc tab, there is a choice to Clear old scripts in Series
2600A SourceMeter instruments when you open a project and run automation. You will need to
click this option to eliminate previous scripts from the system.
Figure 4–3: Square and Circle wafer shape
Figure 73: Square and Circle wafer shapes
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Circle-shaped wafer description panel
The Wafer Description panel allows you to define wafers. It activates once you click the Wafer
Description tab (see next Figure). You can edit the wafer information in this panel and the results
immediately display in the ACS main dialog box work area. You can review the next table for wafer
description editing elements and their corresponding descriptions.
CAUTION
When you change the Orient of the wafer, the sites that you defined in the wafer map will also change
in order to keep consistent with the flat or notch orientation. However, the Axis will not change.
Therefore, this may cause an incorrect operation of the prober to your sites and subsites. It is highly
recommended that you define the Orient before you define any sites or subsites.
Figure 4–4: Wafer Description panel
Figure 74: Wafer Description panel activated
Wafer Description
Elements
Description
Dia
Changes the intended diameter of the wafer to be tested from a drop-down list. When
Dia is changed, the wafer map is redrawn and all dies previously selected are cleared
.
Changes the unit of diameter (inches or millimeters). When Dia Unit is changed, the
content of Dia is automatically converted.
Sets the X die size (millimeters or mils). When Die X is changed, the wafer map is
automatically redrawn and part of selected image previously is cleared1.
Sets the Y die size (millimeters or mils). When Die Y is changed, the wafer map is
redrawn automatically and part of selected image is cleared1.
Changes the unit of die (millimeters or mils). When Die Unit is changed, the X and Y
die size values are converted automatically, as well as the X and Y of the subsite.
Sets the direction in which the X and Y coordinates increase.
Sets whether the wafer has a flat or notched edge.
Specifies the flat or notch position to be 0, 45, 90, 135, 180, 225, 270, or 315 degrees
on the wafer.
Sets the width of the wafer margin in millimeters.
There are four direction arrows: left, up, down, right. When an offset function/button is
selected, the wafer moves in the corresponding direction.
Dia Unit
Die X
Die Y
Die Unit
Axis
Flat
Orient
Wafer Edge Margin (mm)
Offset Settings
1 There is a wafer setting in the miscellaneous tab of the Preference Setting that you can click in order to clear all previous scripts that were
generated for the Series 2600A instruments.
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Wafer pattern
At the macroscopic level, one or more semiconductor dies are built-up at a given wafer location.
This location is comprised not only of end-product dies, but usually one or more parametric test
structures or subsites. ACS refers to such a repeating pattern of dies and test structures as a Pattern.
Once you have inserted the necessary wafer description information, the wafer map opens in the
ACS GUI work area (see next Figure). You are now ready to define the pattern information.
Figure 4–5: Wafer Map Description
Figure 75: Wafer Map Description
ACS supports multiple patterns in a single wafer. All patterns share the same wafer map, but they can
have their own test plan, including different sites, subsites, devices, and test modules. In addition,
different colors can be used to distinguish patterns.
To select a pattern:
1. Double-click the desired Pattern item in the Test Tree.
2. Click the Color function (located to the right of the pattern name), and the Color Choice dialog box
opens (see next Figure). You can choose either a basic color or customize your own color.
Figure 4–6: Color choice pointer
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Figure 76: Color choice pointer
3. To choose a basic color, click on one of the square colors. To choose a custom color, click on the
desired color by left-clicking and dragging the crosshair pointer onto the desired color. The
selected color is displayed in a Custom Colors area that is located below the Basic colors area.
4. Click OK when finished. The color is assigned to the selected pattern.
Display wafer pattern
One wafer can display the selected sites of a pattern, of several patterns, or all patterns. Every
pattern has a single color, however, you can choose the pattern color in order to distinguish between
different patterns. If you deselect a pattern item in the Test Setup tree, the pattern will not display in
the Wafer Map and may not be available for testing.
As shown in the next Figure, Pattern_2 is not selected, which means the sites are not displayed in the
Wafer Map, however, the Wafer Map of Pattern_1 is selected and it’s sites are displayed.
Figure 4–7: Wafer display Pattern_1
Figure 77: Wafer display Pattern_1
NOTE
It is possible to click both Pattern_1 and Pattern_2. If both patterns are selected, the sites of both
patterns will be displayed (see next Figure).
Figure 4–8: Display Pattern_1 and Pattern_2 sites
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Figure 78: Display Pattern_1 and Pattern_2 sites
Circle-shaped wafer map
After a pattern is selected, the displayed Wafer Map is displayed in the work area in the ACS main
dialog box. It is used to display the customized wafer in the Wafer Description panel, and to capture
and set the size and location information where the test structures are to be probed.
Keep in mind that all the information contained in the Wafer Map is in accordance with the current
pattern you have selected.
You can select a site that is under test by clicking the Wafer Map; you can deselect a site by clicking
it. Multisites (or blocks of sites) may be selected or not selected by clicking and dragging, then you
must choose from the options displayed in the drop-down menu (Select Sites, Clear Sites, Erase
Sites, or Recover Sites).
If you right-click on the Wafer Map work area, a drop-down menu displays (see next Figure).
Figure 4–9: Wafer Map drop-down menu
Figure 79: Wafer Map drop-down list
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Wafer Map Menu Item
Description
Select All
Clear All
Set As Target
Selects all possible sites of the wafer.
Clears all selected sites of the wafer.
Sets the selected site as the target site, which defines the first stopping point after
alignment.
Sets the selected site as the reference site, which defines the origin of site
coordinates.
Sets the selected site as the target site, which defines the target site’s position (X,Y).
Sometimes you do not want to perform a test on certain sites, but still mark them as
bad (erased) for further operations such as binning. The selected site will be set as
erased and displayed as gray in the wafer map. ACS will not run a test on this site.
Recovers and brings the erased site back to normal.
Recovers and brings all erased sites back to normal.
Allows the collection of sites that do not fall completely within the usable wafer
boundaries to be selectable.
Only allows the collection of those sites which are fully within the usable wafer
boundaries to be selectable.
Allows you to define the attributes of a predetermined logical site (for applications
such as parallel testing).
Set As Reference
Set As Target With (X, Y)
Set As Erased Site
Recover the Erased Site
Recover all Erased Sites
Allow Partial
Disallow Partial
Define Logical Site
Allow Partial and Disallow Partial
Choosing Allow Partial enables you to test all the dies that are both whole and partial (this means
dies that fall within the outline of the proposed wafer shape)(see next Figure).
Figure 4–10: Allow Partial and Disallow Partial menu items
Figure 80: Allow Partial and Disallow Partial items
When Disallow Partial is selected, you are prevented from testing the partial dies. However, the full
dies within the wafer shape can still be tested. Also, when Disallow Partial is selected, the wafer will
show all the full dies in the color cyan and the partial dies in in gray color (see next Figure).
Figure 4–11: Disallow partial dies
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Figure 81: Disallow Partial dies
Figure 4–13: Selected partial dies
Figure 82: Selected partial dies
Erased sites
You can erase multiple sites from the wafer map so that they cannot be selected for testing. After you
run automation, you can choose to mark those sites as erased.
To mark a site erased, right-click on the site you want to erase, then choose Set As Erased Site. The
selected site will be set as erased and displayed in gray in the wafer map. ACS will not run tests on
this site because it is marked erased. To recover an erased site, click Recover the Erased Site. To
recover all erased sites, click Recover all Erased Sites (see next Figure).
Figure 4–14: Wafer Map with erased sites
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Figure 83: Wafer Map with erased sites
Logical sites
Understanding logical sites
To begin to understand logical sites, you first understand the difference between two concepts:
•
•
Physical site
Logical site
Physical sites are the sites on the wafer, the size and position of which are exactly the same as the
real wafer.
Logical sites are defined to run parallel tests on the wafer with several physical sites grouped together
(the number will depend on how many groups of Series 2600A instruments you have) to
simultaneously perform the same tests during the automation test process. Such a group of physical
sites is called a logical site. Logical sites allow testing of a group of physical sites with only one prober
card touch, which sharply decreases the number of prober movements, thus shortening the
automation test time.
Defining a logical site
1. Right-click on the wafer map to activate the drop-down menu, then click the Define Logical Site
function.
2. Enter the following logical site characteristics:
A. Site Dimension: you can determine how many physical sites are in the row and column of a
logical site (see next Figure).
Figure 4–15: Define Logical Site
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Figure 84: Define Logical Site
B. Dies to Groups Mapping: you can determine the mapping of physical sites and Series 2600A
groups.
NOTE
If you do not assign a physical site, the site will not be chosen and no test will be run.
3. Click OK.
NOTE
If the row is set to 1 and the column is set to 1, the logical site will be disabled.
Defining wafer map with logical site
The collection of logical sites on the wafer map is similar to the physical sites.
When you click a die on the wafer map, it will display a logical site with an icon on the upper left site.
The marked site is the reference site (0, 0) in this logical site. In the Define Logical Site dialog, if you
move and hover your cursor over the defined sites, the reference position numbers and coordinates
will appear.
The next Figure shows an example of a two-row, two-column logical site definition.
Figure 4–16: Logical site: 2-row, 2-column position example
Figure 85: Logical site, two-row, two-column position example
The next Figure shows an example of a one-row, two-column logical site definition that has been
applied to a wafer map.
Figure 4–17: Logical site: 1-row, 2-column example
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Figure 86: Logical site, one-row, two-column example
•
•
If you click on the upper left site (marked) of a selected logical site, it will not be selected.
•
When you apply the drag and click method, it is the typical way to create a collection of selected
logical sites.
•
If you choose Select All, the software will calculate and cover as many physical sites as possible
with logical sites (see next Figure).
•
•
If you want to cover all the sites on the wafer, left-click on the wafer map to click all of them.
If you click on unmarked sites, another logical site will be selected, with a new marked upper-left
site.
After defining the wafer map with logical sites, you can run a parallel test in automation, which
tests several sites at the same time with different Series 2600A groups.
Figure 4–18: Example - Logical Site, Click All command
Figure 87: Logical site, Click All command example
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Site collection by dragging
Site collection by dragging allows you to choose (or clear) several sites on the wafer map by clicking
the left mouse button on the site, holding, and then dragging a box around the sites you want
selected. There are four choices in the Site Selection pop-up menu:
•
•
•
•
Select Sites: chooses all sites inside the rectangular area.
Clear Sites: deselects all sites inside the rectangular area.
Erase Sites: marks all sites inside the rectangular area as invalid.
Recover Sites: recovers all previously-marked invalid sites inside the rectangular area.
Figure 4–19: Clear Sites collection example
Figure 88: Clear Sites collection example
Circle-shaped wafer map advanced settings
The advanced wafer map settings are found in the right-side panel of the wafer map and include:
•
Wafer Map Scale (100% - 500%)
•
Wafer Map Style (Wafer View or Grid View)
•
[Site Sequence] Optimization (click for several options)
•
Current Site Indicator (Current Site and Selected Sites)
•
Wafer Map Color Editor (six color choices)
Wafer Map Scale
Using the Wafer Map Scale setting, the wafer map view can be enlarged by increasing the wafer map
scale input (see next Figure).
NOTE
The wafer map’s axis direction can be changed using the Axis element under Wafer Description.
Figure 4–20: Wafer Map Scale
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Figure 89: Wafer Map scale
For instance, if the Scale is set to 200%, the wafer map view will be displayed at 200% of the original,
with only part of the wafer being displayed (see next Figure).
Figure 4–21: Wafer Map Scale: close view
Figure 90: Wafer Map scale close view
Wafer Map Style
The default style of wafer map is Wafer View, however, it can be changed to Grid View in the Style
setting. Choosing Grid View displays all the grids in the background (see next Figure). The difference
between Wafer View and Grid View is that you can set a reference site outside the wafer boundary by
referencing the grid beyond the edge of the wafer.
Figure 4–22: Wafer Map Style: Grid View
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Figure 91: Wafer Map style grid view
Sites Sequence Optimization
The Sites Sequence Optimization feature is accessed by clicking the Optimization function (see next
Figure).
Figure 4–23: Optimization function
Figure 92: Optimization function
After clicking Optimization, a dialog box displays that allows you to set the sites sequence
characteristics for automation tests (see next Figure).
Figure 4–24: Sites Sequence Optimization
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Figure 93: Sites Sequence Optimization
When a sequence is selected, the test initiates, following the directional sequence of the selected
pattern.
For example, if the icon is selected, the test starts from the lower left corner site and sweeps left to
right in an upwards direction. Click OK to confirm the sequence.
In the sequence priority area, you can click site first or pattern first. These two modes are used when
more than two patterns are selected in the test plan. Site first means that the prober will not move to
the next site until all patterns in a selected site have been finished. Pattern first means that the prober
will not move to Pattern2 until all sites within Pattern1 are finished (see next Figure).
Figure 4–25: Sites Sequence Example: left image site first, right image pattern first
Figure 94: Sites Sequence left image first, right image pattern first
Sites Indicator
Below the Optimization function is the Current Site indicator. The Current Site indicator displays the
coordinates of the site where the last mouse click or drag action was performed on the wafer map.
The Selected Sites indicator shows the total number of presently selected sites on the viewable wafer
map (see next Figure).
Figure 4–26: Sites Indicator
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Figure 95: Sites indicator
Wafer Map Color Editor
The color editor is used to change the color settings of a wafer map (see next Figure).
•
Default Site: This function is used to set and show the color of the wafer background. Once selected, a
Color Choice dialog box displays that allows you to change the color selection. This is the same dialog
box where you choose a color for a selected pattern.
•
Target Site: This function is used to set and show the color of the target site. Once selected, a Color
Choice dialog box displays, allowing you to change the Target Site’s color selections.
•
Selected Target: This function is used to set and show the color of the selected target site, indicating
whether the target site is selected or not. Once selected, a Color Choice dialog box displays, allowing
you to change the color selection.
•
Wafer Margin: This function is used to show and set the color of the wafer margin. Once selected, a
Color Choice dialog box displays, allowing you to change the color selection.
•
Grid Line: This function is used to show and set the color of the lines dividing grids. Once selected, a
Color Choice dialog box displays, allowing you to change the color selection.
•
Invalid Site: This function is used to show and set the color of the invalid sites. Once selected, a Color
Choice dialog box displays, allowing you to change the color selection (see next two Figures).
Figure 4–27: Wafer Map Color Editor
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Figure 96: Wafer Map Colors editor
Figure 4–28: Color Choice
Figure 97: Color choice
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Square-shaped wafer description
Square-shaped wafer description panel
If you want to use a square-shaped wafer (selected through the Tools drop-down menu, then
Preferences, Misc tab), the Wafer Description panel will be modified to allow for defining its’ specific
attributes. For information about how to define a square-shaped wafer, refer to Click a wafer shape
for a new project:
The Wafer Description functions are found on the edit panel in the ACS GUI (see next Figure). You
can edit the wafer information in this panel and the results immediately display in the ACS GUI work
area. You can review the next table for wafer description editing elements and their corresponding
descriptions.
NOTE
The Orient operation will not change the sites or subsites, it only marks the orientation of the
alignment.
Figure 4–29: Square Wafer Description panel
Figure 98: Square-shaped Wafer Description
Wafer Description Elements
Description
Height
Width
Num X
Num Y
Unit
Axis
Orient
Height of the square-shaped wafer.
Width of the square-shaped wafer.
Site number in the X direction.
Site number in the Y direction.
Unit of length, in inch or millimeter.
The axis direction of the squared-shaped wafer.
The direction of the alignment.
Wafer pattern and display pattern
For square-shaped wafer, operations on the wafer pattern and display pattern are the same as that of
the circle-shaped wafer. For more information about Pattern and Display pattern, refer to the Pattern
and Display pattern information.
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Square-shaped wafer map
After a pattern is selected, the desired Wafer Map is displayed in the work area of the ACS GUI (see
next Figure). It can be used to capture and set the size and location information where the test
structures are to be probed.
Figure 4–30: Square-shaped Wafer Map
Figure 99: Square-shaped Wafer Map
You can select a site that is under test by clicking the wafer map; you can deselect a site by reclicking it. Also, you can select or deselect multi-sites (or blocks of sites) by holding down the left
mouse button and dragging over the desired area. Then, choosing one of the options that appears in
the pop-up menu that accompanies this action. If you right-click on the Wafer Map, the Wafer Map
menu displays (see next Figure). You can review the next table regarding the wafer map menu item
descriptions.
Figure 4–31: Square-shaped Wafer Map items
Figure 100: Square-shaped Wafer Map items
Wafer Map items
Wafer Map Menu Item
Description
Click All
Clear All
Set As Target
Selects all possible sites of the wafer.
Clears all selected sites of the wafer.
Sets the selected site as the target site, which defines the first stopping point
after alignment.
Sets the selected site as the reference site, which defines the origin of site
coordinates.
Sets the selected site as the target site, which defines the target site’s position
(X,Y).
Set As Reference
Set As Target With (X, Y)
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Site selection by dragging
Site Selection by dragging allows you to choose (or clear) several sites on the wafer map by clicking
the left mouse button on the site, holding down the mouse function, and dragging a box around the
sites you want selected. There are two choices in the Site Selection pop-up menu:
•
•
Select Sites: select the sites inside the rectangular area.
Clear Sites: clear the selected sites inside the rectangular area.
Figure 4–32: Clear Site selection example
Figure 101: Clear Sites selection example
Square-shaped wafer map advanced settings
The advanced wafer map settings are found on the right panel of the wafer map, and include:
•
•
•
•
Wafer Map Scale
Sites Sequence Optimization
Sites Indicator
Wafer Map Color Editor
Wafer map scale
Using the wafer map scale setting, the wafer map view can be enlarged by increasing the wafer map
scale input (see next Figure). For instance, if the Scale is set to 200%, the wafer map view will be
displayed at 200% of the original, with only part of the wafer being displayed.
NOTE
The wafer map’s axis direction can be changed using the Axis element under Wafer Description.
Figure 4–33: Wafer Map Scale
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Figure 102: Square-shaped Wafer Map Scale
Sites sequence optimization and sites indicator
The sites sequence optimization feature is same as the circle wafer. The optimization function is the
sites indicator. It is also the same as the circle wafer.
Wafer description limits and status tab
Wafer limits tab
Limits refers to the limits data entry area. The limits data associated with one parameter is arranged
as one row (see next Figure).
Figure 4–34: Limits tab
Figure 103: Limits tab
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The limits tab fields are as follows:
•
Subsite: The subsite name defined in test tree. This field cannot be modified.
•
Device: The device name defined in test tree. This field cannot be modified.
•
ID: The ID uniquely identifies each test parameter. This field cannot be modified.
•
Name: The name field provides for a “friendly” name, perhaps describing the parameter more clearly
than the ID. This field can not be modified.
•
Units: The Units field defines the units for the limits test results. This field may contain nonalphanumeric characters (including spaces) and need not be a “C” language name. The only constraint
is that it must not include commas. The string may contain a maximum of 13 characters. Examples of
entries for this field are volts, amps, etc. The default value is “A.”
•
Report: Report determines whether or not the limit is included in the summary report. The entry of this
field is set by checking or not selecting.
•
Critical: Critical allows parameters to be tagged as not critical (0), or as critical with one of nine different
critical flags (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9).
•
Exit condition: You can define what Exit action will be taken when a failure of the corresponding
parameter is found.
•
Target: The Target field identifies the ideal result expected for the specified result ID. The entry for this
field is a numeric value.
•
Valid Low, Valid High: This pair of limits can be used to check for Exit condition within the testing
system. Numbers outside of this range indicate that the data being produced by the system are invalid.
Invalid data triggers the specified Exit Condition.
•
Spec Low, Spec High: This pair of limits can be used to check for manufacturing standards. Numbers
outside the Spec range indicate that the device being tested does not meet manufacturing
specifications. Results of the Spec Low, Spec High limits tests display in the color indicator with either a
pass site or fail site, when run in automation mode.
•
Sigma: Parameter used in statistic
Exit condition
The exit condition column allows you to set the action to take when a failure of the corresponding
parameter is found. There are several exit actions:
•
None (default)
•
Skip Device
•
Skip Subsite
•
Skip Site
•
Skip Wafer
•
Skip Project
In the Limits tab under Wafer Description is the Exit Condition column (see next Figure). You can set
the parameter range for judgment in the Valid High and Valid Low field on the same page.
There is no Skip Test, because the tests are all run in the LUA engine of the Series 2600A
instrument; so on the software level, test flow cannot be controlled.
Figure 4–35: Limits tab Exit Condition
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Figure 104: Limits tab Exit Condition
Limits file
Exporting limits files
There are two ways to export the limits file (.klf file):
•
Click the Export function located at the bottom of Limits tab in Wafer Description.
•
Click the export limits file item under the File menu (see next Figure).
Figure 4–36: Export Limits File
Figure 105: Export Limits File
Using external limits files
The external limits files function is used for reporting generation and being accessed under exit limits
file of summary report (see next Figure).
Figure 4–37: Exit Limits File
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Figure 106: Exit Limits File
Wafer description tab
This tab displays the wafer description file (see next Figure).
Figure 4–38: Status tab of Wafer Description
Figure 107: Wafer Description tab
Exporting wafer description files
There are two ways to export the wafer description file (.wdf file):
Click the Export function located at the bottom of the Wafer Description tab. Click the Wafer
Description file item under the File menu (see next Figure).
Figure 4–39: Export .wdf or .klf files
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Figure 108: Export .wdf or .klf files
After you export a .wdf file and save to a specified folder, you can import this file for use in other tests,
eliminating the need to define a wafer every time you build test plan.
Importing Wafer Description file files
There are two ways to import the Wafer Description file (.wdf file):
Click the Import function located at the bottom of Wafer Description tab in Wafer Description.
Click the Wafer Description file item under the File menu (see next Figure).
Figure 4–40: Import .kpr, .wdf, .csv, .tpl files
Figure 109: Import .kpr, .wdf, .csv, .tpl files
You can also change the content of Wafer Description, and click the Apply Change function, then the
Wafer Map is changed as your new wafer Description.
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Section 5
Test Setup
In this section:
Test tree introduction ............................................................... 5-1
Test process flow summary...................................................... 5-2
Building a test plan................................................................. 5-23
Interactive Test Module (ITM) configuration ........................... 5-45
Script Test Module (STM) configuration ................................. 5-92
C language Test Module (CTM) configuration...................... 5-112
Python language Test Module (PTM) configuration ............. 5-120
Script editor tool ................................................................... 5-146
Script editor tutorials ............................................................ 5-156
Executing a project plan ....................................................... 5-170
Data plot............................................................................... 5-178
User Access Points (UAP) ................................................... 5-216
Test tree introduction
ACS organizes tests in the hierarchy below, consistent with the semiconductor-wafer organization.
The Test Tree is in the following logical hierarchy:
•
Pattern (multipattern)
•
Subsite
•
Device (multigroup)
•
2600A Graphical Interactive Test Module (ITM)
•
Model 4200 Graphical Interactive Test Module (ITM)
•
Script Test Module (STM)
•
C Language Test Module (CTM)
•
Python Language Test Module (PTM)
Pattern
At the macroscopic level, one or more semiconductor sites are built up at a given wafer location. This
location is comprised not only of a product site, but usually has one or more parametric test structures
or subsites. ACS supports multiple patterns of sites on a single wafer. All patterns share the same
wafer map, but they can have their own test plan, which includes different site locations, different
subsite locations, and test modules. You can use different colors to distinguish different patterns.
ACS supports up to eight patterns in total.
Subsites
The terminals of each device on a test structure are connected to a uniformly-spaced series of
contact pads. These pads are used to connect the devices to the probes of a prober. Every wafer
location that the probe moves to and contacts at any time is called a subsite. Sometimes ACS refers
to each such test structure (the combination of test devices that are tested as a group) as a subsite.
Section 5: Test Setup
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Devices
Each subsite contains a series of devices to be characterized - transistors, diodes, resistors,
capacitors, etc. A multigroup test is supported on a device. All selected groups of devices will be
tested simultaneously by a different Series 2600A group.
Test Modules
There are four classes of tests or test modules in ACS: Graphical Interactive Test Module (ITM),
Script Test Module (STM), C Language Test Module (CTM) and Python Test Module(PTM). All test
modules share common data sheet and data plot analysis functions. Key differences between ITMs,
STMs, CTMs and PTMs include the following:
Graphical Interactive Test Module (ITM)
An ITM allows you to define a test interactively using a graphical user interface (GUI).
Script Test Module (STM)
STM supports TSP™ and Keithley Test Macro (KTM) files. A TSP file (Test Script Processor) is
written for testing a device with a Series 2600A System SourceMeter® Device and Wafer Library
(WLR) scripts in ACS can be imported and modified in the STM module. STM also supports
customers’ test scripts for the Series 2600A. A KTM file is produced by the User Test Module of KITE
on the Model 4200 or CTM in ACS.
C Language Test Module (CTM)
A CTM is defined using the programming of its connected KULT-created user module. Configuring
key test parameters is performed using a graphical user interface (GUI).
Python Language Test Module (PTM)
A PTM is defined by the programming of Python language. These Python programs can be imported
or compiled in PTM interface.
Test process flow summary
There are two types of ACS test process flows:
1. Perform tests on only a few devices with no automated flow involved.
2. Perform tests throughout the cassette. When testing throughout the cassette, an auto-prober is
required.
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Working with projects
This section describes how to use an existing project from the standard ACS library and how to
create a new project.
CAUTION
This section assumes that hardware configuration is set and that all hardware is turned on. The
software connections must accurately reflect the physical hardware connections at the time the test is
executed. Incorrect terminal configurations result in anomalous test results at best, or device damage
at worst. At every test startup, you must check whether the connections are matched correctly.
Using an Existing Project
Once launched, ACS will automatically open the existing default project. If you would like to open a
project rather than the default, perform the following steps:
1. Click the Open Project icon on the toolbar; you can also click File and in the drop-down box click
Open.
2. Click the project file you want to open (a .xml file).
NOTE
If SMUs are required in the project you are trying to open, the ACS software will try to detect them in
the current physical connection. Once the SMUs are found, the project will then load in the test tree in
the Test Setup panel.
If the SMU connections in this project do not match the current physical connection, the 26xx SMUs
Missing dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–1: SMUs Missing
Figure 110: SMUs Missing
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The 26xx SMUs Missing dialog box opens to inform you that some of the Series 2600A SMUs in the
ITM-based project(s) cannot be found. To fix this, check all module settings in the project and
reassign them where necessary until the SMUs Missing dialog box no longer opens when opening an
existing project.
Creating a new project using the tree style
1. Click the New function on the toolbar from the ACS Main dialog box (you can also click the New
command from the File menu). The New Project dialog box opens (see next Figure).
2. In the Project Structure field, click Tree Style.
3. In the Template field, type the storage folder or use the Browse function to browse for a directory.
4. Enter the following information in the New Project dialog box.
•
Project Name: Enter the new project name.
NOTE
If you choose a name that has more than one word, the standard naming convention must have an
underscore between the words or numbers, etc. For example, if you name your project
CVU_CpGp_Compensation, the name must include an underscore rather a blank space (see next
Figure).
•
Project Directory: Click storage folder for the Project, or use the default directory. Use the Browse
function to browse for a directory.
•
Technology: Optional device information.
•
Product: Optional device information.
Figure 5–2: Tree Style define new test project
Figure 111: Tree Style define new test project
5. Click OK. The project is displayed in the Test Setup edit panel (see next Figure).
Figure 5–3: Tree Style test setup panel
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Figure 112: Tree Style test setup panel
6. The default Test Setup information displays, and includes:
•
Pattern_1: Default pattern name. The default pattern name can be changed to any string or color.
•
HOME: Default subsite name. The Home default subsite name can be changed to any string.
NOTE
The allowable characters for the name are: A - Z, a - z, 0 - 9, and the underscore ' _ '; the first
character must be A - Z or a - z.
7. Click the Device function icon on the toolbar (or right-click on the HOME or the subsite to choose
the Insert Device function). The SMU type dialog box opens.
Figure 5–4: SMU type
Figure 113: SMU Type
8. In the SMU Type dialog box, click 26** SMU or Model 4200 SMU. Click OK. The Select Device
Type dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–5: Select Device Type
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Figure 114: Select Device Type
NOTE
If you choose the 26xx SMU, the new device will be named device_26. If you choose the Model 4200
SMU, the new device will be named device_42.
9. Select the device type to be tested. Click OK. The Image Browser dialog box opens (see next
Figure).
10. Choose the device image that has a terminal connecting to the SMU. Later, these images appear
in the test ITM,STM, PTM or CTM work area.
11. Click the Select button, and the new device is added to the Test Tree.
Figure 5–6: Device images
Figure 115: Device images
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12. Insert a Test Module by clicking the ITM, STM, PTM, or CTM button on the vertical toolbar. You
can also right-click the device name and click Insert ITM, Insert STM, Insert PTM, or Insert CTM
options to click required test module.
13. Check the desired Group Number in the Groups area within the ITM Definition tab, or on the STM
Script tab.
14. Save the test project by clicking the SAVE function located on the toolbar. You can also use the
Save command from the File menu.
Figure 5–7: Tree style project tree
Figure 116: Tree style project tree
Create a new project using the map style:
1. Click the New function icon on the toolbar (you can also choose New from the File menu). The
New Test Project dialog box opens (see next Figure).
2. In the Project Structure field, click Map Style.
3. In the Template field, type the storage folder or use the Browse function to browse for a directory.
4. Enter the following information in the New Project dialog box.
•
Project Name: Enter the new project name.
NOTE
If you choose a name that has more than one word, the standard naming convention must have an
underscore between the words or numbers, etc. For example, if you name your project
CVU_CpGp_Compensation, the name must include an underscore rather a blank space (see next
Figure).
•
Project Directory: Click storage folder for the Project, or use the default directory. Use the Browse
function to browse for a directory.
•
Technology: Optional device information.
•
Product: Optional device information.
5. Click OK. The project is displayed in the Test Setup edit panel (see next Figure).
Figure 5–8: Map Style define new test project
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Figure 117: Map Style define new test project
6. The default Test Setup information displays and includes:
•
Pattern_1: Default pattern name. The default pattern name can be changed to any string or color.
•
HOME: Default subsite name. The Home default subsite name can be changed to any string.
•
Devices: Device nodes and and test modules can be added to the Devices.
Figure 5–9: Test setup panel
Figure 118: Map Style test setup panel
Create a new project
For each .csv file, it’s better to create a new project. From the ACS menu, click File->New. The
software will open a dialog box where you need to enter a Project Name (see next Figure).
Figure 5–25: Create a new project for stress migration
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Import the SourceMeter .csv setting file:
1. From the ACS File menu, click Import > Test Plan File (*.csv)(see next Figure).
Figure 5–26: Import the stress migration .csv format file
Figure 119: Import the stress migration .cvs file
2.
Confirm the .csv data:
After the .csv file is selected, you will see next Figure the Import Data Confirm dialog box (see next
Figure). Verify that the displayed data file is selected and then click OK.
There are two import modes:
A. Refresh: replaces an existing test, if it is the same in the test setup tree.
B. Append: adds to the test setup tree.
Figure 5–27: Import data confirmed
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Figure 120: Import Data Confirmed
After importing the .csv data file, a test setup tree including the stress migration script test modules is
automatically generated (see next Figure).
Figure 5–28: Automatically generated test setup tree
Figure 121: Automatically generated test setup tree
1. Set the wafer map and select the sites to be tested in the wafer map.
2. Save the project (see next Figure).
Figure 5–29: Set the wafer map and select the site to be tested
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Figure 122: Set the wafer map and select the site to be tested
Import a Model 4200 project file
You can import a Model 4200 project file into ACS. The project test tree may include various types of
test modules, however, ACS can only accept CTMs (C Language Test Modules; .kpr files). When you
import the .kpr test module, it appends to the ACS test tree in a subsite level:
Select File > Import to import a file with a .kpr file extension (see next Figure).
Figure 5...: Import a Model 4200 project file
Figure 123: Import a Model 4200 project file
After selecting the .kpr file, the import project dialog box opens. The default path
is:…//SA200/kIUSER/projects (see next Figure).
Figure 5...: Projects file import dialog box
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Figure 124: Projects file import dialog
Select the desired project folder, then click the Open button (see next Figure).
When the selected project folder opens, select the .kpr file and click Open.
Figure 5...: Project file import dialog box
Figure 125: Project file import dialog box
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After completing the previous steps, the subsite of the Model 4200 project you imported will append
to the test tree of ACS.
The next Figure shows the before and after test tree images when importing a Model 4200 project
file. The left image shows the test tree before importing the project file; the right image shows how the
test tree looks after you import the project file (see next Figure).
Figure 5...: Test tree importing a project before and after views
Figure 126: Test tree importing a project before and after views
Add a pattern:
1. Click the New Pattern icon in the vertical edit toolbar (or right-click Pattern/Insert Pattern). A new
pattern is created with the default name of Pattern_2 (sequential number of patterns created).
2. Use the vertical toolbar to rename, delete, copy, or cut the new pattern (see next Figure).
Repeat step 1 to add extra patterns as needed.
Figure 5–10: Selected pattern_1
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Figure 127: Selected Pattern_1
Add a new subsite:
1. Click the Pattern you want to add a subsite to.
2. Click the New Subsite icon in the vertical edit toolbar (or right-click Pattern/Insert Subsite). A new
subsite is created with the default name of subsite.
3. Repeat steps 1 - 2 to add extra subsites as needed.
4. Use the vertical toolbar to rename, delete, copy or cut the new subsite (see next Figure).
Figure 5–11: Selected subsites
Figure 128: Selected subsites
Figure 5–12: Additional subsites
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Figure 129: Additional subsites
Add a new device:
1. Select Devices from the Test Setup menu tree (see next Figure).
Figure 5–13: Selected Devices tree item
Figure 130: Selected Devices tree item
2. Click the New Device icon in the Vertical edit toolbar (or right-click Device/Test Setup panel).
3. In the SMU Type dialog box, click 26xx SMU or Model 4200 SMU (see next Figure).
NOTE
If you select the Model 26xx SMU, the new device name will be appended with _26. If you select the
Model 4200 SMU, the new device name is appended with _42.
Figure 5–14: SMU type
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Figure 131: SMU Type
4.
5.
6.
7.
Click OK. A dialog box opens allowing you to choose the type of device to test.
Choose one of the eleven devices.
Click OK. A new device is created.
Use the vertical toolbar to rename, delete, copy or cut the new device.
Repeat steps 1 - 6 to add new devices as needed.
Figure 5–15: New device
Figure 132: New Device
Figure 5–16: New devices created
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Figure 133: New Devices created
Add a new test module:
1. Click the device that you want to add a new test module to.
2. From the vertical edit toolbar, click the desired test module icon (ITM,CTM,STM, or PTM). A test
module is created for the selected device (see next Figure).
3. Use the vertical toolbar to rename, delete, copy or cut the new test module.
Figure 5–17: Created test modules
Figure 134: Created test modules
Map subsites and test modules:
You can map any devices and test modules under the Devices tree to the subsites under the Patterns
tree. For example, map devices and test modules to the subsite Home (Home is the default subsite of
a project). This means that you should assign the devices and test modules to the subsite.
1. Click the subsite of the pattern you want to map. The definitions tab will display the devices and
test settings (see next Figure). There are four parts in the Devices and Test Settings: Available
Devices, Devices, Test and Groups.
Figure 5–18: Devices and test settings
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Figure 135: Devices and test settings
2.
In the Available Devices box check the corresponding devices you want to include. You can click
the Select All function to click all the devices or click UnSelect All function to cancel all devices
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–19: Available devices
Figure 136: Available devices
3. The Tests box will show all the test modules for a selected device (the highlighted item in the
Available Devices box)(see next Figure). All test modules are checked by default, click the
deselect All function to cancel them all. Click the check box before each test module you want to
select.
Figure 5–20: Test settings
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Figure 137: Test Settings
4. In the Groups box, all the Groups are checked by default. Click the deselect All function to cancel
all selections and click the check box before the GROUP you want to click (see next Figure).
Figure 5–21: Group settings
Figure 138: Group settings
5.
The Devices section shows all Tests and Groups you have selected. For example, the device_26
contains the ‘itm’ and ‘HCI’ test modules, and GROUP1 is selected (see next Figure).
Figure 5–22: Devices
Figure 139: Devices
6.
To change the test sequence, use the scrollbar up or down functions. For example, if device_42
should be tested first, then device_26_1, and the last device_26. You can operate like this: first
select device_42, and click the up arrow function twice, select device_26 and click the down
arrow once. The test will sequence in the order that you selected (see next Figure).
Figure 5–23: Devices sequence after change
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Figure 140: Devices sequence after change
7. Change the subsite name by typing the new name in the Name field, then set the Loop Num. You
can also change the Position by typing specific X and Y axis values. Then click the Apply function
to update the project with the settings that you have made (see next Figure).
8. Set devices and tests settings in the same way for other subsites.
Figure 5–24: Name, loop number, and position settings
Figure 141: Name, loop number, and position settings
After mapping all the subsites, save the settings, then click the Automation to run this project.
In the Map style, if you want to delete one device or one test module, you need not delete it in all the
subsites containing this device or module. You can just click the Test Setup, and delete it in the
device. It is very convenient for the large project containing a large number of subsites.
Save as a template and import a project template
The Save As Template function was created to make the test as convenient as possible. After the
project template is saved, you can import a project into the main menu by choosing the Import Test
Plan (.tpl) item from the file menu (see next Figure).
Step 1: Save as a template
1. Open the existing project file or folder you want to save as a template. For example, the default
file in projects in the next Figure.
Figure 5–34: Open existing project
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Figure 142: Open existing project
2. From ACS File menu, click Save As Template; the Save project As Template dialog box opens
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–35: Save as template from file
Figure 143: Save As Template in File menu
3. Enter a name in Template Name box and click the ellipsis function to choose a Location.
4. Click OK to save the project as a template.
Figure 5–36: Save project as template dialog box
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Figure 144: Save project As Template
Step 2: Use a template
Use the project template to create a new project.
Figure 5–37: Use the template to create a new project
Figure 145: Use the template to add a new project
Import Test Plan
1. From the File drop-down menu, choose Import and select Test Plan (*.tpl)(see next Figure).
Figure 5–38: Import test plan (*.tpl)
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Figure 146: Import test plan (.tpl)
2. The Convert Test Plan To ACS Project dialog box opens (see next Figure).
3. There are three paths to choose: Test Plan, UAP Files, ACS Test Project. For every item, click
Browse to choose the path.
4. Enter a name in the Project Name edit box.
5. Click OK.
Figure 5–39: Convert Test Plan To ACS Project
Figure 147: Convert Test Plan to ACS Project
Building a test plan
After you create a new project, you will be able to build and configure a test plan according to your
preferences.
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Add a new pattern
Click the New Pattern icon on the toolbar to add a new pattern for the current project. (You can also
right-click a pattern name, then click Insert Pattern to add a new pattern.) The Pattern work area
opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–40: Pattern work area
Figure 148: Pattern work area
There are three tabs in the Pattern work area:
1. Wafer Map
2. Limits
3. Wafer Description
Wafer Map tab
All settings on the Wafer Map are the same as the Wafer Description panel. All patterns share the
same wafer map.
Limits tab
The limits data associated with one parameter are arranged as one row. The fields of the Limits tab
are shown in the next Figure.
Figure 5–41: Limits Tab
Figure 149: Limits tab
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•
ID: The ID uniquely identifies each test parameter. This field cannot be modified.
•
Name: The Name field can be modified.
•
Units: The Unit field defines the unit for the limits test results. This field may contain non-alphanumeric
characters (including spaces) and need not be a legal “C language” name. The only constraint is that it
must not include commas. The string may contain a maximum of 13 characters. Examples of entries for
this field are volts or amps.
•
Report: Report determines whether or not the limit is included in the summary report. If you want to
include the report, make sure to select this option. To remove from the report, make sure you do not
select or deselect as necessary.
•
Critical : Critical allows parameters to be tagged as not critical (0), or as critical with one of nine different
critical flags (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9).
•
Target: The Target field identifies the ideal result expected for the specified ID. The entry for this field is
a numeric value.
•
Valid Low, Valid High: This limit pair can be used to check for device failures or faults within the testing
system. Numbers outside of this range indicate that the data being produced by the system are invalid
usually due to an equipment malfunction..
•
Spec Low, Spec High: This limit pair is used to check for manufacturing standards. Numbers outside of
this range indicate that the device being tested does not meet manufacturing specifications.
Limits tab Formulator function
The Limits tab contains the Formulator function. The Formulator function is active once you click a
Pattern on the project tree (see next Figure).
Figure 5–42: Limits tab functions
Figure 150: Limits tab functions
Click the Formulator function and the Formulator Setting displays (see next Figure).
Figure 5–43: Formulator settings dialog box
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Figure 151: Formulator Settings dialog box
The Formula box is used to create new formulas or edit existing formulas.
NOTE
An Add formula function is part of the Formula function.
When you select the Add function for the Formula, the following will occur:
•
Starts a calculation execution of the formula.
•
Moves a formula to the Formula List box.
The Formula List displays formulas that have been created. The Del function deletes a formula that is
selected in the Formula List box. The Edit function moves a formula from the Formula List to the
Formula box to edit.
Variables is a list of all in the pattern.
The Constants indicates each Constant that you can insert by name. When you click the constant in
the list it is added to the Formula equation, at the cursor position. Selecting the Add function opens a
dialog box that allows you to add a new constant to the list. After inputting the name and value, click
OK. To delete a constant, select the constant then the Del function.
The Parameter Extraction Functions — List 6 parameter extraction functions. Including GMMAX, SS,
SSVTCI, VTCI, VTLINGM, VTSATGM.
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The Math/Statistic Functions lists 26 different functions: ABS, AT, AVG, DELTA, DIFF, DIMENSION,
FINDD, FINDLIN, FINDU, FIRSTPOS, JOIN, LASTPOS, LN, LOG, LOG10, MAX, MAXPOS, MIN,
MINPOS, POW, RES, RES_4WIRE, RES_4WIRE_AVG, SMOOTH, SUBARRAY1, SUBARRAY2.
The Line Fitting and Modeling Functions lists 23 different functions: EXP, EXPFIT, EXFITA, EXPFITB,
LINEFIT, LINFITSLP, LINEFITXINT, LINEFITYINT, LOGFIT, REGFIT, REGFITSLP, REGFITXINT,
REGFITYINT, REGFIT_LGX_LGY, REGFIT_LGX_Y, REGFIT_X_LGY, RSQUAR, TANFIT,
TANFITSLP, TANFITXINT, TANFITYINT, TARGERX, TARGETY.
NOTE
For more information, refer to the Formulator function reference topic in this section. Here you will find
an all inclusive list of all functions.
Wafer Description tab
The Wafer Description tab displays the content of the file (see next Figure). The description tab can
be edited.
Figure 5–44: Status tab of pattern work area
Figure 152: Status tab of pattern work area
Add a new subsite
Click the New Subsite function icon on the toolbar to add a new subsite to the current project. The
Subsite dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–45: Subsite Definition tab
Figure 153: Subsite Definition tab
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Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
Definition tab: You can change a subsite name in the Name entry field.
In Position boxes, you can set the subsite position relative to the site. The axis direction is the same
as in the Wafer Description panel. The X axis defines the horizontal position. The Y axis defines the
vertical position. These position entries are used for moving the probe to the relative position.
You can input a positive integer in the Loop Number. For example, if you input three for the Loop
Number, all the modules in this subsite run three times (see next Figure).
•
Status tab: This tab shows the Subsite Definition information.
You can add multiple subsites and configure as appropriate. This function will save time in instances
where you have the same device and test modules for a subsite.
Click the plus icon to add a new subsite to the definition tab.
Click the X icon to delete selected subsites.
Click the broom icon to clear all added subsites (except for the original one).
Click the up arrow icon to move selected subsites up.
Click the down arrow icon to move selected subsites down.
Click the spreadsheet with left arrow icon to import the subsite list from a .csv file.
Click the spreadsheet with right arrow icon to export the subsite lists to a .csv file.
For an example on how to add a new subsite, see next Figure the instructions:
1. Click the plus icon to add a new subsite (the row will append to the subsite list).
2. Set the X and Y loop number for every subsite. The X axis defines the horizontal position. The Y
axis defines the vertical position (see next Figure).
Figure 5–46: Set subsite list
Figure 154: Set subsite list
Run subsite loop
Click the run function icon (refer to the Test Control functions for more information) to run
the subsite. The modules of the subsite run three times. There will be three groups of
data in the Data tab (see next Figure).
Figure 5–47: Set subsite loop number
Figure 155: Set subsite loop number
Figure 5–48: Result of subsite loop
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Figure 156: Result of subsite loop
Add a new device
Each device is associated with a specific device work area. The device work area is the interface
used to connect every device.
Add a new device for the current project:
1. Click the New Device function on the vertical toolbar. The SMU Type dialog box opens.
NOTE
If the current hardware configuration includes the Model 4200 SMU and a Series 2600A SMU, the
SMU type dialog box opens. If you are including only one type of SMU, the dialog box will not open
and the SMU type is used by default (see next Figure).
Figure 5–49: SMU Type
Figure 157: SMU Type
Figure 5–50: Select new device
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Figure 158: Select new device
2. Click 4200 SMU to create a new device testing under 4200 SMU or click 2600A SMU to create a
new Series 2600A SourceMeter instruments one.
3. Click the desired device (see next Figure).
Figure 5–51: Device images
Figure 159: Device images
4. Click OK. The Image Browser dialog box opens (see next Figure).
5. Select the device image that has a terminal connecting to the SMU. (Later, these images appear
in the test ITM work area.)
6. Click the Select button. The new device is added to the Test Tree named with the device type
chosen and appended with either _42 or _26, according to the selected SMU type. The indicator
area (the black area at the upper right of the ACS dialog box) of the device work area is displayed
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–52: Device work area
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Figure 160: Device work area
Load and save device
There are two tabs in the device work area:
•
•
Device Settings
Status
The Device Setting tab opens by default. The column labels of the device Status tab are also
displayed. In the Device Setting tab, you can assign the device setting according to the physical
connection of the device. The device information can then be see next Figuren in the device Status
tab.
There are four functions in the Device setting panel: Load Device, Load SMU Mapping, Save SMU
Mapping, Save SubDev Info (see next Figure).
Figure 5–53: Functions on Device Setting tab
Figure 161: Functions on Device Setting tab
Load Device is used to change the devices image or type for an exiting device:
1. Click the Load Device function. The Select Device Type dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–54: Select Device Type
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Figure 162: Select Device Type
2. Click on the desired device type.
3. Click OK to load the device. The Image Browser dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–55: Image browser
Figure 163: Image browser
4. Choose a desired image by clicking the Device name, and then click OK.
5. Click Open to finish loading the device.
After loading the device, an image will appear in the device work area (see next Figure). With the
device loaded, you can adjust the settings as needed.
Figure 5–56: Device work area
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Figure 164: Device Setting work area
To load an existing SMU mapping file for special devices:
1. Click Load SMU Mapping function, the Import SMU Mapping File dialog box opens.
2. Select an existing comma separated value (.csv) file which has Pin No. and SMU No. matched
respectively. For example, in the next Figure, 11.csv file is an available SMU Mapping file.
Figure 5–57: Import SMU Mapping file
Figure 165: Import SMU Mapping File
3. Click the Open function.
To save SMU mapping:
1. Click the Save SMU Mapping function. The Save SMU Mapping File dialog box opens. Click the
path for the .csv file to save the changes.
2. Click Save to finish saving.
Figure 5–58: Save SMU Mapping file
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Figure 166: Save SMU Mapping File
Save Sub-Device information
Under the device work area, in Pads-SMU Mapping item, there are four columns: Pad No., SubDevice, SMU No., Pad Name see next Figure).
Figure 5–59: Load SMU mapping
Figure 167: Load SMU mapping
•
Pad No. is the number of each pad which is preset and fixed.
•
Sub-Device indicates where each pad belongs.
•
SMU No. is listed according to the SMU Mapping, which is loaded in Load SMU Mapping step.
•
Pad Name is the name of a pad.
1. Edit the sub-device field by entering numbers within the limits of SubDev No. which has been
chosen previously. For example if the SubDev No. is 2 (see next Figure), the most numbers
entered in Sub-Device editing box is 1, 2).
2. To finish editing the Sub-Device, click the Save SubDev Info function.
Figure 5–60: Device Setting; SubDev Num
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Figure 168: Device Setting; SubDev Num
Device Settings tab
After inserting a new device into the Project Plan, it must be configured to match the physical
connection. ACS supports single device test, multidevice test, and multi group test.
Setting single device
1. From the Device Setting tab of the device work area, click the SMU Terminal. The pads setting
dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–61: SMU Setting
Figure 169: SMU Setting
2. Click the connection in the instrument SMU list box that matches the physical connection of the
device terminal. If the device Pad is not connected (open circuit), or is connected to a particular
SMU, you can click NONE (or choose not to set this SMU terminal). If the device Pad is
connected to Ground, click GND.
3. Click OK.
NOTE
You can also set the SMU number in the SMU No. status column (see next Figure).
Figure 5–62: SMU Setting: Using the SMU No. List Box
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Figure 170: SMU Setting_ using the SMU No. list box
4. Repeat the above steps to set every SMU Terminal .Edit the Pad Name (optional). You cannot
name two pads the same name. If named the same, an Invalid Pad Name dialog box open (see
next Figure).
5. Set the Attribute box. Input the device information in the Attribute box.
•
L(um): the length of device under test
•
W(um): the width of device under test
•
T(cen): the test temperature
Figure 5–63: Invalid pad name
Figure 171: Invalid pad name
6. Click the Save function on the toolbar to save the settings.
7. If you are setting up a multigroup test, you do not need to configure every device one at a time,
you can just check the group number to be tested in the appropriate area.
Select a multidevice
Select the multidevice from the Image Browser dialog box.
Figure 5–64: Select multidevice image
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Figure 172: Select multi-device image
The settings for the multidevice are almost the same as those used the single device, except you
choose the device number and matching sub-device number to the device terminals.
Define a multidevice:
1. Define the type of sub-device using the Select Device Type drop-down list box (using the Load
Device button). The created sub-device will be listed in the Subdevices Included In box (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–65: Setting two sub-devices
Figure 173: Setting two sub-devices
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2. Select any row in the Pad-SMUs Mapping area and it will highlight. Set the SMU as instructed in
step 1. Check the sub-device in Sub-devices Included In box to set the sub-device.
3. Match SMU, Pads and Sub-device to complete the test device structure definition.
NOTE
If a Pad is set as NONE or GND, it will not appear in test set up page (you will need to make the GND
connection yourself). If a Pad is Set As Common, it will be shared by all sub-devices.
Set up a multigroup test
If you set up a multigroup test, it will not be necessary to configure every device one-by-one. All you
need to do is check the group number needed to be tested in the right area.
CAUTION
The software connections must accurately reflect the physical hardware connections at the time the
test is executed. Incorrect terminal configurations result in anomalous test results and/or damage to
the device. At every test startup, you must check whether the SMU terminal connected to the device
Pad is matched correctly.
At the test startup, you must check whether the SMU terminal connected to the device Pad is
correctly matched. Perform the following steps (refer to ACS Example hardware configurations (see
"ACS example hardware configurations and connections" on page 16-1)).
1. Check the physical connection of each test device terminal shown. Verify that it is not connected
(open circuit), connected to the Ground Unit (KI_GND), or connected to a particular SMU.
2. Check the SMU No. list box to ensure that they are properly matched to the physical connection.
3. For each SMU in the Definition tab that is improperly matched, or not yet matched to a physical
connection, assign/reassign the terminal connection as discussed in this section.
Graphically define a new device
Edit a device:
From the Tools menu, click Graphically Define a New Device (see next Figure).
Figure 5–66: Graphically Define a New Device in Tools menu
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Figure 174: Graphically Define a New Device in Tools menu
The Device Map Editor dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–67: Blank Device Map editor
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Figure 175: Blank Device Map editor
Choose the device bitmap by clicking the ellipsis to browse the bitmap (Select the Bitmap) save path.
The selected bitmap will load in the Device Editor dialog box. The bitmap’s name will appear in the
Device Name box as the default name of this device (see next Figure).
Figure 5–68: Select device bitmap
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Figure 176: Select device bitmap
Click the Device Type using the drop-down arrow in the Device Info area (see next Figure). If needed,
select the New function icon to input a new device type. Edit the device name in Device Name edit
box (see next Figure).
Figure 5–69: Graphically Define the device type
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Figure 177: Graphically Define the device type
Enter the Pin Settings
The bitmap of the device is defined as North, South, West, East, NE (Northeast), SE (Southeast), NW
(Northwest), and SW (Southwest).
•
Input the pad number in the North, South, West, and East according to the device bitmap. For
example, in the next Figure, the number 4 is entered in the West box.
•
When you select the Enter key or you move to another control, the pad boxes will be added in the
specified display areas corresponding to the counts entered in the Pin Settings.
Figure 5–70: Enter Pins Settings
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Figure 178: Enter Pin Settings
To set the Pad Name, click on a check box in the Device Map and Layout area. The Set Pad Name
dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–71: Set Pad Name
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Figure 179: Set Pad Name
Enter a unique pad name into the Set Pad Name box.
Click OK.
Click the Save button to save this device to the loaded path.
The next Figure shows the device MyRESISTOR_2T_3D is saved and ready for use by ACS.
Figure 5–72: Save the device to loaded path
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Figure 180: Save the device to loaded path
Interactive Test Module (ITM) configuration
After inserting ITMs, STMs, PTMs, and CTMs into the project, they must be configured to meet your
test requirements. This section describes how to use the powerful and flexible features of ACS to
configure ITMs, STMs, PTMs, and CTMs.
Open an ITM
Each ITM is associated with a specific ITM work area. An ITM work area displays the ITM’s definition
or configuration, its test data, and its data analysis.
To open an ITM work area, from the Test Setup panel, click on the ITM to be configured. The
Definition tab of the ITM work area displays by default. Also, the columns of the Data and Status tabs
display (see next Figure).
Figure 5–73: ITM work area
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Figure 181: ITM work area
•
The Definition tab is the primary interface for configuring an ITM. The Definition tab allows you to
configure an interactive test module and display the current configuration.
•
The Data tab displays the test results in its Data worksheet in spreadsheet format and in real time as
the test executes. Also, the Data tab allows you to create and export graphs of the test and results of a
test analysis, which in most cases, may be displayed in realtime as the ITM executes. It also provides
flexible plot-data selection, formatting, annotation, and numerical coordinate displays (using precision
cursors). In ACS, all test modules (ITM, STM, PTM and CTM) share a common data sheet and data plot
analysis function.
•
The Status tab monitors the configuration status of the test.
•
ITM Definition Tab. The next Figure shows an example Definition tab for a library MOSFET test.
Figure 5–74: ITM Definition tab
Figure 182: ITM Definition tab
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The following items display on the ITM Definition tab:
Test device schematic. This is the SMU terminal next to each terminal of the device under test. The
SMU terminal represents the SMU (or ground, or open circuit) to which the device pad is connected.
It provides the following functions:
•
Identifies the device pad (e.g., as gate, drain, source, collector, and anode, etc.).
•
Shows the present forcing-function and measuring-options configuration for the terminal.
•
You can assign and configure/reconfigure the forcing function and measuring options for each terminal
connected to a SMU. Click the desired radio function in the FORCE function area, then click the SMU to
be forced on. The associated Forcing Functions/Measure Options Table for the terminal is highlighted.
You can configure the terminal at that time. When you finish setting a terminal, choose another terminal,
and repeat the steps above until all terminals are set. For more information on Forcing Functions, refer
to Understanding and configuring the force function parameters - later in this section.
•
Set measure Conditions field.
•
Click the measure results to be exported to the Data worksheet field.
•
Set pre-configured Timing parameters for the ITM field.
•
The current test mode - Sweeping or Sampling - for all configurations.
•
Click the groups to test according to the test hardware connection.
NOTE
The ITM work area in the Definition tab shown in the figure above was opened by clicking the
itm_idvd ITM in the Test Setup panel. The itm_idvd ITM is an existing library that comes preconfigured with default settings.
Click on a New ITM in the Test Setup panel and the ITM work area opens and displays a blank
Definition tab. Based on the device that owns the ITM, the appropriate number of instruments are
displayed - one for each device terminal.
The next Figure shows the blank Definition tab for the idvd2 ITM. The idvd2 ITM is an undefined test
that was just inserted into the illustrated Project Plan.
Figure 5–75: Blank Definition tab of a new ITM
Figure 183: Blank Definition tab of new ITM
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ITM status tab
Before configuring an ITM, you can check the present configuration status of the ITM using the ITM
Data tab. The Data tab reports the ITM’s readiness for use, and typically recommends additional
preparations.
For example, a check of the Status tab for the “itm_idvd” ITM, in the previous Figure shows its proper
configuration status (see next Figure).
Figure 5–76: ITM Status tab
Figure 184: ITM Status tab
ITM definition tab
Forcing Device Terminals
You must initially assign at least one forcing function to a completely new ITM. A forcing function
defines how the SMU applies a current or voltage to a device terminal (including maintaining a zerovoltage/current state). You can reassign a forcing function(s) to an existing library ITM. The following
sections show how to click forcing functions.
To match the Definition tab terminal connections to physical connections manually:
CAUTION
The software connections must accurately reflect the physical hardware connections at the time the
ITM is executed. Incorrect terminal configurations will cause incorrect test results and could possibly
damage your device. When you reassign an exiting ITM, make sure the ITM Definition tab terminal
connection matches the physical connection correctly. Match the Definition tab terminal connections
to the physical connections as described in the following text.
1. Check the physical connection of each test device pad to determine whether it is unconnected
(open circuit), connected to the Ground Unit (KI_GND), or connected to a particular SMU.
2. Check the Instrument Selection edit box for each device to ensure the terminal connections are
properly matched to a physical connection.
3. Assign/reassign the terminal connection in the Device Setting tab of the device work area for
each device terminal in the ITM Definition tab that is improperly matched (or not yet matched) to a
physical connection.
4. After checking and correcting connections, return to the ITM work area and note that the
instrument object connected to the SMU is now assigned a device work area.
Assign/reassign forcing functions to device terminals
ACS provides two forcing functions in the Sampling test mode and six forcing functions in the
Sweeping test mode (see next Figure). In the Force Function area, click the Bias V function, then
click on the SMU terminal. These functions are summarized in the next table.
Figure 5–77: Force function radio buttons
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Figure 185: Force Function radio buttons
Forcing Function Summary dependant
Type
Name
Description
Sweeping
Sampling
Bias
Voltage Bias
(Bias V)
Maintains a defined constant-voltage state at the terminal,
subject to the user-specified current compliance for the
connected SMU.
Maintains a defined constant-current state at the terminal,
subject to a user-specified voltage compliance of the
connected SMU.
Increments a series of voltage values at specified rate
dependent on timing settings. Generates parametric
curve data that is recorded in the ITM Data tab and can
be plotted.
Increments a series of current values at a specified rate
dependent on timing settings. Generates parametric
curve data that is recorded in the ITM Data tab and can
be plotted.
Increments a voltage to two or more levels, each of which
is held constant during the progress of a Current Sweep
or a Voltage Sweep. The combined data can be plotted in
the ITM Data tab, resulting in a family of curves.
Increments a current to two or more levels, each of which
is held constant during the progress of a Current Sweep
or a Voltage Sweep. The combined data can be plotted in
the ITM Data tab, resulting in a family of curves.
X
X
X
X
Current Bias
(Bias I)
Sweep
Sweep voltage
(Sweep V)
Sweep voltage
(Sweep I)
Step
Voltage Step
(Step V)
Voltage Step
(Step I)
X
X
X
X
For detailed information about each forcing function, refer to the section Understanding and
Configuring Current Sweep Function Parameters.
SMU bias/sweep/step table configuration
A Force Function/Measure table is associated with an instrument object that is assigned to a device
terminal. The Forcing Functions/Measure table’s options are used to configure the chosen forcing
function and measurements implemented by the instrument. This section explains the following:
•
Understanding and configuring each available forcing function.
•
Understanding and configuring the measurement options that are associated with a forcing function.
These are discussed generically, for all forcing functions, at the end of this section.
•
Understanding and configuring the other controls on the Forcing Functions/Measure Options dialog box.
Reviewing SMUs bias/sweep/step table
There are two Force Function/Measure tables in the ITM Definition Tab. One is a Sweep/Step SMUs
table; the other is a Bias SMUs table (see next Figure).
Figure 5–78: Forcing functions/measure tables
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Figure 186: Forcing functions_measure tables
Understanding and configuring the force function parameters
1. Voltage bias
2. Current bias
3. Voltage sweep
4. Current sweep
5. Voltage step
6. Current step
7. GND, V Meter(as a voltage meter source) and Open
NOTE
If a terminal is forced as GND, Open or V Meter, this terminal will only be used as a source, no
measurement is performed.
Voltage bias explained
The Voltage Bias forcing function maintains a defined constant-voltage state at the terminal, subject
to your specified current compliance of the connected SMU. A typical Voltage Bias Forcing
Functions/Measure Options table is shown in the next Figure.
Figure 5–79: Bias V and bias I forcing example
Figure 187: Bias V and bias I forcing example
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Device Num: The sub-device number is defined in the device work area based on hardware
connection.
SMU: The number is defined in the device work area, based on hardware connection.
Pad: The name is defined in the device work area, based on the hardware connection.
Function: Force function type.
•
In the Function category, you can select the function you need performed. For example, you can
choose Bias V, Bias I, Sweep V, or Sweep I depending on your testing needs.
Force Range: Specifies the SMU voltage range used to force the bias voltage, including the following
options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the voltage range as the bias
voltage progresses. This option provides the best voltage resolution and control.
•
The numerical voltage range option ( 200 mV, 2 V, 20 V, 200 V) allows you to manually select a
SMU range to suit your needs. For example, when forcing “5V”, you would typically choose the 20
V SMU range or the auto SMU range, which allows the SMU to click the most appropriate range
based on the voltage level.
Source: You can use the Source value edit box to set any valid SMU voltage.
Measure: The unit is amps or volts with the following options:
•
•
•
I: Actual measured current.
•
•
I+V: Measures both current and voltage.
V: Actual measured voltage values.
V (prog): The programmed voltage, as requested forced voltage values. For example, 2.5V is to
be forced at a transistor drain terminal. The programmed value( V(prog) ) is exactly 2.5V, even if
the measured value ( V ) would be 2.4997V. Under the programmed option, the reported value is
exactly 2.5V, even if the measured value would be 2.4997V.
I+V (prog): Measures current and returns voltage (prog).
Compliance: The Compliance edit box specifies any valid SMU current or voltage compliance limit. In
the next Figure, in the Bias V, the compliance is current. The unit is amps.
Meas Range: The measure range edit box specifies the SMU range used. The current measure
range is present for voltage forcing functions, and the voltage measure range is present for current
forcing functions only. In the next Figure, in the Bias V force function, if I in the measure variable edit
box is selected, the measure range is that of the current. If I+V is selected, the measure range is also
that of the current. Otherwise, if V is selected, ACS enforces the Force Range first, and ignores the
measure range. Here you can specify the measure range to be used by the SMU for current, from the
following options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current measurement range. This
option provides the best resolution.
•
The Limits auto option is a compromise between the full auto option and a fixed range option. Here you
can specify the minimum range that the SMU uses when automatically optimizing the current
measurements. This option saves time when maximum resolution at minimum currents is not needed.
•
The numerical range options (100 nA, 1 µA, 10 µA, 100 µA, 1 mA, 10 mA, 100 mA, 1 A, 1.5 A, 10 A)
allow you to manually click a fixed current measurement range to suit your needs.
Limits auto: This feature can only be selected after clicking Limits auto in the measure range edit box.
Define the minimum range that the SMU uses when automatically optimizing the current
measurements.
Voltage bias configuration
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1. In the force Function area, select Bias V, then click on the SMU terminal. The SMU is assigned to
the corresponding Bias SMU’s table and highlighted. SMU, Pad, Function, and Force Range are
configured correctly (see next Figure).
Figure 5–80: Bias V and bias I forcing example #2
Figure 188: Bias V and bias I forcing example #2
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2. Click the best fixed voltage source range in the Force Range edit box. You can also click the auto
option, which commands the SMU to automatically optimize the voltage range.
3. Input any valid SMU voltage in the Force Range edit box; the unit is volts.
4. Enter any valid SMU current compliance in the Compliance edit box; the unit is amps.
5. According to the measured variable selected, click the measure option in the Meas Range edit
box.
6. After the Limits auto is selected, select a suitable minimum range that the SMU will use.
Current bias explained
The current bias forcing function maintains a constant current state at the terminal, subject to the
maximum voltage compliance of the connected SMU. A typical Current Bias Forcing
Functions/Measure Options table is shown in the next Figure.
Device Num: The sub-device number is defined in the device work area based on hardware
connection.
SMU: The number is defined in the device work area, based on hardware connection.
Pad: The name is defined in the device work area, based on the hardware connection.
Function: Force function type.
In the Function category, you can select the function you need performed. For example, you can
choose Bias V, Bias I, Sweep V, or Sweep I depending on your testing needs.
Force Range: Specifies the SMU current range used to force the bias current, including the following
options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current range as the bias
current progresses. This option provides the best current resolution and control.
•
The Numerical Voltage Range options (100 nA, 1 µA, 100 µA, 1 mA, 10 mA, 1 mA, 1 A, 1.5 A, 10
A) allow you to manually click a SMU range to suit your needs. For example, when forcing “1.5
mA”, you would typically choose the 10 mA SMU range or the auto SMU range, which allows the
SMU to click the most appropriate range, based on the current level.
For example, when forcing “1.5mA” user would typically choose the 10mA SMU range or the auto
SMU range, which allows the SMU to click the most appropriate range, based on the current level.
Source: You can use the Source value edit box to set any valid SMU current.
Measure: The unit is amps or volts with the following options:
•
•
•
I: Actual measured current values.
•
•
I+V: Measures both current and voltage.
V: Actual measured voltage values.
I (prog): The programmed current, as requested forced current values. For example, 10 mA is to
be forced at a transistor collector terminal if the programmed value (I(prog)) is 10 mA and the
measured value(I) is 9.9982mA, the programmed option (I(prog)) forces the reported value to
display exactly 10mA, even if the measured value is 9.9982 mA.
V+I (prog): Measures voltage and returns current (prog).
Compliance: The Compliance edit box specifies any valid SMU current or voltage compliance limit.
The next Figure shows the forcing function is Bias I, the compliance is voltage, and the unit is volts.
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Meas Range: The measure range edit box specifies the SMU range used. The current measure
range is present for voltage forcing functions and the voltage measure range is present for current
forcing functions only. That is, in Bias I forcing function, if the V in the Measure edit box is selected,
the measure range is that of the voltage. If I+V is selected, the measure range is also that of the
voltage. In another case, if I is selected, ACS enforces the Force Range first, and ignores the Meas
Range, so, at that time, the Meas Range edit box is disabled. For example, you can specify the
measurement range to be used by the SMU for voltage from the following options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the voltage measurement range. This
option provides the best resolution.
•
The Numerical Range options (200 mV,2 V,20 V,200 V) allow you to manually click a fixed voltage
measurement range to suit your needs.
Limits Auto: Disabled in current bias.
Current bias configuration
1. In the force Function area, select the Bias I function then click on the SMU terminal. The SMU will
be assigned to the corresponding Bias SMU’s table and highlighted. SMU, Pad, Function, and
Force Range are defined properly.
2. Choose the current source range in Force Range edit box. You can click the auto option, which
commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current range.
3. Input any valid SMU current in the Measure edit box. The unit is amps.
4. Enter any valid SMU voltage Compliance in the edit box. The unit is volts.
5. According to the measured variable selected, choose the measure range in the Meas Range edit
box.
Voltage sweep explained
A sweep increments the current or voltage in a series of uniform steps at a speed that is determined
by the Speed and Timing settings (see next Figure) in the ITM Definition tab (refer to the section,
Understanding and Configuring the Sweep2V/I Forcing Function.)
Figure 5–81: Sweep drain voltage on a MOSFET
Figure 189: Sweep Drain Voltage on a MOSFET
The voltage sweep function parameters are listed and displayed in the next Figure:
Figure 5–82: Sweep V-Forcing example
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Figure 190: Sweep V forcing example
Device Num: The sub-device number is defined in the device work area based on hardware
connection.
SMU: The number is defined in the device work area, based on hardware connection.
Pad: The name is defined in the device work area, based on the hardware connection.
Function: Force function type.
In the Function category, you can select the function you need performed. For example, you can
choose Bias V, Bias I, Sweep V, or Sweep I depending on your testing needs.
Force Range: Specifies the SMU voltage range used to force the sweep voltage per the following
options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the single voltage range that best
fits the entire sweep. This option provides the best voltage resolution and control when sweeping
several decades.
•
The numerical voltage range option (200mV, 2V, 20V, 200V) allows you to manually click a SMU
range to suit your needs. This range must accommodate the Stop or Start value, whichever is
greater.
Source: You can use the Source value edit box to set any valid SMU sweep voltage (see next
Figure). You can change the settings according to your test needs.
Figure 5–83: Sweep V Settings
Figure 191: Sweep V settings
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Dual Sweep
An SMU that is configured to perform a sweep, can also be set to perform a dual sweep. With Dual
Sweep enabled, the SMU will essentially perform two sweeps. The first sweep steps from the Start
level to the Stop level. The SMU then continues with the second sweep according to the direction
chosen (forward or reverse). With Dual Sweep disabled, the SMU performs a single sweep stepping
from Start to Stop.
Figure 5–84: Single and dual sweep examples
Figure 192: Single and dual sweep examples
Sweep voltage configured:
1. Select Dual Sweep to enable the forward and reverse functions.
•
Forward: The first sweep steps from the Start level to the Stop level. The SMU then continues with the
second sweep whose working procedure is the same as the previous one (see next Figure).
•
Reverse: The first sweep steps from the Start level to the Stop level. The SMU then continues with the
second sweep which steps from the Stop level back to the Start level (see next Figure).
Figure 5–85: Dual sweep modes
Figure 193: Dual sweep mode; forward and reverse
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2. Mode: Linear and Log
•
Linear: based on the linear axis
•
Log: based on logarithm axis
3. Start, Stop, Step, and Points settings
•
Start: Start point for a sweep that may be any valid SMU voltage.
•
Stop: Stop point for a sweep that may be any valid SMU voltage.
•
Step: The incremental value between every two points. You can edit the step and it will be automatically
calculated depending on the Start, Stop, and Points values.
•
Points: The Data Points edit box value specifies the number of data points that are input when a sweep
is executed. It also specifies the value of the voltage increments for every sweep step.
For example:
{per sweep step value = [ (Stop value - Start value)/( Data points value-1)]}.
{Data Points value = integer of [1 + (Stop value - Start value)/(per Step value)]}
More than two points (include two) be entered in the Data Points edit box. For example: If Start = 0V,
Stop = 4V, and #PTS = 5:
step value = (4V-0V)/(5-1)=1V
Five values are forced: 0V, 1V, 2V, 3V, 4V
Measure: The unit is amps or volts with the following options:
•
•
•
I: Actual measured current values.
•
•
I+V: Measures both current and voltage.
V: Actual measured voltage values.
I (prog): The programmed current, as requested forced current values. For example, 10 mA is to
be forced at a transistor collector terminal if the programmed value (I(prog)) is 10 mA and the
measured value(I) is 9.9982mA, the programmed option (I(prog)) forces the reported value to
display exactly 10mA, even if the measured value is 9.9982 mA.
V+I (prog): Measures voltage and returns current (prog).
Compliance: The Compliance edit box specifies any valid SMU current or voltage compliance limit. In
the next Figure, for the forcing Sweep V, the compliance is current. The unit is amps.
Meas Range: The measurement range edit box specifies the SMU range used. The measure range is
present for voltage forcing functions. For instance, in the Function edit box, if Sweep V is selected,
the measure range is that of the current. If I+V is selected, the measure range is also that of the
current. If V is selected, ACS enforces the Force Range and ignores the measure range. Therefore,
at that time, the Meas Range edit box is disabled. You can specify the measurement range to be
used by the SMU for current from the following options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current measurement range as
stepping/sweeping progresses. This option provides the best resolution when the measurements span
several decades.
•
The Limits auto option is a compromise between the full auto option and a fixed range option. You can
specify the minimum range that the SMU uses when automatically optimizing the current
measurements. This option saves time when maximum resolution at minimum currents is not needed.
•
The Numerical Range options (100 nA, 1 µA, 10 µA, 100 µA, 1 mA, 10 mA, 100 mA, 1 A, 1.5 A, 10 A)
allow you to manually click a fixed current measurement range to suit your needs.
Limits auto: Can only be selected after clicking Limits auto in the Meas Range edit box.
Voltage sweep configuration
1. Select Sweep V in the Function edit box.
2. Choose the best fixed current source range in the Force Range edit box. At most times, you can
click the auto option, which commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current range.
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3. Set the Source as follows:
•
Enable or disable dual sweep.
•
Select sweep mode.
•
Enter a valid value in the Start edit box (the parameter may be any valid SMU voltage).
•
Enter a valid value in the Stop edit box (the parameter may be any valid SMU voltage).
•
Enter a valid value in the Step edit box (the value will cause an automatic update to the points value).
•
Enter valid data in the Points edit box (positive integer equal to or more than two is valid).
4. Enter any valid SMU current compliance in the Compliance edit box. The unit is amps.
5. According to the measured variable selected, choose the measure range option in the Meas
Range edit box.
6. After Limits Auto in Meas Range combo box is selected, click a suitable minimum range that the
SMU will use in the Limits auto edit box.
Current sweep explained
The Current Sweep Function Parameters are listed as follows and in the next Figure:
Figure 5–86: Sweep I forcing example
Figure 194: Sweep I forcing example
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Device Num: The sub-device number is defined in the device work area based on hardware
connection.
SMU: The number is defined in the device work area, based on hardware connection.
Pad: The name is defined in the device work area, based on the hardware connection.
Function: Force function type.
In the Function category, you can select the function you need performed. For example, you can
choose Bias V, Bias I, Sweep V, or Sweep I depending on your testing needs.
Force Range: Specifies the SMU current range used to force the sweep current, per the following
options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current range as the sweep
current progresses. This option provides the best current resolution and control when sweeping
several decades.
•
The Numerical Current range options (100 nA, 1 µA, 100 µA, 1 mA, 10 mA, 100 mA, 1 A, 1.5 A,
10 A) allows you to manually click a SMU range to meet your needs. This range must
accommodate the Stop or Start value, whichever is greater. For example, when forcing Stop “1.5
mA”, you would typically choose the 10 mA SMU range or the auto SMU range. The auto SMU
range allows the SMU to click the most appropriate range, based on the current level.
Source: You can use the Source value edit box to set any valid SMU sweep current. You can change
the settings according to your test needs.
•
Start: The Start edit box specifies the current forced for the first data point of the sweep. The Start
parameter may be any valid SMU current. The unit is amps.
•
Stop: The Stop edit box determines the current forced for the last data point of the sweep. The Stop
parameter may be any valid SMU current. The unit is amps.
•
Step: The incremental value between every two points. You can edit the step and it will be automatically
calculated depending on the Start, Stop, and Points values.
•
Points: The Data Points edit box value specifies the number of data points that are input when a sweep
is executed. It also specifies the value of the current increments for every sweep step.
For example:
{per sweep step value = [ (Stop value - Start value)/( Data points value-1)]}.
{Data Points value = integer of [1 + (Stop value - Start value)/(per Step value)]}
You can enter two or more points in the Data Points edit box.
For example: If Start = 0.0001 A, Stop = 0.0002 A, and Points = 5: step value = (0.0002 A-0.0001 A)/(51) = 0.000025 A
Five values are forced: 0.0001 A, 0.000125 A, 0.00015 A, 0.000175 A, 0.0002 A.
Measure: The unit is amps or volts with the following options:
•
•
•
I: Actual measured current values.
•
•
I+V: Measure both I and V.
V: Actual measured voltage values.
I (prog): The programmed current, as-requested forced current values. For example, 10 mA is to
be forced at a transistor collector terminal. The programmed value is 10 mA, and the measured
value is 9.9982 mA. Under the Programmed option, the reported value is exactly 10 mA, even if
the measured value is 9.9982 mA.
V+I (prog): Measures V and returns I(prog).
Compliance: The Compliance edit box specifies any valid SMU current or voltage compliance limit.
For the forcing Sweep I, the compliance is voltage.
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Meas Range: The measurement range edit box specifies the SMU range used. The measure range is
present for voltage forcing functions. For instance, in the Function edit box, if Sweep V is selected,
the measure range is that of the current. If I+V is selected, the measure range is also that of the
current. If V is selected, ACS enforces the Force Range and ignores the measure range. Therefore,
at that time, the Meas Range edit box is disabled. You can specify the measurement range to be
used by the SMU for current from the following options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current measurement range as
stepping/sweeping progresses. This option provides the best resolution when the measurements span
several decades.
•
The Limits auto option is a compromise between the full auto option and a fixed range option. You can
specify the minimum range that the SMU uses when automatically optimizing the current
measurements. This option saves time when maximum resolution at minimum currents is not needed.
•
The Numerical Range options (100 nA, 1 µA, 10 µA, 100 µA, 1 mA, 10 mA, 100 mA, 1 A, 1.5 A, 10 A)
allow you to manually click a fixed current measurement range to suit your needs.
Limits auto: Can only be selected after clicking Limits auto in the Meas Range edit box.
Current sweep configuration
1. In the force Function area, select the Sweep I function, then click on the SMU terminal. The SMU
is assigned to the corresponding Sweep/step SMU’s table and is highlighted. SMU, Pad,
Function, and Force Range items are configured correctly.
2. Choose the best fixed current source range in the Force Range edit box. You can click the auto
option, which commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current range.
•
•
•
Enable or disable dual sweep
•
Enter any valid value in the Stop edit box (the Stop parameter may be any valid SMU current
value, the unit is amp).
•
Enter a valid value in the Step edit box (the value will cause an automatic update to the points
value)
Click sweep mode
Enter a valid value in the Start edit box (he Start parameter may be any valid SMU current value,
the unit is amp).
•
Enter any valid data in the Points edit box (a positive integer equal to or more than two is valid).
1. Click the measure variable in the measure variable edit box.
2. Enter a valid SMU voltage compliance limit in the Compliance edit field (Compliance) for the
sweep. The unit is Volts.
3. According to the measured variable selected, choose the measure range option in the Meas
Range edit box.
Voltage step explained
A step forcing function incrementally steps a current or voltage to two or more levels, each of which is
held constant during the progress of a voltage or current sweep at another terminal. For each step,
parametric curve data is recorded in the ITM Data tab worksheet. The combined data can be plotted
in the ITM Data tab graph, resulting in a series of curves.
More specifically, the Voltage Step forcing function increments through a multiple, evenly-spaced
constant voltage, and steps over a user-specified range that is subject to specified current
compliance. The time interval for each step is determined automatically by the time required to
complete a sweep.
A typical Voltage Step Forcing Functions table is shown in the next Figure. This figure illustrates how
one Definition tab (for the “vds-id” ITM) specifies both Step and Sweep forcing functions.
Figure 5–87: Typical Voltage step forcing; Sweep Drain and Step Gate
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Figure 195: Typical voltage step forcing; sweep drain and step gate
The next Figure graphically illustrates the combined Step and Sweep forcing functions specified in the
previous Figure and the next two Figures is the graph of plotting with Data plot in Data tab.
Figure 5–88: Sweep and step example of a MOSFET
Figure 196: Sweep and step example of a MOSFET
Figure 5–89: Graph of vds-id
Figure 197: Graph of vds-id
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The Voltage Step Function parameters are the same as the Voltage Sweep Function parameters, and
are listed and described below:
Device Num: The sub-device number is defined in the device work area based on hardware
connection.
SMU: The number is defined in the device work area, based on hardware connection.
Pad: The name is defined in the device work area, based on the hardware connection.
Function: Force function type.
In the Function category, you can select the function you need performed. For example,
you can choose Bias V, Bias I, Sweep V, or Sweep I depending on your testing needs.
Force Range: Specifies the SMU current range used to force the sweep current, per the following
options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the single voltage range that best
fits the entire step. This option provides the best voltage resolution and control.
•
The Numerical Voltage range options (200mV, 2V, 20V, 200V) allow you to manually click an
SMU range to suit your specifications. This range must accommodate the Stop or Start value,
whichever is greater.
Source: Double click the source cell of Step V, the dialog for StepV setting is displayed (see next
Figure). You can change the settings according to your test needs.
Figure 5–90: Step V setting
Figure 198: Step V setting
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Start: The Start edit box specifies the voltage forced for the first data point of the step. The Start
parameter may be any valid SMU voltage. The unit is Volts.
Stop: The Stop edit box determines the voltage forced for the last data point of the step. The Stop
parameter may be any valid SMU voltage. The unit is Volts.
Points: The Data Points edit box. Its value specifies the number of data points that are input when a
step is executed. It also specifies the value of the voltage increments of every step value.
For example:
{per step value = [(Stop value - Start value)/(Data points value-1)]}.
Data Points value = integer of [1 + (Stop value - Start value) / (per Step value)]}
The Data Points parameter may be entered as a positive integer that is more than two.
For example: If Start = 0V, Stop = 4V, and Points = 5:
Step value = (4V-0V)/(5-1)=1V
Five values are forced: 0V, 1V, 2V, 3V, 4V.
Measure: The unit is amps or volts with the following options:
•
•
•
I: Actual measured current values.
•
•
I+V: Measures both I and V.
V: Actual measured voltage values.
I (prog): The programmed current, as-requested forced current values. For example, 2.5 V is to
be forced at a transistor drain terminal. The programmed value is 2.5 V, and the measured value
is 2.4997 V. Under the programmed option (V(prog)), the reported value is exactly 2.5 V, even if
the measured value is 2.4997 V.
V+I (prog): Measures I and returns V (prog).
Compliance: The Compliance edit box specifies any valid SMU current or voltage compliance limit.
The current compliance is present for voltage forcing functions and the voltage compliance is used for
current forcing functions. The current unit is amps and the voltage unit is Volts. Forcing Step V, the
compliance is current compliance. The unit is amps.
Meas Range: The Meas Range edit box specifies the SMU range used. The current measure range is
present for voltage forcing functions and the voltage measure range is present for current forcing
functions only. That is, in Step V force function, if I is selected in the Meas Var edit box, the measure
range is that of the current. If I+V is selected, the measured range is also that of the current.
Otherwise, if V is selected, ACS enforces the Force Range, and ignores the measure range, so at
that time, the Meas Range edit box will be disabled. If you click current measure range, you can
specify the current measurement range to be used by the SMU from the following options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current measurement range as
stepping/sweeping progresses. This option provides the best resolution when the measurements span
several decades.
•
The Limits auto option is a compromise between the full auto option and a fixed range option. You can
specify the minimum range that the SMU uses when automatically optimizing the current
measurements. This option saves time when maximum resolution at minimum currents is not needed.
•
The Numerical Range options (100 nA, 1 µA, 10 µA, 100 µA, 1 mA, 10 mA, 100 mA, 1 A, 1.5 A, 10 A)
allow you to manually click a fixed current measurement range to suit your specifications.
Limits auto: Can only be selected after clicking Limits Auto in the Meas Range edit box.
Voltage step configuration
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1. In the force Function area, click the Step V function, then click on the SMU terminal. The SMU is
assigned to the corresponding Sweep/Step SMU’s table and is highlighted. Items: SMU, Pad,
Function, Force Range are defined correctly.
2. Choose the best fixed voltage source range in the Force Range edit box. You can click the auto
option which commands the SMU to automatically optimize the force voltage range.
3. Set source setting.
•
Enter a valid value in the Start edit box (the Start parameter may be any valid SMU voltage.the
unit is Volts).
•
Enter any valid value in the Stop edit box (the Stop parameter may be any valid SMU voltage,the
unit is Volts).
•
Enter any valid data in the Points edit box. A positive integer of more than two is valid.
Click the measure variable in the Measure Variable edit box.
Enter a valid SMU current compliance limit in the Compliance entry field for the Step V; the unit is
amps.
According to the measured variable selected, choose the measure range option in Meas Range
edit box.
If Limits Auto in the Meas Range edit box is selected, the suitable minimum range that the SMU
uses should be selected in the Limits auto edit box.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Current step explained
Device Num: The sub-device number is defined in the device work area based on hardware
connection.
The Current Step forcing function increments through multiple, evenly-spaced constant current steps
over a user-specified range, subject to specified voltage compliance. The time interval for each step
is determined automatically by the time required to complete a sweep.
The Current Step forcing function parameters are listed below:
SMU: The number is defined in the device work area based on hardware connection.
Pad: The name is defined in the device work area based on the hardware connection.
Function: Force function type sub-edit box.
Force Range: The Force Range (source range) edit box specifies the SMU current range used to
force the step current, per the following options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current range as the step
current progresses. This option provides the best current resolution and control when stepping
several decades.
•
The Numerical Current range options (100 nA, 1 µA, 100 µA, 1 mA, 10 mA, 100 mA, 1 A, 1.5 A,
10 A) allow you to manually click a SMU range to suit your needs. This range must accommodate
the Stop or Start value, whichever is greater. For example, when forcing Stop “1 mA”, you would
typically choose the 1mA SMU range or the auto SMU range, which allows the SMU to click the
most appropriate range based on the current level.
Source: You can use the Source value edit box to set any valid SMU step current (see next Figure).
Figure 5–91: Step I setting
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Figure 199: Step I setting
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Start: The Start edit box specifies the current forced for the first data point of the step. The Start
parameter may be any valid SMU current. The unit is amps.
Stop: The Stop edit box determines the current forced for the last data point of the step. The Stop
parameter may be any valid SMU current. The unit is amps.
Points: The Data Points edit box. Its value specifies the number of data points that are input when a
step is executed. It also specifies the number of the current of every step value.
For example:
{per step value = [(Stop value - Start value)/( Data points value-1)]}.
{Data Points value = integer of [1 + (Stop value - Start value)/(per Step value)]}
Two or more can be entered in the Data Points edit box.
For example: If Start = 0.0001A, Stop = 0.0002A, and Points = 5:
step value = (0.0002A-0.0001A)/(5-1) = 0.000025A
Five values are forced: 0.0001A, 0.000125A, 0.00015A, 0.000175A, and 0.0002A
Measure: The unit is amps or volts with the following options:
•
•
•
I: Actual measured current values.
•
•
I+V: Measures both I and V.
V: Actual measured voltage values.
I (prog): The programmed current, as requested forced current values. For example, 10mA is to
be forced at a transistor collector terminal, the programmed value is 10mA, and the measured
value would be 9.9982mA. Under the programmed option, the reported value is exactly 10mA,
even if the measured value is, for example, 9.9982mA
V+I (prog): Measures V and returns I (prog).
Compliance: The Compliance edit box specifies any valid SMU current or voltage compliance limit.
The current compliance is present for voltage forcing functions and is used for voltage forcing
functions. The current unit is amps and the voltage unit is Volts.
Meas Range: The Meas Range edit box specifies the SMU range used. The current measure range is
presented for voltage forcing functions and the voltage measure range is presented for current forcing
functions only. That is, in the Step I force function, if V in the Meas Var edit box is selected, the
measured range is that of the voltage; if I+V is selected, the measured range is also that of the
voltage. Otherwise, if I is selected, ACS enforces the force range and ignores the measure range.
Therefore, at that time, the Meas Range edit box is disabled. If you click measure voltage in this
forcing, you can specify the voltage measurement range to be used by the SMU for Step I from the
following options:
•
The auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the voltage measurement range as
stepping/sweeping progresses. This option provides the best resolution when the measurements span
several decades.
•
The Numerical Range options 200mV, 2V, 20V, and 200V allow you to manually click a fixed voltage
measurement range to suit your needs.
Limits auto: Disabled in forcing Step I.
Current step configuration
1. In the FORCE Function area, click the Step I function, then click on the SMU terminal. The SMU
is assigned to the corresponding Sweep/Step SMU’s table and is highlighted. SMU, Pad,
Function, and Force Range are defined correctly.
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2. Choose the best fixed current source range in the Force Range edit box. You can click the auto
option, which commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current range.
3. Set the source setting.
•
Enter a valid value in the Start edit box (the Start parameter may be any valid SMU current value,
the unit is amps).
•
Enter any valid value in the Stop edit box (the Stop parameter may be any valid SMU current
value,the unit is amps).
•
Enter any valid data in the Points edit box. A positive integer is valid.
1. Click the measure variable in Meas Var edit box.
2. Enter a valid SMU voltage compliance limit in the Compliance edit box for the step. The unit is
Volts.
3. According to the measured variable selected, choose the suitable measure range option in Meas
Range edit box.
Sweep2 V/I explained
Sweep2 V is a special sweep test. When the forced value is greater than the desired value (call it
monitor source ), a monitor test will add to each sweep step, thus the test can generate two test
results: measured one and monitor one. Specifically, when each sweep interval is increased it will
equal the value of the sweep delay and monitor delay (see next Figure).
Figure 5–92: Sweep 2 V and I
Figure 200: Sweep 2 V and I
The next Figure shows a graph of the sweep 2V forcing function. In this figure, the monitor source
value is 0.45V, when the forced voltage is higher a special monitor test will occur.
Figure 5–93: Sweep 2 V waveform
Figure 201: Sweep 2 V waveform
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To conduct the common Sweep 2V test:
1. In Function sub-edit box, click the Sweep 2V function, the monitor items will append to the Force
and Meas box (see next Figure).
Figure 5–94: Monitor item append
Figure 202: Monitor item append
2. Input a monitor delay time in Monitor Delay edit box.
3. Click OK.
Also, the monitor delay in Time dialog will be enabled (see next Figure).
Figure 5–95: Enable the monitor delay in ITM timing
Figure 203: Enable the monitor delay in ITM timing
1. Set source sweep setting in the Source box as Sweep V (refer to Understanding and Configuring
the Voltage Sweep Function Parameters) The next Figure shows the inputs [0, 1, 10, 0 ].
2. Click a measure value in Measure edit box (only when measurement item contains: Voltage when
forcing I and Current when forcing V), the monitor items will be enabled.
3. Input the monitor source voltage in Mon Source edit box.
If desired, set other items as Sweep V.
Figure 5–96: Set Sweep 2V: set monitor source
Figure 204: Set Sweep 2 V; set monitor source
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List V / List I explained
List V/List I is used to input a voltage/ current list according to the test’s requirement. Items’ setting of
List V/List I is similar to Sweep V / I, except for Source.
List Sweeps allow you to make measurements only at selected forced voltages and currents. For
example, they allow you to skip unimportant measurement points or to synthesize a custom sweep
that is based on a special mathematical equation. As described in the next section, list sweeps allows
you to make pulsed measurements to avoid overheating of low current devices (see next Figure).
Figure 5–97: List Sweep Function general illustration
Figure 205: List sweep function general illustration
To input a voltage/current list:
1. Double click the cell under the item of Source (see next Figure). The dialog for List Sweep setting
is displayed. You can make necessary settings according to their test needs.
Figure 5–98: Source of List V cell
Figure 206: Source of List V cell
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2. In the List Sweep setting dialog:
•
The points field contains the number of columns displayed. Type the number you want to display, then
click Apply function (see next Figure, it shows 10 values displayed).
NOTE
The maximum number of points that can be displayed is 4096.
•
Click the default value. The current unit is amp and the voltage unit is volt.
•
Click OK.
•
If you choose to save the file as a .csv file, the format of the file will be as follows:
column_name
num
num
...
num
•
You can import the file by clicking the Import Setting From .csv File function (see next Figure)
Figure 5–99: List Sweep Settings
Figure 207: List Sweep Settings
In the heading of the column, there are five functions which are intended for editing items (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–100: List sweep toolbar
Figure 208: List sweep toolbar
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•
•
•
•
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Edit item: the default number will be selected and you can enter a suitable value.
New item: a new item will be added.
Delete item: the selected item will be deleted.
Move up: a selected item can be moved up.
Move down: a selected item can be moved down.
Understanding the timing dialog box
When you click the ITM Timing function in the ITM Definition tab, the ITM Timing dialog box displays
(see next Figure). The ITM Timing dialog box is used to configure ITM timing settings. There are two
areas in the ITM Timing dialog box: the Speed area and the Mode area.
Figure 5–101: ITM Timing
Figure 209: ITM Timing
Understanding the Speed area
The Speed area of the ITM Timing dialog box allows you to:
•
•
Locally click the Fast, Normal, Quiet, or Custom measurement speed modes.
Configure Custom speed settings in the Custom measurement speed mode.
Fast, Normal, Quiet, and Custom modes are defined as follows:
•
Fast - Optimizes speed at the expense of noise performance. It is a good choice for fast
measurements where noise and settling time are not concerns.
•
Normal - The default and most commonly used setting. It provides a good combination of speed
and low noise, and is the best setting for most cases.
•
Quiet - Optimizes the low-noise measurements at the expense of speed. If speed is not a critical
consideration, it is a good choice when you need the lowest noise and most accurate
measurements.
•
Custom - Allows you to fine-tune the timing parameters to meet a particular need. With Custom,
you can configure the integration time and individual delay to produce a composite setting that is
faster than the Fast setting, quieter than the Quiet setting, or anything in between. When you click
the Custom radio function, the integration time and average number can be configured to produce
a composite setting, as discussed below (see next Figure).
Figure 5–102: ITM Timing Custom mode
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Figure 210: ITM Timing Custom mode
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The entries in the PLC and #Average edit boxes control the A/D (analog-to-digital) converter
integration time used to measure a signal. Each measured reading by a SMU is the result of one or
more A/D conversions. A short integration time for each A/D conversion results in a relatively fast
measurement speed, at the expense of noise. A long integration time results in a relatively low noise
reading, at the expense of speed. The integration time setting is based on the number of power line
cycles (NPLCs):
•
•
For 60Hz line power, 1.0 PLC = 16.67msec (1/60).
For 50Hz line power, 1.0 PLC = 20msec (1/50).
If you selected the Custom measurement Speed mode, any value between 0.001 and 25 NPLC can
be entered. If you selected the Fast, Normal, or Quiet measurement Speed mode, ACS sets the A/D
Integration Time correspondingly. The next Table summarizes the allowed A/D Integration Time
settings for various measurement Speed modes.
To reduce measurement noise, each SMU applies averaging of multiple readings to make one
measurement.
If you selected the Custom measurement Speed mode, an Average value in #Average can be
entered. If you selected the Fast, Normal, or Quiet measurement Speed mode, the SMU sets a fixed
Average number. The next Table summarizes the allowed #Average settings for various
measurement Speed modes.
Summary of allowed A/D Integration Time
settings
Speed mode
NPLC
Average
Fast
Normal
Quiet
Custom
0.001
1
10
0.001 to
25
1
1
1
≥1
Understanding the mode area
There are two test modes you can click in the Mode area of the ITM Timing dialog box: the Sweeping
test mode and the Sampling test mode.
The Sweeping test mode applies to any ITM in which one or more forced voltages/currents vary with
time.
The Sampling test mode applies to any ITM in which all forced voltages or currents are static (bias I
or bias V), with measurements typically being made at timed intervals. Refer to the Forcing Function
Summary Table discussed earlier. For example, sampling mode would be used to record a few static
measurements, or to time-profile the charging voltage of a capacitor while forcing a constant current.
The Mode is used to observe and/or change the test mode as follows:
•
For a completely new ITM, the Mode allows you to click the Sweeping or Sampling test mode.
Clicking the appropriate test mode simplifies configuration options and helps to avoid errors:
a.
b.
•
Only the static forcing functions are configurable in the Sampling mode.
Only mode-appropriate timing options are configurable.
For an existing library ITM that is in the Sampling mode, the Mode area allows you to change to
the Sweeping mode if you want to change some of the static forcing functions to dynamic forcing
functions.
Sweeping mode
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If any terminal of the device under test is configured for a dynamic forcing function—a Step or Sweep
forcing function — the Sweeping mode is automatically enabled. Then, you can configure two
Sweeping mode settings in the ITM Timing dialog box (see next Figure). These are Sweep Delay and
Hold Time. You can configure these settings for all measurement Speed modes—Fast, Normal,
Quiet, and Custom—as discussed below.
Figure 5–103: ITM Timing Sweeping mode
Figure 211: ITM Timing Sweeping mode
•
Sweep Delay setting - If you are using a sweep forcing function and want some extra settling time
before each measurement, you can specify an additional delay in the Sweep Delay entry field.
You can specify a Sweep Delay from 0 to 1000s (seconds). The default Sweep Delay is 0s.
•
Hold Time setting - The starting voltage(s)/current(s) of a sweep may be substantially larger than
the voltage/current increments of the sweep. Accordingly, the source settling time required to
reach the starting voltage(s)/current(s) of a sweep may be substantially larger than the settling
times required to increment the sweep. To compensate, you can specify a Hold Time delay to be
applied only at the beginning of each sweep. You can specify a Hold Time delay of 0 to 1000s
(seconds). The default Hold Time is 0s.
The next Figure shows an example Sweeping mode timing diagram.
Figure 5–104: Sweeping mode timing diagram
Figure 212: Sweeping mode timing diagram
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•
When the test is started, the Hold Time (HT) provides extra settling time for the initial step change
of the source. The Hold Time is a global setting. Note that the Hold Time is applied at the start
(only) of each sweep, therefore, it is the same for all SMUs that are part of the test (as in the
previous figure that includes Sweep, Step, and Bias).
•
The Delay Time (D) allows the source to settle and is measurement-range dependent. All SMUs
in the test system are synchronized. Therefore, the delay time applied by the most delayed SMU
is the delay time applied by all SMUs.
•
The Sweep Delay (SD) provides additional settling time for each step in the sweep. It is a global
setting and therefore is applied identically to all SMUs in the test system.
•
The Measure Time (MT) is determined by the #Average and the A/D Integration Time (NPLC). All
SMUs in the test system are synchronized. Therefore, the Measure Time for the SMU requiring
the longest measure time is the same for all SMUs in the test system.
Sampling mode
The Sampling mode measures voltages/currents as a function of time while forcing constant
voltages/currents (Bias I or Bias V). Refer to the Forcing Function Summary Table in “Understanding
and configuring the force function parameters” discussed earlier in this section. For example, the
sampling mode would be used to measure voltage while forcing a constant current. Time is measured
relative to when the SMU(s) apply the forced voltage or current (that is, t = 0 at the step change from
0.0 V/0.0 A to the applied voltage/current).
ACS enables the sampling mode option only when all terminals of the device under test are
configured for static forcing functions: Voltage Bias, or Current Bias. If any terminal of the device
under test is configured for a step or sweep forcing function, the Sampling mode option is unavailable
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–105: ITM Timing Sampling mode
Figure 213: ITM Timing Sampling mode
If an ITM is configured for the Sampling mode, you can configure three Sampling mode settings:
Interval, #Samples, and Hold Time.
The Interval, #Samples and Hold Time settings control the Sampling mode, as follows:
•
Interval(s)—Specifies the time between measurements (data points). Interval can be set from 0
to1000sec.
•
#Sample—Specifies the number of data points to be acquired. #Samples can be set from 1 to
4096.
•
Hold Time(s)—After initial application of voltage/current by the SMU(s), the source settling time(s)
can be substantial. To allow for settling, you can specify an extra Hold Time delay to be applied
before making the first measurement. You can specify a Hold Time from 0 to 1000s (seconds).
The timing elements shown in the next Figure are described as follows:
Figure 5–106: Sampling mode timing diagram
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Figure 214: Sampling mode timing diagram
•
If needed, a Hold Time (HT) can be used to allow for extra source settling after the initial
application of voltage(s)/current(s) by the SMU(s). Hold Time is a global setting, and is therefore
the same for all SMUs in the test system.
•
A range-dependent Delay (D) is automatically applied by a SMU before each measurement, to
allow for source settling. All SMUs in the test system are synchronized. Therefore, the Delay time
applied by the most delayed SMU is the delay time applied to all SMUs.
•
The Measure Time (MT) is determined by the A/D Integration Time. All SMUs in the test system
are synchronized. Therefore, the Measure Time for the SMU requiring the longest measure time
is the same for all SMUs in the test system.
Stop on Compliance
Select the Stop on Compliance box to enable the test to exit once it reaches the setting compliance
(limit) value.
ITM test configuration
1. Create a device by clicking Device function from the toolbar.
2. Click the desired device in the Image Browser (see next Figure).
Figure 5–107: Device Image Browser
Figure 215: Device type Image Browser
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•
Define number of sub-device using SubDev down list box, then the created sub-devices with
checkbox will be listed in Subdevices Included In box.
•
Click any row in the Pad SMUs Mapping box, it will highlight. Set the SMU as instructed in ITM
section (refer to Device Setting tab in the next Figure).
•
In the Subdevices Included in section of the screen, click the check box of the desired
subdevice(s).
•
Match SMU, Pads and Sub-device to the actual physical connection, to complete the test device
structure definition.
Figure 5–108: Multi-subdevice setting
Figure 216: Multi-subdevice setting
NOTE
If a Pad is set as NONE or GND, it will not appear in test set up page (users should make GND
connection themselves). If a pad is set as Common, it will be shared by all sub-devices. The pad
name cannot be the same. If named, the Invalid Pad Name dialog box will appear (see next Figure).
Figure 5–109: Invalid pad name
Figure 217: Invalid pad name
Add a new ITM:
1. From the side toolbar, click the ITM function. A new ITM of multi-subdevice will be added to the
tree (see next Figure).
Figure 5–110: ITM GUI of multi-subdevice
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Figure 218: ITM GUI of multi-subdevice
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After creating the new ITM, it must be configured to meet user’s test requirements. There are three
tabs in ITM dialog box that you can use for configuration: Definition tab, Data tab, and Status tab.
Definition tab
Device Num: The sub-device number is defined in the device work area based on hardware
connection.
SMU: The number is defined in the device work area, based on hardware connection.
Pad: The name is defined in the device work area, based on the hardware connection.
Function: Force function type.
In the Function category, you can select the function you need performed. For example, you can
choose Bias V, Bias I, Sweep V, Sweep I, Step V, Step I, V_meter, GND, or OPEN depending on
your testing needs.
Force Range: Specifies the SMU source range used for the voltage source, per the following options:
•
The Numerical Voltage Range options (200 mV, 2 V, 20 V, 200 V) allow user to manually click an
SMU range to suit user’s needs.
•
The Auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the voltage range as the step
voltage progresses. This option provides the best current resolution and control when stepping
several decades.
The current source specifies the type (Bias I, Sweep I and Step I) used to force the
current, per the following options:
•
The Auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current range as the step current
progresses. This option provides the best current resolution and control when stepping several
decades.
•
The Numerical Current range options (100 nA, 1 µA, 100 µA, 1 mA, 10 mA, 100 mA, 1 A, 1.5 A, 10 A)
allow user to manually click an SMU range to suit user’s needs. This range must accommodate the Stop
or Start value, whichever is greater.
For example, when forcing Stop “1 mA” user would typically choose the 1mA SMU range
or the Auto SMU range, which allows the SMU to pick the most appropriate range based
on the current level.
Source: Specifies any valid value that can be applied by the SMU. The unit of measure is volts or
amps.
Since there are two types of tests that are supported (Spot and Sweep), there are two types of format
data that can be entered in the Source box. For a Spot test, enter a single value. For a Sweep test,
double click the source cell. The Sweep V/I setting dialog will appear. Enter the Start, Stop, Stop and
Points values, then click OK (see next Figure).
Figure 5–111: Sweep V setting
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Figure 219: Sweep V settings
Measure: The unit is amps or volts with the following options (see next Figure):
Figure 5–112: Measure Variable sub-list box
Figure 220: Measure Variable sub-list box
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•
•
•
I :Actual measured current.
•
•
•
•
I(prog): The programmed current, as requested forced current values.
Section 5: Test Setup
V:Actual measured voltage values.
V(prog): The programmed voltage, as requested forced voltage values. For example, 2.5V is to
be forced at a transistor drain terminal. The programmed value( V(prog) ) is exactly 2.5V, even if
the measured value ( V ) would be 2.4997V. Under the programmed option, the reported value is
exactly 2.5V, even if the measured value would be 2.4997V.
I+V:Measures I and V both.
I+V(prog): Measures I and returns V(prog).
V+I(prog): Measures V and returns I(prog).
Compliance: The Compliance box specifies any valid SMU current or voltage compliance limit. The
current compliance is present for voltage forcing functions and the voltage compliance is used for
current forcing functions. Here, forcing Bias V, the compliance is current compliance. The unit is Amp.
Meas Range - The measurement range sub-list box specifies the SMU range used .The current
measure range is present for voltage forcing functions and the voltage measure range is present for
current forcing functions only.
If the measure variable involves current measurement, that is, in the Measure sub-list box, the I, I+V,
or I+V(prog) is selected for a voltage source, then the measure ranges that can be used by the SMU
for current, are as follows:
•
The Auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the current measurement range.
This option provides the best resolution.
•
The Limited Auto option is a compromise between the full Auto option and a fixed range option.
Here one can specify the minimum range that the SMU uses when automatically optimizing the
current measurements. This option saves time when maximum resolution at minimum currents is
not needed.
•
The numerical range options (100 nA, 1 µA, 10 µA, 100 µA, 1 mA, 10 mA, 100 mA, 1 A, 1.5 A, 10
A) allow one to manually click a fixed current measurement range to suit the needs.
If the measure variable involves voltage measurement, that is, in the Measure sub-list box, the V, I+V,
or V+I(prog) is selected for a current source, then the measure range that can be used by the SMU
for voltage, are as follows:
•
The Auto option commands the SMU to automatically optimize the voltage measurement range
as stepping/sweeping progresses. This option provides the best resolution when the
measurements span several decades.
•
The Numerical Range options (200 mV, 2 V, 20 V, 200 V) allow user to manually click a fixed
voltage measurement range to suit the needs.
Set Force and Measure Function
1. Configure the forcing and measure functions for each device terminal of a sub-device. If you want
to know how to set these functions, refer to the ITM single device for detailed instructions. After
setting up a device, you can right-click the mouse on any cell belonging to this device (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–113: Apply Settings to Other Sub-Devices
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Figure 221: Apply Settings to Other Sub-Devices
2. After clicking this function, the same setting will cover all the devices. You can also edit the
devices to suit the tests demands.
Set the Timing (Optional)
Enter desired time setting for the entire test as instructed in the ITM single device section or use the
default setting.
Data tab
Set the Formulator (Optional)
There are some special features designed for ITM under multi-subdevices. The main added features
are the ‘Copy to All’ function and four new formulators including RES, RES_4WIRE,
RES_4WIRE_AVG, and RES_AVG. These new features are only used in case of ITM under multisubdevices.
Start the Formulator as follows:
1. Open the Data tab for the test data that you want to analyze.
2. In the Data tab, click on the Formulator function . The Formulator dialog box opens (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–114: Formulator of ITM with Multi-subdevice (1)
Figure 222: Formulator of ITM with Multi-subdevice (1)
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3. Edit the formulator you want to analyze, then click the Copy to All function. This formulator will be
used by all who are using the same format variables generated by different sub-devices.
4. Once the RG=RES(V_GATE_1,I_GATE_1) is added, click Copy to All.This formulator will apply to
V_GATE_2, and I_GATE_2. And RG change to RG_1 and RG_2 at same time. RG_1 and RG_2
will list in output data sheet of DATA tab.
These formulator functions are used in the ITM with multi-subdevices: RES, RES_4WIRE,
RES_4WIRE_AVG, RES_AVG. For more information about how to use the formulator, refer to
Understanding the Formulator.
Model 4200 ITM configuration
NOTE
When the ACS software is controlling the Model 4200 in net mode, make sure the Ethernet cable is
connected to the PC and the Model 4200.
There are two main parts in configuring a Model 4200 ITM: hardware configuration and ITM
configuration.
Configure Model 4200 hardware with ACS software
1. Launch KCON; communication is through Ethernet in the KXCI settings page (see next Figure).
2. Launch KXCI.
Figure 5–115: Set Model 4200-SCS communication mode
Figure 223: Set Model 4200-SCS communication mode
3. Connect the Model 4200-SCS to the ethernet through netlink. Write down the IP address.
4. Install ACS software on a system computer/laptop and connect the system computer/laptop to
ethernet through netlink.
5. Set Model 4200 setting in ACS’s preference menu.
•
Access the Preference item in Tools menu (see next Figure).
Figure 5–116: Preferences in Tools drop-down
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Figure 224: Preferences in Tools drop-down
•
Set the Model 4200 working mode, input the Model 4200 IP address in IP Address edit box (see
next Figure).
Figure 5–117: Set Model 4200-SCS working mode in ACS
Figure 225: Set Model 4200-SCS working mode in ACS
1. Restart ACS.
2. To scan the Model 4200-SCS, click the Scan Hardware function on the toolbar. The system
queries the instruments and then displays the updated configuration information in the
configuration navigator and the work area (see next Figure).
Figure 5–118: Hardware configuration after scan
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Figure 226: Hardware configuration after scan
3. From the navigation tree, check that the hardware information matches the configuration of the
physical system. (If not, use the tree navigator to click the appropriate device.) The next Figure
shows a typical setup.
4. Click the Save function to save the new configuration.
Figure 5–119: ACS on a system computer for the Model 4200-SCS in Ethernet mode
Figure 227: ACS on system compter for Model 4200-SCS in Ethernet mode
5. Check the hardware configuration.
•
Click the configuration Hardware command from the Tools menu (see next Figure).
Figure 5–120: Configure Hardware in Tools menu
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Figure 228: Configure Hardware in Tools menu
•
The interface of the hardware configuration utility has two parts: The left panel is the configuration
navigator; the right panel is the work area (see next Figure).
Figure 5–121: Hardware configuration interface
Figure 229: Hardware configuration interface
•
To scan the Model 4200-SCS, click the Scan Hardware function on the toolbar. The system
queries the instruments and then displays the updated configuration information in the
configuration navigator and the work area (see next Figure).
Figure 5–122: Hardware configuration after scan
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Figure 230: Hardware configuration after scan
•
Using the navigation tree, check that the hardware information matches the configuration of the
physical system. If not, use the tree navigator to click the appropriate device.
•
Click the Save function to save the new configuration. ACS can now communicate with the Model
4200-SCS ITM test module. There is no need to restart ACS.
Configure a Model 4200-SCS ITM test module
1. Click the New function on the toolbar from the ACS Main dialog box. You can also click the New
command from the File menu. Click Tree Style in the Project Structure and input a Project Name
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–123: Define New Test Project
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Figure 231: Define New Test Project
2. Click the New Device icon in the vertical edit toolbar. You can also right-click Home in the Test
Setup panel. For example, right-click Home and click the Insert Device option. Then a SMU Type
dialog pops up, click the Model 4200 SMU to new the Model 4200 SMU (see next Figure). Click
OK and the new device is named device_42.
Figure 5–124: SMU Type
Figure 232: SMU Type
3. The Select Device Type dialog box will appear (see next Figure).
Figure 5–125: Select Device Type
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Figure 233: Select Device Type
4. Click a device and an image browser window opens. Choose the graphic of your choice and then
click OK. A new device is created. Click this new device, vertical edit toolbar includes these items:
New Device, New ITM, Rename, Delete, Copy and Cut (see next Figure).
Figure 5–126: Device type Image Browser
Figure 234: Device type Image Browser
Figure 5–127: Select a new device
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Figure 235: Select a new device
5. Click the ITM icon in the vertical edit toolbar or right-click the device/insert ITM in the Test Setup
panel to insert a new test module for the this device. An ITM test module is created for the device
(see next Figure).
Follow the steps in the next section to configure the Model 4200 ITM parameters similar to the 2600A
ITM.
Figure 5–128: New Model 4200-SCS ITM
Figure 236: New Model 4200-SCS ITM
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Summary of Configuring the ITM test
This section summarizes the parameter configuration of an ITM.
Match the physical and virtual connections manually:
1. In the Test Setup panel, click on the ITM that needs configuration/reconfiguration. The Definition
tab of the ITM work area opens by default
2. In the Definition tab, review the virtual connections for each terminal. Ensure that the physical
device connections match the virtual (Definition tab) device connections. If necessary, shut down
the instrumentation and correct the physical connections.
CAUTION
The physical device-terminal connections must accurately match virtual connections to avoid test
errors results and potential device damage.
Configure the forcing Function for each device terminal
In the force Function area, select the desired cell then click on the SMU Terminal. The SMU is
assigned to the corresponding table and is highlighted.
Configure the Bias function:
1. Enter the current or voltage value(s) and range to be forced for a static forcing function.
2. Click the desired Measure Variable and corresponding Measure Range and default or desired
Limited Auto.
3. Enter the default or the desired Compliance.
Configure the Step/Sweep function:
1. Enter the Start, Stop, Step, and Sweep points for a Sweep forcing function.
2. Enter Start, Stop, and Step points for a step forcing function.
3. Enter the default or desired Force Range.
4. Click the desired Measure Variable, and the corresponding Measure Range, and Limited Auto if
enabled.
5. Enter the default or desired Compliance.
6. Repeat ALL of the steps above for the remaining device terminals.
Enter the Default or Desired Time Setting:
1. Click the test mode prior to configuring a completely new ITM.
2. Add special delays for Sweeping and hole time in test-mode sweeping tests or configure the
timing for Sampling test-mode tests.
3. Enable a timestamp to be recorded for each measurement.
NOTE
Do not forget to make sure a device is configured correctly in each of these steps. If you create a
multigroup test, configure every device as indicated previously, carefully following it step-by-step,
making sure that all of the devices are configured correctly before executing them.
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Script Test Module (STM) configuration
An STM is a script that refers to a file or program that can be created using the Test Script Builder.
Creating a script using Test Script Builder is discussed in the Writing or Modifying a Script section.
After STMs are inserted into a Project Plan, they must be configured to meet the test requirements.
This section describes the connection of Project Plan STMs to your modules and libraries, and
entering/editing module parameters.
Project Plan STM configuration:
1. Open an STM. The STM displays in the STM work area on the Script tab.
2. Connect/reconnect the name of the desired STM to an existing ACS-created user module using
the STM Script tab of the STM work area.
3. In the STM Script tab, check the SMU to match the physical connection, change inputs if
necessary.
4. Configure, or change the script, if any.
5. Save the configuration using the Save function located on the toolbar.
Open a STM
An STM work area allows you to enter information that defines a given STM. An STM work area also
allows you to view and analyze test data created by the STM, both numerically and graphically. The
three tabs associated with the STM work area are:
•
The Data tab displays the STM results in its Data worksheet in a spreadsheet format. This
spreadsheet data sheet allows you to perform data analysis. The spreadsheet, displays the same
output information as the Script tab. Cells in the spreadsheet may be hot-linked to cells in the
Script tab. The Data tab also allows you to create and export graphs of the test and test-analysis
results. The Data tab provides flexible plot-data selection, formatting, annotation, and numerical
coordinate display (using precision cursors).
•
The Status tab monitors the current configuration status of the STM, reporting its readiness for
use and recommending additional preparations if necessary. A test-ready report for a STM is the
same as for an ITM. To view example Status tab reports for ITMs, refer to the ITM Status tab
discussed earlier.
•
The Script tab allows you to specify a TSP-created user library and user module, and allows you
to specify a limited number of test parameters. To configure or reconfigure an STM, you need to
configure the features of the Script tab, which is the default tab of the STM work area.
Open an STM work area:
1. In the Test Setup panel, locate the STM to configure.
2. Click on the STM to configure. For this example, the Resistor_ single STM was selected from the
Test Setup panel (see next Figure).
Figure 5–129: Resistor single STM
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Figure 237: Resistor single STM
If you inserted a completely new STM into the Project Plan that is not yet named or connected to a
module, a blank STM Definition tab displays.
The next Figure shows a blank STM work area created by clicking the TSP function.
Figure 5–130: A new blank STM
Figure 238: A new blank STM
Make configuration changes in the Script tab for the blank STM as follows:
1. Right-click the STM and click the Rename command (see next Figure).
Figure 5–131: Name an STM
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Figure 239: Name an STM
2. Type the name for this STM. In this example, the name is Res_iv.
3. Click OK.
4. Click the Import function located at the bottom of the STM work area to open a test script. The
Choose the test Script dialog box displays (see next Figure).
Figure 5–132: Import script
Figure 240: Import script
5. Choose the Resistor_sweep.tsp in the Resistor folder.
6. Click the Open function. The script is imported into the STM Script tab (see next Figure).
Figure 5–133: Resistor sweep STM
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Figure 241: Resistor sweep STM
NOTE
The imported file can be edited in Script Editor, a tool embedded in ACS, or if you want to write one
yourself, it will have to follow the ACS STM library rules.
STM Script tab
The STM Script tab is divided:
•
•
•
Module Type and device information area.
Group’s information area.
TSP Script area that displays the blank modules and allows you to import one into the user library
or into your own library.
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Understanding a STM script
A script is a collection of instrument control commands and programming statements. A script is
made up of a chunk of programming code that is framed by shell commands. Program statements
control script execution and provide services such as variables, functions, branching, and loop
control. Because scripts are programs, they are written using a programming language. This
language is called the Test Script Language or TSL. TSL is derived from the Lua scripting language.
Script Examples
You scripts can be written using the Test Script Builder (TSB). You scripts are loaded into the Series
2600A instrument and can be saved in nonvolatile memory. Scripts not saved in nonvolatile memory
will be lost when the instrument is turned off.
The example script below is used to do the resistance measurement.
local
local
local
local
local
local
local
local
local
local
local
local
v_value = {}
i_value = {}
sensemode = 0
testmode = 0
RSMU1 = SMU1
RSMU2 = SMU2
forcevalue = 1
myLIMIT = 0.1
myNPLC = 1
testdelay = 0.1
resetflag = 1
Rvalue = {}
setmode(RSMU1, KI_INTGPLC, myNPLC)
setmode(RSMU1, KI_SENSE, sensemode)
if RSMU2 ~= KI_GND then
setmode(RSMU2, KI_SENSE, sensemode)
limiti(RSMU2, 1)
end --if
if testmode == 0 then
limiti(RSMU1, myLIMIT)
forcev(RSMU1, forcevalue)
elseif testmode == 1 then
limitv(RSMU1, myLIMIT)
forcei(RSMU1, forcevalue)
end –-if
if RSMU2 ~= KI_GND then
forcev(RSMU2, 0)
end –-if
delay(testdelay)
intgv(RSMU1, v_value)
intgi(RSMU1, i_value)
Rvalue[1] = v_value[1]/i_value[1]
postdata("R_single", Rvalue[1])
if resetflag == 1 then
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devint()
end --if
Script Using a Function
TSL facilitates grouping commands and statements using the function keyword. Therefore, a script
can also consist of one or more functions. Once a script has been run, the host computer can call a
function in the script directly. TSL allows you to define functions. A function can take a predefined
number of parameters and return multiple parameters if desired.
To define a function and call that function, use the example below:
function add_two(parameter1, parameter2)
return(parameter1 + parameter2)
end
print(add_two(3, 4))
Below is a function that returns multiple parameters. It is used for resistance measurement.
function R_single(sensemode, testmode, RSMU1, RSMU2, forcevalue, myLIMIT, myNPLC,
testdelay, resetflag, Rvalue)
local v_value = {}
local i_value = {}
setmode(RSMU1, KI_INTGPLC, myNPLC)
setmode(RSMU1, KI_SENSE, sensemode)
if RSMU2 ~= KI_GND then
setmode(RSMU2, KI_SENSE, sensemode)
limiti(RSMU2, 1)
end --if
if testmode == 0 then
limiti(RSMU1, myLIMIT)
forcev(RSMU1, forcevalue)
elseif testmode == 1 then
limitv(RSMU1, myLIMIT)
forcei(RSMU1, forcevalue)
end --if
if RSMU2 ~= KI_GND then
forcev(RSMU2, 0)
end --if
delay(testdelay)
intgv(RSMU1, v_value)
intgi(RSMU1, i_value)
Rvalue[1] = v_value[1]/i_value[1]
postdata("R_single", Rvalue[1])
if resetflag == 1 then
devint()
end --if
end --function
You can call a function using the following example:
Local
local
local
local
local
Sensemode = 0
testmode = 0
RSMU1 = SMU1
RSMU2 = SMU2
forcevalue = 1
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local myLIMIT = 0.1
local myNPLC = 1
local testdelay = 0.1
local resetflag = 1
local Rvalue = {}
R_single(sensemode, testmode, RSMU1, RSMU2, forcevalue, myLIMIT, myNPLC, testdelay,
resetflag, Rvalue)
Script header
It is recommended that you add an output list header at the top of each STM, which is already
functional in ACS. Make sure that this header is at the beginning of the script.
--[[
--OUTPUT-I_drain
V_gate
--End of OUTPUT-]]-With this header, you will see next Figure the following changes.
In Data tab of a test module in Test Setup, you will see next Figure the variable sequence is the same
as in the output list. This output list is of highest priority compared to “postdata." If you add the output
list, “postdata” will not be scanned and used.
NOTE
If a parameter is not in the output list, but you still post it, it will be added in the data sheet as well.
Writing or Modifying a Script
A script is a list of Instrument Control Library (ICL) commands and TSL statements. A script file is
created using the Test Script Builder (TSB). TSB is a Keithley Instruments product that can be
downloaded from the Keithley Instruments website under the Source and Measure products heading.
To modify a script file in the STM work area:
1. Click the script file name in the Test Setup panel of ACS. The script file opens in the STM work
area and contains tabs depending on the contents of the script file (see next Figure).
Figure 5–134: Importing a Script
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Figure 242: Importing a Script
2. Modify the script file as necessary.
3. Click the Save function located at the bottom of Script tab in the STM work area.
NOTE
You can also access the Test Script Builder by clicking the Edit function. In the Test Script Builder,
the function is at the bottom of the STM work area.
STM with the .xrc GUI File
If the TSP file imported has a corresponding “.xrc” graphical user interface (GUI) file, ACS
automatically loads and displays the GUI. You can set parameters on the GUI so that you do not
need to edit the parameters (see the next several Figures). You can generate the “.xrc” file yourself.
NOTE
It is recommended that only people who are familiar with XRCed software try to generate their own
.xrc files. This process will require extensive knowledge and understanding to accomplish.
Figure 5–135: TSP GUI example: HCI
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Figure 243: TSP GUI example HCI
If you input empty or invalid parameters in the GUI tab, you will receive a message indicating that the
input is not correct (see next Figure).
Figure 5–136: Empty or Invalid input
Figure 244: Empty or Invalid input
After the correct input is entered, open the Script tab of this script to see next Figure the TSP script
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–137: Script tab of STM
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Figure 245: ACS 4.2 Script tab of STM.eps
Figure 5–138: TSP GUI example: NBTI
Figure 246: TSP GUI example NBTI
The GUI (“.xrc” file) editor can be accessed by clicking the ACS Tools menu, then the TSP GUI
Builder command (see next Figure).
Figure 5–139: Custom Test GUI Designer (XRC) in Tools menu
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Figure 247: ACS 4.2 Custom Test GUI Designer (XRC) in Tools menu.eps
Create a TSP GUI file
NOTE
There is a feature in the ACS software package called Script Editor Tool. Keithley Instruments, Inc.
recommends that you use this tool rather than the XRCed software GUI creation tool described below
(see Script editor tool and Script editor tutorials in this section for more information).
If you are familiar with XRCed software, including wxWindows class names, and with the XRC format,
you can use the following information to assist in creating a TSP GUI file. This process will require
extensive knowledge and understanding to accomplish. Also, note that the following information is not
a step-by-step process on how to create a TSP GUI. If do not have experience or knowledge with
XRCed software, it is strongly recommended that you use Script Editor.
Before creating a TSP GUI, you should create a draft first so that you know how you want the GUI to
look, depending on the functionality that is needed for your testing. First, we will show you an image
of a simple GUI and show you how to create a TSP GUI based on a few simple parameters. For
example, the next figure shows a simple GUI with three labels and three text boxes (see next Figure).
Figure 5–140: Simple GUI image
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Figure 248: Simple GUI image
The purpose of this simple GUI is to take three values (a, b, and c) and add them together that
returns a value, for example, the output will equal a + b + c.
Once you have a draft of a GUI you want, go to Tools, then select Custom Test GUI Designer (XRC)
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–141: Custom Test GUI Designer (XRC) in Tools menu
Figure 249: ACS 4.2 Custom Test GUI Designer (XRC) in Tools menu.eps
Create a new object from the file menu (see next Figure).
Figure 5–142: Create a new object
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Figure 250: Create a new object
Change the XML tree encoding (see next Figure).
Figure 5–143: Change the XML tree encoding
Figure 251: Change the XML tree encoding
Add a panel to the XML tree (only wxPanel is supported in ACS)(see next Figure). Next, change the
panel ID to TSP_PANEL (only this ID script is identified in ACS).
Figure 5–144: Add panel for new object
Figure 252: Add panel for new object
In the next Figure (example) for the design GUI structure, notice the use of the GridSizer and
BoxSizer (see next Figure).
Figure 5–145: Design GUI structure
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Figure 253: Design GUI structure
Select the desired BoxSizer size for your project GUI and choose either vertical or horizontal (see
next Figure).
Figure 5–146: Add Sizers under the TSP_PANEL
Figure 254: Add sizers under the TSP panel
Select the desired GridSizer size, add your StaticText (the label) and the TextCtrl (the text box) to
your project GUI (see next Figure).
Figure 5–147: Add labels and text box under wxGridSizer
Figure 255: Add labels and text box under wxGridSizer
Modify the information in the StaticText (label) and the TextCtrl (text box):
1. Click on the StaticText node on the XML tree.
2. Set the XML ID and label on the right.
3. Click on TextCtrl (see next Figure).
Figure 5–148: Modify information
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Figure 256: Modify information
4. Set the label for the StaticText (return information label, see next Figure).
5. Click on wxStaticText under wxBoxSizer, and set the label.
6. Save your .xrc file, after you have completed the steps.
Figure 5–149: Set label for wxStaticText
Figure 257: Set label for wxStatic Text
NOTE
Once you have completed these steps, you can save this as a .xrc GUI that can be used in the Script
Editor Tool. For more information about how to use the Script Editor and create a STM with the .xrc
GUI, see the Script editor tool and Script editor tutorials in this section for more information.
Helpful tips
•
Once completed, you should save your TSP script file to this folder:
\\ACS\library\26Library\TSPLib; also, you should save your .xrc GUI file to this location:
\\ACS\library\26Library\TSPLib\xrc.
•
Also, you should add a specification line with a recognizable format/name to the top of the TSP
script to help identify it with the corresponding .xrc file. The ACS parsing engine will parse this
format and determine the .xrc file that is related to the TSP script and will load the .xrc file. In
other words, the The TSP text and TSP GUI are linked by the .xrc file name that appears at the
top of the text file. The suggested format/name is: ----<<xrc=HCI.xrc>>---- (see next Figure).
Figure 5–149: XRC specification line name
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Figure 258: XRC specification line name
•
The Name of the wxPanel must be called TSP_PANEL (see next Figure).
Figure 5–149: wxPanel named TSP_PANEL
Figure 259: wxPanel named TSP_PANEL
•
The input XML ID parameter in the test module must have a corresponding control in the XRC
GUI file so that ACS will utilize all of the correct input values that correspond to the input
parameters. Therefore, the controls in the .xrc file must have the same name as the input (see
next two Figures)
Figure 5–149: XML ID of the wxTextCtrl
Figure 260: XML ID of the wxTextCtrl
Figure 5–149: wxTextCtrl and XML ID
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Figure 261: wxTextCtrl and XML ID
•
You must make sure that your script contains a session code at the end of the script that tells the
engine to execute a function with the given input parameters that is named --CALL-- (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–149: Session named CALL
Figure 262: Session named CALL
•
Make sure that you place your input parameters between two key words: --INPUT-- and --End of
INPUT--. This is used by ACS to parse the input parameters (see next Figure).
Figure 5–149: INPUT and End of INPUT parameters
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Figure 263: INPUT and End of INPUT parameters
•
Make sure that you place your output parameters between two key words: --OUTPUT-- and --End
of OUTPUT--. This is used by ACS to parse the output parameters (see next Figure).
Figure 5–149: OUTPUT and End of OUTPUT parameters
Figure 264: OUTPUT and End of OUTPUT parameters
•
You must make sure that your TSP script contains a session code so that it will execute the
desired function. For example, every TSP script should have a main function. The next Figure
indicates the main function (TCR_EM is the main function) of this script (see next Figure).
Figure 5–149: Session code for executing scripts
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Figure 265: Session code for executing scripts
Modify script for GUI import
After the script with the .xrc GUI is imported to ACS, the corresponding information of the GUI and
Script can be changed. If you want to modify information, use the GUI script that you imported.
In the script, there must be a .xrc file name, input variable, function, and function call in order to
modify different parts according to your requirements (see next two Figures).
Figure 5–150: Modify Script for import GUI
Figure 266: Modify script for import GUI
Figure 5–151: Modify Script for import GUI (2)
Figure 267: Modify script for import GUI (2)
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NOTE
In the test script program, the comments denote as “[[ ……]]”, whereas in C program comments
denotes as “/* ……*/”. Input variables can be integer, double, string, table or instID. Additionally, in
the -CALL-part, Call function name must be the same with Main function’s. The following of ‘--CALL --’
is automatically generated by ACS.
You can set the limit range for input variables. For example: double a=0.0 in [-40,40]; double b=0.0 in
[-40,]; integer a=0 in [,40] (see next Figure).
Figure 5–152: TSP GUI for STM
Figure 268: TSP GUI for STM
On the TSP GUI, you can input values according to what you want. If input is empty, you will receive
an Invalid input message (see next Figure).
Figure 5–153: Invalid Input
Figure 269: Invalid input
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C language Test Module (CTM) configuration
A CTM is a test module defined primarily by programming a C-language user module using KULT of
Model 4200-SCS. It is one in which you typically configure key test parameters using a graphical user
interface (GUI).
After inserting a CTM into a project, it must be configured to meet the test requirements. This section
describes the connection of CTMs to user modules and user libraries, and entering/editing module
parameters.
Connect/reconnect the selected CTM to an existing KULT-created user module using the CTM Setup
tab of the CTM work area.
There are two kinds of CTM: ACS Classic Style and Advanced Style (Support CTM List). Classic
Style CTM only contains one test module, but the advanced style CTM contains many test modules.
Classic CTM configuration
1. Click the New CTM icon in the vertical edit toolbar. The Specify the CTM Type dialog box opens
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–154: Specify the CTM Type
Figure 270: Specify the CTM Type
2. Click the ACS Classic Style and Click OK, then CTM Setup Tab displays (see next Figure).
Figure 5–155: CTM Setup Tab
Figure 271: CTM Setup tab
3. In the User Lib drop-down menu of the Setup tab, click the user library that contains the desired
user module to test. For this example, the ACS_DEMO library is selected.
4. In the User Module drop-down menu of the Setup tab, click the desired user module to test. The
CTM displays the configuration parameters for the selected user module. In the next Figure,
idvd_demo is selected as the user module.
Figure 5–156: CTM Setup example
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Figure 272: CTM Setup example
5. Accept the default parameter values, or change them if desired. For an array input, click Set
Value on the active sheet; the Array Value Setting dialog box displays (see next Figure).
Figure 5–157: CTM Array Value Setting
Figure 273: CTM Array Value Setting
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6.
7.
8.
9.
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Choose the desired Array, then click the Apply function. This returns you to the Setup tab.
Save the CTM and the project by clicking the Save or Save All function on the toolbar.
Run the CTM.
View the result in the Data tab.
CTM work area
A CTM work area allows you to enter information that defines a given CTM. A CTM work area also
allows you to view and analyze test data created by the CTM, both numerically and graphically. Tabs
available from the CTM work area are discussed below:
The Setup tab of the CTM work area allows you to specify a KULT-created user library and user
module. In addition, it allows you to specify a limited number of test parameters.
The Data tab displays the CTM results and graph in its Data worksheet. The Data worksheet allows
you to create and plot graphs of the test results. Refer to the Data Plot topic discussed later in this
section.
The Status tab monitors the current configuration status of the CTM (see next Figure).
Figure 5–158: CTM work area
Figure 274: CTM work area
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•
•
•
•
User Lib drop-down menu box: Displays the available user libraries for selection.
•
Present-cell list box: 1) Displays the contents of the presently selected cell and 2) provides an
alternative, more spacious place to input or change the parameters of the currently selected userinput cell.
•
Documentation area: Typically displays descriptions, examples, requirements, etc., for the
connected user module.
User Module drop-down menu box: Displays the user modules in the user library for selection.
Parameter input area: Contains the following:
Parameter cells: Spreadsheet-like cells that receive inputs directly, or display parameter
titles/descriptions. As in a standard spreadsheet, each cell is designated by a column and row (for
example, the fourth column, second row is designated as D2). Any of the white cells next to
parameter titles/descriptions are valid user-input cells.
NOTE
You should be aware that the CTM LPT commands will only work when the ACS software is installed
on the Model 4200-SCS to control the Model 4200-SCS hardware, such as the SMU, CVU, SCP,
VPU, etc. Also, if you are controlling the Model 4200-SCS hardware using the KXCI software and an
Ethernet cable, you will not be able to use the KITE LPT commands at the same time. For more
information about CTMs that are used on the Model 4200-SCS, refer to the supplied documentation
that is located on the Keithley Instruments CD-ROM that was shipped with your purchase.
Post data function in CTM
In KITE UTM, the data post functions are PostDataInt (char *, int *), PostDataDouble (char *, double
*) and PostDataString (char *, char*). But in ACS CTM, those functions can no longer be used if the
KITE version is v7.1 or older. However, if the KITE version is equal to or greater than v7.2, all of the
KITE UTM data post functions can be used in ACS. That means that the KITE user library can be
used in ACS directly without any modifications. Note that the following functions have been added to
take the place.
•
•
•
•
•
•
int ACSPostDataInt (char *data_name, int data_val);
int ACSPostDataFloat (char *data_name, float data_val);
int ACSPostDataDouble (char *data_name, double data_val);
int ACSPostArrayInt (char *data_name, int *data_array, int data_num);
int ACSPostArrayFloat (char *data_name, float *data_array, int data_num);
int ACSPostArrayDouble (char *data_name, double *data_array, int data_num);
NOTE
To use these functions in ACS, you should add “#include acsenv.h” in the C source code.
Advanced CTM configuration
1. Click the New CTM icon in the vertical edit toolbar. The Specify the CTM Type dialog box opens
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–159: Specify the CTM Type
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Figure 275: Specify the CTM Type
2. Click the Advanced (Support CTM List) and click OK, the CTM Setup Tab of this Advanced CTM
is displayed by default (see next Figure).
Figure 5–160: CTM of Advanced Setup Tab
Figure 276: CTM of Advanced Setup tab
There are three main parts in the Setup tab:
•
•
•
Test libraries
Test module list
Test module setting
1. In the Test Libraries box, click the user library that contains the desired user modules. For this
example, the parlib library is selected.
2. After the library unfold, all test modules containing in this library will list. Click the desired module
to test by double-click it. For example, the Vtext module is double-selected. All configuration
parameters for this CTM (see next Figure).
Figure 5–161: CTM Setup tab example
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Figure 277: CTM Setup tab example
3. Set these parameters as classical CTM . For an array input, click active sheet; the Array Value
Setting dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 5–162: CTM Array Setting
Figure 278: CTM Array Setting
4. You can click the Description in the left bottom (see next Figure). It typically displays descriptions,
examples, requirements, etc., for this user module (see next two Figures).
Figure 5–163: Description function
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Figure 279: Description function
Figure 5–164: Description of CTM
Figure 280: Description of CTM
5. Then click the Add function to add this module to the Test Modules List (see next Figure).
Figure 5–165: Add a test module to the Test Modules List
Figure 281: Add a test module to the Test Modules List
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6. In the Test Module List, you can see next Figure _vtest[0] in the Test Module List. Then you can
change the parameters as shown in the step 5, and select the Add function again, which means
you can add this module with the different parameters many times (see next Figure).
Figure 5–166: Add a test module twice to the Test Modules List
Figure 282: Add a test module twice to the Test Modules List
•
Click the Reset function, to set all of the parameters of the module in the Test Module setting to
their original values.
•
If you want to change the parameters of a module in the Test Module List, you can click and
double-selected this module in the Test Module List, and then this module appears in the Test
Module Setting. You can change the parameters as you want, and then click the Update function.
1. You can also add modules in other library to the Test Modules List. For example, click the
kiscopeulib library and double-click the SCP2_CH1 module, and then click the function; this new
module is added to the Test Module List (see next Figure).
Figure 5–167: Add another test module to the list
Figure 283: Add another test module to the list
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2. You can change the module’s test sequence in the Test Modules List by upper function and
forward function. For example, if we want to test the _SCP2_CH1[0] module first, we can click
this module, and click the up arrow function some times, then this module turns to the first place
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–168: Change the module test sequence
Figure 284: Change the module test sequence
3. In the Test Modules List, right-click and there are four items: Click All, deselect All, Delete
Selected Macro and Clear all. Click Delete Selected Macro to delete the selected the module, and
Clear all to delete all the modules in the Test Module List (see next Figure).
Figure 5–169: Right-click in the Test Module List
Figure 285: Right-click in the Test Modules List
4. Save the CTM and the project by clicking the Save or Save All function on the toolbar.
5. Run the CTM.
6. View the result in the Data tab.
The Data tab displays the CTM results and graph in its Data worksheet. The Data worksheet allows
you to create and plot graphs of the test results. Refer to the Data Plot topic discussed later in this
section.
The Status tab shows the current configuration status of the CTM.
Python language Test Module (PTM) configuration
A PTM is a test module defined primarily by programming a Python language user module. It can be
created by using the Script Editor in ACS software.
The PTM can be used as a test module. PTMs can also be used to control instruments and process
data.
After inserting a PTM into a project test tree, it must be configured to meet the test requirements.
Configure a PTM:
1. Click the New PTM icon in the vertical edit toolbar. The Setup tab is displayed (see next Figure).
Figure 5–170: Add a PTM
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Figure 286: Add a PTM
2. You can write a PTM script or import an existing test module.
NOTE
The imported file can be edited in Script Editor, a tool embedded in ACS, or you can write the code
yourself. The code will have to follow the ACS STM library rules. For more information about the
Script Editor, you can refer to the Script Editor Tutorials.
3. Click the Import function to import this PTM module and click the Save function to save it (see
next Figure).
Figure 5–171: Import a PTM module
The Data tab displays the PTM results and the graph in the Data worksheet. The Data worksheet
allows you to create and plot graphs of the test results. Refer to the Data Plot of the Status tab where
it monitors the current configuration status of the PTM.
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Understanding a python script
A python script is a script written in python programming language, and a script is a collection of
instrument control commands and programming statements. Program statements control script
execution and provide services such as variables, functions, branching, and loop control.
Script Examples
The example python script below is used to perform a diode measurement.
from ACSLPT import *
from ptmlpt.constantlpt import *
from ACS_PostData import *
import kimisc as misc
from ACS_Global import *
def Diode_DynamicZ_I1I2(PSMU='SMU1', NSMU='GNDU', I1=0.01, I2=0.02, RangeV=1,
ComplianceV=20, nPLC=1.0, Holdtime=0.01, output_error='error',
output_DynamicZ='DynamicZ', output_I1='I1', output_I2='I2', output_V1='V1',
output_V2='V2'):
"""
VISIBILITY: NOT_HIDDEN
TYPE : standard
INPUTLIST
#Name, Type, Default Value, Min Value, Max Value, Unit
PSMU,enum,'SMU1',('SMU1','SMU2','SMU3','SMU4','SMU5','SMU6','SMU7','SMU8'),,A
NSMU,enum,'GNDU',('SMU1','SMU2','SMU3','SMU4','SMU5','SMU6','SMU7','SMU8','GNDU'),,
A
I1,float,0.01,-0.1,0.1,A
I2,float,0.02,-0.1,0.1,A
RangeV,int,1,1,5,A
ComplianceV,float,20,-1100,1100,A
nPLC,float,1.0,0.01,10,A
Holdtime,float,0.01,0,100,A
END INPUTLIST
OUTPUTLIST
#Name, Type, DefaultValue, Unit
output_error,str,'error',A
output_DynamicZ,str,'DynamicZ',A
output_I1,str,'I1',A
output_I2,str,'I2',A
output_V1,str,'V1',A
output_V2,str,'V2',A
END OUTPUTLIST
DESCRIPTION
Module Name: Diode_DynamicZ_I1I2
Instrument:Keithley S4200 SMU.
DUT: Diode
Function: Calculates the Dynamic Impedance based on two forward voltage or
two reverse voltage measurements.
DynamicZ = (v2 - v1) / (I2 - I1)
Pin Connection: It uses one SMU to force forward current, while the other
terminal is grounded.
---PSMU:SMU name of P terminal. Valid from SMU1 to SMU8.
---NSMU:SMU name of N terminal. Valid from SMU1 to SMU8, GNDU.
---I1:P terminal forced current. Valid from -0.1 to 0.1. [A]
---I2:P terminal forced current. Valid from -0.1 to 0.1. [A]
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---RangeV:Limit auto range of voltage measurement. Valid from 1 to 5. For
some instrument without lorange, it will be set to autorange.
Input
Range
======================
1
Full Auto
2
Limited Auto 0.2V
3
Limited Auto 2V
4
Limited Auto 20V
5
Limited Auto 200V
---ComplianceV:Compliance of current force.
---Valid from -1100 to 1100. [V]
---nPLC:Number of power line cycles for integration.
---Valid input from 0.01 to 10.
---Holdtime:Holdtime before measurement.
---Valid input from 0 to 100. [s]
---output_error : error value list
0 (OK) normal working condition;
-10000 (INVAL_INST_ID)An invalid instrument ID was specified. This generally
means that there is no instrument with the specified ID in your configuration.
-10100 (INVAL_PARAM) An invalid parameter was specified.
-12021 (KI_COMPLIANCE) Measurement compliance occurred.
-12022 (KI_RANGE_COMPLIANCE) Range limit was reached during measurement.
---output_DynamicZ : Dynamic impendence of diode.
---output_I1 :
---output_I2 :
---output_V1 :
---output_V2 :
END DESCRIPTION
"""
Get4200HWCtrl()
error = [ ]
DynamicZ = 0.0
#Some input checking is needed
if abs(I1) > 0.1:
error.append(INVAL_PARAM)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return INVAL_PARAM
if abs(I2) > 0.1:
error.append(INVAL_PARAM)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return INVAL_PARAM
if RangeV < 1 or RangeV > 5:
error.append(INVAL_PARAM)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return INVAL_PARAM
if abs(ComplianceV) > 1100:
error.append(INVAL_PARAM)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return INVAL_PARAM
if nPLC < 0.01 or nPLC > 10:
error.append(INVAL_PARAM)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return INVAL_PARAM
if Holdtime < 0 or Holdtime > 100:
error.append(INVAL_PARAM)
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len(error))
len(error))
len(error))
len(error))
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ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return INVAL_PARAM
#Map the SMUs with DUT terminals
PSMUId = getinstid(PSMU)
if not PSMUId:
error.append(INVAL_INST_ID)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return INVAL_INST_ID
NSMUId = getinstid(NSMU)
if not NSMUId:
error.append(INVAL_INST_ID)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return INVAL_INST_ID
#Set range and compliance
limitv(PSMU, ComplianceV)
if NSMU != "GNDU":
limitv(NSMU, ComplianceV)
if RangeV == 1:
setauto(PSMU)
elif RangeV == 2:
lorangev(PSMU, 0.2)
elif RangeV == 3:
lorangev(PSMU, 2)
elif RangeV == 4:
lorangev(PSMU, 20)
elif RangeV == 5:
lorangev(PSMU, 200)
else:
lorangev(PSMU, 2)
#Set instrument config
setmode(PSMU, KI_INTGPLC, nPLC)
htime = int(Holdtime * 1000)
#Set stress
if NSMU != "GNDU":
forcev(NSMU, 0)
forcei(PSMU, I1)
delay(htime)
V1 = intgv(PSMU)
forcei(PSMU, I2)
delay(htime)
V2 = intgv(PSMU)
#check compliance
cstatus = getstatus(PSMU, KI_COMPLNC)
if cstatus == 2:
error.append(KI_RANGE_COMPLIANCE)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return error[len(error)-1]
if cstatus == 4:
error.append(KI_COMPLIANCE)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error,
return error[len(error)-1]
#test complete
devint()
Idelta = I1 - I2
if Idelta == 0:
Idelta = 1e-37
DynamicZ = (V1 -V2) / Idelta
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error.append(0)
ACSPostDataDouble(output_DynamicZ, DynamicZ)
ACSPostDataDouble(output_I1, I1)
ACSPostDataDouble(output_I2, I2)
ACSPostDataDouble(output_V1, V1)
ACSPostDataDouble(output_V2, V2)
ACSPostArrayInt(output_error, error, len(error))
return DynamicZ
#--CALL-PSMU = "SMU1"
NSMU = "GNDU"
I1 = 0.01
I2 = 0.02
RangeV = 1
ComplianceV = 20
nPLC = 1.0
Holdtime = 0.01
output_error = "error"
output_DynamicZ = "DynamicZ"
output_I1 = "I1"
output_I2 = "I2"
output_V1 = "V1"
output_V2 = "V2"
Diode_DynamicZ_I1I2(PSMU,NSMU,I1,I2,RangeV,ComplianceV,nPLC,Holdtime,output_error,o
utput_DynamicZ,output_I1,output_I2,output_V1,output_V2)
Code Explanation
NOTE
It may be necessary for you to learn some basic knowledge of the Python language before you
continue. You can download the Python IDE (Python Integrated Development Environment) in order
to learn more about basic syntax and the environment (copy and paste this link in your internet
browser and download the Python IDE: http://www.python.org/download/).
Here is an explanation of the code presented previously:
Lines 1 - 4: Import declarations
Lines 6 - 9: Declaring functions
The declare function must follow the rule of indentation plus a colon.
NOTE
Declaration function rule (Python syntax rule): The keyword def starts the function declaration,
followed by the function name, and the arguments in parentheses. Multiple arguments are separated
with commas.
Declaration variable rule (Python syntax rule): Parameters do not specify a data type. In Python,
variables are never explicitly typed. Python figures out what type a variable is and keeps track of it
internally.
Lines 10 - 74: Function description/details
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Between the triple quotes is the function's document string. Of course, you can add some other
comments about the functions.
NOTE
Paragraph rule (Python syntax rule): Python functions have no explicit begin or end, and no curly
braces to mark where the function code starts and stops. The only delimiter is a colon (:) and the
indentation of the code itself. Indenting starts a block and un-indenting ends it.
This means that whitespace is significant, and must be consistent. In this example, the function code
(including the doc string) is indented four spaces. It doesn't need to be four spaces, it just needs to be
consistent. The first line that is not indented is outside the function.
The following example shows various indentation errors:
def perm(l):
# error: first line indented
for i in range(len(l)):
# error: not indented
s = l[:i] + l[i+1:]
p = perm(l[:i] + l[i+1:])
# error: unexpected indent
for x in p:
r.append(l[i:i+1] + x)
return r
# error: inconsistent dedent
For more information about the Python resource, copy and paste the following links in your internet
browser:
http://www.python.org/download/
http://www.activestate.com/Products/ActivePython/
http://www.python.org/doc/
Post data function in PTM
In CTM, the data post functions are ACSPostDataInt(char *, int *), ACSPostDataDouble(char *,
double *) and ACSPostDataString(char *, char*). But in an ACS PTM, those functions can no longer
be used and the following functions are added to take the place.
•
•
•
•
ACSPostDataInt(data_name, data_val);
ACSPostDataDouble(data_name, data_val);
ACSPostArrayInt(data_name, data_array, data_num);
ACSPostArrayDouble(data_name, data_array, data_num);
NOTE
To use these functions in ACS, you should import the ACS_PostData at the beginning of the Python
source code (see next Figure).
Figure 5–172: Import the ACS_PostData line in PTM header
Figure 287: Import the ACS PostData line in PTM header
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Using Log Manager in PTM
If you want to debug the program of a PTM, in this case, LogManager will be used. In the Preferences
setting, you can change the log level for debug or production run.
For the PTM Test module, you can use logInfo, logError, and logCritical to print log information in the
ACS log window if this line is added in the header “from ACS_PostData import *”. The logCritical is
the highest level and cannot be confined by all level settings.
For example, in the ACS Preferences dialog box, set the info level as Info (see next Figure).
Figure 5–173: Select INFO level in Advanced tab
Figure 288: Select INFO Level in Advanced tab
Then add a new PTM test module and add the following lines:
from ACS_PostData import *
logInfo("@@@@@@@@HELLO, [email protected]@@@@@@@@@")
Click the Check button to compile or click run button to run this PTM, this string will be printed in log
window (see next Figure). In info level, the logError, and logCritical can also be used.
It will not print a log message after setting the log level to Warning or Error. If the log level is set to
Error, logError, and logCritical will be used. The logCritical is the highest level and will not be confined
by all level settings (see next Figure).
Figure 5–174: Print line showed in Log window
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Figure 289: Print line in log window
PTM with the .xrc GUI file
The .xrc is a tool used for creating a GUI. As with a STM in ACS, a PTM can include a “.xrc” file for a
test module.
If the file imported has a corresponding .xrc graphical user interface (GUI) file, ACS automatically
loads and displays the GUI. You can set parameters on the GUI so that you do not need to edit
parameters on the script tab.
You can generate the .xrc file yourself. For instructions on how to create a .xrc GUI, refer to How to
create a TSP GUI file in this section.
Configure a PTM with .xrc:
1. After the .xrc PTM is imported, click the test name in the test tree. The module will open and the
GUI is shown by default. The module is in the Script tab of PTM work area. The next Figure
shows a GUI related.
Figure 5–175: Importing a .xrc PTM
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Figure 290: Importing a XRC PTM
2. Set the input parameters.
3. Save the configuration using the Save function located on the toolbar.
The inputs in GUI are related to the function call parameters in the script tab.
To open the corresponding script tab, click the Script tab option (see next Figure).
Figure 5–176: Script tab of a .xrc PTM
Figure 291: Script tab of XRC PTM
If one input parameter in GUI is empty, the value of this input parameter will be nothing in function call
of the script. After the correct input is entered, the function call of script tab of this test module will
change at the same time.
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Global data support in PTM and UAP
In a PTM , ACS supports two-sided data flow:
•
•
Global data can be used in an UAP.
A PTM can change or set new global data, which can be used in any UAP or any other PTM after
the PTM settings run over. The usage is no different than using the variable in global data (see
next Figure).
Figure 5–177: Data flow
Figure 292: Data flow
General module test in a PTM
Configure the device under test
1. Import the PTM module GeneralTestLib.py from PTMlib, and choose the General_HighV Module
from the User Module combo (see next Figure).
Figure 5–178: General module test
Figure 293: General module test
2. Click the Browse function, and the Select Device Type dialog box opens showing various Device
Types for users to indicate their needed Device Map (see next Figure).
Figure 5–179: Select Device Type
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Figure 294: Select Device Type
3. Configure the device pads with different SMUs (see next Figure).
Figure 5–180: Device map example
Figure 295: Device map example
NOTE
In the general module test, different kinds of SMUs are available for devices to perform the test. If
ACS software is installed on a PC, the Model-4200 SMU cannot be used in this General test PTM, so
the Model-4200 SMU will not be displayed on SMU Info box. Only when the ACS software is installed
on the Model-4200 will the Model-4200 SMU be used (see next Figure).
This dialog box shows the SMUs’ detailed information.
Figure 5–181: Selected SMU information
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Figure 296: Selected SMU information
Configuring the SMU’s Force/Measure Table
A Forcing Functions/Measure Options table is associated with an instrument object that is assigned to
a device terminal. The Forcing Functions/Measure Options table items are used to configure the
forcing function and measurements implemented by the instrument. This section explains the
following:
•
•
Understanding and configuring each available forcing function.
•
Understanding and configuring the other controls on the Forcing Functions/Measure Options
dialog box.
Understanding and configuring the measurement options that are associated with a forcing
function. These are discussed generically, for all forcing functions, at the end of this section.
SMUs Bias/Sweep/Step Setting Table
There are three parts in Forcing Functions/Measure Options tables in the General Module Setup Tab:
1. The Pad name and the SMU ID
2. The force functions settings
3. The measure options settings (see next Figure).
Figure 5–182: Forcing functions/measure options tables
Figure 297: Forcing functions_measure options table
Configure the Common Settings
The Common Settings are used to configure the general module timing settings. There are three
areas in the Common Setting: Test Speed; Test Mode; Advanced (see next Figure).
Figure 5–183: Common Settings
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Figure 298: Common Settings
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Understanding Test Speed
The entries in the PLC and #Average list boxes control the A/D (analog-to-digital) converter
integration time used to measure a signal. Each measured reading by a SMU is the result of one or
more A/D conversions. A short integration time for each A/D conversion results in a relatively fast
measurement speed, at the expense of noise. A long integration time results in a relatively low noise
reading, at the expense of speed. The integration time setting is based on the number of power line
cycles (NPLCs). For example:
•
•
For 60Hz line power, 1.0 PLC = 16.67msec (1/60).
For 50Hz line power, 1.0 PLC = 20msec (1/50).
Understanding Test Mode
There are two test modes you can choose in the mode area of the Common Settings dialog box: the
Sweeping test mode and the Sampling test mode.
The Sweeping test mode applies to any General Module in which one or more forced
voltages/currents vary with time.
The Sampling test mode applies to any General Module in which all forced voltages or currents are
static (bias I or bias V), with measurements typically being made at timed intervals. Refer to the
Forcing Function Summary Table discussed earlier. For example, sampling mode would be used to
record a few static measurements, or to time-profile the charging voltage of a capacitor while forcing
a constant current.
The mode is used to observe and/or change the test mode as follows:
•
For a completely new General Module, the mode allows you to choose the Sweeping or Sampling
test mode. Selecting the appropriate test mode simplifies configuration options and helps to avoid
errors:
A. Only the static forcing functions are configurable in the Sampling mode.
B. Only mode-appropriate timing options are configurable.
•
For an existing library PTM that is in the Sampling mode, the mode area allows you to change to
the Sweeping mode if you want to change some of the static forcing functions to sweeping forcing
functions.
Sweeping mode
If any terminal of the device under test is configured for a sweeping forcing function—a Step or
Sweep forcing function—the Sweeping mode is automatically enabled. Then, you can configure two
Sweeping mode settings in the Common Settings dialog box. These are Delay Time and Hold Time
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–184: Sweeping mode setting
Figure 299: Sweeping mode setting
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•
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Hold Time setting - The starting voltage(s)/current(s) of a sweep may be substantially larger than
the voltage/current increments of the sweep. Accordingly, the source settling time required to
reach the starting voltage(s)/current(s) of a sweep may be substantially larger than the settling
times required to increment the sweep. To compensate, you can specify a Hold Time delay to be
applied only at the beginning of each sweep. You can specify a Hold Time delay of 0 to 1000s
(seconds). The default Hold Time is 0s.
The next Figure shows an example Sweeping mode timing diagram.
Figure 5–185: Sweeping mode timing diagram
Figure 300: Sweeping mode timing diagram
•
When the test is started, the Hold Time (HT) provides extra settling time for the initial step change
of the source. The Hold Time is a global setting. Note that the Hold Time is applied at the start
(only) of each sweep, therefore, it is the same for all SMUs that are part of the test (as in the
previous figure that includes Sweep, Step, and Bias).
•
SMU will delay Delay Time (D) before taking a measurement after forcing.
Sampling mode
The Sampling mode measures voltages/currents as a function of time while forcing constant
voltages/currents (Bias I or Bias V). Refer to the Forcing Function Summary Table in “Understanding
and configuring the force function parameters” discussed earlier in this section. For example, the
sampling mode would be used to measure voltage while forcing a constant current. Time is measured
relative to when the SMU(s) apply the forced voltage or current (that is, t = 0 at the step change from
0.0 V/0.0 A to the applied voltage/current).
ACS enables the sampling mode option only when all terminals of the device under test are
configured for static forcing functions: Voltage Bias, or Current Bias. If any terminal of the device
under test is configured for a step or sweep forcing function, the Sampling mode option is unavailable
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–186: Sampling mode setting
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Figure 301: Sampling mode setting
You can configure three Sampling mode settings: Delay Time, Sample Number, and Hold Time.
The Delay Time, Sample Number and Hold Time settings control the Sampling mode, as follows:
•
Delay Time—Specifies the time between measurements (data points). Delay Time can be set
from 0 to1000sec.
•
Sample Number—Specifies the number of data points to be acquired. Sample Number can be set
from 1 to 4096.
•
Hold Time—After initial application of voltage/current by the SMU(s), the source settling time(s)
can be substantial. To allow for settling, you can specify an extra Hold Time delay to be applied
before making the first measurement. You can specify a Hold Time from 0 to 1000s (seconds).
Figure 5–187: Sampling mode timing diagram
Figure 302: Sampling mode timing diagram
•
If needed, a Hold Time (HT) can be used to allow for extra source settling after the initial
application of voltage(s)/current(s) by the SMU(s). Hold Time is a global setting, and is therefore
the same for all SMUs in the test system.
•
A range-dependent Delay (D) is automatically applied by a SMU before each measurement, to
allow for source settling. All SMUs in the test system are synchronized. Therefore, the Delay time
applied by the most delayed SMU is the delay time applied to all SMUs.
•
SMU will delay Measure Time (MT) before taking a measurement after forcing.
Understanding Advanced
In the Advanced area, there are two lists for you to configure for your requirement. They are Test End
Reset and Enable Trigger (see next Figure).
Figure 5–188: Advanced box of Common Settings
Figure 303: Advanced box of common settings
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For the Test End Reset configuration, there are two choices for you to configure.If you choose
False,that means your test result will not be cleaned.If you choose True,after the test is finished,it will
clean the test result to the beginning status.
For the Enable Trigger configuration, it also has two choices.If you want to use trigger to configuration
test,you should choose True, otherwise choose False.
NOTE
For the most SMUs, Choose the Enable Trigger with False is generally accepted.
PTM configuration
The general purpose PTM is used to perform measurements with different instruments on a device,
and the operation can be easily accessible like the standard Series 2600 interactive test modules.
Since this is an interactive test module, no programming is required.
The general test module can be used in any combination of SMUs of Series 2400, Series 2600,
Series 2600A, Model 4200-SCS, and Model 237 SourceMeters. (see next Figure).
For more information on how to configure different GPIB instruments, please refer to ACS Example
hardware configurations (see "ACS example hardware configurations and connections" on page 161).
Figure 5–: General purpose module with multiple SMUs
Figure 304: General purpose module with multiple SMUs
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The general purpose module in ACS can provide a total solution for component characterization tests
with high power requirements. Because the general purpose module can be mixed with several
different types of SMUs, it can also be used in other applications, such as Solar Cell and LED, among
others.
From the general purpose module interface, you can do these tests: BiasV/I, SweepV/I, StepV/I.
However, compared to the Series 2600 ITM, the general purpose module does not allow some
forcing functions due to mixing hardware platforms, including log sweep, dual sweep, list sweep, and
limited auto ranging.
The external trigger feature in the common settings is only used when using multiple Model 237
SMUs with a model 2361 trigger controller. And if you want to use this feature, you will need to
configure the model 2361 as GPI1 (general purpose instrument 1) in the ACS hardware configuration.
The other common settings can be used like the timing dialog in the standard Series 2600 based
interactive tests. The timing and speed of these tests is limited if you combine different generations of
hardware. For the fastest test times, you should always use the Series 2600A SourceMeters in the
standard tests associated with those instruments.
Open the general purpose module
Configure the hardware system
Before you configure a general test module in the system, you need to configure and check the
hardware first. For more information about how to configure different GPIB instruments through ACS,
refer to the Hardware Configurations section.
Add a new general purpose module
Insert a new PTM to the test tree. Click the PTM icon to add a new PTM to the test tree.
Open the PTM, then click the Import function. In the dialog box that opens, you will choose a python
test script. Select the Combined_Test_Mixed_SMUs.py script (see next Figure).
Figure 5–: Import the general PTM
Figure 305: Import the general PTM
The general purpose PTM GUI will display on the ACS main window (see next Figure).
Figure 5–: General purpose PTM GUI
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Figure 306: General purpose PTM GUI
Configure the device under test
After inserting a general purpose PTM module into your project it must be configured to meet your
test requirements.
Click the Browse function, and the Select Device Type dialog box will show various Device Types for
you to choose (see next Figure).
Figure 5–: Select Device Type
Figure 307: Select Device Type
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Next, Select the SMU for the test module by selecting one of the device terminals. Once you make
your selection in the Select SMU For Test Module dialog box, the device terminal will reflect your
selection (see next Figure).
Figure 5–: Map SMU and device terminal
Figure 308: Map SMU and device terminal
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NOTE
If ACS software is installed on a PC, the Model 4200-SMU cannot be used in this general purpose
PTM. This means that the Model 4200-SMU will not be displayed in the Select SMU For Test Module
dialog box. Only when ACS is installed on the Model 4200-SCS will the Model 4200-SMU be
available for the general purpose PTM.
You must set the SMU’s Force Function, Force Range, Force Value, Meas (measure) Variable, and
Meas Range. For more information about how to set force and measure functions and variables
continue to the next topic in this section.
You must also set the Common Settings information in the PTM GUI. For example, the Test Speed,
Test Mode, and Advanced information. For more information about how to set the Common Settings,
refer to the Understanding Common Settings box in this section.
Configuring the Force and Measure functions/variables
The Force and Measure functions/variables are associated with an instrument object that is assigned
to a device terminal. These items are used to configure the forcing function and measurements
implemented by the instrument:
•
•
Understanding and configuring each available forcing function.
•
Understanding and configuring the other controls on the Forcing Functions/Measure Options
dialog box.
Understanding and configuring the measurement options that are associated with a forcing
function. These are discussed generically, for all forcing functions, at the end of this subsection.
SMUs Bias/Sweep/Step Setting Table
There are three parts in the Force and Measure functions/variables in the general purpose PTM tab:
1. The Pad Name and the SMU ID.
2. The force functions settings.
3. The measure options settings (see next Figure).
Figure 5–: Force and Measure functions/variables
Figure 309: Force and Measure functions_variables
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Understanding and configuring the force function parameters
There are seven force functions:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Voltage bias
Current bias
Open
Voltage sweep
Current sweep
Voltage step
Current step
For more information about how to set the voltage bias for a SMU, refer to Understanding and
Configuring the Voltage Bias Function Parameters in this section.
For more information about how to set the current bias, refer to Understanding and Configuring the
Current Bias Function Parameters in this section.
For more information about how to set the voltage sweep and current sweep, refer to Understanding
and Configuring the Voltage Sweep Function Parameters and Understanding and Configuring Current
Sweep Function Parameters in this section.
For more information about how to set Voltage step and current step in the general PTM, refer to
Understanding and Configuring the Voltage Step Forcing Function and Understanding and
Configuring the Current Step Forcing Function in this section.
Configure Common Settings
The Common Settings box is used to configure the general purpose PTM timing settings. There are
three areas in the Common Setting box: Test Speed, Test mode area and Advanced area (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–:PTM Common Settings
Figure 310: PTM Common Settings
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Understanding the Test Speed area
The entries in the PLC and Average edit boxes control the A/D (analog-to-digital) converter
integration time used to measure a signal. Each measured reading by a SMU is the result of one or
more A/D conversions. A short integration time for each A/D conversion results in a relatively fast
measurement speed, at the expense of noise. A long integration time results in a relatively low noise
reading, at the expense of speed. The integration time setting is based on the number of power line
cycles (NPLCs). For example:
For 60Hz line power, 1.0 PLC = 16.67msec (1/60).
For 50Hz line power, 1.0 PLC = 20msec (1/50).
Understanding the mode area: Sweeping and Sampling Test Modes
There are two test modes you can choose in the mode area of the Common Settings dialog box: the
Sweeping test mode and the Sampling test mode.
The Sweeping test mode applies to any general module in which one or more forced
voltages/currents vary with time.
The Sampling test mode applies to any general module in which all forced voltages or currents are
static (bias I or bias V), with measurements typically being made at timed intervals. Refer to the
Forcing Function Summary Table discussed earlier. For example, sampling mode would be used to
record a few static measurements, or to time-profile the charging voltage of a capacitor while forcing
a constant current.
The mode is used to observe and/or change the test mode as follows:
For a completely new general module, the mode allows you to choose the Sweeping or Sampling test
mode. Selecting the appropriate test mode simplifies configuration options and helps to avoid
errors:
– Only the static forcing functions are configurable in the Sampling mode.
– Only mode-appropriate timing options are configurable.
* For an existing library PTM that is in the Sampling mode, the mode area allows you to change to the
Sweeping mode if you want to change some of the static forcing functions to sweeping forcing
functions.
Sweeping mode
If any terminal of the device under test is configured for a sweeping forcing function—a Step or
Sweep forcing function—the Sweeping mode is automatically enabled. Then, you can configure two
Sweeping mode settings in the Common Settings dialog box. These are Delay Time and Hold Time.
Figure 5–:Sweeping Test Mode settings
Figure 311: Sweeping Test Mode settings
•
Hold Time setting - The starting voltage(s)/current(s) of a sweep may be substantially larger than
the voltage/current increments of the sweep. Accordingly, the source settling time required to
reach the starting voltage(s)/current(s) of a sweep may be substantially larger than the settling
times required to increment the sweep. To compensate, you can specify a Hold Time delay to be
applied only at the beginning of each sweep. You can specify a Hold Time delay of 0 to 1000s
(seconds). The default Hold Time is 0s.
Figure 5–:Sweeping mode timing diagram
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Figure 312: Sweeping mode timing diagram
When the test is started, the Hold Time (HT) provides extra settling time for the initial step change of
the source. The Hold Time is a global setting. Note that the Hold Time is applied at the start (only) of
each sweep, therefore, it is the same for all SMUs that are part of the test (as in the previous figure
that includes Sweep, Step, and Bias).
SMU will delay Delay Time (D) before taking a measurement after forcing.
Sampling mode
The Sampling mode measures voltages/currents as a function of time while forcing constant
voltages/currents (bias I or bias V). Refer to the Force and Measure functions/variables information
that can be found on previous pages in this section. For example, the sampling mode is used to
measure voltage while forcing a constant current. Time is measured relative to when the SMU(s)
apply the forced voltage or current (that is, t = 0 at the step change from 0.0 V/0.0 A to the applied
voltage/current).
ACS enables the sampling mode option only when all terminals of the device under test are
configured for static forcing functions: Voltage Bias, or Current Bias. If any terminal of the device
under test is configured for a step or sweep forcing function, the Sampling mode option is unavailable
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–:Sampling Test Mode settings
Figure 313: Sampling Test Mode settings
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You can configure three Sampling mode settings: Delay Time, Sample Number, and Hold Time.
The Delay Time, Sample Number and Hold Time settings control the Sampling mode, as follows:
Delay Time — Specifies the time between measurements (data points). Delay Time can be set from 0 to
1000sec.
Sample Number — Specifies the number of data points to be acquired. Sample Number can be set from 1 to
4096.
Hold Time — After initial application of voltage/current by the SMU(s), the source settling time(s) can be
substantial. To allow for settling, you can specify an extra Hold Time delay to be applied before making
the first measurement. You can specify a Hold Time from 0 to 1000s (seconds).
Figure 5–:Sampling mode timing diagram
Figure 314: Sampling mode timing diagram
If needed, a Hold Time (HT) can be used to allow for extra source settling after the initial application
of voltage(s)/current(s) by the SMU(s). Hold Time is a global setting, and is therefore the same for all
SMUs in the test system.
A range-dependent Delay (D) is automatically applied by an SMU before each measurement, to allow
for source settling. All SMUs in the test system are synchronized. Therefore, the Delay time applied
by the most delayed SMU is the delay time applied to all SMUs.
SMU will delay Measure Time (MT) before taking a measurement after forcing.
Understanding the Advanced area
In the Advanced area, there are two lists for you to configure for your requirement. They are Test End
Reset and Enable Trigger (see next Figure).
Figure 5–:Advanced box of Common Settings
Figure 315: Advanced box of common settings
For the Test End Reset configuration, there are two choices for you to configure. If you choose False,
that means your test result will not be cleared. If you choose True, after the test is finished, it will clear
the test result to the beginning status.
For the Enable Trigger configuration, it also has two choices. If you want to use trigger to configure
your test, you should choose True, otherwise choose False.
NOTE
For most SMUs, it is generally accepted to choose False for the Enable Trigger.
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Script editor tool
The Script Editor is a tool used to create and manage user libraries.
A user library is a collection of one or more user modules. User modules are Python programming
language subroutines (or functions) or TSP script. User libraries are created to control
instrumentation, analyze data, or perform any other system automation task programmatically. Once
a user library has been successfully built using Script Editor, its user modules can be executed using
the ACS software.
The Script Editor provides a simple graphical user interface (GUI) that helps even a novice
programmer to effectively enter code, compile a user module, and link (build) a user library. Script
Editor also provides user-library management features, including the Open file, Delete , Copy Module
and Library, Check, edit and browse, Save and export functions. Script Editor manages user libraries
in a structured manner. You can create your own user libraries to extend the capabilities without
requiring a software upgrade from Keithley Instruments.
To execute a Script Editor user module in ACS, you import or create a test module as TSP or PTM
and connect it to the user module. Once this user module is connected to the test module, the
following occurs each time ACS executes the PTM or STM:
•
•
•
ACS dynamically loads the user module and the appropriate user library.
ACS passes the user-module parameters—stored in the STM or PTM—to the user module.
Data generated by the user module is returned to the STM or PTM for interactive analysis.
The next Figure illustrates the relationships between user libraries, user modules, STM or PTM, ACS,
and Script Editor.
Figure 5–189: Relationships between ACS test module and Script Editor
Figure 316: Relationship between ACS test module and Script Editor
Script editor dialog box
The Script Editor graphical user interface (GUI) is shown in the next Figure. It provides all the
functions, controls, and user-entry areas needed to create/edit/view and build a user library and to
create/edit/view and compile a user module.
Figure 5–190: Script Editor
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Figure 317: Script Editor
Understanding the module identification area
The module identification area is located at the right of the toolbar and defines the presently open
user library and user module. The components of this area are used as follows:
Module Type — Displays the type of the presently open (active) user module. There are two type
module supported: TSP and PTM. For more information about understanding TSP and PTM, refer to
Configuring a Script Test Module (STM) and Configuring a Python Language Test Module (PTM) in
section 6 of this manual.
Library Name — Displays the name of the presently open (active) user library. To specify a user
library, use the Open file function. To delete a library, use the Delete function. To copy a library, use
the Add function. To add a new library, use the add a new library function.
Module Name — Displays the name of the presently open user module. This also allows you to
create a copy of the presently open user module in the same user library.
NOTE
When naming a user module, remember to conform to case-sensitive Python or TSP programming
language naming conventions. Do not duplicate names of existing user modules or user libraries.
Library Visible/Library Hidden — Displays whether or not the presently open user library is available
to ACS. To change the hidden/visible status, check or deselect the Hide option in the Module and
Library definition area.
GUI type — Click the GUI type for user module. In ACS, the PTM and STM can include a GUI. There
are three types of GUI available: standard; .xrc; customize. For more information about using a STM
with a GUI, refer to STM with the .xrc GUI File in this section
Version info— shows the software author and the version information.
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Understanding the module code entry area
The module code-entry area is located below the module and library definition area. The modulecode-entry area is the ACS dialog box location where you enter, edit, or view the user-module code.
Scroll bars located to the right and below the module-code entry area let you move through the code.
The parameters that the module depends on to operate are defined in the Parameters tab area. After
you add the parameters (by clicking the Add button) and entering their usage specifications, the Apply
button is clicked and automatically updates the module definition area within the indicated changes
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–191: Function definition area
Figure 318: Function definition area
NOTE
Do not enter the following Python code items in the module code-entry area. (Script Editor enters
these at special locations based on information in other places in the Script Editor dialog box):
Import and global data
The function prototype
To control internal or external instrumentation, use functions from the Linear Parametric Test Library
(LPTLib). Refer to LPT Library Reference for Series 2600A for more information.
Do not enter the following TSP code items in the module code-entry area. (Script Editor enters these
at special locations based on information in other places in the Script Editor dialog box):
The function call
The function prototype To control internal or external instrumentation, use functions from the Linear
Parametric Test Library (LPTLib). Refer to LPT Library Reference for Series 2600A for more
information.
Understanding the tab areas
Four tab areas are accessed by clicking one of the following tabs: Parameters, Imports(only for PTM),
Module Description, and Log Console. Selections within these tab areas are facilitated using pop-up
menus. The next sections describe the tab areas. (For TSP, there are three tabs: Parameters,
Module Description, and Log Console. These three tab are same as corresponding tab of PTM).
Parameters tab
The Parameters tab area is used to define and display the following for each parameter that is
included in the user module call:
•
•
•
•
Parameter Name.
Input or output (I/O) data direction.
Parameter Data Type.
Default, Min, and Max values, Unit, Comments for the parameter.
The Parameters tab area is located near the bottom of the Script Editor main screen (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–192: Parameters tab example entries
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Figure 319: Parameters tab example entries
To add, delete, or apply a parameter, do one of the following:
•
To add a parameter, click Add function and then enter the information as indicated in the field
descriptions that follow.
•
To delete a parameter, first click the parameter name or any of the adjacent fields; then click
Delete function.
•
To move a row of parameter up/down, click the row of the parameters by clicking the row number,
then this row will be highlighted. After that, click Up/ Down function.
•
•
To apply changes made in the Parameters tab area, click Apply function.
To insert a new external path to Python system path list, click Add sys path function
Figure 5–193: Select a row of parameters to move
Figure 320: Select a row of parameters to move
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Parameter Name field
The Parameter Name field identifies the parameters that are passed to the user module. That is,
these are the same parameters that would be specified in the user-module function prototype (which
Script Editor constructs from the Parameters tab entries when you click Apply, and then displays in
the module-parameter display area).
Data Type field
The Data Type field specifies the parameter data type. Clicking on the arrow at the right of the data
type field activates a pop-up menu, which lists the following data types:
For PTM:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
enum — enumerable type data
str — string data
float — Single precision, floating point data
double — Double precision data
int — integer data
list — list type
dict — dictionary type
For TSP:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
enum — enumerable type data
str — string data
float — Single precision, floating point data
double — Double precision data
int — integer data
list — list type
dict — dictionary type
table — table type
I/O field
The I/O field defines whether the parameter is an input or output type. Clicking on the arrow to the
right of the I/O field activates a sub-list box that shows the Input and Output selections.
NOTE
Output can be selected only for string data type (str).
Default, Min, and Max fields
The Default, Min, and Max fields are used to specify the following:
•
•
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Default field — Specifies the default value for input parameter.
Min field — Specifies the minimum recommended value for input parameter(except list, dict,
table, and str type). When the user module is used in ACS, configuration of the PTM/STM with a
parameter value smaller than the Min value causes ACS to display an out-of-range message.
(For a brief explanation of STM/PTM, refer to Configuring a script test module (STM) and
Configuring a Python language test module (PTM)).
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Max field — Specifies the maximum recommended value for input parameter(except list, dict,
table, and str type). When the user module is used in ACS, configuration of the PTM/STM with a
parameter value larger than the Max value causes ACS to display an out-of-range message.
NOTE
When the data type is enumerable (enum) data, the value of Min/valid tuple field column in parameter
tab is a valid tuple. You must set the min/valid tuple box first so that the default value can be selected
from the drop-down menu (see next Figure).
Figure 5–194: Select a default value for enumerable data
Figure 321: Select a default value for enumerable data
Import tab area
The Import tab area only displays for PTM. It lists the import files used within the Python user module.
This area can be used to add import statements to the presently open user module (see next Figure).
This tab can also be used to import the global statement.
Figure 5–195: Imports tab
Figure 322: Imports tab
In most case, Script Editor always need to enter form ACS_PostData import* into the Import tab area.
Module Description tab area
The Module Description tab area, shown in the next Figure, allows you to enter descriptive
information for the presently open user module. Information entered in this area documents the
module to the ACS user and is used to create ACS user library help (see next Figure).
Figure 5–196: Module Description tab
Figure 323: Module Description tab
NOTE
Do not use doc comment designators (---) in the Description tab area. When the user-module code is
compiled, Script Editor also evaluates the text in this area. Code comment designators in the
Description tab area can be misinterpreted, causing errors (see next Figure).
Figure 5–197: Description tab in ACS
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Figure 324: Description tab in ACS
Log Console tab area
The Log Console tab area displays any error syntax messages that are generated during a code
check operation.
When you click the check function on the toolbar, a message will display in the log console tab.
When error displayed in the Log Console tab area, Script Editor shows which line of code where the
error occurred or the next line, depending on how the compiler caught the error (see next Figure).
This facilitates error corrections. If no errors are found, the Build tab area displays one of the
following:
•
After a check — Checking completed, No error found!
Figure 5–198: Log Console tab
Figure 325: Log Console tab
Understanding the status bar
The Status bar, located at the bottom of the Script Editor dialog box, displays the module saving path
and a description of the Code Entry area at the cursor location. For example, if the cursor is in the
row 42 and column 4 in the Code Entry area, the status bar describes that area (see next Figure).
Figure 5–199: Status bar
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Figure 326: Status bar
Understanding the toolbar
NOTE
Most of the functions apply to the Script Editor GUI that is above the tab areas. Refer to
Understanding the tab areas for more information.
The Toolbar is shown in the next Figure.
Figure 5–200: Script Editor toolbar
Figure 327: Script Editor toolbar
The Toolbar functions:
Import Library — Opens an existing user library and displays the first module that is listed for that
library. Clicking Open Module displays the Choose a File dialog box (see next Figure) where you can
select an existing user module. Click OPEN to see the selected module in place of the currently open
module.
Figure 5–201: Select a .py file
Figure 328: Select a .py file
Delete — Deletes an existing user library or a user module from the indicated user library. Clicking
Delete function displays the Please Select the Lib/Module to delete dialog box (see next Figure). To
delete a selected library and all of its contents, click the Delete function. To delete a particular test
module from the selected library, click the Delete Module check box then click Delete function. Click
Cancel to cancel the delete operation.
NOTE
Be careful when using the delete option. Deleting a library will delete all of the files in it.
Figure 5–202: Select a module to delete
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Figure 329: Select a module to delete
Copy Library and Module — Creates a copy of any existing library and module. Clicking the Copy
Module and Library function displays the Copy Library dialog box (see next Figure). Click the user
library and module to copy. Enter the new library and module name in the New section. You must
enter a unique user-module name. Click OK. The Existing Library or Module will be copied to the
NEW category (see next Figure).
NOTE
If you enter an existing library name to the New section, the module will be copied from one exiting
library into another existing library. If you enter a new library name, the module will be copied into the
new library. The module name in the existing area can be empty (all the modules in the source library
will be copied to the destination library).
Figure 5–203: Copy library and module
Figure 330: Copy library and module
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Check — When selected, checks the source files for syntax errors (including the description tab) in
the module and, if successful, compiles them into object files.
Browse or Edit the entire file — When selected, the Code Entry area will turn to whole file states. You
can Browse or Edit the whole file in this case (see next Figure). When you import a TSP or Python
source code which is not generated by the Script Editor, it may launch this Browse entire file dialog
box directly if the file format does not match the Script Editor’s expectations.
Figure 5–204: Browse the entire file
Figure 331: Browse the entire file
Save Module — Saves the presently open user module source code. The saving path is
\\ACS\library\26Library\TSPLib for TSP and \\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib. The path is assigned in
Preferences settings dialog box (see next Figure). For more information about changing and applying
these settings, refer to the Advanced preference setting.
Figure 5–205: Set the TSP and PTM path
Figure 332: Set the TSP and PTM path
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Show the .xrc GUI of test module. Click this function to display the .xrc GUI builder tool. For more
information about how to use this GUI builder, refer to How to create a TSP GUI file.
Add a library or Module — Create a new library or user module. Clicking near library name, shows a
new library dialog box (see next Figure). Enter the New Library name and New Module Name in the
corresponding text boxes. The new name must not duplicate the name of any existing user module or
user library in the entire collection of user libraries. After entering the name, click OK. A new library or
a new module will be added to the path. You can also click the browse button to choose an
alternative path to save the new library (see next Figure Figure5–207).
Figure 5–206: Add library and module
Figure 333: Add library and module
Preview GUI — After a .bmp file has been chosen and the library modules defined well , click the GUI
Preview button. The dialog box opens (see next Figure) in order for you to check a STM or PTM GUI.
The errors in the GUI files can only be checked by clicking the Preview button.
Figure 5–207: GUI preview
Figure 334: GUI preview
Script editor tutorials
This section includes two tutorials. Each tutorial provides step-by-step instructions for accomplishing
common tasks with the script editor.
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Tutorial 1: Create and run a new TSP
The Script Editor is a tool that facilitates the development of user libraries. Each user library is
comprised of one or more user modules, and each user module is created using the TSP or Python
programming language.
Create a new TSP
1. Start the Script Editor by clicking the Script Editor item on the Tools Menu (see next Figure).
Figure 5–208: Click the Script Editor item from Tools menu
Figure 335: Script Editor in Tools menu
2. A blank Script Editor dialog box opens named Script Editor: Module NoName Library NoName
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–209: Blank Script Editor
Figure 336: Blank Script Editor
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3. Click the TSP type in Module Type area.
4. Create a new user library
•
Click the Add a Library function near the Library box. The Copy Library dialog box opens (see
next Figure).
Figure 5–210: Create a new library
Figure 337: Create a new library
•
In the New Library text box, enter the new user library name.The library name must has a postfix
as .py or .tsp. For this tutorial, enter Mylib1_Resistor.tsp as the new user library name.
•
For this tutorial, enter R_test1 as the new module name (see next Figure).
Figure 5–211: Enter new library and module name
Figure 338: Enter new library and module name
•
Click OK. The new library and module names will appear in the script editor dialog box (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–212: New Library name in Script Editor
Figure 339: New Library name in Script Editor
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Click GUI for TSP:
1. Choose the standard option from the GUI Type items. When using the .xrc GUI, you can indicate
the GUI file and the Event file for the library. For more information about the STM with .xrc GUI,
refer to STM with the .xrc GUI File.
2. Choose a test info graphic for the TSP.
3. Set the group number for the test.
4. Enter the Author and Version in edit box.
Enter the required parameters for the code as follows:
1. Click the Parameters tab (if the Parameters tab area is not already displayed).
2. Click the Add function at the right side of the Parameters tab area.
3. Under Name, enter the first parameter name (or accept the default). For the R_test1 user module,
replace the default name with RSMU1.
4. Under I/O, specify whether the first parameter is an input or output parameter.
NOTE
For an output parameter, only the string data type is acceptable.
•
Under Data Type, enter the data type for the first parameter. Here, we select the enum type for
the first parameter
•
Under Default, Minimum, Maximum, and Units, enter default, minimum, maximum and units
values for the parameter—to simplify and limit the choices to You.
•
If the data type is enum, you should set the Min/valid tuple value first: Right click the Min area, the
Sequence Editor dialog box will open. Click the Append function. Input the items in the Add a new
item dialog box. Click OK. The enum data is set. These values can be selected in default.
•
If the data type is a list, set the default value as follows: Right click the default value (the
Sequence Editor dialog box opens). Add the item as indicated. Click OK. The value will appear in
default box with this format [a,b,c] (see next two Figures).
Figure 5–213: Sequence Editor for setting the enumerable parameter
Figure 340: Sequence Editor for setting enumerable parameter
Figure 5–214: Add a new item for setting the enumerable parameter
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Figure 341: Add a new item for setting enumerable parameter
•
For dict type (dictionary type, mostly used in PTM): Right click the default value (the Sequence
Editor will appear). Click the Append function (the Dictionary Editor dialog box opens). Input the
name and value in the Dictionary Editor (see next Figure). The value will be formatted as
{a:1,b:2,c:3}.
•
For table type(mostly used in TSP): add the item in table {} like a list.
Figure 5–215: Add name and value for Dictionary Editor
Figure 342: Add name and value for Dictionary Editor
•
•
For the mytsp1 user module, enter SMU1, SMU2, and KI_GND for RSMU1 enum data.
•
Enter the comments for the parameter, if desired. Click the comment area and an edit box will
display. Enter the parameter description.
After the Min/Valid tuple value is set, the default value can be selected. In the next Figure, SMU1
for RSMU1 was chosen.
NOTE
Do not use doc comment designators (---) in the Description tab area. When the user-module code is
compiled, Script Editor also evaluates the text in this area. Code comment designators in the
Description tab area can be misinterpreted, causing errors.
Figure 5–216: Enter comments
Figure 343: Enter comments
•
Repeat the steps to add a new item for all additional input and output parameters for the user
module that you are creating. For the R_test1 module, add eight parameters (see next Figure).
Figure 5–217: Parameter tab
Figure 344: Parameter tab
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1. Click Apply function. In the module-parameter display area, the function prototype now includes
the declared parameters.
2. Module R_test1 (RSMU1, RSMU2, forcevalue, myLIMIT, myNPLC, testdelay, error, Rvalue)(see
next Figure).
Figure 5–218: Script Editor after entering and applying parameters
Figure 345: Script Editor after entering and applying parameters
3. Enter the module description:
•
Click the Description tab at the bottom of the dialog box. The Description tab area opens (see
next Figure).
•
Enter any text needed to adequately document the user module to the Script Editor user—who
does not see next Figure the comments that you include with the code.
Figure 5–219: Description tab
Figure 346: Description tab
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NOTE
Do not use doc comment designators (---) in the Description tab area. When the user-module code is
compiled, Script Editor also evaluates the text in this area. Code comment designators in the
Description tab area can be misinterpreted, causing errors.
1. Enter the TSP user module code for the R_test1 shown below. Refer to the LPT Library Function
Reference, for a complete list of supported I/O and SMU commands.
Enter the new TSP code into the module-code entry area.
For the R_test1 user module, enter the simple code listed below:
local v_value = {}
local i_value = {}
local error ={}
setmode(RSMU1, KI_INTGPLC, myNPLC)
limiti(RSMU1, myLIMIT)
forcev(RSMU1, forcevalue)
if RSMU2 ~= KI_GND then
forcev(RSMU2, 0)
end --if
delay(testdelay)
intgv(RSMU1, v_value)
intgi(RSMU1, i_value)
Rvalue[1] = v_value[1]/i_value[1]
posttable("Rvalue", Rvalue)
table.insert(error, 0)
posttable("error",error)
devint()
end
Compile the user module
For TSP, the Script Editor will simply check the user module description part as follows:
1. Click the Check table at the toolbar. After you compile a user module, the Log Console tab area
displays either a confirmation that the module compiled successfully or displays one or more
compile-error messages. For TSP, the Script Editor simply checks the user module description
part for the usage of the ”---”.
2. In the Toolbar, click Check. The following occurs:
3. The user-module source-code file is compiled.
4. The Log console message tab indicates the compilation progress and, if problems are
encountered, displays error messages. For example, when you check the R_test1 user module,
you see next Figure the Log console message tab (see next Figure).
Figure 5–220: Log Console message tab
Figure 347: Log Console message tab
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5. Check until no errors exist.
Save the user module:
1. Click the Save function, all information of source code will save into the path
C:\ACS\library\26Library\TSPLib
2. For the example in the next Figure, after clicking the save function, the following files will be
saved.
Figure 5–221: Log Console path saved
Figure 348: Log Console path saved
3. Source code file(.tsp). The default saving path: C:\CS\library\26Library\TSPLib.
4. .Bmp file and .xrc file. The default saving path: C:\CS\library\26Library\TSPLib\xrc.
5. Events file. The default saving path: C:\CS\library\26Library\TSPLib\event.
The new standard TSP script will be created and saved in the path. If you continue to export this
module from the Script Editor, you can open and run this module in ACS.
Run the TSP:
1. Add a new STM to test tree.
2. Click the Run function at bottom, then choose a Python test module.
3. Choose a module from the TSPLib and it will open (see next Figure). Accept the default
parameters. You can experiment later after you have established that the user module executes
correctly.
Figure 5–222: UserLib module opening
Figure 349: UserLib module opening
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4. Save the STM and the project by clicking the Save All icon at the top of the ACS screen or by
clicking Save All in the File menu.
5. Execute the STM by clicking the green triangular Run Test/Plan icon at the top of the screen or
by clicking Run in the Run menu.
6. If the user module that you created generates data, check the execution results in the STM Data
worksheet. To view the Data worksheet, click the Data tab at the top of the Definition document.
Tutorial 2: Create and run a new PTM
This section provides a tutorial that is designed to help you to create a new PTM. For more
information about PTMs, refer to Configuring a Python language test module (PTM) topic.
Create a new PTM:
1. Start the Script Editor by clicking the Script Editor item on the Tools Menu (see next Figure).
Figure 5–223: Script Editor in Tools menu
Figure 350: Script Editor in Tools menu
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2. A blank Script Editor dialog box opens named Script Editor: Module NoName Library NoName
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–224: Blank script editor
Figure 351: Blank Script Editor
•
In the Create a new Library dialog box, enter the new user library name. For this tutorial, enter
mylib2_Diode.py as the new user library name.
•
•
For this tutorial, enter Diode_test1 as the new module name (see next Figure).
Click OK. The new library and module names will appear in the script editor dialog box.
Figure 5–225: Name a new PTM
Figure 352: Name a new PTM
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1. Click the PTM type in Module Type area.
2. Choose the GUI Type for the PTM.
•
•
•
•
Select a standard option in the GUI Type area.
Choose a bitmap from the browse path.
Set the group number for the test.
Enter the Author and Version in edit box.
1. Click on the Parameter tab and enter the parameter information shown below (see next Figure).
Figure 5–226: Enter parameter for PTM
Figure 353: Enter parameter for PTM
2. Click on the Imports tab.
3. A PTM can import other libraries to use in the current library.
4. Click on the Imports tab at the bottom of the dialog box. The Imports tab area appears (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–227: Imports tab
Figure 354: Imports tab
•
•
•
•
Enter any additional imports files that are needed by the user module.
Enter the Module Description:
Click the Description tab at the bottom of the dialog box. The Description tab area opens.
Enter any text needed to adequately document the user module to the Script Editor user—who
does not see next Figure the comments that you include with the code.
Figure 5–228: Module Description tab
Figure 355: Module Description tab
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NOTE
Do not use doc comment designators (---) in the Description tab area. When the user-module code is
compiled, Script Editor also evaluates the text in this area. Code comment designators in the
Description tab area can be misinterpreted, causing errors.
1. Click the Apply function.
2. Enter the Python code fpr Diode_test1 as listed below. Refer to the Python LPT Library in section
11, for a complete list of supported I/O and SMU commands.
For the DynimicZ user module, enter the simple code listed below.
#Map the SMUs with DUT terminals
PSMUId = lpt.getinstid(PSMU)
if not PSMUId:
error = -10000
post.ACSPostDataInt("error",error)
return error, DynamicZ
NSMUId = lpt.getinstid(NSMU)
if not NSMUId:
error = -10000
post.ACSPostDataInt("error",error)
return error, DynamicZ
#Set range and compliance
lpt.limitv(PSMUId, ComplianceV)
if NSMUId != 4096:
lpt.limitv(NSMUId, ComplianceV)
if RangeV == 1:
lpt.setauto(PSMUId)
elif RangeV == 2:
lpt.lorangev(PSMUId, 0.2)
elif RangeV == 3:
lpt.lorangev(PSMUId, 2)
elif RangeV == 4:
lpt.lorangev(PSMUId, 20)
elif RangeV == 5:
lpt.lorangev(PSMUId, 200)
else:
lorangev(PSMUId, 2)
#Set instrument config
lpt.setmode(PSMUId, lpt.KI_INTGPLC,nPLC)
htime = int(Holdtime * 1000)
#Set stress
if NSMUId != 4096:
lpt.forcev(NSMUId, 0)
lpt.forcei(PSMUId, I1)
lpt.delay(htime)
V1 = lpt.intgv(PSMUId)
lpt.forcei(PSMUId, I2)
lpt.delay(htime)
V2 = lpt.intgv(PSMUId)
#check compliance
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cstatus = lpt.getstatus(PSMUId, KI_COMPLNC)
if cstatus == 2:
error = KI_RANGE_COMPLIANCE
post.ACSPostDataInt("error",error)
return error, DynamicZ
if cstatus == 4:
error = KI_COMPLIANCE
post.ACSPostDataInt("error",error)
return error, DynamicZ
#test complete
lpt.devclr()
Idelta = I1 - I2
if
Idelta == 0:
Idelta = 1e-37
DynamicZ = (V1 -V2) / Idelta
post.ACSPostDataDouble("DynamicZ", DynamicZ)
post.ACSPostDataDouble("I1", I1)
post.ACSPostDataDouble("I2", I2)
post.ACSPostDataDouble("V1", V1)
post.ACSPostDataDouble("V2", V2)
post.ACSPostDataInt("error",error)
return error, DynamicZ
Compile the user module:
1. Click the Check table at the toolbar. After you compile a user module, the Log Console tab area
displays either a confirmation that the module compiled successfully or displays one or more
compile-error messages. For TSP, the Script Editor simply checks the user module description
part for the usage of the ”---”.
2. In the Toolbar, click Check. The following occurs:
3. The user-module source-code file is compiled.
4. The Log console message tab indicates the compilation progress and, if problems are
encountered, displays error messages. For example, when you check the R_test1 user module,
you see next Figure the Log console message tab.
5. Check until no errors exist.
Save the user module:
1. Click the save function, all information will save into the corresponding path (see next Figure).
Figure 5–229: Save information in Log Console
Figure 356: Save information in Log Console
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After clicking the save function the following files will be saved:
•
•
•
The source code file(.py file). The default saving path: C:\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib
The bmp file. The default saving path: C:\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\xrc
The event file. The default daving path: C:\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\event
The new standard PTM will be created and saved . After you export it, you can open and run this
module in ACS.
The new standard PTM script will be created and saved in the path. You can open and run this
module in ACS (see next Figure).
Figure 5–230: Import and open a PTM from PTMLib
Figure 357: Import and open a PTM from PTMLib
Open and run the PTM:
1. Add a new PTM to the test tree in the Test Setup area of ACS.
2. Click the import function at bottom. Then choose a PTM from the PTMLib dialog box that opens.
3. Click a PTM in PTMLib, then the PTM dialog box opens.
4. Save the PTM.
5. Execute the PTM by clicking the green triangular Run Test/Plan icon at the top of the screen or
by clicking Run in the Run menu.
6. If the user module that you created generates data, check the execution results in the PTM Data
worksheet. To view the Data worksheet, click the Data tab at the top of the Definition document.
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Executing a project plan
You can modify the test Patterns, Subsites, Devices, and Test modules by using the Copy, Paste,
Cut, and Rename general editing commands. After the test plan has been built, you can execute an
entire Project Plan or individual parts of a Project Plan. This section describes the following topics:
•
•
•
•
•
Enabling tests (Test Setup panel or Project Navigator)
Run execution of Project Pattern
Run execution of individual Subsite Plans
Run execution of individual Device Plans
Run execution of individual tests
Executing a project pattern
Executing an entire Project Pattern executes all of its components (initialization pattern, Subsite
Plans, Device Plans, ITMs, STMs, and CTMs) in the order they appear in the Test Setup panel.
Before executing a plan, manually check whether the physical connections match the test plan
connections correctly. If they do not match multiple times, manually check them until the specified
SMU is matched correctly.
Each component of the Project Plan has a corresponding checkbox. Selecting the component’s
checkbox enables the test plan, while deselecting the component’s checkbox disables it.
To execute an open Project Plan:
1. Click on Pattern at the top of the Test Setup panel (see next Figure).
Figure 5–231: Select the pattern node
Figure 358: Select the Pattern node
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2. Place the probe at one site.
3. Enable the test by checking its corresponding checkbox; or disable the test by deselecting (see
next Figure).
NOTE
When running a project pattern, the prober controlling command is activated. Make sure the prober is
correctly connected, or set to fake, to avoid errors.
Figure 5–232: Select a Pattern (indicated with checkmark in box)
Figure 359: Select a Pattern (indicated with checkmark in box)
4. If the Project Plan has not been saved, save the Project Plan by clicking the Save function in the
ACS toolbar, or by clicking Save/Save All commands from the ACS File menu (see next Figure).
Figure 5–233: Save the Project Plan
Figure 360: Save the Project Plan
5. Start execution by clicking the triangular Run Test/Plan function in the toolbar (see next Figure).
Figure 5–234: Run Project Plan Test
Figure 361: Run Project Plan Test
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6. The Run Test/Plan toolbar function becomes gray, the Project Pattern executes, and the square
Abort Test/Plan toolbar function is enabled for the duration of the execution, as shown above.
You can click the Abort Test/Plan function at any time during execution to stop the execution.
During execution, the Definition tab of the ITM work area, and the Script tab of the CTM and STM
work areas change color, and during execution, the wafer map tab of pattern change color and the
test tree unfold (see next Figure). These work areas can not be edited at running time.
Figure 5–235: A running Pattern
Figure 362: A running pattern
NOTE
Each time you execute a test or test sequence using the Run function, the data from each test is
inserted into its own Data worksheet. Each new run updates the worksheet.
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Executing individual subsite plans
Running a Subsite Plan executes only the components assigned to it (all of its Device Plans, ITMs,
STMs and CTMs) in the order that they appear in the Test Setup panel.
Follow these steps to execute a Subsite Plan in an open Project Plan:
1. If the test system is connected to a probe, place the probe at the site that contains the Subsite to
be evaluated.
2. In the Test Setup panel, click the name of the Subsite Plan to be executed (see next Figure).
Figure 5–236: Select subsite plan to execute
Figure 363: Select subsite plan to execute
3. Enable a test by clicking its corresponding checkmark; or remove the corresponding checkmark
to disable a test.
4. If the Project Plan has not been saved, save the Project Plan by clicking the Save/Save All
function in the ACS toolbar, or by clicking Save/Save All commands from the ACS File menu (see
next Figure).
Figure 5–237: Save the Project Plan
Figure 364: Save the Project Plan
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5. Start execution by clicking the triangular Run Test/Plan function in the toolbar (see next Figure).
The Run Test/Plan toolbar function becomes gray, the Subsite executes, and the square Abort
Test/Plan icon illuminates for the duration of the test.
Figure 5–238: Run Project Plan Test
Figure 365: Run Project Plan Test
Run a sub site loop
1. Input a positive integer in the Loop Num. For example, input 3 in the Loop num, which will run the
subsite three times (see next Figure).
Figure 5–239: Set subsite loop number
Figure 366: Set subsite loop number
2. Click the run function to run this subsite, this subsite will run three times, and generate three
groups data in the Data tab, they are named like this: xxx, xxx_append1, xxx_append2 (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–240: Run subsite loop
Figure 367: Run subsite loop
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Executing individual device plans
Run Executing an individual Device Plan only the components assigned to the specified device plan
(all of its ITMs and STMs) in the order in which they appear in the Test Setup panel will be executed.
Follow these steps to execute an individual Device Plan from an open Project Plan:
1. If the test system is connected to a probe, place the probe at the site that contains the device to
be evaluated.
2. In the Test Setup panel, click the name of the Device Plan to be executed (see next Figure).
Figure 5–241: Select the device to execute
Figure 368: Select the device to execute
3. Enable a test by clicking its corresponding checkmark; or disable a test by removing the
corresponding checkmark.
4. If the Project Plan has not been saved, save the Project Plan by clicking the Save/Save All
function in the ACS toolbar, or by clicking the Save/Save All commands from the ACS File menu
(see next Figure).
Figure 5–242: Save the Project Plan
Figure 369: Save the Project Plan
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5. Start execution by clicking the triangular Run Test/Plan function in the toolbar (see next Figure).
The Run Test/Plan toolbar function becomes gray, the Device executes, and the square Abort
Test/Plan icon illuminates for the duration of the test.
Figure 5–243: Run Project Plan Test
Figure 370: Run Project Plan Test
Executing individual tests
Executing an individual ITM or STM plan runs only that specific test.
Perform the following steps to execute an ITM or STM from an open Project Plan:
1. If the test system is connected to a probe, place the probe at the site that contains the ITM, STM,
or CTM to be evaluated.
2. In the Test Setup panel, double-click the name of the ITM, CTM, or STM to be executed (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–244: Select the STM to be executed
Figure 371: Select the STM to be executed
3. If the Project Plan has not been saved, save the Project Plan by clicking the Save/Save All
function in the ACS toolbar, or by clicking Save/Save All commands from the ACS File menu (see
next Figure).
Figure 5–245: Save the Project Plan
Figure 372: Save the Project Plan
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4. Start execution by clicking the triangular Run Test/Plan function in the toolbar, as shown below.
The Run Test/Plan toolbar function becomes gray, the ITM or STM executes, and the square
Abort Test/Plan icon illuminates for the duration of the test (see next Figure).
Figure 5–246: Run Project Plan test
Figure 373: Run Project Plan Test
Append and clear append
Append run is functionally the same as as Run, but all previous data is kept (including previous
append data)(see next Figure).
Figure 5–247 START, REPEAT, APPEND, PAUSE, STOP and CLEAR APPEND
Figure 374: START, REPEAT, APPEND, PAUSE, STOP, and CLEAR APPEND
•
•
•
•
•
Only enabled in manual operation mode.
•
•
•
The plot function will plot all the append data automatically.
•
The naming convention is testname-append1.csv, testname-append2.csv.
Disabled in automation mode.
Append is operational at the: test; device; subsite; and pattern level.
Same effect as the RUN function, but all previous data is kept (including previous append data).
When a project is opened, ACS will look at if there are any append data files available for each
test and load the data into data sheet accordingly.
The append data is appended in the data sheet (in a new section) below the previous data.
When you choose to output a .csv file, each append data iteration will be output to a different .csv
file.
The CLEAR APPEND function will display a dialog box to click which append data to be cleared.
When selected, the data file will be deleted and data sheet updated.
Append
Each Append execution generates an additional Append worksheet (Append 1, Append 2, etc.) for
each additional test that you run. For each Append execution thereafter, the new Append data
displays a line in a different color. Each Append worksheet is displayed as one of the following tabs at
the bottom of the sheet tab: Append 1, Append 2, Append 3 (see next Figure).
NOTE
The maximum number of times that you can append a test is 30. If you try to append more than 30
times, a warning dialog box opens.
Figure 5–248: Appended data worksheet
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Figure 375: Appended data worksheet
Data plot
This section describes the variations available with plotting data.
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Open a graph sheet
The Graph sheet is integrated in the same page with the Data sheet. There are two ways to open a
Graph sheet:
1. When setting up an ITM, STM, PTM, or CTM, you can switch to the Graph sheet of the current
test by clicking the Data tab. Results of the current test are displayed, and graphs can be drawn
according to the results. The next Figure shows a graph sheet of a test with a data sheet at the
bottom.
Figure 5–249: An unconfigured graph sheet
Figure 376: An unconfigured graph sheet
2. Click the Tool function on the toolbar. Choose the Offline Data Plotting item and then click a blank
Data Plotting sheet similar to the one shown above. (NOTE: The data plotting sheet will have the
same style except for the additional two functions that are over the top left corner.) Data and
graphs on this sheet are not limited to the current test or the current project. Click the Import
function to import data. Click the Exit function to exit the page.
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Controlling graph properties
Items in the Graph Settings menu and the Graph toolbar control the properties of the graph.
Toolbar Buttons
The toolbar is placed between the graph section and the data section.
The properties graph toolbar contains seven functions; their functions are described below:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Zoom (in): Enlarges a small, selected part of the graph.
Home: Used to go back to the original size before zooming.
Pan: Permits dragging along the graph.
Save: Saves the graph sheet as a separate file; .png, .ps, .eps, and .svg are supported formats.
Detailed instructions on these formats are discussed later in this section.
5. Plot: Draws a graph out of the data selected.
6. Plot Auto Scale: Auto scales all the graphs on the graph sheet.
7. Formulator: Performs simple or complex data calculations on test data as well as on the results of
other Formulator calculations. Detailed instruction about using the Formulator will be discussed
later in this section.
Save a data plot graph
When the Save function is selected, a save dialog displays. You can save the plot in a .png, .ps, .eps
or .svg format, or save the test data in a .csv format (see next Figure).
Figure 5–250: Save data and graphs
Figure 377: Save data and graphs
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Formulator data plot
Understanding the Formulator
The Formulator, accessible from the Data tab, allows you to perform simple and complex data
calculations on test data as well as on the results of other Formulator calculations. The Formulator
provides a variety of computational functions, common mathematical operators, and common
constants.
A formula created by the Formulator is an equation composed from a series of functions, operators,
constants, and arguments. The next two sections summarize how the Formulator applies these
elements.
Formulator arguments and constants
A formula created using the Formulator performs calculations on any combination of the following:
•
•
•
ITM, STM, CTM or PTM test data.
Secondary data created by other Formulator formulas.
Standard constants in the list of constants.
Some of the functions operate on Data tab columns of values (vectors) only. Others operate on single
values (scalar) only. Still others operate on both single values (scalar) and columns of values
(vectors).
Likewise, the results of some calculations may be a column of values (vector) in the Data tab or a
column containing only a single value.
Realtime functions, operators, and formulas
The Formulator provides a variety of functions and operators. Some of these may be used for
realtime, in-test calculations for ITM data. Others may be used only for post-test data computations.
A formula containing exclusively realtime operators and functions is a realtime formula. If a realtime
formula is specified as part of an ITM definition, it executes for each data point generated by the ITM,
just after it is generated. The results of a realtime formula may be viewed in the Data sheet or plotted
during the test in the same way as test data.
NOTE
Realtime calculations do not apply to CTM data. A CTM Data worksheet does not update until the test
is finished.
The following operators and functions are realtime operators and functions:
•
•
Operators: +, -, *, /, ^ (exponent).
Functions: ABS, DELTA, DIFF, EXP, LN, LOG10, SQRT
The formula below is a realtime formula:
•
RESULT1 = ABS(DELTA(I_ drain))
Realtime formulas execute as follows:
•
If a realtime formula is created before the ITM has been run, the formula executes automatically
during each run.
•
If a realtime formula is created after an ITM has been run, the formula executes initially upon
adding it to the ITM and automatically during each subsequent run.
Post-test-only functions and formulas
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A formula containing any one (or more) of the remaining Formulator functions is a post- test only
formula. It executes only at the end of each run of the ITM, STM, or CTM in which the formula is
defined.
The results of a post-test only formula may be viewed in the Data worksheet or plotted only at the end
of a test.
The following functions are post-test only functions:
AT, AVG, EXPFIT, EXPFITA, EXPFITB,LINFIT, LINFITSLP, LINFITXINT, LINFITYINT, MAX,
MAXPOS, MIN, MINPOS, REGFIT, REGFITSLP, REGFITXIN, REGFITYINT, TANFIT, TANFITSLP,
TANFITXINT, TANFITYINT, VTLINGM, VTSATGM
The formula below is a post-test only formula, because MAVG is a post-test only function:
RESULT2 = MAX(ABS(DELTA(I_ drain)))
Post-test only formulas execute as follows:
•
If a post-test only formula is created before the ITM, STM or CTM has been run, the formula
executes automatically at the conclusion of each run.
•
If a post-test only formula is created after an ITM, STM, or CTM has been run, the formula
executes initially upon adding it to the STM, CTM, or ITM and automatically at the conclusion of
each subsequent run.
Start the Formulator as follows:
1. Open the Data tab for the test data that you want to analyze.
2. In the Data tab, click on the Formulator function. The Formulator dialog box opens (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–251: Formulator Settings dialog box
Figure 378: Formulator Settings dialog box
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Becoming familiar with the Formulator dialog box
This section summarizes the significance/use of each Formulator dialog box feature:
•
•
Formula area
The Formula boxes
The two boxes in the Formula area of the dialog box are used as follows:
•
•
The upper Formula box is used to create new formulas or edit existing formulas.
The lower Formula box displays the formulas that have been created for the ITM, STM, CTM or
PTM.
The Add formulas function
Clicking the Add function produces the following results:
•
•
Starts calculation execution for the formula in the upper Formula box.
Moves a formula from the upper Formula box into the collection of formulas displayed in the lower
Formula box.
The Delete formulas function
Clicking the Delete function deletes the formula selected in the lower box.
The Copy to All formulas function
Clicking the Copy to All function copies the formula settings of subdevice to other subdevices
Functions area
The functions area displays a matrix of functions, as well as a generic F= function that can be used in
place of a variable name to complete the equation. When you click a function function, the function is
added to the equation and displayed in the Formula box’s upper dialog box at the cursor position.
Variables area
The Variables area lists the names of all columns in the Data sheet.
NOTE
Columns created by some functions may contain only a single value.
Device Attributes area
The Device Attributes area describes the Attribute,Value and Unit of the device.Besides ,L,T,W below
the Attribute line means the Length,Temperature and Width of the device.This area comes from the
Attribute contains of the Device Setting tab.
Constants/Values area
The Constants/Values area provides constants that may be conveniently inserted by name.
When you click the constant in the constants list, the constant is added to the equation in the upper
dialog box, at the cursor position.
Add new constants function
To add a new constant, click the New function. A dialog input box opens that allows you to input the
name and value of your new constant. After you input the name and value, Click OK; the new
constant will be added to the constants list (see next Figure).
Figure 5–252: New constant
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Figure 379: New constant
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Delete constants function
To delete a constant, click the Del function.
NOTE
When you copy an existing project to a new system, if it is in the Formulator, you should also copy the
KATS_const.ini file.
1. If the ACS installed in a computer whose environment variables contain “KIDAT”, then the
KATS_Const.ini file is located in the path specified in the value of “KIDAT”; it means, suppose
KIDAT=C:\S4200\sys\dat, then the variable defined file is: C:\S4200\sys\dat\ KATS_Const.ini;
2. If “KIDAT” is not defined in environment variables, the KATS_Const.ini file is located in the path
where ACS is installed, it means, suppose ACS is installed in “\\ACS\KATS”, then the variable defined
files: \\ACS\KATS \ KATS_Const.ini;
If not, the formulator in module will disappear in the tsp file, and not effective if run directly after load.
Understanding the Formulator functions
The Formulator functions, as well as operators and constants, can be used singly or in various
combinations to create simple or complex analysis equations.
Multiple functions can be nested. For example, in one equation you can calculate the following:
•
Calculate a series of moving averages for a column of data (vector) in the Data worksheet, using
the MAVG function.
•
•
Find the maximum value of the MAVG averages, using the MAX function.
Multiply the MAX found value by a constant.
The equation below illustrates this use of nested Formulator functions.
MAXDIFF = 10*MAX(MAVG(ColumnA))
The degree (number of levels) of nesting is unlimited. There are 69 formulator functions, including:
ABS, AT, AVG, CURRENT_NOISE, DELTA, DIFF, DIMENSION, EXP, EXPFIT, EXPFITA, EXPFITB,
FINDD, FINDLIN, FINDU, FIRSTPOS, GET_FREQ, GET_TBD, GET_TBD2, GET_VBD, GMMAX,
JOIN, LASTPOS, LINFIT, LINFITSLP, LINFITXINT, LINFITYINT, LN, LOG, LOG10, LOGFIT, MAX,
MAXPOS, MEDIAN, MIN, MINPOS,MOBILITY,NOISE_UTM, POW,POWERFFT, REGFIT,
REGFITSLP, REGFITXINT, REGFITYINT, REGFIT_LGX_LGY, REGFIT_LGX_Y, REGFIT_X_LGY,
RES, RES_4WIRE, RES_4WIRE_AVG(VPOS,VNEG,I), RES_AVG, SMOOTH, SQRT, SS, SSVTCI,
SUBARRAY1, SUBARRAY2, TANFIT, TANFITSLP, TANFITXINT, TANFITYINT, TAR_YatX,
TTF_DID_LGT, TTF_LGDID_T, TTF_DID_T, TTF_LGDID_LGT, VTCI, VTLINGM, VTSATGM,
VT_SAT_TRI
The purpose, format, and arguments for the above functions and all other functions available in the
formulator are described below. An example is given in each case.
Formulator function reference
ABS - Formulator function
Purpose: Calculates the absolute value of each value in the designated column (vector) or the
absolute value of any operand.
Format: ABS(X)
X = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns or any operand.
Example: F2 = ABS(I_GATE)
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Remarks: This function can be used to perform calculations in realtime, while a test is executing.
AT - Formulator function
Purpose: Extracts and returns a single value from a column (vector).1
Format: AT(V, POS)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
POS = The row number of column V where the single value is located.
Example: IDSAT = AT(I_DRAIN, 36)
AVG - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the average of all values in the column (vector).
Format: AVG(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: LEAKAGE = AVG(I_GATE)
CURRENT_NOISE - Formulator function
Purpose: This formula is used to calculate noise current from Ig.
Format: CURRENT_NOISE(IMEAS,POINT_NUM)
IMEAS = measured current
POINT_NUM = The noise points number for calculate.
Example: Ig_noise=CURRENT_NOISE(Ig,50)
DELTA - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the differences between the adjacent values in a column (vector). That is, for
column V, DELTA returns (V2 - V1), (V3 -V2), etc.
Format: DELTA(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: GM = DELTA(I_DRAIN)/DELTA(V_GATE)
Remarks: This function can be used to perform calculations in realtime, while a test is executing.
DIFF - Formulator function
Purpose: For all of the values in two selected columns (vectors), DIFF returns a third column (vector)
containing the difference coefficients. That is, for columns V1 and V2, DIFF returns the following:
(V12 - V11)/(V22 - V21), (V13 - V12)/(V23 - V22), etc.
Format: DIFF(V1, V2)
V1 = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
V2 = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: GM = DIFF(I_DRAIN, V_GATE)
Remarks: This function can be used to perform calculations in realtime, while a test is executing.
DIMENSION - Formulator function
Purpose: Extract a subarray based on full array.
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Format: DIMENSION(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: V2 = DIMENSION(V1)
Remarks: Return a subarray
EXP - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the exponential, e_value, for each value in a column (vector) or for any operand.
Format: EXP(X)
X = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns or any operand.
Example: NEWCURRENT = CURRENT*EXP(ANODEV)
Remarks: This function can be used to perform calculations in realtime, while a test is executing.
EXPFIT - Formulator function
Purpose: Performs an exponential fit.
Fits the following exponential relationship to a specified range of values in two columns (vectors)—
one column, VX, containing X values and the other column, VY, containing Y values: Y = EXPFITA *
e(EXPFITB * X) where: EXPFITA and EXPFITB are fit constants.
Using the above exponential relationship, returns a new column (vector) containing Y values
calculated from all X values in column VX.
Format: EXPFIT(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be exponentially fitted, the row number (index) of
the starting values.
ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be exponentially fitted, the row number (index) of the
ending values.
Example: DIODEI = EXPFIT(ANODEV, ANODEI, 2, LASTPOS(ANODEV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
EXPFITA - Formulator function
Purpose: Performs an exponential fit.
Fits the following exponential relationship to a specified range of values in two columns (vectors)—
one column, VX, containing X values and the other column, VY, containing Y values:
Y = EXPFITA * e(EXPFITB * X)
where EXPFITA and EXPFITB are fit constants. Returns the value of the constant EXPFITA in the
relationship above.
Format: EXPFITA(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be exponentially fitted, the row number (index) of
the starting values.
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ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be exponentially fitted, the row number (index) of the
ending values.
Example: DIODEOFFSET = EXPFITA(ANODEV, ANODEI, 2, LASTPOS(ANODEV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
EXPFITB - Formulator function
Purpose: Performs an exponential fit.
Fits the following exponential relationship to a specified range of values in two columns (vectors)—
one column, VX, containing X values and the other column, VY, containing Y values: Y = EXPFITA *
e(EXPFITB * X) where EXPFITA and EXPFITB are fit constants.
Returns the value of the constant EXPFITB in the relationship above.
Format: EXPFITB(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
X = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be exponentially fitted, the row number (index) of
the starting values.
ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be exponentially fitted, the row number (index) of the
ending values.
Example: DIODEIDEALITY = 1/(EXPFITB(ANODEV, ANODEI, 2, LASTPOS(ANODEV))*0.0257)
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
FINDD - Formulator function
Purpose: Given a column (vector) V, beginning at START, FINDD searches down the column until it
finds a value that matches the specified value X. Then it returns the row number (index) of that value.
If FINDD does not find an exact match for X, it returns the row number (index) of the V value that is
closest to X.
Format: FINDD(V, X, START)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
X = Any value (which may be the result of another calculation[s]).
START = The row number (index) of the starting value for the search.
Example: IF = AT(ANODEI, FINDD(ANODEV, 0.7, FIRSTPOS(ANODEV)))
Remarks: Refer also to the similar functions FINDLIN (Find using linear interpolation) and FINDU
(Find up).
FINDLIN - Formulator function
Purpose: Find using linear interpolation - given a column (vector) V, beginning at START, FINDLIN
searches down the column until it finds a value that is closest (but does not exceed) the specified
value X. Linear interpolation is then used to determine its decimal location between the found value
and the next value in the column (vector). The returned index number (in decimal format) indicates
the position of the specified value.
For example, assume you want to use FINDLIN to locate value 6 in the following array:
(Index 1)V
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(Index 2)1
(Index 3)4
(Index 4)8
The search finds the index marker that is closest to (but does not exceed) 6. In this case, Index 3 is
the closest. Linear interpolation is then used to determine the decimal position of the specified value
(6) which is between Index 3 (value 4) and Index 4 (value 8). Value 6 is halfway between Index 3 and
Index 4. Therefore, FINDLIN will return Index 3.5.
Format: FINDD(V, X, START)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
X = Any value (which may be the result of another calculation[s]).
START = The row number (index) of the starting value for the search.
Example: IF = AT(ANODEI, FINDLIN(ANODEV, 0.7, FIRSTPOS(ANODEV)))
Remarks: Refer also to the similar functions FINDD (Find down) and FINDU (Find up).
FINDU - Formulator function
Purpose: Given a column (vector) V, beginning at START, FINDU searches up the column until it
finds a value that matches the specified value X. It then returns the row number (index) of that value.
If FINDU does not find an exact match for X, it returns the row number (index) of the V value that is
closest to X.
Format: FINDU(V, X, STARTPOS)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
X = Any value (which may be the result of another calculation[s]).
STARTPOS = The row number (index) of the starting value for the search.
Example: IF = AT(ANODEI, FINDU(ANODEV, 0.7, LASTPOS(ANODEV)))
Remarks: Refer also to the similar functions FINDLIN (Find using linear interpolation) and FINDD
(Find down).
FIRSTPOS - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the row number (index) of the first value in a column (vector), typically the number
2.
Format: FIRSTPOS(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: STARTOFARRAY = FIRSTPOS(I_DRAIN)
Remarks: Refer also to the function LASTPOS.
GET_FREQ - Formulator function
Purpose: Get the FFT frequency for a input time list.
Format: GET_FREQ(time_source)
Time_source = The name of time column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: Fre1=GET_FREQ(time1)
Remarks: this formulator function just used in 1/f noise test project.
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GET_TBD - Formulator function
Purpose: This formula is used to get breakdown(BD) time of TDDB test.
Format: GET_TBD(IS, TIME, CUR_J, SLOPE_J, NOISE_J, FIX_CUR_J, SLOPE_P_NUM,
NOISE_P_NUM, AND_OR,METHODS)
It includes following parameters.
2 variables: IS and TIME.
4 methods for BD judgment: CUR_J, SLOPE_J,NOISE_J, IX_CUR_J.
2 parameters for calculation: SLOPE_P_NUM, NOISE_P_NUM.
1 logic relationship: AND_OR.
And choose what kinds of methods: METHODS.
IS = gate current.
TIME = test time.
CUR_J= judgment current times for breakdown, as |Ig[n]/Ig[0]| >= CUR_J.
SLOPE_J= judgment slope times for breakdown, as |slope[n]/slope[n-1]| >= SLOPE_J.
NOISE_J= judgment noise times for breakdown, as |Inoi[n]/Inoi[n-1]| >= NOISE_J.
FIX_CUR_J=fixed cursor for judgment, as |Ig[n]| >= FIX_CUR_J.
SLOPE_P_NUM= the slope points number for each step calculate. If equals to 5, then slope of Ig is
calculated every 5 points.
NOISE_P_NUM= the noise points number for each step calculate. If equals to 5, then noise current of
Ig is calculated every 5 points.
AND_OR= ‘0’ or ’1’. ‘1’ stands ‘and’, means all methods selected are achieved then BD happens; ‘0’
stands ‘or’, means any of the methods selected are achieved then BD happens.
METHODS= the used methods serial number. ‘1234’ means all 4 methods are chosen. ‘14’ means
only first and fourth are chosen.
Example: TBD=GET_TBD(Ig, time, 100, 50, 10000, 1E-4, 5, 5, 0,14)
Remarks: The above example means calculating TBD using Ig and time array. The judgment current
times is 100, judgment slope times is 50, the judgment noise times is 10000, the fixed cursor data for
judgment is 1E-4. Slope of Ig is calculated every 5 points and noise current of Ig is calculated every 5
points. Using the 1st and 4th methods, and these two methods are achieved then BD happens.
GET_TBD2 - Formulator function
Purpose: This formula is used to get breakdown(BD) time of TDDB test.
Format: GET_TBD2(IS, IS_TIME, ISILC, SILC_TIME, IS_CUR_J, ISILC_CUR_J, SLOPE_J,
NOISE_J, FIX_CUR_J, SLOPE_P_NUM, NOISE_P_NUM,METHODS)
It includes following parameters.
4 variables: IS and IS_TIME, ISILC, SILC_TIME.
4 methods for BD judgment: CUR_J, SLOPE_J,NOISE_J, FIX_CUR_J.
2 parameters for calculation: SLOPE_P_NUM, NOISE_P_NUM.
And choose what kinds of methods: METHODS.
IS = gate stressed current.
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IS_TIME = stressed time.
ISILC = gate leakage current.
ISILC_TIME = measure ISILC time.
CUR_J= judgment current times for breakdown, as |Ig[n]/Ig[0]| >= CUR_J.
SLOPE_J= judgment slope times for breakdown, as |slope[n]/slope[n-1]| >= SLOPE_J.
NOISE_J= judgment noise times for breakdown, as |Inoi[n]/Inoi[n-1]| >= NOISE_J.
FIX_CUR_J=fixed cursor for judgment, as |Ig[n]| >= FIX_CUR_J.
SLOPE_P_NUM= the slope points number for each step calculate. If equals to 5, then slope of Ig is
calculated every 5 points.
NOISE_P_NUM= the noise points number for each step calculate. If equals to 5, then noise current of
Ig is calculated every 5 points.
METHODS= the used methods serial number. ‘1234’ means all 4 methods are chosen. ‘14’ means
only first and fourth are chosen.
Example: TBD=GET_TBD2(Ig, time_str, I_silc, time_silc, 100, 50, 10000, 1E-4, 5, 5, 0,14)
Remarks: The above example means calculating TBD using two group of arrays: Ig and time_str,
I_silc and time_silc. The judgment current times is 100, judgment slope times is 50, the judgment
noise times is 10000, the fixed cursor data for judgment is 1E-4. Slope of Ig is calculated every 5
points and noise current of Ig is calculated every 5 points. Using the 1st and 4th methods, and these
two methods are achieved then BD happens.
GET_VBD - Formulator function
Purpose: Get breakdown (BD) voltage in VRamp test.
Format: GET_VBD(IS, TIME, CUR_J, SLOPE_J, SLOPE_P_NUM, AND_OR, METHODS)
IS = gate current.
TIME = test time.
CUR_J = judgment current times for breakdown, as |Ig[n]/Ig[0]| >= CUR_J.
SLOPE_J = judgment slope times for breakdown, as |slope[n]/slope[n-1]| >= SLOPE_J.
SLOPE_P_NUM= the slope points number for each step calculate.
If equals to 5, then slope of Ig is calculated every 5 points.
AND_OR= ‘0’ or ’1’. ‘1’ stands ‘and’, means all methods selected are achieved then BD happens; ‘0’
stands ‘or’, means any of the methods selected are achieved then BD happens.
METHODS= the used methods serial number. ‘12’ means
two methods are chosen.
Example: VBD=GET_VBD(Ig, time, 100, 50,5, 5, 0,1)
Remarks: The above example means calculating VBD using Ig and time array. The judgment current
times is 100, judgment slope times is 50. Slope of Ig is calculated every 5 points. Using the 1st
methods, and it achieved then BD happens.
GMMAX - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the maximum value from the two columns(vectors).
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Format: GMMAX(Id, Vg)
Id= the I_drain vector.
Vg= the V_gate vector.
GM= DIFF(Id, Vg).
Example: Neg= GMMAX(DIFF(I_drain, V_gate))
JOIN - Formulator function
Purpose: to join multiply arrays together, and return a new array.
Format: JOIN(array1,array2)
Example: newarray=JOIN(array1,array2)
LASTPOS - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the row number (index) of the last value in a column (vector).
Format: LASTPOS(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: NUMSWEEPPTS = LASTPOS(COLLECTORI)
Remarks: Refer to the function FIRSTPOS.
LINFIT - Formulator function
Purpose: Finds a linear equation of the form Y = a + bX from two sets of X and Y values selected
from two columns (vectors), VX and VY. This equation corresponds to a line drawn through two
points on a curve that is created by plotting the values in VY against the values in VX. The two points
are specified by the arguments STARTPOS and ENDPOS.
Using the linear equation, returns a new column (vector) containing Y values calculated from all X
values in column VX.
Format: LINFIT(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = The row number (index) of the first set of X and Y values.
ENDPOS = The row number (index) of the second set of X and Y values.
Example: RESISTORFIT = LINFIT (RESV, RESI, FIRSTPOS(RESV), LASTPOS(RESV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result. To return a linear regression fit for two columns
(vectors), use the REGFIT function.
LINFITSLP - Formulator function
Purpose: Finds a linear equation of the form Y = a + bX from two sets of X and Y values selected
from two columns (vectors), VX and VY. This equation corresponds to a line drawn through two
points on a curve that is created by plotting the values in VY against the values in VX. The two points
are specified by the arguments STARTPOS and ENDPOS.
Returns the slope of the linear equation (value of “b” in Y = a + bX).
Format: LINFITSLP(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
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VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = The row number (index) of the first set of X and Y values.
ENDPOS = The row number (index) of the second set of X and Y values.
Example: RESISTANCE = 1/LINFITSLP(RESV, RESI, FIRSTPOS(RESV), LASTPOS(RESV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result. To return the slope of a linear regression fit for two
columns (vectors), use the REGFITSLP function.
LINFITXINT - Formulator function
Purpose: Finds a linear equation of the form Y = a + bX from two sets of X and Y values selected
from two columns (vectors), VX and VY. This equation corresponds to a line drawn through two
points on a curve that is created by plotting the values in VY against the values in VX. The two points
are specified by the arguments STARTPOS and ENDPOS.
Returns the X intercept of the linear equation:
(value of “-a/b” in Y = a + bX).
Format: LINFITXINT(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = The row number (index) of the first set of X and Y values.
ENDPOS = The row number (index) of the second set of X and Y values.
Example: EARLYV = LINFITXINT(COLLECTORV, COLLECTORI, 56, 75)
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result. To return the X intercept of a linear regression fit for
two columns (vectors), use the REGFITXINT function.
LINFITYINT - Formulator function
Purpose: Finds a linear equation of the form Y = a + bX from two sets of X and Y values selected
from two columns (vectors), VX and VY. This equation corresponds to a line drawn through two
points on a curve that is created by plotting the values in VY against the values in VX. The two points
are specified by the arguments STARTPOS and ENDPOS.
Returns the Y intercept of the linear equation:
(value of “a” in Y = a +bX).
Format: LINFITYINT(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = The row number (index) of the first set of X and Y values.
ENDPOS = The row number (index) of the second set of X and Y values.
Example: OFFSET = LINFITYINT(GATEV, GATEI, FIRSTPOS(GATEV), LASTPOS(GATEV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result. To return the Y intercept of a linear regression fit for
two columns (vectors), use the REGFITYINT function.
LN - Formulator function
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Purpose: Returns the base-e (natural, Napierian) log of each value in a designated column (vector) or
the Napierian log of any operand.
Format: LN(X)
X = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns or any operand.
Example: DIODEV = LN(ANODEI)*0.026
Remarks: This function can be used to perform calculations in realtime, while a test is executing.
LOG - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the log value of each value in a designated column (vector) or the log of any
operand. Note that it cannot accept two arrays in its parameters.
Format: LOG(V,VBASE)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns or a number.
VBASE= The base value of logarithms.
Example: F1 = LOG(I_DRAIN, 2)
Remarks: This function can be used to perform calculations in realtime, while a test is executing.
LOG10 - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the base-10 log of each value in a designated column (vector) or the base-10 log of
any operand.
Format: LOG10(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns or any operand.
Example: F2 = LOG10(I_DRAIN)
Remarks: This function can be used to perform calculations in realtime, while a test is executing.
LOGFIT - Formulator function
Purpose: Finds a log equation of the form Y = a + b*log10(X) from two sets of X and Y values
selected from two columns (vectors), VX and VY. The two points are specified by the arguments
STARTPOS and ENDPOS.
Format: LOGFIT(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS, POINTS=0)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = The row number (index) of the first set of X and Y values.
ENDPOS = The row number (index) of the second set of X and Y values.
Example: F3=LOGFIT(I_FM_pre1,I_Neg_pre1,23,56)
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
MAVG(V,N) - Formulator function
Purpose: Moving averages for the vector.
Format: MAV(V,N); V = vector; N = window size.
Example: FILTER = MAVG(GATEI, 3).
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Remarks: If N = 3 and V contains the 12 values X1, X2, X3 through X12, then MAVG(V,N) returns a
column (vector) containing the following values:
#REF, (X1 + X2 + X3)/3, (X2 + X3 + X4)/3, (X3 + X4 + X5)/3 through (X10 + X11 + X12)/3, #REF
MAX - Formulator function
Purpose: Searches all values in a column (vector) and returns the maximum value.
Format: MAX(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: MAXGM = MAX(DIFF(DRAINI, GATEV))
MAXPOS - Formulator function
Purpose: Searches all values in a column (vector), finds the maximum value, and returns the row
number (index) of the maximum value.
Format: MAXPOS(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: PEAKSTRESS = AT(GATEV, MAXPOS(SUBSTRATEI))
MEDIAN - Formulator function
Purpose: Calculate the average value of V between start and stop index.
Format: MEDIAN(V, start_pos, end_pos)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: avg1= MEDIAN(V, 1, 20)
MIN - Formulator function
Purpose: Searches all values in a column (vector) and returns the minimum value.
Format: MIN(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: SMALLESTI = MIN(DRAINI)
MINPOS - Formulator function
Purpose: Searches all values in a column (vector), finds the minimum value, and returns the row
number (index) of the minimum value.
Format: MINPOS(V)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
Example: LOCATION = MINPOS(DRAINI)
MOBILITY - Formulator function
Purpose: Mobility at Vg_tar by Id-Vg curve.
Format: MOBILITY(w,l,ci,Vg_tar,Vth,Id,Vg)
•
•
•
w = Width of device gate
l = Length of device gate
ci = Capacitance of gate
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•
•
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vg_tar = Target VG
Vth = Threshold voltage
Id = Measured Drain current
Vg = Measured Gate voltage
Example: U1= MOBILITY(10,0.03,1,0.05,0.078,Id,Vg)
NOISE_UTIM - Formulator function
Purpose: This formula is used to generate correct time array for noise current
Format: NOISE_UTIM(MEASTIMES,POINT_NUM)
POW - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the power value of each value in a designated column (vector) or any operand.
Note that it cannot accept two arrays in its parameters.
Format: POW(VBASE, VPOW)
VBASE = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns, or a number as base value.
VPOW = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns, or a number as power value.
Example: I2 = POW(I_DRAIN, 2) or I2pow = POW(2, I_DRAIN)
POWERFFT - Formulator function
Purpose: Perform the forward FFT for input data source, get the power spectrum.
Format: POWERFFT(data_source, dialog box)
data_source: The value list of the sample data . a list
dialog box: The name of the dialog box function. integer
value mappings of the parameter dialog box:
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POWERFFT value mappings
value
dialog box
function execution
1
2
3
4
rectangular
hanning
hamming
blackman
5
welch
1
w(n) = 0.5*(1-cos(2*pi*n/(N-1)))
w(n) = 0.54-0.46*cos(2*pi*n/(N-1))
w(n) = 0.42-0.5*cos(2*pi*n/(N-1))+0.08*cos(4*pi*n/(N1))
w(n) = 1-((n-0.5*(N-1))/0.5*(N+1))^2
Example: pow1=POWERFFT(IDrain, 2)
Remarks: Return the power spectrum calculated for input source, this function only used in 1/f noise
test project
REGFIT - Formulator function
Purpose: Performs a linear regression fit.
Fits the relationship of the form Y = a + bX to a specified range of values in two columns (vectors):
column VX containing X values and column VY containing Y values: Y = REGFITYINT + REGFITSLP
* X where REGFITSLP and REGFITYINT are slope and Y-intercept constants. Using the above linear
relationship, returns a new column (vector) containing Y values calculated from all X values in column
VX.
Format: REGFIT(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending values.
Example: COLLECTORFIT =
REGFIT(COLLECTORV, COLLECTORI, 25, LASTPOS(COLLECTORV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
REGFITSLP - Formulator function
Purpose: Fits the relationship of the form Y = a + bX to a specified range of values in two columns
(vectors): column VX containing X values and column VY containing Y values: Y = REGFITYINT +
REGFITSLP * X where REGFITSLP and REGFITYINT are slope and Y-intercept constants.
Returns the value of the slope constant REGFITSLP in the relationship above.
Format: REGFITSLP(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending values.
Example: COLLECTORRES =
1/REGFITSLP(COLLECTORV, COLLECTORI, 25, LASTPOS(COLLECTORV))
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Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
REGFITXINT - Formulator function
Purpose: Fits the relationship of the form Y = a + bX to a specified range of values in two columns
(vectors): column VX containing X values and column VY containing Y values: Y = REGFITYINT +
REGFITYINT * X where REGFITSLP and REGFITYINT are slope and Y-intercept constants.
Returns the value of the X intercept for relationship above (–REGFITYINT/REGFITSLP).
Format: REGFITXINT(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending values.
Example: EARLYV = REGFITXINT(COLLECTORV, COLLECTORI, 25, LASTPOS(COLLECTORV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
REGFITYINT - Formulator function
Purpose: Fits the relationship of the form Y = a + bX to a specified range of values in two columns
(vectors)—column VX containing X values and column VY containing Y values: Y = REGFITYINT +
REGFITSLP * X where REGFITSLP and REGFITYINT are slope and Y-intercept constants.
Returns the value of the Y intercept (REGFITYINT) for relationship above.
Format: REGFITYINT(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending values.
Example: OFFSET = REGFITYINT(COLLECTORV, COLLECTORI, 25, LASTPOS(COLLECTORV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
REGFIT_LGX_LGY - Formulator function
Purpose: Performs a linear regression fit.
Fits the relationship of the form LGY = a + bLGX to a specified range of values in two columns
(vectors):
column VX extracting LGX values and column VY extracting LGY values: LGY = REGFITYINT +
REGFITSLP * LG X where REGFITSLP and REGFITYINT are slope and LGY-intercept constants.
Using the above linear relationship, returns a new column (vector) containing LGY values calculated
from all LGX values. That is, input value is normal VX, VY, but the fit relationship is built on LGY and
LGX.
Format: REGFIT_LGX_LGY(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
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VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending values.
Example: COLLECTORFIT1 = REGFIT_LGX_LGY(COLLECTORV, COLLECTORI, 25,
LASTPOS(COLLECTORV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
REGFIT_LGX_Y - Formulator function
Purpose: Performs a linear regression fit.
Fits the relationship of the form Y = a + bLGX to a specified range of values in two columns (vectors):
column VX extracting LGX values and column VY containing Y values: Y = REGFITYINT +
REGFITSLP * LGX where REGFITSLP and REGFITYINT are slope and Y-intercept constants.
Using the above linear relationship, returns a new column (vector) containing Y values calculated
from all LGX values in column VX. That is, input value is normal value VX,VY, but the fit relationship
is built on Y and LGX.
Format: REGFIT_LGX_Y(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending values.
Example: COLLECTORFIT 2 = REGFIT_LGX_Y(COLLECTORV, COLLECTORI, 25,
LASTPOS(COLLECTORV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
REGFIT_X_LGY - Formulator function
Purpose: Performs a linear regression fit.
Fits the relationship of the form LGY = a + bX to a specified range of values in two columns
(vectors)—column VX containing X values and column VY extracting LGY values: LGY =
REGFITYINT + REGFITSLP * X where REGFITSLP and REGFITYINT are slope and LGY-intercept
constants.
Using the above linear relationship, returns a new column (vector) containing LGY values calculated
from all X values in column VX. That is, input value is normal value VX, VY, but the fit relationship is
built on LGY and X.
Format: REGFIT_X_LGY(VX, VY, STARTPOS, ENDPOS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
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ENDPOS = For the range of X and Y values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending values.
Example: COLLECTORFIT3= REGFIT_X_LGY (COLLECTORV, COLLECTORI, 25,
LASTPOS(COLLECTORV))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at either STARTPOS or ENDPOS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is
#REF), the function will not return a valid result.
RES - Formulator function
Purpose: Calculate resistance vector value by giving V and I.
Format: RES(V,I))
V=voltage vector listed in Variables box
I=current vector listed in Variables box
Example: RG_1=RES(V_Gate_1,I_Gate_1)
Remarks: If a I or V value is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will not return a
valid result.
RES_4WIRE - Formulator function
Purpose: calculate 4-wire resistance vector value by giving V and I.
Format: RES_4WIRE(VPOS,VNEG,I)
VPOS=positive voltage vector listed in Variables box
VNEG=negative voltage vector listed in Variables box
I=current vector listed in Variables box
Example: RGD=RES_4WIRE(V_Gate_1,V_Drain_1,I_Gate_1)
Remarks: If VPOS, VNEG, or I value is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will
not return a valid result.
RES_4WIRE_AVG(VPOS,VNEG,I) - Formulator function
Purpose: calculate 4-wire resistance average value by giving V and I.
Format: RES_4WIRE_AVG(VPOS,VNEG,I)
VPOS=positive voltage vector listed in Variables box
VNEG=negative voltage vector listed in Variables box
I=current vector listed in Variables box
Example: RGD_AVG=RES_4WIRE_AVG(V_Gate_1,V_Drain_1,I_Gate_1)
Remarks: If VPOS, VNEG , or I value is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will
not return a valid result.
RES_AVG - Formulator function
Purpose: calculate resistance average value by giving V and I
Format: RES_AVG(V,I)
V=voltage vector listed in Variables box
I=current vector listed in Variables box
Example: RG_1=RES_ AVG (V_Gate_1, I_Gate_1)
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Remarks: If a I or V value is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will not return a
valid result.
RSQUAR(VX,VY,START_POS,END_POS) - Formulator function
Purpose: Calculate correlation coefficients from an input matrix VX and VY
Format: RSQUAR(VX,VY,START_POS,END_POS
VX = column vectors
VY = column vectors
START_POS = end position to do correlation
END_POS = end position to do correlation
Example: R1=RSQUAR(V_Pos,I_Pos,5,20)
SMOOTH - Formulator function
Purpose: Smooth the vector using FFT.
Format: SMOOTH (V, RANK)
V = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
RANK = The rank number of smooth level.
Example: I2 = SMOOTH (I1, 2)
Remarks: If a V value is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will not return a valid
result.
SQRT - Formulator function
Purpose: Returns the square root of each value in a designated column (vector) or the square root of
any operand.
Format: SQRT(X)
X = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns or any operand.
Example: TWO = SQRT(4)
Remarks: A negative value of X returns #REF in the Data worksheet. This function can be used to
perform calculations in realtime, while a test is executing.
SS - Formulator function
Purpose: Extract the sub-threshold swing between a certain duration of current. The sub-threshold
swing is defined as the deferential of Vg and log Id, for example, SS=dVg/dlogId.
Format: SS (I_DRAIN, V_GATE, START_I, STOP_I)
I_DRAIN = the drain current measured in the test.
V_GATE = the gate voltage forced in the test.
START_I = the start current to define the calculation region.
STOP_I = the stop current to define the calculation region.
Example: S0=SS (I_Drain_1, V_Gate_1, 1.3e-5, 1.5e-5)
Remarks: If an I_DRAIN or V_GATE value is an invalid number (for example, the value is #REF), the
function will not return a valid result.
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SSVTCI - Formulator function
Purpose: Extract the sub-threshold swing from the certain duration between left offset and right offset
of the constant current threshold voltage.
Format: SSVTCI(I_DRAIN, V_GATE, VTCI,LEFT_OFFSET,RIGHT_OFFSET)
I_DRAIN = the drain current measured in test.
V_GATE= the gate voltage.
VTCI= constant current threshold voltage.
LEFT_OFFSET,RIGHT_OFFSET= left offset and right offset of the constant current threshold voltage
Example: SLOPE=SSVTCI(I_Drain_1,V_Gate_1,VTH,-0.1,-0.1)
Remarks: If a I_DRAIN or V_GATE value is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function
will not return a valid result.
SUBARRAY1 - Formulator function
Purpose: Extract a subarray based on full array.
Format: SUBARRAY1(V, start, period)
V: vector array
start: start index
period: extraction period
Example: VGate2=SUBARRAY1(VGate, 1, 5)
SUBRRAY2 - Formulator function
Purpose: Extract a subarray based on full array.
Format: SUBARRAY2(V, start, stop)
V: vector array
start: start index
stop: stop index
Example: VGate2=SUBARRAY1(VGate, 1, 50)
TANFIT - Formulator function
Purpose: Finds a linear equation of the form Y = a + bX from two columns (vectors), VX and VY. This
equation corresponds to a tangent of the curve that is created by plotting the values in VY against the
values in VX. The value at which the tangent is found is specified by the argument POS.
Using the linear equation, returns a new column (vector) containing Y value calculated from all X
values in column VX.
Format: TANFIT(VX, VY, POS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
POS = The row number (index) of the value where the tangent is to be found.
Example: VTFIT = TANFIT(GATEV, DRAINI, MAXPOS(GM))
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Remarks: If a VX or VY value at POS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will
not return a valid result.
TANFITSLP - Formulator function
Purpose: Finds a linear equation of the form Y = a + bX from two columns (vectors), VX and VY. This
equation corresponds to a tangent of the curve that is created by plotting the values in VY against the
values in VX. The value at which the tangent is found is specified by the argument POS.
Returns the slope of the linear equation (value of “b” in Y = a + bX).
Format: TANFITSLP(VX, VY, POS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
POS = The row number (index) of the value where the tangent is to be found.
Example: VTSLOPE = TANFITSLP(GATEV, DRAINI, MAXPOS(GM))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at POS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will
not return a valid result.
TANFITXINT - Formulator function
Purpose: Finds a linear equation of the form Y = a + bX from two columns (vectors), VX and VY. This
equation corresponds to a tangent of the curve that is created by plotting the values in VY against the
values in VX. The value at which the tangent is found is specified by the argument POS.
Returns the X intercept of the linear equation
(value of “-a/b” in Y = a + bX).
Format: TANFITXINT(VX, VY, POS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
POS = The row number (index) of the value where the tangent is to be found.
Example: VT = TANFITXINT(GATEV, DRAINI, MAXPOS(GM))
Remarks: If a VX or VY value at POS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will
not return a valid result.
TANFITYINT - Formulator function
Purpose: Finds a linear equation of the form Y = a + bX from two columns (vectors), VX and VY. This
equation corresponds to a tangent of the curve that is created by plotting the values in VY against the
values in VX. The value at which the tangent is found is specified by the argument POS.
Returns the Y intercept of the linear equation:
(value of “a” in Y = a + bX).
Format: TANFITYINT(VX, VY, POS)
VX = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
VY = The name of any column (vector) listed under Columns.
POS = The row number (index) of the value where the tangent is to be found.
Example: OFFSET = TANFITYINT(GATEV, DRAINI, GMMAX)
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Remarks: If a VX or VY value at POS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will
not return a valid result.
TAR_YatX - Formulator function
Purpose: Find y_tar in y corresponding to x_tar in x’s index
Format: TAR_YatX(x, y, x_tar)
x
x array
y
y arry
x_tar
target x
Example: y0=TAR_YatX(V, I, 0.1)
TTF_DID_LGT - Formulator function
Purpose: TTF means time to failure. In HCI test, you may want to analyze two arrays – time array and
degradation (in percentage), and find the specific time corresponding to the aimed degradation. This
is accomplished by choosing different fitting Models.
In this formulator, the fitting relationship is built on time log scale and degradation of drain current.
Format: TTF_DID_LGT(DID, T, START_POS, END_POS, GOAL)
DID = degradation (in percentage) of drain current listed under Columns
T= time array listed under Columns
STARTPOS = For the range of T and DID values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of T and DID values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending
values.
GOAL = the aim degradation (in percentage) value.
Example: F1= TTF_DID_LGT (I_DRAIN_DEG, TIME, 5, 11, 10)
Remarks: If a T or DID value at pos is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will not
return a valid result.
TTF_LGDID_T - Formulator function
Purpose: TTF means time to failure. In HCI test, you may want to analyze two arrays – time array and
degradation (in percentage), and find the specific time corresponding to the aimed degradation. This
is accomplished by choosing different fitting Models.
In this formulator, the fitting relationship is built on time array and log value of degradation of drain
current.
Format: TTF_LGDID_T(DID, T, START_POS, END_POS, GOAL)
DID = degradation (in percentage) of drain current listed under Columns
T= time array listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of T and DID values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of T and DID values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending
values.
GOAL = the aim degradation(in percentage) value
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Example: F2 = TTF_LGDID_T (I_DRAIN_DEG, TIME, 5, 11, 10)
Remarks: If a T or DID value at pos is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will not
return a valid result.
TTF_DID_T - Formulator function
Purpose: TTF means time to failure. In HCI test, you may want to analyze two arrays – time array and
degradation (in percentage), and find the specific time corresponding to the aimed degradation. This
is accomplished by choosing different fitting Models.
In this formulator, the fitting relationship is built on time array and degradation of drain current.
Format: TTF_DID_T(DID, T, START_POS, END_POS, GOAL)
DID = degradation (in percentage) of drain current listed under Columns.
T = time array listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of T and DID values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of T and DID values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending
values.
GOAL = the aim degradation (in percentage).
Example: F3= TTF_DID_T (I_DRAIN_DEG, TIME, 5, 11, 10)
Remarks: If a T or DID value at pos is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will not
return a valid result.
TTF_LGDID_LGT - Formulator function
Purpose: TTF means time to failure. In HCI test, you may want to analyze two arrays – time array and
degradation (in percentage), and find the specific time corresponding to the aimed degradation. This
is accomplished by choosing different fitting Models.
In this formulator, the fitting relationship is built on time log scale and degradation of drain current.
Format: TTF_LGDID_LGT(DID, T, START_POS, END_POS, GOAL)
DID = degradation (in percentage) of drain current listed under Columns.
T = time array listed under Columns.
STARTPOS = For the range of T and DID values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the starting
values.
ENDPOS = For the range of T and DID values to be fitted, the row number (index) of the ending
values.
GOAL = the aim degradation(in percentage) value.
Example: F4= TTF_LGDID_LGT (I_DRAIN_DEG, TIME, 5, 11, 10)
Remarks: If a T or DID value at pos is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will not
return a valid result.
VTCI(u, w, l, Id, Vg)
VTCI - Formulator function
Purpose: algorithm by using u, w, l to caculate Id_target.
Format: VTCI(u, w, l, I_DRAIN,V_GATE)
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u: the current density
w: the device width
l: the device length
I_DRAIN : the I_drain vector
V_GATE: the V_gate vector
Example: VTH1 = VTCI(0.001,1,0.03,I_DRAIN,V_GATE)
Remarks: If an I_DRAIN or V_GATE value at POS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the
function will not return a valid result.
VTLINGM - Formulator function
Purpose: Extrapolates threshold voltage from measurement of maximum slope of the ID-VGS curve,
as below:
Vth = VGS(@Gmmax)-ID(@Gmmax)/Gmmax
Where, VGS(@Gmmax) is the gate voltage at the point of the maximum slope of the ID-VGS curve;
ID(@Gmmax) is the drain current at the point of the maximum slope of the ID-VGS curve;
Gmmax is the maximum slope of the ID-VGS curve.
Format: VTLINGM(I_DRAIN, V_GATE)
I_DRAIN is the drain current measured in test. V_GATE is the gate voltage.
Example: VTH0 = VTLINGM(I_DRAIN, V_GATE)
Remarks: DC bias voltages for Vth measurements are VDS = VDS_lin,
VBS = VBB typically, for PMOS, VDS_lin=-0.1 V(@VDD=5V); for NMOS,
VDS_lin=0.1V(@VDD=5V).
If a I_DRAIN or V_GATE value is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the function will not
return a valid result.
VTSATGM - Formulator function
Purpose: Extrapolates threshold voltage from measurement of the IDS-VGS curve. In saturation
region of MOSFET, Vth=Vgs(@Ids=0).
DC bias voltages for Vth saturation measurements are
VDS = VGS = VDD, VBS = VBB
Format: VTSATGM(I_DRAIN, V_GATE)
Example: VTH1 = VTSATGM(I_DRAIN, V_GATE)
Remarks: If an I_DRAIN or V_GATE value at POS is an invalid number (i.e., the value is #REF), the
function will not return a valid result.
VT_SAT_TRI - Formulator function
Purpose: Vt algotithm by triple divide Id square root curve.
Format: VT_SAT_TRI(Vg_tar, Id, Vg)
Vg_tar
Target VG
Id Measured Drain current
Vg Measured Gate voltage
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Example: VT0 = VT_SAT_TRI(0.08, Id, Vg
Accessing the graph settings menu
To view the Graph Settings menu, right-click on any portion of the graph (see next Figure)
Figure 5–253: Graph Settings Menu
Figure 380: Graph Settings Menu
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The Graph Settings Menu functions are summarized below:
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•
•
•
•
•
Reset original view: Returns to the original size after zooming or panning.
•
Cursor Setting: Adds a cursor to a graph and sets the cursor properties. For more information,
refer to “Defining Cursor” later in this section.
•
Line Properties and Fitting: Sets the properties of a selected line and makes the fitting if the
cursors are set. For more information, refer to “Editing Line Properties and Making Fitting” later in
this section.
•
•
•
Cursor to MIN: Makes the selected cursor find the minimum point of attached curves.
•
Delete Selected Line: Removes a selected line from the plot. To delete a specific line, first click
the line to be deleted, right-click, then choose Delete Selected Line from the menu.
Forward navigation view: Moves forward one step at-a-time when zooming or panning.
Back navigation view: Goes backwards one step at-a-time after zooming or panning.
Zoom to rectangle: Zooms in on the section of the graph that is within the drawn rectangle.
Plot pan: Moves the graph by dragging.
Plot and Axis Setting: Sets general properties of the selected graph and parameters of its axis.
Many sub-functions are provided. For more information, refer to “Defining Properties of a Graph
and Axis” later in this section.
Cursor to MAX: Makes the selected cursor find the maximum point of attached curves.
Delete Selected Plot: The plot on which the menu is shown will be deleted from the graph sheet
and the other plots will be resized.
NOTE
Do not move the mouse from the line during manipulation.
•
Delete Selected Cursor: Deletes the specified cursor. To delete a cursor, first click on the cursor
to be deleted, right-click, then choose the Delete Selected Cursor menu item.
NOTE
Do not move the mouse from the cursor during manipulation.
•
Delete Selected Fitline: Deletes the specified Fitline cursor. To delete a Fitline, first click the
Fitline (if any) to be deleted, right-click, then choose the Delete Selected Fitline menu item.
NOTE
Do not move the mouse from the Fitline during manipulation.
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Define a graph and plotting
There are two steps when defining a graph and plotting:
1. Define the data to be graphed.
2. Plot according to the data.
Defining the Data to be Graphed
There are two steps in defining data to be graphed:
1. Setting the axis to data.
2. Clicking the data to plot.
Right-click on the title of any column in the Data sheet to display the Graph Definition Menu (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–254: Graph definition menu
Figure 381: Graph definition menu
•
Valid for Series: The Valid for Series command is used when your test is a multi-step test and
there are a series of results, as shown above. If the command is selected, the following settings
to any column in the series are valid for all other columns in the same series. For example, if
column B (I_Drain(1)) is set as X, column D (I_Drain(2)) will be set automatically as X.
•
•
•
Set X: The selected column is set as the X Axis on the graph.
Set Y1: The selected column is set as the Y Axis on left side of the graph.
Set Y2: The selected column is set as the Y Axis on right side of the graph.
To draw a graph, at least one X and one Y1/Y2 should be set.
NOTE
ACS supports multi-plot using one data sheet. This allows different columns to be plotted to different
graphs.
After an axis is set, you should choose data to be plotted on one graph. To choose data, click the title
of a column and the column is highlighted.
To choose more than one column, drag the mouse over the desired column, or click Ctrl+left-click on
the desired column. At least one X and one Y1/Y2 must be selected. The next Figure shows the
results of choosing data.
Figure 5–255: Result of data selection
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Figure 382: Result of data selection
If the data has not been selected, click the plot function, an XY setting dialog will display (see next
Figure). Check the desired X-Y setting in this dialog.
Figure 5–256: XY setting
Figure 383: XY setting
Plot according to data
Click the Plot function from the toolbar to display the Plotting menu (see next Figure).
Figure 5–257: Plotting Menu
Figure 384: Plotting Menu
After clicking the data to be plotted, choose one of the following commands:
Plot1: Draws a graph on plot1, which already exists. If plot1 is not blank, the original lines will remain
instead of being deleted.
New Plot: Draws a graph on a new plot separate from the existing one.
NOTE
If the test is run on a multigroup, the results of all groups under test are shown on one plot (see next
Figure).
Figure 5–258: Plot shows two ids_vd plots
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Figure 385: Plot shows two ids_vd plots
Defining Properties of a Graph and Axis:
Right-click on any portion of the graph to be edited, then choose the Plot and Axis Setting command
from the Graph Settings menu. The Plotting Setting dialog box is displayed. It contains two tabs: On
the left is the Plot Setting tab; and on the right is the Axis Setting tab. The next Figure illustrates the
dialog box displayed for each of the tabs described above.
Figure 5–259: Plot Setting and Axis Setting
Figure 386: Plot Setting and Axis Setting
The Plot Setting dialog box contains the following settings:
•
•
•
Plot Title: Sets the title of the selected plot.
•
Comments: Used to write comments for the selected plot. In a plot, you can click Ctrl and drag
the comment with the mouse to move its position (see next Figure).
Legend Visible: If selected, the legend appears on the plot.
Legend Position: Clicks the position for the legend on the plot. There are many positions
available. However, the recommended position choice is “Best”.
After choosing all of the settings, Click Save to apply the settings, or click the Cancel function to
cancel the settings. The next Figure is an example of a plot having a Title on top, Legend at the right
side, and Comments at the upper left corner of the plot.
Figure 5–260: Results after setting on the Plot Settings
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Figure 387: Results after setting the Plot Settings
Figure 5–261: Results of dragging comment
Figure 388: Results of dragging comment
The axis setting tab contains three parts that corresponds to the settings of the X, Y1, and Y2 axis.
The items in these three parts are the same for each axis. Only one axis is used in this example. The
next Figure shows all the items and sub-items for one axis on the Axis Setting tab.
Figure 5–262: Items on the Axis Settings tab
Figure 389: Items on the Axis Settings tab
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Title Section - properties for the axis title:
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Text: Edits the name of the axis.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Scale section: Sets the scale of the chosen axis.
Rotation: Rotates the title if necessary. The X axis default is 0; the Y1/Y2 axis default is 90 º
rotations.
Auto: The scale of the axis is auto-scaled according to the data. Auto is the default setting.
Min: Sets the minimum value of the axis. Valid when Auto is deselected.
Max: Sets the maximum value of the axis. Valid when Auto is deselected.
Abs: Plots the abstract value of the data along the axis.
Log: If selected, the axis is arranged in logarithmic format; if not selected, the axis is arranged in
linear format. The default setting for Log is linear.
NOTE
Log format can only be set to positive data. If there is negative data, checking Abs first will solve the
problem.
•
Invert: sets former minimum value of the axis as maximum value and former maximum value as
minimum value.
Advanced Setting properties for setting the axis ticks:
•
•
•
Auto: Selected by default. Sets the Ticks automatically; the other settings are ignored.
•
Precision: Sets the precision of the Annotation and is valid when Float or Scientific format is
chosen.
•
•
Major: Sets the major unit to mark ticks along the axis.
Rotation: Rotates the ticks if necessary. 0 is used by default.
Formatter: Sets the format for the Annotation of the Ticks. Three formats are provided: Integer,
Float, and Scientific.
Tick per Major: Number of sub-ticks inside a major tick.
After all of the axis ticks’ properties are set, click Save to apply the settings, or Cancel to cancel the
settings. The next Figure shows a series of Ic_Vce curves with marked features.
Figure 5–263: Ic_Vce curves bearing features of Axis and Ticks
Figure 390: Ic_Vce curves bearing features of Axis and Ticks
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Defining a Cursor:
Right-click on any portion of the plot and choose Cursor Setting from the Graph Settings menu. The
Cursor Setting dialog box displays. The next Figure shows the Cursor Setting dialog box and the
cursors on the I_V curve of a diode.
Figure 5–264: Cursor Setting and the Cursors on Curve
Figure 391: Cursor Setting and the Cursors on Curve
•
Label: Chooses the cursor to be edited. You can choose from the existing cursors, but cannot
change their names.
•
•
•
•
Type: Chooses the shape of the selected cursor.
•
•
•
Add: Adds a new cursor. Once Add is selected, a new cursor appears in the Label.
Color: Chooses the color of the selected cursor.
Size: Edits the size of the selected cursor.
Attach: Chooses between Floating and certain curves. If Floating is set, the cursor can go
anywhere on the plot, otherwise it can only run along the selected curve.
Apply: Applies the settings.
Exit: Exits the active dialog box. If Apply is not selected before Exit, the settings are ignored.
To apply the settings for the cursor, click the Apply function. After clicking Apply, the cursor displays
on the plot. If you click the cursor, the coordinates (x, y) of the current position display at the bottom
of the plot.
Editing Line Properties and Making Fitting
Click the line to be edited, then right-click to choose the Line Properties and Fitting command from
the Graph Settings menu. The Line Settings dialog box displays (see next Figure).
Figure 5–265: I_V curve of a diode with the linear fitting line and the formula used
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Figure 392: I_V curve of a diode with linear fitting line and formula used
The figure above illustrates the original line (black) together with the fitting line (blue) without features.
The formula used displays at the bottom left corner of the sheet.
Properties of the line:
•
•
•
Color: Clicks the color of the line selected.
Style: Clicks the style of the line: Solid, Dashed, Dotted, and Dash-Dot.
Marker: Marks the data points. Clicks the type for the marker.
Line Fitting:
•
•
•
Cursor1: The first cursor defining the segment of the line to be fitted. Click from the list.
•
•
•
Label: Shows the label of the fitting line. You cannot edit this label.
Cursor2: The second cursor defining the segment of the line to be fitted. Click from the list.
Method: Clicks the function used to fit the segment of the line. Linear, Regression, Exponential,
and Log.
Color: Clicks the color of the fitting line.
Style: Clicks the style of the fitting line: Solid, Dashed, Dotted, and Dash-Dot.
NOTE
Only one original line can have one fitting line. If the number of plots on the graph sheet exceeds two,
the formula will not display. After you complete the settings, click the Save function in the Line
Settings dialog box to apply the settings, or Cancel to cancel the settings.
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User Access Points (UAP)
Understanding UAP
The User Access Point (UAP) is a user-friendly management interface used to configure all test
features. UAPs are supported to let users extend the features and functions of the Keithley-provided
test execution engine at the device, subsite, site, wafer, and cassette levels. This is accomplished by
executing either PTM (Python Test Module) or CTM (C language Test Module) at the entry or exit of
each level of automation. PTM and CTM code has access to the results (data collected) and
instrumentation (see next two Figures).
Figure 5–266: UAP execution example
Figure 393: UAP execution example
Figure 5–267: Test execution engine
Figure 394: Test execution engine
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With UAPs you are capable of performing several robust tasks:
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•
•
•
•
•
Display operator instructions
Log lot information
Notified by text message or e-mail to pager or cell phone of a failure or exit condition
Display custom status information
Log results
Format and write custom results files
To customize the test execution environment:
1. Create a C-code or Python module.
2. Pair the modules with user access points (UAP). User access points begin at the end
of…Programs, Lots, Wafers, Sites, and Subsites.
Handling the UAP tree
To access the UAP tree, right-click on the Test Tree in the Test Setup panel. A display menu
appears. Click the Show UAP Tree menu item (see next Figure).
Figure 5–268: Show UAP Tree
Figure 395: Show UAP Tree
Several UAPs are provided, such as: lot_begin; lot_end; wafer_begin; wafer_end; site_begin;
site_end; subsite_begin; subsite_end; device_begin; device_end; test_begin; test_end. To add a
UAP, check the corresponding check box (see next Figure).
Figure 5–269: UAP Test tree setup
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Figure 396: UAP Test tree setup
Editing a UAP
1. Click on a UAP in the UAP tree; an editing panel appears.
2. Click Enable this Function to enable the Shell Command during the automation test. You can also
choose the execution timing of the Shell Command (before or after the nested modules). The
following directory is called before all nested modules (see next Figure).
Figure 5–270: UAP Shell Command editing panel
Figure 397: UAP Shell Command editing panel
3. There are two kinds of modules that can be added: Clicking the New CTM icon will add a C
module (the same as CTM), and clicking the New PTM icon will add a Python module. Click the
modules in the UAP tree and the editing panel of that module appears. Once all the modules and
Shell Commands are correctly set, you can go to the Automation function and click RUN (see
next two Figures).
Figure 5–271: UAP CTM editing panel
Figure 398: UAP CTM editing panel
Figure 5–272: UAP PTM editing panel, edit in Python language
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Figure 399: UAP PTM editing panel; edit in Python language
The following table will give you the UAP global variable name, type, and the associated comment.
These can be accessed in a UAP PTM.
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UAP global variables
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Variable Name
Type
Comment
ACS_frame
ACS_uap_level
ACS_proj_path
ACS_proj_name
ACS_lot_id
ACS_slot_no
ACS_wafer_id
ACS_pattern_id
ACS_site_id
ACS_site_coord
ACS_ssite_id
ACS_ssite_loop
ACS_ssite_loopNum
ACS_ssite_coord
ACS_dut_id
ACS_test_id
ACS_test_data
ACS_kdf_head
ACS_kdf_data
ACS_wdf_head
ACS_wdf_nonexist
ACS_t_start
ACS_t_end
ACS_first_wafer
ACS_last_wafer
ACS_first_site
ACS_last_site
ACS_output_list
ACS_temp_klf
ACS_prb_errcode
ACS_operator
ACS_die_type
ACS_remark
ACS_session_name
ACS_equipment_id
ACS_fixture_id
ACS_testplan_ver
ACS_process_level
ACS_userdata_path
ACS_ptm_path
ACS_site_loop
ACS_site_loopNum
ACS_ktxe_exit
ACS_ktxe_loop_wafer
string
string
string
string
string
int
string
string
string
tuple
string
int
int
tuple
string
string
dictionary
dictionary
list
dictionary
dictionary
string
string
bool
bool
bool
bool
list
string
int
string
string
string
string
string
string
string
string
string
string
int
int
int
int
the frame of ACS
current UAP level
current path
current project name
current lot ID
current slot number
current wafer ID
current pattern ID
current die ID
current die coordinates
current subsite ID
current subsite index of subsite loop
total loop num of the current ssite
current die coordinates
current DUT ID
current test ID
current test data
kdf file header information
current wafer data
wdf header information
wdf non-exist dices dictionary
test start time
test end time
whether it is the first wafer in one cassette
whether it is the last wafer in one cassette
whether it is the first site in one wafer
whether it is the last site in one wafer
all test's output list
temporary klf file location
prober error code
operator name
die type
remark in automation panel
session name in automation panel
equipment in automation panel
fixture id in automation panel
test plan version in automation panel
process level in automation panel
full path of user data
PTM directory setting in preference
current sub site index of subsiteloop
total loop num of the current site
exit the execution of ktxe
current wafer loop flag
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Section 5: Test Setup
Add an attribute using UAP
In ACS, you can set attributes for the test setup by using a UAP. An attribute adds further analysis to
the ACS test results. An attribute could be any of the following items:
•
Any data point within a sweep has the attribute of sweep variables. For a family of curves, the
step value is an attribute.
•
•
•
Device related parameters, such as W, L, Area…
Global information, such as temperature, pressure, and any non-zero stress conditions
Physical locations can be considered an attribute as well. Such as HCI, the W, L, and VDrain can
be set as attributes.
There are two ways to set an attribute and it depends on the test module type. For example, a RTM
or other types of test modules. The following will give you a detailed introduction on how to set an
attribute for these types.
Add an attribute for RTM
For RTM, you can use the ACS_user_attributes. The UAP can be added at the test_begin level (see
next Figure).
Figure 5–273: Set attribute UAP for RTM
m
Figure 400: Set attribute UAP for RTM
You can assign ACS_user_attributes a fixed value or some desired attribute value. The next Figure
shows a fixed attribute value: attr_dict={‘ACS_W’:0.2, ’ACS_L’:0.5,’ACS_T’:120}. The attribute
dictionary value must be formatted as {‘attribute_name1’:attribute_value1,
‘attribute_name2’:attribute_value2,…} and the attribute_value1 must be a single data.
Add attribute for other test modules
Except for RTMs, you can also add attributes for ITMs, STMs, CTMs, and PTMs. In this case, the
UAP must be under the lot_begin UAP level. There is also an example to show the information for
setting an attribute (see next Figures). Open this UAP, you will see the code lines. As shown in the
next Figure, the first line is for setting a fixed attribute value: attr_dict={‘ACS_W’:0.2,
’ACS_L’:0.5,’ACS_T’:120}. The attribute dictionary value must be formatted as
{‘attribute_name1’:attribute_value1, ‘attribute_name2’:attribute_value2,…},and the attribute_value1
must be a single data.
Figure 5–274: UAP tree for other test modules
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Figure 401: UAP tree for other test modules
The other lines indicated in the next Figure are attribute generated code. They have the same
function as other attribute values (see next Figure).
Figure 5–275: Attribute setting information
Figure 402: Attribute setting information
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Section 6
Prober Control
In this section:
Prober control functions ........................................................... 6-1
Prober control panel................................................................. 6-3
Prober control functions
The Prober control functions allow you to control prober station movements and display the probed
sites information in realtime. Click the Prober Control function from the edit panel and the Prober
Control panel displays with the Wafer Map tab open in the work area (see next Figure).
Figure 6–1: Prober Control GUI
Figure 403: Prober Control GUI
Wafer map indicator in Prober Control mode
In Prober Control mode, the Wafer Map Indicator opens in the work area (see next Figure).
Figure 6–2: Wafer Map Indicator in Prober Control mode
Section 6: Prober Control
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Figure 404: Wafer Map Indicator in Prober Control mode
The Wafer Map Indicator is used to optimize the sites list, set the evaluation/standard mode of the
prober station, change and show the color settings, show the state of chucking-up or chucking-down
the prober, and to show the coordinates of the current site.
Optimization – This function allows you to optimize the order of sites that are going to be
probed. Click the Optimize function and the Site Sequence Optimization dialog box
opens. You can choose from sixteen different sequences. Also, the default Sequence
Priority is set to site first (see next Figure).
NOTE
If you want to print a pattern ID in the Log Window Display, you will need to select pattern first in the
Sequence Priority (see the Automation section for more details).
Figure 6–3: Sites Sequence Optimization
Figure 405: Sites Sequence Optimization
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When a sequence is selected, the tester starts at the site closest to the chosen location, and then
proceeds to all selected sites on the wafer, following the selected serpentine sequence. Click OK
when finished.
•
Fake – This function is used to set the evaluation/standard mode of the prober station
configured using the Configure Hardware command from the Tools menu. You can click and
toggle between the two different modes. When the configured prober Model is Offline, the
function is displayed as FAKE . When Online, the function is the Model name, for instance, TSK9
as an example.
•
Chuck Up/Chuck Down –
of the prober.
•
Current Site: (X; Y) – This information is used to indicate the coordinates of the current site
captured by the mouse movement.
•
Colors – This area is used to show and set the color of sites. There are three status indicating
colors: Default site, Current site and Touched site.
•
Default – This button is used to indicate the color of the default setting. You can change the
default color setting by clicking this button.
•
Current – This button is used to indicate the color of the current site the prober is probing. You
can change the color setting of the current site by clicking this button.
•
Touched – This button is used to indicate the color of sites which have already been touched by
the prober. You can change the color setting of touched sites by clicking this button.
This information is used to indicate the raised or lowered chuck state
Prober control panel
To access the Prober Control Panel, click the Prober Control function from the edit panel (see next
Figure).
Figure 6–4 Prober Control panel
Figure 406: Prober Control panel
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•
Initialize – Click this function to initialize the specified prober station. If the prober is initialized
successfully, all Prober Control panel functions enable. If the initialization fails, all Prober Control
panel functions disable.
•
Home – This function is used to move the prober to the target site defined in the Wafer
Description.
•
•
•
Load – This function is used to load a wafer from the cassette onto the prober station.
•
Interval – Determines the time interval between two continuous movements of the prober. The
time unit is in seconds.
•
Step Move – There are eight blue arrow functions in Step Move, which can be used to control the
prober station to move in different directions. Surrounded by the arrow functions, the green Chuck
Up/Down function is used to control the prober station to raise or lower the chuck.
Unload – This function is used to unload the wafer from the prober station back to the cassette.
Probe Sites – This function is used to move the prober to the selected sites continuously in the
optimized sequence.
Moving to a site
1. Click the Initialize function. If the prober is configured correctly, there will be no errors and the
other functions on the Prober Control panel enable.
2. Double-click the site you want to move to on the Wafer Map, or you can click the arrow functions
on Step Move until you drive the prober to the destination site.
Moving to a subsite
1. Move to the desired site on the wafer map.
2. From the Test Tree, locate the subsite item where you moved in the previous section and rightclick on that item.
3. Click the Move to Subsite command (see next Figure).
Figure 6–5: Right-click Menu of Subsite Node in Test Setup
Figure 407: Right-click Menu of Subsite Node in Test Setup
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Section 7
Automation
In this section:
Automation functions................................................................ 7-1
Automation panel ..................................................................... 7-2
Cassette information box........................................................ 7-17
Preference settings ................................................................ 7-18
Read current test data............................................................ 7-25
Wafer map indicator ............................................................... 7-26
Starting an automation test .................................................... 7-28
Automation process example ................................................. 7-30
Automation functions
After your Test Tree has been set up and your wafer has been drawn, you can enter Automation
mode to test all wafers in a cassette. To enter Automation mode, click the Automation function from
the edit panel; the Automation panel displays (see next Figure). The Automation functions are
discussed below.
Figure 408: Automation GUI
Section 7: Automation
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There are three tabs in the automation dialog box:
1. The Wafer Map tab is the primary interface, and allows you to configure an automation test and
display the current configuration and automation run-time information.
2. The Data tab displays the test results in spreadsheet format and in real time as the test executes.
3. The Status tab monitors the configuration status of automation.The Automation functions include.
•
Auto-test information – Auto-Test information is used to input some information related to the
automation test. The information items include: Lot ID, Operator, Die Type, Test Process Level, Fixture
ID, Equipment ID, Laser ID, Test Plan Version, and Remark fields.
•
Options – Used to customize the automation process. There are three options: Skip 1st Wafer Load,
Single Wafer, and Unload Wafer after Test.
•
Cassette information – Used to indicate the wafer mounted status in the cassette, and wafer test status
during automation, which slot is under the testing process and which slot has been tested completely.
The Bottom-up check-box specifies how wafers are arranged in the cassette. By default, the
arrangement of wafers is from top to bottom. You can reverse the arrangement by clicking the Bottomup check-box.
•
Run-time information – Used to indicate the run-time information, current site, current subsite, and
current test module, etc.
Automation panel
While in the Automation panel, click RUN to execute an automation test. The automation test runs
through the entire cassette. Test progress is refreshed in realtime in the Run Time information table,
which is located in the upper-right corner. The following section describes the various parts of the
automation panel (see next Figure).
Figure 7–2: Automation panel
Figure 409: Automation panel
Automatic test information
The Auto-Test information table allows you to input some necessary details related to the automation
test process, such as: Lot ID, Operator, Die Type, Test Process Level, Fixture ID, Equipment ID,
Laser ID, Test Plan Version, and Remark field. This information can be accessed in a UAP to
generate customized data files (see next Figure).
Figure 7–3: Auto Test information box
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Figure 410: Auto-Test Info box
You can see in the previous Figure that the Lot ID, Operator, Die Type, Test Process Level, Fixture
ID, Equipment ID, Laser ID, Test Plan Version and Remark items have been defined.
NOTE
All items are for information logging only, except two required fields: Lot ID and Operator. Information
logging is optional. The meaning of the information logging can be user-defined, and will have no
impact on the data file or other ACS operations.
Automatic test options
ACS provide three option to customize the automation process: Skip 1st Wafer Load, Single Wafer,
and Unload Wafer After Test (see next Figure).
Figure 7–5: Options in the Automation Panel
Figure 411: Options in the Automation Panel
•
Skip 1st Wafer Load – Applicable for some prober Models such as TEL, which requires the first
wafer on chuck to finish the manual alignment operation before the launch the automation test.
Check this function when the first wafer is already loaded.
•
Single Wafer – This tests the first wafer only. The load and unload commands will not be
performed when the Single Wafer check box is selected. This is specially designed for semiautomated probers.
•
Unload Wafer After Test – Only applicable when a single wafer is selected. Checking this box
unloads the wafer automatically upon completion of the wafer test.
Advanced toolbar
The Advanced toolbar is used for advanced automation control features and configurations (see next
Figure).
Figure 7–6: Advanced Toolbar
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Figure 412: Advanced toolbar
Advanced Settings: Used to define advanced wafer settings.
Binning Settings: Defines and enables realtime binning. The binning result displays in the
wafer map during automation.
Wafer Level Plot: Offline binning map, raw data and plotting curve.
Real Time Plot Settings: Define the critical test items in test plan that should be
monitored in real-time.
Show Real Time Plot Window: Only activates when the Realtime Plot setting is
configured. When selected, predefined plotting curve(s) will be updated in real-time.
Post-inking Settings: Enables the post-inking function.
Advanced Settings
In the Advanced Settings dialog box, you can rename the wafer ID and define the wafer to be tested
in automation.
When you click the Advanced Setting function, the ACS software automatically retrieves the slot
status from the prober and shows all in-slot wafers in the Advanced Setting table (see next Figure).
Figure 7–7: Advanced Settings
Figure 413: Advanced Settings
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•
Default ID – This function sets all wafer IDs (column Wafer ID) to default value. The default value
is 01 to 25 (depending on the previous information loaded).
•
Apply Setting –The wafer ID can be edited. This function enabled all wafer IDs to the customized
value after edit them.
•
Test All – This function is used to click all the in-slot wafers(Test Column). Once selected, all
wafers will be selected for testing.
•
Clear All –This function is used to unclick all the in-slot wafers(Test Column). Once selected, all
wafers will be deselected for testing.
Binning Settings
After running the automation test, the binning method measures certain user-specified parameters
(limits) against the results of each semiconductor device test, and then places the device test into an
appropriate category (or “bin”). For example, if the device tests below the user-specified limit, the
device would be placed into a bin labeled, “Failed” (see next Figure). These binned wafers are then
performance-tested. The remaining wafers are certified according to the results of their performance
level and placed in a wafer bank for later use.
Figure 7–8: Binning Settings
Figure 414: Binning Settings
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There are two parts to the binning system setup:
1. Binning Settings
2. Wafer Level Plot
Click Binning Settings icon to enter data (see next Figure).
General Settings
Enable Binning Check: If selected, the Enable Binning Check and all the following functions activate.
When activated, the Enable Binning Check feature runs a test on the devices, compares the results to
the limits set by You, and places them in specific bins. Sites can be color-coded to distinguish
between the various categories (Bins). In addition, a different color can be set for every site on the
binning wafer map.
Criteria: The drop-down list is Pass and Fail. Pass means that if all test results are within the Bin
range (Low < = X < = High), the tested die will be placed in the Pass bin. Fail means that if the tested
die does not fall within the Bin range (X < Low or X > High), the tested die will be placed in the Fail
bin.
Number of Bins: The drop-down list is 1 (highest priority), 2, 3, ... 15 (lowest priority). When clicking a
number, the same amount of Bin tables will be generated. There are a total of 15 Bins supported.
Each Bin has a priority level. Bin 1 has the highest priority level, and Bin 15 has the lowest. When
binning, the software will check if it is in Bin 1 first, if not then Bin 2, then Bin 3... and so on up to and
including Bin 15. If a tested die does not fall into any Bin category, it will enter All Bin Pass or All Bin
Fail (see next Figure).
Figure 7–9: Binning flow chart
Figure 415: Binning flow chart
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Names and Colors:
•
All Bins Fail/Pass Sites (1 Character only): Sets the name and color for all bin Fail/Pass criteria
sites. For pass criteria, it will show All Bins Fail Sites. The default value is blank.
•
Invalid Sites (1 Character only): Sets the name and color for invalid sites. The default value is
blank.
•
Deselect Sites (1 Character only): Sets the name and color for unselected sites. The default value
is blank.
Bin Tables
•
ID: Parameter id, defined as “parameter_name” + “@” + “test_name”. An “@test_name” string is
appended to the end of the parameter name to distinguish between parameters from different
tests.
•
•
Name: Parameter name.
•
Spec High/Low in limits table: Used to enter the low and high values that will determine if a die
passes or fails during automation. The rest is shown on the wafer map in automation. This range
is also used to generate a summary report.
•
Valid High/Low in limits table: Used to set an Exit Condition to tested die that falls out of the valid
high/low range. If a test is out of range, a corresponding Exit action activates. This range is also
used in the summary report.
•
High/Low in Binning table: Used to set the high/low parameters when binning is enabled. All
wafer sites are assigned different bins according to the binning settings. When Binning is
enabled, wafer map in Automation shows the binning result, rather than the pass/fail information
with Spec High/Low.
•
Bin Parameters: Click the Bin Parameters function to click the desired parameters for binning
operation. The Click Binning Items dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Low/High: Defines the binning range for the corresponding parameter. The Binning operation
uses this range.
NOTE
To avoid possible errors when setting parameters, remember to consider the differences between
Valid High/Low, Spec High/Low in the limits table, and High/Low in the Binning table.
Figure 7–10: Select Binning Items
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Figure 416: Select Binning Items
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Section 7: Automation
The listed parameters in the Select Binning Items dialog box originate from the test modules in Test
Setup.
After checking the parameters that will be used for binning, click OK to activate them. The selected
parameters will be shown in the corresponding Bin table. The Low and High values will be loaded
with the default settings (the first time) or from previously saved binning settings.
•
•
Bin Name (1 character only): Sets the name and color for current Bin.
Bin Pass/Fail color: Sets bins to different colors.
Bin Setting Procedure
If binning is enabled, the binning information will show on the wafer map during automation. In
addition, an optional binning file generates that transfers the results to the wafer level binning plot to
detect locations with problems.
For realtime binning operation, follow these procedures:
1. Build one automation test project that runs properly.
2. From the Automation panel, click the Advanced Binning Settings function in the Advanced group;
the Binning Settings panel displays.
3. Check "Enable Binning Check" to click binning.
4. Choose the binning criteria based on Pass/Fail requirements.
5. Choose the number of bins, from 1 to 15; Bin 1 has the highest priority, Bin 15 has the lowest.
When binning, the software will first check if the results fit into Bin 1. If the results fit into Bin 1, the
binning process advances to the next site to be tested. If the results from the test do not fit into
Bin 1, the software will sequentially check the remaining bins for a fit. If the results do not fit into
any bin, an All Bin Pass or All Bin Fail statement appears.
NOTE
If the testing results of a site are placed into a bin, the binning process advances to the next site to be
tested.
6. Click the Bin Parameters function in the bottom right corner and choose the desired parameters
for accessing the bin. Then set the binning Low/High range. You must set each bin individually.
7. Set the binning colors. Set the All Bin Pass Sites color. The All Bin Pass Sites color displays if a
device does not fall into a bin. Then, go to Invalid Sites and Unselected Sites to set their bin
colors. Next, set every bin color and name.
NOTE
After bin setting is complete, Click OK to run automation. The binning results are displayed in realtime on the wafer map, and any location on the binning wafer with a problem detected and displayed.
Binning demo case:
1. Build a project by first clicking the STM named “random.” The random STM generates random
data smaller than one and calculates an average value using the formulator.
2. Click the Binning Settings function to access the binning settings panel.
3. Check Enable Binning Check in the Binning Settings panel, then click as follows: Criteria: Pass;
Number of Bins: 5 (see next Figure).
Figure 7–11: Binning Settings example
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Figure 417: Binning Settings example
4. For this demonstration, click the Bin Parameters function and then click the output
“[email protected]” for every bin.
5. Set the limits for every bin as: bin1[0,0.2], bin2[0,0.4], bin3[0,0.6], bin4[0, 0.8], bin5[0,0.95].
6. Set color for every bin: 5 bins; choose a different color for each bin.
7. Click OK.
8. Click the RUN function to run automation. Binning results display in real-time on the wafer map
(see next Figure).
Figure 7–12: Binning real-time results (example)
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Figure 418: Binning real-time results (example)
Wafer Level Plot
As a result of the tests performed during binning, the wafer plots are assigned to specific categories
for later use. Binning wafer plots are important to trace root causes for higher future yields. For
example, from binning characteristics, engineers can collect data and correlate them with specific
processes. This saves time and aids in finding root causes of problems.
In this part, you can retrieve binning test results, trace the unwanted data, and get a desired site plot.
Click the Wafer Level Plot icon (see next Figure).
Figure 7–13: Blank Wafer Level Plot
Figure 419: Blank Wafer Level Plot
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Wafer Level plot definition
The items in the Wafer Level plot dialog box are as follows (see next Figure):
Select Lot: Click the Select Lot function, then open the desired .kdf file. After the file is loaded, the bin
map of the first tested wafer shows (see next Figure).
NOTE
The selected .kdf file should be generated from the current test plan and should match the current
test plan.
Figure 7–14: Wafer level plot
Figure 420: Wafer Level Plot
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Test time: Disabled in .kdf version.
Wafer: The drop-down list clicks the binning tested wafer. The Prev Wafer button will move You to the
wafer prior to the one selected in the drop-down list; the Next Wafer button will move You to the wafer
after the one selected in the drop-down list. After you click a wafer, the bin map of this wafer is shown
in the figure.
Analysis Plotting and Analysis data sheet: This plotting supports the data plotting and site analysis. In
data plotting, data is retrieved from all sites belonging to the current wafer. In site analysis plotting,
data is retrieved from one selected site. Here, using the above case, “random,” is an example of one
of the two types of plotting.
The items in data sheet of the wafer level plot dialog box:
•
•
•
•
Lot Name
Wafer ID
Site ID
Bin value
There are a total of 15 Bins supported, and the Bins have been prioritized. Bin 1 has the highest
priority, and Bin 15 has the lowest. When binning, the software will check if it is in Bin 1 first, if not
then Bin 2, then Bin 3... then Bin 15. If not in any Bin, it will enter All Bin Pass or All Bin Fail (see next
Table).
Bin Value
Comment
1,2,3,…15
0
<0
Bin 1, Bin2,…Bin 15
All bin pass (in fail criteria) or all bin fail (in pass criteria)
Abnormal result
NOTE
The erased site has no value in .kdf file, so they don’t show here. But in binning file (.nbf file), the
erased site’s value is 255. It is just a virtual number.
For data plotting, set average value of random data “VALUE_AV” as axis Y1, then click the plot
function icon. Click Plot1, and the average value of the random data from the wafer 1 test site is
plotted (see next Figure).
Figure 7–15: Data plotting example
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Figure 421: Data plotting example
Site analysis plotting:
Select the Click Test to execute Site Analysis for the test module you want the performed . A dialog
box will open (see next Figure).
Figure 7–16: Site Analysis Plotting
Figure 422: Site Analysis plotting
Select the test module you want to perform the site analysis, then click OK.
Click the site in the bin map to show the plotting. The data of this plotting is shown to the right, and
the selected site in the Analysis data sheet highlights in the data sheet at the bottom (see next
Figure).
Figure 7–17: Site analysis plotting example
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Figure 423: Site Analysis plotting example
If you do not see next Figure a plot, verify whether a plot has been defined in the Data Sheet of Test
Setup. After all the above steps have been taken, you can trace data and do site analysis.
Real-Time Plot Settings
The real-time plot settings define plots in the data sheet.
1. Select the Realtime Plot Settings function; a dialog box opens (see next Figure).
Figure 7–18: Automation Realtime Plot Settings
Figure 424: Automation Realtime Plot Settings
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2. The test tree shows the tests included in the automation. Check the tests whose plots need to be
displayed in realtime.
Allowed Total Plots: Indicates that the maximum number of plots is 36.
Selected Total Plots: Shows the number of plots that have been selected.
If save plot automatically is selected at the end of each site, the Realtime Plot Settings dialog box will
automatically save the plotting curve to the “kdf” folder of the current project. Click OK to finish this
step.
Click the Show Real Time Plot dialog box function and a dialog box opens (see next Figure). You are
now able to choose View Style and do basic operations.
Figure 7–19: Real-time Plot
Figure 425: Real-time Plot
Post-inking
•
This feature is used for automation wafer inking after automation test. Only EG probers are
supported.
•
The post-inking feature performs automation and inking separately. Before accessing the postinking function, you must first run the automation test and generate a data file and binning file.
•
Click the post-inking Settings icon (see next Figure).
NOTE
Only EG probers are supported for Post Test Inking.
Figure 7–20: Post-Inking Settings
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Figure 426: Post Inking Settings
Description of the post-inking dialog box items:
•
•
•
•
•
Binning File: Indicates the binning file path.
Browse: Used to load the binning file.
Ink Bad (Erased) Die: Sets the erased die inking number.
Wafers in binning file: Lists binning wafer ID.
Option: Loads wafer mode option.
The post-inking process:
•
•
•
•
Click Browse to load the specified binning file.
Set the number of the Bad (Erased) Die Inking No.
Choose Manual or Auto wafer load mode.
Use Run, Pause, Stop and Exit to control the inking process.
Cassette information box
Cassette information shows the run-time information of the wafers/slots in a cassette. There are four
types (see next Figure). Move mouse over the wafer to get the wafer status.
Figure 427: Cassette Info box
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•
•
•
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Selected Wafer (dark blue)
Unselected wafer or nonexistent wafer (purple)
Current Test Wafer (light blue)
Tested Wafer (green)
Preference settings
The Preferences settings may be accessed from the Tools menu option (see next Figure) and are
used to apply customized settings before automation testing.
Figure 7–22: Preferences function from the Tools menu
Figure 428: Preferences function in Tools menu
The options include clicking data file paths, data file formats, Auto-Test information fields, etc,.is the
graphic depicting the Preference Setting dialog box (see next Figure).
Figure 7–23: Preference settings
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Figure 429: Preferences settings
There are four tabs in Preference Setting dialog:
•
•
•
•
Path
Misc
Automation Settings
Advanced
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Preference settings path tab
Project Repository – The project repository path. You can also press the associated Browse button
to click another project path.
Auto-Load Project – Sub-list the auto load project path when launching ACS, including the last loaded
project, default project, and none.
Default Project – The default project path. This field and the associated Browse button are only
accessible when the “Default Project” option is selected in the Auto-Load Project list.
Summary Reports Path – The summary reports path. You can also press the associated Browse
button to click another path.
TSP Library Path –The TSP library path. You can also press the associated Browse button to click
another path.
User Data Path – Used to set the binning file and data file path. The User Data Path will be saved as
software parameter. This path can be read in a UAP, letting a user put the data file in this path. It may
also be read by Convert Data dialog as a default output data file path (see next Figure). You can also
press the associated Browse button to click another path.
Figure 7–24: Misc tab of Preference settings
Figure 430: Misc tab of Preferences settings
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PTM Path – Set the PTM library path. You can also press the associated Browse button to click
another path.
Miscellaneous (Misc) tab
Reset wafer map after adjust die site – Apply the check to reset the wafer map if the die size is
adjusted in the Wafer Description. Checked by default.
Wafer Shape – Customize the wafer shape to either Circle (the default) or Square.
SMU Remote Sense – Click the remote sense operation of the indicated SMU(s); typical for the four
wire test of a resistor.
Check all – Selects all the SMU Remote Sense boxes (these are deselected by default).
Auto Delay – Select to enable the auto delay function of the Model 2635A or 2636A in an ITM or
RTM.
Initiate Unused SMU – Only used for RTM and ITM’s SMU.There are three states for the initiate
unused SMU, Default, High Impedance, Force Current 0A.
Default : OUTPUT_NORMAL OFF mode.Selected by default and it outputs 0 V when the output is
turned off.
High Impedance : HIGH_Z OFF mode.Zero the output (in either volts or current) when off.
Force Current 0A: 0A at ON mode. Force the output current 0 amps and turn on the output.
Clear? – Used to clear old scripts in Series 2600A SourceMeter instruments when a project is opened
and the automation is run.
Prober Movement intervals (ms) – The interval time between each prober movement in the
automation test. The default value is 0 µs.
S4200 IP address – Model 4200-SCS IP address (for when S4200 remote control is required).
NOTE
If any of the matrices in the system are set to Remote Sense or the S530 Kelvin mode, all of the
Series 2600A and Series 2400 instruments in the system will be set to four-wire (4-W) mode when
executing a test. Also, the SMU Remote Sense option box in the Preferences settings Misc tab will be
disabled. When all the matrices are set to Local Sense, all of the Series 2600A and Series 2400
instruments in the system will be set to two-wire (2-W) mode when executing a test. It is highly
recommended that all the matrices in the system are in the same mode. For more information on how
to configure a matrix, refer to the ACS Hardware Configurations section.
Automation setting tab
Only the Lot ID and Operator fields are required, other fields are for information logging and are
optional. The Auto-Test information table can be modified (see next Figure).
Figure 7–25: Automation Settings tab
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Figure 431: Automation Settings tab
NOTE
The Auto-Test Information items can only be modified in engineering mode.
Items on Automation Setting tab (see previous Figure) are listed below:
User mode – Allows the operator to click either Engineering mode or Operator mode.
Automation Information– Any deselected items will not be shown in the Auto-Test Information table.
You can also assign the default value in the edit box (to the right) for each item. For example,
deselect the ‘Test Process level’, ‘Fixture ID’, ‘Equipment ID’, and input Lot ID value, run ACS; these
modifications can be reflected in Auto-Test Information table(see next Figure).
Figure 7–26: Automation Settings
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Figure 432: Automation Settings
Save Test Data to Data Base – Check to save automation test results data to the database. Checked
by default.
Save Test Data to KDF file – Check to save automation test results data to a .kdf file. Checked by
default.
Do Not Remove Old KDF Folder When Overwrite – Check to prevent the old KDF folder from being
removed when a new project is run. Unchecked by default.
Save 2D array data to separate file – Selected to save the two dimensional array data of the
automation test to separate KDF files. Selected by default.
Save 2D array data to KDF file – Selected to save the two dimensional array data of the automation
test results data to one KDF file...
Prefix/Postfix – Allows the user to specify a prefix and postfix to be applied to the data file. After
creating a prefix/postfix, in the Advanced Settings dialog of the Automation Panel, click Apply Settings
to accept the new wafer IDs.
Generate Test Data File (.kdf file) Each Wafer – Once checked, the software generates a .kdf file for
each wafer (unchecked by default). Only one .kdf file generates during automation.
Advanced tab
Parallel Execute Group In – you have three choices: Test, Device, and Subsite (see next Figure).
Working Mode – you have two choices on the drop-down arrow: local mode or network mode. The
network option is for server/client mode (for more information, refer to the Server Solution section).
The local mode option is the default (see next Figure).
Log Window Display Level – you have three choices: INFO, WARNING, and ERROR to show the log
message. The log level configuration will be effective immediately (see next Figure).
Show Prober Status on the LogWindow – when you select this option, the prober control information
will display on the log window.
Figure 7–27: Advanced tab of Preference Setting
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Figure 433: Advanced tab settings
NOTE
If you are using the UAPs in a module and you want to print wafer ID and pattern ID information in
ACS, you will have to choose the radio button INFO in the Log Window Display Level of the
Advanced tab. You will also have to click on the Optimization function of the Wafer Map tab (see next
Figure).
Figure 7–27: Optimization function on Wafer Map tab
Figure 434: Optimization function on Wafer Map tab
Once you select Optimization, the Site Sequence dialog box opens. This is where you select pattern
first in the Sequence Priority to ensure that your pattern ID is displayed in the log window when you
print from the UAPs of your module (see next Figure).
Figure 7–27: Pattern first in Sites Sequence Optimization function
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Figure 435: Pattern first in Sites Sequence Optimization function
NOTE
The default Sequence Priority is set to site first.
Read current test data
Select Read Current Test Data from Tools drop-down menu, the Read Current Temporary Data
dialog will display (see next two Figures).
Figure 7–28 Read Current Test Data in Tools Menu
Figure 436: Read Current Test Data in Tools Menu
Figure 7–29 Read Current Temporary Data
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Figure 437: Read Current Temporary Data
Click the Browse button to specify the .tmp file. Once the target file is found, click the Read button to
display the Show Current Temporary Data dialog (see next Figure).
Figure 7–30 Show Current Temporary Data
Figure 438: Show Current Temporary Data
Wafer map indicator
During the Automation Test, the information in the Basic Monitor Items table will be updated
automatically to show the current running information (see next Figure).
Figure 7–31: Basic Monitor Items table
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Figure 439: Basic Monitor Items table
The Wafer Map Indicator is used to optimize the sites list, set the Offline/Online mode of the prober
Model, change and show the color settings, and to show the coordinates of the current site (see next
Figure). These functions are discussed below:
Figure 7–32: Wafer map indicator
Figure 440: Wafer map indicator
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Optimization – Optimizes probing path of selected sites to minimize the prober moving time. You can
choose from 16 different sequences. When a sequence is selected, the tester starts at the site closest
to the chosen location and then proceeds to all selected sites on the wafer, following the selected
serpentine sequence.
This function is used to set the Offline/Online mode of the prober Model configured using the
Configure Hardware command from the Tools menu. You can toggle the function to switch between
the two different modes. When the configured prober Model is Offline, the function is displayed as
FAKE. When Online, the function is the Model name, for instance TSK9.
Current Site (x, y) – This information is used to indicate the coordinates of current site pointed to by
the mouse/cursor.
Current Site – This function is used to show and set the color of the current site on which the prober
is probing. You can change the color setting of the current site by clicking this function.
Pass Site – This function is used to show and set the color of those sites that have already passed
testing. In the passed state, all test modules in the site have qualified output values validated by the
pre-defined limits. You can change the color setting of a passed site by clicking this function. Fail Site
– This function is used to show and set the color of those sites that fail to pass testing. In the failed
state, all test modules in the site do not have qualified output values validated by the predefined
limits. You can change the color setting of failed sites by clicking this function.
Starting an automation test
1.
2.
3.
4.
Click the Run function on the toolbar to start an automation test. The automation test is launched.
Click the Pause function on the toolbar to pause the automation test.
Click the Stop function on the toolbar to stop the automation test.
You can view a Summary Report of the test execution using the ACS Summary Report functions.
These functions are discussed in “Summary Report Panel” later in this section.
NOTE
The data file or data file folder name is derived from the Lot ID that is assigned by you before the
automation test. Therefore, if the data file already exists, the KDF File or db file Exist dialog box
opens you can choose to backup the file (see next Figure).
Figure 7–33: KDF File or db folder Exists
Figure 441: KDF File or db folder Exists
The results of an automation test are saved into a *.kdf file (Keithley Data File) or a data base file (db
folder file) automatically. You can also click these two saving formats in the Tools->Preferences
options dialog box (see next Figure).
Figure 7–34: Preference Setting_Automation Setting tab
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Figure 442: Preference Setting_Automation Setting tab
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A Keithley data file (.kdf) contains the following items:
Head part contains:
"typ" : type and version,
"lot" : lot ID,
"prc" : process ID,
"dev" : device ID,
"tst" : test program name,
"sys" : tester name,
"tsn" : tester number,
"opr" : operator name,
"stt" : start time,
"sk1" : search key 1,
"sk2" : search key 2,
"sk3" : search key 3,
"lmt" : limit file name,
"wdf" : wafer description file name,
"com" : comment
<EOH>
Data part contains:
wafer_id, split, boat, slot
site_id, coordinate_x, coordinate_y, bin_value
data_id,test_value
...
<EOS>
...
<EOW>
...
NOTE
The data_id part can contain from three to four parts, which are separated by the following symbols:
¡°@¡± sign. For example, [email protected][email protected]_site[@GROUP_ID], and the group id (the
fourth part) is optional.
If more than one group is in the test, the group_id will be added into the data_id.
Automation process example
Example 1: Binning and post-inking
This example shows a typical operation flow of automation with real-time binning and post-inking.
1. Click File > New, then click the New Project function to start a new project. A dialog box appears
(see next Figure).
Figure 7–35: New Test Project
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Figure 443: New Test Project
2. Input the desired name of the project and appropriate information, then click OK.
3. Click Wafer Description on the left side of the panel. Input the wafer parameter information as the
wafer under test (see next Figure).
Figure 7–36: Wafer Description panel
Figure 444: Wafer Description panel
4. Click Test Setup. You can now set up your own test plan. There are several test modules
available: ITM, STM, CTM and PTM. Select the module that you want to run (see next Figure).
5. Right-click the module on the test tree and select Show UAP Tree (see next Figure).
Figure 7–37: Access UAP tree
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Figure 445: Access UAP tree
6. The UAP window will open (see next Figure).
Figure 7–38: Available UAPs
Figure 446: Available UAPs
7. Select the Lot end UAP, then add two Python modules to the test tree (see next Figure).
Figure 7–38: UAP and test tree management
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Figure 447: UAP and test tree management
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8. Import binning modules from the ACS UAP library: NBF.py and NDF.py. Also, if desired, you can
write your own binning customized PTM module, then click Save (see next Figure).
NOTE
You should use the NBF to generate binning files for the wafers in a cassette. It must be put at LOT
end UAP. Also, you should use the NDF to generate data files for wafers in the cassette. It must be
put at LOT end UAP.
An NBF file contains the following items:
Wafer header part contains:
<WAFER>
WAFER ID: wafer01
TEST SESSION NAME: operator
LOT ID: lot01
EQUIPMENT ID:
Keithley S500
FIXTURE ID:
TESTPLAN NAME: demo
TESTPLAN VERSION:
1.1
TEST PROCESS LEVEL:
T4
FLAT REGION:
180
DIE SIZE X (mm):
5.65
DIE SIZE Y (mm):
0.75
COORDINATE QUADRANT: 1
REFERENCE DIE X: 4
REFERENCE DIE Y: 15
TEST OPERATOR: TL
TEST START TIME: 07-May-2009 14:36
TEST END TIME:
07-May-2009 14:36
Bin value part contains:
site_coordinate_x, site_coordinate_y, bin_value
...
</WAFER>
...
An NDF file contains the following items:
Header part contains:
<HEADER>
TEST SESSION NAME:
LOT ID:
lot1
WAFER ID: wafer01
EQUIPMENT ID:
Keithley S500
FIXTURE ID:
TESTPLAN NAME: 36mm FET Jun
TESTPLAN VERSION:
1.1
TEST PROCESS LEVEL:
T4
FLAT REGION:
180
DIE SIZE X (mm):
5.65
DIE SIZE Y (mm):
0.75
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COORDINATE QUADRANT: 1
REFERENCE DIE X: 4
REFERENCE DIE Y: 15
TEST OPERATOR: TL
TEST START TIME: 07-May-2009 14:36
TEST END TIME:
07-May-2009 14:36
</HEADER>
Data part contains:
<DATA>
<WAFER>
wafer_id
<SITE>
site_coordinate_x, site_coordinate_y
output_name,test_value
...
bin, bin_value
</SITE>
...
</WAFER>
...
</DATA>
Figure 7–38: Importing a PTM file for UAP
Figure 448: Importing a PTM file for UAP
1. After you have built the test setup, navigate to the Automation panel. Input the appropriate
operation information, such as Lot ID, Operator, Die Type, and Remark (see next Figure). All of
the operation information prints in the resulting data file (.kdf, .NDF).
Figure 7–39: Automation Setup panel
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Figure 449: Automation setup panel
2. After all the above steps have been completed, click save, then click the Run function to initiate
the Automation process. ACS automatically loads all the wafers and runs the desired tests. All
test data and the binning results are saved in the .kdf file.
3. After the test ends - because lot_end UAP is enabled - the two PTM modules will execute. .NBF
and .NDF files will be written according to the data in the .kdf file. This will take some time,
depending on your computer speed. Wait until ACS finishes this procedure, which is signified by
the Run function turning from a color to gray.
4. The .NBF and .NDF files are ready for post-inking. Navigate to the post-inking dialog and browse
for the .NBF file.
5. In the Manual Load Wafer mode, a dialog displays to inform you to load the wafer with a specified
wafer ID. Follow the dialog prompts, loading the correct wafer (see next Figure).
Figure 7–40: Browsing for the .NBF file
Figure 450: Browsing for the .nbf file
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Example 2: Stress migration
In the stress migration (SM) test, another challenge is that you would like to see the data in real time
during automation, and determine whether to stop the test automatically if a number of consecutive
sites failed on one parameter (in case of a bad probe pin). So the automation logic needs to be
changed as well. In ACS, you can change the process flow (or, operation flow) in order to see the
data in real time.
Operation flow
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Create a new project.
Import the SM comma separated value (.csv) setting file.
Confirm the .csv data.
Set the wafer map and click the site to be tested in the wafer map. Save the project.
Run automation.
Temporarily halt the test when x number of consecutive die fails.
Check the data in wafer map data tab.
Check the Pass/Fail in wafer map.
The first four steps are detailed in the previous section Importing a custom setting project file.
Create a new project for SM
For each .csv file, it is better to create a new project. From the ACS menu, choose File->New, and
ACS will show the dialog below. Enter the Project Name to make a new project in ACS (see next
Figure).
Figure 7–41: Create a new project for SM
Figure 451: Create a new project for SM
Import the SM .csv setting file
From the ACS File menu, click Import-->Test Plan File(*.csv) (see next Figure).
Figure 7–42: Select stress migration .csv format file
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Figure 452: Select stress migration .csv file
Confirm the .csv data
After the .csv file is selected, ACS will show the ImportDataConfirm dialog box (see next Figure).
Confirm the data file is the desired test file, then click OK to move to the next step.
Figure 7–43: Import Data Confirmed
Figure 453: Import Data Confirmed
There are two import modes:
1. Refresh - replace existing one if they are same in test setup tree.
2. Append - append in test setup tree.
After you import the .csv data file, the test setup tree, including the SM script test modules, is created
automatically (see next Figure).
Figure 7–44: Test setup tree including SM script test modules
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Figure 454: Test setup tree including SM script test modules
Setup wafer map
Next, you will be ready to setup the wafer map and the site to be tested (see next Figure).
Figure 7–45: Setup wafer map and site to be tested
Figure 455: Setup wafer map and site to be tested
Run Automation
After you have setup the wafer map, you can run automation (see next Figure).
Figure 7–46: Run Automation
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Figure 456: Run Automation
Temporarily halt the test when x number of consecutive die fails
An x number of consecutive die is read from .csv file. If that x number is greater than 0, ACS will
check the rule automatically.
When consecutive dies fail and reach the setting number x, you will see next Figure a dialog box (see
next Figure). Click Yes to exit the test, click No to continue.
Figure 7–47: Run Automation complete
Figure 457: Run Automation complete
Check Testing Data In Wafer Map Data Tab
The displayed testing data can be updated when switching from wafer map to data tab. You can click
the Refresh function to update data. This tab can display one wafer test data (see next Figure).
Figure 7–48: Check Testing Data In Wafer Map Data Tab
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Figure 458: Check testing data in Wafer Map Data tab
You can click to save the whole wafer data to .csv file when that wafer test is complete in the
Preference Settings. You also can click Save To .csv to save the current data to a .csv file.
Check Pass/Fail in Wafer And Bin Plot panel
You can check pass/fail based on Subsite or Device selection when testing is in process. When you
click Subsite or Device, the wafer map will be updated, however, it cannot be updated dynamically
without selection (see next Figure).
Figure 7–49: Check Pass/Fail in Wafer Bin Plot
Figure 459: Check Pass_Fail in Wafer Bin Plot
Example 3: Save a .csv file
Create a new project:
1. From the ACS menu, click File->New. The ACS software will display a dialog box where you must
enter a Project Name to make a new project (see next Figure).
Figure 7–50: Create a new project
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Figure 460: Create a new project
2. Add a new device and test module.
3. Add a new device that is a Series 2600A SourceMeter instrument.
4. Add a new ITM test module and configure its settings.
Selected test sites:
Click the Patterns, and click some sites in the Wafer Map (see next Figure).
Figure 7–51: Selected test sites
Figure 461: Selected test sites
Click test wafers
1. Click the Automation panel and open the Advanced Settings dialog. Click the Wafer 01 and Wafer
02, and then click OK and Save this project (see next Figure).
Figure 7–52: Selected Test Wafer
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Figure 462: Selected Test Wafer
2. Set the Lot ID and Operator, and choose the way to save the .csv file.
There are three ways to save the .csv file (see next Figure).
a.
b.
c.
Automatically save to .csv file after each wafer
Automatically save .csv file after each site
Parameter in Column
Figure 7–53: Three ways to save a .csv file
Figure 463: Three ways to save a .csv file
Run the project:
Run this project and you can see that the displayed testing data can be updated when switching from
the wafer map to the data tab (see next Figure).
Figure 7–54: Testing data in the wafer map to data tab
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Figure 464: Testing data in the Wafer Map Data tab
Test results are saved in a .csv file:
1. After the run is finished, in the …\ACS\Projects\test\kdf, there is a folder named like this
xxx_WaferInfo (xxx is Wafer ID‘s name). Open this folder, there are two folder and two .csv files
(see next Figure).
Figure 7–55: The save data folder
Figure 465: The save data folder
NOTE
The .csv files are created by checking the Automatically save to .csv file after each wafer.
2. Click two wafers in step 4, so two .csv files are created, the data are saved after each wafer.
Open Wafer_1_20080529092635.csv (see next Figure). This wafer contains four test site, as
shown in H,I, J,K row.
Figure 7–56: The .csv file saved after each wafer
Figure 466: The .csv file saved after each wafer
NOTE
The folder Wafer_1 and Wafer_2 are created by checking the Automatically save .csv file after each
site.
3. Open folder Wafer_1, you can see four .csv files (see next Figure). Because you selected four
test sites in step 3, there are four .csv files, which are created after each site.
Figure 7–57: Open the Wafer_1 folder
Figure 467: Open the Wafer_1 folder
4. Open a .csv file in …\ACS\Projects\test\kdf\test_WaferInfo\Wafer_1 (see next Figure). This .csv is
saved after each site, so there is only one site.
Figure 7–58:The .csv file saved after each site
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Figure 468: The .csv file saved after each site
Check the Parameter in the column:
1. Check the Parameter in column in the data tab, save and run this project again. Then open the
Wafer_1_20080529104534.csv in the …\ACS\Projects\test\kdf\test_WaferInfo (see next Figure).
Figure 7–59: The .csv file saved after each wafer and Parameter
Figure 469: The .csv file saved after each wafer and parameter
NOTE
You can see the Parameter in column F (see next Figure), is the same as rows 1 – 5 of column A in
previous Figure.
2. Open Site_n1p1_20080529104534.csv\\ACS\Projects\test\kdf\test_WaferInfo\Wafer_1 (see next
Figure).
Figure 7–60: The .csv file saved after each site and Parameter
Figure 470: The .csv file saved after each site and parameter
You can see the Parameter in the column (see next two Figures) is the same as the rows in the
Deselect a parameter in a column Figure.
Figure 7–61: Select a parameter in a column
Figure 471: Select a parameter in a column
Figure 7–62: Deselect a parameter in a column
Figure 472: Deselect a parameter in a column
NOTE
All saved test results reported are based the times checked in the limits page.
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Section 8
Statistics
In this section:
Statistics introduction ............................................................... 8-1
Required files ........................................................................... 8-2
Statistics limitations .................................................................. 8-2
Statistics settings ..................................................................... 8-2
Statistics introduction
Statistics is the science of making effective use of numerical data relating to groups of individuals or
experiments. It deals with all aspects of this, including not only the collection, analysis and
interpretation of such data, but also the planning of the collection of data, in terms of the design of
surveys and experiments.
Statistical methods can be used to summarize or describe a collection of data. This is useful in
research, when communicating the results of experiments. In addition, patterns in the data may be
modeled in a way that accounts for randomness and uncertainty in the observations, and are then
used to draw inferences about the process being studied.
Using the Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) statistics feature, you can create an output file in a
Keithley data file (.kdf). This feature also supports multiple .kdf files. By using this feature, you can do
simple analysis on test results and make necessary adjustments and modify test conditions.
Additionally, you can view the online data plot results while ACS testing is in progress.
Run-time monitoring
When ACS is running, you can do the statistic analysis at the same time. This will save you time and
allow you to find any problems in the run-time monitoring. While in online mode it allows you to
automate all reports (including the statistical analysis), as well as notify you of abnormal yield levels
or parameters that are not within specifications. Parameter specifications that are monitored in runtime include: semiconductor test results; mean; sigma; range levels, etc.
Broad statistical analysis range
ACS can perform statistical analysis on your semiconductor data, from analyzing a mean, median, or
sigma. Using the built in editor, that has many filtering options, you can change the data and
immediately see the effect on mean, median, sigma, or range. The built in report lets you easily find
the optimal parameter test limits.
Easy data import and control
You can start the semiconductor data analysis by either manually selecting the test data files from
ACS for semiconductor characterization statistical data analysis, or using the running data
automatically. ACS offers a very easy and flexible interface to select test data files and filter the
information to process for your semiconductor characterization or production analysis. When
leveraging the ACS built in .kdf file, you can review the data file headers at insertion time.
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Required files
Keithley data files (.kdf) for all plots when ACS is not running.
Statistics limitations
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Only supports the .kdf files for statistical analysis and does not support database.
Only supports the common statistical modeling analysis.
Does not support the ability to compare the history data with the online data.
Supports all the test modules except PTM when ACS enters demo mode.
Not compatible with previous versions; only supports ACS version 4.2 and higher.
Statistics settings
Statistics configuration
NOTE
You will need to select the plot type first, then configure the plot settings. Depending on the type of
plot, the settings may differ between the selected plots. There are five different plot types: Wafer
Mapping; Trend; BOX; Histogram; CDF (see next Figure).
Figure 8–1: Plot types
Figure 473: Plot types
Here are the basic steps you need to follow when running a statistical analysis.
NOTE
You should setup Run-Time Settings when you want run-time analysis. To do this, click the box
Enable Run-Time (see next Figure), and you can specify the variables you want to analyze. If you
want to create statistics offline, you do not need to do Run-Time Settings.
Figure 8...Run-Time Settings and Enable Run-Time
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Figure 474: Run-Time Settings and Enable Run-Time
1. Select the plot type and configure the plot settings (see next Figure):
2. Click the Update Plot function.
3. Repeat as necessary.
Figure 8–2: Statistics panel
Figure 475: Statistics panel
Two modes are supported for statistical analysis. The data used in the two modes is from different
sources:
1. Run-Time
•
The plot will be refreshed from memory data when ACS is running and you use the Run-Time Settings
function.
2. Offline
•
The plots show the results of the selected .kdf files. You will need to select the .kdf files that you want to
analyze.
NOTE
No matter what mode, the plot will be refreshed after clicking Update Plot.
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Statistics operations
The following steps show you how to do simple statistical analysis and must be done in the order as
described.
NOTE
If you want to analyze a test in Run-Time mode, you must click the Run-Time Settings function and
choose Enable Run-Time. Then you must choose the devices you want to analyze in the test tree
(see next Figure):
Figure 8...Run-Time Settings of Statistics
Figure 476: Run-Time Settings of Statistics
NOTE
If you are in evaluation mode, you must import the data file (.kdf) that you want to analyze.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Select the plot type you want to analyze.
Choose the Settings that you need, based on the plot type.
Click the Update Plot function.
Repeat these steps as many times as necessary (see next Figure).
Figure 8–: Statistical analysis flow chart
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Figure 477: Statistical operation flow chart
Plot types
There are five plot types available in the statistics feature. The parameter settings depend on the plot
type selected (for example, Wafer Mapping, Trend, BOX, Histogram, and CDF).
NOTE
There are different tabs available for each plot type. For example, the Wafer Mapping plot contains
WaferMapping and data. If you select the Histogram and/or NormalCDF on property settings, you will
have these plots available, as well as clicking the Update Plot function. Note that it is also possible to
export data from the data tab to a .csv file by right-clicking on the data (see next Figure). You can
also copy the selected data.
Figure 8...data tab Export
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Figure 478: data tab Export
Wafer Mapping plot
The Wafer Mapping plot is able to rapidly and automatically create a map of the entire wafers with the
testing results displayed. This enables rapid process feedback early to avoid adding expense to
wafers, or portions of wafers, that may have poor yields. It also provides rapid feedback to the
fabrication process, allowing you to make adjustments to the process to improve the overall yield.
The Wafer Mapping plot works at the site level, as one site on the wafer map is displayed by one
state. That means only a single data point comes from every site for the selected variables that are
used in the wafer mapping statistic function. You will have to locate the variable value by location,
such as lot, wafer, or device, for the RTM, including the subdevice, and then switch the wafer to view
the site distribution.
You can view the Histogram and CDF plot at the same time, if desired. Use the settings to determine
your parameters.
Wafer Mapping parameters
After choosing the Wafer Mapping plot type, the parameters you need to configure are KDFs,Wafer,
Location, Variable, Bin Info, and Property.
Set the Wafer Mapping Settings
1. Click the ellipsis next to the KDFs function to add a file (see next Figure).
Figure 8–5: Wafer Mapping GUI settings
Figure 479: Wafer Mapping GUI settings
After you click the ellipsis, you will need to click the Add function (see next Figure).
Figure 8–6: Add KDF files
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Figure 480: Add KDF files
Once you click Add, you will have to choose the KDF file that you want to upload (see next Figure).
NOTE
You can select more than one KDF file by pushing the Ctrl key plus clicking with your mouse and
selecting one file at time, or pushing the Shift key plus clicking your mouse to select several files that
are in sequence.
Figure 8–7: Choose KDF file
Figure 481: Choose KDF file
1. Choose the Wafer from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8–8: Wafer Mapping parameters Wafer selection
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2. Choose the test module Location (see next Figure).
NOTE
Only one Location can be selected.
Figure 8–9: Wafer Mapping parameters Location selection
Figure 482: Wafer Mapping parameters Location selection
3. Choose the Variable from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8–10: Wafer Mapping parameters Variable selection
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Figure 483: Wafer Mapping parameters Variable selection
4. When you select the Bin information parameter, a dialog box opens where you must input the
desired parameters. For example, you must enter the desired start point value and stop point
value. The Print (True) option will print the data on the WaferMapping. Additionally, you can
import settings or export settings that you have created (see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: Wafer Mapping Bin information parameters
Figure 484: Wafer Mapping Bin info parameter
NOTE
The Bin Settings can be saved to a .csv file and uploaded at a later time for testing purposes. Once
you input all the desired parameters for your Bin (color, minimum and maximum value, and number of
bins), you must choose OK to continue, or choose Cancel to end.
5. Select the ellipsis next to the Property item to enable the advanced settings (see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: Wafer Mapping parameters Property
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Figure 485: Wafer Mapping parameters Property
Histogram: (True) Generates a histogram of the data when you click Update Plot.
Normal CDF: (True) Generates the cumulative distribution function plot when you click Update Plot.
Scientific notation: (True) Enables the Wafer Mapping data to display in scientific notation.
Precise place: Sets the number of effective digits of the data displayed in the Wafer Mapping.
1. After you have set all of the parameters, you must click the Update Plot function to see the
newest plots (see the next Figures).
Figure 8–12: Wafer Mapping plot
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NOTE
You can select both the Histogram and NormalCDF plot. After you update the plots, the Wafer
Mapping viewing area will contain a tab for each plot (see the next Figures).
Figure 8–12: Histogram plot pane
Figure 486: Histogram plot pane
Figure 8–13: NormalCDF plot pane
Figure 487: NormalCDF plot pane
In the wafer mapping plot, you can save the plot by clicking on the save icon (see next Figure).
Figure 8–6: Wafer Map save icon
Figure 488: Wafer Map Plot icons
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•
Bin Value: saves the coordinates and values of all the sites to a .vbf file. If the site contains no
data, the value is -1 by default.
•
Bin NO (Bin Number): saves the coordinates and bin numbers of the sites in the selected bins to
a .nbf file. If the site is not in any bin, the bin number will be -1 by default.
•
Plot: saves the plot to a .png, .eps, or .svg file.
The following is the Save dialog box for the Bin value, Bin NO. or Plot (see next Figure).
Figure 8–7: Wafer Mapping Save
Figure 489: Wafer Mapping Save
Trend plot
The Trend plot is at the wafer level. That means a single point comes from every wafer for the
selected variable. The mean, minimum, and maximum values, which are calculated from all site
values, are shown in the plot for each wafer.
The limit information of the variable and current test data will be loaded automatically when ACS is
testing. Select multiple .kdf files by clicking on the .kdf files parameter settings if ACS is not running.
You will see the updated plot when you select the Update Plot function.
The following is the Trend plot GUI settings (see next Figure).
Figure 8–8: Trend plot GUI settings
Figure 490: Trend Plot GUI settings
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Choosing the parameter settings is similar to the Wafer Mapping settings, however, there are some
differences. The parameters you need to configure are KDFs, Wafers, Location, Variable, Filter, and
Limit.
Set the Trend Settings
1. Click the ellipsis next to the KDFs function to add a file.
2. After you click the ellipsis, you will need to click the Add function (see next Figure).
NOTE
You can select more than one KDF file by pushing the Ctrl key plus clicking with your mouse and
selecting one file at time, or pushing the Shift key plus clicking your mouse to select several files that
are in sequence.
Figure 8...Add KDF files
Figure 491: Add KDF files
3. Once you click Add, you will have to choose the KDF file that you want to upload (see next
Figure).
Figure 8...Choose KDF file
Figure 492: Choose KDF file
4. Next, choose the Wafer (or more than one) from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8...Trend parameters Wafers selection
Figure 493: Trend parameters Wafers selection
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5. Next, you must choose the test module Location (see next Figure).
NOTE
Only one Location can be selected.
Figure 8–9: Trend parameters Location selection
Figure 494: Trend parameters Location selection
6. Next, choose the Variable from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8–10: Trend parameters Variable selection
Figure 495: Trend parameters Variable selection
7. When you click the ellipsis for the Filter setting, the dialog box named Settings opens where you
can set the minimum and maximum of the variable that you choose based on the .kdf file
selected. For example, you must enter the desired minimum setting and maximum setting that
you want to measure in your plot.
Figure 8–11: Trend parameters Filter Settings
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Figure 496: Trend parameters Filter Settings
8. Select the ellipsis next to Limit so that you can determine the Target specification limit, the lower
specification limit (LSL), and the upper specification limit (USL). The default value for the Target,
LSL, and USL is determined by the limit files or limit settings in ACS (see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: Trend parameters Limit Settings
Figure 497: Trend parameters Limit Settings
9. After you have set all of the parameters, you must select the Update Plot function to see the
newest plots. There are two tabs where you can view the plot information: Trend and data (see
next Figure).
Figure 8–11: Trend plot tabs
Figure 498: Trend plot tabs
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BOX plot
The BOX plot is at the lot level and will help you to display differences between populations without
making any assumptions of the underlying statistical distribution. In other words, you can see
differences between lots for selected variables. You are able to select the lots by selecting multiple
.kdf file parameter settings and you can select different devices and different variables to see the
differences between the selected wafers.
The following is the BOX GUI settings (see next Figure).
Figure 8–9: BOX GUI settings
Figure 499: BOX GUI settings
Choosing the parameter settings is similar to the Wafer Mapping settings, however, there are some
differences. The parameters you need to configure are KDFs, Wafer, Location, Variable, Filter, and
Property.
Set the BOX Settings
1. Click the ellipsis next to the KDFs function to add multiple .kdf files.
2. After you click the ellipsis, you will need to click the Add function (see next Figure).
Figure 8...Add KDF files
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Figure 500: Add KDF files
3. Once you click Add, you will have to choose the KDF file that you want to upload (see next
Figure).
NOTE
You can select more than one KDF file by pushing the Ctrl key plus clicking with your mouse and
selecting one file at time, or pushing the Shift key plus clicking your mouse to select several files that
are in sequence.
Figure 8...Choose KDF file
Figure 501: Choose KDF file
4. Next, choose the Wafer from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8...BOX parameters Wafer selection
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Figure 502: BOX parameters Wafer selection
5. Next, you must choose the test module Location (see next Figure).
NOTE
Only one Location can be selected.
Figure 8–9: BOX parameters Location selection
Figure 503: Trend parameters Location selection
6. Next, choose the Variable from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8–10: BOX parameters Variable Settings
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Figure 504: BOX parameters Variable Settings
NOTE
When you choose True, you will see a percentage change from the previous lot to the last lot. Also,
when you choose False, you will see all of the lots used in the plot.
7. When you click the ellipsis for the Filter setting, you will see a dialog box named Settings where
you can set the minimum and maximum of the variable that you choose based on the .kdf file
selected. For example, you must enter the desired minimum setting and maximum setting that
you want to measure in your plot (see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: BOX Filter Settings
Figure 505: Filter Settings
8. Select the ellipsis next to the Property item in order to set a Normal CDF, a Log Normal CDF, and
a Shift (see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: BOX parameters Property
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Figure 506: BOX parameters Property
Normal CDF: (True) Generates the NormalCDF plot.
Log Normal CDF: (True) Generates the LogNormalCDF plot.
Shift: (True) Computes and plots the percentage shift of each selected lot (.kdf) as compared to the
lot with the earliest time stamp. For example, if three .kdf files are selected, then the file with the
earliest timestamp is used as the baseline. The other two lots are compared to the baseline lot and
the equation below is used in the calculation the comparsion
1. After you have set all of the parameters, you must select the Update Plot function to see the
newest plots. There are two tabs where you can view the plot information: BOX and data (see
next Figure).
NOTE
th
The bottom of the BOX is the 25 percentile of the lot and the top is the 75th percentile. Also, the red
band represents the 50th percentile (the median). The whiskers of the lot defines the length of the
whiskers as a function of the inner quartile range. They extend to the most extreme data point. The
default is 1.5 IQR (interquartile range).
Figure 8–11: BOX plot tabs
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Figure 507: BOX plot tabs
Histogram
The Histogram feature is a graphical display of tabulated frequencies indicated with a bar graph (see
next Figure).
Figure 8–10: Histogram plot pane
The following is the Histogram GUI parameter settings (see next Figure).
Figure 8–9: Histogram GUI settings
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Figure 508: Histogram GUI settings
Choosing the parameter settings is similar to the Wafer Mapping settings, however, there are some
differences. The parameters you need to configure are KDFs, Wafer, Location, Variable, Filter, Limit,
Property, and Compared.
Set the Histogram Settings
1. Click the ellipsis next to the KDFs function to add a file.
2. After you click the ellipsis, you will need to click the Add function (see next Figure).
NOTE
You can select more than one KDF file by pushing the Ctrl key plus clicking with your mouse and
selecting one file at time, or pushing the Shift key plus clicking your mouse to select several files that
are in sequence.
Figure 8...Add KDF files
Figure 509: Add KDF files
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3. Once you click Add, you will have to choose the KDF file that you want to upload (see next
Figure).
Figure 8...Choose KDF file
Figure 510: Choose KDF file
4. Next, choose the Wafer from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8...Histogram parameters Wafer selection
Figure 511: Histogram parameters Wafer selection
5. Next, you must choose the test module Location (see next Figure).
NOTE
Only one Location can be selected.
Figure 8–9: Histogram parameters Location selection
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Figure 512: Trend parameters Location selection
6. Next, choose the Variable from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8–10: Histogram parameters Variable Settings
Figure 513: Histogram parameters Variable Settings
7. When you click the ellipsis for the Filter setting, you will see a dialog box named Settings where
you can set the minimum and maximum of the variable that you choose based on the .kdf file
selected. For example, you must enter the desired minimum setting and maximum setting that
you want to measure in your plot (see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: Histogram Filter Settings
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Figure 514: Filter Settings
8. Select the ellipsis next to Limit so that you can determine the lower specification limit (LSL), and
the upper specification limit (USL)(see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: Histogram Limit Settings
9. Select the ellipsis next to Property and you will see a dialog box where you can make the
following settings (see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: Histogram Property Settings
Figure 515: Histogram Property Settings
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•
display_filter_span: if this is False and x_auto_scale is True, the histogram is generated
according to the bins number. In other conditions, the histogram will be generated according to
the bins span.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
bins: sets the bins number.
normed: (True) sets counts to normalized.
x_auto_scale: (True) x-axis is auto-scaled.
x_min_scale: minimum value of x-axis when x_auto_scale is False.
x_max_scale: maximum value of x-axis when x_auto_scale is False.
y_auto_scale: (True) y-axis is auto-scaled.
y_min_scale: minimum value of y-axis when y_auto_scale is False.
y_max_scale: maximum value of y-axis when y_auto_scale is False.
mean: (True) displays mean value on the histogram.
sigma: (True) displays 1σ sigma limit on the histogram.
3sigma: (True) displays 3σ sigma limit on the histogram.
limit: (True) displays limit values in the histogram.
PDF: (True) displays probability density function overlayed on the histogram.
Cpk: (True) displays the process capability overlayed on the histogram.
1. Click the ellipsis next to Compared and a dialog box opens where you can add a lot to compare.
The histogram displays the differences. Leave the Compared option blank when you do not want
to compare the differences.
2. After you have set all of the parameters, you must click the Update Plot function to see the
newest plots. There are two tabs where you can view the plot information: Histogram and data
(see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: Histogram plot tabs
Figure 516: Histogram plot tabs
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Cumulative distribution function (CDF)
In ACS software, the CDF feature is a graphical display of probability distribution that is indicated with
a line plot (see next Figure).
Figure 8–12: Normal CDF plot pane
Figure 517: Normal CDF plot pane
The following is the CDF GUI parameter settings (see next Figure).
Figure 8–9: CDF GUI parameter settings
Figure 518: CDF GUI parameter settings
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Choosing the parameter settings is similar to the Histogram settings. The parameters you need to
configure are KDFs, Wafer, Location, Variable, Filter, Property, and Compared.
Set the CDF Settings
1. Click the ellipsis next to the KDFs function to add a file.
2. After you click the ellipsis, you will need to click the Add function (see next Figure).
NOTE
You can select more than one KDF file by pushing the Ctrl key plus clicking with your mouse and
selecting one file at time, or pushing the Shift key plus clicking your mouse to select several files that
are in sequence.
Figure 8...Add KDF files
Figure 519: Add KDF files
3. Once you click Add, you will have to choose the KDF file that you want to upload (see next
Figure).
Figure 8...Choose KDF file
Figure 520: Choose KDF file
4. Next, choose the Wafer from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8...CDF parameters Wafer selection
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Figure 521: CDF parameters Wafer selection
5. Next, you must choose the test module Location (see next Figure).
NOTE
Only one Location can be selected.
Figure 8–9: CDF parameters Location selection
Figure 522: Trend parameters Location selection
6. Next, choose the Variable from the drop-down list (see next Figure).
Figure 8–10: CDF parameters Variable Settings
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Figure 523: CDF parameters Variable Settings
7. When you click the ellipsis for the Filter setting, you will see a dialog box named Settings where
you can set the minimum and maximum of the variable that you choose based on the .kdf file
selected. For example, you must enter the desired minimum setting and maximum setting that
you want to measure in your plot (see next Figure).
Figure 8–11: Histogram Filter Settings
Figure 524: Filter Settings
8. Select the ellipsis next to Property.
NOTE
There are three types of CDFs for you to use: normal, log normal and Weibull. To choose the type of
CDF you want, you must click the ellipsis next to the Property Settings, then click the down-arrow on
the Settings dialog box (see next Figure).
Figure 8...Types of CDFs
Figure 525: Types of CDFs
9. Click the ellipsis next to Compared and a dialog box opens where you can add a lot to compare.
The histogram displays the differences. Leave the Compared option blank when you do not want
to compare the differences.
10. After you have set all of the parameters, you must click the Update Plot function to see the
newest plots. There are two tabs where you can view the plot information: CDF and data (see
next Figure).
Figure 8–11: CDF plot tabs
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Figure 526: CDF plot tabs
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Section 9
Summary Report
In this section:
Summary report panel.............................................................. 9-1
Generating a summary report .................................................. 9-2
Summary report panel
Select the Summary Report function from the View panel, and the Summary Report panel displays in
the Edit panel (see next Figure). A blank Lot Summary Report displays in the work area.
Figure 8–1: Lot Summary Report
Figure 527: Lot Summary Report
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Check Data with Limits – Used to choose whether to check the testing results with the limits setting in
the test plan.
Data File – Used to choose a Keithley data file (.kdf). Click the Browse function and choose the target
data file (.kdf).
Ext. Limits File (Optional) – Used to choose an external Keithley limits file (.kdf). This option is
available only after the Check Data with Limits is selected. You can click the Browse function and
choose a limits file to replace the test plan limits setting.
Include Raw Data – Used to click whether or not the report will contain Raw Data. By default, this
checkbox is deselected.
HTML Style checkbox – Used to click the style of report; HTML or plain text.
•
•
•
Generate Report function – Click this function to start generating a summary report.
Print function – Click this function to print the generated report shown in the work area.
Save function – Click this function to save the current report.
Generating a summary report
After testing is completed, you can generate a summary report and view the results of a test in the
summary report. The summary report contains such information as testing time, operator, and
measured data from a Keithley data file .kdf, and pass/fail information based on test data and limits
setting. The Summary Report function provides the following capabilities:
•
You can generate a Summary Report and a Raw Data report (see next Figure Figure 8–2). The
Summary Report is a summarized report that includes means, standard deviations and other
statistics. The Raw Data report is a detailed report that includes all the raw data.
Figure 8–2: Lot Summary Report demo
Figure 528: Lot Summary Report demo
•
You can generate an HTML script report and a plain text report (see next Figure). In an HTMLstyle raw report, a hyperlink is set on each row label of the summary table and on the array
results. If you click the row label, the cursor will jump to the corresponding column in the Raw
Data table. If you click an array that is shown as a hyperlink, it will expand.
Figure 8–3: Plain Text Format Report
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Figure 529: Plain Text format report
•
You can sort tested data in the reports according to Limits, Critical, or Results.
Settings for each of these reports are discussed in more detail “Summary Report Panel” earlier in this
section.
As seen in the previous figures, each report has two different parts – Lot Summary Report and Raw
Data. Each is in an HTML-style and in plain text formats.
Each report is preceded by a report header that is called the Lot Summary Report. The report header
displays information about the lot, process, device, testing time, and operator. The header lines are
displayed on each report page. Raw Data consists of all raw tested data. You can choose whether
you want to display Raw Data.
Understanding the lot summary report
Header: A header is placed at the top of the Lot Summary Report. An empty field in the header
indicates that the corresponding field in the data file is empty at the time of searching. The data is
listed with test names as row labels on the left and test information is in columns across the top. The
test information consists of the mean, minimum, and maximum for the sites based on the executed
testing plan (see next Figure).
Figure 8–4: Wafer Summary Report
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Figure 530: Wafer Summary Report
Title: if only one wafer saved in the current loaded kdf file, the title will be “Wafer Summary Report:
%wafer id%”. If multi-wafer saved in the kdf file, then the title will be “Lot Summary Report: %wafer
id%” (see next Figure).
Following the header is a series of column field labels. These fields contain various data derived from
the .kdf file. Some fields, such as %Spec and %Vld, may include an asterisk next to the data points to
indicate the data is out of range, alerting you to notice potentially bad data points. The following
paragraphs describe the fields that serve as the column indices for the standard report shown in the
above two figures.
•
Lot/Wafer: if single wafer option has been selected before generating the kdf file, the label will be
“Wafer”, and the wafer id value will be the same as the title. Otherwise, the label would be “Lot”.
Lot id value is the one input in the Auto-Test Information box in Automation (this value has been
saved in the kdf file)
NOTE
There are two condition that will generate a one-wafer kdf file, one is in single wafer mode, the title is
“Wafer Summary Report: %wafer id%”, the lot/wafer label is “Wafer”. The other is that we only click
on wafer to be tested in the automation or stop the test in the first wafer, the title is “Wafer Summary
Report: %wafer id%”, the lot/wafer label is “Lot.”
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•
•
Operator: defined in the Auto-Test Information box in Automation, input parameter, saved in kdf.
•
•
Start time: the test start time, saved in kdf.
•
•
Sys: the Computer name, saved in kdf.
•
•
Test station: Test station number, default value is 1, saved in kdf.
Process: defined as Test process level in the Auto-Test Information box in Automation, input
parameter, saved in kdf.
Device: defined as Die Type in the Auto-Test Information box in Automation, input parameter,
saved in kdf.
Test name: Tester name, defined as Equipment ID in the Auto-Test Information box in
Automation, input parameter, saved in kdf.
Limits: The limits file name. The limits file used for generating the summary file. If external limits
file has been specified, the value will be the specified file, if not a temp file named “temp.klf” will
be used during the generation, after generation, the temp file will be deleted automatically.
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Special symbols:
•
“?” - If the raw data is outside valid limits, a “?” symbol will be added beside the data, and the
data will be marked with red color.
•
“*” - If the raw data is outside spec limits, a “*” symbol will be added beside the data, and the data
will be marked with red color.
•
“#” - If the raw data of a critical parameter is outside spec limits, a “#” symbol will be added beside
the data, and the data will be marked with red color. The critical part is defined in the limits editor.
•
“-” - If there is no corresponding value to the output parameter in the site, the cell value would be
“-”
Total num of wafers/sites: Total number of wafers and total number of sites can be got from the kdf
file (see next Figure).
Statistic table: Following the header is a series of column field labels. These fields contain various
data derived from the “.kdf” file. Some fields, such as %Spec and %Vld, may include an asterisk next
to the data points that indicates the data is out of range and gives alerts on the potentially bad data
points. The following paragraphs describe these fields that serve as the column indices for the
standard report shown in the above two figures.
•
•
Name: The unique test output id. This is the parameter name to which the data is corresponding.
•
Mean: Mean value of all the data for this parameter. The average for each parameter is
calculated from the data of all testing sites. It is the arithmetic mean of all the results
•
Sdev: SDEV value of all the data for this parameter, depend on the data and the target value
defined in the limits editor. This is the standard deviation from the mean of the parameter’s data
points.
•
•
•
Min: minimum value of all the data for this parameter.
•
Specl and Spech: spec low value and high value defined in the limits editor. These are the
specification constraints from the limits file. These values show quick identification for data points
that are out of range. If no limits file is specified, the default value is -1.00e+16 and 1.00e+16,
respectively.
•
%spec: yield value of the data inside the spec limits, if the value is less than 50, a “*” will be
appended, and marked with red color. This is the percentage of data points that are within SpecL
and SpecH.
•
Cnt: the total records number of this parameter(times this parameter has been tested in the
automation)
•
%vld: yield value of the data inside the valid limits. if the value is less than 50, a “*” will be
appended, and marked with red color.
Units: The parameter units, defined in the limits editor. This field is blank if no limits file is
specified in the Summary Report panel.
Max: maximum value of all the data for this parameter
%sedv: %SDEV value of all the data for this parameter, depend on the data and the target value
defined in the limits editor. This is the standard deviation deselected as a percentage offset from
the mean.
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Understanding raw data
Raw Data is an expanded part of the Lot Summary Report. The additional data found in Raw Data
consists of the actual testing data derived from the .kdf file.
Raw Data uses the same header file as the Lot Summary Report. The parameters are listed in
columns instead of rows. The information shown in a standard report is listed in the bottom rows on
each raw report page. This information is calculated in the same way as in the Lot Summary Report.
In Raw data, separated to different section with each wafer, array data will be located in a list.
Different color and symbols will be used regarding the data value and limits setting (refer to the
special symbol section).
Wafer statistic table:
•
•
Count: the number of data inside the valid limits in the current wafer
mean/stdev/%stdev/min/max: mean/stdev/%stdev/min/max value of data in the current wafer
Customize user data path and convert data
User data path
In the Tools Menu, click Preference to set the binning file and data file path. After you click
Preference, a dialog box appears (see next Figures).
Figure 8–5: Access Preferences in the Tools menu
Figure 531: Access Preferences in the Tools menu
Figure 8–6: User Data Path in Preference setting
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Figure 532: User Data Path in Preferences setting
A User Data Path dialog allows you to click the directory path for the software parameter data. This
path can be read in UAP, letting you put the data file in this path. Also it can be read by Convert Data
dialog as a default output data file path.
Convert data
This is a GUI for converting .kdf file into NDF, NBF and NRF files. It can be accessed from the Tools
menu bar (see next Figures).
Figure 8–7: Access Convert Data from the Tools menu
Figure 533: Access Convert Data in the Tools menu
Figure 8–8: Convert Data
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Figure 534: Convert Data
•
•
Keithley Data File: Used for browsing the .kdf file.
•
Wafer Report – Select Wafer: Used to select which wafer to generate a report on.
Generate Wafer Report/NDF/NBF: This check box tells the software whether to generate the
corresponding file.
Output Folder: Used to store all NDF/NBF/NRF files.
ACS software has a large device test library, including the parametric libraries, WLR library, and
Common library. In ACS software, you can also build a library to import and use. The tables below
summarize all the test modules in the Device test, WLR libraries, and Common library. Detailed
descriptions on each module are in this section.
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Section 10
ACS Hardware Configurations
In this section:
ACS hardware configurations introduction ............................. 10-1
ACS hardware configuration utility ......................................... 10-2
Instrument system configuration .......................................... 10-13
Configuration file locations ................................................... 10-31
ACS hardware configurations introduction
The Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) hardware configuration utility is used to manage the
hardware configuration of the Keithley instruments:
•
Model 707A, 707B, 708A and 708B Switching Matrices
•
Series 2400 SourceMeter®
•
Series 2600A SourceMeter
•
Series 3400 PGU
•
Series 3700 System Switch/Multimeter
•
Model 4200-SCS Semiconductor Characterization System
•
External GPIB instruments and all external system components supported by the ACS software tools
Using the hardware configuration utility, these instruments can be easily added, configured, and
removed from the system configuration.
NOTE
If you make changes to the hardware (for example, remove one instrument, change the 707B work
mode, change node information, etc.) while you are running ACS, you should follow this procedure as
follows:
1, Click the Scan Hardware function in the toolbar to re-scan hardware.
2, Click the Save function to update the changes.
3, Restart ACS for the changes to take effect.
4. Check the Test Setup to ensure the new hardware configuration is correct.
Section 10: ACS Hardware Configurations
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ACS hardware configuration utility
The hardware configuration utility is used to scan information on the hardware instruments of ACS
and modify configurable properties.
NOTE
When you first start the ACS software, during the start up process, an automatic hardware scan is
accomplished and the configuration is complete.
To start the hardware configuration utility, click the Configure Hardware option from the drop-down list
in the Tools menu (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Start hardware configuration utility
Figure 535: Start hardware configuration utility
The hardware configuration utility main dialog box opens. The interface of the hardware configuration
utility has two parts (see next Figure):
1. The left panel is the Configuration Navigator: all instruments and equipment that are included in
the ACS system configuration are displayed here.
2. The right panel is the Work Area: Instruments and equipment properties are viewed and modified
here.
Figure 16...Hardware configuration utility interface
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Figure 536: Hardware configuration utility interface
The configuration navigator provides a tree view of all instruments and equipment present in the ACS
system configuration. The tree can be expanded and minimized by clicking on the arrows.
The work area shows each instrument in the system configuration and its associated properties.
Clicking an instrument in the configuration navigator causes the associated properties dialog box to
open in the work area.
Configuration navigator
The configuration navigator displays a tree that shows each component present in the system
configuration. Clicking a component, or node, in the configuration navigator causes the properties
associated with the selected component to be displayed in the work area. The next Figure shows a
typical system configuration with the configuration navigator partially expanded.
Figure 16...Configuration navigator view of typical system
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Figure 537: Configuration navigator view of typical system
Scan hardware
The ACS system will automatically detect instruments that have a GPIB address, such as Series
2600A system groups, Model 4200-SCS, and other Keithley instruments. The prober station
configuration information is read from the Model 4200-SCS KITE’s configuration file at the same time
(refer to the Model 4200-SCS documentation for more information).
The hardware configuration can be used to scan following hardware systems:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Series 2600A SourceMeters
Series 2400 SourceMeters
Series 3400 PGU
Model 707B/708B Switching Matrix (configured for ICL mode, not DDC)
Series 3700 Switching Matrix
Model 4200-SCS as child to a system computer
To scan the hardware system, click the Scan Hardware icon on the toolbar.
The system queries the instruments and then displays the updated configuration information in the
configuration navigator and the work area.
Scan the instruments (Series 2400, 2600A, 3400, 3700, and Model 707B, 708B)
ACS will scan the Series 2400, 2600A, 3400, 3700, and Model 707B, 708B instruments and all the
hardware from the GPIB address from 0 to 30.
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Scan Model 4200-SCS
You can use the ACS software to scan the Model 4200-SCS by assigning an IP address in the ACS
preferences dialog. For more information about how to set the preference dialog in the ACS, refer to
Configuring a 4200 ITM.
Simulating scan in Demo mode
If ACS runs in Demo mode, it can simulate a virtual system, such as the Series 2600A, Series 3700,
and Model 4200. The Series 2400 and 3400 cannot be simulated in the scan in Demo mode.
To simulate a scan of the Series 2600A instruments:
1. Click the Scan Hardware icon. The hardware configuration dialog appears (see next Figure).
2. Enter the specific Model of the Series 2600A system, the total groups and the number of SMUs
per group desired.
3. Click OK. The System Configuration tree is displayed in the left pane, with corresponding
information displayed in the work area.
To simulate a scan of the Series 3700 and Model 707B, 708B instruments:
1. Click the Scan Hardware icon. The hardware configuration dialog box opens (see next Figure).
2. Select the KI3700, KI707B, or KI708B from the With matrix as subordinate item in the hardware
configure dialog box. For more information about the Model 3700, 708B, and 708B used as a
subordinate or child, refer to TSP Link connections and Assigning node numbers topic.
3. Click OK.
To simulate a scan of the Model 4200-SCS:
1. Click the Scan Hardware icon. The hardware configuration dialog box opens (see next Figure).
2. Select the With S4200 Demo item in hardware configure dialog box.
3. Click OK.
Figure 16...Hardware configuration (Demo Version)
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Figure 538: Hardware configuration (Demo Version)
Add and delete an external instrument
ACS is capable of adding external instruments. An external instrument is defined as an instrument
that is not configured when you accomplish a hardware scan of the system. An external instrument
must be manually added to your hardware configuration. The following information provides more
information about adding and deleting external instruments to your system.
The supported external instrument categories are:
•
•
•
Switch Matrix
Capacitance Meter
General Purpose Test Instrument
All supported external instrumentation and equipment is controlled by ACS Python Test Modules
(PTM).
ACS provides Python LPT libraries for each supported external instrument (see next Table). You can
use these libraries to create your own test modules.
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ACS also provides a number of standard Python user libraries to control external equipment that is
typically used in semiconductor characterization applications. Standard user-module libraries are
provided for the equipment (see next Table).
Supported external equipment table
Category
Instrument
LPT Library1
User Library2
Switch matrix3
Model 707A/707B Switching Matrix
ki70xlpt
switchctrl4
Capacitance meter5
Model 708A/708B Switching Matrix
Model 590 CV Analyzer
ki4200cvulpt
CVITM6
created by user
TEKSCOPE8
Model 595 CV Analyzer
General purpose test
instrument7
Any IEEE-488 controlled instrument or equipment
HiPowerITM9
1 LPT library is saved in this path: \\ACS\library\pyLibrary\ptmlpt. For more about the ACSLPT library functions, you can refer to the Python
LPT Library.
2 The User library saved in this path: \\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib. For more about the PTMLib library, you can refer to the Python User
Library. To learn more about how to import a PTM, refer to PTM with the .XRC GUI File.
3 ACS supports the Keithley Instruments Model 707A/707B and 708A/708B Switch Matricies. The Model 708A/708B accepts a single matrix
card. The Model 70A7/707B accepts up to six matrix cards. Only one switch matrix can be present in the system configuration at a time.
4 The switchctrl saved in \\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\ switchctrl. To learn more about how to use the switchctrl library, refer to
Switch_Control.
5 Up to four supported capacitance meters may be added to system configuration.
6 The CVITM saved in \\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\CVITM. To learn more about how to use this library, refer to Configuring Capacitor
Meter library.
7 ACS supports up to sixteen general purpose test instruments (GPIs). Two-terminal and four-terminal types may be present in the system
configuration simultaneously, but the total number of GPIs cannot exceed sixteen.
8 The TEKSCOPE is saved in the \\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\TEKSCOPE. To learn more about how to use this library, refer to
Configuring Scope library.
9 The HiPower_24 is saved in the \\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\HiPower_24. To learn more about how to use this library, refer to
Configuring Series 2400 SourceMeter instruments library.
To add or delete an external instrument:
1. Click the add instrument function or right click the instrument node in the configuration navigator
and click the pop-up item (see next Figure).
NOTE
You can add an external instrument to an internal or an external instrument. However, you can only
delete the external instrument from the hardware configuration dialog box (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Add or delete external instruments
Figure 539: Add or delete external instruments
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2. After clicking the Add External Instrument option, the External Instrument dialog box opens. In
this dialog box you must Select the Type of Instrument and the model number, then click OK (see
next Figure).
Figure 16...Switch Matrix
Figure 540: Switch Matrix
Delete an external instrument
1. Click on the external instrument that you want removed in the configuration navigator, then click
the delete external instrument function. A single-item pop-up menu opens; clicking the pop-up
menu item deletes the instrument.
2. Alternatively, you can delete an external instrument by clicking it and then click the DELETE
function. You will sea a message asking to confirm this action (see next two Figures).
Figure 16...Warning message for removing device
Figure 541: Warning message for removing device
Figure 16...Delete an external instrument
Figure 542: Delete an external instrument
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Add switching matrix
Each supported external instrument is added to the system configuration by clicking it from the
category. When you click the Add External Instrument function, the supported instrument categories
will display:
•
Model 707A/707B switching matrix
•
Model 708A/708B switching system
Figure 16...Switch Matrix
Figure 543: Switch Matrix
Capacitance meter
ACS is capable of adding a capacitance meter to the system configuration (see next Figure). The
following types of capacitance meters can be added to system configuration:
•
Model 590 CV Analyzer
•
Model 595 Quasistatic CV Meter
Figure 16...Type of Capacitance Meter
Figure 544: Type of Capacitance Meter
General Test Terminal
ACS is also capable of adding a General Test Terminal. You can click the type of terminal (see next
Figure).
Figure 16...Type of General Test Terminal
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Figure 545: Type of General Test Terminal
ACS is capable of adding general purpose test instrument to the system configuration by selecting it
from the category:
•
Generic 2-Terminal GPI
•
Generic 4-Terminal GPI
•
Custom GPI
When you click either the 2-Terminal or 4-Terminal GPI, a new GUI will open (see next two Figures).
Figure 16...2-Terminal configure interface
Figure 546: 2-Terminal configure interface
Figure 16...4-Terminal configure interface
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Figure 547: 4-Terminal configure interface
Customize terminal
If you selected the custom general purpose instrument (GPI) to customize the terminal, a dialog box
will display (see next Figure) that requires you to fill out some basic information:
1. Click the type of terminal.
•
General purpose test terminal
•
Capacitance meter
•
Other source meter
2. Click the communication.
3.
4.
5.
6.
•
GPIB
•
RS232
Click the GPIB address.
Enter the terminal name.
Enter the Model number.
Enter the LPT Model.
NOTE
The LPT Model name must be the same as the python file name saved in the ptmlpt folder
(\\ACS\library\pyLibrary\ptmlpt). ACS supplies these LPT library packages: ki23xlpt, ki24xxlpt,
ki26xxlpt, ki37xxlpt, ki42cvulpt, ki42xxlpt, ki70xlpt, kiag4284lpt.
7. Click OK to complete the customized terminal configuration.
NOTE
If you choose the Capacitance Meter type of terminal, there are two GPIs that are supported (see
next Figure):
•
•
AG4284
AG4980
Figure 16...Customize Capacitance Meter
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Figure 548: Customize Capacitance Meter
NOTE
The Other Source Meter option supports the KI236, KI237, and KI238 instruments as indicated in the
next figure (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Customize Other Source Meter
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Figure 549: Customize Other Source Meter
Instrument system configuration
Each instrument that is included in the system configuration appears in the configuration navigator.
Clicking a configuration navigator node causes the corresponding attributes or properties to be
displayed in the work area. The following sections describe the properties for each supported
instrument.
KI system configuration
When you click the KI System Configuration in the configuration navigator, the work area displays the
system configuration.
Figure 16...KI System Configuration
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Figure 550: KI System Configuration
Series 2600A system properties
Series 2600A System SourceMeter: single configuration
When the node of a Series 2600A instrument on the configuration navigator is selected, the work
area displays an overview of the Series 2600A.
Series 2600A System SourceMeter: group configuration
When the node of GROUPx on the configuration navigator is selected, the work area displays the
groups’ GPIB address and configuration (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Series 2600A group information
Figure 551: Series 3400 PGU information
Series 2600A SMU configuration
When the node of a Series 2600A SMUx on the configuration navigator is selected, the work area
shows the SMU properties, specifications, and power capacity (see next Figure).
Figure 16...SMU information
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Figure 552: SMU information
The Model of the SMU is displayed in the first line. SMU offset information displays in the second line:
SMU A corresponds to offset=0; SMU B corresponds to offset=1. The next three lines display the
SMU node number, its hardware version, and serial number. The last two lines display the calibration
date: The first is the last time SMU was calibrated, while the second is the scheduled date when the
SMU should be calibrated.
Series 2400 system properties
Series 2400 SMU configuration
When the node of a Series 2400 SMUx on the configuration navigator is selected, the work area
shows the SMU properties, specifications, and power capacity (see next two Figures).
Figure 16...Series 2400 SourceMeter instruments configuration
Figure 553: Series 2400 SourceMeter instruments configuration
Figure 16...SMU information
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Figure 554: SMU configuration information
The Model of the SMU is displayed in the first line. The next three lines display the SMU Serial
Number GPIB_ADDRESS and Instrument name.
Series 3400 system properties
Series 3400 PGU configuration
When the node of a Series 3400 PGU instrument on the configuration navigator is selected, the work
area displays the Instrument Properties and Matrix Connection (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Series 3400 PGU information
Figure 555: Series 3400 PGU information
The model of the PGU is displayed in the Instrument Properties text box and it also contains the GPIB
address and the serial number of the instrument. The Matrix Connection shows the connection
between the channel terminal and the matrix terminal.
NOTE
When the instrument is connected through a matrix, the Connection column will display a column
number. Otherwise, the Connection column will display NC when not connected through a matrix.
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Series 3700 system properties
Model 3706 configuration
When the node of a Model 3706 on the configuration navigator is selected, the work area shows the
Properties, Instrument Connection Scheme, and specifications (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Model 3706 information
Figure 556: Model 3706 information
A Model 3706 Properties tab contains the following:
•
•
Instrument Properties area: displays the node and the two type of cards.
Instrument Connection Scheme area: allows you to specify the instrument connection scheme:
a.
b.
Row-column or instrument-card
Instrument SENSE terminals (for example, local or remote sense for measurements).
The following Instrument Connection Scheme selections define the scheme for interconnections
between the instruments, the switch-matrix rows and columns, and the test system (prober or test
fixture).
•
Row-Column (instruments to rows and prober/test fixture to columns) or Instrument Card (both
instrument and prober/test fixture to columns).
•
Local Sense (connections only to instrument FORCE terminals) or Remote Sense (connections
both to instrument FORCE and SENSE terminals).
•
Series 3700 General Specifications area: displays the information about the specifications.
Series 3700: multiplexer card
The next Figure shows two cards are inserted. They are multiplexer card (Card1) and Switch card
(Card2). When the node of CARD1 is selected, the work area shows properties and specifications
(see next Figure).
Figure 16...Multiplexer card information
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Figure 557: Multiplexer card information
As for Card1, the Card Properties area contains information about Model, Group, Hardware Version,
Serial Number, and Description. Specifications for cards are also listed.
NOTE
If any of the matrices in the system are set to Remote Sense or the S530 Kelvin mode, all of the
Series 2600A and Series 2400 instruments in the system will be set to four-wire (4-W) mode when
executing a test. Also, the SMU Remote Sense option box in the Preferences settings Misc tab will be
disabled. When all the matrices are set to Local Sense, all of the Series 2600A and Series 2400
instruments in the system will be set to two-wire (2-W) mode when executing a test. It is highly
recommended that all the matrices in the system are in the same mode. For more information on the
Preference settings, refer to the Automation section.
Series 3700: matrix card
When the node of CARD2 is selected, the work area shows the Properties and connection options
that may be defined for the device (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Matrix card information
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Figure 558: Matrix card information
The Card Properties area for the matrix card is different from that of the multiplexer card in that there
are two additional areas that provide for the definition of the connection method:
•
•
Rows area
Columns area
In the Rows area, the combo boxes labeled 1 through 6 correspond to the 6 rows of all Model 3706
compatible matrix cards. Use the drop-down menus of the combo boxes to connect the rows to
various instrument terminals.
NOTE
Prober or test-fixture pins are always connected to matrix-card columns.
In the Columns area, the combo boxes labeled 1 through 16 (or 17 through 32 for this example)
correspond to the 16 columns of all Model 3706 compatible matrix cards. Use the drop-down menus
of the combo boxes to connect the columns to various instrument terminals and/or prober/test-fixture
pins.
NOTE
You may connect instrument terminals to the matrix card columns only when the Instrument
Connection Scheme setting is active.
•
As for the work area of Card2, you can chose the items in the drop-down menu in Rows and
Columns area. There are different connections for Card2.
•
Row-Column: With the Row-Column scheme, instruments are connected to switch matrix rows,
and prober/test fixture pins are connected to switch-matrix columns. This connection scheme is
the simplest. Instrument signals can route to prober/test-fixture pins through only one matrix card.
However, the Row-Column scheme limits the number of external instruments. If you need to
connect numerous external instruments to the prober/test-fixture, use the Instrument Card
scheme.
Figure 16...Row-column, Local Sense connection scheme example
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Figure 559: Row-column, Local Sense connection scheme example
•
Instrument Card: With the Instrument Card scheme, both instruments and prober/test fixture pins
are connected to the columns of the switch matrix. Instrument signals route to the prober/testfixture pins through two or more matrix cards, as illustrated in the next Figure. This connection
scheme can support large systems with numerous instruments, by removing the 8-row
instrument-connection limitation.
Figure 16...Instrument card, Local Sense connection scheme example
Figure 560: Instrument card, Local Sense connection scheme example
•
Local Sense: Use Local Sense when the measurement-pathway resistance is small and the
associated voltage errors are negligible. The measurement pathway is comprised of the following
conductors, connected in series:
a.
b.
c.
The cables used to connect the instruments to the matrix
The internal matrix-card signal path
The cables used to connect the matrix to the prober or test fixture
Current flowing through the measurement pathway creates a voltage drop (an error voltage) that is
directly proportional to the pathway resistance. This error voltage is present in all Local Sense voltage
measurements.
•
Remote Sense: Use Remote Sense to eliminate the effects of measurement pathway resistance.
The next Figure illustrates the use of Remote Sense in an instrument card configuration. Note
that Remote Sense requires twice as many measurement pathways. The FORCE pathways (in
red) are the current-carrying pathways and the SENSE pathways (in blue) are the measurement
pathways.
Figure 16...Instrument Card, Remote Sense connection scheme example
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Figure 561: Instrument card, Remote Sense connection scheme example
Models 707A/707B and 708A/708B switch matrices
Models 707A, 707B, 708A, and 708B switch matrices can be added to the ACS hardware
configurations through the Add an external Instrument with GPIB connection. Models 707B and 708B
can also be automatically scanned and added to the configuration through the GPIB and TSP link as
a master or subordinate.
Note that ACS supports multiple matrices, such as Models 707A, 707B, 708A, 708B, and Series 3700
instruments to the hardware configuration. Additionally, ACS supports multiple matrices as a group or
as individual instruments.
ACS also supports both device dependent commands (DDC) mode and instrument control language
(ICL) mode for Models 707B and 708B:
•
•
DDC mode instruments must be manually added to the hardware configuration
ICL mode instruments are automatically scanned and added to the hardware configuration
Model 707B and 708 configuration
When the node (or instrument) of a Model 707B or 708B in the configuration navigator is selected, the
instrument Properties, Instrument Connection Scheme, and specifications are viewable in the ACS
GUI (see next Figure)
Figure 16...Model 707B or 708B properties
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Figure 562: Model 707B or 708B properties
The Model 707B or 708B Properties tab contains:
•
Instrument Properties: model of instrument; associated group (ICL mode); node (ICL mode); work
mode (ICL or DDC); card list (ICL mode), and GPIB address (DDC mode).
•
•
S530 System: Kelvin mode enabled or disabled (Model 707A/707B only).
•
Switch Card: select matrix cards for the system (Model 707B has six slots; Model 708B has one
slot)(see next Figure):
Instrument Connection Scheme (you specify the instrument connection scheme):
A. Row-Column or Instrument-Card
B. Instrument SENSE terminals: Local or Remote Sense used for measurements
C. Common LO or Independent LO
Keithley 7071 Matrix Card
Keithley 7072 Matrix Card
Keithley 7072 HV Matrix Card
Keithley 7136 Low Current MUX Card
Keithley 7174 Low Current Matrix Card
Keithley 9174 Semiconductor Matrix Card
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NOTE
If any of the matrices in the system are set to Remote Sense or the S530 Kelvin mode, all of the
Series 2600A and Series 2400 instruments in the system will be set to four-wire (4-W) mode when
executing a test. Also, the SMU Remote Sense option box in the Preferences settings Misc tab will be
disabled. When all the matrices are set to Local Sense, all of the Series 2600A and Series 2400
instruments in the system will be set to two-wire (2-W) mode when executing a test. It is highly
recommended that all the matrices in the system are in the same mode. For more information on the
Preference settings, refer to the Automation section.
Figure 16...Models 707B and 708B switch cards
Figure 563: Models 707B and 708B switch cards
Matrix Card information
When you click one of the matrix cards on the hardware configuration navigator, a GUI dialog box
opens. The GUI is where you configure the hardware (see next figure).
Figure 16...Model 7071 matrix card properties
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Figure 564: Model 7071 matrix card properties
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The Matrix Card Properties tab contains:
•
Card Properties: instrument model, slot number, hardware version, serial number, and the
description of the card.
•
SMU info: instrument model, GPIB address, maximum voltage and current, voltage and current
range.
•
Rows: A through H correspond to the eight (8) rows of all Model 707B/708B compatible matrix
cards. Use the drop-down menus to connect the rows to various instrument terminals.
•
Columns: one through 12 correspond to columns of all Model 707B/708B compatible matrix
cards. Use the drop-down menus to connect the columns to various instrument terminals or
prober test-fixture pins, or any combination of both terminals and prober pins depending on your
needs.
S530 Configuration
When the S530 Kelvin option is selected, the Instrument Connection Scheme properties will
automatically be selected to the Instrument Card, Remote Sense, and Common LO functions (see
next Figure).
Figure 16...S530 Kelvin configuration
Figure 565: S530 Kelvin configuration
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S530 Configuration
When the S530 Kelvin option is selected, the Instrument Connection Scheme properties will
automatically be selected to the Instrument Card, Remote Sense, and Common LO functions (see
next Figure).
Figure 16...S530 Kelvin configuration
Equation 1: ACS S530 Kelvin configuration
Model 4200 system properties
Selecting KI 4200-SCS in the configuration navigator causes the Model 4200-SCS system properties
to be displayed in the work area.
Figure 16...Model 4200 group properties
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Figure 566: Model 4200 group properties
Selecting KI 4200-SCS SMU in the configuration navigator causes the Model 4200-SCS SMU system
properties to be displayed in the work area.
Figure 16...Model 4200 SMU information
Figure 567: Model 4200 SMU information
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Model 590 CV analyzer
When you select the Model 590 CV Analyzer in the configuration navigator, its Properties &
Connections tab opens (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Model 590 CV analyzer
Figure 568: Model 590 CV analyzer
This Properties & Connections tab provides access to the Model 590 instrument properties and also
provides useful switch-matrix connection information. The Instrument Properties area of this
Properties & Connections tab provides access to the following Keithley Instruments Model 590
instrument properties:
•
•
Model: Full vendor name, model number, and instrument description.
GPIB Address: Primary GPIB address drop-down selection menu. Addresses that are in use are
displayed with asterisks (*) next to them. The minimum address value is 0; the maximum is 30
(GPIB address 31 is reserved as the Model 4200-SCS controller address). If the selected GPIB
address conflicts with the GPIB address of another instrument in the configuration, a warning
exclamation-point symbol (!) is displayed next to the address (see next two Figures).
NOTE
You can programmatically read the GPIB address, and other instrument properties, on the system
configuration using the LPTLib getinstattr function. Proper usage of getinstattr allows you to develop
user libraries in a configuration independent manner.
Figure 16...GPIB address selection
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Figure 569: GPIB address selection
Figure 16...GPIB address properties
Figure 570: GPIB address properties
When a matrix is included in the system configuration, the Matrix Connections area of this Properties
& Connections tab displays the matrix connections that are associated with the Model 590
measurement terminals.
Capacitance meter configuration
When you configure a capacitance meter, the only item that you can change is the GPIB address.
You will also see the matrix connection displayed (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Configuration of capacitance meter
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Figure 571: Configuration of capacitance meter
Save function
The Save icon on the toolbar is enabled when you modify any configurable properties.
NOTE
Restart ACS after the new configuration is saved.
Checking the configuration
1. Start the hardware configuration utility from the Tools menu of ACS.
2. Click the Scan Hardware function on the toolbar. The hardware information is displayed in the
work area.
3. Using the navigation tree, navigate through the listed hardware.
4. Verify that the hardware information matches the configuration of the physical system. (If not, use
the tree navigator to click the appropriate device.)
5. Click the Save function to save the new configuration and restart ACS so that you can use the
prober.
Prober station configuration
If the system has a configured prober station, it is displayed on the configuration navigator as a node.
When this node is selected, the work area displays the properties of the prober station. There are two
configurable properties: Model and Number of Pins/Position (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Prober configuration interface
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Figure 572: Prober configuration interface
When setting up the prober, refer to the Probers Reference Manual, located in the Help menu dropdown list (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Probers Reference information
Figure 573: Probers Reference information
Configuration file locations
A configuration file is created and saved by you when you set up your test parameters. When you
start ACS after creating a configuration file, the software will automatically find and read the file.
The following are examples of configuration file names and paths where the files are saved:
•
•
•
ACS_hdcon_Online.kcf
\\ACS\KATS\CONFIG
ACS_hdcon_Demo.kcf
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Section 11
Server Solution
In this section:
Server solution introduction.................................................... 11-1
Install and configure an FTP server ....................................... 11-1
Configure ACS as a network .................................................. 11-7
Build an ACS project on the server ...................................... 11-10
Server solution introduction
The ACS server solution is for remote testing from a file transfer protocol (FTP) server. In this mode,
the test project will be built on the server. When the test is done, the test data (kdf+db) will be
uploaded to the server automatically. The test flow of the server solution is as follows:
•
•
•
On the remote side, configure the server.
•
Every time ACS starts, it will decide if there is a newer version and You can make the decision
whether to download the new build or continue with their current build.
•
The tester computer will import the test project from the server or You can create a new project
on the server.
•
The tester will save the data locally when running test modules. The data will be saved to
CurAppPath\Projects\ProjectName\temp and CurAppPath\Projects\ProjectName\data when the
test module is run. If the preferences have been set to automatically upload the data to the
server it will be saved to CurAppPath\Projects\ProjectName\kdf and
CurAppPath\Projects\ProjectName\db.
•
•
ACS can be configured to save the Test data (kdf+db) to the server automatically..
On the test computer, configure the ACS working mode as network.
Restart ACS (with the USB license key in place ); configure the FTP server in ACS: server ip,
server port, user name, password, server root. Then test the FTP connection to the server.
The tester computer will save the project to the server-side immediately; If several users are
visiting the same project, only 1 tester has the right to save the project, others can import, run
automation, and upload test data concurrently, but will not be able to save the project.
Install and configure an FTP server
Install the FTP server
1. Install an FTP server. For example, install FileZilla_Server.exe.
2. Follow the installation process, until the installation is complete.
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Configure the FTP server
Key points in configuring the FTP server.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Share the FTP folder in the LAN
Make sure the folder’s shared name is the same as the alias of the FTP folder.
Allow users to change the files in this folder.
Make the shared folder’s user name and password the same as the FTP server’s user name and
password. This will make it easier to use.
5. Structure of FTP folder (see next Figure).
Figure 9–1: Structure of FTP folder
Figure 574: Structure of FTP folder
6. You can put your old projects in the Projects/2600A directory or in the Projects/4200 directory,
then they can be opened by different users.
7. Put the newest release in the Build folder, together with a version_information.ini file, which
records the newest build information.
The following steps are the main steps to install and configure the FTP server:
1.
2.
3.
Add user
Set the FTP folder and set alias name
Set user’s permissions – read, write, delete, append
The FileZilla Server will start automatically after installation. Or click Start->menu->all programs>FileZilla Server->FileZilla Server Interface. The Connect to Server dialog box will show the server
address by default (see next Figure).
Figure 9–2: Connect to Server
Figure 575: Connect to Server
1. Enter the server address and ports if needed. Then click the OK button. Then the FileZilla server
page will display (see next Figure).
Figure 9–3: FileZilla server page
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Figure 576: FileZilla server page
2. Then click the Edit-> Users, and the Users page will display (see next Figure).
Figure 9–4: Setup user account
Figure 577: Setup user account
3. Click the Add button, and the Add user account dialog will display (see next Figure Figure 9–5).
Figure 9–5: Add user account
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Figure 578: Add user account
4. Type your name and click the OK button. Check Password, then type any group member in the
Group membership edit box (see next Figure).
Figure 9–6: Type a password in Account settings
Figure 579: Type a password in Account settings
5. Click the Shared folders option in the Page box, and then click the Add button to add
D:\ftphomedir as the FTP home dir; click the Add button again and add another dir,
d:\ftphomedir\acsroot (see next Figure).
Figure 9–7: Setting FTP home directory
Figure 580: Setting FTP home directory
6. Right-click d:\ftphomedir\acsroot and click Edit aliases to input acsroot as its alias name (see next
Figure).
Figure 9–8: Select Edit aliases
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Figure 581: Select Edit aliases
7. Type acsroot in the box in the Enter directory aliases window. Make sure to match the folder’s
shared name in the LAN (see next Figure).
Figure 9–9: Input an alias name for the folder’s shared name
Figure 582: Input an alias for the folder's shared name
NOTE
After you enter the directory name, click OK.
8. Click the Shared folders option and click the FTP dir (d:\ftphomedir\acsroot), and check all the
items in the Files and Directories boxes (see next Figure).
Figure 9–10: Setting the FTP directory
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Figure 583: Setting the FTP directory
9. Next, click OK to close the dialog box.
10. Then click the Edit-> Settings from the FileZilla server dialog box to enter the FileZilla Server
Options (see next Figure).
Figure 9–12: Edit Settings in the server
Figure 584: Edit Settings in the server
Once you choose Settings in the FileZilla Server Options dialog box, you will see next Figure the
General settings options (see next Figure).
Figure 9–13: FileZilla Server Options
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Figure 585: FileZilla Server Options
In the Timeout settings section, the recommended settings are:
•
Connections timeout = 0
•
No Transfer timeout = 0
•
Login timeout = 0
Click OK to finish configuring the FileZilla Server.
After finishing the configuration of the FileZilla Server, the next step is to set up ACS as a network.
Configure ACS as a network
1. For ACS with a certain license, in the ACS user interface top menu click Tools and click
Preference.
2. Open the Advanced tab in the Preference Settings window that will display.
3. Click network as the Working Mode (see next Figure).
Figure 9–14: Preference Setting_Advanced FTP setting tab
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Figure 586: Preference Setting_Advanced FTP setting tab
4. Click OK.
5. Then close and restart the ACS user interface.
6. Then click Tools menu of the ACS user interface and click Preference. There should now be an
FTP Server tab. Click this tab to open the FTP server page (see next Figure).
Figure 9–15: FTP Server page
Figure 587: FTP Server tab
7. Input the Server IP, Sever Port (21 for default), User name, Password, and FTP Root (acsroot).
8. Keep the Confirm Password the same as the Password, or there will be a warning dialog to
instruct you to input again (see next Figure).
Figure 9–16: Connection failure Warning
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Figure 588: Connection failure Warning
9. Click the Test button to test the FTP Connection to the specified server. If a fail dialog appears,
check your network, make sure your FTP server is started, and confirm your Configuration
information is correct.
When you connect to the server successfully, the Test Success dialog will display (see next Figure).
Figure 9–17: Connection Test Success
Figure 589: Connection Test Success
Update online
Sometimes when working in network mode, the server will detect new build information, with a
version higher than the local version. In this case, when you run ACS a dialog box will open asking
you to update your version of the ACS software (see next Figure).
Figure 9–18: Update ACS software online
Figure 590: Update ACS software online
Press the Cancel button to continue with the current version; or press the Download button to
download the new build *.exe.
Below is an example of version_information.ini:
#Keithley build information File for network version
[version_information]
version = V3.3
#version number ,should be format like this
build_exe = acsrelease3.5.exe # the new build exe file’s name
build_date = Jan 31, 2008
#build date
build_time = 11:40:00 PM
#build time
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Build an ACS project on the server
When ACS is in network mode, a project can be built and opened on the server . Compared with the
local mode, there are two differences:
- The opened project’s default location is ftproot(acsroot)/Projects
- The new project’s default location is ftproot(acsroot)/Projects/2600A
NOTE
In fact, in operation there is no critical difference compared to local mode: if you open a new project in
local mode (such as d:\ACS_Home\Projects\testPrj), while the working mode is network, ACS will do
the same as in local mode.
Access test data in network mode
In ACS network mode, for Automation test:
The db data can be saved on the server after the test is complete, with this location : ftproot (acsroot
for example) / Projects/2600A (or 4200) /project_Name /db /testerIP_testerHostid (such as
10.40.65.129_aa3ac10d/lotid/lotid.db(or lotid.wdf);
The db data can be saved locally before the test is complete, with this location : curAppPath(it means
the ACS run path )/ Projects/project_Name(such as aa)/db/lotid/lotid.db (or lotid.wdf);
The .kdf data can be saved on the server after the test is complete, with this location : ftproot(acsroot
in the example)/ Projects/2600A(or 4200)/prjName(such as aa)/kdf/testerIP_testerHostid(such as
10.40.65.129_aa3ac10d/kdf/lotid.kdf(lotid/wafer*.kdf);
The db data can be saved locally before the test is complete, with this location : curAppPath(it means
the ACS run path )/ Projects/prjName(such as aa)/kdf/lotid.kdf(lotid/wafer*.kdf);
After the test is complete and test data is uploaded to the server successfully, the path
curAppPath(the ACS run path )/ Projects/prjName(such as aa)/db(and kdf) will be removed from local
disk.
For manual test:
The test or data folder can be saved on the local side only, with this location : curAppPath(it means
the ACS run path )/ Projects/prjName(such as aa)/temp(or data).
Upload test data to the server
When you are working in network mode there is no difference when configuring a wafer description,
test setup, or other sections. But when the test is complete, click the OK button in the Completion
dialog box (see next Figure).
Figure 9–19: Test Complete
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Figure 591: Test Complete
After clicking the OK button, the .db and .kdf data file will upload to the server automatically, if you
have configured the preference page to save the .db and .kdf files. ACS will display a progress bar
showing how much time remains to finish uploading (see next Figure).
Figure 9–20: Uploading test data progress
Figure 592: Uploading test data progress
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Section 12
KTE conversion to ACS tool
In this section:
KTE conversion tool introduction............................................ 12-1
Process overview ................................................................... 12-1
Configuration.......................................................................... 12-3
Additional adjustments ........................................................... 12-5
Limitations of the conversion tool ........................................... 12-7
KTE conversion tool introduction
ACS software contains a Keithley test environment (KTE) conversion tool that allows you to convert
KTE projects to ACS projects.
NOTE
The KTE conversion tool is a stand-alone software package which means it is not part of the ACS
GUI. Also, you can execute the conversion tool without opening and running ACS software.
The KTE conversion tool is packaged with the ACS software. When you install ACS (version 4.3 or
newer), the conversion tool will also be installed.
Process overview
There are 2 ways to start the KTE conversion tool:
1. Open the Command Prompt from the Start menu and type c:\ACS\KATS\startktec. Note that the
default installation directory location for ACS is c:\ACS. If you installed ACS to a different
directory, you will need to type the correct path for the command to function correctly (see the
next two Figures):
Figure 12–1: Command Prompt
Figure 593: Command Prompt
Figure 12–1: Command Prompt GUI
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Figure 594: Command Prompt GUI
2. Using a file browser, navigate to the installation location and find the ACS folder. Next, find the
subfolder named KATS. Within the KATS subfolder you need to run the executable file named
kte_conv_app.exe (this is an application file and you must double-click the file in order for it to
open and run).
The conversion tool will open and you will see the following dialog box (see next figure).
In this dialog box you will need to select a CPF file, create a new project name, and select the path
where the converted project will reside. Once you click Convert, the tool will execute the conversion.
Figure 12–1: KTE conversion tool GUI
Figure 595: KTE conversion tool GUI
NOTE
The conversion of the KTE project structure to ACS will automatically generate the ACS project
structure. However, you will need to create or modify you user library routines in order to support the
ACS hardware (see Hardware mapping in this document for more information).
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Configuration
KTE test plan location
The KTE utility, Keithley Component Manager (kcm), can be used to package the files used by the
recipe into a single tape archive (.tar) file. This package can then be placed into a shared area for use
by the conversion tool.
The following command can be used on a KTE system to create this package (make sure you replace
cassettePlanName.cpf with the name of the KTE recipe that you want to convert):
kcm -e
cassettePlanName.cpf
This will create a cassettePlanName.cpf.tar file. This file can then be placed into a directory that is
available to the S530 system computer and expanded for use by the conversion tool.
NOTE
It is recommended that you keep all of your KTE test plan files in the same directory for quick access.
Hardware mapping from KTE to ACS
The instrument identifications (IDs) that are used in KTE are not the same IDs that are used in ACS
software. Therefore, you will need to manually map the ID information to ensure that the ACS project
is functional (for example, transfer the KTE instrument IDs to the equivalent ACS instrument IDs).
A global data file (.gdf) named hw_mapping.gdf (hw = hardware)(see next Figure), contains the
information needed to translate the KTE hardware instruments IDs to the ACS hardware instruments
IDs. The format of the .gdf file is the same as a KTE .gdf file.
Figure 12–1: Hardware mapping .gdf
Figure 596: Hardware mapping GDF
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NOTE
If you place the hw_mapping.gdf file in the same directory as the converted test plan files before
conversion, the conversion tool will merge all specified .gdf test plans together. If there is no specified
.gdf file in the test plan, the hw_mapping.gdf file itself will be used in the converted project.
For example, here are some use cases that indicate how the hardware mapping .gdf file is used:
Case 1: There are several .gdf files used in a test plan, and you have already placed the pre-defined
hw_mapping.gdf file in the test plan directory. When this is the case, the conversion tool will merge all
of the .gdf files and the hw_mapping.gdf file to a new .gdf file named:
ACS_GEN_hw_mapping_all.gdf
The new merged .gdf file will be used in the converted project.
Case 2: A .gdf file is not specified in the test plan and you place the pre-defined hw_mapping.gdf file
in the test plan directory. When this is the case, the pre-defined hw_mapping.gdf file is used in the
converted project.
Case 3: You have not placed the pre-defined hw_mapping.gdf file in the test plan directory. If this is
the case, and you run the conversion tool, you will receive an error that is similar to the following:
File "C:\ACS\Projects\p11-02\honey\lib\test.py", line 1, in ?
forcev(VIMS1, 1)
NameError: name VIMS1 is not defined
NOTE
In order to alleviate any potential issues with your converted project, you have to define a hardware
mapping .gdf file and specify the path of the file for the converted project. You must specify the .gdf
file path in the ACS GUI for the Wafer Description Cassette Plan Setting tab. If there is a .gdf file path
already specified, you can append the hardware mapping information to the .gdf file (see next
Figure).
Figure 12–1: .gdf path
Figure 597: GDF path
NOTE
If the KTE test plan uses the linear parametric test library (LPTLib) functions sweepx, asweepx, or
bsweepx, and the KTM is configured to convert to a python test module (PTM), the hardware
mapping .gdf file (hw_mapping.gdf) must be configured before the conversion. If this file is not
created before you attempt your conversion, the conversion will stop.
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Section 12: KTE conversion to ACS tool
ACS PTM or STM?
A KTE test macro (KTM) can be converted to either a python test module (PTM) or a script test
module (STM) in ACS. The conversion.ini configuration file is used to determine if a KTM is converted
to a PTM or to a STM.
NOTE
The conversion tool converts KTMs to STMs by default.
For example, If you have a test macro named my_HV_macro.ktm, you must add the name to the
configuration.ini file in order for this macro to be converted to a PTM (see next Figure).
NOTE
The task of converting KTM files should only be done by someone who has clear knowledge of the
test modules. Also, you can convert several or all your macros at one time using this method.
Figure 12–1: The conversion.ini file format
Figure 598: The conversion.ini file
The advantages of a PTM: easy to reuse; flexible; able to call the user library, and able to use
external instruments.
NOTE
Any test procedure related to the high-voltage Model 2410 and (or) the CVU must use a PTM.
The advantages of a STM is a faster speed of execution compared to a PTM.
Additional adjustments
System engineers are the intended users of the KTE conversion tool. They can convert their KTE test
plans (CPF and corresponding files for S900, S600, or S400 systems) to ACS test plans as they
perform integration and acceptance of their first S530 system purchase. Once these projects are
converted, there are some additional tasks for engineers to complete:
•
The userlib and parlib routine calls in the KTMs will be translated and called from the PTMs or
STMs. However, the userlib and parlib routines themselves need to be either created or ported
from the KTE test routines. The port is necessary due to the hardware differences between the
S530 and S400 or S600 test systems.
•
If the LPT routines (for more information refer to the ACS Programming manual) are called from
any KTM files, the translated LPT calls in the PTMs or STMs need to be checked for the correct
parameters and calling methods.
During the conversion process, the conversion tool will display a dialog box informing you of what has
been converted and what needs to be manually adjusted (see next Figure).
Figure 12–1: The conversion report
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Figure 599: The conversion report
The conversion tool will generate a list of test libraries that needs to be created or modified before the
ACS project can run successfully:
--Please do manual conversion for PARLIB first!
--Please do manual conversion for TUTORIAL first!
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Limitations of the conversion tool
Test macro conversion
The conversion tool simply provides a mapping of the KTE test macros to python (or LUA) scripts.
Any special logic, such as nested ‘if’ statements, and unsupported LPT commands, are not
supported. These conditions will need to be validated and manual editing will need to occur in order
to get the test sequences fully functional in the ACS environment.
For the functions or commands that cannot be converted, the conversion tool will generate placeholders to indicate items that you need to modify:
KTM:
A. Support assignment statement.
B. Support routine call statement.
C. Support "if" statement of 1 level, no nesting; Support 1 level {} in C language, no nesting; Support
&& and || key words.
D. Support the following math operations within KTE macros: abs, fabs, exp, log, log10, pow.
E. No support for C pointer/structure reference, such as ->, *, etc; each of these items will exist as
place-holders and require the user to do some modifications.
F. No support for commands that are not defined in the ACS LPT (or commands in userlib) library.
The conversion tool will keep the commands the same as they are in the original KTM file. These
place-holders are markers that indicate where the user is required to do some modifications.
LPT:
The KTE LPT commands that are supported are listed in the next table:
Supported KTE LPT commands table
DEVCLR
DEVINT
SETxMTR
ADDCON
CONPIN
CONPTH
CLRCON
DELCON
TSTSEL
LORANGEx
RANGEx
SETAUTO
FORCEx
LIMIT
AVG
INTG
MEASx
IMEAST
ASWEEPx
BSWEEPx
RTFARY
SAVG
SINTGx
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SMEASx
SWEEPx
TRIGxG
TRIGxL
ADELAY
DELAY
RDELAY
ENABLE
EXECUT
INSHLD
KIBCMD
KIBDEFCLR
KIBDEFINT
KIBRCV
KIBSND
KIBSPL
KIBSPLW
SETVIMS
BMEASx
SEARCHx
UAP modules
In the user access point (UAP) modules, you will notice that the functionality within the ACS software
does not match the UAP functionality within the KTE software. Due to this incompatibility, the UAP
code used in a KTE recipe must be recreated in the ACS environment.
Limits file
In the KLF file, the conversion tool translates the following fields: RPT, CRT, TAR, UNT, VAL, and
SPC. The conversion tool does not support the CAT, AF, AL, CNT, or ENG fields.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
UNT, units string
CAT,category parameter
RPT, report parameter
CRT, critical parameter
TAR, target parameter
AF, abort_action parameter
AL, abort_limit parameter
VAL, valid minimum value, valid maximum value
SPC, spec minimum value, spec maximum value
CNT, control minimum value, control maximum value
ENG, engineering minimum value, engineering maximum value
Support one WDF only for a single project. Wafer description must be the same among all the tested
wafers.
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Cassette plan mode
The conversion tool will only support the conversion of KTE CPF recipes that use the same wafer
plan file for all slots in the cassette. This is known as “ALL” mode in a KTE Cassette Plan.
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Section 13
ACS Command line execution
In this section:
ACS Commands introduction ................................................. 13-1
ACS Commands .................................................................... 13-2
ACS Commands introduction
The command line execution function in ACS is available to you as a way to start ACS software by
using the command window. ACS can be started and operated through command lines in the
Windows® command execution utility. First, you must open the Command Prompt from the Start
menu. Second, you will need to input the command that you want to execute (see next two Figures).
Figure 13–1: Command Prompt
Figure 600: Command Prompt
Figure 13–1: Windows command execution utility
Figure 601: Windows command execution utility
Using the command lines provides a convenient way for the interaction between ACS and those who
also keep a comparatively matched consistency with the S400 or S600 system in operating style and
diversification of user interface. The commands are listed in the next Table. The commands are case
insensitive and path free.
Table 13–1: Command list
Section 13: ACS Command line execution
Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
Commands
Description
startacs
startauto
startktec
loadprj
hide
show
start ACS software
perform automatic execution
start KTE conversion tool
load an ACS project
hide ACS GUI
show ACS GUI
ACS Commands
Start ACS command
Purpose: start ACS software by using the command window.
Format:
startacs [-options] [args]
NOTE
When you use the startacs command, you can specify login options to load after ACS has started.
However, you cannot use this command if ACS is already open (see next Table).
Table 13–2: Start ACS command options
Options
Arguments Example
N/A
-d
-prj
N/A
N/A
project name
-help
N/A
Description
startacs
start ACS in online or offline mode
startacs -d
start ACS in demo mode
startacs -prj HCI start ACS with a project loaded as the
default
startacs -help
show the help information
Here is an example of a command line that will open ACS in demo mode and will load project HCI as
the default:
startacs –d –prj HCI
Automatic execution
Purpose: start ACS software to automatically execute a .xml project by using the command window.
Format:
startauto [-options] [args]
NOTE
When you use the startauto command, you must make sure that ACS is already open. However, you
cannot use this command if ACS is executing a test. Also, for this command to execute, you will need
to make sure that the Keithley limit file (.klf) and the wafer description file (.wdf) file are identified in
the file path (see next Table).
Table 13–2: Start auto command options
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Section 13: ACS Command line execution
Options
Arguments
Example
Description
-l
-prj
-lid
-help
Keithley limit file
project name
lot ID number
N/A
startauto -l D :\H.klf
startauto -w D :\a.wdf
startauto -lid LOT1
startauto -help
start automation with the H.klf
start automation with a .wdf imported
start automation with lot LOT1
show the help information for this command
Here is an example of a command line that will first open the project HCI, then with a H.klf applied
and a .wdf imported, and then the LOT ID configured with LOT1:
startauto -l D:\H.klf -w D :\a.wdf -prj HCI -lid LOT1
Start KTE conversion tool
Purpose: start the KTE conversion tool that allows you to convert KTE projects to ACS projects by
using the command window.
Format:
startktec
For more information about the KTE conversion to ACS projects, see the KTE converion to ACS tool
section.
Load an ACS project
Purpose: load an ACS project by using the command window.
Format:
loadprj [-options] [args]
NOTE
When you use the loadprj command, you must make sure that ACS is already open. However, you
cannot use this command if ACS is already executing a test (see next Table).
Table 13–2: Load project command options
Options
Arguments
Example
Description
N/A
-help
project name
N/A
loadprj HCI
loadprj -help
load a project named HCI
show the help information for this command
Hide the ACS GUI
Purpose: hide the ACS GUI by using the command window.
Format:
hide
Show the ACS GUI
Purpose: show the ACS GUI by using the command window.
Format:
show
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Section 14
Ultra-Fast BTI
In this section:
UF BTI Introduction ................................................................ 14-1
UF BTI general notes ............................................................. 14-2
UF BTI hardware configuration .............................................. 14-4
UF BTI descriptions................................................................ 14-8
UF BTI project information ................................................... 14-28
UF BTI data.......................................................................... 14-30
UF BTI Introduction
The Keithley Instruments Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) software contains an optional
ultra-fast BTI (bias temperature instability) package that can only be used with the Keithley
Instruments Model 4200-SCS Semiconductor Characterization Suite.
NOTE
If you do not have a Model 4200-SCS, the ultra-fast BTI option will not be functional with your version
of ACS. For more information about the Model 4200-SCS that is used with the ACS software, refer to
the supplied documentation that was shipped with your purchase. You can also visit the Keithley
Instruments website at www.keithley.com to search for updated information by model number.
Ultra-fast BTI is a reliability test, therefore, it uses AC and DC reliability stress and measure
techniques (stressing a device and measuring how the device withstands the stress). This technique
of stress and measure is with ultra-fast coordination of the Keithley Instruments Series 2600A
SourceMeter®, the Model 4200-SCS with the Model 4225-PMU, two Model 4200-SMUs, and the
Model 4225-RPM that provides the source and measure.
The Model 4200-BTI-A Ultra-Fast BTI Package combines advanced DC I-V and ultra-fast I-V
measurement capabilities with automatic test executive software to provide an advanced NBTI/PBTI
test platform to the semiconductor test industry. The 4200-BTI-A package, which builds on the Model
4200-SCS semiconductor parameter analyzer’s test environment, includes all the instruments,
interconnects, and software needed to make NBTI and PBTI measurements on silicon CMOS
technology.
Section 14: Ultra-Fast BTI
Automated Characterization Suite (ACS) Reference Manual
UF BTI general notes
In order to conduct ultra-fast testing, the Model 4200-SCS must use a Model 4225-PMU ultra-fast I-V
module. Each Model 4200-SCS chassis can accommodate up to six Model 4225-PMU modules to
provide up to twelve ultra-fast source and measure channels. The Model 4225-PMU module is the
hardware core of the ultra-fast I-V measurement capability for characterizing NBTI and PBTI
degradation in microseconds, allowing for accurate lifetime measurements for Designed-In Reliability
(DIR) that support modeling for device and circuit design. It integrates a sophisticated two-channel
waveform generator with high-speed voltage and current measurement capabilities, a deep
measurement buffer, and a real-time test execution engine.
Unlike traditional pulse generation solutions, the Model 4225-PMU can be programmed to output the
complex waveforms required in ultra-fast BTI testing. And, unlike traditional Arbitrary Waveform
Generators (AWGs), the waveforms’ duration and complexity are not limited by bitmap or memory
depth. Instead, the 4225-PMU employs a high-level waveform description language that uses the
concept of segments, segment libraries, and looping. In addition, the waveform description specifies
exactly when measurements must be made during the waveform and the type of measurement to be
made.
The following measurement types are supported and multiple measurement types can be linked to
form a test sequence:
•
•
•
•
Spot
Step sweep
Smooth sweep
Sample
The programmable sample period can be set as fast as 5 ns, so most measurements will include
multiple samples. The system’s real-time test execution engine automatically calculates the
mathematical mean of the samples, which reduces the volume of data that must be transferred and
parsed during the course of the test. The resulting measurements are streamed back to the high-level
test module for near-real-time analysis and test termination.
Each channel of the Model 4225-PMU combines high speed voltage outputs (with pulse widths
ranging from 20 nanoseconds to DC) with simultaneous current and voltage measurements. With this
combination of ultra-fast high-speed voltage source and current measurement capabilities, the Model
4200-SCS and ACS software tools can be used for a wide range of ultra-fast I-V test applications.
The Model 4225-RPM (Remote Pulse Measure) connects to the Model 4225-PMU and expands the
PMU's capabilities by providing four additional low current ranges, offering current sensitivity down to
tens of picoamps. The Model 4225-RPM also reduces cable capacitance effects and supports
switching automatically between the Model 4225-PMU, the Model 4210-CVU, and other SMU
modules installed in a Model 4200-SCS chassis (see next Figure). This allows you to choose the
most appropriate instrument for a particular measurement task without re-cabling.
Figure 15...Model 4225-RPM and Model 4200-SCS backplane
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Section 14: Ultra-Fast BTI
Figure 602: Model 4225-RPM and Model 4200-SCS backplane
ACS software solution
The ultra-fast BTI test software module brings together the measurement capabilities of the Model
4225-PMU and 4225-RPM through an intuitive interface without compromising test flexibility. It makes
it easy to define stress timing, stress conditions, and a wide range measurement sequences from
spot, sweep, and sample tests. The test module allows measuring recovery effects as well as
degradation. It also offers prestress and poststress measurement options for both single device and
multiple device tests that incorporate the Model 4200-SCS’s DC SMUs for high-precision low-level
measurements, however, DC tests are only available for single devices.
When used together, the Model 4225-PMU and Model 4225-RPM provide all the tools necessary to
perform a range of applications that otherwise can’t be supported in a single instrument chassis:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Single-Pulse Charge Trapping/high-Κ dielectric characterization
•
NBTI/PBTI reliability tests
Silicon-On-Insulator testing
LDMOS/GaAs isothermal characterization
Flash RTS ID
Phase-change random access memory (PCRAM) testing
Ultra-fast NBTI characterization
Charge pumping measurements
Thermal impedance characterization
MEMs capacitor testing
Random telegraph signal (RTS) CMOS
Charge-based capacitance measurement (CBCM) materials testing for scaled CMOS, such as
high-Κ dielectrics
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UF BTI hardware configuration
Interconnect
The 4200-BTI-A package provides all the cabling and connectors required to connect to standard
coaxial probe manipulators. For enhanced measurement accuracy, you will be able to add an optional
multi-measurement performance cable (MMPC) kit that connects the Model 4200-SCS to a prober
manipulator, simplifying switching between DC I-V, C-V, and ultra-fast I-V testing configurations. This
kit eliminates the need for re-cabling, as well as maximizing signal fidelity by eliminating the
measurement errors that often result from cabling errors. Versions engineered for Cascade Microtech
and SUSS MicroTec probers are available. There’s also a general-purpose kit for connecting the
4225-PMU to other triaxial and coaxial probe stations.
NOTE
Before you start to configure your testing parameters, make sure that Hardware Configuration has
been run to ensure that connections to the SMU and RPM have been established.
The following table shows the minimum required hardware to utilize ultra-fast BTI with the Model
4200-SCS:
Ultra-fast BTI minimum hardware requirements
Quantity
Part number
Name
One
4225-PMU
pulse source and measure unit card
Two
4225-RPM
remote pulse measure unit card
NOTE
The 4200-BTI-A package provides all of the necessary interconnect cables supplied for hardware
configurations. However, you may find that the connection cables and adapters needed will depend
on your specific prober hardware.
The 4225-RPM contains two input and two output TRX connections for the SMU sense and SMU
force. It contains one CVU potentiometer SMA connection and one CVU current potentiometer SMA
connection. It also contains one RPM control slot for the RPM control cable. There is a status LED on
top of the unit that turns green when fill-in-the BLANK occurs, red when when fill-in-the BLANK
occurs and yellow when fill-in-the BLANK occurs (see next Figures).
NOTE
The Model 4225-RPM comes with an optional magnetic base for added stability.
Figure 15...Model 4225-RPM input connections
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Figure 603: Model 4225-RPM input connections
Figure 15...Model 4225-RPM output connections
Figure 604: Model 4225-RPM output connections
NOTE
There is a status LED on top of the unit that signifies the current measurement state of the RPM (see
next Figure):
Green = pulse
Blue = SMU/DC
Red = CV
Figure 15...Model 4225-RPM status LED
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Figure 605: Model 4225-RPM status LED
NOTE
The ultra-fast BTI coordination of instruments sourcing and measuring time starts at <100 ns and can
increase to seconds or hours depending on your application and needs.
When using the Model 4225-RPM, the following timing, measurement, speed and simplicity
capabilities are recognized:
•
•
•
Measure low current (<10 nA resolution and noise)
•
•
•
Flexibly source waveforms and measure methods
Quickly Measure low current (at least one reading within 1 µs)
Visibly Measure low current (1 µs off-stress window includes source transitions of rise, fall ,and
settling)
Provide SMU capability without re-cabling
SMUs not connected while pulsing, pulsers not connected (high impedance, low leakage) when
performing SMU sweeps
When you connect the Model 4200-SCS to the Model 4225-RPM it must be from the Model 4200SMU and the Model 4225-PMU. The Model 4225-RPM must be connected to the device under test
(DUT) (see next Figure).
When you connect the Model 4200-SMU to the Model 4225-RPM, make sure you use the input
connections for the SMU sense and force using the standard triax cables. Also, for the Model 4225PMU, make sure you use the RPM control cables to connect the Model 4225-RPM. Once you have
made those connections, you can make the connections from the Model 4225-RPM to the DUT. The
cables that are used for connecting to the DUT are the multi-measurement performance cables
(MMPC).
NOTE
The following graphic shows the minimum hardware requirements for the Model 4225-PMU, the
4200-SMUs, the 4225-RPMs, and the DUT.
Figure 15...Model 4225-RPM detailed diagram to DUT
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Figure 606: Model 4225-RPM detailed diagram to DUT
This top-down view of a Cascade Microtech analytical probe station illustrates best practices for
interconnecting the Model 4225-RPM to the prober using the blue MMPCs (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Interconnection for Model 4225-RPM to prober
Figure 607: Interconnection for Model 4225-RPM to prober
This close-up of two Model 4225-RPMs highlights the DC SMU, C-V, and ultra-fast I-V cable
connections (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Interconnection of two Model 4225-RPMs to prober
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Figure 608: Interconnection of two Model 4225-RPMs to prober
UF BTI descriptions
The ultra-fast BTI project in ACS includes python test modules (PTM) and interactive test modules
(ITM) (see next Figure).
NOTE
An ITM is used for DC testing.
Figure 15...ACS ultra-fast BTI project tree
Figure 609: ACS ultra-fast BTI project tree
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Section 14: Ultra-Fast BTI
The ACS graphical user interface (GUI) for PTMs and ITMs contains three main tabs (Setup, Data,
Status) and is similar to the NBTI project (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Ultra-fast BTI Setup tab
Figure 610: Ultra-fast BTI Setup tab
NOTE
In this Referenc manual, there is a topic named Python language Test Module (PTM) configuration
(on page 5-120). Refer to this topic for additional information regarding PTMs. You can also find more
information about the NBTI test setup, including the GUI interface.
Additionally, a PTM is defined by the python software language. ACS software contains example
projects that include ultra-fast BTI PTM modules that you can review for more information.
After you create a new ultra-fast BTI PTM in the test tree, you must make sure that it is configured
correctly for your test requirements:
1. Setup -- contains five sub-tabs for test parameter purposes and is the primary interface that
allows you to configure an ultra-fast BTI test module and display the current configuration.
2. Data -- contains plot and data information of test results that are displayed in spreadsheet format
and plot format in real-time test execution.
3. Status -- contains text of test results based on configured parameters.
In the Setup tab there are five sub-tabs:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Device Settings
Stress Settings
Pre-Stress Tests
Measure
Post-Stress Tests
When you first open the PTM GUI, the following figure gives an example of what you will see. This is
where you begin to configure your testing parameters (see next Figure).
NOTE
Before you start to configure your testing parameters, make sure that Hardware Configuration has
been run to ensure that connections to the SMU and RPM have been established.
Import a python file
NOTE
You can click the Import or Save function on all five sub-tabs at anytime (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Import and Save function
Figure 611: Import and Save function
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Click the Import function and the dialog box opens where you can import a python script file (see next
Figure).
CAUTION
The python script file will overwrite the current PTM file information that you are viewing in your
project folder.
Figure 15...Import a python file
Figure 612: Import a python file
Load Device
On the device level (for example, the DUT nMOSFET_42) of the Device Settings tab, you will need to
add hardware to your test configuration. Click the Load Device function and the dialog box opens
where you choose the device (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Select the BTI device
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Figure 613: Select the BTI device
Once you select the device, the dialog box opens. Depending on the type of device chosen, you can
pick a bitmap graphic that will display on the Device Settings tab (see next Figure).
Figure 15..Bitmap device Image Browser
Figure 614: Bitmap device Image Browser
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Device Settings tab
Figure 15...BTI PTM Device Settings
NOTE
In the next figure, you see that two Model 4225-RPMs are connected to the drain and the gate of the
pMOSFET device. Also, note that the source and bulk of the device are connected with a MMPC
Ground.
Figure 615: BTI PTM Device Settings
Depending on your configuration and parameters, the following table shows how the Pad Name
(type) and the RPM type are used interchangeably (in other words, how they can be configured):
Pad Name (type)
RPM type
Drain
Gate
Source
Bulk
RPM
RPM
RPM, MMPC Ground, None
RPM, SMU, MMPC Ground,
None
You can use the drop-down arrow to choose the type of RPM, based on your configuration and the
Pad Name (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Pads-SMUs Mapping settings
Figure 616: Pads-SMUs Mapping settings
NOTE
If there is only one subdevice when a terminal is connected to the RPM, the SMU connected to the
RPM will appear in the SMU connected to RPM column and the SMU test will be available in the PreStress Tests and Post-Stress Tests. If there is more than one subdevice in your configuration
settings, the SMU connected to RPM column will not be available and the SMU test will not be
available (see next Figure).
Figure 15...More than one subdevice
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Figure 617: More than one subdevice
Save RPM Mapping
Click the Save RPM Mapping function and the dialog box opens where you can choose to save your
.csv file (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Save RPM Mapping file
Figure 618: Save RPM Mapping file
Load RPM Mapping
Click the Load RPM Mapping function and the dialog box opens where you can select a .csv file to
import (see next Figure).
NOTE
When you load a .csv file, you will have to navigate to the folder where the ACS projects have been
saved to find the correct file.
Figure 15...Import RPM Mapping file
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Figure 619: Import RPM Mapping file
Stress Settings tab
On the Stress Settings tab you will see five different areas that you need to configure for testing
parameters (see next Figure):
•
Stress Time - establishes the duration of the test and each BTI PTM can have a unique stress
time
•
Recover Time - the Recover function must be selected for this area to be enabled; the Stress
Time settings are duplicated when this area is enabled
NOTE
The default function is for the Recover Time area to duplicate the Stress Time settings, however, you
can change the Recover Time settings if needed.
•
•
•
Stress Type - DC and AC are the available types
Recover Type - identical to Stress Type; DC and AC are the available types
Stress Conditions - establishes the conditions needed for your test
Figure 15...BTI PTM Stress Settings
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Figure 620: BTI PTM Stress Settings
Stress Time settings
You have three choices to configure your stress time scale:
•
•
•
Linear - ensures all stress times are the same
Log - ensures all stress times increase logarithmically with each cycle
List - allows you to specify the stress times
If you select Linear, the Stress List options (Insert, Remove, and Clear) will be not be active and you
must make changes to the edit boxes for your testing needs (see next Figure):
•
•
•
First Stress - enter the amount of time (seconds) your devices are stressed during first cycle
Last Stress - enter the total stress time for your entire subsite plan
Points - enter the number of stress points you want for your test (256 maximum)
Figure 15...Stress Time Linear settings
Figure 621: Stress Time Linear settings
If you select Log, the Stress List options (Insert, Remove, and Clear) will not be active and you must
make changes to the edit boxes for your testing needs (see next Figure):
•
•
•
First Stress - enter the amount of time (seconds) your devices are stressed during first cycle
Last Stress - enter the total stress time for your entire subsite plan
Stresses/Decade - enter the number of tests that you want performed (256 maximum)
Figure 15...Stress Time Log settings
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Figure 622: Stress Time Log Settings
If you select List, the Stress List options will be active and you can make changes directly in the list
(see next Figure):
•
•
•
Insert - use your keyboard to enter a series of stress times by clicking the function
Remove - select one of the list items and click Remove will remove that item from the list
Clear - click and the entire Stress List will be removed
Figure 15...Stress Time List settings
Figure 623: Stress Time List settings
Stress Type settings
The Stress Types available are DC and AC. In the DC type, Frequency, Duty Cycle, and Rise/Fall
Time are not functional. These stress type settings are only available in the AC type (see next
Figure).
Figure 15...Stress Type settings DC
Figure 624: Stress Type settings DC
In the AC type, you will see the following functions where you can change the settings based on you
testing needs (see next Figure):
Frequency - you will need to choose and input based on your testing needs (highest frequency
available is 10 M)
Duty Cycle - you will need to choose and input based on your testing needs
Rise/Fall Time - you will need to choose and input based on your testing needs
Figure 15...Stress Type settings AC
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Figure 625: Stress Type settings AC
Stress setting limitation
The UF BTI module uses a 4225-PMU to generate the waveform and take measurements. According
to the 4225-PMU specifications, the test module sets a limitation to the stress time sequences. In the
GUI, a note will show how many sequences are used and how many sequences are left. If the stress
time exceeds the maximum limits, you will see an indication in the GUI (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Stress Time sequences
Figure 626: Stress Time sequences
NOTE
Between the Stress Time settings and the Recover Time settings are the following five settings:
1. Stress/Recover Cycle - enter the fixed number of times (cycles) that you want the subsite test to execute
(256 maximum)
NOTE
The Stress/Recover Cycle is only available when the Recover function is enabled.
2. Hold Time(s) - measures the device (DUT) before testing occurs; you can specify 0 to 1000 seconds;
default is 0
NOTE
The Hold Time should be less than the shortest stress/recover time so that monitor will be performed
in each stress/recover section once monitor is enabled.
3. Sample Rate - defines the sampling rate of the PMU cards (all cards involved in BTI testing will have the
same sampling rate)
4. Transition Time - the interval between corresponding points on the rising or the falling edge of the pulse
5. Temperature - shows the current temperature of the chuck in celsius
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You will also see the Test Diagram function in this area (see next Figure). These settings are for
global usage in the test configuration that will be used in the Pre-Stress Tests, Measure, and PostStress Tests.
Figure 15...Stress and Recover settings
Figure 627: Stress and Recover settings
If you select the Test Diagram function, the dialog box opens that defines the type of testing with an
example diagram (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Test Sequence Diagram
Figure 628: Test Sequence Diagram
Recover Time settings
Similar to the Stress Time Settings, you have three choices to view your stress time scale:
•
•
•
Linear - ensures all stress times are the same
Log - ensures all stress times increase logarithmically with each cycle
List - allows you to specify the stress times
However, note that you have to select the Recover option for the Recover Time and Recover Type
features to be functional, including the Stress/Recover Cycle function mentioned previously (see next
Figure).
Figure 15...Stress Settings Recover function
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Figure 629: Stress Settings Recover function
If you select Linear, the Stress List options (Insert, Remove, and Clear) will be not be active and you
must make changes to the edit boxes for your testing needs.
•
•
•
First Stress - enter the amount of time (seconds) your devices are stressed during first cycle
Last Stress - enter the total stress time for your entire subsite plan
Points - enter the number of stress points you want for your test (128 maximum)
If you select Log, the Stress List options (Insert, Remove, and Clear) will not be active and you must
make changes to the edit boxes for your testing needs (see next Figure):
•
•
•
First Stress - enter the amount of time (seconds) your devices are stressed during first cycle
Last Stress - enter the total stress time for your entire subsite plan
Stresses/Decade - enter the number of tests that you want performed (128 maximum)
If you select List, the Stress List options will be active and you can make changes directly in the list
(see next Figure):
•
•
•
Insert - use your keyboard to insert a series of stress times by clicking the function
Remove - select one of the list items and click Remove will remove that item from the list
Clear - click and the entire Stress List will be removed
Recover Type settings
The Recover Types available are DC and AC, which are the same as the Stress Types . In the DC
type, Frequency, Duty Cycle, and Rise/Fall Time are not functional. In the AC type, you will see the
Frequency, Duty Cycle, and the Rise/Fall Time available for you to change based on your testing
needs.
NOTE
Depending on your testing needs, the Stress Type and Recover Type (AC or DC) do not have to be
identical as far as values or type. In other words, the Stress Type can be AC and your Recover Type
can be DC, if desired.
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Stress Conditions
The Stress Conditions are in columns and they represent the terminals that are connected to the
RPM. You can view and set up the conditions needed for your test:
Checked - you can choose if the device in that row should be tested by selecting or deselecting (see
next Figure).
Device No. - indicates the the number of the device.
W(um) - you can change the width of the device in microns for testing purposes.
L(um) - you can change the length of the device in microns for testing purposes.
RPM - you can view the status of module.
Terminal - you can view the area of the RPM that is going to be tested.
Pin No. - indicates the pin that is tested.
Stress Voltage - you choose the constant high voltage state that you want applied.
Stress Base - is only enabled for AC stress and you choose the low voltage that you want applied.
Recover Voltage - your defined high voltage state applied
Recover Base - is only enabled for AC recover and it displays the defined low voltage state applied
NOTE
The Stress Voltage is available no matter what stress type is enabled. The Stress Base is enabled for
AC stress only. When Recover is enabled, Recover Voltage is available for both AC and DC recover.
And, Recover Base is only enabled for AC Recover type.
Monitor - if enabled for a terminal, the current of that terminal will be measured once at the beginning
of each stress/recover loop on a PMU and RPM.
NOTE
The Monitor function will be active if the Stress Type or Recover Type is DC.
Meas Range - you can choose the range of parameters needed based on the device and stress
conditions.
Phase_shift (Stress) - on the terminal gate is disabled; the shape of the waveform on the gate is the
same as graphic in the GUI; the phase shift of the waveform on other terminals will use the waveform
on the gate as a reference and will shift to the left side; a valid shift value will fall between 0 - period;
ACS will check the input value.
Phase_shift (Recover) - defines the phase shift in Recover phase.
NOTE
The Phase_shift function will be active if the Stress Type or Recover Type is AC.
Figure 15...Stress Conditions
Figure 630: Stress Conditions
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Pre-Stress Tests tab
On the Pre-Stress Tests tab you will see a list of your pre-stress tests as well as an area for you to set
up your Output Parameters Settings. Additionally, you will see four different functions that allow you
to add four different types of tests (see next Figure).
•
•
•
SMU - measurement of DC; available if one subdevice is connected to RPM
•
Sample - measurement that allows you to choose when to start measuring and the amount of
points you want to measure
Spot - measurement that returns one value
Sweep - measurement that has a starting and stopping point, over a period of time, that returns a
range of values
Figure 15...BTI PTM Pre-Stress Tests
Figure 631: BTI PTM Pre-Stress Tests
You can choose all four tests at once and run your tests, or select one at a time.
The SMU test is a DC test and is performed on the SMU. Also, note that this test is only available if
one subdevice is connected. If there is more than one device, the SMU test will not be available (see
next Figure).
Figure 15...Timing of DC test
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Figure 632: Timing of DC test
The Spot, Sweep, and Sample tests are performed on the PMU that is connected to the RPM.
NOTE
The Spot, Sweep, and Sample tests are available on the Pre-Stress Tests tab, Measure tab, and the
Post-Stress Tests tab. All three tests function the same on each tab. For more information and
descriptions of each test, continue to the next topic for the Measure tab.
You can change the sequence of the testing by clicking the row of the test and clicking the up or
down arrow to the right of the window, or delete any test by clicking the red X.
NOTE
The SMU test cannot be moved and it will run first before any other tests.
The Pre-Stress Tests Output Parameters Settings allow you to create Global parameters, indicate a
low and high variable, and if the testing should exit based on the established parameters.
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Measure tab
On the Measure tab you will see a tab for each device that you have configured for testing, as well as
an area for you to set up Parameter Properties/Degradation Targets. You will also see Tests Settings
for the device and four different functions that allow you to add four different types of tests (see next
Figure).
•
•
Spot - measurement that returns one value
•
Sample - measurement that allows you to choose when to start measuring and the amount of
points you want to measure
•
Inter Stress - unique test inserted between two measurements to allow the DUT time to recover
from the prior measurement (contains voltage value that is usually associated with the stress
value)
Sweep - measurement that has a starting and stopping point, over a period of time, that returns a
range of values
NOTE
The Measure tab does not allow you to run DC tests.
Figure 15...BTI PTM Measure
Figure 633: BTI PTM Measure
The terminals shown on the GUI represent the terminals connected to the RPM.
Spot test: spot mean measurement with the PMU. No calculation is provided for the spot test.
Double click in the Timing column cell of a test and the Timing window of the spot test will display. A
measurement is made during the Meas Window and is defined by Meas Start and Meas Stop values.
One current value is returned (see next Figure).
Timing of Spot test
Figure 15...Timing of Spot test
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Figure 634: Timing of Spot test
Sweep test: sequence of spot mean measurement with the PMU. The value of Points is at least two.
The Start and Stop voltage value of the sweep terminal are split by a comma. Formulas are available
by double clicking a Formula column cell of a sweep test. Double click the Timing section and the
Timing of Sweep test is displayed (see next Figure).
Timing of Sweep test
Figure 15...Timing of Sweep test
Figure 635: Timing of Sweep test
Timing of Sample test
Sample test: waveform capture measurement is performed. Data is collected at the sample rate. You
can choose to measure during the transition time. Once the measurement time is complete, ACS will
calculate the data and display the points once you set the pulse top value. An example of the Timing
for Sample is displayed in the next Figure.
Figure 15...Timing of Sample test
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Figure 636: Timing of Sample test
Inter Stress: allows you to define some special voltage status between two tests. Usually, the device
will go back to stress condition for a while because in the previous tests the device might recover. No
measurement is provided with Inter Stress. As indicated in the test diagram, Inter Stress test will only
be applied in the measurement phase after a stress phase. It will not be applied to the recovermeasure phase, it cannot be the last test completed, and it cannot be the only test performed (see
next Figure).
Figure 15...Timing of Inter Stress
Figure 637: Timing of Inter Stress
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ACS provides basic calculation of Vth, Gm, and sub-threshold slope among others. However, if you
double click a Formula column cell, the Formulator Settings window appears. The Formulator is a
mathematical test results analysis tool where you can manipulate test data with user-defined
formulas. It allows in-test and post-test data computation (see next Figure).
NOTE
Formula is available for sweep test only.
Formulator Settings
Figure 15...Formulator Settings dialog box
Figure 638: Formulator Settings dialog box
Parameter Properties/Degradation Targets
These are variables and the measured and calculated results that have only one value will appear in
this table. The Parameter Properties/Degradation Targets functions determine when to stop a test on
a device. The Shift function is from the initial value of a variable and is calculated and compared with
the target value. When the target is met, the test on that device will be terminated. If Recover is
enabled, this section of the GUI is disabled (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Parameter Properties/Degradation Targets
Figure 639: Parameter Properties_Degradation Targets functions
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Post-Stress Tests tab
Post-Stress Tests are the same as Pre-Stress Tests:
•
•
•
SMU - measurement of DC; available if one subdevice is connected to RPM
•
Sample - measurement that allows you to choose when to start measuring and the amount of
points you want to measure
Spot - measurement that returns one value
Sweep - measurement that has a starting and stopping point, over a period of time, that returns a
range of values
NOTE
Refer to the previous topics on Pre-Stress Tests and Measure for more information and descriptions
of each test.
The only difference is the Output Parameters Settings. Note that the Pre-Stress Tests Output
Parameters Settings allow you to create Global parameters, indicate a low and high variable, and if
the testing should exit based on the established parameters. The Post-Stress Tests Output
Parameters Settings does not allow you to configure these same types of parameters and are for
measurement purposes only (see next Figure).
NOTE
DC testing is permitted, however, DC testing will be performed after pulse testing has completed.
Figure 15...Post-Stress Tests
Figure 640: Post-Stress Tests
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UF BTI project information
There are two demo projects that are included with your version of ACS software for the ultra-fast BTI
test. The UF_BTI_1DUT is one project that represents a standard 4-terminal device. The
UF_BTI_nDUTs is another project that is a more complicated device structure since it consists of
more than one device.
Since PBTI (positive bias temperature instability) tests are usually performed on nMOSFET devices
and NBTI (negative bias temperature instability) tests are usually performed on pMOSFET devices,
the ACS software package contains tests for both devices (see next Figure).
Figure 15...UF_BTI_1DUT test tree
Figure 641: UF_BTI_1DUT test tree
Tests (or modules) that are under the nMOSFET_42 device are:
•
•
•
RPM_config: PTM test used to turn RPMs to SMU mode so that a SMU test can be performed.
•
UF_PBTI_Vt: PBTI test which contains IdVg test and Vt (threshold voltage) extraction in
measurement phase.
•
UF_PBTI_OTF: On_The_Fly PBTI test which extracts shift of threshold voltage in measurement
phase.
•
UF_PBTI_Id: PBTI test contains sampling on drain current in measurement phase. You can
capture the drain current immediately after stress.
IdsVg_NMOS: ITM test used to get IdVg curve of a device with SMU.
RPM_config1: PTM test used to turn RPMs to PMU mode since BTI tests are all performed with
PMU.
NOTE
Tests under the pMOSFET_42 device are similar to the nMOSFET_42 device, with the exception of
the polarity of the voltage.
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When a test structure contains more than one device, there are two possibly different cases:
1. Devices that have shared device terminals.
2. Devices that have separate device terminals.
In the case of shared terminals, ACS permits a shared gate, source, and bulk. However, it is not
possible for devices to have a shared drain. Included with your version of ACS software, you will find
a project that provides tests for separate PMOS devices (named PMOS_notshared_Gate) and shared
gate PMOS devices (named PMOS_shared_Gate) (see next Figure).
Figure 15...UF_BTI_nDUT test tree
Figure 642: UF_BTI_nDUT test tree
Tests (or modules) that are under the PMOS_shared_Gate device are:
•
RPM_config: PTM test used to turn RPMs to PMU mode since BTI tests are all performed with
PMU.
•
UF_NBTI_S_Vt: NBTI test which contains IdVg test and Vt (threshold voltage) extraction in
measurement phase.
NOTE
Tests under the PMOS_notshared_Gate device are similar to the PMOS_shared_Gate device, with
the exception of separate device gates for each device. Also, in either test structure, all testing is
accomplished in parallel.
In the next Figure, notice that the device graphic shows one gate for three different devices. Also,
notice that there are three different sources and one bulk (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Multiple DUT for shared Device Settings tab
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Figure 643: Multiple DUT for shared Device Settings tab
In the next Figure, notice that the device graphic shows a separate (not shared) gate for both devices.
Also, notice that each device has a separate source and separate bulk (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Multiple DUT for not shared Device Settings tab
Figure 644: Multiple DUT for not shared Device Settings tab
UF BTI data
Data tab
When you perform tests during the ultra-fast BTI testing, data is captured and can be viewed on the
Data tab (see next Figure).
Figure 15...PTM Data tab GUI
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Figure 645: PTM Data tab GUI
You can use the Plot Only function to view the test results, the Data Only function, or both functions
(Plot and Data) simultaneously (see next Figure).
Figure 15...PTM Plot and Data GUI
Figure 646: PTM Plot and Data GUI
NOTE
Each module will have test results that you can view. Plus, you can save the results in order to view
the data at a later date (see next Figure).
Figure 15...Save Plot and Data information
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Figure 647: Save Plot and Data information
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Section 15
ACS Sample WLR projects
The ACS software package provides several sample wafer level reliability (WLR) projects and test
modules for special use cases. Theses sample projects or test modules are usually for specific
instruments. This section gives a detailed description about theses projects:
•
•
•
•
Model 237-HV reliability test modules (RTM)
Charge pumping test module
Pulse stress-measure loop project
Stress migration project-resistance batch measurement
Model 237-HV RTM
The Model 237-HV (high-voltage) reliability test module (RTM) is an extended version of the 2600based RTM module that uses the Model 237-HV source-measure unit (SMU). These test modules
extend the voltage range applied to a device under test (DUT). The Model 237 SMU is able to reach
±1100 volts. These test modules include HV TDDB, HV VRamp, HV JRamp, and HV HCI modules.
The test flow and function is the same as the corresponding 2600-based RTM modules. These test
modules are in the PTM category, and support two DUTs tested sequentially. For more information
about TDDB, VRamp, JRamp, and HCI, refer to the ACS 2600 RTM manual (document number
ACS2600RTM-900-01).
Model 237-HV RTM features:
•
•
•
Enables ±1100V bias
Used with PTM modules
Sequential execution with two DUTs
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Hardware configuration
The Model 237-HV RTM uses the Model 237-HV SMU. This instrument is a general purpose
instrument in the ACS hardware configuration. For details on how to add a general purpose
instrument, refer to ACS Reference Manual (document number ACS-901-01)(see next figure).
Figure 648: Add a Model 237-HV SMU
Model 237-HV TDDB
To access the Model 237-HV TDDB module, first create a PTM, then import the file from the following
location: C:\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\KI237_HV_TDDB.py.
The differences between the Model 237-HV TDDB module and the TDDB are shown in the following
examples:
•
The Model 237-HV TDDB is for two DUTs in a tested sequentially (refer to the next figure for the
hardware connection).
Figure 649: Model 237-HV hardware connection
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Test flow: the stress will only be applied once, and there is no SILC (stress induced leakage current)
test in the Model 237-HV TDDB. The test diagram of the Model 237-HV TDDB is shown in the next
figure:
Figure 650: Model 237-HV test diagram
•
Settings: the Model 237-HV TDDB can be configured for a Max Time stress (for instance, a one time
stress, which does not have an inter-stress measurement, and contains the time span of the Max Time
setting). The GUI for setting the time is shown in the next figure.
Figure 651: Model 237-HV TDDB settings GUI
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Model 237-HV VRamp
The Model 237-HV VRamp is used with two DUTs in a sequential test. To access to the Model 237HV VRamp module, first create a PTM, and then import the file from the following location:
C:\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\KI237_HV_Vramp.py.
The test flow for the Model 237-HV VRamp is the same as the 2600-based-RTM VRamp module (see
the next figure):
Figure 652: Model 237-HV VRamp settings
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Model 237-HV JRamp
Model 237-HV JRamp is used for two DUTs sequential test. To access to the 237-HV JRamp module,
first create a PTM, and then import the file from the following location:
C:\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\KI237_HV_Jramp.py.
The test flow for the Model 237-HV JRamp is the same as the 2600-based RTM JRamp module (see
the next figure):
Figure 653: Model 237-HV JRamp settings
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Model 237-HV HCI
The Model 237-HV HCI is with for two DUTs in a sequential test. To access to the Model 237-HV HCI
module, first create a PTM, and then import the file from the following location:
C:\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\KI237_HV_HCI.py.
A typical two DUT test connection is shown in the next figure:
Figure 654: Model 237-HV HCI two DUT connection
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The test flow and settings for the Model 237-HV HCI are similar to the 2600-based RTM HCI module.
The only difference is that in the Model 237-HV HCI, the SMU assignment is at the Stress Settings
tab rather than the device level on the test tree. The Stress Settings tab is shown in the next figure:
Figure 655: Model 237-HV HCI settings
Charge pumping test module
Charge Pumping is a measure technique to evaluate the surface-states at the Si-SiO2 interface of the
MOSFET devices. This method is used to apply pulse on the gate of the MOSFET and measure the
bulk current when the source and drain are biased. The bulk current is caused by the repetitive
recombination at the interface traps of the minority carriers with majority carriers when the gate pulses
the channel between inversion and accumulation.
Charge pumping test module features:
•
•
•
PTM module
Using Agilent 8110 for waveform generating
Three pulse methods: square, triangle, trapezoid
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Connection
The gate of the MOSFET is connected to a pulse generator, and the source and drain are connected
to SMU2. Also, the bulk is connected to SMU1 for the current measurement.
Figure 656: Charge pumping module instrument connections
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The Charge Pumping test module uses as Agilent 8110 (or 8110A) as the pulse generator, the SMU1
is for the bulk current measurement, and SMU2 is for the bias on the Source and Drain. The Agilent
8110 is added to the ACS Hardware configuration as a General Purpose Instrument (GPI), see the
next two figures:
Figure 657: Customized instrument settings
Figure 658: General Custom Instrument Properties and Connection
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Test modules settings
The Charge Pumping Test Module has several functions to achieve different pulse methods. The
function can be selected from the User Module drop-down menu. The module use the standard ACS
test module GUI(see next figure). To access to the Charge Pumping module, first create a PTM, and
then import the file from the following location: C:\ACS\library\pyLibrary\PTMLib\ChargePumping.py.
Figure 659: Charge pumping settings GUI
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Square pulse method
BaseSweep8110 and AmplSweep8110
The BaseSweep 8110 generates a pulse that has a fixed amplitude voltage and a linear changed
base voltage. The AmplSweep 8110 generates a square pulse that has a fixed base voltage and a
linear changed amplitude voltage.
Figure 660: Base sweep and amplitude sweep
The test flow is shown in the next figure:
Figure 661: Square pulse method test flow
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Triangular pulse method
FreqLinearSweep_Tria8110 and FreqFactorSweep_Tria8110
These two modules generate a triangular pulse with an increasing frequency:
FreqLinearSweep_Tria8110 generates a linear changed frequency pulse.
FreqFactorSweep_Tria8110 generates an pulse with an exponentially increasing frequency.
Figure 662: Triangular pulse method
The test flow is shown in the next figure:
Figure 663: Triangular pulse method test flow
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Trapezoidal pulse method
RiseTimeLinearSweep_Trap8110 and FallTimeLinearSweep_Trap8110
These two modules generate a trapezoidal pulse. RiseTimeLinearSweep_Trap8110 has a linearly
changing rise time. FallTimeLinearSweep_Trap8110 has a fall time that varies linearly.
Figure 664: Trapezoidal pulse method
The test flow is shown in the next figure:
Figure 665: Trapezoidal pulse method test flow
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Pulse stress-measure loop project
The Pulse Stress-Measure Loop Project is an ACS project that is used to achieve a stress-measure
loop test for the device reliability analysis. This project uses a subsite loop to achieve the stressmeasure loop, and different tests for stress or measure. Special UAPs are created to control the loop
to determine when to exit testing. Because different tests are used for stress or measure, the recover
time will be inevitably introduced in the loop. This project is for the use case that has no high request
for recover time, but may need to evaluate the change in characteristics after different stresses have
been applied (for example, DC or Pulse, and different waveforms).
The pulse stress-measure loop project features:
•
•
•
•
A complete ACS project with limited test tree setting
Using subsite loop to implement stress-measure loop for reliability tests
Simple exit criteria
PMU for pulse stress; read waveform file to define customized stress for each loop
Example connection of DUT
The following DUT connections are examples of how to use the Pulse Stress-Measure Loop project
for testing.
Figure 666: Single DUT test with two RPMs
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Figure 667: Two DUTs with two RPMs
Figure 668: Two DUTs with four RPMs
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Project setting
Open the Pulse Stress-Measure Loop project located at the following location:
C:\ACS\Projects\Stress_Measure_Loop.
In this project, in order to make the UAP work, the test tree structure (see next figure) cannot be
changed (1 pattern, 1 subsite, 3 devices and the UAP tree structure). The only action that you can
take in the this example is add a test to any device.
Figure 669: Pulse stress-measure loop project
Project explanations from the test tree:
•
automation_begin UAP - SetMax: set the max value of the test results. The UAP file is located in
the following location: ACS\library\pyLibrary\UAP\SetMax.py. In this project, they are I_Drain and
I_Gate (for example, this defines the maximum drain current and maximum gate current)(see
next figure).
Figure 670: Maximum value of current on the drain and gate
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•
If there’s no ITM under the DUT1 or DUT2, or, if there’s no measurement in IV1 or IV2, this
project will not check the device’s failure.
•
site_begin UAP - Init_data: initializes the fail status prior to a site test. The UAP file is located in
the following location: ACS\library\pyLibrary\UAP\Init_data.py.
•
test_end UAP - Check_DUT_fail: at the end of each test, the test determines if the result is larger
than the maximum value set in the automation_begin UAP SetMax. If it is larger, the DUT is
marked as failed and will exit the stress-measure loop. The other DUT will continue the loop until
it reaches the max loop number, or it fails. The UAP file is located in the following location:
\ACS\library\pyLibrary\UAP\Check_DUT_Fail.py.
The Test Tree has a Pattern with a subsite and three devices: Pattern_1; HOME; DUT1, DUT2, and
Stress.
•
You will need to set the loop number for subsite HOME (see next figure):
Figure 671: Set the Loop Number
In the previous figure, the Loop Number is 5. This means that the project will add 5 kinds of stress to
the DUT (subsite HOME).
You will also need to choose the test for each DUT (for example, for DUT1 and DUT2)(see next
figure).
•
IV1 and IV2 are for the parameter test for DUT1 and DUT2, respectively. You can add any device
to these two devices. These are the measure phase of the stress-measure loop. For example,
CV, IV, switch control (RPM or matrix), etc.
You need to choose the stress waveform, too.
•
The PTM Stress under device "Stress" is for the stress phase. In this sample project, add a PTM
and import the Pulse_Stress.py file. This test module uses the PMU to apply a pre-defined
waveform to the DUT. The PTM stress is shown in the next figure:
Figure 672: PTM stress phase
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The following is an example setting for the two DUTs with two RPMs.This means that the stress
terminal for DUT1 is PMU1_1 , the stress terminal for DUT2 is PMU1_2, respectively.
Figure 673: Connection setting example of two DUTs
Click the Add function to add a waveform (see next figure):
Figure 674: Add a waveform
The waveform is read from the waveform .ksf file. The .ksf file is created by Kpulse. The following
figure is an example of the stress setting.
Figure 675: Example of stress setting
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This example means that if the Outer Loop Number is 1 (the subsite loop), ACS will force the stress
waveform 10,000 times, which is defined in the following location:
C:\S4200\kiuser\KPulse\sample1.ksf. For the DC stress, see following example:
Figure 676: DC stress
This example means that if the Outer Loop Number is 2 (the subsite loop), ACS will force the DC
stress for 10 seconds at 1.5V.
For this example, after looping five times, the results of the stress loop and stress settings are shown
in the following figure:
Figure 677: Settings for all stress loops
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For loop1 of the subsite loop, the stress waveform is located in the sample1.ksf file, with a File Loop
Number of 10,000 for both DUTs.
For loop 2, the stress is DC at 1.5V for 10 seconds.
For loop 3, the stress waveform is located in the sample2.ksf file, with a File Loop Number of 50,000
for both DUTs.
For loop 4, the stress is DC at 2.0V for 15 seconds.
For loop 5, the stress waveform is located in the sample3.ksf file, with a File Loop Number of 100,000
for both DUTs.
You should execute this project as a project in Automation mode.
•
During automation, you will know which subsite loop is executing in automation by using the
Basic Monitor Items GUI (see next figure):
Figure 678: Basic Monitor Items
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Test flow
The following figure shows the basic test and stress flow in this project. ACS will first execute all of
tests that are under ‘DUT1’. Next, ACS will execute all of tests that are under ‘DUT2’. After all testing
is complete, ACS will force stress (pulse or DC voltage, depending on the settings) to one or both of
the DUTs.
During the stress, ACS will not make any measurements and the PMU will work like a pulse generator
or a DC power supply.
Figure 679: Basic test and flow of the project
Test result data
The Pulse Stress-Measure Loop project saves the same type of data as another other ACS project.
You have the ability to define a data plot on the data tab of each test (for example, IV1 and IV2 in this
project). Also, you can set the automation real-time plot for these two tests and see the data results of
the plot in real time. The test results can be saved to the following types of files: .kdf, .db, or .csv.
Stress migration project–resistance batch measurement
Stress migration (which may also be call stress voiding or stress-induced voiding), describes the
movement of metal atoms under the influence of mechanical stress gradients. This will cause the
resistance of the metal line to rise and form a void, which may cause electrical failures. Usually the
mechanical stress is caused by a thermal process.
The stress migration project is able to make batch resistance measurements to multiple DUTs. The
test project itself does not provide stress, so there needs to be another procedure used in order to
achieve the stress process. The test project can display the test results as defined with a fail or pass
in real time. This project is contained in a .csv file, which makes it convenient for editing. The project
is generated by importing the .csv test plan file. By importing the file, it simplifies the procedure for
you so that you do not have to create your own project. However, you can edit the .csv file for your
specific needs, if desired.
Stress migration project features:
•
•
•
•
A complete ACS project generated by importing test plan file (.csv format)
For resistance batch measurement
The .csv file can be easily editted
A real-time test result dipslay (allows you to exit the project if the test fails)
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Instument connection
The instruments should all be Series 2600 or Series 2600A in a single GPIB or Ethernet group, which
are connected in a daisy chain by TSP Link. The automatically generated project will only select
Group 1. This may be manually adjusted after the project is generated. The connection between an
SMU terminal and DUT is defined in the test plan .csv file.
Test flow and settings
Create a Stress Migration test project:
1. Create a new ACS project, input a Project Name (see next figure).
Figure 680: New ACS project
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2. Import the test plan file (*.csv): File->Import->Test Plan File (*.csv). The test plan file
(SM_input_format.csv) is located in the following locations: \ACS\Projects\.
Figure 681: Import a test plan
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3. Check the information in the Import Data Confirm Dialog window. The Refresh function will
replace the existing file if they are the same in the test tree. The Append function will add new
modules to the test tree; if the name of the modules already exist and new modules will be
assigned new names.
Figure 682: Import data confirmation
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4. Test Tree:
Figure 683: Test tree
Project explanations from the test tree:
•
site_end UAP: if there are consecutive site failures a dialog box opens and let's the operator
choose to continue testing or exit (the parameters for the dialog box to open is defined in the test
plan .csv file as "x_test."
•
Pattern_1: has one HOME subsite and five subsites (for example, Macro1_Device Macro5_Device).
•
Each subsite MacroX has one device MacroX_Device.
•
Each MacroX_Device has one STM MacroX_STM_Test.
•
In each MacroX_STM_Test, each R_meas function calling performs one resistance measurement.
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Test plan
The Test Plan csv File (SM_input_format.csv) Format and the Generated STM Module
MacroX_STM_Test
The Test Plan csv File contents are as following table:
Column names
Comments
Macro Name
X(µm)
Y(µm)
Test Structure Name
Corresponding to subsite name in subsite definition tab.
Corresponding to subsite X position in subsite definition tab.
Corresponding to subsite Y position in subsite definition tab.
Corresponding to the device name (DevName) in the
generated STM script.
terminal
Corresponding to the resistor measurement mode (ResMode)
in the generated STM script. 4: four terminals; 2: two
terminals.
Ground Rule(GR)
Y: enable gnd (ground) connection. N: disable gnd
connection. If enable and the F +, F - , S +, S - cells are
blank, the terminals will be assigned as gnd (KI_GND).
Force (A)
The force current value applied to the ForceHi terminal. If the
cell is blank, the force function will be voltage force. The
Force (A) and Force (V) should not be all blank.
Force (V)
The force voltage value applied to the ForceHi terminal.
Clamp
The compliance value. Current Compliance for voltage force
function, and voltage Compliance for current force function.
Output
Output information.
x_test
The number of failed sites, after which ACS will pop up a
dialog for you to choose whether continue or exit.
F+
The SMU number of force Hi SMU (for example, 4 stands for
SMU4).
S+
The SMU number of sense Hi SMU.
FThe SMU number of force Lo SMU.
SThe SMU number of sense Lo SMU.
Expected R (Ohm)
Expected resistance.
Shift range (%)
The "pass" shift range. If abs (RValue-ExpectedR) <
ExpectedR*ShiftRange*100%. the test will pass, otherwise it
will fail.
Description (based on The description of the structure on this row.
documentation)
When you import the test plan .csv file, ACS will also generate a STM (MacroX_STM_Test). The STM
script structure is shown in the following figure:
Figure 684: The generated STM script
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Each STM test module includes four parts:
•
•
•
•
Output definition
Instrument pre-setting
Resistance measuring (R_meas) function calling
Reset instruments
The R_meas function is used to perform the resistance measurement. An explanation of R_meas is
below:
R_meas (DevName, ResMode, ForceVIMode, FHiSMU, FLoSMU, SHiSMU, SLoSMU, ForceValue,
ComplValue, NPLC, RstFlag, OutputOffFlag, ExpRValue, ShiftRange, vHi_value, vLo_value,
iHi_value, iLo_value, R_value)
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The parameters in the function that are corresponding to the SM_input_format.csv file:
•
DevName: test structure name
•
ResMode: terminal ( 0 for 4 terminals; 1 for 2 terminals)
•
ForceVIMode: If the cell in Force (A) column is blank and the cell in Force (V) column has a value,
ForceVIMode is assigned to 0 which represents voltage force function and current measurement. If the
cell in Force (A) column has value and the cell in Force (V) column is blank, ForceVIMode is assigned
to 1 which represents current force function and voltage measure.
•
FHiSMU: F+
•
FLoSMU: F-
•
SHiSMU: S+
•
SLoSMU: S-
•
ForceValue: Force (A) when ForceVIMode is equal to 1; Force (V) when ForceVIMode is equal to 0
•
ComplValue: Clamp
•
ExpRValue: Expected
•
ShiftRange: Shift range
The following parameters are additional settings. The default values are set to be commonly used
values:
•
NPLC: Measurement speed setting. 0.001(fast) to 25(slow). Default input is 1.
•
RstFlag: To flag if reset SMUs after one R_meas function. ( 1: reset; 0: not to reset) Default input is 0.
•
OutputOffFlag: To flag if turn SMUs output off after one test. (1: turn off; 0: not to turn off) Default input
is 0.
The others are output parameters to save measurement results:
•
vHi_value: Voltage value measured at SHiSMU for 4 terminals device or FHiSMU for 2 terminals device.
•
vLo_value: Voltage value measured at SLoSMU for 4 terminals device or FLoSMU for 2 terminals
device.
•
iHi_value: Current value measured at FHiSMU.
•
iLo_value: Current value measured at FLoSMU.
•
R_value: Calculate from the above values. R = abs(vHi-vLo/iHi).
Automation
In this particular Stress Migration project, the generated site_end UAP is used to implement the
function that if the same Test Structure fail for the "x_test." You will see a dialog box where you can
choose to exit the project or continue testing (see next figure). The "x_test" parameters are defined in
the SM_input_format.csv file. (For more information on how to set up the automation function, refer to
the Automation section in this manual).
Figure 685: Consecutive fail dialog box
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In the Automation Data tab, the failed test is highlighted in red (see next figure):
Figure 686: Automation Data tab
Error code
In the output, there is an "error$StructureName" indicating the error code of the test:
•
-10100: ResMode is not 0 or 1.
ForceVIMode is not 0 or 1.
When ForceVIMode is 0, ForceValue > 200 or ComplValue > 0.1
When ForceVIMode is 1, ForceValue >0.1 or ComplValue >200
NPLC < 0.001 or NPLC > 25
RstFlag is not 0 or 1
OutputoffFlag is not 0 or 1
•
-10200: FHiSMU, FLoSMU, SHiSMU, SLoSMU are not all set to the correct SMU number.
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Section 16
ACS example hardware configurations and connections
In this section:
Test and control connections ..................................................16-1
Test and control connections
Switch matrix connections
A switch matrix enhances the connectivity of the system by allowing any source measure unit (SMU) or
other instrument to be connected to any device under test (DUT) pin.
Switching mainframes
The following table lists the recommended switching mainframes along with a brief description of each.
The Keithley Instruments Models 3706, 707A, and 707B hold six matrix cards, while the Keithley
Instruments Models 708A and 708B hold one matrix card.
Recommended switching mainframes
Mainframe
Description
Model 3706
6-slot system switch with DMM
Model 3706-NFP
Model 3706-S
Model 3706-SNFP
Model 707A and 707B
Model 708A and 708B
6-slot system switch with DMM, without front panel and keypad
6-slot system switch
6-slot system switch, without front panel and keypad
6-slot Switching Matrix Mainframe
Single slot Switching Matrix Mainframe
Integrated software control for the Keithley Instruments Models 707A, 707B, 708A, 708B and Model
3706 Switching Matrix is provided by the ACS software. For more information, you can refer to the
Python user library.
For additional information about developing user modules and libraries, and to learn the commands,
you can refer to the LPT library reference.
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Recommended matrix cards
The following Table summarizes the recommended Keithley Instruments matrix cards, along with a brief
description of each. Note that a key characteristic of these cards is low offset-current to minimize the
negative effects of offset currents on low-current measurements.
Recommended switching matrix cards
Matrix Card
Description
Model 3730
Model 7072
Model 7172
Model 7174A
Model 9174
6x16 matrix, <100 pA offset current
8x12 matrix, <1 pA offset current
8x12 matrix, <500 fA offset current
8x12 matrix, 100 fA offset current
8x12 matrix, 100 fA offset current
Switch mainframe control
The switch matrix is controlled by the system computer or Model 4200-SCS using the GPIB (IEEE-488)
interface. Refer to IEEE-488 connections in this section for detailed bus connection information.
Typical SMU matrix card connections
The next Figure shows a typical SMU matrix card connection used in a typical system. This is a
configuration that includes 8x SMUs and 24x Pins. SMUs are connected to the instrument card. There
is always one instrument card. Pins are connected to the pin cards. There are 1 to 5 pin cards.
Figure 13-1: SMU matrix connection of typical system
Figure 687: SMU matrix connection of typical system
IEEE-488 connections
The built-in IEEE-488 interface allows you to connect to the system computer or Model 4200-SCS to a
variety of GPIB-equipped devices, such as Series 2400 SourceMeter instruments, a capacitance
voltage (CV) meter or switching matrix. The Model 4200-SCS unit can also be configured as a GPIB
child and be controlled by an external host computer.
IEEE-488 connector
For GPIB communication, connect an IEEE-488 cable between the computer GPIB port and instrument
GPIB port. The standard IEEE-488 connectors are shown in the next Figure.
Figure 13-2: IEEE 488 connector
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Figure 688: IEEE 488 connector
Recommended cables
To avoid electrical interference, use only shielded IEEE-488 connecting cables such as the Keithley
Instruments Models 7007-1 and 7007-2.
Configuring IEEE-488 controller operation
The Model 4200-SCS can be configured to operate either as a GPIB controller or GPIB child.
Other test instruments with GPIB connectors can be configured as a GPIB child. The system computer
with ACS installed and the Model 4200-SCS acts as a GPIB controller when ACS is running. When
operating as a controller, the Model 4200-SCS reserves primary address 0, making that address
unavailable to GPIB child devices such as GPIB switch matrices, CV meters, and automatic probe
stations.
Drivers for these and other instruments, typically integrated into semiconductor test systems, are
included with ACS.
Configuring IEEE-488 child operation and control
The Model 4200-SCS acts as a GPIB child when the Keithley External Control Interface (KXCI)
software is running. When KXCI is running, the Model 4200-SCS can be controlled by an external
computer.
For more information about KXCI, refer to the supplied documentation that is located on the Keithley
Instruments CD-ROM that was shipped with your purchase. The CD-ROM contains customer
documentation for the following models:
•
Model 707A and 707B Switching Matrix
•
Model 708A and 708B Switching Matrix
•
Model 2410 High-Voltage (HV) SourceMeter
•
Series 2600A System SourceMeter
•
Series 3700 System Switch/Multimeter
•
Model 4200-SCS (contains KXCI information)
You can also visit the Keithley Instruments website at www.keithley.com to search for updated
information by model number.
Other instrument’s that are considered a child in the hardware configuration can be controlled by the
system computer or the Model 4200-SCS using GPIB commands.
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RS-232 connections
The built-in RS-232 port allows you to interface the system computer or Model 4200-SCS to a variety of
serial devices, such as a serial printer or plotter. It can also be used to control semi-automatic probe
stations and other serial equipment.
The next Figure shows the location of the RS-232 (COM1) connector, which is a standard DB-9 (9-pin)
male connector. A 9-pin-to-25-pin adapter may be used, if desired.
Figure 13-3: RS-232 connector
Figure 689: RS-232 connector
The following Table gives you a pin number and a description of the RS-232 connector.
RS-232 connector pin out
Pin Number
Description
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Not used
TXD, transmit data
RXD, receive data
Not used
GND, signal ground
Not used
RTS, ready to send
CTS, clear to send
Not used
Recommended serial cables
To avoid electrical interference, use only properly-shielded serial cables. Shielded 25-pin cables may
be used with shielded 25-pin-to-9-pin adapters where needed.
TSP-Link™ connections
The TSP-Link is an expansion interface that allows the instruments to communicate with each other.
Parent and child instruments
In a TSP-Link system, one of the nodes (instruments) is the parent and the others are child nodes.
The parent can control the other nodes (child nodes) in the system. When any node transitions from
local operation to remote, it becomes the parent of the system; all other nodes also transition to remote
operation, and become the child nodes. When any node transitions from remote operation to local, all
other nodes also transition to local operation, and the parent/child relationship between nodes is
dissolved.
A child is a node that is controlled by the parent. The GPIB and RS-232 command interfaces of the
child nodes are disabled.
Connections
Connections for an expanded system are shown in the next Figure. As shown, one unit is optionally
connected to the system computer using the GPIB or RS-232 interface and all the units in the system
are daisy-chained together using LAN crossover cables.
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NOTE
The PC or laptop is not needed for stand alone systems. Also, there are two TSP-Link connectors on
the back panel of each Series 2600A instrument. Also, make sure that you use a LAN crossover cable
for each TSP-Link connector that is type category 5e or higher, and length three meters maximum
between nodes.
Figure 13-4: TSP-Link connections
Figure 690: TSP-Link connections
LAN connections
The Model 4200-SCS can be connected to an ethernet LAN so that tests and data can be easily
accessed and archived. From a networking perspective, the Model 4200-SCS operates the same as
any other personal computer running Windows XP Professional. The following information outlines the
LAN connections and recommended cables.
NOTE
The drivers for the Model 4200-SCS LAN interface are pre-installed on the system. Contact your
system administrator before attempting to enable the LAN interface.
Recommended LAN cables
For the best results, use only CAT 5 UTP cables equipped with RJ-45 connectors to connect the Model
4200-SCS to your LAN.
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Basic configuration
ACS software installations are supported on the following hardware configurations:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
On a laptop/desktop for Series 2600A System instruments.
On a laptop/desktop for Series 2600A System instruments and Series 2400 instruments.
On a laptop/desktop for Series 2600A System instruments and Series 3700 instruments.
On a laptop/desktop for Series 2400 instruments and Model 707A/707B/708A/708B instruments.
On a Model 4200-SCS.
On a laptop/desktop for Model 4200-SCS.
On a Model 4200-SCS for Series 2600A instruments.
On the S530 system (there are two different types: High-Voltage; Low-Current).
NOTE
Different test modules should be used for each configuration.
Configuration 1, 2 and 3: ACS on a laptop/desktop for Series 2600A instruments
NOTE
Configuration 2 includes Series 2600A System instruments and Series 2400 instruments.
Configuration 3 includes Series 2600A System instruments and Series 3700 instruments.
ITMs and STMs can be used for this case. They are only used to control Series 2600A instruments
(and Series 2400 instruments, when part of the configuration).
CTMs can be used for this case. They are only used to control certain external instruments, such as
switch matrices, pulse generators, CV meters, etc.
PTMs can also be used to control instruments and process data.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Install a CEC GPIB card (KUSB-488A or KPCI-488) on a system computer with the latest driver.
Connect the master instrument to the system computer/laptop through the GPIB.
Connect the child instruments to the master one-at-a-time using TSP-Link™ (see next Figure).
Make sure each group of Series 2600A instruments has a master. The Series 2600A that links to
the controller (system computer or Model 4200-SCS) with the GPIB cable is the master.
5. Connect each Series 2600A in the group to the TSP-Link (refer the Series 2600A System
SourceMeter® User’s Manual for more details).
NOTE
For more information about TSP-Link, refer to the supplied documentation that is located on the
Keithley Instruments CD-ROM that was shipped with your purchase.
Figure 16...ACS on a computer/laptop for Series 2600A instruments
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Figure 691: ACS on a computer_laptop for Series 2600A instruments
Assigning GPIB addresses
Each group of Series 2600A instruments should have a unique GPIB address (refer to the Series
2600A System SourceMeter documentation for more details).
The master’s GPIB address is the group’s GPIB address. It’s not necessary to change all Series 2600A
GPIB addresses to the same number.
NOTE
Address 21 is reserved for the system controller (GPIB card).
Assigning node numbers
Each Series 2600A in a group should have a unique node number. You can assign node numbers by
performing the steps below.
Node numbers should be assigned sequentially, since the SMU numbers are assigned automatically
when the system is started and according to the node number sequence. If the node numbers were not
assigned sequentially, the SMU numbers will not be consistent with the setup. The recommended
sequence is:
1. Assign the master to Node 1.
2. Assign the Series 2600A that is linked with the master by TSP-Link to Node 2.
3. Sequentially assign all other Series 2600A instruments’ node numbers.
Checking the node, SMU, and timer numbers
Follow these steps to check the Node, SMU, and Timer numbers on the Series 2600A instruments’
front panels. For a Series 2600A master without Linear Parametric Test (LPT) functions:
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•
When performing a scan of the ACS hardware configuration, the node numbers, SMU numbers, and timer
numbers are displayed on each of the Series 2600A instruments’ front panels.
•
For a Series 2600A master with LPT functions installed, each time the master is turned on, the information
is displayed automatically.
•
Send the string showsmu(10) to a Series 2600A master’s GPIB address by any GPIB communication
software (for example, the TRTEST.exe of CEC 488). The information is displayed for 10 seconds ( note
this method needs LPT functions).
The next Figure shows a typical hardware configuration.
Figure 16...Typical hardware configuration
Figure 692: Typical hardware configuration
NOTE
There are two TSP-Link connectors on the back panel of each Series 2600A instrument. Also, make
sure that you use a LAN crossover cable for each TSP-Link connector that is type category 5e or
higher, and length three meters maximum between nodes.
Connecting to a computer
Each Series 2600A master and other GPIB devices should be connected to the computer by a GPIB
cable. There are no special limits for the topology and the sequence. Follow these steps to connect with
a computer:
If only one GPIB card is installed:
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•
All GPIB devices (Series 2600A instruments, prober, Model 3401 Pulse Pattern Generator, etc.) should all
connect to this GPIB card.
If more than one GPIB card is installed:
•
All Model 4200-SCS related instruments and probers should be connected with GPIB card 0.
•
All Series 2600A groups must be connected with the GPIB card that holds the biggest card number. You
can check the cards’ assigned number using the TEST488.EXE routine, which is located in CEC488
driver folder.
Connecting to the device under test (DUT)
ACS supports the Model 4200-SCS and Series 2600A instruments. There are no special requirements
on the DUT connection beyond those described in the customer documentation (refer the Series 2600A
System SourceMeter User’s Manual and the Model 4200-SCS Semiconductor Characterization System
Reference Manual for more details).
NOTE
For more information about the Series 2600A System SourceMeter instruments and the Model 4200SCS, refer to the supplied documentation that is located on the Keithley Instruments CD-ROM that was
shipped with your purchase.
Configuration 4: ACS on a laptop/desktop for Series 2400 instruments and
Model 707A/707B/708A/708B instruments
NOTE
ITMs and STMs can be used for this case. They are only used to control Series 2400 instruments.
CTMs can be used for this case. They are only used to control certain external instruments, such as
switch matrices, pulse generators, CV meters, etc.
PTMs also can be used to control Series 2400 instruments and Model 707A/707B/708A/708B
instruments, and to control certain external instruments, such as pulse generators and CV meters.
Configuration 5: ACS on the Model 4200-SCS only
NOTE
ITMs cannot be used for this case.
STMs can only be used for importing KTM files.
CTMs can be used for this case. They are used to control the Model 4200-SCS internal hardware, such
as the SMU, PGU, PMU, SCP, etc. Also, they can be used to control certain external instruments,
such as switch matrices, pulse generators, CV meters, etc.
NOTE
Configuration 5 includes all instruments and equipment that are supported by KITE (see next Figure).
Connect the master instrument to the 4200-SCS using the GPIB interface.
Figure 16...ACS software on Model 4200-SCS
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Figure 693: ACS software on Model 4200-SCS
Configuration 6: ACS on a laptop/desktop for a Model 4200-SCS only
NOTE
ITMs can be used for this case. They are only used to control the Model 4200-SCS using an ethernet
cable and KXCI interface.
PTMs can be used for CV testing.
Configuration 7: ACS on the Model 4200-SCS with Series 2600A instruments
NOTE
ITMs cannot be used for this case. They are used to control Series 2600A instruments.
STMs can only be used for this case. They are used to control Series 2600A instruments and for
importing KTM files.
CTMs can be used for this case. They are used to control the Model 4200-SCS internal hardware, such
as the SMU, PGU, PMU, SCP, etc. Also, they can be used to control certain external instruments,
such as switch matrices, pulse generators, CV meters, etc.
NOTE
ACS supports multigroup Series 2600A units. Each group can include up to 64 Series 2600A System
SourceMeter source-measure units (SMU) with a maximum of 128 SMUs.
1. Connect the master instrument to the 4200-SCS using the GPIB interface.
2. Connect the child instruments one-at-a-time to the master with a TSP-Link.
3. Make sure each group of Series 2600A instruments has a master. The Series 2600A that links to
the controller (system computer or Model 4200-SCS) with the GPIB cable is the master.
4. Connect each Series 2600A in the group to the TSP-Link (refer the Series 2600A System
SourceMeter User’s Manual for more details).
NOTE
For more information about TSP-Link, refer to the supplied documentation that is located on the
Keithley Instruments CD-ROM that was shipped with your purchase.
The next Figure shows an example configuration setup with the Model 4200-SCS connected with a
GPIB cable to the Series 2600A instruments.
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NOTE
The example of the Model 4200-SCS backplane may not be typical for your configuration. The cards
that are used in the eight slots of the 4200-SCS backplane can be any combination.
Figure 16...ACS on a Model 4200-SCS with Series 2600A instruments
Figure 694: ACS on a Model 4200-SCS with Series 2600A instruments
Typical S530 system configuration
There are two typical ACS system configurations: high-voltage system, and low-current system (for
more specific configuration information, refer to the S530 Administrative Guide, part number PA-992).
You can also configure your ACS system to other system formats according to your needs.
Keithley Instruments’ ACS integrated test systems support the mini-tester architecture through the use
of the Series 2600A System SourceMeter instruments. By using the proprietary TSP-Link extensible
virtual backplane technology and embedded script processing, groups of Series 2600A units can be
formed into mini-testers.
The next Figure shows the communication diagram of these two typical systems.
Figure 16...S530 Instrument communication diagram
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Figure 695: S530 Instrument communication diagram
System 2: High-voltage (HV) test system configuration
The next Figure shows an example HV system configuration.
Figure 16...Example HV system configuration
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Figure 696: Example HV system configuration
NOTE
For the High-Voltage system, the parameter in the ACS setting file (\\ACS\KATS\ ACS_setting.ini) must
be set as HV (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Set ACS file for high-voltage configuration
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Figure 697: Set ACS file for High-Voltage configuration
Maximum configuration
•
Three SourceMeters: Model 2636A
•
One HV SourceMeter: Model 2410
•
One Switching Matrix: Model 707A/707B
•
Minimum of two Model 7072-HV cards (up to four cards are possible)
•
One Semiconductor Characterization System: Model 4200-SCS/C with a 4210-CVU card; a CVU option
with 10 ft (3 m) cables (four cards installed with the 2-wire option and six cards for the 4-wire option)
•
One system computer with two Network Interface Cards (NIC)
•
One power distribution unit: Model 42000-PDU-2K
•
One cabinet, 23 U
•
One keyboard and keyboard arm with tray
•
One monitor and monitor arm
Each SMU has a ground module connector labeled Channel A/B LO. Every Channel A/B LO triax
connection is connected to the LO Patch Panel. This panel forms the system ground unit. The
aggregated output of the LO Patch Panel is connected to matrix slot1 column 9.
System 3: Low-current test system configuration
The next Figure shows an example of the low-current system configuration.
Figure 16...Example low-current system configuration
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Figure 698: Example Low-Current system configuration
NOTE
For the Low-Current system, the parameter in the ACS setting file (\\ACS\KATS\ ACS_setting.ini) must
be set as SS (see next Figure).
Figure 16...Set ACS file for low-current configuration
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Figure 699: Set ACS file for Low-Current configuration
Maximum Configuration
•
Four SourceMeters: Model 2636A
•
One Switching Matrix: Model 707A/707B
•
Minimum of two Model 7174 cards (up to six cards are possible)
•
One Semiconductor Characterization System: Model 4200-SCS/C with 4210-CVU card, CVU option with
the 10 ft cables
•
One system computer with two Network Interface Cards (NIC)
•
One power distribution unit: Model 42000-PDU-2K
•
One cabinet, 23 U
•
One keyboard and keyboard arm with tray
•
One monitor and monitor arm
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Specifications are subject to change without notice.
All Keithley trademarks and trade names are the property of Keithley Instruments, Inc.
All other trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective companies.
A
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M E A S U R E
O F
C O N F I D E N C E
Keithley Instruments, Inc.
Corporate Headquarters • 28775 Aurora Road • Cleveland, Ohio 44139 • 440-248-0400 • Fax: 440-248-6168 • 1-888-KEITHLEY • www.keithley.com
12/06
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