VM42/62 User's Manual
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Preface
VM62(A) / VM42(A)
Intelligent Universal Controller Modules
for Stand-Alone and VMEbus
Manual Order No. 3368
User’s Manual
Issue 3
Unpacking and Special Handling Instructions
This PepCard product is carefully designed for a long and fault-free life; nonetheless, its life expectancy can be drastically
reduced by improper treatment during unpacking and installation.
Observe standard anti-static precautions when changing piggybacks, ROM devices, jumper settings, etc. If the product
contains batteries for RTC or memory back-up, ensure that the board is not placed on conductive surfaces, including antistatic plastics or sponges. These can cause shorts and damage to the batteries or tracks on the board.
When installing the board, switch off the power mains to the chassis. Do not disconnect the mains as the ground
connection prevents the chassis from static voltages, which can damage the board as it is inserted.
Furthermore, do not exceed the specified operational temperature ranges of the board version ordered. If batteries are
present, their temperature restrictions must be taken into account.
Keep all of the original packaging material for future storage or warranty shipments. If it is necessary to store or ship the
board, re-pack it as it was originally packed.
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 0-1
Preface
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
R EVISION HISTORY
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Issue
1
2
2.0.1
3
Brief Description of Changes
Issue 1
General Corrections throughout Manual
Correction of Figure 3.2.0.1 (Jumper Layout Solder Side)
Updated for board index 02
PCB Index
01-01/2
01-01/4
01-01/4
02
Date of Issue
March, 1995
June, 1995
July, 1995
December, 1995
This document contains proprietary information of PEP Modular Computers. It may not be copied or transmitted by
any means, passed to others, or stored in any retrieval system or media, without the prior consent of PEP Modular
Computers or its authorized agents.
The information in this document is, to the best of our knowledge, entirely correct. However, PEP Modular
Computers cannot accept liability for any inaccuracies, or the consequences thereof, nor for any liability arising from
the use or application of any circuit, product, or example shown in this document.
PEP Modular Computers reserve the right to change, modify, or improve this document or the product described
herein, as seen fit by PEP Modular Computers without further notice.
Page 0-2
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Preface
PEP Modular Computers® Two Year Limited Warranty
We grant the original purchaser of PEP products the following hardware and system warranty. No other warranties that
may be granted or implied by anyone on behalf of PEP are valid unless the consumer has the express written consent of
P E P Modular Computers.
PEP Modular Computers warrants their own products (excluding software) to be free from defects in workmanship
and materials for a period of 24 consecutive months from the date of purchase. This warranty is not transferable nor
extendible to cover any other consumers or long term storage of the product.
This warranty does not cover products which have been modified, altered, or repaired by any other party than
PEP Modular Computers or their authorized agents. Furthermore, any product which has been, or is suspected of
being damaged as a result of negligence, misuse, incorrect handling, servicing or maintenance; or has been damaged as a
result of excessive current/voltage or temperature; or has had its serial number(s), any other markings, or parts thereof
altered, defaced, or removed will also be excluded from this warranty.
A customer who has not excluded his eligibility for this warranty may, in the event of any claim, return the product at
the earliest possible convenience, together with a copy of the original proof of purchase, a full description of the
application it is used on, and a description of the defect; to the original place of purchase. Pack the product in such a way
as to ensure safe transportation (we recommend the original packing materials), whereby PEP undertakes to repair or
replace any part, assembly or sub-assembly at our discretion; or, to refund the original cost of purchase, if appropriate.
In the event of repair, refund, or replacement of any part, the ownership of the removed or replaced parts reverts to
PEP Modular Computers, and the remaining part of the original guarantee, or any new guarantee to cover the
repaired or replaced items, will be transferred to cover the new or repaired items. Any extensions to the original guarantee
are considered gestures of goodwill, and will be defined in the "Repair Report" returned from PEP with the repaired or
replaced item.
Other than the repair, replacement, or refund specified above, PEP Modular Computers will not accept any liability
for any further claims which result directly or indirectly from any warranty claim. We specifically exclude any claim for
damage to any system or process in which the product was employed, or any loss incurred as a result of the product not
functioning at any given time. The extent of PEP Modular Computers liability to the customer shall not be greater
than the original purchase price of the item for which any claim exists.
PEP Modular Computers makes no warranty or representation, either express or implied, with respect to its
products, reliability, fitness, quality, marketability or ability to fulfill any particular application or purpose. As a result,
the products are sold "as is," and the responsibility to ensure their suitability for any given task remains the purchaser's.
In no event will PEP be liable for direct, indirect, or consequential damages resulting from the use of our hardware or
software products, or documentation; even if we were advised of the possibility of such claims prior to the purchase of, or
during any period since the purchase of the product.
Please remember that no PEP Modular Computers employee, dealer, or agent are authorized to make any
modification or addition to the above terms, either verbally or in any other form written or electronically transmitted,
without consent.
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 0-3
Preface
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
T ABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
1.
Introduction
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1.1 Product Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 Ordering Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Figure 1.2.0.1: VM62(A)/VM42(A) Configuration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.4 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Table 1.4.0.1: CPU Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Figure 1.4.0.2: MC68EN360 Intelligent Controller Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.5 Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.
Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2.0.0.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1 The 68EN360 (QUICC) on the VM62(A) / VM42(A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2 Address Decoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.1 Basic Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.2 Boot Decoding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.3 Primary Address Decoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.4 Secondary Address Decoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.5 Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2.2.5.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.6 DMA Transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3 VMEbus Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.1 System Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.2 Dual-Ported SRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.3 Mailbox Interrupt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.4 VMEbus Control / Status Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4 Interrupt Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.1 Internal Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.2 External Autovector Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.3 VME Interrupt Mask Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5 I/O Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.1 Ethernet Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.2 Serial Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2.5.2.1: MC68EN360 Intelligent Controller Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.3 CXC Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 2.5.3.1: CXC Pinouts using the 68(EN)360 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 2.5.3.2: Further Explanation of 68(EN)360 Mnemonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.4 AutoBahn Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6 Special Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.1 Real-Time Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.2 EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.3 TICK Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.4 On-board Bus Error Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.5 VME Bus Error Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.6 Watchdog Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2.6.6.1: Watchdog LED Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.7 First Slot Detection (FSD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.8 Board Control/Status Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.9 Reset Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Page 0-4
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
2-1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
6
7
7
7
8
9
9
9
9
10
11
15
16
17
17
17
17
17
18
18
18
18
19
20
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Preface
2.7 Front Panel Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 2.7.0.1: LED Port and Button Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.7.1 RESET Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.7.2 ABORT Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.7.3 LED Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8 Data Retention for RTC and SRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.9 Register Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
20
20
20
20
21
22
3.
Configuration
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
Table 3.0.0.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Default Jumper Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
3.1 Jumper Description (Component Side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Figure 3.1.0.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Jumper Layout (Component Side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
3.1.1 Jumper J1: VME-SYSCLK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.1.2 Jumper J2: VME-SYSRES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.1.3 Jumper J8: VME Boot (VBOOT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.1.4 Jumper J9: AutoBahn Boot (ABOOT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.1.5 Jumper J14: Connection of Protective and Signal GND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.2 Jumper Description (Solder Side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Figure 3.2.0.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Jumper Layout (Solder Side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.2.1 Jumpers J3, J4 and J5: CPU (Bus) Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.2.2 Jumper J6: 24 MHz Clock (Communications Clock) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.2.3 Jumper J7: CPU Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.2.4 Jumper J10: Serial EEPROM Write Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.2.5 Jumpers J11 and J12: SRAM Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.2.6 Jumpers J131 - J134: Processor Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
4.
Memory Piggybacks
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1 DM600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1.1 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 4.1.1.1: DM600 Jumper Layout (Component Side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 DM601 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.1 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 4.2.1.1: DM601 Jumper Layout (Component Side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3 DM602 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4 DM603 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.1 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figure 4.4.1.1: DM603 Jumper Layout (Component Side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
4-1
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
Page 0-5
Preface
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
5.
Pinouts
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
5.1 Main Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Figure 5.1.0.1: Main Board Connector Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
5.1.1 VMEbus Connector (ST1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
5.1.2 CXC Connector (ST3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
5.2 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
5.2.1 Standard RS232 Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Figure 5.2.1.1: Standard Front Panel Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
5.2.2 Ethernet 10Base2 (SI-10B2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Figure 5.2.2.1: SI-10B2 Front Panel Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
5.2.3 Ethernet AUI / 10Base5 (SI-10B5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Figure 5.2.3.1: SI-10B5 Front Panel Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
5.2.4 Serial RS232 Interface (SI-PB232) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Figure 5.2.4.1: SI-PB232 Front Panel Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
5.2.5 Ethernet 10BaseT (SI-10BT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Figure 5.2.5.1: SI-10BT Front Panel Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
5.2.6 PROFIBUS Interface (SI-PBPRO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Figure 5.2.6.1: SI-PBPRO Front Panel Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
6.
Software Configuration
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6.1 Initializing the 68EN360 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
6.2 Initialising the Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Appendix Controller eXtension Connector
Appendix OS-9 Cabling
Page 0-6
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 1 Introduction
1
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1
Product Overview
The computer user today requires high performance to meet high expectations. At the same time, the mass of data that
has to be processed is dramatically increasing, for instance the data that a modern graphic user interface generates.
Additionally, there is a further demand on the communications ability and multi-functionality of the computer.
The VM62(A)/VM42(A) meets all the above requirements, combining high computational performance with excellent
communication ability via the AutoBahn™ Spanceiver™ chip.
A combination of the high performance CPU (Motorola MC68060 or 68040) and the Quad Integrated Communications
Controller chip, the Motorola MC68EN360 or QUICC, not only enables a pure computation performance from
approximately 35 MIPS to over 100 MIPS, but dispenses with the usual restrictions associated with communications
over serial interfaces. Communication tasks are dealt with by the QUICC chip, freeing the CPU from such timeconsuming chores. Fieldbus protocol, such as PROFIBUS, are also handled by the QUICC. In addition, the QUICC,
used together with PEP’s expanding CXC interface is ideally suited for communication tasks extending from 6 serial
interfaces over LAN to WAN (X.25, ISDN) applications. The ‘EN’ version of the QUICC also supports Ethernet on 2
channels (only one usable on the VM42(A)/VM62(A) using PEP standard software).
The various I/O interfaces are realised using piggybacks attached to the main board. Five options are at the moment
available. They are:
•
•
•
•
•
Ethernet 10Base 2;
Ethernet 10Base 5 (AUI);
Ethernet 10BaseT;
2 * RS232 serial interfaces;
PROFIBUS interface (RS485, isolated, half duplex, 2 wires).
PEP’s AutoBahn technology has solved one of the major problems that exist in information technology - data transfer
over the various bus systems. Normally the data transfer rate over a bus system is below the data transfer capability of a
modern CPU chip. The AutoBahn chip (the Spanceiver MC100SX1451) allows transfer rates of up to 100 Mbyte/sec
over the VMEbus using the VMEbus lines SERA and SERB.
PEP has also developed a cost-effective VMEbus backplane series that support AutoBahn, called VBP4A, in 7, 12 and 15
slot options. These backplanes allow direct connection of the main power supply, hence reducing cabling costs
dramatically.
A CXM-SIO3 module is available in order to make all three serial interfaces that are available on the CXC accessible on
the VM62(A)/VM42(A). This is achieved by using RS232, SC-xxx or SI-xxx interfaces. For more details, please refer to
the CXM-SIO3 user’s manual.
AutoBahn ™ and Spanceiver ™ are trademarks of PEP Modular Computers.
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 1-1
Chapter 1 Introduction
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
1.2 Ordering Information
Name
Description
VM62-BASE
VMEbus single board computer comprising MC68060 @ 50 MHz,
MC68EN360 @ 25 MHz, 256 kByte dual-ported SRAM (with Gold Cap for
backup), configured for use with the AutoBahn interface piggyback, up to 6
serial interfaces (2 available on the front panel as RS232 and an additional 4
divided between the CXC interface and SI-Interface), CXC Interface, PEPbug.
12349
VM62-BASE
Same as order no. 12349 but with 1 MByte dual-ported SRAM
12350
VM42-BASE
VMEbus single board computer comprising MC68040 @ 33 MHz,
MC68EN360 @ 33 MHz, 256 kByte dual-ported SRAM (with Gold Cap for
backup), configured for use with the AutoBahn interface piggyback, 6 serial
interfaces (2 available on the front panel as RS232 and an additional 4 divided
between the CXC interface and SI-Interface), CXC Interface, PEPbug.
12344
VM42-BASE
Same as order no. 12344 but with 1 MByte dual-ported SRAM
12345
VM42-BASE
Same as order no. 12344 but with MC68040V @ 33 MHz (3.3-V technology)
12346
VM42-BASE
Same as order no. 12346 but with 1 MByte dual-ported SRAM
12347
DM600
Memory piggyback with 4 MByte DRAM and 1 MByte Flash EPROM
11852
DM600
Memory piggyback with 4 MByte DRAM and 4 MByte Flash EPROM
11853
DM601
Memory piggyback with 16 MByte DRAM and 1 MByte Flash EPROM
11854
DM601
Memory piggyback with 16 MByte DRAM and 4 MByte Flash EPROM
11855
DM602
Memory piggyback with 1 MByte DRAM and 1 MByte Flash EPROM
12765
DM603
Memory piggyback with 32 MByte DRAM and 512 kByte Flash EPROM
13027
DM603
Memory piggyback with 32 MByte DRAM and 2 MByte Flash EPROM
13627
SI-10B2
10Base2 (Thin) Ethernet (cheapernet) interface with RG58 (coax) connector
9925
SI-10B5
10Base5 (AUI) Ethernet interface piggyback with 15-pin D-Sub connector
9924
SI-10BT
10BaseT (Twisted pair) Ethernet interface piggyback with RJ45 connector
9926
SI-DUMMY
Front panel only fitted when no SI piggyback required
12351
SI-PB232
Serial interface piggyback for 2 RS232 connections (Modem interface) with 2
RJ45 connectors
11850
SI-PB232-ISO
Serial interface piggyback for 1 RS232 optoisolated connection with 1 RJ45
connector (Available in 1996 if requested)
11851
SI-PBPRO
RS485 optoisolated interface piggyback for 2 wire half-duplex (PROFIBUS)
connection with 9-pin D-Sub connector
9927
MP-AB100
AutoBahn interface piggyback complete with all control logic, 128 kByte 32bit fast SRAM as buffer for AutoBahn data transfer with Spanceiver MC
100SX1451 of 50/100 MByte/s
9923
CABLE-VM42232
3 meter RS232 Serial Interface cable for VM42(A) / VM62(A) with 9-pin
female D-Sub (PC pinout) to RJ12 connector
12383
Page 1-2
Order No
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 1 Introduction
Name
Description
Order No
CXM-SIO3-1
CXM module with 3 RJ45 connected RS232 ports for use with a CXC
backplane
TBD
CXM-SIO3-1
CXM module with 3 RJ45 connected RS232 ports, compatible for direct
connection to a CPU board
13692
CXM-SIO3-2
CXM module with 2 RJ45 connected SC piggyback ports and one SI
piggyback interface, no front panel (delivered with SC piggyback) for use with
a CXC backplane
TBD
CXM-SIO3-2
CXM module with 2 RJ45 connected SC piggyback ports and one SI
piggyback interface, no front panel (delivered with SC piggyback), compatible
for direct connection to a CPU board
13693
CXM-SIO3-3
CXM module with 3 RJ45 connected SC piggyback ports for use with a CXC
backplane
TBD
CXM-SIO3-3
CXM module with 3 RJ45 connected SC piggyback ports, compatible for direct
connection to a CPU board
13694
CXM-SIO3-4
CXM module with 3 15-pin D-Sub connected SC piggyback ports, 8TE front
panel for use with a CXC backplane
TBD
CXM-SIO3-4
CXM module with 3 15-pin D-Sub connected SC piggyback ports, 8TE front
panel, compatible for direct connection to a CPU board
13695
Each VM62(A)/VM42(A) comes complete with 2 RS232 serial interfaces situated on the lower half of the front panelThese interfaces are provided with TxD and RxD signals by the SMC1 and SMC2 channels of the ‘QUICC’ controller.
The SCC1 channel of the ‘QUICC’ provides the interface to one of the available SI-xxx piggybacks. All other channels
(SCC2, SCC3 and SCC4) of the ‘QUICC’ are ported to the CXC interface except for the SI-PB232 piggyback which has
on-board additional control provided by the SCC4 channel through the SI Interface.
As mentioned above, a CXM-SIO3 module is available in order to make all the serial interfaces accessible on the
VM62(A)/VM42(A). For more details, please refer to the CXM-SIO3 user’s manual.
Important: The VM62(A)/VM42(A) must be ordered with a memory module (DM60x) and a front
panel interface piggyback module (SI-xxx).
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 1-3
Chapter 1 Introduction
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
OR
SRAM
1 MByte
RTC
VM62(A)
MC68060
@ 50 / 66MHz
VM42(A)
MC68040V
@ 33 MHz
MC68EN360
@ 33 MHz
VM62(A)
MC68060
@ 50/66 MHz
MC68EN360
@ 25 /33MHz
SRAM
256 kByte
OR
dual-ported
SRAM
MP
interface
(optional)
Spanciever
Dual-ported
SRAM
128 kByte
DRAM
+
FLASH
VMEbus
* System
controller
* Master/slave
interface
SRAM
1 MByte
SRAM
256 kByte
OR
SRAM
1 MByte
CPU Options
Page 1-4
VM42(A)
MC68040(V)
MC68040
@ 33 MHz
1 kbit EEPROM
Optional MP
Interface Piggyback
68EN360
* Ethernet
* 6 serial I/O
* Timers
* Watchdog
Companion Mode
VMEbus
VM42(A)
MC68040
@ 33 MHz
MC68EN360
@ 33 MHz
SRAM
256 kByte
CXC Interface
Figure 1.2.0.1: VM62(A)/VM42(A) Configuration Options
Optional Memory Piggyback
with
1 MByte DRAM
1 MByte FLASH
Optional Memory Piggyback
with
4 MByte DRAM
1 or 4 MByte FLASH
Optional Memory Piggyback
with
16 MByte DRAM
1 or 4 MByte FLASH
Optional Memory Piggyback
with
32 MByte DRAM
512 kByte or 2 MByte FLASH
Memory Piggybacks
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
1.3
Chapter 1 Introduction
Specifications
Main CPU
I/O Controller
MC68060
MC68040
MC68040V
MC68LC040
66 or 50 MHz
33 or 25 MHz
33 or 25 MHz
33 or 25 MHz
(3.3V)
(3.3V)
MC68EN360, 25 or 33MHz used in companion mode
Memory
DRAM
FLASH
SRAM
EEPROM
1, 4, 16 or 32 Mbyte
0.5, 1, 2, or 4 MByte
1 MByte or 256 kByte (dual-ported, backed-up using Gold-Caps)
2 kbit (serial); 1 kbit available for applications
VMEbus Interface
A24:D16/D8
Arbitration
AM Codes
Master and slave with optional AutoBahn Interface (100 MBytes/sec)
Single level (BR3*), release-when-done daisy-chain
Standard Superv./User Prog./Data HEX 39/3A/3D/3E
User Defined
HEX 10-17/18-1F
Short I/O
HEX 29/2D
System controller functions
• Automatic First Slot Detection (FSD)
• SYSRES*
(disabled by jumper)
• SYSCLK*
(disabled by jumper)
• ACFAIL*
• SYSFAIL*
• Power monitor
• Bus monitor
(programmable)
• VME IRQ mask register
A24:D16
Dual-port SRAM
1 Mailbox IRQ
Slave
1 Mbyte window, software programmable base (1 out of 16 addresses)
Lower 8kBytes of the SRAM area
Interrupt Control
7 Level VME IRQ Handler,
maskable via VME IRQ mask
register
System vectors
ACFAIL*
-> Level 7 autovectored
ABORT
-> Level 7 autovectored
TICK
-> Level 6 autovectored
SYSFAIL*
-> Level 3 autovectored (maskable)*
Mailbox IRQ
-> Level 5 autovectored
AutoBahn IRQ 2
-> Level 2 autovectored
AutoBahn IRQ 1
-> Level 1 autovectored
16 on-board Interrupters, Levels / Vectors programmable
* Available for Index 02 boards or later.
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 1-5
Chapter 1 Introduction
I/O Ports
Serial
Mezzanine Interface
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
RISC controller (in the 68EN360) with 14 dedicated DMA channels
4*multiprotocol SCCs up to 8 MBaud
with one (two) supporting IEEE 802.3/Ethernet up to 10 Mbit/s
10Base5, 10Base2 or 10BaseT
2*UARTs RS232 (XON/XOFF) RS232 up to 120 kBaud
4 independent baud rate generators
CXC Interface
- 16 bit asyncronous data transfer with 4 IRQs,
independent DMA channel
- 3 serial interfaces
Timers
TICK
General Purpose
Watchdog
Periodic Interrupt Timer, programmable
4*16 bit or 2*32 bit, programmable
512 ms time-out for reset, programmable
Special Functions
Real-time clock (backed-up)
Date (year, month, week, day)
Time (hour, minute, second)
Serial EEPROM
1 kbit for board specific data (serial number, Internet address, etc.)
+ 1 kbit for application purposes
DMA
2 independent channels (supports single and dual address transfers
between all offboard locations including DRAM, FLASH,
AutoBahn memory, CXC and VME)
Front Panel Functions
RESET button
ABORT button
HALT LED (red)
Watchdog LED (yellow)
General purpose LED (green)
Data Retention
Short term backup for RTC and
SRAM via on-board Gold-Cap
Typ. 2µA/3V -> 50 hours
Long term backup via VME 5V
Stby line
Dependent on the battery installed on the system 5V Stby.
Automatic switching between 5V Stby and internal Gold-Cap
Typ. 30µA/3V
Power Requirements
VM62 /66 MHz
VM62 /50 MHz
VM42 /33 MHz (68040)
VM42 /25 MHz 3.3V (68040V)
To be defined
5 W with DM600 and SITB5 fitted
7W with DM600 and SITB5 fitted
4 W with DM600 and SITB5 fitted
Temperature Range
Standard 0 - 70˚C
Optionally E2 -40˚C to +85˚C
Operating Humidity
0 to 95% non-condensing
Board Size
Single height Eurocard 100*160 mm
VMEbus Connector
DIN 41612 style C, 96 contacts, P1 connector
Front panel width
4 TE, 1 slot
Page 1-6
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
1.4
Chapter 1 Introduction
Features
CPU Options
The Table below illustrates the capabilities of the available CPUs. The 68060 processors operating at 50 MHz deliver up
to 100 MIPs while the 68040 processors operating at 33 MHz give performances up to 35 MIPs.
Table 1.4.0.1: CPU Configuration
*
Processor
Product
CPU
MMU
FPU
Supply
MC68040
VM42(A)
√
√
√
5V
MC68LC040*
VM42(A)
√
√
5V
MC68040V
VM42(A)
√
√
3.3V
MC68060
VM62(A)
√
√
MC68EC060
planned project
VM62(A)
√
√
3.3V
3.3V
Mask E71M required.
68EN360
25/33 MHz - the ‘QUICC’ chip used in ‘companion mode’ is tightly coupled to the CPU. Working as an I/O and system
controller, it provides all the necessary interfaces, timers and clocks etc. in addition to the DRAM memory controller.
Serial Channels
Six are provided by the ‘QUICC’ - Two SMC channels are ported to the front panel and the remaining four SCC channels
may be optionally configured as shown below.
Figure 1.4.0.2: MC68EN360 Intelligent Controller Schematic
SCC2
SCC3
SCC4
MC68EN360
SCC1
SMC1
}}
SI-Interface
CXC Interface
SI-Piggyback
Interface
SMC2
}
2x RS232 with
Rx and Tx only
May 17, 1996
Memory
Piggyback
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 1-7
Chapter 1 Introduction
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Ethernet Interface (SI-10B2, SI-10B5, SI-10BT)
Three different piggybacks complete with all the associated control logic are available providing 10Base5, 10Base2 or
10BaseT interfaces.
Note
The SI-10B5 piggyback requires an external +12V power source to operate.
Fieldbus Interface (SI-PBPRO)
This is a fully optoisolated RS485 (PROFIBUS) interface piggyback with a 9-pin D-Sub connector.
RS232 Serial Interface
Two piggybacks are available with RJ45 connectors for MODEM compatible communication.
AutoBahn Interface (MP-AB100)
This is realised via a piggyback containing all the necessary control logic, 128 kByte high speed SRAM (10 ns) as a
memory buffer between the processor and the AutoBahn chip (MC 100SX1451) for communication on the high speed
serial data lines over pins b21 and b22 of the VMEbus.
DMA Channels
2 independent channels are provided by the ‘QUICC’ chip and can be used by applications requiring data transfer between
CXC-modules, DRAM, FLASH memory, dual-ported SRAM and AutoBahn memory buffers. This memory can be
configured with different memory options allowing tremendous flexibility when customising memory requirements for
real-time applications.
DRAM/FLASH
This memory, complete with a 32 bit data wide access bus is placed on a piggyback with addressing capability for up to
two memory banks of 64 MByte each. On-board +5V FLASH memory provides the latest ROM technology allowing the
user to take advantage of the on-board programming facility to produce low cost upgrades by simply overwriting existing
stored data.
SRAM
This is a dual-ported battery-backed (Gold-Cap) memory area with a 16 bit data wide access bus. Users of the VMEbus
and the on-board CPU both have access to this memory. The lower 8 kByte are reserved for the location monitor.
EEPROM
Although a 2 kbit EEPROM is provided on-board, 1 kbit has been pre-programmed with PEP production data (boot info,
Ethernet registration, etc) leaving the remaining 1 kbit for user application code. A write protect jumper prevents
accidental erasure.
Page 1-8
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
1.5
Chapter 1 Introduction
Related Publications
VITA
VMEbus Specifications Revision C1
MPI: Modpack and CXC Specification from PEP (Version 1.5 or later)
Motorola
M68060 Microprocessors User’s Manual
M68040 Microprocessors User’s Manual
MC68EN360 Quad Integrated Communications Controller User’s Manual
AutoBahn Spanceiver Data Sheet
EM Microelectronic
V3021 1 Bit Real Time Clock Data Sheet
XICOR
X25C02 SPI Serial EEPROM Data Sheet
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 1-9
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 2 Functional Description
2
2. FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
Figure 2.0.0.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Block Diagram
CPU
68(LC)040
68040V
33 / (40) MHz
68060
50 / 66 / (80) MHz
32 Bit
32 Bit
68EN360
Companion
Mode
25/33/(40) MHz
DRAM
1/4/16/32 MB
FLASH
0.5/1/2/4 MB
IRQ
Handler
Clock
Logic
Reset
Logic
Status/
Control
Logic
Watchdog
Address/
Data/
Control
3.3V
5V
Serial
EEPROM
Real-Time
Clock
BUSSIZER
SPI
1 Bit
8 Bit
1 Bit
CXC (Serial / Parallel / DMA Port)
16 Bit
optional
On board Gold-Cap
Backup
Logic
autoswitchover
VME 5V Stdby
Dual-Port
SRAM
Serial
I/O User
Spec
Serial
I/O User
Spec
Serial
I/O User
Spec
SCC2
SCC3
SCC4
SCSI
(DMA)
16 Bit
256/1MB
70ns
Front Panel
optional
b21
b22
AutoBahn
Interface
32 Bit
Serial
I/O
RS232
Serial
I/O
RS232
SMC1
SMC2
10Base2/5/T
RS485
RS232 ISo
2*RS232
LED
Functions
SCC1 SCC4
Standard I/O
Additional I/O
16 Bit
VMEbus Interface
Master / Slave
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-1
Chapter 2 Functional Description
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
2.1 The 68EN360 (QUICC) on the VM62(A) / VM42(A)
Motorola’s MC68EN360 is a 32 bit high performance communication controller, combining powerful peripheral
functions with system integration functions and an on-chip microprocessor core (CPU32+).
On the VM62(A) / VM42(A), the on-chip CPU core is disabled and replaced with a more powerful external CPU, the
MC68040 or MC68060. The 68EN360 operates as a slave to the CPU in so-called ‘Companion Mode’. In this mode, the
68EN360 provides complete I/O functionality. The DMA channels can still obtain ownership of the CPU’s system bus
and therefore all on-chip DMA channels can address the whole of the address space. Moreover, important functions for
system integration, such as memory controller, clock generation, interrupt controller etc. are available in this mode,
meeting the requirements for the initialisation of the 68EN360, described later in this manual.
The programming of the 68EN360 begins by determining the block of on-chip RAM and registers via the MBAR
register. This register is located at a fixed address and can only be accessed in CPU space.
2.2 Address Decoder
2.2.1 Basic Structure
The address decoder of the VM62(A) / VM42(A) consists of two basic parts. A primary address decoder pre-decodes the
select signals for the processor data bus (in front of the bussizer) and for the I/O data bus (behind the bussizer). With
reference to initial boot cycles, the primary address decoder passes or enables a secondary address decoder stage. The
secondary address decoder stage is realised using the programmable chip slect logic of the MC68EN360. The 8 outputs of
the 68EN360 chip select logic are used for the base addresses of the various memory and I/O address ranges.
2.2.2 Boot Decoding
Due to the fact that the default boot memory used by the VM62(A) / VM42(A) is FLASH memory, which is completely
reprogrammable, a special boot decoder is provided. The boot memory is jumper selectable, the user having the choice
between FLASH (default), VMEbus memory or the on-board AutoBahn Interface. The boot decoder redirects the physical
address range 0H to 1000000H from either FLASH (DM60x), VMEbus or MP piggyback, providing the selected boot
memory is initially accessed.
Note
VMEbus boot memory must be located at VME base address 0H in Standard Supervisor Program/Data
address space.
Page 2-2
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 2 Functional Description
2.2.3 Primary Address Decoder
The primary address decoder generates the following select signals.
CS_360
Secondary address decoder (68EN360, DRAM, FLASH)
CS_VME
VMEbus address range
CS_AUT
AutoBahn Interface address range
CS_BSS
Bussizer address range (VME, SRAM, AutoBahn, I/O)
BERR_0
Reserved address range (Bus Error)
EN_BSS
68EN360 DMA address range
IACK
Interrupt Acknowledge Cycle
2.2.4
Secondary Address Decoder
The secondary address decoder is built by the 68EN360 chip select logic and is therefore programmable. The outputs are
used as base address selects, as shown below.
68EN360 Chip Select
Connected to
CS0
FLASH
CS1
DRAM
CS2
VME via 68EN360 DMA
CS3
AutoBahn Interface
CS4
SRAM
CS5
CXC
CS6
RTC
CS7
Control / Status Registers
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-3
Chapter 2 Functional Description
2.2.5
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Address Map
The VM62(A) / VM42(A) address map shown in the Table below is based on the recommended default initialisation of
the 68EN360 chip select logic.
Figure 2.2.5.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Address Map
(PEP Default)
Address (Hex)
Device
00 xx xx xx
04 xx xx xx
07 00 0x xx
09 xx xx xx
0A xx xx xx
0B xx xx xx
0C xx xx xx
0D xx xx xx
1x xx xx xx
2x xx xx xx
3x xx xx xx
4x xx xx xx
5x xx xx xx
6x xx xx xx
DRAM (68EN360’s CS1)
FLASH (68EN360’s CS0)
Reserved, 68EN360 internal RAM / register
DMA AutoBahn (CS3)
Reserved, mirrored 68EN360’s CS4
Reserved, mirrored 68EN360’s CS5
Reserved, mirrored 68EN360’s CS6
Reserved, mirrored 68EN360’s CS7
Reserved (BERR_0)
Reserved (BERR_0)
Reserved (BERR_0)
MP interface (CS_AUT)
Reserved (BERR_0)
Reserved (BERR_0)
The following address area is non-cachable serialised.
82 xx xx xx
83 xx xx xx
85 00 xx xx
87 xx xx xx
87 xx xx xx
9x xx xx xx
Ax xx xx xx
Bx xx xx xx
C0 xx xx xx
C4 xx xx xx
C7 xx xx xx
CA xx xx xx
CB F7 0x xx
CC xx xx xx
CD 00 00 01
CD 00 00 05
CD 00 00 07
Dx xx xx xx
Ex xx xx xx
Fx xx xx xx
VMEbus (CS_VME), user-defined AM code
VMEbus (CS_VME), user-defined AM code
VMEbus (CS_VME), short I/O AM code
VMEbus (CS_VME), user-defined AM code
DMA-VME, 68EN360’s CS2
Reserved (BERR_0)
Reserved (BERR_0)
Reserved (BERR_0)
Reserved, mirrored DRAM
Reserved, mirrored FLASH
Reserved, 68EN360 internal RAM / register
68EN360’s CS4, SRAM
68EN360’s CS5, CXC
68EN360’s CS6, RTC
68EN360’s CS7+1, VME IRQ MASK register
68EN360’s CS7+5, VME control / status register
68EN360’s CS7+7, board control / status register
Reserved (BERR_0)
Reserved (BERR_0)
Reserved (BERR_0)
Note
In order to determine the base of the 68EN360’s internal memory map, the module base address register
(MBAR) must be set. The location of this register is fixed in the address area Supervisor CPU Space at
3FF00H. For more information, please refer to the Software Configuration chapter in this manual.
Page 2-4
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
2.2.6
Chapter 2 Functional Description
DMA Transfers
Memory to memory transfers with the 68EN360 DMAs are possible with any combination of on-board and VME
addresses. In order to achieve address compatibility between CPU/VME and DMA/VME transfers, it is recommended that
the initialisation of CS2 be initialised to the standard VME address space as described in the Software Configuration
chapter in this manual.
2.3 VMEbus Interface
The VM62(A) / VM42(A) has a complete master interface for the P1, J1 VMEbus connector. It consists of a VMEbus
arbiter, requester, system controller and buffers for data/address/control signals. In addition, the VM62(A) / VM42(A)
provides a VMEbus slave interface which consists of a programmable board address decoder, a dual-ported RAM and a
mailbox interrupt controller.
2.3.1
System Controller
The VM62(A) / VM42(A) can act as a VME system controller with arbiter, system clock driver, power monitor with
system reset driver, IACK daisy chain driver and 7-level VMEbus interrupt controller.
Arbitration is single level FAIR1 on BR3*. If the VM62(A) / VM42(A) is used as system controller it has to be placed
in slot 1 of the VMEbus backplane (furthermost left slot). There is no jumper setting necessary, as the board provides a
‘first slot detection’ function which is also readable within the VME control / status register. The IACK daisy chain
driver is supplied by connecting the IACKIN* and IACKOUT* line. IACK* is connected via the VMEbus backplane for
IACKIN* of slot 1.
VME SYSCLK* and SYSRES* can be routed from on-board using jumpers, leaving the choice of generating these
signals by the system controller to the user. SYSFAIL* generates a maskable on-board autovectored interrupt (see also
External Autovector Requests). ACFAIL* generates a non-maskable autovector level 7 interrupt (NMI) in the same way
as the ABORT button. When an ACFAIL* NMI is detected, it can be differentiated from an ABORT by reading bit 1 of
the Board Control/Status Register (bit 1 is set to ‘1’ for ACFAIL*). If this is the case, the CPU should stay in the IRQ
service routine and save any important data to non-volatile memory.
The VM62(A) / VM42(A) also provides a bus monitor for the VMEbus. A 128µs timeout timer monitors VMEbus data
transfer cycle lengths and generates a VMEbus BERR* signal for error termination. This timer is enabled/disabled via the
VME control / status register which also supplies a timeout status bit in order to identify bus errors generated by the bus
monitor.
2.3.2
Dual-Ported SRAM
The VM62(A) / VM42(A) provides on-board SRAM of either 256 kByte or 1 Mbyte. The SRAM is 16- bit wide and
dual-ported between the CPU/DMA and VME, accessible through an on-board arbiter. Read-Modify-Write cycles (TAS
instruction used for semaphores) are supported in any direction. The location of the dual-ported SRAM as seen from the
VME is programmable via the VME control / status register. There are 16 different base addresses possible that are all
located in the VME standard supervisor / user data space. Enable / disable is selected using a separate bit.
Note
The lower 8 kBytes of dual-ported SRAM should not be accessed from the VME because this area is
reserved for mailbox interrupts.
1
May 17, 1996
FAIR according to VME 64 Specifications, Rule 3.14 and Observation 3.17.
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-5
Chapter 2 Functional Description
2.3.3
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Mailbox Interrupt
An external VMEbus master may interrupt the VM62(A) / VM42(A) by setting P_IRQ5 (pending mailbox IRQ) in the
VME control / status register. The address of this dual-ported register seen from VME is identical to the base address of
the dual-ported SRAM, occupying the lower 8 kBytes (odd byte addresses) of the dual-ported SRAM.
Setting P_IRQ5 generates an autovector 5 interrupt on the CPU. Typically, the on-board CPU resets P_IRQ5 during the
processing of the corresponding interrupt service routine.
Note
Although every odd address of the 8k block of the VME control / status register can be accessed from
VME, only the P_IRQ5 bit can be set. All other bits are write protected from the VME. As the
P_IRQ5 bit is located at bit 7 within the register, it can be directly used as a semaphore because readmodify-write (TAS instruction) is supported.
2.3.4
VMEbus Control / Status Register
Address:
Format:
Access:
Value after HW reset:
CS7 + $5
Byte
read / write
see table
7
CS7 + $5
6
P_IRQ5
PEP Default Address $CD 00 00 05
5
4
EN_DPR EN_BERR2
FSD
3
BADR3
2
BADR2
1
0
BADR1
BADR0
Register Description
Name
Value
Reset (HW)
Slot 1
Other
Reset PEP (SW)
Slot 1
Other
Description
P_IRQ5
bit 7
1
0
0
0
0
EN_DPR
bit 6
1
0
0
Value
stored in
EEPROM
Value
stored in
EEPROM
EN_BERR2
bit 5
1
0
0
1
0
Enable bus monitor timer, all VME
cycles, timeout after 128µs
FSD
bit 4
1
1
0
1
0
VMEbus ‘First Slot Detection’ flag,
system controller
0
0
Value
stored in
EEPROM
Value
stored in
EEPROM
BADR3
- BADR0
bits 3 - 0
Page 2-6
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Pending mailbox IRQ
Dual-port RAM (including mailbox
IRQ) for VME requester enabled. Base
address fixed through BADRx bits
VME address location of dual-ported
RAM. Equivalent to VME address lines
A23 - A20, programmable from $0 - $F
in 1 Mbyte windows, enabled with
EN_DPR. See Table on next page.
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 2 Functional Description
BADR [3 .. 0]
VME Board Base Address
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
$00 00 00
$10 00 00
$20 00 00
$30 00 00
$40 00 00
$50 00 00
$60 00 00
$70 00 00
$80 00 00
$90 00 00
$A0 00 00
$B0 00 00
$C0 00 00
$D0 00 00
$E0 00 00
$F0 00 00
2.4 Interrupt Control
The interrupt control logic processes internal interrupt requests (68EN360), together with external requests (VME) and
external autovectored interrupt requests. The interrupt control logic is built up using the 68EN360 internal interrupt
controlling and a 7-level VMEbus interrupt handler with the corresponding mask register.
2.4.1 Internal Requests
Internal requests are related to all interrupt requests caused by the 68EN360 sources, including the 68EN360 system
integration functions (watchdog timer, periodic interrupt timer) and the communication processor module (RISC
controller, timers, DMAs, SCCs and so on). For more information, please refer to the 68EN360 User’s Manual.
In order to avoid conflicts regarding interrupt levels, it is recommended to use IRQ level 4 for 68EN360 CPU internal
requests and IRQ level 6 for 68EN360 SIM60 internal requests.
Note
The 4 IRQ lines specified by CXC are supplied by the 68EN360 Port C lines and are therefore also
processed as internal requests (PC0, 1, 2, 3).
2.4.2 External Autovector Requests
Some 68EN360 external interrupt sources are routed to the IRQ lines of the 68EN360 and generated as autovectored
interrupts. Care must be taken that the relevant 68EN360 register is initialised with respect to the wiring (see also the
Software Configuration chapter in this manual).
Source
68EN360 Pin
Autovector
ABORT / ACFAIL
IRQ7
7
TICK
IRQ6
6
Mailbox IRQ
IRQ5
5
SYSFAIL
IRQ3
3
AutoBahn IRQ2
IRQ2
2
AutoBahn IRQ1
IRQ1
1
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-7
Chapter 2 Functional Description
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
2.4.3 VME Interrupt Mask Register
Address:
CS7 + $1
Format:
Byte
Access:
read / write
Value after HW reset: 0
Value after PEP SW initialization: Value of EEPROM
CS7 + $1
PEP Default Address $CD 00 00 01
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
EN_IRQ7
EN_IRQ6
EN_IRQ5
EN_IRQ4
EN_IRQ3
EN_IRQ2
EN_IRQ1
SYSFAIL
Register Description
Name
Value
Description
EN_IRQx
1
Enable VME IRQx where x = 1 to 7
SYSFAIL
1
Enable VME SYSFAIL IRQ autovector 3
Page 2-8
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 2 Functional Description
2.5 I/O Ports
2.5.1
Ethernet Port
The MC68EN360 is specified to support a full set of IEEE 802.3/Ethernet CSMA/CD media access control and channel
interface functions. Since the 68EN360 requires an external interface adapter and transceiver function, the Ethernet port
can be adapted to all standard Ethernet functions, such as 10BaseT, 10Base5 and 10Base2 via a piggyback connected to the
SI Interface on the VM62(A) / VM42(A).
2.5.2
Serial Ports
The VM62(A) / VM42(A) provides 6 serial ports based on the 68EN360 communications processor. The ports can be
configured in the following way:
•
•
2 * service / debug ports (SMC port / RxD / TxD only RS232);
4 * full MODEM ports / multiprotocol channels (SCC ports).
The service / debug ports are configured as default on the VM62(A) / VM42(A). These ports supply RxD/TxD RS232
Interfaces software handshake (XON/XOFF) capability. The full MODEM ports supply RxD, TxD, RTS, CTS, CD,
DTR and RCLK/TCLK. Two of the full MODEM ports can be configured on the SI Interface with a variety of SI
Modules (RS232/RS485, isolated/non-isolated and so on). Together with the two service/debug ports, a maximum of
three (four) completely configured serial ports are available for the base board. Three (two) serial ports may be configured
via the CXC where three of the four full MODEM Interfaces are routed.
Figure 2.5.2.1: MC68EN360 Intelligent Controller Schematic
SCC2
SCC3
SCC4
MC68EN360
SCC1
SMC1
}}
SI-Interface
CXC Interface
SI-Piggyback
Interface
SMC2
}
Memory
Piggyback
2x RS232 with
Rx and Tx only
Note
The serial channel SCC4 is routed to both the SI Interface and the CXC and can only be used by one or
the other and not both at the same time.
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-9
Chapter 2 Functional Description
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
The Ethernet port can be configured via the SI Interface with 10BaseT, 10Base5 or 10Base2 SI Modules. The following
configurations are therefore possible for the serial ports.
Versions with Ethernet Port
*
Port
68EN360 Resource
Configured via
Service/Debug 1
SMC1
Base board, upper RJ12
Service/Debug 2
SMC2
Base board, lower RJ12
Ethernet
SCC1
Base board, SI Module
Full MODEM 2
SCC2
CXC Module
Full MODEM 3
SCC3
CXC Module
Full MODEM 4
SCC4
CXC Module*
The 10BaseX Modules do not make use of SCC4 and, therefore, can be used on the CXC.
Versions without Ethernet Port
*
Port
68EN360 Resource
Configured via
Service/Debug 1
SMC1
Base board, upper RJ12
Service/Debug 2
SMC2
Base board, lower RJ12
Full MODEM 1
SCC1
Base board, SI Module
Full MODEM 2
SCC2
CXC Module
Full MODEM 3
SCC3
CXC Module
Full MODEM 4
SCC4
Base board, SI Module or CXC Module*
Can only be used once.
2.5.3
CXC Interface
The Controller Extension Connector (CXC) is a local mezzanine interface. The CXC contains a 16-bit data bus, 7 address
lines and 8 decoded chip select lines. In total, there are 8 control signals. The base address of the CXC can be programmed
via the CS5 line of the 68EN360. The 8 CXC chip selects (CXC_CS0 - CXC_CS7) occupy 256 Bytes each and have an
address length of 400H (512 Bytes).
Furthermore, the CXC contains 4 IRQ capability (4 edge sensitive IRQs), DMA capability (1 channel, DREQ + DACK),
serial ports (3 channels, Full MODEM) and a set of parallel port signals. These special CXC functions are based on the
68EN360 resources.
For general CXC information, including generic pinouts and a comparison of the 68(EN)360 and 68302 CPU pinouts on
the CXC, please refer to the CXC Specification User’s Manual and the CXC Appendix attached to this manual.
Page 2-10
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 2 Functional Description
Table 2.5.3.1: CXC Pinouts using the 68(EN)360
Pin
Row A
Signals
Row B
Signals
Row C
Signals
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
PC0/_RTS1/L1ST1
PC1/_RTS2/L1ST2
PC2/_RTS3/_L1RQB/L1ST3
PC3/_RTS4/_L1RQA/L1ST4
PB0/_SPISEL/_RRJCT1
PB1/SPICLK/_RSTRT2
VCC
PB2/SPIMOSI(SPITXD)/_RRJCT2
PB3/SPIMISO(SPIRXD)/BRGO4
PB8/_SMSYN1/_DREQ2
PB16/BRGO3/STRBO
PB9/_SMSYN2/_DACK2
PB17/_RSTRT1/STRBI
VCC
_CS-CXC (CS5 of 68360)
_AS
R/_W
_UDS
_LDS
VCC
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
VCC
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
PA8/CLK1/BRGO1/L1RCLKA/TIN1
PA10/CLK3/BRGO2/L1TCLKA/TIN2
GND
PA3/TXD2
PB13/_RTS2/L1ST2
GND
PB15/_RTS4/_L1RQA/L1ST4
PC11/_CD4/_L1RSYNCA
GND
PA2/RXD2
PB10/SMTXD2/L1CLKOB
GND
PC6/_CTS2
PC7/_CD2/_TGATE2
GND
PC10/_CTS4/_L1TSYNCA/_SDACK1
_SYSR
GND
_EDTACK
16MHz CLOCK
GND
_CXC-CS0
_CXC-CS1
GND
A6
A7
GND
D6
D7
GND
D8
D9
PB6/SMTXD1/_DONE1
PB5/BRGO2/_DACK1
PB4/BRGO1/_DREQ1
PB11/SMRXD2/L1CLKOA
PA14/CLK7/BRGO4/TIN4
PA15/CLK8/_TOUT4/L1TCLKB
VCC
PA7/TXD4/L1RXDA
PA6/RXD4/L1TXDA
PB7/SMRXD1/_DONE2
PC9/_CD3/_L1RSYNCB
PB14/_RTS3/_L1RQB/L1ST3
PC8/_CTS3/_L1TSYNCB/SDACK2
VCC
PA12/CLK5/BRGO3/TIN3
PA13/CLK6/_TOUT3/L1RCLKB/BRGCLK2
PA5/TXD3/L1RXDB
PA4/RXD3/L1TXDB
VCC
_CXC-CS2
_CXC-CS3
_CXC-CS4
_CXC-CS5
_CXC-CS6
_CXC-CS7
VCC
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-11
Chapter 2 Functional Description
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
CXC
Function
Pin Nr.
68302 HW
Compatible
68(EN)360
Port
IRQ_1
a1
Yes
PC0
IRQ_2
a2
Yes
PC1
IRQ_3
a3
Yes
PC2
IRQ_4
a4
Yes
PC3
CXC
Function
Pin Nr.
68302 HW
Compatible
68(EN)360
Port
DMA_ACK
c2
Yes
PB5
DMA_REQ
c3
Yes
PB4
CXC
Function
Pin Nr.
68302 HW
Compatible
68(EN)360
Port
SER1_RCLK
b1
Yes
PA8
SER1_TCLK
b2
Yes
PA10
SER1_TXD
b4
Yes
PA3
SER1_RXD
b10
Yes
PA2
SER1_RTS
b5
Yes
PB13
SER1_DTR
a13
Yes
PB17
SER1_CTS
b13
Yes
PC6
SER1_CD
b14
Yes
PC7
CXC
Function
Pin Nr.
68302 HW
Compatible
68(EN)360
Port
Comment
SER2_RCLK
c16
Yes
PA13
Cannot be used if J6 is set
See note 3
SER2_TCLK
c15
Yes
PA12
SER2_TXD
c17
Yes
PA5
SER2_RXD
c18
Yes
PA4
SER2_RTS
c12
Yes
PB14
SER2_DTR
a11
Yes
PB16
SER2_CTS
c13
Yes
PC8
SER2_CD
c11
Yes
PC9
Page 2-12
Comment
Comment
Comment
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 2 Functional Description
CXC
Function
Pin Nr.
68302 HW
Compatible
68(EN)360
Port
Comment
SER3_RCLK
c6
Yes
PA15
Not usable if SI Module uses SCC4
See note 4
SER3_TCLK
c5
Yes
PA14
SER3_TXD
c8
Yes
PA7
Not usable if SI Module uses SCC4
See note 4
SER3_RXD
c9
Yes
PA6
Not usable if SI Module uses SCC4
See note 4
SER3_RTS
b7
Yes
PB15
Not usable if SI Module uses SCC4
See note 4
SER3_DTR
a12
Yes
PB9
Not usable if SI Module uses SCC4
See note 4
SER3_CTS
b16
Yes
PC10
Not usable if SI Module uses SCC4
See note 4
SER3_CD
b8
Yes
PC11
Not usable if SI Module uses SCC4
See note 4
CXC
Function
Pin Nr.
68302 HW
Compatible
68(EN)360
Port
Comment
user defined
a5
No
PB0
Used on board SPI SEL for
EEPROM. Cannot be used on CXC
See note 2
a6
No
PB1
SPI Clk: can be used if an ‘SPI SEL’
other than PB0 is used.
a8
No
PB2
SPI TxD: can be used if an ‘SPI SEL’
other than PB0 is used.
a9
No
PB3
SPI RxD: can be used if an ‘SPI
SEL’ other than PB0 is used.
a10
No
PB8
See 68360 User Manual
b11
No
PB10
Used on board SMC2 (Transmit)
See note 1
c1
No
PB6
Used on board SMC1 (Transmit)
See note 1
c4
No
PB11
Used on board SMC2 (Receive)
See note 1
c10
No
PB7
Used on board SMC1 (Receive)
See note 1
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-13
Chapter 2 Functional Description
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Notes
Reserved Pins
1)
On a standard VM62(A)/VM42(A) board, these signals are already used for UART ports at BU7 and BU8.
2)
On a standard VM62(A)/VM42(A) board, these signals are used for SPI to which the EEPROM is already
connected. PB0 is chip select of the EEPROM.
3)
On PA13, a 24 MHz clock signal is routed via jumper J6. This signal is always needed for PEP standard
software (serial drivers).
Dual Functioning Signal Pins
4)
These signals are routed both to the base board SI Interface connector (ST5C) and the CXC connector and can
only be used by one or the other and not both at the same time.
Due to this, a conflict exists if the SCC4 port is to be used with the SI232 piggyback and CXC boards (such as
CXM-SIO3), as both boards access this port. The SCC4 port can, therefore, not be used at the same time by SI
piggybacks and CXC boards.
The CXC ports SER1, SER2 and SER3 are equivalent to ports SCC2, SCC3 and SCC4 resp. on the 68xx360.
With regard to special CXC capabilities, the CXC pinout on the VM62(A) / VM42(A) has been developed to provide
maximum compatibility between the standard CXC functions. In addition, all signals are available in order to configure 2
time division multiplexed channels via the CXC (ISDN, PCM, GCI and so on). Multi-function pins with incompatible
functions with regard to the 68302 and 68EN360 (called user defined in the generic CXC specification) are not part of the
VM42(A) / VM62(A) CXC specification.
Although the SMCs are configured on the base board, these ports are also integrated on the CXC. This is because of
possible ISDN applications where SMCs can be integrated and other protocols supported by the 68EN360.
Note
If the RCLK2 signal (CXM pin c16) is required, jumper J6 (24 MHz clock) must be opened and the
serial drivers delivered by PEP modified.
Page 2-14
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 2 Functional Description
Table 2.5.3.2: Further Explanation of 68(EN)360 Mnemonics
Group
Signal Name
Mneumonic
Function
SCC
Receive Data
RXD4-RXD1
Serial receive data input to the SCCs (I)
Transmit Data
TXD4-TXD1
Serial transmit data output from the SCCs (O)
Request to Send
_RTS4-_RTS1
Request to send outputs indicate that the SCC is ready
to transmit data (O)
Clear to Send
_CTS4-_CTS1
Clear to send inputs indicate to the SCC that data
transmission may begin (I)
Carrier Detect
_CD4-_CD1
Carrier detect inputs indicate that the SCC should begin
reception of data (I)
Receive Start
_RSTRT1
This output from SCC1 identifies the start of a receive
frame. Can be used by an Ethernet CAM to perform
address matching (O)
Receive Reject
RRJCT1
This input to SCC1 allows a CAM to reject the current
Ethernet frame after it determines the frame address did
not match (I)
Clocks
CLK8-CLK1
Input clocks to the SCCs, SMCs, SI, and the baud rate
generators (I)
DMA Request
_DREQ2_DREQ1
A request (input) to an IDMA channel to start an
IDMA transfer (I)
DMA Acknowledge
_DACK2_DACK1
An acknowledgement (output) by the IDMA that an
IDMA transfer is in progress (O)
DMA Done
_DONE2_DONE1
A bidirectional signal that indicates the last IDMA
transfer in a block of data (I/O)
Timer Gate
_TGATE2_TGATE1
An input to a timer that enables/disables the counting
function (I)
Timer Input
TIN4-TIN1
Time reference input to the timer that allows it to
function as a counter (I)
Timer Output
_TOUT4_TOUT1
Output waveform (pulse or toggle) from the timer as a
result of a reference value being reached (O)
SPI Master-In
Slave-Out
SPIMISO
Serial data input to the SPI master (I); serial data
output from an SPI slave (O)
SPI Master-Out
Slave-In
SPIMOSI
Serial data output from the SPI master (O); serial data
input to an SPI slave (I)
SPI Clock
SPICLK
Output clock from the SPI master (O); input clock to
the SPI slave (I)
SPI Select
_SPISEL
SPI slave select input (I)
SMC Receive Data
SMRXD2SMRXD1
Serial data input to the SMCs (I)
SMC Transmit Data
SMTXD2SMTXD1
Serial data output from the SMCs (O)
SMC Sync
_SMSYN2_SMSYN1
SMC syncronization signal (I)
IDMA
TIMER
SPI
SMC
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-15
Chapter 2 Functional Description
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Group
Signal Name
Mneumonic
Function
SI
SI Receive Data
L1RXDA,
L1RXDB
Serial input to the Time Division Multiplexed (TDM)
channel A or channel B
SI Transmit Data
L1TXDA,
L1TXDB
Serial output from the TDM channel A or channel B
SI Receive Clock
L1RCLKA,
L1RCLKB
Input receive clock to TDM channel A or channel B
SI Transmit Clock
L1TCLKA,
L1TCLKB
Input transmit clock to TDM channel A or channel B
SI Transmit Sync
Signals
L1TSYNCA,
L1TSYNCB
Input transmit data sync signal to TDM channel A or
channel B
SI Receive Sync
Signals
L1RSYNCA,
L1RSYNCB
Input receive data sync signal to TDM channel A or
channel B
IDL Interface
Request
L1RQA, L1RQB
IDL interface request to transmit on the D channel.
Output from the SI
SI Output Clock
L1CLKOA,
L1CLKOB
Output serial data rate clock. Can output a data rate
clock when the input clock is 2x the data rate
SI Data Strobes
L1ST4-L1ST1
Serial data strobe outputs can be used to gate clocks to
external devices that do not have a biult-in Time Slot
Assigner (TSA)
Baud Rate Generator
Out 4-1
BRGO4-BRGO1
Baud rate generator output clock allows baud rate
generator to be used externally
BRG Input Clock
CLK2, CLK6
Baud rate generator input clock from which BRG will
derive the baud rates
Port B 15-0
PB15-PB0
PIP Data I/O Pins
Strobe Out
STRBO
This input causes the PIP output data to be placed on
the PIP data pins
Strobe In
STRBI
This input causes data on the PIP data pins to be
latched by the PIP as input data
SDMA
Acknowledge 2-1
_SDACK2_SDACK1
SDMA output signals used in RISC receiver to mark
fields in the Ethernet receive frame
BRG
PIP
SDMA
2.5.4
AutoBahn Interface
In preparation
Page 2-16
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
2.6
Special Functions
2.6.1
Real-Time Clock
Chapter 2 Functional Description
The RTC (V3021 3-wire serial interface) is a 1-bit device which is accessible over the CS6 of the 68EN360. Its
timekeeping features include :• seconds, minutes, hours, day of month, month, year, week day and week number in BCD format.
• leap year and week number correction
• standby supply smaller than 1µA
See also the Software Configuration chapter in this manual and the V3021 data sheet.
2.6.2
EEPROM
The serial EEPROM is a 1-bit device which is accessible over the SPI Interface (3-wire Interchip) of the 68EN360. The
first half of the EEPROM (1 kbit) is reserved for factory data, including Board ID codes, Internet/Ethernet addresses, boot
information etc. The second half of the EEPROM is available for the user. See also the Software Configuration chapter in
this manual.
For more information on the EEPROM, please refer to the XICOR X25C02 data sheet.
2.6.3
TICK Generator
The 68EN360 internal Periodic Interrupt Timer is used by the PEP real-time operating system as TICK generator.
For more information please refer to the 68EN360 User’s Manual.
2.6.4
On-board Bus Error Timer
The VM62(A) / VM62(A) provides an on-board bus error timer. An 8µs timeout timer monitors the cycle lengths of data
transfers to and from locations beyond the bussizer, including on-board I/O, CXC, SRAM, AutoBahn and some VME.
After a timeout occurs, it generates an on-board BERR signal for error termination. This timer is enabled/disabled via the
board control/status register, which also supplies a timeout status bit in order to identify bus errors generated by the onboard bus error timer.
There are four cases of bus error.
Cause
Timeout
Enable / Disable possible
Reserved address BERR0
100ns
None
On-board BERR1
8µs
Yes, set in board control register
VME BERR2
128µs
Yes, set in VMEbus control register
Chip selects 68EN360
programmable
Yes, set in 68EN360 register
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-17
Chapter 2 Functional Description
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Note
During VMEbus cycles, the on-board bus error timer is reset as soon as the VM62(A) / VM42(A) gains
VMEbus ownership. This means that the time gap between a VMEbus request and the starting of the
VMEbus cycle is monitored by the on-board BERR timer. VMEbus cycles themselves are monitored
by the separate VMEbus BERR timer (BUS monitor).
2.6.5
VME Bus Error Timer
The VM62(A) / VM42(A) also provides a bus monitor for the VMEbus. A 128µs timeout timer monitors VMEbus data
transfer cycle lengths and generates a VMEbus BERR* signal for error termination. This timer is enabled/disabled via the
VME control/status register which also supplies a timeout status bit in order to identify bus errors generated by the bus
monitor.
2.6.6
Watchdog Timer
A 512ms watchdog timer triggers the on-board and VME system reset generator at timeout. Once enabled via the board
control/status register, the watchdog timer cannot be reset by software. It must be re-triggered via the corresponding bit in
the board control/status register periodically within the timeout period. ‘Watchdog timer running’ is a status that is
displayed by the yellow front panel LED.
Figure 2.6.6.1: Watchdog LED Location
Watchdog LED
Yellow
W
2.6.7
First Slot Detection (FSD)
The VM62(A)/VM62(A) detects during power-up whether the CPU in use is positioned in the far left slot of the system.
This is achieved using a 100k pull-down resistor at the BG3IN* pin.
BG3IN* low
BG3IN* high
= system controller (far left slot)
= no system controller
This information can be read from the VMEbus Control/Status register and is valid until the next power down of the
system.
Page 2-18
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
2.6.8
Chapter 2 Functional Description
Board Control/Status Register
Address:
Format:
Access:
Value after HW reset:
CS7 + $7
Byte
read / write
0
7
CS7 + $7
WDG
PEP Default Address $CD 00 00 07
6
5
4
BERR2
BERR1
EN_WDG
3
2
TR_WDG EN_BERR1
1
0
ACFAIL
LED_G
Register Description
Name
Value
Access
Description
WDG
bit 7
Read/Write
Set by watchdog timer when timout has been reached. Used
to differentiate between resets caused by the watchdog and
resets caused by the reset button
(power up resets can be identified within the 68EN360)
BERR2
bit 6
Read/Write
Set by VMEbus BUS monitor when timeout has been
reached. Used to identify BERR caused by this timer (see
also VMEbus Control/Status register)
BERR1
bit 5
Read/Write
Set by on-board bus error timer when timeout has been
reached. Used to identify BERR caused by this timer
EN_WDG
bit 4
1
Read/Write
Enable the watchdog timer. It can only be set once, and
remains enabled until the next reset
TR_WDG
bit 3
1
Read/Write
Triggers the watchdog timer. Watchdog timeout = 512ms
EN_BERR1
bit 2
1
Read/Write
Enables the on-board bus error timer. It also monitors all onboard I/O cycles, including the time from the VMEbus
request to the VMEbus grant. Timeout = 8µs
ACFAIL
bit 1
1
Read/Write
VME ACFAIL signal latched when active in order to
distinguish a level 7 NMI from an ABORT or ACFAIL
LED_G
bit 0
1
Read/Write
Enables the green ‘general purpose’ front panel LED
Note
Information may be lost if the user writes to bit 7.
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-19
Chapter 2 Functional Description
2.6.9
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Reset Sources
Reset Source
Identification
Push button
No
SYSRES* VME
No
Watchdog
WDG bit on-board (Board Control/Status Register)
Power monitor (4.65V)
Inside the 68EN360
2.7
Front Panel Functions
Figure 2.7.0.1: LED Port and Button Location
Watchdog LED
Yellow
General Purpose
Green
CPU HALT or RESET
Red
U W H
RESET Switch
2.7.1
RST AB
ABORT Switch
RESET Button
A RESET button is fitted to the front panel to avoid false operation. The RESET button triggers the on-board system reset
generator, as well as the VME if jumper J2 is set.
2.7.2
ABORT Button
Together with the RESET button, an ABORT button is also fitted to the front panel. The ABORT button generates a level
7 IRQ (non-maskable interrupt) which is used for debugging purposes. In this case, bit 1 of the Board Control/Status
Register is not set (remains ‘0’).
2.7.3
LED Port
The front panel LED port consists of three LEDs with the following functions:
Red LED
Yellow LED
Green LED
CPU in HALT or RESET status
Watchdog timer running status
General purpose, set via board control/status register
The green LED is free to be used by the customer. It is set by the software during startup when the 68EN360 is initialized.
Page 2-20
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 2 Functional Description
2.8 Data Retention for RTC and SRAM
Short term data retention for RTC and SRAM is gained with two Gold-Caps, each with a value of 0.22 Farad. In contrast
to Lithium cells, Gold-Caps do not require servicing. This short term backup is intended for short power failures or for
reconfiguring systems. An empty Gold-Cap needs approximately three hours to charge up, with backup times dependant on
the temperature, memory size and memory manufacturer tolerances. A well charged Gold-Cap provides a minimum of 10
hours backup time.
Laboratory tests at PEP indicate a typical backup time of 1 week for both 256kB and 1MByte SRAM plus RTC (typical
onboard backup current is 2µA.
Long term data retention is made via the VMEbus 5V Stby line. With respect to the VM62(A) / VM42(A), this voltage
can drop to 2.5V, with the typical current via the 5V Stby being 30µA at 3V.
Note
The VM42(A) / VM62(A) board can be removed from the system and then plugged in again without
losing any information. Data retention switches from the VME 5V Stby to the on-board Gold-Caps
automatically.
The on-board Gold-Caps are continuously reloaded via the 5V Stby line. The 5V Stby current is
typically 7mA for a few minutes when the Gold-Caps are at the beginning of the loading phase (fully
empty).
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-21
Chapter 2 Functional Description
2.9
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Register Overview
VME Interrupt Mask Register (page 2-8)
Address:
CS7 + $1
Format:
Byte
Access:
read / write
Value after HW reset: 0
Value after PEP SW initialization:
CS7 + $1
PEP Default Address $CD 00 00 01
Value of EEPROM
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
EN_IRQ7
EN_IRQ6
EN_IRQ5
EN_IRQ4
EN_IRQ3
EN_IRQ2
EN_IRQ1
SYSFAIL
VMEbus Control / Status Register (page 2-6)
Address:
Format:
Access:
Value after HW reset:
7
CS7 + $5
P_IRQ5
CS7 + $5
Byte
read / write
see table on page 2-6
6
5
EN_DPR EN_BERR2
PEP Default Address $CD 00 00 05
4
FSD
3
2
BADR3
BADR2
1
0
BADR1
BADR0
Board Control/Status Register (page 2-14)
Address:
Format:
Access:
Value after HW reset:
7
CS7 + $7
Page 2-22
WDG
CS7 + $7
Byte
read / write
0
PEP Default Address $CD 00 00 07
6
5
4
BERR2
BERR1
EN_WDG
3
2
TR_WDG EN_BERR1
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
1
0
ACFAIL
LED_G
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
May 17, 1996
Chapter 2 Functional Description
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 2-23
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 3 Configuration
3
3. CONFIGURATION
The VM62(A) / VM42(A) has twelve jumpers fitted to the board. The list of default jumper settings is shown below.
Table 3.0.0.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Default Jumper Settings
Jumper
Default Setting
Description
Wire
J1
Set
SYSCLK connected to VME
J2
Set
On-board RESET generator to VME
J8
Open
Boot from VME disabled
J9
Open
Boot from MP memory interface disabled
Solder
J3
J4
J5
Dependent on board
J6
Set
J7
Dependent on board
J10
Open
J11
J12
Dependent on board
J14
Open
J131 - J134
Dependent on board
CPU frequency
Clock connected to 68EN360
CPU type
Write protection of EEPROM disabled
SRAM size
Signal GND not connected to Protective GND
Processor power supply
Note
Jumpers J1, J2, J8 and J9 are normal wire jumpers that can be configured by the user. The other
jumpers are solder jumpers and are factory set.
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 3-1
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.1
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Jumper Description (Component Side)
Figure 3.1.0.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Jumper Layout (Component Side)
J2 J1
J14
MC68040/
MC68060
CXC
Interface
J9 J8
Page 3-2
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
3.1.1
Jumper J1: VME-SYSCLK
Setting
Description
Set
SYSCLK connected to VME
Open
SYSCLK disconnected from VME
3.1.2
Description
Set
On-board RESET generator to VME
Open
On-board RESET disconnected from VME
Default
Jumper J8: VME Boot (VBOOT)
Setting
Description
Set
Boot from VME enabled
Open
Boot from VME disabled
3.1.4
Default
Jumper J2: VME-SYSRES
Setting
3.1.3
Chapter 3 Configuration
Default
Jumper J9: AutoBahn Boot (ABOOT)
Setting
Description
Set
Boot from MP memory interface enabled
Open
Boot from MP memory interface disabled Default
3.1.5
Jumper J14: Connection of Protective and Signal GND
Setting
Description
Set
Signal GND connected to Protective GND
Note: Care must be taken to avoid grounding current if this jumper
is set.
Open
Signal GND not connected to Protective GND
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Default
Page 3-3
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.2
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Jumper Description (Solder Side)
Figure 3.2.0.1: VM62(A) / VM42(A) Jumper Layout (Solder Side)
J133
J131
3
1
2
J134
J6 J5 J4 J3
J10
J132
3
1
2
J7
J11 J12
WARNING!
Solder jumpers are factory set and must not be altered by the user. Alteration of jumper
settings can result in damage to the board (especially J131-134).
Page 3-4
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
3.2.1
Jumpers J3, J4 and J5: CPU (Bus) Clock
Setting
J3
J4
J5
Set
Set
Open
25 MHz
Open
Set
Open
33.3 MHz
Set
Open
Open
40 MHz
3.2.2
Chapter 3 Configuration
Description
Jumper J6: 24 MHz Clock (Communications Clock)
Setting
Description
Set
Clock connected to 68EN360
Open
Clock not connected to 68EN360
Default
Note
Jumper J6 must be opened if the RCLK2 signal (CXM pin c16) is required, as it is not compatible
with PEP standard software.
3.2.3
Jumper J7: CPU Type
Setting
Description
Set
68060 Processor
Open
68040 Processor
3.2.4
Jumper J10: Serial EEPROM Write Protection
Setting
Description
Set
Write protection enabled
Open
Write protection disabled
3.2.5
Default
Jumpers J11 and J12: SRAM Size
Setting
J11
J12
Description
1-2
1-2
1 MByte
1-3
1-3
256 kByte
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 3-5
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.2.6
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Jumpers J131 - J134: Processor Power Supply
Setting
J131 - J134
Description
1-2
5 Volt (68040 / 68LC040)
1-3
3.3 Volt (68040V / 68060)
WARNING!
Alteration of the settings of J131-J134 can result in damage to the board.
Page 3-6
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 4 Memory Piggybacks
4
4. MEMORY PIGGYBACKS
4.1
DM600
4.1.1
Configuration
The DM600 is a memory piggyback fitted with 4MByte DRAM and either 1 or 4MByte Flash EPROM. Two
configurable jumpers are present on the board, indicating if write protection is enabled or disabled and whether 1MBit or
4MBit Flash EPROM chips are fitted.
Figure 4.1.1.1: DM600 Jumper Layout (Component Side)
1
Flash
J1
4 3 2
Bank 0
J2
3
1
2
Bank 1
Jumper J1: FLASH Write Protection
Setting
Description
Open
All Flash EPROM write protected
1-2
No protection
1-3
1-4
May 17, 1996
1 MB Flash
(29F010)
4 MB Flash
(29F040)
Flash bank 1 write protected
upper 512 kB
($40080000 $40100000)
upper 2 MB
($40200000 $40400000)
Flash bank 0 write protected
lower 512 kB
($40000000 $40080000)
lower 2 MB
($40000000 $40200000)
Default
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 4-1
Chapter 4 Memory Piggybacks
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Jumper J2: Flash Chip Size
Setting
Description
1-2
4 Mbit Flash chips fitted
1-3
1 Mbit Flash chips fitted
4.2
DM601
4.2.1
Configuration
The DM601 is a memory piggyback fitted with 16MByte DRAM and either 1 or 4MByte Flash EPROM. Two
configurable jumpers are present on the board, indicating if write protection is enabled or disabled and whether 1MBit or
4MBit Flash EPROM chips are fitted.
Figure 4.2.1.1: DM601 Jumper Layout (Component Side)
1
Flash
J1
4 3 2
Bank 0
J2
3
1
2
Bank 1
Jumper J1: Flash Write Protection
Setting
Description
Open
All Flash EPROM write protected
1-2
No protection
1-3
1-4
Page 4-2
1 MB Flash
(29F010)
4 MB Flash
(29F040)
Flash bank 1 write protected
upper 512 kB
($40080000 $40100000)
upper 2 MB
($40200000 $40400000)
Flash bank 0 write protected
lower 512 kB
($40000000 $40080000)
lower 2 MB
($40000000 $40200000)
Default
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 4 Memory Piggybacks
Jumper J2: Flash Chip Size
Setting
Description
1-2
4 Mbit Flash chips fitted
1-3
1 Mbit Flash chips fitted
4.3
DM602
In preparation
4.4
DM603
4.4.1
Configuration
The DM603 is a memory piggyback fitted with 32MByte DRAM and 0.5MByte Flash EPROM. A version of the
DM603 with 2MByte Flash EPROM fitted will soon be available. One configurable jumper is located on the board,
indicating whether the Flash EPROMs are write protected.
Figure 4.4.1.1: DM603 Jumper Layout (Component Side)
Flash
EPROM
DRAM
J1
Jumper J1: Flash Write Protection
Setting
Description
Open
All Flash EPROM write protected
Set
No protection
May 17, 1996
Default
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 4-3
Chapter 4 Memory Piggybacks
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
This page has been intentionally left blank
Page 4-4
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 5 Pinouts
5
5. PINOUTS
5.1 Main Board
Pin 7
ST3A
ST3B
ST3C
Figure 5.1.0.1: Main Board Connector Overview
Pin 1
ST5A
Pin 49
Pin 50
Pin 1
Pin 2
BU2
Serial
Piggyback
ST5B
CXC
Pin 1
ST5C
BU4
BU10
Pin 1
MP
Piggyback
ST1C
ST1B
ST1A
Pin 7
Pin 2
Pin 1
Pin 2
Memory
Piggyback
BU9
Pin 49
May 17, 1996
Pin 50
Pin 49
Pin 50
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Pin 49
Pin 50
Pin 1
Pin 2
Page 5-1
Chapter 5 Pinouts
5.1.1
*
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
VMEbus Connector (ST1)
Pin Nr.
Row A Signal
Row B Signal
Row C Signal
1
D00
BBSY*
D08
2
D01
BCLR*
D09
3
D02
ACFAIL*
D10
4
D03
BG0IN*
D11
5
D04
BG0OUT*
D12
6
D05
BG1IN*
D13
7
D06
BG1OUT*
D14
8
D07
BG2IN*
D15
9
GND
BG2OUT*
GND
10
SYSCLK
BG3IN*
SYSFAIL*
11
GND
BG3OUT*
BERR*
12
DS1*
BR0*
SYSRESET*
13
DS0*
BR1*
LWORD*
14
WRITE*
BR2*
AM5
15
GND
BR3*
A23
16
DTACK*
AM0
A22
17
GND
AM1
A21
18
AS*
AM2
A20
19
GND
AM3
A19
20
IACK*
GND
A18
21
IACKIN*
SERA
A17
22
IACKOUT*
SERB
A16
23
AM4
GND
A15
24
A07
IRQ7*
A14
25
A06
IRQ6*
A13
26
A05
IRQ5*
A12
27
A04
IRQ4*
A11
28
A03
IRQ3*
A10
29
A02
IRQ2*
A09
30
A01
IRQ1*
A08
31
-12V
+5VSTDBY
+12V
32
+5V
+5V
+5V
Active signal low
Page 5-2
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
5.1.2
Chapter 5 Pinouts
CXC Connector (ST3)
For CXC connector pinouts, please refer to the CXC Appendix.
5.2 Front Panel
The front panel connectors are dependent on which interface piggyback is mounted. They are:
Standard Connectors
•
2 * RS232 serial interfaces (BU7 and BU8).
A front panel is available with only the above standard RS232 connectors fitted (SI-DUMMY)
Piggyback Options
•
•
•
•
•
Ethernet 10Base2 (SI-10B2);
Ethernet AUI / 10Base5 (SI-10B5);
Ethernet 10BaseT (SI-10BT);
2 * RS232 serial interfaces (SI-PB232);
PROFIBUS interface (SI-PBPRO).
Each option is described in the following Sections.
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 5-3
Chapter 5 Pinouts
5.2.1
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Standard RS232 Connectors
Figure 5.2.1.1: Standard Front Panel Pinouts
Dependent on
version ordered
Watchdog LED
Yellow
General Purpose
Green
CPU HALT or RESET
Red
U W H
ABORT Button
AB
SER 0
RST
Pin 1
TERM
RESET Button
Pin 1
BU7 RJ12 (SMC1)
Pin 6
BU8 RJ12 (SMC2)
Pin 6
VMx2(A)
6-pin RJ12 RS232 Serial Interface Connectors (BU7 and BU8)
Pin Nr.
Page 5-4
Signal
1
Not Connected
2
GND
3
TxD
4
RxD
5
Not Connected
6
Not Connected
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
5.2.2
Chapter 5 Pinouts
Ethernet 10Base2 (SI-10B2)
SITB2 on board
Figure 5.2.2.1: SI-10B2 Front Panel Pinouts
Collision
Col Tx
Transmit
ETHERNET
10Base2
May 17, 1996
BU3 (SCC1)
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 5-5
Chapter 5 Pinouts
5.2.3
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Ethernet AUI / 10Base5 (SI-10B5)
SITB5 on board
Pin 1
Pin 8
ETHERNET 10Base5
Figure 5.2.3.1: SI-10B5 Front Panel Pinouts
Pin 9
BU3 (SCC1)
Pin 15
15-pin D-Sub Ethernet AIU / 10Base5 Connector (BU3)
Pin Nr.
Page 5-6
Signal
1
Control In circuit Shield
2
Control In circuit A
3
Data Out circuit A
4
Data In circuit Shield
5
Data In circuit A
6
Voltage Common
7
Not Connected
8
Not Connected
9
Control In circuit Shield
10
Data Out circuit B
11
Data Out circuit Shield
12
Data In circuit B
13
+12 Volts
14
GND
15
Not Connected
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
5.2.4
Serial RS232 Interface (SI-PB232)
Chapter 5 Pinouts
SI232 on board
Pin 1
Pin 8
Pin 1
SER 2
Pin 8
BU2 RJ45 (SCC1)
SER 1
Figure 5.2.4.1: SI-PB232 Front Panel Pinouts
BU3 RJ45 (SCC4)
8-pin RJ45 Serial Interface Connectors (BU2 and BU3)
Pin Nr.
Signal
1
DSR
2
RTS
3
GND
4
TXD
5
RXD
6
DCD
7
CTS
8
DTR
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 5-7
Chapter 5 Pinouts
5.2.5
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Ethernet 10BaseT (SI-10BT)
SITBT on board
Figure 5.2.5.1: SI-10BT Front Panel Pinouts
Collision
Col Tx
Transmit
ETHERNET
10BaseT
Pin 8
Pin 1
BU3 RJ45 (SCC1)
8-pin RJ45 Serial Interface Connector (BU3)
Pin Nr.
Signal
1
TD+
2
TD-
3
RD+
4
Not Connected
5
Not Connected
6
RD-
7
Not Connected
8
Not Connected
Configuration
The SI-10BT piggyback has one configurable jumper that sets the shielding of the board. The jumper settings are shown
below.
Jumper J1: Shielding
Setting
Page 5-8
Description
1-2
Shielded
1-3
Not Shielded
Default
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
5.2.6
Chapter 5 Pinouts
PROFIBUS Interface (SI-PBPRO)
SIPRO on board
Pin 1
BU3 (SCC1)
Pin 5
PROFIBUS
Figure 5.2.6.1: SI-PBPRO Front Panel Pinouts
Transmit
Yellow
Pin 6
Pin 9
Tx
9-pin D-Sub PROFIBUS Connector (BU3)
Pin Nr.
Signal
Description
1
SHIELD
Shield, Protective Ground resp.
2
RP
Reserved for power
3
RxD+/TxD+
Receive/Transmit Data +
4
CNTR+
Control +
5
DGND
Data Ground
6
VP
Voltage Plus
7
RP
Reserved for power
8
RxD-/TxD-
Receive/Transmit -
9
CNTR-
Control -
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 5-9
Chapter 5 Pinouts
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
This page has been intentionally left blank
Page 5-10
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 6 Software Configuration
6
6. SOFTWARE CONFIGURATION
6.1
Initializing the 68EN360
Many components of the VM62(A) / VM42(A) are controlled by the MC68EN360. Due to this fact, this chip requires a
special initialization sequence before any other software can be started.
The following list describes how the initialization must be performed on the VM62(A) / VM42(A).
WARNING!
The order of the initialization listed below must not be changed, otherwise erratic
behaviour of the board may result.
1)
Set DPRBASE to 0x000000
0x7000001.L -> MBAR (in CPU space!)
Example
move.l
move.l
movec
moves.l
#7,d1
#$7000001,d0
d1,dfc
d0,MBAR
select CPU space
value to write to MBAR
select CPU space
set MBAR
2)
Clear reset status register
3)
Set system protection register
• bus monitor enabled, 128 system clocks timeout
4)
0xFF.B -> RSR
Set module configuration register
• bus request MC68040 arbitration ID: 3
• arbitration synchronous timing mode
• bus clear out arbitration ID: 3
• SIM60 registers are Supervisor Data
• BusClear in arbitration ID: 3
• interrupt arbitration: 3
0x7.B -> SYPCR
0x60008CB3.L -> MCR
5)
Set PLL enabled and lock access
0xC000.W -> PLLCR
6)
Lock access to clock divider control register
0x8000.W -> CDVCR
May 17, 1996
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 6-1
Chapter 6 Software Configuration
7)
8)
9)
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Configure CLK lines
• COM2 to full strength
• COM1 disabled
• register access locked
0x83.B -> CLKOCR
Configure PEPAR register
• set /IOUT0-2 are PRTY0-2
• select /RAS1DD function
• select /WE0-3
• select AMUX
• select /CAS0-3
0x51C0.W -> PEPAR
Configure GMR register
• set refresh counter period to 24
• set refresh cycle length to 3
• set DRAM port size to 32 bit
• assert CS/RAS on CPU space
• enable refresh
0x18800100.L -> GMR
10) Configure autovector register
• enable autovector on levels 2, 3, 5 and 7
11) Configure chip select lines
• CS0: FLASH to 0x4000000, negate timing ‘040
• CS0: size to 16 MByte, port size 32 bit, tcyc 3
• CS1: DRAM to 0x0, burst acknowledge ‘040
• CS1: size to 16 MByte, port size 32 bit, tcyc 0, bcyc 1
• CS2: DMA - VME to 0x87000000
• CS2: size to 16 MByte, port size external, tcyc 1
• CS3: AutoBahn to 0x9000000
• CS3: size to 16 MByte, port size external, tcyc 1
• CS4: SRAM to 0xA000000
• CS4: size to 16 MByte, port size external, tcyc 1
• CS5: CXC to 0xBF70000
• CS5: size to 8 kByte, port size external, tcyc 1
• CS6: RTC to 0xC000000
• CS6: size to 2 kByte, port size external, tcyc 1
• CS7: on-board control to 0xD000000
• CS7: size to 16 MByte, port size external, tcyc 1
Page 6-2
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
0xAC.B -> AVR
0x4000011.L
0x3F000000.L
0x21.L
0xF000001.L
0x87000001.L
0x1F000006.L
0x9000001.L
0x1F000006.L
0xA000001.L
0x1F000006.L
0xBF70000.L
0x1FFFE006.L
0xC000001.L
0x1FFFF806.L
0xD000001.L
0x1F000006.L
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
->
BR0
OR0
BR1
OR1
BR2
OR2
BR3
OR3
BR4
OR4
BR5
OR5
BR6
OR6
BR7
OR7
May 17, 1996
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Chapter 6 Software Configuration
12) The system software normally determines the real sizes of the DRAM and SRAM installed and re-programs the CS
lines accordingly. The simplest way to achieve this is to write a pattern to the first location and then search for that
pattern at meaningful distances (e.g. 256kB, 512 kB, 1 MB, 2 MB, 4 MB, 8 MB, 16 MB). If the pattern is found at
such an address, the original pattern must be altered and then checked to see if the mirrored pattern changes in the
same way. If not, the search must be contined or, if yes, the memory size is found.
Note
The MC68040 normally operates in non-serialised mode, meaning that read accesses can occur before
write accesses, even if they are programmed in the opposite way. It is therefore recommended that
especially when changing the patterns, a ‘nop’ instruction should be inserted, as this forces all pending
cycles to be completed.
13) Set vector and IRQ level for internal IRQ requester
• vector base = 0x40
• level = 4
0x8040.L -> CICR
14) Set SDMA configuration register
0x770.W -> SDCR
15) If the card is in the first slot, enable the VMEbus monitor
If bit 4 in VCSR is set then set bit 5 in VCSR
16) Enable on-board I/O bus error timer
May 17, 1996
Set bit 2 in BCSR
© 1995 PEP Modular Computers
Page 6-3
Chapter 6 Software Configuration
VM62(A) / VM42(A) User’s Manual
Address List of Involved Registers
MBAR
0x3FF00
RSR
SYPCR
MCR
PLLCR
CDVCR
CLKOCR
PEPAR
GMR
AVR
BR0
OR0
BR1
OR1
BR2
OR2
BR3
OR3
BR4
OR4
BR5
OR5
BR6
OR6
BR7
OR7
0xC0001009
0xC0001022
0xC0001000
0xC0001010
0xC0001014
0xC000100C
0xC0001016
0xC0001040
0xC0001008
0xC0001050
0xC0001054
0xC0001060
0xC0001064
0xC0001070
0xC0001074
0xC0001080
0xC0001084
0xC0001090
0xC0001094
0xC00010A0
0xC00010A4
0xC00010B0
0xC00010B4
0xC00010C0
0xC00010C4
CICR
SDCR
0xC0001540
0xC000151E
VCSR
BCSR
0xCD000005
0xCD000007
6.2
(CPU space!)
Initialising the Cache
Before the system enables any cache present, they should be invalidated using:
cinva bc
Furthermore, the complete address range should not be cachable, as caching only makes sense on DRAM and FLASH
EPROM. Other areas should never be cached and must be switched to serialised in order to prevent the
MC68040/MC68060 from mixing up read and write cycles.
The easiest way of doing this is to make use of the DTT0 register, in the following way:
move.l
movec
#$807FE040,d1
d1,dtt0
The code above sets all addresses below $80000000 to cacheable and non-serialised, whereas all addresses above are set to
non-cacheable and serialised.
Accesses to the DRAM and FLASH should be made at $0 and $4000000. All other components addressed by the
MC68EN360 should always be accessed over the mirrored area with $Cxxxxxxx, as described in Section 2.2.5 Address
Map.
Page 6-4
©1995 PEP Modular Computers
May 17, 1996
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement