null  null

ARM

®

MultiTrace

Version 1.0

User Guide

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

ii

ARM MultiTrace

User Guide

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

Release Information

The following changes have been made to this document.

Change history

Date

19 February 2001

Issue

A

Change

First Release

Proprietary Notice

Words and logos marked with

®

or

are registered trademarks or trademarks owned by ARM Limited. Other brands and names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

Neither the whole nor any part of the information contained in, or the product described in, this document may be adapted or reproduced in any material form except with the prior written permission of the copyright holder.

The product described in this document is subject to continuous developments and improvements. All particulars of the product and its use contained in this document are given by ARM in good faith. However, all warranties implied or expressed, including but not limited to implied warranties of merchantability, or fitness for purpose, are excluded.

This document is intended only to assist the reader in the use of the product. ARM Limited shall not be liable for any loss or damage arising from the use of any information in this document, or any error or omission in such information, or any incorrect use of the product.

Conformance Notices

This section contains

ElectroMagnetic Conformity

(EMC) notices.

Federal Communications Commission Notice

This device is test equipment and consequently is exempt from part 15 of the FCC Rules under section 15.103.

CE Declaration of Conformity

This equipment has been tested according to ISE/IEC Guide 22 and EN 45014. It conforms to the following product EMC specifications:

The product herewith complies with the requirements of EMC Directive 89/336/EEC as amended.

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Contents

ARM MultiTrace User Guide

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Appendix A

Preface

About this document ...................................................................................... vi

Further reading ............................................................................................ viii

Feedback ....................................................................................................... ix

Introduction

1.1

About MultiTrace ......................................................................................... 1-2

1.2

Availability and compatibility ....................................................................... 1-4

Getting Started

2.1

2.2

2.3

System requirements .................................................................................. 2-2

Connecting the MultiTrace hardware .......................................................... 2-4

Configuring the Ethernet interface .............................................................. 2-8

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

3.1

3.2

Configuring MultiTrace ................................................................................ 3-2

Performing a trace ...................................................................................... 3-7

MultiTrace Interface Connections

A.1

MultiTrace interface .................................................................................... A-2

A.2

Trace signals ............................................................................................... A-5

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

iii

Contents

Appendix B Designing the Target Board

B.1

B.2

B.3

B.4

B.5

Overview of high-speed design .................................................................. B-2

Termination ................................................................................................. B-3

Probe dimensions and keep out areas ....................................................... B-6

Signal requirements .................................................................................... B-7

Probe modelling .......................................................................................... B-8

Glossary

iv

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Preface

This preface introduces the

MultiTrace User Guide

. It explains the structure of the

User

Guide

and lists other sources of information that relate to MultiTrace, the ARM Trace

Debug Tools, and ARM debuggers. It contains the following sections:

About this document

Further reading

Feedback

on page vi

on page viii

on page ix.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

v

Preface

About this document

This document describes version 1.0 of MultiTrace, the ARM

Trace Port Analyzer

(TPA).

Intended audience

This document is aimed at experienced hardware and software engineers. Some sections of this manual assume prior knowledge of some aspects of the ARM

Architecture.

Organization

This document is organized into the following chapters and appendices:

Chapter 1

Introduction

Read this chapter for a description of what is provided in the MultiTrace product.

Chapter 2

Getting Started

Read this chapter for information on how to start working with

MultiTrace. The chapter includes the hardware and software system requirements, how to connect up the hardware, and start the debugger.

Chapter 3

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

This chapter describes how to:

• connect MultiTrace to an ARM debugger change the behavior of MultiTrace.

You must read this chapter in conjunction with the debugger user documentation, for example the

ADS Debuggers Guide

.

Appendix A

MultiTrace Interface Connections

This appendix describes and illustrates the interface cable pin connections.

Appendix B

Designing the Target Board

This appendix provides the details necessary to design a target board that can operate with MultiTrace.

vi

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Preface

Typographical conventions

The following typographical conventions are used in this document:

bold

Highlights ARM processor signal names within text, and interface elements such as menu names. Can also be used for emphasis in descriptive lists where appropriate.

italic

typewriter

Highlights special terminology, cross-references and citations.

Denotes text that can be entered at the keyboard, such as commands, file names and program names, and source code.

typewriter Denotes a permitted abbreviation for a command or option. The underlined text can be entered instead of the full command or option name.

typewriter italic

Denotes arguments to commands or functions where the argument is to be replaced by a specific value.

typewriter bold

Denotes language keywords when used outside example code.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

vii

Preface

Further reading

This section lists publications by ARM Limited, and by third parties, that are related to this product.

ARM publications

Read the following ARM documents for more information on using trace and debug tools:

AXD Trace Debug Tools User Guide

(ARM DUI 0118).

ARM Developer Suite

(ADS) manual set, in particular the

Guide

(ARM DUI 0058)

ADS Debug Target

ARM Architecture Reference Manual

(ARM DUI 0100) is the main reference source for information on ARM processors

ARM Multi-ICE Installation Guide

(ARM DSI 0005) and

ARM Multi-ICE User

Guide

(ARM DUI 0048).

The following manuals can be useful for engineers using the respective ARM CPU cores:

ARM7TDMI Data sheet

(ARM DDI 0029)

ARM9TDMI Technical Reference Manual

(ARM DDI 0145).

Application Note 38

and the technical reference manuals can be downloaded from the

ARM website. The

ARM Architecture Reference Manual

is a published book, ISBN

0-13-736299-4. The other documents are supplied with the appropriate products.

viii

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Preface

Feedback

ARM Limited welcomes feedback both on MultiTrace and on the documentation.

Feedback on MultiTrace

If you have any problems with MultiTrace, please contact your supplier. To help them provide a rapid and useful response, please give: the MultiTrace version you are using details of the platforms you are using, including both the host and target hardware types and operating system where appropriate, a small standalone sample of code that reproduces the problem a clear explanation of what you expected to happen, and what actually happened the commands you used, including any command-line options if possible, sample output illustrating the problem.

Feedback on this document

If you have any comments on this document, please send email to [email protected]

giving: the document title the document number the page number(s) to which your comments refer a concise explanation of your comments.

General suggestions for additions and improvements are also welcome.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ix

Preface x

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Chapter 1

Introduction

This chapter introduces MultiTrace Version 1.0 and describes its hardware and software components and documentation. It contains the following sections:

About MultiTrace

on page 1-2

Availability and compatibility

on page 1-4.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

1-1

Introduction

1.1

About MultiTrace

The MultiTrace unit works in conjunction with the ARM Multi-ICE to provide

RealTrace functionality for software running in leading edge

System-on-Chip

(SoC) devices with deeply embedded processor cores.

MultiTrace has the following features:

• MultiTrace passively collects information from an ARM based SoC containing an

Embedded Trace Macrocell

(ETM). The ETM monitors the ARM instruction and data buses at full core speeds.

It collects trace information at clock speeds of up to 200MHz.

Uploading to

Trace Debug Tools

(TDT) uses Ethernet 10/100baseT

Data port widths of 4, 8, and 16 bits are supported.

A half rate trace clock is supported that captures data on both the rising and falling clock edges.

The SoC voltage can be in the range of 1.0 to 3.3V.

Trace information is time stamped at a resolution of 10ns.

• MultiTrace forms one component in the ARM

Real-Time Trace

(RealTrace) debugging system. RealTrace consists of:

Trace Debug Tools (TDT)

MultiTrace

Multi-ICE

RealMonitor.

A typical system is shown in Figure 1-1.

PC running

AXD and TDT

Ethernet

Parallel-port cable

MultiTrace

Multi-ICE

Data cable

5-wire

JTAG

Trace

Probe

JTAG port

Trace port

ARM Core

Embedded Trace

Macrocell

ASIC

Figure 1-1 Trace system

1-2

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Introduction

1.1.1

The MultiTrace product

The MultiTrace product comprises:

• an interface unit that connects to an Ethernet LAN a cable to connect the interface unit to a trace port software on CD-ROM that enables an ARM debugger to communicate with the interface unit

• a serial cable that can be used to configure and operate the MultiTrace unit if

Ethernet is not available a power supply for the MultiTrace unit printed copies of this User Guide and an Installation Guide.

1.1.2

Capture rates

The ETM on the target board can output 4, 8, or 16 trace data bits. Half rate clocking allows data to be output from the ETM on both edges of

TRACECLK

. This effectively halves the clock frequency.

Multiplexed mode allows 2 or 4 consecutive trace samples to written to same memory location within MultiTrace. This effectively reduces the speed of operation of internal circuitry and also increases the trace depth. It has the disadvantage of coarser time stamping. The system has the capability to set the port width automatically from the

Configure ETM dialog.

Half rate clocking and multiplexing facilities provide correct operation at

TRACECLK

frequencies above 100Mhz. Below 100Mhz, the MultiTrace system will operate without these facilities.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

1-3

Introduction

1.2

Availability and compatibility

MultiTrace is available from ARM Limited and its resellers as a package that includes both the hardware and the software. Contact ARM Limited directly regarding OEM licenses.

1.2.1

Debugger

1.2.2

The

ARM Developer Suite

(ADS 1.1) CD-ROM for Windows includes the

ARM eXtendable Debugger

(AXD). This debugger fully supports MultiTrace.

MultiTrace is also compatible with third-party debuggers that conform to the ARM standard RDI 1.51tx interface.

Target board

The target board must have a device with an ARM core and the

Embedded Trace

Macrocell

(ETM). The board connects to the MultiTrace unit using the connector

described in Appendix A

MultiTrace Interface Connections

.

1-4

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Chapter 2

Getting Started

This chapter describes how to connect the parts of MultiTrace together and how to configure the MultiTrace software. It contains the following sections:

System requirements

on page 2-2

Connecting the MultiTrace hardware

Configuring the Ethernet interface

on page 2-4

on page 2-8.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

2-1

Getting Started

2.1

System requirements

This section describes the hardware and software requirements of MultiTrace:

Host software requirements

on page 2-2

Host hardware requirements

on page 2-3

Target hardware requirements

on page 2-3.

2.1.1

Host software requirements

The software component of MultiTrace consists of the MultiTrace DLL. This DLL must be run on the PC running the debugger. Table 2-1 identifies the operating systems you that support the DLL.

Table 2-1 Supported operating systems for MultiTrace

Operating system

MultiTrace

DLL

Windows 95

Windows 98

Windows NT 4.0 (Intel)

Windows 2000 yes

Solaris no

HP-UX no yes yes yes

A compatible debugger is required to use the MultiTrace DLL. The AXD debugger supplied in version 1.1 of ADS is suitable, as are debuggers supplied by third parties that conform to the ARM RDI 1.51tx specification. A run controller, Multi-ICE for example, is also required.

2-2

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Getting Started

2.1.2

Host hardware requirements

The minimum recommended hardware requirements for installing and running

MultiTrace are:

200MHz Pentium PC system memory:

32MB RAM for Windows 95 and Windows 98

64MB RAM for Windows NT and Windows 2000.

CD-ROM drive (can be used across a network) an OS supported graphics device capable of VGA resolution or better parallel port network card.

Disk space

If you wish to carry out a full installation of the software, up to 3MB of hard disk space is required.

2.1.3

Target hardware requirements

MultiTrace supports processors containing ARM cores and the ETM. The board containing the processor must have a trace port connector.

Caution

Target hardware running at high frequencies and not following the design guidelines

specified in Appendix B

Designing the Target Board

might exhibit irregularities in the trace data. Typical symptoms of this are missed triggers, trace data synchronization failures, and memory access failures. Ensure that your target hardware is capable of running at the selected frequency.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

2-3

Getting Started

2.2

Connecting the MultiTrace hardware

This section explains how to set up the hardware for MultiTrace.

2.2.1

What you require

To set up the hardware you require the following items from the MultiTrace product kit:

• A communications connection for configuring MultiTrace. This can be either:

An Ethernet connection.

The supplied serial cable and a free serial port on your PC. (This cable is only used for configuration when an Ethernet connection is not available.)

• The interface cable (a flat ribbon cable with a square

Insulation Displacement

Connector

(IDC)) socket at each end.

The MultiTrace interface unit (a small flat box with MultiTrace written on it).

The supplied power supply.

Caution

MultiTrace has been tested with the supplied power supply. Using another power supply might cause overheating or damage to the power supply or MultiTrace unit.

You must also provide the following items:

• a computer with an Ethernet connection, running an operating system supported by the MultiTrace DLL (see Table 2-1 on page 2-2)

The trace probe. This is a small PCB that contains the interface circuits that buffer the signals between the target board and the interface cable.

some target hardware containing a device supported by MultiTrace (see

Target hardware requirements

on page 2-3).

2-4

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Getting Started

2.2.2

Connection instructions

To connect the hardware together and configure the software:

1.

Ensure the debugger, TDT, Multi-ICE, and MultiTrace software is installed on the host machine. For details, see

Installing the MultiTrace software

in the

MultiTrace Installation Guide

and the installation guides provided with the products.

2.

3.

MultiTrace requires a TCP/IP network and must be allocated an IP address. The default configuration for MultiTrace is to use auto-configure and a DHCP assigned address. (Contact your system administrator for this address.)

Connect the power supply cable from the mains power unit (5V) to the MultiTrace power connector.

4.

Configure the MultiTrace unit using either an Ethernet or serial connection:

• if you are using an Ethernet cable, follow the instructions in

Ethernet interface

on page 2-8 and

Using the Ethernet Configuration

Utility, TPACONFIG.EXE

on page 2-9

Configuring the

• if you are using a serial cable, follow the instructions in

Configuring the

Ethernet interface

on page 2-8 and

Using the Serial Configuration Utility,

STPACONFIG.EXE

on page 2-14.

Note

Do not connect both the Ethernet and serial cables to the unit at the same time.

The unit will not operate. The MultiTrace unit can be configured and operated over the serial cable, but performance is considerably decreased.

Note

You can either connect the MultiTrace box to an existing Ethernet network (as shown in Figure 2-2 on page 2-6) or directly to the Ethernet connection on a standalone PC (as shown in Figure 2-3 on page 2-7).

If you are connecting directly to a standalone PC, disable DHCP and set the addresses manually. For standalone operation, you must use a crossover twisted pair cable.

5.

Install the Multi-ICE hardware and software as described in the

Multi-ICE

Installation Guide

.

If your target board does not have separate trace and Multi-ICE sockets, use the

Multi-ICE socket on the trace probe as shown in Figure 2-1 on page 2-6.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

2-5

Getting Started

2-6

6.

7.

Figure 2-1 Multi-ICE connector on probe

Connect one end of the Ethernet cable to a LAN and the other end of the cable to the MultiTrace interface unit.

Connect one end of the interface cable to the MultiTrace connector, and the other end of the cable to the trace probe.

Plug the trace probe into the trace connector on the target board.

Host workstation running Multi-ICE server

Host workstation running AXD and TDT

Local Area Network

Network cable

Network cable

10BaseT etnernet cable

ARM DC power cable to 5V PSU

Multi

Trace

interface unit

60-way high density ribbon cable

RealV iew

Parallel port cable

ARM

RealV iew

Multi

ICE

interface unit

20-way ribbon cable

Target board

Target buffer board

JTAG IDC socket

Trace Mictor socket

Figure 2-2 Remote operation

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Getting Started

Host workstation running

AXD and TDT

10BaseT Ethnernet crossover cable

Parallel port cable

ARM

RealV iew

Multi

ICE

interface unit

DC power cable to 5V PSU

Multi

8.

9.

Trace

interface unit

ARM

RealV iew

20-way ribbon cable

Target board

60-way high density ribbon cable

Target buffer board

JTAG IDC socket

Trace Mictor socket

Figure 2-3 Standalone operation

Configure your debugger and trace tools. Refer to the

ARM Trace Debug Toolkit

User Guide

and

AXD User Guide

for more details.

Use your debugger to load an image and start a trace session.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

2-7

Getting Started

2.3

Configuring the Ethernet interface

The parameters available for configuration are:

• Network Type

IP Address

Subnet Mask

Default Gateway.

The Network Type specifies the speed (10Mb/sec or 100Mb/sec) and full/half duplex nature of the network connection. You can set this manually or MultiTrace can be instructed to auto-detect the network type.

If your network uses DHCP to automatically allocate IP addresses, you must enable

DHCP in the MultiTrace configuration. If your network uses fixed IP addresses, you must obtain a new address and enter this into the MultiTrace configuration. If you do not know your subnet mask and default gateway, ask your network administrator. These parameters must be entered correctly if you are not using DHCP.

Note

If you are using Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT, certain IP addresses are not legal. You are recommended to avoid class A addresses (that is, ones of the form

63.0.0.0).

2.3.1

Using the MultiTrace host name with DHCP

When MultiTrace is shipped, it has its Network Type set to Auto-Detect and the TCP/IP parameters obtained through a DHCP server. If your network supports this configuration, the MultiTrace unit is ready to run out of the box.

If MultiTrace is configured to use DHCP, it obtains a new IP address each time it is powered up. You can use the browser in the MultiTrace configuration dialog to locate your MultiTrace unit on the network. Unfortunately, You must repeat this step every time you power up the unit. There are two possible solutions to this problem, either:

• Configure your DHCP server to always assign the same IP address to your

MultiTrace unit. Your can now leave the software configured to use this fixed IP address.

• Specify a unique host name for the MultiTrace unit. You can configure the

MultiTrace software to connect to this fixed host name. This requires integrated

DHCP and DNS systems on your network. Your network administrator can provide further assistance.

2-8

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Getting Started

Note

The alternatives to locating your MultiTrace unit each time you log on might not be possible on your network. Contact your network administrator for more information.

2.3.2

Using the Ethernet Configuration Utility, TPACONFIG.EXE

Follow the steps below to configure your MultiTrace unit:

1.

Start the Ethernet Configuration Utility from the in Figure 2-4 is displayed.

Start

menu. The window shown

2.

Figure 2-4 TPA Configuration

Scan the local network for MultiTrace units. To do this either:

• click the scan toolbar icon select

TPA

Scan

from the main menu.

After a few seconds the TPAConfig window displays the MultiTrace units it has discovered. The window should look like Figure 2-5.

Figure 2-5 Devices found

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

2-9

Getting Started

3.

4.

In the case where the configuration utility finds several MultiTrace units, you must identify which one you intend to change. There are several ways to do this:

• The first column shows the

Ethernet Address

. Each MultiTrace unit has label on it showing its Ethernet address. This can be matched against the number displayed in the window.

The default

Host Name

(described in more detail in step 6) has the form

TPA

xxxxxxxx

where the

xxxxxxxx

is the serial number of MultiTrace unit.

This can be matched against the serial number displayed on the label on the

MultiTrace unit.

Select one of the MultiTrace units on screen by clicking on it. Now either right mouse click and select

Identify

from the popup menu or select

TPA

Identify

from the main menu. You can also click the Identify icon on the toolbar.

The MultiTrace unit you selected flashes all its LEDs for several seconds.

Once you have the correct MultiTrace unit, you can proceed to change its configuration.

To change the MultiTrace unit configuration: a.

Either right mouse click and select

TPA

Configure

from the main menu (see Figure 2-6), or click the

Configure icon on the toolbar.

Configure

from the popup menu, select

5.

Figure 2-6 MultiTrace units configuration

A dialog box is displayed allowing you to change the MultiTrace unit configuration. The fields you can change depend on whether the

DHCP

check box is checked (see Figure 2-7 on page 2-11).

2-10

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Getting Started

ARM DUI 0150A

6.

Figure 2-7 Configuration

If the DHCP checkbox is checked (the default) you can only change the

Host

Name

and the

Ethernet Type

. Follow the steps below to change these fields. If

The

DHCP

box is unchecked, proceed to step 7: a.

Specify a unique

Host Name

for the MultiTrace unit. This name can be used in the MultiTrace configuration dialog as an alternative to the IP address (the IP address is not fixed if DHCP is enabled). This requires

integrated DHCP and DNS systems on your network. See also

Using the

MultiTrace host name with DHCP

on page 2-8.

b.

c.

d.

The current

IP Address

is displayed. This might be

0.0.0.0

if MultiTrace has never acquired an IP address. You cannot alter this field.

The current default gateway IP address is displayed in the

Default

Gateway

field. This might be

0.0.0.0

if MultiTrace has never acquired the gateway IP address. You cannot alter the gateway.

The

Subnet

field shows the current subnet mask. This might be

255.255.255.0

if MultiTrace has never acquired the gateway IP address. You cannot alter this field. e.

f.

g.

The

Ethernet Address

field shows the Ethernet address of the MultiTrace unit. This field is fixed and cannot be altered. It is shown for information only.

The

Ethernet Type

field specifies an Ethernet speed indicates that automatic frequency detection is used. In general, the field should be set to

Auto-Detect

.

Proceed to step 8 and set the Ethernet type.

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

2-11

Getting Started

2-12

7.

If the DHCP checkbox is unchecked, you can edit the IP Address, Default

Gateway, Subnet mask, and the Ethernet Type: a.

If DHCP is disabled, a host name can only be assigned by a DNS server and cannot be specified from the dialog.

b.

Enter the static IP address for your MultiTrace unit in the

IP address

field.

If you do not know what IP address to assign, contact your network administrator.

Caution

IP addresses must be unique. This address must be assigned by your network administrator.

8.

c.

d.

e.

Set the

Default Gateway

field to the IP address of the default gateway on your network. If you do not know what IP address to input, contact your network administrator. If your network does not have a gateway, or you will only use MultiTrace within your local network segment, you can set this to

0.0.0.0

.

Enter the

Subnet Mask

for your local network segment. If you are unsure what to enter, contact your network administrator.

The

Ethernet Address

field shows the Ethernet Address of the MultiTrace unit. This field is fixed and cannot be altered. It is shown for information only.

MultiTrace unit supports connection to the following Ethernet types:

• 10Mb/sec half duplex

10Mb/sec full duplex

100Mb/sec half duplex

• 100Mb/sec full duplex.

In most network environments, MultiTrace can Auto Detect the ethernet type. If

MultiTrace refuses to communicate or selects the wrong type (see

Status indication on the LEDs

on page 2-17) you might have to disable the Auto Detect

process and set the Ethernet type as required.

Caution

One of the columns in the window is entitled

Active Connections

. This shows how many currently open connections there are to each MultiTrace unit. Do not configure a MultiTrace unit that has any active connections.

If you try to change the configuration of a MultiTrace unit that has active connections (at the time of the last scan), a warning will be displayed.

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Getting Started

9.

10.

When you have finished making the changes, click the

Configure

button to save the new configuration to the MultiTrace unit. The display line for the MultiTrace unit shows gray while MultiTrace restarts and its new configuration is read.

Follow the instructions in the

ARM Trace Debug Tools

guide, or your third-party

debugger guide, to configure the debugger to capture trace data. See Chapter 3

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

for a condensed set of instructions.

Blind configuration

On some network configurations, the configuration utility might be unable to locate your MultiTrace unit using the scan function. If you know the Ethernet address of your

MultiTrace unit, it is still possible to configure it.:

1.

Select

TPA

Blind Configure

from the main menu or click on the Blind

Configure toolbar icon.

2.

Complete the dialog box shown in Figure 2-8.

This is very similar to the standard configuration dialog with the exception that you must manually fill in the Ethernet Address of the MultiTrace unit to configure.

ARM DUI 0150A

3.

4.

5.

Figure 2-8 Configuration

After you complete the Ethernet Address, click the

ID

button to make MultiTrace identify itself by flashing its LEDs for several seconds.

When you have completed all relevant fields, press the

Configure

button to configure and restart MultiTrace.

After a few seconds you can verify that MultiTrace has restarted by clicking the

ID

button again and verifying that it identifies itself.

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

2-13

Getting Started

2.3.3

6.

Press the

Cancel

button to dismiss the dialog and start another scan. Your configured MultiTrace unit should now be displayed in the list of MultiTrace units.

If MultiTrace does not identify itself, this suggests either a network routing problem between the PC host and MultiTrace or an Ethernet Type incompatibility. In such cases, connect MultiTrace using the supplied serial cable and configure use the serial configuration program. See

Using the Serial Configuration Utility, STPACONFIG.EXE

.

Using the Serial Configuration Utility, STPACONFIG.EXE

1.

2.

The Serial Configuration Utility does a similar job to the Ethernet Configuration Utility but uses a serial connection to a single MultiTrace unit. To configure MultiTrace:

If it is present, remove the Ethernet cable from the MultiTrace unit.

Connect the provided serial cable between your PC and the MultiTrace unit and power up the MultiTrace unit.

3.

Start the Serial Configuration Utility from the

Start

menu. The dialog box in

Figure 2-9 is displayed.

2-14

Figure 2-9 Serial configuration dialog

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Getting Started

4.

Select the COM port that MultiTrace is connected to and then click the

Read

Config

button. The dialog then changes to show the current configuration similar to one of the dialogs in Figure 2-10 on page 2-15 (depending on whether DHCP is checked).

5.

6.

Figure 2-10 COM port

Set the configuration fields for your device. Refer to step 6 in

Using the Ethernet

Configuration Utility, TPACONFIG.EXE

on page 2-9 for a description of the

fields. When you have finished editing the configuration, click the

Write Config

button to update the configuration in the MultiTrace unit and restart it.

Click the

Read Config

button.

If the error dialog box shown in Figure 2-11 is displayed, the configuration utility did not receive a response from the MultiTrace unit. Either you have selected the wrong COM Port or have an Ethernet cable plugged into the MultiTrace unit.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

Figure 2-11 Timeout error

2-15

Getting Started

If you selected a COM port to which a modem is connected, the dialog in

Figure 2-12 on page 2-16 might be displayed. Select the correct port and try again.

7.

8.

9.

Figure 2-12 Modem error

Remove the serial cable and reattach the Ethernet cable.

View the status LEDs to ensure that the device is performing correctly. See

Status indication on the LEDs

on page 2-17.

Follow the instructions in the

ARM Trace Debug Tools

guide, or your third-party

debugger guide, to configure the debugger to capture trace data. See Chapter 3

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

for a condensed set of instructions.

2-16

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Getting Started

2.3.4

Status indication on the LEDs

The MultiTrace unit has five LEDs in total:

• three on the top of the case

• two on the Ethernet connector.

The two Ethernet LEDs have the following functions:

Yellow LED

Shows Tx and Rx Ethernet activity.

Green LED

Shows DHCP activity and the link speed. When DHCP activity is underway the LED blinks. If the LED is mainly ON the link speed is

100Mb/sec, if it is mainly OFF the link speed is 10Mb/sec.

The three case LEDs have the following functions:

Red LED

When ON this indicates the trace buffer is full.

Yellow LED

This LED momentarily lights to show when a record is written into the trace buffer.

Green LED

Shortly after power up, MultiTrace looks for either an Ethernet connection or a serial connection. If it finds neither, it rapidly blinks this

LED until either the Ethernet cable or the serial cable is plugged in.

The first cable detected defines the communications link used. Following the link detection, this LED lights steadily to indicate that MultiTrace is functioning correctly.

If an operational failure occurs, this LED starts blinking a pattern to indicate the failure. If one of these errors occur, you must power cycle the

MultiTrace unit to return it to an operational state. If the error persists, contact your dealer.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

2-17

Getting Started

2-18

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Chapter 3

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

This chapter describes how to use MultiTrace with the

ARM Extendable Debugger

(AXD) and the

Trace Debug Tools

(TDT). It contains the following sections:

Configuring MultiTrace

Performing a trace

on page 3-2

on page 3-7.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

3-1

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

3.1

Configuring MultiTrace

Follow the steps in this section to configure AXD to use MultiTrace:

1.

Start AXD and select the Multi-ICE target. Refer to the Multi-ICE manual for details on target selection and configuration. Select a Multi-ICE server on either the local computer or a computer connected to the network

2.

Configure Trace: a.

Click on the

Trace

tab as shown in Figure 3-1.

Note

If the trace tab is not displayed, this indicates that your debugger does not support trace. If you are using ARM ADS, you must install TDT before using MultiTrace.

3-2 b.

Figure 3-1 Trace tab

Click

Add

and select the location of the MultiTrace DLL to add it to the list of

Trace Capture

DLLs.

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

c.

Click on

Change location

to display the Location dialog as shown in

Figure 3-2. To specify the location of your MultiTrace unit, either:

• enter the IP address or host name of your MultiTrace unit in the

TCP/IP

field and proceed to step i

• use the Browse dialog as described in steps d and e below to locate

MultiTrace units.

Figure 3-2 TPA location

Note

If an Ethernet connection is not available, use the serial cable to connect your MultiTrace unit. Select the

RS232

button and the appropriate COM port. Although full functionality is still available over the serial line, speed will be significantly slower than Ethernet.

d.

If the address to your trace unit is not displayed as shown in Figure 3-2, click

Browse

and select your trace unit from the list as shown in Figure 3-3.

Note

If an Ethernet connection fails, the subnet mask might be incorrectly set.

Use the Ethernet Configuration Utility to set the appropriate net mask for your class of Ethernet. If in doubt, contact your system administrator.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

3-3

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools e.

Figure 3-3 Select MultiTrace

Select the MultiTrace unit from the list and click

OK

. Click

OK

to close the Trace dialog.

3-4

Figure 3-4 MultiTrace unit selected

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

f.

The capture mode settings are:

• Multiplexed

• 4x4 bit with Single edge clock

• Automatic Select Multiplexed.

If you use the Configure ETM dialog to change the port width, the multiplexing also changes:

4-bit

8-bit

Multiplexed 4x4 on single edge clock

Multiplexed 8x2 on single edge clock

16-bit

Multiplexed 16x2 on single edge clock

Check

Collect timestamp data

to record timing for the instruction. If you are capturing signals less than 100MHz and you require timestamps on every trace record, you must modify the hardware configuration.

If you are capturing signals greater than 100MHz, you must use select

Use multiplexed modes

.

Note

After this dialog exits, the system checks that the hardware and firmware stored on the local disk are compatible. Contact your dealer for firmware updates.

ARM DUI 0150A

Figure 3-5 Configure hardware dialog

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

3-5

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools g.

h.

i.

Check

Automatic Mode Selection

to allow TDT to set the port width automatically. If you uncheck

Automatic Mode Selection

, you can select any TPA mode from the pull down menu, however, this is only recommended for advanced users.

Check or uncheck

Collect timestamp data

to enable or disable collecting timestamp data.

Click

OK

to close the Configure Hardware dialog.

Click

OK

to close the Multi-ICE dialog (see Figure 3-4) and then click

OK

to close the Choose Target dialog (see Figure 3-6).

Figure 3-6 Click OK to close dialog

3-6

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

3.2

Performing a trace

Use the trace-enabled AXD debugger to monitor a process in real-time. Simplified instructions are included in this section. Refer to the

Trace Debug Toolkit User Guide

for detailed instructions.

To start a trace session:

1.

2.

Start AXD and, if necessary, configure Multi-ICE and MultiTrace (see

Configuring MultiTrace

on page 3-2).

Display the Trace Window by selecting

Processor Views

Trace

View

Trace

. (If the menu option is not available, tracing has not been properly configured.)

3.

4.

Load the dhry.axf

image for downloading to the processor under test. (Use

File

Load Image

.)

Specify the trace start conditions as shown in Figure 3-7.

5.

Figure 3-7 Trigger conditions

Start program execution. For some programs, such as Dhrystone, you might have to start program execution twice because of a breakpoint at main() .

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

3-7

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

6.

To view the source code, right-click on the line in the Trace Window and select

Locate to Source

(see Figure 3-8).

Figure 3-8 Locate code

3-8

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

The line in the traced code and the corresponding source code line are highlighted as shown in Figure 3-9 on page 3-9.

Figure 3-9 Source code

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

3-9

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

3-10

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Appendix A

MultiTrace Interface Connections

This appendix describes and illustrates the MultiTrace pin connections. It contains the following sections:

MultiTrace interface

Trace signals

on page A-2

on page A-5.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

A-1

MultiTrace Interface Connections

A.1

MultiTrace interface

This section describes the pin connections and lists any applicable notes for each pin.

MultiTrace supports 4, 8, and 16-bit data port widths with the high density target

connector described in

Trace high density connector

.

MultiTrace can capture the state of signals

PIPESTAT[2:0]

,

TRACESYNC

and

TRACEPKT[n:0]

at each rising edge of each

TRACECLK

or on each alternate rising or falling edge. See Chapter 3

Using MultiTrace with the Trace Debug Tools

for setting capture options. Any unused

TRACEPKT

pins must be grounded on the target board.

A.1.1

Trace high density connector

MultiTrace provides a connection to the AMP Mictor connector. Figure A-1 shows the target connector (AMP 2-767004-2 38 pin surface mount receptacles).

A5

A4

A3

A2

A1

NC

NC

A TRACECLK

DBGACK

EXTRIG

VTREF

Vsupply

A7

A6

A0

TRACESYNC

PIPESTAT2

PIPESTAT1

PIPESTAT0

19

21

23

25

27

29

31

33

35

37

11

13

15

17

5

7

1

3

9

20

22

24

26

28

30

32

34

36

38

12

14

16

18

6

8

2

4

10

NC

NC

GND

DBGRQ

NSRST

TDO

RTCK

TCK

TMS

A12

A11

A10

A9

A8

TDI

NTRST

A15

A15

A13

Figure A-1 Pin connections on target board

A-2

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

ARM DUI 0150A

MultiTrace Interface Connections

Table A-1 shows the pinouts in single ETM mode.

Target board signal

NC

NC

GND

DBGRQ

NSRST

TDO

RTCK

TCK

TMS

TDI

NTRST

Port A TRACEPKT[15]

Port A TRACEPKT[14]

Port A TRACEPKT[13]

Port A TRACEPKT[12]

Port A TRACEPKT[11]

Port A TRACEPKT[10]

Port A TRACEPKT[9]

Port A TRACEPKT[8]

NC

NC

Port A TRACECLK

Pin

5

7

1

3

9

31

33

35

37

25

27

29

2

4

6

17

19

21

23

11

13

15

Table A-1 Connector signals

Description

No Connect

No Connect

Signal ground

Debug request

Open-collector output from the run control to the target system reset

Test data output from target JTAG port

Return test clock from the target JTAG port

Test clock to the run control unit from the JTAG port

Test mode select from run control to the JTAG port

Test data input from run control to the JTAG port

Active-low JTAG reset

The trace packet port. Unused packet port pins must be set to ground on the target board.

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

No Connect

No Connect

Clocks trace data on rising edge or both edges

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

A-3

MultiTrace Interface Connections

Target board signal

DBGACK

EXTRIG

VTREF

Vsupply

Port A TRACEPKT[7]

Port A TRACEPKT[6]

Port A TRACEPKT[5]

Port A TRACEPKT[4]

Port A TRACEPKT[3]

Port A TRACEPKT[2]

Port A TRACEPKT[1]

Port A TRACEPKT[0]

Port A TRACESYNC

Port A PIPESTAT[2]

Port A PIPESTAT[1]

Port A PIPESTAT[0]

22

24

26

28

16

18

20

30

32

34

36

38

Pin

8

10

12

14

Table A-1 Connector signals (continued)

Description

Debug acknowledge from the test chip,

High

when in debug state

Optional external trigger signal to the ETM

Signal level reference. This pin must be connected to the supply voltage (between 1.0 and 3.3 V) on the target board.

Supply voltage. This is not required for MultiTrace, but this pin can supply power to the Multi-ICE unit if it is connected to the probe.

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

The trace packet port

Start of branch sequence signal

RAM pipeline status

RAM pipeline status

RAM pipeline status

A-4

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

MultiTrace Interface Connections

A.2

Trace signals

Data transfer is synchronized by the

TRACECLK

signal.

A.2.1

Signal levels

The maximum capacitance presented by the TPA at the trace port connector, including all cabling and interfacing logic, is less than 15pF. The trace port lines have a matched impedance of 68

.

The MultiTrace unit will operate with a target board that has a supply voltage range from 1.0V to 3.3V. The signal level is determined by the voltage on the VTREF pin. This pin must be supplied from the target board supply voltage.

A.2.2

Clock frequency

For capturing trace port signals synchronous to

TRACECLK

the TPA supports a

TRACECLK

frequency of up to 200MHz. Figure A-2 and Table A-2 describe the timing for

TRACECLK

.

Tperiod

ARM DUI 0150A

Twh Twl

Parameter

Tperiod

Twh

Twl

Figure A-2 Clock waveforms

Table A-2 TRACECLK frequencies

Minimum

5ns

2ns

2ns

Period

Clock period

High pulse width

High pulse width

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

A-5

MultiTrace Interface Connections

A.2.3

Data setup and hold

Figure A-3 and Table A-3 show the setup and hold timing of the trace signals with respect to

TRACECLK

.

TRACECLK

DATA

Tsh Thh Tsl Thl

Half-rate

TRACECLK

Parameter

Tsh

Thh

Tsl

Thl

Figure A-3 Data waveforms

Table A-3 Data setup and hold

Minimum

2.5ns

1ns

2.5ns

1ns

Period

Data setup high

Data hold high

Data setup low

Data hold low

Note

The TPA supports half-rate clocking mode. Data is output on each edge of the

TRACECLK

signal and

TRACECLK (max)

<= 100MHz. For half-rate clocking, the setup and hold times at the Mictor connector must be observed.

A.2.4

Hot plugging

MultiTrace is not damaged if it is powered up when plugged into a unpowered target or if a unpowered MultiTrace unit is plugged into a powered target.

If both the MultiTrace unit and the target are powered, no damage will occur to the

MultiTrace unit, but there might be damage to a (third-party) target system.

A-6

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Appendix B

Designing the Target Board

This appendix describes the properties of a target board that can be connected to

MultiTrace. It contains the following sections:

Overview of high-speed design

Termination

on page B-3

on page B-2

Probe dimensions and keep out areas

Signal requirements

Probe modelling

on page B-7

on page B-8.

on page B-6

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

B-1

Designing the Target Board

B.1

Overview of high-speed design

Failure to observe high speed design rules when designing a target system containing an ARM ETM trace port can result in incorrect data being captured by MultiTrace.You must give serious consideration to high-speed signals when designing the target system.

The signals coming from an ARM ETM trace port can have very fast rise and fall times, even at relatively low frequencies. For example, a signal with a rise time of 1nS has an effective knee frequency of 500MHz and a signal with a rise time of 500pS has an effective knee frequency of 1GHz ( f knee

= 0.5/Tr ).

These principles apply to all of the trace port signals (

TRACEPKT[0:15]

,

PIPESTAT[0:2]

,

TRACESYNC

), but special care needs to be taken with

TRACECLK

.

B.1.1

Avoid stubs

Stubs are short pieces of track that tee off from the main track carrying the signal to, for example, a test point or a connection to an intermediate device. Stubs cause impedance discontinuities that affect signal quality and must be avoided.

B.1.2

Minimize Signal Skew (Balancing PCB Track Lengths)

You must attempt to match the lengths of the PCB tracks carrying all of

TRACECLK

,

PIPESTAT

,

TRACESYNC

and

TRACEPKT

from the ASIC to the mictor connector to within approximately 0.5 inches (12.5mm) of each other. Any greater differences directly impact the setup and hold time requirements.

B.1.3

Minimize Crosstalk

Normal high-speed design rules should be observed (that is, do not run dynamic signals parallel to each other for any significant distance, keep them spaced well apart, use a ground plane and so forth.) Particular attention must be paid to the

TRACECLK

signal.

If in any doubt, place grounds or static signals between the

TRACECLK

and any other dynamic signals.

B.1.4

Use impedance matching and termination

Termination is almost certainly necessary, but there are some circumstances where it is not needed. The decision is related to track length between the ASIC and the Mictor connector (

Termination

on page B-3).

B-2

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Designing the Target Board

B.2

Termination

To calculate the maximum track length that can be used without termination, you must know the following about your ASIC and PCB:

• the rise time ( Tr ) of the signals coming off the ASIC the impedance of the output drivers on the ASIC for the ETM signals the propagation delay per inch of PCB track ( Tpdt ).

B.2.1

Example

The maximum track length without termination is given by:

Length(inches)

<

Tr(pS)

5 Tpdt(pS)

That is, the signal propagation delay from ASIC to the Mictor connector must be less than one fifth of the signal rise time. This calculation allows for the 47pS delay of the

Mictor connector and the 96pS delay of the track from the Mictor to the input buffers on the probe.

For a case where the signal rise time (

Tr

) is 1nS (1000pS) and the propagation delay of the trace (

Tpdt

) is 160pS per inch (typical for a PCB made with FR4 laminate),

L

must be less than

1000/(5 * 160)

. That is,

L

must be less than 1.25 inches. If the PCB trace length from the ASIC to the Mictor connector is greater than 1.25 inches, you must use termination.

B.2.2

Termination options

There are four termination options:

Matched impedance

Where available, the best termination scheme is to have the ASIC manufacturer match the output impedance of the driver to the impedance of the PCB track on your board. This produces the best possible signal.

Series (source) termination

This method requires a resistor fitted in series with signal. The resistor value plus the output impedance of the driver must be equal to the PCB track impedance.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

B-3

Designing the Target Board

DC parallel termination

This requires either a single resistor to ground or a pull-up/pull-down combination of resistors (Thevenin termination), fitted at the end of each signal and as close as possible to the Mictor connector. If a single resistor is used, its value should be set equal to the PCB track impedance. If the pull-up/pull-down combination is used, their resistance values must be selected so that their parallel combination equals the PCB track impedance.

Caution

At lower frequencies, parallel termination requires considerably more drive capability from the ASIC than series termination and so, in practice,

DC parallel termination is rarely used.

AC parallel termination

This typically uses a resistor and capacitor in series to ground.

Caution

AC termination can only be used with signals with a 1:1 mark/space ratio

(DC balanced) and is not suitable for asymmetric signals such as the

TRACEPKT

and

PIPESTAT

signals. AC termination is not recommended.

B.2.3

Rules for series terminators

Series (source) termination is the most commonly used method. The basic rules are:

1.

2.

3.

The series resistor must be placed as close as possible to the ASIC pin (less than

0.5 inches)

The value of the resistor must equal the impedance of the track minus the output impedance of the output driver. So for example, a 60

PCB track driven by an output with a 38

impedance, requires a resistor value of 22

.

A source terminated signal is only valid at the end of the signal path. At any point between the source and the end of the track, the signal appears distorted because of reflections. Any device connected between the source and the end of the signal path will therefore see the distorted signal and may not operate correctly. Care must be taken not to connect devices in this way, unless the distortion will not affect device operation.

B-4

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Designing the Target Board

B.2.4

PCB track impedance

Use the following formula only for microstrips (track on outer layer over a ground plane) and 0.1 < w/h < 2 and 1 < Er < 15 :

Impedance in Ohms

=

87 ln(5.98 h)

(Er + 1.41) (0.8 w + t)

Where:

h w t

E r

Height above ground plane (inches)

Track width (inches)

Trace thickness (inches)

Relative permittivity of substrate.

w t h

Ground plane

Figure B-1 Track impedance

As an example, the following track (in microstrip form) has an impedance of 64.08

:

h

0.005 inch height above ground

w t

0.005 inch width track

0.0007 inch thickness (1/2 oz. copper)

E r

4.9 (FR4 laminate).

Note

As the track width increases, the impedance decreases.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

B-5

Designing the Target Board

B.3

Probe dimensions and keep out areas

Figure B-2 shows the probe attached to a target board.

Caution

The Mictor connector is not robust. It is recommended that the plastic shroud is fitted around the target connector. This part is not supplied as standard with MultiTrace.

The Mictor connector support shroud is available from Agilent as part number

E5346 - 44701

1.81 in

46mm

0.36 in

9.1mm

MultiTrace probe

0.52 in

13.2mm

2.59 in

66mm

2.59 in

66mm

1.06 in

26.9mm

0.39 in

10mm

Support shroud

(if used)

Target board

1.31 in

33.2mm

1.06 in

26.9mm

1.26 in

32mm

Figure B-2 Probe dimensions

B-6

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Designing the Target Board

B.4

Signal requirements

Table B-1 lists the specifications that apply to the signals as seen at the Mictor

connector:

Table B-1

Signal

Fmax

Ts setup time (min.)

Th hold time (min.)

TRACECLK high pulse width (min.)

TRACECLK high pulse width (min.)

Value

200MHz

2.5nS

1nS

2nS

2nS

The signal waveform is shown in Figure B-3.

TRACECLK

DATA

Tsh Thh Tsl Thl

Half-rate

TRACECLK

Figure B-3 Setup and hold

If both MultiTrace and the target are powered, plugging or unplugging the trace cable does not damage or crash the MultiTrace system. It is not possible, however, to guarantee similar immunity to any third party target system. You must, therefore, take precautions such as pulling inputs and driving or making high Z outputs when

Vsupply

is not present.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

B-7

Designing the Target Board

B.5

Probe modelling

For

TRACECLK

frequencies above 100MHz, it is recommended that modelling is used. The characteristics for the MultiTrace probe are:

• The Mictor connector can be viewed as a microstrip transmission line with 68

Ω impedance and 47pS propagation delay ( Tpd ).

Trace widths are 0.005 inch

Trace thickness is 0.0007 inch

Distance from track to ground plane is 0.005 inch

Trace lengths from Mictor to input buffers is 0.6 inch

• Er = 4.9.

Use the IBIS model for the DM90LV048ATMTC device to model the input buffers.

This model is available on the National Semiconductor Corporation web site at www.national.com

.

B-8

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Glossary

ADS

ANSI

Angel

ARM Developer

Suite

ARM eXtendable

Debugger

AXD

Debugger

DLL

See

ARM Developer Suite

.

American National Standards Institute. An organization that specifies standards for, among other things, computer software.

Angel is a program that enables you to develop and debug applications running on

ARM-based hardware. Angel can debug applications running in either ARM state or

Thumb state.

A suite of applications, together with supporting documentation and examples, that enable you to write and debug applications for the ARM family of RISC processors.

The

ARM eXtendable Debugger

(AXD) is the latest debugger software from ARM. It enables you to make use of a debug agent in order to examine and control the execution of software running on a debug target. AXD is supplied in both Windows and UNIX versions.

See

ARM eXtendable Debugger

.

An application that monitors and controls the execution of a second application. It is usually used to find errors in the application program flow.

See

Dynamic Linked Library

.

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

Glossary-1

Glossary

Dynamic Linked

Library

Embedded trace macrocell

Environment

ETM

Host

ICE

Image

In Circuit Emulator

A collection of programs, any of which can be called when needed by an executing program. A small program that helps a larger program communicate with a device, such as a printer or keyboard, is often packaged as a DLL.

The logic inside the core that communicates details of program execution to the external trace port.

The actual hardware and operating system that an application will run on.

See

Embedded trace macrocell.

A computer which provides data and other services to another computer. Especially, a computer providing debugging services to a target being debugged.

See

In Circuit Emulator.

An executable file that has been loaded onto a processor for execution.

A device enabling access to and modification of the signals of a circuit while that circuit is operating.

The name of the standards group which created the IEEE 1149.1 specification.

Joint Test Access

Group

JTAG

Multi-ICE

Program image

RDI

Remote Debug

Interface

Remote_A

Target

TDT

Trace Debug Tools

Trace port adaptor

TPA

See

See

Joint Test Access Group.

Multi-processor EmbeddedICE interface. ARM registered trademark.

See Image.

Remote Debug Interface.

RDI is an open ARM standard procedural interface between a debugger and the debug agent. The widest possible adoption of this standard is encouraged.

A communications protocol used, for example, between debugger software such as

ARM eXtendable Debugger

(AXD) and a debug agent such as Angel.

The actual processor (real silicon or simulated) on which the application program is running.

See

Trace Debug Tools.

Software provided by ARM that allows, together with a TPA and Multi-ICE, real-time tracing of program execution.

A logic analyzer that can capture the details of program execution in real time.

MultiTrace is the ARM trace port adaptor.

See

Trace port adaptor.

Glossary-2

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

ARM DUI 0150A

Index

The items in this index are listed in alphabetical order, with symbols and numerics appearing at the end. The references given are to page numbers.

A

ARM

ADS 2-2

Debuggers 2-2

Developer Suite 2-2

Trace Debug Tools 3-1

AXD

configuring 3-2 starting 3-2

C

CE Declaration of Conformity ii

Clock

frequency A-5

setup A-6

TCK A-3

COM port

STPACONFIG 2-15

Configuration

blind 2-13

capture 3-7

Connecting

Multi-ICE hardware 2-4

Connector

dimensions B-6

hot plugging A-6

pinouts A-3

D

Data

setup and hold A-6

Device

TPA 2-10

DHCP

selecting 2-11

Dialog

choose target 3-2

configure capture 3-7 configure trace 3-7

select Multi-ICE 3-2

STPACONFIG 2-14

TPACONFIG 2-9

trace 3-7

Disk usage 2-3

E

Electromagnetic conformity ii

Error

Comms failure 2-15

LED indication 2-17

Ethernet

crossover cable 2-5

frequency 2-12

ETM 2-3

F

FCC notice ii

Frequency

maximum A-5

ARM DUI 0150A

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

Index-1

Index

H

Hard disk useage 2-3

Hardware

connecting 2-4

requirements 2-3

Host name

assigning 2-8

default 2-10

DHCP 2-11

I

IP address

assigning 2-8

editing 2-12

L

LED

flashing 2-17

identifying unit 2-10

status 2-17

M

Microsoft Windows

versions 2-2

Multi-ICE

connector 2-5 installing 2-5

server 3-2

N

Network

Ethernet 2-5

Notices, FCC ii

O

OEM licenses 1-4

Index-2

P

Power

requirements 2-4

Probe

dimensions B-6

hot plugging A-6

modelling B-8

R

RDI

protocol 1-3

RealTrace

components 1-2

Requirements

hardware 2-3

power 2-4

software 2-2

S

Signal

high-speed B-2

levels A-5

requirements B-7

synchronization A-5

Software requirements 2-2

Source

viewing 3-8

Status

LEDs 2-17

STPACONFIG.EXE

using 2-14

System requirements 2-2

T

Target

board 1-4

connector A-2

designing B-2

PCB tracks B-5

probe B-6

requirements 2-3

termination B-3

Copyright © 2001 ARM Limited. All rights reserved.

TDT

installing 2-5

Termination

impedance B-3

Timestamps

collecting 3-6

TPACONFIG.EXE

TPA device 2-10

using 2-9

Trace

configuring 3-2

packet A-3

source code 3-8

starting 3-7

ARM DUI 0150A

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