RULE BOOK - Red meeple
Washington’s War Rules Manual
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RULE BOOK
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Introduction.......................................................2
Game Components............................................2
Terminology.......................................................3
Setting up the Game..........................................5
Sequence of Play...............................................6
Strategy Cards....................................................7
Movement........................................................10
8
9
10
11
12
13
Reinforcements................................................13
Battles..............................................................14
Political Control...............................................17
Winter Attrition................................................19
French Alliance................................................20
Victory.............................................................22
GMT Games, LLC
P.O. Box 1308 • Hanford, CA • 93292-1308
www.GMTGames.com
© 2009 GMT Games, LLC
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Washington’s War Rules Manual
WASHINGTON’S WAR
RULES OF PLAY
2.0 GAME COMPONENTS
A complete game of Washington’s War includes:
• One 34”x 22” Map
• Two Six-Sided Dice
• 52 Round Playing Pieces
• 14 Rectangular Playing Pieces
1.0 INTRODUCTION
• 68 Hexagonal Playing Pieces
Washington’s War is a two player, strategic level simulation of the American Revolution. By way of the game
mechanics, the players attempt to initiate, control, weather
or exploit a wide variety of diplomatic, political, cultural
and military events in order to either help the United States
win its independence or to retain the 13 colonies as British
dominions.
• 32 Square Playing Pieces
• Two 8 1/2”x 11” Player Reference Cards
• One Rules Booklet
• One Playbook
• 110 Strategy Cards
• 14 Plastic Stands for Generals and the French Navy
2.1 The Game Map
Credits
Designer: Mark Herman
Developer: Joel Toppen
Art Director: Rodger MacGowan
Box Art and Design: Rodger MacGowan
Map: Harold Lieske and Mark Simonitch
Cards: Mark Simonitch
Counters: Harold Lieske
Game Manuals & Player Aid Card: Charles Kibler
Playtest Tournament Coordinator: Keith Wixson
Playtesters: George Young, Philip Burgin-Young, Ron Jacobsen, Keith Wixson, Jonathan Moody, Kevin Klemme, William
Peeck, Doug Pratto, Brian Mountford, Tobias Kriener, Paul
Schwartz, Don Chappell, Joel Toppen, David Rubin, Randy
Pippus, Ken Gutermuth, Paul Pawlak, Henry Rice, Paul Gaberson, John Clark, Russ Hewson, Christopher Leary, Michael
Mitchell, Scott Henshaw, Sandon Kallstrom, John Leggat
A. The map for Washington’s War covers the area of eastern
North America over which the Revolutionary War was fought.
The circles, squares and eight-point stars—called Spaces—represent the major locations, and players move among, fight over,
and take control of these spaces. Armies may move between
adjacent spaces, i.e., the spaces joined by lines, and movement
takes place along those lines. The map is sub-divided into
Colonies, and the color coding of the spaces helps players keep
track of which spaces belong to each colony.
B. Square spaces and eight-point star spaces serve as Winter
Quarters spaces. The line of snow flake symbols coincident
with the Virginia-North Carolina border is the Winter Attrition Line. Both the Winter Attrition Line and Winter Quarters
spaces play a role in resolving Winter Attrition (11.0).
Game design based on We The People: The American Revolution
from Avalon Hill. Used with permission.
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Washington’s War Rules Manual
C. Spaces bearing a Port symbol are known as Port Spaces.
Quebec, Montreal, Charleston SC and Philadelphia PA are
depicted as eight-point stars. Such star-shaped spaces are
defined as fortified ports. Each of these ports historically was
able to resist naval actions in their vicinity. If these spaces are
not under British Control (i.e., contain a British PC marker),
certain rules pertaining to British landing parties (7.2.B), British Naval Movement (7.5) and Royal Navy support (9.42) are
more restrictive than for standard ports.
D. The Political Control (PC) markers are
shaped like hexagons and are placed in individual spaces on the map to denote control of
that space. They are double-sided, representing
American control on one side and British control on the reverse; they are flipped when
control of a space changes hands.
2.2 The Playing Pieces (Counters and Markers)
Washington’s War uses two kinds of playing pieces: counters and
markers. The counters represent Combat units and Generals. The
markers provide a host of additional information.
A. The round playing pieces are combat units
(CUs), colored and pictured to represent
American (blue), British (red), or French
(green) fighting forces. The number on these
counters represents that number of combat
units for that nationality, in denominations of 1, 2, 3 or 5. Feel
free at any time to “make change” freely with these counters:
for example, you may replace a “5” combat unit with two “2”s
and a “1”, or with five “1”s.
B. The large rectangular pieces are the Generals, which are
placed in the plastic stands included in the game so that they
stand up on the map. Each depicts a General important to the
conflict—American, British, or French. CUs may only move
when stacked with a General. For players who prefer them,
smaller square pieces are included for each General to be used
in lieu of the rectangular stand-up pieces.
Strategy Rating
Potential
Battle Rating
Agility Rating
Modifier to Agility Rating for
Retreat Before Battle
C. The number at top left of a stand-up General counter is his
Strategy Rating. Strategy Ratings range from 1-3, and are used
in conjunction with the OPS Cards to activate Generals (and
their CUs) for movement (7.0). The number at top right is the
General’s Potential Battle Rating and are used in the Combat
Resolution Procedure (9.2). Potential Battle Ratings vary from
1-6 and are used as the basis for determining the General’s Actual Battle Rating (and DRM) during combat resolution (9.3).
The number in the lower right is the General’s Agility Rating.
Agility Ratings vary from 1-3. The Agility Rating impacts the
possible losses the enemy may take during combat resolution
(9.5). For American Generals, the Agility Rating is also used
to resolve interception (7.8) and retreat before battle (7.9) attempts. (Washington and Greene enjoy a special modification
to their Agility Rating when attempting retreat before battle.)
3.0 TERMINOLOGY
The following terms are used throughout the rules and on Strategy Cards:
Adjacent: Two spaces are said to be adjacent when they are
connected by a line. There are two types of lines which
connect spaces: normal, solid lines and dashed Wilderness Connections; see 7.3.D. If the American General,
Arnold is in either Falmouth, MA or Quebec, Canada,
the other space is adjacent to Arnold only, traced along
the dashed Wilderness Connection. For purposes of PC
Isolation, British controlled ports are all considered adjacent to each other.
Agility Rating: An expression of a General’s ability to maneuver his Army in battle. The higher the rating, the (better) the General’s ability to retreat or intercept an enemy
Army. The higher the rating, the more likely the winner
will take losses in a battle where the General is defeated.
American Unit: An American or French General, an
American or French CU, the Continental Congress or
any combination of these units. An American PC marker
does not count as an American Unit.
Army: A General with at least one friendly Combat Unit in
a space.
Battle Card: A special subset of Event Strategy Cards.
When played as an event during the Combat Resolution
Procedure battle, the player receives certain benefits
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which may include a helpful DRM. Battle Card text also
directs the player to draw a replacement card from the
Strategy Deck (9.45).
Blockade Zone: A group of Port spaces comprise a “Blockade Zone” (12.3).
Blockaded Zone: A Blockaded Zone is a Blockade Zone
containing the French Navy (12.3).
Colony: A grouping of one or more spaces on the map
makes up each colony and Canada. Every space belongs
to one of the thirteen American colonies or to Canada
and is color-coded to aid in identifying its colonial association.
Combat Unit (CU): A combat unit represents approximately a Brigade of soldiers. CUs have no
ability to move except when moved in
conjunction with a General. CUs are
treated like monetary change. Players
may exchange them at any time for any
reason as long as the nationality and total
number of CUs in the space is not altered by the exchange.
Die Roll Modifier (DRM): When a battle occurs each
player rolls a six sided die as modified by a wide range
of DRMs. The higher modified value yields victory in
battle.
Event Strategy Card: A Strategy Card implementing
the effects of an important social, economic, political,
military or diplomatic event that historically occurred or
could have occurred. Event Strategy cards have nationspecific flags next to their titles to help players determine
which side(s) may implement the event. The text of
the title is provided merely to provide historical color
and texture; it has no bearing on implementing the text.
When played (not discarded) the text on the card must be
implemented literally, exactly and completely; although
some cards do provide the player with options. Most
Event Strategy Cards may be discarded in lieu of being
played. There are seven Special Event Strategy Cards
that must be played as the event regardless of which
player draws them (6.34).
General: A General represents an important military leader
that participated in the war. Each General has a Strategy,
Agility and Potential Battle Rating.
OPS Card: A Strategy Card bearing a number 1, 2 or 3
at top left. Players play these cards during the Strategy
Phase in order to move Generals and any accompanying
CUs from space to space, or to place and flip PC markers
in spaces, or to bring reinforcements into the game.
Political Control: A player controls a space if he has one
of his Political Control (PC) markers in that space. This
is true even if an opposing CU or General also occupies
that space. Political Control of a space can change numerous times over the course of a game.
Political Control Marker (PC): Hexagonal playing piece
which represents either American or British political
control of a space.
Potential Battle Rating: An expression of a General’s
potential tactical prowess in battle. The higher the rating,
the greater the probability that the General will contribute die roll modifiers in battle and the higher the possible
Actual Battle Rating.
Stacking Limits: There are no CU stacking limits; a space
may contain as many CUs as the owning player desires.
There is a limit of one General for each side to a space.
Except during the resolution of a battle, no space may
contain Generals and/or CUs of both sides.
Strategy Card: See Event Strategy Card and OPS Card.
Strategy Rating: A value that determines how easy it to activate a General for movement. A “1 rated” General can
be activated by any value OPS card, a “2 rated” General
can be activated by a 2 or 3 value OPS card, and a “3
rated” General can be activated by 3 value OPS card.
Stock: Combat Units not located on the map or in a Reinforcement box constitute a player’s Combat Unit stock.
See 8.2.C.
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Wilmington (NC): PC
Ninety Six (SC): PC
British Reinforcement Box: Generals Burgoyne, Clinton,
Cornwallis
American:
Lexington and Concord (MA): General Washington, 5 CU,
PC
Newport (RI): General Greene, 2 CU
Charleston (SC): 2 CU, PC
Philadelphia (PA): Continental Congress, PC
American Reinforcement Box: Generals Arnold, Lincoln,
Gates, Lee, and Lafayette
French Reinforcement Box: General Rochambeau, 5 French
CUs, French Navy
Committees of Correspondence:
The American player places 1 PC Marker in each of the
Thirteen Colonies in any space that does not contain a British
Playing Piece.
4.0 SETTING UP THE GAME
For The King:
After the Americans place their Committees of Correspondence
the British can place 2 PC markers within all restrictions for
British PC marker placement (10.11.B) in any colony except
MA, CT, NH, PA, or VA.
To begin the game, unfold the map and lay it on the table.
Carefully punch out the counters and separate them according
to nationality. Remove the “Declaration of Independence” and
the “Baron von Steuben Trains the Continental Army” Event
Strategy cards from the Strategy Card deck and set them aside.
Shuffle the remaining Strategy Cards and put the resulting deck
face-down near the map. Put the Game Turn marker on the Game
Turn Record Track on the map, with the “British Regulars” side
showing. Place the “French Alliance” marker on the “0” space
of the “French Alliance Track.” Next, set up the playing pieces
as indicated below. Both sides set up simultaneously. Lastly, the
American player places the Committee of Correspondence PC
Markers, followed by the British player’s placement of For The
King PC markers.
Abbreviations:
x CU = a number of Combat Units equal to x
PC = Political Control Marker
British:
Quebec (Canada): General Carleton, 2 CU, PC
Montreal (Canada): PC
Ft Detroit (Canada): 1 CU, PC
Boston (MA): General Howe, 5 CU, PC
Norfolk (VA): PC
Gilbert Town (NC): PC
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The play of each Strategy card allows that player to do one of
the following:
(a) move a General;
(b) take control of spaces, putting PC Markers in those
spaces;
(c) cause the card’s Event to happen;
(d) acquire Reinforcements.
Except for Special Event Strategy Cards, a player may satisfy
a card play by discarding a card (all information on the card is
ignored; see 6.32.
5.4 Winter Attrition Phase
5.0 SEQUENCE OF PLAY
Washington’s War follows a specific sequence of play. All activities of one phase must be completed before the subsequent phase
is started. Within a phase, all activities of one segment must be
completed before the next segment is started. Within a segment,
players may perform their activities simultaneously or in any
order agreeable to both players. Should an issue arise where
both players do not agree, the American player determines the
order, but from that point forward the order of activities for that
segment cannot be changed.
5.1 Reinforcements Phase
If either player’s Generals are in Captured Generals box, they
are moved to their respective Reinforcements boxes. The British
player then gets Combat Units equal to the number listed for the
current turn on the turn track and places them in his Reinforcements box; see 8.1.A.
5.2 Strategy Cards Phase
Deal seven Strategy Cards to each player. The American player
is always dealt the first card. When the Strategy Deck is fully
depleted, or at the beginning of a turn after an event occurs requiring a reshuffle of the Strategy Deck, the Strategy Card Deck
is reconstituted; see 6.1.
5.3 Strategy Phase
The British player may declare himself the first player by playing
a Campaign card (Major or Minor) as the first card. If the British
player declines this option, the American player chooses if he
will play the first Strategy Card or require the British player to
play the first card. The players then take alternate impulses, each
playing one Strategy card, until both players’ hands are empty, at
which point the Strategy Phase ends. In some turns, one player
might run out of cards well before the other, in which case the
player with cards remaining continues to play until his cards
run out. Cards may not be “saved” until the next turn, nor may
a player “pass” his impulse so long as he has cards in his hand.
All CUs are checked for possible Winter Attrition Losses. The
nationality of the CUs, the location of the CUs with respect to
the Winter Attrition Line and Winter Quarters spaces and whether
they are stacked with a General influence their possible losses;
see 11.0.
5.5 French Naval Phase
During this phase, and only during this phase, the French Navy
may be relocated. The American player picks up the French Navy
counter and relocates it to any Blockade Zone he wishes; see 12.3.
5.6 Political Control Phase
If the Continental Congress has been dispersed, the American
player returns it to play. Each player places PC markers in spaces
containing his Armies. Lastly isolated PC markers are removed;
see 10.2.
5.7 End Phase
If the French Alliance was triggered during the current GameTurn, European War breaks out and the British player removes
2 CUs from the map; see 12.2.B.iii.
If an Automatic Victory has not occurred (13.1), the game ends if
the “Lord North’s Government Falls—War Ends” Event Strategy
Card in the War Ends box states that the game ends on this turn or
a previous turn. If the game ends, determine the winner per 13.2.
If the game has not ended, move all OPS Cards from the Reinforcements Cards boxes to the Discard pile and begin a new
Game Turn by advancing the Game Turn Marker to the next
space on the Game Turn Track.
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dependence” and “Baron Von Steuben Trains the Continental
Army” cards are set aside; see 4.0. At the beginning of the 1776
turn, shuffle both cards into the Strategy Card deck. This is not
a re-shuffle per se, so the discards remain discarded unless an
event requiring a reshuffle is played (or the French Alliance
comes into effect) in 1775.
6.2 Playing the OPS Cards
Most of the game play revolves around the use of OPS Cards.
These cards let players conduct their military campaigns and take
control of spaces and colonies. Each time a player plays an OPS
Card, he may do one (and only one) of the following:
6.0 STRATEGY CARDS
During the Strategy Phase, all activity depends on the play of
Strategy cards. This includes moving Armies and fighting battles
as well as taking control of spaces (by placing PC markers),
bringing in reinforcements, and causing events to happen. The
first three actions occur by playing the OPS Cards, while events
occur by playing the Event Strategy Cards.
6.1 Dealing Strategy Cards and Reshuffling the
Strategy Card Deck
In the Strategy Cards Phase of each game-turn, starting with the
American player, both players are dealt a hand of seven Strategy
Cards from the top of the Strategy Deck. These seven cards
constitute each player’s hand.
• Activate a General for movement, with or without
Combat Units under his command. Activation can occur only if the General’s Strategy Rating is equal to or
less than the number on the card. An OPS Card showing a “3” can therefore activate any General, while an
OPS Card with a “1” can activate only a General who
has a Strategy Rating of 1. The OPS Card with a “2”
can activate Generals with Strategy Ratings of 2, or 1,
but not 3.
• Add a number of PC Markers to the map equal to the
number on the OPS Card. See 10.1 for details.
• Bring on Reinforcements. See 8.0 for details.
• Place that number of Operations into an Operations
Queue. See 7.1.B for details.
Card ID
A. When the Strategy Deck is fully depleted, including the
situation where a Strategy Card deal is interrupted, reconstitute the Strategy Card deck as described below, and resume
dealing if appropriate.
B. The Strategy Card Deck is reconstituted when either an
Event Strategy Card is played (not discarded) that requires the
Strategy Card Deck to be reshuffled or when the Strategy Card
deck is depleted. In every case all the discards and any cards
remaining in the Strategy Card deck are shuffled to constitute
a fresh Strategy Card deck. Only the current “Lord North’s
Government Falls — War Ends” card and any Event Strategy
cards that have been permanently removed from play due to
the instruction on the card are excluded from the shuffle.
C. Either player may examine the cards in the Discard Pile at
any time. Neither player may examine the cards in the Strategy
Card Deck.
D. Certain event cards may change the constitution of either
player’s hand, as explained on the card itself. For example,
if the American Player plays the “John Paul Jones Shipping
Raids” event, one card is randomly drawn from the British
player’s hand and is discarded.
E. SPECIAL RULE: “Declaration of Independence” and
“Baron Von Steuben Trains the Continental Army” Cards:
During the initial setup of the game, the “Declaration of In-
OPS Card value
Possible activities that
can be conducted with
this OPS Card
OPS Cards used for placing PC counters or moving Generals and Armies are played by placing
the card face up on the Discard Pile. Those used
to bring on reinforcements are placed face up in
one of that side’s Reinforcement Card boxes to
record that a reinforcement action has occurred. Those cards
used to begin or extend an Operations Queue are played face-up,
under an “Operations Queue” marker in front of the player until
the Queue is used to activate a General or the Queue is abandoned. Once the Queue is used or abandoned all the OPS Cards
associated with it are placed face up in the Discard Pile.
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6.3 Playing the Event Strategy Cards
6.31. Playing Event Strategy Cards
A. The Event Strategy Cards simulate events that occurred,
or may have occurred, during the historical conflict. When an
Event Strategy Card is played, the instructions on the card are
precisely implemented. Alternatively most (but not all) Event
Strategy cards may be discarded, in which case the discarding
player may take some alternative minor actions as described
below. Special Event Strategy Cards may not be discarded
regardless of which player is dealt the card; the event must
be implemented, but the player holding the card determines
when during the Strategy Phase that he will play that card as
the event.
B. The titles printed on Event Strategy Cards have no impact
whatsoever on the play of the event; they are added simply
to provide background color and historic texture to the game.
For example, the “Benedict Arnold’s Treason Undermines the
Patriot Cause” may occur whether or not the Arnold General
counter is in play or not. Next to the titles on the Event Strategy
Cards is a nation-specific flag which indicates which player
may play the card to trigger its event. An American flag indicates events that are playable by the American player. A British
flag indicates events playable by the British player. The absence
of a flag denotes events playable by either player (i.e. Minor
and Major Campaigns). The presence of both flags signifies a
Special Event Card that must be played by the player holding it.
Card Number
Event Title (Battle Card
if title in white on red or
blue background)
British flag indicates
only the British player
may play the event;
American flag indicates
only the American player
may play the event.
Card Event text
C. When an Event Strategy Card has been played as the event,
examine the card text to determine if it may only be played
once per game. Cards that are removed from play are set
aside where both players may see that the event has occurred.
These cards are not included in any subsequent reshuffles of
the Strategy Card Deck. All other cards are placed face up on
the Discard pile.
D. If the Event Strategy Card directs that the deck be reshuffled,
place the card face up on the Strategy Card Deck as a mnemonic to reshuffle the deck at the beginning of the next Strategy
Card Phase. If a subsequent Event Strategy Card directs that a
card be drawn from the Strategy Card Deck before the reshuffle
occurs, simply take the next card on the top of the deck under
the mnemonic; do not reshuffle the deck at that time.
Play of a Strategy Card Event implements all of the actions
described in the text of the card. To allow the text on the card to
be concise, some generalities apply:
• Many events have conditional clauses that limit the
activity in the event; read the card text carefully. For
example the “Joseph Brant Leads an Iroquois Raid”
limits the effect on the card to the non-port spaces in
three specific colonies.
• If the text uses the word “may”, then that portion of
the instructions on the card is voluntary. The player
playing the card may implement the action or not at
his discretion.
• If the text does not use the word “may”, then all of the
instructions must be implemented. For example, during
play of the “Declaration of Independence”, PC markers must be played into every colony where placement
is legal even if this will ultimately result in the loss of
American PCs during the Political Control Phase.
• Some Event Strategy Cards indicate that PC markers
or Combat Units be removed from the map. Which
specific units or counters are removed is entirely up to
whomever plays the card.
• Some Event Strategy Cards call for the player to remove a Strategy Card from his opponent’s hand; the
player who plays such an event randomly draws a
Strategy Card from the other player’s hand and discards it, face up, without looking at any other Strategy
Cards in that player’s hand. Loss of a Strategy Card
from one’s hand in this fashion does not constitute a
play of that strategy card. If he still has strategy cards
remaining, the player losing the Strategy Card still
makes the next play.
Design Note: This mechanic may have the effect of
changing which player will move last and may give a
player back-to-back Strategy Card plays.
• In cases where there is a perceived contradiction between the rules and the card text, the card text takes
precedence.
6.32. Discarding Event Strategy Cards
A. Except for Special Event Strategy Cards that must be played
as events, either player may choose to discard an Event Strategy Card rather than play it to implement the event. British
players must discard Event Strategy Cards which have an
American flag next to the title; American players must discard
Event Strategy Cards which have a British flag next to the title. If the conditions specified in the card text cannot be met, then
the card must be discarded. A card which is discarded is never
removed from the game.
Example: If “William Pitt Urges Peace Talks” is in a player’s
hand after the French Alliance has occurred, then it must be
discarded as described in this section or in section 6.33.
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Washington’s War Rules Manual
B. When a player discards an Event Strategy Card as his play
during the Strategy Phase, he also takes one of the following
actions:
(i.) The card is simply discarded and no further action is
taken; or
(ii.) Place or flip one PC adjacent to a friendly PC subject
to the additional restrictions in Rule 10.11; or
(iii.) Remove one enemy PC from a space which is adjacent
to a space containing a friendly PC counter and that is not
occupied by an enemy CU, an American General or the
Continental Congress.
Play Note: An OPS Card cannot be discarded to remove an
opponent’s PC marker. Only an Event card (even a friendly
Event, but not a Special Event) can be discarded to remove
a PC marker.
C. If a player discards an Event Strategy Card as a play during the Strategy Phase (i.e., not as a Battle Card as described
below), his opponent may exchange an OPS Card in his hand
with the discarded Event Strategy Card before he takes his
turn. Note that this action does not change the total number of
cards in the exchanging player’s hand, nor does it constitute
taking his turn.
• The American player must exchange either a 2 or 3
value OPS Card to retrieve such a discarded Event
Strategy Card.
• The British player must exchange any OPS Card, regardless of value, to retrieve a discarded Event Strategy Card.
Example: It is the British player turn. The British player discards the “Henry Knox Continental Artillery Commander”
Event Strategy Card. He chooses to place a PC marker on the
board. After the British turn and before taking his turn, the
American player discards a 2 OPS Card from his hand and
exchanges it to bring the discarded “Henry Knox” card which
he places into his hand. It is now the American player’s turn.
6.33. Event Strategy Cards as Battle Cards
A. Event Strategy Cards with the title printed in a colored box
are called Battle Cards. These events can only be implemented
when the card is played during the resolution of a battle (9.45).
(Exception: “Banastre Tarleton’s Waxhaws Massacre” provides the British player with the option to play the card as an
event during the Strategy Phase.) Once the battle is resolved,
the card is discarded (Exception: “Benedict Arnold’s Treason
Undermines the Patriot Cause” is permanently removed). The
+2 Battle DRM advantage applies only to the battle underway
when the card is played; i.e., if more than one battle occurs
during the turn as the result of a Major or Minor Campaign
event the Battle Card only modifies one battle.
B. Each Battle Card contains the instruction to draw a Strategy
Card after the active player’s impulse. Draw the replacement
Strategy Card after all other activity in the impulse has been
completed. If more than one Battle Card has been played (as
9
in a Major or Minor Campaign), then a replacement card is
drawn for each one. Normally it will not matter which player
replaces their card first, but in cases where it may matter (such
as when the Strategy Card Deck will become exhausted) the
player taking their impulse replaces their Battle Cards first.
C. Except for Special Event Strategy Cards, any Event Strategy Card may be discarded to gain a +1 die roll modification
in Battle (9.45). An Event Strategy Card discarded for this
purpose is not replaced by drawing another Event Strategy
Card, nor may it be retrieved by the exchange procedure used
during the Strategy Card Phase (6.32.C).
Play Note: This mechanic can be used to discard an opponent’s
event without fear of exchange. However, it does reduce the size
of one’s hand, possibly giving the opponent the opportunity to
make a back-to-back play.
D. Each player may play/discard a maximum one Event Strategy Card for each battle. The attacker decides to play/discard
first, then the defender makes his decision. During a Major/
Minor Campaign Event, each players may play/discard an
Event Strategy Card in every battle if they so choose.
Clarifications: The “Benedict Arnold’s Treason Undermines
the Patriot Cause” Battle card may only be played as an event
during the battle resolution process. As with other Battle Cards,
this card cannot be played as the event during the Strategy Card
Phase simply to remove the Arnold General counter. The Arnold
General counter does not have to be involved in the battle in
order to play this Battle Card. When the event is resolved, the
Arnold General counter is permanently removed from the game
regardless of his current location (on the map, in the American
Leader Reinforcement box or in the Captured Generals box).
The American player may discard this card per 6.32 or discard
it as a battle card at his option.
6.34. Special Event Strategy Cards
A. There are seven Special Event Strategy Cards. They are
indicated by the notation ‘Must Be Played’ at the top. These
cards may not be discarded under any circumstances. The
player drawing a Special Event card into his hand must play
it at some point during the Strategy Phase of the game-turn in
which he draws it. A player holding a Special Event Strategy
Card does have the option of when during the Strategy Phase
to play the card.
B. When a Special Event Strategy Card is randomly selected
and drawn from a player’s hand, its event is immediately
implemented. The requirement to implement the event is
mandatory regardless of which player drew the card, held the
card, or which side benefits.
C. The Special Event Strategy Cards are:
(i.) Declaration of Independence. This event requires the
American player to place one PC marker in each of the
thirteen colonies (excluding Canada) where placement is
possible. Such placement is not optional, although the choice
of which space if there is more than one possible space is at
the option of the American player. PC marker placement is
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limited by the restrictions listed in Rule 10.11.A.ii. British
PC markers cannot be flipped even if an American Army or
General is present. The Declaration of Independence event
takes place even if the Continental Congress is currently
dispersed.
Play Note: In some cases, play of the “Declaration of Independence” can potentially result in losses of American
PCs during a subsequent PC Isolation Phase (10.3). This
is intended. This event was pivotal and crystallized strong
feelings on both sides of the issue as well forcing many undecided Americans to commit. Such large swings of popular
support are modeled by the PC Isolation mechanic. In some
games the Americans will benefit strongly, in others the
British may. It depends on the skill and luck of the players.
(ii.) Benjamin Franklin: Minister to France. Advance the
French Alliance marker four spaces towards “French Alliance”. If play of this event results in the French Alliance
marker reaching +9, then immediately implement the effects
of the French Alliance; see 12.0.
(iii.) Lord North’s Government Falls Card and the War
Ends Box. The “North’s Government Falls” cards are used
to regulate the end of the game. Each of the five cards
changes the end of the game to one of the years from 1779
to 1783. To implement this event, place the card face up in
the box on the map labeled “War Ends Card”. If a “North’s
Government Falls” is already in the box, place it in the
discard pile and replace it with the card just played. In this
way, should the Strategy Card deck be reshuffled, except
for the card currently in the War Ends Box, all the other
“North’s Government Falls” cards will be returned to play.
During the End Phase of each Game Turn, the players will
compare the current year with the year shown on the “North’s
Government Falls” card. If the card shows the current year
or a preceding year, then the game ends and victory is determined; see 13.0.
American Armies may conduct interceptions and retreats before
battle, and thus make minor changes to their locations during the
Strategy Phase, but these mechanics do not require activation of
a General and are covered separately.
7.1 Activating Generals with OPS Cards
A. To activate a General with a Strategy Rating of 3 (e.g., Carleton), play an OPS Card with the number 3 on it. To activate
a General with a Strategy Rating of 2 (e.g., Gates), play an
OPS Card with either the number 3 or 2 on it. A General with
a strategy rating of 1 (e.g., Greene) may be activated by the
play of any OPS Card.
B. Instead of activating a General with the play
of a single OPS Card, a player may choose to
create an Operations Queue.
(i.) A player establishes the start of an Operations Queue by playing an OPS Card with the
number 1 or 2 face up in front of the player and stating that it
is an Operations Queue. Place an Operations Queue marker
on top of the card or cards played into the Queue.
(ii.) On the player’s next Strategy Card play, he plays an
additional OPS Card into the Queue. He may then activate
a General with a Strategy Rating less than or equal to the
total value of the OPS Cards. Alternatively he may choose
to continue the Operations Queue.
(iii.) When creating an Operations Queue, the player must
play each subsequent Strategy Card into the Queue until
he uses the Queue or abandons it. The Operations Queue
is abandoned if the player discards or plays any Strategy
Card to perform a different activity. (Note: This applies to
the sequential plays of Strategy Cards during the Strategy
Phase. Battle Cards played and other Event Strategy Cards
discarded during resolution of a battle do not cause abandonment of the Operations Queue.) When an Operations Queue
has been completed (used to activate a General) or abandoned, place all the OPS Cards face up on the discard pile.
Example: The British player holds a hand of three 1 OPS Cards,
one 3 OPS Card and three event cards. During the course of the
game turn he foresees the possible need to move Howe, Cornwallis and/or Burgoyne. As his first play, he places one of the 1 OPS
Cards in front of him and starts an Operations Queue, placing an
“Operations Queue” marker on top of it. The American player
makes a routine play that does not change the British player’s
plan. The British player then plays the second 1 OPS Card into
the Operations Queue. The queue now totals two, so he activates
Burgoyne for movement. After the move is completed, both 1 OPS
Cards are placed in the Discard Pile.
7.0 MOVEMENT
Movement only occurs during the Strategy Phase and only when
Generals have been activated by an OPS Card, “John Glover’s
Marblehead Regiment” Event Strategy Card or by a “Major/
Minor Campaign” Event Strategy Card. A Combat Unit (CU)
may only move when accompanied by an activated General.
Example: With the same starting situation as above, the American player takes an action that the British player believes must
be responded to by playing one of his Event Strategy Cards as
the event. He does so, but has interrupted his continual play of
cards into the Operations Queue and thus abandoned it. The event
is implemented but the 1 OPS Card in the Operations Queue is
placed in the discard pile. The British player may start a new
Operations Queue with his next play.
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Example: With the same starting situation as above, the Operations Queue has grown to hold two 1 OPS Cards. After the
American’s second play, the British player decides he wishes to
activate Cornwallis. Even though there are already two 1 OPS
Cards in the queue, he must still play another card into the queue
in order to activate a General. He cannot play an event and
also activate Cornwallis, nor may he pass on playing a card to
activate Cornwallis. He plays the remaining 1 OPS Card into the
queue and now has three operations points, so he may activate
any British General that he chooses.
7.2. Activating Generals with Campaign Cards
A. By playing a “Major Campaign” Event Strategy Card, a
player may activate up to three of his Generals, regardless of
their Strategy Ratings. By playing a “Minor Campaign” Event
Strategy Card, he may activate up to two Generals (regardless of their Strategy Ratings). The first General must finish
his entire activation (including any Battles he wishes to fight)
before the next General begins. A General cannot be activated
more than once in a Campaign, nor may a given CU be moved
by more than one General during a campaign. The player need
not announce which Generals will be activated when the card
is played; the player may move one General, and then select
which General he will activate next and so on until all Generals
have completed their activations.
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C. Special American Mobility Advantage: American Generals and any CUs with them may move up to five spaces
provided that they do not execute an Overrun nor end the
move in a space occupied by any enemy CUs (i.e., the Army
may not move 5 spaces and enter into a Battle). American
Generals moving alone may also move five spaces subject to
normal movement restrictions; see 7.4. An American Army
may capture British Generals unaccompanied by CUs while
moving five spaces.
Special: The “John Glover’s Marblehead Regiment” Event
Strategy Card activates one American General who may move
up to six spaces and enter into Battle or execute one or more
Overruns, for that activation only. Remember that the card
text in an Event supersedes the rules.
B. Landing Party (British): With the play of any Campaign
Event Strategy Card, in lieu of activating one General, the
British player may either (a) flip an American PC marker in a
non-Blockaded port space not containing an American General, CU, or the Continental Congress; or (b) place a British
PC marker in an empty, non-Blockaded port space. Neither
of these options may be employed in a fortified port space
(2.1.C). Only one Landing Party activation is allowed per play
of a Campaign Event Strategy Card.
Design Note: Subsequent to flipping the American PC counter,
the British player may use an additional activation during the
same Campaign Event to make a British Naval Movement to
that now friendly port.
7.3 Movement Procedure
A. When activated, a General may move a maximum of four
spaces from the space in which he begins the activation (Exception: American Mobility Advantage; see 7.3.C). During
his move, a General may take up to five CUs with him. The
General may change the constitution of his Army while moving
by picking up and dropping off CUs along the way, but at no
time may that Army move with more than five CUs.
B. Movement is traced along the solid and dashed lines connecting adjacent spaces. The movement of an Army ends when
it enters a space containing an enemy CU. (Exception: Overruns 9.7) Movement is complete even if the enemy Army occupying the space successfully executes a retreat before battle.
Example: General Gates and four CUs begin in Ninety-Six.
The American player plays a 2 OPS Card to activate General
Gates, who moves, via Camden, two spaces to Eutaw Springs,
where he drops off two CUs. One space further along in
Charleston, three CUs await, and General Gates moves there
to pick them up (he now has his maximum of 5). He ends his
activation by moving one more space (total of 4) and ends his
movement in Savannah. Because Gates is an American General
and is participating neither in an overrun nor in a battle, he
could optionally continue his move to Augusta or St. Mary’s
(a total of 5 spaces.)
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D. Wilderness Connections: Crossing a dotted line connection
counts as 3 spaces entered. American Armies can intercept and
retreat before battle along Wilderness Connections. See 7.4.D
for restrictions on the Falmouth-Quebec connection.
Design Note: Both sides in the Revolutionary War regularly
exchanged high ranking prisoners of war; this rule covers
that practice. By contrast, lower-ranking prisoners stayed in
squalid prison camps for long periods of time.
Example: moving from Fort Detroit to Basset Town, PA counts
as 3 spaces moved. A British Army which started moving in
Detroit could not enter Point Pleasant, VA in the same move
since that would count as another 3 spaces moved.
B. SPECIAL RULE: George Washington Capture: If George
Washington is captured, he is removed from the game. The
British immediately remove 5 PC markers, no more than one
per colony (including Canada) in any space that does not contain an American CU, General, or the Continental Congress. In
addition, if France has not yet entered the war move the French
Alliance marker three spaces to the negative.
7.4 Restrictions on Movement
The following restrictions apply to movement at all times:
A. In order to enter a space containing an enemy CU, a General must be moving with at least one friendly CU. A General
moving without a CU may move through a space containing
an enemy General without accompanying CUs, but may not
stop in that space.
B. No General moving alone can enter a space with an enemy
PC marker.
C. A General may end his move, his retreat, or his interception in the same space as another friendly General, whether
or not either General has CUs with him. If a General does end
a move in the same space as a friendly General, one of the
Generals—owner’s choice—must be placed in the Reinforcements Box. General Washington may never be removed to the
Reinforcement Box.
D. Only one General in the game—Benedict Arnold—may
move, intercept, or retreat along the dotted line between Falmouth, MA and Quebec. Arnold may do so either by himself
or with CUs. Note that this is also a Wilderness Connection
and counts as 3 spaces moved.
E. When a Campaign card is played, a specific CU may not be
moved by more than one General. Nor may the same General
activate more than once.
7.5 British Naval Movement
The British player may use Naval Movement to transfer Generals (with or without CUs) from one eligible port to another. To
conduct Naval Movement, the activated British General must
start the move in an eligible Port space, use the entire move to
transfer himself and up to 5 CUs, and end in an eligible destination port. A port is eligible for Naval Movement unless it contains
an American CU or an American PC marker (even if the space
is also occupied by British Generals/CUs). Additionally, any
origin or destination port in a Blockaded Zone is ineligible for
Naval Movement.
7.6 Capturing Generals During Movement
A. Any time an Army enters a space containing an enemy
General unaccompanied by CUs (whether by Movement, Interception, or Retreat), that General is captured. He is placed
in the Captured Generals Box, and during the Reinforcements
Phase of the following game-turn, he (like every other captured General) is placed in his side’s Reinforcements Box.
See also 9.63.
7.7 Dispersing the Continental Congress
If the British Army enters the space containing
the Continental Congress and it is unaccompanied
by American CUs, the Congress is dispersed. The
British Army may continue moving. If a battle (or
overrun) takes place in the space occupied by the
Continental Congress and the American forces are eliminated or
forced to retreat, then the Continental Congress is dispersed.
When dispersed, place the Continental Congress marker into the
Continental Congress Dispersed Box on the map. The counter
comes back into play in the Political Control Phase. Note that
there are substantial restrictions to the American player while
the Congress is dispersed. (10.11.A.iv)
7.8 Interception (Americans only)
A. American Armies may intercept moving British Armies
under certain circumstances. The American player may attempt
to make an interception, subject to some restrictions, when
the British Army moves into an adjacent space that contains
an American PC marker. To resolve the interception attempt,
the American player rolls a die and compares the result to the
Agility Rating of the intercepting General. The interception
is successful if the result is less than or equal to the Agility
Rating; otherwise it fails.
B. Interception may not be attempted into spaces which already contain British CUs prior to the entry of the moving
Army. British Armies using Naval Movement (7.5) may not
be intercepted. British Generals moving without CUs may not
be intercepted.
C. Successful interception results in the placement of the intercepting General and all CUs stacked with him into the space
just entered by the British Army. (Exception: If the intercepting
General is stacked with more than 5 CUs, all CUs in excess
of 5 remain in their original space.) Interception immediately
ends the British movement and initiates the Combat Resolution Procedure (9.2).
D. American Armies may intercept into spaces which already
contain American CUs. In this case the American player may
be required to remove an excess General of his choice to the
Reinforcement Box prior to the resolution of the battle. Once
an interception takes place, the Americans may not attempt a
retreat before battle.
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E. Multiple Armies may attempt to intercept into the same space,
but the first successful interception immediately ends British
movement, causes a battle and prevents any further interceptions
by other Armies from occurring during that activation. No Army
may attempt interception more than once per Strategy Card
played by the British player; i.e., during a British Campaign
event each American Army is allowed a total of one interception
attempt. Whether an interception attempt is successful or not,
any Army attempting interception may not subsequently attempt
a Retreat Before Battle until the next Strategy Card is played.
F. When an interception is successful, the intercepting force is
considered to be in the space before the arrival of the moving
British Army. If the American Army is subsequently forced
to retreat, it may use any legal retreat route from that space, it
need not retreat back to the space from which it intercepted.
Conversely if the British Army is required to retreat, it must
retreat back into the space it left upon entering the intercept
space, even if this forces it to retreat back onto an American
PC (and thus is forced to Surrender, see 9.63).
13
die roll result is less than or equal to the Agility Rating, the
retreat before battle attempt is successful.
Special Rule: Washington and Greene enjoy a special +2
modification to their Agility Rating when attempting retreat
before battle.
Reminder: An American Army that has attempted interception
(successfully or unsuccessfully) may not attempt retreat before
battle if subsequently attacked by a British Army at any point
during play of the same Strategy Card.
B. If the retreat before battle attempt is successful, the American Army conducts a retreat using the battle retreat mechanics
and restrictions in 9.61. If the American Army has more than
5 CUs, only the General and 5 CUs may be retreated. All
remaining CUs conduct battle or are overrun as appropriate.
If the retreat before battle attempt is unsuccessful, proceed
immediately to the Combat Resolution Procedure (9.2). The
British Army must stop moving in the space vacated in any
case, even if they overrun an American CU left behind. All
desired interception attempts resulting from the movement of
the British Army into the space need to be resolved before the
retreat from battle attempt is made.
C. There is no limit on the number of times that a particular
American Army may attempt to retreat before battle during a
single Strategy Phase; i.e., an American Army attacked during
each activation of a British Campaign Event may attempt to
retreat before battle in each case.
Example: A British Army enters a space containing an American PC Marker, which is adjacent to an American Army led
by General Arnold. The American player chooses to attempt
interception by rolling the die. Since Arnold’s Agility Rating
is a 2, the attempt succeeds on a die roll of 1 or 2. If successful, Arnold and his Army (up to 5 CUs) are placed into the
Interception space and a Battle is fought. If the die roll is 3
through 6, the interception attempt fails and the British Army
may continue moving. If any British Army, during the play of
this Strategy Card, attacks Arnold’s Army by entering its space,
they may not attempt to Retreat Before Battle.
7.9 Retreat Before Battle (Americans Only)
A. When a British Army enters a space containing an American
Army, the American player may attempt to retreat before battle.
To resolve the retreat before battle attempt, the American player
rolls a die and compares the result to the Agility Rating. If the
8.0 REINFORCEMENTS
During the Reinforcement Phase (5.1), captured Generals are
repatriated and potential reinforcing British CUs are determined.
Bringing on reinforcements during the Strategy Phase is optional.
Neither player is required to do so.
8.1 British Reinforcements
A. During the Reinforcements Phase, the British player transfers all of his Generals currently in the Captured Generals
Box into his Reinforcements Box. He also places, from the
counter mix, the number of CUs equal to the number showing
in the current space on the Game Turn Record Track into the
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Reinforcement Box. These CUs are added to any British CUs
currently in the Reinforcement Box. There is no limit to how
many or how long British CUs can remain in the Reinforcements Box.
B. Once during the Strategy Phase of each game-turn, the
British player may bring on reinforcements by playing an
OPS Card, of any value, into the British Reinforcement Card
Box. Placing the OPS Card in the box serves as mnemonic to
both players that the British have conducted their reinforcement activity.
C. To bring on reinforcements the British player transfers
any number of CUs from the British Reinforcements Box to
any one non-Blockaded Port space that does not contain an
American CU or PC marker. The British player may, but need
not, transfer one of his Generals from the Reinforcements Box
to that space. If a British General is already in the space and a
new General is brought on, the old General is removed to the
Reinforcements Box.
9.0 BATTLES
Clarifications: The General and all CUs desired (some may be
left in the Reinforcement Box) all arrive in the same eligible port
space. More than 5 CUs may be brought on if desired, and the
British may add these reinforcing CUs to any number of CUs
already in the space.
Combat is resolved in two stages. First the winner of the battle is
determined by modified competitive die rolls. Once the winner is
ascertained, the number of CUs lost by each side is determined
and, unless one side is entirely eliminated, the loser executes a
retreat. Combat die rolls are modified by Army strengths, Generals’ tactical abilities, Battle Cards and a number of other factors.
8.2 American Reinforcements
9.1 Battle Definition
A. During the Reinforcements Phase (5.1), the American Player
transfers any American Generals currently in the Captured
Generals Box to his Reinforcements Box.
B. Twice during the Strategy Phase of each game-turn, the
American player may bring on reinforcements by playing
an OPS Card, of any value, into one of the two American
Reinforcement Card Boxes. Placing the OPS Card into a box
serves as mnemonic to both players that the Americans have
conducted one of their two possible reinforcement activities.
C. To bring on reinforcements, the American player transfers,
from stock, as many CUs as the number on the OPS Card (i.e.,
with a 3 OPS Card, 3 CUs) to any space that does not contain
a British CU or PC marker. Additionally he may also transfer
to the same space a General from the American Reinforcement
Box. If there is an American General already in the space,
then the new General takes his place and the old General is
returned to the Reinforcement Box. The replaced General may
be brought back on during a subsequent reinforcement activity
even during the same Game-Turn. Washington may never be
sent to the Reinforcement Box, so if CUs are brought on to
reinforce Washington’s space, no General may be brought on.
Clarification: PC marker status permitting, either player may
place reinforcements into a space which contains an enemy
General with no CUs. In such a case the General is captured.
A battle occurs when an activated General and his Army are in a
space with enemy CUs after any interception and retreat before
battle attempts have been resolved. Under some conditions an
Overrun (9.7) may occur instead, in which case the activated
General and his Army may continue moving. The activated
General and his Army are always considered the attacker, even
if an interception attempt was successful and resulted in a battle
unplanned by the activating player.
Design Note: The intercepting force is placed into the space
before the attacking force arrives, which causes the battle. The
intercepting force remains the defender, but one who selected
the actual field of combat and usually was able to prepare positions and surprise the attacker. Two clear historical examples
occurred at Monmouth and Cowpens. Interceptions only occur
on American PC Markers which represents the both the lack of
Tory guides and the presence of rebel irregulars who interfered
with British reconnaissance and intelligence gathering.
9.2 Combat Resolution Procedure
Step 1: The attacker declares and plays a Battle Card or
discards an Event Strategy Card (6.33) if he wishes to do
so. Then the defender may play a Battle Card or discard an
Event Strategy Card. Each player may only play or discard
one card. (Special: If the “Benedict Arnold’s Treason Undermines the Patriot Cause” event is played (not discarded
by the American player), take all the actions specified on the
card immediately. If the conditions for an overrun now exist,
conduct an overrun procedure in lieu of continuing the battle
procedure. Note that Arnold may be removed from the battle
space or from some other location on the board. If Arnold is
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removed from the battle, the American force, even if attacking,
continues the battle.)
Step 2: Each player rolls a die to determine his General’s
Actual Battle Rating for this battle; see Table 9.3.
Step 3: The players determine and agree on the total die roll
modifiers (DRM) for each side using the procedures specified
in section 9.4.
Step 4: Each player rolls a die and adds to it the DRM for
their side. If the attacker’s total is greater than or equal to the
defender’s total, the attacker wins the battle.
Step 5: The CU losses to both sides are determined using the
procedures specified in section 9.5.
Step 6: The losing side, which may consist only of a General
if the losses were great enough, conducts a retreat using the
procedures specified in 9.6.
Step 7: If the Americans win, advance the French Alliance
Marker by one space (12.1). If the British lose 3 CUs or more,
including through Surrender (9.63), flip the Turn Counter to
the “No British Regulars Advantage” if the British Regulars
Advantage is still in effect.
9.3 Determining a General’s Actual Battle
Ratings
A General’s Potential Battle Rating depicts the range of performance that General and his subordinates may have during a
particular Battle. For each General, roll a die. On a die roll of
1-3, the General’s Battle Rating is halved (round fractions down);
on a die roll of 4-6, the General receives his full, printed Battle
Rating. Important Exception: A General’s Actual Battle Rating
can never be greater than the number of friendly CUs stacked
with him. If there is no General in the battle, then the Actual
Battle Rating is automatically zero. The Actual Battle Ratings
are included in each side’s calculation of the combat DRM as
described below.
Table 9.3 Actual Battle Rating
Die Roll General’s Battle Rating
1-3
4-6
General receives half Battle Rating (rounded down)
as a drm—but never greater than the number of
CUs in his Army.
General receives his printed, full Battle Rating as
a drm—but never greater than the number of CUs
in his Army.
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9.4 Determining Combat Die Roll Modifiers
Each side calculates a Combat DRM by adding to the number of
CUs on that side all the appropriate modifiers. These modifiers
are tabulated in Table 9.4 and the conditions related to each are
described below.
Table 9.4 Combat Resolution Die Roll Modifiers
+X Where X is the number of CUs for that side
+Y Where Y is the Actual Battle Rating of that side’s
General (9.3)
+1 British Regulars’ Advantage (9.41)
+1 Royal Navy Support (9.42)
+1 Militia (9.43)
+2 American Winter Offensive (9.44)
+2 Battle Card (9.45)
+1 Discard of an enemy Event Card (9.45)
+1 Interception (9.46)
9.41 British Regulars’ Advantage
During set up of the game, the Game-Turn
marker is placed with the British “Regulars” side
face up on the Game Turn Record Track. The
British receive a +1 DRM in all battles until the
British Regulars’ Advantage is lost. The British
Regulars’ Advantage is lost immediately if the British lose 3 or
more CUs in a single battle or through Surrender (9.63). The
British may also lose the British Regulars’ Advantage as a result
of the play of the “Baron Von Steuben Trains the Continental
Army” Strategy Event Card.
When the British Regulars’ Advantage is lost, flip
the Game-Turn marker to the “No Regulars” side
for the remainder of the game. If the British
Regulars’ Advantage is lost during one of the
activations of a Major/Minor Campaign event, the
advantage is lost immediately and will apply during any subsequent battles caused by the remaining activations of the campaign. When the British lose the British Regulars’ Advantage,
also advance the French Alliance marker by 2 spaces (unless
France has already entered the war; see 12.1).
9.42 Royal Navy Support
The British forces receive a +1 DRM for support by the Royal
Navy if the Battle takes place in a port space regardless of the
PC status of the port. (Exception: If the battle takes place in a
fortified port space [i.e., Charleston SC, Philadelphia PA, Quebec or Montreal] the DRM is only used if the space contains a
British PC marker.) The British do not receive the +1 DRM for
Royal Navy support if battle takes place in a port that is in a
Blockaded Zone (12.3).
9.43 Militia Support
The side with the most PC markers in the colony receives a +1
DRM for Militia. If both sides have equal numbers of PC markers
in the colony then neither player receives this DRM. To control
the Canadian Militia, Montreal and Quebec must be controlled.
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9.44 American Winter Offensive
If an American Army commanded by Washington is the attacker and it was activated by the last Strategy Card played in
the Strategy Card Phase, then the American force receives a +2
DRM. If the last Strategy Card played is a Campaign card, then
Washington’s Army (only) receives this DRM regardless of the
sequence of activations.
9.45 Battle Card Bonus
Event Strategy Cards can be used to generate Battle DRM benefits. During Step 1 of the Combat Resolution Procedure (9.2)
each player (attacker first) can play, or discard, one Event Strategy
Card to receive a DRM; see 6.33. Event Strategy Cards which are
Battle Cards (those cards with their titles printed in a colored box)
provide a +2 DRM. A discarded Event Strategy Card provides a
+1 DRM. (Reminder: It should be noted that Rule 6.33 does not
permit the retrieval of an Event Strategy Card discarded for the
purposes of gaining a +1 DRM in battle.) Event Strategy Cards
used for this purpose apply only to a single battle even during
activations caused by a Major/Minor Campaign Event. In the
event that Battle Cards were played during battles generated by
a Major/Minor Campaign Event, delay drawing cards pursuant to
the cards’ instructions until after all activations of the campaign
have been completed.
9.46 Interception Bonus
The American side receives a +1 DRM if there was a successful
interception attempt; see 7.8.
9.5 Determining Combat Losses
During Step 5 of the Combat Resolution Procedures, both sides
determine their losses.
The loser of the battle rolls a die:
• on a die roll of 1, 2 or 3, 1 CU is lost;
• on a die roll of 4 or 5, 2 CUs are lost;
• on a die roll of 6, 3 CUs are lost.
The winner of the battle rolls a die:
• If the losing side had no General, the winning side loses 1 CU if the die roll is 1.
• If the losing General has an Agility Rating of 1, the
winning side loses 1 CU if the die roll is 1-2.
• If the losing General has an Agility Rating of 2, the
winning side loses 1 CU if the die roll is 1-3.
• If the losing General has an Agility Rating of 3, the
winning side loses 1 CU if the die roll is 1-4.
Special: Casualties could potentially leave a winning General
with no CUs. In such a case, if the General is on a space containing a friendly PC marker or on an uncontrolled space he remains
on the map with no CUs; but if he is located in a space with an
enemy PC marker, he is captured.
9.6 Resolving Retreats
9.61 Retreat Mechanics
A. The losing General and Army must retreat to an adjacent
space that is not occupied by an enemy CU nor an enemy PC
marker. If this basic requirement cannot be satisfied, the losing
General and Army must Surrender (9.63).
B. Subject to the basic retreat requirements, if the attacker
loses the battle, the surviving General and Army must retreat
into the space from which it entered the battle. If the defender
loses the battle the surviving General and Army may retreat
into any space other than the one from which the attack originated. The retreating force may not be split up; all must retreat
to the same space. A defending Army which intercepted into
the battle space is not required to retreat into the space from
which it intercepted.
9.62 British Retreat By Sea
A defending British General and any surviving CUs that lose a
battle in a port space may be able to retreat by sea. Retreat by
sea is only allowed if the battle space is not a blockaded port and
is not a fortified port (Charleston SC, Philadelphia PA, Quebec,
or Montreal) without a British PC marker in it. The retreating
force may retreat to any other non-Blockaded port that does not
contain an American CU or PC marker. The British player may
choose to retreat by sea even if other legal retreat options exist.
Note that the British may not retreat by sea when they are the
attacker because the attacker must retreat to the space from which
they entered the battle. American and French Generals and CUs
can never retreat by sea.
9.63 Surrenders
If a General and surviving CUs cannot conduct a legal retreat,
they must Surrender. CUs that Surrender are eliminated, while
Surrendering Generals are captured. Place the General counter
into the Captured Generals Box on the map board; see 7.6.
A. If the attacker enters the battle from a space that contains
an enemy PC marker and loses, then the attacking Army must
Surrender since it must retreat back to the space from which it
entered the Battle and that space contains an enemy PC marker.
B. The defending General and any surviving CUs must Surrender if:
• all of the spaces adjacent to the battle space contain
enemy CUs or PC markers, and
• a retreat by sea is not possible, and
• the only remaining space is the space from which the
attacker entered the battle (which is not a legal retreat
space for the defender).
Design Note: Moving an Army into battle from an enemy controlled space is very risky because if you lose the battle the
Army will have to Surrender. Effectively this is what happened
to General Burgoyne at the Battle of Saratoga.
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The Turn marker is flipped on the Turn track to note this. The
French Alliance marker is adjusted +1 for the American victory
and +2 for the loss of the British Regulars.
9.7 Overruns
Combat Example: General Burgoyne and 5 CUs march into
Saratoga by way of Ticonderoga. American General Gates and
5 American CUs are in Saratoga. Not wishing to retreat before
battle, Gates stands and fights. The British discard an Event
card to gain a +1 DRM. The Americans play Battle Event,
“Morgan’s Riflemen” for a +2 DRM. Next, each General rolls
a die to determine their Actual Battle Rating. Burgoyne rolls a
“4” and receives his full, printed Battle Rating of “2” for a +2
DRM. Gates rolls a “1” and receives only half of his printed
Battle Rating for a +1 DRM.” Next, both players determine
their combat DRMs: The British get +5 for their 5 CUs, +2 for
General Burgoyne’s Battle Rating (determined above), +1 for
the British Regulars bonus (which is still in effect), and +1 for
the discard of an Event card for a total of +9. The Americans
get +5 for their 5 CUs, +1 for Gates’ Battle Rating (determined
above), +1 for the militia of New York (the Americans control
more PC markers in the Colony), and +2 for the play of the Battle
Event for a total of +9. Each player then rolls a die and adds
their Combat DRM: The British roll a “3” which is modified to
12. The Americans roll a “4” which is modified to “13.” The
attacker’s modified die roll must be greater than or equal to the
defender’s modified die roll in order to be victorious. In this case,
the attacker’s modified roll is less than the defender’s modified
roll so the Americans win! Next, combat losses must be determined. The British lost the battle so they roll a die and consult
the Combat Losses Chart (9.5). Rolling a “5” they lose 2 CUs
and must retreat. The Americans must check to see if they suffer
any losses. Noting the losing General’s Agility Rating (Burgoyne
has an Agility of “1”), the Americans roll a die and consult the
Combat Losses Chart (9.5). Rolling a “2” the Americans find
they lose 1 CU. Note that the winner will never lose more than
1 CU and will often times not suffer any losses. Now the losing
General must retreat what is left of his Army. Since Burgoyne
was the attacker and must retreat, he must retreat to the space
from which he entered combat—in this case, Ticonderoga. Unfortunately, this space is American-controlled. This results in
Burgoyne surrendering the remainder of his Army. Burgoyne
is placed in the “Captured Generals” box and his 3 CUs are
removed from the map and placed back into the player’s stock.
Since the British lost 3 or more CUs in this battle, the British
lose their “Regulars” advantage for the remainder of the game.
An overrun occurs when an activated General with either 4 or 5
CUs enters a space occupied by 1 enemy CU without a General.
The moving Army declares an overrun, removes the enemy CU,
and if it has any remaining movement may continue. Any interception attempts are resolved before the overrun is conducted.
After a successful overrun the activated Army does not roll for
losses. If a defending General is present or there is more than 1
CU present, the attacking Army must end its movement and a
battle occurs. (Clarification: If the Arnold counter is removed as
a result of play of the “Benedict Arnold’s Treason Undermines
the Patriot Cause” Battle Card, the General is removed as Step
1 of the Combat Resolution Procedure. If at that time only 1
American CU remains, and the British are attacking with either
4 or 5 CUs, an overrun occurs. If the Americans are attacking
when Arnold is removed, even with 4 or 5 CUs, an overrun does
not occur and battle results).
10.0 POLITICAL CONTROL
A. Political control of the colonies and Canada determines
who wins a game of Washington’s War. Political control is
determined by the number of PC markers in each colony. Each
space on the board may be in one of three states:
• American control, denoted by an American PC marker;
• British control, denoted by a British PC marker, or
• Uncontrolled, denoted by the absence of a PC marker.
No space ever contains more than one PC marker.
B. Colonies are controlled by the side that has the majority
of PC markers in them. If both sides have equal numbers,
or if there are no PC markers in the colony, the colony is
uncontrolled. Canada is not a colony, but will count toward
achieving Victory Conditions (13.0). To control Canada, the
controlling side must control both the Montreal and Quebec
spaces. Control of Fort Detroit is irrelevant in determining
control of Canada.
C. Players may place friendly PC markers and remove enemy PC markers through play of Strategy Cards during the
Strategy Phase (5.3). Players also place friendly PC markers
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and remove enemy PC markers during certain activities of the
Political Phase (5.6).
10.1 Placing and Removing PC Markers during
the Strategy Phase
10.11 Placing and Flipping PC Markers with OPS Cards
Each side uses a slightly different mechanic for placing PC
markers with OPS Cards.
A. American:
(i.) To place or flip PC markers, the American
plays an OPS Card face up on the Discard
pile. The number on the OPS Card indicates
how many PC actions he may take, i.e., how
many PC markers he may potentially place
or flip. Example: If a 3 OPS Card is played
the American could place up to three American PC markers
or flip up to three British PC markers to the American side
or any combination of placing and flipping, subject to the
restrictions on both.
up to two American PC markers to the British side or any
combination of placing and flipping, subject to the restrictions on both.
(ii.) As one PC action the British player can place a British
PC marker into any space not containing a PC marker of
either side, nor containing an American Unit. Important: All
new British PC markers must be placed in spaces adjacent to
spaces already containing British PC markers. PC markers
newly placed or flipped as a result of a PC action taken with
the play of the current OPS Card do not satisfy the requirement that new played British PC markers be placed adjacent
to existing British PC markers (i.e., no “daisy chaining”).
(ii.) As one PC action the American player can place an
American PC marker into any space not containing a PC
marker of either side nor containing a British CU. (Exception: see iv below.)
(iii.) As one PC action the American player may flip a British PC marker to its American PC marker side if there is
an American General in the space. The American General
does not need to have any CUs in the space. Note: Generals
without CUs may not move into a space with an enemy PC
(7.4), so the situation where an American General is in a
space with a British PC only occurs through some indirect
combination of moves/events.
Design Note: This rule differs from the similar rule for the
British and gives the Americans a slight edge. It represents
the ability of the American leaders (political as well as
Generals) to revitalize the revolution in areas that were not
garrisoned by British troops.
(iv.) Continental Congress dispersed (“Pennsylvania
and New Jersey Line Mutinies”): The American player
may not use OPS Cards or an Event discard to place PC
Markers if the Continental Congress is dispersed (7.7) or
if the “Pennsylvania and New Jersey Line Mutinies” Event
Strategy Card has been played as the event during the current
turn. The Americans may still flip PC markers with an OPS
Card play (see iii above). The Americans can still remove
PC markers by discarding an Event card (6.32.B.iii). The
Americans can still play Events to place PC markers.
B. British:
(i.) To place or flip PC markers, the British
play an OPS Card face up on the Discard
pile. The number on the OPS Card indicates
how many PC actions he may take, i.e., how
many PC markers he may potentially place
or flip. Example: If a 2 OPS Card is played
the British could place up to two British PC markers or flip
Example: The British begin the game with a PC marker
in Montreal. The British player plays a 2 OPS Card and
declares he will use it to place PC markers. The first PC
marker is placed in Oswego which is adjacent to Montreal.
The second PC marker, however, may not be placed in Fort
Stanwix even though Fort Stanwix is adjacent to Oswego
since Oswego did not have a PC marker at the beginning
of the card play. The second PC marker will have to be
placed elsewhere.
Important: For the British, all ports are considered to be
adjacent to each other for all purposes regardless of the
placement of the French Navy if present.
(iii.) As one PC action the British player may place a British PC marker or flip an American PC marker to its British
PC marker side if there is a British Army (i.e., a General
and at least 1 CU) in the space. This action can take place
in any space; it need not be adjacent to an existing British
PC marker.
Design Note: This capability allows the British player to
move an Army into a new area, gain control one space and
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then, in subsequent card plays, begin placing PC markers
adjacent to the recently controlled space. This represents the
ability of the British Army to systematically pacify a region
through the use of selective arrests, local offers of amnesty,
seizure of armament stores and gaining political control of
local militias and community governments. Howe’s pacification of New Jersey in the late summer and fall of 1776
provides an historical example.
10.12 Placing and Removing PC Markers with Event
Strategy Cards
A. During the Strategy Phase, Event Strategy Cards played as
events may allow for the placement or removal of PC markers.
The conditions pertaining to these events vary widely from card
to card so it is important to implement the text on the card specifically and literally. For example an enemy PC marker may
not be flipped if the event text specifies “place PC markers”.
There are usually geographic constraints as well as restrictions
regarding the other counters that may be in the space.
B. Event Strategy Cards may also be discarded per Rule 6.32
to allow one PC action to be taken on a space adjacent to a
current friendly PC marker. Important: The restriction that
the PC being placed or removed be adjacent to a friendly PC
applies to both sides in this case. That action may be to:
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players place/flip PC markers even in spaces which are not
adjacent to extant British PCs. Neither side may place PC
markers in spaces that are occupied by a friendly General
with no CUs nor occupied by CUs without a General.
3. Remove Isolated PC Markers Segment
The American player removes all of his PC markers that
are isolated as defined in Section 10.3. After all isolated
American PC markers have been removed, the British player
removes all of his PC markers that are isolated. Because the
American player removes PC markers first, British PC markers that appeared to be isolated may no longer be isolated.
10.3 Determining PC Marker Isolation
During the Remove Isolated PC Markers segment of the Political Control Phase, each player, in turn, American player first,
evaluates each friendly PC marker to determine if it is isolated.
Determining PC marker isolation differs slightly for each side.
10.31 American PC Marker Isolation
A. An American PC marker is NOT isolated if it can trace a
path through adjacent American controlled spaces to:
• an uncontrolled space that does not contain a British
CU, or
• place or flip one PC adjacent to a friendly PC subject
to the additional restrictions for each side in itemized
in Rule 10.11, or
• a space containing the Continental Congress, or
• remove one enemy PC from a space which is adjacent
to a space containing a friendly PC counter and that is
not occupied by an enemy CU, an American General or
the Continental Congress.
• an American controlled space containing an American
or French General.
Play of any Campaign Event Strategy Card by the British
provides the option of executing a Landing Party which allows the British player to place a British PC marker or flip an
American PC marker under certain circumstances; see 7.2.B.
• an American controlled space containing an American
or French CU, or
(Note: The path traced to avoid possible isolation may be
traced through American controlled spaces that are occupied
by British CUs or British Generals unaccompanied by CUs.)
10.2 The Political Control Phase
The Political Control Phase consists of three segments, executed
in specific order:
1. Continental Congress Segment
If the Continental Congress counter is in the Continental
Congress Dispersed Box, the American player must place
it in on the map, in any space in the Thirteen Colonies (not
Canada) containing an American PC Marker but no British
playing pieces. If there are no such spaces available, the
Continental Congress counter remains out of play until the
Continental Congress Segment of the next Game-Turn. Note
that dispersing and subsequent placement in a different space
is the only way in which the Continental Congress counter
can change locations on the map.
2. Place PC Markers Segment
Each player places a PC marker in any uncontrolled space
and flips to friendly control any enemy PC marker in any
space currently occupied by one of his Armies. British
Example 1: Newport, RI (space “C”) is uncontrolled. The American PC markers in space “B” and space “A” can trace to space
“C” since it is uncontrolled and does not contain a British CU.
If space “C” contained a British CU, then both spaces “A” and
“B” would be isolated.
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• an uncontrolled space that does not contain an American/French General, or
• a British controlled port, including itself, regardless of
the port’s Blockade status, or
• a British controlled space containing a British CU.
(Note: The path traced to avoid possible isolation may be
traced through British controlled spaces that are occupied by
American/French CUs or American/French Generals unaccompanied by CUs.)
Example 2: Newport, RI (space “C”) contains the Continental
Congress. The American PC markers in spaces “A” and “B” can
trace to space “C” since it contains the Continental Congress.
Space “C” would never be isolated since its space contains the
Continental Congress.
Example 1: Hartford, CT (space “B”) is uncontrolled. Space “A”
can trace to the uncontrolled space “B” and thus avoid isolation. If space “B” contained an American PC marker, space “A”
would still not be isolated since the British can always trace to
a British-controlled port. Space “A,” being a British-controlled
port, would therefore, never be isolated. If Space “B” contained
an American/French CU or an American/French General and
space “A” were not a port, then space “A” would be isolated.
Example 3: Spaces “A,” “B” and “C” each contain American
PC markers. Space “A” contains an American CU. This allows
the PC markers in spaces “B” and “C” to trace to space “A.”
The same would be true if space “A” contained a French CU,
or an American/French General (with or without CUs). If space
“A” did not contain an American/French CU or General then
all three spaces would be isolated and removed. If space “C”
contained a British CU, space “B” would still be able to trace
through space “C” to the American CU in space “A” since space
“C” contains an American PC marker.
B. If the PC marker is isolated, it is removed during the Remove
Isolated PC Markers Segment. If there are adjacent American
PC markers that are also isolated, all adjacent isolated American PC markers are removed simultaneously.
10.32 British PC Marker Isolation
A. A British PC marker is NOT isolated if it can trace a path
through adjacent British controlled spaces to:
• an uncontrolled space that does not contain an American/French CU, or
Example 2: Space “A” is British-controlled but is surrounded by
spaces “B,” “C,” and “D” which contain American PC markers. Space “A” is not isolated because it contains a British CU.
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11.0 WINTER ATTRITION
In the Winter Attrition Phase (5.4), CUs are subject to removal.
There are different rules for British, American and French CUs.
Winter Quarters spaces are denoted on the map by a square or a
eight-point star (fortified port) space. Generals, the Continental
Congress, and the French Navy are always immune to Winter
Attrition.
Example 3, Mutual Isolation: Spaces “A” and “B” are Britishcontrolled and isolated by virtue of the American PC markers
in all the adjacent spaces. Spaces “C” and “D” are Americancontrolled and are similarly isolated by the surrounding Britishcontrolled spaces. American isolated PC markers are removed
before the isolated British PC markers. In this case, when this
is done, spaces “C” and “D” will be uncontrolled. This then
allows spaces “A” and “”B” to trace to the newly uncontrolled
spaces “C” and “D.” No longer isolated, the British PC markers
in spaces “A” and “B” remain on the map and are not removed.
B. If the PC marker is isolated, it is removed during the Remove
Isolated PC Markers Segment.
If there are adjacent British PC markers that are also isolated,
all adjacent isolated British PC markers are removed simultaneously.
Design Note: The PC Isolation rules represent the gradual
solidification of popular support in a region. While a space
remains uncontrolled, the actual sentiments of the region
are indeterminate. Once all the spaces are controlled, local
sentiments crystallize and the minority opinion is driven underground unless they are supported by regular troops (British
or American) or by a reasonably well organized and supported
militia (i.e., an American/French General).
11.1 British
British CUs in a Winter Quarters space, or south
of the Winter Attrition Line, do not lose any CUs
due to Winter Attrition. British CUs north of the
Winter Attrition Line, that are not in a Winter
Quarters space, lose half their strength, fractions
rounded down. For example, 5 British CUs in Reading PA would
lose 2.5 CUs rounded down to 2 CUs, leaving 3 CUs in the space.
Similarly, a space containing 3 CUs would be reduced to 2 CUs.
An Army with 1 CU never loses any CUs to Winter Attrition. To
determine the Winter Attrition result for a single British CU,
unaccompanied by a General, north of the Winter Attrition Line
and not in a Winter Quarters space, roll a die. On a die roll of
1-3, remove the CU from the map. On a die roll of 4-6, the CU
avoids Winter Attrition.
11.2 American
American CUs suffer Winter Attrition regardless
of their location. Stacks of American CUs lose
half their strength, fractions rounded down. A
single American CU in a space if accompanied
by an American or French General is never removed for Winter Attrition. To determine the Winter Attrition
result for a single American CU, unaccompanied by a General,
roll a die. On a die roll of 1-3, remove the CU from the map. On
a die roll of 4-6, the CU avoids Winter Attrition. (Note: One
playtester uses the mnemonic rhyme: “One through threes, it
flees; four through six, it sticks.”)
Important Exception: Up to 5 CUs stacked with General
Washington are exempt from Winter Attrition losses if they are
in a Winter Quarters space or are south of the Winter Attrition
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Line. If Washington is stacked with more than 5 CUs, all the
excess CUs are evaluated for Winter Attrition as if they were
alone in the space.
Example: Washington and 6 CUs are in Philadelphia PA, a
Winter Quarters space. Five CUs are exempt from loss. The fate
of the sixth CU must be determined by die roll.
11.3 French
French CUs that are in a space with at least one
American CU suffer Winter Attrition as if they
were American CUs. French CUs that are in a
space with only French CUs suffer Winter Attrition as if they were British CUs. When both
French and American CUs are in the same space, the American
player determines which CUs are removed for losses, if any.
• If George Washington is captured (and consequently removed from the game), the marker is decreased -3 spaces (away from the “French Alliance” space). Note that
the marker cannot be decreased lower than the “0” box.
12.2 Consequences of French Alliance
A. When the French Alliance marker enters the “French Alliance” space on the French Alliance Track (space 9 on the
track), the French sign an alliance with the Americans, enter
the war, and a multinational European War soon breaks out.
The French Alliance Track and marker are no longer needed
for the rest of the game.
B. The French Alliance event is implemented after the current
Strategy Card has been fully resolved. Additional activations
of a Major/Minor Campaign Strategy Event, if necessary, are
completed before the French Alliance event is implemented.
Implement the French Alliance by taking the following actions:
(i.) The American player places the French Navy in any
Blockade Zone on the map. During subsequent French Navy
Phases (5.5), including the current Game-Turn, the American
player may reposition the French Navy.
12.0 French Alliance
There is a ten space French Alliance Track on the
map numbered from 0 to 9. The final space on the
track is the “French Alliance Space.” At the beginning of the game, the French Alliance Marker is
placed in the 0 space on the track.
(ii.) The American player places the French General Rochambeau and the 5 French CUs in any single port space
that does not contain a British CU or a British PC marker.
If no port spaces meeting these restrictions are available,
Rochambeau and the French CUs are placed in the American
Reinforcements Box. The American player does not have
the option of delaying the placement of the French Forces
if a suitable port exists. Thereafter, the American player can
bring them into the game by playing an OPS Card of any
value into one of the American Reinforcement Boxes and
placing all the French forces into a single port that does not
contain a British CU or a British PC marker. If any French
forces are brought on as Reinforcements, then all must be
brought on; the American cannot bring on some at one time,
and others at a different time.
• When the “Hortelez et Cie Clandestine French Aid”
Event Strategy Card is played as an event, the marker
is advanced +2 spaces.
(iii.) Flip the French Alliance Marker to its
European War side Place and place it on the
next Game-Turn of the Game-Track as a
mnemonic that the European War will be in
effect. The European War does not occur
until the End Phase (5.7) of the current Game-turn. Many
Strategy Event Cards have conditions that require that the
European War to be in effect or not in effect. The remainder
of the current Strategy Phase is played with the European
War not in effect. During the End Phase of the current GameTurn, the British Player removes 2 British CUs from any
space or spaces on the map. These CUs may be removed
from any spaces on the map, including Blockaded Ports, at
the British player’s option. They may be removed from two
different spaces. They may not be removed from the British
Reinforcement Box.
• When the “Benjamin Franklin: Minister to France”
Event Strategy Card is played, the marker is advanced
+4 spaces.
Design Note: The outbreak of General war in Europe had a
large, but mixed, impact on the American Revolution. There
12.1 Moving the French Alliance Marker
The French Alliance Marker may advance (towards the “French
Alliance” space) or decrease (away from the “French Alliance”
space) as follows:
• Each time the British lose a battle the marker is advanced +1 space. Overruns count as a battle for this
purpose.
• If the British lose the “Regulars” advantage (for any
reason), the marker is advanced +2 spaces. This can
only occur once per game.
(iv.) Reshuffle the deck at the end of the turn.
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was a revival of previously waning British popular support
for continuing the conflict now that their historical foes—the
French, Spanish and Dutch—were involved. The British army
and navy were increased in size, but many additional dominions, particularly in the West Indies, were now at risk. Lord
Germain was forced to divert troops and other support from
North America to protect these locations. Events occurring
all over the world, including as far away as the Indian Ocean,
begin to impact the war in the Thirteen Colonies. These events
are reflected by a number of Event Strategy Cards.
C. Rochambeau and French CUs are treated
identically as American Generals and CUs in
every respect except Winter Attrition (11.0). When
activated Rochambeau can move both American
and/or French CUs. Rochambeau may be used to attempt interception or retreat before battle. American Generals, when
activated may move French CUs as if they were American.
During PC actions, either in the Strategy Phase or the Political
Phase, French CUs and Rochambeau are treated as American
CUs and Generals. During Winter Attrition French CUs may
be treated as either American or as British depending on the
composition of CUs in each space; see 11.3. The 5 French CUs
can only enter the game via the French Alliance and cannot
be replaced if eliminated during play. All references in the
rules or on the cards to an American General or American units
includes Rochambeau and French CUs.
• No Landing Party (7.2.B) activations may flip American PC counters in a Blockaded Zone.
• The British may not retreat by sea (9.62) from a port in
a Blockaded Zone.
• The British do not receive a +1 DRM for Royal Naval Support (9.42) for combat that takes place in a port
space in a Blockaded Zone.
Important Note: For purposes of placing, flipping, removing
and determining PC isolation (10.0) the Blockade status of a
port is irrelevant.
If the “d’Estaing Sails to the Caribbean” Event Strategy Card is
played, the French Fleet is removed from its Blockade Zone and
placed on the current space on the Turn Track. It is placed into any
desired Blockade Zone Box during the next French Navy Phase.
12.3 French Navy
The French Navy has several game effects that
affect the British. When brought on initially and
during every subsequent French Navy Phase, the
French Navy may be placed in any one of seven
Blockade Zones. Once in play the French Navy
marker can only be moved during the French Naval
Phase. Every port space on the map is in one of the
Blockade Zones:
Blockade Zone
St. Lawrence
New England
Ports
Montreal, Quebec
Falmouth (MA), Boston (MA), Barnstable (MA), Newport (RI)
Long Island Sound New York (NY), Long Island (NY),
New Haven (CT)
Delaware
Philadelphia (PA), Wilmington (DE)
Chesapeake
Baltimore (MD), Alexandria (VA),
Yorktown (VA), Norfolk (VA)
Carolinas
Wilmington (NC), New Bern (NC),
Charleston (SC)
South Atlantic
Savannah (GA), St. Mary’s (GA)
When the French Navy is in a Blockade Zone, all the ports in
that zone are affected in five ways:
• No port in the Blockaded Zone may receive British Reinforcements (8.1).
13.0 VICTORY
13.1 Automatic Victory
An Automatic Victory may occur during the Strategy Phase or the
Winter Attrition Phase of any turn. A British Automatic Victory
occurs the instant no American or French Combat Units remain
on the map including Canada. An American Automatic Victory
occurs the instant no British Combat Units remain in any of the
13 Colonies (excluding Canada).
13.2 Game Ends Victory
If the game ends due to the “North’s Government Falls—War
Ends” Special Event Strategy Card, determine the winner by
counting the colonies controlled by each side. Canada is counted
as a colony for victory determination. The British win if they
control six or more colonies at the end of the game. The Americans win if they control seven or more colonies at the end of the
game. If the British and the Americans both achieve victory or
neither player achieves victory, then the British win by default.
The side with the most Political Control markers in the colony
controls the colony. If tied, neither player controls the colony. To
control Canada, both Montreal and Quebec must be controlled;
see 10.0.
• No British Naval Movement (7.5) into or out of a port
in a Blockaded Zone is allowed.
© 2009 GMT Games, LLC
For ease of play, square Colony Control
markers have been provided for use on
the Colony Control Schematic on the
map.
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Washington’s War Rules Index
Activation
Campaign Card Activation: 7.2
General Activation: 7.1, A
Operations Queue Activation: 7.1, B
Army
Definition: 3.0
Placing PC Markers: 10.11 B iii
Attrition
American Attrition: 11.2
British Attrition: 11.1
French Attrition: 11.3
Winter Attrition Phase: 5.4
Winter Attrition: 11.0
Battle
American Winter Offensive: 9.44
Battle Card Bonus: 9.45
Battle Cards: 9.45
Battle Definition: 9.1
British Regulars Advantage: 9.41
Combat Die Roll Modifiers: 9.4
Combat Losses: 9.5
Combat Resolution: 9.2
General’s Actual Battle Rating: 9.3
Interception Bonus: 9.46
Overruns: 9.7
Retreat from Battle: 9.6
British Retreat By Sea: 9.62
Retreat Mechanics: 9.61
Royal Navy Support: 9.42
Surrender: 9.63
British Navy
British Naval Movement: 7.5
Landing Party: 7.2, B
Royal Navy Battle Support: 9.42
British Regulars
British Regulars Combat Modifier: 9.41
Losing British Regulars: 9.41, 12.1
Canada
Canada as Colony: 13.2
Canada Control: 10.0 A/B
Cards
Battle Cards
Battle Card Bonus: 9.45
Battle Card Definition: 3.0
Dealing Cards: 6.1
Event Strategy Cards
Battle Card Use: 6.33
Discarding: 6.32
Event Strategy Card Definition: 3.0
Placing PC Markers: 6.31, 6.32 B, 10.12
Playing: 6.3, 6.31
Removing PC Markers: 6.32 B iii, 10.12
OPS Cards
Activating Generals: 7.1 A
OPS Card Definition: 3.0
Playing: 6.2
Reshuffling Card Deck: 6.1, 12.2 iv
Special Events
Benjamin Franklin: 6.34 C ii
Declaration of Independence: 6.1 E, 6.34 C i
Definition: 6.34 A/C
Game Ends Cards: 6.34 C iii
Random Selection: 6.34 B
Strategy Card Definition: 3.0
Strategy Card Phase: 5.2
Colony
Canada as Colony: 13.2
Definition: 3.0
Political Control: 10.0 A/B
Combat Units (CU)
American Unit Definition: 3.0
CU Definition: 3.0
Unit Denominations: 2.2 A
Combat: See Battle
Committees of Correspondence
Game Set Up: 4.0, Playbook
Example of Play: Playbook
Continental Congress
Continental Congress Segment: 10.2.1
Dispersing: 7.7
Effects of Dispersing: 10.11 A iv
Designers Notes: Playbook
End Phase
End Phase: 5.7
Game Ends: 6.34 C iii, 13.2
European War
European War: 12.2 B iii
Events: See Cards
For the King
Game Set Up: 4.0, Playbook
French
French Alliance Effects: 12.2 B
French Units as American Units: 3.0, 12.2 C
French Units: 11.3, 12.2 C
Moving French Alliance Marker: 12.1
French Navy
Blockade Zone Definition: 3.0
Blockade Zone Effects: 12.3
French Naval Phase: 5.5
French Navy Blockade Zones: 12.3
Generals
American Generals placing PC Markers: 10.11 A iii
Capturing: 7.6, 9.5 Special Note
General Placement: 8.1 C, 8.2 C
General Ratings
Agility Rating Definition: 3.0
Definition: 3.0
Rating Explanation: 2.2 B/C
Strategy Rating Definition: 3.0
George Washington
Capturing: 7.6 B Special Rule
Retreat Before Battle: 7.9 A Special Rule
Winter Attrition: 11.2, Important Exception
Winter Offensive: 9.44
Greene Retreat Before Battle: 7.9 A Special Rule
Interception: 7.8
Potential Battle Rating Definition: 3.0
Reinforcement Box: 4.0, 8.1, 8.2
Rochambeau: 12.2 C
Isolation
American PC Marker Isolation: 10.31
British PC Marker Isolation: 10.32
Determining PC Marker Isolation: 10.3
Remove Isolated PC Marker Segment: 10.2.3
GMT Games, LLC
Militia
Militia Support: 9.43
Movement
Adjacent Definition: 3.0
American Mobility Advantage: 7.3, C
British Naval Movement: 7.5
Campaign Card Activation: 7.2
General Activation: 7.1, A
Interception: 7.8
Interception Bonus: 9.46
Movement Procedure: 7.3
Operations Queue Activation: 7.1, B
Overruns: 9.7
Restrictions: 7.4
Retreat Before Battle: 7.9
Operations Queue
Operations Queue Activation: 7.1, B
Overrun
Overruns: 9.7
Player’s Notes: Playbook
Political Control (PC)
Canada Control: 10.0 A/B
Colony Control: 10.0 A/B
Definition: 3.0
French Navy Effects: 12.3 Important Note
PC Markers
American Placing PC Markers: 6.32 B ii,
10.11 A
British Placing PC Markers: 6.32 B ii,
10.11 B
Isolation
American PC Marker Isolation: 10.31
British PC Marker Isolation: 10.32
Determining PC Marker Isolation: 10.3
Remove Isolated PC Marker Segment:
10.2.3
PC Markers Segment: 10.2.2
Removing PC Markers: 6.32
Political Control Marker Definition: 3.0
Political Control Phase: 5.6
Reinforcements
American Reinforcements: 8.2
British Reinforcements: 8.1
Reinforcements Phase: 5.1
Retreat
British Retreat By Sea: 9.62
Retreat Before Battle: 7.9
Retreat Mechanics: 9.61
Stacking Limits
Definition: 3.0
Strategy Phase
Strategy Phase: 5.3
Surrender
Loss of British Regulars: 9.41, 12.1
Surrenders: 9.63
Victory
Automatic Victory: 13.1
Game Ends Victory: 13.2
P.O. Box 1308 • Hanford, CA • 93292-1308
www.GMTGames.com
© 2009 GMT Games, LLC
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