Ticketing and Reservations

Ticketing and Reservations
Ticketing and Reservations
Book and Coordinate Supplier Service
www.stc.gov.sa
Book and Coordinate Supplier Service
Trainee Manual
T-TT-TARO-03
Trainee Manual
March 2008
BOOK AND COORDINATE
SUPPLIER SERVICES
T-TT-TARO-03
Project Base
William Angliss Institute of TAFE
555 La Trobe Street
Melbourne 3000 Victoria
Telephone: (03) 9606 2111
Facsimile: (03) 9670 1330
© William Angliss Institute of TAFE 2007
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copyright owner.
This booklet was produced by William Angliss Institute of TAFE to be used as resource material.
Disclaimer:
Every effort has been made sure that this booklet is free from error or omissions. However, you
should conduct your own enquiries and seek professional advice before relying on any fact,
statement or matter contained in this book. William Angliss Institute of TAFE is not responsible for
any injury, loss or damage as a result of material included or omitted from this course. Information
in this module is current at the time of publication. The time of publication is indicated in the date
stamp at the bottom of each page.
William Angliss
Institute of TAFE
Delivering training solutions to industry for
over 60 years, William Angliss Institute of
TAFE is the Specialist Centre for Hospitality,
Tourism and Culinary Arts. Situated in the heart
of Melbourne, it is the largest Government
specialist TAFE institute in the nation. Each year
over 13,000 Australian and more than 1,000
international students study at the Institute.
William Angliss Institute has received many
prestigious awards including the Victorian
Training Provider of the Year. These
awards highlight the Institute’s leadership
position and reputation as first choice in the
hospitality, tourism and food industries, and
its commitment to quality training based on
graduate outcomes and employer satisfaction.
Courses are conducted in a modern
environment, in purpose-built training rooms are
designed to accommodate the person entering
the workforce, the employee, manager or
enthusiast.
The Institute is pro-active in the development
and expansion of strong industry relationships
with key employers in order to design, develop
and manage both customised and nonaccredited training courses.
The Institute has various courses available in:
•
Travel and Tourism
•
Hospitality
•
Culinary Studies
•
Food Technology
•
Baking, Pastry cooking, Bread making and
patisserie
•
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•
Wine Appreciation
•
Responsible Service of Alcohol
•
Responsible Service of Gaming
Curriculum Development, Research and
Development, Consultancy Services, Multimedia
Technology and Industry-based training are also
available.
Credits are available at many Australian
Universities including Melbourne, RMIT,
Monash, La Trobe, Victoria University, Western
Sydney, Griffith and Central Queensland.
For further information:
Phone: (03) 9606 2111
Fax: (03) 9670 0594
http://www.angliss.vic.edu.au
Table of Contents
William Angliss Institute of TAFE
i
Your Vocational Training: “What’s it all about?”
3
Competency Standard
5
Element 1: Administer customer file & identify
booking requirements
7
Element 2: Request services
27
Element 3: Record request and confirmation
31
Element 4: Update and finalise bookings
45
Appendix A: AFTA Code of Ethics
50
Today vocational training can be delivered in a
variety of ways. It may be provided to you:
•
On-the-job;
•
Off-the-job – at a TAFE Institute or at
a private provider (also known as a
Registered Training Organisation); or
•
As a combination of these two options.
No longer is it necessary for you to be absent
from the workplace for long periods of time
in order to obtain recognised and accredited
qualifications.
Some vocational training may also be delivered
as part of secondary school education as part
of Vocational Education and Training.
These changes have benefits to both trainees
and employers but in order for the certificates
that are issued to be well regarded by
employers, rigorous assessment is essential.
Most trainees will participate in workplace
assessment, meaning on-the-job assessment.
This style of assessment is vastly different to
traditional assessment.
The following examples may be used:
•
direct observation of practical
demonstrations
•
review of duties/tasks performed
•
project work and case studies
•
verbal or written questioning and/or
explanations
•
evaluation of practical work and actual
samples produced
•
evaluation of presentation notes and
supporting materials prepared by the
candidate
•
evaluation of printed materials prepared by
the candidate
•
evaluation of plans, reports, campaigns and
activities undertaken by the candidate
•
role-plays to observe performance in
nominated situations
•
review of portfolios of evidence and third
party workplace reports of on-the-job
performance by the candidate.
There is a distinct requirement for trainees to
demonstrate competency and there are many
& diverse sources of ‘evidence’ available to the
assessor - evidence is simply proof that the
assessor gathers to show you can actually do
what you are required to do.
On-going performance at work, as verified by
your supervisor or physical evidence, can count
towards your assessment; or, additionally, the
assessor can talk to customers, patrons, guests
or work colleagues to gather evidence about
your performance.
Central to on-the-job training is that the
rigour of traditional training is maintained in
the workplace through continual, practical
assessment that has integrity and credibility by
virtue of its sound and thorough nature.
To this end, your unit notes feature Assessment
Items throughout. These are activities that
you are required to undertake to prove your
competency in this unit – all Assessment
Items must be completed satisfactorily
for you to obtain competence in this unit:
there are no exceptions to this requirement
however it is possible that in some
cases several Assessment Items may be
combined and assessed together.
PLEASE NOTE: In addition, you must
attempt all Training Activities and it is
strongly recommended that, in addition,
you also complete the Pre-Assessment
Checklist that precedes every Assessment
Item in order to indicate your readiness for
assessment - simply tick the boxes and
enter the date.
Your workplace assessor will arrange
appropriate times to conduct these
assessments, notify you of your results, and
record your progress towards attainment of
your Certificate.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Your Vocational
Training: “What’s it
all about?”
For this unit, the following is required by the
accredited curriculum documentation:
Context of assessment and
resource implications
Critical aspects of
assessment
Assessment must ensure:
•
competency is demonstrated by
performance of all stated criteria, including
paying particular attention to the critical
aspects and the knowledge and skills
elaborated in the Evidence Guide, and
within the scope as defined by the Range
Statement
•
assessment of performance requirements
in this unit should be undertaken in an
actual workplace or simulated environment
•
the candidate has access to appropriate
documentation and resources normally
used in the workplace
•
in order to achieve consistency of
performance, evidence is collected over
a set period of time which is sufficient to
include dealings with an appropriate range
and variety of situations.
Evidence of the following is critical:
•
integrated demonstration of all elements of
competence and their performance criteria
•
knowledge of simple work processing
functions
•
knowledge of standard document layout
•
knowledge of simple document design
principles
knowledge of organisational requirement
for simple wordprocessed documents.
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
•
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
Competency
Standard
Element 2: Request services
Performance Criteria
2.1 Request products and services from
suppliers using the appropriate method and
in accordance with enterprise procedures.
T-TT-TARO-03: Book and
coordinate supplier services
2.2 Provide full details of the required booking
to ensure the customer receives the correct
product or service including:
Unit Descriptor
customer details
date, time and location of commencement and conclusion of service
– any pre negotiated costs and payment
details
– nature of service to be provided
– special request or requirements.
2.3 Request return confirmation of all details of
the booking from the supplier.
–
–
This unit deals with the skills and knowledge
required to make and administer bookings
for tourism or hospitality products and
services. It describes the co ordination of
bookings with suppliers, normally a business
to business supply. This unit does not cover
the skills required to receive and process an
incoming reservation within a supplier/principal
organisation (refer to THTSOP06B Receive and
process reservations).
2.4 Make requests for multiple services in the
most practical order.
Performance Criteria
2.5 Seek and request alternatives if requested
bookings are not available and identify and
action flow-on impacts making adjustments
to other bookings as required.
1.1 Interpret existing or create new records of
the customer’s booking requirements.
Element 3: Record request and
Confirmation
1.2 Prepare and issue documents and other
materials to the customer.
Performance Criteria
1.3 Update the financial status of the
customer’s records accurately and in
accordance with enterprise procedures.
1.4 Identify all supplier services to be booked
according to the customer’s requirements
and requests.
1.5 Identify details of specific products and
services which have been sold and
confirmed to the customer.
1.6 Where no specific product or service has
been confirmed to the customer, select
appropriate suppliers to ensure customer
needs are met and according to prices
quoted to the customer.
3.1 Keep accurate records of all bookings
made, including request and confirmation,
and file in accordance with enterprise
procedures.
3.2 Monitor files to ensure that all confirmations
have been received and chase any
outstanding confirmations.
3.3 Note and schedule future action to be taken
in relation to bookings in accordance with
system and/or enterprise procedures.
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Element 1: Administer customer file and
identify booking requirements
1.7 Select suppliers according to any predetermined enterprise negotiated
arrangements.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services Element 4: Update and finalise Bookings
Performance Criteria
4.1 Make any necessary amendments/
adjustments to bookings and accurately
record these in accordance with enterprise
procedures.
4.2 Action any payment required by the supplier
at the appropriate time in accordance with
enterprise procedures.
4.3 Provide suppliers with any changes
to the bookings in accordance with
agreed procedures and any contractual
arrangements.
The following knowledge and skills must be
assessed as part of this unit:
•
booking systems and procedures as
appropriate to the specific industry sector
•
product knowledge as appropriate to
specific industry sector
•
principles that underpin reservations and
booking procedures
•
relationships between different sectors
of the tourism industry in relation to
reservations and bookings.
•
negotiated costs, contractual arrangements
preferred supplier arrangements in place
•
interpretation of the customer’s
requirements
•
interpretation of any quotations previously
supplied to customer
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
4.4 Advise suppliers of final customer details
and requirements in accordance with the
needs of particular bookings and enterprise
procedures.
Essential Knowledge and Skills to
be Assessed
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
Element 1:
Administer
customer file &
identify booking
requirements
Here are some examples:
1. Mrs. Collins lives in Sydney. She phones
Day Tours of Sydney direct to book the
‘Spectacular Sights of Sydney City’ day
tour for herself and her partner from
Sydney.
2. Mr. Greg lives in Sydney. He visits the
Sydney Visitors Center to find out about
day tours options in the city and booked
and paid for ‘Spectacular Sights of Sydney
City’ at the Visitors Center.
1.1 Interpret existing
or create new records of
the customer’s booking
requirements.
3. Mrs. Brown lives in Brisbane. He booked
a Qantas Holidays package to Sydney
through his local travel agency. The
‘Spectacular Sights of Sydney City” tour is
part of his package with Qantas Holidays.
4. Mr. Jordan lives in Texas USA. He booked
his whole Australia holidays through his
local travel agent who booked out of
the ‘Come on down to the Down under’
brochure. Come on down to the Down
under develops its packages from the
products offered by Australian inbound tour
operator Select Tours.
To interpret existing or in fact create new
records of customers travel requirements you
must first of all have an understanding of how
the travel industry works.
The Travel Industry Network
Once you have started your new travel job you
will see that there are a number of businesses
and organisation that make contact with each
other-sometimes there are several links in the
chain and sometimes the link is direct.
These linking mechanisms are called the
industry distribution network or systems.
Select Tours deals with Sydney City day tours.
Let’s hope that Mrs. Collins, Mr. Greg, Mrs.
Brown and Mr. Jordan all have a good time on
the ‘Spectacular Sights of Sydney City’ tour!
The position of your business in this network
will directly impact on your day-to-day work.
It will dictate:
Who your customers are
•
Who else in the industry you liaise with
•
The type of bookings you deal with
•
The information you need to know
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
•
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services Why does it work like this?
Can you think of any benefits that come
from having such a comprehensive industry
distribution network? Here are some ideas:
It’s not practical for Mr. Jordan in Texas
USA to make his booking direct with
Australian suppliers - where would he
get all his information and imagine the
communication costs.
•
For a travel agent, it is very time consuming
to organise everything direct -especially
when every customer’s needs are different.
Tour wholesalers and tour operators
provide a whole range of services to make
things simpler -promote the product
encouraging booking at travel agents,
produce brochures and information,
coordinate bookings and supply
documentation.
•
Tour wholesalers can develop programs
and promote them to all travel agents
- volume of sales allows them to negotiate
special rates, which makes packages more
affordable.
•
From a supplier perspective, it is impossible
for most individual hotels or tour operators
to promote in all markets. Local information
centers, tour operators, wholesalers and
inbound tour operators become additional
marketing sources for the supplier. They
reach the customers the supplier cannot
afford to reach direct.
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
•
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
Trainee Activity 1
– Practical
Note: it is a requirement of this unit that you
attempt this Training Activity
A customer could phone The Grace Hotel
direct to book some accommodation.
In your own words describe three different
ways this may be booked using the industry
distribution network.
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 1.2 Prepare & issue
documents & other materials
to the customer
1.3 Up date the financial
status of the customers
records.
To assist the customer, preparation of specific
documents are issued at certain stages of the
booking. These are the documents as follows:
Customer’s records can and will be changed
many times before the client final departs and
it is important that at each change the client’s
records are correctly and accurately updated.
These changes will be done either
•
Letter with brochure request
•
Confirmation letter
•
Flight Itinerary
•
Invoice
•
Final Itinerary
•
Itinerary updates
•
General business letters
•
Credit notes
•
•
Manually
•
Electronically
And may include:
•
Receiving, processing and recording
payments
•
Generating and issuing invoices and credit
notes for charged arrangements
Receipts
•
Checking that the customer has paid in full
•
Information packs
•
Welcome home letters
•
Coach/Rail tickets
•
Airline tickets domestic and international
Knowledge and skills in balancing customer’s
financial records is a vital part of working in
retail travel agencies. Close attention to detail
on all recorded transactions will result in correct
updates and changes at all times.
•
Insurance policies
•
Car/ Hotel Vouchers
Knowledge of some basic principles of letter
writing is advisable.
Refer to Perform office procedures
THHGGA02B
Refer also to Process financial transactions
THTGFA01B
1.4 Identify all supplier
services to be booked
according to the customers
requirements and requests
When a customer comes in to book a holiday,
you must identify the services:
•
Domestic
•
International
•
Mixture of both
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
The suppliers as either
10
•
Internal
•
External to the organisation
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
This will assist you in narrowing down
destinations if the customer is requiring
assistance in the planning process. It is your
job to offer the products that will satisfy your
customer’s needs. In many cases this will
involve offering products and services they
have not considered. By pre-paying most of the
holiday components, benefits are realised by
both the customer and the agency.
1.5 Identify details of
specific products & services
which have been sold and
confirmed to the customer
In other words, you need to ensure that all
parties involved in a booking have a detailed
record of what has been organised on behalf
of the client. There are a few ways to do this,
which we will look at now.
Maintaining records for the agent:
You need to make precise records for yourself
(the agent) and other colleagues in your office.
This can be done many different ways. Some
offices still maintain cardboard file cards (also
referred to as “booking files”). There are some
blank ones contained in this workbook for you
to refer to. These files need to be NEATLY and
COMPLETELY filled out. There are spaces
to record details such as the full name of the
product that has been sold, the in and out
dates, how you booked the product/service,
who you spoke to when making the booking,
and the confirmation number. You must ensure
all of these details are on the card. If something
goes awry you then have a detailed record to
refer back to.
This is a brilliant tool, that if well maintained,
provides an invaluable historical record. In some
account systems, reports can be generated
from these records. There is also the advantage
too of not having to try and read hand writing!
Most offices have a pro forma way they like
you to operate these client records: ensure
you fully understand them from the beginning,
so you form good habits immediately. An
important point to remember is that you are
not the only one who may be reading these
records, so ensure you are clear and detailed.
Remember, you may not be around tomorrow,
and someone else may have to look after your
client.
You can also record some details of what you
have sold to a client in the actual computer
reservation (CRS) booking. Again, there is
a place in these CRS bookings to do this. It
is often referred to as the “Notepad”. As the
format can be a little confusing in a CRS
booking, try not to be put too much into this
area. It is better to make the fully detailed
record in the client accounts system.
Maintaining records for the
provider:
Providers will generally maintain their own
records. However, you need to reconfirm with
them. This can be done MANY different ways
depending on how the product/service was
booked in the first place. You can use email
(keep a hard copy or file it in an email folder),
phone (record details in the client account or on
the file card), by fax (maintain hard copy in the
hard copy folder), via the internet or through the
CRS.
Corresponding to the file card, you will usually
need to maintain a folder containing all the
relevant hardcopy, documents from the
suppliers
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Some agencies do not maintain manual
file cards, and instead rely on using their
computerised client account systems to do
so. There is space within these systems to set
up electronic records of client’s individual trips.
11
Maintaining records for the client:
The best way to do this, is to provide the client
with a fully detailed invoice. Leave nothing to
guesswork…give them all the dates, the full
product/service name, who you have booked
through and the costs. Again, your agency
should have a pro forma invoice for you to use.
Make sure you give the client an amended
invoice each time money changes hands
between you both. Always ensure you date
each transaction.
If you are unsure of anything, CALL the client
to reconfirm details. Do this a long time before
the client leaves, to allow time to make any
amendments if necessary.
So how do you assist customers specific needs
are met?
Information is a key component of sales and
marketing in tourism. Effective information is
also a key requirement for the booking and
documentation of any tourism product or
service. As we discussed in an earlier topic,
finding information and using it effectively to
meet the needs of your customers is a key
element of working in many tourism industry
positions.
To be absolutely sure you have booked exactly
what the client requires, write up a detailed
invoice, get the client in for an appointment and
go through thoroughly with them their booking.
Have a calendar and the relevant brochures and
documents on hand to support you.
•
Where is it …..?
•
How do I get it…..?
•
How long does it take…..?
•
What is it like…..?
•
Is there a good…..?
1.6 Where no specific
product or services has
been confirmed to the
customer, select appropriate
suppliers to ensure customer
needs are met & according
to prices quoted to the
customer.
•
How much does it cost…..?
•
What would you recommend…..?
•
What is the weather like…..?
•
Where can I go to buy…..?
Some examples of products the customer may
require:
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
People in the travel industry have not been to
every holiday destination or on every organised
tour, stayed in every hotel or been on every
cruise ship.
To assist customers, coordinate the booking
and to ensure specific needs are met it is
imperative to continually seek knowledge and
updates on all products and services offered in
the tourism industry.
To identify clients needs and then select
products such as:
•
Adventure holidays, packages and tours
•
transport
•
Snow skiing holidays, packages and tours
•
accommodation
•
Specific age holidays, packages and tours
•
transfers
•
Diving
•
tours (if required)
•
Cruising
•
meals (eg: breakfast)
•
Rail
•
travel insurance.
•
Coach
•
Sporting
•
Safaris
12
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
•
Family
Information sources
•
Overland Treks/Walking
•
Beach
•
Camping
•
Singles
•
Gay/Lesbian
•
People with Disabilities
The range of information in the tourism industry
is so vast that nobody could hope to absorb it
all. That’s why a key skill for you to develop
is how to find the information you need.
It is also why there are a huge number of
computerised and manual resources for the
tourism industry and why there are specialists in
particular areas.
•
Campervan/Car rental
•
Wedding ceremonies
•
Local
Here is a general list of some of the major
resources and references. It is by no means
exhaustive.
It is one of the most important aspects of any
job in the tourism industry is finding information.
It is impossible to know everything about the
thousands of different tourism products and
services. You can with experience build up what
you know, and first hand knowledge is the most
valuable of all.
In some jobs you need a broad range of
information about multiple destinations and in
others you need an in-depth knowledge of one
destination.
•
If you work for the rail network you would
need to know about booking rail services
and about the destination points on the
network.
•
If you worked for a tour operator you would
need to know about the destinations they
visited on tours, tour costs and other
booking requirements.
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
The underpinning key to information
provision is knowing where and how to find
it the information you need and applying that
information effectively to the specific needs of
your customer.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 13
Information sources What sort of information can you find here?
Brochures/Videos
Destinations and product information, packages, prices, booking
conditions. Many brochures also provide information on local customs,
health precautions, visa requirements, currency, shopping, hints on what
to wear
Hotel and
accommodation
guides and indexes
Information and contacts on accommodation
Atlases, maps and
encyclopedias
Geographical and general destinations information
Travel guides eg.
Lonely Planet,
Fodor’s, Insight
Destination and product information
Individual timetables
Product and scheduling information, general industry information
Automated
information systems
These days, virtually anything if you know where to look-systems range
from the Internet to specific sate based system (such as VISNET for
NSW)
Computerised
reservations systems
CRS
Almost anything relating to airlines-flight schedules, fares seating plans,
just to name a few. In addition, most CRSs can provide you with a
massive amount of other information-what time it is in France, what’s the
exchange rate today, visa information, destination information. They also
provide a link into the reservations systems of many wholesalers.
International airline
guides
Comprehensive worldwide air schedules, minimum-connecting times,
check in requirements, baggage information, airline and city codes,
international time calculators, local taxes etc. The main example is the
Official Airline Guide (OAG), although its use has been superceded to a
great extent by the CRS.
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
Travel Trade Yearbook Contacts for hundreds of companies in different sectors of the travel
industry
Travel Information
Manual (TIM)/Travel
Trade Visa Guide/
Travel Express Visa
Guide
Visa and other statutory requirements for overseas countries. TIM can
now also be assessed on the CRS
Passenger Air Tariff
Airfare information
Trade press e.g.
Travel Trade, Travel
Week
Industry updates, destination and product information, general news
General print and
electronic media
such as travel shows,
travel pages, travel
magazines and even
news bulletins for
current issues
General destinational and product information. News services can supply
very current information on the day to day developments such as flood,
social unrest, exchange rates and so forth
14
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
Information sources What sort of information can you find here?
Government
agencies such as
National Parks and
Wildlife Services or
government tourism
offices
General destinational and product information
Educationals/Product
familiarisations
Opportunities to experience products and services first hand
Other organisations in A major way to get information and advise on all matters is to contact
the industry
other industry organizations who specialize in particular areas
The Internet
A major resource of all types of information-destinations, airline, current
affairs, hotels, just to name a few. The Internet is fast becoming an
increasing popular means of booking travel arrangements
Travel Companies
product launches,
travel shows and
information nights
A major way to gain knowledge on specific products with specific travel
companies, update you on new product information on the market and
to keep in touch with people in the travel industry
We can now look at some of the above resources in more detail.
Printed material
Tourism Industry Magazines
Atlases
To keep up to date with the continuous
changes in the industry, many tourism
organisations subscribe to one or more tourism
industry magazines, such as: Travel Trade
(published fortnightly) Travel Week (published
weekly) Inside Tourism (published monthly) A
highly recommended book is the World Travel
Guide.
Most atlases include information on the world’s
regions and countries, the world’s cities,
population, climate, and geology. They generally
include a comprehensive index of cities,
countries, states and territories. Whilst we do
not usually change physical features such as
mountains and oceans political aspect such as
country borders and populations do. Be sure
you have an up-to date edition.
Maps
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Maps come in all sizes, from the world on a
page, to the main street of a tiny village on a
page. People who are travelling on independent
itineraries should always carry maps of the
areas they are visiting. Some government tourist
departments can supply them free of charge.
The guide provides a complete fact file of all
countries from a tourism industry perspective.
Since 1997 the World Travel Guide has been
available on interactive CD-ROM. Although not
specifically dedicated to travellers, an additional
publication that contains a brief fact file on every
country in the world is the SBS World Guide,
purchased from ABC Bookshops or SBS
Marketing.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 15
We should have a brief look at the basic format
of a brochure. Obviously all brochures will be
different.
They will range in size from a single page leaflet,
to a fold out pamphlet, to a brochure consisting
of a few pages, to a glossy colour publication of
20 pages or more.
These brochure styles will be used by
accommodation, local attractions, Visitor
Information Centres, wholesalers, and inbound
and local tour operators to name a few.
Cover page
This will show the name of the region or
destination covered in the brochure, usually
accompanied by a glossy picture depicting
an attraction or feature of the destination. It
will display the company’s name and logo (if
applicable) and any principals associated with
the packages. It might also mention the type
of packages or products within the brochure,
for example, Camping Safaris or Luxury Coach
Holidays.
Front section
Located within the first few pages, you will
generally find the following information:
Brochures
Brochures are a very important source of
product and motivational information. Although
there are a number of marketing tools to
attract prospective clients, it is mainly through
brochures that tourism organisations are able to
convey their product to clients.
•
an index showing what is available in the
brochure
•
general information about the organisation
and any special features or discounts
offered by the company
•
information about the destination itself.
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
As with a lot of tourism products, the client is
required to pay weeks or even months before
any documentation is received or the product
can actually be used. Therefore a brochure
is often their only contact with reality and the
only tangible reminder of the product they have
purchased.
16
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
Descriptions of the products
This information makes up the greater part
of the brochure. Examples of this information
include:
•
accommodation being offered
•
a day-by-day itinerary of the package
•
maps showing the route of the itinerary
•
tour departure dates
•
information on the inclusions/exclusions of
the package
•
prices of the package.
Back pages
Generally toward the back of a brochure or
even on the back page itself, you will find
booking conditions relevant to the products on
offer. Topics such as deposits, cancellations,
amendments, inclusions and exclusions are
covered in this section.
Details of operator policy of cancellation of tours
are listed here.
Failure to check the back pages of brochures
may cause many problems to clients, agents
and operators.
Also included is any other general or important
information the organisation feels you should
know about, such as climate, clothing,
insurance, baggage allowance etc.
Part of the booking conditions can include a
responsibility clause. Once an operator has
accepted a customer’s booking, and a deposit
has been sent, it is confirmed and a Contract is
made between them. It is important the customers know what is expected of them and
what the operator’s responsibilities are to the
customer.
See for yourself how brochures are laid out and
what information is included in them? These
brochures will also assist you with your product
knowledge.
Tourism industry publications
A number of publications are available within
the industry providing information on specific
needs such as transport, accommodation,
government regulations. Some of these include:
1. ABC Passenger Shipping Guide published
quarterly - contains details of passenger
ship services, car- passenger ferries, cargo
- passenger ships, principal cruises, river
water way coastal cruises, yacht cruises.
2. RACV accommodation and activity guides.
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
3. Travel trade Visa Guide - published yearly
- contains information on government
regulations related to tourism. It has been
written especially for Australian, New
Zealand and United Kingdom passport
holders.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 17
4. Official Hotel Guide - published yearly
- contains detailed information on hotels
worldwide.
5. Hotel and Travel Index and the Dawson’s
Hotel Guides - accommodation directories.
6. Travel trade Yearbook, provides a listing
of travel and tourism industry firms
and organizations. For each entry, an
address, contact numbers and names of
key personnel are listed. This directory
is produced twice a year and includes
information on:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
retail travel agencies
inbound tour operators
domestic tour operators
wholesalers
coach operators
car rental companies
tourist offices(domestic and overs
seas)
airlines
general sales agents
hotel representative firms.
To continually assist customers, coordinate the
booking and to ensure specific needs are met it
is imperative to continually seek knowledge and
updates on all products and services offered in
the industry.
Product knowledge comes with time. When
making investigations on behalf of a client, give
yourself enough time to do so. Don’t promise
results in an unattainable timeframe.
In addition to “preferred” lists and other staff,
other good sources of information are tourist
bureaus and of course, the internet. There is
also a biannual “Travel Trade” Yearbook that
contains the contact details of most suppliers.
Most agencies subscribe to this, in addition
to the numerous travel publications (eg
Travelweek).
If you are unsure about a supplier, seek advice.
Many companies will not allow you to use
an unknown supplier without it having been
checked out by your company.
Using unknown suppliers opens you, your
company and most importantly, your client, up
to greater risk.
Keep in mind, that your research will be in vain
if you don’t keep the clients’ budget in mind.
Common-sense, intuition and asking the right
questions will help you to find the right product
at the right price.
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
How you know who to use and when? In
section 1.7, we discuss the role of the preferred
supplier. The customer has come to us as
the “expert”. We need to ensure our product
knowledge is up to date, or at least know where
to find the information required.
When you are new, this requires you to take
home brochures to read through, attend as
many product launches as possible, read
through the daily fares updates, invite sales
representatives into your office to give you a
product run down and ask as many people as
possible about who to use and when.
18
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
1.7 Select suppliers
according to any pre
determined enterprise
negotiated arrangements.
There are many suppliers out there, and
sometimes it is difficult to know who to use
and trust. Companies often have “preferred”
arrangements with suppliers. You will need to
ask your manager for the list of “preferreds”.
If a supplier is on the preferred list, it usually
means they have been vetoed by your
company. Their finances have usually been
checked and passed, and any necessary
licences obtained. It also means that your
company has gathered other feedback on this
company as to what quality of service they
provide. As the agent, dealing with a supplier
from a preferred list, gives you peace of mind.
You can be confident that you are dealing
with a competent, professional and financial
company. This confidence then extends to the
client.
In addition to having their character investigated
and passed, “preferred” companies can also
sometimes offer a commission override. This
means a financial incentive to you to sell
their product over others. These overrides
are negotiated on your behalf usually by your
manager, or in the case of bigger companies,
by the “BDMs”: business development
managers.
“Preferred” agreements are exclusive and
confidential arrangements. Both parties need to
have trust in each other for it to be a successful
relationship. The stronger these relationships
become, the more lucrative they will be.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Dealing with a “preferred” supplier will not
guarantee success. It just reduces the risk.
Preferred suppliers require constant monitoring
by your company, to ensure they still fit the
requirements. If you experience difficulties with
a preferred, this needs to be reported to the
appropriate person within your company.
19
Student/Trainee
Activity 2 – Practical
4. Who can I contact to book Amtrak rail
passes?
Note: it is a requirement of this unit that you
attempt this Training Activity
Travel Trade Year Book Activity 1.2
5. What is the agent’s reservation phone
number for CIT Australia? What is the sales/
administration phone number?
Using the Travel Trade extract, answer the
following:
1. What types of packages is the international
wholesaler, Allways Travel involved in?
2. Does the wholesaler Amadablam have an
office in Australia?
6. Does an Australian passport holder
require a visa for China? What about Hong
Kong? Where can I obtain a Chinese visa in
Melbourne?
3. What is the address of the shipping
wholesaler, Abercrombie and Kent? Do they
have any interstate offices? What sort of
products/companies do they represent?
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
20
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 21
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
22
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 23
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
24
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 25
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
26
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
2.1 Request products
& services using the
appropriate method.
You need to contact suppliers of tourism
product to find out the:
2.2 Provide full details of
the booking to ensure the
customer receives the
correct product or service
including:
•
Customer details
•
Date, time and location of commencement
and conclusion of service
•
Any pre negotiated costs and payment
details
•
cost
•
payment requirements
•
Nature of service to be provided
•
give them customer details
•
Special request or requirement
•
explain what service/s you require
•
request special services or requirements.
Tourism operators enter into contractual
agreements with customers. Booking
conditions are normally included and tend to
cover three areas:
Requesting products and services can be
done in many different ways and each supplier/
principle will have many methods making
requesting an easy and quick process.
•
Phone requests
•
E mail
•
Faxing
•
CRS systems
•
Online booking and requests
•
mail
1. Impose some kind of requirement upon
the traveller (deposits, cancellation
requirements, fitness to travel, travel
insurance etc)
2. Allow for variation and cancellation by the
operator or wholesaler (change in prices
and tours)
3. Attempt to limit the responsibility of the
operator or wholesaler (inclusions and
exclusions, statements that say the
operator or wholesaler is only acting on
behalf of others, limiting responsibility for
information in the brochure and general
clauses for events beyond the control of the
operator/wholesaler)
You will need to understand standard industry
codes and industry jargon to correctly complete
or interpret client’s details and to benefit from
error – free reservations and ticketing.
You will need to be familiar with the 24-hour
clock.
All airlines use it and most of the industry
documentation you will need to interpret is
presented with 24-hour clock times.
Booking conditions will normally be drafted
by legal experts or industry managers but all
industry workers need to be aware of their
importance. A couple of important points:
•
You will also need to be very familiar with
phonetic alphabet from the first day you start
your new travel job.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services In a legal sense there is a requirement to
show that the customers attention was
drawn to the booking conditions (this may
be done in documentation provided to the
customer).
27
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Element 2: Request
services
•
The booking conditions can say anything
they like but if they breach basic consumer
rights they will carry no weight in a court of
law.
•
The customer is very well protected in this
area and great care needs to be taken.
Consumer protection
The ultimate aim of consumer protection laws
is to protect the customers in their dealings
with supplies of goods and services. The
Commonwealth Trade Practices Act and the
state/territory Fair Trading Acts have a number
of provisions which allow the consumer to sue
suppliers where they have engaged in unfair
practices.
The Trade Practices Act mainly used in
the travel industry in relation to advertising,
brochures and anti-competitive conduct.
The Fair Trading Act is used for dishonesty,
sharp practice and as a base for licence
disqualifications.
The two main areas that cause problems in
the travel industry are misleading information in
brochures and the failure to advise customers
about variations to price, quality and itineraries.
In all your dealings with customers, you
should be honest, accurate and current in the
information you supply. This means industry
customers and the general public customers.
The AFTA code of Ethics was set up for this
purpose.
Refer to the Booking Code of Ethics in
Appendix A
2.3 Request return
confirmation of all details of
the booking from supplier.
Before we can take deposits and issue
documents for clients the booking requests
must all be confirmed, this may take one
day but sometimes it can take a few days
depending on what product has been
requested.
Monitoring clients files is an important part of
the booking process and is generally done daily.
When reservations for products are confirmed
from a supplier it will come through:
•
Ticketing time limit (TTL)
•
CRS review booking (RB.)
•
Courier
•
Online booking procedures
•
Fax
•
E mail
•
Mail
•
Telephone
2.4 Make requests for
multiple services in a
particular order.
Reservations for multiple services can
involve many different suppliers to ensure the
customer’s requirements are met.
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
This will require the ability to co-ordinate
effectively, the booking process from the initial
request to the confirmation.
•
Interpret correctly requirements and
services.
•
Ability to keep accurate records of
bookings made.
•
Ability to find this information and products
as required
•
28
Identify codes, abbreviations and jargon
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
2.5 Seek and request
alternatives if requested
bookings are not available
and identify & action flow-on
impacts making adjustments
to other bookings as
required.
Finding a suitable combination of flights,
accommodation, transport, insurance etc
for the customer is part of the coordination
process. It is recommended that the client
books early or finds alternative choices if
any portion of the booking components are
unavailable.
Even when minor adjustments are made to a
booking the flow on action can have a major
impact on the booking as a whole. To avoid
potential disasters, procedures are needed
for checking and cross checking these
adjustments.
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
One of these procedures is the use of a booking
card or file, the accuracy of the records and the
need for the information to be understood.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 29
Element 3: Record
request and
confirmation
An existing or new booking should be
easily and effortlessly be understood by all
consultants who will need to at any stage
pick up that information and continue with the
booking process.
Let us study the procedures of the booking
card/file:
3.1 Keep accurate records of
all bookings made, including The Booking Card
Having secured your client’s booking it is now
request and confirmation,
necessary to record the details of this booking
and file.
on a booking card before making a reservation.
•
electronic profiles
•
booking cards
•
booking files
•
file diaries.
•
quotations
Required client details:
•
name, initial and title
•
age of any children or infants
•
contact details at home and work
•
date(s) of travel
•
places of travel
•
tourism product details
•
club membership details e.g. Frequent flyer
number
•
special requirements e.g. special meals
•
method of payment including details.
Importance of recording details accurately and
promptly from booking profiles/files/diaries or
quotation will allow all consultants to clearly
interpret this information when on-booking to
suppliers/principles.
General knowledge of standard formats of
booking cards files, manual and automated,
quotations, booking profiles on your CRS
system or personal system is needed.
Computerised reservations and filing systems
will probably one day lead to the demise of the
manually created booking card, but booking
cards are far from dispensible in today’s retail
travel industry. A completed booking card
reflects your level of competence and efficiency
as a travel consultant. It must be correctly
completed of your client is to benefit from error
– free reservations and ticketing.
The information relating to the booking is
recorded on file, once again regardless of the
type of system used, manual or automated;
the same industry standard codes are used to
denote services requested. Due to automation
of the tourism industry there is now a code for
almost everything a consumer could possible
require.
The advantage of using codes is that it makes it
quicker and easier to record information. Every
airport has a unique three-letter airport code.
This code distinguishes this airport from every
other airport in the world. For example, there
are two cities called Melbourne, each with its
own airport, one is in Australia and the other is
in the USA. To differentiate one airport from the
other Melbourne Australia’s code is MEL and
Melbourne USA’s code is MLB.
The use of codes in the tourism industry
extends well beyond airports. There are also
codes for many cities around the world, class
of travel, type of accommodation requested,
meal requests and many other services offered
across the industry. For example, you wish to
send a request to British Airways to try and
confirm a seat for your passenger on flight 12,
economy class, from Perth to London on 17
August. Your message would look like this,
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 31
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Broad knowledge of types of client records
including:
PLS DAPO TO KK
BA12Y17AUGPERLHR
The translation of this is:
Please do all possible to confirm British Airways
flight number 12, economy class, 17th August,
Perth to London (Heathrow Airport).
PLS = please, DAPO = do all possible, TO =
to, KK = confirm, BA12 = British Airways flight
number 12, Y = economy class, 17AUG =
17 August, PER = Perth and LHR = London
(Heathrow Airport)
Learning and using these codes can save you
time and also reduce confusion, which may
arise due to language barriers because these
codes are internationally recognised.
Travel arrangements make up a large section of
the booking card that was discussed in Element
of Competency 1. These are the transportation
details (eg: carrier, service or flight numbers,
class of travel, time of departure and arrival,
date of travel, origin and destination),
accommodation details (name of establishment,
in/out dates and room type), auxiliary services
(car hire, transfers, day tours).
Make sure you know where each item of
information should be entered. This can be
either:
•
manual
•
electronic
Don’t panic! You will find that your knowledge
of codes increases naturally with time.
Should you have any queries in the meantime
most automated systems have a decoding
(converting from code) and an encoding
(converting to code) function. Your knowledge
of the CRS system will help you with this.
There are also some simple procedures you can
use to prevent mistakes from occurring when
you are recording client’s information.
Can you think of any of these procedures and
list them below:
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
32
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Figure 1: Front of a booking card
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 33
Information on a Booking File
11.Credit card details:
There are many different formats of booking
cards in existence and although the
presentation of each may be different they all
basically require the same types of information.
The areas identified on the booking card are as
follows, refer to figure 1:
enter type of credit card, Master card MC,
American Express AX, number on the credit
card.
rel/pax: relationship to passenger if the
passenger and credit card name are
different, expiry date on the card.
date: enter date of transaction.
1. Names of passengers:
for: record here the clients purchase item in
detail.
the passenger name should include
their christain name and title as per their
passport and age.
pay to: record the agency name and ask
the client to sign here.
2. Date of departure:
enter passengers first date of departure.
3. Nat:
clients nationality on their passport
4. Address:
enter clients address.
5. (H) telephone:
enter home telephone number of client.
6. (W) telephone:
enter clients frequent flyer number.
8. Contact:
enter the name of the contact client.
9. Booked with:
enter airline details if applicable, name of
operator and date.
10.Booking form and consultants name:
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
34
Enter the date the airline ticket is to be
issued. Refer to the airfare rules.
13.Rec Loc. (Record locator):
enter the airline booking number referred to
as the record locator.
14.Ticket numbers/MCO:
enter business or/and mobile telephone
number of client.
7. Frequent flyer number:
12.TTL (ticket time limit):
Enter airline or consolidator name, the date
the ticket or MCO miscellanous charge
order was ordered, and the ticket number.
Date adv, is date advise and this is the date
of issue and your initials.
15.A check list:
A handy reminder for the consultant, when
in the booking process.
16.Spec Req:
enter here any special requests made by
client for meals, hotels, or tours.
17.Air, coach or rail reservation data area:
enter flight no and airline code, class,
date of departure of each flight, origin
and destination cities, times of departure
and arrival. Status of the flights, seat no.
if applicable. Confirmed information and
amount payable for airfares.
per person, per person taxes and total
amount per booking.
enter a booking number, if applicable and
consultants initials.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
18.Fare basis:
23. Client signatures:
Completed and dated as documents are
collected, if insurance is declined,
Record here the name of the fare used,
gross amount per person, the nett amount
per person, taxes per person and where
the ticket is to be purchased.
If clients obtain their own visa and
cancellation/refund details are explained
19.Insurance details:
and given in writing. Dated and initialed by
the consultant.
Enter the name of the travel insurance
company, dur - length of the plan by days,
months or year. Plan type usually indicated
by A,B,C.
24. Payments received:
from client.
25. Op paid:
pre exist are pre existing conditions, here
the client needs to advise the insurance
company of any health conditions prior to
departure and at the time of purchase.
Operators paid on behalf of the client.
26. Docs recv:
20.Auxiliary information area:
It is essential that each member of staff in an
office fills out cards in an identical manner,
and that complete information is provided. It
is important that at any time a staff member
should be able to pick up that card/file and
know exactly the state of the booking this will
avoid any confusion if more than one person is
referring to the booking.
Enter other booking details such as rental
car, tours, cruises and hotels
City 3 letter codes, auxiliary details, dates,
nights or days total, company
booked with, date requested, name of
operator, date confirmed, name of
operator.
Inclusions, enter here confirmed information
and costs for each item purchased. Either
by per night cost for hotels, per days cost
for car hire, per tour cost and per person
cost. Include upgrade costs and any
inclusions over and above the standard
cost listed. Always include a total cost.
21. Visas required:
Documents received from the operators.
Some more details that are on a booking file:
When it is time for confirmations they can be
recorded as the following industry accepted
abbreviations and codes including:
• confirmed (KK)or (HK)
• waitlisted (WL)
• need (NN)
Record the clients visa requirements, the
countries and/or re entry visas.
• request (RQ)
Consultant should photocopy the visa and
passport and keep on file for client.
• (PU) pick up
22. Additional notes:
Enter additional information and notes as
required.
• ticketing time limit (TTL)
• (DO) drop off
• (Htl) hotel
• (Rt) return
• Ticketing time limit (TTL)
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Many more abbreviations will be used.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 35
Recording booking information
Auxiliary
Refer to figure 2
The auxiliary sections have been used strictly
according to their headings. More clarity has
been obtained by showing the PU and DO
on separate lines and under inclusions made
it clear the child seat is an extra payment
on arrival. If there isn’t enough room on
the booking card it is advisable to attach a
photocopy or extra sheet and make a note on
the booking card that it is attached.
As an example consider the Smith family of
three booked to fly from Perth to Adelaide, with
a Thrifty car booked for their stay in Adelaide.
This example shows how the front of the
booking card would look, after the booking had
been made but before it had been ticketed. This
example assumes the travel consultant is based
in Perth and so the Perth contact telephone
number has no STD prefix.
Names
Notice that the surname (family name as seen
on passport) has been entered first, followed by
the christian name (first name) and title of the
person and, in the case of the child by the age.
Rental Cars
The card also shows that the air booking was
made with Brad from Qantas and the rental car
with Jane at Thrifty. PU stands for pick – up
and DO stands for drop – off, location is in
three letter code - apt stands for airport and the
time of PU and DO is important as car rental is
usually in 24 hour blocks.
These codes are explained later. Any extra details
about the car hire would need to be included
next the car hire details or if there is too much
information another sheet can be attached
or a photocopy of a brochure page with the
highlighted details for the client to take away.
Notes
Additional notes on the delivery procedure for
this client are entered here.
If on the 4 Sep Ms Smith returns to the agency
and see another consultant TM. TM is able to
see from the booking card exactly what has
been booked and with whom it was booked.
The card reflects everything that has taken
place to date. This should always be the case
with your booking cards to know exact status of
the booking concerned.
Most booking card these days do not record
payments made as this all computerised but
if the agency still records manually the area
identified for payments received and payments
paid is on the rear of the card or the agency has
a separate ledger system.
Ms Smith wants to pay for her booking and at
the same time changes her return flights:
Ticketing
The booking has been made by consultant AS
on the 3 Sept 05 and has not been ticketed but
has a ticketing time limit (TTL) 4 Sep.
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
Airfares and taxes
The airfares for the adults and the child have
been listed separately in the far column,
including the taxes as stated. The airfares
could have been listed as one amount for the
adults and one amount for the child if stated
on the file.
36
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Figure 2 - Booking card with recorded
information
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 37
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
Figure 3 - Example of Amadeus CRS
online booking card
38
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
Trainee Activity 3
– Practical
In Kuala Lumpur he will make his own way
to a friend’s place and stay for 3 nights until
traveling back to Melbourne on 26 March on
Malaysian flight 25 departing 2230 and arrives
0550 +1.
Note: it is a requirement of this unit that you
attempt this Training Activity
All air flights are confirmed on record locator
TZU455.
Read through first then complete a client file/
booking card (inc Air, Hotel and Car hire) for
the following scenario:
He is traveling business class on all flights.
The class is J with Qantas and Singapore and
C with Malaysian. Cost for all flights total are
$4,550 and taxes $245.
Mr Isaac Hayes is a corporate client of the
agency and has requested the following two
weeks prior to departure:
Mr Hayes needs to travel from Melbourne to
Singapore on 19 March on Qantas flight 23
departing at 1600 and arrives Singapore at
0045 + 1.
In Singapore he wishes to stay in a Junior
Suite single share (recorded as sgl) at the
Park Hyatt Hotel (record as htl) for three
nights including American breakfast (record
as b/fast). Accommodation was confirmed
with Rosa at Utell Reservations who provided
a booking reference number of H123433 and
the rate was confirmed at AUD580 per person
night (recorded as pp per ngt and total cost).
Mr Hayes will collect a Hertz rental car, group
D (recorded as Grp) at the airport on arrival
(record as PU) at 0100 and return it two
days later (record as DO) at the airport at
0600 / 23rd March. Booking was made with
Hertz direct and confirmed immediately with
Darren in reservations at a rate of $95 a day
including unlimited km’s (recorded as unlkm)
collision damage waiver (CDW) all taxes and
theft. There is an excess of $1200AUD or a
payment of $5.50 per day extra will bring the
excess down to only $200 record this so the
client can be advised. Hertz booking reference
is HZ123345.
Fare Basis: CC1YR
His details are as follows:
Company:
Shaft Limited
CTCB – 03 9696
2121
American Express:
3760 070370 12345
exp 11/08
Qantas frequent
flyer membership:
QF23675
Name of card:
Mr I Hayes
Passport:
Australian
Special Requests:
Low salt meals
The arrangement for payments are recorded
in the company’s profile. Shaft Limited is
invoiced for the airfares and the staff pays
their own expenses for car rental and
accommodation using their credit card.
It is not necessary to take any deposits and
final payment for the accommodation and
rental car will be due a week prior to departure
for this booking.
Each client has his or her own corporate
insurance, this is a year policy.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Mr Hayes then travels to Kuala Lumpur on 23
March on Singapore flight 655 at 1150 and
arrives Kuala Lumpur at 1305.
39
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
40
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 41
Reservations procedure
Code of ethics
It is recommended that the following rules be adhered to in order to efficiently handle reservations
and to avoid client inconvenience. Accurate and complete records must be kept covering all
reservation transactions. These must include flight numbers, class of service, date of travel
departure and arrival time, status of segments, names and initials of passengers with contact
address/telephone number and ticketing details. Client confidentiality must be strictly adhered to.
All dealings should be conducted in a businesslike manner. Keep in mind at all times the need and
efficient handling of each transaction.
1. Making a reservation
a) Always adhere to the standard reservation procedures.
b) Never deliberately make duplicate reservations for the same client.
c) Facilitate the efficient handling of a reservation by always establishing the itinerary, minimum
connecting times, service/flight numbers etc before contacting the principal.
d) Always attempt to establish a contact address (es) with the client and advise the airline
accordingly. This is particularly important as it enables airlines to better serve your client when
the office is closed.
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
e) Travel agents should request all reservations for a specific itinerary and advise subsequent
changes through one airline (normally the first international airline). Where this is not
practicable, each airline with whom reservations have been made must be informed of
reservations made with other airlines.
42
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
a) Whenever a passenger cancels his
reservation, such cancelled space must be
immediately released. Cancellations must
be advised immediately to the Principal
so that the space can be released for sale
again.
b) When a passenger changes his itinerary
ensure that all space and supplementary
services no longer required are cancelled at
the time that the new bookings are made.
d) NEVER create a booking for multiple
reservations when it is evident the client can
only use one of the flights reserved.
3.2 Monitor files to ensure
that all confirmations have
been received and chase any
outstanding confirmations.
Monitor clients’ files is an important part of the
booking process and generally is done using
these methods:
•
Ticketing time (TTL)
•
Diary (manual and electronic)
•
Courier
•
Online booking updates
•
Telephone
•
Fax
•
Email
•
Mail
Once you have actioned a booking, you need
to sit on it and ensure all correspondence has
been received and acted up. There are many
ways to do this, depending on the service. The
best way is to use a diary. Larger companies
have diaries specifically designed for their staff.
Some are electronic, others hardcopy.
Using a diary effectively, requires discipline. You
need to form habits. There are many training
sessions on effective “time management” of
which a diary is an essential item. You need
to prioritise and update daily. Upon close of
business, and before you go home, spend a
few moments putting in the priorities for the
next day.
There are other tools to help you monitor
your bookings. Within a computer reservation
system, there is the entry “TTL” and queues.
TTL is “ticketing time limit”: the deadline as to
when a booking needs to be paid and ticketed
by. This deadline is put in by you when you
create a booking. When this deadline arises, the
computer will automatically stick this booking
onto a queue.
Queues are electronic mail boxes. There are
general mail boxes that need to be sorted by
one person daily, and individual mail boxes for
each member of your team. An individual queue
needs to be monitored throughout the day.
Airlines use these queues as well to send you
important information about your bookings.
You can also place other reminders in a booking
that will automatically place it in your queue at
the time and date you need it. Queues form a
sort of electronic diary. To find out how to do
this , you will need to speak with your computer
reservations system provider (eg Galileo, Sabre,
Amadeus).
Emails can also help you monitor your
bookings. With so much of our business
coming via email, we need to stay organise.
Use the email folders to keep all information
together per booking. Depending on your office,
you may also like to print out a hard copy of the
emails and place them in client folders. Some
businesses are trying to become paperless
and may not encourage this. Regardless, you
will receive hard copies of information from
suppliers and will need to have a folder system
in place to keep this information organised.
With emails, it is important to control what you
keep: delete immediately any unnecessary
emails and file those you need.
Some suppliers will require you to log in to their
internet site to keep a tab on what’s happening
with a requested booking. You will need to use
your diary to remind you to do this! Be aware of
which wholesalers do this (when you action the
booking, pursue this information then).
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 43
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
2. Cancelling a reservation
Other methods to keep track of the booking
include:
•
the telephone: always keep a written record
of the date, time, who you spoke to and
the result of the call. Keep this information
in your client file: either electronic or hard
copy.
•
mail: open all correspondence when it first
arrives, check it and take any necessary
action. Then file it away in the appropriate
area. Try to handle a piece of paper only
once. DON’T stick it in the “IN” tray..it could
stay there for some time and possibly
become a problem.
•
Fax: see mail above.
Maintaining bookings requires good time
management. If this is something you struggle
with, speak to someone about it. There is
normally one person within an office who can
help you with this. Don’t believe the catch cry
“I don’t have time for time management”. If
you don’t make the time, you will make costly
mistakes and end up in a heap on the floor.
3.3 Note and schedule future
action to be taken in relation
to bookings in accordance
with systems
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
If you use your diary effectively, the queues
system mentioned above and maintain all
correspondence records, you will find everything
falls into place. Most companies offer training
on how to use their systems: ensure you get
this training early and ask questions if you don’t
understand it. It is important to try and get on
top of systems early so your time management
kicks in as soon as possible allowing you to be
an effective operator.
As soon as you have a date to have something
actioned by, put in a queue reminder to the
booking, and stick that date in your diary. Just
doing this, will keep your head above water.
44
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
Element 4: Update
and finalise
bookings
4.1 Make any necessary
amendments/adjustments
to bookings and accurately
record these.
Accurate and fully recorded booking details are
absolutely vital to ensure the customer receives
the services they have booked and paid for and
this also means accurate and fully recorded
amendments/adjustments to the booking.
Make necessary changes to the booking card/
file, this means leaving history of the original
booking and showing the changes to reflect the
amended details.
Advising the customer of the changes
immediately by phone or e mail is very
important. Then in writing as a confirmation
letter and itinerary.
Diplomacy and tact is required. It is not
necessary for you to explain the workings of
the operator, but it is necessary for you to be
considerate of your customer and how these
changes may affect them and their plans.
Usually the operator will offer an alternative
which inconveniences your customer least.
Even a change of ten minutes to the original
aircraft scheduled time will necessitate you
advising your customer and altering the ticket
where possible.
Always have your customer’s best interests as
your focus and make alternate arrangements,
which will cause them minor inconvenience.
Avoid making derogatory remarks about the
operator, as this is unprofessional and could
reflect badly on the travel industry as a whole.
Amendments
Figure 4. shows how the card will look when
a change has been made. The flight change
was made with Liz at QF on 4 Sep. The ticket
number is written in after the flights have been
paid for as a record on the file. Once again
anyone who picks up this booking card can see
exactly what has taken place so far.
Follow up to make sure everything is okay at the
completion of the job.
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
As well as the situation where your customer’s
first choice of travel may be unavailable, another
situation which may arise could be when a
tour is cancelled, due to lack of numbers.
Alternatively, airline field management may
assess flight loadings several days prior to
operation, and decide to amalgamate two
services into one, due to light loadings. While
not common, it is a part of the industry make
up, and the operator will contact you to
advise of these changes. Sometimes these
can occur close to the day of departure and
your customers may even have collected their
documents.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 45
Figure 4. Booking Card with amended
information
4.2 Action any payments
required by supplier at the
appropriate time.
All suppliers will issue an invoice that will advise
you when the product and services need to
be paid in full by. Usually payment is due 60
days prior to departure for organised tours
including cruises and packages and 30 days for
everything else.
All suppliers due dates are different and that is
why it is necessary to record and monitor these
due dates correctly.
When it is time to make payment you will
choose one of these methods according to the
suppliers method requested:
•
Requesting payment from the accounts
department e.g. cheque requisition or
purchase order
•
Self administer the payment
•
Issuing a miscellaneous charge order
•
Sending payment by cheque, electronic
transmission
Refer also to Perform Office Procedures
THHGGA02B
4.3 Provide suppliers
with any changes to the
booking in accordance with
agreed procedures and any
contractual arrangement.
When a client makes changes to their booking
that affect the supplier, the supplier should
be notified immediately. If the change means
the supplier having to alter a product, never
guarantee things to the client unless the
supplier has confirmed the change. Failing to do
so, could result in a product not being available:
for example, if a client wants to change their
tour dates, you will need to check on the
availability with the supplier before confirming
the change..it’s all common sense.
If you are unsure as to whether a supplier
needs to be advised of any changes, contact
them! Just remember, to take action NOW.
As to how, depends on what methods you use
with that supplier. If they are an internet based
operation, email them: just ensure you diarise
to check on whether they respond to your
email. If the change is urgent, the telephone
is still the quickest and most reliable way to
communicate.
When using the telephone, remember to always
get the name of the person you are dealing
with and asked for a hard copy of the actioned
amendment to be sent through to you.
The other important thing to remember is:
changes can involve fees. Most suppliers
charge for changes to be made to bookings.
These charges can be as little as 30 dollars or
can be much higher, depending on the product
and when the change is made. Changes to
a tour which is due to leave within days, may
incur a large fee. This is to cover the cost of
issuing new documents, and sometimes loss of
income.
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 47
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Many suppliers have a preferred method of
communication: it is your job to know what
these are and action via that method.
If your client is cancelling one tour to go on
another, the operator may not have enough
time to fill that space on the old tour. They need
to be compensated for this.
Before a client pays any money for a product
or service, they must be made aware of the
changes policy for the company involved.
Much of this information can be found in the
conditions page of a brochure (normally on the
back cover), or for an airfare, in the relevant fare
sheet under the “changes and cancellations”
section.
You, as the agent, need to consider whether
you are going to charge to make changes
on behalf of clients. The fees that suppliers
charge do not cover the agent’s time or lost
commission. Again, if you are going to charge,
the client needs to be made aware of this early
in the negotiations.
When it comes to making changes, take a
moment now to read the “code of ethics” that
applies to reservation procedures for airlines.
These procedures can be loosely applied to all
product suppliers:
Code of ethics
a) Always adhere to the standard reservation
procedures.
b) Never deliberately make duplicate
reservations for the same client.
c) Facilitate the efficient handling of a
reservation by always establishing the
itinerary, minimum connecting times,
service/flight numbers etc before contacting
the principal.
d) Always attempt to establish a contact
address (es) with the client and advise
the airline accordingly. This is particularly
important as it enables airlines to better
serve your client when the office is closed.
e) Travel agents should request all
reservations for a specific itinerary and
advise subsequent changes through one
airline (normally the first international airline).
Where this is not practicable, each airline
with whom reservations have been made
must be informed of reservations made with
other airlines.
2. Cancelling a reservation
a) Whenever a passenger cancels his
reservation, such cancelled space must be
immediately released. Cancellations must
be advised immediately to the Principal
so that the space can be released for sale
again.
b) When a passenger changes his itinerary
ensure that all space and supplementary
services no longer required are cancelled at
the time that the new bookings are made.
d) NEVER create a booking for multiple
reservations when it is evident the client can
only use one of the flights reserved.
Just remember, when it comes to changes,
take action IMMEDIATELY.
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
It is recommended that the following rules
be adhered to in order to efficiently handle
reservations and to avoid client inconvenience.
Accurate and complete records must be kept
covering all reservation transactions. These
must include flight numbers, class of service,
date of travel departure and arrival time, status
of segments, names and initials of passengers
with contact address/telephone number and
ticketing details. Client confidentiality must
be strictly adhered to. All dealings should be
conducted in a businesslike manner. Keep in
mind at all times the need and efficient handling
of each transaction.
1. Making a reservation
48
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
4.4 Advise suppliers of
final customer details and
requirements in accordance
with the needs of particular
bookings.
Before final documentation is issued by the
supplier, it is important to go over the latest
invoice to ensure all details are correct on behalf
of the client. To spend a little extra time at this
point, can save a lot of money in the long run.
If it is possible, have the client with you when
you go over these final details, and check
with them if there are any other requirements.
Otherwise, email or telephone them. You
should also create a prompt to reminder you to
ask for details such as seat preferences, meal
preferences, frequent flyer details etc. This is
something you could easily draft up and stick
on the side of your computer.
Before making bookings, particularly airline
bookings, it is important for you to have
witnessed the client’s passport to confirm you
have the correct name in the computer system.
Failure to do so, could result in your client being
denied boarding. Don’t wait until tickets and
other documents have been issued before you
see the passport. You may have to reissue
everything. Changing names in a flight booking
is complex and sometimes cannot be done.
925-V2 – 18/10/2007
Remember, in this industry, it is the details that
make the difference between good and poor
service. Double check everything!
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services 49
Appendix A: AFTA
Code of Ethics
In relation with the public, an agent should:
1. protect the public from fraud,
misrepresentation or unethical practices;
2. keep management and staff informed and
up to date;
3. be aware of all facts pertinent to products
sold;
4. consider all clients transactions confidential;
5. advise client re cancellation fees;
6. make use of AFTA insignia in premises,
advertising etc;
7. avoid misleading advertising;
8. have at least one consultant with twelve
months or more experience;
In relations with carriers/principals, an agent
should:
1. give them fair and impartial representation;
2. make staff aware of agreements, tariffs and
regulations;
3. release all cancelled/unsold space
immediately and refrain from making
duplicate bookings;
4. treat orders placed for accommodation/
services as binding and cancel immediately
if not required – vouchers/order should be
honoured without delay;
5. always make truthful statements when
making statements about giving opinions of
carriers/principals;
6. give the principal/carrier the opportunity
to make investigations into any complaint
before acting;
9. treat the clients’ interests a paramount.
In relations with other travel agents, an agent
should;
1. avoid controversies and refer disputes to
AFTA rather than resort to litigation;
2. not disparage the business practices of a
competitor;
3. not interfere with or induce cancellation of a
transaction through another agent, once a
deposit is paid;
4. not imitate, simulate or copy other designs,
logos, names etc, without permission;
1042-V2 – 18/10/2007
5. not break the AFTA Code of Ethics on the
grounds that another agent does so.
50
THTSOP07B – Book and Coordinate Supplier Services
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