BICYCLE OWNERS MANUAL please read carefully

BICYCLE OWNERS MANUAL please read carefully
BICYCLE OWNERS MANUAL
please read carefully before using
your bike
This is a partially assembled bicycle. In the interest of
saftey we recommend assembly by a skilled mechaninc
COMPONENTS TO BE
ASSEMBLED:
- HANDLEBARS - PEDALS
- FRONT WHEEL - FENDERS
- BRAKES
- SEAT
TOOLS REQUIRED:
-
4,5,6 mm ALLEN KEYS
9 -17mm SPANNERS
PLIERS
SCREWDRIVER SET (Phillips)
WARRANTY
LEKKER BIKES
LEKKER BIKES
LEKKER BIKES
LEKKER BIKES
LEKKER BIKES
LEKKER BIKES
LEKKER BIKES
LEKKER BIKES
BICYCLE OWNERS MANUAL
CONTENTS
You should read this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Owner’s information and responsibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
What kind of bicycle is it? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
What is it called?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Section 1: Safety Precautions
1.1 Fitting your bicycle for a safe ride. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.2 Safety check before riding your bicycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.3 Safety equipment and sensible riding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Section 2
How things work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Section 3: Service and Basic Maintenance
3.1 Maintaining your bicycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.2 Monthly service chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Additional Information:
Helpful hints, Special Instructions and Warranty
4.1 About your bicycle retailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
4.2 Special instructions for care of carbon fibre bicycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
4.3 Tools and bicycle assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
4.4 Lock your bicycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
4.5 Keep a record of your bicycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Troubleshooting chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Bicycle record chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Acknowledgments
This Manual has been developed by BIA Ltd.
Illustrations reproduced courtesy of BIA member Companies.
The information contained in this Manual complies with relevant Australian Standards at the time of printing.
This Manual may not be reproduced without the express and written permission of BIA Ltd.
Bicycle Industries Australia Ltd. ABN 84 094 666 538
Bicycle Industry of Australia on the Web: www.bikeoz.com.au
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BICYCLE OWNERS MANUAL
YOU SHOULD READ THIS MANUAL
Your bicycle is legally a vehicle. It can be ridden on roads mixing
with other traffic. You need to know about certain legal and
common sense requirements for the enjoyable, safe
and trouble free use of your bicycle.
OWNER’S INFORMATION AND RESPONSIBILITY
To reduce the risk of serious personal injury, you should read the instructions in this manual
carefully.
There are warnings throughout this manual.
Follow all warning instructions. Don’t risk injury,
mechanical failure or damage.
Your bicycle has been supplied fully assembled and adjusted ready for use. This
manual is not an ‘assembly instruction’. If your bicycle has been supplied in a form not
ready for use you must obtain “assembly instructions” from your supplier.
Return your bicycle for an initial service by your bicycle retailer to ensure correct functions of
components. The owner or main rider is then responsible for normal maintenance of the bicycle
to keep it in good operating condition.
Know how to operate all standard and accessory equipment on the bicycle.
Ensure that anyone who uses the bicycle has been fully instructed in the operation of bicycle
functions.
Your bicycle conforms to relevant Australian Standards. Other local regulations may apply.
Check with your bicycle retailer.
Many bicycle product manufacturers and suppliers provide additional information on Web sites.
The Bicycle Industry in Australia Web site includes many useful links and other information at:
www.bikeoz.com.au
The Cycling Promotion Fund offers helpful hints and links at: www.rideabike.com.au
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WHAT KIND OF BICYCLE IS IT?
Bicycles can be broadly categorised into four types:
n
n
n
n
n
Road or Touring
Mountain or Off Road
Cross, Hybrid, City or Comfort
BMX
Freestyle
Bicycles for younger riders use are generally scaled down
versions of adult bicycles including the step through
design. Other bicycles include tandems, recumbents and
folding bicycles. Which type is your new bicycle?
ROAD OR TOURING
Typically has narrow tyres and drop handlebar.
Variations include bicycles suited for touring, commuting,
sports, and recreational riding.
MOUNTAIN OR OFF ROAD
The Mountain Bicycle is designed to give the rider
maximum control and durability on a wide variety of harsh
terrain. Everything about the Mountain Bicycle is more
rugged. Its frame geometry provides maximum ground
clearance and allows you to quickly and easily shift your
weight to change the balance of the bicycle as terrain
conditions demand.
WARNING: Not all Mountain type bicycles are
intended for off road or competition use.
Check specifications and technical advice
from your bicycle retailer before use.
CROSS, HYBRID, CITY OR COMFORT
Usually something of a mixture of characteristics of the
Road and Mountain types but may include evolving frame
shapes and components. Suited for general purpose riding.
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BMX
BMX, are general purpose bicycles for younger riders.
The BMX type Bicycle is a versatile machine usually of 20”
(510mm) or less sized wheels with wide section tyres,
ideal for general purpose use by younger riders.
WARNING: General purpose Freestyle and
BMX bicycles are not designed for stunting,
racing or competition use.
FREESTYLE
Modelled on a trick riding style machine, featuring 360
degree revolving handlebar/fork assembly, axle pegs and
wide profile tyres. Using a freestyle type bicycle for trick or
competition riding may void warranty.
POWER ASSISTED BICYCLES
Have characteristics and equipment which may require
special instruction, adjustment, care and maintenance.
Read carefully all instruction manuals. Ask your bicycle
retailer for advice on maintenance, adjustments and
repair.
Unauthorised work may limit or void the warranty.
FOLDING BICYCLES
Designed for easy storage. May require special instruction
before use. Ensure that all locking devices are correctly
secured before riding a Folding bicycle.
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WHAT IS IT CALLED?
Although bicycle components vary in design, weight and
method of use, basically all bicycles are the same.
A bicycle is made up of a frame, wheels, drive train,
brakes, stem, handle bars and saddle. Frames must show
a makers ID label.
Familiarise yourself with the bicycle’s terminology; it will
make basic maintenance instructions much easier to follow.
TYPICAL PARTS OF A BICYCLE
NOTE: Not all components nor all bicycle types are shown.
WARNING: Handlebar handgrips or tube-end
plugs should be replaced if damaged.
Unprotected tube-ends can cause injury. Bicycles
used by children should especially be checked to
ensure bar end handgrips are in good condition.
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FOR ALL TYPES
Where a suspension unit, disk and / or hydraulic brake
units, multi-gear hub, electric gear changing system, etc,
are fitted, consult manufacturers specification and
warranty documents. For correct selection and repair
advice, ask your bicycle retailer. Unauthorised work may
limit or void a product warranty.
1. SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
1.1 FITTING YOUR BICYCLE FOR A SAFE RIDE
To ride safely and comfortably a bicycle and its equipment
must be matched properly to the size and skills of the
rider.
FITTING FOR LEG LENGTH
FRAME SIZE
RIDER LEG LENGTH
14.5”
15”
16”
17”
18”
19”
20”
21”
22”
23”
25 - 26”
26 - 27”
27 - 28”
28 - 30”
29 - 31”
30 - 32”
31 - 33”
32 - 34”
33 - 35”
34 - 36”
24”
35 - 37”
25”
36 - 38”
MAKE SURE THE BICYCLE FITS
A bicycle that is too big or too small for the rider is hard to
control and can be uncomfortable. If your bicycle does not
fit properly, you may lose control and fall.
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SADDLE HEIGHT
To ride comfortably and pedal efficiently, it’s very important
to have the saddle at the correct height. Your leg length
determines the correct saddle height. The saddle is at the
correct height for you when, while seated on the saddle,
your knee is slightly bent when the crank is at the
maximum down stroke (pedal is closest to the ground).
To adjust the saddle height, loosen the seat binder bolt
(A) or the quick release (B) and move the seat post up or
down as required. Make sure that the saddle is parallel to
the top tube of the bicycle. Retighten the seat post tight
enough so that you cannot twist the saddle out of
alignment.
A loose seat post will allow the saddle to turn or slip and
may cause you to lose control and fall. Therefore:
1. Ask your bicycle retailer to help you make sure you
know how to correctly clamp your seat post.
2. Before you ride the bicycle, first check that the seat
post is securely clamped.
Under no circumstances should the seat post project
from the frame beyond its ‘Minimum Insertion’ or
‘Maximum Extension’ mark.
WARNING: do not replace the seat post
with a post which is: A) not of the same
diameter or B) longer than the original. Either
will void the warranty and could lead to seat
post failure, loss of rider control and injury.
HANDLEBAR HEIGHT AND ANGLE
After you have set the saddle height and tilt, adjust the
handlebar for a safe and comfortable ride.
Ask your bicycle retailer for advice.
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WARNING: Under no circumstances should
the head stem be retightened with its
‘Minimum Insertion’ or ‘Maximum Extension’
mark visible.
‘Threadless’ headset. DO NOT over tighten the
two securing bolts. If unsure, consult your
bicycle retailers.
If the front brake cable is attached to the handlebar stem
moving the stem up or down will require a readjustment of
the brake. If in doubt, ask your bicycle retailer to make the
adjustment.
CONTROLS POSITION ADJUSTMENT
The brake and shifting controls on your bicycle are
positioned where they work best for most riders. The
angle of the controls and the position on the handlebars
can be changed. Ask your bicycle retailer to make the
adjustments for you.
WARNING: Front wheel brake lever must be
mounted on the right hand side; rear brake
lever on the left hand side.
HAND BRAKE LEVER ‘REACH’
Many bicycles have brake levers which can be adjusted
for ‘reach’. If you have small hands and find it difficult to
squeeze the brake levers, your bicycle retailer can either
adjust the reach or fit shorter reach brake levers.
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1.2
SAFETY CHECK BEFORE RIDING YOUR
BICYCLE
c Check and tighten any loose nuts, bolts and straps. If
you’re not sure, ask your bicycle retailer to check.
c Tyres correctly inflated? Check by pushing down with
your thumb on the top of the tyre. The tyre should
depress slightly. Compare to how it feels when you
know the tyres are correctly inflated.
Replace damaged tyres before they puncture.
c Wheels true? Spin each wheel and check for brake
clearance and side-to-side wobble. If a wheel
wobbles or hits the brake pads, take the bicycle to
your bicycle retailer.
c Brakes: Check that the brakes operate effectively.
QUICK RELEASES
c Are the front wheel, rear wheel and seat post quick
releases properly adjusted and in the locked position?
Check all quick release mechanisms are correctly and
securely closed.
CHECK LIGHTS AND REFLECTORS
c Working
c Correctly aligned
HANDLEBAR AND SADDLE
c Are the handlebar and saddle system: horizontal?
tight enough so they won’t twist? handlebars secure,
good condition? handle bar ends plugged?
c Is a bell fitted and working?
Any broken or worn parts should be replaced before the
bicycle is used.
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Certain activities may damage your bicycle and result in
serious personal injury. Take these precautions:
n
avoid jumping kerbs
n
avoid potholes and gratings
n
avoid stunt riding and jumping
WARNING: Do not remove protective safety
equipment fitted to your bicycle, including
handlebar end covers or plugs; reflectors
fitted to frame, wheels and pedals; reflector
mount brackets (where cantilever brakes are
fitted); front chain ring guard; rear wheel
spoke protector (right hand side); chain guard
where fitted; warning stickers affixed to
frame.
Note: A replacement fork must be the same
length and maintain the same rake and trail
characteristics as the original. Ask your
bicycle retailer for advice.
1.3 SAFETY EQUIPMENT AND
SENSIBLE RIDING
As a road user you have responsibility for your own safety
and the safety of others.
You need to know:
n
the road rules
n
how to ride safely
YOUR BICYCLE
n
Check your bicycle before you use it. (Use the safety
check 1.2 including the adjustments).
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YOUR BICYCLE (CONT)
n
Know how to work all bicycle controls.
n
For riding in low light and night conditions, fit your
bicycle with appropriate front and rear lamps.
WARNING: Check reflectors and mounting
brackets regularly to make sure that they
are clean, straight, unbroken and securely
mounted. Equip your bicycle with lights:
white front and red rear. Riding in low
light or at night time without reflectors and
lights is extremely dangerous.
YOUR CLOTHING
n
Wear a correctly fitted and fastened Approved helmet.
n
Be seen:
wear brightly coloured clothes - yellow, green and
orange are best for day, reflective tape improves the
conspicuity of riders at night.
n
Wear shoes, not thongs or ride with bare feet.
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WARNING: Always wear a correctly fitted and
fastened helmet when riding your bicycle.
BE ALERT
n
Obey all road rules
n
Watch out for other road and pathway users.
n
Adapt your riding to suit the conditions.
HOOK TURN
This manoeuvre can assist in safer right hand turns at
intersections.
There are three steps to the hook turn:
1. Stay on the left, go straight ahead and cross the
intersection. Stop on the other side of the intersection.
2. Swing your bike around to face the new direction.
3. Obey any traffic lights and complete your turn when it
is safe.
CARRYING LOADS
n
Use correctly fitted carriers, racks, panniers or a back
pack for parcels.
RIDING IN THE WET
Wet weather affects visibility for all road users.
It is harder for you, and other vehicles, to stop in the wet.
Allow more distance to brake.
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RIDING IN LOW LIGHT
Riding when light levels are low: - use lamps and
reflectors, - wear bright reflective clothing.
BE RESPONSIBLE
Follow the road rules. Use common sense. If riding in
remote areas:
n
go with a friend
n
leave details of route and return time with a responsible
person
n
tell them when you get back!
PARENTS
Most cycling incidents involve small children and
teenagers.
Make sure:
n
The bicycle is in good working order
n
The rider knows:
n
Clothing, helmet, lighting are appropriate for the bicycle
trips undertaken.
How to use the controls
The road rules
QUICK SAFETY SUMMARY
n
Obey all traffic laws
n
Be predictable
n
Be alert
n
Use reliable safety equipment
n
Use the bicycle for the manufacturer’s
recommended purpose
n
Adjust riding to traffic and weather conditions
n
Wear appropriate clothing
n
Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for any
adjustments
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2.
HOW THINGS WORK
It’s important for your enjoyment and safety to know how
things work on your bicycle.
QUICK RELEASE (QR) MECHANISM
The bicycle quick release allows wheel removal without
the need for tools.
WARNING: Riding with an improperly adjusted
wheel quick release can allow the wheel to
wobble or disengage from the bicycle, causing
damage to the bicycle and risk of a crash.
It is essential that you:
n
Ask your bicycle retailer to show you how to install and
remove your wheels safely.
n
Use the correct technique for clamping your wheel in
place with a quick release.
n
Before you ride the bicycle, check that each wheel is
securely clamped.
The Wheel Quick Release is a long bolt called a skewer,
with a lever on one end and a nut on the other, the wheel
quick release uses a cam action to clamp a bicycle wheel
in place.
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ADJUSTING THE QUICK RELEASE MECHANISM
The wheel hub is clamped in place by the force of the
Quick Release lever cam pushing against one dropout
and pulling the adjusting nut using the skewer against the
other dropout.
Turning the adjusting nut CLOCKWISE will INCREASE the
clamping strength of the lever.
Turning the adjusting nut ANTI-CLOCKWISE will
DECREASE the clamping strength of the lever.
The full force of the cam action is needed to clamp the
wheel securely. You cannot secure the quick release
mechanism by twisting the adjusting nut. Never use the
QR lever to wind up the mechanism. Tighten or loosen
using the adjusting nut with the QR lever in the open
position.
FRONT WHEEL SECONDARY RETENTION DEVICES
Some bicycles have front forks which use a secondary
wheel retention device to keep the wheel from
disengaging if the axle nuts loosen.
Some bicycle front forks have a shaped lug which acts to
keep the wheel from disengaging if the axle nuts are
loosened. To remove the wheel the axles nuts (or quick
release mechanism) must be backed off far enough for the
wheel to be removed.
WARNING: Removing or disabling the
secondary retention device is extremely
dangerous, may void the warranty, and
can lead to serious injury.
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REMOVING THE FRONT WHEEL
Cantilever and Linear brakes
Release the Brake Quick Release. (This will allow the
brakes to be opened to let the tyre pass between the
brake blocks).
Side pull brakes
Release the Brake Quick Release. (This will allow the
brakes to be opened to let the tyre pass between the
brake blocks).
Move the Wheel Quick Release Lever to the open
position.
If your bicycle is fitted with secondary retention devices
unwind the Quick Release Lever enough to allow the
wheel to be removed.
If your front wheel is fitted with axle nuts instead of a Quick
Release mechanism, use a spanner of the correct size to
fit the axle nuts.
n
Unwind the axle nut sufficiently to allow the secondary
retention devices to release.
n
Hold the front of the bicycle 30mm to 50mm off the
ground to allow the wheel to be removed.
INSTALLATION OF THE FRONT WHEEL
The installation is the reverse procedure to Removing the
Front Wheel, except:
n
Make sure the wheel axle is correctly positioned in the
fork (see diagram).
n
Position the Quick Release parallel to the front fork
when it is in the CLOSE position. This will prevent the
lever being knocked open whilst riding.
n
The Quick Release Lever is positioned on the left hand
side.
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ADJUSTMENT NOTES
If the Quick Release Lever can be easily pushed to the
CLOSE position, the clamping strength is insufficient.
n
Return the lever to a position at right angles to the fork.
n
Turn the Adjusting Nut clockwise to increase the
clamping strength.
n
Push the lever back to the CLOSE position to check
the clamping strength.
n
You will need a reasonable amount of force to CLOSE
the lever to ensure the adjustment is correct.
NOTE: If you are not sure of any of these steps
or how the quick release mechanism operates
ask your bicycle retailer.
REMOVING THE REAR WHEEL
n
Set the rear gear lever so that the chain can be moved
to the smallest cog.
n
Release the Brake Quick Release (see Removing the
Front Wheel)
n
If fitted with axle nuts, use the correct spanner to
loosen the axle nuts enough to allow the wheel to be
removed.
n
If fitted with a Quick Release Lever, move the lever into
the OPEN position. This allows the wheel to be
removed.
n
Lift the bike off the ground 30-50mm, push the wheel
forward and down until it comes out of the dropouts.
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INSTALLING THE REAR WHEEL
Installation is the reverse procedure of removing the rear
wheel. NOTE: Make sure that the chain is on the small
cog as you position the rear wheel in the dropouts.
Check that you have the correct clamping pressure (Quick
Release Lever).
If you have axle nuts make sure they are tightened
correctly.
Ensure that the Quick Release Lever is positioned as
shown to prevent the lever from releasing whilst riding.
When repositioning the wheel in the frame make sure that
it is centrally located to prevent ‘rubbing’ of the wheel on
the frame.
WARNING: Failure to properly reinstall a wheel
may result in a crash.
SEAT POST QUICK RELEASE
Many bicycles are equipped with quick release seat post
clamps. The seat post quick release clamps work exactly
like the Wheel Quick Release.
See Adjusting the Quick Release Mechanism.
Follow the steps described to adjust the height of your
seat post.
WARNING: The full force of the cam action is
needed to clamp the seat post securely.
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OTHER SEAT POST FIXINGS
n
An Allen Key Bolt or a nut is used. You must use the
correct type of tool to make adjustments.
n
The Seat Post must be inserted in the seat tube to at
least the minimum insertion point.
n
Ensure indexing lug on the seat post clamp bolt is
correctly engaged in the seat tube clamp.
BRAKES
The braking action of a bicycle is a function of friction
between brake surfaces, usually the brake blocks and the
wheel rims.
n
Keep your wheel rims and brake blocks clean and free
of lubricants, waxes or polishes.
n
Make sure that your hands can reach and squeeze the
brake levers comfortably.
n
Most bicycles are fitted with front and rear hand brake
levers and these are attached to either CANTILEVER
CALIPERS, SIDE PULL CALIPERS, DISK or LINEAR
BRAKES.
n
When replacing both brake cables check that the left
hand cable is fitted to the rear brake when looking from
the riding position.
n
To adjust chain tension on a bicycle fitted with a back
pedal brake or internally geared hub with
a single freewheel cog, the back wheel must
be moved forward or backward in the dropouts.
Loosen the axle nuts and brake arm clip.
Allow 10 -12mm of up / down chain movement halfway
between chainring (front) and cog (rear).
Re-tighten nuts and brake arm clip.
n
For back pedal brakes: check that the brake arm clip is
securely attached to the chain stay.
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WARNING: Careless use of the front brake
first can cause a crash.
Note: Most brakes have some form of quick release
mechanism to allow the brake shoes to clear the tyre
when a wheel is removed or reinstalled. When the brake
quick release is in the open position, the brake will not
operate. Ask your bicycle retailer for help. Make sure you
understand the way the brake quick release works on
your bicycle.
BRAKE ADJUSTMENT
CANTILEVER TYPE BRAKES
n
You should have approximately 2mm clearance
between the brake blocks and the wheel rim.
n
To adjust the brakes, on the brake lever turn the barrel
adjuster CLOCKWISE to loosen the brake. Move the
adjuster ANTI-CLOCKWISE to tighten the brake. Turn
the lock ring located below the barrel until it stops to
set your adjustments.
n
If your brakes shudder/squeal you need to check the
toe in/out alignment of the brake blocks. The leading
edge of the block should be 0.5 - 1mm, closer to the
wheel rim than the trailing edge.
n
To centre the brake arms, loosen the cable carrier nut,
slide the cable carrier up or down until it centres the
brake blocks (so there is an even gap on either side of
the rim).
n
Retighten the cable carrier nut.
n
Spin the wheel to ensure the brake blocks, do not rub
on the wheel rim.
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n
Use the springforce adjustment screw to change toe
in/out position.
n
Using an Allen key turn CLOCKWISE to move the
brake pad trailing edge out. Turn the Allen key ANTICLOCKWISE to move the brake pad trailing edge in.
LINEAR TYPE BRAKES
n
A Linear brake arm might have a post type brake block
(as for a Cantilever brake) or a block which can only be
adjusted for toe-in and block-to-rim alignment, in
which case brake block-to-rim clearance is adjusted by
changing the brake cable length at the brake arm or at
the brake lever cable adjuster. Ask your bicycle retailer
how to make the correct adjustment.
n
To release a Linear brake press the brake arms
together and unclip the cable lead unit (curved metal
tube) from the pivotted metal stirrup. The brake cable
remains attached to the opposite brake arm. If the
cable lead unit and cone shaped ferrule cannot be
unclipped either slacken the cable at the brake lever
(using the cable adjuster) or release the cable end
which is attached to the brake arm.
n
NOTE: Allow sufficient ‘travel’ in the brake lever and
cable to enable the curved cable lead tube to be
unclipped from the stirrup.
n
To reset the cable lead tube press the brake arms
together and re-clip into the pivotted metal stirrup.
IMPORTANT: Ensure the cone shaped ferrule is
fully seated in the stirrup. Ensure the protective
flexible bellows or accordion-like cable protector
between the brake arm and the stirrup is correctly
located.
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LINEAR BRAKE (CONT)
n
Brake lever ‘travel’ can be adjusted for ease of use by
a child or anyone with small hands by means of the
adjuster screw usually located on the body of the brake
lever.
n
NOTE: a brake lever with too little ‘travel’ before hitting
the handlebar may cause a linear brake to ‘lock up’ if
the lever is pulled on hard. Longer lever ‘travel’ allows
more progressive and better controlled braking. Adjust
to suit your riding style, or ask your bicycle retailer to
assist you make the correct adjustment.
n
NOTE: all components of a linear brake must be
compatible. Do not mix brake types.
n
The brake lever for a linear brake is not designed to
work with other types.
SIDE PULL TYPE BRAKES (ROAD BICYCLES)
When your side pull brake caliper is properly adjusted, you
should have between 1-2mm gap between the brake
block and the wheel rim.
n
To centre the brake caliper use the centering
adjustment screw to centre the brakes.
n
Turn the screw CLOCKWISE to move the caliper to the
right.
n
Turn the screw ANTI-CLOCKWISE to move the caliper
to the left.
n
To set the gap between the blocks and the wheel rim
use the Cable Adjustment Bolt.
n
Turn the Adjustment Bolt CLOCKWISE to move the
brake block away from the rim.
n
Turn the Adjustment Bolt ANTI-CLOCKWISE to move
the brake block towards the rim.
n
Tighten the Cable Adjustment Bolt Lock Nut in a
CLOCKWISE direction to set your adjustment.
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n
If your brakes shudder/squeal you need to adjust the
toe in / out.
n
As you need to realign the caliper arms to overcome
this problem, your dealer should make this adjustment
to your bike.
DISK STYLE BRAKES
The distinctive feature of disk brakes is the actual braking
disk that is fixed to the wheel and the caliper unit attached
to the front fork or rear wheel frame.
The brake is activated either by a cable or hydraulic
system. Disk brake systems require special care of the
disk itself, which can even be damaged by some bicycle
parking racks.
Hydraulic systems may require special tools and
adjustments. If in doubt about any adjustments or
maintainance consult your bicycle retailer or the
manufacturer’s manual or specifications data. Some
brands provide technical data on their websites.
WARNING: Failure to properly maintain your
brake system may result in a crash.
The brake Quick Release mechanisms are used to open
the brake arm to assist in the removal / installation of
wheels. The brakes will not function if the Quick Release
is left open.
WARNING: Failure to firmly secure the Brake
Quick Release Mechanism may cause a crash.
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THE DERAILLEUR GEAR SYSTEM
The gear system on your bicycle consists of:
n
A rear cluster (freewheel) which is attached to the rear
wheel.
n
A rear derailleur which moves the chain across the
cluster to change the gear ratio.
n
A front derailleur which moves the chain between the
front chain rings to change the gear ratio.
n
Gear levers which, when moved, change the gears.
n
Control cables which attach the gear levers to both the
front and rear derailleurs.
n
A chain.
INTERNAL GEARED HUB
If your bicycle is fitted with a multi speed internal geared
rear hub it may require special instruction for correct use,
adjustment, care and maintenance. Read carefully the
instruction manual supplied with your bicycle.
Ask your bicycle retailer for advice on use and
maintenance of an internal geared hub.
NOTE: Unauthorised work may limit or void the warranty.
The purpose of derailleurs is to move from one sprocket
to another to allow for a variety of gear ratios.
These ratios allow the rider to maintain a constant pedal
revolution in a variety of road and speed conditions.
Ask your bicycle retailer for advice.
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SHIFTING GEARS
Identify your gear levers from the diagrams.
Mountain / Cross bicycles have handlebar mounted
shifters.
Road bikes use various types of shifters, these can
include Integrated Brake and Gear Levers, rotating
handlebar ‘grip shift’ systems or other variants. Ask your
bicycle retailer to explain the gear changing procedure.
Practice changing gears to gain confidence.
For smooth operation of all types of levers you must be
pedalling forwards when changing gears.
NOTE: Some bicycles have gear levers mounted on the
down tube (see diagram) of the frame. Using this type of
mounting requires practice.
WARNING: Pedalling backwards whilst
changing gears can jam the chain causing
damage to your bicycle and / or a crash.
FRICTION GEAR SHIFT LEVERS
Friction levers are ‘stopless’ and hold the derailleur in
place with simple force (tension). The amount of friction
can be adjusted by means of the screw on top of the lever
assembly.
If derailleur gears on your bicycle are indexed, each time
you move the gear lever one click the derailleur travels a
set distance to engage the next gear. This enables you
easier and more accurate gear changing.
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The gear shift principle: The right hand
lever operates the rear gears. The left hand
lever operates the front chain ring shifter.
When shifting through a wide range of gears, you may
notice a noise as a result of the chain rubbing on the
inside of the front derailleur cage.
This noise can be eliminated by moving the gear lever
(friction systems) or adjusting the gear cable (indexing
systems.)
WARNING: Avoid riding with the chain on
both the largest front chain ring and the
largest rear cog, smallest rear cog and small
chain ring. This puts excessive strain on the
chain and can damage derailleur parts.
Practice changing to a lower gear before stopping. This
will assist easier starting at take-off.
As you gain more experience with your gear ratios you will
be able to select the most suitable gear for the terrain and
weather conditions.
NOTE: Your bicycle retailer will be able to assist you if you
are uncertain about the steps in shifting gears.
DERAILLEUR ADJUSTMENT
From time to time your rear derailleur needs adjustment.
You may need to tighten the derailleur cable to remove
excessive cable slack. Excessive slack in the cable will
cause the derailleur to miss shift.
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Locate the Adjusting Barrel on the back of the derailleur.
Turn the barrel ANTI-CLOCKWISE half a turn and test the
derailleur by changing gear.
Continue to turn the barrel until the chain is pitching
correctly onto each gear.
NOTE: If you are not sure of these steps consult your
bicycle retailer.
After the initial settling in period, if you have any
adjustments that need attention, return to your bicycle
retailer for advice.
TOE CLIPS AND TOE STRAPS
Toe clips and straps are used to assist with the correct
positioning of your feet on the pedals and to help your
riding technique. The toe clip positions the ball of the foot
over the pedal spindle, which gives maximum pedalling
power. The toe strap, when tightened, keeps the foot
engaged throughout the rotation cycle of the pedal.
Getting into and out of pedals with toe clips and straps
requires skill which can only be acquired with practice. Do
not ride in traffic or around other hazards until you can use
toe clips and straps as a reflex action. Never ride in traffic
with your toe straps tight.
CLIPLESS PEDALS
Clipless pedals are usually adjustable. Your bicycle retailer
can show you how to make this adjustment.
WARNING: Clipless pedals are intended for
use with shoes specifically made to fit them
and are designed to firmly keep the foot
engaged with the pedal. Practice is required
to learn to engage and disengage the foot
safely.
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TYRES AND TUBES
Bicycle tyres are available in many designs and
specifications, ranging from general purpose designs to
tyres designed to perform best under very specific
weather or terrain conditions. Your bicycle retailer can help
you select the most appropriate tyre and tube.
The size and pressure rating of a tyre is marked on the
sidewall of the tyre. The part of this information which is
most important to you is Tyre Pressure.
The best way to inflate a bicycle tyre to the correct
pressure is with a bicycle pump. Your bicycle retailer can
help you select an appropriate pump.
TAKE CARE: When using compressed air,
over inflation can burst the tube and tyre.
Never inflate a tyre beyond the maximum
pressure marked on the sidewall of the tyre.
If the tyre pressure on your tyres is not in
kilopascals please refer to the conversion
table on Page 43.
Tyre pressure is given either as maximum pressure or as
a pressure range. How a tyre performs under different
terrain or weather conditions depends largely on tyre
pressure.
Inflating the tyre to near its maximum recommended
pressure gives the lowest rolling resistance; but also
produces the harshest ride. High pressures work best on
smooth, dry pavement.
Very low pressures, at the bottom of the recommended
pressure range, give the best performance on loose or
muddy surfaces.
Riding with your tyres underinflated can cause a puncture,
the tyre deforms and pinches the inner tube between the
rim and the riding surface. Cornering with underinflated
tyres can cause the tyre to roll off the rim resulting in a fall.
Ask your bicycle retailer to recommend the best tyre
pressure for your kind of riding.
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TYRE VALVES
There are two kinds of bicycle tube valves in common use
- the Schraeder Valve and the Presta Valve. The bicycle
pump you use must have the fitting appropriate to the
valve stems on your bicycle.
The Schraeder is like the valve on a car tyre. To inflate a
Schraeder valve tube with compressed air or with a
bicycle pump, remove the valve cap and push the air hose
or pump fitting on to the end of the valve stem. To let air
out of a Schraeder valve, depress the pin in the end of the
valve stem with the end of a key or other appropriate
object.
The Presta valve has a narrower diameter and is only
found on bicycle tyres. To inflate a Presta valve tube using
a Presta headed bicycle pump:
n
remove the valve cap
n
unscrew (anti-clockwise) the valve stem lock nut
n
push down on the valve stem to free it up
n
push the pump head on to the valve head,
and inflate.
BICYCLE SUSPENSIONS
Some bicycles come equipped with suspension systems.
There are many different types of suspension systems.
If your bicycle has a suspension system ask your bicycle
retailer to explain care and use. Return your bicycle for
regular maintenance and adjustment of the suspension
system.
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NOTE: Changing suspension adjustment can
change
the
handling
and
braking
characteristics of your bicycle. Read and
follow manufacturer’s instructions
Not all bicycles can be safely retrofitted
with suspension systems. Check with your
bicycle retailer.
3.1 MAINTAINING YOUR BICYCLE
SERVICE AND BASIC MAINTENANCE
Bicycles perform best when they are kept clean,
lubricated and serviced regularly.
How much of your bicycle’s service and maintenance you
can do yourself depends on your level of skill and
experience, and whether or not you have the special tools
required.
Warning: Some bicycle service and repair
tasks require special knowledge and tools. Do
not begin any adjustments or service on your
bicycle if you have doubt about your ability.
Unauthorised or incorrect service and repairs
may void product warranty.
CLEANING
Mud and dust can be highly abrasive. Regular cleaning will
help maintain your bicycle in good condition.
Always dry and lubricate your bicycle after washing to
prevent rust.
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LUBRICATION
Keep your bicycle regularly lubricated for good
performance and durability. Lubrication reduces friction
and helps protect against rust.
All bearings and other moving parts require regular
appropriate lubrication:
n
Grease type lubrication:- bearings in head stem,
wheels, bottom bracket and pedals (requires
disassembly refer to your bicycle retailer).
n
Oil type lubrication:- Brake and derailleur pivot points
and jockey wheels, chain, free wheel.
For advice on appropriate special lubricants, ask your
bicycle retailer.
3.2 MONTHLY SERVICE CHART
Monthly servicing of your bicycle is recommended. This
consists of lubrication and adjustment of components.
Use the correct type of lubricants and tools, service the
bicycle’s components in logical groups and clean before
you start.
TYRES AND TUBES
n
Clean the tyres and inspect treads for wear.
n
Remove any debris from tread or walls.
n
Check tyre pressure is correct.
n
Replace faulty tubes.
WHEELS
n
Clean rims and check they are not dented or dimpled.
n
Check rims for trueness and spokes for evenness of
tension.
n
Replace any bent or broken spokes.
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CHAIN
n
Check chain for excessive wear or stretching.
n
Check for any stiff links.
n
Use recommended lubricant.
BRAKES
n
Check brake block and brake lever mounting bolts.
n
Check brake blocks for wear. Replace if necessary.
n
Check block toe-in is correct.
n
Lubricate brake pivot bolts and adjust where
necessary.
GEAR AND BRAKE CABLES
n
Inspect all cable housing for damage. Replace if
necessary.
n
Clean and examine all cable wires for kinks and frayed
ends. Replace if necessary.
n
Adjust barrel adjusters and/or cable anchor bolts to
compensate for cable stretch.
HUBS
n
Check front and rear hub bearings for excess play or
binding. Have adjustable cup-and-cone bearings,
tightened or loosened if necessary.
n
Check hubs are correctly lubricated.
n
Tighten hub axle nuts and check quick release levers.
FRONT AND REAR DERAILLEURS
n
Clean derailleur cages bushings.
n
Check the accuracy of the indexing and adjust cable
tension at barrel adjusters and/or cable anchor bolts as
required.
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CRANK/CHAINRINGS AND FREEWHEELS
n
Clean chainrings; check they are true and have no
excessively worn, or broken teeth.
n
Check crank arms are tight on bottom bracket spindle.
n
Clean and lubricate freewheel and check for wear.
n
Check freewheel sprockets for worn or broken teeth.
BOTTOM BRACKET/AXLE
n
Test bottom bracket bearings for excess play or
binding.
n
Check that the locknut is tight.
n
Check bottom bracket is correctly lubricated.
HEADSET
n
Check headset for excess play or binding.
n
Check the locknut is tight.
PEDALS
n
Check pedal bodies are not cracked.
n
If pedals are loose, tighten the mounting bolts firmly.
n
Inspect toe clips/toe straps for damage.
GENERAL
n
Check frame alignment and all the tubes for dents or
damage.
n
Check all bolts and nuts are secure. Tighten bolts with
the correct tools.
CAUTION: Alloy bicycle parts can be damaged by
overtightening.
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STORAGE
The best protection for your bicycle is to store it under
cover in a dry environment and away from corrosive
materials such as battery acid and swimming pool
chemicals. Thoroughly dry off your bicycle after use in wet
conditions. Wax or lubricate as required.
Failure to follow this procedure may lead to rust and
corrosion of metal work.
4.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
HELPFUL HINTS, SPECIAL
INSTRUCTIONS AND WARRANTY
4.1
ABOUT YOUR BICYCLE RETAILER
Your bicycle retailer will help you to select bicycle
accessories for the kind of riding you wish to do. Bicycle
shop staff have the knowledge, tools and experience to
give you reliable advice and provide maintenance
services. If you have a problem with your bicycle or your
riding, talk to your bicycle retailer.
4.2 SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR CARE OF
CARBON FIBRE BICYCLES
A carbon fibre frame requires special care due to the
nature of its construction.
n
Never clamp the bicycle using any of the carbon fibre
frame tubes. Use the seat post to hold the frame during
assembly.
n
Do not use any solvents on the frame. Clean only with
a mild detergent and water.
n
Do not paint the frame.
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n
Avoid scratches and direct impacts to the frame. If you
are involved in a mishap, or your bicycle is scratched
during use, immediately see your bicycle retailer for
inspection of the damage.
n
Use a chain protector to lessen the chance of chipping
the carbon fibre tubing.
n
Use the manufacturer’s recommended size seatpost
and headset. Do not attempt to alter the original sizes
of these parts.
n
Avoid overtightening of the seatpost.
n
Any other questions? Please contact your bicycle
retailer.
4.3
TOOLS AND BICYCLE ASSEMBLY
Should you intend to undertake maintenance the following
tools are considered to be the basic requirement:
n
Adjustable wrench 5-10cm
n
Adjustable wrench 32cm
n
Flat screw driver 15mm
n
Phillips head screw driver 15mm
n
Allen Key set 2mm-6mm
n
Set of open end spanners 7-17mm
n
Set of tyre levers
n
Chain link remover
n
Wire cutters
n
Torque wrench
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All nuts and bolts should be checked on a regular basis
for tightness. To assist in achieving the correct tension
when tightening nuts and bolts the use of a torque wrench
is recommended. Apply the following torque for the
nominated parts of your bicycle:
Front Wheel Nuts
22-27 Newton Metres
Rear Wheel Nuts
24-29 Newton Metres
Seat Binder Nut
12-17 Newton Metres
Seat Pillar Clamp Nut
4-19 Newton Metres
Brake Anchor Nut
7-11 Newton Metres
Handle Bar Clamp Nut
5-19 Newton Metres
Head Stem Expander Bolt
Crank Cotter Pin Nuts
Brake Centre Bolt
Pedals
17-19 Newton Metres
5-10 Newton Metres
5-7 Newton Metres
35-40 Newton Metres
The following checklist presumes a bicycle which is
assembled except for the handlebar & stem, brake and
gear levers, saddle and seat stem, pedals, frame
reflectors and wheels.
n
Fit wheels to frame and align. Secure axle nuts or
Quick Release (QR) mechanism.
n
Lubricate handlebar stem, slacken wedge bolt and
wedge, slide into head set to below minimum insert
mark, align square to front wheel, tighten wedge bolt.
Tighten wedge bolt. Check head stem lock nut is tight
and that the handlebar will not rotate.
n
If your bicycle is equipped with a ‘threadless’ headset,
check fitting adjustments with your bicycle retailer. DO
NOT OVER TIGHTEN the two securing bolts.
n
Slide brake and gear lever assemblies onto handlebar
in correct configuration. Tighten locking bolts. Adjust
brake assembly cables and align brake blocks for
prescribed clearance.
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n
Fit handlebar tape or handgrips, stop ends to bar if bar
is taped, and bell.
n
Assemble saddle onto seat stem. Tighten fixing nuts.
Lubricate seat stem and insert in seat tube to below
minimum insert mark. Tighten seat binder bolt or
Quick Release mechanism.
n
Fit pedals to crank in correct order; pedal marked R on
the right hand side; L on the left.
n
Fit frame mounted reflector brackets and reflectors.
Align reflectors to vertical. Tighten all bolts. Confirm
that wheel reflectors are fitted.
n
Recheck that all components are correctly assembled,
all bolts, nuts and QR correctly secure. Check that
handlebar and saddle cannot be swivelled sideways.
n
Check derailleur gears/hub gears for correct
operation; adjust to manufacturer’s specification.
Check both brakes for correct operation.
WARNING: If you are unsure about correct
assembly and/or adjustment, seek advice
from a qualified bicycle mechanic.
‘Threadless’ head sets: some bicycles,
especially those equipped with a front fork
suspension system, are fitted with a
‘threadless’ head set. Special tools and/or
procedures may be required to correctly
secure such devices.
4.4
LOCK YOUR BICYCLE
If you lock up your bicycle, it is much less likely to be
stolen. Nearly all bicycles stolen were not locked at the
time.
Lock your bicycle to something solid e.g. a tree,
a parking meter or a post. Make sure the bicycle cannot
be lifted from the post or the post lifted out of the ground
or pavement. Use a good quality U-Lock.
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A good quality, hardened steel U-lock is your bicycle’s
best protection from theft. U-locks are more secure than
cables or chains with padlocks. Combination locks
provide least security.
Make sure the lock or cable is not in a position which
makes it easy to be removed or cut.
n
A front wheel with Quick Release can be removed and
locked to the frame.
n
A good quality U-Lock may be the most secure device
for locking your bicycle.
n
Bicycle parking rails should comply with Australian
Standard AS2890.3 (1993).
n
Refer to Guide to Traffic Engineering Practice Part 14 Bicycles (AUSTROADS 1999).
n
www.bikeoz.com.au - provides additional information.
n
www.cyclingpromotion.com.au - helping you get
more out of your riding.
4.5
KEEP A RECORD OF YOUR BICYCLE
Take a colour photograph of your bicycle, write the frame
number on the back of the photograph and keep it in a
safe place. Less than one in ten stolen bicycles is
returned, partly because the owner cannot describe the
bicycle. Engraving a registration number on the bicycle will
also help. The police, Neighbourhood Watch and service
clubs run bicycle registration programs.
If you keep a record of the details of your bicycle it will
greatly increase the possibility of getting it back should it
be lost or stolen.
Remember the advice about LOCKING YOUR BICYCLE.
A good quality lock is cheap insurance.
See the record chart at end of this manual.
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TROUBLESHOOTING CHART
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Frequent punctures
Inner tube old or faulty
Replace inner tube
Tyre tread / casing worn
Replace tyre
Tyre unsuited to rim
Replace with correct tyre
Tyre not checked after
previous puncture
Remove sharp object
embedded in tyre
Tyre pressure too low
Correct tyre pressure
Spoke protruding into rim
File down spoke
Brake blocks worn down
Replace blocks
Brake block toe-in
incorrect
Correct block toe-in
Brake blocks / rim
dirty or wet
Clean blocks and rim
Brake arms loose
Tighten mounting bolts
Brake blocks worn down
Replace brake blocks
Brake blocks or rims
greasy, wet or dirty
Clean blocks and rims
Brake cables are binding /
stretched / damaged
Clean / adjust / replace
cables
Brake levers are binding
Adjust brake levers
Brakes out of adjustment
Centre brakes
Wheels not aligned
Align wheels correctly
Headset loose or binding
Adjust / tighten headset
Front forks or frame bent
Seek advice at
a bicycle shop
When applying the brakes
they squeal / squeak
Brakes not working
effectively
Steering not accurate
continued over 4
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TROUBLESHOOTING CHART (CONTINUED)
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Knocking or shuddering
when applying the brakes
Bulge in the rim or
rim out of true
True wheel or take rim to a
bicycle shop for repair *
Brake mounting bolts loose
Tighten bolts
Brakes out of adjustment
Centre brakes and / or adjust
brake block toe-in
Disk brakes: disk may be
bent or blocks not free
Seek advice at
a bicycle shop
Forks loose in head tube
Tighten headset
Axle broken
Replace axle
Wheel out of true
True wheel
Hub cones loose
Adjust hub bearings
Headset binding
Adjust headset
Derailleur cables sticking
stretched / damaged
Lubricate / tighten / replace
cables
Front or rear derailleur
not adjusted properly
Adjust derailleurs
Indexed shifting not
adjusted properly
Adjust indexing
Excessively worn / chipped
chainring or freewheel
Replace chainring, sprockets
and chain
Chain worn / stretched
Replace chain
Stiff link in chain
Lubricate or replace link
Non compatible chain /
chainring / freewheel
Seek advice at a
bicycle shop
Wobbling wheel
Gear shifts faulty
Slipping chain
* Repair of damaged front wheel rim not recommended. Replace wheel rim.
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TROUBLESHOOTING CHART (CONTINUED)
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Chain jumping off
Chainring bent
Replace Chainring
Chainring loose
Tighten mounting bolts
Chainring teeth bent
or broken
Replace Chainring
Rear or front derailleur
side-to-side travel out
of adjustment
Adjust derailleur
travel
Stiff chain link
Lubricate or replace link
Loose pedal
spindle / bearings
Adjust bearings /
spindle nut
Loose bottom bracket
spindle / bearings
Adjust bottom bracket
Bent bottom bracket /
pedal spindle
Replace bottom
bracket / spindle
Loose crank
Tighten crank bolt
Pedal bearings too tight
Adjust bearings
Bottom bracket
bearings too tight
Adjust bearings
Chain fouling derailleurs
Adjust chain line
Derailleur jockey
wheels dirty / binding
Clean and lubricate jockey
wheels
Freewheel internal
pawl pins are jammed
Lubricate. If problem
persists, replace freewheel
Constant clicking noises
when pedalling
Grinding noise
when pedalling
Freewheel does not
freewheel
Regular maintenance by your bicycle retailer is recommended
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KEEP A RECORD OF YOUR NEW BICYCLE
OWNER:
ADDRESS:
POSTCODE:
TEL:
BRAND & SERIAL NUMBER:
MODEL:
FRAME STYLE:
FRAME SIZE:
FRAME COLOUR(S):
WHEEL SIZE:
TYRE SIZE & TYPE:
BRAKE TYPE & BRAND:
TRANSMISSION BRAND:
SADDLE BRAND:
OTHER ACCESSORIES (LIST & BRAND NAMES):
PURCHASED FROM (SHOP NAME):
SHOP ADDRESS:
TEL:
DATE OF PURCHASE:
/
/
PRICE PAID: $
Remember the advice about LOCKING YOUR BICYCLE.
A good quality lock is cheap insurance.
BICYCLE INDUSTRIES AUSTRALIA LTD
Page 42
www.bikeoz.com.au © 2010
BICYCLE OWNERS MANUAL
KILOPASCAL FROM PSI CONVERSION TABLE
PSI
BAR
KPA
PSI
BAR
KPA
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
2.4
2.8
3.1
3.5
3.8
4.1
4.5
4.8
5.2
5.5
5.9
6.2
6.6
241
276
310
345
379
414
448
483
517
552
586
621
655
100
105
110
115
120
125
130
135
140
145
150
155
160
6.9
7.2
7.6
7.9
8.3
8.6
9.0
9.3
9.7
10.0
10.3
10.7
11.0
689
724
758
793
827
862
896
931
965
1000
1034
1069
1103
NOTES
BICYCLE INDUSTRIES AUSTRALIA LTD
www.bikeoz.com.au © 2010
Page 43
BICYCLE OWNERS MANUAL
It is the responsibility of the supplier of your bicycle to include
with this Owner Manual all relevant WARRANTY details.
Proof of ownership may be required before
warranty provisions can be processed.
YOUR CONSUMER RIGHTS:
White pages telephone directories list State and
Territory consumer and fair trading office numbers.
Key words: CONSUMER AFFAIRS / FAIR TRADING
Government web sites provide extensive
information. Check these sources
Warranty enquiries should be made to the
point of sale (the retailer) in the first instance.
THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS
MANUAL COMPLIES WITH RELEVANT
AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND STANDARDS
AT THE TIME OF PRINTING.
THIS MANUAL MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED
WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF BIA LTD.
BICYCLE INDUSTRIES AUSTRALIA LTD
Page 44
www.bikeoz.com.au © 2010
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