The most trusted, dependable name in projector lamp sales.

The most trusted, dependable name in projector lamp sales.
The most trusted, dependable name
in projector lamp sales.
http://www.myprojectorlamps.com
http://www.myprojectorlamps.ca
http://www.myprojectorlamps.eu
The following projector manual has not been modified or altered in any way.
PRELIMINARY
M-Vision
Operation Manual
Digital Projection Incorporated
55 Chastain Road, Suite 115
Kennesaw, GA 30144
770-420-1350
www.digitalprojection.com
Publish Date: 11/14/2009
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Instr uctions ....................................................................................4
Intr oduction .................................................................................. 7
1.1 About This Manual.............................................................................................................................................. 7
Target Audience ..................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Textual and Graphic Conventions ......................................................................................................................................... 7
1.2 Description, Features and Benefits ..................................................................................................................... 8
Key Features and Benefits..................................................................................................................................................... 9
Parts List ............................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Contr ols and
Functions .....................................................................................10
2.1 Projector at a Glance ......................................................................................................................................... 10
2.2 Projector Rear Panel.......................................................................................................................................... 12
2.3 Projector Remote Control ................................................................................................................................. 13
Installation .................................................................................. 14
3.1 Remote Control ................................................................................................................................................. 14
Notes on Batteries ............................................................................................................................................................... 14
Notes on Remote Control Operation ................................................................................................................................... 14
3.2 Quick Setup ....................................................................................................................................................... 15
3.3 Installation Considerations................................................................................................................................ 16
Installation Type .................................................................................................................................................................. 16
Ambient Light ...................................................................................................................................................................... 16
Throw Distance ................................................................................................................................................................... 17
Vertical and Horizontal Position......................................................................................................................................... 18
Folded Optics ...................................................................................................................................................................... 20
Other Considerations .......................................................................................................................................................... 20
3.4 Mounting the Projector ..................................................................................................................................... 21
Floor Mounting (Upright) ................................................................................................................................................... 21
Adjusting the Projection Angle............................................................................................................................................ 21
3.5 Connections to the projector ............................................................................................................................. 22
Connecting Source Components to the projector................................................................................................................ 22
Connect your video sources to the projector as shown and described in the sections that follow. .................................... 22
RS-232 Controller Connection ............................................................................................................................................ 26
2
Connecting an External IR Receiver ................................................................................................................................... 27
Connecting to AC Power ..................................................................................................................................................... 27
3.6 Turning on the Power ........................................................................................................................................ 28
3.7 Changing the OSD Language............................................................................................................................ 28
3.8 Adjusting the Picture Orientation...................................................................................................................... 29
Rear Projection ................................................................................................................................................................... 29
3.9 Lens Adjustments .............................................................................................................................................. 29
Focus...................................................................................................................................................................................29
Zoom ...................................................................................................................................................................................30
Image Shift........................................................................................................................................................................... 30
4.1 Selecting an Aspect Ratio.................................................................................................................................. 31
4.2 Selecting An Input Source................................................................................................................................. 31
Oper ation .....................................................................................31
4.3 Using the On-Screen Menus ............................................................................................................................. 32
Main ...................................................................................................................................................................................34
Advanced ............................................................................................................................................................................. 42
System.................................................................................................................................................................................. 47
Control................................................................................................................................................................................. 49
Language ............................................................................................................................................................................. 50
Service ................................................................................................................................................................................. 51
5.1 Lamp Replacement............................................................................................................................................ 53
Maintenance and
Tr oubleshooting ..................................................................... 53
5.2 Cleaning the filters ............................................................................................................................................ 54
Cleaning the fans................................................................................................................................................................. 54
Replacing the optional filter................................................................................................................................................ 54
5.3 Troubleshooting Tips......................................................................................................................................... 55
Serial Interface
Specifications........................................................................... 56
6.1 Transfer Specifications...................................................................................................................................... 56
7.1 Projector Specifications .................................................................................................................................... 63
Specifications ..................................................................................
................... 63
7.2 Projector Dimensions ........................................................................................................................................ 65
7.3 Supported Timings ............................................................................................................................................ 66
TABLE OF CONTENTS
3
IMPORTANT SAFETY
INSTRUCTIONS
Thank you for your purchase of this quality product! For best performance, please read this manual carefully as it is
your guide through the menus and operation.
WARNING
CAUTION
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
CAUTION:
TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT REMOVE COVER (OR BACK)
NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE.
REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED
SERVICE PERSONNEL.
This symbol is intended to alert the user to the
presence of uninsulated “dangerous voltage” within the product’s enclosure that may be of sufficient
magnitude to constitute a risk of electric shock.
This symbol is intended to alert the user to the
presence of important operating and maintenance
(servicing) instructions in the literature accompanying the appliance.
1. Read and keep this instruction.
2. Heed all warnings.
3. Follow all instructions.
4. Do not use this apparatus near water.
5. Clean only with a dry cloth.
6. Do not block any of the ventilation openings. Install in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
7. Do not install near any heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, stoves, or other apparatus
(including amplifiers) that produce heat.
8. Do not defeat the safety purpose of the polarized or grounding type plug. A polarized plug has two blades with one
wider than the other. A grounding type plug has two blades and a third grounding prong. The wide blade or the
third prong is provided for your safety. When the provided plug does not fit into your outlet, consult an electrician
for the replacement of the obsolete outlet.
9. Protect the power cord from being walked on or pinched particularly at plugs, convenience receptacles and the
point where they exit from the apparatus.
10. Only use the attachments/accessories specified by The company.
11. Use only with a cart, stand, tripod, bracket or table specified by the manufacturer or sold with the
apparatus. When a cart is used, use caution when moving the cart/apparatus to avoid injury from
tip-over.
12. Unplug this apparatus during lightning storms or when unused for long periods of time.
13. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Servicing is required when the apparatus has been damaged in
any way, such as power supply cord or plug is damaged, liquid has been spilled or objects have fallen into the apparatus, the apparatus has been exposed to rain or moisture, does not operate normally, or has been dropped.
14. The +12V trigger only outputs 12Vdc signal for triggering. Do not connect to any other power input or output.
This could cause damage to this unit.
15. Keep the packing material in case the equipment should ever need to be shipped.
16. The lamp becomes extremely hot during operation. Allow the projector to cool down for approximately 45 minutes
prior to removing the lamp assembly for replacement.
17. Do not operate lamps beyond the rated lamp life. Excessive operation of lamps beyond rated life could cause them
to explode in rare occasions.
18. Never look directly into the lens when the lamp is on.
4
Compliance
Information
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY:
DPI hereby declares that
the M-Vision 260-1080p
conform with the provisions of:
Council Directive 2004/108/EC on Electromagnetic Compatibility;
EN 55022 “Limits and methods of measurements of radio interference characteristics of information technology equipment” 1998;
EN 55024 “Limits and methods of measurements of immunity characteristics of information technology equipment”
1998;
Including:
• EN 61000-4-2 “Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Part 4: Testing and measurement techniques Section 2:
Electrostatic discharge immunity test”
• EN 61000-4-3 “Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Part 4: Testing and measurement techniques Section 3:
Radiated, Radio-Frequency, Electromagnetic Field Immunity Test”
• EN 61000-4-4 “Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Part 4: Testing and measurement techniques Section 4:
Electrical fast transient/burst immunity test”
• EN 61000-4-5 “Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Part 4: Testing and measurement techniques Section 5: Surge
immunity test”
• EN 61000-4-6 “Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Part 4: Testing and measurement techniques Section 6:
Conducted disturbances induced by radio-frequency fields immunity test”
• EN 61000-4-8 “Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Part 4: Testing and measurement techniques Section 8:
Conducted disturbances induced by power frequency magnetic fields immunity test”
• EN 61000-4-11 “Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Part 4: Testing and measurement techniques Section 11:
Voltage dips, short interruptions and voltage variations immunity tests”
Including:
• EN 61000-3-2 “Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Part 3, Section 2: Limits for harmonic current emissions
(equipment input current up to and including 16 A per phase)” 2000;
• EN 61000-3-3 “Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Part 3, Section 3: Limitations of voltage changes, voltage fluctuations and flicker in public low-voltage supply systems, for equipment with rated current up to and including 16 A
and not subject to conditional connection” 1995;
Council Directive 2006/95/EC and amended by M1 and C1 on Low Voltage Equipment Safety;
EN 60950 “Safety of information technology equipment, including electrical business equipment”
Date of Declaration: October 2008
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
5
FCC PART 15:
NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to
Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation.
This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance
with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct
the interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
INDUSTRY CANADA (ICES-003):
This Class B digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.
IMPORTANT RECYCLE INSTRUCTIONS:
Lamp(s) inside this product contain mercury. This product may contain other electronic waste that
can be hazardous if not disposed of properly. Recycle or dispose in accordance with local, state, or
federal Laws.
For more information, contact the Electronic Industries Alliance at WWW.EIAE.ORG.
For lamp specific disposal information check WWW.LAMPRECYCLE.ORG.
DISPOSAL OF OLD ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT
(Applicable throughout the European Union and other European countries with separate collection programs)
This symbol found on your product or on its packaging, indicates that this product should not be
treated as household waste when you wish to dispose of it. Instead, it should be handed over to
an applicable collection point for the recycling of electrical and electronic equipment. By ensuring
this product is disposed of correctly, you will help prevent potential negative consequences to the
environment and human health, which could otherwise be caused by inappropriate disposal of this
product. The recycling of materials will help to conserve natural resources. This symbol is only
valid in the European Union. If you wish to discard this product, please contact your local authorities or dealer and ask for the correct method of disposal.
6
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
INTRODUCTION
1
1.1
About
This
Manual
This User’s Manual describes how to install, set up and operate this 1080p projector.
Target Audience
This manual help installers and end users get the most out of this 1080p projector.
It has made every effort to ensure that this manual is accurate as of the date it was printed. However, because of ongoing product improvements and customer feedback, it may require updating from time to time.
Textual and Graphic Conventions
Text Conventions: The following conventions are used in this manual, in order to clarify the information and instructions provided:
• Remote button identifiers are set in upper-case bold type; for example, “Press EXIT to return to the previous menu.”
• Computer input (commands you type) and output (responses that appear on-screen) is shown in monospace (fixedwidth) type; for example: “To change the aspect ratio to Letterbox, type op aspect = 1 <Enter>. “
• All keys with functional names are initial-capped, set in bold type and enclosed in angle brackets. These keys are
the following: <Enter>, <Spacebar>, <Control>, <Esc> and <Tab>.
• <Enter> indicates that you may press either the RETURN or ENTER key on your keyboard if it has both keys.
In addition to these conventions, underlining, boldface and/or italics are occasionally used to highlight important information, as in this example:
Note
A
carriage
return
must
be
used
after
each
command
or
string.
7
Graphic Conventions: These symbols appear in numerous places throughout the manual, to emphasize points that
you must keep in mind to avoid problems with your equipment or injury:
Tip
Note
NOTES
emphasize
text
with
unusual
importance
or
special
significance.
They
also
provide
supplemental
information.
Caution
CAUTIONS
alert
users
that
a
given
action
or
omitted
action
can
degrade
performance
or
cause
a
malfunction.
WARNING
WARNINGS
appear
when
a
given
action
or
omitted
action
can
result
in
damage
to
the
equipment,
or
possible
non‐fatal
injury
to
the
user.
DANGER!
DANGER
appears
when
a
given
action
can
cause
severe
injury
or
death.
TIPS
highlight
time‐saving
short
cuts
and
helpful
guidelines
for
using
certain
features.
1.2
Description,
Features
and
Benefits
This projector has been engineered for the top quality 1080p picture performance and installation flexibility heretofore
associated with projectors costing far more.
This Full-HD (1920 x 1080) native resolution DLPTM light engine projector features state-of-the-art technology for bright,
pristine, high-definition images at today’s highest available resolution.
This projector is equipped with a precision optics package offering zoom, focus and lens shift controls and a throw
range of 1.85:1 to 2.40:1. For installations requiring shorter throw distances, This projector is optionally available with a
lens that offers a throw range of 1.56:1 to 1.86:1 or a .73:1 fixed lens.
This projector incorporates proprietary de-interlacing technology that provides exceptional scaling and film-to-video
(3:2 pull-down) conversion for the most artifact-free images possible.
Discrete infrared (IR) and RS-232 control make custom installation seamless, while discrete power on/off and source
selection accommodate any automation control system.
8
INTRODUCTION
Key Features and Benefits
This projector offers these key features and benefits:
• Native Resolution: 1920 x 1080 (16:9 Native Aspect Ratio)
• DLP system using high-performance Digital Micromirror Device (DMD)
• Customized color wheel produces wide dynamic range and rich grayscale
• Two (2), HDMI 1.3 Inputs with High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP)
• HDTV Compatible
Parts List
Your projector is shipped with the following items. If any items are missing or damaged, please contact your dealer
• This 1080p DLP Projector
• Remote Control Unit and two (2), AA-size batteries
• One AC Power Cord (North America)
• Allen wrench (for image shift adjustment)
Optional Accessories
• Replacement lamp
• 0.8x zoom adaptor
• 1.25x zoom adaptor
• Replacement filter
INTRODUCTION
9
2
CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONS
2.1
Projector
at
a
Glance
Figure 2-1 and Figure 2-2 show the key projector components.
Horizontal Lens Shift
Vertical Lens Shift
Exhaust Vent
Intake Vent
Zoom Ring
Focus Ring
Projection Lens
Figure 2-1: Projector Front/Side View
• EXHAUST VENT
Warm air exits the projector through this vent. Ensure that it is not blocked.
• INTAKE VENT
Internal fans draw cool air into the projector through this vent.
• ZOOM RING
Rotate this to change the projected image size.
• FOCUS RING
Rotate this to focus the projected image.
• PROJECTION LENS
Available in two versions: standard throw range (1.85:1 to 2.40:1), short throw range (1.56:1 to 1.86:1) and .73 fixed.
• REAR IR SENSOR
10
INTRODUCTION
Receives infrared signals from the remote control unit.
1.
LAMP MODULE COVER
Remove this cover to access the lamp compartment.
2.
ADJUSTABLE FEET
Use these when the projector is installed in a
table-top configuration to level the image and/
or adjust the projection angle.
3.
BOLT MOUNTING PATTERN
Mounting holes are provided to secure the projector to a table or mounting plate to prevent
accidental movement. Below drawing is the
mechanical dimension for you to design a
mounting plate.
4.
PROJECTION LENS
The inside of the lens barrel is threaded to accommodate a standard, 72-mm lens filter. For
example, with a smaller screen you can install
a neutral-density filter to reduce the overall
light output.
12V TRIGGER
1
RS-232
2
IR INPUT
S-VIDEO
COMPONENT
SCART
VIDEO
1
H DMI
1
H DMI
1-
2
RGB
Y
Pb
COMPONENT
2
Pr
AC POWER IN
2
3
4
Figure 2-2: Projector Rear/Bottom/Top View
11
2.2
Projector
Rear
Panel
Figure 2-3 shows the projector rear panel.
11
RS-232
HDMI 1
10 9
12V
TRIGGER
1
2
8
IR INPUT
5
7
6
S-VIDEO
VIDEO
Y
Pb
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 1 - SCART
HDMI 2
RG
B
1
2
AC
AC POWER IN
3
Pr
4
Figure 2-3: Projector Rear Panel
1. HDMI 1 (Digital)
HDMI 2 (Digital)
HDCP-compliant digital video inputs for connecting an HDMI or DVI source.
2. POWER INPUT (100 to 240 VAC)
Use power cord to connect the projector and power.
3. RGB
Provides a standard, 15-pin VGA-style connection to either an RGB or component high-definition source, or to a
personal computer. This projector automatically detects the input signal resolution.
4. COMPONENT 2
Three BNCs for connecting component (YPbPr) video sources.
5. COMPONENT 1/SCART (RCA connectors)
Standard- or high-definition (480i/480p/576i/576p/720p/1080i/1080p) Component (YPrPb) input for connecting a
DVD/HD-DVD/BD player, HD set-top box or other SD/HD source. Also provides RGB input for RGBS sources.
6.
VIDEO
Standard composite video input for connecting a VCR, laser disc player or other composite video source. Also
provides composite sync input for RGBS sources.
7. S-VIDEO
A standard S-Video input for connecting a DVD player, satellite receiver or Super VHS (S-VHS) VCR.
8. IR INPUT
Wired input from a Niles- or Xantech-compatible, infrared (IR) repeater system.
9. TRIGGER 2 (3.5-mm, mini phono jack)
Provides 12 (+/- 1.5) volt switched output for screen relays with 250mA current capacity and short protection.
10. TRIGGER 1
Provides 12 (+/- 1.5) volt switched output for screen relays with 250mA current capacity and short protection.
11. RS-232
A female, 9-pin D-sub connector for interfacing with a PC or home theater automation/control system.
12
CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONS
2.3
Projector
Remote
Control
Figure 2-4 shows the projector remote control, and the paragraphs that follow describe its functionality.
1.ON
Use this button to turn the projector on.
2.OFF
Use this button to turn the projector off.
3.Source Selection Buttons (1-5):
Press to select a video source. By default, these
buttons are assigned as follows:
1 = RGB; 2 = HDMI 1; 3 = HDMI 2;
4 = Component 1 ; 5 = S-Video. However, you can
assign each button to any source you wish.
4.Cursor Keys ( ►,▼ ,◄ ,▲ )
Use these buttons to select items or settings, adjust
settings or switch display patterns.
ENTER
Press to select a highlighted menu item or confirm a
changed setting.
5. Aspect Ratio Selection Button
Press this button repeatedly to select one of the following aspect ratios:
16 : 9: Default setting. For viewing 16:9 DVDs or HDTV
programs in their native aspect ratio. Letterbox: For viewing
LaserDisc movies or non- anamorphic DVDs on a 16:9 screen.
4 : 3: Scales the input signal to fit 4:3 sources in
the center of the screen.
4:3 Narrow: Scales the input signal to fit 4:3 sources in the
center of the screen when using an anamorphic lens.
Native: Displays source image in its native resolu- tion without
re-sizing or overscan.
6.MENU
Press this button to show or hide the OSD controls.
7.These keys available with service code only.
Figure 2-4: Projector Remote Control
CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONS
13
3
INSTALLATION
3.1
Remote
Control
To install batteries in the remote control:
1.
Slide the battery compartment cover in the direction of the arrow to remove it.
2.
Install two AA batteries with the correct polarity.
3.
Replace the cover.
1.
3.
2.
Notes on Batteries
• Make sure that the battery polarities are correct when installing the batteries.
• Do not mix an old battery with a new one or different types of batteries.
• If you will not use the remote control for a long time, remove the batteries to avoid damage from battery leakage.
Notes on Remote Control Operation
• In most situations, you can simply point the remote control at the screen which will reflect the IR signal from the remote back toward the IR receiver on the projector. In some cases, however, ambient conditions may prevent this. If
so, point the remote control at the projector and try again.
• If the effective range of the remote control decreases, or it stops working, replace the batteries with new ones.
• The r emote control may fail to operate if t he infrared remote sensor is exposed to b righ t sunli ght or fluor escent lighting.
Figure 3-1: IR Reception Angles
14
CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONS
3.2
Quick
Setup
Table 3-1 gives a quick overview of the projector installation process. The sections following this one provide detailed
instructions.
Note
Installation
should
be
performed
by
a
qualified
custom
video
installation
specialist.
1
Choose a location for the projector
For Details,
Refer to
pa ge...
17
2
Mount the projector
21
3
Connect signal sources to the Projector
22
4
Connect external controller to RS-232 port and/or IR repeater system (optional)
26
5
Apply power to the projector
28
6
Change the OSD Language (optional)
28
7
For rear-screen and/or ceiling-mount installations, select the proper picture orientation
29
8
Primary lens adjustments: projected image size (zoom), position (shift) and focus
18, 30
9
Projector calibration: adjust the following for each input; save settings when finished:
33
Step
Pr ocedur
e
Aspect ratio
Brightness
Contrast
Color level
Tint
Input position
Table 3-1: Installation Overview
CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONS
15
3.3
Installation
Considerations
Proper installation of your projector will ensure the quality of your display. Whether you are installing a projector temporarily or permanently, you should take the following into account to ensure your projector performs optimally.
Installation Type
Choose the installation type that best suits your needs: front or rear screen, floor mount or inverted mount. Table 3-2
compares these various installation methods.
Advanta ges
Consider ations
Front Screen, Floor Mount Installation
• Easy to set up
• Shares floor space with audience
• Can be moved or changed quickly
• Easy to access
Rear Screen, Floor Mount Installation
• Projector is completely hidden
• Requires separate room
• Projector is easily accessed
• Installation cost is usually higher
• Usually good ambient light rejection
Rear Screen, Floor Mount with Mirror
• Projector is completely hidden
• Requires separate room
• Usually good ambient light rejection
• Requires less space behind screen than other rear
screen installations
• Installation cost is usually higher
Table 3-2: Projector Installation Options
Ambient Light
In general, minimize or eliminate light sources directed at the screen. Contrast ratio in your images will be noticeably
reduced if light directly strikes the screen, such as when a shaft of light from a window or floodlight falls on the image.
Images may then appear washed out and less vibrant.
16
Throw Distance
Throw distance is the distance measured from the front of the projector to the screen. This is an important calculation
in any projector installation as it determines whether or not you have enough room to install your projector with a desired screen size and if your image will be the right size for your screen.
You can quickly estimate the throw distance by taking the width of the screen and multiplying it by the lens throw ratio;
see Figure 3-2. The result of this calculation tells you roughly how far back the projector should be positioned from the
screen in order to project a focused image large enough to fill the screen.
Estimating Throw Distance
Throw Distance (TD) = Screen Width (w) x Lens Throw Ratio
Figure 3-2: Estimating Throw Distance
Two models of the projector are available, one with 1.56-1.86:1 lens and the other with 1.85-2.40 lens With optional
zoom adaptors throw ratios of 1.24 – 3.0 can be achieved.
The standard projector offers a throw ratio of between 1.85 and 2.40.
With the optional, short-throw accessory lens, the projector offers a throw ratio of between 1.56 and 1.86. A .73:1 fixed
lens is also available.
INSTALLATION
17
Vertical and Horizontal Position
Proper placement of the projector relative to the screen will yield a rectangular, perfectly-centered image that completely fills the screen.
Ideally, the projector should be positioned perpendicular to the screen and in such a way that the lens center is aligned
with either the top or bottom edge of the screen area, and centered horizontally. See Figure 3-3.
Table Installation
Height
Projection Distance
x
Lens Center
Lens Center
Screen
Figure 3-3: Projector Placement
Vertical Lens Shift
You can use the lens shift controls on the projector to center the image on the screen. Lens shift is generally expressed
as a percentage of the screen height or width, as shown in Figure 3-4 and Figure 3-5.
Screen Center
0%
50% Height
Lens Shift
(0.5 x H)
100% Height
Lens Shift
(1.0 x H)
Note
This
is
a
general
example
of
lens
shift.
Lenses
vary
in
their
shift
capabilities.
No
particular
lens
or
projector
is
used
in
this
example.
Figure 3-4: Vertical Lens Shift (Example Only)
Vertical Lens Shift:
The projector provides up to 120% of upward vertical lens shift and up to 120% of downward vertical lens shift. For example, with a 100 x 56 inch (1.78:1) screen, you can shift the image up to 14.00 inches (0.36 meters) above or 33.60
inches (0.85 meters) below the screen center.
18
INSTALLATION
Horizontal Lens Shift:
The projector provides ±30% of horizontal lens shift. For example, with a 100 x 56 inch (1.78:1) screen, you can shift
the image up to 7.50 inches (0.19 meters) left or right of the screen center.
100% Width Lens Shift
(1.0 x W)
50% Width Lens Shift
(0.5 x W)
Screen Center
0%
Screen Width (W)
Note
This
is
a
general
example
of
lens
shift.
Lenses
vary
in
their
shift
capabilities.
No
particular
lens
or
projector
is
used
in
this
example.
Figure 3-5: Horizontal Lens Shift (Example Only)
Note
1.
With
no
vertical
or
horizontal
lens
shift,
the
lens
center
and
screen
center
are
aligned
with
each
other.
2.
Vertical
shift
limits
are
percentages
of
the
screen
height.
Horizontal
shift
limits
are
percent‐
ages
of
the
screen
width.
3.
Vertical
lens
shift
figures
are
for
ceiling
mount
configurations.
For
floor
installations
(where
the
projector
is
upright),
reverse
the
up/down
vertical
lens
shift
percentages.
INSTALLATION
19
Folded Optics
In rear-screen applications where space behind the projector is limited, a mirror may be used to fold the optical path,
as shown in Figure 3-6. The position of the projector and mirror must be accurately set. If you are considering this type
of installation, contact your dealer for assistance.
Screen
Mirror
Figure 3-6: Folded Optics
Other Considerations
Other considerations and tips that can help improve your installation:
• Keep the ambient temperature constant and below 35°C (95°F). Keep the projector away from heating and/or air
conditioning vents. Changes in temperature may cause drifts in the projector circuitry, which may affect performance.
• Keep the projector away from devices that radiate electromagnetic energy such as motors and transformers.
Common sources of these include slide projectors, speakers, power amplifiers and elevators.
• Utilize optical offset prior to tilting or aiming projector at screen.
• Keep optics, lens and port glass clean for best performance and image quality.
20
INSTALLATION
3.4
Mounting
the
Projector
There are several methods for mounting the projector. Depending on your chosen installation, one method may be
more suitable than another.
Floor Mounting (Upright)
In typical front and rear screen installations, the projector can be mounted to a secure and level surface such as a
table or cart. Carts are useful when moving a projector during a presentation or from site to site. If possible, lock the
wheels when it’s in position to prevent it from being moved during a presentation.
Adjusting the Projection Angle
If the screen is significantly higher or lower than the projector, you can also tilt the projector at a slight angle. In a ceiling installation, you do this by adjusting the ceiling mount.
For a floor installation, turn the adjustable feet at the bottom of the projector to adjust the projection angle.
If you do this, you may need to vertically shift the image to compensate. For detailed instructions, refer to Lens
Adjustments on page 30.
INSTALLATION
21
3.5
Connections
to
the
projector
Proceed as follows to connect the projector to your video sources, external controller(s) - if present - and AC power.
When connecting your equipment:
• Use the correct signal cables for each source.
• Ensure that the cables are securely connected. Tighten the thumbscrews on connectors that have them.
Connecting Source Components to the projector
Connect your video sources to the projector as shown and described in the sections that follow.
HDMI/DVI Connections: See Figure 3-7.
HDMI 1
HDMI 2
HDMI or DVI Source(s)
(BD/HD-DVD/DVD Player,
HD Set Top Box,
Game Console etc.)
Figure 3-7: HDMI/DVI Source Connections
22
INSTALLATION
RGB Connections: Connect your personal computer or other RGB source to the RGB input.
Optionally, if the source outputs RGB with composite sync, connect the green, blue and red outputs to the Y, Pb and Pr
terminals on the COMPONENT 1/SCART input and the sync output to the VIDEO input.
See Figure 3-8.
Sync
Green
Blue
Red
DVD Player or
Other SCART RGBS
Source
12V TRIGGER
1
2
IR INPUT
S-VIDEO
VIDEO
COMPONENT 1 - SCART
Personal
Computer
Figure 3-8: RGB Connections
INSTALLATION
23
Component Video Connections: Connect your component video sources to the COMPONENT 1/SCART,
COMPONENT 2 or RGB inputs as shown in Figure 3-9.
Y
Pb
Pr
COMPONENT 1 SCART
RGB
Y
Y
Pb
COMPONENT 2
Pb
Pr
Pr
DTV Set-Top Box or
Other Component
(YPbPr) Source
Figure 3-9: Component Video Connections
24
INSTALLATION
Composite/S-Video Connections: Connect your Composite and S-Video sources to the projector as shown in Figure
3-10.
S-VIDEO
VIDEO
DVD Player, VCR,
Satellite Receiver,
Laser Disc etc.
Figure 3-10: Composite and S-Video Connections
INSTALLATION
25
RS-232 Controller Connection
Connect a PC or home theater control/automation system (if present) to the RS-232 port on the projector; see Figure
3-11. Use a standard, 9-pin serial cable, wired straight-through.
For more information about using this connection, refer to Serial Communications on page 67.
5
4
9
3
8
1
2
7
6
RS-232
2 Transmit Data
3 Receive Data
5 Ground
(none of the other pins are used)
to Automation/
Control System
or PC
Figure 3-11: RS-232 Control System Connection
26
INSTALLATION
Connecting an External IR Receiver
If infrared signals from the remote control cannot reach the projector due to excessive distance or obstructions such as
walls or cabinet doors, you can connect an external IR repeater system to the IR INPUT on the projector to extend the
range of the remote control. See Figure 3-13.
IR Sensor
Remote Control
IR Repeater
(3.5-mm, mini
phono plug)
IR
INPUT
SVIDEO
VIDEO
COMPONENT
1 - SCART
Figure 3-12: External IR Receiver Connection
Connecting to AC Power
The projector ships with one AC power cord. If you need a different cord, find one that is appropriate to your locate that
has a IEC Female plug to interface to the projector side. Plug the female end of the power cord into the AC receptacle
on the rear of the projector (AC 100V ~ 240V); see Figure 2-3. Then, connect the other end to your AC power source.
INSTALLATION
27
3.6
Turning
on
the
Power
1.
Turn on your source components.
2.
Press the ON
button on the remote control to turn on the projector. The LED flashes green to indicate that
it is warming up.
3.
When the projector is ready for use, the LED turns off.
3.7
Changing
the
OSD
Language
When you turn on the projector for the first time, the OSD Language Menu appears.
The projector can display the menus in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Traditional Chinese,
Simplified Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese or Russian.
Press
28
or
to select a language. Then, press ENTER to confirm your selection.
INSTALLATION
3.8
Adjusting
the
Picture
Orientation
If the projector is installed behind the screen, you must change the picture orientation to match the installation method.
To do this, press MENU on the remote control. Then, select System from the Main Menu.
Rear Projection
If the projector is used in a rear-projection application (see Figure 3-6), press
from the System Menu. Press or to set it to On.
repeatedly to select Rear Projection
3.9
Lens
Adjustments
The projector gives you a great deal of control over the picture size, position and focus.
Focus
To focus the projected image, grasp the
lens by the front ring and rotate it.
Focus Ring
INSTALLATION
29
Zoom
To make the picture smaller (zoom out) or
larger (zoom in), rotate the zoom ring in the
appropriate direction..
Zoom In
Zoom out
Zoom Ring
Image Shift
To Pull the badge out to adjust the image
shift.
Vertical Image shift: To shift the projected
image vertically, insert the provided Allen
wrench
into the hole at the top of the projector
(directly above the lens). Then, turn the
wrench to shift the lens in the desired direction.
Horizontal Image shift: To shift the projected
image horizontally, insert the provided Allen
wrench
into the hole at the top of the projector.
Then, turn the wrench to shift the lens in
the desired direction.
30
INSTALLATION
Vertical Image Shift
Horizontal
Image Shift
OPERATION
4
4.1
Selecting
an
Aspect
Ratio
Press the aspect ratio (
viewed.
) button to select the appropriate aspect ratio for the type of program material being
4.2
Selecting
An
Input
Source
When you turn on the projector, it switches to the last selected input and looks for a valid signal.
Use these buttons on the remote control to select an input source
directly. You can assign each of these five buttons to any input. The
default assignments are:
1 = RGB (VGA, HD15)
2 = HDMI 1
3 = HDMI 2
4 = Component 1
5 = S-Video.
For more information, refer to 1 Key / 2 Key / 3 Key / 4 Key / 5 Key on page 56.
INSTALLATION
31
4.3
Using
the
On­Screen
Menus
1.
Press the MENU button on the remote control followed by the IR remote password: UP, DOWN, LEFT, RIGHT,
LEFT to display the Main Menu.
2.
There are six menus. Press
3.
Press
4.
For each sub-menu item, the currently-selected value appears in white text or is otherwise highlighted.
Press or to choose a setting for that item, or press ENTER to go to another sub-menu.
5.
Press MENU to return to the previous menu.
6.
From the Main Menu, press MENU to turn off the OSD menu.
or
or
to select a sub-menu.
to select a sub-menu item.
The projector OSD menus are arranged hierarchically, as shown in Figure 4-1. Depending on the selected input source
and signal characteristics, some menu options may not be available.
32
INSTALLATION
Aspect Ratio
16:9, 4:3, Letterbox, 4:3 Narrow
or Native
Brightness
Contrast
Color Saturation
0 ... 50* ... 100
Menu Position
Top Left, Top Right,
Bottom Left, Bottom
Right or Center
Ceiling Mode
2 Key
Control
Sharpness Overshoot
Language
Texture Overshoot
On or Off
English, French, German, Italian, Spanish,
Swedish, Traditional Chinese, Simplified
Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese or
Russian
Unit Serial Number
Noise Reduction
Software Version
Noise Reduction Mode (Simple
or Advanced)
Mosquito Noise Reduction
HDMI 1, HDMI 2,
RGB, Comp. 1,
Comp. 2, Video, SVideo or SCART
Model Name
Noise Threshold
Block Artifact Reduction
4 Key
Auto Source
Vertical Texture
General Noise Reduction
3 Key
5 Key
Horizontal Texture
Diagonal Texture
NA
1 Key
Vertical Sharpness
Diagonal Sharpness
On or Off
Rear Projection
Horizontal Sharpness
Advanced
NA
Auto Power On
Sharpness Mode
(Simple or Advanced)
Noise Reduction
PIP Position
Auto Power Off
Sharpness
Main
On or Off for each
source
System
Color Tint
Sharpness
Source Enable
Pixel Clock
(read-only)
Signal Format
Service
H/V Refresh Rate
Lamp Hours
Overscan
Off, Crop or Zoom
Factory Reset
Reset Everything?
(Yes or No)
Source Select
HDMI 1, HDMI 2, RGB, Comp.
1, Comp. 2, Video, S-Video or
SCART
Blue Only
On or Off
Test Patterns
On or Off
Resync
(press ENTER to execute)
Color Space
Auto, REC709, REC601,
RGB-PC or RGB-Video
Video Standard
Auto, NTSC, PAL or SECAM
Gamma
CRT, Film, Video, Bright or Graphics
Color Temperature
This item has no function
DLP Frame Rate
Auto, 48 Hz, 50 Hz or 60 Hz
Color Gamut
Auto, REC709, SMPTE-C,
EBU or Native
Adaptive Contrast
On or Off
RGB Adjust
Figure 4-1: Projector OSD Menu Structure
Red / Green / Blue Offset
Red / Green / Blue Gain
V. Position
H. Position
Fine Sync
Phase
Tracking
Sync Level
OPERATION
33
Main
The projector Main Menu, shown in Figure 4-2, provides access to the most commonly-used projector functions.
Note
Image
controls
only
operate
on
the
active
source.
Figure 4-2: Projector Main Menu
Aspect Ratio: To change the aspect ratio (size and shape) of the projected image, press
or
to highlight Aspect
Ratio. Use the or buttons to select the appropriate aspect ratio for your screen size, installed lens configuration
and the type of program material being viewed, then press ENTER; refer to Table 4-2.
34
OPERATION
Memory: Select Memory from the Main menu, then press ENTER to recall image quality settings previously saved, or
to save changed settings in any of four memory locations.
• Recall Memory: Select Recall Memory from the Memory menu to recall saved image quality settings. Unless you
select Default (see below), this control affects all sources, not just the active source.
• User Memory 1 and User Memory 2 contain the factory default settings when the projector is initially turned on.
• Choose Default to restore the factory-default settings for the active source only. The other sources are
unaffected.
• Save Settings: Select Save Settings from the Memory menu to save any image-related settings you have changed
to User Memory 1 or User Memory 2.
OPERATION
35
The following items are saved (for all sources, not just the active source):
• Brightness / Contrast
• Color Saturation / Color Tint
• Sharpness (all settings in sub-menu)
• Noise Reduction (all settings in sub-menu)
• Color Space
• Video Standard
• Gamma
• DLP Frame Rate
• Color Gamut
• Adaptive Contrast
• RGB Adjust (all settings in sub-menu)
The settings that are saved are the same as those saved with the Save Settings command (see above).
Brightness: On your external test pattern source, select a PLUGE pattern. (PLUGE is an acronym for “Picture LineUp Generation Equipment.”) Figure 4-3 shows a typical PLUGE pattern.
Below Black
Above Black
Figure 4-3: Typical PLUGE Pattern for Adjusting Brightness
36
OPERATION
PLUGE patterns vary but generally consist of some combination of black, white and gray areas against a black background. The example above includes two vertical bars and four shaded boxes.
Select Brightness from the Main menu. Use the
or
buttons to adjust the level so that:
The darkest black bars disappear into the background.
• The dark gray areas are barely visible.
• The lighter gray areas are clearly visible.
• The white areas are a comfortable level of true white.
• The image contains only black, gray and white (no color).
Contras: On your external test pattern source, select a stepped, gray-bar pattern like the one shown in Figure 4-4.
Figure 4-4: Typical Gray Bar Pattern for Adjusting Contrast
Select Contrast from the Main menu. Use the or buttons to adjust the contrast up until the top two bars become
almost the same brightness, then down just until the brightness change between these bars is consistent with the other
bars.
Note
Brightness
and
Contrast
controls
are
interactive.
A
change
to
one
may
require
a
subtle
change
to
the
other
in
order
to
achieve
the
optimum
setting.
Color Saturation:To adjust the overall color intensity, select Color Saturation from the Main menu. Decrease this setting
if colors are overly saturated; increase it if colors appear muted or washed out.
Color Tint:Tint or “hue” is the ratio of red to green in the color portion of the image. To adjust the tint, select Color Tint
from the Main menu. Decrease this setting to shift the hue toward red; increase it to shift the hue toward green.
Note
Like
the
Brightness
and
Contrast
controls,
the
color
and
tint
controls
are
interactive.
A
change
to
one
may
require
a
subtle
change
to
the
other
in
order
to
achieve
the
optimum
setting.
Sharpness: “Sharpness” is the amount of high-frequency detail in the image. To adjust this, select Sharpness from the
Main menu and press ENTER. On your external test pattern source, select a pattern like the one shown in Figure 4-5.
Figure 4-5: Typical Test Pattern for Adjusting Sharpness
OPERATION
37
• Sharpness (Simple Mode): Adjust as needed, looking for white edges around the transitions from black to gray and
differently-sized lines in the “sweep” patterns at the top and bottom. Lower the sharpness setting to eliminate them.
• Sharpness Mode: Sharpness Mode allows or prevents access to the detailed sharpness controls in this menu.
• In most cases, Simple mode provides a sufficient level of control to produce the best picture from the most popular
sources. In Simple mode, only the Sharpness (top-most) slider is adjustable; the others are grayed out.
• Choose Advanced mode if you need more precise control over sharpness. In Advanced mode, only the top slider is
grayed out.
• Horizontal Sharpness / Vertical Sharpness / Diagonal Sharpness
• Use these controls to enhance image detail along horizontal, vertical and diagonal edges respectively.
• Sharpness Overshoot: Use the Sharpness Overshoot control to minimize or eliminate rings or shadows on dominant
edges that cannot be removed using the “simple” Sharpness control.
• Horizontal Texture / Vertical Texture / Diagonal Texture / Texture Overshoot: Use these controls to remove artifacts
from textured areas that cannot be removed using the “simple” Sharpness control.
• Noise Threshold: The Noise Threshold setting adjusts the frequency below which the Sharpness controls have an
effect. Frequencies above the threshold are considered “noise.”
Generally, the higher the setting, the more noticeable the effect of any adjustments will be.
• Noise Reduction: To apply noise reduction to the source signal, select Noise Reduction from the Main menu and
press ENTER. Noise Reduction is useful for clearing up noisy images from interlaced SD sources.
• Noise Reduction (Simple Mode): Use the or button to adjust as desired, keeping in mind that reducing noise (which
reduces high frequencies) may also soften the image.
• Noise Reduction Mode: Noise Reduction Mode allows or prevents access to the detailed noise reduction controls in
this menu.
In most cases, Simple mode provides a sufficient level of control to produce the best picture from the most popular
sources. In Simple mode, only the Noise Reduction (top-most) slider is adjustable; the others are grayed out.
Choose Advanced mode if you need more precise control over noise reduction. In Advanced mode, only the top
slider is grayed out.
• General Noise Reduction: General Noise Reduction is temporal and spatial noise reduction for all types of inputs.
The scene is analyzed for differences from frame to frame and reduces those differences that are not determined to
be motion.
• Block Artifact Reduction: Use this control to reduce or eliminate so-called “block artifacts” in MPEG-compressed video signals (digital broadcasts or DVDs). Set it as needed to minimize distortion within horizontal and vertical block
boundaries.
• Mosquito Noise Reduction: Use this control to reduce or eliminate so-called “mosquito noise” in MPEG-compressed
video signals. Set it as needed to minimize distortion around the edges of moving objects, moving artifacts around
edges and/or blotchy noise patterns superimposed over the objects.
Overscan: Some television programs are produced based on the assumption that older television sets may not display
the outer edges of the broadcast picture area. Overscan effectively hides these inactive, outer edges of the image.
Choose one of the following:
• Off: This setting leaves the image as-is.
• Crop: This setting adds a mask at the left and right edges of the source active image equal to 3% of the displayed
horizontal resolution, and at the top and bottom edges equal to 3% of the displayed vertical resolution.
• Zoom: This setting adds a factor to the scaling of the source active image so that the vertical and horizontal resolutions are 106% of the size determined by the aspect ratio function. Anything outside of the original image area is
removed.
Note
38
OPERATION
When
the
Aspect
Ratio
is
set
to
Native,
set
Overscan
to
Off
or
Crop.
Source Select: To select a video source, press or to highlight Source Select, then press ENTER. This displays the
Source Select sub-menu, shown in Figure 4-7.
The default source selection is RGB (VGA, HD15). All sources that are not available per the source enable function
(refer to Source Enable on page 54) are grayed out.
Figure 4-7: Source Select Sub-Menu
All sources that are not available per the source enable function (refer to Source Enable on page 54) are grayed out.
Resync: If the projected image becomes unstable or degraded, press
or
to highlight Resync, then press ENTER.
OPERATION
39
Advanced
Use the controls in the Advanced menu, shown in Figure 4-8, to perform advanced image adjustments.
Figure 4-8: Projector Advanced Menu
Color Space: Select Color Space from the Advanced menu to choose the color space of the source signal for HDMI,
RGB, and component connections.
• The default setting, Auto, functions as follows:
• HDMI: If the Auxiliary Video Information (AVI) infoframe contains color space and/or range data, the projector
uses that information. Otherwise, for RGB sources, the projector uses the RGB-Video color space. For component SDTV and EDTV resolutions, REC601 is used. For other component video resolutions, REC709 is used.
• RGB: If Hsync or Vsync signals are present, the projector uses the RGB-PC color space. Otherwise, REC601 is
used for SDTV and EDTV sources, and REC709 for all other sources.
• Component: For SDTV and EDTV resolutions, the projector uses the REC601 color space. For all other resolutions REC709 is used.
In most cases, the Auto setting determines the correct color space to use. If it does not, you can force the projector to
use a specific color space. Choose one of the following:
• REC709 sets the color space matrix to that defined in ITU-R BT.709.
• REC601 sets the color space matrix to that defined in ITU-R BT.601.
• RGB-PC uses RGB color space and sets black at 0,0,0 RGB and white at 255,255,255 RGB, assuming an 8-bit image.
• RGB-Video uses RGB color space and sets black at 16,16,16 RGB and white at 235,235,235, assuming an 8-bit
image, to correspond to the luminance values defined in digital component standards.
40
OPERATION
Video Standard: Select Video Standard from the Advanced menu to specify the color system for composite video or
S-Video input signals.
Different countries use different formats for video signals. Select the appropriate Video Standard for your region:
• Auto: The color systems are automatically identified and the format is set accordingly.
• PAL: This is the standard used in Europe, Australia and many other parts of the world, typically with a 50Hz frame
rate.
• SECAM: This is a standard format used mainly in France and Russia.
• NTSC: This is the standard format used mainly in the United States and Japan.
Gamma: Select Gamma from the Advanced menu to choose a DLP de-gamma curve. Used correctly, the Gamma control can improve contrast while maintaining good details for blacks and whites.
If excess ambient light washes out the image and it becomes difficult or impossible to see details in dark areas, lower
the gamma setting to compensate. This improves contrast while maintaining good details for blacks. Conversely, if the
image is washed out and unnatural, with excessive detail in black areas, increase the setting.
• CRT sets the gamma to 2.5.
• Film sets the gamma to 2.2.
• Video is similar to Film gamma but differs in dark areas of the image to correspond to the function that video cameras use to create images.
• Bright sets the gamma to 2.0.
• Graphics should only be used for computer presentations that require increased brightness at the cost of grayscale
accuracy.
DLP Frame Rate: Select DLP Frame Rate from the Advanced menu to choose the output frame rate. You can have the
projector automatically determine the optimum frame rate, or you can force it to use a specific frame rate.
• The default setting, Auto, frame locks to the main source if it has a vertical refresh rate of between 48 and 62Hz.
Vertical refresh rates of from 24 to 31Hz are doubled. Frame rates between 31 and 48Hz and greater than 62Hz are
converted to 60Hz.
• Select 48Hz to force the output frame rate to 48Hz. Use this setting to eliminate 2:3 pull-down judder with 60Hz filmbased sources.
• 50Hz and 60Hz force the output frame rate to 50Hz and 60Hz respectively.
Color Gamut: Select Color Gamut from the Advanced menu to select a color gamut (range) that may be different from
the default color gamut.
Each setting defines the precise hue of each primary (red, green and blue) and secondary (yellow, cyan and magenta) color component used to generate the millions of colors produced in displays. Changing either or both of these
numbers changes the hue of the color and relocates the “triangle” for possible colors. For example, changing the x/y
coordinates for red moves the color closer to either orange or violet, which in turn affects all displayed colors having a
red component.
OPERATION
41
• Auto automatically chooses the appropriate color gamut:
• SMPTE C for NTSC, 480i and 480p sources.
• EBU for PAL, SECAM, 576i and 576p sources.
• REC709 for all other sources.
• REC709 chooses the REC709 color gamut.
• Select SMPTE-C to choose the SMPTE-C color gamut.
• Select EBU to choose the EBU color gamut.
• Select Native to use REC709 for cyan, magenta, and yellow and uncorrected values for red, green, and blue.
Table 4-3 lists the x- and y-coordinates for each primary and secondary color component.
Prim ar
y
Colo
Red r
Yellow
Color Gam ut Settings and Associated x/y Values
x
REC70
9
SM PTE “C”
y
x
EBU
y
x
y
0.640
0.330
0.635
0.340
0.640
0.330
0.419
0.505
0.421
0.506
0.418
0.502
Green
0.300
0.600
0.305
0.595
0.290
0.600
Cyan
0.225
0.329
0.228
0.326
0.220
0.329
Blue
0.150
0.060
0.155
0.070
0.150
0.060
Magenta
0.321
0.154
0.318
0.162
0.328
0.158
Table 4-3: x/y Color Gamut Values
Adaptive Contrast: Adaptive Contrast enhancement expands the light and dark portions of an output image according
to the mean luminance of the input image.
RGB Adjust: To remove any trace of color from the white areas of the projected image, choose RGB Adjust from the
Advanced menu and press ENTER. This displays the RGB Adjust sub-menu, shown in Figure 4-9.
42
OPERATION
Figure 4-9: RGB Adjust Sub-Menu
• Gain: Use the Gain controls to correct color imbalances in the bright areas of the image. A good way to do this is to
use a test pattern consisting mostly of solid white areas, such as an 80 IRE “window” pattern. If the white areas contain traces of red, green or blue, decrease the Gain for that color.
• Offset: Use the Offset controls in the RGB Adjust sub-menu to correct color imbalances in the dark areas of the image. A good way to do this is to use a test pattern consisting mostly of dark gray areas, such as a 30 IRE “window”
pattern. If the gray areas contain traces of red, green or blue, decrease the Offset for that color.
The Gain controls increase or decrease the full-scale input range; the Offset controls shift the entire range, resulting
in a change in brightness.
Note
Generally,
higher
Gain
settings
reduce
the
image
contrast;
higher
Offset
settings
reduce
the
image
brightness.
OPERATION
43
Fine Sync: To fine-tune the position and other image attributes, choose Fine Sync from the Advanced menu and press
ENTER. This displays the Fine Sync sub-menu, shown in Figure 4-10.
Figure 4-10: Fine Sync Sub-Menu
• V Position: This control adjusts the vertical position of the image within the designated image area, up to 25 per cent
of the image height up or down.
• H Position:
• This control adjusts the horizontal position of the image within the designated image area, up to 25 per cent of the
image width left or right.
• Phase (RGB or Component sources): This control adjusts the phase of the pixel sampling clock relative to the incoming signal. Adjust the phase when an RGB or Component image still shows shimmer or “noise” after Tracking
has been optimized.
Tip
Adjust
the
Phase
after
adjusting
Tracking
(see
below).
If
some
shimmer
from
a
video
or
HDTV
source
persists,
use
the
Noise
Reduction
controls
(described
on
page
44)
to
remove
high‐frequency
noise
from
the
signal.
For best results, use a good test pattern such as a smooth gray consisting of a clear pattern of black and white
pixels, or a similar “half on, half off” graphic image. Adjust the slidebar until the image stabilizes and each pixel is
clearly defined. You may notice that you can stabilize the image at more than one point. Use either setting in such
cases.
44
OPERATION
• Tracking (RGB or Component sources): Tracking determines the frequency of the pixel sampling clock, indicated by
the number of incoming pixels per line, so that all pixels generated by a particular source are sampled.
• Steady flickering or several soft vertical stripes or bands across the entire image indicates poor pixel tracking.
Proper pixel tracking helps ensure that the image quality is consistent across the screen, that aspect ratio is maintained and that pixel phase (see above) can be optimized.
• Sync Level (Component sources only): Select Sync Level to adjust the voltage level of the Projector Sync signal detection circuitry.
• Sync Level adjustment is occasionally necessary when a DVD player or HDTV source signal drops “below black”
(for example, during scenes with explosions or when subtitles are present) and causes the projector to temporarily
lose sync. If the Sync Level from the source is persistently too low, the projector won’t sync with the source at all.
The range is from 50 to 256 millivolts (mV) inclusive. The default setting is 240 mV and should rarely require
adjustment.
System
Use the controls in the System menu, shown in Figure 4-11, to adjust the lamp, change the display orientation and
perform other, common installation tasks.
Figure 4-11: Projector System Menu
OPERATION
45
Source Enable: To enable or disable selection of a source, choose Source Enable from the System menu and press
ENTER. This displays the Source Enable sub-menu, shown in Figure 4-12.
Figure 4-12: Source Enable Sub-Menu
• HDMI 1/HDMI 2: Enables or disables the HDMI 1 and HDMI 2 sources.
• RGB: Enables or disables the RGB source.
• Comp 1/Comp 2: Enables or disables the Component 1 and Component 2 sources.
• Video: Enables or disables the Composite video source.
Note
If
either
Component
1
or
Video
is
enabled,
SCART
must
be
disabled.
• S-Video: Enables or disables the S-Video source.
• SCART: Enables or disables the SCART RGBS source.
Note
46
OPERATION
If
SCART
is
enabled,
both
Component
1
and
Video
must
be
disabled.
Auto Power On:Setting Auto Power On to On causes the projector to automatically power up when AC power is
present. If the projector is plugged into a switched AC outlet, this allows the projector to be turned on using a wall
switch instead of the remote control unit. If you do not need this capability, set Auto Power On to Off (this is the default
setting).
Rear Projection: This control reverses all images and menus, and is necessary when the projector is used in rear-projection applications. The default is Off.
Control
Select Control from the Main Menu to set various options related to control of the projector.
1 Key / 2 Key / 3 Key / 4 Key / 5 Key: These menu items assign the function of the keys numbered 1 through 5 on the
remote.
There are eight sources corresponding to the eight connections to the projector. When you assign a source to a num-
OPERATION
47
bered key, the projector immediately goes to that source when the key assigned to it is pressed.
If the chosen source is disabled via the Source Enable menu (refer to page 54), this setting has no effect.
Auto Source: This control chooses whether or not to scan for other active sources if the current source is not available.
The default setting is off.
Language
Select Language from the Main Menu to change the OSD Language.
The projector can display the menus in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Traditional Chinese,
Simplified Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese or Russian.
Press
48
or
OPERATION
to select a language. Then, press ENTER to confirm your selection.
Service
Access the Service Menu, shown in Figure 4-15, to view information that uniquely identifies your projector and indicates its current operational status:
• Model Name
• Unit Serial Number
• Software Version
• Active Source
• Pixel Clock
• Signal Format
• H/V Refresh Rate
• Lamp Hours (number of lamp hours elapsed since the last reset)
Should you ever need to contact Technical Support, this information will help them answer your questions and/or resolve product performance issues.
Figure 4-14: Projector Service Menu
There is no user intervention required to reset the lamp counter subsequent to replacing the lamp module. The lamp
module has a lamp timer memory built into it.
OPERATION
49
WARNING
Do
not
exceed
the
recommended
lamp
life.
An
old
lamp
becomes
increasingly
fragile
and
prone
to
sudden
failure.
Factory Reset: Select Factory Reset from the Service menu to restore all projector settings - except those listed below
- to their factory-default values:
• Lamp Hours
• Model Name / Serial Number
• Language
Blue Only: This feature removes all red and green color information from the image, and is useful for color-calibrating
the projector or other video components.
Test Patterns: The projector has numerous internal test patterns that are useful to technicians for advanced calibration,
measurement and fault isolation purposes. To access them, select Test Patterns from the Service menu and set it to
On.
The available test patterns are:
• White
• Black
• Red
• Green
• Blue
• Cyan
• Magenta
• Yellow
• ANSI Checkerboard
• Horizontal Gray Ramp
• Focus Grid
Press
or
on the remote control unit to cycle through the test patterns.
Note
The
OSD
menus
are
not
available
when
in
“test
pattern”
mode.
To turn test patterns off, press any key other than
or
on the remote control unit.
Altitude: Select Altitude from the Service Menu to control the operation of the projector’s cooling fan.
In most cases, the default setting (Auto) will maintain the correct operating temperature. If the lamp frequently turns off
due to overheating, or in certain high-altitude operating environments, you may need to change this setting to High.
50
OPERATION
MAINTENANCE AND
TROUBLESHOOTING
5
5.1
Lamp
Replacement
The lamp should be replaced when it reaches the end of its life (typically 2000 hours depending on the Lamp Power
setting), or sooner if a noticeable degradation in brightness occurs. Contact your dealer to obtain a replacement lamp.
1.
Turn off the projector and unplug the power cord. Allow the
projector to cool down for approximately 60 minutes prior to removing the lamp assembly for replacement.
2.
Using a flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the two screws holding
the rear compartment cover in place.
3.
Remove the rear compartment cover by tilting it upward.
4.
Loosen the screw on the lamp cover and pull the
lamp cover out.
5.
Loosen the two screws on the lamp module.
7.
Perform Steps 6 through 2 (in reverse order) to install
the new lamp module.
6.
Pull the lamp module handle firmly to remove the
lamp module.
8.
Turn on the power and reset the lamp timer.
53
5.2
Cleaning
the
filters
Cleaning the fans
The projector uses the filter to keep the fans free of dust and other particles, and should be cleaned every 500 hours of
operation. In dustier environments, it is recommended to clean the filter more frequently. If the filter is dirty or clogged,
your projector may overheat.
54
MAINTENANCE AND TROUBLESHOOTING
5.3
Troubleshooting
Tips
Table 5-1 provides some general guidelines for troubleshooting problems you may encounter with the projector. If
the suggested solutions fail to resolve the problem or if you encounter an issue not described here, please contact
Technical Support.
Sym ptom s
Possible Cause(s)
Solution
The projector does not turn on.
• The Projector is not plugged in or
the AC outlet is not active.
• Ensure that the Projector is
plugged in and that the AC outlet
is active.
• Lamp cover is not securely attached.
• Securely attach the lamp cover.
The projector does not turn back on
after it was powered off.
• The projector will not turn on for
• Wait until the Projector completes
two minutes after power-off, to proits cool-down (POWER LED lights
tect the lamp.
solid green).
The remote control does not work
correctly.
• The batteries have run out.
• Replace the batteries.
• IR code set mismatch between
remote control unit and projector.
• Press and hold the LIGHT and
ENTER remote control buttons simultaneously until the remote control
back-lighting “blinks” (approximately
five seconds). Then, try again.
The projector is on and OSD menus
appear, but there is no video image
on-screen.
• Incorrect source selection.
• Select the correct source.
• Source component is not turned on.
• Turn on the source.
• Source component is connected
incorrectly or not at all.
• Check cable connection from
source component to projector.
A projected image from a DVD is
split or otherwise scrambled.
• DVD player is connected to the
Component input and set to progressive scan mode.
• Turn off progressive scan on the
DVD player.
Image is blurred.
• The lens is not correctly focused.
• Adjust the focus with the remote control.
Image is too bright and/or lacks defini- • Contrast is set too high.
tion in the bright areas of the image.
• Lower the contrast setting.
Image appears “washed out” and/or
dark areas appear too bright.
• Brightness is set too high.
• Lower the brightness setting.
Colors in the image are swapped;
for example, reds appear blue or
vice versa.
• The Red/Pr, Green/Y or Blue/Pb
outputs from the source are connected to the wrong inputs on the
Projector.
• Ensure that the source outputs are
connected to the correct Projector
input.
LED is flashing alternating green
and red.
• The lamp cover is open.
• The lamp has failed or exceeded
its usage life.
• Close the lamp cover.
• Replace the lamp with a new one.
LED is flashing red.
• Projector internal temperature is
too high.
• Power off the Projector and allow
it to cool down. Ensure that the
intake and exhaust vents are not
blocked. Turn the projector back
on. If the problem persists, please
contact your local dealer Support
for assistance.
LED lights solid red.
• Fans are not working properly or
power-on self-test has failed.
• Please contact your local dealer
Support for assistance.
Table 5-1: Troubleshooting Chart
MAINTENANCE AND TROUBLESHOOTING
55
RS-232 Documentation
7
Full documentation can be downloaded as a separate .pdf document in the M-Vision document library
on www.digitalprojection.com.
56
SERIAL INTERFACE SPECIFICATIONS
SPECIFICATIONS
7
7.1
Projector
Specifications
Table 7-1 lists the Projector specifications.
Optics
Brightness
• 3500 lumens typical
• 3000 lumens minimum
Contrast
• 2000:1 typical
• 1500:1 minimum
Uniformity
• 85% typical
• 70% minimum
Color
x
y
White
0.312
0.357
Red
0.634
0.358
Green
0.310
0.580 ( Meet REC709)
Blue
0.140
0.085
Note: Color tolerance x,y = ± 0.03 for R, G; ± 0.15 for B
Resolution
TI” DMD, 0.95” X 1, 12 degree, DC2
Driver Technology
Dual 3021’s
Color Wheel
5-segment, RYGWB (2X)
Color Temperature
6500K ± 1500K
Lamp
1 x 260W lamp
Projection Lens
Short throw lens = 1.46 to 1.86:1 or Medium throw ratio = 1.85 to 2.5:1
Fixed lens = .73:1
Note: Values for 1080p w 0.95”
Projection Lens Image Offsets
• Vertical ± 120% V
• Horizontal ± 30% H
Image width range
8ft to 30 ft (see screen size table)
Prism/DMD Optics
DMD gasketed to prevent dust settling on panel - filter free optics
Electrical
I/O - Video Input
•
•
•
•
•
DB15 pin RGB - primary input
2 x HDMI
Component 1 - RCA
Component 2 - BNC
S-Video
57
Electrical
I/O - Control and Status
9-Pin, 2-Way RS232
I/O - Power Input
IEC-320-C14receptacle
Projector Control
Zoom/Focus/Offsets
• Hard wired via RS-232 w Sanyo emulation
• IR Remote - for set up only
Manually lens shift, Manual zoom/focus
Projection Modes
Front/ Rear
Video Modes
PC modes
System Software
Includes Sanyo emulation
Ballast
UART control , synchronized
Power
100V - 240V, 50/60Hz; 350W max, <2W Standby
Safety
UL 60950 -1, RoHS compatible
EMI
FCC Class A
Software
Basic User Command List
See User Manual
Fault Tolerant Ballast Control
Standard ballast control
Mechanical
Engine weight
20 lbs.
Dimensions
351(W) x 394(D) x 165(H) mm ( 14.2 x 15.5 x 6.5 inches)
Enclosure
Table or rack mounted (open rack only)
Adjustable feet
2” max travel
Reliability
Operating Temperature
10°C to 35°C ambient
Storage
-20°C to 60°C, 90% RH
Lamp Life
2000 hours Normal
Lamp Module
User replaceable
Electronics
Modular replaceable
Table 7-1: Projector Specifications
58
SPECIFICATIONS
7.2
Supported
Timings
Table 7-2 lists the signal types supported by each input on the Projector.
For mat
Resolution
60.00
Horizont
al
Fr equenc
y (kHz)
31.469
25.175
66.59
35.892
29.862
75.00
37.500
31.500
85.00
43.269
36.000
60.00
37.879
40.000
75.00
46.875
49.500
85.00
53.674
56.250
Refr esh
Rate (Hz)
Pixel
Fr equenc
y (MHz)
Suppor ted? (? = Yes, - = No)
RGB
Component 1
Component 2
HDMI 1
HDMI 2
Composite
S-V ideo
-
85.00
91.146
157.500
1600x1200
1600x1200
60.00
75.000
162.000
1680x1050
1680x1050
59.94
69.830
164.240
1920x1080
1920x1080
47.95
56.821
150.007
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
480/60i
720x487
59.94
15.734
13.500
-
480/60p
720x483
59.94
31.469
27.000
ü
576/50i
720x576
50.00
15.625
14.750
-
576/50p
720x576
50.00
31.250
29.000
720/50p
1280x720
50.00
37.500
75.250
720/60p
1280x720
60.00
45.000
74.250
1080/50i
1920x1080
50.00
28.125/31.250
74.250/72.000
1080/60i
1920x1080
59.94/60.00
33.716/33.750
74.175/74.250
1080/24p
1920x1080
23.98/24.00
26.978/27.000
74.175/74.250
1080/50p
1920x1080
50.00
56.250
148.500
1080/60p
1920x1080
59.94/60.00
67.433/67.500
148.350/148.500
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
NTSC 3.58
-
59.94/60.00
15.734/15.750
3.580
-
-
-
NTSC 4.43
-
59.94/60.00
15.734/15.750
4.430
-
-
-
PAL-B/G
-
50.00
15.625
4.430
-
-
-
PAL-M
-
59.94/60.00
15.734/15.750
3.580
-
-
-
PAL-N
-
50.00
15.625
3.580
-
-
-
PAL-60
-
59.94/60.00
15.734/15.750
4.430
-
-
-
SECAM
-
50.00
13.500
4.250/4.410
-
-
-
640x480
800x600
640x480
800x600
832x624
832x624
74.54
52.849
60.036
848x480
848x480
48.00
25.270
27.089
60.00
31.020
33.750
60.00
48.363
65.000
75.00
60.023
78.750
85.00
68.677
94.500
1024x768
1024x768
1280x720
1280x720
47.95
37.833
64.769
1280x1024
1280x1024
60.00
63.981
108.000
75.00
79.976
135.000
-
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
-
-
ü
-
ü
-
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
Table 7-2: Supported Signal Timings by Input
59
SPECIFICATIONS
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