LIFE User's Guide - Planck LFI

LIFE User's Guide - Planck LFI
LIFE User’s Guide
The Planck/LFI People
This manual is for LIFE, version 3 (Lama 3.1.0, 2008-09-05 15:36:10).
c 2004-2008 The Planck/LFI People.
Copyright First version created by Maurizio Tomasi on 2006/06/22.
i
Table of Contents
1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
2
RaNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LAMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conventions used in this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
1
1
1
Tutorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2.1
2.2
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
A Lama View Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3
RaNA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
4
LAMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.1
The Lama Top Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.1.1 Start Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.1.2 View Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.1.3 Analyse Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.1.4 Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.1.5 Close Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.1.6 Additional Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4.2 The Lama View Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
4.2.1 Node List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
4.2.1.1 Add new test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
4.2.1.2 Unload test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
4.2.1.3 Add Data to New Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
4.2.1.4 Add data to an Existing Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
4.2.1.5 The Default Selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
4.2.1.6 Right Mouse Button Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
4.2.2 Window List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
4.3 The Lama Plot Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
4.3.1 The plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
4.3.1.1 Zoom data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4.3.1.2 Navigating into the data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4.3.1.3 Select data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4.3.1.4 Pan plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4.3.1.5 Reset plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4.3.1.6 The Plot Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4.3.2 Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4.3.3 Scientific Selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
4.3.4 Radiometric Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
4.3.4.1 Swap sky and reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
4.3.4.2 Show gaps in scientific data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
ii
4.3.5 Housekeeping information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.6 Manual operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4 The Lama Cross-correlation Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.1 Choosing Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.2 The plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.2.1 Navigating into the data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.2.2 Save data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.3 Time Span . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.4 Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.4.1 Reset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.4.2 Swap Axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.4.3 Show points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.4.4 Show error bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.4.5 Bin data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.4.6 Show fit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.5 Data Information Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18
19
20
20
20
21
21
21
21
21
21
22
22
22
22
22
5
OCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
6
IDL Command Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
The Lama Instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening and closing Lama View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loading/unloading tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feed horns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1 Scientific data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1.1 General functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1.2 Accessing binned data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1.3 Accessing full scientific data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1.4 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1.5 Photometric calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1.6 Miscellanea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.2 Housekeeping data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.2.1 Housekeeping Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.2.2 Miscellanea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.3 Browsing the node tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.3.1 Node paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.3.2 The current node. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.3.3 Retrieving scientific/housekeeping data . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.3.4 Unloading data from memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.3.5 Finding nodes in the tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.4 Using measure units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.4.1 RaNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.4.2 Lama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6 Triggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7 Log messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.8 DAE calibration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
25
26
27
28
28
28
29
30
32
34
34
36
37
37
38
39
42
43
43
44
45
45
45
46
48
50
iii
Appendix A
A.1
Regular expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Backreferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Concept index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Function index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Chapter 1: Overview
1
1 Overview
This is the LFI User’s Guide, a document which illustrates the features of LIFE 3. It is in
a very rough format, but it provides some useful information about LIFE from the point of
view of an user.
There is no need to be a programmer to read this manual. However, knowing the IDL
language will help reading those sections which describe the interface between LIFE and
IDL.
LIFE is a package of a number of different tools. They are RaNA (used to test the LFI
RCAs), LAMA (used to test the two LFI RAAs) and OCA (introduced with LAMA 2.0, it
is a tool written by Michele Maris to test the REBA).
1.1 RaNA
RaNA, the Radiometer aNAlyser, is a tool used during the LFI QM/FM RCA test campaigns. It opens FITS files produced by Rachel and let the user to calibrate the chains and
perform a number of operations on the scientific/housekeeping data.
1.2 LAMA
LAMA (the LFI Array Measurement Analyser) is a tool for the LFI QM/FM RAA test
campaigns. It can read the FITS files created by TM2TOI and perform a number of analysis
similar to RaNA.
In order to simplify the analisys for the 44 FM RCAs, the analysis modules now have a
command-line interface which eases the use of scripts to perform automatic procedures.
1.3 OCA
OCA is a tool written by Michele Maris ([email protected]) to test the REBA.
1.4 Conventions used in this manual
This reference lists the IDL procedures and functions defined by LIFE and accessible through
the IDL command line. Here is a list of the conventions we used in this manual:
• IDL procedures are marked with “Procedure”. They never return a value and are
called by following their name with a command and a list of arguments. An example
is [lama instance close], page 25.
• IDL functions are marked as “Function”. Their return value is described in the text
following the function definition. When calling a function, you must provide the arguments enclosed into rounded brackets. Brackets should be used even when the function
has no arguments. An example is [lama instance is created], page 25.
• When providing an example, we use the a symbol to indicate what is the output of
the commands, e.g.:
print, ’Hello, world!’
a Hello, world!
• Every procedure and function described in this manual is listed in the [Function index],
page 58 (if it is not, it is a bug!).
Chapter 1: Overview
You can download a PDF version of this manual at
http://belzebu.lambrate.inaf.it/lifedocs/life/manual/life.pdf.
2
Chapter 2: Tutorial
3
2 Tutorial
2.1 Getting Help
As well as reading this manual, it is useful to know how to access the IDL help files for each
function. Use the show help command
show_help,’lama_tune_phase_switch_currents’,/helpinput,/helpoutput
This function will generate a help window containing information about the function
you specify.
2.2 A Lama View Session
First of all a test is needed. For this example download TUN 0015.tgz from Max and
decompress it in a directory.
From command line execute:
idl run-life.pro
IDL compiles LIFE and after this, if there are no errors, the main LIFE window appears.
Click on LAMA icon and Lama Top appears (Figure 2.1).
Figure 2.1: Lama Top main window
The first task is to open a session. All the operations done during the session are stored
in a folder. Click on the button labeled Browse to change the location of the directory.
Then click the button labeled Start Session to start the session. Lama creates the new
directory and all subdirectories needed for saving operations.
Click the button labeled View Data to open Lama View. The window is empty. For
loading the test click the button labeled Add New Test and select the directory in which
are saved the TUN 0015 test. Click open. Now the test is opened and Lama View appears
like in Figure 2.2.
Chapter 2: Tutorial
4
Figure 2.2: Lama View after the loading of the TUN 0015 test
Click on the + symbol to expand the tree. In this example we plot the feed horn 27.
Select this feed horn and click the button labeled Add to New Plot as in Figure 2.3 to open
the new window. Select in Node List with ctrl pressed other nodes to open more than one
feed horn or housekeeping data.
Figure 2.3: How to open new Lama Plot window
The new window appears like in Figure 2.4. We can see on the left the plot with the
data opened, on the top left the possible plot operation, on the right one tab with different
possibilities and the legend of the plot.
Chapter 2: Tutorial
5
Figure 2.4: Lama Plot window
In the top left of the Lama Plot window there are six buttons. The buttons with the
icons change the mouse interaction with the plot: the first is for zooming, the second is for
selecting and the third is for pan. Press left mouse button on the plot and move it, a blue
rectangle appears in the plot. Now release the button and the plot is zoomed in. Do the
same pressing right mouse button for zooming out.
The two arrows let to navigate into the different zooms.
Now press the icon with the two sheet. Pressing the left mouse button on the plot and
moving it, a blue rectangle shows the selection area (See [ScientificSelection], page 16, for
details).
Now press the icon with the mouse. Pressing the left mouse button on the plot and moving
it moves the entire plot.
Press the button labeled Reset to undo all the operations performed on the data and reset
the zoom list.
On the right of the Lama Plot windows there is a tab with five pages.
• In the first page there are three radio buttons for seeing real data, data normalized in
the range between -1 and +1, and data without theirs mean.
• The second page is for selection operation and works only with radiometric data. The
radiometric data loaded and plotted by Lama View are AUX files, in which data are
Chapter 2: Tutorial
6
binned at 1 Hz. The selection page let to load complete (or with a different bin value)
data. See [ScientificSelection], page 16, for more information.
• The third and the fourth pages shows statistical information about plotted data. If the
data are zoomed the statistics are referred to those data.
• The fifth page has a manual zoom and a button to select statistical range for IDL
functions.
On the right bottom of the Lama Plot window there is the legend, in which are listed
the data stream plotted with the name and the color. Select one or more lines and right
click. The menu let to change style, color and hide (or show) the selected data stream.
Now select the first line (sky 2700) and the last line (ref 2711) and right click the mouse.
Select Cross correlation from the menu. This opens a new window: the Crosscorrelation
plot (Figure 2.5). This plot window shows data correlated. The main difference between
this window and the Lama Plot window is in the first page of the tab in which it’s possible
to invert axes, to bin data, to show error bars. For more information See Section 4.4 [Cross],
page 20.
Figure 2.5: Lama Crosscorrelation plot window
Return to Lama View. Select the feed horn 28 and press the button labeled Add to
Existing. In the menu select the voice Lama Plot 2700 window. Now in the bottom of
the window there is a list. Select the voice Lama Plot 2700 window and press the button
Chapter 2: Tutorial
7
labeled Bring to Front. The Lama Plot window shows data of both feed horns.
Return to Lama View. Select feed horn 24 and press the button labeled Add to new plot.
Return to Lama View again. In the Window List select both windows and press the button
labeled Combine Windows. Now there is only one window which shows data contained in
both previous windows.
At the end of the work session close Lama View (this will close all the Lama Plot and
Lama Cross opened windows) and return to Lama Top. Before exit the program close the
session pressing the button labeled Close Session in Lama Top. Now exit the program.
For more details about Lama View see See Section 4.2 [View], page 10.
Chapter 3: RaNA
3 RaNA
8
Chapter 4: LAMA
9
4 LAMA
This chapter provides an overview of the LAMA (Lfi Array Measurement Analyser) software. It is divided into two main parts: the lama top section describes the functionality of
the lama main window, the lama view section and the following describe how to access to
the data and plot them.
The purpose of LAMA is to load and analyse data aquired during the LFI RAA FM test
campaign. It provides a graphical user interface to load the data saved during the tests,
plot scientific and housekeeping values, and provides a number of analysis tools to estimate
the tuning parameters and the performances of the instrument.
4.1 The Lama Top Window
The main window of Lama is the Lama Top window (see image). Through this window the
user can use Lama utilities: the Lama View software, the analyisis modules and the report.
The next sections describes how the buttons of the Lama Top window work.
4.1.1 Start Session
The first operation when the user open Lama is to start a session. A session is a folder
where all the operations made during the work are stored. The predefined folder is the
home folder but the user can change it by pressing the brwose button and choosing another
folder. If the user doesn’t open a session it’s impossible to begin working. When a session is
started Lama open the log messages window in which are stored all the software messages
during the session.
4.1.2 View Data
The View Data button open the Lama view window, that is the software for plotting data
(See Section 4.2 [The Lama View Window], page 10, for details).
4.1.3 Analyse Data
4.1.4 Report
4.1.5 Close Session
Before exit the program it’s necessary to close the session in order to let LIFE to use others
software. Pressing close session button the session is closed.
4.1.6 Additional Buttons
At bottom of the Lama Top window there are three additional button.
• The Configure button let the user to choose the LaTex software (for reporting operations), the DVI Reader (for reading the reports) and the internet browser.
• The Exit button close Lama. It doesn’t work if one session is still opened.
• The Help button.
Chapter 4: LAMA
10
4.2 The Lama View Window
Lama view lets the user to plot data of the LFI instrument and the housekeeping data.
The main window of Lama view shows two views: the node list and the windows list
(Figure 4.1). The first view is a tree of nodes which represents scientific and housekeeping
data, the second view is the list of the plot windows opened.
Figure 4.1: Lama View main window
4.2.1 Node List
The node list shows a tree in which each node represents a scientific node or an housekeeping
node (Figure 4.2). The root of the tree is the test of the desired data.
The scientific nodes are ordered by frequency (30 GHz, 44 GHz, 70 GHz), horn (from
18 to 28) and channel (4 for each horn). The housekeeping nodes are divided in groups:
temperatures, voltage and currents of the FEM, DAE and REBA parameters.
Each node is selectable and must be selected in order to perform all the operations that are
shown in the next sections.
Chapter 4: LAMA
11
Figure 4.2: Node List in Lama View main window
4.2.1.1 Add new test
When Lama View is opened the Node List is void. In order to show some data is necessary
that the user chosees a dataset. Pressing the button labeled Add new test (Figure 4.3) the
software open a window where it’s possible to choose the folder in which the desired data
are stored. After this operation Lama View shows the new root of the dataset.
4.2.1.2 Unload test
When a dataset is no more usefull or if the memory of the pc is full it could be necessary
to unload some data. Pressing the button labeled Unload test (Figure 4.3) the software
unload one or more selected dataset from the Node list. It’s necessary that the user select
one or more root in order to perform this task. After this operation the tree is updated
without the unloaded data.
4.2.1.3 Add Data to New Plot
In order to view data in a plot to analyze them Lama View let the user to open a Lama
Plot window (See Section 4.3 [Plot], page 13, for details). Pressing the button labeled Add
Data to New Plot (Figure 4.3) Lama View opens new Lama Plot window with data selected
in the Node List. If the user selects one node which one or more children all of them are
plotted in the new window.
After this operation Lama View update the Windows List tree adding the new opened Lama
Plot window.
Chapter 4: LAMA
12
4.2.1.4 Add data to an Existing Plot
Observing one plot it could be usefull compare data shown in the plot window with other
data. Pressing the button labeled Add data to an Existing Plot (Figure 4.3) Lama View
opens the list of opened windows. By pressing the desired window Lama View adds the
selected nodes in the Node List to the window.
4.2.1.5 The Default Selection
The IDL procedures and functions (See Chapter 6 [IDL], page 25, for details) need a default
test, a default feed horn and a default processing type. Pressing the button labeled Make
Default (Figure 4.3) Lama View signs as default the selected node in the Node List. The
default nodes are bold in the Node List.
Figure 4.3: Buttons in Lama View main window
4.2.1.6 Right Mouse Button Menu
By clicking the right mouse button on the Node List a menu appears. The menu has five
possible tasks to let the user to see information about files in the dataset folder, load or
unload files, export data to file and open a cross-correlation plot.
• Open object information. One or more fits files are associated to each terminal node of
the Node List. To see information about those files select one or more nodes in the Node
List, click right mouse button and select Open Object Information. A new window is
opened in which there is the view with the selected nodes and the information about
the selected fits files, with information about theirs contents and if they are loaded or
not.
• Load data. Select one or more nodes in the Node List, click the right mouse button
and select Load Data. Lama View load the fits files associated to the selected nodes.
After this operation the loaded nodes are in italics character.
• Unload data. Select one or more nodes in the Node List, click the right mouse button
and select Unload Data. Lama View unload the fits files associated to the selected
nodes. After this operation the unloaded nodes returns to normal character.
• Export data to file. Select one or more nodes in the Node List, click the right mouse
button and select Export data to file. Lama View opens new window in which the user
can select the name of file and the place where it must be saved. The file format is
CSV ("Comma Separated Values"), a text file in which data are stored in the same
row separated by commas. It’s the simpler text format that can be imported in Excel
or OpenCalc.
• Cross correlation plot. Select two nodes in the Node List, click the right mouse button
and select Cross-correlate plot. Lama View load the fits files associated to the selected
nodes, if necessary, and then open a new Cross correlation plot that shows the crosscorrelation plot between the two selected nodes (See Section 4.4 [Cross], page 20, for
details).
Chapter 4: LAMA
13
4.2.2 Window List
The Window List shows the list of all plot windows opened (either Lama Plot, either Lama
Cross), with theirs titles (Figure 4.4). Expanding one node of the list Lama View shows
the content of the expanded node.
• Bring to front. Selecting one window from the Window List and clicking the Bring to
front button the selected window is brought to the front of the desktop.
• Combine windows. Selecting two or more windows from the Window List and clicking
the Combine windows button the selected windows are closed and the data contained
in all the windows are shown in a new plot window. The selected windows disappear
from the Window List and a new item appear that represents the new window.
• Close window. Selecting one or more windows from the Window List and clicking the
Close window button the selected windows are closed and disappear from the Window
List.
Figure 4.4: Windows List in Lama View main window
4.3 The Lama Plot Window
Lama Plot window plots scientific and housekeeping values.
4.3.1 The plot
The plot is the image in the left part of Lama Plot (Figure 4.5). The image shows values of
data selected in Lama View Node List view in different colors. The x-axis is ususally time,
instead the y-axis is different for different types of data (e.g. all scientific data are in volts).
In the bar at the top of the window there are different buttons for different operations
(Figure 4.6). The next sections show how to use those tasks.
Chapter 4: LAMA
14
Figure 4.5: The plot
4.3.1.1 Zoom data
When the Zoom button (Figure 4.6) is selected it’s possible to “zoom in” in the plot by
clicking the left mouse button. Moving mouse with the left mouse pressed a rectangle is
drawn in the window. After the release of the button Lama Plot updates the plot drawing
data contained in the rectangle. If the user presses the right mouse button and moves the
mouse Lama Plot draws a rectangle in the plot. After the release of the button Lama Plot
updates the plot “zooming out” with, in the center, the content of the rectangle.
4.3.1.2 Navigating into the data
Using the Navigation buttons (Figure 4.6) it’s possible to navigate backward and forward
in the different zooms applied by the user to the plot.
Note that columns mean and sigma in the data information box will show information
which is related with the portion of the plot shown in the plot window. Zooming in or out
in the plot will make these values change.
4.3.1.3 Select data
When the Select button is selected (Figure 4.6) it’s possible to select data into the plot
by pressing the right mouse button and moving it. After the release Lama Plot stores the
begin and the end of the x-range selected. This operation is possible only for scientific data.
The next operation is to load selected data (see [ScientificSelection], page 16 for details).
Chapter 4: LAMA
15
4.3.1.4 Pan plot
When the Pan button is selected (Figure 4.6) it’s possible to pan the plot. If the right mouse
button is pressed when the user moves the mouse into the plot then the plot is moved. After
the mouse release the plot is in the last position.
4.3.1.5 Reset plot
Clicking the button labeled Reset (Figure 4.6)will undo all the operations performed on the
data and reset the zoom list. After clicking on this button the navigation buttons will be
deactivated until another zoom operation is performed.
Figure 4.6: The buttons for plot interactions
4.3.1.6 The Plot Legend
In the right corner of the Lama Plot window there is the Legend (Figure 4.7). In the Legend
there is one row for each data stream plotted with its name, its color, its style and a boolean
which says if it’s visible.
It’s possible to select some data stream in the legend. Pressing the right mouse button a
menu appears. The menu has the possibility to change the style or the color, to show or to
hide a stream, to remove a stream, to open a crosscorrelation plot (see Section 4.4 [Cross],
page 20 for details).
Figure 4.7: The Legend of the plot
4.3.2 Operations
The first tab in the right side of Lama Plot is the Operations tab (Figure 4.8). It let
to remove mean from the plot and to normalize data in the plot. Those operation let a
comparison between data plotted if they have a large range in the y-axis.
• Remove Mean. Pressing the Remove Mean button Lama Plot updates the plot removing the mean of each node plotted in the image.
• Normalize Data. Pressing the Normalize Data button Lama Plot updates the plot
drawing each node plotted in the image in a range between -1 and +1.
Chapter 4: LAMA
16
Figure 4.8: The plot operations tab
4.3.3 Scientific Selections
The second tab in right side of Lama Plot let the user to load scientific data (Figure 4.9).
The data plotted in Lama Plot are the values contained in AUX files in which the scientific
data are binned at the frequency of 1 Hz. If the user needs to see the complete values has
to load them from the scientific files.
• Pressing the Load Data button Lama Plot loads values from the scientific fits files in
the range selected in the plot with the choosen bin value and append them to the
Node List. After this operation the scientific nodes in the Node List appeats in italic
character.
• Pressing the Unload Data button Lama Plot unloads the scientific fits files removing
them from the Node List. After this operation the scientific nodes in the Node List
appeats in normal character.
• Pressing the Show Data button Lama Plot shows the loaded scientific data in a subplot.
After this operation the Show Data button changes its name in Hide Data. If the user
presses the button another times Lama Plot hide the subplot and brings back the name
to Show Data.
Chapter 4: LAMA
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Figure 4.9: The plot selection tab
4.3.4 Radiometric Operations
The third tab in right side of Lama Plot shows the radiometric statistics of the plotted data
(Figure 4.10). The list contains 6 columns. The first column is the name of the channel
and the file (AUX or Scientific). The second and the thrid columns show the mean and the
sigma values of the sky data stream, the fourth and the fifth the mean and the sigma values
of the reference data stream. The last column is boolean the shows if the sky and reference
data stream are swaped of not. Note that if the plot is zoomed the statistics are referred
to this.
Chapter 4: LAMA
18
Figure 4.10: The plot operations tab
4.3.4.1 Swap sky and reference
If the DAE inverts sky and reference values those values are stored in fits files in wrong
way. Lama shows data as they are stored in the fits files, so, in this case, the data shown
are wrong. The Swap sky/ref button lets the user to swap sky and reference in the plot.
Select the channel from the list of radiometric data and click Swap sky/ref button. After
this operation the last column change from false to true and the background of the row
become grey. Clicking again the button reset sky and reference in the plot and the row in
the list of radiometric data.
4.3.4.2 Show gaps in scientific data
During operations DAE (or REBA) could loose some packets. Pressing the Show Gaps
button let the user to know it this is happened.
4.3.5 Housekeeping information
The fourth tab in right side of Lama Plot shows the housekeeping statistics of the plotted
data (Figure 4.11). The list in this tab contains three columns. The first column is the name
of the housekeeping parameter. The second and the third columns show mean and sigma
values of the parameter in the actual plot. Note that if the plot is zoomed the statistics are
referred to this.
Chapter 4: LAMA
19
Figure 4.11: The plot housekeeping information tab
4.3.6 Manual operations
The last tab in the right side of Lama Plot shows the manual operation (Figure 4.12). There
are two possible operations:
• There are four cells. Set one (or more) of those cells and press the button labeled Zoom
shows the data in the selected range of zoom.
• Clicking the button labeled SET the two cells labeled X Origin and X End are updated
with the range of the x axis. This range can be used for computing statistics available
from IDL command line. See [statistics], page 31.
Chapter 4: LAMA
20
Figure 4.12: The plot manual operations tab
4.4 The Lama Cross-correlation Window
4.4.1 Choosing Data
There are two ways to display a cross correlation plot:
1. Display a cross correlation plot form Lama View: On the data tree select 2 timelines
to be correlated, right click and choose Cross Correlate Plot on the menu.
2. Display a cross correlation plot from the Plot Window: On the legend select the two
timelines to cross correlate, right click on the legend and choose Cross Correlate Plot.
Any of these actions starts the same cross correlation plot window. There however a
few differences in the type of data that can be choosen. When a cross correlation plot
is displayed from the Lama View window only cross correlation plots involving the sky
signal can be created since the Lama Node List does not allow to choose between Sky and
Reference for each channel from Lama View.
On the other hand, opening a cross correlation plot from the legend in the plot window
will not only allow for sky or reference to be choosen but also to perform the cross correlation
on a selected chunk of data: the cross correlation plot will only contain data displayed in
the plot window. To display the cross correlation for a particular segment of data we can
first zoom in on the relevant region in the Lama Plot window and then select the cross
correlation plot.
It is therefore recommended that a cross correlation plot should start almost always from
the plot window.
4.4.2 The plot
The plot is shown on the plot window which occupies most of the cross correlation window.
the leftmost part of the cross correlation window.
Chapter 4: LAMA
21
4.4.2.1 Navigating into the data
The zoom button activates the zoom function. To zoom in on a particular region in the plot
the procedure is exactely the same as for the Lama Plot window. The navigation buttons
also work in the same way as those for the Lama Plot window.
Note that columns x,y and z in the data information box will show information which
is related with the portion of the plot shown in the plot window. Zooming in or out on the
plot will make these values change.
NOTE : The zoom button will probably be removed in the near future since there is no
other navigation mode available for the cross correlation window.
4.4.2.2 Save data
The Save Data button will save data to an ASCII file. To save data click the Save Data
button and select a directory where you would like the data file to be stored. The name of
the file will be automatically generated from the X and Y data in the plot. There are two
different formats for the ASCII file generated by pressing the Save Data button:
1. Unbinned data If the Bin button is not checked the file will contain two columns, the
first containing X data and the second Y data. Note that this is not necessarily the
actual raw data as some binning might have already ocurred to deal for instance with
different sampling rates for the X and Y timestreams.
2. Binned data If the Bin button is checked the file will contain five columns: the first
contains X corresponding to the center of the bins; the second the average of all X values
contributing to the bin; the third the error associated with the bin average in column
2; the fourth the binned valued of Y and the fifth and last the error associated with
the binned value for Y. The errors saved on the file are simply the standard deviation
calulated from all the values in the bin.
The files containing data with associated error bars have a BIN appended at the end
of the name.
4.4.3 Time Span
There are three numbers on the right upper corner immediately above the plot region:
1. Min The time associated with the first sample used in the cross correlation
2. Max The time associated with the last sample used in the cross correlation
3. Range The time interval associated with the full timelines used in the cross correlation
4.4.4 Operations
4.4.4.1 Reset
Clicking the button labeled Reset will undo all the operations on the data and reset the
zoom list. After clicking on this button the navigation buttons will be deactivated until
another zoom operation is performed.
4.4.4.2 Swap Axes
Clicking on the check box labelled Swap X/Y will swap the axes. Before displaying the plot
the data is sorted according to the values originaly displayed as Y. Clicking one more time
will display the original plot.
Chapter 4: LAMA
22
It is not possible to swap the axes when error bars are displayed.Conversely when the
axis are swaped it is also not possible to show error bars.
4.4.4.3 Show points
Clicking on the check box labeled Show Data Points will display the data points. Note
that when the cross correlation plot being displayed involves data streams with different
sampling rates or when the sampling rate is the same for the two data streams but the
sampling times are not synchronised some binning will automatically be performed and
therefore the points displayed are not necessarily the real data points. Cliking again to
uncheck the box will return to the line plot. The same action is obtained from the legend
pop up menu. Selecting Change Style->Points from the menu when selecting a plot in the
legend will also show the data points.
4.4.4.4 Show error bars
To show error bars in the plot click on the Show Error Bars check button after choosing
which error bars to dsiplay using the radio buttons labeled X and Y. It is not possible to
display error bars before binning the data. Cliking one more time will hide the error bars.
As mentioned before (See [Swap Axes], page 21.) it is not possible to display error bars
when the axes are swaped.
4.4.4.5 Bin data
There are two ways to bin data
1. Choose the number of points you want on the binned plot by clicking on the Bin Count
radio button, entering the number of points in the box and checking the check button
labeled Bin. This will produce regularly distributed points.
2. Choose the number of points you want on each bin by checking the radio button labeled
Bin Size and proced as in 1). This will produce irregularly distributed points in the
plot.
To change the number of bins/data points per bin change the number in the edit box
and click on bin again.
4.4.4.6 Show fit
The cross correlation module calculates the correlation coefficient as well as a simple linear
least squares fit (y=a+bx ) for the data displayed on the plot window. To display the fit
check the Show Fit check box. To hide the fit click on the check box again.
4.4.5 Data Information Window
The data information window has 8 columns
1. Description of X data.
2. Description of Y data.
3. Correlation coefficient for the full data set or the region of the dataset originally selected
from Lama Plot.
4. Correlation coefficient for the region currentely displayed in the correlation plot. This
number changes after a zoom operation.
Chapter 4: LAMA
23
5. Linear fit coefficient a for the full dataset or the region of the dataset originally selected
from Lama Plot.
6. Linear fit coefficient a for the region currentely displayed in the correlation plot.
7. Linear fit coefficient b for the full dataset or the region of the dataset originally selected
from Lama Plot.
8. Linear fit coefficient b for the region currentely displayed in the correlation plot.
Chapter 5: OCA
5 OCA
24
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
25
6 IDL Command Reference
This chapter provides a broad and fairly complete overview of the commands implemented
by LIFE which are available through the IDL command line.
6.1 The Lama Instance
Lama uses a more complex design than RaNA. It uses a mix of IDL/C++ code to achieve
greater speed and provide the user with a complete graphical user interface.
In order to use C++ modules, you have to create an “instance”, that is, a data structure
which keeps track of the various data structure that need to be shared both by IDL and
by the C++ functions. See [lama instance create], page 25. Only one instance of Lama
is needed during the program execution: typically, it is created when the “Start session”
button in the Lama Top window is pressed, and destroyed when the “Close session” button
is pressed.
lama_instance_create [directory]
[Function]
Create a new instance of LAMA. This function needs to be called once, usually
when the “Start session” button in the Lama Top window is pressed. The directory
parameter is a string containing the full path to the ‘life/lama’ directory, and is
used to locate Lama-specific files like ‘lama_parameters.xml’. If directory is not
specified, the current working directory will be used.
The return value is nonzero if the instance was created successfully, zero if some error
occurred.
result = lama_instance_create ("/home/tomasi/work/life/lama")
[Procedure]
Close the currently opened Lama instance. It is usually called when the user presses
the “Close session” button in the Lama Top window.
lama_instance_close
[Function]
This function returns nonzero if lama_instance_create was called and therefore the
Lama system has been initialized.
Since almost every function in the Lama Input and Lama View modules requires a
working Lama instance, this function is extremely useful in scripts to check if an
instance has been created:
if ~lama_instance_is_created () then begin
print, "Error: you need to create a Lama instance"
exit, 1
endif
lama_instance_is_created
6.2 Opening and closing Lama View
[Function]
This function opens the Lama View window. If the window is already opened, it does
nothing.
This function always returns a nonzero value.
lama_view_open
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
lama_view_close
26
[Function]
Close the Lama View window. If the windows is not open, does nothing.
[Function]
Return nonzero if the Lama View window has been opened (i.e. the [lama view open],
page 25 function has been called).
lama_view_is_opened
6.3 Loading/unloading tests
lama_input_load_test dir
[Function]
This function opens the test found in the directory named dir (a string), and marks it
as the new default test. If it is successful, returns a nonzero value, otherwise returns
zero.
The dir variable can contain either an absolute path, or a path relative to the current
working directory. However, in scripts the absolute path should be preferred.
test_to_load = "/home/tomasi/work/datasets/TUN_0032"
result = lama_input_load_test (test_to_load)
if result eq 0 then begin
print, "Unable to open the file located in ", test_to_load
end if
lama_input_unload_test name
[Procedure]
This function remove test named name from memory. Note that name must be the
name of the test, not the full directory. See [lama input get list of tests], page 27.
[Function]
This function returns nonzero if at least one test has been loaded.
See
[lama input load test], page 26.
lama_input_is_test_available
lama_input_select_test name
[Function]
This function makes name the default test. Every time a function which provides the
TEST keyword (e.g. [lama get sky y], page 29) is called without specifying it, the test
passed to lama_input_select_test will be used.
The function will return true (nonzero) if the test was selected, false if the specified
test does not exists (i.e. it has not been loaded).
name must be one of the strings returned by [lama input get list of tests], page 27.
[Function]
Return a string containing the name of the currently selected test. Here is an example
of use:
;; Save the currently selected test
saved_test = lama_input_get_selected_test ()
lama_input_get_selected_test
;; Load a new test
lama_input_load_test ("/home/tomasi/work/datasets/XXX_0012")
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
27
;; Do whatever you want with XXX_0012
...
;; Now select again the old test
lama_input_select_test, saved_test
[Function]
Return an array of strings containing the currently loaded tests. Each string
contains only the test name, not the full path. You can use any of them with
[lama input select test], page 26 and [lama input unload test], page 26: this is
guaranteed to work (if it does not, it is a bug!).
;; This code will select the first tests as the default
lama_input_get_list_of_tests
tests_loaded = lama_input_get_list_of_tests ()
if ~lama_input_select_test (tests_loaded[0]) then begin
print, "Error: unable to load test ", tests_loaded[0]
endif
6.4 Feed horns
lama_input_select_feed_horn feed TEST=test
[Function]
Set feed to be the default feed horn for test named test. If the TEST keyword it is not
specified, the default test will be used. See [lama input select test], page 26.
The feed variable can be specified in three ways:
1. A string with the feed horn number alone, e.g. ’28’;
2. A string with the pound character # followed by the feed horn number, e.g.
’#28’;
3. The number of the feed horn, e.g. 28. This is useful when you are selecting horns
in a for loop.
The function will return true (i.e. nonzero) if the feed horn was selected, false if the
feed horn does not exists or its output has not been recorded by SCOS during the
specified test.
;; This code will cycle through all the 11 feed horns
for i = 18, 28 do begin
if ~ lama_input_select_feed_horn (i) then begin
print, "Error with feed horn ", i, ", skipping"
endif else begin
;; Do some operation on feed horn number I
endelse
endfor
lama_input_get_selected_feed_horn feed TEST=test
[Function]
This function will return the selected feed horn for test named test, or for the default
test if TEST was not specified. See [lama input select test], page 26.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
This function is guaranteed to return
[lama input select feed horn], page 27.
28
a
value
which
is
usable
by
6.5 Accessing data
In this section we provide the documentation for functions accessing the scientific/housekeeping data. With “scientific data” we mean the samples coming out from the
radiometers, while “housekeeping data” include everything other stream of data recorded
by SCOS2000 (i.e. drain currents, temperatures and so on).
6.5.1 Scientific data
The functions listed in this sections let to access the scientific data coming from the radiometers. You must know there are two kind of scientific data available with Lama:
Full scientific data
This is the data coming from the radiometers. Its sampling frequency depends
on the radiometer (being greater for the 70 GHz ones) and the REBA processing
type, but it is never smaller than 1 Hz.
Binned data
This is the default type of data loaded by Lama View. Its sampling frequency
is always 1 Hz, regardless of the radiometer and the processing type, and it
is calculated from full scientific data by evaluating the mean value and the
standard deviation in a time span of 1 second per each binned sample.
Binned data is something that is not produced by the TQL/TMH software: the binned
datasets are created by Lama “on the fly”, in order to reduce the time needed to load and
display data. The FITS files containing binned data are called “AUX” files.
6.5.1.1 General functions
lama_get_num_of_sci_tabs TEST=test
[Function]
Return the overall number of scientific channels present in test. If the TEST keyword
was not specified, use the default test.
In some cases the acquisition system is not able to identify the sky and reference
signals correctly. Lama provides the ability to swap the two signals by means of
[lama swap sky ref], page 28. You can determine if a channel has been already swapped
by using the function [lama channel is swapped], page 28.
lama_swap_sky_ref channel TEST=test FEED HORN=feed horn
[Procedure]
Swap sky and reference values. If no keywords is specified do nothing. If CHANNEL
is specified swap sky and reference of that channel of the default test of the default
feed horn. If FEED_HORN is specified swap sky and reference of all channels of the
feed horn of the default test. If TEST is specified swap all horns of the test.
lama_channel_is_swapped channel num TEST=test name
[Function]
FEED HORN=feed horn PROC TYPE=proc type
Return 1 if the scientific sky and reference signals coming from channel ch are
swapped. If TEST, FEED_HORN and PROC_TYPE are not specified, the defaults are used.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
29
6.5.1.2 Accessing binned data
The following functions give access to the data saved in the AUX files, i.e. the scientific
data downsampled at 1 Hz.
lama_get_sky_x ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit
Return the time series for the scientific binned sky signal coming from channel ch.
If TEST, FEED_HORN and PROC_TYPE are not specified, the defaults are used. If UNIT
is specified return the series in the specified measure unit, otherwise return time in
seconds. See [measureUnits], page 45.
lama_get_ref_x ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit
Return the time series for the scientific binned reference signal coming from channel
ch. See [lama get sky x], page 29.
lama_get_raw_x ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type, UNIT=unit
Return the time series for the scientific binned reference signal coming from channel
ch. The sky and reference samples are alternating, in order to mimic the way they
come from the BEU. See [lama get sky x], page 29.
lama_get_sky_y ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the data series for the scientific binned sky signal coming from channel ch.
If no ofs is nonzero, the values will have their mean removed from the data (i.e. they
will have zero mean).
The PGA_CORRECT and RAW keywords are implemented for compatibility with RaNA.
See [measureUnits], page 45.
lama_get_sky_sigma ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the standard deviation (i.e. the root mean square) of each binned sky sample.
See [lama get sky y], page 29.
lama_get_ref_y ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the data series for the scientific binned reference signal coming from channel
ch. See [lama get sky y], page 29.
lama_get_ref_sigma ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the standard deviation (i.e. the root mean square) of each binned ref sample.
See [lama get ref y], page 29.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
30
lama_get_raw_y ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the data series for the scientific binned reference signal coming from channel
ch. The sky and reference samples are alternating, in order to mimic the way they
come from the BEU. See [lama get sky y], page 29.
lama_get_raw_sigma ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the standard deviation (i.e. the root mean square) of each binned sky/ref
sample. The sky and reference samples are alternating, in order to mimic the way
they come from the BEU. See [lama get raw y], page 29.
6.5.1.3 Accessing full scientific data
The following functions provide access to the full scientific data. To be able to access
this data, the user must specify a time range where to load the data and a binning. The
frequency sampling of scientific data depends on the acquisition mode and the specified
binning.
To load the full scientific data, use the [lama select range], page 30 procedure.
lama_select_range ch min max bin TEST=name HORN=horn
[Procedure]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Load scientific data inside the specified time range [min, max] (in seconds) and using
bin samples for the binning (i.e. bin equal to 1 means that there is no binning). If
TEST, FEED_HORN and PROC_TYPE are not specified, the defaults are used.
In order to determine if some scientific selection has been loaded, you can use either
[lama selection is sky available], page 30 and [lama selection is ref available], page 30.
The two functions are equivalent under Lama.
lama_selection_is_sky_available ch TEST=name HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Return nonzero if the scientific selection loaded by the last call to [lama select range],
page 30 contains a non-void stream of sky data.
lama_selection_is_ref_available ch TEST=name HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Return nonzero if the scientific selection loaded by the last call to [lama select range],
page 30 contains a non-void stream of sky data.
lama_selection_get_sky_x ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit
Return the time series for the scientific binned sky signal coming from channel ch.
If TEST, FEED_HORN and PROC_TYPE are not specified, the defaults are used. If UNIT
is specified return the series in the specified measure unit, otherwise return time in
seconds. See [measureUnits], page 45.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
lama_selection_get_ref_x ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
31
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit
Return the time series for the scientific binned reference signal coming from channel
ch. See [lama selection get sky x], page 30.
lama_selection_get_raw_x ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit
Return the time series for the scientific binned sky/reference signal coming from
channel ch. The sky and reference samples are alternating, in order to mimic the way
they come from the BEU. See [lama selection get sky x], page 30.
lama_selection_get_sky_y ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the data series for the scientific binned sky signal coming from channel ch.
For a discussion about UNIT, PGA_CORRECT and RAW see [lama get sky y], page 29.
lama_selection_get_sky_sigma ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the standard deviation (i.e. the root mean square) of each scientific sky
sample. See [lama selection get sky y], page 31.
lama_selection_get_ref_y ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the data series for the scientific binned reference signal coming from channel
ch. See [lama selection get sky y], page 31.
lama_selection_get_ref_sigma ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the standard deviation (i.e. the root mean square) of each scientific reference
sample. See [lama selection get ref y], page 31.
lama_selection_get_raw_y ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the data series for the scientific binned sky/reference signal coming from
channel ch. The sky and reference samples are alternating, in order to mimic the way
they come from the BEU. See [lama selection get sky y], page 31.
lama_selection_get_raw_sigma ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type UNIT=unit PGA CORRECT=pga RAW=raw
Return the standard deviation (i.e. the root mean square) of each scientific
sky/reference sample. The sky and reference samples are alternating, in order to
mimic the way they come from the BEU. See [lama selection get raw y], page 31.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
32
6.5.1.4 Statistics
Lama provides the user with some functions to perform quick analysis on the selected data.
They are useful e.g. for writing batch scripts.
range = lama_selection_get_range ()
average = lama_selection_get_sci_ave (0)
sigma = lama_selection_get_sci_sigma (0)
print, "Between ", range[0], " s and ", range[1], $
" s the sky signal is"
print, average[0] " +/- ", sigma[0], " and the ref. signal is"
print, average[1] " +/- ", sigma[1]
print, "The difference is then:"
print, abs (average[0] - average[1]), " +/- ", $
sqrt (sigma[0]^2 + sigma[1]^2)
lama_get_sci_nsamples ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Return an array (of the same size as the ones returned by [lama get sky x], page 29,
[lama get sky y], page 29, [lama get ref x], page 29 and [lama get ref y], page 29)
containing the number of scientific samples used to create the aux binned data. If
TEST, FEED_HORN and PROC_TYPE are not specified, the defaults are used.
lama_get_sci_ave ch range min=[min time] range max=[max time]
[Function]
TEST=test FEED HORN=horn PROC TYPE=proc type X UNIT=x unit
UNIT=y unit
Return the mean of the selected scientific/reference data for channel ch. If
min time and max time are specified, then the mean is calculated in the specified
time window. Otherwise, it is calculated in the current statistical range (see
[lama get statistic range], page 33). The result is a two-valued array where the first
value refers to the sky, the second to the reference load. If X_UNIT keyword is not
specified then the function uses seconds for the time series. If UNIT is not specified
then the function returns values in Volt. See [measureUnits], page 45.
lama_get_sci_sig ch range min=[min time] range max=[max time]
[Function]
TEST=test FEED HORN=horn PROC TYPE=proc type X UNIT=x unit
UNIT=y unit
Return the standard deviation of the selected scientific/reference data for channel
ch. If min time and max time are specified, then the mean is calculated in the
specified time window. Otherwise, it is calculated in the current statistical range (see
[lama get statistic range], page 33). The result is a two-valued array where the first
value refers to the sky, the second to the reference load. If X_UNIT keyword is not
specified then the function uses seconds for time series. If UNIT is not specified then
the function returns values in Volt. See [measureUnits], page 45.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
lama_selection_get_binning TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
33
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Return the binning used in the last call to [lama select range], page 30 to load a
selection of scientific data for the specified feed horn and processing type. If TEST,
FEED_HORN and PROC_TYPE are not specified, the defaults are used.
lama_selection_get_nsamples ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Return the number of samples loaded during the last call to [lama select range],
page 30 to load the scientific data for channel ch. If TEST, FEED_HORN and PROC_TYPE
are not specified, the defaults are used.
lama_selection_get_range TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Return the time range used in the last call to [lama select range], page 30. The result
is a two-valued array containing the two time limits (in seconds) where scientific data
has been selected.
lama_selection_get_sci_avg ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type X UNIT=x measure unit UNIT=y measure unit
Return the mean of the selected scientific/reference data for channel ch. The result is
a two-valued array where the first value refers to the sky, the second to the reference
load. If X_UNIT keyword is not specified then the function uses seconds for time series.
If UNIT is not specified then the function returns values in Volt. See [measureUnits],
page 45.
lama_selection_get_sci_sigma ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type X UNIT=x measure unit UNIT=measure unit
Return the standard deviation of the selected scientific/reference data for channel ch.
The result is a two-valued array where the first value refers to the sky, the second to
the reference load. If X_UNIT keyword is not specified then the function uses seconds
for time series. If UNIT is not specified then the function returns values in Volt. See
[measureUnits], page 45.
lama_is_statistic_range_selected TEST=test
[Function]
Return nonzero if the user has selected a range for computing statistics (through one
of the Lama Plot windows). See [Manual Operations], page 19. If test is not specified,
the default one will be used.
lama_get_statistic_range TEST=test
[Function]
Return the range used by [lama get sci ave], page 32 and [lama get sci sig], page 32
to do statistics. If test is not specified, the default one will be used.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
34
6.5.1.5 Photometric calibration
Lama has the ability to perform a photometric calibration to convert the voltages coming
out from a radiometer into an antenna temperature. In order to do this, the user must
supply a calibration curve per each channel and processing type. This curve will be saved
into FITS files which will be reused by Life.
A calibration curve must be provided as a TOD, i.e. a stream of time-ordered data,
using the [lama set calibration], page 34 function.
lama_set_calibration ch time cal TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Set the photometric calibration curve for channel ch. If test, horn and proc type are
not specified, the defaults will be used. The time and cal arguments are two arrays
with the same size containing the time (in seconds) and the calibration constant (in
K/V) to be used respectively. The return value is nonzero if the calibration was set
successfully and written on the disk, zero if some error occurred.
An example of use is:
time = [ 32671., 32900. ]
cal = [
1.031, 1.046 ]
result = lama_set_calibration (0, time, cal)
if result eq 0 then begin
print, "Error: unable to set calibration for channel 0"
endif
This example will instruct Lama to use the photometric constant 1.031 from time
32671 to 32900, and the constant 1.046 from 32900 till the end of the scientific datastream. The function will also save this calibration curve into a FITS file, so that it
will be no longer needed to specify the curve if the test is to be loaded again.
Note that if a channel has been sampled using two different acquisition modes (e.g.
AVR1 and COM5) you have to provide two calibration curves.
To determine if a channel already has a calibration curve associated with its scientific
data, use the [lama is channel calibrated], page 34 function.
lama_is_channel_calibrated ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Return nonzero only if channel ch has a photometric calibration curve. This happens
when one of the following two conditions are met:
1. The function [lama set calibration], page 34 has been called for this channel
during the current working session;
2. There is a FITS file in the ‘toi’ directory of the test named test (the default test
if not specified) which contains a valid calibration curve for the specified channel.
6.5.1.6 Miscellanea
The following two functions are designed to get the path of a scientific node for further
use with browsing functions, like [lama input get node description], page 41 (see section
[IDLBrowse], page 38).
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
lama_get_aux_path ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
35
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Return the path of the AUX data node associated with channel ch, test test, feed
horn horn and processing type proc type.
lama_get_selection_path ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Function]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Return the path (see section [IDLBrowse], page 38) of the node associated with
the scientific selection of channel ch, test test, feed horn horn and processing
type proc type. This path can be used with a number of browsing functions, like
[lama input get node description], page 41.
Note that this function works even if no selection has been loaded yet for the specific
channel. It simply returns a path to the position where the selection would be loaded.
The following functions are specializations of [lama input unload node], page 43 and are
useful when you have completed some elaboration on a feed horn or radiometric channel
and want to free some memory. See also [lama input unload hk], page 38. Refer to section
[IDLUnloadData], page 43 for more information about unloading data from memory.
lama_input_unload_feed_horn feed horn num TEST=test
[Procedure]
This function unloads any X and Y data associated with the feed horn number
feed horn num (this includes any selection made through [lama select range],
page 30). You can still call [lama get sky x], page 29, [lama get sky y], page 29,
[lama get ref x], page 29 and [lama get ref y], page 29 after a call to this function:
Lama will silently load the data again.
The following example shows how to save some memory when processing data from
feed horns:
;; Retrieve sky data from feed horn #27 (30 GHz)
feed_horn = 27
x = lama_get_sky_x (feed_horn)
y = lama_get_sky_y (feed_horn)
;; We have the sky data available into the two IDL vectors X
;; and Y, so we can unload it from Lama View
lama_input_unload_feed_horn, feed_horn
;; Now use X and Y freely!
...
lama_input_unload_aux ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
[Procedure]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Free any memory associated with the AUX datastream for channel ch, test test, feed
horn horn and processing type proc type.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
lama_input_unload_selection ch TEST=test FEED HORN=horn
36
[Procedure]
PROC TYPE=proc type
Free any memory associated with the scientific selection for channel ch, test test,
feed horn horn and processing type proc type. Calling this function when there is no
scientific solution does not harm: the function will silently returns with no error.
Note that, unlike [lama select range], page 30, this function will operate on one channel, rather than on all the scientific channels of a feed horn.
6.5.2 Housekeeping data
lama_get_hk_name tab element [TEST=test]
[Function]
Return the name of an housekeeping parameter. It can be in the form LMxxxxxx
with each x being a digit (for housekeeping parameters recorded by SCOS2000) or
#fm-XXX:nn with XXX being a lowercase name and nn a number (for cryofacility temperatures).
lama_get_hk_description name|tab [element] [TEST=test]
[Function]
Return the description of an housekeeping parameter. It is an human-readable description of the parameter (e.g. “Drain current for #2700”). For an explanation of
the parameters of this function, see [lama get hk x], page 36.
There are two functions to get the data associated with an housekeeping file. They are
[lama get hk x], page 36 and [lama get hk y], page 36, and return the X data series (time)
and the Y data series (whose meaning depends on the parameter being selected).
lama_get_hk_x name|tab [element] TEST=test UNIT=measure unit
[Function]
Return the X data stream (time) associated with the specified housekeeping parameter. If test is not specified, the default one will be used. If UNIT is not specified return
time in seconds. See [measureUnits], page 45.
The function can be called in two ways:
1. When used with one parameter (name), you pass a string containing the LM code
of the parameter;
2. When used with two parameters (tab, element), you pass the tab and element
numbers of the housekeeping.
Tabs and elements are the remnants of the way old Lama 1.0 handled housekeepings,
and should be avoided in new code. You should prefer to use the LM code, as it is
guaranteed not to change between different tests.
;; This is the first form. The name refers to the drain current
;; of FH#27 M1
x1 = lama_get_hk_x (’LM051322’)
;;
;;
;;
x2
And this is the second one. Note that the housekeeping specified
by the (1, 15) pair is not always the same, but depends on the
test currently loaded
= lama_get_hk_x (1, 15)
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
37
lama_get_hk_y name|tab [element] TEST=test UNIT=measure unit
[Function]
Return the X data stream (time) associated with the specified housekeeping parameter. If test is not specified, the default one will be used. UNIT specifies the desired
measure unit. See [measureUnits], page 45.
For an explanation of the parameters accepted by this function, see [lama get hk x],
page 36.
6.5.2.1 Housekeeping Statistics
lama_get_env_ave ch hk tab, hk element, TEST=test,
[Function]
X UNIT=x measure unit, Y UNIT=y measure unit
Return the mean of the housekeeping parameter hk tab, hk element. The mean is
calculated in the current statistical range (see [lama get statistic range], page 33).
If X_UNIT keyword is not specified then the function uses seconds for time serie. If
Y_UNIT is not specified then the function uses RAW data for data serie. See [measureUnits], page 45.
lama_get_env_sig ch hk tab, hk element, TEST=test,
[Function]
X UNIT=x measure unit, Y UNIT=y measure unit
Return the sigma of the housekeeping parameter hk tab, hk element. The mean is
calculated in the current statistical range (see [lama get statistic range], page 33).
If X_UNIT keyword is not specified then the function uses seconds for time serie.
If Y_UNIT is not specified then the function returns raw (uncalibrated) data. See
[measureUnits], page 45.
6.5.2.2 Miscellanea
The following function is designed to get the path of an housekeeping node for further
use with browsing functions, like [lama input get node description], page 41 (see section
[IDLBrowse], page 38).
lama_get_hk_path name|tab [element] TEST=test
[Function]
Return the path of the data node associated with the housekeeping parameter with
name name, or identified by the two index numbers tab and element. A typical usage
is:
path1 = lama_get_hk_path (’LM101326’) ; New LM syntax - preferred
path2 = lama_get_hk_path (1, 5)
; Old syntax - compatible with RaNA
print, ’Node 1 is ’, lama_input_get_node_description (path1)
print, ’Node 2 is ’, lama_input_get_node_description (path2)
The following procedure is used to get a list of all the available housekeeping parameters
in the specified test.
lama_dump_hk_tables TEST=test
[Procedure]
This procedure prints on the IDL terminal a list of all the housekeeping parameters
found in test, or in the default test if the TEST keyword is not specified. For each
parameter the following information is provided:
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
38
1. The pair to be used with [lama get hk x], page 36 and [lama get hk y], page 36;
2. The LM code of the parameter, to be used with [lama get hk x], page 36 and
[lama get hk y], page 36 and as reference;
3. The full description of the parameter.
The following function is a specialization of [lama input unload node], page 43. See
also [lama input unload feed horn], page 35 and similar functions. Refer to section [IDLUnloadData], page 43 for more information about unloading data from memory.
lama_input_unload_hk name TEST=test
[Procedure]
This function unloads the X and Y data from the housekeeping parameter identified
by name. You can still call [lama get hk x], page 36 and [lama get hk y], page 36
after a call to this function: Lama will silently load the data again.
The following example shows how to save some memory when processing data from
housekeeping parameters:
;; Retrieve data from an housekeeping parameter
hk_name = ’LM302122’
x = lama_get_hk_x (hk_name)
y = lama_get_hk_x (hk_name)
;; We have the housekeeping data available into the two IDL
;; vectors X and Y, so we can unload it from Lama View
lama_input_unload_hk, hk_name
;; Now use X and Y freely!
...
6.5.3 Browsing the node tree
Starting from Lama 2.0, a new approach to access test data has been developed. The housekeeping and scientific parameters recorded during a test are stored in a tree-like structure.
The basic element of this tree is a “node”, i.e. a piece of information. Nodes are connected
hierarchically by means of parent/child relationships: each node has one parent node and
several child nodes.
This is the view of some details of the full node tree used by Lama:
Scientific data
30 GHz feed horns
FH#27
Processing type: AVR1
Channel: 00
Scientific node
AUX node
Calibration node
Channel: 01
Scientific node
AUX node
Calibration node
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
39
Temperatures
FPU temperatures
Housekeeping: Right Bottom (FH28)
Housekeeping: Cone Right Part
Housekeeping: Right Side Wall
Housekeeping: Left Bottom (FH25)
Housekeeping: Cold Plate Far Left
Housekeeping: Cone Left Part
BEU temperatures
Housekeeping: L-BEM 1
Housekeeping: L-BEM 2
This example should make the parent/child relationship clear. For instance, the “FPU
temperatures” node has six children (all are housekeeping parameters), while its parent is
the “Temperatures” node.
Nodes are divided into different types according to the information they provide:
Scientific nodes
They contain the sky and reference signal coming from a specified channel and
recorded using a specified processing type.
Housekeeping nodes
They are used to store information about an housekeeping parameter monitored
by SCOS2000.
AUX nodes
These nodes contain the subsampled scientific data coming from a specified
channel and processing type.
Calibration nodes
These nodes contain the information needed to apply a photometric calibration
on the data coming from a specified channel and processing type.
Parameter groups
These nodes do not contain information, but are used to hierarchically group
a set of similar nodes (e.g. the “FPU temperatures” node contains a set of
housekeeping parameters used to monitor temperatures in the Front End).
Processing types
These nodes are used to group together a set of channels belonging to the same
feed horn.
Feed horns
These nodes are used to group together a list of processing types.
6.5.3.1 Node paths
You can consider the node structure to be much like the layout of your hard drive: some
kind of nodes behave like files (e.g. scientific, housekeeping), while others are like directories
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
40
(e.g. parameter groups). We used this analogy to develop an IDL interface to access the
tree structure: to find or uniquely specify a node you have to provide a “path” to the node.
Node paths are made by concatenating the names of each parent nodes, following the
hierarchical sequence, separated by a ‘&’. For instance, the full path to Cone Right Part is
Temperatures&FPU temperatures&Cone Right Part. To get the node names you can use
the function lama_input_get_node_name.
lama_input_get_node_name [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return the name of the node relative to path (a string) and belonging to the test
named name. If path is not specified, the current node in the test will be used (see
[current node], page 42). If name is not specified, the current test will be used.
To traverse the node tree you need to know what are the children of a specified node.
This is provided by the function lama_input_get_children.
lama_input_get_children [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return a string array containing the children of the node specified by path and belonging to the test named name. If path is not specified, the current node of the test
will be used (see [current node], page 42). If name is not specified, the default test
will be used. If the node has no children, the function returns -1.
Here is an example showing how to print the full node tree by implementing a recursive
IDL procedure.
pro print_node_tree, start_path, indent_level
;; Create a string made by a number of INDENT_LEVEL
;; whitespace characters
if indent_level gt 0 then begin
byte_arr = bytarr (indent_level)
byte_arr[*] = byte (’ ’)
indent = string (byte_arr)
endif else indent = ""
;; Print the name of the node
print, indent, lama_input_get_node_name (start_path)
;; Recursively iterate through children
child_list = lama_input_get_children (start_path)
if size (child_list, /n_dim) gt 0 then begin
for i = 0, n_elements (child_list) - 1 do begin
;; Make up the path of this child node
if start_path ne ’&’ then $
child_path = start_path + ’&’ + child_list[i] $
else $
child_path = ’&’ + child_list[i]
;; Print the node tree of this child
print_node_tree, child_path, indent_level + 2
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
41
endfor
endif
end
There are additional functions which retrieve other information about a node. They are
listed here.
lama_input_get_node_description [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return a description for the node with path path and belonging to the test named
name. If path is not specified, the current node in the test will be used (see [current node], page 42). If name is not specified, the current test will be used.
lama_input_get_node_x_units [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return an array of IDs containing the valid measure units to be used for the X data of
node with path path and belonging to the test named name. If path is not specified,
the current node in the test will be used (see [current node], page 42). If name is not
specified, the current test will be used.
If the node does not contain data (e.g. if it is a group node), -1 will be returned.
lama_input_get_node_y_units [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return an array of IDs containing the valid measure units to be used for the Y data of
node with path path and belonging to the test named name. If path is not specified,
the current node in the test will be used (see [current node], page 42). If name is not
specified, the current test will be used.
If the node does not contain data (e.g. if it is a group node), -1 will be returned.
lama_input_get_node_unit_name unit id [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return a string containing the short name (e.g. “s” for seconds) of the measure unit
with ID unit id. The measure unit must belong to the node specified by path and
to the test named name. If path is not specified, the current node in the test will be
used (see [current node], page 42). If name is not specified, the current test will be
used.
Note that this function does not distinguish between X and Y measure units: this
means that you can use it either with IDs returned by [lama input get node x units],
page 41 and [lama input get node y units], page 41.
If the node does not contain an unit with ID unit id, an empty string will be returned.
lama_input_get_node_unit_full_name unit id [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return a string containing the full name (e.g. “seconds”) of the measure unit with
ID unit id. The measure unit must belong to the node specified by path and to the
test named name. If path is not specified, the current node in the test will be used
(see [current node], page 42). If name is not specified, the current test will be used.
Note that this function does not distinguish between X and Y measure units: this
means that you can use it either with IDs returned by [lama input get node x units],
page 41 and [lama input get node y units], page 41.
If the node does not contain an unit with ID unit id, an empty string will be returned.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
42
lama_input_get_node_unit_description unit id [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return a string containing a short description (e.g. “Temperature”) of the measure
unit with ID unit id. The measure unit must belong to the node specified by path
and to the test named name. If path is not specified, the current node in the test will
be used (see [current node], page 42). If name is not specified, the current test will
be used.
Note that this function does not distinguish between X and Y measure units: this
means that you can use it either with IDs returned by [lama input get node x units],
page 41 and [lama input get node y units], page 41.
If the node does not contain an unit with ID unit id, an empty string will be returned.
lama_input_get_node_type [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return the type (an integer) of the node belonging to the test named name and
specified by the string path. If path is not specified, the current node in the test will
be used (see [current node], page 42). If name is not specified, the current test will
be used.
The type codes are listed here:
Code
0
Description
A generic node. This code usually indicates that there is an error in
the node tree.
1
The root node of the tree. Its name is the name of the test.
2
A parameter group
3
A node containing photometric calibration information for a channel.
4
A feed horn
5
A radiometric channel
6
A processing type
7
An AUX file
8
A node containing the scientific output of a channel
9
An housekeeping parameter
6.5.3.2 The current node
Each test loaded into memory has a “current working node”, much similar to the concept
of the “current working directory” in operating systems. This is the default node used by
almost all the functions described in this section. The root node is always indicated with
&. There are two functions designed to set/retrieve the current node: lama_input_get_
current_node and lama_input_set_current_node.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
43
lama_input_get_current_node TEST=name
[Function]
Return the path of the “current” node for the test named name. If name is not
provided, return the current node for the default test.
lama_input_set_current_node path TEST=name
[Function]
Change the current node for the test named name to the node specified by path. If
name is not provided, set the current node for the default test.
Return true (nonzero) if the node was found and selected, false (zero) if path is not
a valid path.
If you want to extract multiple pieces of information from the same node (e.g. the name,
the description and the type), it is faster to set that node as the “current” one:
;; Print information about the blanking time parameter
x = lama_input_set_current_node (’REBA parameters&LM100326’)
print, "Name:
", lama_input_get_node_name ()
print, "Description: ", lama_input_get_node_description ()
print, "Type:
", lama_input_get_node_type ()
Apart from the small increase in the speed, this also produces cleaner code.
6.5.3.3 Retrieving scientific/housekeeping data
lama_input_get_hk_node_pair [path] TEST=name
[Function]
Return the pair of numbers (tab, index) (used by functions like [lama get hk y],
page 36) for the housekeeping node specified by path and belonging to the test named
name. If path is not specified, use the current node. If name is not specified, use the
default test.
If the node specified by path is not valid, or is not an housekeeping parameter (i.e.
the value returned by [lama input get node type], page 42 is not equal to 9), the
function returns -1.
There are two other functions that returns the node path of an AUX/selection/housekeeping
files. They are [lama get aux path], page 34, [lama get selection path], page 35 and
[lama get hk path], page 37. Refer to sections [IDLScientific], page 28 and [IDLHK],
page 36 for further information.
6.5.3.4 Unloading data from memory
Some node types have the ability to load data from FITS files. These are the AUX,
scientific and housekeeping nodes (their types are respectively 7, 8 and 9 – see
[lama input get node type], page 42). There is no need for the user to tell when to load
the FITS files, because Lama is smart enough to load them when needed.
Starting from version 3.0, Lama gives the user the ability to unload the data loaded from
FITS files. This can save a lot of memory, expecially when performing automated tests
where a number of radiometric channels and housekeeping parameters must be accessed
sequentially. Unloaded data can be reloaded by Lama if they are needed again. Also, if you
unload data that are plotted in a window, the window will continue to be usable, as each
window maintains a local copy of each data stream.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
44
lama_input_unload_node [path] TEST=name
[Procedure]
This function unloads any data associated with the node pointed by path. If the node
does not contain any datum, the function does nothing.
This function will not free data associated with child nodes – use
[lama input unload subtree], page 44.
The following function is a wrapper for [lama input unload node], page 43 which also
frees the memory allocated by every descendant of the start node.
lama_input_unload_subtree [path] TEST=name
[Procedure]
This function unloads any data associated with the node pointed by path and with
every descendant. It is implemented in IDL and uses [lama input unload node],
page 43.
Consider also using the more specialized functions [lama input unload feed horn],
page 35, [lama input unload aux], page 35, [lama input unload selection], page 35 and
[lama input unload hk], page 38.
6.5.3.5 Finding nodes in the tree
Because of the complexity of the node tree, sometimes it is quite difficult to find the desired
node. The function lama_input_find_nodes provides a powerful way to look into the tree
for nodes matching some pattern.
lama_input_find_nodes pattern [start path] REGEXP=regexp
[Function]
RECURSIVE=recursive NAME=name TEST=name
This function searches into the list of the children owned by the node specified by
start path for any node whose description is equal to pattern. If name is true, then
the node name will be matched instead of the description. If recursive is true, all the
nodes having start path as ancestor (i.e. its children, grandchildren and so on) will
be checked.
The function returns a list of strings, each containing the full path to the found nodes,
or an empty string if no matching node was found.
This example will initialize gain to the DAE gain states of feed horn 27 channel 00. It
finds the right node by looking for an housekeeping parameter matching the LM code
of the DAE parameter, and then retrieving the tab number and tab index required
by [lama get hk y], page 36.
;; LM001326 is the code for the DAE gain of FH 27, channel 00
node_path = lama_input_find_nodes (’LM001326’, ’&’, $
/recursive, /name)
pair = lama_input_get_hk_pair (node_path)
gain = lama_get_hk_y (pair[0], pair[1])
If regexp is nonzero, the pattern will be considered a regular expression. This provides
an extremely powerful tool to search into a tree. For instance, the following code will
print a list of nodes whose description either contains “Feed horn”, “feed horn”, “FH”
or “fh”, followed by a two-digit number, with optional space between them:
result = lama_input_find_nodes (’([Ff]eed horn|FH|fh)\s*\d\d’, $
’&’, /recursive, /regexp)
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
45
For more information about regular expressions, see Appendix A [Regular expressions], page 52.
Note that if regexp is true, then lama_input_find_nodes will return all the nodes
whose name matches the regular expression, while if regexp is false, it will return all
the nodes whose description (or name, if /name is used) is exactly equal to pattern.
Therefore, in this example r1 and r2 are not necessarily equal:
r1 = lama_input_find_nodes (’DAE gain’, ’&’, /recursive)
r2 = lama_input_find_nodes (’DAE gain’, ’&’, /recursive, /regexp)
This happens because if there is a node named DAE gain for FH27, it will be included
into r2 but not into r1. To make the two searches exactly the same you can use the
special characters ^ and $ (see Appendix A [Regular expressions], page 52 for an
explanation of their meaning):
;; Now r1 and r2 are the same
r1 = lama_input_find_nodes (’DAE gain’, ’&’, /recursive)
r2 = lama_input_find_nodes (’^DAE gain$’, ’&’, /recursive,
/regexp)
6.5.4 Using measure units
6.5.4.1 RaNA
RaNA implements a simple way to specify which measure unit to use when asking for scientific data. Functions returning a radiometric output datastream ([lama get sky y], page 29,
[lama get ref y], page 29, [lama selection get sky y], page 31, [lama selection get ref y],
page 31) implement the keywords RAW and PGA_CORRECT for this purpose. Their meaning
is the following:
• If no PGA_CORRECT nor RAW keyword is specified, the array returned by the function
will contain voltages;
• If PGA_CORRECT is set to zero, the array returned by the function will contain voltages,
but the DAE offset correction will not be applied;
• If RAW is specified, the array returned by the function will contain raw ADU values.
The default behavior is therefore to return a stream of voltages.
6.5.4.2 Lama
Lama implements a simple and powerful way to specify measure units when asking for
scientific or housekeeping data, by means of the UNIT keyword.
The argument for the UNIT keyword is a number specifying the measure unit to use.
Here is a list of supported measure units, as well as the function which support them:
0
Clock ticks ([lama get sky x], page 29, [lama get ref x], page 29,
[lama get raw x],
page 29,
[lama selection get sky x],
page 30,
[lama selection get ref x], page 30, [lama selection get raw x], page 31,
[lama get hk x], page 36)
1
Seconds [s] ([lama get sky x],
[lama get raw x],
page 29,
page 29, [lama get ref x], page
[lama selection get sky x],
page
29,
30,
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
46
[lama selection get ref x], page 30, [lama selection get raw x], page 31,
[lama get hk x], page 36)
2
Raw radiometer output [ADU] ([lama get sky y], page 29, [lama get ref y],
page 29, [lama get raw y], page 29, [lama selection get sky y], page 31,
[lama selection get ref y], page 31, [lama selection get raw y], page 31)
3
Radiometer output [V] ([lama get sky y], page 29, [lama get ref y],
page 29, [lama get raw y], page 29, [lama selection get sky y], page 31,
[lama selection get ref y], page 31, [lama selection get raw y], page 31)
4
Radiometer
output
without
DAE
offset
[V]
([lama get sky y],
page 29, [lama get ref y], page 29, [lama get raw y], page 29,
[lama selection get sky y], page 31, [lama selection get ref y], page 31,
[lama selection get raw y], page 31)
5
Temperature [K] ([lama get hk y], page 36, when applicable)
6
Photometric calibration constant [V/K] (this measure unit is for internal use
only)
7
Raw housekeeping data [DEC] ([lama get hk y], page 36, when applicable)
100
Pure number [] ([lama get hk y], page 36, when applicable)
If you do not specify a UNIT keyword, Lama will use an appropriate default choice:
• Time is expressed in seconds (UNIT=1);
• Radiometric output is expressed in voltages (UNIT=3);
• Housekeeping parameters are expressed using their “natural” measure unit, e.g. temperature (UNIT=5).
Please note that Lama supports also the old RAW and PGA_CORRECT keywords in functions
returning radiometric output, but their use is now discouraged in favour of the more general
UNIT keyword. To upgrade the old code, here are some rules:
1. If no PGA_CORRECT nor RAW keyword is specified, the result is the same as using UNIT=3;
2. If PGA_CORRECT is set to zero, the result is the same as using UNIT=4;
3. If RAW is specified, the result is the same as using UNIT=2.
The following function is useful when you get lost while using Lama from the command
line. Basically, it provides you the same table shown above.
[Function]
lama_dump_measure_units
Print a table containing the list of measure units available.
6.6 Triggers
All the trigger functions explained in this section use a peculiar way to specify the LFI
channels:
Unit
FH #27, rad. 0, ch. 0
FH #27, rad. 0, ch. 1
Code
101
102
Unit
FH #20, rad. 0, ch. 0
FH #20, rad. 0, ch. 1
Code
129
130
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
47
FH #27, rad. 1, ch. 0
103
FH #20, rad. 1, ch. 0
131
FH #27, rad. 1, ch. 1
104
FH #20, rad. 1, ch. 1
132
FH #24, rad. 0, ch. 0
105
FH #19, rad. 0, ch. 0
133
FH #24, rad. 0, ch. 1
106
FH #19, rad. 0, ch. 1
134
FH #24, rad. 1, ch. 0
107
FH #19, rad. 1, ch. 0
135
FH #24, rad. 1, ch. 1
108
FH #19, rad. 1, ch. 1
136
FH #21, rad. 0, ch. 0
109
FH #18, rad. 0, ch. 0
137
FH #21, rad. 0, ch. 1
110
FH #18, rad. 0, ch. 1
138
FH #21, rad. 1, ch. 0
111
FH #18, rad. 1, ch. 0
139
FH #21, rad. 1, ch. 1
112
FH #18, rad. 1, ch. 1
140
FH #22, rad. 0, ch. 0
113
FH #26, rad. 0, ch. 0
141
FH #22, rad. 0, ch. 1
114
FH #26, rad. 0, ch. 1
142
FH #22, rad. 1, ch. 0
115
FH #26, rad. 1, ch. 0
143
FH #22, rad. 1, ch. 1
116
FH #26, rad. 1, ch. 1
144
FH #23, rad. 0, ch. 0
117
Feed horn #18 (70 GHz)
201
FH #23, rad. 0, ch. 1
118
Feed horn #19 (70 GHz)
202
FH #23, rad. 1, ch. 0
119
Feed horn #20 (70 GHz)
203
FH #23, rad. 1, ch. 1
120
Feed horn #21 (70 GHz)
204
FH #25, rad. 0, ch. 0
121
Feed horn #22 (70 GHz)
205
FH #25, rad. 0, ch. 1
122
Feed horn #23 (70 GHz)
206
FH #25, rad. 1, ch. 0
123
Feed horn #24 (44 GHz)
207
FH #25, rad. 1, ch. 1
124
Feed horn #25 (44 GHz)
208
FH #28, rad. 0, ch. 0
125
Feed horn #26 (44 GHz)
209
FH #28, rad. 0, ch. 1
126
Feed horn #27 (30 GHz)
210
FH #28, rad. 1, ch. 0
127
Feed horn #28 (30 GHz)
211
FH #28, rad. 1, ch. 1
128
LFI (all radiometers)
301
This way of numbering channels derives from the FEM channel numeration used by the
SCOS2000 scripts to drive the FEM active units (phase switches and LNAs). Since triggers
are mainly used for tuning tests, we chose to use the same FEM numeration in the functions
dealing with triggers.
lama_input_get_list_of_triggers start end channel time
[Function]
lama_input_get_trigger is an high-level procedure wrapped around lama_input_
find_trigger. It is used to find a list of start/end trigger pairs found in the test.
The start trigger is coded by start, while the end trigger is coded by end. The time
parameter specifies the start time where to look for triggers.
The return value of this function is a 2 times N matrix where each row contains the
start and end time of each trigger. If no triggers with the specified start/end codes
exist in the current test, the function returns -1.
;; Search for
print, lama_input_get_list_of_triggers (1, 2, 101, 0.0)
lama_input_find_trigger channel code time TEST=test
[Function]
lama_input_find_trigger looks for a trigger with code code and associated with
the FEM channel channel into the specified test test (or the default test, if TEST is
not specified). The first trigger occurring at a time greater than time is returned. If
no suitable trigger is found, return -1.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
48
;; This example looks for the first start/end trigger in the test
;; and then select data inside. No error checking is made.
start = lama_input_find_trigger (101, 1, 0.0)
;; Note that we start our search from time START instead of 0.0
end_time = lama_input_find_trigger (101, 2, start)
lama_select_range, 0, start, end_time, 1
Internally, a trigger is a sequence of values stored in an housekeeping parameter.
Setting a trigger in a test is an operation which takes some time (usually a few
seconds). The time specified in the time parameter always points to the beginning of
the sequence, while the returned value points to the end of the same sequence.
Here is an example. We imagine that in some test the trigger sequence with code 1
was started at 100 s and was made by 6 values, each lasting for 4 seconds. Therefore,
the trigger ended at 124 s. Here is how the lama_input_find_trigger works in this
case:
;; Look for trigger 1, starting from 100 s
print, lama_input_find_trigger (101, 1, 100.0)
a 124.0
This has several benefits:
1. It is trivial to perform repetitive searches:
;; This will print a list of triggers found in the test
;; and referring to the FEM channel 101
time = 0.0
repeat
time = lama_input_find_trigger (101, 1, time)
print, "Found a trigger at ", time
until time lt 0.0
2. Usually, a test starts after the SCOS operator has finished sending the trigger
sequence. Therefore, the value returned by lama_input_find_trigger marks
exactly the start of the test.
6.7 Log messages
When a test is running, the TQL operator has the ability to write comments that are stored
in the test. They are referred as “log messages”, and are used to keep track of what the
user is doing. Lama provides some IDL functions to access these messages.
lama_input_get_num_of_log_messages TEST=test
[Function]
Return the number of log messages recorded by the TQL for test named test. If
test does not exist, the function returns -1. If there are no log messages recorded, it
returns 0.
If the TEST keyword was not specified, the default test will be used.
[lama input get selected test], page 26.
See
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
49
lama_input_get_log_time TEST=test
[Function]
Return an array of double values containing the time (in second) when each log
message was recorded by the TQL. These times are comparable with those returned
by e.g. [lama get sky x], page 29. The number of elements in the array should match
the return value of [lama input get num of log messages], page 48.
If test does not exist or if no log message was recorded, the function returns -1.
If the TEST keyword was not specified, the default test will be used.
[lama input get selected test], page 26.
See
;; The first and the last log message usually mark the
;; beginning and the end of the test. We use them to
;; estimate how long the test lasted.
log_time = lama_input_get_log_time ()
num_of_logs = n_elements (log_time)
if num_of_logs gt 0 then begin
print, "The test lasted", $
log_time[num_of_logs-1] - log_time[0]
endif
lama_input_get_log_time_str TEST=test
[Function]
Return an array of strings containing the date and time when each log message was
recorded by the TQL. The number of elements in the array should match the return
value of [lama input get num of log messages], page 48. Each string contains the
date and time in ISO format, e.g. yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss where yyyy is the year, mm
the month, dd the day, hh the hours, mm the minutes and ss the seconds when the log
message was entered.
If test does not exist or if no log message was recorded, the function returns -1.
If the TEST keyword was not specified, the default test will be used.
[lama input get selected test], page 26.
See
lama_input_get_log_text TEST=test
[Function]
Return an array of strings containing the text of each log message recorded by
the TQL. The number of elements in the array should match the return value of
[lama input get num of log messages], page 48.
If test does not exist or if no log message was recorded, the function returns -1.
If the TEST keyword was not specified, the default test will be used.
[lama input get selected test], page 26.
;;
;;
;;
if
Typically the first log message contains a string which
describes what the test is about. We want to display it on
the screen
lama_input_get_num_of_log_messages() gt 0 then begin
print, "Purpose of the test:"
print, (lama_input_get_log_text())[0]
endif
See
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
50
lama_input_get_log_messages TEST=test
[Function]
Return an array of structures containing information about each log message recorded
by the TQL. The number of elements in the array should match the return value of
[lama input get num of log messages], page 48.
Each element of the array is a structure with three fields:
time
The same value as returned by [lama input get log time], page 48.
time_str
The same value as returned by [lama input get log time str], page 49.
text
The same value as returned by [lama input get log text], page 49).
If test does not exist or if no log message was recorded, the function returns -1.
If the TEST keyword was not specified, the default test will be used.
See
[lama input get selected test], page 26.
6.8 DAE calibration
The DAE calibration tables are used to convert the digital output produced by the DAE
into a voltage. Three tables are required:
1. A ‘TSCAL’ file which associates the DAE gain levels with the actual gains.
2. A ‘TZERO’ file which includes a (usually small) correction to be applied to the voltage
after having applied the ‘TSCAL’ table.
3. A ‘OFFSET’ file which associates the DAE offset levels with the actual offsets.
Within LAMA, these three tables are named a calibration set. Up to LIFE 3.1, only two
calibration sets were required: one for the Qualification Model (QM), and the other one for
the Flight Model (FM). LAMA decided which calibration table to apply according to the
instrument type information read from the test files.
But we must consider that in the future there will be the need to update the calibration
tables more than once:
• A new calibration table to be used during the analysis of the tests acquired during the
Planck cryogenic campaign must be produced.
• In the CPV phase (the first months after the launch of Planck) we will calibrate the
DAE again, therefore producing new tables.
However, we do not want to throw away the old calibration tables, as they will still
be needed to load the old tests acquired in the many ground tests performed before the
launch. What we want is that for each test recorded during the ground test LAMA applies
the “right” calibration tables. Unfortunately, so far the software offered no tools to perform
this task.
With version 3.1 we have introduced new facilities that give the user full control over
the calibration sets. In LAMA each test can have its own calibration set. Within IDL, each
set is identified through a string like QM. To get a list of the calibration sets available for a
specified test, you can use the lama_get_calibration_sets function.
lama_get_calibration_sets TEST=name
[Function]
Return an array of strings representing the list of available calibration sets for the
test named name. If path is not specified, the current test will be used.
If an error occurred during the execution of this function, the value 0 is returned.
Chapter 6: IDL Command Reference
51
The default test can be retrieved and changed with lama_get_default_calibration
and lama_default_calibration.
lama_get_default_calibration_set TEST=name
[Function]
Return a string containing the name of the calibration set being used for the test
named name. If path is not specified, the current test will be used.
If an error occurred during the execution of this function, the value 0 is returned.
lama_set_default_calibration_set new set TEST=name
[Function]
Select the new calibration set to be used for the test specified by name (or for the
default test, if the TEST keyword is not specified). The value of new set must be one
of the strings returned by lama_get_calibration_sets.
If an error occurred during the execution of this function, the value 0 is returned.
The following example shows how to use these three functions to set up the calibration
set for the default test:
;;; Retrieve the list of calibration sets available for the default test
list_of_calibrations = lama_get_calibration_sets ()
;;; Check that the operation was successful (e.g. that at least *one* test
;;; has been loaded...)
if keyword_set (list_of_calibrations) then begin
;; We now try to select a new calibration
if lama_set_default_calibration_set ("CoolestCalibrationEver") then begin
;; Done! We have successfully changed the configuration.
print, "The new DAE calibration is ", lama_get_default_calibration_set ()
endif else begin
;; Something went wrong: warn the user.
print, "Error: Unable to set the DAE calibration!"
endelse
endif
Of course, in a real world you would check that CoolestCalibrationEver is one of the
supported calibrations by checking that it is included into list of calibrations.
Appendix A: Regular expressions
52
Appendix A Regular expressions
Regular expressions have a syntax in which a few characters are special constructs and the
rest are “ordinary”. An ordinary character is a simple regular expression which matches
that same character and nothing else. The special characters are $, ^, ., *, +, ?, {, }, [, ],
(, ) and \. Any other character appearing in a regular expression is ordinary, unless a \
precedes it.
For example, f is not a special character, so it is ordinary, and therefore f is a regular
expression that matches f. Likewise, o is a regular expression that matches only o.
Any two regular expressions A and B can be concatenated. The result is a regular
expression which matches a string if A matches some amount of the beginning of that
string and B matches the rest of the string.
As a simple example, we can concatenate the regular expressions f and o to get the
regular expression fo, which matches the string fo. Still trivial. To do something nontrivial,
you need to use one of the special characters. Here is a list of them.
.
(period) is a special character that matches any single character except a newline. Using concatenation, we can make regular expressions like a.b, which
matches any three-character string that begins with a and ends with b.
*
is not a construct by itself; it is a postfix operator that means to match the
preceding regular expression repetitively as many times as possible. Thus, o*
matches any number of o (including no os).
* always applies to the smallest possible preceding expression. Thus, fo* has
a repeating o, not a repeating fo. It matches f, fo, foo, and so on.
The matcher processes a * construct by matching, immediately, as many repetitions as can be found. Then it continues with the rest of the pattern. If that
fails, backtracking occurs, discarding some of the matches of the *-modified
construct in case that makes it possible to match the rest of the pattern. For
example, in matching ca*ar against the string caaar, the a* first tries to match
all three as; but the rest of the pattern is ar and there is only r left to match,
so this try fails. The next alternative is for a* to match only two as. With this
choice, the rest of the regexp matches successfully.
+
is a postfix operator, similar to * except that it must match the preceding
expression at least once. So, for example, ca+r matches the strings car and
caaaar but not the string cr, whereas ca*r matches all three strings.
?
is a postfix operator, similar to * except that it can match the preceding expression either once or not at all. For example, ca?r matches car or cr; nothing
else.
{N}
is a postfix operator that specifies repetition N times–that is, the preceding
regular expression must match exactly N times in a row. For example, x{4}
matches the string xxxx and nothing else.
{N,M}
is a postfix operator that specifies repetition between N and M times–that is,
the preceding regular expression must match at least N times, but no more
than M times. If M is omitted, then there is no upper limit, but the preceding
regular expression must match at least N times.
Appendix A: Regular expressions
53
( ... | ... )
is an alternation, that is, it matches any of the regular expression enclosed
between the |. For instance, (fh|FH|feed horn) will match either fh, FH or
feed horn. Parentheses is also used in backreferences, see [backreferences],
page 54.
[ ... ]
is a character set, which begins with [ and is terminated by ]. In the simplest
case, the characters between the two brackets are what this set can match.
Thus, [ad] matches either one a or one d, and [ad]* matches any string composed of just as and ds (including the empty string), from which it follows that
c[ad]*r matches cr, car, cdr, caddaar, etc.
You can also include character ranges in a character set, by writing the starting
and ending characters with a - between them. Thus, [a-z] matches any lowercase ASCII letter. Ranges may be intermixed freely with individual characters,
as in [a-z$%.], which matches any lower-case ASCII letter or $, % or period.
Note that the usual regexp special characters are not special inside a character
set. A completely different set of special characters exists inside character sets:
], - and ^.
To include a ] in a character set, you must make it the first character. For
example, []a] matches ] or a. To include a -, write - as the first or last
character of the set, or put it after a range. Thus, []-] matches both ] and -.
To include ^ in a set, put it anywhere but at the beginning of the set. (At the
beginning, it complements the set–see below.)
[^ ... ]
[^ begins a “complemented character set”, which matches any character except
the ones specified. Thus, [^a-z0-9A-Z] matches all characters except ASCII
letters and digits.
^ is not special in a character set unless it is the first character. The character
following the ^ is treated as if it were first (in other words, - and ] are not
special there).
A complemented character set can match a newline, unless newline is mentioned
as one of the characters not to match. This is in contrast to the handling of
regexps in programs such as ‘grep’.
^
signifies the beginning of the string. If you wish to match a literal ^ you must
escape it by writing \^. For example, ^Feed horn will only match strings which
begin with the characters ‘Feed horn’.
$
is similar to ^ but matches only at the end of a line. Thus, x+$ matches a string
of one x or more at the end of a line.
\
has two functions: it quotes the special characters (including \), and it introduces additional special constructs:
Element
c
Meaning
Any character represents itself unless it has a special regexp
meaning. Thus c matches the character c.
Appendix A: Regular expressions
54
\c
A character that follows a backslash matches the character itself except where mentioned below. For example if you wished
to match a literal caret at the beginning of a string you would
write ^.
\a
This matches the ASCII bell character (BEL, 0x07).
\f
This matches the ASCII form feed character (FF, 0x0C).
\n
This matches the ASCII line feed character (LF, 0x0A, Unix
newline).
\r
This matches the ASCII carriage return character (CR,
0x0D).
\t
This matches the ASCII horizontal tab character (HT, 0x09).
\v
This matches the ASCII vertical tab character (VT, 0x0B).
\xhhhh
This matches the Unicode character corresponding to the hexadecimal number hhhh (between 0x0000 and 0xFFFF).
\0ooo (i.e.,
\zero ooo)
matches the ASCII/Latin1 character corresponding to the octal number ooo (between 0 and 0377).
\d
This matches a digit.
\D
This matches a non-digit.
\s
This matches a whitespace (space or tab).
\S
This matches a non-whitespace.
\w
This matches a word character (a letter, a number or _).
\W
This matches a non-word character.
\n
The n-th backreference, e.g. \1, \2, etc.
Because \ quotes special characters, \$ is a regular expression that matches
only $, and \[ is a regular expression that matches only [, and so on.
A.1 Backreferences
Backreferences are used to refer to a previously matched part of the regular expression.
When you use constructs like e.g. (first|1st) you cannot know which word was matched.
By using \n (with n being a digit) you can backreference a parenthesis. For instance,
Appendix A: Regular expressions
55
\b(\w+)\W+\1\b will match hello--hello because \b(\w+) matches the first hello, \W+
matches -- and \1 matches the expression specified by (\w+), which was hello.
To use parentheses only to specify alternatives and not for backquoting, you can use
the (?:), e.g. (?:current|voltage). This kind of parentheses is slightly more efficient
because the parser has less book-keeping to do.
Concept index
56
Concept index
57
Concept index
A
Add New Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Add to Existing Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Add to New Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Analyse Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
AUX files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
B
Binned data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Bring to front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
C
Close Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Close window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Combine windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Computing statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Conventions for this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Correlation coefficient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Cross-correlation plot, Binned data. . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Cross-correlation plot, open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Cross-correlation plot, Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Cross-correlation plot, Save Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Cross-correlation plot, Show error bars . . . . . . . . 22
Cross-correlation plot, Show fit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Cross-correlation plot, Show points . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Cross-correlation plot, Swap Axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Crosscorrelation plot, open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
D
DAE calibration, calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
E
Export data to file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
F
Feed horns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Full scientific data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
H
help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Lama, open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Load Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 16
M
Make Default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual Zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Measure units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Messages, Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
19
45
48
N
Node List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Node paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Normalize data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
O
Open Object Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
P
Path to nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
R
RaNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Regular expressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 52
Remove Mean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
S
Scientific data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Show Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Show Gaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Start Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Swap sky/ref . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
T
Triggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Tutorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
U
IDL functions, Feed horns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Units of measure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Unload Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 16
Unload Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
L
V
Lama, example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
View Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
I
Function index
58
Function index
lama_channel_is_swapped . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_dump_hk_tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_dump_measure_units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_aux_path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_calibration_sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_default_calibration_set . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_env_ave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_env_sig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_hk_description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_hk_name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_hk_path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_hk_x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_hk_y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_num_of_sci_tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_raw_sigma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_raw_x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_raw_y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_ref_sigma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_ref_x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_ref_y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_sci_ave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_sci_nsamples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_sci_sig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_selection_path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_sky_sigma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_sky_x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_sky_y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_get_statistic_range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_find_nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_find_trigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_current_node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_hk_node_pair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_list_of_tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_list_of_triggers . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_log_messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_log_text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_log_time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_log_time_str . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_node_description . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_node_name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_node_type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_node_unit_description . . . . .
lama_input_get_node_unit_full_name . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_node_unit_name . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28
37
46
35
50
51
37
37
36
36
37
36
37
28
30
29
30
29
29
29
32
32
32
35
29
29
29
33
44
47
40
43
43
27
47
50
49
49
49
41
40
42
42
41
41
lama_input_get_node_x_units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_node_y_units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_num_of_log_messages . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_selected_feed_horn. . . . . . . . .
lama_input_get_selected_test . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_is_test_available . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_load_test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_select_feed_horn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_select_test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_set_current_node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_unload_aux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_unload_feed_horn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_unload_hk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_unload_node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_unload_selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_unload_subtree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_input_unload_test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_instance_close . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_instance_create . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_instance_is_created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_is_channel_calibrated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_is_statistic_range_selected . . . . . . . . . .
lama_select_range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_binning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_nsamples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_raw_sigma . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_raw_x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_raw_y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_ref_sigma . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_ref_x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_ref_y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_sci_avg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_sci_sigma . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_sky_sigma . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_sky_x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_get_sky_y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_is_ref_available . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_selection_is_sky_available . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_set_calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_set_default_calibration_set . . . . . . . . . .
lama_swap_sky_ref . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_view_close . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_view_is_opened . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
lama_view_open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
41
48
27
26
26
26
27
26
43
35
35
38
44
36
44
26
25
25
25
34
33
30
33
33
33
31
31
31
31
31
31
33
33
31
30
31
30
30
34
51
28
26
26
25
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