HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator

(Including Options 001, 002, 004, 006, and 008)

User’s Guide

SERIAL NUMBERS

This manual applies directly to any swept signal generator with the model and serial number prefix combination shown below. You may have to modify this manual so that it applies directly to your instrument version. Refer to the “Instrument History” chapter.

HP 83620B/22B/23B/24B/3OB/4OB/50B

3844A and Below

HP Part No. 08360-90127

Printed in USA February 1999 Supersedes: September 1997

Notice

The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.

Hewlett-Packard makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this material, including but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material.

Restricted Rights

Legend

Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) of the

Rights of Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS

252.227-7013 for DOD agencies, and subparagraphs (c) (1) and

(c) (2) of the C ommercial Computer Software Restricted Rights clause at FAR 52.227-19 for other agencies.

@ Copyright Hewlett-Packard Company 1996, 1997, 1999

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation without prior written permission is prohibited, except as allowed under the copyright laws.

1400 Fountaingrove Parkway, Santa Rosa, CA 95403-1799, USA

Certification

Warranty

Hewlett-Packard Company certifies that this product met its published specifications at the time of shipment from the factory.

Hewlett-Packard further certifies that its calibration measurements are traceable to the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology, to the extent allowed by the Institute’s calibration facility, and to the calibration facilities of other International

Standards Organization members.

This Hewlett-Packard instrument product is warranted against defects in material and workmanship for a period of one year from date of shipment. During the warranty period, Hewlett-Packard

Company will, at its option, either repair or replace products which prove to be defective.

For warranty service or repair, this product must be returned to a service facility designated by Hewlett-Packard. Buyer shall prepay shipping charges to Hewlett-Packard and Hewlett-Packard shall pay shipping charges to return the product to Buyer. However, Buyer shall pay all shipping charges, duties, and taxes for products returned to Hewlett-Packard from another country.

Hewlett-Packard warrants ‘that its software and firmware designated by Hewlett-Packard for use with an instrument will execute its programming instructions when properly installed on that instrument. Hewlett-Packard does not warrant that the operation of the instrument, or software, or firmware will be uninterrupted or error-free.

L

IMITATION OF

W

ARRANTY

The foregoing warranty shall not apply to defects resulting from improper or inadequate maintenance by Buyer, Buyer-supplied software or interfacing, unauthorized modification or misuse, operation outside of the environmental specifications for the product, or improper site preparation or maintenance.

NO OTHER WARRANTY IS EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED.

HEWLETT-PACKARD SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS THE

IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND

FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

E

XCLUSIVE

R

EMEDIES

THE REMEDIES PROVIDED HEREIN ARE BUYER’S SOLE

AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES. HEWLETT-PACKARD SHALL

NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL,

INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, WHETHER

BASED ON CONTRACT, TORT, OR ANY OTHER LEGAL

THEORY.

. . .

III

Assistance

Product maintenance agreements and other customer assistance agreements are available for Hewlett-Packard products. For any assistance, contact your nearest Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service

Ofice.

Safety Notes

WARNING

CAUTION

The following safety notes are used throughout this manual.

Familiarize yourself with each of the notes and its meaning before operating this instrument.

Warning denotes a hazard. It calls attention to a procedure which, if not correctly performed or adhered to, could result in injury or loss of life. Do not proceed beyond a warning note until the indicated conditions are fully understood and met.

Caution denotes a hazard. It calls attention to a procedure that, if not correctly performed or adhered to, would result in damage to or destruction of the instrument. Do not proceed beyond a caution sign until the indicated conditions are fully understood and met.

General Safety

Considerations

WARNING

n

No operator serviceable parts inside. Refer servicing to qualified personnel. To prevent electrical shock, do not remove covers.

I For continued protection against fire hazard replace line fuse only with same type and rating (F 5A/25OV). The use of other fuses or material is prohibited.

n

This is a Safety Class I product (provided with a protective earthing ground incorporated in the power cord). The mains plug shall only be inserted in a socket outlet provided with a protective earth contact. Any interruption of the protective conductor, inside or outside the instrument, is likely to make the instrument dangerous.

Intentional interruption is prohibited.

n

If this instrument is used in a manner not specified by

Hewlett-Packard Co., the protection provided by the instrument may be impaired. This product must be used in a normal condition (in which all means for protection are intact) only.

n

Position the instrument according to the enclosure protection provided. This instrument does not protect against the ingress of water. This instrument protects against finger access to hazardous parts within the enclosure.

V

CAUTION

Note

n

Before switching on this instrument, make sure that the line voltage selector switch is set to the voltage of the power supply and the correct fuse is installed.

n

Always use the three-prong ac power cord supplied with this instrument. Failure to ensure adequate earth grounding by not using this cord may cause instrument damage.

n

Before switching on this product, make sure that the line voltage selector switch is set to the voltage of the power supply and the correct fuse is installed. Assure the supply voltage is in the specified range.

w Ventilation Requirements:

When installing the instrument in a cabinet, the convection into and out of the instrument must not be restricted. The ambient temperature (outside the cabinet) must be less than the maximum operating temperature of the instrument by 4 “C for every 100 watts dissipated in the cabinet. If the total power dissipated in the cabinet is greater than 800 watts, then forced convection must be used.

n

This product is designed for use in Installation Category II and

Pollution Degree 2 per IEC 1010 and 664, respectively.

The detachable power cord is the instrument disconnecting device.

It disconnects the mains circuits from the mains supply before other parts of the instrument. The front panel switch is only a standby switch and is not a LINE switch.

PREFACE

This manual provides user information for the HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator.

Instruments Covered

This manual applies to instruments having a serial number prefix

By This Manual

listed on the title page (behind the “Documentation Map” tab).

Some changes may have to be made to this manual so that it applies directly to each instrument; refer to Chapter 5, “Instrument

History”, to see what changes may apply to your instrument.

A serial number label (Figure O-l) is attached to the instrument’s rear panel. A prefix (four digits followed by a letter), and a suffix

(five digits unique to each instrument), comprise the instrument serial number.

/

SERIAL NUMBER

A

\

PREFIX SUFFIX

-A

INSTALLED

OPTIONS

Figure O-l. Typical Serial Number Label

User’s Guide

Organization

Tabs divide the major chapters of this manual. The contents of each chapter is listed in the Table of Contents.

HP 8360 B-Series

Documentation

Documentation Map

For a pictorial representation of the HP 8360 B-Series documentation,

see

the

“Documentation Map”

at the front of this manual.

Ordering Manuals

A manual part number is listed on the title page of this manual.

You may use it to order extra copies of this manual. See

“Replaceable Parts”

in

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator/

HP 8360 L-Series Swept CW Generator Service Guide

for a complete list of HP 8360 documentation and ordering numbers.

vii

Typeface

Conventions

Regulatory

Information

The following conventions are used in the HP 8360 B-Series documentation:

Italics

Italic type is used for emphasis, and for titles of manuals and other publications.

Computer Computer type is used for information displayed on the instrument. For example: In this sequence, POWER LEVEL is displayed.

(Hardkeys) Instrument keys are represented in “key cap.” You are instructed to

press

a hardkey.

Softkeys Softkeys are located just below the display, and their functions depend on the current display. These keys are represented in “softkey.” You are instructed to

select

a softkey.

This product has been designed and tested in accordance with IEC

Publication 1010, Safety Requirements for Electronic Measuring

Apparatus, and has been supplied in a safe condition. The instruction documentation contains information and warnings which must be followed by the user to ensure safe operation and to maintain the instrument in a safe condition.

. . .

VIII

Manufacturer’s

Declaration

Note

Note

This is to certify that this product meets the radio frequency interference requirements of Directive FTZ 1046/1984. The German

Bundespost has been notified that this equipment was put into circulation and has been granted the right to check the product type for compliance with these requirements.

Note: If test and measurement equipment is operated with unshielded cables and/or used for measurements on open set-ups, the user must insure that under these operating conditions, the radio frequency interference limits are met at the border of his premises.

Model HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator

Hiermit wird bescheinigt, dass dieses Gerit/System in ubereinstimmung mit den Bestimmungen von Postverfiigung 1046/84 funkentst”rt ist.

Der Deutschen Bundespost wurde das Inverkehrbringen dieses

Gerates/Systems angezeight und die Berechtigung zur oberpriifung der Serie auf Einhaltung der Bestimmungen eingeraumt.

Zustzinformation fur Mess-und Testgerate:

Werden Mess- und Testgerate mit ungeschirmten Kabeln und/oder in offenen Messaufbauten verwendet, so ist vom Betreiber sicherzustellen, dass die Funk-Entst”rbestimmungen unter

Betriebsbedingungen an seiner Grundstiicksgrenze eingehalten werden.

ix

Declaration of

Conformity

DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY

according to ISOilEC G&de 22 and EN 45014 blanufacturer’s Name:

Hewlett-Packard Co.

Manufacturer’s

Address:

Microwave Instruments Division

1400 Fountaingrove Parkway

Santa

Rosa,

CA 95403-1799

USA

declares that the products

Product Name:

Model Numbers:

Product Options:

Synthesized Sweeper

HP 83620B, HP 836228, HP 836238

HP 836248, HP 836308, HP 836408

HP 836508

This declaration covers all options of the above products.

:onform to the following Product specifications:

Safety: IEC 348:1978/HD 401 Sl:1981

CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 231 (Series M-89)

EMC: CISPR 11:1990/EN 55011:1991 Group 1, Class A

IEC 801-2:1984/EN 50082-I:1992 4 kV CD, 8 kV AD

IEC 80+3:1984/EN 50082-I:1992 3 V/m, 27-500 MHz

IEC 801-4:1988/EN 50082-I:1992 0.5 kV Sig. Lines, 1 kV Power Lines

IEC 5552:1982 + Al:1985 I EN 60555-2:1987

IEC 555-3:1982 + Al:1990 I EN 60555-3:1987 + Al:1991

jupplementary Information:

rhese products herewith comply with the requirements of the Low Voltage Directive

‘3/23/EEC and the EMC Directive 89/336/EEC and carry the CE-marking accordingly.

‘roduct safety qualification testing for these products was performed prior to 1

December 1993.

Santa Rosa, California, USA 17 Dec. 1996

J

Manager

European Contact: Your local Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service Office or Hewlett-Packard GmbH. Department HQ-TRE.

Herrenberger Strasse 130, D-71034 BWingen. Germany (FAX *497031-l 4-3143)

Compliance with

German Noise

Requirements

This is to declare that this instrument is in conformance with the

German Regulation on Noise Declaration for Machines (Laermangabe nach der Maschinenlaermrerordnung -3.GSGV Deutschland).

Acoustic Noise Emission/Geraeuschemission

LpA <70 dB

LpA <70 dB

Operator position

Normal position per IS0 7779 am Arbeitsplatz normaler Betrieb nach DIN 45635 t.19

CE

The instruction documentation symbol. The product is marked with this symbol when it is necessary for the user to refer to the instructions in the documentation.

The CE mark is a registered trademark of the European

Community.

The CSA mark is a registered trademark of the

Canadian Standards Association.

I

“ISMl-A”

This is a symbol of an Industrial Scientific and Medical

Group 1 Class A product.

This is an ON symbol. The symbol ON is used to mark the position of the instrument power line switch.

I

This is an ON symbol. The symbol ON is used to mark the position of the instrument power line switch.

CI)

N

This is a STANDBY symbol. The STANDBY symbol is used to mark the position of the instrument power line switch.

This is an OFF symbol. The OFF symbol is used to mark the position of the instrument power line switch.

This is an AC symbol. The AC symbol is used to indicate the required nature of the line module input power.

xi

xii

Table O-l. Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service Offices

UNITED STATES

Instrument Support Center

Hewlett-Packard Company

(800) 403-0801

EUROPEAN FIELD OPERATIONS

Headquarters

Hewlett-Packard S.A.

150, Route du Nant-d’Avri1

1217 Meyrin 2/Geneva

Switzerland

(41 22) 780.8111

Great Britain

Hewlett-Packard Ltd.

Eskdale Road, Winnersh Triangle

Wokingham, Berkshire RG41 5DZ

England

(44 734) 696622

France

Hewlett-Packard France

1 Avenue Du Canada

Zone D’Activite De Courtaboeuf

F-91947 Les Ulis Cedex

France

(33 1) 69 82 60 60

Germany

Hewlett-Packard GmbH

Hewlett-Packard Strasse

61352 Bad Homburg v.d.H

Germany

(49 6172) 16-O

Headquarters

Hewlett-Packard Company

3495 Deer Creek Road

Palo Alto, California, USA

94304-1316

(415) 857-5027

China Japan

China Hewlett-Packard Company Hewlett-Packard Japan, Ltd.

38 Bei San Huan Xl Road 9-l Takakura-Cho, Hachioji

Shuang Yu Shu

Hai Dian District

Tokyo 192, Japan

(81 426) 60-2111

Beijing, China

(86 1) 2566888

Taiwan

Hewlett-Packard Taiwan

8th Floor, H-P Building

337 Fu Hsing North Road

Taipei, Taiwan

(886 2) 712-0404

INTERCON FIELD OPERATIONS

Australia

Hewlett-Packard Australia Ltd.

31-41 Joseph Street

Blackburn, Victoria 3130

(61 3) 895-2895

Canada

Hewlett-Packard (Canada) Ltd.

17500 South Service Road

Trans-Canada Highway

Kirkland, Quebec H9J 2X8

Canada

(514) 697-4232

Singapore

Hewlett-Packard Singapore (Pte.) Ltd.

150 Beach Road

#29-00 Gateway West

Singapore 0718

(65) 291-9088

Contents

1. Getting Started

What Is In This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . .

How To Use This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . .

Equipment Used In Examples . . . . . . . . .

Introducing the HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal

Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Display Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Entry Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CW Operation and Start/Stop Frequency Sweep . .

CW Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Start/Stop Frequency Sweep . . . . . . . . . .

Center Frequency/Span Operation . . . . . . . .

Power Level and Sweep Time Operation . . . . . .

Power Level Operation . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sweep Time Operation . . . . . . . . . . . .

Continuous, Single, and Manual Sweep Operation

.

Marker Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Saving and Recalling an Instrument State . . . . .

Power Sweep and Power Slope Operation . . . . .

Power Sweep Operation . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Slope Operation . . . . . . . . . . . .

Getting Started Advanced . . . . . . . . . . . .

Externally Leveling the Swept Signal Generator

. .

Leveling with Detectors/Couplers /Splitters . . .

External Leveling Used With the Optional Step

Attenuator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Leveling with Power Meters . . . . . . . . . .

Leveling with MM-wave Source Modules . . . . .

Working with Mixers/Reverse Power Effects . . . .

Working with Spectrum Analyzers/Reverse Power

Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance . .

Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction

Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Creating

a

User Flatness Array Automatically,

Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Creating a User Flatness Array, Example 2

. .

Swept mm-wave Measurement with Arbitrary

Correction Frequencies, Example 3 . . . .

Scalar Analysis Measurement with User Flatness

Corrections, Example 4 . . . . . . . . .

Using Detector Calibration . . . . . . . . . .

Contents-l

l - l l-2 l-2 l-3 l-4 l-5 l-6 l-6 l-6 l-8 l-10 l-10 l-10

1-12

1-14 l-16

1-18

1-18

1-19

1-21 l-23 l-23 l-26 l-27

1-28 l-30 l-32 l-33 l-33 l-34

1-36

1-39 l-43 l-47

Contents-2

Using the Tracking Feature . . . . . . . . . .

Peaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ALC Bandwidth Selection . . . . . . . . . . . .

Using Step Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Creating and Using a Frequency List . . . . . . .

Using the Security Features . . . . . . . . . . .

Changing the Preset Parameters . . . . . . . . .

Getting Started Programming . . . . . . . . . .

HP-IB General Information . . . . . . . . . . .

Interconnecting Cables . . . . . . . . . . . .

Instrument Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HP-IB Instrument Nomenclature . . . . . . . .

Listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Talker.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Programming the Swept Signal Generator . . . .

HP-IB Command Statements . . . . . . . . .

Abort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Remote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Local Lockout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Local

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Clear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

o u t p u t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Getting Started with SCPI . . . . . . . . . . .

Definitions of Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Standard Notation

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Command Mnemonics . . . . . . . . . . .

Angle Brackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How to Use Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Command Examples

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Response Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Essentials for Beginners . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Program and Response Messages . . . . . . .

Forgiving Listening and Precise Talking . . . .

Types of Commands . . . . . . . . . . . .

Subsystem Command Trees . . . . . . . . . .

The Command Tree Structure . . . . . . . .

Paths Through the Command Tree . . . . . .

Subsystem Command Tables . . . . . . . . . .

Reading the Command Table . . . . . . . .

More About Commands . . . . . . . . . . .

Query and Event Commands . . . . . . . .

Implied Commands . . . . . . . . . . . .

Optional Parameters . . . . . . . . . . .

Program Message Examples . . . . . . . . .

Parameter Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Numeric Parameters

. . . . . . . . . . .

Extended Numeric Parameters . . . . . . .

Discrete Parameters . . . . . . . . . . .

l-58 l-58

1-59 l-59 l-60

1-61

1-63

1-63

1-64 l-56

1-56 l-56 l-56 l-56 l-56 l-57 l-57

1-64 l-64

1-64 l-64 l-65

1-66 l-66 l-66

1-67 l-68 l-68 l-68

1-71

1-71 l-72 l-72 l-72 l-72 l-72 l-73 l-73 l-74 l-75 l-52 l-53 l-54 l-55 l-56 l-56 l-49

1-49 l-49 l-50

1-51

Boolean Parameters

. . . . . . . . . . .

Reading Instrument Errors

. . . . . . . . . .

Example Programs

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Example Program

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Program Listing

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Program Comments

. . . . . . . . . . .

Details of Commands and Responses

. . . . . . .

In This Subsection

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Program Message Syntax

. . . . . . . . . . .

Subsystem Command Syntax

. . . . . . . .

Common Command Syntax

. . . . . . . . .

Response Message Syntax . . . . . . . . . . .

SCPI Data Types

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Parameter Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Numeric Parameters

. . . . . . . . . . .

Extended Numeric Parameters . . . . . . .

Discrete Parameters

. . . . . . . . . . .

Boolean Parameters

. . . . . . . . . . .

Response Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . .

Real Response Data . . . . . . . . . . .

Integer Response Data

. . . . . . . . . .

Discrete Response Data . . . . . . . . . .

String Response Data . . . . . . . . . . .

Programming Typical Measurements

. . . . . . .

In This Subsection

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Using the Example Programs

. . . . . . . . .

Use of the Command Tables . . . . . . . . .

HP-IB Check, Example Program 1

. . . . . . .

Program Comments

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Local Lockout Demonstration, Example Program 2

Program Comments

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Setting Up A Typical Sweep, Example Program 3

Program Comments

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Queries, Example Program 4 . . . . . . . . . .

Program Comments

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Saving and Recalling States, Example Program 5 .

Program Comments

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Looping and Synchronization, Example Program 6

Program Comments

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Using the *WA1 Command, Example Program 7 .

Program Comments

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Using the User Flatness Correction Commands,

Example Program 8 . . . . . . . . . . . .

Programming the Status System

. . . . . . . . .

In This Subsection

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

General Status Register Model . . . . . . . . .

Condition Register

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Transition Filter

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Event Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enable Register

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contents-3

l-103 l-106 l-106 l-106 l-106 l-107 l-107 l-107 l-83

1-83

1-83

1-84

1-85 l-85 l-85 l-85 l-75 l-76 l-77 l-77 l-77 l-77 l-78 l-80 l-80 l-80

1-81

1-81 l-82

1-86 l-86

1-86 l-87 l-87 l-87 l-88 l-90 l-90

1-91 l-92 l-93 l-93

1-95 l-95 l-97

1-97 l-99 l-99 l-101 l-101

Contents-4

An Example Sequence

. . . . . . . . . . .

Programming the Trigger System . . . . . . . . .

In This Subsection . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Generalized Trigger Model . . . . . . . . . . .

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Details of Trigger States . . . . . . . . . . .

Inside the Idle State . . . . . . . . . . .

Inside the Initiate State . . . . . . . . . .

Inside Event Detection States

. . . . . . .

Inside the Sequence Operation State

. . . .

Common Trigger Configurations

. . . . . . . .

The INIT Configuration . . . . . . . . . . .

The TRIG Configuration . . . . . . . . . .

Description of Triggering in the HP 8360 B-Series

Swept Signal Generators

. . . . . . . . . .

Advanced Trigger Configurations . . . . . . .

Trigger Keyword Definitions . . . . . . . . . .

ABORt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

IMMediate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ODELay

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SOURce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Related Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The International Institute of Electrical and

Electronics Engineers.

. . . . . . . . . . .

Hewlett-Packard Company . . . . . . . . . . .

2. Operating and Programming Reference

How To Use This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . .

A.

Address . . . . . . . . . .

Adrs

Menu

. . . . . . . .

..........

..........

..........

..........

. . . . . . . . . .

1-117

1-118

1-118 l-118

1-118 l-118

1-119 l-120 l-120 l-120 l-107 l-109 l-109 l-109 l-109 l-110

1-111 l-111

1-112

1-114 l-115

1-115

1-116

2-l

AM

Menu . . . . . . . . .

AM On/Off la dB/V . . . .

AM an/Off lOO%fV . . . .

AM

an/Off Ext . . . . . .

AM an/Off Int . . . . . .

Amp1 Markers . . . . . . .

A-13

A-13

A-14

A-14

A-15

A-16

A-16

A-17

A-18

A-l

A-l

A-3

A-10

A-10

A-11

A-11

A-12

AMType dBfV

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

AM Type lUC%fV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ANALYZERSTATUS REGISTER

. . . . . . . .

Arrow Keys . . .

...............

...............

...............

...............

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

...............

...............

B.

Blank Disp . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

c.

(CONT) . . . . .

Copy List . . .

CorPair Disable

Coupling Factor

Icw) . . . . . .

CW/CF Coupled .

...............

...............

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............

D.

Dblr Amp Menu .

Deep

AM . . . .

Delay Menu . . .

Delete Menu . .

Delete All . . .

Delete Current .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

...............

...............

Delete Undef . .

Delta Marker . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

...............

Delta Mkr Ref .

...............

Disp Status . .

Doubler Amp Mode

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

AUTO . . . . . . . . . . . .

Doubler Amp Mode

Doubler Amp Mode

Dwell Coupled .

aff . . . . . . . . . . . .

an . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-l

D-3

D-4

D-5

D-5

D-l

D-2

D-2

D-3

D-6

D-7

D-8

D-9

D-10

D-10

A-18

A-19

A-20

A-22

A-23

A-24

A-25

A-26

A-27

A-28

C-l c-2 c-2 c-3 c-4 c-4 c-11 c-12 c-12 c-13 c-13 c-14

Contents-5

Contents-6

E.

8360hdrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EnterCorr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HnterFreq..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enter List Dwell

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enter List Freq

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enter List Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ENTRYKEYS.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[

ENTRY ON

/

OFF

) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ExtDet Cal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F .

Fault Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fault Info t

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fault Info 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fault Info 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fltness Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(FLTNESS

O N

/

O F F

) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FM Coupling 1OOkHz . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FM Coupling DC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FMMenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FM an/Off AC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FM On/Off DC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FM an/Off Ex t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FM On/Off Int

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FreqCaI Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Freq Follow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FreqMult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Freq Offset

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FulIUsr Cal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G.

Global Dwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Global affset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F-12

F-13

F-13

F-14

F-15

F-16

F-16

F-17

F-18

F-19

F-20

F-l

F-2

F-3

F-4

F-5

F-10

F-11

F-11

G-l

G-l

E-l

E-2

E-3

E-4

E-4

E-5

E-5

E-6

E-6

H.

HP-IB Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HP-IB Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

I.

Internal

AM

Depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal AM Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal AM Waveform Noise

. . . . . . . . .

Internal

AM

Waveform Ramp

. . . . . . . . . .

Internal AM Waveform Sine

. . . . . . . . . .

Internal

AM

Waveform Square . . . . . . . . .

Internal AM Waveform Triangle . . . . . . . .

Internal FM Deviation

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal FM Rate

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal FM Waveform Noise

. . . . . . . . .

Internal FM Waveform Ramp . . . . . . . . . .

Internal FM Waveform Sine . . . . . . . . . .

Internal FM Waveform Square . . . . . . . . .

Internal FM Waveform Triangle

. . . . . . . .

Internal Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal Pulse Generator Period . . . . . . .

Internal Pulse Generator Rate . . . . . . . .

Internal Pulse Generator Width . . . . . . .

Internal Pulse Mode Auto

. . . . . . . . . .

Internal Pulse Mode Gate

. . . . . . . . . .

Internal Pulse Mode Trigger . . . . . . . . .

Invert Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

JJ.

Leveling ModehLCoff

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Leveling ModeNormal . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Leveling ModeSearch

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Leveling PointExtDet . . . . . . . . . . . .

Leveling PointIntrnl

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Leveling PointModule'

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Leveling PointPwrMtr

. . . . . . . . . . . .

LINESWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ListMenu

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

List Mode Pt Trighuto

. . . . . . . . . . . .

List Mode Pt TrigBus

. . . . . . . . . . . .

List Mode Pt TrigExt

. . . . . . . . . . . .

H-l

H-l

L-5

L-5

L-6

L-8

L-9

L-9

L-10

L-l

L-2

L-2

L-3

L-3

L-4

I-3

I-3

I-4

I-4

I-l

I-2

I-2

I-5

I-5

I-6

I-6

I-7

I-9

I-10

I-10

I-11

I-11

I-7

I-8

I-8

I-12

I-12

Contents-7

Contents-8

M.

MI--M2 Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Manual Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MarkerMl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MarkerM2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MarkerM3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MarkerM4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MarkerM5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Markers All Off

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Measure Corr All

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Measure Corr Current

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Measure Corr Undef

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Meter Adrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Meter On/Off AH

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Meter On/Off FM

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ModOut On/Off AM

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ModOut On/Off FM

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Amplitude Modulation

FM Modulation . . .

Pulse Modulation . . .

Module Menu . . . .

I

{odule Select AUTO

Module Select Front

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Module Select None

Module Select Rear

Monitor Menu . . . .

more n/m . . . . . .

Mtr Meas Menu . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

.............

.............

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

P.

Peak RF Always . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PeakRFOnce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[P

OWER LEVEL

] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Slope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Preset Mode Factory

Preset Mode User

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

P-7

P-8

P-9

P-10

P-11

P-l

P-2

P-2

P-5

P-6

M-8

M-9

M-9

M-10

M-10

M-11

M-12

M-13

M-14

M-17

M-19

M-23

M-24

M-24

M-25

M-26

M-26

M-27

M-28

M-6

M-6

M-7

M-7

M-8

M-l

M-l

M-3

M-4

M-5

M-5

Printer Adrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Programming Language Analyzr

. . . . . . . .

Programming Language GILL

. . . . . . . . . .

Programming Language SCPI

. . . . . . . . . .

Pt Trig Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Delay Normal

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Delay Trig'd

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse OnfOffExtrnl

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse On/OffIntrnl

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse OnfOffScalar

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Rise TimeAuto

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Rise TimeFast

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Rise TimeSlow

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Width

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PwrMtr Range

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

R.

Ref Osc Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

R-l

R-l

R-2

R-2

s.

ROTARY KNOB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(SAVE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SaveLock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Save User Preset . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SCPI ConformanceInformation . . . . . . . . .

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

SCPI STATUS REGISTER STRU&iRi . : : : :

Security Menu

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Selftest (Full) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SetAtten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Software Rev . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Start=Ml Stop=M2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Start Sweep Trigger Auto . . . . . . . . . .

Start Sweep Trigger Bus . . . . . . . . . . .

s-59 s-59

S-60

S-60

S-61

S-61

S-62

S-63

S-63 s-1 s-2 s-2 s-3 s-14

S-56

S-58

Contents-9

P-18

P-19

P-19

P-20

P-21

P-21

P-22

P-22

P-23

P-23

P-24

P-11

P-12

P-13

P-13

P-14

P-15

P-16

P-16

P-17

Contents-10

Start Sweep Trigger Ext

. . . . . . . . . . .

Step Control Master

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step Control Slave

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step Dwell

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step Points

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

StepSize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step Swp Menu

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step Swp PtTrig Auto . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step Swp PtTrig Bus

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step Swp PtTrig Ext

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

..............

..............

..............

..............

..............

.............

..............

..............

..............

SYSTEM (MENU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

T.

10 MHz Freq Std Auto . . . . . . . . . . . .

10 MHz Freq Std Extrnl . . . . . . . . . . .

10 MHz Freq Std Intrnl . . . . . . . . . . .

10 MHz Freq Std None . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tracking Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

TrigOut Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

U.

Uncoupl Atten . . .

Unlock Info . . . .

Up/Down Power . . .

.............

.............

.............

.............

.............

.............

............

.............

.............

S-64

S-64

S-66

S-67

S-68

S-68

S-69 s-70 s-70 s-71 s-71

S-72 s-73 s-74 s-74 s-75 s-75

S-76

S-76 s-77

U-l

U-l u-2 u-2 u-3 u-4 u-5

U-6

U-6

T-l

T-2

T-2

T-3

T-3

T-4

W .

Waveform Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .

W - l

Z.

Zero Freq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Z-l z-1

2a. Error Messages

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Front Panel Error Messages in Alphabetical Order

.

2a-1

2a-1

SCPI Error Messages in Numerical Order . . . . .

2a-5

Swept Signal Generator Specific SCPI Error Messages

2a-5

Universal SCPI Error Messages

. . . . . . . .

Error Messages From -499 To -400

. . . . .

2a-6

2a-6

Error Messages From -399 To -300

. . . . .

2a-6

Error Messages From -299 To -200

. . . . .

2a-6

Error Messages From -199 to -100 . . . . . .

2a-7

2b. Menu

Maps

ALC Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Frequency Menu

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Marker Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Modulation Menu

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Service Menu

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sweep Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

User Cal Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2~. Specifications

Frequency

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Frequency Bands (for CW signals)

. . . . . . .

Frequency Modes:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CW and Manual Sweep

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Synthesized Step Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . .

Synthesized List Mode

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Ramp Sweep Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal 10 MHz Time Base

. . . . . . . . . .

RF Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Output Power

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accuracy ( dB)4

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Flatness (dB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Analog Power Sweep

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

External Leveling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Source Match

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Spectral Purity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Spurious Signals

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Single-Sideband Phase Noise (dBc/Hz)

. . . . .

Offset from Carrier . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contents-l 1

2c-4

2c-4

2c-5

2c-5

2c-6

2c-6

2c-6

2c-7

2c-7

2c-9

2c-9

2c-2

2c-2

2c-2

2c-2

2c-2

2c-2

2c-3

2c-3

2c-3

2c-3

2b-3

2b-5

2b-7

2b-9

2b-11

2b-13

2b-15

2b-17

2b-19

Contents-12

Residual FM (RMS, 50 Hz to 15 kHz bandwidth) .

Modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

AM and Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Simultaneous Modulations . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal Modulation Generator Option 002

. . . .

AM,FM

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Modulation Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environment al . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Warm-Up Time

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Weight & Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Adapters Supplied

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inputs & Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Auxiliary Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

External ALC Input . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Input/Output

. . . . . . . . . . . .

AM Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FM Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Trigger Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Trigger Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10 MHz Reference Input . . . . . . . . . . .

10 MHz Reference Output . . . . . . . . . .

Sweep Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Stop Sweep Input/Output . . . . . . . . . .

Z-Axis Blanking/Markers Output . . . . . . .

Volts/GHz Output . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Source Module Interface . . . . . . . . . . .

Auxiliary Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pulse Video Output (Option 002 only) . . . .

Pulse Sync Out (Option 002 only) . . . . . .

AM/FM Output (Option 002 only) . . . . . .

Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Option 001 Add Step Attenuator . . . . . . .

Option 002 Add Internal Modulation Generator

Option 004 Rear Panel RF Output . . . . . .

Option 006 Fast Pulse Modulation . . . . . .

Option 008 1 Hz Frequency Resolution . . . .

Option 700 MATE System Compatibility . . .

Option 806 Rack Slide Kit . . . . . . . . . .

Option 908 Rack Flange Kit . . . . . . . . .

Option 910 Extra Operating & Service Guides .

Option 013 Rack Flange Kit . . . . . . . . .

Option W30 Two Years Additional Return-To-HP

Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2c-18

2c-15

2c-15

2c-15

2c-15

2c-15

2c-15

2c-15

2c-15

2c-14

2c-14

2c-14

2c-14

2c-14

2c-14

2c-15

2c-16

2c-16

2c-16

2c-16

2c-16

2c-9

2c-10

2c-10

2c-11

2c-12

2c-12

2c-13

2c-13

2c-13

2c-13

2c-17

2c-17

2c-17

2c-17

2c-17

2c-17

2c-17

2c-16

2c-16

2c-16

2c-16

2c-17

2c-17

2c-17

2c-18

2c-18

2c-18

2c-18

3.

Installation

Initial Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Equipment Supplied

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Options Available

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Preparation for Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Power Requirements

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Line Voltage and Fuse Selection

. . . . . . . .

Power Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Language Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How to View or Change a Language Selection from the Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How to Select a Language on an Instrument without a Front Panel

. . . . . . . . . .

HP-IB Address Selection

. . . . . . . . . . .

How to View or Change an HP-IB address from the Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How to Prevent a Front Panel Change to an HP-IB

Address

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How to Set the HP-IB Address on a Swept Signal

Generator without a Front Panel

. . . . .

Mating Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10 MHz Frequency Reference Selection and Warmup

Time

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operating Environment . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chassis Kits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rack Mount Slide Kit (Option 806) . . . . . . .

Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rack Flange Kit for Swept Signal Generators with

Handles Removed (Option 908)

. . . . . . .

Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rack Flange Kit for Swept Signal Generators with

Handles Attached (Option 913)

. . . . . . .

Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . .

Storage and Shipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Package the Swept Signal Generator for Shipment

Converting HP 8340/41 Systems to HP 8360 B-Series

Systems

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Manual Operation

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Compatibility

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Front Panel Operation

. . . . . . . . . . .

Instrument Preset Conditions

. . . . . . .

System Connections

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

The HP 8510 Network Analyzer

. . . . . . .

The HP 8757C/E Scalar Network Analyzer

. .

The HP 83550 Series Millimeter-wave Source

Modules

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The HP 8970B Noise Figure Meter

. . . . . .

Remote Operation

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Language Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . .

Network Analyzer Language . . . . . . . . .

3-6

3-6

3-7

3-8

3-8

3-8

3-8

3-8

3-9

3-10

3-10

3-11

3-13

3-14

3-15

3-16

3-17

3-17

3-18

3-22

3-22

3-23

3-23

3-23

Contents-13

3-3

3-3

3-4

3-6

3-l

3-2

3-2

3-3

3-19

3-20

3-20

3-20

3-20

3-21

3-21

3-22

Contents-14

Test and Measurement System Language . . .

Control Interface Intermediate Language . . .

Converting from Network Analyzer Language to

SCPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Numeric Suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Status Bytes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4. Operator’s Check and Routine Maintenance

Operator’s Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Service Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Local Operator’s Check . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Description

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Preliminary Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Main Check

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Routine Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How to Replace the Line Fuse

. . . . . . . . .

How to Clean the Fan Filter . . . . . . . . . .

How to Clean the Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . .

How to Clean the Display Filter . . . . . . . .

5. Instrument History

Index

3-23

3-23

3-23

3-24

3-24

4-3

4-4

4-4

4-5

4-l

4-l

4-2

4-2

4-2

4-6

4-6

Figures

O-l. Typical Serial Number Label . . . . . . . . . .

l-l. The HP 83620B Swept Signal Generator . . . . .

l-2. Display

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

l-3. Entry Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

l-4. CW Operation and Start/Stop Frequency Sweep .

l-5. Center Frequency and Span Operation

. . . . .

l-6. Power Level and Sweep Time Operation . . . . .

l-7. Continuous, Single, and Manual Sweep Operation l-8. Marker Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

l-9. Saving and Recalling an Instrument State . . . .

l-10. Power Sweep and Power Slope Operation

. . . .

l-11. ALC Circuit Externally Leveled . . . . . . . .

l-12. Typical Diode Detector Response at 25°C . . . .

1-13. Leveling with a Power Meter . . . . . . . . . .

l-14. MM-wave Source Module Leveling . . . . . . .

1-15. MM-wave Source Module Leveling Using a Microwave

Amplifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

l-16. Reverse Power Effects, Coupled Operation with -8 dBm Output

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

l-17. Reverse Power Effects, Uncoupled Operation with -8 dBm Output

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-18. Creating a User Flatness Array Automatically . .

l-19. Creating a User Flatness Array . . . . . . . . .

l-20. Creating Arbitrarily Spaced Frequency-Correction

Pairs in a Swept mm-wave Environment . . .

l-21. Scalar System Configuration . . . . . . . . . .

l-22. Automatically Characterizing and Compensating for a Detector

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

l-23. Decision Tree for ALC Bandwidth Selection . . .

l-24. SCPI Command Types

. . . . . . . . . . . .

l-25. A Simplified Command Tree . . . . . . . . . .

l-26. Proper Use of the Colon and Semicolon . . . . .

l-27. Simplified SWEep Command Tree . . . . . . .

l-28. Voltage Controlled Oscillator Test . . . . . . .

l-29. Simplified Program Message Syntax . . . . . . .

l-30. Simplified Subsystem Command Syntax . . . . .

l-31. Simplified Common Command Syntax . . . . .

l-32. Simplified Response Message Syntax . . . . . .

l-33. Generalized Status Register Model . . . . . . .

l-34. Typical Status Register Bit Changes . . . . . .

l-35. Generalized Trigger Model . . . . . . . . . . .

l-36. Inside the Idle State

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

l-29 l-31 l-31 l-34

1-37 l-40 l-43 l-47 l-50 l-67 l-68 l-70 l-71 l-77 l-80 l-81 l-82 l-82 l-106 l-108 l-110 l-111 vii l-3 l-4 l-5 l-7 l-9 l-11 l-13 l-15 l-17 l-19 l-23 l-25 l-27 l-28

Contents-15

Contents-16

l-37. Inside the Initiate State . . . . . . . . . . . .

l-38. Inside an Event Detection State

. . . . . . . .

l-39. Inside the Sequence Operation State . . . . . .

l-40. The INIT Trigger Configuration . . . . . . . .

l-41. The TRIG Trigger Configuration . . . . . . . .

l-42. HP 8360 Simplified Trigger Model

. . . . . . .

A-l. ALC System Simplified Block Diagram . . . . .

A-2. Typical External Leveling Hookup

. . . . . . .

C-l. Auxiliary Interface Connector . . . . . . . . .

C-2. HP-IB Connector and Cable . . . . . . . . . .

C-3. Interface Signals of the Source Module Connector .

F-l. Basic User Flatness Configuration Using an HP 437B

Power Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F-2. User Flatness Correction Table as Displayed by the

Swept Signal Generator . . . . . . . . . .

F-3. The Sources of ALC Calibration Correction Data .

F-4. Array Configuration when the Correction Data

Frequency Span is a Subset of the Swept Signal

Generator Frequency Span . . . . . . . . .

M-l. ALC Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . .

M-2. Power Accuracy Over the AM Dynamic Range . .

M-3. FM Deviation and Rate Limits . . . . . . . . .

M-4. ALC Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . .

M-5. Pulse Modulation System

. . . . . . . . . . .

M-6. Video Feedthrough . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

P-l. How (PRIOR) Works

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

S-l. Connections Required for a Two-Tone Scalar

Network Analyzer Measurement System

. . .

2b-1. ALC Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2b-2. Frequency Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2b-3. Marker Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2b-4. Modulation Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2b-5. Power Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2b-6. Service Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2b-7. Sweep Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2b-8. System Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2b-9. User Cal Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-1. AC Power Cables Available . . . . . . . . . .

3-2. Rear Panel HP-IB Switch

. . . . . . . . . . .

3-3. Removing the Side Straps and Feet . . . . . . .

3-4. Chassis Slide Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-5. Rack Mount Flanges for Swept Signal Generators with Handles Removed . . . . . . . . . . .

3-6. Rack Mount Flanges for Swept Signal Generators with Handles Attached . . . . . . . . . . .

4-l. Replacing the Line Fuse . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-2. Removing the Fan Filter . . . . . . . . . . .

F-6

F-7

F-8

S-65

2b-3

2b-5

2b-7

2b-9

2b-11

2b-13

2b-15

2b-17

2b-19

3-5

3-7

3-11

3-12

3-14

3-16

4-4

4-5

F-8

M-13

M-16

M-18

M-20

M-20

M-22

P-12 l-111 l-113 l-114 l-115

1-116 l-117

A-5

A-8 c - 7

C-8 c-10

Tables

l-l. Keys Under Discussion in This Section

. . . . .

l-2. SWEep Command Table

. . . . . . . . . . .

l-3. SCPI Data Types

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-4. Sample Swept Signal Generator Commands

. . .

C-l. Pin Description of the Auxiliary Interface

. . . .

D-l. Mnemonics used to Indicate Status . . . . . . .

S-l. HP 8360 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

. . . .

3-l. Adapter Descriptions and Part Numbers Shipped with Each Swept Signal Generator Model . . .

3-2. Language HP-IB Addresses . . . . . . . . . .

3-3. Factory-Set HP-IB Addresses

. . . . . . . . .

3-4. Rack Mount Slide Kit Contents

. . . . . . . .

3-5. Rack Flange Kit for Swept Signal Generators with

Handles Removed Contents . . . . . . . . .

3-6. Rack Flange Kit for Swept Signal Generators with

Handles Attached Contents . . . . . . . . .

3-7. Instrument Preset Conditions for the HP

8360/8340/8341

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-8. Numeric Suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-9. Programming Language Comparison

. . . . . .

4-l. Fuse Part Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-2

3-6

3-7

3-10

3-13

1-21

1-71 l-83 l-88 c-7

D-7

S-18

3-15

3-20

3-24

3-25

4-4

Contents-17

Getting Started

What Is In This

Chapter

Note

This chapter contains information on how to use the

HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator. The information is separated into three sections.

Basic

For the novice user unfamiliar with the

HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator. This section describes the basic features of the swept signal generator.

Advanced

For the user familiar with swept signal generators, but not necessarily familiar with how to use the special features of the HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator.

Programming

For the user wishing to program an HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator. This section contains an introduction to Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments language

(SCPI), Hewlett-Packard’s implementation of

IEEE-488.2-1987, and an introduction to the

Analyzer programming language.

If you are unpacking a new swept signal generator, refer to the installation suggestions provided in Chapter 3, “Installation”.

Getting Started Introduction l- 1

How To Use This

Chapter

To use this chapter effectively, refer to the tabbed section “Menu

Maps”. Menu maps can be folded out to be viewed at the same time as the Getting Started information, as illustrated.

Equipment Used In

The following table lists the equipment used in the operation

Examples

examples shown in this chapter. You can substitute equipment, but be aware that you may get different results than those shown.

Equipment Used In Examples

Equipment Recommended

Model Numbers

Power Meter

Power Sensor

Power Splitter

Oscilloscope

HP 436A/437B

HP 8485A

HP 11667B

HP 1740A mm-Wave Source Module HP 83556A

Power Amplifier HP 8349B

Coupler

Detector

HP 11691D

HP 8474D

l-2 Getting Started Introduction

Introducing the

HP 8360 B-Series

Swept Signal

Generators

Getting Started Basic

The HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators are high performance, broadband frequency swept signal generators.

PRESET

Figure l-l. The HP 838208 Swept Signal Generator

(PRESET) initializes the front panel settings and runs the swept signal generator through a brief self-test. In the following examples, unless stated otherwise, begin by pressing (PRESET).

Getting Started Basic l-3

Display Area

‘1

ACTIVE ENTRY AND

DATA DISPLAY AREA

J

- M E S S A G E L I N E

SOFTKEY LABEL A R E 4

SOFTKMS

Figure 1-2. Display

Active Entry and Data Display Area:

This area typically displays the frequency and power information of the current instrument state. When data entry is expected, the swept signal generator uses all or part of this area to record the entries. The active entry arrow (-->) indicates the active entry function and its current value.

Message Line: This line is used to display:

ALC level status.

Unlock information.

Timebase status.

RF output status.

Softkey Label Area:

This area displays the name of the softkey directly below it.

Softkeys:

These keys activate the functions indicated by the labels directly above them.

1-4 Getting Started Basic

Entry Area

All function values are changed via the rotary knob and/or keys of the entry area.

ENTRY

ON/OFF

ENTRY ON

LEO

1 \

\,

ENTRY

ARROW KEYS

/

ROTARY KNOB

TERMINATOR

KEYS

NUMERIC

ENTRY KMS

NEGAM SIGN/

BACKSPACE

Figure 1-3. Entry Area

The following are active only when the swept signal generator expects an input.

[

ENTRY ON

/

OFF

):

This key lets you turn off or on the active entry area. Turning off the entry area after a value is entered prevents accidental changes.

ENTRY ON LED:

This LED lights when the entry area is active.

Arrow Keys:

The up/down arrow keys let you increase or decrease a numeric value. The left/right arrow keys choose a significant digit indicated by an underline.

Rotary Knob:

The rotary knob increases or decreases a numeric value. The rotary knob can be used in combination with the left/right arrow keys to change the increment size.

Terminator Keys:

After the numeric entry keys are used to enter a value, these keys define the units.

Negative Sign/Backspace Key:

If a data entry is in progress, this key backspaces over the last digit entered, otherwise a negative sign is entered.

Numeric Entry Keys:

These keys enter specific numbers in the active entry area and must be followed by one of the terminator keys before the function value changes.

Getting Started Basic l-5

CW Operation and

Start/Stop

Frequency Sweep

CW Operation

CW operation is one of the major functions of the swept signal generator, and is easy to do using front panel keys. In CW operation, the swept signal generator produces a single, low-noise, synthesized frequency. Try this example: Press [cw 0 0 0 @ @ @ @ 0 @

(GHz).

Check the active entry area. It indicates:

--> cw:

12345.678000 MHz

The data display area indicates CW operation and the frequency that you entered. The ENTRY ON LED is lit and the green SWEEP

LED is off.

Try other frequencies. Experiment with the rotary knob and the arrow keys as alternate methods of data entry.

Start/Stop Frequency

The swept signal generator can sweep a frequency span as wide as

Sweep

the frequency range of the instrument, or as narrow as 0 Hz (swept

CW).

In start/stop sweep operation, the swept signal generator produces a sweep from the selected start frequency to the selected stop frequency.

For example:

Press ISTART) @ 0 @ @ [GHz).

Press LSTOP) @ 0 @ @ (GHzl.

The data display area indicates the start frequency and the stop frequency. The green SWEEP LED is on (periodically off when sweep is retracing). Because this is the active function, the active entry area indicates:

--> STOP FREqUENCY: 7890.000000 MHz

Any subsequent entries change the stop frequency. To change the start frequency, press (START), which remains the active function until you press a different function key.

l-6 Getting Started Basic

HEWLETT

PACKARD n

hlO‘IU SELECT

POWER

-- INSTRUMENT STATE

FREQUENCY -,

SOURCE MCWLE INTERFACE

SWEEP LED cw

START STOP

Figure 1-4. CW Operation and Start/Stop Frequency Sweep

CW Operation start/stop

Frequency Sweep

1. Press Icw].

2. Enter value.

3. Press terminator key.

1. Press (?=iiZQ.

2. Enter value.

3. Press terminator key.

4. Press (STOP).

5. Enter value.

6. Press terminator key.

RF O”TP”T

Getting Started Basic l-7

Center

Frequency/Span

Operation

Center frequency/span is another way of establishing swept operation. This is just a different way of defining sweep limits. As an example of center frequency/span operation:

Press (CENTER) @ (GHz).

Press w 0 IGHz).

The swept signal generator is now sweeping from 3.5 to 4.5 GHz (to view these figures, press either [START) or c-1, then LSPAN)). The data display area indicates the center frequency as well as the span.

Notice that the green SWEEP LED is on.

While span is the active function, try the rotary knob and arrow keys. This symmetrical increase or decrease of the frequency span about the center frequency is one reason that center frequency/span swept operation is used instead of start/stop frequency sweep.

Another example illustrates the subtleties of center frequency/span.

Press [email protected] LGHz).

Press (SPAN) @ (GHz).

Notice that the center frequency changed. This is because the center frequency could not accommodate a span of 8 GHz without exceeding the lower frequency limit of the swept signal generator’s specified frequency range. If the low or high frequency range limits are exceeded, the inactive (center or span) function is reset. Experiment with the rotary knob and the arrow keys as alternate methods of data entry.

l-8 Getting Started Basic

HEWLETT

PACKARD

ENTRY -

- SWEEP.

PCWCR

-F- INSTRUMENT STATE -

\ \

SWEEP LED

Center Frequency

Operation

1. Press (CFiTFj.

2. Enter value.

3. Press terminator key.

CENTER SPAN

Figure 1-5. Center Frequency and Span Operation

Span Operation

1. Press ISPAN).

2. Enter value.

3. Press terminator key.

[pJ1[ [email protected]

RF OUTPUT

Getting Started Basic l-9

Power Level and

Sweep Time

Operation

Power Level Operation

The swept signal generator can produce leveled power for CW, swept frequency, or power sweep operation. The selected power level can range from -20 dBm (-110 dBm for option 001 swept signal generators) to +25 dBm.

For practice: Press

(

POWER LEVEL

)

I-) @ @J 0). The active entry area shows:

--> POWER LEVEL: -20 .OO dBm

If the selected power level is beyond the range of the swept signal generator, the closest possible power is shown in both the data display area and the active entry area. If the selected power level exceeds the maximum leveled power the swept signal generator is able to produce, the unleveled message UNLVLED appears on the message line. Experiment with the rotary knob and the arrow keys as alternate methods of data entry.

Sweep Time Operation

In typical applications the sweep time can vary tremendously, from milliseconds in a network analyzer system, to more than a minute in thermistor-based power meter systems.

Press (START) (JiJ (GHz).

Press (STOP) @ (GHz.

Press

(

SWEEP

mm) @ 0 @ (,,,.

Watch the green SWEEP LED, it blinks every 2.5 seconds. The LED blinks at each retrace.

For the fastest sweep speed for which all specifications are guaranteed, the swept signal generator must be in automatic sweep time selection.

Refer to menu map 7.

Press SWEEP (MENU].

Select more l/3.

Select SwpTime Auto .

Notice that the active entry area indicates:

--> SWEEP TIME:

100.0 mSec AUTO

When the swept signal generator‘is in automatic sweep time selection, the active entry area displays AUTO along with the current sweep time. Faster sweep speeds than this are possible, turn the rotary knob counter-clockwise until the display no longer changes.

Notice that AUTO is no longer displayed.

l-10 Getting Started Basic

PACKARD

SWEEP TIME

Power Level

Operation

SWEEP LED POWER LEVEL

Figure 1-6. Power Level and Sweep Time Operation

Sweep Time

Operation

1. Press

[

POWER

LEVEL).

2. Enter value.

3. Press IdeoJ.

1. Press

[

SWEEP

TIME].

2. Enter value.

3. Press terminator key.

Getting Started Basic l-l 1

Continuous, Single,

Continuous sweep is the operation mode set when the swept

and Manual Sweep

signal generator is preset. It simply means that when the swept signal generator is performing a swept operation, the sweeps will

Operation

continuously sweep-retrace-sweep-retrace until a different sweep mode is selected. To choose this sweep mode, press (CONT).

To change from continuous sweep to single sweep operation, press

(sx). This causes the swept signal generator to abort the sweep in progress and switch to the single sweep mode. This initial keystroke causes the swept signal generator to switch sweep modes, but it does not initiate a single sweep. A second keystroke (press (SINGLE)) initiates a single sweep. When the swept signal generator is in single sweep operation, the amber LED above the key lights. When the swept signal generator is actually performing a sweep in single sweep mode, the green SWEEP LED lights.

The manual sweep mode lets you use the rotary knob to either sweep from the start frequency to the stop frequency or to sweep power.

Refer to menu map 7, SWEEP.

Press (PRESET).

Press SWEEP (MENU).

Select Manual Sweep.

The active entry area displays:

--> SWEPT MANUAL:

XXXXXXXXX MHz

Use the rotary knob to sweep from the start to the stop frequency.

The green SWEEP LED is off in manual sweep mode because the sweeps are synthesized.

1-12 Getting Started Basic

HEWLETT

PACKARD

.MWU [email protected] ‘I,

SINGLE

Single Sweep

1. Press @FELT).

CONT SWEEP MENU

Figure 1-7. Continuous, Single, and Manual Sweep Operation

Continuous Sweep

Manual

Sweep

1. Press (E5EJ 1.

Press SWEEP CMENU).

2.

Press Manual

Sweep.

3. Use the rotary knob to adjust frequency.

Getting Started Basic 1-13

Marker Operation

Caution

The swept signal generator has five frequency markers that can be used as fixed frequency “landmarks,” or as variable frequency pointers on a CRT display. To view the marker features of the swept signal generator on a CRT, connect the swept signal generator as shown in Figure l-8.

Refer to menu map 3, MARKER.

Press (START) @ [GHz).

Press (STOP) @ (GHz).

Press (MARKER).

Select Marker Ml and enter

The swept signal generator is sweeping from 3 to 7 GHz, with a

100 ms sweep speed. A frequency marker is set at 4 GHz, which causes an intensified dot to appear on the CRT. To obtain an amplitude spike at that frequency, select amp1 Markers . Notice that you can set the amplitude of the spike with the rotary knob or entry keys. To return to the intensified dot representation, select

Amp1 Markers (asterisk off).

Amplitude markers increase the output power at the marker frequency. Provide protection to devices that could be damaged.

For a second marker, select Marker M2 and enter @ 0 @ LGHz).

This process can be continued for all five markers. Note that the marker displayed in the active entry area is “active” and can be controlled by the rotary knob, arrow keys, and numeric entry keys.

Once the Ml and M2 markers are established, the marker sweep function, softkey MI--M2 Sweep, temporarily changes the original start/stop frequencies to those of markers Ml and M2. Select

Ml--M2

Sweep. Notice that the swept signal generator now is sweeping from 4 to 5.5 GHz. Use this function to focus in on a selected portion of the frequency sweep. Select Ml--M2 Sweep again.

This turns the function off and returns the swept signal generator to its original sweep parameters. To change the start/stop frequencies for the swept signal generator, not just temporarily, use the softkey

Start=Ml Stop=H2.

As an example of the delta marker function:

Select Marker M3 and enter @ 0 0 IGHz).

Select Delta Marker.

The frequency difference between marker 3 and marker 1 is displayed, and the CRT trace is intensified between the two markers. The active entry area displays:

--> DELTA MKR (3-l) :

2700.000000 MHz

1-14 Getting Started Basic

Marker 1 was chosen because it is selected as the delta marker reference. To change reference markers, select Delta Mkr Ref .

Select M2 as the reference. Watch the display change to indicate:

--> DELTA MKR (3-2) : 1200.000000 MHz

You can choose any of the five markers as a reference, but when delta marker is on, if the reference marker has a frequency value higher than the last active marker, the difference between the frequencies is negative and is displayed as such by the swept signal generator. The

CRT display continues to intensify the difference between the two markers.

When delta marker is showing in the active entry area, the ENTRY area is active. Rotate the rotary knob and watch the frequency difference change. The last active marker (in this case, marker 3) changes frequency value, not the reference marker.

on0 0 0 0 -

RF OUTPUT

O S C I L L O S C O P E

DETECTOR

0

.-a

OEC

A

M R T

INPUT

Marker Operation

1. Press (j-j.

2. Select a marker key (MI . . . ~5).

3. Enter value.

4. Press terminator key.

Figure 1-8. Marker Operation

Delta Marker

Operation

1. Press (MARKER].

2. Select a marker key (ffl . . . ~5).

3. Enter value.

4. Press terminator key.

5. Select a different marker key (ai . . ~5).

6. Enter value.

7. Press terminator key.

8. Select Delta

I&r

Ref.

9. Select one of the previously chosen markers.

10. Press (PRIOR).

11. Select Delta Marker.

Getting Started Basic 1-15

Saving and

Recalling an

Instrument State

The save/recall registers store and access a previously set instrument state.

For example, set the swept signal generator to sweep from 3 GHz to

15 GHz at a -10 dB power level, with markers 1 and 2 set at 4.5 and

11.2 GHz.

Press ISTART) (?J (GHz).

Press LSTOP) (iJ Q (GHz).

Press

(POWER LEvEL)

I-) (iJ @ (dB(m)).

Press (MARKER).

Select Marker Ml @o @ (GHz).

Select Marker M2 0 0 0 @ LGHz).

To save this instrument state in register 1, press (SAVE) 0. To verify that the swept signal generator has saved this state:

Press (PRESET).

Press (RECALL) (iJ.

Press (NIARKER).

The active entry area displays:

--> RECALL REGISTER: 1 RECALLED

Notice the sweep end points, power level, and the asterisks next to the marker 1 and 2 key labels.

You can save instrument states in registers 1 through 8. Register

0 saves the last instrument state before power is turned off. When power is turned on, register 0 is automatically recalled.

I-16 Getting Started Basic

SAVE RECALL ci

USER DrnNED

1

Save

Figure 1-9. Saving and Recalling an Instrument State

Recall

1. Set up swept signal generator as desired.

2.

Press (SAVE).

3. Press a number 1 through 8.

1. Press (m).

2. Press a number 0 through 8.

RF OUrnUT

I l

Getting Started Basic 1-17

Power Sweep and

Power Slope

Operation

Power Sweep Operation

The power sweep function allows the power output to be swept

(positive or negative) when the swept signal generator is in the

CW frequency mode. The power output of the swept signal generator determines the maximum leveled power sweep that can be accomplished. For this example, refer to the “Menu Map” section.

Zero and calibrate the power meter.

Connect the instruments as shown in Figure l-10.

Press Lcw) @ m).

Press

(POWER LEVEL) (iiJ m.

P r e s s [ S W E E P @ (,,,) (jZi!jZ).

Set the power meter to dB[REF] mode.

The swept signal generator is ready to produce a 4 GHz CW signal at 0 dBm power out, with a 2 second sweep rate whenever a single sweep is executed. The power meter is ready to measure the power level relative to a starting point of 0 dBm.

Press POWER (jZK).

Select Power Sweep and enter 0 (dB0) (asterisk on).

Press (SINGLE).

Watch the relative power indication on the power meter. At the end of the sweep the power meter indicates +7 dB. The active entry area on the swept signal generator indicates:

--> POWER SWEEP: 7.00 dB/SWP

Now enter @ @ [lecm,) (power sweep is still the active entry function).

Press (SINGLE).

This time the power meter indicates less than the power sweep requested. Note that the swept signal generator is unleveled, UNLVD.

This happens because the swept signal generator’s output power at the start of the sweep is 0 dB and the requested power sweep takes the swept signal generator beyond the range where it is able to produce leveled power. The range of the power sweep is dependent on the ALC range and can be offset if a step attenuator (Option 001) is present.

Select Power Sweep to turn this function off (no asterisk).

Press

(P

OWER

LEVEL) (-) (TJ @.

On the power meter, press dB[REF] to reset the reference level.

1-18 Getting Started Basic

Select

Power

Sweep (asterisk on).

Press @YEi?).

The swept signal generator performs a power sweep beginning at

-20 dBm and ending at +5 dBm. The power meter indicates

+25

dB.

Power Slope Operation

This function allows for compensation of high frequency system or cable losses by linearly increasing the power output as the frequency increases. For this example, refer to the “Menu Map” section.

Press Power Slope, the active entry area displays:

--> RF SLOPE:

X. XX dB/GHz, where X is a numeric value.

Power slope is now active, notice that an asterisk is next to the key label.

Use the entry keys, rotary knob, or arrow keys to enter a value for the linear slope.

Press Power Slope again to turn this feature off.

SUEPT SIGNAL

GENERflTOR

POWER tlETER

RF OUTPUT

POUER SENSOR

Power Sweep

1. Press POWER INIENU).

2.

Select Power Sweep.

3. Enter a value.

4. Press terminator key.

Figure l-10. Power Sweep and Power Slope Operation

Power Slope

1. Press POWER IFV1ENU_).

2.

Select Power Slope.

3. Enter a value.

4. Press terminator key.

Getting Started Basic 1-19

Getting Started

Advanced

Advanced

This section of Chapter 1 describes the use of many of the unique features of the HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators. The format used is similar to the one used on the previous pages. When referred to a menu map number, go to the Menu Map tab and unfold the menu map so that you can view it together with the text.

Some menus have more than one page of softkeys. Select the more m/n softkey to view the next page of softkeys. more m/n is not included in the keystrokes given in these procedures.

Table l-l. Keys Under Discussion in This Section

‘aragraph Heading

:xternally

Leveling the Swept Signal Generator

Keys

Leveling Point ExtDet

Coupling Factor

POWER LEVEL

Set Atten

Leveling Point PwrMtr

Pwr Mtr Range

Norking with Mixers/Reverse Power Effects

Leveling Point Module

Mdl Lev Menu

Uncoupl Atten

Leveling Mode Normal

Norking with Spectrum Analyzers/ Leveling Mode ALCoff

Leveling Mode Search leverse Power Effects

‘Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” Fltness Menu

Delete Menu

Auto Fill Start

Auto Fill Stop

Auto Fill Incr

Mtr Meas Menu

FLTNESS ON/OFF

Enter Freq

Enter Corr

Freq Follow

List Menu

Copy List

Sweep Mode List

Ext Det Cal

Getting Started Advanced 1-21

Advanced

Table l-l.

Keys Under Discussion in This Section (continued)

Paragraph Heading Keys

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” Auto Track continued

Peak RF Always

Peak RF Once

Swp Span Cal Once

Swp Span Cal Always

AM BW Cal Always

AM BW Cal Once

FullUsr Cal

Using Step Sweep

Zreating and Using a Frequency List

Using the Security Features

Changing the Preset Parameters

AM On/Off 100%/V

AM On/Off lOdB/V

Deep AM

USER DEFINED MENL

ASSIGN

Step Sap Menu

List Menu

Delete Menu

Enter List Freq

Enter List Offset

Enter List Dwell

Pt Trig Menu

Zero Freq

Save Lock

Clear Memory

Blank Display

Save Usr Preset

Preset Mode User

PRESET

For more information, each of these keys has a separate entry in

Chapter 2.

1-22 Getting Started Advanced

Externally Leveling the Swept Signal

Generator

In externally leveled operations, the output power from the swept signal generator is detected by an external sensor. The output of this detector is returned to the leveling circuitry, and the output power is automatically adjusted to keep power constant at the point of detection.

Leveling with

Figure l-11 illustrates a typical setup for external leveling. When

Detectors/Couplers

externally leveled, the power level feedback is taken from the external

/Splitters

negative detector input rather than the internal detector. This feedback voltage controls the ALC system to set the desired RF output. Refer to Figure A-l in Chapter 2 for a block diagram of the swept signal generator’s ALC circuitry.

Figure l-l 1. ALC Circuit Externally Leveled

Getting Started Advanced 1-23

Note

Hint

To level externally:

1. Set up the equipment as shown. For this example, the detector/coupler setup is used.

2. Refer to menu map 1.

3. Press (ALC).

4. Select Leveling Point ExtDet .

5. Set the coupling factor. Select Coupling Factor (-) @ @

(dB0).

Power splitters have a coupling factor of 0 dB.

Figure 1-12 shows the input power versus output voltage characteristics for typical HP diode detectors. From the chart, the leveled power at the diode detector input resulting from any external level voltage setting may be determined. The range of power adjustment is approximately -30 dBm to +18 dBm.

Automatically characterize and compensate for the detector used by performing a detector calibration. Refer to “Using

Detector Calibration” in the “Optimizing Swept Signal Generator

Performance” section.

1-24 Getting Started Advanced

100 mV

10 mV s SOUARE LAW ASYMPTOTE

1 mV

-60 dBV

- 6 6 dBV

-70 dBV

.l mV

- 4 0

+30

-80 dBV

- 3 0 - 2 0

- 1 0 0

+10

DETECTOR INPUT POWER, dBm

Figure 1-12. Typical Diode Detector Response at 2S’C

+20

Getting Started Advanced 1-25

+20 dBV

+lO dBV

+6 dBV

0 dBV

-10 dBV

-20 dBV

-30 dBV

-40 dBV

-50 dBV

Hint

External Leveling Used With the Optional Step Attenuator

Some external leveling applications require low output power from the swept signal generator. The swept signal generator automatically uncouples the attenuator from the ALC system for all external leveling points.

Press

(

POWER LEVEL

).

Note the display. It shows:

--> ATTEN 0 dB, POWER LEVEL: 0.00 dBm

For example, leveling the output of a 30 dB gain amplifier to a level of -10 dBm requires the output of the swept signal generator to be around -40 dBm when leveled. At some frequencies this level is beyond the range of the ALC modulator alone. If so, the

LOW UNLVLED warning message is displayed. Inserting 40 dB of attenuation results in an ALC level of 0 dBm, which is well within the range of the ALC. At 20 GHz, 30 dB attenuation is a better choice as it results in an ALC level of -10 dBm. This gives a margin for AM or other functions that vary the power level.

For optimum display accuracy and minimum noise, the ALC level should be greater than -10 dBm. This is achieved by using attenuation equal to the tens digit of output power. Example: desired output power = -43 dBm; use:

--> ATTEN: 40 dB, ALC -3 dBm

1. Press POWER (j).

2. Select Set Atten @@cm].

To obtain flatness corrected power, refer to “Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction Array” in the “Optimizing Swept Signal

Generator Performance” section.

1-26 Getting Started Advanced

Leveling with Power

Leveling with a power meter is similar to leveling with a diode

Meters

detector. Figure 1-13 shows the setup for power meter leveling.

WEPT S I G N A L

GENERATOR

----a

PPam naoPPP maa0 on= 000

LEVELED OUTPUT

Hint

Figure l-13. Leveling with a Power Meter

1. Set up the equipment as shown. Be sure to set the power meter to manual range mode and note the range.

2. Refer to menu map 1.

3. Press (ALC.

4. Select Leveling Point PwrMtr.

5. Select Pwr Mtr Range.

Enter the range value set for the power meter as noted in step 1.

6. Select Coupling Factor , press @ [x).

Unlike detector leveling, power meter leveling provides calibrated power out of the leveled RF port.

To obtain flatness corrected power, refer to “Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction Array” in the “Optimizing Swept Signal

Generator Performance” section.

Getting Started Advanced l-27

Leveling with MM-wave

Millimeter-wave source module leveling is similar to power meter

Source Modules

leveling. The following figures illustrate the setups for leveling with a mm-wave source module.

WEPT SIQNAL

GENERNTOR

Figure l-14. MM-wave Source Module Leveling

High power model swept signal generators can externally level mm-wave source modules to maximum specified power without a microwave amplifier.

1-28 Getting Started Advanced

WEPT SIGNRL

GENERRTOR

AHPLIFIER

Htl-URVE SOURCE

Figure l-15. MM-wave Source Module Leveling Using a Microwave Amplifier

Hint

1. Set up the equipment as shown.

2. Refer to menu map 1.

3. Select Leveling Point Hodule .

4. Select Module Menu.

5. Select Module Select Auto or Front or Rear, depending on where the interface connection is made.

All of the ALC data necessary to communicate properly with the swept signal generator is exchanged via the SOURCE MODULE

INTERFACE.

To obtain flatness corrected power, refer to “Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction Array” in the “Optimizing Swept Signal

Generator Performance” section.

Getting Started Advanced l-29

Working with

Mixers/Reverse

Power Effects

Note

Uncoupled operation applies to Option 001 swept signal generators only.

Uncoupled operation is useful when working with mixers. Figure 1-16 shows a hypothetical setup where the swept signal generator is providing a small signal to a mixer. The swept signal generator output is -8 dBm, which in Leveling Mode Normal results in

ATTEN = 0 dB, ALC Level = -8 dBm. The mixer is driven with an

LO of +lO dBm, and has LO to RF isolation of 15 dB. The resulting

LO feedthrough of -5 dBm enters the swept signal generator’s

OUTPUT port, goes through the attenuator with no loss, and arrives at the internal detector. Depending on frequency, it is possible for most of this energy to enter the detector. Since the detector responds to its total input power regardless of frequency, this excess energy causes the leveling circuit to reduce its output. In this example the reverse power is actually larger than the ALC level, which may result in the swept signal generator output being shut off.

Figure 1-17 shows the same setup, with uncoupled operation used to produce the same -8 dBm output. In this case, ATTEN = -10 dB,

ALC Level = +2 dBm. The ALC level is 10 dB higher, and the attenuator reduces the LO feedthrough by 10 dB. Thus the detector sees a +2 dBm desired signal versus a possible -15 dBm undesired signal. This 17 dB difference results in a maximum 0.1 dB shift in the swept signal generator output level. To set the swept signal generator to the attenuator uncoupled mode as discussed in this example, do the following:

1. Press POWER [MENU).

2. Select Set Atten and press (iJ @ (dB(m)). This step does two things, it uncouples the attenuator from the rest of the ALC system, and it lets you set an attenuator value, in this case, 10 dB.

3. Press

[

POWER LEVEL

)

@ [ml. This sets the ALC level to

+2 dBm.

For more information on the ALC or setting power level, refer to

(ALC)

or

[

P O W E R L E V E L

)

in Chapter 2.

l-30 Getting Started Advanced

SVNTHESIZER WITH OPTION DO1

MC LEVEL

I

- 8 dBm

RF LEVEL ,-,

CONTROL

C

,,

0

ATTENUATOR

0 dB t I

-5dBm

IF

= +lO dEm

Figure l-16. Reverse Power Effects, Coupled Operation with -6 dBm Output

r------------.‘---------------------------------------------------------------~

SYNTHESIZER WITH OPflON

001

I

MC LEVEL

-. +2

dBm

RF LEVEL :

CONTROL

-

DETECTOR

MEASURES +2 d8m

MC LEVEL

ATTENUATOR - !

10 dB

DETECTOR

MEASURES -15 dBm

REVERSE POWER

-

! THROUGH =

-!MBm

IF

= +lO dBm

Figure 1-17. Reverse Power Effects, Uncoupled Operation with -6 dBm Output

Getting Started Advanced

1-3 1

W

‘orking with

SpectrGm

Analyzers/Reverse

Power Effects

Reverse power is a problem with spectrum analyzers that do not have preselection capability. Some analyzers have as much as

+5 dBm LO feedthrough coming out of their RF input, at some frequencies. The effects of reverse power are less in the heterodyne band (0.01 to 2.0 GHz) where the power amplifier provides some broadband matching. Similarly, at frequencies above 2.0 GHz, reverse power that is within 10 MHz of the swept signal generator’s frequency may be partially absorbed by the YIG filter. If the frequency difference is small enough to be within the leveling system bandwidth (typically 10 kHz CW, 200 kHz sweep or AM), the effect of reverse power is amplitude modulation of the swept signal generator’s output. The AM rate equals the difference in RF frequencies. Reverse power problems may be treated by using the unleveled mode. There are two unleveled modes, ALC off and search.

To set the swept signal generator to the ALC off mode:

1. Refer to menu map 1.

2. Press IALC).

3. Select Leveling Node ALCoff .

In this mode, the swept signal generator provides RF power with no ALC correction and therefore requires a power meter to set a particular power.

To set the swept signal generator to the search mode:

1. Press a.

2. Select Leveling Mode Search.

In this mode, the swept signal generator is in the normal ALC mode until the desired power level is reached, then the ALC is disconnected.

1-32 Getting Started Advanced

Optimizing Swept

Signal Generator

Performance

Creating and Applying

The following examples demonstrate the user flatness correction

the User Flatness

feature:

Correction Array

1. Using an HP 437B power meter to automatically enter correction data for a swept 4 to 10 GHz measurement.

2. Manually entering correction data for a stepped (List Mode) measurement.

3. Making swept mm-wave measurements, automatically entering correction data for an arbitrary list of correction frequencies.

4. Making scalar analysis measurements with automatically-entered correction data that compensates for power variations at the output of a directional bridge.

Each example illustrates how to set up correction tables for a different measurement requirement. Modify the instrument setups shown to suit your particular needs. Completed correction tables may be easily edited if more correction data is required for your measurement. Additional correction frequencies may be added by using the auto fill feature or by entering correction frequencies individually. The auto fill feature adds but does not delete correction frequencies.

There are two basic front-panel methods of creating a flatness correction array. The first and quickest method is to use an HP 437B power meter. Refer to Figure 1-18 for the setup. The second method is just as accurate, but requires a little more interaction between the operator and the instruments. Figure 1-19 shows the setup for the second method.

Getting Started Advanced 1-33

Creating a User Flatness Array Automatically, Example 1

In this example, a flatness array containing correction frequencies from 4 to 10 GHz at 1 GHz intervals is created. An HP 438B power meter controlled by the swept signal generator through the interface bus is used to enter the correction data into the flatness array.

For this example, refer to menu map 5, POWER.

1. The equipment setup shown in Figure 1-18 assumes that if the setup has an external leveling configuration, the steps necessary to correctly level have been followed. If you have questions about external leveling, refer to “Externally Leveling the Swept Signal

Generator”.

Setup Power Meter

2. Zero and calibrate the power meter/sensor.

3. Enter the appropriate power sensor calibration factors into the power meter.

4. Enable the power meter/sensor cal factor array. For operating information on the HP 437B power, refer to its operating and service manual.

5. Connect the power sensor to the point where corrected power is desired.

H P - I B

I

kTii&TFG

--

CABLES

I RN0 OTHER I

B-B J DEVICES ,

L -I” I

1 FUINBS

I coRREcTEo

, OUTPUT PORT

--

OUT

-u

DEVICE

UNDER

TEST

IN

-

-0 ooo~o~a q DDDaa b

POUER SENSOR

- - B - m u d

Figure 1-16. Creating a User Flatness Array Automatically

HP 4378

POUER HETER

Note

No other devices can be connected to the HP-IB cable.

1-34 Getting Started Advanced

Setup Swept Signal Generator Parameters

6. On the swept signal generator, press (PRESET).

7. FREQUENCY ISTART) @ (GHz), (STOP) 0 @ LGHz).

8.

(POWER mm) (FJ (dB0).

Access User Flatness Correction Menu

9.

Press POWER (MENU). Select Fltness Menu.

10.

Select Delete Menu Delete All. This step insures that the flatness array is empty.

11.

Press (j%i?K’). Leave the delete menu and return to the previous soft key menu.

12.

Enter the frequency points at which the correction information will be taken. Choose either the point-by-point entry method

Enter

Freq

or the automatic frequency point generation

Auto Fill Start. For this example, select Auto Fill Start

@IGHz).

13.

Select Auto Fill Stop @ @ (GHz), Auto Fill Incr 0 IGHz).

Notice that a frequency list starting at 4 and ending at 10 GHz with an increment value of 1 GHz is created.

Enter Correction Data into Array

14.

Select Mtr Meas Menu Measure Corr All . The power meter is now under swept signal generator control and is performing the sequence of steps necessary to generate the correction information at each frequency point.

If an HP-IB error message is displayed verify that the interface connections are correct. Check the HP-IB address of the power meter and ensure that it is the same address the swept signal generator is using (address 13 is assumed). Refer to the menu map 8, System, for the key sequence necessary to reach softkey

Meter Adrs .

Enable User Flatness Correction

15. When the operation is complete, (a message is displayed) the flatness correction array is ready to be applied to your setup.

Disconnect the power meter/sensor and press

[FLTNESS

ON

/

OFF

)

(amber LED on). T he p ower produced at the point where the

I

Dower meter/sensor was disconnected is now calibrated at the frequencies and power level specified above.

Getting Started Advanced 1-35

1-36 Getting Started Advanced

Creating a User Flatness Array, Example 2

This example shows how to use the swept signal generator and a power meter in manual entry mode. This example also introduces two features of the swept signal generator. The softkey Freq Follow simplifies the data entry process and the softkey List Mode sets up a list of arbitrary test frequencies.

The frequency follow feature automatically sets the source to a CW test frequency equivalent to the active correction frequency in the user flatness correction table. The front panel arrow keys are used to move around the correction table and enter frequency-correction pairs. Simultaneously, the swept signal generator test frequency is updated to the selected correction frequency without exiting the correction table.

To further simplify the data entry process, the swept signal generator allows you to enter correction data into the user flatness correction table by adjusting the front panel knob until the desired power level is displayed on the power meter. The user flatness correction algorithm automatically calculates the appropriate correction and enters it into the table. If you already have a table of correction data prepared, it can be entered directly into the correction table using the front-panel keypad of the swept signal generator.

With the list mode feature, you may enter the test frequencies into a table in any order and specify an offset (power) and/or a dwell time for each frequency. When list mode is enabled, the swept signal generator steps through the list of frequencies in the order entered.

The user flatness correction feature has the capability of copying and entering the frequency list into the correction table. Since the offset in the list mode table is not active during the user flatness correction data entry process, the value of the correction data is determined as if no offset is entered. When user flatness correction and list mode

(with offsets) are enabled, the swept signal generator adjusts the output power by an amount equivalent to the sum of the correction data and offset for each test frequency. You must make sure that the resulting power level is still within the ALC range of the swept signal generator.

--

1 FLATNESS

1 CORRECTED

, OUTPUT PORT

POWER NETER

-00cl

Q

P

Figure l-19. Creating a User Flatness Array

For this example, refer to menu map

5, POWER.

1. The equipment setup shown in Figure 1-19 assumes that if your setup has an external leveling configuration, the steps necessary to correctly level have been followed. If you have questions about external leveling, refer to “Externally Leveling the Swept Signal

Generator”.

Setup Power Meter

2. Zero and calibrate the power meter/sensor.

3. Connect the power sensor to the point where flatness corrected power is desired.

Setup Swept Signal Generator Parameters

4. On the swept signal generator, press (PRESET).

5.

[

POWER LEVEL

)

@ (dB0). This sets the test port power to

+5

dBm (PO maX - Ppath loss).

Create A Frequency List

6. On the swept signal generator, press FREQUENCY (MENU).

7. Select List

Menu

Enter List Freq [email protected]&. This enters

5 GHz as the first frequency in the list array. Entering a frequency automatically sets the offset to 0 dB and the dwell to

10 ms.

8. Enter 18, 13, 11, and 20 GHz to complete this example array.

Getting Started Advanced 1-37

l-38 Getting Started Advanced

Access User Flatness Correction Menu

9.

Press

POWER

(MENU). Select Fltness Menu.

10. Select Delete Menu Delete All . This step insures that the flatness array is empty.

11. Press (PRIOR). Leave the delete menu and return to the previous soft key menu.

12. Select Copy List This step copies the frequency list into the correction table in

sequential

order.

13. Select Freq Follow.

This sets the swept signal generator to CW frequency mode to facilitate taking correction information. As you scroll through the correction cells, the swept signal generator produces the corresponding CW frequency at 0 dBm.

14. Select Enter Corr . This allows correction value entry.

15. Press

(FLTNESS

ON

/

OFF

).

This step enables user flatness correction.

16. For 5 GHz, set the appropriate power sensor cal factor on the power meter.

17. Use the swept signal generator rotary knob to adjust for a measurement of 0.00 dBm on the power meter. Notice that a correction value is entered at 5 GHz.

18. Use the up arrow key to increment to the next correction cell.

19. For 11 GHz, set the appropriate power sensor cal factor on the power meter.

20. Use the swept signal generator rotary knob to adjust for a measurement of 0.00 dBm on the power meter.

21. Repeat this sequence of steps until all the frequency points have a correction value entered.

Activate List Mode

22.

Press

SWEEP

[MENU). Select Sweep Mode List.

23. The flatness correction array is ready to be applied to your setup.

Disconnect the power meter/sensor. The power produced at the point where the power meter/sensor was disconnected is now calibrated at the frequencies and power level specified above.

Note

Swept mm-wave Measurement with Arbitrary Correction Frequencies,

Example 3

The focus of this example is to use user flatness correction to obtain flat power at the output of the HP 83550 series mm-wave source modules. In this case we will use non-sequential correction frequencies in a swept 26.5 to 40 GHz measurement with an

HP 83554 source module.

The time it takes for a large quantity of power meter measurements can be long, therefore, we selected non-sequential correction frequencies to target specific points or sections of the measurement range that we assume are more sensitive to power variations. This greatly expedites setting up the user flatness correction table. The amount of interpolated correction points between non-sequential correction frequencies varies. This example uses the HP 437B to automatically enter correction data into the array.

Turn off the swept signal generator before connecting to the source module interface (SMI) cable, or damage may result.

Getting Started Advanced l-39

WEPT SIGNAL

GENERATOR

H P 437B

POUER METER

POUER SENSOR

WEPT SIGNAL

OENERRTOR

SOURCE MODULI

INlERFACl

H P 4378

POUER NETER

NICROURVE IWPLIFIER

‘F OUT

POUER SENSOR l-40 Getting Started Advanced

Figure l-20.

Creating Arbitrarily Spaced Frequency-Correction Pairs in a Swept mm-wave Environment

For this example, refer to menu map 5, POWER.

1. The equipment setup shown in Figure l-20 assumes that you have followed the steps necessary to correctly level the configuration. If you have questions about external leveling, refer to “Externally Leveling the Swept Signal Generator”.

Setup Power Meter

2. Zero and calibrate the power meter/sensor.

3. Connect the power sensor to test port.

4. Enter and store in the power meter, the power sensor’s cal factors for correction frequencies to be used.

Note

U, V, and W-band power sensors are not available from

Hewlett-Packard. For these frequencies use the Anritsu ML83A

Power Meter with the MP715-004 (40 to 60 GHz), the MP716A

(50 to 75 GHz), or the MP81B (75 to 110 GHz) power sensors. Since the Anritsu model ML83A Power Meter is not capable of internally storing power sensor cal factors, you must manually correct the data entry. Refer to example 2 for information on manual entry of correction data.

Setup Swept Signal Generator Parameters

5. Turn on the swept signal generator and press (PRESET).

The following occurs:

The source module’s frequency span is displayed on the swept signal generator.

The swept signal generator’s leveling mode is automatically changed from internal to “module leveling”.

The source module’s maximum specified power is set and displayed.

6. Press FREQUENCY (START) @ @ 0 @ IGHz), ISTOP) @ @

(GHz). The frequency sweep is set from 26.5 to 40 GHz.

7. Press [

POWER LEVEL

]

@ IdBm). The source module power is set to

+7 dBm for maximum power to the device under test.

Access User Flatness Correction Menu

8. Press POWER (MENU). Select Fltness Menu.

9. Select Delete Menu Delete All. This step insures that the flatness array is empty.

10. Press [PRIOR). Leave the delete menu and return to the previous soft key menu.

11. Select Enter Freq @ @ 0 @ (GHz), to enter 26.5 GHz as the first correction frequency. Enter 31, 32.5, and 40 GHz to complete the list. Notice that the frequencies are arbitrarily spaced.

Getting Started Advanced l-41

1-42 Getting Started Advanced

Enter Correction Data into Array

1‘2. Select Mtr

Meas

Menu

Measure Cars

All. The power meter is now under swept signal generator control and is performing the sequence of steps necessary to generate the correction information at each frequency point.

If an HP-IB error message is displayed verify that the interface connections are correct. Check the HP-IB address of the power meter and ensure that it is the same address the swept signal generator is using (address 13 is assumed). Refer to the menu map 8, System, for the key sequence necessary to reach softkey

Meter Adrs .

Enable User Flatness Correction

13. When the operation is complete, (a message is displayed) the flatness correction array is ready to be applied to your setup.

14. To save the swept signal generator parameters including the correction table in an internal register, press [SAVE) 0.

(n = number 1 through 8).

15. Disconnect the power meter/sensor and press

(FLTNESS

ON

/

OFF

)

(amber LED on). T he p ower produced at the point where the power meter/sensor was disconnected is now calibrated at the frequencies and power level specified above.

Note

Scalar Analysis Measurement with User Flatness Corrections,

Example 4

The following example demonstrates how to set up a scalar analysis measurement (using an HP 8757 Scalar Network Analyzer) of a 2 to

20 GHz test device such as, an amplifier. User flatness correction is used to compensate for power variations at the test port of a directional bridge. Follow the instructions to set up the swept signal generator, then configure the system as shown in Figure 1-21.

The swept signal generator’s rear panel language and address switches must be set to 7 and 31 (all l’s), to change the language or address of the swept signal generator from the front panel. The programming language must be set to Analyzer.

Refer to menu map 8, System, to find the location of softkey

Programming Language Analyzer (asterisk on = active language).

WEPT SIGNRL

GENERRTOR

SCRLflR

NETYORK ANRLYZER

I

DETECTOR 1

Figure l-2 1. Scalar System Configuration

Example Overview

In this example you use an HP 437B power meter to automatically enter correction data into the array. It is necessary to turn off the

HP 8757 System Interface (controlled from the front-panel of the analyzer) so that the swept signal generator can temporarily control the power meter over HP-IB. When the correction data entry process is complete, enable user flatness correction and set the desired test port power level. Then store the correction table and swept signal generator configuration in the same register that contains the analyzer configuration. Re-activate the HP 8757 System Interface and recall the stored register. Make sure that user flatness correction is still enabled before making the measurement.

Getting Started Advanced 1-43

Note

1-44 Getting Started Advanced

When an HP 437B power meter is used to automatically enter the correction data, the correction calibration routine automatically turns off any active modulation, then re-activates the modulation upon the completion of the data entry process. Therefore, the scalar pulse modulation that is automatically enabled in a scalar measurement system is disabled during an HP 437B correction calibration.

The user flatness correction array cannot be stored to a disk. You must make sure that the array is stored in one of the eight internal registers. Recalling a file from an HP 8757 disk will not erase the current array; therefore you may recall an array from an internal register, then recall an associated file from a disk.

For this example, refer to menu map 5, POWER.

1.

The equipment setup shown in Figure 1-21 assumes that you have followed the steps necessary to correctly level the configuration. If you have questions about external leveling, refer to “Externally Leveling the Swept Signal Generator”.

2.

On the analyzer, press I-). Reset the analyzer and swept signal generator to a known state.

Setup System Parameters

3.

On the swept signal generator, press FREQUENCY ISTART) @

(GHz), ISTOP) @ @ IGHz). Set the swept signal generator for a frequency sweep of 2 to 20 GHz.

4.

Press

(

POWER

LEVEL)

0 (dBm. Where n = maximum available power.

5.

On the analyzer, set up the appropriate measurement

(i.e. gain for an amplifier). Calibrate the measurement (thru and short/open calibration). Press ISAVE) 0 to store the analyzer’s configuration and swept signal generator parameters in storage register 1.

6.

Turn off the HP 8757 System Interface. Use the analyzer

SYSINTF ON OFF softkey found under the SYSTEM menu to deactivate the system interface.

Access User Flatness Correction Menu

7.

On the swept signal generator, press POWER (MENU). Select

Fltness Menu.

8.

Select Del.ete Menu Delete All. This step insures that the flatness array is empty.

9.

Press (PRIOR). Leave the delete menu and return to the previous soft key menu.

10. Select Auto Fill Start @ IGHz). Set the first frequency in correction table to 2 GHz.

11. Auto Fill Stop @ @ ml. Set the last frequency in correction table to 20 GHz.

12. Auto Fill Incr 0 @ @ (MHz). Set the frequency increment to every 100 MHz from 2 to 20 GHz.

Setup Power Meter

13. Zero and calibrate the power meter/sensor.

14. Connect the power sensor to test port.

15. Enter and store in the power meter, the power sensor’s cal factors for correction frequencies to be used.

Enter Correction Data into Array

16. Select Mtr Meas Menu Measure Corr All . The power meter is now under swept signal generator control and is performing the sequence of steps necessary to generate the correction information at each frequency point.

If an HP-IB error message is displayed verify that the interface connections are correct. Check the HP-IB address of the power meter and ensure that it is the same address the swept signal generator is using (address 13 is assumed). Refer to the menu map 8, System, for the key sequence necessary to reach softkey

Meter Adrs .

Enable User Flatness Correction

17. When the operation is complete, (a message is displayed) the flatness correction array is ready to be applied to your setup.

18. Disconnect the power meter/sensor.

19. On the swept signal generator, press

(

POWER LEVEL

) (TJ m.

Where n=P 0 max - Ppath loss for maximum leveled power at the test port.

20. To save the swept signal generator parameters including the correction table in an internal register, press (SAVE) 0.

(n = number 1 through 8).

Getting Started Advanced 1-45

l-46 Getting Started Advanced

Reactivate the HP 8757 System Interface

21. Set the analyzer to SYSINTF ON, the analyzer and swept signal generator preset.

22. Press (RECALL) (iJ. Recall the swept signal generator parameters from storage register 1

23. On the swept signal generator, press

(

FLTNESS ON

/

OFF

)

(amber

LED on). The power produced at the point where the power meter/sensor was disconnected is now calibrated at the frequencies and power level specified above.

Using Detector

Detector calibration is useful for characterizing and compensating for

Calibration

negative diode detectors used in external leveling. Detectors may be characterized by three operating regions as shown in Figure 1-12: the square law, the linear, and the transition region. The following steps use an HP 437B to automatically characterize the operating regions and use this information to automatically compensate for the detector being used. The equipment setup shown in Figure l-22 assumes that the steps necessary to correctly externally level have been followed.

Refer to menu map 9, USER CAL.

3 .

. ,

H P - 1 6

HP 4378

POUER IlETER

DIRECTIONRL

POUER

SENSOR

-c+

/

Figure l-22. Automatically Characterizing and Compensating for a Detector

1. Connect the power meter as shown.

2. Zero and calibrate the power meter/sensor.

3. Enter the appropriate power sensor calibration factors into the power meter.

4. Enable the power meter/sensor cal factor array. For operating information on the HP 437B power meter, refer to its operating and service manual.

5. Connect the power sensor to the output of the coupler

(or splitter).

Getting Started Advanced 1-47

l-48 Getting Started Advanced

6. On the swept signal generator, set the power level and start/stop frequency information as desired.

7. Press (USER].

8. Select Ext Det Cal . The power meter is now under swept signal generator control and is performing the sequence of steps necessary to generate the compensation information.

If an HP-IB error message is displayed verify that the interface connections are correct. Check the HP-IB address of the power meter and ensure that it is the same address the swept signal generator is using (address 13 is assumed). Refer to the menu map 8, System, for the key sequence necessary to reach softkey

Meter Adrs .

9. When the operation is complete, (a message is displayed) disconnect the power meter/sensor. The swept signal generator has stored the compensation information in its memory and is using it to calibrate the detector’s output voltage relative to power.

Using the Tracking

Feature

Peaking

Peaking is the function that aligns the output filter (YTM) so that its passband is centered on the RF output, in CW or manual-sweep mode. Use peaking to obtain the maximum available power and spectral purity, and best pulse envelopes, at any given frequency above 2.0 GHz. The YTM is inactive for the low band frequencies

(10 MHz to 2.0 GHz).

To peak at the present CW frequency:

Press (USERCAL).

Select Tracking Menu Peak RF Once.

This causes an instantaneous execution of the peaking function. This is a one-time implementation of the peaking, where the function is turned on and then turned off.

To peak at the present CW frequency, and continue to peak at new frequencies as they are entered:

Press (j?ZKiiCAL).

Select Tracking Menu Peak RF Always.

If “peak always” is on (denoted by an asterisk next to the key label) for an extended period of time, the peaking function will automatically repeak every seven minutes.

Note

Tracking

Auto track is a more extensive version of peaking. It causes all of the YTM tracking calibration constants to be aligned and requires approximately 40 to 90 seconds to complete. Tracking is performed from 2.0 GHz to the end of the specified frequency range.

If the swept signal generator does not have a step attenuator, terminate the RF OUTPUT with a good 50 52 impedance match such as a 10 dB attenuator or a power sensor to prevent mistracking.

To enhance the power output and spectral purity of swept modes, and to improve tracking performance (especially in harsh environments having wide temperature variations):

Press [USERCAL).

Select Tracking Menu Auto Track.

Getting Started Advanced l-49

ALC Bandwidth

Selection

The ALC bandwidth defaults at factory preset to the auto selection

ALC Bandwidth Select Auto which selects the appropriate bandwidth (high or low) for each application. To make the bandwidth selection, the swept signal generator determines which functions are activated and uses the decision tree shown in

Figure l-23.

ya s;ey.i?la & High EW

High BW

Figure l-23. Decision Tree for ALC Bandwidth Selection l-50 Getting Started Advanced

Using Step Sweep

1. Refer to menu map 2.

2. Press FREQUENCY LMENU).

3.

Select Step Sap Menu.

4.

Select Step Size.

Enter the desired increment value.

5. Select Step Points.

Enter the number of points desired.

6. Determine the dwell time desired, select Step swell and enter a value, or choose the dwell time determined by the ramp mode sweep time, select Dwell Coupled .

7. Determine the triggering scheme, select Step Swp Pt Trig Auto ,

Bus,or Ext

8. Press SWEEP [MENU].

9. Select Sweep Mode Step , to activate the step frequency mode.

Getting Started Advanced l-5 1

Creating and Using

1. Refer to menu map 2.

a Frequency List

2. Press FREQUENCY (MENU).

3.

Select List

Menu.

To use the frequency points of a frequency list to create the frequency portion of the user flatness correction array:

1. Refer to menu map 5.

2. Press POWER (MENU).

3. Select Fitness Menu.

4. Select Copy List.

l-52 Getting Started Advanced

Using the Security

Features

To access the security menu:

1. Refer to menu map 8.

2. Press SYSTEM (j&ii7).

3.

Select Security Menu.

Getting Started Advanced 1-53

Changing the Preset

1. Set up the swept signal generator in the desired operation state to

Parameters

be used as the preset state.

2. Refer to menu map 8.

3. Press SYSTEM (MENU).

4. Select Save User Preset.

5. Select Preset Mode User.

Whenever the [jG’$FF) key is pressed, the swept signal generator will return to the operation state setup and saved in steps 1 and 4. The swept signal generator displays:

*** USERDEFINEDPRESETRECALLED *** and also gives you the option of selecting the factory preset state by creating a factory preset softkey.

1-54 Getting Started Advanced

Getting Started

Programming

Programming

HP-IB, the Hewlett-Packard Interface Bus, is the instrumentto-instrument communication system between the swept signal generator and up to 14 other instruments. Any instrument having

HP-IB capability can be interfaced to the swept signal generator, including non-HP instruments that have “GPIB,” “IEEE-488,”

“ANSI MC1.l,” or “IEC-625” capability (these are common generic terms for HP-IB; all are electrically equivalent although IEC-625 uses a unique connector). This portion of the manual specifically describes interfacing the swept signal generator to one type of instrument: a computer.

The first part of this section provides general HP-IB information.

Later, the Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments language (SCPI) is introduced, and example programs are given.

For information on programming in the Control Interface

Intermediate Language (CIIL), refer to a separate option 700 manual supplement.

Getting Started Programming 1-55

HP-IB General

Information

Interconnecting Cables

Figure C-2 shows the swept signal generator rear-panel HP-IB connector and suitable cables, and describes the procedures and limitations for interconnecting instruments. Cable length restrictions, also described in Figure C-2, must be observed.

Instrument Addresses

Each instrument in an HP-IB network must have a unique address, ranging in value from 00-30 (decimal). The default address for the swept signal generator is 19, but this can be changed using the

My Adrs softkey or rear panel switch as described in the reference chapter (Chapter 2) under the “8360 Adrs” entry (the examples in this section use 19 as the address for the swept signal generator).

Other instruments use a variety of procedures for setting the address, as described in their operating manuals, but typically either a rear panel switch or a front panel code is used.

HP-IB Instrument

Nomenclature

An HP-IB instrument is categorized as a “listener,” “talker,” or

“controller,” depending on its current function in the network.

Listener

A listener is a device capable of receiving data or commands from other instruments. Any number of instruments in the HP-IB network can be listeners simultaneously.

Talker

A talker is a device capable of transmitting data or commands to other instruments. To avoid confusion, an HP-IB system allows only one device at a time to be an active talker.

Controller

A controller is an instrument, typically a computer, capable of managing the various HP-IB activities. Only one device at a time can be an active controller.

Programming the Swept

Signal Generator

The swept signal generator can be controlled entirely by a computer

(although the line POWER switch must be operated manually).

Several functions are possible only by computer (remote) control.

Computer programming procedures for the swept signal generator involve selecting an HP-IB command statement, then adding the specific swept signal generator (SCPI, Analyzer, or CIIL) programming codes to that statement to achieve the desired operating conditions. The programming codes can be categorized into two groups: Those that mimic front panel keystrokes; and those that are unique, and have no front panel equivalent.

l-56 Getting Started Programming

In the programming explanations that follow, specific examples are included that are written in a generic dialect of the BASIC language.

BASIC was selected because the majority of HP-IB computers have

BASIC language capability. However, other languages can also be used.

HP-IB Command

Command statements form the nucleus of HP-IB programming;

Statements

they are understood by all instruments in the network and, when combined with the programming language codes, they provide all management and data communication instructions for the system.

An explanation of the fundamental command statements follows.

However, some computers use a slightly different terminology, or support an extended or enhanced version of these commands.

Consider the following explanations as a starting point, but for detailed information consult the BASIC language reference manual, the I/O programming guide, and the HP-IB manual for the particular computer used.

Syntax drawings accompany each statement: All items enclosed by a circle or oval are computer specific terms that must be entered exactly as described; items enclosed in a rectangular box are names of parameters used in the statement; and the arrows indicate a path that generates a valid combination of statement elements.

The seven fundamental command statements are as follows:

Abort

Abort abruptly terminates all listener/talker activity on the interface bus, and prepares all instruments to receive a new command from the controller. Typically, this is an initialization command used to place the bus in a known starting condition. The syntax is:

interface select code

*

where the interface select code is the computer’s HP-IB I/O port, which is typically port 7. Some BASIC examples:

10 ABORT7

100 IF V>20 THEN ABORT 7

Related statements used by some computers:

ABORT10 (used by HP-80 series computers)

HALT

RESET

Getting Started Programming l-57

Remote

Remote causes an instrument to change from local control to remote control. In remote control, the front panel keys are disabled

(except for the [E) key and the POWER-switch); and the amber

REMOTE annunciator is lighted. The syntax is: where the device selector is the address of the instrument appended to the HP-IB port number. Typically, the HP-IB port number is 7, and the default address for the swept signal generator is 19, so the device selector is 719. Some BASIC examples:

10 REMOTE 7 which prepares all HP-IB instruments for remote operation (although nothing appears to happen to the instruments until they are addressed to talk), or

10 REMOTE 719 which affects the HP-IB instrument located at address 19, or

10 REMOTE 719, 721, 726, 715 which effects four instruments that have addresses 19, 21, 26, and 15.

Related statements used by some computers:

RESUME

Local Lockout

Local Lockout can be used in conjunction with REMOTE to disable the front panel (LOCAL) key. With the (iZZiiJ key disabled, only the controller (or a hard reset by the POWER switch) can restore local control. The syntax is:

interface select .

code b

A BASIC example:

10 REMOTE719

20 LOCALLOCKOUT 7

l-58 Getting Started Programming

Local

Local is the complement to REMOTE, causing an instrument to return to local control with a fully enabled front panel. The syntax is:

Some BASIC examples:

10 LOCAL 7 which effects all instruments in the network, or

10

LOCAL 719 for an addressed instrument (address 19).

Related statements used by some computers:

RESUME

Clear

Clear causes all HP-IB instruments, or addressed instruments, to assume a “cleared” condition, with the definition of “cleared” being unique for each device. For the swept signal generator:

1. All pending output-parameter operations are halted.

2. The parser (the software that interprets the programming codes) is reset, and now expects to receive the first character of a programming code.

The syntax is:

Getting Started Programming l-59

Some BASIC examples:

10 CLEAR 7 to clear all HP-IB instruments, or

10 CLEAR 719 to clear an addressed instrument.

Related statements used by some computers:

RESET

CONTROL

SEND

The preceding statements are primarily management commands that do not incorporate programming codes. The following two statements do incorporate programming codes, and are used for data communication.

output

Output is used to send function commands and data commands from the controller to the addressed instrument. The syntax is:

1 f numeric

,expre**ionI string

OXPWeiC+l

LJ

where USING is a secondary command that formats the output in a particular way, such as a binary or ASCII representation of numbers.

The USING command is followed by “image items” that precisely define the format of the output; these image items can be a string of code characters, or a reference to a statement line in the computer program. Image items are explained in the programming codes where they are needed. Notice that this syntax is virtually identical to the syntax for the ENTER statement that follows.

l-60 Getting Started Programming

device selector

A BASIC example:

100 OUTPUT 719; “programming codes”

The many programming codes for the swept signal generator are listed in the “SCPI Command Summary” in Chapter 2.

Related statements used by some computers:

CONTROL

CONVERT

IMAGE

IOBUFFER

TRANSFER

Enter

Enter is the complement of OUTPUT, and is used to transfer data from the addressed instrument to the controller. The syntax is:

A line number

ENTER is always used in conjunction with OUTPUT, such as:

100

OUTPUT 719; ‘I . . . programming codes . . . ”

110

ENTER 719; ” . . . response data.. . ”

ENTER statements are commonly formatted, which requires the secondary command USING and the appropriate image items. The most-used image items involve end-of-line (EOL) suppression, binary inputs, and literal inputs. For example:

100 ENTER 719 USING ‘I#, B”; A, B, C suppresses the EOL sequence (#), and indicates that variables A, B, and C are to be filled with binary (B) data.

As another example,

100

ENTER 719 USING ‘I#, 123A” ; A$ suppresses EOL, and indicates that string variable A$ is to be filled with 123 bytes of literal data (123A).

Getting Started Programming l-6 1

Note

Be careful when using byte-counting image specifiers. If the requested number of bytes does not match the actual number available, data might be lost, or the program might enter an endless wait state.

The suppression of the EOL sequence is frequently necessary to prevent a premature termination of the data input. When not specified, the typical EOL termination occurs when an ASCII LF

(line feed) is received. However, the LF bit pattern could coincidentally occur randomly in a long string of binary data, where it might cause a false termination. Also, the bit patterns for the

ASCII CR (carriage return), comma, or semicolon might cause a false termination. Suppression of the EOL causes the computer to accept all bit patterns as data, not commands, and relies on the HP-IB EOI

(end or identify) line for correct end-of-data termination.

Related statements used by some computers:

CONVERT

IMAGE

IOBUFFER

ON TIMEOUT

SET TIMEOUT

TRANSFER

This completes the HP-IB Command Statements subsection. The following material explains the SCPI programming codes, and shows how they are used with the OUTPUT and ENTER HP-IB command statements.

l-62 Getting Started Programming

Getting Started with

This section of Chapter 1 describes the use of the Standard

SCPI

Commands for Programmable Instruments language (SCPI). This section explains how to use SCPI commands in general. The instrument command summary (at the end of this chapter) lists the specific commands available in your instrument. This section presents only the basics of SCPI. If you want to explore the topic in greater depth, see the paragraph titled, “Related Documents.”

Definitions of Terms

This section defines most terms when they are first used, you need a general understanding of the terms listed below before you continue.

controller

A controller is any computer used to communicate with a SCPI instrument. A controller can be a personal computer, a minicomputer, or a plug-in card in a card cage. Some intelligent instruments can also function as controllers.

instrument

An instrument is any device that implements SCPI.

Most instruments are electronic measurement or stimulus devices, but this is not a requirement.

Similarly, most instruments use an HP-IB interface for communication. The same concepts apply regardless of the instrument function or the type of interface used.

program message

A program message is a combination of one or more properly formatted SCPI commands.

Program messages always go from a controller to an instrument. Program messages tell the instrument how to make measurements and output signals.

response message

A response message is a collection of data in specific

SCPI formats. Response messages always go from an instrument to a controller or listening instrument.

Response messages tell the controller about the internal state of the instrument and about measured values.

command

A command is an instruction in SCPI. You combine commands to form messages that control instruments. In general, a command consists of mnemonics (keywords), parameters, and punctuation.

query

A query is a special type of command. Queries instruct the instrument to make response data available to the controller. Query mnemonics always end with a question mark.

Getting Started Programming 1-63

Standard Notation

This section uses several forms of notation that have specific meaning.

Command Mnemonics

Many commands have both a long and a short form, and you must use either one or the other (SCPI does not accept a combination of the two). Consider the FREQuency command, for example. The short form is FREQ and the long form is FREQUENCY (this notation style is a shorthand to document both the long and short form of commands). SCPI is not case sensitive, so fREquEnCy is just as valid as FREQUENCY, but FREQ and FREQUENCY are the only valid forms of the FREQuency command.

Angle Brackets

Angle brackets indicate that the word or words enclosed represent something other than themselves. For example, <new line> represents the ASCII character with the decimal value 10. Similarly,

<-END>means that EOI is asserted on the HP-IB interface. Words in angle brackets have much more rigidly defined meaning than words used in ordinary text. For example, this section uses the word

“message” to talk about messages generally. But the bracketed words

<program message> indicate a precisely defined element of SCPI.

If you need them, you can find the exact definitions of words such as

<program message> in a syntax diagram.

How to Use Examples

It is important to understand that programming with SCPI actually requires knowledge of two languages. You must know the programming language of your controller (BASIC, C, Pascal) as well as the language of your instrument (SCPI). The semantic requirements of your controller’s language determine how the SCPI commands and responses are handled in your application.

Command Examples

Command examples look like this:

:FREQuency:CW?

This example tells you to put the string :FREQuency :CW? in the output statement appropriate to your application programming language. If you encounter problems, study the details of how the output statement handles message terminators such as <new line>.

If you are using simple OUTPUT statements in HP BASIC, this is taken care of for you. In HP BASIC, you type:

OUTPUT Source; ‘I : FREQuency : CW?”

Command examples do not show message terminators because they are used at the end of every program message. “Details of

1-64 Getting Started Programming

Commands and Responses,” discusses message terminators in more detail.

Response Examples

Response examples look like this:

1.23

These are the characters you would read from an instrument after sending a query command. To actually pull them from the instrument into the controller, use the input statement appropriate to your application programming language. If you have problems, study the details of how the input statement operates. In particular, investigate how the input statement handles punctuation characters such as comma and semicolon, and how it handles <new line> and

EOL.

To enter the previous response in HP BASIC, you type:

ENTER Source;CW,frequency

Response examples do not show response message terminators because they are always <new line> <-END>. These terminators are typically automatically handled by the input statement. The paragraph titled “Details of Commands and Responses” discusses message terminators in more detail.

Getting Started Programming l-65

Essentials for

Beginners

This subsection discusses elementary concepts critical to first-time users of SCPI. Read and understand this subsection before going on to another. This subsection includes the following topics:

Program and Response

Messages

Subsystem Command Trees

Subsystem Command Tables

Reading Instrument Errors

Example Programs

These paragraphs introduce the basic types of messages sent between instruments and controllers.

These paragraphs describe the tree structure used in subsystem commands.

These paragraphs present the condensed tabular format used for documenting subsystem commands.

These paragraphs explain how to read and print an instrument’s internal error messages.

These paragraphs contain two simple measurement programs that illustrate basic SCPI programming principles.

Program and Response

To understand how your instrument and controller communicate

Messages

using SCPI, you must understand the concepts of program and response messages. Program

messages

are the formatted data sent from the controller to the instrument. Conversely,

response messages

are the formatted data sent from the instrument to the controller.

Program messages contain one or more commands, and response messages contain one or more responses.

The controller may send commands at any time, but the instrument sends responses only when specifically instructed to do so. The special type of command used to instruct the instrument to send a response message is the

query.

All query mnemonics end with a question mark. Queries return either measured values or internal instrument settings. Any internal setting that can be programmed with SCPI can also be queried.

Forgiving Listening and Precise Talking

SCPI uses the concept of forgiving listening and precise talking outlined in IEEE 488.2.

Forgiving listening

means that instruments are very flexible in accepting various command and parameter formats. For example, the swept signal generator accepts either

: POWer : STATe ON or : POWer : STATe 1 to turn RF output on.

Precise talking

means that the response format for a particular query is always the same. For example, if you query the power state when it is on (using :POWer:STATe?), the response is always 1, regardless of whether you previously sent : POWer : STATe

1

or : POWer : STATe ON.

l-66 Getting Started Programming

Types of Commands

Commands can be separated into two groups, common commands and subsystem commands.

Common commands

are generally not measurement related. They are used to manage macros, status registers, synchronization, and data storage. Common commands are easy to recognize because they all begin with an asterisk, such as *IDN?, *OPC, and *RST. Common commands are defined by IEEE 488.2.

Szlbsystem commands

include all measurement functions and some general purpose functions. Subsystem commands are distinguished by the colon used between keywords, as in

:FREQuency :CW?. Each command subsystem is a set of commands that roughly corresponds to a functional block inside the instrument.

For example, the Power subsystem contains commands for power generation, while the STAT

US

subsystem contains commands for accessing status registers.

I

SPCI

1

Common

Commands

Subsystem

Commands

*RST

“IDN?

:MEAS:VOLT?

:FREQ 1 KHz

Figure l-24. SCPI Command Types

The remaining paragraphs in this subsection discuss subsystem commands in more detail. Remember, some commands are implemented in one instrument and not in another, depending on its measurement function.

po75b

Getting Started Programming l-67

Subsystem Command

Trees

The Command Tree Structure

Most programming tasks involve subsystem commands. SCPI uses a hierarchical structure for subsystem commands similar to the file systems on most computers. In SCPI, this command structure is called a

command tree.

root AA l-68 Getting Started Programming level 1 B B c c

DD rtl rtl

level 2

EE FF GG HH JJ

Figure l-25. A Simplified Command Tree

In the command tree shown in Figure l-25, the command closest to the top is the

root command,

or simply the

root.

Notice that you must follow a particular path to reach lower level subcommands. For example, if you wish to access the GG command, you must follow the path AA to BB to GG.

Paths Through the Command Tree

To access commands in different paths in the command tree, you must understand how an instrument interprets commands. A special part of the instrument firmware, a

purser,

decodes each message sent to the instrument. The parser breaks up the message into component commands using a set of rules to determine the command tree path used. The parser keeps track of the

current path,

the level in the command tree where it expects to find the next command you send.

This is important because the same keyword may appear in different paths. The particular path you use determines how the keyword is interpreted. The following rules are used by the parser:

w Power On and Reset

After power is cycled or after *RST, the current path is set to the root.

w Message Terminators

A message terminator, such as a <new line> character, sets the current path to the root. Many programming languages have output statements that send message terminators automatically.

The paragraph titled, “Details of Commands and Responses,” discusses message terminators in more detail.

When it is between two command mnemonics, a colon moves the current path down one level in the command tree. For example, the colon in MEAS:VOLT specifies that VOLT is one level below MEAS.

When the colon is the first character of a command, it specifies that the next command mnemonic is a root level command. For example, the colon in :INIT specifies that INIT is a root level command.

n

Semicolon

A semicolon separates two commands in the same message without changing the current path.

n

Whitespuce

White space characters, such as <tab> and <space>, are generally ignored. There are two important exceptions. White space inside a keyword, such as :FREQ uency, is not allowed. You must use white space to separate parameters from commands. For example, the

<space> between LEVel and 6.2 in the command :POWer : LEVel

6.2 is mandatory. White space does not affect the current path.

w Commas

If a command requires more than one parameter, you must separate adjacent parameters using a comma. Commas do not affect the current path.

n

Common Commands

Common commands, such as *RST, are not part of any subsystem.

An instrument interprets them in the same way, regardless of the current path setting.

Figure l-26 shows examples of how to use the colon and semicolon to navigate efficiently through the command tree.

Getting Started Programming 1-69

I

BB c c

I

DD

EE

dl r-t-l

FF GG

HH JJ to ROOT

1)

:M:CC

:AA:BB:EE;FF;GG c u r r e n t p a t h

DOWN one level

3)

:AA:DD:HH;JJ

:AA:BB:EE; :M:DD:JJ

Figure l-26. Proper Use of the Colon and Semicolon

In Figure l-26, notice how proper use of the semicolon can save typing.

Sending this message:

:AA:BB:EE; FF; GG

Is the same as sending these three messages:

:AA:BB:EE

:AA:BB:FF

:AA:BB:GG

l-70 Getting Started Programming

Subsystem Command

These paragraphs introduce a more complete, compact way of

Tables

documenting subsystems using a tabular format. The command table contains more information than just the command hierarchy shown in a graphical tree. In particular, these tables list command parameters for each command and response data formats for queries.

To begin this exploration of command tables, consider a simplified

SWEep subsystem for the swept signal generator in both the graphical and tabular formats.

SWEep

DWELI GENeration MANual

AUTO POlNt RELative

Figure l-27. Simplified SWEep Command Tree

Command

Table 1-2. SWEep Command Table

Parameters Parameter

Type

:SWEep

:DWELl

:AUTO

:GENeration

:MANual

:POINt

[:RELative] state BooleanlONCE

Reading the Command Table

Note the three columns in the command table labeled

Command,

Parameters,

and

Parameter Type.

Commands closest to the root level are at the top of the table. Commands in square brackets are implied commands, which are discussed in later paragraphs.

If a command requires one or more parameters in addition to the keyword, the parameter names are listed adjacent to the command.

Parameters in square brackets are optional parameters, which are discussed in later paragraphs. If the parameter is not in square brackets, it is required and you must send a valid setting for it with

Getting Started Programming l-7 1

the matching command. The parameter type is listed adjacent to each named parameter.

More About Commands

Query and Event Commands. Because you can query any value that you can set, the query form of each command is not shown explicitly in the command tables. For example, the presence of the swept signal generator : SWEep : DWELl command implies that a : SWEep : DWELl?

also exists. If you see a table containing a command ending with a question mark, it is a

query

only command. Some commands are

events,

and cannot be queried. An event has no corresponding setting if it causes something to happen inside the instrument at a particular instant. For example, : INITiate : IMMediate causes a certain trigger sequence to initiate. Because it is an event, there is no query form of : INITiate : IMMediate.

Implied Commands.

Implied commands

appear in square brackets in the command table. If you send a subcommand immediately preceding an implied command, but do not send the implied command, the instrument assumes you intend to use the implied command, and behaves just as if you had sent it. Note that this means the instrument expects you to include any parameters required by the implied command. The following example illustrates equivalent ways to program the swept signal generator using explicit and implied commands.

Example swept signal generator commands with and without an implied commands:

: SWEep : MANual : RELat ive 6

using explicit commands

:SWEep:MANual 6

using implied commands

Optional Parameters. Optional parameter names are enclosed in square brackets in the command table. If you do not send a value for an optional parameter, the instrument chooses a default value.

The instrument’s command dictionary documents the values used for optional parameters.

Program Message Examples

The following parts of the swept signal generator SCPI command set will be used to demonstrate how to create complete SCPI program messages:

:FREQuency

[:CWl

:MULTiplier

: STATE

: POWER

[ : LEVEL]

1-72 Getting Started Programming

Example 1:

“FREQuency:CW 5 GHZ; MULTiplier 2”

The command is correct and will not cause errors. It is equivalent to sending:

“FREQuency : CW 5 GHZ ; : FREQuency : MULTiplier 2”.

Example 2:

“FREQuency 5 GHZ; MULTiplier 2”

This command results in a command error. The command makes use of the default [:CW] node. When using a default node, there is no change to the current path position. Since there is no command

“MULT” at the root, an error results. A correct way to send this is:

“FREQ 5 GHZ; FREQ : MULT 2” or as in example 1.

Example 3:

“FREQuency:MULTiplier 2; MULTiplier:STATE ON;

FREQuency : CW 5 GHZ”

This command results in a command error. The FREQ:CW portion of the command is missing a leading colon. The path level is dropped at each colon until it is in the FREQ:MULT subsystem. So when the

FREQ:CW command is sent, it causes confusion because no such node occurs in the FREQ:MULT subsystem. By adding a leading colon, the current path is reset to the root. The corrected command is:

“FREQuency:MULTiplier2; MULTiplier:STATE ON; :FREQuency:CW

5 GHZ”.

Example 4:

“FREQ 5 GHZ; POWER 4 DBM”

Notice that in this example the keyword short form is used. The command is correct. It utilizes the default nodes of [:CW] and

[:LEVEL]. Since default nodes do not affect the current path, it is not necessary to use a leading colon before POWER.

Parameter Types

As you saw in the example command table for SWEep, there are several types of parameters. The parameter type indicates what kind of values are valid instrument settings. The most commonly used parameter types are numeric, extended numeric, discrete, and

Boolean. These common types are discussed briefly in the following paragraphs. The paragraph titled “Details of Commands and

Responses” explains all parameter types in greater depth.

Numeric Parameters. Numeric parameters are used in both subsystem commands and common commands. Numeric parameters accept all commonly used decimal representations of numbers including optional signs, decimal points, and scientific notation. If an instrument accepts only specific numeric values, such as integers, it automatically rounds numeric parameters to fit its needs.

Getting Started Programming 1-73

Examples of numeric parameters:

100

100.

-1.23

no decimal point required fractional digits optional leading signs allowed

4.56e<space>3

space allowed after e in exponents

-7.89E-01

+256

.5

use either E or e in exponentials leading + allowed digits left of decimal point optional

Examples of numeric parameters in commands:

100 OUTPUT OSource;":FREQuency:STARt l.OE+09"

110 OUTPUT OSource;":LIST:FREQuency lO.Oe+9,le+7"

Extended Numeric Parameters. Most measurement related subsystems use

extended numeric

parameters to specify physical quantities. Extended numeric parameters accept all numeric parameter values and other special values as well. All extended numeric parameters accept MAXimum and MINimum as values. Other special values, such as UP and DOWN may be available as documented in the instrument’s command summary. Some instruments also let you to send engineering units as suffixes to extended numeric parameters. The SCPI Command Summary lists the suffixes available, if any. Note that extended numeric parameters are not used for common commands or STAT

US

subsystem commands.

Examples of extended numeric parameters:

100.

-1.23

4.56e<space>3

-7.89E-01

+256

.5

any simple numeric values largest valid setting

MAX

MIN

valid setting nearest negative infinity

Examples of extended numeric parameters in commands:

100 OUTPUT QSource;":FREQuency:STOP MAX"

110 OUTPUT QSource;":LIST:FREQuency MAX,MIN"

l-74 Getting Started Programming

Discrete Parameters. Use discrete parameters to program settings that have a finite number of values. Discrete parameters use mnemonics to represent each valid setting. They have a long and a short form, like command mnemonics. You can use mixed upper and lower case letters for discrete parameters.

Examples of discrete parameters:

INTernal

level internally

DIODe

level using an external diode

PMETer

MMHead

level using an external power meter

Level using a mm-wave source module

Examples of discrete parameters in commands:

100 OUTPUT @Source;" :POWer:ALC:SOURce INT"

110 OUTPUT @Source;" :POWer:ALC:SOURce mmh"

Although discrete parameters values look like command keywords, do not confuse the two. In particular, be sure to use colons and spaces properly. Use a colon to separate command mnemonics from each other. Use a space to separate parameters from command mnemonics.

Boolean Parameters. Boolean parameters represent a single binary condition that is either true or false. There are only four possible values for a Boolean parameter.

Examples of Boolean parameters:

1

0

ON

Boolean TRUE, upper/lower case allowed

OFF

Boolean FALSE, upper/lower case allowed

Boolean TRUE

Boolean FALSE

Examples of Boolean parameters in commands:

100 OUTPUT QSource;":FM:STATe On"

110 OUTPUT OSource;":AM:STATe 1"

Getting Started Programming 1-75

Reading Instrument

When debugging a program, you may want to know if an instrument

Errors

error has occurred. Some instruments can display error messages on their front panels. If your instrument cannot do this, you can put the following code segment in your program to read and display error messages.

10 !

20 ! The rest of your

30 ! variable declarations

40 !

50 DIM Err_msg$[751

60 INTEGER Err-num

70 !

80 ! Part of your program

90 ! that generates errors

100 !

110 !

200 REPEAT

210

OUTPUT OBox;":SYST:ERR?"

220 ! Query instrument error

230 ENTER OBox;Err-num,Err-msg$

240 ! Read error #, message

250 PRINT Err-num,Err-msg$

260 ! Print error message

270 UNTIL Err-num = 0

280 ! Repeat until no errors

290 !

300 !

The rest of your program

310 !

1-76 Getting Started Programming

Example Programs

The following is an example program using SCPI compatible instruments. The example is written in HP BASIC.

This example is a stimulus and response application. It uses a source and counter to test a voltage controlled oscillator.

Example Program

Description. This example demonstrates how several SCPI instruments work together to perform a stimulus/response measurement. This program measures the linearity of a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO). A VCO is a device that outputs a frequency proportional to an input signal level. Figure 1-28 shows how the hardware is configured.

Unit Under Test rfT-t-,

Stimulus

Souroe

O-5OOmV

L

Response

Counter

HP-16

H P BASIC

Controller

Figure l-28. Voltage Controlled Oscillator Test

Program Listing.

20 !

30

40

50

60

70 !

80

90

INTEGER First,Last,Testpoint,Dummy

DIM Id$[701

ASSIGN @Stimulus TO 717

ASSIGN @Response TO 718

First=0

Last=100

100 !

110 CLEAR @Stimulus

120 CLEAR @Response

130 !

140 OUTPUT QStimulus;"*RST"

150 OUTPUT OResponse;"*RST"

160 !

170 PRINT "Voltage Controlled Oscillator Test"

180 PRINT

190 !

200 PRINT "Source Used . ..'I

Getting Started Programming 1-77

210 OUTPUT QStimulus;"*IDN?"

220 ENTER QStimulus;Id$

230 PRINT Id$

240

PRINT

250 !

260 PRINT "Counter Used . ..'I

270 OUTPUT OResponse;"*IDN?"

280

ENTER OResponse;Id$

290

PRINT Id$

300 PRINT

310 !

320

OUTPUT QStimulus;":OUTPUT ON"

330 !

340 PRINT

350

PRINT "INPUT [mvl","OUTPUT CkHz]"

360

PRINT tf---------- II,II ------------II

370 PRINT

380 !

390 FOR Testpoint=First TO Last

400

OUTPUT OStimulus;":SOURCE:VOLT ";VAL$(Testpoint/lOOO);";*OPC?"

410

420

430

440

ENTER OStimulus;Dummy

OUTPUT OResponse;":MEAS:FREq?"

ENTER QResponse;Reading

PRINT Testpoint,Reading/lOOO

450

NEXT Testpoint

460 !

470 OUTPUT QSource;":OUTPUT OFF"

480

END

Program Comments. Lines 20 to 70: Declare variables and I/O paths for instruments. I/O paths let you use a name for an instrument in

OUTPUT and ENTER statements,instead of a numeric address.

80 to 100: Assign values to the input test limits in mV.

110 to 130: Clear the instrument HP-IB interfaces.

140 to 160: Reset each instrument to a known measurement state.

170 to 190: Print the test report title.

200 to 310: Query measurement instruments'identifications for test traceability.

320 to 330: Connect the source output signal to the output terminals.

340 to 380: Print results table header.

390 to 460: This is the main measurement loop. Line 400 contains two commands.

:SOURce:VOLT sets the output level of the source.

*OPC? is used to signal that the preceding command has finished executing. To make an accurate measurement, the source output must be allowed to settle. When the output has settled, *OPC? places

1-78 Getting Started Programming

a 1 in the source Output Queue. The program waits at line 410 until the 1 returned by *OPC? is entered.

Note that following each OUTPUT containing a query is an ENTER to retrieve the queried value. If you do not use paired OUTPUT

S and

ENTER

S

, you can overwrite data in the instrument Output Queue and generate instrument errors.

470 to 480: Disconnect output terminals of the instruments from the unit under test, and end the program. All HP BASIC programs must have END as the last statement of the main program.

Getting Started Programming 1-79

Details of

Commands and

Responses

In This Subsection

This subsection describes the syntax of SCPI commands and responses. It provides many examples of the data types used for command parameters and response data. The following topics are explained:

Program Message These paragraphs explain how to properly

Syntax construct the messages you send from the computer to instruments.

Response Message These paragraphs discuss the format of

Syntax messages sent from instruments to the computer.

SCPI Data Types These paragraphs explain the types of data contained in program and response messages.

Program Message

These paragraphs examine the construction of SCPI program

Syntax

messages in more detail. Recall that program messages are the messages you send from the computer to an instrument. These program messages contain commands combined with appropriate punctuation and program message terminators. Figure 1-29 illustrates the simplified syntax of a program message.

subsystem command

A common command b

A b

<new line> A END

NOTES:

<new line> = ASCII character decimal 10

“ E N D = EOI asserted concurrent with last byte

Figure l-29. Simplified Program Message Syntax

As Figure l-29 shows, you can send common commands and subsystem commands in the same message. If you send more than one command in the same message, you must separate them with

l-80 Getting Started Programming

a semicolon. You must always end a program message with one of the three program message terminators shown in Figure l-29.

Use <new line>, C-END>, or <new line> <*END> as the program message terminator. The word <-END>> means that EOI is asserted on the HP-IB interface at the same time the preceding data byte is sent. Most programming languages send these terminators automatically. For example, if you use the HP BASIC OUTPUT statement, <new line> is automatically sent after your last data byte. If you are using a PC, you can usually configure the system to send whatever terminator you specify.

Subsystem Command Syntax

Figure l-30 describes the basic syntax of SCPI subsystem commands.

\

A b

NOlE

SP = white space, ASCII characters 0 ,,, to 9 ,. and 11 ,. to 32 ,.

Figure l-30. Simplified Subsystem Command Syntax

As Figure l-30 shows, there must be a <space> between the last command mnemonic and the first parameter in a subsystem command. This is one of the few places in SCPI where <space> is required. Note that if you send more than one parameter with a single command, you must separate adjacent parameters with a comma. Parameter types are explained later in this subsection.

Common Command Syntax

Figure 1-31 describes the syntax of common commands.

Getting Started Programming

1-8 1

mnemonic

NOTE:

SP = white space, ASCII characters 0 ,. to 9 ,. and 11 ,. to 32 ,.

Figure l-31. Simplified Common Command Syntax

As with subsystem commands, use a <space> to separate a command mnemonic from subsequent parameters. Separate adjacent parameters with a comma. Parameter types are explained later in this subsection.

Response Message

Figure l-32 shows a simplified view of response message syntax.

Syntax

v

l response data

Figure l-32. Simplified Response Message Syntax

Response messages can contain both commas and semicolons as separators. When a single query command returns multiple values, a comma separates each data item. When multiple queries are sent in the same message, the groups of data items corresponding to each query are separated by a semicolon. For example, the fictitious query

: QUERYl? : qUERY2? might return a response message of:

<datal>,Cdatal>;<data2>,Cdata2>

Response data types are explained later in this subsection. Note that

<new line><-END> is always sent as a response message terminator.

l-82 Getting Started Programming

SCPI Data Types

These paragraphs explain the data types available for parameters and response data. They list the types available and present examples for each type. SCPI defines different data formats for use in program messages and response messages. It does this to accommodate the principle of forgiving listening and precise talking. Recall that forgiving listening means instruments are flexible, accepting commands and parameters in various formats. Precise talking means an instrument always responds to a particular query in a predefined, rigid format. Parameter data types are designed to be flexible in the spirit of forgiving listening. Conversely, response data types are defined to meet the requirements of precise talking.

Table 1-3. SCPI Data Types

Parameter Types

Numeric

Extended Numeric

Response Data Types

Real or Integer integer

Discrete

Boolean

String

Block

Discrete

Numeric

Boolean

String

Definite Length Block

Indefinite Length Block

Non-decimal Numeric Hexadecimal

Octal

Binary

Notice that each parameter type has one or more corresponding response data types. For example, a setting that you program using a numeric parameter returns either real or integer response data when queried. Whether real or integer response data is returned depends on the instrument used. However, precise talking requires that the response data type be clearly defined for a particular instrument and query. The instrument command dictionary generally contains information about data types for individual commands. The following paragraphs explain each parameter and response data type in more detail.

Parameter Types

Numeric Parameters. Numeric parameters are used in both subsystem commands and common commands. Numeric parameters accept all commonly used decimal representations of numbers including optional signs, decimal points, and scientific notation.

If an instrument setting programmed with a numeric parameter can only assume a finite number of values, the instrument automatically

Getting Started Programming 1-83

rounds the parameter. For example, if an instrument has a programmable output impedance of 50 or 75 ohms, you specified

76.1

for output impedance, the value is rounded to 75. If the instrument setting can only assume integer values, it automatically rounds the value to an integer. For example, sending *ESE 10.123

is the same as sending *ESE 10.

Examples of numeric parameters:

100

no decimal point required

100.

-1.23

fractional digits optional leading signs allowed

4.56e<space>3

space allowed after e in exponentials

-7.89E-01

+256

.5

use either E or e in exponentials leading + allowed digits left of decimal point optional

Extended Numeric Parameters. Most measurement related subsystems use extended numeric parameters to specify physical quantities.

Extended numeric

parameters accept all numeric parameter values and other special values as well. All extended numeric parameters accept MAXimum and MINimum as values. Other special values, such as UP and DOWN may be available as documented in the instrument’s command dictionary. Note that MINimum and

MAXimum can be used to set or query values. The query forms are useful for determining the range of values allowed for a given parameter.

In some instruments, extended numeric parameters accept engineering unit suffixes as part of the parameter value. Refer to the command summary to see if this capability exists.

Note that extended numeric parameters are not used for common commands or STAT

US

subsystem commands.

Examples of extended numeric parameters:

100.

-1.23

4.56eCspace>3

-7.89E-01

+256

.5

any simple numeric values largest valid setting

MAX

MIN

-100 mV

valid setting nearest negative infinity negative

100

millivolts

1-84 Getting Started Programming

Discrete Parameters. Use

discrete parameters

to program settings that have a finite number of values. Discrete parameters use mnemonics to represent each valid setting. They have a long and a short form, just like command mnemonics. You can used mixed upper and lower case letters for discrete parameters.

Examples of discrete parameters used with the ROSCillator subsystem:

INTernal

internal frequency standard

EXTernal

external frequency standard

NONE

no frequency standard, free run mode

Although discrete parameters values look like command keywords, do not confuse the two. In particular, be sure to use colons and spaces properly. Use a colon to separate command mnemonics from each other. Use a space to separate parameters from command mnemonics.

Boolean Parameters. Boolean parameters represent

a

single binary condition that is either true or false. There are only four possible values for a Boolean parameter.

Examples of Boolean parameters:

1

ON

Boolean TRUE, upper/lower case allowed

OFF

Boolean FALSE, upper/lower case allowed

0

Boolean TRUE

Boolean FALSE

Response Data Types

Real Response Data. A large portion of all measurement data are formatted as

real

response data. Real response data are decimal numbers in either fixed decimal notation or scientific notation. In general, you do not need to worry about the rules for formatting real data, or whether fixed decimal or scientific notation is used.

Most high level programming languages that support instrument I/O handle either type transparently.

Examples of real response data:

1.23E+O

-1.OE+2

+l.OE+2

0.5E+O

1.23

-100.0

+100.0

0.5

Getting Started Programming 1-85

Integer Response Data.

Integer

response data are decimal representations of integer values including optional signs. Most status register related queries return integer response data.

Examples of integer response data:

0 signs are optional

+100

leading + sign allowed

-100

leading sign allowed

256

never any decimal point

Discrete Response Data.

Discrete

response data are similar to discrete parameters. The main difference is that discrete response data return only the short form of a particular mnemonic, in all uppercase letters.

Examples of discrete response data:

INTernal

level internally

DIODe

PMETer

MMHead

level using an external diode level using an external power meter level using a mm-wave source module

String Response Data.

String

response data are similar to string parameters. The main difference is that string response data use only double quotes as delimiters, rather than single quotes. Embedded double quotes may be present in string response data. Embedded quotes appear as two adjacent double quotes with no characters between them.

Examples of string response data:

"This IS valid"

"SO IS THIS "" "

"I said, II "Hello ! II II II

1-88 Getting Started Programming

Programming

Typical

Measurements

In This Subsection

This subsection illustrates how the general SCPI concepts presented in previous subsections apply to programming real measurements.

To introduce you to programming with SCPI, we must list the commands for the swept signal generator. We will begin with a simplified example.

Using the Example

Programs

The example programs are interactive. They require active participation by the operator. If you desire to get an understanding of the principles without following all of the instructions, read the

“Program Comments” paragraphs to follow the programmed activity.

The HP-IB select code is assumed to be preset to 7. All example programs in this section expect the swept signal generator’s HP-IB address to be decimal 19.

To find the present HP-IB address, use the front panel.

Press SYSTEM (MENU).

Select HP-IB Menu adrs Menu My Adrs.

The active entry area indicates the present decimal address. If the number displayed is not 19, reset it to 19.

Press (iJ @ (ENTER). If the swept signal generator does not respond to a front panel address change, set the HP-IB address switch (rear and interface language.

Now check that the interface language is set to SCPI.

Press (PRIOR).

An asterisk denotes the selected interface language. If an asterisk is not next to the SCPI key label, select Power Up Language SCPI .

Getting Started Programming l-87

Use of the Command Tables

In Table 1-4, notice that a new column titled “Allowed Values” has been added to the command table. This column lists the specific values or range of values allowed for each parameter. A vertical bar

(I) separates values in a list from which you must choose one value.

The commands listed in the table are only part of all the available

SCPI commands of the swept signal generator. For a complete listing of the programming codes see “SCPI Command Summary” in

Chapter 2, “Operating and Programming Reference”.

Table 1-4. Sample Swept Signal Generator Commands

Command

:ALibration

Parameters

:PMETer

:FLATness

:INITiate? flatness array to cal

:NEXT?

measured power

ORRection

:FLATness 801 freqcorrection pairs

REQuency

:CENTer center freq

Parameter Type discrete extended numeric extended numeric extended numeric

Allowed Values

USER(DIODE]PMETer]MMHead

<num> [lvl suffix]

{ <num> [freq suffix],

DB}2*801

[:CW]

:AUTO

CW freq extended numeric

Boolean specified freq range

~AXimum(MINimum]UP]DOWN specified freq range or MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

ON]OFF]l]O

:MODE

:STARt coupled to center freq free mode start freq discrete extended numeric

CW]SWEep]LIST specified freq range or MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

:STEP

:AUTO auto freq step

[:INCRement] freq step

Boolean extended numeric

:STOP

ARKer[n]

:FREQuency stop freq marker frequency extended numeric extended numeric

ON]OFF]l]O

20 to 0.01 dB or

MAXimum(MINimum specified freq range or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

[n] is 1 to 5, 1 is the default specified freq range or MAXimumjMINimum l-88 Getting Started Programming

Table 1-4. Sample Swept Signal Generator Commands (continued)

Parameter Type Allowed Values Command Parameters

:POWer

:ATTenuation atten setting extended numeric

:AUTO

[:LEVel] coupled atten output level

Boolean extended numeric

Boolean

0 to 90 [DB] or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

ON]OFF]l]o specified power range or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP(DOWN

ON,OFF,l,O

:STATe

:SWEep

RF on/off

:GENeration type of sweep

:TIME sweep time

:AUTO

:LLIMit auto sweep time switch fastest sweep time discrete extended numeric

Boolean extended numeric

STEPpedlANALog

200s

to

133 m.5 or

MAXimumlMINimum

ON,OFF]l]O

<num>[time suffix] or

MAXimumlMINimum

Getting Started Programming l-89

HP-IB Check, Example

This first program is to verify that the HP-IB connections and

Program 1

interface are functional. Connect a controller to the swept signal generator via an HP-IB cable. Clear and reset the controller and type in the following program:

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Source=719

ABORT 7

LOCAL Source

CLEAR Source

REMOTE Source

CLS

PRINT “The source should now be in REMOTE.”

PRINT “Verify that the ‘REMOTE’ LED is on.”

END

Run the program and verify that the REMOTE LED is lit on the swept signal generator. If it is not, verify that the swept signal generator address is set to 19 and that the interface cable is properly connected.

If the controller display indicates an error message, it is possible that the program was entered in incorrectly. If the controller accepts the REMOTE statement but the swept signal generator REMOTE

LED does not turn on, perform the operational checks as outlined in the respective Operating and Service Manuals to find the defective device.

Program Comments

10: Set up a variable to contain the HP-IB address of the source.

20: Abort any bus activity and return the HP-IB interfaces to their reset states.

30: Place the source into LOCAL to cancel any Local Lockouts that may have been set up.

40: Reset the source’s parser and clear any pending output from the source. Prepare the source to receive new commands.

50: Place the source into REMOTE.

60: Clear the display of the computer.

70: Print a message to the computer’s display.

l-90 Getting Started Programming

Local Lockout

When the swept signal generator is in REMOTE mode, all the front

Demonstration,

panel keys are disabled except the LOCAL key. But, when the

Example Program 2

LOCAL LOCKOUT command is set on the bus, even the LOCAL key is disabled. The LOCAL command, executed from the controller, is then the only way to return all ( or selected) instruments to front panel control.

Continue example program 1. Delete line 90 END and type in the following commands:

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

90

100

240

PRINT "Verify that all keys are ignored, except the 'LOCAL' key."

PRINT "Verify that 'LOCAL' causes the

REMOTE LED to go OFF."

PRINT ' . . . . . press CONTINUE"

PAUSE

REMOTE Source

LOCAL LOCKOUT 7

PRINT

PRINT "Source should now be in LOCAL LOCKOUT mode."

PRINT "Verify that all keys (including 'LOCAL') have no effect."

PRINT " . . . . . press CONTINUE"

PAUSE

LOCAL Source

PRINT

PRINT "Source should now be in LOCAL mode."

PRINT "Verify that the swept signal generator's keyboard is functional."

END

To verify and investigate the different remote modes do the following:

1. Reset the controller.

2. On the swept signal generator: Press (PRESET).

3. Clear the controller display and run the program.

4. Verify that the REMOTE LED on the swept signal generator is lit.

5. From the front panel, attempt to change the start frequency and verify that this is impossible.

6. Verify that all keys except (LOCAL) are disabled.

7. Now press the (LOCAL) key and verify that the swept signal generator REMOTE LED is off and that you can modify any of the sweep functions.

8. Execute a “continue” on the controller. With the controller displaying “LOCAL LOCKOUT mode”, verify that the swept signal generator REMOTE LED is again lit.

Getting Started Programming l-9 1

HINT

9. Attempt to change the start frequency and press (PRESET). Verify that this is impossible.

10. Now press the swept signal generator (i?%iiJ key and verify that still no action is taken.

11. Execute a “continue” on the controller. With the controller displaying “LOCAL mode”, verify that the swept signal generator REMOTE LED is off. Also verify that all sweep functions now can be modified via the front panel controls.

Note that the swept signal generator (i?ZiiJ key produces the same result as programming LOCAL 719 or LOCAL 7. Be careful because the LOCAL 7 command places all instruments on the HP-IB in the local state as opposed to just the swept signal generator.

Program Comments

90 to 120: Print a message on the computer’s display, then pause.

130: Place the source into REMOTE.

140: Place the source into LOCAL LOCKOUT mode.

150 to 190: Print a message on the computer’s display, then pause.

200: Return the source to local control.

210 to 230: Print a message on the computer’s display.

1-92 Getting Started Programming

Setting Up A Typical

In swept operation, the swept signal generator is programmed for the

Sweep, Example

proper sweep frequency range, sweep time, power level, and marker

Program 3

frequencies for a test measurement. This program sets up the swept signal generator for a general purpose situation. The instrument is the same as in program 1. Clear and reset the controller and type in the following program:

20

30

40

50

10 Source=719

ABORT 7

LOCAL 7

CLEAR Source

REMOTE Source

60

70

80

OUTPUT Source;"*RST"

OUTPUT Source;"FREQuency:MODE SWEep"

OUTPUT Source;"FREQuency:STARt 4 GHZ"

90

OUTPUT Source;"FREQuency:STOP 7 GHz"

100 OUTPUT Source;"POWer:LEVel -5 DBM"

110 OUTPUT Source;"SWEep:TIME 500MS"

120

130

140

OUTPUT Source;":MARKerl:STATe 0N;FREQuency 4.5GHZ"

OUTPUT Source;"MARKer2:STATe 0N;FREQuency 6111E6"

OUTPUT Source;"*OPC?"

150

160

170

ENTER Source;X

OUTPUT Source;"POWer:STATe ON"

OUTPUT Source;"INITIate:CONTinuous ON"

180 CLS

190 PRINT "Source setup complete."

200

210

220

230

PRINT "Verify that the source is sweeping from"

PRINT "4 GHz to 7 GHz at a power of -5 dBm,"

PRINT "with a sweeptime of 0.5 seconds."

END

Run the program.

Program Comments

10: Assign the source’s HP-IB address to a variable.

20 to 50: Abort any HP-IB activity and initialize the HP-IB interface.

60: Set the source toitsinitial state for programming. The *RST state is not the same as the PRESET state. For complete details of the instrument state at *RST, see “SCPI Command Summary," in Chapter 2.

70: Select the frequency mode to be SWEEP instead of the default sweep mode of “CW” that was selected with *RST.

80: Set the source start frequency to 4 GHz.

90: Set the source stop frequency to 7 GHz. Note the optional usage of the short-form mnemonic, “FREQ”.

100: Set the source’s power level to -5 dBm.

Getting Started Programming 1-93

l-94 Getting Started Programming

110: Set the sweeptime to 500 ms. Notice that upper/lower case in commands does not matter. Also spaces before the suffix (“MS”) are not required in SCPI.

120 and 130: Set markers 1 and 2 to a fixed value. Notice that the value for marker 2 does not end with a frequency suffix. Hertz is a default terminator and is understood.

140: Wait until the source has completed setting up the commands that have been sent so far before turning on the output.

150: The ENTER statement causes the program to wait here until the source responds to the previous *OPC? with a ‘1’.

160: The source has now completed processing the commands.

The RF frequency, power, and markers are at their programmed values. Turn on the RF output of the source.

170: Select a continuously initiated sweep instead of the default mode of non-continuous that was selected with *RST.

180: Clear the computer’s display.

190 to 220: Print a message on the computer’s display.

Queries, Example

The following example demonstrates the use of query commands and

Program 4

response data formats. Clear and reset the controller and type in the following program:

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40

Run the program.

Source=719

ABORT 7

LOCAL 7

CLEAR Source

REMOTE Source

CLS

OUTPUT Source;"*RST"

OUTPUT Source;"POWER:LEVEL -5 dBm;STATE ON"

OUTPUT Source;"FREQ:CW?"

ENTER Source;F

PRINT "Present source CW frequency is : ";F/l.E+6;"MHz"

OUTPUT Source;"POWER:STATE?"

ENTER Source;W

PRINT "Present power ON/OFF state is : ";W

OUTPUT Source;"FREQ:MODE?"

DIM A$[101

ENTER Source;A$

PRINT "Source's frequency mode is : "&A$

OUTPUT Source;"FREQ:CW? MIN"

ENTER Source;A

PRINT "Minimum source CW frequency is : ";A/l.'E+6;"MHz"

OUTPUT Source;"FREQ:START?;STOP?"

ENTER Source;X,Y

PRINT "Swept frequency limits :I'

PRINT " Start ";X/l.E+6;"MHz"

PRINT ' Stop ";Y/l.E+G;"MHz"

END

Program Comments

10: Assign the source’s HP-IB address to a variable.

20 to 50: Abort any HP-IB activity and initialize the HP-IB interface.

60: Clear the computer’s display.

70: Set the source to its initial state for programming.

80: Set up the source power level using a compound message.

90: Query the value of the source’s CW frequency.

100: Enter the query response into the variable ‘F’. The response always is returned in fundamental units, Hz in the case of frequency.

110: Print the CW Frequency in MHz on the computer display.

120: Query the value of a Boolean function, POWER:STATE.

Getting Started Programming 1-95

l-96 Getting Started Programming

130: Enter the query response into a variable ‘W’. Boolean responses are always ‘1’ for ON and ‘0’ for OFF.

140: Print the value of the POWER:STATE on the computer display.

150: Query the value of a discrete function (FREQ:MODE).

160: Dimension a string variable to contain the response.

170: Enter the response into A$. The response will be a string that represents the function’s present value.

180: Print the value of A$ on the computer display.

190: Example usage of a MIN query. This will request the maximum value that the FREQ:CW function can be programmed to.

200: Enter the numeric response into the variable A.

210: Print the value of A on the computer display.

220: This is compound query. Up to 8 parameters can be queried from the swept signal generator at one time using this method. In this example, the start and stop frequencies are interrogated.

230: The responses are read back into the variables X and Y. The order of the responses is the same as the order of the queries. X will contain the START frequency and Y will contain the STOP.

240 to 260: Print the START/STOP frequencies on the display.

Saving and Recalling

When a typical sweep, like example program 3, is set up, the

States, Example

complete front panel state may be saved for later use in non-volatile

Program 5

memories called registers 1 through 8. This can be done remotely as a part of a program. Clear and reset the controller and type in the following program:

10

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50

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70

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190

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210

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230

80

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120

130

Run the program.

Source=719

ABORT 7

LOCAL 7

CLEAR Source

REMOTE Source

CLS

OUTPUT Source;“*RST;FREQ:MODE SWE;STAR 4GHZ

;STOP 5GHZ;:INIT:CONT ON”

OUTPUT Source; “*SAV 1”

CLS

PRINT “A sweeping state has been saved in REGISTER 1.”

OUTPUT Source;“*RST;FREQ:CW 1.23456GHZ;:POW:LEV -1DBM”

OUTPUT Source; “*SAV 2”

PRINT “A CW state has been saved in REGISTER 2 .‘I

PRINT ‘I. . . . . Press Continue”

PAUSE

OUTPUT Source ; “*RCL 1”

PRINT “Register 1 recalled. Verify source is sweeping.”

PRINT “Press Continue. ”

PAUSE

OUTPUT Source ; “*RCL 2”

PRINT “Register 2 recalled. ‘I

PRINT “Verify source is in CW mode. I’

END

Program Comments

10: Assign the source’s HP-IB address to a variable.

20 to 50: Abort any HP-IB activity and initialize the HP-IB interface.

60: Clear the computer’s display.

70: Set up the source for a sweeping state. Note the combination of several commands into a single message. This single line is equivalent to the following lines:

OUTPUT Source; “*RST”

OUTPUT Source ; “FREQ : MODE SWEepI’

OUTPUT Source; “FREQ : STARt 4 GHZ”

OUTPUT Source ; “FREQ : STOP 5 GHZ”

OUTPUT Source; “INIT: CONT ON”

80: Save this state into storage register 1.

Getting Started Programming l-97

l-96 Getting Started Programming

90: Clear the computer display.

100: Print a message on the computer display.

110: Set up the source for a CW state. Note the combination of several commands into a single message. This single line is equivalent to the following lines:

OUTPUT Source;"*RST"

OUTPUT Source;"FREQ:CW 1.23456 GHZ"

OUTPUT Source;"POWer:LEVel -1 DBM"

120: Save this state into storage register 2.

130 to 150: Print a message on the computer display and pause.

160: Recall the instrument state from register 1. It should contain the sweeping state.

170 to 190: Print a message on the computer display and pause.

200: Recall the instrument state from register 2. It should contain the CW state.

210 and 220: Print messages on the computer display.

Looping and

Clear and reset the controller and type in the following program:

Synchronization,

Example Program 6

10 Source=719

20 ABORT 7

30

LOCAL 7

40

CLEAR Source

50 REMOTE Source

60 CLS

70 OUTPUT Source;"*RST"

80

OUTPUT Source;"FREQ:START 4 GHZ; STOP 5 GHZ; MODE SWEEP"

90 OUTPUT Source;"POWER:LEVEL -1 DBM; STATE ON"

100 OUTPUT Source;"SWEEP:TIME 1"

110 OUTPUT Source;"*OPC?"

120

ENTER Source;X

130 REPEAT

140

150

160

DISP "Enter number of sweeps to take :

INPUT N

IF N>O THEN

170

180

FOR I=1 TO N

190

200

210

220 END IF

230 UNTIL N=O

OUTPUT Source;"INIT:IMM;*OPC?"

ENTER \

NEXT I

240

END

CO to exit]";

Run the program.

Program Comments

10: Assign the source’s HP-IB address to a variable.

20 to 50: Abort any HP-IB activity and initialize the HP-IB interface.

60: Clear the computer’s display.

70: Set the source to its initial state for programming.

80: Set up the frequency parameters using a compound message.

90: Set up the source's power level and state using a compound message.

100: Set up the source's sweep time to 1 second.

110: Send the *OPC? commandtothe sourcetoensure that the previous commands are completed and the source is ready to begin controlled sweeps.

120: Enter the response to the “OPC? into the variable X. The response should be a '1'.

130: Start of the loop.

Getting Started Programming l-99

140 and 150: Prompt the operator for the number of sweeps to take. The number of sweeps to take is stored in the variable N.

Enter 0 to quit the program.

160: Don’t take any sweeps if N is less than 0.

170: Start a FOR/NEXT loop to take N sweeps.

180: Display the number of this sweep on the computer display.

190: Initiate a single sweep on the source and then wait until the pending operation is complete. Return a ‘1’ when the sweep completes.

200: Enter the response to the *OPC? into the variable X. The program execution will halt on this ENTER statement until the sweep is finished.

210: Repeat the 1NIT:IMM sequence N times.

220: End of the IF statement to skip sweeps if N is negative.

230: Exit the program if the value of N is 0.

l-100 Getting Started Programming

Using the *WAI

Command, Example

Program 7

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120

10

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40

50

180

190

200

210

220

130

140

150

160

170

The following example illustrates the use of the *WA1 command to cause the swept signal generator to perform a synchronous sweep.

Source=719

ABORT 7

LOCAL 7

CLEAR Source

REMOTE Source

CLS

OUTPUT Source;"*RST"

OUTPUT Source;"FREQ:STAR 4GHZ; STOP SGHZ; MODE SWE"

OUTPUT Source;"SWE:TIME 2"

OUTPUT Source;"*OPC?"

ENTER Source;X

FOR I=1 TO 4

OUTPUT Source;"INIT"

OUTPUT Source;"*WAI"

OUTPUT Source;"POW:STAT ON"

OUTPUT Source;"INIT"

OUTPUT Source;"*WAI"

OUTPUT Source;"POW:STAT OFF"

NEXT I

PRINT "Finished sending commands to source."

PRINT "Note that execution is continuing for four cycles."

END

Run the program.

Program Comments

10: Assign the source’s HP-IB address to a variable.

20 to 50: Abort any HP-IB activity and initialize the HP-IB interface.

60: Clear the computer’s display.

70: Set the source to its initial state for programming.

80: Set the source up for a sweep, from 4 GHz to 5 GHz.

90: Set the sweep time to 2 seconds. In SCPI, suffixes are optional if you program in fundamental units (for sweep time, that would be seconds).

100: Send an ‘OPC? to the source.

110: Enter the query response to the *OPC? into a variable “X”.

The program execution will halt here until the source has finished processing all the commands up to this point. Once complete, the source will respond to the *OPC? with a “1”.

120: Begin a FOR/NEXT loop that is repeated four times.

130: Initiate a sweep on the source.

Getting Started Programming 1-l 0 1

140: Send a *WA1 command to the source. This command causes the source to stop executing new commands until all prior commands and operations have completed execution. In this case, there is a sweep in progress, so no further commands will be executed until the sweep finishes.

150: Turn the RF output of the source ON.

160: Initiate a sweep on the source.

170: Send another *WA1 to the source. Although the *WA1 command causes EXECUTION of commands to be held off, it has no effect on the transfer of commands over the HP-IB. The commands continue to be accepted by the source and are buffered until they can be executed.

180: Toggle the RF STATE to OFF.

190: Repeat the sample exercise.

200 and 210: Print messages on the computer display.

1-l 02 Getting Started Programming

Using the User Flatness

The following program interrogates the swept signal generator and

Correction Commands,

an HP 437B power meter for frequency and power information

Example Program 8

respectively. The swept signal generator is programmed to sweep from 2 to 20 GHz, with frequency-correction pairs every 100 MHz and +5 dBm leveled output power. For this example, we assume that the path losses do not exceed 5 dBm and that the HP 437B power meter already has its power sensor’s calibration factors stored in sensor data table 0. If another power meter is used, the power sensor’s calibration factors will have to be stored in a look-up table. Modify the program to suit your particular measurement requirements. Up to 801 points may be entered in the user flatness correction table with this program.

SCPI commands are used to set up the source parameters and enter correction frequencies and data into the correction table.

80

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

10

20

30

40

50

60

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170

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230

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310

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330

340

350

250

260

270

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290

I

I

!ASSIGN THE ADDRESS TO THE SOURCE AND POWER METER

DIM A$[5000],B$[5000]

ASSIGN @Source TO 719

ASSIGN @Meter TO 713

INTEGER Error-flag

ABORT 7

!SET UP SOURCE

OUTPUT QSource;"*RST"

OUTPUT OSource;"FREQ:MODE SWE;STAR 2 GHZ;STOP 20 GHZ"

OUTPUT QSource;"SWEEP:TIME 200

MS”

OUTPUT OSource;"POW:LEV 5 DBM;:INIT:CONT ON"

OUTPUT OSource;"*OPC?"

ENTER OSource;Done

!SET UP POWER METER

OUTPUT OMeter;"PR"

OUTPUT QMeter;"FA"

OUTPUT QMeter;"TRO"

!ZERO POWER METER

OUTPUT OSource;"POW:STAT OFF"

Zero-meter(OMeter,OSource,Error_flag)

IF Error-flag THEN

BEEP

CLEAR SCREEN

PRINT "ERROR:METER DID NOT COMPLETE ZEROING OPERATION!"

ELSE

!SET UP CORRECTION FREQUENCIES IN USER FLATNESS CORRECTION TABLE

!OUTPUT OSource;"CORR:FLAT 'I;

Start_freq=2

Stop_freq=20

Increment=1

N=(((Stop-freq-Start,freq)/Increment)+l)

Getting Started Programming 1-l 03

730

740

750

760

770

780

660

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680

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720

790

800

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420

Freq=Start-freq

FOR I=1 TO N

A$=A$&VAL$(Freq)C"GHZ,Odb,"

Freq=Freq+Increment

NEXT I

B=LEN(A$)

B=B-1

!

B$=A$ cl ,Bl

OUTPUT OSource;"CORR:FLAT ";B$

! OUTPUT QSource;"POW:STAT ON"

!

!ENTER DATA IN USER CORRECTION TABLE

OUTPUT OSource;"CAL:PMET:FLAT:INIT? USER"

ENTER QSource;Freq

WHILE Freq>O

Power=FNRead-meter(OMeter,Freq)

OUTPUT QSource;"CAL:PMET:FLAT:NEXT? ";VAL$(Power);"DBM"

ENTER QSource;Freq

END WHILE

END IF

END

SUB Zero-meter(@Meter,QSource,INTEGER Error-flag)

OUTPUT OSource;"Pow:stat off"

OUTPUT QMeter;"CS"

OUTPUT OMeter;"ZE"

Max-attempts=30

Attempts=0

Zeroing=1590

Finished=0

WHILE Zeroing AND NOT Finished

Attempts=Attempts+l

Meter-stat=SPOLL(OMeter)

IF Attrmpts>Max-attempts THEN Zeroing=0

IF BIT(Meter-stat,11 THEN Finished=1

WAIT 1

END WHILE

OUTPUT QSource;"Pow:stat on"

IF NOT Zeroing THEN

Error-flag=1

ELSE

Error-flag=0

END IF

I

SUBEND

DEF FNRead-meter(QMeter,Freq)

OUTPUT OMeter*"SEOEN"

Freq$=VAL$(Friq)

OUTPUT QMeter;"FR"&Freq$t"GZ"

OUTPUT OMeter*"TRZ"

ENTER OMeter;Power$

1-l 04

Getting Started Programming

870 PO=VAL(Power$)

880

890

900

910

Flips=0

Slope=0

REPEAT

920

930

940

OUTPUT OMeter*"TR2"

ENTER BMeter;bower$

Pl=VAL(Power$)

950

960

970

980

990

1000

Slope2=SGN(PO-Pl)

IF Slope2Slope THEN

Flips=Flips+l

Slope2=Slope

ELSE

IF Slope2=0 THEN Flips=Flips+.2

END IF

PO=Pl 1010

1020

1030

UNTIL Flips>=3

Power=(PO+P1)/2

1040 RETURN Power

1050 FNEND

Getting Started Programming l- 105

Programming the

Status System

In This Subsection

This subsection discusses the structure of the status system used in

SCPI instruments, and explains how to program status registers. An important feature of SCPI instruments is that they all implement status registers the same way. The status system is explained in the following paragraphs:

General Status These paragraphs explain the way that status

Register Model registers are structured in SCPI instruments. It also contains an example of how bits in the various registers change with different input conditions.

Required These paragraphs describe the minimum required

Status Groups status registers present in SCPI instruments. These status registers cover the most frequently used functions.

General Status Register

The generalized status register model shown in Figure l-33 is the

Model

building block of the SCPI status system. This model consists of a condition register, a transition filter, an event register and an enable register. A set of these registers is called a

status group.

Bit 0

Bit 1

Bit 2

Bit 3

Bit Name f

Bit Number

Condition

Register

Transition

Filter

Event

Register

Enable

Register

*

Summary

Bit

Figure l-33. Generalized Status Register Model

When a status group is implemented in an instrument, it always contains all of the component registers. However, there is

not

always a corresponding command to read or write to every register.

Condition Register

The

condition register

continuously monitors the hardware and firmware status of the instrument. There is no latching or buffering for this register, it is updated in real time. Condition registers are read-only.

l-1 06 Getting Started Programming

There may or may not be a command to read a particular condition register.

Transition Filter

The

transition filter

specifies which types of bit state changes in the condition register will set corresponding bits in the event register.

Transition filter bits may be set for positive transitions (PTR), negative transitions (

NTR

), or both. Positive means a condition bit changes from 0 to 1. Negative means a condition bit changes from 1 to 0. Transition filters are read-write. Transition filters are unaffected by *CLS (clear status) or queries. They are set to instrument dependent values at power on and after *RST.

Event Register

The

event register

latches transition events from the condition register, as specified by the transition filter. Bits in the event register are latched, and once set they remain set until cleared by a query or a *CLS (clear status). There is no buffering, so while an event bit is set, subsequent events corresponding to that bit are ignored. Event registers are read-only.

Enable Register

The

enable register

specifies the bits in the event register that can generate a summary bit. The instrument logically ANDs corresponding bits in the event and enable registers, and ORs all the resulting bits to obtain a summary bit. Summary bits are in turn recorded in the Status Byte. Enable registers are read-write.

Querying an enable register does not affect it. There is always a command to read and write to the enable register of a particular status group.

An Example Sequence

Figure l-34 illustrates the response of a single bit position in a typical status group for various settings. The changing state of the condition in question is shown at the bottom of the figure. A small binary table shows the state of the chosen bit in each status register at the selected times Tl to T5.

Getting Started Programming l-1 07

Case A

Case B

Case C

Case D al z i$E;

Gc

-2

+=tllE

S&G

Condition

Afrbu-

Tl

T2 T3 ti f-5

Figure l-34. Typical Status Register Bit Changes l-1 08 Getting Started Programming

Programming the

Trigger System

In This Subsection

This subsection discusses the layered trigger model used in SCPI instruments. It also outlines some commonly encountered trigger configurations and programming methods. Trigger system topics are explained in the following paragraphs:

Generalized Trigger These paragraphs explain the structure and

Model components of the layered trigger model used in all SCPI instruments.

Common Trigger

Configurations

These paragraphs explain the INIT and TRIG configurations implemented in the swept signal generator.

Trigger Command These paragraphs provide condensed definitions

Definitions for the keywords used in this subsection.

Understanding trigger systems requires more technical expertise than most other topics covered in this section. If you find this subsection difficult, keep in mind that you do not have to program the trigger system to make measurements or output signals. Using MEASure,

READ, or INITiate, you can avoid having to learn the information in this subsection.

Generalized Trigger

Model

Overview

An instrument trigger system synchronizes instrument actions with specified events. An instrument action may be to make a measurement or source an output signal. The events used to synchronize these actions include software trigger commands, changing signal levels, and pulses on BNC connectors. The trigger system also lets you specify the number of times to repeat certain actions, and delays between actions.

Figure l-35 shows a simplified view of the generalized SCPI trigger model. Instruments may implement some or all of this model, to accommodate varying needs. Each unshaded block in Figure l-35 represents a particular

trigger state.

The generalized trigger model allows an arbitrary number of event-detection states. Note that there can be two paths into a state and two paths out of a state. These are called the downward entrance and exit, and the upward entrance and exit.

Upward

means moving towards the idle state and

downward

means moving towards instrument actions.

Getting Started Programming l-109

An instrument moves between adjacent states, depending on its internal conditions and the commands that you send. When you first turn on power to an instrument, it is in the idle state. You can force the instrument to the idle state using :ABORt or *RST.

The initiate and event detection trigger states are essentially a list of conditions that must be satisfied to reach the adjacent states. The sequence operation state signals the instrument hardware to take some action, and listens for a signal that the action has been taken.

Idle

_ :ABORt

*RST

Initiate

Event

Detection # 1

A v

Event

Detection #N

Sequence

Operation

* Instrument

*

Actions

Figure 1-35. Generalized Trigger Model

Details of Trigger States

These paragraphs use flow charts to explain the decision making rules inside each trigger state. These rules govern how the instrument moves between adjacent states. Some of the flow charts reference commands that have not been discussed yet. These commands are explained later in this subsection. Keep in mind that this explanation covers the most general case. Your particular instrument may not implement all of the commands discussed here.

l-1 10 Getting Started Programming

Inside the Idle State. Figure l-36 illustrates the operation of the

idle

state.

c :ABORt

*RST

,I

Figure l-36. Inside the Idle State

Turning power on, or sending *RST or :ABORT forces the trigger system to the idle state. The trigger system remains in the idle state until it is initiated by INITiate: IMMediate or

1NITiate:CONTinuous ON. Once one of these conditions is satisfied, the trigger system exits downward to the

initiate

state. Note that

*RST sets INITiate : CONTinuous OFF.

Whenever the trigger system leaves the idle state, it sets the instrument’s Operation Pending Flag. Returning to idle clears the flag. The

Operation Pending Flag

is a special bit inside the instrument that can affect how the instrument responds to certain commands. You need to know this fact when using *OPC, *OPC?,

*WAI, and other commands.

Inside the Initiate State. Figure l-37 illustrates the operation of the

initiate

state.

:INIT:CONT O N

Figure l-37. Inside the Initiate State

If the trigger system is on a downward path, it travels directly through the initiate state without restrictions. If the trigger system

Getting Started Programming l-l 11

is on an upward path, and 1NITiate:CONTinuous is ON, it exits downward to an event-detection state. If the trigger system is on an upward path and INITiate: CONTinuous is OFF, it exits upward to the idle state.

Inside Event Detection States. Figure l-38 illustrates the operation of an arbitrary event detection state named <state-name>. Typical

<state-names >are TRIGger,

ARM,

STARt , and STOP.

Normal downward execution is controlled by the source command.

SOURce

The : <state-name> : SOURce command specifies which particular input can generate the event required to continue the downward path. If the source chosen is a non-analog signal, such as IMMediate,

BUS, or TIMer, no further qualifications are required to generate an event. If, however, an INTernal or EXTernal analog signal is chosen, additional qualifications may apply. You specify these additional qualifications using appropriate LEVel, SLOPe, and HYSTeresis commands. Sending *RST sets the SOURce to IMMediate .

The downward path also provides a command to override normal operation.

IMMediate

The : <state-name> : IMMediate command bypasses event detection,

ECOunt, and DELay qualifications one time. The upward path through the event detection state contains only one condition. A

: <state-name> :COUNt command sets the number of times the trigger system must successfully exit that event detection state on a downward path. If this condition is satisfied, the trigger system exits upward.

l-l 12

Getting Started Programming

L loop-ctr=o event-ctr=O

I

qualified event detection 1

1 :<state-name>:SIGNal , e v e n t - c t r b y 1

YES wait

:DELay

:<state-name>:IMMediate

Figure l-38. Inside an Event Detection State

Getting Started Programming l-l 13

Inside the Sequence Operation State. Figure l-39 illustrates the operation of the sequence operation state.

The downward entrance to the Sequence Operation State signals that some instrument dependent action should begin at once. An upward exit is not allowed until the instrument signals that its action is complete. Note that complete can be defined differently for different instruments. For example, consider an instrument that can sweep a range of frequencies starting with fr and ending with f2. The action-complete signal can be defined to coincide with the output of either fr or f2.

Figure l-39. Inside the Sequence Operation State l-1 14 Getting Started Programming

Common Trigger

Configurations

In the previous paragraphs, you learned about the basic building blocks allowed in a SCPI trigger system. Generally, an instrument implements only a portion of the trigger features available. These paragraphs discuss the simplest configurations: INIT and TRIG.

The INIT Configuration

The INIT configuration is the simplest possible trigger configuration.

It uses no event detection states, and requires only two subsystems for programming, INITiate and ABORt.

All SCPI instruments implement these two subsystems.

I

Idle

I-

Fl

:ABORt

*RST

Sequence

Operation

* I n s t r u m e n t

Actions

Figure l-40. The INIT Trigger Configuration

Command

Parameters Parameter Type

:CONTinuous

state

Example commands using the INIT trigger configuration:

: ABORt

abort operations, go to idle

:INIT:IMM

execute one sequence operation

:INIT:CONT ON

execute sequence operations continuously

: INIT: CONT OFF

stop sequence operations after the current one is complete

Getting Started Programming 1-115

The TRIG Configuration

Instruments using the

TRIG

configuration include one event detection state named TRIG, and a corresponding TRIGger subsystem. And, all SCPI instruments implement the required

INITiate and ABORt subsystems.

E X T >-

IMMED O-

TRIG

Event Detection

Sequence

I M M E

_I) I n s t r u m e n t . BUS

Actions

EXT

D

Figure 1-41. The TRIG Trigger Configuration

1-118 Getting Started Programming

Description of

The HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators follow the SCPI model

Triggering in the

of triggering. It is a layered model with the structure shown in

HP 8360 B-Series Swept

Figure l-42.

Signal Generators

I

Sweep Started

I

I

Sweep S t a t e

Perform a Sweep

(Frequency, Power,

I

Stepped, List, or Analog) 1

Figure l-42. HP 8380 Simplified Trigger Model

The process of sweeping involves all 3 of these states. The IDLE state is where the sweep begins. The IDLE state is left when the sweep is initiated. This can happen on a continuous basis

(INIT : CONT ON) or on a demand basis (INIT: CONT OFF). The functions of continuous and single sweeps are handled by this command. When the 1NIT:CONT ON command is given, the sweep is continuously re-initiated. When in the OFF state, the sweep is initiated with the INIT: IMMediate command.

Once initiated, the

wait for trigger

state is entered. Here, the trigger signal selected by the TRIG:SOURce command is examined until a

TRUE condition is detected. These trigger signals are:

IMMediate

EXTernal

BUS

This signal is always TRUE.

This is the external trigger input jack. A positive transition on this jack constitutes a TRUE signal.

This signal is the HP-IB <get> (Group Execute

Trigger) message or a *TRG command.

When a TRUE signal is found, the sweep is actually started.

The act of producing the sweep in some cases involves the use of trigger signals. For example, the stepped and list sweeps have modes that allow triggering for point-to-point advancement through the sweep. These trigger signals are selected by individual

TRIG:SOURce commands in the appropriate subsystems (i.e.

LIST:TRIGger:SOURce and SWEep:TRIGger:SOURce). The definition of these signals in the swept signal generator cause the

Getting Started Programming l-l 17

sweep to jump to the next point when the signal becomes TRUE, therefore the first point in the list or stepped sweeps is produced immediately upon starting the sweep. Receiving a trigger signal at the last point causes the IDLE state to be re-entered. Analog sweeps do not use the trigger signals during the sweep (although the trigger signals are needed to start the sweep as described).

The ABORt command resets any sweep in progress and immediately returns the instrument to the IDLE state.

The *WAI, *OPC and *OPC? commands indicate a complete operation at the end of the sweep upon re-entry into the IDLE state.

Advanced Trigger Configurations

Because the SCPI layered trigger model is expandable, many more complex trigger configurations are possible.

Trigger Keyword

The following paragraphs contain condensed definitions of the

Definitions

keywords used in the command tables. Many of the commands in trigger related subsystems are event commancts. Remember that event commands cannot be queried. Similarly, event commands have no related *RST actions or settings. Event commands cause a particular action to take place inside the swept signal generator.

ABORt

The ABORt command forces the trigger system to the idle state. Any measurement or output sequence in process is aborted as quickly as possible.

ABORt

does not alter the settings programmed by other commands, unlike *RST.

ABORt

is a root level event command and cannot be queried.

IMMediate

The IMMediate command provides a one-time override of the normal downward path in an event-detection state. The instrument must be in the specified event detection state when IMMediate is received, or an error is generated and the command has no effect. For example, the instrument must be in the TRIG state for :TRIGger: IMMediate to work properly. If the instrument is in the idle state, the command has no effect, and an error would be generated. IMMediate is an event command and cannot be queried.

ODELay

The ODELay command specifies the time between the source settling and the time the trigger out signal is sent. Specifying

:TRIGger:ODELay <num>(time suffix) instructs the swept signal generator to set the specified time as the delay necessary to ensure proper settling. Sending *RST sets ODELay to an instrument dependent value, usually zero.

1-l 18 Getting Started Programming

SOURce

The SOURce command selects the trigger source for an event-detection state. Only one source can be specified at a time, and all others are ignored. Sending *RST sets SOURce to IMMediate.

The most commonly used sources are: n

BUS

The event detector is satisfied by either Group Execute

Trigger( <GET>) or a

*TRG command. <GET> is a low level

HP-IB message that can be sent using the TRIGGER command in

HP BASIC.

w EXTernal

An external signal connector is selected as the source.

w IMMediate

Qualified events are generated automatically. There is no waiting for a qualified event.

Getting Started Programming l- 119

Related Documents

The International

IEEE Standard 488.1-1987, IEEE Standard Digital Interface for

Institute of Electrical

Programmable Instrumentation. New

York, NY, 1987.

and Electronics

Engineers.

This standard defines the technical details required to design and build an HP-IB interface (IEEE 488.1). This standard contains electrical specifications and information on protocol that is beyond the needs of most programmers. However, it can be useful to clarify formal definitions of certain terms used in related documents.

IEEE Standard 488.2-1987, IEEE Standard Codes, Formats,

Protocols, and Common Commands For Use with ANSI/IEEE Std

488.1-1987. New York, NY, 1987.

This document describes the underlying message formats and data types used in SCPI. It is intended more for instrument firmware engineers than for instrument user/programmers. However, you may find it useful if you need to know the precise definition of certain message formats, data types, or common commands.

To obtain a copy of either of these documents, write to:

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.

345 East 47th Street

New York, NY 10017

USA

Hewlett-Packard

BASIC 5.0/5.1 Interfacing Techniques. Vol. 2, Specific Interfaces,

Company

1987.

This HP BASIC manual contains a good non-technical description of the HP-IB (IEEE 488.1) interface in chapter 12, “The HP-IB

Interface” . Subsequent revisions of HP BASIC may use a slightly different title for this manual or chapter. This manual is the best reference on instrument I/O for HP BASIC programmers.

Hewlett-Packard Company.

Tutorial Description of the

Hewlett-Packard Interface Bus, 1987.

This book provides a thorough overview of HP-IB basics for the

HP-IB system designer, programmer, or user.

To obtain a copy of either of these documents, contact the

Hewlett-Packard representative listed in your telephone directory.

l-120 Getting Started Programming

2

Operating and Programming Reference

How To Use This

Chapter

The operating and programming functions of the synthesizer are listed in alphabetical order. Each entry has a complete description, complete programming codes, and a cross reference to the main function group and respective menu map. Cross references to operating and programming examples located in Chapter 1, “Getting

Started”, are also given.

Error messages, instrument specifications, and menu maps are located in their own tabbed sections. Menu maps can be folded out and viewed at the same time as the alphabetical entry. See the illustration below.

, a r f v v

IL

T-T c-:3

AL-

I

For operator’s service information, see the Chapter 4, “Operator’s

Check and Routine Maintenance”. The operator accessible [SERVICE) softkeys are described in that chapter. Complete (SERVICE) menu and softkey information is provided in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal

Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept CW Generator Service Guide.

Programming Language

Comparison

Table 3-9 cross-references the actions that the instrument can perform with the programming commands that will prompt those actions.

Operating and Programming Reference 2-1

Address

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

The

8360 Adrs

softkey lets you change the HP-IB address of the swept signal generator. Enter the address desired using the numeric entry keys or the up/down arrow keys. The address value may be set between 0 and 30. The swept signal generator stores the address value in non-volatile memory. The default address of the swept signal generator is 19.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:COMMunicate:GPIB:ADDRess

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Connectors,

HP-IB Menu

“Instrument Addresses” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Adrs Menu

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

8

SYSTEM

This softkey accesses the HP-IB address menu.

Meter Adrs

Controls the system power meter address.

8 3 6 0 A d r s

Can control the swept signal generator’s address, depending on the setting of the rear panel HP-IB switch.

P r i n t e r A d r s

Controls the system printer address.

Operating and Programming Reference A-l

Adrs Menu

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see the individual softkeys listed.

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

HP-13 Menu, softkeys listed above.

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

“HP-1B Address Selection” in Chapter 3

A-2 Operating and Programming Reference

(ALC)

0ALC

Function Group

ALC

Menu Map 1

Description

This hardkey accesses the automatic level control (ALC) functions.

ALC BW Menu

Accesses the ALC bandwidth menu.

Coupling Factor

Specifies the coupling factor of an external coupling device and causes the display to indicate the power at the coupler main output.

Leveling Mode ALCoff

Leveling Mode Morn&

Leveling Mode Search

L e v e l i n g P o i n t ExtDet

L e v e l i n g P o i n t I n t e r n a l

Leveling Point Module

Disables the ALC leveling circuits.

Relative power level is controlled by means of the level DAC and attenuator. Power is not sensed at any point, and absolute power level is uncalibrated.

Sets the swept signal generator to continuous leveling at the specified leveling point.

The swept signal generator activates power search leveling mode.

Similar to ALCoff mode, but first automatically searches for the correct modulator setting so that the desired power level is produced.

Sets the swept signal generator to level power externally. A negative detector output must be connected to the EXT ALC input.

Sets the swept signal generator to level power internally.

Sets the swept signal generator to level power at the output of a millimeter-wave module. Either an HP 8349B or 8355X series millimeter-wave source module must be connected to the SOURCE

MODULE INTERFACE.

Operating and Programming Reference A-3

L e v e l i n g P o i n t PwrMtr

Pwr Mtr Range

Sets the swept signal generator to level power at an external power meter. A power meter’s recorder output must be connected to the EXT

ALC input.

Specifies the operating range of an external power meter used in an external leveling setup. This causes the swept signal generator display to agree with the power meter’s power indication.

The following paragraphs explain the power control (leveling) function of the swept signal generator in detail.

ALC SYSTEM - OVERVIEW

The ALC system, referred to as a system because it encompasses more than one functional area, is shown as a simplified block diagram in Figure A-l. The purpose of this system is to control the amplitude or power level of the RF energy generated by the swept signal generator. It is a feedback control system, in which the output power is measured and compared to the desired power level. If the output power does not equal the desired power level, the ALC system changes the output until they are equal.

Desired power level can be set by either front panel or remote operation. As shown in Figure A-l, the inputs and calibration data are processed by the swept signal generator

CPU,

which uses this information to set the

Level DAC.

In turn, the

Level DAC

sends a controlling voltage to the

Level

Control Circuits.

In the presence of modulation, voltages appearing at the AM and/or PULSE inputs contribute to the control of the

Level Control Circuits.

In swept signal generators with optional step attenuators, the power level at the output connector can be reduced by a maximum of

90 dB, in 10 dB steps. This is in addition to the control capabilities provided by the

Level Control Circuits.

A

Feedback Signal

to the

Level Control Circuits

can be provided by either internal or external detectors. This signal is the comparison voltage necessary for accurate, stable, power level settings and good source match at various

Leveling Points.

Alternatively, the power level can be set without using feedback. In this mode however, power level is uncalibrated and is subject to drift with temperature.

The following paragraphs describe the operation of the different leveling modes and leveling points.

A-4 Operating and Programming Reference

HP 8360B SERIES SWEPT SIGNAL GENERATOR

-B------m--- ---w----

1

-

AM

I

PULSE

I

I

I

I

I

LEVEL DAC

ALC REFERENCE

LEVEL

CONTROL

CIRCUITS b

RF

COMPONENTS

ALC

LEVEL b

0 TO 90 dB

STEP

ATTENUATOR

(

S E E

N O T E )

I

I

; i

POWER b OUTPUT

0

ALC OFF

EXTERNAL DETECTOR / POWER METER

< E X T A L C

SOURCE MODULE

.--A

LEVELING POINTS

1__-__-_____-__-__-__________.

< S O U R C E MODI

INTERFACE

JLE

N o t e : T h i s b l o c k a p p l i e s t o s y n t h e s i z e r s w i t h o p t i o n 0 0 1 o n l y .

Figure A-l. ALC System Simplified Block Diagram

Operating and Programming Reference A-5

Note

Two terms are used in the following discussions: power output and

ALC level. Power output means actual output power including the effects of the attenuator. ALC level means power levels before the attenuator. In swept signal generators without attenuators, these two terms are equivalent.

Internal Leveling -

Leveling Mode Normal,

L e v e l i n g P o i n t I n t r n l

In this configuration (Figure A-l), power is sensed by a detector internal to the swept signal generator and a dc output from this detector is fed back to the

Level Control Circuits.

The ALC level is limited at the low end by the

Level Control Circuits

and at the high end by maximum available power. Noise and drift limit the range at the low end to -20 dBm or greater.

The combination of RF frequency and RF components (different models of swept signal generator have different RF components) limit the ALC range available at the high end. The internal instructions (firmware) of the swept signal generator limit the ALC level range available for request from -20 to +25 dBm. If the power level requested is higher than the swept signal generator is capable of producing, the maximum available power is produced, and the message line displays UNLVLED (unleveled). When the swept

.signal generator performs frequency sweeps at certain ALC levels, maximum available power can be exceeded during small portions of the sweep; in this case, a flashing UNLVLED message appears.

ALC leveling accuracy depends on power level. Although the ALC level is useable from -20 to +25 dBm, it is most accurate from

-10 to +lO dBm. This fact is reflected in the performance specifications of the swept signal generator.

Coupled Operation.

Since many applications require power output less than -20 dBm, an optional step attenuator has a range of

0 to 90 dB, in 10 dB steps. With this option, power output down to -110 dBm is achieved when the

Step Attenuator

and

Level

Control Circuits

work in conjunction (see Figure A-l). With the attenuator, the ALC level is normally used over the smaller, more accurate portion of its range. Since ALC level accuracy suffers below

-10 dBm, and at some frequencies only +l dBm of RF output is available, the ALC level is set between -10 and 0 dBm. For power less than -100 dBm, the attenuator is set to 90 dB, and the ALC level is used from -10 to -20 dBm. At frequencies where power output above 0 dBm is desired, the attenuator is set to 0 dB, and the

ALC level is used from 0 to +25 dBm (or whatever power is available at the RF frequency in use).

Coupled operation is assumed by the swept signal generator unless

Uncoupl Atten or Leveling Mode ALCoff is selected. The proper combination of ALC level and attenuator setting is decided by the

A-6 Operating and Programming Reference

firmware. In coupled operation, when desired power output is set via

(

POWER LEVEL

), the ALC level and attenuator are set automatically to provide the most accuracy for the power requested.

Uncoupled Operation.

In some applications it is advantageous to control the ALC level and attenuator separately, using combinations of settings that are not available in coupled operation. In uncoupled mode (Uncoupl Atten ), when the desired power output is set via

[

POWER LEVEL

), only the ALC level is changed. The attenuator setting is changed via Set Atten.

One use of uncoupled operation is power sweep, where the output power linearly tracks the sweep voltage ramp. The swept signal generator can generate power sweeps of up to 40 dB, depending on frequency. The power at the start of the sweep is set via

POWER LEVEL

(coupled operation) or by a combination of

(

POWER LEVEL

) and Set Atten (uncoupled operation). The sweep range is entered by selecting Power Sweep. If the sweep range entered exceeds the ALC range (stop power greater than maximum available power), the UNLVLED warning message appears at the end of sweep. No warning is given at the time of entry. If the start power is entered when the swept signal generator is in coupled operation, the

ALC level is set no lower than -10 dBm, limiting the available power sweep range. Using uncoupled operation and setting the ALC level to

-20 dBm gives an additional 10 dB of sweep range.

External Leveling -

Leveling Mode

Normal ,

Leveling Point ExtDet

or PwrMtr or

Module

In externally leveled operations, the output power from the swept signal generator is detected by an external sensor. The output of this detector is returned to the leveling circuits, and the output power is automatically adjusted to keep the power constant at the point of detection. Figure A-2 shows a basic external leveling arrangement.

The output of the detected arm of the splitter or coupler is held constant. If the splitter response is flat, the output of the other arm is also constant. This arrangement offers superior flatness over internal leveling, especially if long cables are involved. Flatness may be improved with user flatness correction

([

FLTNESS ON

/

OFF

),

Fitness

Menu

) applied at the external leveling point.

Operating and Programming Reference A-7

d’

\

MT

ALC

P

RF OUTPUT

LEVEED OUTPUT

NEGATIVE

Figure A-2. Typical External Leveling Hookup

ALC Disabled

- Leveling Mode ALCoff, Leveling Mode Search

ALC

Off. In this configuration, the ALC is disabled, power is not sensed at any point, and therefore the absolute power level is uncalibrated (see Figure A-l). Direct and separate control of the

RF modulator (p/o

RF Components)

and the attenuator is possible.

The swept signal generator’s front panel indicates the attenuator setting and a reference level. The reference level is an approximate indication of the attenuation provided by the RF modulator.

Typically the RF amplifier that follows the modulator is saturated for modulation levels near 0 dB. Therefore the actual change in the

RF output power will not track the indicated reference level until the amplifier is out of saturation.

The ALC off mode is useful for applications that involve pulse modulation with extremely narrow pulses. If the pulse is narrow enough, the ALC may be unable to provide accurate leveling due to bandwidth limitations.

Search.

Search mode is similar to the ALC off mode in that the

ALC is disabled in order to remove bandwidth limitations. The essential difference is that, when search mode is enabled, the swept signal generator searches out the appropriate modulator level such that the RF output power after the ALC is disabled closely matches the power prior to search mode being enabled. Specifically, when search mode is selected the swept signal generator follows this sequence of steps:

1. All modulation is disabled and the ALC system is closed to provide a calibrated reference power.

2. The output power is measured using the internal coupler/detector.

3. The ALC system is disabled (opened).

A-8 Operating and Programming Reference

4. While monitoring the internal detector, the RF modulator level is varied until the detected power is equivalent to the reference power measured in step 2.

5. Modulation is re-enabled if appropriate.

These steps are performed in approximately 200 ps and are repeated any time power or frequency is changed.

See Also

Softkeys listed above, Fltness Menu,

(MOD), [

POWER LEVEL

),

S e t atten

“Externally Leveling the Swept Signal Generator” in Chapter 1

“Working with Mixers/Reverse Power Effects” in Chapter 1

“Working with Spectrum Analyzers/Reverse Power Effects” in

Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference A-9

ALC Bandwidth

Select Auto

Function Group

ALC

Menu Map 1

Description

This softkey sets the swept signal generator to choose the ALC bandwidth automatically depending on the current sweep and modulation conditions. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:ALC:BANDwidth:AUTO ON]1

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

ALC BW Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

ALC Bandwidth

Select High

Function Group

ALC

Menu Map 1

Description

This softkey sets the swept signal generator to the ALC high bandwidth position (100 kHz). In this mode, the ALC bandwidth operates in a wide bandwidth for all sweep and modulation conditions. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

Sending the swept signal generator an ALC bandwidth frequency value of >lO kHz causes it to select the high ALC bandwidth mode.

POWer:ALC:BANDwidth:AUTO OFF]0

POWer:ALC:BANDwidth <freq>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also LALC), ALC BW Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter

A-10 Operating and Programming Reference

ALC BW Menu

ALC Bandwidth

Select Low

Function Group

ALC

Menu Map 1

Description

This softkey sets the swept signal generator to the ALC low bandwidth position (10 kHz).

In this mode, the ALC bandwidth operates in a narrow bandwidth for all sweep and modulation conditions. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

Sending the swept signal generator an ALC bandwidth frequency value of 210 kHz causes it to select the low ALC bandwidth mode.

POWer:ALC:BANDwidth:AUTO OFF]0

POWer:ALC:BANDwidth <freq>[freq suffix] or

MAXimumlMINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also (ALC), ALC BW Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

ALC BW Menu

Function Group

ALC

Menu Map 1

Description

This softkey reveals the softkeys of the ALC bandwidth select menu.

ALC Bandwidth Select Auto

ALC Bandwidth Select High

Sets the ALC bandwidth to be automatically chosen by the swept signal generator, depending on the current sweep and modulation conditions.

Sets the ALC bandwidth to the high bandwidth position (100 kHz), and to remain there for all sweep and modulation conditions.

Operating and Programming Reference

A-l 1

ALC BW Menu

ALC Bandwidth Select Low

Sets the ALC bandwidth to the low bandwidth position (10 kHz), and to remain there for all sweep and modulation conditions.

See Also LALC)

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Altrnate Regs

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

SYSTEM

8

This softkey causes the swept signal generator to alternate on successive sweeps between the present instrument state and a second instrument state stored in an internal register (1 to 8). Select

Altmate Regs once to turn it on, a second time to turn it off. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:ALTernate:STATe ONlOFFlllO

SYSTem:ALTernate <num>IMAXimum(MINimum

Analyzer:

ALln, where n= 1 through 8 function on, AL0 function off

See Also

@Eiii-],@

“Saving and Recalling an Instrument State” in Chapter 1

A-12 Operating and Programming Reference

AH BW Cal Once

AM BW Cal Always

Function Group

USER CAL

Menu Map 9

Description

This softkey causes an AM bandwidth calibration to be performed every time a frequency or power parameter is changed.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

CALibration:AM:AUTO ON

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Modulation

AM BW Cal Once

Function Group

USER CAL

Menu Map 9

Description

This softkey causes a single AM bandwidth calibration to be performed.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

CALibration:AM:[EXECute]

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Modulation

Operating and Programming Reference A-13

AM Cal Menu

Function Group

USER CAL

Menu Map

9

Description

This softkey accesses the AM bandwidth calibration menu.

AM BW Cal Always Causes an AM bandwidth calibration to be performed every time a frequency or power parameter is changed.

AM BW Cal Once

Causes a single AM bandwidth calibration to be performed.

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

AM Menu

Function Group IlvloD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) accesses the amplitude modulation softkeys. These softkeys engage external and internal amplitude modulation. They allow you to define the scaling, waveform, rate, and depth of the internal AM.

AM On/Off Ext

Toggles on and off the amplitude modulation mode for an external AM source.

AM On/Off Int Toggles on and off the amplitude modulation mode using the internal AM generator.

Internal AM Rate

Sets the rate of the internal amplitude modulation.

Internal AM Depth

Sets the depth of the internal amplitude modulation.

AM Type 100%/V Sets the scale to linear at 100% per volt.

AM

Type

IadBfv Sets the scale to exponential at 10 dB per volt.

Deep AM

Opens the ALC loop when the detected signal level power is below the detector’s sensing range.

A-14 Operating and Programming Reference

AM On/Off 10 dB/V

Waveform

Menu

Displays the waveforms for internal amplitude modulation.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see the individual softkeys listed.

Analyzer:

NONE

See AIs0 (MOD_), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

AM On/Off 10 dB/V

Function Group

MOD (MODULATION)

Menu Map

Description

4

Programming Codes

This softkey activates the exponentially-scaled amplitude modulation function. Amplitude modulation lets the RF output of the swept signal generator be continuously and exponentially varied at a rate determined by the AM input. See “Specifications” for the AM characteristics, input range, and damage level. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

AM:TYPE EXPponential

AM[:STATE] ONlOFFjllO

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

[ALC), CONNECTORS, (MOD)

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference A-15

AM On/Off 100%/V

Function Group

MOD (MODULATION)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey activates the linearly scaled amplitude modulation function. The amplitude of the RF output changes linearly as a function of AM input changes. See “Specifications” for the AM characteristics, input range, and damage level. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

AM:TYPE LINear

AM[:STATE] ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

AM1 function on, AM0 function off

See Also

(ALC), CONNECTORS, (MOD)

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

AM On/Off Ext

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) activates the amplitude modulation mode for an external source. The AM source is connected to the AM modulation connector.

When external AM is in effect, the RF output is amplitude modulated with a rate and depth set by the external source.

Amplitude scaling is controlled by the following softkeys:

AM Type lOO%fV AM Type IOdB/V . An asterisk next to the key label indicates that external AM is active and

HM

is displayed on the message line.

A-16 Operating and Programming Reference

Programming Codes

SCPI:

AM:SOURce EXTernal

AM:STATe ON/OFF

Analyzer:

AM1 function on, AM0 function off

See Also

(MOD), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

AN On/Off Int

AM On/Off Int

Function Group

(MOD_)

Menu Map

Description

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) activates the internal amplitude modulation mode. No external source is needed.

When internal AM is in effect, the parameters are controlled by the following soft keys: Internal AM Rate Internal AM Depth

AM Type 100%/V AM Type IOdB/V Deep AM Waveform Menu.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that internal AM is active and HP~ is displayed on the message line. Both amplitude and pulse modulation can be in effect simultaneously.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

AM:SOURce INTernal

AM:STATe ON/OFF

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

a], also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

Operating and Programming Reference A- 17

Amp1 Markers

Function Group

MARKER

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

Active markers are normally displayed as intensified dots on a CRT display. With Amp1 Markers selected, active markers are displayed as amplitude spikes (an abrupt discontinuity in the sweep trace).

The marker amplitude can be varied. The swept signal generator displays: --> AMPLITUDE MARKER SIZE: XXXX dB. Where XXXX represents an amplitude value. Use the rotary knob, the step keys, or the numerical entry keys with the dB(m) terminator key to set the desired value. If a small change is required, the left and right arrow keys can be used to underline the digit to be changed.

Select Amp1 Maskers again to return to the normal intensified dot representation. See “Specifications” for the range of acceptable amplitude values. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

SCPI:

MARKer:AOFF

Analyzer:

AK1 function on, AK0 function off.

See Also

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Setting Up A Typical Sweep, Example Program 3” in Chapter 1

AM Type 10 dB/V

Function Group

MOD (MODULATION)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) scales the amplitude modulation exponentially. Amplitude modulation lets the RF output of the swept signal generator be continuously and exponentially varied at a rate determined by the AM input or at a rate set by softkey for internal AM. See “Specifications” for the AM characteristics, input range, and damage level. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

A-18 Operating and Programming Reference

AH Type

100%/V

Programming Codes

SCPI:

AM:TYPE EXPponential

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

IALC), CONNECTORS, IFV1OD)

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

AM Type 100%/V

Function Group

MOD (MODULATION)

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) scales the amplitude modulation function linearly. The amplitude of the RF output changes linearly as a function of AM input changes (or at a rate set by softkey for internal AM). See “Specifications” for the AM characteristics, input range, and damage level. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

AM:TYPE LINear

Analyzer:

AM1 function on, AM0 function off

See Also

(ALCI, CONNECTORS, INIOD)

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter I

Operating and Programming Reference A-19

ANALYZER STATUS

REGISTER

Function Group

NONE

Menu Map

NONE

Description

The following is the status register structure of the swept signal generator when the analyzer programming language is selected. This status structure is the structurally and syntactically the same as on the HP 8340/41.

OS(2B) Output Status bytes, is used to read the two 8-bit status bytes from the swept signal generator. The first status byte concerns the cause of an SRQ (Service Request), while the second status byte concerns failures and faults, as follows:

Bit # 7

6

Decimal

Value

126

64

Function

SRQ on new REQUEST frequencies or sweep time in effect.

SERVICE

@QS)

Bit # 7

Decimal

Value

128

Function

Fault

Indicator

On

6

64

STATUS BYTE (#I)

5

4

32

16

SRQ on

HP-IB or

SRQ on

End of syntax error. Sweep

SRQ on

RF Settled

SRQ on

Changed in

Extended status

Byte

SRQ on

Numeric

Entry

Completed

(HP-IB or

Front

Panel)

EXTENDED STATUS BYTE (#2)

5

32

4

6

3

8

2

4

1

2

RF Unleveled Power

Failure

3

8

RF Unlocked External

Frequent y

Reference

Selected

Oven

Cold

2

4

1

2

0

1

0

1

SRQ on

Any Front

Panel Key

Pressed

0V.X

Modulation

Self Test

Failed

Status Byte 1

Bit 0: SRQ caused by a key closure on the front panel of the swept signal generator (use the OM code to determine the front panel status).

Bit 1: SRQ caused by the completion of a numeric entry (use the OA code to determine the value of the numerical entry).

Bit 2: SRQ caused by a change in the extended status byte (status byte 2) affected by the RE-coded mask (see the RE code for an explanation of this masking).

A-20 Operating and Programming Reference

ANALYZER STATUS REGISTER

Bit 3: SRQ caused by the completion of phase locking and the settling of the RF source (use the OK code to determine the last lock frequency).

Bit 4: SRQ on end-of-sweep or mid-sweep update in NA (network analyzer code) mode.

Bit 5: SRQ caused by HP-IB syntax error.

Bit 6: SERVICE REQUEST; by IEEE-488 convention, the instrument needs service from the controller when this bit is set true.

Bit 7: SRQ caused by a change in the coupled parameters (start frequency, center frequency, and sweep time). Use the OC code to determine the new values of the coupled parameters.

Status Byte 2 (Extended Status Byte)

Bit 0: Self test failed at power on or at Instrument Preset. This bit remains latched until this status byte has been read, or until cleared by the CS or CLEAR 719 commands.

Bit 1: Excessive amplitude modulation input.

Bit 2: Oven for the reference crystal oscillator is not at operating temperature.

Bit 3: External reference frequency is selected.

Bit 4: RF is unlocked (UNLOCK appears in the message line). Use

OF to determine the source of the unlocked output. This bit remains latched until this status byte has been read, or until cleared by the

CS or CLEAR 719 commands.

Bit 5: ac line power interruption has occurred since the last

Instrument Preset. This bit also remains latched until read or cleared.

Bit 6: RF is unleveled (use OR to determine present power level).

This bit also remains latched until read or cleared.

Bit 7: FAULT message is displayed. Use OF to determine the cause of the fault.

See Also

SCPI STATUS REGISTER

Chapter 3

Operating and Programming Reference A-21

Arrow Keys

Function Group

ENTRY

Menu Map

NONE

Description

This group of entry active entry line.

keys lets you manipulate numerical values in the keys identify (by underlining) the digit to be

1 . changed. For example, if CW frequency is in the active entry line, and the display indicates:

--> cw: 10005.000000 MHz

You may wish to change the 5 to a 6. Press the a five times until the underline is under the 5. Now use the rotary knob or the a to change the 5 to a 6. The underlined digit remains the active character in this function until the swept signal generator is preset, turned off, or the underline is moved completely left or right.

The @) and @j arrow keys increment or decrement the numeric value by a predetermined amount. The increment value depends on the active function and the step value set. All increment values are defaulted to their original values when the swept signal generator is preset (unless Preset Mode User has defined the default differently).

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fitness Menu, List Menu

“Entry Area” in Chapter 1

“Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction Array” in

Chapter 1

A-22 Operating and Programming Reference

@Eiq

(iii+

Function Group

USER DEFINED

Menu Map

NONE

Description

This hardkey lets you select any softkey and assign its function to

1 of 12 user defined keys in the

(

USER DEFINED

)

Menu. The following message appears on the swept signal generator display: --> Press

MENU KEY to be assigned. Complete keypaths are assigned not just the key label. For example, assigning List Menu to the user defined menu, copies the complete structure (keypath) of that key. All of the pages and lower level menus are placed within the user defined menu.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

USER DEFINED (MENU)

Operating and Programming Reference A-23

Auto Fill Incr

Function Group

FREQUENCY, POWER

Menu Map

2, 5

Description

This softkey is used in two locations: Fltness Menu and

List Menu.

Flatness Menu - When selected, the swept signal generator waits for a frequency increment value to be entered. --> Increment: is displayed in the active entry area. A list of frequencies is created automatically, beginning at the auto fill start frequency and always ending with the auto fill stop frequency. The swept signal generator uses the increment value on all points, but if the stop frequency requires a different increment to be used to be exact, the swept signal generator simply ends the frequency list at the stop frequency disregarding the increment value.

If the increment value requested creates a list that exceeds the number of elements available, the following message appears:

TOO MANY CORRECTION PTS REQUESTED

List Menu - When selected, the swept signal generator waits for a frequency increment value to be entered. --> Increment : is displayed in the active entry area. A list of frequencies is created automatically, with all points separated by the frequency increment value. The list begins at the auto fill start frequency and ends at a frequency less than or equal to the auto fill stop frequency.

If the increment value requested creates a list that exceeds the number of points available (801), the following message appears:

TOO MANY LIST PTS REQUESTED

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE, see Fltness Menu or List Menu

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu, List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

A-24 Operating and Programming Reference

Auto Fill #Pts

Auto Fill #Pts

Function Group

FREQUENCY, POWER

Menu Map 2,s

Description

This softkey is used in two locations: Fltness Menu and

List Menu.

Flatness Menu - When selected, the swept signal generator waits for a numeric value representing the number of correction points to be entered. --> Number of Correction Points: is displayed in the active entry area. A list of frequencies containing the number of specified points is created automatically. The list begins at the auto fill start frequency and ends at the auto fill stop frequency. The rest of the points are equally spaced between them. A minimum of two points must be entered.

If the number of points requested creates a list that exceeds the number of elements available (801), the following message appears:

TOO MANY CORRECTION PTS REQUESTED

List Menu - When selected, the swept signal generator waits for a numeric value representing the number of list points to be entered.

--> Number of List Frequencies: is displayed in the active entry area. A list of frequencies containing the number of specified points is created automatically. The list begins at the auto fill start frequency and ends at the auto fill stop frequency. The rest of the points are equally spaced between them. A minimum of two points must be entered.

If the number of points requested creates a list that exceeds the number of points available (801), the following message appears:

Error. . . t o o m a n y l i s t p o i n t s r e q u e s t e d .

P o i n t s u s e d : 0

Points available : 801

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see Fltness Menu or List Menu

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fitness Menu, List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference A-25

Auto Fill Start

Function Group

FREQUENCY, POWER

Menu Map 2,s

Description

This softkey is used in two locations: Fltness Menu and

List Menu. The operation is the same in both applications.

This softkey enables the entry of a start frequency used to determine the beginning frequency of the automatic filling array. The array is not created until either the increment value or the number of points is assigned. The auto fill start frequency does not affect the swept signal generator start frequency. When Auto Fill Start is selected, the active entry area indicates:

--> Fill Start: XXXXXXXXX MHz where X represents a numeric value. Unless a previous entry was made, the display indicates the swept signal generator minimum frequency.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE,see Fltness Menu or List Menu

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu, List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

A-26 Operating and Programming Reference

Auto Fill Stop

Auto Fill Stop

Function Group

FREQUENCY, POWER

Menu Map 2,5

Description

This softkey is used in two locations: Fltness Menu and

List Menu. The operation is the same in both applications.

This softkey enables the entry of a stop frequency used to determine the ending frequency of the automatic filling array. The array is not created until either the increment value or the number of points is assigned. The auto fill stop frequency does not affect the swept signal generator stop frequency. When Auto Fill Stop is selected, the active entry area indicates:

--> Fill Stop: XXXXXXXXX MHz where X represents a numeric value. Unless a previous entry was made, the display indicates the swept signal generator maximum frequency.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see Fltness Menu or List Menu

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu, List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference A-27

Auto Track

Function Group

POWER, USER CAL

Menu Map 5,9

Description

This softkey optimizes the tracking of the swept signal generator’s output filter to the oscillator. Use it to maximize RF power output.

The swept signal generator displays: Peaking At : XXXXX MHz, where XXXXX represents frequency values. Peaking begins at the low frequency end and steps through to the high end of the frequency range. Auto Track is complete when the display returns to its original state. On swept signal generators without a step attenuator provide a good source match on the RF connector. Use a power sensor or a 10 dB attenuator. If a good source match is not provided, the swept signal generator can mistrack because of excessive reflections at the output.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

CALibration:TRACk

Analyzer:

SHRP

See Also

Tracking Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

A-28 Operating and Programming Reference

Blank Disp

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

When this softkey is selected, it causes the top four lines of the display to blank and remain blank until the [PRESET) key is pressed.

Blanking the display prevents sensitive information from being displayed. As an added benefit, remote execution time is reduced because the display does not require refreshing. This key does not disable any other key functions. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this function is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI: DISPlay[:STATe] ON]OFF]O]l

Analyzer: SHSll disables the display, SHSlO re-enables the display

See Also

Security Menu

B

Operating and Programming Reference B-l

C

(CENTER)

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

NONE

This hardkey lets you select the center frequency for center frequency/frequency span swept operation. When you press [CENTER), the swept signal generator displays: --> CENTER: XXXXX MHz, where

XXXXX represents a frequency value. Use the entry area to set the desired value.

Certain center frequency and frequency span combinations cause the swept signal generator to limit the value entered. In general, any combination that would cause the swept signal generator to exceed its minimum or maximum specified frequency will be limited.

SCPI:

FREQuency:CENTer <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

FREQuency:MODE SWEep

Analyzer:

CF

See Also

(SPAN), (START), (STOP)

“Center Frequency/Span Operation” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference C-l

Center=Marker

Function Group

MARKER

Menu Map 3

Description

This softkey sets the center frequency of the sweep to the frequency of the most recently activated marker. Select any marker Ml . . .

MEi,

then select Center=Marker to change the center frequency of the sweep to that of the marker. The frequency span does not change unless the new sweep limits fall outside the frequency range of the swept signal generator, in that case the swept signal generator automatically scales the frequency span to be within the swept signal generator’s operating frequency range.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MARKer[n][:FREQuency] ?

FREQuency:CENTer <freq from above>[freq suffix]

Analyzer:

MC

See Also C-1

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

Clear Fault

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

SERVICE

6

This softkey clears all the latched fault status indicators.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

DIAGnostics:OUTPut:FAULts

The above command relays the fault information and clears all faults.

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fault Menu

C-2 Operating and Programming Reference

Clear Memory

Clear Memory

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey causes the swept signal generator to return to the factory preset instrument state, after writing alternating ones and zeroes over all state information, frequency lists, and save/recall registers. You can select the number of times to clear memory. When you select Clear Memory, the swept signal generator displays the following in the active entry area:

--> # OF TIMES TO CLEAR MEMORY: X

Enter the number of times the state information should be overwritten. While the swept signal generator is working to overwrite the state information, it flashes the count on the display.

This softkey causes the swept signal generator to recall the original calibration data stored in permanent memory (EEROM) all list and user ALC correction data will be lost.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:SECurity:COUNt <n>

SYSTem:SECurity[:STATe] ON

SYSTem:SECurity[:STATe] OFF

The transition from on to off triggers the blanking. Sending the “off’ message by itself will do nothing.

Analyzer:

SHMZ18HZ

SHKZOHZ

See Also

S e c u r i t y

M e n u

“Using the Security Features” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference C-3

Clear Point

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

5

This softkey lets you change the correction value for the active frequency point to the “Undefined” state.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE, see Fltness Menu

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

m), Fltness Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter I

CONNECTORS

BNC Connectors

AM/FM OUTPUT (Option 002 only) Outputs the internallygenerated AM or FM waveform. This output can drive 50 R or greater. When driving 100 R or less, a selftest error may be generated. The AM output is scaled the same as it is generated, either 100%/V or 10 dB/V. The FM scaling depends on the FM deviation chosen. The following table shows the scale versus deviation.

AM INPUT There are two AM operation modes: linear and log.

When the swept signal generator is in linear AM mode, the input accepts a -1 to +l V signal. With an AM input of 0 V, the RF output level (the reference level) is unaffected; at -1 V input, the RF is shut off, and with a fl V input, the RF output is 100% (3 dB) higher that the reference level. Therefore, there must be 23 dB of margin between the reference power level and the maximum available at a given frequency. The on (0 V input) to off (-1 V input) ratio is a function of power level and frequency, but is always greater than

20 dB. The amplitude of the RF output changes linearly as the AM input changes.

C-4 Operating and Programming Reference

When the swept signal generator is in log AM mode, the input accepts a wider range of input signal. For every -1 V input, the

RF output level decreases by 10 dB. For every +l V, increases by

10 dB. So the dynamic range of positive to negative power levels is dependent on the swept signal generator power level setting.

The input impedance for this input connector is factory set at

50 0, but can be switched to 2 kR. Refer to “Adjustments” in the

Calibration

manual. See “Specifications” for the electrical requirements of the AM input. Damage levels for this input are

>+15 V or s-15 V.

AUX OUTPUT provides a reference signal from 2 to 26.5 GHz at a typical minimum power level of -10 dBm. Nominal input impedance is 50 0.

EXT ALC allows the swept signal generator to be externally leveled.

This input is used for power meter leveling or negative crystal detector leveling.

Input impedance in crystal or meter leveling modes is nominally

1 MR. See “Specifications” for the signal requirements. Nominal input impedance is 100 kR.

FM INPUT accepts a -8 to +8 V signal when on the 1 MHz/V sensitivity, or a -1 to +l V signal when on the 10 MHz/V sensitivity. Any signal greater than these limits will cause distortion.

The deviation changes linearly as the FM input changes from 0 to its upper or lower voltage limit. The input impedance for this input connector is factory set at 50 s2, but can be switched to 600 R. Refer to “Adjustments” in the

Calibration

manual. Damage level for this input is 215 V or 1-15 V.

PULSE INPUT is TTL compatible. A TTL high input (>+2 V) causes a maximum selected RF power output, while a TTL low input causes minimum RF output (>80 dB RF on/off ratio). Nominal input impedance is 50 a. When using internal pulse generator, a

TTL-level pulse sync signal preceding the RF pulse by nominally

70 ns is produced at this connector. The electrical requirements of the PULSE INPUT are detailed in “Specifications”. The damage levels for this input are >+5.5 V or s-O.5 V.

PULSE SYNC OUT (Option 002 only) Outputs a 50 ns wide TTL pulse synchronized to the leading edge of the internally-generated pulse.

PULSE VIDEO OUT (Opt ion 002 only) Outputs the pulse modulation waveform that is supplied to the modulator. This can be either the internally- or externally-generated pulse modulation.

SWEEP OUTPUT provides a voltage range of 0 to +lO V. When the swept signal generator is sweeping, the SWEEP OUTPUT is

0 V at the beginning of the sweep and +lO V at the end of the sweep regardless of the sweep width. In CW mode, the SWEEP

OUTPUT ranges from 0 V at the swept signal generator minimum

Operating and Programming Reference C-5

CONNECTORS

frequency to +lO V at the specified maximum frequency, with a proportional voltage for frequencies between the specified minimum and maximum. When the swept signal generator is in manual sweep operation the sweep output voltage is a percentage of the span.

Minimum load impedance is 3 kR.

STOP SWEEP IN/OUT

stops a sweep when this input is pulled low. Retrace does not occur, and the sweep resumes when this input is pulled high. The open circuit voltage is TTL high and is internally pulled low when the swept signal generator stops its sweep.

Externally forcing this input high will not cause damage or disrupt normal operation.

10 MHz REF INPUT

accepts a 10 MHz flO0 Hz, 0 to +lO dBm reference signal for operation referenced to an external time base.

Nominal input impedance is 50 CR.

10 MHz REF OUTPUT

provides a 0 dBm, 10 MHz signal derived from the internal frequency standard of the swept signal generator.

This input is a 50 fl connector that can be used as the master clock reference output for a network of instruments.

TRIGGER INPUT

activated on a TTL rising edge. Used to externally initiate an analog sweep or to advance to the next point of a step list or a frequency list.

TRIGGER OUTPUT

Produces a 1 pus wide TTL-level pulse at 1601 points evenly spaced across an analog sweep, or at each point in a step list or a frequency list.

VOLTS/GHz

supplies a voltage that is proportional to the RF output frequency, with a ratio of 0.5 volt output for every 1 GHz of RF frequency (factory setting). This ratio is switchable to either 0.25 or 1 volt. The switch is located on the Al2 SYTM assembly, see Adjustments in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal

Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept CW Generator Service Guide

for information. This output is designed to drive into 2 kR or greater.

Z-AXIS BLANK/MKRS

supplies a positive rectangular pulse

(approximately +5 V into 2 k0) during the retrace and switch points when the swept signal generator is sweeping. This output also supplies a -5 V pulse when the RF output is coincident with a marker frequency.

Multi-pin Connectors

AUXILIARY INTERFACE

connector provides control signals to the

HP 8516A S-parameter test set switch doubler. This connector is a

25-pin D-subminiature receptacle located on the rear panel. It is also used for dual swept signal generator measurement systems (two-tone systems), refer to

Step

Control Master for more information.

C-6 Operating and Programming Reference

5

6

7

8

9

3

4

10

11

12

18

19

20

21

22

13

14

15

16

17

23

24

25

1

2

P i n #

Table C-l. Pin Description of the Auxiliary Interface

Function

In/out Signal

Level

No Connection

Z-Axis Blanking/Markers o u t Blank=+5 V

M a r k e r = - 5

Spare

Spare

Low Stop Sweep

+5.2V

No Connection

Divider-Sync

External Trigger

Spare

Spare

Low Retrace

No Connection

Low Marker

Low Qualified Stop Sweep

Spare

Spare

Sweep Output

Ground

Low Blank Request

Spare

No Connection

Spare

Low Source Settled

No Connection

I/O

I/O o u t

T T L

T T L

T T L o u t T T L

In T T L o u t o u t

T T L

T T L

I/O

T T L o u t T T L o u t T T L o u t T T L o u t

T T L o u t 0 to 10 V ramp

In T T L o u t

T T L

CONNECTORS

HP-IB

connector allows the swept signal generator to be connected to any other instrument or device on the interface bus. All HP-IB instruments can be connected with HP-IB cables and adapters.

These cables are shown in the accompanying illustration. The adapters are principally extension devices for instruments that have recessed or crowded HP-IB connectors.

H P - B

SHl

AH1

TEi

L4

LEO

SRl

RLl

PPO

DC1

DTl

COl-3, 2 8

El

r

0‘ t:

::

::

l e t: t:

. .

II

0

Figure C-2. HP-IB Connector and Cable

HP-IB Interface Cables Available

HP-IB Cable

Part Numbers

HP

10833A

HP 10833B

HP 10833C

HP 10833D

Lengths

lm (3.3 ft)

2m (6.6 ft)

4m (13.2 ft)

0.5

m

(1.6 ft)

As many as 14 HP-IB instruments can be connected to the swept signal generator (15 total instruments in the system). The cables can be interconnected in a “star” pattern (one central instrument, with the HP-IB cables emanating from that instrument like spokes on a wheel), or in a linear pattern (like boxcars on a train), or any combination pattern. There are certain restrictions: n

Each instrument must have a unique HP-IB address, ranging from

0 to 30 (decimal). Refer to

8360

adrs for information on setting the swept signal generator’s HP-IB address.

n

In a two-instrument system that uses just one HP-IB cable, the cable length must not exceed 4 meters (13 ft).

n

When more than two instruments are connected on the bus, the cable length to each instrument must not exceed 2 meters (6.5 ft) per unit.

n

The total cable length between all units must not exceed 20 meters

(65 ft).

Hewlett-Packard manufactures HP-IB extender instruments

(HP models 37201A, 37204A/B) that overcome the range limitations imposed by the cabling rules. These extenders allow twin-pair cable

C-8 Operating and Programming Reference

operation up 1 km (3,280 ft), and telephone modem operation over any distance. HP Sales and Service offices can provide additional information on the HP-IB extenders.

The codes next to the HP-IB connector, illustrated in Figure C-2, describe the HP-IB electrical capabilities of the swept signal generator, using IEEE Std. 488-1978 mnemonics (HP-IB, GP-IB,

IEEE-488, and IEC-625 are all electrically equivalent). Briefly, the mnemonics translate as follows:

SHl

AH1

T6:

Source Handshake, complete capability.

Acceptor Handshake, complete capability.

Talker; capable of basic talker, serial poll, and unaddress if MLA.

TEO

L4

Talker, Extended address; no capability.

Listener, capable of basic listener, and unaddress if

MTA.

LEO

SRI

RLl

PPO

DC1

Listener, Extended address; no capability.

Service Request, complete capability.

Remote Local, complete capability.

Parallel Poll, no capability.

Device Clear, complete capability.

DTl Device Trigger, complete capability.

CO,

1, 2,

3, 28 Controller capability options; CO, no capabilities;

Cl, system controller; C2, send IFC and take charge;

C3,

send REN; C28, send I. F. messages.

E l

Electrical specification indicating open collector outputs.

These codes are described completely in the

IEEE Std 488-1978

document, published by The Institute of Electrical and Electronic

Engineers, Inc., 345 East 47th Street, New York, New York 11017.

SOURCE MODULE INTERFACE sends and receives digital and analog signals to and from an HP 83550-Series millimeter-wave source module. With the source module connected, the swept signal generator assumes the characteristics of the source module. Refer to

Leveling Point

Module

for more information.

Operating and Programming Reference C-9

CONNECTORS

MOO Cl +5v RESERKKI MOO ANLG GNO

MOO

SENSE

MOO $1 DIG &do MT LVL’ (COAX)

\

- 1 5 v

\

RESERVED

Figure C-3. Interface Signals of the Source Module Connector

The codes indicated on the illustration above translate as follows:

MOD DO

Source module data line zero. Signals MOD DO through MOD D3 are the mm source module data bus lines (bi-directional).

MOD Dl

MOD D2

MOD D3

MOD CO

Data line one.

Data line two.

Data line three.

Source module control line zero. Signals MOD

CO and MOD Cl are the control lines for the read/write to and from the mm source module.

MOD Cl

CLAMP CNTL

MOD SENSE

Control line one.

Source module clamp control (not used).

Source module sense. A 1mA current is injected on this line by the mm source module to indicate its presence. This signal always equals

0 v.

L MOD RF OFF

EXT LVL RET

EXT LVL

Low = RF off. Source module RF is turned off.

Source module external leveling return.

Source module ,external leveling input, from the mm source module.

0.5V/GHz

- 1 5 v

+15v

+w

+5v

DIG GND

MOD ANLG GND

ANLG GND RET

Internal 0.5 V/GHz to the mm source module.

Power supply. Range is -14.25 to -15.90 V.

Power supply. Range is +14.25 to +16.40 V

Power supply. Range is +7.75 to t8.25 V.

Power supply. Range is t4.75 to t5.45 V.

Digital ground.

Source module analog ground.

Analog ground return.

C-10 Operating and Programming Reference

RF Output Connector

The swept signal generator is equipped with a precision 3.5 mm male connector (2.4 mm male connector on 40 GHz models). The output impedance, SWR and other electrical characteristics are listed in

“Specifications”. When making connections, carefully align the center conductor elements, then rotate the knurled barrel while the mating component remains still. Tighten until firm contact is made.

Take care when working with either of these connectors. If this connector is mechanically degraded in any way, high frequency losses occur. Refer to

Application Note 326, Connector Cure,

for more information.

Function Group

SWEEP

Menu Map

Description

7

This hardkey initiates continuous sweep-retrace cycling of the swept signal generator. The sweep is initiated by one of the trigger functions, while the sweep speed is controlled by the sweep time function. The green LED located above this key lights when the swept signal generator is performing an list, step, or analog sweep.

The LED is off during all of the following: retrace, band crossings, phase locking at the start frequency of each new sweep and during manual sweeps.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

1NITiate:CONTinuous ON11

Analyzer: S

1

See Also

Manual Sweep, (E)

“Continuous, Single, and Manual Sweep Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference

C-l 1

Copy List

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

5

This softkey lets you copy the frequency information of the frequency list to the flatness correction menu. If there is no frequency list to copy, nothing happens.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see Fitness

Menu

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

0,

Fltness Menu

CorPair Disable

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map 5

Description

This softkey lets you disable the user flatness array (frequencycorrection pairs) so that the 1601 point flatness array will be applied when

FLTNESS ON

/

OFF is on. The 1601 point flatness array is accessible only through the HP-IB interface.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

CORRection:SOURce[O]l] ARRay

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

C-12 Operating and Programming Reference

Coupling Fact;or

Function Group

ALC

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

1

This softkey allows specification of the coupling factor of an external coupler/detector used to externally level the swept signal generator output power. Negative coupling factor values are required for valid entry. See “Specifications” for the coupling factor range.

SCPI:

POWer:ALC:CFACtor <num>[dB]]MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(ALC)

“Externally Leveling the Swept Signal Generator” in Chapter 1

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This hardkey lets you select a synthesized continuous wave frequency.

When you press (cwl, the swept signal generator stops sweeping

(green SWEEP LED off) and displays: --> CW: XXXXX MHz, where XXXXX represents a frequency value. Use either the rotary knob, the step keys (with or without the left/right arrow keys), or the numerical entry keys with a terminator key to set the desired value. If a small change is desired, use the left and right arrow keys to underline the digit to be changed.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FREQuency[:CW] <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

FREQuency:MODE CW

Analyzer:

CW

See Also

CW/CF Coupled,(~],(~]

“CW Operation and Start/Stop Frequency Sweep” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference C-13

CW/CF Coupled

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey couples the CW function to the center frequency function. Any change initiated in either one of these parameters causes a change in the other.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FREQuency:CW:AUTO ONlOFFlllO

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also (m), @l

C-14 Operating and Programming Reference

D

Dblr Amp Menu

Function Group

P O W E R

Menu Map 5

Description

This softkey accesses the doubler amp mode softkeys. These softkeys are applicable to instrument models with a doubler installed. The doubler has an integral amplifier whose operation is controlled by the instrument firmware. Its use depends on the frequency of operation and on the calibration constants set at the factory. The instrument defaults after preset to this automatic mode of operation which is the specified operation. Softkeys in this menu will allow you to turn the doubler amplifier always on or always off. These two modes are unspecified operation for instruments with a doubler installed. These softkeys have no effect on instruments without a doubler.

Doubler Amp Mode AUTO

Sets the doubler amp mode to

AUTO. This is the default after preset and must be used for specified performance.

Doubler Amp Mode On

Turns the doubler amplifier on regardless of the frequency of operation. Using this mode results in

unspecified

performance.

Doubler Amp Mode Off

Turns the doubler amplifier off regardless of the frequency of operation. Using this mode results in

unspecified

performance.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

Operating and Programming Reference D-l

Deep AM

Function Group

MODULATION

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey activates distortion reduction mode for deep AM operation. Deep AM automatically switches to the ALC off leveling mode when the modulation level drives the “detector-logger” (part of the RF components, see Figure A-l) below its detection range.

The modulated waveform is DC coupled and ALC leveled above

-13 dBm. Below -13 dBm the waveform is DC controllable but not

ALC leveled, and is subject to drift of typically 4~0.25 dB/s. This value is reduced by a factor of 10 if the low ALC bandwidth feature is selected. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

AM:MODE DEEP

AM:STATe ONlOFFlllO

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(ALC, AM On/Off , LMOD)

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Delay Menu

Function Group IruloD]

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) accesses the pulse delay softkeys.

These softkeys let you delay the internally generated pulsed output from either the PULSE SYNC OUT signal or from the external pulse signal at the PULSE input.

Pulse Delay Normal

Pulse Delay Trig’&

Delays the output pulse from the

PULSE SYNC OUT signal.

Delays the output pulse from the

PULSE input.

D-2 Operating and Programming Reference

Delete All

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “Modulation” and “Pulse”.

Delete Menu

Function Group

FREQUENCY, POWER

Menu Map 2,s

Description

In the menu structure there are two occurrences of this softkey. It leads to the delete choices for both the frequency list menu and the power flatness menu.

D e l e t e A11 Deletes the complete array.

Delete Current

Deletes the active line in the array.

Delete Undef

Appears in the power flatness menu only. It deletes the points that are undefined.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE,see Fltness

Menu

or List Menu

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fitness Menu, List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Delete All

Function Group

FREQUENCY, POWER

Menu Map 2,5

Operating and Programming Reference D-3

Delete All

Description

Programming Codes

In the menu structure there are two occurrences of this softkey. One occurs in the frequency list menu. The other occurs in the power flatness menu.

In the both applications, this softkey lets you delete all entries in the array with one keystroke.

SCPI:

NONE,see Fltness Menu or List Menu

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fitness Menu, List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Delete Current

Function Group

FREQUENCY, POWER

Menu Map 2,s

Description

In the menu structure there are two occurrences of this softkey. One occurs in the frequency list menu. The other occurs in the power flatness menu.

In the list menu application, the frequency entry and the associated offset and dwell values in the active line are deleted. The active line is designated by the --> pointer and can be pointing at any of values within the array.

In the flatness menu application, the frequency and associated correction value in the active line is deleted. The active line pointer

--> can be pointing to either the frequency value or the correction value.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE,see Fltness Menu or List Menu

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu, List Menu

D-4 Operating and Programming Reference

Delta Marker

Delete Undef

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

5

This softkey occurs in the power flatness menu. It lets you delete only those points that are undefined. Undefined correction values are noted by the display as Undefined.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE, see Fltness

Menu

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu

Delta Marker

Function Group

MARKER

Menu Map 3

Description

This softkey causes the difference in frequency between two markers to appear on the swept signal generator display. The frequency difference is indicated in the following format: --> DELTA MARKER

Im - nl

XXXXX MHz, where m= the last marker activated, n= the reference marker, and XXXXX represents some frequency value.

On a CRT display, the trace between the two selected markers is intensified. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

At preset (factory), the swept signal generator is set to measure the difference between M2 and Ml ( marker reference). If markers have not been activated after preset, selecting Delta Marker indicates the difference between M2 and Ml. Both of these markers have an asterisk next to their key label, indicating that they are on.

Whenever Delta Marker is selected, it reactivates the last marker selected and makes that marker the “m” frequency. If the delta marker feature is active, selecting a marker causes the “m” frequency to change to the marker selected. If a frequency entry is made when delta marker is in the active entry area, the frequency value of the

“m” frequency is changed to the new frequency entry causing the new difference in frequency to be displayed. Negative frequency differences are possible if “n” is greater than “m”.

Operating and Programming Reference D-5

Delta Marker

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MARKer[n]:DELTa? <num>, <num>

Analyzer:

MD1 function on, MD0 function off

See Also (-1

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Delta Mkr Ref

Function Group

MARKER

Menu Map 3

Description

This softkey displays the five markers available as the delta marker reference. The delta marker frequency is calculated using the equation:

f(ym=fm--frmf

where f, is the frequency of the active marker and fmref is the frequency of the reference marker.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MARKer:REFerenc <marker number>

Analyzer:

MD1 function on, MD0 function off.

See Also

Delta Marker

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

D-6 Operating and Programming Reference

Disp Status

Disp Status

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey causes the status of various features to be displayed.

For example, this is what the swept signal generator displays as its status after a factory preset:

Pls=Off

AM=Off

FM=Off

Lvl=Int

ALC=On

UsrCorr=Off

RF Slp=Off

Pwr Swp=Off

SwpMode=Swept

Altn=Off SwpTrig=Auto AutoCal=None

This key is useful when checking the current operation state of the swept signal generator. The following is a listing of the various mnemonics used to indicate status.

Function

Pulse

AM

FM

Table D-l. Mnemonics used to Indicate Status

Mnemonic

Pls

AM

FM

Alternate Registers Altn

Off

AC

DC

Off

State

Off

Scalar

Internal

External

Off lOdB/V

100%/V

Off

AC

DC

Off

Mnemonic

Off

Scalar

Intrnl

Extrnl

Off lOdB/V

100%/V

ALC Leveling Point Lvl

ALC Leveling Mode ALC

Internal

External

Power Meter

On

Off

Int

Ext

Mtr

On

Off

Operating and Programming Reference D-7

Disp Status

Function

Power Slope

Power Sweep

Sweep Mode

Table D-l.

Mnemonics used to indicate Status (continued)

Flatness On/Off

Mnemonic

usrcorr

Start Sweep Trigger SwpTrig

Peak RF Always

Rf Slope

Pwr Swp

SwpMode

AutoCal

State

Off

On

Automatic

HP-IB

External

Off

On

Off

On

Ramp

Step

List c w

Span=0

On

AM BW Cal Always AutoCal

SwpSpan Cal Always AutoCal

On

On

Mnemonic

Off

On

Auto

BUS

Ext

Off

On

Off

On

Swept

Step

List c w

Zero Span

Peaking or

Peak

AM BW or

AmBw or

Am

SweptFreq or

Freq or Frq

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

STATUS MESSAGES

Doubler Amp Mode AUTO

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map 5

Description

This softkey is applicable to instrument models with a doubler installed. The doubler has an integral amplifier whose operation is controlled by the instrument firmware. The use of the amplifier depends on the frequency of operation and on the calibration constants set at the factory. The instrument defaults after preset to this automatic mode of operation which is the specified operation.

This softkey has no effect on instruments without a doubler.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

This feature is the default after preset.

D-8 Operating and Programming Reference

Doubler

Amp

Mode Off

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE:AUTO ONlOFFlOll

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE:AUTO?

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Dblr

Amp Menu

Doubler Amp Mode Off

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map c!

Description

This softkey is applicable to instrument models with a doubler installed. The doubler has an integral amplifier whose operation is controlled by the instrument firmware. This softkey turns off the automatic mode of operation and turns off the amplifier so that it is never used. This is an

unspecified

mode of operation since the output power may not be at the maximum leveled output power specification at frequencies generated in the doubled mode. This softkey has no effect on instruments without a doubler.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE ONlOFFlOll

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE?

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Dblr Amp Menu

Operating and Programming Reference D-9

Doubler Amp Mode On

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

5

This softkey is applicable to instrument models with a doubler installed. The doubler has an integral amplifier whose operation is controlled by the instrument firmware. This softkey turns off the automatic mode of operation and turns on the amplifier so that it is always used. This is an

unspecified mode

of operation since it can cause increased harmonics and degraded dynamic range at some frequencies. This softkey has no effect on instruments without a doubler.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE ON]OFF]O]l

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE?

See Also

Analyzer:

NONE

Dblr Amp

Menu

Dwell Coupled

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

This softkey lets you couple the dwell time for points in the stepped frequency sweep mode to the ramp sweep mode sweep time. The equation to determine the dwell time in the dwell coupled mode is as follows:

Coupled Dwell Time = (sweep time) + (number of step points)

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SWEep[:FREQuency]:DWELl:AUTO ON]1

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

S t e p Swp

M e n u

D-10 Operating and Programming Reference

8360 Adrs

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

SYSTEM

8

Programming Codes

This softkey lets you change the HP-IB address of the swept signal generator. Enter the address desired using the numeric entry keys or the up/down arrow keys. The address value may be set between

0 and 30. The swept signal generator stores the address value in non-volatile memory. The default address of the swept signal generator is 19.

SCPI:

SYSTem:COMMunicate:GPIB:ADDRess

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Connectors, HP-IB Menu

“Instrument Addresses” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

E

Operating and Programming Reference E-l

Enter Corr

Function Group

P O W E R

Menu Map 5

Description

This softkey lets you enter a power correction value for a frequency point in the flatness array. A frequency point must be entered before a correction value can be accepted, otherwise the following error message appears:

ERROR - Must first enter correction freq.

The up/down arrow keys let you scroll through the frequency points available for power correction. If no correction value is entered for a frequency point, the swept signal generator display indicates

Undefined. The range of acceptable values is -40 to +40 dB. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE, see Fltness Menu

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter

1

E-2 Operating and Programming Reference

Enter Freq

Enter Freq

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

This softkey lets you enter a frequency point into the flatness correction array. When the Power Fltness Menu is selected,

Enter Freq is automatically activated. Frequency points must be entered before correction values can be accepted into the array.

Frequency points can be entered in any order, and the swept signal generator automatically reorders them beginning with the lowest frequency. One frequency-correction pair is the minimum and 801 is the maximum number of points that can be entered. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see Fltness Menu

Analyzer:NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu

“Oatimizinrr Sweat Signal Generator Performance” in Chanter 1

Operating and Programming Reference E-3

Enter List Dwell

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

2

This softkey lets you enter a dwell time for a frequency point in the frequency list array. A frequency point must be entered before a dwell value can be accepted, otherwise the following error message appears:

ERROR: Must first enter aList Frequency.

The rotary knob and the up/down arrow keys let you scroll through the frequency points available to change the default dwell values.

The range of values is 100 ps to 3.2 s. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

NONE, see List Menu

Analyzer:NONE

See Also

List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Enter List Freq

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey lets you enter a frequency point into the frequency list array. The frequency list may contain as few as one and as many as

801 points. The order frequencies are entered is the order they are listed. Additions to an existing list are placed as indicated by the active entry arrow. The rotary knob and the up/down arrow keys let you scroll through the frequencies points. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see List Menu

Analyzer:NONE

See Also

List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

E-4 Operating and Programming Reference

ENTRY KEYS

Enter List Offset

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

2

This softkey lets you enter an offset value for a frequency in the frequency list. A frequency point must be entered before a power value can be accepted, otherwise the following error message appears:

ERROR: Must first enter a List Frequency.

The rotary knob and the up/down arrow keys let you scroll through the frequency points available to change the default power values. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

NONE, see List Menu

Analyzer:NONE

See Also

List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

ENTRY KEYS

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

NONE

NONE

The entry keys consist of, the numeric entry keys (0 through 9), the decimal point key, the negative sign/backspace key, and the terminator keys. These keys are active whenever the ENTRY

ON/OFF LED is lit.

See Also

ARROW KEYS, ROTARY KNOB

“Entry Area” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference E-5

(ENTRYON/OFF]

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

ENTRY

NONE

This hardkey lets you turn off (blank) the active entry area and disable the ARROW keys, rotary knob, and entry keys. When any function key (hard or soft) is pressed, the active entry area is reactivated. The yellow LED, ENTRY ON, next to

ENTRY ON

/

OFF

) indicates whether the entry area is active (LED on=active).

Programming Codes

SCPI:

No specific code activates

(

ENTRY ON

/

OFF

)

Analyzer:EF=off

See Also

Arrow Keys

“Entry Area” in Chapter

1

Ext Det Cal

Function Group

USER CAL

Menu Map 9

Description

This softkey enables the swept signal generator to act as a controller to an HP 437B power meter. This softkey causes an immediate execute on the interface bus and generates an HP-IB error if no power meter is present on the interface bus or if the swept signal generator is unable to address the power meter. Use external detector calibration to characterize and compensate for an external negative diode detector used in an external leveling configuration.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

CALibration:PMETer:DETector:INITiate? DIODe

CALibration:PMETer:DETector:NEXT? <num>[lvl suffix]

Analyzer:NONE

See Also

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

E-6 Operating and Programming Reference

Fault Menu

Function Group

SERVICE

Menu Map 6

Description

This softkey accesses the fault information softkeys. Use this softkey if a fault is indicated on the message line.

Fault Info 1

Indicates the latched status of PEAK, TRACK,

RAMP, SPAN, V/GHZ, and ADC.

Fault Info 2

Indicates the latched status of EEROM, PWRON,

CALCO, PLLZERO, PLLWAIT, and FNXFER.

Fault Info 3

Indicates the latched status of CALYO, CALMAN,

TMR CNFLCT, and SEARCH.

Clear Fault

Clears all latched fault status messages.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

DIAGnostics:OUTput:FAULts

This command produces a string of ones and zeroes (16 bits) separated by commas to indicate the latched status of the different fault indicators.

1

Bit #

0

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

4

5

6

7

2

3

Fault Name

PEAK

TRACK

RAMP

SPAN

V/GHZ

ADC

EEROM

PWRON

CALCO

PLLZERO

PLLWAIT

FNFXER

CALYO

CALMAN

TMR CNFLCT

SEARCH

Operating and Programming Reference F-l

Fault Hem

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

Fault Info 1

Function Group

SERVICE

Menu Map 6

Description

This softkey displays the latched status of the following fault messages.

PEAK FAIL Indicates that the peak algorithm is unable to align the YTM passband to the frequency of the YO.

This fault indication is possible only if a peaking or autotrack routine has been initiated.

TRACK FAIL Indicates that the autotrack algorithm is unable to calculate the calibration constants needed to track the YTM passband to the frequency of the YO.

This fault indication is possible only if an autotrack routine has been initiated.

RAMP FAIL

SPAN FAIL

Indicates that the ramp algorithm is unable to adjust the sweep ramp voltage to 10.00 V at the end of the sweep. Initiate a full self-test to gather more information if this fault is indicated.

Indicates that the span algorithm is unable to adjust the YO to achieve the correct frequency at the end of a band. This fault indication is possible only if a sweep span routine has been initiated.

V/GHZ FAIL

ADC FAIL

Indicates that the internal YO V/GHz line adjusted at power-on or at preset is unable to calibrate.

Initiate a full self-test to gather more information if this fault is indicated.

Indicates that the ADC ( analog-to-digital converter) is not responding to a measurement request within the time-out period. The ADC is used extensively in the operations of the swept signal generator. Initiate a full self-test to gather more information if this fault is indicated.

F-2 Operating and Programming Reference

Fault

Iti0 2

Programming Codes

SCPI: See Fault Menu.

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Fault Menu

Fault Info 2

Function Group

SERVICE

Menu Map 6

Description

This softkey displays the latched status of the following fault messages.

EEROM FAIL Indicates that the EEROM (electrically erasable read only memory) has failed to store data properly.

Whenever any data is stored in EEROM, the integrity of the data is checked (read back and compared to the data in RAM).

The EEROM is the main storage location for calibration data. If this fault is indicated, the present calibration data may be lost.

PWRON FAIL Indicates that the test of the processor, ROM, RAM and I/O system performed at power-on has failed.

The front panel INSTR CHECK LED lights. Initiate a full self-test to gather more information if this fault is indicated.

CALCO FAIL

PLLZERO

FAIL

PLLWAIT

FAIL

Indicates that the internal calibration data has been defaulted either deliberately or due to an EEROM failure.

Indicates a phase lock loop error caused by either a hardware failure or misadjustment.

FNXFER

FAIL

Indicates a phase lock loop error caused by either a hardware failure or misadjustment. Initiate a full self-test to gather more information if this fault is indicated.

Indicates that the transfer of fractional-N data has failed. Initiate a full self-test to gather more information if this fault is indicated.

Operating and Programming Reference F-3

Fault

Info 2

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fault Menu

Fault Info 3

Function Group

SERVICE

Menu Map 6

Description

This softkey displays the latched status of the following fault messages.

CALYO FAIL Indicates that the YO adjusted at power-on or at preset is unable to calibrate. Initiate a full self-test to gather more information if this fault is indicated.

CALMAN Indicates that the manual sweep DAC adjusted at

F A I L power-on or at preset is unable to calibrate. Initiate a full self-test to gather more information if this fault is indicated.

T M R

CNFLCT

FAIL

SEARCH

Indicates a possible internal software error. Two routines are trying to use the same timer.

Indicates that the ALC search leveling algorithm has failed. This fault indication is possible only if the search leveling mode is on.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fault Menu

F-4 Operating and Programming Reference

Fitness

#enu

Fltness Menu

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map 5

Description

This softkey reveals control user-defined the softkeys in the flatness correction menu that leveling parameters.

A u t o F i l l Incr

Automatically creates a frequency list with all points separated by the specified increment in a given frequency range.

A u t o F i l l #Pts

A u t o F i l l S t a r t

A u t o F i l l S t o p

C l e a r P o i n t

Copy List

CorPair D i s a b l e

Delete Menu

Automatically creates a frequency list containing the specified number of points in a given frequency range.

Sets the start frequency of the flatness correction array that will load automatically when either the number of points or the increment size is specified.

Sets the stop frequency of the flatness array that will load automatically when either the number of points or the increment size is specified.

Changes the power correction value for the indicated frequency point to the undefined state.

Copies the frequency list, (see List Menu ), into the frequency parameter of the flatness correction array.

Disables the frequency-correction pair array and uses the HP-IB transferred 1601 point correction set to apply correction information.

Reveals the delete softkeys.

Enter C o r r

E n t e r F r e q

Freq Follow

Mtr Meas Menu

Enables the entry of a power correction value for a frequency point.

Enables the entry of a single frequency point into the flatness correction array.

Sets the swept signal generator to CW frequency mode so that the corresponding correction values can be entered.

Reveals the softkeys in the power meter measure correction menu.

Operating and Programming Reference F-5

Fltness Menu

The softkeys in this menu help front panel users enter and edit flatness correction parameters. These editing softkeys are not accessible over HP-IB.

To load correction arrays over HP-IB, the correction arrays must be created in the controlling program and then downloaded to the swept signal generator. The corresponding SCPI array creation and control commands are given after the description of this feature.

The HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator provide extremely flat power to a test port, for testing power sensitive devices such as amplifiers, mixers, diodes or detectors. The user flatness correction feature of the swept signal generator compensates for attenuation and power variations created by components between the source and the test device.

User flatness correction allows the digital correction of up to 801 frequency points (1601 points via HP-IB), in any frequency or sweep mode (i.e. start/stop, CW, power sweep etc.). Using a power meter to calibrate the measurement system as shown in Figure F-l, a table of power level corrections is created for the frequencies where power level variations or losses occur (see Figure F-2). These frequencies may be sequential linear steps or arbitrarily spaced. To allow for the correction of multiple test setups or frequency ranges, you may save as many as eight different measurement setups (including correction tables) in the internal storage registers of the swept signal generator.

H P - I B

- O LLt:‘:ETER c W-B : RkER ;

L ‘V-B J

OUT

B-B

El m

w m -

1 FLATNESS

I CORRECTED

, OUTPUT PORT

POUER SENSOR

s /

YN”NvD:cRE

TEST

Figure F-l. Basic User Flatness Configuration Using an HP 4378 Power Meter

F-6 Operating and Programming Reference

Fltness Menu

->

Frequency ( M H

Z

)

10.000000

110.000000

Correction

Undefined

Undefined

210.000000

Undefined

I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Auto Fill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

more

I

Start stop # Pts Incr

2/3

Figure F-2.

User Flatness Correction Table as Displayed by the Swept Signal Generator

Theory of operation

The unparalleled leveled output power accuracy and flatness of the

HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator. This is achieved by using a new digital (versus analog) design to control the internal automatic leveling circuitry (ALC).

An internal detector samples the output power to provide a dc feedback voltage. This voltage is compared to a reference voltage which is proportional to the power level chosen by the user. When there is a discrepancy between voltages, the power is increased or decreased until the desired output level is achieved. For comprehensive theory on the ALC system, refer to the IALC) entry in the “A” section of this manual.

The factory-generated internal calibration data of the swept signal generator is digitally segmented into 1601 data points across the start/stop frequency span chosen. Subsequently, these points are converted into 1601 reference voltages for the ALC system. The digital ALC control scheme not only delivers excellent power accuracy and flatness at the output port of the swept signal generator, but also provides the means to execute the user flatness correction feature.

Generally, a power meter is required to create a table of correction data that produces flat power at the test port. You may measure and enter correction data for up to 801 points. The correction data contained in the table is linearly interpolated to produce a 1601-point data array across the start/stop frequency span set on the swept signal generator. The 1601-point data array is summed with the internal calibration data of the swept signal generator (Figure F-3).

Operating and Programming Reference F-7

Fitness

Menu

1601 Equadistant

Point Array

Accessible Only

From a Computer

User Flatness Correction Array

When user flatness correction is enabled, the sum of the two arrays produces the 1601 reference voltages for the ALC system.

CorPair

1601 Paints for ALC of Correction

1601 Points of lntemol

Calibration Data

Figure F-3. The Sources of ALC Calibration Correction Data

If the correction frequency span is only a subset of the start/stop frequency span set on the source, no corrections are applied to the portion of the sweep that is outside the correction frequency span.

The following example illustrates how the data is distributed within the user flatness correction array.

Assume that the swept signal generator is set to sweep from 2 to

18 GHz, but you only enter user flatness correction data from

14 to 18 GHz. Linear interpolation occurs between the correction entries to provide the 401 points required for the 14 to 18 GHz portion of the array. No corrections are applied to the 2 to

13.99 GHz portion of the array. Refer to Figure F-4.

Point Number --) 0

Frequency --) 2GHz

1200 1600

No Corrections Applied

401 P o i n t s o f D a t a

14GHz

1st Corr. Freq.

18GHz

Figure F-4.

Array Configuration when the Correction Data Frequency Span is a Subset of the Swept Signal Generator Frequency Span

Number of points interpolated between correction entries is calculated as follows: freq. span between correction entries stop frequency - start frequency

I

1600 - 1 = Number of pts

F-8 Operating and Programming Reference

Fltness Kenu

When correction frequencies are arbitrarily spaced, the number of interpolated points varies.

When utilizing the user flatness correction feature, do not exceed the swept signal generator ALC operating range. Exceeding the

ALC range causes the output power to become unleveled and eliminates the benefits of user flatness correction. The ALC range can be determined by subtracting the minimum output power

(-20 dBm) from the maximum specified power. When the optional step attenuator is ordered on a swept signal generator, at times it may be necessary to uncouple the attenuator to obtain the full ALC range. This can be accomplished by selecting POWER [MENU]

[Uncoupl Atten]. For example, an HP 83620B has an ALC range of

230 dB (>+lO to -20 dBm).

When user flatness correction is enabled, the maximum settable test port power is equivalent to the maximum available leveled power minus the maximum path loss (PO max - Pp&, loss). For example, if an HP 83620B has a maximum path loss of 15 dB due to system components between the source output and the test port, the test port power should be set to -5 dBm. When user flatness correction is enabled, this provides the maximum available power to the device under test (DUT).

Programming Codes

SCPI:

n

CORRection:FLATness {<num>[freq suffix],<num>[DB]}2*801

The portion of the above command contained in { } can be entered from one to 801 times. This command creates the frequency-correction pair array similar to the front panel array.

The correction entered is at the associated frequency and frequencies in between are determined by linear interpolation.

n

CORRection:FLATness?

This command queries the flatness array created with CORR:FLAT.

n

CORRection:ARRay[i] {<num>[DB]}1601*1601

The portion of the above command contained in {} must be entered 1601 times. This array must contain 1601 evenly spaced correction values. This command creates the 1601-point correction set that has no equivalent front panel entry. If this command is used to enter flatness correction information the

CORRection:SOURce command (described below) will be set to array. There is an array for the foreground state (i=O) and for the foreground state (i=O).

n

CORRection:ARRay[i]?

This command queries the entire 1601-point correction set.

n

CORRection:SOURce[i] ARRayjFLATness

Operating and Programming Reference F-9

Fltness Menu

When the above command is set to flatness CORR:SOUR FLAT, the array chosen is the frequency-correction pair array. When the command is set to array CORR : SOUR ARR, the array chosen is the

1601 point correction set.

n

CORRection:SOURce[i]?

Queries the source of correction.

n

CORRection[:STATe] ON]OFF(l]O

Sets the switch on the user flatness correction feature. This is the same as pressing

FLTNESS ON

/

OFF on the front panel.

n

CORRection:STATe?

Queries the condition of the internal switch.

n

CORRection:FLATness:POINts? [MAXimum]MINimum]

The above command returns information on how many frequency-correction pairs were entered using the CORR : FLAT command.

Analyzer:

NONE

S e e

A l s o

m), (

FLTNESS ON

/

OFF

),

List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

“Programmmg Typic2 Measurements” in Chapter 1

( FLTNESS

O N

/

O F F

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map

Description

5

This hardkey applies flatness correction to the swept signal generator

RF output. If no array has been created, pressing this key applies

0 dB of flatness correction at all points. The yellow LED above the hardkey lights when user flatness correction is on.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

CORRection[:STATe] ON]OFF(l]O

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(ALC, Fltness Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

F-10 Operating and Programming Reference

FE! Cotipling DC

FM Coupling 100kHz

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the FM input to be

AC-coupled. If you choose AC-coupled FM, you will be modulating a phase locked carrier. This is the specified synthesized operation. You

must

modulate at a 100 kHz rate or greater. If not, the frequency changes caused by the modulation are inside the phase locked loop bandwidth and the output will not be linear FM. For modulation frequencies below 100 kHz, choose DC-coupled FM.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that AC FM coupling is selected. This selection is the factory preset default.

For swept signal generators

without

Option 002, see

FM On/Off 100 kHz.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FM:FILTer:HPASs <num>[freq suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum

<num> sets the AC bandwidth to 100 kHz for any value > 1 kHz and sets the AC bandwidth to 20 Hz for any value < 1 kHz.

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD_), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

FM Coupling DC

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the FM input to be

DC-coupled. Use DC coupling for modulation rates below 100 kHz.

In this mode, the phase-locked loop is de-activated. This means that the swept signal generator is operating as an open loop sweeper. The swept signal generator will not be phase locked, and therefore, be aware that the phase noise and CW frequency accuracy specifications do not apply.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that DC FM coupling is selected. The factory preset default is AC coupling.

For swept signal generators

without

Option 002, see FM On/Off DC .

Operating and Programming Reference

F-l 1

FM Coupling DC

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FM:FILTer:HPASs <num>[freq suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

FM Menu

Function Group (MOD_)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) accesses the frequency modulation softkeys. These softkeys engage external and internal frequency modulation. They allow you to define the coupling, waveform, rate, and deviation of the internal FM.

EM On/Off Ext

FM On/Off Int

Internal FM Rate

Internal FM Deviation

FM Coupling IOOkHz

FM Coupling DC

Waveform Menu

Toggles on and off the frequency modulation mode for an external FM source.

Toggles on and off the frequency modulation mode using the internal

FM generator.

Sets the rate of the internal frequency modulation.

Sets the deviation of the internal frequency modulation.

Sets AC coupling for modulation rates of 100 kHz or greater. The RF signal is phase locked.

Sets DC coupling for modulation rates of less than 100 kHz. The phase locked loop is open.

Displays the waveforms for internal frequency modulation.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see the individual softkeys listed.

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also (MOD), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

F-12 Operating and Programming Reference

FM On/Off DC

FM On/Off AC

Function Group

MODULATION

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey lets you select AC coupled frequency modulation

(FM), and makes FM deviation frequency the active function.

FM sensitivity is selectable. Use the rotary knob, up/down, or numeric entry keys to choose, 100 kHz, 1.00 MHz/V or 10.0 MHz/V.

Frequency deviation is dependent on the magnitude of the input signal. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FM:SENSitivity <num>[freq/V suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum

FM:COUPling AC

FM:STATe ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

FM1 function on, followed by either 100 kHz, lMHz, or 10 MHz

FM0 function off

See Also

m), CONNECTORS

FM On/Off DC

Function Group

MODULATION

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey lets you select DC coupled frequency modulation

(FM) and makes FM deviation frequency the active function.

FM sensitivity is selectable. Use the rotary knob, up/down, or numeric entry keys to choose, 100 kHz, 1.00 MHz/V or 10.0 MHz/V.

Frequency deviation is dependent on the magnitude of the input signal. When DC FM is chosen the swept signal generator displays

DC FM on the message line. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Operating and Programming Reference F-13

FM On/Off DC

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FM:SENSitivity <num>[freq/V suffix][MAXimum]MINimum

FM:COUPling AC

FM:STATe ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also IIVIOD), C O N N E C T O R S

FM On/Off Ext

Function Group [MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) activates the frequency modulation mode for an external source. The FM source is connected to the FM modulation connector. The FM sensitivity function is active. It is factory preset to 10 MHz/V. Use the numeric entry keys, arrow keys, or rotary knob to change the sensitivity to 100 kHz/V or 1 MHz/V.

When external FM is in effect, the RF output is frequency modulated with a rate and depth set by the external source. The FM coupling is controlled by the following softkeys: FM Coupling IOOkHz

FM Coupling DC. The FM coupling defaults to 100 kHz. This is AC coupling for FM rates of 100 kHz or greater. For modulation rates below 100 kHz, choose DC-coupled FM.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that external FM is active and

FM

is displayed on the message line.

For swept signal generators without Option 002, see FM On/Off AC and FM On/Off DC.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FM:SOURce EXTernal

FM:SENSitivity <num>[freq suffix/V]]MAXimum]MINimum

FM:STATe ONIOFF

Analyzer:

FM1 function on, FM0 function off

See Also

m), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

F-14 Operating and Programming Reference

FM On/Off Int

Function Group INIOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) activates the internal frequency modulation mode. No external source is needed.

When internal FM is in effect, the parameters are controlled by the following soft keys: Internal FM Rate Internal FM Deviation

FM Coupling IOOkHz FM Coupling DC Waveform Menu.

The swept signal generator is factory preset to a 1 MHz rate, 1 MHz deviation, and sine wave parameters.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that internal FM is active and

FM

is displayed on the message line.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FM:SOURce INTernal

FM:STATe ONIOFF

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also (MOD_), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

Operating and Programming Reference F-15

Freq Cal Wenu

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

USER CAL

9

This softkey accesses the sweep span calibration menu.

Swp Span Cal Always Performs a sweep span calibration each time the frequency span is changed.

Swp Span Cal Once

Performs a sweep span calibration.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see softkeys listed above.

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter

1

Freq Follow

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

5

This softkey facilitates the entry of correction values. The swept signal generator generates the corresponding CW frequency at the set power level as you scroll the correction cells of the flatness array. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see Fitness

Menu

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Fitness Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

F-16 Operating and Programming Reference

FREQUENCY @Ki--

FREQUENCY [-)

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This hardkey allows access to the frequency functions listed below.

CW/CF Coupled

When this feature is on, the center frequency and the CW frequency is kept equal. Changing either the center frequency or the CW frequency causes the other to change to the same value. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Freq Mult

Freq Offset

List Menu

Step Swp Menu

Up/Down Size CW

Up/Down Size Swept zocim

Sets the frequency multiplier value and applies it to all frequency parameters.

Sets the frequency offset value and applies it to all frequency parameters.

Displays the frequency list create/edit soft keys.

Reveals the stepped frequency sweep edit softkeys.

Sets the frequency step size in the CW frequency mode.

Sets the frequency step size in the swept frequency mode.

Places the swept signal generator in the

CF/AF sweep mode, where the rotary knob and numeric entry keys control CF, and the up/down arrow keys control AF.

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference F-17

Freq Mult

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey lets you set a frequency multiplier value and applies it to all frequency parameters. Any integer value between and including f36 is accepted. Changing the multiplier value changes the display, it does not affect the output of the swept signal generator.

For example:

1. Set the start frequency to 4 GHz.

2. Set the stop frequency to 10 GHz.

3. Set the frequency multiplier to 5.

Note that the display indicates start=20 GHz, stop=50 GHz and asterisks appear next to the frequency data.

4. Now set the stop frequency to 30 GHz. The swept signal generator frequency is 6 GHz, or 30 GHz + 5.

Frequency multiplier and offset are related as shown by the following equation:

Entered value or Displayed Frequency = (Frequency Generated x

Multiplier) + Offset value

The factory preset value is 1. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FREQuency:MULTiplier <num>IMAXimumIMinimum

FREQuency:MULTiplier:STATe ONIOFF(110

<num> will be rounded to the nearest integer.

Analyzer:

SHFA <r-t>

See Also

FREQUENCY [MENU], Freq Off set

F-18 Operating and Programming Reference

Freq Offset

Freq Uffset

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey lets you set a frequency offset value and applies it to all frequency parameters. The frequency offset ranges between and including fllO.O GHz. Changing the frequency offset value changes the display but does not affect the output frequency. Frequency multiplier and offset are related as shown by the following equation:

Entered value or Displayed Frequency = (Frequency Generated x

Multiplier) + Offset value

Programming Codes

The factory preset value is 0 Hz. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

FREQuency:OFFSet <num>]MAXimum]MINimum

FREQuency:OFFSet:STATe ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

SHFB <n>[Hz]Kz]Mz]Gz]]

See Also

FREQUENCY (MENU), Freq Mult

Operating and Programming Reference F-19

FullUsr Cal

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

9

USER CAL

This softkey initiates a full swept signal generator user calibration.

The calibration performed is instrument state dependent. For example, if the swept signal generator is in ramp sweep mode, a sweep span calibration and an auto track is done. If the swept signal generator has amplitude modulation active on a CW signal, then RF peaking and an AM bandwidth calibration is performed.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

See the individual types of calibration.

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

AM BW Cal Always, AM BW Cal Once, Auto Track,

Peak RF Always, Peak RF Once, Swp Span Cal Always,

Swp Span Cal Once

F-20 Operating and Programming Reference

Global Dwell

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

This softkey is used to set a dwell time value for all points in the frequency list array.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see List Menu

Analyzer:NONE

See Also

Enter List Dwell, List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Global Offset

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey is used to set an offset value for all points in the frequency list array.

Programming Codes

SCPI:NONE,

see List Menu

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Enter List Offset, List Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

G

Operating and Programming Reference G-1

H

HP-IB Address

To set the swept signal generator’s HP-IB address, refer to “Address” in this manual.

HP-13 Menu

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey reveals the softkeys in the HP-IB control menu.

Adrs Menu

Reveals the softkeys that allow HP-IB addresses to be changed.

Programming Language Analyzr

Sets analyzer as the external interface language.

Programming Language CIIL

Programming Language SCPI

Sets CIIL as the external interface language.

Sets SCPI as the external interface language.

Three different programming languages are available: n

SCPI,

Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments, is the instrument control programming language developed by

Hewlett-Packard to conform to the IEEE 488.2 standard (replacing

IEEE 728-1982). The IEEE 488.2 standard provides codes, formats, protocols, and common commands that were unavailable in the previous standard.

n

Analyzer

is the programming language compatible with the

HP 8340/41 synthesized sweepers system language and many network analyzers.

n

CIIL,

Control Interface Intermediate Language, is the instrument control programming language used in option 700 swept signal generators. Option 700 swept signal generators are M.A.T.E.

(Modular Automatic Test Equipment) compatible.

Operating and Programming Reference H-l

HP-IB

Henu

See Also

CONNECTORS, HP-IB

“Getting Started Programming” in Chapter I

H-2 Operating and Programming Reference

Internal AM Depth

Function Group

(MOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

Programming Codes

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the AM depth for internally-generated AM. Use the numeric entry keys, arrow keys, or rotary knob to change the value of the depth. The swept signal generator accepts values from 0 to 99.9 percent (0 percent is equivalent to no modulation) and has a resolution of 0.1 percent.

The factory preset depth is 30 percent.

SCPI:

AM[:DEPTH] < num>[PCT]]MAXimum]MINinum]<num>DB

UNIT:AM DB]PCT

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

I

Operating and Programming Reference I-1

Internal AM Rate

Function Group

(MOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

Programming Codes

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the AM rate for internally-generated AM. Use the numeric entry keys, arrow keys, or rotary knob to change the rate. The swept signal generator accepts values from 1 Hz to 1 MHz, however it is specified to 1 MHz only for a sine waveform. Refer to the specifications. The factory preset rate is 100 kHz.

SCPI:

AM:INTernal:FREQuency <num>[<freq suffix>]

IMAXimumJMINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

IIvIoD_), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

Internal AM Waveform Noise

Function Group

(MOD]

Menu Map

Description

4

Programming Codes

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the AM waveform to noise (white noise AM rate; gaussian distribution centered around

AM depth) for internally-generated AM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. The factory preset default is sine wave.

SCPI:

AM:INTernal:FUNCtion NOISe

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD_), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

l-2 Operating and Programming Reference

Internal AH Waveform Sine

Internal AM Waveform Ramp

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the AM waveform to ramp for internally-generated AM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. The factory preset default is sine wave.

SCPI:

AM:INTernal:FUNCtion RAMP

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

IhnoD_), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

Internal AM Waveform Sine

Function Group

INIOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

Programming Codes

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the AM waveform to sine wave for internally-generated AM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. Sine wave is the factory preset waveform.

SCPI:

AM:INTernal:FUNCtion SINusoid

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

LMOD), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

Operating and Programming Reference l-3

Internal AM Waveform Square

Function Group

IIVIOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the AM waveform to square wave for internally-generated AM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. The factory preset default is sine wave.

Programming Codes

SCPI: AM:INTernal:FUNCtion SQUare

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

Internal AM Waveform Triangle

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

4

Programming Codes

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the AM waveform to triangle wave for internally-generated AM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. The factory preset default is sine wave.

SCPI: AM:INTernal:FUNCtion TRIangle

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

l-4 Operating and Programming Reference

Internal F&I Rate

Internal FM Deviation

Function Group

(MOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

Programming Codes

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the FM deviation for internally-generated FM. Use the numeric entry keys, arrow keys, or rotary knob to change the value of the deviation. The swept signal generator accepts values from 1 Hz to 10 MHz. The factory preset deviation is 1 MHz.

SCPI:

FM[:DEViation] <num>[freq suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD_), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

Internal FM Rate

Function Group

(MOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the FM rate for internally-generated FM. Use the numeric entry keys, arrow keys, or rotary knob to change the value of the rate. The swept signal generator accepts values from 1 Hz to 1 MHz, however it is specified to 1 MHz only for a sine waveform. Refer to the specifications. The factory preset rate is 1 MHz (note that the swept signal generator also presets to a sine waveform).

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FM:INTernal:FREQuency <num>[freq suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

Operating and Programming Reference l-5

Internal FM Waveform Noise

Function Group

INIOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

Programming Codes

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the FM waveform to noise

(white noise FM rate; gaussian distribution centered around FM deviation) for internally-generated FM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. The factory preset default is sine wave.

SCPI: FM:INTernal:FUNCtion NOISe

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

Internal FM Waveform Ramp

Function Group

INIOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the FM waveform to ramp for internally-generated FM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. The factory preset default is sine wave.

Programming Codes

SCPI: FM:INTernal:FUNCtion RAMP

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

l-6 Operating and Programming Reference

Internal FH Waveform Square

Internal FM Waveform Sine

Function Group

(MOD]

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the FM waveform to sine wave for internally-generated FM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. Sine wave is the factory preset waveform.

SCPI:

FM:INTernal:FUNCtion SINusoid

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD_), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

Internal FM Waveform Square

Function Group

[MOD)

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the FM waveform to square wave for internally-generated FM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. The factory preset default is sine wave.

SCPI:

FM:INTernal:FUNCtion SQUare

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

Operating and Programming Reference l-7

Internal FM Waveform Triangle

Function Group

INIOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the FM waveform to triangle wave for internally-generated FM. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. The factory preset default is sine wave.

Programming Codes

SCPI: FM:INTernal:FUNCtion TRIangle

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

Internal Menu

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you define the parameters of the internal pulse modulation.

Internal Pulse Generator Width

Sets the width of the on portion of the internally-generated pulse.

I n t e r n a l P u l s e G e n e r a t o r R a t e

Sets the repetition frequency of the internally-generated pulse.

Internal Pulse Generator Period

Sets the period of the internally-generated pulse.

I n t e r n a l P u l s e G e n e r a t o r D e l a y

Delays the pulse from the trigger signal applied to the external trigger.

Internal Pulse Mode Auto

Default mode of generating automatically-triggered internal pulses.

l-8 Operating and Programming Reference

Internal

Pulse Generator Period

I n t e r n a l P u l s e

M o d e

G a t e

Turns on the internal pulse mode during the positive cycle of the externally generated pulse.

Internal Pulse Mode Trigger

Triggers on the leading edge of the external pulse input.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see the individual softkeys listed.

Analyzer:

NONE

Internal Pulse Generator Period

Function Group INIOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set a value for the internal pulse generator’s pulse period. The pulse is adjustable from

300 ns to 400 ms with 25 ns resolution. The factory preset default is 2 ms pulse period. When this feature is active, its current value is displayed in the active entry area.

Since period and rate are inversely related, if both are given values, only the last one will be applied which will cause the first one to be recalculated. Use the one that is convenient for your application. For example, if you set the pulse period, do not change the pulse rate

(the swept signal generator automatically adjusts the rate to match the period).

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULS:INTernal:PERiod <num>[time suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

Operating and Programming Reference l-9

Internal Pulse Generator Rate

Function Group IhnoD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set a value for the internal pulse generator’s pulse rate. The range of acceptable values is from

2.5 Hz to 3.33 MHz. (These values are obtained by taking the inverse of the period.) The factory preset default is 500 Hz. When this feature is active, its current value is displayed in the active entry area.

Since rate and period are inversely related, if both are given values, only the last one will be applied which will cause the first one to be recalculated. Use the one that is convenient for your application. For example, if you set the pulse rate, do not change the pulse period

(the swept signal generator automatically adjusts the period to match the rate).

Programming Codes

SCPI: PULM:INTernal:FREQuency <num>[freq suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “Pulse” and “Modulation”.

Internal Pulse Generator Width

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set a value for the internal pulse generator’s pulse width. The pulse is adjustable from 25 ns to 400 ms with 25 ns resolution. The factory preset default is 1 ms pulse width. If you set a value for the pulse width that is greater than the pulse period, the pulse period is recalculated to a value equal to the pulse width plus 25 ns. When this feature is active, its current value is displayed in the active entry area.

I-10 Operating and Programming Reference

Internal Pulse Mode Gate

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULM:INTernal:WIDTh <num>[time suffix]lMAXimumJMINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

Internal Pulse Mode Auto

Function Group (MOD_)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) is the default mode of generating internal pulses. It is not synchronized to any trigger signal. An asterisk next to the key label indicated that this mode is selected.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULM:INTernal:TRIGger:SOURce INTernal

Analyzer:

NONE

Internal Pulse Mode Gate

Function Group (MOD_)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) logically “ANDs” the internal pulse generator with a gating signal supplied from an external source.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULM:INTernal:GATE ONlOFFlllO

PULM:INTernal:TRIGger:SOURce INTernal

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

m), also see “Pulse” and “Modulation”.

Operating and Programming Reference

I-1 1

Internal Pulse Mode Trigger

Function Group IhnoD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set the internal pulse generator to trigger on the leading edge of the externally generated pulse.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULM:INTernal:TRIGger:SOURce EXTernal

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “Pulse” and “Modulation”.

Invert Input

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) inverts the logic of the external pulse input.

With this function active, +5 V turns off RF power.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULM:EXTernal:POLarity INVerted

Analyzer:

NONE

l-12 Operating and Programming Reference

Leveling Node

ALCoff

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

ALC

1

This softkey lets you open the ALC loop. Direct and separate control of the linear modulator circuit (LVL DAC) and attenuator

(ATN) is possible (see Figure A-l). The power level must be set using an external indicator (power meter/sensor). If the power level is set when the swept signal generator is in CW mode and then pulse modulation is activated, the peak pulse level equals the CW level. The attenuator value is set via the Set Atten softkey in the

POWER menu.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:ALC:STATe OFF10

POWer:ATTenuation:AUTO OFF/O

Analyzer:

SHA3

See Also

(ALC), INIOD), Pulse On/Off External , Set Atten

“Working with Mixers/Reverse Power Effects” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference L-l

Leveling Mode

Normal

Function Group

ALC

Menu Map

Description

1

Programming Codes

This softkey lets you set the leveling mode of the swept signal generator to continuous leveling at the desired leveling point. In this mode, the RF OUTPUT is controlled by the automatic level control (ALC) circuit, otherwise referred to as the leveling loop. The attenuator works in conjunction with the ALC to achieve the full range of power levels. At factory preset, ALC normal is the default state. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

POWer:ALC:STATe ONI 1

Analyzer:

Al, internal normal; A2, external normal; A3, external power meter normal; SHA2, source module normal.

See Also

IALC)

Leveling Mode

Search

Function Group

ALC

Menu Map 1

Description

This softkey causes the ALC to switch off once the desired power level is reached. When this leveling mode is activated, or when power or frequency is changed, the swept signal generator switches to CW frequency and closes the ALC system until the desired power level is reached. The swept signal generator reverts to its original frequency/modulation state and opens the ALC system.

This mode is similar to ALC off mode and is useful for narrow pulse applications. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

L-2 Operating and Programming Reference

Leveling PointIntrnl

Programming Codes

SCPI: POWer:ALC:STATe SEARch

Analyzer: SHAl

See Also (ALC, Pulse Modulation

“Working with Spectrum Analyzers/Reverse Power Effects” in

Chapter 1

Leveling Point

ExtDet

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

ALC

1

This softkey lets you set the swept signal generator to accept an external feedback connection from a negative-output diode detector to level power. The EXT ALC BNC is the input connection for the required signal. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:ALC[:SOURCce] DIODe

POWer:ATTenuation:AUTO OFF]0

Analyzer:

A2

See Also

(ALC)

“Externally Leveling the Swept Signal Generator” in Chapter 1

Leveling Point

Intrnl

Function Group

ALC

Operating and Programming Reference L-3

Leveling PointIntrnl

Menu Map

1

Description

Programming Codes

This softkey lets you set the swept signal generator to level at the output of the directional coupler located inside the swept signal generator. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

POWer:ALC[:SOURce] INTernal

Analyzer:

Al

See Also

IALC)

Leveling Point

Module

Function Group

ALC

Menu Map 1

Description

This softkey lets you set the swept signal generator to level at the output of an HP 8355X series millimeter-wave source module.

All models of the HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator drive mm-wave source modules. High power models of HP 8360 drive the mm-wave source modules directly and to specified power levels.

An HP 8349B power amplifier is needed in other configurations.

The source module interface multi-pin connector provides the communication path between the swept signal generator and mm-wave source module. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:ALC[:SOURce] MMHead

Analyzer:

SHA2

See Also (ALC), C O N N E C T O R S

“Externally Leveling the Swept Signal Generator” in Chapter 1

L-4 Operating and Programming Reference

LINE SWITCH

Leveling Point

PwrMtr

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

ALC

1

This softkey lets you set the swept signal generator to level at the power sensor of an external power meter. This mode of operation requires a feedback connection from the power meter to the EXT

ALC BNC located on the swept signal generator. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI: POWer:ALC[:SOURce] PMETer

Analyzer: A3

See Also

(ALC, CONNECTORS

“Externally Leveling the Swept Signal Generator” in Chapter 1

LINE SWITCH

Function Group

NONE

Menu Map

NONE

Description

The line switch (on/off switch) has two positions, off or standby and on. If line power is connected to the swept signal generator and the line switch is set to off, the swept signal generator is in the standby state (amber LED on). Standby provides power to the internal frequency standard oven.

When line power is connected and the line switch is set to on, the swept signal generator power supplies are enabled and a limited self-test is initiated. The CPU self test is performed; power supplies and the front panel processor are checked.

Programming Codes

NONE

See Also

“INSTALLATION” for information on fuses.

“Error Messages” for information on messages displayed at power on.

Operating and Programming Reference L-5

List Menu

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey allows access to the frequency list functions.

A u t o F i l l Incr

Automatically creates a frequency list using the user-specified increment value.

A u t o F i l l # P t s

Automatically creates a frequency list containing a user-specified number of points.

A u t o F i l l Start

A u t o F i l l S t o p

Global Offset

Pt Trig Menu

Allows the entry of a start frequency for the frequency list.

Allows the entry of a stop frequency for the frequency list.

Reveals the frequency list delete menu.

Delete Menu

Enter List Dsell

Enter List Fxeq

Allows the entry of a dwell time for a frequency point in the frequency list.

Allows the entry of a frequency point into the frequency list.

Enter List Power

Allows the entry of an ALC output power correction value for a frequency in the frequency list.

Global Dwell Automatically sets the dwell time for all points in the frequency list to a user-specified value.

Automatically sets the ALC output power correction value for all points in the frequency list to a user-specified value.

Reveals the frequency list in the point trigger menu.

A frequency list consists of two or more frequency points. A frequency point can be any frequency value within the specified frequency range of the swept signal generator and must be entered before a value for either ALC output power offset or dwell time is accepted. The maximum number of frequency points in a frequency list is 801.

Creating a Frequency List

There are two methods of constructing a frequency list:

1. Use the Enter List Fxeq softkey to begin entering frequency points. The list will be generated in the order the values are entered.

L-6 Operating and Programming Reference

Note

List Menu

2. If the minimum and maximum frequencies of the swept signal generator frequency range are not the endpoints desired for the frequency list, use the Auto Fill Start and Auto Fill Stop softkeys to define the frequency list endpoints. Then, use either the Auto Fill Incr or Auto Fill #Pts softkeys to create the list. A list created by this method is ordered with the lowest frequency as the first point and the highest frequency as the last point of the frequency list.

Editing Frequency Points

To add a frequency point to the list, place the active entry arrow --> where you want the next frequency point to appear. The frequency point is added directly after the value indicated by the arrow.

Lists created by the Auto Fill method are appended to an existing list much the same way frequency points are added to a list. The newly created list is added between the frequency point indicated by the active entry arrow and the point directly after it.

If adding a new list of frequencies causes the existing list to exceed the maximum number of frequency points allowed (801), the new list is not appended to the existing list. The error message TOO MANY

LIST PTS REQUESTED is displayed.

To remove a frequency point and its associated offset value and dwell time, use the delete menu (Delete Current ) softkey. To remove an entire frequency list, use the delete menu, (Delete All ) softkey.

Editing ALC Offset and Dwell Time

Once a frequency point has been entered, you can assign an ALC offset and a dwell time value. Use either the Enter List Power or Global Offset softkey to enter offset values. Use either the

Enter List Dwell or Global Dwell softkey to enter dwell time values.

The editing softkeys of this menu are not accessible over HP-IB.

Frequency lists to be loaded over HP-IB must first be created in the controlling program and then downloaded i n their entirety to the swept signal generator.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

LIST:FREQuency {<num>[freq suffix]]Iv 1 AXimum ] MINimum}

LIST:[POWer]:CORRection {<num>[DB]]MAXimum]MINimum}

LIST:DWELl {<num>[time suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum}

In the above three commands, the entries contained in {} can be repeated between 1 to 801 times.

LIST:DWELl:POINts? [MAXimumlMINimum]

LIST:FREQuency:POINts? [MAXimumIMINimum]

Operating and Programming Reference L-7

List

Nenu

LIST[:POWer]:CORRection:POINts? [MAXimumlMINimum]

In the above three commands, the swept signal generator responds with the number of points for the named parameter that are in the list array.

If a particular list is shorter than another, an error is generated upon execution. An exception is made for the case where the shorter list is of length 1. In this case, the list of length 1 is treated as though it were a list of equal length, with all values the same. At *RST, all lists for the current state are cleared and reset to a single value.

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also (RECALL),(E), Sweep Mode List

“Creating and Using a Frequency List” in Chapter 1

List Mode Pt Trig

Auto

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

Programming Codes

This softkey lets you set the swept signal generator to automatically step through a frequency list, when the swept signal generator is in sweep list mode.

SCPI:

LIST:TRIGger:SOURce IMMediate

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

List Menu, Pt Trig Menu, Sweep Mode List

“Creating and Using a Frequency List” in Chapter 1

L-8 Operating and Programming Reference

List Mode Pt TrigExt

List Mode Pt Trig

Bus

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

This softkey lets you set the trigger point to be the HP-IB. When the swept signal generator receives an HP-IB trigger, it steps to the next frequency point of the frequency list, provided the swept signal generator is in sweep list mode.

Programming Codes

SCPI: LIST:TRIGger:SOURce BUS

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

List Menu, Pt Trig Menu, Sweep Mode List

“Creating and Using a Frequency List” in Chapter 1

List Mode Pt Trig

Ext

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

Programming Codes

This softkey lets you set the trigger point to be an external hardware trigger. When the swept signal generator receives an external hardware trigger, it steps to the next frequency point of the frequency list, provided the swept signal generator is in sweep list mode.

SCPI: LIST:TRIGger:SOURce EXTernal

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

List Menu, Pt Trig Menu, Sweep Mode List

“Creating and Using a Frequency List” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference L-9

( L O C A L )

Function Group

INSTRUMENT STATE

Menu Map

Description

NONE

This hardkey lets you cancel remote operation and return the swept signal generator to front panel operation. The front panel keys are deactivated when the swept signal generator is operated remotely. If the external controller executes a LOCAL LOCKOUT command, pressing the (LOCAL) key does not return the swept signal generator to front panel control.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

LOCAL

Analyzer:

LOCAL

See Also

NONE

“Getting Started Programming” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

L-10 Operating and Programming Reference

M

Ml--M2 Sweep

Function Group

MARKER

Menu Map 3

Description

This softkey lets you set the swept signal generator to start sweeping at the frequency of marker 1 (Ml), and stop sweeping at the frequency of marker 2 (M2). M2 must have a higher frequency value than Ml. If

Mf--M2

Sweep is activated when M2 is at a lower frequency than Ml, the values of Ml and M2 are permanently interchanged. While this function is active, the start/stop frequencies of the swept signal generator are changed to the values of Ml and

M2. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SWEep:MARKer:STATe ONlOFFlllO

Analyzer:

MPl function on, MPO function off.

See Also

M a r k e r

Mi, Start=Ml Stop=M2

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Manual Sweep

Function Group

SWEEP

Menu Map 7

Description

This softkey lets you set the swept signal generator to the manual sweep mode of operation. Depending on what parameter is sweeping, you can use either the rotary knob or the ARROW keys to manually sweep between the start/stop limits. In manual sweep mode, the swept signal generator does not automatically retrace at the sweep end point (the user must turn the rotary knob to retrace), and the green SWEEP LED does not light. The resolution of the rotary knob is 0.1% of the sweep span in either start/stop or CF/AF mode.

The resolution of the @) and a arrow keys are dependent on the

Operating and Programming Reference M-l

Manual Sueep resolution defined by the m and a keys. Frequencies in the manual sweep mode are synthesized, just as they are in CW mode.

There are two major differences between manual sweep and a sweep generated by activating the CW function and rotating the rotary knob or pressing the ARROW keys.

1. The sweep output voltage ramp is 0 to +lO V in both modes, but in CW mode, 0 V corresponds to lowest frequency of the swept signal generator frequency range and +lO V corresponds to the highest frequency of the range. In manual sweep mode,

0 V corresponds to the start frequency

specified

and +lO V corresponds to the stop frequency

specified.

In both cases, the sweep voltage at intermediate frequencies is a linear interpolation of the frequency span. For example, a frequency half-way between the start/stop limits has a sweep voltage of 5 V.

2. The bandcross points in CW mode occur at 2.0, 7, 13.5, 20, 25.5, and 32 GHz.

In manual sweep mode the bandcrossing points have 200 MHz of flexibility, that is automatically used by the swept signal generator for optimum performance. For example, a 2.0 to 7.1 GHz sweep could be accomplished without any band changes in manual sweep mode.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SWEep:MODE MANuallAUTO

This is the command for frequency manual sweep.

POWer:MODE SWEep

POWer:SPAN <num>[lvl suffix]~MAXimum~MINimum

This is the command for power manual sweep.

LIST:MODE MANual

This is the command for manual list sweep.

Analyzer: S3

See Also

Power Sweep, Sweep Mode List

“Continuous, Single, and Manual Sweep Operation” in Chapter 1

M-2 Operating and Programming Reference

(MARKER]

Function Group

MENU SELECT

Menu Map 3

Description

This hardkey allows access to the marker functions.

Amp1 Markers

Causes the swept signal generator to display markers as an amplitude pulse.

Center=Marker

Delta Marker

Changes the swept signal generator’s center frequency to the value of the most recently activated marker.

Display the frequency difference between the active marker and the marker designated by the softkey Delta Mkr Ref .

Delta Mkr Ref

MI--M2 Sweep

Marker MI

Reveals the softkeys in the delta marker reference menu.

Causes the swept signal generator to sweep from

Ml to M2.

Makes Ml frequency the active function.

Makes M2 frequency the active function.

Marker M2

Marker M3

Makes M3 frequency the active function.

Marker M4

Makes M4 frequency the active function.

Marker M5

Makes M5 frequency the active function.

Markers All Off

Turns off all markers.

Start=Ml Stop=M2

Changes the swept signal generator start and stop frequencies to the values of Ml and M2.

The markers are functional whenever an asterisk appears next to the key label, but only one marker can be active at a time. The active marker is indicated in the active entry area.

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference M-3

Marker Ml

Function Group

MARKER

Menu Map 3

Description

The softkeys labeled Marker Ml through Marker

M5

function identically. The softkey turns the marker off/on. When an asterisk appears next to the key label, it indicates that the marker is on, but not necessarily active. A marker is only active when it is indicated in the active entry area.

The active entry area displays the active marker and its frequency value. Use the rotary knob, the ARROW keys, or the entry keys to set the frequency. Markers are displayed normally as Z-axis intensity dots, but can be changed to amplitude pulses (Amp1 Markers ).

When a marker is turned off, the frequency value of that marker is retained in memory. If the marker is reactivated, the stored frequency value is recalled for that marker.

The frequency value of Ml and of M2 can also be used to define parameters in two other marker features: Ml--M2 Sweep and

Start=Mi Stop=M2.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MARKer[l][:FREQ uency] <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimumIMINimum

MARKer[l]:STATe ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

Ml function on, MO function off.

See Also

Amp1 Markers, MI--M2 Sweep,[%%?$, MkrRef Menu,

Start=Mi Stop=M2

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

M-4 Operating and Programming Reference

Marker M2

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

MARKER

3

See MARKER Mi

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MARKer2[:FREQ uency] <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum 1 MINimum

MARKer2:STATe ONlOFFlllO

Analyzer: M2 function on, MO function off.

See Also

Amp1 Markers, Mf--M2 Sweep,(m), MkrRef Menu,

Start=Ml Stop=M2

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

M a r k e r H3

Marker M3

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

MARKER

3

See MARKER Mi

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MARKer3[:FREQ uency] <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimumjMINimum

MARKer3:STATe ONIOFFJllO

Analyzer: M3 function on, MO function off.

See Also

[email protected] Markers,(m), MkrRef Menu

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference M-5

Marker M4

Function Group

MARKER

Menu Map 3

Description

See MARKER Mi

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MARKer4E:FREQ uency] <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum I MINimum

MARKer4:STATe ON(OFFI110

Analyzer: M4 function on, MO function off.

See Also

Amp1 Markers , (m), MkrRef Menu

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Marker M5

Function Group

MARKER

Menu Map 3

Description

See MARKER M1

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MARKer5[:FREQ uency] <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum I MINimum

MARKer5:STATe ONIOFF(110

Analyzer: M5 function on, MO function off.

See Also

Amp1 Markers , C-1, MkrRef Menu

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

M-6 Operating and Programming Reference

Measure Corr

All

Markers All Off

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

MARKER

3

This softkey lets you turn all the markers off. The frequency value given to the markers remains in memory and will be recalled when the marker softkeys are pressed again. Softkeys Amp1 Markers ,

Center=Marker , and Ml--M2 Sweep are not affected by turning the markers off. The function (or the frequency values) is retained as the swept signal generator settings.

Programming Codes

SCPI: MARKer:AOFF

Analyzer: SHMO

See Also

Amp1 Markers , Center=Marker, Ml--M2 Sweep,@%?'ii?)

“Marker Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Measure Corr All

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

5

This softkey enables the swept signal generator to act as a controller to command an HP 437B power meter to measure flatness correction values at all frequency points defined in the flatness array.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu, Mtr Meas Menu

“Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction Array” in

Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference M-7

Measure Corr

Current

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

5

POWER

This softkey lets you enable the swept signal generator to act as a controller to command an HP 437B power meter to measure a single flatness correction value at the current flatness array frequency.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Fltness Menu, Mix Meas

Menu

“Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction Array” in

Chapter 1

Measure Corr

Undef

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map

Description

5

This softkey lets you enable the swept signal generator to act as a controller to command an HP 437B power meter to measure flatness correction values for those frequency points of the flatness array that do not have correction values assigned.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Fltness

Menu,

Mtr Meas Menu

“Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction Array” in

Chapter 1

M-8 Operating and Programming Reference

ffeter On/ilff

AI4

Meter Adrs

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

8

SYSTEM

In cases where the swept signal generator is capable of acting as a controller to an HP 437B power meter, this softkey enables you to set the programming address of the power meter. The address value can be set from 0 to 30, with the factory default address set at 13. The address value is stored in non-volatile memory.

Programming Codes

SCPI: DIAGnostics:INSTrument:PMETer:ADDRess <num>

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Adrss Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

Chapter 3

Meter On/Off AM

Function Group

INIOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you display the value of the depth of the externally-generated amplitude modulation.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MEASure:AM?

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

m), also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

Operating and Programming Reference M-9

Meter On/Off FM

Function Group

m

Menu Map

4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you display the frequency deviation produced by the externally-generated frequency modulation.

Programming Codes

SCPI: MEASure:FM?

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

m), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

(

M O D

]

Function Group

MENU SELECT

Menu Map 4

Description

This hardkey allows access to the modulation functions. The following types of modulation are available:

AM

FM

Amplitude modulation is accepted from an external source at the AM connector. The AM can be scaled either linearly or exponentially. Swept signal generators with Option 002 also have the capability of internally synthesizing amplitude modulation in sine, square, triangle, ramp, or noise waveforms.

Deep AM (a distortion reduction mode) can be selected for use when operating at a deep amplitude modulation level.

Frequency modulation is accepted from an external source at the FM connector. The FM can be either

AC-or DC-coupled. Swept signal generators with

Option 002 also have the capability of internally synthesizing frequency modulation in sine, square, triangle, ramp, or noise waveforms.

M-10 Operating and Programming Reference

NodOut On/Off AM

Pulse

Pulse modulation is accepted from an external source at the PULSE connector. In addition, pulse modulation can also be internally generated.

The pulse is adjustable in standard swept signal generators with 1.0 ps resolution. Swept signal generators can also produce a 27.778 kHz square wave for use with HP scalar network analyzers.

Swept signal generators with Option 002 generate a synthesized pulse that is adjustable with 25 ns resolution.

Additional information is available under “Modulation”, or refer to the type of modulation by name (AM, FM, Pulse).

See Also

“Modulation”

ModOut On/Off AM

Function Group

(MOD)

Menu Map

4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you output the internallygenerated amplitude modulation waveforms to the rear panel

AM/FM OUTPUT connector. When scaled linearly at 100%/V, the maximum output voltage is +l V and the minimum output voltage is

- 1 v .

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MODulation:OUTput:SOURce AM

MODulation:OUTput:STATe ONlOFFlllO

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD, also see “AM” and “Modulation”.

Operating and Programming Reference

M-l 1

ModOut On/Off FM

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you output the internallygenerated frequency modulation waveforms to the rear panel AM/FM

OUTPUT connector. When scaled exponentially at 10 dB/V, the maximum output voltage is offset to 0 V and the minimum voltage level is -4 V.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

MODulation:OUTput:SOURce FM

MODulation:OUTput:STATe ONlOFFlllO

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “FM” and “Modulation”.

M-12 Operating and Programming Reference

Modulation

Modulation

General Circuit Theory

The swept signal generator’s amplitude and pulse modulation performance is directly tied to the ALC (Automatic Level Control) system. Refer to the ALC block diagram in Figure M-l. The ALC system controls the amplitude or power level of the RF output.

A portion of the output signal is detected, summed with the reference level signal, and the difference (error) signal drives an integrate-and-hold circuit. The integrator output drives the RF output power level via the linear modulator. When the sum of the detected and reference signals is 0 volts, the output of the integrator is held at a constant level and the RF output is leveled. This loop is bandwidth-limited by the integrator and the integrate-and-hold circuit. Notice, however, that there is a

feedforward

path that allows changes in power level that are bandwidth-independent from the rest of the ALC loop. Power level information supplied by the level DAC and AM input travels the feedforward path to drive a linear modulator. (See IALC) for additional information on the ALC system.)

PULSE INPUT

-I

Figure M-l. ALC Block Diagram

Operating and Programming Reference M-13

Amplitude

Modulation

Amplitude modulation can be accepted from an external source at the AM connector or can be internally generated by swept signal generators with Option 002. The damage level of the AM input is f15 V DC. The input impedance of the AM connector is 50 0.

A jumper on the A10 ALC board allows you to change the input impedance to 2 kR (See “Adjustments” in the

HP 8360 B-Series

Swept Signal Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept CW Generator

Service Guide.)

The AM can be scaled either linearly at 100% per volt or exponentially at 10 dB per volt.

When internal AM is chosen (Option 002), the rate and depth are set by softkeys in the AM menu. The waveform menu provides a choice of sine, square, triangle, ramp, or noise waveforms. The monitor menu lets you output the internally generated modulation waveforms to the rear panel AM/FM OUTPUT connector. The AM output is scaled the same as it is generated, either 100%/V or 10 dB/V. This connector can drive 50 R or greater. The monitor menu also lets you display the value of the AM depth.

UNLVLED Message

The maximum leveled output is limited by the swept signal generator’s maximum leveled output power specification. (Individual swept signal generators may be capable of greater leveled output power; the unleveled message indicates the actual limit.) Amplitude modulation adds to and subtracts from the reference RF power level.

If an

WL’dLED

message appears on the display, you may be trying to modulate beyond the swept signal generator’s maximum output power capability.

OVRMOD Message

The maximum AM depth is limited to approximately 90% by the detector’s ability to sense low power levels. If you try to amplitude modulate too deep

without

using deep AM mode (explained later), you will see an I:I’GF!MOD message displayed on the message line. Also, if you modulate below -20 dBm ALC level without using deep AM mode or below -50 dBm with deep AM or search ALC mode, you will see an O’4RtKlLS message.

Dynamic Range

The ALC and attenuator combination (when an optional attenuator is present) are automatically set by the swept signal generator to keep the ALC in its most accurate range (0 to -10 dBm). This is called the

coupled attenuator

operating mode.

For applications where modulating across an attenuation switch point is undesirable, you can uncouple the attenuator and manually set the power level of the ALC and the attenuator.

For example, setting the power level to 0 dBm in coupled mode will give an ALC level of 0 dBm and 0 dB of attenuation. In uncoupled mode, the attenuator can be set to 10 dB and the ALC to +lO dBm,

M-14 Operating and Programming Reference

Amplitude Modulation

giving 0 dBm output power and greater AM depth potential. The

ALC can now be varied over its entire range and the attenuator remains at a fixed level.

Uncoupled mode can also be used for the following:

H To increase the available AM depth if you are modulating near the minimum power range of the ALC loop.

n

To offset the power sweep range.

n

To reduce AM noise by operating at a higher ALC level.

AM Rate

The maximum AM rate available is limited by the bandwidth of the components in the RF path. At rates of about 100 kHz, the integrator can no longer respond so the ALC loop is

eflectively

opened. The feedforward path provides the capability to modulate at much faster rates.

RF components in the ALC loop limit the ALC bandwidth to

250 kHz. High power and Option 006 swept signal generators are also limited to 100 kHz by the components in the RF path. Swept signal generators with frequency doublers (A32) are limited by the 100 kHz bandwidth of the doubler for carrier frequencies greater than 20 GHz.

Note that due to the feedforward scheme, AM bandwidth is not affected when amplitude and pulse modulation are simultaneously activated.

Deep AM

Deep AM mode is a means of reducing distortion when the desired

AM depth is very deep (greater than 90%) or when modulating below an ALC level of -20 dBm. Amplitude modulation is summed with the reference level signal. The detected signal is compared to the reference. Therefore, the ALC loop should follow the AM input.

However, the detector’s ability to sense low power levels limits the maximum AM depth. When the modulation signal reduces the output power level to a level which is below the detector’s range limit, the error signal generated sends the integrator to rail, resulting in gross AM distortion. This is where deep AM mode should be used.

Deep AM engages a comparator circuit (see Figure M-l) to sense the power level of the detected signal. When the signal level is out of the detector’s range, the loop integrator switch opens (opening the ALC loop). The output of the integrator is frozen, applying a constant drive to the modulator. Since the modulator’s most linear range is at low power levels, the AM envelope distortion is minimal. When the comparator senses a signal that is within the detector’s range, the integrator switch is closed, re-engaging ALC loop leveling.

Figure M-2 shows the leveled AM characteristics in the different modes. The maximum leveled output with ALC engaged is shown as the swept signal generator’s maximum leveled output specification.

(Individual swept signal generators may have more power; watch

Operating and Programming Reference M-15

Amplitude Modulation

for an

UHL’:rLED

message.) The minimum level is limited by the detector’s range (approximately -20 dBm). With deep AM engaged, the minimum level (where the ALC loop is opened) is set to

-13 dBm. This guarantees that the detector can still sense the signal level with no distortion. With the ALC loop open, the minimum level is limited by the modulator’s range to approximately -50 dBm.

p out

I

Maximum Soecified Power

Figure M-2. Power Accuracy Over the AM Dynamic Range

Calibrating the Linear Modulator

The AM bandwidth calibration feature calibrates the linear modulator gain at the current CW frequency. This results in more accurate performance in deep AM mode when the ALC loop is opened. Figure M-2 shows the calibrated response of the modulator compared to the uncalibrated response. If you choose to calibrate

“Always”, the swept signal generator will automatically perform the calibration whenever you change the CW frequency. Although this feature provides more accurate performance, note that it also slows the frequency switching time by 20 ms.

ALC Bandwidth

Since the ALC loop is open at power levels less than -13 dBm in deep AM mode, power levels at very slow AM rates are subject to integrate-and-hold drift of typically 0.25 dB/s. Setting the ALC bandwidth to low reduces drift by a factor of 10 by switching a larger capacitor into the integrator circuit. The larger capacitor reduces the effects of leakage on the integrator. The ALC bandwidth defaults at factory preset to the auto selection which normally selects the appropriate bandwidth (high or low) for your application. However, in this case (modulating with deep AM at a slow rate), auto mode would have set the ALC bandwidth to high where a setting of low would decrease drift. To make the bandwidth selection, the swept signal generator determines which functions are activated such as

M-16 Operating and Programming Reference

FM Modulation

FM Modulation

frequency list mode, step sweep mode, search leveling mode, sweep frequency mode, AM or pulse modulation, among others. (For a complete explanation of the selection sequence, see “Getting Started,

Advanced” .)

Frequency modulation can be accepted from an external source at the FM connector or can be internally generated by swept signal generators with Option 002. The damage level of the FM input is

&15 V DC. The input impedance is set to 50 0. A jumper on the

All FM Driver board allows you to change the input impedance to

600 R. (See “Adjustments” in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal

Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept CW Generator Service Guide.)

The FM sensitivity can be scaled to either 100 kHz/V, 1 MHz/V, or

10 MHz/V.

When internal FM is chosen (Option 002), the rate and deviation are set by softkeys in the FM menu. The waveform menu provides a choice of sine, square, triangle, ramp, or noise waveforms. The monitor menu lets you output the internally generated modulation waveforms to the rear panel AM/FM OUTPUT connector. The scale of the FM output depends on the FM deviation chosen. The following table shows the scale versus deviation. The monitor menu also lets you display the value of the FM deviation.

FM Coupling

Whether provided from an external source or generated internally

(Option 002), the FM system can be either AC or DC coupled. If you choose AC coupled FM, you will be modulating a phase-locked carrier. This is the specified synthesized operation. The modulation rate must be 100 kHz or greater. If not, the frequency changes caused by the modulation are inside the phase-lock loop bandwidth and the output will not be linear FM. For modulation frequencies below 100 kHz, choose DC coupled FM. In this mode, the phase locked loop is de-activated. This means that the swept signal generator is operating as an open loop sweeper. The swept signal generator will not be phase locked, and therefore, be aware that the phase noise and CW frequency accuracy specifications do not apply.

Operating and Programming Reference M-17

FM Modulation

OVERMOD Message (Maximum Deviation)

The maximum FM deviation is limited by the following two conditions: l

Maximum FM deviation must be less than 8 MHz

and

l

Maximum FM deviation must be less than n x 5 x FM rate

(refer to the “Frequency Bands” specification for the value of n).

The following chart shows the limits of each band given these two conditions.

For example, in band 1 at a 1 MHz FM rate, the FM deviation must be less than 5 MHz.

n (1) x 5 x FM Rate (1 MHz) = 5 MHz.

The FM rate can be decreased as long as the FM deviation remains less than n x 5 x FM rate

and

less than 8 MHz.

1 0

9 xi-

8 s

s

7

.-

5 6 b

0 5

E 4

E z 2

1

N

6

N z

N N N z 5 2

3 z

:

;

2 g&

F M R a t e

N z

G

N

Figure M-3. FM Deviation and Rate Limits

If the FM deviation is set greater than the 8 MHz limit, it must be decreased for specified performance. An

O?ERtKiD

message is displayed on the message line if the FM deviation exceeds n x 5 x FM rate. Then, either decrease the FM deviation or increase the FM rate until both conditions for FM deviation are met.

At FM rate levels greater than those shown for each band corresponding to the 8 MHz FM deviation level, the n x 5 x FM rate value will always be greater than 8 MHz so the maximum FM

M-18 Operating and Programming Reference

Pulse Modulation

deviation

is

no longer limited by the FM rate, only by the maximum limit of 8 MHz.

Pulse Modulation

Pulse modulation can be accepted from an external source at the

PULSE connector or can be internally generated. The damage levels of the PULSE input are +lO and -5 V DC. The input impedance is

50 R. A function generator must be capable of driving TTL levels into a 50 R load. With no input signal, the pulse input is held low, so activating pulse with no input causes RF output to shut off.

The swept signal generator can also produce a 27.778 kHz square wave for use in HP scalar network analyzers. Swept signal generators with Option 002 internally generate a synthesized pulse. The swept signal generator provides internal pulse modulation with pulse widths adjustable with 1 ~LS resolution (adjustable with 25 ns resolution with

Option 002).

Leveling

Pulse leveling performance depends on the accuracy of the diode detector which measures the RF amplitude. The ALC block diagram,

Figure M-4, shows the pulse modulation input signal to the swept signal generator which controls a pulse modulator. The pulse input is represented by trace 1 in Figure M-5. The pulse modulator is either full on or full off. The amplitude, when the pulsed RF is on, is controlled by the linear modulator used for CW leveling and AM.

Trace 2 is the resultant RF pulse, which is the RF output. This pulse is detected by the diode detector. It trails the pulse input because of propagation delays in the pulse modulator and its drive circuits.

The output of the detector is amplified by a logarithmic amplifier

(log amp).

Trace 3 is the output of the log amp. Note that this signal is delayed from the RF output signal and that the rise time is slower.

This is a result of the bandwidth of the detector and the log amp.

The amplitude of trace 3 is summed with the reference signal from the level DAC and the difference (error) signal drives an integrate-and-hold circuit. The integrator output drives the RF output power level via the linear modulator. When the sum of the detected and reference signals is 0 volts, the output of the integrator is held at a constant level and the RF output is leveled.

Trace 4 is the delayed signal from the pulse input which controls the switch in the integrate-and-hold circuit. Trace 4 is timed to coincide with trace 3. Since the integrate-and-hold switch is closed only when trace 3 is high, the integrator responds to correct the power level only when the RF power is on.

Operating and Programming Reference M-19

Pulse Modulation

BR’YDWND

MICRowA”E

OSCluATOR

p-k

- (

T R A C E

2) m;m;py

4-u

17

I

MlCROWA”E

OUTPUT

LOOP -

,NTEGR*TOR

PULSE lNPUT _o

[TRACE I)

(TRACE 4)

HOLD

.3

INTEGRATE

I

Figure M-4. ALC Block Diagram

(B) PULSE WAVEFORMS

0

1

PULSE INPUT

0

2

RF

/ THIS PEDESTAL REPRESENTS

THE RF AMPLITUDE

0

3

LOG AMP OUTPUT

0

4 S / H C O N T R O L

Figure M-5. Pulse Modulation System

M-20 Operating and Programming Reference

Pulse Modulation

Leveling Narrow Pulses

For narrow pulses of less than 1 ps width, either use search leveling mode or use unleveled operation. (If you do not, you will see the output level continue to rise as the swept signal generator tries to correct for the off portion of the cycle.)

In search leveling mode, the RF amplitude is set with pulse modulation off and the ALC loop closed. Then the loop integrator output is measured. Next, the integrator is disconnected and the modulator is driven directly with a DC voltage which has been set to the value that was provided by the loop integrator. Any AM signal present is added to this DC voltage. This procedure is automatic with search leveling mode engaged. The level setting procedure is automatically repeated whenever the carrier frequency or power level is changed and takes approximately 250 ms. This procedure should also be repeated periodically to correct for the effects of temperature drift.

Unleveled operation can be used for very narrow pulses by opening the ALC loop (see “Leveling Mode ALCoff’). The power level is set in CW operation, with pulse modulation off, using an external power meter. With Option 006, pulses as narrow as 20 ns can be produced in this mode. Changes due to temperature drift can be expected in this mode also.

Pulse Envelope

The best pulse envelopes are obtained with the peak RF function

(see “Peak RF Always”). This feature aligns the output filter so that its passband is centered on the RF output. The pulse envelope changes with frequency and changes slightly with power level. Swept signal generators with Option 006 pulse capability vary little with frequency.

The pulse envelope produced by the swept signal generator has finite rise time and overshoot. Below 2.0 GHz, the rise time and overshoot are essentially independent of frequency, but above 2.0 GHz, in swept signal generators without Option 006, they are strongly influenced by the passband shape and centering of the tracking YIG filter.

Source Match

The best source match is obtained at the swept signal generator’s operating frequency. In addition, swept signal generators with certain

RF components at the output provide improved broadband source match. These include swept signal generators with Option 006, with high power output (HP 83623B and HP 83624B), or with the

Option 001 step attenuator set to 210 dB.

Performance can be improved by padding between the reflections. At the source, for output power above -10 dBm, setting the leveling mode to normal results in 0 dB attenuation. If enough power is available, uncoupled operation can be used to improve the swept

Operating and Programming Reference M-21

Pulse Modulation

signal generator’s source match by inserting 10 dB attenuation and using a 10 dB higher ALC level.

Video Feedt hrough

Video feedthrough is a video signal at the modulation rate that is superimposed on the RF envelope (see Figure M-6). If large enough, video feedthrough can disturb mixer balance, amplifier bias, crystal detector output, etc. Because it is low frequency energy, it can disturb systems that are not intended to deal with it, especially demodulation systems. High band (>2.0 GHz) employs a tracking

YIG filter that essentially eliminates video feedthrough except in

Option 006 (b ecause the pulse modulator is after the YIG filter).

Attempts to measure high band video feedthrough can turn out to be measurements of ground currents in coaxial cables. Low band

(<2.0 GHz) employs a low-level mixer followed by a high gain amplifier. At high power levels (2 -10 dBm), the bias levels in the amplifier shift slightly as the RF is turned on or off. The slew of the bias from one level to another couples to the output and produces the video feedthrough waveform. At low ALC levels (-10 dBm), another mechanism dominates. Mixer imbalance produces DC at the output of the mixer, and its magnitude varies with RF amplitude and modulator state. This shifting DC level couples through the amplifier as video feedthrough spikes. In percentage terms, this mechanism gets worse at low levels.

RF ENVELOPE

WITH

VIDEO FEEDTHROUGH

RF ENVELOPE

VIDEO

FEEDTHROUGH

Figure M-6. Video Feedthrough

Slow Rise Time Pulse Modulation for Scalar Network Analyzers

For use with Hewlett-Packard scalar analyzers, the swept signal generator offers a scalar pulse modulation mode that provides approximately 2 ps rise and fall times. An internal oscillator provides the 27.778 kHz square wave with no external connections necessary. The slow waveform reduces the spectral width of the output, improving measurements made on filters with steep skirts. A slow pulse rise time (approximately 2 ps) is available for externally generated pulse inputs as well.

M-22 Operating and Programming Reference

Hodule Menu

Module Menu

Function Group

(ALC)

Menu Map

1

Description

This softkey accesses the source module selection softkeys.

Millimeter-wave source modules can be connected to the swept signal generator source module interface connectors (there is one each on the front and rear panels). These softkeys give you the option of letting the swept signal generator automatically look at both connectors for source modules or telling the swept signal generator to look only at the front or at the rear connector. You can also turn off module sensing completely.

Module Select AUTO

Module Select Front

Module Select Rear

Module Select None

Sets the swept signal generator to automatic selection of the source module.

(Selects the front connector if source modules are present at both front and rear connectors.) This is the default after preset.

Sets the swept signal generator to select the source module connected to the front panel source module interface connector.

Sets the swept signal generator to select the source module connected to the rear panel source module interface connector.

Disables source module sensing.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

Operating and Programming Reference M-23

Module Select AUTO

Function Group

POWER and FREQUENCY

Menu Map

2 and 5

Description

This command sets the automatic selection of the millimeter source module interface connector. The swept signal generator looks at both front and rear connectors and determines the type of source module

(if any) connected. If a source module is present at both connectors, the swept signal generator selects the front connector as the active one. After selecting the interface the instrument frequency limits and multiplier are altered accordingly. However, the leveling point is

not

changed. See Leveling Point Module to set the swept signal generator to level at the output of the source module.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active. This feature is the default after preset.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect:AUTO ONjOFFlllO

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect:AUTO?

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Module

Menu

Module Select Front

Function Group

POWER and FREQUENCY

Menu Map

2 and 5

Description

This command causes the swept signal generator to examine only the front panel source module interface connector to determine the type of source module (if any) connected. The instrument frequency limits and multiplier are altered according to the source module connected. However, the leveling point is

not

changed. See

Leveling Point Module to set the swept signal generator to level at the output of the source module.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

M-24 Operating and Programming Reference

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect FRONtlREARlNONE

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect?

Nodule Select lone

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Module Menu

Module Select None

Function Group

POWER and FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2 and 5

This command disables millimeter source module sensing. The swept signal generator will

not

alter its frequency limits and multiplier even if a source module is connected to either source module interface connector.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect FRONtlREARINONE

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect?

See Also

Analyzer:

NONE

Module

Menu

Operating and Programming Reference M-25

Module Select Rear

Function Group

POWER and FREQUENCY

Menu Map

2 and 5

Description

This command causes the swept signal generator to examine only the rear panel source module interface connector to determine the type of source module (if any) connected. The instrument frequency limits and multiplier are altered according to the source module connected. However, the leveling point is

not

changed. See

Leveling Point Module to set the swept signal generator to level at the output of the source module.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect FRONtlREARlNONE

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect?

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Module Menu

Monitor Menu

Function Group IrvlOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) accesses the menu which allows you to output internally-generated AM and FM waveforms to the rear panel AM/FM OUTPUT connector. It also accesses the softkeys which allow you to display the AM depth and FM deviation of the modulation waveforms.

ModOut On/Off AM

Outputs the AM waveform to the AM/FM

OUTPUT connector.

ModOut On/Off

FM

Outputs the FM waveform to the AM/FM

OUTPUT connector.

Meter On/Off AM Displays the AM depth of the modulating signal.

M-26 Operating and Programming Reference

Meter On/Off FM more n/m

Displays the FM deviation of the modulating signal.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see the individual softkeys listed.

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

m), also see “Modulation”.

more n/m

Function Group

ALL FUNCTION GROUPS

Menu Map

ALL MENU MAPS

Description

The more n/m softkey allows you to page through the menus. Look at one of the menu maps. Notice the line (keypath) drawn from more n/m. By selecting this softkey, the next page of the menu is revealed. If you are viewing the last page of the menu, selecting more n/m returns the first page of the menu. In this softkey “n” represents the page you are on and “m” represents the total number of pages in the menu.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

Not Applicable

Analyzer:

Not Applicable

See Also (jj)

Operating and Programming Reference M-27

Mtr Meas Menu

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map 5

Description

This softkey accesses the meter measure softkeys.

Meas Corr All

Measures flatness correction values for all frequency points in the flatness correction array.

Meas Corr Cursent

Measures a flatness correction value for the frequency point currently in the active line of the flatness correction array.

Meas Corr Undef

Measures flatness correction values for all frequency points in the flatness correction array that have no correction values assigned.

The meter measure function uses an external HP 437B power meter to automatically measure and store power correction values for the frequency points requested.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE, see Fltness Menu

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Flatness Menu

“Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction Array” in

Chapter 1

M-28 Operating and Programming Reference

Peak RF Always

Function Group

POWER, USER CAL

Menu Map 5,9

Description

This softkey appears in two locations: the POWER Tracking Menu and the USER CAL Tracking Menu. The operation is the same in both locations.

This softkey causes the swept signal generator, when in CW or manual-sweep output mode, to align the output filter (SYTM) so that its passband is centered on the RF output. Peaking is used to obtain both the maximum available power and spectral purity, and the best pulse, FM envelopes, at a given frequency. This peaking occurs each time the frequency is changed, or every seven minutes.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates this function is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

CALibration:PEAKing:AUTO ONlOFFlllO

Analyzer: RPl function on, RPO function off.

See Also

Auto Track, Peak RF Once, Tracking Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

P

Operating and Programming Reference P-l

Peak RF Once

Function Group

POWER, USER CAL

Menu Map 5,9

Description

This softkey appears in two locations: the POWER Tracking Menu and the USER CAL Tracking Menu. The operation is the same in both locations.

This softkey causes an instantaneous, one-time execution of the peaking function when the swept signal generator is in the CW or manual sweep mode. It aligns the output filter (SYTM) so that its passband is centered on the RF output.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

CALibration:PEAKing[:EXECute]

Analyzer:

SHAK

See Also

Auto Tracking, Peak RF Always, Tracking Menu

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter I

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map

NONE

Description

This hardkey lets you control the output power level of the swept signal generator. The swept signal generator has different power leveling modes and leveling points, and as such, the

[

POWER LEVEL

) key controls different aspects of the power level (ALC) system.

The following is an explanation of power level operation in the different ALC system configurations.

In

Normal, Internal,

the

(

POWER LEVEL

) key controls the output power level of the swept signal generator directly. The attenuator

(if present) is controlled together with the complete range of the ALC system (t25 to -20 dBm).

P-2 Operating and Programming Reference

(

POWER LEVEL

)

When you press

(

POWER LEVEL

], the active entry area displays:

--> POWER LEVEL :

X. XX dBm, where X represents a numeric value. The data display area indicates:

Power (dBm)

INT : x.xx.

In

Normal, Uncoupled Attenuator,

the

(

POWER LEVEL

] key controls the

Level DAC

and

Level Control Circuits

(see Figure A-l) within the ALC level range (+25 to -20 dBm). The attenuator is uncoupled from the ALC system and is controlled separately with the

Set Atten key.

When you press

(

POWER LEVEL

), the active entry area displays:

--> ATTEN X dB, A L C : X.Xx dBm, where X represents a numeric value. The data display area indicates:

Power (dBm)

INT: x . x x .

In

Normal, External Detector (ExtDet),

the

(

POWER LEVEL

] key controls the output power of the swept signal generator as compared to the external detector feedback voltage. The attenuator

(if present) is automatically uncoupled from the ALC system and the

(

POWER LEVEL

) key controls the

Level DAC

and

Level Control Circuits

(see Figure A-l) within the ALC level range (+25 to -20 dBm).

This mode of operation requires a feedback connection from a

negative-output

diode detector to the EXT ALC connector.

When you press

(

POWER LEVEL

), the active entry area displays:

--> ATTEN X dB, EXT POWER: X.Xx dBm , where X represents a numeric value. The data display area indicates:

Power(dBm)

EXT : x . x x .

In

Normal, Power Meter (PwrMtr),

the

(

POWER LEVEL

) key controls the output power of the swept signal generator as compared to the feedback voltage of the power meter. The attenuator

(if present) is automatically uncoupled from the ALC system and the

(

POWER LEVEL

) key controls the

Level DAC

and

Level Control

Circuits

(see Figure A-l) within a more restricted range of the ALC level. Instead of the 45 dB range of the ALC in other modes, 12 dB is available in this mode, with the upper end of the range set by the

Pwr Mtr Range softkey. This mode of operation requires a feedback connection from the recorder output of a power meter.

Operating and Programming Reference P-3

(POWER LEVEL)

When you press

(

POWER LEVEL

), the active entry area displays:

--> ATTEN X dB, POWER LEVEL: X.Xx dBm , where X represents a numeric value. The data display area indicates:

Power ($Bm)

MTR : x . x x .

In

Normal, Module,

the

(

POWER LEVEL

) key controls the output power of the swept signal generator as compared to the feedback voltage from a millimeter-wave source module. The attenuator (if present) is automatically uncoupled from the ALC system and the

[

POWER LEVEL

) key controls the

Level DAC

and

Level Control Circuits

(see Figure A-l) within the ALC level range (+25 to -20 dBm). This mode of operation requires a feedback connection from the module to the swept signal generator through the SOURCE MODULE

INTERFACE.

When you press

[

POWER LEVEL

), the active entry area displays:

--> ATTEN X dB, MODULE LEVEL: X.Xx dBm , where X represents a numeric value. The data display area indicates:

Power (dBm)

MDL : x . x x .

In

ALCoff,

there is no feedback voltage to level the power, so power level is uncalibrated. A leveling point is not specified in this mode.

The

[

POWER LEVEL

) key controls the linear modulator directly, from 0 to approximately -80 dB. The attenuator (if present) is automatically uncoupled from the ALC system.

When you press

(

POWER LEVEL

), the active entry area displays:

--> ATTEN X dB, REFERENCE: X.Xx dB , where X represents a numeric value. The data display area indicates:

OFF :

Ref (dB) x . x x and the message line indicates: UNLVLED.

In

Search,

any of the leveling points can be specified and used as the comparison feedback voltage. Basically, this mode operates the same as ALCoff after the searched-for power level is reached. The active entry area displays different information depending on the leveling point chosen.

P-4 Operating and Programming Reference

POWER (MENU_)

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer[:LEVEL] <num>[lvl suffix] or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

Analyzer:

PL

See Also a), CONNECTORS, Det Cal Menu,

(FLTNESS

ON

/

OFF

),

Set Atten, Tracking Menu, Uncoupl Atten

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

POWER (i+

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map 5

Description

This hardkey accesses the power function softkeys.

Fltness Menu

Accesses the softkeys in the flatness correction menu.

Power Offset Changes the displayed power to include an offset, but does not change the output power of the swept signal generator.

Power Slope

Power Sweep

Set Atten

Activates the linear, power-per-frequency mode of power output, and makes RF slope (dB/GHz) the active function.

Activates power sweep mode and makes power sweep (dB/swp) the active function.

Activates uncoupled attenuator as the mode of operation and makes the attenuator value the active function.

Tracking Menu

Uncoupl Atten

Accesses the softkeys in the tracking calibration menu.

Uncouples the attenuator from the ALC system.

Up/Dn Power

Allows you to enter values for the power level step size.

All RF power functions except for power level, flatness on/off, and

RF on/off are contained in the power menu.

Operating and Programming Reference P-5

POWER (MENU)

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed previously under this menu key, [ALC),

(FLTNESS

ON

/

OFF

), (

POWER LEVEL

), and (ON/OFF).

“Introducing the HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generators” in

Chapter 1

“Getting Started Advanced” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Power Offset

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map 5

Description

This softkey changes the mapping of absolute power parameters on input to the swept signal generator. It does not change the RF output produced by the swept signal generator. The equation used to determine the displayed value is:

Entered or Displayed Power = Hardware Power (ALC) + Active Offset

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:OFFset:STATe ONlOFFlljO

POWer:OFFset <num>[DB](MAXimum~MINimum~UP(DOWN

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also [

POWER LEVEL

) and POWER [MENU].

P-6 Operating and Programming Reference

Power Slope

Power Slope

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

5

This softkey lets you compensate for system, cable, and waveguide variations due to changes in frequency, by linearly increasing or decreasing power output as the frequency increases. RF slope values may range from -2.50 to +2.50 dB per GHz. The power at the beginning of the sweep equals the current power level. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:SLOPe:STATe ON]OFF]l]O

POWer:SLOPe <num>[DB]]MAXimum]MINimumJUP]DOWN

Analyzer:

SLl function on, SLO function off. Note that because SL functions in the fundamental units of dB/Hz, you program the SL code SLmdt, where m is 1 (on) or 0 (off); d is the numerical value in dB/Hz, and t is either “DB” or the ASCII LF terminator. For example, for a slope of 1.5 dB/GHz use this procedure:

1. 1.5 dB/GHz = 1.5 dB/1,000,000,000 Hz

2. 1.5 dB/lES Hz = 1.5E-9 dB/Hz

3. The programming code is “SL11.5E-9 DB”

See Also

@OWER LEVEL),

Power Sweep

“Power Sweep and Power Slope Operation” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference P-7

Power Sweep

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

P O W E R

5

Programming Codes

This softkey enables the power sweep function. RF output power can be swept both positively and negatively over a selected range.

The level of the power sweep starting point is the power level programmed. Power sweep widths can be 45 dB wide in either direction. However, the settable power sweep range is dependent on the ALC level set. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

POWer:MODE SWEeplFIXed

POWer:STARt <num>[level suffix]IMAXimumIMINimum

POWer:SPAN <num>[level suffix](MAXimum(MINimum

Analyzer:

PSl function on, PSO function off.

See Also

(POWER LEVEL),

Power Slope

“Power Sweep and Power Slope Operation” in Chapter 1

P-8 Operating and Programming Reference

[

P R E S E T

)

Function Group

INSTRUMENT STATE

Menu Map

NONE

Description

This hardkey (green) causes the swept signal generator to perform a short version of self-test, and initializes the swept signal generator to a standard starting configuration. Two states can be defined for the standard configuration: Factory or User.

Press (PRESET) at any time to test the swept signal generator and restore to a standard configuration. If the red LED adjacent to THE

[PRESET) KEY (labeled INSTR CHECK) stays on after preset, the swept signal generator failed self-test; refer to

HP 8360 B-Series

Swept Signal Generator/HP $360 L-Series Swept CW Generator

Troubleshooting Guide.

Cycling power with the POWER switch does not have the same effect as presetting the swept signal generator. Cycling power causes the swept signal generator to display the programming language, the HP-IB address, and the firmware revision date. After the swept signal generator displays this data, it restores its configuration to the state before power was turned off.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:PRESet[:EXECute]

Analyzer:

IP

See Also

Preset Mode Factory, Preset Mode User

“Changing the Preset Parameters” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference P-9

Preset Mode

Factory

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey sets the standard starting configuration of the swept signal generator when the (PRESET) key is pressed, as set by the manufacturer. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active. The following is a description of the configuration.

n

Start sweep at the minimum specified frequency.

w Stop sweep at the maximum specified frequency.

n

Power level set at 0 dBm.

n

Sweep time set to auto.

n

CONT sweep.

n

Sweep mode ramp.

n

ALC leveling point internal.

n

ALC leveling mode normal.

n

Markers set to activate at the center frequency of the sweep.

n

All function values stored in memory registers 1 through 9 remain in their previous states.

n

The checksum of the calibration data is calculated, and if an error is detected, the calibration data in protected memory is used. If the checksum of the protected data is not correct, then default values are used an error message (EEROM FAILED, LOST CAL) is displayed.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:PRESet:TYPE FACTory

Analyzer:

IP, which is the same as (PRESET).

See Also

(PRESET), Preset Mode User

“Changing the Preset Parameters” in Chapter 1

P-10 Operating and Programming Reference

Printer

Adrs

Preset Mode User

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey sets the standard starting configuration of the swept signal generator when the (PRESET) key is pressed, as set by the user. You can define any starting conditions: Set up the swept signal generator with the conditions you want, then select

Preset Mode User. Now whenever you press[w),the swept signal generator returns to the configuration you set. If preset mode user is set, when you press [PJ the swept signal generator displays the following:

*** USER DEFINED PRESET RECALLED ***

You can still do a factory preset. When the user preset mode is active, the softkey Factory Preset appears when you press

[PRESET). An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:SYSTem:PRESet TYPE USER

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(-1, Preset Mode Factory, Save User Preset

“Changing the Preset Parameters” in Chapter 1

Printer Adrs

Function Group

Menu Map

SYSTEM

8

Description

Programming Codes

This softkey lets the swept signal generator recognize a printer address between 0 and 30. The swept signal generator can act as a controller for a printer during self-test, if the log-to-a-printer feature is initiated.

SCPI:

DIAGnostic:INSTrument:PRINTer:ADDRess <num>

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Adrs Menu, Selftest (Full)

Operating and Programming Reference

P-l 1

Function Group

MENU SELECT

Menu Map

NONE

Description

This hardkey lets you view previous menus. All menus visited from the last preset are remembered and displayed in a

“last-visited-first-seen” order. Refer to Figure P-l, and follow the arrow paths as indicated.

SOME OTHER

PREVIOUS MENU

BLANK

KEYlABEL

AREA

Figure P-l. How (PRIOR) Works

The sequence of keystrokes

Figure P-l is: that created the movement shown in

1. FREQUENCY [MENU)

2. more l/2

3. List Menu

4. Delete Menu

5. (PRIOR)

6. [PRIOR)

7. (PRIOR)

P-12 Operating and Programming Reference

Prograu&ng Language CIIL

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

more n/m

Programming

Language Analyzr

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey lets you select Analyzer Language as the swept signal generator’s interface language. This language uses HP 8340/8341 mnemonics and provides HP network analyzer compatibility. Any commands issued within 100 ms of a change in language may be ignored or lost. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:LANGuage COMPatible

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

A&s Menu, ANALYZER STATUS REGISTER

“Getting Started Programming” in Chapter 1

Chapter 3

Programming

Language CIIL

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Operating and Programming Reference P-13

Programming Language CIIL

Description

Programming Codes

This softkey lets you select CIIL as the swept signal generator’s external interface language. The use of this language requires the

M.A.T.E. option (Option 700) to be installed. Any commands issued within 100 ms of a change in language may be ignored or lost. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

SYSTem:LANGuage CIIL

Analyzer:

CIIL

See Also

Adrs Menu

The M.A.T.E. option (Option 700) is documented in a separate manual supplement called,

HP 8360 Series Synthesized Sweepers

Option 700 Manual Supplement.

Programming

Language SCPI

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

8

Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments (SCPI) is the instrument control programming language adopted by

Hewlett-Packard. SCPI provides commands that are common from one Hewlett-Packard product to another, eliminating “device specific” commands.

This softkey lets you select SCPI as the swept signal generator’s external interface language. This is the default language set at the factory. Any commands issued within 100 ms of a change in language may be ignored or lost. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

SYSTem:LANGuage SCPI

Analyzer:

SYST or SCPI

See Also

Adrs Menu, SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY, SCPI STATUS

REGISTER STRUCTURE

“Getting Started Programming” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

P-14 Operating and Programming Reference

Pt Trig Menu

Pt Trig Menu

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey accesses the list mode point trigger softkeys.

List Mode Pt Trig Auto

Automatically steps the swept signal generator to next point in the frequency list.

List Mode Pt Trig Bus

Steps the swept signal generator to the next point in the frequency list when an HP-IB trigger is received.

List Mode Pt Trig Ext

Steps the swept signal generator to the next point in the frequency list when an external hardware trigger is received.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above, List Menu

Operating and Programming Reference P-15

Pulse Delay Normal

Function Group

(MOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set a value for the internal pulse generator’s pulse delay. The output pulse is delayed from the leading edge of the PULSE SYNC OUT signal. The range of acceptable values is from 0 to a maximum of 25 ns

less than

the period. The factory preset default is 0 ns. Use the numeric entry keys, arrow keys, or rotary knob to change the value. When this feature is active, its current value is displayed in the active entry area.

Programming Codes

SCPI: PULM:INTernal:DELay <num>[time suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD_), also see “Pulse” and “Modulation”.

Pulse Delay Trig'd

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey (Option 002 only) lets you set a value for the internal pulse generator’s pulse delay. The output pulse is delayed from the leading edge of the PULSE input signal. The range of acceptable values is from 225 ns to 419 ms. The factory preset default is 225 ns.

Use the numeric entry keys, arrow keys, or rotary knob to change the value. When this feature is active, its current value is displayed in the active entry area.

Programming Codes

SCPI: PULM:EXTernal:DELay <num>[time suffix]~MAXimum(MINimum

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

(MOD), also see “Pulse” and “Modulation”.

P-l 6 Operating and Programming Reference

Pulse Menu

Pulse Menu

Function Group

(MOD)

Menu Map

4

Description

This description is for the Pulse Menu softkey for swept signal generators

without

Option 002. For the Option 002 Pulse Menu softkey go to the “Pulse Menu” heading that follows this one.

This softkey reveals the pulse parameter softkeys.

P u l s e P e r i o d

Sets the internal pulse generator’s pulse period.

Pulse Rate

Pulse Rise Time Auto

Pulse Rise Time Fast

Pulse Rise Time Slow

Pulse Width

Sets the internal pulse generator’s pulse repetition rate.

Applies the appropriate filter

(fast, slow) to both internal and external pulse waveforms.

Applies a fast rise pulse filter to both internal and external pulse waveforms.

Applies a slow rise pulse filter to both internal and external pulse waveforms.

Sets the internal pulse generator’s pulse width.

See Also

Softkeys listed above, IALC), (MOD)

Operating and Programming Reference P-17

Pulse Menu

Function Group IIV1OD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This description is for the Pulse Menu softkey for swept signal generators

with

Option 002. For the standard 002 Pulse Menu softkey go to the “Pulse Menu” heading that precedes this one.

This softkey accesses the pulse modulation softkeys. These softkeys engage external, internal, and scalar pulse modulation. They allow you to define the rise time, and give access to the internal menu for defining the parameters of the internally-generated pulse modulation.

P u l s e On/Off E x t

Toggles on and off the pulse modulation mode for an external pulse source.

Pulse On/Off Scalar

P u l s e On/Off I n t

Internal Menu

Pulse Rise Time East

Pulse Rise Time Slow

Toggles on and off the internal scalar modulation mode.

Toggles on and off the internal pulse modulation mode.

Gives access to the internal menu for defining the parameters of the internally-generated pulse modulation.

Applies a fast rise pulse filter to both internal and external pulse waveforms.

Applies a slow rise pulse filter to both internal and external pulse waveforms.

Pulse Rise Time Auto

I n v e r t I n p u t

Automatically applies the appropriate filter (fast or slow) to both internal and external pulse waveforms.

Inverts the pulse input logic. When active, a +5 V input turns RF power off.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see the individual softkeys listed.

Analyzer: NONE

P-18 Operating and Programming Reference

Pulse OnlQffIntrnl.

Pulse On/Off

Extrnl

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey activates the pulse modulation mode for an external pulse source. The pulse source is connected to the PULSE INPUT

BNC connector and fed to the pulse modulator through a buffer circuit.

When pulse modulation is in effect, the RF output is turned on

(programmed power is produced) and off (>80 dB attenuation) at a rate determined by the pulse modulation input. Pulse and amplitude modulation can be in effect simultaneously. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULSe:SOURce EXTernal

PULSe[:STATe] ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

PM1 function on, PM0 function off.

See Also

IALCJ, CONNECTORS, Ir\noD), Pulse Menu

Pulse On/Off

Intrnl

Function Group m

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey activates pulse modulation mode using the internal pulse generator. No external connection is needed. When internal pulse modulation is selected, the PULSE INPUT BNC becomes an output for the internally generated signal. An asterisk next to the softkey label indicates that this feature is active. The pulse parameters

(width, period, rate, rise time, etc.) are controlled by softkeys. See

Pulse Menu (or Internal Menu for swept signal generators with

Option 002) for a list of these softkeys.

Operating and Programming Reference P-19

Pulse OnlQffIntrnl

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULSe:SOURce INTernal

PULSe[:STATe] ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also (x), (MOD), Pulse Menu

Pulse On/Off

Scalar

Function Group

(MOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

Programming Codes

This softkey activates pulse modulation mode, and sets the internal pulse generator to produce 27.778 kHz square wave pulses

(18 ps pulse width, 36 ps pulse period). The rise and fall times of the RF envelope are approximately 2 ps. These pulses allow proper operation with HP scalar network analyzers in ac detection mode.

An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

PULSe:SOURce SCALar

PULSe[:STATe] ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

SHPM function on, PM0 function off.

See Also

Fp,F, Pulse

Menu

a

P-20 Operating and Programming Reference

Pulse Rate

Pulse Period

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey lets you set a value for the internal pulse generator’s pulse period. The range of acceptable values is from 2 ps to 65.5 ms.

The factory preset value is 2 ms. When this feature is active, its current value is displayed in the active entry area.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULSe:TIMing:PERiod <num>[time suffix] or

MAXimumlMINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also (ALC),m, Pulse Menu

Pulse Rate

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

MODULATION

4

This softkey lets you set the internal pulse generators pulse repetition rate. The repetition rate can vary from 15.26 Hz to 500 kHz. The factory preset value is 500 Hz. When this feature is active, its current value is displayed in the active entry area.

SCPI:

PULse:FREQ uency <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimumIMINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(ALC),m, Pulse Menu

Operating and Programming Reference P-21

Pulse Rise Time

Auto

Function Group

MODULATION

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey lets you set the pulse rise time to depend on the state of the swept signal generator pulse scalar function. If pulse scalar is on, rise time is set to slow. Conversely if pulse scalar is off, then the rise time is set to fast. The factory default is pulse rise time set to auto. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this function is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULM:SLEW:AUTO ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Pulse Menu

Pulse Rise Time

Fast

Function Group

MODULATION

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey lets you set the pulse rise time to 250 ns regardless of any other conditions. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this function is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULM:SLEW <num>[time suffix]]MINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Pulse Menu

P-22 Operating and Programming Reference

Pulse Width

Pulse Rise Time

Slow

Function Group

MODULATION

Menu Map 4

Description

This softkey lets you set the swept signal generator to apply a slow rise pulse filter to both internal and external pulse waveforms. This results in pulses having approximately 2 ps rise/fall times. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this function is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULM:SLEW <num>[time suffix]MAXimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Pulse Menu

Pulse Width

Function Group

(MOD)

Menu Map

Description

4

This softkey lets you set a value for the internal pulse generator’s pulse width. The range of acceptable values is from 1 11s to 65.5 ms.

The factory preset value is 1 ms. When this feature is active, its current value is displayed in the active entry area.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

PULSe:INTernal:WIDTh <num>[time suffix] or

MAXimumIMINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

[E), (l\/roD], Pulse Menu

Operating and Programming Reference P-23

Pwr Mtr Range

Function Group TALC)

Menu Map 1

Description

This softkey lets you specify a range of operation

(from +20 to -60 dBm) for an external power meter, when a power meter is used to level power externally. The factory preset value is

0 dBm. The value specified for Pwr Mtr Range directly affects the power level range for power meter leveling points. When this feature is active, its current value is displayed in the active entry area.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:RANGe <num>[power suffix]]MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Leveling Point PwrMtr

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

P-24 Operating and Programming Reference

R

(

R E C A L L

]

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

8

SYSTEM

This hardkey retrieves a front panel setting that was previously stored in a SAVE register (1 through 8).

Programming Codes

SCPI:

*RCL <num>

The above is an IEEE 488.2 common command.

Analyzer:

RCn, where n= a numeric value from 0 to 9.

See Also

m), SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

“Saving and Recalling an Instrument State” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Ref Dsc Menu

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey reveals the softkeys in the frequency standard menu.

IO MHz Freq Standard Auto Automatically selects the frequency standard to be used by the swept signal generator.

10 MHz Freq Standard Extrnl Sets the swept signal generator to accept an external frequency standard as its reference.

10 MHz Freq Standard Intrnl Sets the swept signalgeneratorto use its internal frequency standard as its reference.

Operating and Programming Reference R-l

Ref Osc Henu

10 MHz Freq Standard None

Sets the swept signal generator to free-run operation, where no frequency standard is used.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

ROSCillator:SOURce:INTernal~EXTernal~NONe

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map

NONE

Description

This hardkey turns the RF power output on or off. Press (-ON/OFF).

If the yellow LED above the hardkey is off, power is off, and

RF OFF appears in the message line of the display. Press the key again to turn on RF power and restore the power value last entered.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:STATe ONlOFFlllO

Analyzer:

RF1 power on, RF0 power off.

See Also

[MOD), (

POWER LEVEL

)

ROTARY KNOB

Function Group

ENTRY

Menu Map

NONE

Description

The rotary knob is active whenever the entry area is on. It controls a rotary pulse generator that allows analog-type adjustment of the active entry area. Although the rotary knob has the feel of analog control, it is actually a digital control that generates 120 pulses per revolution.

Programming Codes

NONE

See Also

ARROW KEYS, ENTRY KEYS

“Entry Area” in Chapter 1

R-2 Operating and Programming Reference

S

@ii--

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map

Description

8

This hardkey allows up to eight different front panel settings to stored in memory registers 1 through 8. Swept signal generator settings can then be recalled with the (RECALL) key. A memory be register can be alternated with the current front panel setting using the Atrnate Regs softkey.

The information stored in memory registers is retained in memory indefinitely when ac line power is constantly available, or for approximately three years without line power. Pressing (PRESET) does not erase the memory registers (1 through 8).

Register 0 is a memory register also. It saves the last front panel settings automatically and can not be accessed through the (SAVE) key. Likewise, register 9 is reserved for user preset storage and can not be accessed with the ISAVE) key. Pressing (PRESET] erases register

0, but not register 9.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

*SAV <num>

The above is an IEEE 488.2 common command.

Analyzer:

SVn, where n= a numeric value from 1 to 8.

See Also

Altrnate Regs , Clear Memory,[m], Save Lock

“Saving and Recalling an Instrument State” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference S-l

Save Lock

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

SYSTEM

8

Programming Codes

This softkey lets you disable the save function. It prohibits the saving of the present instrument state into a save/recall memory register. If this function is active, an error message is displayed. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this function is active.

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

SHSV locks the registers, SHRC unlocks the registers.

See Also

B), Security Menu

“Saving and Recalling an Instrument State” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Save User Preset

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

SYSTEM

8

This softkey lets you store the present state of operation to be used as the PRESET state. Set the swept signal generator to the desired operating conditions. Select

Save

User Preset . The display shows:

- - >

User Defined Preset Saved

To activate this stored information, you must set the preset mode to

User.

SCPI:

SYSTem:PRESet:SAVE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Preset

Mode

User

“Changing the Preset Parameters” in Chapter 1

S-2 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI Conformance

Information

SCPI Conformance Information

The HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators conform to the 1990.0

version of SCPI.

The following are the SCPI confirmed commands implemented by the

HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators: n

:ABORt n

:AM

[:DEPth]

[:DEPth]?

:INTernal

:FREQuency

:FREQuency?

:SOURce

:SOURce?

:STATe

:STATe?

H :CORRection

[:STATe] n

:DISPlay

[:STATe]

[:STATe]?

n

:FM

:COUPling

:COUPling?

:INTernal

:FREQuency

:FREQuency?

:SENSitivity

:SENSitivity?

:SOURce

:SOURce?

:STATe

:STATe?

w :FREQuency

:CENTer

:CENTer?

[:CW]

:AUTO

:AUTO?

[:FIXed]

[:CW]?

[:FIXed]

:AUTO

:AUTO?

[:FIXed]?

:MANual

:MANual?

:MODE

:MODE?

:SPAN

Operating and Programming Reference S-3

SCPI Conformance Information

:SPAN?

:STARt

:STARt?

:STOP

:STOP?

n

:LIST

:DWELl

:POINts?

:DWELl?

:FREQuency

:POINts?

:FREQuency?

n

:MARKer[n]

:AOFF

:FREQuency

:FREQuency?

:REFerence

:REFerence?

[:STATe]

[:STATe]?

n

:POWer

:ALC

:BANDwidth]:BWIDth

:AUTO

:AUTO?

:BANDwidth]:BWIDth?

:ATTenuation

:AUTO

:AUTO?

:ATTenuation?

/:;;:;i e ?

:MODE

:MODE?

:RANGe

:SPAN

:SPAN?

:STARt

:STARt?

:STOP

:STOP?

n

:PULM

:EXTernal

:POLarity

:POLarity?

:INTernal

:FREQuency

:FREQuency?

:SOURce

:SOURce?

S-4 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI Conformance Information

:STATe

:STATe?

n

:PULSe

:PERiod

:PERiod?

:WIDTh

:WIDTh?

n

:ROSCillator

:SOURce

:AUTO

:AUTO?

:SOURce?

n

:STATus

:OPERation

:CONDition?

:ENABle

:ENABle?

[:EVENt]?

:NTRansition

:NTRansition?

:PTRansition

:PTRansition?

:PRESet

:QUEStionable

:CONDition?

:ENABle

:ENABle?

[:EVENt]?

:NTRansition

:NTRansition?

:PTRansition

:PTRansition?

n

:SWEep

:DWELl

:AUTO

:AUTO?

:DWELl?

:GENeration

:GENeration?

:MODE

:MODE?

:POINts

:POINts?

:STEP

:STEP?

:TIME

:AUTO

:AUTO?

:LLIMit

:LLIMit?

Operating and Programming Reference S-5

SCPI Conformance Information

:TIME?

n

:SYSTem

:ALTernate

:STATe

:STATe?

:ALTernate?

:COMMunicate

:GPIB

:ADDRess

:SECurity yFTy e ?

:VERSion?

n

:TRIGger

[:IMMediate]

:SOURce

:SOURce?

The following are the SCPI approved commands implemented by the

HP 8360B-Series swept signal generators:

Instrument-specific diagnostic commands: n

:DIAGnostics

:ABUS

:AVERage

:AVERage?

:STATus?

:ABUS?

:ERRor

:ADD

:INSTrument

:PMETer

:ADDRess

:ADDRess?

:PRINter

:ADDRess

:ADDRess?

:IORW

:IORW?

:LED

:ACTive

:ACTive?

:ERRor

:ERRor?

:IOCHeck

:IOCHeck?

: o s c

:FNCW

:FNDN

:FNUP

:HARM

S-6 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI Conformance Information

:IF

:SAMP

:YO

:OUTPut

:BANDcross?

:FAULts?

:FREQs?

:UNLocks?

:YODacs?

:YTMDacs

:SRECeiver

:ASTate

:ASTate?

:BCRoss

:MODE

:MODE?

:RSWeep

:SWAP

:SWAP?

:BUCKet

:DIVider

:DIVider?

:SWEep

:ARRay[O] l]

:LOCK

:LOCK?

:ARRay[O] l]?

:RESult?

:TEST

:CONTinue

:DATA

:DESC?

:MAXimum?

:MINimum?

:VALue?

:DISable

:ENABle

[:EXECute]

:LOG

:SOURce

:SOURce?

t:;FTy e ?

:LOOP

:LOOP?

:NAME?

:PATCh

:DATA

:DATA?

:POINts?

Operating and Programming Reference S-7

SCPI Conformance Information

:DELete

:POINts?

:RESult?

:TINT?

The following are the commands implemented by the HP 8360

H-Series swept signal generators which are not part of the SCPI definition: n

:AM

:INTernal

:FUNCtion

:FUNCtion?

:MODE

:MODE?

:TYPE

:TYPE?

n

:CALibration

:ADJust

:A4:VCO

:A5:LGAin

:AG:VCO

:AG:SMATch

:AG:LGAin

:AG:IFGain

:AS:OFFSet

:AlO:MGAin

:A13:REFerence

:A13:GAIN

:A14:SRAMp

:AM

:AUTO

:AUTO?

[:EXECute]

:CONStants

:DEFault

:NAME?

:RECall

:SAVE

:CONStants?

:PEAKing

:AUTO

:AUTO?

[:EXECute]

:FINE

:PMETer

:ATTenuation

:ATTenuation?

:DETector

:INITiate?

:NEXT?

S-8 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI Conformance Information

:FLATness

:INITiate?

:NEXT?

:RANGe

:RANGe?

:POWer

:ARRay

:POINts?

:ARRay?

:ATTenuation

:ATTenuation?

:EXTernal

:ARRay

:POINts?

:ARRay?

:RANGe

:RANGe?

:TYPE

:TYPE?

:VALue

:VALue?

:ZERO

:TYPE

:VALue

:VALue?

:RANGe

:RANGe?

:RECall

:SAVE

:ZERO

:ALL

:SECurity

:CODE

:STATe

:STATe?

:SPAN

:AUTO

:AUTO?

[:EXECute]

:TRACk n :(

:ORRection

:ARRay[i]

:ARRay[i]?

:FLATness

:POINts?

:FLATness?

:SOURce[i]

:SOURce[i]?

[:STATe]

[:STATe]?

Operating and Programming Reference S-9

SCPI Conformance Information

n

:FM

[:DEViation]

[:DEViation]?

: FILTer

:HPASs

:HPASs?

:INTernal

:FUNCtion

:FUNCtion?

n

:FREQuency

:MULTiplier

:STATe

:STATe?

:MULTiplier?

:OFFSet

:STATe

:STATe?

:OFFSet?

:STEP

:AUTO

:AUTO?

[:INCRement]

[:INCRement]?

n

:INITiate

:CONTinuous

:CONTinuous?

[:IMMediate] n

:LIST

:MANual

:MANual?

:MODE

:MODE?

[:POWer]

:CORRection

:POINts?

:CORRection?

:TRIGger

:SOURce

:SOURce?

n

:MARKer[n]

:AMPLitude

[:STATe]

[:STATe]?

:VALue

:VALue?

:DELTa?

:MODE

:MODE?

w :MEASure

:AM?

S-10 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI Conformance Information

:FM?

n

:MODulation

:STATe?

:OUTPut

:SOURce

:SOURce?

:STATe

: STATe?

w :POWer

:ALC

:CFACtor

:CFACtor?

:SOURce

:SOURce?

[:STATe]

[:STATe]?

AMPLifier

:STATE

:AUTO

:AUTO?

:STATE?

:CENTer

:CENTer?

:OFFSet

:STATe

:STATe?

:OFFSet?

:SEARch

:SLOPe

:STATe

:STATe?

:SLOPe?

:STATe

:STATe?

:STEP

:AUTO

:AUTO?

[:INCRement]

[:INCRement]?

w :PULSe

:FREQuency

:FREQuency?

n

:PULM

:EXTernal

:DELay

:DELay?

:INTernal

:DELay

:DELay?

:GATE

Operating and Programming Reference

S-l 1

SCPI Conformance Information

:GATE?

:PERiod

:PERiod?

:TRIGger

:SOURce

:SOURce?

:WIDTh

:WIDTh?

:SLEW

:SLEW?

:AUTO

:AUTO?

n :STATus

:MSIB

:CONDition?

:ENABle

:ENABle?

[:EVENt]?

:NTRansition

:NTRansition?

:PTRansition

:PTRansition?

:SREceiver

:CONDition?

:ENABle

:ENABle?

[:EVENt]?

:NTRansition

:NTRansition?

:PTRansition

:PTRansition?

n :SWEep

:CONTrol

:STATe

:TYPE

:MANual

:POINt

:POINt?

~:I?,?&attive~ a ive ?

:MARKer

:STATe

:STATe?

:XFER

:TRIGger

:SOURce

:SOURce?

D :SYSTem

:DUMP

:PRINter

S-12 Operating and Programming Reference

:PRINter?

:ERRor?

:KEY

:ASSign

:CLEar

[:CODE]

[:CODE]?

:DISable

:ENABle

:LANGuage

:MMHead

:SELect

:AUTO

:AUTO?

:SELect?

:PRESet

[:EXECute]

:SAVE

:TYPE

:SECurity

:COUnt

:COUnt?

n

:TRIGger

:ODELay

:ODELay?

n

:TSWeep n

:UNIT

:AM

:AM?

:POWer

:POWer?

SCPI Conformance Information

Operating and Programming Reference S-13

SCPI COMMAND

SUMMARY

Introduction

This entry is organized as follows:

1. IEEE 488.2 common commands in alphabetical order.

2. Command table of SCPI programming commands.

3. Alphabetical listing of commands with descriptions.

IEEE 488.2 Common

a *cLs

Commands

Clear the Status Byte, the Data Questionable Event Register, the

Standard Event Status Register, the Standard Operation Status

Register, the error queue, the OPC pending flag, and any other registers that are summarized in the Status Byte.

l

*ESE <rum> l

*ESE?

Sets and queries the value of the Standard Event Status Enable

Register.

l

*ESR?

Queries the value of the Standard Event Status Register. This is a destructive read.

l

*IDN?

This returns an identifying string to the HP-IB. The response is in the following format: HEWLETT-PACKARD,model,serialnumber,DD

MMM YY, where the actual model number, serial number, and firmware revision of the swept signal generator queried is passed.

a *LRN?

This returns a long string of device specific characters that, when sent back to the swept signal generator, restores that instrument state.

l

*opt

Operation complete command. The swept signal generator generates the OPC message in the Standard Event Status Register when all pending operations have finished (such as, “sweep” or “selftest”).

a *OPC?

Operation complete query. The swept signal generator returns an

ASCII “1" when all pending operations have finished.

S-14 Operating and Programming Reference

l

*OPT?

This returns a string identifying any device options.

l

*RCL <num>

The instrument state is recalled from the specified memory register.

The value range is from 0 to 8.

. *RST

The swept signalgeneratoris set to a predefined condition as follows:

AM:DEPTH value is 50%

AM INTernal FREQuency value is 1kHz

AM:MODENORMal

AM:SOURce EXTernal

AM:STATe OFF

AM:TYPELINear

CALibration:PEAKing:AUTO OFF

CALibration:POWer:ATTenation 0 DBM

CALibration:POWer:RANGe 1

CALibration:SPAN:AUTO OFF

CORRection:FLATness? returns a 0

CORRection:ARRay clear

CORRection:FLATness:POINts? returns a0

CORRection:STATe OFF

DIAGnostics:ABUS:AVERage 1

DIAGnostics:TEST:ENABle ALL

DIAGnostics:TEST:LOG:SOURce FAIL

DIAGnostics:TEST:LOGC:STATel OFF

DIAGnostics:TEST:LOOP OFF

DISPlay[:STATel ON

FM:DEViationvalueis 1 MHz

FM:COUPlingAC

FM:FILTer:HPASs MAXimum

FM:INTernal:FREQuency value is 1 MHz

FM:SENSitivity MAXimum

FM:SOURce EXTernal

FM:STATe OFF

FREQuency:CENTer value is (MAX+MIN)/2

FREQuency:CW value is (MAX+MIN)/2

FREQuency:CW:AUTO OFF

FREQuency:MANualvalueis (MAX+MIN)/2

FREQuency:MODE CW

FREQuency:MULTiplier 1

FREQuency:MULTiplier:STATe OFF

FREQuency:OFFSet 0

FREQuency:OFFSet:STATe OFF

FREQuency:STARtMINimum

FREQuency:STEP calculated from span

FREQuency:STEP:AUTO ON

FREQuency:STOPMAXimum

Operating and Programming Reference S-15

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

1NITiate:CONTinuous OFF

LIST:DWELlvalueis 100 ps (MINimum)

LIST:DWELl:POINts? returns al

LIST:FREQuency value is (MAX+MIN)/2

LIST:FREQuency:POINts? returns a 1

LIST:MANuall

LIST:MODEAUTO

LIST[:POWer]:CORRectionO

LIST[:POWer]:CORRection:POINts? returns a 1

LIST:TRIGger:SOURce IMMediate

MARKer[n]:AMPLitude[:STATe] OFF

MARKer[n]:AMPLitude:VALue 2 DBM

MARKer[n]:FREQuency value same as FREQ:CENT *RST value

MARKer[n]:MODE FREQuency

MARKer[n][:STATe] OFF

POWer:ALC:BANDwidth:AUTO ON

POWer:ALC:CFACtor -16 DBM

POWer:ALC[:SOURce] INTernal

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE:AUTO ON

POWer:ATTenuation:AUTO ON

POWer:CENTer 0 DBM

POWer[:LEVel] 0 DBM

POWer:MODEFIXed

POWer:SLOPe 0

POWer:SLOPe:STATe OFF

POWer:SPAN 0 DB

POWer:STARtO DBM

POWer:STATe OFF

POWer:STEP:AUTO ON

POWer:STEP[:INCRement] 10 DB

POWer:STOP 0 DBM

PULSe:FREQuency 500 KHZ

PULSe:PERiodZ 11s

PULSe:WIDthlps

PULM:EXTernal:DELayMINimum

PULM:EXTernal:POLarityNORMal

PULM:INTernal:DELay value is 0

PULM:INTernal:FREQuency value is 500 kHz

PULM:INTernal:GATE OFF

PULM:INTernal:PERiodvalueis 2 ps

PULM:INTernal:TRIGger:SOURce INTernal

PULM:INTernal:WIDthvalueis 1~s

PULM:SLEWMINimum

PULM:SLEW:AUTO ON

PULM:SOURce INTernal

PULM:STATe OFF

ROSCillator:SOURce:AUTO ON

SWEep:DWELl 100 ~"s

SWEep:DWELl:AUTO OFF

SWEep:POINts 11

S-16 Operating and Programming Reference

SWEep:STEP value is (StopMAX-StartMIN)/lO

SWEep:TIMEMINimum

SWEep:TIME:AUTO ON

SWEep:TIME:LLIMit 10 ms

SWEep:GENerationANALog

SWEep : MODE AUTO

SWEep:MANual:POINt 1

SWEep:MANual[:RELative] 0.50

SWEep:MARKer:STATe OFF

SYSTem:ALTernate 1

SYSTem:ALTernate:STATe OFF

SYSTem:COMMunicate:GPIB:ADDRess 19

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect:AUTO ON

SYSTem:SECurity:COUNt 1

UNIT:AMPCT *UNIT:POWerDBM l

*SAV <nun0

The present instrument state is storedin the specified memory register. The acceptable numeric range is from 1 to 8. An execution error occurs if you try to save state 0.

l

*SRE <r-mm> l

*SRE?

Sets and queries the value of the Service Request Enable Register.

a *STB?

Queries the Status Byte. This is a non-destructive read.

a *TRG

This command performs the same function as the Group Execute

Trigger command defined by IEEE 488.1.

l *TST?

A full selftest is performed, without data logging or looping, and returns one of the following error codes:

Error Code

0

1

4

5

2

3

-1

Definition

Test passed.

Test failed.

Test not run yet. (This is an unlikely event.)

Test aborted.

Can not execute the test.

Can not execute the test, test skipped.

Unrecognized result, software defect.

Operating and Programming Reference S-17

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

l

*WA1

This causes the swept signal generator to wait for the pending commands to be completed before executing any other commands.

For example, sending the command:

TSW;*WAI allows for synchronous sweep operation. It causes the swept signal generator to start a sweep and wait until the sweep is completed before executing the next command.

Table S-l. HP 8360 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

Parameters Parameter Type’

Allowed Values

Command

ABORt

A M

[:DEPth] AM depth %

INTernal

:FREQuency AM frequency numeric extended numeric

0 to 40 dB

:FUNCtion waveform discrete discrete discrete

Boolean discrete

<num> [freq suffix] or MAXimum]Minimum

SINusoidlSQUare

TRIangle]RAMP]NOISe

DEEP]NORMal

INTernallEXTernal

ON]OFF]l]O

LINearlEXPonential

:MODE

:SOURce

:STATe

:TYPE

AM depth

AM source state

AM type

CALibration

:AM

:AUTO

[:EXECute]

:PEAKing auto calibrate

:AUTO

[:EXECute]

:PMETer auto RF peak

:DETector

:INITiate? type of det cal

:NEXT?

power correction value

Boolean

Boolean discrete extended numeric

ON]OFF]l]O

ON]OFF]l]O

IDETectorlDIODe

<num> [lvl suffix]

1 Parameter types are explained in the “Getting Started Programming” chapter.

S-18 Operating and Programming Reference

Table S-l. HP 8360 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY (continued)

Command

CALibration

:PMETer

:FLATness

:INITiate7

:SPAN

:NEXT?

:AUTO

[:EXECute]

:TRACk

Parameters flatness array to cal measured power auto calibrate state

Parameter Type1 discrete extended numeric

Boolean

CORRection

:ARRay[Oll]

:FLATness

:POINts?

1601 pts of correction

501 freqcorrection pairs num of freqcorrection pairs zorrection source state extended numeric extended numeric extended numeric

:SOURce[Oll]

[:STATe]

DIAGnostics

:ABUS

:AVERage discrete

Boolean

4DC averages extended numeric

:STATus?

:INSTrument

:PMETer

:ADDRess

:PRINter lower meter address extended numeric sxtended numeric extended numeric :IORW

:ADDRess winter address r/O device lumber and value

:OUTPut

:FAULts?

:RESult?

Allowed Values

USERlDIODElPMETerlMMHead

<num> [lvl suffix]

ONlOFFlllO

(<num>[DB]}1601*1601

(<num> [freq suffix],

DB}2*801

:MAXimumlMINimum]

4RRaylFLATness

3NIOFFIllO

:num>

I to 31

I to 31

:num>, <num>

Operating and Programming Reference S-19

Table S-l. HP 8360 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY (continued)

Command

IAGnostics

Parameters Parameter Type1

:TEST

:CONTinue

:DATA

:DESC?

:MAXimum?

:MINimum?

:VALue?

:DISable

:ENABle disable listed selftests enable listed selftests

[:EXECute]

:LOG

:SOURce

[:STATe]

:LOOP

:NAME?

:POINts?

:RESult?

:TINT?

[Splay

[:STATe] vl

:COUPling

[:DEViation] log when state state selftest number number of selftests condition of selftests state coupling type peak FM deviation extended numeric or discrete extended numeric or discrete extended numeric discrete

Boolean

Boolean extended numeric

Boolean discrete extended numeric

0 to 288

ALLIFAIL

ON]OFF]l]O

ON]OFF]l]O

0 to 288

ON]OFF]l]O

Allowed Values

{<num>}l*?(ALL

{<num>}l*?]ALL

ACIDC

<num>[freq suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

:FILTer

:HPASs FM AC Bandwidth extended numeric <num>[freq suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

:INTernal

:FREQuency FM frequency extended numeric

:FUNCtion

:SENSitivity

FM waveform discrete extended numeric

<num> [freq suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

SINusoidlSQUare

TRIanglelRAMPlNOISe looKHZ/V]lMHZ/V]lOMHZ/V or MAXimumlMINimum

S-20 Operating and Programming Reference

Command

FM

:SOURce

:STATe

FREQuency

:CENTer

Table S-l. HP 8360 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY (continued)

Parameters

Parameter Type1

Allowed Values

FM source state center freq discrete

Boolean extended numeric

INTernallEXTernal

ONlOFFlllO

[:CW]

:AUTO

:MANual

:MODE

:MULTiplier

:STATe

:OFFSet

:STATe

:SPAN

:STARt

CW freq state freq offset extended numeric coupled to center freq Boolean manual freq extended numeric free mode freq mult state freq span start freq discrete extended numeric

Boolean extended numeric

Boolean extended numeric extended numeric specified freq range or MAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN specified freq range or MAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN

ONlOFFlllO start/stop limits or MAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN

CWlSWEeplLIST

+36 to -36 or MAXimumlMINimum

ONlOFFlllO

+w.wg to -99.999 GHz or MAXimumlMINimum

ONlOFFlllO

0 to MAX-MIN or MAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN specified freq range or MAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN

:STEP

:AUTO auto freq step

[:INCRement] freq step

:STOP stop freq

Boolean extended numeric extended numeric

ONlOFFlllO range or

MAXimumjMINimum specified freq range or

MAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN

NITiate

:CONTinuous

[:IMMediate]

JST

:DWELl cant sweep sweep immediately dwell time

Boolean extended numeric

ONlOFFlllO

(0.1 to 3200 ms}*SOl or

{MAXimum~MINimum}l*8Ol

:POINts?

:FREQuency list freq extended numeric

:POINts num of freq points extended numeric

{specified freq range}*801 or

{MAXimum~MINimum}l*801

[MAXimumlMINimum]

Operating and Programming Reference S-21

Table S-l. HP 8380 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY (continued)

Command Parameters

LIST

:MANual num of points to lock on list sweep mode :MODE

[:POWer]

:CORRection correction level

Parameter Type1 numeric discrete extended numeric

Allowed Values

1 to maximum defined

AUTOlMANual numeric

{+40 to -40 DB}1*801 or

{MAXimum]MINimum}l*801

[MAXimum]MINimum] :POINts?

num of corr levels

:TRIGger

:SOURce

MARKer[n] list trig source

:AMPLitude

[:STATe]

:VALue state amp marker depth discrete IMMediatelBUSlEXTernal

[n] is 1 to 5 (1 is the default)

Boolean extended numeric

ON]OFF]l]O

+10 to

-lODB]MAXimum]MINimum

:AOFF

:DELTa?

<num>,<num> 1 to 5

:FREQuency difference between numeric two markers marker frequency extended numeric discrete numeric

Boolean specified freq range or MAXimumlMINimum

FREQuencylDELTa

1 to 5

ON]OFF]l]o

:MODE

:REFerence

[:STATe]

MODulation

:OUTPut

:SOURce

:STATe

:STATe?

marker mode delta marker ref state output mod source output mod state state

‘OWer

:ALC

:BANDwidth ALC bwidth discrete

Boolean

Boolean extended numeric

AM/FM

ON]OFF]l]O

ON]OFF]l]O

:AUTO

:CFACtor

:SOURce

[:STATe] bwidth selection coupling factor leveling point state

Boolean extended numeric discrete

Boolean

<num> [freq suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

ON]OFF]l]O

0 to -9O[DB] or

MAXimumJMINimum]UP]DOWN

INTernal]DIODe]PMETer]MMHead

ON]OFF]l]O

S-22 Operating and Programming Reference

Command

?OWer

:AMPLifier

:STATE

:AUTO

:ATTenuation

:AUTO

:CENTer

[:LEVel]

:MODE

:OFFSet

:STATe

:RANGe

:SEARch

:SLOPe

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

Table S-l. HP 8360 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY (continued)

Parameters

Parameter Type’

Allowed Values rtten setting

:oupled at ten

,ower sweep

:enter mtput level

3ower mode

3ower equation offset itate bower meter ange earth mode bower slope

:STATe

:SPAN

:STARt tate bower sweep pan bower sweep tart value tF on/off

Boolean extended numeric extended numeric

:STATe

:STEP

:AUTO

[:INCRement]

Boolean tep size determined Boolean tep size extended numeric

:STOP

,ower sweep top value

Boolean

Boolean extended numeric

Boolean extended numeric extended numeric discrete extended numeric

Boolean

Extended numeric

Boolean extended numeric extended numeric

ON]OFF]lJO

ON]OFF(l]O

0 to 90 [DB] or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP(DOWN

ON]OFF]l]O specified power range or

MAXimum]MINimum]UPJDOWN specified power range or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

FIXedlSWEep

<num>[level suffix] or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

ON]OFF(l]O

-30 to -9ODB or tiAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

3N]OFF]l]O]ONCE

1.5 to -2.5DB/GHZ or tiAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

3N]OFF]l]O t45 to -45DB or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN specified power range or

WAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

3N]OFF(l]O

3NIOFFIlIO

10 to O.OlDB or

WAXimumlMINimum specified power range or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

?ULSe

:FREQuency mlse freq extended numeric

:PERiod

:WIDTh mlse period nrlse width extended numeric extended numeric

<num>[freq suffix] sr MAXimumlMINimum

<num>[time suffix]

3r MAXimumlMINimum

<num>[time suffix] nr MAXimumlMINimum

Operating and Programming Reference S-23

Command

‘ULM

:EXTernal

:POLarity

:DELay

Table S-l. HP 8360 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY (continued)

Parameters

Parameter Type1

Allowed Values extnl pulse polarity extnl pulse delay discrete extended numeric

NORMallINVerted

<num>[time suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

:INTernal

:FREQuency intnl pulse frequency extended numeric

:GATE

:PERiod intnl pulse gating intnl pulse period

Boolean extended numeric

<num> [freq suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

ON]OFF]lJO

<num>[time suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

:TRIGger

:SOURce

:WIDTh pulse trigger source intnl pulse width discrete extended numeric

:SLEW pulse modulation extended numeric

INTernal]EXTernal

<num>(time suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

<num>[time suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

ON]OFF]l]O

INTernaljEXTernallSCALar

ON]OFF]l(O

:AUTO

:SOURce

:STATe lOSCillator

:SOURce

:AUTO pulse mod rise time pulse mod source state ref osc source state

TATus

:OPERation

:CONDition?

:ENABle

[:EVENt]?

:NTRansition neg transition filter

:PTRansition pos transition filter

:PRESet

Boolean discrete

Boolean discrete

Boolean numeric numeric numeric

INTernal(EXTernal]NONE

ON]OFF]l]O

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

S-24 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

Table S-l. HP 8360 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY (continued)

Command Parameters

Parameter Type1

STATUS

:QUEStionable

:CONDition?

:ENABle

[:EVENt]?

SRQ enable register

:NTRansition neg transition filter numeric numeric

:PTRansition pos transition filter numeric

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

0 to 2047

SWEep

:CONTrol

:STATe

:TYPE

Boolean discrete

Allowed Values

ON]OFF]l]O

MASTerlSLAVe

:DWELl

:AUTO dual source mode type of sweep control settling time plus dwell time dwell calculation state type of sweep extended numeric

Boolean discrete

0.1 to 3200 rns or MAXimumlMINimum

ONJOFF]l]O

STEPpedlANALog

:GENeration

:MANual

:POINt

[:RELative]

:MARKer

:STATe

:XFER step point number percent of sweep numeric extended numeric

1 to the number of step points

0 to 100%

ON]OFF]l]O

:MODE

:POINts

:STEP

:TIME

:AUTO state

Ml=start,

MZ=stop manual sweep mode switch points in step sweep step size

Boolean discrete numeric extended numeric sweep time extended numeric

Boolean

AUTOlMANual

<num> ]MAXimum]MINimum function of current span

MAXimumlMINimum

200s to 133 ms or

MAXimumlMINimum

ON]OFF]l]O

:LLIMit auto sweep time switch fastest sweep time extended numeric <num>[time suffix] or MAXimumlMINimum

:TRIGger

:SOURce stepped trig source discrete

IMMediatelBUSlEXTernal

Operating and Programming Reference S-25

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

Table S-l. HP 8360 SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY (continued)

C o m m a n d

SYSTem

:ALTernate

:STATe

:COMMunicate

:GPIB

:ADDRes:

:DUMP

:PRINter?

:ERRor?

:KEY

:ASSign

:CLEar

:DISable

:ENABle

:LANGuage

:MMHead

SELect

AUTO

:PRESet

[:EXEC]

:SAVE

:TYPE

:SECurity

:COUnt

(:STATe]

:VERSion?

;ave/recaIl register itate nemory clear itate

Parameters nstrument address ney code assign dears user menu save lock save lock anguage selection areset mode

Parameter numeric

Boolean numeric numeric numeric discrete discrete discrete discrete

Boolean discrete numeric

Boolean

Type1

TRIGger

[:IMMediate]

:ODELay

:SOURce mtput delay rig source extended numeric discrete

TSWeep equivalent of :ABORt;INITiate[:IMMediate]

UNIT

:AM

:POWer

AM depth units default power units string

Allowed Values to 8IMAXimumlMINimum

)N]OFF]l]O to 30

I to 511, 1 to 14 excluding 5 and 10 to 14lALL

;AVE

;AVE

CPI]CIIL]COMPatible

‘RONtlREARINONE

)N]OFF]O]l

‘ACTorylUSER t o 32767]MAXimum]MINimum

)N]OFF]l]O

I

to 3.2s

MMediatelBUSlEXTernal

DBIPCT

DBM

S-28 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

l

ABORt

Causes the sweep in progress to abort and reset. If INIT: CONT is

ON it immediately restarts the sweep. The pending operation flag

(driving *OPC, *WA& and *OPC?) undergoes a transition once the sweep is reset.

l

AM[:DEPTh] <num>[PCTlIMAXimumlMINimuml<num>DB l

AM[:DEPThl? [MAXimumIMINimuml

Sets and queries the percentage of AM when the SOURce is

INTernal. If <num> is received with units ofdB, the value is converted to percent by the equation:

[%] = 100 * (1 - lO**(-dB/20))

Valid ranges of dB are 0 to 40 dB. After *RST, the value is 50%.

l

AM:INTernal:FREQuency <num>[<freqsuffix>] IMAXimumlMINimum l

AM:INTernal:FREQuency? [MAXimumIMINimum]

Sets and queries the frequency (in Hz) of the internal AM source.

After *RST, the value is 1 kHz.

l

AM:INTernal:FUNCtion SINusoidlSQUarelTRIanglelRAMPlNOISe l

AM:INTernal:FUNCtion?

Sets and queries the waveform of the internal AM source. After

*RST, the value is SINusoid.

l

AM:SOURce INTernallEXTernal l

AM:SOURce?

Sets and queries the source of the AM modulating signal. After

*RST, the value is EXTernal.

l

AM:MODE DEEPlNORMal a AM:MODE?

Controls the AM depth limits of the swept signal generator. The

NORMal position is selected at *RST.

l

AM:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

AM:STATe?

Sets and queries the status of the AM modulation. After *RST, the setting is OFF.

l

AM:TYPE LINearlEXPonential l

AM:TYPE?

Sets and queries the type of AM modulation. After *RST, the setting is LINear.

l

CALibration:AM:AUTO ONIOFFIlIO l

CALibration:AM:AUTO?

Sets and queries the automatic modulator calibration switch.

Operating and Programming Reference S-27

If this is ON, each time a frequency or power is changed,

CALibration:AM[:EXECute] is attempted.

l

CALibration:AM[:EXECute]

When AM is on and the swept signal generator is in the CW or manual mode, the swept signal generator performs a modulator calibration as long as power sweep is not active.

l

CALibration:PEAKing:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

CALibration:PEAKing:AUTO?

Sets and queries the automatic peaking function. If AUTO is ON, then a peak is done at regular intervals automatically. After *RST, the setting is OFF.

l

CALibration:PEAKing[:EXECutel

Peaks the SYTM.

l

CALibration:PMETer:DETector:INITiate? IDETectorlDIODe

Initiates the specified calibration. These calibrations require the use of an external power measurement. Once initiated, the swept signal generator sets up for the first point to be measured, and responds to the query with the frequency at which the power is to be measured.

The parameters mean:

IDETector

DIODe

Initiates a calibration of the internal detector logger breakpoints and offsets.

Initiates a calibration of an external detector’s logger breakpoints and offsets.

l

CALibration:PMETer:DETector:NEXT? <num>[lvlsuffix]

The parameter is the measured power that is currently produced by the swept signal generator. You must supply this parameter after measuring the power using an external power meter. The query response is issued after the swept signal generator processes the supplied parameter and settles on the next point to be measured.

The query response is:

> o

The frequency [in Hz] that is currently produced.

0

The calibration is complete.

<O

An error has occurred and the calibration is aborted.

l

CALibration:PMETer:FLATness:INITiate?

USERlDIODelPMETerlMMHead

Initiates the specified calibration. These calibrations require the use of an external power measurement. Once initiated, the swept signal generator sets up for the first point to be measured, and responds to the query with the frequency at which the power is to be measured.

The parameters mean :

USER Initiates a calibration at all of the user flatness points.

S-28 Operating and Programming Reference

DIODe

PMETer

MMHead

Initiates a calibration of the external flatness. Depends on value of CALibrat ion

: PMETer : RANGe.

Initiates a calibration of the power meter flatness.

Depends on value of CALibrat ion : PMETer : RANGe.

Initiates a calibration of the source module flatness.

Depends on value of CALibrat ion: PMETer : RANGe.

l

CALibrat ion : PMETer : FLATness : NEXT? <num> [lvl suffix]

The parameter is the measured power that is currently produced by the swept signal generator. You must supply this parameter after measuring the power using an external power meter. The query response is issued after the swept signal generator processes the supplied parameter and settles on the next point to be measured.

The query response is:

>o

The frequency [in Hz] that is currently produced.

0

The calibration is complete.

<O An error has occurred and the calibration is aborted.

a CALibration:SPAN:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

CALibration:SPAN:AUTO?

Sets and queries the automatic sweep span calibration.

ON

OFF

A calibration is done whenever the sweep span is changed.

A calibration is done only when

CALibrat ion : SPAN [ : EXECut el is sent.

After *RST, the setting is OFF.

l

CALibrat ion : SPAN [ : EXECut el

Causes a sweep span calibration.

l

CALibration:TRACk

Causes an automatic tracking calibration procedure.

l

CORRection:ARRay[i] (<num>[DB])1601*1601 l

CORRect ion : ARRay [i] ?

Sets and queries the entire 1601-point array of correction values that can be added to the internal flatness correction array. The

1601-points are added to the internal flatness array synchronized on the trigger output 1~s pulses. These TTL-level pulses are 1601 evenly spaced points across an analog sweep, or at each point in step or list mode. Entering this array causes the CORRection:SOURce[il command to set to ARRay. There is one array for the foreground state (i=O) and one for the background state (i=l). If the [i] is not specified, the default value is i=O. After *RST, these arrays are cleared.

Operating and Programming Reference S-29

l

CORRection:FLATness (<num>Cfreqsuffix],Cnum>[DB])2*801 l

CORRection:FLATness?

Sets and queries an array of up to 801 frequency-correction pairs. This correction information is used to create a correction array that can be added to the internal calibration array. The correction entered is at the associated frequency. Frequencies in between frequency-correction pair values are determined by linear interpolation. If a value of START or STOP frequency is specified that is outside the limits of the specified frequencies, the correction applied at those points is 0 dB. After *RST, returns a

MinFreq, 0 DB, MaxFreq, 0 DB response.

l

CORRection:SOURce[il ARRaylFLATness l

CORRection:SOURce[il?

Sets and queries the source of correction.

l

CORRection:FLATness:POINts? [MAXimumIMINimum]

Returns the number of frequency-correction pairs entered using the

CORR:FLAT command. After *RST, the value is 2.

l

CORRection[:STATe] ONlOFFlllO l

CORRection[:STATe]?

Sets and queries the switch on the users ALC correction system.

The ‘RST value is OFF.

l

DIAGnostics:ABUS? <num>

Reads the analog bus node number and returns the number of millivolts.

l

DIAGnostics:ABUS:AVERage <num> l

DIAGnostics:ABUS:AVERage?

Sets and queries the number of ADC averages to use during the read

ADC query. After *RST, the value is 1.

l

DIAGnostics:ABUS:STATus?

Queries the status of the prior ADC reading. The response is a single byte that is bit-encoded to mean:

Bit 0

Bit 1

Bit 2

Set to 1, if ADC timed out (hardware fault).

Set to 1, if reading was unsettled.

Set to l,if out of range occurred.

l

DIAGnostics:INSTrument:PMETer:ADDRess <num> l

DIAGnostics:INSTrument:PMETer:ADDRess?

Sets and queries the HP-IB address to use for the power meter during swept signal generator calibration routines. Allowable values are 0

S-30 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

through 31. “RST or power on does not effect this value. Default is

13. It is defaulted only when memory is initialized.

l

DIAGnostics:INSTrument:PRINter:ADDRess <mm> l

DIAGnostics:INSTrument:PRINter:ADDRess?

Sets the HP-IB address of the printer to use during some of the calibration procedures when the swept signal generator assumes

HP-IB control. *RST and power on do not effect this command. The default is 1. The default value is set at memory initialization only.

l

DIAGnostics:IORW <num>,<num>

Performs a write to the I/O Device number specified in the first

<num> and sets it to the value in the second <num>.

l

DIAGnostics:IORW? <mm>

Reads from the specified I/O device number and returns the response data.

l

DIAGnostics:OUTPut:FAULt?

Returns a string of 16, 1s and OS that are equivalent to the fault display.

Bit 0 = PEAK

Bit 1 = TRACK

Bit 2 = RAMP

Bit 3 = SPAN

Bit 4 = V/GHz

Bit 5 = ADC

Bit 6 = EEROM

Bit 7 = PWRON

Bit 8 = CALCO

Bit 9 = PLLZERO

Bit 10 = PLLWAIT

Bit 11 = FNXFER

Bit 12 = CAL YO

Bit 13 = CAL MAN

Bit 14 = TMR CNFLCT

Bit 15 = SEARCH

Operating and Programming Reference S-31

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

l

DIAGnostics:FlESult?

Returns the following information:

<result>, <test failure>, <manual entry point> where, <result> is one of the following:

0

Diagnosis successful.

2

1 Cannot diagnose; full selftest must be executed first.

No failures found-all selftests passed.

-1 Cannot diagnose; diagnosis routine failed to isolate failure.

(software fault)

<test failure> is the test number of the most relevant failure

(-999 if parameter is not used, as in <result> of 1).

<manual entry point> is a string response that identifies the paragraph number in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator/

HP 8360 L-Series Swept CW Generator Service Guide

to begin the troubleshooting procedure.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:CONTinue

Causes the selftest execution to continue when paused for raw data examination. Does nothing in other conditions.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:DATA:DESC?

Returns the description string of the raw data examined during a selftest. It returns “ ” in other conditions.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:DATA:MAXimum?

Returns the upper test limit for the raw data point examined.

Returns “0” in other conditions.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:DATA:MINimum?

Returns the lower test limit for the raw data point examined.

Returns “0” in other conditions.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:DATA:VALue?

Returns the raw data value for the raw data point examined.

Returns a “0” in other conditions.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:DISable (<num>)l*?IALL

Prevents the listed selftests from being selected. If ALL is sent then all of the selftests are disabled. “RST causes DIAG : TEST : ENAB ALL to execute.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:ENABle (<num>)l*?IALL

Enables the listed selftests to execute. If ALL is sent then all of the selftests are enabled. *RST causes DIAG : TEST : ENAB ALL to execute.

S-32 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

l

DIAGnostics:TEST[:EXECute]

<mm>

The specified selftest is executed. Normal instrument operation is suspended and the instrument state is restored upon exiting the selftest mode.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:LOG:SOURce ALLIFAIL l

DIAGnostics:TEST:LOG:SOURce?

Sets and queries the source for the raw data logging. ALL specifies that all raw data points are displayed. FAIL selects only those data points out of the test limits. Both commands are executable in selftest mode. After *RST, the setting is FAIL.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:LOG[:STATe]?

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:LOG[:STATe] ONlOFFlllO

Selects and queries the raw data logging ON/OFF switch. Both commands are executable in selftest mode.

After *RST, the setting is 0.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:LOOP ONlOFFlllO l

DIAGnostics:TEST:LOOP?

Selects and queries the test looping ON/OFF switch. Both commands are executable in selftest mode.

After *RST, the setting is 0.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:NAME? [<nun01

Queries the name of a selftest by number. If the number is not specified then an array of all the selftest names is returned.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:POINts?

Returns the number of points of selftest that is output using

DIAGnostics:TEST:NAME?orDIAGnostics:TEST:RESult?.

l

DIAGnostics:TEST:RESult? [<num>]

Queries the result of a selftest, by number. The response is a string containing either

Passed, Failed,

or

NotRun.

If <num> is missing, an array of selftest results are returned.

l

DIAGnostics:TINT?

<mm>

A test feature that returns the value passed to it. This is used to test the HP-IB interface.

l

DISPlayC:STATel ONlOFFlllO l

DISPlay [ : STATeI ?

Sets and queries the display ON/OFF switch.

After “RST, the value is 1.

Operating and Programming Reference S-33

l

FM:COUPling ACIDC l

FM : COUPling?

Sets and queries the FM input coupling mode.

The *RST value is AC.

l

FM[:DEViationl <num>[freq suffix>] IMAXimumlMINimum l

FM[:DEViation]? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the peak FM deviation (in Hz) when the internal

FM generator is used. After *RST, the value is 1 MHz.

l

FM:FILTer:HPASs <num>[freq suffix’lMAXimumlMINimum l

FM : FILTer : HPASs? [MAXimum I MINimuml

Sets and queries the FM AC bandwidth. There are only two positions to the bandwidth, < 20 Hz and > 100 kHz, but any numeric is accepted. The value is compared to 1 kHz and the correct position is determined (> 1 kHz sets the position to 100 kHz and

5 1 kHz sets the position to 20 Hz). After *RST, the value is

100 kHz.

l

FM:INTernal:FREQuency <num>[freq suffix] 1MAXimumlMINimum l

FM:INTernal:FREQuency? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the frequency (in Hz) of the internal FM source.

After ‘RST, the value is 1 MHz.

l

FM:INTernal:FUNCtion SINusoidlSQUarelTRIaglelRAMPlNOISe l

FM : INTernal : FUNCt ion?

Sets and queries the waveform of the internal FM source.

After *RST, the value is SINusoid.

l

FM:SOURce INTernallEXTernal l

FM:SOURce?

Sets and queries the source of the FM modulating signal.

After ‘RST, the value is EXTernal.

l

FM:SENSitivity Cnum>Cfreqsuffix/VlIMAXimumlMINimum l

FM:SENSitivity? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the FM Input sensitivity.

The *RST value is MAX (10 MHz/V) .

l

FM:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

FM : STATe?

Sets and queries the FM modulation state.

After *RST, the value is OFF.

S-34 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

Frequency Subsystem

Any two frequency setting headers (STARt, STOP, CENTer, or

SPAN) may be sent in a single message and the resulting sweep is what was requested. The order of the headers in the message does not make any difference in the final result. When a message is completed, coupling equations are used to fix the unset parameters to the correct values. These equations specify that: center frequency = (start + stop) / 2 frequency span = (stop - start)

If more than two are sent, then the last two in the message are used to determine the sweep and no errors are given.

If only one header is sent in a message, then the assumed pairs are center/span and start/stop. In other words, if only center is sent, then span is kept constant (if possible) while adjusting center to the requested value. The start/stop frequencies are updated to reflect the changes based on the coupling equations.

The swept signal generator uses “bumping” to move unspecified frequency parameters, but if the final value of any of the frequency headers is the result of bumping, then an error is generated since the user is

not

getting what was specified. This means, to guarantee sequence independence requires sending the frequency pairs in a single message.

Example 1: (present state start = 5 GHz, stop = 6 GHz)

FREQ:STARt 20 GHZ

FREQ:STOP 22 GHZ

an error results since the stop frequency is bumped.

the final sweep does not generate an error

(20 to 22).

Example 2: (present state start = 5 GHz, stop = 6 GHz)

FREQ:STOP 22 GHZ

FREQ:STARt 20 GHZ

no error is generated, start frequency is unchanged.

still no error.

Example 3: (present state start = 5 GHz stop = 6 GHz)

FREQ:STARt 20 GHZ;STOP 22 GHZ

FREQ:STOP 22 GHZ;STARt 20 GHZ

both are fine, no errors.

l

FREQuency:CENTer <num>[freq suffix]lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

FREQuency:CENTer? CMAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the center frequency.

The *RST value is (MAX + MIN)/2.

l

FREQuency[:CWI:FIXedl Qmm>[freq suffix]lMAXimumlMINimum~UPlDOWN l

FREQuency[:CWl ? CMAXimumlMINimuml l

FREQuency[:FIXedl? CMAXimumlMINimuml

Operating and Programming Reference S-35

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

Sets and queries the CW frequency. This does not change the swept/CW mode switch. *RST value is (MAX + MIN)/2 .

See FREQ : CENTER for more information.

l

FREQuency[:CW]:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

FREQuency[:FIXed]:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

FREQuency[:CWl:AUTO?

l

FREQuency[:FIXed]:AUTO?

Sets and queries the CW/ center frequency coupling switch. This switch keeps the two functions coupled together when ON. Changing one ofthem, changes both. *RST setting is OFF. See FREQ:CENTER for more information.

l

FREQuency:MANual <num>[freq suffix]lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

FREQuency:MANual? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the manual frequency. This controls the output frequency in swept manual mode. The limits are START and STOP.

*RST valueis the same as FREQ:CENTER. See FREQ:CENTERfor more information.

l

FREQuency:MODE FIXedlCWlSWEeplLIST l

FREQuency:MODE?

Sets and queries the switch that selects either swept, CW or list operation. *RST value is CW.

l

FREQuency:MULTiplier <num>lMAXimumlMINimum l

FREQuency:MULTiplier? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the frequency multiplier. The numeric value is rounded to the nearest integer. This function changes mapping of frequency parameters on input to and output from the swept signal generator. Changing this does not affect the output frequency of the swept signal generator. Only the displayed parameters and query responses are changed.

The equation implied by this is :

Entered/displayed frequency = (Hardware Freq * Multiplier ) + Offset

After *RST, the value is 1.

l

FREQuency:MULTiplier:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

FREQuency:MULTiplier:STATe?

Queries and turns the frequency multiplier off and on.

After *RST, the setting is OFF.

l

FREQuency:OFFSet Cnum>lMAXimumlMINimum l

FREQuency:OFFSet? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the frequency offset. This function changes the

S-36 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

mapping of the frequency parameters on input to and output from the swept signal generator. Changing this does not affect the output frequency of the swept signal generator. Only the displayed parameters and query responses are changed. The equation implied by this is :

Entered/displayed frequency = (Hardware Freq * Multiplier ) + Offset

After *RST, the value is 0.

l

FREQuency:OFFSet:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

FREQuency:OFFSet:STATe?

Queries and turns the frequency offset off and on.

After *RST, the setting is OFF.

l

FREQuency:SPAN <num>[freq suffix]lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

FREQuency:SPAN? [MAXimumlMINimum~

Sets and queries the frequency span. See FREQ : CENTER for more information.

l

FREQuency:STARt <num>[freq suffix] lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

FREQuency:STARt? CMAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the START Frequency. See FREQ : CENTER for more information. *RST setting is MIN.

l

FREQuency:STEP:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

FREQuency:STEP:AUTO?

Sets and queries the function switch that controls the calculation of the frequency step size (FREQ:STEP:INCR). If the response is

AUTO ON, then the swept signal generator selects a step size that is coupled to the frequency span. The *RST setting is

ON.

l

FREQuency:STEP[:INCRement] <num>[freq suffix]lMAXimumlMINimum l

FREQuency:STEP[:INCRement]?

Sets and queries the frequency step size to use for any node in the frequency subsystem that allows UP and DOWN as parameters. Setting this value explicitly causes a FREQ:STEP:AUTO OFF command.

The *RST setting is automatically calculated from span.

l

FREQuency:STOP <num>Cfreq suffixllMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN a FREQuency:STOP? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the stop Frequency. See FREQ : CENTER for more information. *RST setting is MAX.

Operating and Programming Reference S-37

l

1NITiate:CONTinuous ONlOFFlllO l

INITiate:CONTinuous?

Sets and queries the state of the continuous initiation switch. This is more commonly known as single or continuous sweep. This does not affect a sweep in progress. *RST setting is OFF.

l

INITiate [: IMMediateI

Causes the initiation of a sweep. Useful mainly in the 1NIT:CONT OFF mode of operation (single sweep). By combining the *OPC, *WA1 facilities with the 1NIT:IMM command, the functionality of the analyzer compatible language take

sweep

and

single sweep

command can be achieved.

l

LIST:DWELl C<num>[time suffix] lMAXimumlMINimum)1*801 l

LIST : DWELl?

[MAXimum I MINimum]

Sets and queries the amount of time to dwell at each frequency.

The number of dwells can be queried with LIST:DWELl :POINts?.

This dwell is the time after completing phaselock and turning RF on before changing to the next frequency. After *RST, the value is

100 P”S

(

MIN

).

l

LIST:DWELl:POINts? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Returns the number of dwells entered using the LIST:DWELl command. After *RST returns a 1.

l

LIST:FREQuency (<num>[freq suffix] lMAXimumlMINimum)l*8Ol l

LIST:FREQuency?

Sets and queries a list of frequencies that the swept signal generator phase locks to in the sequence entered when the list mode is selected.

*RST value is the (MAX + MIN)/2.

l

LIST:FREQuency:POINts? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Returns the number of frequencies that have been entered into the list frequency array. After “RST returns a 1.

l

LIST:MANual <num> l

LIST:MANual?

Sets and queries the list point number to go to and lock. The value is a unitless value that is limited between 1 and the maximum number of points in either of the three arrays. This command has no effect unless the list mode is set to manual. This value may be bumped if the number of list frequencies is changed. *RST value is 1.

a LIST:MODE AUTOlMANual

. LIST : MODE?

Selects and queries whether the list is played back automatically or manually as described in LIST:MANual.

S-38 Operating and Programming Reference

LIST:MODE

AUTO

AUTO

AUTO

MANual

LIST:TRIGger:SOURce How the list is played back.

IMMediate

BUS

EXTernal

Don’t care

Each new frequency point is stepped to automatically, after waiting the specified

DWELl time.

Wait for a <GET> or *TRG over the HP-IB before advancing to the next frequency in the list.

Wait for a signal to be received on the external input before advancing to the next frequency in the list.

Only the list point specified by LIST:MANual is played back.

*RST state is AUTO.

l

LIST[:POWer]:CORRection (<num>CDB] lMAXimumlMINimum)l*801 l

LIST[:POWer]:CORRection?

Sets and queries the list of correction levels that correspond to each of the frequencies entered using the LIST:FREQ command. The attenuator is not allowed to change during the list execution. The number of parameters can be from 1 to 801.

After *RST, the value is 0.

l

LIST[:POWer]:CORRection:POINts? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Returns the number of correction points that have been entered into the list array. After *RST returns a 1.

l

LIST:TRIGger:SOURce IMMediatelBUSIEXTernal l

LIST:TRIGger:SOURce?

Sets and queries the list point-to-point trigger source when in the automaticlistmode. See LIST:MODE and 1NIT:CONTfor more details.

*RST state is IMMediate.

l

MARKer[n]:AMPLitude[:STATe] ONlOFFlllO l

MARKer[n]:AMPLitude[:STATe]?

Sets and queries the amplitude marker on/off switch. While [n] may be used, there is really only a single switch for all the markers.

*RST value is OFF.

l

MARKer[n]:AMPLitude:VALue <num>[DBllMAXimumlMINimum l

MARKer[n]:AMPLitude:VALue? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the value of the amplitude marker. While [n] may

Operating and Programming Reference S-39

be used, there is really only a single value for all the markers.

*RST value is 2 dB.

l

MARKer [n] : AOFF

Sets all the markers to OFF at once. While [n] may be used, there is really only a single switch for all the markers.

l

MARKer [n] : DELTa? <num> , <num>

This query returns the difference in frequency between the two specified marker numbers.

l

MARKer [n] : FREQuency <num> [f req suffix] I MAXimum I MINimum l

MARKer [n] : FREQuency? [MAXimum I MINimum]

Sets and queries the specified marker frequency (marker number one is the default if [n] is not specified). The value is interpreted differently based on the value of the marker mode.

MARKer[n]:MODE

FREQuency

DELTa

How the frequency of the marker is determined.

Absolute frequency is used. The limits are confined to the present START and STOP frequency limits.

The value is specified with respect to the reference marker. (MARKer[n]:REFerencel

The *RST values are the same as the FREQ : CENTcommand *RST value.

l

MARKer [n] : MODE FREQuency 1 DELTa l

MARKer [nl : MODE?

Sets and queries the mode of the specified marker. Setting one marker to delta turns all other marker modes to frequency. If [n] is not specified, the default is one. *RST value is FREQuency.

l

MARKer [n] : REFerence <n> l

MARKer [n] : REFerence?

Sets and queries which marker is the reference marker for use in the delta mode. While [n] may be used, there is really only a single reference for all the markers. MARKerl : REFerence 5 ; and

MARKer2:REFerence 5; both set marker 5 as the reference.

l

MARKer [nl [ : STATe]

ON I OFF

I

1

IO

l

MARKer [n] [ : STATe] ?

The state of the specified marker is set and queried (marker number one if [n] is not specified). The *RST value for all markers is OFF.

l

MEASure : AM?

A query-only command that causes the modulating AM signal to be

S-40 Operating and Programming Reference

Power Subsystem

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

measured and the absolute value of the peak percent deviation to be returned.

l

MEASure:FM

A query-only command that causes the modulating FM signal level to be measured and the corresponding peak frequency deviation returned.

l

MODulation:OUTPut:SOURce AMIFM l

MODulation:OUTPut:SOURce?

Sets and queries the source of the rear panel output modulation

BNC.

l

MODulation:OUTPut:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

MODulation:OUTPut:STATe?

Sets and queries the state of the rear panel output modulation BNC.

l

MODulation:STATe?

Queries the status of any modulation. If any of the modulation states are on, then it returns a 1, otherwise it returns a 0.

Any place where dBm is accepted as a suffix, any level suffix is accepted also. In the absence of a suffix, the units are assumed to be as set by the UNIT:POW command.

l

POWer:ALC:BANDwidthl:BWIDth <num>[freq suffixllMAXimumlMINimum l

POWer:ALC:BANDwidth?I:BWIDth? CMAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the ALC bandwidth. This is actually not continuously variable, so the input is rounded to the nearest possible switch position.

is ON.

*RST setting is automatically determined since AUTO l

POWer:ALC:BANDwidthl:BWIDth:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

POWer:ALC:BANDwidthl:BWIDth:AUTO?

Sets and queries the automatic ALC bandwidth selection switch. The

*RST value is

ON.

l

POWer:ALC:CFACtor <num>[DB] lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

POWer:ALC:CFACtor? CMINimumlMAXimuml

Sets and queries the coupling factor used when the command

POWer:ALC[:SOURce] is set toDIODe or PMETer.

l

POWer:ALC:SOURce INTernallDIODelPMETerlMMHead l

POWer:ALC:SOURce?

Operating and Programming Reference S-41

Sets and queries the ALC leveling source selection switch.

The *RST value is INTernal.

l

POWer:ALC[:STATe] ONlOFFlllO l

POWer : ALC [ : STATe] ?

Sets and queries the state switch of the ALC. The positions are :

ON-normal ALC operation

OFF-open loop ALC mode

When on, the power can be programmed in fundamental units as selected by the UNIT:POWer command.

When off, the power is no longer calibrated in absolute units and is set in units of dB of arbitrary modulator setting.

l

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE ONlOFFlOll l

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE?

Sets and queries the state of the amplifier contained in the doubler (for those models with a doubler installed).

Programming a specific value for POWer : AMPLif ier : STATE sets

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE:AUTOto OFF.

l

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE:AUTO ONlOFFlOll l

POWer:AMPLifier:STATE:AUTO?

Sets and queries the automatic selection of the doubler amplifier state. Programming a specific value for POWer : AMPLif ier : STATE sets

POWer : AMPLif ier : STATE:AUTO to OFF. *RST value is ON.

l

POWer:ATTenuation <num>[DB] lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

POWer:ATTenuation? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the output attenuation level. Note that when setting the attenuator level to 10 dB, the output power is decreased by 10 dB. Programming a specified attenuation sets

POWer:ATTenuation:AUTO OFF.

l

POWer:ATTenuation:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

POWer:ATTenuation:AUTO?

Sets and queries the state of the RF attenuator coupling switch.

Programming a specified attenuation sets

POWer:ATTenuation:AUTO OFF.

ON - insures that the amplitude level of the ALC is kept within optimal limits.

OFF - the attenuator setting is set to the value of POW: ATT and left there. The *RST value is ON.

l

POWer:CENTer <num> [lvl suffix]lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

POWer:CENTer? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the center power for power sweep. Default units

(and units for query response) are determined by the UNIT:POWer command.

S-42 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

The coupling equations for power sweep are exactly analogous to those for frequency sweep. Power sweep is allowed to be negative, unlike frequency sweeps.

See FREQ: CENT for a description. *RST value is 0 dBm.

l

POWer[:LEVel] <num>[lvl suffix] lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

POWer[:LEVel]? [MAXimumIMINimum]

Sets and queries the output level. Default units and units for the query response are determined by the UNIT:POWer command. Maximum and minimum levels refer to the leveling mode at the time the command is sent. For example,

*RST;POWer:LEVelMIN; ALC:SOURceMMHeadhas different effects from *RST;POWer:ALC:SOURceMMHead; POWer:LEVelMIN

After *RST, the value is 0 dBm.

l

POWer:MODE FIXedlSWEep l

POWer:MODE?

Sets and queries the setting of the power sweep mode switch. If in the sweep mode then the output level is controlled by the start, stop, center and span functions. If in the fixed power mode then the output is controlled by the POW C : LEVEL] command. The *RST value is FIXed.

l

POWer:OFFSet <num>[DB]lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

POWer:OFFSet? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the power offset. This function changes mapping of absolute power parameters on input to and output from the swept signal generator. Changing this does not affect the output power of the swept signal generator. Only the displayed parameters and query responses are changed. The equation implied by this is:

The entered or displayed power = Hardware Power + Offset After

*RST, the value is 0.

l

POWer:OFFSet:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

POWer:OFFSet:STATe?

Queries and turns the power offset off and on. After *RST, the setting is OFF.

l

POWer:RANGe <num>[lvlsuffix]lMAXimumIMINimumIUPlDOWN l

POWer:RANGe?

Sets and queries the setting of the power meter range. This is used when the command POWer:ALC:SOURceis set to PMETer.

l

POWer:SEARch ONlOFFlllOlONCE l

POWer:SEARch?

Sets and queries the power search switch. This has an interaction with POWer:ALC:STATe as described below.

Operating and Programming Reference S-43

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

ON

I

ON

OFF

POWer:ALC:STATe

ON

P O W e r : S E A R c h

ON

OFF

ONCE not applicable

Power Switch Action

ALC is momentarily closed to level at the requested power, and then the modulator is set to the same voltage in open loop mode. This repeats automatically any time that the power level or frequency is changed.

Normal mode.

Immediately performs a power search. This leaves POWer:SEARch in the ON position.

Modulator setting is explicitly set by user.

I

l

POWer : SLOPe <num> [DB/f req suffix]lMAXimumlMINimumlUP~DOWN l

POWer : SLOPe?

[MAXimum I MINimum]

Sets and queries the RF slope setting (dB per Hz).

FREQ:MODE Affect on Slope

CW or LIST Rotates around 0 Hz.

SWEep or

STEP

Rotates around the start frequency.

The *RST value is 0.

l

POWer:SLOPe:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

POWer:SLOPe:STATe?

Sets and queries the power slope state. *RST value is 0.

l

POWer:SPAN <num>[DB] ~MAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

POWer : SPAN? [MAXimum I MINimum]

The coupling equations for power sweep are exactly analogous to those for frequency sweep. Power sweep is allowed to be negative, unlike frequency sweeps. *RST value is 0.

l

POWer:STARt <num>[lvlsuffix] lMAXimumlMINimumlUPlDOWN l

POWer:STARt? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Default units and units for query response are determined by the command UNIT:POWer. The coupling equations for power sweep are exactly analogous to those for frequency sweep. Power sweep is allowed to be negative, unlike frequency sweeps.

*RST value is 0 dBm.

l

POWer:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

POWer : STATe?

Sets and queries the output power on/off state. *RST value is OFF.

S-44 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

l

POWer:STEP:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

POWer:STEP:AUTO?

Sets and queries the function switch that controls how the power step size (POWer:STEP:INCRement)is determined. If in the automatic state, then the step size is 1 dB. The *RST setting is ON.

l

POWer:STEPC:INCRementl <num>CDB] IMAXimumlMINimum l

POWer:STEP[:INCRementl?

CMAXimum

I

MINimum]

Sets and queries the power step size to be used for any node in the power subsystem that allows UP and DOWN as parameters. Setting this value explicitly causes POWer:STEP:AUTO OFF.

The *RST setting is 10 dB.

l

POWer:STOP Cnum>[lvl suffix] lMAXimumlMINi.mumlUPlDOWN

l

POWer:STOP? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the ending power for a power sweep. Default units and units for query response are determined by the command

UNIT:POWer. The coupling equations for power sweep are exactly analogous to those for frequency sweep. Power sweep is allowed to be negative, unlike frequency sweeps. *RST value is 0 dBm.

l

PULM:EXTernal:DELay <num>[time suffix] lMAXimumlMINimum l

PULM:EXTernal:DELay? [MAXimumIMINimum]

Sets and queries the value of pulse delay from the time the external pulse signal arrives to when the video pulse is generated. The minimum value is 225 ns. After *RST the value is MINimum.

l

PULM:EXTernal:POLarityNORMalIINVerted a PULM:EXTernal:POLarity?

Selects the polarity of the external pulse signal. NORMal causes the positive-going edge of the signal to trigger the internal pulse generator and to turn on the RF. After *RST the value is NORMal.

l

PULM:INTernal:FREQuency <num>[freq suffix] IMAXimumlMINimum l

PULM:INTernal:FREQuency? [MAXimumlMINimum

Sets and queries the frequency of the internal pulse generator.

The *RST value is 500 kHz.

l

PULM:INTernal:GATE ONlOFFlllO l

PULM:INTernal:GATE?

Sets and queries the state of the internal pulse generator’s gating control. When ON, and the pulse trigger source is internal, the external pulse input is used to gate the pulse generator. When pulse trigger source is external, this switch is ignored and no gatingis possible. After *RST, the setting is 0.

Operating and Programming Reference S-45

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

Pulse Subsystem

l

PULM:INTernal:PERiod Cnum>[time suffix] 1MAXimumlMINimum l

PULM:INTernal:PERiod? {MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the period of the internal pulse generator.

The *RST value is 2 pus.

l

PULM:INTernal:TRIGger:SOURce INTernallEXTernal l

PULM:INTernal:TRIGger:SOURce? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the setting of the internal pulse generator’s trigger source. When INTernal, pulse period and frequency determine the repetition rate of the pulse train. When in EXTernal, the repetition rate is set by the EXT PULSE in jack. After *RST, the value is

INTernal.

l

PULM:INTernal:WIDTH <num>(time suffix] 1MAXimumlMINimum l

PULM:INTernal:WIDTH? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the width of the internal pulse generator. The "RST value is 1 ps.

Since frequency and period are inversely related, if both are sent in the same message, only the last one is applied. If the WIDth command and either the FREQuency or PERiod command are sent in the same message, they must be accepted without error if the resulting pulse is possible.

l

PULSe:FREQuency <num>[freq suffix] 1MAXimumlMINimum l

PULSe:FREQuency? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the frequency of the internal pulse generator. The resolution of the frequency is such that the resulting period is set to a resolution of 1 ps. The *RST value is 500 kHz.

l

PULSe:PERiod <num>[time suffix] 1MAXimumlMINimum l

PULSe:PERiod? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the period of the internal pulse generator. The resolution of this is 1 ps. The *RST value is 2 ps.

l

PULSe:WIDTh Cnum>[time suffix] IMAXimumlMINimum l

PULSe:WIDTh? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the width of the internal pulse generator. The *RST value is 1 ~.ls.

l

PULM:SLEW Cnum>Ctime suffix] 1MAXimumlMINimum l

PULM:SLEW? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the rise time for the pulse modulation. The typical usage is MAX

I

MIN since calibrating the rise time of the pulses is not common. Slow pulse is set by the command PULS:SLEW MAX. Any value above 1.8 ps is set to maximum. The *RST setting is MIN.

S-46 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

l

PULM:SLEW:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

PULM:SLEW:AUTO?

Sets and queries the automatic setting of rise time for the pulse modulation system. The *RST setting is ON.

l

PULM:SOURce INTernallEXTernallSCALar l

PULM:SOURce?

Sets and queries the source for the pulse modulation control signal.

*RST value is INTernal.

l

PULM:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

PULM:STATe?

Sets and queries the state of pulse modulation. The *RST value is

0.

a ROSCillator:SOURce?

l

ROSCillator:SOURce INTernallEXTernallNONE

Sets and queries the reference oscillator selection switch. The command to set the switch will cause ROSC:SOUR:AUTO OFF to be done also. The ‘RST value is automatically determined.

l

ROSCillator:SOURce:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

ROSCillator:SOURce:AUTO?

Sets and queries the automatic reference selection switch.

The *RST value is 1.

l

STATus:OPERation:CONDition?

Queries the Standard Operation Condition register.

l

STATus:OPERation:ENABle <num> l

STATus:OPERation:ENABle?

Sets and queries the Standard Operation Enable register.

The STATus:PRESet value is 0.

l

STATus:OPERation[:EVENt]?

Queries the Standard Operation Event Register. This is a destructive read.

l

STATus:OPERation:NTRansition Q-mm> l

STATus:OPERation:NTRansition?

Sets and queries the Standard Operation Negative Transition Filter.

The STATus:PRESet value is 0.

l

STATus:OPERation:PTRansition

<mm> l

STATus:OPERation:PTRansition.?

Sets and queries the Standard Operation Positive Transition Filter.

After STATus:PRESet, all used bits are set to 1s.

Operating and Programming Reference S-47

l

STATUS:PRESet

This command presets the following enable and transition registers:

MSIB, OPERation, QUEStionable, and SRECeiver.

ENABle Is set to all 0s.

NTRansition Is set to all 0s.

PTRansition All bits used are set to 1s. Unused bits remain OS.

l

STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition?

Queries the Data Questionable Condition Register.

l

STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle <mm> l

STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle?

Sets and queries the Data Questionable SRQ Enable register.

The

STATus:PRESet value is 0.

l

STATus:QUEStionable[:EVENt]?

Queries the Data Questionable Event Register. This is a destructive read.

l

STATus:QUEStionable:NTRansition <rum> l

STATus:QUEStionable:NTRansition?

Sets and queries the Negative TRansition Filter for the Data

Questionable Status Register. The STAT

US

:PRESet value is 0.

l

STATus:QUEStionable:PTRansition Cnum> l

STATus:QUEStionable:PTRansition?

Sets and queries the Positive TRansition Filter for the Data

Questionable Status Register. After STAT

US

: PRESet, all used bits are set to 1s.

S-48 Operating and Programming Reference

Sweep Subsystem

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

Interactions between dwell, sweep time, points, step size, and frequency span are as follows:

SWEep:TIME = (5 ms + SWEep:DWELl) x (SWEep:POINts - 1)

FREQ:SPAN = SWEep:STEP x (SWEep:POINts - 1)

DWELl

OFF

OFF

ON

ON

T I M E

OFF

ON

OFF

ON

S W E e p : x x : A U T O s w i t c h e s

Switch Action

No coupling between SWEep:DWELl,

SWEep:TIME and SWEep:POINts.

No coupling between SWEep:DWELl,

SWEep:TIME and SWEep:POINts.

When SWEEP:TIME or SWEEP:POINts are changed, SWEep:DWELl =

(SWEep:TIME / (SWEep:POINts - 1)) - 5 mS.

SWEep:DWELl is limited to 100 ps, minimum.

SWEep:DWELl = 100 ps (MINimum).

SWEep:TIME = 5.1 ms

x

(SWEep:POINts - 1)

l

SWEep:CONTrol:STATe ONIOFFIllO l

SWEep:CONTrol:STATe?

Sets and queries the state of the sweep control.

OFF

O N

Normal source mode.

Use master slave source mode.

*RST value is OFF.

l

SWEep:CONTrol:TYPE MASTerlSLAVe a SWEep:CONTrol:TYPE?

Sets and queries the swept signal generator, whether it is in master or slave mode. This applies in a dual source mode. *RST value is

MASTer.

l

SWEep:DWELl <num>[time suffix] 1MAXimumlMINimum l

SWEep : DWELl?

[MAXimum 1 MINimumI

Sets and queries the amount of time in seconds that the swept signal generator stays (dwell) t

source settled

SRQ

and pulsing the Trigger

Out

line low. This one value is used at each step when in the SWE:TRIG: SOUR IMM mode of a stepped sweep.

Setting SWEep:DWELL sets SWEep:DWELl :AUTO OFF. *RST value is

100 /Js.

l

SWEep:DWELl:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

SWEep:DWELl:AUTO?

Sets and queries the state of the automatic dwell calculation switch.

Setting SWEep:DWELL sets SWEep:DWELl:AUTO OFF. “RST state is OFF.

Operating and Programming Reference S-49

Combining the Sweep Mode With the Sweep Generation Command to Obtain the Desired Sweep Condition

Description of

Sweep Condition

CW

Non-swept

Analog freq sweep

Manual analog freq sweep

Stepped freq sweep

Manual step freq sweep

CW with analog power sweep

CW with manual analog power sweep

CW with stepped power sweep

CW with manual stepped power sweep

Analog frequency and power sweep

Manual analog frequency and power sweep

Stepped frequency and power sweep

Manual stepped frequency and power sweep

List sweep

Manual list sweep

FREQ

:MODE c w

S W E

S W E

S W E

S W E c w c w c w c w

S W E

S W E

S W E

S W E

LIST

LIST

:POW

:MODE

FIX

FIX

FIX

FIX

FIX

S W E

S W E

S W E

S W E

S W E

S W E

S W E

S W E ignored ignored

S W E

:MODE ignored

AUTO

MAN

AUTO

MAN

AUTO

MAN

AUTO

MAN

AUTO

MAN

AUTO

MAN ignored ignored

:LIST

:MODE ignored ignored ignored ignored ignored ignored ignored ignored ignored ignored ignored ignored ignored

AUTO

MAN

S W E

:GEN ignored

ANAL

ANAL

STEP

STEP

ANAL

ANAL

STEP

STEP

ANAL

ANAL

STEP

STEP ignored ignored

l

SWEep:GENeration STEPpedlANALog l

SWEep:GENeration?

Sets and queries the type of sweep to be generated: an analog sweep or a digitally stepped sweep. In either case, all of the other sweep subsystem functions apply. *RST is ANALog.

l

SWEep:MANual:POINt <num>lMAXimumlMINimum l

SWEep:MANual:POINt? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the step point number to go to and lock. The value is a unitless value that is limited between 1 and the number of points requested. This command has no effect on the instrument unless: the sweep mode is set to manual and the sweep generation is set to stepped mode. *RST value is 1.

l

SWEep:MANual[:RELative] <num> l

SWEep:MANual[:RELative]?

Sets and queries a percent of sweep to go to and lock. This command has no effect unless: the sweep mode is set to manual and the sweep generation is set to analog. *RST value is 0.50.

S-50 Operating and Programming Reference

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

l

SWEep:MARKer:STATe ONlOFFlllO a SWEep:MARKer:STATe?

Sets and queries the state of marker sweep. When ON, the frequency sweep limits are taken to be the positions of marker 1 and marker 2.

*RST value is 0.

l

SWEep:MARKer:XFER

This transfers the values of marker 1 and marker 2 frequencies into start and stop frequency.

l

SWEep:MODE AUTOlMANual l

SWEep : MODE?

Selects and queries the manual sweep mode switch.

AUTO

The sweep is under the control of the INIT and

SWEEP subsystems.

MANual FREQ:MANual, SWEep:MANual[:RELative], and

SWEep:MANual:POINt control the output.

*RST value is AUTO.

l

SWEep:POINts <num>lMAXimumlMINimum l

SWEep:POINts? [MAXimum 1 MINimum]

Sets and queries the number of points in a step sweep. When points is changed, SWEep:STEP is modified by the equation

STEP = SPAN/POINTS.

Span is normally an independent variable but is changed to STEP x POINTS if both of these parameters are changed in the same message. *RST value is 11.

l

SWEep:STEP <num>[freq suffix] 1MAXimumlMINimum l

SWEep : STEP.

7 [MAXimum I MINimum]

Sets and queries the size of each frequency step. :STEP is governed by the equation

STEP = SPAN/POINTS.

If you change step size then the number of points will be changed to span/step and a

Parameter Bumped

execution error is reported.

If span or points are changed, then STEP= SPAN/POINTS. The step sweep command creates a coupling with sweeptime also.

If the number of points is changed through this coupling and

DWELl :AUTO is ON and TIME: AUTO is ON, then dwell is changed to

SWEEPTIME/POINTS. Span is normally an independent variable but is changed to STEP x POINTS if both of these parameters are changed in the same message. *RST value is StopMax-StartMin/lO.

l

SWEep : TIME Cnum> [time suffix] I MAXimum 1 MINimum a SWEep : TIME?

[MAXimum 1 MINimumI

Sets and queries the current sweep time. The dwell time can be coupled to sweep time if SWE:DWEL:AUTO is ON. The dwell time is

Operating and Programming Reference S-51

then governed by the equation DWELl = SWEEPTIME/POINTS.

Changing either sweep time or the number of points causes DWELl to be recalculated but does not cause an error. If you attempt to change the dwelltimethen :AUTO is set to OFF.IfDWELl:AUTOis OFF then sweep time is independent of the dwell time and the number of points. *RST value is MIN. l

SWEep:TIME:AUTO ONlOFFlllO l

SWEep:TIME:AUTO?

Sets and queries the automatic sweep time switch.

ON

O F F

The value of the sweep time is automatically to minimum.

Attempting to set a sweep time faster than allowed in the AUTO mode causes this switch to change to

AUTO ON evenifit was previously in the AUTO OFF mode.

*RST state is ON.

l

SWEep:TIME:LLIMit <num>Ctime suffix] IMAXimumlMINimum l

SWEep:TIME:LLIMit? [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the lower sweep time limit. This value specifies the fastest sweep time that you wants the swept signal generator to allow either on input or when calculated internally when in AUTO ON mode.

This value must be greater than 10 ms. *RST value is 10 ms.

l

SWEep:TRIGger:SOURce IMMediatelBUSlEXTernal l

SWEep:TRIGger:SOURce?

Sets and queries the stepped sweep point-to-point trigger source.

This only applies when SWEep:GENis set to STEPped.

l

SYSTem:ALTernate <num>lMAXimumlMINimum l

SYSTem:ALTernate? [MAXimumlMINimuml

Sets and queries the save/recall register number to alternate the foreground state of the instrument. The *RST value is 1.

l

SYSTem:ALTernate:STATe ONlOFFlllO l

SYSTem:ALTernate:STATe?

Sets and queries the state of the Alternate State function.

*RST setting is OFF.

l

SYSTem:COMMunicate:GPIB:ADDRess <n>

Changes the GPIB’s (G eneral Purpose Interface Bus) address.

The *RST value is 19.

S-52 Operating and Programming Reference

l

SYSTem:DUMP:PRINter?

Causes a dump of the display contents to be made to the HP-IB.

l

SYSTem:ERRor?

Returns the next message in the error queue. The format of the response is : <error number>,<error string> where the error number is as shown in the “Error Messages” section and error string is :

“<Generic HP-SL string>;<More specific information>”

An example response to SYST:ERR? is

-23,"NUMERIC 0VERFLOW;YOUPUT IN A NUMBERTOO BIG" l

SYSTem:LANGuage SCPIlCIILlCOMPatible

Causes the swept signal generator to perform a language switch to another language system.

l

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect:AUTO ONIOFFIOll l

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect:AUTO?

Sets and queries automatic selection of the millimeter source module interface connector. If the swept signal generator finds a source module connected at both the front and the rear connectors, the source module at the front connector is selected.

Programming a specific state via SYSTem:MMHead:SELect sets

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect:AUTO to OFF. *RST value is 1.

l

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect FRONtlREARlNONE a SYSTem:MMHead:SELect?

Sets and queries the active millimeter source module interface.

Programming a specific state (FRONt [REAR/NONE) sets

SYSTem:MMHead:SELect:AUTO to OFF. Programming a specific state will cause the instrument to examine the selected interface to determine the type of source module connected. The instrument frequency limits and multiplier will be altered accordingly. However, the leveling point is not changed (see POWer:ALC:SOURce).

l

SYSTem:PRESet[:EXECutel

Sets the swept signal generator to its “local operation” state. This is the same as pressing the front panel “green” key. There is no corresponding query.

l

SYSTem:PRESet:SAVE

Saves the present state so it can be used whenever the command

SYSTem:PRESet[:EXECute] is executed or the front panel “green" key is pressed.

l

SYSTem:PRESet:TYPE FACTorylUSER l

SYSTem:PRESet:TYPE?

Operating and Programming Reference S-53

Sets and queries the type of preset to execute when the

SYSTem:PRESet[:EXECutel command is given. Factory preset defaults all values to factory specified values. User defined preset defaults all values to a specified state of the swept signal generator that you have saved with SYSTem:PRESet : SAVE.

l

SYSTem:SECurity:COUNt <num>lMINimumlMAXimum l

SYSTem:SECurity:COUNt? CMINimumlMAXimum]

Sets and queries the number of times to clear memory when the value of SYSTem:SECurity[:STATe] changes from ON to OFF.

*RST value is 1.

l

SYSTem:SECurity[:STATel ONlOFFlllO l

SYSTem:SECurity[:STATe]?

Controls the security mode of the swept signal generator. When in secure mode, any display annunciators that have been disabled cannot be re-enabled without destroying certain stored information.

This value is not affected by *RST. When you change the value from ON to OFF, everything except calibration data is initialized or destroyed. In particular, data in instrument state and all save/recall registers are destroyed.

l

SYSTem:VERSion?

This query returns a formatted numeric value corresponding to the

SCPI version number to which the swept signal generator complies.

The response has the form YYYY.V where the Ys represent the year version (i.e. 1990) and the V represents an approved revision number for that year. This is a query only and therefore does not have an associated *RST state.

l

TRIGger[:IMMediate]

Causes the trigger event to occur regardless of other settings in the subsystem. This event does not affect any other settings in this subsystem.

This command has no effect unless the swept signalgeneratorisin the

wait for trig

state. If the swept signal generator is in the

wait for trig

state, it performs its trigger action. This is an event and has no

*RST condition.

l

TRIGger:ODELay <num>[time suffix] IMAXimumlMINimum l

TRIGger:ODELay.7 [MAXimumlMINimum]

Sets and queries the trigger output delay, the time between when the source is settled, (when Bit 1 of the Standard Operation Status

Register makes a negative transition), and the trigger out signal is sent.

S-54 Operating and Programming Reference

l

TRIGger:SOURce IMMediatelBUSlEXTernal l

TRIGger:SOURce?

Sets and queries the source of the trigger event.

a TSWeep

This is a convenience command that does the equivalent of

ABORt;INITiate[:IMMediate].

l

UNIT:AM DBIPCT l

UNIT:AM?

Sets and queries the default units for AM depth.

The *RST value is PCT.

l

UNIT:POWer [lvlsuffixl l

UNIT:POWer?

Sets and queries the default power subsystem units.

*RST value is DBM.

Operating and Programming Reference S-55

z P

“7 On s5

**= $6 n” 20 ?a

SCPI STATUS REGISTER STRUCTURE

STANDARD OPERATION STATUS GROUP

DATA QUESTIONABLE STATUS GROUP

NOTE:

STAT:PRES

T H I S C O M M A N D P R E S E T S T H E F O L L O W I N G

ENABLE AND TRANSITION REGISTERS:

O P E R , A N D Q U E S .

CONDlTlON REGISTER

STAT OPER COND?

NEGAT,YE TRANS[TION F I L T E R

STAT OPEA NT% <num>

STAT.OPER.NTw

POSlTNE TRANSlTlON F I L T E R

STAT OPER PTR <““rn>

S,A,US oPERatio”:Ptra”sition7

EVENT REGISTER

STAT”S OPEROtion~

ENABLE REGISTER

STAT OPER ENAB <“urn>

STAT”9 OPERotlon:Enable

CONDlTlON REGISTER

STAT OUES COW?

NEGATNE TRANSlTlON F I L T E R

STAT O”ES NTR <num>

STAT.OUES NTW

POSITIVE TR

A

NSITION FILTER

STATGUES PTR~

ENABLE REGISTER

STAT WE ENAB <““In>

STATOUES ENAW

EVENT REGISTER

STAT WE5 PWCNTI 7

Operating and Programming Reference S-57

Security Menu

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey accesses the security function softkeys.

Blank Display Turns off the swept signal generator’s data display, active entry, and message line areas.

Clear Memory

Save Lock

Zero Freq

Writes alternating ones and zeros over all swept signal generator state functions and save/recall registers a selectable number of times, then returns the swept signal generator to the factory-preset state of operation.

Disables the save function.

Displays zeros for all accessible frequency information.

The features listed above together with the softkeys Freq Offset and Freq

Mult

provide the swept signal generator with security controls for a variety of situations. The local lockout (LLO) programming command adds security when the swept signal generator is used in an ATE environment. A security calibration constant that can be accessed through the service adjustment menu (requires a password for access) is available also. Refer to the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator/HP 8360 L-Series

Swept CW Generator Service Guide

for information on calibration constants.

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

“Using the Security Features” in Chapter 1

S-58 Operating and Programming Reference

Set Atten

Selftest (Full)

Function Group

SERVICE

Menu Map 6

Description

This softkey activates the self-test function of the swept signal generator.

Programming Codes

SCPI: *TST?

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Fault Menu, SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

Chapter 4, “OPERATOR’S CHECK and ROUTINE

MAINTENANCE”

Set Atten

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

This softkey lets you set the attenuator separately from the rest of the ALC system. When an entry is made using this key, the attenuator is automatically uncoupled from the ALC system, so that the

(

POWER LEVEL

) key controls the ALC system apart from the attenuator.

Programming Codes

SCPI: POWer:ATTenuation <num>[DB] or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

Analyzer: SHLS <num>[DB]DM]

See Also

IALC), (

POWER LEVEL

) Uncoupl Atten

“Working with Mixers/Reverse Power Effects” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference S-59

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

7

SWEEP

Programming Codes

This hardkey selects single sweep mode, aborts any sweep in progress and initiates a single sweep at a rate determined by the sweep time function.

If you press (SINGLE) in the middle of a continuous sweep, the sweep is aborted and the swept signal generator retraces to the starting point but does not start a sweep. Press ($Ki?) a second time to start the sweep. The amber LED above the hardkey is lit when the function is on.

SCPI:

1NITiate:CONTinuous OFF]0

ABORt

INITiate[:IMMediate]

Analyzer: S2

See Also

(CONT)

“Continuous, Single, and Manual Sweep Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Software Rev

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey displays the swept signal generator’s programming language, HP-IB address, and firmware date code.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

*IDN?

Analyzer:

01

See Also

HP-13

Menu,

SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY

S-60 Operating and Programming Reference

(SPAN)

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

2

This hardkey lets you set a value for the frequency span in the center frequency/frequency span mode of swept frequency operation. Press m, and use the entry area to enter the desired value. The swept signal generator sweeps from one half the span below to one half above the center frequency.

Certain center frequency and frequency span combinations cause the swept signal generator to limit the value entered. In general, any combination that causes the swept signal generator to exceed its minimum or maximum specified frequency is limited.

SCPI:

FREQuency:SPAN <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum]MINimumJUP]DOWN

FREQuency:MODE SWEep

Analyzer:

DF <num> [Hz]Kz]Mz]Gz]

See Also

(CENTER), (START), (STOP)

“Center Frequency/Span Operation” in Chapter 1

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This hardkey activates swept frequency mode and makes the start frequency parameter the active function. Press (START) and use the entry area to enter the desired value. The start/stop frequency must be separated by at least 2 Hz in order to remain in the frequency sweep mode. If start=stop frequency then the zero span mode is entered.

Operating and Programming Reference

S-6 1

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FREQuency:STARt <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum]MINimum(UP]DOWN

FREQuency:MODE SWEep

Analyzer:

FA <num> [Hz]Kz]Mz]Gz]

See Also

CCENTER), Icw_l, FREQUENCY [MENU), [[email protected], [??%-I

“CW Operation and Start/Stop Frequency Sweep” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Start=Ml Stop=M2

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

3

MARKER

This softkey changes the swept signal generator start frequency to the frequency value of marker 1, and the stop frequency to the frequency value of marker 2. The swept signal generator has been reset to these start/stop values, unlike the softkey Ml--M2 Sweep that changes the start/stop values only while active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SWEep[:FREQuency]:MARKer:XFER

Analyzer:

SHMP

See Also Ml--M2

Sweep

“Marker Operation” in Chapter I

S-62 Operating and Programming Reference

Start Sweep Trigger Bus

Start Sweep

Trigger Auto

Function Group

SWEEP

Menu Map 7

Description

When this softkey is selected, the swept signal generator automatically triggers a sweep. This is the fastest way to accomplish the sweep-retrace cycle. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

TRIGger:SOURce IMMediate

Analyzer:

T 1

See Also (=I, I-1, Sweep Menu

Start Sweep

Trigger 3us

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

SWEEP

7

When this softkey is selected, the swept signal generator waits for an

HP-IB trigger to trigger a sweep. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

TRIGger:SOURce BUS

Analyzer:

TS

See Also

(??%I, (E], Sweep Menu

Operating and Programming Reference S-63

Start Sweep

Trigger Ext

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

SWEEP

7

When this softkey is selected, the swept signal generator waits for an external hardware trigger to trigger a sweep. Connect the trigger pulse to TRIGGER INPUT. It is activated on a TTL rising edge. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

TRIGger:SOURce EXT

Analyzer: T3

See Also

(=I, (SINGLE), Sweep Menu

Step Control

Master

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

This softkey lets you designate the swept signal generator as the master control in a dual swept signal generator measurement system.

A dual swept signal generator system (two-tone measurement system) facilitates accurate device characterizations by providing one timebase reference for both sources. This technique reduces instabilities from temperature or line voltage fluctuations, or drift.

The swept signal generators can be operated in either ramp sweep or step sweep modes for both fixed offset and swept offset measurements. Figure S-l shows the connections required for a two-tone system.

S-64 Operating and Programming Reference

Step Control Uaster

SCRLRR

NETUORK RNRLYZER

IlASTER

SYNTHESIZER

SLRVE

SYNTHESIZER

Figure S-l. Connections Required for a Two-Tone Scalar Network Analyzer Measurement System

1. Designate one swept signal generator as the master, the other as the slave.

2. Make the connections.

3. To avoid synchronization problems, always set up the slave

(frequency and power) before setting up the master.

4. Set up the master (frequency, power, and sweep time).

5. Set the sweep time on the slave.

6. Configure the swept signal generators for step sweep, or ramp sweep.

7. Select the appropriate triggering scheme.

8. Activate the slave mode on the slave swept signal generator.

9. Activate the master mode on the master swept signal generator.

By connecting the master’s 10 MHz reference standard to the slave’s

10 MHz reference input, the master swept signal generator’s timebase supplies the frequency reference for both swept signal generators.

In step sweep measurements, if the master swept signal generator is not connected to an external controller, it must automatically trigger the steps. Set Step Swp Pt Trig Auto on the master.

When a the scalar network analyzer is the step sweep controller, set

Step Swp Pt Trig Bus on the master swept signal generator so that the analyzer can trigger the steps.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SWEep:CONTrol:STATe ONjOFFJ110

SWEep:CONTrol:TYPE MASTer

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Step Control Slave, Step Swp Menu

Operating and Programming Reference S-65

Step Control Slave

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey lets you designate the swept signal generator as the slave in a dual swept signal generator measurement system. A dual swept signal generator system (two-tone measurement system) facilitates accurate device characterizations by providing one timebase reference for both sources.

Figure S-l shows the connections required for a two-tone system. On the message line, the status message EXT REF appears indicating the swept signal generator has an external timebase reference. The start and stop frequencies of the slave can be offset above or below those set on the master for fixed offset two-tone measurements.

To synchronize properly for swept offset measurements, the 0 to 10 volt sweep ramp must be actively sweeping on the slave. If a CW frequency is selected as the fixed LO frequency, the sweep ramp is deactivated and the proper synchronization does not occur. Select a center frequency with zero span to keep the slave’s voltage sweep ramp active and ensure proper synchronization.

For synthesized step sweep measurements, set the number of sweep points on the slave the same as on the master swept signal generator. If the master swept signal generator is connected to a network analyzer, the analyzer automatically sets the master swept signal generator’s step size to match the number of points displayed on the analyzer. Since the slave swept signal generator is not connected to the analyzer, set the slave to match the master swept signal generator. Allow the master to trigger the slave’s steps. Set

Step Swp Pt Trig Ext on the slave swept signal generator.

For ramp sweep measurements, on the slave set the sweep time equivalent to the master swept signal generator. If the master is connected to a network analyzer, the slave’s sweep time is slightly longer than the master’s because the analyzer does not stop the sweep precisely on the last point. Use the following formula to determine the slave’s sweep time for a system controlled by an analyzer.

SweepTimeMaste, x 1.03 = SweepTimeslave

For fixed-offset ramp sweep measurements, the same sweep time must be set on both the master and the slave. Since the master’s sweep time is typically determined by the measurement configuration, set the slave to match the master.

For more accurate ramp sweeps, select Swp Span Cal Always on both the master and slave swept signal generators. When this feature

S-66 Operating and Programming Reference

Step Dwell is active it calibrates the frequency at the end of every frequency band.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SWEep:CONTrol:STATe ON]OFF]l]O

SWEep:CONTrol:TYPE SLAVe

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Step Control Master, Step Sap Menu

Step Dwell

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

Programming Codes

This softkey lets you set dwell times for points in the stepped frequency mode of sweep operation. The dwell time for points in step frequency sweep may range from 100 ps to 3.2 s. The actual time between points is the sum of dwell and phase lock times.

Select Step Dwell , then use the entry area to enter the desired value.

SCPI: SWEep[:FREQ uency]:DWELl <num>[time suffix] or

MAXimum] MINimum

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Step Sup Menu, Sweep Mode Step

Operating and Programming Reference S-67

Step Points

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

This softkey lets you define the number of step points in a stepped frequency sweep. The number of points in a stepped sweep can range from 2 to 801. Step Size and Step Points are dependent variables. If you know how many steps are desired in a given sweep, use the softkey Step Points to set the desired value The step size will be calculated automatically.

Programming Codes

SCPI: SWEep[:FREQ uency]:POINts <num>)MAXimum]MINimum

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Step Size, Step Sup Menu, Sweep Mode Step

“Using Step Sweep” in Chapter 1

Step Size

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey lets you specify the step size in a stepped frequency sweep. The range of increment size is dependent on frequency span and the number of step points desired, as given by the formula: STEP SIZE = SPAN + STEP POINTS. Step Size and

Step Points are dependent variables, as shown by the formula. If a particular step size is desired, use the Step Size softkey to set the desired increment. The number of step points is then calculated automatically.

Programming Codes

SCPI: SWEep[:FREQuency]:STEP <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimumlMINimum

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Step Points, Step Swp Menu, Sweep Mode Step

“Using Step Sweep” in Chapter 1

S-68 Operating and Programming Reference

Step

Sup Menu

Step Swp Menu

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey reveals the stepped frequency sweep entry menu.

Dwell Coupled

Couples the dwell time for stepped sweep points to ramp sweep, sweep time.

Step Control Master

Step Control Slave

Step Dwell

S t e p P o i n t s

Step Size

Step Sup Pt Trig Auto

Step Sup Pt Trig Bus

Step Sup P t T r i g E x t

Causes the swept signal generator to act as the master control in a dual swept signal generator measurement setup.

Causes the swept signal generator to act as the slave in a dual swept signal generator measurement setup.

Sets the dwell time for points in stepped sweep.

Sets the number of points in a stepped sweep.

Sets the increment value for the points in a stepped sweep.

Automatically steps the swept signal generator to the next point in a stepped sweep.

Steps the swept signal generator to the next point in a stepped sweep when an HP-IB trigger is received.

Steps the swept signal generator to the next point in a stepped sweep when an external hardware trigger is received.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

[K), (m),

Sweep Mode Step

, [

S W E E P T I M E

)

“Using Step Sweep” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference S-69

Step Swp Pt

Trig Auto

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

Programming Codes

When this softkey is selected, the swept signal generator automatically steps to the next point in the stepped frequency sweep until all points are swept. The time between points is equal to the sum of the dwell and phase lock times. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

SWEep:TRIGger:SOURce IMMediate

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Step Sup Menu, Sweep Mode Step

“Using Step Sweep” in Chapter 1

Step Swp Pt

Trig Bus

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

When this softkey is selected, the swept signal generator steps to the next point in a stepped frequency sweep when an HP-IB trigger

(*TRG, <GET>) is received (leading edge TTL). When the last frequency point is reached and continuous sweep is selected, the next trigger causes the step sweep to return to the start frequency.

Connect the trigger signal to the TRIGGER INPUT BNC. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SWEep:TRIGger:SOURce BUS

Analyzer:

TS

See Also

Step Sup Menu , Sweep Mode Step

S-70 Operating and Programming Reference

Step Swp Pt

Trig Ext

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

When this softkey is selected, the swept signal generator steps to the next point in the stepped frequency sweep when an external hardware trigger is received. When the last frequency point is reached and continuous sweep is selected, the next trigger causes the step sweep to return to the start frequency. Connect the trigger signal to the TRIGGER

INPUT BNC. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI: SWEep:TRIGger:SOURce EXT

Analyzer: TS

See Also

Step Sup Menu, Sweep Mode Step

“Using Step Sweep” in Chapter 1

( S T O P )

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

NONE

This hardkey activates swept frequency mode and makes the stop frequency parameter the active function. The start/stop frequency must be separated by at least 2 Hz in order to remain in the frequency sweep mode. If start=stop frequency then the zero span mode is entered.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FREQuency:STOP <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum]MINimum]UP]DOWN

FREQuency:MODE:SWEep

Analyzer: FB <num> [Hz]Kz]Mz]Gz]

Operating and Programming Reference S-71

See Also

(CENTER), a, FREQUENCY I=-, (SPAN), (START)

“CW Operation and Start/Stop Frequency Sweep” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

SWEEP (MENU)

Function Group

SWEEP

Menu Map 7

Description

This hardkey accesses the sweep menu soft keys.

Manual Sweep

Activates manual sweep mode.

Depending on what parameter is sweeping, frequency and/or power can be changed manually with the rotary knob or the arrow keys.

Start Sweep Trigger Auto

Start Sweep Trigger Bus

Start Sweep Trigger Ext

Automatically triggers a sweep when (SINGLE) or [CONT) is pressed.

Waits for an HP-IB trigger to trigger a sweep when (SINGLE) or

(CONT) is pressed.

Waits for an external hardware trigger to trigger a sweep when

[SINGLE) or[CONT)is e d .

Sweep Mode List

Sweep Mode Ramp

Sweep Mode Step

SwpTime Auto

TrigOut Delay

Activates the list frequency sweep mode.

Activates the analog frequency sweep mode.

Activates the stepped frequency sweep mode.

Sets the sweep time to a minimum value for a given span.

Sets the time delay after phase-lock and before a trigger pulse is sent from the ANALYZER INTERFACE

BNC. A source settled SRQ is generated.

S-72 Operating and Programming Reference

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Sueep Mode List

Sweep Mode List

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

SWEEP

7

This softkey activates the step frequency list mode. To use this type of sweep, a frequency list must have been entered, otherwise an error message appears. In this mode, the swept signal generator steps only those frequencies defined by the frequency list. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

See Also

SCPI: FREQuency:MODE LIST

Analyzer: SN

CONNECTORS,

List Menu

“Creating and Using a Frequency List” in Chapter 1

Operating and Programming Reference S-73

Sweep Mode Ramp

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

SWEEP

7

This softkey activates the analog frequency sweep mode. Ramp sweep mode is the factory preset state. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FREQuency:MODE SWEep

SWEep[:FREQuency]:GENeration ANALog

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

CONNECTORS, (CONT), Manual Sweep, [?iKZJ

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Sweep Mode Step

Function Group

SWEEP

Menu Map 7

Description

This softkey activates the stepped frequency step mode. In this mode, the swept signal generator steps from the start frequency to the stop frequency, by the designated frequency step size. Manual, continuous, and single sweeps can be performed in this mode. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FREQuency:MODE SWEep

SWEep[:FREQuency]:GENeration STEPped

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

I=), Manual Sweep, (ml, Step Sup Menu

“Using Step Sweep” in Chapter 1

S-74 Operating and Programming Reference

Sup Span CalOnce

Swp Span Cal

Always

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

USER CAL

9

Programming Codes

This softkey causes a sweep span calibration each time the frequency span is changed. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

SCPI:

CALibration:SPAN:AUTO ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Freq Cal Menu

“Using Frequency Calibration,”

Swp Span Cal

Once

Function Group

Menu Map

USER CAL

9

Description

Programming Codes

This softkey activates sweep span calibration immediately and performs it only once. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

SCPI:

CALibration:SPAN[:EXECute]

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Freq Cal Menu

“Using Frequency Calibration,”

Operating and Programming Reference S-75

(SWEEP TIME)

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

7

SWEEP

This hardkey lets you set a sweep time for frequency sweeps or power sweeps. The sweep time range is 10 ms to 2OOs, but the fastest sweep time is constrained by the frequency span. The fastest possible sweep can be determined automatically:

1. Press SWEEP (MENU), this reveals the sweep menu keys.

2. Select more l/3 , to scroll to the next page of the sweep menu.

3. Select SwpTime Auto, to set the sweep time to automatic. The swept signal generator calculates the fastest possible calibrated sweep time for

any

sweep span.

Whenever you press (SWEEP), the active entry area displays the current sweep time and whether the sweep time is coupled to the frequency span (far right hand side displays: AUTO). If the word

AUTO is not displayed then the sweep time auto function is off.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SWEep[:FREQ uency]:TIME <num>[time suffix] or

MAXimumIMINimum

Analyzer:

ST <num> [sclms]

See Also

Power Sweep

“Power Level and Sweep Time Operation” in Chapter 1

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

SwpTime Auto

Function Group

SWEEP

Menu Map 7

S-76 Operating and Programming Reference

SYSTEM IMENU)

Description

This softkey lets you set the swept signal generator’s sweep time to a minimum value for a chosen span and meet all specifications. The sweep time is limited by a 300 MHz/ms sweep rate. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SWEep:TIME:AUTO ONlOFFlllO

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also (-TIME)

“Power Level and Sweep Time Operation” in Chapter 1

SYSTEM @iii]

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This hardkey reveals the system menu.

Alternate Regs

Causes the swept signal generator to alternate on successive sweeps between the present instrument state and a second instrument state stored in an internal register.

Dim Display

Disp Status

HP-IB Menu

Preset Mode Factory

Preset Mode User

Dims the swept signal generator’s display.

Displays the present status of the swept signal generator.

Reveals the HP-IB control menu.

Sets the preset state, as defined by the manufacturer, to be recalled by the

(PRESET) y .

Sets the preset state, as defined by the user, to be recalled by (-1.

Ref Osc Menu

Save User Preset

Security

Menu

Reveals the frequency standard options menu.

Stores the present instrument state in a special preset storage register.

Reveals the menu that controls the security features of the swept signal generator.

Operating and Programming Reference S-77

SYSTEM m

Software Rev

UsrKey Clear

UsrMenu Clear

Causes the swept signal generator to display the date code of its internal software.

Activates the USER-DEFINED (MENU) and lets you delete a

single

key within that menu.

Activates the USER-DEFINED (MENU) and clears

all

keys in that menu.

Programming Codes

SCPI: NONE

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above, CONNECTORS, USER-DEFINED (MENU)

S-78 Operating and Programming Reference

10 MHz Freq Std

Auto

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey sets the swept signal generator to choose its frequency standard automatically. If an external standard is connected to the

10 MHz REF INPUT BNC, then it is chosen as the reference. If no external standard is connected, the internal standard is chosen as the reference. If the internal standard has been disconnected also, the swept signal generator operates in a free run state. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

ROSCillator[:SOURce]:AUTO ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Ref Osc Menu

Operating and Programming Reference T-l

10 MHz Freq Std

Extrnl

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey tells the swept signal generator to accept an external

10 MHz signal as the frequency reference. The external signal must be applied to the 10 MHz REF INPUT BNC connector located on the rear panel. If no external signal is applied, UNLOCK and EXT REF appears on the message line of the display. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

ROSCillator[:SOURce] EXTernal

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Ref Osc Menu

10 MHz Freq Std

Intrnl

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

SYSTEM

8

This softkey sets the swept signal generator to select the internal

10 MHz signal as the frequency reference. If the internal signal is disconnected or not working properly, UNLOCK appears on the message line of the display. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

SCPI:

ROSCillator[:SOURce] INTernal

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Ref Osc Menu

T-2 Operating and Programming Reference

Tracking Nenu

10 MHz Freq Std

None

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey sets the reference oscillator to a free-run state, where no frequency reference is used. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI: ROSCillator[:SOURce] NONE

Analyzer: NONE

See Also

Ref Osc Menu

Tracking Menu

Function Group

POWER, USER CAL

Menu Map 5,9

Description

In the menu structure there are two occurrences of this softkey. One occurs in the POWER [MENU), the other occurs in the USER CAL

(MENU). Both softkeys operate the same way. These softkeys access the tracking menu.

Auto Track

Peak RF Always

Peak RF Once

Realigns the swept signal generator’s output filter and oscillator to maximize output power for the swept frequency mode.

Periodically realigns the swept signal generator’s output filter and oscillator to maximize output power for the CW frequency mode.

Realigns the swept signal generator’s output filter and oscillator to maximize output power for the CW frequency mode.

Operating and Programming Reference T-3

Tracking Menu

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

“Using the Tracking Feature” in Chapter 1

TrigOut Delay

Function Group

SWEEP

Menu Map 7

Description

This softkey lets you specify the amount of time after phase-lock before a trigger pulse is sent out of the TRIGGER OUTPUT BNC.

The delay can be set from 0 to 3.2 seconds. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

TRIGger:ODELay <num>[time suffix]

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Start Sweep Trigger Auto, Start Sweep Trigger B

U S

,

Start Sweep Trigger Ext

T-4 Operating and Programming Reference

Uncoupl Atten

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

POWER

This softkey uncouples the attenuator (if there is one) from the ALC system. It allows independent control of attenuator settings. An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

To set the attenuator after it is uncoupled, select Set Atten. To view the current ALC and attenuator settings, press

POWER LEVEL

.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:ATTentuation:AUTO ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

SHPS <num> [DBIDM] to set the ALC, SHSL <num>

[DBIDM] to attenuator. PL causes the attenuator couple to the ALC.

See Also

(ALC), (

POWER LEVEL

),

Set Atten

“Working with Mixers/Reverse Power Effects” in Chapter 1

Unlock Info

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

6

Programming Codes

SERVICE

This softkey causes the swept signal generator to display lock/unlocked status of all the phase-lock-loops. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

SCPI:

DIAGnostics:OUTput:UNLocks?

Analyzer:

SHT3 or SHM4 diagnostics test results.

See Also

STATUS MESSAGES

Chapter 4, “OPERATOR’S CHECK and ROUTINE

MAINTENANCE”

Operating and Programming Reference U-l

Up/Down Power

Function Group

POWER

Menu Map 5

Description

This softkey activates the power step size function. It can be set from 0.01 to 20 dB. In this mode, power is stepped by the up/down arrow keys. An asterisk next to the key label indicates this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

POWer:STEP[:INCrement] <num>[DB] or

MAXimum] MINimum

POWer:STEP:AUTO ON]OFF]l]O

Analyzer:

SP or SHPL and UP or DOWN

See Also

Up/Dn Size CW, Up/Dn Size Swept

“Programming Typical Measurements” in Chapter 1

Up/Dn Size CW

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map 2

Description

This softkey lets you set the frequency step size for the CW frequency mode. The step size may be set from 1 Hz to

10 GHz. The factory preset size is 100 MHz. CW frequency is incremented/decremented by pressing the up/down arrow keys.

If an underline cursor appears under a digit in the entry display, then the value will be modified by the up/down arrow keys or the rotary knob. The increment/decrement size in this case is the underlined digit by the power of 10.

If the up/down function is on (asterisk next to key label) and the cursor is not under one of the active entry area digits, then frequency value is changed by the up/down size using either the up/down arrow keys or the rotary knob.

U-2 Operating and Programming Reference

Up/Dn Size Saept

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FREQuency:STEP[:INCR] <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimumIMINimum

Analyzer:

SF or SHCF <num> [Hz]Kz]Mz(Gz]

See Also

Manual Sweep, Sweep

Mode

Step, Up/Dn Size Swept

Up/Dn Size Swept

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

2

This softkey sets the frequency step size in the swept frequency step mode. The step size may be set from 1 Hz to 10 GHz. The factory preset step size is 100 MHz. Step size values are entered using the entry area.

If an underline cursor appears under a digit in the entry display, then the value will be modified by the up/down arrow keys or the rotary knob. The increment/decrement size in this case is the underlined digit by the power of 10.

If the up/down function is on (asterisk next to key label) and the cursor is not under one of the active entry area digits, then frequency value is changed by the up/down size using either the up/down arrow keys or the rotary knob.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

FREQuency:STEP[:INCR] <num>[freq suffix] or

MAXimum] MINimum

Analyzer:

SF or SHCF <num> [Hz]Kz]Mz]Gz]

See Also

Up/Dn S i z e CW

Operating and Programming Reference U-3

Function Group

USER CAL

Menu Map 9

Description

This hardkey accesses the user calibration softkeys.

FullUsr Cal Performs a complete alignment as determined by the instrument settings.

Tracking Menu

AM Cal Menu

Freq Cal Menu

Ext Det Cal

Accesses the softkeys of the tracking menu.

Accesses the AM calibration menu.

Accesses the Frequency span calibration menu.

Uses an external power meter to calibrate an external detector’s output voltage relative to power.

Programming Codes

NONE

See Also

Softkeys listed above.

“Optimizing Swept Signal Generator Performance” in Chapter 1

U-4 Operating and Programming Reference

USER DEFINED LMENU)

USER DEFINED

Function Group

USER DEFINED

Menu Map

NONE

Description

This hardkey reveals the customized menu created by selecting softkeys and assigning them to this menu. The user defined menu is empty until you assign keys to it. Three sections (12 key assignment locations) of menu are available for key assignment.

Any softkey can be assigned to any of the 12 positions. A softkey assigned to the user defined menu performs as if it is in its home menu. Pressing the (iGG7) key does not erase the contents of this menu.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(m), Ix)), UsrKey C l e a r , UsrMenu C l e a r

Operating and Programming Reference U-5

UsrKey Clear

Function Group

SYSTEM

Menu Map 8

Description

This softkey lets you recall the user defined menu and remove a single softkey that appears in that menu.

1. Select UsrKey Clear.

The user defined menu appears in the softkey label area. The active entry area displays:

->Press USER Soft Key to Clear

2. Select the softkey you wish to remove from the menu. The active entry area turns off and the softkey is removed from the user defined menu. The user defined menu remains in the softkey label area.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

[ASSIGN), USER DEFINED (K), UsrMenu Clear

UsrMenu Clear

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

SYSTEM

8

This softkey recalls the user defined menu and removes all softkeys assigned to that menu. The empty user defined menu remains in the softkey label area.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

(m), USER DEFINED (MENU), UsrKey Clear

U-6 Operating and Programming Reference

W

Waveform Menu

Function Group (MOD)

Menu Map 4

Description

The waveform menu (Option 002 only) allows you to choose sine, square, triangle, ramp, and noise waveforms for internal AM and

FM. The default is sine wave. There are two waveform menus. The waveform menu in the AM menu sets the waveform for amplitude modulation only. The waveform menu in the FM menu sets the waveform for frequency modulation only.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

NONE, see the individual softkeys listed.

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

LMOD), also see “AM”, “FM”, and “Modulation”.

Operating and Programming Reference W-l

Z

Zero Freq

Function Group

Menu Map

Description

8

SYSTEM

This softkey lets you enable a security feature that displays zeroes for all accessible frequency information. Once this security feature is activated, it can be turned off by a front panel (PRESET). An asterisk next to the key label indicates that this feature is active.

Programming Codes

SCPI:

SYSTem:SECurity[:STATe] ON

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

Security Menu

Zoom

Function Group

FREQUENCY

Menu Map

Description

Programming Codes

2

This softkey activates the CF/Span sweep mode (zoom). In this mode, span is controlled by the up/down arrow keys. Center frequency is controlled by the rotary knob or the numeric entry keys.

The left and right arrows control the resolution with which the center frequency can be changed. This is a front-panel-only feature and is inaccessible over HP-IB.

SCPI:

NONE

Analyzer:

NONE

See Also

[CENTER), (SPAN)

Operating and Programming Reference

Z-1

2a

Error Messages

Introduction

WARNING

This section lists the error messages that may be displayed by the front panel or transmitted by the swept signal generator over the interface bus. Each error message is accompanied by an explanation, and suggestions are provided to help solve the problem. Where applicable, references are given to related chapters of the user’s and service guides.

A list of the messages displayed on the message line of the swept signal generator are included in separate list because they are considered status messages rather than error messages.

No operator serviceable parts inside. Refer servicing to qualified personnel. To prevent electrical shock, do not remove covers.

Front Panel Error

Messages in

ABILITY TO SAVE A RECALL REGISTER IS LOCKED OUT:

This message occurs when the save/recall registers have been disabled by the save lock feature or by a calibration constant.

ADDR ERROR EXCEPTION:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

Auto Track Failed! Cal Not Updated:

Occurs when auto track has been initiated and for some reason has failed. Refer to Chapter 4 and follow the local operator’s check procedures.

BUS ERROR EXCEPTION:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

DEFAULTING LANGUAGE:

This error message is displayed in conjunction with one of the following messages.

n

Invalid Language set on rear panel switch.

The HP-IB/Language switch located on the rear panel has been set to an invalid programming language selection. The programming language is defaulted to the previous setting. Check the rear panel switch.

See Chapter 3 for information on language selection.

Error Messages 2a-1

2a-2 Error Messages

n OPTION NOT INSTALLED.

The language selected and the corresponding firmware/hardware necessary to run that language is not present in the swept signal generator. See Chapter 3 for information on language selection.

DISPLAY IS NOT RESPONDING:

Can appear on the front panel emulator if the internal processor can not communicate with the display properly. This error indicates a display failure or a display connector problem.

DIVIDE BY ZERO EXCEPTION:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

EEROM FAILED, LOST CAL:

This error indicates that the swept signal generator has lost its calibration constants and may not meet specifications. Refer to Chapter 4 and follow the local operator’s check procedures. If you are a qualified service technician and this failure occurs, read the Calibration Constants section in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept

CW Generator Service Guide.

EEROM Failed !!:

This error will only occur if the service adjustment menu is accessed. Specifically, an attempt has been made to write to a test patch and EEROM failed to store the data.

ERROR: CALIBRATION FAILED

!!: This error will only occur if the service adjustment menu is accessed. Specifically, an Al4 sweep ramp calibration has been attempted and failed. Run the sweep ramp selftest. Refer to the “MENU MAPS” chapter in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept

CW Generator Service Guide.

ERROR - Must first enter correction freq:

This error occurs when a correction point does not have its corresponding frequency entered first. Refer to “Creating and Applying the User Flatness Correction

Array” in Chapter 1.

ERROR: Must first enter a List Frequency

!!: This error occurs when a dwell or offset value does not have its corresponding frequency entered first. Refer to “Creating and Applying the User

Flatness Correction Array” in Chapter 1.

ERROR: Power Search Failed

!!: This error occurs when the ALC is in the ALC search mode and is unable to level to the desired power level. Refer to Chapter 4 and follow the local operator’s check procedures.

ERROR: Start must be < Stop !!:

This error occurs in association with the frequency list, auto fill, feature. If the start frequency entered is greater than the stop frequency, you will see this error.

Correct by entering a start frequency less than the stop frequency.

ERROR: Stop must be > Start !!:

This error occurs in association with the frequency list, auto fill, feature. If the stop frequency

entered is less than the stop frequency you will see this error. Correct by entering a stop frequency greater than the start frequency.

Error in Test Patch entry !!:

This error will only occur if the service adjustment menu is accessed. Specifically, one of three entries has been attempted.

n

An invalid test patch number.

n

An invalid test patch data point.

n

An invalid parameter of the test patch specification.

Correct by entering a valid parameter.

Freq step must be >= 0 !!:

This error occurs in association with the user power flatness menu, auto fill increment, feature. If the increment value entered is less than zero you will see this error.

Correct by entering an increment value greater than zero.

FUNCTION LOCKED OUT:

This error will only occur if the service adjustment menu is accessed. Specifically, the calibration constant that inhibits access to certain functions has been set. If you need access to the function, contact a qualified service technician.

HP-IB SYNTAX ERROR:

This indicates that an analyzer language syntax error has been encountered. Review the program to find the syntax error.

ILLEGAL INSTRUCTION EXCEPTION:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

INPUT BUFFER EMPTY:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

INPUT BUFFER FULL:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

INVALID LANGUAGE ON REAR PANEL SWITCH:

The invalid programming language selection. Check the rear panel switch.

See Chapter 3 for information on language selection.

Invalid Save/Recall Register!:

message is possible.

There are two cases when this error n

If a save function is attempted to either register 0 or 9.

w If a recall function is attempted on register 9.

Correct by selecting a valid save/recall register.

LINT1 INTERRUPT:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

Error Messages 2a-3

2a-4

Error Messages

LINT2 INTERRUPT:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

LINT6 INTERRUPT:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

Number of pts must be >= 2 !!:

This error occurs in association with the user power flatness, auto fill number of points, feature. If the number of points requested is less than two, you will see this error message. Correct by entering number of points greater than or equal to two.

OPTION NOT INSTALLED:

This error occurs when the HP-IB language switch is set to a configuration requiring a certain firmware/hardware combination to be present in the swept signal generator. See Chapter 3 for information on language selection and see “Specifications” for information on option available.

PRIV VIOLATION EXCEPTION:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

RECALL REGISTERS LOST:

This message can appear in association with the security menu feature, memory clear. Also, a weak, dead, or disconnected internal battery can cause this message.

Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

Selftest REQUIRES system interface OFF:

This error message indicates that the swept signal generator is connected to a network analyzer and can not run selftest. Correct by disconnecting the system interface cable from the swept signal generator.

SPURIOUS INTERRUPT:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

SYSTEM CONTROLLER

ON

BUS:

This error message is generated when an external controller is active on the HP-IB and the swept signal generator has attempted to act as the controller.

Disconnect the HP-IB interface or return the swept signal generator to LOCAL operation and repeat the request.

TOO MANY CORRECTION PTS REQUESTED:

This error occurs in association with the user power flatness menu. The maximum number of correction points has been reached or the addition of the points requested will exceed the maximum. The maximum number of points available is 801.

TOO MANY LIST POINTS REQUESTED:

This error occurs in association with the frequency list menu. The maximum number of list points has been reached or the addition of the points requested will exceed the maximum. The maximum number of points available is 801.

TRACE EXCEPTION:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

TRAP0 EXCEPTION:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

TRAP3 EXCEPTION:

This can only be caused by an internal processor error. Refer to Chapter 4 for instructions on contacting a qualified service technician.

Too many test patches !!:

This error will only occur if the service adjustment menu is accessed. Specifically, the maximum number of test patches has been reached and can accept no more.

WAIT-SAVING CALIBRATION:

This error will only occur if the service adjustment menu is accessed. Specifically, a save calibration has been initiated and not yet completed when another request is made.

WRONG PASSWORD:

This error occurs when the service adjustment menu password is entered incorrectly or the wrong password has been used. Qualified service technicians, refer to “ADJUSTMENTS,” in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal

Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept CW Generator Service Guide

for more information.

SCPI Error

Messages in

Numerical Order

Swept Signal Generator 0, No Error:

This message indicates that the device has no errors

Specific SCPI Error

and is currently ready to perform the operations for which it is

Messages

designed.

1, FUNCTION DISABLED:

The particular function invoked has been disabled by a calibration constant. If you need access to the function, contact a qualified service technician.

2, Wrong password:

This error occurs when the service adjustment menu password is entered incorrectly or the wrong password has been used. Qualified service technicians, refer to “ADJUSTMENTS,” in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator/HP 8360 L-Series

Swept CW Generator Service Guide

for more information.

4, Unable to store data in EEROM

5, Not allowed to change address

6, Switch on Processor Board is Set:

This error occurs when a service adjustment menu password can not be set because the

Error Messages 2a-5

override switch on the processor is set. Qualified service technicians, refer to “ADJUSTMENTS,” in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal

Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept CW Generator Service Guide

for more information.

Universal SCPI Error

Messages

Error Messages From -499 To -400

These error messages indicate that the Output Queue Control of the swept signal generator has detected a problem with the message exchange protocol. This type of error sets the Query Error Bit (bit

2) in the Event Status Register. One of the following has occurred: n

An attempt has been made to read data from the Output Queue when no output is present or is pending.

n

Data in the Output Queue has been lost.

Events that generate Query Errors do not generate Command Errors,

Execution Errors, or Device-specific Errors.

-440, Query UNTERMINATED after indefinite res

-430, Query DEADLOCKED

-430, Query DEADLOCKED;Output Buffer Full

-420, Query UNTERMINATED

-420, Query UNTERMINATED;Nothing To Say

-410, Query INTERRUPTED

Error Messages From -399 To -300

These error messages indicate that some device operations did not properly complete, possibly due to an abnormal hardware or firmware condition. This type of error sets the Device-specific Error (bit 3) in the Event Status Register. Events that generate Device-specific

Errors do not generate Command Errors, Execution Errors, or Query

Errors.

-350, Too many errors and also -32768

-330, Self-test failed

-330, Self-test failed;Power-On Tests

-313, Calibration memory 1ost;Defaulted

Error Messages From -299 To -200

These error messages indicate that an error has been detected by the swept signal generator’s Execution Control Block. An error of this type sets the Execution Error Bit (bit 4) in the Event Status

Register. One of the following events has occurred: n

A data element following a header was evaluated by the swept signal generator as outside of its legal input range or is inconsistent with the swept signal generator’s capability.

w A valid program message can not be properly executed due to some instrument condition.

2a-6 Error Messages

Execution Errors are reported by the swept signal generator after rounding and expression evaluation operations have taken place.

Errors that generate Execution Errors do not generate Command

Errors, Device-specific Errors, or Query Errors.

-240, Hardware error; Rear panel HP-IB switch

-224, Illegal parameter value

-222, Data out of range;Expected O-l

-222, Data out of range

-221, Settings conflict

-221, Settings conflict;List Arrays Invalid

-221, Settings conflict;Power And Level Mode

-221, Settings conflict;Power and attenuator

-221, Settings conflict;mm Module Mismatch

-220, Parameter error;Value not allowed

-213, Init ignored

-200, Execution error;No more room in EEROM

-200, Execution error;Option Not Installed

Error Messages From - 199 to -100

These error messages indicate that a SCPI syntax error has been detected by the swept signal generator’s parser. An error of this type sets the Command Error Bit (bit 5) in the Event Status Register.

One of the following events has occurred: n

A syntax error has been detected. Possible errors are: a data element that violates the device listening formats or whose type is unacceptable to the instrument.

w A semantic error has been detected indicating that an unrecognized header was received.

n

A Group Execute Trigger (GET) was entered into the input buffer inside a SCPI program message.

Events that generate Command Errors do not generate Execution

Errors, Device-specific Errors, or Query Errors.

- 178, Expression data not allowed

-170, Expression error;Bad terminator

-161, Invalid block data;Bad terminator

-160, Block data error

-160, Block data error;Bad block type

-151, Invalid string data;Bad terminator

-144, Character data too long;>12 chars

-141, Invalid character data;Bad char in token

-138, Suffix not allowed

-131, Invalid suffix;This one not allowed

-123, Exponent too 1arge;Decimal number

- 123, Exponent too 1arge;Numeric overflow

-122, RESERVED

-121, Invalid character in number

-120, Numeric data error;Bad format

Error Messages 2a-7

2a-8 Error Messages

-120, Numeric data error;Bad terminator

-113, Undefined Header;Query not allowed

-113, Undefined header;Bad mnemonic

- 109, Missing parameter

-108, Parameter not allowed;Too many

-105, GET not allowed

-104, Data type error

-104, Data type error;Block not allowed

-104, Data type errorChar not allowed

-104, Data type error;DecimaI not allowed

-104, Data type error;Non-dec not allowed

-104, Data type errorString not allowed

-103, Invalid separator

Menu Maps

2b

Menu Maps 2b-1

ALC Bandwidth Select .

Low *High *Auto

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Module Sense . . . .

*AUTO *Front Rear None t-t-m;”

A L C M E N U

II I

. . .

Up/Dn Size . . .

Freq

Swept cw Offset

Freq

Muk more l/3 + Zoom

List

Menu

Step Swp

Menu

CW/CF

Coupled more

Module

2/3 * Menu

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Module Sense . . . . . . . . . . .

*AUTO *Front Rear None more

3/3

I

..........

Enter List ..........

Freq Offset Dwell

Delete

Menu more ..................

l/3 + Start

Auto stop

Fill ....................

# Pts Incr more

213

......

* O f f s e t

Global ......

Dwell

Pt Trig

Menu more

313

-/I

I

Step

Size

Step

Points

1 1

Step

Dwell

Dwell

Coupled more l/3

. . . .

Step Swp Pt Trig . . . .

*Auto Bus Ext more

313 ccc

I I

I

F R E Q U E N C Y M E N U 2

W M E N U S E L E C T -

Marker

M l

Marker

M 2

M l - - M 2 Start=Ml

Sweep stop=td2 more l/3 +

Marker

M 3

Morker

M4

Marker

M 5

Center=

Marker more Delto

2/3 * Mkr Ref

Delta

Marker

Markers

All Off

Amp1

Markers more

3/3

*Ml

Delta Marker Reference ._. ._.___.._

M 2

M 3 M4 M 5

M A R K E R M E N U

3

O P T I O N 0 0 2 M E N U

Pulse

Menu

A M

Menu

7

F M

Menu

F M O n / O f f

Monitor

Menu

F M Coupling

A M O n / O f f

Ext Int

I n t e r n a l A M

“Rate Depth more A M T y p e l/2 + *100%/V 1 OdB/V

Deep

A M

Waveform

Menu more

2/2

*Sine

Internal A M Woveform

Square Triangle Ramp Noise

Internal Pulse Generator

Width Rate Period

Delay

Menu more I n t e r n a l P u l s e M o d e l/2 + *Auto Gate Trigger

Pulse Delay . .

Normal Trig’d more

212 r

M E N U S E L E C T -

I

MOD ALC

IO

J

I

.

Scalar

Pulse On/Off lntrnl Extrnl

Pulse

Menu more A M O n / O f f l/3 + lOdB/V

100%/V

Deep

A M

Pulse

Width

Pulse

Rate

Pulse

Period more l/2 * *Fast

Pulse R i s e T i m e

Slow *Auto more

2/3 + 100kHz

F M On/Off .

DC more

2/2 more

3/3

MODULATION MENU

Uncoupl

Atten

Set

Atten

Up/Dn

Power

Power

Slope

I more l/3 -,

Tracking

Menu

I 1

I

I

Power

Offset

Fltness

Menu

Power

Sweep

I

I more

2/3

Dblr Amp

+ M e n u

-

1

I more

313

I I

. . . . .

Enter .

Delete Clear more . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

l/3 + Start

*Freq

Corr Menu Point stop

Auto Fill . . . .

# Pts lncr more

COPY

2/3 * List

Freq

Follow

M t r Meas CorPoir

Menu Disoble more

313

,

I

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . .

All

Undef Current

,

. . . . . . .

Measure Corr . .

All Undef Current

POWER MENU

r

M E N U S E L E C T

1

Fault

Info1

Fault

Info2

Fault

Info3

Clear

Fault

S E R V I C E M E N U 6

Manual

Sweep

. . Sweep Mode . . . . . . . . . . .

Step List *Ramp more SwpTime l/3 -, *Auto

. . .

S t a r t S w e e p T r i g g e r

*Auto Bus Ext more TrigOut

Z/3 * Delay stopswp

Menu more

3/3

Step

Size

Step

Points

Step

Dwell

Dwell

Coupled more l/3 -,

.

Step Swp Pt Trig .

*Auto Bus Ext

I 1 more

I I

.

S t e p C o n t r o l

2/3 * Master Slave more

313

I 1

S W E E P M E N U

7

HP-IB

Menu

Altrnate

Regs

II I

Disp

Status

UsrKey

Clear more l/3 -,

UsrMenu

Clear

Ref Osc

Menu

Security

Menu

Software

Rev more . .

P r e s e t M o d e S a v e U s e r

2/3 * * F a c t o r y User Preset

Dim

Display more

313

I

8360

Adrs

Meter

Adrs

Printer

Adrs

S Y S T E M M E N U 8

r

M E N U S E L E C T

1

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Cal

Tracking

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AM Cal

Menu

Freq Cal

Menu more Ext Det l/2 * Cal more

212

U S E R C A L M E N U 9

Specifications

2c

This section lists the specifications for the HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator. In a effort to improve these swept signal generators,

Hewlett-Packard has made changes to this product which are identified with changes in the serial number prefix.

To check if your swept signal generator specifications are the same as those listed in this section:

1. Locate your instrument model number and serial prefix number in the “Instrument History Changes” table in Chapter 5.

2. Check the right column of this table to determine whether any changes apply to your instrument’s model number/serial prefix number combination.

3. If a change is listed, check this change to determine if specifications other than those listed in this section apply. The changes are included in Chapter 5.

Specifications describe warranted instrument performance over the 0 to +55 ‘C temperature range except as noted otherwise. Specifications apply after full user calibration and in coupled attenuator mode of operation (ALC level greater than

-10 dBm). Supplemental characteristics, denoted typical or nominal, are intended to provide information useful in applying the instrument, but are non-warranted parameters.

Specifications 2c-1

Frequency

Range

Resolution

HP

HP

83620B: 10 MHz to 20 GHz

83622B: 2 to 20 GHz

HP

83623B: 10 MHz to 20 GHz High Power

HP

83624B: 2 to 20 GHz High Power

HP

83630B: 10 MHz to 26.5 GHz

HP

HP

83640B: 10 MHz to 40 GHz

83650B: 10 MHz to 50 GHz

Standard: 1 kHz

Option 008: 1 Hz

Frequency Bands

(for CW signals)

Band

6

7

4

5

2

3

1

0

Frequency

Range

10 MHz to < 2 GHz

2 GHz to < 7 GHz

7 GHz to < 13.5 GHz

13.5 GHz to < 20 GHz

20 GHz to < 26.5 GHzl

26.5 GHz to < 33.5 GHz*

33.5 GHz to < 38 GHz3

38 GHz to 50 GHz

1 This band is 20 GHz to < 25.5 GHz on the HP 83640B.

2 This band is 25.5 GHz to < 32 GHz on the HP 83640B.

3 This band is 32 GHz to < 40 GHz on the HP 83640B.

n

6

6

8

3

2

4

1

1

Frequency Modes:

CW and Manual Sweep

Accuracy:

Same as time base

Switching Time

For Steps Within a Frequency Band:

15 ms + (step size/l GHz)

x

5 ms

Maximum, or Across Band Switch Points: 50 ms

Step or List Modes within a frequency band:

5 ms + (step size/l GHz)

x

5 ms’.

’ Frequencies < 2 GHz, switching time = 6 ms + (step size/l GHz)

x

5 ms.

2c-2 Specifications

Synthesized Step

Accuracy:

Same as time base

Sweep

Minimum Step Size:

Same as frequency resolution

Number of Points: 2

to 801

Switching Time:

Same as CW

Dwell Time:

100 /.JS to 3.2 s

Synthesized List Mode

Accuracy:

Same as time base

Minimum Step Size:

Same as frequency resolution

Number of Points:

1 to 801

Switching Time:

Same as CW

Dwell Time:

100 ps to 3.2 s

Ramp Sweep Mode

Accuracy’:

(sweep time 2 100 ms and 5 5 s):

Sweep Widths 5 n x 10 MHz: 0.1% of sweep width f time base accuracy.

Sweep Widths > n x 10 MHz: Lesser of 1% of sweep width or n x

1 MHz + 0.1% of sweep width.

Sweep Time:

10 ms to 100 seconds, 300 MHz/ms maximum rate

Internal 10 MHz

Accuracy:

Calibration f Aging Rate & Temperature Effects f Line

Time Base

Voltage Effects

Stability

Aging Rate: 5 x 10 -“/day, 1 x 10m7/year

With Temperature: 1 x 10-‘“/oC, typical

With Line Voltage: 5 x 10 -lo for line voltage change of lo%, typical

’ Sweeptime 2 150 ms and 5 5 s for Option 006 instruments.

Specifications 2c-3

RF Output

Output Power

Maximum Leveled

3

Standard

Option 006

HP 83620B, HP 83622B

HP 83623B

HP 83624B

HP 83630B

Output Frequencies < 20 GHz

Output Frequencies 1

20 GHz

HP 83640B

Output Frequencies < 26.5 GHz

Output Frequencies > 26.5 GHz

HP 83650B

Output Frequencies < 26.5 GHz

Output Frequencies 2 26.5 GHz and < 40 GHz

Output Frequencies 2 40 GHz

+13

+17

+20

+13

+10

+10

-l-6 i-10

+5 t2.5

+13

+17

+17

+13

t-10 i-10

i-6 t10

t5

t2.5

With attenuator (Option 001): Minimum settable output power is

-110 dBm.

Maximum leveled output power is reduced by 1.5 dB to 20 GHz, 2.0 dB above

20 GHz, and 2.5 dB above 40 GHz.

Minimum Settable

Standard: -20 dBm Option 001: -110 dBm

Resolution: 0.02

dB

Switching Time:

(without attenuator change): 10 ms, typical

Temperature Stability:

0.01 dB/OC, typical

30

25

Typical Maximum Available Power

L HP83624EI

I

I

HP L?X+B

I

0.01 2.0

13.5

20 25.5

Frequency (Gttz)

40 50

3 Specification applies over the 0 to 35 “C temperature range (0 to 25 ‘C for output frequencies > 20 GHz). Maximum leveled output power over the 35 to 55 ‘C temperature range typically degrades by less than 2 dB.

2c-4 Specifications

Accuracy (dB)4

Specifications apply in CW, step, list, manual sweep, and ramp sweep modes of operation.

Power

> +lO dBm

> -10 dBm5

> -60 dBm

< -60 dBm

< 2.0

It1.2

60.6

50.9

zIz1.4

Frequency (GHz)

2 2.0

and < 20

> 2.0

and < 40

f1.3

f0.7

lto.9

fl.O

ztl.5

51.2

f1.7

> 40 f1.7

A2.0

zk2.5

Flatness (dB)

Specifications apply in CW, step, list, manual sweep, and ramp sweep modes of operation.

Power

> +lO dBm

> -10 dBm5

> -60 dBm

< -60 dBm

< 2.0

f0.9

f0.5

f0.7

fl.1

Frequency (GHz)

> 2.0

and 5 20 > 2.0 and < 40

fl.O

f0.6

f0.8

f1.2

f0.8

fl.O

f1.4

> 40

Ik1.5

k-1.7

Ik2.1

* Specification applies over the 15 to 35 ‘C temperature range for output frequencies

< 50 MHz.

5 Specification applies over the 15 to 35 “C temperature range and are degraded 0.3 dB outside of that range.

Specifications 2c-5

Typical HP 6365OB/L Power Flatness

26.5

Frequency (GHz)

Analog Power Sweep

Range:

-20 dBm to maximum available power, can be offset using step attenuator.

External Leveling

Range

At External HP 33330D/E Detector: -36 to +4 dBm

At External Leveling Input: -200 PV to -0.5 volts

Bandwidth

External Detector Mode: 10 or 100 kHz (sweep speed and modulation mode dependent), nominal

Power Meter Mode: 0.7 Hz, nominal

Source Match

(internally leveled), typical

6

< 20 GHz 1.6:1 SWR

< 40 GHz 1.&l SWR

< 50 GHz 2.0:1 SWR

6 Typically 2.0:1 SWR at frequencies below 50 MHz.

2c-6 Specifications

T y p i c a l A L C L i n e a r i t y

( F r e q u e n c i e s < 20GHz)

- 1 0 0

A L C Level(dBm)

+10

+20

Spectral Purity

Specifications apply in CW, step, list, and manual sweep modes of operation.

Spurious Signals

Harmonics o u t p u t H P 83620B H P 8 3 6 2 3 B H P 8 3 6 3 0 B H P 8 3 6 4 0 B H P 8 3 6 5 0 B

Frequencies HP 83622B HP 83624B

< 2.0 GHz

Standard - 3 0 7

Option 006 -307

-257

-257

- 3 0 7

- 3 0 7

- 3 0 7

- 3 0 7

- 3 0 7

- 3 0 7

1 2.0 and

< 26.5 GHz

Standard - 5 0

Option 006 - 6 0

- 2 5

- 6 0

- 5 0

- 6 0

- 5 0

- 5 0

- 5 0

- 5 0

2 26.5 GHz

Standard

Option 006

- 4 0

- 4 0

- 4 0

- 4 0

Subharmonics o u t p u t

H P 8 3 6 2 0 B H P 8 3 6 2 3 B H P 8 3 6 3 0 B H P 8 3 6 4 0 B H P 8 3 6 5 0 B

Frequencies HP 83622B HP 83624B

None None None

None None

< 7GHz

27 and

< 20 GHz - 5 0

- 5 0 - 5 0 - 5 0 - 5 0

> 20 and

< 40 GHz

> 40 GHz

- 5 0 -408 -408

-358

7 Specification is - 2 0 dBc below 50 MHz.

’ Specification typical below 0 dBm.

Specifications 2c-7

2c-8 Specifications

- 2 0

-30

- 4 0

-50

8 -60

- 7 0

- 6 0

40

-100

0.01

2.0

Typical HP 836206 Harmonics & Subharmonics

7

Carrier Frequency (GHz)

13.5

-20

I

Typical HP 636238 Harmonics at 17 dBm

I

20

-100’ , f , , , , , I , , 1 I ,I, I I , I I ’

0.01 2

7 13.5

20

Carrier Frequency (GHz)

Non-Harmonically Related

Output Frequencies:

< 2.0 GHzg

> 2.0 and < 20 GHz

- 6 0

- 6 0

2 20 GHz and 5 26.5 GHz - 5 8

> 26.5 and 5 40 GHz

- 5 4

> 40 GHz

- 5 2

’ Specification applies at output levels 0 dBm and below.

Power-Line Related (< 300 Hz offset from carrier)

10 MHz to < 7 GHz

7 GHz to < 13.5 GHz

13.5 GHz to 20 GHz

> 20 GHz to < 26.5 GHz

26.5 GHz to < 38 GHz’O

38 GHz to 50 GHz

- 5 5

- 4 9

- 4 5

- 4 3

- 3 9

- 3 7

Single-Sideband

Phase Noise

Offset from Carrier

(dBc/Hz)

Band(s)

10 MHz to < 7 GHz

7 GHz to < 13.5 GHz

13.5 GHz to 20 GHz

> 20 GHz to < 26.5 GHz

26.5 GHz to < 38 GHz”

38 GHz to 50 GHz

100 Hz

- 7 0

- 6 4

- 6 0

- 5 8

- 5 4

- 5 2

1 kHz

- 7 8

- 7 2

- 6 8

- 6 6

- 6 2

- 6 0

10 kHz 100 kHz

- 8 6

- 8 0

- 7 6

- 7 4

- 7 0

- 6 8

-107

-101

- 9 7

- 9 5

-91

-89

-60

_ -80

CE u

--loo

1 OOHz

IkHz IOkHz IOOkHz

O f f s e t F r o m C a r r i e r

IMHz

Residual FM

CW Mode or Sweep Widths 2 n x 10 MHz: n x 60 Hz, typical

(RMS, 50 Hz to 15 kHz

Sweep Widths > n x 10 MHz: n x 15 kHz, typical

bandwidth) lo Frequency range is 26.5 GHz to 40 GHz on the HP 83640B.

IOMHz

Specifications 2c-9

Modulation

Pulse

Pulse modulation specifications apply for output frequencies

400 MHz and above.

On/Off Ratio”

Rise/Fall Times

Minimum

Width

Internally Leveled

Search Mode

Output Frequencies < 2.0 GHz

Output Frequencies 2 2.0 GHz

ALC Off Mode

Output Frequencies < 2.0 GHz

Output Frequencies > 2.0 GHz

Minimum

Repetition Frequency

Internally leveled

Search Mode

ALC Off Mode

Level Accuracy

(dB, relative to CW level)

Widths 2 1 ,us

Widths < 1 ps (Search Mode)

Video Feedthrough

Output Frequencies < 2.0 GHz

Power Levels 5 10 dBm

Power Levels > 10 dBm

Output Frequencies 2 2.0 GHz

HP 83620B/22B/30B

HP 83623B/24B/40B/50B

Overshoot, Ringing

Delay”

Output Frequencies < 2.0 GHz

Output Frequencies > 2.0 GHz

Compression

Output Frequencies < 2.0 GHz

Output Frequencies 2 2.0 GHz

Standard

80 dB

25 ns

1 P

50 ns

50 ns

50 ns

50 ns

10 Hz

DC

DC f 0 . 3 f0.5, typical

2%

5%

0.2%

1%

15%, typical

Option 006

80 dB

10 ns

1 P

50 ns

15 ns

50 ns

15 ns

10 Hz

DC

DC f 0 . 3

~kO.5, typical

2%

5%

1%

1% lo%, typical

80 ns, typical 80 ns, typical

80 ns, typical 60 ns, typical f10 ns, typical f10 ns, typical

*lO ns, typical ~.t5 ns, typical

l1 In the HP 83623B/24B, specification applies at ALC levels 0 dBm and above, and over the 20 to 55 “C temperature range. Specification degrades 5 dB below 20 “C, and

1 dB per dB below ALC level 0 dBm in those models.

I2 Option 002 adds 30 ns delay and f5 ns pulse compression for external pulse inputs.

2c-10 Specifications

Internal Pulse Generator

Width Range: 1 ps to 65 ms

Period Range: 2 ps to 65 ms

Resolution: 1 ps

AM and Scan

Bandwidth

(3 dB, 30% depth, modulation peaks 3 dB below maximum rated power):

DC to 100 kHz (typically DC to 300 kHz)

Modulation Depth

(ALC levels noted, can be offset using step attenuator)

Normal Mode: -20 dBm to 1 dB below maximum available power

Deep ModeI37 r5: 50 dB below maximum available power

Unleveled Model41 15: 50 dB below maximum available power

Sensitivity

Linear: lOO%/volt

Accuracy (1 kHz rate, 30% depth, normal mode): 5%

Exponential: 10 dB/volt

0

Incidental Phase Modulation

(30% depth): 0.2 radians peak, typica

Incidental FM:

Incidental phase modulation x modulation rate

Accuracy (Normal Mode): 0.25 dB f5% of depth in dB

Typical AM Distortion

(ALC l e v e l OdBm, C a r r i e r s r20GHr)

1 OOkH z Rote

/---_

=-I-

I

I

I I

80 1 0 0

1/,----

20 40 60

A M D e p t h (%) l3 Deep mode offers reduced distortion for very deep AM. Waveform is DC-coupled and feedback-leveled at ALC levels above -13 dBm. At ALC levels below -13 dBm, output is DC-controllable, but subject to typical sample-and-hold drift of 0.25 dB/second.

I4 The HP 8360 has two unleveled modes, ALC off and search. In ALC off mode, the modulator drive can be controlled from the front panel to vary quiescent RF output level. In search mode, the instrument microprocessor momentarily closes the ALC loop to find the modulator drive setting necessary to make the quiescent RF output level equal to an entered value, then opens the ALC loop while maintaining that modulator drive setting. Neither of these modes is feedback leveled.

I5 Modulation depth is 40 dB below maximum available power for frequencies > 20 GHz on HP 83640B and HP 83650B.

Specifications 2c-11

0 . 0 0 0 0 0 s

Ir.ooooop 5

8 OOOOOp s

D e l t a V = 2 9 60mvolts

V m c r k e r 1

= 6OO.OOpvolts

Vmarker 2 = 30.200mvolts

Timebose = 800ns/div

FM

Locked

Mode

Maximum Deviation: f8 MHz

Rates (3 dB bandwidth, 500 kHz deviation): 100 kHz to 8 MHz

Maximum Modulation Index (deviation/rate): n x 5

Unlocked Mode

Maximum Deviation

At rates 5 100 Hz: f75 MHz

At rates > 100 Hz: f8 MHz

Rates (3 dB bandwidth, 500 kHz deviation): DC to 8 MHz

Sensitivity

100 kHz, 1 MHz, or 10 MHz/volt, switchable

Accuracy (1 MHz rate, 1 MHz deviation): 10%

Simultaneous

Full AM bandwidth and depth is typically available at any pulse

Modulations

rate or width. FM is completely independent of AM and pulse modulation.

2c-12 Specifications

Internal Modulation

Generator

Option 002

AM, FM

Pulse

Modulation Meter

Internal Waveforms:

sine, square, triangle, ramp, noise

Rate

Range

Sine: 1 Hz to 1 MHz

Square, triangle, ramp: 1 Hz to 100 kHz

Resolution: 1 Hz

Depth, deviation

Range: same as base instrument

Resolution: 0.1%

Accuracy: same as base instrument

Modes:

free-run, gated, triggered, delayed

Period range: 300

ns to 400 ms

Width Range: 25

ns to 400 ms

Resolution: 25

ns

Accuracy: 5

Video delay

ns

Internal sync pulse: 0 to 400 ms

Externally-supplied sync pulse: 225 to 400 ms

Accuracy

(rates 5 100 kHz): 5% of range

Specifications 2c- 13

General

Environmental

Warmup Time

Operating Temperature Range: 0

to 55 “C

Altitude:

Up to 4572 meters

Humidity: 5

to 80% relative at j-25 to 40 “C

Enclosure Protection:

IP20, according to IEC 529

This product is designed for use in INSTALLATION CATEGORY II and POLLUTION DEGREE 2, per IEC 1010 and 664 respectively.

EMC:

Within limits of CISPR Pub. 11/1990 Group 1, Class A, and

Mil-Std-461C Part 7 RE02.

Operation:

Requires 30 minute warmup from cold start at 0 to

55 “C. Internal temperature equilibrium reached over 2 hour warmup at stable ambient temperature.

F’requency Reference:

Reference time base is kept at operating temperature with the instrument connected to AC power.

Instruments disconnected from AC power for more than 24 hours require 30 days to achieve time base aging specification. Instruments disconnected from AC power for less than 24 hours require 24 hours to achieve time base aging specification.

Power Requirements

48 to 66 Hz; 115 volts (+lO/-25%) or 230 volts (+lO/-15%); 400

VA maximum (30 VA in standby)

Weight & Dimensions

Net Weight: 27 kg (60 lb)

Shipping Weight: 36 kg (80 lb)

Dimensions: 178 H x 425 W x 648 mm D (7.0 x 16.75 x 25.5 inches)

Adapters Supplied

HP

83620B,

HP 83622B, HP

83623B,

HP

83624B,

HP 83630B

Type-N (female) - 3.5 mm (female)

3.5 mm (female) - 3.5 mm (female)

Part number 1250- 1745

Part number 5061-5311

HP 83640B, HP 83650B

2.4 mm (female) - 2.92 (female)

2.4 mm (female) - 2.4 mm (female)

Part number 1250-2187

Part number 1250-2188

2c-14 Specifications

Inputs & Outputs

Auxiliary Output

Provides an unmodulated reference signal from 2 to 26.5 GHz at a typical minimum power level of -10 dBm. Nominal output impedance 50 ohms. (SMA female, rear panel)

RF Output

Nominal output impedance 50 ohms. (Precision 3.5 mm male on 20 and 26.5 GHz models, 2.4 mm male on 40 and 50 GHz models, front panel.)

External ALC Input

Used for negative external detector or power meter leveling. Nominal input impedance 120 kR, damage level f15 volts. See RF output specifications. (BNC female, front panel.)

Pulse Input/Output

TTL-low-level signal turns RF off. When using the standard internal pulse generator, a TTL-level pulse sync signal preceding the RF pulse by nominally 80 ns is output at this connector. Nominal input impedance 50 ohms, damage level +5.5, -0.5 volts. See modulation specifications. (BNC .female, front panel.)

AM Input

Nominal input impedance 50 ohms (internally switchable to 2 kn), damage level f15 volts. See modulation specifications. (BNC female, front panel.)

FM Input

Nominal input impedance 50 ohms (internally switchable to

600 ohms), damage level 615 volts. See modulation specifications.

(BNC female, front panel.)

Trigger Input

Activated on a TTL rising edge. Used to externally initiate an analog sweep or to advance to the next point in step or list mode. Damage level +5.5, -0.5 volts. (BNC female, rear panel.)

Trigger Output

Outputs a one-microsecond-wide TTL-level pulse at 1601 points evenly spaced across an analog sweep, or at each point in step or list mode. (BNC female, rear panel.)

Specifications 20 15

2c-16 Specifications

10 MHz Reference Input

Accepts 10 MHz flO0 Hz, 0 to +lO dBm reference signal for operation from external time base. Nominal input impedance 50 ohms. Damage level +lO, -5 volts. (BNC female, rear panel.)

10 MHz Reference Output

Nominal signal level 0 dBm, nominal output impedance 50 ohms.

(BNC female, rear panel.)

Sweep Output

Supplies a voltage proportional to the sweep ranging from 0 volts at start of sweep to +lO volts at end of sweep, regardless of sweep width. In CW mode, voltage is proportional to percentage of full instrument frequency range. Minimum load impedance 3 kilohms.

Accuracy f0.25%, f10 mV, typical. (BNC female, rear panel.)

Stop Sweep Input/Output

Sweep will stop when grounded externally. TTL-high while sweeping, TTL-low when HP 8360 stops sweeping. Damage level

+5.5, -0.5 volts. (BNC female, rear panel.)

Z-Axis Blanking/Markers Output

Supplies positive rectangular pulse (Approximately +5 volts into

2 kQ) during the retrace and bandswitch points of the RF output.

Also supplies a negative pulse (-5 volts) when the RF is at a marker frequency (intensity markers only). (BNC female, rear panel.)

Volts/GHz Output

Supplies voltage proportional to output frequency at 0.5 volts/GHz

(internally switchable to 0.25 or 1 volt/GHz). Maximum output 18 volts. Minimum load impedance 2 kR. Accuracy ~tO.5%, f10 mV, typical. (BNC female, rear panel.)

Source Module Interface

Provides bias, flatness correction, and leveling connections to

HP 83550-series millimeter-wave source modules (Special, front and rear panels.)

Auxiliary Interface

Provides control signal connections to HP 8516A S-parameter Test

Set. (25-pin D-subminiature receptacle, rear panel.)

Pulse Video Output (Option 002 only)

Outputs the pulse modulation waveform that is supplied to the modulator. This can be either the internally or externally generated pulse modulation signal. (BNC female, rear panel.)

Pulse Sync Out (Option 002 only)

Outputs a 50 ns wide TTL pulse synchronized to the leading edge of the internally-generated pulse. (BNC female, rear panel.)

AM/FM Output (Option 002 only)

Outputs the internally-generated AM or FM waveform. This output can drive 50 ohms or greater. The AM output is scaled the same as it is generated, either 100%/V or 10 dB/V. The FM scaling depends on the FM deviation selected. (BNC female, rear panel.)

Models

HP

83620B: 10 MHz to 20 GHz

HP

83622B: 2 to 20 GHz

HP

83623B: 10 MHz to 20 GHz High Power

HP

83624B: 2 to 20 GHz High Power

HP 83630B:

10 MHz to 26.5 GHz

HP 83640B:

HP 83650B:

10 MHz to 40 GHz

10 MHz to 50 GHz

Options

Option 001 Add Step Attenuator

With this option, minimum settable output power is -110 dBm.

Maximum leveled output power is lowered by 1.5 dB to 20 GHz, and

2 dB above 20 GHz, and 2.5 dB above 40 GHz.

Option 002 Add Internal Modulation Generator

Adds a digitally-synthesized internal modulation waveform source-on-a-card to the HP 8360. It provides signals that would otherwise be supplied to the external modulation inputs.

Option 004 Rear Panel RF Output

Moves the RF Output, External ALC Input, Pulse Input/Output,

AM Input, and FM Input connectors to the rear panel.

Option 006 Fast Pulse Modulation

Improves pulse rise/fall time to 10 ns. Also effects maximum leveled output power and harmonic performance.

Option 008 1 Hz Frequency Resolution

Provides frequency resolution of 1 Hz.

Option 700 MATE System Compatibility

Provides CIIL programming commands for MATE system compatibility.

Specifications 2c- 17

2c-18 Specifications

Option 806 Rack Slide Kit

Used to rack mount HP 8360 while permitting access to internal spaces.

Option 908 Rack Flange Kit

Used to rack mount HP 8360 without front handles.

Option 910 Extra Operating & Service Guides

Provides a second copy of operating and service guides.

Option 013 Rack Flange Kit

Used to rack mount HP 8360 with front handles. Front handles are standard on the HP 8360.

Option W30 Two Years Additional Return-To-HP Service

Does not include biennial calibration.

Installation

CAUTION

This chapter provides installation instructions for the HP 8360

B-Series swept signal generator and its accessories. It also provides information about initial inspection, damage claims, preparation for use, packaging, storage, and shipment.

This product is designed for use in Installation Category II and

Pollution Degree 2 per IEC 1010 and 664, respectively.

3

Initial Inspection

Inspect the shipping container for damage. If the shipping container or cushioning material is damaged, it should be kept until the contents of the shipment have been checked for completeness and the swept signal generator has been checked mechanically and electrically. The contents of the shipment should agree with the items noted on the packing slip. Procedures for checking the basic operation of the swept signal generator are in Chapter 4, “Operator’s

Check and Routine Maintenance”. You will find procedures for checking electrical performance in the “Performance Tests” chapter of your

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator/HP 8360 L-Series

Swept CW Generator Service Guide.

If there is any electrical or mechanical defect, or if the shipment is incomplete, notify the nearest Hewlett-Packard office. If the shipping container is damaged, or if the cushioning material shows signs of stress, notify the carrier as well as the Hewlett-Packard office. Keep the shipping material for the carrier’s inspection. The HP office will arrange for repair or replacement without waiting for a claim settlement.

Installation 3-1

Equipment Supplied

All HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators are sent from the factory with the following basic accessories: w Rack handles (mounted) n

Power cord n

Software package n

A set of manuals

The following adapters are also shipped with the swept signal generators:

Table 3-1.

Adapter Descriptions and Part Numbers Shipped with

Each Swept Signal Generator Model

H P 8362OB/HP 83622B/HP 83623B/HP 83624B/HP 8 3 6 3 0 B

Type-N (F) to 3.5 nun (F)

3.5 mm (F) to 3.5 nun (F)

1250-1745

5061.5311

H P 83640B/HP 8 3 6 5 0 B

2.4 mm (F) to K (F)

2.4 mm (F) to 2.4 mm (F)

1250-2187

1250-2188

Options Available

There are several options available on the HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators. For descriptive information on all of the options available, refer to Chapter 25 “Specifications”. For installation information on the rack mounting kits, refer to later paragraphs in this chapter. For information on retrofitting options, refer to the

“Option Retrofits” chapter in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal

Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept CW Generator Service Guide.

3-2 Installation

Preparation for Use

Enclosure Protection

Power Requirements

Install the instrument according to the enclosure protection provided.

n

This instrument does not protect against the ingress of water.

n

This instrument protects against finger access to hazardous parts within the enclosure.

The HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators require a power or 230 V (+lO/-15%), 48 to 66 Hz, single-phase. Power consumption is 400 VA maximum (30 VA in standby).

Line Voltage and Fuse

Selection

WARNING

The swept signal generator is provided with a voltage selector

(located on the rear panel) to match the swept signal generator to the ac line voltage available at the site of installation. Both the line selector and fuse were selected at the factory to match the ac line voltage expected to be found at the shipping destination. Verify that the voltage selector has been set to the correct line voltage before connecting power to the swept signal generator.

For continued protection against fire hazard replace line fuse only with same type and rating. The use of other fuses or material is prohibited.

CAUTION

Refer to the “Routine Maintenance” in Chapter 4 for information on changing fuses.

Before switching on this product, make sure that the line voltage selector switch is set to the voltage of the power supply and the correct fuse is installed. Assure the supply voltage is in the specified range.

Installation 3-3

Power Cable

WARNING

In accordance with international safety standards, this instrument is equipped with a three-wire power cable. When connected to an appropriate power line outlet, this cable grounds the instrument cabinet. Figure 3-l shows the styles of plugs available on power cables supplied with Hewlett-Packard instruments. The HP part numbers indicated are part numbers for the complete power cable/plug set. The specific type of power cable/plug shipped with the instrument depends upon the country of shipment destination.

This is a Safety Class I product (provided with a protective earthing ground incorporated in the power cord). The mains plug shall only be inserted in a socket outlet provided with a protective earth contact.

Any interruption of the protective conductor, inside or outside the instrument, is likely to make the instrument dangerous. Intentional interruption is prohibited.

CAUTION

Always use the three-prong ac power cord supplied with this instrument. Failure to ensure adequate earth grounding by not using this cord may cause instrument damage.

The offset prong of the three-prong connector is the grounding pin. The protective grounding feature is preserved when operating the swept signal generator from a two contact outlet by using a three-prong to a two-prong adapter and connecting the green wire of the adapter to ground. An adapter is available (for US connectors only) as HP part number 1251-0048.

Install the instrument so that the detachable power cord is readily identifiable and is easily reached by the operator. The detachable power cord is the instrument disconnecting device. It disconnects the mains circuits from the mains supply before other parts of the instrument. The front panel switch is only a standby switch and is not a LINE switch. Alternately, an externally installed switch or circuit breaker (which is readily identifiable and is easily reached by the operator) may be used as a disconnecting device.

3 - 4 tnstallation

PLUG MPE ’

250V

CABLE

HP PART

NUMBER*

8 1 2 0 - 1 3 5 1

8 1 2 0 - 1 7 0 3

PLUG DESCRIPTION ’

S t r a i g h t BS1363A

9 0 ”

CABLE

LENGTH

(inches)

9 0

9 0

CABLE

COLOR

FOR USE IN COUNTRY

Mint Gray

Mint Gray

United Kingdom,

C y p r u s , Nigeria,

Zimbobwe, Singapore

250V

8 1 2 0 - 1 3 6 9

8 1 2 0 - 0 6 9 6

Straight ZNSSl98IASC 1 12

9 0 ”

79 a 7

Gray

Gray

Australia,

New Zealand

250V

8120-1689

8 1 2 0 - 1 6 9 2

S t r a i g h t CEE7-VII

9 0 ”

125V

250V

8 1 2 0 - 1 3 4 8

8120-1398

8 1 2 0 - 1 7 5 4

8120-1378

8120-1521

8 1 2 0 - 1 6 7 6

8 1 2 0 - 2 1 0 4

Straight NEMA5-I 5P

9 0 ”

S t r a i g h t NEMA5-15P

S t r a i g h t NEMA5-15P

9 0 ”

Straight NEMA5-I 5P

Straight SEVI 01 1 1959

2 4 5 0 7 , T y p e 1 2

8 1 2 0 - 0 6 9 8

Straight NEMAG- 15P

0

250V

d hi

22ov

8 1 2 0 - 1 9 5 7

8 1 2 0 - 2 9 5 6

S t r a i g h t D H C K 1 0 7

9 0 ”

250V

8 1 2 0 - 1 8 6 0 S t r a i g h t CEEZZ-VI

( S y s t e m C a b i n e t U s e )

79

79

8 0

8 0

3 6 a0

80

3 6

79

Mint G r a y

M i n t G r a y

Black

Black

Black

J a d e G r a y

J a d e G r a y

J a d e G r a y

Gray

E a s t a n d W e s t E u r o p e ,

Saudi Arabia, Egypt,

R e p u b l i c o f S o . A f r i c a ,

I n d i a ( u n p o l a r i z e d i n m a n y n a t i o n s )

United States,

Canada, Japan,

(IOOV o r 2OOV),

Mexico, Philippines,

Taiwan

Switzerland

79

79

U n i t e d S t a t e s , C a n a d a

Gray

Gray

Denmark

1.

2.

E = Earth Ground; L = Line, N = Neutral.

Part number for plug is industry identifier for plug only. N u m b e r shown f o r cable i s H P P a r t N u m b e r f o r COmplete c a b l e including p l u g .

Figure 3-1. AC Power Cables Available

Installation 3-5

Language Selection

You can operate the swept signal generator using one of three external interface languages: SCPI, Analyzer language, or CIIL

(Option 700).

Note

How to View or Change a Language Selection from the Front Panel

To set a programming language from the front panel, the instrument language on the rear panel HP-IB switch (Ll, L2, and L3 shown in

Figure 3-2)

must

be set to 7 (all 1s).

Remember

The HP-IB menu provides access to the swept signal generator’s programming language:

1. Press SYSTEM (MENU).

‘2. Select HP-IB Menu.

3. The swept signal generator displays the three language softkeys: Programming Language SCPI ,

Programming Language Analyzr , and

Programming Language CIIL . An asterisk indicates the selected language.

4. Select the desired softkey.

If the swept signal generator displays Rear panel HP-IB language must be 7 (111) in order to change current language (=XxX), the address on the rear panel HP-IB switch (Figure 3-2) is set to something other than 7 (all 1s).

Note

If the swept signal generator does not have Option 700, and you select Power Up Language CIIL , the instrument displays

*****OPTIONNOT INSTALLED*****.

5. The asterisk indicates the selected softkey, and the swept signal generator displays LANG:XXXX, ADRS=XX, REV da mo yr.

How to Select a Language on an Instrument without a Front Panel

If your swept signal generator does not have a front panel, set the rear panel HP-IB switch (F’g

3-2) for the language you want. (See

Table 3-2 for language addresses.)

Table 3-2. Language HP-IB Addresses

1 Language j HP~3BA.&a$%s

1

0

3-6 Installation

1 r

HP-IB

LANG ADDRESS

Figure 3-2. Rear Panel HP-IB Switch

HP-IB Address

In certain applications, the swept signal generator acts as a controller

Selection

for a power meter and a printer. Because of this, the address menu provides access not only to the swept signal generator’s

HP-IB address, but also to the address at which the swept signal generator expects to see a power meter, and the address at which the swept signal generator expects to see a printer. (See Table 3-3 for factory-set addresses.)

Table 3-3. Factory-Set HP-IB Addresses

Instrument

1 1 ;yPz”“:: Generator /

HP-IB Address

(Decimal)

i!

Installation 3-7

Note

Remember

How to View or Change an HP-IB Address from the Front Panel

To set an HP-IB address from the front panel, the instrument address on the rear panel HP-IB switch (Figure 3-2)

must

be set to

31 (all 1s).

1. Press SYSTEM [MENU).

2. Select HP-IB Menu Adrs Menu.

3. The swept signal generator displays the three address softkeys:

8360 Adrs , Meter Adrs , and Printer Adrs .

4. Select the desired softkey.

5. The swept signal generator displays the address selected for that instrument.

6. If you want to change the address, use the keypad to enter the desired address (0 to 30), then press (ENTER).

If the swept signal generator displays Rear panel HP-IB address must be 31 (11111) in order to change current address (=Xx>, the address on the rear panel HP-IB switch (Figure 3-2) is set to something other than 31 (all 1s).

How to Prevent a Front Panel Change to an HP-IB Address

To disable the address softkeys, set the instrument address on the rear panel HP-IB switch (Figure 3-2) to any address

other than 31

(all 1s).

How to Set the HP-IB Address on a Swept Signal Generator without a

Front Panel

If your swept signal generator does not have a front panel, set the address on the rear panel HP-IB switch (Figure 3-2) to the address you want (factory default is 19).

Mating Connectors

All of the externally mounted connectors on the instrument are discussed in “CONNECTORS” in Chapter 2. If you are interested in the HP part number for a connector, see “Replaceable Parts” in the

HP 8360 B-Series Swept Signal Generator/HP 8360 L-Series Swept

CW Generator Service Guide.

10 MHz Frequency

To keep the internal timebase frequency reference oven at operating

Reference Selection

temperature, the swept signal generator must be connected to ac line

and Warmup Time

power. The swept signal generator requires approximately 30 minutes to warm up from a cold start before the OVEN display message goes off. With a stable outside temperature, internal temperature equilibrium is reached after approximately two hours. For additional information on warmup times, see Chapter 2c, “Specifications”.

3-6 Installation

Operating Environment

Temperature.

The swept signal generator may be operated in environments with temperatures from 0 to +55 “C.

Humidity.

The swept signal generator may be operated in environments with humidity from 5 to 80% relative at +25 to

40 “C. However, protect the swept signal generator from temperature extremes, which can cause condensation within the instrument.

Altitude.

The swept signal generator may be operated at pressure altitudes up to 4572 meters (approximately 15,000 feet).

Cooling.

The swept signal generator obtains all cooling airflow by forced ventilation from the fan mounted on the rear panel.

Information on cleaning the fan filter is located in “Routine

Maintenance” in Chapter 4.

CAUTION

Ensure that all airflow passages at the rear and sides of the swept signal generator are clear before installing the instrument in its operating environment. This is especially important in a rack mount configuration.

Installation 3-9

Chassis Kits

Rack Mount Slide Kit

Option 806 swept signal generators are supplied with rack mount

(Option 806)

slides and the necessary hardware to install them on the swept signal generator. The following table itemizes the parts in this kit.

Table 3-4. Rack Mount Slide Kit Contents

Quantity Description

Rack Mount Kit

(Includes the following parts)

2 Rack Mount Flanges

8

Screws

Slide Kit

(Includes the following parts)

2 Slide Assemblies

4

8

Screws (Inner Slide Assembly)

Screws (Outer Slide Assembly)

8 Nuts (Outer Slide Assembly)

Slide Adapter Kit

(NON-HP,

includes the following parts)

4 Adapter Brackets

4 Adapter Bar

8

8

Screws (Bracket to Bar)

Nuts (Bracket to Slide Assembly)

CAUTION

Ventilation Requirements:

When installing the instrument in a cabinet, the convection into and out of the instrument must not be restricted. The ambient temperature (outside the cabinet) must be less than the maximum operating temperature of the instrument by 4 “C for every 100 watts dissipated in the cabinet. If the total power dissipated in the cabinet is greater than 800 watts, then forced convection must be used.

3-10 Installation

tnstallation Procedure

Remove handle trim strips.

1 Refer to Figure 3-3.

2: rovided, attach the rack mount flanges to the

3. Using the screws p outside of the handles.

4 Remove the side straps and end caps.

5: Remove the bottom and back feet and the tilt stands.

Figure 3-3. Removing the Side Straps and Feet

Installation 3-11

6. Refer to Figure 3-4. Remove the inner slide assemblies from the outer slide assemblies.

7. To secure the side covers in place, mount the inner slide assemblies to the instrument with the screws provided.

8. With the appropriate hardware, install the outer slide assemblies to the system enclosure.

9. Lift the swept signal generator into position. Align the inner and outer slide assemblies and slide the instrument into the rack.

Realign the hardware as needed for smooth operation.

MOUNTING HARDWARE

FOR HP

SYSTEMS ENCLOSURES

MOUNTING HARDWARE

FOR NON-HP

SYSTEMS ENCLOSURES

Figure 3-4. Chassis Slide Kit

3-12 Installation

Rack Flange Kit for

Option 908 swept signal generators are supplied with rack flanges and

Swept Signal

the necessary hardware to install them on the swept signal generator

Generators with

after removing the instrument handles. The following table itemizes

Handles Removed

the parts in this kit.

(Option 908)

Table 3-5.

Rack Flange Kit for Swept Signal Generators with

Handles Removed Contents

1 Quantity ) Description

Rack Mount Flanges

Screws

I

CAUTION

Ventilation Requirements:

When installing the instrument in a cabinet, the convection into and out of the instrument must not be restricted. The ambient temperature (outside the cabinet) must be less than the maximum operating temperature of the instrument by 4 “C for every 100 watts dissipated in the cabinet. If the total power dissipated in the cabinet is greater than 800 watts, then forced convection must be used.

Installation 3-13

Installation Procedure

1. Refer to Figure 3-5. Remove handle trim strips.

2. Remove the four screws on each side that attach the handles to the instrument; remove the handles.

3. Using the screws provided, attach the rack mount flanges to the swept signal generator.

4. Remove the bottom and back feet and the tilt stands before rack mounting the instrument.

Figure 3-5. Rack Mount Flanges for Swept Signal Generators with Handles Removed

3-14 Installation

Rack Flange Kit for

Option 913 swept signal generators are supplied with rack flanges

Swept Signal

and the necessary hardware to install them on the swept signal

Generators with

generator without removing the instrument handles. The following

Handles Attached

table itemizes the parts in this kit.

(Option 913)

Table 3-6.

Rack Flange Kit for Swept Signal Generators with

Handles Attached Contents

Description 1 Quantity 1

2

I I

Rack Mount Flanges

8 Screws

I

CAUTION

Ventilation Requirements:

When installing the instrument in a cabinet, the convection into and out of the instrument must not be restricted. The ambient temperature (outside the cabinet) must be less than the maximum operating temperature of the instrument by 4 “C for every 100 watts dissipated in the cabinet. If the total power dissipated in the cabinet is greater than 800 watts, then forced convection must be used.

Installation 3-15

Installation Procedure

1. Refer to Figure 3-6. Remove handle trim strips.

2. Remove the four screws on each side that attach the handles to the instrument.

3. Using the longer screws provided, attach the rack mount flanges to the outside of the handles.

4. Remove the bottom and back feet and the tilt stands before rack mounting the instrument.

,@

,[email protected]

,..b

,..d

Figure 3-6. Rack Mount Flanges for Swept Signal Generators with Handles Attached

3-16 Installation

Storage and

Shipment

Environment

The swept signal generator may be stored or shipped within the following limits:

Temperature -40 o to +75 “C.

Humidity

Altitude

5% to 95% relative at 0 ’ to +40 “C.

Up to 15240 meters. Pressure approximately 50,000 feet.

The swept signal generator should be protected from sudden temperature fluctuations that can cause condensation.

Installation 3-17

Package the Swept

Use the following steps to package the swept signal generator for

Signal Generator for

shipment to Hewlett-Packard for service:

Shipment

1. Fill in a service tag (available at the end of Chapter 4) and attach it to the instrument. Please be as specific as possible about the nature of the problem. Send a copy of any or all of the following information: n

Any error messages that appeared on the swept signal generator display n

A completed Performance Test record from the service guide for your instrument n

Any other specific data on the performance of the swept signal generator

CAUTION

Swept signal generator damage can result from using packaging materials other than those specified. Never use styrene pellets in any shape as packaging materials. They do not adequately cushion the instrument or prevent it from shifting in the carton. Styrene pellets cause equipment damage by generating static electricity and by lodging in the swept signal generator fan.

2. Use the original packaging materials or a strong shipping container that is made of double-walled, corrugated cardboard with 159 kg

(350 lb) bursting strength. The carton must be both large enough and strong enough to accommodate the swept signal generator and allow at least 3 to 4 inches on all sides of the swept signal generator for packing material.

3. Surround the instrument with at least 3 to 4 inches of packing material, or enough to prevent the instrument from moving in the carton. If packing foam is not available, the best alternative is SD-240 Air CapTM from Sealed Air Corporation (Hayward,

CA 94545). Air Cap looks like a plastic sheet covered with l-1/4 inch air-filled bubbles. Use the pink Air Cap to reduce static electricity. Wrap the instrument several times in the material to both protect the instrument and prevent it from moving in the carton.

4. Seal the shipping container securely with strong nylon adhesive tape.

5. Mark the shipping container “FRAGILE, HANDLE WITH

CARE” to ensure careful handling.

6. Retain copies of all shipping papers.

In any correspondence, refer to the swept signal generator by model number and full serial number.

3-18 Installation

Converting HP

8340141 Systems to

HP 8360 B-Series

Systems

The following paragraphs are intended to assist you in converting existing HP 8340/8341-based systems to HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator-based systems. Both manual and remote operational differences are addressed.

Manual operation topics are: n functional compatibility w front panel operation n conditions upon instrument preset n connections to other instruments

Remote operation topics are: n language compatibility n status structure n programming languages

Installation 3-19

Manual Operation

Compatibility

The HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators are designed to be, in all but very few cases, a complete feature superset of the

HP 8340/8341 synthesized sweepers. The most notable omissions are that the HP 8360 B-Series does not accept: n line triggers (ie. 50 or 60 Hz line frequency) n an external leveling input from positive diode detectors

Front Panel Operation

The HP 8360 B-Series uses a softkey menu driven approach toward accessing instrument functions versus a front panel key or shift key sequence as with the HP 8340/8341.

Instrument Preset Conditions. The factory defined preset conditions for the HP 8360 B-Series are identical to those for the HP 8340/8341.

The HP 8360 B-Series also allows you to define a different set of preset conditions. Refer to “Changing the Preset Parameters” in

Chapter 1 for examples and more information. Table 3-7 illustrates the factory instrument preset conditions for the HP 8360 B-Series and the HP 8340/8341. An instrument preset turns off all the functions and then sets the following:

Table 3-7.

Instrument Preset Conditions for the HP 8360/8340/8341

Function

Sweep Mode

Sweep

Condition

Full Span

Continuous/Auto

Trigger

Markers

Modulation

Frequency Step Size

Status Bytes

Leveling

Free Run

All Off

Off

10% of span

Cleared

Internal

RF Output

Power Level

Power Step Size

On

0 dBm

Power Sweep/Slope

Storage Registers

HP-IB Address

Status Byte Mask

10 dB

0 dB

Retain current values

Retains current value

Unchanged

Extended Status Byte Mask Unchanged

Language Mode

Unchanged

3-20 Installation

System Connections

Note

The HP 8510 Network Analyzer

The HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generator is compatible with any HP 8510 network analyzer with firmware revision 4.0 or higher.

To upgrade firmware for an existing HP 8510, an HP 11575C

Revision 4.0 Upgrade Kit or an HP 11575D Revision 5.0 Upgrade Kit is required.

HP 8510 revisions prior

to

6.0

(not inclusive)

require that you use the following connections: n

SWEEP OUTPUT n

STOP SWEEP IN/OUT w HP-IB INTERFACE n

AUXILIARY INTERFACE

HP 8510 revisions 6.0 and greater use the connections as designated on the rear panel of the swept signal generator. They are: n

TRIGGER OUTPUT n

STOP SWEEP IN/OUT n

HP-IB INTERFACE n

AUXILIARY INTERFACE

The dedicated HP 8510 versions of the HP 8360 (HP 83621B,

HP 83631B) may be configured to power-up to one of two possible system languages, network analyzer language, or SCPI (Standard

Commands for Programmable Instruments). This configuration is controlled via a switch located on the rear panel of the instrument.

The factory default setting for this switch is network analyzer language at an HP-IB address of 19. To interface with a network analyzer the language selected must be Analyzer language. Refer to earlier paragraphs in this chapter for the rear panel switch settings.

Models other than the dedicated HP 8510 versions are set at the factory for SCPI. To interface with a network analyzer the language selected must be Analyzer language.

Installation 3-2 1

3-22 Installation

The HP 8757C/E Scalar Network Analyzer

The connections between the analyzer and the HP 8360 B-Series are similar to the connections between the analyzer and the

HP 8340/8341. The HP 8360 B-Series differs from the HP 8340/8341 in one connection only. It is unnecessary to connect the modulator drive signal from the analyzer to the source. The HP 8360 B-Series internally produces the 27.8 kHz modulated signal necessary for AC mode measurements on the analyzer. The connections from the

HP 8360 B-Series to the analyzer are: n

Z-AXIS BLANK/MKRS n

SWEEP OUTPUT

H STOP SWEEP IN/OUT n

HP-IB Interface

Configure the general-purpose HP 8360 B-Series to HP-IB address 19 and network analyzer language for operation with the analyzer. For information on selecting the instrument address and language refer to earlier paragraphs in this chapter.

The dedicated HP 8510 versions (HP 83621B, HP 83631B) of the

HP 8360 B-Series cannot be used with the HP 8757C/E.

The HP 83550 Series Millimeter-wave Source Modules

Refer to “Leveling with MM-wave Source Modules” in Chapter 1 for information and examples.

The HP 89708 Noise Figure Meter

Connections from the HP 8360 B-Series to the HP 8970B noise figure meter are identical to those used with the HP 8340/8341. Configure the HP 8360 B-Series to an address corresponding to the source address of the HP 8970, typically HP-IB address 19, and network analyzer language.

Remote Operation

Language Compatibility

The HP 8360 B-Series swept signal generators support three HP-IB programming languages; network analyzer language, SCPI (Standard

Commands for Programmable Instruments), and M.A.T.E. CIIL language (Option 700).

Network Analyzer Language

HP 8360 B-Series network analyzer language is syntactically and semantically identical to the HP 8340/8341 HP-IB mnemonics.

However, fundamental hardware differences such as: n command execution time, n instrument diagnostics, n and other hardware specific functions exist and prevent executing an unmodified HP 8340/8341 program successfully. For example, the HP 8360 B-Series does not recognize or accept the HP 8340/8341 learn string.

Test and Measurement System Language

SCPI is an HP-IB programming language developed by

Hewlett-Packard specifically for controlling electronic test and measurement instruments. It is designed to conform to the IEEE

488.2 standard which provides codes, formats, protocols, and common commands for use with IEEE 488.1-1987 that were unavailable in the previous standard. SCPI provides commands that are common from one Hewlett-Packard product to another for like functions, thereby eliminating device specific commands.

Refer to “Getting Started Programming” in Chapter 1 for information on SCPI.

Control Interface Intermediate Language

CIIL is the instrument control programming language used in Option

700 HP 8360 B-Series. Like the HP 8340/8341 E69, the Option 700

HP 8360 B-Series is M.A.T.E.-compatible. Refer to the HP 8360

Option 700 Manual Supplement for information on this option.

Converting from

Table 3-9 illustrates the programming command in network analyzer

Network Analyzer

language and its equivalent SCPI programming command. In the

Language to SCPI

table, numbers enclosed by greater/less than symbols (<>) are parameters. Braces ({}) are used to enclose one or more options that may be used zero or more times. A vertical bar (I) can be read as “or”, and it is used to separate alternative parameter options.

Optional numeric suffixes for SCPI commands are enclosed in square brackets ([ I).

Installation 3-23

3-24 Installation

Features not available in one of the language modes are marked by a horizontal line in the corresponding column. In the interest of brevity all SCPI commands have been listed in their most concise form. For a complete and comprehensive listing of the swept signal generator SCPI commands refer to “SCPI COMMAND SUMMARY” in Chapter 2. For explanations of SCPI refer to “Getting Started

Programming” in Chapter 1.

Numeric Suffixes

Numeric suffixes consist of 2 or 3character codes that terminate and scale an associated value. The numeric suffixes for network analyzer language on the HP 8360 B-Series and the HP 8340/8341 are identical. Table 3-8 lists the HP 8360 B-Series suffixes. The default unit for each type of suffix is shown in bold type.

suffiv

Type

Frequency

Power Level

Power Ratio

Time

Table 3-8. Numeric Suffixes

Network Analyzer

Language

HZlKZlMZlGZ

DB

DB

SClMS

SCPI

HZjKHZlMHZlGHZ

DBMlWjMWlUW

DB

SlMSlUSlNSlPS

I

Status Bytes

There are two separate and distinct status structures within the

HP 8360 B-Series depending on the HP-IB language selected. When network analyzer language is selected, the status structure utilized is structurally and syntactically the same as on the HP 8340/8341.

This greatly enhances programming compatibility between existing

HP 8340/8341 programs and network analyzer programs converted or written for the HP 8360 B-Series.

In the SCPI language mode, the status structure is defined by the

SCPI status system. All SCPI instruments implement status registers in the same fashion.

For more information on the status registers, refer to “ANALYZER

STATUS REGISTER” and “SCPI STATUS REGISTER

STRUCTURE” in Chapter 2.

Description

ALC

Leveling mode, external

Leveling mode, internal

Leveling mode, mm module

Leveling mode, power meter

Enable normal ALC operation

Disable ALC and control modulator drive directly

Set output power, then disable ALC

Uncouple attenuator, control ALC independently

Frequency

Set CW frequency

Set start frequency

Set stop frequency

Set center frequency

Set frequency span

Set swept mode step size

Set CW mode step size

Enable frequency offset function

Enable frequency nultiplier function

Keep multiplication factor on instrument on/off or preset

Multiplication factor=1 on instrument on/off or preset

Zoom function

Table 3-9. Programming Language Comparison

Network Analyzer

Language

SCPI Language

A2

A l

SHA2

A3

Al]A2]A3(SHA2

SHA3

SHAl

SHPS <num>DB

CW <num>freq-suffix

FA <num>freq-suffix

FB <num>freq-suffix

CF <num>freq-suffix

DF <num>freq-suffix

SHCF <num>freq-suffix

SHCW <num>freq-suffix

SHFB <num>freq-suffix

SHFA <num>

SHAL

SHIP

SHST

POW:ALC:SOUR DIOD;

:POW:ATT:AUTO OFF

POW:ALC INT

POW:ALC:SOUR MMH;

:POW:ATT:AUTO OFF

POW:ALC:SOUR PMET;

:POW:ATT:AUTO OFF

POW:ALC:STAT ON

POW:ALC:STAT OFF

POW:SEAR ON

POW:ATT:AUTO OFF;

: P O W <num>[DBM]

FREQ:CW <num>[freq-suffix]

;MODE C W

FREQ:STAR <num>[freqsuffix]

;MODE S W E

FREQ:STOP <num>[freqsuffix]

;MODE S W E

FREQ:CENT <num>[freqsuffix]

;MODE S W E

FREQ:SPAN <num>[freq-suffix]

;MODE S W E

FREQ:STEP <num>[freq-suffix]

FREQ:STEP <num>[freq-suffix]

FREQ:OFFS <num>[freq-suffix]

;OFFS:STAT ON

FREQ:MULT <num>;MULT:STAT ON

(Refer to user defined preset)

(Refer to user defined preset)

Installation 3-25

Description

Table 3-9. Programming Language Comparison (continued)

Network Analyzer

Language

SCPI Language

HP-IB only functions

Output status byte

OS

Status byte mask

Extended status byte mask

Clear status byte

Output learn string

R M <num>

RE <num> cs

OL

*STB?

(See SCPI common commands)

*SRE

(See SCPI common commands)

*ESE

(See SCPI common commands)

*cLs

(See SCPI common commands)

*LRN?

(See SCPI common commands)

Mode string

Advance to next bandcross

Display updating

Activate fast phaselock mode

Enable front panel knob

OM

BC

DU

FP

EK

DISP ONIOFF

Increment frequency

IF

SYST:KEY 132 (enable up)

SYST:KEY 133 (enable down)

*TRG

(See SCPI common commands)

SYST:ILRN

Input learn string

Keyboard release

Select network analyzer mode

Output active value

Output next bandcross frequency

Output coupled parameters

Dutput diagnostics

1L

KR

NA

DA

3B

3C

3D

(See SCPI Command Summary)

DIAG:OUTP:BAND?

3utput fault information

3utput identity

3utput last lock frequency

3utput interrogated value

3utput power level

3F

31

3K

3P

3R

FREQ:STAR?;CENT?;:SWE:TIME?

DIAG:OUTP

/:FREQ?I:UNL?I:YOD?I:YTMD?

DIAG:OUTP:FAUL?

‘IDN?

[See SCPI common commands)

DIAG:OUTP:FREQ?

[See SCPI Command Summary)

POW:LEV?

3-26 Installation

Reset sweep

Description

Set remote knob

Request status byte mask

Table 3-9. Programming Language Comparison (continued)

SCPI Language Network Analyzer

Language

RB

RE <num>,RM <num>

RS

*SRE <num>, *SRE?,

*ESE <num>, *ESE?

A B O R

SN <num>

SWE:POIN <num>

Number of steps in a stepped sweep

Swap network analyzer channels

Test HP-IB interface

Sets sweep time lower limit

Take sweep

Instrument State

Instrument preset

Local instrument control

S W <l]O>

TI <num>

TL <num>time-suffix

TS

IP

LOCAL 7XX

DIAG:TINT? <num>

SWE:TIME:LLIM <num>[time-suffix]

TSW;*WAI

SYST:PRES

LOCAL 7XX

(XX=Source HP-IB address)

Markers [n] is 1 to 5, 1 is default

Turn on and set marker

Mn <num>freq-suffix

Turn off frequency marker

Enable Ml-M2 sweep

Disable Ml-M2 sweep

Move start->Ml stop->M2

Enable delta marker

Disable delta marker

Move marker to center frequency

Turn off all markers

Turn on amplitude markers

Turn off amplitude markers

MnMO

MPl

MPO

SHMP

MD1

MD0

MC

SHMO

AK1

AK0

MARK[n]:FREQ

<num>[freq-suffix]

STAT ON

MARK[n] OFF

SWE:MARK:STAT ON

SWE:MARK:STAT OFF

SWE:MARK:XFER

MARK[n]:DELT? <num>,<num>

MARK OFF

MARK[n]:FREQ?;

:FREQ:CENT <response>[freqsuffix]

MARK:AOFF

MARK[n]:AMPL ON

;AMPL:VAL <num>[DB]

MARK:AMPL OFF

Installation 3-27

Description

Table 3-9. Programming Language Comparison (continued)

Network Analyzer

Language

SCPI Language

Modulation

Scalar pulse modulation

Enable external pulse modulation

Disable external pulse modulation

Enable linearly scaled AM

Disable linearly scaled AM

Enable AC coupled FM

SHPM

PM1

PM0

AM1

AM0

FM1 <num>

FM0

PULS:SOUR SCAL;STAT ON

PULS:SOUR EXT;STAT ON

PULS:SOUR EXT;STAT OFF

AM:TYPE LIN;STAT ON

AM:TYPE LIN;STAT OFF

FM:SENS <num>[freqsuffix/V]

;COUP AC;STAT ON

FM:STAT OFF Disable AC coupled FM

Power

Set power level

Activate power sweep

Deactivate power sweep

RF output On

RF output Off

Uncouple internal attenuator and ALC

Couple internal attenuator and ALC

Set attenuator value and uncouple attenuator

Set power step size

Activate power slope function

Do auto track

Continuously peak RF

Peak RF once

PL <num>DB

PSl

PSO

RF1

RF0

SHPS

PL

SHSLIAT <num>DB

SHPLISP <num>DB

SLl <num>DB

SHRP

RPl

SHAK

P O W <num>[DBM]

POW:MODE SWE

POW:MODE FIX

POW:STAT ON

POW:STAT OFF

POW:ATT:AUTO OFF

POW:ATT:AUTO ON

POW:ATT <num>[DB]

POW:STEP <num>(DB]I[freqsuffix]

POW:SLOP <num>[freq suffix];STAT ON

CAL:TRAC

CAL:PEAK:AUTO ON

CAL:PEAK

3-28 Installation

Description

Table 3-9. Programming Language Comparison (continued)

Network Analyzer

Language

SCPI Language

Sweep

Set sweep time

Sweep once

Single sweep

Sweep continuously

Sweep manually

Activate step sweep mode

Activate ramp sweep mode

Trigger, external

Trigger, free run

Irigger, step system lecall an instrument state jave an instrument state

1ctivat.e alternate

Itate sweep

1eactivate alternate itate sweep lisplay software revision

ST <num>time-suffix

SZ]SG

S2]SG

Sl

SMlS3

SN]SEST

FA]FB]CF]DF]Sl]S2

T3

Tl

TRSB

RC <O-9> s v <l-9>

AL1 <l-9>

AL0

(cycle power)

(hardware)

SWE:TIME <num>[time-suffix]

INIT

1NIT:CONT 0FF;:ABOR;:INIT

1NIT:CONT ON

SWE:MODE MAN

SWE:GEN STEP;MODE MAN

:FREQ:MODE SWE

SWE:GEN ANAL;:FREQ:MODE SWE

TRIG:SOUR E X T

TRIG:SOUR IMM

*RCL <O-8>

*SAV <l-S>

SYST:ALT <l-B>;ALT:STAT ON

SYST:ALT:STAT OFF

*IDN?

(See SCPI common commands)

ROSC INT select an internal requency reference select an external requency reference

1isplay/set HP-IB address

(hardware)

(front panel/hardware)

ROSC EXT select SCPI select network analyzer language select CIIL

,ock save/recall registers lnlock save/recall registers

‘urge all instrument memory llank instrument display

SYSTISCPI’

SYST:LANG COMP’

CIIL (Or hardware)

SHSV

SHRC

SHMZlSHZ SHKZOHZ

DUO

SYST:COMM:GPIB:ADR <num>

(or hardware switch)

SYST:LANG SCPI (or hardware switch)’

SYST:LANG

COMP’

SYST:LANG CIIL (or hardware switch)

SYST:KEY:DIS SAVE

SYST:KEY:ENAB SAVE

SYST:SEC 0N;SEC OFF

DISP OFF

1 Wait one second after executing this command before sending any additional commands or they may be lost or ignored.

installation 3-29

Operator’s Check and Routine Maintenance

WARNING No operator serviceable parts inside. Refer servicing to qualified personnel. To prevent electrical shock, do not remove covers.

Operator’s Checks

The local operator’s check (front panel use) allows the operator to make a quick check of the main swept signal generator functions prior to use.

For delete front panel options of the HP 8360 B-Series, use the

“Front Panel Emulator Software” to perform an operator’s check.

Service Information

If the swept signal generator requires service and the routine maintenance procedures do not clear the problem, contact a qualified service technician. A list of HP Sales and Support Offices is provided behind the “PREFACE” tab at the front of this manual. To help the service technician identify the problem quickly, fill out and attach a service repair tag. Service repair tags are provided at the end of this chapter. If a self test error occurs, note the name of the failure and the referenced paragraph number in the failure symptoms/special control settings section of the tag. Provide any information that you feel is imnortant to recreate the failure.

Operator’s Check/Routine Maintenance 4-l

Local Operator’s

Check

Description

The preliminary check provides assurance that most of the internal functions of the swept signal generator are working. The main check provides a general check of the overall functions of the swept signal generator. No external equipment is needed.

Preliminary Check

Each time the swept signal generator is turned on the swept signal generator performs a series of self tests on the internal CPU, power supplies, and front panel. When the self test is complete, the swept signal generator returns to the same functional configuration that it was in prior to power off. When the (PRESET) key is engaged, the swept signal generator returns to the factory or user preset functional configuration.

1. Turn the swept signal generator on. Note the functional configuration.

2. Turn the swept signal generator off. Verify that the amber

STANDBY LED is on.

3. Turn the swept signal generator on. Verify that the amber

STANDBY LED is off, and that the green POWER ON LED is on.

a. Check the display, a cursor will appear in the upper-left corner followed by the HP-IB language, HP-IB address, and the date code of the firmware installed in the swept signal generator.

b. The display will now indicate the functional configuration noted in step 1.

c. Check the fan, it should be turning.

4-2 Operator’s Check/Routine Maintenance

Main Check 1.

Press (SERVICE).

2.

Select Selftest (Full) . Check that all tests performed pass.

3.

Press [PRESET). If the display indicates a user preset was performed, select Factory Preset . Verify that the green

SWEEP LED is blinking, the amber RF ON/OFF LED is on, and the red INSTR CHECK LED is off.

4.

Press (UsERCAL).

5.

Select Tracking Menu.

a. If the swept signal generator has Option 001, step attenuator, select auto Track. Wait for the swept signal generator to finish peaking before continuing.

b. If the swept signal generator has no step attenuator installed, provide a good source match on the output connector (a power sensor or 10 dB attenuator will do). Select auto Track.

Wait for the swept signal generator to finish peaking before continuing.

6.

Press (PRIOR).

7.

Select Freq Cal Menu.

8.

Select Swp Span Cal Once. Verify that status problems do not exist (UNLOCK, UNLVLED, or FAULT). An OVEN status message will appear on the message line if the swept signal generator has been disconnected from ac power. This message will turn off within 10 minutes, if it does not, there may be a problem. If a

FAULT message is displayed, refer to menu map 6, Service, to access fault information.

9.

Terminate the RF output with a good source match (either a 50 R load or power sensor). Press

POWER LEVEL

. Increase the power level until the unleveled message is displayed on the message line. Decrease the power level until the unleveled message turns off. Note the power level reading. Verify that the swept signal generator can produce maximum specified power without becoming unleveled.

This completes the operator’s check. If the swept signal generator does not perform as expected, have a qualified service technician isolate and repair the fault. See “Service Information.”

Operator’s Check/Routine Maintenance 4-3

Routine

Maintenance

Routine maintenance consists of replacing a defective line fuse, cleaning the air filter, cleaning the cabinet, and cleaning the display.

These items are discussed in the following paragraphs.

Table 4-1. Fuse Part Numbers c

WARNING

For continued protection against fire hazard replace line fuse only with same type and rating. The use of other fuses or material is prohibited.

How to Replace the

Line Fuse

Note

The value for the line fuse is printed on the rear panel of the swept signal generator next to the fuse holder. See Figure 4-l

1. Turn off the swept signal generator.

2. Remove the ac line cord.

The detachable power cord is the instrument disconnecting device.

It disconnects the mains circuits from the mains supply before other parts of the instrument. The front panel switch is only a standby switch and is not a LINE switch.

3.

Using a small flat-blade screwdriver, rotate the fuse cap counter-clockwise, and remove the fuse holder.

4.

Replace the original fuse.

5.

Replace the fuse holder in the rear panel. Using the screwdriver, rotate the fuse cap clockwise to secure the fuse holder in place.

6.

Reconnect the swept signal generator to line power.

CAUTION:

F O R F I R E P R O T E C T I O N R E P L A C E

HOLDER

4-4 Operator’s Check/Routine Maintenance

Figure 4-1. Replacing the Line Fuse

How to Clean the Fan

The cooling fan located on the rear panel has a thin foam filter.

Filter

How often the filter must be cleaned depends on the environment in which the swept signal generator operates. As the filter collects dust, the fan speed increases to maintain airflow (as the fan speed increases, so does the fan noise). If the filter continues to collect dust after the fan reaches maximum speed, airflow is reduced and the swept signal generator’s internal temperature increases. If the internal temperature reaches 90 “C! the swept signal generator will automatically turn off and the amber STANDBY LED will turn on.

Clean the fan filter as follows:

1. Turn off the swept signal generator.

2. Remove the ac line cord.

Note

The detachable power cord is the instrument disconnecting device.

It disconnects the mains circuits from the mains supply before other parts of the instrument. The front panel switch is only a standby switch and is not a LINE switch.

3. Remove the screws holding the fan cage. See Figure 4-2.

4. Remove the fan cage from the rear panel.

5. Rinse the fan cage, filter, and the filter retainer in warm water, then dry.

6. Reverse the removal procedure to reassemble the swept signal generator.

Figure 4-2. Removing the Fan Filter

Operator’s Check/Routine Maintenance 4-5

How to Clean the

Cabinet

Warning

To prevent electrical shock, disconnect the HP 8360 B-series swept signal generator from the mains before cleaning.

Use a dry cloth or one slightly dampened with water to clean the external case parts. Do not attempt to clean internally.

How to Clean the

The display of the swept signal generator is protected by a plastic

Display Filter

display filter. To clean the display filter, use mild soap or detergent and water, or a commercial window cleaner (ammonia does not hurt the plastic surface). Use a soft, lint-free cloth. Do not use abrasive cleaners, tissues or paper towels, which can scratch the plastic.

4-6 Operator’s Check/Routine Maintenance

Instrument History

This chapter is left blank until this manual requires changes.

5

Instrument History 5-l

Index

1

10 MHz frequency standard chosen automatically, T-l

10 MHz frequency standard external, T-l

10 MHz frequency standard internal, T-2

10 MHz frequency standard none chosen, T-2

10 MHz reference functions, R-l

10 MHz reference input connector, C-6

10 MHz reference output connector, C-6

1601 point flatness array, C-12

2

2.4 mm connector, C-11

27.778 kHz square wave, P-20

3

3.5 mm connector, C-11

a

8360 Adrs, E-l

A

ABORt command defined, 1-118 effect on trigger state, l-111 example using, 1-115

ABORt[abort] affect on trigger state, l-110 abort statement, l-57

AC FM, F-12 ac power switch, L-5 active entry area, l-4 active entry area on/off, E-5 active entry arrow, l-4 adapters, 3-l

HP-IB, C-7 adapter, three-prong to two-prong, 3-4

ADC fail, F-2 address swept signal generator, A-l, E-l address changes, no front panel, 3-8 address changes, prevent, 3-8 address, changes to, 3-8 addresses, factory-set interface, 3-7 address menu, A-l address, printer, P-11 address, programming power meter, M-8 airflow, 3-9

ALC bandwidth, M-16

Index-l

Index-2

menu, A-11 select auto, A-9 select high, A-10 select low, A-10

ALC bandwidth selection, l-50

ALC disabled theory of, A-8

ALC leveling internal, L-3 mm-wave module, L-4 normal, L- 1 power meter, L-4 search, L-2

ALC menu, A-2-4

ALC off, L-l

ALC off mode, l-32

ALC open loop, L-l

ALC search mode, l-32 align output filter, A-27, P-l alternate registers, A-12 altitude pressure, 3-9 always calibrate sweep span, S-74

AM

ALC off mode, D-l deep, D-l, M-15 depth, I-l exponentially scaled, A-15, A-18 linearly scaled, A-15, A-19 rate, I-l, M-15

AM bandwidth calibration, M-16

AM/FM output connector, C-4

AM input connector, C-4

AM output rear panel, M-11 amplitude markers, 1-14, A-17 amplitude modulation, M-13 display depth, M-9 greater depth, D-l internal, I-l softkeys, A-14 amplitude modulation bandwidth calibration, A-12-14 amplitude modulation on/off, A-15-16, A-18-19

AM waveform noise, I-2 ramp, I-2 sine, I-3, I-6 square, I-3 triangle, I-4, I-7 analog sweep mode, S-73 analyzer compatibility, P-13 analyzer language, P-13 analyzer programming language, A-19 angle brackets, l-64 apply flatness correction, F-10 arrow keys, A-21

assign softkey, A-22 attenuator, uncouple, U-l attenuator uncouple, M-14 attenuator, value set, S-59 auto fill increment, A-23 auto fill number of points, A-24 auto fill start, A-25 auto fill stop, A-26 automatically set sweep time, S-76 automatic sweep time, l-10 automatic trigger, stepped sweep, S-69 auto track, A-27 auto track failed message, 2a-1 auxiliary interface connector, C-6 auxiliary output connector, C-5

B

bandwidth

ALC, A-9, A-10, A-11

AM, A-12, A-13 amplitude modulation, A-12, A-13 beginning frequency flatness correction, A-25 frequency list, A-25 bits in general status register model, l-106 summary bit in general status register model, l-107 blank display, B-l

BNC connectors, C-4

Boolean parameters discussed in detail, l-85 explained briefly, l-75 brackets, angle, l-64

BUS trigger source defined, 1-119

C

cabinet, clean, 4-5 cables

HP-IB, C-7 calco fail, F-3 calibrate sweep span always, S-74 calibrate sweep span once, S-75 calibration full user, F-19 sweep span, F-15 calibration failed message, 2a-2 calibration, user functions, U-3 calman fail, F-4 calY0 fail, F-4 center frequency, 1-8, C-l

CW coupled, C-13 center frequency marker, C-l

CF/span sweep mode, zoom, Z-l change correction value, C-3 change interface address, 3-8

Index-3

Index-4

characterization diode detectors, l-47 checks, operator, 4-l

CIIL language, P-13 clean cabinet, 4-5 clean display, 4-6 clean fan filter, 4-5 clear display, B-l clear fault, C-2 clear memory, C-2 clear point, C-3 clear statement, l-59

*cLs, s-14 colon examples using, l-69 proper use of, l-69, l-85 types of command where used, l-67 command examples, l-64 commands, l-80 common, l-67 defined, l-63 event, 1-72 implied, l-72 query, l-72 subsystem, l-67 syntax, 1-81 commands, common IEEE 488.2, S-14 commands, SCPI programming, S-13 command statements, fundamentals, l-57 command tables how to read, 1-71 how to use, 1-71 command trees defined, l-68 how to change paths, l-68 how to read, l-68 simplified example, 1-71 using efficiently, l-69 commas problems with commas in input data, l-65 proper use of, l-69, l-82 common commands, l-67, l-69 defined, l-67 compare, analyzer language to SCPI, 3-24 compensation negative diode detectors, l-47 condition register, l-106 connections to HP 83550 series mm-wave modules, 3-22 to HP 8510 network analyzer, 3-21 to HP 8757C/E scalar analyzer, 3-21 to HP 8970B noise figure meter, 3-22 connector

10 MHz reference input, C-6

10 MHz reference output, C-6

AM/FM output, C-4

AM input, C-4 auxiliary interface, C-6 auxiliary output, C-5 external ALC, C-5

FM input, C-5

HP-IB, C-7 pulse input, C-5 pulse sync out, C-5 pulse video out, C-5

RF output, C-11 source module interface, C-9 stop sweep in/out, C-6 sweep output, C-5 trigger input, C-6 trigger output, C-6 volts/GHz, C-6

Z-axis blank/markers, C-6 connectors,

C-4-11

connectors, mating, 3-8

CONT, 1-12, C-11 continuous leveling, L-l continuous sweep, 1-12, C-11 continuous wave frequency, C-13 control attenuator separately, U-l controller defined, l-63 controller, definition of, l-56 control power level, P-2 conventions, typeface, vii cooling airflow, 3-9 copy frequency list, C-l 1 copy list, C-11 correcting for power sensitive devices, F-4 correction value enter, E-l correction value entry, F-16

COUNt in general programming model, 1-112 coupled attenuator, A-6 coupled frequency, C-13 coupled stepped sweep to sweep time, D-10 coupling factor, C-12 current path defined, l-68 rules for setting, l-68 custom menus, A-22

CW/CF coupled, C-13

CW frequency, C-13

CW frequency, step size, U-2

CW operation, l-6

Index-5

Index-6

D

damage claims, 3-l data display area, l-4 data questionable event register, clear, S-14 data types explained briefly, l-73 date code of firmware, S-60

DC FM, F-13 decrement key, A-21 decrement step size

CW frequency, U-2 power, U-l decrement step size, swept frequency, U-3 deep AM, D-l, M-15 defaulting language message, 2a-1 defined preset, P-10 define increment size, A-23 define number of points, A-24 defining sweep limits, 1-6, l-8 definitions of terms, l-63 delete, D-3 delete active array entry, D-4 delete all, D-3 delete array, D-3 delete current, D-4 delete undefined entry, D-4 delta marker, 1-14, D-5 delta marker reference, D-6 detector coupling factor, C-12 detector calibration, l-47-48, E-6 device enter statement, 1-61 device output statement, l-60 diagnostics fault information, F-l diode detectors characterization of, l-47 directional coupler coupling factor, C-12 disable interface address changes, 3-8 disable save, S-l disable user flatness array, C-12 discrete parameters discussed in detail, l-85 explained briefly, l-75 discrete response data discussed in detail, l-86 display, l-4 display blank, B-l display, clean, 4-6 display clear, B-l display status, D-6 display status of phase-lock-loops, U-l display zero frequency, Z-l doubler amp mode auto, D-8 doubler amp mode off, D-9

doubler amp mode on, D-9 doubler amp softkeys, D-l down arrow, A-21 dual source control, S-64 dwell coupled, D-10 dwell time frequency point, E-3 list array, all points, G-l stepped frequency mode, S-67 dwell time coupled, D-10

EEROM fail, F-3

EEROM failed, lost CAL message, 2a-2

EEROM failed message, 2a-2 enable register, l-107 in general status register model, l-106

^END, l-64

^END[end], l-81 ending frequency flatness correction, A-26 frequency list, A-26 enter correction, E-l enter frequency value flatness, E-2 enter list dwell, E-3 enter list frequency, E-4 enter list offset, E-4 enter statement, l-6 1 entry area, 1-4, E-5 entry keys, E-5 entry on LED, l-5 entry on/off, E-5

EOI, l-64, 1-81

EOL, suppression of, 1-61 equipment supplied, 3-l erase active array entry, D-4 erase array, D-3 erase array entries, D-3 erase memory, C-2 erase undefined entry, D-4 erase user defined menu, U-6 erase user defined softkey, U-5 error messages, 2-1, 2a-1-8 error queue, clear, S-14

*ESE, S-14

*ESR?, S-14 event commands, l-72 event detection trigger state details of operation, 1-112 in general programming model, l-110 event register, l-107 in general status register model, l-106, l-107 events event commands, l-72

Index-7

Index-8

example program flatness correction, l-103

HP-IB check, l-90 local lockout, 1-91 looping and synchronization, l-99 setting up a sweep, l-93 synchronous sweep, l-101 use of queries, 1-95 use of save/recall, l-97 example programs, l-87-105 examples, equipment used, l-2 examples, simple program messages, l-72 example, stimulus response program, l-77 extended numeric parameters discussed in detail, 1-84 explained briefly, l-74 extenders

HP-IB, C-8

EXTernal trigger source defined, 1-119 external ALC BNC, L-3, L-4 external ALC connector, C-5 external AM, A-16 external detector calibration, E-6 external detector leveling, L-3 external frequency standard, T-l external leveling, l-23-29 coupling factor, C-12 detector calibration, E-6 low output, l-26 theory of, A-7 with detectors, couplers, or splitters, l-23-26 with power meters, l-27 with source modules, l-28 external power meter range, P-23 external pulse modulation, P-18 external trigger frequency list, L-9 external trigger, stepped sweep, S-70 external trigger, sweep mode, S-63

F

factor, coupling, C-12 factory preset, P-10 factory-set interface addresses, 3-7 fan filter, clean, 4-5 fastest sweep-retrace cycle, S-62 fault information, F-l fault information 1, F-2 fault information 2, F-3 fault menu, F-l fault status clear, C-2 feature status, D-6 filter

transition, l-107 firmware datecode identify, S-60 flatness array frequency value, E-2 user, F-4 flatness corrected power, l-33 flatness correction clear value, C-3 copy frequency list, C-11 frequency increment, A-23

HP 437B measure at all frequencies, M-7

HP 437B measure at one frequency, M-7, M-8

HP 437B measure functions, M-27 number of points, A-24 start frequency, A-25 stop frequency, A-26 flatness correction, example program, l-103 flatness menu, F-4 flatness on/off, F-10

FM deviation, I-4 rate, I-5

FM coupling, M-17

FM deviation, maximum, M-17

FM input connector, C-5

FM modulation, M-17

FM on/off AC, F-12

FM on/off DC, F-13

FM on/off ext, F-14

FM on/off int, F-14

FM output rear panel, M-11

FM waveform noise, I-5 ramp, I-6 square, I-7

FNxfer fail, F-3 forgiving listening, l-66, l-83 frequency center, C- 1 coupled to center, C-13 c w , c - 1 3 difference marker, D-5 display zero, Z-l stepped sweep functions, S-68 sweep mode define start, S-61 frequency calibration menu, F-15 frequency-correction pair, E-2 frequency follow, F- 16 frequency increment, A-23 frequency list dwell time, E-3 dwell time, all points, G-l frequency increment, A-23 frequency value, E-4

Index-9

Index-10

number of points, A-24, E-4 offset value, all points, G-l power offset, E-4 start frequency, A-25 step sweep activate, S-73 stop frequency, A-26 trigger external, L-9 trigger functions, P-14 trigger interface bus, L-8 trigger point automatic, L-8 frequency list copy, C-11 frequency list functions, L-5 frequency list, number of points, L-6 frequency markers, 1-14 frequency menu, F-16 frequency modulation

AC, F-12 coupling, F-10, F-11

DC, F-13 deviation, I-4 display deviation, M-9 internal, I-4 rate, I-5 softkeys, F-12 frequency multiplier, F-17 frequency offset, F- 18 frequency softkeys, F-16 frequency span, S-60 frequency standard chosen automatically, T-l external, T-l internal, T-2 none chosen, T-2 frequency standard functions, R-l frequency start, S-61 frequency start/stop=markers l/2, S-62 frequency step stepped sweep activate, S-74 frequency, stepped mode dwell time, S-67 frequency, stepped mode number of points, S-67 frequency, stepped sweep step size, S-68 frequency stop, S-71 frequency sweep, l-6 manually, M- 1 marker1 to marker2, M-l frequency sweep functions, S-72 frequency sweep once, S-59 frequency sweep, stop frequency, S-71 frequency sweep, sweep time, S-75 frequency value dwell time, E-3 flatness, E-2 front-panel checks, 4-2 front panel connectors, C-4 front panel error messages, 2a-1

front panel operation, L-9 full selftest, S-58 full selftest command, S-17 fullusr cal, F-19 function locked out message, 2a-3 fuse part numbers, 4-4 fuse, replace, 4-4 fuse selection, 3-3

G

global dwell list array, G-l global offset list array, G-l

GP-IB analyzer language, P-13

CIIL language, P-13 printer address, P-l 1

SCPI programming, P-14 trigger, frequency list, L-8

GP-IB address changes to, 3-8 factory-set, 3-7 power meter, M-8

GPIB address swept signal generator, A-l, E-l

GP-IB check, example program, l-90

GP-IB connector, C-7

GP-IB control functions, H-l

GP-IB trigger stepped sweep mode, S-70 sweep mode, S-63 grounding pin, 3-4

Group Execute Trigger, 1-119 group execute trigger command, S-17

H

HP 437B detector calibration, E-6 programming address, M-8

HP 437B, flatness correction measure all, M-7

HP 437B, measure correction, M-7, M-8

HP 437B measure correction functions, M-27

HP 8340 status register, A-19

HP 8340/41 system convert to HP 8360 system, 3-19

HP 83550-series interface connector, C-9

HP 83550 series system connections, 3-22

HP 8360 as controller, 3-7

HP 8510 system connections, 3-21

HP 8516A interface connector, C-6

HP 8757C/E system connections, 3-21

HP 8970B system connections, 3-22

HP-IB analyzer language, P-13

CIIL language, P-13

Index-l 1

Index-12

printer address, P-l 1

SCPI programming, P-14 technical standard, l-120 trigger, frequency list, L-8

HP-IB address changes to, 3-8 factory-set, 3-7 power meter, M-8 swept signal generator, A-l, E-l

HP-IB address identify, S-60

HP-IB address menu, A-l

HP-IB check, example program, l-90

HP-IB connecting cables, l-56

HP-IB connector, C-7

HP-IB connector mnemonics, C-9

HP-IB control functions, H-l

HP-IB, definition of, 1-55

HP-IB syntax error message, 2a-3

HP-IB trigger stepped sweep mode, S-70 sweep mode, S-63 humidity range, 3-9

I

identify current datecode, S-60 identifying string, S-14 identify options command, S-14 idle trigger state, l-109 details of operation, l-111, 1-112 in general programming model, l-110

*IDN?, S-14

IEEE mailing address, l-120

IEEE 488.1

how to get a copy, l-120

IEEE 488.2

how to get a copy, l-120

IEEE 488.2 common commands, S-14

IMMediate set by *RST, 1-112 trigger command defined, 1-118 trigger command discussed, 1-112 trigger source defined, 1-119 implied commands, l-72 increment key, A-21 increment step size

CW frequency;U-2 power, U-l increment step size, swept frequency, U-3 initial inspection, 3-l initialize the swept signal generator, P-8

INITiate

CONTinuous[initiatecont]:usage discussed, 1-11

IMMediate[initiateimm]:usage discussed, l-l 11 initiate trigger state

details of operation, l-111

INIT trigger configuration example commands using, 1-115 instruments defined, l-63 instrument state, A-12 instrument state recall, R-l instrument state recall command, S-15 instrument state restore string, S-14 instrument state, save, S-l instrument state save command, S-17 integer response data discussed in detail, l-86 integers rounding, l-84 interface address change, 3-8 factory-set, 3-7 power meter, M-8 printer, P-11 view, 3-8 interface bus trigger, frequency list, L-8 interface bus connector, C-7 interface bus softkeys, H-l interface bus trigger, stepped sweep, S-70 interface bus trigger, sweep mode, S-63 interface language analyzer, P-13

CIIL, P-13

SCPI, P-14 interface language selection, 3-6 internal AM, A-17 internal AM depth, I-l internal AM rate, I-l internal FM rate, I-5 internal frequency standard, T-2 internal leveling, A-5 internal leveling point, L-3 internal pulse generator period, I-9 internal pulse generator rate, I-9 internal pulse generator width, I-10 internal pulse mode auto, I-11 internal pulse mode gate, I-11 internal pulse mode trigger, I-11 internal pulse modulation, P-19 gate, I-11 period, I-9 rate, I-9 soft keys, I-8 trigger, I-11 width, I-10 internal selftest, S-58 internal timebase warmup time, 3-8 invalid language message, 2a-3

Index-13

Index-14

invalid save/recall register message, 2a-3 invert input, I-12

K key

arrow, l-5 backspace, l-5 negative sign, l-5 numeric entry, l-5 terminator, l-5 keys entry area, E-5 knob, R-2

L

language compatibility, 3-23 language compatibility, analyzer to SCPI conversion, 3-23 language identify, S-60 language selection, 3-6 left arrow, A-21

LEVel trigger command discussed, 1-112 leveling flatness correction, F-10 theory of, A-4-9 leveling accuracy, A-6 leveling control, A-2 leveling loop normal, L- 1 leveling mode

ALC off, A-8, L-l normal, L- 1 search, A-8, L-2 leveling mode normal, A-5 leveling modes, A-5 leveling point external detector, A-7, L-3 internal, L-3 module, L-4 power meter, A-7, L-4 source module, A-7 leveling points, A-5 line fuse, replacement, 4-4 line switch, L-5 line voltage selection, 3-3 listener, definition of, l-56 list frequency dwell time, E-3 enter value, E-4 number of points, E-4, L-6 power offset, E-4 list frequency functions, L-5 list frequency step sweep activate, S-73 list menu, L-5 list mode point trigger, external, L-9

point trigger, interface bus, L-8 trigger functions, P-14 list mode point trigger automatic, L-8 local key, L-9 local lockout, example program, l-91 local lockout statement, l-58 local statement, l-58 lock save, S-l looping and synchronization, example program, l-99

*LRN?, S-14

M

Ml-M2 sweep, M-l maintenance, routine, 4-4 making entries, l-5 manual part number, vii manual sweep, 1-12 manual sweep key, M-l marker center frequency, C-l delta, 1-14, D-5 delta reference, D-6 difference between, 1-14 marker 1 key, M-3 marker 2 key, M-4 marker 3 key, M-5 marker 4 key, M-5 marker 5 key, M-6 marker functions, M-2 marker key, M-2 markers amplitude, 1-14, A-17 frequency, 1-14 markers l/2 set start/stop, S-62 markers all off, M-6 marker sweep, M-l master, step control, S-64

MATE compatibility, P-13 mating connectors, 3-8 maximize RF power, A-27 measure correction all, M-7 measure correction current, M-7 measure correction undefined, M-8 memory erase, C-2 memory registers, 1-16 memory registers 1 to 8, save, S-l menu maps, 2-l menus, previous, P-11 message annunciators, l-4 message line, l-4 messages details of program and response, l-66 simple examples, l-72 messages, error, 2a-l-8

Index-15

Index-l 6

message terminators response message terminator defined, l-82 meter address, M-8 meter measure functions, M-27 meter on/off AM, M-9 meter on/off FM, M-9 mistrack, A-27 mixers, l-30 mm-wave interface connector, C-9 mm-wave interface mnemonics, C-10 mm-wave module leveling, L-4 mm-wave source modules system connections, 3-22 mnemonics, l-63, l-64 conventions for query commands, l-63 long form, l-64 short form, 1-64 modify HP 8340/41 program for SCPI, 3-23

MOD key, M-10 modout on/off AM, M-11 modout on/off FM, M-11 modulation

ALC leveling, M-12

AM, A-15, A-18 amplitude, M-13

AM rate, M-15 deep AM, M-15 dynamic range, M-14

FM, M-17 narrow pulses, M-21 pulse, M-19 pulse characteristics, P-16 pulse, external, P-18 pulse, internal, P-19 pulse period, P-20 pulse rate, P-21 pulse, scalar, P-20 reducing integrate-and-hold drift, M-16 module selection, M-23, M-24, M-25 module selection softkeys, M-22 monitor menu, M-26 more key, M-27 multi-pin connectors, C-6 multiplication factor frequency, F-17

N

new line affect on current path, l-68 in response message terminator, l-82 symbol used for, l-64 use as a program message terminator, l-64 use as a response message terminator, l-65 with HP BASIC

OUTPUT statements, 1-81 new line[new line] use as a program message terminator, 1-81

no frequency standard, T-2 no front-panel, change interface address, 3-8 noise

AM waveform, I-2

FM waveform, I-5 noise figure meter system connections, 3-22 normal leveling mode, L-l number of points, A-24 frequency list, A-24, E-4, L-6 number of step points, S-67 numeric entry keys, E-5 numeric parameters discussed in detail, l-83 explained briefly, l-73

0

ODELay trigger command defined, 1-118 offset list array, all points, G-l offset frequency, F-18 offset, power, P-6 on/off switch, L-5

*opt, s-14

*oPc?, s-14 in example program, 1-78

*oPc?[opc], l-111

*oPc[opc], l-111

OPC pending flag, clear, S-14 open leveling loop, L-l theory of, A-8 operating environment, 3-8 operating temperature, 3-9 operation complete command, S-14 operation complete query, S-14

Operation Pending Flag, l-111 operator checks, 4-l operator maintenance, 4-4

*OPT?, S-14 optimize tracking, A-27 option 806, rack mount slides, 3-10 option 908, rack flange kit, 3-13 option 913, rack flange kit, 3-15 optional parameters, l-72 option not installed message, 2a-4 options available, 3-2 options identify command, S-14 output connector, C-11 output statement, l-60 output status bytes, A-19

OVEN message, 3-8

OVERMOD message during frequency modulation, M-17

OVRMOD message during amplitude modulation, M-14

Index-17

Index-18

p p a r a m e t e r s

Boolean, l-75, l-85 discrete, l-75, l-85 extended numeric, l-74, l-84 numeric, l-73, l-83 optional, l-72 types explained briefly, l-73 parser explained briefly, l-68 part number, fuses, 4-4 part number, manual, vii peak fail, F-2 peaking, 1-49 peak RF always, P-l peak RF once, P-l periodic maintenance, 4-4 period, pulse, P-20

PLLwait fail, F-3

PLLzero fail, F-3 point clear, C-3 points in stepped mode, S-67 point trigger automatic list mode, L-8 point trigger menu key, P-14 power leveling control, A-4 power cable, 3-4 power correction value, E-l power level, l-10 power level functions, P-2 power leveling, A-2 internal point, L-3 normal, L- 1 open loop, L-l search mode, L-2 power leveling with external detector, L-3 power leveling with mm-wave module, L-4 power leveling with power meter, L-4 power level key, P-2 power level step size, U-l power menu functions, P-5 power menu key, P-5 power meter

HP 437B, l-34, l-47 power meter leveling, L-4 power meter measure correction functions, M-27 power meter programming address, M-8 power meter range, P-23 power offset, P-6 list array, all points, G-l list frequency, E-4 power on/off, RF, R-2 power output maximizing, l-49 peaking, 1-49

power slope, 1-18, P-6 power sweep, 1-18, P-7 uncoupled operation, A-7 power sweep once, S-59 power sweep, sweep time, S-75 power switch, L-5 precise talking, l-66, l-83 prefix number, vii preset conditions, HP 8340/41 compared to HP 8360, 3-20 preset key, 1-3, P-8 preset mode factory, P-10 user, P-10 preset, save user defined, S-2 pressure altitude, 3-9 prevent interface address changes, 3-8 previous menu, P-l 1 printer address, P-l 1 prior key, P-11 program and response messages, l-66 program example flatness correction, l-103

HP-IB check, l-90 local lockout, 1-91 looping and synchronization, l-99 queries and response data, l-95 save/recall, l-97 setting up a sweep, l-93 synchronous sweep, l-101 program examples, l-87-105 programmable flatness array, C-12 program message examples, l-72 program messages defined, l-63 program message terminators affect on current path, l-68 defined, 1-81 syntax diagram, l-80 use in examples, l-64 programming language analyzer, P-13

CIIL, P-13

SCPI, P-14

SCPI commands, S-13-26 programming language comparison, 3-24 programming languages definition of, H-l programming language selection, 3-6 pulse delay normal, P-15 pulse delay softkeys, D-2 pulse delay triggered, P-16 pulse envelope, M-21 optimizing, l-49 pulse input invert, I-12

Index-19

Index-20

pulse input BNC, P-18, P-19, P-20 pulse input connector, C-5 pulse menu, P-16, P-17 pulse modulation, M-19 delay, P-15 gate, I-11 internal, I-8 leveling, M-19 narrow pulses, M-21 period, I-9 pulse envelope, M-21 rate, I-9 scalar network analyzer rise time, M-22 softkeys, P-17 source match, M-21 trigger, I-l 1 triggered delay, P-16 video feedthrough, M-22 width, I-10 pulse modulation softkeys, P-16 pulse on/off external, P-18 pulse on/off internal, P-19 pulse on/off scalar, P-20 pulse period, P-20 pulse rate, P-21 pulse rise time internal generator, P-21-23 pulse sync out connector, C-5 pulse video out connector, C-5 pulse width internal generator, P-23 pwron fail, F-3

Q q u e r i e s defined, l-63 discussed, l-66 queries, example program, l-95 query commands, l-72 query only, l-72 query only, l-72 query status byte, S-17

R

rack flange kit contents, 3-13 rack flange kit installation, 3-14 rack flange kit, no handles, 3-13 rack flange kit, with handles, 3-15 rack mount slide installation, 3-11 rack mount slide kit contents, 3-10 ramp

AM waveform, I-2

FM waveform, I-6 ramp fail, F-2 ramp sweep mode, S-73 range, power meter, P-23

*RCL, S-15 rear panel connectors, C-4

rear panel output softkeys, M-26 recall instrument state command, S-15 recall key, R-l recall registers, 1-16 recall registers lost message, 2a-4 recall/save, example program, l-97 reduce distortion, D-l reference oscillator functions, R-l register accessing of, 1-16 register, save, S-l related documents, l-63 remote statement, l-57 remove key from user defined menu, U-5 repetition rate, pulse, P-21 replace line fuse, 4-4 reset swept signal generator command, S-15 response data discrete, l-86 integer, l-86 response data format, example program, l-95 response examples, l-65 response messages defined, l-63 discussed in detail, l-80 syntax, l-82 response message terminators, l-65 defined, l-82 restore instrument state string, S-14 reverse power effects, l-30, l-32

RF on/off, R-2

RF output connector, C-11

RF peaking, P-l

RF power maximize, A-27

RF power functions, P-5 right arrow, A-21 rise time automatic, pulse, P-21 rise time fast, pulse, P-22 rise time, pulse modulation and scalar analyzers, M-22 rise time slow, pulse, P-22 root defined, l-68 root commands defined, l-68 rotary knob, 1-5, R-2 rounding, l-84 routine maintenance, 4-4

RPG, R-2

*RST, S-15

Index-2 1

Index-22

S

*SAV, S-17 save instrument state command, S-17 save key, S-l save lock, S-l save/recall, example program, l-97 save register recall, R-l save registers, 1-16 save user preset, S-2 scalar network analyzer, pulse modulation rise time, M-22 scalar network analyzer system connections, 3-21 scalar pulse modulation, P-20

SCPI conformance information, S-2

SCPI error messages, 2a-5

SCPI language, P-14 search fail, F-4 search leveling mode, L-2, M-21 security functions, S-57 selftest command, S-17 selftest full, S-58 selftest requires system interface off message, 2a-4 semicolon examples using, l-69 problems with input statements, l-65 proper use of, 1-69 sequence operation trigger state details of operation, 1-114 in general programming model, l-110 serial number, vii service information, 4-l service keys, 2-l service request enable register, S-17 service tags>, 4-6 set attenuator, S-59 setting HP-IB addresses, A-l shipment, 3- 17 shipping damage, 3-l sine

AM waveform, I-3

FM waveform, I-6 single, 1-12 single frequency, C-13 single sweep, 1-12, S-59 slave, step control, S-65 slope, power, P-6 slow rise time, pulse modulation, M-22 softkey label area, l-4 software revision, S-60

SOURce in general programming model, 1-112 trigger command defined, 1-119 source match, pulse modulation, M-21 source module interface, L-4 source module interface connector, C-9, M-23, M-24, M-25 source module interface mnemonics, C-10 source module leveling, L-4

source module selection, M-22, M-23, M-24, M-25 space proper use of, l-69 span fail, F-2 span, frequency, S-60 span key, S-60 span operation, l-8

S-parameter test set interface connector, C-6 specifications, 2-l spectral purity enhancement of, l-49 spectrum analyzers, l-32 square

AM waveform, I-3

FM waveform, I-7 square wave pulses, scalar, P-20

*SRE, S-17

SRQ

analyzer language, A-19 standard event-status enable register, S-14 standard event status register, clear, S-14 standard event status register, query value, S-14 standard, frequency chosen automatically, T-l standard, frequency external, T-l standard, frequency internal, T-2 standard, frequency none, T-2 standard notation, l-64 standard operation status register, clear, S-14 start frequency, S-61 flatness correction, A-25 frequency list, A-25 start=ml stop=m2, S-62 start/stop frequency, l-6 start sweep trigger, S-62 start sweep trigger bus, S-63 start sweep trigger external, S-63 status display, D-6 status byte, clear, S-14 status byte query, S-17 status bytes analyzer compatible, A-19 status bytes, compatible, 3-24 status of phase-locked-loops, display, U-l status register analyzer, A-19 status registers condition register, l-106 enable register, l- 107 event register, l-107 example sequence, l- 107 general model, l-106 transition filter, l-107 status register structure, SCPI, S-55 status system

Index-23

Index-24

overview, l-106

*STB?, S-17 step attenuator, A-6 step control master, S-64 step control slave, S-65 step dwell, S-67 stepped frequency mode, dwell time, S-67 stepped mode, number of points, S-67 stepped sweep coupled, D-10 stepped sweep mode, S-74 stepped sweep mode, step size, S-68 step points, S-67 step points dwell time, D-10 step size, S-68 step size, CW frequency, U-2 step size, power level, U-l step size, swept frequency, U-3 step sweep functions, S-68 step sweep trigger automatic, S-69 step sweep trigger bus, S-70 step sweep trigger external, S-70 stimulus response measurements programming example, l-77 stop frequency flatness correction, A-26 frequency list, A-26 stop frequency key, S-71 stop sweep in/out connector, C-6 storage, 3-17 storage registers, 1-16 store instrument state command, S-17 store instrument state key, S-l string response data discussed in detail, l-86 subsystem commands, l-67 defined, l-67 graphical tree format, l-68 tabular format, 1-71 summary bit, l-107 suppression of EOL, 1-61 sweep continuous, C- 11 frequency, markers, M-l power, P-7

SWEep simplified subsystem command tree, 1-71 sweep complete, wait command, S-17 sweep, example program, l-93 sweep functions, S-72 sweep LED, 1-6, 1-12 sweep mode stepped functions, S-68 sweep mode ramp, S-73 sweep modes, 1-12 sweep mode step, S-74

sweep mode stepped frequency list, S-73 sweep once, S-59 sweep output connector, C-5 sweep span calibrate always, S-74 sweep span calibrate once, S-75 sweep span calibration, F-15 sweep time, l-10 sweep time coupled to stepped sweep, D-10 sweep time key, S-75 sweep time set automatically, S-76 swept offset measurement, S-66 swept operation center frequency, C-l swept power, 1-18 swept signal generator as controller, 3-7 swept signal generator, no front-panel change address, 3-8 swept signal generator remote address, A-l, E-l swept signal generator reset command, S-15 swept signal generator status, D-6 switch, line, L-5 synchronization command, S-14 synchronization, example program, l-99 synchronous sweep, example program, l-101 synchronous sweep operation, interface bus, S-17 syntax diagrams commands, 1-81 message terminators, l-80 program message, l-80 response message, l-82 syntax drawings, l-57 system controller on bus message, 2a-4 system interface connector, C-7 system language (SCPI), P-14 system menu keys, S-77

T

tab proper use of, l-69 talker, definition of, l-56 temperature, operating, 3-9 terminators program message, l-64, 1-81 program message:use in examples, l-64 response message, l-65 time, sweep set automatically, S-76 tmr conflct fail, F-4 track fail, F-2 tracking, l-49 tracking functions, T-3 transition filter, l-107 in general status register model, l-106

*TRG, S-17

*TRG[trg], 1-119 triangle

AM waveform, I-4

Index-25

Index-26

FM waveform, I-7 trigger automatic, frequency list, L-8 stepped sweep automatic, S-69 stepped sweep external, S-70 sweep mode external, S-63 trigger commands defined, 1-118 trigger functions list mode, P-14 trigger, group execute command, S-17

TRIGGER (HP BASIC), 1-119 trigger input BNC, S-71 trigger input connector, C-6 trigger, interface bus stepped sweep, S-70 trigger out delay, T-4 trigger output BNC, T-4 trigger output connector, C-6 trigger point external, list mode, L-9 interface bus, list mode, L-8 trigger states event detection, 1-112 idle, l-111 in general programming model, l-109 sequence operation, 1-114 trigger system general programming model, l-109

INIT trigger configuration, 1-115

TRIG configuration, 1-116

Trigger system

INIT configuration, 1-115

TRIG trigger configuration, 1-116

*TST?, S-17 two-tone control, S-64 typeface conventions, vii

U

uncoupled attenuator, A-7, U-l unleveled message, l-10, 1-18 unlock, information on status, U-l

UNLVLD message, 1-18

UNLVLED message, l-10 during amplitude modulation, M-14 up arrow, A-21 user calibration functions, U-3 user-defined leveling, F-4 user defined menu, U-4 user defined menu erase, U-6 user defined softkey erase, U-5 user defined softkeys, A-22 user flatness array, l-33-46 frequency value, E-2

HP 437B, l-34

power meter, l-36 user flatness correction, F-4

HP 437B measure, M-7, M-8 power meter measure, M-27 user flatness correction commands, example program, l-103 user preset, P-10 user preset, save, S-2

w

vector network analyzer connections, 3-21

V/GHz fail, F-2 video feedthrough, pulse modulation, M-22 view interface address, 3-8 view previous menu, P-l 1 volts/GHz connector, C-6

W

*WAI, S-17 wait for sweep complete command, S-17

*WAI, use of example program, l-101

*WAI[wai], l-111 warmup time, 3-8 waveform noise, I-2, I-5 ramp, I-2, I-6 sine, I-3, I-6 square, I-3, I-7 triangle, I-4, I-7 waveform menu, W-l waveform softkeys, W-l whitespace proper use of, l-69 width, pulse, P-23 without front-panel, change interface address, 3-8 wrong password message, 2a-5

z

Z-axis blank/markers connector, C-6 zero frequency, Z-l zoom, Z-l

Index-27

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