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VOLUME 26 | ISSUE 15 | APRIL 13-19, 2017 | FREE
JAZMINE GALLEGOS
ITCHING FOR INK SINCE 1992
5
1
ge
a
P
SIKH SOLIDARITY,
GALLEGOS’ LEGACY
PAGE: 7
A JOURNEY TO THE
OUTER COLONIES
PAGE: 16
OODLES OF
FAREAST FARE
PAGE: 18
PLAY MISTY,
FOR GOLEC
PAGE 24
First N
Nations
ations Community HealthSource
Com
Community
mmuniity
y Garden
Ga
In
Invites
nvites
i
Your
Your P
Participation!
articip
i ipation!
i
Family and
and Children
Children Welcome!
Welcome!
Family
All Nations Wellness and Healing
Center
6416 Zuni Ave. SE
April 22nd Earth Day
Help us plant seeds in our 5 raised beds
to celebrate Earth Day!
For More Information Contact:
Carey Tully carey.tully@fnch.org (505) 603-2807
This Project is in partnership with the Healthy Here Initiative and is made possible by
generous funding by Center for Disease Control.(CDC)
[2]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
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alibi
VOLUME 26 | ISSUE 15 | APRIL 13-19, 2017
EDITORIAL
MANAGING EDITOR/COPY EDITOR:
Renee Chavez (ext. 255) renee@alibi.com
FILM EDITOR:
Devin D. O’Leary (ext. 230) devin@alibi.com
MUSIC EDITOR/NEWS EDITOR:
August March (ext. 245) august@alibi.com
ARTS/LIT EDITOR:
Maggie Grimason (ext. 239) maggie@alibi.com
CALENDARS EDITOR:
Megan Reneau (ext. 260) megan@alibi.com
STAFF WRITER:
Joshua Lee (ext. 243) josh@alibi.com
SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR:
Samantha Carrillo (ext. 223) samantha@alibi.com
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Taylor Grabowsky (ext. 260) taylor@alibi.com
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:
Cecil Adams, Gustavo Arellano, Robin Babb, Bob
Brezsny, Carolyn Carlson, Doug Cohen, Desmond Fox,
Kristi D. Lawrence, Sara MacNeil, Hosho McCreesh,
Mikee Riggs
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GRAPHIC DESIGNERS:
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CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS:
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[4]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
Alibi (ISSN 1088-0496) is published weekly 52 times per year. The content
of this issue is Copyright © 2016 by NuCity Publications, Inc., and may not be
reprinted in part or in whole without written consent of the publisher. All rights
are reserved. One copy of each edition of Alibi is available free to county residents
and visitors each week. Anyone caught removing papers in bulk will be prosecuted
on theft charges to the fullest extent of the law. Yearly subscription $100, back
issues are $3, Best of Burque is $5. Queries and manuscripts should include a
self-addressed stamped envelope; Alibi assumes no responsibility for
unsolicited material.
Association
of Alternative
Newsmedia
No Clear Winner
Letters should be sent with the writer’s name,
address and daytime phone number via email to
letters@alibi.com. They can also be faxed to (505)
256-9651. Letters may be edited for length and
clarity, and may be published in any medium; we
regret that owing to the volume of
correspondence we cannot reply to every letter.
Word count limit for letters is 300 words.
Martinez’s Rhetoric
Dear Alibi,
Has anyone else noticed the change in our
governor’s rhetoric lately? I mean she’s always
been a bit inflexible, but since her visit and
dinner with the “Don” at Mar-a-Lago, her speech
has taken on quite a different tone; actually
belligerent. Her comments and refusal to
compromise in the least with the State
Legislature sound more and more “Trump-like.”
She couldn’t care less about the people of New
Mexico. Now it’s her way or the highway, and her
way sounds more and more like Trump’s way.
What could cause such a shift in her
governing? Perhaps she’s simply looking ahead.
She will soon be out of a job. Her position as a
female governor who sucks up to the “Don”
would, no doubt, appeal to Trump. I’m betting
she’s already been offered a position within the
Trump administration. I’ll be surprised if she even
finishes out her term. Sound far-fetched? Maybe
you should take a head count of all the people
that were running against Trump for the
presidential nomination. The majority of those
that “dropped out” inexplicably had jobs waiting
for them when Trump won the election. So, who
promised who, what?
-T. Warkentine
On the Governor�s Vetoes
Dear Alibi,
Governor Martinez’s outdated “no new taxes”
political pledge has resulted in the worst economy
in our state in decades. Because of her political
ideology, New Mexico has the worst
unemployment rate in the country; young New
Mexicans are fleeing the state in search of jobs;
and schools are dangerously underfunded.
The Legislature passed a forward-thinking
budget with revenue to fund critical services. We
applaud them for their hard work and express
extreme disappointment in several of the
governor’s vetoes. SB 175 would have brought
additional federal funds into the state to expand
an effective child abuse prevention program. HB
202 would have leveled the playing field for our
home-grown businesses and raised much needed
funds to support critical services like education,
health care and public safety. The governor also
vetoed bills that would have helped working
families such as the minimum wage increase and
leave for caregivers.
The budget “options” she refers to in her
message include lowering the take-home pay of
teachers and other state employees, most of
whom have not had a raise in years. The
Legislature passed numerous bills that would have
moved New Mexico’s economy forward, but the
governor’s vetoes indicate that she is content to
continue holding the state back.”
-J. Jimenez, Executive Director of New
Mexico Voices for Children
Dear Alibi,
I look forward to reading the Best of Burque list
every year—even from a million miles away—
and it was so disappointing to see multiple
categories where “no clear winner” was selected.
Nowhere was this more upsetting for me than in
the category of Best Local Comedian. In the copy,
it was mentioned that “hundreds” of votes had
“trickled in” and I wished that the staff at the
Alibi could’ve done the right thing and given
credit to the comic with the most votes. Or
acknowledgment to the small batch that tied. Or
even to the top five in no particular order. The
ability to say you were among the “Best of” the
city can be a credit that goes a long way for the
comedians in town. It can make or break a
booker’s decision to give these comedians road
work which often pays and also raises the profile
of not only the comic, but of Albuquerque as a
whole. The comics in the 505 work so hard to
help raise awareness that comedy even exists and
they also fight daily to get Burqueños out of their
houses to see live events and support local
businesses. Refusing to give someone the title and
then telling them that they should work harder to
get one next year is a super letdown and
something that I hope improves next year. In the
meantime, I also remain impressed by the quality
of jokes in the fair city I love and miss so much.
-S. Kennedy (former Best of Burque “Best
Local Comedian” 2012, 2013, 2014)
BoB Comedians
Dear Alibi,
I personally feel as though the blurb for Best
Comedian was absolutely atrocious. Sure, no
clear winner is fine; at least send some shout-outs
to some comedians or venues that host comedy
frequently. Like The Guild, Turtle Mountain,
Open Source Comedy, etc., etc. Also the line
about a challenge to set ourselves apart is bullshit.
I’d like to know exactly what happened to make
this result. Was there truly no clear top 3-5? I’d
love to see an apology in your next issue.
-K. Brand
Letter from the Editor
Dear Comedians,
The results of Best of Burque are determined by a
democratic vote. It’s not that we “refused to give
someone the title” or enacted a malicious scheme
to “make this result.” Simply put, no one earned
it. It’s unfortunate that no local comedian rose to
win top honors, but if you really want to know
why there wasn’t a fountain of votes for any one
person, you’ll have to look to your fellow
Burqueños. Did you vote? Did you ask your fans,
coworkers, family, friends, random strangers, Uber
driver, garbage man, etc. to vote? We encourage
you all to wage a major election campaign next
year to ensure that a winner is chosen by the
people, of the people, for the people.
-Weekly Alibi
CORRECTIONS
Dear Readers,
We apologize for the misspelling of the Best
Mechanic Shop winner’s name in Best of
Burque (vol.26, i.14, April 6-12). The
winner was Reincarnation Inc (The Subaru
Guys).
-Weekly Alibi a
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[5]
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Community Environmental
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4324 CORRALES ROAD • CORRALES
Facilitator Shannon Beaucaire
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www.cewg.org
ODDS
ENDS
AND
It’s
WEIRD NEWS
Dateline: Israel
American pop star Britney Spears is causing a
major disruption in Israel, forcing the country to
move an entire election. Seems that the singer is
set to perform her first-ever concert in Tel Aviv
on July 3. Unfortunately for locals, that’s the same
day as the Israeli Labor Party’s primary election.
So party officials have moved the election—not
because they wanted to see the concert instead
(or so they say), but because of security concerns.
“We delayed the vote one day to July 4,” Labor
Party spokesperson Liron Zach told CNN. “We
couldn’t hire enough security for the election
because of the Britney Spears concert on July 3.
There would also be a lot of traffic and roadblocks
that would make it hard for the vote to go
ahead.” The primary will decide who becomes
chairman of the party. That elected official will
then be in the running for prime minister. Spears’
concert is being held at Yarkon Park, right across
the street from the Tel Aviv exhibition grounds
where the polling is set to take place. “We aren’t
concerned about voters favoring Spears over the
party,” insisted Zach. “The two main concerns are
security and traffic.” The Tel Aviv stop is part of
Spears’ first world tour since 2011.
checking a roadside welcome center when he saw
a maroon Jeep Wrangler parked in the
commercial vehicle area. He went to tell the
driver to move. Before he reached the Jeep,
however, a white object—later identified as a
water balloon—was thrown out the window.
Lasalle wrote in his report that he approached the
vehicle and notice the driver was wearing a
“white bra,” from which he “removed a second
water balloon and tried to bust it on the ground
near my feet.” When Lasalle returned to his
vehicle to call for backup, Prisby drove back onto
the interstate, eventually leading the trooper on a
chase with speeds up to 100 mph. Lasalle, with
the help of police from Clarksville, eventually
took Prisby into custody. According to the police
report, Prisby had slurred speech, red watery eyes
and smelled of alcohol at the time of his arrest.
Lasalle searched the Jeep and found an open
bottle of Bailey’s Irish Cream. Prisby was taken to
Montgomery County Jail and held on $20,000
bond.
Dateline: California
In what amounts to a very small victory, a woman
who fell off California’s highest bridge while
taking a selfie will not be charged with
trespassing. The Placer County Sheriff’s Office
said the Sacramento-area woman was airlifted to
a hospital after the 60-foot fall and is expected to
survive. The woman—unidentified in press
reports—and a group of friends were walking on a
catwalk underneath the 730-foot-tall Foresthill
Bridge near Auburn when she fell while taking a
photo. Authorities said the walkways under the
bridge are closed to the public, and people who
access them are violating the law.
Dateline: Canada
!
Y
D
D
U
M
, 2017
T
E
G
S
WITH U
JUNE 3
Police in Hamilton, Ontario are on the hunt for
the person or persons who stole $45,000 worth to
lettuce. Between 8pm on March 31 and 4pm on
April 1, a truck and refrigerated trailer full of
lettuce went missing. Police say the truck
eventually turned up in Toronto, but the trailer
full of lettuce is missing. Police asked the public
to “romaine calm” after the incident. Unwilling
to let it go, police also asked the public on social
media to “lettuce know if you have any tips.” The
pun-filled Facebook post also let readers know,
“Your information could be the tip of the iceberg
and uncover a major theft ring.”
Dateline: Tennessee
A man wearing a bra threw water balloons at a
state trooper and then led him on a high-speed
chase. The Tennessean reports that 57-year-old
Alan Brian Prisby of Decatur was arrested and
charged with evading arrest, driving under the
influence, implied consent violation, reckless
driving and speeding. According to the arrest
warrant, filed earlier this month, Tennessee
Highway Patrol Trooper Julio Lasalle was
Presented by
Media Sponsors
abqmuddvolleyball.org
[6]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
Dateline: Kentucky
President Donald Trump has vowed to revive
America’s coal industry—but if the Kentucky
Coal Mining Museum is any indication, it’s going
to be an uphill battle. The museum, located in
Benham, Ky. announced earlier this month it is
installing solar panels on its roof as part of a
project aimed at lowering the energy costs of one
of the city’s largest electric customers. “We
believe that this project will help save at least
eight to ten thousand dollars off the energy costs
on this building alone,” Communications
Director Brandon Robinson of the Southeast
Kentucky Community and Technical College—
which owns the museum—told WYMT
Mountain News. “It is a little ironic,” he
conceded. The museum was opened in 1994 in a
building that once housed the company store for
a former coal camp town. The site houses relics
from the state’s coal mining past, including items
from the personal collection of “Coal Miner’s
Daughter” singer Loretta Lynn. a
Compiled by Devin D. O’Leary. Email your weird news
to devin@alibi.com.
NEWS | COUNCIL WATCH
NEWS CITY BY JOSHUA LEE
City Loses Over $400K to Scam
Solidarity, Justice and Ted Gallegos
State Auditor Tim Keller discovered last
Thursday that the city of Albuquerque was the
victim of a fraud scheme that diverted at least
$420,000 of public funds into the hands of a
fake construction contractor. City officials
confirmed that a scammer posed as a
construction contractor working on a city project
and filed a work invoice that appeared almost
identical to the real one, except with different
vendor payment information. It is unclear what
city project the scammer pretended to be
working on or which agency or individual
complied with the requested change of payment
information. Officials are unsure of whether or
not the loss can be covered by insurance. Early
last week, the Office of the State Auditor (OSA)
had warned agencies to be wary of scams after a
very similar debacle cost an elementary school in
Socorro $200,000.
Council considers local issues
BY CAROLYN CARLSON
he April 3 regular meeting of the
Albuquerque City Council was quick and
easy. President Isaac Benton was excused,
leaving Councilor Brad Winter in charge of
the gavel. Winter, a lifelong track and field
star, ran the meeting as if he was sprinting to
the finish line. The meeting adjourned after
just over two hours and coincidentally in time
for the NCAA basketball final championship
playoff game scheduled for that evening.
ERIC WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHY
T
Sikh Solidarity
Albuquerque and Northern New Mexico
are home to many members of the Sikh
religion. Councilor Diane Gibson sponsored a
proclamation acknowledging the Sikh
community’s many contributions to our state.
The proclamation also wishes the Sikh
community a joyous Baisakhi on April 13.
Baisakhi is a Sikh religious festival honoring
the origins of one of the top 10 religions in
world. Sikhism, a panentheistic religion, was
founded around 1469 in the Punjab area of
India. There are approximately 500,000
American Sikhs. This branch was founded by
Yogi Bhajan, a yoga master. He founded the
local community in Española, N.M.. Because
Sikhs wear turbans they are often mistaken for
Muslims but they are not followers of Islam.
This misunderstanding has spawned several
hate crimes against Sikhs across the nation.
This religion is more closely related to
Hinduism. Several local Sikh business people
were on hand and said they are reaching out so
people know who they are. Among their
teachings are living an honest and healthy life,
a belief in one god, sharing, caring and the
equality of all human beings.
Helping Victims
Those who help victims of violent crimes
got some recognition. Councilor Trudy Jones
sponsored a proclamation for April being
declared violent crime victim’s awareness
month. Representatives from the Resource
Center for Victims of Violent Death and the
New Mexico Crime Victims Reparation
Commission were on hand, as was a mother of
a violent crime victim and a violent crime
reparation officer. According to Frank Zubia of
the Reparation Commission, the commission
handled 3,000 applications in fiscal year 2016,
spent $486,000 for homicide victim support,
funded 145 crime victim groups in the state
and assisted 164 families during a violent
death event.
Palabras Publicas
Local semi-naked man Don Schrader let
the Council know they can be in love with
more than one person at a time. “Hell no to
lies and cheating, yes to deep intimacy and
sexual pleasure shared with more than one
person,” Schrader gravely intoned as he ended
his commentary. His comments were a little
hard to beat but the next speaker gave it a shot
and talked about bubbles in space that might
represent the biggest hoax in global warming.
Another regular commenter said he was
wondering what Albuquerque was becoming
with all the liberals, Democrats, homosexuals
and communists running around. It is no
wonder Councilor Winter sprinted to end the
meeting.
Things Done
Councilors approved renaming the
Alamosa Community Center the Ted M.
Gallegos Community Center. Gallegos was
born and raised in the Alamosa neighborhood,
was co-founder of the La Familia Car Club and
co-founder of the Alamosa Neighborhood
Association. He was also a Golden Glove
boxer. Ted was a vital member of Youth
Development Incorporated and touched many,
many lives, all while bettering his community.
“Rest in peace, the world was lucky to have
you,” said one speaker. Gallegos, 59, died Jan.
16, 2017 due to complications after an auto
accident said close friend Councilor Klarissa
Peña.
The city is getting a little closer to owning
an exceptional piece of open space after
Councilors approved spending interest monies
for the La Cuentista properties which sit next
to the Petroglyph National Monument near
the Five Sisters volcanoes. The city is
currently in negotiations for the 60-acre
property initially appraised at over $6 million.
Things Not Done
In a revised resolution, to be taken up at
the April 17 meeting, Councilor Pat Davis is
reserving $500,000 from his set aside pot of
money for some design and construction on
some of Nob Hill’s sidewalks. The work will be
done after the Albuquerque Rapid Transit
project is finished.
Other postponed items include amending
how the city and county will work together on
collaborative behavioral health reform, renaming the stage at civic plaza after Al
Hurricane Sr., adding the name Ruby Tafoya
to the Louis Tafoya Community Room at the
Westside police substation and amending the
public purchases ordinance requiring
competitive bids in capital project changes.
Level Up
Outside of the Council Chambers,
Democratic Councilor Pat Davis announced
his run for Congress. Davis is competing for
the open seat left by current Democrat
Representative Michelle Lujan Grisham. She
is vying for governor. Davis joins the political
arena along with Councilor Dan Lewis who
recently announced he is running for mayor
on the Republican ticket. a
Send your comments about the City Council to
carolyn@alibi.com.
The next meeting
Monday, April 17, 5pm
Council Chambers in the basement of City Hall
View it on GOV TV 16 or at cabq.gov/govtv
APS Applying For Native Education
Grant
Last month, Gov. Susana Martinez vetoed a bill
that would have required 23 state school
districts to set up programs aimed at addressing
the lower-than-average performance of Native
American students by studying their learning
patterns and finding ways to better serve their
needs. She cited state budgetary concerns for
the decision, saying the bill would “mandate
duplicative programming” that would cost too
much. Following the veto, Albuquerque Public
Schools announced last week that they will be
applying for a $50,000 grant from the Spencer
Foundation, a Chicago nonprofit organization.
The grant would be used to fund a team of
researchers who would investigate Native
American students’ family environments, cultural
practices and family life to help find better ways
to engage them in the learning process. Native
students have the lowest test scores, graduation
rates and attendance of any ethnic group
nationwide.
N.M’s Worrisome Black Homicide Rate
According to a new report from the Washington,
D.C.-based Violence Policy Center, New Mexico
has the third highest homicide victimization rate
in the nation per capita for African-Americans.
Although the sample size was smaller than
average—there are less than 60,000 AfricanAmericans currently living in New Mexico—the
state’s black homicide rate was 28.48 per
100,000 in 2014, the most recent year with
available data, compared to the national rate of
16.38 per 100,000. The report states that there
were 15 qualifying black homicide victims, almost
four times the overall homicide rate nationwide
(4.19 per 100,000). In all but one of the
incidents studied, the victim was killed by
someone they knew. For cases in which the
circumstances could be identified, only 3 were
related to the commission of another felony.
Where the murder weapon could be identified,
79 percent of victims (11 out of 14) were killed by
firearms. The New Mexico Department of Health
contests the report, however, since records show
only nine homicides among African-Americans in
2014, for a rate of 18.7 black homicide victims
per 100,000. The Violence Policy Center says
its data was sourced from “unpublished
Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR) data”
from the FBI’s “Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR)
Program.” a
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[7]
NEWS | NM POLITICAL REPORT
Nice Idea, Not Interested
Two big-name Dems say no to public
!
financing in ABQ mayoral race
"
BY ANDY LYMAN
lbuquerque mayoral candidates have to file
their next campaign finance reports by
April 15. For most, it will be their first
reports filed this election. While many of the
candidates speak highly of public financing,
only one has qualified for it.
New Mexico Democrats, for example, have
pushed for more publicly financed races and
campaigns since at least 2008, when the party
added language to their state platform that
says “all political campaigns should be publicly
financed. The Albuquerque mayoral race is
nonpartisan, so none
of the candidates will
be identified with any
specific political party
on the ballot. Mayoral
candidates Deanna
Archuleta and Brian
Colón are both
prominent Democrats
running for mayor who
both opted to use
private funds for their
campaigns.
Colón told NM Political Report he
supports a public campaign financing system
that works but lamented that Albuquerque’s
system does not. “I have long advocated for
the city to create a public finance system that
fairly allows candidates access to public funds,”
Colón said in a prepared statement. “However,
our current public finance system does not yet
provide the vehicle for campaigns to properly
communicate with the electorate.”
Colón was the chair of the state
Democratic Party in 2008 when the party
added its public financing stance to its
platform. He said he initially thought about
using public financing for his mayoral
candidacy but ultimately decided not to
because “the system is completely broken.”
Colón added that the city’s version of political
action committees, called measure finance
committees, can still have a large influence on
a race by using outside money to support
publicly financed candidates.
“I’m not interested in engaging in that
system,” Colón said. “Instead, I’ve decided to
be completely transparent and raise and report
all funds associated in any way with my
campaign.”
Archuleta did not respond to an emailed
question from NM Political Report about her
decision to run on private financing.
The Democratic Party of New Mexico
doesn’t necessarily see the two Democrats
choosing not to use public campaign financing
A
Author of
Autobiography
of a Yogi
and
subject of the
award-winning film
AWAKE:
The Life of Yogananda
Wednesday, April 26th 7:00 P.M.
St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church,
601 Montaño Road NW, Albuquerque
Presented by
Brother Bhumananda,
a monk of the
Self-Realization Fellowship Order
[8]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
For more information:
albuquerque.srf@gmail.com
for their candidacies as a problem either. Party
Director Joe Kabourek said that ultimately
candidates will decide whether public
financing is appropriate or not. “Each
candidate is going to make the best choice for
their campaign,” Kabourek said. Kabourek
added that the statewide party platform “at
best is an aspirational document.”
Former City Councilor and current
Director of New Mexico’s Working Families
Party Eric Griego wrote the legislation that
ultimately became Albuquerque’s public
financing ordinance. Griego said he’s
“disappointed” in both Archuleta and Colón
for not attempting to get public financing.
“This is a bad tactical
decision on their
part,” he said.
New Mexico
State Auditor Tim
Keller, a registered
Democrat, was the
only mayoral
candidate to qualify
—TIM KELLER
for public financing.
Keller told NM
Political Report he
recognizes that public financing reflects the
Democratic platform but emphasized that he
also opted not to use private money for
personal reason. “For me, it was the right thing
to do,” Keller said.
Keller also took a shot at politicians who
praise public financing but don’t use it.
“Everyone talks about public financing, but
yet when they have a choice, [they say] ‘Oh,
maybe it’s not for me,’” he said.
The majority of filed mayoral candidates
originally sought public financing but were
unable to collect the 3,820 $5 donations
necessary from Albuquerque voters to qualify.
Last year, the Albuquerque City Council
voted in favor of a ballot measure to nearly
double the amount of money available to
candidates who use public financing. But the
Bernalillo County Commission ultimately
voted to not include the measure on the
general election ballot last November.
Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry won his
first election with public financing, but did not
use it in his 2013 reelection campaign.
Numerous city councilors have also won races
using public financing. a
“For me, it was
the right thing
to do”
This story was written by NM Political Report, a
local news outlet. Read more stories like this at
www.nmpol.com.
OPINION | ¡ASK A MEXICAN!
Special Dallas
Edición
BY GUSTAVO ARELLANO
ear Mexican: Okay, sour cream!
Growing up in a Mexican family, my
mom never ever used sour cream on
the food she cooked. Now
when she comes to visit
me, I take her to Mexican
restaurants here in the
Dallas area. Almost
every time she orders
an entrée, she always
ask me why they put
sour cream as a side
item. Is it me, or is
it a gabacho thing
with the “got to
have sour cream
thing on my Tex-Mex
food.” Am I too oldfashion, too old-school?
—I’ll Love Tony Romo
Forever
D
1
T
Send
‘em to:
X
A
R
Ask the Mexican at
themexican@askamexican.net. Be his fan on
Facebook. Follow him on Twitter
@gustavoarellano or follow him on Instagram
@gustavo_arellano!
SUBMISSIONS!
A FOR
artbox@alibi.com
N
?
Dear Gaybacho: I can’t answer this question
fully as a cishet cabrón, but I can offer this:
Mexican families don’t take kindly to their
kids being grabby-grabby with their
significant others in front of them, because
no child of any Mexican parents have ever
had sex in their lives. Your papi chulo
obviously likes you—otherwise, you’d never
have met the family in the first place—but
he might be taking the commandment I just
shared with you a bit too seriously. Check in
with him, and see what’s up. And if it
doesn’t work out? Get one of his male
relatives. As I’ve said before in this column,
what’s the difference between a straight
hombre and a gay one? Three beers. a
a
A
ER TI
O
OP
Dear Pocha: Your mom might not use sour
cream, but si es old-school, I guarantee you
that she used crema fresca, or crema salada, or
even jocoque if she’s from from Jalisco. Those
are the Mexican versions of sour cream—in
other words, a dairy product that enlivens
dishes with a tart milkiness. When
Mexicans came to the United States in the
early 1900s and started making Mexican
food, the substitute for crema was sour cream
because there was none in los Estados Unidos
at the time due to a lack of concentration of
Mexicans. It’s the same reason why Tex-Mex
food uses cheddar cheese and that pointless
cabbage salad on the side of a combo plate—
you make do with what you tienes. I don’t
have a problem with it, but real Mexicans
like you do because ustedes can’t
comprehend that mestizaje is a two-way calle
that makes our culture thrive. Man, y’all
must also be mad at Mexicans in the US for
learning English instead of staying
monolingual in Spanish—good luck with
that!
Dear Mexican: I’m a gay gabacho who has
been in a relationship with a Mexican for
seven years. His family knows about us
and they love me. They treat me almost
like a celeb whenever they come to Dallas
and visit or when we go to Mexico. At
first, they didn’t like me for the simple
reason they didn’t trust white people. Once
they got to know me, that was all over
with. His mother is the family matriarch
and treats me as if I am
one of her own
children. So, whenever
we get around them or
his friends in Mexico, he
acts like I am not even
there. I actually spend
more time with
everyone else
(between my broken
Spanish and their
broken English, we
communicate rather
well). Is his distance
from me caused by the
fact that I am white, or that
we are in a gay relationship? I
ask only because his friends and
family don’t have a problem with it, so this
stumps me.
—Gaybacho
B O
MAIL, DROP OFF OR
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APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[9]
EVENT | PREVIEWS
EVENT HORIZON WEEK OF APRIL 13-19
THURSDAY APRIL 13
AROUND THE WORLD IN FOUR
HOURS
Want to travel and experience the world and all its different
cultures but don’t have the time or money? Well now you
can! On Thursday, April 13, on Cornell Mall, just east of
UNM’s Student Union Building is the International Festival.
UNM’s international students and people from the
community will share their cultures via food, crafts, clothing
and performances. This is a fun and entertaining way to
expand your knowledge and learn something new about
someone different from you, all without needing a passport.
The event is free and lasts from 10am-2pm. UNM STUDENT
UNION BUILDING 1 UNIVERSITY
OF NEW MEXICO, 10AM TO 2PM
alibi.com/v/4tp4. (Taylor Grabowsky) a
FRIDAY APRIL 14
WHY IS PIE?
DEALING THROUGH ART
Carl Sagan famously said, “If you want to make an apple pie from
scratch, you must first invent the universe.” Ponder that for a
minute. Keep pondering—there’s a lot to unpack in that one
sentence. Now toss in demigods, alter-egos and the meaning
of life. Okay, now write a whole play about the questions and
ideas that arise from that exciting mixture of things. Oh,
wait! Someone already did that so you don’t have to. Wade
through your physical perception of the universe toward the
Adobe Rose Theatre in Santa Fe Thursdays-Sundays to see
Theater Grottesco’s performance of PIE. Regular tickets range
from $12-$25, but Thursday performances are pay-what-you-wish and April 14 is a special
$100 per person gala. Regular showings are at 7pm Thursday-Saturday and 2pm on Sunday. ADOBE
The phrase “The Best Kind,” invokes an idea of
happiness, relief and satisfaction, but this honors
thesis show documents something that once found out
is anything but those comforting terms. Kelly Watson is
showing her work that chronicles her journey living with
cancer at Exhibit/208 this Friday, April 14, in addition
to another exhibition Good to Go, showcasing the
works of Heidi Pollard. Watson will be presenting her
testimony of this incredible undertaking through prints,
photography and multimedia works from 5-8pm,
otherwise stop by Thursday-Saturday from 10am-4pm
until April 29, to see this beautifully eye-opening show.
ROSE THEATER 1213 B PARKWAY, 7 TO 8:30PM alibi.com/v/4sja. (Renée Chavez) a
EXHIBIT/208 208 BROADWAY SE, 5 TO 8PM alibi.com/v/4u8x. (Rini
Grammer) a
WEDNESDAY APRIL 19
SATURDAY APRIL 15
YOUTH OF THE NATION
SEEN THE LIGHT?
LIFE’S A COSMIC JOKE
I have begun fasting in preparation for the Bacon, Beer
and Blues festival at the Balloon Fiesta Park this
Saturday, Apr. 15. My tummy will be an empty vessel,
poised to receive the bacon-themed delicacies of 50
local restaurants, food trucks, bakeries, and gourmet
food companies and the sudsy products of 12 local
craft breweries. But more importantly: My spirit will be
purified and ready to accept the unmitigated truth
dished out by three of the best local blues bands.
Tickets are $8 for general admission and $35 for a
Bacon & Beer Premier Pass. The party starts at 11am. I
will be avoiding the eating contest. Competition mars
the spiritual journey, you know. BALLOON FIESTA PARK 5000
And if you live for the laughs, you’ll want to
make absolutely sure you cop a ticket for the
11th Annual Southwest FunnyFest. This
year’s lineup includes four funny women
whose names you might recognize from Conan
or The Tonight Show, like Dana Goldberg and
Erin Foley. Not only will you get to hear fresh
material from the nation’s finest, but a portion
of the proceeds from this event held at the
KiMo Theatre go toward New Mexico AIDS
Services. Even the price tag of $22-$32 is
laughably little for seeing such top talent this
Saturday, April 15, at 7:30pm. KIMO THEATRE
BALLOON FIESTA PARKWAY NE, 11AM TO 5PM alibi.com/v/4t6q. (Joshua
Lee) a
423 CENTRAL NW, 7:30 TO 10PM alibi.com/v/4trn.
(Maggie Grimason) a
PHOTO BY JOHNNY GOMEZ
The New Mexico Office of African American Affairs and Warehouse 508 have come together to teach kids that
being an artist can be a viable way to live through a series of five workshops called Youth Engagement.
Beginning this Saturday, April 15, kids from 11-20 can learn how to identify skills attained through hobbies
that can be used for income. A lot of artistic hobbies are often regarded as “just for fun” when the skills
learned can be used in many careers like therapy, marketing, graphic and interior design, just to name a few.
The workshops cover hip-hop dance, financial literacy, poetry, t-shirt printing and social justice art. The dates
following this Saturday’s event are April 22, May 13 and May 20. These free workshops require a
reservation—call Shaina Saint-Lôt at (505) 383-6215 or email her at shaina.saintlot@state.nm.us to put
yourself or your child’s name on the list, only 40 kids can join each workshop date—which lasts from 10am to
3pm. WAREHOUSE 508 508 FIRST STREET NW, 10AM TO 3PM alibi.com/v/4uhs. (Rini Grammer) a
YEE-HAW!
First, the genre of Americana is growing in influence and popularity across the USA. Second, my old pal Brett
Sparks (The Handsome Family) reminded me that the genre was originally a marketing ploy devised by countryWestern radio industry types who wanted a broader audience. With that in mind, it’s high time you sauntered down
to a place where you can get a load of some real American music. On Wednesday, April 19, that place is Sister.
Steve Hammond & his High Plains Grifters will be playing a show with the UNM Honky Tonk Ensemble, as well
as The Tumbleweeds. Hammond (Leeches of Lore) is a cultural treasure whose intense interest in honky tonk has
sounded new sonic alarms across the city. The college folks are led by Dr. Kristina Jacobsen, a musicologist with a
flair for bringing our nation’s folk traditions to the fore. The Tumbleweeds feature a traditional Western swing
ensemble fronted by legendary Texan fiddler Joe Carter. So, if you wanna be witness to the real deal—not the radiofriendly version—you ought to go; for 21+ cowpokes, it’ll be free to park your horse and leave your spurs at the
door. SISTER 407 CENTRAL NW, 7PM alibi.com/v/4twz. (August March) a
Compiled by Megan Reneau. Submit your events at alibi.com/events.
[10]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
Join us for New Mexico’s
Premier B2B Event of the Year.
APRIL 25, 2017
Isleta Resort & Casino
NETWORKING • FOOD & DRINKS • ROUNDTABLES
REGISTER BY 04/14 TO SAVE $12
505.828.0574 | B2BExpoNM.com
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[11]
Calendar | Community
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
THURSDAY APRIL 13
FLYING STAR CAFÉ Fundraiser Night. Ten percent of sales are
donated to A Light in the Night, a local organization providing
clothing and toiletries for the homeless. 8000 Paseo Del Norte NE.
5-8pm. 923-4211. alibi.com/v/4u8k.
FRIENDS MEETING HOUSE Albuquerque Wildlife Federation
Monthly Meeting. Miya King-Flaherty speaks about her group’s
Chaco Canyon campaign to stop gas fracking near the national
historic park. 1600 Fifth Street NW. 7:30-9pm. ALL-AGES!
463-0125. alibi.com/v/4u9d.
SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Santa Fe Tax Assistance.
Income tax preparation assistance in partnership with the AARP
Foundation’s Tax-Aide. 6401 Richards. 8:30am-5:30pm.
ALL-AGES! 428-1780. alibi.com/v/4ode.
UNM STUDENT UNION BUILDING International Festival.
Experience the great energy, rhythm and colors of the world
through performances, international food and global artisans.
1 University of New Mexico. 10am-2pm. ALL-AGES! 277-4032.
alibi.com/v/4tp4. See Event Horizon.
Indulge your animal instinct with an adults-only tour of the sexual happenings
and habits of the ABQ BioPark Zoo animals. Our resident experts will divulge
the details of the curious romantic rituals and strategies of animals.
Tickkets include ZZooo admission,
on, a 2-hour tour
o r, hearty appetizers
rss, and adult bevverages.
WELLNESS/FITNESS
ALBUQUERQUE VIPASSANA CENTER Meditation Gathering.
Meditation followed by a discussion. Chairs and cushions are
provided. 200 Rosemont NE. Donations encouraged. 6:30-8pm.
alibi.com/v/4geu.
Saturday, April 15, 6 - 8 p.m.
CONSERVATORY OF FLAMENCO ARTS Adult Flamenco Intro Classes.
Train in flamenco and gain the tools to advance through the program.
1620 Central SE. 6-7pm. 242-7600. alibi.com/v/4ogk.
Tickets $50/adult, $45 NMBPS Members (21+ only)
GITANA GARAGE STUDIO Flamenco Class. Develop beautiful
arms and footwork rhythms with flamenco music. 225 Hermosa NE.
$10. 5:30pm. ALL-AGES! 544-9804. alibi.com/v/4slc.
Space is limited! Please visit www.abqbiopark.com/likeananimal to get your tickets today.
www.abqbiopark.com | BioPark Education: 505-764-6214
Cultural Services Department, City of Albuquerque, Richard J. Berry, Mayor
For general information, please call 311 or 505-768-2000 (Relay NM or 711)
HILAND DANCE STUDIO Salsa Basics For The Beginner.
Fundamental skills that set a strong foundation for your understanding of the timeless dance. 7-8pm. 13+. alibi.com/v/4rlf.
Also, Bachata. Learn about the basics of this Latin dance and
Dominican music. 8-9pm. 13+. alibi.com/v/4rmx. Also, Body
Movement and Isolation. Explore a variety of movements while
focusing on control, balance and strength. 130 Jackson NE. $12.
9-10:15pm. 13+. 268-1558. alibi.com/v/4roe.
KADAMPA MEDITATION CENTER NEW MEXICO Healthy Love.
Gain deep insights into the nature of love and attachment with
Buddhist wisdom. 142 Monroe NE. $10. 7-8:30pm. ALL-AGES!
292-5293. alibi.com/v/4spe.
MANZANO MESA MULTI-GEN CENTER Wise Women Belly Dance.
Perform basic techniques of this ancient dance form. 501 Elizabeth SE.
$5-$10. 6-7pm. ALL-AGES! 280-3638. alibi.com/v/4fpw.
SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Santa Fe Tax Assistance.
6401 Richards. 8:30am-5:30pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing.
TAYLOR RANCH LIBRARY Kite Making Demo. Members of the
Alta Mira Kite Fest teach how and afterwards make your own
unique kite from recycled materials. 5700 Bogart NW.
11:30am-1pm. ALL-AGES! 768-5170. alibi.com/v/4sa8.
KIDS
ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY Family Art
Workshop. Create art with your family. 2000 Mountain NW. $1-$4.
1-2:30pm. ALL-AGES! 243-7255. alibi.com/v/4tdl.
CONSERVATORY OF FLAMENCO ARTS Baby Flamenco Classes.
This class utilizes techniques to develop rhythm and coordination
for beginning flamenco dancers, ages 3-5 years old. 10-11am.
alibi.com/v/4oj6. Also, Child Intro to Flamenco Classes. A basic
introduction to the skills and processes of flamenco that prepare
students to advance through the curriculum. 1620 Central SE.
11am-noon. 242-7600. alibi.com/v/4oim.
SOUTH BROADWAY LIBRARY Alice in Wonderland. Watch the
2010 movie in the youth section. Children must be accompanied
by an adult. 1025 Broadway SE. 3-5pm. ALL-AGES! 764-1742.
alibi.com/v/4u8m.
UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO, The Rotunda, UNM Science and
Technology Park Global One to One Youth Summit. High school
students learn about issues affecting refugees and immigrants
in the community, share and listen to each other’s stories and
plan positive action steps to make the community welcoming
and supportive to all. 801 University SE. 9:30am-3pm. 13+.
255-2042. alibi.com/v/4tu3.
WAREHOUSE 508 Youth Engagement. Kids identify their skills
while learning about themselves, how to approach different
activities with an economic mindset and find hobbies that
are inherently valuable. 508 First Street NW. 10am-3pm.
ALL-AGES! 379-6071. alibi.com/v/4uhs. See Event Horizon.
LEARN
ABQ BIOPARK ZOO BioPark Behind-the-Scenes Tour: Elephants.
Keepers explain their elephant training and share in depth and
personal stories about each of the six Asian elephants.
1:15-2:15pm. alibi.com/v/4rrm. Also, BioPark Behind-the-Scenes
Tours: Rhinos and Giraffes. Come face to face with some of the
most curious and endearing animals on a keeper-guided adventure. 903 10th Street SW. $75. 1:15-2:15pm. ALL-AGES!
764-6297. alibi.com/v/4rsb.
JUAN TABO PUBLIC LIBRARY Seed Saving Basics. Garden planning, times to harvest and storage tips are covered. 3407 Juan
Tabo NE. 2-3:30pm. ALL-AGES! 291-6260. alibi.com/v/4u8l.
NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENCE
Owls in the Land of Enchantment. Featuring photography by
Dennis Dusenbery and specimens from New Mexico Musuem
of Natural History and Science and the Museum of Southwestern
Biology at UNM. 1801 Mountain NW. $4-$8. 9am-5pm.
841-2861. alibi.com/v/4uao.
SPORTS/OUTDOOR
MAPLE STREET DANCE SPACE Zumba. An aerobic dance class
set to hip-hop, soca, samba, salsa, merengue and mambo music.
3215 Central NE. $5. 5:25-6:25pm. ALL-AGES! 977-8881.
alibi.com/v/4n2k.
CENTURY 14 DOWNTOWN Downtown Walking Tour. Learn about
the diverse settlers and their contributions to local history.
100 Central SW. 10am-noon. ALL-AGES! 289-0586.
alibi.com/v/4oot.
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FLAMENCO Flamenco Fit and Fabulous.
Introduction to an adult flamenco experience. No experience necessary. 1620 Central SE. 6-7pm. 13+. 242-7600. alibi.com/v/4o66.
EXPO NEW MEXICO Roller Derby. Albuquerque Roller Derby goes
head to head against the New Texican Lionesses. 300 San
Pedro NE. 7-9pm. alibi.com/v/4tkp.
STUDIO SWAY 5Rhythms Sweat. Learn about movement meditation. 1100 San Mateo NE. $13. 7-9pm. ALL-AGES! 847-5860.
alibi.com/v/4uex.
MENAUL TRAILHEAD Open Space Spring Clean-up. Trash pickup, graffiti removal, trail maintenance and morning refreshments
provided. Door prizes for the most interesting trash found each
Saturday. East of Tramway on Menaul Blvd. 8:30am-12:30pm.
alibi.com/v/4t6v.
FRIDAY APRIL 14
SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Santa Fe Tax Assistance.
6401 Richards. 8:30am-5:30pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing.
KIDS
EXPLORA! Maker Camp: School’s Out. Spend a day off from
school tinkering, experimenting and building with hinges, gears
and circuits for grades K-5. 1701 Mountain NW. $75-$90.
9am-4:30pm. 224-8341. alibi.com/v/4ugt.
WELLNESS/FITNESS
GITANA GARAGE STUDIO Flamenco Class. 225 Hermosa NE.
$10. 5:30pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing.
SATURDAY APRIL 15
BALLOON FIESTA PARK Bacon, Beer and Blues. Discover
creative bacon dishes, taste local craft beer, enjoy live music,
take part in bacon-themed games, an eating contest and
more. 5000 Balloon Fiesta Parkway NE. $0-$35. 11am-5pm.
301-2418. alibi.com/v/4t6q. See Event Horizon.
OPEN SPACE VISITOR CENTER Lions and Hikers and Bears, Oh
My. US Forest Service Wildlife Biologist Daryl Ratajczak teaches
about bear and cougar behavior and what to do to stay safe
while travelling through their habitats. 6500 Coors NW. 1-3pm.
897-8831. alibi.com/v/4ubt.
UNM CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF COURSE Easter Scramble. Proceeds
earned from the tournament go to Albuquerque Christian School
for educational enrichments, building improvements and more.
3601 University SE. $120. 8am-2pm. ALL-AGES! 379-6967.
alibi.com/v/4pmj.
VALLE DE ORO NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Birding and
Breakfast. Enjoy a light breakfast followed by a tour of the refuge
led by experienced birders. Registration recommended.
7851 Second Street SW. 7-10am. ALL-AGES! 933-3230.
alibi.com/v/4sys.
WELLNESS/FITNESS
BACHECHI OPEN SPACE Wyrush Gathering. Conversation and meditation that helps with self-realization. 9521 Rio Grande NW. $35.
12:30-5:30pm. ALL-AGES! (970) 901-8080. alibi.com/v/4u7w.
Compiled by Megan Reneau and Taylor Grabowsky. Submit your events at alibi.com/events.
[12]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
Calendar | Community
CONSERVATORY OF FLAMENCO ARTS Adult Flamenco Intro
Classes. 1620 Central SE. 6-7pm. See 4/13 listing.
GITANA GARAGE STUDIO Flamenco Class. 225 Hermosa NE.
$10. 5:30pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing.
LLOYD SHAW DANCE CENTER International Folk Dance. Learn
the basic steps of folkdances from around the world.
5506 Coal SE. $2. 7-10pm. 299-0332. alibi.com/v/4imj.
MAPLE STREET DANCE SPACE Speakeasy Swing. Learn the
basics of swing dance without a partner. Go online for the entrance
password. 3215 Central NE. $5-$6. 8:15-11:15pm. ALL-AGES!
366-4982. alibi.com/v/4bf5.
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FLAMENCO Flamenco Fit and Fabulous.
1620 Central SE. 9-10am. 13+. See 4/13 listing.
UNM NORTH GOLF COURSE Running Medicine Spring 2017
Season. Build community through walking and running with
people of all ages, ability and fitness levels. 2201 Tucker NE.
$15. 9am. ALL-AGES! 340-5658. alibi.com/v/4s74.
SUNDAY APRIL 16
KIDS
BACHECHI OPEN SPACE Family Fun. Crafts, outdoor activities
and experiments offered to deepen knowledge of the natural
world. 9521 Rio Grande NW. Noon-5pm. ALL-AGES! 314-0398.
alibi.com/v/4thj.
KADAMPA MEDITATION CENTER NEW MEXICO Meditation for
Kids. Kids 4-13 learn how to build a space of inner strength and
confidence by developing their good qualities. 142 Monroe NE.
$3. 10-11:30am. 292-5293. alibi.com/v/4tvx.
LEARN
ABQ BIOPARK ZOO Spring Fling Enrichment. Watch as zookeepers
give the animals paper mache chicks, bunnies, tissue paper
flowers and other fun spring-themed items. 903 10th Street SW.
$0-$13. 9:30-11:30am. ALL-AGES! 764-6214. alibi.com/v/4gl5.
WELLNESS/FITNESS
ALBUQUERQUE VIPASSANA CENTER Meditation Gathering.
200 Rosemont NE. Donations encouraged. 6:30-8pm. See 4/13
listing.
KADAMPA MEDITATION CENTER NEW MEXICO World Peace
Meditation. Bring more peace and happiness into the world by
learning to cherish others, overcome anger and deal with stress
through meditation. 142 Monroe NE. $10. 10-11:30am.
ALL-AGES! 292-5293. alibi.com/v/4tw2.
HOTEL ALBUQUERQUE A Toast to Kim Posich. Celebrate the New
Mexico Center on Law and Poverty’s Executive Director. Happy
hour and a spoken word performance by Carlos Contreras. 800 Rio
Grande NW. 5-7pm. ALL-AGES! 255-2840. alibi.com/v/4uhv.
SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Santa Fe Earth Day Resource
Fair. Meet with local community organizations whose efforts and
contributions help sustain the well-being of the planet.
6401 Richards. 10am-2pm. ALL-AGES! 428-1266.
alibi.com/v/4tx3.
WELLNESS/FITNESS
CONSERVATORY OF FLAMENCO ARTS Adult Flamenco Intro
Classes. 1620 Central SE. 6-7pm. See 4/13 listing.
HILAND DANCE STUDIO Salsa Essentials: Ladies Techniques.
Focus on fundamental and essential skills necessary to become
stronger in partner dance. 7-8pm. alibi.com/v/4qnk. Also, Spin
and Turning Techniques. Develop control, strength and balance
on the dancefloor. $12. 8-9pm. 13+. alibi.com/v/4qp1. Also,
Body Movement and Isolation. 130 Jackson NE. $12. 9-10pm.
13+. See 4/13 listing. 268-1558.
MAPLE STREET DANCE SPACE Zumba. 3215 Central NE. $5.
5:25-6:25pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing.
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FLAMENCO Flamenco Fit and Fabulous.
1620 Central SE. 6-7pm. 13+. See 4/13 listing.
WEDNESDAY APRIL 19
CANVAS ARTISTRY KITCHEN MUSIC ART BAR Indivisible Nob
Hill Weekly Meeting. Progressive precinct training to energize the
community and inject the State Democratic Party with an active
and conscientious, progressive voice. 3120 Central SE.
5:30-6:30pm. 18+. 350-3323. alibi.com/v/4pxf.
KIDS
ALAMOSA LIBRARY Creative Movement. Children learn basic
dance concepts such as rhythm, balance, shape, imagination
and more. For ages 2-4. 6900 Gonzales SW. 10-10:30am.
768-5170. alibi.com/v/4sac.
LEARN
FAT PIPE ABQ Startup School by Y Combinator. Lectures about
becoming a successful entrepreneur followed by a group discussion. 200 Broadway NE. 3:30-4:30pm. ALL-AGES! 219-0757.
alibi.com/v/4th6.
MAPLE STREET DANCE SPACE Zumba. 3215 Central NE. $5.
11am-noon. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing.
GREATER ALBUQUERQUE HABITAT FOR HUMANITY RESTORE
Making Money Online in the Sharing Economy. Review online
opportunities such as Snapgoods and Lyft, plus Leslye Sneider
shares her positive experiences hosting an Airbnb.
4900 Menaul NE. Noon-1pm. 18+. 353-2423. alibi.com/v/4u77.
OPEN SPACE VISITOR CENTER Yoga with a View. A guided yoga
class in a unique setting overlooking 18 acres of agricultural
fields. All abilities and levels welcome. 6500 Coors NW. $5-$15.
8:30-10am. 897-8831. alibi.com/v/4pft.
SOUTH VALLEY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CENTER Become a
Community Interpreter. Orientation for bilingual community
members interested in starting a career in interpretation.
318 Isleta SW. 6-7:30pm. 18+. 596-0592. alibi.com/v/4u6u.
SANI YOGA Trauma Sensitive Yin Yoga. Instructor registered yoga
teacher and has advanced trauma sensitive trainings including
trauma informed yoga therapy. 521 Central NW. $5. 7pm. 18+.
alibi.com/v/4ug5.
WELLNESS/FITNESS
MONDAY APRIL 17
LEARN
KESHET CENTER FOR THE ARTS Intellectual Property Law for
Arts Entrepreneurs. Discuss concerns and ideas and talk to
mentors in the arts business field, including Intellectual Property
Attorney, Diane Albert. 4121 Cutler NE. $25. 11am-12:30pm.
ALL-AGES! 221-5168. alibi.com/v/4udo.
WELLNESS/FITNESS
HILAND DANCE STUDIO Salsa Rhythm and Timing. Learn about
the different instruments that make up a salsa song and connect
better to the music through dance. 7:30-8:30pm. 13+.
alibi.com/v/4qjv. Also, Salsa Level One. Build on the fundamentals
of salsa dancing by reinforcing the basic steps, essential footwork,
turning and spin techniques, and leading and following methods.
130 Jackson NE. $12. 8:30-9:30pm. 13+. 268-1558.
alibi.com/v/4qm3.
ST. TIMOTHY’S LUTHERAN CHURCH Silent Meditation Group.
One hour of silence for meditators of strong determination.
211 Jefferson NE. 6pm. ALL-AGES! 450-3409. alibi.com/v/4fil.
TUESDAY APRIL 18
EPICENTER ABQ Impact and Coffee. Nonprofit leaders, volunteers,
board members, funders and people who want to find their place
in the social impact community meet up. 119 Gold SW. 9-10am.
alibi.com/v/4rqw.
AFRICAN AMERICAN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, Expo NM 90Day Health Challenge Finale. Soul food potluck, prizes, contest
winners and more. Food catered by Bobbi’s Homestyle Cooking.
310 San Pedro NE. 6-8pm. ALL-AGES! 383-6216. alibi.com/v/4omz.
ECKANKAR CENTER Explore Your Inner Worlds. Learn about spiritual experiences, dreams, past life recall and soul travel.
2501 San Pedro NE. Noon-2pm. ALL-AGES! 265-7388.
alibi.com/v/4u0e.
GITANA GARAGE STUDIO Flamenco Class. 225 Hermosa NE.
$10. 5:30pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing.
HILAND DANCE STUDIO Salsa On Two Footwork. Introduction
to a variety of footwork techniques while learning to improve your
sense of rhythm and timing. 130 Jackson NE. $12. 7:30-8:30pm.
13+. 268-1558. alibi.com/v/4rig.
JUAN TABO PUBLIC LIBRARY Put the Zippity Back in Your Doo
Dah. Learn about recent developments in nutritional health and
how it effects every aspect of your life. 3407 Juan Tabo NE.
6-7pm. 18+. 292-8832. alibi.com/v/4stb.
MAPLE STREET DANCE SPACE Dirty Girls Flash Mob Dance
Exercise Class. Participants learn a one-song routine and perform
it in a surprise public dance eruption. Taught by local bestselling
author and Starz TV producer, Alisa Valdes. $10. 4-5pm. 13+.
alibi.com/v/4jmj. Also, Zumba. 3215 Central NE. $5.
5:25-6:25pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing. 559-3100.
REMEDY DAY SPA Acroyoga Fundamentals. Learn basing, flying
and spotting techniques in partner acrobatics with a yoga
consciousness creating a playful, creative practice that brings
people together for fun, trust and balance. 113 Vassar SE. $5-$12.
7:15-9pm. 13+. 265-9219. alibi.com/v/4o2e.
ST. TIMOTHY’S LUTHERAN CHURCH Silent Meditation Group.
211 Jefferson NE. 6pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/17 listing.
Compiled by Megan Reneau and Taylor Grabowsky. Submit your events at alibi.com/events.
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[13]
[14]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
ERIC WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHY
featuRe | tattOO
Top: Joshua “Bedo” Escobedo, Bottom: Portion of leg sleever (Route 66)
Portion of leg sleeve (Rogue)
Colored Ink Via the Black Rooster
Playing witness at the tat shop
BY RENÉE CHAVEZ
A
s soon as I walk into Gallo Negro Tattoo
Studio (203 Rio Grande NW), the smallest
bones in my body begin rattling with the
buzz of a tattoo machine. The space is larger that
it appears on the outside and every inch of wall is
covered with art—traditional flash, painted
skateboards, rooster murals, Bob Marley posters,
Japanese tigers, Air Force pinup girls and a
picture of an old-timey tattooed lady
proclaiming, “I’m old enough to know better, but
young enough to do it anyway.” I sit down on a
creaky wooden church pew that’s older than I am
and get ready to watch a total stranger get
tattooed. Joshua “Bedo” Escobedo putters around
his roomy station in the back, preparing for work
while I pepper him with questions.
I learn that he got into tattooing in a
roundabout way—he wanted to be a piercer, and
succeeded in becoming one before sidestepping
into tattooing to pay the bills. He apprenticed for
three years in his brother’s shop, Elite Custom
Tattoo Studio, in Scottsdale, Ariz. “He had
plenty of great artists pass through the shop. I
pulled knowledge out of each and every one, and
thank each one for the opportunity,” Bedo tells
me. The first full tattoo he completed was a
minuscule hiker’s boot print that no one else in
the shop wanted to touch. Unaware that he
should be afraid of something so small and
precise, he hammered it out perfectly and got the
bug—the satisfaction that comes with seeing
someone walk out the door with your artwork
indelibly pressed into their skin.
While setting up a bottle of woodsy-smelling
green soap, tiny ink cups and bluish needles
sterilized with ethylene oxide gas, Bedo details
that he always drew here and there, was good but
not great in art classes. And that’s when I realize
you don’t necessarily have to be an art prodigy to
be a tattooer. Sure, you’ve got to have a certain
level of raw skill, but you also have to be willing
to put in good old-fashioned work. I ask what he
thinks it takes to be a legitimate tattooer, to
which he responds, “I guess the short answer is:
Be licensed by the state.” But he’s motivated by
more than just bureaucracy and license papers
and logged hours: “Aside from [always] working
to be a better artist, you have to have many
things like [being] prompt, being responsible and
having ethics—I mean, we are permanently
marking someone for life.” Precision is important,
and Bedo is disdainful of anyone who cuts
corners: He says the most important qualities of
an expert tattoo are layout, flow on the body,
quality of design, clean lines, solid fill and
smooth gradients. Considering all these skills and
the creativity that pulls it all together, the $125
per hour minimum starts to sound pretty damn
fair. Plus tip, of course.
Today’s human canvas is Christy McCool, a
costume designer with an extensive and
impressive leg sleeve in progress. She’s a little
late, but arrives bearing fresh-made soup for
Bedo, along with a million other accoutrements
that show this isn’t her first rodeo—far from it.
Pillows, snacks, music and reading material are all
a must when you’re sitting in a plastic-wrapped
chair for as long as she does. I soon get a glimpse
of the work du jour. The front-top panel of her
leg is covered by a colorful Día de los Muertos
woman (based on a picture of herself in costume
on Halloween); this image flows down into a
bright ’90s Jim Lee-esque X-Men scene featuring
Rogue flying over a cityscape. The back of her leg
leeches into a black and gray Route 66 collage
with arrows, road signs and a pinup girl. The topback panel of her leg is again shaded with
another Día de los Muertos woman. Bedo
illuminates various ways of merging one tattoo
into another, such as flow movement, matching
color values and similar background themes. He
ballparks his work on the leg sleeve at around 26
hours total with sessions lasting up to 7 hours at
one time. Clearly, McCool is a trooper.
Finally, purple gloves on, tiny pots of white,
black, robin’s egg blue and vivid orange waiting,
Bedo revs the machine gun and leans forward to
begin the process. The two chat about their kids
and summer. Music plays. Other artists come to
catch up with McCool since her last session.
Customers walk by to proudly show off their
shiny, new ink.
Hypnotized by the buzz of the machine, I
meditate on the repetitive process: Dip the
needles in the ink. Buzz. Buzz. Buzzzzzz. Swipe
with the green soap—the scent gets stronger and
stronger. Dip, buzz, swipe, repeat. Rinse between
colors. After a while, microbeads of ruby blood
occasionally well up, only to be quickly blotted
and have their enzymes broken down by the
medical-grade cleansing agent. The skyscrapers
below Rogue become dark and brooding, and the
night wind curling between the buildings takes
on life. That’s the magic. Even as my eyes are
beginning to glaze over from the repetition, this
artist in front of me is precisely and skillfully
pushing new life into already living tissue. And
perhaps that’s why we get tattoos—to feel a little
more soul under our mortal skin. a
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[15]
ARTS | CULTURE SHOCK
COMIC REVIEW
BY MIKEE RIGGS
Stranger in a Strange Land
Aleister and Adolf
BY MIKEE RIGGS
In varying degrees, evil
can be viewed as
subjective. What
someone may perceive as
a monster, another
person could see as tame.
Aleister and Adolf seeks
to show you just that.
While the book is by no
means saying Adolf Hitler
wasn’t evil, it does paint
Aleister Crowley in a
better light. To some,
Crowley is a man of pure
evil. Perhaps the most
famous occultist, Crowley’s views are often seen as
controversial. In Aleister and Adolf Crowley is painted
as a deep thinker who at times is very self-centered,
but is certainly not evil; in this way, the work is a
breath of fresh air.
Aleister and Adolf is a work of historical fiction by
Douglas Rushkoff and Michael Avon Oeming. At the
very beginning of the book, Rushkoff notes “Most of
the stuff in this story really happened. The rest may
as well have,” implying that the overall story being
used to share the facts is an interpretation, but only
to a certain degree. The story begins in 1995 with
Roberts, a young web developer, attempting to
transfer a logo for a company online. The logo is
thought to be corrupted, so he goes looking for
answers from its original designer. Instead of an easy
answer, he finds a story that takes place during World
War II involving Aleister Crowley, who is attempting
to manipulate and in turn defeat the Nazis. The logo’s
designer is working for the army and has been tasked
with coercing Crowley into helping America seize an
item dubbed the Spear of Destiny from Hitler.
Roberts soon finds himself sliding deep into a rabbit
hole of sexual ritual and occult beliefs.
The story itself revolves around the power and
deeper meaning of symbols. Crowley is convinced the
swastika is feeding Hitler’s power and in turn, tries to
come up with a strong symbol that can counteract it.
The book spends a lot of time digging into the power
of symbolism and uses it as a means to show
Roberts’ descent into occultism.
Rushkoff’s writing in this graphic novel is
astounding. He creates well-crafted characters and
uses them expertly to move the story along. The
story itself is rich, complex and well researched.
Rushkoff has taken the time to learn the subject
matter and does it justice without making it seem at
all hokey. He manages to tackle Crowley, occultism,
the Holocaust and iconography without once making
the story feel muddy or bogged down.
Backing up this strong plot and taking it to the
next level is the art of Michael Avon Oeming. Oeming
has been developing his talent for decades now. His
work on Powers solidified him as a business mainstay
as well as one of the contemporary greats. In Aleister
and Adolf, Oeming does some of his best work to
date. His style is sharp and concise, making the story
even more engaging. His panel work is something to
be marveled at. Throughout the book, Oeming
creates amazing two- and single-page layouts that
jump off the paper. His style is stark but compelling,
creating a whole that is nothing short of brilliant.
Aleister and Adolf’s art alone could be viewed as a
master class in graphic storytelling.
Overall, this is a strong story about what’s on the
surface and what meanings are hidden. It asks you to
look past its source material and ask questions about
the world around you. In a time where questioning
what you see is as important as ever, Aleister and
Adolf is a must-read book. a
Aleister and Adolf
By Douglas Roushkoff, Illustrated by Michael Avon
Oeming
Dark Horse Originals
88 pages
$19.99
[16]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
Shing Yin Khor brings an outer space apothecary to Old Earth
BY MAGGIE GRIMASON
he antique Edison bulb flared in the
rebuilt wooden gashapon as I cranked
the lever. One turn, and a fortune, as
divined by LA-based artist Shing Yin Khor,
was dropped into my palm. I opened it
carefully and uncurled the yellowed paper.
“You are a forgotten protagonist,” it read,
“but not for long.” “Wow, that’s actually
one of the more positive ones,” Khor
laughed as I read it aloud, meanwhile, her
scruffy little dog, Bug, paced about our feet.
We settled on two wooden crates (built
by Khor herself) in the gallery space of
Stranger Factory in Nob Hill to discuss the
fantastical worlds that Khor creates in her
work. Bug settled on my lap as I tapped the
record button on my phone.
Khor was in the middle of her install
process, and so we sat straddling two
worlds—the one we know, and the future,
outer space world that her imagination
inhabits much of the time. Cabinets of
curiosities filled with monsters, mysterious
diagrams, obscure medicines, alien
specimens and space detritus already lined
a portion of the wall behind me. “People
remember,” Khor said about the concept
for her month-long exhibition at the space,
Apothecary: An Introduction to Ritual and
Tradition in the Outer Colonies of Space,
“They remember Old Earth. The idea of
this whole thing is humanity trying to
make sense of a world that is falling apart.
A lot of people are just looking to the past,
and they’re like, ‘How did people make
sense of the world centuries ago?’” Ritual,
tradition, understanding—and how people
access these things—interests Khor, and
they emerge in Apothecary in interesting
ways. Here there are new methods of
divination, a trove of pseudo-science
ephemera and ancient medicines bisected
by a Space Age, albeit fringe, world.
“I had been building these haunted
house installations out in the desert,” Khor
explained of the genesis of this work,
“essentially placing this little immersive
universe out in the middle of nowhere. Last
summer I did an installation called Last
Apothecary and took it to Burning Man.”
The installation was the ramshackle home
of Theodore Lee, an intergalactic eccentric
who set off for the messy, frontier lands of
the Outer Colonies and started building a
wacky collection of medicines and
memorabilia in his home. Visitors entered
as explorers of the abandoned site in the
aftermath of Lee’s death. “This,” Khor
gestured to the works she has created—
handcrafted monsters, alien phrenology
heads, divination boards and so much
more—“is a little bit of a sequel to that.”
T
Space oddity from Khor’s installation at Stranger Factory
In this particular installation, the story has
progressed. Lee’s daughter has left the “tightly
controlled, clean lined, very lit Inner
Colonies” for the Outer Colonies that “are full
of space hobos and junk.” When she reaches
her father’s empty home, she has a series of
revelations about who he was—a really
interesting person, although “gullible as hell”
as Khor described. She wants to take her
father’s trove back to the Inner Colonies to
study, but she needs money along the way. “So,
here we are!” Khor laughed. And so, we along
the way, are privy to the apothecary’s private
collection. There are specimens from a lost
planet called Oceanus, a compendium of space
hobo codes, dental casts of humanoid species,
a gazillion specimens of strange creatures,
palmistry models for unfamiliar hands (like the
paw of a “cat-like humanoid,” sporting nine
life lines). It wasn’t even fully installed, and I
was already immersed in the world Khor was
creating.
Khor’s background is in theater (though she
works in many mediums; she even recently
finished a graphic novel), where she learned
many of the technical skills needed to be a
prop maker. She made a living in the theater
world, but eventually got a more run-of-themill day job, which was important because
then, for the first time, she started sculpting
for fun. It was at that time that alien creatures
began to take shape in her workshop, and,
“Once you start down a certain path, you end
up opening up so many other paths,” Khor
explained of how the world she has created
becomes continually more expansive. “I kind
of got obsessed with these spaces that really
absorbed you in their world,” she continued.
“The idea that you can build immersive sets
and allow the audience to be the actors in
SHING YIN KHOR
them … Being a story teller and a sculptor and
a theater person, it was like, ‘Oh my God, this
is so obvious!’ Why not put all these things
that I do into one thing that I love?’” And so,
Theodore Lee was born.
Despite this being largely Lee’s story, Khor’s
comes through, too. “I am an immigrant, my
home country is Malaysia, which has a really
long history of settlement and colonialism,”
she said. “I am fascinated by the sense of
searching and wonderment when we didn’t
have science to tell us what the world was [as
in early cabinets of curiosity]. In a sense, this
was also incredibly destructive, because this
was in the colonial era.” She points out some
text near one of her cabinets, written by Lee’s
daughter, it reads: My father was a complicated
man, I’m not sure that he was a good man.
“Having grown up being surrounded by a lot of
post-colonial detritus, these are things I think
about a lot. They kind of sneak into my work.”
Khor is quick to point out, too, more playful
elements that reflect her in the work. “I’m a
sort of anxious and curious person,” she
described. “All the faces that I’ve sculpted …
these are very anxious faces. None of them are
ever smiling. They’re like, ‘I don’t know what
I’m doing! What am I doing here?’ Which is a
fairly constant theme in my life.”
Khor hopes that visitors might find
themselves just as bewildered when they step
into this world. “That’s sort of my preferred
state,” she explained. “I want everyone to
come with a little bit of curiosity, a sense of
adventure and a little bit of bewilderment.”
And, perhaps most important, to ask
themselves: Who am I in this world? Who
would I be? What sort of person am I? Those
answers, in this curious reflection of our own
world, may be more telling than we realize. a
Calendar | arts & lit
ARTS & LIT
CALENDAR
THURSDAY APRIL 13
WORDS
SATURDAY APRIL 15
WORDS
CONGREGATION NAHALAT SHALOM A World Beyond Borders
Passover Haggadah. Rabbi Lynn Gottlieb presents social justice
storytelling based on her new Passover Haggadah which she
wrote and illustrated. 3606 Rio Grande NW. Donations encouraged. 7pm. ALL-AGES! 343-8227. alibi.com/v/4t5r.
KIMO THEATRE Song of the Lion. Author Anne Hillerman reads
from her upcoming novel about a deadly bombing takes Navajo
Tribal cops and their mentor the legendary Lieutenant Joe
Leaphorn into the past to find a vengeful killer. 423 Central NW.
7-8:30pm. 768-3522. alibi.com/v/4sg5.
GALLERY ABQ Karmic Ash. Enjoy great art, conversation and
refreshments, featuring local author Paul M. Baca who discusses
his creative philosophy and the road that led him to the publication
of his new book. 8210 Menaul NE. 1-4pm. ALL-AGES! 292-9333.
alibi.com/v/4uhh.
STAGE
ART
ADOBE ROSE THEATER, Santa Fe Pie. Apollo Garcia, Danielle
Reddick, John Flax and Tara Khozein come together in a stellar
ensemble cast, dexterously moving between emotionallydriven clownish characters and their buffoon alter-egos.
1213 B Parkway. $5-$25. 7-8:30pm. ALL-AGES! 474-8400.
alibi.com/v/4sja. See Event Horizon.
GRAFT Coddiwomple. An interactive immersive installation set
in an alternate universe. Relax with the cave dwellers, watch the
squabblers at work, play dress up with a variety of hand made
costumes and more. 1415 Fourth Street SW. 6-10pm. ALL-AGES!
alibi.com/v/4toi.
KESHET CENTER FOR THE ARTS The Spitfire Grill. A feisty parolee
follows her dreams to a small town in Wisconsin and finds a
place for herself working at Hannah’s Spitfire Grill. 4121 Cutler NE.
$18-$24. 7:30-9:30pm. 13+. 243-0596. alibi.com/v/4ty6.
NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER The House on Mango
Street. Based on the book by Sandra Cisneros, the stage adaptation by Amy Ludwig is a touching and humorous collection of
vignettes told by a girl growing up in a Latino neighborhood in
Chicago. 1701 Fourth Street SW. $15-$18. 7:30pm. 13+.
724-4771. alibi.com/v/4t95.
SONG & DANCE
OUTPOST PERFORMANCE SPACE Vaivén. A flamenco-jazz fusion
trio featuring internationally acclaimed flamenco guitarist Calvin
Hazen, bassist Jon Gagan and percussionist, Robby Rothschild.
210 Yale SE. $15-$20. 7:30-9:30pm. ALL-AGES! 268-0044.
alibi.com/v/4ppp.
FRIDAY APRIL 14
WORDS
SOUTH BROADWAY LIBRARY The Poet As a Visionary. Poetry
open mic hosted by Mary Oishi, author of Spirit Birds they Told Me.
1025 Broadway SE. 6-7:30pm. ALL-AGES! 764-1742.
alibi.com/v/4u8j.
ART
DOWNTOWN CONTEMPORARY GALLERY Gallery Nights. A presentation of local art, music, film, fashion, comedy and community
organizations, curated by JP Eaglin. 105 Fourth Street SW.
Donations encouraged. 5-9pm. ALL-AGES! 363-3870.
alibi.com/v/4re1.
EXHIBIT/208 Good to Go Opening. Heidi Pollard presents a
personal lexicon of figures and symbols based on drawings,
inspired by forms in the natural world, Buddhist philosophy and
her abiding interest in art of all cultures. Runs through 4/29.
5-8pm. ALL-AGES! alibi.com/v/4u8w. Also, The Best Kind
Opening. Kelly Watson presents her honors thesis show chronicling her journey living with cancer through prints, photo and
works on paper. Runs through 4/29. 208 Broadway SE. 5-8pm.
ALL-AGES! 450-6884. alibi.com/v/4u8x. See Event Horizon.
STAGE
ADOBE ROSE THEATER, Santa Fe Pie. 1213 B Parkway. $5-$25.
7-8:30pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing. See Event Horizon.
UNM CONTINUING EDUCATION BUILDING Spring Craft Show.
Local vendors with gifts for Easter, Mother’s Day, graduations and
weddings. Table fees and raffle proceeds are donated to animal
shelters. 1634 University NE. 8am-3pm. ALL-AGES! (505)
453-7406. alibi.com/v/4u9i.
STAGE
ADOBE ROSE THEATER, Santa Fe Pie. 2-3:30pm. ALL-AGES!
See Event Horizon. Also, 1213 B Parkway. $5-$25. 7-8:30pm.
ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing. See Event Horizon.
AUX DOG THEATRE Much Ado About Nothing. A tale of two couples
dealing with mistaken identities, love, honour, shame and court
politics. 3011 Monte Vista NE. $5-15. 8-10pm. 13+. 254-7716.
alibi.com/v/4szj.
BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE AND IMPROV THEATRE The Show.
100 Gold SW. $10. 9-10pm. See 4/14 listing.
KESHET CENTER FOR THE ARTS The Spitfire Grill. 4121 Cutler NE.
$18-$24. 7:30-9:30pm. 13+. See 4/13 listing.
KIMO THEATRE Eleventh Annual Southwest FunnyFest. Nonstop, side-splitting, no-apologies comedy with four of the
nation’s top female comedians. 423 Central NW. $22-32.
7:30-10pm. 768-3522. alibi.com/v/4trn. See Event Horizon.
MUSICAL THEATRE SOUTHWEST Evita. 6320 Domingo NE.
$20-$22. 7:30pm. 13+. See 4/14 listing.
NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER The House on Mango
Street. 2pm. 13+. Also, 1701 Fourth Street SW. $15-$18.
7:30pm. 13+. See 4/13 listing.
HOTEL ALBUQUERQUE Tablao Flamenco. 800 Rio Grande NW.
8pm. See 4/14 listing.
NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER A Night with Elvis.
Lonnie Yanes as Elvis featuring the local Beatles tribute band,
Twist and Shout. 1701 Fourth Street SW. $5-$47. 7:30-9:30pm.
ALL-AGES! 246-2261. alibi.com/v/4t6w.
SOUTH BROADWAY CULTURAL CENTER ZoZobra Reunion de
Albuquerque. The legendary Chicano band of the ’70s reunites
with special guest Christine V. 1025 Broadway SE. $18. 7-9pm.
848-1320. alibi.com/v/4lya.
SUNDAY APRIL 16
STAGE
KESHET CENTER FOR THE ARTS The Spitfire Grill. 4121 Cutler NE.
$18-$24. 7:30-9:30pm. 13+. See 4/13 listing.
ADOBE ROSE THEATER, Santa Fe Pie. 1213 B Parkway. $5-$25.
2-3:30pm. ALL-AGES! See 4/13 listing. See Event Horizon.
MUSICAL THEATRE SOUTHWEST Evita. A recount of Eva Perón’s
meteoric rise from the slums of Argentina to the presidential
mansion as First Lady. 6320 Domingo NE. $20-$22. 7:30pm.
13+. 265-9119. alibi.com/v/4sy8.
AUX DOG THEATRE Much Ado About Nothing. 3011 Monte
Vista NE. $5-15. 2-4pm. 13+. See 4/15 listing.
NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER The House on Mango
Street. 1701 Fourth Street SW. $15-$18. 7:30pm. 13+. See
4/13 listing.
POPEJOY HALL, UNM Center for the Arts Taj Express. A unique
fusion of dance, film and music exploding with the sights and
sounds of India. 203 Cornell NE. $20-$62. 8pm. ALL-AGES!
277-9771. alibi.com/v/4knm.
SONG & DANCE
HOTEL ALBUQUERQUE Tablao Flamenco. Authentic Spanish
cuisine, beverages and flamenco performances. 800 Rio
Grande NW. 8pm. 242-7600. alibi.com/v/4om5.
OUTPOST PERFORMANCE SPACE Austin Piazzolla Quintet.
Unique arrangements of Astor Piazzolla’s compositions, innovative
original works and fiery improvisation. 210 Yale SE. $15-$20.
7:30-9:30pm. ALL-AGES! 268-0044. alibi.com/v/4ppq.
3r
3rd
dT
Thursday!
hursday!
I
SONG & DANCE
KESHET CENTER FOR THE ARTS The Spitfire Grill. 4121 Cutler NE.
$18-$24. 2-4pm. 13+. See 4/13 listing.
MUSICAL THEATRE SOUTHWEST Evita. 6320 Domingo NE.
$20-$22. 2pm. 13+. See 4/14 listing.
SONG & DANCE
HOTEL ALBUQUERQUE Tablao Flamenco. 800 Rio Grande NW.
6pm. See 4/14 listing.
Wild West
Listen to Country & Western music
from Bob Farrell and Brushfire.
MONDAY APRIL 17
SONG & DANCE
NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER Cervantes: A Quixotic
Quest With Flamenco. A unique performance uniting video, song
and reading that provides a bigger insight into Miguel de
Cervantes’ world. 1701 Fourth Street SW. 7-8:15pm. ALL-AGES!
724-4777. alibi.com/v/4ucm.
3
RD
Create your own original artwork
based on the Hollywood Southwest
exhibition.
At 7 p.m., discover Westerns that have
been filmed in New Mexico with film
historian Jeff Berg, author of New
Me
exico Filmmaking.
April 20, 5 – 8:30 p.m.
3rd Thursday (Free)
Happy Hour specials in the Lobby Lounge and
Grab and Go snack
kss available from 5 – 8 p.m.
from Slate at The Museum. Galleries open.
2000 Mountain Road NW (in Old Town)
505-243-7255 or 311 • Relay NM or 711
cabq.gov/museum
Cultural
Cultur
al Services Department,
Department, City of Albuquerque,
Albuquerqu
ue, Richard
ue
Richard J.
J. Berry,
Berry Mayor
Compiled by Megan Reneau and Taylor Grabowsky. Submit your events at alibi.com/events.
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[17]
FOOD | RestauRant Review
Mountains of Chow
Fresh food—and a lot of it—at Fareast Fuzion
BY TAYLOR GRABOWSKY
n a blustery Sunday afternoon my cousin,
her daughter and I were in need of some
Asian food, so we decided to check out
Fareast Fuzion Sushi Bar and Lounge on
Central and San Mateo. Although the outside
of Fareast doesn’t offer much, the inside is
well-decorated and cozy. Red walls are
adorned with paintings, there are dragon kites
hanging from the ceiling, and a large fish tank
sits behind the sushi bar on the far wall. The
small dining room had only one other full
table, and we were seated in a booth on the
other side of the restaurant. I was surprised
that the place wasn’t busier for a weekend
afternoon, but figured that maybe the A.R.T.
construction had something to do with it.
We were all starving and the extensive
menus (both regular and sushi) were both
welcoming and overwhelming. Our waitress
was very friendly, and we put in our orders for
drinks: Thai iced coffee ($2.50), jasmine tea
and Dr. Pepper (both $1.95), while we mulled
over our choices a little more. The jasmine tea
came with its own teapot, and the Thai iced
coffee came in a milkshake glass. The iced
coffee was very sweet and creamy, it almost
tasted like melted coffee ice cream.
Before hunger took us over completely, we
ordered our food. I chose the sesame chicken
($9.95) that came with a side of white rice
and a choice of a cup of miso or egg drop soup.
I picked the egg drop soup. My cousin got the
red curry with tofu ($9.95), and the little one
chose a classic orange chicken ($9.95), that
also came with a side of rice and she chose the
miso soup. On the sushi menu we ordered a
New Mexico roll ($5.95) and a vegetable
tempura roll ($4.95). It seemed like seconds
after we placed our order that the soups
arrived at our table. The bright
sunshine yellow of the egg
drop soup warmed me up
before I even took a sip.
When I finally dug in,
I was rewarded with
the best egg drop
soup in town. The
broth was not too
thick or too
runny; it had the
perfect texture.
The pieces of egg
were large and
chewy without
being slimy. By the
time I looked up from
my soup, several plates of
food were being placed
upon our table.
My cousins and I gave each other
the same look of determination to finish the
smorgasboard. “I don’t think this is orange
O
[18]
WEEKLY ALIBI APRIL 13-19, 2017
Drunken noodles
chicken. It isn’t all congealed,” my little
cousin exclaimed. We explained to her that
this wasn’t Panda Express, and the large
orange slices lying in the sauce over the
chicken indicated that it was, indeed, orange
chicken. My dish was overflowing with crispy,
crunchy sweet and tangy sesame chicken with
a healthy amount of sauce as well. Our sides of
rice were served in overflowing bowls, and my
cousin’s red curry came in an
oversized bowl.
Both the sushi rolls were
served with our meal, so
we had a lot to take in.
The N.M. roll comes
with a filling of
cucumber, avocado
and tempura-fried
green chile. The
vegetable tempura
roll has the same
filling, just various
tempura-fried
veggies instead of
green chile. Each roll
comes with six to eight
pieces. The tempura in
both rolls added a nice extra
crunch and flavor to them,
while the green chile was my favorite.
Like a true New Mexican, I believe green
ERIC WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHY
Fareast Fuzion Sushi Bar
and Lounge
5901 Central NE
(505) 255-2910
http://pwbportal.us/fareast-fuzion-sushi-barlounge
Hours: Mon-Thu 11am-9pm, Fri 11am-10pm, Sat
noon-10pm, Sun noon-8pm
Vibe: Quiet and cozy
Alibi Recommends: Egg drop soup, drunken noodles
chile can and should be added to every dish.
After several quiet moments only broken by
the occasional utensil hitting a plate, I
remarked at how proud I felt. The sense of
pride that happens when you find a good
restaurant with delicious food that everyone
enjoys. The kind that surfaces when you know
that, even though you didn’t make the food,
you made the decision to order the food.
Nodding in agreement, my cousins also felt
the same way. We left with bellies full of tasty
food, hands full of leftovers we couldn’t finish
and hearts full of misplaced pride.
The second time I went to Fareast to get a
another helping of pride was a Thursday
where I met my friend for lunch, and she
brought her one-year-old son. The place was
still just as empty as the first time I had been
there, and the service was just as quick and
friendly. The waitress offered my friend a
highchair for her son, and my friend remarked
on how family-friendly they were. Hungry and
unable to make a decision, my friend and I
decided to share the sweet and sour chicken
($9.95) and the drunken noodles with tofu
($9.95). We also ordered the Lady in Red roll
($11.95), which has the same filling as the
N.M. roll, but is topped with crab and special
sauce.
Our food came, and yet again I was
overwhelmed at how much we were given and
how high the plates were piled with food.
Nevertheless, we persisted. The sweet and
sour chicken wasn’t overly drenched in sauce,
which was nice. It also came with large slices
of carrots and onions. The surprise star was
the drunken noodles. The tofu was crispy on
the outside and full of flavor, which is not
always the case with tofu. The basil gave a
nice overall flavor to the dish without it being
overpowering. It was spicy, it was savory, and
there was a crispiness in every bite, thanks to
the tofu. Both my friend and I were so
pleasantly surprised by this dish. “I’m
definitely ordering that next time,” she said
when we were leaving. So next time you’re in
the neighborhood, stop by this little
unassuming Asian restaurant next to a used
car lot on Central. Come hungry and leave
proud. a
Chowtown
a rotating guide to restaurants we like
suggest a restaurant or search for more at:
w alibi.com/chowtown
These listings have no connection with Alibi advertising
Top o’
the
Mornin�
DOWNTOWN
THE STANDARD DINER
320 Central SE, 243-1440 • $$$
[American, Dessert] Matt DiGregory, owner of
Range Café, updated this 1938 Texaco Station to
include a modern kitchen, large, sleek, jazz-inspired
dining areas and a small front patio. Think San
Francisco meets downtown Albuquerque. The menu
is composed of upscale comfort food, much of it
using local ingredients, and it’s priced accordingly
(without being too inhibitive). Don’t forget your rockcandy stick to stir your coffee (or just eat off the
stick like you did when The Beach was still around).
FAR NORTHEAST HEIGHTS
FLYING STAR CAFÉ
4501 Juan Tabo NE, 275-8311 • $$
[American, Bakery/Sweets, Deli/Sandwiches,
Coffee/Tea/Espresso, Organic/Locally Grown]
Sure, you go in thinking you’ll be good and get a
skinny latte, scrambled egg whites and a side of
turkey and green chile sausage, but five minutes
later somebody’s saying “apple pie with ice cream”
and the voice is coming from your mouth. Give in. It
tastes good.
THE BREW
311 Gold SW, 363-9453 • $
[Coffee/Tea/Espresso] The Brew makes a lasting
mark with its comfortable seating, low-key, classy
vibe, fantastic baristas and superior beverage menu.
Our favorites include the butter coffee, the red chile
mocha and the cortado—a drink like a concentrated
latté.
GOLD STREET CAFFÉ
218 Gold SW, 765-1633 • $$
[American, Fusion, Mexican, Deli/Sandwiches]
This charming café is probably going to be busy
every morning we try to eat there but it’s totally
worth the wait. They serve up a menu of homey
breakfast favorites like waffles, eggs benedict,
breakfast burritos, huevos and their gold hash, plus
more delicious options for lunch and dinner. We
recommend the portobello mushroom sandwich!
MIDTOWN
Tax preparation
April 17th & 18th, 2017
9AM- 6PM
E-File Available
Tax Season Ending
NAPOLI COFFEE
3035 Menaul NE, 884-5454 • $
[Coffee/Tea/Espresso, Deli/Sandwiches,
Bakery/Sweets] This is the kind of friendly, local
and, above all, comfortable coffee shop that has
become a rare breed since the caffeine-laced
heyday of the mid-’90s. Napoli Coffee offers a warm
and inviting sitting area that makes it a perfect
hangout spot on a chilly winter’s day. You can pick
up all the usual espresso drinks here as well as
sandwiches, burritos and pastries.
Volpert Tax & Accounting
505-453-0590
Est. 2002
Courtyard Marriott (near I-25 and
Paseo del Norte)
Pecos Room
5151 Journal Center Blvd NE
ABQ, NM 87109
NORTH VALLEY
PUEBLO HARVEST CAFÉ
2401 12th Street NW, 724-3510 • $$$
THE GROVE CAFÉ & MARKET
600 Central SE, Suite A, 248-9800 • $$$
[Deli/Sandwiches, Specialty Food Store] This
ray of sunshine in EDo serves gourmet breakfast
and lunch, sells house-made English muffins, and
has a mini-shop filled with goodies like honey, jams,
mustards and vinegars, not to mention non-edibles
like cookbooks, serving vessels and cards. A tiny
wine list is just as chic—five reds and five whites are
marked on a chalkboard, and all are constantly
changing. This list is extremely well thought-out and
offers a sampling of some of the most esoteric
varietals and brands available in Albuquerque.
There’s also a large, shaded patio, incredible housemade cupcakes and too-cute macaroons.
SLATE STREET CAFÉ
515 Slate NW, 243-2210 • $$$
[Fine Dining, Bakery/Sweets, American,
Organic/Locally Grown] Slate is on a quiet, blinkand-you-miss-it avenue between Fifth and Sixth
Street, nestled right in the heart of the legal district.
Like the space itself, the menu is polished and
unintimidating. Don’t miss the ahi tuna sandwich
(with gluten-free bread available!). It’s all very
affordable for its level of quality. There’s also a
fabulous wine loft with the wines listed by style—
“just a little sweet,” “ABC: Anything But Chardonnay”
or “sexy, elegant, austere”—not varietal or region.
Demystifying the label like this makes it easy for
patrons to pair wine and food.
[Native American, New Mexican] Two words: fry
bread. Use this heaping hunk of pillowy carbs to
sop up green or red chile posole, mutton stew and
huevos rancheros. When you’re stuffed tighter than
a stocking on Christmas morning, go check out
what events, classes or dances are going on at the
Indian Pueblo Cultural Center.
OLD TOWN
CENTRAL GRILL AND COFFEE
HOUSE
2056 Central SW, 554-1424
[Diner, New Mexican, American] Central Grill is
one of the crop of new diners that embraces the
aesthetic of yesterday’s greasy spoons while offering
house-made meals with high-quality ingredients. It
might be a little too cozy, especially during the
lunch rush, but if you go during quieter hours the
small space becomes intimate and homey. Try the
inside-out burger with cheese cooked into the patty,
or the chilaquiles with fried tortilla wedges and your
choice of chile.
PRISMATIC COFFEE
1761 Bellamah NW, 400-2470 • $
[Coffee/Tea/Espresso, Bakery/Sweets] You
know a place takes its java seriously when espresso
is served on a slab of rock with a glass of
effervescent water. This third wave coffee shop isn’t
messing around. The space is beautiful, the staff is
friendly, the sweets are scrumptious and most
importantly, the coffee is delicious. We especially
recommend grabbing a caramel stroopwafel to pair
with your cuppa.
KEY: $ = Inexpensive $8 or less | $$ = Moderate $8 to $15 | $$$ = Expensive $15 to $20 | $$$$ = Very Expensive $20 and up
APRIL 13-19, 2017 WEEKLY ALIBI
[19]
REEL WORLD
FILM | REVIEW
BY DEVIN D. O’LEARY
Gifted
Spaced Out
The historic KiMo Theatre (423 Central NW)
returns to its Sci-Fi Friday screenings with ’50s
Favorites. The series will start out this Friday,
April 14, with the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet.
The film, a Space Age adaptation of William
Shakespeare’s The Tempest, follows the
adventures of a spaceship crew stranded on a
dangerous alien planet with a mad scientist and
his lovely daughter. The film will screen at 6 and
8:30pm. Tickets are $8 adults or $6
students/seniors. Sci-Fi Fridays continue on April
21 with 1954’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.
For more info go to kimotickets.com.
Lead By Example
The Valencia Leading Edge Film Festival returns
to the UNM-Valencia campus in Los Lunas this
coming Wednesday and Thursday, April 19 and
20. This year’s 6th annual festival spotlights the
art of documentary filmmaking, while
“showcasing the unique diversity of filmmakers
and dynamic creativity of UNM-Valencia students
in the Digital Media Arts and Film Technology
programs.” In addition to various shorts and
features, the festival will include in-person
discussions with industry experts and guests. On
Wednesday, April 19, at 2:30pm, for example,
there will be a panel discussion featuring
actor/filmmaker Ricky Lee, screenwriter and
board president of the New Mexico Film
Foundation Harry Musselwhite, UNM-Valencia
instructor and filmmaker Justin Romine,
filmmakers Glenn Silber and Dyanna Taylor, and
UNM-Valencia faculty member Alexa Wheeler.
Among the films being shown this year are The
War at Home (which depicts resistance to the
Vietnam War during the period) and Annapurna:
A Woman’s Place (the dramatic story of the first
American ascent of the world’s 10th highest peak
by a team of 13 women in 1978). “Midnight
Shanghai,” the pilot episode for a locally
produced martial arts Western will also be
screened. Other titles include The Byrd Who
Flew Alone: Gene Clark, Fanatic Heart: The Story
So Far of Black 47, They Will Just Have to Kill Us
First: Music and Resistance in Mali and
Bernadette Devlin: Notes on a Political Journey.
The festival will run from 9am to 6pm both days
in the Student Community Center on the south
side of UNM-Valencia campus (280 La Entrada)
This event is free and open to the public. For
more info call 925-8600.
Experi-Mental
Experiments in Cinema, Basement Films’ annual
celebration of “un-dependent” cinematic art,
returns to town this coming week. This year’s sixday festival will concentrate on scholars and
experimental films from Cuba. In addition to
highlighting Cuban works, films from the USA and
36 other countries will be represented. UNM’s
Department of Cinematic Arts will also host
several hands-on workshops over the course of
the festival. Experiments in Cinema v12.3 will get
underway at Guild Cinema (3405 Central NE) on
Tuesday, April 18, at 3pm with “Experiment 1,”
which will feature short film/video works by Peter
Volkart, Müge Yildiz, Kiera Faber, Shubhangi
SIngh, Yanyu Dong and others. That’s followed
by the Regional Youth Program, featuring
homegrown works by students at Albuquerque
Academy, Amy Biehl Charter High School, Del
Note High School, Public Academy for
Performing Arts, Working Classroom and others.
Tickets are $10 per day, general admission or $8
per day for students. Workshops are free. For a
complete schedule of all EIC v12.3 events, go to
experimentsincinema.org. And check out next
week’s Alibi for more info. a
[20]
WEEKLY ALIBI APRIL 13-19, 2017
Dramedy about brains will hit you in the feels
BY DEVIN D. O’LEARY
ollywood loves precocious kids:
particularly the smart-ass ones, because
they can always be relied upon to provide
a cutting punchline in any family sitcom. By
the same token, movies about preternaturally
talented children aren’t exactly an uncommon
thing (see for example: August Rush, Billy
Elliot, Little Man Tate, Akeelah and the Bee,
Queen of Katwe, Searching for Bobby Fischer
and ... um, Baby Geniuses, I guess). But even
those tend to miss a lot of the real-life
subtleties about raising gifted kids. Gifted, the
appropriately titled new film from director
Marc Webb (500 Days of Summer, The
Amazing Spider-Man), tries to address the topic
with a bit more depth than the average tale of
preteen talent.
Gifted stars Chris Evans (Captain America
himself) as Frank Adler, an incredibly
handsome, terribly selfless and quietly
wounded dude who finds himself guardian of
his niece following his sister’s postpartum
suicide. Now 7 years old, Mary (Mckenna
Grace, a veteran of some 40 movies and TV
shows) is a wise-beyond-her-years math whiz,
currently bristling at the idea of being sent to
an ordinary public school. She knows she’ll be
bored out of her skull among regular kids—but
mostly the shell-shocked little girl is afraid to
leave her beloved uncle’s side. She was only a
baby when her mother took her own life, but
she’s still traumatized by the abandonment.
Frank, for his part, is reluctant to send little
Mary off to school. He wants her to have a
normal childhood, though, and is dead set
against any more homeschooling.
You see, Mary’s mom was a tormented
genius herself, particularly ill-equipped to
function well in the real world. (As evidenced
by her poor choice in baby daddies.) Frank
doesn’t want Mary following in his sister’s
footsteps—even if it means denying the girl a
top-notch academic future. (Also, living in a
Florida trailer park and repairing boat engines
for a career hasn’t left Frank with the
economic wherewithal to send Mary to a tony
private school.) So off to public school she
goes, where she is immediately singled out by a
super-nice, potentially datable-by-her-uncle
teacher (comedian Jenny Slate).
Unfortunately, brainy Mary’s sudden
appearance at a public institution catches the
attention of Frank’s wealthy, domineering
mother, Evelyn (British actress Lindsay
Duncan from “Sherlock” and Alice in
Wonderland). Evelyn is a prototypical dragon
mom, a brilliant academician herself, who
gave up her research career to get married and
have children. Upset with herself over the
decision, Evelyn cracked the whip on her
children, pushing them to succeed. Frank
eventually opted out, leaving his university
H
“Is that Iron Man over there?”
Gifted
Directed by Marc Webb
Starring Chris Evans, Mckenna Grace, Lindsay
Duncan
Rated PG-13
Opens Thursday 4/13
career by the wayside. His sister bore up as
long as she could. But when she became
pregnant at a young age, Evelyn flipped out
and all but disowned her—yet another factor
in the suicidal depression of Mary’s late mom.
Out of the blue, Evelyn shows up on
Frank’s doorstep. Now that little Mary’s of
school age and showing signs of her mother’s
singular intelligence, Evelyn is insisting the
girl be placed on the fast-track to college
admission. (Yes, she’s that smart.) Knowing
what his sister went through, however, Frank
refuses. This sets up a mother/son custody
battle that will be decided, Kramer vs. Kramerstyle, in court.
Gifted is a calculated film, to be sure.
Emotions will be manipulated, tears will be
jerked. But it’s such a sweet-natured story,
filled with such likable people, that it’s hard to
remain cynical. The screenplay comes from
newby Tom Flynn, who wound up on
Hollywood’s famous “Black List” of best
unproduced screenplays for it. His script is
well-grounded in reality and knows enough to
stop short of total Hollywood formula. It’s the
difference between being manipulated by a
skillful chiropractor and a total quack.
At its heart the story addresses a difficult
question facing a lot of parents of gifted
children: Should these phenoms be pushed to
develop their gifts as much as possible, or
should they be encouraged to live their lives as
ordinary children. The former leaves them
with significant life-skill gaps, while the later
denies them (and the world) the full benefit of
their talents. It’s a tough debate, and Gifted
doesn’t soft-sell it with easy answers. It also
keeps the courtroom scenes to a minimum
(thankfully), and doesn’t try to turn Evelyn
into a stock villain. She’s Frank’s mother, and
he loves her despite it all. She just has
different ideas than he does.
In the end everything wraps up just as tidy
as you’d expect it to. That makes this a much
more mainstream film than it might have
been. Webb has experimented with both indie
films and mainstream movies, and he seems
comfortable making Gifted into an
unambiguous crowd-pleaser. But that’s no real
sin. Mckenna is cute as hell and successfully
navigates her character’s wide-ranging
emotions without making the preteen prodigy
cloying or annoying. She has a wonderful
chemistry with Evans—who is impossibly
smart, handsome and fatherly (good luck
resisting that triple-threat, ladies). The laughs
are genuine and the feelings sincere. No,
there’s nothing particularly sophisticated going
on here. This is a feel-good comedy-drama all
the way. But there’s something irresistibly
appealing about it—even if you’ve seen most
of these elements before. a
TELEVISION | IDIOT BOX By DEVIN D. O’LEary
TV News
Televised tidbits from
around the dial
Tax It
Just in time for Tax Day, Viceland Network is
kicking off a weeklong stunt centered around one
of the irreverent channel’s two favorite topics.
(Hint: it ain’t skateboarding.) Viceland’s
#WeedWeek will start on April 17 and end on
(what else?) 4/20. The network is bringing back
two of its bleary-eyed favorites: “Weediquette” with
Kirshna Addavolu and the recent James Beard
Award-nominee “Bong Appetite” with Abdullah
Saeed, both featuring new episodes. There will also
be a special 4/20 episode of Action Bronson’s
travel/food show “Fuck, That’s Delicious.” To
generate buzz (so to speak), the network has even
launched a hotline viewers can call to discuss a
number of topics, including marijuana laws and tax
season. So what are you waiting for? Get stoned,
call (646) 851-0347 and tell Viceland your totally
high method for reforming American tax code.
Sing Street
CBS’ “The Late Late Show With James Cordon”
will go primetime on Monday, May 22, with “The
Late Late Show Carpool Karaoke Primetime
Special 2017.” The hourlong event will feature a
brand new carpool karaoke segment, along with
“best of” segments from the past year. This marks
the second primetime special for “The Late Late
Show.” Last year’s inaugural “The Late Late Show
With James Cordon Carpool Karaoke Special”
earned an Emmy Award for Outstanding Variety
Special.
Kontinue Keeping Up
Viewers worried that the E! Network isn’t giving
the various members of the Kardashian clan
enough coverage can rest assured that 19-year-old
THE WEEK IN
SLOTH
THURSDAY 13
“Sacred Cod” (Discovery 7pm) Even
though this is Easter week, that is not
a typo. This documentary—featuring
fisherman, scientists, advocates and
federal judges—looks at how the
oldest fishery in the United States
has been driven to the edge of
commercial extinction
FRIDAY 14
“Fortitude” (Amazon streaming
anytime) The second season of this
freaky-deaky, British-made, Icelandshot, Norway-set series moves over to
Amazon. Maybe now we’ll figure out if
it’s a supernatural horror series, a
murder mystery or some sort of sci-fi
whatsit. Last season’s finale seemed
to imply the last one, but it’s flipflopped before.
“Mystery Science Theater 3000”
(Netflix streaming anytime) I wasn’t
doing anything this weekend anyway.
Guess I’m watching the entire first
season of the new “MST3K” starring
Jonah Ray, Felicia Day and Patton
Oswalt.
SATURDAY 15
“Doctor Who” (BBC America 7pm)
The 10th season of “Doctor Who”
“cosmetics mogul and social media powerhouse”
Kylie Jenner will now star in her own docu-reality
show. “Life With Kylie” will be an eight-episode
spin-off of “Keeping Up With the Kardashians” and
is scheduled to air sometime this summer. The
spinoff follows “I Am Cait,” “Rob and Chyna,”
“Khloé & Lamar,”“Kourtney and Khloé Take
Miami” and “Kourtney and Kim Take New
York”—leaving poor “fashion model and television
personality” Kendall as the sole Jenner/Kardashian
without a spinoff show on E!
Crime Time
The next two installments of FX’s Emmy-gobbling
“American Crime Story” are steadily accruing
details. the first season, subtitled “The People v.
O.J. Simpson” was a runaway hit for the network.
The second season, concentrating on the aftermath
of Hurricane Katrina, will feature actors Annette
Bening and Matthew Broderick (in addition to
“American Horror Story”/“American Crime Story”
regulars Sarah Paulson, Cuba Gooding Jr. and
Courtney B. Vance). The third season will be about
the murder of fashion icon Gianni Versace. Édgar
Ramírez (The Bourne Ultimatum, Wrath of the
Titans) will play Versace, Penélope Cruz will play
Donatella Versace and singer Ricky Martin will
serve as Versace’s longtime business/romantic
partner Antonio D’Amico. Seasons two and three
are currently scheduled to air in 2018. Rumor has it
producers want to concentrate on the Bill
Clinton/Monica Lewinsky affair for the fourth
season.
NCIS Overload
CBS launches a weird crossover series on Tuesday,
April 25, with “48 Hours: NCIS.” The network’s
long-running news series commits to a six-part
documentary mini-series taking viewers into the
real life cases handled by the Naval Criminal
Investigative Service. Needless to say, they aren’t
nearly as sensational as the ones on CBS’ hit crime
dramas “NCIS,” “NCIS: Los Angeles” and “NCIS:
New Orleans.” Rocky Carroll, one of the stars of
“NCIS” will narrate the summer special. a
(well, the second 10th season for
longtime fans) shows up with new
companion Bill (Pearl Mackie) in tow.
“Class” (BBC America 8:10pm) This
brand new “Doctor Who” spin-off is set
in the Coal Hill School, the site of the
good Doctor’s first appearance on
Earth. Seems that years of time travel
energy have thinned the building’s
walls, making it more susceptible to
extradimensional/extraterrestrial
danger. Now it’s up to a group of
teenage students to fight these
monstrous threats.
SUNDAY 16
“Inside Disneynature: Wild Lives”
(KOAT-7 6pm) Disney takes a behindthe-scenes look at its animal-centric
documentaries.
“The White Princess” (Starz 6pm) This
saucy new drama digs into the
personal and political intrigue
surrounding Elizabeth of York’s
tumultuous marriage to King Henry VII.
“The Real Jesus of Nazareth”
(Smithsonian 6pm) Right about this
time of year, science and history
channels get real churchy.
“The Jesus Strand: A Search for DNA”
(History 7pm) See what I mean?
“Stayin’ Alive: A Grammy Salute to the
Music of the Bee Gees” (KRQE-13
7pm) Celine Dion, Ed Sheeran, Keith
Urban, John Legend and Stevie
Wonder show up to sing some Bee
Gees songs.
“Iron Chef Gauntlet” (Food Network
7pm) Food Network’s adaptation of
the crazed Japanese cooking
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Free Code:
Weekly Alibi
competition returns. Now, apparently,
with some sort of gauntlet.
“Guerilla” (Showtime 7pm) This sixpart series (starring Idris Elba and
Freida Pinto) explores life in a radical
underground cell in 1970s London.
MONDAY 17
“Car Saviors” (Discovery 8pm) This,
like “Sacred Cod,” has nothing to do
with Easter. It’s just another reality
show about car renovators.
TUESDAY 18
“L.A. Burning: The Riots 25 Years
Later” (A&E 7pm) A&E looks back
at the infamous Los Angeles riots of
1992. Good times.
“Cooper’s Treasure” (Discovery
8:02pm) Former NASA astronaut
Gordon Cooper allegedly left behind
a map he believed would lead to
“billions of dollars” in treasure. Here,
Discovery attempts to decode the
map, which will undoubtedly—like
“Mystery of Oak Island” and “Finding
Bigfoot” before it—pay off
handsomely by season’s end.
WEDNESDAY 19
“Fargo” (FX 11pm) The third season of
FX’s pitch-black crime-comedy
anthology finds Ewan McGregor, Mary
Elizabeth Winstead, David Thewlis
and Jim Gaffigan stuck in St. Cloud,
Minn. for more murder, mobsters and
mayhem.. a
FIND REAL GAY MEN NEAR YOU
Albuquerque:
(505) 268-1111
www.megamates.com 18+
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[21]
FILM | CAPSULES by DEvIn D. o’LEAry
OPENING THIS WEEK
STILL PLAYING
Logan
After the Storm
Beauty and the Beast
Modern Japanese master Hirokazu Koreeda (After Life, Still
Walking, Our Little Sister) directs this bittersweet family drama
about a former prize-winning author named Ryota (Hiroshi Abe)
who can barely afford child support payments thanks to his
gambling debts. After the death of his father, Ryota’s aging
mother and beautiful ex-wife seem ready to move on with their
lives. Renewing contact with his estranged family, Ryota
struggles to take back control of his world and find a lasting
place in his young son’s life. In Japanese with English subtitles.
117 minutes. Unrated. (Opens Friday 4/14 at Guild Cinema)
Disney’s animated classic from 1991 gets the live-action
remake treatment. (Soon, all will submit!) Emma Watson from
the Harry Potter series takes over as Belle, the bookish heroine
who finds herself falling for a hairy prince (Dan Stevens from
“Downton Abbey”). Ewan McGregor, Ian McKellen and Emma
Thompson are among the stars voicing various animate
household objects. It looks and sounds gorgeous—but, yes,
you’ve seen it all before. 129 minutes. PG. (Century 14
Downtown, Rio Rancho Premiere Cinema, Flix Brewhouse, Icon
Cinemas Albuquerque, Century Rio, Cottonwood Stadium 16,
AMC Albuquerque 12)
Hugh Jackman returns as Logan/Wolverine in this X-Men
spinoff. Loosely based on the Old Man Logan comic book
series by Mark Millar and Steve McNiven, this brutal, bruising
drama is set in a post-apocalyptic future in which mutants
have all but dwindled out of existence. A not-so-well-aged
Wolvie is busy hiding out in the Mexican desert and taking care
of a senile Professor X (Patrick Stewart) when a mysterious
preteen mutant (Dafne Keen) with a serious connection to our
claw-popping hero shows up needing his help. Stripped down,
bleakly imagined and properly bloody, this superpowered
Western is a stark, satisfying stand-alone. 137 minutes. R. (Flix
Brewhouse, Rio Rancho Premiere Cinema, Century 14
Downtown, Cottonwood Stadium 16, Century Rio)
The Boss Baby
Power Rangers
Apprentice
Shot in Singapore, this grave prison drama introduces us to a
former soldier turned correctional officer named Aiman
(Firdaus Rahman) who befriends a long-standing executioner
(Wan Hanafi Su). As the title implies, our protagonist becomes
the hangman’s apprentice—only to learn that he may have
been responsible for the death of Aiman’s father. In English
and Malay with English subtitles. 115 minutes. Unrated.
(Opens Friday 4/14 at Guild Cinema)
The Blues Brothers
Thirty-seven years after it first hit theaters, The Blues Brothers
remains arguably the best “Saturday Night Live” spin-off film.
John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd playing it straight. James Brown
preaching to the choir. Cab Calloway, Ray Charles and Aretha
Franklin showing you how it’s done. Carrie Fisher with a
grenade launcher. What’s not to love? 133 minutes. R. (Opens
Friday 4/14 at Guild Cinema)
Experiments in Cinema v12.3
Basement Films brings back its annual, round-the-world survey
of cutting-edge experimental film and video. This year’s special
concentration is on films from Cuba—but there are offerings
from 37 other countries as well. Hands-on workshops, guest
lectures, parties and more round out the six-day festival,
scheduled to take place April 18 through 23. Go to
experimentsincinema.org for a complete schedule. Unrated.
(Opens Tuesday 4/18 at Guild Cinema)
The Fate of the Furious
This eighth entry into the hyperbombastic Fast and Furious
franchise finds car thief turned hero Dominic Toretto (Vin
Diesel) shockingly double-crossing his mixed family of
spies/thieves/superheroes/whatever they’re supposed to be
for evil terrorist Charlize Theron. The increasingly crowded cast
includes Dwayne Johnson, Jason Statham, Michelle Rodriquez,
Tyrese Gibson, Ludacris, Kurt Russell, Luke Evans and Scott
Eastwood. Fans, of course, will go ape shit. 136 minutes. PG13. (Opens Thursday 4/13 at AMC Albuquerque 12, Century
14 Downtown, Flix Brewhouse, Icon Cinemas Albuquerque, Rio
Rancho Premiere Cinema, Century Rio, Cottonwood Stadium
16)
Gifted
Reviewed this issue. 101 minutes. PG-13. (Opens Wednesday
3/12 at Century 14 Downtown, Century Rio, Cottonwood
Stadium 16)
Grease
You can’t go wrong with this nostalgic 1978 musical featuring
John Travolta in a leather jacket and—ultimately—Olivia NewtonJohn in leather as well. This is the karaoke-style, sing-along
version, so feel free to shout along to “There Are Worse Things I
Could Do.” 110 minutes. PG-13. (Monday 4/17 at Flix
Brewhouse)
Life Is Beautiful
Italian comic/filmmaker Roberto Benigni won three Oscars for
this much-loved 1997 comedy-drama about a Jewish librarian
(Benigni) who uses his imagination to shield his young son
from the horrors of the Holocaust. In English, German and
Italian with English subtitles. 116 minutes. PG-13. (Opens
Friday 4/14 at SUB Theater)
Mister
Sreenu Vaitla (Dookudu, Baadshah) directs this romantic
comedy. Varun Tej stars. Lavanya Tripathi and Hebah Patel are
looking to be romanced. In Telugu with English subtitles. 135
minutes. Unrated. (Opens Friday 4/14 at Movies West)
Omo Child: The River and the Bush
This award-winning documentary is screening as a fundraiser
for the Omo Child Ethiopian Orphanage and its ecological
education program. The film relates the true story of one young
man’s journey to end the ancient Ethiopian practice known as
mingi. Children believed to be mingi (cursed) are routinely
killed according to cultural tradition. 89 minutes. (Opens
Saturday 4/15 at Guild Cinema)
Spark: A Space Tail
Somehow, Jessica Biel, Susan Sarandon, Hilary Swank and
Patrick Stewart got talked into providing voices for this cheap,
3D computer-animated sci-fi comedy from Canada/South
Korea. It’s about a teenage space monkey who joins forces with
a fox and a warthog to take back the planet Bana from an evil
general. 90 minutes. PG. (Opens Friday 4/14 at Rio Rancho
Premiere Cinema, Cottonwood Stadium 16)
[22]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
In this oddly conceived CGI toon from DreamWorks Animation,
a suit-wearing, briefcase-carrying infant (voiced by Alec
Baldwin) is assigned by Baby Corp. to infiltrate the household
of prepubescent Tim (Miles Christopher Bakshi) in order to spy
on his parents. Seems Mom and Dad work for Puppy Co., and
the company’s evil CEO has a secret plot to replace people’s
love for babies with a love for puppies, and ... Seriously, this
film makes very little sense. If the idea of Alec Baldwin saying
“Cookies are for closers!” sends you into paroxysms of
laughter, this is the film for you. Reviewed in v26 i13. 97
minutes. PG. (Flix Brewhouse, Century Rio, Century 14
Downtown, Rio Rancho Premiere Cinema, Icon Cinemas
Albuquerque, AMC Albuquerque 12, Cottonwood Stadium 16)
The Case For Christ
This faith-based drama is inspired by the true story of Lee
Strobel, an award-winning journalist and avowed atheist
(played here by Mike Vogel of Cloverfield) who applies his
journalistic skills to disproving the newfound Christian faith of
his wife (Erika Christensen). Spoiler alert: He fails. If you’re not
already a Christian apologist, then Strobel’s quest (which
basically involves interviewing a bunch of evangelical
theologists) isn’t going to constitute any sort of persuasive
argument. 112 minutes. PG-13. (Century Rio, Century 14
Downtown, Cottonwood Stadium 16)
CHIPS
For fans of goofy TV-to-movie reboots like Charlie’s Angels,
Starsky & Hutch, 21 Jump Street, The Dukes of Hazzard,
S.W.A.T., The A-Team (and others) comes another ’70s/’80s
flashback. Dax Shepard (hubby to Kristen Bell and star of ... he
was in Idiocracy) writes, directs and stars in this campy action
comedy about motorcycle cops in California. Michael Peña
(End of Watch, Ant Man) comes along to replace Erik Estrada.
Baywatch is next! 100 minutes. R. (AMC Albuquerque 12,
Cottonwood Stadium 16)
Get Out
Jordan Peele (of “Key amd Peele” fame) writes and directs his
first feature, a timely and rather subversive horror-comedy twist
on The Stepford Wives. A young African-American man named
Chris (Daniel Kaluuya, Sicario) visits his new Caucasian
girlfriend’s liberal parents (Bradley Whitford and Catherine
Keener) in their upscale country estate. The family and their
lily-white neighbors seem weirdly, condescendingly friendly. Is
Chris being paranoid or is there something strange going on?
Peele skillfully combines twisty thrills with savvy satire for a
satisfying, action-packed genre mash-up. Reviewed in v26 i9.
103 minutes. R. (AMC Albuquerque 12)
TV-to-movie nostalgia hits ’90s kids with this big budget reboot
of the loooong-running Saban series that basically steals all its
special effects from old Japanese TV shows. In it, some high
school kids are infused with unique superpowers, get colorcoordinated outfits and fight giant space aliens (led by
Elizabeth Banks). Unfortunately, the film spends an awful lot of
time dealing with angsty teenage melodrama. It’s like
everybody involved was too embarrassed to get out and, you
know, fight those giant space aliens. When the action finally
does arrive, it’s fun and flashy—even though it’s swamped in
that “realistic” grimdark monochrome of Batman v. Superman:
Dawn of Justice. Seriously, Hollywood, make with the color
again! 124 minutes. PG-13. (Century Rio, AMC Albuquerque
12, Icon Cinemas Albuquerque, Rio Rancho Premiere Cinema,
Cottonwood Stadium 16)
The Shack
After his young daughter is murdered, a grieving man (Sam
Worthington, Avatar) receives a mysterious, personal invitation
to meet with God (Octavia Spencer) at the remote shack where
his daughter was killed. There, he encounters manifestations of
the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost and learns some sort of
lesson. Probably religious in nature. This faith-based drama is
based on the best-selling Christian novel by William P. Young.
132 minutes. PG-13. (Cottonwood Stadium 16, Rio Rancho
Premiere Cinema)
Smurfs: The Lost Village
Neil Patrick Harris and Hark Azaria gracefully bow out of this
all-animated take on the Smurfs. Seems that, for this goaround, a mysterious map sends Smurfette and her tiny blue
pals on a journey through the Forbidden Forest to discover “the
biggest secret in Smurf history.” Parents are advised to dump
the kids and run. 89 minutes. PG. (Flix Brewhouse, Icon
Cinemas Albuquerque, Century Rio, Century 14 Downtown, Rio
Rancho Premiere Cinema, AMC Albuquerque 12, Cottonwood
Stadium 16)
T2 Trainspotting
No, Renton, Begbie, Spud and Sick Boy haven’t returned to
fight off Arnold Schwarzenegger and prevent Judgment Day.
Instead, director Danny Boyle and his cast have come back to
Scotland after 20 years to see what our favorite heroin addicts
are up to these days. There’s a tonal shift, of course, making
this one much more melancholy than the amped-up, savagely
humored original. Still, there are some fun moments for fans.
117 minutes. R. (Century 14 Downtown)
Your Name
Masamune Shirow’s prototypical cyberpunk manga series (later
adapted as an anime in 1995 by Momoru Oshii) goes liveaction with Scarlett Johansson as a special task force police
officer whose entire body has been replaced by
cybertechnology. In the near future, she and her teammates
hunt down a mysterious terrorist with the ability to hack into
humans and control their bodies via their computer-enhanced
brains. The film nails the visual aesthetic of Oshii’s anime, but
fails to capture the philosophical underpinnings of Shirow’s
manga. 106 minutes. PG-13. (Flix Brewhouse, Century Rio,
Century 14 Downtown, Rio Rancho Premiere Cinema, AMC
Albuquerque 12, Cottonwood Stadium 16)
This supernatural romance is the highest-grossing anime ever
in Japan. Writer-director Makoto Shinkai (The Place Promised
In Our Early Days, The Garden of Words) twists the formula
seen in films like Ghost, Big, The Lake House, The Time
Traveler’s Wife into a crowd-pleasing tale of a high school boy
in Tokyo and a teenage girl in rural Japan who inexplicably
switch bodies. The Freaky Friday-like situation is played for a
few laughs, but mostly explores cultural differences, slowly
allowing its two characters to sympathize with one another. The
story adds a more cosmic element about halfway through,
morphing from a small-scale romance to an epic race-againsttime. But it remains emotional, intriguing and vividly animated.
Screening in Japanese with English subtitles and English
dubbed. Reviewed in v26 i14. 106 minutes. PG. (Century Rio)
Going in Style
The Zookeeper’s Wife
Ghost in the Shell
This remake of a 1979 comedy of the same name finds three
well-aged pals (Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Alan
Arkin) plotting to rob a bank after their retirement funds are
stolen by shady bankers. Zach Braff (star of “Scrubs,” director
of Garden State) directs. 96 minutes. PG-13. (Flix Brewhouse,
Icon Cinemas Albuquerque, Century Rio, Century 14
Downtown, Rio Rancho Premiere Cinema, AMC Albuquerque
12, Cottonwood Stadium 16)
In this based-on-a-true-story biopic directed by Niki Caro
(Whale Rider), Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty) and Johan
Heldenbergh (“The Tunnel”) star as Antonina and Jan Zabinski,
the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo during World War II. Together,
they helped save hundreds of people and animals during the
German invasion of Poland. This tasteful and mostly formulaic
historical heart-tugger is based on the book of the same name
by Diane Ackerman. 124 minutes. PG-13. (Century 14
Downtown)
Kong: Skull Island
Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson, Brie Larson, John C. Reilly,
John Goodman, freakin’ everybody shows up on an uncharted
Pacific island trying to solve the mystery of its isolation—only to
discover its primary inhabitant is a hundred-foot-tall ape with
anger issues. Between this silly fun creature feature and the
recent reboot of Godzilla, Legendary Entertainment is hoping to
launch their own giant monster franchise. 120 minutes. PG-13.
(Century Rio, Century 14 Downtown, Rio Rancho Premiere
Cinema, Icon Cinemas Albuquerque, AMC Albuquerque 12,
Cottonwood Stadium 16)
SECOND RUN
A Dog’s Purpose
Lasse Hallström (My Life as a Dog, Hachi: A Dog’s Tale) directs
this movie about a dog who tries to discover his purpose in life
over the course of several lifetimes and owners. Every time he
dies, you see, he’s reincarnated as another dog. In other words:
It’s a feel-good movie about a dog who dies. Repeatedly. Josh
Gad voices the dog. Based on the novel by W. Bruce Cameron.
120 minutes. PG. (Movies West, Movies 8)
Fist Fight
Charlie Day ( “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia”) is a nebbish
teacher who runs afoul of a pugnacious fellow teacher (Ice
Cube), gets him fired and is challenged to an after-school fight.
The bulk of this simple comedy is taken up with our protagonist
trying to avoid the titular altercation. 91 minutes. R. (Movies
West, Movies 8)
Hidden Figures
This important historical drama is based on the true story of
the Human Calculators, a team of African-American women
who worked for NASA, providing crucial mathematical data in
the early, pre-computer days of the American space program.
Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monáe star
alongside Kevin Costner and Kirsten Dunst. It’s a formulaic,
feel-good tribute to unsung heroes, but it delivers its
predetermined beats with humor and sympathy. 127 minutes.
PG. (Movies West, Movies 8)
John Wick: Chapter 2
Keanu Reeves shot back into relevance with 2014’s hardhitting, stripped-to-the-bone, out-of-nowhere action flick John
Wick. This second outing amps things up a bit for Reeves’
titular, light-lipped assassin, but—between Reeves’ grimly
stone-faced performance and the film’s near-balletic
bloodshed—still manages to achieve the same level of pure
pulp poetry. 122 minutes. R. (UNM Midweek Movies, Movies 8,
Movies West)
La La Land
From director Damien Chazelle (Whiplash) comes this
unabashedly, unironically antiquated, Busby Berkeley-style
song-and-dance musical. Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling star
as a wannabe actress and an unsuccessful jazz musician
dreaming of stardom in cynical, modern-day Hollywood. Amid
their will-they-or-won’t-they romance, our two main characters
engage in a string of lovingly assembled musical numbers on
the streets of LA. The luminous, Technicolor Era cinematography
is gorgeous and the mood is infectious. But the story seems
like small potatoes. La La Land will win a lot of fans for its
sheer nostalgic novelty, but it just doesn’t stack up to the
classic MGM musicals it so slavishly references. Reviewed in
v25 i50. 128 minutes. PG-13. (Movies 8)
The LEGO Batman Movie
Fans of 2014’s The LEGO Movie (and there are plenty) are, no
doubt, salivating at the prospect of a spinoff concentrating on
Will Arnett’s hilariously self-obsessed crimefighter. This time
around, Bruce Wayne finds himself dealing with a wave of
criminals in Gotham City (including, but not limited to, Zach
Galifianakis’ Joker, Jenny Slate’s Harley Quinn, Conan O’Brien’s
Riddler, Doug Benson’s Bane and Billy Dee Williams’ Two-Face).
On top of that, our hero’s learning to accept the responsibility
of his recently adopted ward, Dick Grayson (Michael Cera). No,
it’s not as profound as its predecessor. But damned if it isn’t
ridiculously fast-paced fun. 104 minutes. PG. (Movies 8,
Movies West)
Lion
Adapted from Saroo Brierley’s autobiographical book A Long
Way Home, this tear-jerking/inspirational drama relates the life
story of a 5-year-old Indian boy who gets lost on the streets of
Calcutta, thousands of miles from home. Eventually, he is a
adopted by a kindly Australian couple. Some 25 years later, he
returns to India to sort out his confusing past and mixed
identity. Dev Patel (Slumdog Millionaire, The Best Exotic
Marigold Hotel) stars alongside Nicole Kidman, David Wenham
and Rooney Mara. 118 minutes. PG-13. (Movies West, Movies
8)
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
Lucky (and talented) bastard Gareth Edwards (Monsters,
Godzilla) gets to direct this prequel to the original Star Wars:
Episode IV—A New Hope. Felicity Jones (The Theory of
Everything) stars as a particularly rebellious rebel tasked with
helping a ragtag squad of freedom fighters liberate the plans to
the Death Star—thereby setting up the plot mechanics of the
original 1977 film. Diego Luna, Alan Tudyk, Donnie Yen, Mads
Mikkelsen, Forest Whitaker and Jimmy Smits (Bail Organa in
the house!) round out the cast. 133 minutes. PG-13. (Movies
West)
Sing
The French animation company behind the Despicable Me
films offers up this tune-filled toon. When a fast-talking,
showbiz-loving koala finds his once-glorious theater threatened
with foreclosure, he comes up with the idea of hosting an
amateur singing competition. Although “American Idol” would
seem like slight inspiration for a family film, the script conjures
up quite a bit of sympathy for its anthropomorphic pigs,
hedgehogs, gorillas and mice. Amid the comedy hijinks and the
rather impressive songs, we get a lot of compelling backstory,
telling us what brings each of these animalistic contestants to
this particular grab at glory. Matthew McConaughey, Reese
Witherspoon, Seth MacFarlane, Scarlett Johansson and Taron
Egerton are among the cast. 108 minutes. PG. (Movies 8,
Movies West)
AMC ALBUQUERQUE 12
3810 Las Estancias SW •
The Fate of the Furious Fri 11:00am, 12:00, 2:00, 3:00,
5:00, 6:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:00, 9:30, 11:00; Sat-Sun
11:00am, 12:00, 2:00, 3:00, 5:00, 6:00, 6:30, 8:00,
9:00, 9:30; Mon 11:00am, 12:00, 2:00, 3:00, 5:00,
6:00, 8:00, 9:00; Tue 11:00am, 12:00, 2:00, 3:00,
5:00, 6:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:00, 9:30; Wed-Thu 11:00am,
12:00, 2:00, 3:00, 5:00, 6:00, 8:00, 9:00
The Fate of the Furious: An IMAX Experience Fri-Sun
10:00am, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:15; Mon 12:30, 3:30,
6:30, 9:30; Tue 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:15; Wed-Thu
12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30
Beauty and the Beast Fri-Sun 10:15am, 1:15, 4:15,
7:15, 10:10; Mon 12:30, 3;30, 6:40, 9:30; Tue 1:15,
4:15, 7:15, 10:10; Wed-Thu 12:30, 3:30, 6:40, 9:30;
(Sing Along) Fri-Sun 11:15am, 4:50; Mon 11:00am,
4:20; Tue 11:15am, 4:50; Wed-Thu 11:00am, 4:20
Smurfs: The Lost Village 3D Fri-Thu 1:45
Smurfs: The Lost Village Fri-Thu 11:10am, 4:00, 6:30,
8:40
Going in Style Fri-Thu 11:15am, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15
The Boss Baby 3D Fri-Sun 11:20am, 4:05; Mon
11:30am; Tue 11:20am, 4:05; Wed-Thu 11:30am, 4:05
The Boss Baby Fri-Sun 10:30, 1:30, 6:15, 8:45; Mon
11:00am, 1:30, 6:15, 8:45; Tue 11:05am, 1:25, 6:15,
9:45 Wed-Thu 11:00am, 1:30, 6:15, 8:45
Ghost in the Shell 3D Fri-Sun 1:50, 7:10; Mon 3:00,
5:30; Tue 1:50, 7:10; Wed-Thu 1:40, 6:50
Ghost in the Shell Fri-Sun 4:40, 10:00; Mon 11:40,
6:50; Tue 4:40, 10:00; Wed-Thu 3:00, 5:30
Power Rangers Fri-Sun 1:10, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40; Mon
1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30; Tue 1:10, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40;
Wed-Thu 1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30
CHIPS Fri-Sun 2:15, 7:45, 10:15; Mon 1:50, 7:10, 9:30;
Tue 2:15, 7:45, 10:15; Wed-Thu 1:50, 7:10, 9:30
Kong: Skull Island 3D Fri-Sun 11:00am, 4:25, 9:40; Mon
11:00am, 4:05, 9:20; Tue 11:00am, 4:25, 9:40; WedThu 11:00am, 4:05, 9:20
Kong: Skull Island Fri-Sun 11:05am, 1:50, 7:15; Mon
12:15, 8:00; Tue 11:05am, 1:50, 7:15; Wed-Thu 12:15,
8:00
Get Out Fri-Sun 7:30; Mon 1:30, 4:00, 6:30; Tue 1:30,
3:55; Wed-Thu 1:30, 4:00, 6:30
CENTURY 14 DOWNTOWN
100 Central SW • 1 (800) 326-3264 ext. 943#
Gifted Fri-Sun 11:35am, 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55; MonThu 11:35am, 2:10, 4:45, 7:20
The Fate of the Furious Fri-Sat 11:05am, 12:45, 1:20,
2:25, 4:05, 5:00, 5:45, 7:25, 8:10, 9:05, 10:35; Sun
11:05am, 12:45, 2:25, 4:05, 5:00, 5:45, 7:25, 9:05,
10:35; Mon-Thu 11:05am, 12;45, 2:25, 4:05, 5:45,
7:25
T2 Trainspotting Fri-Sun 11:25am, 2:15, 5:05, 7:55,
10:45; Mon-Thu 11:25am, 2:15, 5:05, 7:55
Smurfs: The Lost Village 3D Fri-Thu 4:35
Smurfs: The Lost Village Fri-Sun 11:20am, 2:05, 7:00,
9:20; Mon-Thu 11:20am, 2:05, 7:00
Going in Style Fri-Sun 12:10, 2:40, 5;10, 7:40, 10:10;
Mon-Thu 12:10, 2:40, 5;10, 7:40
The Case For Christ Fri-Sun 10:55am, 1:40, 4:30, 7:15,
10:00; Mon-Thu 10:55am, 1:40, 4:30, 7:15
The Zookeeper’s Wife Fri-Sun 10:50am, 1:45, 4:50,
7:45, 10:45; Mon-Thu 10:50am, 1:45, 4:50, 7:45
Ghost in the Shell 3D Fri-Sun 10:40
Ghost in the Shell Fri-Sun 11:15am, 1:50, 4:55, 7:50;
Mon-Thu 11:35am, 4:55, 7:50
The Boss Baby 3D Fri-Sun 9:40
The Boss Baby Fri-Thu 11:30am, 2:10, 4:40, 7:10
Beauty and the Beast Fri-Sun 1:00, 4:00, 7:05, 10:05;
Mon-Thu 1:00, 4:00, 7:05
Kong: Skull Island Fri-Sat 4:45; Sun 4:45, 7:35, 10:25;
Mon-Tue 1:55, 4:45, 7:35; Thu 1:55, 4:45, 7:35
Logan Fri-Sun 12:50, 8:15; Mon 12:50; Tue 12:50, 4:10;
Wed 12:50; Thu 12:50, 4:10, 7:30
CENTURY RIO
I-25 & Jefferson • 1 (800) 326-3264
Gifted Fri-Thu 10:50am, 1:40, 4:35, 7:25, 10:15
The Fate of the Furious Fri-Sat 9:25am, 10:10am,
10:50am, 11:30am, 12:10, 12:50, 1:35, 2:15, 2:55,
3:35, 4:15, 5:00, 5:40, 6:20, 7:00, 7:40, 8:25, 9:05,
9:45, 10:25. 11:05, 11:45, 12:01am; Sun-Thu 9:25am,
10:10am, 10:50am, 11:30am, 12:10, 12:50, 1:35,
2:15, 2:55, 3:35, 4:15, 5:00, 5:40, 6:20, 7:00, 7:40,
8:25, 9:05, 9:45, 10:25
Smurfs: The Lost Village 3D Fri-Thu 3:20
Smurfs: The Lost Village Fri-Thu 10:10am, 11:20am,
12:45, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00
Going in Style Fri-Thu 11:00am, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:05
The Case For Christ Fri-Thu 10:00am, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00,
10:00
Your Name (Subtitled) Fri-Thu 7:30; (Dubbed) Fri-Thu
10:25
Logan Fri-Thu 8:30
Ghost in the Shell Fri-Thu 10:55, 1:50, 4:45, 7:40,
10:35
The Boss Baby Fri-Thu 10:35am, 12:00, 1:25, 2:50,
4:15, 5:40, 7:05, 9:55
Power Rangers Fri-Thu 10:05am, 1:10, 4:20, 7:30,
10:40
Beauty and the Beast 3D Fri-Thu 3:50
Beauty and the Beast Fri-Thu 12:30, 7:10, 10:30; (SingAlong) Fri-Thu 10:05am
Kong: Skull Island Fri-Thu 1:15, 4:25. 7:35, 10:45
ICON CINEMAS ALBUQUERQUE
13120-A Central Ave. SE • 814-7469
The Fate of the Furious Fri-Thu 11:00am, 11:30am,
12:00, 12:30, 12:45, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30,
3:45, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00,
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:15, 10:30
Going in Style Fri-Wed 11:00am, 1:20, 3:40, 6:00, 8:20;
Thu call for showtimes
Smurfs: The Lost Village Fri-Wed 11:15am, 1:30, 3:40,
5:50, 8:00; Thu call for showtimes
The Boss Baby Fri-Wed 11:50am, 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10;
Thu call for showtimes
Power Rangers Fri-Wed 2:25, 7:50, 10:10; Thu call for
showtimes
Beauty and the Beast Fri-Wed 11:00am, 1:45, 4:30,
7:15, 10:00; Thu call for showtimes
Kong: Skull Island Fri-Wed 11:45am, 5:10, 10:35; Thu
call for showtimes
COTTONWOOD STADIUM 16
Cottonwood Mall • 897-6858
Gifted Fri-Thu 12:40, 3:50, 7:05, 9:45
Spark: A Space Tail Fri-Thu 11:35am, 2:05, 4:35, 7:10,
9:40
The Fate of the Furious Fri-Thu 11:30am, 12:00, 12:45,
1:15, 3:15, 4:00, 4;30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:15, 7:45, 9:45,
10:30
The Boss Baby 3D Fri-Wed 11:55am, 2:35; Thu call for
showtimes
The Boss Baby Fri-Wed 11:25am, 2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50;
Thu call for showtimes
Smurfs: The Lost Village Fri-Wed 2:10, 4:50, 7:25,
10:05; Thu call for showtimes
Smurfs: The Lost Village 3D Fri-Wed 11:35am; Thu call
for showtimes
Going in Style Fri-Wed 11:45am, 2:15, 4:50, 7:35,
10:10; Thu call for showtimes
Ghost in the Shell Fri-Wed 12:15, 3:15, 7:05, 10:05; Thu
call for showtimes
The Case For Christ Fri-Wed 12:10, 3:10, 7:00, 10:00;
Thu call for showtimes
CHIPS Fri-Wed 3:20, 10:25; Thu call for showtimes
Power Rangers Fri-Wed 6:45, 9:50; Thu call for
showtimes
Beauty and the Beast Fri-Wed 11:30am, 12:00, 3:00,
3:30, 6:30, 7:00, 10:00, 10:30; Thu call for showtimes;
(Sing-Along) Fri-Thu 12:30
Kong: Skull Island Fri-Wed 3:50, 7:30, 10:25; Thu call for
showtimes
Logan Fri-Wed 6:55, 10:10; Thu call for showtimes
The Shack Fri-Wed 12:25, 3:40; Thu call for showtimes
FLIX BREWHOUSE
MOVIES 8
4591 San Mateo NE • 1 (800) Fandango, express # 1194
John Wick: Chapter 2 Fri-Thu 12:10, 3:10, 6;20, 9:30
The LEGO Batman Movie 3D Fri-Thu 1:20, 4:10, 5:30,
8:20
The LEGO Batman Movie Fri-Thu 11:50am, 2:40, 7:00,
9:50
Lion Fri-Thu 12:30, 3:30, 6:40, 9:40
La La Land Fri-Thu 3:40, 10:00
A Dog’s Purpose Fri-Thu 11:30am, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30,
10:10
Hidden Figures Fri-Thu 12:40, 3:50, 7:10, 10:20
Fist Fight Fri-Thu 11:40am, 2:20, 5:00, 7:40, 10:30
Sing Fri-Thu 12:20, 6:50
THUR
VAIVÉN
13
Flamenco-Jazz fusion trio
FRI
AUSTIN PIAZZOLLA
QUINTET
APR
7:30PM
APR
14
Original nuevo tango
7:30PM
DOUG LAWRENCE
APR ORGAN TRIO W/DAN
20 TRUDELL
THUR
7:30PM
Renowned tenor
saxophonist & Hammond
B3 virtuoso
FRI
APR
CHRISTOPHER SHULTIS
PERCUSSION MUSIC
7:30PM
Distinguished UNM
Professor Emeritus-Composer
21
MOVIES WEST
9201 Coors NW • 1 (800) Fandango, express # 1247
Mister Fri-Sat 9:00
John Wick: Chapter 2 Fri-Thu 12:30, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00
The LEGO Batman Movie 3D Fri-Thu 12:20, 3;00, 5:40,
8:30
The LEGO Batman Movie Fri-Thu 11:00am, 1:40, 4:20,
7:10, 10:10
Sing Fri-Thu 4:10, 10:20
Hidden Figures Fri-Thu 12:10, 3:30, 6:40, 9:50
Lion Fri-Thu 11:10, 2:05, 5:00; Sun-Thu 11:10, 2:05,
5:00, 8:00
A Dog’s Purpose Fri-Thu 11:20am, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40,
10:30
Hidden Figures Fri-Thu 12:20, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10
Fist Fight Fri-Thu 11:40am, 2:10, 4:40, 7:20, 9:40
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Fri-Thu 1:00, 7:00
210 Yale SE | 505.268.0044 | Student discounts and Rush tickets available! | TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE: OUTPOSTSPACE.ORG
FILM | TIMES wEEk oF FrI., APrIL 14-ThurS., APrIL 20
3236 La Orilla NW • 445-8500
The Fate of the Furious Fri-Sat 11:00am, 11:30am,
12:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 9:30,
10:00, 10:30; Sun 11:00am, 11:30am, 12:00, 2:30,
3:00, 3:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:15, 9:30, 10:00, 10:45; Mon
11:00am, 11:30am, 12:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 6:30,
7:00, 9:00, 9:45, 10:30; Tue-Wed 11:00am, 11:30am,
12:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3;30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 9:30,
10:00, 10:30; Thu 11:00am, 11:30am, 12:00, 2:30,
3:00, 3;30, 6:30, 7:15, 9:00, 10:00, 10:45
Grease (Sing-Along) Mon 7:00, 7:30, 8:00
Going in Style Fri-Thu 11:00am, 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00
Smurfs: The Lost Village Fri-Sun 12:15, 3:00, 5:45,
11:15; Mon-Thu 11:45am, 2:30, 5:15, 11:15
The Boss Baby Fri-Thu 11:15am, 2:00, 4:45, 7:3, 10:15
Ghost in the Shell Fri-Thu 10:30am, 11:00
Beauty and the Beast Fri-Sun 10:30am, 2:00, 4:30,
5:30, 8:15, 9:00; Mon 12:15, 3:45, 4:30, 7:45, 10:30;
Tue-Thu 10:30am, 2:00, 4:30, 5:30, 8:15, 9:00
Logan Fri-Sun 1:15, 7:45; Mon 1:15; Tue-Thu 1:15, 7:45
RIO RANCHO PREMIERE CINEMA
1000 Premiere Parkway • 994-3300
The Fate of the Furious Fri-Thu 11:00am, 11:55am,
12:55, 2:35, 3:30, 4:25, 6;10, 6;55, 7:55, 9:45, 10:20
Spark: A Space Tail Fri-Thu 11:00am, 1:35, 4:10, 6:45,
9:20
Smurfs: The Lost Village 3D Fri-Thu 2:50, 7:50
Smurfs: The Lost Village Fri-Thu 12:20, 5:20, 10:20
Going in Style Fri-Thu 11:15am, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15
The Shack Fri-Wed 12:20, 3:25, 6:40
Ghost in the Shell Fri-Thu 9:55
The Boss Baby 3D Fri-Thu 12:05, 5:35
The Boss Baby Fri-Thu 11:10am, 1:45, 2:45, 4:35, 7:20,
8:20, 10:00
Power Rangers Fri-Thu 12:20, 3:25, 6:30, 9:35
Beauty and the Beast Fri-Thu 11:20am, 1:20, 2:30,
4:30, 7:40; (Sing Along) Fri-Thu 12:20, 3:30
Kong: Skull Island Fri-Thu 11:10am, 2:10, 5:10, 6:40,
8:10, 9:40
Logan Fri-Thu 5:40, 9:05
GUILD CINEMA
3405 Central NE • 255-1848
SUB THEATER
After the Storm Fri-Mon 3:15, 8:00
Apprentice Fri-Mon 5:45
The Blues Brothers Fri 10:30pm
Omo Child: The River and the Bush Sat 1:00
Experiments in Cinema v12.3 Tue-Thu call for films and
times
HIGH RIDGE
UNM (Student Union Building Room 1003) • 277-5608
Life Is Beautiful Fri-Sat 6:00, 8:30
UNM MIDWEEK MOVIES
UNM (Student Union Building Room 1003) • 277-4706
John Wick: Chapter 2 Tues 8:00; Wed 4:00, 7:00; Thu
3:30
12910 Indian School NE • 275-0038
Please check alibi.com/filmtimes for films and times.
WINROCK STADIUM 16 IMAX & RPX
2100 Louisiana Blvd. NE • 881-2220
Please check alibi.com/filmtimes for films and times.
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[23]
AURAL FIXATION
MUSIC | SONIC WEIRDO
BY GEOFFREY PLANT
Getting Absurd with
Father John
Going for Golec
Easter concert a benefit
BY GEOFFREY PLANT w geoff@alibi.com
[24]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
Misty’s new album invokes pure comedy
BY DESMOND FOX
n 2015’s album I Love You, Honeybear, Father
John Misty spit some real wit at us with the
track “Bored in the USA.” The track itself
stands out on the album as a moment of clarity for
Father John—known to friends and family as Josh
Tillman—who steps away from the personal
recollections of dreams and romantic emotions
that comprise the rest of the record.
“Bored in the USA” pores over the comedy of
adult, middle class life. The narrator’s
expectations of adulthood are not being met, a
problem that is examined through the observation
of mundane injustices such as student loan
repayment and pharmaceutical-induced erectile
disfunction. Father John Misty calls out for
President White Jesus to save him from himself—
perhaps with some sort of distraction or
entertainment. Maybe a music record would do
nicely.
In April 2017 the bored American
consumers—meaning you and me—have yet
another Father John Misty album to access. This
time around we’re led into new territory by an
accomanying video for the album’s titular single,
called “Pure Comedy.” The video is lengthy and
has a desperate tone; it’s generally about the
comedy of existence and features notebook
doodles of human cruelty, paired with stock
footage that hints at the death of the American
Father John Misty
dream. Memorably, at one point in the
proceedings, American wrestler and human
goodwill machine John Cena surrenders his “never give up”
all is?,” “Isn’t it great how none of this matters to anyone
ideology with the flippant toss of a sweatband, left smelly and
but yourself?,” “Don’t you feel small?,” “Are you happy?”
alone in the center of the ring.
and “Does it matter if you are?”
As the father of folk rock Bob Dylan himself once declared,
One of the quiet moments on this record—a track titled
“The times they are a changin,’” but Misty takes a broader view “Leaving LA”—studies the human condition as a string
of the subject and suggests that perhaps they’re not changing at section swells up behind the sentiment and steers the
all, at least in any meaningful way. On Pure Comedy a wealth of listener where Misty needs them to go. Beautiful moments
nihilistic and absurdist notions come to a musical head. One
like this are scattered throughout the record and keep the
day all of this will be the distant past and what we leave behind project from ever feeling terribly preachy. The
on this godless blue marble in space doesn’t much matter, the
instrumentals are mixed with just as much care as Misty’s
record consistently suggests in an echoing sentiment that floats
often-subtle vocals, and it makes for a powerful experience.
through each tune.
At the end of the day, Pure Comedy might sound a little
If that sounds like a bit of a downer, well that’s all a matter
samey. It’s a long 75 minutes, but time well spent on the
of perspective. Personally, I’m a bit humbled and comforted by
philosophical ramblings of the self-proclaimed oldest man
the notion that our lives are meaningless pursuits of
in folk rock. Students of Kierkegaard and Camus will find
entertainment, but not everyone likes being made to feel small. just as much to enjoy as students of Nash and Young as they
To those listeners I urge you to zone out a bit while
fall into Father John Misty’s rabbit hole of human suffering
partaking in Misty’s admonitions. Don’t take it too seriously:
and think to themselves: Fuck man, fuck the measure of all
Have a drink, and enjoy the cool hour-plus of Misty’s honeyed
things.
vocals, layered over a careful soundtrack of acoustic guitar and
But what would I know? Halfway into my second play
carefully arranged jazz horns. Pure Comedy is not crushingly
through of the album, I stopped the record so I could go get
pessimistic in its musical composition, and that is a mercy
stoned and watch Sausage Party on Netflix; which, in a way,
without the feeling and telling of it becoming a compromise.
perfectly encapsulates what this whole project has been
Pure Comedy stands as a work composed as a whole; it’s a
about. After all, as Misty says on “Ballad of the Dying
single narrative with threads connecting every track on the
Man,” “We leave as clueless as we came.” I at least plan on
album. That notion is summarized on all 13 tracks, and overall,
leaving entertained, never bored, in the USA. a
the work asks questions like “Isn’t it funny how fucked up this
O
BOTH IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST VIA FACEBOOK
This Sunday, April 16, at Sister (407 Central NW) freaks and
norms, one and all,
are welcomed to
the First Annual
Psychedelic
Easter. The show
was originally
organized by and
now benefits local
rock and roll
musician Daniel
Golec. Golec was
hospitalized
March 8 after
being involved in a
collision with a car
while riding his
bicycle.
What had been a typical day of biking—attending to the general
business of his band the Holy Glories and networking with people
on projects like a possible brewpub to house his burgeoning skills
as a beer maker—ended most unexpectedly. Golec was struck by a
car just yards from what was probably his final destination of the
day. He sustained multiple injuries including skull fractures and a
traumatic brain injury that left him unconscious, even as this goes
to print.
For someone as vital and energetic as Daniel Golec, the notion
that he may not fully recover his former aptitude and personality is
a tragedy beyond description. No one can say whether or when he
will regain consciousness. The range of outcomes from traumatic
brain injury is unpredictable. The proceeds of Sunday’s show will
provide for the long recovery options that lay ahead.
Golec became a musician about five years ago after someone in
the now-defunct psych-garage-pop group CanyonLands noticed
his attendance at band practices was better than any of the actual
band members, suggesting he officially join the band as their synth
player. As longtime friend Luke Murphy puts it, Golec was having
too much fun playing in a band, so when CanyonLands broke up he
and (CanyonLands drummer) Mark Campagna talked Luke (Terri
Shiavo Dance Party) into playing drums in a new band. “Campagna
moved to guitars and vocals where he wanted to be, Bon Baca
played bass and Golec kept playing synth.”
Campagna, who has been in more Albuquerque bands than even
he can list, calls the drum heavy “death garage” Glories his near
favorite project so far, partly because of the quality of the music
but also because of Golec’s joyful presence, whom he and Luke
both point to as the driving force behind the band. While the
songwriting is a collaborative effort involving the synth player,
Golec has also been instrumental in promoting the band and
setting up gigs as the band’s informal manager.
Thanks to Golec, the Holy Glories were getting deserved
attention outside Burque. But the Glories had to cancel three
shows set up by Golec in Austin during the SXSW festival, a mere
two weeks after his hospitalization. The shows took place in the
underground NON-SXSW scene that happens every year in Austin
during the now-massive and industry-catered event and included a
high profile slot at the 5th Annual Psychedelic Pig Roast which
included psych scene heavies like Yonatan Gat and Greenbeard.
A full length Glories album that was to be ready for their shows
in Austin has also been put on hold for now. Without Golec, the
band says, there is no Holy Glories.
Friends and strangers, bicyclists and rockers are invited to
gather on Easter Sunday at 8pm at Sister to combine psychic
forces and send some Positive Mental Attitude in his direction. The
cover is low; donate at least five dollars to help with the continuing
cost of his medical care. On the bill are the droney Mirror Travel
from Taos, dreamy locals Adult Beverage and the damn loud Sun
Dog. a
Wednesday APRIL 12 8:00pm Doors
HOLOCAUSTIC
SORRY GUERO! + REGICIDE + EYE
Thursday APRIL 13 8:00pm Doors
CRIME LAB
BASKETBALL SHORTS + BELLEMAH
Friday APRIL 14 8:00pm Doors
WALLS WITHIN
ANESTHESIA
WAKE OF FIRE + TWO GUN KINGS
JOE ANDERSON
Saturday APRIL 15 8:00pm Doors
SHOGGOTH
DISENCHANTER
DOOMSTRESS
PREY FOR KALI +ISENORDAL
Sunday APRIL 16 8:00pm Doors
KOFFIN
KATS
MOONSHINE BLIND
THE COFFIN STUFFERS
Monday APRIL 17 8:00pm Doors
PEELANDER-Z
BEEFCAKE IN CHAINS
SHREWD
Wednesday APRIL 19 8:00pm Doors
HELL
OR HIGHWATER
BLINDDRYVE + STARBOT
Thursday APRIL 20 8:00pm Doors
REBECCA ARSCOTT
HIGH STREET RITUAL
RUDE BOIZ + DJ JETTI NASTY
Tuesday APRIL 25 6:30pm Doors
OCEANO
SLAUGHTER TO PREVAIL
AVERSIONS CROWN * SPITE * NO ZODIAC
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[25]
Calendar | MusiC
MUSIC
CALENDAR
MOLLY’S BAR, Tijeras Ancient Bones • classic rock, folk • 1:30pm •
Dangerous Curvz • classic rock • 6pm • FREE • 21+
SANTA ANA STAR CASINO, Bernalillo The Bus Tapes • funk, rock,
folk, jazz • 9pm • FREE • 21+
THE RANGE CAFÉ, Bernalillo Blues Guild of Albuquerque • blues •
7pm • FREE • 21+
SIDELINES SPORTS GRILLE & BAR Badd Fish • rock • 9pm
SISTER CHURCH • Youngsta • dubstep • Unicorn Fukr • James Black •
MC Ptrckuno • 8pm • $5 • 21+
THURSDAY APRIL 13
RIO BRAVO BREWING COMPANY Leah Leyva and The Band •
pop, blues, rock • 8pm • FREE • 21+
THE BARLEY ROOM BellaDawn • dance, rock • 6pm • 21+
ROCK & BREWS AOR • classic rock • 8pm • FREE
STAGE @ SANTA ANA STAR, Bernalillo Vegas Nights • DJ Andy
Gil • EDM, hip-hop • 9pm • $5-$10 • 21+
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB Tylor Brandon • acoustic,
variety • 7:30pm • FREE • ALL-AGES!
SANTA ANA STAR CASINO, Bernalillo The Bus Tapes • funk, rock,
folk, jazz • 9pm • FREE • 21+
STONE FACE TAVERN Odd Dog • classic rock • 8:30pm • FREE •
21+
BURTS TIKI LOUNGE Headphone • Hyrdant • Shrewd • house •
9pm • FREE • 21+
SHERATON UPTOWN HOTEL Last Call • jazz, blues, R&B • 6pm •
FREE • ALL-AGES!
SUNSHINE THEATER The Wailers • reggae, ska • Mondo Vibrations •
InnaState • Brotherhood Sound System • 7pm • $25 • 13+
CANTEEN BREWHOUSE Dusty Low • folk, Americana • 6pm • FREE •
21+
TRACTOR BREWING TAPROOM Brian McDaniel • folk • 5pm •
FREE • 21+
THE CRAFTROOM Kyle Martin • variety • 7pm • FREE • 21+
UPTOWN FUNK DUELING PIANOS Jorge Ramirez • Jami McNeil •
Craig Hendry • piano • 8pm • $5 • 21+
DIRTY BOURBON Redneck • country • 9pm
FILLING PHILLY’S Julian Dossett • blues • 5pm • FREE • ALL-AGES!
SUNDAY APRIL 16
FIRST TURN LOUNGE @ THE DOWNS CASINO Ladies Night • DJ
Sider • country, Latin, New Mexican • 8pm • FREE • 21+
LAUNCHPAD Koffin Kats • psychobilly • Moonshine Blind • rock,
country • Coffin Stuffers • 7pm • $8 • 21+
MARBLE BREWERY So Say We All • nerdcore • Rogues Beware •
rock • Stemson • 8pm • FREE • 21+
MINE SHAFT TAVERN, Madrid Memphis Strange • Doug Strahan •
Texas rock • 3pm • FREE • 21+
MEZCAL TEQUILERIA Emo Night • 9pm • $0-$5 • 21+
SISTER Sun Machine • Holy Glories • garage rock, psychedelic •
Sun Dog • 7pm • $5 • 21+ • See Aural Fixation.
MOLLY’S BAR, Tijeras Jam Night • Scott & Company • 6pm • FREE •
21+
SKYLIGHT, Santa Fe Latin Night • salsa, bachata, cumbia,
merengue, EDM • 9pm
SISTER Reignbeau • indie electronica • 1960SFE • chill
wave • bk beats • trap • 8pm • $5
TRACTOR BREWING WELLS PARK Delphia • 8pm • FREE • 21+
UPTOWN FUNK DUELING PIANOS Jorge Ramirez • piano • Jami
McNeil • Craig Hendry • 7pm • FREE • 21+
MONDAY APRIL 17
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB Julian Dossett • variety • 6pm •
FREE • ALL-AGES!
SKYLIGHT, Santa Fe Kinetic Fridays • DJ Poetics • variety • 9pm
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB, Rio Rancho New Mexico
Western Music Association • country • 6:30pm • FREE • ALL-AGES!
WINNING COFFEE CO. Songwriter Open Mic • 7pm • FREE
STAGE @ SANTA ANA STAR, Bernalillo DJ Andy Gil • hip-hop,
EDM • 9pm • $0-$10 • 21+
LAUNCHPAD Peelander-Z • Beefcake In Chains • punk • Shrewd •
8pm • $7 • 21+
FRIDAY APRIL 14
UPTOWN FUNK DUELING PIANOS Jorge Ramirez • Jami McNeil •
Craig Hendry • piano • 8pm • $5 • 21+
LIZARD TAIL BREWING Open Mic Jam Night with Dave and
Friends • 7pm
YANNI’S AND LEMONI BAR AND GRILL Jazz Brasileiro • bossa
nova • 7:30pm • FREE • 21+
MOONLIGHT LOUNGE Round Up Boys • The Shadowmen • rockabilly • 9pm • 21+
SATURDAY APRIL 15
TRACTOR BREWING TAPROOM Old-Time Jam Circle • Virginia
Creepers • 7:30pm • FREE • 21+
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB Ancient Bones • classic rock,
folk • 5:30pm • Half a Shipwreck • variety • 8:30pm • FREE •
ALL-AGES!
TUESDAY APRIL 18
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB John Suesy • variety • 5:30pm •
FREE • ALL-AGES!
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB, Rio Rancho Rob Roman •
variety • 4:30pm • Singing Pilgrims • folk, country • 7:30pm • FREE •
ALL-AGES!
BURTS TIKI LOUNGE Chiefs • Red Mesa • Dead Canyon • Alien
Space Kitchen • space rock • 9pm • $5 • 21+
THE CO-OP Eyes Set to Kill • metal • Bad Seed Rising • The Nearly
Deads • Powerhouse • hardcore punk • Illumina AD • 7pm • $10 •
ALL-AGES!
THE CRAFTROOM The Riddims • roots, rock, reggae • 7pm • FREE •
21+
DIRTY BOURBON Redneck • country • 9pm
HOTEL ANDALUZ The Tracey Whitney Quartet • classical jazz • 7pm
LAUNCHPAD Walls Within • metal • Anesthesia • Wake of Fire • Two
Gun Kings • 8pm • $5 • 21+
LAZY LIZARD GRILL, Cedar Crest Odd Dog • classic rock • 7pm •
FREE • 21+
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB, Rio Rancho Emily Anslover •
variety • 4:30pm • Da Terra Miega • variety • 7:30pm • FREE •
ALL-AGES!
THE BREW DIG • acoustic, singer-songwriter • 1pm • FREE •
ALL-AGES!
CANTEEN BREWHOUSE Johnny Anzari • blues • 4pm • FREE • 21+
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB Open Mic • 6pm • FREE •
ALL-AGES!
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB, Rio Rancho Open Mic • 6pm •
FREE • ALL-AGES!
DIRTY BOURBON Anders Osborne • Americana, rock • 7:30pm •
FREE • 21+
THE COOPERAGE Calle 66 • salsa • 5pm • $7 • 21+
DRAFT STATION Julian Dossett • blues • Michael Graff • Kevin
Maher • 7pm • FREE • 21+
THE CRAFTROOM Matt Jones • folk, acoustic • 1pm • The Gershom
Brothers • folk, Americana • 7pm • FREE • 21+
FIRST TURN LOUNGE @ THE DOWNS CASINO Karaoke • 7pm •
FREE • 21+
DIRTY BOURBON Redneck • country • 9pm
MOONLIGHT LOUNGE The Talking Hours • Snailmate • Starbot •
Mountainhead • electronic • 8pm • 21+
THE LINKS BAR AND GRILL, Santa Fe Karaoke Night • 6:30pm •
FREE • 21+
DRAFT STATION Todd Tijerina • blues, roots rock • 7pm • FREE •
21+
MARBLE BREWERY Pawnshop Poster Boys • ska, reggae, alternative • 8pm • FREE • 21+
EL CAMPANARIO DE SANTA FE, Santa Fe Gia Farre • variety •
8pm • $15 • 21+
WEDNESDAY APRIL 19
HOTEL ALBUQUERQUE DJ Aztech Sol • Latin, salsa • 10pm • 21+
BLUE GRASSHOPPER BREW PUB Chris Ravin • variety • 7pm •
FREE • ALL-AGES!
MARBLE BREWERY HEIGHTS TAP ROOM RJ Perez • funk, blues •
7pm • FREE • 21+
MARBLE BREWERY WESTSIDE TAP ROOM Alchemie • indie,
modern rock • 8pm • FREE • 21+
JAM SPOT Midget Loco • Chicano rap • Yung Malo • J Tha Hustla •
7pm • $20-$40 • ALL-AGES!
LAUNCHPAD Shoggoth • metal • Disenchanter • Doomstress • Prey
For Kali • stoner rock • Isenordal • 8pm • $7 • 21+
MARBLE BREWERY Le Chat Lunatique • jazz, swing • 8pm • FREE •
21+
MARBLE BREWERY HEIGHTS TAP ROOM Cali Shaw Duo • indie,
folk • 7pm • FREE • 21+
MARBLE BREWERY WESTSIDE TAP ROOM Seth Hoffman • folk,
acoustic • 8pm • FREE • 21+
MINE SHAFT TAVERN, Madrid CW Ayon • blues • 3pm • 21+ •
Bernardus • acoustic, folk rock • 7pm • FREE
MOLLY’S BAR, Tijeras Rock Bottom • country • 1:30pm • Memphis
P-Tails • blues, rock • 6pm • FREE • 21+
MINE SHAFT TAVERN, Madrid Jesse Hunter • singer-songwriter • 5pm • Foxfeather • Americana, folk • 7pm • FREE
PUEBLO HARVEST CAFÉ Levi Platero Band • blues, rock, funk •
6pm • $10 • ALL-AGES!
THE RANGE CAFÉ, Bernalillo Last Call • jazz, blues, R&B • 7pm •
FREE • ALL-AGES!
THE RANGE CAFÉ, Bernalillo Ivan Rane • fingerstyle guitar • 7pm
BURTS TIKI LOUNGE Emby Alexander • indie, experimental • Port
Alice • rock • St. Range • Giant Killer • indie, electro pop • 9pm •
FREE • 21+
LAUNCHPAD Hell or Highwater • BlindDryve • alternative metal •
Starbot • 8pm • $8 • 21+
MARBLE BREWERY Whiskerman • rock, soul, funk • 8pm • FREE •
21+
MOLLY’S BAR, Tijeras Cowboy Scott • country • 6pm • FREE • 21+
MOONLIGHT LOUNGE The Riddims • roots, rock, reggae • Natty
Common Roots • Vibestrong • 8pm • 21+
SISTER Steve Hammond • Hi-Plains Grifters • UNM Honky Tonk
Ensemble • The Tumbleweeds • Western swing, honky tonk •
7pm • FREE • 21+ • See Event Horizon
TRACTOR BREWING TAPROOM Julian Wild • acoustic • 8:30pm •
FREE • 21+
UPTOWN FUNK DUELING PIANOS Jorge Ramirez • piano • Ashley
Owen • 7pm • FREE • 21+
Compiled by Megan Reneau and Taylor Grabowsky. Submit your events at alibi.com/events.
[26]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
bAked goods | cAnnAbis ReVieW by August MARch
A Patient Forest Fire
On CBD, THC and pain management
was sitting in an easy boy recliner that I found
at an estate sale in Ridgecrest—they have the
best estate sales in Ridgecrest, btw—listening
to an album called Globe of Frogs. It is by an
English band called Robyn Hitchcock and the
Egyptians. The recording mostly concerns itself
with wickedness and goodness and life and
death on the planet Earth. The songs have an
earthy yet arch flavor, a sadness that is singular
as far as Brit pop goes.
Oh, and it was three in the morning, and I
could not get to sleep, my body feels
like it is burning in spots. Chronic
pain and inflammation—and the
physical and psychological toll
they take on the human form—
made it difficult to rise from the
chair I took from someone named
Harry, who’s already shuffled off
this mortal coil.
I used to think that if I couldn’t
be strong, I couldn’t live.
Without a reserve of physical
strength, I wouldn’t want to live, I
earnestly believed.
My youthful exploits included stints
on the edge of Amazonia in a bamboo hut, the
wind-swept valleys of Mustang with naught but
a sleeping bag and a knife, and the West End of
London in a cold-water flat through a
particularly wet winter. While an auto-immune
disease changed that idealistic outlook, it took
the clinical efficacy of medical cannabis to
evolve my life situation into something that was
once again tolerable … and even pleasant.
I have adjusted to things I once believed I
would never tolerate. I don’t think I’d ever been
sick before 2004. That year, in April, my middle
finger suddenly grew to the size of a pickle. It
was inflamed, rigid and very painful. My
primary care physician at the time did not know
what to think. Three years later, when I came
down with a rare form of vasculitis, the truth
became painfully clear.
For me, pain management has become an issue
that is as important—nay, more so—than my
underlying condition. That’s because I know
that if I’m in pain, my chances of healing are
dramatically lessened; the stress that moderate
chronic pain creates may even cause further
flare ups and a decline in the health I hold so
precious.
Getting a N.M. Department of Health Medical
Marijuana card was not a problem. My primary
care physician—long in the know about the
amount of moderate chronic pain I
experience—knew that such would be to my
benefit.
The real issue, it turned out, was finding the
proper combination of ingredients,
consumption methods and dosages necessary to
relieve my pain and inflammation on a regular
and sustainable basis.
Since my condition includes inflammation of
the lining of my lungs, I decided that smoking
was not to my taste, or benefit. Instead, I began
investigating edible medical cannabis.
I
I began my quest at Seven Clover, a dispensary
in my Nob Hill neighborhood. It has a boutique
flair to it and the attendants are thorough and
friendly.
For my first encounter with medical cannabis, I
chose a packet of watermelon flavored Karma
Hard Candies (41.6mg THC, 1.74mg CBD per
candy, $18). About one hour after consuming
one of the candies (Don’t try to chew these up,
they stuck to my teeth;they may stick to yours
too.) I began to feel some relief. The pain I
felt was not so much gone as it was very
muted. It became part of the background,
I felt slightly euphoric and was able to
spend the rest of the evening practicing
the piano without distraction, although
some lingering stiffness and
inflammation remained.
When it came time for bed, I ate
another candy; I slept through
the night and awoke feeling
rested and ready for work. Since
this form of medicine comes in a
handy, resealable foil packet, I
determined that it would be a good
idea to keep the container on my
person, both to keep the pain at bay and to
become aware of the idea that there was indeed
an applicable solution to my quandary.
That afternoon, I stopped at Seven Clover to
check out a more CBD-based medicine. It has
been reported that cannabidiol (CBD)
suppresses chronic inflammatory and
neuropathic pain, and I wanted to find out for
myself. I chose the Bhang THC+CBD Ratio
Nugget, a dark, rich chocolate featuring a
hybrid called Cannatonic (12.5mg THC, 25mg
CBD, $16) to further my knowledge and
experience of those properties which I sought to
regain help regain my health equilibrium.
In this case, the medicine began to have an
effect after about 45 minutes. This time there
was no mild euphoria and no displacement of
pain. Instead the pain upon which much of my
life is based was gone. I could tell from looking
at and using the joints normally affected by
inflammation that such had also receded.
Armed with this newfound, anecdotally
acceptable knowledge, I trucked over to Seven
Clover the next day and purchased more Bhang
Cannatonic chocolates and two more packets of
watermelon candy, keeping keenly aware of
CBD’s strong pain-fighting qualities.
I’m sitting in that same chair I told about
earlier. This time, I’m at rest; the Hitchcock
music I’m listening to (Olé Tarantula) is less
frantic, less fraught with fate’s fragility . And I’ll
sleep well tonight, comfortable in the
knowledge that as my health condition
continues to evolve, so will the medical options
available to treat it in a reasonable and
strength-sustaining way. a
Seven Clover
3800 Central SE
(505) 255-7000
Hours: Mon-Sat 1am-7pm, Sun 11am-5pm
YS
EE DAYS
DAY
DA
DAY
S OF
THREE
SAVIN
VINGS!
4/20 SAVINGS!
ear on April 20th, w
we say
y thank y
you to the
Every year
w Me
Mexico by offering
ering lo
lower prices.
patients of New
xpand on this tr
tradition, we
e will be offering
o
To
o expand
amazing savings
vings for
f three days!
s! Join us April 18th,
19th and 20th at
a all locations for
or these deals!*
$9 Per Gram
ram
rains • $10
0 Edibles
am On All Strains
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Discounted
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NOB HILL
4014 Central Ave
e. SE
Albuquerque,, NM 87108
8
WESTSIDE
5201 Ouray Rd. NW Suite E
Albuquerque
que, NM 87120
MIDTOWN
4414 Menaul Blvd.
Suit 1
d. NE Suite
Albuquerque,, NM 87110
8
NORTH COORS
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9421 Coors
oors Blv
Blvd. NW Suite C
Albuquerque
que, NM 87114
GRANTS
411 W. Santa Fe Ave.. Suite
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020
NE HEIGHTS
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gomery Blvd.
Blv NE
Albuquerque
que, NM 87111
(505) 510-17
1717 • WWW.RGREENLEAF
.RGREENLEAF.COM
*04/18/17 through 04/20/17.
er medicine is specially priced
s, a selection of edibles and deriv
derivatives will
0/ Flower
pric for all three days,
be on sale daily. Price advertised
ertised does not include tax. R. Greenleaf
Gr
reserves
es the right to
t alter this promotion as seen fit.
Photo credit - Sergio Salvador
ador - aat RGO NE Heights. ©2017 All rights reserved.
ed. R. Greenleaf
Gr
Organics, Inc.
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[27]
straIght dopE | advIcE from thE abyss
Clinical Assessment
Services
If everything else is more
expensive in Europe, why do
we pay more for healthcare?
for
MEDICAL CANNABIS
PROGRAM
NM Lic. Medical
Doctor & Clinical
Psychologist on
premises for MCP
diagnosis and renewals
People always point out that Americans pay 2.5
times more per capita for healthcare compared
to Europe and receive much poorer results. But
isn’t everything in Europe—gasoline, housing,
food, taxes—more expensive than in the US? If
this is true, then how could healthcare be so
inexpensive?
—Pearl-Clutching Provocateur
505-508-5575
!
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[28]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
!!
by cEcIl adams
!
Priorities, Pearl, priorities. European
governments slap heavy taxes on gas, for instance,
but they’ve made sure to contain healthcare costs. In
the US we’ve done the opposite: Mexico excepted,
our gas tax is by far the lowest in the industrialized
world, but healthcare costs are largely entrusted to
market forces. American insurers are corporations
seeking profits, which raises prices, requiring
government to step in and cover excessive costs, and
this steady flow of state money in turn allows
insurers to raise prices even further. In the end, our
health-insurance system doesn’t look too different
from what you’d get if you’d set out to design one as
expensive as you could manage.
Look at administrative costs. Twenty-five percent
of hospital spending in the US goes to
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
administration, compared to just 12 percent in (e.g.)
Scotland.
Why? The Scots use a single-payer
!
insurance system (you know—the kind we’re not
!! allowed to have), wherein the hospital simply sends a
to the government and gets reimbursed. In the
!! bill
US there are multiple payers: private insurance
!! companies, government insurance plans, and
patients. Sorting through this crowd to determine
!! who'll pay for what is a full-time job—many, many
jobs, in fact. And insurance companies need
!! full-time
to cover their expenses and make a little profit
! themselves.
So do pharmaceutical companies, which brings us
! to a more headline-grabbing cause: high drug costs.
! We all remember the outcry when Mylan marked up
its EpiPen by 400 percent, but that was merely an
extreme example of the rational capitalist behavior
drug firms engage in all the time. When your product
can literally save a life, and you’ve got a 20-year
patent monopoly on it, you'll tend to price it like the
goldmine it is unless someone steps in to regulate
you.
And European nations do. The UK’s National
Health Service, like other Euro programs, negotiates
pricing with drug companies to limit markup. By
contrast, Medicare, the biggest drug customer in the
US, is legally barred from such negotiation, and it
reimburses doctors more when they prescribe more
expensive meds. Meanwhile, companies maintain
their monopolies by tweaking drugs’ nontherapeutic
aspects to extend the patent. And even when
generic alternatives exist, laws in 26 states require
patient consent for pharmacists to make a
substitution, meaning that prescriptions needlessly
get filled with pricey name-brand drugs instead; as a
result, a 2016 Harvard report found, Medicaid
shelled out an extra $19.8 million in 2006 for the
cholesterol drug Zocor alone.
The pharmaceutical industry can’t just shrug and
say, “Well, capitalism” without inflaming popular
opinion, so it defends high prices by pointing to R &
D costs: somebody’s got to invent these new
wonder drugs, they say, and that process ain’t
cheap. Thing is, the pharma companies aren’t bearing
these costs all by themselves—especially in the early
stages of drug development, a lot of the key work
may get done at the National Institutes of Health or
in university labs. The actual cost of drug research is
hard to pin down, partly because pharmaceutical
companies are so secretive about their accounting. A
2014 study from a pharma-backed organization
priced the per-drug development cost at $2.6 billion,
but independent research has it as low as $161
million.
Doctors are more expensive in the US too. A
stateside physician may earn effectively three times
what her German peers do; on the other hand, she’s
probably paying off debt, whereas in Germany
medical education is basically free. Again: priorities.
Physicians’ groups also blame our litigious society,
which they say leads doctors to practice defensive
medicine—guarding against malpractice claims by
ordering excessive testing and procedures. It’s tough
to say how much these tendencies may cost us, as
doctors have widely varying ideas about what’s
necessary treatment and what’s ass-covering: a
2010 Harvard study put the annual impact of
defensive medicine in the US at $45.5 billion; a big
healthcare staffing company used data from a Gallup
survey of doctors to come up with a figure seven
times higher.
Whether fear of malpractice suits motivates our
docs or not, we certainly do get more care than our
European counterparts: 3 times as many
mammograms, 2 1/2 times as many MRIs, about 30
percent more C-sections. But the benefit of that
extra care is hard to gauge. For instance,
Pennsylvania, which has roughly the same
population as Ontario, has about six times as many
hospitals where patients can receive open-heart
surgery. Here’s the thing, though: the fact that this
treatment is more readily available means US
patients (insured ones, anyway) who might not need
it go under the knife just to be safe; meanwhile, life
expectancy after a heart attack is about the same in
both countries. Still, would you or I pass up a
potentially life-saving operation based on that
statistic? Probably not—and there’s another part of
what’s keeping our costs so high.
Free Will Astrology | Horoscopes by
ARIES (March 21-April 19): Before visiting Sicily
for the first time, American poet Billy Collins learned to
speak Italian. In his poem “By a Swimming Pool
Outside Siracusa,” he describes how the new
language is changing his perspective. If he were
thinking in English, he might say that the gin he’s
drinking while sitting alone in the evening light “has
softened my mood.” But the newly Italianized part of
his mind would prefer to say that the gin “has allowed
my thoughts to traverse my brain with greater
gentleness” and “has extended permission to my mind
to feel a friendship with the vast sky.” Your assignment
in the coming week, Aries, is to Italianize your view of
the world. Infuse your thoughts with expansive
lyricism and voluptuous relaxation. If you’re Italian,
celebrate and amplify your Italianness.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s closing time. You
have finished toiling in the shadow of an old sacred
cow. You’ve climaxed your relationship with ill-fitting
ideas that you borrowed from mediocre and
inappropriate teachers once upon a time. And you can
finally give up your quest for a supposed Holy Grail
that never actually existed in the first place. It’s time to
move on to the next chapter of your life story, Taurus!
You have been authorized to graduate from any
influence, attachment and attraction that wouldn’t
serve your greater good in the future. Does this mean
you’ll soon be ready to embrace more freedom than
you have in years? I’m betting on it.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The heaviest butterfly
on the planet is the female Queen Victorian Birdwing.
It tips the scales at two grams. The female Queen
Alexandra Birdwing is the butterfly with the longest
wingspan: over 12 inches. These two creatures remind
me of you these days. Like them, you’re freakishly
beautiful. You’re a marvelous and somewhat
vertiginous spectacle. The tasks you’re working on are
graceful and elegant, yet also big and weighty.
Because of your intensity, you may not look flightworthy, but you’re actually quite aerodynamic. In fact,
your sorties are dazzling and influential. Though your
acrobatic zigzags seem improbable, they’re effective.
CANCER (June 21-July 22): Picasso had mixed
feelings about his fellow painter Marc Chagall, who
was born under the sign of Cancer. “I’m not crazy
about his roosters and donkeys and flying violinists,
and all the folklore,” Picasso said, referring to the
subject matter of Chagall’s compositions. But he also
felt that Chagall was one of the only painters “who
understands what color really is,” adding, “There’s
never been anybody since Renoir who has the feeling
for light that Chagall has.” I suspect that in the coming
weeks, you will be the recipient of mixed messages like
these. Praise and disapproval may come your way.
Recognition and neglect. Kudos and apathy. Please
don’t dwell on the criticism and downplay the
applause. In fact, do the reverse!
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Go Tell It on the Mountain”
is the title of an old gospel song, and now it’s the
metaphorical theme of your horoscope. I advise you to
climb a tall peak—even if it’s just a magic mountain in
your imagination—and deliver the spicy monologue
that has been marinating within you. It would be great
if you could gather a sympathetic audience for your
revelations, but that’s not mandatory to achieve the
necessary catharsis. You simply need to be gazing at
the big picture as you declare your big, ripe truths.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): If you were a snake, it
would be a fine time to molt your skin. If you were a
river, it would be a perfect moment to overflow your
banks in a spring flood. If you were an office worker, it
would be an excellent phase to trade in your
claustrophobic cubicle for a spacious new niche. In
other words, Virgo, you’re primed to outgrow at least
one of your containers. The boundaries you knew you
would have to transgress some day are finally ready to
be transgressed. Even now, your attention span is
expanding and your imagination is stretching.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): For over a century, the
Ringsaker Lutheran Church in Buxton, N.D. hosted
rites of passage, including 362 baptisms, 50 marriages
rob brezsny
and 97 funerals. It closed in 2002, a victim of the
area’s shrinking population. I invite you to consider the
possibility that this can serve as a useful metaphor for
you, Libra. Is there a place that has been a sanctuary
for you, but has begun to lose its magic? Is there a
traditional power spot from which the power has been
ebbing? Has a holy refuge evolved into a mundane
hang-out? If so, mourn for a while, then go in search of
a vibrant replacement.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Most people throw
away lemon rinds, walnut shells and pomegranate
skins. But some resourceful types find uses for these
apparent wastes. Lemon rind can serve as a
deodorizer, cleaner and skin tonic, as well as a zesty
ingredient in recipes. Ground-up walnut shells work
well in facial scrubs and pet bedding. When made into
a powder, pomegranate peels have a variety of
applications for skin care. I suggest you look for
metaphorically similar things, Scorpio. You’re typically
inclined to dismiss the surfaces and discard the
packaging and ignore the outer layers, but I urge you
to consider the possibility that right now they may
have value.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’re growing
too fast, but that’s fine as long as you don’t make
people around you feel they’re moving too slowly. You
know too much, but that won’t be a problem as long as
you don’t act snooty. And you’re almost too attractive
for your own good, but that won’t hurt you as long as
you overflow with spontaneous generosity. What I’m
trying to convey, Sagittarius, is that your excesses are
likely to be more beautiful than chaotic, more fertile
than confusing. And that should provide you with
plenty of slack when dealing with cautious folks who
are a bit rattled by your lust for life.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Until recently,
scientists believed the number of trees on the planet
was about 400 billion. But research published in the
journal Nature says that’s wrong. There are actually
three trillion trees on earth—almost eight times more
than was previously thought. In a similar way, I
suspect you have also underestimated certain
resources that are personally available to you,
Capricorn. Now is a good time to correct your
undervaluation. Summon the audacity to recognize
the potential abundance you have at your disposal.
Then make plans to tap into it with a greater sense of
purpose.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The poet John
Keats identified a quality he called “negative
capability.” He defined it as the power to calmly
accept “uncertainties, mysteries and doubts without
any irritable reaching after fact and reason.” I would
extend the meaning to include three other things not
to be irritably reached for: artificial clarity, premature
resolution and simplistic answers. Now is an excellent
time to learn more about this fine art, Aquarius.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Are you ready for a
riddle that’s more enjoyable than the kind you’re used
to? I’m not sure if you are. You may be too jaded to
embrace this unusual gift. You could assume it’s
another one of the crazy-making cosmic jokes that
have sometimes tormented you in the past. But I hope
that doesn’t happen. I hope you’ll welcome the riddle
in the liberating spirit in which it’s offered. If you do,
you’ll be pleasantly surprised as it teases you in ways
you didn’t know you wanted to be teased. You’ll feel a
delightful itch or a soothing burn in your secret self,
like a funny-bone feeling that titillates your immortal
soul. PS: To take full advantage of the blessed riddle,
you may have to expand your understanding of what’s
good for you. a
TEST THIS HYPOTHESIS: THE ANSWER TO A PRESSING
QUESTION WILL COME WITHIN 72 HOURS AFTER YOU
DO A RITUAL IN WHICH YOU ASK FOR CLARITY.
Go to realastrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded
weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The
audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888
or (900) 950-7700.
Are
A
re y
you
ou ready
re
ea
ad
dy
y ffor
or 4/
4/2
4/20?
/20?
Hate waiting in line?
Come in for the same deals on 4/19 as 4/20. 50% off glass, 20%
tinctures and topicals, Live music and raffle prizes 4-7pm on 4/20 at
Green Jeans in ABQ.
First 50 patients receive a free goodie bag with purchase on 4/20.
ALBUQUERQUE
Sun-Th: 12-9pm
Fri-Sat: 12-10pm
3600 Cutler Ave Ne
505-348-5599
SANTA FE
Sat-Sun: 11-4pm
Mon-Fri: 10-7pm
Search for:
Sacred Garden
1300 Luisa St Suite 1
505-216-9686
www.SacredGardenNM.com
Pain Relief in a Brief
Medical Cannabis Health & Information Center
•New and Renewal Licenses with our in house Doctors
•Personal Production License to grow your own
•Caregiver Licenses
•Low Income,Veteran, and Student Discounts
(discounts Valid after April)
•Competitor Quoted Price Match Available
(ask for details)
•Payments Plans
•Ask about our Compassionate Fund!
•Interested in the Medical Cannabis Industry?
Consult with our four in-house
Medical Cannabis Professionals!
"Seed to Smoke" Program
Purchase, set up and assistance
with growing your very own medical cannabis!
IN home bid= $75.00
4730 Pan American East Freeway NE #E Albuquerque, NM 87109
APRIL 13-19, 2017 WEEKLY ALIBI [29]
Classified
Beauty Services
6827/www.rebels-music.com
UNM DENTAL SERVICES FREE
Dental Screenings and
AFFORDABLE Dental care. We
accept Medicaid and other
dental insurance. Call or text
505-433-9543
Seminars/Workshops
TEACH ENGLISH
w ANYWHERE Get Certified
LEGAL DOCUMENTATION
SRVC. Pro Se Legal Document
Preparation Service. call 505804-4774
to teach English & teach your
way around the world. Take the
4-week SIT TESOL Certificate
Course this June in Santa Fe.
6/12-7/07.
info@tesoltrainers.com. Call
John 204-4361.
www.tesoltrainers.com/sittesol-certificate.html
Handyman Services
Events
7 STAR ELECT-PLUMB &
HVAC
www.AlbuquerqueElectricians.ne
t 505-332-8965 / Mike Bell /
Owner Electric, Plumbing,
Heating & Cooling mikebell711@yahoo.com
UNM SUSTAINABILITY EXPO
Come celebrate Earth Day at
the University of New
Mexicoâs 9th Annual
Sustainability Expo! The event
will be held on the Cornell
Mall â” east of the Student
Union Building â” April 20th
10:30am to 2:30pm.
Legal Services
w
Buy/Sell/Trade
BUYING DIABETIC TEST
STRIPS FOR $CASH$ &
FREE PICK-UP! Highest CASH
Prices Paid In NM For Your
Diabetic Test Strips And FREE
Pick-UP! Help Others(Those
Without Insurance) & Make
Money Too! Call: 505-2036806
w
Education/Instruction
GUITAR AND BASS LESSONS
With 20 years experience, Jay
Forsythe offers personalized
instruction to each student.
Weekly full or half hour lessons
available. 505-227-
Announcements
JOHN V. KEMM
http://johnvkemm.com/
Studies
MRI STUDY 18-60 y.o.
M/F for brain study. $20
per hour. 505-948-3230
(HRRC # 13-637).
ARE YOU TRYING TO QUIT
SMOKING? We are studying
whether an experimental
treatment can help people
quit smoking. The study
involves answering questions
about your mood, personality,
and alcohol and tobacco use
over the phone and in the
w
Place your ad: alibi.com
classifieds@alibi.com
(505) 346-0660 ext 258
laboratory. It consists of eight
different visits over a period of
three months. Eligible
participants will be paid up to
$300 for their time and be
given free nicotine patches.
We are currently seeking
regular smokers who are
between the ages of 18-60
and who want to quit
smoking. If you would like to
participate please call 505933-9891 or email
12-547@mrn.org. Please
mention “Quit Smoking
Study”. UNM HRRC #12-547.
ABQ DRINQ STUDY We are
seeking healthy individuals
22-55 years of age who are
moderate to heavy drinkers for
a study of how alcohol use
affects brain functioning. The
study involves four visits at the
Mind Research Network over
18 months and each visit
requires up to 8 hours, which
can be split over multiple
days. You will be compensated
at the rate of $20/hour for
your participation. The Mind
Research Network is located
on the North Campus of
University of New Mexico. If
you would like to be
considered for the study,
please call 505-633-4028 or
email abqdrinq@mrn.org.
Please mention âABQ DRINQ
Studyâ.
STRESS & THE BRAIN STUDY
Researchers at UNM, CASAA
and the Mind Research
Network are seeking people
21-50 years of age who have
experienced domestic
violence, rape, sexual assault,
or severe physical assault for
a study of the effects of
traumatic stress on emotions
and urges to drink alcohol. The
study involves two
appointments at the Mind
Research Network for a total
of about 7 hours. We are
looking for people who donât
have any problems as well as
those who do. You will be
compensated financially for
your participation. If you are
interested in participating or
would like more information,
please call 505-925-2335 or
email us at
casaastudy@gmail.com.
HRRC# 13-327
MRI STUDY 12-18 y.o.
M/F for brain study. $20
per hour. 272-0769 (HRRC #
07-272).
MRI STUDY 18-50 y.o.
M/F with history of
mental illness for brain study.
$20 per hour. 948-3230
(HRRC # 13-637).
Business or property with
WWW.DukeCityTimes.Com call
505-804-4774
138 Girard, 4brm 1bth
1300mnth 1100
deposite,Maddox 505-2420989
w
w
Cars
CALL ME FOR LOW
w PAYMENTS Call me I’ll
get you LOW car
payments!Steven 505-8044774
YOU WILL GET RESULTS when
you place your classified ad in the
Weekly Alibi. Call 346-0660 ext.
221 today!
Real Estate
Securitas Security Events Team
Looking for extra income? Join our Special Events team and qualify for
seasonal bonus incentives.
Upcoming events:
• Gathering of Nations April 27th-29th
• Isleta Concert Season May-Oct
• NM Expo Events Feb-Sept
• Santa Ana Events Feb-Sept
Join us for the entire event season through September and qualify for
great bonus and incentive programs.
**Increased bonus available to those hired with current NM Level 1
Guard License.
Apply at: www.Securitasjobs.com
Albuquerque, NM Special Events Security Officer or
Weekly Open Hiring Events held every Friday 10am-3pm starting March 10th
2201 San Pedro Drive NE
Bldg.2 Suite 225
Albuquerque
505-341-2041
[30]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
Real Estate
condition! $500. 119 Quincy
NE. 620-4970.
EAST NOB HILL OFFICE 3
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incl. Upfront pkng. Beautiful
condition! $500. 119 Quincy
NE. 620-4970.
EAST NOB HILL OFFICE 3
ofcs, recptn, conf rm. Utils
incl. Upfront pkng. Beautiful
Downtown
Apartments for Rent
ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS!! Advertise Your
Houses for Rent
Nob Hill
UNM HOUSE LEASE NOW
THE WEEKLY ALIBI
CLASSIFIEDS are a great deal!
Call 346-0660 ext. 221.
Body & Soul
Wellness
BUDDHIST MEDITATION
Buddhist Introductory
Meditation Class, April 10-May
1, Mondays, 6:30-8:00 pm.
Students at all levels of
practice are welcome.
Location/Contact:
Albuquerque Insight
Meditation Center (ABQ
Insight.org), 200 Rosemont
Ave. NE, ABQ.
REDUCE YOUR
DRINKING? New nonmedication based treatment
w
program for heavy drinking
using brain stimulation and
mindfulness treatment. You
will be paid up to $400 for up
to 28 hours of your time.
Please call 505-750-0451 or
email abqresearch@unm.edu.
Counseling/Psychiatr
y
STRUGGLING? Offering
w evidence-based,
problem-focused, DBT-trained,
strength-based, holistic,
rational, experienced therapy.
Private office in UNM area.
Insurance accepted:
Presbyterian and Magellan,
and sliding scale. Jay
Glickman LPCC; Gryphon
Counseling LLC. (505) 5852601
Licensed Massage
PAIN RELIEF/ IT WORKS!
Ad: Extraordinary pain/stress
relief. Hospital/rehab
experience. Canadian trained
Therapist. $60 w/ad. Katrina
LMT#6855 (505)506-4016
innovative.massagetherapy.co
m
Martial Arts
ZEN AND AIKIDO CLASSES
Combining the stillness of Zen
with the beauty, power and
grace of Aikido. Noon and
evening classes forming,
starting in May. Both Hands
Clapping Aikido.
Spas
NEW 5-PERSON HOT TUB
New 5-person 9-jet hot tub
originally $3999, only $2000!
Buyer must pick up in
Corrales. Email for details.
Employment
Employment
NOW HIRING: K & N
Construction, Inc. is NOW
HIRING!! We are looking for
experienced Concrete Form
Setters & Finishers!! Please
send your application to:
applications@knconstinc.co
m
HIRING EVENT 04/14/17
w The Sheraton ABQ Uptown
Hotel is hiring! Join us at our
hotel hiring event Friday, 04/14
from 9am-12pm. We are located
at 2600 Louisiana Blvd. NE.
Apply online today:
www.sheratonuptown.com/apply
. Questions? Call 505-349-
8033.
HOUSE CLEANERS Mon-Fri,
Days. Weekly Pay. Up to
$10.70/hr. Car required. Paid
Mileage & Travel. Paid Training.
CALL 344-9880
Opportunities
DRESSMAKER WANTED Oneoff job. Measuring and making
a set of custom
dresses/skirts/tunics. Must
happen the first two weeks of
May in ABQ. Serious enquiries
only. Payment negotiable.
BY RYAN NORTH
“They’re Getting Along Great”—in this puzzle, at least.
by Matt Jones
Across
1 Animal that can follow the first
word in each of this puzzle’s four
theme entries
4 Folklore automaton
9 Steering wheel theft deterrent,
with “The”
13 “Cheerleader” singer
14 Biblical landing site
16 1980s tennis star
Mandlikova
17 Group that gets called about
illicit facsimiles?
19 Fix a feature, e.g.
20 ___ buco (veal entree)
21 Canines often metaphorically
sacrificed
23 Weather report stats
27 Kleenex crud
28 Classic 1971 album that
closes with “Riders on the
Storm”
31 Rapper Biggie
35 Jointly owned, maybe
36 Animal who says “Baa,
humbug”?
39 2003/2005/2007 A.L. MVP,
familiarly
41 Elevator or train component
42 Blacken, as a steak
43 Where to dispose of cooking
grease and tropical oils?
48 Apr. number cruncher
49 Plan so that maybe one can
50 Mischievous
52 Breakfast side dish
54 Gambling game played in
convenience stores
55 Fifties fad involving
undulation
59 “Terrible” ages
63 Conservation subj.
64 Product of a betweenbuildings cookoff?
68 Ointment ingredient
69 Illinois city symbolizing
Middle America
70 “Funeral in Berlin” novelist
Deighton
71 Kentucky senator Paul
72 Put up with
73 Animal that can follow the
second word in each of this
puzzle’s four theme entries
Down
1 Couturiere Chanel
2 “Cornflake Girl” singer Tori
3 Contents of some jars
4 Empty space
5 El Dorado’s treasure
6 Magic’s NBA team, on
scoreboards
7 City north of Pittsburgh
8 Big name in Thanksgiving
parades
9 Extremely speedy mammals
10 Stow, as on a ship
11 Hand or foot, e.g.
12 Aptly titled English spa
15 Wee
18 Acronym popularized by
Drake
22 ___ of Maine (toothpaste
brand)
24 Three-letter “Squee!”
25 Failure of diplomacy
26 Moved stealthily
28 Does nothing
29 Haloes of light
30 Made music?
32 Clingy critter?
33 Made like a kangaroo
34 Prevent infestations, in a way
37 The shortest month?
38 Practical joke
40 Record producer with the
2017 single “Shining”
44 Site of Bryce Canyon
45 Old-school “Fuggedaboutit!”
46 “Call Me Maybe” middle
name
47 Horse’s brownish-gray hue
51 Unironic ankh wearer at night
53 Fillings for some donuts?
55 Consider officially, as a judge
56 Bruins’ alma mater
57 “On Golden Pond” bird
58 Novel necessity
60 Like joker values
61 Another word for margarine
62 Illumination Entertainment’s
other 2016 film (besides “The
Secret Life of Pets”)
65 History class division
66 Counterpart of yang
67 Philandering fellow
©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords
ANSWERS TO THIS WEEK’S PUZZLE ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE AT ALIBI.COM
APRIL 13-19, 2017
WEEKLY ALIBI
[31]
alibi
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ALL THE FOOD THAT’S FIT TO EAT
Advertising Deadline: 5/10/17
Weekly Alibi has 35,000 papers hitting the
streets each week, reaching more than
175,000 people.
[32]
WEEKLY ALIBI
APRIL 13-19, 2017
On Stands: 5/18/17
Reserve space with a friendly
rep at 346-0660 ext. 248
advertising@alibi.com
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