Second Generation SlideMinder System

Second Generation SlideMinder System
Second Generation
SlideMinder System Assembly
& Installation Guide
CALL & NICHOLAS INSTRUMENTS, INC.
2475 N. Coyote Drive, Tucson, AZ 85745 USA
Tel. (520) 670-9774 ~ www.slideminder.com
Information in this document is subject to change without notice. No part of this
document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without permission
from CALL & NICHOLAS INSTRUMENTS, INC.
©2014 CALL & NICHOLAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. All rights reserved. Printed in the
United States of America.
SlideMinder® is a registered trademark of CALL & NICHOLAS INSTRUMENTS, INC.
Foster, J. T., Lamm, J. D., & Wilks, J. S., Second Generation SlideMinder System
Assembly & Installation Guide, Tucson, Arizona: CALL & NICHOLAS INSTRUMENTS,
INC.
Disclaimer of Warranty
CALL & NICHOLAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. disclaims any warranty of merchantability
or fitness for a particular use. Because of the nature of the installation of the
instrument and transmission of data, no representation of accuracy of the data
can be made.
Limitation of Damages
CALL & NICHOLAS INSTRUMENTS, INC.’s liability for any warranty damage shall be
limited to the original purchaser only and shall be limited to the refund of the
original purchase price or the replacement cost, whichever is less. CALL &
NICHOLAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. shall not be held responsible for any
consequential or unintended damages.
Version 1.1
December2014
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1: Overview
1-1
Introduction
CHAPTER 2: OREAD Server Set-Up
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
3-2
3-3
3-4
5
7
Server hardware
7
2-1.1 Standard server hardware
7
Omni-directional antenna set-up
8
2-2.1 Antenna hardware connections
8
Standard base station assembly
(antenna, server, & radio modem)
9
2-3.1 Server hardware connections
9
OREAD server software installation
10
2-4.1 Software installation
10
Base station COM port assignment
12
2-5.1 Changing the COM port assignment (if needed)
12
CHAPTER 3: OREAD Configuration
3-1
5
13
OREAD login
13
3-1.1 Logging in
13
Alarm management
14
3-2.1 Alarm set-up (creating an alarm)
14
3-2.2 Alarm grouping
16
System configuration
17
3-3.1 System settings
18
Extensometer list
20
3-4.1 Adding & editing extensometer: general tab
Sampling overview
20
21
3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
3-4
3-5
3-6
Extensometer list (continued)
3-4.2 Adding & editing extensometers: sampling tab
21
Device configuration tab (battery voltage thresholds,
dropout voltages & hardware alarm)
22
3-4.3 Hardware alarm settings
23
Viewing extensometer data
24
3-5.1 How to view extensometer data
24
3-5.2 How to view data from multiple extensometers
28
User & group management
29
3-6.1 Creating a new user group
29
3-6.2 Adding users and assigning those users to groups
31
CHAPTER 4: Extensometer Assembly & Activation
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4
33
Tripod assembly
34
4-1.1 Tripod foot assembly & attachment
34
4-1.2 Counter weight hardware
35
Mounting extensometer enclosure and solar panel
36
4-2.1 Mounting & securing the extensometer enclosure
36
4-2.2 Solar panel assembly
37
Solar panel season & latitude adjustments
38
4-2.3 Attaching and positioning the solar panel
38
Counter weight & wireline deployment
39
4-3.1 Securing counter weight & tripod
39
4-3.2 Running wireline
40
4-3.2 Raising counter weight
41
Activating extensometer
42
4-4.1 Connecting antenna, battery, & strobe
42
4-4.2 Activating the extensometer
43
®
SlideMinder System
Chapter 1: Overview
Ground movement in and around open-pit mines, quarries, large constructions sites and
highways can damage or destroy expensive equipment as well as cause injury or death to
workers and bystanders. The SlideMinder System helps address these hazards by providing
real-time monitoring of ground movement via a Wireline Extensometer. Displacement and
velocity data can be gathered for analysis and is presented in intuitive graphical formats. When
a critical velocity and/or displacement is registered the SlideMinder System issues hazard
warnings to all appropriate personnel.
1-1 Introduction
The SlideMinder System is a remotely operated and deployed slope monitoring network that is
composed of both software and hardware components. The minimum components needed for a
SlideMinder system are a server with the Observation, Recording, Evaluation, & Administrative
Database (OREAD) program installed, a base station with omni-directional antenna and at least
one wireline extensometer. Additional extensometers may be added when needed but only one
server and base station are required for a given network.
The OREAD server is accessed via graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI allows a user, with
appropriate permissions, to establish and adjust OREAD, as well as extensometer settings. A user,
with the appropriate permissions, can also add or delete extensometers and set alarms and
alarm groups. The OREAD GUI also displays all collected data in interactive graphical format. For
every deployed extensometer the displacement, velocity, battery consumption/recharge rate,
internal enclosure temperature and accumulated precipitation may all be graphed over specified
date ranges. Multiple extensometers may also be graphed together for relative data comparisons.
OREAD not only displays reported data but also compares ground displacement and movement
velocity to user established alarm thresholds. Numerous alarm settings and alarm groupings are
possible, allowing different procedures to be implemented based on varying movement
scenarios. When ground movement exceeds preset thresholds, triggering one or more of the
alarms, the OREAD server will send warning messages via email, mobile device, or LAN to all
appropriate personnel. OREAD will also display a user specified warning message with an
accompanying audible alarm at the server and any other computer viewing the GUI remotely.
OREAD will activate warning devices, such as strobe lights and sirens, within the monitoring
network if those devices are assigned to an alarm.
The base station is a 900 MHz spread spectrum radio frequency modem. It is connected by USB
cable to the server where the OREAD program is installed. The OREAD server uses the base
station to communicate with deployed extensometers in order to collect ground movement data.
OREAD also uses the base station to send commands to extensometers, activate warning devices
and relay initial or updated settings. The OREAD server stores all the ground movement data it
collects in an SQL database.
5
The SlideMinder extensometer is a remotely deployed, solar-powered, wireline slope monitoring
device. It will detect and report tensional ground movement to the OREAD server via radio
telemetry for qualified review and analysis. The extensometer’s direct connection to the area of
concern allows immediate and accurate detection of displacement and velocity. Each
extensometer is also able to accommodate a warning device (typically a strobe) and a rain gauge.
If communication with the server is temporarily interrupted, an extensometer is capable of
storing data until the link is restored.
Two additional network accessories may be added to the monitoring network if needed. A
wireless strobe may be added and assigned to alarms to increase visibility. A repeater may also
be added to facilitate a radio connection with one or more extensometers that have no line of
sight to the base station antenna. See Figure 1-1 for an example of the standard configuration
radio communication network.
Extensometer
(obstructed)
Extensometer
Extensometer
Wireless Strobe
REPEATER
OREAD Client
OREAD Client
OREAD Base Station &
Server
Local Area Network
On Site WiFi Access
Remote Access
Figure 1-1: SlideMinder network diagram
6
®
SlideMinder System
Chapter 2: OREAD Server Set-Up
OREAD is a web-based program that resides on a dedicated server for remote accessibility. The
OREAD interface allows administrators to configure the server and the deployed extensometers
to specific requirements. The following chapter outlines hardware assembly and set-up as well
as OREAD program installation (if done on site).
2-1 Server hardware
The OREAD Server requires some physical assembly to be functional. Each client receives the
standard server hardware. (Figures 2-1 & 2-2) If a pre-programmed server was requested it will
also require some assembly.
2-1.1 Standard server hardware
1.
2.
3.
3-ft omni-directional antenna and mounting kit
Lightning surge protector
50-ft antenna cable
4.
5.
6.
10-ft antenna adapter cable
DIGI radio modem box and components
Thumb drive with the OREAD installation
software
1
2
3
4
5D
Figure 2-1: OREAD server
components
5
5C
5A
5B
•
DIGI radio modem (5A)
•
USB cable (5B)
•
12V AC cord (5C)
•
International adapters (5D)
Figure 2-2: DIGI radio modem
components
7
2-2 Omni-directional antenna set-up
The L-Com HGV-906U omni-directional antenna is used to link the OREAD server, via the base
station, to deployed extensometers in the field when using the radio modem network
configuration. Installation of the antenna is not standardized because each location will have
unique requirements. The antenna must be high enough to allow for line-of-sight communication
to all extensometers. If an obstruction prevents communication, then a repeater will be required.
Lightning
Surge
Protector
OmniDirectional
Antenna
3 ft OmniDirectional
Antenna
Lightning Surge
Protector
Grounding
Cable
Grounding
Cable
Mounting
Plate
Assembly
Grounding
Cable
Figure 2-4: Lightning surge
protector between antenna
cable & antenna with
grounding cable attached
50-ft Antenna
Antenna Cable
Cable
For USB/Serial
safety, the horizontal
Cable
distance from the tower
Base
or antennaStation
mast to the
closest power line should
be a minimum of twice
10-ft Antenna
Adapter Cable of the
the total
height
12V AC
Power Cord
antenna
mast.
Figure 2-3: Erected & grounded omnidirectional antenna with antenna
cable
Figure 2-5: Grounding cable (from
lightning surge protector)
attached to local grounding path
2-2.1: Antenna hardware connections
1.
Select a site for the base station omni-directional antenna. There should be no significant
obstructions between the antenna and the extensometers. (Figure 1-2)
If line-of-sight isn’t achievable a SlideMinder repeater will be required to redirect and/or boost the signal.
2.
Attach the omni-directional antenna to secured mounting plate. (Figure 2-4)
Placement of antenna and mounting plate are subject to site specific requirements.
8
3.
Place the lightning surge protector between the omni-directional antenna and the 50-ft
antenna cable. (Figure 2-4)
4.
Ground the antenna by attaching a 1 OAWG wire to the lightning surge protector. The
grounding cable is not supplied. (Figures 2-3, 2-4, & 2-5)
5.
Run the 50-ft antenna cable to the base station.
2-3 Standard base station assembly (antenna, server, & radio modem)
The 50-ft antenna cable connects the omni-directional antenna to the base station via the 10-ft
antenna adapter cable. The base radio (Digi Xtend-PKG USB RF Modem) is connected to the server via
a USB cable.
3 ft OmniDirectional
Antenna
Lightning Surge
Protector
Grounding
Cable
Figure 2-6: USB cable connected
to server
Figure 2-8: Antenna adapter cable
connected to the base station
50-ft Antenna
Cable
Server
USB Cable
12V AC
Power Cord
Figure 2-7: USB & power cables
Base
Station
10-ft Antenna
Adapter Cable
Figure 2-9: Connection between the
10-ft antenna adapter cable & the
50-ft antenna cable
antenna
Ensure that omni-directional
is installed and grounded on the
exterior of building before beginning
server hardware connections.
2-3.1: Server hardware connections
1.
Attach the USB cable to the base station radio modem and then to a USB port on the back
of the server. (Figures 2-6 & 2-7)
2.
Plug in the 12V AC power cord and connect to the base station. Verify 3 green lights at start
up. (Figure 2-7)
3.
Connect the 10-ft antenna adapter cable to the base station radio modem. (Figure 2-8)
4.
Connect 10-ft antenna adapter cable to 50-ft antenna cable. (Figure 2-9)
9
2-4 OREAD server software installation
If a pre-programmed server has been purchased the following section will be completed before
shipment. If needed, installation of the OREAD program should be done by an IT professional or
qualified technician. The server must meet the following system requirements in order to
guarantee OREAD will function properly.
Minimum System Requirements
•Window 7 Pro, 64bit operating system
•Intel C2D 2.93 GHz processor
•4GB of RAM
•300 GB available hard drive space
•Access to the Google Chrome web browser
1B
1A
Figure 2-11: Fully assembled server
Figure 2-12: Window for assigning
the server name and password
1C
Figure 2-13: Network configuration
window. Select “work network”
2-4.1: Software installation
1.
10
Server assembly and initial configuration
A.
Assemble the server, or prepare a virtual server, then connect to the local area
network. (Figure 2-11)
B.
Assign a machine name and password. If a server has been provided the default user
name is “SM” and the default password is “SM1001”(Figure 2-12)
C.
Configure unit for “Work Network” settings. (Figure 2-13)
2-4.1: Software installation (continued)
2.
Install OREAD files
A. Insert the provided thumb drive then select the current software version. Copy the
program to the desktop before running installation. (Figure 2-14)
B.
From the desktop copy, RIGHT-CLICK and select “Run as administrator,” then
extract. Not doing this will result in an incomplete installation. (Figure 2-15)
C.
Select “Run” to begin installation. (Figure 2-16)
D.
Allow installation and settings to be changed. (Figure 2-17)
E.
When the driver pop-ups are displayed, select “Install driver anyway”. This will be
done twice. (Figure 2-18)
F.
When “Press any key to continue…” is displayed, the installation is complete. Delete
the desktop version of the install program and remove thumb drive.(Figure 2-19)
DO NOT close the window when “Success” is displayed. Installation is not complete until “Press
any key to continue…” is displayed. This may take up to fifteen minutes to complete.
2A
Figure 2-14: Copying the OREAD
installation package to the
desktop
2D
Figure 2-17: Allow the server
settings to be changed
2B
Figure 2-15: Right-click and
select “Run as administrator”
2E
Figure 2-18: Select “Install thids
software anyway” for driver
installation
2C
Figure 2-16: Select “Run” to start
installation
2F
Figure 2-19: Install is complete when
“Press any key…” is displayed
11
2-5 Base station COM Port assignment
The base station connects to the server using a USB cable and an server selected COM Port. This
COM Port assignment is not always the same. Before operating the OREAD software ensure that
the slope.json file has the correct COM Port assignment for the base station.
2-5.1: Changing the COM Port assignment (if needed)
1.
On the server, navigate to Device Manager>Ports. Note the COM Port the base station
currently assigned to. (Figure 2-20)
2.
Next, navigate to the slope.json file: OS(C:) sm>client>bin>slope.json file. (Figure 2-21)
3.
Open the slope.json file, using Notepad or a similar program, and change the COM Port to
the one noted from the device manager. If the COM Port is the same no change is needed.
Save and close the file. (Figure 2-22)
Figure 2-20: Finding the
current port assignment
in the Device Manager
Figure 2-21: The file
path to the slope.json
file
Figure 2-22:
Notepad
12
Editing the COM Port assignment using
®
SlideMinder System
Chapter 3: OREAD Configuration
The OREAD program is web based and is accessible from any terminal with network access via
the assigned IP address. OREAD installs with a default username and password, but these can
be changed after configuration. Configuration of OREAD to site specific requirements is
accomplished through the graphical user interface (GUI) after login.
3-1 OREAD login
The OREAD login is the initial access screen for users. The initial installer, using the default user
name and password, has full administrator privileges and can add users and user groups with full,
reduced, or limited access depending on the need.
3-1.1: Logging in
1.
Using the Google Chrome web browser, navigate to the local host or assigned OREAD Server
IP address to access the OREAD program. (Figure 3-1)
2.
The default username is “admin” and the default password is “test”. This login allows the
first user full administrator privileges. (Figure 3-1)
Default Username: admin
Default Password: test
Figure 3-1: OREAD login screen, accessed via Google Chrome
13
3-2 Alarm management
Alarms are created by the user by assigning each alarm site specific thresholds. When these
thresholds are exceeded, an alarm is triggered. Alert messages, e-mails, audible alarms, strobes,
and any other OREAD network warning devices will be activated per the pre-set alarm conditions.
All alarms must be assigned to an alarm group and multiple alarms may be grouped together in
an alarm group. Any single alarm may be assigned to more than one alarm group. Extensometers
must have an assigned alarm group for full functionality and an alarm group may be assigned to
multiple extensometers.
The SlideMinder system allows an alarm to be dependent on displacement, velocity, or limit
measurements. The OREAD software is pre-programmed with three velocity based default
alarms: red, orange, and yellow, all of which are loaded to the Default alarm group.
Warning devices, such as strobe lights, can be installed with the extensometers or as standalone
units called wireless strobes. Warning devices are activated through their assignment to specific
alarms (in the alarms management folder when setting up or editing an alarm) not by their
physical connection with an extensometer.
3-2.1 Alarm set-up (creating an alarm)
1.
Open the Alarm Management folder and select Alarms, then click on “Add Alarm” to create
a new alarm. (Figure 3-2)
2.
Select the desired alarm type from the dropdown (Displacement, Velocity, Limit) and click
“Create.” (Figure 3-2.1)
3.
Under the Alarm Data tab enter the alarm Description, enable the alarm, set the threshold
values, and click “Save”. (Figure 3-2.2)
Figure 3-2: Alarm set up options/path. NOTE: Not all windows will be open at the same time as seen above
14
3-2.1 Alarm set-up (continued)
4.
Under the Message Data tab, three types of warning types may be selected: Message Box,
Email, and Warning Device. Any combination of these types may be selected depending on
user requirements.
A.
The Message Box tab contains the message to be displayed on the OREAD graphical
user interface when any specific alarm has been activated. Every open browser
viewing the software will display this message warning. (Figure 3-3)
B.
The Email tab contains the message to be sent to the email addresses listed in the
Address area.
C.
1)
Each email in the list must be separated by two semi-colons in the address
box without any spaces between them.
Example: [email protected];;[email protected]
2)
Enter the desired text for the email in the Message area. (Figure 3-4)
The Warning Device tab is a list of all warning devices (i.e. strobes) to be activated
when an alarm condition is determined by the OREAD server. To use this function,
list the assigned names of all units with warning devices separated by two
semicolons without spaces.
Example: extensometer1;;extensometer2;;wireless_strobe1 (Figure 3-5)
4A
4B
Figure 3-3: Message Data warning
box and message
Figure 3-4: Message Data email
assignments and message
4C
Figure 3-5: Warning Device assignment
15
3-2.2 Alarm grouping
.
1. In Alarm Management open Alarm Groups then select Add Alarm Group. Name the new
group. (Figure 3-6)
2.
A drag & drop grid will be displayed. On the right side of the grid a list of current alarms will
be displayed. Drag any needed alarms to the left to assign those alarms to the current
group. (Figure 3-7)
3.
Once an alarm group is created, it must be assigned to one or more extensometers to be
used. This is done when adding an extensometer or wireless strobe. (See Section 3-4.1)
4.
If an alarm group is currently assigned to one or more extensometers, those unit names will
be listed to the right of the alarm groups name. (Figure 3-6)
Figure 3-6: Creating a new alarm group
Figure 3-7: Drag & drop alarm grid
16
3-3 System configuration
The Configuration folder contains three sub-directories; Box Command Queue, Message Queue,
and System Settings. Except for troubleshooting purposes, the first two sub-directories may
generally be ignored.
Box Command Queue: The OREAD program stores all commands to be sent to extensometers in
this queue. extensometers report to the base station at user assigned intervals and commands
will be present in the queue until contact is made with the extensometer. A command in queue
for an extended period of time indicates a communication error between the extensometer and
the base station.
Message Queue: All alarm triggered email messages are stored here until the system sends them
to the alarm’s designated email list. One or more emails in queue for longer than 30 seconds
indicates an inability for the server to send alarm triggered emails.
System Settings: Many essential OREAD Server settings are entered, selected, or changed here.
See the following pages for more detail regarding the system settings. (Figure 3-8)
Figure 3-9
Figure 3-10
Figure 3-11
Figure 3-8: System settings
17
3-3.1 System settings: upper section (Figure 3-9)
1.
Enter the designated administrators email in Admin Email box.
2.
Select either U.S. or Metric measurements at the Unit System box .
3.
The Alarm Service Check Period is the rate at which OREAD checks logged data for alarm
activation. The Default is 11 seconds. It is NOT recommended that this value be adjusted.
4.
Email Alert Settings:
A.
B.
Assign to an SMTP Server with an open Port. This allows OREAD to send email alerts
when an alarm is triggered.
Enter SMTP Authorization if the assigned server has restricted access.
5.
Enter the Sender Address. This will be the email address listed on all outgoing alarm
triggered emails. It is recommended that a valid email address be entered here to prevent
spam filtration programs from blocking alarm triggered emails.
6.
The Emailer Service Check Period is the rate at which OREAD checks the message queue for
any alarm triggered emails to be sent. The default is 30 seconds. It is NOT recommended
that this value be adjusted.
1
2
3
4
A SMTP server
MUST be assigned
for alarm emails
to be sent.
4A
4B
Enter a designated sender
address to prevent spamfiltering from blocking
alarm emails.
5
6
Figure 3-9: Upper section of system settings
18
It is recommended that a
qualified IT professional
configure and/or adjust
these settings.
3-3.1 System settings: mid & bottom sections (Figures 3-10 & 3-11)
7.
Do not change Logging Options without contacting SlideMinder or your local distributor.
8.
The Graph Option is where the default graphic data display options can be adjusted.
A.
B.
C.
D.
9.
The Refresh Every value is the time (in minutes) that the displayed data will update.
The Date Range is the default viewing range for any graph displayed in OREAD. The
user may select day, week, month, year, or max.
The Data Normalized box, when checked, will normalize multiple data sets displayed
on the same graph relative to the start date or zero on the y-axis.
The Velocity Moving Average is the average (in hours) for graphical representation of
velocity data sets. The default for this is zero. If changed, increments of 24 hours are
recommended.
Check the box next to Enable advanced settings to allow users with administrator access to
make advanced adjustments to the control board settings in the extensometers. This
function should be disabled unless specifically needed.
10. Checking the box next to Use desktop notifications if available allows OREAD to display alert
messages on the desktop when the OREAD GUI window is minimized. This permission must
be granted in the browser settings. (Figure 3-11 & 3-12)
11. Enabling Play audio alerts if available will allow OREAD to provide an audio alert at the
server or the accessing terminal when alarms are triggered.
7
9
10
DO NOT CHANGE THESE SETTINGS!
11
Figure 3-11: Enabling advanced settings, desktop
notifications and audio alerts
8
1.
2.
3.
4.
Figure 3-10: Logging Options & Graph Options
5.
Click the Chrome menu on the browser
toolbar.
Select Settings.
Click Show advanced settings
In the Privacy section, click Content
settings
Scroll down to Notifications and select
Allow desktop notifications
Figure 3-12: Change the permissions in Google
Chrome to allow for desktop notifications
19
3-4 Extensometer list
The Extensometer List is where all extensometer profiles are added, displayed, or deleted. Units
on the Extensometer List can also be selected for individual edits to their settings or to view their
data graphically. Selecting multiple units will allow the user to view all their data on one graph.
3-4.1 Adding & editing extensometers: general tab
1.
Open the Extensometer List menu, select All, then Add Extensometer to bring up the Create
New Extensometer window. (Figure 3-13)
2.
In the Management section of the General tab do the following: (Figure 3-14)
A.
B.
3.
In the Radio section of the General tab do the following: (Figure 3-14)
A.
B.
C.
D.
4.
Enter the name of the unit.
Assign it to an alarm group. (“default” is the only alarm group pre-loaded)
Assign the extensometer to the base station. This will be collector 1 because most
sites will have only one base station.
Enter the assigned Device ID for the extensometer. This is programmed before
shipment and is based on the current number of extensometers on site. The ID will
be labeled inside the extensometer.
Radio Always On and Strobe-only mode should NOT be selected.
Radio Timeout is defaulted to 30 minutes. This is the maximum amount of time that
a unit will try to communicate unsuccessfully with the base station to prevent
battery drain.
In the Location section, enter the Easting, Northing, Elevation, and Bearing of the wireline
from the unit.
2A
2B
3A
3B
Figure 3-13: Extensometer list in the OREAD program
20
3C
3D
Figure 3-14: Creating
a new extensometer;
General tab
Sampling overview
The Sampling tab is where an extensometer’s normal and high-resolution sampling intervals are
set. For both the normal and Hi-Res sampling intervals the report interval is calculated by
multiplying the sample interval by the samples per transmission. In the figure below the Normal
Sample Rate setting would read the encoder every 2 minutes; after 6 readings were recorded,
OREAD would have the unit send the data to the server. The end result would be the
extensometer transmitting data every 12 minutes.
If one or more of the alarms assigned to the extensometer is triggered by reported data, OREAD
instructs the extensometer to enter a Hi-Res Mode. In this mode, the user can choose a
combination of the Sample Interval and the Samples per transmission to provide more data and
transmit that data to the server sooner. This results in a more detailed synopsis of the event.
1
Sample
Interval
2
3
Figure 3-15: Creating a new
extensometer; sampling settings
X
Samples per
transmission
=
Report
Interval
Closely spaced report intervals may result in
battery depletion over time and can
contribute to a larger database than
necessary. The Normal Sample Rate default
setting of a 10 minute Sample Interval while
sending 3 Samples per transmission optimizes
power consumption, database size, and
refresh rates for slope monitoring.
3-4.2 Adding & editing extensometers: sampling tab (Figure 3-15)
1.
Set the Normal Sample Rate with the desired Sample Interval and Samples per transmission.
The product of these two values is the time (in minutes) between normal reports by the
extensometer.
2.
Set the Hi-Res Mode with the desired Sample Interval and Samples per transmission. The
product of these two values is the time (in minutes) between high-resolution reports by the
extensometer.
3.
When done programming or editing the extensometer select Apply then Save. The settings
will be set or updated when the extensometer communicates with the OREAD server.
21
Device configuration tab (battery voltage thresholds, dropout voltages & hardware alarm)
SlideMinder extensometers are designed for remote operations and thus minimal maintenance
after deployment. When the unit is fully functioning the recharge and power components will
maintain data gathering and reporting capabilities for an extended period of time. However, there
are circumstances when power reduction may occur. Common reasons for power reduction are a
depleted battery, disconnection of the solar panel cable, or required adjustment of solar panel
orientation. When an extensometer is added to the Extensometer List the Device Config tab is
pre-loaded with the default setting. There are three sections under this tab; Battery Voltage
Thresholds, Dropout Voltages, and Hardware Alarm.
DO NOT
CHANGE
THESE
VALUES!
DO NOT
CHANGE
THESE
VALUES!
The
default
battery
voltage thresholds and
dropout voltages should
not be altered without
contacting SlideMinder
or your local distributor.
SEE SECTION 3-4.3 &
FIGURE 3-17.
Figure 3-16: Creating a new extensometer;
device configuration options.
Battery Voltage Threshold: The maximum and minimum defaults are 16V and 11.5V
respectively. These default settings are configured for the recommended 12V, 12Ah batteries.
These settings allow OREAD to determine and report if an extensometer’s battery is over or
under charged. If the battery voltage falls below 11.5V a notification will be displayed on the
extensometers status menu.
Dropout Voltages: The extensometer uses the dropout voltage settings to determine when to
stop radio communication and eventually encoder data recording. The standard configuration
utilizes the Digi XT09 radio and the extensometer will continue communication with the base
station until the voltage falls below 8V at which time the extensometer will cease radio operation
to conserve power in order to continue to record data. It will continue to gather and record (but
not report) data until the battery voltage fall below 6V. Battery power below 6V results in the
extensometer ceasing to be functional because the supplied power is outside of the operating
limits of the encoder. If the Tait radio is installed, the dropout voltage will be 11V.
22
Hardware Alarm
The hardware alarm is determined by the trigger length delta (TLD) and the trigger time delta
(TTD). Simply put, if the extensometer measures movement equal to or greater than the value of
the TLD during the TTD the alarm will be activated. A hardware alarm will activate any warning
device connected to the extensometer and the unit will wake and report all data gathered even if
it is between scheduled report intervals.
The hardware alarm is not needed for operation of an extensometer. If used, it can provide an
alarm specific to the extensometer that is independent of OREAD. This may be useful as a
failsafe.
3-4.3 Hardware alarm settings
1.
Set the Trigger length delta in inches or centimeters (depending on the unit system being
used)
This is the threshold of displacement that must be measured by the extensometer
over the TLD (see step 2) for the hardware alarm to be activated.
2.
Set the Trigger time delta in minutes.
The required displacement (assigned as the TLD) must be met or exceeded within this
time for the hardware alarm to be activated.
The time window does not
pertain to the hardware
alarm and should not be
altered. This setting adjusts
the high resolution time
interval and will be moved in
the next OREAD update.
Trigger length
delta:
Trigger time
delta:
1
2
Figure 3-17: Creating a new extensometer; device configuration
options.
= Hardware Alarm
23
3-5 Viewing extensometer data
OREAD displays data measurements graphically from all active extensometers and may display
individual or multiple extensometers for comparison on one graph. OREAD graphs slope
displacement, slope velocity, battery power consumption, internal temperature, and precipitation
accumulation. The Status for each extensometer is also shown; highlighted areas indicate a
possible problem such as overdue communication from a unit (Example: Display Model).
(Figure 3-18)
3-5.1 How to view extensometer data
1.
Select the extensometer to be viewed. Next select Graph Extensometer from the option bar
above the extensometer list. The default displacement graph will be displayed based on
user preferences. (Figures 3-18 & 3-19)
Figure 3-18: Selecting an extensometer to graph
Figure 3-19: Default graph of extensometer data
24
3-5.1 How to view extensometer data (continued)
2.
A user may select which data graph to view. The five data graphs available are located in the
lower left corner as selectable tabs.
3.
The user may adjust the date range for the data set to be viewed for all graph types and
then may zoom in to view the data in finer detail. (Figure 3-20)
A.
The user may define the viewable time using the bottom scroll bar.
B.
Using the mouse the user may drag-and-select any portion of the data graph to view
the selected date range in more detail.
C.
Pre-selected date ranges are also available in the upper left corner.
D.
The dates in the upper right corner only represent the date range selected and are
not editable.
3
3C
3D
3B
3A
Figure 3-20: Ways to view data for specific date ranges.
25
3-5.1 How to view extensometer data (continued)
4.
Selecting a specific range of available data allows the user to view more detail in relation to
the time axis. This may be done until individual minutes can be viewed depending on the
assigned sampling interval. The graph below is the selected portion of the displacement
graph from Figure 3-19, 3B. (Figure 3-20)
5.
Graphed examples of velocity, battery usage and recharge cycles, as well as temperature
changes inside the enclosure, are shown in Figures 3-22, 3-23, & 3-24.
Figure 3-21: Selected data from Figure 3-20, 3B
Figure 3-22: Velocity data (normalized for a 24-hour average)
26
Figure 3-23: Battery power usage and recharge cycles
Figure 3-24: Daily temperature data (inside of the extensometer enclosure)
27
3-5.2 How to view data from multiple extensometers
1.
Select the extensometers to be viewed using the check marks on the left side of the
extensometer list, then select Graph Extensometer. (Figure 3-25)
2.
All the extensometers selected will be displayed. Generally, select Normalized to Start to
display all data relative to zero on the y-axis. This is helpful when comparing data with large
differences in relative displacement. (Figure 3-26)
3.
Date range selections will be applied to all extensometers included in the graph as long as
data is available for the requested date range.
4.
The graphing display from any of the selected extensometers may be hidden or re-added to
the graph by clicking on the name in the list on the right side of the screen. (Figure 3-26)
Figure 3-25: Selecting multiple units for data viewing
When graphing multiple
extensometers it is
recommended that you
normalize your data. All
normalized data will
start at zero for better
relative comparison.
Click a unit in the legend
to hide or display data
from previously selected
extensometers.
Figure 3-26: Data from multiple extensometers displayed on a single graph
28
3-6 User & group management
OREAD will allow the system administrator to create new user profiles with full or limited
permissions. Permissions are selected when creating a group to which a new User is assigned.
users assigned to a group only have the permissions granted to that group. Multiple groups with
differing levels of access may be created.
OREAD initially has one default group (Administrator) with one default user (System
Administrator) assigned to it. The administrator group has full permissions. Before adding
additional users, add groups and with appropriate permissions first, then add user and assign
them to groups.
3-6.1 Creating a new user group
1.
Navigate to the Group Management list in the User Management folder. (Figure 3-27)
2.
Select Add Group then enter the desired name for the group and save. (Figure 3-27) If
editing a pre-existing group select Edit Group.
3.
Drag-and-drop any desired permissions from the list on the right to the left to assign them
to a new user group. (Figure 3-28)
Deleting the administrator group IS NOT
recommended. If no replacement group
with the appropriate permissions is
created, then no user will be able to fully
administer the system.
Figure 3-27: Creating a new user group
29
3-6.1 Creating a new user group (continued)
Figure 3-28: Assigning permissions to a group
4.
See the list below for definitions of specific permissions. (Figure 3-28)
1.
Configuration/box_config: Users in the group may configure extensometers and other RSU
settings.
User Management/users_read: Users in the group may view groups, group permissions,
users, and user Information.
User Management/users_write: Users in this group may add groups, set group permissions,
add or delete users, and adjust user information.
Alarms/Read: Users in this group may see alarms.
Alarms/Write: Users in the group may change trigger parameters for alarms.
Alarms/delete: Users in the group may delete alarms.
Alarms/create: Users in the group may create new alarms and alarm groups.
Alarms/full_edit: Users in the group may edit existing alarms and alarm groups.
Boxes/read: Users in the group may read all available information and data from an
extensometer or other RSU
Boxes/write: Users in the group may add new extensometers and other RSU’s to the OREAD
network.
Boxes/delete: Users in the group may delete extensometers and other RSU’s in the OREAD
network.
Boxes/full_edit: Users in the group may edit all existing extensometers and other RSU’s.
Eventlog/read: Users in the group may read event list.
Eventlog/write: Users in the group may manipulate event list filters.
Observations/read: Users in the group may view all observations made by the
extensometers.
Observations Write: Users in the group may make adjustments to observation display data.
Observations Delete: Users in the group may remove unneeded or obsolete observations.
System/write_settings: Users in the group may make adjustments to the OREAD settings.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
30
Figure 3-29: Available group permissions
3-6.2 Adding new users and assigning those users to groups
1.
Navigate to the User Management list in the User Management folder. (Figure 3-30)
2.
Select Add User and enter required information then Save. (To edit a user’s information,
select a user from the list then select Edit User.) (Figure 3-30)
3.
Navigate to the Group Management list in the User Management folder. Select the desired
group to which the new user will be assigned. Drag & drop the user from the available user
list to the group assignment list. (Figure 3-31)
Figure 3-30: Adding new user information
Figure 3-31: Assigning a new user to a group
31
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY
LEFT BLANK
®
SlideMinder System
Chapter 4: Wireline Extensometer Assembly & Activation
The SlideMinder Wireline Extensometer is used to detect ground movement and report
movement data to the OREAD Server via radio or wirelessly via the local area network. The
unit is solar powered and able to continually monitor an area of concern; providing real-time
data to the OREAD server for evaluation and, if needed, alarm activation. An optional strobe
may be added, to be activated when displacement or velocity thresholds are exceeded,
providing a highly visible warning to nearby personnel. The extensometer includes a
collapsible tripod. A barrel mounting kit may also be requested.
1.
Extensometer box
2
2A
A.
Solar panel
B.
Accessories
C.
Solar panel mount
D.
Tripod feet
E.
Strobe light
F.
Extensometer
1D
1A
1C
1F
3
1B
1E
2.
Tripod box
A.
3.
Tripod unpacked
Counter weight box
A.
Counter weight unpacked
Figure 4-1: Components of a SlideMinder Wireline Extensometer with the strobe accessory
33
4-1 Tripod assembly
Each extensometer is designed to be easily transported and assembled. The following section
outlines extensometer assembly. All four tripod feet are interchangeable and all required
accessories are inside the accessories box.
4-1.1 Tripod foot assembly & attachment
1.
Extend outer three tripod legs and rotate the L-Brackets 90 degrees. (Diagram 4-A)
2.
Using a Phillips Head screwdriver attach the floor mount to one of the tripod feet using 3
head screws (provided in the accessory box). These items combined will become the center
foot. Set aside. (Figures 4-2 & 4-3)
Note: All tripod feet can serve as either a center foot or an outer foot.
3.
Next, using a Phillips Head Screwdriver, attach the each remaining tripod foot to a tripod leg
at the L-bracket using 3 head screws. (Figures 4-4 & 4-5)
Diagram 4-A
Figure 4-4: Attaching an Lbracket to a tripod foot
with 3 head screws
Figure 4-2: Floor mount, 1
tripod foot, and head
screws
Outer Foot
Center Foot
Each tripod foot has pre-drilled
holes and each may function as
either a center foot with a floor
mount or as an outer foot
attached to the L-brackets.
Figure 4-3: Floor mount
attached to a tripod foot
with 3 head screws making
the “center foot”
34
Figure 4-5: Attached Lbracket and tripod foot
making an “outer foot”
4-1.2 Counter weight hardware
1.
Slide the center pole down the middle of the extended tripod. (Diagram 4-B)
2.
Before seating the center pole into the floor mount install the rise collar on the center leg
approximately 3 ½ in. below the supporting braces using the 3/16 in. hex key. This will
prevent the weight from impacting the support brace to ensure the weight rotates freely.
(Figure 4-7) A 3/16 in. hex key is provided in the accessory box.
3.
Assemble the weight bearing components on the center pole in the following order
(Figure 4-8)
A.
B.
C.
D.
Weight carrier
First washer
Compression spring
Final washer
4.
Secure the center pole to the floor mount using the 3/16 in. hex key. (Figure 4-9)
5.
Use a Crescent Wrench (not provided) to secure the center pole at the supporting braces
and the apex of tripod.
Diagram 4-B
3A
3B
3D
Figure 4-6: Weight carrier,
compression spring, rise collar,
3/16 in. Allen Wrench and
center foot
Figure 4-7: Securing the rise
collar
3C
Figure 4-8: Weight bearing
component order
Figure 4-9: Center pole
secured to the center foot at
the floor mount
35
4-2 Mounting the extensometer enclosure and solar panel
The extensometer enclosure is where the power board, encoder, magnetic brake, voltage
regulator, and battery are housed. The wireline spool, encoder sheave and mounting brackets are
also located on the rear exterior of the enclosure. The enclosure is mounted and secured on the
top of the center pole with the solar panel extended to either side via the solar panel mount
attached at the slip-on tee.
Diagram 4-C
Upper mounting
bracket
Slip-on Tee
Lower mounting
bracket
Figure 4-10: The upper
mounting bracket, slip-on tee,
and lower mounting bracket
Ensure that the slip-on tee (for the solar
panel mounting pole) is between the
upper and lower mounting brackets.
Figure 4-11: Using the 3/16 in.
hex key to secure the enclosure
to the center pole
Two 3/16 in. hex keys are
provided in the accessory
box and the enclosure.
4-2.1 Mounting and securing the extensometer enclosure
36
1.
Ensure the tripod is properly assembled and secured. (See previous sections)
2.
Slide the extensometer enclosure over the top of the center pole. The slip-on tee (located in
the accessory box) must be positioned between the upper and lower mounting brackets.
(Diagram 4-C & Figure 4-10)
3.
Secure the upper and lower mounting brackets with one of the provided 3/16 in. hex key.
(Figure 4-11)
4-2.2 Solar panel assembly
Gather the needed hardware and tools. (Figure 4-12)
1.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Solar panel (inside box #1)
Two L-brackets (inside accessory box)
Solar panel accessories (inside accessory box)
11mm socket wrench and 11mm box wrench. (not provided)
13mm socket wrench or 13mm box wrench. (not provided)
2.
Position L-brackets and insert hex bolts. (Figure 4-13)
3.
Inside the solar panel lip, secure hex bolts with lock washers. (Figure 4-14)
4.
Use 11mm box wrench to tightly secure hex bolts and L-brackets to the solar panel.
(Figure 4-15)
5.
On each L-bracket, loosely attach the u-bolt with the “U” facing upward using the hex bolts
and the lock washers. (Figure 4-16)
6.
The solar panel is ready for attachment to the solar panel mount. (Figure 4-17)
1
2
Figure 4-12: A solar panel,
mounting brackets , and ubolt kit
Figure 4-13: Hex bolts
connecting the mounting
bracket to the solar Panel
4
5
Figure 4-15: Securing the hex
bolts with an 11mm box end
or open wrench
Figure 4-16: The u-bolt
secured with the lock
washers an the locknuts
3
Figure 4-14: Inside view of
the hex bolts each secured
with a lock washer
6
Figure 4-17: Assembled solar
panel ready for attachment
to the solar panel mount
37
If your latitude is below 25°, use the latitude times 0.87.
If your latitude is between 25° and 50°, use the latitude times 0.76, plus 3.1 degrees.
If your latitude is above 50°, you might need larger Solar Panels and/or Batteries. Contact your
distributor or Call & Nicholas Instruments, Inc.
The Solar Panel should be tilted towards the equator and all angles are calculated from the
horizontal.
4-2.3 Attaching and positioning the solar Panel
1.
Attach the solar panel mount to the enclosure at the slip-on tee. Tighten outer fastener
using the 3/16 in. hex key. (Figure 4-18)
2.
Slide solar panel onto solar panel mount through the U-bolts. (Figure 4-19 & Diagram 4-D)
3.
Rotate and angle the solar panel for optimum insolation using a 13mm box wrench to
secure the solar panel and 3/16 in. hex key to secure the slip-on tee. (Figure 4-20)
4.
Do not connect solar panel to enclosure until activation. Battery must be connected first
for the voltage regulator to function properly. (Figure 4-21)
Diagram 4-D
Figure 4-18: Securing the
solar panel mount to the slipon tee
Figure 4-20: Securing solar
panel at optimum insolation
angle
38
Figure 4-19: Angled solar
panel attached with u-bolts
Figure 4-21: DO NOT attach solar
panel cable until activation
4-3 Counter weight and wireline deployment
The counter weight is used in conjunction with the magnetic brake to keep constant tension on
the deployed (spooled out) wireline. Before being deployed to the ground in question the
wireline is wrapped around the counter weight, then around the encoder sheave. Once the
wireline has been deployed, and secured, it is re-spooled until the weight carrier contacts the rise
collar. The magnetic brake is then set between 50 and 65 percent to hold the weight in place.
4-3.1 Securing counter weight & tripod
1.
Slide counter weight on the weight carrier with the SlideMinder label facing outward.
(Figure 4-23)
2.
Attach zinc plated shaft collar (located in the accessory box) and secure using 5/32 in. hex
key. (Figure 4-24)
3.
Brace the outer tripod feet using rocks, sand bags, or weighting method to prevent sliding
or tipping of the extensometer. (Diagram 4-E)
Diagram 4-E
Figure 4-22: Unpacked
counter weight
Figure 4-23: Slide counter
weight onto the weight
carrier (label out)
Front of the counter weight
(side with SlideMinder decal)
faces the front leg
Figure 4-24: Securing
counter weight with shaft
collar and 5/32 in. hex key
Weight is aproximently 30 lbs
(13.6 kg) Handle with caution!
Figure 4-25: Counter weight
secured and ready to be
suspended for tension
39
4-3.2 Running wireline
1.
Loosen screws on the magnetic brake, Set to 25%, then re-tighten screws. This will provide
optimum tension while deploying the wireline. (Figure 4-26)
2.
Turn the counter weight on the weight carrier so that front face is facing the same direction
as the enclosure front (Photo depicts weight prior to proper positioning). (Figure 4-27)
3.
Un-spool the wireline and run around the counter weight 1½ revolutions before coming up
the opposite side. (Figure 4-27, Figure 4-28, & Diagram 4-F)
4.
Continue the wireline around the top of the encoder sheave 1½ revolutions before moving
off towards the desired area to be monitored. (Figure 4-29 & Diagram 4-F)
5.
If needed, use the included swivel assembly to guide the wireline over any sharp edges or
other obstructions in the wirelines path.
Diagram 4-F
Figure 4-28: Unspooling
wireline to the left
Figure 4-26: Set magnetic
brake to 25% while running
the wireline
Figure 4-27: Running wireline
around counter weight 1½
revolutions
40
Before running the wireline,
ensure that two legs are
positioned at the rear of the
enclosure; the front leg should
extended out perpendicular
from the front of the enclosure.
This orientation prevents the
tripod from interfering with the
wireline.
Figure 4-29: Running wireline
around encoder sheave 1½
revolutions
4-3.3 Raising counter weight
1.
Secure the wireline to the monitoring point via anchor pin (not provided) or other nonmovable device.
2.
At the extensometer rewind the wire spool clockwise to remove slack. (Figure 4-30)
3.
Continue to re-spool the wireline until the counter weight is fully suspended with the
weight carrier contacting the rise collar. (Figure 4-31)
4.
Adjust the magnetic brake to between 50% and 65%, then tighten the thumb screws. DO
NOT OVER TIGHTEN THUMB SCREWS. (Figure 4-32)
Diagram 4-G
Figure 4-30: Re-spooling the
wire spool clockwise to raise
counter weight
Figure 4-31: Re-spooling the
wire spool counter-clockwise
will raise the counter weight
Re-spool the wireline until
the counter weight is fully
suspended with the weight
carrier contacting the rise
collar, then set the magnetic
brake to between 50% and
65% to ensure proper
tension on the wireline.
Figure 4-32: With counter
weight suspended and the
weight carrier contacting the
rise collar, set the magnetic
brake to between 50% and
65%
41
4-4 Activating the extensometer
Once an extensometer is activated it will continuously monitor displacement at the desired
location. Aside from routine periodic maintenance and seasonal solar panel re-orientation each
extensometer is able to run continuously until it is re-deployed.
4-4.1 Connecting antenna, battery, & strobe
1.
Remove the 900Mhz magnetic antenna from packaging (located inside the extensometer
enclosure) and connect to the antenna mount on the bottom of the enclosure. Place
antenna on top of the enclosure. (Figure 4-33 & Diagram 4-H)
2.
Connect the battery to positive/red (+) and negative/black (-) connectors inside the
enclosure. The battery status LEDs will cycle on the voltage regulator then display the
battery’s charge status. Secure battery to mounting plate using the battery strap provided
in the accessory box. (Figure 4-34 & 4-36)
3.
Connect the solar panel to the appropriate terminal on the underside of the enclosure. If
receiving power the solar status LED will be flashing. (Figure 4-35 & 4-36)
4.
If applicable, connect the strobe to the appropriate terminal on the underside of the
enclosure. (Figure 4-34)
Diagram 4-H
Figure 4-34: Connecting and
securing the battery
Figure 4-33: Connecting the
antenna to the antenna mount
Charging
Status LED
Figure 4-35: Connecting the
solar panel and strobe
42
Always connect battery
before connecting the
solar panel to ensure
proper voltage regulator
readings.
Battery
Status LEDs
Figure 4-36: Status light on the
voltage regulator
4-4.2 Activating the extensometer
1.
2.
Turn on extensometer on by toggling the power switch to the right. The power switch is
located on the top left corner of the control board. (Figure 4-37)
A.
All three LEDs will flash at start-up. If connected, the strobe will briefly flash for 2-3
seconds at start-up. (Figures 4-37 & 4-38)
B.
If the OREAD server is activated and can be reached by the extensometer the
amber LED will flash, signaling communication, and all settings made at the OREAD
server will be uploaded or updated.
C.
The amber light will next flash at the normal sampling rate interval to report
collected data.
Once the extensometer is communicating with the OREAD server, close and secure the
door. A key is supplied in the accessory box to lock the enclosure, if desired. The
extensometer is now fully deployed.
Power Switch
Power
Board
Status LEDs
Figure 4-37: Turning on the power
switch and all three LEDs flashing
to signal start-up
Figure 4-38: Strobe flashing at
powered start-up
Red Amber Green: All three LEDs
flash at initial start-up.
Green (Flashing): Extensometer is
taking a sample measurement.
Amber (Flashing): Extensometer is
communicating with the OREAD
server.
REMINDER: the front leg should
be in front of the enclosure
face. Solar panel position may
then be adjusted to maximize
battery recharge.
Red: Critical power board error.
Call your local distributor.
Figure 4-39: Power board LED indications
43
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement