Advanced Rules and Playbook

Advanced Rules and Playbook
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
18.0
19.0
20.0
21.0
22.0
23.0
24.0
25.0
26.0
27.0
28.0
Regions
18.1
Movement and Regions
18.2
Control of Regions
18.3
Combat and Regions
18.4
Regions and Terrain
18.5
Regions and Retreat
18.6
Regions and Advance After Combat
18.7
Regions and Supply
Trenches
19.1
Building Trenches
19.2
Trench Construction Die Rolls
19.3
Trench Levels
19.4
Removing Trench Markers
19.5
Trench Effects on Combat
Forts
20.1
General Rules
20.2
Destroying a Fort
20.3
Besieging a Fort
20.4
Surrender of Besieged Forts
20.5
Forts and Supply
Flank Attacks
21.1
Restrictions on Flank Attacks
21.2
Forts and Flank Attacks
21.3
Pinning Spaces and Flank Attack DRMs
21.4
Resolving Flank Attacks
Assembling Units
22.1
Only LCUs Can Be Assembled
22.2
Composition of Assembled LCUs
22.3
How to Assemble LCUs
Rebellions and Revolution
23.1
Mechanics of Rebellion
23.2
Tracking National Will
23.3
Uprising Units
23.4
Russian Revolution
23.5
Collapse of Germany
23.6
Collapse of Austria-Hungary
Troop Quality
24.1
Tracking Troop Quality
24.2
Effects on Reinforcements and Rebuilt Units
Invasions by Sea
25.1
General Rules
25.2
Executing Sea Invasions
25.3
Moving AP LCUs By Sea
25.4
Enemy Capture of Sea Invasion Spaces
25.5
Russian Amphibious Assault
Neutral and Minor Countries
26.1
Albania
26.2
Bulgaria
26.3
Greece
26.4
Italy
26.5
Romania
26.6
Serbia and Montenegro
26.7
Turkey
Out-Of-Theater Campaigns
Headquarters and Heavy Artillery
28.1
Special Effects of HQs and Heavy Artillery
29.0
30.0
31.0
32.0
33.0
34.0
35.0
36.0
Page 1 of 27
Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
More Than Two Players
30.1
Two AP Players
30.2
Two CP Players
Introductory Game
31.1
The 1914 Invasion of Serbia
Shorter Game Scenarios
32.1
From Mobilization to Limited War
32.2
The Brusilov Offensive and Beyond
Strategy Guide
33.1
Allied Powers Strategy
33.2
Central Powers Strategy
Strategy Card Histories and Notes
34.1
Allied Powers Cards
34.2
Central Powers Cards
Acknowledgments
Bibliography
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
18.0
REGIONS
18.1
Movement and Regions
a.
Units move from a Space to a connected Region at a
cost of 1 MP.
b.
Units move between connected Regions at a cost of 1
MP.
c.
Units move between the Italian Front Inset Map and
Carniola or Tyrol at a cost of 1 MP.
d.
Combat Units may move into a Region occupied by
enemy units or Uprising Units.
e.
a.
A Combat Unit takes control of a Region empty of
enemy units or Uprising Units by moving into or
through it.
b.
A Combat Unit takes does not take control of a Region
occupied by enemy units or Uprising Units by simply
moving into it.
c.
After a Combat Unit takes control of an enemy
Region, a Control Marker for the unit’s Nationality is
placed there. A friendly Region under enemy control
can be recaptured by Movement or Attack. When a
player recaptures a Region from enemy control, the
enemy Control Marker is removed.
d.
If an enemy Region is captured by units of multiple
or mixed nationalities, the Control Marker for any
unit’s nationality can be placed there.
Movement is always from point to point along a
connecting line. Regions cannot be skipped.
18.2.1
18.1.1
Control of Regions After Combat
Activating Units in Regions for Movement
Attacking units take control of a Region after Combat when:
a.
18.2
Arrange units in a Region into Stacks of no more than
3 (at no OPS cost).
b.
Activate a Stack of units in a Region for Movement.
(This is indicated by placing a Move Marker on the
Stack.)
c.
The OPS cost to Activate a Stack for Movement equals
the number of number of friendly nationalities having
units in the stack (see Rule 9.4.2).
d.
Movement of an Activated Stack in a Region must be
completed before units in another Region or Space can
Move.
e.
Stacks of units are not required to Move together, and
can Move to different destinations, or Move by
different routes to the same destination. Some units in
a Stack may Move while other units in that Stack
remain in place.
f.
Movement of one unit must be completed before
another unit moves.
g.
Movement of all units must be completed before
Combat begins.
h.
Units marked with a Move Marker do not have to
Move, but unused OPS Points are lost.
i.
Uprising Units that are placed in Regions do not move.
a.
There is at least one friendly unit in the Region; and
b.
All defending units in the Region are destroyed,
eliminated, or withdrawn; and
c.
There are no Uprising Units in the Region.
18.3
Control of Regions
Page 2 of 27
Combat and Regions
a.
Regions are not Activated for Attack. Instead,
attacking units in a Region are grouped into Stacks of
no more than three units (at no OPS cost), and each
Stack can be Activated as if it was a separate Space.
b.
A player need not Activate all the units that he has in
a Region, but may Activate as many or as few as he
wishes as long as he can pay the OPS cost for
activating the stack (see Rule 9.4.1).
c.
Combat may occur between friendly and enemy units
within the same Region.
d.
Attacks may be made from a Region to a connected
Region, from a Region to a connected Space, or from
a Space to a connected Region.
e.
A multi-stack Attack can be made within a Region.
f.
Attacks into a Region can be made in combination
with an Attack by friendly units already in the Region,
observing the rules for multinational attacks.
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
g.
18.3.1
a.
b.
More than one Stack of attacking units in a Region can
combine to Attack a Space connected to the Region.
b.
Units can trace supply lines through Regions in enemy
Nations that are occupied by friendly units.
Defending in a Region
c.
Only one Stack of units in a Region can defend against
an Attack, with the defending player choosing which
units will act as defenders in the Combat.
Units can trace supply lines through any Regions
containing enemy units or Uprising Units if those
Regions are also occupied by friendly units.
d.
Units can trace supply lines into any Region that they
occupy.
If the defending player has more than three units in the
Region, he must use three of those units as defenders.
c.
If the defending player has three or less than three units
in the Region, he must use all those units as defenders.
d.
The defending player’s other units (in excess of three)
do not participate in the Combat and cannot be used to
absorb Combat losses.
18.4
19.0
TRENCHES
19.1
Building Trenches
a.
Trenches can be built in any Turn.
b.
Combat Units of any Nationality (except for HQs and
Heavy Artillery) occupying a Clear or Mountain Space
that is activated for Movement can attempt to build a
Trench instead of moving.
c.
Trenches can be built in Clear or Mountain Spaces
containing a Fort. Combat Units defending a Fort
Space or besieging a Fort entrench.
d.
Uprising Units cannot build Trenches.
e.
In a Space that is activated for Movement, some units
can stay and build a Trench while others move away.
Only non-moving Combat Units count toward
building a Trench.
f.
Units can Move into a Space where a Trench will be
built, but do not count toward building a Trench.
g.
Trenches cannot be built in a Swamp Space, in a
Region, or on Lemnos.
h.
Only one Trench building attempt may be made per
space in an Action Round. Trenches are built by
rolling a six-sided die for each trench building attempt.
Regions and Terrain
a.
If a Region contains terrain, the terrain’s effects apply
only to Combat.
b.
Terrain in a Region does not affect Movement.
18.5
Regions and Retreat
a.
Units retreating into a Region as the first part of a twospace retreat do not retreat into a second space.
Retreating into a Region constitutes a full retreat.
b.
If the defending Stack in a Region loses a Combat, it
may retreat to a connected Space or Region but does
not have to. The defending Stack may retreat within
the Region.
18.6
Regions and Advance After Combat
a.
b.
Attacking units can Advance After Combat into a
Region—even when the Region contains enemy units
or Uprising Units—but must stop when they move into
the Region.
If an Attack from outside the Region wins the Combat,
up to three full-strength attacking units (LCUs and
SCUs) can Advance After Combat into the Region.
18.7
Regions and Supply
18.7.1
Tracing Supply Lines through Regions
a.
19.2
Units can trace supply lines through unoccupied
Regions in their own Nation or in friendly Nations.
Page 3 of 27
Trench Construction Die Rolls
a.
If the space is occupied by one or more LCUs, the
Trench is built on a die roll of 1, 2, or 3.
b.
If the space is only occupied by SCUs, the Trench is
built on a die roll equal to or less than the number of
SCUs in the space.
c.
It does not matter whether units building a Trench are
full or reduced strength.
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
d.
e.
19.3
When units successfully entrench, place a Trench
Marker of the player’s color in that space (blue for AP,
grey for CP).
20.0
FORTS
20.1
General Rules
There is no penalty for subsequent attempts by a unit
to build a Trench in a space if the first attempt fails.
20.1.1
Entering a Fort Space
a.
Units cannot move into a Space containing an
unbesieged enemy Fort during Movement or Combat,
unless they can besiege the Fort.
When units successfully entrench, place a Level 1
Trench Marker of the player’s color in that space.
Only one trench marker can be placed in a space.
b.
Units that move into a Space containing an unbesieged
enemy Fort must stop there, and cannot move or
advance any further during the Action Round.
The Level 2 Trench Marker at Doiran is the only Level
2 Trench in the game. (The vast trench systems on the
Western Front did not exist in this theater.)
20.1.2
Trench Levels
a.
b.
19.4
Destroying a Fort before a Successful Siege
a.
Forts do not have to be besieged in order to be
destroyed.
Removing Trench Markers
a.
A Trench Marker remains in a space, even if the space
contains no friendly units.
b.
An unbesieged Fort can be attacked from a connected
Space and destroyed.
b.
When an enemy unit enters a Level 1 Trench, the
marker is removed.
c.
A besieged Fort can only be attacked by units in its
Space.
c.
When an enemy unit enters the Level 2 Trench at
Doiran, replace it with a Level 1 Trench Marker of the
enemy’s color except when the “Surrender at Ft.
Rupel” Event is played (allowing the CP Player to
capture the Level 2 Trench intact).
20.1.3
19.5
a.
Forts add their Combat Factor (CF) to the Combat
Strength of friendly units defending the Fort Space.
b.
Forts do not add their CF to the Combat Strength of
friendly units attacking from a Fort Space.
Trench Effects on Combat
a.
b.
If the Defending Space contains a Level 1 Trench
Marker, the Fire Table column used by the attacker for
his offensive fire shifts one column to the left. In
addition, the Fire Table column used by the defender
for his defensive fire shifts one column to the right.
20.1.4
a.
If a Fort Space also contains a Trench Marker,
defending units apply the effects of that Trench to
Combat.
If the Defending Space contains a Level 2 Trench
Marker, the Fire Table column used by the attacker for
his offensive fire shifts two columns to the left. The
Fire Table column used by the defender for his
defensive fire still shifts only one column to the right.
b.
Forts themselves cannot benefit from the effects of a
Trench.
c.
Forts themselves cannot build Trenches.
20.1.5
c.
Fort Combat Strength
A Fort Space containing a Trench Marker but no
friendly units does not benefit from the Trench.
d.
A Trench Marker in the attacker’s space does not
affect Combat.
e.
Defending units that occupy a Space containing a
Trench Marker can reduce their retreat after Combat
by one space if they take one additional step loss from
any of their units.
Control of Fort Spaces
a.
A Fort Space cannot be controlled by the enemy as
long as there is an undestroyed Fort in the space—even
if the Fort is besieged.
b.
A player cannot claim Victory Points for an enemy
Fort Space until he gains control of that space.
20.1.6
Page 4 of 27
Forts and Trenches
Forts and Advance After Combat
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
a.
If a Space contains an undestroyed enemy Fort,
attacking units cannot Advance After Combat into that
Space unless they can besiege the Fort.
b.
If a Space contains an undestroyed enemy Fort and its
defending units take a two-space retreat, attacking
units in excess of those required to besiege the Fort can
Advance After Combat beyond the Fort’s space.
c.
If defending units take a two-space retreat through an
undestroyed friendly Fort Space that was not part of
the Combat, attacking units may Advance After
Combat into that Fort’s space if they can besiege the
Fort.
20.2
the Fort Space as a result of Movement or Advance
After Combat during an Action Round. When this
occurs, a Besieged Fort Marker is placed on the space.
b.
If any Combat Units move into an unbesieged enemy
Fort Space during Movement, the number of units
required to besiege the Fort must stop in that Space.
Excess units not required for a siege can continue
Movement through the Space.
c.
If any Combat Units move into an unbesieged enemy
Fort Space during Advance After Combat, all
advancing units must stop in that space.
d.
Combat Units cannot move into an unbesieged enemy
Fort Space during Movement or Advance After
Combat unless enough units will enter the Space by
the end of the Action Round to besiege the Fort.
Destroying a Fort
a.
When a Fort Space containing friendly Combat Units
is attacked, the Fort itself is unaffected by the Combat
until all defending units are destroyed or permanently
eliminated.
1.
2.
If the attacker’s Loss Number exceeds what is
needed to destroy or permanently eliminate the
defending Combat Units, the unused portion of
the Loss Number may be applied to destroy the
Fort.
20.3.2
As long as the besieger has a sufficient number of Combat Units
in an enemy Fort Space to besiege the Fort:
a.
The besieger may trace a line of supply into or
through the Fort Space.
b.
The besieger may move units through the Fort Space
during Movement without having to stop.
The Fort is destroyed if the remaining Loss
Number is equal to or greater than the Fort’s CF.
20.3.3
a.
A defending Fort is not affected by an attacker’s Loss
Number if any defending units survive the Combat—
even if those defending units retreat from the Fort
Space.
b.
If a Fort is attacked when no defending units are in its
Space, the Fort is destroyed if the attacker‘s Loss
Number is equal to or greater than the Fort’s CF
f.
Forts do not take partial damage. They are either fully
intact or completely destroyed.
Once a Fort is destroyed, it remains so for the duration
of the game. Forts cannot be repaired.
h.
When a Fort is destroyed, a Destroyed Marker is
immediately and permanently placed in the Fort
Space.
20.3
Besieging a Fort
20.3.1
How to Besiege an Enemy Fort
a.
Attacks by Besieging Units
a.
A player can Activate for Attack a besieged enemy
Fort Space, but only those units not required for
besieging the Fort can attack connected spaces.
b.
All units in the besieged Fort Space can attack the Fort
itself.
20.3.4
g.
Effects of Siege
Moving Units off Besieged Forts
a.
A player cannot Move units off a besieged enemy Fort
Space if it would leave an insufficient number of
friendly units in that space to besiege the Fort.
b.
A player can Move all of his units off a besieged
enemy Fort Space if he is abandoning the siege.
20.3.5
Losses to Besieging Units
If units besieging an enemy Fort are attacked and take losses
that reduce them below the minimum required to besiege the
Fort, then:
To besiege an enemy Fort, at least one LCU or a
number of SCUs equal to the Fort’s CF must move into
Page 5 of 27
a.
The Fort is no longer besieged.
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
b.
The units are not required to move off the Fort Space.
b.
c.
No surrender die roll is made during the Siege Phase.
d.
Lines of supply cannot be traced through the Fort
Space, but can still be traced into that space.
a.
Flank Attacks cannot be made against a Space where
all of the attacking units are crossing Water.
e.
Additional friendly units that move into the enemy
Fort Space must stop until there are a sufficient
number of units to besiege the Fort.
b.
Flank Attacks cannot be made against a Swamp or
Mountain Space.
c.
Flank Attacks cannot be made against a Space having
a Trench Marker.
21.1
At least one of the attacking units is an LCU.
Restrictions on Flank Attacks
20.4
Surrender of Besieged Forts
20.4.1
Making Surrender Checks
d.
Flank Attacks cannot be made against units in a
Region.
During the Siege Phase of each Turn, the players check
to see if any besieged Forts surrender.
e.
Flank Attacks cannot be made using OOS units.
f.
Flank Attacks cannot be made against Uprising Units.
a.
b.
c.
20.4.2
To check for surrender, a six-sided die is rolled for
each besieged Fort. If the number is greater than the
Fort’s CF, the Fort surrenders, and the Fort itself is
destroyed. Place a Destroyed Marker on the Fort and
transfer control of the Fort Space to the besieging
player.
Flank Attacks cannot be made against Fort Spaces that
contain no Combat Units.
If the die roll is equal to or less than the Fort’s CF, the
Fort does not surrender.
b.
Flank Attacks can be made against unentrenched
Combat Units in a Fort Space.
Sieges and Severe Weather Checks
c.
Flank Attacks cannot be made against Uprising Units
in a Fort Space or any other kind of Space.
21.3
Forts and Supply
a.
Forts do not need supply, and are not affected by the
Fort’s Space being OOS.
b.
Combat Units in friendly Fort Spaces are always in
supply.
c.
Spaces containing friendly Forts that are not besieged
remain under friendly control, even if the space would
otherwise be OOS.
d.
21.0
Pinning Spaces and Flank Attack DRMs
a.
When attempting a Flank Attack, the attacker must
designate one Attacking Space as the “Frontal
Assault” or “Pinning Space”.
b.
For each additional Attacking Space that is not
connected to an enemy-occupied space (other than
the Defending Space), the attacking units receive a
+1 DRM for the Flank Attack Attempt die roll.
21.4
Resolving Flank Attacks
a.
The attacker rolls a six-sided die to resolve the Flank
Attack, adjusted by any DRMs.
b.
If the modified die roll is 4 or higher, then the Flank
Attack succeeds and the attacker goes to the Resolve
Combat step before the defender, including the
infliction of losses on the defender. So, if the Flank
Attack succeeds, the defender’s Combat Strength is
reduced by any losses he incurs before he rolls for
defensive fire.
Supply lines can be traced through a Space containing
a besieged enemy Fort.
Flank Attacks
The attacker may declare a Flank Attack against a Defending
Space if the following conditions are met:
a.
Forts and Flank Attacks
a.
Units may besiege Forts and conduct surrender checks without
making a Severe Weather Check because a siege is not Combat.
20.5
21.2
There are attacking units in two or more spaces
connected to the Defending Space.
Page 6 of 27
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
c.
If the modified die roll is 3 or lower, then the Flank
Attack fails and the defender goes to the Resolve
Combat step before the attacker, including infliction of
any losses on the attacker. So, if the Flank Attack fails,
the attacker’s Combat strength is reduced by any
losses he incurs before he rolls for offensive fire.
a.
The SCUs being used to assemble an LCU must
begin the Action Round on the same Space, or in the
same Stack within a Region. To assemble the LCU,
the Space or Stack must first be Activated for
Movement. An LCU can assemble and move in the
same Action Round.
d.
In a failed Flank Attack, the attacker’s CCs are still
used when he rolls for the results of his offensive fire.
b.
A full-strength LCU can be assembled from three fullstrength SCUs by taking an LCU counter from the
Replaceable Units Box, removing the three SCUs
being used to assemble the LCU from the map, and
placing the LCU on their Space. Put the removed SCU
counters in the Reserve Box.
c.
A full-strength LCU can be assembled from a
reduced-strength LCU and a full-strength SCU that
begin the Action Round in the same Space, or in the
same Stack within a Region. To assemble the LCU,
the Space or Stack must first be Activated for
Movement. Then put the SCU in the Reserve Box
and flip the LCU counter over to its full-strength
side. The LCU can assemble and move in the same
Action Round.
d.
A reduced-strength LCU can be assembled from two
full-strength SCUs by taking an LCU counter from the
Replaceable Units Box, removing the two SCUs being
used to assemble the LCU from the map, and placing
the LCU on their Space. Put the removed SCU
counters in the Reserve Box.
22.0
ASSEMBLING UNITS
22.1
Only LCUs Can Be Assembled
a.
A full-strength LCU can be assembled on any
supplied, friendly-controlled space that contains three
full-strength SCUs of the same Nationality as the
LCU.
b.
A full-strength LCU can be assembled on any
supplied, friendly-controlled space that contains a
reduced-strength LCU and a full-strength SCU of the
same Nationality as the LCU.
c.
A reduced strength LCU can be assembled on any
supplied, friendly-controlled space that contains two
full-strength regular SCUs of the same Nationality as
the LCU.
d.
Special Units (yellow unit symbol backgrounds)
cannot be used to assemble LCUs.
e.
Uprising Units cannot be used to assemble LCUs.
f.
An SCU cannot be assembled from other units.
22.2
Composition of Assembled LCUs
a.
22.3
When assembling a full-strength LCU from three
SCUs, the first two SCUs must be from the same
Nationality and unit type as the LCU being assembled,
and the third SCU can be any infantry or cavalry from
that Nationality.
b.
When assembling a full-strength LCU from a
reduced-strength LCU and a full-strength SCU, the
SCU can be infantry or cavalry from the LCU’s
Nationality.
c.
When assembling a reduced-strength LCU, the two
SCUs can be any infantry or cavalry from the LCU’s
Nationality.
23.0
REBELLION AND REVOLUTION
23.1
Mechanics of Rebellion
Casualties, loss of home VP Spaces, and Events may cause
Rebellion to break out in Russia, Germany, or Austria-Hungary.
These are represented by the movement of RU, GE, and AH
National Will Markers on the General Records Track. Each
marker starts the game at “16” on the General Records Track.
23.2
How to Assemble LCUs
Page 7 of 27
Tracking National Will
a.
RU, GE, and AH National Will Markers move +1 on
the General Records Track for each enemy or neutral
VP Space that the marker’s Nation captures, and -1 for
each home VP Space that it loses.
b.
RU, GE, and AH National Will Markers move +1 on
the General Records Track for each home VP Space
that is recaptured from enemy control.
c.
RU, GE, and AH National Will Markers move -1 for
each LCU of that Nation that is permanently
eliminated.
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
d.
Movement of National Will Markers for each of those
Nations may also be affected by Events.
e.
If downward movement of the RU, GE, or AH
National Will Markers causes any of them to reach the
National Demoralization Level (6 or less on the
General Records Track), then Rebellion may break out
in the that Nation. Rebellion is represented by placing
an Uprising Unit in that Nation during the
Rebellion/Revolution Phase.
f.
23.3
h.
23.4
Russian Revolution
23.4.1
Timing of the Russian Revolution
There is no additional effect if downward movement
of the RU, GE, or AH National Will Markers reaches
zero. It does not cause a Nation to collapse and does
not give Automatic Victory to the enemy. National
Will cannot fall below zero, and any further downward
movement of National Will is ignored.
a.
The Russian Revolution may occur at any time after
the “Russian Food Riots” Event has been played.
b.
“Russian Food Riots” cannot be played until the
“Russian Railroad Collapse” Event has been played.
When “Russian Railroad Collapse” is played, place its
marker on that Turn Space as a reminder.
c.
When “Russian Food Riots” is played, place its marker
in its space on the Russian Revolution Track as a
reminder.
d.
If there is an RU Uprising Unit in Russia after
“Russian Food Riots” is played, place the Revolution
Marker on next Turn Space.
e.
When the Turn Marker enters the same Turn Space as
the Revolution Marker, move the Revolution Marker
to the red space on the Russian Revolution Track. This
begins the Russian Revolution.
Uprising Units
a.
b.
If Austria-Hungary falls to the National
Demoralization Level by the Rebellion/Revolution
Phase of a Turn, the AP Player can place one AH
Uprising Unit on any unoccupied Space in AustriaHungary or in either of its Regions.
If Germany falls to the National Demoralization Level
by the Rebellion/Revolution Phase of a Turn, the AP
Player can place one GE Uprising Unit on any
unoccupied Space in Germany or in the Brandenburg
Region.
c.
If Russia falls to the National Demoralization Level by
the Rebellion/Revolution Phase of a Turn, the CP
Player can place one RU Uprising Unit on any
unoccupied Space in Russia, or in any of its Regions.
d.
An Uprising Unit can be placed in a Nation during
the Rebellion/Revolution Phase of each Turn that the
Nation sits at the National Demoralization Level.
e.
f.
An Uprising Unit remains on the map until it is
destroyed by Combat. When an Uprising Unit is
destroyed, it is removed from the map but can be used
again.
23.4.2
In the first Action Round of each Turn that a Nation
sits at the National Demoralization Level, the
opposing player may make a Free Play of 1 OPS
Point to place another Uprising Unit in that Nation.
Uprising Units of a Demoralized Nation cannot be
placed in Spaces or Regions that are located within
another Nation.
Stages of the Russian Revolution
a.
In each following Rebellion/Revolution Phase, move
the Revolution Marker ahead one Stage on the Russian
Revolution Track.
b.
The Russian Revolution cannot advance Stages if
there are no Uprising Units in Russia.
c.
As the Russian Revolution enters each Stage, the
following rules apply:
Revolution Stage 1:

Revolution Stage 2:

g.
If RU, GE, or AH National Will later rises above the
National Demoralization Level, no more Uprising
Units can be placed in that Nation until its National
Will falls to the National Demoralization Level
again.
Page 8 of 27
Cards can no longer be played to obtain RU
reinforcements.
RPs can no longer be spent to repair or rebuild RU
units.
Revolution Stage 3:

Reduce all full-strength RU units on the map by
one step.
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
Revolution Stage 4:


23.4.3
a.
b.
c.
d.
23.5
4.
Replace each RU LCU with a full-strength RU
SCU of any type (except RU Uprising Units),
taken from the Reserve Box, and put the RU LCU
into the Replaceable Units Box. If no RU SCU is
available, put the RU LCU into the Replaceable
Units Box without a replacement.
23.6
All other CP units can Move into GE Spaces or
Attack AP units in GE Spaces.
Collapse of Austria-Hungary
a.
In Step 5 of any War Status Phase, if all VP Spaces in
Austria-Hungary are controlled by AP units and/or AH
Uprising Units, the Austro-Hungarian government
collapses and Austria-Hungary is out of the war.
b.
If Austria-Hungary collapses:
RU LCUs cannot be assembled.
Suppressing the Russian Revolution
The “Long Live the Tsar!” Event may be played to
suppress the Russian Revolution after all Uprising
Units in Russia are destroyed and removed from the
map.
When playing “Long Live the Tsar!” to suppress the
Russian Revolution: (1) place the “Long Live the
Tsar!” Marker in its space on the Russian Revolution
Track and (2) move the Revolution Marker back to the
red space on the Russian Revolution Track.
After “Long Live the Tsar!” is played: (1) RU
Reinforcement Cards can be played, (2) cards can be
played to get RU RPs, (3) RPs can be used to repair or
rebuild RU units, (4) AP-A RPs can be converted to
RU RPs, and (5) RU LCUs can be assembled.
The Russian Revolution remains suppressed until the
CP player plays the “Fall of the Tsar” card. When this
card is played, place the “Fall of the Tsar” Marker in
its space on the Russian Revolution Track. The
Russian Revolution then proceeds in accordance with
these rules (see Rule 23.4.2).
24.0
1.
Remove all AH Combat Units and all AH
Uprising Units from the map.
2.
Keep all AP Control Markers in their AH Spaces
until other CP units enter those Spaces by
Movement or end of a Retreat.
3.
AP units can still Move into GE Spaces or Attack
other CP units in GE Spaces.
4.
All other CP units can Move into GE Spaces or
Attack AP units in GE Spaces.
TROOP QUALITY
As RU, IT, GE, and AH casualties mount, the drain on their
national manpower reserves and officer corps is reflected in the
reduction of their Troop Quality.
24.1
Tracking Troop Quality
a.
Each of these Nations has a Troop Quality Marker that
moves downward on the General Records Track to
represent this. Troop Quality Markers all start at “19”
on the General Records Track.
b.
The RU, IT, GE, or AH Troop Quality Marker moves
-1 on the General Records Track each time a Strategy
Card is played to bring reinforcements for that Nation
onto the map, or each time RPs are spent to repair or
rebuild Combat Units of that Nation, or each time that
an LCU of that Nation is permanently eliminated.
c.
The only exception to this rule is that GE Troop
Quality does not change when “Tsar’s Armories” is
played for RPs to immediately repair GE units on the
map.
Collapse of Germany
a.
In Step 5 of any War Status Phase, if all VP Spaces in
Germany are controlled by AP units and/or GE
Uprising Units, the German government collapses and
Germany is out of the war.
b.
If Germany collapses:
1.
Remove all GE Combat Units and all GE Uprising
Units from the map.
2.
Keep all AP Control Markers in their GE Spaces
until other CP units enter those Spaces by
Movement or end of a Retreat.
3.
AP units can still Move into GE Spaces or Attack
other CP units in GE Spaces.
24.2
Effects on Reinforcements and Rebuilt Units
If downward movement of the RU, IT, GE, or AH Troop
Quality Marker reaches “9” or less on the General Records
Track:
Page 9 of 27
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a.
Regular or Reserve Infantry reinforcements of that
Nation are placed on the map with a step reduction.
b.
Rebuilt Regular or Reserve Infantry LCUs of that
Nation (from the Replaceable Units Box) are placed
on the map with a step reduction. This means only one
step of an LCU in the Replaceable Units Box can be
rebuilt before it enters the map; the LCU can receive
additional RPs after entering the map.
25.0
INVASIONS BY SEA
25.1
General Rules
Sea Invasions are conducted only by AP LCUs and
SCUs.
b.
Only AP LCUs and SCUs on Lemnos can be used for
Sea Invasions.
c.
Three strategy cards are used for Sea Invasions:
“Salonika Invasion”, “Albanian Gambit”, and
“Noemvriana”.
d.
Sea Invasions cannot be conducted in a Winter Turn.
e.
The AP Player can play no more than one Sea Invasion
card per non-Winter Turn.
f.
Playing the “Rule Britannia” Event is a prerequisite
for playing any Sea Invasion card.
g.
Landing Markers are placed on the map as indicated
on the Sea Invasion card.
Executing Sea Invasions
25.2.1
Using the Landing Marker
a.
b.
25.2.2
Arrange AP Combat Units on Lemnos into Stacks of
no more than 3 (at no OPS cost).
b.
Activate a Stack of AP Combat Units on Lemnos for
Movement by placing a Move Marker on the Stack.
c.
The OPS cost to Activate a stack for Movement equals
the number of number of friendly nationalities having
units in the stack (see Rule 9.4.2).
d.
Move the Stack to a Sea Invasion Space that has a
Landing Marker.
25.2.3
a.
25.2
a.
The AP Player executes a Sea Invasion in the same
Action Round that he plays a Sea Invasion card as
follows:
1.
Place the Landing Marker on a Sea Invasion
Space (at no OPS cost).
2.
Activate a Stack of AP units on Lemnos for
Movement, move them to the Landing Marker at
a cost of 1 MP, and then stop.
a.
If a Sea Invasion Space contains a Landing Marker
from a prior Action Round, up to three AP units can
Move from Lemnos to the Sea Invasion Space at a cost
of 1 MP and then stop.
b.
In any later Action Round, the Sea Invasion Space can
be Activated for Movement and AP units in that Space
can Move to the connected Port Space and inland at
the usual cost of 1 MP per Space.
c.
In any later Action Round, the Sea Invasion Space can
also be Activated for Attack and AP units in that Space
can Attack the connected Port Space if it contains CP
units.
d.
If a Sea Invasion Space contains a Landing Marker,
AP units can Move to it from a connected Port Space
at a cost of 1 MP and then stop. In any later Action
Round, the Sea Invasion Space can be Activated for
Movement and AP units in that Space can Move to
Lemnos at a cost of 1 MP.
e.
AP units moving from a Sea Invasion Space to
Lemnos must stop on Lemnos. They cannot continue
movement through Lemnos to another Sea Invasion
Space in the same Action Round.
f.
If a Sea Invasion Space does not contain a Landing
Marker, AP units cannot Move to that space until the
AP Player conducts a Sea Invasion and places a
Landing Marker in that Space.
25.2.4
More than one invasion can occur in the game as long
as there are unused Landing Markers.
Activating Units on Lemnos for Movement
Page 10 of 27
Using Sea Invasion Spaces
Landing Space Limitations
a.
The same stacking limits that apply to Spaces on land
also apply to Sea Invasion Spaces.
b.
Only three Landing Markers can be used in the game.
Once they are used, they cannot be re-used if removed
from the map. Once removed from the map, a Landing
Marker is permanently removed from the game.
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
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c.
25.2.5
Winter Restrictions
a.
No Sea Invasion card may be played as an Event
during a Winter Turn.
b.
No Landing Marker may be placed on a Sea Invasion
Space during a Winter Turn.
c.
Units on Lemnos may not be Activated for Movement
during a Winter Turn.
d.
Sea Invasion Spaces that contain Landing Markers
may be activated for Movement or Attack during a
Winter Turn.
25.3
25.4
Moving AP LCUs by Sea
Enemy Capture of Sea Invasion Spaces
a.
A CP unit can only move onto a Sea Invasion Space
when it contains a Landing Marker.
b.
When a CP unit moves into an unoccupied Sea
Invasion space as a result of Movement, the Landing
Marker is destroyed and is permanently removed from
the game. The CP unit immediately returns to the Port
Space connected to the Sea Invasion Space. The CP
Player adds 1 GE, AH, or CP-A RP to the General
Records Track representing captured supplies.
c.
If a CP unit moves into a Sea Invasion space as a result
of Advance After Combat, the Landing Marker is
destroyed and is removed from the game. The CP unit
immediately returns to the Port Space connected to the
Sea Invasion Space. The VP Marker is moved +1 VP
on the General Records Track.
AP LCUs in a Sea Invasion Space may Move to Lemnos by a
Withdrawal Under Fire or by a Safe Withdrawal.
25.3.1
a.
b.
c.
d.
25.3.2
a.
b.
Withdrawals Under Fire
The AP Player may Activate all LCUs in a Sea
Invasion Space that is connected to a Port Space
occupied by enemy units. The AP Player then moves
his LCUs to Lemnos and removes the Landing
Marker. The Landing Marker is permanently removed
from the game.
25.5
When the withdrawn LCUs land on Lemnos, they
must stop. In any later Action Round, those units may
move to a new Landing Marker as part of another Sea
Invasion, or move through an existing Landing Marker
to a space on land.
All full-strength LCUs withdrawn under fire are
reduced by one step.
Russian Amphibious Assault
a.
Once per game, the RU Black Sea SCU may make an
amphibious assault. This is done by activating the unit
for Movement and moving it from Odessa to any
unoccupied Port Space on the Black Sea. This may
not occur during a Winter Turn.
b.
The RU Black Sea SCU may not make an
amphibious assault on Constanta until Romania
enters the war, and may not make an amphibious
assault on Varna or Burgas until Bulgaria enters the
war.
c.
Once the RU Black Sea SCU conducts its amphibious
assault, that special ability may not be used again.
Place the “No RU Amphib Assaults” Marker on its
map space to show this.
d.
The RU Black Sea SCU can besiege any enemy Fort
by itself. Other AP units may therefore move through
a Space containing an undestroyed enemy Fort without
stopping when the Space is occupied by the RU Black
Sea SCU.
The VP Marker is moved +1 on the General Records
Track.
Safe Withdrawal
The AP Player can Activate a Sea Invasion Space that
is connected to a Port Space unoccupied by enemy
units. The AP Player then moves his LCUs back to
Lemnos, but does not have to remove the Landing
Marker.
When the withdrawn LCUs land on Lemnos, they
must stop. In any later Action Round, those units may
move to a new Landing Marker as part of another Sea
Invasion, or move through an existing Landing Marker
to a space on land.
AP units making a Safe Withdrawal do not suffer a
step reduction.
26.0
Neutral and Minor Countries
26.1
Albania
26.1.1
General Rules
Page 11 of 27
a.
AP and CP units can Move into any vacant Space in
Albania.
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
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b.
AP and CP units can use any Port in Albania that is not
occupied by enemy units.
c.
AP and CP units can trace supply lines through any
space in Albania that is not under enemy control.
26.2
Bulgaria
26.2.1
General Rules
a.
Neither player may move into Bulgaria until it enters
the war.
b.
BU units are placed on the map when Bulgaria enters
the war.
c.
When Bulgaria enters the war, BU units that can trace
a supply line to friendly-controlled Sofia can Activate
for Movement or Attack, use SR, and get RPs. BU
units that are only able trace a supply line to friendlycontrolled Supply Sources for other CP Nations can
Activate for Movement, but cannot Activate for
Attack, cannot SR, and cannot use RPs to repair or
rebuild.
a.
GR units are placed on the map to start the game (see
the Unit Set-Up Chart). Neither player can move
them unless allied with Greece, except that playing
the “Surrender of Ft. Rupel” Event allows the CP
Player to reposition GR units as indicated on the
card.
b.
When Greece is neutral, GR units are in supply
anywhere in Greece.
c.
Players may Attack each other in Greece, but an
Attack on any neutral GR unit will cause Greece to
enter the war as an ally of the opposing player.
d.
While Greece is neutral, Salonika can become an APcontrolled Port when either: (1) the BR/GR Nat’l.
Defense Corps is placed in Salonika or (2) AP LCUs
move into Salonika from a Sea Invasion Space.
Neither violates Greek neutrality.
e.
AP and CP units can move into, and trace supply
lines through, any vacant Space in neutral Greece—
except for Athens. If an AP or CP unit moves into
neutral Athens, the moving player rolls a six-sided
die. Greece enters the war as an ally of the opposing
player on a die roll of 6.
f.
When Greece enters the war, GR units that can trace a
supply line to friendly-controlled Athens can Activate
for Movement or Attack, use SR, and get RPs.
g.
GR units that are only able trace a supply line to
friendly-controlled Supply Sources for other friendly
Nations can Activate for Movement, but cannot
Activate for Attack, cannot SR, and cannot get RPs.
h.
GR units are repaired or rebuilt by using AP-Allied
RPs if Greece becomes an AP ally or by using CPAllied RPs if Greece becomes a CP ally. GR may be
repaired in any GR Space, or can be rebuilt in the
Replaceable Units Box.
26.2.2 Bulgarian Entry into the War
a.
b.
26.2.3
When the “Bulgaria” Neutral Entry Event is played,
all the BU, GE, AH, BR, and FR units listed under
“Bulgarian Entry” on the Unit Set-Up Chart are placed
on the map. Bulgaria then enters the game as a CP
ally.
The CP Player does not get Victory Points for VP
Spaces in Bulgaria by its entering the war as a CP ally.
Bulgarian Collapse
a.
Bulgaria collapses if the AP Player controls both VP
Spaces in Bulgaria during Step 5 of the War Status
Phase.
b.
When Bulgaria collapses, permanently remove all BU
units from the game. Replace the LXI and LXII Gen.
Kdo. LCUs with one full-strength GE Regular or
Reserve Infantry SCU each. (If these are not available,
there is no replacement.)
c.
26.3.2
After Bulgaria collapses, AP and CP units can still
Move into BU Spaces or Attack enemy units in BU
Spaces.
26.3
Greece
26.3.1
General Rules
Page 12 of 27
Greek Entry into the War
a.
Greece becomes an AP ally when the “Greece”
Neutral Entry Event is played—unless the CP Player
counters in his immediately following Action Round
by playing the “King Constantine” Event.
b.
Greece becomes a CP ally if the “King Constantine”
Event is played when all VP spaces in the Balkans are
CP-controlled.
c.
If Greece becomes a CP ally, the “Greece” card may
never be played as an Event.
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
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b.
d.
e.
f.
g.
26.3.3
When Greece allies with a player, all unoccupied
spaces in Greece immediately convert to that player’s
control. He also gains control of all GR units.
However, the BR/GR Nat’l. Defense Corps SCU
always belongs to the AP Player.
If Greece becomes an AP ally, CP units can no longer
trace supply lines through vacant spaces in Greece or
through spaces occupied by GR units. If Greece
becomes a CP ally, AP units can no longer trace supply
lines through vacant spaces in Greece or through
spaces occupied by GR units.
26.4.3
26.5
Romania
26.5.1
General Rules
When Greece enters the war, GR units that can trace a
supply line to friendly-controlled Athens can Activate
for Movement or Attack, use SR, and get RPs. GR
units that are only able trace a supply line to friendlycontrolled Supply Sources for other allied Nations can
Activate for Movement, but cannot Activate for
Attack, cannot SR, and cannot get RPs.
The AP Player does not get Victory Points for VP
Spaces in Greece by its entering the war as an AP ally.
The CP Player does not get Victory Points for VP
Spaces in Greece by its entering the war as a CP ally.
a.
Neither player may move into Romania until it enters
the war.
b.
When Romania enters the war, RO units that can trace
a supply line to friendly-controlled Bucharest or
Odessa can Activate for Movement or Attack, use SR,
and get RPs.
c.
RO units that are only able trace a supply line to other
friendly-controlled AP Supply Sources can Activate
for Movement, but cannot Activate for Attack, cannot
SR, and cannot get RPs.
d.
RO units can be repaired in any RO Space or in Odessa
prior to the Romanian Collapse.
e.
If Romania is neutral when the Russian Revolution
begins, the “Romania” Event cannot be played.
Greek Collapse
26.5.2
26.4
Italy
26.4.1
General Rules
a.
Neither player may move units into IT spaces on the
Italian Front Inset Map before Italy enters the war.
b.
When Italy enters the war, IT units that can trace a
supply line to friendly-controlled Venice, Southern
Italy, or Vlore can Activate for Movement or Attack,
use SR, and get RPs.
26.4.2
a.
Italian Collapse
Italy never collapses, even if both Italian VP Spaces are CPcontrolled.
Greece never collapses, even if both Greek VP Spaces are
enemy-controlled.
c.
The AP Player does not get Victory Points for VP
Spaces in Italy by its entering the war as an AP ally.
a.
When the “Romania” Event is played, the RO, GE,
AH, RU, and RU/SB units listed under “Romanian
Entry” on the Set-Up Chart are placed on the map.
Romania then enters the war as an AP ally.
b.
The AP Player does not get Victory Points for VP
Spaces in Romania by its entering the war as an AP
ally.
26.5.3
IT units that are only able trace a supply line to
friendly-controlled Supply Sources for other AP
Nations can Activate for Movement, but cannot
Activate for Attack, cannot SR, and cannot get RPs,
Page 13 of 27
Romanian Collapse
a.
Romania collapses if the CP Player controls both VP
Spaces in Romania during Step 5 of the War Status
Phase.
b.
If Romania collapses, RO units remain on the map but
are still subject to supply and attrition rules but are still
subject to supply and attrition rules (see Rules 14.0
and 26.5.1).
c.
After Romania collapses, RO units that can trace a
supply line to Odessa can still Activate for Movement
or Attack, but cannot SR and cannot get RPs.
Italian Entry into the War
When the “Italy” Neutral Entry Event is played, the IT
and AH units listed under “Italian Entry” on the Unit
Set-Up Chart are placed on the Italian Front Inset Map.
Italy then enters the war as an AP ally.
Romanian Entry into the War
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d.
After Romania collapses, the CP Player can
immediately SR one or two CP units in the Balkans to
any other CP-controlled Spaces at no OPS cost.
e.
After Serbia collapses, AP and CP units can still Move
into SB and MN Spaces or Attack enemy units in SB
and MN Spaces.
e.
AP and CP units can still Move into RO Spaces or
Attack enemy units in RO Spaces after Romania
collapses.
f.
When “The Serbs Return” Event is played, SB units
on the map can be repaired in any Spaces that they
occupy, and any SB units in the Replaceable Units
Box can be rebuilt there.
26.6
Serbia and Montenegro
26.6.1
General Rules
26.6.3
a.
SB and MN units are placed on the map to start the
game (see the Unit Set-Up Chart), but they cannot
move until CP units attack an SB or MN Space.
b.
AP units cannot move into Serbia or Montenegro until
CP units attack or control an SB or MN space. Both
players may then enter Serbia and Montenegro for the
remainder of the game.
c.
d.
e.
26.6.2
a.
b.
SB units that can trace a supply line to friendlycontrolled Belgrade or Cetinje, or can trace a supply
line to Lemnos, can Activate for Movement or Attack,
use SR, and get RPs.
If the MN can trace a supply line to friendly-controlled
Belgrade or Cetinje, it can Activate for Movement or
Attack and use SR. Since the MN SCU is a Special
Unit, it cannot get RPs.
a.
SB SCUs can Move to Lemnos through Port Spaces in
Albania or Greece. The SB SCUs first move to the
Port Space and stop. On any following Action Round,
SB SCUs in the Port Space can Move to Lemnos at a
cost of 1 MP.
b.
SB LCUs can Move to Lemnos through a Sea Invasion
Space that has a Landing Marker. The SB LCUs first
move to the Sea Invasion Space and stop. On any
following Action Round, SB LCUs in the Sea Invasion
Space can Move to Lemnos at a cost of 1 MP.
c.
The MN unit cannot Move to Lemnos.
26.7.1
Turkey
26.7.1
General Rules
SB and MN units that are only able trace a supply line
to friendly-controlled Supply Sources for other AP
Nations can Activate for Movement, but cannot
Activate for Attack and cannot SR. SB units cannot
get RPs.
a.
TU units that can trace a supply line to friendlycontrolled Constantinople, Rodosto, or Anatolia can
Activate for Movement or Attack, use SR, and get
RPs.
b.
TU units that are only able trace a supply line to
friendly-controlled Supply Sources for other AP
Nations can Activate for Movement, but cannot
Activate for Attack, cannot SR, and cannot get RPs.
Serbian Collapse
Serbia collapses if the CP Player controls both VP
Spaces in Serbia during Step 5 of the War Status
Phase.
If Serbia collapses, MN and SB units remain on the
map but are still subject to supply and attrition rules
(see Rules 14.0 and 26.6.1).
c.
After Serbia collapses, SB units that can trace a
supply line to Lemnos can still Activate for
Movement or Attack, but cannot SR and cannot get
RPs.
d.
When Serbia collapses, up to two CP units in the
Balkans can immediately SR to any other CPcontrolled spaces at no OPS cost.
Serbian Withdrawal
26.7.2
Turkish Collapse
Turkey never collapses, even if both Turkish VP Spaces are APcontrolled.
27.0
28.0
Page 14 of 27
Out-Of-Theater Campaigns
a.
Events that do not occur on the map, such as “Verdun”,
“The Somme”, “Kaiserschlacht”, and “The Arab
Revolt”, are Out-Of-Theater Campaigns that may
require players to remove Combat Units from the
game. (These are not unit eliminations.)
b.
Removed units are taken only from the map.
Headquarters and Heavy Artillery
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
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a.
HQs and GE Heavy Artillery do not count toward
stacking limits, and do not count toward besieging
requirements.
b.
HQs and GE Heavy Artillery must end their
movement stacked with a friendly Combat Unit.
c.
If all Combat Units stacked with an HQ or GE Heavy
Artillery are destroyed, the HQ or GE Heavy Artillery
is permanently eliminated.
d.
e.
When “Treaty of Brest-Litovsk” is played, place its
marker two Turn Spaces ahead.
c.
When the Turn Marker enters the same Turn Space as
the “Treaty of Brest-Litovsk” Marker, Russia is no
longer at war with the Central Powers. This means:
Only one friendly HQ or one GE Heavy Artillery can
occupy a space with other Combat Units, but GE
Heavy Artillery can occupy the same space as a
friendly HQ.
An HQ may participate in only one Attack per Action
Round, but can be withheld from an Attack in which
it could participate. An HQ must participate in the
defense of a space that it occupies. HQs never absorb
combat losses.
f.
An HQ that loses a Combat is reduced by one step. If
it was already reduced, it is permanently eliminated
and goes into the Eliminated Units Box.
g.
Any HQ that wins a Combat is increased by one step
if it was already reduced. A full strength HQ receives
no bonus for winning a Combat.
h.
An HQ that participates in a Combat is unaffected if
the Combat results in a tie.
i.
Heavy Artillery may participate in an attack. It does
not participate in the defense of a space.
28.1
b.
Special Effects of HQs and Heavy Artillery
a.
An HQ that is stacked with friendly Combat Units
during Combat adds a DRM equal to the number in
brackets on the HQ counter. The DRM applies
whether the units are attacking or defending.
b.
Heavy Artillery adds a DRM equal to the number in
brackets on that counter. The counter flips over after
its first use, and is permanently removed after its
second use.
29.0
TREATY OF BREST-LITOVSK
a.
After the CP Player has played “November Coup”, the
AP Player can play the “Treaty of Brest-Litovsk”
Event.
30.0
1.
RU units cannot Move into any CP-controlled
Spaces or Regions inside Russia.
2.
RU units cannot Move into any Spaces or Regions
outside of Russia.
3.
All supplied RU units outside of Russia must
immediately SR, at no OPS cost, to RU-controlled
Spaces inside Russia (subject to stacking limits),
or to any RU Regions that are not CP-controlled.
4.
RU units cannot attack CP units, but can still
attack Uprising Units inside Russia.
5.
Non-Russian AP units can Attack any CP units
inside Russia, can enter any CP-controlled Spaces
or Regions inside Russia, and can Attack any RU
Uprising Units.
6.
Non-Russian AP units cannot Attack any RU
Combat Units, and cannot enter any RUcontrolled Spaces or Regions.
7.
CP units cannot attack any RU units, but can
Attack any Non-Russian AP units inside Russia.
8.
CP units can only Move into Spaces or Regions
inside Russia that are CP-controlled or are
controlled by Non-Russian AP Nations.
9.
All supplied GE LCUs must immediately SR, at
no OPS cost, to Brandenburg. After that, only one
GE LCU can Move out of Brandenburg per Turn
until AP units Attack or Move into a Space in
Germany or in Austria-Hungary (after which, the
number of GE LCUs that can Move out of
Brandenburg per Turn is unlimited).
MORE THAN TWO PLAYERS
This game can be played with two AP Players opposing one CP
Player, two CP Players opposing one AP Player, or two AP
Players opposing two CP Players.
30.1
Page 15 of 27
Two AP Players
a.
If there are two AP Players:
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
1.
One AP Player controls RU units and also RO
units when Romania enters the war. The other AP
Player controls SB, MN, IT, BR, and FR units—
also GR units if Greece becomes an AP ally.
11. Each AP Player controls Movement, Combat,
Advance or Retreat After Combat, and SR for his
units.
2.
The AP Player controlling RU units also controls
the placement of GE Uprising Units, and the other
AP Player controls the placement of AH Uprising
Units.
12. The AP Player controlling RU units also controls
the accumulation and use of RU RPs. The other
AP Player controls the accumulation and use of IT
and CP-A RPs.
3.
To start the game, the AP Player controlling RU
units takes Command Card #1 from the AP
Strategy Card Deck, and the other AP Player takes
Command Card #2.
13. After the “Treaty of Brest-Litovsk” is played, the
AP Player controlling RU units may continue
playing his cards or allow his cards to be played
by the other AP Player in any AP Action Round.
4.
After that, the AP Player controlling RU units
may take the “Drive on East Prussia” card from
the Mobilization Deck if he chooses.
5.
6.
7.
30.2
Two CP Players
a.
If there are two CP Players:
The AP Player controlling RU units then shuffles
the remaining AP Mobilization cards and deals 2
more cards to himself if he took the “Drive on
East Prussia” card, or deals 3 more cards to
himself if he did not. He deals 3 more cards to the
other AP Player.
1.
One CP Player controls AH units, and the other
CP Player controls GE, TU, and BU units—also
GR units if Greece becomes a CP ally.
2.
The CP Player controlling AH units also controls
the placement of RU Uprising Units.
In each AP Action Phase, the AP Player
controlling RU units plays a card (or chooses to
make a 1 OPS Point “Free Play”) in AP Action
Rounds 1, 3, and 5. The other AP Player plays a
card (or chooses to make a 1 OPS Point “free
Play”) in AP Action Rounds 2, 4, and 6.
3.
To start the game, the CP Player controlling AH
units takes Command Card #1 from the CP
Strategy Card Deck, and the other CP Player takes
Command Card #2.
4.
After that, the CP Player controlling AH units
may take a 4 OPS card from the Mobilization
Deck if he chooses.
5.
The CP Player controlling AH units then shuffles
the remaining CP Mobilization cards and deals 2
more cards to himself if he took a 4 OPS card, or
deals 3 more cards to himself if he did not. He
deals 3 more cards to the other CP Player.
6.
In each CP Action Phase, the CP Player
controlling GE units plays a card (or chooses to
make a 1 OPS Point “Free Play”) in CP Action
Rounds 1, 3, and 5. The other CP Player plays a
card (or chooses to make a 1 OPS Point “Free
Play”) in CP Action Rounds 2, 4, and 6.
7.
In each CP Action Round, a CP Player may
choose to play a card from his or the other CP
Player’s hand (simulating the friction in CP
decision-making). However, he may not choose
the other player’s Command Card.
8.
If a player uses a Command Card during a Turn,
the card goes into the Discard Pile.
In each AP Action Round, an AP Player may
choose to play a card from his own or the other
AP Player’s hand (simulating the friction of
allied decision-making). However, he may not
choose the other player’s Command Card.
8.
If a player uses a Command Card during a Turn,
the card goes into the Discard Pile.
9.
At each Strategy Card Draw Phase, the AP Player
controlling RU units takes Command Card #1
from the AP Draw Pile if he used that card during
the Turn, and the other AP Player takes Command
Card #2 from the AP Draw Pile if he used that
card during the Turn.
10. The AP Player controlling RU units then shuffles
the AP Draw Pile and deals himself cards from it
until he holds 4 cards, including cards remaining
from his previous hand. He deals cards to the
other AP Player from the AP Draw Pile until that
player holds 4 cards, including cards remaining
from his previous hand.
Page 16 of 27
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
9.
At each Strategy Card Draw Phase, the CP Player
controlling AH units draws Command Card #1
from the CP Draw Pile if he used that card during
the Turn, and the other CP Player draws
Command Card #2 from the CP Draw Pile if he
used that card during the Turn.
d.
No units may enter Bulgaria or Italy. Any that do are
permanently eliminated and removed from the map.
e.
At the end of the game, the Victory Point score
determines the winner (see Rule 5.2).
31.1.1
10. The CP Player controlling GE units then shuffles
the CP Draw Pile and deals himself cards from it
until he holds 4 cards, including cards remaining
from his previous hand. He deals cards to the
other CP Player from the CP Draw Pile until that
player holds 4 cards, including cards remaining
from his previous hand.
11. Each CP Player controls Movement, Combat,
Advance or Retreat After Combat, and SR for his
units.
12. The CP Player controlling GE units also controls
any AH units stacked with his units during his
Action Rounds (simulating GE dominance in CP
decision-making). This includes Movement,
Combat, Advance or Retreat After Combat,
choosing the units that absorb damage, and SR.
13. The CP Player controlling AH units also controls
the accumulation and use of AH RPs. The other
AP Player controls the accumulation and use of
GE and CP-A RPs.
31.0
a.
Use the following AP Strategy Cards: AP #1 to 14.
Only AP #7, 8, and 9 can be played for their Events.
AP #11 and 14 can be played for their VPs.
b.
Use only the following CP Strategy Cards: CP #1 to
14. None of these cards cannot be played for their
Events, but CP #4 and 8 can be played for their VPs.
c.
Place the Turn Marker in the Summer 1914 Turn (Turn
1) space on the Turn Track.
d.
Place the VP Marker in the “15” space on the General
Records Track.
e.
Place the AP War Status and CP War Status markers
in the “0” space on the General Records Track.
f.
Place the Replacement Points (RP) Markers for each
Nation next to the General Records Track.
g.
Combined War Status, Troop Quality, and National
Will are not tracked in this game.
h.
The AP and CP Mandatory Offensive Tracks are not
used in this game.
14. If Austria-Hungary collapses, then the CP Player
controlling GE units plays the other CP Player’s
cards and units in addition to his own.
31.1.2
15. If Germany collapses, then the CP Player
controlling AH units plays the other CP Player’s
cards and units in addition to his own.
The component corps of the Austro-Hungarian 2nd Army were
transferred to the Eastern Front in late August 1914 to fight the
Imperial Russian Army. This is represented as follows:
Introductory Game
Remove the AH IV Inf. Corps from the map at the end
of CP Action Phase 2 in the Summer 1914 Turn (Turn
1).
b.
Remove the AH VII Inf. Corps from the map at the
end of CP Action Phase 4 in the Summer 1914 Turn
(Turn 1).
c.
Remove the AH IX Inf. Corps from the map at the end
of CP Action Phase 6 in the Summer 1914 Turn (Turn
1).
1914: The Invasion of Serbia
a.
Follow the Invasion of Serbia Set-Up Rules (see Rule
31.1.1).
b.
Use the 1914 Invasion of Serbia Unit Set-Up Chart.
c.
Play the game from the Summer 1914 Turn (Turn 1)
to the end of the Fall 1914 Turn (Turn 2), following
the Sequence of Play (see Rule 6.0).
2.0
Page 17 of 27
Transfer of Austro-Hungarian 2nd Army
a.
To learn the basic mechanics of this game, try this introductory
scenario.
31.1
Invasion of Serbia Set-Up Rules
Shorter Game Scenarios
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
When there isn’t time to play the entire game, try these shorter
game scenarios.
32.1
GE National Will Marker in the “24” space on the
General Records Track.
From Mobilization to Limited War
a.
Follow the Basic Game Set-Up Rules (see Rule 4.0).
b.
Use the 1914 Unit Set-Up Chart.
c.
Play the game from the Summer 1914 Turn (Turn 1)
to the end of the Summer 1915 Turn (Turn 4),
following the Sequence of Play (see Rule 6.0).
d.
32.2
i.
Place the RU Troop Quality Marker on the “9” space,
the AH Troop Quality Marker in the “8” space, GE
Troop Quality in the “14” space, and IT Troop Quality
in the “12” space on the General Records Track.
j.
Place the Replacement Points (RP) Markers for each
Nation next to the General Records Track.
k.
Place the AP and CP Mandatory Offensive (MO)
Markers in the “None or Made” space on each player’s
MO Track. Place the AP and CP MO Modifier
Markers on the “2” space of each player’s Mandatory
Offensive Modifier Track.
l.
Place the “1 GE RP can convert TU RP” Marker on its
space in the CP Reserve Box.
At the end of the game, the Victory Point score
determines the winner (see Rule 5.2).
The Brusilov Offensive and Beyond
a.
Follow the Brusilov Offensive Set-Up Rules (see Rule
32.2.1).
b.
Start the game in the Spring 1916 Turn (Turn 8)
following the Brusilov Game Start Rules (see Rule
32.2.2).
c.
Play the game until there is an Automatic Victory or
Armistice, following the Sequence of Play (see Rule
6.0).
d.
At the end of the game, the Victory Point score
determines the winner (see Rule 5.2).
32.2.1
m. Place the “1 AP-A RP can convert RU RP” Marker on
its space in the AP Reserve Box.
n.
Place the “Royal Navy Blockade”, “Sea Invasions
Allowed”, “U-Boats in the Med.”, and “Convoys”
markers in their spaces on the map. The “RU Amphib
Assaults Allowed” space is unchanged.
o.
Place a Destroyed Fort Marker on each of the
following Fort Spaces: Lotzen, Kovno, Olita, Grodno,
Lomza, Warsaw, Ivangorod, Brest-Litovsk, Przemsyl,
and Lutsk.
p.
Place GE Control Markers on Kovno, Olita, Grodno,
Lomza, Warsaw, Ivangorod, Brest-Litovsk, and Lutsk.
q.
Place the AP Action Markers next to the AP Action
Round Chart, and place the CP Action Markers next to
the CP Action Round Chart.
Brusilov Offensive Set-Up
a.
Use only the following AP Strategy Cards: AP #3, 5,
9, 16, 19, 26, 35-55.
b.
Use only the following CP Strategy Cards: CP #6, 11,
17, 26, 32, 34-55.
c.
Use the Brusilov Offensive Unit Set-Up Chart.
r.
Place the Move/Attack Activation Markers where both
players can reach them.
d.
Place the Turn Marker in the Spring 1916 (Turn 8)
space on the Turn Track.
s.
Place all other markers within reach.
e.
Place the VP Marker in the “23” space on the General
Records Track.
f.
Place the AP War Status and CP War Status markers
in the “14” space on the General Records Track.
1.
The AP Player makes a deck from his cards
(see Rule 23.2.1a).
Place the Combined War Status markers in the “28”
space on the General Records Track.
2.
If the AP player chooses, he may take “The
Brusilov Offensive” card from the deck.
32.2.2
a.
g.
h.
Place the RU National Will Marker in the “8” space,
the AH National Will Marker in the “9” space, and the
Page 18 of 27
Brusilov Game Start
Starting the game for the AP Player:
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
b.
3.
The AP Player then shuffles the remaining
AP Mobilization cards and draws a hand of 6
more cards. (If he does not take the take “The
Brusilov Offensive” card, he shuffles the AP
cards and draws a hand of 7 cards.)
lead to AH National Demoralization that force the CP Player to
divert units from the front to put down consequent uprisings.
The CP Player risks Austro-Hungarian collapse if he ignores
AH uprisings. An AH collapse makes it likely that the Allied
Powers can win the war on the Eastern Front.
4.
The AP Player makes a Draw Pile from the
rest of his Mobilization cards.
5.
“The Brusilov Offensive” card cannot be
played as an Event until “Brusilov Takes
Command” is played.
RU units will outweigh German defenders at first. The AP
Player could choose to push into Germany early to take
whatever VP Spaces he can before German defenses firm up
and force him to turn south. If GE units cannot blunt a Russian
advance, the AP Player could continue west to impose more
losses on GE units, capture more VP Spaces in Germany, and
induce uprisings to threaten German collapse.
Starting the game for the CP Player:
1.
The CP Player makes a deck from his cards
(see Rule 23.2.1b).
2.
The CP player may take a 4 OPS card from
his deck, if he chooses.
The AP Player should bring Italy and Romania into the war as
soon as possible, forcing the Central Powers to thin out their
units fighting Russia. This would impede the Central Powers’
strategy to capture VP Spaces in Russia and impose sufficient
RU losses to induce RU National Demoralization, consequent
uprisings, and the Russian Revolution.
3.
The CP player then shuffles the remaining CP
cards and draws a hand of 6 more cards.
(Otherwise, he shuffles the CP cards and
draws a hand of 7 cards.)
Forcing the CP Player to fight Russian, Italian, and Romanian
Fronts simultaneously, and also defend against AP units in the
Balkans, could stretch the Austro-Hungarian defenses so thin
that they break and eventually lead to an AH collapse.
4.
The CP Player makes a Draw Pile from the
rest of the cards.
33.2
5.
The CP player is not required to play the 4
OPS Point card first, and is not required to
play the card as an Event if the card is
played.
33.0
STRATEGY GUIDE
33.1
Allied Powers Strategy
The Allied Powers should be aggressive along all fronts
because VP Spaces within the Central Powers are dispersed.
Cutting the Central Powers in half by driving through AustriaHungary to Budapest could be an attractive winning strategy.
AH units south of that line would be cut off from their home
Supply Sources. Turkey could not convert GE RP’s into TU
RPs. Bulgaria would be isolated.
The loss of Russian VP Spaces and corps-sized units need to be
offset by the Russian capture of enemy VP Spaces, in order to
avoid RU National Demoralization and consequent uprisings.
Avoiding such uprisings is critical to preventing the Russian
Revolution.
Heavy losses could be imposed on AH units before Germany
adequately fills the gap. AH Troop Quality would erode
quickly and force the CP Player to use fewer and decreasingly
effective AH units to stop a Russian onslaught. It would also
Central Powers Strategy
The Central Powers should push their GE and AH units
aggressively against Russia. Most VP Spaces in Russia are
lined up against the front. Capturing those Spaces and imposing
significant RU losses early would induce RU National
Demoralization and consequent uprisings. Severe RU losses
would erode RU Troop Quality. The AP Player would be
forced to divert decreasingly effective RU units from the front
to put down these uprisings or risk a Russian Revolution.
Inducing the Russian Revolution (even the AP Player
temporarily suppresses it), makes it likely that the Central
Powers can win the war on the Eastern Front.
The CP Player should bring Bulgaria into the war as soon as
possible to help collapse Serbia, and bring Turkey into play
against Romania when it enters the war. Until Romania enters
the fray, BU and TU units should move against AP forces
elsewhere in the Balkans and in Greece to win VP Spaces and
protect Austria-Hungary’s southern flank.
When Italy enters the war, the CP Player is best off allocating
just enough forces to hold IT units at bay until Russia is
effectively neutralized. Then shift CP units to the Italian Front
and take the offensive against AP forces there.
34.0
Strategy Card Histories and Notes
34.1
Allied Powers Cards
Page 19 of 27
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
AP #1 Drive on East Prussia: Tsar Nicholas II responded to
French requests for direct aid from by ordering a change from
the original Russian plan to attack Austria-Hungary and watch
Germany. Instead, the Russian First and Second Armies were
sent into East Prussia.
AP #2 Russian Reinforcements: The Russian 9th Army,
which included the RU Guard, XXVI, XVIII, and I Turkestan
Infantry Corps, assembled in August 1914.
AP #3 Plehve: Gen. Pavel Plehve was an aggressive and
tactically skillful leader who commanded the Russian 5th Army
in the 1914 Battle for Galicia, and later stopped the 1915
German drive on Riga.
Plehve commanded the RU
Northwestern Front from 1915 to early 1916, and died in April
1916.
AP #4 Zheleznodorozhnyye Voyska (“Railway Troops”):
Russia built railroads using a different gauge than its neighbors
to impede transportation for invading armies. After the war
began, alterations to rail connections with Austria-Hungary
were needed to support the Imperial Russian Army in the Battle
of Galicia. This was done by the Zheleznodorozhnyye Voyska,
the oldest railway troops in the world, established in 1851 as an
engineering corps unit of the Imperial Russian Army.
AP #5 No Retreat: Stavka ordered Gen. Nikolai Ivanov not
to retreat his depleted Southwestern Front forces facing a
Central Powers counter-offensive in Galicia.
AP #6 Prittwitz: Gen. Maximilian von Prittwitz (nicknamed
“The Fat One”) commanded the German 8th Army in East
Prussia when the war started, but his indecisiveness and
timidity caused the German Supreme Army Command (Oberste
Heeresleitung or “OHL”) to remove him and appoint Gen. Paul
von Hindenburg as his successor.
AP #7 Galicia Offensive: Russian 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 8th
Armies drive into Galicia during September 1914, and AustriaHungary loses nearly half of its forces engaging the Russians.
AP #8 Putnik: Gen. Radomir Putnik led the Serbian Army
to successive victories over Austro-Hungarian invaders until
Bulgaria also struck Serbia to avenge its defeat by the Serbs in
the Second Balkan War. Overwhelmed by CP attacks from left
and right, Putnik refused surrender and force-marched his
troops to Albanian ports. From there, they were evacuated by
AP ships to the Greek isles. In poor health during and after the
Serbia Withdrawal, Putnik died in May 1917.
AP #9 Battle for Warsaw: As part of a joint GE/AH
offensive into Poland, started in September 1914, the German
9th Army attempted to capture Warsaw twice but was repulsed.
In August 1915, after three weeks of hard fighting, Warsaw fell
to the German 12th Army.
AP #10 Kitchener: Severe munition shortages that the
Imperial Russian Army experienced in the first half of 1915,
due to inadequate domestic production, were cured in part with
shipments arranged by Lord Horatio Kitchener. In 1898, Lord
Kitchener won fame for winning the Battle of Omdurman and
securing control of Sudan for the British Empire. Kitchener
died in 1916 when his ship sank after striking a mine while he
was travelling to Russia for diplomatic negotiations.
AP #11 Royal Navy Blockade:
British naval vessels
blockaded the Turkish coast following Turkey’s entry into the
war as a CP ally in November 1914. It cut off shipping that the
Ottoman Empire depended upon for importing, exporting, and
internal transportation.
AP #12 Russian Reinforcements: The Russian 10th Army,
which included the II Caucasus, III Siberia, and XXII Finnish
Infantry Corps, assembled in August 1914.
AP #13 Stavka: Supreme Headquarters of the Imperial
Russian Army. It controlled an active army of 114 infantry and
36 cavalry divisions. Stavka prepared two war plans: Plan G
designed a three-army offensive against Germany while using
three armies to hold off Austria-Hungary, and Plan A designed
a four-army offensive against Austria-Hungary while using two
armies to hold off Germany.
AP #14 Rule Britannia: Royal Navy surface combatants
achieved dominance in the Mediterranean basin by Fall 1914,
bottling up the Austro-Hungarian Navy and sweeping away the
German Navy.
AP #15 Conrad:
Field Marshall Franz Conrad von
Hötzendorf, Austro-Hungarian Chief-of-Staff, had a keen
strategic mind that was offset by an unrealistic view of his
army’s abilities. The result was that he devised a series of
brilliant plans that all failed.
AP #16 Alexeyev: Gen. Mikhail Alexeyev commanded the
Northwestern Front and skillfully extricated Russian troops
from entrapment in the Polish Salient during 1915. Tsar
Nicholas II later appointed him as Stavka Chief-of-Staff.
AP #17 Siege of Przemysl: The Russian offensive into
Galicia pushed to the Carpathian Mountains by October 1914,
leaving the AH fortress at Przemysl behind Russian lines. The
besieged Przemysl garrison surrendered in March 1915.
AP #18 Intervention in the Balkans: Responding to the
AH/BU invasion of Serbia, France and Britain convinced Greek
Prime Minister Venizelos to allow the landing of an AP
expeditionary force at Salonika. Greece’s King Constantine,
wishing to avoid the Kaiser’s wrath (the Kaiser was his brotherin-law), made Venizelos resign. The BR/GR National Defense
Corps that landed at Salonika was led by the British, but was
Page 20 of 27
Illusions of Glory—The Great War on the Eastern Front
ADVANCED RULES AND PLAY BOOK (Rev. 2/18/2016)
(Designer: Perry R. Silverman; Developer: Fred Schachter; Assistant Designer & Developer: Aaron H. Silverman)
also composed of Greek soldiers who supported Venizelos and
opposed King Constantine.
AP #19 Shore Bombardment: British and French surface
combatants were used as floating artillery to give AP troops
near the Mediterranean shore a slight but continuous advantage
in battle.
AP #20 Russian Reinforcements: The RU XXIX, XXX,
XXXI, XXXII, and XXXIII Infantry Corps were built to fill
manpower shortages resulting from casualties suffered in the
Battle for Galicia.
AP #21 Italy: Although a member of the pre-war Triple
Alliance with Austria-Hungary and Germany, Italy declared its
neutrality in 1914. It argued that the Triple Alliance was
defensive in nature, and Austria-Hungary's aggression against
Serbia did not obligate Italy to take part. Also, an Italian
nationalist movement called Italia Irredenta (Unredeemed
Italy) demanded seizure of Italian-inhabited territories in
Austria-Hungary. This idea was adopted by a significant part
of the Italian political elite. Italy was persuaded to enter the war
in May 1915 as an AP ally because of its ambition to take the
Trentino region, the port city of Trieste, and the eastern Adriatic
coast from Austria-Hungary.
AP #22 Salonika Invasion: British and French troops landed
at Salonika and, as their numbers grew, so did their combat
power. Adding a rebuilt Serbia Army, this force put Bulgaria
out of the war, liberated Serbia, and prepared to invade AustriaHungary when the CP sued for peace.
AP #23 Convoy: In response to the threat posed by German
U-Boats to Mediterranean shipping, AP troop transports and
supply ships traveled in groups guarded by British and French
destroyers and other surface combatants assigned to sink or
drive away enemy submarines.
AP #24 The Great Retreat: Beginning in September 1915,
the Imperial Russian Army was withdrawn from Poland to
avoid envelopment by German and Austro-Hungarian forces.
When this process ended in October 1915, Russian forces held
a 400-mile line stretching from Riga in the north to Czernowitz
in the south.
AP #25 Polivanov: After Alexei Polivanov was appointed
Russian Minister of War in June 1915, he created Special
Councils with industrialists to reform faulty armament and
munition production systems, bringing an end to Russian war
materiel shortages. Polivanov also brought the Imperial
Russian Army up to modern European standards. In spite of his
accomplishments, Polivanov was later dismissed for offending
“mad monk” Grigory Rasputin.
AP #26 Cadorna: When Italy entered the war, Gen. Luigi
Cadorna was the Italian Army Chief-of-Staff, and he sent fresh
and motivated divisions into battle along the Isonzo River,
where they fought the Austro-Hungarians with great courage.
In the Eleventh Battle of the Isonzo, Cadorna put tremendous
pressure on the AH defenders and almost broke them.
AP #27 Russian Reinforcements: During his tenure as
Minister of War, Alexei Polivanov instituted a new recruitment
system that raised 2,000,000 well-trained, disciplined, and
motivated troops.
AP #28 Sarrail: Gen. Maurice Sarrail was appointed to
command multinational AP forces at Salonika, designated as
the Army of the Orient. He reorganized them and supplied them
across a narrow span of the Adriatic to avoid German U-Boats.
Sarrail built a potent force and led it north in Fall 1915 to assist
the Serbian Army, but was blocked by Bulgarian units. After
Serbia fell, Sarrail retreated to a defensive perimeter around
Salonika. In September 1916, he went on the offensive to
relieve Romania but was stalled again by stiff CP resistance.
AP #29 Albanian Gambit: This is a hypothetical derived
from the AP decision to land troops in Macedonia for the
purpose of liberating Serbia, defeating Bulgaria, and rolling
back the Turks.
AP #30 German Labor Strikes: Food shortages, an everrising cost of living, and increasing frustrations with the war
drove long-suffering German workers to go on strike 137 times
in 1915, 240 times in 1916, and 561 times in 1917.
AP #31 Massed Cavalry Charge: An abundance of cavalry
enabled the Imperial Russian Army to launch massed cavalry
charges against retreating Austro-Hungarian infantry in 1914.
As the war dragged on, changing battle tactics and advanced
weaponry reduced the opportunity for successful massed
cavalry charges.
AP #32 The Arab Revolt: In June 1916, the Arab Revolt
began and caused the Ottoman loss of Islam’s holiest shrines.
Arabs marched on Damascus, and fought for dominion of the
Hejaz Region. The revolt forced a diversion of Turkish troops
to battle Arab insurgents.
AP #33 Italian Reinforcements: Gen. Luigi Cadorna was
compelled to raise additional divisions by 1916 due to his
strategy of attritional warfare against the Austro-Hungarians.
AP #34 The Serbs Return: In Fall 1915, a multinational CP
force defeated the Serbian Army and drove it into exile. The
Serbs, rebuilt their army, assisted by the Allied Powers, and
were brought to Greece for an offensive that liberated Serbia
and prepared to invade Austria-Hungary.
AP #35 Noemvriana (“November Events”): In 1916, AP
troops landed in Athens to prevent King Constantine from
allying Greece with the Central Powers. His pro-German
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leanings, firing Venizelos, and surrendering Ft. Rupel to
Bulgaria made the Allied Powers suspicious that this was
coming. AP forces met organized resistance from armed Greek
monarchists, and a confrontation took place in which King
Constantine nearly declared war on the Allied Powers. AP
naval forces then imposed a blockade against Greece, and King
Constantine was forced to abdicate in 1917.
AP #36 Brusilov Takes Command: Stavka gave Gen. Alexei
Brusilov command of the Imperial Russian Army’s Southwest
Front in March 1916. Reviewing tactics employed by German
troops at the Battle of Lake Naroch, and adjusting for
shortcomings in Russian arms, he designed a system to break
through Austro-Hungarian trench lines opposite his forces.
AP #37 Cavalry Screen: Russian cavalry were often used to
probe the strength of enemy forces in front of advancing
Russian infantry, and protect the rear and flanks of retreating
Russian infantry by positioning themselves between the
infantry and pursuing CP troops.
AP #38 Russian Reinforcements: During his tenure as
Minister of War, Alexei Polivanov raised additional Guards
divisions and reorganized Russian cavalry into corps-sized
formations.
AP #39 The Brusilov Offensive: Beginning in June 1916,
Gen. Alexei Brusilov launched simultaneous attacks along the
entire RU Southwestern Front. This prevented defending
Austro-Hungarians from sending reserves to any single point of
attack. As Russian troops drove forward, thinned AH
formations collapsed. Attrition eventually wore down the
Russians, causing the Brusilov Offensive to run out of steam in
July 1916.
AP #40 Romania:
Coveting territory in Transylvania,
Romania declared war on the Central Powers in August 1916
and attacked north into Austria-Hungary with two of its four
armies. A mixed AH and GE force stopped the Romanian
offensive, while a second CP force comprised of Germans,
Austro-Hungarians, and Turks attacked into Romania from the
south. Bucharest fell in December 1916.
AP #41 Greece:
Following the abdication of King
Constantine, Greece joined the Allied Powers in June 1917.
Greek soldiers then fought alongside French and British troops
in the Balkan front.
AP #42 Forced March:
Throughout the war, Russian
commanders used forced marches to reinforce beleaguered RU
positions, extricate RU troops from entrapment, and pursue
retreating AH troops.
AP #43 Italian Reinforcements: Still more Italian divisions
were raised by 1917 due to losses suffered in the Isonzo battles,
the massive AH/GE Caporetto attack, and the AH Asiago
offensive.
AP #44 The Somme: A large-scale offensive in July 1916,
where the French and British coordinated their forces. The
Germans were compelled to triple the number of defending
divisions. German commanders insisted that their troops fight
for every yard, massing forward positions with troops and
making them easy targets for British artillery. The resulting
carnage led to the dismissal of Gen. Erich von Falkenhayn as
head of OHL
AP #45 War Weary Austro-Hungarian Army: Plagued by
starvation, a shortage of weapons, and insufficient munitions,
Austro-Hungarian units frequently abandoned their positions
under pressure from advancing AP forces in 1918.
AP #46 “Germandom Against Slavdom”:
German
insistence upon commanding the entire Eastern Front alienated
Slavs comprising half of the Austro-Hungarian army, and led to
their short-lived resistance against orders that came from the
German OberOst (Supreme Headquarters East) instead of from
AH Chief-of-Staff Conrad.
AP #47 Bulgarian Army Breaks: By 1918, the Bulgarians
were poorly equipped, short of ammunition and food, and tired
of war. They were left virtually alone to fend off AP forces in
the Balkans, as the German Army transferred its units to the
Western Front. In September 1918, the Allied Powers launched
an offensive into Serbia using French, British, and Serb troops.
The defending Bulgarian forces could no longer hold, and the
AP broke through their lines. The Bulgarian Army was forced
into a general retreat.
AP #48 Turkish Desertions: While every ethnic group in the
Ottoman Empire contributed to the ranks of Turkish Army
deserters, the majority were Turks and Anatolian Muslims.
Physical and mental exhaustion, elusiveness of victory, and the
perception that the Ottoman Empire was dying caused
desertions from Turkish army units. By the end of the war,
there were at least 500,000 desertions. Deserters roamed the
countryside, living off the land and becoming bandits. Turkish
troops had to be detached in ever greater numbers to deal with
the security problems that these deserters created.
AP #49 Russian Reinforcements: Formed from Opolchenie
(“Militia Brigades”), the RU XXIX, XL, and XLI Infantry
Corps was composed of second reserve manpower and older
recruits.
AP #50 Austro-Hungarian Sailor Revolt: In February 1918,
a mutiny started in the AH Fifth Fleet at the Kotor naval base
on the Adriatic Sea. Sailors on 40 ships joined the mutiny.
Initial demands for better treatment were soon replaced by
political demands and a call for peace. The mutiny was put
down by force.
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AP #51 Long Live the Tsar!: This hypothesizes a Tsar
capable of suppressing rebellion, keeping the loyalty of his
subjects and his military, and preventing revolution. The
mechanics used by Illusions of Glory to represent this (see Rule
23.4.3) separate it from other card-driven games.
AP #52 Supreme War Council: The Battle of Caporetto
convinced the Allied Powers that they needed closer
cooperation. They formed the Supreme War Council as an
advisory body, which later developed into a unified command.
Its first act was to send six French and five British divisions to
the Italian Front.
AP #53 The Kerensky Offensive: In March 1917, the Tsar
lost political legitimacy and control of his military. He
abdicated and was replaced by a Provisional Government
headed by Prince Georgy Lvov, with Alexander Kerensky—a
member of the Duma (Parliament)—in his cabinet. Kerensky
prodded Gen. Brusilov, now Russian commander-in-chief, to
launch an attack in Galicia. It was briefly successful, and then
collapsed under a counterattack by CP forces. The failure of
the “Kerensky Offensive” brought down the Lvov government,
but elevated Kerensky himself to head its replacement.
AP #54 “Desperate Frankie”: Repeated military failures
ended Gen. Maurice Sarrail’s command at the Army of the
Orient. He was succeeded by Gen. Franchet d'Espèrey in early
1918.
In September 1918, d'Espèrey led an army
of Greeks, French, Serbs, British, and Italians on a successful
offensive in Macedonia that took Bulgaria out of the war. He
followed this victory by overrunning much of the Balkans and
preparing to roll up Hungary. Collapse of the Southern Front
was one of several developments forcing the November 1918
Armistice. During his final campaign, d'Espèrey was given the
nickname "Desperate Frankie" by British officers.
AP #55 Treaty of Brest-Litovsk: In November 1917, after
wrestling power away from the Provisional Government, the
Bolsheviks began peace negotiations with Germany. The peace
talks broke down in February 1918 due to the Germans’ harsh
demands. Germany then launched an offensive toward
Petrograd, Moscow, and Kiev.
Russian forces were
overwhelmed by the German assault. In March 1918, Russia
signed the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk to end hostilities with
Germany on terms dictated by the Germans.
AP #56 Command Card #1: Strategy card used by the AP
player controlling RU and RO units when there are two AP
players in the game (see Rule 30.1).
AP #57 Command Card #2: Strategy card used by the AP
player controlling SB, MN, BR, FR, IT and AP-allied GR units
when there are two AP players in the game (see Rule 30.1).
34.2
Central Powers Cards
CP #1 Guns of August: In August 1914, the German 8th
Army prepared for attacks from the Russian 1st and 2nd Armies
into East Prussia. The Germans set an ambush for the RU 1st
Army west of Gumbinnen. If successful, they would next move
against the RU 2nd Army. If not, the GE 8th Army planned to
retreat behind the Vistula River.
CP #2 Von François:
Gen. Hermann von François
commanded the GE I Infantry Corps in August 1914.
Aggressive to the point of insubordination, he attacked a
division of the Russian 1st Army east of Gumbinnen and caused
the German 8th Army to lose the element of surprise.
CP #3 German Reinforcements: The German 8th Army
was reinforced by the GE XI and Guard Res. Infantry Corps,
taken from Schlieffen’s right wing on the Western Front, and
by a cavalry unit from Belgium.
CP #4 Burgfrieden (“Party Truce”): Feuding political
parties in the Reichstag set aside their differences and joined in
support of the German war effort.
CP #5 Hindenburg and Ludendorff in Command: After
losing the Battle of Gumbinnen on August 20, 1914, the
German 8th Army planned a retreat from East Prussia.
Dissatisfied with this decision, OHL sacked the army’s
commander (Gen. Maximilian von Prittwitz) and replaced him
with Gen. Paul von Hindenburg, a veteran of the FrancoPrussian War. Gen. Erich Ludendorff became its new Chiefof-Staff.
CP #6 Wireless Intercepts: Orders were transmitted to
Imperial Russian Army units by wireless in an easily
decipherable code that was intercepted and decoded by the
Germans, who were then able to prepare for and counter
Russian combat plans.
CP #7 Rennenkampf:
Gen. Pavel Rennenkampf
commanded the Russian 1st Army in August 1914. He led his
army into East Prussia from Kovno while the Russian 2nd
Army advanced into East Prussia from the south. Between
them, they were supposed to trap the German 8th Army.
However, Rennenkampf procrastinated after his victory at
Gumbinnen and failed to help close the trap. This left the
advancing RU 2nd Army unsupported against German forces at
Tannenberg.
CP #8 Landwehr to the Front: Germany’s Landwehr was a
third category of troops, after the regular army and the reserves.
They were intended to be a territorial defense force, but combat
losses compelled the Germans to integrate them into front-line
units as replacements.
CP #9 Tannenberg: On August 26, 1914, the GE XVII and
I Res. Infantry Corps attacked the RU 2nd Army at Tannenberg,
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striking its right flank. The GE I Infantry Corps attacked the
Russians’ left flank. Although threatened with encirclement,
the Russians delayed their retreat so that the RU 1st Army could
attack the Germans from behind. When that failed to
materialize, it was too late for an orderly retreat. Only
fragments of the RU 2nd Army managed to escape. The GE
8th Army followed this up by pushing briefly into Russia.
and with the XXXVIII Res. and XXXIX Res. Infantry Corps in
late 1914.
CP #10 Mackensen: Gen. August von Mackensen was given
command of the GE 9th Army in Fall 1914. His forces captured
Lodz on December 6, 1914. In May 1915, he took command of
the newly-formed GE 11th Army, and spearheaded an offensive
that broke through the Russian lines at the Battle of GorliceTarnow. After that, Mackensen and the GE 11th Army moved
to the Serbian front where they attacked Belgrade in September
1915. In September 1916, Mackensen led a combined force of
Germans, Austro-Hungarians, Turks, and Bulgarians against
Romania. He devised a tactic, later named the “Mackensen
Wedge”, in which massive artillery barrages were used to blow
open a defending line at the point of attack.
CP #18 Sud Army: Assembled in January 1915 from AustroHungarian and German corps-sized formations to fill a gap in
the Galicia front, the Sud Army fought on the Eastern Front as
a multinational unit until it was dissolved in January 1918.
CP #11 Masurian Lakes: After decimating the Russians at
Tannenberg, the German 8th Army turned on the Russian 1st
Army near the Masurian Lakes. German forces nearly broke
through the Russian left, and Russian counterattacks failed.
The RU 1st Army withdrew to Kovno.
CP #12 German Reinforcements: The German 9th Army
was formed in Fall 1914 from the GE XVII Res. and XXV Res.
Infantry Corps, the 1st Cavalry Kommando, and other units
from the GE 8th Army.
CP #13 Eisenbahntruppen
(“Railroad
Troops”):
Organized into brigades of rail construction, rail traffic, and
general labor companies, German railroad troops fulfilled three
main missions—to facilitate the rail transport of troops and
supplies, to repair damaged rail lines, and to extend standard
gauge rail lines for troop mobility.
CP #14 Hoffmann: With the best operational mind of any
Eastern Front general, Gen. Max von Hoffmann designed the
battle plans that destroyed the Russian 2nd Army at
Tannenberg, defeated the Russian 1st Army at Masuria, stopped
the Kerensky Offensive, and finished the Russian Army.
CP #15 OberOst: Created in 1914, OberOst (Supreme
Headquarters East) consisted of its commander and his military
staff, along with the districts they controlled. The first
commander of OberOst was Gen. Paul von Hindenburg. When
Gen. Erich von Falkenhayn was dismissed as head of OHL in
1916, von Hindenburg replaced him. Prince Leopold of
Bavaria was then given titular command of OberOst, but
operational control was given to Gen. Max von Hoffmann.
CP #16 German Reinforcements: OberOst was reinforced
with the GE II and XXI Infantry Corps from the Western Front
CP #17 Chlorine Gas: In 1915, German forces used chlorine
gas against the Imperial Russian Army during battles south of
Warsaw and at Osowiec, causing thousands of Russian
casualties.
CP #19 U-Boats in the Mediterranean: The introduction of
German U-Boats into the Mediterranean changed the balance
of naval power and impeded the transport of AP troops and
supplies by sea until AP navies devised the convoy system.
Without armed escorts, no AP invasion could be attempted or
even contemplated in the face of the submarine menace.
CP #20 German Reinforcements: OberOst was reinforced
with the GE XIII Infantry Corps from the Western Front and
with the XXIV and XL Res. Infantry Corps in early 1915.
CP #21 Army of the Bug: Named for the Bug River,
the Army of the Bug was a German command formed in July
1915. It fought exclusively on the Eastern Front until it was
dissolved in March 1918.
CP #22 The Black Hand: Founded in May 1911 by Serbian
Army officers, the Black Hand Society aimed to unite Serbinhabited territories by training and arming guerilla fighters and
saboteurs. They organized and facilitated the assassination of
AH Archduke Franz Ferdinand during his 1914 visit to
Sarajevo, leading to the outbreak of war. Assassinations and
other illegal activities by the Black Hand spurred Serbian Prime
Minister Nikola Pašić to arrest their members and destroy the
organization.
CP #23 Bulgaria: Coveting territory in Serbian Macedonia,
and seeking revenge for its defeat by the Serbs in the Second
Balkan war, Bulgaria entered the war as a CP ally in September
1915. Its invasion of Serbia, while the Serbian Army was fully
engaged against German and Austro-Hungarian forces, sealed
a defeat of the Serbs. Bulgarian troops then blocked the
advance of AP forces from Greece into the Balkans. Left
virtually alone, as German units transferred to the Western
Front, the Bulgarian Army was worn down by AP forces and
collapsed.
CP #24 Surrender of Ft. Rupel: In May 1916, King
Constantine ordered the surrender of a Greek fort guarding the
Rupel Pass to approaching Bulgarian forces. The Greek king
may have been trying to avoid war with Bulgaria, but the Allied
Powers viewed it as proof that he secretly sided with his
brother-in-law, Kaiser Wilhelm II, and that Greece might
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become a CP ally. Bulgaria also occupied the fortified
mountain positions at Doiran.
CP #25 Russian War Materiel Shortage: A shortage of
Russian artillery shells and rifles that threatened in 1914
became a full-blown crisis in early 1915. Russia’s pre-war
industrial development was outmatched by the needs of modern
war. It opened up a whole host of questions about the viability
of Tsarist Russia’s economic and political systems. This storm
was postponed when Alexei Polivanov was appointed Russian
Minister of War in June 1915. Polivanov created Special
Councils with industrialists to reform the faulty requisition,
production, and delivery systems causing Russian war materiel
shortages.
CP #26 Von Bojna:
General Svetozar Boroevic von
Bojna (later promoted to Field Marshal) commanded the AH VI
Infantry Corps in Galicia during 1914, and successfully fought
off superior Russian forces from his defensive positons in the
Carpathian Mountains. In May 1915, von Bojna was given
command of the Austro-Hungarian 5th Army in Italy and
distinguished himself in defensive fighting along the Isonzo
River.
CP #27 The Tsar Takes Command: Tsar Nicholas II
replaced the Grand Duke with himself as commander of Stavka
after Russia’s defeat at the Battle of Brest-Litovsk. The Tsar
was militarily unqualified for such a command, which also
caused him to neglect his political duties as leader of the
Russian nation.
CP #28 Turkish Reinforcements: The TU VI Infantry Corps
was released from Thrace to fight in Romania, and the TU XV
Infantry Corps was released from Gallipoli to fight in Galicia.
Still, the Turks lacked the ability to support the number of corps
that they put into the field. As the war continued, the strain on
available Turkish manpower severely damaged the largely
agrarian economy.
CP #29 Verdun: When German forces attacked Verdun in
February 1916, the French defenders were ordered to hold at all
costs. Gen. Henri Petain, who commanded the French at
Verdun, received a regular supply of fresh divisions. Nearly
two-thirds of the entire French Army fought at Verdun at one
time or another. OHL planned to turn Verdun into a killing
ground for the French Army, but the French defenders fought
tenaciously and used an interior line of forts to keep Verdun in
their hands.
CP #30 Austro-Hungarian Reinforcements: Created from
regular and reserve divisions, the AH XVIII and XIX Infantry
Corps saw action in Galicia and Italy. A number of independent
cavalry divisions were consolidated into two corps-sized
formations and assigned to Gen. Leopold von Hauer and to
Gen. Adolph von Brudermann.
CP #31 German War Industry: Unable to rely on foreign
suppliers due to the AP naval blockade, Germany greatly
expanded its own production of armaments and munitions.
CP #32 Lake Naroch: In 1916, the French pleaded with Tsar
Nicholas II to attack in order to relieve German pressure on
Verdun. On March 18, 1916, Stavka launched a coordinated
attack by the RU Northwest Front and the RU Western Front
against outnumbered German forces near Lake Naroch. After
an ineffective two-day Russian artillery barrage, Northwestern
Front forces attacked and were driven back. The Western
Front’s attack bogged down because an early spring thaw
melted the winter ice and made the battlefield swampy. Its
assaults were restricted to narrow land bridges where Russian
troops were vulnerable to German artillery and machine guns.
The offensive lost all momentum by month’s end.
CP #33 German Reinforcements: In 1915, the GE IV Res.
and X Res. Infantry Corps were transferred from the
Western Front to reinforce OberOst.
CP #34 The Struma and Monastir: In August 1916, Gen.
Maurice Sarrail’s AP force from Salonika checked a Bulgarian
move to cross the Struma River and reach the Greek coast.
Later that month, he attacked the Bulgarian 1st Army at Doiran
but failed to dislodge them. In September 1916, Sarrail
captured Monastir but his attempts to move further north were
stopped by the German 11th Army.
CP #35 King Constantine: When war broke out, Greece’s
King Constantine was faced with a dilemma. He sympathized
with Germany, ruled by his wife’s brother. He was also aware
that a maritime country like Greece could not antagonize the
Allied Powers, whose navies dominated the Mediterranean.
The king chose a policy of neutrality but his Prime Minister,
Eleftherios Venizelos, was fervently pro-AP. When Bulgaria
attacked Serbia, Venizelos tried to use his majority in the Greek
Parliament to ally Greece with the Allied Powers. After
Venizelos permitted AP forces to land at Salonika, King
Constantine fired him and he fled there. In August 1916,
Venizelos established a provisional revolutionary government
in Salonika and declared war on the Central Powers. AP navies
blockaded pro-monarchist areas of Greece and forced King
Constantine to abdicate.
CP #36 Rasputin: Grigory Rasputin became known as the
“Mad Monk” for his depravity, eccentricities, and obsessions.
Rasputin’s ability to treat the Tsar’s hemophiliac son enabled
him to manipulate the Tsarina and, through her, the Tsar and
the Russian Empire. Rasputin hurt the Russian war effort by
engineering the appointment of corrupt and incompetent
officials. In December 1916, Russian nobles assassinated
Rasputin in an attempt to save the country.
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CP #37 German Reinforcements: In 1916, the GE XXII
Res. and XXVII Res. Infantry Corps, along with one battalion
of heavy artillery, were transferred from the Western Front to
reinforce OberOst.
of survival. To sustain AP troops in the Balkans, it was
necessary to run supplies from Italy’s east coast across a narrow
stretch of the Adriatic, where U-Boat attacks could be thwarted
more easily.
CP #38 Enver-Falkenhayn Summit: As Minister of War and
de facto Commander-in-Chief, Enver Pasha was the most
powerful figure in the Ottoman Empire’s government. He
brought the Ottoman Empire into the war as a German ally. At
a meeting with Gen. Erich von Falkenhayn in 1916, Enver
pledged to send troops to Galicia and assist in the invasion of
Romania.
CP #45 Feuerwalze: Lt. Col. Georg Bruchmüller devised a
fireplan for German artillery that emphasized a high rate of fire,
and barrages mixed with concentrations, to destroy defenses
and make defenders take cover while attacking forces advanced
on their positions. Barrages advanced ahead of the attackers to
allow them to take enemy positions and move on. This became
known as the feuerwalze (“fire-roller”). Since communication
between artillerists and advancing troops was problematic,
barrage timing was critical. Artillery had to follow a precise
firing plan. If the barrage advanced too slowly, attacking forces
could not exploit their gains. A barrage that advanced too
quickly enabled defenders to regroup and fiercely resist
attacking troops.
CP #39 War in Africa: Before the war, Germany managed to
build a colonial empire in Africa. These colonial holdings were
located in Togo, Kamerun, and German Southwest Africa
(Namibia) on the Atlantic coast, and also German East Africa
(Tanganyika) abutting the Indian Ocean. The AP campaign to
seize these colonies lasted from 1914 to 1917 and diverted
almost 250,000 of its troops to Africa.
CP #40 Falkenhayn Comes East: After his dismissal from
OHL in 1916, Gen. Erich von Falkenhayn was sent east to
command Turkish troops.
CP #41 Clearing the Dobruja: Leading a combined force of
Germans, Austro-Hungarians, Turks, and Bulgarians against
Romania, Gen. August von Mackensen conducted an offensive
in the Dobruja region of Romania (bordered by the Danube
River and the Black Sea) to drive out all Romanian and Russian
forces.
CP #42 Austro-Hungarian Reinforcements: Created from
regular and reserve divisions, the AH XXII, XXIII, XXIV,
XXV, and XXVI Infantry Corps were sent to the Italian Front
and drove the Italian Army into retreat during 1917.
CP #43 Von Below:
In 1917, Gen. Otto von Below
commanded the Austro-German 14th Army on the Italian Front.
On October 24, 1917, his army attacked Italian positions along
the Isonzo River in the Battle of Caporetto (Twelfth Isonzo).
Von Below’s troops infiltrated enemy lines and, after three
days, outflanked the entire Italian position. Nearly one-half of
Italy’s divisions were wrecked, enabling von Below to advance
within 20 miles of Venice. However, von Below’s army lacked
the strength to press on when OberOst refused to send it
reinforcements.
CP #44 Unrestricted Submarine Warfare: The use of naval
escorts and armed merchantmen by AP nations had greatly
eroded the success and survivability of German U-Boats under
“Prize Rules” (requiring submarines to surface and allow
merchantmen crews to escape). Beginning in February 1917,
the German Navy authorized its U-Boats to abandon these
restrictions and sink enemy vessels without warning to increase
the submarine’s combat effectiveness and improve its chances
CP #46 Russian Army Morale Dissolves: Loss of morale by
Russian troops was directly connected to terrible physical
conditions, inadequate equipment, military failure, and a
chronic shortage of competent officers. They were also
exposed to a flow of pacifist and anti-monarchist propaganda
from turbulent Russian cities. As a result, Russian soldiers
deserted, defected, and even murdered their officers.
CP #47 Von Hutier: Gen. Oskar von Hutier perfected
infiltration tactics for the German 8th Army’s attack on Riga in
1917. Using feuerwaltze to create an opening, German troops
seized a foothold across the Dvina River and formed three
columns of divisions. They ignored defensive strongpoints and
drove through the Russian lines. The outer two columns rolled
up those lines, while the middle column drove for the Baltic
coast to trap the Russians in a pocket.
CP #48 Russian War Weariness: By 1917, the Russian
people had enough of war and the hardships it imposed. The
war caused price inflation that outpaced wage increases,
angering the working class. It also caused a shortage of civilian
medical supplies and services.
Lost battles, mounting
casualties, and a demoralized army fueled pacifist and antimonarchist propaganda. Social and economic unrest grew in
the cities. Strikes, protests, and riots ensued.
CP #49 Russian Railroad Collapse: In the winter of 19161917, Russia’s railroad system began to break down from
overuse. Insufficient numbers of train engines and rolling stock
to adequately supply both the Russian Army and the civilian
populace caused food shortages in the cities.
CP #50 Russian Food Riots: Russian cities rioted as a result
of food shortages following the breakdown of Russia’s railroad
system. In Petrograd, Tsar Nicholas II ordered that food riots
be put down with force. His troops refused to leave their
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barracks or shoot the rioters. Some soldiers went over to the
mob.
CP #51 Fall of the Tsar: As riots mounted against food
shortages and other hardships caused by the war, the Tsar lost
political legitimacy in the eyes of the Russian people. In March
1917, Tsar Nicholas II was forced to abdicate when he also lost
control over his military.
CP #52 Lenin to Petrograd: Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, better
known as Lenin, was living in Swiss exile when the Tsar fell.
In April 1917, the Germans smuggled him back into Russia to
speed up Russia’s collapse. When a Bolshevik uprising in July
1917 was defeated, Lenin fled to Finland. In November 1917,
Lenin slipped back into Petrograd to make plans for an armed
uprising against the Kerensky government.
CP #53 November Coup: On November 6, 1917, a coup
conducted by revolutionists, soldiers, sailors, and workers
seized control of Petrograd’s telephone exchange, railroad
stations, and bridges. Kerensky fled and the Bolsheviks came
to power.
CP #54 Tsar’s Armories: As German forces advanced into
Russia, they seized supplies from Russian stockpiles to
supplement their own.
CP #55 Kaiserschlacht: The German Army launched an
offensive along the Western Front on March 21, 1918, in order
to defeat the Allied Powers before the overwhelming resources
of the United States could be fully deployed. Germany also had
a temporary advantage in numbers due to the transfer of nearly
50 divisions from the Eastern Front (after the Treaty of BrestLitovsk). This Kaiserschacht (“Kaiser’s Battle”) involved four
attacks, codenamed “Michael”, “Georgette”, “Gneisenau”, and
“Blücher”. Michael was the main attack, intended to break
through the Allied lines, outflank the British forces holding the
front from the Somme River to the English Channel, and defeat
the British Army. The Germans hoped that once this was
achieved, France would seek an armistice. The other attacks
were subsidiary to Michael, and were designed to divert Allied
forces from the main offensive on the Somme. After significant
early successes, the Germans Army was unable to move
supplies and reinforcements fast enough to maintain its
advance. All of the German attacks petered out due to attrition
and the lack of supplies.
CP #56 Command Card #1: Strategy card used by the CP
player controlling AH units when there are two CP players in
the game (see Rule 30.2).
CP #57 Command Card #2: Strategy card used by the CP
player controlling GE, BU, TU, and AP-allied GR units when
there are two CP players in the game (see Rule 30.2).
35.0
Game design and development is no single-handed task. I am
deeply indebted to the following persons for the success of
Illusions of Glory:
Fred Schachter, my long-time friend and fellow grognard
who, as Game Developer, critiqued this game’s early designs,
recommended the measurement of manpower drain, and
conducted playtests of the game in its many iterations.
Aaron H. Silverman, Chairman of the Social Studies
Department at Millenium High School in Manhattan, who
served as Assistant Designer and Developer in reviewing this
game’s designs and recommending changes to make it more
realistic and playable.
Thomas Cadenhead, Jeff Newell, Pete Gade, Ha Lee, Bill
Vargas, Eric Guttag, Jack Greene, Luther Harris, Lewis
Ritter, Nick Baker, Scot McConnachie, and John Rainey,
who dedicated their time as Key Playtesters.
Mark Simonitch, who served as the patient and long-suffering
key Producer of this game for GMT.
Jim Lauffenburger, for his invaluable role in developing the
VASSAL playtest platform for Illusions of Glory.
Brad Stock, for his design suggestions and support.
Rachel S. Silverman, for the encouragement that only a
daughter can give.
Ruth K. Silverman, for her endless support as my spouse.
36.0
Bibliography
Consider reading this short list of books, to which I also give
credit as research sources for Illusions of Glory:
Hart, B.H. Liddell, History of the First World War. London:
Pan Books, 1972.
Keegan, John. The First World War. New York: Vintage
Books. 1998.
Raicer, Ted S., Crowns in the Gutter. Bakersfield, Calif.:
Strategy & Tactics Press, 2009.
Stone, Norman. The Eastern Front 1914-1917.
Penguin Books, 1998.
Tuchman, Barbara.
Macmillan, 1962.
Acknowledgments
Page 27 of 27
The Guns of August.
London:
New York:
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