Home User Guide - Markey Construction

Home User Guide - Markey Construction

H ome

U ser

G u

FLAT 1 -1 6

, 63 WHADDON ROAD,

CHELTENHAM, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, GL52 5NE

Water Gas

Supplier

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Meter Reading

Meter Number

MPRN/MPAN

Emergency Contact

Emergency Number

Severn Trent

0800 783 4444

National Grid

0800 111 999

Electric

Western Power

0800 365 900

CONTENTS

0.1.1 Provisions of Information in Alternative Formats

0.1.2 In an Emergency

0.1.3 Metering

0.1.4 Reporting Problems

1.1.1 Smoke & Fire Alarms

1.1.2 Key Features

1.1.3 Insulation

1.1.4 Timber Frame

1.1.5 Air Source Heating

1.1.6 General Advice

1.2.1 Heating your Home

1.2.2 Internal Lighting

1.2.3 External Lighting

1.2.4 The Bathroom

1.2.5 The Kitchen

1.2.6 The Hall

2.1.1 What is Climate Change?

2.1.2 The Cause of Climate Change

2.1.3 The Effects of Climate Change

2.1.4 What Can Be Done?

2.4.1 Thermostat

2.4.2 Simple Functions

2.5 Links, Referen ces and Further information

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3.1.1 Air Source Heat Pump

3.1.2 Prefabricated Timber Frame

3.1.3 Low-E Glass

3.1.4 Certified Timber

3.2.1 Energy Performance Certificates

3.2.2 Details of EU labeling scheme for white goods

3.2.3 Low energy lighting

3.3.1 Sanitary Ware

3.3.2 Using the shower

3.3.3 Water saving measures and tips

3.3.4 External water use and efficiency

3.4 Waste & Recycling

3.4.1 Your household refuse and recycling service

3.4.2 Collection day changes

How the scheme works

Sign up (new customers) and get a year's subscription for £36.

3.4.3 Information on recycling bins and their location

3.4.4 WRAP

3.4.5 Recycling

3.4.6 Bulky Waste Collection

3.4.7 Household Recycling Centres (HRC’s)

3.6.1 General

3.6.4 Minimising Condensation

3.6.5 Care of Kitchen

3.7.1 General

3.7.2 Electrical

3.7.3 Plan Your Escape

4.1.1 Places to Visit

4.1.2 Train

4.1.3 Bus Route

4.1.4 Park & Ride Schemes

4.1.5 Cycle paths

4.1.6 Car Hire

4.2.1 Responsible Purchasing

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4.2.2 Emergency Information

5.4 European Labeling Scheme Information

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WELCOME

WELCOME

Firstly welcome to your new home.

This guide has been created with you in mind and aims to help you understand and operate your new home effectively. It has been designed to help you after all of the stress of moving so sit back and relax. The guide firstly introduces you to the key features of your home and under

Part One you are provided with a Quick Start Guide which aims to allow you become acquainted with the functions of your home.

Under Part Two you are introduced to the reasons why your home has been build to achieve 3 stars under the Code for Sustainable Homes by explaining climate change and offering practical advice which will help to reduce your consumption and waste.

Part Three looks in more detail at the strategy & design features of your home and the reasons for their use. It gives guidance using the best suited materials and products for your home should you wish to carryout any DIY. Emergency information it also provided (should the DIY not go so well). It also looks at how Waste, Water & Energy Usage has been reduced in the design and how you can reduce it further. Part Four takes a closer look at the development as a whole and the surrounding area suggesting cycle routes and gives details on local amenities and how to make the best use of public transport. It gives contact details for everything that we thought you may need. Part Five is the appendices section which is where you will find all your certificates, cycle routes and bus time tables and anything else we couldn’t cram in to the guide itself.

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WELCOME

We appreciate that this is a rather long guide and a lot to take in. However it is important that the guide covers all the aspects which will help to reduce the stress and help should something go wrong, so please take your time to read through. We would recommend that you read through the quick start guide as soon as possible as it has everything you need to get started including the bits to touch and the bits not to (lets face it we all like to press buttons). If any problems should arise we recommend you refer back to this guide for assistance and if it doesn’t solve your problem at least you can tell the Association or the Association’s appointed

Agent the page number and picture number so they can look at the guide their end (rather than trying to explain that the ‘thingamajig’ is broken).

Once again welcome to your new home,

Markey Construction

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GETTING STARTED

0.1 Getting Started

0.1.1 Provisions of Information in Alternative Formats

If you would like any further information on this HUG or require an alternative format of the guide please contact the following;

Bromford Living

Unit 1-6

Cirencester Office Park

Tetbury Road

Cirencester

GL7 6JJ

Phone:

0330 1234 034

E-mail:

[email protected]

Web site:

www.bromfordgroup.co.uk

Opening times: 8am - 6pm Monday to Friday.

(Closed public bank holidays)

Alternatively electronic versions can be found at the following address mar keyconstruction.co.uk

Please Note: Any instructions issued by the Bromford Group must take precedence over the information provided in this guide.

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GETTING STARTED

0.1.2 In an Emergency

Make sure that you know where the cut offs and switches are situated, so they can quickly be turned off should an emergency situation arise.

Turn off the ELECTRICITY at the consumer unit in your Hall by flicking the switch to off

Turn off the WATER using the stop tap which can be found under the kitchen sink

You may be charged for attending to problems caused by wilful damage as detailed in your

Tenancy Agreement and “Tenants’ Handbook”. Reference should also be made to the

“Repairs Handbook” provided in the sign-up pack.

0.1.3 Metering

All electrical metering can be found in the hall way in the cupboard along the wall of FLAT 1.

Your water meter is located in the same cupboard as the electrical meter. This should not be needed but please keep note.

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GETTING STARTED

0.1.4 Reporting Problems

Please contact Bromford by the most convenient method for you.

Our registered office address:

Bromford Living

Unit 1-6

Cirencester Office Park

Tetbury Road

Cirencester

GL7 6JJ

Opening times: 8am - 6pm Monday to Friday.

(Closed public bank holidays)

General Enquiries:

0330 1234 034

E-mail: [email protected]

Web site: www.bromfordgroup.co.uk

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PART ONE

1.1 Quick Start Guide

1.1.1 Smoke & Fire Alarms

Your home has been fitted with a heat alarm and an optical alarm. Both of these alarms run off mains power and in the event of power failure have a rechargeable battery backup which can last up to 6 months without a mains power supply.

1.1.2 Key Features

To help you to reduce the running costs of your home and live in a more sustainable way, your home has been constructed using environmentally friendly materials & products. These materials & products have been selected as they are best suited to keep your living costs down whilst reducing the demand on natural resources and energy intensive manufacturing and construction methods.

1.1.3 Insulation

Your home has been insulated to a very high standard which has helped reduce the demand on your heating system, resulting in lower heating bills, a home that retains heat well and is heated quickly. The environmental benefit is that it you will not require much energy to heat which reduces the amount of carbon emitted.

1.1.4 Timber Frame

A timber frame construction method was chosen it heats up your home quicker. It offers a quicker construction time than a typical masonry structure and requires lower maintenance. The timber which has been used has been sourced from sustainably managed forests which, generally, plant more trees than those that are cut down.

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PART ONE

1.1.5 Air Source Heating

Your home has been fitted with an air source heat pump (air to water). It works by extracting heat from the outside air and distributing the heat via the central heating system.

Unlike a typical boiler, your heat pump delivers heat at a lower temperature over much longer periods.

This means that they need to be left on at all times. By selecting ‘off’, on the thermostat the Air Source

Heat pump is actually still on, functioning at 5ºC. It also means that radiators should never feel as hot to the touch as they would do when using a typical heating system (the high levels of insulation ensure that your home will stay warm).

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PART ONE

1.1.6 General Advice

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Your home has been designed to meet short term accommodation needs and it is not anticipated that it would require further adaptation to meet your housing requirements, including any additional appliance need. However, should your circumstances change to warrant any reconsideration of this then please contact the Association or their appointed agent who will advise further.

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The communal garden is there for all tenants to enjoy, but please do not remove or adjust the planting in the garden without consulting the Association or the Association’s appointed Agent, you may be charged. Please always remember to be considerate to your neighbours when in the garden.

Your housing association hold no responsibility for your contents so please ensure that you arrange a comprehensive contents insurance policy to cover you for fire, burglary, house break-in, storm and flood damage and other risks as soon as you move in.

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If you are installing digital television, please be aware that the wiring has already been done for you.

Make the engineer aware to avoid unnecessary cabling around the building.

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PART ONE

1.2 Settings

1.2.1 Heating your Home

To make things as simple as possible we have already set up your thermostat and heating system. So that you have an idea of what everything means a diagram of the thermostat has been provided below.

Thermostat Controls Layout

On your MPRT unit you set the value of three temperatures, Low, Medium and High.

“Low” is typically a night setting, “Medium” an afternoon setting, and “High” a morning and evening setting. Your MPRT will then operate your heating to maintain these MPRT will then operate your heating to maintain these MPRT temperature settings.

Follow steps 1 to 3 on the following page.

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PART ONE

1. Setting the clock

Hold down ‘Heat times’ for 5 seconds.

This screen appears:

Use UP and DOWN buttons to alter the blinking text (hours). Press OK to proceed to minutes and change using UP and DOWN .

Press OK to proceed to day and change using UP and DOWN .

Press OK and the time is now set and the screen returns to normal.

2. Setting the temperature

Press H.

This screen appears:

Use UP and DOWN to set the ‘High’ temperature.

You have now set your high temperature. Press OK and the screen will return to normal.

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PART ONE

3. Setting the heating times

Press HEAT TIMES .

This screen appears:

NOTE:

If the screen above appears without the days of the week displayed it means the room unit has been set up to give the same temperatures every means the room unit has been set up to give the same temperatures every means the room unit has been set up to give the same temperatures ever day. If you wish to change this set up to enter for individual days press OK to exit. Then press UP and DOWN together and hold down for 10 seconds.

Press HEAT TIMES to enable daily time settings. Press OK to accept.

Now press and follow the instruction below.

(To revert to the same programme each day repeat the above process.)

When the daily programme is enabled, the bar graph shows the temperatures for the 24 hours of Monday.

A Low temperature is indicated by

----

, a Mid temperature by

----

, and a High temperature by = . If you are happy with the temperatures entered for Monday,

Press OK .

Tuesday’s temperatures appear.

If you are happy with these temperatures press OK again, and so on to Sunday.

Press OK . The screen returns to normal.

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PART ONE

Smart Start

“SMART START” varies the start-up times to ensure that the building achieves temperature by the required time.

The smart start system is continually learning the temperature rise requirement, delaying the start up of the system, therefore saving energy during milder weather.

SETUP FOR SMART-START.

To toggle the Smart-Start function between enabled and disabled, hold UP and DOWN together for 10 seconds.

The button can now be used to toggle Smart-Start between active and deactivated.

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PART ONE

1.2.2 Internal Lighting

Fluorescent kitchen lighting

Crompton Troposphere Single 58W Cp 515 fluorescent batten bulbs available from most DIY stores

Bathroom & Cloakroom

Located in your bathroom is a Robus Golf R282D+LE with 28W 4 pin lamp.

It has a 3 hour maintained emergency duration and a 12 000 hour lamp life bulbs available from most DIY stores

1.2.3 External Lighting

Lighting in other areas

Standard 2 pin pendant light fittings

10 ASD Mini Horizon external wall lights have been fitted to externally.

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PART ONE

1.2.4 The Bathroom

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Extractor Fan

In your bathroom you will find a MANROSE XF150BP extractor fan this operates when the bathroom light is turned on. Once the light is turned off the fan will continue to operate for 20 minutes.

Please be aware that there is an isolator switch above the door should you require the fan to be turned off.

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Shaver Socket

In your bathroom you will find a shaver socket above your sink, to operate simply plug in any 2 pinned device.

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PART ONE

1.2.5 The Kitchen

In your kitchen you will find a grid switch that operates the following:

Washing Machine

Fridge Freezer

Extractor Fan

Spare

This is the cooker switch.

There are also plenty off additional sockets for your appliances

Extractor Fan

The MANROSE extractor fan in the kitchen is operated by a switch. This can be found on an individual spur switch.

The fan has a filter that can be removed for cleaning. Using a blunt implement such as a flat ended screw driver, insert into slot to release the cover to remove the filter. Clean the filter using warm soapy water and allow to dry before reinserting

Similarly to bathrooms, any property which has a work top limiting the ability to operate the window effectively without stretching has been provided with a future spur to allow for a powered window.

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PART ONE

1.2.6 The Hall

- Electrical consumer unit

A NHRS15SSLHI Wylex NH consumer Unit has been installed which has been designed to British and International standards.

A consumer unit is fitted with fuses and is often referred to as a

"fuse box".

- Thermostat

The Myson MPRT Programmable thermostat provides an automatic time and temperature control for your heating.

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PART ONE

1.3 Links, References and Further information

Bromford Living

Unit 1-6, Cirencester Office Park,

Tetbury Road, Cirencester, GL7 6JJ

0330 1234 034 [email protected]

01242 262 626 [email protected]

Cheltenham Borough Council

Municipal Offices Promenade, Cheltenham,

Gloucestershire, GL50 9SA

N Power

PO Box 93

Peterlee, SR8 2XX

Severn Trent

Severn Trent Water Ltd, Customer Relations, PO

Box 5310, Coventry, CV3 9FJ

0800 073 3000 [email protected]

08457 500 500 [email protected]

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PART TWO

2.1 Climate Change

2.1.1 What is Climate Change?

'Climate Change' refers to changes in the earth’s temperature over the last 100 years. Changes in climate can be caused by adjustments to climatic systems such as a volcanic eruption and cyclical changes in solar activity.

Today, climate change is most often used in to depict an anthropogenic (human) change to climate. The principal way in which humans are understood to be affecting the climate is through the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

Climate Change is used interchangeably with “global warming" both of which reflect a trend of warming that scientists have observed over the past century. Climate Change is a more fitting term than global warming, as climate change describes the broader changes in climate.

2.1.2 The Cause of Climate Change

There is now strong evidence and almost universal agreement between scientists & academics that significant recent global warming can not be explained just by natural causes. Humans are changing the climate by their actions through heating our homes, running our cars, construction and manufacturing all of which emit greenhouse gases, which warm the atmosphere.

In the last 100 years, the Earth has warmed by 0.75 degrees Celsius. Global sea levels have risen, glaciers and sea ice have melted, and extreme weather events, like floods and droughts, have been more frequent and unpredictable.

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PART TWO

2.1.3 The Effects of Climate Change

The effects of climate change can be seen in the UK and around the world. UK temperatures, including those of British coastal waters, have already risen. Globally, extreme weather is predicted to become more common and to have a negative impact on humans, animals and plants.

Globally, 2000 to 2009 was the warmest decade since records began in 1850. The average temperature of the atmosphere near the Earth’s surface has risen by about 0.75 degrees Celsius since around 1900.

The overwhelming view amongst climate science experts is that, if we continue to emit greenhouse gases:

• global temperatures could rise between 1.1 and 6.4 degrees above 1980 to 1999 levels

• this could happen by the end of the 21st century

The exact amount depends on the levels of future greenhouse gas emissions.

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PART TWO

2.1.4 What Can Be Done?

Tackling climate change will be one of the most important things this generation does, and everyone needs to get involved. Every day, more and more people are taking actions to help reduce carbon emissions and tackle other environmental problems. Here are some ideas about how you can help.

The energy you use at home is likely to be your biggest contribution to Climate Change. 80 percent of the energy used goes on heating and hot water, so this is a good place to look for savings.

Travel accounts for around a quarter of all the damage individuals do to the environment, including climate change effects.

Producing, transporting and consuming food is responsible for nearly a fifth of our Climate Change effects. Some foods have a much bigger impact on the environment than others.

Reducing, reusing and recycling waste saves on the raw materials and energy which are needed to make new paper, metal, glass and other items. Saving energy helps tackle climate change.

There are now lots of choices you can make when shopping that help take care of the environment.

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PART TWO

2.2 Energy Saving Tips

10 ways to save energy, money, and help prevent climate change.

1.

Turn your thermostat down

Reducing your room temperature by 1°C could cut your heating bills by up to 10 percent. If you have a programmer, set your heating and hot water to come on only when required rather than all the time.

2.

Check your thermostat

3.

Stop heat escaping

Is your water too hot? Your cylinder thermostat should be set at

60°C/140°F.

Close your curtains at dusk to stop heat escaping through the windows and check for draughts around windows and doors.

4.

Check your lights Always turn off the lights when you leave a room.

5.

Turn off appliances

Don't leave appliances on standby and remember not to leave laptops and mobile phones on charge unnecessarily.

6.

Wash full loads If possible, fill up the washing machine, tumble dryer or dishwasher: one full load uses less energy than two half loads.

7.

Use what you need

Only boil as much water as you need (but remember to cover the elements if you're using an electric kettle).

8.

Turn off taps

9.

Energy saving light bulbs

A dripping hot water tap wastes energy and in one week wastes enough hot water to fill half a bath, so fix leaking taps and make sure they're fully turned off!

They last up to 10 times longer than ordinary bulbs, and using one can save you around £40 over the lifetime of the bulb.

10.

Energy saving trust

Visit www.est.org.uk and carry out a home energy check. By answering a few simple questions about your home you will receive a free, impartial report telling you how you can save on your household energy bills.

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PART TWO

2.3 The Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH)

The Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) is an environmental assessment method for rating and certifying the performance of new homes. It is a scheme lead by the Department of Communities and Local

Government (DCLG) and has been created to encourage continuous improvement in sustainable home building.

2.3.1 Scope and Scoring

The Code uses a sustainability rating system – indicated by ‘stars’, to communicate the overall sustainability performance of a home. A home can achieve a sustainability rating from one (*) to six (*****) stars depending on the extent to which it has achieved Code standards. One star is the entry level – above the level of the Building Regulations; and six stars is the highest level – reflecting exemplar development in sustainability terms.

The sustainability rating which a home achieves represents its overall performance across the nine Code design categories, these include:

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Energy

Water

Materials

Surface water run-off

Waste

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Pollution

Management

Health and well-being

Ecology

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PART TWO

2.4 Detailed Operations

2.4.1 Thermostat

The MPRT is a programmable room thermostat. It measures the temperature of your room and then controls the heating to maintain the room at the chosen temperature.

Please refer to 13 page under part one for the three easy steps for the basic setup of your thermostat.

However if you are looking for more detailed functions please refer to the information below;

2.4.2 Simple Functions

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One hour of high temperature.

If you press 1Hr you will get an hour of High heat, irrespective or whether your times are set for Low or

Mid heat. If you want to cancel this function you simply press OFF MAN .

Manual Override.

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If you hold OFF MAN for 5 seconds, the room unit will go into manual mode. In this mode there is only one temperature. Press either UP or DOWN to see this temperature change. Set it to the temperature you require. The thermostat will continue to control your heating at this temperature until you deactivate manual override by pressing OFF MAN.

Replacing the batteries in the thermostat.

Dependant on type and manufacturer the batteries in your MPRT should last approximately 2 years. When they go low, a battery symbol appears on the LCD screen telling you to replace the batteries.

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PART TWO

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Deactivating your heating:

If you press OFF MAN your heating will be deactivated. The screen will continue to indicate the room temperature but the heating will never come on.

To reactivate your heating simply press OFF MAN.

Note:

Provided you deactivate via the MPRT the system will have frost protection at 6°C. If the system is to be left shut down for long periods over the winter please ensure there is sufficient battery life to maintain protection.

- SMART-START function.

The message “SMART START” displayed on the screen indicates that this function is operating. Smart-

Start works by switching the heat on in advance so that the room can warm up. As an example, if you were to get out of bed at 8am and you want the room to be warm at that time. Without Smart-Start you must programme your High temperature for 7am.

With Smart-Start you need only programme your High temperature for 8am. - See diagram below.

But Smart-Start is even more intelligent than this. It remembers how cold it was on the previous mornings. Thus, in winter it might start the heating 1 hour before 7a.m. and in Spring start half an hour before 7a.m. In this way it provides optimum comfort and energy saving.

Note:

In extreme low temperatures and dependant on your heating system capability, the desired temperature set may not be reached by the set time. Thus an earlier higher temperature may need to be set.

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PART TWO

2.5 Links, References and Further information

Energy Savings Trust

21 Dartmouth Street,

London, SW1H 9BP

Act on CO²

Whitehall Place,

London, SW1A 2AW

Department of Energy and Climate Change

3 Whitehall Place,

London, SW1A 2AW

Met Office

Fitzroy Road,

Exeter, EX1 3PB

Stroma

Pioneer Way, Castleford,

West Yorkshire, WF10 5QU

BRE

Bucknalls Lane,

Watford, WD25 9XX

0800 512 012

0800 512012

0300 060 4000

0870 900 0100

0845 621 11 11 [email protected]

01923 664000 [email protected]

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PART THREE

PART THREE

PART THREE

3.1 Environmental Strategy & Design Features

3.1.1 Air Source Heat Pump

Your home has been fitted with Daikin Altherma Air Source Heat pump . These heat pumps are highly flexible, energy efficient home heating system that extracts the heat from the outside air, raises this heat to a higher temperature and then distributes warmth around the home.

At the heart of the system lies an air to water heat pump. Because of this advanced technology, three quarters of the heat generated by the Daikin

Altherma system is from a renewable energy source, the air around us, and therefore absolutely free of charge! It offers triple the efficiency of the most efficient boilers and produces 2/3 rds

of all heating and hot water required for your home. This can save you on average £270 on yearly fuel costs compared with running an energy efficient A-rated boiler.

Operating instructions

To adjust the temperature in your home to a comfortable level and to save energy when you are away you will need to adjust the thermostat which is located in your hall there are three setting which you can use;

Auto (automatic) will set your heating to a preset temperature program which can be personalised.

Man (manual) this mode acts as a simple thermostat which has fixed set points throughout the day. The set point can easily be adjusted from 5°C – 35°C using the up and down keys.

Off mode sets the thermostat to the minimum of 5°C that acts as a frost prevention measure

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PART THREE

3.1.2 Prefabricated Timber Frame

Timber frame construction has developed significantly over recent years and is seen by the industry as an excellent way to meet demand for more energy-efficient homes while helping to reduce CO2 emissions and help mitigate the effects of climate change.

Your home has been constructed using a Prestoplan Urban Advantage which is a closed panel system which is pre-assembled wall panels and typically include insulation, moisture control layers and the weathering envelope. The benefits of this type of construction is speed of construction, improved quality may be improved due to more co-ordinated supply chain processes and production in controlled factory environments.

3.1.3 Low-E Glass

Low-emission glass (Low-E) is a clear glass that has microscopically-thin coating of metal oxide. This allows the sun's heat and light to pass through the glass into the building. At the same time it blocks heat from leaving the room, reducing heat loss considerably. It increases the energy efficiency of windows by reducing the transfer of heat or cold through glass. That means in the winter your house stays warmer, and in the summer it stays cooler.

3.1.4 Certified Timber

All the timber used in your home is Certified Timber which has been sourced from responsibly managed forests. This ensures that your home has not caused unnecessary damage to the environment when sourcing construction materials for your home.

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PART THREE

3.2 Energy Usage

3.2.1 Energy Performance Certificates

Better Known as (EPCs) they give you information on how to make your home more energy efficient and reduce carbon dioxide emissions. All homes bought, sold or rented require an EPC. Around 27 per cent of the UK’s carbon dioxide emissions come from domestic homes.

In the appendices of this guide you will find one that is specific to your home.

What they tell you

An EPCs contain:

• information on your home's energy use and carbon dioxide emissions

• a recommendation report with suggestions to reduce energy use and carbon dioxide emissions

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions

EPCs carry ratings that compare the current energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions with potential figures that your home could achieve. The rating measured using an ‘A’ to ‘G’ grading system.

With ‘A’ being the most efficient, while ‘G’ is the least efficient. The average efficiency grade to date is 'D'.

All homes are measured using the same calculations, so you can compare the energy efficiency of different properties.

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PART THREE

3.2.2 Details of EU labeling scheme for white goods

The EU Energy Labelling scheme is a compulsory requirement for all white goods and home appliances sold within the EU. It allows consumers to clearly see the efficiency and energy consumption of a product.

The system used by the EU Energy Label runs from A to G and primarily shows energy efficiency. Other details shown by the scheme including various performance related ratings (also scaled

A to G).

Since its introduction in 1995, the EU Energy Label has become a widely recognised and respected guide for manufacturers and consumers alike.

The scheme covers; Dishwashers , Washing Machines , Freezers ,

Fridge Freezers and Refrigerators .

All of which require a D rating or above.

In the appendices you will also find a S hopper’s Guide to Green Labels which has been provide by Defra, The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs . This will help you understand environmental labels on products

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PART THREE

3.2.3 Low energy lighting

Depending on how long your lights are in use every day, just one energy saving light bulb could save you on average around £2.50 a year. And the light bulb will last around 10 times longer than a standard bulb and could save you around £40 before it needs replacing.

Fitting all your light with energy saving bulbs and you could save around £37 a year and £590 over the lifetime of all of the bulbs.

These savings take into account the higher cost of energy saving light bulbs. With prices starting from £1

- £2, you'll usually recoup the extra outlay within a year....

Energy saving light bulbs use between a fifth and a quarter of the electricity of ordinary bulbs to generate the same amount of light. So where you'd normally use a 60W bulb, you'll only need a 11-14 Watt bulb.

Standard bulbs

25W

40W

Energy saving equivalent

5-7W

8-9W

60W

100W

11-14W

20-23W

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PART THREE

3.3 Water Usage

3.3.1 Sanitary Ware

Kitchen taps

Pegler Mercia Modern Kitchen Mono with a 6 litres per min flow restrictor fitted

Toilets

The Twyfords Alcona Dual flush toilet operates using 4 or 2.6 litres of water.

Shower

The Bristan Artisan operates at 6 litres per minute. The shower requires regular cleaning and the showerhead MUST be regularly cleaned to remove scale and debris.

Bath Volume

Twyford Celtic 140 litre bath

Hand basin

Bristan Value Lever with a flow rate of 3 litres per min

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PART THREE

3.3.2 Using the shower

(1) Water Flow Control

To control the amount or flow of water from the showerhead. Turn up to increase the flow rate.

Temperature Control (2)

Adjustable temperature control.

Only press the button (and turn the control) when a water temperature over 38˚ is required.

Riser rail

Turning the slider handle will allow the slider to be raised and lowered and the angle of the showerhead to be adjusted.

Adjusting the Showerhead

The showerhead has 3 spray functions - spray, jet spray and combination. Simply rotate the spray head one way or the other to the desired spray pattern.

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PART THREE

3.3.3 Water saving measures and tips

Considerations have been made to limit the amount of water used in your dwelling these include; all wash hand basin taps have flow regulators which limits the flow to 3 litres per minute. The toilets have a 4/2.6 litre dual flush which gives the option to save water. The bath has an overflow of 140 litres which is 40 litres less than a conventional bath and your electric shower has a flow rate of below 6 litres per minute.

There are also simple steps that you can take to reduce your water consumption which will help to save you money and water usage.

-

Take a shower rather than a bath

-

Don’t run the tap whilst cleaning your teeth

-

Only boil as much water as you need when making drinks

-

Don’t leave taps dripping - repair any worn washers

-

Only wash full loads in washing machines and/or dishwashers

-

Water remaining after boiling eggs can be cooled and used to water plants as this is high in nutrients as is the dirty water taken from a fish tank

-

If you drink tap water and normally run the tap for a while to ensure the water is cold, collect this initial supply either in your kettle or to water plants etc. alternatively, instead of waiting for it to run cold keep a jug of water in the fridge.

-

Wash vegetables in a bowl rather than under a running tap.

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PART THREE

3.3.4 External water use and efficiency

Tips for outdoor water use

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

When gardening try to use a watering can, a drip irrigation system or a hosepipe with a trigger and better still connect it to your water butt. This allows for sensible water wise gardening, whilst still conserving supplies.

Pressure washers use a lot of water. Use them sparingly and think about what you are doing. If must use one to wash your patio furniture or bike, why not do it on the lawn so the water gets recycled.

Lots of people use bathwater on their garden. Remember this is dirty water. Use it immediately and never store it. Do not use it on fruit or vegetables or near children.

Use a trigger nozzle on your hosepipe to halve the water used and direct the water flow to the roots of your plants. Alternatively by using a watering can you can significantly reduce the amount of water wasted.

Your roof collects about tens of thousands of rainwater each year. This could fill your water butts hundreds of times with free water.

Use a bucket and sponge to wash your car. Just 30 minutes with a hosepipe will waste hundreds of litres. And, using a bucket will give your car a much more precise wash. If you must use a hosepipe, attach a trigger nozzle.

Use mulch and bark in your garden to reduce evaporation by up to 75%

Think about mixing some drought resistant bedding and perennial plants to your garden to add diversity.

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PART THREE

3.4 Waste & Recycling

3.4.1 Your household refuse and recycling service

Cheltenham Borough Council provides a number of services for residence within the Borough. Services include:

Recycling, refuse, food waste, garden waste collections & Household recycling centres

The collection dates for the applicable services are as follows;

Recycling

Refuse ( Green )

Tuesdays

Tuesdays

Tuesdays

Tuesdays

Fortnightly (with food bin)

Fortnightly (with food bin)

Weekly collection

Optional service collected with recycling Garden waste ( Brown )

& food

Recycling

The recycling bin collection is a fortnightly collection service on alternate weeks to the refuse bin. Please ensure that you use the bins correctly for individual materials. Please make sure that the bins are placed on the kerbside by 7am next to your larger food caddy.

These are communal bins so need to be shared and remember materials need to be segregated. Your kitchen cupboard bin will assist you with this as each flat has been provided one.

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PART THREE

All rubbish collected in the black bin goes to landfill. We encourage all residents to recycle as much as possible before putting anything in the refuse bin. This reduces the impact on the environment and Under the Duty of Care regulations, all householders need to ensure that their refuse is passed to authorised carriers only. Householders not taking reasonable measures to do so could face fines of up to £5,000.

Refuse collection guidelines:

-

-

-

All rubbish must fit in the bin and the lid must be closed.

Rubbish placed at the side or on top of the bin will not be collected

Put your food waste caddy next your bin for collection. The same crew will collect the food waste in a separate compartment one the vehicle.

3.4.2 Collection day changes

When there is a Bank Holiday in the week, the refuse is usually collected one day later. Separate arrangements are made for the Christmas/New Year period.

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PART THREE

---- Food waste collection

Cheltenham Borough Council operates a food waste collection on a weekly basis.

How to use the weekly food waste collection

1. Line the small caddy with a compostable liner or newspaper

2. Use the smaller caddy in the kitchen to collect the food waste

3. Every few days transfer the food waste (and the liner) to the larger caddy

4. Put the larger caddy outside next to the correct bin, every week for collection

The food waste is then collected weekly which is then turned into compost

- Caddy Facts:

Both caddies are lockable. Rotate the handle to the front of the caddy and it locks. This prevents pets and pests getting inside.

Using a liner will keep the caddy clean but it is recommended that every few months they are washed out with warm soapy water. The water can be tipped down the drain (it's just like dirty washing up water).

Caddies are dishwasher safe up to 60 o

C.

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PART THREE

---- Garden waste collection

Brown bin garden waste collection

The garden waste collection service makes a significant contribution to

Cheltenham's recycling rate.

You can subscribe to the service by ordering and paying in advance for one year. For the duration of the subscription, you will receive a brown wheeled bin in which to keep your garden waste. The brown bin is emptied fortnightly, on the alternate week to your kerbside recycling box.

How the scheme works

If you opt into the scheme you will be issued with a 240 litre brown wheeled bin for your garden waste.

The brown bins will be emptied fortnightly. A bin will be delivered within 10 days of payment being taken and it is possible to join the scheme at any time in the year on a 12 month contract.

Only garden waste contained within the bin will be collected from the kerbside. Any additional garden waste can be taken to the recycling centre on Swindon Road. Please ensure you put the brown bin out by

7am on the day of collection.

Please remember that garden waste must not be put in the green refuse bins. Green refuse bins containing garden waste may not be collected and you may be asked to remove the garden waste before a collection can be made.

The council will contact you after 11 months to inform you that your subscription is due for renewal. Your renewal date is set as the first of the month after your bin was delivered.

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PART THREE

Sign up (new customers) and get a year's subscription for £36.

1. By telephone - please call 01242 262626, and have your debit/credit card ready for payment

2. In person – you can pay by cash, cheque or credit/debit card at the Municipal Offices reception on the Promenade in Cheltenham

3. Pay online – at www.cheltenham.gov.uk

3.4.3 Information on recycling bins and their location

Within your kitchen cupboard you will find a fitted 30 litre bin for recyclable household waste. This is to assist you with recycling and is in addition to your domestic waste bin.

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PART THREE

3.4.4

WRAP

Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP)

WRAP is a non-profit organisation that is supported by government funding. Its main aim that is achieved through working with partners is to prevent waste, promote recycling and develop markets for valuable products. WRAP works with the public providing information and tools that support recycling and reduces food waste. This helps bring measurable gains to the economy and long term benefits to the environment.

WRAP works in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to help businesses and individuals reap the benefits of reducing waste, develop sustainable products and use resources in an efficient way.

Areas WRAP Impacts on

Waste prevention

Both at home and at work WRAP seeks to reduce the amount of waste produced protecting natural resources whilst cutting costs and reducing carbon footprints.

Collecting and sorting

Helping people to recycle as much of their waste as possible to reduce the amount of rubbish being sent to landfill and reduce the need to extract materials.

Recycling and reprocessing

Helping the UK recycling and reprocessing sector to create demand for recyclable material.

Market development

Helping with the recycling of material through efficient processes creating high-value products and suitable market demand.

If you would like guidance on recycling and sustainable waste disposal please visit their website for further information; www.wrap.org.uk

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PART THREE

3.4.5 Recycling

The local authority offers a bulky domestic waste collection service for the removal of large household items, from outside your home. Before disposing of any unwanted furniture or goods please consider donating your unwanted goods to one of the organisations below. This will save you the cost of disposal and will enable others to reuse you unwanted items.

Furniture Recycling Project

Warehouse 5

The Docks

GL1 2EH

01452 302 303

British Heart Foundation Re-use shop

92-96 Northgate Street

Gloucester

Gloucestershire

GL1 1SL

0844 248 9133

Emmaus Gloucestershire

Secondhand Superstore

Chequers Road

Gloucester

GL4 6PN

01452 413095

Advertise your unwanted items for free at;

You could always sell your unwanted goods on ebay, newsagent’s window or even in your local paper

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PART THREE

3.4.6 Bulky Waste Collection

However if these options are not suited, as a last resort you can use the local authorities collection service;

Cheltenham Borough Council offer a special collection service for items that do not fit into a standard wheeled bin or dustbin, or weigh more than 25kg. There is a charge of £15.05 per unit for this service. A unit is equivalent to a three piece suite or a double bed and mattress or a cooker. We also collect fridges and freezers as part of this service.

Please note:

• the collection address must be within Cheltenham borough

• collections can only be booked on receipt of payment

• bulky items will be charged at different rates according to their size/weight

• one unit is £15.05

• some items are classed as half units and some as two units

• all collections will be rounded up to the nearest unit.

• no more than 6 units can be collected at one time

• items must be outside of the property for collection

• collections are made from 7.30am

• we are not able to guarantee a collection time

Our conditions of collection are:

• that items for collection are owned by you, and you have requested them to be removed.

• that you are responsible for moving the items to the agreed collection point outside your property where they can easily be collected (for example on the driveway), which is done at your own risk.

• that the council's insurance policy does not allow for its employees to assist in moving items to the collection point. If, in exceptional circumstances, council employees assist in moving items to the collection point, then this will be entirely at your own risk.

• that only items listed on the application for bulky items collection will be removed.

Refunds can only be made if cancellations are requested at least 3 working days before the scheduled date of collection.

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PART THREE

To arrange for a special collection

If you have a valid debit or credit card please call 01242 262626

You can also pay by cheque.

A collection date cannot be confirmed until the cheque has been received. On receipt of the cheque and information, a confirmation letter will be sent out advising you of a collection date.

If you wish to pay by cheque please send it with the following details:

• address where the collection is to be made from

• daytime contact telephone number (in case of any problems on collection day)

• location where the items will be left, such as driveway, front garden

• list and quantity of items to be collected

You can also pay in person at the municipal offices or central depot.

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PART THREE

3.4.7 Household Recycling Centres

(HRC’s)

At Household Recycling Centres (formerly known as “The Tip”) you can recycle a wide range of materials.

Gloucestershire County Council provides five Household Recycling Centres (HRCs). At these sites, even more items can be recycled than at neighbourhood recycling banks The nearest Household Recycling

Centre (HRC) is located on Swindon Road, which is three miles from your home alternatively Wingmoor

Farm is also three miles away, half a mile west of Bishop's Cleeve on the road to Stoke Orchard. The facility is open all year round except Christmas Day (25th December) and New Years Day (1st January).

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PART THREE

It is now necessary to book an appointment to bring a van, pick-up or vehicle with a trailer to any of

Gloucestershire county Council’s Household Recycling Centres. Small trailers with a load space up to 6ft by 4ft do not need to book.

To make an appointment please phone: 0845 602 9344 (lines open 9am – 5pm Mon to Fri) giving 24 hours notice. Proof of residency will be required on your visit.

Open 7 days a week (except Christmas Day and New Year's Day)

Opening hours:::: 9am – 6:15pm all year round

The Household Recycling Centres cannot accept any business waste. It is illegal for HRCs to accept any waste from businesses.

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PART THREE

3.5 Sustainable DIY

If you are planning to carry out DIY it is important to choose the most suitable materials for the job. Here are some tips to ensure that you chose products that are sustainable, non-hazardous and are suited to your home.

Decoration @ Whaddon Road

Paint used: Glidden – Magnolia Contract Matt Available from: Widely

Tiles used:

Bathroom - CAN30084

150 x 150 mm (bumpy white)

Available from:

CANDY

(British Ceramics)

Fixings – it is important to remember that your home is constructed using a timber frame so when fixing a picture frame to the wall for example you will need to check exactly what you are screwing into. It will be either plasterboard or into the stud wall, in the case of it being plasterboard you will need a cavity wall fixing. If it is stud you should be able to screw directly to the wall. If you are in any doubt you should contact a professional as it is essential that know exactly what you are screwing/drilling into prior to starting.

Timber – the timber you choose can have an impact on the environment. Materials that are less environmentally damaging do not necessarily cost more, often perform well, and many are widely available.

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PART THREE

Paints & Finishes

When choosing a paint or finish try to find one with a low environmental impact. You can do this by choosing:

- a product without a hazard warning on the label (a black symbol on an orange or yellow square, with a description of the hazard)

-

-

'natural' or 'all natural' paints, milk paints and white washes can contain less harmful substances than ordinary paint calculate how much paint you need and try not to buy too much - a lot of paint that people buy is never used

- look for the European Ecolabel for indoor paints (shown in the background)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

Most paints contain VOCs, which can be harmful to humans, wildlife, plants and even building materials.

New legal limits have been introduced for VOC content in paints and varnishes used around the home.

VOC content must now be displayed on all such products:

- choosing the appropriate product with the lowest VOC content you can will help reduce harmful effects

Think twice about projects that consume energy

Some DIY projects will increase your energy usage significantly, increasing fuel bills and your contribution to climate change. If possible:

- think about using solar power for water features and lighting in your garden

Manufacturing tools use energy and resources, but many are hardly used. The average drill is used for less than 15 minutes in its entire lifetime, so consider borrowing or hiring instead of buying.

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PART THREE

3.6 Tips for making the best use of your Home

3.6.1 General

Have been provided by Sameday Windows are designed and constructed to require minimum maintenance. PVCu frames are chemically stabilised to prevent discolouration and should only require an occasional clean with warm water and detergent to prevent a build-up of dirt and pollutants.

Listed below are some useful do’s & don’ts:

- Clean the glass regularly with a liquid spray glass cleaner

- Occasionally wash the PVCu with warm soapy water and wipe dry

- Use PVCu cleaner on isolated stubborn stains by applying with a damp cloth

- Always ensure that the drainage slots are kept unblocked and free of dirt etc

- Keep hinge and locking gear tracks clear of dust and debris to reduce wear

- Use glass cleaner on PVCu

- Use coloured glass cleaner

- Use abrasive past cleaner

- Use excessive pressure

- Use high pressure or steam cleaners

- Use any type of bleach, solvent or adhesives

- Use any unspecified tools or abrasive papers such as sandpaper

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PART THREE

3.6.4 Minimising Condensation

Although you can not see it there is always moisture in the air. This can appear as condensation and be seen as steam or mist on your bedroom windows in the morning, in the bathroom mirror or from your

‘breath’ that you can see when you go out on a cold day. It mainly appears in cold weather and is found on the coldest surfaces or in places where there is little or no movement of air. You will find it in the corners of rooms, or near windows or behind furniture. It mostly appears on north facing walls which are colder because they do not get the sun.

The damp caused by condensation can cause mould to grow on walls, fabric and furniture which eventually leads to rotting. It can also cause paint to blister and wallpaper to peel off. Mould gives off tiny seeds called ‘spores’ - these spores float in the air (this is how it spreads) and can make conditions such as Asthma.

Modern construction techniques such as insulation to walls, draught proofing on doors and sealed window units have made it easier for you to keep your home warm by minimising draughts and stopping heat escaping from your home. But these improvements also stop moisture escaping. To reduce the risk of condensation in your home a control system can be installed such as Mechanical Ventilation Heat

Recovery (MVHR). Please see section one for further details.

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PART THREE

There are a number of things you can do:

Make less moisture

-

Wipe the water from your windows and sills with a cloth, but make sure you wring your cloth out in the sink and don’t put the wet cloth on a heater to dry. Putting a wet cloth on a heater allows the water to evaporate back into the air which means it will re-appear as condensation when the temperature drops.

-

Don’t dry washing inside your home. All the water from your clothes will go straight into the air and as soon as the air cools you will get condensation on your windows and walls.

-

Put lids on you saucepans when you cook. This keeps steam in the pan and saves money on your fuel bill.

-

Vent your tumble drier outside. If your dryer is not self condensing make sure you put the hose out of a window to ensure the hot, moisture filled air produced by the machine does not condense inside your home. Opening a window is not enough. You can get hose kits from most electrical & DIY stores.

Increase the Ventilation

-

Use the trickle ventilators in your windows. You need a good air flow to help get rid of moisture which is produced in your home all the time. Modern windows have pull down flaps to help ventilate your home. Keep these open as much as possible so damp air can escape.

-

Open a window when cooking and after showering/bathing. Boiling pans, hot baths and showers produce lots of steam. Opening a window ensures this steam condenses outside rather than inside your home.

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PART THREE

It also helps to keep your kitchen and bathroom doors shut when these rooms are in use for about 20

- minutes after to stop moist air getting into other rooms. When your kitchen, bathroom or other rooms are not in use leave doors open so heat can spread evenly through your home.

Allow air to circulate

-

Do not put furniture against the outside walls of your home. The inside walls (between rooms) are always warmer and are therefore less prone to condensation. Leave a gap between the wall and the furniture so air can circulate and ensure that wardrobes and cupboards are properly ventilated to prevent mould growing inside.

Keep your home warm

-

When moisture condenses on your walls it makes them colder. This causes you to loose heat and increases the risk of mould growing. It then takes more energy to heat your home to a comfortable temperature which costs more. Heating your home efficiently helps reduce condensation and could save money on your heating bills. Try to keep your home above 18ºC (63°F) - most people find a comfortable heat is around 21°C (70°F). Condensation is sure to occur if you let your home fall below

18°C.

Remove mould as soon as you find it

-

You MUST remove mould as soon as you find it to stop it spreading and causing more damage to your home. You can get special cleaning products from DIY stores (always follow the manufacturers instructions) or you could use Detol Mould Remover which is available in all major superstores.

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PART THREE

3.6.5 Care of Kitchen

Premiere Kitchens’ units are designed to give many years of reliable service in normal household conditions. However it should be noted that the product is a piece of fitted furniture and should be treated with care, paying particular attention to the following areas.

Cleaning of Doors and Drawer Fronts

-

These should be cleaned using a clean damp cloth containing a small amount of mild detergent. Avoid over wetting gently wipe over the surface in one direction and then wipe over with a clean dry cloth. A cleaning agent such as Fairy Liquid is recommended.

-

Do not use any abrasive cleaning agents, acids, bleaches, petrol or solvents. Similarly do not use scouring pads, wire wool or any similar cleaning aids. Avoid excessive water or any other liquid.

-

-

-

Cleaning Interiors of Units

-

Brush out any loose dust etc. The interior should then be cleaned using a clean damp cloth containing a small amount of mild detergent. Avoid over wetting gently wipe over the surface in one direction and then wipe over with a clean dry cloth. A cleaning agent such as Fairy Liquid is recommended.

Do not use any abrasive cleaning agents, acids, bleaches, petrol or solvents. Similarly do not use scouring pads, wire wool or any similar cleaning aids. Particularly avoid saturating the unit bottom with excessive water or any other liquid.

Drawer Boxes system is designed to operate under a maximum load of 25kg. Do not lean on partly opened drawers as this may cause the drawer box to part from the drawer runner.

To remove drawer boxes Pull out the drawer box until it resists. Tip the front upwards to disengage the box from the runners.

-

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PART THREE

To clean drawer boxes

Remove drawers from the units and brush to remove loose dirt etc. Clean the drawer box using a clean damp cloth containing a small amount of mild detergent. Avoid over wetting gently wipe over the surface in one direction and then wipe over with a clean dry cloth. A cleaning agent such as Fairy Liquid is recommended.

Do not use any abrasive cleaning agents, acids, bleaches, petrol or solvents. Similarly do not use scouring pads, wire wool or any similar cleaning aids. Particularly avoid saturating the drawer bottom with excessive water or any other liquid.

General Care

1.

Never place hot cooking utensils taken straight from the hob or oven directly onto the worktop surface as this will cause damage. Use heat resistant mats. The Duropal laminate is tested to a temperature of

180c. Boiling water and cooking splashes will therefore do no harm to the surface of the worktop.

2.

Do not allow water or other liquids to stand on the worktop or collect around joints and cutouts. Wipe away immediately.

3.

Check the seal around all inset sink tops, hob cut-outs, end caps, jointing strips etc. thoroughly in order to ensure no moisture penetration. Always use a sealing agent on exposed chipboard edges and if an edging becomes loose or is damaged have it replaced immediately.

4.

Do not cut objects directly on the worktop always use a chopping board for preparing food.

Cleaning Worktops

The major advantage of Premiere Kitchens’ worktops is that the HPL surface makes cleaning so simple.

Usually a moist cloth is sufficient, but use washing-up liquid to get rid of any grease. Stubborn dirt can be removed with an organic solvent such as methylated spirits or alcohol. Brushes with soft nylon bristles may be used for textured surfaces to ensure a more thorough cleaning but abrasive scouring pads, creams and even polishes should be avoided.

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3.7 Emergency Information

3.7.1 General

Make sure that you know where the cut offs and switches are situated, so they can quickly be turned off should an emergency situation arise.

Turn off the ELECTRICITY at the consumer unit in your Hall by flicking the switch to off

Turn off the WATER using the stop tap which can be found under the kitchen sink

Please Be aware there is a stop tap under the stairs for the rainwater harvesting, this should not be touched by tenants unless instructed

You may be charged for attending to problems caused by wilful damage as detailed in your

Tenancy Agreement and Bromford’s “Tenants’ Handbook”. Reference should also be made to the Bromford’s “Repairs Handbook” provided in the sign-up pack.

Maintenance/Repair

If you have any maintenance requirements or require an urgent repair your point of contact is the Association or the Association’s appointed

Agent. The number below is operational 24 hrs a day.

Bromford Housing –

0330 1234 034

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PART THREE

3.7.2 Electrical

Smoke alarm

Your home has been fitted with an Aico Ei156TLH optical alarm in the kitchen and an Aico Ei154TL heat alarm upstairs. Both of these alarms run off mains power and in the event of power failure have a rechargeable battery backup which can last up to 6 months without a mains power supply.

-

The green indicator shows that mains power is present and every 40 seconds the red light will flash to show that it has self tested.

-

Pressing the button will test the alarm and sound the horn while suppressed

-

When the battery is empty the alarm will flash and beep every 40 seconds to indicate in needs recharging

-

Alarm has a 5 year guarantee

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PART THREE

3.7.3 Plan Your Escape

Create an Escape Plan

As recommended by the Fire and Rescue Service every household should have some sort of escape plan just in case the worst was to happen. Hopefully you will never have to use it, but it is important to prepare for it so there is no delay when put into action.

The Fire and Rescue Service can help you devise an escape plan, free of charge.

Key things to consider when devising an Escape Plan

• Plan together as a family ensuring that all the children in the household know the plan and what to do in the unlikely event of fire occurring

• Consider any special arrangements that may be needed for example elderly people

• Ensure that the escape route is practicable and clear from obstruction.

• Consider where any keys necessary for escape are kept and familiarise yourself with the operation of any windows and doors which might be needed for escape.

More information on how to devise an Escape Plan can be found on the Fire and Rescue

Service website (www.fireservice.co.uk).

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PART THREE

3.8 Links, References & Further Information

Energy Savings Trust

21 Dartmouth Street,

London, SW1H 9BP

Recycle now

No address available

Waterwise

1 Queen Anne’s Gate

London, SW1H 9BT

WRAP

The Old Academy, 21 Horse Fair

Banbury, OX16 0AH

0800 512 012 www.est.org.uk

0845 600 0323

www.recyclenow.com

0207 344 1882 www.waterwise.org.uk

01295 819 900 www.wrap.org.uk

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PART FOUR

4.0 Site and Surroundings

4.1.1 Places to Visit

The Ark Animal Sanctuary

Located within 140 acres of beautiful Worcestershire countryside at

Evesham Country Park, The Ark Animal Sanctuary offers a wonderful day-out and animal experience for the whole family. Open from

10.30am daily, The Ark Animal Sanctuary is home to a wide variety of

British and World wildlife, including Otters, Foxes, Meerkats,

Racoons, Scottish Wild cats, along with a variety of reptiles, rare breed sheep and other farm animals.

01386 443 348 thearkanimalsanctuary.co.uk

Evesham Country Park ,

Evesham, Worcestershire,

WR11 4TP

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PART FOUR

Gloucester Waterways Museum submerge yourself into the fascinating world of Gloucester's

Victorian docks and meet the people and wildlife of our wonderful waterways.

An exciting selection of events and workshops runs throughout the year, such as Boater's Craft Demonstrations, and Roses and Castles Painting where visitors can try their hand at traditional canal painting.

Admission: 2012 Prices:

Adult £4.95

Child £3.50

Children under 4’s admitted free

Opening Times: 2012

Open daily throughout the year

Open: 11am - 4pm

July - August 10.30am- 5.00pm

Gloucester Waterways Museum, Llanthony

Warehouse, The Docks, Gloucester, GL1

2EH

01452 318200

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PART FOUR

4.1.2 Train

Your nearest train station is Cheltenham Spa and is located at the map below. For further enquires and train times please contact the following;

Station info

Cheltenham Spa Station

Queens Road

Cheltenham

Gloucestershire

GL51 8NP firstgreatwestern.co.uk

Buying tickets virgintrains.co.uk

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PART FOUR

Historic Railway Travel

The Gloucestershire Warwickshire Railway is a volunteer-run heritage railway that has reopened the closed railway line offering a 20-mile round trip between Toddington and Cheltenham

Racecourse through some of the most spectacular scenery in the Cotswolds.

The Railway attracts a varying range of steam locomotives and has its `home´ fleet of heritage diesel locomotives.

Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway

The Railway Station, Toddington,

Gloucesteshire, GL54 5DT

01242 621405 www.gwsr.com

4.1.3 Bus Route

The Stage Coach A bus route runs directly outside your home and will take you to Cheltenham town centre. You will find a timetable for this service effective from September, 2012 in the appendices of this

Guide.

For more bus service information please visit http://www.stagecoachbus

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PART FOUR

4.1.4 Park & Ride Schemes

Due to the location of your home there are no park & ride facilities close to your home but if travelling further afield to Cheltenham or Gloucester Park and Ride services can help you avoid the hassle and stress of city centre driving, finding a parking space or the expense of city centre parking.

The park and ride services operating in Gloucester are shown below.

Arle Court Park & Ride

Cheltenham

GL51 6SY

The car park is at Cheltenham Racecourse, which is well signposted. The service is commercially run by Stagecoach (Service D) and operates up to a 10 minute frequency.

For further information on bus routes and services please contact:

01452 425543 [email protected]

Integrated Transport Unit

Gloucestershire County Council

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PART FOUR

4.1.5 Cycle paths

Cycling Information

It is commonly considered that the majority of all car journeys made are for less than five miles, by avoiding these short journeys wherever possible you can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions along with reducing noise and air pollution. The health and fitness of the cyclist can also improve.

Cycle Storage

The provision of secure cycle storage shed or similar has been provided within your home giving a convenient and safe place to store bicycles when they are at home.

For more information on cycling in the region please visit the following websites;

Cycle Routes Cycle Clubs

Cheltenham & County

Sustrains cheltenhamctc

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PART FOUR

4.1.6 Car Hire

Apex Self Drive

Marshall House,

Wyman's Lane,

Swindon Village,

Cheltenham,

GL51 9QF

01242 233084 apex selfdrive.co.uk

Blink Car Hire

Kingsditch Lane,

Cheltenham

GL51 9PB

01242 250885

Sixt Car Hire

Kingsditch Lane,

Cheltenham

GL51 9PB

0844 248 6620

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PART FOUR

4.2 Local Amenities

The following provides you with the locations of various amenities within the local area;

Dunalley Primary School

West Drive, Cheltenham, GL50 4LB

Whaddon Primary School

Clyde Crescent, Cheltenham, GL52 5QH

Pittville School

Albert Road Cheltenham, GL52 3JD

Gloucestershire College

Princess Elizabeth Way, Cheltenham GL51 7SJ

01242 512391 dunalley.gloucs.sch.uk

01242 515775

01242 524 787 pittville.gloucs.sch.uk

0845 155 2020 gloscol.ac.uk

Stoke Road Surgery

326A Prestbury Road, Cheltenham, GL52 3DD

St Georges Surgery

121 Swindon Road, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire GL50 4DP

01242 244868

Sevenposts-greyholme.nhs.uk

0844 477 8963

Whaddon Youth Support Centre

Dart Road, Cheltenham, GL52 5QW

01242 242825 whatnowglos.co.uk

Located just 200m down Whaddon Road

Pittville Park

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PART FOUR

Gloucester Docks

The former dock estate has become a popular destination where visitors can enjoy interesting views and a range of modern facilities while wandering around a remarkably complete example of a Victorian port. Views include many fine warehouses and other dock-related buildings that have been found new uses. Where ships once discharged their cargoes, there is now an ever-changing miscellany of visiting narrow boats, smart motor cruisers and the occasional yacht or tall ship. The whole area is suitable for wheel-chairs.

Whether you are looking for a great family day out, the opportunity to interact with our unrivalled collection of domestic rare breeds, or the chance to learn more about farming and conservation – we have been here to welcome you since 1971, and our visitors tell us the experience just keeps on getting better.

Cotswold Farm Park, Guiting Power, GL54 5UG

01451 850307

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PART FOUR

Sainsburys ,

Priors Road, Cheltenham, GL52 5AQ

St Michael’s Church ,

1 Severn Road, Cheltenham, GL52 5QA

Badham Pharmacy ,

102 Whaddon Road, Cheltenham GL52 5NF

Leisure @ Cheltenham,

Tommy Taylors La, Cheltenham GL50 4RN

Fox and Hounds,

116 Prestbury Road, Cheltenham, GL52 2DP

Smile Stores ,

112 Whaddon Road, Cheltenham, GL52 5NQ

01242 235967

01242 694 985 achurchnearyou.com

01242 514 330 badhampharmacy.co.uk

01242 528764

01242 523095

01242 253313

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PART FOUR

Post Office ,

98 Whaddon Road, Cheltenham, GL52 5NF

01242 234357

For more cash points please visit the following; www.link

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PART FOUR

4.2.1 Responsible Purchasing

Reduce the energy costs of running your white goods appliances

Apart from heating your home, the energy you use in your home is mostly used up by appliances so a lot of attention is being paid to making them use less energy. Although this is good for reducing bills and the environment, there is a much simpler and cheaper way to reduce costs.

To reduce the energy costs of running appliances you should make sure that your buying electricity and gas from one of the cheaper suppliers. Most people can save a significant amount of money each year – even if they’ve already changed suppliers before.

These savings can be far greater than the savings you could make by replacing an appliance with one that uses less energy. We don’t need to get obsessive about constantly transferring to the cheapest energy supplier but it does make sense to at least check we aren’t paying way over the odds by keeping an eye on competitive tariffs. organic food procurement/ food growing/ local produce

10 Bennington Street

Cheltenham,

GL50 4ED

01242 238 733

Slipstream Organics

Unit 2, Ullenwood Court, Ullenwood

Cheltenham, GL53 9QS

George’s Organic Café provides work experience for our service users, it offers social inclusion within the local community and is an ideal situation for socializing. We market the café to local businesses and the public. www.slipstream

01242 227273

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PART FOUR

4.2.2 Emergency Information

In case of an emergency please dial

999

Contact Details of the Emergency Services

Cheltenham General Hospital

Sandford Road

Cheltenham

Gloucestershire

GL53 7AN

08454 222222 gloshospitals.org.uk

Whaddon Police Station

Cotswold Road,

Cheltenham

Gloucestershire

GL52 5HD

0845 090 1234

Cheltenham General Hospital

Sandford Road

Cheltenham

Gloucestershire

GL53 7AN

08454 222222 gloshospitals.org.uk

Gloucestershire Fire Station

Eastern Avenue

Gloucester

Gloucestershire

GL4 4LP

01452 753333

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PART FOUR

4.3 Links, References & Further Information

If you would like any further information on this HUG or require an alternative format of the guide please contact the following;

Bromford Living

Unit 1-6

Cirencester Office Park

Tetbury Road

Cirencester

GL7 6JJ

Phone:

0330 1234 034

E-mail:

[email protected]

Web site:

www.bromfordgroup.co.uk

Opening times: 8am - 6pm Monday to Friday.

(Closed public bank holidays)

Alternatively electronic versions can be found at the following address markeyconst ruction

If you would like any further information on what has been covered in the guide please contact the following organisations

Cheltenham Borough Council

Municipal Offices Promenade, Cheltenham,

Gloucestershire, GL50 9SA

01242 262 626 [email protected]

Gloucestershire County Council

Shire Hall, Westgate Street, Gloucester, GL1 2TG

01452 425000 gloucestershire [email protected]

80

PART FOUR

CYCLING

Sustrans

Sustrans is the UK's leading sustainable transport charity

Better By Bike

Everything you need to get on your bike

Gloucestershire County Council

Shire Hall, Westgate Street,

Gloucester, GL1 2TG

Bikeability

Bikeability is the Cycling Proficiency Test for the

21st century

LOCAL TRANSPORT PROVIDERS

Stagecoach Ltd

229 High Street Cheltenham,

GL50 3HH

First Great Western

Customer Services Team, First Great Western,

Freepost SWB40576,

Plymouth, PL4 6ZZ

SERVICES

Link

Find your nearest cash points

0845 1130065 [email protected]

01452 425000 [email protected]

[email protected]

01242 544120 stagecoach bus

08457 000125 www.link

81

Post Office

RESPONSIBLE PURCHASING ADVICE

Responsible Purchasing Initiative c/o Traidcraft Exchange, Unit 306, 16 Baldwin’s

Gardens, London, EC1N 7RJ

Energy Saving Trust

21 Dartmouth Street, London,

SW1H 9BP

Forest Stewardship Council

11-13 Great Oak Street, Llanidloes,

Powys, SY18 6BU

Forestry Commission

Public Enquiries, 231 Corstorphine Road,

Edinburgh, EH14 5NE

Fairtrade Foundation

Ibex House, 42-47 Minories,

London, EC3N 1DY

Soil Association

South Plaza, Marlborough Street,

Bristol, BS1 3NX www.postoffice

0207 2423955 [email protected]

0800 512012

01686 413916 [email protected]

0845 3673787 [email protected]

020 7405 5942

0117 314 5000 soilassociation [email protected]

82

PART FIVE

Appendices

5.1 Energy Performance Certificates

5.2 Electric Safety Certificate

5.3 Shopper’s Guide to Green Labels

5.4 European Labeling Scheme Information

5.5 Bus Timetable

83

84

5.1 Energy Performance Certificates

85

86

5.2 Electric Safety Certificate

87

88

5.3 Shopper’s Guide to Green Labels

89

90

5.4 European Labeling Scheme Information

91

92

5.5 Bus Timetable

93

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