Intel(R) Matrix Storage Manager User's Manual

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Intel(R) Matrix Storage Manager User's Manual | Manualzz

Intel

®

Matrix Storage Manager

Intel® Matrix Storage Technology

User’s Manual

Revision 2.6

January 2006

INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED IN CONNECTION WITH INTEL

®

PRODUCTS. NO LICENSE, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, BY

ESTOPPEL OR OTHERWISE, TO ANY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IS GRANTED BY THIS DOCUMENT. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED IN

INTEL’S TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE FOR SUCH PRODUCTS, INTEL ASSUMES NO LIABILITY WHATSOEVER, AND INTEL

DISCLAIMS ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY, RELATING TO SALE AND/OR USE OF INTEL PRODUCTS INCLUDING LIABILITY OR

WARRANTIES RELATING TO FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, MERCHANTABILITY, OR INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT,

COPYRIGHT OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT. Intel products are not intended for use in medical, life saving, or life sustaining applications.

Intel may make changes to specifications and product descriptions at any time, without notice.

Designers must not rely on the absence or characteristics of any features or instructions marked "reserved" or "undefined." Intel reserves these for future definition and shall have no responsibility whatsoever for conflicts or incompatibilities arising from future changes to them.

The Intel® Matrix Storage Manager may contain design defects or errors known as errata which may cause the product to deviate from published specifications. Current characterized errata are available on request.

Contact your local Intel sales office or your distributor to obtain the latest specifications and before placing your product order.

Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.

*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

Copyright © 2006, Intel Corporation

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Contents

13

14

Scope of This Document..................................................................................................... 9

RAID Background ............................................................................................................. 10

RAID 0 (Striping) ............................................................................................................... 11

RAID 1 (Mirroring) ............................................................................................................. 13

RAID 5 (Striping with Parity) ............................................................................................. 15

RAID 10 (RAID 0+1) ......................................................................................................... 17

Matrix RAID (Two Volumes Per Array) ............................................................................. 19

RAID Migration Feature .................................................................................................... 20

Serial ATA (SATA) ............................................................................................................ 21

9.1

9.2

Description............................................................................................................ 21

Installing Serial ATA Hard Drives ......................................................................... 21

Advanced Host Controller Interface / Native Command Queuing .................................... 23

Intel® Matrix Storage Manager ......................................................................................... 25

11.1

Description............................................................................................................ 25

11.2

Do You Need the Intel Matrix Storage Manager? ................................................ 25

Configuring BIOS for Intel Matrix Storage Technology for Serial ATA on Intel

Motherboards .................................................................................................................... 27

12.1

BIOS Importance .................................................................................................. 27

12.2

BIOS Settings ....................................................................................................... 27

Intel Matrix Storage Manager Option ROM ...................................................................... 28

13.1

Entering Option ROM User Interface ................................................................... 28

13.2

Confirming Version of Intel Matrix Storage Manager Option ROM Installed ....... 29

13.3

Creating, Deleting, and Resetting RAID Volumes ............................................... 29

13.3.1

How To Create a RAID Volume............................................................ 29

13.3.2

Example of RAID Volume Creation ...................................................... 30

13.3.3

How To Delete a RAID Volume ............................................................ 36

13.3.4

Example of RAID Volume Deletion....................................................... 36

13.3.5

How To Reset Disks to Non-RAID........................................................ 37

13.3.6

Example of Resetting Disks to Non-RAID ............................................ 38

Loading the Intel Matrix Storage Manager Driver During Operating System Install......... 40

14.1

Instructions on Creating F6 Floppy Diskette ........................................................ 40

14.2

Installation Using F6 Method................................................................................ 41

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Installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager ...................................................................... 42

15.1

Installation Caution............................................................................................... 42

15.2

Steps to Take Before Installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager....................... 42

15.2.1

Resolve Conflicts in Device Manager................................................... 42

15.3

Obtaining and Installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager .................................. 42

15.3.1

Installation Steps................................................................................... 43

15.3.2

Installation: Welcome Screen ............................................................... 44

15.3.3

Installation: Uninstall Warning .............................................................. 45

15.3.4

Installation: License Agreement............................................................ 46

15.3.5

Installation: Choose Destination Location ............................................ 47

15.3.6

Installation: Select Program Folder ...................................................... 48

15.3.7

Installation: Setup Status ...................................................................... 49

15.3.8

Installation: InstallShield* Wizard Complete ......................................... 50

15.4

Confirming Installation of Intel Matrix Storage Manager ...................................... 50

15.5

Identifying Version of Intel Matrix Storage Manager Installed.............................. 51

15.5.1

Using the Intel Matrix Storage Console: ............................................... 51

15.5.2

RAID Driver File Properties: ................................................................. 52

Issues During Installation.................................................................................................. 53

16.1

Incompatible Hardware Error Message................................................................ 53

16.2

Operating System Not Supported Error Message ............................................... 53

“RAID Ready”.................................................................................................................... 54

17.1

“RAID Ready” System Requirements .................................................................. 54

17.2

Steps to Set Up a “RAID Ready” System............................................................. 54

17.3

Converting “RAID Ready” System into RAID System Using the Migration Feature54

17.3.1

Converting “RAID Ready” System into RAID 0 or RAID 1 System With

Two Hard Drives ................................................................................... 54

17.3.2

Converting “RAID Ready” System into RAID System With Three or

Four Hard Drives .................................................................................. 57

17.3.3

Creating a New Partition Using Windows* Disk Management ............. 66

17.3.4

Strip Size Descriptions.......................................................................... 67

Uninstalling the Intel Matrix Storage Manager.................................................................. 69

18.1

Uninstall Warning ................................................................................................. 69

18.2

Uninstallation on Windows* XP ............................................................................ 69

Unattended Installation Under Windows* XP ................................................................... 71

Intel® Matrix Storage Console .......................................................................................... 73

20.1

Description............................................................................................................ 73

20.2

User Interface Modes ........................................................................................... 73

20.3

Create Volume Manually ...................................................................................... 73

20.3.1

Create RAID Volume Wizard ................................................................ 74

20.3.2

Configure Volume ................................................................................. 75

20.3.3

Select Volume Location ........................................................................ 78

20.3.4

Specify Volume Size............................................................................. 79

20.4

Completing Create RAID Volume Wizard ............................................................ 80

20.5

Disk and Volume Status Parameter Descriptions ................................................ 81

20.5.1

Status Entries for Physical Disk Parameters: ....................................... 82

20.5.2

Status Entries for Volume Parameters: ................................................ 82

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20.6

Generate and View a Report using the Intel Matrix Storage Console ................. 82

20.6.1

View System Report ............................................................................. 82

20.6.2

Saving/Printing System Report............................................................. 83

20.7

Support Tab Information....................................................................................... 83

Troubleshooting ................................................................................................................ 85

21.1

RAID Volume Restoration .................................................................................... 85

21.1.1

Failed RAID 0 Volume .......................................................................... 85

21.1.2

Degraded RAID 1 Volume .................................................................... 86

21.1.3

Degraded RAID 1 and Failed RAID 0 Volume on a Single RAID Array86

21.1.4

Degraded RAID 5 Volume .................................................................... 88

21.1.5

Failed RAID 5 Volume .......................................................................... 89

21.1.6

Degraded RAID 10 Volume .................................................................. 89

21.1.7

Failed RAID 10 Volume ........................................................................ 90

21.2

Volume Modification Failed Error Dialog.............................................................. 90

21.3

Larger Source Hard Drive Error ........................................................................... 91

21.4

Hard Drive has System Files Error....................................................................... 91

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) ................................................................................ 92

Appendix A How to Identify the Intel Chipset ....................................................................................... 93

Appendix B Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility for Intel Chipsets .............................................. 94

B.1

Description............................................................................................................ 94

B.2

Obtaining the Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility ....................................... 94

B.3

Confirming Installation of the Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility ............... 94

B.4

Troubleshooting.................................................................................................... 95

Appendix C Serial ATA ......................................................................................................................... 96

C.1

Description............................................................................................................ 96

C.2

Comparing Serial ATA toParallel ATA ................................................................. 96

C.3

System Requirements .......................................................................................... 97

C.4

Serial ATA Data Cable ......................................................................................... 97

C.5

Serial ATA Power Cable....................................................................................... 98

C.6

Are a Serial ATA Data and Power Cable Needed for Serial ATA?...................... 98

C.7

Mixing/Matching Serial ATA Hard Drives with IDE Hard Drives .......................... 98

C.8

Using IDE to Serial ATA Adaptors........................................................................ 98

C.9

Theoretical Transfer Rates Associated with Transfer Modes .............................. 99

Appendix D Glossary .......................................................................................................................... 100

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Figures

Figure 1. RAID 0 ...............................................................................................................11

Figure 2. RAID 1 ...............................................................................................................13

Figure 3. RAID 5 ...............................................................................................................16

Figure 4. RAID 10 ............................................................................................................. 17

Figure 5. Matrix RAID........................................................................................................ 19

Tables

Table 1. Serial ATA Transfer Rates Associated With Transfer Modes ............................ 99

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Revision History

Revision

Number

1.0

1.1

2.0

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

2.5

2.6

Description

Initial Release.

Added RAID 1 information

Added Intel® Matrix RAID Technology, AHCI/Native Command

Queuing information

Updated screen captures

Updated ICH6R requirements and Option ROM updates

Updated Unattended Installation instructions to add AHCI instructions.

Updated for ICH6M

Removed incorrect RAID 0 restore information

Updated AHCI information throughout

Added automatic F6 floppy instructions

Updated User’s Manual to include Intel® Matrix Storage Manager

5.0 feature set

Replaced list of chipsets that support AHCI with link to web site

Revision Date

March 20, 2003

June 6, 2003

June 15, 2004

June 21, 2004

November 16,

2004

December 7,

2004

January 10, 2005

May, 2005

January, 2006

Document Conventions

Throughout this document, symbols are used to indicate important messages to the reader. These are marked as note, important note, caution or warning.

Note: Note and Important Note: Means reader take note. Notes can also contain helpful suggestions or references.

Caution: Caution: This symbol means reader be careful.

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Warning: Warning: Not following these instructions might render the system unusable. Certain functions may also have consequences that you need to be aware of.

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User's Manual

Scope of This Document

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1 Scope of This Document

This document discusses how to properly configure your system when using the Intel® Matrix

Storage Manager.

The issues information in this guide is only relevant on systems implementing an AHCI or RAID solution and using a supported Intel chipset and supported operating system.

x

Supported Intel chipsets http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-020644.htm

x

Supported operating system http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-020648.htm

Please note that the Intel Matrix Storage Manager does NOT support Beta or pre-released versions of any Windows* operating systems.

The majority of the information in this document is related to either software configuration or hardware integration. Intel is not responsible for the software written by third party vendors or the implementation of Intel components in the products of third party manufacturers.

Customers should always contact the place of purchase or system/software manufacturer with support questions about their specific hardware or software configuration.

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RAID Background

RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) was originally conceived at the University of

California at Berkeley in 1987 by David A. Patterson, Garth Gibson, and Randy H. Katz. The focus of their research was to improve storage subsystem performance and reliability. As a result of their findings, they proposed five levels of RAID (RAID 0 – RAID 5) to provide a balance of performance and data protection. Each RAID level is designed for speed, data protection, or a combination of both. Patterson, Gibson, and Katz published their findings in a document titled “A

Case for Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID).” This document is archived at the

University of California, Berkeley: http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/TechRepPages/CSD-87-391

RAID was designed to improve the way computers manage and access large amounts of data by providing an independent and redundant system of disks. Instead of writing to one Single Large

Expensive Disk (SLED), RAID writes to multiple independent disks.

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Figure 1. RAID 0

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RAID 0 (Striping)

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3 RAID 0 (Striping)

RAID 0 uses the read/write capabilities of two or more hard drives working in unison to maximize the storage performance of a computer system. Data in a RAID 0 array is arranged into blocks that are interleaved among the disks so that reads and writes can be performed in parallel

(see below diagram). This technique, known as “striping”, is the fastest of all of the RAID levels, especially for reading and writing large sequential files. Real world tasks where RAID 0 can be of particular benefit include loading large files into image editing applications, saving large movie files in a video editing application, or creating CD or DVD images with a CD/DVD authoring package.

The hard drives in a RAID 0 array are combined to form one volume which appears as a single virtual drive to the operating system. For example, two 400 GB hard drives in a RAID 0 array will appear as a single 800 GB hard drive to the operating system.

No redundancy information is stored in a RAID 0 array. This means that if one hard drive fails, all data on both drives is lost. This lack of redundancy is also reflected by the RAID level 0, which indicates no redundancy. RAID 0 is not recommended for use in servers or other environments where data redundancy is a primary goal.

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RAID 0 (Striping)

Minimum Disks:

Advantage:

Fault-tolerance:

Application:

2

Highest transfer rates

None – if one disk fails all data will be lost

Typically used in desktops and workstations for maximum performance for temporary data and high I/O rate. Not available in mobile configurations.

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RAID 1 (Mirroring)

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A RAID 1 array contains two hard drives where the data between the two is mirrored in real time.

Because all of the data is duplicated, the operating system treats the usable space of a RAID 1 array as the maximum size of one hard drive in the array. For example, two 400 GB hard drives in a RAID 1 array will appear as a single 400 GB hard drive to the operating system.

The primary benefit of RAID 1 mirroring is that it provides good data reliability in the case of a single disk failure. When one disk drive fails, all data is immediately available on the other without any impact to the data integrity. In the case of a disk failure, the computer system will remain fully operational to ensure maximum productivity.

The performance of a RAID 1 array is greater than that of a single drive because data can be read from multiple disks – the original and the mirror – simultaneously. Disk writes do not realize the same benefit because data must first be written to one drive, then mirrored to the other.

Figure 2. RAID 1

Minimum Disks:

Advantage:

Fault-tolerance:

Application:

2

100% redundancy of data. One disk may fail, but data will continue to be accessible. A rebuild to a new disk is recommended to maintain data redundancy.

Excellent – disk mirroring means that all data on one disk is duplicated on another disk.

Typically used for smaller systems where capacity of one disk is sufficient and for any application(s) requiring very high availability. Not available in mobile configurations.

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RAID 1 (Mirroring)

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User's Manual

RAID 5 (Striping with Parity)

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A RAID 5 array contains three or more hard drives where the data is divided into manageable blocks called strips. Parity is a mathematical method for recreating data that was lost from a single drive, which increases fault-tolerance. The data and parity are striped across all the hard drives in the array. The parity is striped in a rotating sequence to reduce bottlenecks associated with the parity calculations.

The capacity of a RAID 5 array is the size of the smallest drive multiplied by one less than the number of drives in the array. The equivalent of only a single hard drive is used to store the parity information, allowing for fault-tolerance with less than the 50% capacity reduction of RAID 1.

For example, three 400 GB hard drives in a RAID 5 array will appear as a single 800 GB hard drive to the operating system.

The primary benefits of RAID 5 include capacity and data protection. Because parity is used for data protection, up to 75% of the total drive capacity is usable. Further, any single drive can fail and it is possible to rebuild the data after replacing the failed hard drive with a new drive.

However, the extra work of calculating the missing data will degrade the write performance to the

RAID 5 volume while the volume is being rebuilt.

The read performance of a RAID 5 array is greater than that of a single drive because data can be read from multiple disks simultaneously. Disk writes do not realize the same benefit because parity must be calculated and written to all the drives.

To enhance the write performance of RAID 5, Intel® Matrix Storage Manager software has implemented a RAID 5 volume write-back cache and coalescer.

The volume write-back cache allows writes to be buffered and improves coalescing. The cache is disabled by default, but can be enabled by the user through the Intel® Matrix Storage Console.

An Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) is recommended for use if the cache is enabled.

The coalescer allows write requests to be combined into larger requests to reduce the number of

I/Os per write for parity calculations. The coalescer is enabled by default, and the user does not have the option to disable it.

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RAID 5 (Striping with Parity)

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Figure 3. RAID 5

Minimum Disks:

Advantage:

Fault-tolerance:

Application:

3

Higher percentage of usable capacity and high read performance as well as faulttolerance.

Excellent - parity information allows data to be rebuilt after replacing a failed hard drive with a new drive.

Storage of large amounts of critical data. Not available in mobile configurations.

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RAID 10 (RAID 0+1)

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A RAID 10 array uses four hard drives to create a combination of RAID levels 0 and 1. The data is striped across a two-drive array forming the RAID 0 component. Each of the drives in the

RAID 0 array is then mirrored by a RAID 1 component.

Since all of the data on the RAID 0 array is duplicated, the capacity of a RAID 10 array is the size of the RAID 0 array. For example, four 400 GB hard drives in a RAID 10 array will appear as a single 800 GB hard drive to the operating system.

The primary benefit of RAID 10 is that it combines the benefits of RAID 0 performance and

RAID 1 fault-tolerance. It provides good data reliability in the case of a single drive failure. When one hard drive fails, all data is immediately available from the other half of the mirror without any impact to the data integrity. In the case of a disk failure, the computer system will remain fully operational to ensure maximum productivity. Data fault-tolerance can be restored by replacing the failed drive.

The performance of a RAID 10 array is greater than that of a single drive since data can be read from multiple disks simultaneously. Compared to a two-disk RAID 0, RAID 10 read performance is higher as data can be read from either half of the mirror, but write performance is slightly lower due to ensuring data is written out completely to the array.

Figure 4. RAID 10

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RAID 10 (RAID 0+1)

Minimum Disks:

Advantage:

Fault-tolerance:

Application:

4

Combines the read performance of RAID 0 with the fault-tolerance of RAID 1.

Excellent – disk mirroring means that all data on one disk is duplicated on another disk.

High-performance applications requiring data protection, such as video editing. Not available in mobile configurations.

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Matrix RAID (Two Volumes Per Array)

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Per Array)

Matrix RAID allows you to create two RAID volumes, of the same or different types, on a single

RAID array.

On systems with an Intel® 82801GR or Intel® 82801GH controller hub, Intel® Matrix Storage

Manager allows you to create a matrix RAID configuration with three or four hard drives that utilizes RAID 0, RAID 5, or RAID 10, as well as continuing to provide the benefits of RAID 0 performance and RAID 1 protection on two hard drives.

A matrix RAID configuration with RAID 0 and RAID 5 on four hard drives provides better data protection than RAID 0, by providing one volume of RAID 5 storage where data can be protected from a single hard drive failure. Also, matrix RAID can provide greater total storage capacity and improved performance than RAID 5 alone.

Figure 5. Matrix RAID

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RAID Migration Feature

8 RAID Migration Feature

The RAID migration feature in the Intel® Matrix Storage Manager is an advanced software technology that enables a properly configured PC, known as a “RAID Ready” system, to be converted into a high-performance RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 10 configuration by adding one or more Serial ATA hard drives to the system and invoking the RAID migration process from within Windows*.

The RAID migration feature also allows the user to migrate data from a RAID 0, RAID 1, or

RAID 10 volume to RAID 5 by adding any additional Serial ATA hard drives necessary and invoking the modify volume process from within Windows.

The following migrations are supported by Intel Matrix Storage Manager: x

"RAID Ready" to 2, 3, or 4-drive RAID 0 x

"RAID Ready" to 2-drive RAID 1 x

"RAID Ready" to 3 or 4-drive RAID 5 x

"RAID Ready" to 4-drive RAID 10 x

2-drive RAID 0 to 3 or 4-drive RAID 5 x

3-drive RAID 0 to 4-drive RAID 5 x

2-drive RAID 1 to 3 or 4-drive RAID 5 x

4-drive RAID 10 to 4-drive RAID 5

The migrations do not require re-installing the operating system. All applications and data remain intact.

The migration process can take as long as several hours, depending on the size of the hard drives being converted, but the system is still fully functional while the migration is being performed – it is possible to conduct other activities such as use the Internet or run work-related applications while the system is being migrated. The only limitation is that some disk-intensive tasks may have slower performance during a RAID migration.

The RAID migration feature also features advanced safety algorithms to ensure that an interrupted migration does not result in data loss or corruption. If the migration process is interrupted by a power loss or system reset, the migration will resume from the point of its most recent progress upon the next system reboot.

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Serial ATA (SATA)

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9 Serial ATA (SATA)

9.1 Description

Serial ATA (SATA) is a storage interface designed to replace parallel ATA (e.g. IDE technology). SATA was designed for a variety of reasons including performance headroom, cabling issues, and voltage tolerance requirements. SATA combines software and operating system transparency, low cost, scalability, and design flexibility. One of the main design advantages of SATA is that the cables are thinner than ATA cables, which not only improves air flow inside the case but also allows smaller case designs. Another design advantage is that the

SATA cables can be up to 1m long, compared to the 45cm of the older PATA cables, which allows more flexibility in hard drive placement within the case. The signal voltage is much lower as well: 250 mV for SATA versus 5 V for PATA. SATA has attracted widespread industry support through the Serial ATA Working Group ( www.sata-io.org

).

Note: Please refer to Appendix A for additional information on Serial ATA hard drives.

9.2

Installing Serial ATA Hard Drives

Note: Please refer to Appendix A for additional information on Serial ATA hard drives.

Installing Serial ATA (SATA) hard drives requires a SATA data cable (7-pin, 4-conductor) which supports the Serial ATA protocol and a SATA power cable. Either end of the SATA data cable can be connected to the SATA hard drive or the connector on the motherboard.

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21

Serial ATA (SATA)

For correct cable installation** (refer to illustration below):

1. Attach either cable end to the connector (A) on the motherboard

2. Attach the other cable end (B) to the SATA hard drive

Note: Both the data and power SATA cables are new designs – you cannot use older 40-pin 80conductor IDE or regular IDE power cables with SATA hard drives.

** You should always carefully follow any instructions that come from the hard drive manufacturer

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Advanced Host Controller Interface / Native Command Queuing

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10 Advanced Host Controller

Interface / Native Command

Queuing

Advanced Host Controller Interface

Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) is an interface specification that allows the storage driver to enable advanced Serial ATA features such as Native Command Queuing and Native Hot

Plug.

x

Intel chipsets that support AHCI http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imst/sb/CS-012304.htm

AHCI also requires Intel® Application Accelerator version 4.x or Intel® Matrix Storage

Manager.

Native Command Queuing

Native Command Queuing (NCQ) is a feature supported by AHCI that allows Serial ATA hard drives to accept more than one command at a time. NCQ, when used in conjunction with one or more hard drives that support NCQ, increases storage performance on random workloads by allowing the drive to internally optimize the order of commands.

Note: To take advantage of NCQ, you need the following: x

A chipset that supports AHCI x

Intel Application Accelerator version 4.x or Intel Matrix Storage Manager x

One or more Serial ATA hard drives which support NCQ

Native Hot Plug

Native hot plug is a feature supported by AHCI that allows Serial ATA hard drive removal or insertion while the system is powered on and running. For example, this feature may be used when replacing a failed hard drive that is in an externally-accessible drive enclosure.

Note: To take advantage of native hot plug, you need the following: x

A chipset that supports AHCI x

Intel Application Accelerator version 4.x or Intel Matrix Storage Manager x

One or more Serial ATA hard drives which support hot plug

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Advanced Host Controller Interface / Native Command Queuing

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Intel® Matrix Storage Manager

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11 Intel® Matrix Storage

Manager

11.1 Description

The Intel Matrix Storage Manager software package provides high-performance Serial ATA and

Serial ATA RAID capabilities in Windows* XP, Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003,

Windows XP x64 Edition, and Windows Server 2003 x64 Edition. It was previously known by the names “Intel® Application Accelerator RAID Edition” and “Intel Application Accelerator

4.x”. Intel Matrix Storage Manager contains the following key features: x

Serial ATA RAID driver providing high performance RAID 0, fault-tolerant RAID 1, high capacity & fault-tolerant RAID 5, high performance & fault-tolerant RAID 10, and matrix RAID for the benefits of two RAID volumes on a single array.

x

Advanced Host Controller Interface support for RAID and non-RAID Serial ATA drives, providing Native Command Queuing performance benefits, as well as Native Hot

Plug capability.

x

Intel® Matrix Storage Console, which provides the Windows* user interface for managing Serial ATA drives, offering increased usability in managing RAID arrays. x

Migration Feature, allowing migration from a single-drive (also known as “RAID

Ready”) configuration to a RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 10, or matrix RAID configuration. The ability to migrate from a RAID 0, RAID 1, or RAID 10 configuration to RAID 5 is also available. The migrations do not require a reinstallation of the operating system.

x

3 and 4-drive RAID 0 support, allowing the user to continue to scale the performance benefits of RAID 0.

11.2

Do You Need the Intel Matrix Storage

Manager?

Use the Intel Matrix Storage Manager if you have supported hardware and would like to enable

AHCI features and RAID performance or data protection features on two or more hard drives, or would like to use AHCI features on single-drive RAID (“RAID Ready”) systems. The Intel

Matrix Storage Manager is not required for stand-alone Serial ATA hard drive(s) to work properly (e.g. not configured for RAID or AHCI).

To use the Intel Matrix Storage Manager, your system must meet ALL of the following requirements:

25

Intel® Matrix Storage Manager

x

A supported Intel chipset

http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-020644.htm

x

A supported operating system

http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-020648.htm

To take advantage of increased storage subsystem performance and overall system performance, your system must meet the following requirements: x

A Serial ATA capable hard drive

Warning: Serial ATA has specific requirements. Please refer to the Appendix C.3 for more information.

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Configuring BIOS for Intel Matrix Storage Technology for Serial ATA o

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12 Configuring BIOS for Intel

Matrix Storage Technology for Serial ATA on Intel

Motherboards

To install the Intel® Matrix Storage Manager, the system BIOS must include the Intel Matrix

Storage Manager option ROM. ICH7R-based systems should use option ROM version 5.0.

ICH6R-based systems should use option ROM version 4.x. ICH5R-based systems should use option ROM version 3.x. An option ROM is not necessary on mobile systems.

The system BIOS must be set up correctly for the RAID controller before you install the Intel

Matrix Storage Manager. Refer to the motherboard documentation or contact the motherboard manufacturer or your place of purchase for instructions on configuring the system BIOS for

RAID.

If you are using an Intel motherboard with a supported Intel chipset

(see

http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-020644.htm

), Section 12.2 identifies how to configure the BIOS for Intel® Matrix Storage Technology for Serial ATA.

Note: The instructions listed below are specific to motherboards manufactured by Intel with a supported

Intel chipset. Always follow the instructions that are provided with your motherboard.

** The specific BIOS settings on non-Intel manufactured motherboards may differ from the instructions listed below. **

The RAID option must be enabled in BIOS before the system can load the Intel Matrix Storage

Manager option ROM code for Intel Matrix Storage Technology.

1. Enter the BIOS Setup program by pressing the <F2> key after the Power-On-Self-Test

(POST) memory test begins.

2. Select the Advanced menu, then the Drive Configuration menu.

3. Switch the Drive Mode option from Legacy to Enhanced.

4. Enable Intel(R) RAID Technology.

5. Press <F10> to save the BIOS settings and exit the BIOS Setup program.

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Intel Matrix Storage Manager Option ROM

13 Intel Matrix Storage Manager

Option ROM

The Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM should be integrated with the system BIOS on all motherboards that use a supported Intel chipset (see

http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-020644.htm

). The Intel Matrix Storage

Manager option ROM is a PnP option ROM that provides a pre-operating system user interface for the Intel RAID implementation and provides BIOS and DOS disk services (Int13h).

13.1

Entering Option ROM User Interface

Serial ATA RAID volumes may be configured using the user interface within the RAID option

ROM.

During the Power-On Self Test (POST), the following message will appear for a few seconds:

Note: The ‘Drive Model’, ‘Serial #’, and ‘Size’ listed in your system can differ from the following example.

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After the above message appears, press the <Ctrl> and <i> keys simultaneously to enter the RAID

Configuration Utility.

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13.2

Confirming Version of Intel Matrix Storage

Manager Option ROM Installed

There is only one way to determine which version of the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option

ROM has been integrated into the system BIOS: x

Press the CTRL + I keys when you see the ‘Intel(R) Matrix Storage Manager RAID

Option ROM’ status screen appear (should appear early in system boot-up, during the

Power-On Self Test (POST)) x

Located in the top right corner you should see a version number in the following format:

V5.0.0.xxxx

13.3

Creating, Deleting, and Resetting RAID

Volumes

13.3.1

How To Create a RAID Volume

1. Select option 1 Create RAID Volume and press the <Enter> key.

2. Type in a volume name and press the <Enter> key, or simply press the <Enter> key to accept the default name.

3. Select the RAID level by scrolling through the available values (RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5,

RAID 10) by using the <Ç> or <È> keys.

4. Press the <Enter> key after you have selected the desired RAID level.

5. Unless you have selected RAID 1, select the strip value for the RAID array by scrolling through the available values by using the <Ç> or <È> keys and pressing the <Enter> key.

The available values range from 4 KB to 128 KB in power of 2 increments. The strip value should be chosen based on the planned drive usage. The default selection is 128 KB for

RAID 0 and RAID 10 volumes, and 64KB for RAID 5 volumes.

6. Press <Enter> to select the physical disks. This will bring up another dialog.

7. Select the appropriate number of hard drives by scrolling through the list of available hard drives by using the <Ç> or <È> keys and pressing the <Space> key to select the drive.

When you have finished selecting hard drives, press the <Enter> key.

8. Select the volume size.

9. At the Create Volume prompt, press the <Enter> key to create the volume. Confirm this selection by pressing the <Y> key after the prompt.

10. Scroll to option 4 Exit and press the <Enter> key to exit the RAID Configuration utility.

Confirm the exit by pressing the <Y> key.

Note: To change any of the information before the volume creation has been confirmed, you must exit the Create Volume process and restart it. Press the <Esc> key to exit the Create Volume process.

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Intel Matrix Storage Manager Option ROM

13.3.2

Example of RAID Volume Creation

Note: The following procedure should only be used with a newly-built system or if you are reinstalling your operating system. The following procedure should not be used to migrate an existing system to RAID 0. If you wish to create matrix RAID volumes after the operating system software is loaded, they should be created using the Intel Matrix Storage Console in Windows.

During the Power-On Self Test (POST), the following message will appear for a few seconds.

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1. Press the <Ctrl> and <i> keys simultaneously, and the following window will appear:

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2. Select option 1 ‘Create RAID Volume’ and press the <Enter> key and the following window will appear:

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3. Specify a RAID volume name and then press the <TAB> or <ENTER> key to advance to the next field:

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4. Specify the RAID level and then press the <TAB> or <ENTER> key to advance to the next field:

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Intel Matrix Storage Manager Option ROM

5. Press the <Enter> key to select the physical disks to use and the following prompt will appear:

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6. Select a minimum of two hard drives to use for creating the volume by using the [SPACE] bar to select. A green arrow will appear immediately to the left of the hard drives after they have been selected similar to the following:

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7. Press the <ENTER> key after your selection is complete. The window will be returned to the main menu:

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8. Select the strip size value for the RAID 0 array by scrolling through the available values by using the < field.

Ĺ

> or <

Ļ

> keys and pressing the <Enter> key to select and advance to the next x

The available values range from 4KB to 128 KB in power of 2 increments. The strip value should be chosen based on the planned drive usage. Some suggested selections for

RAID 0 are listed below.

 16 KB – Best for sequential transfers

 64 KB – Good general purpose strip size

 128 KB – Best performance for most desktops and workstations

9. Scroll down to ‘Capacity’, enter the volume capacity, and press <ENTER>. The default value indicates the maximum volume capacity using the selected disks. If less than the maximum volume capacity is chosen, creation of a second volume is needed to utilize the remaining space (i.e. a matrix RAID configuration).

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Intel Matrix Storage Manager Option ROM

10. Scroll down to ‘Create Volume’ and press the <ENTER> key to create the specified volume.

The following prompt will appear:

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11. Confirm this selection by pressing the <Y> key after the prompt. The window will be returned to the main menu with an updated status similar to the following:

Note: The disk/volume information listed for your system can differ from the following example.

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12. Scroll to option 4 ‘Exit’ and press the <Enter> key to exit the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM. The following prompt will appear:

13. Confirm the exit by pressing <Y> key.

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13.3.3

How To Delete a RAID Volume

Warning: All data on the RAID drives will be lost unless the volume that is selected is a RAID 1 volume.

1. Select option 2 Delete RAID Volume and press the <Enter> key to delete the RAID volume.

2. Use the up and down arrow keys to select the volume you would like to delete.

3. Press the <Delete> key to delete the RAID volume. Confirm the volume deletion by pressing the <Y> key.

13.3.4

Example of RAID Volume Deletion

Warning: By performing this operation, all data on the RAID drives will be lost.

1. Select option 2 ‘Delete RAID Volume’ from the main menu window and press the <Enter> key to select a RAID volume for deletion. The following window will appear:

Warning: If your system currently boots to RAID (has the operating system on the RAID volume) and you delete the RAID volume in the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM, your system will become unbootable.

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2. Select the volume and press the <Delete> key to delete the RAID volume and the following prompt will appear:

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3. Confirm the volume deletion by pressing the <Y> key.

13.3.5

How To Reset Disks to Non-RAID

Note: Possible reasons to ‘Reset Disks to Non-RAID’ could include issues such as incompatible RAID configurations, a failed volume or a failed member of a RAID 0 volume.

Warning: All data on the RAID drives and any internal RAID structures will be lost unless the drives are members of a RAID 1 volume. Resetting drives that are members of a RAID 1 volume to non-

RAID will not result in the loss of data on those member drives.

1. Select option 3 ‘Reset Disks to Non-RAID’ and press the <Enter> key to delete the RAID set and remove any RAID structures from the drives.

2. In the selection screen, use the <space> bar to select the drives you would like to reset. Press

<Enter> after selecting the drives.

3. Confirm the selection by pressing the <Y> key.

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13.3.6

Example of Resetting Disks to Non-RAID

Note: Possible reasons to ‘Reset Disks to Non-RAID’ could include issues such as configurations, a failed volume or a failed member of a RAID 0 volume.

Warning: By performing this operation, all data on the RAID drives and any internal RAID structures will be lost.

1. Select option 3 ‘Reset Disks to Non-RAID’ and press the <Enter> key to delete the RAID volume and remove any RAID structures from the drives and the following window will appear:

2. Select the hard drives that should be reset by using the [SPACE] bar to select. A green arrow

will appear immediately to the left of the hard drives after they have been selected similar to the

following:

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3. Press the <ENTER> key to complete the selection.

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4. Confirm the selection by pressing the <Y> key.

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Loading the Intel Matrix Storage Manager Driver During Operating System Install

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14 Loading the Intel Matrix

Storage Manager Driver

During Operating System

Install

The Intel Matrix Storage Manager driver can be loaded during Windows* operating system installation..

14.1

Instructions on Creating F6 Floppy

Diskette

To automatically create the F6 floppy diskette, download the latest Floppy Configuration Utility from the Intel download site: http://downloadfinder.intel.com/scriptsdf/Product_Filter.asp?ProductID=2101 and run the .EXE file.

Note: Use the instructions in the F6README.txt to determine whether the system contains a 32-bit or

64-bit processor. Use F6flpy32.exe on a 32-bit system. Use F6flpy64.exe on a 64-bit system.

To manually create an F6 floppy diskette that contains the files that are needed when installing the driver by the F6 installation method, complete the following steps:

1. Download the Intel Matrix Storage Manager (or use the CD shipped with your motherboard which contains the Intel Matrix Storage Manager). The Intel Matrix Storage Manager can be downloaded from the following website: http://downloadfinder.intel.com/scripts-df/Product_Filter.asp?ProductID=2101

2. The following files need to be extracted from the compressed .CAB file (which is contained inside the Intel Matrix Storage Manager .EXE package): IAAHCI.CAT, IAACHI.INF,

IASTOR.CAT, IASTOR.INF, IASTOR.SYS, and TXTSETUP.OEM.

3. To extract these files, run 'C:\IATA5X_MULTI.EXE –A -A -P C:\<path>' (as described in the ‘Advanced Installation Instructions’ section of the README.TXT.)

4. After these files have been extracted, copy the IAAHCI.CAT, IAACHI.INF, IASTOR.CAT,

IASTOR.INF, IASTOR.SYS, and TXTSETUP.OEM. files to a floppy diskette. If the system has a 32-bit processor, copy the files found in the Drivers folder; if the system has a 64-bit processor, copy the files found in the Drivers64 folder. Note: These files should be placed in the root directory of the floppy.

Note: Any spaces in the pathname or filename require quotes around the pathname or filename. The switches do not require quotes. For example:

“C:\My Documents\setup.exe” –A –P

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14.2

Installation Using F6 Method

When you start the installation of Windows* XP, you probably will be shown a message stating,

‘Setup could not determine the type of one or more mass storage devices installed in your system’. If this occurs, the instructions below explain how to install the RAID driver. To install the Intel Matrix Storage Manager driver using the F6 installation method, complete the following steps:

Note: After completing these steps and after the operating system has been successfully installed, you will still need to install the Intel Matrix Storage Manager by running the typical Setup.exe process.

1. Press F6 when prompted in the status line with the ‘Press F6 if you need to install a third party SCSI or RAID driver’ message at the beginning of Windows XP setup (during textmode phase). Note: After pressing F6, setup will temporarily continue loading drivers and then you will be prompted with a screen to load support for mass storage device(s).

2. Press the ‘S’ key to ‘Specify Additional Device’.

3. You will be prompted to ‘Please insert the disk labeled Manufacturer-supplied hardware support disk into Drive A:’ After you see the prompt, insert the floppy disk containing the following files: IAAHCI.CAT, IAACHI.INF, IASTOR.CAT, IASTOR.INF, IASTOR.SYS, and TXTSETUP.OEM. and press ENTER.

Note: See Section 14.1 titled ‘Instructions on Creating F6 Floppy Diskette’ for instructions on how to extract these files from the Intel Matrix Storage Manager Setup.exe file.

4. After pressing ENTER, you should be shown a list of available SCSI Adapters; it should list your particular RAID or AHCI controller. Select the entry that corresponds to your BIOS setup and press ENTER.

5. The next screen should confirm that you have selected the Intel(R) RAID or AHCI controller.

Press ENTER again to continue.

6. At this point, you have successfully F6 installed the Intel Matrix Storage Manager driver and

Windows XP setup should continue. Leave the floppy disk in the floppy drive until the system reboots itself because Windows* setup will need to copy the files again from the floppy to the Windows installation folders. After Windows setup has copied these files again, remove the floppy diskette so that Windows setup can reboot as needed.

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15 Installing the Intel Matrix

Storage Manager

42

Caution: The Intel Matrix Storage Manager driver may be used to operate the hard drive from which the system is booting or a hard drive that contains important data. For this reason, you cannot remove or un-install this driver from the system after installation; however, you will have the ability to un-install all other non-driver components.

The following non-driver components can be un-installed: x x x x x

Intel Matrix Storage Console

Help Documentation

Start Menu Shortcuts

System Tray Icon Service

RAID Monitor Service

15.2

Steps to Take Before Installing the Intel

Matrix Storage Manager

15.2.1

Resolve Conflicts in Device Manager

Before installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager, there should be NO conflicts (e.g. yellow exclamation points or red X’s) in Device Manager under Hard Disk Controllers. Device Manager can be accessed by going to: Start Button / Settings / Control Panel / System / Device Manager.

Often, installing the Intel® Chipset Software Installation Utility will resolve conflicts where the operating system does not properly recognize the Intel device.

Please refer to Appendix A for additional information on the Intel Chipset Software Installation

Utility.

15.3

Obtaining and Installing the Intel Matrix

Storage Manager

The Intel Matrix Storage Manager is probably supplied on a CD-ROM that was included with your motherboard or system.

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If needed, the Intel Matrix Storage Manager can also be downloaded from the following Intel website: http://downloadfinder.intel.com/scripts-df/Product_Filter.asp?ProductID=2101

The Intel Matrix Storage Manager is available for supported operating systems

(see

http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-020644.htm

) in both English

(iata5x_enu.exe) and multi-language (iata5x_multi.exe) versions. An included README.TXT file covers topics such as system requirements and basic and advanced installation instructions.

A Release Notes document is located at the following website: http://downloadfinder.intel.com/scripts-df/Product_Filter.asp?ProductID=2101

A Known Compatibility Issues document is located at the following website: http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imst/sb/CS-012524.htm

After the Intel Matrix Storage Manager has been downloaded from the Intel website to a known location on your hard drive, you need to run the file iata5x_enu.exe (English version) or iata5x_multi.exe (multi-language). Running the file can be done by double-clicking on the file name. The installation program should launch after you double-click on the file name. Click on the “Next” button at the Welcome screen. Read the license agreement and click on the “Yes” button to accept the license terms and continue. Click on the “Next” button to install the driver in the default folder location. Click on the “Next” button to create the default Program Folder. The driver files will now be installed. After you have finished installing, select the “Yes” button for the reboot option and click on the “Finish" button to restart your computer. The Intel Matrix

Storage Manager should now be installed.

Note: The instructions above assume that the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM and BIOS have been configured correctly and the RAID driver has been installed using the F6 installation method (see Section 14.1 titled ‘Installation Using F6 Method’ for additional information).

15.3.1

Installation Steps

After you click on the .EXE file, installation will begin and the following screen will temporarily appear:

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Installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager

15.3.2

Installation: Welcome Screen

Click on the ‘Next’ button after the following welcome window appears:

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15.3.3

Installation: Uninstall Warning

Carefully read through the uninstall warning in the following window and then click on the

‘Next’ button:

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15.3.4

Installation: License Agreement

Carefully read through the uninstall warning in the following window and then click on the

‘Next’ button:

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15.3.5

Installation: Choose Destination Location

Select the folder in the following window where you would like Setup to install the files and then click on the ‘Next’ button:

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15.3.6

Installation: Select Program Folder

Select a program folder in the following window where you would like Setup to add the program icons:

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15.3.7

Installation: Setup Status

The status of the Intel Matrix Storage Manager Setup will then appear in the following window:

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Installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager

15.3.8

Installation: InstallShield* Wizard Complete

After installation is complete, the following window will appear. Select ‘Finish’:

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15.4

Confirming Installation of Intel Matrix

Storage Manager

To confirm that the Intel Matrix Storage Manager has been installed, complete the following steps: x x

Click on Start Button / All Programs

Find the ‘Intel Matrix Storage Manager’ program group x

Select the ‘Intel® Matrix Storage Console’ shortcut

The Intel Matrix Storage Console should be shown x

If installation was done by have-disk, F6, or an unattended installation method, you can confirm that the Intel Matrix Storage Manager has been loaded by completing the following steps:

Note: The following instructions assume classic mode in Windows* XP: x

Click on Start Button / Control Panel

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x x x x x x x

Double-click on the ‘System’ icon

Select the 'Hardware' tab

Select 'Device Manager' button

Expand the 'SCSI and RAID Controllers' entry

Right-click on the ‘Intel(R) 82801GR/GH SATA RAID Controller’

Select the 'Driver' tab

Select the 'Driver Details' button

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15.5

Identifying Version of Intel Matrix Storage

Manager Installed

There are two ways to determine which version of the Intel Matrix Storage Manager is installed: x

Use the Intel Matrix Storage Console x

Locate the RAID driver (iaStor.sys) file and view the file properties

15.5.1

Using the Intel Matrix Storage Console:

x x x x

Run the Intel Matrix Storage Console from the following Start Menu path:

 Windows XP: Start Æ All Programs Æ Intel Matrix Storage Manager Æ Intel

Matrix Storage Console

 Windows 2000: Start Æ Programs Æ Intel Matrix Storage Manager Æ Intel Matrix

Storage Console

Click the ‘Device Information’ tab

·Single left-mouse click on the ‘Intel(R) 82801GR/GH SATA RAID Controller’ item in the Devices tree

Note: the specific Intel SATA RAID Controller depends on your system, but will be in the format “82801xR”

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Installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager

x

Look for a parameter in the Parameters list box titled ‘Driver Version’. The version number should be listed in the following format:

 5.0.0.xxxx

15.5.2

RAID Driver File Properties:

x x x x

Locate the file “iaStor.sys” in the following path:

 <System Root>\Windows\System32\Drivers

Single right-mouse click on “iaStor.sys” and select ‘Properties’

Select the ‘Version’ tab

A parameter called “File version” should be located at the top of this tab’s view. Next to it will be the RAID driver version. The version number should be listed in the following format:

 5.0.0.xxxx

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16 Issues During Installation

16.1

Incompatible Hardware Error Message

Issue: The following error message occurs during installation:

Resolution: This issue is resolved by installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager on a system with a supported Intel chipset.

(see

http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imst/sb/CS-020644.htm

).

16.2

Operating System Not Supported Error

Message

Issue: The following error message occurs during installation:

Resolution: This issue is resolved by installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager on a system with a supported operating system.

(see

http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-020648.htm

)

Note: Note for Windows* XP users: To successfully complete installation of the Intel Matrix Storage

Manager with Windows* XP, the user must be logged on with Administrator rights.

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“RAID Ready”

54

A "RAID Ready" system is a specific system configuration that enables a seamless migration from a single non-RAID disk drive to a RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 10 array. The Intel

Matrix Storage Manager offers the flexibility to upgrade from a single Serial ATA (SATA) hard drive to a RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 10 configuration when one or more SATA hard drives are added to the system. This process will create a new RAID volume from an existing disk.

17.1

“RAID Ready” System Requirements

In order for a system to be considered “RAID Ready”, it must meet all of the following requirements:

1. System must contain a supported Intel chipset and one Serial ATA (SATA) hard drive

2. RAID controller must be enabled in the BIOS

3. Motherboard BIOS must include the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM

4. Intel Matrix Storage Manager must be loaded

17.2

Steps to Set Up a “RAID Ready” System

To set up a “RAID Ready” system, complete the following steps:

Note: The system must meet all the “RAID Ready” system requirements specified in Section 17.1.

1. Install Intel Matrix Storage Manager driver during operating system installation or preinstalled driver on a SATA hard drive (configured as non-RAID disk – also known as RAID

Ready Mode)

2. Install Intel Matrix Storage Manager driver from within the operating system to add Start

Menu links and the Intel Matrix Storage Console

17.3

Converting “RAID Ready” System into

RAID System Using the Migration Feature

17.3.1

Converting “RAID Ready” System into RAID 0 or

RAID 1 System With Two Hard Drives

Note: The steps listed in this section assume that the operating system has been installed on an existing

Serial ATA hard drive and the required driver was installed during the operating system setup.

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Warning: This operation will delete all existing data from the additional hard drive or drives and the data cannot be recovered. It is critical to backup all important data on the additional drives before proceeding. The data on the source hard drive, however, will be preserved.

To turn a RAID Ready system into a RAID 0 or RAID 1 system using two hard drives, complete the following steps:

1. Physically add an additional Serial ATA hard drive to the system

2. Boot to Windows* and install the Intel Matrix Storage Manager (if needed)

3. Open the Intel Matrix Storage Console (Start/All Programs/Intel Matrix Storage

Manager/Intel Matrix Storage Console)

4. The Intel Matrix Storage Console user interface should look as follows:

Note: If the user interface does not look similar to the view displayed above, switch to the Basic mode by clicking on the ‘View’ menu, then selecting ‘Basic mode’.

5. Click on the ‘Protect data from a hard drive failure with RAID 1’ or ‘Improve storage performance with RAID 0’ icon in the right-hand pane to create a RAID volume.

6. Click on the ‘Create a RAID x volume’ icon to begin the migration process. In the following example, RAID 1 was selected.

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“RAID Ready”

7. Click ‘yes’ to confirm.

8. The tray icon will indicate that the migration is in progress.

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9. While the migration is in progress, the status of the user interface will appear as follows:

10. A progress dialog will display the status of the migration as a percentage complete, as shown in the following dialog:

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11. When the migration is complete, reboot the system.

12. Optional: Use 3rd party application or Windows* to create and format a new data partition on unused space, if any (see Note below)

17.3.2

Converting “RAID Ready” System into RAID

System With Three or Four Hard Drives

To turn a RAID Ready system into a RAID 0, RAID 5, or RAID 10 system using three or four hard drives, complete the following steps:

1. Physically add two or more additional Serial ATA hard drives to the system

2. Boot to Windows* and install the Intel Matrix Storage Manager (if needed)

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“RAID Ready”

3. Open the Intel Matrix Storage Console (Start/All Programs/Intel Matrix Storage

Manager/Intel Matrix Storage Console)

4. Switch to the Advanced mode (View menu, Advanced Mode) as demonstrated in the following dialog:

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Note: The user interface should look similar to the following example:

5. Perform a ‘Create RAID Volume from Existing Hard Drive’ migration (right-mouse click on

‘RAID Volumes’ entry in the device tree or select option under ‘Actions’ file menu). The menu option is shown in the following image:

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6. Click on the ‘Next’ button after the following welcome screen appears:

“RAID Ready”

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“RAID Ready”

7. A desired RAID volume name should be typed in where the ‘Volume_0000’ text currently appears below. The RAID volume name must also be in English alphanumeric ASCII characters and has a maximum limit of 16 characters.

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8. Select a RAID level. If there are not enough hard drives in the system to create the selected

RAID level, an error dialog will appear when the ‘Next’ button is selected and a new RAID level will need to be selected (or additional hard drives will need to be added to the system).

In the following example, RAID 10 was selected.

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9. Select the desired strip size setting. As indicated, the default setting for RAID 10 is 128KB.

The default setting for RAID 0 is also 128KB. The default setting for RAID 5 is 64KB. Even though the default setting is the recommended setting for most users, you should choose the strip size value that is best suited to your specific RAID usage model. Additional details on the most typical strip size settings are listed in Section 17.3.4 titled ‘Strip Size Descriptions’.

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10. Select ‘Next’ after choosing a strip size

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11. In the left-hand ‘Available’ window, select the source hard drive and then click ‘Next’. The source hard drive can be selected either by double-clicking on the hard drive, or by singleclicking on the hard drive and then selecting the right arrow key. The data on the hard drive you select will be preserved and migrated across to a new RAID volume.

Warning: It is very important to note which disk is the source disk (the one containing all of the information to be migrated). On a RAID Ready system, this can be determined by making a note during POST of which port (e.g. Port 0 or Port 1) the single disk is attached to. You can also use the Intel

Matrix Storage Manager before the additional disks are installed to verify the port and serial number of the drive that contains the data.

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12. Select the member hard drives from the hard drives listed in the left-hand ‘Available’ window and then click ‘Next’. If fewer hard drives are selected than are required for the

RAID level, an error dialog will appear when the ‘Next’ button is clicked. Once the new

RAID volume is created, it will span the source hard drive as well as any member hard drive(s):

Warning:

CRITICAL WARNING

: Existing data on the selected hard drive(s) will be permanently deleted.

Back up all important data before continuing.

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13. Use the fields or the slider bar to specify the amount of available array space to be used by the new RAID volume and then click ‘Next’:

Note: The migration process may take up to several hours to complete depending on the size of the disks being used and the strip size selected. While you can still continue using your computer during the migration process, after the migration process starts, it cannot be stopped. If the migration process gets interrupted and your system is rebooted for any reason, it will pick up the migration process where it left off.

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14. Select ‘Finish’ to begin migrating data to the new volume:

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15. After the migration is complete, reboot the system

16. Optional: Use 3rd party application or Windows* to create and format a new data partition on unused space, if any (see Note below)

Note: To ensure that non-Windows* partitions are kept intact, the migration to a RAID volume does not utilize the extra space made available by adding the additional hard drive(s). To take advantage of the extra hard drive space you will need to do one of the following: x

Create a new partition using Windows Disk Management (See Section 17.3.3 for instructions) or x

Extend the partition to fill the rest of the available space. Windows does not natively include tools to do this, but there are 3rd party software utilities to accomplish this such as

PartitionMagic* or Partition Commander*.

17.3.3

Creating a New Partition Using Windows* Disk

Management

To create a new partition using Windows* Disk Management, complete the following steps:

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1. Complete one of the following tasks, then proceed with the remaining steps: a) Right-mouse click 'My Computer', select 'Manage'. In the Computer Management program window, left-mouse click 'Disk Management' in the program tree on the left (located under

‘Storage’ subsection).

or

b) Within the Control Panel (Start/Control Panel), double-click 'Administrative Tools'. In the window that appears, double-click 'Computer Management'. In the Computer Management program window, left-mouse click 'Disk Management' in the program tree on the left (located under ‘Storage’ subsection).

2. Maximize the Computer Management program window for easier viewing.

3. In the Computer Management program window, you should see your RAID volume represented as a physical disk. Notice that the RAID volume size is the size of the Serial

ATA disks combined. At this point, you should see the partitions within the RAID volume that were originally on the single disk you used as your source. After the partitions, you should see a gray area labeled 'Free Space'. This area must be partitioned and formatted before it may be used.

17.3.4

Strip Size Descriptions

Strip Size Settings

4KB

8KB

16KB

32KB

64KB

128KB

Descriptions

For specialized usage models requiring 4KB strips

For specialized usage models requiring 8KB strips

Best for sequential transfers

Good for sequential transfers

Good general purpose strip size

Best performance for RAID 0 or RAID 10 for most desktops and workstations

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18 Uninstalling the Intel Matrix

Storage Manager

Warning:

CRITICAL WARNING

: Removing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager from a system that has been configured as RAID will DELETE ALL EXISTING DATA from the RAID-controlled hard drive(s) and the data cannot be recovered. It is critical that you backup all important data before proceeding.

Uninstalling the Intel Matrix Storage Manager would render all data on any existing RAID volumes inaccessible and therefore it cannot be automatically uninstalled. It is recommended that any RAID volume be deleted before disabling the Intel 82801GR/GH SATA RAID Controller.

Disabling the Intel 82801GR/GH SATA RAID Controller would re-enable the SATA controller and the operating system would no longer use the Intel Matrix Storage Manager driver.

For instructions on how to manually uninstall the Intel Matrix Storage Manager, please refer to

Section 18.2 titled ‘Uninstallation on Windows* XP’.

18.2

Uninstallation on Windows* XP

To manually uninstall the Intel Matrix Storage Manager from your system, complete the following steps:

Note: Important Note: All the data on the RAID-controlled hard drive(s) will be DELETED and will not be accessible after completing these steps. Backup all important data before proceeding.

1. Reboot the system

2. Depending on your system configuration, complete one of the following set of tasks:

If the system has the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM installed, follow the steps listed in section 13.4.3 titled ‘Reset Disks to Non-RAID‘

or

If the system does not have the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM installed: a. Enter the system BIOS Setup (usually done by pressing a key such as 'F2' or 'Delete' during boot-up) b. Change the IDE configuration for the RAID-controlled hard drive(s) from 'RAID' to

'IDE'.

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3. Delete any partitions on the hard drives that were previously connected to the RAID controller

4. Reinstall the operating system

Note: If you experience any difficulties making these changes to the system BIOS, please contact the motherboard manufacturer or your place of purchase for assistance.

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Under Windows* XP

To install the Intel Matrix Storage Manager as outlined in the Microsoft* document "Deployment

Guide Automating Windows NT Setup," use the supplied TXTSETUP.OEM file included in the application package and insert the lines below into the UNATTEND.TXT file. This method is available for Windows* XP.

First, determine if your system contains a 32-bit or 64-bit processor. This can be done using the following steps:

1.

On the Windows XP Start menu, select Control Panel.

2.

Open the 'System' applet (you may first have to select 'Switch to Classic View').

3.

Select the 'Hardware' tab.

4.

Select the 'Device Manager' button.

5.

The processor type will be indicated by the value under the 'Computer' section on the 'General' tab. x

On a 64-bit system, Intel® Itanium or Intel® Itanium 2 or Intel® Pentium 4 will appear.

x

On a 32-bit system, a value other than Intel® Itanium or Intel® Itanium 2 will appear.

To install the Intel Matrix Storage Manager by unattended install, first extract the IAAHCI.CAT,

IAACHI.INF, IASTOR.CAT, IASTOR.INF, IASTOR.SYS, and TXTSETUP.OEM files from the compressed .CAB file. To extract these files, run 'C:\IATA5X.EXE -A -A -P C:\<path>' as described in the ‘Advanced Installation Instructions’ section of the README.TXT. If the system has a 32-bit processor, the files will be located in the Drivers folder; if the system has a 64-bit processor, the files will be located in the Drivers64 folder.

Note: This same procedure can be used for systems using the 'Intel(R) 82801ER SATA RAID

Controller,' the 'Intel(R) 6300ESB SATA RAID Controller,' the ‘Intel(R) 82801FR SATA RAID

Controller,’ the ‘Intel(R) 82801FR SATA AHCI Controller’ or the ‘Intel(R) 82801FBM SATA

AHCI Controller.’ Replace the text within the quotation marks.

Systems Configured for RAID Mode:

// Insert the lines below into the UNATTEND.TXT file

[MassStorageDrivers]

"Intel(R) 82801GR/GH SATA RAID Controller" = OEM

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[OEMBootFiles]

iaStor.inf

iaStor.sys

iaStor.cat

Txtsetup.oem

Systems Configured for AHCI Mode:

// Insert the lines below into the UNATTEND.TXT file

[MassStorageDrivers]

"Intel(R) 82801GR/GH SATA AHCI Controller" = OEM

[OEMBootFiles]

iaAhci.inf

iaStor.sys

iaAhci.cat

Txtsetup.oem

Place iaAhci.cat, iaAhci.inf, iaStor.cat, iaStor.inf, iaStor.sys, and Txtsetup.oem in the following folder:

<SystemRoot>:\i386\$OEM$\Textmode

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20 Intel® Matrix Storage

Console

20.1 Description

The Intel® Matrix Storage Console is a Windows*-based application that provides management capabilities and detailed status information for storage devices and RAID arrays.

20.2

User Interface Modes

The Intel Matrix Storage Console provides device information using one of two views: Basic and

Advanced.

Basic mode displays the status of the hard drives and an illustration of the current RAID volume.

This mode is visual and uses animations to communicate the current status and any user actions.

Basic mode is the default view of the user interface.

Advanced mode displays a combination of logical and physical views of the hard drives and any supported RAID volumes that may be present. The logical view provides details on the arrays and volumes in the RAID configuration. The physical view provides details on the hard drives and how they are connected to each other.

The user can switch between the Basic and Advanced modes by selecting the appropriate option in the View menu. If the user is in Basic mode, they can also click on the ‘Switch to Advanced

Mode view’ button if it is present.

20.3

Create Volume Manually

The Intel Matrix Storage Manager offers the ability to create a RAID volume manually. This option should be used if you are using a third bootable device such as an IDE or SCSI hard drive

– in addition to using two or more Serial ATA hard drives. One benefit of using a third bootable device and creating a RAID volume manually is that the operating system is not located on the

RAID volume. Should something happen to the RAID volume, the operating system should not be impacted.

Note: The ‘Create Volume Manually’ option is not selectable unless a third bootable device (such as an

IDE or SCSI hard drive) is installed in the system – in addition to using two or more Serial ATA hard drives.

To manually create a RAID volume, click on ‘Actions’ in the Intel Matrix Storage Console file menu and then select ‘Create RAID Volume’ as illustrated below:

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Note: The ‘Actions’ menu will only be present in Advanced mode. If the ‘Actions’ menu is not present, switch to Advanced mode using the View menu, or click on the ‘Switch to Advanced mode view’ button if it is present. The following image provides an example:

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20.3.1

Create RAID Volume Wizard

Click on the ‘Next’ button after the following welcome window appears:

Warning:

CRITICAL WARNING

: Creating an initial RAID volume will permanently delete existing data on the selected hard drives or array. Back up all important data before continuing. To preserve the existing data on a hard drive, use the ‘Create RAID Volume from Existing Hard

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Drive’ action instead (refer to section 17 titled ‘RAID Ready’ for additional

information).

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Select the RAID volume name, RAID level, and strip size and then click ‘Next’:

RAID Volume Name:

A desired RAID volume name needs to be typed in where the ‘RAID 5’ text currently appears above. The RAID volume name has a maximum limit of 16 characters. The RAID volume name must also be in English alphanumeric ASCII characters.

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RAID Level:

Select the desired RAID level. In this example, RAID 5 was selected.

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Strip Sizes:

Select the desired strip size setting. As indicated, the default setting for RAID 5 is 64KB. The default setting for RAID 0 and RAID 10 is 128KB. Even though the default setting is the recommended setting for most users, you should choose the strip size value which is best suited to your specific RAID usage model. Additional details on the most typical strip size settings are listed in Section 17.3.4 titled ‘Strip Size Descriptions’.

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20.3.3

Select Volume Location

In the left-hand ‘Available’ window, specify the location for the new RAID volume by selecting

2, 3, or 4 hard drives or an array and then click ‘Next’:

Warning:

CRITICAL WARNING

: Selecting hard drives will permanently delete the data on the hard drives. Back up all important data before continuing. Selecting an existing array will preserve any volume(s) on the array.

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Intel® Matrix Storage Console

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20.3.4

Specify Volume Size

Use the fields or slider bar to specify the amount of available array space to be used by the new

RAID volume and then click ‘Next’:

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20.4

Completing Create RAID Volume Wizard

Select ‘Finish’ to create the new RAID volume:

Warning:

CRITICAL WARNING

: Completing this action will permanently delete existing data on the selected hard drive(s). Back up all important data before continuing.

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Intel® Matrix Storage Console

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20.5

Disk and Volume Status Parameter

Descriptions

The Intel Matrix Storage Console displays a wide variety of information including the status of the physical disk parameters and the volume parameters. The status of the physical disk parameters indicates the health of the disk while the status of the volume parameters indicates the health of the RAID volume. Listed below are descriptions on the different disk and volume parameters that could appear:

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20.5.1

Status Entries for Physical Disk Parameters:

Status

Indicates the health of the disk

Normal

Disk is present and functioning as expected

Error Occurred

SMART Event

Missing

Incompatible Version

Disk has exceeded its unrecoverable threshold.

Disk will continue to be accessed if it’s a member of a RAID 0 volume.

Disk has exceeded its recoverable error threshold and is at risk of failure.

Disk is not present.

Disk has RAID meta-data on it but its version is incompatible with the current version of RAID software. Updated version might be needed to resolve

20.5.2

Status Entries for Volume Parameters:

Status

Indicates the health of the RAID volume

Normal

Volume data is fully accessible to host

Degraded

Failed

Migrating

One disk in a redundant RAID volume is missing or has failed but the volume is still functional

One or more disks are missing or have failed, and the volume will complete all I/O requests with a failing status.

A RAID volume topology (RAID level, strip size, capacity, etc.) is changing

20.6

Generate and View a Report using the Intel

Matrix Storage Console

The Intel Matrix Storage Console allows you to generate and view a report. Everything that appears for each device in your system (except for the Serial #'s), can be generated into a report.

This information can be very helpful if you need assistance from Intel Customer Support.

20.6.1

View System Report

To generate and view a report, click on the 'View' menu (located at the top left of the window), then click on 'System Report' as illustrated in the following example:

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When viewing the System Report, you will also have the ability to save or print the report.

20.6.2

Saving/Printing System Report

To save or print a report, click on the ‘File’ menu, then click on ‘Save System Report’ or ‘Print

System Report’ as illustrated in the following example:

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Selecting ‘Save System Report’ option:

The report can be saved to a location on your hard drive and then viewed with a text viewer such as Notepad* or WordPad*.

20.7

Support Tab Information

The ‘Support’ tab contains links to Intel Customer Support websites that provide information on any the following topics related to the Intel Matrix Storage Manager: x x x

Top Technical Issues

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x

Compatibility Information

The following illustration shows an example of the ‘Support’ tab:

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21 Troubleshooting

Please refer to the following Intel Matrix Storage Manager website for troubleshooting information: http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/index.htm

21.1

RAID Volume Restoration

In the event that a RAID volume is reported as degraded or failed by the Intel Matrix Storage

Manager tray icon, it may be possible to restore the RAID volume. If restoration is not possible, you will need to recreate the RAID volume and restore data manually from a back up. Refer to the section below that corresponds to your particular scenario to restore the RAID configuration on your system.

21.1.1

Failed RAID 0 Volume

A RAID 0 volume is reported as failed when one of its members fails or is disconnected. If either of these scenarios occurs, the RAID 0 volume and its data is no longer accessible. The RAID 0 volume can be recovered if a member is disconnected, but can not be recovered if a member has failed.

Missing Hard Drive Member

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Reconnect the missing hard drive.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM user interface will display the RAID 0 volume as ‘Normal’.

4. After the operating system is running, select Intel Matrix Storage Console from the

Start menu or click the Intel Matrix Storage Manager tray icon.

5. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode’ to see a detailed view of device storage information.

6. Right click the RAID 0 volume in the device pane to confirm that it is operating normally. The status in the information pane will display as ‘Normal’.

Failed Hard Drive Member

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Replace the failed hard drive with a new one that is of equal or greater capacity.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM user interface will display the RAID 0 volume status as ‘Failed’, prompting you to press Ctrl-I to enter the user interface.

4. Press Ctrl-I to enter the ‘MAIN MENU’.

5. Select option 2 in the main menu to ‘Delete RAID Volume’.

6. In the ‘DELETE VOLUME MENU’, select the failed RAID 0 volume, using the up and down arrow keys.

7. Press the ‘Delete’ key to delete the volume.

8. Press ‘Y’ to confirm the deletion.

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9. Create a new RAID 0 volume. If the failed hard drive was a part of the system volume, you will also need to reinstall the operating system.

21.1.2

Degraded RAID 1 Volume

A RAID 1 volume is reported as degraded when one of its members fails or is disconnected, and data mirroring is lost. As a result, the system can only use the functional member. To re-establish data mirroring and restore data redundancy, refer to the procedures below.

Missing Hard Drive Member

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Reconnect the missing hard drive.

3. Restart the system. The rebuild will occur automatically.

Failed Hard Drive Member

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Replace the failed hard drive with a new one that is of equal or greater capacity.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel(R) Matrix Storage Manager option ROM user Interface will display the RAID 1 volume status as ‘Rebuild’.

4. After the operating system is running, select the Intel Matrix Storage Console from the

Start Menu or click the Intel Matrix Storage Manager tray icon.

5. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode' to display a detailed view of the Intel

Matrix Storage Console.

6. From the Volumes view in the device pane, select the RAID 1 volume. The status will display ‘Rebuilding % complete’. After the rebuild is complete, the status will display

‘Normal’.

21.1.3

Degraded RAID 1 and Failed RAID 0 Volume on a

Single RAID Array

This can occur when two RAID volumes (0 and 1) exist on a single RAID array (see Matrix

RAID). A RAID 0 volume is reported as failed and a RAID 1 volume is reported as degraded when one of their members fails or is disconnected.

Missing Hard Drive Member When the Operating System is on the RAID 0 Volume

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Reconnect the missing hard drive.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM user interface will display RAID 0 volume status as ‘Normal’ and the

RAID 1 volume status as ‘Rebuild’.

4. After the operating system is running, select the Intel Matrix Storage Console from the

Start Menu or click the Intel Matrix Storage Manager tray icon.

5. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode’ to display a detailed view of the Intel

Matrix Storage Console.

6. From the Volumes view in the device pane, select the RAID 0 volume. The status of the RAID 0 volume will display as ‘Normal’ and the RAID 1 volume status will display as ‘Rebuilding % complete’ in the information pane when RAID 1 volume is selected.

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7. After the RAID 1 volume rebuilding is complete, the status shows as ‘Normal’.

Missing Hard Drive Member When the Operating System is on the RAID 1 Volume or is on a Non-RAID Hard Drive

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Reconnect the missing hard drive.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM user interface will display RAID 0 volume status as ‘Normal’ and the

RAID 1 volume status as ‘Rebuild’.

4. After the operating system is running, select the Intel Matrix Storage Console from the

Start Menu or click the Intel Matrix Storage Manager tray icon.

5. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode’ to display a detailed view of the Intel

Matrix Storage Console.

6. From the Volumes view in the device pane, select the RAID 0 volume. The status will display as ‘Normal’ and RAID 1 volume status will display as ‘Rebuilding % complete’ in the information pane when the RAID 1 volume is selected.

7. After the RAID 1 volume rebuilding is complete, the status shows as ‘Normal’.

Failed Hard Drive Member When the Operating System is on the RAID 0 Volume

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Replace the failed hard drive with a new one that is of equal or greater capacity.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel(R) Matrix Storage option

ROM splash screen will display the RAID 0 volume status as ‘Failed’ and the RAID 1 volume as ‘Degraded’.

4. Do not enter the Intel(R) Matrix Storage option ROM User Interface.

5. Install the operating system on the new non-RAID hard drive.

6. During the installation procedure, you will be prompted to Press F6 to load the RAID driver.

7. Press F6 to install the RAID driver onto the new non-RAID hard drive.

8. After installing the operating system and the RAID driver, open Windows Explorer to identify the new partition existing on the new hard drive and the partition existing on the degraded RAID 1 volume.

9. Copy the data you want to keep from the degraded RAID 1 volume onto the new partition.

10. If you intend to restore the RAID configuration with RAID 0 and RAID 1 volumes, continue with the following steps.

11. Select the Intel(R) Matrix Storage Console from Start Menu.

12. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode’ to display a detailed view of the Intel

Matrix Storage Console.

13. From the Volumes view in the device pane, select the RAID 0 volume and delete the volume by right clicking and selecting ‘Delete Volume’.

14. The ‘Delete RAID Volume’ Wizard will help to delete the volume.

15. Select the RAID 1 volume and delete the volume.

16. From the Actions menu, select ‘Create RAID Volume from Existing Hard Drive’ submenu to create a new RAID 0 volume.

17. The ‘Create RAID Volume from Existing Hard Drive’ Wizard will help to create the

RAID 0 volume. Ensure the volume size is less than the Array size to create another volume.

18. Create a new RAID 1 volume.

19. You have restored your original configuration.

20. Move any of your original RAID 1 data back to this new RAID 1 volume if you wish.

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Failed Hard Drive Member When the Operating System in on the RAID 1 Volume or on a

Non-RAID Hard Drive

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Replace the failed hard drive with a new one that is of equal or greater capacity.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel(R) Matrix Storage option

ROM user interface will display RAID 1 volume status as ‘Degraded’ and RAID 0 volume status as ‘Failed’.

4. After the operating system is running, select Intel(R) Matrix Storage Console from the

Start menu or click the Intel Matrix Storage Manager tray icon.

5. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode’ to display a detailed view of the

Intel(R) Matrix Storage Console.

6. From the Volumes view in the device pane, right-click the RAID 0 volume and select

‘Delete Volume’. The ‘Delete Volume Wizard’ will guide through the deletion procedure.

7. To create a new volume, select ‘Actions’ menu and choose ‘Create a new volume’. The

‘Create RAID Volume Wizard’ will guide through the creation procedure.

8. Use Windows Disk Management to partition and format the new RAID volume.

9. From the Volumes view in the device pane, select the RAID 1 volume and view the information pane. The status will indicate as ‘Rebuilding: % complete’. After the rebuild is complete, the status shows as ‘Normal’.

21.1.4

Degraded RAID 5 Volume

A RAID 5 volume is reported as "Degraded" when one of the members has failed or is disconnected. The volume will be reported as Failed when two or more members are missing or have failed. If this occurs, refer to the appropriate procedure below:

Missing Member

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Reconnect the missing hard drive.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage option ROM user interface will display the RAID 5 volume status as ‘Rebuild’.

4. After the operating system is running, select Intel Matrix Storage Console from the

Start menu or click the Intel Matrix Storage Manager tray icon.

5. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode’ to display a detailed view of the Intel

Matrix Storage Console.

6. From the Volumes view in the device pane, select the RAID 5 volume and view the information pane. The status will indicate ‘Rebuilding: % complete’. After the rebuild is complete, the status shows as ‘Normal’.

Failed Member

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Replace the failed hard drive with new hard drive that is of equal or greater capacity.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage option ROM user interface will display RAID 5 volume status as ‘Rebuild’.

4. After the operating system is running, select Intel Matrix Storage Console from the

Start menu or click the Intel Matrix Storage Manager tray icon.

5. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode’ to display a detailed view of the Intel

Matrix Storage Console.

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6. From the Volumes view in the device pane, select the RAID 5 volume and view the information pane. The status will indicate ‘Rebuilding: % complete’. After the rebuild is complete, the status shows as ‘Normal’.

21.1.5

Failed RAID 5 Volume

A RAID 5 volume is reported as ‘Failed’ when more than one member has failed. If this occurs, please follow the procedure shown below:

Failed Members

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Replace the failed hard drives with new hard drives that are of equal or greater capacity.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM user interface will display the RAID 5 volume status as ‘Failed’, prompting you to press Ctrl-I to enter the user interface.

4. Press Ctrl-I to enter the ‘MAIN MENU’.

5. Select option 2 in the main menu to ‘Delete RAID Volume’.

6. In the ‘DELETE VOLUME MENU’, select the failed RAID 5 volume, using the up and down arrow keys.

7. Press the ‘Delete’ key to delete the volume.

8. Press ‘Y’ to confirm the deletion.

9. Create a new RAID 5 volume.

10. You will also need to reinstall the operating system on the new volume.

21.1.6

Degraded RAID 10 Volume

A RAID 10 volume is reported as ‘Degraded’ when one of the members has failed or is disconnected. A RAID 10 volume is reported as ‘Failed’ when at least two of the members have failed or are disconnected. If this occurs, restore the volume by following the appropriate procedure below:

Missing Member

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Reconnect the missing hard drive.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage option ROM user interface will display the RAID 10 volume status as ‘Rebuild’.

4. After the operating system is running, select Intel Matrix Storage Console from the

Start menu or click the Intel Matrix Storage Manager tray icon.

5. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode’ to display a detailed view of the Intel

Matrix Storage Console.

6. From the Volumes view in the device pane, select the volume and view the information pane. The status shows as ‘

7. Rebuilding: % complete’. After the rebuild is complete, the status shows as ‘Normal’.

Failed Members

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Replace the failed hard drive with new hard drive that is of equal or greater capacity.

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3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage option ROM user interface will display the RAID 10 volume status as ‘Rebuild’.

4. After the operating system is running, select Intel Matrix Storage Console from the

Start menu or click the Intel Matrix Storage Manager tray icon.

5. From the View menu, select ‘Advanced Mode’ to display a detailed view of the Intel

Matrix Storage Console.

6. From the Volumes view in the device pane, select the volume and view the information pane. The status shows as ‘

7. Rebuilding: % complete’. After the rebuild is complete, the status shows as ‘Normal’.

21.1.7

Failed RAID 10 Volume

A RAID 10 volume is reported as ‘Failed’ when at least two members have failed. If this occurs, please follow the procedure shown below:

Failed Members

1. Make sure the system is powered off.

2. Replace the failed hard drives with new hard drives that are of equal or greater capacity.

3. Power on the system. During the system startup, the Intel Matrix Storage Manager option ROM user interface will display the RAID 10 volume status as ‘Failed’, prompting you to press Ctrl-I to enter the user interface.

4. Press Ctrl-I to enter the ‘MAIN MENU’.

5. Select option 2 in the main menu to ‘Delete RAID Volume’.

6. In the ‘DELETE VOLUME MENU’, select the failed RAID 10 volume, using the up and down arrow keys.

7. Press the ‘Delete’ key to delete the volume.

8. Press ‘Y’ to confirm the deletion.

9. Create a new RAID 10 volume.

10. You will also need to reinstall the operating system on the new volume.

21.2

Volume Modification Failed Error Dialog

To migrate a 2 or 3-drive RAID 0 array or a 2-drive RAID 1 array to RAID 5, the hard drive(s) added to the system must be equal to or greater in size than the hard drive members of the RAID 0 or RAID 1 array.

If you receive the following dialog after clicking ‘Finish’ in the Modify Volume wizard, check the size of the hard drive(s) that were added to the system:

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21.3

Larger Source Hard Drive Error

To migrate from a RAID Ready configuration to a RAID configuration, the member hard drives must be equal to or greater in size than the source hard drive. If the source hard drive is larger, the following error dialog will appear and the migration process will not begin:

If the above dialog appears, follow the steps listed in the dialog to correct the problem.

21.4

Hard Drive has System Files Error

If the computer boots from a Serial ATA hard drive, that hard drive cannot be selected as a member hard drive during the manual ‘Create RAID Volume’ process. If it is chosen, the following error dialog will appear and the hard drive must be unselected and a new hard drive(s) chosen.

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

22 Frequently Asked Questions

(FAQs)

Please refer to the following Intel Matrix Storage Manager website for Frequently Asked

Questions (FAQs): http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/index.htm

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Appendix A How to Identify the Intel

Chipset

If you are unsure which Intel chipset is located in your computer, first check the documentation that came with the computer for this information. If this is not successful, the Intel® Chipset

Identification Utility provides an easy way to identify the specific Intel chipset that is located on your motherboard. The Intel Chipset Identification Utility can be downloaded from the following

Intel website: http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/inf/chipsetid.htm

If Windows* has properly identified your Intel chipset, you should be able to look at Device

Manager in Windows to identify your Intel chipset: http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/deviceman.htm

Note: If the above options do not provide the necessary information, a qualified professional may be able to assist you in determining the chipset included in your system. A qualified professional should be able to properly identify the chipset while taking all necessary precautions to safeguard your system. (If you choose to take your system to a qualified professional, you will be responsible for all associated costs).

Note: Important Note

The section below is for qualified and trained professionals only. Please do not follow the instructions listed below unless you are a qualified and trained professional. Only qualified and trained professionals should open a computer system.

Note: Some system manufacturers may void your warranty if you open the case. Check with the manufacturer if you have any concerns about this before proceeding.

Note: Important Note: Please do not follow the instructions listed below or attempt to open a computer system unless you are a qualified and trained professional.

Qualified and trained professionals shall take all necessary precautions to avoid damage to all computer systems, such as but not limited to disconnecting the power before opening the case, using proper electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions (including ground straps, gloves, ESD mats), having suitable facilities and proper tools and training.

Identifying the Intel chipset components located in your computer can usually be done by looking at the motherboard for the chipset markings. Chipsets are comprised of multiple components and the website listed below shows the combinations that make up the various Intel® 800 series of chipsets.

Note: Intel strongly recommends that you do not try removing any heat sink attached to your chipset (if present) to view the chipset markings.

Chipset Photo Examples (see

http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/inf/identify.htm

)

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Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility for Intel Chipsets

Appendix B Intel Chipset Software

Installation Utility for Intel Chipsets

B.1 Description

The Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility (formerly referred to as Intel INF Installation

Utility) for Intel chipsets was developed for updating certain versions of Windows. This utility allows the operating system to correctly identify the Intel chipset components and properly configure the system. The Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility installs specific Windows

INF files. The INF files inform the operating system about how to properly configure the chipset for specific functionality, such as AGP, USB, Core PCI, and ISA PnP services.

For more details about the specific INF files that are updated, please refer to the README.TXT

file that is included with the Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility for Intel chipsets.

Note: It is important that your Intel chipset is properly configured prior to installing the Intel Matrix

Storage Manager. If the Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility is needed, it should always be installed prior to installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager.

F6 Installation Note: If you plan on installing the Intel Matrix Storage Manager using the F6 installation method (Section 14), you will not be able to install the Intel Chipset Software

Installation Utility first.

B.2

B.3

Obtaining the Intel Chipset Software Installation

Utility

The Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility for Intel chipsets can be downloaded from the following Intel web site: http://downloadfinder2.intel.com/scripts-df/Product_Filter.asp?ProductID=816

Confirming Installation of the Intel Chipset

Software Installation Utility

To confirm that the Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility in installed, please refer to the instructions listed on the following Intel website: http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/inf/confirm.htm

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B.4 Troubleshooting

After installing the Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility for Intel chipsets, certain symptoms may be seen depending on the system configuration. Please refer to the following Intel Chipset

Software Installation Utility website for troubleshooting information: http://support.intel.com/support/chipsets/inf/

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Serial ATA

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Appendix C Serial ATA

C.1 Description

Serial ATA (SATA) is defined as the primary inside-the-box storage connection only, with no outside-the-box implementation. It is a storage device-centric technology and does not support other peripherals, such as cameras, scanners, or printers.

The Serial ATA 1.0 specification outlines the following benefits: x x x

Performance Headroom: SATA provides higher performance than equivalent ATA with performance scaling from 150MB/sec at introduction and 300MB/sec in the second generation. It is ultimately forecasted to reach 600MB/sec during its anticipated 10-year roadmap.

Software Transparency with Legacy Parallel ATA: This enables a relatively easy transition to the new technology.

Low Cost: SATA is cost-competitive with equivalent Parallel ATA solutions, including hosts, devices, and cabling in volume quantities.

C.2

Comparing Serial ATA toParallel ATA

The table below compares Serial ATA (SATA) to Parallel ATA (IDE):

Serial ATA (SATA)

Theoretical Transfer Rate

(over life of SATA)

Transfer Mode

Data Cable

Max Data Cable Length

Power Cable

Power Consumed

150/300/600

MB/sec (forecast only)

Generation 1-2

7-pin SATA

1 meter (39 inches)

SATA Power Cable

250 mV

Parallel ATA (IDE)

Theoretical Transfer Rate

133MB/sec

Transfer Modes

Data Cable

Max Data Cable Length

Power Cable

Power Consumed

PIO – UDMA-6

40-pin, 80-conductor IDE

IDE Power Cable

5 V

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The following illustrations show examples of SATA and IDE data cables:

Serial ATA

C.4

To use Serial ATA (SATA), your system must meet ALL of the following requirements: x

SATA compatible logic either on the motherboard or on a Serial ATA adapter card x

Serial ATA adapter cards are not supported by the Intel Matrix Storage Manager x

SATA compatible BIOS x

SATA-aware device driver for the operating system x

SATA compatible device such as a hard drive x

A SATA data cable x

A SATA power cable

Serial ATA Data Cable

Serial ATA (SATA) data cables are 7-pin cables. Either end of the SATA data cable can be connected to the SATA hard drive or the connector on the motherboard. SATA data cables can be up to 1 meter (39 inches) in length. The following illustration shows an example of a SATA data cable:

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Serial ATA

C.5

Serial ATA Power Cable

Serial ATA power cables are usually 4 or 5-pin cables with 15-pin connectors. SATA power cables currently use an IDE/ATAPI to SATA power adaptor. One end of the SATA power cable is a typical 4-pin IDE/ATAPI power connector (which gets connected to an unused power cable from the power supply) and the other end (15-pin connector) gets connected to the SATA hard drive. The following illustration shows an example of a SATA power cable:

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C.6

C.7

C.8

Are a Serial ATA Data and Power Cable Needed for

Serial ATA?

To take advantage of Serial ATA (SATA), SATA data and power cables must be used. These

SATA cables have a new design configuration; you cannot use older 40-pin, 80-conductor IDE or regular IDE power cables with SATA hard drives because they physically do not fit the SATA devices.

Mixing/Matching Serial ATA Hard Drives with IDE

Hard Drives

If your motherboard has a supported Intel chipset and provides both IDE and Serial ATA connections, you can use both Serial ATA and IDE hard drives in the system. Note that Serial

ATA hard drives use different data and power cables than IDE devices. To use both IDE and

Serial ATA hard drives in a RAID configuration, please refer to Section 20.3 titled ‘Create

Volume Manually’ for additional information.

Using IDE to Serial ATA Adaptors

Using IDE to Serial ATA adaptors (also referred to as “Serial ATA converter” or “device side dongle”) to connect IDE hard drives to Serial ATA ports is not recommended. Intel recommends that you only connect Serial ATA hard drives to Serial ATA ports. IDE to Serial ATA Adapters are not recommended for use with Intel Matrix Storage Technology because these devices have not been validated for use in Intel platforms. Intel does not provide support for configurations using IDE to Serial ATA Adapters.

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C.9

Theoretical Transfer Rates Associated with

Transfer Modes

The table below lists different transfer modes Serial ATA (SATA) devices support along with the theoretical transfer rate. Please refer to the documentation that was bundled with your device or contact the hardware manufacturer for more information about your specific device.

Note: This table contains theoretical transfer rates of SATA transfer modes supported by the Intel

82801ER I/O Controller Hub. Your actual transfer rates can vary from the information contained in this table. To take advantage of Serial ATA, your system must meet specific requirements.

Please refer to Appendix C.3 for more information.

Table 1. Serial ATA Transfer Rates Associated With Transfer Modes

Mode

Generation 1

Generation 2

Theoretical Transfer Rate (MB/s)

150MB/s

300MB/s

Note: Refer to the Glossary (Appendix D) for a definition of the terms ‘theoretical transfer rate’,

‘sustained transfer rate’, and ‘burst transfer rate’.

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Glossary

Appendix D Glossary

48-bit LBA

AHCI

Array Roaming

BIOS

Block size

Burst transfer rate

Create From Existing Disk

Disks

IDE

IDE to Serial ATA Adaptor

ICH5R

ICH6R

ICH7R

Intel Matrix Storage

Manager Option ROM

Matrix RAID

Native Hot Plug

NCQ

Port0

Port1

Port2

Technology used with hard drives larger than 137GB

Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) is an interface specification that allows the storage driver to enable advanced Serial ATA features such as

Native Command Queuing and hot plug.

Ability to move a complete RAID array from one computer system to another computer system and preserve the RAID configuration information and data on that RAID array.

Basic Input/Output System

Same term as ‘Strip size’: Grouping of data on a single physical disk within a

RAID volume

Maximum burst rate of the drive. These short transfers usually account for a small percentage of total transfer requests, mostly from the integrated controller cache or buffer.

Feature in the Intel Matrix Storage Manager which allows flexibility to upgrade from a single Serial ATA (SATA) hard drive to a RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, or

RAID 10 configuration when an additional SATA hard drive is added to the system. Occurs without loss of data.

Physical disks attached to a RAID controller

Integrated Drive Electronics

Also referred to as “Serial ATA converter” or “device side dongle.” Connects

IDE hard drive to Serial ATA port

Intel 82801ER I/O Controller Hub

Intel 82801FR I/O Controller Hub

Intel 82801GR I/O Controller Hub

Standard PnP option ROM that provides a pre-operating system user interface for the Intel RAID implementation. Also allows boot order to be selected from within the BIOSes setup utility.

Combines the benefits of two RAID volumes on a single RAID array

Feature supported by AHCI, allowing Serial ATA hard drive removal or insertion while the system is powered on and running. For example, this may be used when replacing a failed hard drive that is in an externally-accessible drive enclosure.

Native Command Queuing (NCQ) is a feature supported by AHCI that allows for ATA drives to accept more than one command at a time. NCQ, when used in conjunction with a hard drive that supports NCQ, increases storage performance on random workloads by allowing the drive to internally optimize the order of commands.

Serial ATA port (connector) on a motherboard identified as Port0

Serial ATA port (connector) on a motherboard identified as Port1

Serial ATA port (connector) on a motherboard identified as Port2

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Glossary

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Port3

POST

RAID

RAID 0

RAID 1

RAID 5

RAID 10

RAID Array

RAID Ready

RAID Volume

SCSI

Serial ATA (SATA)

Strip

Stripe

Sustained transfer rate

Theoretical transfer rate

Serial ATA port (connector) on a motherboard identified as Port3

Power-On Self Test

Redundant Array of Independent Disks

Data striping array. RAID 0 stripes the data across all the drives but doesn’t utilize parity. This RAID level is designed for speed and is the fastest of the

RAID levels but provides the least protection.

Mirrored array. RAID 1 requires that each primary data disk have a mirrored disk. The contents of the primary disk and the mirror disk are identical. RAID 1 provides the best data protection but is slower than RAID level 0.

Striping with parity array. The data in the RAID volume and parity are striped across the array’s members. Parity is written along with the data in a rotating sequence across the members of the array. This RAID level is a preferred configuration for efficiency, fault-tolerance, and performance.

RAID 0 + 1. Information is striped across a two disk array for system performance. Each of the drives in the array has a mirror for fault tolerance.

RAID 10 provides the performance benefits of RAID 0 and the redundancy of

RAID 1; however, it requires a minimum of four disk drives.

A group of physical disk drives managed by either hardware, software, or a combination of both

Term used to describe a system that an end-user can turn into a RAID system by adding additional Serial ATA hard drive(s) and invoking the migration feature

A block of capacity, allocated from a RAID array and arranged into a RAID topology. The operating system sees a RAID volume as a physical disk.

Small Computer System Interface

New storage interface designed to replace parallel ATA (e.g. IDE technology).

SATA was designed for a variety reasons, including performance headroom, cabling issues, and voltage tolerance requirements.

Grouping of data on a single physical disk within a RAID volume

The sum of all strips in a horizontal axis across physical disks within a RAID volume

Rate at which the drive can transfer data sequentially from multiple tracks and cylinders on the disk (closer to real-world file transfers)

Actual speed that the drive can read bits from the surface of the platter or write bits to the surface of the platter (can be used to compare drives against one another)

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