MegaRAID 320 Storage Adapters User's Guide
Intel® RAID Software User’s Guide:
• Intel® Embedded Server RAID
Technology II
• Intel® Integrated Server RAID
• Intel® RAID Controllers using the
Intel® RAID Software Stack 3
July, 2007
Intel Order Number: D29305-005
INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED IN CONNECTION WITH INTEL(R)
PRODUCTS. NO LICENSE, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, BY ESTOPPEL OR OTHERWISE, TO ANY
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IS GRANTED BY THIS DOCUMENT. EXCEPT AS
PROVIDED IN INTEL'S TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE FOR SUCH PRODUCTS, INTEL
ASSUMES NO LIABILITY WHATSOEVER, AND INTEL DISCLAIMS ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
WARRANTY, RELATING TO SALE AND/OR USE OF INTEL PRODUCTS INCLUDING LIABILITY
OR WARRANTIES RELATING TO FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE,
MERCHANTABILITY, OR INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT OR OTHER
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT. Intel products are not intended for use in medical, life saving,
life sustaining applications. Intel may make changes to specifications and product descriptions at
any time, without notice.
Intel is a trademark or registered trademark of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United
States and other countries.
*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.
Copyright © 2007 by Intel Corporation. Portions Copyright 2005-2007 by LSI Logic Corporation. All
rights reserved.
ii
Intel® RAID Software User’s Guide
Contents
1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Supported Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fault Tolerance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
2
2
3
5
2 Levels of RAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
RAID 0 - Data Striping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
RAID 1 - Disk Mirroring/Disk Duplexing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
RAID 5 - Data Striping with Striped Parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
RAID 6 - Distributed Parity and Disk Striping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
RAID 10 - Combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
RAID 50 - Combination of RAID 5 and RAID 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
RAID 60 - Combination of RAID 0 and RAID 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
3 RAID Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II BIOS Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 Configuration Utility for Intelligent RAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Intel® RAID Web Console 2 Configuration and Monitoring Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive Hierarchy within the RAID Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Intel® Intelligent RAID Controller Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enterprise Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fault Tolerant Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cache Options and Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Background Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Audible Alarm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
13
14
14
15
15
16
16
17
17
18
4 Intel® RAID Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Windows* System Driver Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Driver Installation on New Windows Operating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Driver Installation on Existing Windows Operating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Driver Installation for Red Hat* Enterprise Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Driver Installation for SuSE* Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
19
20
20
21
5 Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Creating, Adding or Modifying a Logical Drive Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Write Cache and Read Ahead Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with a Global Hotspare Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Hot Spare Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Hot Spare Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rebuilding a Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auto Rebuild and Auto Resume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking Data Consistency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing and Changing Device Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forcing a Drive Online or Offline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
25
26
26
26
27
27
27
28
28
iii
Configuring a Bootable Logical Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Deleting (Clearing) a Storage Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
6 Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Quick Configuration Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Detailed Configuration Steps using the Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start the BIOS Console 2 Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Screen and Option Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Wizard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating RAID 0, 1, or 5 through the RAID BIOS Console 2 (detailed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID 10 and RAID 50 Creation Using BIOS Console 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Drive Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Hot Spare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Event Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
32
32
32
38
40
44
49
50
53
7 Intel® RAID Web Console 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Configuration Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware and Software Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 on a Windows Operating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 on Linux or SUSE SLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Startup, Overview, and Setup of Intel® RAID Web Console 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Intel® RAID Web Console 2 Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical/Logical View Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Properties/Operations/Graphical View Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event Log Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Menu Bar / File Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Menu Bar / Operations Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
File Menu / Group Operations Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
File Menu / Log Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
File Menu / Help Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive Configuration Tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guided Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Spanned Disk Array or Disk Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Hot Spares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Adjustable Task Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Drive to a Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Drive from a Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the RAID Level of a Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Virtual Disk Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Virtual Disk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving a Configuration to Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing a Configuration from a Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Configuration from a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring System Events and Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring System Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iv
55
55
55
56
56
58
58
59
60
61
62
62
62
63
63
63
63
63
64
72
75
77
79
80
83
85
86
86
87
87
89
90
91
91
92
Monitoring Disk Drives and Other Physical Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Monitoring Virtual Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Monitoring Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Monitoring Battery Backup Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Initializing a Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Running a Consistency Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Scanning for New Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Rebuilding a Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Removing a Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Flashing the Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Appendix 8 Configuring RAID 0, 1, or 5 using Custom Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Appendix A Events and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
v
vi
Figures
Figure 1. RAID 0 - Data Striping ............................................................................................... 7
Figure 2. RAID 1 - Disk Mirroring/Disk Duplexing..................................................................... 8
Figure 3. RAID 5 - Data Striping with Striped Parity ................................................................. 8
Figure 4. Example of Distributed Parity across Two Blocks in a Stripe (RAID 6) ..................... 9
Figure 5. RAID 10 - Combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0 ....................................................... 10
Figure 6. RAID 50 - Combination of RAID 5 and RAID 0 ....................................................... 10
Figure 7. RAID 60 Level Logical Drive.................................................................................... 12
Figure 8. Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS Configuration Utility Screen .......................... 23
Figure 9. Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 Menu ......................................................................... 33
Figure 10. Adapter Properties................................................................................................. 34
Figure 11. Additional Adapter Properties................................................................................ 35
Figure 12. BIOS Console 2 - Adapter Selection ..................................................................... 37
Figure 13. BIOS Console 2 - Configuration Types ................................................................. 38
Figure 14. BIOS Console 2 - Configuration Methods ............................................................. 39
Figure 15. BIOS Console 2 - Add Physical Drives to Array .................................................... 40
Figure 16. BIOS Console 2 - Set Array Properties ................................................................. 41
Figure 17. BIOS Console 2 - Confirm Configuration............................................................... 42
Figure 18. BIOS Console 2 - Initialization Speed Setting ....................................................... 43
Figure 19. RAID BIOS Console 2 Utility – Multiple Disk Groups for RAID 10 or 50 ............... 44
Figure 20. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Spanning Multiple Arrays ............................................... 45
Figure 21. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Viewing Completed Settings .......................................... 46
Figure 22. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Initialization Settings ...................................................... 47
Figure 23. RAID BIOS Console 2 – RAID 10 Final Screen .................................................... 47
Figure 24. RAID BIOS Console 2 – RAID 10 Properties Screen............................................ 48
Figure 25. RAID BIOS Console 2 – RAID 50 Properties Screen............................................ 48
Figure 26. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Choosing a Hot Spare Drive .......................................... 50
Figure 27. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Setting a Hot Spare Drive .............................................. 51
Figure 28. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Viewing Hot Spare ......................................................... 51
Figure 29. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Main Screen showing Hot Spare Drive .......................... 52
Figure 30. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Event Information Screen............................................... 53
Figure 31. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Selecting Events to View................................................ 54
Figure 32. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Viewing an Event ........................................................... 54
Figure 33. IIntel® RAID Web Console 2 – Customer Information Screen............................... 56
Figure 34. Setup Type Screen................................................................................................ 57
Figure 35. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Select Server Screen............................................. 59
Figure 36. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Login Screen ......................................................... 59
Figure 37. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Main Screen .......................................................... 60
Figure 38. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Operations Tab...................................................... 61
Figure 39. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Graphical Tab ........................................................ 62
Figure 40. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Starting Configuration Wizard................................ 64
Figure 41. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Selecting Type of Configuration ............................ 64
Figure 42. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Auto Configuration Screen .................................... 65
Figure 43. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – First Manual Configuration Screen ........................ 66
Figure 44. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Selecting Drive for Hotspare.................................. 67
Figure 45. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – New Disk Group with Hotspare ............................. 68
Figure 46. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Defining a Virtual Disk ........................................... 69
vii
Figure 47. Manual Configuration – New Configuration........................................................... 70
Figure 48. Manual Configuration – Virtual Disk Summary ...................................................... 71
Figure 49. First Guided Configuration Screen ........................................................................ 72
Figure 50. Guided Configuration – Parameters ...................................................................... 73
Figure 51. Final Guided Configuration Screen ....................................................................... 74
Figure 52. Defining the Spanned Array .................................................................................. 75
Figure 53. New Spanned Array .............................................................................................. 76
Figure 54. Make Global Hotspare........................................................................................... 77
Figure 55. Creating a Dedicated Hotspare ............................................................................. 78
Figure 56. Select Hotspare Drive............................................................................................ 78
Figure 57. Set Adjustable Task Rates .................................................................................... 79
Figure 58. Starting Reconstruction Wizard ............................................................................. 80
Figure 59. Reconstruction Wizard .......................................................................................... 81
Figure 60. Selecting Drives to Add ......................................................................................... 81
Figure 61. Drive Selected for Virtual Disk ............................................................................... 82
Figure 62. Changing RAID Level ............................................................................................ 82
Figure 63. Select Drives to Remove from logical drive........................................................... 83
Figure 64. Drive Selected for Removal from logical drive....................................................... 84
Figure 65. Select RAID Level ................................................................................................. 84
Figure 66. Selecting RAID Level............................................................................................. 85
Figure 67. Set Virtual Disk Properties..................................................................................... 86
Figure 68. Save Configuration to File ..................................................................................... 87
Figure 69. Save Configuration Dialog Box.............................................................................. 88
Figure 70. Clear Configuration................................................................................................ 89
Figure 71. Add Saved Configuration....................................................................................... 90
Figure 72. Event Information Window..................................................................................... 91
Figure 73. Controller Information ............................................................................................ 92
Figure 74. Physical Drive Information..................................................................................... 93
Figure 75. Locating Physical Drive ......................................................................................... 94
Figure 76. Patrol Read Configuration ..................................................................................... 95
Figure 77. Virtual Disk Properties ........................................................................................... 96
Figure 78. Enclosure Information - Graphical View ................................................................ 97
Figure 79. Battery Backup Unit Information............................................................................ 98
Figure 80. Group Show Progress Window ............................................................................. 99
Figure 81. Selecting Initialize................................................................................................ 100
Figure 82. Group Consistency Check Window ..................................................................... 101
Figure 83. Scan for Foreign Configuration............................................................................ 102
Figure 84. Preparing Drive for Removal ............................................................................... 103
Figure 85. Flashing the Firmware ......................................................................................... 104
Figure 86. Starting Configuration Wizard.............................................................................. 105
Figure 87. Selecting Manual Configuration........................................................................... 106
Figure 88. Selecting Drives for RAID 0................................................................................. 106
Figure 89. Drives Selected for RAID 0.................................................................................. 107
Figure 90. Configure RAID 0 Parameters............................................................................. 107
Figure 91. Accepting RAID 0 Parameters............................................................................. 108
Figure 92. Completing RAID 0 Configuration ....................................................................... 108
Figure 93. RAID 0 in Logical Tab.......................................................................................... 109
viii
1
Overview
This document describes the software and utilities, available RAID modes, and instructions
for configuring and maintaining RAID arrays. The software described in this document is
designed for use only with Intel® RAID controllers that use the Intel® RAID Software Stack 3
(software names begin with “ir3-” or “esrt2”).
Supported Hardware
This manual covers the software stack that is shared by multiple Intel® server products:
• Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II on the Intel® Enterprise South Bridge 2
(ESB2) in the chipset that is used in Intel® Server Boards that are based on the S5000
and S7000 chipsets, and on Intel® Server Boards that include the LSI* 1064e SAS
controller and some that include the LSI* 1068 SAS controller.
Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II provides firmware-based RAID modes 0,
1, and 10 with an optional RAID 5 mode provided by the Intel® RAID Activation Key
AXXRAKSW5 on the ESB2 and LSI 1064e on some models of Intel server boards.
ESB2 is SATA only.
LSI SAS 1064e and 1068 provide SATA and SAS support. Not all 1068 SAS boards
provide Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II modes.
Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II must be enabled in the server system
BIOS before it is available. Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II is limited to a
maximum of eight drives including hot spare(s).
• Intel® Integrated RAID Technology on the Intel® ROMB solutions. Server boards and
systems include:
— Intel® Server Board S5000PSL with product code S5000PSLROMB
— Intel® Server System SR1550AL with product code SR1550ALSAS
— Intel® Server System SR2500 with produt code SR2500LX
— Intel® Server System SR4850HW4s
— Intel® Server System SR6850HW4s
— Intel® Server System S7000FC4UR with a SAS riser card.
Systems using the Intel® RAID Controller SROMB18E provide XOR RAID modes 0,
1, 5, 10, and 50 when the optional Intel® RAID Activation Key AXXRAK18E and a
DDR2 400 ECC DIMM are installed.
The SAS riser card requires the optional Intel® RAID Activation Key AXXRAK28E
and a DDR2 667 ECC DIMM to provide XOR RAID modes 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60.
Note: This manual does not include the software RAID modes provided by the SAS riser
card on the Intel® Server System S7000FC4UR
• Intel® Intelligent RAID used on the discrete Intel® RAID Controller SRCSAS18E,
SRCSAS144E, SRCSATAWB, SRCSASRB, or SRCSASJV. The first generation SAS
controllers provide XOR RAID modes 0, 1, 5, 10, and 50 through the LSI 1068 SAS
controller and Intel® IOP333 chipset. The second generation SAS controller (LSI 1078
ROC) provides XOR RAID modes 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60.
1
Notes: This manual does not include information about native SATA or SAS-only modes of the RAID
controllers.
Caution: Some levels of RAID are designed to increase the availability of data and some to provide data
redundancy. However, installing a RAID controller is not a substitute for a reliable backup strategy.
It is highly recommended that all data be backed up regularly via a tape drive or other backup
strategy to guard against data loss. It is especially important to back up all data before working on
any system components and before installing or changing the RAID controller or configuration.
Software
Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II and Intel Integrated Server RAID controllers
include a set of software tools to configure and manage RAID systems. These include:
• Intel® RAID controller software and utilities: The firmware that is installed on the RAID
controller provides pre-operating system configuration.
— For Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II, press <Ctrl> + <E> during the
server boot to enter the BIOS configuration utility.
— For Intel Integrated Server RAID, press <Ctrl> + <G> during the server boot to enter
the RAID BIOS Console II.
• Intel® RAID Controller Drivers: Intel provides software drivers for these operating
systems:
— Microsoft Windows 2000*, XP*, and Server 2003* (32-bit and 64-bit editions)
— Red Hat* Enterprise Linux 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 (X86 and X86-64)
— SuSE* Linux Enterprise Server 9.0 with service packs 1 - 3, SLES 10 (X86 and
X86-64)
Note: Only combinations of controller, driver, and Intel® Server board or system listed
in the Tested Hardware and Operating System List (THOL) have been tested.
Check the supported OS list for both your RAID controller and your server board
to verify operating system support and compatibility.
• Intel® RAID Web Console 2: A full-featured GUI utility is provided to monitor, manage,
and update the RAID configuration.
RAID Terminology
RAID is a group of physical disks put together to provide benefits that include increased I/O
performance (via allowing multiple simultaneous disk access) and/or fault
tolerance/reliability (by reconstructing failed drives from remaining data). The physical drive
group is called an array, and the partitioned sets are called virtual disks. A virtual disk can
consist of a part of one or more physical arrays, and/or one or more entire arrays.
Using two or more configured RAID arrays in a larger virtual disk is called spanning. It is
represented by a double digit in the RAID mode/type (10, 50, 60).
Running more than one array on a given physical drive or set of drives in called sliced
configuration.
2
The only drive that the operating system works with is the virtual disk, also called a logical
drive. The logical drive is used by the OS as a single drive (lettered storage device in
Windows*).
The RAID controller is the mastermind that must configure the physical array and the virtual
disks, and initialize them for use, check them for data consistency, allocate the data between
the physical drives, and rebuild failed disks to maintain data redundancy in an array. The
features available per controller are highlighted later in this document and in the hardware
guide for the RAID controller.
The common terms used when describing RAID functions and features can be grouped into
the areas of fault tolerance (data protection and redundancy) and performance.
Fault Tolerance
Fault tolerance describes a state in which even with a drive failure, the data on the logical drive
is still complete and the system is available after the failure and during repair of the array.
Most RAID modes are capable of incurring a physical disk failure without compromising data
integrity or processing capability of the logical drive.
RAID mode 0 is NOT fault tolerant. With RAID 0, if a drive fails, then the data is no longer
complete and is no longer available. Backplane fault tolerance can be achieved by a spanned
array where the arrays are on different backplanes.
True fault tolerance includes the automatic ability to restore the RAID array to redundancy so
that another drive failure will not destroy its usability.
Hot Spare
True fault tolerance requires the availability of a spare disk that the controller can add to the
array and use to rebuild the array with the data from the failed drive. This spare disk is called a
hot spare. It must be a part of the array before a disk failure occurs. A hot spare drive is a
physical drive that is maintained by the RAID controller but not actually used for data storage
in the array unless another drive fails. Upon failure of one of the array’s physical drives, the
hot spare drive is used to hold the recreated data and restore data redundancy.
Hot spare drives can be global (available to any array on a controller) or dedicated (usable
only by one array). There can be more than one hot spare per array and the drive of the closest
capacity will be used. If both dedicated and global hot spare drives are available, then the
dedicated drive is used first. If the hot swap rebuild fails, then that hot spare will also be
marked failed. Since RAID 0 is not redundant, there is no hot spare value.
If a hot spare drive is not an option, then it is possible to perform a hot or cold swap of the
failed drive to provide the new drive for rebuild after the drive failure. A swap is the manual
substitution of a replacement drive in a disk subsystem. If a swap is performed while the
system is running, it is a hot swap. A hot-swap can only be performed if the backplane and
enclosure support it. If the system does not support hot swapping drives, then the system must
be powered down before the drive swap occurs. This is a cold swap.
In all cases (hot spare, hot-swap, or cold-swap), the replacement drive must be at least as large
as the drive it replaces. In all three cases, the failed drive is removed from the array. If using a
hot spare, then the failed drive can remain in the system. When a hot spare is available and an
automatic rebuild starts, the failed drive may be automatically removed from the array before
the utilities detect the failure. Only the event logs will show what happened.
3
All rebuilds should automatically restart on reboot if the system is shut down during the
rebuild.
Note: If running a sliced configuration (RAID 0 and RAID 5 on the same set of physical drives), then the
rebuild of the spare will not occur until the RAID 0 array is deleted.
Data Redundancy
Data redundancy is provided by mirroring or by disk striping with parity stripes.
• Disk mirroring is found only in RAID 1 and 10. With mirroring, the same data is
simultaneously written to two disks. If one disk fails, the contents of the other disk can
be used to run the system and reconstruct the failed disk. This provides 100% data
redundancy but uses the most drive capacity since only 50% of the total capacity is
available. Both mirrored disks contain the same data at all times until a failure occurs.
Either drive can act as the operational drive.
• Parity is the ability to recreate data by using a mathematical calculation derived from
multiple data sets. Parity is basically a checksum of all the data, the “ABCsum”. When
drive A fails, the controller uses the ABCsum to calculates what remains on drives B+C.
The remainder needs to be recreated onto new drive A.
Parity can be dedicated (all parity stripes are placed on the same drive) or distributed
(parity stripes are spread across multiple drives). Calculating and writing parity slows
the write process but provides redundancy in a much smaller space than mirroring.
Parity checking is also used to detect errors in the data during consistency checks and
patrol reads.
RAID 5 uses distributed parity and RAID 6 uses dual distributed parity (two different
sets of parity are calculated and written to different drives each time.) RAID modes 1
and 5 can survive a single disk failure, although performance may be degraded,
especially during the rebuild. RAID modes 10 and 50 can survive multiple disk failures
across the spans, but only one failure per array. RAID mode 6 can survive up to two
disk failures. RAID mode 60 can sustain up to two failures per array.
Data protection is also provided by running calculations on the drives to make sure data is
consistent and that drives are good. The controller uses consistency checks, background
initialization, and patrol reads. These should be included in regular maintenance schedules.
• The consistency check operation verifies that data in the array matches the redundancy
data (parity or checksum). This is not provided in RAID 0 in which there is no fault
tolerance.
• Background initialization is a consistency check that is forced 5 minutes after the
creation of a virtual disk. Background initialization also checks for media errors on
physical drives and ensures that striped data segments are the same on all physical drives
in an array.
• Patrol read checks for physical disk errors that could lead to drive failure. These checks
usually include an attempt at corrective action. Patrol read can be enabled or disabled
with automatic or manual activation. This process starts only when the RAID controller
is idle for a defined period of time and no other background tasks are active, though it
can continue to run during heavy I/O processes.
Enclosure management is the intelligent monitoring of the disk subsystem by software and/or
hardware, usually via a disk enclosure. It increases the ability for the user to respond to drive
or power supply failure by monitoring those sub systems.
4
Performance
Performance improvements come from multiple areas including disk striping and disk
spanning, accessing multiple disks simultaneously, and setting the percentage of processing
capability to use for a task.
Disk Striping
Disk striping writes data across all of the physical disks in the array into fixed size partitions or
stripes. In most cases, the stripe size is user-defined. Stripes do not provide redundancy but
improve performance since striping allows multiple physical drives to be accessed at the same
time. These stripes are interleaved in a repeated sequential manner and the controller knows
where data is stored. The same strip size should be kept across RAID arrays.
Terms used with strip sizing are
• Strip size: One disk section
• Stripe size: Total of one set of strips across all data disks, not including parity stripes
• Stripe width: The number of disks involved.
A 5 drive RAID 5 array stripe would commonly contain 64 KB stripe size from a 16 KB strip
size.
Disk Spanning
Disk spanning allows more than one array to be combined into a single logical drive. The
spanned arrays must have the same stripe size and must be contiguous. Spanning alone does
not provide redundancy but RAID modes 10, 50, and 60 all have redundancy provided in their
pre-spanned arrays through RAID 1, 5, or 6.
Note: Spanning two contiguous RAID 0 drives does not produce a new RAID level or add fault tolerance.
It does increase the size of the logical volume and improves performance by doubling the number of
spindles. Spanning for RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60 requires two to eight arrays of RAID 1, 5,
or 6 that have the same stripe size and always uses the entire drive.
CPU Usage
Resource allocation provides the user with the options to set the amount of compute cycles to
devote to various tasks, including the rate of rebuilds, initialization, consistency checks, and
patrol read. Setting resource to 100% gives total priority to the rebuild. Setting it at 0% means
the rebuild will only occur if the system is not doing anything else. The default rebuild rate is
30 percent.
5
6
2
Levels of RAID
Note: RAID levels 6 and 60 are available only on LSI* 1078 ROC controllers.
RAID 0 - Data Striping
In RAID 0, data is split into blocks called stripes, and stripes are written to alternating drives.
RAID 0 usually requires at least two drives and may consist of up to 8 physical SATA drives
or 16 SAS devices. The stripe size is user configured. RAID 0 provides significant
improvement of the data throughput but does not provide data redundancy. When one hard
disk fails, all data is lost. Because RAID 0 does not provide data redundancy, all drive space is
available for data and there is no need for a hot spare drive. A single drive can be set to
provide RAID 0 as a method to pass a single drive through to the operating system.
RAID 0 improves performance for video streaming and high-speed applications because data
is stored and retrieved across multiple drives. Do not use RAID 0 to store critical data.
RAID 0
ABCDEF
RAID Adapter
Available Capacity
N=# disks
C = Disk Capacity
Available Capacity = N*C
A
C
E
B
D
F
Data Striping
RAID 0
Figure 1. RAID 0 - Data Striping
RAID 1 - Disk Mirroring/Disk Duplexing
RAID 1 requires two drives because all data is stored twice, once each on two identical disks,
making one drive a mirror image of the other. If one hard disk fails, all data is immediately
available on the other without an impact on performance. If both drives are on a single
channel, the term is Disk Mirroring. If each drive is on a separate channel, the term is Disk
Duplexing. Because all data is duplicated, only half of the total drive space can be counted as
available space.
RAID 1 is an easy and highly efficient way to provide data redundancy and system availability
and is ideal for the operating system drive or databases. Use a hot spare drive and any disk
failure will start an automatic rebuild of the data onto the hot spare drive.
7
RAID 1
ABC
RAID Adapter
A
B
C
Available Capacity
N=# disks
C = Disk Capacity
Available Capacity =
(N*C) /2
A
B
C
Disk Mirroring
RAID 1
Figure 2. RAID 1 - Disk Mirroring/Disk Duplexing
RAID 5 - Data Striping with Striped Parity
RAID 5 works by striping data across multiple drives, but it also provides data redundancy by
calculating and writing data checksums (parity). If one drive fails, all data remains fully
available. Missing data is recalculated from the remaining data and parity information.
RAID 5 balances throughput and redundancy and requires at least three drives. Multi-user,
multi-tasking environments typically use small data blocks, which are well suited to RAID 5.
RAID 5
ABCDEF
RAID Adapter
Available Capacity
N=# disks
C = Disk Capacity
Available Capacity =
(N*C)(N-1) /N
B
A
C
P2
E
P3
P1
D
F
Data Striping &
Striped Parity
RAID 5
Figure 3. RAID 5 - Data Striping with Striped Parity
RAID 6 - Distributed Parity and Disk Striping
RAID 6 uses distributed parity, with two independent parity blocks per stripe, and disk
striping. A RAID 6 virtual disk can survive the loss of two disks without losing data.
RAID 6 is similar to RAID 5 (disk striping and parity), except that instead of one parity block
per stripe, there are two. With two independent parity blocks, RAID 6 can survive the loss of
two disks in a virtual disk without losing data.
8
Table 1. RAID 6
Uses
Provides a high level of data protection through the use of a second parity block in
each stripe. Use RAID 6 for data that requires a high level of protection from loss.
In the case of a failure of one drive or two drives in a virtual disk, the RAID
controller uses the parity blocks to recreate the missing information. If two drives
in a RAID 6 virtual disk fail, two drive rebuilds are required, one for each drive.
These rebuilds do not occur at the same time. The controller rebuilds one failed
drive at a time.
Use for office automation and online customer service that requires fault
tolerance. Use for any application that has high read request rates but low write
request rates.
Strong Points
Provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good performance in most
environments. Can survive the loss of two drives or the loss of a drive while
another drive is being rebuilt. Provides the highest level of protection against drive
failures of all of the RAID levels. Read performance is similar to that of RAID 5.
Weak Points
Not well suited to tasks requiring lot of writes. A RAID 6 virtual disk has to
generate two sets of parity data for each write operation, which results in a
significant decrease in performance during writes. Disk drive performance is
reduced during a drive rebuild. Environments with few processes do not perform
as well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance gains in
handling simultaneous processes. RAID 6 costs more because of the extra
capacity required by using two parity blocks per stripe.
Drives
3 to 32
The following figure shows a RAID 6 data layout. The second set of parity drives are denoted
by Q. The P drives follow the RAID 5 parity scheme.
Segment 1
Segment 6
Segment 2
Segment 7
Segment 11
Segment 16
Parity (P17-P20)
Segment 12
Parity (P13-P16)
Parity (Q17-Q20)
Segment 3
Segment 8
Segment 4
Parity (P5-P8)
Parity (P9-P12) Parity (Q9–Q12)
Segment 13
Parity (Q13-Q16)
Segment 17
Segment 18
Parity (P1-P4)
Parity (Q5-Q8)
Segment 9
Segment 14
Segment 19
Parity (Q1-Q4)
Segment 5
Segment 10
Segment 15
Segment 20
NOTE: Parity is distributed across all drives in the array.
Figure 4. Example of Distributed Parity across Two Blocks in a Stripe (RAID 6)
RAID 10 - Combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0
RAID 10 is a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1, which gives a blend of performance and
redundancy without requiring parity calculations or writes. Best performance is achieved in
highly sequential load situations but one half of the capacity is lost to redundancy. RAID 10
requires a minimum of two and up to eight RAID 1 arrays and each array must contain exactly
9
two drives. RAID 10 will tolerate one drive failure per stripe set, meaning two total drives
could be lost as long as they are in separate RAID 1 arrays. A hot spare drive can be used in
any position.
Mirror Set
RAID 10
ABCDEF
Available Capacity
A
C
E
B
D
F
B
D
F
N=# disks
C = Disk Capacity
Available Capacity =
(N*C) /2
Stripe Set
RAID Adapter
A
C
E
Disk Mirror
&
Data Striping
RAID 10
Figure 5. RAID 10 - Combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0
RAID 50 - Combination of RAID 5 and RAID 0
Like RAID 10, RAID 50 is created by first creating multiple RAID 5 arrays or disk groups and
spanning a logical drive across them. RAID 50 arrays or disk groups provide the excellent
performance of RAID 5 with added data security. RAID 50 requires a minimum of six drives
and can span a maximum of eight RAID 5 arrays or disk groups. RAID 50 will tolerate a
single drive failure per stripe.
RAID 5 Set
RAID 50
ABCDEFGHIJK
P(I+K)
C
P(E+G)
I
P1(A+C)
G
K
N=# disks
C = Disk Capacity
Available Capacity =
(N*C)(N-1) /N
B
F
P(J+L)
D
P(F+H)
J
P1(B+D)
Stripe Set
RAID Adapter
Available Capacity
A
E
H
L
RAID 5
&
Data Striping
RAID 50
Figure 6. RAID 50 - Combination of RAID 5 and RAID 0
10
RAID 60 - Combination of RAID 0 and RAID 6
RAID 60 uses distributed parity, with two independent parity blocks per stripe in each RAID
set, and disk striping. A RAID 60 virtual disk can survive the loss of two disks in each of the
RAID 6 sets without losing data. It works best with data that requires high reliability, high
request rates, high data transfers, and medium-to-large capacity.
RAID 60 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 6 and includes both parity and disk
striping across multiple arrays. RAID 6 supports two independent parity blocks per stripe.
RAID 60 is best implemented on two RAID 6 disk arrays with data striped across both disk
arrays.
RAID 60 divides data into smaller blocks, then stripes the blocks of data to each RAID 6 disk
set. RAID 6 divides the data into smaller blocks, calculates parity by performing an exclusiveor on the blocks, then writes the blocks of data and parity to each drive in the array. The size of
each block is determined by the stripe size parameter, which is set during the creation of the
RAID set.
RAID 60 can support up to 8 spans and tolerate up to 16 drive failures, though less than total
disk drive capacity is available.
Table 2. RAID 60
Uses
Provides a high level of data protection through the use of a second parity block in
each stripe. Use RAID 60 for data that requires a very high level of protection from
loss.
In the case of a failure of one drive or two drives in a RAID set in a virtual disk, the
RAID controller uses the parity blocks to recreate all the missing information. If
two drives in a RAID 6 set in a RAID 60 virtual disk fail, two drive rebuilds are
required, one for each drive. These rebuilds do not occur at the same time. The
controller rebuilds one failed drive, and then the other failed drive.
Use for office automation and online customer service that requires fault
tolerance. Use for any application that has high read request rates but low write
request rates.
Strong Points
Provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good performance in most
environments. Each RAID 6 set can survive the loss of two drives or the loss of a
drive while another drive is being rebuilt. Provides the highest level of protection
against drive failures of all of the RAID levels. Read performance is similar to that
of RAID 50, though random reads in RAID 60 might be slightly faster because
data is spread across at least one more disk in each RAID 6 set.
Weak Points
Not well suited to tasks requiring lot of writes. A RAID 60 virtual disk has to
generate two sets of parity data for each write operation, which results in a
significant decrease in performance during writes. Disk drive performance is
reduced during a drive rebuild. Environments with few processes do not perform
as well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance gains in
handling simultaneous processes. RAID 6 costs more because of the extra
capacity required by using two parity blocks per stripe.
Drives
A minimum of 8
The following figure shows a RAID 6 data layout. The second set of parity drives are denoted by Q. The
P drives follow the RAID 5 parity scheme.
11
RAID 60
Figure 7. RAID 60 Level Logical Drive
12
Segment 2
Parity (Q3-Q4)
Parity (Q1-Q2)
Parity (P3-P4)
Segment 15
RAID 6
Segment 16
Parity (Q15-Q16)
Segment 12
Segment 7
Parity (P1-P2)
NOTE: Parity is distributed across all drives in the array.
Parity (P15-P16)
Parity (Q11–Q12) Parity (P11-P12) Segment 11
Segment 1
Segment 8
Parity (P9-P10)
Segment 13
Parity (Q9–Q10)
Parity (P13-P14)
RAID 0
Parity (P3-P4)
Segment 10
Parity (Q13-Q14)
Segment 9
Segment 5
Segment 14
Parity (Q3-Q4)
Parity (P5-P6)
RAID 6
Segment 4
Parity (Q5-Q6)
Segment 6
Segment 3
3
RAID Utilities
Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II BIOS
Configuration Utility
With support for up to six SATA drives or eight SAS / SATA drives, depending on the server
board or system, the embedded RAID BIOS has the following features:
• Support for interrupt 13 and Int19h.
• Support for SATA CD-ROM / DVD-ROM devices, including support for booting from a
CD-ROM drive.
• POST and run-time BIOS support for device insertion and removal.
• Support for a migration path from Intel® Embedded Server RAID Technology II to Intel
Integrated Server RAID hardware.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Automatic resume of rebuilding, check consistency, and initialization.
Global hot spare support based on the logical drive size.
Support for RAID levels 0, 1, and 10.
Support for auto rebuild.
Support for different capacity disks in the same array.
Support for up to eight physical drives and eight logical drives.
Stripe size of 64 Kbytes only.
Support for disk coercion with options of None, 128 Mbytes, 1 Gbyte.
Ability to select a logical drive as boot device. By default, logical drive 0 is bootable.
Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 Configuration Utility for
Intelligent RAID
The Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 configuration utility provides full-featured, GUI-based
configuration and management of RAID arrays. The Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 utility
resides in the controller firmware and is independent of the operating system. The Intel®
RAID BIOS Console 2 configuration utility lets you:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Select an Intel® RAID controller
Choose a configuration method for physical arrays, disk groups, and logical drives
Create drive arrays
Define logical drives
Initialize logical drives
Access controllers, logical drives, and physical arrays to display their properties
Create hot spare drives
13
• Rebuild failed drives
• Verify data redundancy in RAID 1, 5, 10, or 50 logical drives
Intel® RAID Web Console 2 Configuration and
Monitoring Utility
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 is an operating system-based, object-oriented GUI utility
that configures and monitors RAID systems locally or over a network. The Intel® RAID Web
Console 2 runs on each of the supported Windows and Linux operating systems.
With the Intel® RAID Web Console 2, you can perform the same tasks as you can with the
Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 or with the Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS Configuration
utility. In addition, the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 provides on-the-fly RAID migration,
creating almost limitless adaptability and expansion of any logical drive while the system
remains operational.
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 allows you to:
• Create and manage logical drives
• Add a drive to a RAID logical drive
• Convert from a RAID 0 configuration to a RAID 1 or 5 configuration by adding a
physical drive
• Change a degraded redundant logical drive to an optimal RAID 0 logical drive
• Remove physical drives from a logical drive
• Convert a RAID 1 or 5 logical drive to a RAID 0 drive
Drive Hierarchy within the RAID Firmware
The Intel® Integrated RAID firmware is based on three fundamental levels. Logical drives are
created from drive arrays that are created from physical drives.
• Level 1 consists of the physical drives (hard drives and removable hard disks). The
firmware identifies each drive by its physical ID and maps it to a virtual address. A
logical drive can be constructed of more than one physical drive.
• Level 2 consists of the array(s) formed by firmware made of one or more disks and can
be made into RAID 0, 1, 5, 10, or 50.
• Level 3 consists of the logical drives. These are the only drives that can be accessed by
the operating system. These are the drives given drive letters (C, D, etc.) under a
Windows* operating system. The firmware automatically transforms each newly
installed drive array into a logical drive. RAID 0, 1, and 5 use a single array and RAID
10 and 50 use multiple arrays.
14
Intel® Intelligent RAID Controller Features
Enterprise Features
• Online capacity expansion (OCE). Add capacity to the logical drive. The added capacity
can be presented to the operating system as additional space for the operating system to
partition it as an additional drive, or it may be added to an operating system drive,
depending upon the capability of the operating system.
• Online RAID level migration allows for upgrading a RAID level. Options are to go from
RAID 1 to RAID 0, RAID 5 to RAID 0. With OCE, options are to go from RAID 0 to
RAID 1, RAID 0 to RAID 5, and from RAID 1 to RAID 5.
— You cannot migrate or perform OCE on a spanned RAID array or disk group
(RAID 10 or RAID 50).
— You cannot migrate to a smaller capacity configuration.
— You cannot perform OCE when there is more than one logical drive on a logical
array or disk group.
• 128 logical drives are allowed per controller.
• Smart Initialization automatically checks consistency of logical drives for RAID 5 when
five or more disks are used. This allows performance optimization by enabling readmodify-write mode of operation with five or more disks in a RAID 5 array or disk group.
Peer read mode of operation is used when the RAID 5 array or disk group contains three
or four physical drives.
• The initialization or rebuild process will automatically resume on the next boot if the
system shuts down. Auto resume must be enabled prior to logical drive creation.
• Stripe size is user definable on a per drive basis and can be 8, 16, 32, 64, or 128 KB in
size. The default is 64 KB, which is optimal for many data access types.
• Hot spares can be set as global or dedicated. A global hot spare will automatically come
online to replace the first drive to fail on any array or disk group on the controller. A
dedicated hot spare is assigned to a specific array or disk group and will only come
online to rebuild a failed drive in that array or disk group. A hot spare will only come
online if it is the same size or larger than the failing drive (see drive coercion below), and
if a drive has been marked as failed. If a drive is removed (and marked as failed) within
a logical drive, the hot spare will automatically come online. However, there must be
disk activity (I/O to the drive) in order for a missing drive to be marked as failed.
• Drive coercion refers to the ability of the controller to recognize the size of the physical
drives that are connected and then force the larger drives to use only the amount of space
available on the smallest drive. Drive coercion allows an option to map out a reserved
space to compensate for slightly smaller drive sizes that may be added later. The default
is set to 1 GB. The coercion algorithm options are:
— None: No coercion of size.
— 128 M: The software rounds the drive capacity down to the next 128 MB boundary
and then up to the nearest 10 MB until the coerced capacity is larger than the actual
drive size. It is then reduced by 10 MB.
— 1G: The software rounds the drive capacity down to the nearest 1 GB boundary and
then down by 1 MB. This corresponds to the terms most drive manufacturers use.
15
Fault Tolerant Features
• Configuration on Disk (COD) and NVRAM storage of array and disk group
configuration information. Array and disk group configuration information is stored both
on the hard drive (COD) and in NVRAM. This helps protect against loss of the
configuration due to adapter and/or drive failure.
• Failed drives are automatically detected and a transparent rebuild of the failed drive
automatically occurs using a hot spare drive.
• Support for SAF-TE enabled enclosures allows enhanced drive failure and rebuild
reporting via enclosure LEDs; support also includes hot swapping of hard drives.
• A battery backup for cache memory is available as an option. RAID controller firmware
automatically checks for the presence of the battery module, and if found, allows the
write back cache option. The adapter continuously tracks the battery voltage and reports
if the battery is low. When low, the battery is first given a fast charge to replenish the
charge and is then given a trickle charge to keep it at an optimal power level. Adapters
that support the battery module include a “dirty cache” LED; when power is lost to the
system and data remains in the cache memory that has not been written to disk, this LED
signals that this operation needs to be completed. Upon reboot, the data in memory can
then be written to the hard disk drive.
• Although I/O performance may be lower, hard disk drive write-back cache is disabled by
default because data can potentially be lost if a power outage occurs. Enabling the HDD
write-back cache may improve performance, but when enabled, a UPS device should be
used to prevent data loss during power outages.
• Battery life is about three years. Battery health should be monitored and the battery
replaced when needed.
• SMART technology is supported. This provides a higher level of predictive failure
analysis of the hard disk drives by the RAID controller.
Cache Options and Settings
Cache options and settings can be unique for each logical drive.
• Cache Write Policy
— Write Through: I/O completion is signaled only after the data is written to hard disk.
— Write Back: I/O completion is signaled when data is transferred to cache.
• Cache Policy
— Direct I/O: When possible, no cache is involved for both reads and writes. The data
transfers will be directly from host system to the disk and from the disk to the host
system.
— Cached I/O: All reads will first look at cache. If a cache hit occurs, the data will be
read from cache; if not, the data will be read from disk and the read data will be
buffered into cache. All writes to drive are also written to cache.
• Read Policy
— No Read Ahead: Provides no read ahead for the logical drive.
— Read Ahead: Additional consecutive stripes/lines are read and buffered into cache.
— Adaptive: The read-ahead will be automatically turned on and off depending upon
whether the disk is accessed for sequential reads or random reads.
16
Background Tasks
• Rebuilding a failed drive is performed in the background. The rebuild rate is tunable
from 0-100%.
— The rebuild rate controls the amount of system resources allocated to the rebuild.
Caution: It is not recommended to increase the rebuild rate to over 50%. A higher
rebuild rate can result in operating system requests not being serviced in a
timely fashion and causing an operating system error.
• A consistency check scans the consistency of data on a fault-tolerant disk to determine if
data has been corrupted.
• Background initialization is a background check of consistency. It has the same
functionality as the check consistency option but is automatic and can be canceled only
temporarily. If it is canceled, it will start again in a few minutes. Background
initialization is only performed on redundant volumes.
• RAID level migration and online capacity expansion are completed in the background.
• Patrol Read is a user definable option available in the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 that
performs drive reads in the background and maps out any bad areas of the drive.
Error Handling
• Most commands are retried four or more times. The firmware is programmed to provide
the best effort to recognize an error and recover from it if possible.
• Failures are logged and stored in NVRAM. OS-based errors are viewable from the event
viewer in the Web Console 2.
• RAID-related errors can be reported by the hard drive firmware, SAF-TE controller, or
the RAID controller firmware. These errors may be reported to the operating system
through RAID management software, through SMART monitoring, or through CIM
management. Some errors may also be reported by the SAF-TE controller and logged in
the system event log (SEL) for the Intel® server board. In addition, access errors may be
reported by the operating system. Depending on the RAID controller and drive
enclosure, the error may be evident via the color of LEDs, the flashing of LEDs, or
audible alarms.
17
Audible Alarm
The following list of beep tones is used on Intel® Intelligent RAID Controllers. These beeps
usually indicate that a drive has failed.
• Degraded Array or Disk Group: Short tone, 1 second on, 1 second off
• Failed Array or Disk Group: Long tone, 3 seconds on, 1 second off
• Hot Spare Commissioned - Short tone, 1 second on, 3 seconds off
The tone alarm will stay on during a rebuild. After the rebuild completes, an alarm with a
different tone will sound.
The disable alarm option in either the BIOS Console 2 or the Web Console 2 management
utilities will hold the alarm disabled after a power cycle. The enable alarm option must be used
to re-enable the alarm.
The silence alarm option in either the BIOS Console 2 or the Web Console 2 management
utilities will silence the alarm until a power cycle or another event occurs.
18
4
Intel® RAID Drivers
The drivers that Intel provides for Intel® Intelligent RAID Controllers are not compatible with
SCSI or SATA-only RAID controllers. The RAID driver files are available on the Resource
CD that accompanies the Intel RAID controllers. The driver files are also available at
http://downloadfinder.intel.com/scripts-df-external/Support_Intel.aspx. Files can be copied to
a floppy diskette or to a USB key for transfer to another system.
Note: Intel updates software frequently and later drivers may provide additional features. Check for later
software at the Intel web site: http://support.intel.com/support/motherboards/server/. See the
readme file that accompanies the download for updated information.
Windows* System Driver Installation
RAID Driver Installation on New Windows Operating System
This procedure installs the RAID device driver system during the Windows 2003*, Windows
2000*, or Windows XP* operating system installation. The system must contain an Intel
RAID controller. Windows 2003 automatically adds the driver to the registry and copies the
driver to the appropriate directory.
1. Start the Windows installation by booting from the Windows CD-ROM disk. The
system BIOS must support booting from a CD-ROM drive. You may need to change
BIOS settings to allow CD-ROM booting. See your system documentation for
instructions.
2. Press <F6> to install when the screen displays:
Press F6 if you need to install...
Note: You must press <F6> for the system to recognize the new driver.
3. Choose <S> to specify an additional device when the screen displays:
Setup could not determine the type...
Note: If this screen is not displayed as the first user input, then the <F6> key press was
not seen by the setup program. Reboot the system and return to step 2.
4. When the system asks for the manufacturer-supplied hardware support disk, insert the
Windows driver diskette and press <Enter>.
5. Select the appropriate Windows driver from the menu by highlighting it. Press <Enter>
to proceed. The driver is added to the registry and copied to the appropriate directory.
6. Continue with the Windows operating system installation procedure.
19
RAID Driver Installation on Existing Windows Operating System
This procedure installs or upgrades the RAID device driver on an existing Windows 2003*,
Windows 2000*, or Windows XP* operating system.The system must contain an Intel RAID
controller.
1. Boot to the Windows operating system. The Found New Hardware Wizard is displayed.
The information on the first page of this window identifies the SAS controller and
requests the driver diskette.
2. Insert the Windows driver diskette into the floppy drive.
3. For Windows 2003 or Windows XP, choose Install Software Automatically. In
Windows 2000, choose Search for a Suitable Driver.
4. Windows 2000 only: Click the Specify location box and make sure the search location
is the floppy drive.
5. Click Next.
6. A message might display saying that this driver is not digitally signed. This message
informs you that a nonsigned driver is being installed. If you see this message, click
Continue Anyway.
7. The system loads the driver from the Windows driver diskette and copies the driver to
the system disk. The Found New Hardware Wizard screen displays the message:
The wizard has finished...
8. Click Finish to complete the driver upgrade.
RAID Driver Installation for Red Hat* Enterprise Linux
This section describes the installation of the device driver on new Red Hat* Enterprise Linux
3, 4, or 5 systems. See the release notes that accompanied the driver for information on
updating the Red Hat Linux driver on an existing Red Hat Linux system.
1. Boot to the CD-ROM with Disk 1. Type:
linux dd
2. Press <Enter> at the boot prompt on the Welcome screen.
3. Copy the Linux driver image from the Resource CD to a diskette or USB key.
4. Insert the diskette with driver image.
5. Select Yes.
6. Scroll down to select Intel RAID adapter driver. The utility locates and loads the driver
for your device.
7. Follow the Red Hat Linux installation procedure to complete the installation.
20
RAID Driver Installation for SuSE* Linux
SuSE* Linux uses a program called YaST2 (Yet another System Tool) to configure the
operating system during installation. For complex installations, you can select “Install
Manually” at the first install screen and a different program, linuxrc, will be used. This
section assumes a straightforward installation using YaST2.
1. Insert CD-ROM disk 1 into the CD-ROM drive and the RAID controller driver diskette
in the floppy drive.
1. Boot to the CD.
2. The operating system loads a minimal operating system from the CD onto a RAM disk.
Any driver module found in the floppy drive will also be loaded.
3. At the Welcome to YaST2 screen, select your language and click Accept.
4. At the “Installation Settings” screen, setup the disk partitioning.
5. Continue with the SuSE Linux installation procedure.
21
22
5
Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS
Configuration Utility
If the SATA RAID or SAS RAID options are enabled in the server BIOS, an option to enter
the Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS Configuration utility displays during the server boot
process. To enter the utility, press the <Ctrl> + <E> when prompted.
The Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS Configuration utility allows a user to:
•
•
•
•
Create, add, modify, and clear logical drive configurations
Initialize or rebuild the configured drives
Set the boot drive
Create a global hotspare drive
• View physical and logical drive parameters
• View and set adapter properties, including consistency check and auto-resume
SATA and SAS systems use different versions of the Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS
Configuration utility, but both versions use the same keystrokes and contain identical menus.
The utility menus show limited help at the bottom of the screen and selections are chosen with
the arrow keys and the space bar. A warning is displayed if there is no logical drive is available
to be configured. Only the number of potential physical drives differs for the SAS and SATA
versions of the utility.
The following menu and sub-menu options are available:
Figure 8. Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS Configuration Utility Screen
23
Creating, Adding or Modifying a Logical Drive
Configuration
Use the following steps to create, add, or modify a logical drive configuration.
1. Boot the system.
2. Press <Ctrl> + <E> when prompted to start the Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS
Configuration utility.
3. Select Configure from the Main Menu.
4. Select a configuration method:
— Easy Configuration does not change existing configurations, but allows new
configurations.
— New Configuration deletes any existing arrays and logical drives and creates only
new configurations.
— View/Add Configuration lets you view or modify an existing configuration.
For each configuration method, a list of available physical drives is displayed. These
drives are in the READY state. Information about each drive is displayed if you select
it.
5. Use the arrow keys to move to a drive and press the space bar to add it to the array.
Note: The utility limits each drive to the size of the smallest drive.
The status for each selected drive that is added to an array changes status from READY
to ONLIN A[array#]-[drive#]. For example, ONLIN A00-01 means array 0, disk
drive 1.
6. (Optional) Create a global hotspare drive by highlighting a drive that is marked
READY and press the <F4> key. Then select Yes from the pop-up menu.
7. Repeat step 5 and step 6 to create a second array if desired. When you have selected
drives for all desired arrays, press the <F10> key.
8. Select an array by highlighting it. Press the <Enter> key to set the properties.
9. The logical drive configuration screen is displayed, This screen shows the
— Logical drive number
— RAID level
— Logical drive size
— Number of stripes in the physical array
— Stripe size
— State of the logical drive
To set these options, highlight a property and press the <Enter> key. The available
parameters for that property are displayed for the selection.
10. Select a RAID level: Select 0, 1, or 10 depending upon number of drives and the
purpose.
11. Consider whether you need to override the default logical drive size. By default, all
available space in the array is assigned to the current logical drive. For RAID 10 arrays,
only one logical drive can be defined for the entire array.
24
12. (Optional) Change the default Write Cache and Read Ahead policies. See Setting the
Write Cache and Read Ahead Policies.
13. When you have finished defining the current logical drive, select Accept and press the
<Enter> key.
14. Repeat step 8 through step 13 for all logical drives.
15. Save the configuration when prompted, and press any key to return to the Main Menu.
16. Select Initialize and use the space bar to highlight the logical drive to initialize.
Caution: All data on the logical drive will be erased during an initialization.
17. Press the <F10> key. Select Yes at the prompt and press the <Enter> key to begin the
initialization. A graph shows the progress of the initialization.
18. After the initialization is complete, press the <Esc> key to return to the previous menu.
Pressing the <Esc> key closes the current menu. If a process is running when you press
the <Esc> key, you will be given the following options:
— Abort: When Abort is selected, the task is stopped and will not resume. Abort does
not restore data if an initialization had been started.
— Stop: When Stop is selected, the current task stops. Stop is available only if auto
resume is enabled on the adapter. See AutoResume / AutoRestore for information.
— Continue: The task continues normally. Continue cancels the press of the <Esc>
key. If AutoResume is enabled, the task will resume from point at which it was
stopped.
Setting the Write Cache and Read Ahead Policies
Read and write cache settings apply to all logical drives in an array. They may show as on/off;
enable/disable; or as initials of the desired state, such as WB for Write Back. They appear in
menus as Write Policy and Read Policy or as Write Cache and Read Ahead. These policies can
be seen from the Adapter Properties or from the Logical Drive's View/Update Parameters.
The following are the cache policies:
• If WC is on, or if Write Policy is WB, Write Back is enabled. In this mode, the data
transfer is signaled as complete when the controller cache has received all the data.
Caution: Write Back mode will lose data if power fails before the cached data is written
to the drive.
• If WC is off, Write Through is enabled. The data transfer is complete when the drive has
received all the data.
• RA = ON allows the controller to read additional data and store that data into its cache.
This improves performance on sequential reads.
25
To change cache policies:
1. Select Objects | Logical Drive | Logical Drive n | View/Update Parameters.
2. Use the arrow key to select the option to change. Press the <Enter> key.
3. Use the arrow key to select Off or On.
4. Confirm the choice by using the arrow key to select Yes if asked to confirm the change.
Press the <Enter> key to change the cache setting.
Working with a Global Hotspare Drive
A global, but not dedicated, hotspare drive can be created to automatically replace a failed
drive in a RAID 1 or RAID 10 array. For new arrays, the global hotspare should be created
during the configuration process. See “Creating, Adding or Modifying a Logical Drive
Configuration,” on page 24.
Adding a Hot Spare Drive
To add a hot spare drive to an existing configuration, follow these steps:
1. Select Objects from the Main Menu.
2. Select Physical Drive. A list of physical drives is displayed.
3. Select an unused drive from the list, and select Make Hot Spare. The screen changes to
indicate HOTSP.
Removing a Hot Spare Drive
To remove a hotspare drive:
1. Select Objects from the Main Menu.
2. Select Physical Drive. A list of physical drives is displayed.
3. Select the disk that displays HOTSP, press the <Enter> key.
4. Select Force Offline and press the <Enter> key. The status of the drive changes to
READY. The drive can be used in another array.
26
Rebuilding a Drive
The Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS Configuration utility includes a manual rebuild
option that rebuilds an individual failed drive in a RAID 1 or 10 array. RAID 0 drives are not
redundant and cannot be rebuilt. A good drive (not physically failed) can also be rebuilt using
the existing configuration data.
To rebuild a drive:
1. Select Rebuild from the Main Menu. The failed drives show the status FAIL.
2. Press the arrow keys to highlight the physical drive that you want to rebuild. Press the
space bar to select the drive.
3. Press the <F10> key and select Y to confirm. The drive indicator shows REBLD as the
rebuild process starts.
4. When the rebuild is complete, press any key to continue.
Auto Rebuild and Auto Resume
To ensure data protection, enable Auto Rebuild and Auto Resume so that drives are
automatically re-created to maintain redundancy.
• In a pre-boot environment, auto rebuild starts only when you enter the BIOS utility.
Note: Hot plug support is not available in the pre-boot environment. For the system
BIOS or the Intel® Embedded Server RAID BIOS Configuration utility to detect
the physical drive, insert the drive when the system is off.
• When the operating system is running, the auto rebuild starts if the system has a hotspare
drive or if you replace the failed drive with a new drive.
The Auto Rebuild and Auto Resume options areavailable in the Intel® Embedded Server
RAID BIOS Configuration utility from the menu that is displayed after you select Objects |
Adapter.
Checking Data Consistency
The Check Consistency feature can be used on RAID 1 or RAID 10 drives to verify the data
consistency between the mirrored drives. It can be set to only report or to both report and
automatically fix the data.
1. From the Main Menu, select Check Consistency and press the <Enter> key. A list of
configured logical drives is displayed.
2. Use the arrow keys to choose the desired drive. Press the space bar to select the logical
drive to check for consistency. (RAID 1 or 10 only)
3. Press the <F10> key.
4. At the prompt, select Yes and then press the <Enter> key.
If the Report and Fix/Report options are not shown, select Main Menu | Objects | Adapter |
ChkCons and set Report only or Fix\Report.
27
Viewing and Changing Device Properties
The properties of adapters, logical drives, and physical drives can be viewed. Some adapter
properties and the Write Cache and Read Ahead for Logical Drives can be changed.
1. From the Main Menu select Objects.
2. Choose Adapter, Logical Drive, or Physical Drive.
3. Select the device from the list and view the properties.
— For logical drives choose View | Update Parameters.
— For physical drives choose Drive Properties.
The numeric values of the rates settings are the percentage of system resources. FGI and
BGI are abbreviations for foreground and background initialization rates.
4. To change a value, highlight the property and press the <Enter> key.
Note: Some values cannot be changed.
5. Select or type a different value for the property and press the <Enter> key.
6. When you are finished, press the <Esc> key until you return to the Main Menu.
Forcing Drives Online or Offline
A drive can be forced offline so that a hot spare drive will replace it. Power failures may cause
a drive to go offline and you must force it back online.
Forcing a Drive Online or Offline
To force a drive online or offline, follow these steps:
1. On the Main Menu, select Objects and then Physical Drive.
2. Highlight a physical drive that is a member of an array and press the <Enter> key.
3. From the menu, choose one of the following:
— Force Offline to take the drive off line. If the drive was online, its status changes to
FAIL.
— Force Online to bring the drive on line. If the drive was offline, its status changes to
ONLIN.
Configuring a Bootable Logical Drive
Follow these steps to configure a bootable logical drive:
1. From the Main Menu, select Configure | Select Boot Drive.
2. Select a logical drive from the list to be the designated boot drive.
Note: You should also check the system BIOS Setup utility for the boot order setting. To access the BIOS
Setup utility, press the <F2> key when prompted during POST.
28
Deleting (Clearing) a Storage Configuration
Caution: Before you clear a storage configuration, back up all the data you want to keep.
To clear a storage configuration, follow these steps:
1. On the Main Menu, select Configure | Clear Configuration.
2. When the message appears, select Yes to confirm. All logical drives are deleted from
the configuration.
29
30
6
Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 Utility
The Intel® BIOS Console 2 utility provides a GUI utility to configure and manage RAID
volumes. The utility configures disk arrays, disk groups, and logical drives. Because the utility
resides in the RAID controller firmware, it is independent of the operating system.
The BIOS Console 2 utility:
• Selects adapters
• Displays adapter properties
• Scans devices
• Displays the physical properties of devices
• Configures physical drives
• Defines logical drives
• Displays logical drive properties
• Initializes logical drives
• Checks data for consistency
The Intel® BIOS Console 2 utility provides a Configuration Wizard to guide you through the
configuration of logical drives and physical arrays.
Quick Configuration Steps
This section provides the steps to configure arrays and disk groups, and logical drives using
the Intel® BIOS Console 2 utility. The following sections describe how to perform each action
using the BIOS Console 2 utility. The steps are:
1. Power on the system.
2. Press <Ctrl>+<G> to start the Intel® BIOS Console 2 utility.
3. Start the Configuration Wizard.
4. Choose a configuration method.
5. Create arrays and disk groups using the available physical drives.
6. Define the logical drive(s) using the space in the arrays and disk groups.
7. Initialize the new logical drives.
31
Detailed Configuration Steps using the Intel® RAID
BIOS Console 2
Start the BIOS Console 2 Utility
1. When the system boots, hold down the <Ctrl> key and press the <G> key when the
following is displayed:
Press <Ctrl>+<G> for BIOS Console 2
2. After you press <Ctrl>+<G>, the Adapter Selection screen displays. Select an adapter
and click Start to begin the configuration.
Note: If there is a configuration mismatch between the disks and the NVRAM, the utility automatically
displays the Select Configuration screen. Choose whether the configuration should be read from the
RAID array or from NVRAM. For more information, see the subsection entitled “Configuration
Mismatch Screen” on page 38.
Screen and Option Descriptions
This section describes the BIOS Console 2 screens and options.
Toolbar Options
Table 3 describes the BIOS Console 2 toolbar icons.
Table 3. Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 Toolbar Icon Descriptions
Icon
32
Description
Icon
Description
Return to the main screen.
Scan for adapters connected to your system.
Return to the page you accessed immediately
before the current page.
Display the properties of the adapter, such as
the firmware version, BIOS version, RAM size,
and initiator ID.
Exit the BIOS Console 2 utility.
Configure the arrays and disk groups, and
logical drives.v
Display the adapters that you can select.
Silence the alarm.
Main Screen
From the main screen you can scan the devices connected to the controller, select an Intel®
RAID adapter, and switch between the physical drives view and logical drive view. The main
screen also provides access to the screens and tools:
• Adapter Properties
• Scan Devices
• Physical Drives
• Logical Drive
• Configuration Wizard
• Events
• Exit
Figure 9. Intel® RAID BIOS Console 2 Menu
33
Adapter Properties Screen
When you select the Adapter Selection option on the main screen, the Intel® BIOS Console 2
utility displays a list of the Intel RAID adapters in the system.
The Adapter Properties screen allows you to view and configure the software and hardware of
the selected adapter.
Figure 10. Adapter Properties
• Firmware Version: The firmware version.
• Host Interface: The host interface for the installed RAID controller.
• NVRAM Size: The NVRAM size on the RAID controller.
• Firmware Time: The current time.
• Min Stripe Size: The minimum stripe size used to read and write data.
• BIOS Console 2 Version: The BIOS version for the BIOS Console 2.
• Sub Device ID: The sub-device ID for the RAID controller.
• Port Count: Number of ports available.
• Memory Size: The memory size of the installed DIMM.
• Max Stripe Size: The maximum stripe size.
• Physical Disk Count: The number of physical disks connected to the RAID controller.
34
Additional Adapter Properties
To access the screen that displays the additional adapter properties, click Next from the
Adapter Properties screen. To change one of the properties displayed in the screen below,
select the new entry and click Submit.
Figure 11. Additional Adapter Properties
• Battery Backup: Indicates if a battery backup unit is installed.
• Set Factory Defaults: Changing this field to Yes resets the RAID controller settings to
the factory defaults.
• Cluster Mode: Enable this field if the RAID controller is used in a cluster.
• Rebuild Rate: Enter a number between 0 and 100 to control the rate at which a future
rebuild will be performed on a disk array or disk group.
• Patrol Read Rate: A patrol read is a preventive procedure that monitors physical disks
to locate and resolve potential problems that could lead to disk failure. Enter a number
between 0 and 100 to control the rate at which patrol reads will be performed.
• BGI Rate (Background Initialization Rate): Background initialization makes the
logical drive immediately available for use, even while initialization is occurring. Enter a
number between 0 and 100 to control the rate at which logical drives are initialized in the
background.
• CC Rate (Check Consistency Rate): A consistency check scans the consistency of data
on a fault-tolerant disk to determine if the data has become corrupted. Enter a number
between 0 and 100 to control the rate at which a consistency check is done.
• Reconstruction Rate: Enter a number between 0 and 100 to control the rate at which the
reconstruction of a logical drive occurs.
• Adapter BIOS: Determines whether the Option ROM is loaded.
35
• Coercion Mode:
— None: No coercion of size.
— 128M: The software rounds the drive capacity down to the next 128 MB boundary
and then up to the nearest 10 MB until the coerced capacity is larger than the actual
drive size. It is then reduced by 10 MB.
— 1G: The software rounds the drive capacity down to the nearest 1 GB boundary and
then down by 1 MB. This corresponds to the terms most drive manufacturers use.
• PDF Interval: The PDF interval is the predictive disk failure polling interval. This is the
time needed between disk polls to perform SMART polling.
• Alarm Control: Disable the alarm to turn off the onboard speaker alarm.
• Interrupt Throttle Count and Interrupt Throttle Time: Sets the interrupt throttle and
count times. This is the number of times that interrupts are coalesced and the amount of
time that firmware holds an interrupt before passing it to the host software. Set values
lower for better performance, but be aware that latency is impacted by these settings.
• Cache Flush Interval: This sets the cache flush interval. Valid settings are 2, 4, 6, 8, or
10 seconds.
• Spinup Drive Count: This setting controls the number of drives that spin up at one
time.
• Spinup Delay: After the RAID controller completes its initialization process, the initial
delay value defines the number of seconds before the first disk interrogation request is
issued to the array or disk group. This value should not be changed.
Scan Devices Option
When you select the Scan Devices option on the Main screen, the BIOS Console 2 checks the
physical and logical drives for any changes of the drive status. The BIOS Console 2 displays
the results of the scan in the physical and logical drive descriptions.
Logical Drives Screen
You can access the logical drives screen by clicking on a logical drive in the logical drive list
on the main screen. The upper right section of the screen displays the logical drives that
currently exist. The Logical Drives screen provides options to:
• Initialize the logical drives: The Slow Initialize option initializes the selected logical
drive by writing zeroes to the entire volume. You should initialize each new logical drive
that you configure.
Warning: Initializing a logical drive deletes all information on the physical drives that
compose the logical drive.
• Check consistency (CC): This option verifies the correctness of the redundancy data and
is available for arrays and disk groups using RAID 1, 5, 10, or 50. If a difference in the
data is found, the BIOS Console 2 assumes that the data is accurate and automatically
corrects the parity value.
36
• Display the logical drive properties: Through the Properties option you can:
— Display the logical drive properties (such as RAID level, logical drive size, and
stripe size).
— Display the read, write, Access, Disk Cache, BGI, and I/O policies.
— Change the read, write, Access, Disk Cache, BGI, and I/O policies.
— Start initialization.
— Start a consistency check.
After setting any property, click Go to perform the selected operation. Click Change to apply
any policy changes.
Physical Drives Screen
This screen displays the physical drives for each channel or port. From this screen, you can
rebuild the physical arrays or disk groups, or view the properties for the physical drive you
select. Click Reset to return to the configuration that existed before you made any changes.
Select Properties and click Go to view the properties. An unconfigured drive can be made into
a hot spare from the Properties screen.
Configuration Wizard Option
This option enables you to clear a configuration, create a new configuration, or add a
configuration. ”Configuration Wizard,” on page 38 provides detailed steps for using the
Configuration Wizard.
Adapter Selection
This option allows you to choose an Intel® RAID controller installed in the system.
Figure 12. BIOS Console 2 - Adapter Selection
Events Screen
This option displays the events generated by logical drives, physical devices, enclosure, the
Intel® Smart Battery, and SAS controller. See Appendix B: “Events and Messages” for events
and message descriptions.
Physical View/Logical View Option
This option toggles between Physical View and Logical View.
37
Exit
This option allows you to exit and reboot the system.
Configuration Mismatch Screen
A configuration mismatch occurs when the data in the NVRAM and the hard disk drives are
different. It will be automatically displayed after POST when a configuration mismatch
occurs. The Configuration Mismatch screen allows you to:
• Select Create New Configuration to delete the previous configuration and create a new
configuration.
• Select View Disk Configuration to restore the configuration from the hard disk.
• Select View NVRAM Configuration to restore the configuration from the NVRAM.
Configuration Wizard
This section provides detailed steps for using the Configuration Wizard to set up a RAID
array.
1. Start the Configuration Wizard by selecting the Configuration Wizard icon on the
BIOS Console 2 main screen.
Figure 13. BIOS Console 2 - Configuration Types
2. Select New Configuration and click Next.
38
3. Choose the configuration method and click Next.
Figure 14. BIOS Console 2 - Configuration Methods
The configuration methods options are described below.
— Auto Configuration with Redundancy
This option configures RAID 1 for systems with two drives or RAID 5 for systems
with three or more drives. All available physical drives will be included in the
logical drive using all available capacity on the disks.
Note: Hot spare drives must be designated before starting auto configuration using all
available capacity on the disks.
— Auto Configuration without Redundancy
Configures all available drives as a RAID 0 logical drive.
— Custom Configuration
Allows you to configure the RAID mode.
Note: Auto Configuration cannot be used for RAID 10 or 50 or with mixed SATA and SAS drives.
39
Creating RAID 0, 1, or 5 through the RAID BIOS
Console 2 (detailed)
This section describes the process use the custom configuration options to set up RAID modes.
1. When the server boots, hold the <Ctrl> key and press the <G> key when the following
is displayed:
Press <Ctrl>+<G> for BIOS Console
The Adapter Selection screen is displayed.
2. Select an adapter and click Start to begin the configuration.
3. Choose Custom Configuration and click Next.
4. At the Virtural Drive Definition (VD Definition) screen, hold down the <Ctrl> key and
click each drive you want included in the array or disk group. See ”Levels of RAID,” on
page 7 for the required minimum number of drives that must be added.
Figure 15. BIOS Console 2 - Add Physical Drives to Array
5. Click Accept DG. If you make a mistake and need to remove drives, click Reclaim.
Click Next.
40
6. On the VD Definition window, select RAID 0, 1, or 5 from the first dropdown box.
7. Enter the logical drive size in the Select Size box. This example shows 712392, but the
size may be edited.
8. If desired, change the Stripe Size, the policies for Access, Read, Write, IO, and Disk
Cache and decide whether to use background initialization. See ”Setting Drive
Parameters,” on page 49.
Figure 16. BIOS Console 2 - Set Array Properties
9. Click Accept to accept the changes, or click Reset to delete the changes and return to
the previous settings.
41
10. The BIOS Console 2 configuration utility displays a preview of the configuration. Click
Accept to save the configuration, or click Back to return to the previous screens and
change the configuration.
Figure 17. BIOS Console 2 - Confirm Configuration
11. Click Next and then Accept to complete the selection.
12. Click Accept to accept the configuration. You are prompted to save the configuration
and then to initialize the logical drive.
42
13. Click Yes to initialize the new drive.
14. Click Initialize to begin the initialization process.
— Fast initialization runs a quick preliminary initialization and then runs full
initialization in the background after the operating system is booted.
— Slow initialization may take several hours to complete.
Figure 18. BIOS Console 2 - Initialization Speed Setting
15. Click Home to return to the main configuration screen. Select an additional logical
drive to configure or exit the BIOS Console 2 configuration utility and reboot the
system.
43
RAID 10 and RAID 50 Creation Using BIOS Console 2
RAID 10 and RAID 50 require setting up multiple RAID arrays / disk groups.
1. When the server boots, hold the <Ctrl> key and press the <G> key when the following
is displayed:
Press <Ctrl>+<G> for BIOS Console
2. After you press <Ctrl>+<G>, the Adapter Selection screen displays. Select an adapter
and click Start to begin the configuration.
3. Select Custom Configuration and click Next.
4. At the Virtual Drive Definition (VD Definition) screen, hold down the <Ctrl> key and
click each drive you want included in the first array.
— For RAID 10, use two drives
— For RAID 50, use at least three drives
5. Click Accept DG. The first group of drives appears as a disk group in the right pane.
These drives are no longer available in the left pane.
6. From the drives that are available in the left pane, choose an additional group of drives
and again click Accept DG. Each disk group must contain the identical quantity and
size of drives.
7. Multiple drive groups are now displayed in the right pane. Up to eight arrays can be
added to the right pane for either RAID 10 or RAID 50.
Figure 19. RAID BIOS Console 2 Utility – Multiple Disk Groups for RAID 10 or 50
8. Select all arrays or disk groups that are to be spanned in the RAID 10 or 50 array by
holding down the <Ctrl> key and selecting each array/disk group in the right pane.
Click Next.
44
9. At the Virtual Drive Definition (VD Definition) window, select RAID 1 (for RAID 10)
or RAID 5 (for RAID 50) in the RAID Level drop-down. RAID 10 is illustrated below.
10. Select the appropriate Stripe Size, Access Policy, Read Policy, Write Policy, IO Policy,
Disk Cache Policy, and Enable/Disable BGI for your application.
11. Set the drive size to a number in MB that is a size greater then the size of the RAID 1 or
RAID 5 size listed in the disk group.
Figure 20. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Spanning Multiple Arrays
12. Click Next if the application does not automatically progress to the next screen.
45
The configuration preview screen displays the logical drive as shown below. The
configuration preview screen displays the logical drive (RAID 1 for RAID 10, or RAID
5 for RAID 50).
Figure 21. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Viewing Completed Settings
13. Click Accept to save the configuration.
14. Click Yes when asked to save the configuration. This will store the configuration in the
RAID controller.
15. Click Yes when asked to initialize the drive.
46
16. Select Fast Initialize. Click Go. The drives will initialize based on the RAID settings.
Note: Slow Initialize initializes the entire drive and may take several hours to complete.
Figure 22. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Initialization Settings
17. Click Home at the BIOS Console 2 screen to return to the main screen.The RAID 10 or
RAID 50 logical drives are displayed. The figure below shows the RAID 10 logical
drives.
Figure 23. RAID BIOS Console 2 – RAID 10 Final Screen
47
18. Under Virtual Drives, select VD0: RAID1 for RAID 10, or select VD0:RAID 5 for
RAID 50 to display the drive properties. The properties display as RAID 10 or RAID
50.
Figure 24. RAID BIOS Console 2 – RAID 10 Properties Screen
Figure 25. RAID BIOS Console 2 – RAID 50 Properties Screen
48
Setting Drive Parameters
• RAID Level:
— RAID Level 0: Data striping
— RAID Level 1: Data mirroring
— RAID Level 5: Data striping with parity
— RAID Level 6: Distributed Parity and Disk Striping
— RAID level 10: Striped mirroring
— RAID Level 50: Striped RAID 5
— RAID Level 60: Distributed parity, with two independent parity blocks per stripe
Note: RAID levels 6 and 60 are available only on LSI* 1078 ROC controllers.
• Stripe Size: Specify the size of the segment written to each disk. Available stripe sizes
are 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes. LSI* 1078-based controllers add support for 256,
512, and 1024 Kbyte stripe sizes. The default is 64 Kbytes.
• Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this logical drive. The
choices are Read/Write, Read Only, or Blocked.
• Read Policy: Enables the read-ahead feature for the logical drive. Read-ahead is the
default setting.
— Normal: The controller does not use read-ahead for the current logical drive.
— Read-ahead: Additional consecutive stripes are read and buffered into cache. This
option will improve performance for sequential reads.
— Adaptive: The controller begins using read-ahead if the two most recent disk
accesses occurred in sequential sectors.
• Write Policy: Determines when the transfer complete signal is sent to the host. Writethrough caching is the default setting.
— Write-back caching: The controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the
host when the controller cache receives all of the data in a transaction. Write-back
caching has a performance advantage over write-through caching, but it should only
be enabled when the optional battery backup module is installed.
— Write-through caching: The controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the
host after the disk subsystem receives all the data in a transaction. Write-through
caching has a data security advantage over write-back caching.
Caution: Do not use write-back caching for any logical drive in a Novell* NetWare*
volume.
• IO Policy: Applies to reads on a specific logical drive. It does not affect the read-ahead
cache.
— Cached IO: All reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Direct IO: Reads are not buffered in cache memory. Data is transferred to cache and
to the host concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes from cache
memory.
• Disk Cache Policy: The cache policy applies to the I/O on a specific logical drive. It
does not affect the read-ahead cache.
49
— Cached I/O: Buffers all reads in cache memory.
— Direct I/O: Does not buffer reads in cache memory. When possible, Direct I/O does
not override the cache policy settings. Direct I/O transfers data to cache and the host
concurrently. If the same data block is read again, the host reads it from cache
memory. The choices are Unchanged, Enabled, or Disabled.
• Disable BGI: Enable or disable background initialization. Set this to “Yes” to disable
background initialization.
• Select Size: Set the size of the logical drive in megabytes. The right pane of the logical
drive configuration window lists the maximum capacity that can be selected, depending
on the RAID level chosen.
Creating a Hot Spare
1. In the main screen, select the drive that should be used as the hot spare.
Figure 26. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Choosing a Hot Spare Drive
2. Select the disk group.
50
3. Click Make Dedicated Hot Spare to add the drive as a hot spare.
4. Click Make Global Spare if you want to create a global hot spare for all disk groups.
Figure 27. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Setting a Hot Spare Drive
5. Click Go to create the hot spare. The Drive State changes to HOTSPARE, as shown
below.
Figure 28. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Viewing Hot Spare
6. Click Home to return to the main screen.
51
Figure 29. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Main Screen showing Hot Spare Drive
52
Viewing Event Details
Events contain information, warnings, and fatal events. Events can be captured on various
RAID controller components, such as the battery, physical card, and within the configuration.
These events can be viewed by using the following steps.
1. Select Event Links from the menu at the left. The events screen is displayed, as shown
below.
Figure 30. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Event Information Screen
2. Select the component to display from the list in the Event Locale list box.
3. Select the type of event to display from the Event Class drop-down.
4. Select the Start Sequence# and the # of Events to display.
53
The following example shows a selection has been made for informational events for the
logical drive, starting at sequence number 120 and displaying 10 events.
Figure 31. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Selecting Events to View
5. Click Go. In this example, logical drive events for informational messages have been
selected, starting with the event at sequence 120. The events screen displays the event
information for sequence number 120 in the right pane.
Note: In the sample, the Start Sequence# and the # of Events fields each display 0. These
fields automatically reset to 0 when you click Go to display the events.
Figure 32. RAID BIOS Console 2 – Viewing an Event
6. Click Next to view the next message.
54
7
Intel® RAID Web Console 2
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 enables you to configure, monitor, and maintain Intel®
RAID controllers and the storage related devices connected to the RAID controller. The Intel®
RAID Web Console 2 graphical user interface makes it easy to create and manage storage
configurations.
Configuration Functions
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 enables you configure the controllers, disk drives, battery
backup units, and other storage-related devices installed on a system.
• The Configuration Wizard simplifies the process of creating disk arrays and disk groups,
and logical drives.
• Auto Configuration mode automatically creates the best possible configuration for the
available hardware.
Note: Auto Configuration cannot be used for RAID 10 or 50 or with mixed SATA and
SAS drives.
• Guided Configuration mode asks you a few brief questions about the configuration, and
then creates the array for you.
• Manual Configuration mode, which gives you complete control over all aspects of the
storage configuration.
• The Reconstruction Wizard enables you to increase or reduce the size of a logical drive
and to change the RAID level of an array.
Monitoring Functions
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 displays information on the status of logical drives, physical
disks, and other storage-related devices on the systems that you are monitoring. System errors
and events are recorded in an event log file and are displayed on the screen. Special device
icons appear on the screen to notify you of disk failures and other situations that require
immediate attention.
Maintenance Functions
Use the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 to perform system maintenance tasks such as running
patrol read operations, updating firmware, and running consistency checks on arrays and disk
groups that support redundancy.
55
Hardware and Software Requirements
The hardware requirements for Intel® RAID Web Console 2 software are as follows.
• PC-compatible computer system with at least on Intel® Xeon® architecture processor or
an Intel® Extended Memory 64 Technology (Intel® EM64T) 64-bit processor
• At least 256 Mbytes of system memory
• Hard disk drive with at least 50 Mbytes available free space
• A supported operating system:
— Microsoft Windows 2000*, Microsoft Windows Server 2003*, or Microsoft
Windows XP*
— Red Hat* Linux Enterprise 3.0, 4.0, or 5.0
— SUSE* Enterprise Linux 9.0 with service packs 1 - 3, or 10
Installing the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 on a
Windows Operating System
To install the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 on a Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows
Server 2003, or Microsoft Windows XP system, follow these steps:
1. Insert the Resource CD in the CD-ROM drive.
2. When the Welcome screen is displayed, click Next.
3. When the next screen is displayed, read and accept the user license and click Next. The
Customer Information screen is displayed, as shown in Figure 33.
Figure 33. IIntel® RAID Web Console 2 – Customer Information Screen
56
4. Enter your user name and organization name. In the bottom part of the screen, select an
installation option:
— If you select Anyone who uses this computer, any user with administrative
privileges can view or change the RAID configurations.
— If you select Only for me, only you can view or change the RAID configurations.
5. Click Next to continue.
6. Accept the default Destination Folder, or click Change to select a different destination
folder. Click Next to continue. The Setup Type screen is displayed, as shown in
Figure 34.
Figure 34. Setup Type Screen
7. Select one of the Setup options.
— Select Complete if you are installing the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 on a system.
— Select Client component only if you are installing the Intel® RAID Web Console 2
on a PC that will be used to view and configure systems over a network.
— Select StandAlone if you will use the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 to create and
manage storage configurations on a standalone workstation.
8. Click Next to proceed.
9. Click Finish to complete the installation process.
57
Installing the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 on Linux or
SUSE SLES
To install Intel® RAID Web Console 2 on a system running Red Hat* Linux 3.0, 4.0, or 5.0, or
SUSE* SLES 9 or 10, follow these steps:
1. Unzip the file ir3_Linux_RWC2_v....tgz.
2. In the unzipped files, read the readme.txt file.
3. Run install.sh and follow the instructions that appear on the screen.
The three setup options are the same as those shown in step 7 of the Windows
installation instructions.
Startup, Overview, and Setup of Intel® RAID Web
Console 2
Follow these steps to start the Intel® RAID Web Console 2:
• Windows: select Start | All Programs | RAID Web Console 2 | StartupUI, or doubleclick the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 icon on the desktop.
• RHEL3 U6: Select Start | System Tools | RAID Web Console 2 StartupUI.
• SLES 9 SP1: Select Start | System | More Programs | RAID Web Console 2
StartupUI.
58
Intel® RAID Web Console 2 Screens
This section describes the main Intel® RAID Web Console 2 screens. When you start the
Intel® RAID Web Console 2, the Select Server window is displayed.
Figure 35. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Select Server Screen
Note: To access systems on a different subnet, type in the box at the bottom of the screen the IP address of
a system in the desired subnet where Intel® RAID Web Console 2 is running and click Update. If you
check the Connect to remote framework box, you can also access a standalone server running Intel®
RAID Web Console 2, if it has a network connection
Color Coding: If the circle in the server icon is yellow instead of green, it means that the system is
running in a degraded state.For example, a disk drive used in a logical drive has failed. If the circle
is red, the storage configuration in the system has failed.
To log in to a system, follow these steps:
1. Double-click the icon of the system that you want to access. The Server Login window
is displayed.
Figure 36. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Login Screen
59
2. Select an access mode from the drop-down menu.
— Select Full Access if you need to both view the current system configuration and
change the configuration.
— Select View Only if you only need to view the system configuration.
3. Enter your user name and password and click Login. If your user name and password
are correct for the login mode you have chosen, the main screen is displayed.
Figure 37. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Main Screen
The system shown has one controller, a RAID enclosure, and four physical drives.
The following subsections describe this screen in more detail.
Physical/Logical View Panel
The left panel displays either the Physical View or the Logical View of the system and the
devices in it, depending on which tab is selected.
• The Physical View shows the hierarchy of physical devices in the system. At the top of
the hierarchy is the system itself. Controllers are installed in the system, and each
controller has one or more ports. Disk drives and other physical devices are attached to
the ports.
• The Logical View shows the hierarchy of systems, controllers, logical drives, and arrays
and disk groups that are defined for the system.
Small icons represent the servers, controllers, and other devices. A red circle to the right of an
icon indicates that the device has failed. For example, this icon indicates that a disk drive has
failed:
A yellow circle to the right of an icon indicates that a device is running in a degraded state. For
example, this icon indicates that a logical drive is running in a degraded state due to the failure
of a disk drive:
60
Properties/Operations/Graphical View Panel
The right panel has either two or three tabs, depending on the kind of device that is selected in
the left panel, and depending on your login mode (full-access or view-only).
The Properties tab displays information about the selected device.
Figure 38. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Operations Tab
The Operations tab lists the operations that can be performed on the device that is selected in
the left panel. (This tab is available only when you are logged in to Intel® RAID Web Console
2 in Full-access mode.) Options available for controllers include: enabling or silencing the
alarm, flashing the firmware, and so on. Some types of devices, such as arrays, disk groups,
and ports, do not have operations associated with them.
61
The Graphical tab is available in the right panel if a physical drive or a logical drive is selected
on the left. In the Graphical View, the device's storage is color coded to show used capacity,
unused capacity, and so on.
Figure 39. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Graphical Tab
Event Log Panel
The lower part of the screen displays the event log entries for the system. New event log
entries appear during the session. Each entry has a time and date stamp, an Error Level that
indicates the severity of the event, and a brief description of the event. For information about
the event log entries, see Appendix B:, “Events and Messages.”
Menu Bar / File Menu
The File menu includes the Exit option to close the Intel® RAID Web Console 2. It also
includes a Rescan option to update the screen with the latest configuration information.
Menu Bar / Operations Menu
The Operations menu is available only when a controller, physical drive, logical drive, or other
storage object is selected in the main window. The options on the Operations menu vary by
item selected. For example, the Enable Alarm and Silence Alarm options are available only
when a controller is selected. The options also vary depending on the current state of the
selected object. For example, if an offline physical drive is selected, the Make Drive Online
option is displayed in the Operations menu.
You can also view the Operations selections from the Operations tab in the right panel. If an
operation requires user input before it can be executed, it appears in the Operations tab but not
in the Operations menu. A device-specific operations menu pops up if you right-click a device
icon in the left panel.
An Advanced Operations sub-menu is also available. On this menu, you access the
Configuration Wizard and other configuration-related commands.
62
File Menu / Group Operations Menu
The Group Operations menu options include Check Consistency, Initialize, and Show
Progress.
File Menu / Log Menu
The Log menu includes options for saving and clearing the message log.
File Menu / Help Menu
The Help menu provides access to the online help file and Intel® RAID Web Console 2
version.information.
Drive Configuration Tasks
You can use Intel® RAID Web Console 2 to perform the following configuration tasks:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Creating a New Configuration
Creating a Spanned Disk Array or Disk Group
Creating Hot Spares
Setting Adjustable Task Rates
Adding a Drive to a Virtual Disk
Removing a Drive from a Virtual Disk
Changing the RAID Level of a Virtual Disk
Changing Virtual Disk Properties
Deleting a Virtual Disk
Managing Configurations
Configuration Wizards
Use the Configuration Wizard to create disk arrays, disk groups, and virtual disks. The
Configuration Wizard can create simple configurations automatically. For more complex
configurations, the Configuration Wizard allows you to customize the configuration
parameters according to your needs.
The Reconstruction Wizard allows you to easily change RAID levels, or to expand or reduce
the capacity of existing logical drives.
Note: You cannot create or modify a storage configuration unless you are logged on to a system with
Administrator privileges.
63
Creating a New Configuration
You use the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 Configuration Wizard to create new disk arrays, disk
groups, and virtual disks.
1. To open the Configuration Wizard, select a controller in the left panel and then select
Operations | Advanced Operations | Configuration | Configuration Wizard. The
first Configuration Wizard screen is displayed.
Figure 40. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Starting Configuration Wizard
2. Select an option to proceed, or click Cancel to close the window.
Figure 41. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Selecting Type of Configuration
64
The following sections explain how to use the three options:
• Auto Configuration automatically configures the available drives into an optimal
configuration.
Note: Auto Configuration cannot be used for RAID 10 or 50 or with mixed SATA and
SAS drives.
• Manual Configuration gives you the greatest level of control in creating a new virtual
disk.
• Guided Configuration asks you a few simple questions about what kind of configuration
you want and then automatically creates it.
Auto Configuration
Note: Auto Configuration cannot be used for RAID 10 or 50 or with mixed SATA and SAS drives.
Auto Configuration is the quickest and simplest way to configure a virtual disk. When you
select Auto Configuration, Intel® RAID Web Console 2 creates the best configuration possible
using the controllers and physical disks that are available. Figure 42 shows the Auto Configure
screen.
Figure 42. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Auto Configuration Screen
Follow these steps to complete Auto Configuration:
1. Select a Redundancy option from the drop-down menu at the bottom of the screen:
— No Redundancy: The virtual disk will have no data redundancy (RAID 0). If a
physical disk fails, all data is lost.
— With Redundancy: The virtual disk will have data redundancy, either via parity
data (RAID 5) or duplicated data (RAID 1). If a physical disk fails, data will not be
lost.
65
2. Select an Initialization option from the drop-down menu at the bottom of the screen:
— No Init: Select this option if you do not want to initialize the new configuration at
this time. If you select this option, be sure to initialize the configuration later. For
more information, see “Initializing a Virtual Disk,” on page 100.
— Quick Init: Select this option to quickly initialize the configuration by writing zeros
to the first and last 10 Mbyte regions of the virtual disk.
— Full Init: Select this option to run a complete initialization of the configuration. This
may take a long time, depending on the number and capacity of the physical disks.
3. Click Modify if you want to make changes to the Auto Configuration. For example, you
could modify the size of a virtual disk.
4. Click Finish. The storage configuration will be created and initialized, unless you
selected No Init.
Manual Configuration
Manual Configuration allows you the greatest level of control in creating a new configuration.
When you select Manual Configuration, Figure 43 shows the first screen that is displayed:
Figure 43. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – First Manual Configuration Screen
The panel on the left shows the unconfigured physical drives that are available to create a new
array or disk group. The right panel shows new arrays or disk groups as you define them. It
also shows existing arrays or disk groups that have “holes” — free space that can be used to
form new virtual disks.
66
Step 1: Defining New Arrays or Disk Groups
To define new arrays or disk groups with the Manual Configuration option, follow these steps:
1. Select available drives in the left panel. You can Shift-click to select a range of drives,
or Ctrl-click to select multiple drives individually. Click the arrow button below the
panel to move the drives to the right panel.
2. When you have selected all the drives you want for the array or disk group, click
Accept to accept these drives for the new array or disk group.
3. Select drives for another array or disk group, if desired, and click Accept.
4. To add a dedicated hotspare to an array or disk group that you have defined, select an
available drive in the left panel, select the array or disk group from the drop-down
panel, and click Add HotSpare To.
Figure 44. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Selecting Drive for Hotspare
67
Figure 45 shows a newly defined disk group with a dedicated hotspare.
Figure 45. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – New Disk Group with Hotspare
Note: To remove all physical drives from a proposed array or disk group, select the New Array icon in the
right panel and click the left-pointing button. To remove a single drive from a proposed array or
disk group, select the drive icon in the right panel and click the left-pointing button. To remove a
dedicated hotspare from an array or disk group, select it in the right panel and click Remove
HotSpare.
5. Click Next to continue with the next configuration step.
68
Step 2: Defining Virtual Disks
The next Manual Configuration screen is displayed, as shown in Figure 46.
Figure 46. Intel® RAID Web Console 2 – Defining a Virtual Disk
The scrolling menu in the upper middle panel shows arrays or disk groups with available
space—both the array(s) / disk group(s) that you defined on the previous screen and any
existing arrays or disk groups with “holes” (free space). A single array or disk group can have
multiple holes, which you can see in the drop-down menu for the array or disk group.
6. Click check boxes in the menu to select arrays or disk groups, and holes that you want
to use for the new virtual disk. Select multiple check boxes to create a spanned
configuration.
7. When you have selected all of the space you need for the virtual disk, change the default
virtual disk properties in the right panel, if needed.
Note: You can change the virtual disk properties later after the disk is created by selecting Operations |
Set Virtual Disk Properties.
69
8. Click Accept to accept the configuration of the new virtual disk. This is displayed in
Figure 47.
Figure 47. Manual Configuration – New Configuration
Note: Click Reclaim if you want to undo a virtual disk that you just defined.
9. Select the available space and define its properties, or click Next to continue with the
next configuration step.
70
Step 3: Accepting the Configuration
Figure 48. Manual Configuration – Virtual Disk Summary
10. Review the configuration. If you want to change something, click Back and change the
configuration parameters.
11. If the configuration is acceptable, click Finish to accept it and to start the actual
initialization process (unless you selected the No Init option on the previous screen).
71
Guided Configuration
The Guided Configuration creates the best possible configuration on the controller after asking
you a few simple questions. Figure 49 shows the first screen that is displayed when you select
Guided Configuration:
Figure 49. First Guided Configuration Screen
Follow these steps to complete Guided Configuration:
1. Select a Redundancy option:
— Redundancy Only: Create a configuration only if redundancy is possible and if
there are enough available disk drives.
— Redundancy when possible: Create a redundant configuration if possible.
Otherwise, create a non-redundant configuration.
— No Redundancy: Create a non-redundant configuration.
2. Choose whether you want to use existing arrays or disk groups in the new virtual disk.
The options are:
— Use Existing Arrays Only: This option is disabled if there are no available existing
arrays or disk groups.
— Don’t Use Existing Arrays
— Use Existing and New Arrays: This option is disabled if there are no available
existing arrays or disk groups.
3. Select a maximum number of virtual disks to be created. The Intel® RAID Web Console
2 may not be able to create as many virtual disks as you want, depending on the current
configuration and the number of virtual disks that have already been created.
4. Click Next to continue to the next screen, as shown in Figure 50.
72
Figure 50. Guided Configuration – Parameters
5. Change the default volume parameters on this screen, if needed.
In this example, RAID 0 and RAID 1 volumes are being configured. In the top section
of the screen you can specify the number of virtual disks to create. You can also choose
to use less than the full capacity of this array or disk group for the virtual disk(s). You
might want to do this to leave capacity available for other virtual disks that you create
later. However, in some situations the remaining space might not be usable.
6. Click Next to continue to the next screen, as shown in Figure 51.
73
Figure 51. Final Guided Configuration Screen
7. Check the configuration that you have just defined. If it is acceptable, click Finish. If
you want to change something, click Back to return to previous screens.
74
Creating a Spanned Disk Array or Disk Group
Spanning allows you to configure multiple arrays as a single virtual disk. Spanned arrays
provide additional levels of data redundancy and storage capacity. The Intel® RAID Web
Console 2 supports three types of spanned arrays or disk groups:
• RAID 00 (multiple RAID 0 arrays or disk groups)
• RAID 10 (multiple RAID 1 arrays or disk groups)
• RAID 50 (multiple RAID 5 arrays or disk groups)
Follow these steps to create a spanned disk array or disk group. The example given here is for
RAID 10, but the steps are the same for RAID 00 or RAID 50.
1. Open the Configuration Wizard and select the Manual Configuration option.
2. On the first Manual Configuration screen, select disks for two or more RAID 1 arrays or
disk groups (two disks per array or disk group).
3. Select hot spares for the arrays or disk groups, if desired, and click Next when you have
defined all the arrays or disk groups you want.
4. On the next screen (Virtual Disk Creation), select two or more of the new arrays or disk
groups from the Arrays with Free Space menu, as shown in Figure 52. You can select up
to eight arrays or disk groups for the spanned array.
Figure 52. Defining the Spanned Array
5. Select RAID 10 from the drop-down RAID Level menu, as shown in Figure 52, or
select RAID 0 or RAID 50 for the other types of spanned arrays or disk groups.
6. Change the virtual disk properties as needed, and then click Accept to accept the
spanned array. The newly defined virtual disk is displayed, as shown in Figure 53.
75
Figure 53. New Spanned Array
7. Click Next to continue, and click Finish in the last screen to complete the process.
76
Creating Hot Spares
Hot spares are disk drives that are available to automatically replace failed drives in a virtual
disk. There are two kinds of hot spares: 1) dedicated hot spares, which are available one or
more specified arrays or disk groups, and 2) global hot spares, which are available to any array
or disk group defined on the controller.
To create a global hot spare, follow these steps:
1. In the left panel of the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 window, right-click the icon for any
disk drive that is not already part of an array or disk group.
2. Select Make Global Hotspare.
Figure 54. Make Global Hotspare
77
You normally create a dedicated hot spare when you create a new configuration with the
Manual Configuration option (see “Manual Configuration,” on page 66). To add a dedicated
hot spare to an existing array or disk group, follow these steps:
1. In the left panel of the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 window, click the icon of a disk
drive that is not already assigned to a storage configuration. A check mark is displayed
on the disk drive icon if it is already assigned.
2. In the right panel, click the Operations tab and select Make Dedicated Hotspare, as
shown in Figure 55.
Figure 55. Creating a Dedicated Hotspare
3. Select the array or disk group to which the hotspare will be dedicated from the list on
the right.
Figure 56. Select Hotspare Drive
4. Click Go to create the dedicated hotspare.
78
Setting Adjustable Task Rates
If you want to change the Rebuild rate and other task rates for a controller, you must first log
onto the system in All Access mode (versus View-Only mode). Then follow these steps to set
the adjustable task rates:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel, and select the Physical View tab.
2. In the right panel, select the Operations tab and select Adjustable Task Rates. The
task rates appear at the right, as shown in Figure 57.
Figure 57. Set Adjustable Task Rates
3. Enter changes as needed to any of the task rates:
— Rebuild Rate. Enter a number from 0 to 100 to control the rate at which a rebuild
will be performed on a disk drive when one is necessary. The higher the number, the
faster the rebuild will occur. The system I/O rate might be slower as a result of
selecting a high number.
— Patrol Rate. Enter a number from 0 to 100 to control the rate at which patrol reads
will be performed. Patrol read is a preventive procedure that monitors physical disks
to find and resolve potential problem that might cause a disk failure. The higher the
number, the faster the patrol read will occur. The system I/O rate might be slower as
a result of selecting a high number.
— Background Initialization (BGI) Rate Enter a number from 0 to 100 to control the
rate at which virtual disks are initialized in the background. Background
initialization makes the virtual disk immediately available for use, even while the
initialization is occurring. The higher the number, the faster the initialization will
occur. The system I/O rate might be slower as a result of selecting a high number.
— Check Consistency Rate. Enter a number from 0 to 100 to control the rate at which
a consistency check is done. A consistency check scans the consistency data on a
fault tolerant virtual disk to determine if the data has become corrupted. The higher
the number, the faster the consistency check is done. The system I/O rate might be
slower as a result of selecting a high number.
79
— Reconstruction Rate. Enter a number from 0 to 100 to control the rate at which
reconstruction of a virtual disk occurs. The higher the number, the faster the
reconstruction will occur. The system I/O rate might be slower as a result of
selecting a high number
4. Click Go to accept the new task rates.
5. When the warning message is displayed, click OK to confirm that you want to change
the task rates.
Note: The Controller Operations tab also has options for disabling or silencing the alarm on the
controller. Ordinarily you should leave the alarm enabled so it can warn you of abnormal
conditions on the controller. You might need to silence the alarm if the alarm is malfunctioning or it
is too loud.
Adding a Drive to a Virtual Disk
You can use Intel® RAID Web Console 2 to increase the capacity of an existing virtual disk by
adding physical disk drives to it. In order to do this, you must be logged on to the system in All
Access mode.
Warning: Be sure to back up the data on the virtual disk before you change its capacity.
To increase the capacity of a virtual disk, follow these steps:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel and then select Operations | Advanced
Operations | Configuration | Reconstruction Wizard.
Figure 58. Starting Reconstruction Wizard
The Reconstruction Wizard window is displayed, as shown in Figure 59.
80
Figure 59. Reconstruction Wizard
2. Click Add Drive. The following screen is displayed.
Figure 60. Selecting Drives to Add
81
3. In the top panel, select the disk drives that you want to add to the virtual disk.
4. Click the down-arrow button to add the drives. To remove a drive from your selection
list, click the up-arrow button.
Figure 61. Drive Selected for Virtual Disk
5. When you are finished adding disk drives, click Next. The screen on which you can
change the RAID level is displayed, as shown in Figure 62.
Figure 62. Changing RAID Level
6. If desired, select a new RAID level from the drop-down menu at the lower right part of
the window. Review the information for the newly expanded virtual disk.
7. When everything is acceptable, click Finish to accept the new configuration.
82
A Reconstruct operation begins on the virtual disk. You can monitor the progress of the
reconstruction in the Group Show Progress window. Select Group Operations | Show
Progress.
Removing a Drive from a Virtual Disk
You can use Intel® RAID Web Console 2 to remove a physical disk drive from a virtual disk.
In order to do this, you must be logged on to the system in All Access mode.
Warning: Be sure to back up the data on the virtual disk before you change its capacity.
1. Select a controller icon and start the Reconstruction Wizard, as described in the
previous section.
2. Click Remove Drive.
3. In the top panel, select the disk drives that you want to remove from the virtual disk.
4. Click the down-arrow button to remove the drives.
.
Figure 63. Select Drives to Remove from logical drive
83
5. When you are finished removing disk drives, click Next to continue.
Figure 64. Drive Selected for Removal from logical drive
6. When the next screen is displayed, select a new RAID level from the drop-down menu,
if desired. Review the displayed information for the virtual disk.
Figure 65. Select RAID Level
7. When everything is acceptable, click Finish to accept the new configuration.
A Reconstruct operation begins on the virtual disk. You can monitor the progress of the
reconstruction in the Group Show Progress window. To do so, select Group
Operations | Show Progress.
84
Changing the RAID Level of a Virtual Disk
Warning: Be sure to back up the data on the virtual disk before you change its RAID level.
You can use Intel® RAID Web Console 2 to change the RAID level of an existing virtual disk.
To do this, follow these steps:
1. Select a virtual disk icon in the left panel and then select Operations | Advanced
Operations | Configuration | Reconstruction Wizard.
2. When the Reconstruction Wizard window is displayed, click Change RAID Level.
3. When the next screen is displayed, select the desired RAID level from the drop-down
menu in the lower right corner.
Figure 66. Selecting RAID Level
4. Click Finish to accept the new RAID level.
A Reconstruct operation begins on the virtual disk. You can monitor the progress of the
reconstruction in the Group Show Progress window. To do so, select Group
Operations | Show Progress.
85
Changing Virtual Disk Properties
You can change a virtual disk’s Read Policy, Write Policy, and other properties after the disk
is created. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Select a virtual disk icon in the left panel and then select Operations | Set Virtual Disk
Properties. Alternatively, click the Properties panel and then click Set Virtual Disk
Properties. Figure 67 shows the Set Virtual Disk Properties screen.
Figure 67. Set Virtual Disk Properties
2. Change the properties as needed in the right panel.
3. Click Go to accept the changes.
Deleting a Virtual Disk
Warning: Be sure to back up the data on the virtual disk before you delete it.
You can delete one or more virtual disk. Before you can do this, you must be logged on to the
system in All Access mode. To delete a virtual disk, follow these steps:
1. Back up all user data on the virtual disk you intend to delete.
2. In the left panel, select the Logical tab and click the icon of the virtual disk you want to
delete.
3. In the right panel, select the Operations tab and select Delete Virtual Disk. Click Go.
4. When the warning message is displayed, click Yes to confirm that you want to delete
the virtual disk.
86
Managing Configurations
You can use Intel® RAID Web Console 2 to manage the configurations that you create. For
example, you can save a storage configuration that you have already defined on a controller
and load this configuration from disk to another controller, after first clearing the existing
configuration from that controller. In order to do this, you must be logged on to the system in
All Access mode. This section explains how to do these tasks.
Saving a Configuration to Disk
You can save an existing controller configuration to a file so you can apply it to another
controller. To save a configuration file, follow these steps:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel of the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 window.
2. Select Operations | Advanced Operations | Configuration | Save Configuration as
shown below.
Figure 68. Save Configuration to File
87
The Save dialog box is displayed, as shown in Figure 69.
Figure 69. Save Configuration Dialog Box
3. In the dialog box, type a name for the configuration file.
4. Click Save to save the configuration file, or accept the default name (hostname.cfg).
88
Clearing a Configuration from a Controller
If you want to manually create a new storage configuration on a controller, or load a
configuration file on a controller, you must first clear the existing configuration.
Warning: Before you clear a configuration, be sure to save any data that you want to keep! Clearing a
configuration deletes all data from the disks in the existing configuration.
To clear a configuration from a controller, follow these steps:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel of the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 window.
2. Select Operations | Advanced Operations | Configuration | Clear Configuration.
Figure 70. Clear Configuration
3. A Warning message is displayed. Click Yes to clear the configuration or No to cancel
the operation.
89
Adding a Configuration from a File
When you replace a controller, or when you want to duplicate an existing storage
configuration on a new controller, you can add a saved configuration to the controller.
Warning: When you add a saved configuration to a replacement controller, be sure that the number and size
of the physical disks connected to the controller is exactly the same as it was when the configuration
was saved.
To add a saved configuration, follow these steps:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel of the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 window.
2. Select Operations | Advanced Operations | Configuration | Add Configuration
from File.
.
Figure 71. Add Saved Configuration
3. A Warning message is displayed. Click Yes. When the Open dialog box is displayed,
select the configuration file and click Open.
4. View the configuration detail, then select Apply.
5. Confirm the new configuration when prompted.
90
Monitoring System Events and Devices
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 enables you to monitor the status of disk drives, virtual disks,
enclosures, and other devices. The following can be monitored:
• Monitoring System Events
• Monitoring Controllers
•
•
•
•
•
Monitoring Disk Drives and Other Physical Devices
Monitoring Virtual Disks
Monitoring Enclosures
Monitoring Battery Backup Units
Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes
Monitoring System Events
Intel® RAID Web Console 2 monitors the activity and performance of all controllers in the
system and the devices attached to them. When an “event” occurs—such as the completion of
a consistency check or the removal of a physical drive—an event message is displayed in the
log displayed at the bottom of the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 screen, as shown in Figure 72.
These event messages also appear in the Windows application log (the Event Viewer).
Figure 72. Event Information Window
Each event in the log includes an error level—Information, Warning, Critical, Fatal, or
Dead—a date/time stamp, and a brief description. (For a list of all events, see Appendix B:,
“Events and Messages.”) The status bar at the bottom of the screen indicates whether the log
displayed is a system log (as in Figure 72) or a log being displayed from a locally stored file.
(This file could have been generated by a previous “Save Log” action.)
91
When a system log is displayed, the Log menu has three options:
• Save Log: Saves the current log to a .log file.
• Clear Log: Clears the current log information, if you have full access (versus view-only
access).
• Load Log: Enables you to load a local .log file.
When a local log is displayed, the status bar lists the name of the local log file, and the Log
menu has an additional option, Read Server Log, that enables you to retrieve the system log.
The Clear Log option is disabled when a local log is displayed.
Monitoring Controllers
When Intel® RAID Web Console 2 is running, you can see the status of all controllers in the
left panel. If the controller is operating normally, the controller icon looks like this:
. If the
controller has failed, a small red circle is displayed to the right of the icon.
To display complete controller Information, click on a controller icon in the left panel and
click the Properties tab in the right panel. Figure 73 shows the Controller Information
window.
Figure 73. Controller Information
Note the following:
• The Rebuild rate, Patrol read rate, Reconstruction rate, Consistency check rate, and
BGI rate (background initialization) are all user-selectable. For more information, see
“Setting Adjustable Task Rates,” on page 79.
• The BBU Present field indicates whether a battery backup unit is installed.
• The Alarm Present and Alarm Enabled fields indicate whether the controller has an
alarm to alert the user with an audible tone when there is an error or problem on the
controller. There are options on the controller Properties tab for silencing or disabling
the alarm. For more information, see “Setting Adjustable Task Rates,” on page 79.
92
Monitoring Disk Drives and Other Physical Devices
When the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 is running, you can see the status of all physical disk
drives and other physical devices in the left panel. If the physical drive is operating normally,
the controller icon looks like this:
. If the physical drive has failed, a small red circle is
displayed to the right of the icon.
To display complete physical drive Information, click on a physical drive icon in the left panel
and click the Properties tab in the right panel. Figure 74 shows the Properties panel for a
physical drive.
Figure 74. Physical Drive Information
There are no user-selectable properties for physical devices. Icons for other physical devices
such as CD-ROM drives and DAT drives may also appear in the left panel.
93
If the physical drives are in a disk enclosure, you can identify which physical drive is
represented by a disk icon on the left. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Click the physical disk icon in the left panel.
2. Click the Operations tab in the right panel.
3. Select Locate Physical Drive and click Go.
Figure 75. Locating Physical Drive
The LED on the physical disk drive in the enclosure starts blinking to show its location.
Note: LEDs on drives that are global or dedicated hotspares do not blink.
4. To stop the disk drive light from blinking, select Stop Locating Physical Drive and
click Go.
94
Running a Patrol Read
A Patrol Read periodically verifies all sectors of physical disks that are connected to a
controller, including the system reserved area in the RAID configured drives. Patrol Read
works for all RAID levels and for all hotspare drives. A patrol read is initiated only when the
controller is idle for a defined period and has no other background activities.
To enable and configure Patrol Read, follow these steps:
1. Click a controller icon in the left panel.
2. Select the Operations tab in the right panel, and select Set Patrol Read Properties, as
shown in Figure 76.
Figure 76. Patrol Read Configuration
3. Select an Operation Mode for patrol read. The options are:
— Auto: Patrol Read runs automatically at the time interval you specify on this screen.
— Manual: Patrol Read runs only when you manually start it by selecting Start Patrol
Read from the controller options screen (see Figure 76).
— Disabled: Patrol Read does not run at all.
4. (optional) Specify a maximum count of physical drives to include in the patrol read.
The default number is 255; you can specify a lower number if you wish.
5. (optional) Select virtual disks on this controller to exclude from the Patrol Read. The
existing virtual disks are listed in the gray box. To exclude a virtual disk, check the box
next to it.
6. Enter the frequency at which the Patrol Read will run, in seconds.
7. Click Go to enable these Patrol Read options.
95
Monitoring Virtual Disks
When the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 is running, you can see the status of all virtual disks. If
a virtual disk is operating normally, the icon looks like this:
. If the virtual disk is running
in degraded mode—for example, if a physical disk has failed—a small yellow circle is
displayed to the right of the icon looks like this:
.
When the Logical tab is selected, the panel on the left shows which physical disks are used by
each virtual disk. In Figure 77 you can see that the virtual disk uses physical disks 1, 2, and 3.
The same physical disk can be used by multiple virtual disks.
To display complete virtual disk information, click the Logical tab in the left panel, click on a
virtual disk icon in the left panel, and click the Properties tab in the right panel. Figure 77
shows the Properties tab for a virtual disk.
Figure 77. Virtual Disk Properties
The RAID level, stripe size, and access policy of the virtual disk are set when it is configured.
Note: You can change the Read Policy, Write Policy, and other virtual disk properties by selecting
Operations | Set Virtual Disk Properties.
96
Monitoring Enclosures
When the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 is running, you can see the status of all enclosures that
are operating normally. Information about the enclosure is displayed in the right panel when
you select the Properties tab. Figure 78 shows the more complete enclosure information that
is displayed when you select the Graphical View tab.
Figure 78. Enclosure Information - Graphical View
The display in the center of the screen shows how many slots of the enclosure are populated by
disk drives, and the lights on the disk drives show the drive status. The information on the
right shows you the status of the temperature sensors, fans, and power supplies in the
enclosure.
97
Monitoring Battery Backup Units
When the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 is running, you can see the status of all battery backup
units. The battery backup unit information is displayed in the right panel when you select the
Properties tab. This information includes the number of times the battery has been recharged
(cycle count), the remaining battery capacity and estimated run time to empty, the current
battery temperature, and so on.
Figure 79 shows the BBU information that is displayed in the right panel when you select the
Properties tab.
Figure 79. Battery Backup Unit Information
98
Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 allows you to monitor the progress of rebuilds and other
lengthy processes in the Group Show Progress window, shown in Figure 80. You open this
window by selecting Group Operations | Show Progress.
Figure 80. Group Show Progress Window
Operations on virtual disks appear in the left panel of the window, and operations on physical
drives appear in the right panel. The types of operations that appear in this window are as
follows:
•
•
•
•
Initialization of a virtual disk (see “Initializing a Virtual Disk,” on page 100).
Rebuild (see “Rebuilding a Drive,” on page 102).
Reconstruction (see “Adding a Drive to a Virtual Disk,” on page 80).
Consistency check (see “Running a Consistency Check,” on page 101).
Note: A Reconstruction process cannot be aborted. To abort any other ongoing process, click Abort next
to the status indicator. Click Abort All to abort all ongoing processes. Click Close to close the
window.
99
Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations
This section explains how to use Intel® RAID Web Console 2 to maintain and manage storage
configurations. You must log on to the system in Full Access mode to do these maintenance
and management tasks. This following maintenance and management functions can be done:
• Initializing a Virtual Disk
•
•
•
•
Running a Consistency Check
Rebuilding a Drive
Removing a Drive
Flashing the Firmware
Initializing a Virtual Disk
When you create a new virtual disk with the Configuration Wizard, you can choose to
initialize the disk initialized immediately. To initialize a virtual disk after the configuration
process, follow these steps:
1. Select the Logical tab in the left panel, and click the icon of the virtual disk to initialize.
2. Select Group Operations | Initialize.
Figure 81. Selecting Initialize
3. The Group Initialize dialog box is displayed. Select the virtual disk(s) to initialize.
Select Fast Initialization if you want to use this option.
Fast Initialization quickly formats the virtual disk by writing zeros to the first few
sectors of the physical disks in the virtual disk. Regular initialization takes longer,
depending on the number and size of the physical disks in the virtual disk.
4. Click Start to begin the initialization.
You can monitor the progress of the initialization, if you want to. See “Monitoring
Rebuilds and Other Processes,” on page 99 for more information.
100
Running a Consistency Check
You should periodically run a consistency check on fault-tolerant virtual disks. A consistency
check scans the virtual disk to determine whether consistency data has become corrupted and
needs to be restored. It is especially important to do this if you suspect that the virtual disk
consistency data may be corrupted.
To run a consistency check, follow these steps:
1. Select Group Operations | Check Consistency. The Group Consistency Check
window is displayed, as shown in Figure 82.
Figure 82. Group Consistency Check Window
2. Select the virtual disks that you want to check, or click Select All to select all disks.
3. Click Start to begin. You can monitor the progress of the consistency check. See
“Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes,” on page 99 for more information.
Note: You can also run a consistency check by selecting the virtual disk icon in the left panel and selecting
the option on the Operation tab in the right panel. You can select the “Automatically fix errors”
check box if you want to.
101
Scanning for New Drives
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 normally detects newly installed disk drives and other
storage devices and displays icons for them on the main screen. If the Intel® RAID Web
Console 2 does not detect a new drive, you can use the Scan for Foreign Configuration
option to find it. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel.
2. Select Operations | Scan for Foreign Configuration.
Figure 83. Scan for Foreign Configuration
If the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 detects any new disk drives, it displays a list of them
on the screen.
Rebuilding a Drive
If a single drive in a fault tolerant system fails, the system is protected from data loss by the
parity data (in RAID 5 and RAID 50) or by data redundancy (RAID 1, RAID 10). The failed
drive must be replaced, and the drive’s data must be rebuilt on a new drive to restore the
system to fault tolerance. (Or the data can be rebuilt on the failed drive, if the drive is still
operational.) If dedicated or global hot spare disks are available, the failed drive is rebuilt
automatically without any user intervention.
If a drive has failed, a red circle is displayed to the right of the disk drive icon:
.
A small yellow circle is displayed to the right of the icon of the virtual disk that uses this
physical disk:
. This indicates that the virtual disk is in a degraded state, but the data is
still intact.
102
Follow these steps if you need to rebuild a physical drive:
1. Right click the icon of the failed drive and select Rebuild.
2. Click Yes when the warning message is displayed. If the drive is still good, a rebuild
starts.
You can monitor the progress of the rebuild in the Group Show Progress window by
selecting Group Operations | Show Progress. If the drive cannot be rebuilt, an error
message is displayed, and you must replace the drive before a rebuild can occur.
Continue with the next step.
3. Click the icon of the failed drive in the left panel and select the Operations tab in the
right panel.
4. Select Prepare for Removal.
5. Click Go.
Figure 84. Preparing Drive for Removal
6. Physically remove the failed drive and replace it with a new drive of equal or greater
capacity.
When the new drive spins up, the drive icon changes to green, and the rebuild begins
automatically. You can monitor the progress of the rebuild in the Group Show Progress
window by selecting Group Operations | Show Progress.
Note: If you want to force a disk drive into Fail status in order to trigger a rebuild, right-click the drive
icon, and select Make Drive Offline.
103
Removing a Drive
You may sometimes need to remove a non-failed drive that is connected to the controller. For
example, you may need to replace the drive with a larger drive. Follow these steps to remove a
drive safely:
1. Click the icon of the drive in the left panel and select the Operations tab in the right
panel.
2. Select Prepare for Removal and click Go.
3. If you change your mind, select Undo Prepare for Removal and click Go. Otherwise,
wait until the drive spins down and then remove it.
Warning: Never replace a drive that has not failed (and is not marked by the controller as failed) while the
system is powered off. A drive must always be failed before it is replaced in an array.
Flashing the Firmware
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 enables you to easily upgrade the controller firmware. To
flash the controller firmware follow these steps:
1. In the left panel, click on the icon of the controller you need to upgrade.
2. In the right panel, click the Operations tab and select Flash Firmware.
3. Click Go.
Figure 85. Flashing the Firmware
4. Browse for the .rom flash update file and click OK. The Intel® RAID Web Console 2
displays the version of the existing firmware and the version of the new firmware file.
5. When you are prompted to ask if you want to upgrade the firmware, click Yes. The
controller is updated with the new firmware code contained in the .ROM file.
104
Appendix A: Configuring RAID 0, 1, or 5
using Custom Configuration
1. Start the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 by selecting Start | Programs | RAID Web
Console 2.
2. Double click the icon on the system that you want to access. The Server Login Window
is displayed as shown.
3. Select an full access mode from the drop-down menu.
4. Enter your user name and password and click Login.
5. Select a controller and select Operations | Advanced Operations | Configuration |
Configuration Wizard.
Figure 86. Starting Configuration Wizard
105
1. Select Manual Configuration.
Figure 87. Selecting Manual Configuration
6. Select the drives:
— RAID 0 or RAID 1: Select two drives by highlighting each drive individually and
then clicking the right arrow button.
— RAID 5: Select three drives by highlighting each drive individually and then
clicking the right arrow button.
Figure 88. Selecting Drives for RAID 0
106
The selected drives are added to the right pane, as shown below.
Figure 89. Drives Selected for RAID 0
7. Click Accept to accept the array or disk group.
8. Click Next to define the virtual disk created from the array or disk group. The scrolling
menu in the upper middle panel shows the arrays or disk groups that have available
space.
9. Select the newly created array "New Array 0" as shown by the example below.
Figure 90. Configure RAID 0 Parameters
107
10. Select the array type (RAID 0, RAID 1, or RAID 5) and set the rest of the RAID
parameters, Stripe Size, Read Policy, Write Policy, and other parameters according to
the needs of your application. For more information on these parameters see “Manual
Configuration,” on page 66.
11. Click Accept to set the parameters and define the new array or disk group.
Figure 91. Accepting RAID 0 Parameters
12. Click Finish to define the new array or disk group.
Figure 92. Completing RAID 0 Configuration
108
The new array or disk group is visible when you select the Logical tab.
Figure 93. RAID 0 in Logical Tab
109
110
Appendix B: Events and Messages
This appendix lists the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 events that may appear in the event log.
The Intel® RAID Web Console 2 monitors the activity and performance of all controllers in
the server and the devices attached to them. When an “event” occurs—such as the completion
of a consistency check or the removal of a physical drive—an event message is displayed in
the log displayed at the bottom of the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 screen. The messages are
also logged in the Windows Application log (Event Viewer). Error event levels are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Progress: This is a progress posting event. Progress events are not saved in NVRAM.
Info: Informational message. No user action is necessary.
Warning: Some component may be close to a failure point
Critical: A component has failed, but the system has not lost data
Fatal: A component has failed, and data loss has occurred or will occur
Dead: A catastrophic error has occurred and the controller has died. This is seen only
after the controller has been restarted.
The following table lists all of the Intel® RAID Web Console 2 event messages:
111
Table 4. MFI Event Messages
Number
112
Type
Description
0
Info
Firmware initialization started (PCI ID %04x/%04x/%04x/%04x)
1
Info
Firmware version %s
2
Fatal
Unable to recover cache data from TBBU
3
Info
Cache data recovered from TBBU successfully
4
Info
Configuration cleared
5
Warning
Cluster down; communication with peer lost
6
Info
Logical drive %s ownership changed from %02x to %02x
7
Info
Alarm disabled by user
8
Info
Alarm enabled by user
9
Info
Background initialization rate changed to %d%%
10
Fatal
Controller cache discarded due to memory/battery problems
11
Fatal
Unable to recover cache data due to configuration mismatch
12
Info
Cache data recovered successfully
13
Fatal
Controller cache discarded due to firmware version incompatibility
14
Info
Consistency Check rate changed to %d%%
15
Dead
Fatal firmware error: %s
16
Info
Factory defaults restored
17
Info
Flash downloaded image corrupt
18
Caution
Flash erase error
19
Caution
Flash timeout during erase
20
Caution
Flash error
21
Info
Flashing image: %s
22
Info
Flash of new firmware image(s) complete
23
Caution
Flash programming error
24
Caution
Flash timeout during programming
25
Caution
Flash chip type unknown
26
Caution
Flash command set unknown
27
Caution
Flash verify failure
28
Info
Flush rate changed to %d seconds
29
Info
Hibernate command received from host
30
Info
Event log cleared
31
Info
Event log wrapped
32
Dead
Multi-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x
33
Warning
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x
34
Dead
Not enough controller memory
35
Info
Patrol Read complete
36
Info
Patrol Read paused
37
Info
Patrol Read Rate changed to %d%%
38
Info
Patrol Read resumed
39
Info
Patrol Read started
Table 4. MFI Event Messages (Cont.)
Number
Type
Description
40
Info
Rebuild rate changed to %d%%
41
Info
Reconstruction rate changed to %d%%
42
Info
Shutdown command received from host
43
Info
Test event: ’%s’
44
Info
Time established as %s; (%d seconds since power on)
45
Info
User entered firmware debugger
46
Warning
Background Initialization aborted on %s
47
Warning
Background Initialization corrected medium error (%s at %lx
48
Info
Background Initialization completed on %s
49
Fatal
Background Initialization completed with uncorrectable errors on %s
50
Fatal
Background Initialization detected uncorrectable double medium errors
(%s at %lx on %s)
51
Caution
Background Initialization failed on %s
52
Progress
Background Initialization progress on %s is %s
53
Info
Background Initialization started on %s
54
Info
Policy change due to BBU on %s from %s to %s
55
Info
Policy change due to user on %s from %s to %s
56
Warning
Consistency Check aborted on %s
57
Warning
Consistency Check corrected medium error (%s at %lx
58
Info
Consistency Check done on %s
59
Info
Consistency Check done with corrections on %s
60
Fatal
Consistency Check detected uncorrectable double medium errors (%s at
%lx on %s)
61
Caution
Consistency Check failed on %s
62
Fatal
Consistency Check failed with uncorrectable data on %s
63
Warning
Consistency Check found inconsistent parity on %s at strip %lx
64
Warning
Consistency Check inconsistency logging disabled on %s (too many
inconsistencies)
65
Progress
Consistency Check progress on %s is %s
66
Info
Consistency Check started on %s
67
Warning
Initialization aborted on %s
68
Caution
Initialization failed on %s
69
Progress
Initialization progress on %s is %s
70
Info
Fast initialization started on %s
71
Info
Full initialization started on %s
72
Info
Initialization complete on %s
73
Info
LD Properties updated to %s (form %s)
74
Info
Reconstruction complete on %s
75
Fatal
Reconstruction of %s stopped due to unrecoverable errors
76
Fatal
Reconstruct detected uncorrectable double medium errors (%s at %lx on
%s at %lx)
77
Progress
Reconstruction progress on %s is %s
78
Info
Reconstruction resumed on %s
113
Table 4. MFI Event Messages (Cont.)
Number
114
Type
Description
79
Fatal
Reconstruction resume of %s failed due to configuration mismatch
80
Info
Reconstructing started on %s
81
Info
State change on %s from %s to %s
82
Info
PD Clear aborted on %s
83
Caution
PD Clear failed on %s (Error %02x)
84
Progress
PD Clear progress on %s is %s
85
Info
PD Clear started on %s
86
Info
PD Clear completed on %s
87
Warning
Error on %s (Error %02x)
88
Info
Format complete on %s
89
Info
Format started on %s
90
Caution
Hot Spare SMART polling failed on %s (Error %02x)
91
Info
PD inserted: %s
92
Warning
PD %s is not supported
93
Warning
Patrol Read corrected medium error on %s at %lx
94
Progress
Patrol Read progress on %s is %s
95
Fatal
Patrol Read found an uncorrectable medium error on %s at %lx
96
Caution
Predictive failure: CDB: %s
97
Fatal
Patrol Read puncturing bad block on %s at %lx
98
Info
Rebuild aborted by user on %s
99
Info
Rebuild complete on %s
100
Info
Rebuild complete on %s
101
Caution
Rebuild failed on %s due to source drive error
102
Caution
Rebuild failed on %s due to target drive error
103
Progress
Rebuild progress on %s is %s
104
Info
Rebuild resumed on %s
105
Info
Rebuild started on %s
106
Info
Rebuild automatically started on %s
107
Caution
Rebuild stopped on %s due to loss of cluster ownership
108
Fatal
Reassign write operation failed on %s at %lx
109
Fatal
Unrecoverable medium error during rebuild on %s at %lx
110
Info
Corrected medium error during recovery on %s at %lx
111
Fatal
Unrecoverable medium error during recovery on %s at %lx
112
Info
PD removed: %s
113
Warning
CDB: %s
114
Info
State change on %s from %s to %s
115
Info
State change by user on %s from %s to %s
116
Warning
Redundant path to %s broken
117
Info
Redundant path to %s restored
118
Info
Dedicated Hot Spare PD %s no longer useful due to deleted array
119
Caution
SAS topology error: Loop detected
Table 4. MFI Event Messages (Cont.)
Number
Type
Description
120
Caution
SAS topology error: Unaddressable device
121
Caution
SAS topology error: Multiple ports to the same SAS address
122
Caution
SAS topology error: Expander error
123
Caution
SAS topology error: SMP timeout
124
Caution
SAS topology error: Out of route entries
125
Caution
SAS topology error: Index not found
126
Caution
SAS topology error: SMP function failed
127
Caution
SAS topology error: SMP CRC error
128
Caution
SAS topology error: Multiple subtractive
129
Caution
SAS topology error: Table to table
130
Caution
SAS topology error: Multiple paths
131
Fatal
Unable to access device %s
132
Info
Dedicated Hot Spare created on %s (%s)
133
Info
Dedicated Hot Spare %s disabled
134
Caution
Dedicated Hot Spare %s no longer useful for all arrays
135
Info
Global Hot Spare created on %s (%s)
136
Info
Global Hot Spare %s disabled
137
Caution
Global Hot Spare does not cover all arrays
138
Info
Created %s}
139
Info
Deleted %s}
140
Info
Marking LD %s inconsistent due to active writes at shutdown
141
Info
Battery Present
142
Warning
Battery Not Present
143
Info
New Battery Detected
144
Info
Battery has been replaced
145
Caution
Battery temperature is high
146
Warning
Battery voltage low
147
Info
Battery is charging
148
Info
Battery is discharging
149
Info
Battery voltage is normal
150
Fatal
Battery needs to be replacement
151
Info
Battery relearn started
152
Info
Battery relearn in progress
153
Info
Battery relearn completed
154
Caution
Battery relearn timed out
155
Info
Battery relearn pending: Battery is under charge
156
Info
Battery relearn postponed
157
Info
Battery relearn will start in 4 days
158
Info
Battery relearn will start in 2 day
159
Info
Battery relearn will start in 1 day
160
Info
Battery relearn will start in 5 hours
115
Table 4. MFI Event Messages (Cont.)
Number
116
Type
Description
161
Info
Battery removed
162
Info
Current capacity of the battery is below threshold
163
Info
Current capacity of the battery is above threshold
164
Info
Enclosure (SES) discovered on %s
165
Info
Enclosure (SAF-TE) discovered on %s
166
Caution
Enclosure %s communication lost
167
Info
Enclosure %s communication restored
168
Caution
Enclosure %s fan %d failed
169
Info
Enclosure %s fan %d inserted
170
Caution
Enclosure %s fan %d removed
171
Caution
Enclosure %s power supply %d failed
172
Info
Enclosure %s power supply %d inserted
173
Caution
Enclosure %s power supply %d removed
174
Caution
Enclosure %s SIM %d failed
175
Info
Enclosure %s SIM %d inserted
176
Caution
Enclosure %s SIM %d removed
177
Warning
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d below warning threshold
178
Caution
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d below error threshold
179
Warning
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d above warning threshold
180
Caution
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d above error threshold
181
Caution
Enclosure %s shutdown
182
Warning
Enclosure %s not supported; too many enclosures connected to port
183
Caution
Enclosure %s firmware mismatch
184
Warning
Enclosure %s sensor %d bad
185
Caution
Enclosure %s phy %d bad
186
Caution
Enclosure %s is unstable
187
Caution
Enclosure %s hardware error
188
Caution
Enclosure %s not responding
189
Info
SAS/SATA mixing not supported in enclosure; PD %s disabled
190
Info
Enclosure (SES) hotplug on %s was detected, but is not supported
191
Info
Clustering enabled
192
Info
Clustering disabled
193
Info
PD too small to be used for auto-rebuild on %s
194
Info
BBU enabled; changing WT virtual disks to WB
195
Warning
BBU disabled; changing WB virtual disks to WT
196
Warning
Bad block table on PD %s is 80% full
197
Fatal
Bad block table on PD %s is full; unable to log block %lx
198
Info
Consistency Check Aborted Due to Ownership Loss on %s
199
Info
Background Initialization (BGI) Aborted Due to Ownership Loss on %s
200
Caution
Battery/charger problems detected; SOH Bad
201
Warning
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s); warning threshold
exceeded
Table 4. MFI Event Messages (Cont.)
Number
Type
Description
202
Caution
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s); critical threshold
exceeded
203
Caution
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s); further reporting
disabled
204
Caution
Enclosure %s Power supply %d switched off
205
Info
Enclosure %s Power supply %d switched on
206
Caution
Enclosure %s Power supply %d cable removed
207
Info
Enclosure %s Power supply %d cable inserted
208
Info
Enclosure %s Fan %d returned to normal
209
Info
BBU Retention test was initiated on previous boot
210
Info
BBU Retention test passed
211
Caution
BBU Retention test failed!
212
Info
NVRAM Retention test was initiated on previous boot
213
Info
NVRAM Retention test passed
214
Caution
NVRAM Retention test failed!
215
Info
%s test completed %d passes successfully
216
Caution
%s test FAILED on %d pass. Fail data: errorOffset=%x goodData=%x
badData=%x
217
Info
Self check diagnostics completed
218
Info
Foreign Configuration Detected
219
Info
Foreign Configuration Imported
220
Info
Foreign Configuration Cleared
117
118
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement