safety guidelines for general production

safety guidelines for general production
GENERAL SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR PRODUCTION
Production Company:
Show Name:
Additional safety information is available at www.safetyontheset.com
Before you start your job:
1. Read these General Safety Guidelines for Production.
2. Sign the attached Acknowledgment Form and give it to your
supervisor.
1. Know the Emergency Plan and how to react in emergency
situations. Familiarize yourself with emergency procedures for each
location. Speak to your supervisor if emergency procedures are
unknown.
2. Read all posted safety information on your stage or location.
NOTE: Employees can express safety concerns: 1.) By contacting the
Safety Representative assigned to your show; 2)By calling the
ANONYMOUS SAFETY HOTLINE (818) 954-2800 or (877) 566-8001; or 3.)
In writing by submitting an anonymous web form at safetyontheset.com.
No employee shall be retaliated against for reporting hazards or
potential hazards, or for making suggestions related to safety.
INJURY AND ILLNESS PREVENTION PROGRAM
FOR PRODUCTION
This Production has a written Injury and Illness Prevention Program
(IIPP). It is contained in the Production Safety Manual and is available
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to all employees: 1.) as a hard copy kept on the set with the 1 Assistant
Director and in the Production Office with the Unit Production Manager;
and 2.) on the web at safetyontheset.com.
In addition, this Production requires all CSATF employees whose Local
participates in the SAFETY PASS PROGRAM to be fully trained in all
safety classes that their Local Management have determined
mandatory. The Training Class Schedule may be found at
www.csatf.org and registered for by calling (818) 847-0040.
The IIPP for Production addresses the following:
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Responsible Persons
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Compliance: Enforcement of Safe Work Practices
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Communication
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Inspections
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Injury or Illness Investigation
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Hazard Assessment and Control of Unsafe or Unhealthful
Conditions
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Safety Training
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Recordkeeping
STATEMENT OF SAFETY POLICY
It is the policy of this Production that an Injury and Illness Prevention
Program (IIPP) will be instituted and administered as a comprehensive
and continuous occupational IIPP for all employees. Our goal is to
prevent accidents, to reduce personal injury and occupational illness,
and to comply with all safety and health standards.
Safety is a priority.
NOTE: Whenever an unsafe or unhealthful condition, practice or
procedure is observed, discovered, or reported, the UPM or designee
will take appropriate corrective measures in a timely manner based
upon the severity of the hazard. Affected employees will be informed of
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
the hazard, and interim protective measures taken until the hazard is
corrected.
SPECIAL NOTICE TO HEADS OF DEPARTMENT/SUPERVISORS
The Head of Department or Supervisor:
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Is an individual who can take immediate, direct action to make
sure that his or her work area is safe for employees.
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Is an individual who can control employees, machines, and
working conditions on a daily, full-time basis.
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Works most directly with subordinates and bears responsibility
and accountability for their work practices.
Under Federal and State Safety Regulations, a supervisor is responsible
for certain safety duties, including:
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Provide, or arrange and ensure safety training for subordinates
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Provide resources, support and share experience.
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Enforce safety practices consistently
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Oversee worksite safety.
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Investigate workplace accidents
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Correct unsafe conditions
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Work safely and ensure your subordinates follow your lead.
FIREARMS POLICY
The Company expressly prohibits weapons, including but not limited
to firearms, in the workplace. The workplace includes all property
owned, leased or controlled by the Company. Exceptions will be
made for weapons approved for use for filming or with prior written
approval by the Company.
These Safety Guidelines are not intended as legal interpretation of
any federal, state, or local laws.
Failure to comply with these Safety Guidelines may result in
discipline, up to and including termination.
CODES OF SAFE PRACTICES FOR PRODUCTION
These Codes of Safe Practices have been prepared to inform employees
of safety issues associated with their positions, and to recommend ways
of preventing injuries while on the job. However, Production
Management cannot monitor every employee, in every situation, every
minute of the day to see that safe practices are being followed. It is a
condition of employment that each employee be committed to safe work
practices daily. Each employee, for themselves and fellow workers, must
take the responsibility to work safely and should report to his or her
supervisor any unsafe conditions or practices observed. While most of
these guidelines are driven by common sense, others are mandated by
government regulations. Failure to follow these guidelines could result
not only in serious injury, but will cost valuable time and expense due to
delays and/or shut downs enforced by Governmental agencies or
Production Management personnel.
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GENERAL
Know the Emergency Plan and how to react in emergency
situation. Familiarize yourself with emergency procedures for
each location. Speak to your supervisor if emergency procedures
are unknown.
Attend all pertinent toolbox talks assigned by your supervisor and
additional safety meetings whenever any stunt, special effect,
firearm, live ammunition, hazardous or unusual activity is
scheduled.
Report all injuries, no matter how minor, immediately so proper
medical or first aid treatment can be arranged. Inform the
appropriate supervisor.
Report any employees interfering with communications
equipment, the dissemination of safety information, or disrupting
safety meetings, to their supervisors.
Your supervisor will specify appropriate work shoes and clothing.
Loose or frayed clothing, gloves, long hair, rings, etc., can become
entangled in certain machines and shall not be worn.
Your supervisor will furnish safety equipment. Use goggles or
safety glasses when cutting, grinding or chipping; correctly wear
harnesses with suitable anchorages when working above or
outside of guardrails; wear hard-hats when exposed to potential
falling objects.
All safety guards and other protective devices should be properly
adjusted and remain in place. Missing or faulty safety equipment
should visibly marked and be reported promptly to the employee’s
supervisor.
Always use push sticks to guide short or narrow pieces of stock
through saws. Using the correct push stick allows saw operators to
keep their hands at a safe distance from the saw blade and
prevent kickback.
Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM): No employee of this
company shall be asked to remove, demolish, or abate ACM or
suspected ACM. All such work will be performed by licensed third
party ACM remediation vendors. Contact the Production Safety
Representative.
Any employee who accidentally disturbs friable ACM and is
potentially exposed to ACM should undergo a precautionary
decontamination procedure so as to avoid exposing other workers
and, potentially, bringing contaminated materials home:
a). the employee should wash down in the nearest shower;
b). the employee’s clothes should be disposed of by the third party
asbestos remediation company;
c). the employee should be loaned clothing to wear when
returning home.
Only authorized and trained personnel are allowed to use aerial
lifts, scissor lifts, etc. Harnesses and lanyards are to be worn at all
times, including in scissor lifts and bucket lifts. (May require
adjustment of lanyard for Fall Restraint.)
Always use aerial lifts, scissor lifts and forklifts as the
manufacturers intended or has provided special guidelines.
Familiarize yourself with the manual. Do not overload, tower, use
in place of a crane, use in high wind conditions, etc.
Always make sure the area below is clear of personnel when
working with overhead loads unless exception is approved by the
Production Safety Representative.
Ladders, scaffolds, working platforms and walkways, should be
properly maintained and used in a safe manner. Access areas and
walkways are to be kept clear of material and debris.
Adequate fall protection devices (i.e. guardrails, covers, personal
fall arrest systems, barricades) shall be provided at all elevated
surfaces, excavations, trenches, pits and floor openings that
expose any worker to a potential fall of 4 feet or more. (Trigger
height may vary. Contact the Production Safety Representative.)
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
16. Liftgates: Always operate liftgates according to manufacturers’
guidelines. Chock or lock wheels of all carts or materials being
lifted by liftgate. Keep employees clear when raising or lowering
liftgate.
17. Working Alone or in Isolation: If your work requires you to be
alone or isolated from other employees, let your Department Head
know where you will be and what you will be doing. Have the area
you are working inspected for any hazards. Establish regular
telephone contact with your Department Head. If no telephone
service is available, alternate methods of contact should be made.
18. Notify your supervisor if you are taking any medication that may
interfere with your ability to work. Working under the influence of
illegal drugs or alcohol is prohibited.
19. It is your responsibility to report unsafe conditions, employees
engaged in unsafe activities, and all accidents to your supervisor or
to the Anonymous Safety Hotline (818) 954-2800 /(877) 566-8001.
20. See that all visitors and new hires remain a safe distance from
potentially hazardous construction and filming.
21. Do not engage in pranks, horseplay, scuffling or other unsafe acts.
22. Never enter confined spaces (manholes, underground vaults,
chambers, silos, etc.) until oxygen and gas levels have been
checked by a qualified person and confirmed as being healthful.
23. Stunts and Special Effects require an on-site walk-through with all
involved parties before filming. The meeting and rehearsals
should be documented (the daily production report may be used.)
Certain stunts and special effects, such as those involving aircraft,
high falls, body burns, car crashes, etc., should be reviewed by the
Production Safety Representative prior to execution. Special
Effects involving pyrotechnics, atmospheric smoke, explosives
and/or fire, should be noted in advance on the call sheet. There
should be planned escape routes provided for each person who
should personally check the route to determine its accessibility.
Only persons necessary for the stunt and/or effect should be in the
immediate area. Those involved in the scene should ask questions
until they thoroughly understand their part in the action. All
others should stay in the designated safe zone.
24. Firearms and Live Ammunition should always be treated as if they
are loaded or set to detonate. Do not play with firearms or any
weapons and never point a firearm at anyone, including yourself.
Follow the directions of the property master regarding all firearms
and weapons. Ask for clarification until you understand its proper
use. Do not bring live ammunition to the filming location.
25. Film Vehicles: Be particularly cautious when vehicles such as fixed
wing aircraft, boats, cars, helicopters, motorcycles and trains are
being used. When driving, walking or traveling in any manner in
congested areas, proceed slowly and watch for sudden
movements. Pay close attention when working around helicopters
and on runways.
26. Water Hazards: Always wear life vests or other safety gear when
possible when working on boats, pontoons, rafts, etc. Use safety
lines, nets, observers and/or safety divers when filming in rivers or
other bodies of water. Only electrical equipment intended for use
in and around water should be used.
27. Animals: Make sure you understand and follow the wrangler’s
safety precautions in effect when animals are present. Do not
feed, pet or play with any animal. Defer to the trainer/wrangler at
all times.
28. Tools and Equipment: See to it that all equipment is in proper
working order and that all protective guards are in place and are
used. Do not attempt to alter, modify, displace or remove any
existing safety equipment. Saw guards, safety switches, and other
safety mechanisms are installed for your protection. Always use
push sticks to guide short or narrow pieces of stock through saws.
Using a push stick allows saw operators to keep their hands at a
safe distance from the saw blades. Do not use tools or equipment
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for which you are not trained and certified. See your supervisor if
you have any questions or feel that you need additional training.
Do not use, alter, or modify equipment being used by another
employee without informing them prior to doing so.
Chemical Handling: Store all flammable liquids in approved safety
cans or cabinets. Do not allow paint chemicals and other materials
to accumulate on stage floors, under platforms, or in other work
areas where they do not belong. Read understand and follow
proper handling and storage procedures for all combustible or
flammable materials. Use only approved flame retardants and
decorative set materials that are non-combustible. Properly
dispose of all hazardous waste generated by the company,
including paint. Do not dump down the sink, storm drain, septic
systems, or in the trash.
Fire Safety: In buildings, keep all exterior doors unlocked and
capable of being opened from the inside. Make sure all aisles,
traffic lanes, electrical panels, and fire exits and all fire equipment
are kept clear and accessible at all times. Maintain clear walkways
(4 feet around the perimeter) and exit passages.
NO SMOKING: Smoking is prohibited on all soundstages and in all
buildings, regardless of location. This applies to all smoking
products, including e-cigarettes. Smoke only in designated areas.
Extinguish all smoking materials in appropriate butt cans.
Ladders: Place ladders on slip-free surfaces, even if they have slipresistant feet. Secure the ladder if a slip-free surface is not
available. .
Fall Protection: All personnel working in the permanent grid and
truss system (perms) outside the catwalks and handrails will use
Cal/OSHA compliant fall protection equipment. Prior to use each
day, the wearer should visually inspect all fall protection
equipment.
Electrical Safety: Keep all electrical cords away from pinch points.
In any wet, damp or moist environment, Ground Fault Circuit
Interrupters (GFCI’s) should be used. See to it that all electrical
panels are unobstructed and have a minimal clearance of 36”.
Lock Out/Tag Out: Always turn off a tool or appliance before
disconnecting it to avoid exposure to live electrical parts. Never
work on machinery which may unexpectedly be re-energized.
Lifting Precaution: When lifting, stand close to the object with
your feet comfortably apart, squatting down, and bending at the
hips and knees. As you lift the object, arch your back inward and
pull your shoulders back, keeping the load close to your body.
Once you arrive at your destination, set the load down, bending at
the hips and knees. Remember: never twist your body at the hip
when carrying a load.
Reach Lifts/ Gradall’s should only be operated by persons trained
on the specific model being used.
EMERGENCY INFORMATION
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EMERGENCY PLAN:
Attend your Emergency Plan meeting.
1. Know exits.
2. Know assembly points.
3. Know your fellow employees.
When an emergency warning is made:
1. WARN OTHERS!
2. Move to the nearest exit quickly.
3. Use the stairwells. DO NOT USE THE ELEVATOR.
4. Evacuate to the outdoors, to a pre-assigned evacuation area.
5. After reaching the assembly area:
a. Stay with your evacuation group and wait for further
instructions.
b. Do not reenter an evacuated building until emergency
personnel notify you it is safe.
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
IN THE EVENT OF A FIRE
KEEP CALM.
EVACUATE: all occupants from the room and adjoining rooms near
the fire.
IF SAFE, CLOSE THE DOORS AND WINDOWS NEAR THE FIRE.
PULL THE FIRE ALARM OR CALL THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. Tell them
your exact location and the nature of the emergency.
IF YOU HAVE BEEN TRAINED TO USE A FIRE EXTINGUISHER AND
CAN DO SO SAFELY, expend the fire extinguisher and leave the
building. (See FIRE EXTINGUISHERS)
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Use a fire extinguisher only if you have been trained to do so and
can do so safely. If there is any danger at all from fire, smoke,
fumes or extreme heat, LEAVE THE AREA IMMEDIATELY.
Determine what type of fire you have and check the label on the
extinguisher to make sure it is intended for your type of fire.
Letters on the label indicate the type of fire it will fight:
a) A = wood, cardboard, paper, cloth
b) B = flammable liquids and gases
c) C = electrical equipment
d) D = metals
(Never use water on an electrical fire – water can cause a fatal
shock.)
Use the PASS system to put out the fire:
a) Pull the pin or ring. Some units require releasing of a lock
latch, pressing a puncture lever, or other motion.
b) Aim the extinguisher nozzle at the base of the fire.
c) Squeeze or press the handle.
d) Sweep from side to side slowly at the base of the fire until it
goes out.
If the fire gets big, GET OUT! Close the door to slow the spread of
the fire.
FIRE PREVENTION
Check to see that all fire exits, doorways, stairways, aisles and
corridors are not obstructed or blocked at anytime.
Make sure you know the location of all fire exits.
Poor housekeeping is a fire breeder. Avoid all unnecessary
accumulation of combustible debris.
Regularly check all electrical cords and plugs for fraying or cracked
wire insulation and fitness for use. OSHA prohibits the use of
ungrounded extension cords longer than 12 feet in office buildings.
Store all flammable liquids, such as copy machine fluids, cleaning
products, solvents, etc. according to instructions on label.
Report fluorescent lights that give off a loud humming sound, as
this may indicate a defective ballast.
Turn off all coffeemakers and other personal electrical appliances
when they are not in use. Check the plugs, cords and wiring on a
regular basis to determine if they are in good condition.
SMOKING IS PROHIBITED ON ALL SOUNDSTAGES, ON ALL SETS, AND IN
ALL BUILDINGS, REGARDLESS OF LOCATION. THIS APPLIES TO ALL
SMOKING PRODUCTS, INCLUDING E-CIGARETTES. SMOKE ONLY IN
DESIGNATED AREAS.
WORKING AT HEIGHTS
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FALL PROTECTION: DEFINITIONS & GUIDELINES
(1) Passive Fall Prevention
 The best way to avoid a fall is not to work from a height. Bring the
work down to ground level whenever possible.
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If you can’t bring the work to ground level, work from access
equipment such as scaffolding, a platform, an aerial lift, or a
ladder.
 If the work environment does not allow you to use access
equipment, secure the elevated work area with a passive fall
prevention barrier system, such as guardrails or a roof parapet at
least 42” high.
(2) Fall Restraint
If the work environment does not allow for the use of a passive fall
prevention system, use an approved fall restraint system. Fall restraint
systems, such as a harness, and rope grab prevent the employee from
reaching the edge of the roof.
(3) Fall Arrest
• A fall arrest system, such as a rope grab kit, lanyard, and
approved or acceptable anchorage point arrests and limits the fall
of an employee. Plan a method of rescue prior to the use of a fall
arrest system.
(4) Controlled Access Zone
• When on elevated surfaces such as rooftops, platforms, or around
pits and tanks one option is to establish a Controlled Access Zone
(CAZ) A CAZ protects employees not wearing fall protection
equipment by warning them when they are within six feet of the
fall hazard.
• The system uses stanchions and control lines with high visibility
flags every six feet. The line must be rated for two hundred
pounds and be not less than six or more than 25 feet from the
edge.
• A safety monitor must be assigned to: watch and warn employees
who leave the safe zone and enter the CAZ six foot zone who are
not wearing fall protection gear.
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FALL PROTECTION: TRIGGER HEIGHTS
Fall protection is always required when employees are working
within six feet from the unprotected edge of a set, platforms, or
roof, that is elevated 6’ (7’1/2 “ in CA) above the surface below
where the edge is not protected by a 42” guardrail or parapet
wall.
For general production crews, the trigger height for mandatory fall
protection is 4 feet. Guardrails (42”), or harnesses with
appropriate anchorage points are required.
For set/scenery construction crews the trigger height for
mandatory fall protection is 4 feet. Guardrails (42”), or harnesses
with appropriate anchorage points are required.
For construction work on a permanent structure, the trigger
height for mandatory fall protection is 6’ (7’1/2 “in CA). Guardrails
(42”), or harnesses with appropriate anchorage points are
required.
The trigger heights do not apply to work performed from portable
ladders. If ladders are used properly, additional fall protection
measures are generally not necessary.
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FALL PROTECTION: GENERAL LADDER SAFETY
All employees must follow proper safety practices when using ladders.
If ladders are maintained and used correctly, additional fall protection
measures are generally not necessary.
• Inspect all ladders prior to use. Read all manufacturer safety
warnings on the ladder and comply with them.
• Check for loose steps or rungs, cracked or split steps or side rails,
loose or bent hinges, missing ladder feet, etc. All defective ladders
shall be marked “defective” and brought to the attention of the
supervisor and removed from service.
• Make sure the ladder is free of oil, grease, or other slippery
hazards.
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
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Use ladders on stable and level surfaces only.
Ladders shall not be placed in doorways unless protected by
barricades or guards.
If using a step ladder, make sure it is securely spread open. Never
use a folding step ladder in an unfolded position.
Make sure the ladder is securely fixed at both the top and the foot
so that it cannot move from its top or bottom points of rest. If the
ladder cannot be secured at the top and bottom, then securely fix
it at the base. If this is not possible, have someone stand at the
base of the ladder and secure it manually against slipping.
When using an extension ladder, the base to height ratio should be
placed at approximately 1to 4.
Ladders used to reach a walking surface or roof must extend at
least 3 feet beyond the landing surface.
Always face the ladder when ascending or descending.
Use fiberglass or wood ladders when doing electrical work.
You must maintain three points of contact at all times while
climbing. Carry tools in a tool belt, pouch or holster, not in your
hands. Keep your hands on the ladder.
Do not stand on the top two steps of a step ladder.
Do not try to reach so far above you or to either side that you lose
your balance; instead, move the ladder.
When you are using a hand line to pull up equipment or supplies,
all material should be securely attached to the line and you should
be in a stable position complying with fall protection regulations.
No one should be permitted to stand, walk or work under a ladder
while it is in use.
When using rolling “A” frame trestle ladders, never extend them
beyond twenty feet or manufacturer’s recommendation.
Always lock or chock the wheels of trestle ladders to prevent any
rolling or instability.
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FALL PROTECTION: FIXED LADDERS
When climbing a fixed ladder over 20 feet in length without rest balconies,
or a ladder that is not equipped with a ladder cage, you must use a ladder
safety device. This equipment includes: a full-body harness and a sliding
sleeve attached to either a fixed-rail or cable system.
• Inspect all fall protection equipment prior to use.
• Connect the sleeve to the “D” ring located on the front of your
harness.
• Connect the sleeve to the fixed-rail or cable. Connect the sleeve
onto the fixed-rail or cable with the arrow pointed toward the top
of the ladder.
• Once attached, climb up the ladder normally. The detachable
cable sleeve will follow you as you climb.
• When you reach the top of the ladder, carefully disconnect from
the ladder safety device to exit the ladder.
• To descend the ladder, reattach your “D” ring to the sleeve and
climb down smoothly in a normal manner. Allow the sleeve to
“lead” you down. Climbing down out of position will cause the
sleeve to lock onto the fixed-rail or cable.
• If the sleeve locks, move upward slightly to release the sleeve.
• You must be attached to the ladder safety system whenever you
are on the ladder.
• Do not use unprotected fixed ladders over 20 feet in length.
Contact your Production Safety Representative.
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FALL PROTECTION: SOUNDSTAGE PERMANENTS
When working outside the catwalks, in the unprotected area of the
permanents known as the “ozone,” you must use fall arrest equipment.
This equipment includes: a full body harness and a self-retracting
lanyard.
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Inspect all fall protection equipment prior to use.
Locate an anchorage point for the self-retracting lanyard (SRL).
Single-user anchorage points are located on the soundstage
trusses at the corners of the ozone; are constructed of wire rope
with thimbles; and have been identified with a yellow tag.
Select an anchorage point as close as possible to where you are
working to avoid or limit a possible swing fall.
Connect the SRL to the anchorage point with a self-locking
carabineer.
Attach the double-locking snap hook from the SRL to the “D” ring
located on the back of your harness.
Avoid quick or sudden movements in any direction to prevent loss
of balance from line tension or locking. The SRL maintains normal
line tension when line is being steadily extracted and retracted. Do
not allow the SRL to go slack.
Practice using your attached SRL on the catwalk. This will
familiarize you with the tension and locking actions of the system
and make you aware of the forces applied to your body by the
system during movement.
If you need to move farther than the SRL will allow, return to the
catwalk and find another anchorage point. Never try to increase
the length of an SRL by attaching it to another SRL.
Never detach from the SRL until you are safely back on the
catwalk.
WARNING: Do not allow the retractable lifeline to wrap around
your arm. Do not turn and/or reach over the lifeline.
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FALL PROTECTION: HORIZONTAL CABLE SYSTEM
OVER PERMANENTS
An employee working outside the catwalks, in the unprotected area of
the permanents known as the “ozone,” must use fall arrest equipment.
This equipment includes: a full body harness, a shock absorbing lanyard
or a self-retracting lanyard (SRL), and a carabineer.
• Inspect all fall protection equipment prior to use. Inspect the
horizontal wire rope cable for any kinks or damage.
• Select a horizontal line as close as possible to where you are
working to avoid or limit a swing fall. These engineered lines are
designed for two users per line.
• Connect the lanyard to the fixed horizontal anchorage line with a
double-locking snap hook or self-locking carabineer.
• You may connect to the horizontal anchorage line either by:
o Connecting the SRL to the horizontal line directly with a selflocking carabineer,
o Substituting a 6-foot shock-absorbing “Y” lanyard for the SRL.
• Attach the double-locking snap hook from the SRL to the “D” ring
located on the back of your harness.
• When using an SRL, avoid quick or sudden movements in any
direction to prevent loss of balance from line tension or locking.
The SRL maintains normal line tension when line is being steadily
extracted and retracted. Do not allow the SRL to go slack.
• Practice using the device on the catwalk. This will familiarize you
with the tension and locking actions of the SRL and make you
aware of the forces applied to your body by the line during
movement.
• If you need to move farther than the lanyard will allow, return to
the catwalk and find another horizontal line. Never try to increase
the length of a lanyard by attaching it to another lanyard.
• Never detach from the lanyard until you are safely back on the
catwalk.
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FALL PROTECTION: BELOW THE PERMANENTS –
SINGLE ROPE GRAB SYSTEMS
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
When working at heights below the permanents that cannot be reached
by using a ladder, aerial lift, or scaffolding, you must use fall arrest
equipment. (Examples of this work include, hanging greenbeds or
walking on the top of set walls). The equipment needed includes: a full
body harness with a self-retracting lanyard, a vertical rope lifeline with
rope grab, a carabineer and a tag line.
• Inspect all fall protection equipment prior to use.
• Locate an anchorage point for the vertical lifeline. Single-user
anchorage points are eyebolts located on the soundstage trusses
and have been identified with a yellow tag.
• Select an anchorage point above you and as close as possible to
where you are going to be working to avoid or limit a swing fall.
• Connect the vertical lifeline to the anchorage point with the
double-locking snap hook.
• Open the rope grab and enclose the vertical lifeline with the rope
grab (arrow pointed up) then tightly screw the rope grab to the
vertical lifeline. Make sure that the arrow on the rope grab is
pointing up toward the anchorage point.
• Attach the self-retracting lanyard (SRL) to the rope grab with a selflocking carabineer.
• Connect the tag line to the double-locking snap hook on the other
end of the SRL.
• Position the rope grab, SRL and tag line on the lifeline so that the
final height of the SRL is 6 feet above your intended work height.
• Protect the lifeline against rough edges by using a rope protector
or by padding sharp corners.
• From the ground or greenbed, pull the tag line down and attach
the double-locking snap hook from the SRL to the “D” ring located
on the back of your harness.
• Never remove your lifeline until you are back on the ground or
greenbed.
• If you need to move a longer distance horizontally across the set,
you can rig two or more vertical lifeline systems. This will reduce
the swing fall potential. (See “Multiple Rope Grab Systems”
below.)
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FALL PROTECTION: BELOW THE PERMANENTS – MULTIPLE ROPE
GRAB SYSTEMS
When working at heights below the permanents that cannot be reached
by using a ladder, aerial lift, or scaffolding, you must use fall arrest
equipment. (Examples of this work include, hanging greenbeds or
walking on the top of set walls).
When you need to move long distances horizontally across the set, use a
multiple rope grab system. Two or more rope grab set-ups will allow you
to travel across the set without risking a swing fall. This equipment
includes: a full body harness the number of self-retracting lanyards
(SRL’s) you intend to use, number of vertical lifelines with rope grabs you
intend to use, tag lines, carabineers and a double D-ring extender for
your harness.
• Inspect all fall protection equipment prior to use.
• Locate an anchorage point for each of your vertical lifelines.
Single-user anchorage points are located on the soundstage
trusses and have been identified with a yellow tag.
• Select anchorage points above you and as close as possible to
where you are going to be working to avoid or limit a swing fall.
• Connect the vertical lifelines to the anchorage points you have
chosen with the double-locking snap hook. Attach only one
vertical lifeline per anchor point.
• Open the rope grab and enclose the vertical lifeline with the rope
grab (arrow pointed up) then tightly screw the rope grab to the
vertical lifeline. Make sure that the arrow on the rope grab is
pointing up toward the anchorage point.
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Attach the self-retracting lanyard (SRL) to the rope grab with a selflocking carabineer.
Connect the tag line to the double-locking snap hook on the SRL.
Position the rope grab, SRL and tag line on the lifeline so that the
final height of the SRL is 6 feet above your intended work height.
Protect the lifeline against rough edges by using a rope protector
or by padding sharp corners.
From the ground or greenbed, pull the tag line and attach the
double-locking snap hook from the SRL to the double D-ring
extender attached to the D-ring on the back of your harness.
As you work move toward the next SRL you previously positioned.
Pull the tag line and hook the double-locking snap hook to the
second D-Ring extender.
Unhook the first double-locking snap hook from the first SRL.
Never remove one lifeline until you are safely attached to the
second lifeline, or until you are back on the ground or greenbed.
 FALL PROTECTION: Rooftop Restraint
When working within 6 feet of the unprotected edge of a flat or lowpitched roof (maximum allowable pitch 4:12 slope), or around
unguarded skylights, then you must use fall restraint equipment. This
equipment includes a full-body harness and a lifeline; an adjustable rope
grab all attached to an appropriate anchorage point by a cross arm
strap or other similar method. (Note: Roof edges protected with a 42”
guardrail (permanent or a temporary equivalent) or a 42” or higher
parapet wall do not require the use of fall restraint equipment.)
• Inspect all fall protection equipment prior to use.
• Select an anchorage point as close as possible to where you are
working. Because you will be harnessing yourself so that it would
be impossible to fall over the edge of the building (Fall Restraint)
the anchorage point should be four times heavier than your body
weight. (*Prior to working on a roof with no anchorage points,
contact your Production Safety Representative.)
• Connect the lifeline to the anchorage point cross arm strap D-Ring
(or equivalent device) with a double-locking snap hook or selflocking carabineer.
• Open the rope grab and enclose the vertical lifeline with the rope
grab (arrow pointed up) then tightly screw the rope grab to the
vertical lifeline. Make sure that the arrow on the rope grab is
pointing up toward the anchorage point.
• Position the rope grab on the lifeline so that its maximum
extended length will physically limit your ability to inadvertently
fall over the edge of the roof.
• Attach the double-locking snap hook or self-locking carabineer
from the rope grab to the “D” ring located on the back of your
harness.
• You must be attached to the system prior positioning yourself for
work.

FALL PROTECTION: CONTROLLED ACCESS ZONE
When you are working in elevated areas such as rooftops, unprotected
platforms, or around pits and tanks, one option for fall prevention is to
establish a Controlled Access Zone (CAZ). The CAZ is the area within six
feet of the edge of the fall hazard. A CAZ protect employees not
wearing fall arrest or fall restraint equipment by physically and verbally
warning them when they are within 6 feet of a potential fall hazard.
This system requires stanchions, control lines, high visibility markers and
additional employees acting as safety monitors.
WARNING: The CAZ requires vigilance, and a dedicated designated
“safety monitor”. It is therefore not appropriate to all situations.
• The Controlled Access Zone (CAZ) is separated from the Safe Zone
by a heavy control line that restricts access to the CAZ.
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Post Signs at the entrance of the Safe Zone warning employees or
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
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unauthorized personnel that they: (1) are entering a CAZ; (2)
should stay within the visibly marked control lines (Safe Zone);
and, (3) to do as they are told by the Safety Monitors.
Control lines must be positioned not less than 6 feet from the fall
hazard and not more than 25 feet from the fall hazard.
Expand the CAZ during adverse conditions (e.g., rain, wind,
slippery roof), or when working at an additional elevation within
the "Safe Zone" (e.g., on a step ladder).
Make sure control lines consist of ropes, wires, or equivalent
materials that have a minimum breaking strength of 200 pounds.
Control lines should be clearly marked every six feet with highvisibility materials. (Bright barricade tape or red flags).
Rig each line so it is between 39 inches and 45 inches from the
working surface. Do not let them “sag”.
Anyone working outside the “SAFE ZONE” and inside the CAZ
(within 6 feet of the leading edge or fall hazard), must wear fall
restraint or fall arrest equipment.
Designate a person whose sole job and responsibility is to
monitor the safety of other employees in the work area and who
will:
Watch and warn employees when it appears that they are acting in
an unsafe manner; crossing the CAZ line without wearing fall
protection or fall arrest protection.
The Safety Monitor must be able to see that the entire CAZ is clear
of unprotected employees. If necessary add an additional Safety
Monitor to ensure the CAZ remains clear.
All Employees who working at a location utilizing a Controlled
Access Zone will comply with the Safety Monitors directives.
If there are repeated infractions into the CAZ, the Safety Monitor
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will bring the matter to the attention of the 1 AD.
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FALL PROTECTION: IN THE EVENT OF A FALL
(NOTE: All falls sustained by employees in fall protection equipment
should immediately be reported to local emergency personnel (911).
Self Rescue: If a person falls a short distance and is conscious, uninjured,
and can reach a working surface safely, the employee should do so and
be taken to First Aid.
Ladder or Aerial Work Platform Rescue: if self-rescue is not possible, the
next option is the use of a ladder, “condor,” or scissor lift. This rescue
depends upon the accessibility and condition of the person; the
availability of appropriate equipped personnel and the necessary
equipment. Ensure the employee is taken to First Aid.
Fire Department Rescue: if the previous rescue options cannot be
accomplished in a prompt and safe manner, the fire department
personnel will rescue the person using advanced techniques.
• Establish verbal contact and continuously monitor the employee.
• Watch for signs or complaints of suspension trauma: faintness,
nausea, breathlessness, dizziness, sweating, paleness, hot flashes,
loss of vision or increased heart rate.
• Continue to talk to the suspended worker; tell them to keep their
legs moving to increase circulation.
• Safely lower a rope with a loop tied in the end of it and the
opposite end tied to an anchor point to the suspended worker.
Have the worker step into the loop and stand up at regular
intervals to remove the pressure on his legs created by the leg
straps. This also enables him to shift his body weight around into a
more comfortable position.
• After the event do not continue to use any of the Fall Protection
Equipment involved in the incident. Tag it, “Do Not Use” and
return it to your supervisor or Production Safety Representative.
• Report all falls to your supervisor and Production Safety
Representative.
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HAZARD COMMUNICATIONS
This Code of Safe Practices is designed to help employees work safely with
potentially hazardous materials that they may use. This program outlines
procedures for Department Heads and Supervisors to make employees
aware of the chemical hazards that they may encounter and how to protect
themselves from them.
1. Supervisors shall see that employees understand proper handling
and disposal of hazardous products they use.
2. Observe and comply with all Warning Signs that you encounter
(i.e. DANGER - NO SMOKING, etc.).
3. Read, understand and obey Warning Labels that are attached to
containers of products containing hazardous chemicals.
4. Check to see that all containers being used to store hazardous
chemicals, including those filled from the original container are
labeled with the same safety information that is available on the
manufacturer’s label.
5. Alert your supervisor when you discover unlabeled containers. Do
not use the contents of the container.
6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS): You can request a copy of an SDS for any
product by calling the 3E Company at (800) 451-8346, an SDS
management company for this Production.
7. Always wear the appropriate eye, skin, body and respiratory
personal protective equipment (PPE) required to protect you from
potential workplace hazards. If unsure of the type of PPE to use,
ask your supervisor, Production Safety Representative, or follow
the directions on the container or SDS.
8. Store chemicals in approved areas (i.e. flammable materials in
flammable cabinets, acids in acid cabinets, etc.). Incompatible
materials like flammable and oxidizing materials or inorganic acids
and certain combustible materials can react violently if allowed to
mix. Always store these incompatible materials separately. SDS’s
or the original container should be consulted for specific
incompatibility information.
9. Notify your supervisor before mixing together any hazardous
materials for the first time. Conduct all mixing operations
following the directions found on the product’s warning label, the
manufacturer’s mixing instructions, or on the SDS.
10. Call local emergency personnel (911) whenever there is a large
spill involving potentially hazardous or unknown chemical
products.
11. In the event of a spill, attempt to contain the spread of the
hazardous material only if it is safe to do so.
12. Regularly inspect hazardous material containers for leaks or signs
of deterioration. Notify your supervisor of containers in poor
condition or those exceeding shelf life.
13. Check the ventilation requirements for a chemical product before
using it in a space with low ventilation.
14. Contact the Production Safety Representative if you have any
questions or concerns about materials or chemicals present in
your workplace.
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LOCK OUT/TAG OUT
Only employees who have been trained in LOCK OUT/ TAG OUT
shall service or repair any machine or equipment that could cause
injury during unexpected startup or movement.
Lock Out/Tag Out is a method for preventing equipment from
being set in motion and endangering workers.
Common situations for use of Lock Out/Tag Out are: (a) when you
are to remove or bypass a guard or other safety device not
installed by a fellow employee, (b) when you are to place any part
of your body where it could be caught moving machinery, (c) when
using electrical circuits.
Whether the power switch is on or off, be aware that residual
energy could be present in equipment.
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
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Stored energy poses special problems. Employees should know or
determine the nature of the power source, i.e. hydraulic pressure,
steam, electric charge, etc. All residual energy should be dissipated
prior to work being performed. Ask your supervisor if you do not
know how to do this procedure.
Energy controls are applied according to a six-step procedure:
• Preparation for shutdown
• Equipment shutdown
• Equipment isolation
• Application of Lock Out/Tag Out devices
• Control of stored energy
• Equipment isolation verification
Removal
1. Prior to removing Lock Out/Tag Out devices, make sure that the
equipment is safe to operate by removing all tools and verifying
that the system is fully assembled.
2. Lock Out/Tag Out devices may only be removed by the person who
put them on, except in an emergency.
3. When the worker who applied a lock is not present to remove the
lock, it can be removed only under the direction of the supervisor.
4. Follow the manufacturer’s checklist to re-energize the system.
5. If an outside contractor or other outside worker is performing
service or maintenance, they are to coordinate their activities with
all affected Production employees.
6. If servicing lasts more than one shift, Lock Out/Tag Out protection
should not be interrupted. One shift should inform the next.
7. Never remove a lock until you are absolutely sure that it is
completely safe to do so.
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TRENCHING AND SHORING
Contact the Production Safety Representative if you are planning
any trenching job deeper than 4 feet.
A Trenching and Shoring Trained Competent Person is to be in
charge of any shoring operation.
Before digging, you are to check the site for potential hazards.
Adequate barriers (i.e. guardrails, covers, barricades) shall be
provided at all excavations, trenches, pits and holes.
A shoring or benching system is to be employed in trenches and
evacuation deeper than 5 feet.
Before excavating, locations of existing underground utilities are to
be determined by Underground Services Alert at (800) 422-4133.
They require 48-hour notice, unless it is an emergency.
Before entering a confined space, the air in the space is to be
tested for dangerous gases and oxygen levels.
No part of any shoring system of an excavation shall be removed
until proper steps have been taken to avoid hazard to men from
moving ground.
Spoil piles are to be 2’ back from edge of all excavations.
LIFTING
Before lifting, check the load for slivers, jagged edges, burrs, rough
or slippery surfaces, and protruding nails.
Wear appropriate protective clothing (gloves, safety shoes, etc.).
Ask for help when a load cannot be handled safely by one person
because of excessive weight, bulkiness or awkward shape of the
load.
Check your route of travel for any slip, trip or fall hazards before you
lift.
When lifting as a group, one person should communicate commands
to the others. Indicate any changes in elevation, cornering or
rotating. Always give adequate warnings before setting your portion
of the load down.
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Recommended Lifting Procedures:
a) Stand close to the load with your feet spread shoulder width
apart.
b) Squat down, bending at the hips and knees, while keeping
your back straight.
c) Grip the load firmly, tighten your abdomen, and use your legs
to lift the object.
d) Lift in one continuous motion while keeping your back
straight.
e) Remember to breathe normally while you lift. Steady
breathing prevents you from becoming fatigued.
f) Keep the load close to your body. The closer the load is to
your body, the less pressure it exerts on your back.
g) Change directions by moving your feet. Never twist your
body.
h) When you set the load down, bend only at the hips and knees
while keeping your lower back straight.
i) If retrieving a load from above your shoulder level, do not
reach over your head. Elevate yourself to the load with a
ladder. Get help if you need it.

HEAT ILLNESS (Cal/OSHA)
When the body is unable to cool itself by sweating, several heat-induced
illnesses such as heat stress or heat exhaustion and more severe heat
stroke can occur. All are serious conditions and should be treated
immediately.
Factors Leading to Heat Stress
1. High temperature and humidity
2. Direct sun or heat
3. Limited air movement
4. Physical exertion
5. Poor physical condition
6. Some medicines
7. Inadequate acclimatization to work in hot area
Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion
1. Headaches, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting
2. Weakness and moist skin
3. Mood changes such as irritability and confusion
4. Upset stomach or vomiting
Symptoms of Heat Stroke
1. Dry, hot skin with no sweating
2. Mental confusion of losing consciousness
3. Seizures or convulsions
Preventing Heat Stress
1. Know signs/symptoms – monitor yourself and watch for symptoms
in coworkers.
2. Block direct sun or other heat sources with EZ-Ups or other
shelters or shade, and take frequent advantage of any shade.
3. Use cooling fans/air conditioning where possible.
4. Rest regularly.
5. Drink plenty of water – about 1 cup every 15 minutes.
6. Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothes and broadbrimmed hats.
7. Avoid alcohol, caffeinated drinks and heavy meals.
What to Do for Heat-Related Illness
1. Call local emergency personnel (911) immediately.
2. While waiting for help to arrive:
a. Move the worker to a cool, shady area.
b. Loosen or remove heavy clothing.
c. Provide cool drinking water.
d. Fan and mist the person with water.
For more complete information, contact your Production Safety
Representative.
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
SCAFFOLD USER AWARENESS
1. Only employees who have been properly trained to do so may
work from scaffolds.
2. Do not use scaffolds that do not have proper guardrails, mid rails
and toe boards (as appropriate).
3. Do not overload scaffolds. Follow the manufacturer’s or
construction coordinators safe working load recommendations.
4. Do not climb cross braces. Use only approved access ladders or
steps and use both hands while climbing. When climbing, always
maintain three points of contact.
5. Do not stand on guardrails, ladders or makeshift devices on top of
scaffolds to gain greater height.
6. Never use scaffolds where contact can be made with live electrical
circuits or power lines. Always maintain safe clearance from any
electrical source.
7. Never apply shock loads to the scaffold platform. (Never jump
down onto the platform.)
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SCAFFOLD USER AWARENESS
Only employees who have been properly trained to do so may
work from scaffolds.
Do not use scaffolds that do not have proper guardrails, mid rails
and toe boards (as appropriate).
Do not overload scaffolds. Follow the manufacturer’s or
construction coordinators safe working load recommendations.
Do not climb cross braces. Use only approved access ladders or
steps and use both hands while climbing. When climbing, always
maintain three points of contact.
Do not stand on guardrails, ladders or makeshift devices on top of
scaffolds to gain greater height.
Never use scaffolds where contact can be made with live electrical
circuits or power lines. Always maintain safe clearance from any
electrical source.
Never apply shock loads to the scaffold platform. (Never jump
down onto the platform.)
BLOODBORNE PRECAUTIONS
All employees, whose jobs may expose them to blood during first
aid or paramedic procedures, or during cleaning operations, are to
receive Bloodborne Pathogens Training.
Other employees whose jobs may expose them to blood should
always use Universal Precautions.
Universal Precautions:
Treat all human blood and certain human bodily fluids as if they were
infectious.
1. Employees shall wash their hands and any other skin with soap
and water, or flush mucous membranes with water immediately or
as soon as possible following contact with blood or potentially
infectious materials.
2. Employees who may have contacted blood should call First Aid or
the Anonymous Safety Hotline immediately.
3. All fluids are to be wiped up with disinfectants (i.e. 100% bleach)
by a person trained in Bloodborne Pathogens.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
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Always wear appropriate clothing and work shoes. Do not wear
loose or frayed clothing, long hair, rings, etc., near machinery and
other sources of entanglement.
Always wear appropriate foot protection when you are exposed to
foot injuries from hot, corrosive, hazardous substances, falling
objects, crushing or penetrating actions that may cause injuries, or
when you are working in abnormally wet locations.
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Always wear appropriate hand protection (gloves) when you are
exposed to cuts, burns harmful physical or chemical agents that
are encountered and capable of causing injury or impairments.
Never wear gloves where there is a danger of their becoming
entangled in moving machinery. Use push-sticks.
Always wear face or eye protection when working in locations
where there is a risk of receiving eye injuries such as punctures,
abrasions, contusions, or burns as a result of contact with flying
particles, hazardous substances, projections or injurious light rays.
Suitable screens or shields isolating the hazardous exposure should
be used to safeguard nearby employees.
Always wear approved head protection when you are exposed to
flying or falling objects.
Always wear hearing protection when noise levels exceed 85
decibels.
See to it that personal protective equipment (PPE) is cleaned
regularly or disposed of after use. Always keep PPE in good repair.
If you are working with electricity, you require additional or
specialized PPE and should consult with your supervisor.
 RESPIRATORS
This Code of Safe Practices is designed to act as a guide in the use,
selection and care of respiratory protective equipment. All respirator
protective equipment used on this Production is intended to be used to
reduce employees’ potential exposure to airborne dusts, gases, vapors,
mists and fumes.
1. Only employees who have been fit tested and trained in the
proper use of respirators may use them. The Production Safety
Representative can help arrange training and fit tests. Vendors
may also be authorized to train in the selection, use, cleaning and
maintenance of their respiratory equipment.
2. Respirator training and certification is specific for each different
make and model of respirator. Employees are to receive additional
training before they use any respirator for which they have not
been trained and fit tested.
3. Respirators may be required when creating smoke or fog effects
on interior sets or when working in locations with compromised air
quality. Producer(s) are responsible for the purchase of
appropriate respirators (consult SDS as required). Refer to Safety
Bulletin #10 - Artificially Created Smokes, Fogs and Lighting
Effects for further information.
4. Prior to the issuance and use of a respirator and at least annually
thereafter, each employee shall be given a qualitative fit test by a
qualified person.
5. Employees who have a diagnosed respiratory disease or ailments
(i.e. asthma, emphysema, cardio-pulmonary disease, chemical
sensitivity, respiratory allergies, etc.) or who feel that they could
not wear a respirator because of some other physical or medical
limitation are to notify their supervisor or the Production Safety
Representative so they can be given special consideration.
6. If you are using a new product, your supervisor or Production
Safety Representative will determine what type of respiratory
protection should be used. This determination will be based on the
nature and level of the airborne contaminant(s) in your work area.
7. Employees shall request assistance from the Production Safety
Representative whenever the nature or level of airborne
contaminants changes and they are not sure if their respiratory
protection is appropriate for the work they are doing.
8. NEVER use dual cartridge respirator or paper mask (dust, paint
fumes or high efficiency particulate air filters) to enter an oxygendeficient or suspected oxygen-deficient atmosphere. Call the
Production Safety Representative when there is any reason to
suspect an environment may be oxygen deficient.
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
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Respiratory protection shall be used when required by law or
when deemed necessary by your supervisor or Production Safety
Representative.
Employees are to make sure to obtain a gas-tight seal between
their facial skin and the respirator. This means that employees
who have a beard, moustache, or who are not clean-shaven may
not be issued or wear a respirator.
Employees shall perform a negative and positive pressure test
before each use of their respirator.
Employees shall inspect their respirators for defects before each
use and shall not wear a faulty respirator under any circumstance.
If an employee smells or tastes the airborne contaminant that the
respirator is designed to remove, then the employee shall leave
the work area, re-inspect the respirator and conduct another
positive and negative test. If there is a gas-tight seal and the
smell/taste returns, then the employee shall install new cartridge
filters of the type recommended by the product manufacturer or
the Production Safety Representative.
If breathing through the respirator becomes difficult, the filter
cartridges or pre-filters may need to be replaced. Contact your
supervisor or Production Safety Representative for replacement
parts. If breathing remains difficult, call your supervisor or
Production Safety Representative immediately.
Employees will routinely clean their respirators in accordance with
the manufacturer’s instruction.
Respirators will be stored in air tight bags when not in use.
TOOLS
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POWER TOOLS
Only persons trained in the safe operation of power tools shall be
allowed to operate them.
Wear safety glasses whenever you are performing work that may
generate dust, chips, splinters, shards, dust or flakes. Sources of
debris such as drills, grinding equipment, table saws, wire brushes or
similar equipment are obvious; however less obvious causes of eye
loss include cutting wire, working with chemicals, and misusing air
hoses.
Check your working materials carefully before proceeding. Make
sure there are no nails, bolts or flaws before you run the materials
through table saws, jointers, sanders, routers or other power tools.
Make sure all guards are in place prior to using power tools. Do not
wear clothes, gloves or items that may become entangled in the
machine.
Use a push stick when ripping material on a table saw or when using
a jointer. Whenever possible, avoid standing directly behind the
blade in order to avoid kickback.
Do not force wood, Plexiglas, or any other material through any saw,
jointer, planer, etc. Allow the blades to do the cutting.
When walking by operating power equipment, wear safety glasses to
safeguard against flying particles. Be aware and avoid accidental
contact with the equipment.
Disconnect power before changing blades, belts or bits. (See Lock
Out/Tag Out).
POWDER–ACTUATED TOOLS
Only qualified employees who carry valid operator cards shall be
permitted to operate powder-actuated tools. Training can be
arranged through the manufacturers’ representative or your
Production Safety Representative.
Eye or face protection shall be worn by operators and assistants
when the tool is in use.
Prior to use, the operator is to inspect the tool to determine that it is
in proper working condition.
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Any tool found not to be in working condition shall be immediately
removed from service, tagged "Defective,” given to the supervisor
and not used until it has been repaired.
Use only fasteners and powder loads recommended by the tool
manufacturer for a particular tool.
Tools shall be loaded just prior to firing. If the work is interrupted
after loading, the tool shall be unloaded immediately.
Never point a loaded or unloaded powder actuated tool at any
person.
Always keep hands and feet clear of the open barrel end.
The tool should be held perpendicular to the work surface when
fastening into any material, except for specific applications approved
by the tool manufacturer.
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TABLE SAWS
Woodworking can be DANGEROUS if safe and proper operating
procedures are not learned and followed. Using the machine with respect
and caution will considerably lessen the possibility of personal injury. If
normal safety precautions are overlooked or ignored, severe injury to the
operator may result. Whenever possible use all safety equipment such
as guards, push sticks, hold-downs. Featherboards, goggles, dust
masks and hearing protection can reduce your potential for injury.
Even the best guard won't make up for poor judgment, carelessness or
inattention. Always use common sense and exercise caution in the
workplace. If a procedure feels dangerous, or you do not understand the
task and equipment interface then don't try it. Get advice from your
supervisor or figure an alternative way to make the cut that feels safer.
REMEMBER: Inform your supervisor of any faulty equipment. Your
personal safety is your responsibility.
Table saws are designed for certain applications only. Do not modify or
use this machine for any application other than those for which it was
designed. If you have any questions relative to an application, do not use
this table saw until you have first contacted your supervisor or the
manufacturer and determined if the machine is appropriate to your task.
1. Only persons trained in the safe operation of table saws shall be
allowed to operate them.
2. For your own safety, read the instruction manual before
operating. Learn the correct application and limitations as well as
any specific potential hazards of your table saw.
3. KEEP GUARDS IN PLACE and in working order. Removal of the
guard requires the permission of your supervisor.
4. WEAR PROPER APPAREL. Do not wear loose clothing, gloves, rings,
bracelets, or other jewelry that may bet get caught in moving
parts of the table saw. Non-slip footwear is recommended.
Wear a hat to keep hair from becoming entangled.
5. ALWAYS USE SAFETY GLASSES. Wear Safety Glasses, Face Shields,
or Goggles when grinding chipping or cutting or when exposed
to flying debris. Eye glasses are not safety glasses.
6. GROUND ALL TOOLS. If a tool is equipped with a three-prong plug, it
should be plugged into a three-hole electrical receptacle, if an adapter
is used to accommodate a two- prong receptacle, the adapter lug
must be attached to a known ground. Never remove the third
prong.
7. REMOVE ADJUSTING KEYS AND WRENCHES. Form the habit of
checking to see that keys and adjusting wrenches are removed from the
table saw before turning it "on."
8. KEEP YOUR WORK AREA CLEAN. Cluttered areas and benches
invite accidents. Use a brush to clear not your hands.
9. DON’T USE IN DANGEROUS ENVIRONMENT. Don't use power
tools in damp or wet locations, or expose them to rain. Keep your
work area well-lighted.
10. KEEP EMPLOYEES AND VISITORS AWAY. All fellow employees and
visitors should be kept a safe distance from your work area. You
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
should stay a safe distance back from other employees work areas.
11. Make work area FOOLPROOF — with padlocks, master switches, lock
out tag out, or by removing starter keys.
12. DON’T FORCE a table saw. It will cut cleaner and be safer at the rate
for which it was designed.
13. Secure work. Use clamps or vise to hold your work when
practical. It's safer than using your hand and frees both hands to
operate the table saw.
14. Don’t overreach. Keep proper footing and balance at all times.
15. MAINTAIN tools in top condition. Keep tools sharp and clean for
best and safest performance. Follow manufacturer instructions for
lubricating and changing accessories.
16. TURN OFF THEN DISCONNECT the machine before servicing and
when changing accessories such as blades, bits, cutters, etc.
17. Use recommended accessories: The use of accessories and
attachments not recommended by the manufacturer may cause
hazards or a risk of injury to you or other nearby employees.
18. Reduce the risk of unintentional starting. Make sure switch is in
"OFF" position before plugging in power cord.
19. NEVER STAND ON A TABLE SAW. Serious injury could occur if the
tool is tipped or if the cutting blade is accidentally contacted.
20. Check damaged parts. Before further use of the tool, a guard or
other part that is damaged should be carefully checked to ensure
that it will operate properly and perform its intended function — check
for alignment of moving parts, binding of moving parts, breakage of
parts, mounting, and any other conditions that may affect its
operation. A guard or other part that is damaged should be
properly repaired or replaced.
21. Direction of feed. Feed work into a blade or cutler against the direction
of rotation of the blade or cutter only.
22. NEVER leave a tool running unattended. TURN THEPOWER OFF.
Don't leave the table saw until the blade comes to a complete
stop.
23. DRUGS, ALCOHOL, MEDICATION. Do not operate this tool
while under the influence of drugs, alcohol or any medication.
24. Make sure the table saw is disconnected from power supply while
the motor is being mounted connected or disconnected.
WARNING: The dust generated by certain woods and wood products
may be injurious to your health. Always operate machinery in well
ventilated areas and provide for proper dust removal. Use proper dust
removal systems whenever possible. Use appropriate PPE such as dust masks. If
you have any questions, contact your Production Safety Representative.
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CIRCULAR SAWS
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Only persons trained in the safe operation of circular saws shall
be allowed to operate them.
WARNING: Do not operate your saw until it is completely
assembled and installed according to the instructions.
If you are not thoroughly familiar with the operation of circular
saws, seek advice from your supervisor, knowledgeable
employee, or other qualified person.
AVOID awkward operations and hand positions where a sudden
slip could cause your hand to move into the cutting tool. Find
another way.
ALWAYS KEEP HANDS AND FINGERS AWAY FROM THE
BLADE.
NEVER stand or have any part of your body in line with the
path of the saw blade,
NEVER reach behind or over the cutting tool with either hand
for any reason.
NEVER attempt to free a stalled saw blade without first turning
the saw "OFF."
NEVER start the saw with the work-piece pressed against the
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blade.
10. NEVER use solvents to clean plastic parts. Solvents could possibly
dissolve or otherwise damage the material. Only a soft damp
cloth should be used to clean plastic parts.
11. Should any part of your circular saw be missing, damaged, or fail in
any way, or any electrical components fail to perform properly,
shut off switch and remove plug from power supply outlet. Tag
and report the machine to your supervisor. Ensure that missing,
damaged or failed parts are present and in good working order
before resuming operation.
Additional information regarding the safe and proper operation of this
product is available from the Safety Pass Center; the Production Safety
Representative; the National Safety Council, the manufacturer and your
supervisor.
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WELDING
Only persons trained in the safe operation of welding equipment shall
be allowed to operate it.
Gas Welding
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Compressed gas cylinders should be stored and transported in the
upright position with the valve protective caps on. Cylinders in
portable service are to be secured upright with a chain.
Welding is not permitted in areas with limited or restricted air supply
(see Confined Space) without prior approval from the Production
Safety Representative.
Cylinders will not be stored or placed where they are exposed to
heat, flame, impact, electric arcs or circuits, high temperature
process equipment or sparks.
Empty cylinders should be tagged “Empty” and stored separately
from full ones with the valve cap in place.
Proper eye and/or face protection will be worn when welding.
Torches should be lighted by friction lighters or other approved
devices and not by matches or from hot work.
Cutting or welding will be permitted only in areas that are, or have
been made, fire safe.
Suitable fire extinguishing equipment should be maintained ready
for use while welding and cutting are being performed.
Designated fire watches should be used whenever welding or cutting
is performed in locations where other than a minor fire might
develop.
Arc Welding and Cutting
1. Workers or other persons adjacent to the welding areas shall be
protected from the rays by noncombustible or flameproof screens or
shields, or should wear appropriate goggles.
2. Arc welding and cutting cables should be completely insulated,
flexible and capable of handling the maximum current required by
the operations to be performed. Take into account the number of
duty cycles.
3. When electrode holders are left unattended, electrodes should be
removed and holders situated so as to prevent employee injury.
4. The power supply switch should be kept in the off position when arc
welders or cutters leave or stop work, or when machines are moved.
Never unplug a machine in the “on position”.
5. When arc welding is performed in wet or in high humidity
conditions, employees should use additional protection to prevent
the increased potential of electric shock. Use rubber pads or boots,
6. When welding employees are exposed to ultraviolet radiation and
should cover their skin completely to prevent ultraviolet burns or
damage. Helmets and hand shields should not have leaks, openings
or highly reflective surfaces.
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ROPE AND CHAIN
Fiber Rope
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
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Never drag a rope. This hurts the outer fibers and leads to the
eventual deterioration of the rope’s overall strength.
2. Avoid kinking. This strains the rope and overstresses the fibers.
3. Splice, don’t knot. When joining lengths of ropes, they should be
spliced, not knotted. A properly done splice will hold up 100% of
the strength of the rope, but a knot only half.
4. Don’t allow rope to freeze and store away from heat, moisture,
chemicals, rodents, and sunlight.
Wire Rope
1. Use sheaves and drums of suitable size and design.
2. Don’t exceed the rated capacity of wire rope.
3. Check for the integrity of the wire rope.
4. Be sure to use the correct lay (twist) for the application.
Chains
1. Take up slack slowly and make sure every link seats correctly.
2. Chain shackles are to be used for shortening and/or splicing chains
together. Bolts as makeshift links or fasteners are prohibited.
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INDOOR CRANE (HOIST)
The hook should have a safety latch that closes the throat of the
hook.
2. Read the ANSI warning tag listing operational checks, which should
be located on the control section.
3. Never exceed the cranes lifting capacity; it should be stenciled on
both sides of the hoist.
4. Determine the weight of the load by checking the manufacturer
information or request a dynamometer from your Production
Safety Representative.
5. Select the proper rigging gear that is within the Safe Working Load
(SWL) of the web sling or wire rope being used.
6. Inspect the rigging gear prior to use. For wire rope, never exceed
six or more broken wires within one lay of strand length. The wire
rope is to be discarded.
7. Cranes are designed for vertical lifts only. Side pulling may result in
hoist and crane breakdown or collapse.
8. Sling angles are very critical; never exceed 45 degrees, as this will
put too much tension on the sling.
9. Conduct all lifting operations so that no one would be injured if
there were an equipment failure.
10. Never leave a suspended load unattended.
11. Do not pass a load over coworkers or allow anyone to walk under
the load.
12. Personal protective equipment, including, hard hats, eye
protection, hearing protection, and gloves should be worn by
employees when appropriate.
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COMPRESSED AIR
Compressed air or other compressed gases in excess of 10 pounds
per square inch gauge shall not be used to blow dirt, chips, or dust
from clothing while it is being worn.
Do not disconnect air hoses at compressors until the hose line has
been bled.
Compressed air or gases are not to be used to empty containers of
liquids where the pressure can exceed the container’s safe
working pressure.
Use personal protective equipment such as safety glasses to
protect employees from eye or body injury.
Abrasive blast cleaning nozzles are to be equipped with an
operating valve, which are to be held open manually. A support is
to be provided on which the nozzle may be mounted when not in
use.
Compressed gases shall not be used to elevate or otherwise
transfer any hazardous substance from one container to another
unless the containers are designed to withstand (with a factor of
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safety of at least four) the maximum possible pressure that may be
applied.
VEHICLES
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LIFTGATES
Pre-Operations
1. Read and comply with the liftgate operating instructions and all
safety decals. Ensure the Liftgate and truck are well lit.
2. Inspect the liftgate and do not use if there are signs of poor
maintenance.
3. Before loading the liftgate, ensure that the landing area is
adequate for loading and unloading freight.
14. Never operate a vehicle on floors, sidewalks, doors or platforms
that will not safely support the loaded vehicle.
15. Always maintain a minimum distance of one tire width from the
edge of any elevated dock, platform, freight car or truck.
16. Never load any truck in excess of its rated capacity as stated on the
manufacturers ID plate.
17. Never move a loaded vehicle until the load is safe and secure.
18. Use extreme care when tilting loads. NEVER TILT FORWARD WITH
THE FORKS ELEVATED, except when picking up a load. NEVER TILT
AN ELEVATED LOAD FORWARD, except when depositing it onto a
storage rack or equivalent. When stacking or tiering, limit
backward tilt to that necessary to stabilize the load.
19. Always place the forks in such a manner that the load will be
securely held or supported.
Operations
1. Before lifting or lowering, ensure that loads are secure (i.e. brakes,
chocks, sandbags.).
2. Anyone riding the liftgate should position themselves so a shifting
load will not harm them or knock them off the liftgate.
3. Recognize and avoid pinch points.
4. Keep the work area clear of people, and stand to the side of the
vehicle when bringing the liftgate up or down.
5. If necessary - due to the nature of the load - ask for help from an
employee with experience operating liftgates.
6. Secure top-heavy loads with ratchets or strapping to prevent them
from tipping.
7. Do not lift or lower loads greater than the rated capacity of the
liftgate.
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FORKLIFTS
Only employees who have been properly trained and can safely
operate a forklift may do so. The Production Safety
Representative can help arrange training.
The use of additional counter balances on forklifts is strictly
forbidden.
Never allow riders on vehicles or bicycles to “hitch rides.”
Never ride or allow anyone to ride on the forks of lift trucks.
Never place any part of your body outside the running lines of an
industrial truck or between the mast uprights or other parts of the
truck where shear or crushing hazards exist.
Never stand, pass, or work under the elevated forks of any
industrial truck, loaded or empty, unless they are blocked in
position.
Never operate an industrial truck with a leak in the fuel or
hydraulic system.
When operating a forklift, always look in the direction of travel and
never move a vehicle until you’re certain there are no people in
your path of travel.
When ascending or descending grades in excess of 10 percent,
drive loaded trucks with the load upgrade.
Always carry the forks as low as possible, consistent with safe
operations.
When leaving a vehicle unattended, always shut off the power, set
the brakes, lower the forks, and bring the mast to the vertical
position. When leaving the vehicle on an incline, always chock the
wheels.
When necessary to elevate employees using a forklift, make sure
the platform is of sufficient size to accommodate the employee
and material elevated, and that the platform is secured and meets
the guardrail, backboard and toe board requirements as set forth
by CAL/OSHA. Refer to section “Forklift Mounted Work Platforms”
for additional requirements.
NEVER TOWER OR TRAVEL WITH A WORKER IN A FORKLIFT
MOUNTED WORK PLATFORM.
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
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FORKLIFT- MOUNTED WORK PLATFORMS/ MANBASKETS
The platform deck shall be equipped with:
a) A guardrail or other structure around its upper periphery that
shall be 42 inches high with a midrail. (Chains or the
equivalent may be substituted where they give equivalent
protection.)
b) Where the guardrail is less than 39 inches high, an approved
personal fall protection system consisting of a harness and
shortened lanyard providing fall restraint shall be used.
Elevating Work Platforms shall include:
a) Toeboards at sides and ends which shall not be less than 3 ½
inches high. (EXCEPTION: Toeboards may be omitted at the
access openings and on television and movie camera booms.
b) A platform the minimum width of which shall not be less than
16 inches.
Aerial baskets or platforms shall not be supported by adjacent
structure(s) when workers are on the platform on in the basket
while in an elevated position.
Lift controls shall be tested in accordance with the manufacturer’s
recommendations or instructions prior to use to determine that
such controls are in safe working condition.
Belting off to an adjacent pole, structure or equipment while
working from an aerial device shall not be permitted.
Employees shall not sit or climb on the edge of the basket or use
planks, ladders or other devices to gain greater working height.
Boom and basket and platform load limits specified by the
manufacturer shall not be exceeded.
When elevating personnel with the vehicle stationary the braking
systems shall be set.
Provided they can be safely installed, wheel chocks shall be
installed before using an aerial device on an incline.
If an approved forklift work platform is used to elevate workers,
ensure the work platform is securely attached to the forks or mast
in such a manner as to prevent tipping, slipping, or falling from the
supports.
Ensure that the rear of the basket has a protective barrier at least
six feet tall securely strapped to the rails of the basket to prevent
any elevated employees from becoming entangled in the forklift’s
elevating machinery.
Always make sure there is an operator in the control position on
the lift truck while there is a worker on the elevated platform.
Do not travel with the workers on the platform (towering) other
than to make minor adjustments for final positioning of the
platform.
Do not operate forklifts within 10 feet of an energized high
voltage source unless danger from accidental contact has been
effectively guarded against.
Never work from a platform attached to a forklift when:
a) exposed to extreme weather conditions (thunderstorms, high
winds, heavy rain, extreme heat/cold etc.) unless provisions
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have been made to for the protection and safety of the
workers
b) winds exceed 25 miles per hour.
16. Secure all loose objects or production equipment that may
inadvertently fall from the platform.
17. Do not use a forklift or other aerial device as a welding ground.
18. Do not weld on aerial equipment without first disconnecting both
positive and negative battery terminals. Refer to the
manufacturer’s Operating Manual.
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CRANE OPERATION AWARENESS
The travel of cranes or boom-type excavators shall be controlled
so as to avoid collision with persons, material, and equipment.
The empty hook shall be lashed or otherwise restrained so that it
cannot swing freely.
Tag or restraint lines shall be used where rotation of the load is
hazardous.
Cranes shall not be operated with wheels or tracks off the ground
or working surface at any time unless properly bearing on
outriggers.
The brakes shall be tested each time a load approaching the
rated load is handled by raising the load a few inches and
applying the brakes.
Only one crane is to be used to lift a load.
A crane, derrick, or hoist shall not be loaded beyond its rated
capacity.
The load shall be attached to the hook by means of sling or other
suitable or effective means.
Slings shall be inspected before use and be free of kinks or twists.
When moving the load, the individual directing the lift shall see
that:
a) The crane is leveled for the work being performed and the
wheels blocked where necessary.
b) The load is well secured and properly balanced in the sling
or lifting device before it is lifted a few inches.
All individuals assisting in the lift shall wear proper personal
protective equipment including seat belts, gloves and hard hats.
When a load of any kind is to be suspended for any considerable
length of time, the brake shall be firmly applied.
Cranes shall not be left unattended while the load is suspended
unless the load is suspended over water, a barricaded area, or
blocked up or otherwise supported from below during repairs or
emergency.
Employees are prohibited from standing under any suspended
loads.
AERIAL PLATFORMS: General
This section covers the safe operations of the following vehicles:
(1) vertically operated elevating work platforms or “scissors lifts”;
(2) boom mounted telescoping and rotating elevating work
platforms or “condors”, and (3) forklifts with attached work
platforms.
Only persons trained in the safe operation of these work platforms
shall be allowed to operate the elevating aerial work platforms
described above.
Do not use this equipment if you feel dizzy, ill, or unsteady in any
way. Do not use while under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
All labels and placards shall be legible and in good condition.
Operators should review the accompanying manual.
Clear all personnel below and around the platform when it is being
raised or lowered.
Do not sit or stand on guardrails or use guardrails to carry
materials. Do not allow overhanging materials when elevating the
platform.
Work only within the platform guardrail area and do not attempt
to increase the working height by any other means such as
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
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standing on the mid-rail or toe-board. Do not lean out over the
platform railing to work.
Do not release the outriggers, or move the unit with a person or
materials on board.
Do not use the lift to do work which would result in horizontal
force being applied to the work platform.
Make sure the chain guardrail is in place.
Do not use near moving vehicles.
Batteries should be charged in well ventilated areas free of sparks
and open flames.
Do not exceed manufacturer’s load capacity.
The condition of the equipment shall be inspected prior to
operation. Check for the manual, maintenance logs, for damage or
leaking hydraulic lines. Carefully check each operational control.
Return the equipment to the vendor if any of the aforementioned
condition exists.
Evaluate the job to be done using the equipment you intend to use
at the job sites location and think through the work to discover
potential hazards.
Do not operate an aerial elevating work platform within 10 feet of
an energized, high voltage line or source unless danger from
accidental contact with the source has been effectively guarded
against. Apply greater clearance distances with greater high
voltage, and wetter conditions.
The operation of aerial platforms OVER energized, high voltage
sources of any kind is prohibited at all times.
Make sure the jobsite’s surface is stable and will support the
equipment, and there are no hazardous irregularities or
accumulation of debris, which might cause the moving platform to
overturn.
Soft surfaces or soundstage flooring with pits or weight restrictions
may require the use of grip track (to spread the load) or outriggers
(to add stability). When in doubt, contact the facility Operations
Department or your Production Safety Representative. Always
observe stage floor load restrictions.
Survey the route to be used. Check for overhead obstructions,
traffic, holes in the pavement, ground, soft shoulders, ditches,
slope of the road, etc.
Operation of aerial platforms on inclined surfaces shall not exceed
manufacturer’s ratings. Wheel chocks shall be used on inclined
surfaces.
No employee shall stand in front of or behind an aerial platform
when it is being moved.
AERIAL PLATFORM: Operation
SAFETY HARNESSES – an approved safety harness with lanyard
shall be properly worn when using an aerial/elevating work
platform.
The lanyard shall be securely attached to the manufacturer’s
anchorage point basket, tub, or platform.
Belting off to an adjacent pole, structure or equipment while
working from basket, tub, or platform is prohibited.
The lanyard shall be attached in a manner that prevents a free fall
of more than four feet. (Lanyards used on scissor lifts shall be
shortened so the employee cannot fall over the top rail.)
Do not load the basket, tub, or platform/basket beyond its rated
maximum height or reach.
Do not attempt to raise the platform/basket beyond its rated
maximum height or reach.
Aerial baskets, tubs, or platforms shall not be supported by or
attached to any adjacent structures.
Ladders, planks, or any other objects shall not be placed in or on
top of the platform (or guardrail) to gain greater height.
Workers shall not climb or sit on the edge of the basket/platform.
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10. The brake system shall be set whenever workers are being
elevated in the vehicle.
11. Outriggers should be on solid footing and shall be equipped with
hydraulic holding valves or mechanical locks at the outriggers.
12. Operate all controls slowly to facilitate smooth platform
movement.
13. Only in emergencies should lower level controls at the base of the
platform be operated when workers are in the basket.
14. Boom mounted, telescoping and rotating aerial platforms shall not
be used as cranes.
15. No Towering - When using condors and scissors lifts, DO NOT
travel (move the wheels) with a worker in the basket. The boom
should be retracted completely before traveling or moving.
16. “Climbers”, pole-climbing equipment, shall not be worn while
performing work from an aerial device.
17. Where traffic or moving vehicles are present, the work area
around the aerial equipment shall be marked by flags, signs, traffic
cones, or other means of traffic control.
18. Remote control operation may only be done from the side of the
aerial platform: never in front of, or behind the vehicle.
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ELECTRIC CARTS
Electric cart speed limit is 8 mph.
Electric carts are not to be modified in a way that will affect
capacity and safe operation of the vehicle (for instance, you should
not add a trailer hitch).
Battery charging installations will be in marked designated areas
that are well ventilated.
Whether on or off-lot, drivers of electric carts will obey all DMV
vehicular traffic signs and regulations:
a) stop at posted intersections and blind corners
b) obey the speed limit
c) do not pass moving vehicles
d) avoid quick or jerky stops and turns at fast speeds.
e) use seat belts and turn signals whenever crossing city streets.
Only licensed and specially-equipped golf carts are allowed on
city streets. Always check with your supervisor before driving off
the lot.
Feet, legs, arms and hands are to be kept inside the electric cart at
all times. Do not drag your foot outside the cart.
Never park the electric cart in a fire lane, aisle or doorway, or block
material or equipment to which someone else may need access.
The number of passengers may not exceed the number of seats or
the manufacturer’s recommended seating/weight capacity.
When carrying a load, it is the driver’s responsibility to be sure the
load is stable and will not fall off the vehicle while the vehicle is
moving. Loads will be balanced, braced and secured. Always drive
more slowly and with greater caution when transporting a heavy
load.
Golf carts have been known to flip over, causing serious injury.
Always drive under control and avoid sudden sharp turns.
Smoking is not permitted in golf carts.
Communications on cell phones is not permitted while driving a
cart.
There is to be absolutely no horseplay on the golf carts.
(Form 1) General Safety Guidelines for Production - Revised July 2016
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BICYCLES
Keep your bicycle in good mechanical condition (tires, chain,
brakes).
Obey all traffic rules and signs - always give proper signals to
indicate your intended direction at intersections.
Walk your bike across busy intersections.
Always ride with the traffic and as close as possible to the right
side of the road.
Smoking is not permitted on bicycles.
Communications on cell phones is not permitted while riding a
bicycle
Beware of production vehicles and silent electric carts.
Always ride single file and watch for opening car doors.
Bicycles are built to carry one person ONLY.
Yield right of way to pedestrians.
Never carry heavy loads or long items which reduce your ability to
maneuver your bicycle safely.
When carrying a small load, it is the rider’s responsibility to be sure
the load is stable and will not fall off the bicycle while it is moving.
Loads will be balanced, braced and secured to prevent tipping and
falling.
Riders should not attempt to tow other materials alongside or
behind a bicycle (for example, with a rope, chain or by hand).
Riders are not allowed to “hitch rides” alongside other moving
vehicles, such as golf carts, forklifts, etc.
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