Lola_Manual_1.4.0 - Conservatorio di musica Giuseppe Tartini

Lola_Manual_1.4.0 - Conservatorio di musica Giuseppe Tartini
LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
LOLA
Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Installation & User's Manual
© 2005-2014 - Conservatorio di musica G. Tartini – Trieste, Italy
Version 1.4.0
http://www.conts.it/artistica/lola-project
[email protected]
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Index
1. Introduction......................................................................................................................................3
2. Hardware and Operating System requirements................................................................................4
2.1.
2.2.
2.3.
2.4.
2.5.
2.6.
2.7.
Audio input/output hardware requirements.............................................................................................................................4
Video input hardware requirements.........................................................................................................................................4
Video output hardware requirements.......................................................................................................................................6
PC hardware requirements...................................................................................................................................................... 6
Network requirements............................................................................................................................................................. 7
LOLA v1.4.x backward compatibility.....................................................................................................................................9
Network Interface Cards (NICs) performances.......................................................................................................................9
3. System Setup..................................................................................................................................11
3.1. Common libraries/drivers installation....................................................................................................................................11
3.2. Drivers for BitFlow systems (Alta-AN, Karbon-CXP)..........................................................................................................12
3.3. Drivers for Ximea USB3-Vision systems..............................................................................................................................14
3.4. Audio hardware Setup........................................................................................................................................................... 14
3.5. BitFlow Video hardware Setup..............................................................................................................................................15
3.6. Installing LOLA application..................................................................................................................................................16
3.7. Tuning the LOLA Workstation..............................................................................................................................................18
3.8. TCP/UDP ports used by LOLA.............................................................................................................................................18
3.9. Local and Remote Audio/Video Quality................................................................................................................................18
3.10. Software you should not install on your Lola pc.................................................................................................................19
4. Running LOLA...............................................................................................................................20
4.1. Local audio and video settings (Lola Setup)..........................................................................................................................21
4.2. Local and Remote rendering windows..................................................................................................................................25
4.3. Color Menu and Bayer decoding...........................................................................................................................................27
4.4. Connection with a remote host..............................................................................................................................................29
4.5. Fine Audio/Video buffer tuning.............................................................................................................................................30
4.6. Toggling Audio/Video and Network Monitor........................................................................................................................31
4.7. Disconnecting from a remote host.........................................................................................................................................32
4.8. Debugging a connection: Bounce-Back mode.......................................................................................................................32
4.9. Debugging a connection: TaskMgr........................................................................................................................................33
4.10. Audio and Video Recording................................................................................................................................................34
4.11. Chat window....................................................................................................................................................................... 35
4.12. Audio Test signal................................................................................................................................................................. 36
4.13. Windows layout................................................................................................................................................................... 36
4.14. Duplicate window (remote host display).............................................................................................................................36
4.15. LolaGui process priority......................................................................................................................................................37
4.16. Audio only setup................................................................................................................................................................. 37
4.17. Lola system checkup........................................................................................................................................................... 37
5. LOLA Tools....................................................................................................................................39
5.1. Lola Wav Splitter.................................................................................................................................................................. 39
5.2. Lola Video Converter........................................................................................................................................................... 39
5.3. LolaGUI Tester..................................................................................................................................................................... 40
Appendix A – Old experimental digital video setup ........................................................................42
Appendix B – Compatible Video Analog Cameras ...........................................................................43
Appendix C – Cameras Cabling Guide .............................................................................................44
Appendix D – Setting Cameras in External Trigger Mode ...............................................................49
Appendix E – Audio Card internal Mixer settings.............................................................................53
Appendix F – Manual BitFlow Configuration...................................................................................56
Appendix G – Lola Hardware components........................................................................................59
Appendix H – Known Issues..............................................................................................................61
Appendix I – Remote assistance with TeamViewer...........................................................................65
Appendix J – Connection debugging hints.........................................................................................66
Acknowledgments..............................................................................................................................67
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
1. Introduction
Lola is an Audio Visual Streaming System developed by “Conservatorio di Musica G.
Tartini”, Trieste, Italy, in collaboration with GARR, the Italian Academic and Research Network.
LOLA goal is to provide a tool for real-time audio/video “natural” distance human interaction. It
was originally conceived for distance music performances, education and production, but can be
used for any other scenario where real-time interaction is required. A special attention has been
paid to the optimization of the signal processing and transmission in order to keep the system
latency as low as possible, below the human delay perception threshold. Both Standard Definition
video (SD) and High Definition video (HD) modes are supported from version 1.4.x
The system is based on high performance audio/video acquisition hardware, and on the
integration and optimization of audio/video stream acquisition, presentation and transmission. The
LOLA system also requires very high performance Wide Area and Local Area Networks: 1 Gigabit
per second end-to-end connection is the minimum suggested configuration when running the
system with uncompressed video signals; lower bandwidth can be used when running the LOLA
system with video compression on.
NOTE: Lola depends on very specific hardware components and it doesn't work with any
kind of camera; please carefully read the following “Hardware and Operating System
requirements” chapter.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
2. Hardware and Operating System
requirements
In order to achieve a low transmission and presentation latency, LOLA relies on software
optimization and on high performance audio and video devices. Low latency video in particular has
been achieved by adopting a family of industrial video grabbers which at the moment are only
supported under the Microsoft Windows Operating System. To date, LOLA has been tested on
Windows XP, Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 (both 32-bit and 64-bit versions). Since Windows XP is
being phased out, and Windows 7 offers better performances for LOLA, we recommend to use
Windows 7 as the base operating system.
Starting from ver. 1.4.0, support for Windows XP is discontinued. Minimum OS
requirements is Windows Vista with “SP2” and “Platform Update for Windows Vista”.
2.1. Audio input/output hardware requirements
Low latency audio performance requires that small in/out audio buffers can be used, that no
bottlenecks are present in the data transfer between the converters and the system, and that robust
and efficient software drivers are available for the OS in use. USB and FireWire (IEEE 1394)
external devices do not offer such a fast data acquisition processing, thus LOLA uses a PCI/PCIe
internal device and a reliable ASIO driver. To date, the following Audio boards have been
successfully tested and have shown very good performances with a buffer size of 32 samples (0.7
ms):
–
RME HDSPe-AIO (PCI-Express internal card)
–
RME Hammerfall HDSP 9632 (PCI internal card)
–
RME Multiface II (PCI/PCIe host card + external ADC/DAC box)
2.2. Video input hardware requirements
Fast video acquisition and streaming relies on a family of video grabbers by BitFlow Inc.
and on the new USB3-Vision compliant xiQ cameras by Ximea, which provide high hardware
performances and a versatile API for low-level video processing control.
2.2.1. Supported BitFlow video grabbers:
–
BitFlow ALTA-AN1 (Analog grabber)
This card supports both B/W and color analog cameras. Tested cameras for b/w service are:
Sony HR50 (it works fine at 30 and 60 fps) and Sony HR70 (this one works fine at 29 and
30 fps but with some workarounds; see Appendix D for more details).
In case of color video acquisition the video camera must provide component analog color
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
output (RGB or YpbPr). For color operation the PC running LOLA should provide enough
CPU performance to deal with data processing, i.e. an i5/i7 CPU based workstation is
recommended. The following color cameras have been extensively tested with LOLA (and
camera files are provided):
–
Hitachi KP-FD30 color analog
–
Toshiba IK-TF5 color analog
To connect the cameras to the video grabber you need appropriate analog cables. Analog
cables length can vary, and up to now cables up to 12m have been successfully used. Longer
cables should work fine as well, but testing that the performance does not degrade is
recommended. These cables can be easily created starting from high quality VGA cables,
both for b/w and color analog cameras. A schematic of the various cables pinout is included
in Appendix C.
–
BitFlow KARBON-CXP2 (Digital grabber)
This card supports B/W, Bayer encoded and color digital cameras. Tested CoaXPress
cameras are:
–
Imperx: CXP-B1410C, CXP-B1411C and ICX-B1410C (old Gen 1 model)
–
Adimec: OPAL-2000C-CXP
(to properly configure digital cameras please carefully read the “System setup” chapter)
For Bayer decoding and color operations we strongly recommend an i7 cpu.
To connect CoaXPress digital cameras to the video grabber you need an high quality 75
Ohm coaxial cable (BNC connectors); cables up to 100m have been successfully used.
Camera power is provided directly by the grabber.
Useful links:
- http://www.coaxpress.com/coaxpress.php
- http://www.intercon-1.com/Uploads//CoaXPress%20Product%20Info%20Sheet.pdf
2.2.2. Ximea USB3-Vision xiQ cameras
Starting from ver. 1.4.0 Lola also supports USB3-Vision cameras; in order to achieve the
best performance we currently use the xiQ camera series by Ximea which provide low latency
acquisition and reliable API for low-level programming.
Ximea cameras don't require a frame grabber; they connect directly to USB3 ports.
Currently tested camera is:
–
Ximea xiQ line: MQ013CG-E2
(http://www.ximea.com/en/products/usb3-vision-cameras-xiq-line/mq013cg-e2)
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
2.2.3. Experimental configurations
LOLA also experimentally supports BitFlow digital Camera Link grabber and cameras (B/W
and Color). See Appendix A for details and Appendix B for further considerations and a short list of
compatible video cameras. Currently there is no more support for this type of video setup.
2.3. Video output hardware requirements
LCD monitors introduce additional latency w.r.t. CRT monitors. Use a fast LCD monitor
with real low latency/response time (equal to or less than 2 or 3 milliseconds) or an old style, but
faster, CRT monitor/projector.
The way you connect the monitor to the PC may also cause additional latency. Use VGA,
DVI-D or RGB connectors, avoid HDMI. In case you use any additional device, like video splitters,
cable extenders, etc., please ensure that they do not add significant further latency to the video
output chain. If you need dual video output, try to use graphic cards in the PC which already have
native dual output, instead of using external splitting devices. In general beware that many video
devices (including video walls, etc) are intended for broadcasting or streaming use, where latency is
not important; thus the devices perform very badly when used with LOLA and should not be used.
2.4. PC hardware requirements
LOLA software runs on a typical mid/high-end multimedia PC. A suggested configuration
consists in an Intel dual/quad core based system (for color and HD support we highly recommend
an i7 Quad Core processor with Hyperthread support), with at least 4 GB RAM and the following
specifications:
– Mid/High performance motherboard providing PCI Express bus and supporting DDR3 ram
technology. Intel chipsets are highly recommended.
– 1Gbit LAN port. LOLA currently uses only 1 LAN port, but in the near future it will support
more LAN ports simultaneously for multiple nodes and multiple cameras support. See section
2.8 for important information regarding NIC performance.
– Integrated graphic adapter should be enough for mid-range pc; however a PCI-Express
Video Adapter by Nvidia (GeForce GTX series cards) is strongly recommended, specially for
color and HD video processing and for newly introduced Cuda compression features.
– Enough PCI-express free slots to host Audio card, Graphic adapter, BitFlow grabber and
additionally a compatible Intel NIC adapter. About required pci-e lanes, note that analog
BitFlow cards require a x4 PCIe slot and digital cards require a x8 PCIe slot. Using a lower
bandwidth PCIe slot, sometimes located besides the PCIe x4 and PCIe x16 ones, will result in
bad video grabbing performances.
– Mid/Full tower case with quiet design, a good air flow circulation and fans, and at least four
full height expansion slots.
– A really good and stable PSU (Corsair AX series, Seasonic or Antec).
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
– When using Ximea xiQ cameras a compatible USB3 host adapter chipset. Tested and
recommended USB3 adapters are:
- Fresco Logic FL1009 (395MB/s), Fresco Logic FL1100 (395MB/s), Fresco Logic FL1000
(210MB/s)
- Renesas D720200AF1 (386MB/s), Renesas D720202 (365MB/s), Renesas D20200F1
(327MB/s)
- Intel Z77 (450MB/s), Intel QM77 (450MB/s)
Known incompatible USB 3.0 chipsets are:
- ASMedia AS1042
- Etron EJ168A
- Via Labs VL800-Q8
For a more comprehensive USB3 adapters list look at:
http://www.ximea.com/support/wiki/usb3/Compatible_hardware
and for a more detailed hardware configuration list see Appendix G.
2.5. Network requirements
LOLA requires at least 100Mbps in minimal uncompressed configuration (640x480, b/w, 30
frames per second) up to 500Mbps in full SD video uncompressed configuration (640x480, color,
60 frames per second), or much more for HD uncompressed/unencoded video setups (over 2Gbps),
and generates a very high Packet Per Second (PPS) rate, as it uses 1K data packets, e.g. from 100 up
to 60 KPPS for SD and up to 250 KPPS for HD uncompressed/unencoded video. Thus the minimal
end-to-end connectivity for uncompressed mode (excluding uncompressed/unencoded HD where it
goes beyond 1Gbps) must be at least 1Gbps. This requires 1Gbps compliant cabling (Cat6 or
optical), and adequate networking hardware. You should pay special attention to LAN switches
performances when using LOLA, because of the high PPS rate, in particular when other data flow
compete on the same switch; in general the ideal situation is when the LOLA workstation is directly
connected to the Wide Area Network device (router or switch) at 1Gbps with no other network
devices in between, or at least there is no competing network traffic on the LAN devices being used
by LOLA data traffic. Furthermore some older routers (like for example Cisco 7200 and 7300 series
with NSE 100 or NSE 300 routing engines and equivalent ones) are also known to be unable to
perform correctly with LOLA in full uncompressed mode.
Starting from version 1.3.0 and on, Lola supports m-jpeg video compression; using
compressed video the minimum required bandwidth is reduced to about 20Mbps (640x480, b/w or
color, 30 fps). Please note that when using compression without the use of a CUDA compliant
graphic card, the PC processing power will be affected heavily, and the overall latency will also
increase from 3 to 10 milliseconds, depending on video resolution and CPU speed.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
The following tables give an approximate estimate of LOLA bandwidth traffic:
Uncompressed 8 bit (B/W or Bayer encoded)
•
640x480 - 30 fps:
~ 85 Mbps
•
640x480 - 60 fps:
~ 170 Mbps
•
1024x768 - 30 fps:
~ 210 Mbps
•
1024x768 - 60 fps:
~ 420 Mbps
•
1280x720 - 30 fps:
~ 245 Mbps
•
1280x720 - 60 fps:
~ 490 Mbps
•
1280x960 - 30 fps:
~ 325 Mbps
•
1280x960 - 60 fps:
~ 650 Mbps
•
1280x1024 - 30 fps:
~ 350 Mbps
•
1280x1024 - 60 fps:
~ 700 Mbps
•
1392x1040 - 30 fps:
~ 385 Mbps
•
1920x1080 - 30 fps:
~ 535 Mbps
Uncompressed 24 bit (Color RGB)
•
640x480 - 30 fps:
~ 250 Mbps
•
640x480 - 60 fps:
~ 500 Mbps
•
1024x768 - 30 fps:
~ 620 Mbps
•
1024x768 - 60 fps:
~ 1240 Mbps
•
1280x720 - 30 fps:
~ 730 Mbps
•
1280x720 - 60 fps:
~ 1460 Mbps
•
1280x960 - 30 fps:
~ 965 Mbps
•
1280x960 - 60 fps:
~ 1930 Mbps
•
1280x1024 - 30 fps:
~ 1030 Mbps
•
1280x1024 - 60 fps:
~ 2060 Mbps
•
1392x1040 - 30 fps:
~ 1100 Mbps
•
1920x1080 - 30 fps:
~ 1700 Mbps
Compressed 8/24 bit (Jpeg comp. quality = 60)
•
640x480 - 30 fps:
~ 15 Mbps
•
640x480 - 60 fps:
~ 30 Mbps
•
1024x768 - 30 fps:
~ 25 Mbps
•
1024x768 - 60 fps:
~ 50 Mbps
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
•
1280x720 - 30 fps:
~ 30 Mbps
•
1280x720 - 60 fps:
~ 60 Mbps
•
1280x960 - 30 fps:
~ 40 Mbps
•
1280x960 - 60 fps:
~ 80 Mbps
•
1280x1024 - 30 fps:
~ 45 Mbps
•
1280x1024 - 60 fps:
~ 90 Mbps
•
1392x1040 - 30 fps:
~ 50 Mbps
•
1920x1080 - 30 fps:
~ 60 Mbps
LOLA should not run behind a Firewall and should run with a public IPv4 address (no
NAT). IPv6 addresses are currently not yet supported. Traffic Shapers and other devices
which inspect/act deeply on network performances must also be avoided. There can be network
issues if the LOLA generated traffic goes via a number of Local Area Network Switches which are
shared with other IP traffic: indeed LOLA generates a high rate of packets (PPS rate) as it uses 1K
packet size, and this can affect performance of a number of LAN switches, resulting in a poor
LOLA end-to-end connection. A workaround can be to connect LOLA PC directly (or as close a
possible) to the LAN edge routers connecting to the network backbone, to avoid switches.
As LOLA provides no error recovery procedures and a very minimal data buffering, the
whole end-to-end network connection must be with very high performance: low jitter, error free and
the lowest possible network latency (packets Round Trip Time, RTT); network latency adds in fact
to LOLA system latency, and the sum define the upper limit when real-time human interaction is
still possible. LOLA has been developed to use the services provided by the Research and
Education hi-end networking services (like GARR, GÈANT, Internet2) and can run both on shared
IP network services (TCP and UDP) or on dedicated circuits, which provide better network
performances and reliability, especially at high bandwidth configuration. It is recommended to
perform end-to-end network tests also using additional tools; iperf or equivalent
http://iperf.sourceforge.net/) can be used, trying to simulate LOLA expected traffic before using
LOLA itself, but the best possible tests you can perform are using the LOLA-Tester application,
which is included into the distribution package itself: in fact it generates a traffic which is very very
similar to a real LOLA session (see section 5.3 for more details). These tools are also useful as a
powerful network debugging aid, in case of problems using LOLA.
2.6. LOLA v1.4.x backward compatibility
Due to some newly introduced features, LOLA v1.4.x is NOT backward compatible with
1.2.x (and before) versions. LOLA is fully compatible with all 1.3.x versions.
2.7. Network Interface Cards (NICs) performances
During various tests we detected that a number of NICs who declare a full 1Gigabit per
second capability are indeed unable to deliver that, or have problems in delivering correctly the
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
number of Packets per Second (PPS) generated by LOLA (up to 250000 in some cases). We
identified issues with all the Realtek and Broadcom chipset based NICs. Also some Marvell NICs
seem to have the same issues. We thus strongly suggest to get NICs which are based on Intel
chipsets, because all Intel based NICs we tested perform correctly also with LOLA at high frame
rates.
INTEL NICs NOTE: if you encounter some audio or video performance issues at high
video fps (greater than 30), we suggest to modify the “Interrupt Moderation Rate” value to
“Medium” (on Windows 7) or “Low” (on Windows 8). Generally the default setting is “Adaptive”,
but during our tests we discovered that it's not always good for LOLA. The same problem occurs if
you completely turn off the interrupt moderation rate.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
3. System Setup
This chapter describe in details how to install and correctly setup a LOLA system. Please
read it carefully.
3.1. Common libraries/drivers installation
These libraries are required by all Lola versions (both BitFlow and Ximea).
3.1.1 WinPcap (ver. 4.1.3)
LOLA relies on the WinPcap windows packet capture library, which has to be installed on
your PC before running LOLA. You will find the correct installer version within the Lola
package inside the “WinpcapSetup” folder.
3.1.2 Visual C++ 2010 SP1 Redistributable package (x86-x64)
Starting from version 1.4.0, Lola is distributed with all the required Microsoft libraries, so
it is no longer needed to download and install the “Visual Studio C++ 2010 SP1
Redistributable” package.
However, in case you encounter some issues with the included libraries, you can manually
download and install the package from:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/default.aspx
Read Appendix H.10 for further details.
3.1.3 RME Audio Card updated drivers
Download and install the latest available firmware and drivers from the audio board
producer site:
http://www.rme-audio.de/en_downloads.php
3.1.4 Nvidia Graphics Card updated drivers (required only by Lola “_Cuda” versions)
When using LOLA compiled with the Nvidia-Cuda support (LolaGui_Cuda versions),
please make sure your Nvidia graphics card drivers are greater than or equal to ver. 319.37.
If not download an updated version from Nvidia site:
http://www.nvidia.com/Download/index.aspx
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
3.2. Drivers for BitFlow systems (Alta-AN, Karbon-CXP)
3.2.1 BitFlow SDK 5.90
Download and install from the video board producer site:
http://www.bitflow.com/index.php/DownloadTable
NOTE: In order to work correctly with Lola please be sure to exactly download version
5.90 and no other.
In case you have installed previous SDK versions or you are upgrading an older LOLA
version which runs with an SDK older than 5.90, you must first remove the old SDK
and then install the new one.
You do not need a license code for the BitFlow SDK, thus just install it as “drivers only”,
when prompted for the serial number.
Note: if you are using a 64-bit Windows version please be sure to leave the “Install 32bit Binaries on 64-bit Windows” option checked (see Fig. 1).
Figure 1: BitFlow SDK Setup
After installing drivers you need to reboot your pc !
For analog systems no other drivers or tools are required; for digital systems (KarbonCXP) please follow the additional steps described below (section 3.2.2, steps 1 and 2)
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
3.2.2 Additional steps for BitFlow Karbon-CXP card (not required for ALTA-AN)
After installing the BitFlow drivers you will also need to update the Karbon-CXP firmware
and to install the Ximilon application.
Before proceeding, please make sure to connect your CXP camera to the first grabber
input (VFG0); it's labeled as "Port 1" on the grabber rear metal bracket (Fig. 2).
Figure 2: Karbon-CXP2 rear ports
1) FWDownload command (ONLY for Karbon-CXP card)
To update the Karbon-CXP firmware, open a Command Prompt window (All programs 
Accessories  Command Prompt) and run the following command:
FWDownload
You will be prompted to confirm the operation by pressing 'd' on your keyboard (Fig. 3).
Follow the instructions of the program and when it has finished please perform a cold
reboot (note that a warm reboot is not sufficient). To do so, turn the computer off (by
pressing the power switch button or using the “Shut down” button on the Windows Start
menu), wait for about ten seconds to ensure that all capacitors on the motherboard have time
to discharge and then turn it on again.
Figure 3: FWDownload command (Karbon-CXP grabber)
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
2) Ximilon version 1.7 for SDK 5.80+ (ONLY for Karbon-CXP card)
This tool installs all the required libraries by the standard GenICam interface and it's needed
to properly configure and control your CoaXPress cameras.
Download and install from the video board producer site:
http://www.bitflow.com/index.php/DownloadTable
After installing Ximilon you need to reboot your pc !
After all required drivers and libraries have been properly installed and you have correctly
rebooted your pc, Lola should automatically configure your camera during first start-up; if
not, see Appendix F for manual configuration.
3.3. Drivers for Ximea USB3-Vision systems
3.3.1 XIMEA API Software Package
Before connecting your Ximea camera, you need to download and install the latest BETA
drivers ("Ximea API Software Package Beta") from Ximea site:
http://www.ximea.com/support/wiki/apis/XIMEA_API_Software_Package
Note: be sure to download the latest BETA version and not the stable one (beta version
contains most recent updates).
After installing Ximea drivers and rebooting your pc, you can safely connect your USB3Vision camera to the computer.
3.4. Audio hardware Setup
Update/install the drivers first! (see section 3.1). Before using the software, it is highly
recommended to check if there is any board setup panel providing latency settings on which the
software applications have no control. The RME driver usually provides a DSP Setting Panel as the
one shown in Fig. 4 (a link to it is usually available in the Windows bottom-right toolbar).
Set the hardware latency (Buffer Size) to the smallest available (32 samples or 0.7 ms).
DSP setting panel might have a different look (it depends on driver versions), but they all have the
same equivalent functionality.
Since version 1.4.0, when LOLA is launched, it will check your current buffer setting and,
in case it doesn't correspond to the correct value, it will alert you with a warning message. LOLA
will also check for all available audio ASIO devices and if none is available, the program will
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
provide a warning message and run without audio support.
It will be possible to select the desired ASIO audio device from the Audio Video Setup dialog
window, available in the Tools menu (Fig. 5). If you are unfamiliar with the audio card internal
mixer settings, see Appendix E.
Figure 4: audio device control panel (2 different driver versions)
3.5. BitFlow Video hardware Setup
Please update/install the BitFlow drivers first! (see section 3.2).
3.5.1 Automatic BitFlow configuration (NEW)
Since version 1.4.0, Lola automatically configures your video grabber and camera during
start-up, both for analog and digital cards. Manual configuration, using SysReg and/or Ximilon
utilities, is no longer needed.
In case of automatic configuration failure, please carefully read and follow the instructions
described in Appendix F.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
3.6. Installing LOLA application
After the WinPcap, Visual C++ Redistribute libraries and BitFlow SDK or Ximea SDK are
correctly installed, to install LOLA simply unzip the .zip file provided in a directory of your choice
and where you have all read/write permissions.
To run LOLA just launch the LolaGui_x.x.x_YYY.exe application (x.x.x = version number,
YYY = build info).
3.6.1 Activation code and first time run
The first time the software is launched, LOLA will ask you for a user identification and
activation code. Just insert the ones you received.
Then the Audio/Video setup dialog window will pop up (Fig. 5) asking for first-time device
selection. The setup will then be stored in a LolaGui.ini configuration file in the Lola current
directory and will be used in future sessions. You can always modify the Audio/Video setup starting
from the Options menu, but only when LOLA is not connected to a remote node.
Figure 5: Lola Setup Dialog
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
LOLA initial default audio setup is for 2 stereo channels, collecting audio input from the
first two channels of the RME audio card; e.g. setting the “Audio Input Offset” to 0. LOLA will
also remember these settings until you change them again. Multichannel audio is always enabled
since v1.4.0
You will also have the possibility to select the “N. of Audio Channels” from this menu; if
you want to use more than 2 channels or you want to collect audio not from the first two channels
of the RME audio card, see section 4.1 for further setup details.
TX Audio Level let you choose between “1” (no audio pre-amplification) or “2” (6dB audio
pre-amplification). The default value “1” should be OK with most devices and setup, but in case
you need to boost the level, you can use “2” instead.
In the “Video” section, select the camera file appropriate for your device. You can also
configure a Toshiba or Hitachi color camera to run in b/w by selecting the appropriate “Mono8”
files. Since version 1.2.1 LOLA supports all Frame Rates between 25fps up to 60fps. Of course the
more fps the more bandwidth you will use. Standard values of 30fps or 60fps are commonly used.
If your PC has more than one NIC (Network Interface Card), in the “Network Adapter” field
you can also select which one LOLA will use to send and receive data.
Multiple NICs Note: Due to an internal software design, if you have more than one NIC
adapter, you have to physically disconnect the unused network cable and leave only the one
connected to the selected NIC.
Starting from version 1.3.0, LOLA can also compress video data. By default compression
is disabled (“NONE” selected from the “compression” menu) since it introduces further latency
and requires more processing power. It should be used only when there is not enough bandwidth
available to run LOLA with uncompressed video data (see section 2.5 and section 4.1 for further
details).
When using BitFlow grabbers, after you have finished configuring the available options and
clicked the OK button, Lola will ask your permission to write a new value in your Windows
Registry (Fig. 6). This is needed to automatically configure your analog or digital cameras. Please
make sure you are logged in as an account with administrative rights.
Figure 6: Lola Camera File registration window
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
3.6.2 Changing the user identification and activation codes
If you need to change your user identification/activation code, just select the LOLA “Help”
menu, and then “Update Serial”; upon confirmation your current codes will be removed. Quit the
LOLA application and restart it in order to enter the new codes.
3.7. Tuning the LOLA Workstation
It is recommended to switch off other applications that might interfere with the audio/video
streaming process when the application is used in production sessions: anti-virus scanning software
or similar should be carefully disabled. In case you notice some PC performance problems, it is
suggested to disable the various “energy saving” options. The fine tuning of the Operating System
for audio video streaming applications might also be advisable, although it is not strictly necessary,
specially on Windows 7 or later . Please note that Windows 7 firewall disables by default ICMP and
thus LOLA capability to perform its initial "check" function with the remote partner; you can fix
this by enabling ICMP responses in the Windows 7 firewall configuration. Also remember to turn
off the screen saver.
When using Lola it's also suggested to set your Windows "Power plan" to "High
performance" (Control Panel  Power options); depending on cpu we have seen some great
performance improvements.
3.8. TCP/UDP ports used by LOLA
LOLA will use by default ports TCP 7000, UDP 19788 and UDP 19798 for service
communication and audio/video streaming. It is thus required that no restrictions apply for these
ports (e.g. due to network or Windows firewall settings or local network administration policies). If
you experience problems like “no connection”, or “video OK but no audio”, or “audio OK but no
video” or “remote video window open but remains black screen” it is likely that some port filtering
is affecting your connection. Please check your local network policies and also ask the remote site
to do the same.
3.9. Local and Remote Audio/Video Quality
LOLA is just a tool which delivers to the remote site (in the best possible way) what it gets
as input into the system locally; if you input good audio an good video, you will likely get good
audio and good video delivered to the remote side. As such, remember to check locally your input
before sending it to the remote system. Check your audio levels, check how microphones collect the
sound, check the images the cameras are getting and the local lighting, etc. : remember the saying
“garbage in → garbage out!”
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
3.10. Software you should not install on your Lola pc
LOLA absolutely requires a perfectly “tuned” pc and so, in order to maintain your Windows
installation as clean as possible, please don't install any Antivirus software, Skype or similar video
conferencing applications, Apple software (iTunes or similar), VideoLan or other streaming
systems, and in general all other tools or background services that could seriously affect the overall
system and network performance.
The ideal Lola pc is based on a really clean Windows installation, with only the required
drivers and tools for the audio and video cards and grabbers and no other software than Lola itself.
Please also check the correctness of your installed drivers, specially with regard to the RME
card, BitFlow grabber and Network adapter.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
4. Running LOLA
LOLA user interface (Fig. 7) is intended to be as simple as possible: a remote address to call
(IPv4 address), a “Check” button to make a quick and simple pre-connection test, a “Connect” and a
“Disconnect” button. A “Session name” box allows you to assign a specific name to a setup
configuration for easier identification and you can also “Save” this configuration from the “File
menu”. It is thus possible to recall previously saved setup configurations via the “File menu”
“Open” command; as the saved configuration file also includes the remote party IP address, you can
use this feature to create your “LOLA address book”, where each entry also includes personalized
setup parameters for the remote partner. Furthermore, LOLA also remembers the “last session”
setup, thus it will always restart from the last session configuration. See also section 4.2 and Fig.
16.
Figure 7: LOLA main window: the control panel (left) and the local host video frame (right)
Since version 1.4.0, LOLA executable is provided in four versions and two architectures
(x86/32bit and x64/64bit):
1. LolaGui_1.4.0_BitFlow: for BitFlow grabbers
2. LolaGui_1.4.0_Ximea: for Ximea USB3-Vision xiQ cameras
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
3. LolaGui_1.4.0_BitFow_Cuda: for BitFlow grabbers and Nvidia Cuda compatible graphics
cards
4. LolaGui_1.4.0_Ximea_Cuda: for Ximea USB3-Vision xiQ cameras and Nvidia Cuda
compatible graphics cards
To prevent possible bitness-mismatch issues, the 64-bit versions are labeled with the _x64
suffix; 32-bit versions have no suffix. Although you can run 32-bit versions on a 64-bit OS, it's
strongly recommended to use the appropriate 64-bit version to avoid possible errors.
Please, make sure to use the correct version that corresponds to your OS bitness (32 or 64
bit) and hardware setup, otherwise Lola will not work.
When using Lola with Nvidia-Cuda support (_Cuda versions), please also make sure that
your Nvidia graphics card drivers are greater than or equal to ver. 319.37. To check your current
version open the Nvidia Control Panel (a link to it is usually available in the Windows bottom-right
toolbar) and click on “System information”.
Using Nvidia cards with Cuda support can generally improve the overall jpeg compression
speed; however it highly depends on your graphics card model. At the moment we suggest to use at
least the Geforce GTX 700 series graphics cards (a GTX 770 or better is highly recommended).
4.1. Local audio and video settings (Lola Setup)
Before attempting to connect to a remote host, the user should correctly configure the local
audio and video options. The Lola Setup dialog (in the Options Menu, Fig. 5) allows to select the
desired ASIO audio device, the video camera file, the desired video frame rate (25 up to 60 fps, but
30 or 60 are the standard suggested values), the video compression (default is “NONE”) and the
network interface controller.
4.1.1 Audio setup
This section allows to set the number of used audio channels and to specify from which
audio input channel from the RME audio card you shall collect the local audio input. You can
control from which audio input channel LOLA shall receive input by using the “Audio Input
Offset” setting. If set to 0 (default value), LOLA will receive audio starting from the first RME
channel, which usually is an analog input one.
Figure 8: Lola Setup, Audio section
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
As an example, imagine you have multichannel audio enabled and your audio card has the
following list of input audio channels:
AN1 AN2 SP.L SP.R A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7 A8
and you want LOLA to receive audio input from the 8 ADAT (A1-A8) channels. Then you need to
set “Audio Input Offset” = 4, thus LOLA will skip the first 4 channels, and “N. Audio Channels” =
8 in the Lola Setup dialog box. If you request more audio channels than available, LOLA will signal
an error. An easy way to detect your RME audio card configuration is to see the HDSP Matrix from
the card internal mixer (see appendix E). The “input channels” are listed as the top row in the
matrix.
It is recommended to verify that audio input is working properly and the input latency is low
as expected. A rough test can be done by switching on input-to-output redirection (using the “Local
audio On/Off” flag available on the control panel in the main window, see Fig. 7) and using
headphones connected to the LOLA audio card output to avoid an audio feedback effect. Further
checks on the audio setup can be done using the appropriate audio card mixer/setup application (see
for example Appendix E).
LOLA can also pre-amplify audio input by 6dB in case this is needed; just set “TX Audio
level” to “2.0” if you want this pre-amplification to happen.
4.1.2 Video Setup
If the local video camera is connected and the correct camera file is selected, you should
also see in the “Local Host” windows your local video. Also in this case you should check that the
local video latency is low as expected. You should also check that the local audio and the local
video are synchronized correctly.
Figure 9: Lola Setup, Video section
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
In this section you can control various video parameters:
–
"Camera Model" and "Camera Settings" specify the camera model, its resolution
and its pixel depth (8 bit for monochrome-Mono8 or 24 bit for RGB8-RGB8PACKED).
–
"Frame Rate": here you can specify the frame per seconds of your camera. Inside the
brackets on the right side of the "Fps" drop-down box, Lola indicates the minimum and
maximum fps values reached by the camera at the chosen resolution.
To avoid video stuttering or tearing effects it's preferable to select a value which
correspond to your monitor refresh rate or to the half; since generally the refresh monitor
rate is 60Hz the suggested values are 30 or 60 fps.
–
"Compression": starting from version 1.3.0 it is possible to send and receive jpeg
compressed video frames; this reduces the amount of transmitted/received data/packets
so saving a lot of network bandwidth. In order to apply the compression, select from the
drop-down menu the “M-JPEG” value; after selecting this option the compression
quality drop-down menu will be available too (in brackets is indicated the compression
algorithm: "CPU" indicates cpu-simd, "GPU" indicates gpu-cuda acceleration).
"Comp. Quality" indicates the overall video compression quality:
- 100% = high video quality but more cpu/gpu usage and compression time;
- 60% (default) = good balance between video quality and cpu/gpu performance;
- 40% = low video quality but low cpu/gpu usage and overall better performance.
Although it is also possible to compress Bayer encoded images, we recommend to use
compression on 24-bit RGB images only, in order to avoid highly visible video artifacts.
–
"Estimated TX Bandwidth (Mbit)" indicates the required network transmission
bandwith; for jpeg compressed streams it is an approximation.
– Options:
- "Optimize Jpeg Decompression": when activated LOLA uses a secondary thread to
decompress the incoming jpeg stream in order to avoid issues with the audio buffers
(LOLA Network Monitor  Realigned buffers). Generally the benefits depends on your
cpu speed, number of cores and hyperthread support. If you see that your receiving
video stream is stuttering (specially with frame rate higher than 50 fps) try to disable this
option; when disable pay attention to the number of Realigned Buffers in the Network
Monitor. The default is "enabled".
- "Enable CPU-SIMD Acceleration": this option should be always enabled in order to
achieve the better performance from your system. However, in the remote case you
encounter some audio or video issues, you can try to disable it to resolve them. The
default is "enabled".
- "Auto-Enable Bayer Decoding": when activated LOLA tries to auto-detect Bayer
encoded images and automatically debayering them. In case this doesn't work properly
you can manually activate Bayer demosaicing by using the Color Bayer Decoding
command available in the Bayer Color menu (Local/Remote windows). The default is
“enabled”.
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- “Auto-Enable Bilinear Interpolation”: when using DirectX video acceleration LOLA
automatically set image interpolation to “Bilinear” for a better image quality. Since this
operation is directly done by your graphic card, it doesn't add any latency to the overall
video rendering pipeline.
When you disable DirectX acceleration (by using Disable DirectX Acceleration
command in the local/remote window Options menu) LOLA automatically set
interpolation to “Nearest Neighbor”. In this case pay attention that using a zoom
bigger than 100% may consume more CPU time and decrease the overall system
performance, specially if you reactivate bilinear interpolation; so if you hear clicks on
audio or notice “stuttering” video effects set the window zoom to 100% and
interpolation to “Nearest neighbor”.
- “Use CXP cameras quick startup”: when checked Lola directly configures your
digital camera without using the GenICam interface. Since the actual version of the
GenICam libraries has some minor issues that randomly appear, we have preferred to
configure the cameras through a direct memory access. However, if you encounter any
image size or pixel format configuration issues, try to uncheck this option in order to use
the GenICam standard interface.
- “Use LOLA HW Color Correction for CXP cameras (bypass Ximilon settings)”:
when activated LOLA tries to directly configure your CoaXPress camera bypassing
Ximilon settings; disable it only when you encounter problems or want to manually
configure your camera through Ximilon interface. This option is available only on
Karbon-CXP grabber.
- “Use VFG0 as default virtual frame grabber for CXP cameras”: when using the
Karbon-CXP2 grabber, you have the ability to connect up to two cxp cameras and to
select the desired one by selecting VFG0 or VFG1 (VFG stands for Virtual Frame
Grabber; please refer to the BitFlow manual for further details). By leaving this option
checked, which is the default value, Lola will not pop up a dialog to prompt you which
board/port to open but instead it will automatically select the first one on the list (by
default VFG0, C1, Master, Port 1); if you want to manually configure it, uncheck this
option and Lola will prompt you to select the desired VFG at every camera initialization.
- “Use GPU to decode incoming JPEG stream”: here you can specify to use or not the
GPU to decompress incoming stream; the overall decompression speed depends on your
GPU card model. You can monitor the decompression speed by using the Show Window
Info command available in the Options menu (on the Remote Video window); if it's slow
you can deselect this option and use the CPU to decompress jpeg streams. This option is
available only on LOLA “_Cuda” versions.
- “Incomplete frames rendering threshold”: when using uncompressed video you can
also select the incomplete frames rendering threshold (Fig. 9); 0% means that Lola must
receive ALL video packets from the remote host in order to correctly render the entire
video frame. Setting a percentage between 1% to 10% means that LOLA can render the
video frame also if it hasn't received all the necessary packets to rebuild the entire frame:
in case of some lost network packets, this results in small black lines randomly rendered
on the display surface. In normal operation conditions, there shall be no lost data
packets, thus this parameter shall be left 0% (which is the default value). Use it only if
you experience some small network problems which affects video.
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4.1.3 Network Setup
“Network Adapter” section: inside this section you can select the desired Network
Interface Controller and apply or not the “IP and UDP Advanced Filtering” option. This last option
should be always checked except in case of network connection errors or the inability to complete
the negotiation between the hosts.
“Video packet size” set the size in bytes of the transmitted video packet; the default value is
1000 which is a good compromise for overall CPU and network performance. However when using
high resolution images (Full-HD) you can try to rise this value up to 1400 bytes in order to reduce
the CPU load and to contribute for an overall better system performance. When rising it, please pay
attention that larger packets could affect network performance on “non-optimal” network
connections.
Figure 10: Lola Setup, Network section
4.2. Local and Remote rendering windows
The features of the local video stream (resolution / pixel depth / frame rate) are shown on
top of the video frame, as shown in Fig. 12 (i.e. “Local host: 1280x1024, 24 bit, 30 FpS”).
It is possible to enlarge the video frame by selecting the desired zoom ratio from the pop-up
menu available on the video frame (Fig. 11) or simply by resizing the window with the mouse; note
that the video aspect ratio is preserved in all cases. Since version 1.4.0 there are no more problems
about CPU usage because video rendering is completely DirectX-Gpu accelerated.
You can monitor window rendering speed and overall video performance by using the Show
Window Info command (Fig. 11) available in the pop-up menu. When you select this option, you
will see some useful information (Rendering mode, FpS, Zoom, Bayer decoding speed, Rendering
speed, Jpeg compression/decompression speed) overlaid on your display surface (Fig. 12).
When using CoaXPress cameras with 24-bit pixel format, an “RGB ↔ BGR” command will
be also enabled in the popup menu (Fig. 11). This command converts the standard GenICam RGB
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
format outputted by digital cameras to the BGR format used by Windows to render the images on
screen; we are waiting for a new camera firmware update from Imperx which should directly
perform this conversion internally and with no latency.
Figure 11: local/remote windows right-click pop-up menu
Figure 12: Rendering info overlaid on display surface
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
4.3. Color Menu and Bayer decoding
“Color Bayer Decoding” and “Bayer Matrix” menus, available in the local/remote window
pop-up menu (Fig.11), are intended for use with digital cameras when 8 bit Bayer encoded images
are used: they allow to switch from B/W to Color (by software Bayer decoding) and to select the
Bayer matrix type.
“Enable SW Color Correction” command available in the pop-up menu provides support for
color corrections (both for demosaiced and RGB images); this is a software correction and so use it
carefully because it adds some amount of latency depending on your CPU speed. Note that when
digital cameras with an RGB 24bit pixel depth are used, this option is automatically disabled
because LOLA can directly control the color corrections through hardware interface and with no
latency. In this case use the “Digital Cameras HW Color Correction” command available in the
main window “Options” menu (Fig. 13).
Figure 13: Hardware Color Correction command (main window Options menu)
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Figure 14: Hardware Color Correction window for BitFlow CXP grabber (GenTL Interface)
Figure 15: Hardware Color Correction window for Ximea xiQ cameras
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Depending on the camera pixel format (Mono8 or RGB), some color correction options may
not be available.
For the Ximea digital cameras is also available the “Enable Bad Pixels Correction” option
(Fig. 15); in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications “this correction is done on the host
side (driver level), based on the RAW data received from the camera. This means that the
processing is an additional step in the imaging pipeline, but its impact on the overall latency is
really marginal (it uses SSE function set)”. However, in order to ensure the maximum LOLA
performance, this option is disabled by default.
For the Imperx cameras you can also choose the “White Balance” mode: when set to “Auto”
the camera automatically configure its colors gain for you, when set to “Manual” you can manually
change the gain for each of the component colors, thus the camera will keep them constantly.
Generally it depends on your needs, but we suggest to set it to “Manual” in order to have a more
stable colors and to avoid some unwanted automatic balance corrections under unexpected lightning
conditions changes.
NOTE: In order to reduce the required network bandwidth, when using digital cameras
it's highly recommended to use Bayer encoded images; when demosaiced they have the same
quality as the RGB ones and generally the overall latency added by decoding process is about 1
ms or lower (Intel Core i7, quad core, 3.0GHz).
To use Bayer encoded images on digital cameras, simply select a camera-file with “Mono8”
indication in the Camera Settings drop-down list (i.e. “1280x1024-Mono8”). Lola will
automatically activate the “Color Bayer Decoding” command menu.
4.4. Connection with a remote host
The simplest way to connect to a remote host is by specifying its IP address in the Remote
IP Address box and clicking on the Connect button. You can also assign a “Session name” label for
easier identification into the corresponding box.
You may also load a previously saved “Session Configuration File” in which the address
information for a given host is stored. These are files with extension .ssn , and can be loaded/saved
using the File Menu (Fig. 16). These files are stored into the same folder where the LOLA
application is. The configuration stored into the “LastSsn.ssn” file is always the settings used in the
last LOLA session. If you want to create your own LOLA address/configuration book, just create
one .ssn file per each site you usually connect to, and then recall the appropriate one when needed.
To remove a stored session configuration, just delete the corresponding .ssn file in the LOLA folder.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Figure 16: Session Load/Save options
Before sending a connection request, it is recommended to check if the remote host is ready
for the connection. After inserting the remote host IP address, use the Check button provided in the
control panel below the IP address box: LOLA will issue a “ping request” the remote host at the
given IP address, and will also check if LOLA is running on it. An estimate of the network round
trip time (RTT) will also be provided. If the remote host is reachable, but LOLA is not running on
it, you should ask your remote party to start LOLA on his local host, and wait until your Check test
declares LOLA is also running remotely. The LOLA chat service (see section 4.10) works after you
enter the remote IP address and can help you in coordinating the connection with your remote
partner. Please note that if ICMP network protocol is filtered by network or local firewalls, the
“Check” test will fail.
If LOLA is running on the remote host, pressing the Connect button will cause the two
systems to negotiate the connection and start sending their audio/video streams to each other. Only
one node needs to initiate the connection. Note that while different video stream characteristics are
allowed for the two hosts (e.g., different frame rate, picture resolution, bit depth, color or b/w), the
audio stream parameters must be exactly the same. By default, 44100 Hz @ 16 bit, stereo, is
assumed. If during the negotiation an incompatible setup is detected, the two hosts will refuse to
connect. This is particularly important if audio multichannel is enabled.
4.5. Fine Audio/Video buffer tuning
Once the two hosts are connected, the user will have the opportunity to interactively change
the number of audio and video buffers used by the application, by using the Buffer Tuning panel
available in the Tools menu (Fig. 17). The number of buffers can be set both using the control slider,
or by typing the value into the box below the slider. Adding buffers means also adding latency: this
fact indeed also let you fine tune the audio/video synchronization, for example by adding audio
buffers. A balance between optimal latency, quality and synchronization is something you should
try to achieve, depending on the specific configuration situation.
For the video, you can control both the number of buffers you use before sending your video
(“Local”) and the number of buffers you use before displaying the received remote video
(“Remote”). For the audio you can only control the number of buffers you use before rendering the
received remote audio.
The number of buffers can be increased if dropouts or glitches are noticed in the received
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
audio or video streams, due to network traffic or delay jitter, otherwise it should be kept as low as
possible to avoid additional latency. In a typical correct situation video buffers are both set to “0”,
and audio buffers should be possibly “0” and not exceed “5”. LOLA remembers the last settings of
all Audio and Video Buffers, and will also save them into all specific .ssn files you save; thus you
can also save the “ideal” settings you like for any remote location you connect to.
Figure 17: Buffer tuning panel
4.6. Toggling Audio/Video and Network Monitor
During a connection, the user can also gain some information on the audio and video stream
through the Network Monitor panel, available in the Tools menu (Fig. 18). This dialog box provides
some information on the connection and on the traffic, as well as the possibility of selectively
switching off/on each one of the inbound, outbound, audio and video streams.
The Network Monitor windows Video section also show real-time values of send/received
video frames: “Local window Fps” and “Sent Fps” shall always be close to “Local Fps settings”
values. At the same time “Remote windows fps” and “Received Fps” shall always be close to
“Remote Fps Settings” values. If you notice quite different values, you should start investigating for
transmission losses problems (differences in Remote values) or in local PC performances (Local
values). For a detailed debugging help using Lola Network Monitor and TaskMgr, see Appendix I.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Figure 18: Network monitor panel
4.7. Disconnecting from a remote host
The connection can be interrupted by any of the two hosts by clicking on the Disconnect
button.
When the software is shutting down, the current local configuration (i.e., audio and video
setup) will be saved to a .ini file located in the same directory as the executable, and will be loaded
at the next start-up of the Lola application. Also, the last session information (remote host address
and info) is stored for future sessions.
4.8. Debugging a connection: Bounce-Back mode
To allow some easier debugging in case of problems, and to let you check the quality of your
transmission as received on the remote site, under the “Tools” menu you can enable the “Bounceback mode”. When selected, the remote LOLA host will start bouncing back your video stream
instead of sending its own. This action does not require any intervention on the remote host. On the
other hand, if you also want to have your audio to be bounced-back, an action is needed on the
remote host, by either physically connecting the in-out audio on the card, or by telling the audio
card mixer to route the audio in back to out channel. This bounce-back feature is still experimental
and also requires the remote host to use quite a lot of processing power.
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Note 1: connected hosts must have the same video compressed or uncompressed
configuration. If you use an “asymmetric” video connection (compressed with uncompressed) you
cannot use the bounce-back mode.
Note 2: Currently, Lola supports bounce-back mode on uncompressed streams only.
4.9. Debugging a connection: TaskMgr
LOLA strictly rely on an error free stable network connection. To check the status of what
you are sending/receiving from your own PC, you should run the Windows “TaskMgr” application.
Figure 19: Windows Task Manager
Select the “network” tab, and under the “show” menu display all total (green), input (yellow)
and output (red) real time traffic statistics. When everything is working fine (with uncompressed
video - default) you should see something like the above picture: a very stable constant traffic flow,
both in and out. If the 2 nodes are configured in the same way (same frame rate, same resolution,
same number of audio channels, etc) the input and output traffic shall be very close to each other. If
you see that the input traffic is unstable (and of course LOLA loses lot of audio and video data),
your should start investigating the network setup. It means that at some point of the connection
between the remote sending node and your node traffic is dropped. This can happen in the various
places: the network backbone connections (check with your network supplier), or on the remote
Local Area Network (check with the remote partner) or in your own Local Area Network. In case of
LAN problems, check that you do not have any firewall of any kind in place on the LAN, because
most of them cannot cope with LOLA traffic correctly. You should also check that your LAN
switches can work with LOLA traffic (at 30000 Packets Per Second PPS for 30fps in color SD), and
in case check if you have any IP traffic shaper in place which can affect LOLA traffic, too.
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4.10. Audio and Video Recording
4.10.1 Audio recording
LOLA can record an audio session at full quality, both for the local and the remote audio. If
you specify a file name and press the “Start Now” button on the main window, LOLA will create
into specified folder 2 audio files, with “_Local” and and “_Remote” suffixes which contains all
audio channels being send/received during a session. Please note that if you use more than 2 audio
channels, the audio recording files will contain all audio channels, thus you need an appropriate
audio player/editor in order to be able to open them all. Inside LOLA folder you will also find
LolaWavSplitter.exe: it's a small utility to extract channels from a multichannel .wav file (see
“LOLA Tools” chapter for more details).
4.10.2 Video recording
Starting from version 1.4.0, LOLA can also record video sessions (both local and remote
streams).
Figure 20: Audio/Video Recording Section (main Lola window)
In the “Audio/Video Recording” section of the main window, you can Start/Stop recording,
select which stream to record (both Audio and Video, Audio only or Video only) and set the output
filename. To select the output path or to change the default recording settings select the “A/V
Recording Setup” command available in the main window “Options” menu or simply press
Ctrl+Shift+R. Please refer to the following section 4.9.3 for further details.
Note: When recording uncompressed data, please pay attention to your hdd/sdd writing
speed. For example the required bandwidth for an uncompressed 1920x1080 RGB video stream at
30 fps is about 178 MB/s and recording both local and remote streams on the same disk raises it to
356 MB/s. Using a Bayer encoded video with the same resolution and fps reduces the bandwidth
demand to 59.33 MB/s or using Jpeg compression drastically reduces it to about 7 MB/s or lower
(depending on compression quality). To achieve better performance it is also suggested to use
different physical disks for recording local and remote streams.
LOLA writes the video streams to disk as a sequence of numbered image files (one file for
each frame) using bmp or jpg formats; this system should grant a good compatibility with general
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video-editing softwares.
4.10.3 Audio and Video Recording Setup Window
Inside “A/V Recording Setup” window you can change various recording settings. You can
specify the output paths, compression (uncompressed or jpeg compressed images) and decide which
stream to record (local, remote or both).
Figure 21: Audio/Video Recording Section (main LOLA window)
4.11. Chat window
In order to resolve possible issues with the remote host, LOLA has the ability to “chat” with
the remote node. To open the chat window select the Chat window command available in the Tools
menu or simply press Ctrl+L. The remote address where the message will be sent is the same as that
indicated in the main window in the Remote Session/IP Address field. To send the message press
CTRL+Return. Chat window works also when LOLA is not connected.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
4.12. Audio Test signal
To test the audio connection Lola can send an internally generated audio signal (689Hz,
-3dBfs) to the remote host. To do so use the Send Audio Test Signal command available in the Tools
menu.
4.13. Windows layout
When Lola is connected to the remote host, you can decide how to automatically dispose the
Local and Remote windows on the screen. Three layouts are available: tile vertically (Ctrl+Shift+1),
tile horizontally (Ctrl+Shift+2) or maximize remote (Ctrl+Shift+3). This last is really useful when
using HD or Full-HD setups.
4.14. Duplicate window (remote host display)
When Lola is connected to the remote host, you can duplicate the Remote host window by
clicking on the Create/Destroy Duplicate Window command available in the main window Options
menu. A new remote window clone will be displayed; to destroy it simply click another time on
Create/Destroy Duplicate Window command.
Figure 22: Duplicate window (remote host)
Duplicating the remote windows is useful to organize your local video setup, enabling
scenarios where you need to handle in different ways the video coming from the remote site. For
example imagine that you need to use a monitor dedicated for the users involved in the connection,
36
LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
and you need another different image to display to the audience on a different screen or projector.
As you can zoom/resize independently the 2 video windows, you can arrange them in the more
appropriate way for your setup.
4.15. LolaGui process priority
Starting with version 1.4.0, you can change the LolaGui executable process priority by using
the “LolaGUI process priority” menu in the Options menu (main window).
In the previous versions it was hard coded and set to “High priority” by default; but after
adjusting and improving some internal thread settings, LOLA can now work with a “Normal
priority” level. This change has brought some benefits for the audio thread stability, specially when
using HD video streams and/or CUDA acceleration (it primarily avoids some audio “click” issues).
You can try to raise the priority level to “Above Normal” or “High” and see if this could
improve your LOLA performance or not; it highly depends on your CPU type, speed and number of
cores.
4.16. Audio only setup
If you haven't installed a video grabber on your system (BitFlow cards or USB3-Vision
cameras), you can use Lola in an “audio only” setup. To do so please use the XIMEA version
because it doesn't require additional BitFlow SDK drivers and in this case it works better. During
start up, Lola will warn you about no video devices found and ask you if you want to continue;
answer “yes” and you are ready to go.
4.17. Lola system checkup
When Lola is running, please make sure to check some important things:
•
If you have more than one network card, make sure to select the right one (the one really
connected to your network and correctly configured); otherwise Lola will fail to connect or
show you a black “Remote host” window. To check or set your network adapter open the
“Lola Setup” dialog (Options menu → Lola setup).
•
After applying your camera “Fps” setting, always check its correctness by opening the Lola
Network Monitor (Tools menu → Network monitor) and look if the “Local FpS settings”
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
and “Local window FpS” values match.
You can also check it by using the “Show Window Info” command in your “Local host”
window context menu; when selected a “Fps” info will be overlaid on the display surface
(together with other useful information).
•
When selecting a camera file and the relative image size and pixel format (Mono8 or
RGB8), please take a look at the estimated TX bandwidth value in order to avoid sending
too much data and packets to the remote host (this can cause video stuttering or audio
crackling noise issues to the receiving site).
•
Make sure to use the correct Lola version that corresponds to your OS bitness (32 or 64 bit)
and hardware setup, otherwise Lola will not work.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
5. LOLA Tools
Provided with LOLA there are three useful tools: LolaWavSplitter, LolaVideoConverter and
LolaGui_Tester.
5.1. Lola Wav Splitter
This tool converts multichannel audio files into separate mono files.
Figure 23: Lola Wav Splitter application
5.2. Lola Video Converter
In order to optimize the overall system performance, Lola writes raw image files when using
Bayer encoded streams or Jpeg BGR files when using compressed streams. So, before importing
these files into your preferred video editing software, you can use this tool to convert them into one
of the following formats:
–
8 bit Bayer encoded to 24 bit RGB;
–
BGR to RGB (for 24 bit Jpeg compressed images)
–
Uncompressed Bmp to Jpeg;
Using "Browse" button you can specify the folder where you previously saved the A/V files;
in the Files info section it will display the total number of video files, their format (bmp or jpg) and
image info. It also suggests the more appropriate conversion option.
Click on the "Preview" buttons to have a conversion preview based on the first captured
frame.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Cliking on "Convert" button will start the conversion process. When finished you will find
the converted files in the same "Input path" location but inside a newly created folder named
"ConvertedFiles_[DD_MM_YY]_[hh_mm_ss]" (where DD=day, MM=month, YY=year, hh=hours,
mm=minutes and ss=seconds). Files inside new folder maintain their original name.
Figure 24: Lola Video Converter application
5.3. LolaGUI Tester
This tool simulates a LOLA setup which runs without audio and video equipment, but
generates a nearly identical network traffic as the real LOLA does. Currently it only generates a
video data stream, because is really difficult to emulate the RME Audio cards internal
40
LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
clock/interrupts precision; but given the important network traffic is generated by video stream it
works fine as a quick to use tester.
You can use it to connect between two "tester" installations, but also between a real LOLA
application and a tester.
Since version 1.0.3 there are a jitter indication and a jitter graph in order to get more detailed
info about your network performance.
Figure 25: LolaGUI tester application
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix A – Old experimental digital video setup
A.1 - CameraLink
A CameraLink Digital (B/W and Color) video configuration was tested but for various reasons, first
of all the small maximum cable length (10m) but also for the greater latency, it is abandoned. The
Camera Link configuration under test was as follows:
•
BitFlow Neon-CL grabber with SDK 5.60 drivers;
•
Sentech STC-PoCL33A color video camera (color output is Bayer encoded, needs SW
Bayer decoding).
Digital Camera Link cameras are found on the market in a wide variety of brands and
models, and a selection of cameras, both B/W or RGB and likely to be compatible with LOLA, is as
follows:
Adimec (e.g., A1000 Camera Link or Opal2000-CL ), Basler (e.g., L100 or L300 series), CIS (e.g.
VCC-F32 series), Hitachi (e.g., KP-FD30CL), Imperx (e.g., ICL-B0610 ), Leutron Vision (e.g.,
PicSight P34B-PoCL), Jai (e.g., RMC-6740CL), PhotonFocus (e.g., MV-D640(C) series), Sentech
(e.g., STC-CLC33A ), Toshiba-Teli (e.g., CS6910CL ), Uniq(e.g., UP600-CL).
There is NO MORE support for this type of video setup.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix B – Compatible Video Analog Cameras
Analog B/W cameras with characteristics similar to the Sony HR50 can be easily found. On the
other hand, analog color cameras with frame rates > 30 fps @ 640x480 and RGB output seems to
be rare on the market. A few examples of brands offering analog RGB cameras are Toshiba (e.g.,
IK-TF5), JAI-Pulnix (e.g. the CV-M91 series), Hitachi (e.g. KP-FD30).
Using a different camera (color or b/w) usually requires adapting/creating a new “camera file”
specific for the camera itself. You can start from the ones available in the distribution kit, and create
a new one for the intended model. Finally, the camera file must also be compliant to external
trigger mode. This can be achieved by editing a camera file with the CamEd.exe tool (available in
Start/All Programs/BitFlow/Sdk 5.90/), and setting the External trigger flag to Enabled in the
Triggering menu item (Fig. B1).
Figure B1: The CamEd.exe utility, and the external trigger flag set to “enable”.
Other parameters which might need adjustment are the camera resolution and the video sensor
offsets. Please contact [email protected] for assistance if you plan to use a different camera from
the ones in the supported list.
Work is also in progress to support generic RGB and YpbPr input video sources.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix C – Cameras Cabling Guide
Although you can buy appropriate cables for many of the analog cameras to be used with the BitFlow
grabber cards, this short guide can help you in building your own high quality cables.
In order to start, we suggest to use high quality VGA cables, which you can quite easily get anywhere. A
good reference model are for example the Belkin F3H982, which comes in different lengths. In some of the
tables you will find specific examples built using the Belkin F3H982 cables. Another very good alternate
cable, which also supplies power via the BitFlow card to the cameras, is the KSI (Kontact-Systeme Inter
Gmbh) model HYB 8 + 3 Koax (nr. 75 65 380) http://www.ksi.at/online-kataloge/kat7A/7A-565/7-565.pdf.
For b/w cameras you will often need a 12 pin Hirosi connector model HA10A-10P-12S, while color cameras
often use a standard 15pin VGA connector, thus you do not need to replace the one already on the cable.
For the BitFlow grabber 62 pin connectors the suggested parts are: Plug model AMP 748367-1, Shielding
HW model AMP 748471-1, Enclosure model AMP 748476-1
Please always check the camera documentation for the correct cabling. The following are the schemas for
LOLA supported cameras. In addition here is the BitFlow 62 pin cabling full specification:
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
45
LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Cable for Sony HR50
The VGA connector has 3 coaxial cables for video signal, but for b/w cameras you only need one;
just select, for example, the "G" (green) one. Use the twisted pairs for the other signals. Remove
both VGA connectors from the cable, and connect the pins as follows:
Hirosi
62pin
signal
comments
1
43
Ground
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
5
3
2
44
24
47
4
23
26
25
48
+12V
Ground
VIDEO1
Ground
HD
VD
Ground
Ground
WEN_IN
TRIG_OUT
Ground
VIDEO1 shield, coax
VIDEO1 signal, coax
Cable for Hitachi KP-FD30
Remove one of the VGA connectors from the cable and connect to the 62 pin connector as shown in
Fig. C1, the other VGA connector is already correctly connected to go on the camera.
VD
HD
4
23
6
11
24 25 26
47
trigger wen
b
g
r
wire
wire
wire
shield
shield
shield
Figure C1: The cabling for the Hitachi KP-FD30 camera.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Here is a detailed table for pinout connections, if you use the Belkin F3H982 and the Hitachi:
(NC) = Not Connected
15 Pin Hitachi camera
Comment
Belkin cable
62 Pin DIN Comment
1
R/C Output
For Y/C mode
Red Coaxial
23
2 tap mode?
2
G/Y Output
For Y/C mode
Green Coaxial
2
2 tap mode?
3
B/VBS Output
Wen in Y/C mode? Blue Coaxial
1
4
WE Output
Wen?
Black
26
5
GND (TXD/RXD)
Brown
(NC)
6
Video GND
Red Shield
11
7
Video GND
Green Shield
6
8
Video GND
Blue Shield
4
9
Unreg. +12V Input
(No wire)
5
10
Trig Input
Red
11
GND
Orange
(NC)
12
RXD
Yellow
(NC)
13
HD In/Out/Sync
Out
HD=Horizontal
Direction
Green
24
14
VD In/VD Out
VD=Vertical
Direction
Grey
47
15
TXD
Wen?
White
(NC)
Shield GND
Power from
BitFlow
Shield/Copper
No wire available
on Belkin cable
25
Connct to
improve
(NC) or 62
EMI/RFI
Rejection
Power Supply from the BitFlow card: the Belkin F3H982 cable does not have a wire to provide
power supply from the BitFlow board card (pin 5) to the camera (pin 9). If the cable you are using
has a wire available, just make the connection as above, and you will not need an external power
supply for the camera.
Better grounding/shielding: even if not strictly necessary, if you also connect the shield/ground as in
the table above, you may gain in image quality, specially in “noisy” area with a lot of EMI/RFI.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Cable for Toshiba IK-TF5
The cable for the Toshiba is very similar to the one for the Hitachi. Remove one of the VGA
connectors from the cable and connect to the 62 pin connector as shown in the following table (the
other VGA connector is already correctly connected to go on the camera), F3H982 Belkin cable:
(NC) = Not Connected
15 Pin Toshiba camera
Comment
Belkin cable
62 Pin DIN Comment
No Y/C mode?
Red Coaxial
23
1
R Output
2
G Output
Green Coaxial
2
3
B Output
Blue Coaxial
1
4
TXD
Black
(NC)
5
GND
Brown
4
6
GND
Red Shield
11
7
GND
Green Shield
6
8
Sync
Wen?
Blue Shield
4
Shorted to Blue
Shield
9
12V
Power from
BitFlow
5
No wire
available on
Belkin cable
10
GND
Red
(NC)
11
RXD
Orange
(NC)
12
Trig
Yellow
25
13
HD In/Out
Green
24
14
VD In/Out
Grey
47
15
Index
White
26
Shield GND
Wen?
(No wire)
Shield/Copper
Shorted to Blue
Shield
Connect to
improve
(NC) or 62
EMI/RFI
Rejection
Power Supply from the BitFlow card: the Belkin F3H982 cable does not have a wire to provide power
supply from the BitFlow board card (pin 5) to the camera (pin 9). If the cable you are using has a wire
available, just make the connection as above, and you will not need an external power supply for the camera.
Better grounding/shielding: even if not strictly ncessary, if you also connect the shield/ground as in the table
above, you may gain in image quality, expecially in “noisy” area with a lot of EMI/RFI.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix D – Setting Cameras in External Trigger Mode
This section show how to correctly set in External Trigger Mode the supported cameras. If you are
using a camera not listed here, contact [email protected] for assistance.
Sony HR50 setting for external trigger mode
If using the Sony HR50 B/W analog camera, the camera must be configured according to external
trig/shutter mode 2 (DIP switches 6 and 7 set to OFF, and DIP switch 8 set to ON) and with the
switch n. 4 set to ON.
Figure D1: Sony HR50 DIP switch settings
Sony HR70 setting for external trigger mode
If using the Sony HR70 B/W analog camera, the camera must be configured according to external
trig/shutter mode 2 (DIP switches 6 and 7 set to OFF, and DIP switch 8 set to ON).
Figure D2: Sony HR70 DIP switch settings
Note: the default exposure setting for Lola is 100, but when using the Sony XC-HR70 camera this
value causes some artifacts on the image (black lines or superimposed ghost images).
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
As a workaround you have to manually set the "Exposure" value in the LolaGui.ini file (created by
Lola during the first start/end cycle) using the following indications:
- 640x480, 30 fps >> Exposure=31.000000
- 1024x768, 29 fps >> Exposure=30.000000
If you don't want to edit the file every time you change the camera file, you can set the following
values which work for both:
- FrameRate=29.000000
- Exposure=30.000000
Hitachi KP-FD30 setting for external trigger mode
If using the Hitachi KP-FD30 color analog camera, the camera must be configured according to
external trig/shutter mode: the internal DIP switches (accessed by removing the back panel of the
camera) should be set as follows: SW6001 - Lower side (input sync), SW6002 - Upper side (Fig.
D3).
Figure D3: Hitachi KP-FD30 internal switch setting for external trig/shutter mode.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
The camera rear switch should be set for progressive scan as follows: 1-On (VGA progressive
scan), 2-Off, 3-Off, 4-Off (Fig. D4).
Figure D4: Hitachi KP=FD30 rear DIP switch setting for progressive scan mode.
Finally, the "shutter mode" field in the software setting menu of the camera should be set to "Ext. Trigger"
Main Menu -> shutter Menu -> Mode: ext trig
Trigger Mode: one trig
Trig polarity: negative
Wen Polarity: positive
Main Menu -> Sub Menu -> Item: preset
Sync/HD out: HD
Sync On G: On
Toshiba IK-TF5 setting for external trigger mode
The Toshiba IK-TF5 color analog camera should be configured according to external trig/shutter mode as
follows:
1. the internal DIP switch (accessed by removing the metal chassis of the camera) should be set in
the HD/VD Input 75 Ohm position (factory setting), as in Fig. D5.
Figure D5: IK-TF5 internal DIP switch setting.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
2.
as follows:
the "shutter " Menu fields in the software setting menu of the camera (Fig, D6) should be set
Index Menu -> shutter Menu -> Mode: E. TRG
E. TRG: 1P SR
TRG P.: positive polarity
EXP: 16 msec
PART: off
Figure D6: IK-TF5 shutter menu settings
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix E – Audio Card internal Mixer settings
LOLA usually adopt RME audio cards for audio in/out functions. In order to work correctly, these audio
cards must be setup in the correct configuration to ensure LOLA gets the correct audio input channels, and
also can output the sound from the remote host correctly. You should at first display the audio card routing
matrix (see Fig. E1 and E2). The top row displays the available input channels. This information is useful to
set appropriately the AudioInputOffset parameter. In both examples, to use AN1 and AN2 analog channels
the AudioInputOffset must be set to 0; to use the ADAT A1...A8 channels, the AudioInputOffset must be set
to 8 in the Fig. E1 example, and to 4 in the Fig. E2 one.
Figure E1: the HDSP Matrix, with audio out routing for analogue and ADAT channels
Figure E2: a different HDSP Matrix, with audio out routing for the ADAT channels only
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Then the output routing shall be correctly configured. Fig. E1 shows a correct routing example both for the
analogue channels and for the ADAT channels. Fig. E2 shows a configuration where only the 8 ADAT
channels are routed to the output.
The HDSP audio Mixer should also look like in Fig. E3 or E4. Please note that buttons link Out1 Out2 AN1
AN1 shall NOT be in red/pink color, because this means you set the audio card in local audio loop.
Figure E3: The RME main Mixer window (stereo analog in/out setup)
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Figure E4: The RME main Mixer window (8 channels out setup)
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix F – Manual BitFlow Configuration
Please update/install the BitFlow drivers first! (see section 3.2).
F.1 Camera file installation
Before using an application relying on BitFlow video devices, a so called camera
configuration file must be installed for each camera possibly connected to the BitFlow grabber. The
utility SysReg.exe, available in Start/All Programs/BitFlow/SDK 5.90/, can be used to add a new
camera file to the grabber (note: for these tools to affect the system configuration in Windows 7,
they must be “run as Administrator”). It is useful to also install test camera files which can generate
synthetic video with a wide range of frame rate and resolution characteristics. You should install the
camera files for the video camera(s) you intend to use with LOLA. The current camera files for the
LOLA tested cameras are included into the “CameraFiles” folder inside the LOLA distribution kit
(if not already included into the BitFlow standard distribution):
- Sony HR50:
00-Sony-XCHR50-640x480-Mono8-Fps60.anlg
- Sony HR70:
00-Sony-XCHR70-640x480-Mono8-Fps30.anlg
00-Sony-XCHR70-1024x768-Mono8-Fps29.anlg
Note: This camera is supported but not really suggested because it requires
some hacks inside LolaGui.ini file and can only reach 30fps.
- Hitachi KP-FD30:
00-Hitachi-KPFD30-640x480-Mono8-Fps60.anlg
00-Hitachi-KPFD30-640x480-RGB8-Fps60.anlg
- Toshiba IK-TF5:
00-Toshiba-IKTF5-640x480-Mono8-Fps60.anlg
00-Toshiba-IKTF5-640x480-RGB8-Fps60.anlg
Color cameras can also run in b/w (for example because you want to reduce network
bandwidth use); you just need to load and then select the appropriate b/w configuration Camera
File, which is identified by the “Mono8” indication in the name.
.
Figure F1: SysReg.exe utility. Add button allows to choose
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
new camera files from the list of available ones
When the camera files are installed, you can select the appropriate camera from the Audio
Video Setup dialog window, available in the LOLA Tools menu (Fig. 4).
LOLA allows the user to select different frame rates (from 25 up to 60 fps) from its own
setup dialog windows. In order to make this option work, the camera must be configured to
allow triggering by an external source. See Appendix D to correctly set the supported analog
cameras. We can also supply on request camera files with internal triggering (...SYNC-ON-VID
ones) but they should not be used with LOLA.
F.2 Additional steps to manually configure CoaXPress Digital cameras
Launch Ximilon, expand your camera-name node (i.e. “Imperx ICX-B1410C”), “Camera
Feature Set” node and “AcquisitionAndTriggerControls” node and then change the following
parameters:
- “Imperx CXP-B1410C” and “Imperx CXP-B1411C” (Gen 2)
- Exposure:
- ExposureMode = Off;
- Trigger
- TriggerActivation = RisingEdge;
- TriggerMode = On;
- TriggerOverlap = Off;
- TriggerSource = CxpTrigger;
- TriggerType = Fast;
- ImageSizeControl
- CameraSpeed = OverClocked;
- “Imperx ICX-B1410C” (Gen 1)
- Exposure:
- ExposureMode = Off;
- Trigger
- TriggerActivation = RisingEdge;
- TriggerMode = Off;
- TriggerOverlap = Off;
- TriggerSource = TimerTrigger;
- TriggerType = Fast;
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
- ImageSizeControl
- CameraSpeed = OverClocked;
- “Adimec OPAL-2000C”
- Acquisition Control:
- ExposureMode = TriggerWidth
- ExposureTime = 15140
- FrameStartActivation = RisingEdge
- FrameStartSource = Trigger
- TriggerActivation = RisingEdge
- TriggerSource = Trigger
If you manually configure your camera, you must also change the Width, Height and
PixelFormat values according to your BitFlow camerafile settings.
F.3 Camera Setup Check
After the camera files have been registered, it is recommended to check that the video
grabbing devices are working properly, by using CiView.exe utility provided with the BitFlow SDK
in the same location as the SysReg.exe tool. Note that with this particular configuration, the camera
must triggered by an external trigger. This can be achieved by running the application in “Free Run
Mode” (this option is available in the Preview menu).
When LOLA is launched, it will check for all available video BitFlow devices (if none is
available, the program will provide a warning and run without video support). It will be possible to
select the desired video camera, among the ones listed inside Lola “CameraFiles” folder.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix G – Lola Hardware components
HIGH-END PC (Full HD resolution, 1920x1080, RGB) :
– Mid/Full tower case with quiet design, a good air flow circulation and fans, and at least four full
height expansion slots (Antec Sonata Solo II or similar)
– Power Supply Unit: at least 860W (Corsair AX860 or better)
– Processor: Intel Core i7 (4930K, 6 cores)
– 16GB RAM DDR3 (Corsair or Kingston, 4x4GB, Quad Channel DDR3 Memory Kit)
– Motherboard: an high-end motherbord with Intel chipset X79 (i.e. M/B ASRock Fatal1ty X79
Professional or similar) or better with enough PCI-express slots for:
- 1 Graphics Card (16x slot required) … Note: high-end graphics cards occupy the space of two
slots!
- 1 BitFlow frame grabber (for the Karbon-CXP a 8x slot is required, for the ALTA-AN a 4x slot is
required)
- 1 RME Audio Card (for the HDSPe-AIO a 1x slot is required)
–
–
–
–
–
–
SSD (suggested for OS)
2 HDD - 1TB (Raid 1 configuration) for uncompressed video recording (Western Digital WD-Black)
Nvidia GeForce GTX 770 or better (EVGA) … (Nvidia cards suggested for jpeg hardware
acceleration)
Intel Gigabit CT Desktop Ethernet Pci-e adapter (required when an Intel NIC is not integrated on the
motherboard)
Full-HD LCD Monitor with low response time (<= 2ms)
OS Windows 7 or 8.1 (32-bit or 64-bit)
MID-RANGE PC (SD/HD resolution, 1024x768, RGB ):
– Mid/Full tower case with quiet design, a good air flow circulation and fans, and at least four full
height expansion slots (Antec suggested)
– Power Supply Unit: at least 500/600W (Corsair suggested); it depends on Graphics card
– Processor: Intel Core i7 (3770K, 4 cores)
– 8 GB RAM DDR3 (Corsair or Kingston suggested)
– Motherboard: a mid-range motherbord with Intel chipset and enough PCI-express slots for:
- 1 Graphics Card (a 16x slot is required) … Note: high-end graphics cards occupy the space of two
slots!
- 1 BitFlow frame grabber (for the Karbon-CXP a 8x slot is required, for the ALTA-AN a 4x slot is
required)
- 1 RME Audio Card (for the HDSPe-AIO a 1x slot is required)
– Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 (Nvidia cards suggested for jpeg hardware acceleration)
– Intel Gigabit CT Desktop Ethernet Pci-e adapter (required when an Intel NIC is not integrated on the
motherboard)
– OS Windows 7 or 8.1 (32-bit or 64-bit)
LOW-END PC (SD resolution, 640x480, RGB):
– Mid tower case with qa good air flow circulation and fans, and at least four full height expansion
slots
– Power Supply Unit: at least 400/500W
– Processor: Intel Core i5
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
–
–
–
–
4 GB RAM (DDR3)
Motherboard: a mid-range motherbord with Intel chipset and enough PCI-express slots for:
- 1 Graphics Card (a 16x slot is required)
- 1 BitFlow frame grabber (for the Karbon-CXP a 8x slot is required, for the ALTA-AN a 4x slot is
required)
- 1 RME Audio Card (for the HDSPe-AIO a 1x slot is required)
Intel Gigabit CT Desktop Ethernet Pci-e adapter (required when an Intel NIC is not integrated on the
motherboard)
OS Windows 7 or 8.1 (32-bit or 64-bit)
- Digital cameras and frame grabbers with CoaXPress interface:
– BitFlow Karbon-CXP2
– Imperx B1410C-CXP camera
– Imperx B1411C-CXP camera
– Adimec OPAL-2000C (this is still in beta-testing)
- USB3Vision Digital Cameras (no frame grabber required)
– XIMEA MQ013CG-E2 camera
- Analog cameras and frame grabbers:
– BitFlow ALTA-AN1
– Hitachi KP-FD30
– (Toshiba IK-TF5 - Discontinued)
- Audio Cards:
– RME HDSPe-AIO (Pci-e)
- Possible Audio Components
–
2 small Genelec or Yamaha audio monitors
–
1 active audio PA system (fox example Mackie)
–
2 condenser high quality microphones (for example Neumann KM184)
–
1 dynamic microphone (service voice)
–
1 analogue mixer (minimum 16ch in, 4 out + Main L/R, 4 AUX (for example Mackie), or one digital
mixer with ADAT support
–
Various audio cables
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix H – Known Issues
H.1 No timeout on remote partner unexpected disconnection
In some rare occasions, if the remote LOLA system occurs in an unexpected disconnection (system
or application problems, network disconnection, etc) and thus cannot notify the other system about its
closure, the local system remains “open and active” without warning (you of course immediately see you are
not receiving any more audio/video from the remote system). In such a case, just quit LOLA manually and
restart it to be ready for a new connection. If the remote system resumes transmission without requesting a
new “connect” (for example because it has been a network disconnection problem), both LOLA systems will
realign and restart normal operations without any action needed by you on both sides.
H.2 Windows Firewall and LOLA initial “check”
Windows 7 Firewall by default completely blocks ICMP (“ping”) packets. This makes the initial
LOLA “check” function unable to work correctly. To ensure that you can correctly use LOLA, without
risking to run with a Firewall completely disabled (if you are on the public Internet), you should configure
Windows Firewall with a rule enabling ICMP packets flow on your system (as well as on the remote system,
of course).
H.3 LOLA and antivirus software
LOLA uses an IP network packets building engine based on WinPcap libraries. Many antivirus
packages will detect this and list LOLA as a “malicious” software and try to block it. Until these antivirus
software will correctly recognize LOLA, you should disable them on your system. More over, in any case,
antivirus packages perform highly invasive activities on your PC, which can seriously compromise system
performances and LOLA itself. Thus you should carefully disable them while using LOLA.
H.4 Packet Per Second (PPS) and LAN Switches
LOLA produces a very high UDP packet per second (PPS) rate, especially when in color mode at
60fps. A number of LAN switches might be unable to cope with such a traffic, especially if there are other
applications running on the same switch which also requires a high PPS rate or packets priority handling
(like VoIP system/telephones, etc). If you see, for example via TaskMGR “network monitoring” application a
very irregular traffic pattern (and you get audio/video drops, clicks, artifacts), try to disable other
applications running on the same switches, or try to setup a direct connection between the LOLA system and
your border router, avoiding the LAN switches which cause the problem.
H.5 Packet Per Second (PPS) and NICs
Network Interface Cards (NICs) based on Realtek, Broadcom and some on Maverick chipset cannot
deliver correctly the PPS rate required by LOLA. This issue is know also when these NICs are used for other
kind of applications and depends on the the way the NIC drivers are handling traffic. There is no workaround
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to this issue until the manufacturer fix it either in the NIC itself of the drivers. We suggest to use Intel based
NICs which work fine. Please see some important informations about “Interrupt moderation rate” settings for
the Intel NICs described at chapter 2.8. Network Interface Cards (NICs) performances.
H.6 Network Configuration on the same Virtual LAN
If both LOLA systems are on the same Virtual LAN (VLAN), for example a GigaEthernet Circuit
with IP addresses in the same subnet, the current LOLA IP packet generation engine can behave not correctly
and you might have the systems to connect correctly, but no audio or video or both streaming flow among
them. You can see this in the Network Monitor panel, where the counters do not increase.
While a fix is in progress, a workaround to this problem is to configure the systems (PCs) Network
Connection Control Panel in a way that the “Gateway” IP address of one PC is set to the IP address of the
other PC (and the same on the other side).
If system “A” has
IP: 140.2.1.10 mask 255.255.255.0
and system “B” has
IP: 140.2.1.20 mask 255.255.255.0
then the full system “A” configuration shall be:
IP: 140.2.1.10 mask 255.255.255.0 GW: 140.2.1.20
and the full system “B” configuration shall be:
IP: 140.2.1.20 mask 255.255.255.0 GW: 140.2.1.10
H.7 Sony XC-HR70 camera exposure settings
The default exposure setting for Lola is 100.000000, but when using the Sony XC-HR70 camera this
value causes some artifacts on the image (black lines or superimposed ghost images). As a workaround you
have to manually set the "Exposure" value in the LolaGui.ini file using the following indications:
–
640x480, 30fps → Exposure=31.000000
–
1024x768, 29fps → Exposure=30.000000
If you don't want to edit the file every time you change the camerafile, you can set the following values
which work for both:
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
- FrameRate=29.000000
- Exposure=30.000000
H.8 Video Artifacts if LOCAL and REMOTE video windows overlay on screen.
If the LOCAL and the REMOTE video Windows overlay one to the other on the screen, the
foreground window may display some artifacts in the area where the background window is laying behind it.
This issue is still under investigation. Thus avoid to have partially overlapping LOCAL and REMOTE
windows on the the screen while using LOLA. The issue is not present if one of the windows uses the full
area of the screen.
Fig H1: note the artifact in the area where the 2 windows overlap
(in this case a different color rendering, but it can also be a partially late frame area).
H.9 BitFlow cards not recognized after Windows 8.1 Update 1 - Workaround.
When installing Windows 8.1 Update 1 the BitFlow cards are not recognized at the first cold boot,
but after restarting the pc (warm reboot), they work fine as usual. As suggested by BitFlow support, most
likely the problem is related to the fact that Windows 8 (by default) never actually shuts down: when you say
"Shut down" it actually sleeps. A work-around is to turn off this behavior, so that "Shut down" really shut's
down the computer. It's a little hard to find this setting, but check under the :
- Control Panel > Hardware & Sound > Power Option > System Settings > Shutdown Settings
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
H.10 Manual installation of the “Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 SP1 Redistributable Package (x86-x64)”
In case you encounter any issues with the included Microsoft libraries, you can manually download
and install the package from:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/default.aspx
and searching for "Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 SP1 Redistributable Package (x86)" if you are using a 32-bit
Windows version or “Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 SP1 Redistributable Package (64)” for a 64-bit one. In
case you can also apply the appropriate security patches, if any.
H.11 Digital cameras initialization failure when using the GenICam interface
When using the GenICam interface to initialize your digital camera (i.e. when “Use CXP cameras
quick startup” option is unchecked), sometimes it is not correctly initialized (video artifacts, wrong size and
pixel format or duplicated images). This is due to the fact that the actual version of the GenICam libraries
has some minor issues that randomly appear; as a workaround you have to reinitialize your camera by
opening the Lola Setup dialog and re-applying your settings with the “OK” button or by activating the option
“Use CXP cameras quick startup” (in this case Lola configures the camera through a direct memory access).
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix I – Remote assistance with TeamViewer
In order to give you a better assistance or to configure untested digital cameras, we can also
check and debug your pc and camera remotely using the TeamViewer software. Before asking for
remote assistance, please download the “TeamViewer QuickSupport” executable.
Please make sure to download the “QuickSupport” version and not the full
TeamViewer installer; the TeamViewerQS.exe is a simple standalone application that doesn't
require any installation.
Contact us at [email protected] for further information or details.
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Appendix J – Connection debugging hints
To debug your connection it's very useful to use the Network Monitor tool in conjunction
with TaskMgr. (this section is still under preparation).
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LOLA: Low Latency Audio Visual Streaming System
Acknowledgments
We would like to thank:
•
Dan Nichols (NIU School of Music) for his precious work, collaboration and suggestions
both for the creation of camera cables and for fine tuning of many Camera Files;
•
Marco d'Ambrosio (Università di Cassino) for his camera power supply suggestions;
•
the GPUJPEG library authors for giving us the permission to use it inside Lola;
•
the BitFlow support for the really precious help;
•
Matt Parkin for finding an insidious cxp bug and letting us to remotely configure and debug
his Imperx CXP-B1411C camera;
•
the LOLA users community for helping us in testing/debugging and suggesting new
features!
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