Silver Lake Studio School Proposal - Teacher

Silver Lake Studio School Proposal - Teacher

SILVER  LAKE  STUDIO  SCHOOL

 

 

 

 

Middle  School  Concept  to  serve  grades  6  &  7  in  2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE  OF  CONTENTS

 

A.  MISSION  STATEMENT  

B.  VISION  STATEMENT  

C.  SCHOOL  DATA  PROFILE/ANALYSIS  

D.  RATIONALE  FOR  CHOOSING  PILOT  SCHOOL  MODEL  

E.  PILOT  SCHOOL  TRANSFORMATION  

1.  Curriculum,  Instruction,  and  Assessment

 

2.  Schedule  and  Calendar  

3.  Staffing  

4.  Professional  Development  

5.  School  Culture  

6.  School  Governance  

7.  Budget  

8.  Family  and  Community  Engagement  

F.  SCHOOL  PLANNING  TEAM  

G.  IMPLEMENTATION

 

H.  REQUIRED  AND  ADDITIONAL  ATTACHMENTS  

Attachment  A  (Letter  of  Intent  /  Information  Sheet)  

Attachment  B  (Elect-­‐to-­‐Work  Agreement)  

Attachment  C  (Critique  Protocol)  

Attachment  D  (Draft  Bell  Schedules)  

Attachment  E  (Professional  Collaboration  Protocols)  

Attachment  F  (Year  One  Budget)  

I.  REFERENCES  

Studio  School    

Pilot  School  RFP  

                 

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A.  MISSION  STATEMENT  

The  Mission  of  the  Studio  School  is  to  advance  the  academic,  social  and  emotional  skills  that   students  will  need  for  future  academic  success  and  to  encourage  the  ability  to  respond   creatively  to  21st  century  challenges  with  integrity,  discipline,  compassion,  and  courage.  The  

Studio  School  will  achieve  this  mission  by  creating  a  small,  diverse  learning  community  devoted   to  the  pursuit  of  excellence  in  authentic  intellectual  and  artistic  work.    

   

B.  VISION  STATEMENT    

The  Studio  School  is  a  vibrant  learning  community  that  engages  both  students  and  teachers  in   active,  purposeful  learning  tailored  specifically  to  address  the  developmental  needs  of  middle   school  learners.  The  Studio  School  inspires  students  to  strive  for  academic  and  creative   achievement  and  excellence  by  means  of  the  Renaissance  model  of  studio  work  in  which   authentic  work  and  learning  are  integrated.  Through  such  a  rich  and  demanding  academic   curriculum  and  commitment  to  a  strong  arts  program,  the  school’s  students  will  be  uniquely   prepared  for  the  demands  of  high  school  and  college.  Further,  a  Studio  School  middle  level   education,  with  its  emphasis  on  inquiry,  problem  solving  and  creativity,  will  develop  in  its   students  the  skills  and  knowledge  to  think  creatively,  communicate  effectively  and  act  with   integrity  and  purpose.  Participation  in  project  based  learning,  arts  education  and  social-­‐ emotional  learning  programs  will  promote  cooperation,  communication  and  respect  among  a   diverse  student  population,  thus  preparing  our  students  to  become  compassionate  global   citizens.    

 

Core  Beliefs  and  Guiding  Principles.  

The  middle  school  years  stand  alone  as  a  uniquely   challenging  and  exciting  time  in  a  young  person’s  growth  and  development.  The  years  spent  in   middle  school  are  truly  a  bridge  between  childhood  and  later  adolescence  when  our   expectations  shift  towards  greater  self-­‐responsibility  and  initiative.  As  early  adolescents   experience  such  dramatic  and  rapid  developmental  changes,  the  schools  they  attend  have  a  

  particular  charge  to  respond  with  sensitivity  to  both  their  academic  and  social-­‐emotional  needs.

 

The  Association  for  Middle  Level  Education  has  put  forth  four  Essential  Attributes  of  a  high   quality  middle  school  that  the  Studio  School  embraces  as  guiding  principles  in  the  school’s   design:  

   

1.  

Developmentally  Responsive.

 Every  aspect  of  a  quality  education  for  middle  school   students  needs  to  take  into  consideration  the  rapid  and  profound  developmental   changes  that  occur  during  this  time  of  life.    Rather  than  treating  middle  school  students   as  either  mini  high  school  students  or  older  elementary  children,  their  educational  

2.   needs  are  best  met  in  an  environment  that  addresses  the  specific,  exciting  and  often   complicated  tasks  of  this  particular  stage  of  human  development.    

Engaging.

 A  challenging  academic  program  ensures  that  every  student  learns  and  every   member  of  the  learning  community  is  held  to  high  standards.  Traditional  middle  school   programs  have  too  often  given  students  work  that  seems  meaningless,  dull  and   disconnected  from  the  adult  world  in  which  they  are  beginning  to  participate.  The  

Studio  School    

Pilot  School  RFP  

                 

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3.  

4.  

Studio  School  will  provide  a  challenging,  engaging  school  experience  through  a  carefully   constructed  integration  of  Authentic  Intellectual  Work  projects,  instruction  in  the   artistic  disciplines,  and  rigorous  academic  tasks  around  the  major  content  areas,  all   supported  by  technology.

 

Empowering.

 An  empowering  education  is  one  that  facilitates  the  evolution  of  a   student  from  a  passive  receiver  of  information  to  an  inspired  creator  of  knowledge.  At   the  Studio  School,  we  believe  that  we  empower  our  students  with  authentic  work   projects  that  connect  to  the  world  outside  of  school  through  presentations,   performances  and  solutions-­‐oriented  service  opportunities.  Through  curricular  choices   such  as  inquiry  based  lesson  delivery,  arts  instruction  and  presentations  and  the   practice  of  expressing  oneself  clearly  and  openly  in  Council,  Studio  School  students  are   given  the  opportunity  to  make  their  voices  heard  from  a  place  of  empowerment  rather   than  reaction.

 

Equitable.

 In  the  diverse  community  of  learners  that  will  comprise  the  Studio  School,   every  student’s  right  to  an  appropriately  challenging  and  relevant  curriculum  is  upheld.  

Through  flexible  small  group  instruction,  educational  technology  programs  and  the   frequent  analysis  of  data  from  a  variety  of  assessment  tools,  we  will  continuously  adapt   to  meet  the  educational  needs  of  our  diverse  student  body.    

 

We  believe  that  the  habits  of  mind  and  practice  modeled  by  the  adults  in  children’s  lives  have  a   profound  impact  on  student  learning  and  engagement.  The  Studio  School  will  function  as  an   active  community  of  learners,  where  teachers,  staff  and  adults  from  community  partnerships   model  their  own  learning  process  and  the  willingness  to  continually  evolve  as  passionate,   engaged  learners  and  problem  solvers.  Parents  will  be  encouraged  to  share  their  knowledge   and  expertise  with  students  and  will  be  given  the  opportunity  to  participate  in  a  parent   education  series  meant  to  support  families  during  the  often  challenging  transition  from   childhood  to  early  adolescence.  Teachers  will  be  supported  through  professional  development   in  arts  curriculum,  project  based  learning,  social  emotional  learning  models  and  participation  in   lesson  studies.  Through  flexible  scheduling,  teachers  will  be  given  the  time  to  reflect  on  their   practice,  analyze  assessment  data  to  inform  instructional  planning  and  collaborate  with  peers.    

 

C.  SCHOOL  DATA  PROFILE/ANALYSIS    

Since  the  Studio  School  does  not  have  an  exact  attendance  boundary,  this  school  profile  is   based  on  the  performance  data  from  the  middle  schools  in  the  targeted  area  (T.S.  King,  W.  

Irving,  and  F.  Nightingale  Middle  Schools)  and  their  feeder  elementary  schools  in  the  targeted   neighborhood  (Allesandro,  Aragon,  Atwater,  Clifford  St.,  Dorris  Place,  Elysian,  Franklin,  Glassell  

Park,  Glenfeliz,  Ivanhoe,  Logan  St.,  and  Micheltorena  Elementary  Schools).  This  preliminary   analysis  was  conducted  using  publicly  available  data  from  the  2010-­‐11  LAUSD  School  Report  

 

Cards.

 

Areas  of  Concerns.

 Middle  schools  are  perceived  to  be  chronically  ineffective  at  serving  their   populations.  The  theories  of  learning  behind  middle  level  learning  have  varied  widely  over  the   last  century,  and  the  research  community  has  generally  been  unable  to  identify  what,  exactly,   makes  middle  schools  work  (Weiss  &  Kipnes,  2006).  Research  on  middle  level  education  

Studio  School    

Pilot  School  RFP  

                 

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  repeatedly  finds  that  middle  schools  are  filled  with  behavioral  problems,  attendance  problems,   and  poor  academic  records,  with  little  to  explain  the  discrepancy  other  than  the  complexity  of   that  age  group’s  developmental  needs.  Put  simply,  the  designs  of  middle  schools-­‐-­‐large  schools,   geared  towards  preparing  students  for  high  school-­‐-­‐have  typically  failed  to  engage  all  students.

 

The  middle  schools  in  the  area  targeted  by  the  Studio  School  maintain  this  trend.  In  general,   these  three  middle  schools  are  all  much,  much  larger  than  their  feeder  elementary  schools,   ranging  from  847  to  1,505  students,  while  the  elementary  schools  ranged  from  203  to  605   students  (median  423).  Middle  school  APIs  averaged  744,  while  the  students  in  the  same   neighborhood  elementary  schools  scored  an  average  804  API  (ranging  from  712  to  927,  median  

811).  APIs  do  not  capture  some  of  the  more  significant  academic  statistics,  so  we  also  examined   the  percentage  of  students  proficient  in  math  and  English/Language  Arts  at  their  final  year  of   schooling  (5th  and  8th  grade  for  elementary  and  middle  schools,  respectively).  Weighted   average  ELA  proficiency  rates  dropped  from  57%  Proficient  and  Advanced  in  elementary   schools  to  46%  in  middle  school,  and  Math  proficiency  rates  dropped  from  an  average  of  60%  

  to  36%.

 

Aside  from  academic  indicators,  the  School  Report  Card  provides  insight  on  some  of  the   affective  components  of  schooling,  as  well.  A  weighted  average  of  83%  of  middle  school   students  reported  “feeling  safe  on  campus,”  down  from  an  average  of  92%  of  elementary   students.  Perhaps  more  alarming,  the  percent  of  parents  who  reported  that  they  “talk  to  a   teacher  about  their  child’s  work”  dropped  from  a  weighted  average  of  67%  of  elementary   parents  to  only  41%  of  middle  school  parents.  Suspension  rates  were  higher  across  the  middle   schools  than  the  elementary  schools,  though,  surprisingly,  attendance  at  the  middle  schools   was  higher  than  at  the  elementary  schools  (with  a  weighted  average  of  73%  of  middle  school  

  students  with  96%  or  better  attendance,  versus  64%  of  elementary  students).

 

Areas  of  Growth.

 Recently,  King  MS  announced  a  plan  to  convert  to  an  all-­‐magnet  campus  

(Stutz,  2012),  which  has  the  potential  to  address  some  of  the  concerns  for  students  attending   that  campus.  Some  of  the  key  characteristics  of  exemplary  middle  level  schools  are  that  they:  

(1)  foster  relationships  between  and  among  adults  and  students  that  promote  both  academic   and  social/emotional  development;  (2)  employ  educators  who  value  working  with  young   people  and  are  trained  specifically  to  do  so;  and  (3)  are  guided  by  a  shared  vision  of  the  school  

(Andrews,  Caskey  &  Anfara,  2007).  The  King  MS  transition  has  the  potential  to  achieve  some  of   these  goals,  since  the  reorganization  will  also  allow  for  staffing  changes  to  support  the  goals.    

 

However,  structure  alone  is  not  a  sufficient  condition  to  ensure  equitable  access  to  a  quality   education  for  all  students.  Research  has  developed  our  understanding  of  the  developmental   needs  of  this  critical  age,  and  has  contributed  significantly  to  our  understanding  of  what  is   needed  for  middle  level  education  to  be  effective  and  appropriate  for  early  adolescents.  The   underlying  cause  of  ineffective  middle  level  education  can  be  found  in  the  degree  to  which  the  

  schools’  are  developmentally  responsive  to  their  students’  needs.

 

Studio  School    

Pilot  School  RFP  

                 

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Personalization.  

One  of  the  issues  that  the  Studio  School  seeks  to  address  is  the  difficulty  that   the  larger  middle  schools  in  the  area  have  to  encourage  relationships  and  meaningful   connections  between  students,  parents,  teachers  and  other  adult  staff.  As  outlined  above,  it  is   essential  that  middle  schools  are  safe,  inviting  and  developmentally  responsive  spaces.  

Research  supports  the  idea  that  “being  known  well  and  acknowledged  is  essential  to  students’   psychological  well  being  and  learning,  especially  for  those  students  who  are  typically   overlooked  in  large  impersonal  settings”  (Position  Statement  of  the  National  Forum  to  

Accelerate  Middle  Grades  Reform,  2004).  On  average,  only  63%  of  the  students  of  King,  Irving   and  Nightingale  report  that  their  teachers  know  their  names.  In  addition,  only  42%  of  parents   from  the  three  schools  report  that  they  have  adequate  access  to  their  children’s  teachers,   another  indicator  that  relationships  between  these  schools  and  the  families  they  serve  are   weak.  The  quality  of  the  connections  and  relationships  at  a  given  school  can  be  tied  to  the   ability  of  the  school  to  be  developmentally  and  personally  responsive  to  its  students.  When   school  staff  are  unable  to  really  know  their  students,  they  are  also  unable  to  respond  to  their   academic  and  social-­‐emotional  needs  appropriately.  Moreover,  the  quality  of  the  relationships,   their  depth  and  mutual  responsiveness,  have  a  large  impact  on  the  school  culture  and  learning   environment,  another  important  factor  in  student  learning  outcomes.    

   

Challenging  Curriculum.  

The  Studio  School  seeks  to  offer  a  new  option  to  parents  who  hold  the   common  perception  that  many  large  middle  schools  offer  inadequate  curricular  programs  and   are  a  poor  fit  for  many  students.  As  discussed  above,  the  data  show  that  the  three  middle   schools  serving  the  area  yield  lower  API  scores  as  well  as  lower  rates  of  E.L.  and  math   proficiency  rates  than  the  smaller  feeder  elementary  schools  do.  Unfortunately,  these  lower   scores  on  academic  assessments  support  the  perception  that  the  traditional  middle  school  

  curriculum  does  not  meet  the  needs  of  its  students.    

Small  School  Size.  

The  traditional,  large  middle  school  setting  makes  it  difficult  for  the  genuine   efforts  of  its  teachers,  staff  and  community  members  to  create  the  impact  on  student   achievement  that  they  desire.  For  example,  at  King,  the  school  has  clearly  made  an  effort  to   enroll  the  majority  of  the  students  in  Algebra  as  research  shows  that  passing  algebra  by  the  8th   grade  bodes  well  for  future  academic  success.  However,  in  the  2010-­‐2011  school  year,  with  

93%  of  the  students  enrolled  in  Algebra,  only  56%  were  passing,  which  is  lower  than  the  LAUSD   average  of  61%.  At  Irving,  only  52%  of  the  students  are  enrolled  in  Algebra  and  only  47%  of   those  students  are  passing.  Another  area  of  concern  is  the  difficulty  these  large  schools  have  

 

  providing  an  equitable  educational  environment.  Again,  to  use  King  as  an  example,  in  2010-­‐11,  

51%  of  the  8th  grade  students  scored  proficient  in  ELA  and  37%  were  proficient  in  math.  

However,  students  in  the  gifted  magnet  scored  at  91%  proficiency  in  ELA  and  82%  for  math,   exemplifying  the  struggle  that  large  middle  schools  have  serving  all  of  their  students  equally.

 

 

Studio  School    

Pilot  School  RFP  

                 

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D.  RATIONALE  FOR  CHOOSING  PILOT  SCHOOL  MODEL  

Need  for  the  Autonomies  that  the  Pilot  School  Model  Affords

 

Although  the  individual  elements  of  this  plan  could  probably  be  implemented  without  the  

Studio  School  operating  as  a  Pilot  school,  the  collective  significance  of  the  Pilot  autonomies  are   essential  to  creating  a  small,  adaptive  school  culture  that  embodies  the  vision  and  objectives   laid  out  in  this  plan.  A  school  that  focuses  on  being  developmentally-­‐appropriate,  engaging,   empowering  and  equitable  for  youth  must  uphold  these  same  values  for  the  adults,  as  well,  and  

  the  Pilot  school  contract  is  the  proper  vehicle  for  doing  so.

 

Developmentally-­‐Appropriate.

 A  school  that  is  responsive  to  young  adolescents’   social/emotional  and  academic  needs  will  need  autonomy  over  curriculum  and  scheduling   to  address  changing  needs  quickly.  Budgetary  and  professional  development  resources   may  need  to  be  quickly  refocused  to  address  students’  needs  as  they  arise.  Similarly,  the  

Pilot  school  Elect-­‐to-­‐Work  Agreement  serves  as  a  vehicle  for  responding  to  the  changing   needs  of  educators  and  their  working  conditions,  and  revisiting  the  EWA  each  year  serves   as  a  moment  to  re-­‐examine  whether  the  working  conditions  in  the  school  are  supportive  of   teachers’  professional  needs.

 

 

Challenging  and  Engaging.

 As  the  teachers  in  the  school  design  and  implement  new   curriculum  based  on  the  school’s  mission  and  vision,  the  school  will  need  autonomy  to   move  away  from  district-­‐mandated  curriculum  and  assessments.  The  school  will  need   flexibility  in  scheduling  and  calendar  to  take  advantage  of  opportunities  and  programs  in   the  community.

 

 

Empowering.

 An  empowered  school  culture  requires  local  control  and  substantial  input  

  from  the  school’s  stakeholders.  Governance  autonomy  will  accelerate  community   ownership  of  the  school  and  transformative  culture.

 

Equitable.  

Ensuring  that  the  school  remains  focused  on  the  learning  needs  of  students   requires  that  all  of  the  systems  and  structures  are  aligned  and  supportive  of  the  school’s   mission  and  vision.  Autonomy  over  staffing  and  professional  development  will  allow  for   proper  allocation  of  resources.

 

 

Elect-­‐to-­‐Work  Agreement  (EWA)

 

All  teachers  at  the  Studio  School  will  sign  an  EWA  annually.  The  EWA  (see  Section  H)  outlines   the  requirements  for  teachers  working  in  the  school,  and  is  framed  around  the  requirements  

  inherent  in  these  four  pillars  of  the  school  design.

 

Partnership  with  Future  Is  Now  Schools

 

Led  by  Green  Dot  Founder  Steve  Barr,  FIN  is  committed  to  creating  and  supporting  teacher-­‐led   schools  as  the  best  way  to  create  sustainable  systemic  reform.    FIN’s  work  is  based  on  the   success  of  a  teacher-­‐driven  high  school  jointly  founded  by  then-­‐president  of  the  United  

Studio  School    

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Federation  of  Teachers  Randi  Weingarten  and  Steve  Barr.    The  school,  now  managed  by  FIN  and   soon  to  be  renamed  University  Prep  South  Bronx,  recently  received  an  “A”  from  the  NYC  

 

Department  of  Education  and  is  in  the  top  2%  of  high  schools  in  New  York.  

FIN  has  made  a  two-­‐year  pro  bono,  no  management  fee  commitment  to  the  Studio  School.    As   part  of  this  commitment,  FIN  will  provide:  

 

·∙            Assistance  in  the  recruitment  of  staff  

·∙            Assistance  in  hiring  a  school  leader  

·∙            Assistance  in  community  organizing  and  marketing  to  neighborhood  families.  

·∙            Operational  assistance.  

·∙            Fundraising  to  allay  start  up  costs  and  adding  a  grade  at  a  time  model,  and  additional   fundraising  to  support  the  shared  goals  of  the  partnership.    

·∙            Assistance  for  principal  and  teachers  in  developing    community  and  organizational   partnerships.  

   

By  the  end  of  its  commitment,  Inc.  and  FIN  will  have  created  a  site-­‐based  governance  board   including  teachers,  parents,  community  members  and  LAUSD.  This  board  will  replace  FIN’s  role  

  at  the  Studio  School.  

 

E.  PILOT  SCHOOL  TRANSFORMATION    

 

Studio  School  Educational  Philosophy

 

The  world  our  students  will  graduate  into  is  not  the  one  that  we  live  in  today.  The  rapidly   changing,  ever  evolving  economic,  political  and  ecological  landscapes  of  the  21st  century   require  that  our  students  emerge  from  school  with  the  ability  to  work  with  others,  and  solve   problems  creatively  and  effectively.  In  a  recent  article  for  the  Huffington  Post,  Sir  Ken  Robinson   explains  that  “building  new  forms  of  education  on  these  alternative  principles  is  not  a  romantic   whimsy:  it's  essential  to  personal  fulfillment  and  to  the  sustainability  of  the  world  we  are  now   creating”  (Huffington  Post,  12/2012).  As  a  means  of  creating  an  educational  environment   founded  on  the  belief  that  our  schools  must  adapt  to  provide  these  alternative  principles,  the  

Studio  School  curriculum  is  designed  around  the  following  four  philosophical  commitments.

 

 

1.  Diversity.

 An  equitable  education  is  one  that  embraces  and  fosters  diversity  and  a   learning  environment  in  which  our  differences  become  a  springboard  for  learning.

 

2.  Respect  for  the  Individual

.  An  empowering  education  is  one  that  encourages  its   students  to  recognize  and  utilize  their  unique,  often  unrealized  gifts  and  potentials.

 

3.  Excellence  through  authentic,  meaningful  work

.  Students  remain  engaged  and   motivated  to  work  toward  academic  and  artistic  excellence  when  educational  tasks  are   authentic  and  inspired  by  real  work  connected  to  the  world  outside  of  school.

 

4.  Creativity.

 Every  area  of  the  Studio  School  curriculum  engages  the  creative  mind  from   direct  arts  instruction  and  the  integration  of  art  into  other  disciplines,  to  creative  

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problem  solving  in  authentic  work  projects  or  approaching  the  solution  of  mathematical   problems  in  different  ways.

 

 

1.  Curriculum,  Instruction,  and  Assessment  

 

Inquiry-­‐driven  instruction.  

Tony  Wagner  argues  that  teaching  is  about  providing  students  not   with  a  textbook  curriculum  but  with  a  thinking  curriculum  that  will  serve  them  well  into   adulthood  in  a  world  that  may  be  quite  different  from  the  one  we  live  in  today  (Wagner,  2008,   p.163).  Through  an  inquiry  based  curriculum  designed  around  the  major  content  concepts  and   interdisciplinary  themes  at  each  grade  level,  the  Studio  School  will  provide  its  students  with  an   engaging,  “thinking”  curriculum.  We  plan  to  start  with  traditional  LAUSD  curriculum,   augmented  by  authentic  work  projects  that  serve  to  integrate  the  curriculum  and  provide  arts   instruction  in  the  afternoons.  Multi  age,  flexible  groupings  will  be  used  whenever  possible  to   encourage  a  culture  that  allows  students  to  be  mentors,  leaders  and  learners.    

 

Research  shows  that  middle  school  students  who  participate  in  authentic  intellectual  work   projects  as  a  key  component  of  their  school  work,  demonstrate  both  greater  engagement  and   higher  achievement  on  standardized  tests.  Studio  School  students  will  be  taught  to  go  beyond   the  mere  completion  of  curricular  assignments  to  the  creation  of  excellent  work  through  the   use  of  Critique  Protocol  as  developed  by  Ron  Berger  (see  Attachment  C  for  explanation).  

Employment  of  an  inquiry  and  project  based  curriculum  in  the  core  content  areas  with  the   support  of  educational  technology,  an  integrated  and  strong  arts  program  and  a  variety  of   flexible  structures,  will  ensure  that  Studio  School  students  are  challenged  and  inspired  to   achieve  excellence.

 

 

Assessment.  

Assessment  is  an  important  part  of  the  learning  process.  It  provides  a  critical  point   of  self-­‐reflection  about  the  attainment  of  learning  goals  not  only  for  students  and  their  parents,   but  also  for  teachers  and  administrators.  Assessment  data  should  drive  instruction  and  serve  to   motivate  and  direct  students  to  take  on  the  responsibility  for  their  own  learning.  The  Studio  

School  will  use  a  variety  of  assessment  tools,  both  formative  and  summative  to  inform  the   learning  community  about  the  mastery  of  important  skills,  student  growth,  and  the  strengths   and  weaknesses  of  individual  students  and  the  school  curriculum  as  a  whole.

 

 

Students  will  be  assessed  in  a  variety  of  ways  including  academic  and  artistic  portfolio   presentations,  musical  and  theater  performances,  teacher  created  quizzes,  LAUSD  quarterly   assessments  and  all  required  state  tests.    

 

Arts  Partnerships.  

The  arts  are  at  the  center  of  the  Studio  School  Curriculum  and  are  connected   to  core  themes  in  the  academic  content  classes.  We  believe  that  a  quality  arts  focused   education  provides  a  powerful  avenue  to  reach  the  goals  of  the  Studio  School  mission.  Early   adolescence  is  an  especially  ripe  time  to  steward  the  acquisition  of  our  students’  non-­‐cognitive   skills  and  arts  education  has  been  proven  effective  in  improving  qualities  such  as  self-­‐regulation   and  resilience,  as  well  as  other  non-­‐cognitive  skills  that  are  associated  with  personal  success.  

The  research  of  James  Catterall  has  shown  that  an  arts  education  not  only  promotes  “genuine  

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feelings  of  competence  and  engagement,”  but  that  students  with  high  levels  of  arts   participation,  outperform  “arts-­‐poor”  students  by  virtually  every  measure  (Catterall,  2002).  In   addition,  the  arts  have  been  proven  to  reach  students  in  untraditional  ways  and  often  young   people  who  have  been  unsuccessful  academically  can  become  high  achievers  in  arts  learning  

  settings,  an  experience  which  has  proven  to  then  carry  over  into  other  areas.  (Catterall,  2002).    

Years  of  research  show  that  a  high  quality  arts  education  can  be  linked  to  the  attainment  of  the   goals  educators  and  parents  seek  for  their  children;  academic  achievement,  social  and   emotional  development,  civic  engagement  and  equitable  opportunity.  Arts  programming  also   offers  a  valuable  set  of  opportunities  to  engage  parents,  community  members,  and  other  

  stakeholders  in  examining  students’  work  and  progress,  as  well  as  making  clear  and  public  the   school’s  mission  and  vision.

 

 

Social  Emotional  Learning  Framework

 

At  the  Studio  School,  we  take  our  mission  to  produce  graduates  who  will  respond  with  integrity,   discipline,  compassion  and  courage  to  21st  century  challenges  seriously.  We  believe  that   schools  have  an  important  role  to  play  in  working  with  families  and  communities  to  raise   knowledgeable,  happy,  caring,  contributing  children  and  adolescents  and  thus,  we  include  a  

  component  of  Social  Emotional  Learning  as  one  of  our  curricular  areas.    

Social  Emotional  Learning  has  been  defined  as  the  process  through  which  people  acquire  the   knowledge,  attitudes  and  skills  to  recognize  and  manage  emotions,  set  and  achieve  positive   goals,  demonstrate  care  and  concern  for  others,  establish  and  maintain  positive  relationships,   make  responsible  decisions  and  handle  interpersonal  situations  effectively.  (Durlak,  Weissburg,  

2010)  These  social  and  emotional  skills  are  the  skills  that  create  the  foundation  that  promote   other  types  of  learning.  A  growing  body  of  research  has  shown  that  Social  Emotional  Learning  

(SEL)  curricula,  when  chosen  carefully  and  faithfully  implemented,  produce  students  with   superior  SEL  skills  and  an  11%  gain  in  academic  achievement  as  well.  (Zins,  Weissberg,  Wang,  

Walberg,  2004).  What’s  more,  SEL  programs  have  been  proven  effective  for  students  from   different  backgrounds  and  ethnicities.  (Durlak,  Weissburg,  2010)  

 

There  are  several  methods  of  Social  Emotional  Learning  and  The  Studio  School  is  looking  into   several  approaches.  The  first  is  Council,  a  program  already  in  use  widely  throughout  LAUSD   which  fosters  authentic  expression  and  empathic,  non-­‐judgemental  listening  through  a  formal,   structured  process.  Other  evidence  based  SEL  programs  of  interest  to  this  design  team  are  

Roots  of  Empathy,  Positive  Action,  Second  Step  and  Resolving  Conflict  Creatively.  In  addition,   schools  employ  meditation  instruction  and  service  learning  as  components  of  their  SEL   programs  and  The  Studio  School  plans  to  develop  and  incorporate  those  practices  as  well  over  

  the  course  of  the  school’s  first  two  years.    

 

Some  of  the  strategies  that  will  be  used  at  the  Studio  School  are  described  here:  

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1.  Studio  Time  (aka  Advisory):  

Advisory-­‐or  Studio  Time  at  the  Studio  School-­‐is  a  daily  45   minute  period  where  students  gather  in  multi-­‐age  groupings  to  meet  with  a   teacher/facilitator  for  a  variety  of  activities  that  are  meant  to  build  school  culture  and   community  as  well  as  to  serve  as  an  important  point  of  connection  for  our  young   adolescents  with  an  adult  outside  of  the  home.  Studio  Time  will  be  used  to:  

•   Meet  in  Council,  SEL  curriculum  

Discuss  study  skills  and  time  management  tools  

•  

•  

•  

•  

•  

•  

Trouble-­‐shoot  the  coordination  of  projects  

Address  academic  questions  or  concerns  

Establish  peer  mentoring  relationships  

Read  Literature  and  Journal  around  developmentally  appropriate  topics

Explore  ideas  for  projects,  tinker.

 

 

 

2.  Critique.  

We  will  use  critique  protocol  as  a  key  interdisciplinary  strategy  to  promote  a   culture  of  collaboration  in  authentic,  meaningful  work.  With  this  peer  critique  process,   where  students  identify  the  criteria  that  produce  excellent  work  and  are  encouraged  to   revise  many  times  to  get  something  right,  students  are  challenged  to  take  ownership   and  responsibility  for  their  learning  outcomes.  (Berger,  2003)  

 

3.  Council.  

Council  is  a  community  building  practice  that  exemplifies  and  strengthens   the  school  cultural  norm  of  respect  for  diversity  and  it  also  serves  as  a  bridge  between   academic  and  social-­‐emotional  learning.  In  Council,  students  will  have  the  opportunity   to  practice  expressing  themselves  clearly,  with  honesty  and  integrity  and  to  listen   without  judgement  to  the  thoughts  and  feelings  of  peers  and  adult  facilitators.  We  want  

Council  to  serve  as  a  model  for  how  we  listen  with  respect  to  one  another,  deal   peacefully  with  interpersonal  conflict  and  express  ourselves  honestly  and  responsibly  at  

The  Studio  School.    

 

Core  Content

 

Further,  each  core  content  area  will  focus  on  supporting  the  goals  of  the  social  emotional   learning  framework:  

 

Humanities.

 Humanities  will  be  an  interdisciplinary  core  subject  that  combines  the  Common  

Core  Language  Arts  Standards  with  the  California  Social  Studies  Standards.  Throughout  their   time  at  the  Studio  School,  in  their  Humanities  classes,  students  will  read,  write  and  respond  to  a   broad  variety  texts,  works  of  art,  and  primary  source  materials.  The  courses  will  emphasize   foundational  skills  including  grammar,  research  and  writing  both  academic  and  creative  work.  

Students  will  learn  to  analyze  historical  and  fictional  texts,  formulate  ideas,  use  evidence  to   support  their  ideas,  and  clearly  express  themselves  both  orally  and  in  writing.  The  curriculum   uses  a  project-­‐based  approach  to  integrate  visual  arts,  dramatic  arts,  music,  politics,  philosophy,   history,  literature,  and  current  events.    

 

Mathematics.  

Middle  school  math  topics  will  take  their  lead  from  the  Mathematics  Common  

Core  Standards.  Our  goal  is  for  students  to  see  the  world  mathematically  and  see  math  as  a  tool  

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  to  map  and  make  sense  of  the  world.  6th  grade  will  focus  on  ratios  and  rates,  explorations  of   fractions  and  negative  numbers,  using  expressions  and  equations,  and  developing  an   understanding  of  statistical  thinking.  7th  grade  will  explore  proportional  relationships  in  the   real  world  including  geometrical  scale  drawings  and  constructions,  further  work  with   expressions,  linear  relationships  in  the  real  world  and  creating  expressions  to  define  them,  and   exploration  of  population  samples  as  sources  of  information  and  understanding  about  the   world.  8th  grade  will  broaden  these  explorations  of  number  systems  to  include  irrational   numbers,  radicals,  and  exponents.  Whenever  possible,  mathematical  concepts  at  each  level  will  

  be  integrated  into  arts  education  and  projects.

 

Math  classes  will  take  full  advantage  of  technological  learning  from  gamified  blended  learning   models.  Online  learning  sites  such  as  Khan  Academy,  TenMarks,  and  BuzzMath  will  supplement   classroom  instruction  and  homework  practice  as  will  tablet  apps  and  computer  programs.  Math,   of  course,  will  be  connected  as  much  as  possible  to  science,  but  also,  where  possible  to  

Humanities  (Sumerian  Base  60,  e.g.).  Math-­‐based  informatics  and  infographics  are  a  vital  part   of  analysis  and  communication  in  the  21st  century  world,  and  students  will  also  explore   databases  and  design  cross-­‐disciplinary  representations  of  information  gleaned  from  those   databases.    

 

Science.

 A  new  Science  Common  Core  is  under  construction,  so  our  curriculum  is  based  on  the   existing  California  Content  Standards.  Science  should,  as  much  as  possible,  be  hands-­‐on,   inquiry-­‐based,  and  curiosity-­‐driven  and  the  exploration  of  scientific  concepts  will  be  studied   from  the  perspectives  of  other  program  disciplines  as  well.  Teachers  of  math  and  science  will   team  to  create  projects  where  students  need  to  use  and  understand  mathematics  in  relation  to   the  explanation  of  scientific  concepts.  Literacy  and  writing  will  weave  through  the  science   curriculum  in  complex  ways  from  reading  for  understanding  to  communicating  the  results  of   experiments  to  the  exploration  of  precision  that  is  such  a  fundamental  part  of  the  scientific   process.    

● 6th  graders  will  explore  earth  science  to  arrive  at  a  foundational  understanding  of  how   the  landscape  they  move  through  daily  came  into  being:  the  formation  of  the  universe,   the  geology  and  topography  of  the  earth,  how  energy  moves  and  shapes  these  systems.  

In  7th  grade  they  will  focus  on  the  processes  and  principles  of  how  the  landscape  they  

● explored  in  6th  grade  became  populated  with  life.  As  they  make  sense  of  adaptation   and  evolution,  they  will  explore  how  scientific  knowledge  is  constructed  through   classifications,  taxonomies,  hypotheses,  observation,  experimentation,  theorization,   challenge,  and  revision.    

8th  graders  will  focus  on  a  deep  understanding  of  matter,  force,  and  motion,  as  well  as   connect  algebra  concepts  to  scientific  concepts  to  map  real-­‐world  behaviors.  Students   will  complete  a  number  of  labs  in  which  they  study  and  document  mass/volume,   conservation  of  mass,  characteristic  property,  and  the  periodic  table.    

Arts.  

Through  partnership  with  Inner-­‐City  Arts,  our  students  and  teachers  will  receive  high   quality  arts  instruction  from  ICA  instructors,  focusing  on  a  specific  art  form:  visual  arts,  ceramics,   music,  dance,  drama,  digital  photography  or  animation,  twice  each  week  for  seven-­‐week  

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sessions.  In  addition,  school  staff  will  receive  professional  development  in  arts  education  by  

Inner-­‐City  Arts  Instructors  during  a  week  long  program  in  the  summer.  Continuous  teacher   participation  in  the  ICA  program  along  with  students  will  ensure  that  whenever  possible,  the   work  started  at  ICA  can  be  continued  back  at  the  school  site  throughout  the  remainder  of  each   week  during  the  student’s  afternoon  arts  block  or  studio  time.  Each  seven-­‐week  session  will   include  a  culminating  event  such  as  a  performance  or  exhibition  that  provides  an  opportunity  

  for  assessment  and  for  students  to  share  their  artistic  work  with  their  parents  and  families.    

For  sixth  and  seventh  grades,  the  students  will  receive  a  broad  arts  education,  providing   exposure  and  experimentation  with  all  art  forms.  Each  year,  sixth  and  seventh  grade  students   will  be  expected  to  culminate  the  year  with  a  performance  or  visual  arts  show  that  will  be  open   to  the  greater  school  community.  By  the  eighth  grade  year,  students  will  be  asked  to  commit  to   one  art  form  and  they  will  spend  their  last  year  of  middle  school  practicing  and  honing  their   chosen  art  form.  Every  Studio  School  graduate  will  start  high  school  with  extensive  knowledge   of  visual  and  performing  arts  standards  and  leave  middle  school  with  the  skills  and  discipline   necessary  to  take  their  chosen  art  form  to  the  level  of  professional  internship  during  high  

  school  should  they  so  choose.

 

As  all  Studio  School  teachers  will  be  active  participants  in  Inner-­‐City  Arts  classes,  there  is   particular  opportunity  to  integrate  core  subject  matter  with  arts  instruction.  For  example,  a   current  exhibit  at  ICA  involves  the  creation  of  marble  runs  made  from  poster  board  along  the   walls.  Studio  School  teachers  would  have  the  opportunity  to  discuss  the  mathematical  concepts   of  measurement  and  slope  involved  in  the  project  and  extend  that  conversation  back  in  the   classroom.  Students  would  then  have  a  real  world  point  of  reference  for  mathematical  concepts  

  that  could  be  incorporated  into  problem  sets  in  their  math  classes  at  school.    

Physical  Education

.  Studio  School  will  meet  state-­‐mandated  P.E.  requirements  of  200   min/2weeks  for  6th  graders  and  400  min./2  weeks  for  7th-­‐8th  graders  through  a  variety  of  

  elective  classes  and  sports.    

 

Meeting  the  Needs  of  Diverse  Learners

 

Essential  to  the  core  values  of  The  Studio  School,  is  the  ongoing  support  for  an  inclusive   learning  community  where  all  students,  parents,  and  the  school’s  staff  appreciate  and  value   diversity.  The  teachers  of  this  design  team  are  most  concerned  with  meeting  the  needs  of  all   students  and  believe  that  the  pilot  model  of  a  small  school  afforded  specific  autonomies   provides  a  unique  opportunity  to  meet  the  needs  of  diverse  learners.  In  addition  to  the   curricular  choices  outlined  above,  we  intend  to  address  the  academic  and  social  emotional  

  learning  needs  of  our  diverse  student  body  in  the  following  ways.

 

Literacy

.  We  recognize  that  our  middle  school  students  will  come  to  our  classrooms  with   varying  levels  of  proficiency  in  English  Language  reading,  comprehension  and  writing  skills.  For   this  reason,  and  especially  to  be  able  to  reach  struggling  readers  and  writers,  our  Humanities   teachers  will  employ  a  variety  of  practices  in  their  literacy  instruction.  Every  component  of  the  

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literacy  instructional  program  will  include  thoughtful  and  measured  scaffolding  designed  to   work  with  students  at  their  conceptual  level  in  order  to  move  them  forward.  (Vygotsky,  1978,  

Wertsch,  1998).  Students  at  every  grade  level  will  read  and  write  in  a  variety  of  genres  and  the   school  will  work  to  provide  texts  for  readers  at  different  levels.  Students  will  discuss  literature   in  Literature  Circle  and/or  Book  Club  formats  to  promote  discussion  as  well  as  peer  mentoring   in  the  comprehension  and  analysis  of  class  literature.  The  use  of  Literature  Circles  allows  high   achieving  students  to  analyze  texts  and  report  on  their  findings  both  orally  and  in  writing  at  the   perhaps  deeper  level  of  their  understanding  while  serving  as  models  for  students  who  struggle   with  comprehension  or  expression.  The  Studio  School  will  use  Writer’s  Workshop  Curriculum   due  to  this  program’s  success  with  student  motivation  and  its  inherent  ability  to  meet  students   where  they  are  in  their  development  as  writers  as  well  as  the  flexibility  of  the  program  to   differentiate  writing  instruction  in  meaningful  ways.  Teachers  will  honor  the  many  ways  to  be   literate  that  extend  beyond  print-­‐based  literacy  and  will  include  digital,  visual,  audio  and   performed  texts  whenever  possible.    

 

Numeracy.  

The  mathematics  teachers  will  explore  a  variety  of  alternative  mathematics   curriculum  for  use  as  supplementary  or  core  programs.  The  math  teachers  will  identify   curriculum  that  meets  the  objectives  and  mission  of  the  school,  which  is  to  engage  students  in   challenging  and  relevant  mathematical  tasks.  Although  ideal  projects  and  tasks  will  connect  to   students’  lives,  other  academic  work,  and  community,  a  relevant  curriculum  may  also  align  with   students’  intuitive  problem-­‐solving  skills,  celebrating  their  diverse  solution  paths  rather  than   dictating  a  single,  formulaic  response.  One  such  program  that  fulfills  this  objective  is  the  College  

Preparatory  Mathematics  program  (CPM),  which  offers  a  Common  Core-­‐aligned  sequence  from   middle  school  through  high  school.  The  curriculum  was  designed  and  vetted  by  experienced   math  teachers  working  in  California  schools,  and  the  program  emphasizes  real-­‐world  problem   solving  and  writing.  The  curriculum  can  be  altered  and  amended  to  bring  in  tasks  that  connect   to  students’  other  academic  work  and  community,  as  well,  allowing  for  deep,  rich  conversations   about  students’  solution  paths  and  construction  of  knowledge.  Students  with  diverse  learning   experiences  are  effectively  supporting  in  this  math  program,  by  encouraging  collaborative   learning  through  inquiry-­‐driven  tasks  and  challenging,  open-­‐ended  problems.

 

 

Intervention.  

The  Studio  School  is  committed  to  developing  an  in-­‐school  and  after  school   intervention  program  to  support  all  students  in  meeting  program  goals  and  grade-­‐level   achievements.  Our  technology  model  will  enable  us  to  provide  adaptive  learning  interventions  

  both  within  school  and  at  home  to  extend  the  learning  day.  We  will  use  best  practices  to  do  so.

 

Special  Education

 

The  Studio  School  will  provide  special  education  services  in  accordance  with  the  federal  

Americans  with  Disabilities  Act  (42.  U.S.C.  §  12101  et  seq.),  and  all  applicable  California  State   laws  and  regulations  regarding  special  education,  and  reasonable  accommodation  will  be   provided  for  students  with  physical  disabilities  on  the  basis  of  the  school’s  responsibilities.

 

The  Studio  School  will  focus  on  improving  social  awareness  in  the  community  at  large  as  well  as   preventing  future  learning  and  social  problems  for  children  with  or  without  disabilities.  All  

Federal,  State,  and  local  legal  mandates  will  be  upheld.  For  students  with  disabilities,  inclusion  

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  is  based  on  needs  determined  by  the  IEP.  No  child  will  be  denied  services  based  in  his/her   disability.    

Children  whose  educational  needs  emerge  after  enrolling  in  The  Studio  School  will  be  the  focus   of  a  meeting  between  the  teachers  and  the  parent/guardian  to  discuss  the  specifics  of  the   concern  and  options  for  intervention,  including  bringing  in  a  consultant  (from  school  staff  or   community).  The  team  may  determine  that  no  further  action  be  taken  or  may  refer  the  

  concerns  to  the  Student  Success  Team  (SST).  

 

The  SST’s  task  is  to  understand  the  education  and/or  behavior  issue,  and  work  with  the   teachers  family  members,  and  child  to  create  an  intervention  plan  that  addresses  the  problem.  

Over  the  course  of  a  specified  time,  the  plan  will  be  monitored  and  evaluated.  On  the  basis  of   the  evaluation  the  SST,  teachers  and  parents  will  determine  if  further  action  needs  to  be  taken.  

At  this  point  one  of  three  actions  may  take  place;  1)the  plan  was  effective  and  all  parties  agree   that  no  further  actions  is  necessary,  2)the  intervention  plan  needs  revision  and  the  SST,   teachers,  parents  and  child  engage  in  that  new  plan,  or  3)  the  plan(s)  were  ineffective,  it  is   determined  that  the  child  would  benefit  from  additional  educational  services,  and  the  child  is   then  referred  to  determine  eligibility  for  special  education  services.

 

 

Parents,  Guardians  and  Family  Members  will  be  involved  in  the  entire  process:  referral,   placement,  program  planning/implementation,  and  program  evaluation.  Parents  will  be   considered  integral  partners  in  the  overall  operation  of  the  school  as  well  as  in  the  planning  and   implementing  of  their  child’s  educational  program.  The  Studio  School  will  comply  with  all  

Federal,  State,  and  local  special  education  mandates.  Parents  must  give  consent  for  an  initial   evaluation  and  initial  placement,  be  notified  of  any  change  in  placement  or  services  that  may   occur,  and  be  invited,  along  with  teachers,  to  conferences  and  meeting  to  develop  IEPs.  Parents   will  have  the  right  to  initiate  a  due  process  hearing  to  challenge  a  decision  regarding  the   identification,  evaluation  or  educational  placement  of  their  child.    

 

Inclusion  Model.

 The  Studio  School  will  be  premised  on  a  full  inclusion  model  for  the  education   of  all  children.  Children  with  disabilities  will  be  educated  using  best  practices  in  classrooms  with   their  peers  who  do  not  have  disabilities.  IEP  support  services  will  come  to  the  children  and  be   provided  in  the  natural  flow  of  the  classroom  regimen.  The  implementation  of  the  IEP’s  will  be   the  responsibility  of  both  the  general  and  special  education  teachers,  para-­‐educators,  and  DIS  

  personnel.  Each  individual  will  be  fully  certified  and  qualified  to  deliver  the  very  best  instruction.

 

English  Learners

 

The  Studio  School  is  profoundly  committed  to  educating  English  Learners  (EL)  so  that  they   achieve  proficiency  in  English  and  attain  academic  success.  All  El  students  will  have  access  to  all   programs,  curriculum  and  levels  of  instruction,  including  all  enrichment  and  extracurricular   activities;  they  will  be  fully  integrated  in  the  mainstream  of  the  school  community  as  they   receive  targeted  English  Language  Development  (ELD)  support  and  services.  The  Studio  School’s   inquiry  based  curriculum  and  use  of  authentic  project  based  learning  opportunities  will  provide  

English  Learners  with  a  dynamic  opportunity  to  hear  and  use  both  social  and  academic  english  

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in  highly  engaging,  natural  ways.  The  arts  focus  is  another  critical  avenue  proven  to  help  EL   learners.  A  UCLA  study  provides  evidence  that  participation  in  the  Inner-­‐City  Arts  programs  

“significantly  contributed  to  students’  listening  comprehension  and  the  ability  for  students  to   use  advanced  language  constructs  when  speaking”  (Arts  in  the  Middle,  2007  ).    

The  Studio  School  will  ensure  that  EL  students  will  be  held  to  the  same  high  expectations  of   learning  as  all  students  and  be  taught  challenging  academic  content  via  instruction  that  builds   on  their  previous  education  and  that  reflects  their  language  proficiency.  Parents  and  guardians   whose  English  proficiency  is  limited  will  receive  notices  and  information  from  the  school  in  the   language  they  best  understand  in  order  to  welcome  them  into  the  Studio  School  community   and  enable  them  to  support  their  child’s  learning.

 

 

Recruitment.

 The  Studio  School  will  ensure  that  families  of  EL  students  have  access  and   opportunity  to  apply  for  enrollment.  The  school  will  liaison  with  key  staff  including  English  

Language  Coordinators  in  proximate  elementary  schools  as  well  as  community  organizations   and  resource  centers  in  the  communities  that  we  will  serve.  This  will  be  facilitated  by  the  fact   that  The  Studio  School’s  lead  teachers  have  strong  ties  to  ELL  schools.  Student  service  learning   projects  at  feeder  schools  will  also  create  relationships  between  The  Studio  School  and   economically  disadvantaged,  high  EL  elementaries.

 

 

Delivery  of  Services.

 The  Studio  School  will  ensure  that  English  Learners  succeed  by  providing   and  using  SDAIE  strategies  in  content  area  classes  in  addition  to  English  as  a  Second  Language   instruction  when  appropriate.  These  services  will  ensure  that  ELs  reach  proficiency  in  the  

English  language  as  quickly  as  possible  while  developing  the  content  knowledge  and  academic   language  required  for  success  across  the  curriculum.  While  meeting  the  statutory  requirement   for  educating  ELs,  The  Studio  School  will  provide  ELs  with  equal  access  to  the  full  and  rich   educational  program  provided  to  native  English  speakers.

 

 

Students  will  receive  their  content  area  classes  from  teachers  utilizing  a  SDAIE,  approach  in   which  language  and  content  are  taught  together.  For  those  students  at  earlier  stages  of  English   language  acquisition,  ESL  instruction  will  be  provided  in  a  separate  class.  Staff  and  outside   expertise  will  be  tapped  to  create  a  culture  of  PD  responsive  to  EL  needs.  We  will  pay  particular   attention  to  the  identification  and  remediation  of  long-­‐term  English  learners.    

 

Monitoring  and  Evaluation.  

The  English  language  proficiency  of  identified  EL  students  will  be   measured  annually  using  the  CELDT.  The  Studio  School  will  also  evaluate  each  student’s   performance  in  academic  content  areas  to  measure  the  student’s  progress  in  core  subjects.  If   an  EL  student  fails  to  show  appropriate  progress  in  these  academic  areas,  appropriate   modifications  to  the  instructional  program  will  be  made.  The  Studio  School  will  follow  state  and   district  guidelines  for  reclassification  of  EL  students.  The  Studio  School  will  also  disaggregate  its   student  achievement  data  to  track  disparities  in  performance  between  the  EL  and  native  

 

English  speaking  student  populations.

 

 

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Gifted  Students

 

The  Studio  School  believes  that  the  needs  of  gifted  students  are  often  mentioned  but  rarely   met.  One  of  the  most  important  of  these  needs  is  social  and  emotional  learning,  which  is  often   neglected  in  students  whose  academic  achievement  may  extend  well  beyond  their  age  and   maturity.  The  Studio  School  recognizes  that  a  portion  of  GATE  students  are  twice  exceptional;   that  their  intellectual  acuity  may  well  be  accompanied  by  an  emotional  or  learning  disability.  

The  Studio  School’s  focus  on  social  emotional  learning  will  help  build  the  foundation  for  GATE   students  upon  which  a  variety  of  academic  engagement  methods  and  strategies  may  be   deployed.  Acceleration  is  one  option  for  allowing  gifted  students  to  create  an  educational   pathway  and  The  Studio  School’s  blended  learning  model  enables  this.  The  arts  program  at  the  

Studio  School  offers  all  students  of  varying  academic  abilities,  but  especially  our  gifted  students   an  opportunity  for  unlimited  challenge.  Equally,  we  believe  that  depth  and  complexity  are   important  for  developing  gifted  student’s  abilities,  and  the  Studio  School’s  PBL  model  allows  for   this  type  of  content  and  process  engagement  through  differentiation  within  the  framework  of   whole  class  projects  as  well  as  independent  studies.  Badge-­‐based  learning  also  allows  for  all   students,  and  especially  GATE  students,  to  develop  and  satisfy  their  interests  in  specialization  as  

 

  well  as  breadth.  Our  portfolio  and  badge  models  also  enable  varied  pathways  to  demonstrate   mastery,  as  do  service  and  linked  learning.    

 

Formative  and  Summative  Measures  Used  to  Determine  Student  Progress  and  Success

 

1.  Dashboards:

 The  Studio  School  is  committed  to  pioneering  new  approaches  to   improving  student  outcomes.  One  such  approach  that  shows  much  promise  is  using   blended  learning  models  with  effective  data  dashboards  both  for  students  and  for   teachers/administration.  Dashboards  such  as  those  accompanying  Khan  Academy,  

TenMarks,  and  NoRedInk  promote  students’  self-­‐awareness  of  their  progress  in   mastering  fundamental  learning.  Pairing  them  with  reward  systems  generates   motivation.  They  also  offer  teachers  and  administrators  real-­‐time  data  to  assess,  refine,   and  target  differentiated  instruction,  as  well  as  reflect  on  and  reconfigure  practice.  We  

  are  presently  researching  meta-­‐dashboard  and  learning  management  systems.

 

2.  Rubrics:

 Project-­‐based  learning  as  well  as  any  form  of  writing  require  rubrics  for   students  to  self-­‐assess  and  compare  and  contrast  their  self-­‐assessments  with  peer-­‐ evaluations,  teacher-­‐evaluations,  and  parent-­‐evaluations.  Rubrics  promote  a  culture  of   engagement  with  growth.  When  students  learn  to  discuss  work  with  each  other,  with   teachers,  with  families,  learning  no  longer  is  a  private  or  punitive  interaction  between   one  child  and  one  adult  but  rather  community  investment  in  a  growth  process  with  

  marked  guideposts  showing  the  path  forward.    

3.  Portfolios:

 Projects  with  rubrics  combined  together  create  portfolios,  both  physical   and  digital.  Portfolios  may  contain  exemplary  pieces  of  work,  or  paired  pieces  of  work   that  show  growth  along  a  standard  or  learning  objective.  Over  the  course  of  a  year,  

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students  will  create  portfolios  that  will  ‘bingo’  all  squares  of  The  Studio  School’s  

Learning  Matrix.  Over  the  course  of  multiple  years,  students  will  be  able  to  see  their  

  growth  within  that  same  matrix.    

4.  Badge  Portfolios:

 The  Studio  School  believes  badges  will  become  an  increasingly   important  assessment  component  of  21st  Century  learning.  Badges  are  on-­‐line,  portable   records  of  achievement  (not  unlike  scouting  badges),  and  they  serve  to  promote  self-­‐ starting  as  well  as  pride  in  accomplishment.  Badges  include  evidence  of  accomplishment   or  achievement,  the  means  of  assessment,  skills  demonstration,  and  issuer  information.  

Presently,  institutions,  agencies,  and  sites  as  varied  as  the  New  York  Department  of  

Education,  the  School  District  of  Philadelphia,  the  Khan  Academy,  NASA,  the  American  

Museum  of  Natural  History,  the  Smithsonian,  and  4H  issue  badges  for  defined  on-­‐line   and  real-­‐world  learning  pathways.  Badges  can  serve  as  an  important  monitoring  tool  for   students’  development  of  challenging  concepts,  but  are  not  a  replacement  for  authentic,  

  rigorous  summative  tasks.

 

5.  Standardized  Tests:

 The  Studio  School  recognizes  that  standardized  testing  in   moderation  provides  valuable  data  to  students,  parents,  teachers,  schools,  and  larger   educational  authorities.  Standardized  testing  is  part  of  the  college  admissions  process  as   well  as  life,  so  our  goals  are  to  assist  students  and  families  in  thinking  of  testing  as  one   measure  of  achievement  amongst  multiple  other  measures,  as  well  as  to  learn  to  master   the  strategies  needed  to  take  the  tests.  Studio  School  will  help  students  see   standardized  tests  as  a  way  to  link  themselves  into  larger  networks:  districts,  states,  the   country-­‐-­‐as  well  as  to  see  their  own  progress  over  time.    

 

6.  Ongoing  Evaluation:

 Ongoing  evaluation,  both  formal  and  informal,  takes  place  in  all   effective  classrooms.  Self-­‐starting  teachers  are  constantly  noting  student  progress  and   deficits,  and  modifying  instruction  to  meet  those  needs.  Teachers  will  also  team  to   create  in-­‐house,  grade-­‐level  assessments  and  discuss  student  needs  for  remediation  and   enrichment.    

 

7.  LAUSD  Quarterly  Assessments

:  During  the  first  few  years,  the  school  will  make  use  of  

  the  District  Periodic  Assessments  to  monitor  students’  progress  toward  proficiency.

 

8.  Performances  and  Exhibitions:  

In  some  courses,  The  Studio  School  will  use   performance  assessment  to  systematically  observe  and  rate  an  actual  student   performance.  Performances  and  exhibitions  of  the  work  students  do  at  Inner-­‐City  Arts   will  be  evaluated  according  to  established  performance  criteria  and  rubrics  that  are   aligned  with  state  standards.  Students  will  be  asked  to  perform  a  complex  task  or  to   create  a  product.  These  activities  will  often  include  real-­‐life  tasks  that  call  for  higher-­‐ order  thinking  skills.  Both  individuals  and  groups  will  be  assessed  on  both  the  process   and  the  end  product.  In  addition,  students  will  create  their  own  tools  to  gain  valuable   experience  in  setting  their  own  goals  and  standards  of  excellence.  In  some  instances,   presentations  will  be  judged  by  a  trained  panel  of  adults  and  peers.    

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9.  Teacher-­‐Student  Conferences  and  Student-­‐Led  Conference:  

One-­‐on-­‐one  interaction   between  students  and  teachers  will  be  an  invaluable  opportunity  to  assess  student   progress  and  inform  individual,  classroom,  and  grade-­‐level  instruction.  During  these   conferences,  teachers  will  assess  a  student’s  strengths  and  needs,  resulting  in   individualized  support.  Teachers  will  record  information  from  these  conferences  to  have   an  ongoing  record  of  student  progress.  Conferences  will  rotate  between  teacher-­‐led  and  

  student-­‐led  conferences.

 

 

2.  Schedule  and  Calendar  

The  Studio  School  will  operate  on  the  LAUSD  early-­‐start  calendar,  with  up  to  two  weeks  of   summer  professional  development  for  teachers  each  year.  Students  will  take  5  academic  

  classes  on  campus,  and  will  receive  elective  credit  for  arts  classes  conducted  at  Inner-­‐City  Arts.

 

The  bell  schedule  (see  Attachment  D  for  an  example)  is  organized  around  students  attending   twice/weekly  arts  classes  at  Inner-­‐City  arts.  Students  will  be  divided  into  four  cohorts,  each  of   which  will  attend  classes  on  either  mornings  or  afternoons  on  either  Mondays/Wednesdays  or  

Tuesday/Thursdays.  Thus,  a  single  bus  can  accommodate  ~100  students/day  to  and  from  Inner-­‐

 

City  Arts.  The  bell  schedule  presented  here  is  a  draft,  since  the  exact  class  times  will  be   coordinated  with  Inner-­‐City  Art’s  schedule  and  LAUSD  transportation  services.  As  additional   arts  partnerships  develop,  arts  course  may  also  be  offered  on  site  at  the  school,  diminishing  the   need  for  travel.

 

 

Students  will  take  5  classes  on  campus  (ELA,  math,  science,  social  studies,  and  PE),  and  will   participate  in  a  once  weekly  “Studio  Time”  on  Friday  mornings.  Studio  Time  will  be  an   opportunity  for  the  school  organize  and  implement  Council,  host  “gallery”  tours  of  student  art   work,  focus  students  on  short  projects,  or  simply  extend  learning  time  on  important  tasks.

 

The  school  day  will  end  early  on  Friday  afternoons,  allowing  teachers  time  for  professional   collaboration.  To  avoid  shortened  classes  on  Fridays,  the  school  might  alternate  even/odd   classes  meeting  on  Fridays,  using  the  time  for  in-­‐class  assessments  and  interventions.  Two   hours/week  will  be  allocated  for  instructional  collaboration  and  operations,  allowing  teachers  

 

  uninterrupted  time  for  focusing  on  their  craft  and/or  resolving  school  operational  challenges.

 

 

3.  Staffing  

Leadership  Team.

 The  leadership  team  of  the  Studio  School  consists  of  the  principal,  counselor,  

Title  1/EL  coordinator  (if  funding  allows  for  this  position),  and  lead-­‐teacher.  The  team  will  meet   weekly,  either  before  or  after  school,  to  monitor  the  school’s  implementation  of  the  plan,   organize  professional  development  activities,  resolve  urgent  issues,  and  support  the  principal  in  

  sustaining  the  vision  of  the  school.

 

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EWA.

 By  February  15th  of  each  year,  the  teachers  will  revisit  the  EWA  and  determine  if  the  

EWA  needs  to  be  updated.  There  will  be  annual  reviews  of  the  EWA,  leading  to  any  necessary  

  revisions  of  the  EWA.

 

 

 

Decision-­‐making  processes.  

Inclusive  decision-­‐making  processes  are  vital  for  distributing   leadership  within  the  school  and  empowering  teachers  to  voice  their  concerns  and  suggestions.  

In  general,  decisions  must  support  and  reinforce  the  vision  of  the  school.

 

● Staff  meeting  structure.

 Each  week,  the  entire  faculty  will  meet  for  a  staff  meeting,   using  the  30-­‐minute  meeting  structure  developed  by  LAEP.  The  30-­‐minute  meeting   structure  is  a  protocol  for  efficient,  limited-­‐dialogue  staff  meetings.  The  format  allows   for  10  minutes  of  “updates”  from  any  staff  member-­‐-­‐updates  regarding  field  trips,   programs,  partnerships,  etc.  Any  staff  member  may  share  an  update.  Second,  10   minutes  are  reserved  for  “questions  and  needs.”  Again,  any  staff  member  may  ask  a   question  or  share  a  need,  and  those  that  can’t  be  resolved  immediately  are  charted  for   follow-­‐up.  Finally,  the  staff  spends  the  last  10  minutes  assigning  responsibility  to  the   posted  questions  and  needs  and  identifies  meeting  times  for  these  follow-­‐up   conversations.  Typically,  many  school-­‐wide  needs  can  be  addressed  by  a  smaller  group   and  brought  back  the  following  week  for  review,  so  that  all  staff  members  can  have   input  on  a  decisions  without  needing  to  be  present  for  every  conversation.  Further,  

regular  use  of  the  structure  supports  developing  distributed  leadership  among  all  staff   members.

 

Consensus  decision-­‐making.

 When  the  school  faces  decisions  that  require  collective   staff  input  (such  as  any  decision  that  represents  a  departure  from  the  plan  and  goals  of   the  school),  the  staff  will  use  the  “Straw  Poll”  strategy  from  Adaptive  Schools.  Straw  poll   uses  a  sufficient  consensus  process,  allowing  all  members  to  share  a  level  of  agreement,   ranging  from  1  (“I  strongly  agree  with  the  idea”)  to  a  6  (“I  strongly  disagree”).  The  power   of  the  protocol  lays  in  its  ability  to  focus  on  moving  people  who  disagree  to  a  3  (“I  have   a  few  reservations,  but  generally  am  in  agreement”)  or  a  4  (“I’m  not  in  favor,  but  will  go   along  with  the  rest  of  the  team”).  The  process  of  identifying  the  concerns  of  those  who   give  a  5  or  6  allows  the  entire  staff  to  brainstorm  solutions  to  reconcile  the  concerns   raised  by  a  few.  Finalizing  agreement  with  everyone’s  support  also  prevents  future   challenges,  since  all  staff  members  had  ample  opportunity  to  voice  concerns  prior  to   implementation  of  a  challenging  idea.

 

 

4.  Professional  Development  

We  believe  that  professional  development  must  be  an  ongoing,  iterative  process  of  examining   problems  and  creating  solutions.    

 

Weekly  Collaboration  Time.

 Teachers’  weekly  collaboration  time  will  be  devoted  to  supporting   teachers  in  designing,  implementing,  and  assessing  authentic  tasks  in  their  classes.  Friday   afternoon  professional  collaboration  time  will  begin  with  a  short  round  of  sharing  successes   and  challenges  from  the  week.  De-­‐privatizing  teachers’  instructional  practice  requires  

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  incremental  steps  of  building  trust  and  creating  shared  solutions  to  common  problems.  

Challenges  raised  by  teachers  will  be  addressed  in  a  myriad  of  ways,  such  as  by  partnering  them   with  a  colleague  or  providing  a  focused  agenda  at  a  subsequent  meeting  to  address  the   challenges.

 

Teachers  will  then  spend  their  time  using  either  Tuning  Protocol  or  Consultancy  Protocol  to   analyze  student  work  samples  and  lesson  plans,  respectively.  These  protocols  allow  teachers  to   share  their  practice  in  a  structured,  safe  environment.  Used  in  an  ongoing  fashion,  these   protocols  help  create  a  community  of  practice  organized  around  instruction.  (Please  see  

 

Attachment  E  for  example  agendas.)  

 

Operations  Meeting.

 Friday  afternoons  will  close  with  a  30-­‐minute  meeting,  which  is  a  protocol   for  succinct  faculty  meetings.  All  teachers  have  an  opportunity  to  share  updates,  ask  questions  

  and  raise  needs,  and  participate  in  developing  solutions.

 

5.  School  Culture  

 

Importance  of  Community.  

In  the  urban  sprawl  of  Los  Angeles,  many  of  us  yearn  for  an   experience  of  community,  of  connection  to  one  another  and  commitment  to  something  beyond   ourselves.  While  academic  achievement  and  excellence  remain  the  primary  aim  of  The  Studio  

School,  we  believe  the  school  can  also  become,  what  good  schools  all  over  the  city  already  are,   centers  that  fulfill  some  of  our  collective  need  for  community  and  connection.  At  the  heart  of   this  aspiration  is  the  idea  that  schools  are  institutions  that  serve  their  communities,  and  service   is  as  much  an  attitude,  a  way  of  being,  as  it  is  a  collection  of  generous  acts.  We  hope  The  Studio  

School  will  provide  the  students,  parents  and  community  with  a  sense  of  belonging,  a  sense  of  

  meaning  and  purpose  that  will  empower  and  guide  them  to  participate  in  the  solutions  of  our  

21st  century  challenges.    

We  realize  that  we  cannot  just  hope  this  idea  into  fulfillment,  that  deliberate  choices  must  be   made  that  will  serve  to  create  a  school  culture  that  embodies  the  norms  and  attitudes  that  this   vision  is  founded  upon.  The  Studio  School  will  intentionally  create  a  school  culture  that  instills   the  values  of  academic  and  artistic  excellence,  respect  for  diversity,  personal  responsibility,  and  

  the  value  of  civic  participation  in  the  following  ways:

 

Arts.  

As  described  previously,  the  school  will  be  organized  around  making  full  use  of  arts   programming  offered  through  Inner-­‐City  Arts  and  other  potential  partners.    

 

Supportive  Adult  Relationships.

 One  of  the  most  crucial  benefits  of  a  small  school  environment   is  the  possibility  for  teachers  to  get  to  know  their  students  well,  to  personalize  their  instruction   according  to  individual  traits  and  needs.  The  research  of  Linda  Darling-­‐Hammond  affirms  that   deep,  meaningful  relationships  between  students,  teachers,  and  parents  or  caregivers  have  a   positive  impact  on  all  students,  but  particularly  those  at  risk  of  dropping  out  (Darling-­‐Hammond   et  al.,  2006).  At  The  Studio  School,  teachers  and  students  will  have  much  more  access  to  one  

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another  than  a  traditional  large  school  environment  provides.  The  interdisciplinary  team   teaching  structures  at  The  Studio  School  will  allow  teacher  partners  to  build  deep  relationships   with  smaller  groups  of  students.  In  addition,  each  student  will  be  assigned  an  advisor,  their  

Studio  Time  teacher,  who  will  closely  monitor  the  academic  progress  and  social  emotional   needs  of  their  students.  Advisors  will  meet  with  students  and  parents  individually  at  the  start  of   each  semester  to  map  out  the  academic  goals  and  create  personalized  education  plans.  

Advisors  will  also  meet  with  students  individually  each  week  and  provide  guidance  and  support   to  assist  each  student  in  achieving  academic  goals.  Advisors  will  be  responsible  to  maintain  

  communication  with  parents  and  respond  to  questions  or  concerns.

 

Social  Emotional  Learning.

 While  the  Studio  School’s  Social  Emotional  Learning  component   strives  to  nurture  our  student’s  non-­‐cognitive  skills,  it  also  sets  the  tone  and  the  expectations   for  behavior  of  the  entire  school  community.  Through  the  practice  of  Council  for  instance,  it  is   made  clear  that  the  school  culture  is  one  that  promotes  respect  for  diversity  and  fosters   authentic  expression  and  empathic  non-­‐judgemental  listening  in  all  areas  of  school  life.  The  SEL   component  of  the  school  curriculum  not  only  teaches  the  respect  for  diverse  viewpoints  which   is  critical  to  relationship  and  conflict  resolution  skills,  but  the  importance  of  taking  personal   responsibility  for  one’s  choices.    

 

Service  Learning.  

Over  the  course  of  the  first  two  years,  staff  and  parents  will  work  together  to   create  a  meaningful  service  component  to  the  school  program.  Ideally,  students  will  come  up   with  at  least  one  project  each  year  that  will  directly  benefit  the  surrounding  community  and   parents,  teachers  and  staff  will  facilitate  the  realization  of  these  projects.  Examples  include   regular  outings  to  clean  up  trash  in  the  neighborhood  and  the  creation  of  signs  or  pamphlets   that  encourage  responsible  recycling  and  reduction  of  landfill  trash.  The  students  might  come   up  with  ways  to  provide  a  community  health  fair,  inviting  community  partners  like  the  

American  Red  Cross  and  other  neighborhood  health  related  institutions  to  participate.  A   project-­‐based  assignment  might  be  to  create  an  artistic  presentation  to  promote  healthy   nutrition  and  self  care  that  students  can  present  to  the  wider  community  at  the  health  fair.  

Service  Learning  provides  a  powerful  avenue  for  demonstrating  the  values  of  the  school’s  

  culture  and  climate.

 

Inclusion  and  Support  for  Parents

.  The  Studio  School  will  welcome  and  respect  parents  as   partners  in  the  success  of  their  child’s  school  experience.  The  school  will  maintain  an  open  door   policy  and  attitude  towards  parents  and  will  provide  opportunities  for  parent  visits,   volunteerism,  participation  in  end-­‐of-­‐unit  projects,  parent  conferences  and  will  actively  seek  to   utilize  the  expertise  of  parents  in  various  contexts.  Parents  will  also  be  invited  to  several  parent   education  nights  hosted  on  campus  to  provide  support  for  their  important  role  in  the  lives  of  

  their  young  adolescent  children.    

Open  School  Culture.  

We  will  regularly  host  visitors  to  our  school,  such  as  parents,  community   organizations,  and  volunteers.  Our  school  is  structured  to  invite  and  regularly  engage   community  members  and  parents  to  work  closely  with  parents  and  students  on  operations,  

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  curriculum,  and  end-­‐of-­‐unit  projects.  Visitors  to  our  school  will  observe  an  open,  transparent   school  culture  with  a  value  for  academic  achievement.

 

Culture  of  Excellence.  

The  key  to  motivating  a  culture  of  excellence  is  to  provide  opportunities   for  authentic,  meaningful  work  that  is  connected  to  the  world  beyond  the  classroom.  The  use   of  critique  protocol  for  project  based  and  artistic  work,  demonstrates  that  striving  for   excellence  is  a  shared  value  at  the  Studio  School.  Presentations  of  student  work  to  families  and  

  community  members  sets  the  school  expectation  for  work  that  is  worthy  of  audience  attention.

 

Collaborative  Adult  Culture.

 Research  shows  that  collaboration  that  revolves  around   instruction  has  a  significant  impact  on  student  achievement  (Newmann  &  Wehlage,  1995,  

Corcoran  &  Silander,  2009).  Interdisciplinary  teaching  gives  grade-­‐level  teams  an  opportunity  to   develop  thematic,  backwards-­‐planned  curriculum.  Teachers  collaborate  in  both  grade-­‐level  and   vertical/subject-­‐specific  teams  to  ensure  that  curriculum  and  instruction  is  sequenced  for  the  

  developmental  needs  of  all  learners

 

 

Our  end  goal  is  an  adult  culture  that  is:  Empowering,  Engaging,  and  Equitable.

 

 

6.  School  Governance  

Pilot  Schools  have  the  freedom  to  create  their  own  governance  structure  that  has  increased   decision  making  powers  of  budget  approval,  principal  selection  and  evaluation,  and  program   and  policies,  while  being  mindful  of  legal  requirements  and  applicable  collective  bargaining   agreements.  (Review  the  Governance  section  in  the  Pilot  School  Manual  to  gain  a  better   understanding  of  the  roles  and  responsibilities  of  the  Governing  School  Council).

 

   

In  addition  to  GC,  an  Advisory  Council  comprised  of  parents,  community  partners,  and  artists  to   review  curriculum,  projects.  Can  meet  during  school  day,  kids  present,  etc.

 

 

   

7.  Budget  

Our  small  schools  model  with  regular  off-­‐site  classes  (for  example,  one  bus/day  for   transportation  to  and  from  Inner-­‐City  Arts)  will  require  strategic  budgeting  and  external   support.  Summer  Professional  Development  costs  will  need  to  covered  as  well.  Future  Is  Now  

Schools  (FIN)  is  committed  to  raising  $500,000  to  supplement  the  budget.  In  addition,  FIN  is   committed  to  providing  an  iPad  or  tablet  for  each  student  and  will  work  with  the  

Superintendent's  office  to  include  our  school  in  a  technology  pilot  program  for  future  district  

  buy-­‐in.    

 

8.  Family  and  Community  Engagement  

Parents  will  play  a  vital  role  both  in  their  child’s  education  at  the  Studio  School  and  in  the   growth  and  development  of  the  school  itself.  While  we  understand  that  it  is  common,  natural   and  developmentally  appropriate  for  parents  to  participate  at  their  child’s  middle  school  less  

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than  they  might  have  during  elementary  school,  Studio  School  parents  will  be  highly  regarded   partners  in  the  educational  process  and  will  need  to  participate  in  a  variety  of  ways.  During  the   registration  process,  parents  will  be  informed  of  their  expected  participation  at  school  in  the   following  ways:  

 

Parent  Conferences.  

The  opportunity  to  meet  with  teachers,  go  over  individual   progress  and  set  goals  at  parent  conferences  will  be  held  twice  each  year.  Parents  and   students  will  come  to  school  for  two  student  led  conferences  in  which  the  student  will   be  expected  to  share  their  academic  and  artistic  work  as  well  as  have  a  discussion  with  

  teachers  about  progress.  At  the  student  led  conference,  the  student  will  also  set  goals   for  the  quarter  and  assess  their  progress  on  previously  set  goals  as  well.    

Volunteerism.  

We  welcome  parent  volunteers  to  help  with  a  variety  of  activities  at  the  

Studio  School.  We  will  need  parents  to  help  with  preparation  of  project  supplies  and   materials  and  to  help  with  special  projects,  presentations,  and  after-­‐school  activities.  

Parents  will  be  needed  to  share  their  expertise  with  students  as  it  pertains  to   curricular  areas,  especially  in  the  arts.  The  school  will  also  need  parents  to  serve  on  its  

Governing  Board  and  be  involved  in  school  decision  making.    

 

Parents  as  Audience.  

Students  will  have  several  performances  and  exhibitions  of  their   work  throughout  the  school  year  and  will  be  expected  to  attend  and  be  important   audience  members.  This  serves  to  inform  parents  about  the  work  that  is  being  done  at   school,  both  academic  and  artistic  and  it  also  builds  the  connection  between   meaningful  work  and  its  place  in  the  world  outside  of  school.    

 

Communication.

 The  School  will  work  to  ensure  that  parents  receive  clear,  timely   communication  from  the  school  about  their  child’s  progress,  upcoming  events  or  ways   to  be  of  service  at  School.  School  communication  will  be  provided  in  the  home   languages  of  all  students,  whenever  possible  to  ensure  equitable  access  to  school   information.  Technology  will  play  a  vital  role  in  communication  between  school  and   home  and  we  plan  to  use  technology  as  a  way  for  our  community  to  easily  connect,   share  questions  and  concerns  and  have  access  to  student  assignments  and  grades.  By   utilizing  technology  including  social  media,  we  will  be  able  to  survey  parents,  monitor   participation  data,  tabulate  feedback,  provide  summary  reports  over  time,  and  

  continue  to  work  to  provide  meaningful  ways  to  bring  our  community  closer  together.    

Parent  Education.  

Parents  will  receive  support  in  their  role  as  parents  of  young   adolescents  in  the  form  of  parent  education  meetings  taught  by  school  staff  and   community  partners.  We  will  also  make  every  effort  to  record  these  events  so  that   parents  who  are  unable  to  attend  might  be  able  to  access  them  online  from  home.  

 

Topics  for  such  discussions  will  come  from  parent  surveys  given  at  the  beginning  and   end  of  each  year.    

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Community  Resources.  

Information  on  community  resources,  such  as  health  and   wellness  organizations  and  arts  organizations  will  be  made  available  to  parents  and   the  school  will  work  to  create  connections  between  parents,  students  and  outside   community  resources  that  families  need.    

 

 

F.  SCHOOL  PLANNING  TEAM    

Marca  Whitten

 has  served  as  an  educator  in  Los  Angeles  for  over  twenty  years.  She  received   her  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree  from  UCLA  and  a  Masters  of  Science  in  Counseling  from  California  

State  University  Los  Angeles.  For  the  last  seven  years,  she  has  taught  Kindergarten  and  First  

Grade  at  Ivanhoe  Elementary  School  in  the  Silver  Lake  area  of  Los  Angeles.  A  life  long  Silver  

Lake  community  member  and  parent  to  three  children,  she  understands  the  educational  needs   and  tenor  of  Silver  Lake  residents  as  few  others  can.  At  Ivanhoe,  she  has  served  as  a  lead   teacher  and  a  member  of  the  School  Site  Council.  She  has  participated  in  numerous   professional  development  opportunities  including  The  Orton-­‐Gillingham  reading  methodology   created  for  children  with  learning  disabilities,  Singapore  math  training  and  Writer’s  Workshop.  

Marca  completed  her  counseling  internship,  working  with  families  in  middle  school  and  high   school  students  at  Foshay  Learning  Center  in  Los  Angeles.  In  addition  to  teaching  in  the   elementary  setting,  Marca  received  training  and  taught  classes  for  LAUSD’s  Parent  Education   department.  She  has  led  numerous  parent  education  workshops  at  Ivanhoe  and  has  extensive   experience  supporting  parents  with  children  of  all  ages.  As  a  Silver  Lake  mother  of  three   children  ages  18,  15  and  12,  Marca  understands  the  strengths  and  weaknesses  of  the  area’s   middle  schools  well  and  was  honored  to  serve  on  the  design  team  of  a  new  pilot  middle  school   for  the  community  she  knows  and  loves.    

 

Marca  took  the  lead  on  designing  the  core  instructional  program  of  the  school.

 

 

Paul  Payne  

is  a  leader  on  the  design  team  of  the  Los  Angeles  River  School,  which  was  approved   through  Public  School  Choice  2.0  and  opened  its  doors  in  September  2011  as  one  of  three  Pilot   schools  on  the  Sonia  Sotomayor  Learning  Academies  campus  in  LD4.  Paul  has  taught  all  levels  of   secondary  math  for  10  years;  designed  and  coordinated  a  very  successful  Humanitas  SLC  on  B-­‐ track  at  John  Marshall  HS  for  8  years;  and  has  created,  facilitated,  and  evaluated  professional   development  activities  for  Los  Angeles  Education  Partnership  for  the  last  six  years  as  an   educational  consultant.  He  holds  an  M.A.  in  Mathematics  Education,  B.A.’s  in  Economics  and  

Environmental  Studies,  and  is  currently  pursuing  his  Ed.D.  in  Educational  Leadership  and  Policy  

Studies  at  CSU,  Northridge,  with  his  research  focusing  on  Pilot  school  leaders’  experiences  in   innovation.  He  is  passionate  about  the  power  of  teacher-­‐led  reform  to  improve  instructional   practices  and  student  achievement,  and  he  is  equally  passionate  about  using  collaborative,  

 

  student-­‐centered  strategies  in  the  classroom.    

Paul  shared  his  small  school  experiences  and  technical  assistance  to  organize  the  writing   process  of  this  plan.

 

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Advisory  Team.

 In  addition  to  these  core  members,  we  have  also  worked  closely  with  the  other   two  FIN  pilot  design  teams  from  Fairfax  and  Venice.  The  teachers  on  three  teams,  Sujata  Bhatt  

(5th  Grade  Grandview  Elementary),  James  Encinas,  Kathy  Haggerman  (AP  History,  Fairfax  High),  

Mohammed  Choudhary  (English,  Luther  Burbank  Middle  School),  consulted  together  on  all   aspects  of  school  design.    

   

G.  IMPLEMENTATION  

Creating  the  school  described  here  will  require  significant  time  and  attention  to  

  implementation  details.  Implementation  will  be  staggered,  with  the  goal  of  putting  all  programs   in  place  during  the  first  three  years  of  operation.

 

 

 

 

The  school  will  begin  with  two  sixth  grade  classes  and  one  seventh  grade  and  grow  to  include   another  seventh  grade  class,  an  eighth  grade  class  and  finally  two  classes  of  each  grade  level.  

Interdisciplinary  teacher  teams  will  facilitate  core  content  instruction  from  the  Common  Core  

Standards.  We  plan  to  start  with  traditional  LAUSD  curriculum,  augmented  by  authentic  work   projects  that  serve  to  integrate  the  curriculum  and  provide  arts  instruction  in  the  afternoons.  

Multi  age,  flexible  groupings  will  be  used  whenever  possible  to  encourage  a  culture  that  allows  

  students  to  be  mentors,  leaders  and  learners.    

The  first  year  will  open  with  traditional  LAUSD  curriculum  and  a  strong  arts  partnership  with  

Inner-­‐City  Arts.  Teachers  will  attend  trainings  during  the  summer  prior  to  opening  to   understand  how  to  implement  some  of  the  core  curricular  and  co-­‐curricular  programs.  In  the   second  and  third  years,  teachers  will  begin  to  implement  innovative  and  challenging  curricular   projects  aimed  at  supporting  the  central  arts  focus  of  the  school,  such  as  through  project-­‐based   learning.  In  years  four  and  five,  we  would  expect  to  see  deep  curricular  connections  between  

  core  content  in  the  academic  subjects  and  the  arts  program.

 

 

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    24  

 

 

 

 

 

 

H.  REQUIRED  AND  ADDITIONAL  ATTACHMENTS  

   

Attachment  A  (Letter  of  Intent  /  Information  Sheet)  

LETTER  OF  INTENT  /  INFORMATION  SHEET

 

School  Site  Name:

 

Silver  Lake  /  Echo  Park  Attendance  area  (near  

Thomas  Starr  King  MS)

 

Proposed  School  Name  (

if   planning  to  change  current   school  name

):

 

Conversion  or  New  Pilot  

School:

 

Silver  Lake  Community  Middle  School

New,  co-­‐located

 

 

School  Address:

 

Mailing  Address:

 

626  Wilshire  Blvd,  Suite  330

 

Los  Angeles,  CA  90017

 

Primary  Contact  Name:

 

Primary  Contact  Phone  No:

 

Primary  Contact  E-­‐mail  Add:

 

Secondary  Contact  Name  1:

 

Secondary  Phone  No  1:

 

Secondary  E-­‐mail  Add  1:

 

Paul  Payne

 

323.205.6348

 

[email protected]

 

Marca  Whitten

 

323.819.1591

 

[email protected]

 

Secondary  Contact  Name  2:

 

Secondary  Phone  No  2:

 

Secondary  E-­‐mail  Add  2:

 

Windy  O’Malley

 

[email protected]

 

323.401.3628

 

Proposed  Grade  Level  

Configuration  for  2013  –  2014:

 

6-­‐8

th

 

Proposed  Thematic  Units  or  

Areas  of  Focus  (

if  applicable

):

 

 

 

Visual  Arts  and  Service-­‐Learning  

 

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    25  

 

Attachment  B  (Elect-­‐to-­‐Work  Agreement)  

   

Studio School Elect-to-Work Agreement

The following agreement has been crafted using the guidelines set up cooperatively by the Los

Angeles Unified School District, United Teachers of Los Angeles, and Associated

Administrators of Los Angeles (LAUSD, UTLA and AALA) for the LAUSD Pilot Schools

Network and has been approved by the Silverlake Studio Pilot School (Studio School) design team. It was developed to fulfill the core vision, mission, and goals of the Studio School.

The Studio School is dedicated to creating a learning environment where young people are supported in their desire to innovate, create, and transform their worlds by engaging in critical

  inquiry in the arts and sciences.

When hired and no later than April 15 annually thereafter, each Pilot School UTLA-represented staff person is required to sign an Annual Elect to Work Agreement. The Elect to Work Agreement should include the following areas included in this template. Since teachers elect or choose to teach at a Pilot School, it is essential that each school clearly outline the working conditions, terms and expectations for employment.

SCHOOL NAME: Silver Lake Studio School

SCHOOL YEAR THIS DOCUMENT IS IN EFFECT: 2013-2014

1) Introduction

I, _______________________________ am voluntarily electing to work at Silver Lake Studio

School (Studio School). I am signing this Elect to Work Agreement to indicate that I understand and agree to the following terms and conditions of my employment.

Studio School is under the Pilot Schools program described in the negotiated Agreement between the Los Angeles Unified School District and United Teachers Los Angeles (Memorandum of

Understanding between LAUSD and UTLA). You shall continue to receive, at a minimum, the salary and all health and welfare benefits set forth in the Agreement. However, you may receive a non-uniform salary pursuant to Government Code 3543.2(e).

Other terms and conditions of my employment will be determined by Studio School and its

Governing School Council, rather than by the Agreement. While not attempting to be exhaustive, this Elect-to-Work-Agreement states the more important terms and conditions.

2) Salary, benefits, seniority and membership in United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA)

I shall continue to be a member of the United Teachers of Los Angeles. If am hired as a teacher, I will receive the salary and benefits established in the UTLA Contract, Article XIV.

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I shall continue to be subject to the rights, protections, obligations and duties applicable to certificated employees under the California Education Code, including, but not limited to, the membership in the State Teachers Retirement System. I shall continue to accrue seniority as provided in the California Education Code.

I shall continue to attain and maintain “status and classification” as set forth in the California

Education Code (e.g., temporary, probationary, permanent, substitute, intern, etc.).

3) Terms of employment

Studio School will follow the LAUSD early-start school calendar. The workday for teachers will be from 8:00am to 3:30pm, Monday through Friday. In preparation for each year, teachers may be expected to attend up to two weeks (10 days) of professional development during the summer, paid or unpaid.

In addition, supplemental hours and tasks necessary to complete the mission of the Studio School may be required.

4) Responsibilities

Teachers at the Studio School, in addition to regular teaching responsibilities, are responsible for: a. Chaperoning students twice/week to arts classes, and participating in arts classes there with the students. b. Integrating themes from the arts classes into their academic classes. c. Developing project-based learning opportunities in their classes and using technology as part of a blended learning program. d. Participate in Friday afternoon collaboration time by bringing student work samples and lesson plans for discussion. e. Conduct oneself in a professional manner consistent with vision and mission of the school. f. Other duties assigned by the Administrator.

5) Performance Evaluation

I shall continue to be subject to the following provisions of the Agreement: Evaluation (Article X),

Peer Evaluation (Article XXVII, Section 3.2(e)) and Discipline (Article X), and Peer Assistance and

Review (Article X-A)

6) Dispute Resolution

The following Articles of the Agreement shall continue to apply to me and shall be subject to the Grievance provisions of the Agreement.

• Leaves (Article XII)

• Reduction in Force (Article XIII)

• Evaluation (Article X), Peer Evaluation (Article XXVII, Section 3.2(e)) and

Discipline (Article X)

Studio  School    

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• Peer Assistance and Review (Article X-A)

• Dues Deduction (Article IV-A)

• Safety (Article XXXVIII)

• Holidays (Article XVII) (9 legal holidays, 8 winter recess holidays and 5 spring recess holidays)

• Election of Chapter Chair (Article IV, Section 8.0(a) through (c))

All other matters shall not be subject to the contractual Grievance provisions and, instead, are subject to review, etc. exclusively through the Internal Appeals Process. Unless altered in future EWAs, the Studio School will follow the due process outline in the UTLA collective bargaining agreement.

7) Transfers (voluntary and involuntary)

You may transfer from Silver Lake Studio School at the end of each school year. Similarly, Silver

Lake Studio School may unilaterally transfer you at the end of each school year. You will be transferred to a vacancy for which you are qualified at a school within the geographic area in which

Silver Lake Studio School is located, or if no such vacancy exists, transferred to another geographic

 

area.

8) Dismissal

I will be subject to dismissal from the Los Angeles Unified School District in the same manner as other UTLA-member employees of my status who are not working at a Pilot School.

9) Signatures

By signing this document, I acknowledge that I have read all the provisions of this Elect- to-Work

Agreement and that I agree to all its terms.

_________________________________________________________________

Employee Name / Employee # Date

_________________________________________________________________

Principal Date

 

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    28  

 

 

 

Attachment  C  (Critique  Protocol)  

 

Example  of  student  work,  revised  after  multiple  rounds  of  Critique:  

The  critique  protocol  allows  students  to  share  constructive  feedback  with  one  anothers’  work.  

The  process  is  simple:  Students  exchange  work,  and  offer  a  compliment,  a  question,  and   suggestion  for  their  partner.  Used  regularly  over  time,  the  protocol  reinforces  the  skills  of  

  observation,  academic  vocabulary,  and  perseverance.

 

In  this  series  of  drafts  drawn  by  Austin,  a  first  grade  student,  we  glean  the  power  of  the  critique   protocol  process  as  outlined  by  Ron  Berger.  Austin  knew  that  his  goal  was  to  make  an  accurate,   colored,  scientific  drawing  of  a  Western  Tiger  Swallowtail  Butterfly  from  a  picture  given  to  him   by  his  teacher.  In  his  first  drawing,  he  did  exactly  as  most  first  graders  would,  he  drew  the   common  child’s  icon  of  a  butterfly.  He  met  with  a  critique  group  of  peers  who  were  asked  to   give  him  advice  and  were  instructed  to  be  Helpful,  Specific  and  Kind.  Austin  went  back  to  work   in  his  second  and  third  drafts,  following  the  advice  of  his  friends  to  attend  to  the  details  of  the   shape  of  the  wings  and  to  depict  that  butterflies  have  upper  and  lower  wings  on  each  side.  

Austin’s  final  draft  demonstrates  a  truly  remarkable  transformation  of  his  work  over  time-­‐-­‐ made  all  the  more  notable  since  the  drafts  were  completed  without  the  assistance  or  

Studio  School    

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    29  

 

intervention  of  the  teacher  in  the  classroom.  Critique  has  the  power  to  engage  students  in  

  thoughtful  and  purposeful  revisions  to  their  work.

 

 

Studio  School    

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    30  

 

 

 

Attachment  D  (Draft  Bell  Schedules)  

Morning  Cohort

             

               

Monday  /  Wednesday  Schedule  Tuesday  /  Thursday  Schedule    

Time   Event   Duration     Time   Event   Duration    

Friday  

8:00  AM   [email protected]   2:00  

10:00  AM   Nutrition   0:20  

10:20  AM     0:05    

 

  8:00  AM   per  5  

9:50  AM    

1:30  

9:30  AM   Nutrition   0:20  

0:05    

 

 

10:25  AM   per  1  

11:30  AM    

11:35  AM   per  2  

12:40  PM   Lunch  

1:10  PM    

1:15  PM   per  3  

2:20  PM    

1:05  

0:05  

1:05  

0:30  

0:05  

1:05  

0:05  

 

2:25  PM   per  4  

3:30  PM   dismissal    

1:05  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

9:55  AM   per  1  

11:05  AM    

11:10  AM   per  2  

12:20  PM   Lunch  

12:50  PM    

12:55  PM   per  3  

2:05  PM    

2:10  PM   per  4  

3:20  PM   dismissal    

   

1:10  

0:05  

1:10  

0:30  

0:05  

1:10  

0:05  

1:10  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Afternoon  Cohort    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

               

 

Monday  /  Wednesday  Schedule  Tuesday  /  Thursday  Schedule    

Time   Event   Duration     Time   Event   Duration    

Friday

 

8:00  AM   per  1  

9:05  AM    

1:05  

0:05  

 

 

8:00  AM   per  5   1:30  

9:30  AM   Nutrition   0:20  

 

 

9:10  AM   per  2   1:05  

10:15  AM   Nutrition   0:20  

10:35  AM     0:05  

10:40  AM   per  3  

11:45  AM    

1:05  

0:05    

 

 

 

  9:50  AM    

9:55  AM   per  1  

11:05  AM    

11:10  AM   per  2  

12:20  PM   Lunch  

0:05  

1:10  

0:05  

1:10  

0:30    

 

 

 

 

11:50  AM   per  4  

12:55  PM   Lunch  

1:25  PM    

1:05  

0:30  

0:05  

 

1:30  PM   [email protected]   2:00  

3:30  PM   dismissal    

   

 

 

 

 

 

  12:50  PM    

12:55  PM   per  3  

2:05  PM    

0:05  

1:10  

0:05  

 

2:10  PM   per  4  

3:20  PM   dismissal    

1:10  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Time  

 

 

Event  

8:00  AM   Studio  

 

Duration

 

1:20

9:20  AM   Nutrition   0:20

 

 

9:40  AM    

12:25  PM   per  5  

0:05

9:45  AM   per  1  or  2   1:00

10:45  AM     0:05

10:50  AM   per  3  or  4   1:00

11:50  AM   Lunch  

12:20  PM    

0:30

0:05

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1:25  PM   dismissal  

 

 

 

1:00

1:30  PM   tchr  coll..   2:00

3:30  PM   dismissal  

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

Time  

 

 

Event  

8:00  AM   Studio  

 

Duration

 

1:20

9:20  AM   Nutrition   0:20

 

 

9:40  AM    

12:25  PM   per  5  

0:05

9:45  AM   per  1  or  2   1:00

10:45  AM     0:05

10:50  AM   per  3  or  4   1:00

11:50  AM   Lunch  

12:20  PM    

0:30

0:05

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1:25  PM   dismissal  

 

 

 

1:00

1:30  PM   tchr  coll.   2:00

3:30  PM   dismissal  

 

 

 

 

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    31  

 

 

Attachment  E  (Professional  Collaboration  Protocols)  

 

As  a  whole  group:

 

 

 

20  minute  meeting:  

Stay  informed  on  success  and  challenges  in  curriculum

 

WHAT

 

HOW

 

TIME

 

Inclusion

 

Successes

 

“I’m  In”

 

Round-­‐robin

 

3  min

5  min

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or

 

Challenges

 

Between  Now  and  Then

 

Round-­‐robin

 

Identification  of  Next  Steps,  

Assign  Roles

 

7  min

3  min

 

 

Reflection

 

Meeting  Standards  

Assessment

 

2  min

 

 

 

Divide  into  2  or  3  smaller  groups  for:

 

 

Tuning  Protocol:  

Collaborative  examination  of  student  work  and/or  lesson  design

 

WHAT

 

HOW

 

TIME

 

Lesson  or  Student  Work

 

Examination

 

Warm  +  Cool  Feedback

 

Feedback

 

Response

 

Reflection

 

Presentation

Clarification  Questions

Discussion

 

Probing  Questions

Presenter  Responds

Meeting  Standards  

Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

5  min

2  min

 

10  min

15  min

10  min

10  min

 

 

 

 

 

 

Studio  School    

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    32  

 

 

 

 

 

Consultancy  Protocol:  

Support  for  lesson/project  development

 

WHAT

 

HOW

 

Dilemma

 

Clarification  Questions

Probing  Questions

 

 

Examination  of  Dilemma

Response

 

 

Presentation

Round-­‐robin

Round-­‐robin

Discussion

 

 

 

 

Presenter  Responds

 

TIME

 

5  min

 

10  min

 

10  min

15  min

 

10  min

Reflection

 

Meeting  Standards  

Assessment

 

2  min

 

 

 

30-­‐minute  meeting:  

Protocol  for  quick  and  efficient  faculty  meetings  

WHAT

 

HOW

 

TIME

 

 

 

Inclusion

 

Updates

 

Q  and  N

 

Between  Now  and  Then

 

“I’m  In”

 

Presentation

Recording

 

 

Identification  of  Next  Steps

 

3  min

 

5  min

 

10  min

 

10  min

 

 

Studio  School    

Pilot  School  RFP  

                 

    33  

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment F Year One Budget 2013-2014*

Description

Secondary Teacher

Counselor

Principal

Office Technician

Day to Day Subs

Psychologist

Financial Manager

Campus Aide

Nurse

Plant Manager

B & G Worker

Operating Supplies

General Supplies

IMA

Maintenance of Equip

Subtotal

Attendance Rate

92%

94%

Revenue

$1,195,494

$1,221,483

 

*Based on enrollment of 350 students.

 

FTE

11.00

1.00

1.00

0.15

0.00

0.02

0.15

0.15

0.05

0.15

0.15

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Total Cost

900,460

81,860

125,593

12,758

26,000

2,411

13,000

5,000

4,470

11,424

8,333

1,500

1,500

10,000

3,500

$1,207,809

Difference

(12,315)

$13,674

Studio  School    

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    34  

 

 

 

 

I.  REFERENCES  

Andrews,  P.  G.,  Caskey,  M.  M.,  &  Anfara,  V.  A.,  Jr.  (2007).

 Characteristics  of  exemplary  schools   for  young  adolescents

.  Waterville,  OH:  National  Middle  School  Association.

 

 

Arts  in  the  middle:  A  project  of  Inner-­‐City  Arts.  (2007).  Collaboration  between  LAUSD  LD4,  

Inner-­‐City  Arts,  and  UCLA  GSEIS  

 

Berger,  R.  (2003).  

An  ethic  of  excellence:  Building  a  culture  of  craftsmanship  with  students.

 

Portsmouth,  NH:  Heinemann.

 

Catterall,  J.  &  Peppler,  K.  (2007).  Learning  in  the  visual  arts  and  the  worldviews  of  young   children.  

Cambridge  Journal  of  Education,  37

(4),  543-­‐-­‐560.

 

 

Corcoran,  T.  &  Silander,  M.  (2009).  Instruction  in  high  schools:  The  evidence  and  challenge.  

The  

 

future  of  children

:  

America’s  high  schools.  19

(1),  157-­‐183.  Princeton,  NJ:

 

The  Woodrow  Wilson  

School  of  Public  and  International  Affairs  at  Princeton  University  and  The  Brookings  Institution.

 

 

Durlak,  J.  A.,  Weissberg,  R.  P.  (2010).  BETTER:  Evidence-­‐Based  Education.

 

 

Fiske,  E.  (1999).  Champions  of  change:  The  impact  of  the  art  on  learning.  President’s  Committee   on  the  Arts  and  the  Humanities.

 

 

Newmann,  F.  &  Wehlage,  G.  (1995).  

Successful  school  restructuring:  A  report  to  the  public  and   educators

.  Madison,  WI:  Wisconsin  Center  on  Education  Research.

 

 

 

Robinson,  Sir  Ken.  (2012).  

Do  schools  kill  creativity?  

Accessed  online  at  Huffington  Post.

 

Stutz,  C.  (2012).  

King  to  shift  to  all-­‐magnet  campus

.  Los  Feliz  Ledger.  Accessed  online:   http://www.losfelizledger.com/2012/11/king-­‐to-­‐shift-­‐to-­‐all-­‐magnet-­‐campus/

 

 

Vygotsky,  L.  S.  (1978).  

Mind  in  society:  The  development  of  higher  psychological  processes

.  

Cambridge,  Massachusetts:  Harvard  University  Press.

 

 

Wertsch,  J.  (1998).  

Mind  as  action.

 Oxford,  England:  Oxford  University  Press.

 

Wagner,  T.  (2008).  

The  global  achievement  gap:  Why  even  our  best  schools  don’t  teach  the  new   survival  skills  our  children  need-­‐-­‐and  what  we  can  do  about  it.  

New  York,  NY:  Basic  Books.

 

Studio  School    

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    35  

 

 

Weiss,  C.  C.  &  Kipnes,  L.  (2006).  Reexamining  middle  school  effects:  A  comparison  of  middle   grades  students  in  middle  schools  and  K-­‐8  schools.  

American  Journal  of  Education,  112

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Building  Academic  Success  on  

Social  and  Emotional  Learning:  What  Does  the  Research  Say?

 

Studio  School    

Pilot  School  RFP  

                 

    36  

 

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