Report Date: 22/06/2009 Assessor: Maxim Markovski

Report Date: 22/06/2009 Assessor: Maxim Markovski
Report Date: 22/06/2009
Assessor: Maxim Markovski
Address: APT 72 SPENCER DOCK
HILL OF DOWN HOUSE
NORTH WALL
DUBLIN 1
BER:
100780618
MPRN:
10301393703
Ventilation
General Operational Advice.
Care should always be taken to ensure a sufficient level of ventilation to maintain fresh
air levels in each room. For health and safety reasons it is important to ensure an
adequate air supply to combustion appliances e.g. gas fires. If draught stripping is
damaged at any time make sure to replace it.
Chimneys.
This dwelling has no chimneys.
Fan & Vents
This dwelling has one or more fans/vents.
Fans and vents increase heat loss in a dwelling by allowing heated air to escape but
can be important in ensuring adequate ventilation. If there is no cover on the inside of
the vents, installing controllable vent covers will allow you to control the air flow
through the vents, and so can help reduce heat loss. All changes to ventilation must
comply with relevant Building Regulations requirements, particularly Part F
(Ventilation) and Part J (Heat Producing Appliances).
Cost: Low
Impact: Low
Draught Lobby
This dwelling has a draught lobby.
Suspended wooden floor
This dwelling has a solid floor.
Draught Stripping
This dwelling has 100% draught stripping.
Ventilation System
This dwelling has natural ventilation.
Building Elements
Floors
General Operational Advice.
Floors can be a source of significant heat loss and dampness in a dwelling. Installing
insulation will reduce this heat loss, and so reduce the energy demand of the dwelling.
Floors with a heat loss greater than the current building standards (with a U-Value >
0.25) could be improved. It should be noted that installing floor insulation generally
involves a considerable amount of work. The floor space must also have adequate
ventilation to prevent dampness. All changes to ventilation must comply with relevant
Building Regulations requirements, particularly Part F (Ventilation) and Part J (Heat
Producing Appliances).
All floors in this dwelling have U-Values of <=0.25.
Roofs
General Operational Advice.
Proper insulation will help retain valuable heat and improve overall comfort levels. If
insulation is disturbed or damaged at any time, e.g. in attic space, make sure to
restore or replace it.
Roof Insulation
The roof is one of the largest heat loss areas in a dwelling. Installing insulation will
reduce this heat loss, and so reduce the energy demand of the dwelling. Roofs with a
heat loss greater than the current building standards could be improved. The current
building standard for pitched roofs that are insulated on the rafter, or for a room in
roof, is to have a U-Value <= 0.2. For pitched roofs that are insulated on the ceiling,
the current building standard is to have a U-Value <=0.16. For flat roofs, the current
building standard is to have a U-Value <=0.22. Blanket insulation, rigid board
insulation or expanding foam may be used to achieve the required insulation level.
Loose beads may also be used for roofs insulated on the ceiling. It should be noted
that installing roof insulation generally involves a considerable amount of work. The
attic/roof space must also have adequate ventilation to prevent dampness. All
changes to roof insulation must comply with relevant Building Regulations
requirements, particularly Part F (Ventilation), Part J (Heat Producing Appliances) and
Part B (Fire Safety).
Walls
As often the largest surface area, the wall can make up one of the largest heat loss
areas in a dwelling. Installing insulation will reduce this heat loss and can help reduce
thermal bridging and so reduce the energy demand of the dwelling. Walls with a heat
loss greater than the current building standards (i.e. have a U-Value > 0.27) could be
improved. Insulation may be installed as cavity fill, where the gap between the inner
and outer layers of external walls is filled with an insulating material. If cavity insulation
is not applicable or is not technically possible, insulation may be installed internally or
externally. Internal insulation involves a layer of insulation being fixed to the inside
surface of external walls, and a suitable fire resistant finish being incorporated or
applied. External solid wall insulation is the application of an insulant and a weatherprotective finish to the outside of the wall. It should be noted that installing wall
insulation generally involves a considerable amount of work.
There are wall areas in this dwelling with a U-Value of <0.6 and >0.27.
Cost: High
Impact: Low
Windows
Much heat can be lost from dwellings through their windows as they have relatively
poor thermal insulation compared to other elements of the building. Installing energy
efficient windows such as low-E double glazing helps to retain heat and improves
comfort through elimination of cold window surfaces and associated downdraughts
and condensation. The use of shutters, lined curtains and blinds can improve heat
retention at night and further reduce downdraughts. Windows with a heat loss greater
than the current building standards (i.e. have a U-Value > 2) could be improved.
However, it should be noted that best benefits are achieved through the upgrade from
single to low E double or triple glazing. Note that single glazing can also be improved
by adding secondary glazing rather than changing to proprietary double glazing.
There are window areas in this dwelling with a U-Value of <2.7 and >2.
Cost: High
Impact: Low
Doors
Heat is lost from dwellings through doors which often have relatively poor thermal
insulation compared to other elements of the building. Installing insulated doors will
reduce this heat loss, and also generally reduce draughts through air gaps at the
frames. Doors with a heat loss greater than the current building standards (i.e. have a
U-Value >2.0) could be improved.
Hot Water
General Operational Advice.
Ensure that the hot water cylinder insulation is not disturbed or damaged. Incomplete
insulation increases heat loss and costs money.
Hot water primary circuit losses
The hot water system in this dwelling has no cylinder thermostat.
Installing insulation on hot water distribution pipework reduces heat loss in areas
where it is not required. This reduces the amount of heat required to be generated by
the heating system, and so reduces the amount of fuel required. Ideally, this involves
all pipework (flow and return) between the boiler and hot water cylinder being
insulated (including in walls and floors). In general, the simplest improvement that can
be made is to install a cylinder thermostat to reduce unnecessary heat loss from the
primary pipework.
Cost: Medium
Impact: Low
Hot water cylinder insulation
The hot water cylinder has factory fitted insulation.
Cylinder Timer /Thermostat
The hot water cylinder in this dwelling has a timer and thermostat.
This thermostat allows you to set the temperature at which hot water is stored in your
cylinder. The lower the storage temperature the less the heat loss from your cylinder.
However, you should not set the storage temperature below 60°C so as to avoid risk
of legionnaires disease.
Lighting
General Operational Advice.
CFLs use 20% of the energy used by typical incandescent bulbs to give the same
amount of light. A 22 Watt CFL has the same light output as a 100 Watt
incandescent. LED lights use less than 10% of the energy required for corresponding
tungsten lights. Low energy lighting will give highest savings in rooms that are most
often used.
Lighting - low energy bulbs
The low energy lighting in this dwelling is <50%.
Replacement of traditional light bulbs (tungsten or incandescent) with energy saving
bulbs (LED or CFL) can reduce lighting costs significantly. They also last considerably
longer than ordinary light bulbs. Consider replacing traditional light bulbs with energy
saving bulbs.
Cost: Low
Impact: Medium
Space Heating
General Operational Advice.
Your automatic timer switch or programmer allows you to schedule the heating duty
on the hot water system and to turn the system on and off as required. Use this
facility to limit the running time for the hot water system to fit your specific needs and
you will save money. Likewise the heating system can be set to provide space heating
only when needed. Room thermostats normally turn the boiler and heating circulation
pump off when the room temperature has reached the desired level. A room
thermostat is normally located in a living area or circulations area (hall or landing).
Guide temperature settings are 20°C for a living room and 16 - 18°C for circulation
areas. However, the most appropriate setting depends on location of the thermostat
and the heating system design. Choose the lowest setting that gives acceptable
comfort conditions. Finding the setting to suit you may take some experimentation. A
reduction of 1°C on your thermostat can reduce annual space heating costs by 10% or
more. TRVs (Thermostatic Radiator Valves) can be set to suit the heating
requirements of the room(s) in question.
Dist. System losses and gains (control category)
The heating system controls in this dwelling could be improved.
The heating system would benefit from a programmer/timer and room thermostat to
enable the boiler to switch off when no heat is required. This would reduce the
amount of energy used and lower your fuel bills. Thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs)
could also be installed to allow the temperature of each room to be controlled to suit
individual needs, adding to comfort and reducing heating bills. For example, they can
be set to be warmer in the living room and bathroom than in the bedrooms. TRVs
should be fitted to every radiator excluding the radiator in the same room as the room
thermostat and to the radiator/towel rail in the bathroom. The room thermostat is
needed as well as the TRVs, to enable the boiler to switch off when no heat is
required.
Cost: Medium
Impact: Medium
Thermal Solar Panels
This dwelling has no solar water heating.
Solar Panels, also known as "collectors", can be fitted to a building's roof. They use
the sun's heat to warm water, or another fluid, which passes through the panel. The
fluid is then fed to a heat store (e.g. a hot water tank) and helps provide hot water
directly or can provide a source of hot water for the central heating system in the
dwelling. Solar panels work throughout daylight hours, even if the sky is overcast and
there is no direct sunshine. Solar panels can also be used to meet some space
heating demand. Ideally the panels should be located on an unshaded, south facing
roof at a tilt angle of 30°- 45° to the horizontal. Space will be need to accommodate
an appropriately sized cylinder for the system and a thermal mixing (anti-scald) valve
should also be installed.
Cost: High
Impact: Medium
Group Heating Scheme
General Operational Advice.
The heat generator should be professionally serviced at least once per year. A clean
and serviced appliance will operate more economically and will have a longer service
life.
Group Heating Systems
This dwelling is connected to a group heating system. The efficiency of at least one
group heating boiler is <80%.
A condensing boiler is capable of much higher efficiencies than other types of boiler,
meaning it will burn less fuel to heat this property. This improvement is most
appropriate when the existing central heating boiler needs repair or replacement, and
it is rarely that circumstances would make this impractical. Condensing boilers need a
drain for the condensate which can limit where they are located. Biomass boilers could
also be considered as a low carbon dioxide direct alternative to a gas or oil boiler.
Biomass boilers usually require more fuel storage space than gas/oil boilers. Heat
pumps could also be used to improve the energy consumption levels but are not as
easily retrofitted, particularly when the dwelling does not have underfloor heating. As
the dwelling is heated by a group heating scheme, the homeowner may not be in a
position to upgrade the dwelling heating system. Improvements within the dwelling
may still be considered (such as insulation improvements).
Cost: High
Impact: High
General Energy Advice
Appliances
New kitchen appliances carry energy rating labels which rate energy efficiency on a
scale of A to G. When buying new appliances look for at least A rated products which
are more energy efficient and cost less to run. Do not under or overload appliances
such as dishwashers and washing machines. For washing machines, a 40°C rather
than a 60°C wash cycle cuts electricity use by approximately a third. (Modern washing
powders and detergents can work equally effectively at lower temperatures). Defrost
your freezer regularly to save energy and extend the operating life. Equipment on
standby uses up to 20% of the energy it would use when fully on. When an appliance
is not in use, turn it off fully.
Carbon dioxide Emissions
Using one unit of electricity in your house releases up to three times as much CO2 as
one unit of gas. The use of renewable technologies (such as solar water heating)
avoids the harmful greenhouse gas emissions associated with energy production.
Lighting
Avail of natural daylight whenever possible and avoid leaving electric lights switched
on in unoccupied rooms. All lighting lamps carry an energy label similar to that on
appliances (i.e. an A to G label) so always choose the most efficient to suit your
particular needs.
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