Untitled - MUSIC Group
Top-notch electric guitar
Adjustable black nylon strap
Padded gig bag
10 foot high-quality instrument cable
3 picks
Vibrato arm
Chord chart poster
Guitar instruction book
Amp manual
Guitar amplifier
Your Guitar .................................................................................................................................................. 4
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................................
Parts of a guitar .......................................................................................................................................
Installing the vibrato arm ..........................................................................................................................
Guitar fretboard diagram ..........................................................................................................................
Left-hand position ....................................................................................................................................
4
4
4
4
4
Holding Positions .......................................................................................................................................5
Holding the guitar ..................................................................................................................................... 5
The picks ................................................................................................................................................. 5
Downward strum ...................................................................................................................................... 5
Tuning............................................................................................................................................................ 6
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................................
Guitar pitch pipe ......................................................................................................................................
Keyboards ...............................................................................................................................................
Relative tuning .........................................................................................................................................
Electronic tuner .......................................................................................................................................
Tuning with BEHRINGER guitar amps .....................................................................................................
Online tuning ...........................................................................................................................................
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
Chords ........................................................................................................................................................... 7
Brief introduction to chords ...................................................................................................................... 7
First Steps ................................................................................................................................................... 8
F major ....................................................................................................................................................
Power chords ..........................................................................................................................................
Easy chord progressions .........................................................................................................................
Pentatonic scale ......................................................................................................................................
8
8
8
8
Care/Maintenance ................................................................................................................................... 9
Cleaning your guitar ................................................................................................................................. 9
Care ........................................................................................................................................................ 9
Changing strings ...................................................................................................................................... 9
Tips ................................................................................................................................................................. 9
INTRODUCTION
Welcome to the BEHRINGER family! We’ll
show you how playing a musical instrument
like the guitar can be a lot of fun. The
following pages will help you learn some
guitar basics. You’ll get familiar with chords
that allow you to play well-known songs.
You’ll get the skills you need to add a musical
flair to your life.
PARTS OF A GUITAR
No matter what guitar you use (acoustic
or electric), and no matter what it is used
to play (folk, rock, country, jazz, or even
classical music), the basic parts of the
guitar are always the same. The illustration
to the right shows you what these parts
are called. Take some time to familiarize
yourself with those! Knowing those parts
by name will help you understand what
you read in this book and elsewhere.
INSTALLING THE VIBRATO ARM
Carefully insert the threaded end of the vibrato arm into the arm socket in the bridge (see diagram above for the correct position).
Rotate the arm clockwise until it is firmly (but not too tightly) attached. The arm swing can be adjusted (some players prefer a loose
arm swing) by turning it counter-clockwise one turn. Depressing the vibrato arm (while playing the instrument) lowers the pitch and
pulling up on the arm will raise the pitch.
GUITAR FRETBOARD DIAGRAM
Fretboard diagrams are like road maps for playing the
guitar. They show you what notes to play and what
strings to strum. Take note of how the diagram represents
the guitar fretboard.
LEFT-HAND POSITION
Left-hand fingers are
numbered 1 to 4, beginning with the index
finger. Always press the
strings with the tips of
the fingers; keeping your
fingernails short will
make your life a lot
easier.
4
HOLDING THE GUITAR
SITTING
Place the guitar on your right thigh and hold it against the right side of
your chest using your right arm. Try to stay relaxed. You should
support the guitar using your body and not your hands, tilting the
guitar neck upwards. If you cross your legs, you can elevate the
neck to a higher position.
A couple of general guidelines to follow:
*
Adjust the position of your body, arms and legs so you avoid
tension
*
Try several positions before you find the one that feels most
comfortable
*
Try to hold your head up straight; letting it droop causes
strain on your spine
If the guitar hangs too low while you are playing in the standing
position, this may cause unnecessary strain on your left wrist.
Similarly, it may also overwhelm your right hand when you are
strumming. Therefore, adjust the strap so that you find yourself in a
relaxed playing position, allowing both of your hands to comfortably
assume their positions.
STANDING
THE PICKS
Hold the pick firmly between your
thumb and index finger.
We have included 3 picks with
the guitar pack. Most players
start with a thin pick and then
graduate to a thicker pick as their
skills improve.
This is how you hold a pick in relationship to the strings. Try to relax
and not think about what you are actually doing. This will help you
feel more comfortable.
DOWNWARD STRUM
Use your right hand to strum your guitar. When
strumming, it is important to go over all the strings
using just one motion.
Follow the direction symbols
given on sheet music you use
(upstroke vs. downstroke).
Always try to keep a steady
rhythm. Tapping your foot or
counting out loud will help you
keep the rhythm.
5
INTRODUCTION
KEYBOARDS
Correcting the pitch of each string is called
tuning. Pitch simply means how high or how
low the sound of a musical instrument (in this
case, your guitar) is. There are several ways
to tune your guitar:
If you have a piano or electric keyboard, here’s a quick overview of how
to tune your guitar. Follow the same procedure as with the pitch pipe.
Which key corresponds to which guitar string is shown below.
GUITAR PITCH PIPE
Pitch pipe is a pipe that you can buy at your
local music store. Blow into it to produce a
reference tone. The guitar string is then tuned
to this tone.
So let’s start with what we know for sure:
there are six strings on your guitar and six holes
in the pitch pipe. Now how do you match the
six sounds of the pitch pipe to the sound of the
strings?
1. Sit comfortably and hold your guitar.
2. Have the pitch pipe near you.
3. Now here is the tricky part. Pick up your pitch
pipe and blow through the hole marked E1. Try
to match the sound of the pitch pipe to the E1
string (all the way at the bottom) by turning the
tuning key for that string. When both the pitch
pipe and the string have the same pitch, you’re
done with that string.
4. Do the same for the top string (E6) by blowing
through the hole marked E6 and turn the tuning
key for that string until the sounds match.
5. Continue the same steps to do B2 (2nd string)
and A5 (5th string) and the same thing for G3
and D4 (3rd and 4th string).
6. When you are finished tuning all six strings,
go back through the tuning once again to be
sure all strings match the sounds of the notes
on the pitch pipe. Your guitar is now in tune and
ready to play.
If you experience difficulty in tuning all six strings
to the pitch pipe’s tones, tune only one string to
the pitch pipe and then tune the rest by using
the relative tuning method.
RELATIVE TUNING
Relative tuning is the most versatile tuning method because you can use it
anywhere and anytime.
All you need is a single reference tone (e.g. from another instrument or
your pitch pipe). You can tune all strings relative to one another, provided
one of them is tuned right.
What makes it even better: if you don’t have a reference tone against
which to check your pitch, simply choose a reference tone. The following
example uses the 6th string (E6) as the reference tone.
1. Tune the open (no chord played) 6th string (E6) to a clear, low-pitch
sound. Get the string to the point of not being too loose, otherwise it will
buzz when you play.
2. Press the sixth string at the fifth fret. This is the pitch to which you
should tune the open fifth string. Keep on strumming the pressed 6th string
and the open 5th string until their sounds match. They are now in tune with
one another.
3. Keep doing the same for the remaining strings, always using the highernumbered string as the reference for tuning the adjacent lower-numbered
string.
Here’s a short overview of how it’s all done:
6th string 5th fret = open 5th string
5th string 5th fret = open 4th string
4th string 5th position = open 3rd string
3rd string 4th position = open 2nd string
2nd string 5th position = open 1st string
Simply refer to the following diagram:
ELECTRONIC TUNER
Electronic tuners are widely available at music
stores, and are probably the easiest method to
tune a guitar. The tuner “listens” to the pitch of
each string as you strum it, one at a time, and
uses an easily understandable display to let
you know if your pitch is too high or too low.
You may consider getting one if you find it
difficult to tune your guitar using the other tuning
methods we describe in this book.
TUNING WITH BEHRINGER GUITAR AMPS
ONLINE TUNING
The 2-channel amps of our V-TONE guitar amp series (GMX212, GMX210
and GMX110) feature an integrated electronic tuner! Further information
can be found at www.behringer com.
At www.behringer.com, you will find an awesome online tuner for your guitar. Go for it!
6
BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO CHORDS
Don’t be afraid of chords—there’s no reason for it. Chords are simply three or more notes that are being played together at the same
time. The most popular chords are major and minor chords. Major chords have an elevated, cheerful character, while minor chords
often connote a sense of melancholy and sadness.
A chord consists of a “root” note and some additional notes that have a specific tonal relationship to the root. This relationship, or
distance between the root and the other notes in the chord, depends on the type of chord (e.g. major, minor or seventh chords) being
played. This is why the finger positions for the C major, C minor and C seventh chords are different.
Remember the last camp fire sing-along with the guy playing the guitar? Chances are, he was just playing a couple of chords, but
only a couple of chords you master are enough to get you started and be able to play a couple of simple songs.
7
F MAJOR
POWER CHORDS
The F chord (F major) on page 7 is a base “barre”
chord, and it may take some time to get it right. So,
what’s a “barre” chord? Barre chords are basically
chords moved up the fretboard by using your
“barred” finger as the nut.
Power cords are those chords that utilize only the bottom three
strings of the guitar. This creates a more closed sound and mutes
the top strings. It’s called “power chord” because this technique
creates a more imposing overall sound. Power chords are an integral
part of rock and metal music.
Don’t avoid practicing; doing it just a little each day,
you’ll be positively surprised by the results. Once
you’ve mastered basic chords, you’ll have a
powerful tool for controlling how you play your
guitar.
See the following example:
Did you notice the similar shape of the E and F
chords? Right, the F chord is simply an E chord,
shifted upward one position.
This trick works equally well for a lot more chords,
e.g. Am. Shift to the 5th fret position and play Dm!
Here, too, the index finger replaces the nut.
You can easily mute the top three strings with your index finger
while playing the power chord.
Note: If you move the G power chord 2 frets upward (in the direction
to the pickups), you get an A power chord, 4 frets upward and you
get a B power chord... you get the picture. ;-)
EASY CHORD PROGRESSIONS
This diagram shows an easy chord progression in the key of A minor. The tune has a total length of 12 measures, divided in three
parts of four measures each. Start again from the beginning when you’ve played it all the way through.
Each slash means a downstroke. Study each chord as a single unit before you start playing the whole progression. Strive for a slow
but steady beat. When you feel comfortable, experiment with different tempos.
Here are some more chord progressions to play:
1) A - D - E - A
2) A - D - E7 - A
3) A7 - D7 - E7 - A7
4) D - G - A7 - D
5) G - C - D - G
6) D - Em - G - A - D
7) C - Am - Dm - G - C
8) G - Em - Am - D - E
PENTATONIC SCALE
“Penta” means “five” in Greek, and “tonic” refers to
tone. Therefore, the pentatonic scale consists of
five tones per octave. In other words, it is a major
scale without the 4th and the 7th note. Still with
us? Keep in mind that, in contrast to the pentatonic
scale, the major scale consists of 7 tones per
octave.
The diagram shows you how a pentatonic scale is
derived from a G major scale. For example, use the
notes which belong to the G major pentatonic scale
to play an easy guitar solo.
8
CLEANING YOUR GUITAR
Use a soft, dry cloth to clean the strings of your guitar
each time after you play. The wetness from your hands
can cause the strings to rust. Cleaning the strings regularly
will greatly prolong their life.
Polish your guitar from time to time using a high-grade
instrument polish containing small amounts of non-silicon
wax and maybe a little lemon oil.
To keep the fingerboard free from dry marks and cracks,
some lemon oil on a cloth applied to the wood should do the
job.
CARE
Do not lean your guitar against walls; it could get knocked
over or bumped into.
Never leave your guitar lying on the floor or on the edge of
your bed where it may get stepped on or knocked off or
even sat on.
Never leave your instrument in the trunk of a car when the
weather is very warm or extremely cold. Extreme
temperatures can be harmful to your gear. If you must
store your guitar inside a car, first remove the tension from
the strings and allow things to cool off or warm up
completely before pulling up to pitch again.
CHANGING STRINGS
Visit your local music store to purchase new strings and
get detailed instructions on how to change them.
Replace the strings periodically, as they will lose their
brilliance after a while. How often you change the strings
depends on the type of strings, their gauge or diameter.
Rule of thumb: When the strings start sounding dull, this is
a hint that you should replace them.
If you’re looking for further guitar instructions, please take a look at the following books:
PETER BURSCH’s ROCK GUITAR. Guitar tab/without notes.
Learn to play guitar without notes! Rocking made easy—
start playing right away! Master easy basic rhythms.
Discover what made Jimi Hendrix, Metallica, Van halen
and AC/DC sound so great. Learn how to move your
fingers faster than ever! Use the left-hand finger exercises
included, plus much more. [email protected]
ISBN 3-8024-0365-7
HAL LEONARD GUITAR METHOD BOOK 2, Will Schmid and
Greg Koch. The second installment continues in the
footsteps of the first book, covering Am, Dm, A, E, F and
B7 chords; power chords; fingerstyle guitar; syncopations,
dotted rhythms, and triplets; Carter style solos; bass runs;
pentatonic scales; improvising; tablature; it also offers 92
great songs, riffs and examples; notes in first and second
position; and more! The included CD contains 57 tracks
that nicely demonstrate the techniques at hand and let the
student play along.
HAL LEONARD GUITAR METHOD BOOK 1, Will Schmid and
Greg Koch, new revision! More teachers prefer this edition
of the now-famous learning method by Will Schmid and
Greg Koch because it is effective and user-friendly. The
easy-to-follow format gives students a solid music
education and lets them play songs right away. In Book 1,
you will find beginning instruction on tuning, 1st position
melody playing, C, G, G7, D7, and Em chords, rhythms
through eighth notes, solos and ensembles and strumming.
You also get a chord chart and many all-time favorites like
Amazing Grace · Greensleeves · and When the Saints Go
Marching In.
ISBN: 079351245X
ISBN: 0634013130
Technical specifications and appearance subject to change without notice. The information contained herein is correct at the time of printing. The names
of companies, institutions or publications pictured or mentioned and their respective logos are registered trademarks of their respective owners. Their use
neither constitutes a claim of the trademarks by BEHRINGER nor affiliation of the trademark owners with BEHRINGER. BEHRINGER accepts no
liability for any loss which may be suffered by any person who relies either wholly or in part upon any description, photograph or statement contained
herein. Colours and specification may vary slightly from product. Products are sold through our authorised dealers only. Distributors and dealers are not
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any purpose, without the express written permission of BEHRINGER International GmbH. BEHRINGER® is a registered trademark.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. © 2006 BEHRINGER International GmbH,
Hanns-Martin-Schleyer-Str. 36-38, 47877 Willich-Münchheide II, Germany.
Tel. +49 2154 9206 0, Fax +49 2154 9206 4903
9
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