User's Guide
User’s Guide
3HAC 0966-21
For BaseWare OS 3.1
ABB Flexible Automation
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a
commitment by ABB Robotics Products AB. ABB Robotics Products AB assumes no responsibility for
any errors that may appear in this document.
In no event shall ABB Robotics Products AB be liable for incidental or consequential damages arising
from use of this document or of the software and hardware described in this document.
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charge.
© ABB Robotics Products AB
Article number: 3HAC 0966-21
Issue: For BaseWare OS 3.1
ABB Robotics Products AB
S-721 68 Västerås
Sweden
CONTENTS
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1 Table of Contents ..................................................................................... 1-1
2 Introduction ............................................................................................. 2-1
1 New Features in this Version of the Robot ........................................................
2 Other Manuals .....................................................................................................
3 How to Read this Manual....................................................................................
3.1 Typographic conventions ..............................................................................
4 Reader’s Comments.............................................................................................
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3 Safety ........................................................................................................ 3-1
1 General..................................................................................................................
1.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................
2 Applicable Safety Standards...............................................................................
3 Fire-Extinguishing ...............................................................................................
4 Definitions of Safety Functions...........................................................................
5 Safe Working Procedures....................................................................................
5.1 Normal operations.........................................................................................
6 Programming, Testing and Servicing.................................................................
7 Safety Functions ...................................................................................................
7.1 The safety control chain of operation ...........................................................
7.2 Emergency stops ...........................................................................................
7.3 Mode selection using the operating mode selector .......................................
7.4 Enabling device.............................................................................................
7.5 Hold-to-run control .......................................................................................
7.6 General Mode Safeguarded Stop (GS) connection .......................................
7.7 Automatic Mode Safeguarded Stop (AS) connection...................................
7.8 Limiting the working space...........................................................................
7.9 Supplementary functions...............................................................................
8 Safety Risks Related to End Effectors ...............................................................
8.1 Gripper ..........................................................................................................
8.2 Tools/workpieces...........................................................................................
8.3 Pneumatic/hydraulic systems ........................................................................
9 Risks during Operation Disturbances................................................................
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Risks during Installation and Service ..............................................................
Risks Associated with Live Electric Parts........................................................
Emergency Release of Mechanical Arm ..........................................................
Limitation of Liability .......................................................................................
Related Information ..........................................................................................
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4 Basic Operation........................................................................................ 4-1
5 Starting up................................................................................................ 5-1
1 Switching on the Power Supply ..........................................................................
1.1 Errors on start-up ..........................................................................................
2 The Operator’s Panel ..........................................................................................
3 Selecting the Operating Mode ............................................................................
3.1 Automatic mode (production mode).............................................................
3.2 Manual mode with reduced speed (programming mode) .............................
3.3 Manual mode with full speed (testing mode) ...............................................
4 Switching the Power Supply to the Motors On.................................................
5 Emergency Stops..................................................................................................
5.1 Activating the emergency stop button ..........................................................
5.2 Resetting after an emergency stop ................................................................
6 The Teach Pendant ..............................................................................................
6.1 Entering text using the teach pendant ...........................................................
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6 Jogging ...................................................................................................... 6-1
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1 General .................................................................................................................
1.1 The Jogging window.....................................................................................
1.2 Reading the current position .........................................................................
1.3 How moving the joystick affects movements ...............................................
1.4 Locking of joystick axes ...............................................................................
1.5 Motion Supervision.......................................................................................
2 Jogging the Robot ................................................................................................
2.1 Jogging the robot along one of the base coordinate axes..............................
2.2 Jogging the robot in the direction of the tool................................................
2.3 Reorienting the tool.......................................................................................
2.4 Aligning a tool along a coordinate axis ........................................................
2.5 Jogging the robot in the direction of the work object ...................................
2.6 Jogging the robot along one of the world coordinate axes ...........................
2.7 Using a stationary tool ..................................................................................
2.8 Jogging the robot axis-by-axis ......................................................................
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2.9 Incremental movement..................................................................................
2.10 Jogging an unsynchronised axis..................................................................
3 Jogging External Axes.........................................................................................
3.1 Choosing external units.................................................................................
3.2 Jogging external units axis-by-axis...............................................................
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3.3 Jogging external units coordinated ............................................................... 6-17
7 Inputs and Outputs.................................................................................. 7-1
1 General..................................................................................................................
1.1 The Inputs/Outputs window..........................................................................
1.2 Choosing an I/O list ......................................................................................
1.3 Defining the Most Common I/O list..............................................................
2 Changing Signal Values .......................................................................................
2.1 Changing the value of a digital output ..........................................................
2.2 Changing the value of an analog output signal or a group of output signals
3 Displaying Information .......................................................................................
3.1 To display information on a given signal......................................................
3.2 To display a chart of all digital signals of a unit ...........................................
3.3 To print an I/O list .........................................................................................
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8 Programming and Testing ...................................................................... 8-1
1 Creating a New Program.....................................................................................
1.1 What is a program? .......................................................................................
1.2 The Program window....................................................................................
1.3 Creating a new program ..............................................................................
1.4 Loading an existing program ........................................................................
2 Defining Tools and Work Object ........................................................................
3 Creating New Routines........................................................................................
3.1 What is a routine? .........................................................................................
3.2 The Program Routines window ....................................................................
3.3 Creating a new routine ..................................................................................
3.4 Duplicating a routine.....................................................................................
4 Creating new instructions ...................................................................................
4.1 Choosing a routine ........................................................................................
4.2 The Program Instr window...........................................................................
4.3 What is an instruction?..................................................................................
4.4 Getting more information about an instruction.............................................
5 Programming .......................................................................................................
5.1 Choosing from the instruction pick list.........................................................
5.2 Adding an instruction....................................................................................
5.3 Expressions ...................................................................................................
5.4 Moving and copying instructions..................................................................
6 Running Programs...............................................................................................
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6.1 Program execution ........................................................................................
6.2 The Program Test window............................................................................
6.3 Choosing the speed correction ......................................................................
6.4 Choosing the execution mode.......................................................................
6.5 Starting program execution...........................................................................
6.6 Stopping program execution .........................................................................
6.7 Where will the program start?.......................................................................
6.8 Simulating wait conditions ...........................................................................
7 Saving and Printing Programs ...........................................................................
7.1 Saving the program on diskette or some other type of mass memory ..........
7.2 Printing a program from the robot ................................................................
7.3 Printing a program using a PC ......................................................................
8 Changing the Program ........................................................................................
8.1 Selecting an instruction or an argument........................................................
8.2 Modifying the position in a positioning instruction......................................
8.3 Tuning position during program execution...................................................
8.4 Changing an argument ..................................................................................
8.5 Adding optional arguments...........................................................................
8.6 Changing the structure of an IF, FOR or TEST instruction ..........................
8.7 Changing the name or declaration of a routine.............................................
8.8 Deleting an instruction or an argument.........................................................
8.9 Deleting a routine..........................................................................................
8.10 Undo latest action .......................................................................................
9 Special Editing Functions ...................................................................................
9.1 Search & replace ...........................................................................................
9.2 Mirroring.......................................................................................................
10 Creating Data .....................................................................................................
10.1 What is data?...............................................................................................
10.2 The Program Data window (used to manage data)....................................
10.3 Creating new data .......................................................................................
10.4 Creating new array data ..............................................................................
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10.5 Duplicating data ..........................................................................................
10.6 Storing position data using the robot ..........................................................
10.7 Routine data ................................................................................................
11 Changing Data....................................................................................................
11.1 Viewing and possibly changing the current value ......................................
11.2 Changing data names or declarations..........................................................
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11.3 Deleting data ...............................................................................................
12 Error Handling ..................................................................................................
13 Using Modules ....................................................................................................
13.1 What is a module?.......................................................................................
13.2 Choosing modules.......................................................................................
13.3 Creating a new module ...............................................................................
13.4 Changing the name or declaration of a module ..........................................
13.5 Reading a program module from diskette or some other type of
mass memory..............................................................................................
13.6 Deleting program modules from the program.............................................
13.7 Listing all routines in all modules...............................................................
13.8 Duplicating a routine from one module to another .....................................
13.9 Listing all data in the current module .........................................................
13.10 Duplicating data from one module to another ..........................................
13.11 Saving modules on diskette or some other type of mass memory ............
13.12 Calling up the complete module list .........................................................
14 Preferences..........................................................................................................
14.1 Defining the Most Common instruction pick list ........................................
14.2 Default data Global/Local ...........................................................................
14.3 Defining programming rule for robot positions ..........................................
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9 The programming language RAPID...................................................... 9-1
1 Programming a Position......................................................................................
1.1 Positioning instructions.................................................................................
1.2 Programming an offset ..................................................................................
2 Changing the Value of an Output.......................................................................
3 Waiting..................................................................................................................
3.1 Wating for an input........................................................................................
3.2 Waiting a specific amount of time ................................................................
4 Controlling the Program Flow............................................................................
4.1 Calling a subroutine ......................................................................................
4.2 Program control within a routine ..................................................................
5 Assigning a Value to Data (Registers) ................................................................
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10 Calibration ............................................................................................. 10-1
1 Coordinate systems ..............................................................................................
2 Coordinated axes..................................................................................................
2.1 External axes, general ...................................................................................
2.2 Coordination..................................................................................................
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3 Calibration ........................................................................................................... 10-6
3.1 What is calibration? ...................................................................................... 10-6
3.2 Viewing the calibration status ....................................................................... 10-6
3.3 Checking the calibration ............................................................................... 10-7
3.4 Updating revolution counters........................................................................ 10-8
4 Base Frame for the Robot ................................................................................... 10-9
4.1 Defining the Base Frame for the Robot ........................................................ 10-9
5 Coordinated track motion................................................................................... 10-12
5.1 How to get started with a coordinated track motion ..................................... 10-12
5.2 Defining the Base Frame for a track motion................................................. 10-12
6 Coordinated external axes .................................................................................. 10-16
6.1 How to get started with a coordinated (moveable) user coordinate system . 10-16
6.2 Defining the User Frame for a rotational axis (single) ................................. 10-17
6.3 Defining the User Frame for a two-axes mechanical unit, Method 1 ........... 10-20
6.4 Defining the User Frame for a two-axes mechanical unit, Method 2 ........... 10-23
7 Defining Tools....................................................................................................... 10-28
7.1 Creating a new tool ....................................................................................... 10-28
7.2 Manually updating the TCP and weight of a tool ......................................... 10-29
7.3 Methods of defining the tool coordinate system........................................... 10-29
7.4 Using the robot to change the TCP and orientation of a tool........................ 10-31
7.5 Stationary tool ............................................................................................... 10-33
8 Work Objects and Program Displacements ...................................................... 10-35
8.1 General .......................................................................................................... 10-35
8.2 Using work objects ....................................................................................... 10-36
8.3 Creating a new work object .......................................................................... 10-36
8.4 Manually updating the user and object coordinate system of the work object10-37
8.5 Methods of defining a work object ............................................................... 10-37
8.6 Using the robot to change the work object ................................................... 10-38
8.7 Defining a moveable object frame................................................................ 10-40
8.8 How to use different work objects to get different displacements................ 10-40
8.9 How to adjust the program vertically using the object frame ....................... 10-42
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Using program displacement ...................................................................... 10-42
Creating a new displacement frame ............................................................ 10-43
Manually updating a displacement frame ................................................... 10-43
Methods for defining a displacement frame ............................................... 10-44
Using the robot to change a displacement frame ........................................ 10-44
User’s Guide
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11 Production Running .............................................................................. 11-1
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The Production Window .....................................................................................
Reading a Program ..............................................................................................
Changing the Override Speed.............................................................................
Changing the Program Running Mode .............................................................
Starting the Program...........................................................................................
5.1 Restarting after a stop ...................................................................................
5.2 Starting a program from the beginning .........................................................
6 Stopping the Program .........................................................................................
7 Tuning position.....................................................................................................
8 Operator Dialogs..................................................................................................
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12 System Parameters ................................................................................ 12-1
1 Changing a Parameter......................................................................................... 12-3
1.1 Subdivision of parameters............................................................................. 12-3
1.2 Changing a parameter ................................................................................... 12-3
1.3 Deleting a parameter ..................................................................................... 12-4
1.4 Generating a restart ....................................................................................... 12-4
1.5 Viewing the last changes that were made ..................................................... 12-5
1.6 Checking Parameters..................................................................................... 12-5
2 Saving and Loading Parameters ........................................................................ 12-6
2.1 Saving parameters to diskette or some other mass storage device ............... 12-6
2.2 Loading parameters from a diskette or some other mass storage device...... 12-7
3 Topic: IO Signals.................................................................................................. 12-9
3.1 Defining I/O Units ........................................................................................ 12-9
3.2 Additional parameters for gateway (field bus) units..................................... 12-10
3.3 Defining input and output signals ................................................................. 12-12
3.4 Defining signal groups .................................................................................. 12-14
3.5 Defining cross connections ........................................................................... 12-15
3.6 List all available I/O Unit Types ................................................................... 12-19
3.7 I/O Data Specifications ................................................................................. 12-21
3.8 Defining system inputs.................................................................................. 12-22
3.9 Defining system outputs................................................................................ 12-24
3.10 PLC Communication................................................................................... 12-26
4 Topic: Communication ........................................................................................ 12-31
4.1 Defining physical channels ........................................................................... 12-31
4.2 Defining Transmission Protocol ................................................................... 12-32
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4.3 Defining Application Protocol...................................................................... 12-34
5 Topic: Controller.................................................................................................. 12-37
5.1 Activate delayed safeguarded space stop...................................................... 12-37
5.2 Activate Hold-To-Run Control ..................................................................... 12-37
5.3 Defining event routines................................................................................. 12-38
5.4 Specifying regain distances........................................................................... 12-39
5.5 System miscellaneous ................................................................................... 12-40
5.6 Automatic loading of modules and programs ............................................... 12-41
5.7 Defining multitasking ................................................................................... 12-42
6 Topic: TeachPendant ........................................................................................... 12-45
6.1 Defining Optional Packages ......................................................................... 12-45
6.2 Defining File Extension ................................................................................ 12-45
6.3 Defining authorisation and confirmation ...................................................... 12-46
6.4 Activation of Limited ModPos Function ...................................................... 12-49
6.5 Programmable keys....................................................................................... 12-50
6.6 Defining Running Mode Settings ................................................................. 12-51
7 Topic: Manipulator.............................................................................................. 12-53
7.1 Defining the commutation offset and calibration offset of the motors ......... 12-53
7.2 Defining the range of movement and calibration position of each axis ....... 12-54
7.3 Defining supervision level ............................................................................ 12-54
7.4 Tuning the motion supervision ..................................................................... 12-55
7.5 Defining teach mode speed........................................................................... 12-56
7.6 Defining independent motion ....................................................................... 12-56
7.7 Defining arm load ......................................................................................... 12-57
7.8 Defining arm check point.............................................................................. 12-58
7.9 Defining external torque ............................................................................... 12-59
7.10 Defining friction compensation .................................................................. 12-60
7.11 Defining the base coordinate system .......................................................... 12-61
7.12 Defining external manipulators with more than one axis ........................... 12-62
7.13 Defining a track motion with coordinated motion...................................... 12-63
7.14 Defining an external mechanical unit coordinated with the robot .............. 12-63
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Defining external axes ................................................................................ 12-63
Activate forced gain control for an external axis........................................ 12-75
Activate notch filter for an external axis..................................................... 12-76
Soft servo for external axis ......................................................................... 12-77
Defining the joystick directions for the robot and external manipulator .... 12-78
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7.22
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Defining the joystick directions for a single external axis.......................... 12-80
Defining kinematic parameters for general kinematics .............................. 12-81
Servo parameters......................................................................................... 12-83
CPU Optimization....................................................................................... 12-84
Installation optimization of drive system parameters ................................. 12-86
13 File Manager .......................................................................................... 13-1
1 Program/Data Storage ........................................................................................
2 The FileManager Window ..................................................................................
2.1 Choosing a directory .....................................................................................
2.2 Viewing file information ...............................................................................
3 Creating or Moving Files and Directories .........................................................
3.1 Creating a new directory ...............................................................................
3.2 Renaming a file or a directory.......................................................................
3.3 Deleting a file or directory ............................................................................
3.4 Copying files and directories ........................................................................
3.5 Moving files and Directories.........................................................................
3.6 Printing files ..................................................................................................
4 Formatting a Diskette ..........................................................................................
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14 Service..................................................................................................... 14-1
1 The Service Window ............................................................................................
2 Changing the Current Date and Time ...............................................................
3 Logs .......................................................................................................................
3.1 What is a log?................................................................................................
3.2 What types of logs are there? ........................................................................
3.3 Viewing all logs ............................................................................................
3.4 Viewing a message in a log...........................................................................
3.5 Erasing the contents of a log .........................................................................
3.6 Erasing the contents of all logs .....................................................................
3.7 Updating the contents of a log automatically or by means of a command ...
3.8 Avoiding normal error reports.......................................................................
3.9 Saving log messages on diskette or some other mass storage device ...........
4 Calibration............................................................................................................
4.1 What is calibration? ......................................................................................
5 Commutation........................................................................................................
5.1 What is commutation? ..................................................................................
6 Frame Definition ..................................................................................................
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7 Two Axes Definition............................................................................................. 14-9
8 Obtaining information on the robot system ...................................................... 14-9
9 Backup and Restore............................................................................................. 14-10
9.1 Perform a Backup ......................................................................................... 14-10
9.2 Perform a Restore ......................................................................................... 14-11
10 Perform a Restart .............................................................................................. 14-11
15 ScreenViewer.......................................................................................... 15-1
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User screen..........................................................................................................
The ScreenViewer Window...............................................................................
The Screen Options............................................................................................
The Screen Loading...........................................................................................
The Screen Information ....................................................................................
The Screen Display ............................................................................................
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16 Error Management ................................................................................. 16-1
1 Error Management ..............................................................................................
1.1 Confirming an error message........................................................................
1.2 Calling up suggestions on how to correct an error .......................................
1.3 Acknowledging warning messages...............................................................
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16 System and Error Messages................................................................... 16-5
1 Operational error messages ................................................................................ 16-7
2 System error messages ........................................................................................ 16-9
3 Hardware error messages ................................................................................... 16-16
4 Program error messages ..................................................................................... 16-31
5 Motion error messages ........................................................................................ 16-58
6 Operator error messages..................................................................................... 16-68
7 IO & Communication error messages ............................................................... 16-72
8 Arcweld error messages ...................................................................................... 16-83
9 Spotweld error messages ..................................................................................... 16-92
10 Paint error messages.......................................................................................... 16-93
17 Program Examples ................................................................................. 17-1
1 Simple Material Handling...................................................................................
1.1 What the robot does ......................................................................................
1.2 The main routine ...........................................................................................
1.3 Operating the gripper ....................................................................................
1.4 Fetching a part from the In feeder.................................................................
1.5 Leaving the part in the machine....................................................................
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1.6 Starting to process ......................................................................................... 17-5
1.7 Fetching the part from the machine .............................................................. 17-5
1.8 Leaving the part on the Out feeder................................................................ 17-5
2 Material Handling................................................................................................ 17-7
2.1 What the robot does ...................................................................................... 17-7
2.2 The main routine ........................................................................................... 17-7
2.3 Operating the gripper .................................................................................... 17-8
2.4 Starting production........................................................................................ 17-9
2.5 Fetching the part from the In feeder.............................................................. 17-9
2.6 Leaving the part in the machine.................................................................... 17-9
2.7 Updating operating statistics......................................................................... 17-10
2.8 Stopping production for the day.................................................................... 17-10
18 Quick Reference..................................................................................... 18-1
1 The Jogging Window ........................................................................................... 18-3
1.1 Window: Jogging .......................................................................................... 18-3
2 The Inputs/Outputs Window .............................................................................. 18-4
2.1 Window: Inputs/Outputs ............................................................................... 18-4
3 The Program Window ......................................................................................... 18-6
3.1 Moving between different parts of the program ........................................... 18-6
3.2 General menus............................................................................................... 18-7
3.3 Window: Program Instr................................................................................. 18-10
3.4 Window: Program Routines .......................................................................... 18-11
3.5 Window: Program Data................................................................................. 18-13
3.6 Window: Program Data Types ...................................................................... 18-15
3.7 Window: Program Test.................................................................................. 18-16
3.8 Window: Program Modules .......................................................................... 18-18
4 The Production Window ..................................................................................... 18-19
4.1 Window: Production ..................................................................................... 18-19
5 The FileManager.................................................................................................. 18-21
5.1 Window: FileManager................................................................................... 18-21
6 The Service Window ............................................................................................ 18-23
6.1 General menus............................................................................................... 18-23
6.2 Window Service Log..................................................................................... 18-26
6.3 Window Service Calibration ......................................................................... 18-27
6.4 Window Service Commutation ..................................................................... 18-28
7 The System Parameters....................................................................................... 18-29
7.1 Window: System Parameters ........................................................................ 18-29
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19 Special Functionality in this Robot ...................................................... 19-1
20 Index, Glossary ...................................................................................... 20-1
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Introduction
CONTENTS
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1 New Features in this Version of the Robot.................................................................... 3
2 Other Manuals................................................................................................................. 3
3 How to Read this Manual ............................................................................................... 3
3.1 Typographic conventions........................................................................................ 4
4 Reader’s Comments ........................................................................................................ 5
User’s Guide
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Introduction
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User’s Guide
Introduction
Introduction
This manual will help you whenever you use the robot. It provides step-by-step
instructions on how to perform various tasks, such as how to move the robot
manually, how to program, or how to start a program when running production.
1 New Features in this Version of the Robot
New functionality and other interesting information can be read from the file
readme on the Set-up diskette. This file is continuously updated with the latest
information, which is why two robots of the same version may contain different
information in their readme files.
This file can be read from a normal PC, using any word processing program. It can
also be loaded into the robot program memory and then read on the teach pendant.
For information on how to load programs from diskette, see Chapter 8: Programming and Testing.
2 Other Manuals
Before using the robot for the first time, you should read Basic Operation. This will
provide you with the basics of operating and programming the robot.
Basic Operation is included in this manual, see Chapter 4.
The Product Manual describes how to install the robot, as well as maintenance procedures and troubleshooting. This manual also contains a Product Specification
which provides an overview of the characteristics and performance of the robot.
The RAPID Reference Manual contains a detailed explanation of the programming
language as well as all data types, instructions and functions. They are described in
alphabetical order for your convenience. If you are programming off-line, the
RAPID Reference Manual will be particularly useful in this respect.
3 How to Read this Manual
Before you start reading through this manual, it is essential that you read Chapter
3: Safety. This tells you what you should or should not do to avoid injuring yourself
or someone else.
Chapter 4: Basic Operation is an introduction to the basic operation and programming of the robot. It is recommended to be used as a tutorial, together with a robot
or the PC software QuickTeachTM.
You will find a general description of the robot, such as what happens on start-up or
what the teach pendant does and looks like, in Chapter 5: Starting up.
Generally speaking, the robot is operated by means of different windows:
- Manual movement, see Chapter 6: Jogging.
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Introduction
- Manual operation of inputs and outputs, see Chapter 7: Inputs and Outputs.
- Programming and testing, see Chapter 8: Programming and Testing.
The programming language is clearly described in Chapter 9: The programming language RAPID.
For a more detailed description, see RAPID Reference Manual.
- Running production, see Chapter 11: Production Running.
- Setting system parameters, see Chapter 12: System Parameters.
- Copying programs, etc., see Chapter 13: File Manager.
- Service tools, see Chapter 14: Service.
Calibrating the robot, TCP and other coordinate systems, see Chapter 10: Calibration.
The program option Screen Viewer is described in Chapter 15: ScreenViewer.
Chapter 16 contains Error Management and System and Error Messages.
In Chapter 17: Program Examples, a number of programs are built up, step by step.
Here you can learn a little about how to program, and also see the instructions in
their correct context.
If you want to find out what a particular menu command does, you should refer to
Chapter 18: Quick Reference. This chapter can also be used as a pocket guide when
you are working with the robot.
If the robot is delivered or upgraded with some extra functionality this is described
in Chapter 19: Special Functionality in this Robot.
To make things easier to locate and understand, Chapter 20 contains an index and a
glossary.
3.1 Typographic conventions
The commands located under any of the five menu keys at the top of the teach pendant display are written in the form of Menu: Command. For example, to activate
the Print command in the File menu, you choose File: Print.
The names on the function keys and in the entry fields are specified in bold italic
typeface, e.g. Modpos.
Words belonging to the actual programming language, such as instruction names,
are written in italics, e.g. MoveL.
Examples of programs are always displayed in the same way as they are output to
diskette or a printer. This differs from what is displayed on the teach pendant in the
following ways:
- Certain control words that are masked in the teach pendant display are
printed, e.g. words indicating the start and end of a routine.
- Data and routine declarations are printed in the formal form,
e.g. VAR num reg1;.
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User’s Guide
Introduction
4 Reader’s Comments
You can use the next page to send us your comments about the manual. In this way,
you will help us to improve the manual and make it easier for yourself to follow in the
future. Thank you kindly for your cooperation.
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Introduction
2-6
User’s Guide
Safety
CONTENTS
Page
1 General ............................................................................................................................. 3
1.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................... 3
2 Applicable Safety Standards .......................................................................................... 3
3 Fire-Extinguishing........................................................................................................... 4
4 Definitions of Safety Functions ...................................................................................... 4
5 Safe Working Procedures ............................................................................................... 5
5.1 Normal operations ................................................................................................. 5
6 Programming, Testing and Servicing ............................................................................ 5
7 Safety Functions .............................................................................................................. 6
7.1 The safety control chain of operation .................................................................... 6
7.2 Emergency stops.................................................................................................... 7
7.3 Mode selection using the operating mode selector................................................ 7
7.4 Enabling device ..................................................................................................... 8
7.5 Hold-to-run control................................................................................................ 8
7.6 General Mode Safeguarded Stop (GS) connection................................................ 9
7.7 Automatic Mode Safeguarded Stop (AS) connection ........................................... 10
7.8 Limiting the working space ................................................................................... 10
7.9 Supplementary functions ....................................................................................... 10
8 Safety Risks Related to End Effectors........................................................................... 10
8.1 Gripper................................................................................................................... 10
8.2 Tools/workpieces ................................................................................................... 11
8.3 Pneumatic/hydraulic systems ................................................................................ 11
9 Risks during Operation Disturbances........................................................................... 11
10 Risks during Installation and Service ......................................................................... 11
11 Risks Associated with Live Electric Parts ................................................................... 12
12 Emergency Release of Mechanical Arm ..................................................................... 13
13 Limitation of Liability................................................................................................... 13
14 Related Information...................................................................................................... 13
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Safety
3-2
User’s Guide
Safety
Safety
1 General
This information on safety covers functions that have to do with the operation of the
industrial robot.
The information does not cover how to design, install and operate a complete system,
nor does it cover all peripheral equipment, which can influence the safety of the total
system.
To protect personnel, the complete system has to be designed and installed in accordance with the safety requirements set forth in the standards and regulations of the country where the robot is installed.
The users of ABB industrial robots are responsible for ensuring that the applicable
safety laws and regulations in the country concerned are observed and that the safety
devices necessary to protect people working with the robot system have been designed
and installed correctly.
People who work with robots must be familiar with the operation and handling of the
industrial robot, described in applicable documents, e.g. Users’s Guide and Product
Manual.
The diskettes which contain the robot’s control programs must not be changed in
any way because this could lead to the deactivation of safety functions, such as
reduced speed.
1.1 Introduction
Apart from the built-in safety functions, the robot is also supplied with an interface for
the connection of external safety devices.
Via this interface, an external safety function can interact with other machines and
peripheral equipment. This means that control signals can act on safety signals
received from the peripheral equipment as well as from the robot.
In the Product Manual/Installation, instructions are provided for connecting safety
devices between the robot and the peripheral equipment.
2 Applicable Safety Standards
The robot is designed in accordance with the requirements of ISO10218, Jan. 1992,
Industrial Robot Safety. The robot also fulfils the ANSI/RIA 15.06-1992 stipulations.
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Safety
3 Fire-Extinguishing
Use a CARBON DIOXIDE extinguisher in the event of a fire in the robot (manipulator or controller).
4 Definitions of Safety Functions
Emergency stop – IEC 204-1,10.7
A condition which overrides all other robot controls, removes drive power from robot
axis actuators, stops all moving parts and removes power from other dangerous functions controlled by the robot.
Enabling device – ISO 11161, 3.4
A manually operated device which, when continuously activated in one position only,
allows hazardous functions but does not initiate them. In any other position, hazardous
functions can be stopped safely.
Safety stop – ISO 10218 (EN 775), 6.4.3
When a safety stop circuit is provided, each robot must be delivered with the necessary
connections for the safeguards and interlocks associated with this circuit. It is necessary
to reset the power to the machine actuators before any robot motion can be initiated.
However, if only the power to the machine actuators is reset, this should not suffice to
initiate any operation.
Reduced speed – ISO 10218 (EN 775), 3.2.17
A single, selectable velocity provided by the robot supplier which automatically
restricts the robot velocity to that specified in order to allow sufficient time for people
either to withdraw from the hazardous area or to stop the robot.
Interlock (for safeguarding) – ISO 10218 (EN 775), 3.2.8
A function that interconnects a guard(s) or a device(s) and the robot controller and/or
power system of the robot and its associated equipment.
Hold-to-run control – ISO 10218 (EN 775), 3.2.7
A control which only allows movements during its manual actuation and which causes
these movements to stop as soon as it is released.
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Safety
5 Safe Working Procedures
Safe working procedures must be used to prevent injury. No safety device or circuit
may be modified, bypassed or changed in any way, at any time.
5.1 Normal operations
All normal operations in automatic mode must be executed from outside the safeguarded space.
6 Programming, Testing and Servicing
The robot is extremely heavy and powerful, even at low speed. When entering into the
robot’s safeguarded space, the applicable safety regulations of the country concerned
must be observed.
Operators must be aware of the fact that the robot can make unexpected movements.
A pause (stop) in a pattern of movements may be followed by a movement at high
speed. Operators must also be aware of the fact that external signals can affect robot
programs in such a way that a certain pattern of movement changes without warning.
If work must be carried out within the robot’s work envelope, the following points
must be observed:
• The operating mode selector on the controller must be in the manual mode position
to render the enabling device operative and to block operation from a computer link
or remote control panel.
• The robot’s speed is limited to max. 250 mm/s (10 inches/s) when the operating mode
selector is in position < 250 mm/s. This should be the normal position when entering
the working space. The position 100% – full speed – may only be used by trained personnel who are aware of the risks that this entails.
Do not change “Transm gear ratio” or other kinematic parameters from
the teach pendant or a PC. This will affect the safety function Reduced speed
250 mm/s.
• During programming and testing, the enabling device must be released as soon as
there is no need for the robot to move.
The enabling device must never be rendered inoperative in any way.
• The programmer must always take the teach pendant with him/her when entering
through the safety gate to the robot’s working space so that no-one else can take over
control of the robot without his/her knowledge.
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Safety
7 Safety Functions
7.1 The safety control chain of operation
The safety control chain of operation is based on dual electrical safety chains which
interact with the robot computer and enable the MOTORS ON mode.
Each electrical safety chain consist of several switches connected in such a way that all
of them must be closed before the robot can be set to MOTORS ON mode. MOTORS
ON mode means that drive power is supplied to the motors.
If any contact in the safety chain of operation is open, the robot always reverts to
MOTORS OFF mode. MOTORS OFF mode means that drive power is removed from
the robot’s motors and the brakes are applied.
K2
K1
K1
Drive
Unit
M
K2
Interlocking
EN RUN
&
&
Man2
Man1
+
+
LIM1
Auto1
TPU
En1
ES1
GS1
AS1
LIM2
External
contactors
TPU
En2
ES2
GS2
Auto2
AS2
The status of the switches is indicated by LEDs on top of the panel module in the control cabinet and is also displayed on the teach pendant (I/O window).
After a stop, the switch must be reset at the unit which caused the stop before
the robot can be ordered to start again.
The time limits for the central two channel cyclic supervisions of the safety control
chain is between 2 and 4 second.
The safety chains must never be bypassed, modified or changed in any other way.
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Safety
7.2 Emergency stops
An emergency stop should be activated if there is a danger to people or equipment.
Built-in emergency stop buttons are located on the operator’s panel of the robot controller and on the teach pendant.
External emergency stop devices (buttons, etc.) can be connected to the safety chain
by the user (see Product Manual/Installation). They must be connected in accordance
with the applicable standards for emergency stop circuits.
Before commissioning the robot, all emergency stop buttons or other safety equipment
must be checked by the user to ensure their proper operation.
Before switching to MOTORS ON mode again, establish the reason for the stop
and rectify the fault.
7.3 Mode selection using the operating mode selector
The applicable safety requirements for using robots, laid down in accordance with
ISO/DIS 10218, are characterised by different modes, selected by means of control
devices and with clear-cut positions.
One automatic and two manual modes are available:
Manual mode:
< 250 mm/s - max. speed is 250mm/s
100% - full speed
Automatic mode: The robot can be operated via a remote control device
The manual mode, < 250 mm/s or 100%, must be selected whenever anyone enters the
robot’s safeguarded space. The robot must be operated using the teach pendant and, if
100% is selected, using Hold-to-run control.
In automatic mode, the operating mode selector is switched to
, and all safety
arrangements, such as doors, gates, light curtains, light beams and sensitive mats, etc.,
are active. No-one may enter the robot’s safeguarded space. All controls, such as emergency stops, the control panel and control cabinet, must be easily accessible from outside the safeguarded space.
Programming and testing at reduced speed
Robot movements at reduced speed can be carried out as follows:
• Set the operating mode selector to <250 mm/s
• Programs can only be started using the teach pendant with the enabling device activated.
The automatic mode safeguarded space stop (AS) function is not active in this mode.
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Safety
Testing at full speed
Robot movements at programmed speed can be carried out as follows:
• Set the operating mode selector to 100%
• Programs can only be started using the teach pendant with the enabling device activated.
For “Hold-to-run control”, the Hold-to-run button must be activated. Releasing the button stops program execution.
The 100% mode may only be used by trained personnel. The applicable laws and
regulations of the countries where the robot is used must always be observed.
Automatic operation
Automatic operation may start when the following conditions are fulfilled:
• The operating mode selector is set to
• The MOTORS ON mode is selected
Either the teach pendant can be used to start the program or a connected remote control
device. These functions should be wired and interlocked in accordance with the applicable safety instructions and the operator must always be outside the safeguarded
space.
7.4 Enabling device
When the operating mode selector is in the MANUAL or MANUAL FULL SPEED
position, the robot can be set to the MOTORS ON mode by depressing the enabling
device on the teach pendant.
Should the robot revert to the MOTORS OFF mode for any reason while the enabling
device is depressed, the latter must be released before the robot can be returned to the
MOTORS ON mode again. This is a safety function designed to prevent the enabling
device from being rendered inactive.
When the enabling device is released, the drive power to the motors is switched off, the
brakes are applied and the robot reverts to the MOTORS OFF mode.
If the enabling device is reactivated, the robot changes to the MOTORS ON mode.
7.5 Hold-to-run control
This function is always active when the operating mode selector is in the MANUAL
FULL SPEED position. It is possible to set a parameter to make this function active
also when the operating mode selector is in the MANUAL position.
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Safety
When the Hold-to-run control is active, the enabling device and the Hold-to-run button
on the teach pendant must be depressed in order to execute a program. When the button
is released, the axis (axes) movements stop and the robot remains in the MOTORS ON
mode.
Here is a detailed description of how to execute a program in Hold-to-run control:
• Activate the enabling device on the teach pendant.
• Choose execution mode using the function keys on the teach pendant:
- Start (continuous running of the program)
- FWD (one instruction forwards)
- BWD (one instruction backwards)
• Wait for the Hold-to-run alert box.
• Activate the Hold-to-run button on the teach pendant.
Now the program will run (with the chosen execution mode) as long as the Hold-torun button is pressed. Releasing the button stops program execution and activating the
button will start program execution again.
For FWD and BWD execution modes, the next instruction is run by releasing and
activating the Hold-to-run button.
It is possible to change execution mode when the Hold-to-run button is released and
then continue the program execution with the new execution mode, by just activating
the Hold-to-run button again, i.e. no alert box is shown.
If the program execution was stopped with the Stop button on the teach pendant, the
program execution will be continued by releasing and activating the Hold-to-run
button.
When the enabling device on the teach pendant is released, the sequence described
above must be repeated from the beginning.
7.6 General Mode Safeguarded Stop (GS) connection
The GS connection is provided for interlocking external safety devices, such as light
curtains, light beams or sensitive mats. The GS is active regardless of the position of
the operating mode selector.
When this connection is open the robot changes to the MOTORS OFF mode. To reset
to MOTORS ON mode, the device that initiated the safety stop must be interlocked in
accordance with applicable safety regulations. This is not normally done by resetting
the device itself.
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Safety
7.7 Automatic Mode Safeguarded Stop (AS) connection
The AS connection is provided for interlocking external safety devices, such as light
curtains, light beams or sensitive mats used externally by the system builder. The AS
is especially intended for use in automatic mode, during normal program execution.
The AS is by-passed when the operating mode selector is in the MANUAL or
MANUAL FULL SPEED position.
7.8 Limiting the working space
For certain applications, movement about the robot’s main axes must be limited in
order to create a sufficiently large safety zone. This will reduce the risk of damage to
the robot if it collides with external safety arrangements, such as barriers, etc.
Movement about axes 1, 2 and 3 can be limited with adjustable mechanical stops or by
means of electrical limit switches. If the working space is limited by means of stops or
switches, the corresponding software limitation parameters must also be changed. If
necessary, movement of the three wrist axes can also be limited by the computer software. Limitation of movement of the axes must be carried out by the user.
7.9 Supplementary functions
Functions via specific digital inputs:
• A stop can be activated via a connection with a digital input. Digital inputs can be used
to stop programs if, for example, a fault occurs in the peripheral equipment.
Functions via specific digital outputs:
• Error – indicates a fault in the robot system.
• Cycle_on – indicates that the robot is executing a program.
• MotOnState/MotOffState – indicates that the robot is in MOTORS ON / MOTORS
OFF mode.
• EmStop - indicates that the robot is in emergency stop state.
• AutoOn - indicates that the robot is in automatic mode.
8 Safety Risks Related to End Effectors
8.1 Gripper
If a gripper is used to hold a workpiece, inadvertent loosening of the workpiece must
be prevented.
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Safety
8.2 Tools/workpieces
It must be possible to turn off tools, such as milling cutters, etc., safely. Make sure that
guards remain closed until the cutters stop rotating.
Grippers must be designed so that they retain workpieces in the event of a power failure or a disturbance of the controller. It should be possible to release parts by manual
operation (valves).
8.3 Pneumatic/hydraulic systems
Special safety regulations apply to pneumatic and hydraulic systems.
Residual energy may be present in these systems so, after shutdown, particular care
must be taken.
The pressure in pneumatic and hydraulic systems must be released before starting to
repair them. Gravity may cause any parts or objects held by these systems to drop.
Dump valves should be used in case of emergency. Shot bolts should be used to prevent
tools, etc., from falling due to gravity.
9 Risks during Operation Disturbances
If the working process is interrupted, extra care must be taken due to risks other than
those associated with regular operation. Such an interruption may have to be rectified
manually.
Remedial action must only ever be carried out by trained personnel who are familiar
with the entire installation as well as the special risks associated with its different parts.
The industrial robot is a flexible tool which can be used in many different industrial
applications. All work must be carried out professionally and in accordance with applicable safety regulations. Care must be taken at all times.
10 Risks during Installation and Service
To prevent injuries and damage during the installation of the robot system, the regulations applicable in the country concerned and the instructions of ABB Robotics must
be complied with. Special attention must be paid to the following points:
• The supplier of the complete system must ensure that all circuits used in the safety
function are interlocked in accordance with the applicable standards for that function.
• The instructions in the Product Manual/Installation must always be followed.
• The mains supply to the robot must be connected in such a way that it can be turned
off outside the robot’s working space.
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Safety
• The supplier of the complete system must ensure that all circuits used in the emergency stop function are interlocked in a safe manner, in accordance with the applicable standards for the emergency stop function.
• Emergency stop buttons must be positioned in easily accessible places so that the
robot can be stopped quickly.
• Safety zones, which have to be crossed before admittance, must be set up in front of
the robot’s working space. Light beams or sensitive mats are suitable devices.
• Turntables or the like should be used to keep the operator away from the robot’s working space.
• Those in charge of operations must make sure that safety instructions are available for
the installation in question.
• Those who install the robot must have the appropriate training for the robot system in
question and in any safety matters associated with it.
Although troubleshooting may, on occasion, have to be carried out while the power
supply is turned on, the robot must be turned off (by setting the mains switch to OFF)
when repairing faults, disconnecting electric leads and disconnecting or connecting
units.
Even if the power supply for the robot is turned off, you can still injure yourself.
• The axes are affected by the force of gravity when the brakes are released. In addition
to the risk of being hit by moving robot parts, you run the risk of being crushed by the
tie rod.
• Energy, stored in the robot for the purpose of counterbalancing certain axes, may be
released if the robot, or parts thereof, is dismantled.
• When dismantling/assembling mechanical units, watch out for falling objects.
• Be aware of stored energy (DC link) and hot parts in the controller.
• Units inside the controller, e.g. I/O modules, can be supplied with external power.
11 Risks Associated with Live Electric Parts
Controller
A danger of high voltage is associated with the following parts:
- The mains supply/mains switch
- The power unit
- The power supply unit for the computer system (55 V AC)
- The rectifier unit (260 V AC and 370 V DC. NB: Capacitors!)
- The drive unit (370 V DC)
- The service outlets (115/230 VAC)
- The power supply unit for tools, or special power supply units for the machining
process
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User’s Guide
Safety
- The external voltage connected to the control cabinet remains live even when
the robot is disconnected from the mains.
- Additional connections
Manipulator
A danger of high voltage is associated with the manipulator in:
- The power supply for the motors (up to 370 V DC)
- The user connections for tools or other parts of the installation (see Installation,
max. 230 V AC)
Tools, material handling devices, etc.
Tools, material handling devices, etc., may be live even if the robot system is in the
OFF position. Power supply cables which are in motion during the working process
may be damaged.
12 Emergency Release of Mechanical Arm
If an emergency situation occur where a person is caught by the mechanical robot arm,
the brake release buttons should be pressed whereby the arms can be moved to release
the person. To move the arms by manpower is normally possible on the smaller robots
(1400 and 2400), but for the bigger ones it might not be possible without a mechanical
lifting device, like an overhead crane.
If power is not available the brakes are applied, and therefore manpower might not be
sufficient for any robot.
Before releasing the brakes, secure that the weight of the arms not enhance the
press force on the caught person.
13 Limitation of Liability
The above information regarding safety must not be construed as a warranty by
ABB Robotics that the industrial robot will not cause injury or damage even if all
safety instructions have been complied with.
14 Related Information
Described in:
Installation of safety devices
Product Manual - Installation and
Commissioning
Changing robot modes
User’s Guide - Starting up
Limiting the working space
Product Manual - Installation and
Commissioning
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Basic operation
CONTENTS
Page
1 Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 3
2 Safety ................................................................................................................................ 5
3 System Overview ............................................................................................................. 7
3.1 General.................................................................................................................... 7
3.2 The manipulator...................................................................................................... 8
3.3 The controller ......................................................................................................... 8
3.4 Operator’s panel ..................................................................................................... 9
3.5 Teach pendant ......................................................................................................... 10
4 Starting the System ......................................................................................................... 15
5 Working with Windows .................................................................................................. 17
6 Jogging the Robot Using the Joystick............................................................................ 21
6.1 Linear jogging......................................................................................................... 21
6.2 Fine positioning ...................................................................................................... 23
7 Selecting a Program ........................................................................................................ 25
7.1 Using the training program..................................................................................... 25
8 Starting the Program ...................................................................................................... 31
9 Stopping the Program..................................................................................................... 35
10 Automatic Mode ............................................................................................................ 37
11 Errors ............................................................................................................................. 39
12 Switching the robot off.................................................................................................. 41
13 Changing a Program..................................................................................................... 43
13.1 Modifying positions.............................................................................................. 43
13.2 Changing arguments ............................................................................................. 45
13.3 Adding instructions............................................................................................... 46
13.4 Programming a delay............................................................................................ 48
14 Storing the Program on Diskette ................................................................................. 51
14.1 Storing on diskette ................................................................................................ 51
15 Printing Programs......................................................................................................... 55
15.1 Using a PC ............................................................................................................ 55
16 I/O Signals...................................................................................................................... 57
16.1 Programming an I/O instruction ........................................................................... 57
User’s Guide
4-1
Basic operation
4-2
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Introduction
1 Introduction
This manual explains the basics of handling and operating an ABB robot. You do not
need any previous experience of robots to understand its contents.
The manual is divided into chapters, each of which describes a particular work task and
how to go about performing it. The chapters complement one another and should,
therefore, be read in the order they appear in the book.
It is an advantage if you have access to a robot (or the PC-program Quick Teach) when
you use this manual, but just reading it should help you understand the basic operation
of a robot.
The manual is written to suit a standard installation. Differences can therefore occur,
depending on the configuration of the system.
Please note that this manual describes only one method of carrying out any of the
normal work tasks and, if you are an experienced user, there may be other methods. For
other methods and more detailed information, see the following manuals.
The User’s Guide is a reference manual with step by step instructions on how to
perform various tasks.
The programming language is described in the RAPID Reference Manual.
The Product Manual describes how to install the robot, as well as maintenance
procedures and troubleshooting.
If you just wish to be able to start programs, run the robot with the joystick, load programs from diskette, etc., it is not necessary to read Chapters 14-16 in this manual.
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Introduction
4-4
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Safety
2 Safety
Operational procedures, during training or at any other time, must be carried out safely.
Entering the safeguarded space around the robot may cause severe injury and should
be avoided whenever possible. However, if this is necessary, then only authorised
personnel may enter the area. The existing safety regulations must always be taken into
consideration.
The safety regulations are specified in the chapters on safety in the User’s Guide and
in relevant plant documentation (if any).
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Safety
4-6
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
System Overview
3 System Overview
3.1 General
A robot is made up of two principal parts:
Manipulator
Controller
Figure 1 The controller and manipulator are connected by two cables.
You can communicate with the robot using a teach pendant and/or an operator’s panel,
located on the controller (see Figure 2).
1
2
P1
7 8 9
4 5 6
1 2 3
0
P2
P3
Figure 2 The teach pendant and the operator’s panel.
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System Overview
Basic Operation
3.2 The manipulator
Figure 3 shows the directions in which the various axes of the manipulator can move
and what these are called.
Axis 4
Axis 5
Axis 6
Axis 3
Axis 2
Axis 1
Figure 3 Manipulator, IRB 2400.
3.3 The controller
Figure 4 illustrates the principal parts of the controller.
Teach pendant
Operator’s panel
Mains switch
Disk drive
Figure 4 The S4C control system.
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User’s Guide
Basic Operation
System Overview
3.4 Operator’s panel
Figure 5 below shows a close-up of the operator’s panel. A short explanation of the
push buttons follows.
100%
MOTORS ON
Operating mode selector
AUTOMATIC
MANUAL REDUCED SPEED
MANUAL FULL SPEED
Emergency stop
100%
Duty time counter
Figure 5 The operator’s panel.
MOTORS ON
In the MOTORS ON state, the motors of the robot are activated and the MOTORS
ON button is continuously lit.
Operating mode AUTOMATIC (Production mode)
Used when running ready-made programs in production. It is not possible to move the robot
with the joystick in this mode.
Operating mode MANUAL REDUCED SPEED (Programming mode)
Used when working inside the robot’s working area and when programming the robot.
Also used to set the robot in MOTORS OFF state.
Operating mode MANUAL FULL SPEED (Testing mode, Option not standard)
Used to test run the robot program at full programming speed.
Emergency stop
The robot stops – regardless of which state or mode the system is in – immediately
when the emergency stop button is pressed. The button remains pressed in and, to turn
to MOTORS ON again, must be returned to its original position.
Duty time counter
Indicates the operating time for the manipulator (released brakes).
User’s Guide
4-9
System Overview
Basic Operation
3.5 Teach pendant
The teach pendant is described briefly below; see Figure 6 and Figure 7.
7
4
1
Display
1
2
P1
8
5
2
0
9
6
3
Enabling
device
Joystick
P2
P3
Emergency
stop button
Figure 6 The teach pendant.
Emergency stop
The robot stops – regardless of which state or mode the system is in – immediately the
emergency stop button is pressed. The button remains pressed in and, to turn to
MOTORS ON again, must be returned to its original position.
Enabling device (for safe operation)
A push button on the teach pendant which, when pressed halfway in, takes the system
to MOTORS ON (if the operating mode selector is switched to one of the two manual
modes). When the enabling device is released or pushed all the way in, the robot is
taken to the MOTORS OFF state.
If the enabling device is released and pressed in halfway again within half a second, the
robot will not return to the MOTORS ON state.
If this happens, the enabling device must first be released and then pushed halfway in
again.
The enabling device should only be activated when the robot is to be moved –
either with the joystick or during program execution.
Joystick
The joystick is used to jog (move) the robot manually; e.g. when programming the
robot.
Display
Used to display all information during programming, to change programs, etc. It can
accommodate 16 lines; each line can accommodate 40 characters.
4-10
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
System Overview
Figure 7 shows the names of the various keys on the teach pendant.
Menu keys
Contrast
Display
Window
keys
Jogging
Program
Inputs/
Outputs
Motion keys
1
2
Misc.
P1
Incremental
7
8
9
4
5
6
1
2
3
Numeric
keyboard
0
Delete
P2
Enter
P3
User defined key
Stop key
Function keys
User defined
keys
Navigation keys
Figure 7 An overview of the various keys on the teach pendant, Version 2.
Window keys (to select a window to work with on the display):
Jogging: Used to jog the robot.
Program: Used to program and test.
Inputs/Outputs: Used to manually operate the input and output
signals connected to the robot.
Misc.: Miscellaneous; other windows, i.e. the System Parameters,
Service, Production and File Manager windows.
User’s Guide
4-11
System Overview
Basic Operation
Navigation keys (to move the cursor within a window on the display):
List: Press to move the cursor from one part of the window to
another (normally separated by a double line).
Previous/Next page: Press to see the next/previous page.
Up and Down arrows: Press to move the cursor up or down.
Left and Right arrows: Press to move the cursor to the left or right.
Motion keys: (to select how the robot or other peripheral equipment should move when
using the joystick – during manual operation):
Motion Unit: Press to jog the robot or other mechanical units.
Motion Type: Press to select how the robot should be jogged,
reorientation or linear.
1
2
Motion Type: Axis by axis movement. 1 = axis 1-3, 2 = axis 4-6
Incremental: Incremental jogging on/off
4-12
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
System Overview
Other keys:
Stop: Stops program execution.
Contrast: Adjusts contrast of the display
Menu keys: Press to display menus containing various commands.
Function keys: Press to select the various commands directly.
Delete: Deletes the data selected on the display.
Enter: Press to input data.
Programmable keys:
P1
P2
P3
Functions to be defined by the user.
(P4)
(P5)
User’s Guide
4-13
System Overview
4-14
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Starting the System
4 Starting the System
You are now going to turn the system on, i.e. get it ready for programming, running
programs, etc.
Before you switch the system on, make sure that no-one is inside the safeguarded
space around the robot.
1. Switch the mains switch on (see Figure 8). The robot is then automatically checked.
0
1
Figure 8 Mains switch
After the system has been checked and no errors are located, the following message
(see Figure 9) appears on the display.
Welcome To IRB 6400-0000
BaseWare OS 3.1
ABB Robotics Products AB
(c) Copyright 1993
Figure 9 The “welcome” window may vary slightly depending on the type and version of your
robot.
User’s Guide
4-15
Starting the System
4-16
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Working with Windows
5 Working with Windows
In this chapter, you will find out about the basics of working with windows. The following example shows the window for Inputs/Outputs (manual handling of in- and
outputs).
1. Press the Inputs/Outputs window key (see Figure 10.)
Figure 10 The Inputs/Outputs application key, both versions.
2. The window for manual I/O is now shown on the display, as in Figure 11. The
appearance of the I/O list may vary depending on how the signals have been defined
and how many I/O boards there are in the system.
Menu keys
File
Window title
I/O list name
I/O list
Edit
Inputs / Outputs
All signals
Name
View
Value
Type
1(40)
di1
di2
grip1
grip2
grip3
grip4
progno
welderror
1
0
0
1
1
1
13
0
DI
DI
DO
DO
DO
DO
GO
DO
Line number
Cursor
Function keys
Figure 11 Window for manual I/O handling.
When a digital output is selected, its status can be changed using the function keys.
User’s Guide
4-17
Working with Windows
Basic Operation
3. You can select a signal in the list (move the cursor) in several ways:
Movement
Select
One line up
ArrowUp
One line down
ArrowDown
To the first line in the list
Goto top from the Edit menu
To the last line in the list
Goto bottom from the Edit menu
To the next page
NextPage
To the previous page
PreviousPage
To select a specific line in the list
Goto from the Edit menu; enter
the desired line number and press OK
4. Windows are sometimes divided in two by a double line (see Figure 12).
5. When an output is selected, two function keys will be displayed (see Figure 12).
File
Edit
View
Inputs/Outputs
All signals
Name
Value
Type
di1
di2
grip1
grip2
grip3
grip4
progno
welderror
1
0
0
1
1
1
13
0
DI
DI
DO
DO
DO
DO
GO
DO
double line
17(40
0
1
Function keys
Figure 12 A window with two parts.
In some windows, you can move the cursor between the different parts of the window.
In these windows, move the cursor using the List key
4-18
.
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Working with Windows
6. There are four window keys on the teach pendant (see Figure 13 below and
Chapter 3).
Window keys
1
2
P1
7
8
9
4
5
6
1
2
0
3
P2
P3
Figure 13 The four window keys.
When you press a window key, the active window will be hidden under the new one.
Each time you select a window, it will look the same as it did the last time you worked
with it.
User’s Guide
4-19
Working with Windows
4-20
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Jogging the Robot Using the Joystick
6 Jogging the Robot Using the Joystick
You can move (jog) the robot using the joystick on the teach pendant. This chapter
describes how to jog the robot linearly (i.e. in a straight line) and step by step, to make
it easier to position the robot exactly (known as incremental jogging).
6.1 Linear jogging
1. Make sure that the operating mode selector is in the < 250 mm/s position
shown in Figure 14.
, as
Figure 14 The maximum speed during manual operation is 250 mm/s.
2. Check that the Robot motion unit and the Linear motion type are selected
(see Figure 15).
Motion unit
Motion type
Figure 15 Motion keys, LEDs shows the current settings.
With the Motion unit key, you can choose between operating the robot, or some other
unit connected to the controller, using the joystick. Select the robot for this exercise.
With the Motion type key, you can choose the way you want the robot to move when
you use the joystick during manual operation.
You can choose:
- linear movement
- reorientation of a particular end-effector
- axis-by-axis movement (group 1: axes 1-3; group 2: axes 4-6)
We will use linear motion for the purposes of this exercise.
User’s Guide
4-21
Jogging the Robot Using the Joystick
Basic Operation
When linear type motion is selected, the robot will move as shown in Figure 16.
Z+
Y+
X+
X+
Figure 16 X, Y, Z form the robot’s coordinate system.
The point that will move linearly, along the axes of the coordinate system above, is
called the Tool Centre Point (TCP) 0. It is located at the front of the upper arm, in the
centre of the robot’s face plate (see Figure 17).
Tool Centre Point 0
Figure 17 The centre of the face plate is called TCP 0.
3. Push the enabling device halfway in to switch the MOTORS ON.
4. Now, jog the robot using the joystick.
Standing in front of the robot, the TCP 0 will, depending on how you move the
joystick, move linearly along the X-, Y- and Z-axes (see Figure 18).
X-
Y-
Y+
Z+ ZX+
Figure 18 Robot movements with different joystick deflections.
Try jogging the robot in the directions corresponding to X, Y and Z above.
You can also combine the various movements of the joystick and move in several
directions simultaneously. Note that the speed of the robot depends on how much you
move the joystick. The larger deflection, the faster the robot moves.
4-22
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Jogging the Robot Using the Joystick
6.2 Fine positioning
1. Press the Jogging window key (see Figure 19).
Figure 19 The Jogging window key.
A window like the one in Figure 20 will appear.
Window
title
Jogging
Unit:
Motion:
Field
Robot Pos:
Robot
Linear
x:
y:
z:
Base
tool0...
wobj0...
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
World
Base
Tool
q1:
q2:
q3:
q4:
1234.5 mm
-244.9 mm
12.8 mm
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
x z y
Joystick direction
WObj
Figure 20 The Jogging window.
The appearance of the window changes depending on the type of window selected (i.e.
depending on what you want to do).
The Menu keys perform different commands. The list of commands available is displayed in a pull-down menu when you press any of the menu keys.
The area enclosed by a dashed line is called a Field. The highlighted (shaded, grey)
area is known as an input field and can be changed by selecting a different function
using one of the Function keys (or, in some cases, using the Motion keys on the teach
pendant).
The highlighted input field in Figure 20 is marked with a “
that:
” after it which means
- Selection is done using a Function key
User’s Guide
4-23
Jogging the Robot Using the Joystick
Basic Operation
2. Move the cursor (the shaded field) to the Incremental field using the
Down arrow key on the teach pendant (see Figure 21).
Figure 21 The Down arrow navigation key.
3. If you move the cursor to the Incremental field, as in Figure 22, you can choose
incremental jogging by pressing one the function keys.
Jogging
Robot Pos:
Unit:
Motion:
Robot
Linear
Coord:=
Tool:=
Wobj:=
Base
tool0...
wobj0...
Joystick lock: None
Incremental:= No
No
Small
Medium
x:
y:
z:
q1:
q2:
q3:
q4:
1234.5 mm
-244.9 mm
12.8 mm
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
x z y
Large
User
Figure 22 Selection of incremental jogging.
If you press the Small, Medium, Large or User function key, the No in the Incremental
field will be immediately replaced.
The robot will then move one step at a time each time you move the joystick; the size
of the steps (Small, Medium, Large or User defined) will depend on your choice.
You can also use the key
to turn incremental movement on and off.
Try operating the robot using the joystick and note how the robot moves.
More information on manual operation, the various coordinate systems, etc., can be
found in the chapter on jogging in the User’s Guide.
If you do not wish to continue this exercise, switch off the system as explained in
Chapter 12 Switching the robot off.
4-24
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Selecting a Program
7 Selecting a Program
This chapter explains how to open (choose) a program. A program is usually made up
of three different parts, one main routine (always present), a number of subroutines
and program data. Only one main routine is permitted per program (see Figure 23).
RAPID-program
Program data
Robot positions
Counters
etc.
main routine
subroutine 1
subroutine 2
MoveL.....
MoveL.....
subroutine 3
WaitTime 3;
MoveL....
Figure 23 Program structure.
If you open a program, that program replaces the program in the robot’s memory. When
a program is opened, the main routine will be shown on the display with the first
instruction in the main routine selected (highlighted).
7.1 Using the training program
The training program is stored on the system diskette “Controller parameters”, under
the directory DEMO, and is called “EXERCISE”.
1. Turn the operating mode selector on the operator’s panel to < 250 mm/s.
2. Press the Program window key (see Figure 24).
Figure 24 The Program window key.
User’s Guide
4-25
Selecting a Program
Basic Operation
If there is no program in the robot’s memory, the following window will appear (Figure
25), otherwise you will see the program that is stored in the memory of the robot.
File
Program Instr
No Program to show.
Use the menu File to
open or to create a new
Program
Figure 25 The Program window.
3. Insert the Setup diskette into the disk drive at the front of the cabinet. The diskette
should be inserted as in Figure 26.
Figure 26 Inserting the diskette.
4. Press the File menu key (see Figure 25 above). The window in Figure 27 will appear.
1
2
3
4
Open...
New...
Save Program
Save Program as..
File
1 Open...
Program Instr
2 New...
No Program to show.
5
6
7
8
Print...
Preferences...
Check Program
Close Program
Use the menu File to
open or to create a new
Program
Figure 27 The File menu when there is no program in the robot’s internal memory.
4-26
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Selecting a Program
The menu that now appears on your display is called a “pull-down menu”. All commands that can be chosen from the File menu are listed here (commands that cannot be
chosen are indicated by parentheses). The other menu keys work in the same way.
From now on we will write File: Open..., File: Save, etc. The name on the left of the
colon is the name of the menu and the name on the right stands for the command you
should choose.
The first function in the pull-down menu is always highlighted when you press the
menu key. You can move the cursor within the menu using the arrow keys on the teach
pendant (see Figure 28). When you have selected the command you want to choose,
press Enter.
You can also use the numeric keyboard to choose a command; to do this enter the
number in front of the command.
Up arrow
Down arrow
Figure 28 Navigation keys: Up arrow and Down arrow.
Three dots “...” following the command means that a dialog box will appear when that
command is chosen.
To remove a pull-down menu, press the menu key with which you opened it.
5. After selecting Open..., press Enter
(see Figure 29).
This means that the “Open...” command will be carried out. However, as it has three
dots “...” after it, the command will not be performed directly since more information
is required. You must now, in this case, choose the particular program you wish to open.
Enter
Figure 29 The Enter key on the teach pendant.
User’s Guide
4-27
Selecting a Program
Basic Operation
Using the Unit function key, you can switch between the robot’s internal memory
(ram1disk), the diskette unit (flp1:) or some other type of mass storage device.
6. Press Unit. Check that “flp1:” appears after Massmemory unit:=. A dialog box will
appear and the contents of the diskette will be shown, as in Figure 30.
Open...
Select a Program or a Module
The training program is stored here
Massmemory
name
Massmemory unit:= flp1:
/
1(5)
DEMO
MOVEPROG
README
SERVICE
SYSPAR
Directory
Directory
Program
Directory
Directory
Unit
Cancel
The appearance of
the list can vary
OK
Figure 30 The Open dialog box.
If a dialog box (does not have any menus) is closed by pressing Cancel, the command
requested will not be carried out. If you press OK, the command requested will be carried out and the dialog box will close.
7. Select DEMO. Move the cursor with the Up and Down arrow keys.
8. Press Enter
.
9. Select EXERCISE.
10.Press OK and a window like the one in Figure 31 will appear.
File
Edit
View
Routine Special
Program Routines
Routines In Module
Name
Type
EXERCISE
1(1)
main
New..
Decl..
Dupl..
Data->
Test
Figure 31 Opening the main file of the training program.
4-28
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Selecting a Program
11. Then press Enter
. The window in Figure 32 appears.
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
1(4)
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,v300,fine,tool0;
*,v300,fine,tool0;
*,v300,fine,tool0;
*,v300,fine,tool0:
Copy
Paste OptArg... ModPos
Test->
Figure 32 The training program appears on the display.
This is the main routine in the training program. It consists of four “move” instructions.
The routines consist of different types of instructions, such as move instructions, wait
instructions, etc. Each instruction is followed by different arguments. Arguments can,
depending on their type, be changed or omitted altogether. Figure 33 indicates an
example of an instruction.
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
1(4)
MoveL *, v300, fine, tool0;
MoveL *, v300, fine, tool0
MoveL *, v300, fine, tool0;
MoveL *, v300, fine, tool0;
The name of the
instruction which
moves the
robot linearly.
Copy
Hides the values of
the instruction’s
position.
Paste OptArg... ModPos
Determines the
velocity of the
robot.
Test->
Determines the
precision of the
robot’s position.
Specifies which
tool is active.
Figure 33 Example of a motion instruction.
User’s Guide
4-29
Selecting a Program
4-30
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Starting the Program
8 Starting the Program
You are now going to start the program you just opened. It should first be run step by
step using reduced velocity, then continuously.
The program consists of four motion instructions and includes positions near the
robot’s “calibration position” (see Figure 34).
1
4
2
3
TCP 0
(TOOL0)
Figure 34 The robot’s calibration position
Before starting the program move axis 5, manually with the joystick, downwards
about 45°. (For information on the various robot axes, see Chapter 3.2)
1. Press the Program
window key and a window, like the one in Figure 35,
will appear (you have already reached this stage if you have come directly from
Chapter 7).
File
Edit
View
Program Instr
IPL1
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
1(4)
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
Copy
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
fine,
fine,
fine,
fine,
Paste
tool0;
tool0;
tool0;
tool0:
OptArg
ModPos
Test->
Figure 35 The Program window.
User’s Guide
4-31
Starting the Program
Basic Operation
2. Press the Test function key. The window in Figure 36 appears.
File
Edit
Program Test
Speed:=
Running:=
View
Special
EXERCISE/main
100%
Continuous
1(4)
» Program pointer = PP
»
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
Start
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
fine,
fine,
fine,
fine,
FWD
tool0;
tool0;
tool0;
tool0:
BWD
Modpos Instr->
Figure 36 The Program Test window.
Function keys displayed:
- Start: continuous running of the program.
- FWD: one instruction forward.
- BWD: one instruction backward.
- Instr->: select the Program instruction window again.
The program point (PP) indicates the instruction with which the program will start
when you press one of the options Start, FWD or BWD.
3. Select the upper part of the window by pressing the List
key.
4. Reduce the velocity to 75% by pressing the -% function key (see Figure 37).
Correction is carried out in increments of 5%.
File
Edit
Program Test
Speed:=
Running:=
View
Special
EXERCISE/main
75%
Continuous
1(4)
»
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
- %
fine,
fine,
fine,
fine,
tool0;
tool0;
tool0;
tool0:
+%
25%
100%
Figure 37 Correction of velocity.
4-32
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Starting the Program
5. Move (using the same key as in point 3) the cursor back to the first line of the
program (see Figure 38).
File
Edit
Program Test
Speed:=
Running:=
View
Special
EXERCISE/main
75%
Continuous
1(4)
»
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
Start
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
FWD
fine,
fine,
fine,
fine,
tool0;
tool0;
tool0;
tool0:
BWD
Modpos Instr->
Figure 38 Window for starting the program.
The program can now be started. Make sure that no-one is inside the
safeguarded space around the robot.
6. Start the program by pushing in the enabling device and pressing the FWD function
key (see Figure 38).
When the program has started, the robot will carry out one instruction, then it will stop.
Press FWD to initiate the next instruction, press again for the next one, and so on.
The window in Figure 39 is displayed during the execution of the program.
Exec Test
Program Run
Speed:=
Running:=
Event Log
EXERCISE/main
75%
Continuous
1(1)
Executing
Figure 39 Window during program execution.
7. Go through all the program instructions step by step. Press FWD repeatedly after
the robot is in position.
8. If you press FWD when the program comes to the final instruction, the program
will start from the beginning again.
9. Let the robot move to position number 4 (see Figure 34).
User’s Guide
4-33
Starting the Program
Basic Operation
10. Move, in the same way as before, the cursor to the Running field and change to
Cycle execution.
11. Move the cursor back to the program.
12. Start the program by pressing Start.
When Cycle is selected the program will be executed once, and then will stop in
position 4 (one cycle).
13. Select Continuous execution again.
4-34
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Stopping the Program
9 Stopping the Program
Stop the program by pressing the Stop key on the teach pendant (see Figure 40).
1
2
P1
7 8 9
4 5 6
1 2 3
0
P2
P3
Figure 40 Stop key on the teach pendant.
User’s Guide
4-35
Stopping the Program
4-36
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Automatic Mode
10 Automatic Mode
Automatic mode is used to execute ready-made programs.
1. Turn the operating mode selector on the operator’s panel to position
The window in Figure 41 appears.
.
Change of Operating Mode
Operating Mode has been changed
from MANUAL to AUTO.
Please acknowledge this by pressing OK.
(If Cancel, the Operating Mode Selector must
be switched back to MANUAL.)
OK
Cancel
Figure 41 Dialog box used to confirm a change from manual to automatic mode.
2. Press OK. You have now changed to automatic mode and the Production
window appears on the display (see Figure 42).
File
Window title
Edit
Production Info
Routine
Status
Robot
velocity
View
CAR_LIN1
: main :
: Stopped
Speed:=
75
%
Running mode:=
Continuous
2(39)
Program
pointer
Program list
Program name
Routine name
Program status
Adjusted velocity
Running mode
MoveL p1, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p2, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p3, v500, z20, tool1;
Set do1;
Set do2;
Start
FWD
BWD
Figure 42 The Production window in auto mode.
3. Press the MOTORS ON button on the operator’s panel.
4. Start the program with the Start function key.
5. Stop the program with the STOP button on the teach pendant.
6. Switch back to < 250 mm/s.
For further information, see Chapter 11, Production Running in the User’s Guide.
User’s Guide
4-37
Automatic Mode
4-38
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Errors
11 Errors
A window displaying an error message appears whenever there is any type of error (see
Figure 43).
Error code number
Reason for error
Message log
Error: 50028
Motion
Jogging error
Jogging was made in wrong direction when
a joint was out of working range.
50028 Jogging error
Category of
error
1(1)
0810 09:25.30
Check
OK
Figure 43 Example of a window displaying an error message.
Error code number
A number unique to each error.
Category of error
Assigns errors to groups relating to the type of error. Each category has its own code
number series; e.g. Operator errors (6001-6999).
Reason
Describes the reason for the error in plain language. For more information regarding
hardware faults, see the User’s Guide - 16 Error Management.
Message log
Indicates the most recent errors. The error indicated on the first line is displayed in the
window. The log shows the error code number, a brief description of the error, and the
time the error was registered. If you highlight one of the errors in the log, the window
will then be updated with the appropriate error code number, reason and category.
The Check function key can be used to get help on how handle a specific error.
If you press OK, the error-message window will disappear.
Using the joystick, try to manually operate the robot outside its operating area.
You will then see an example of an error message.
User’s Guide
4-39
Errors
4-40
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Switching the robot off
12 Switching the robot off
If you are going to continue with the rest of the exercises, you can skip this chapter.
All output signals will be set to zero when the robot is switched off. This may affect
the gripper and peripheral equipment.
So, before switching the robot off, check first that the equipment, and any people
in the area, will not come to any harm.
1. If the program is running, stop it by pressing the Stop push button on the teach
pendant.
2. After you have done this, switch off the mains switch.
The robot’s memory is battery-backed and is thus not affected when the system is
switched off.
User’s Guide
4-41
Switching the robot off
4-42
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Changing a Program
13 Changing a Program
The following chapters are intended to be read by people who will create programs, edit
programs, etc.
This chapter explains some of the ways in which you can change the program you
opened and started in the preceding chapters. You will:
- run the program step by step until you get to the position you want to modify
- modify this position
- change an argument in an instruction
- enter a new instruction (position)
- program a time delay (WaitTime)
13.1 Modifying positions
1. If you have exited the previous exercises, choose the Program window
(see Figure 44).
Figure 44 The Program window key.
The window in Figure 45 appears on the display.
File
Edit
Program Test
Speed:=
Running:=
View
Special
EXERCISE/main
75%
Cycle
1(4)
»
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
Start
*,
*,
*,
*,
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
FWD
fine,
fine,
fine,
fine,
tool0;
tool0;
tool0;
tool0:
BWD
Modpos Instr->
Figure 45 The Program Test window.
User’s Guide
4-43
Changing a Program
Basic Operation
2. Push in the enabling device and press FWD. Move the robot to the first position in
the program (the first instruction should be highlighted).
File
Edit
Program Test
Speed:=
Running:=
View
Special
EXERCISE/main
75%
Cycle
1(4)
><
»
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
Start
*,
*,
*,
*,
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
FWD
fine,
fine,
fine,
fine,
tool0;
tool0;
tool0;
tool0:
BWD
Modpos Instr->
Figure 46 The first instruction is selected.
3. Then move the robot to a new position with the joystick.
4. Press the ModPos function key.
The window in Figure 47 will then appear on the dispaly.
Warning
Are you sure you want to
modify the position?
No
Yes
Figure 47 The warning dialog when modifying a position.
5. Press Yes if you want to change the original position specified to the current position
of the robot.
6. Activate the enabling device and press FWD again to move the robot to the next
position.
Repeat points 3 to 6 and go through all the positions in the training program.
7. Test run the program step by step.
Stop the program in any position and press the Instr function key (to terminate the
Program Test). The window in Figure 48 will then appear on the display.
4-44
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Changing a Program
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
1(4)
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
Copy
fine,
fine,
fine,
fine,
Paste
tool0;
tool0;
tool0;
tool0:
OptArg
ModPos
Test->
Figure 48 The Program Instr window.
13.2 Changing arguments
You are now going to change one of the arguments of the first move instruction
(MoveL), which should be highlighted. You are going to change the precision of the
position.
1. Select the “fine” argument (see Figure 49). Move the cursor using the right arrow
key.
File
Edit
View
Program Instr
IPL1
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
1(4)
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
Copy
fine,
fine,
fine,
fine,
Paste
tool0;
tool0;
tool0;
tool0:
OptArg (ModPos) Test->
Figure 49 The “fine” argument is selected.
2. Press Enter
.
The window in Figure 50 appears.
User’s Guide
4-45
Changing a Program
Basic Operation
Instruction arguments
MoveL *, v300, ?fine, tool0
Zone:
fine
New...
z5
z20
z50
fine
z10
z30
z60
1(5)
Next
Func
More..
z1
z15
z40
z80
Cancel
OK
Figure 50 Dialog box for programming instruction arguments.
3. Move the cursor to z10.
4. Press Enter
and the fine argument will change to z10.
5. Then press OK. The instruction has now changed to z10.
6. Move the cursor so as to select the complete instruction (see Figure 51).
13.3 Adding instructions
You are now going to add a movement instruction to the program after the first instruction. The Program Instr window in Figure 51 should now appear on the display.
File
Edit
View
Program Instr
IPL1
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
1(4)
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
Copy
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
z10, tool0;
fine, tool0;
fine, tool0;
fine, tool0:
Paste
OptArg (ModPos) Test->
Figure 51 Program window.
1. Press the Copy function key to copy the first instruction (highlighted) in Figure 51.
2. Then press Paste. The window in Figure 52 appears. As it is the first instruction in
4-46
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Changing a Program
the program that is highlighted, you will be asked where you want the new instruction to be inserted.
MoveL *, v300, z10, tool0;
Insert before:
Yes
No
No
Cancel
OK
Figure 52 Dialog box used to insert new instructions when the first instruction is highlighted.
3. Select No. Press OK.
4. The new instruction will be inserted directly under the instruction that was
highlighted, and will be highlighted itself.
File
Edit
View
Program Instr
IPL1
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
2(5)
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
*,
Copy
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
z10, tool0
z10, tool0;
fine, tool0;
fine, tool0;
fine, tool0:
Paste
OptArg
ModPos
Test->
Figure 53 An extra position (the same as the one copied) is added to the program.
5. Using the joystick, move the robot to the position to which you want it moved.
6. Press ModPos (see Figure 53).
7. Test run the program using continuous execution.
8. Select Test->.
9. Push the enabling device.
10. Press Start.
User’s Guide
4-47
Changing a Program
Basic Operation
13.4 Programming a delay
You are now going to program a delay, i.e. make the robot wait a specified amount of
time. The new instruction will be inserted after the fourth instruction.
1. When the program test-run is completed, press the Instr function key.
The window in Figure 54 appears.
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
1(5)
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
*,
Copy
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
z10, tool0
z10, tool0
fine, tool0
fine, tool0
fine, tool0
Paste
OptArg
ModPos
Test->
Figure 54 The Program Instruction window.
2. Using the arrow keys (up and down), move the cursor to the fourth instruction in the
program. The new instruction will be inserted under the highlighted one.
3. Select IPL1: Various. The window in Figure 55 appears.
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
Various
4(5)
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
MoveL
*,
*,
*,
*,
*,
Copy
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
z10, tool0
z10, tool0
fine, tool0
fine, tool0
fine, tool0
Paste
OptArg
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
:=
Comment
Load
UnLoad
WaitDI
WaitDo
WaitTime
WaitUntil
ModPos
Test->
Figure 55 The pick list including the waitTime instruction.
4. Select the desired instruction from the pick list, in one of the following ways:
- Using the numeric keyboard, enter the number (7) shown in front of WaitTime
(see Figure 55). (The numeric keyboard is illustrated in chapter 3.)
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User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Changing a Program
- Select the pick list by pressing the List key
tion and press Enter
. Then select the desired instruc-
.
5. A window like the one in Figure 56 appears.
Instruction Argument
WaitTime:? <EXP>
Time
1(2)
New...
reg3
Next
reg1
reg4
Func
reg2
reg5
More..
Cancel
OK
Figure 56 Dialog box for entering arguments.
6. Type 3 on the numeric keyboard to get a wait time of 3 seconds.
7. Press OK. The window like the one in Figure 57 appears.
File
Edit
Program Instr
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
WaitTime
MoveL *,
Copy
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
3;
v300,
IPL1
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
M.C.1
5(6)
1 :=
z10, tool0;
2 Comment
z10, tool0;
fine, tool0;
3 Load
fine, tool0;
4 UnLoad
5 WaitDI
fine, tool0;
6 WaitDo
7 WaitTime
8 WaitUntil
Paste
View
OPtArg (ModPos) Test->
Figure 57 The Program Instr appears on the display.
8. Press Edit: Hide IPL to remove the pick list.
9. Now test run the program again using the Program Test window. Choose continuous
execution.
INFORMATION
The Edit menu includes a number of functions which can be used to edit the program
(see Figure 58).
User’s Guide
4-49
Changing a Program
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
Undo “Latest action”
Cut
Copy
Paste
Goto Top
Goto Bottom
Mark
Change Selected
Value
ModPos
Search...
Show/Hide IPL
Basic Operation
File
Edit
View
Undo
Program Instr
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
WaitTime
MoveL *,
1 Cut
2 Copy
.
v300,
z10, tool0;
.
v300,
z10, tool0;
v300,
fine, tool0;
.
v300, fine, tool0;
3;
v300, fine, tool0;
IPL1
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
5(6)
Figure 58 The Edit pull-down menu.
Press the Edit menu key again to remove the menu.
See the User’s Guide for more detailed information.
4-50
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Storing the Program on Diskette
14 Storing the Program on Diskette
You are now going to copy the program to a diskette.
Use 3.5” HD (High Density) DOS formatted diskettes.
Do not use the Setup diskette to store the exercise program.
14.1 Storing on diskette
1. Choose the Program Instr application (see Figure 59), if you are not already in it.
Figure 59 The Program window appears on the display.
2. Press the File menu key. The window in Figure 60 appears.
1
2
3
4
Open
New...
Save Program
Save Program As...
5 Print...
6 Preferences...
File
Edit
View
1 Open
2 New...
3 Save Program
4 Save Program as...
ARL Prog
Program
Instr
IPL1
IPL2
EXERCISE/main
1(6)
MoveL *, v300,
MoveL *, v300,
MoveL *, v300,
MoveL *, v300,
WaitTime,3;
MoveL *, v300,
z10, tool0;
z10, tool0;
fine, tool0;
fine, tool0;
fine, tool0:
7 Check Program
8 Close Program.
Copy
Paste
OptArg
ModPos
Test->
Figure 60 Commands in the File menu.
3. Select File: Save Program as and press Enter
. (You could, alternatively,
use the numeric keyboard to enter the number shown in front of the function name.)
The dialog box in Figure 61 appears on the display.
User’s Guide
4-51
Storing the Program on Diskette
Basic Operation
Massmemory
name
Save Program as:
Name: EXERCISE...
Massmemory Unit:= flp1:
\DEMO
1(1)
Go up one level
. .
Unit
New Dir
Cancel
OK
Figure 61 Dialog box for Save Program as.
4. Press Unit to choose the type of mass storage, if it is not already chosen;
“flp1” should appear on the third line of the window (see Figure 61).
5. Press Enter
to enter an optional name. The text-input dialog box in
Figure 62 then appears.
Enter Name
EXERCISE
789
456
123
_0_
ABC
DEF
GHI
JKL
MNO
PQR
STU
VWX
<-
->
YZ_
Cancel
OK
7
8
9
4
5
6
1
2
3
-
0
.
Some of the characters
obtained by pressing
different numbers.
Figure 62 Window for entering text.
You can now see five groups of characters. Each group is represented on the numeric
keyboard: the layout of the keyboard corresponds to the layout of the characters. You
can move between the various groups using the <- and -> function keys (the selected
group is indicated with squares both above and below it, see Figure 62).
Use the Delete
type.
key to delete the name that is displayed or any errors you may
6. Now give the program a new name. When you have entered this, press OK.
The window in Figure 63 appears.
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User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Storing the Program on Diskette
Save Program as
Name: XXXXX...
Massmemory Unit:= flp1:
\DEMO
1(1)
Go up one level
. .
Unit
New Dir
Cancel
OK
Figure 63 The Save Program as window.
7. Press OK. A window like the one in Figure 64 appears.
Save Program as
Name: XXXXX...
Massmemory
Unit:= flp1:
Disk Changed!
\DEMO
1(1)
. .
The contents of the disk has
Go up one level
been changed since last read.
Reread the contents?
Reread
Unit
Cancel
New Dir
Cancel
OK
Figure 64 An alert box.
8. Press Enter
. The window in Figure 65 appears.
Save Program as
Name: XXXXX...
Massmemory Unit:= flp1:
1(1)
Empty volume
Unit
New Dir
Cancel
OK
Figure 65 Window for storing the program on diskette.
9. The program is saved onto diskette when you press OK (see Figure 65).
10. Close the dialog box.
User’s Guide
4-53
Storing the Program on Diskette
4-54
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
Printing Programs
15 Printing Programs
15.1 Using a PC
It is also possible to print programs from a PC. Almost all word-processing programs
can be used. The only requirement is that the computer can handle DOS-formatted diskettes.
1. Store the program on diskette.
2. Enter the program into the PC.
3. Print.
User’s Guide
4-55
Printing Programs
4-56
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
I/O Signals
16 I/O Signals
This chapter describes how you can program an instruction which activates a digital
output signal. After you have test run the program, you will manually open the I/O list
and look at the signal in question.
16.1 Programming an I/O instruction
1. Select the Program window (see Figure 66).
Figure 66 The Program window key.
The window in Figure 67 appears on the display.
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
IPL2
XXXXX/main
1(6)
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
WaitTime
MoveL *,
v300,
v300,
v300,
v300,
3;
v300,
Copy
Paste
z10, tool0;
z10, tool0;
fine, tool0;
fine, tool0;
XXXXX= the name
you gave the program
in Chapter 14.
fine, tool0;
OptArg
ModPos
Test->
Figure 67 The Program Instruction window.
The new instruction (set an output) will be entered directly under the highlighted
instruction. Select the third instruction in the program.
2. Select IPL1: IO. The window in Figure 68 appears.
User’s Guide
4-57
I/O Signals
Basic Operation
File
Edit
View
IPL1
IPL2
Program Instr
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
WaitTime
MoveL *,
Copy
EXERCISE//main
I/O
3(6)
1 InvertDO
v300, z10, tool0;
v300, z10, tool0;
2 PulseDO
v300, fine, tool0; 3 Reset
v300, fine, tool0; 4 Set
3;
v300, fine, tool0; 5 SetAO
6 SetDO
7 SetGO
8 WaitDI
Paste OptArg ModPos Test->
Figure 68 The pick list including the set instruction.
Select the function Set in the same way as you selected the WaitTime instruction in
Chapter 13.
3. After you have selected the function Set, the dialog box in Figure 69 appears.
Instruction Argument
Set ? <EXP>
Signal
1(11)
New...
d01
d02
d03
d04
d05
d06
d07
d08
d09
d010
do11
Next
Func
More... Cancel
OK
Figure 69 Dialog box for selecting a digital output signal.
4. Select “do4” in the list. Press OK. The window in Figure 70 appears.
File
Edit
Program Instr
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
Set do4;
MoveL *,
WaitTime
MoveL *,
Copy
View
IPL1
IPL2
XXXXX/main
I/O
4(7)
1 InvertDO
v300, z10, tool0;
2 PulseDO
v300, z10, tool0;
v300, fine, tool0; 3 Reset
4 Set
v300, fine, tool0;
5 SetAO
3;
v300, fine, tool0: 6 SetDO
7 SetGO
8 WaitDI
Paste OptArg (ModPos) Test->
Figure 70 The “Set do4” instruction has been entered into the program.
4-58
User’s Guide
Basic Operation
I/O Signals
5. Remove the pick list of instructions by pressing Edit: Hide IPL.
The window in Figure 71 will then appear.
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
IPL2
XXXXX/main
4(7)
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
MoveL *,
Set do4;
MoveL *,
WaitTime
MoveL *,
Copy
v300, z10, tool0;
v300, z10, tool0;
v300, fine, tool0;
v300, fine, tool0;
3;
v300, fine, tool0;
Paste
OptArg (ModPos) Test->
Figure 71 The Program Instruction window.
6. Test run the program using the Test function, one instruction at a time, so that the
“Set do4” instruction can be read by the program.
7. You are now going to manually check the state of the signal.
8. Press the Inputs/Outputs window key (see Figure 72).
Previous page
Inputs/Outputs window key
Next page
Figure 72 The Manual I/O application.
Browse through the list displayed in the window with the keys as shown in Figure 72.
9. Find (using the up and down arrow keys) the “do4” signal in the IO list and highlight
it.
10. Check its value.
You can change the value using the function keys (0 / 1) that appear on the display each
time an output signal is highlighted.
11. Change the value of the signal and then press the Prog application key.
12. Test run the program once more (Test) and check the value of the signal again.
INFORMATION
When you use lists from the View menu in the Manual I/O window, you can choose to
have only input signals, only output signals, etc., shown on the display.
User’s Guide
4-59
I/O Signals
4-60
Basic Operation
User’s Guide
Starting up
CONTENTS
Page
1 Switching on the Power Supply..............................................................................
1.1 Errors on start-up ............................................................................................
2 The Operator’s Panel ..............................................................................................
3 Selecting the Operating Mode ................................................................................
3.1 Automatic mode (production mode) ...............................................................
3.2 Manual mode with reduced speed (programming mode) ...............................
3.3 Manual mode with full speed (testing mode)..................................................
4 Switching the Power Supply to the Motors On.....................................................
5 Emergency Stops......................................................................................................
5.1 Activating the emergency stop button ............................................................
5.2 Resetting after an emergency stop ..................................................................
6 The Teach Pendant ..................................................................................................
6.1 Entering text using the teach pendant .............................................................
User’s Guide
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
6
7
9
5-1
Starting up
5-2
User’s Guide
Starting up
Starting up
1 Switching on the Power Supply
Before switching on the power supply, check that no-one is in the safeguarded
space around the robot.
• Switch on the mains switch
0
1
The robot hardware is then automatically checked. When the check is complete and if no
errors have been detected, a message (see Figure 1) will be displayed on the teach pendant.
Welcome To IRB 6400-0000
BaseWare OS 3.1
ABB Robotics Products AB
(c) Copyright 1993
Figure 1 The welcome message after start-up.
In automatic mode, the Production window will appear after a few seconds.
The robot is started up with the same status as when the power was switched off. The
program pointer remains unchanged and all digital outputs are set to the value before
power off, or to the value specified in the system parameters. When the program is
restarted, this is considered to be a normal stop - start:
- The robot moves back slowly to the programmed path (if there is a deviation)
and then continues on the programmed path.
- Motion settings and data are automatically set to the same values as before
power off.
- The robot will continue to react on interrupts.
- The mechanical units that was active before power off will automatically be
activated at program start.
- The arc welding and spot welding processes are automatically restarted. But if
a change of weld data has just been executed, this new data will be activated
too early on the seam.
Limitations:
- All files and serial channels are closed (this can be handled by the user
program).
- All analogue outputs are set to 0 and the Soft servo/Tune servo is set to default
values (can be handled by the user program).
User’s Guide
- WeldGuide cannot be restarted.
5-3
Starting up
- Independent axes cannot be restarted.
- If the power failure occurs during a movement in an interrupt routine or error
handler, the restart of the path is not possible.
- If the program execution is in a part when the CPU is very busy, there is a small
chance that there is not enough time to make a proper close down at power failure. The robot will in this case tell the user that a restart is not possible.
1.1 Errors on start-up
During the entire start-up sequence, the robot functions are checked extensively. If an error
occurs, it is reported as a message in plain text on the teach pendant, and recorded in the
robot’s event log. For more information on troubleshooting, see the Product Manual.
2 The Operator’s Panel
The functions of the operator’s panel are described in Figure 2.
MOTORS ON button
and indicating lamp
Emergency stop
If pressed in, pull to release
Operating mode selector
Duty time counter
Indicates the operating time for
the manipulator (released brakes)
MOTORS ON
Continuous light
= Ready for program execution
Fast flashing light (4Hz) = The robot is not calibrated or the revolution counters are not updated
NB: The motors have been switched on
Slow flashing light (1 Hz) = One of the safeguarded space stops is active
NB: The motors have been switched off
Figure 2 The operator’s panel is located on the front of the cabinet.
3 Selecting the Operating Mode
The operating mode is selected using the operating mode selector.
3.1 Automatic mode (production mode)
When the robot is in the automatic operating mode, it is essential that nobody
enters the safeguarded space around it. Carelessness may cause personal injury.
5-4
User’s Guide
Starting up
• Turn the key to
Automatic mode is used when running complete programs in production operation. In
this mode, the enabling device on the teach pendant is disconnected and the functions
used to edit programs are locked.
3.2 Manual mode with reduced speed (programming mode)
• Turn the operating mode selector to
If the hold-to-run function is active (the function is available by means of a system
parameter), program execution will stop as soon as you release the Hold-to-run key on
the teach pendant.
Manual mode with reduced speed is used when programming and when working in the
robot working space. In this mode, external units cannot be remotely controlled.
3.3 Manual mode with full speed (testing mode)
In Manual 100% mode, the robot moves at full speed. This operating mode may
only be used by trained personnel. Carelessness may cause personal injury.
• Turn the operating mode selector to
100%
The hold-to-run function is now active, i.e. program execution will stop as soon as you
release the Start key on the teach pendant.
Manual mode with full speed is only used when testing the robot program at full speed.
In this mode, external units cannot be remotely controlled.
4 Switching the Power Supply to the Motors On
Enabling
device
• In automatic mode, press the Motors On button on the operator’s panel.
• In manual mode, turn to MOTORS ON mode by pressing the enabling device on the
teach pendant halfway in.
If the enabling device is released and pressed again within half a second, the robot
will not return to the MOTORS ON state. If this happens, first release the enabling
device, then push it halfway in again.
User’s Guide
5-5
Starting up
5 Emergency Stops
5.1 Activating the emergency stop button
Emergency stop buttons are located on the operator’s panel and on the teach pendant. There
are often other ways of activating an emergency stop, but these depend on the robot installation.
When the emergency stop button is activated, the power supply to the motors is shut off
and program execution stops.
5.2 Resetting after an emergency stop
• Fix the problem that caused the emergency stop.
• Reset the emergency stop state by pressing the MOTORS ON button (see Figure 3).
MOTORS ON button
Figure 3 The emergency stop must be reset before setting the robot in the MOTOR ON state.
5-6
User’s Guide
Starting up
6 The Teach Pendant
The teach pendant is described below, see Figure 4.
Hold-to-run
Display
1
2
P1
7
8
9
4
5
6
1
2
3
Enabling
device
Joystick
0
P2
P3
Emergency
stop button
Figure 4 The teach pendant is used to operate the robot.
Jogging: Used to jog the robot.
Program: Used to program and test.
Inputs/Outputs: Used to manually operate the input and output
signals connected to the robot.
Misc.: Miscellaneous; other windows, i.e. the System Parameters,
Service, Production and File Manager windows.
Stop: Stops program execution.
Contrast: Adjusts the contrast of the display.
Menu keys: Press to display menus containing various commands.
Function keys: Press to select the various commands directly.
User’s Guide
5-7
Starting up
Motion Unit: Press to jog the robot or other mechanical units.
Motion Type: Press to select how the robot should be jogged,
reorientation or linear.
1
2
Motion Type: Axis by axis movement. 1 = axis 1-3, 2 = axis 4-6
Incremental: Incremental jogging on/off
List: Press to move the cursor from one part of the window to
another (normally separated by a double line).
Previous/Next page: Press to see the next/previous page.
Delete: Deletes the data selected on the display.
Enter: Press to input data.
Up and Down arrows: Press to move the cursor up or down.
Left and Right arrows: Press to move the cursor to the left or right.
P1
P2
P3
User defined keys: How to define these, see Chapter 12, System
Parameters
(P4)
(P5)
5-8
User’s Guide
Starting up
6.1 Entering text using the teach pendant
When naming files, routines, data, etc., text can be entered using the teach pendant. As
there is no character keyboard available, the numeric keyboard is used in a special way
(see Figure 5).
Selected characters
Expression
7
8
9
4
5
6
1
2
3
0
789
456
123
-0.
ABC
DEF
GHI
JCL
MNO
PQR
STU
VWX
YZ+
-<>
*/,
?=&
:_
[](
]{}
%&"
A-a
<-
->
Cancel
OK
Figure 5 The dialog box used for entering text.
The keys on the numeric keyboard correspond to the selected characters on the display.
• Select a group of characters by pressing the function key -> or <-.
• Press the corresponding key on the numeric keyboard. If the third group is selected
(as shown in Figure 5), 7 corresponds to M, 8 to N, 9 to O, etc.
• Move the cursor to the right or left using ArrowLeft
or ArrowRight
• Delete the character in front of the cursor by pressing Delete
.
.
• Switch between upper and lower case letters by pressing A-a.
• When you have finished entering text, press OK.
User’s Guide
5-9
Starting up
5-10
User’s Guide
Jogging
CONTENTS
Page
1 General ............................................................................................................................. 3
1.1 The Jogging window ............................................................................................. 3
1.2 Reading the current position.................................................................................. 4
1.3 How moving the joystick affects movements........................................................ 4
1.4 Locking of joystick axes........................................................................................ 5
1.5 Motion Supervision ............................................................................................... 5
2 Jogging the Robot............................................................................................................ 6
2.1 Jogging the robot along one of the base coordinate axes ...................................... 6
2.2 Jogging the robot in the direction of the tool......................................................... 7
2.3 Reorienting the tool ............................................................................................... 9
2.4 Aligning a tool along a coordinate axis ................................................................. 9
2.5 Jogging the robot in the direction of the work object............................................ 11
2.6 Jogging the robot along one of the world coordinate axes .................................... 13
2.7 Using a stationary tool........................................................................................... 13
2.8 Jogging the robot axis-by-axis............................................................................... 14
2.9 Incremental movement .......................................................................................... 14
2.10 Jogging an unsynchronised axis .......................................................................... 15
3 Jogging External Axes .................................................................................................... 16
3.1 Choosing external units ......................................................................................... 16
3.2 Jogging external units axis-by-axis ....................................................................... 16
3.3 Jogging external units coordinated ........................................................................ 17
User’s Guide
6-1
Jogging
6-2
User’s Guide
Jogging
Jogging
1 General
A joystick is used to jog the robot. It has three degrees of freedom, which means that
you can move the robot in three different directions simultaneously. The robot speed is
proportional to the joystick deflection, the greater the joystick deflection, the higher
the speed (but not faster than 250 mm/s).
The joystick can be used irrespective of which window is open at the time. You cannot,
however, jog the robot in the following situations:
- When the robot is in automatic mode
.
- When the robot is in the MOTORS OFF state.
- When program execution is in progress.
If any axis is outside its working range, it can only be jogged back into its working
range.
The function of the joystick can be read from and changed in the Jogging window.
Some of the settings can also be changed directly using the motion keys on the teach
pendant, see Figure 1.
Robot
Reorientation
Axes 1, 2, 3
1
2
External unit
Linear
Axes 4, 5, 6
Figure 1 The indications next to the motion keys show the current settings.
The robot or external unit will start to move immediately you move the joystick.
Make sure that no one is standing in the safeguarded space around the robot and
also that the motion settings for jogging are correctly set. Carelessness can injure
someone or damage the robot or other equipment.
1.1 The Jogging window
• Press the Jogging key
to open the window.
The window displays the current motion settings for jogging and the current
position of the robot. See the example in Figure 2.
User’s Guide
6-3
Jogging
Special
Jogging
Current
motion
settings
Robot pos:
Unit:
Motion:
Robot
Linear
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
Base
tool0...
wobj0...
x:
y:
z:
Q1:
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
World
Base
Tool
1234.5
-244.9
12.8
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
x z y
Wobj
Current
position
Motion
resulting from
different
deflections of
the joystick
Figure 2 Define the various jogging settings in the Jogging window.
1.2 Reading the current position
The current position of the robot is displayed in the Jogging window (see Figure 2).
In Linear or Reorientation motion types, the position and orientation of the tool in
relation to the coordinate system of the chosen work object is displayed (regardless of
the type of coordinate system used).
In Axis-by-Axis motion type with Robot as the unit, the positions of the robot axes are
displayed in degrees related to the calibration position of the respective axis.
When an external unit is moved, the position of the axes is displayed. In the case of
linear axes, the position is displayed in mm related to the calibration position. For
rotating axes, the position is displayed in degrees related to the calibration position.
When a unit is unsynchronised, no position is displayed.
1.3 How moving the joystick affects movements
The field that indicates the various deflections of the joystick displays how the
principal joystick directions are linked to axes or coordinate directions. See the
example in Figure 3.
Note The relationship between joystick deflection and robot movement can be
changed in the system parameters. All the figures in this manual are related to standard
setup.
6-4
User’s Guide
Jogging
Xx z y
Y-
Y+
Z+ ZX+
Figure 3 The direction of movements associated with each joystick deflection is displayed in the
Jogging window.
1.4 Locking of joystick axes
It is possible to disable joystick deflections in certain directions.
• Select the field Joystick lock (see Figure 4).
• Select the joystick axes to be disabled by pressing the corresponding function key.
Enable all axes by pressing the function key None.
Unit:
Motion:
Robot
Linear
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
Base
tool0...
wobj0...
Joystick lock:
Incremental: No
xx:
y:
z:
Q1:
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
1234.5
-244.9 m
12.8 m
0.7071 m
0.0000 m
0.0000 m
-0.7071 m
x z y
None
Figure 4 A joystick with disabled up-down and rotational deflection.
1.5 Motion Supervision
It is possible from the jogging window to turn motion supervision (collision detection)
on and off. This will only affect motion supervision during jogging.
• Choose Special: Motion Supervision.
A dialog box appears displaying the setting for motion supervision (see Figure 5).
User’s Guide
6-5
Jogging
File
Edit
View
Test
Motion Supervision...
Turn Motion Supervision ON/OFF
Note: Only applies to jogging
Motion Supervision State: On
ON
OFF
Cancel
OK
Figure 5 The dialog box for motion supervision
If you want to turn the motion supervision off or on:
• Press the function key OFF or ON,
• Press OK to confirm.
2 Jogging the Robot
2.1 Jogging the robot along one of the base coordinate axes
• Set the keys
to jog the robot in a straight line.
• Select the field Coord (see Figure 6).
• Press the function key Base.
Special
Jogging
Robot pos:
Unit:
Motion:
Robot
Linear
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
Base
tool0...
wobj0...
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
World
Base
1234.5 mm
-244.9 mm
12.8 mm
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
x:
y:
z:
Q1:
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
Tool
x z y
Wobj
Figure 6 Specify the coordinate system in the Jogging window.
The robot will move the TCP along the base coordinate axes (see Figure 7).
6-6
User’s Guide
Jogging
XZ
Y-
Y+
Z+ Z-
Y
X
X+
Figure 7 Linear movement in the base coordinate system.
2.2 Jogging the robot in the direction of the tool
• Set the keys
to jog the robot in a straight line.
• Select the field Coord (see Figure 8).
• Press the function key Tool.
Special
Jogging
Robot pos:
Unit:
Motion:
Robot
Linear
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
Tool
tool0...
wobj0...
x:
y:
z:
Q1:
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
World
Base
Tool
1234.5 mm
-244.9 mm
12.8 mm
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
x z y
Wobj
Figure 8 Specify the coordinate system in the Jogging window.
The tool that was last used when jogging the robot or last used for program execution
is automatically chosen (see Figure 9).
User’s Guide
6-7
Jogging
X-
Y-
Y+
Y
Z
Z+ Z-
X
X+
Figure 9 Linear movement in the tool coordinate system.
If you want to change the tool:
• Select the field Tool (see Figure 10).
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
z:
Q1:
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
Tool
gun1...
wobj0...
12.8 mm
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
x z y
Figure 10 Choose a tool by selecting the field Tool.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired tool from the dialog box which subsequently appears on the display.
(Tool0 in the dialog box corresponds to the centre of the mounting flange.)
File
Edit
View
Test
Select desired data in the list:
1(2)
gun1
tool0
New ...
gun2
tool1
gun3
Change ... Define ... Cancel
OK
Figure 11 Changing or adding a tool.
You can create a new tool as follows:
• Press New.
You can change the values of a tool as follows:
6-8
User’s Guide
Jogging
• Press
- Change to input the value manually
- Define to use the robot to measure up the tool coordinate system.
For more information see Chapter 10 Calibration.
• Press OK to confirm.
2.3 Reorienting the tool
• Set the keys
to reorientate the tool.
The tool is reorientated about the axes of the coordinate system that was chosen. The
TCP of the chosen tool will not move (see Figure 12).
X-
YY
Z
Y+
Z+ Z-
X
X+
Figure 12 Reorientation about the tool coordinate system’s axes.
2.4 Aligning a tool along a coordinate axis
The Z-direction of a tool can be aligned along a coordinate axis of a chosen coordinate
system. The angle between the tool’s Z-direction and the coordinate axes determines
which coordinate axis the tool should be aligned along; the axis closest to the tool’s Zdirection will be used (see Figure 13).
User’s Guide
6-9
Jogging
TCP
Z
X
Z
z
X
Y
Y
Figure 13 The tool is aligned along the Z-axis.
Adjust the direction of the tool manually so that it is close to the desired direction.
• Choose Special: Align
A dialog box appears displaying the coordinate system used for alignment (see Figure
14).
File
Edit
View
Test
Align!
The alignment is started by moving the
joystick.
The tool will be aligned along a
coordinate axis of “World”.
Coord:
World
World
Base
Wobj
OK
Figure 14 The dialog box for aligning the tool.
If you want to change the coordinate system, press any of the function keys World,
Base or Wobj.
• To start the alignment, press the enabling device and move the joystick. The joystick
is used to adjust the speed. The robot will automatically stop as soon as it reaches the
desired position.
• Press OK to confirm.
6-10
User’s Guide
Jogging
2.5 Jogging the robot in the direction of the work object
• Set the keys
to jog the robot in a straight line.
• Select the field Coord (see Figure 15).
• Press the function key Wobj.
p
Jogging
Robot pos:
Unit:
Motion:
Robot
Linear
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
Wobj
tool0...
wobj0...
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
World
Base
1234.5 mm
-244.9 mm
12.8 mm
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
x:
y:
z:
Q1:
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
Tool
x z y
Wobj
Figure 15 Specify the coordinate system in the Jogging window.
The work object that was last used when jogging the robot or last used for program
execution is automatically chosen.
If you want to change the work object:
• Select the field Wobj (see Figure 16).
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
Wobj
tool0...
wobj0...
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
z:
Q1:
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
12.8 mm
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
x z y
Figure 16 Choose a work object by selecting the field Wobj.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired work object from the dialog box which subsequently appears on
the display. (Wobj0 in the dialog box corresponds to the world coordinate system.)
User’s Guide
6-11
Jogging
File
Edit
View
Test
Select desired data in the list:
1(2)
wobj1
wobj4
wobj2
New ...
wobj3
Change ... Define ... Cancel
OK
Figure 17 Changing or adding a work object.
You can create a new work object as follows:
• Press New.
You can change the values of a work object as follows:
• Press
- Change to input the value manually
- Define to use the robot to measure up the coordinate systems.
For more information see chapter 10 Calibration.
• Press OK to confirm.
The robot will move along the axes of the object coordinate system (see Figure 18).
X-
Z
X
Y
Y+
YZ- Z+
X+
Figure 18 Linear movement in the object coordinate system.
6-12
User’s Guide
Jogging
2.6 Jogging the robot along one of the world coordinate axes
• Set the keys
to jog the robot in a straight line.
• Select the field Coord (see Figure 19).
• Press the function key World.
Jogging
Robot pos:
Unit:
Motion:
Robot
Linear
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
World
tool0...
wobj0...
x:
y:
z:
Q1:
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
World
Base
Tool
1234.5 mm
-244.9 mm
12.8 mm
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
x z y
Wobj
Figure 19 Specify the coordinate system in the Jogging window.
The robot will move the TCP along the world coordinate axes (see Figure 20).
X-
Y-
Z
Y+
Z+ Z-
Y
X
X+
Figure 20 TCP movement is independent of the robot mounting.
2.7 Using a stationary tool
If a stationary TCP is active, the work object will move in accordance with the chosen
coordinate system.
User’s Guide
6-13
Jogging
2.8 Jogging the robot axis-by-axis
• Choose axis-by-axis movement by setting the motion keys (see Figure 21).
25-
Axes 1, 2, 3
14+
1
2
1+
43 - 3+
6+ 6 -
Axes 4, 5, 6
2+
5+
3-
3+
4+
2+
2-
1-
1+
56+
4-
65+
Figure 21 Specify the axes you want to move by setting the keys as above.
Only the axis affected by the joystick deflection moves, which means that the TCP does
not move linearly.
2.9 Incremental movement
Incremental movement is used to adjust the position of the robot exactly. This means
that each time the joystick is moved, the robot moves one step (increment). If the
joystick is deflected for one or more seconds, a sequence of steps, at a rate of 10 steps
per second, will be generated as long as the joystick is deflected.
• Select the field Incremental (see Figure 22).
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
Wobj
gun1...
frontdoor...
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
No
Small
Medium
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
2 3 1
Large
User
Figure 22 Specify the incremental step size in the field Incremental.
6-14
User’s Guide
Jogging
• Specify the size of the steps using the function keys.
- No:
Normal (continuous) movement
- Small:
Approx. 0.05 mm or 0.005 degrees per joystick deflection
- Medium:
Approx. 1 mm or 0.02 degrees per joystick deflection
- Large:
Approx. 5 mm or 0.2 degrees per joystick deflection
- User:
User defined increments
You can also use the key
on and off.
on the teach pendant to turn incremental movement
If you want to specify the sizes of the user defined increments:
• Choose Special: Increments
A dialog box appears displaying the values of the increments for the different motion
types (see Figure 23).
File
Edit
View
Test
User defined increments
Change the values of the variable jog
increments used for the different
motion types.
Motion type
Linear:
Robot axes:
Reorientation:
External axes:
Value
Limits
5.00 mm
[0.50 - 10.0]
3.14 deg [0.01 - 0.20]
0.40 deg [0.03 - 0.50]
Same as medium incr.
Cancel
OK
Figure 23 The dialog box for specifying the user defined increments.
• Change the applicable value(s) and press OK to confirm.
2.10 Jogging an unsynchronised axis
If the robot or an external unit is unsynchronised, it can only move using one motor at
a time.
The working range is not checked, which means that the robot can be moved until
it is stopped mechanically.
User’s Guide
6-15
Jogging
3 Jogging External Axes
3.1 Choosing external units
If you wish to use more than one external unit, those units must be chosen from the
Jogging window.
• Set the motion key
to choose external units.
• Select the field Unit (see Figure 24).
• Using the function keys, choose a unit.
If you are using more than 5 external units and you cannot find the one you want in the
function key dialog, press Enter
and select the desired unit from the new dialog.
Unit:=
Motion:
Manip1
Axes
1:23.3
2:37.5
3:-180.4
Coord:=
Tool:=
Wobj:=
Base
tool0...
wobj0...
4:
5:
6:
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
Robot
Manip1
Manip2
Deg
Deg
Deg
1 2 3
Trackm
Manip3
Figure 24 Specify the unit to be jogged in the Unit field.
From this stage onwards, the key
can be used to toggle between the external
unit that was last chosen and the robot.
3.2 Jogging external units axis-by-axis
• Choose the desired axis group using the motion keys (see Figure 25). If more than one
external unit is used, see 3.1 Choosing external units.
6-16
User’s Guide
Jogging
14-
Axes 1, 2, 3
1
2
Axes 4, 5, 6
25-
2+
5+
3+ 3 6+ 6 1+
4+
Figure 25 Specify the external axes you want to move by setting the keys as above.
3.3 Jogging external units coordinated
If an axis is coordinated with the robot (defined by the chosen work object), the robot
also moves when it is jogged. The TCP, however, will not move in relation to the work
object.
If you want to jog the unit uncoordinated, choose a work object which is not connected
to a coordinated unit, e.g. wobj0, in the field Wobj.
User’s Guide
6-17
Jogging
6-18
User’s Guide
Inputs and Outputs
CONTENTS
Page
1 General .............................................................................................................................
1.1 The Inputs/Outputs window ..................................................................................
1.2 Choosing an I/O list...............................................................................................
1.3 Defining the Most Common I/O list ......................................................................
2 Changing Signal Values ..................................................................................................
2.1 Changing the value of a digital output...................................................................
2.2 Changing the value of an analog output signal or a group of output signals ........
3 Displaying Information...................................................................................................
3.1 To display information on a given signal ..............................................................
3.2 To display a chart of all digital signals of a unit....................................................
3.3 To print an I/O list .................................................................................................
User’s Guide
3
3
4
4
6
6
6
7
7
7
8
7-1
Inputs and Outputs
7-2
User’s Guide
Inputs and Outputs
Inputs and Outputs
1 General
The robot can be equipped with both digital and analog signals. The signals are named
and configured in the system parameters. They can also be assigned various system
actions, e.g. program start.
In addition to this the robot can communicate with printers and computers via serial
channels and Ethernet.
1.1 The Inputs/Outputs window
• Press the Inputs/Outputs key
to open the window.
The window displays a list of appropriate signals or units. It also provides information
on the values of the signals. See the example in Figure 1.
File
I/O list name
Edit
View
Inputs/Outputs
All signals
Name
Value
Type
di1
di2
grip1
grip2
grip3
grip4
progno
welderror
1
0
0
1
1
1
13
0
DI
DI
DO
DO
DO
DO
GO
DO
4(64)
I/O list
0
1
Figure 1 The Inputs/Outputs window displays a list of selected signals or I/O units.
The information displayed in the window is automatically updated every other second.
User’s Guide
7-3
Inputs and Outputs
1.2 Choosing an I/O list
• You can decide which signals you want to look at by choosing any of the lists from
the View menu:
List name
Information in the list
Most Common
The value of the most important (most used)
signals. This list can be customised to suit
any robot installation.
All signals
The value of all signals.
Digital In
The value of all digital input signals.
Digital Out
The value of all digital output signals.
Analog
The value of all analog input and output signals.
Groups
The value of all groups of digital signals.
Safety
The value of all safety signals.
Units
The type and address of all I/O units.
I/O Unit: name
The value and position of all signals of a unit.
To look at this list:
• Choose View: Units.
• Select the desired unit and press Enter
Group: name
.
The value and position of all signals in a signal
group.
To look at this list:
• Choose View: Groups.
• Select the desired unit and press Enter
1.3 Defining the Most Common I/O list
You can obtain an easy-to-access list of your most frequently-used signals by
specifying the contents of the Most Common list.
• Choose File: Preferences.
All signals will be displayed. Those included in the Most Common list will be marked
with an x to the left of their names (see Figure 2).
7-4
User’s Guide
Inputs and Outputs
Most Common Setup
Name
Type
di1
di2
grip1
grip2
grip3
grip4
progno
welderror
DI
DI
DO
DO
DO
DO
GO
DI
4(64)
x
x
x
x
x
Result
Excl
Cancel
OK
Figure 2 You specify the signals to be included in the list in the Most Common Setup dialog
box.
• To add a signal, select an appropriate signal and press Incl.
This signal will then be marked with an x to the left of its name.
• To remove a signal, select an appropriate signal and press Excl.
This signal will remain in the window, but the x to the left of the signal name will
disappear.
• Press Result.
The signals included in the Most Common list will then be displayed (see Figure 3).
Most Common Result
Name
Type
di1
grip1
grip2
grip3
grip4
DI
DO
DO
DO
DO
4(5)
Setup
Move
Move
Cancel
OK
Figure 3 The order of the signals in the list can be specified in the Most Common Result
dialog box.
• You can change the order of the signals using the Move-keys. The selected signal
moves one step at a time.
• Define the signal and press OK; if you want to return to the Most Common Setup
dialog box press Setup first.
User’s Guide
7-5
Inputs and Outputs
2 Changing Signal Values
Robot equipment may be affected (e.g. start to move or fall off) if you change the
value of a signal.
Before you do so, make sure that no-one is in the safeguarded space around the
robot. Incorrect operation can injure someone, or damage the robot or other
equipment.
2.1 Changing the value of a digital output
• Select the digital output.
• Choose the desired value using the function keys (see Figure 4).
File
Edit
View
Inputs/Outputs
All signals
Name
Value
Type
di1
di2
grip1
grip2
grip3
grip4
progno
welderror
1
0
0
1
1
1
13
0
DI
DI
DO
DO
DO
DO
GO
DO
4(64)
0
1
Figure 4 You can change the value of a digital output directly using the function keys.
2.2 Changing the value of an analog output signal or a group of output signals
• Select the signal and press Change (see Figure 5).
File
Edit
View
Inputs/Outputs
All signals
Name
Value
Type
di1
di2
grip1
grip2
grip3
grip4
progno
welderror
1
0
0
1
1
1
13
0
DI
DI
DO
DO
DO
DO
GO
DO
4(64)
Change...
Figure 5 You can change a group of outputs or an analog output signal by choosing Change
and entering a value using the numeric keyboard.
7-6
User’s Guide
Inputs and Outputs
A dialog box will appear, which you can use to enter an arbitrary value.
• Specify the desired value using the numeric keyboard and press OK.
You can also change the value of a group of output signals, signal by signal, by pressing
Enter
and changing the signals one by one.
3 Displaying Information
3.1 To display information on a given signal
• Select the desired signal and press Enter
.
The following information will be displayed:
-
the signal name
the signal type
the value of the signal
the physical connection
cross-connections (if any)
etc.
• Press OK when ready.
3.2 To display a chart of all digital signals of a unit
• Call up the unit list by choosing View: Units.
• Select the desired unit and press the State function key.
The values of all digital signals related to the selected I/O unit will appear on the
display (see Figure 6). The values of the signals are indicated by 1 or 0, where, for
example, 1 is equivalent to +24 V and 0 is equivalent to 0 V.
An “x” means that the signal is not mapped (cannot be used in a program).
A “?” means that the signal value cannot be read.
Sigstate
I/O unit:
ARCW1
DI-01
DI-09
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
DO-01
DO-09
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
?
0
x
OK
Figure 6 The value of all the digital values of an I/O unit are displayed together on a signal chart.
• Leave the signal chart by pressing OK.
User’s Guide
7-7
Inputs and Outputs
3.3 To print an I/O list
• Select the desired I/O list from the View menu.
• Choose File: Print.
A dialog box will be displayed (see Figure 7).
Inputs/Outputs Printing
Data to Print : All Signals
Add Signal Info : No
Print Only to File : No
Yes
No
Cancel
Print
Figure 7 You can specify the extent of information and the destination.
• In the field, Add Signal Info, specify how much you want to print:
- Press No to print the list.
- Press Yes to print other information about the signals, such as their
configuration.
• Select the destination in the field, Print Only to File:
- Press No to output to the printer connected to the robot.
- Press Yes to save the list in a file. An additional line with the filename will be
displayed. If you want to change the filename, select it and press Enter
.
• Start the print-out by pressing Print.
• Press OK to confirm.
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CONTENTS
Page
1 Creating a New Program ................................................................................................ 5
1.1 What is a program?................................................................................................ 5
1.2 The Program window ............................................................................................ 6
1.3 Creating a new program ...................................................................................... 6
1.4 Loading an existing program................................................................................. 7
2 Defining Tools and Work Object ................................................................................... 7
3 Creating New Routines ................................................................................................... 8
3.1 What is a routine? .................................................................................................. 8
3.2 The Program Routines window............................................................................. 9
3.3 Creating a new routine........................................................................................... 10
3.4 Duplicating a routine ............................................................................................. 11
4 Creating new instructions............................................................................................... 12
4.1 Choosing a routine................................................................................................. 12
4.2 The Program Instr window ................................................................................... 12
4.3 What is an instruction? .......................................................................................... 13
4.4 Getting more information about an instruction ..................................................... 14
5 Programming................................................................................................................... 14
5.1 Choosing from the instruction pick list ................................................................. 15
5.2 Adding an instruction ............................................................................................ 16
5.3 Expressions............................................................................................................ 18
5.4 Moving and copying instructions .......................................................................... 21
6 Running Programs .......................................................................................................... 21
6.1 Program execution................................................................................................. 21
6.2 The Program Test window .................................................................................... 22
6.3 Choosing the speed correction............................................................................... 22
6.4 Choosing the execution mode................................................................................ 23
6.5 Starting program execution ................................................................................... 24
6.6 Stopping program execution.................................................................................. 25
6.7 Where will the program start? ............................................................................... 25
6.8 Simulating wait conditions .................................................................................... 27
7 Saving and Printing Programs....................................................................................... 28
7.1 Saving the program on diskette or some other type of mass memory................... 28
7.2 Printing a program from the robot......................................................................... 29
7.3 Printing a program using a PC............................................................................... 29
8 Changing the Program ................................................................................................... 29
8.1 Selecting an instruction or an argument ................................................................ 30
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Programming and Testing
8.2 Modifying the position in a positioning instruction .............................................. 31
8.3 Tuning position during program execution ........................................................... 31
8.4 Changing an argument........................................................................................... 33
8.5 Adding optional arguments ................................................................................... 34
8.6 Changing the structure of an IF, FOR or TEST instruction .................................. 35
8.7 Changing the name or declaration of a routine ..................................................... 35
8.8 Deleting an instruction or an argument ................................................................. 36
8.9 Deleting a routine .................................................................................................. 36
8.10 Undo latest action ................................................................................................ 36
9 Special Editing Functions............................................................................................... 37
9.1 Search & replace ................................................................................................... 37
9.2 Mirroring ............................................................................................................... 39
10 Creating Data ................................................................................................................ 45
10.1 What is data? ....................................................................................................... 45
10.2 The Program Data window (used to manage data) ............................................ 45
10.3 Creating new data ................................................................................................ 47
10.4 Creating new array data....................................................................................... 48
10.5 Duplicating data .................................................................................................. 50
10.6 Storing position data using the robot................................................................... 50
10.7 Routine data......................................................................................................... 50
11 Changing Data ............................................................................................................... 50
11.1 Viewing and possibly changing the current value ............................................... 50
11.2 Changing data names or declarations .................................................................. 51
11.3 Deleting data........................................................................................................ 52
12 Error Handling.............................................................................................................. 52
13 Using Modules ............................................................................................................... 54
13.1 What is a module? ............................................................................................... 54
13.2 Choosing modules ............................................................................................... 55
13.3 Creating a new module........................................................................................ 56
13.4 Changing the name or declaration of a module................................................... 56
13.5 Reading a program module from diskette or some other type of mass memory. 57
13.6 Deleting program modules from the program ..................................................... 57
13.7 Listing all routines in all modules ....................................................................... 57
13.8 Duplicating a routine from one module to another ............................................. 58
13.9 Listing all data in the current module.................................................................. 58
13.10 Duplicating data from one module to another................................................... 58
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13.11 Saving modules on diskette or some other type of mass memory..................... 58
13.12 Calling up the complete module list .................................................................. 59
14 Preferences ..................................................................................................................... 60
14.1 Defining the Most Common instruction pick list................................................. 60
14.2 Default data Global/Local ................................................................................... 61
14.3 Defining programming rule for robot positions .................................................. 62
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Programming and Testing
8-4
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Programming and Testing
Programming and Testing
1 Creating a New Program
1.1 What is a program?
A program consists of instructions and data, programmed in the RAPID programming
language, which control the robot and peripheral equipment in a specified way.
The program is usually made up of three different parts:
- a main routine
- several subroutines
- program data.
In addition to this, the program memory contains system modules (see Figure 1).
Program memory
Program
Program data
Main
routine
Subroutines
System modules
Figure 1 The program instructions control the robot and robot peripherals.
The main routine is the routine from which program execution starts.
Subroutines are used to divide the program up into smaller parts in order to obtain a
modular program that is easy to read. They are called from the main routine or from
some other routine. When a routine has been fully executed, program execution
resumes at the next instruction in the calling routine.
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Programming and Testing
Data is used to define positions, numeric values (registers, counters) and coordinate
systems, etc. Data can be changed manually, but it can also be changed by the program;
for example, to redefine a position, or to update a counter.
An instruction defines a specific action that is to take place when the instruction is
executed; for instance, moving the robot, setting an output, changing data or jumping
within the program. During program execution, the instructions are executed one at a
time, in the order in which they were programmed.
System modules are programs that are always present in the memory. Routines and data
related to the installation rather than the program, such as tools and service routines,
are stored in system modules.
1.2 The Program window
All program and testing is performed using the Program window.
• Press the Program key
to open the window.
The Program window is actually made up of a number of different windows. These can
be chosen from the View menu.
Window title
Used to:
Program Instr
Program and change program instructions
Program Routines
Choose or create new routines
Program Data
Create or change data
Program Data Types
Choose data of a specific type
Program Test
Test programs
Program Modules
Choose or create new modules
1.3 Creating a new program
• Choose File: New.
If the robot is already loaded with a program which has not been saved, a dialog box
appears and you will be asked whether you want to save it or not. Then choose File:
New again.
• Specify the new name of the program in the dialog box that appears.
(See Chapter 5, Starting up - Entering text using the teach pendant, in this manual for
how to handle the text editor.)
• Choose OK to confirm.
A program with only one empty main routine is created.
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1.4 Loading an existing program
• Choose File: Open.
A dialog box appears, displaying all programs in the current directory (see Figure 2).
Open...
Select a Program or a Module
Massmemory unit:= flp1:
ROBOT1
Mass memory unit
4(5)
..
WELD1
WELD2
USER1
TEST/
Current directory
(Go up 1 level)
Program
Program
System Module
Directory
Unit
Cancel
OK
Figure 2 The dialog box used to read programs.
• If necessary, change the mass memory unit by pressing Unit until the correct unit is
displayed.
• Select the desired program. Move up or down in the directory by using either ‘. .’
(up), or the desired directory (down) and press Enter
.
• Choose OK to confirm.
When a program is already loaded into the system, but has not been saved, and you
wish to open another program, a dialog box appears and you will be asked whether you
want to save the old program or not.
Tip
If there is an error in the program, this error will be displayed if you choose
File: Check Program.
Note When a program is loaded into the robot, it requires about three times as much
memory compared with the size of the file on diskette.
2 Defining Tools and Work Object
Before starting any programming work, it is essential that you define the tools, work
objects, and other coordinate systems that you intend to use. The more accurately you
do this, the better the results you will obtain.
See Chapter 10, Calibration.
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Programming and Testing
3 Creating New Routines
3.1 What is a routine?
Before you start to program, you should think out the structure of your program:
- The program should be divided into several subroutines to get a more readable
program.
- Instruction sequences that recur frequently in the program, such as gripper
handling, form their own routines.
Figure 3 illustrates an example of a simple program; the robot takes parts to and from
a machine. Figure 4 illustrates the structure of this program.
Machine
In feeder
Out feeder
Figure 3 The robot gives a part to a machine which then processes it.
First, the robot fetches a part from the In feeder and places it in the machine where the
part is processed. Then, when this has been done, the robot takes the part and places it
on the Out feeder.
The main routine is built up of a number of routine calls which reflect the robot work
cycle (see Figure 4).
As the gripper grips and releases parts several times during the program run, it is best
to set up separate routines for this, which can be called from different places in the
program.
routine main
fetch_part
leave_in_machine
process_part
fetch_fr_machine
leave_part
routine fetch_part
MoveJ *, vmax,z50, tool1
MoveL *, v1000, z30, tool1
MoveL *, v200, fine, tool1
grip
MoveL *, v200, z30, tool1
RETURN
routine grip
Set gripper
WaitTime 0.3
RETURN
routine release
Reset gripper
WaitTime 0.3
RETURN
Figure 4 For more information about this example, see Chapter 17, Program Examples.
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Programming and Testing
There are three types of routines: procedures, functions and trap routines.
A procedure could be described as a number of instructions that perform a specific
task, such as welding a part or changing a tool.
A function returns a value and, for example, is used to displace a position or read an
input.
A trap routine is used to deal with interrupts.
A routine comprises four parts: declarations, data, instructions and an error handler
(see Figure 5).
Routine
Name
Routine type
Scope
Function data type
Parameters
Declarations
Data
Instructions
Error Handler
Figure 5 A routine comprises declarations, routine data, instructions and an error handler.
The declaration specifies routine parameters, among other things. These are used to
make the routine more generally applicable. A routine that, for example, moves the
robot a given distance in the direction of the tool can have that distance as a parameter.
This routine can then be called using different distances and thus can be used to move
the robot different distances.
The error handler takes care of automatic error handling (see Error Handling on page
52).
3.2 The Program Routines window
• Choose View: Routines to open the window.
The window displays routines and, if there is a function present, also the type of data
returned for that function (see Figure 6).
File
Routines
Edit
View
Routine Special
Program Routines
Routines In Module
Name
Type
WELDPIPE
cleangun
errorout1
givedist
main
weldseq1
weldseq2
New...
Decl...
4(6)
Value returned
for a function
num
Dupl...
Data>
Test
Figure 6 The Program Routines window displays all routines in the program.
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Programming and Testing
3.3 Creating a new routine
• Open the Program Routines window by choosing View: Routines.
• Press the function key New.
A dialog box appears, displaying the name of the routine (see Figure 7). The name is
set to routineN, where N is a number incremented each time a routine is created.
Routine Definition In USER
Name:= routine1...
Decl...
Cancel
OK
Figure 7 A new routine is created.
• Change the name by pressing Enter
and specify a new name.
If you want a normal subroutine (procedure), without parameters, you should finish
here by pressing OK. In other cases, the characteristics of the routine must be defined.
• Press the function key Decl.
• Change the characteristics of the routine by selecting the appropriate field, then:
- Press Enter
and specify the desired alternative in the dialog box that
appears on the display (fields marked with ...).
- Choose an alternative using the function keys (fields marked with
).
Field
Description
Name
The name of the routine (a maximum of 16 characters)
Type
Specifies whether the routine is to be a procedure (Proc),
a function (Func) or a trap routine (Trap)
In Module
The module in which the new routine will be used
Data type
The return value for the data type (only specified for functions)
If the routine is not to include any parameters, you can terminate the definition by
pressing OK. In other cases, the parameters must also be defined.
• Select the parameter list by pressing the List
key.
• Add a parameter by pressing the New function key.
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Programming and Testing
New parameters are placed after the selected parameter in the list. You can, however,
move the parameter using Move (up one step) och Move (down); see Figure 8.
Routine definition
Name:= routine1...
Type:= function
In Module:= USER...
Data type: num
Name
Data type
Req Alt
param1
param2
num
num
*
New
Move
1
Move
Cancel
Mode
1(2)
In
In
OK
Figure 8 The dialog box used to define parameters.
• Change the name and characteristics of the parameter by selecting the appropriate
field, then:
- Press Enter
appears.
and specify the desired alternative in the dialog box that
- Choose an alternative using the function keys.
Field
Description
Name
The name of the parameter (max. 16 characters).
Data type
The data type of the parameter.
Required
Specifies whether the parameter is compulsory (Yes) or can be
omitted (No) at a call – marked with * in the list.
Alt
Non-compulsory parameters can be mutually exclusive, i.e.
they cannot be used simultaneously in the instruction. To input
the first of these parameters, press the function key First and
to input the last one, press Tail.
Mode
Specifies whether the parameter can only be read (IN) or
whether it can be read and changed in the routine (INOUT).
• Add any additional parameters (maximum 16 parameters). To remove a parameter,
select it and then press Delete
.
• Choose OK to confirm.
Tip It is sometimes easier to create a new routine by duplicating and changing
an existing one.
3.4 Duplicating a routine
• Choose View: Routines.
• Select the routine to be duplicated.
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Programming and Testing
• Press the function key Dupl.
• Specify the new name of the routine in the dialog box that appears.
• Choose OK to confirm the duplication.
This creates a new routine that contains the same data and instructions as the original
routine.
4 Creating new instructions
4.1 Choosing a routine
• Choose View: Routines.
• Select the routine to be programmed and press Enter
.
To call up the main routine
• Choose View: Main Routine.
To call up a routine that can be selected from the list of instructions
• Select the routine that you want to look at.
• Choose View: Selected Routine.
4.2 The Program Instr window
• Choose View: Instr to open the window.
If you are in the Program Test or Program Data window, you can press the function
key Instr instead.
The instructions for the current routine are displayed in the window (see Figure 9).
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Programming and Testing
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
IPL2
WELDPIPE/main
1(26)
!Init data
counter:=0;
!Go to start position
MoveL pstart,v500,fine,gripper;
WaitUntil di1=1;
!Start
Set startsignal;
open_gripper;
MoveJ *,v500,z10,gripper;
Instructions
Copy
Paste
OptArg... (ModPos) Test
Figure 9 The Program Instr window is used for programming.
An instruction that does not fit into one line is only displayed in part. Arguments that
lie outside the visible area are moved successively inwards from the right when the
various arguments are selected.
4.3 What is an instruction?
An instruction defines a specific task that is to be carried out when the instruction is
executed, for example:
- Moving the robot
- Setting an output
- Changing data
- Jumping within the program.
Instructions comprise an instruction name and a number of arguments. The name specifies
the principal task of the instruction and the arguments specify the characteristics.
An argument may be either compulsory (required) or optional. Optional arguments
may be omitted, and are specified by the name of the argument and its value, if it has
one. For example:
Instruction
Meaning
MoveL p1,v500,fine,tool1
Moves the TCP linearly to the position p1. The
arguments, v500, fine and tool1, specify the
current speed, position accuracy and tool.
SetDO do2,1
Sets the output do2 to 1.
SetDO \SDelay:=0.5,do2,1
Sets the output do2 to 1 with a delay of 0.5
seconds. \SDelay is an optional argument, do2 and
1 are compulsory.
An argument that does not have a specified value is marked with <...>.
Programs that contain such instructions (i.e. incomplete instructions) can be executed,
but program execution stops when that type of instruction occurs.
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Programming and Testing
Arguments can be specified as:
- numeric values, e.g. 1
- string values, e.g. “Waiting for machine”
- data, e.g. reg2
- function calls, e.g. Abs(reg2)
- expressions, e.g. reg2 + reg3 / 5.
4.4 Getting more information about an instruction
• Select the desired instruction and press Enter
.
The dialog box shows the names of the arguments (see Figure 10).
Current Instruction
2(5)
Argument
name
MoveL
ToPoint:
Speed:
Zone:
Tool:
*
v500
fine
tool
(robtarget)
(speeddata)
(zonedata)
(tooldata)
Data type
Value
Change
(Info)
OptArg Cancel
OK
Figure 10 The name, value and data type of each argument is displayed.
• If you wish to change an argument, choose Change or press Enter
Changing an argument on page 33 for more information.
. See
• If you wish to add or remove an optional argument, choose OptArg. See Adding
optional arguments on page 34 for more information.
• Choose OK to exit the dialog.
5 Programming
In this chapter you will find descriptions for general handling of the various
instructions in a program - moving, copying or adding. For details about programming
the most common instructions please see the next chapter in this manual, 9 The
programming language RAPID.
For other instructions see the RAPID Reference Manual.
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Programming and Testing
5.1 Choosing from the instruction pick list
You can choose instructions by selecting an appropriate instruction in an instruction
pick list (IPL). Although most of these pick lists are fixed, some can be user-defined.
This means that you can place the instructions you use most in the same pick list (see
Defining the Most Common instruction pick list on page 60).
The following pick lists are available:
From the IPL1 menu
Name
Contains
Common
Some of the most-commonly used instructions
Prog. Flow
Instructions that control the program flow
Various
E.g.‘:=’ and wait
Motion Settings
Instructions that affect movements
Motion & Process
Motion instructions
I/O
I/O instructions
Communicate
Communication instructions
Interrupts
Instructions that handle interrupts
Error Recovery
Instructions that handle errors
System & Time
Date and time instructions
Mathematics
Arithmetic instructions
From the IPL2 menu
Most Common 1
User-defined
Most Common 2
User-defined
Most Common 3
User-defined
Motion Set Adv.
Advanced Motion setting instructions
Motion Adv.
Advanced Motion instructions
Ext. Computer
Communication Ware instructions
Service
Service instructions
• Call up one of the instruction pick lists in the IPL1 or IPL2 menu.
• Call up the instruction pick list that was used most recently by pressing Edit:
Show IPL. If the pick list contains more than 9 instructions you can scroll up/down
in the list using 9 on the numeric keyboard.
• Change to the previous or next pick list by selecting the pick list (
) and pressing
PreviousPage
or NextPage
. You can also choose 0 to go directly to the next
page.
• Remove the instruction pick list by choosing Edit: Hide IPL.
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Programming and Testing
5.2 Adding an instruction
If a new instruction is added, it is placed after the instruction that is selected.
If the selected instruction is first in a routine, or in a compound instruction (IF, FOR,
WHILE or TEST), you can choose whether you want the new instruction to be placed
before or after the instruction (by means of a question). However, if there is only one
instruction in the routine, or in the compound instruction, new instructions will always
be added after the selected one.
• Select the place where you want the new instruction to be added.
• Call up one of the instruction pick lists by choosing the appropriate pick list from the
IPL1 or IPL2 menu. If you want to call up the instruction pick list that was used most
recently, choose Edit: Show IPL.
The pick list will be displayed on the right hand side of the window (see Figure 11).
File
Edit
Program Instr
View
IPL1
IPL2
WELDPIPE/main
M.C.1
1(26)
!Init data
1 MoveL
counter:=0;
2 MoveJ
!Go to start position
3 MoveC
MoveL pstart,v500,FINE,gripper;
4 ProcCall
WaitUntil di1=1;
5 Set
!Start
6 Reset
Set startsignal;
7 :=
open_gripper;
8 Incr
MoveJ *,v500,z10,gripper;
9 More
Copy
Paste
OptArg...(ModPos)
Test
Figure 11 The instructions are chosen from an instruction pick list.
• Choose the desired instruction using one of the following alternatives:
- Using the numeric keyboard, press the number displayed in front of the
appropriate instruction in the pick list.
- Select the pick list by pressing the List
instruction and press Enter
.
key. Then, select the desired
- Use 0 on the numeric keyboard to scroll down to the lower part of the pick list
or to the next pick list.
If the instruction has no arguments, or if these are automatically set, the instruction is
ready for use right away.
If the instruction has arguments that cannot be automatically set, a dialog box will
appear in which you can specify the value of the instruction arguments. The argument
is marked with a ”?” in front of it (see Figure 12).
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Instruction Arguments
Add ?<EXP>,<EXP>;
Data:
New...
reg1
reg4
Next
counter_a
reg2
Func
More
1(3)
counter_b
reg3
Cancel
OK
Figure 12 The dialog box used to define arguments. In this example, the instruction Add is
programmed.
The argument can now be defined in four different ways:
- by entering a numeric value directly using the numeric keyboard
- by choosing data in the lower part of the dialog box
New, the first alternative in the list, is used when you want to create new
data and refer to it. If you choose New, you define new data as described
in Creating Data on page 45.
- by choosing a function; press the function key Func and select the desired
alternative from the list
A new dialog box that can be used to program arguments appears, like the
one in Figure 12. Specify the function argument in the same way as you
specified the instruction argument. Use the function key Skip to delete
optional arguments that are not to be included.
- by entering an expression by pressing More.
For more information, see Programming an expression on page 19.
• Choose Next to change the next argument.
• Choose OK to confirm.
Optional arguments that are not included at the start can be inserted, see Adding
optional arguments on page 34.
The structure of an IF, FOR or TEST instruction can be changed, see Changing the
structure of an IF, FOR or TEST instruction on page 35.
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Programming and Testing
5.3 Expressions
What is an expression?
An expression is used as an argument of an instruction and can have an arbitrary
number of components.
There are three different types of expressions:
- logical expressions;
these have the value true/false and are used together with tests, e.g.
IF reg1=5 AND reg2 >10 ......
IF di1 = 1 .......
- arithmetic expressions;
these have a numeric value and are used together with calculations, e.g.
reg1 = reg2 + 3 * reg5
reg1 = reg2 + 1
- strings, e.g.;
TPWrite “Producing”
=
<
Data
Data
>
Value
Value
<>
Function
>=
Function
OR
<=
NOT
AND
TRUE
XOR
FALSE
Boolean data
Boolean function
Figure 13 Logical expression.
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+
-
Data
Data
*
Value
Value
/
Function
Function
MOD
DIV
Figure 14 Arithmetic expression.
Programming an expression
Expressions are programmed by pressing the function key More in the instruction
argument dialog box (see Figure 12).
Expressions can be entered or changed directly in the upper part of the dialog box (see
Figure 15) by doing any of the following:
- move the cursor to the left or right using ArrowLeft
or ArrowRight
- delete what is marked by the cursor by pressing Delete
;
;
- add digits in front of the cursor using the numeric keyboard.
Expression
1(2)
counter_a
reg2
Text...
Func
counter_b
reg3
reg1
reg4
Content
Cancel
OK
Figure 15 The Expression dialog box.
Data, functions and operators can be selected in the lower part of the dialog box. Press
, if needed, select the desired alternative and press Enter
.
Enter text by pressing Text. A dialog box appears in which, using the function keys and
the numeric keyboard, you can enter text.
If the desired information is not in the lower part, press one of the function keys Data,
Func or Content first.
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Programming and Testing
- Data gives a list of all user-defined data of the selected data type
- Func gives a list of all functions of the selected data type
- Content gives an intermediate dialog where data of a new data type can be
chosen in the same way as the IF instruction, for example. You can also choose
to view user-defined or system-defined data, or both. denotes the current
choice (see Figure 16).
Select datatype:
1 num
2 signaldi
3 bool
4 ...
Add
User data
System data
Remove
Cancel
OK
Figure 16 Dialog box for choosing data types.
Editing an expression
Move the cursor using the arrow keys. The content of the list will change so that it
corresponds to that selected. The function key Content changes to Insert (see Figure 17).
Expression
reg2<counter_b
1(2)
counter_a
reg2
Text...
Func
counter_b
reg3
reg1
reg4
Insert
Cancel
OK
Figure 17 The dialog box for editing an expression.
Replace what has been selected by selecting the desired choice in the lower part of the
box and pressing Enter
.
You can make an addition to an expression by pressing the function key Insert. An
underscored “blank” _ will then be inserted before the cursor and the function key
Insert will change to Content (see Figure 18).
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Programming and Testing
Expression
reg2<_counter_b
1(2)
counter_a
reg2
Text...
Func
counter_b
reg3
reg1
reg4
Content
Cancel
OK
Figure 18 New data can be inserted into an expression.
5.4 Moving and copying instructions
• Select the instruction you wish to move or copy. To select several instructions, choose
Edit: Mark.
• Choose Edit: Cut (move) or Edit: Copy.
• Indicate where you wish to add the new instructions.
• Choose Edit: Paste.
In the Program Instr window, copy and paste can also be selected using a function key.
6 Running Programs
6.1 Program execution
A program can be executed regardless of whether or not it is complete. Nonetheless, if
program execution comes to an incomplete instruction, the program is stopped.
When the program is started, the robot checks that all references to data and routines
are correct. If they are not, the fault is indicated and the program is not started. This
check can also be performed by choosing File: Check Program. The first fault in the
program is then indicated.
The program is usually started from the first instruction in the main routine, but can also
be started from an arbitrary routine (procedure) with no parameters. A program that has
been stopped is, unless otherwise specified, always started from the instruction last
executed in the program.
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Programming and Testing
6.2 The Program Test window
• Choose View: Test. When you are in the Program Instr or Program Data window,
you can also press the function key Test.
The section of the program that will be executed when you start the program is
displayed in the window.
A program pointer keeps up with the program execution. This pointer is shown with
in the program list. Program execution normally continues from this point. However,
if the cursor is moved to another instruction when the program is stopped, execution
can be started from the position of the cursor (see Figure 19).
File
Edit
Program Test
Speed:=
Running:=
Test
settings
View
Special
WELDPIPE/main
50%
Continuous
Program and
routine name
1(26)
Program pointer
Instructions
!Init data
counter:=0;
!Go to start position
MoveL pstart,v500,FINE,gripper;
WaitUntil di1=1;
!Start
Set startsignal;
open_gripper;
Start
FWD
BWD
Cursor
(Modpos) Instr>
Figure 19 The Program Test window is used to execute a program.
If the robot is equipped with an arc-welding function, an extra field with the blocking
status will be shown.
6.3 Choosing the speed correction
When the program is being tested for the first time, it is advisable to reduce the speed.
A 50% speed correction means that the speed will be reduced to 50% of the
programmed speed. On the other hand, when the robot is in manual mode with reduced
speed, the speed is never more than 250 mm/s.
It is also possible to change the speed correction while the program is executing.
• Select the upper part of the window by pressing the List
selected).
key (if it is not already
• Select the field Speed (see Figure 20).
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Programming and Testing
File
Edit
View
Program Test
Speed:=
Running:=
Special
WELDPIPE/main
50%
Continuous
1(26)
!Init data
counter:=0;
!Go to start position
MoveL pstart,vfast,fine,gripper;
WaitUntil di1=1;
!Start
Set startsignal;
open_gripper;
-%
+%
25%
100%
Figure 20 The speed can be changed (0 - 100%).
• Increase or decrease the speed by pressing the function keys -% or +%. Correction
then takes place in steps of 5%.
Set the speed to 25% or 100% by pressing the function key 25% or 100%.
6.4 Choosing the execution mode
The program can be run in three different modes;
- continuous
- cycle (one cycle at a time)
- step-by-step (forwards or backwards, one instruction at a time).
Note The execution mode is automatically changed when switching between
automatic and manual mode. The default set-up can be defined in the system
parameters.
Choose continuous or cyclic running as follows:
• Select the upper part of the window by pressing the List
selected).
key (if it is not already
• Select the field Running.
• Choose the program execution mode using the function key Cont or Cycle.
Use the
key to select the lower part of the window.
Use the function key Start to start program execution in the mode that you chose above.
To step the program forwards/backwards, use the function keys FWD and BWD (see
Figure 21).
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Programming and Testing
Program Test
Speed:=
Running:=
WELDPIPE/main
50%
Continuous
1(26)
!Init data
counter:=0;
!Go to start position
MoveL pstart,v500,FINE,gripper;
WaitUntil di1=1;
!Start
Set startsignal;
open_gripper;
Start
Continuous or cycle
FWD
BWD
(Modpos)
Instr
Step-by-step backwards
Step-by-step forwards
Figure 21 A program can be run in several different program execution modes.
Instructions act differently during step-by-step execution than during continuous
execution. The principal differences are as follows:
- Positioning instructions are executed in the normal way, but the robot gets into
position even when a fly-by point is programmed.
- Other instructions execute in the normal way when executing forwards and are
skipped when executing backwards.
6.5 Starting program execution
• Choose the speed correction as above.
• Select the lower part of the window by pressing the List
selected).
key (if it is not already
When you start program execution, the robot will start to move. Peripheral
equipment may also be started.
Make sure that everything is ready for program execution to begin and that
nobody is in the safeguarded area around the robot. Starting the program
incorrectly can injure someone, or damage the robot or other equipment.
• Set the robot into MOTORS ON mode by pressing the enabling device.
• Press the function key Start for continuous or cycle execution mode.
If you want to execute step-by-step, press the function key FWD or BWD instead.
When “Hold-to-run” is active, the following is applicable:
- press the Start key, release it, and press the Hold-to-run key. Keep this key
depressed while the program is running, otherwise the program will stop (see
Figure 22).
The start key should only be pressed once after each MOTORS ON, the Hold-to-run
key can then be used to start and stop program execution.
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Programming and Testing
Hold-to-run
Start
FWD
BWD
(Modpos)
Instr>
Enabling device
Press the Hold-to-run key within 3 s
after you pressed the Start key. If a
longer time elapses, you must start
again with the Start key.
Figure 22 The Hold-to-run key is located on the side of the teach pendant.
6.6 Stopping program execution
When Hold-to-run control is enabled
• Release the Hold-to-run key.
When Hold-to-run control is NOT enabled
• Press the Stop key on the teach pendant.
If the program execution mode is changed from continuous to step-by-step or cycle, the
robot will stop automatically after it has completed the instruction or the cycle.
6.7 Where will the program start?
How do you recognise the program pointer?
The program pointer shows how far the program has run and is marked with
of the instruction.
in front
An instruction that has been fully executed is marked with an , but is only shown
during instruction-by-instruction execution. If the cursor is positioned at this
instruction, the program starts from the program pointer . See the example below. (In
all other cases, the cursor will define the instruction that will be executed when you
press Start.)
Example:
IF reg1=5 THEN
reg2:=5;
ELSE
reg2:=8;
ENDIF
Set do1
User’s Guide
The last instruction executed.
The next instruction to be executed
8-25
Programming and Testing
If the cursor is not located on the last instruction executed, then when you press Start,
an alert box will be displayed (because the program flow has been changed).
Select whether you wish to start from the program pointer (PP) or the cursor using the
arrow keys:
Cursor does not coincide
with Program Pointer (PP)!!
Start program from:
PP
• Press Enter
Cursor
Cancel
.
To move the cursor to the program pointer
• Choose Special: Move cursor to PP.
To move the program pointer to the cursor
• Choose Special: Move PP to cursor.
Note If the program pointer is moved into a FOR statement the program will run the
rest of the FOR statement to the end, and then continue with the next statement.
To start the program from the beginning
• Choose Special: Move PP to Main.
The program pointer and the cursor are set to the first instruction in the main routine.
To start the program from a routine
The program pointer and cursor can be moved to any routine (procedure) with no
parameters. If it is moved, the call hierarchy at that time will no longer be valid, which
means that program execution continues from the start of the routine after the routine
has been fully executed.
• Choose Special: Move PP to Routine.
A dialog box appears, displaying all possible routines.
• Select the desired routine and press OK.
To execute a routine without losing the call hierarchy
A routine without parameters can be executed without losing the call hierarchy and
program settings, e.g. program displacement, mechanical unit activation etc.
• Choose Special: Call Routine
A dialog box appears, displaying all possible routines.
• Select the desired routine and press OK.
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When the program pointer reaches the end of a called routine, you are asked whether
to run the routine again or to return to the original program pointer where the “Call
Routine” was performed.
To execute a service routine without losing the call hierarchy
A preconfigured service routine without parameters can be executed without losing the
call hierarchy and program settings, e.g. program displacement, mechanical unit
activation etc.
• Choose Special: Call Service Routine
A dialog box appears, displaying all possible service routines.
• Select the desired service routine and press OK.
When the program pointer reaches the end of a called service routine, you are asked
whether to run the service routine again or to return to the original program pointer
where the “Call Service Routine” was performed.
To go to a position without moving the program pointer
Place the cursor on the position argument in the instruction. You can also select a
position (robtarget) in the Program Data window.
• Choose Special: Go to selected position.
A dialog box appears, see Figure 23.
Start robot movement towards
selected position
Start
Cancel
Figure 23 The Go to selected position dialog box.
• Press the function key Start to start the movement.
6.8 Simulating wait conditions
When the robot is stationary in a wait instruction, e.g. WaitDI di1 or WaitTime 3, a
dialog box is automatically displayed.
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Programming and Testing
• To continue in the program without fulfilling the condition or time, press Enter
.
The dialog box will disappear automatically when the condition has been fulfilled.
7 Saving and Printing Programs
7.1 Saving the program on diskette or some other type of mass memory
To save a program that has been stored previously
• Choose File: Save Program.
The program is duplicated to mass memory and replaces the version that was last
saved. If the file name or module name is not the same, the dialog Save Program As
will be displayed automatically.
To save under a new name
• Choose File: Save Program As.
A dialog box appears, displaying all programs in the current directory (see Figure 24).
Save Program As
Name:= WELDPIPE...
Massmemory unit:= flp1:
ROBOT1
Mass memory unit
1(5)
..
WELD1
WELD2
WELDPIPE
TEST/
Unit
Directory level
(Go up 1 level)
Program
Program
Program
Directory
New Dir
Cancel
OK
Figure 24 The dialog box used to store programs.
• If necessary, change the mass memory unit by pressing Unit until the correct unit is
displayed.
If the program is to be saved in another directory:
• Select the lower part of the window by pressing the List
key.
• Choose the directory in which the program is to be saved. Move up or down in
the directory by choosing either ‘. .’ (up), or the desired directory (down) and
press Enter
.
• Select the upper part of the window by pressing the List
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key.
User’s Guide
Programming and Testing
• Press Enter
when the field Name is selected.
• Specify the new name in the dialog box that appears. When you have finished
entering text, press OK.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
Note If a file with the same name already exists, a warning will be given and you can
choose to finish or continue.
Note If you have made a change in a system module, you will be requested to save this
alteration.
7.2 Printing a program from the robot
Print a whole program
• Save the program on a diskette or the ramdisk, and print out from the File Manager.
See Chapter 13 in this manual - File Manager.
Print a module
• Choose File: Print. The current module will be printed directly or saved to a file.
To be able to print, a printer must be connected to the robot controller.
7.3 Printing a program using a PC
A program can be printed using a personal computer. Most word-processing programs
can be used, the only requirement being that the PC can support diskettes in DOS format.
• Store the program on a diskette.
• Load the program into the PC.
• Print the program.
If you do not wish to print out the position values of a position instruction, save the
program using the command File: Print in the Program window and choose Save to file.
Only the current module will be saved.
8 Changing the Program
Programs can be protected against alteration by making the appropriate settings in the
system parameters. A password must then be used to make any changes. See chapter 12,
System parameters Topic: Teach Pendant.
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Programming and Testing
8.1 Selecting an instruction or an argument
A complete instruction or a single argument can be selected before a command is given
to change the program. If you wish to change a single argument, it is often easiest to
select the argument first. If you wish to change a complete instruction, you select the
complete instruction. Often, e.g. when adding a totally new instruction, it does not
make any difference whether the complete instruction, or an individual argument, is
selected.
To select a complete instruction
Movement
Choose
Up one instruction
ArrowUp
Down one instruction
ArrowDown
To first instruction
Edit: Goto Top
To last instruction
Edit: Goto Bottom
To next page
NextPage
To previous page
PreviousPage
If the cursor is moved to the first line in a compound instruction (IF, FOR, WHILE or
TEST), all instructions, including the last line (e.g. ENDIF), will be selected. If
ArrowDown is then pressed, the instructions in the compound instruction will be
selected, one after the other. Terminators (e.g. ENDIF, ELSE) cannot, however, be
selected separately.
When the cursor is moved upwards to a compound instruction, ArrowUp can be used
to select the instructions within that instruction, and ArrowLeft can be used to select
the complete compound instruction.
To select a number of instructions
You can select a group of instructions that are in sequence.
• Select the first or the last instruction in the group.
• Choose Edit: Mark.
• Select the other instructions using ArrowUp
or ArrowDown
.
The selection will automatically be deactivated when Edit: Cut or Edit: Copy is
chosen. You can also make the selection inactive by choosing Edit: Unmark.
To select an argument
• Use ArrowRight
to move the cursor one argument to the right, or ArrowLeft
to move the cursor one argument to the left.
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8.2 Modifying the position in a positioning instruction
• Move the robot to the desired position.
• Select the instruction that is to be changed. For instructions containing more than one
position, e.g. MoveC, select the position argument to be changed.
• Press the function key ModPos or choose Edit: ModPos.
Note
An answer must be given to the password check and confirmation dialog if
they have been set to active in the configuration. The default set-up is no password but
with confirmation.
The maximum movement/reorientation of a position can be limited in the system
parameters. If this has already been implemented, the system parameters must be
changed in order to allow any greater changes of position. See chapter 12, System
parameters Topic: Teach Pendant.
The old position is replaced by the current position of the robot. This position is related
to the current tool and work object.
Note
If a named position data is modified, all other instructions which refer to that
position data will also be changed.
8.3 Tuning position during program execution
The tuning command makes it possible to tune the x, y and z coordinates of a robtarget
during program execution. The function is valid only for named robtargets of the
datatypes constant and persistent. It is not valid for positions represented by ‘*’ and
robtargets of the datatype variable. The change is also valid in stopped mode.
• Start with the Program Test window.
• Press Start.
The window Program Run Info appears (see Figure 25).
View
Program Run Info
Speed:=
50%
Running:=
Continuous
PROG1
Executing!
Figure 25 The window Program Run Info.
• Select View: Position.
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Programming and Testing
The window Program Run Position appears (see Figure 26).
View
Program Run Position
50%
Speed:=
Continuous
Running:=
Robtarget:=
PROG1
...
Tuning Present
1(1)
No Data
Figure 26 Window for tuning position during execution.
• Select the field Robtarget and press Enter
.
• Select the robtarget to be tuned. Only robtargets declared in the module chosen in the
robtarget dialog are shown. To select a robtarget in an other module press Module,
select module, press Enter
and continue selecting robtarget.
• Choose OK or press Enter
to confirm the choice.
The x, y and z values of the chosen position are displayed (see Figure 27).
View
Program Run Position
50%
Speed:=
Continuous
Running:=
Robtarget:=
x
y
z
PROG1
pos10 ...
Tuning
Present
0.00
0.00
0.00
xx.xx
yy.yy
zz.zz
1(3)
mm
mm
mm
Tune
Figure 27 The Program Run Position window with a robtarget selected.
• Choose the x, y or z coordinate in the list.
• Press Tune.
A dialog box will appear where you can tune the position.
• Enter the desired tuning value and press Enter
.
- No change = 0
- Maximum change in one step = ±10 mm.
Several steps can be entered. The position data is changed immediately after each step
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Programming and Testing
but will not affect the robot path until the next instruction using this position data is
executed. The values in the Present column will be used in this instruction.
The total tuning will be displayed in the Tuning column.
Note If a named position data is modified, all instructions which refer to that position
data will be affected. Unnamed positions (marked as * in the instruction) cannot be
tuned.
8.4 Changing an argument
• Select the argument that is to be changed.
• Press Enter
.
The dialog box used to program instruction arguments appears and the selected
argument is marked with ”?” in front of it (see Figure 28).
Instruction Arguments
reg1:=?reg2;
Select Value: reg2
New...
reg1
reg4
Next
counter_a
reg2
Func
More...
2(3)
counter_b
reg3
Cancel
OK
Figure 28 The dialog box used to change arguments. In this example, the argument reg2 will be changed.
The argument can now be changed in four different ways:
- by changing a numeric value; this alternative is used when a numeric value is
to be specified, e.g. 5, or when an argument is to be changed, e.g. from reg2 to
reg3;
• Select the middle part of the dialog box
following:
and alternately do one of the
- move the cursor to the left or right using ArrowLeft
ArrowRight ;
or
- delete the character in front of the cursor by pressing Delete
;
- enter digits at the cursor using the numeric keyboard.
- by choosing data in the lower part of the of the dialog box; this alternative is
used when the argument is to constitute a reference to data, e.g. reg2;
- by choosing a function; press the function key Func and select the desired
alternative from the list. This alternative is used when an argument is to
constitute a function call, e.g. Offs(p1,5,0,0);
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Programming and Testing
A new dialog box that can be used to program function arguments appears.
Use the function key Skip to delete optional arguments that are not to be
included.
- by entering an optional expression, press the function key More; this
alternative is used when the argument is to constitute an expression with
several components, e.g. reg1+reg2 or reg1>5, or a string value, e.g.
“Producing part A”.
For more information, see Expressions on page 18.
• If desired, choose Next to change the next argument.
• Choose OK to confirm.
Note You can also use Copy and Paste to change arguments.
Note Any changes in an active position instruction (except for ModPos) will be valid
first for the next execution of the instruction. To get an immediate result, choose
Special: Move PP to cursor.
8.5 Adding optional arguments
Optional arguments of an instruction are not normally included when programming an
instruction, but have to be added afterwards.
• Select the instruction that is to be modified.
• Press the function key OptArg.
If you are in the Program Test window, you must first select the whole instruction,
then press Enter
and then OptArg.
A dialog box appears, displaying all arguments that the current instruction can possibly
have. The arguments not included in the instruction are enclosed within square
brackets (see Figure 29).
Instruction Arguments
2(9)
MoveL
[\Conc]
ToPoint
Speed
[\Time] | [\V]
Zone
[\Z]
Tool
[\WObj]
Add
Remove
Cancel
OK
Figure 29 The dialog box used to add optional arguments.
• Add an optional argument by selecting the desired argument and pressing Add.
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Some arguments (displayed on the same line) cannot exist simultaneously in an
instruction. When such an argument is added, the corresponding mutually exclusive
argument is automatically removed.
An optional argument can also be removed by selecting the desired argument and
pressing the function key Remove.
• Choose OK to confirm the change.
8.6 Changing the structure of an IF, FOR or TEST instruction
• Select the complete instruction that is to be changed.
• Press Enter
.
A dialog box appears, displaying the structure that the instruction can have. Structure parts
not included in the instruction are enclosed within square brackets (see Figure 30).
Instruction Arguments
4(6)
IF
expression
\Statement list
[\ELSE]
[\ELSEIF]
ENDIF
Add
Remove
Cancel
OK
Figure 30 The dialog box used to change the structure of an IF instruction.
• Add part of the structure by selecting the desired part and pressing Add.
• Remove a part of the structure by selecting the desired part and pressing Remove.
• Choose OK to confirm the change.
Note If you want to add more than one ELSEIF or CASE, these can be added in the
Program window using Copy and Paste. Different CASE statements, such as CASE 1,
2, 3, can also be added using Copy and Paste.
8.7 Changing the name or declaration of a routine
• Choose View: Routine.
• Select the desired routine.
• Press the function key Decl.
A dialog box appears, displaying the routine declaration.
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Programming and Testing
• Make whatever changes you wish to make (see Creating a new routine on page 10).
• Choose OK to confirm the change(s).
8.8 Deleting an instruction or an argument
• Select the instruction or the argument you wish to delete.
• Press Delete
.
Note An answer must be given to the password check and confirmation dialog if they
have been set to active in the configuration. The default set-up is no password but with
confirmation.
If an argument is compulsory (required), it will be replaced by <...>.
8.9 Deleting a routine
• Choose View: Routines.
• Select the desired routine.
• Press Delete
.
Note An answer must be given to the password check and confirmation dialog if they
have been set to active in the configuration. The default set-up is no password but with
confirmation.
8.10 Undo latest action
• Choose Edit: Undo.
The command Undo performs an undo operation on the latest performed action in the
window selected. Undo is enabled in the Program Instr, Test, Data and Routine
windows. The Program Instr and Program Test windows share the same undo buffer.
The Data window and Routine window each have their own undo buffer. The undo
command line tells you which command is to be undone (see Figure 31). If there is
nothing to be undone or if the undo buffer has been lost, the undo command is disabled.
This is shown as (Undo) on the menu command line.
File
Edit
View
Undo Delete
1 Copy
2 Paste
3 Goto Top
4 Goto Bottom
6 Mark
...
Figure 31 In this example the latest Delete command can be undone.
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Operations that are possible to undo:
- Delete, Cut, Paste are always possible to undo.
- Change Selected is used to change the arguments to an instruction. When the
operation is ordered either via Edit: Change Selected or by pressing Enter
, a copy of the entire selected instruction is made. If the operation is to be
undone, the instruction is replaced by this copy.
- Optional Arguments is used to add or remove arguments to instructions or
procedure calls. Undo is handled as Change Selected.
- New Instruction is undone by removing the latest inserted instruction.
Each of these operations clears previous undo buffers. E.g. it will not be possible to
Undo a previous delete operation when a new instruction has been inserted.
When Undo is performed, the part of the program that is affected will be shown.
Limitations: Operations that change data values, e.g. ModPos and Edit:Value, cannot
be undone.
9 Special Editing Functions
9.1 Search & replace
The search and replace function makes it possible to search for and replace data names
in the program. It is also possible to search for/replace procedure/function calls.
Instruction names can also be changed, e.g. from MoveL to MoveJ.
Choose Edit: Search in the Program Test or Program Instr window.
A dialog box appears (see Figure 32).
Search & Replace
Mod:
All
Rout:
All
Direction:
Forward
Search: do2...
Replace: do3...
weldpipe
main
1(4)
MoveL p1,v100,z10,tool0;
Set do1;
Reset do2;
WaitTime 2;
All
Mod...
OK
Figure 32 The search and replace dialog.
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Programming and Testing
• Define how the search is to be carried out by defining the following fields.
Field
Description
Mod
If “All modules” is selected, the current module name is shown
to the right of the field. If Mod or Enter
are pressed, a list
of available modules is shown, and a specific module can be
selected.
Rout
Searching/replacing is performed in all available routines in
the module selected from the module field. If Rout or Enter
are pressed, a list of available routines is shown, and a
specific routine can be selected.
Direction
Directions for searching.
Search
Selection field where a list of available names to search for is
shown when you press Enter
.
Replace
Selection field where a list of available names to replace is
shown when you press Enter
.
To start a search
• Move the cursor to the lower part of the window using the list key
33).
Search & Replace
Mod:
All
Rout:
All
Direction:
Forward
Search: do2...
Replace: do3...
(see Figure
weldpipe
main
1(4)
MoveL p1,v100,z10,tool0;
Set do1;
Reset do2;
WaitTime 2;
Replace
Search Repl.all
OK
Figure 33 Search & Replace dialog when the program is selected.
• Press the function key Search to start the search.
The first match will be selected in the lower part of the window.
• Press Replace to replace the selected text or press Repl.all to replace all matches
without having to confirm.
• Continue the search with Search.
• Press OK to end the search.
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9.2 Mirroring
The mirror function can be applied to any routine in a program.
Mirroring a routine means that a copy of the routine is created with all positions
mirrored in a specific mirror plane.
The new, mirrored routine will be given a new name (a default name is proposed). All
stored data of type robtarget, used in the routine, will be mirrored and stored with a new
name (the old name ending with _m). All immediate robtarget data, shown with an “*”,
in movement instructions will also be mirrored.
What does mirrored mean?
In general, all data of the type robtarget, used in the routine, will be mirrored. It makes
no difference whether the robtarget data is declared as a constant (which it should be),
as a persistent or as an ordinary variable. Any other data, e.g. of type pos, pose, orient,
etc., will not be mirrored. Mirroring data only affects the initialization value, i.e. any
current value will be ignored. This means that if a robtarget variable has been defined
without an init value, this variable will not be mirrored.
The mirroring works as follows:
• The new routine is scanned for any local robtarget data, declared inside the routine
with an init value. All such data’s init values are mirrored.
• Then the new routine is scanned for any statement with one or more arguments of type
robtarget.
• When such a statement is found, the following actions will take place:
- If the argument is programmed with a reference to a local variable or a constant,
this argument will be ignored, since it has already been mirrored as described
above.
- If the argument is programmed with an immediate robtarget data, shown with
an asterisk “*”, then this value will be mirrored directly.
- If the argument is programmed with a reference to a global variable, persistent
or a constant, defined outside the routine with an init value, then a duplicate is
created and stored in the module with a new name (the old name ending with
_m). The init value of this new data is mirrored, and after that the argument in
the statement is changed to the new name. This means that the module data list
will expand with a number of new mirrored robtarget data.
Error handlers or backward handlers, if any, in the routine, are not mirrored.
Mirror plane
The mirror function will mirror all positions, mentioned above, in the mirror plane, i.e.
the mirrored position will be located symmetrically on the other side of the plane,
relative to the original position. The mirror plane is always the xy-plane of an object
frame, used for mirroring. This object frame is defined by a work object data, e.g. with
the name MIRROR_FRAME. The work object MIRROR_FRAME uses, as all work
objects, two frames for defining the object frame: the user frame and object frame.
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The object frame is defined relative to the user frame, and the user frame is defined
relative to the world frame. Usually, the user frame is set equal to the unity frame and,
in such a case, the object frame is defined relative to the world frame (see Figure 34).
The mirror frame must be stated in the mirror dialogue.
Y
Z
work object
X
Y
X
world frame
mirror
plane
original point
mirrored point
Figure 34 The mirror plane.
Work object
All positions which are to be mirrored are related to a specific work object frame. This
means that the coordinates of the robtarget data are expressed relative to this work
object frame (see the figure above). Furthermore, the mirrored position will be related
to the same work object frame.
In the dialogue, before mirroring, this specific work object must be stated. This work
object will be used as the reference frame for all variables that are to be mirrored.
IMPORTANT:
Be sure to state the same work object as was originally used when defining the
robtarget data, and which was used as a parameter in the movement instructions. If no
work object was used, the wobj0 should be stated.
Mirroring of orientation
The orientation of the robtarget position is also mirrored. This mirroring of the
orientation can be done in two different ways, where either the x and z axes are
mirrored or the y and z axes (see Figure 35). The method used, x or y axis (the z axis
is always mirrored), is dependent on the tool used and how the tool coordinate system
is defined. In the mirror dialogue, the method must be stated.
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Y
Y
Z
X
X
Z
Mirroring of x- and z-axes
X
Z
Z
Y
X
Y
Mirroring of y- and z-axes
Figure 35 Two different ways of mirroring.
Configuration
The configuration will not be mirrored, which means that, after mirroring, it has to be
carefully checked by executing the path in test mode. If the configuration has to be
changed, this must be done manually and the position corrected with a modpos
command.
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Mirror example 1, one robot
A programmed routine, org, is stored in the robot’s memory. A mirrored copy of this
routine is to be created and stored with the name mir in memory. All positions are
related to the work object, wobj3. The mirror plane is known from three positions in
the plane, p1, p2 and p3.
An original position in org, pos, is mirrored to pos_m (See Figure 36).
y
x
p3
p2
m
pl irr
an or
e
pos
p1
Object frame
wobj3
z
pos_m
Figure 36 Mirroring of a routine, using one robot.
To perform this mirroring, the mirror frame must first be defined. To do this, start off
by creating a new work object and name it mirror or whatever. Then, use the three
points, p1 to p3, to define the object coordinate system with the help of the robot (see
Chapter 10, Calibration).
After this, the routine, org, can be mirrored using wobj3 and mirror as input data.
Mirror example 2, two robots
In this case, a routine, org, created on one robot, is to be mirrored and used on another
robot. Suppose that a spot welding robot, robot 1, is used for the left side of a car body.
When the program for the left side is done, it should be mirrored and used again for the
right side by robot 2.
The original program, org, is programmed relative to a work object, wobj1, which is
defined with the help of three points, A, B and C on the left side of the car body, using
the “3-point” method, (see Chapter 10, Calibration). The mirrored program, mir, is to
be related to a corresponding work object, wobj1, defined by the corresponding points
D, E and F on the right side of the car body. Wobj1 for robot2 is defined with robot2,
using the same “3-point” method. Note that since the points D, E, F are reflected images
of points A, B and C, the wobj1 for robot2 will also be mirrored. One of the
consequences of this is that the z-axis will point downwards.
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Virtual
mirror plane
Robot 1
x
z
B
p1
Robot 2
x
E’
p1_m
y
C
A
wobj1 = mirror
p1_m
frame
y
F
wobj1 for robot2
D’
= projection of p1 in xy-plane
z
Figure 37 Mirroring of a routine, using two robots.
After the work object, wobj1, has been defined, all programming is done in this frame.
Then the program is mirrored using the same wobj1 frame as the mirroring frame. A
position, p1, will be mirrored to the new position p1_m.
After this, the mirrored program is moved to robot 2, using the work object wobj1, as
described above. This means that the mirrored position, p1_m, will be “turned up” as
if it were mirrored in a “virtual” mirror plane between the two robots (see Figure 37).
Mirror function dialogue
• Choose View: Routines
• Select the routine to be mirrored.
• Choose Special: Mirror
A dialog box appears (see Figure 38).
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Mirroring Of Routine
Routine to mirror : left
New routine name
: right...
Work object
Mirror frame
: left_side...
: car_centre...
Mirror axis
: X
Cancel
OK
Figure 38 Mirror function dialogue.
• Define how the mirroring is to be performed in the fields below.
Field
Description
Routine to mirror
The name of the routine that will be mirrored.
New routine name
The mirrored routine will be given this name. If the
Enter
key is pressed when this field is
selected, a text input dialog will be displayed.
Work object
The work object to be used when applying the
mirror function on robtarget variables. If the
Enter
key is pressed, the work object
selection dialogue will be displayed.
Mirror frame
The frame to be used as the mirror plane. The
frame is of the type wobjdata. If the Enter
key
is pressed, a mirror frame selection dialogue will
be displayed.
Mirror axis
Specifies the mirroring of orientation. When this
field is selected, the function key bar shows the
alternatives X and Y. The mirroring of orientation
is then selected by pressing the corresponding
function key.
• Start the mirroring with OK.
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10 Creating Data
10.1 What is data?
Data is used to store values that can be used at a later stage in the program. Data is
grouped into different data types that describe its contents and its field of application.
Data type
Used for:
num
Numeric values (registers, counters)
bool
Logical values (true or false)
robtarget
Position data
tooldata
Tool data (see Chapter 10, Calibration)
wobjdata
Work objects (see Chapter 10, Calibration)
pose
Program displacement frames (see Chapter 10, Calibration)
For more detailed information on data and its contents, see the appropriate data type in
RAPID Reference Manual - Data Types.
Data must be defined (declared) before it can be used. However, depending on the
configuration of the robot, there is usually a number of predefined data.
Data can be defined as constants, variables or persistents:
- The value of a constant can only be changed manually.
- A variable can also be changed by the program, but its initialisation value is
automatically set when:
- the program is read from diskette or the like,
- the program is started from the beginning, i.e. from the first instruction in
the main routine,
- the program pointer is moved to the beginning of a routine by choosing
Test: Move PP To Routine, or to the beginning of a program by choosing
Test: Move PP To Main.
- A persistent can be described as a variable whose initialisation value is
constantly updated so that it corresponds to the current value. Thus, its value is
not changed when the program is started from the beginning. If the program is
output to a diskette, the new initialisation value is stored.
10.2 The Program Data window (used to manage data)
• Choose View: Data to open the Program Data window.
The window displays all data of the type last selected. The current values are also
displayed (see Figure 39).
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File
Edit
View
Data
Special
Program Data
Data type
Data
WELDPIPE
num In System
Name
Value Local Module
counter_a
counter_b
reg1
reg2
reg3
reg4
reg5
12
20
1
0
0
99
45
New...
Dupl...
Decl...
X
X
X
3(7)
WELDPIPE
WELDPIPE
USER
USER
USER
USER
USER
Instr
Test
Figure 39 All data of a given type are displayed in the Program Data window.
To choose a new data type in the Program Data window
• Open the window Program Data Types by choosing View: Data Types.
The Program Data Types window opens and displays all data types that have at least
one declared data (see Figure 40).
File
Edit
View
Types
Prog. DataTypes
WELDPIPE
5(7)
Data types
All data
bool
clock
num
robtarget
tooldata
wobjdata
All
Data
Figure 40 The Program DataTypes window is used to change the data type.
• Select the desired data type and press Enter
. If the desired type is not displayed
in the window, you can call up all data types by pressing All type or choosing
Types: All Types.
All data can be chosen by selecting All data.
Data for a selected type can be chosen by pressing Data or Enter
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10.3 Creating new data
• Open the Program Data window by choosing View: Data ...
The Program Data window is opened and displays all data of the type last selected.
If you wish to create data of a type other than that displayed, choose View: Data
Types, select the desired data type and press Enter
.
• Press the function key New.
A dialog box appears, displaying the name of the data (see Figure 41). The name of the
data is set to xxxN where xxx describes the data type and N is a number incremented
each time this type of data is created. The first data of the type clock is named clock1,
the second, clock2, etc. Some data types are abbreviated, e.g.:
Data type
Predefined name
Data type
Predefined name
num
regN
loaddata
loadN
robtarget
pN
tooldata
toolN
bool
flagN
speeddata
speedN
Current module
num Data Def. in USER
Name:= reg7...
Decl
Cancel
OK
Figure 41 New data is created.
• Change the name by pressing Enter
and specify a new name.
The data will automatically be given characteristics that are best suited to the current
type, but these can be changed when necessary.
Normally, data is stored as a part of the program. However, when data is to be present
in the memory, irrespective of which program is loaded, it is stored in the system
module User. Examples of this type of data are:
- tools and work objects; changing this data will affect all programs.
- registers and other data that are not to be initialised when a program changes.
When you wish to save in the current module and with standard characteristics, you
can finish by pressing OK. In other cases the characteristic must be defined.
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• Press the function key Decl.
A dialog box appears, displaying the basic data declaration (see Figure 42).
num Data Definition
Name:= reg7...
Type:= variable
In Module:= USER ...
Global
1(1)
reg7:=
0
(num)
Cancel
OK
Figure 42 A data declaration includes the name and characteristics of the data.
• Select the appropriate field and specify the desired characteristics by:
- pressing Enter
and specifying the desired alternative in the dialog box
that appears (fields marked with ...)
- choosing an alternative using the function keys (fields marked with
)
- specifying the value directly using the numeric keyboard (numeric initial
value).
Field
Description
Name
The name of the data (a maximum of 16 characters).
Type
Specifies whether the data is to be a constant (Const), variable
(Var) or persistent variable (Pers).
Global/Local
Specifies the scope attribute for the data. Default for the
datatype is set in File:Preferences. See Default data Global/
Local on page 61.
In Module
The module in which the new data will be used.
Initial value
A value assigned to the data when, e.g. reading from a diskette.
Change the value by pressing
and enter the new initial
value.
• Choose OK to approve the definition.
Tip It is sometimes easier to create new data by duplicating and changing existing data.
10.4 Creating new array data
• Open the Program Data window by choosing View: Data.
The Program Data window is opened and displays all data of the type last selected.
If you wish to create data of a type other than that displayed, choose View: Data
Types, select the desired data type and press Enter
.
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• Select Data:New Array
A dialog box appears, asking for the number of dimensions, 1, 2 or 3. Make a choice
and press Enter
.
A dialog box appears, displaying the basic array data declaration (see Figure 43).
num Array Data Definition
Name:=
Type:=
Dimension:=
In Module:=
reg7...
variable
{5}
USER ...
{1}:
{2}:
{3}:
{4}:
{5}:
Global
1(5)
0
0
0
0
0
Cancel
OK
Figure 43 An array data declaration includes the name and characteristics of the data.
• Select the appropriate field and specify the desired characteristics by:
- pressing Enter
and specifying the desired alternative in the dialog box that
appears (fields marked with ...)
- choosing an alternative using the function keys (fields marked with
)
- specifying the value directly using the numeric keyboard (numeric initial
value).
Field
Description
Name
The name of the data (a maximum of 16 characters).
Type
Specifies whether the data is to be a constant (Const), variable
(Var) or persistent variable (Pers).
Global/Local
Specifies the scope attribute for the data. Default for the
datatype is set in File:Preferences. See Default data Global/
Local on page 61.
Dimension
Size of the chosen dimensions.
In Module
The module in which the new data will be stored.
Initial value
A value assigned to the data when, e.g. reading from a diskette.
Change the value by pressing
and enter the new initial
value.
• Choose OK to approve the definition or Cancel to abort the definition.
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10.5 Duplicating data
• Open the window Program Data by choosing View: Data.
• Select the data to be duplicated.
• Press the function key Dupl.
• Specify the new name in the dialog box that appears.
• Choose OK to confirm the duplication.
10.6 Storing position data using the robot
• Open the Jogging window and specify the tool and work object on which the position
is to be based.
• Jog the robot to the desired position.
• Create new data as described in Creating Data on page 45. Specify the data type
robtarget.
The current position of the robot will be automatically stored as an initial value.
10.7 Routine data
Normally, data – program data – can be accessed from anywhere in the program. Data
can also be linked to a specific routine – routine data – and, in this case, exists locally
within the routine.
• Open the Program Data window by choosing View: Data.
• Choose Data: In Routine ...
The window will then display the routine data for the current routine. The window is
identical to the window shown in Figure 39, except that it displays the routine name
after the program name.
Now you can create and change routine data in the same way as for program data.
11 Changing Data
11.1 Viewing and possibly changing the current value
• Select the desired data in an instruction.
• Choose Edit: Value.
A dialog box will appear, displaying the current value (see the example in Figure 44).
For more detailed information on the meaning of the various components, see the
appropriate data type in the RAPID Reference Manual.
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Current Data value
gun1:
robhold:=
tframe:
trans:
x:=
y:=
z:=
rot:
q1:=
TRUE
2(17
(tooldata)
(bool)
(pose)
(pos)
(num)
(num)
(num)
(orient)
(num)
TRUE
0.0
0.0
0.0
1.0000
FALSE
Cancel
Data types
OK
Figure 44 The dialog box used to change values.
• Change the value by selecting the desired field, then:
- Choose an alternative using the function keys.
- Specify the value directly using the numeric keyboard.
• Choose OK to confirm the change.
You can also open the dialog box as follows:
• Choose View: Data.
• Select the desired data. If you wish to view data of a type other than that displayed,
choose Data: Datatypes and select the desired data type.
• Press Enter
or choose Data: Value.
Continue as above when the dialog box appears.
11.2 Changing data names or declarations
• Choose View: Data.
• Select the desired data. If you wish to view data of a type other than that displayed,
choose Data: Datatypes and select the desired data type.
• Press the function key Decl.
A dialog box appears, displaying the data declaration.
• Change the name and declaration as described in Creating Data on page 45.
• Choose OK to confirm the change.
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11.3 Deleting data
• Choose View: Data.
• Select the desired data.
• Press Delete
.
• Press OK to confirm the deletion.
12 Error Handling
Each routine has an error handler that can be programmed to deal with any errors that
occur during program execution. In this way, some errors (listed below) can be dealt
with automatically by the program:
- when no search stop is obtained during a search,
- when a file cannot be opened,
- when there is division by 0.
- Other errors are listed under Data Types - errnum - Predefined Data (RAPID
Reference Manual).
The error handler is programmed in the normal way using RAPID instructions. When an
error occurs, a jump is made to the error handler in the routine in which the error occurred.
If there is no error handler, a jump is made instead to the error handler in the routine
that called the routine in question. A general error handler for the whole program can
therefore be created in the main routine. If there is no error handler when an error
occurs, program execution will stop and an error message will be displayed.
The error can then be remedied in the error handler and the program can be
automatically restarted as in the example in Figure 45.
Main routine
.
.
read_diskette;
MoveJ ..
.
RAISE
RETURN
ERROR
RETRY
TRYNEXT
read_diskette
Open .....
.Set di1;
.
ne
If a
urs
c
c
ro
rro
ERROR
IF ERRNO=ERR_FILEOPEN THEN
Remedy the error by, for example,
requesting the operator to insert the
correct diskette.
Figure 45 The program can be restarted from the error handler in various ways.
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If the program cannot read a diskette, a jump is made to the error handler of the routine,
where the error is remedied. The program can then be restarted by re-executing (RETRY)
the instruction that caused the error, executing the next instruction (TRYNEXT) or by
returning (RETURN) to the calling routine. The error can also be remedied in the error
handler of the main routine (RAISE).
To create an error handler
• Choose View: Routines.
• Choose the routine to which the error handler is to belong.
• Choose Routine: Add Error Handler.
To program the error handler
• Choose the routine to which the error handler is to belong.
• In the Routine window: Choose Routine: Error Handler.
In other windows: Choose View: Error Handler.
• Program the error handler in the usual way.
• Return to the main part of the routine by choosing View: Instr.
To remove an error handler
• Choose View: Routines.
• Choose the routine to which the error handler is to belong.
• Choose Routine: Remove Error Handler.
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13 Using Modules
13.1 What is a module?
The robot program can be subdivided into program modules, each module containing
a group of routines and data. In addition to this, system modules which are always
present in the memory, can be used (see Figure 46).
Program memory
Program
Main module
Program data
Main
routine
Routines
Modules
Program data
Routines
System modules
Figure 46 Routines and data can be grouped together to form modules.
The entire program or separate modules can be stored on diskette or some other type
of mass memory. System modules are automatically loaded when the system is coldstarted.
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A module can include, for example:
- general routines for many different installations,
- positions generated via CAD,
- routines for a certain type of external equipment, such as a workpiece
manipulator.
System modules can, for example, include general data (e.g. tool data) for all programs
used in the same robot.
The main routine of the program is located in one of the modules (the module with the
same name as the program).
Both program and system modules work in the same way once they have been loaded
into the memory. All modules can normally be edited using the teach pendant, but, as
system modules are often write-protected, the write protection must first be removed.
13.2 Choosing modules
• Choose View: Modules.
The window Program Modules displays all modules present in the program memory
(see Figure 47).
File
Edit
View
Module
Program Modules
WELDPIPE
Name
Type
CAD_POS
WELDPIPE
USER
BASE
Program Module
Program Module
System Module
System Module
2(4)
Modules
New...
Decl...
Data
Figure 47 The Program Modules window displays all modules in the task program.
• Select the desired module.
• Press Enter
.
The Program Routines window, in which you can choose the desired routine, opens.
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13.3 Creating a new module
• Open the window Program Modules by choosing View: Modules.
• Press the function key New.
A dialog box appears, displaying the basic module declaration (see Figure 48). The
name of the routine is set to moduleN, where N is a number incremented each time a
routine is created.
Module definition
Name:= module1...
Type:= program module
Cancel
OK
Figure 48 A module declaration specifies the name and characteristics of a module.
• Change the name and characteristics of the module by selecting the appropriate field,
then:
- Press Enter
and specify the desired alternative in the dialog box that
appears on the display (fields marked with...).
- Choose an alternative using the function keys (fields marked with
).
Field
Description
Name
The name of the module (a maximum of 16 characters).
Type
Specify whether the module is to be a program or system
module.
• Press OK to end the module declaration.
13.4 Changing the name or declaration of a module
• Choose View: Module.
• Select the desired module.
• Press the function key Decl.
A dialog box appears, displaying the module declaration.
• Make whatever changes you wish to make (see Creating a new module on page 56).
• Choose OK to confirm the change(s).
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13.5 Reading a program module from diskette or some other type of mass memory
• Choose File: Open.
A dialog box appears, displaying all modules and programs in the current directory
(see Figure 49).
Open
Select a Program or a Module
Massmemory unit:= flp1:
MODULES
Mass memory unit
4(4)
..
CAD_POS
USER
BASE
Unit
Directory level
(Go up 1 level)
Program Module
System Module
System Module
New Dir
Cancel
OK
Figure 49 The dialog box used to read modules.
• If necessary, change the mass memory unit by pressing Unit until the correct unit is
displayed.
• Select the desired program module. Move up or down in the directory by choosing
either ‘. .’ (up), or the desired directory (down) and press Enter
.
• Choose OK to confirm.
The specified module will then be read to the robot memory and added to the rest of
the program.
13.6 Deleting program modules from the program
• Open the window Program Modules by choosing View: Modules.
• Select the desired module.
• Press Delete
.
Note
An answer must be given to the password check and confirmation dialog if
they have been set to active in the configuration. The default set-up is no password but
with confirmation.
13.7 Listing all routines in all modules
Usually only the routines contained in the current module are displayed in the Program
Routines window. You can, however, change this so that all routines in all modules are
displayed.
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• Open the window Program Routines by choosing View: Routines.
• Choose Routine: In System.
To list only the routines in the current module again, choose Routine: In Module.
13.8 Duplicating a routine from one module to another
• Choose the module in which the new routine is to be included.
• List all routines by choosing Routine: In System in the Program Routines
window.
• Select the routine to be duplicated.
• Continue in the normal way, as described in Duplicating a routine on page 11.
13.9 Listing all data in the current module
Usually the data contained in all modules is displayed in the Program Data window.
You can, however, change this to display only the data in the current module.
• Open the window Program Data by choosing View: Data.
• Choose Data: In Module.
To list all program data in all modules again, choose Data: In System.
13.10 Duplicating data from one module to another
Data can be duplicated from one module to another. Routine data cannot, however, be
duplicated.
• Choose the module in which the new data is to be included.
• Select the data to be duplicated in the Program Data window.
• Continue in the normal way, as described in Duplicating data on page 50.
13.11 Saving modules on diskette or some other type of mass memory
To save a module that has been stored previously
• Open the window Program Modules by choosing View: Modules.
• Select the module to be saved.
• Choose File: Save Module.
The module is duplicated to mass memory and replaces the last version saved.
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To save under a new name
• Open the window Program Modules by choosing View: Modules.
• Select the module to be saved.
• Choose File: Save Module As.
A dialog box appears, displaying all modules and programs in the current directory
(see Figure 50).
Save Module
Name:
Cadpos ...
Massmemory unit:= flp1:
MODULES
Mass memory unit
1(4)
..
CAD_POS
SYSTEM1
SYSTEM2
Unit
Directory level
(Go up 1 level)
Program Module
System Module
System Module
New Dir
Cancel
OK
Figure 50 The dialog box used to store modules.
• If necessary, change the mass memory unit by pressing Unit until the correct unit is
displayed.
• Choose the directory in which the module is to be saved. Move up or down in the
directory by choosing either ‘. .’ (up), or the desired directory (down) and press
Enter
. Create a new directory by pressing New Dir.
• Press Enter
when the field Name is selected.
• Specify the new name (using the numeric keyboard) in the dialog box that appears.
Press OK when you have finished entering the new name.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
13.12 Calling up the complete module list
• Choose View: Modules.
• Select the desired module.
• Choose Module: Module List.
The complete module is displayed, including its data declarations and routines. It
cannot, however, be changed.
• Exit the module list by pressing OK.
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14 Preferences
14.1 Defining the Most Common instruction pick list
You can define the contents of the Most Common instruction pick list to obtain a pick
list of the instructions you use most.
• Choose File: Preferences.
• Select, for example, Most Common SetUp 1.
• Press Enter
.
All instructions and procedures are displayed. Those included in the pick list are
marked with an x to the left of their names (see Figure 51).
Most Common SetUp 1
7(40)
X
X
Result
:=
AccSet
ClkReset
ClkStart
ClkStop
Close
Compact IF
ConfJ
ConfL
Excl
Cancel
OK
Figure 51 You specify the instructions to be included in the list in the Most Common Setup
dialog box.
• Add an instruction by selecting the appropriate instruction and pressing Incl.
That instruction will then be marked with an x to its left.
• Remove an instruction by selecting the appropriate instruction and pressing Excl.
The instruction will still be displayed in the window but the x to its left will disappear.
• Press Result.
The instructions included in the pick list are displayed (see Figure 52).
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User’s Guide
Programming and Testing
Most Common Result 1
4(6)
:=
Compact IF
FOR
GOTO
IF
RESET
Setup
Move
Move
Cancel
OK
Figure 52 You specify the order of the instructions in the list in the Most Common Result
dialog box.
• Change the order of the instructions using Move and Move . Move moves the
selected instruction up one step and Move moves it down one step.
• When the definition is ready, press OK.
To return to the Most Common Setup dialog box, press Setup instead.
The current Most Common list is automatically chosen as the active pick list. The
various Most Common lists can be chosen from the IPL2 menu in the Program Instr
window.
Note This definition is stored in the system parameters (topic Teach Pendant) which
should be saved from the System Parameters window.
14.2 Default data Global/Local
You can decide what scope new data of a specific datatype should have by default. The
scope is either Global, reachable from other modules, or Local, only reachable in the
module where the data is declared. When new data are created the setting in this list
will be used for the data scope attribute.
• Choose File: Preferences.
• Select Default data Global/Local and press Enter
.
• A list with all available datatypes are presented. Mark the datatype you want to
change and press Global or Local.
Note This definition is stored in the system parameters (topic Teach Pendant) which
should be saved from the System Parameters window.
For more information regarding Global and local data, see RAPID Reference Manual.
User’s Guide
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Programming and Testing
14.3 Defining programming rule for robot positions
It is possible to select whether or not to automatically create new robtargets when
programming move instructions.
Automatic name sequence
When a Move instruction is programmed, a new robtarget is automatically created.
If the last used ToPoint was named, i.e not a “*”, a new robtarget will be created and
named according to a sequential naming rule. For example p10, p20, p30 or p12, p13,
p14 etc.
Dialog with next robtarget selected
This rule is used when robtargets are created in advance. When a Move instruction is
programmed no robtarget is created. Instead the instruction argument dialog is opened
with the next sequential robtarget selected. For example, if the last used robtarget was
p100, the instruction argument dialog will be opened with p110 selected.
Dialog with * selected
Same as “Dialog with next robtarget selected” except that the instruction argument
dialog is opened with the “*” selected.
• Choose File: Preferences.
• Select Robtarget programming rule
• Select a programming rule and press OK.
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CONTENTS
Page
1 Programming a Position ................................................................................................. 3
1.1 Positioning instructions ......................................................................................... 3
1.2 Programming an offset .......................................................................................... 6
2 Changing the Value of an Output .................................................................................. 7
3 Waiting ............................................................................................................................. 8
3.1 Wating for an input ................................................................................................ 8
3.2 Waiting a specific amount of time ......................................................................... 10
4 Controlling the Program Flow ....................................................................................... 10
4.1 Calling a subroutine............................................................................................... 10
4.2 Program control within a routine........................................................................... 11
5 Assigning a Value to Data (Registers) ........................................................................... 14
User’s Guide
9-1
The programming language RAPID
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User’s Guide
The programming language RAPID
The programming language RAPID
1 Programming a Position
1.1 Positioning instructions
A positioning instruction contains the following information:
- Type of path (e.g. linear, joint motion)
- The destination position to which the robot is to move
- Speed
- Zone size (accuracy), i.e. how close the robot must be to the destination
position before it can start to move towards the next position. If fine is chosen,
the robot moves to the position.
- Current tool (TCP).
Type
- L=
- J=
- C=
of path
linear
Joint
circular
Speed specified in the speed data v100 = 100mm/s
Zone size specified in the zone data z10 = 10mm
Tool (TCP)
MoveL p1, v100, z10, tool1
Destination position
- *= stored in instruction
- p1= stored in position data p1
The speed and zone size refer to different data, which includes the desired speed in
mm/s, zone size in mm, etc. You can create and name this data yourself, but, the most
commonly used values are already available.
You specify the tool – its dimensions and weight – in the tool data (see Chapter 10,
Calibration). The TCP of the tool is moved to the specified destination position when
the instruction is executed (see Figure 1).
User’s Guide
9-3
p3
p1
/s
/s
50
0
mm
m
0
10
0
20
m
mm
/s
10
m
m
The programming language RAPID
p2
MoveL p1, v200, z10, tool1
MoveL p2, v100, fine, tool1
MoveJ p3, v500, fine, tool1
Figure 1 Positioning the robot.
Apart from these arguments, a positioning instruction may contain optional arguments,
e.g. arguments used to specify the positioning time. See the appropriate instruction in
RAPID Reference Manual for more details.
• Jog the robot to the desired destination position.
• Call up the instruction pick list by choosing IPL1: Motion&Process.
The program and specified pick list will then appear in the window (see Figure 2).
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
IPL2
WELDPIPE/main
Motion&Proc
1(1)
<SMT>
Copy
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Paste
ActUnit
DeactUnit
MoveC
MoveCDO
MoveJ
MoveJDO
MoveL
MoveLDO
More
OptArg... (ModPos)
Test
Figure 2 The dialog box used to program positioning instructions.
• Choose the desired instruction by pressing the appropriate numeric key.
The instruction will be added directly to the program, as illustrated in Figure 3. The
arguments are set automatically.
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The programming language RAPID
File
Edit
View
IPL1
Program Instr
WELDPIPE/main
Motion&Proc
1(1)
MoveL *, v100, z10, tool1
Copy
IPL2
Paste
OptArg...
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
ActUnit
DeactUnit
MoveC
MoveCDO
MoveJ
MoveJDO
MoveL
MoveLDO
More
ModPos
Test
Figure 3 A positioning instruction is added directly to the program.
If the correct argument was chosen, the instruction is now ready for use. However, we
will continue and change the speed and zone size.
• Select the argument you wish to change (v100 in this example).
• Press Enter
.
The dialog box, used to program instruction arguments, appears. The selected argument
is marked with a ? in front of it (see Figure 4). The lower part of the box displays all
available speed data that can be selected.
Instruction Argument
MoveL *,? v100, z10, tool1;
Speed:
v100
4(8)
New...
v10
v40
v80
Next
vmax
v20
v50
v100
Func
More...
v5
v30
v60
v150
Cancel
OK
Figure 4 The dialog box used to change the speed.
• Select the desired speed.
• Go to the next argument (zone data) by pressing Next.
All available zone data will be displayed (see Figure 5).
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The programming language RAPID
Instruction Argument
MoveL *, v60,? z10, tool1;
Zone:
z10
2(4)
fine
z15
z40
z80
New...
z10
z30
z60
Next
Func
z5
z20
z50
z100
More...
Cancel
OK
Figure 5 The dialog box used to change zone data.
• Select the desired zone size.
• Choose OK to confirm the change.
The instruction is now ready for use.
1.2 Programming an offset
Sometimes it is easier to define a position as an offset from a given position. If, for
example, you know the exact dimensions of a work object, it will only be necessary to
jog to one position (see Figure 6).
p1
100 mm
p2
50 mm
p4
p3
MoveL p1, ......
MoveL p2, ......
MoveL p3, ......
MoveL p4, ......
MoveL p1, ......
MoveL p1, ....
MoveL Offs (p1, 100, 0, 0), ....
MoveL Offs (p1, 100, 50, 0), ....
MoveL Offs (p1, 0, 50, 0), ....
MoveL p1, ....
Figure 6 Two different ways of programming a movement.
Starting point
Displacement in x-direction
Displacement in y-direction
Displacement in z-direction
MoveL Offs (p1, 100, 50, 0), v100,....
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User’s Guide
The programming language RAPID
• Program a positioning instruction as described in Programming a Position on page 3.
• Select the position argument and press Enter
.
• Press Func.
• Select the function Offs and press Enter
.
A dialog box appears in which you can enter the arguments of the function
(See Figure 7).
Function Argument
Offs (?,<...>,<...>,<...>
....
Point
1(1)
New...
Next
p1
Func
More...
Cancel
OK
Figure 7 The dialog box used to set an offset.
• Select the starting point.
• Press Next.
• Enter the offset (the offset value) in the x-direction using the numeric keyboard.
• Press Next.
• Enter the offset in the y-direction using the numeric keyboard.
• Press Next.
• Enter the offset in the z-direction using the numeric keyboard.
• Press OK.
2 Changing the Value of an Output
An output instruction contains the following information:
- information on the output to be changed,
- information on the desired value.
User’s Guide
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The programming language RAPID
Digital output
Reset do1
Output
Desired value
SetDO do1, high
• Call up the instruction pick list for I/O instructions by choosing IPL1: IO.
• Choose the desired instruction by pressing the appropriate numeric key.
You must now specify the output to be changed. All the different robot outputs are
displayed for this purpose (see Figure 8).
Instruction Argument
Reset ?<EXP>;
Signal
1(4)
do1
do4
do7
do10
New...
do3
do6
do9
Next
Func
More...
do2
do5
do8
do11
Cancel
OK
Figure 8 The dialog box used to define an output.
• Select the desired output.
• Choose OK to confirm.
3 Waiting
3.1 Wating for an input
A wait-until-input instruction contains the following information:
- the name of the input,
- the input value necessary for program execution to continue.
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The programming language RAPID
Input
Value
WaitDI di1, 1
Input
Value
WaitUntil di1 = 1
The WaitUntil instruction can also be used to wait for several inputs.
• Choose IPL1: Various.
• Select the instruction WaitDI.
You must now specify the condition that must be satisfied before the program execution
is to continue. You do this using the dialog box illustrated in Figure 9.
Instruction Argument
WaitDI ?<EXP>,<EXP>;
Signal
1(4)
New...
di
di6
di9
Next
di1
di4
di7
di10
Func
More...
di2
di5
di8
di11
Cancel
OK
Figure 9 The dialog box used to define an input.
• Select the desired input.
• Choose Next to define the next argument, i.e. the value of the input.
• Enter the input value using the numeric keyboard.
• Press OK to confirm.
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The programming language RAPID
3.2 Waiting a specific amount of time
Time to wait
WaitTime 0.5
• Choose IPL1:Various.
• Select the instruction WaitTime.
A dialog box appears in which you can enter the time (see Figure 10).
Instruction Argument
WaitTime ?<EXP>,
Time
1(1)
New...
Next
Func
More...
Cancel
OK
Figure 10 The dialog box used to define WaitTime.
• Enter the time using the numeric keyboard.
• Press OK to confirm.
4 Controlling the Program Flow
4.1 Calling a subroutine
A call instruction contains the following information:
- information on the routine to be called,
- information on any arguments.
The routine name
Arguments (if any)
routine1 reg3, 23
When this instruction is executed, the called routine will be executed. Following this,
execution will return to the calling routine (see Figure 11).
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The programming language RAPID
main routine
..
..
..
routine1;
set do1;
..
routine1
..
..
..
..
..
Figure 11 A routine can call another routine.
• Call up the instruction pick list for the program flow by choosing IPL1: Prog. Flow.
• Choose the instruction ProcCall by pressing the appropriate numeric key.
You must now specify the routine that is to be called. All routines are displayed for this
purpose (see Figure 12).
Select Procedure
1(2)
cleangun
weldseq1
errorout1
weldseq2...
Cancel
OK
Figure 12 The dialog box used to select procedures.
• Select the desired routine and press OK.
If the routine has no parameters, the instruction is ready for use; if it has parameters
(indicated by ...), a dialog box will appear in which you specify the parameters of the
routine in the same way as you specify an instruction argument.
4.2 Program control within a routine
The IF instruction is used when different instructions are to be executed depending on
whether a condition is satisfied or not, e.g. depending on whether an input is set or not.
User’s Guide
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The programming language RAPID
Input
Condition: =, <>, >, <, >=, <=
Value
IF di1 = 1 THEN
Instructions executed if di1=1
ELSE
Instructions executed if di1=0
ENDIF
An IF instruction without ELSE is used when certain instructions are to be executed
only if a condition is satisfied. If only one instruction is to be executed, a Compact IF
instruction can be used.
Compact IF:
Any condition
Any instruction
IF reg1 = reg2 Set do1
IF:
Any condition
IF di1 = 1 OR di2 = 1 THEN
Instructions executed if di1 or di2=1
ENDIF
To program an IF instruction in order to test an input
• Call up the correct instruction pick list by choosing IPL1: Prog. Flow.
• Choose the instruction IF (or Compact IF) by pressing the appropriate numeric key.
A dialog box will appear in which you specify the required data type for the condition
(see Figure 13).
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The programming language RAPID
Select datatype:
1 IF num
2 IF signaldi
3 IF bool
4 ...
(e.g. reg1<5)
(e.g. di1=1)
(e.g. flag1=TRUE)
Cancel
OK
Figure 13 The dialog box used to select data type.
• Select IF signaldi and press Enter
. Alternatively, you can use the numeric
keyboard to select the figure in front of the desired data type.
A dialog box will appear in which you can specify the desired input (see Figure 14).
Expression
_
1(6)
di0
di3
di6
di9
di12
di15
Text...
di1
di4
di7
di10
di13
di16
Func
Content
di2
di5
di8
di11
di14
Cancel
OK
Figure 14 The dialog box used to define expression arguments.
• Select the desired input and press Enter
.
The dialog box used to program expressions will be called up again. All operators are
now displayed in the lower part of the box.
• Select the operator = and press Enter
.
• Enter 0 or 1 directly using the numeric keyboard.
• Choose OK to confirm the change.
• Add instructions between THEN and ELSE and between the ELSE and ENDIF by
selecting the empty instruction <SMT> and choosing the desired instructions from the
pick list.
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The programming language RAPID
If you want to remove the ELSE part of the instruction:
• Select the complete IF instruction and press Enter
.
A dialog box will appear, displaying the possible structure of the instruction. Structure parts
not included in the instruction are enclosed within square brackets (see Figure 15).
Instruction Arguments
4(6)
IF
Expression
\Statement list
[\ELSEIF]
\ELSE
End
Add
Remove
Cancel
OK
Figure 15 The dialog box to change the structure of an IF instruction.
• Select \ELSE and press Remove.
• Choose OK to confirm the change.
5 Assigning a Value to Data (Registers)
An assignment instruction contains the following information:
- information on the data to be changed
- information on the desired value, which may be a complete expression, e.g.
reg1+5*reg2.
Value
Data to be
changed
reg1 := 1
The following instructions can be used to perform simple calculations on register variables.
Clear
Incr
Decr
Add
9-14
reg1
reg1
reg1
reg1, 5
clears a register
increments by 1
decrements by 1
adds a value (5) to a register
User’s Guide
The programming language RAPID
To program an assignment instruction
• Call up the correct instruction pick list by choosing IPL1: Various or Mathematics.
• Choose the instruction := by pressing the appropriate numeric key.
You must now specify the data to be changed. All the various data are displayed for this
purpose (see Figure 16).
Select datatype:
1 num :=
2 bool :=
3 robtarget:=
4 ... :=
(e.g. reg1:=5)
(e.g. flag1:=TRUE)
(e.g. p1:=p4)
Cancel
OK
Figure 16 The dialog box used to select data type.
• Select the desired data type and press Enter
. Alternatively, you can use the
numeric keyboard to select the figure in front of the desired data type.
If the desired data type is not found among the three predefined types, choose
alternative 4 for more types. The data types that have already been used in the program
will now be listed in the lower half of the box (see Figure 17).
To view all the data types, press the function key All.
Select datatype:
1 num :=
2 bool :=
3 robtarget:=
4 ... :=
(e.g. reg1:=5)
(e.g. flag1:=TRUE)
(e.g. p1:=p4)
1(11)
dionum
jointtarget
loaddata
num
robtarget
speeddata
All
Cancel
OK
Figure 17 The dialog box shows data types used in the program.
• Choose the desired data type and press Enter
A dialog box will appear in which you can define data that is to be changed (see Figure
18).
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The programming language RAPID
Instruction Argument
?<VAR>:= <EXP>;
Data
New...
reg1
reg4
Next
1(3)
counter_6
reg3
reg100
counter_a
reg2
reg5
Func
More...
Cancel
OK
Figure 18 The dialog box used to define data that is to be changed.
Only num data is shown in the list.
• Select the desired data.
• Select the next argument by pressing Next.
You must now specify the new value for the data. For the purposes of this exercise, we
have chosen a constant value, e.g. reg1:=5.
Use
(list) to select a data instead of a numeric value.
• Using the numeric keyboard, enter the value directly.
• Choose OK to confirm the input of the instruction.
The instruction is now ready for use.
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User’s Guide
Calibration
CONTENTS
Page
1 Coordinate systems ......................................................................................................... 3
2 Coordinated axes............................................................................................................. 5
2.1 External axes, general............................................................................................ 5
2.2 Coordination .......................................................................................................... 5
3 Calibration ....................................................................................................................... 6
3.1 What is calibration? ............................................................................................... 6
3.2 Viewing the calibration status................................................................................ 6
3.3 Checking the calibration........................................................................................ 7
3.4 Updating revolution counters ................................................................................ 8
4 Base Frame for the Robot............................................................................................... 9
4.1 Defining the Base Frame for the Robot................................................................. 9
5 Coordinated track motion .............................................................................................. 12
5.1 How to get started with a coordinated track motion.............................................. 12
5.2 Defining the Base Frame for a track motion ......................................................... 12
6 Coordinated external axes.............................................................................................. 16
6.1 How to get started with a coordinated (moveable) user coordinate system .......... 16
6.2 Defining the User Frame for a rotational axis (single).......................................... 17
6.3 Defining the User Frame for a two-axes mechanical unit, Method 1.................... 20
6.4 Defining the User Frame for a two-axes mechanical unit, Method 2.................... 23
7 Defining Tools .................................................................................................................. 28
7.1 Creating a new tool................................................................................................ 28
7.2 Manually updating the TCP and weight of a tool.................................................. 29
7.3 Methods of defining the tool coordinate system ................................................... 29
7.4 Using the robot to change the TCP and orientation of a tool ................................ 31
7.5 Stationary tool........................................................................................................ 33
8 Work Objects and Program Displacements ................................................................. 35
8.1 General................................................................................................................... 35
8.2 Using work objects ................................................................................................ 36
8.3 Creating a new work object ................................................................................... 36
8.4 Manually updating the user and object coordinate system of the work object...... 37
8.5 Methods of defining a work object........................................................................ 37
8.6 Using the robot to change the work object ............................................................ 38
8.7 Defining a moveable object frame......................................................................... 40
8.8 How to use different work objects to get different displacements ........................ 40
8.9 How to adjust the program vertically using the object frame................................ 42
8.10 Using program displacement ............................................................................... 42
User’s Guide
10-1
Calibration
Page
8.11
8.12
8.13
8.14
10-2
Creating a new displacement frame.....................................................................
Manually updating a displacement frame ...........................................................
Methods for defining a displacement frame........................................................
Using the robot to change a displacement frame ................................................
43
43
44
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User’s Guide
Calibration
Calibration
1 Coordinate systems
All robot positions in a robot program, are stored in rectangular coordinates (e.g. xyz
values for position), related to a defined coordinate system (or frame). This coordinate
system may in turn be related to another coordinate system etc. in a chain. Some of
these coordinate systems are embedded in the configuration of the robot system, and
are not visible to the user, while others may be programmed by the user. The table
below provides an overview of the various coordinate systems (or frames) used in the
robot system:
Coordinate system
Defined where
Related to
Base Frame of robot
Service/View:BaseFrame.
Base frame definition of robot gives relation between
world and base frame.
World Frame
World Frame
No definition needed
Nothing
User Frame, fixed in room.
(Tool mounted on robot)
Program/View: Data Types - wobjdata
In any work object data
World Frame
User Frame, fixed on robot mounting
plate.
(Tool fixed in room)
Program/View: Data Types - wobjdata
In any work object data
Wrist Frame
User Frame, coordinated to an external
axis
Service/View:/BaseFrame.
In the base frame definition of an external mechanical
unit
World Frame
Object Frame
Program/View: Data Types - wobjdata
In any work object data
User Frame
Program Displacement Frame
In the system variable C_PROGDISP, set up by instructions PDispSet or PDispOn etc.
Object Frame
Robtarget frame (Programmed position)
When a position is programmed.
Program Displacement Frame
Base Frame of a mechanical unit (only for
internal system use)
Service/View:BaseFrame.
In the base frame definition of an external mechanical
unit or as configuration parameter.
World Frame
Wrist Frame
Implicit in the kinematic model of robot
Base Frame of the robot.
Tool Frame
(Tool mounted on robot)
Program/View: Data Types - tooldata
In any tool data
Wrist Frame
Tool Frame
(Tool fixed in room)
Program/View: Data Types - tooldata
In any tool data
World Frame
Now any programmed position, e.g. p1, will be related to the World Coordinate system
through the chain:
world frame ’ user frame ’ object frame ’ program displacement frame ’ p1
The current position of the robot, i.e. the location of the tool, is related to the World
Coordinate system through the chain:
world frame ’ base frame ’ kinematic model ’ wrist centre frame ’ tool frame
User’s Guide
10-3
Calibration
When the robot is moved in automatic mode to a programmed position, the aim is to
bring the tool (tool frame) to coincide with the programmed position, i.e. to close the
chain:
user frame ’ object frame ’ program displacement frame ’ p1
world frame
base frame ’ kinematic model ’ wrist centre frame ’ tool frame
Z
Y
P1
X
Z
vem
mo
Wrist
Y
ent
Y
P-disp X
Z
Tool
y
z
x
Y
Z
Z
X
Object X
Y
Z
Z
User
X
Y
Robot base
X
World
X
The accuracy of the robot, i.e. how well the tool frame will coincide with the programmed position, is normally independent of the accuracy of the various coordinate
systems. This is true, however, only if the same coordinate systems are used as when
programming the robot, pointing out all positions with the robot (repetition accuracy).
If the coordinate systems are changed, making it possible to displace the program, then
the accuracy is dependent on every single link in the chain. This means that the accuracy is directly dependent on the calibration accuracy of the various frames. This is
even more important for off-line programming.
In the following chapters, an overview will be given of the steps to be taken to calibrate
and define the robot and the different coordinate systems mentioned above.
10-4
User’s Guide
Calibration
2 Coordinated axes
2.1 External axes, general
All external axes are handled in mechanical units. This means that before an external
axis may be moved, the mechanical unit to which it belongs, must be activated. Within
a mechanical unit, the different axes will be given a logical name, from a to f. In the
system parameters, these logical axes will be connected to the external axes joints. For
each joint a motor and a drive unit is defined. Different joints may share the same motor
and drive unit.
Two or more mechanical units may be activated at the same time, as long as they do not
have the same logical axes defined in their set of external axes. However, two or more
mechanical units may have the same logical axes, if they are not activated simultaneously.
Two or more mechanical units may not be activated at the same time, if they share one
or more drive units, even if they use separate logical axes. This means that two logical
axes, each belonging to different mechanical units, may control the same drive unit, but
not at the same time.
2.2 Coordination
A mechanical unit may be coordinated or not coordinated with the robot movements.
If it is not coordinated, each axis will be moved independent of the robot movements,
e.g. when jogging, only the separate axis will move. However during program execution, the external axes will be synchronized to the robot movement, in such a way that
both movements will be completed in the same time.
If the mechanical unit is coordinated, it is guaranteed that the robot TCP movements,
as seen in the object or user coordinate system, will be the same irrespective of the
movements of the external axes.
Two types of coordination categories exist. The first category of coordination is when
the robot itself is moved, e.g. the coordination to a gantry or track movement. This
means that the robot is mounted on a gantry or a track, and may be moved along these
axes. The world and user/object coordinate systems, however, will be fixed in the room,
and the robot movements in these coordinate systems will be independent of simultaneous gantry or track movements. This coordination is automatically active, if the
mechanical unit with the track motion is active.
The second coordination category, is when the robot movements are coordinated to the
movements of a user frame connected to a mechanical unit. E.g. a user frame may be
placed on a turntable and connected to its movements. An ordinary work object may be
used for this purpose, if it is marked with the name of the mechanical unit to be connected to, and that it should be moveable. The coordination will be active if the
mechanical unit is active, and the “coordinated” work object is active. When such a
“coordinated” work object is used, in jogging or in a move instruction, the data in the
“uframe” component will be ignored and the location of the user coordinate system will
User’s Guide
10-5
Calibration
only depend on the movements of the mechanical unit. However the “oframe” component will still work giving an object frame related to the user frame and also the displacement frame may be used.
3 Calibration
3.1 What is calibration?
Calibration involves setting the calibration positions (zero positions) of the axes and is
used as the basis for their positioning. If the robot or external axes are not correctly
calibrated, this will result in incorrect positioning and will have a negative effect on the
agility of the robot. The robot is calibrated on delivery.
The position of the robot axes is determined using a resolver and a counter that counts
the number of resolver revolutions. If the robot is correctly calibrated, it is automatically able to calculate the current position on start-up.
Calibration is carried out in two stages:
- Calibration of resolvers (fine calibration): the axes are placed in their specific
calibration positions and the current resolver values are stored. For information
on how to do this, see the chapter on Repairs in the Product Manual.
- Update of revolution counters: the correct motor revolution for the calibration
is defined; the axes are placed close to their calibration positions and the
revolution counters are updated.
The position of an external axis is determined using sync. switches. The same method
used for the robot can be used.
3.2 Viewing the calibration status
• Press the Miscellaneous key
and select the Service window.
• Choose View: Calibration.
This window displays an overview of the status of all the mechanical units in the robot
system (see Figure 1).
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User’s Guide
Calibration
File
Edit
View
Calib
Service Calibration
Unit
Status
Robot
Manip1
Manip2
Trackm
Synchronized
Synchronized
Synchronized
Synchronized
1(4)
Calibration
status
Figure 1 The Service Calibrate window shows whether or not the robot system is calibrated.
The calibration status can be any of the following:
- Synchronized
All axes are calibrated and their positions are known. The unit is ready for use.
- Not updated Rev. Counter
All axes are fine-calibrated but one (or more) of the axes has a revolution
counter that is NOT updated. This or these must thus be updated.
- Not calibrated
One (or more) of the axes is NOT fine-calibrated. This or these must thus be
fine-calibrated.
- Unsynchronized
At least one of the axes has a position that is NOT known. An external axis with
a sync. switch must thus be synchronized. See Section 5, Starting up, in this
manual.
3.3 Checking the calibration
If a revolution counter is incorrectly updated, it will cause incorrect positioning.
Thus, check the calibration very carefully after each update.
An incorrect update can damage the robot system or injure someone.
• Run the calibration program under the /SERVICE/CALIBRAT/ directory on the
system diskette, Set up. An alternative method is to jog the robot axis-by-axis until
the axis angles in the Jogging window equal zero.
• Check each axis to see if the marks are positioned exactly opposite one another. If they
are not, the calibration must be redone.
The marks may be scribed lines, vernier scales or the like. Their location is described in
the chapter on Installation and Commissioning in the Product Manual.
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10-7
Calibration
3.4 Updating revolution counters
• Open the Service window.
• Choose View: Calibration.
• Select the desired unit.
• Move the robot or the chosen unit close to (half a motor revolution at the furthest) the
calibration pose. The latter is usually indicated by a scribed line or a vernier scale. The
calibration pose of the robot is described in the chapter on Installation and
Commissioning in the Product Manual.
• Choose Calib: Rev.Counter Update.
A dialog box will appear, in which you can choose the axis you want to update (see
Figure 2).
Rev.Counter Updating
Robot
To update, include axes and press OK.
Axis
Status
1
2
3
4
5
6
Not Rev.Counter
Not Rev.Counter
Calibrated
Calibrated
Not Rev.Counter
Not Rev.Counter
4(6)
x
x
x
x
Incl
All
updated
updated
updated
updated
Cancel
OK
Figure 2 The dialog box used to select axes when updating the revolution counter.
• Select the axis to be updated and press the Incl function key.
An x to the left indicates that the axis is to be updated.
• Use the same procedure on the remaining axes or press the function key All which
selects all axes. A selected axis can be deselected by pressing the Excl function key.
• Confirm the choice of axes by pressing OK.
• Start updating by pressing OK in the confirmation dialog box.
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Calibration
4 Base Frame for the Robot
4.1 Defining the Base Frame for the Robot
The following methods are used to define the location of the robot’s base frame in relation to the world coordinate system.
In order to define a robot base frame you need a world fixed tip within the robot’s working range, and optionally an elongator attached to the tip. If the robot is mounted on a
track or similar, the track should be in its calibration position. The calibration procedure
consists of a number of positionings for the robot’s TCP to a reference point. The reference point´s coordinates in the world coordinate system, must be known. The coordinates must be stated before the calibration can be done.
The following positions on the world fixed tip device are involved in the calibration:
- the tip itself (with known coordinates in world), used when defining the base
frame translation
- one point on the elongator defining the positive z direction for the world coordinate system
- one point on the elongator defining the positive x direction for the world coordinate system.
Z
l
(xw, yw, zw)
Z
Elongator point Z
l
Elongator point X
X
World fixed tip device
Z
Robot base
X
World
X
Figure 3 Robot base frame definition points.
When the necessary conditions are fulfilled the definition of the robot base frame can
be performed. Please observe, that in the case of a track mounted robot, the track must
be in the calibration position before the base frame of the robot may be defined.
• Press the Miscellaneous key
and select the Service window.
• Choose View:BaseFrame.
A dialog containing all synchronized mechanical units is shown.
• Select the robot and press Enter
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or Def.
10-9
Calibration
A dialog like the one in Figure 4 will appear.
Robot Base Frame Definition
Unit
: MASTER_ROBOT
Method
: 4 points...
Status
Point
1(4)
Point
Point
Point
Point
1
2
3
4
Set...
Modified
ModPos
Cancel
(OK)
Figure 4 Robot base frame definition dialog.
To choose a definition method
Before you start modifying any positions, make sure the desired method is displayed.
• Select the field Method and press Enter
.
• Choose method for definition and press OK.
The method requires an elongator attached to the world fixed tip.
Input of world coordinates of the reference point
• Press Set.
• Input the x, y and z values.
• Verify that the input is correct and press OK.
To record world fixed reference points
• Select the first point Point 1.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to the world fixed tip.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Repeat the above for the points Point 2 to Point n.
To record the elongator X point
• Select the elongator point Point X.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to the elongator point on the positive X axis.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
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Calibration
To record the elongator Z point
• Select the elongator point Point Z.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to the elongator point on the positive Z axis.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
To calculate the robot base frame
• Press OK to calculate the robot base frame for the selected mechanical unit.
When the calculation is finished, a dialog like the one in Figure 5 will appear.
Robot Base Frame Calculation Result
Unit
: MASTER_ROBOT
Calculation Log
1(10)
Method
Mean error
Max error
Cartesian X
Cartesian Y
Cartesian Z
n points (n=4)
1.12
2.31
10.34
234.56
-78.56
File...
Cancel
OK
Figure 5 The result of a robot base frame calculation.
Field
Description
Unit
The name of the mechanical unit for which the definition of
robot base frame is to be done.
List contents
Description
Method
Displays the selected calibration method.
Mean error
The accuracy of the robot positioning against the tip.
Max error
The maximum error for one positioning.
Cartesian X
The x coordinate for the base frame.
Cartesian Y
The y coordinate for the base frame.
Cartesian Z
The z coordinate for the base frame.
Quaternion 1-4
Orientation components for the base frame.
The result of the calculation is expressed in the world coordinate system.
The calculation result can be saved in a separate file for later use in a PC:
• Press the function key File.
• Specify a name and a location where to save the result.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
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Calibration
If the estimated error is
- acceptable, press OK to confirm the new robot base frame.
- not acceptable, redefine by pressing Cancel.
• Choose File: Restart in the Service window to activate the base frame.
The definition is now complete, but before proceeding with other tasks, verify it by
jogging the robot in the world coordinate system.
5 Coordinated track motion
5.1 How to get started with a coordinated track motion
In the checklist below, the steps required to coordinate track motion are described. In
each step, there may be a reference to another chapter in this manual, where more
details of the specific actions to be taken will be found.
• Define the system parameters for the track motion, see chapter 12 in this manual System Parameters/Defining a track motion with coordinated motion. Find out the name
of this mechanical unit, and the corresponding logical axis.
• Calibrate the robot and the track motion, i.e. the zero position of the measuring system
for both robot and track must be carefully determined. See Calibration on page 6.
• Define the base frame of the robot, see Defining the Base Frame for the Robot on page
9. Please observe that the track must be in its calibration position when the robot base
frame is defined.
• Define the base frame of the track, see Defining the Base Frame for a track motion
on page 12.
• Store all these definitions on a diskette by giving the command File: Save All as in
the System parameter window. See chapter 12 in this manual.
• Activate the track unit in the jogging window and check that the coordination is working satisfactorily. This may be done by choosing World or Wobj in the field Coord and
then jogging the track axis. The robot TCP should not move, but be fixed relative to
the object coordinate system.
5.2 Defining the Base Frame for a track motion
To make coordinated track motion possible it is necessary to define the base frame of
the track. This frame is located in the calibration position of the track, see Figure 6.
For the definition of a track base frame you need a world fixed tip within the robot’s
working range. The calibration procedure consists of a number of positionings of the
TCP to the reference point. Please note that before the base frame of the track may be
defined, the base frame of the robot must be defined with the track in the calibration
position.
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User’s Guide
Calibration
Z
l
World
World fixed
tip device
X
Z
X
Z
Z
Robot base
X
Robot base
X
Track base
Calibration position
for track
Figure 6 Track base frame definition procedure.
The track’s base coordinate system has its origin in the robot’s base when the track is
in its calibration position. The x direction is pointing along the linear track path and the
z axis of the track’s coordinate system is parallel with the z axis of the robot’s base
coordinate system.
Figure 7 shows an example of how the base systems are oriented for a specific robot
mounting. In this case the robot is mounted on the track at an angle of 45 degrees.
Y
Y
Y
Y
Track base
X
X
Robot base
Robot base
Robot base
X
X
Figure 7 Track and robot base coordinate systems seen from above.
• Press the Miscellaneous key
and select the Service window.
• Choose View:BaseFrame.
A dialog containing all synchronized mechanical units is shown.
• Select the track unit and press Enter
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or Def.
10-13
Calibration
A dialog like the one in Figure 8 will appear.
Track Base Frame Definition
Unit
: TRACK
Method
: n points (n=3)...
Point
Status
Point 1
Point 2
Point 3
Modified
-
1(3)
ModPos
Cancel
(OK)
Figure 8 Track base frame definition dialog.
To choose definition methods
Before you start modifying any positions, make sure the desired method is displayed.
The method defines the number of track positions from where the robot TCP will be
moved to the reference point.
• Select the field Method and press Enter
.
• Choose the number of points to be used for definition and press OK. (Currently only
the three point method is implemented.)
To record world fixed reference points
Activate the track unit and run it to the calibration position, i.e. zero position should be
displayed on the teach pendant.
• Select the first point Point 1.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to the world fixed tip.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Move the robot along the track and repeat the steps above for the points Point 2 and
Point 3.
To calculate the track base frame
• Press OK to calculate the track base frame for the selected mechanical unit.
When the calculation is finished, a dialog like the one in Figure 9 will appear.
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Calibration
Track Base Frame Calculation Result
Unit
: TRACK
Calculation Log
1(10)
Method
Mean error
Max error
Cartesian X
Cartesian Y
Cartesian Z
n points (n=3)
1.19
2.56
63.05
16.12
98.00
File...
Cancel
OK
Figure 9 The result of a track base frame calculation.
The result of the calculation is expressed in the world coordinate system.
Field
Description
Unit
The name of the mechanical unit for which the definition of
base frame is to be done.
List contents
Description
Method
Displays the selected track definition method.
Mean error
The accuracy of the robot positioning against the tip.
Max error
The maximum error for one positioning.
Cartesian X
The x coordinate for the base frame. (x, y, z is the same as for
the robot base frame).
Cartesian Y
The y coordinate for the base frame.
Cartesian Z
The z coordinate for the base frame.
Quaternion 1-4
Orientation components for the base frame.
The calculation result can be saved in a separate file for later use in a PC:
• Press the function key File.
• Specify a name and a location where to save the result.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
If the estimated error is
- acceptable, press OK to confirm the new track base frame.
- not acceptable, redefine by pressing Cancel.
• Choose File: Restart in the Service window to activate the track base frame.
The definition is now complete but before proceeding with other tasks, verify it by
doing the following:
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10-15
Calibration
• Point out with the robot, in coordinated mode, the world fixed reference point with
the track in different positions, and print out the position in world coordinates. Jog the
track in coordinated mode.
6 Coordinated external axes
6.1 How to get started with a coordinated (moveable) user coordinate system
In the checklist below, the steps required to coordinate a user coordinate system are
described. In each step, there may be a reference to another chapter in this manual,
where more details of the specific actions to be taken will be found.
• Define the system parameters for the external mechanical unit, see chapter 12 in this
manual System Parameters/Defining an external mechanical robot coordinated with
the robot. Find out the name of this mechanical unit, and the corresponding logical
axis.
• Calibrate the robot and the mechanical unit, i.e. the zero position of the measuring system for both robot and mechanical unit must be carefully determined. See Calibration
on page 6.
• Define the base frame of the robot, see Defining the Base Frame for the Robot on page
9.
• Define the user frame of the mechanical unit, see Defining the User Frame for a rotational axis (single) on page 17 or Defining the User Frame for a two-axes mechanical
unit, Method 1 on page 20 or Defining the User Frame for a two-axes mechanical
unit, Method 2 on page 23.
• Store all these definitions on a diskette, by giving the command File: Save All as in
the System parameter window. See chapter 12 in this manual.
• Create a new work object data and give it a name, e.g. turntable. In this work object,
change the component ufprog to FALSE, indicating that the user object should be connected to a moveable mechanical unit. Also change the component ufmec to the name
of the mechanical unit turntable (must be written in text mode).
• If you want the object frame to be displaced relative to the user frame, you may write
the displacement in the x, y, z values of the “oframe” component of the work object.
For other methods see Defining a moveable object frame on page 40.
• Activate the mechanical unit in the jogging window and check that the coordination
is working satisfactorily. This may be done by choosing Wobj in the field Coord, and
the work object, e.g. turntable, in the field Wobj, and then jogging one of the mechanical unit axes. The robot TCP should also move, following the moveable object coordinate system.
• When programming, it is important to have the coordinated work object, in this case
turntable, programmed as an argument in each move instruction. This will be automatically added to the move instruction, if the work object is activated in the jogging
window before starting the programming.
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User’s Guide
Calibration
6.2 Defining the User Frame for a rotational axis (single)
This method will define the location of the user coordinate system of a rotational single
axis type mechanical unit, relative to the world coordinate system. This user coordinate
system should be used when a coordinated work object is used.
The definition of a user frame for a rotational external axis requires that the turntable
on the external axis has a marked reference point. The calibration procedure consists
of a number of positionings for the robot’s TCP on the reference point when the turntable is rotated to different angles. See Figure 10.
Axis of rotation
Turntable run by
single external axis
Position 2
l
l
z
y
Position 1
Position 3
l
x
l
Position 4
z
Reference point
on turntable
Origin for user coordinate
system of rotational single
y
x
World
Figure 10 Definition points for a rotational axis.
The user coordinate system for the rotational axis has its origin in the centre of the turntable. The z direction coincides with the axis of rotation and the x axis goes through
the reference point. Figure 11 shows the user coordinate system for two different positionings of the turntable (turntable seen from above).
l
x
y
y
l
0 degrees rotation
x
+45 degrees rotation
Figure 11 The user coordinate system at various angles of rotation.
User’s Guide
10-17
Calibration
• Press the Miscellaneous key
and select the Service window.
• Choose View:BaseFrame.
A dialog containing all synchronized mechanical units is shown.
• Select the mechanical unit and press Enter
or Def.
A dialog like the one in Figure 12 will appear.
Rot Single User Frame Definition
Unit
: ROT_SINGLE
Method
: n points (n=4)...
Point
Status
Point 1
Point 2
Point 3
Modified
-
1(3)
ModPos
Cancel
(OK)
Figure 12 Dialog for definition of user frame for a rotational axis.
To choose a definition method
Before you start modifying any positions, make sure the desired method is displayed.
• Select the field Method and press Enter
.
• Choose number of points to use for definition and press OK. (Currently only the four
point method is implemented.)
To record turntable reference points
Activate the mechanical unit and run it to its calibration position, i.e. zero position
should be displayed on the teach pendant.
• Select the first point Point 1.
• Point out the reference point on the turntable with the robot’s TCP.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Rotate the turntable in the positive direction and repeat the above for the points Point
2 and Point 3.
To calculate the user frame
• Press OK to calculate the user frame for the selected mechanical unit.
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User’s Guide
Calibration
When the calculation is finished a dialog like the one in Figure 13 will appear.
Rot Single User Frame Calc Result
Unit
: ROT_SINGLE
Calculation Log
1(10)
Method
Mean error
Max error
Cartesian X
Cartesian Y
Cartesian Z
n points (n=3)
1.12
2.31
7.08
35.55
-97.00
File...
Cancel
OK
Figure 13 The result of a user frame calculation for a rotating single.
The calculation log shows the user frame expressed in the world coordinate system
when the mechanical unit is in its calibration position.
Field
Description
Unit
The name of the mechanical unit for which the definition of
user frame is to be done.
List contents
Description
Method
Displays the selected calibration method.
Mean error
The accuracy of the robot positioning against the reference
point.
Max error
The maximum error for one positioning.
Cartesian X
The x coordinate for the user frame.
Cartesian Y
The y coordinate for the user frame.
Cartesian Z
The z coordinate for the user frame.
Quaternion 1-4
Orientation components for the user frame.
The calculation result can be saved in a separate file for later use in a PC:
• Press the function key File.
• Specify a name and a location where to save the result.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
If the estimated error is
- acceptable, press OK to confirm the new user frame.
- not acceptable, redefine by pressing Cancel.
• Choose File: Restart in the Service window to activate the user frame.
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10-19
Calibration
The definition is now complete, but before proceeding with other tasks, verify it by
jogging the mechanical unit in coordinated mode.
Note The user frame is stored in the system parameters as the base frame of the
external mechanical unit. The user frame in the corresponding work object is therefore
not used.
6.3 Defining the User Frame for a two-axes mechanical unit, Method 1
This method will define the location of the user coordinate system of an “Orbit” type
mechanical unit, relative to the world coordinate system. This user coordinate system
should be used when a coordinated work object is used.
It should be noted that this method requires that the kinematics (relationship between
two axes) of the mechanical unit are defined in the robot system configuration. Therefore, this method can only be used for workpiece manipulators supplied by ABB, where
a ready-made configuration was included in the delivery. For other types of workpiece
manipulator see Defining the User Frame for a two-axes mechanical unit, Method 2 on
page 23.
The definition of this user coordinate system requires that the orbit turntable is marked
with a coordinate system as shown in Figure 14. The coordinate system must have the
x axis in the plane of the two turning axes of the Orbit station, when the turn table is in
its calibration position.
y
l
x
l
l
User coordinate
system
Figure 14 Orbit user coordinate system.
The coordinate system of the orbit station has its xy plane in the surface of the turntable,
and the origin is located in the centre of the turntable, i.e. the z axis will coincide with
the second axis.
• Press the Miscellaneous key
and select the Service window.
• Choose View:BaseFrame.
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Calibration
A dialog containing all synchronized mechanical units is shown.
• Select the mechanical unit and press Enter
or Def.
A dialog like the one in Figure 15 will appear.
Orbit User Frame Definition
: ORBIT
Unit
Point
Status
Negative X
Positive X
Positive Y
Modified
-
1(3)
ModPos
Cancel
(OK)
Figure 15 Dialog for definition of user frame for orbit station.
To record reference points
• Activate the mechanical unit and run it to its calibration position, i.e. zero position
should be displayed on the teach pendant.
• Select the first point Negative X.
• Point out the reference point on the negative x axis with the robot’s TCP (it is not
necessary that the position is on the negative side of the origin, but it must be on the
negative side relative to the next point “Positive X”).
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Select the point Positive X.
• Point out the reference point on the positive x axis with the robot’s TCP.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Select the point Positive Y.
• Point out the reference point on the positive y axis with the robot’s TCP.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
To calculate the user frame
• Press OK to calculate the user frame for the selected mechanical unit.
When the calculation is finished, a dialog like the one in Figure 16 will appear.
The calculation log shows the user frame expressed in the world coordinate system
when the mechanical unit is in its calibration position.
User’s Guide
10-21
Calibration
Orbit User Frame Calculation Result
Unit
: ORBIT
Calculation Log
1(9)
Cartesian X
Cartesian Y
Cartesian Z
Quaternion 1
Quaternion 2
Quaternion 3
123.45
45.67
398.56
0.382683
0.000000
0.923880
File...
Cancel
OK
Figure 16 The result of a linear moving base frame calculation.
Field
Description
Unit
The name of the mechanical unit for which the definition of
user frame is to be done.
List contents
Description
Cartesian X
The x coordinate for the user frame.
Cartesian Y
The y coordinate for the user frame.
Cartesian Z
The z coordinate for the user frame.
Quaternion 1-4
Orientation components for the user frame.
The calculation result can be saved in a separate file for later use in a PC:
• Press the function key File.
• Specify a name and a location where to save the result.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
If the estimated error is
- acceptable, press OK to confirm the new user frame.
- not acceptable, redefine by pressing Cancel.
• Choose File: Restart in the Service window to activate the user frame.
The definition is now complete, but before proceeding with other tasks, verify it by
jogging the mechanical unit in coordinated mode.
Note The user frame is stored in the system parameters as the base frame of the
external mechanical unit. The user frame in the corresponding work object is therefore
not used.
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Calibration
6.4 Defining the User Frame for a two-axes mechanical unit, Method 2
This method will define the location of the user coordinate system of an “Orbit” type
mechanical unit, relative to the world coordinate system. This user coordinate system
should be used when a coordinated work object is used.
It should be noted that this method does not require that the kinematics (relationship
between two axes) of the mechanical unit are defined in the robot system configuration. If this is a known factor, another method can be used. See Defining the User
Frame for a two-axes mechanical unit, Method 1 on page 20.
Figure 17 shows an orbit station with two rotational axes and a turntable mounted on
the second axis.
second axis
Turntable
first axis
Figure 17 Geometric structure of an orbit station.
The definition of the user frame requires that the turntable has a marked reference
point. The origin of the user frame is located in the centre of the turntable with the z
axis coinciding with the second axis of rotation. The x axis goes through the reference
point (see Figure 18).
Y
Z
Reference point
X
X
(a)
(b)
Figure 18 The turntable seen from above (a) and side (b).
The user frame is determined by two definition procedures. One procedure for the first
axis and another similar procedure for the second axis. These two procedures are performed separately but both are necessary to complete the user frame definition.
• Press the Miscellaneous key
and select the Service window.
• Choose View: Two Axes Definition
A dialog containing all synchronized mechanical units is shown.
• Select the mechanical unit and press Enter
User’s Guide
or Def.
10-23
Calibration
A dialog like the one in Figure 19 will appear.
Mechanical Unit Axes Definition
: MHA160B1
: n points (n=4)...
: 1
Unit
Method
Axis
Point
Status
1(4)
Point
Point
Point
Point
1
2
3
4
Modified
ModPos
Cancel
(OK)
Figure 19 Dialog for definition of axes.
Defining the first axis
Before defining the first axis, both axes must be run to their calibration positions. The
procedure to define the first axis consists of a number of positionings for the robot’s
TCP on the reference point when the first axis is rotated to different angles. Position 1
is the position of the reference point when both axes are fixed to their calibration positions. The following positions, position 2, 3, 4 etc., are the positions of the reference
point when the first axis is rotated to greater angles in successive steps. See Figure 20.
l
Position 4
Position 3
Z1
l
Position 2
l
Reference point
l
First axis
Position 1
Turntable
z
y
World
X1
Second axis (in calibration position)
x
Figure 20 Definition of the first axis. Four positionings of the robot’s TCP on the reference point
are performed with the first axis rotated to different angles.
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Calibration
Defining the second axis
Before defining the second axis, both axes must be run to their calibration positions.
The procedure to define the second axis consists of a number of positionings for the
robot’s TCP on the reference point when the second axis is rotated to different angles.
Position 1 is the position of the reference point when both axes are fixed to their calibration positions. The following positions, position 2, 3, 4 etc., are the positions of the
reference point when the second axis is rotated to greater angles in successive steps.
See Figure 21.
Z2
Position 2 l
First axis (in calibration position) Position 3 l
l
Position 1
X2
l
Position 4
z
Reference point
Second axis
y
World
x
Figure 21 Definition of the second axis. Four positionings of the robot’s TCP on the reference
point are performed with the second axis rotated to different angles.
This frame coincides with the user frame when both axes are fixed to their calibration
positions.
To choose a definition method
Before you start modifying any positions, make sure the desired method is displayed
and the mechanical unit is activated.
• Select the field Method and press Enter
.
• Choose the number of points to use for the axis definition and press OK.
To choose axis
You can choose which one of the axes you want to define. Remember that both axes
must be defined to complete the user frame definition. It is possible to redefine both
axes or just one of them.
• Select the field Axis and press Enter
User’s Guide
to switch axis.
10-25
Calibration
To record reference points for the first axis definition
Make sure Axis 1 is chosen. Run the mechanical unit to its calibration position.
• Select the first point, Point 1.
• Point out the reference point on the turntable with the robot’s TCP.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Rotate the first axis to a greater angle and repeat the above for the points Point 2 to
Point n.
• Press OK to calculate the frame of the first axis.
To record reference points for the second axis definition
Make sure Axis 2 is chosen. Run the mechanical unit to its calibration position.
• Select the first point Point 1.
• Point out the reference point on the turntable with the robot’s TCP.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Rotate the second axis to a greater angle and repeat the above for the points Point 2
to Point n.
• Press OK to calculate the frame of the second axis.
To confirm/cancel the new axis definition
When OK is pressed after the points have been modified for an axis, a dialog like the
one in Figure 22 will appear.
Mechanical Unit Axes Calc Result
Unit
Axis
: MHA160B1
: 1
Calculation Log
Method
Mean error
Max error
Cartesian X
Cartesian Y
Cartesian Z
File...
1(10)
n points (n=4)
0.57
0.98
7.08
35.55
-97.00
Cancel
OK
Figure 22 The result of the first axis definition.
The calculation log shows the calculated frame expressed in the world coordinate
system.
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Field
Description
Unit
The name of the mechanical unit for which the definition of the
axis is to be done.
Axis
The chosen axis.
List contents
Description
Method
Displays the selected method.
Mean error
The accuracy of the robot positioning relative to the reference
point.
Max error
The maximum error for one positioning.
Cartesian X
The x coordinate for the frame.
Cartesian Y
The y coordinate for the frame.
Cartesian Z
The z coordinate for the frame.
Quaternion 1-4
Orientation components for the frame.
The calculation result can be saved in a separate file for later use in a PC:
• Press the function key File.
• Specify a name and a location where to save the result.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
If the estimated error is
- acceptable, press OK to confirm the new axis definition. Now the next axis can
be defined if necessary.
- not acceptable, redefine by pressing Cancel.
• Choose File: Restart in the Service window to activate the user frame.
The user frame definition is now completed, but before proceeding with other tasks,
verify it by jogging the mechanical unit in coordinated mode.
Note The user frame is stored in the system parameters as the base frame of the
external mechanical unit. The user frame in the corresponding work object is therefore
not used.
User’s Guide
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Calibration
7 Defining Tools
The position of the robot and its movements are always related to its tool coordinate
system, i.e. the TCP and tool orientation (see Figure 23). To get the best performance,
it is important to define the tool coordinate system as correctly as possible. For more
information, see the RAPID Reference Manual/ Motion and I/O Principles.
y
TCP
x
z
Figure 23 The tool coordinate system for a gripper.
A tool coordinate system can either be defined manually or the robot can be used as the
measuring tool. Manual definitions can be used if accurate data for the dimensions of
the tool is available or if minor corrections are to be done.
7.1 Creating a new tool
A tool should normally be placed in the system module, User. In that way, it will be
common to all programs, which means that if a TCP is modified, all programs will
automatically be affected. The tool can then also be used for jogging when there is no
program in the program memory.
• Open the Program Data Types window by choosing View: Data Types.
• Select the type tooldata and press Enter
.
• Create the new tool using one of the following alternatives:
- alt 1. Press the function key New.
The tool’s TCP and orientation will then be the same as the robot’s mounting
flange.
- alt 2. Select an existing tool and press the function key Dupl.
The tool’s TCP and orientation will then be the same as the one duplicated.
A window appears, displaying the name of the data.
• If you want to change the name, press Enter
and specify a new name.
• Press the function key Decl.
A dialog box appears, displaying the basic tooldata declaration.
• If you want to save the data in another module, select the field In Module and press
Enter
. Specify the name of the module in which the data is to be saved.
• Press OK to confirm.
Note: Do not change the type of the tool. This must always be of the persistent type.
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Calibration
7.2 Manually updating the TCP and weight of a tool
• Open the Program Data Types window by choosing View: Data Types.
• Select the type tooldata and press Enter
.
• Select the tool to be changed and press Enter
.
• Select the TCP component (x, y, z) that you wish to change.
• Change the value using the numeric keyboard. To enter a decimal point ( . ) or minus
sign ( - ), use the function keys.
• Select the mass component.
• Change the weight using the numeric keyboard.
• If the tool is stationary, i.e. not mounted on the robot, change the component robhold
to FALSE. For more information about stationary tools see Stationary tool on page
33.
• Choose OK to confirm the change.
Note: Only the mass of the tool should be specified. A payload handled by a gripper is
specified by the instruction GripLoad.
7.3 Methods of defining the tool coordinate system
To define the TCP of a tool, you need a world fixed tip within the robot’s working
space. You then jog to (at least) four robot positions with different orientations, as close
as possible to the world fixed tip (see Figure 24). These positions are called approach
points.
3
1
World fixed tip
2
4
Figure 24 Approach points for a tool’s TCP.
To define a complete orientation of a tool, you move any position on the desired z axis
and any position on the desired x axis to the world fixed tip. These positions are called
elongator points (see Figure 25). This can be done by fitting an elongator to the tool to
define the z and x directions or by aligning the tool according to the world coordinate
system and then jogging the robot in these directions.
Note The elongator points must be defined with the same orientation as the last
approach point used.
User’s Guide
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Calibration
z
x
x
TCP
Elongator points
z
Figure 25 Elongator points for a tool’s orientation.
If you only want to define the TCP, only the world fixed tip is needed. If you only need
a definition of the orientation in the z direction, the elongator will only point to z.
The following methods are supported:
- 4-point TCP
Four approach points are used to define the TCP. The orientation will be set
according to the wrist coordinate system (see Figure 26).
z
x
TCP
z
x
Figure 26 Using the 4-point method, only the TCP is defined. The tool direction will
correspond to the wrist coordinate system.
- 4-p TCP ORIENT NOT SET
The same as 4-point TCP but the orientation will not be changed.
- 5-point TCP&Z
Four approach points are used to define the TCP and one elongator point is used
to define the z direction of the tool. The x and y directions will be as close as
possible to the corresponding axes in the wrist coordinate system (see Figure 27).
z
x
x
TCP
Elongator point
z
Figure 27 Using the 5-point method, the TCP and the tool’s z direction are defined.
The x and y directions are set automatically by the robot.
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Calibration
- 6-point TCP&ZX
Four approach points are used to define the TCP, one elongator point is used
to define the z direction and one elongator point is used to define the x
direction of the tool (see Figure 28).
z
x
x
TCP
Elongator points
z
Figure 28 Using the 6-point method, the TCP and all the tool’s directions are defined.
7.4 Using the robot to change the TCP and orientation of a tool
• Open the Program Data Types window by choosing View: Data Types.
• Select the type tooldata and press Enter
.
• Select a tool (or create a new tool, see Creating a new tool on page 28).
• Choose Special: Define Coord.
A dialog box appears, displaying the points defined by whichever method was used
(see Figure 29).
Tool Coordinates Definition
Tool
:tool4
Method
:4 points TCP...
Status
Point
1(4)
Approach
Approach
Approach
Approach
Point
Point
Point
Point
1
2
3
4
Desc... ModPos
Modified
Cancel
OK
Figure 29 The robot can be used to define the tool coordinate system.
The status can be defined as follows:
Status
Meaning
-
No position defined
Modified
Position modified
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Calibration
To choose a definition method
Before you start modifying any positions, make sure the desired method is displayed.
See Methods of defining the tool coordinate system on page 29.
• Select the field Method and press Enter
.
• Choose a method and press OK.
To record Approach Points
• Select the first point Approach Point 1.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to the world fixed tip.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Repeat the above for the points Approach Point 2-4.
To record Elongator Point Z (if the 4-point TCP method is not used)
• Select Elongator z Point.
• Jog - without changing the orientation from the last approach point - any point on
the desired positive z axis to the world fixed tip. An extension should be fitted to
obtain better accuracy.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
To record Elongator Point X (only if the 6-Point TCP&XZ method is used)
• Select Elongator x Point.
• Jog - without changing the orientation from the last approach point - any point on
the desired positive x axis to the world fixed tip.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
To calculate the tool coordinate system
• Press OK to calculate the tool coordinate system.
When the calculation is finished, a dialog like the one in Figure 30 will appear.
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Calibration
Tool Calculation Result
Tool
: tool4
TCP
: (50.57, 0.00, 231.82)
Calculation Log
1(4)
Method
Mean Error
Max Error
Quaternion 1
4 points TCP
1.12
2.31
0.978453
File...
Cancel
OK
Figure 30 The result of a tool calculation.
Field
Description
TCP
The values of the calculated TCP.
Mean Error
The average distance that the approach points are from the
calculated TCP, i.e. how accurately the robot was positioned
relative to the tip.
Max Error
The maximum error for one approach point.
The calculation result can be saved in a separate file for later use in a PC.
However, this file cannot be read by the robot:
• Press the function key File.
• Specify a name and a place to save the result.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
• If the estimated error is
- acceptable, press OK to confirm the new tool coordinate system;
- not acceptable, redefine by pressing Cancel.
The definition is now complete, but before proceeding with other tasks, verify it by
linearly jogging in the tool coordinate system and by reorienting the TCP.
If the tool has been stored in a system module, save this module.
7.5 Stationary tool
When using a stationary tool, the robot is holding the work piece and the tool is stationary in the room. In this case the TCP coordinates are related to the world coordinate
system, and the work object (i.e. the user coordinate system) is related to the wrist
coordinate system.
Creating a new tool.
• The tool is created as described in previous chapters.
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Calibration
• The component robhold is changed to FALSE.
Creating a corresponding work object
When using a stationary tool, it is also necessary to use a work object held by the robot.
• The work object is created as described in Creating a new work object on page 36.
• The component robhold is changed to TRUE.
Methods for defining the tool coordinate system
The methods are the same as for a TCP mounted on the robot. However in this case, the
reference tip is mounted on the robot and the robot is moved, so as to bring the tip to
the stationary tool TCP. The tip must be defined and activated as a tool before the definition of the stationary tool may be done.
• Define and activate the tool, which should be used as a pointing tip, and which is
mounted on the robot.
• Now the same methods for defining the stationary tool may be used, as described in
Manually updating the TCP and weight of a tool on page 29 and Using the robot to
change the TCP and orientation of a tool on page 31. Use the robot mounted tip to
point out the stationary TCP with four approach points, and if needed, the z and x
directions of the axes. It is possible to use the same positioning for all four TCP
approach points to perform a faster frame definition. However, it is recommended to
point out the stationary TCP with different orientations to obtain a reliable statistical
result. The point that is used to approach the stationary TCP must be the active TCP
(hold by the robot).
Note: If the stationary tool is to be used with coordinated track motion , the coordination must be active during the calibration of the stationary tool.
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8 Work Objects and Program Displacements
8.1 General
All programmed positions are related to a program displacement frame, which in turn
is related to the object frame, related to the user frame, related to the world frame. Both
object and user frames are included in a work object, which may be added to each move
instruction. See Figure 31.
z
z
Object coordinate system
y
User coordinate system
x
y
x
Figure 31 A user and an object coordinate system describe the position of a work object.
The intention is to use the work object to define both the position of a table (user frame)
and the position of the object to work on (object frame). When the table or the object
is moved, the program may still work if the corresponding work object is updated.
These coordinate systems are very well suited to off-line programming since the positions specified can usually be taken directly from a drawing of the work object.
The program displacement coordinate system is used for small temporary displacements, e.g. as the result of a search operation. This displacement is modal, i.e. it is activated in a separate instruction and then it remains active until it is deactivated in
another separate instruction. See Figure 32.
Z
Z
Y
X
Y
X
Figure 32 Using a displacement frame, all positions in the program can be displaced.
All such program displacements include both robot displacements and external axes
displacements.
Please note the difference between work object and program displacement. The work
object used must be added to each move instruction and it must be active when programming the move instruction. It should be included from the beginning because it is
a little tricky to add it afterwards. A program displacement, however, which is activated in a separate instruction, is very easy to add afterwards.
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Calibration
8.2 Using work objects
In the checklist below, the steps required to define and use a work object are described.
In each step, there may be a reference to another chapter in this manual, where more
details of the specific actions to be taken will be found.
• Before starting to program, the work objects to be used must be defined. First create
a new work object and give it a name, e.g. “wobj1”, see Creating a new work object
on page 36.
• Define the work object by using the robot to point out three points on the user frame
and the object frame respectively. See Using the robot to change the work object on
page 38. Please note that if the same positions are used both for the user frame and for
the object frame, then all the locations will go into the user frame and the object frame
will still be zero. It should also be noted that it is possible to update the values of the
work object manually. See Manually updating the user and object coordinate system
of the work object on page 37.
• Now check that the definition of the work object is correct by jogging the robot in the
object coordinate system. This may be done by choosing the Wobj in the field Coord
in the jogging window, and the work object, e.g wobj1, in the field Wobj, and then jogging the robot.
• When programming it is important to have the work object, in this case wobj1, programmed as an argument in each move instruction. This will be automatically added
to the move instruction, if the work object is activated in the jogging window before
starting the programming.
8.3 Creating a new work object
A work object should normally be placed in the system module, User. In this way it will
be common to all programs, which means that if a work object is modified, all
programs will also automatically be modified. The work object can also be used for
jogging when there is no program in the program memory.
• Open the Program Data Types window by choosing View: Data Types.
• Select the type wobjdata and press Enter
.
• Create the new work object using one of the following alternatives:
- alt 1. Press the function key New.
The user and object coordinate systems will then coincide with the world
coordinate system.
- alt 2. Select an existing work object and press the function key Dupl.
The coordinate systems will then be the same as those duplicated.
A window appears, displaying the name of the data.
• If you want to change the name, press Enter
and specify a new name.
• Press the function key Decl.
A dialog box appears, displaying the basic wobjdata declaration.
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• If you want to save the data in another module, select the field In Module and press
Enter
. State the name of the module where the data is to be sent.
• Press OK to confirm.
Note: Do not change the work object type. This must always be of the persistent type.
8.4 Manually updating the user and object coordinate system of the work object
• Open the Program Data Types window by choosing View: Data Types.
• Select the type wobjdata and press Enter
.
• Select the work object to be changed and press Enter
.
• Select the component (x, y, z, q1-q4) that you wish to change.
• Change the value using the numeric keyboard. To enter a decimal point ( . ) and
minus sign ( - ), use the function keys.
• Choose OK to confirm.
Note
If the work object is defined using a movable user coordinate system, only the
object coordinate system need be defined. The user coordinate system is defined in the
Service window. See Coordinated external axes on page 16.
8.5 Methods of defining a work object
The methods used to define the user and object coordinate system are called:
- No change
No changes to the definition of the user or object coordinate system will be
made, i.e. the definition of the user or object frame will be left as it is.
- 3-point
Three points are used: two points on the x axis and one point on the y axis (see
Figure 33). A tool with a known TCP is required.
User
Z
Object
Z
User
Z
X1
Y
Y1
Y
Y1
Y
X
X2
X1
X2
X
X
Figure 33 Measuring points for defining a work object.
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Calibration
8.6 Using the robot to change the work object
• Choose View: Data Types.
• Select the type wobjdata and press Enter
.
• Select the work object to be defined (or create a new one, see Creating a new work
object on page 36).
• Choose Special: Define Coord.
A dialog box appears, displaying the points defined by the method that was used
(see Figure 34).
Work Object Coordinates Definition
WObj
Tool
User Method
Object Method
:
:
:
:
Before starting, make sure
that the tool displayed is
the one you want to use.
wobj2
tool4
3 points...
3 points...
Points
Status
User X1
User X2
User Y1
Object X1
Modified
-
Desc... ModPos
Cancel
2(6)
OK
Figure 34 The robot can be used to define the position of the work object.
The status can be defined as follows:
Status
Meaning
-
No position defined
Modified
Position modified
To record Measuring Points for the user coordinate system
Note If the work object is defined using a movable user coordinate system, the user
coordinate system is defined in the Service window. See Coordinated external axes on
page 16.
• Select the first measuring point User X1.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to a point on the x axis.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Select the measuring point User X2.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to a point on the x axis defining the positive x
direction.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
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• Select the measuring point User Y1.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to a point on the positive y axis.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
To record measuring Points for the object coordinate system
• Select the first measuring point Object X1.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to a point on the x axis.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Select the measuring point Object X2.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to a point on the x axis defining the positive x
direction.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Select the measuring point Object Y1.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to a point on the positive y axis.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
To calculate the user and object coordinate system
• Press OK to calculate the coordinate systems.
When the calculation is finished, a dialog like the one shown in Figure 35 will appear.
Work Object Calculation Result
Wobj
: wobj4
User
Obj
: (50.57, 0.00, 231.82)
: (150.56, 30.02, 1231.81)
Calculation Log
Status
User Method
Quaternion 1
Quaternion 2
Quaternion 3
3 points
1.000000
0.000000
0.000000
1(10)
File
Cancel
OK
Figure 35 The result of a work object calculation.
Field
Description
User
The origin of the user coordinate system.
Obj
The origin of the object coordinate system.
The calculation result can be saved in a separate file for later use in a PC.
Note, however, that this file cannot be read by the robot:
• Press the function key File.
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Calibration
• Specify a name and a place to save the result.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
The definition is now complete, press OK to confirm the new work object, but before
proceeding with other tasks, verify it by jogging linearly in the work object’s coordinate
system.
If the work object was stored in a system module, save this module.
8.7 Defining a moveable object frame
Method 1
• Use the method for defining a work object. See Using the robot to change the work
object on page 38. When using this method, please observe that the coordination flag,
i.e. the component ufprog in the work object data must be temporarily set to TRUE.
You must point out three positions for the user system (which must be placed as the
coordinated one) and three positions for the object system.
If the user system is not possible to reach, use method 2 or 3 below.
Method 2
• Activate the coordinated work object and jog the robot to the point where you want
to place the origin of the object frame.
• Read the coordinates, x, y, z for this position in the jogging window.
• Write these values in the o_frame component of the work object data.
This will shift the object frame to the new position, with the same orientation as the user
frame. If you want another orientation, use method 3.
Method 3
• Activate the coordinated work object (suppose it is named co_wobj), create three
positions, e.g. p1, p2 and p3. p1 should be located at the origin of the shifted object
frame, p2 on the x axis and p3 in the x-y plane.
• Program and execute the instruction
co_wobj.oframe: = DefFrame(p1, p2, p3);
8.8 How to use different work objects to get different displacements
Suppose you have used the work object wobj_use when creating a procedure, draw_fig,
as below.
MoveL p1, v200, z1, tool1\WObj:=wobj_use;
MoveL p2, v200, z1, tool1\WObj:=wobj_use;
MoveL p3, v200, z1, tool1\WObj:=wobj_use;
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MoveL p4, v200, z1, tool1\WObj:=wobj_use;
MoveL p5, v200, z1, tool1\WObj:=wobj_use;
wobj_use
P1
P2
y
P5
P4
P3
x
Now you want it to be performed displaced, corresponding to wobj1, wobj2 or wobj3,
see below.
wobj2
wobj1
wobj3
y
y
y
x
x
x
Suppose that the value of reg1 is used to control which work object should be used.
If reg1 = 1, wobj1 should be used; if reg1 = 2, wobj2 should be used; and if reg1 = 3,
wobj3 should be used.
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The program below will set wobj_use = wobj1 if reg1 = 1, then call the draw_fig procedure, etc.
IF reg1=1 THEN
wobj_use:=wobj1;
draw_fig;
ENDIF
IF reg1=2 THEN
wobj_use:=wobj2;
draw_fig;
ENDIF
IF reg1=31 THEN
wobj_use:=wobj3;
draw_fig;
ENDIF
8.9 How to adjust the program vertically using the object frame
When running your program in the location defined by wobj2, suppose you find it is
positioned a little too high. The vertical position can be adjusted by moving the object
coordinate system a small amount vertically, relative to the user coordinate system, i.e.
the z coordinate for object is changed. E.g. if the robot is to work a little lower, then the
z value should be decreased.
8.10 Using program displacement
A program displacement is set with a pose data, using a PDispSet instruction. This will
store the program displacement in a system variable, C_PROGDISP, holding also displacement values for external axes. The current value in C_PROGDISP is used in all
movement instructions and added to the programmed positions. The program displacement is cleared, when a PDispOff instruction is executed, resulting in no further displacement.
A PDispOn instruction will both calculate a new program displacement, from the difference between two positions, and store this displacement in the C_PROGDISP variable. When this instruction has been executed a new program displacement will
become active.
The following example will illustrate how to use a PDispOn instruction in combination
with a SearchL instruction, to make a movement on different locations, depending on
the search point.
The program should do the following:
- Go to a start point, pstart, for searching.
- Make a linear search from the start position to an end position, pend. When a
digital input di1 is set, the robot should stop the movement and draw a figure,
triangle, the position of which will depend on the search point, psearch.
The figure, triangle, is programmed with no displacement active and with the first position in ptriangle1.
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The program may look like:
MoveL pstart, v200, fine, tool1;
SearchL \Stop, di1, psearch, pend, v100, tool1;
PDispOn \ExeP: = psearch, ptriangle1, tool1;
triangle;
PDispOff
etc.
pstart
ptriangle1
pend
psearch
displacement
vector
8.11 Creating a new displacement frame
• Open the Program Data Types window by choosing View: Data Types.
• Select the type pose and press Enter
.
• Create the new displacement frame using one of the following alternatives:
- alt 1. Press the function key New.
The displacement frame will then have no translation or rotation.
- alt 2. Select an existing displacement frame and press the function key Dupl.
The displacement frame will then be the same as the one duplicated.
A window appears, displaying the name of the data.
• If you want to change the name, press Enter
and specify a new name.
• Press OK to confirm.
8.12 Manually updating a displacement frame
• Open the Program Data Types window by choosing View: Data Types.
• Select the type pose and press Enter
.
• Select the displacement to be changed and press Enter
.
• Select the frame component (x, y, z, q1-q4) that you wish to change.
• Change the value using the numeric keyboard. To enter a decimal point ( . ) and
minus ( - ), use the function keys.
• Choose OK to confirm the change.
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8.13 Methods for defining a displacement frame
The following method is supported:
- n-point
At least three well-defined points on an object at its initial position and the
same points when the object is in its new position (see Figure 36) are used to
define the displacement frame.
P1
P3
P2
Figure 36 A displacement frame can be defined by moving the robot to a number of points.
8.14 Using the robot to change a displacement frame
• Open the Program Data Types window by choosing View: Data Types.
• Select the type pose and press Enter
.
• Select the displacement frame to be defined (or create a new one, see Creating a new
displacement frame on page 43).
• Choose Special: Define Coord.
A dialog box appears, displaying the points defined by the method that was used (see
Figure 37).
Displacement Frame Definition
: disp4
: n points (n=3)...
Disp
Method
Point
Status
Initial Point 1
Initial Point 2
Initial Point 3
Moved Point 1
Modified
Modified
-
Desc... ModPos
Cancel
1(6)
OK
Figure 37 Displacement frame definition dialog
The status can be defined as follows:
10-44
Status
Meaning
-
No position defined
Modified
Position modified
User’s Guide
Calibration
To choose the definition method
Before you start modifying any positions, make sure the n-point method, together with
the number of points that you want to use, is displayed:
• Select the field Method and press Enter
.
• Enter the desired number of points and press OK.
To record the Initial Points
• Select the first definition point Initial Point 1.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to a well-defined position on the object.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Repeat the above for the points Initial Point 2, Initial Point 3, etc.
To record Moved Points
• Move the object to its new position.
• Select the first definition point Moved Point 1.
• Jog the robot as close as possible to the same position on the object as for Initial
Point 1.
• Modify the position by pressing the function key ModPos.
• Repeat the above for the points Moved Point 2, Moved Point 3, etc.
To calculate the displacement frame
• Press OK to calculate the displacement frame.
When the calculation is finished, a dialog like the one shown in Figure 38 will appear.
Displacement Frame Calculation Result
Disp
:disp4
Orig
: (1050.51 ,1000.00,1231.82)
Calculation Log
1(4)
Method
Mean error
Max error
Quaternion 1
File
n points (n=3)
4.12
6.73
0.345271
Cancel
OK
Figure 38 The result after a displacement frame calculation.
User’s Guide
10-45
Calibration
Field
Description
Orig
The origin of the displacement frame.
Mean Error
The average distance that the points are from the original
points, i.e. how accurately the robot was positioned.
Max Error
The maximum error for one point.
The calculation result can be saved in a separate file for later use in a PC.
Note, however, that this file cannot be read by the robot:
• Press the function key File.
• Specify a name and a place to save the result.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
• If the estimated error is
- acceptable, press OK to confirm the new displacement frame;
- not acceptable, redefine by pressing Cancel.
10-46
User’s Guide
Production Running
CONTENTS
Page
1
2
3
4
5
The Production Window.................................................................................................
Reading a Program .........................................................................................................
Changing the Override Speed ........................................................................................
Changing the Program Running Mode.........................................................................
Starting the Program ......................................................................................................
5.1 Restarting after a stop ............................................................................................
5.2 Starting a program from the beginning..................................................................
6 Stopping the Program .....................................................................................................
7 Tuning position ................................................................................................................
8 Operator Dialogs .............................................................................................................
User’s Guide
3
4
5
5
6
7
7
7
8
9
11-1
Production Running
11-2
User’s Guide
Production Running
Production Running
The Production window appears automatically on the teach pendant display when the
power is switched on, and the operating mode selector is in the Auto position. You can
also call it up by pressing
and choosing Production.
1 The Production Window
The Production window is used to start and stop program execution (see Figure 1).
File
Edit
Production Info
Routine
Status
View
CAR_LIN1
Program name
: main :
: Stopped
Speed:=
75
Running mode:=
Continuous
%
2(39)
MoveL p1, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p2, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p3, v500, z20, tool1;
Set do1;
Set do2;
Program pointer
Program list
Start
FWD
BWD
Figure 1 All production runs are controlled from the Production window.
Before starting the program, check the program name to see that it is the correct
program. The Program name is displayed in the right hand upper corner of the window.
• Choose View:Info to open the window Production Info.
To start the program, see Starting the Program on page 6.
If the Status field indicates NOT LOADED, then you must load a program
(see Reading a Program on page 4).
Field:
Indicates:
Routine
Status
The subprogram that is being run
NOT LOADED
= no program is loaded
STOPPED
= a program is loaded and it can be
executed (PP is set)
RUNNING
= program execution is in progress
NOT EXECUTABLE = a program is loaded but cannot be
executed
The chosen speed correction as a percentage
Continuous
= continuous execution
Cycle
= the program is executed once
The part of the program that is being run
The instruction to be executed when Start is pressed.
Speed
Running mode
Program list
Program pointer
User’s Guide
11-3
Production Running
2 Reading a Program
A program can be read from a diskette or from the robot’s mass memory. To open a
program, do as follows:
• Choose File: Load Program.
File
View
Edit
1 Load Program...
The following dialog box will appear (see Figure 2).
Open...
Select a Program to load
Massmemory unit:= flp1:
ROBOT1
4(5)
..
WELD1
WELD2
WELDPIPE
TEST/
Program list
(Go up 1 level)
Program
Program
Program
Directory
Unit
Cancel
OK
Figure 2 The dialog box displays a list of all available programs.
The Mass memory unit field indicates:
- flp1
to denote a diskette
- ram1disk
to denote the robot’s internal memory (the RAM disk)
• Press Unit until the desired unit is displayed.
• Choose the desired program – use ArrowUp
or ArrowDown
through the list: select . . to go up one level and press
to scroll
to go down one level.
• Press OK.
11-4
User’s Guide
Production Running
3 Changing the Override Speed
The speed of the robot can be adjusted while running production. The function keys
indicate how the speed can be decreased or increased.
−%
+%
25%
100%
Decreases the value by 5% (or 1% if <5%)
Increases the value by 5% (or 1% if <5%)
Sets the value to 25%
Sets the value to 100%
To override the speed, do as follows:
• Select the middle part of the display by pressing
.
• Using one of the arrow keys, select the field for the corrected speed (see Figure 3).
Status
Corrected speed in %
: STOPPED
Speed:=
75
%
Running mode:=
Continuous
2(39)
Program list
MoveL p1, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p2, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p3, v500, z20, tool1;
Set do1;
Set do2;
- %
+ %
25%
100%
Figure 3 The function keys can be used to both increase and decrease the programmed speed.
• Press the desired alternative.
• To return to the program list, use
.
4 Changing the Program Running Mode
A program can be run in either of the following two ways:
- Cont – continuous execution
- Cycle – the program is executed once.
You can change the program running mode in the Running mode field:
• Select the middle part of the display by pressing
.
• Select Running mode (see Figure 4).
User’s Guide
11-5
Production Running
Status
: STOPPED
Speed:=
75
Running mode:=
Continuous
%
Program running mode
2(39)
MoveL p1, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p2, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p3, v500, z20, tool1;
Set do1;
Set do2;
Program list
Cont
Cycle
Figure 4 The function keys are used to select the different program running modes.
• Press the desired function key Cont or Cycle.
• To return to the program list part, use
.
5 Starting the Program
When the program is started, the robot and any peripheral equipment will start to
move. Check that all preparations have been made for program execution. Make
sure that the workcell is clear of all personnel before starting the robot.
If NOT LOADED is displayed on the program status line, then a program must be loaded
(see Reading a Program on page 4).
If a program is loaded and is executable, STOPPED will be displayed on the program
status line and the program can be started:
Start
• Press the function key Start.
When a program is executing the current executing instruction is shown in the window
(see Figure 5).
File
Edit
Production Info
Routine
Status
Speed:=
Running mode:=
View
PROG1
: *
: Running
100
%
Continuous
.....
Executing RAPID instruction
MoveL p2, v500, z20, tool1;
1(2)
The executing instruction
Program Executing
Figure 5 The current instruction is shown while the program is running.
11-6
User’s Guide
Production Running
5.1 Restarting after a stop
If you wish to restart program execution from where it was interrupted:
• Press Start.
The program can also be restarted from the beginning. This is described below.
5.2 Starting a program from the beginning
To start again from the beginning, proceed as follows:
• Choose Edit: Start from Beginning.
File
Edit
View
1 Goto...
_ _ _ _
2 Start from Beginning
• Press OK to confirm.
The program pointer
will then move to the first instruction in the program.
• Press Start.
6 Stopping the Program
Program execution can be stopped by pressing the stop button on the teach pendant
(see Figure 6).
In case of an emergency, press one of the emergency stop buttons instead. This will cut
off the power supply to the robot motors and engage all brakes.
P1
Figure 6 This stop button is used to stop the program.
User’s Guide
11-7
Production Running
7 Tuning position
• Choose View: Position
File
Edit
View
1 Info...
2 Position
The tuning function in the Production window makes it possible to tune the x, y and z
coordinates of a robot position (see Figure 7). The tuning can be performed either when
status is Stopped or when status is Running.
File
Edit
View
Production Position
Routine
: main :
Status
: Stopped
Speed:=
Running mode:=
Robtarget:=
PROG1
75
%
Continuous
.....
...
Tuning Present
Robtarget selection field.
1(1)
No Data
Figure 7 The Production Info view. No robtarget selected.
• Select the field Robtarget and press Enter
.
• Choose the position to be tuned in the list that will appear.
• Press OK or Enter
File
to confirm the choice.
Edit
View
Production Position
Routine
: main :
Status
: Stopped
Speed:=
Running mode:=
Robtarget:=
x
y
z
PROG1
75
%
Continuous
.....
p110...
Tuning Present
1(3)
0.00
xx.xx mm
0.00
yy.yy mm
0.00
zz.zz mm
Coordinate list
Tune
Figure 8 The Production Position view with a robtarget selected.
• Choose the x, y or z coordinate in the coordinate list (see Figure 8).
• Press: Tune
11-8
User’s Guide
Production Running
A dialog will appear where you can tune the position.
• Enter the desired tuning value and press Enter
.
- No change = 0.
- Max. change in one step = ±10 mm
Several steps can be entered. The position data is changed immediately after each step
but will not affect the robot path until the next instruction using this position data is
executed. The values in the Present column will be used in this instruction.
The total tuning will be displayed in the Tuning column.
Note If a named position data is modified, all instructions which refer to that position
data will be affected. Unnamed positions (marked as * in the instruction) cannot be
tuned.
See also Chapter 8 Programming and Testing - Tuning position during program
execution.
The tuning function can be disabled in automatic mode. See chapter 12 System
Parameters - Topic:Teach Pendant.
8 Operator Dialogs
Special instructions can be created in the program and used as a form of
communication between the program and the operator (see Figure 9).
Operator
Operator Log
The robot is now picking up a part from
the front conveyor belt.
Number of parts to be processed: 25
Figure 9 Example of a message sent to the operator.
• You can return to the Production window by pressing
Production.
and choosing
Sometimes, the operator must respond before program execution can continue (see the
example in Figure 10).
User’s Guide
11-9
Production Running
7 8 9
4 5 6
1 2 3
0
Program Waiting for data
How many parts to be processed?:
1
OK
2
Figure 10 Use the numeric keyboard to answer questions from the program.
• Use the numeric keys when the reply is a numeric value.
• Press OK.
• If text is displayed above the function keys, you can give your answer by pressing the
desired alternative (see Figure 11).
Select program to run:
Front A Front B Front C
Other
SERVICE
Figure 11 Operator dialogs can be tailor-made to suit any robot installation.
The dialog window shown in Fig. 10 can only be exited in one of two ways, either by
answering the question or by stopping program execution.
11-10
User’s Guide
System Parameters
CONTENTS
Page
System Parameters ......................................................................................... 3
1 Changing a Parameter.................................................................................................... 3
1.1 Subdivision of parameters ..................................................................................... 3
1.2 Changing a parameter............................................................................................ 3
1.3 Deleting a parameter.............................................................................................. 4
1.4 Generating a restart................................................................................................ 4
1.5 Viewing the last changes that were made.............................................................. 5
1.6 Checking Parameters ............................................................................................. 5
2 Saving and Loading Parameters.................................................................................... 6
2.1 Saving parameters to diskette or some other mass storage device ........................ 6
2.2 Loading parameters from a diskette or some other mass storage device .............. 7
3 Topic: IO Signals ............................................................................................................. 9
3.1 Defining I/O Units ................................................................................................. 9
3.2 Additional parameters for gateway (field bus) units ............................................. 10
3.3 Defining input and output signals.......................................................................... 12
3.4 Defining signal groups........................................................................................... 14
3.5 Defining cross connections.................................................................................... 15
3.6 List all available I/O Unit Types............................................................................ 19
3.7 I/O Data Specifications.......................................................................................... 21
3.8 Defining system inputs .......................................................................................... 22
3.9 Defining system outputs ........................................................................................ 24
3.10 PLC Communication ........................................................................................... 26
4 Topic: Communication ................................................................................................... 31
4.1 Defining physical channels.................................................................................... 31
4.2 Defining Transmission Protocol ............................................................................ 32
4.3 Defining Application Protocol............................................................................... 34
5 Topic: Controller ............................................................................................................. 37
5.1 Activate delayed safeguarded space stop .............................................................. 37
5.2 Activate Hold-To-Run Control .............................................................................. 37
5.3 Defining event routines ......................................................................................... 38
5.4 Specifying regain distances ................................................................................... 39
5.5 System miscellaneous............................................................................................ 40
5.6 Automatic loading of modules and programs........................................................ 41
5.7 Defining multitasking ............................................................................................ 42
6 Topic: TeachPendant....................................................................................................... 45
6.1 Defining Optional Packages .................................................................................. 45
User’s Guide
12-1
System Parameters
Page
6.2 Defining File Extension......................................................................................... 45
6.3 Defining authorisation and confirmation .............................................................. 46
6.4 Activation of Limited ModPos Function............................................................... 49
6.5 Programmable keys ............................................................................................... 50
6.6 Defining Running Mode Settings.......................................................................... 51
7 Topic: Manipulator ......................................................................................................... 53
7.1 Defining the commutation offset and calibration offset of the motors.................. 53
7.2 Defining the range of movement and calibration position of each axis ................ 54
7.3 Defining supervision level..................................................................................... 54
7.4 Tuning the motion supervision .............................................................................. 55
7.5 Defining teach mode speed ................................................................................... 56
7.6 Defining independent motion ................................................................................ 56
7.7 Defining arm load.................................................................................................. 57
7.8 Defining arm check point ...................................................................................... 58
7.9 Defining external torque........................................................................................ 59
7.10 Defining friction compensation........................................................................... 60
7.11 Defining the base coordinate system ................................................................... 61
7.12 Defining external manipulators with more than one axis.................................... 62
7.13 Defining a track motion with coordinated motion .............................................. 63
7.14 Defining an external mechanical unit coordinated with the robot ...................... 63
7.15 Defining external axes......................................................................................... 63
7.16 Activate forced gain control for an external axis ................................................ 75
7.17 Activate notch filter for an external axis ............................................................. 76
7.18 Soft servo for external axis.................................................................................. 77
7.19 Defining the joystick directions for the robot and external manipulator ............ 78
7.20 Defining the joystick directions for a single external axis .................................. 80
7.21 Defining kinematic parameters for general kinematics....................................... 81
7.22 Servo parameters ................................................................................................. 83
7.23 CPU Optimization ............................................................................................... 84
7.24 Installation optimization of drive system parameters.......................................... 86
12-2
User’s Guide
System Parameters
System Parameters
The system parameters describe the equipment and area of application of the robot system, e.g. I/O names and the characteristics of the external axes.
1 Changing a Parameter
1.1 Subdivision of parameters
The available parameters are grouped together in a number of different topics. These
topics are, in turn, divided up into different types.
Topic
Parameters that affect
File name
Controller
Event routines, etc.
SYS.CFG
Communication
Serial channels
SIO.CFG.
IO Signals
I/O boards and signals
EIO.CFG
Manipulator
The robot and external axes
MOC.CFG
TeachPendant
Displaying data and access
on the teach pendant
MMC.CFG
Arc Welding
Arc welding
PROC.CFG
• To view all parameters, choose Topics: All Topics in the System Parameters window.
All relevant topics in the robot system will then be displayed. Choose the desired topic
by selecting it and pressing Enter
.
1.2 Changing a parameter
• Press the Miscellaneous key
to open the System Parameters window.
• Select System Parameters from the dialog box that appears.
• Press OK or Enter
.
• Call up the parameter type that contains the parameter to be changed, by choosing a topic
from the Topics menu and a type from the Types menu.
All parameters of that type will be displayed, as illustrated in Figure 1. To be able to
display some parameter types, however, you must first choose the current unit, such as
an I/O board or a signal, by selecting it and pressing Enter
.
User’s Guide
12-3
System Parameters
File
Parameter type
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
User signals
Parameters
IO Signals
Info
Signal Name
Unit Name
Signal Type
Signal Number
Logical Max
Physical Max
Logical Min
Physical Min
do1
d327_11
DO
1
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000
Parameter topic
1(10)
Parameters
OK
Figure 1 All parameters of a given type are displayed in the window at the same time.
• Select the parameter to be changed.
• Change the value of the parameter by
- pressing Enter
appears,
and specifying the desired alternative in the dialog box that
- choosing an alternative from the function keys (fields marked with
).
All parameters, together with possible values, are described in the following sections
under the appropriate topic.
Note. You will have to restart the robot in order for the change to have an effect on some
parameters. You will be informed of this the first time you change such a parameter and
when you exit the system parameters, i.e. change window.
1.3 Deleting a parameter
• Select the parameter to delete
• Press Delete
.
• Press OK to confirm the delete.
1.4 Generating a restart
You have to restart the robot in order for a change to have an effect on some of the
parameters. If you exit the system parameters without generating a restart, the parameter values will not be the same as those used in the robot. Nevertheless, if you generate
a restart at a later stage, then the changes will take effect.
• Choose File: Restart and press OK or turn the mains switch off and then on again.
An error message will be displayed when there is an error in the parameters. However,
this can be due to a sequential error. The origin of an error can be found by looking at
the robot’s error logs. See chapter 14, Service: Logs.
12-4
User’s Guide
System Parameters
1.5 Viewing the last changes that were made
• Choose Edit: Show Change Log.
A dialog box appears, displaying the changes that were last made (see Figure 2).
File
Edit
View
Test
Change Log
Change Log Transactions
Type of change
2(7)
chg attr: EIO EIO_USER_SIGNAL I=25
Type = DI -> DO
add inst: EIO EIO_USER_SIGNAL I = 33
del inst: EIO EIO_USER_SIGNAL I = 33
load par: FILE=eio_ext.cfg
restart:
save par: FILE=EIO.CFG
OK
Figure 2 The Change Log dialog box.
The following identification tags are used:
- chg attr:
Shows the parameter that has been changed and how it was
changed.
- add inst:
Shows that a new parameter has been added.
- del inst:
Shows that a parameter has been deleted.
- load par:
Shows that new parameters have been loaded.
- save par:
Shows that parameters have been saved.
- restart:
Shows that the robot has been restarted.
1.6 Checking Parameters
When you have changed a parameter, it is a sensible idea to check the change before
restarting, in order to avoid problems when restarting. In the current version the
Manipulator area can be checked.
• Select the area to be checked in Topics (only Manipulator can currently be checked)
• Select File: Check Parameters and the check will start.
When the check is finished, a report will be made showing that either there was an error
or the change of the parameter was done correctly. The error will be reported via the
usual error log. See chapter 14, Service.
User’s Guide
12-5
System Parameters
2 Saving and Loading Parameters
2.1 Saving parameters to diskette or some other mass storage device
The system parameters can be stored in their entirety or stored as individual parameter
topics, for example, on a diskette.
To save all parameters
The parameters are always saved to a directory in the form of a separate file for each
topic.
• Choose File: Save All As.
A dialog box appears, displaying all files in the current directory (see Figure 3).
File
Edit
View
Test
Save All Parameters!
Select a directory to save to.
Mass storage unit
Massmemory Unit= flp1:
PARAM
1(4)
..
BACKW18
IO
ROBOT
Unit
Directory level
Go up 1 level
Directory
Parameters
Parameters ‘
New Dir...
Cancel
OK
Figure 3 The dialog box used to store parameters.
• If necessary, change the mass storage unit by pressing the Unit function key until the correct unit is displayed. To store on a diskette, choose flp1:.
• Select the directory to which the parameters are to be saved. You can move to the next
directory level by selecting the desired directory or ‘. .’ (upwards) and pressing Enter
.
Create a new directory by pressing the New Dir function key. Specify the new directory name in the dialog box that appears. Choose OK to confirm.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
To save an individual parameter topic
• Choose File: Save As.
A dialog box appears, displaying all the previously saved parameters in the current
directory.
12-6
User’s Guide
System Parameters
• If necessary, change the mass storage unit by pressing the Unit function key until the correct unit is displayed. To store on a diskette, choose flp1:.
• Specify the file name by selecting the field Name and pressing Enter
desired name and press OK to confirm.
. Enter the
• Select the directory to which the parameters are to be saved. You can move to the next
directory level by selecting the desired directory or ‘. .’ (upwards) and pressing Enter
.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
2.2 Loading parameters from a diskette or some other mass storage device
Parameters can be loaded in their entirety or loaded as individual parameter topics. If
several parameters are to be loaded, the parameters must be placed in a directory.
• Choose File: Load Saved Parameters to replace a complete parameter topic.
• Choose File: Add New Parameters to add new parameters to the current one (e.g. when
defining an external axis).
• Choose File: Add or Replace Parameters to replace parts of a parameter topic (e.g.
when reediting an external axis). If a parameter already exists its value will be updated
according to the new one. If the parameter does not exist it will be added.
A dialog box appears, displaying all parameters in the current directory (see Figure 4).
File
Edit
View
Test
Load ... Parameters!
Select a directory or a file to Open.
Saved or New
Massmemory Unit= flp1:
PARAM
Mass storage unit
Directory level
1(2)
..
BACKW18
IO
ROBOT
Go up 1 level
Directory
Parameters
Parameters
Unit
Cancel
OK
Figure 4 The dialog box used to load parameters.
• If necessary, change the mass storage unit by pressing the Unit function key until the correct unit is displayed. To load parameters from a diskette, choose flp1:.
• Select the directory from which the parameters are to be loaded. You can move to the next
directory level by selecting the desired directory or ‘. .’ (upwards) and pressing Enter
.
• Choose OK to confirm the load.
An alert box will be displayed during reading. After this the robot must be restarted
(see Generating a restart on page 4).
User’s Guide
12-7
System Parameters
12-8
User’s Guide
System Parameters
3 Topic: IO Signals
The following parameters are found under the topic IO Signals:
- Specification of all I/O units
- Name and characteristics of input and output signals
- Groups of digital signals
- Cross connections
- List of all available unit types
- System signals
• Choose Topics: IO Signals.
3.1 Defining I/O Units
• Choose Topics: IO Signals
• Choose Types: IO Units.
All defined units will be displayed, as shown in Figure 5.
File
Edit
Topics
System Parameters
IO Units
Address
Name
Types
IO Signals
Type
Bus
d331
d327
d328
BASE
BASE
BASE
3(3)
PANEL
d327_11
d328_12
10
11
12
Add
Figure 5 System parameters of the type IO Units.
• Select the appropriate I/O unit to be changed and press Enter
by pressing Add.
, or add a new one
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
To delete a unit
• Select the appropriate unit.
• Press
.
All the signals on this unit will remain defined. These must be deleted separately.
User’s Guide
12-9
System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Unit Name
The name of the unit (max. 16 characters).
Unit Type
Unit type (see also 3.2 below).
Compare with the designation on the cover of the unit.
Unit type eip000 is used for simulated digital and analog signals. This simulated unit can handle up to 100 digital inputs,
100 digital outputs, 30 analog inputs and 30 analog outputs.
For more information about the selected unit type press the
function key Info.
Unit Bus
The bus on which the unit is located, normally BASE. All units
that are connected to the SIM bus will be simulated.
Address
The address of the unit on the BASE bus according to the
physical keying, see Product Manual - Installation and
Commissioning.
Digital Outputs
The number of digital output signals to be used.
Digital Inputs
The number of digital input signals to be used.
Analog Inputs
The number of analog input signals to be used.
Analog Outputs
The number of analog output signals to be used.
PollRate
Some units needs to be polled to update input and output signals. The parameter specifies the time between two consecutive polls.
NOTE. All units produced by ABB Robotics Products, except
the gateway (field bus) units, are event driven. With these units
the polling mechanism is used as heart-beat only. It is recommended to use the default poll rate, 1 second, with these units
(20 ms to10 s, resolution 10 ms).
Disabled
Specifies that the I/O unit will not be present on the bus at start
up.
3.2 Additional parameters for gateway (field bus) units
A gateway unit is a unit which is connected to the internal BASE bus (Can/DeviceNet)
and also to an external field bus, such as Interbus-S, Profibus, A-B RIO.
The gateway unit converts the data from one field bus to another field bus.
Allen-Bradley Remote I/O adapter DSQC 350 (Unit Type = d350)
12-10
Parameter
Description
Rack Address
The rack address is entered in decimal form while Allen-Bradley use octal (0-7). Valid values are from 0 to 63 (Allen-Bradley 0-77). Note that the Allen-Bradley PLC series 2/30 starts
from octal address 1.
Data Rate
The data rate on the RIO Bus.
Valid values are:
57.6 KBaud.
115.2 KBaud.
230.4 KBaud.
User’s Guide
System Parameters
Starting Quarter
The DSQC 350 starting quarter.
Valid values are:
First
Second
Third
Fourth
PLC value 0
2
4
6
Rack Size
The DSQC 350 rack size.
Valid values are:
1/4 rack
1/2 rack
3/4 rack
full rack
32 out, 32+2 in1
64 out, 64+2 in1
96 out, 96+2 in1
128 out, 128+2 in1
Last Rack
Specifies that the DSQC 350 is the last rack on the RIO Bus.
Valid values are:
No
Yes
Interbus-S slave adapter DSQC 351 (Unit Type = d351)
Parameter
Description
Data Width
The data width determines the number of I/O signals. The valid
values are:
1 word = 16 out, 16+1 in2
2 words = 32 out, 32+1 in2
3 words = 48 out, 48+1 in2
4 words = 64 out, 64+1 in2
Profibus-DP slave DSQC 352 (Unit Type = d352)
Parameter
Description
Master Input Size
The master input size determines the number of digital output
signals. The valid values are:
0 word = 0 out
1 word = 16 out
2 words = 32 out
3 words = 48 out
4 words = 64 out
5 words = 80 out
6 words = 96 out
7 words = 112 out
8 words = 128 out
Master Output Size
The master output size determines the number of digital input
signals. The valid values are:
0 word = 0+1 in
1 word = 16+1 in
2 words = 32+1 in
3 words = 48+1 in
4 words = 64+1 in
1. Input numbers 33, 65, 97 or 129 respectively, correspond to NAC status LED flashing (high at RIO link
particularly up, i.e. PLC in programming mode)
Input numbers 34, 66, 98 or 130 respectively, correspond to NAC status LED steadily lit (high at RIO link up)
2. Input numbers 17, 33, 49 or 65 respectively, correspond to Interbus-S status LED BA steadily lit (Bus
Active)
User’s Guide
12-11
System Parameters
5 words = 80+1 in
6 words = 96+1 in
7 words = 112+1 in
8 words = 128+1 in
Station Address
The Profibus node address entered in decimal form. Valid values are from 2 to 126. 126 is reserved for uninitialised nodes.
To configure the Profibus master use the GSD-file supplied on the diskette Controller
Parameters, file SERVICE\GSD\ABB_0600.GSD. The modules to be choosen
depends on the I/O definition.
3.3 Defining input and output signals
• Choose Topics: IO Signals.
• Choose Types: User Signals.
All named signals will be displayed (see Figure 6).
File
Edit
Topics
System Parameters
User Signals
Unit
Name
currentok
di6
di7
do1
do2
do28
do29
do32
d327_11
d327_11
d327_11
d327_11
d327_11
d328_12
d328_12
d328_12
Types
IO Signals
Type
DI
DI
DI
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
Sig
1(96)
4
6
7
1
2
12
13
16
Add
Figure 6 System parameters of the type User Signals.
Note that several signals can be connected to the same physical channel. The same signals cannot, however, be connected to different physical channels.
• Select the signal to be changed and press Enter
Add.
, or add a new one by pressing
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
To delete a signal
• Select the appropriate signal.
• Press
12-12
.
User’s Guide
System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Signal Name
The name of the signal (max. 16 characters).
Unit Name
The unit to which the signal is connected.
For more information about the selected unit press the function
key Info.
Signal Type
The type of signal: DI= Digital Input, DO= Digital Output,
AI= Analog Input, AO= Analog Output.
Signal Number
The physical channel to which the signal is connected.
The numbering restarts from 1 for each unit and “signal type”.
Logical Max
Physical Max
Logical Min
Physical Min
The scaling between the programmed and physical value of
an analog signal (see Figure 7).
Physical value of the
output signal (V, mA, etc.)
Physical Max
Logical Max
Logical value in the
program
Logical Min
Physical Min
Figure 7 Diagram to show how analog signal values are scaled
Logical max/min. is the maximum/minimum value that an
analog input or output can be set to, from a RAPID program or
from the teach pendant. The units are user defined (e.g. meter/
minute).
Physical max/min. is the maximum/minimum physical value
that can be set on the output or input. To obtain the physical
limit for a specified unit, see the Product Manual.
If both physical and logical max/min. are set to 0, the default
values for the unit are picked up, which are the physical maximum and minimum limits. The logical and physical is set to the
same value, which gives an amplification factor of 1.
If any of the values is set by the user, all four must be defined.
Therefore, make sure that:
physical maximum is > physical minimum
logical maximum is > logical minimum.
Example: An analog unit is controlling a current source with
an amplification of 50 A/V and a max current of 500A. The
following settings could then be applicable.
Physical Max = 10 V
Physical Min = 0 V
Logical Max = 500 A/V
Logical Min = 0 A/V
User’s Guide
12-13
System Parameters
Filter Passive
The time (in millisecs) that a digital input signal must be zero,
before the robot acts on the signal change (100 ms to 32 s).
Filter Active
The time (in millisecs) that a digital input signal must be 1,
before the robot acts on the signal change (100 ms to 32 s).
If two signals are connected to the same physical channel, the
filter time for these signals must be the same.
Inverted
Set to YES, if the digital signal shall be inverted, i.e. if logical
”1” should be set on the output as ”0”.
Store
If set to YES, the digital outputs will be stored at a power
failure, and restored when the system is powered up again.
It should be noted that the value is connected to a logical signal.
If more than one logical signal is connected to the same physical signal, an unexpected value may be obtained. In such cases
this parameter should be set to NO.
Maximum number of user defined signals including group signals = 512.
Signals connected to a simulated unit (Type = eip000) can not use Delay, Pulse or any
time related instruction, only “clean” set and reset of digital input signals.
3.4 Defining signal groups
Digital signals can be grouped together and handled as if they were one signal. The
value of such a signal will thus be a positive integer that is binary coded using the individual digital signals as a basis.
• Choose Topics: IO Signals.
• Choose Types: Groups.
All defined signal groups will be displayed (see Figure 8).
File
Edit
Topics
System Parameters
Groups
Unit
Name
inport1
outport1
d327_11
d327_11
Types
Special
IO Signals
Len
4
6
Phsig.
1(2)
5
9
Add
Figure 8 System parameters of the type Groups.
• Select the signal group to be changed, and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
12-14
User’s Guide
System Parameters
• Press OK to confirm.
To delete a signal group
• Select the appropriate signal group.
• Press
.
Parameter
Description
Signal Name
The name of the signal (max. 16 characters).
Unit Name
The unit to which the signal is connected.
For more information about the unit type press the function
key Info.
Signal Type
The type of signal: GI= Group of input signals, GO= Group of
output signals.
Group length
The number of digital signals in the group. The length must be
set so that the group is within one unit. The maximum value for
length is 16.
Start signal
The physical channel of the unit to which the first signal (the
least significant) is connected. The remaining signals are automatically connected to the following channels on the same
unit.
Inverted
Set to Yes if all signals in the group shall be inverted.
Store
If set to YES, the digital outputs will be stored at a power
failure, and restored when the system is powered up again.
It should be noted that the value is connected to a logical signal. If more than one logical signal is connected to the same
physical signal, an unexpected value may be obtained. In such
cases this parameter should be set to NO.
3.5 Defining cross connections
A digital input or output signal can be logically connected to one or several digital
input or output signals. This means that a cross-connected signal will automatically be
changed when the “activation” signal is changed. See also RAPID Reference Manual
- Motion and I/O Principles.
• If the signal has not already been defined, then define its name in the normal way. See
Defining input and output signals on page 12.
• Choose Topics: IO Signals
• Choose Types: Cross Connections.
All the defined cross connections will be displayed (see Figure 9).
User’s Guide
12-15
System Parameters
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
Cross Connections
From
To
IO Signals
1(4)
di1
do8
do8
do9
do5
do5
di1
di25
Add
Figure 9 An output signal can be logically connected to an input signal.
• Select the cross connection to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Define the ”activation (From)” signal and the corresponding ”cross connected (To)”
signal.
• Press OK to confirm.
A maximum of 60 signals can be cross connected. Make sure that the same signal is not
connected on both the ”From” and ”To” sides, in the same chain.
To delete a cross connection
• Select the appropriate cross connection.
• Press
.
Cross connections with logical conditions (Option)
The digital I/O signals can have the logical conditions AND or OR, to set up a condition
for a cross connection. These conditions cannot be entered from the teach pendant.
They are instead set up in the configuration file EIO.CFG in the cross-connection section (starting with the line “EIO_CROSS:”) using a standard PC. The same rules apply
to the logical condition connections for the result signals as for the normal cross-connected result signals. The actors in the cross-connection section have the logical condition operators.
The logical condition operators are:
- AND, syntax in configuration file = “&”
- OR, syntax in configuration file = “!”
For each logical condition connection there can only be one kind of logical operator.
Each logical condition connection can be seen as a logical operator box.
The AND operator has the following function:
12-16
User’s Guide
System Parameters
- If all in signals (actor signals) to the AND box are high, the result signals will
be high.
The OR operator has the following function:
- If any in signals (actor signals) to the OR box are high, the result signals will
be high.
There is one help operator:
- INV, syntax in configuration file = “*” , inverted.
The INV help operator can be connected before an in signal (actor signal) to an AND
or OR box which means that the signal is inverted before being checked in the operator
box.
Examples
Logical
di1
&
do2
do26
do10
In Configuration file:
EIO_CROSS:
-Lres do26
-Lact di1 & do2 & do10
Logical
di1
do2
do10
!
do26
In Configuration file:
EIO_CROSS:
-Lres do26 -Lact di1 ! do2 ! do10
User’s Guide
12-17
System Parameters
di1
= INV = Invert
!
do2
do10
do26
In Configuration file:
EIO_CROSS:
-Lres do26 -Lact *di1 ! do2 ! *do10
The actor signals can be both digital In and Out signals. There can be 5 actor signals in
each condition but there can be several conditions. The cross-connected signals cannot
use Delay or Pulse or any parameters, only “clean” set and reset of digital in and out
signals. The example below describes a configuration file that has several logical condition connections
.
di2
do3
&
do11
do15
!
di12
do3
&
do14
!
di13
do3
di11
&
&
do23
do54
do33
do17
do3
12-18
&
do61
User’s Guide
System Parameters
In Configuration file:
EIO_CROSS:
-Lres do11
-Lact di2 & do3
-Lres do14
-Lact di12 & *do3
-Lres di11 + do23 + do17 -Lact di13 & do3
-Lres do15 -Lact do11 ! do14 ! *di11
-Lres do33
-Lact di11 & do23
-Lres do61
-Lact do17 & do3
-Lres do54 -Lact do15 ! *do33
Calculation of number of cross connections
If you make a cross connection with logical conditions, the number of cross connections may be more than the number of signals actual used in the cross connection itself.
You will use one cross connection for each input to a gate, and one for the output of the
gate. If you connect an output from one gate to an input of another gate, it takes two
cross connections even if there is only one signal involved.
In the configuration above you have 15 signal names used, but it takes 24 cross connections.
3.6 List all available I/O Unit Types
• Choose Topics: IO Signals
• Choose Types: Unit Types
All available unit types will be displayed, as shown in Figure 10.
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
IO Signals
Unit Types
Name
Product Name
7(8)
eip000
Simulated
d320
120 Vac Unit
d327
Combi Unit
d328
24 Vdc Unit
d331
Panel Unit
d332
Relay Unit
d350
RIO Adapter
Figure 10 List of all available unit types.
To get detailed information about a particular unit type:
• Select the appropriate unit type and press Enter
Parameter
User’s Guide
Description
12-19
System Parameters
Unit Type
Name of the unit type
Vendor
Name of the vendor that manufactures this unit type
Product
Description of this unit type
Vendor ID
Vendor’s identification code
Product ID
Unit’s product identification
Device Type ID
Unit type identification code
Major Revision
Major revision for the software resident in the unit
Minor Revision
Minor revision for the software resident in the unit
Digital Inputs
Maximum number of digital input signals available on
this unit type
Digital Outputs
Maximum number of digital output signals available on
this unit type
Analog Inputs
Maximum number of analog input signals available on
this unit type
Analog Outputs
Maximum number of analog output signals available on
this unit type
Adding User Defined I/O Unit Types (Option)
I/O devices that does not have a unit type equivalent listed on the teach pendent, needs
to be defined in the EIO.CFG configuration file. This cannot be done from the teach
pendant. It has to be done using a standard PC.
User defined unit types are defined in the unit type section of the configuration file.
Create this section by writing “EIO_UNIT_TYPE:” at the end of the file.
The unit types are defined in the configuration file, using the syntax below filling in the
appropriate italic- value ( the figures below are only examples):
EIO_UNIT_TYPE:
-Name typename \
-VendorId 75 \
-VendorName "Vendor Name" \
-DeviceType 7 \
-ProductId 334 \
-ProductName "Product Name" \
-MajorRev 2 \
-MaxDigin 16 \
-MaxDigout 16 \
-MaxAnin 0 \
-MaxAnout 0
Some devices may respond incorrectly to commands sent from the robot controller
during connection establishment. The robot controller will then generate the error
message: 71102 “DeviceNet incompatible”.
12-20
This can be avoided by explicitly specifying that the controller should use a more trivial
method for connection establishment. This is done by adding the line; ‘-DeviceDriver
DNGeneric’ to the configuration file:
User’s Guide
System Parameters
EIO_UNIT_TYPE:
-Name typename \
-VendorId 75 \
-VendorName "Vendor Name" \
-DeviceType 7 \
-DeviceDriver "DNGeneric"\
-ProductId 335 \
-ProductName "Product Name" \
-MajorRev 2 \
-MaxDigin 16 \
-MaxDigout 16 \
-MaxAnin 0 \
-MaxAnout 0
3.7 I/O Data Specifications
The names of I/O signals, units etc. have a maximum limit of 16 characters.
Each name must be unique in the topic IO Signals.
I/O signals connected to a simulated I/O unit cannot use Pulse, Delay or Filter.
A maximum of 20 I/O units, including simulated I/O units can be defined.
A maximum of 10 simulated I/O units can be defined.
“Pollrate” for I/O units has the range:
- Minimum: 10 ms
- Maximum 10 seconds
- Step: 10 ms
A maximum of 512 signal names, including user signals and group signals can be
defined.
Filter Passive and Active time has the range:
- Minimum: 100 ms
- Maximum: 32 seconds
- Step: 10 ms
A maximum of 128 I/O signals can be defined with the “Store” parameter.
A maximum of 60 cross connections can be defined.
User’s Guide
12-21
System Parameters
3.8 Defining system inputs
The input signals can be assigned specific system actions. In this case, they will
automatically be handled by the robot. See also PLC Communication on page 26.
System inputs with actions including a MOTORS ON order or Start of any robot
movement are allowed in automatic mode only. When a system input order is rejected
because the system is in manual mode or due to any other unfulfilled requirement, no
error messages will be displayed on the teach pendant.
The reason for this is that the teach pendant is normally not being used by the operator
in these situations and there is therefore no sense in displaying the messages on the
teach pendant. However, the messages will still be stored in the error log, so you may
check for an answer there as to why a system input gives no action.
• If the signal has not already been defined, define its name in the normal way. See Defining
input and output signals on page 12.
• Choose Types: System Inputs.
All defined system inputs will be displayed (see Figure 11).
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters IO Signals
System Inputs
Name
Action
1(4)
di8
di9
progstart
serviceprog
MotorOn
MotorOff
StartMain
ManInterrupt
Add
Figure 11 Input signals can be assigned specific system actions.
• Select the system input to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Define the name of the signal and the system action that is assigned to it. To add the system
actions MotOnStart, Start, StartMain, Interrupt, LoadStart and Sync ExtAx, define their
arguments as well.
• Press OK to confirm.
The following system actions are available:
12-22
System action
Description
MotorOn
Sets the robot to the MOTORS ON state.
User’s Guide
System Parameters
MotOnStart
Sets the robot to the MOTORS ON state and starts the program
(continuous or cycle execution) from the current instruction,
i.e. from the program pointer.
MotorOff1
Sets the robot to the MOTORS OFF state.
If a program is executing, it will be stopped before changing
state. The robot cannot be set to the MOTORS ON state when
this signal is high.
Start
Starts the program (continuous or cycle execution) from the
current instruction, i.e. from the program pointer.
StartMain
Starts the program (continuous or cycle execution) from the
beginning.
Not valid during program execution.
Stop1
Stops program execution. A program cannot be started when
this signal is high.
QuickStop1
Stops program execution. Gives a quicker stop and some deviation from the programmed path. A program cannot be started
when this signal is high.
StiffStop1
Stops program execution. Gives an even quicker stop and
some more deviation from the programmed path than QuickStop.
A program cannot be started when this signal is high.
StopInstr1
Stops program execution after the current instruction has been
finished. A program cannot be started when this signal is high.
StopCycle1
Stops program execution when the complete program has been
executed, i.e. when the last instruction in the main routine has
been executed. A program cannot be started when this signal is
high.
SysReset
Performs a system reset (restart), i.e. similar to power off/on.
Interrupt
Executes a routine (procedure) without changing the start
pointer.
Not valid during program execution. When the routine has
been executed, the normal program can be restarted.
The name of the routine to be executed is also defined in this
dialog, e.g. routine1.
This signal, for example, can be used to go to a service
position. When the normal program is started again, the robot
will move to the point where it was stopped and continue from
there.
ResetError
Resets the system output signal Error.
SyncExtAx
Synchronises an external mechanical unit. The unit to be
synchronised is also defined in this dialog e.g. orbit1. One signal is required for each unit. (S4 only)
LoadStart
Loads a program from diskette or other mass storage device.
The program is then started from the beginning.
The program file name (including mass memory unit) to be
User’s Guide
12-23
System Parameters
loaded is also defined in this dialog, e.g.
flp1: PROGRAM1.PRG.
Not valid during program execution.
ResetEstop
Resets the emergency stop. The robot can then be set to the
MOTORS ON state.
AckErrDialog
Acknowledge the error dialogue on the teach pendant, i.e. the
same operation as pressing OK on the teach pendant.
Several input signals can be assigned the same system actions, but several system
actions may not be assigned to the same signal.
1. Allowed in both manual and automatic mode.
To delete a system action
• Select the signal to be deleted.
• Press
The system action assigned to this signal is then deleted, but the signal itself remains
defined.
3.9 Defining system outputs
The output signals can be assigned a specific system status. In this case, they will automatically be handled by the robot.
• If the signal has not already been defined, define its name in the normal way. See Defining
input and output signals on page 12.
• Choose Types: System Outputs.
All defined system outputs will be displayed (see Figure 12).
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters IO Signals
System Outputs
Status
Name
do8
do9
progrun
1(3)
MotorOn
MotorOff
CycleOn
Add
Figure 12 Output signals can be assigned specific types of system status
12-24
User’s Guide
System Parameters
• Select the system output to be changed and press Enter
ing Add.
, or add a new one by press-
• Define the name of the signal and the system action assigned to it.
• Press OK to confirm.
The following types of system status are available:
System status
Description
MotorOn
The robot is in the MOTORS ON state. If the robot system is
not synchronised, the output will start flashing.
MotOnState
The robot is in the MOTORS ON state.
The output is stable, i.e. no flashing.
MotorOff
The robot is in the MOTORS OFF state.
If the safety chain is broken, the output will start flashing.
MotOffState
The robot is in the MOTORS OFF state.
The output is stable, i.e. no flashing.
CycleOn2
A program is executing.
EmStop
The robot is in the Emergency Stop state. The emergency stop
must be reset before the robot can be set to the MOTORS ON
state.
AutoOn
The robot is in automatic mode.
RunchOk
The run chain is not broken.
TCPSpeed
An analog signal that describes the speed of the TCP.
The logical value of the signal is specified in m/s, e.g. a speed
of 2000 mm/s corresponds to the logical value 2. The scaling
factor for the physical value is specified in the system parameters of the corresponding signal.
Error
The robot program execution has been stopped due to an error.
(If an error occurs when a program is not executing, this output
will not be set.)
PFError
A power failure error has occurred.
The program would not restart after this type of error. The program can usually be started, but it will start from the beginning.
MotSupTrigg
The motion supervision function has been triggered.
MotSupOn
The motion supervision function is active.
RegDistErr
An attempt to start the program has been done but this failed
due to that the robot was outside the Regain Distance zone (i.e.
too far from the programmed path).
The output is reset by one of the following actions:
- A restart of the program has to succeed (the robot must be
jogged into the zone first)
- The PP has to be set to Main.
Several output signals can be assigned the same system status, but several system status may not be assigned to the same signal.
2. Also active for Event Routine execution.
User’s Guide
12-25
System Parameters
To delete a system status
• Select the signal to be deleted.
• Press
.
The system status assigned to this signal is then deleted but the signal itself remains
defined.
3.10 PLC Communication
This chapter describes how to control the robot using, for example, digital signals from
a PLC.
For a definition of the signals see chapter Defining system inputs on page 22 and Defining system outputs on page 24.
All system inputs are 0 to 1 level sensitive and the pulse length must exceed 50 ms.
Most system inputs are only permitted in the automatic mode. If any interactive unit,
such as the teach pendant, a computer link, etc., has reserved exclusive rights to one or
more functions in the system, the system input request will be denied. The signals
MotorOff and Program stop signals from the system Input are active in Manual mode
also.
Some examples of the signal sequences are described below.
To verify that the robot is in automatic mode
Signal sequence:
1
AutoOn (Out)
0
To switch the robot to MOTORS ON state
Requirement: Robot in MOTORS OFF state and Runchain is closed (=RunchOK)
Signal sequence:
1
MotorOn (IN)
Order
0
1
MotorOn (OUT)
Response
12-26
0
User’s Guide
System Parameters
To switch the robot to MOTORS OFF state
Requirement: Robot in MOTORS ON state.
Signal sequence:
1
MotorOff (IN)
Order
0
1
MotorOff (OUT)
Response
0
If the program is running (CycleOn), the MotorOff action will stop execution of the
program.
To start the program from the beginning of the main routine
Requirement: Robot in MOTORS ON state and program control not occupied by any
other resource (e.g. external computers).
Signal sequence:
1
StartMain (IN)
Order
0
1
CycleOn (OUT)
Response
0
To start or restart program execution from the current instruction or after a power
failure
Requirement: Robot in MOTORS ON state and program control not occupied by any
other resource (e.g. external computers). A PFError indicates that a
power failure error has occurred
Signal sequence:
1
Start (IN)
Order
0
1
CycleOn (OUT)
Response
User’s Guide
0
12-27
System Parameters
To load and start a program
Load a program from diskette or another mass storage device. The program will then
start from the beginning. If a program is running, execution will stop first.
Requirement: Robot in MOTORS ON state and program control not occupied by any
other resource (e.g., external computers).
Signal sequence:
Load (IN)
Order
1
0
1
CycleOn (OUT)
Response
0
To stop, QuickStop, StiffStop program execution
Requirement: Valid in all modes.
Signal sequence:
1
Stop (IN)
Order
0
1
CycleOn (OUT)
Response
0
To stop at the end of the cycle
Stops program execution when the complete program cycle has been executed.
Requirement: Valid in all modes.
Signal sequence:
1
StopCycle (IN)
Order
0
1
CycleOn (OUT)
Response
12-28
0
User’s Guide
System Parameters
To detect spontaneous execution stops
Requirement: Robot in AutoOn (1), MotorOn (1) and CycleOn (1).
Signal sequence:
1
CycleOn (OUT)
Response
0
There are three main reasons why stops occur:
1. Program controlled exit, stop (or error in the program).
2. Emergency stop.
3. Safety chain broken due to reasons other than an emergency stop.
Detect case 1 with:
Error (1).
Detect case 2 with:
MotorOn (0), CycleOn (0), EmStop (1) and RunchOK (0).
Detect case 3 with:
MotorOn (0), CycleOn (0), EmStop (0) and RunchOK (0).
To reset an emergency stop
Switches the robot back to MOTORS OFF state after a spontaneous emergency stop.
Requirement: Robot in automatic mode after an emergency stop. The safety chain must
be closed, by resetting the emergency stop.
Signal sequence:
1
ResetEstop (IN)
Order
EmStop (OUT)
Response
RunchOK (OUT)
Response
0
1
0
1
0
Continue by switching the power to the motors back on.
User’s Guide
12-29
System Parameters
RunchOK
Indicates that the robot is back to MOTOR OFF state after a spontaneous safety chain
stop.
Requirement: Robot in automatic mode and spontaneous stop case 3 (see above).
Signal sequence:
Wait until the RunchOK is high (the safety chain is closed).
RunchOK (OUT)
Response
1
0
Continue by switching the power to the motors back on.
12-30
User’s Guide
System Parameters
4 Topic: Communication
The following parameters are found under the Communication topic:
- Specification of physical channels.
- Transmission protocols.
- Application protocols.
Application protocol
Transmission protocol
XON/XOFF
Physical channels
RAP
NFS
Remote Mounted
disk
SLIP
TCP/IP
SIO
RS232/RS422
ETHERNET
Figure 13 The following combinations of application protocols, transmission protocols and
physical channels are possible. The boxes with a thick frame can be an endpoint
of a configuration, i.e. they can function independently of the overlaying layers.
• Choose Topics: Communication
4.1 Defining physical channels
• Choose Topics: Communication
• Choose Types: Physical Channels
All defined physical channels will be displayed, as shown in Figure 14.
User’s Guide
12-31
System Parameters
File
Edit
Topics
System Parameters
Physical Channels
Name
Type
Types
Communication
Channel
1(1)
sio1:
sio
1
Add
Figure 14 System parameters of the type Serial Channels.
• Select the physical channel to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Select the desired parameter and change its value. Press OK to confirm.
Parameters
Description
Name
Name of physical channel (max. 16 characters)
Type
Type of physical channel (SIO, ETHERNET). See Figure 13.
SIO - Serial Channels
Additionally, the following parameters must be set if the Type is set to SIO
Channel
Channel number (1 - 2).
Baud rate
Baud rate for the serial channel (300 - 19200).
Parity
Type of parity for serial channel. (Odd, Even, None).
No / of bits
Number of data bits (7, 8).
No / of stops bits
Number of stop bits (1, 2).
RTS / CTS Control
RTS / CTS flow control when sending from the robot
(ON/OFF). RTS / CTS is not available on channel 2.
4.2 Defining Transmission Protocol
• Choose Topics: Communication
• Choose Types: Transmission Protocol
All defined transmission protocols will be displayed, as shown in Figure 15.
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
Communication
Transmission Protocols
Name
Type
PhyChannel
slip1
com2
SLIP
XON/XOFF
1(1)
sio1:
sio2:
Add
Figure 15 System parameters of the type Transmission protocol.
• Select the transmission protocol to be changed and press Enter
by pressing Add.
, or add a new one
• Select the desired parameter and change its value. Press OK to confirm.
Parameters
Description
Name
Name of the transmission protocol (max. 16 characters). The
name must be unique and must not be used anywhere else.
Type
Type of transmission protocol (None, XON/XOFF, SLIP, TCP/
IP). See Figure 13.
PhyChannel
Name of the physical channel the protocol should use.
SLIP
Additionally, the following parameters must be set if the Type is set to SLIP
Local Address
Local address of the SLIP connection.
Remote Address
Remote address of the SLIP connection.
TCP/IP
Additionally, the following parameters must be set if the Type is set to TCP/IP
Local Address
Local IP address.
Note that the robot will use 4 IP addresses.
This address, ta+1, +2, +3 e.g. “192.168.1.1”, “192.168.1.2”,
“192.168.1.3” and “192.168.1.4”.
Subnet Mask
The subnet mask of the ethernet interface.
XON/XOFF
This protocol can only be used if ASCII values are transmitted,
i.e. to a terminal or a printer.
User’s Guide
12-33
System Parameters
4.3 Defining Application Protocol
• Choose Topics: Communication
• Choose Types: Application Protocol
All defined application protocols will be displayed, as shown in Figure 16.
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
Application Protocols
Name
Type
Trans. Prot.
rap1
slip1
RAP
Communication
1(1)
Add
Figure 16 System parameters of the type Application protocol.
• Select the application protocol to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Select the desired parameter and change its value. Press OK to confirm.
Parameters
Description
Name
Name of the application protocol (max. 16 characters). The
name must be unique and must not be used anywhere else.
Type
Type of application protocol (RAP, NFS). See Figure 13.
Trans Prot.
Name of the transmission protocol the protocol should use.
RAP - Robot Application Protocol
Additionally, the following parameters must be set if the Type is set to RAP
12-34
Remote Address
The IP Address of the Remote Computer. This variable is
required when sending start up messages. If the transmission
protocol is SLIP this parameter can be left empty. The Remote
Address of the SLIP connection is used instead.
PortNo
The TCP protocol port number of the remote computer.
Send start-up msg
When enabled the robot controller can send a message at start
up.
Enable SUBSCW
This variable is used for setting up subscriptions of RAPID
events.
User’s Guide
System Parameters
NFS - Remote Mounted Disk
Additionally, the following parameters must be set if the Type is set to NFS
Server Address
The IP Address of the computer with the NFS server.
Trusted
This flag decides if this computer should be trusted, i.e. if losing the connection should make the program stop. (YES/NO)
Local Path
The name of the unit on the robot. If, for example the unit is
named pc:, the name of the test.prg on this unit would be
pc:test.prg
Server Path
The name of the exported disk on the remote computer.
User ID
The UNIX user id for the mounting. (This parameter must be
the same for all mountings on a robot)
Group ID
The UNIX group id for the mounting. (This parameter must be
the same for all mountings on a robot)
Show on Teach Pendant
This flag decides if the unit should be visible in the list of units
on the teach pendant. (YES/NO)
User’s Guide
12-35
System Parameters
12-36
User’s Guide
System Parameters
5 Topic: Controller
The following parameters are found under the Controller topic:
- Activation of delayed (soft) safeguarded space stop
- Activation of Hold-To-Run Control
- Event routines
- Maximum regain distances
- System miscellaneous
- Automatic loading of modules and programs
- Tasks (option Multitasking is required)
• Choose Topics: Controller.
5.1 Activate delayed safeguarded space stop
A delayed stop gives a smooth stop. The robot stops in the same way as a normal
program stop with no deviation from the programmed path. After approx. 1 second the
power supplied to the motors shuts off. The stopping distance can be longer than at a
hard stop (e.g. emergency stop).
• Choose Types: SafetyRunChain.
• Select the safety function to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Define the function and whether or not it shall be active (True).
SoftAS = Delayed automatic mode safeguarded space stop
SoftGS = Delayed general mode safe guarded space stop
• Press OK to confirm.
5.2 Activate Hold-To-Run Control
When using the Hold-To-Run control, the program start key must be held down all the
time, in order to execute a program.
This function is always activated in the manual operating mode at full speed, but can
also be activated at reduced speed.
• Choose Types: SafetyOpKey.
• Select the safety function to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Define the function and whether or not it shall be active (True).
• Press OK to confirm.
User’s Guide
12-37
System Parameters
5.3 Defining event routines
Special system events, such as program stop, can be connected together with an ordinary routine. When the event occurs, the corresponding routine is executed automatically.
• Choose Types: Event Routines.
All defined event routines will be displayed (see Figure 17).
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
Event Routines
Routine
Event
Controller
Task
1(4)
STOP
POWER ON
START
RESET
STOP ROUTINE
RESTORE_IO
SYS_RESET
SYS_RESET
MAIN
MAIN
MAIN
MAIN
Predefined, but could be modified
Predefined and should not be
removed
Add
Figure 17 Certain events can start routines automatically.
• Select the event routine to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Define the system event and the routine assigned to it, also select which task the definition
is for.
• Press OK to confirm.
The following types of system events are available:
System event
Description
POWER ON
The robot is restarted (warm start) from the teach pendant or by
power on.
START
Execution is started from the beginning of the program.
RESTART
Execution is started from the position where is was stopped.
STOP
The program was stopped. Note: A delayed stop after current
cycle will not execute the routines connected to this state.
QSTOP
The robot was quick stopped (emergency stop).
RESET
The old program was erased.
The specified routine must be a procedure without any parameters. The routines should
be in a system module, at least the routines for the RESET event.
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
If the robot cannot find the specified routine, an error message will be given.
Avoid motion instructions in the routines. For STOP/QSTOP, a motion instruction in
the corresponding event routine will result in an error. It is advisable to keep the routines short and quick.
A maximum of four routines may be specified for each system event and each task
(multitasking). The same routine can be used in more than one event.
If there is a Stop or a Break instruction in some event routine, the routine will be
executed from the beginning at the next event.
The task(s) available are dependent on the type Tasks.
Limitation for POWER ON, RESET and QSTOP event: The specified event routine
cannot be executed if the task program has semantic errors (reference errors etc.). If
this is the case, the system will generate an error.
5.4 Specifying regain distances
Maximum distance for a regain movement (the distance from the current robot position
to the last executed path). This can be set both for start in manual mode and for start in
automatic mode.
A regain movement will begin when program start is ordered and before the program
continues with the instruction that was interrupted due to a stop request. If the regain
distance exceeds the specified max. distance, an error message will occur.
• Choose Types: Regain distances.
The operating modes will be listed, (see Figure 18).
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
Regain distances
Mode
Tcp_dist
Controller
Tcp_rot
MAN
AUTO
0.35
1.57
1(2)
0.02
0.5
Figure 18 Maximum regain distances.
• Select the operating mode to be changed and press Enter
User’s Guide
.
12-39
System Parameters
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Mode
AUTO or MAN.
Tcp_dist
The maximum TCP distance (m).
Tcp_rot
The maximum TCP rotation (rad).
Ext_dist
The maximum distance for external axes (m).
Ext_rot
The maximum rotation for external axes (rad).
5.5 System miscellaneous
Changes to any item in this menu will force the system to restart the program handling
part of the system at the next warm start. All user programs will be erased and all task
modules specified in the configuration will be reloaded.
• Choose Types: System misc.
All functions already added will be listed, (see Figure 19).
File
Edit
Topics
System Parameters
System misc
Types
Controller
Function
Value
SimMenu
AveragePers
YES
20
1(2)
ADD
Figure 19 System miscellaneous.
• Mark the function to be changed and change it, or add a new one.
• Press OK to confirm.
12-40
Function
Description
SimMenu
The WaitTime, WaitUntil and WaitDI instructions will generate
an alert box in manual mode to make it possible for the user to
simulate the instruction and continue to execute the next
instruction. If this is set to NO, no menu will be generated.
YES is the default behaviour.
AveragePers
Average size in bytes of one PERSISTENT variable. This
setting will affect the maximum number of persistents in the
system.
User’s Guide
System Parameters
5.6 Automatic loading of modules and programs
System modules and/or normal RAPID program modules can be loaded automatically
when the robot is powered on (restarted).
Changes to any item in this menu will force the system to restart the program handling
part of the system at the next warm start. All user programs will be erased, and all task
modules specified in the configuration will be reloaded.
• Choose Types: Task modules.
A list of the files which will be preloaded will be shown, (see Figure 20).
File
Edit
Topics
System Parameters
Task modules
Types
Controller
Task
File
MAIN
MAIN
SUPERVISION
SUPERVISION
GUN
GUN
ram1disk:base.sys
ram1disk:user.sys
ram1disk:base_mt.sy
ram1disk:superv.mod
ram1disk:base_mt.sy
ram1disk:gun.mod
1(6)
Add
Figure 20 Programs loaded into the system during the warm start sequence.
• Select the item to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Task
The symbolic name of the task to which the module should be
loaded. The available task(s) is shown under the type Tasks.
(See Defining multitasking on page 42).
File
A path to the module file. (Note: The file must be reachable in
every warm start, e.g. ram1disk:base.sys)
Storage
Built in or loaded. A built in module is not visible, it will not
occur in the list of modules and cannot be removed from the
program window (see Developer’s Manual). Loaded is the
default behaviour.
TextResource
If Storage is set to Built in it is possible to use a national
language for routine names, for example. This parameter
should be 0 as English is used for the RAPID language (see
Developer’s Manual).
User’s Guide
12-41
System Parameters
Shared
If Storage is set to Built in it is possible in a multitask system
to install the module so it (and all its objects) will be reachable
from all tasks. This parameter should then be set to YES. These
objects are also called Intertask Objects (see Developer’s
Manual). The default behaviour is NO.
The files “ram1disk:base.sys” and “ram1disk:user.sys” are predefined and should not
be removed, but the contents of “user.sys” may be modified.
The file “ram1disk:base_mt.sys” should always be defined for any additional tasks.
5.7 Defining multitasking
Available when the option Multitasking is installed. The various tasks are defined with
name, priority and execution behaviour.
Changes to any item in this menu will force the system to restart the program handling
part of the system at the next warm start. All user programs will be erased and all task
modules specified in the configuration will be reloaded.
• Choose Types: Tasks.
All specified tasks will be listed, (see Figure 21).
File
Edit
Topics
System Parameters
Tasks
Prog
Task
MAIN
SUPERVISION
GUN
0
1
2
Types
Controller
Type
1(3)
NORMAL
SEMISTATIC
SEMISTATIC
Add
Figure 21 All available tasks.
• Select the task to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
, or add a new one by
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Task
The name of a task. (max 16 characters)
Prog
The program number. Program no. 0 is reserved for the normal
robot program which is the only one that may include motion
instructions.
Type
Controls the start/stop and system restart behaviour.
NORMAL - The task will react on START/STOP requests
given from the teach pendant or other sources.
STATIC - The task will be started from the beginning at the
first warm start after a cold start, and automatically restarted at
the current position at all other warm starts.
SEMISTATIC- The task will be restarted from the beginning
at all warm starts.
Program no. 0 must be of type NORMAL. The other tasks
should be of type STATIC or SEMISTATIC.
Task in foreground
The name (or program number) of a task that should run in
foreground the of this. If “-1” or an empty string ““ is set for
this parameter, it will run at the highest level with no other task
that could suspend its execution.
Main entry
The name of the start routine. It should be a RAPID routine
without any parameters and reachable in this task (only valid
for STATIC and SEMISTATIC tasks).
BindRef
This parameter should be set to NO if the system is to accept
unsolved references in the program while linking a module, or
otherwise set to YES (default value is YES). The parameter
must be set to NO if the instructions Load/Erase are to be
used.
There will be a runtime error on execution of an unresolved
reference.
TrustLevel
TrustLevel handle the system behaviour when a SEMISTATIC
or STATIC task is stopped for some reason or not executable.
SysFail - This is the default behaviour. All NORMAL tasks
(normally only the MAIN task) will be stopped. Besides that
the system is set to state SYS_FAIL. All jogging and program
start orders will be rejected. Only a new warm start resets the
system. This should be used when the task has some security
supervisions.
SysHalt - All NORMAL tasks will be stopped. The system is
forced to “motors off”. When taking up the system to “motors
on” it is possible to jog the robot, but a new attempt to start the
program will be rejected. A new warm start will reset the
system.
SysStop - All NORMAL tasks will be stopped but is
restartable. Jogging is also possible.
NoSafety - Only the actual task itself will stop.
If a task is specified as a STATIC or SEMISTATIC type, all modules must be
preloaded. See Automatic loading of modules and programs on page 41.
User’s Guide
12-43
System Parameters
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
6 Topic: TeachPendant
The following parameters are found under the TeachPendant topic:
- Optional packages
- Defining customised file extensions
- Authorising and confirmation of user commands, changing Pass Codes.
- Activation of limited modpos function
- Programmable keys.
- Default running mode settings
• Choose Topics: Teach Pendant.
The Most Common instruction pick lists and I/O list are also stored when saving this
topic.
6.1 Defining Optional Packages
If several process packages (ArcWare, SpotWare etc.) have been added to the system,
it is possible to define which package is to be used for the Program window and the
Production window.
• Choose Topics: TeachPendant.
• Choose Types: Optional Package.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Use for Program
The name of the process package to be used for Program, or
NONE if not used.
Use for Production
The name of the process package to be used for Production, or
NONE if not used. (No process package available in this
version).
6.2 Defining File Extension
It is possible to add file extensions for RAPID created files, so that they are recognised
by any file dialogue.
• Choose Topics: TeachPendant.
• Choose Types: File Extensions.
User’s Guide
12-45
System Parameters
• Select the File extension to be changed and press Enter
pressing Add.
or add a new one by
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Name
The name of the extension (max. 3 characters)
Description
Explains the type of data in the file
6.3 Defining authorisation and confirmation
It is possible to limit the access to certain commands, by using user levels and associated pass codes. This means that a function will not be executed unless you have the
correct user level. It is also possible to define that a command will not be performed
until it is confirmed.
In the robot there are four (4) user levels:
Operator
for functions accessible to all users.
No pass code needed.
Service
for functions associated with service.
Pass code needed.
Programmer
for functions related to programming and testing.
Pass code needed.
Service & Programmer
For functions needed for both programming and service.
Pass code needed for either Service or Programmer.
A pass code can be up to 8 digits long.
If you try to perform a command and you do not have the correct user level, a dialogue
will appear, as shown in Figure 22:
File
Edit
Topics
Types
Auth.
Pass Code Input!
“Service” pass code required
to be able to continue!
********
Cancel
OK
Figure 22 Pass Code Input Dialogue.
12-46
User’s Guide
System Parameters
• Input your pass code for the correct user level.
• Press OK to confirm the pass code input.
If the pass code is still not correct, press Cancel and ask your system administrator for
the correct one.
Defining new pass codes
• Choose Topics: TeachPendant.
• Choose Edit: Change Pass Codes.
• Read the warning message and press OK.
File
Edit
Topics
Types
Auth.
Change Pass Code!
Input the old Pass Code before
changing to a new Pass Code.
Old
New
Operator No “Pass Code”
Service
Programmer
Cancel
OK
Figure 23 Pass CodeChange Dialogue
• Select the old pass code of the user level to be changed (use the arrow keys Up or Down)
• Input the old pass code (the pass code will not be visible). After installation of the control
program, the pass code is 007.
• Select the new pass code of the user level to be changed.
• Input the new pass code, (the pass code will be visible).
• Press OK to acknowledge the change of pass code.
• Press Enter
to confirm the updating.
Defining authorisation
To authorise a function:
• Choose Topics: TeachPendant.
• Choose from the Types menu, the window you want to authorise (names start with
Authorise...).
All functions that can be authorised will be displayed (e.g. as shown in Figure 24).
• Select the function to change and press Enter
User’s Guide
.
12-47
System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Function
The name of the function to be authorised (cannot be changed).
User Level
Required user level to be able to execute the function,
(can be Operator, Service and Programmer).
Confirm
Should the function be confirmed before it is executed? Yes or
No.
• To change
- User Level, select parameter User Level and press Enter
- Confirm, select parameter Confirm and press Enter
.
.
• Choose appropriate value and press OK.
• When finished, press OK to confirm the change.
Authorise SystemParameters
• Choose Topics: TeachPendant.
• Choose Types: Authorise SystemParameters.
All possible functions will be displayed, as shown in Figure 24.
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
TeachPendant
Authorise SystemParameters
Function
User level Confirm
1(3)
Launch
Service
No
Change Code
Service
Yes
Delete Inst
Service
Yes
Figure 24 Authorise System Parameters.
Function
Description
Launch
To authorise the opening of the window.
Change Code
To authorise the change of pass codes.
Delete Inst
To authorise the deletion of a parameter.
• To change user level and/or confirm, see Defining authorisation on page 47.
Authorise Program
• Choose Topics: TeachPendant.
• Choose Types: Authorise Program.
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
All possible functions will be displayed, as shown in Figure 25.
File
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
TeachPendant
Authorise Program
User level Confirm
Function
1(5)
Operator
Launch
No
Operator
ModPos
Yes
Operator
Edit Program
No
Programmer Yes
Delete Instr
Programmer Yes
Delete Object
Operator
Conf. Start
Yes
Figure 25 Authorise Program.
Function
Description
Launch
To authorise the opening of the window.
ModPos
To authorise modification of a position
Edit Program
To authorise changing of the program.
Delete Instr
To authorise the deletion of any instruction in a RAPID
routine.
Delete Object
To authorise the deletion of any RAPID objects (e.g. routines,
modules or data).
Conf. Start
Only confirmation. If set to No the program execution will
always start from the program pointer (PP).
• To change user level and/or confirm, see Defining authorisation on page 47.
6.4 Activation of Limited ModPos Function
If the Limit ModPos function is active, only a limited deviation from the original position is allowed, when the ModPos key is pressed to modify a position. The limited
deviation concerns both the linear distance and the orientation.
• Choose Topics: TeachPendant.
• Choose Types: Modify Position.
Now the current type of ModPos function will be displayed, ModPos or LModPos.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
User’s Guide
12-49
System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Type
The current type of modpos. ModPos means that Limit ModPos is deactivated, i.e. any change is accepted. LModPos means
that Limit ModPos is activated, i.e. the change must be within
a limited area.
Tuning In Auto
Tuning Off or On in auto.
On = tuning functionality enabled in automatic mode.
Off = tuning functionality disabled in automatic mode.
Mode
The current mode of limited modpos.
Abs = The limited area is around a fixed original point.
Rel = The limited area is around the current point and will be
moved when you modify the point.
Max Trans
The maximum allowed deviation in mm from the current or
original position.
Max Rot
The maximum allowed reorientation in degrees from the current or original position.
Max External Trans
The maximum allowed deviation in mm from the current or
original position concerning external linear axes.
Max External Rot
The maximum allowed deviation in degrees from the current or
original position concerning external rotational axes.
If Auto
Parameter for automatic activation of Limit ModPos when the
operator’s key is switched to Auto Mode. LModPos means that
Limit ModPos is activated when the operator’s key is switched
to Auto Mode. As Is means that ModPos is not changed.
6.5 Programmable keys
There are five keys on the teach pendant which you can define for the purpose of setting
outputs and generating signal events, see Figure 26.
P5
P4
7 8 9
4 5 6
1 2 3
0
1
2
P1
P2
P1
P3
P2
P3
Figure 26 The five programmable keys.
• Choose Topics: Teach Pendant.
• Choose Types: Programmable Keys.
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
Now the definition of the keys will be displayed.
• Select the key to be defined and press Enter
.
Parameter
Description
Key
The designation of the key P1-P5
Type
Type of key: Input, Output or None (not activated)
Connection
Name of signal to be chosen.
When Type is selected as Output, the following are also available:
Key Pressed
Defines how the output should be set.
Toggle: if the signal value is high (1), it will become low (0)
and vice versa.
Pulse: a positive pulse (200 ms) is generated.
Set1/Set0: either to high (1) or to low (0).
Press/Release: the signal will be high (1) as long as the key is
depressed. When the key is released, the signal will change to
low (0).
Allow in Auto
Defines if the output should be possible to use even in
automatic mode.
Yes allows the key to be operational in both manual and
automatic mode.
No allows the key to be used only in manual mode.
When Type is selected as Input, an event will be generated for this input. This event can
be related to:
- System input: The input must then be associated with a system activity, see
Defining input and output signals on page 12.
- Interrupt: This is defined by the instruction ISignalDI (see RAPID Reference
Manual).
- Waiting for input: This is programmed via the instruction WaitDI (but not WaitUntil). (See RAPID Reference Manual).
6.6 Defining Running Mode Settings
The default set-up for the running mode can be defined for the program window (manual mode) and the production window (automatic mode).
• Choose Topics: TeachPendant.
• Choose Types: Running Mode.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
User’s Guide
12-51
System Parameters
12-52
Parameter
Description
Operating mode
Manual or Automatic mode
Running Mode
Running mode (Continuous or Cycle) when starting the robot
in this mode or switching to this mode.
User’s Guide
System Parameters
7 Topic: Manipulator
The Manipulator topic contains parameters associated with motion control in the robot
and external axes, e.g.:
- The commutation offset
- The calibration offset
- The working space limits.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
Do not change “Transm gear ratio” or other kinematic parameters from the teach
pendant or a PC. This will affect the safety function Reduced speed 250 mm/s.
Regarding available parameters, please note the following:
Some parameters described here require the boot sequence service to be available when
making changes, see the Product Manual - Installation and Commissioning, chapter
Installing the Control Program. It may also be convenient to make a backup and restore
it later on, see Chapter 14, Service - Backup and Restore in this manual.
7.1 Defining the commutation offset and calibration offset of the motors
These values are generally updated from the Service window. If, however, they are
known, they can be specified in the System Parameters window.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Motor Calib.
• Select the desired motor and press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Name
The name of the motor, e.g. motor_1 (max. 16 characters).
Calibration offset
The position of the motor (resolver) when it is in the calibration
position (in radians).
Cal offset valid
Specifies whether the calibration offset is defined.
Commutator offset
The position of the motor (resolver) when the rotor is in the
electrical zero position relative to the stator (in radians).
Com offset valid
Specifies whether the commutation offset is defined.
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System Parameters
7.2 Defining the range of movement and calibration position of each axis
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Arm.
• Select the desired arm (axis) and press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Name
The name of the arm, e.g. arm_1 (max. 16 characters).
Upper joint bound
The upper joint limit, e.g. +3.139 for axis 1 (in radians).
180o = 3.1416 radians.
Lower joint bound
The lower joint limit, e.g. -3.139 for axis 1 (in radians).
Use check point
The name of a check point (if any). See Defining arm check
point on page 58.
Use arm load
The name of an arm load (if any). See Defining arm load on
page 57.
Calibration position
The position of the axis when it was calibrated. If this value is
changed, the robot must subsequently be fine-calibrated in the
Service window. See the Product Manual.
7.3 Defining supervision level
It is possible to change the default supervision levels if a system needs to be more or
less tolerant to external disturbances. A higher tune factor than 1.0 gives a more tolerant
robot system and vice versa with a tune factor lower than 1.0. For instance, an increase
from the default tune factor 1.0 to factor 2.0, doubles the allowed supervision levels,
making the robot system more tolerant to external disturbances. Decreasing the tune
factor to 0.5 gives a system which is less tolerant to external disturbances.
Increasing the tune factors can reduce the lifetime of the robot.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Arm
• Select the desired arm (axis) and press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
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System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Jam sup trim factor
Tune factor for jam supervision. The factor influences
the maximum time allowed at zero speed with maximum
torque.
Load sup trim factor Tune factor for load supervision. The factor
influences the maximum time allowed at non-zero speed
with maximum torque.
Speed sup trim factor Tune factor for speed supervision. The factor influences the
maximum allowed speed error.
Pos sup trim factor
Tune factor for position supervision. The factor influences the
maximum allowed position error.
7.4 Tuning the motion supervision
Motion supervision is the name of a collection of functions for high sensitivity, modelbased supervision of the robot’s movements. The motion supervision includes functionality for the detection of collisions, jams and incorrect load definitions.
The motion supervision can be tuned through the system parameters. Separate
parameters exist for jogging and program execution. Currently, the names of the
system parameters refer to the collision detection. However, they also turn on and
off and modify the supervision levels of the load and jam supervisions.
If the motion supervision is triggered, then do one of the following:
• If the load is incorrectly defined, use the load identification function to define it.
• If the application involves many external process forces, increase the supervision level for
jogging and program execution in steps of 30 percent until you no longer receive the error
code.
• If the external process forces are only temporary (such as closing a large spotweld gun),
then use the instruction MotionSup to raise the supervision level or turn the function off
temporarily.
• If everything else fails, turn off the motion supervision.
The motion supervision parameters do not require a restart when modified. Use
the following procedure to change the motion supervision system parameters.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Motion Sup.
• Select the desired instance (usually IRB) and press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
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System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Path col detect
Turn the collision detection ON or OFF for program
execution (also modifies the load and jam supervisions).
Jog col detect
Turn the collision detection ON or OFF for jogging (also
modifies the load and jam supervisions).
Path col detect level
Modifies the supervision level for the collision detection for
program execution by the specified percentage value (also
modifies the load and jam supervisions). A large percentage
value makes the function less sensitive.
Jog col detect level
Modifies the supervision level for the collision detection for
jogging by the specified percentage value (also modifies the
load and jam supervisions). A large percentage value makes
the function less sensitive.
7.5 Defining teach mode speed
When there is a requirement to monitor manual mode with reduced speed lower than
250 mm/s, this can be achieved by changing the teach mode maximum speed.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Motion system
• Select the desired system and press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Teach mode max speed
Maximum allowed speed in manual mode with reduced
speed.
7.6 Defining independent motion
Independent motion is a part of Advanced Motion, and the system has to be loaded in
service mode in order to be able to change the independent parameters. The control
program must be re-installed to activate these parameters. First select the Query mode.
When the question Service/Standard movement parameters? comes up, choose
Service. See the Product Manual - Installation and Commissioning.
For the manipulator, only axis 6 can be used in independent mode. For external axes
there are no limits for independent motion.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Arm
• Select the desired arm and press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
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System Parameters
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Independent joint
Flag used to allow independent mode for this axis.
For external axes, the transmission ratio must be defined as normal with the parameter
Transm. gear ratio, but also with its nominator and denominator values.
• Choose Types: Transmission and specify the following:
Parameter
Description
Transm. high gear
The integer value of the numerator of the transmission gear
ratio. Only used for independent joints.
Transm. low gear
The integer value of the denominators of the transmission gear
ratio. Only used for independent joints.
Example: For a rotating axis with high gear 100 and low gear
30, has a transmission gear ratio of 100/30=3.333333 .
For both manipulator axes and external axes the working area can be increased up to:
Manipulator
Work area (radians arm side)
IRB 1400
IRB 2400.1.8
IRB 2400.1.5
IRB 4400
IRB 6400
External axes
±1885
±1885
±1571
±1260
±943
±1256637 (motor side)
• Choose Types: Arm and specify the arm characteristics for the axis.
Parameter
Description
Positive limit
Upper limit for the axis work area (in radians or metres).
Negative limit
Lower limit for the axis work area (in radians or metres).
7.7 Defining arm load
The performance of the robot will be negatively affected if the arm load is not defined.
When more than one load is mounted on one and the same arm, the total weight and
the position of the centre of gravity must be calculated.
All loads mounted on the upper arm are related to axis 3, including loads on the
rotating part.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Arm load.
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System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Name
The name of the arm load, e.g. armload_1 (max. 16 characters).
Mass
The mass of the arm load (in kg).
Mass centre x
Mass centre y
Mass centre z
The mass centre, specified using the coordinate system
of the arm (in m). See the example in Figure 27.
Z arm 3
Z arm 2
X arm 2
Z arm 1
X arm 3
X arm 1
Figure 27 The arm coordinate system for axes 1, 2 and 3.
Now, this arm load must be connected to the current arm (axis):
• Choose Types: Arm.
• Select the desired arm and press Enter
.
• Select the parameter Use customer arm load and specify the name of the arm load
previously defined.
• Press OK to confirm.
7.8 Defining arm check point
If an extra load, such as a transformer or a welding-bar roller, is attached to an arm, then
a point on this equipment can be defined. In this case, the robot monitors the speed of
that point so that it does not exceed 250 mm/s in the manual operating mode (reduced
speed).
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Arm check point.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
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System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Name
The name of the check point, e.g. chk_pnt_1 (max. 16
characters).
Position x
Position y
Position z
The position of the check point, specified on the basis of the
current coordinate system of the arm (in meters). See the
example in Figure 28.
Z arm 3
Check point
X arm 3
Figure 28 Definition of the check point for arm 3.
Now, this check point must be connected to the current arm (axis):
• Choose Types: Arm.
• Select the desired axis and press Enter
.
• Select the parameter Use check point and specify the name of the arm check point
previously defined.
• Press OK to confirm.
7.9 Defining external torque
When external equipment, for instance a cable or a coiled hose, affects any joint
significantly, the external torque should be defined using the following formula:
T = A + k ⋅ ( θ – θ0 )
T
= external torque [Nm]
A
= constant torque [Nm]
k
= scale factor for position dependent torque [Nm/rad]
θ0
= joint position when position dependent torque is zero [rad]
The formula is also illustrated in the figure below.
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System Parameters
T
A
zero angle
joint position
Figure 29 External torque
Example: A coiled hose is mounted and affects joint 6 as follows:
• 0 Nm at 0 degrees
• 5 Nm at 200 degrees
5
-.
This external torque can be defined using A = 0, θ 0 = 0, k = --------------------------------200 ⋅ ( π ⁄ 180 )
If the estimated value of a significant external torque is too low, there could be
unnecessary path deviations and the manipulator could be damaged. If the estimated
value is too high, the performance of the manipulator will be reduced due to restrictive
acceleration limits.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Arm.
• Select the desired arm and press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Ext const torque
External constant torque [Nm].
Ext prop torque
Scale factor for position dependent torque [Nm/rad].
Ext torque zero angle Joint position when position dependent torque is zero [rad].
7.10 Defining friction compensation
Friction compensation can be activated to reduce path errors caused by friction and
backlash at low speeds (10 - 200 mm/s).
The friction model is a constant level with a sign opposite to the axis speed direction.
Friction ffw level (Nm) is the absolute friction level at (low) speeds greater than
Friction ffw ramp (rad/s) see Figure 30.
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System Parameters
Low speed motor friction (Nm)
Friction ffw level (Nm)
Friction ffw ramp (rad/s)
Axis motor speed (rad/s)
Figure 30 Friction model.
The instruction TuneServo can be used to tune optimal values for each robot axis.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Control parameters.
• Select the desired axis and press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Friction ffw on
Activates/deactivates friction compensation.
Friction ffw level
Low speed motor friction level [Nm].
Friction ffw ramp
Friction ramp [rad/s].
Tuning procedure
The most straight forward way to tune the friction parameters is to consider one axis
at a time. Choose a motion which has a characteristic friction “bump” due to a specific
axis changing direction. Turn the friction compensation on for this specific axis and
use the default setting for friction level and ramp. Use the TuneServo command to
gradually increase the friction level until the bump in the path is removed.
Repeat this procedure for all axes.
7.11 Defining the base coordinate system
Normally the base coordinate system of the robot coincides with the global coordinate
system. However, the base coordinate system can be moved relative to the global
coordinate system. Please note that the programmed positions are always related to the
global coordinate system, and all positions will therefore also be moved, as seen from
the robot. Normally this would be defined from the Service window, but if the values
are known they can be input from the system parameters.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Robot.
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System Parameters
• Select the manipulator whose base coordinate system is to be changed.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Name
The name of the robot, e.g. robot_1 (max. 16 characters).
Type
Robot type (not to be changed).
Base frame x
The X-coordinate of the base coordinate system’s position
in relation to the world coordinate system (in metres).
Base frame y
The Y-coordinate of the base coordinate system (in metres).
Base frame z
The Z-coordinate of the base coordinate system (in metres).
Base frame q1-q4
The orientation of the base coordinate system in relation to
the world coordinate system (expressed in quaternions q1q4). Figure 31 illustrates some examples of different values.
Base frame moved by
Specifies whether the robot is to be operated in coordination
with a track. See Defining a track motion with coordinated
motion on page 63.
Floor mounted
Suspended
case 1
X base
Z base
Suspended
case 2
X base
Z base
Z base
Y base
X base
Z world
(X, Y, Z, 1, 0, 0, 0)
(X, Y, Z, 0, 1, 0, 0)
(X, Y, Z, 0, 0, 1, 0)
Y world
X world
Figure 31 Some examples of definitions of the base coordinate system.
7.12 Defining external manipulators with more than one axis
To achieve the best possible performance from an external manipulator, a set of data,
describing its kinematic and dynamic properties (among other things), must be defined.
This data cannot be defined in the system parameters, but must be read from a diskette.
If no diskette was supplied with the manipulator, the manipulator cannot be coordinated
with the robot. It can, however, be defined as a number of separate external axes.
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System Parameters
• Read the files that define the manipulator. See Loading parameters from a diskette or
some other mass storage device on page 7. Use the command File: Add New
parameters.
• Define the calibration offset, name of the mechanical unit, etc. See Defining external
axes on page 63.
• Define the base coordinate system as described in Defining an external mechanical unit
coordinated with the robot on page 63.
7.13 Defining a track motion with coordinated motion
• Define the axis in the usual way. See Defining external axes on page 63. Define the base
coordinate system of the track motion, from the Service window, for example. See
Chapter 10, Calibration.
• Choose Types: Robot.
• Select the robot and press Enter
.
• Set the parameter Base frame moved by to the name of the axis (single) that is used by the
defined track.
7.14 Defining an external mechanical unit coordinated with the robot
• Define the axis in the usual way. See Defining external axes on page 63. Define the base
coordinate system of the unit from the Service window, for example. See Chapter 10,
Calibration.
• Choose Types: Mechanical unit.
• Select the mechanical unit to be coordinated with the robot and press Enter
.
• Set the parameter User frame moved by to the name of the axis (Single) that rotates the
work object.
7.15 Defining external axes
The configuration files supplied must be used for track motion and for manipulators
supplied by ABB. See the enclosed documentation.
On the system diskette Control Parameters, which is supplied with the robot, there are
a number of predefined setups of external axes. These can be found in the directory
EXTAXIS and must be used during installation.
• Service movement parameters must be used when defining external axes. The control
program must be re-installed to activate these parameters. First select the Query mode.
When the question Service/Standard movement parameters? comes up, choose Service.
See the Product Manual - Installation and Commissioning.
• When a separate transformer and rectifier unit is used to power external axes (drive
system installed in a separate cabinet), read in the configuration files for the transformer
and rectifier unit in question.
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System Parameters
Configuration file
Identification number
EXTAXIS/UTIL/TRAFO1D2
EXTAXIS/UTIL/TRAFO2D2
EXTAXIS/UTIL/TRAFO3D2
3HAC 0747-1 or 0749-1 or 0750-1
3HAC 0751-1 or 0752-1 or 0753-1
3HAC 0754-1 or 0755-1 or 0756-1
EXTAXIS/UTIL/DC0_D2
EXTAXIS/UTIL/DC1_D2
EXTAXIS/UTIL/DC2_D2
EXTAXIS/UTIL/DC3_D2
EXTAXIS/UTIL/DC2T_D2
DSQC 345A
DSQC 345B
DSQC 345C
DSQC 345D
DSQC 358C
The files can be found on the Control Parameters diskette. See Loading parameters
from a diskette or some other mass storage device on page 7. Use the command File:
Add new parameters.
Only one file may be read in for the transformer and rectifier unit respectively, even
when more than one external axes is used. In this way the transformer and rectifier unit
will be automatically defined as common to all the external axes in the drive system 2.
• Read in the axis-configuration files for the required axes, EXTAXIS/MN_DEF/
MNxMyDz where x denotes the measurement node number, y the measuring system and
z the drive system connected. The files will be loaded from the Control Parameters
diskette. See Loading parameters from a diskette or some other mass storage device
on page 7. Use the command File: Add new parameters.
Read in the file that corresponds to the current installation, one file for each axis used.
Rules for connecting external axes to the system (for general information see Product
Manual - Installation and Commissioning/External axes):
A maximum of 6 external axes may be connected to the system.
- Measuring system connections:
One extra Serial Measuring board can be connected to measuring system 1.
On this, one axis can be physically connected to node 4 on the board.
Up to four SMBs can be connected to measuring system 2. The measurement
boards must be numbered in consecutive order starting with board_1_m2 followed
by board_2_m2 etc.
Each axis in the measurement system must have its own unique node number.
The axes can be connected to the measuring boards in an arbitrary way.
- Drive system connections:
Max. one external axis may be activated in drive system 1.
If drive system 1.2 is used, drive system 2 must not be used.
Only one configuration file per axis number may be read in.
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System Parameters
Configuration files with standard data on Control Parameters
Configuration file
Logical axis
Measuring system
Drive system
System*
Node*
System*
Unit position
Node
MN4M1D1
7
1
4(7)**
1
0
2
MN4M1D2
7
1
4(7)**
2
1
2
MN4M1D12
7
2
4(7)**
2
0
2
MN1M2D1
8
2
1
1
0
2
MN1M2D2
8
2
1
2
1
1
MN1M2D12
8
2
1
2
0
1
MN2M2D1
9
2
2
1
0
2
MN2M2D2
9
2
2
2
2
2
MN2M2D12
9
2
2
2
0
2
MN3M2D1
10
2
3
1
0
2
MN3M2D2
10
2
3
2
2
1
MN3M2D12
10
2
3
2
0
1
MN4M2D1
11
2
4
1
0
2
MN4M2D2
11
2
4
2
3
2
MN4M2D12
11
2
4
2
0
2
MN5M2D1
12
2
5
1
0
2
MN5M2D2
12
2
5
2
3
1
MN5M2D12
12
2
5
2
0
1
MN6M2D1
7
2
6
1
0
2
MN6M2D2
7
2
6
2
1
2
MN6M2D12
7
2
6
2
0
2
* Parameter value must not be changed.
** Is connected physically to node 4 but the logical value in the system parameters must be 7.
A mechanical unit is now created for each axis. Its name will be the same as in the file,
e.g. MN4M1D1.
• Now restart using File: Restart. (Do not worry about any error codes, which are caused
by drive system parameters that have not yet been updated.)
• Choose Area: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Mechanical unit, and specify the following:
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System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Name
Name of the unit (max. 7 characters).
This name will be used later in the Jogging window and in
the program, e.g. when a unit is activated.
Standby state
The unit is controlled and the brakes are released not until
the first movement instruction is executed or until it is
moved manually.
Must not be deactivated in the S4C system.
Activated when starting Unit is automatically activated when starting.
Deactivate not allowed
Unit must not be deactivated.
• Choose Types: Single Type and specify under parameter Mechanics:
TRACK
FREE_ROT
EXT_POS
TOOL_ROT
- Linear track motion
- Rotating external axis
- Used internally
- Used internally
• Choose Types: Joints and specify, under parameter Logical axis, the logical number of
the axis in the RAPID program. Example: Logical axis 10 will then correspond to the field
eax_d in a data of the type robtarget.
• Choose Types: Arm and specify the arm characteristics for the axis.
Parameter
Description
Positive limit
Upper limit for the axis work area (in radians or metres).
Negative limit
Lower limit for the axis work area (in radians or metres).
• Choose Types: Acc data and specify the arm performance for the axis.
Parameter
Description
Nominal acceleration Axis acceleration in radians/s2. If the value specified is too
high, the motor will reach the torque limit.
Nominal deceleration Axis deceleration in radians/s2. If the value specified is too
high, the motor will reach the torque limit.
• Choose Types: Transmission and specify the following:
Parameter
Description
Transm. gear ratio
Gear ratio between motor and axis.
Example: For a linear axis, 21.43 denotes that when the axis
moves 1 m, the motor rotates 21.43 radians.
Rotation movement
Denotes whether the axis is of the rotating type (Yes) or linear
type (No).
Transm. high gear
The integer value of the numerator of the transmission gear
ratio. Only used for independent joints.
Transm. low gear
The integer value of the denominators of the transmission gear
ratio. Only used for independent joints.
Example: For a rotating axis with high gear 100 and low gear
30, has a transmission gear ratio of 100/30=3.333333.
• Choose Types: Drive unit and specify the following:
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System Parameters
Parameter
Description
Use drive unit type
Current type of drive unit.
Unit position
Denotes the physical location in the cabinet.
Node
Denotes the node on the drive unit to which the axis is
physically connected.
Max current (A)
Denotes the max. current of the drive node.
Max thermal current (A) Denotes the max. thermal current of the drive node.
Data for drive units
Drive unit type
Node
Max. current (A)
Max. thermal current (A)
DSQC 346A
1
2
3
3.25
3.25
1.5
1.6
1.6
1.0
DSQC 346B
1
2
3
6.7
3.25
1.5
3.2
1.6
1.0
DSQC 346C
1
2
3
11.3
11.3
6.7
5.3
5.3
4.0
DSQC 346G
1
2
29.7
36.8
16.5
20.0
DSQC 358C
2
36.8
20.0
Positions of drive units in the drive system:
* Drive unit position of
drive system 12
0
3 2
(0*)
1
Figure 32 Drive system as seen from the front of the cabinet.
• Choose Types: Motor type and specify the following:
Parameter
Description
Polepairs
Number of pole pairs for the motor, typically 2 or 3.
ke (V/rad/s)
Nominal voltage constant, induced voltage phase to phase.
Max current (A rms)
Max. current without irreversible demagnetisation.
Phase resistance (Ohm) Stator phase resistance (half the resistance value measured
between incoming phases).
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System Parameters
Phase inductance (H)
Stator phase inductance.
• Choose Types: Motor_calibration and define the calibration and commutation offsets as
described in Defining the commutation offset and calibration offset of the motors on
page 53.
Commutation (Normally commutation does not need to be implemented because the
motors supplied by ABB are precommutated with the commutation value 1.5708).
Input commutation offset for an uncommutated motor:
1. Ensure that the motor is not affected by large external torques (gravity and
friction).
2. Connect a DC power supply to the motor (S-phase +, T-phase -, R-phase not
connected).
3. Feed in as large a current as possible with regard to the max. permissible
currents of the motor.
4. The motor will now assume the commutation position.
5. Commutate the motor from the Service window.
Calibration offset can be updated by moving the axes to their calibration positions and
then fine-calibrating from the Service window.
• Choose Types: Max operational cycle and specify the characteristics of the drive system
at its maximum usage.
Parameter
Description
Torque abs.max
Max. allowed torque (Nm).
Speed abs.max
Max. allowed motor rotational speed (radians/s).
• Restart using File: Restart.
Define activating relays (if any are connected)
The external drive units can be activated via signals from the robot. When a unit is
activated, e.g. by choosing the unit in the Jogging window, the output signal is
automatically set. A check is made later that the corresponding input signal from the
relay is set.
• Define the input and output signals for the relays. See Defining input and output signals
on page 12. Restart the robot using File: Restart, and check that the external axes can be
activated from the I/O window.
• Read in a relay configuration file, EXTAXIS/UTIL/RELAY, from the Control Parameters
diskette. See Loading parameters from a diskette or some other mass storage device
on page 7. Use the command File: Add new parameters. A new relay with the name
RELAY_x will now be created.
• Choose Area: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Relays and specify the name of the relay and its signal connections.
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Parameter
Description
Name
Name of the relay, e.g. relay_track (max. 16 characters).
This must be changed when more relays are to be used.
Out signal
Denotes the logical name of the output signal to the relay. The
name must be identical (including upper and lower case letters)
to the name used for the signal definition.
In signal
Denotes the logical name of the input signal to the relay. The
name must be identical (including upper and lower case letters)
to the name used for the signal definition.
Inverted input
Denotes whether or not an inverted input is to be used to the
relay.
• Choose Types: Mechanical unit and specify under the parameter Use act.relay the name
of the activating relay.
• When more than one activating relay is used, read in a new relay file (file RELAY) and
repeat the procedure above.
Define brake relays (if any are connected)
If the external mechanical units are equipped with brakes, these will be automatically
activated when the unit is deactivated or when the robot system assumes the MOTORS
OFF state. They will also be activated when the axes have been stationary for a certain
time in the MOTORS ON state.
• Defining the input and output signals for the relays. See Defining input and output
signals on page 12. Start the robot with File: Restart, and check that the brakes can be
activated from the I/O window.
• Read in a relay configuration file, EXTAXIS/UTIL/RELAY, from the Control Parameters
diskette. See Loading parameters from a diskette or some other mass storage device
on page 7. Use the command File: Add new parameters. A new relay with the name
RELAY_x is now be created.
• Choose Area: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Relays and specify the name of the relay and its signal connections. See
Define activating relays (if any are connected) on page 68.
• Choose Types: Mechanical unit and specify, under the parameter Use brake relay, the
name of the activating relay.
The time after which the regulator will cease to brake and let the mechanical brakes
themselves brake, can be changed by choosing Types: Brakes.
Parameter
Description
Control time delay
Time delay (s) that starts when the speed < Control speed limit
and before the regulator should be turned off
Control speed limit
Speed (as a % of max. speed) at which the time delay starts.
When more that one brake relay is used, read in a new relay file (file RELAY) and
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System Parameters
repeat the procedure above.
• Restart using File: Restart.
Tuning the axes
The servo control method can be adjusted to achieve the best possible performance.
• For an uncalibrated axis, choose Types: Uncal control master 0 and specify the tuning
values for Kp, Kv and Ti that give good performance. See below under the description for
Lag control master 0 for an explanation of these parameters.
• For a calibrated axis, choose Types: Lag control master 0 and specify the values that give
good performance.
Parameter
Description
Feedforward mode
Possible options are No, Spd or Trq. Each one corresponds to
a different mode of the controller as described below:
No: This is the simplest configuration. The controller is driven
by the position error (lag). Because a relatively large lag is
needed to move the axis, the position error can be large.
Spd: In this configuration the controller receives information
about the desired speed of the axis. As a result, the position lag
is greatly reduced compared to the No configuration. For this
reason, Spd is the recommended configuration.
Trq: In this configuration the controller uses the desired speed
and acceleration of the axis to calculate the desired motor
torque. This requires knowledge of the mass moment of inertia
of the axis, which must be supplied by the user. For this reason
this configuration is more difficult to tune. It is only
recommended for experienced users.
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Delay
This parameter should be left at its default value.
Bandwidth
This parameter should be left at its default value.
Df
Dynamic factor. This parameter is only available in the Trq
configuration. It can be used to damp oscillations of the axis
due to mechanical resonance. Initially Df should be left at its
default value. It can be adjusted once the other controller
parameters have been fixed.
Dw
This parameter should be left at its default value.
Inertia
Total mass moment of inertia.
Kp, gain pos loop
The amplification of the position control, e.g. 15. A high value
will give a stiff axis that quickly assumes its new position. The
value should be large without inducing overshoot in the
position or oscillations of the axis.
Kv, gain speed loop
The amplification of the velocity control, e.g. 2. A high value
gives better high frequency stiffness, better response speed and
low overshoot. If the value is too high the axis will vibrate.
User’s Guide
System Parameters
Kv controls the amount of damping for the axis and is the most
limiting of the parameters. A poor value of Kv will limit Kp
and Ti, and the axis will not be fully utilised.
Ti, I-time speed loop
The integration interval constant of the velocity control, e.g.
0.2. A low value gives low steady state error and better path
following. If Ti is too small the axis will overshoot and the
response will be oscillatory.
Tuning strategies for Lag Control Master 0
Specifying the Inertia
If the No or Spd configuration is used, the parameter Inertia should be set to 0. If the
Trq configuration is used, the total mass moment of inertia should be calculated and
entered under Inertia. This is only recommended for experienced users. The inertia is
given by:
Inertia = InertiaAxis/(Transm gear ratio)2 + InertiaMotor + InertiaBreak.
Initial tuning of Kp, Kv and Ti
Set Kp to 5.
• Select Ti based on the mass moment of inertia of the external axis. Ti should be in the
range from 0.1 for very light axes (J = 0.3 kgm2) to 0.5 for the heaviest axes (J = 12 kgm2).
A typical value is 0.3.
• Increase Kv to its highest value until the axis starts to vibrate/oscillate or a clear vibration
can be heard from the axis, either during motion or when stationary. The axis velocity
supervision may also indicate speed failure. When you reach the unstable point, divide Kv
by 2.
• Increase Kp in increments of 0.5 for the fastest response time, until the first signs of
overshooting are observed. Then subtract 1 from Kp. If you observe overshooting at a
later time, reduce Kp to an even lower value.
Using a printer
• Connect the printer channels to the test outputs in the cabinet. The outputs are marked 1
and 2 with a common zero point ground. Voltage level ±10V. (Required: a two channel
printer, chart recorder, 25-135 mm/s, e.g. Brush 220.) Inputs:
- X5: TSTOUT1
- X6: TSTOUT2
- X7: 0V
- X8: 0V
• Make sure that the external axis is commutated and calibrated. Any position may be
defined as the calibration position.
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System Parameters
• Tune the axis so it may be jogged without stopping due to speed or torque supervision.
Keep the same values of Kp and Kv as above but multiply Ti by a factor of 2. Ti will be
re-tuned last in the procedure.
• Program a back-and-forth motion of the external axes with test signals enabled. For the
final tuning of the control parameters of the axis it is convenient to use the TuneServo
command. The following program may be used as an example (STN1 is the name of the
external axis):
PROC main()
ActUnit STN1;
TestSign 1,speed STN1,1,1,0;
TestSign 2,torque_ref,STN1,1,8,0;
TuneServo STN1,1,TuneValue\Type:=TUNE_KP;
TuneServo STN1,1,TuneValue\Type:=TUNE_KV;
TuneServo STN1,1,TuneValue\Type:=TUNE_TI;
FOR i FROM 1 TO 10 DO
MoveJ t1,v_tune,fine,too10;
MoveJ t2,v_tune,fine,too10;
ENDFOR
DeactUnit STN1;
ENDPROC
The velocity data and test positions can be modified depending to the value that is to
be tuned.
TestSign Output, SignalId, MechUnit, Axis, Scale, Stime
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Output
Data type: num
Selection of test output, acceptable values are 1 and 2.
SignalId
Data type: testsignal
Name of the test signal.
MechUnit
Data type: mecunit
Mechanical unit for which test signal is required.
Axis
Data type: num
Axis number.
Scale
Data type: num
Scaling factor. Acceptable values are 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, etc.
Stime
Data type: num
Sampling time in seconds. The test output is updated with a
new value at each sampling.
The value 1 denotes one update every second.
The value 0 denotes updating as often as possible.
The value 0.01 denotes 100 updates per second.
User’s Guide
System Parameters
Tuning the Nominal acceleration and deceleration
If an axis has a variable moment of inertia, Nominal acceleration and Nominal
deceleration should be tuned with the maximum inertia.
If gravity has an influence on the axis, then Nominal acceleration should be tuned with
a motion accelerating upwards against gravity. Nominal deceleration should be tuned
with a stopping motion (deceleration) while moving downwards with gravity.
Program two test points for acceleration and two test points for deceleration with the
following requirements:
• Velocity: Choose a velocity that is approximately 50% of the maximum speed of the
external axis, i.e. speed test signal of approximately 2.5 V.
• Distance: The distance should be chosen to ensure that the axis stabilises at the
programmed velocity before deceleration.
1. Using the chart recorder, record the values of speed and torque_ref for the external
axis.
2. Use test positions for Nominal acceleration. Run the motion and check the value of
torque_ref for the torque limit. Adjust the value of Nominal acceleration upwards or
downwards in increments of 0.5 until the torque_ref signal shows that the axis does not
reach the torque limit. Reduce the final value by 10% to allow for variations in the
mechanical system over a period of time.
3. Use test positions for Nominal deceleration. Run the motion and check the value of
torque_ref for the torque limit. Adjust the value of Nominal deceleration upwards or
downwards in increments of 0.5 until the torque_ref signal shows that the axis does not
reach the torque limit. Reduce the final value by 10% to allow for variations in the
mechanical system over a period of time.
Final tuning of Kp, Kv and Ti
If the axis has a variable moment of inertia, Kp and Kv and Ti should be tuned with the
maximum value for the moment of inertia.
Program two test points with the following requirements:
Velocity: Choose a velocity that is approximately 25% of the maximum speed of the
external axis. The speed must be low enough to guarantee that the axis does not
encounter the current limit but high enough to prevent friction from affecting the result.
Distance: The distance should be chosen to ensure that the axis stabilises at the
programmed velocity before deceleration starts.
• Using the chart recorder, record the values of speed and torque_ref for the external axis.
• Increase the TuneValue for Kv in steps of 5% and observe torque_ref. Stop when the axis
starts to vibrate. Divide the TuneValue by 2 and run the axis again, while observing
torque_ref. There should be at most one or two damped oscillations after the acceleration
stage. If torque_ref oscillates more than this, then decrease its value somewhat. Kv is a
critical parameter. A large value will result in a stiff axis and a fast response. If Kv is too
small Kp will also be limited, resulting in an under-utilised axis.
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System Parameters
• Increase the TuneValue for Kp slowly until the following speed and torque_ref profiles are
achieved:
speed
Slight overshoot
acceptable
No overshoot
acceptable
time
torque_ref
One or two damped
oscillations acceptable
time
The position error (lag) is inversely proportional to Kp. Thus a large value for Kp is
desirable.
• Adjust the TuneValue for Ti downwards in steps of 10% until the effect can be seen on the
chart recordings of speed as an increased overshoot. Increase the tuning factor by 5 to 10%
to remove the effect.
• Calculate the final values of Kp, Kv and Ti by multiplying the value entered under Lag
control master 0 by the TuneValue divided by 100. Enter these new values for Kp, Kv and
Ti under Lag control master 0.
Tuning of Df
The dynamic factor (Df) can be used to damp oscillations of the axis due to mechanical
resonance. This parameter is only available in the Trq configuration. For most
applications it is not necessary to adjust Df. If however, the torque_ref signal is
oscillatory due to mechanical resonance, then the performance of the axis can be
improved by adjusting Df. To do this, measure the distance between resonance peaks
(in mm) on the plot of the torque_ref signal. A rough estimate of Df can be obtained by
dividing this value by the chart recorder speed (in mm/sec):
Df =
chart recorder speed
distance between resonance peaks
Df should be in the range 3 to 25. To tune Df, program short back-and-forth motions of
the axis at maximum speed. The axis should not be allowed to reach full speed before
deceleration. Use the TUNE_DF argument of the TuneServo command to adjust Df and
examine the torque_ref signal. Adjust Df until the oscillations in the torque_ref signal
are damped out.
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
7.16 Activate forced gain control for an external axis
When activating forced gain control for an external axis, two Types under Manipulator
must be considered. In Lag control master 0, you can decide which axes should have
forced gain control and in Supervision, you can decide which axes should affect forced
gain control. All the axes that affect forced gain control must be within a certain
positional range from the end point before the forced gain control is enabled. This
positional range is also specified in Supervision. To activate forced gain control for an
external axis the system needs to be booted with the service option.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Lag control master 0.
• Select the lag control master corresponding to the external axis.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Forced control active
Determines whether forced gain control is active for this
joint. If set to Yes, Affects forced ctrl in Supervision should
normally also be set to Yes for this joint (see below).
Forced factor for Kp
The forced factor for Kp, if forced gain control is active.
Forced factor for Ki
The forced factor for Ki, if forced gain control is active.
Rise time for Kp
The rise time for forced Kp.
The default values for the forced factors and rise time are recommended but can be
changed if necessary.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Supervision.
• Select the supervision corresponding to the axis that should/should not affect forced gain
control.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Affects forced ctrl
Determines whether this joint affects forced gain control.
Forced on pos limit
The upper position limit for forced gain control.
Forced off pos limit
The lower position limit for forced gain control.
The positions are expressed in radians for the motor. Keep Forced off pos limit = 0
unless the forced factors cause problems, such as noise from the motors, when in
position.
Do not change supervision for the robot axes. This can reduce the service life of
the robot and impair its performance.
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System Parameters
7.17 Activate notch filter for an external axis
This is used only in arc welding applications when a variation in external axis speed
affects the welding process. This problem sometimes occurs when both coordinated
interpolation and weaving are used. The frequency of the speed variation is typically 2
times the weaving frequency. The notch filter will prevent the external axis from
oscillating at the weave motion frequency.
There are two ways of using the notch filter. One way is to lock the notch filter to one
specific frequency specified in the parameter Notch filter frequency. The other way is
to activate Notch auto mode, which means that the notch filter will automatically adjust
to the current weave frequency.
A notch filter should not be used together with Rapid Weave. In Notch auto mode this
is handled automatically and the notch filter will work as if there was no weaving at all.
To activate Notch auto mode the system needs to be booted with the Service option.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Lag control master 0.
• Select the lag control master corresponding to the external axis.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
Notch filter activated Yes (if activated), No (otherwise)
Notch filter frequency Frequency of speed variation. Used when Notch auto mode is
set to No.
2 x Weld speed
Typical value:
Weave length
Notch filter width
Width of notch filter. A higher value increases the width but
can also have a negative effect on the performance (response)
of the external axis.
Recommended value: 0.2.
Notch auto mode
auto no weave freq
auto min freq
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If Yes, the notch filter frequency will automatically adjust to
the weave frequency according to the formula
2 x Weld speed .
Weave length
This frequency is used in the notch filter when Notch auto
mode is set to Yes, but weaving is not being used or Rapid
Weave is being used.
Note:
The default value should only be changed by
advanced programmers.
The minimum notch filter frequency when Notch auto mode is
set to Yes.
Note:
The default value should only be changed by
advanced programmers.
User’s Guide
System Parameters
auto max rel change Factor that sets the maximum instant change in the notch filter
when Notch auto mode is set to Yes.
Note:
The default value should only be changed by
advanced programmers.
7.18 Soft servo for external axis
Soft servo can be activated for external axis which are configured with Lag control
master 0. The behaviour of movements with the soft servo activated is described in the
RAPID Reference Manual - Motion and I/O Principles.
There are four system parameters to consider when the soft servo is used for an external axis. The parameters are set to default values but can be changed if the system is
booted in service mode:
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Lag control master 0.
• Select the lag control master corresponding to the external axis.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameter and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Parameter
Description
K soft max factor
Determines the value of the product Kp*Kv when the soft
servo is used with softness 0%. K soft max factor should
be in the range 0.1 - 2.0 (default 1.0). When the soft servo
is activated with 0% softness, the control parameters Kp
and Kv will be tuned such that Kp*Kv = (Kp*Kv)normal*K soft max factor, where (Kp*Kv)normal is the product of Kp and Kv during normal operation
K soft min factor
Determines the value of the product Kp*Kv if the soft servo
is used with softness 100%. K soft min factor should be in
the range 0.001 - 0.1 (default 0.01). When the soft servo is
activated with 100% softness, the control parameters Kp
and Kv are tuned such that Kp*Kv = (Kp*Kv)normal*K
soft min factor.
Kp/Kv ratio factor
Factor used to alter the Kp/Kv ratio during soft servo. Kp/
Kv ratio factor should be in the range 0.1 - 1.0 (default
1.0). In soft servo mode, Kp and Kv are tuned such that Kp/
Kv = (Kp/Kv)normal * Kp/Kv ratio factor.
Ramp time
Default time for activation of the soft servo. The default
value is 0.5 s.
When the soft servo is activated with an arbitrary softness (0% - 100%), Kp and Kv
are tuned such that the product Kp*Kv is equal to a interpolated value between the
max value, (Kp*Kv)normal*K soft max factor, and the min value, (Kp*Kv)normal*K
soft min factor.
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System Parameters
Trimming of the soft servo parameters
In most applications these parameters do not have to be trimmed and can be left at their
default values.
K soft max factor determines, together with Kp and Kv, the softness at 0%. If a softness of 0% yields too stiff a servo, the factor should be reduced, and it should be
increased if 0% softness gives a servo which is too soft.
K soft min factor determines, together with Kp and Kv, the softness at 100%. If a softness of 100% gives a too soft servo, this factor should be increased, and it should be
reduced if 100% gives too stiff a servo. A tuning algorithm can be:
• Determine a maximum axis movement for which the axis should not move with softness
100%. Such a movement can be 0.1 rad for a rotating axis.
• Determine a minimum axis movement for which the axis should move with softness
100%. Such a movement can be 0.2 rad for a rotating axis.
• Activate the soft servo with softness 100% and perform the two movements
• If the axis moves for both movements, the axis is too stiff and the minimum factor should
be reduced. If the axis does not move for any movement, the axis is too soft and the
minimum factor should be increased.
• Repeat the last two actions until the axis does not move for the smaller movement but does
move for the bigger movement.
The movements in the trim procedure should be done close to the point where the soft
servo is activated, to minimize the risk of the axis collapsing.
Kp/Kv ratio factor determines the stability margin for the axis. A value less than 1.0
increases the stability. It not possible to set this parameter to a value larger than 1.0
since the stability of the axis would be jeopardized.
If Ramp time is changed, the duration of the activation and deactivation phase will
change. A short ramp time can result in snatch of the axis at activation.
7.19 Defining the joystick directions for the robot and external manipulator
These values are available under the System Parameters window.
• Load the jog direction templates file for the mechanical units. See Loading parameters
from a diskette or some other mass storage device on page 7. Use the command File:
Add New parameters. The jog direction template files can be found on the
CONTROLLER PARAMETER diskette under directory JOGDIR.
File ROBOT_M.CFG is intended for the robot. Loading this file will define the
parameter instance name strings “linear_jog_m”, “reorient_jog_m”,and “joint_m”.
File ROBOT_E.CFG is intended for the external manipulator. Loading this file will
define the parameter instance name string “joint_e”. When more than one external
manipulator is used, each external robot file should have its unique name, e.g.
ROBOT_E1.CFG, ROBOT_E2.CFG. Also the JOG_JOINT names in each file should
be changed from joint_e to joint_e1, joint_e2, respectively
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
If joystick directions for several mechanical units are to be defined, the template files
for all the units can be loaded here. When the file is loaded perform a Restart.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types 1: Robot.
• Select robot unit.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameters (Linear jog dir, Reorient jog dir, Joint jog dir) to be changed.
Selecting the “default” type restores factory default jog directions.
Do not perform the Restart requested here.
• Repeat for all robots.
• Press OK to confirm.
• Choose Types 2: For each selected parameter type above.
• Select the desired parameter type.
• Edit the elements.
• Press OK to confirm.
• Perform a Restart to activate the modifications to the joystick directions. When joystick
directions for both robots and single axes are to be modified, it is not necessary to perform
the restart until all the modifications have been made.
Linear jogging
• For each coordinate system, specify the desired axis direction for the respective joystick
movements as shown in Figure 33 (±1 for x-axis, ±2 for y-axis and ±3 for z-axis).
The signs denote a positive or negative direction of the motion for a positive joystick
deflection.
rot
sideways
down
Figure 33 Joystick deflections
Parameters
Coordinate system
World down/rot/side
World coordinate system
Base down/rot/side
Base coordinate system
Tool down/rot/side
Tool coordinate system
Wobj down/rot/side
Object coordinate system
St tool world down/rot/side
World coordinate system when using stationary tool
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System Parameters
St tool base down/rot/side
Base coordinate system when using stationary tool
St tool tool down/rot/side
Tool coordinate system when using stationary tool
St tool wobj down/rot/side
Object coordinate system when using stationary tool
Reorientation jogging
• For each coordinate system, specify the desired direction of rotation for the respective
joystick movements as shown in Figure 33 (±1 for rotation around the x-axis, ±2 for y-axis
and ±3 for z-axis).
The signs denote a positive or negative direction of the motion for a positive joystick
deflection.
Parameters
Coordinate system
World down/rot/side
World coordinate system
Base down/rot/side
Base coordinate system
Tool down/rot/side
Tool coordinate system
Wobj down/rot/side
Object coordinate system
St tool world down/rot/side
World coordinate system when using stationary tool
St tool base down/rot/side
Base coordinate system when using stationary tool
St tool tool down/rot/side
Tool coordinate system when using stationary tool
St tool wobj down/rot/side
Object coordinate system when using stationary tool
Axis-by-axis jogging
• Specify the desired axis direction for the respective joystick movements as shown in
Figure 33 (±1 for axes 1 and 4, ±2 for axes 2 and 5, ±3 for axes 3 and 6).
The signs denote a positive or negative direction of the motion for a positive joystick
deflection.
Parameters
Description
Group 1 down/rot/side
Axis (joint) 1, 2 and 3
Group 2 down/rot/side
Axis (joint) 4, 5 and 6
7.20 Defining the joystick directions for a single external axis
These values are available under the System Parameters window.
• Load the jog direction template file SINGLE.CFG for single external axes. See Loading
parameters from a diskette or some other mass storage device on page 7. Use the
command File: Add New parameters. The file can be found on the CONTROLLER
PARAMETER diskette under directory JOGDIR.
Loading this file will define the parameter instance ??? name strings “x1”,“x2”,
“x3”,“x4”,“x5”, and “x6”.
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
When joystick directions for several mechanical units are to be defined, the template
files for all the units can be loaded here. When the file has been loaded, perform a
Restart.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types 1: Single.
• Select single.
• Press Enter
.
• Select the desired parameters (Single jog dir) to be changed. Selecting the “default” type
restores factory default jog directions.
Do not perform the Restart requested here.
• Repeat for all singles.
• Press OK to confirm.
• Choose Types 2: Single jog.
• Select the desired parameter type.
• Edit the elements.
• Press OK to confirm.
• Perform a Restart to activate the modifications to the joystick directions. When joystick
directions for both robots and single axes are to be modified, it is not necessary to perform
the restart until all the modifications have been made.
Single axis (joint) jogging
Parameters
Description
Joint
The attachment of a single axis of a mechanical unit to a
joystick deflection.
+/- 1 gives attachment to downways joystick deflection.
+/- 2 gives attachment to rotating joystick deflection.
+/- 3 gives attachment to sideways joystick deflection.
7.21 Defining kinematic parameters for general kinematics
It is possible to use general kinematics for both master robot and external robots. Definition is not possible via the teach pendant, PC editing of the MOC.cfg file is necessary
Denavit-Hartenberg notation according to John J. Craig, Introduction to Robotics,
Mechanics & Control, (Addison-Wesley 1986) is used.
MASTER ROBOT
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System Parameters
The following data needs to be defined
• Under ROBOT_TYPE
- pos_tol_x, pos_tol_y, pos_tol_z ( in meters) (Accepted position error in iterative inverse kinematics procedure)
- rot_tol_x, rot_tol_y, rot_tol_z ( in radians) (Accepted orientation error in iterative inverse kinematics procedure)
- base_pose_rot_u0, base_pose_rot_u1, base_pose_rot_u2, base_pose_rot_u3
(Rotation between user defined robot base and internal base according to
Denavit - Hartenberg definition)
- no_of_joints = 6
- type GEN_KIN0 For robot with no wrist axes
- type GEN_KIN1 For robot with one wrist axis
- type GEN_KIN2 For robot with two wrist axes
• Under ARM
• For each arm of the robot in question
- rotating_move if rotating axes, excluded otherwise
• Under ARM_TYPE
• For each arm of the robot in question
- length (a according to Craigh’s definition)
- offset_x = 0
- offset_y = 0
- theta_home_position (theta according to Craigh’s definition)
- offset_z (d according to Craigh’s definition)
- attitude (alpha according to Craigh’s definition)
Structures with less than 6 axes require a LOCKED definition for all references to the
inactive axes.
EXTERNAL ROBOT
The following data needs to be defined
• Under ROBOT_TYPE
- base_pose_rot_u0, base_pose_rot_u1, base_pose_rot_u2, base_pose_rot_u3
(Rotation between user defined robot base and internal base according to
Denavit - Hartenberg definition)
- no_of_joints = highest joint number
- type GEN_KIN
• Under ARM
• For each arm of the external robot in question
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System Parameters
- rotating_move if rotating axes, excluded otherwise
• Under ARM_TYPE
• For each arm of the external robot in question
- length (a according to Craigh’s definition)
- offset_x = 0
- offset_y = 0
- theta_home_position (theta according to Craigh’s definition)
- offset_z (d according to Craigh’s definition)
- attitude (alpha according to Craigh’s definition)
Structures with less than 6 axes require a LOCKED definition for all references to the
inactive axes.
7.22 Servo parameters
Adjustment of the servo to control slow external equipment and the use of brakes when
the robot is waiting for movement.
Event preset time
Event preset time is used to delay the robot to make it possible to activate/control
external equipment up to 0.5 seconds before the robot runs through the position.
Up to about 70 ms, there is no need to adjust Event preset time when the servo has an
internal lag. But if a longer adjustment is needed then set Event preset time to the
longest time wanted.
Example, the parameter EquipLag in the TriggEquip is set to 200 ms below. If this is
the longest time, set Event preset time to 200 ms.
TriggEquip gunon, 10, 0.2 \Op:=gun, 1;
TriggL p1, v500, gunon, z50, gun1;
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: motion system.
• Press Enter
.
• Select Event preset time and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Remember that when using Event preset time, the start of the robot will be delayed
and the performance of weldguide and conveyor will be decreased.
Brake on time
Brake on time will define the time from when the robot stops to activation of the
mechanical brakes. This time should be kept high to maintain the reliability of the
servo at high level.
User’s Guide
12-83
System Parameters
7.23 CPU Optimization
In some demanding applications, CPU load problems may occur, causing errors such
as “50082 Deceleration too long” or “50024 Corner path failure”. The parameters
described below can be used to reduce these problems.
Path resolution
Path resolution corresponds in some sense to the distance between two points in the
path. Increasing Path resolution means increasing that distance which leads to a
decrease in the resolution of the path!
Increasing Path resolution is a way to deal with robot installations that have external
axes with long deceleration times. In such applications the warning “50082
Deceleration too long” will be reported, simultaneously generating a quick-stop. The
path resolution parameter will then need to be increased until the problem disappears.
The need for tuning the path resolution parameter will increase when:
- The acceleration value of an external axis (and the robot) is decreased (Acc Set,
first parameter).
- The acceleration derivative is decreased (Acc Set, second parameter).
- The speed is increased.
- The distances between closely programmed positions are decreased.
- The number of simultaneously controlled axes is increased.
- Using coordinated interpolation.
- Using Weldguide.
- Using Conveyor tracking.
- Using RAPID controlled path correction.
- Using Multitasking with computationally demanding RAPID programs.
- Reorienting with a small or no TCP movement.
It is important to use a path resolution value which is as small as possible in order to
achieve a high path resolution also at high speed. Keeping Path resolution small can
also give shorter cycle times if the cycle contains many stop points, and the move
instructions following these stop points, have low speed.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: motion system.
• Press Enter
.
• Select Path resolution and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
There is also a RAPID instruction called PathResol which affects the resolution of the
path. For more information about the instruction see RAPID Reference Manual.
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
Prefetch time
Prefetch time affects the point in time at which the controller starts to plan for the
motion through a fly-by point. If the planning time is too short, a fly-by point will
become a stop point. This generates an error called “50024 Corner path failure”.
Increasing the parameter Prefetch time may solve the problem, when the planning
time is too short because of high CPU loading. However, it will not solve the problem
when the error occurs because too many fly-by points were placed very closely
together, or because of incorrect use of instructions, e.g. a fly-by point followed by a
WaitDI instruction. Normally Prefetch time should only be increased when the fly-by
point is really needed in the application. When it is not really needed, change the flyby point to a fine point.
There is a drawback when increasing the Prefetch time. The difference between the
position of the executed RAPID instruction and the current position of the manipulator
will increase. This means that after pressing stop during program execution, the
program counter on the teach pendant may show an instruction that has not yet affected
the manipulator. When starting again, the manipulator will continue along the original
path.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: motion system.
• Press Enter
.
• Select Prefetch time and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
CPU equalisation
The parameter CPU equalisation affects the CPU load in terms of peak load versus
average load. When there is a CPU load problem, indicated for example by “50082
Deceleration too long”, then one solution could be to use CPU equalisation to
distribute the CPU load over time in some other way. Sometimes a higher peak load
can be acceptable, as long as it occurs at a favourable moment in time. Try changing
CPU equalisation both upwards and down, to find the optimal value.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: motion system.
• Press Enter
.
• Select CPU equalisation and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
When CPU equalisation is increased, it can also be beneficial to increase the system
parameter Queue time.
Queue time
Increasing Queue time will make the system more tolerant to uneven CPU loads. The
User’s Guide
12-85
System Parameters
drawback is that the robot will react more slowly when jogging and when stopping a
program in execution. However, the emergency brake is not affected. Also the accuracy
of sensor process, e.g. Weldguide and Conveyor tracking, may be impaired.
• Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: motion system.
• Press Enter
.
• Select Queue time and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Note that the real queue time is a multiple of a sample time related to dynamic
resolution. If the value of the parameter Queue time is not an even multiple of dynamic
resolution, then the controller will automatically use a queue time as close as possible
to the given Queue time.
Process update time
Process update time determines how often the process path information is calculated.
This information is used for path following in Conveyor, Weldguide and Rapid Weave,
for example. Decreasing Process update time will improve accuracy but also increase
CPU loading. Increasing Process update time will decrease the CPU loading.
Note When running programs where the manipulator is moving at high speed, Process update time should be kept small to get the best performance. When the manipulator is moving slowly, Process update time is not critical.
Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: motion system.
• Press Enter
.
• Select Process update time and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
7.24 Installation optimization of drive system parameters
When installing the software, all the drive system related parameters are set to their
nominal values. If the following parameters are adjusted according to the installation
(cable length, peak power, mains tolerance) cycle times can be shorter.
Changes outside the range of the installation may violate robot performance.
Mains tolerance
The mains tolerance is set to +10% / -15% on delivery. If the minimum tolerance is less
than 15%, cycle times can be shorter if the parameter is changed.
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User’s Guide
System Parameters
Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Mains
• Press Enter
.
• Select Mains tolerance min and change its value.
• Press OK to confirm.
Maximum transformer power
The software assumes a predefined maximum power consumption that together with
the mains tolerance gives a certain DC link voltage. If the application needs less than
this power, the DC voltage will always be higher and the cycle times can be shorter, if
the parameter is changed.
Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Trafo
• Press Enter
.
• Select Power max and change its value.
Press OK to confirm.
Cable length
The lengths of the power cables are set to 30 m on delivery. If shorter cables are used
this parameter can be changed.
Choose Topics: Manipulator.
• Choose Types: Cable
• Press Enter
.
• Select Length and change its value.
Press OK to confirm.
User’s Guide
12-87
System Parameters
12-88
User’s Guide
File Manager
CONTENTS
Page
1 Program/Data Storage ...................................................................................................
2 The FileManager Window..............................................................................................
2.1 Choosing a directory..............................................................................................
2.2 Viewing file information .......................................................................................
3 Creating or Moving Files and Directories.....................................................................
3.1 Creating a new directory........................................................................................
3.2 Renaming a file or a directory ...............................................................................
3.3 Deleting a file or directory.....................................................................................
3.4 Copying files and directories.................................................................................
3.5 Moving files and Directories .................................................................................
3.6 Printing files ..........................................................................................................
4 Formatting a Diskette .....................................................................................................
User’s Guide
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
7
7
7
13-1
File Manager
13-2
User’s Guide
File Manager
File Manager
The File Manager is used to
- copy or transfer files,
- change the name of a file,
- create directories on diskettes or other mass storage devices,
- print files,
- format diskettes.
1 Program/Data Storage
Programs and data are stored as normal PC text files. These can be saved and restored
to/from a diskette or an internal RAM disk.
The diskette is a standard 3.5", High Density, 1.44 Mbytes, DOS formatted diskette.
Note. Before saving programs and data, the diskette should be formatted in the
robot or in a PC. Pre-formatted DOS diskettes will not always operate satisfactorily.
Note. The diskettes must never be stored inside the cabinet as the information on
them can be destroyed due to heat and magnetic fields.
The internal RAM disk is a special part of the robot’s memory, and can be used in the
same way as a diskette.
A file can be a program, data created by the program or system parameters and the like,
stored in some sort of mass storage.
Directories are used to group files together to achieve a memory unit that is more structured. For example, test programs in one directory and production programs in another
(see Figure 1 ).
.
Directories:
Files:
SERVICE
TESTPROG
TEST1
PARTA
PARTB
PRODPROG
PARTC
PARTD
Figure 1 The files can be stored in directories on a diskette.
User’s Guide
13-3
File Manager
2 The FileManager Window
• Press the Miscellaneous key
.
• Select FileManager in the dialog box that appears.
• Press Enter
.
The FileManager window will be displayed (see Figure 2)
.
File
Current unit
Edit
View
Options
FileManager
flp1:/WELDINGS/TEST
Name
Current directory
Latest change
Date
Type
2(12)
..
PROC1
PROC2
PROCFUNC
WDATA
WTOOLS
RESULTS
Files
Go Up One Level
Program
Program
Program Module
Program Module
Directory
Directory
..
1993-05-28
1993-05-09
1993-05-01
1993-05-01
1993-05-01
1993-06-01
Up
Figure 2 The FileManager window displays all files in a directory.
• Choose the desired unit from the View menu:
- Diskette
View: [flp1:]
- RAM disk
View: [ram1disk:]
2.1 Choosing a directory
• Select the desired directory.
• Press Enter
.
The directories and files located in the chosen directory will be displayed. The next
directory above this can be selected by moving to the top line in the list (..) and then
pressing Enter
, or by using the Up function key.
2.2 Viewing file information
• Select a file in the list and press Enter
.
The following information will be specified:
- the name and type of the file,
- the size of the file in bytes,
- the date and time when the file was last changed.
• Choose OK to terminate the dialog.
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User’s Guide
File Manager
3 Creating or Moving Files and Directories
3.1 Creating a new directory
• Choose File: New Directory.
A dialog will be displayed, as in Figure 3.
.
Create directory named : DIRNAME...
Cancel
OK
Figure 3 The New Directory dialog.
• Press Enter
.
• Enter the new name and press OK.
Confirm by pressing OK. The directory will be created under the current directory.
3.2 Renaming a file or a directory
• Choose File: Rename.
A dialog will be displayed, as in Figure 4.
Rename
Old directory name : WELDINGS
New directory name : DIRNAME...
Figure 4 The Rename dialog for a directory.
• Press Enter
.
• Enter the new name (max. 8 characters) and press OK.
• Confirm by pressing OK.
User’s Guide
13-5
File Manager
3.3 Deleting a file or directory
• Select the desired file or directory.
• Press Delete
.
• Choose OK to confirm the deletion.
You can only delete a directory if it is empty.
3.4 Copying files and directories
• Select the file or directory to be copied. If you select a directory, all subordinate
directories and files will also be copied.
• Choose File: Copy.
A dialog will be displayed, as in Figure 5.
Type of file
Current file
(Copy from)
New file name
Copy “Program”
ram1disk:/PROC1
To : PROC1...
At : ram1disk:/SERVICE
..
PROC0
PROC52
PROCS
SDATA
Unit
5(18)
Go Up One Level
Program
Program
Program Modul
Program Modul
Cancel
Content of
destination directory
Copy
Figure 5 The dialog for copying files or catalogues.
• Specify the name of the new file by selecting the field To, and press Enter
.
If you do not specify a name, the copied file/directory will be given the same as the
original.
• Specify the destination unit (first part of At field) by pressing the Unit function key.
If you do not specify a unit, the same unit that was used originally will be used.
• Specify the destination directory (latter part of At field) by selecting the lower part of
the window. Select the desired directory and press Enter
. If you do not specify
a directory, the same directory that was used originally will be used.
• Choose Copy to start copying.
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User’s Guide
File Manager
3.5 Moving files and Directories
• Select the file or directory that is to be moved.
• Choose File: Move.
A dialog will be displayed, as in Figure 6.
Type of file
Current file
(Move from)
Move “Program”
From : ram1disk:/PROC1
To : PROC1...
At :ram1disk:/SERVICE
New file name
..
PROC31
PROC52
PROCS
SDATA
5(18)
Go Up One Level
Program
Program
Program Modul
Program Modul
Unit
Cancel
Content of
destination directory
Copy
Figure 6 The dialog for moving of files and catalogues.
• Give the file to be moved a new name by selecting To, and press Enter
. If you
do not specify a new name, the file/directory that is moved will retain the same name.
• Specify the destination unit (first part of At field) by pressing the Unit function key.
If you do not specify a unit, the same unit that was used originally will be used.
• Specify the destination directory (latter part of At field) by selecting the lower part
of the window. Select the desired directory and press Enter
.
• Choose Move to start moving.
3.6 Printing files
• Select the file to be printed.
• Choose File: Print File
• Choose OK to start printing.
4 Formatting a Diskette
NB: The previous contents on the diskette will be erased when formatting.
• Choose Option: Format.
A confirmation dialog will be displayed.
• If desired, rename the diskette and press Enter
.
• Choose OK to start formatting.
User’s Guide
13-7
File Manager
13-8
User’s Guide
Service
CONTENTS
Page
1 The Service Window ....................................................................................................... 3
2 Changing the Current Date and Time........................................................................... 3
3 Logs................................................................................................................................... 4
3.1 What is a log? ........................................................................................................ 4
3.2 What types of logs are there? ................................................................................ 4
3.3 Viewing all logs ..................................................................................................... 5
3.4 Viewing a message in a log ................................................................................... 6
3.5 Erasing the contents of a log.................................................................................. 6
3.6 Erasing the contents of all logs.............................................................................. 6
3.7 Updating the contents of a log automatically or by means of a command............ 7
3.8 Avoiding normal error reports ............................................................................... 7
3.9 Saving log messages on diskette or some other mass storage device ................... 7
4 Calibration ....................................................................................................................... 8
4.1 What is calibration? ............................................................................................... 8
5 Commutation ................................................................................................................... 9
5.1 What is commutation? ........................................................................................... 9
6 Frame Definition ............................................................................................................. 9
7 Two Axes Definition ........................................................................................................ 9
8 Obtaining information on the robot system.................................................................. 9
9 Backup and Restore ........................................................................................................ 10
9.1 Perform a Backup .................................................................................................. 10
9.2 Perform a Restore .................................................................................................. 11
10 Perform a Restart.......................................................................................................... 11
User’s Guide
14-1
Service
14-2
User’s Guide
Service
Service
The Service window is used to
- obtain information on the robot system
- view and change logs (e.g. error log)
- calibrate the measuring system for the robot and external axes
- commutate the motors for the robot and external axes
- set the date and time.
For more detailed information on service, maintenance and troubleshooting, see the
Product Manual.
1 The Service Window
• Press the Miscellaneous key
to open the Service window.
• Select Service in the dialog box that appears.
• Press Enter
.
The service window comprises a number of different windows:
Window title
Used to:
Service Date & Time
Change the current date and time
Service Logs
View logs.
Service Calibrate
Test/Calibrate the measuring system for the robot
or external axes.
Service Commutate
Test/Commutate the motors for the robot or
external axes.
Frame Definition
Define base or user coordinate system.
Two Axes Definition
Define user frame for a two axes rotational
mechanical unit
System Info
Obtain information about storage capacity, task
states, system and product ID etc.
2 Changing the Current Date and Time
• Choose View: Date & Time.
A dialog box will be called up displaying the current date and time (see Figure 1).
User’s Guide
14-3
Service
Service Date & Time
Date:
Time:
<
1994 26 Feb
09: 35. 10
>
Cancel
OK
Figure 1 The dialog box used to set the date and time.
• Select that which you wish to change using the arrow keys.
• Using the function keys, < (decreases) and > (increases), change the date or time.
• Choose OK to confirm.
3 Logs
3.1 What is a log?
All messages reported, such as error messages and changes in the status, are stored in
a log. Each message stored is timestamped and it is thus possible to determine the order
of events from a log.
When the maximum number of messages in a log is attained, a new message will
replace the oldest one.
3.2 What types of logs are there?
The following logs exist:
14-4
User’s Guide
Service
Name
Max. limit
Used to show
Common
40
All messages
Operational
20
Changes in the status, e.g. a change of
operating mode
System
20
The messages related to the control
program
Hardware
20
The messages related to defective hardware
components
Motion
20
Any messages that appear when moving the
robot or other mechanical units
Program
20
Any messages displayed during program
execution
Operator
20
Any messages that appear when using the
teach pendant
I/O & Communication
20
The messages related to I/O and
communication
User
20
User defined messages
(by using the instruction ErrWrite)
Arc Welding
20
The messages related to the arc welding
process
Spot Welding
20
The messages related to the spot welding
process
Internal
20
Internal errors – does not usually contain
any messages
3.3 Viewing all logs
• Choose View: Log.
The window will display information on all logs in the robot (see Figure 2).
File
Edit
View
Special
No. of messages
Time of most recent
message
Service Log
Log list
Name
Common
Operational
System
Hardware
Motion
Program
Operator
I/O & Communication
Messages
Latest
#
10
20
0
1
3
0
4
4(9)
0810 20:30.32
0810 20:25.14
0810 20:30.32
0810 19:15.12
0810 19:15.12
0809 12:30.00
Msg->
Displays the messages in selected log
Figure 2 The Service Log window displays all existing logs.
User’s Guide
14-5
Service
3.4 Viewing a message in a log
• Open the Log window by choosing View: Log.
• Choose the log you wish to look at by selecting that log from the list and pressing the
Msg function key, or press Enter
.
The window will display all messages for the log that you choose (see Figure 3).
File
Log name
Edit
View
Special
Service Logs
Motion
Message
Date
50028 Jogging error
1(1)
0810 20:11:20
Error number
Heading
Logs->
Displays all logs
Figure 3 The Service Log Messages window displays all messages in the log.
• You can obtain more information on a specific message by selecting the message and
pressing Enter
, or by choosing Edit: Info.
3.5 Erasing the contents of a log
• Open the Log window by choosing View: Log.
• Select the log to be erased.
• Choose Special: Erase Log.
• Choose OK to confirm.
3.6 Erasing the contents of all logs
• Open the Log window by choosing View: Log.
• If there are log messages displayed, press the function key logs.
• Choose Special: Erase All Logs.
• Choose OK to confirm.
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User’s Guide
Service
3.7 Updating the contents of a log automatically or by means of a command
When you view a log message and a new message appears, you have two choices: you
can either update the log
- automatically when the message appears; or
- update the log using the function key Update.
(The Update function key is only visible if there are more messages.)
To update automatically:
• Choose Special: Update log on Event.
To update on command:
• Choose Special: Update log on Command.
3.8 Avoiding normal error reports
When trying to isolate faults in different hardware components, you may not wish to be
shown error alert boxes. To prevent these appearing:
• Open the Log window by choosing View: Log.
• Choose the Common log by selecting it and pressing the Msg function key, or press
Enter
.
Now, error alert boxes will not be shown. Error messages will be either displayed
directly (if you chose Special: Update log on Event) or following a command in the
log (if you chose Special: Update log on Command).
3.9 Saving log messages on diskette or some other mass storage device
• Open the Log window by choosing View: Log.
• Select the log that you wish to save and choose File: Save As.
A dialog box will appear, displaying the contents of the current directory (see Figure 4).
User’s Guide
14-7
Service
Save log messages as!
Name:= ELOG ...
Mass storage unit
Directory level
Massmemory unit:= flp1:
/ROBOT1
4(5)
..
OPLOG
SYSLOG
COMLOG
TEST/
Unit
(Go up 1 level)
Event log
Event log
Event log
Directory
New Dir
Cancel
OK
Figure 4 Dialog box for storing logs.
• If necessary, change the mass storage unit by pressing the Unit function key until the correct unit is displayed. To store on a diskette, choose flp1:.
• Select the Name field, press Enter
appears. Choose OK to confirm.
and enter the new name in the dialog box that
• Select the directory to which the log is to be saved. You can move to the next directory
level by selecting the desired directory or ‘. .’ (upwards) and pressing Enter
.
Create a new directory by pressing the New Dir function key. Specify the new directory name in the dialog box that appears. Choose OK to confirm.
• Choose OK to confirm the save.
4 Calibration
4.1 What is calibration?
Calibration involves setting the calibration positions of the axes and is used as the basis
for their positioning. If the robot or external axes are not correctly calibrated, this will
result in incorrect positioning and will have a negative effect on the agility of the robot.
The robot is calibrated on delivery.
For more information see Calibrating the robot in Chapter 10 Calibration in this
manual.
14-8
User’s Guide
Service
5 Commutation
5.1 What is commutation?
Each motor must be commutated in order to be able to utilise it to its full capacity.
Commutation involves reading the resolver value when the motor is in a given pose. The
robot motors are commutated on delivery.
For information on how to do this, see the section on Repairs in the Product Manual.
6 Frame Definition
See Frames in Chapter 10 Calibration in this manual.
7 Two Axes Definition
See Frames in Chapter 10 Calibration in this manual.
8 Obtaining information on the robot system
• Choose View: System Info.
A list of topics is shown in the dialog box (see Figure 5).
Service System Info
Select topic and press Enter
Topics
1(6)
Storage capacity
Task state
System ID
Product ID
Robot type
Program resources
OK
Figure 5 The system information window.
• Select a topic using the arrow keys and press Enter
topic will be displayed.
User’s Guide
. Information on the selected
14-9
Service
Topic
Description
Storage capacity
All available storage devices are shown in a list
containing the device name, free space and total
size.
Task state
All tasks are shown in a list containing task name
and task state (Uninitialised, Ready, Executing or
Stopped). If a task is stopped or executing the
current instruction is displayed.
System ID
The unique system identification code is shown.
Product ID
The identification code for all installed products is
shown.
Robot type
Shows the robot type specification.
Program resources
Shows the total program memory before task
configuration and the maximum number of
persistents.
• Press Update to update the information.
9 Backup and Restore
The backup function saves all system parameters, system modules and program modules in a context. If desired, all logs are also saved. The data will be saved in a directory
specified by the user.
The restore function retrieves data from a backup directory. Restore replaces all system
parameters and loads all modules from the backup directory. A warm start is then automatically performed.
9.1 Perform a Backup
• Choose File: Backup.
The Backup dialog will be displayed (see Figure 6).
View
Backup
Saves all modules and system parameters
to destination directory.
Include logs:
No
Destination directory:
flp1:/BAK0321...
Cancel
OK
Figure 6 The Backup view.
14-10
User’s Guide
Service
• Choose whether or not all logs are to be saved by selecting the Include logs field.
• Select a backup directory. A default directory is suggested, consisting of a prefix and
current date, BAKmmdd.
If you want to change directory press Enter
and select, or create a new,
directory.
• Press OK to start the backup.
9.2 Perform a Restore
• Choose File: Restore. The Restore dialog will be displayed.
• Select a source directory generated by the Backup function.
• Press OK to start the restore.
Warning! Restore will remove and replace all existing parameters and modules in
the system.
10 Perform a Restart
In the Service window a number of different restarts can be performed.
• Choose File: Restart .
- Normal restart: Press OK.
- Generate a cold start to be able to load in a complete new control program:
Enter the numbers 1 3 4 6 7 9 and press C-Start.
- Change language, options or robot type: Enter the numbers 1 4 7 and press
I-Start.
- Activate arc welding parameters: Enter the number 2 5 8 and press P-Start.
Note When an arc welding parameter is activated, the program memory will
be erased. So, make sure that you have saved all programs on diskette.
Fore more information of C-Start and I-Start, see Product Manual - Installation and
Commissioning.
User’s Guide
14-11
Service
14-12
User’s Guide
ScreenViewer
CONTENTS
Page
1
2
3
4
5
6
User screen .......................................................................................................................
The ScreenViewer Window ............................................................................................
The Screen Options .........................................................................................................
The Screen Loading ........................................................................................................
The Screen Information..................................................................................................
The Screen Display..........................................................................................................
User’s Guide
3
3
4
4
5
6
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ScreenViewer
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User’s Guide
ScreenViewer
ScreenViewer
SrceenViewer is used to
- display user screen packages installed
- load a user screen package
- remove an installed user screen package
- list the user screen packages installed
- display information on the user screen packages installed
11 User screen
The user screen is a screen composed of text or lines, function keys, pop-up menus and
input fields defined by the ScreenMaker PC tool. These user screens can be grouped in
a user screen package file under a specific name (Ex: SpotTimer 1.00).
These user screen packages are loaded, removed and displayed via the ScreenViewer
window.
For more detailed information on the user screen packages, see the Product Specification RobotWare.
12 The ScreenViewer Window
• Press the Miscellaneous key
.
• Select Screen Viewer in the dialog box that appears.
• Press Enter
.
The ScreenViewer window comprises a number of different windows:
Window title
Used to:
Screen Options
select from the three options below:
Screen Loading
load a user screen package.
Screen Information
list the user screen packages installed.
Screen Display
display the user screen packages installed.
User’s Guide
15-15
ScreenViewer
13 The Screen Options
The screen options window is always available if no user screen packages have been
installed. If at least one user screen package has been installed, the screen options window will be available
- for one minute after the start-up if the controller is in the manual mode,
- never if the controller is in the automatic mode during the start-up.
User Window Manager
Automatic start in xx seconds
Load
Info
Start
Figure 7 The screen option window.
The choices available are :
- Load
to display the screen loading window.
- Info
to display the screen information window (and also to remove
packages)
- Start
to display the screen display window
If the screen option window is not available, the screen display window will be displayed automatically, and the controller will need to be restarted in manual mode to
return to the screen options window.
14 The Screen Loading
A user screen package file can be loaded via the screen loading window. The file will
be loaded, analysed and installed as a new user screen package.
• Press Load in the screen options window.
A dialog box appears, displaying all user screen package files (as a parameter file) in
the current directory (see Figure 8).
15-16
User’s Guide
ScreenViewer
New screen package loading
Select the screen package to load
1(3)
Go up 1 level
Parameters
Parameters
..
SWSCREEN
AWSCREEN
Unit
Cancel
OK
Figure 8 The screen loading window.
• If necessary, change the mass storage unit by pressing the function key Unit until the correct unit is displayed. To load user screen package files from a diskette, choose flp1:.
• Select the directory from which the user screen package files are to be loaded. You can
move to the next directory level by selecting the desired directory or ‘..’ (upwards) and
pressing Enter
.
• Choose OK to confirm the load.
An alert box will be displayed after reading, with the state of the loading. After this the
display returns to the screen options window.
15 The Screen Information
• Press Info in the screen options window:
A dialog box appears, displaying the list of the installed user screen packages (name
and size used), and the total memory size used (see Figure 9).
Screen package informations
SpotTimer 1.00
SpotGun 2.01
Pallet 2.21
1(3)
23.4% used
16.7% used
11.6% used
Memory 25230/49000 bytes (51.7% used)
Remove
Exit
Figure 9 The screen information window.
User’s Guide
15-17
ScreenViewer
• Press Remove to remove the selected package.
• Choose Exit to return to the screen options window.
16 The Screen Display
The screen display window is accessible only if at least one user screen package has
been installed.
• Press Start in the screen options window:
A dialog box appears, displaying the current screen of the first user screen package
installed. Four of the menu keys can be user-defined and represent the definition of the
user screen. The menu key View is reserved for displaying the list of the installed
packages (see Figure 10).
View
1 SpotTimer 1.00
2 SpotGun 2.01
3 Pallet 2.21
Figure 10 The screen display window.
The selection of the different screens of a user screen package to display is made by the
menus and the function keys according to the definition of the user screen package
installed.
The selection of a new user screen package is made by the selection of the package in
the View menu. The current screen of the package selected will then be displayed.
For more detailed informations on a specific user screen package installed, see the
documentation given with this user screen package.
15-18
User’s Guide
Error Management
CONTENTS
Page
1 Error Management..................................................................................................
1.1 Confirming an error message..........................................................................
1.2 Calling up suggestions on how to correct an error..........................................
1.3 Acknowledging warning messages.................................................................
User’s Guide
3
3
3
4
16-19
Error Management
16-20
User’s Guide
Error Management
Error Management
1 Error Management
If an error occurs, an error message will be displayed in plain language on the teach
pendant (see Figure 1). If several errors occur simultaneously, the error that occurred
first will be selected.
Error: 50028
Motion
Jogging error
Jogging was made in wrong direction when
a joint was out of working range.
Log
50028 Jogging error
Check
1(1)
0810 09:25.30
OK
Figure 1 An error message is displayed in plain language as soon as an error occurs.
All errors and status changes are also registered and time-stamped in a log. For more
detailed information on these logs, see Service in Chapter 14 of this manual.
1.1 Confirming an error message
• Press OK.
The window displayed before the error occurred will be displayed once more. If you
want to view an error message later on, you can find it in the log (see Service in Chapter
14 of this manual).
1.2 Calling up suggestions on how to correct an error
• Press Check.
Information about possible corrective measures is displayed, along with the reason for
the error (see Figure 2).
User’s Guide
16-21
Error Management
Error: 50028
Motion
Jogging error
Jogging was made in wrong direction when
a joint was out of working range.
Use the joystick to move the involved
joint into the working range again.
Log
OK
Figure 2 Suggestions on how to correct an error.
• Press Log to display the log instead of the check list.
1.3 Acknowledging warning messages
Sometimes, a warning or information message will be displayed. This message is displayed in the form of a minimised alert box that conceals only part of the previous window.
• Acknowledge the message by pressing Enter
16-22
.
User’s Guide
System and Error Messages
CONTENTS
Page
1 Operational error messages ........................................................................................... 7
2 System error messages .................................................................................................... 9
3 Hardware error messages............................................................................................... 16
4 Program error messages ................................................................................................. 31
5 Motion error messages.................................................................................................... 58
6 Operator error messages ................................................................................................ 68
7 IO & Communication error messages........................................................................... 72
8 Arcweld error messages.................................................................................................. 83
9 Spotweld error messages ................................................................................................ 92
10 Paint error messages. .................................................................................................... 93
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
16-23
System and Error Messages
16-24
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
1 Operational error messages
10002: Program reset
The task %!%!%s has
been rewound to its start point.
10014: System failure state
Fatal non recoverable system error.
Warm start is required.
10005: Program stopped
The task %!%!%s has
stopped. The reason is that
%s
10015: Manual mode selected
10007: Program started
The task %!%!%s has
start to execute.
%s
10008: Program restarted
The task %!%!%s has
restart to execute.
%s
10009: Work memory full
No memory left for new RAPID
instructions or data.
The task is %!%!%s
Check:
Save the program and then
restart.
10010: Motors off state
10011: Motors on state
10012: Guard stop state
Runchain opened by any safety guard
except the emergency stop.
Check:
Close runchain, it could be broken
by the following devices (if used):
Access gate, light screen, servo
disconnector or any other safety
device connected to the run chain.
10013: Emergency stop state
Runchain opened by emergency stop.
Em stop reset is required.
Use the motors off button.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
10016: Automatic mode requested
10017: Automatic mode confirmed
10018: Manual mode FS requested
Manual mode with full speed requested
Check:
10019: Manual mode FS confirmed
Manual mode with full speed confirmed
10020: Execution error state
The program execution has reached
a spontaneous error state
10021: Execution error reset
The program execution has left
a spontaneous error state
10022: Hold to run waiting
Waiting for hold to run button to be
pressed on the programming unit.
10023: Hold to run timeout
The hold to run button on the
programming unit must be pressed
within timeout limit.
10024: Collision triggered
A collision has been detected.
10025: Collision resetted
The collision detection has
been resetted.
10026: Collision confirmed
Returned to the path after
a collision detection.
10027: Collision not confirmed
The system has not returned
to the path after a collision
detection.
16-25
System and Error Messages
10030: All axes commutated
10031: All axes calibrated
10032: All rev counters updated
10033: All axes synchronized
10034: Axis not commutated
10035: Axis not calibrated
10036: Rev counter not updated
10037: Axis not synchronized
10040: Program loaded
The task %!%!%s has
loaded a program or program module.
The free user space was %i bytes
before this operation and
%i bytes after.
10041: Program erased
The task %!%!%s has
erased a program.
10043: Restart failed
The task %!%!%s
can’t restart
10044: Program Pointer updated
The task %!%!%s
could have changed the PP pos.
10045: System restarted
An already installed system
was restarted.
10046: System restarted in cold
mode
First start after installation.
10047: Background task %s
refuse to start
%s
10048: Background task did stop
The task %s stoped without reason
%s
16-26
10049: Protected area not finish
A power fail did occur in the
middle of a protected area for
the task %!%s
%s
10050: Execution cancelled
The restart will clear the execution
in task %!%.16s of a
%s
10051: Event routine error
The task %!%s could not start
the specified system event routine
%s
The routine is either unknown to
the system or unlinkable.
Check:
Insert the routine in a system
module or correct the program.
10052: Regain start
A regain movement has started
10053: Regain ready
The regain movement is ready
10060: Test of enable chain
The enable chain is always tested at
startup. If the test failed an error
message concerning enable will follow.
Check:
If enable chain test at startup failed
the related error message will be
"Enable chain timeout"
10070: Backup step ready
The backup %!%s is ready
10071: Backup error
Error during the backup
of %!%!%s
%s
Check:
%s
10072: Restore step ready
The restore %!%s
is ready
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
10073: Restore error
Error during the restore
of %!%!%s
%s
Check:
%s
10074: NFS server up
The connection to the NFS server
’%s’ is working.
All devices remotely mounted from
this server are now available.
10075: NFS server down
The connection to the NFS server
’%s’ has been lost.
All devices remotely mounted from
this server are unavailable.
10080: Background task %s
has an older version of a module
installed than the source
%s
Check:
Restart the system with a P-START
to install the newer version
10081: Background task %s
failed to load a newer version of a
module The source of the module is
%s
Check:
See previous messages for the cause
Or restart the system with a P-START
to load the newer version
10082: RAPID Task supervision
Task %s is not running
the system will be set in SysFail
state. It’s now impossible to change
to motors on
%s
Check:
See previous messages for the cause
Restart the system to reset the
error state
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
10083: RAPID Task supervision
Task %s is not running
the system will be set in motors off
state.
%s
Check:
See previous messages for the cause
10084: RAPID Task supervision
Task %s is not running
the main task will also stop
%s
Check:
See previous messages for the cause
2 System error messages
20010: Em stop state active
Em stop reset is required.
Press the panel button.
20011: Em stop state active
Em stop reset is required.
First release the Em stop button
and then press the panel button.
20012: Sys failure state active
Fatal non recoverable system error.
Warm start is required.
Check:
Switch the mains switch off and on
again if the soft restart command is
ignored or not possible to reach.
20024: Enable chain timeout
Two channel status timeout.
Check:
The acknowledgement for a two channel
enable chain status change was not
received within the expected time.
20030: Axis not commutated
One or several internal drive unit
axes are not commutated.
20031: Axis not calibrated
One or several absolute/relative
measurement axes are not calibrated.
16-27
System and Error Messages
20032: Rev counter not updated
One or several absolute measurement
axes are not synchronized.
Check:
Move the robot to the sync position
and update the revolution counters.
20071: Not allowed command
Not allowed while changing to
Motors On state.
20033: Axis not synchronized
One or several relative measurement
axes are not synchronized.
Check:
Order Motors On and synchronize all
mechanical units in the list.
20073: Not allowed command
Not allowed while changing to
Motors Off state.
20050: Not allowed command
Not allowed in this operating mode.
20075: Not allowed command
Not allowed in Emergency Stop state.
Check:
Em stop reset is required.
Press the panel button.
20051: Not allowed command
Not allowed when client not in control
of the resource (program/motion).
20052: Not allowed command
Not allowed in this cabinet state.
20053: Not allowed command
Not allowed in this manipulator state.
20054: Not allowed command
Not allowed when program is executing.
20060: Not allowed command
Not allowed in Auto mode.
20061: Not allowed command
Not allowed when changing to Auto
mode.
20062: Not allowed command
Not allowed in Manual mode.
20072: Not allowed command
Not allowed in Motors Off state.
20074: Not allowed command
Not allowed in Guard Stop state.
20076: Not allowed command
Not allowed in System Failure state.
Check:
Fatal non recoverable system error.
Warm start is required.
Switch the mains switch off and on
again if the soft restart command is
ignored or not possible to reach.
20080: Not allowed command
Not allowed when axis is not commutated.
20081: Not allowed command
Not allowed when axis is not calibrated.
20082: Not allowed command
Not allowed when axis rev counter is not
updated.
20063: Not allowed command
Not allowed in Manual full speed mode.
20083: Not allowed command
Not allowed when axis is not
synchronized.
20064: Not allowed command
Not allowed when changing to Manual
full speed mode.
20092: Not allowed command
Not allowed in state
System IO Start Blocked.
20070: Not allowed command
Not allowed in Motors On state.
20100: Teachpendant in ctrl
A teachpendant application
is in control of the requested
resource (program/motion)
16-28
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
20101: Teachp (prg) in ctrl
The teachpendant programming
window has focus and is in control
of the program server.
Change to the production window
and perform the command again.
20120: System IO in ctrl
20102: Teachp (joystick) in ctrl
The teachpendant joystick is in
control of the motion server.
Release the joystick and perform
the command again.
20130: Out of memory in cfg
20111: Teachp (prg) in ctrl
The teachpendant programming
window has focus and is in control
of the program server.
Change to the production window
and perform the command again.
20112: Program 1 in ctrl
The program server 1 is in
control of the motion server.
Stop the program and perform
the command again.
20113: Program 2 in ctrl
The program server 2 is
in control of the motion server.
Stop the program and perform
the command again.
20114: Program 3 in ctrl
The program server 3 is
in control of the motion server.
Stop the program and perform
the command again.
20115: Program 4 in ctrl
The program server 4 is
in control of the motion server.
Stop the program and perform
the command again.
20116: Program 5 in ctrl
The program server 5 is
in control of the motion server.
Stop the program and perform
the command again.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
20125: Client %s in ctrl
Specified client is in
control of the requested
resource (program/motion)
20131: Unable to read file
20132: Parameters not saved
Parameters cannot be saved.
Probably, because disk is write
protected or no space available.
Check:
Check if disk is write-protected or
if space on disk is enough.
20133: Cannot modify instance
DescriptionReason:
Can’t replace instance in line %d
of file %s
Check:
The instance is write protected.
20134: Wrong version
DescriptionReason:
The cfg domain version is wrong in file
%s
The software is made for
version %s
Check:
Change the version of the cfg domain.
20135: Line too long
Description\Reason:
Line %d > %d characters
Check:
Reduce the number of characters.
20136: Attr out of range
DescriptionReason:
Attribute %s is out of range
in line %d
Check:
Change the value on the attribute.
16-29
System and Error Messages
20137: Dublicate inst name
DescriptionReason:
Dublicate name in line %d
of file %s
Check:
Change the name.
20140: Motors On rejected.
Motors On via System IO
not allowed.
20141: Motors Off rejected.
Motors Off via System IO
not allowed.
20142: Start rejected.
Start/restart of program via System
IO not allowed.
Check:
The reason could be that the robot
is outside of regain distance.
20143: Start main rejected.
Start of main program via System IO
not allowed.
20144: Stop rejected.
Stop of program via System IO
not allowed.
20145: Stop cycle rejected.
Stop of program cycle via System IO
not allowed.
20146: Man interrupt rejected.
Manual interrupt of program via
System IO not allowed.
20147: Load and start rejected.
Load and start of program via
System IO not allowed.
Program file name (including mass
memory unit) to be loaded must
be defined.
20148: Confirm rejected.
Emergency Stop Reset Confirm via
System IO not allowed.
20149: Error reset rejected.
Program execution error reset via
System IO not allowed.
20150: Syncronization rejected.
Syncronization of mechanical unit
via System IO not allowed.
20151: Faulty signal name.
Signal name not possible to
subscribe to for Sysio.
The Signal name might not be in
the cfg-file for Sysio.
20152: Too many restrictions.
For an action (signal) in
Sysio, no restrictions are set.
The total number of restrictions
(signals) for an action in the
cfg-file for Sysio are too high.
20153: Mot. On, Start rejected.
Motors On, Start/restart of program
via System IO not allowed.
Check:
The reason could be that the robot
is outside of regain distance.
20154: Stop instr. rejected.
Stop of program instruction via
System IO not allowed.
20155: Undefined Argument
SyncExtAx mechanical_unit_name
is not defined
20156: Undefined Argument
Interrupt routine_name
is not defined
20157: Undefined Argument
LoadStart program_name
is not defined
20158: No System Input signal
A system input has been declared to
a signal that doesnt exist.
20159: No System Output signal
A system output has been declared to
a signal that doesnt exist.
16-30
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
20160: Not in configuration
The system module %!%s in task
%s has no corresponding
specification in the configuration
for "Task modules"
Check:
View "Task modules" in the "System
Parameter" menu and add an item for
this system module
20161: Path not find
The system module %!%s in task
%s has a corresponding
specification in the configuration
for "Task modules" that point out
a non existing file path
Check:
View "Task modules" in the "System
Parameter" menu and change the path
in the item for this system module
20162: Write error
A write error occur when the system try
to save the system module %!%.14s
at %.37s
in task %.16s. Or the file
system was full
Check:
View "Task modules" in the "System
Parameter" menu and change the path
in the item for this system module
20163: Reconfig failed
Some user module(s) changed but not
saved. See previous warnings stored
in the log.
Check:
Save those modules that are specified
by earlier warnings and try another
system start.
20164: Reconfig failed
There are still some unsaved system
module
Check:
Read error descriptions in earlier
messages.
Try another system start
20165: PP lost!
Restart is no longer possible from
current position. The program has to be
started from the beginning.
20166: Refuse to save module
The module %!%.14s
is older than the source
at %.37s
in task %.16s.
20167: Unsaved module
The module %!%.14s
is changed but not saved
in task %.16s.
20170: SYS_STOP
Program motion stopped along path.
20171: SYS_HALT
Program and motion stopped with
motors off.
20172: SYS_FAIL
System Failure, restart system.
20175: Teachpendant fail
Teachpendant lost contact
this will force Guard Stop
20180: System IO restriction
System IO restrictions are active for
other clients, e.g. teach pendant or
computer link.
Check:
Motor on is restricted by System IO
MotorOff.
Program start is restricted by
System IO Stop, StopCycle or StopInstr.
20201: Limit Switch open
20202: Emergency Stop open
20203: Enabling Device open
20204: Operation Key open
20205: Auto Stop open
20206: General Stop open
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
16-31
System and Error Messages
20207: Backplane Enable open
Check:
1. Check other error messages for
primary fault reason.
2. If no other error messages,
please check line voltage for
one phase missing.
20208: Chain switches open
One or many switches in chain open.
20209: External Contactor open
20210: Motor Contactor open
20211: Two channel fault
Enable from backplane was not allowed
to be closed.
Runchain two channel fault has not
been reset.
Check:
First open both channels and then close
them again to reset runchain.
Please check the safety guard that
caused the status conflict.
20212: Two channel fault
Runchain was not allowed
to be closed.
Runchain two channel fault has not
been reset.
Check:
First open both channels and then close
them again to reset runchain.
Please check the safety guard that
caused the status conflict.
20213: Two channel fault
Runchain two channel fault has not
been reset.
Check:
First open both channels and then close
them again to reset runchain.
Please check the safety guard that
caused the status conflict.
16-32
20221: Chain conflict
Status conflict
for one or many switches in chain.
Check:
Please check the two channel safety
guard that caused the status conflict.
20222: Limit Switch conflict
Status conflict
for the Limit Switch chain.
Check:
Please check the two channel safety
guard that caused the status conflict.
20223: Emergency Stop conflict
Status conflict
for the Emergency Stop chain.
Check:
Please check the two channel safety
guard that caused the status conflict.
20224: Enabling Device conflict
Status conflict
for the Enabling Device chain.
Check:
Please check the two channel safety
guard that caused the status conflict.
20225: Auto Stop conflict
Status conflict
for the Auto Stop chain.
Check:
Please check the two channel safety
guard that caused the status conflict.
20226: General Stop conflict
Status conflict
for the General Stop chain.
Check:
Please check the two channel safety
guard that caused the status conflict.
20227: Motor Contactor conflict
Status conflict
for the Motor Contactor chain.
Check:
Please check the two channel safety
guard that caused the status conflict.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
20228: Ordered ES conflict
Status conflict
between ordered and configured type of
Emergency Stop Turn Off (immediate or
delayed).
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
20229: Ordered AS conflict
Status conflict
between ordered and configured type of
Auto Stop Turn Off (immediate or
delayed).
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
20230: Ordered GS conflict
Status conflict
between ordered and configured type of
General Stop Turn Off (immediate or
delayed).
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
20231: Delayed ES conflict
Status conflict
between ES1 and CH1 or ES2 and CH2
after a delayed Emergency Stop.
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
20232: Delayed AS conflict
Status conflict
between AS1 and CH1 or AS2 and CH2
after a delayed Auto Stop.
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
20233: Delayed GS conflict
Status conflict
between GS1 and CH1 or GS2 and CH2
after a delayed General Stop.
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
20234: Immediate ES conflict
Status conflict
between ES1 and CH1 or ES2 and CH2
after an immediate Emergency Stop.
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
20235: Immediate AS conflict
Status conflict
between AS1 and CH1 or AS2 and CH2
after an immediate Auto Stop.
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
20236: Immediate GS conflict
Status conflict
between GS1 and CH1 or GS2 and CH2
after an immediate General Stop.
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
20241: Key speed status fault
Status conflict
for the operating mode key signals
and the speed signal.
Check:
Check operating mode key hardware
or replace Panel Board.
20242: Auto mode conflict
Status conflict
for the operating mode key signals
in Auto operation.
Check:
Check operating mode key hardware
or replace Panel Board.
20243: Manual mode conflict
Status conflict
for the operating mode key signals
in Manual operation.
Check:
Check operating mode key hardware
or replace Panel Board.
16-33
System and Error Messages
20244: Manual FS mode conflict
Status conflict
for the operating mode key signals
in Manual Full Speed operation.
Check:
Check operating mode key hardware
or replace Panel Board.
20251: Transformer temp. high
Status active for over temperatur
in main transformer.
Make sure to let the transformer cool
down before ordering Motors On again.
Check:
View Safety in the IO window and wait
until the signal TRFOTMP equals 0
before ordering Motors On again.
20252: Motor temp. high
Status active
for over temperature in
motors of manipulator.
Make sure to let the Motors cool down
before ordering Motors On again.
Check:
View Safety in the IO window and wait
until the signal PTC equals 0 before
ordering Motors On again.
20253: Ext. device temp. high
Status active
for over temperature in
external device.
Make sure to let the Motors cool down
before ordering Motors On again.
Check:
View Safety in the IO window and wait
until the signal PTCEXT equals 0 before
ordering Motors On again.
20254: Power supply fan stopped
Status active
when fan in power supply not running.
Check:
Check the power supply fan hardware.
16-34
20255: Panel Board voltage low
Status active
when Panel Board 24 V failed.
Check:
Check the Panel Board voltage.
20260: Run control status fault
Status conflict between
motor contactors and run control.
Check:
Replace Panel Board.
20261: Strings to long
Description\Reason:
- Elog message number %d:
Total String length %d >
%d characters
Check:
1. Reduce the total string length.
20270: Access error
Panel Module access error.
Check:
Examine your EIO configuration files.
20280: Symbol conflict
The signal %s defined in the IO
configuration conflict with another
program symbol with the same name.
Due on that fact the signal will not be
mapped to a program variable.
Check:
Rename the signal in
the IO configuration.
3 Hardware error messages
31108: Error in serial channe
Error in serial channel %.f
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31114: Bus error
Bus error when accessing LED on
main computer
Check:
1. Replace main computer board
2. Replace robot computer board
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
31115: Error in serial channel 1
Received data not equal to transmitted
data
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31117: Parity error channel 1
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31135: Framing error channel 2
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31136: Noise error channel 2
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31118: Framing error channel 1
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31137: Error in serial console
Received data not equal to transmitted
data
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31119: Noise error channel 1
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31138: Overflow serial console
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31130: Port error
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31139: Parity error console
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31131: SYSRESET did not fire.
Replace VME bus boards.
1. Check Robot computer.
2. Check other VME-bus boards.
3. Check backplane.
31140: Framing error console
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31132: Error in serial channel 2
Received data not equal to transmitted
data
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31141: Noise error console
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31133: Overflow serial channel 2
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31142: Error in tpu channel
Received data not equal to transmitted
data
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31134: Parity error channel 2
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31143: Overflow in tpu channel
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
16-35
System and Error Messages
31144: Parity error tpu channel
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31145: Framing error tpu channel
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31146: Noise error tpu channel
Check:
1. Check communication parameters
2. Replace robot computer board
31203: Floppy Disk Error
Bad floppy disk or not formatted
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Change disk
31206: Floppy Disk Error
Bad floppy disk or internal error
Check:
1. Check the floppy drive
2. Change disk
3. Restart the system
31207: Floppy Disk Error
No floppy disk or disk not ready
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
31210: Floppy Disk Error
Invalid format
Check:
1. Change disk
31211: Floppy Disk Error
Data transfer error to/from floppy
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Change disk
3. Restart the system
31214: Floppy Disk Error
Data transfer was interrupted
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Restart the system
16-36
31215: Floppy Disk Error
Internal command invalid
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Restart the system
31216: Floppy Disk Error
Floppy disk was moved during tranfer
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Restart the system
31217: Floppy Disk Error
Bad floppy disk or floppy device
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Change Disk
3. Restart the system
31219: Floppy Disk Error
Floppy device not ready
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Restart the system
31220: Floppy Disk Error
Bad floppy disk or internal error
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Change Disk
3. Restart the system
31221: Floppy Disk Error
Data error
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Change Disk
3. Restart the system
31222: Floppy Disk Error
Internal error - Overrun
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Restart the system
31223: Floppy Disk Error
Bad floppy or internal error
Check:
1. Repeat attempt
2. Change Disk
3. Restart the system
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
31224: Floppy Disk Error
Floppy write protected
Check:
1. Remove write protection
31225: Floppy Disk Error
Bad Floppy - Address mark missing
Check:
1. Change Disk
31226: Floppy Disk Error
Bad data on floppy
Check:
1. Change Disk
31227: Floppy Disk Error
Bad floppy - Missing cylinder
Check:
1. Change Disk
31228: Floppy Disk Error
Bad floppy - Bad cylinder
Check:
1. Change Disk
31229: Floppy Disk Error
Bad floppy - Bad address mark in data
Check:
1. Change Disk
31401: DMA error
DMA transfer error in ROBOT COMPUTER
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31402: DMA error
DMA transfer error in ROBOT COMPUTER
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31403: DMA error
DMA transfer error in ROBOT COMPUTER
Check:
Replace robot computer board
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
31404: DMA error
DMA transfer error in ROBOT COMPUTER
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31408: Axis computer error
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31409: Robot computer error
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31410: Axis computer error
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31411: Axis computer error
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31414: Main computer error
Check:
1. Replace main computer board
2. Replace robot computer board
31415: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
31418: DMA transfer error
DMA transfer error in ROBOT COMPUTER
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31419: DMA transfer error
DMA transfer error in ROBOT COMPUTER
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31420: DMA transfer error
DMA transfer error in ROBOT COMPUTER
Check:
Replace robot computer board
16-37
System and Error Messages
31501: Battery voltage too low
Battery voltage too low on
battery 1
Check:
Replace battery 1
32248: Mailbox 2 interrupt error
Mailbox 2 interrupt error on
IO computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31502: Battery voltage too low
Battery voltage too low on
battery 2
Check:
Replace battery 2
32301: Memory error MAIN COMP.
Check:
Replace main computer board
31503: Battery voltage too low
Battery voltage too low on both
batterys
Check:
Replace batterys
32302: Memory error MAIN COMP.
Check:
Replace main computer board
32303: Memory error MAIN COMP.
Check:
Replace main computer board
31505: Battery cirquit error
Check:
Replace robot computer board
32305: Type error MEMORY EXPANS.
Check:
Replace memory expansion board
31605: Memory error IO-computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33150: Axis Computer Int Error
Axis computer was stopped with
hw interrupt due to interrupt error
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
31606: Memory error IO-computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
31607: Memory error IO-computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
32118: MC RESET ERROR.
Main computer running in spite
of RESET command.
Check:
Replace main computer board
32247: Mailbox 1 interrupt error
Mailbox 1 interrupt error on
IO computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
16-38
33158: Axis Comp Driver Clk fail
Axis computer driver clock failure
Main computer is not responding on
request
Check:
Reload system
Replace main computer board
33159: Manual Mode Speed Warning
Manual mode speed exceeded for
the joint connected to axc channel %.f.
Check:
Check for correct load mass definition
Check controller parameters on external
axes
Check for robot singularity
Replace drive unit
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
33201: Axis cpu Read Error
Error in reading from axis computer
driver. Axis computer driver did not
return correct number of bytes.
Check:
Check system configuration
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
33202: Axis cpu Write Error
Error in writing to the axis computer
driver. Axis computer driver did not
return correct number of bytes.
Check:
Check system configuration
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
33203: Axis cpu ioctl Error
Error in ioctl to the axis computer
driver.
Fail to execute ioctl command
Check:
Restart system
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
33210: Feedback Position Error
Driver failed to read feedback position
on joint %.f
Check:
Restart system
Replace main computer board
33211: Position Control Underrun
Unable to complete position control in
the allowed time
Check:
Reload system
Check noise level on I/O connections
33212: DMA Time out Error
DMA access failed from main computer
to
axis computer
Check:
Reload system
Replace main computer board and
axis computer board
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
33213: DMA Operation Error
DMA Control Operation failed from Main
computer to Axis computer
Check:
Reload system
Replace main computer board and
axis computer board
33214: Float number error
Illegal references sent from Main
computer to Axis computer for joint %.f
Check:
Reload system
Check system parameters
33220: Axis computer failure
Axis computer has returned an error code
indicating hardware failure
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
33301: Error in axis computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33302: Error in axis computer
Axis computer was not able to
deactivate VME signal SYSFAIL
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33303: Error in axis computer
Axis computer was not able to
activate VME signal SYSFAIL
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33304: Error in axis computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33305: Error in axis comp memory
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33308: Error in axis computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
16-39
System and Error Messages
33309: Error in axis computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33310: Error in axis computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33311: Axis computer
Current ref. loopback error
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33312: Axis computer error
RUNNING/DRVFLT signal error
Check:
1. Replace robot computer board
2. Check drive system boards
33314: Axis computer error
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33315: Axis computer error
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33316: Axis comp err loopb comm.
Axis computer error loopback
comm. error.
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33320: Axis computer error.
Error reported by Axis computer
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33321: Axis computer error.
Uncorrect VME-vector generated at test
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33401: Over writing mea. system
Over writing of output data to
measurement system %.f
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
Replace measure board
16-40
33402: Over writing drive sys.
Over writing of output data to
drive system %.f
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
Replace drive unit
33403: Over writing mea. system
Over writing of input data from
measurement system %.f
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
Replace measure board
33404: Over writing drive sys.
Over writing of input data from
drive system %.f
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
Replace drive unit
33405: Timeout mea. system
Contact lost with measurement
system %.f. Axis computer stopped
due to transmission timeout.
Check:
Check connections from cabinet to
measurement board(s).
Replace measurement board or
robot computer
33406: Timeout drive sys.
Contact lost with drive system %.f.
Axis computer stopped due to
transmission timeout.
Check:
Check connections from cabinet to
drive unit(s).
Replace drive modeule or
robot computer
33407: Access violation.
Access violation of measurement system
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
33408: Access violation.
Access violation of drive system
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
33409: Access violation.
Access violation of R6 calculation unit
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
33410: Access violation.
More than one status in R6 cleared
simultanously
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
33411: Unknown error interrupt
Unknown error interrupt from the axis
computer
Check:
Restart system
Replace robot computer board
33412: Clock error
Axis computer driver clock failure
Main computer is not responding on
request
Check:
Reload system
Replace main computer board
33413: Loopback error
Error in measurement system %d when
testing seriel link in loopback mode
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33414: Loopback error
Error in drive system %d when testing
seriel link in loopback mode
Check:
Replace robot computer board
33415: Drive system error
Error in the drive system %d when
testing seriel link in normal mode
Check:
Check seriel link
Check drive unit
Check dc link
Check/Replace robot computer board
34001: Bus error
Unexpected bus error during a VME-test
Check:
Check VME boards
34002: Bus error
Unexpected reply during a VME-test
Check:
Check VME boards
37001: Contactor activate Error
Motor On contactor did not activate/
energize
Check:
1. Restart system
2. Check/replace contactors (M.On/AUX)
3. Replace panel board
37002: DSQC306 not running
Main computer software not downloaded
or not running
37003: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37004: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37005: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37006: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37007: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
16-41
System and Error Messages
37008: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37021: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37009: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37022: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37010: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37023: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37011: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37024: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37012: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37025: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37013: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37026: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37014: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37027: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37015: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37028: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37016: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37029: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37017: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37030: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37018: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37031: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37019: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37032: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37020: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37033: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
16-42
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
37034: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37047: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37035: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37048: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37036: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37049: Contactor activate Error
Contactor for station %s or
Supervisory contactor or auxiliary
contactor did not activate or energize
Check:
Restart system
Check contactor or Supervisory
contactor or auxiliary contactor
Check digital output to contactor
or digital input from contactor
Replace system board
37037: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37038: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37039: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37040: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37041: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37042: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37043: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37044: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37045: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
37046: Main computer error
Check:
Replace main computer board
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
38001: Battery backup lost
Battery backup on serial measurement
board %.f on measurement system %.f
lost since last
power down or restart
Check:
Check battery voltage during power off
after 18 hours recharging in power on
Check battery connection to serial
measurement board
Replace battery
38010: Serial Board not found
Serial measurement board %.f on
measurement system %.f not found
Check:
Check system configuration parameters
Check connections and cables to
serial measurement system
Replace serial measurement board
38012: Serial Offset X Error
Offset error in X signal on serial
measurement board %.f on
measurement system %.f
Check:
Replace serial measurement board
16-43
System and Error Messages
38013: Serial Offset Y Error
Offset error in Y signal on serial
measurement board %.f on
measurement system %.f
Check:
Replace serial measurement board
38014: Serial Linearity Error
Linearity error in X-Y signal difference
on serial measurement board %.f on
measurement system %.f
- System may still operate with warning
- System will not function with error
Check:
Replace serial measurement board
38015: Serial Linear X Error
Linearity error in X signal on serial
measurement board %.f on
measurement system %.f
Check:
Replace serial measurement board
38016: Serial Linear Y Error
Linearity error in Y signal on serial
measurement board %.f on
measurement system %.f
Check:
Replace serial measurement board
38030: Resolver error
Failure in X or Y resolver signal on
joint %s
Sum of squared X and Y exceeds max
Check:
Check resolver and resolver connections.
Replace measurement boards
38031: Resolver error
Failure in X or Y resolver signal on
joint %s
Sum of squared X and Y below min
Check:
Check resolver and resolver connections.
Replace measurement boards
16-44
38032: Transmission failure
Axis computer detected failure in
transmission to/from serial
measurement system %d.
Check:
Check connections/cables for serial
measurement system. Check shieldings
Check for high electromagnetic
disturbances along cable run to robot
Replace measure board or robot computer
38033: Transmission failure
Axis computer detected failure in
transmission to/from serial
measurement system %d.
Check:
Check connections/cables for serial
measurement system. Check shieldings
Check for high electromagnetic
disturbances along cable run to robot
Replace measure board or robot computer
38034: Transmission failure
Axis computer detected failure in
transmisson to/from serial measurement
system %d.
Accumulated errors since warmstart: %d.
%d absent transmission of %d detected.
Check:
Check connections/cables for serial
measurement system. Check shieldings
Check for high electromagnetic
disturbances along cable run to robot
Replace measure board or robot computer
38035: Transmission failure
Axis computer detected failure in
transmission to/from serial
measurement system %d.
Check:
Check connections/cables for serial
measurement system. Check shieldings
Check for high electromagnetic
disturbances along cable run to robot
Replace measure board or robot computer
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
39101: Drive System Error
Temperature too high on DC-link,
drive system %.0f.
Check:
Check cooling fan(s)
Check AC voltage to DC-link
Modify user program
Replace DC-link
39102: Drive System Error
Shunt resistor overload,
drive system %.0f.
Check:
Too much deceleration
Modify user program
Check AC voltage to DC-link
Replace DC-link
39103: Drive System Error
DC-link incoming mains not valid,
drive system %.0f.
Check:
Check voltage from Motor On contactor
Replace DC-link
39104: Drive System Error
DC-link voltage NOT OK,
drive system %.0f.
Check:
Check voltage from Motor On contactor.
Replace DC-link.
39105: Drive System Error
+/- 15V out of limit on DC-link,
drive system %.0f.
Check:
Check +/- 15V from power supply.
Replace DC-link.
39110: Drive System Error
Unknown type code for dc link
%s. Read typecode %d when
expecting %d.
Check:
Replace dc link.
Check serial link.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
39111: Drive System Error
Wrong type detected for dc link
%s. %s found when
expecting %s.
Check:
Check/modify configuration.
Replace dc link.
39201: Drive System Error
Reset from drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Restart start controller
Replace drive unit
39202: Drive System Error
Watchdog reset from drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Restart start controller.
Replace drive unit.
39203: Drive System Error
+/- 15V out of limit on drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Check +/- 15V from power supply.
Replace drive unit.
39204: Drive System Error
Too many consecutive communication/
synchronization errors on drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Restart start controller.
Replace drive unit.
Replace drive unit right to the one
reporting the error.
Replace Robot Computer Board.
39205: Drive System Error
Internal HardWare/SoftWare error on
drive unit, joint: %s.
Internal error code: %s
Check:
Restart start controller.
Replace drive unit.
16-45
System and Error Messages
39206: Drive System Error
Glitch on short circuit detector on
drive unit, joint: %s.
39207: Drive System Error
Short circuit detected on drive unit,
joint: %s.
39208: Drive System Error
High temperature WARNING on
drive unit, joint: %s.
39209: Drive System Error
High temperature ALARM on drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Allow system to cool down before
restart.
39210: Drive System Error
Over temperature on drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Allow system to cool down before
restart.
39211: Drive System Error
High temperature on transistors on
drive unit, joint: %s.
Check:
Allow system to cool down before
restart.
39212: Drive System Error
DC link voltage higher than allowed
detected by drive unit,
joint: %s.
DC link voltage: %s (V)
Check:
Check inkomming mains.
Check/replace shunt resistors.
Check/replace DC-link.
16-46
39213: Drive System Error
Critical over voltage on DC link
detected by drive unit,
joint: %s.
DC link voltage: %s (V)
Check:
Check inkomming mains.
Check/replace shunt resistors.
Check/replace DC-link.
39214: Drive System Error
Low DC voltage detected by drive unit,
joint: %s. Voltage: %s (V).
NOTE !! This error will be disabled
until next MOTOR ON.
Check:
Check inkomming mains.
Check program. Check konfiguration.
Check/replace DC-link.
39215: Drive System Error
Too big difference in 3 consecutive
current references to drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Restart system.
Check/replace resolver.
Check serial link(drivesystem
39216: Drive System Error
Too big difference in 3 consecutive
rotor positions to drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Restart system.
Check/replace resolver.
Check serial link(drivesystem
39217: Drive System Error
Current error: PWM ratio bigger than
allowed. Drive unit, joint: %s.
DC link voltage: %s (V)
Check:
Check DC-voltage.
Check configuration.
Check motor/cables.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
39218: Drive System Error
Broken motor cabling detected by
drive unit, joint: %s.
DC link voltage: %s (V)
Check:
Check motor/cables.
39219: Drive System Error
Current error: Torque producing current
lower than ordered. Drive unit,
joint: %s.
DC link voltage: %s (V)
Check:
Check DC-voltage.
Check configuration.
Check motor/cables.
39220: Drive System Error
Current error: Torque producing current
higher than ordered. Drive unit,
joint: %s.
DC link voltage: %s (V)
Check:
Check configuration.
Check motor/cables.
39221: Drive System Error
Current error: Non torque producing
current bigger than allowed.
Drive unit, joint: %s.
DC link voltage:%s (V)
Check:
Check DC-voltage.
Check configuration.
Check motor/cables.
39222: Drive System Error
Current error: The current is higher
than max measurable due to short cirquit
or unstabile current controller.
Drive unit, joint: %s.
DC link voltage:%s (V)
Check:
Check motor/cables (short cirquit).
Check configuration (motor parameters).
Replace drive unit.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
39230: Drive System Error
Unknown drive unit type code,
joint %s. Read typecode %d when
expecting %d.
Check:
Replace drive unit.
Check serial link.
39231: Drive System Error
Wrong program revision in drive unit
for joint %s.
Read revision (%d) out of range.
Check:
Replace drive unit.
39232: Drive System Error
Drive unit CPU, for joint %s did not
start.
Check:
Replace drive unit.
39233: Drive System Error
Axis computer has detected too many
consecutive communication errors from
serial link to drive system %d.
Accumulated errors since warmstart: %d.
Check:
Restart start controller.
Check serial link.
39234: Drive System Error
Axis computer has detected transmission
error from serial link to drive
system %d.
Accumulated errors since warmstart: %d.
Check:
Check serial link.
39235: Drive System Error
Axis computer has detected a checksum
error when transmitting parameters
to drive unit for joint %s.
Check:
Restart controller.
Replace Drive unit.
Replace robot computer.
16-47
System and Error Messages
39236: Drive System Error
Wrong drive unit type detected for
joint %s. %s found when
expecting %s.
Check:
Check/modify configuration.
Replace drive unit.
39237: Drive System Error
Axis computer has detected too many
communication absent errors from serial
link to drive system %d.
Errors since warmstart: %d.
%d absent transmission of %d detected.
Check:
Restart start controller.
Check serial link.
39238: Drive System Error
Axis computer has detected transmission
absent error from serial link to drive
system %d.
Accumulated errors since warmstart:
%d.
Check:
Check serial link.
39301: External Drive Error
High DC voltage detected by external
drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
See documentation for Atlas DMC/FBU.
Check inkomming mains.
Check/replace shunt resistors.
Check/replace External Drive Unit.
39302: External Drive Error
High motor temperature detected by
drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Allow motor to cool down.
Check/replace External Drive Unit.
See documentation for Atlas DMC/FBU.
16-48
39303: External Drive Error
High Power device temperature on
external drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Allow drive unit to cool down.
Check/replace External Drive Unit.
See documentation for Atlas DMC/FBU.
39304: External Drive Error
Current regulator fault detected on
external drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
See documentation for Atlas DMC/FBU.
Check/replace External Drive Unit.
39305: External Drive Error
Short circuit detected on drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
See documentation for Atlas DMC/FBU.
Check/replace External Drive Unit.
39306: External Drive Error
Missing ENABLE for external drive
unit, joint: %s.
Check:
See documentation for Atlas DMC/FBU.
39307: External Drive Error
External drive unit, joint:
%s has performed
a CPU reset.
Check:
Restart the system.
See documentation for Atlas DMC/FBU.
Check/replace External Drive Unit.
39308: External Drive Error
Too many consecutive communication
errors on external drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Restart start controller.
Replace drive unit.
Replace drive unit right to the one
reporting the error.
Replace Robot Computer Board.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
39309: External Drive Error
Too many consecutive synchronization
errors on external drive unit,
joint: %s.
Check:
Restart start controller.
Replace external drive unit.
Replace Robot Computer Board.
39310: External Drive Stop
External drive, joint:
%s has order
a program stop.
Check:
See documentation for Atlas DMC/
FBU.
39311: External Drive EM-Stop
External drive, joint:
%s has order
an emergancy stop.
Check:
See documentation for Atlas DMC/
FBU.
39320: External drive error
Time out in communication with external
drive unit, joint: %s
Check:
Restart system and external drive
Replace external drive
See documentation for Atlas DMC/
FBU.
4 Program error messages
40001: Argument error
Task %.16s: More than one
occurence of optional parameter
%.16s
Check:
Make sure that the optional parameter is
not specified more than once in the same
routine call.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40002: Argument error
Task %.16s: Excluding
arguments must have conditional value
(%.16s has value)
Check:
Arguments may not be specified for more
than one parameter from a list of
parameters that exclude each other
unless all values are conditional
argument values.
40003: Argument error
Task %.16s: Expecting
argument for required parameter
%.16s but found optional
argument %.16s
Check:
Check that the arguments are specified
in the same order as the parameters for
the routine being called.
40004: Argument error
Task %.16s: Argument for REF
parameter %.16s is not data
reference
Check:
Make sure the argument expression is
just a data or parameter reference.
40005: Argument error
Task %.16s: Argument for
’INOUT’ parameter %.16s is
not variable or persistent reference or
is read only.
Check:
Make sure the argument is
just a variable, persistent, variable
parameter or persistent parameter
reference and it is writeable.
Do not use () around the argument.
40006: Argument error
Task %.16s: Missing optional
argument value for parameter
%.16s
Check:
Only ’switch’ parameters may be
specified by name only. Optional
parameters of other types must be
assigned a value. Add a value.
16-49
System and Error Messages
40007: Argument error
Task %.16s: Optional argument
%.16s at wrong place in
argument list
Check:
Check that the arguments are specified
in the same order as the parameters for
the routine being called.
40008: Argument error
Task %.16s: Reference to
optional parameter %.16s in
required argument
Check:
An argument corresponding to an
optional
parameter must be specified with a
leading ‘\’character. Change the
required argument into an optional.
40009: Argument error
Task %.16s: Reference to
required parameter %.16s in
conditional argument value
Check:
A conditional value for an optional
parameter must refer an optional
parameter in the calling routine.
Change the conditional value.
40010: Argument error
Task %.16s: Reference to
required parameter %.16s in
optional argument
Check:
An argument corresponding to a required
parameter must not be specified with the
leading ‘\’ character. Change the
optional argument into a reguired.
40011: Argument error
Task %.16s: Named required
argument %.16s at wrong place
in argument list
Check:
Check that the arguments are specified
in the same order as the parameters for
the routine being called.
16-50
40012: Argument error
Task %.16s: ’switch’ argument
%.16s cannot have a value
Check:
An argument corresponding to a ‘switch'
parameter may not be assigned a value.
Remove the value.
40013: Argument error
Task %.16s: Too few arguments
in call to routine %.16s
Check:
A routine call must supply values for
all required parameters of the routine
being called. Add more arguments to fit
the parameter list.
40014: Argument error
Task %.16s: Too many
arguments in call to routine
%.16s
Check:
Remove arguments so that no arguments
are supplied in excess to those defined
by the parameter list of the called
routine.
40015: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Array dimension
must be > 0 (value is %i)
Check:
Array dimensions must be positive.
Change the dimension expression.
40016: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Too many
dimensions in array definition
Check:
An array may have at most 3 dimensions.
Rewrite the program so that no more than
3 dimensions are needed.
40017: Type error
Task %.16s: Indexed data
%.18s %.18s is
not of array type
Check:
Only data that have been declared to be
arrays may be indexed. Remove the index
or indices, or declare the data to be an
array.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40018: Type error
Task %.16s: Data
%.18s %.18s is
not of record type
Check:
Components are only available for data
of record type. Check the type and name
of the referenced data.
40019: Limit error
Task %.16s: Error when
creating the persistent variable
(internal error code %i)
%.16s
Check:
An error occurred when the persistent
was to be inserted into the shared
database. Probably the database is full.
Ref. to system parameter AveragePers.
40020: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Expression not
constant expression (%.16s
not constant)
Check:
Expressions contained within data
declarations must be constant
expressions. Make sure the expression
does not contain any variable or
persistent reference, or function call.
40021: Instruction error
Task %.16s: RETURN from
function must have an expression
Check:
A RETURN instruction within a function
must specify a function value to be
returned. Add a value expression.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40022: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal
combination of operand types
%.18s and
%.18s for ‘*' operator
Check:
The allowed type combinations for the
two operands of the ’*’ operator are
’num’*’num’, ’num’*’pos’, ’pos’*’num’,
’pos’*’pos’ and ’orient’*’orient’. Check
the types of the operands.
40023: Instruction error
Task %.16s: Cannot transfer
control into another instruction list
Check:
Make sure that the label is located in
the same instruction list as the GOTO
instruction, at the same or an outer
level. It is not possible to jump into
a program flow instruction.
40024: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for left operand of
binary ’+’ or ’-’ operator
Check:
The allowed types for the operands of
the ’+’ operator are ’num’, ’pos’ and
’string’, for the ’-’ operator ’num’ and
’pos’. Check the type of the operand.
40025: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for operand of unary
’+’ or ’-’ operator
Check:
The allowed types for the operands of
the ’+’ and ’-’ operators are ’num’ and
’pos’. Check the type of the operand.
16-51
System and Error Messages
40026: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for right operand of
binary ’+’ or ’-’ operator
Check:
The allowed types for the operands of
the ’+’ operator are ’num’, ’pos’ and
’string’, for the ’-’ operator ’num’ and
’pos’. Check the type of the operand.
40027: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for left operand of
’/’, ’DIV’ or ’MOD’ operator
Check:
The only allowed type for the operands
of the ’/’, ’DIV’ and ’MOD’ operators
is ’num’. Check the type of the operand.
40028: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for right operand of
’/’, ’DIV’ or ’MOD’ operator
Check:
The only allowed type for the operands
of the ’/’, ’DIV’ and ’MOD’ operators
is ’num’. Check the type of the operand.
40029: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for left operand of
’<’, ’<=’, ’>’ or ’>=’ operator
Check:
The only allowed type for the operands
of the ’<’, ’<=’, ’>’ and ’>=’ operators
is ’num’. Check the type of the operand.
40030: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for right operand of
’<’, ’<=’, ’>’ or ’>=’ operator
Check:
The only allowed type for the operands
of the ’<’, ’<=’, ’>’ and ’>=’ operators
is ’num’. Check the type of the operand.
16-52
40031: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for left operand of
’*’ operator
Check:
The allowed types for the operands of
the ’*’ operator are ’num’, ’pos’ and
’orient’. Check the type of the operand.
40032: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for right operand of
’*’ operator
Check:
The allowed types for the operands of
the ’*’ operator are ’num’, ’pos’ and
’orient’. Check the type of the operand.
40033: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for operand of ’NOT’
operator
Check:
The only allowed type for the operand of
the ’NOT’ operator is ’bool’. Check the
type of the operand.
40034: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for left operand of
’OR’, ’XOR’ or ’AND’ operator
Check:
The only allowed type for the operands
of the ’OR’, ’XOR’ and "AND’ operator is
’bool’. Check the type of the operand.
40035: Type error
Task %.16s: Illegal type
%.18s for right operand of
’OR’, ’XOR’ or ’AND’ operator
Check:
The only allowed type for the operands
of the ’OR’, ’XOR’ and "AND’ operator is
’bool’. Check the type of the operand.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40036: Type error
Task %.16s: Incorrect number
of indices in index list for array
%.18s with %i dimension(s)
Check:
Make sure that the number of indices in
the index list is the same as the number
of dimensions of the indexed data array.
40037: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: LOCAL illegal in
routine constant declaration
Check:
Only program data declarations may have
the LOCAL attribute. Remove the LOCAL
attribute or move the declaration
outside of the routine.
40038: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: LOCAL illegal in
routine variable declaration
Check:
Only program data declarations may have
the LOCAL attribute. Remove the LOCAL
attribute or move the declaration
outside of the routine.
40039: Name error
Task %.16s: Constant name
%.16s ambiguous
Check:
Routine data must have names that are
unique within the routine. Program data
must have names that are unique within
the module. Rename the data or change
the conflicting name.
40040: Name error
Task %.16s: Global constant
name %.16s ambiguous
Check:
Global data must have names that are
unique among all the global types, data,
global routines and modules in the
entire program. Rename the data
or change the conflicting name.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40041: Name error
Task %.16s: Global persistent
name %.16s ambiguous
Check:
Global data must have names that are
unique among all the global types, data,
global routines and modules in the
entire program. Rename the data
or change the conflicting name.
40042: Name error
Task %.16s: Global routine
name %.16s ambiguous
Check:
Global routines must have names that are
unique among all the global types, data,
global routines and modules in the
entire program. Rename the routine
or change the conflicting name.
40043: Name error
Task %.16s: Global variable
name %.16s ambiguous
Check:
Global data must have names that are
unique among all the global types, data,
global routines and modules in the
entire program. Rename the data
or change the conflicting name.
40044: Name error
Task %.16s: Label name
%.16s ambiguous
Check:
Labels must have names that are unique
within the routine. Rename the label or
change the conflicting name.
40045: Name error
Task %.16s: Module name
%.16s ambiguous
Check:
Modules must have names that are unique
among all the global types, global data,
global routines and modules in the
entire program. Rename the module
or change the conflicting name.
16-53
System and Error Messages
40046: Name error
Task %.16s: Parameter name
%.16s ambiguous
Check:
Parameters must have names that are
unique within the routine. Rename the
parameter or change the conflicting
name.
40047: Name error
Task %.16s: Persistent name
%.16s ambiguous
Check:
Program data must have names that are
unique within the module. Rename the
data or change the conflicting name.
40048: Name error
Task %.16s: Routine name
%.16s ambiguous
Check:
Routines must have names that are unique
within the module. Rename the routine or
change the conflicting name.
40049: Name error
Task %.16s: Variable name
%.16s ambiguous
Check:
Routine data must have names that are
unique within the routine. Program data
must have names that are unique within
the module. Rename the data or change
the conflicting name.
40050: Type error
Task %.16s: Operand types
%.18s and
%.18s for binary ’+’ or ’-’
operator not equal
Check:
The two operands of the ’+’ and ’-’
operators must have equal type. Check
the operand types.
16-54
40051: Type error
Task %.16s: Operand types
%.18s and
%.18s for ’=’ or ’<>’
operator not equal
Check:
The two operands of the ’=’ and ’<>’
operators must have equal type. Check
the operand types.
40052: Instruction error
Task %.16s: RETURN with
expression only allowed in function
Check:
In a procedure or trap the RETURN
instruction must not specify a return
value expression. Remove the expression.
40053: Instruction error
Task %.16s: RAISE in error
handler must not have an expression
Check:
A RAISE instruction within an error
handler can only be used to propagate
the current error, and may therefore not
specify an error number. Remove the
error number expression.
40054: Type error
Task %.16s: Different
dimension of array type (%i) and
aggregate (%i)
Check:
Make sure that the number of expressions
in the aggregate is the same as the
dimension of the data array.
40055: Type error
Task %.16s: Assignment target
type %.18s is not value or
semi-value type
Check:
The type, of the data to be assigned a
value, must be a value or semi-value
type. Data of non-value types may only
be set by special type specific
predefined instructions or functions.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40056: Type error
Task %.16s: Type
%.18s for left operand of
’=’ or ’<>’ operator not value or
semi-value type
Check:
The ’=’ and ’<>’ operators may only be
applied to expressions of value or semivalue type. If comparisons are to be
made, special type specific predefined
functions are needed.
40057: Type error
Task %.16s: Type
%.18s for right operand of
’=’ or ’<>’ operator not value or
semi-value type
Check:
The ’=’ and ’<>’ operators may only be
applied to expressions of value or semivalue type. If comparisons are to be
made, special type specific predefined
functions are needed.
40058: Type error
Task %.16s: TEST expression
type %.18s not value or
semi-value type
Check:
The TEST instruction may only be
applied
to an expression of value or semi-value
type. If comparisons are to be made,
special type specific predefined
functions are needed.
40059: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Place holder for
value expression not allowed in
definition of named constant
Check:
Complete the data declaration or change
the data name to a place holder.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40060: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Place holder for
array dimension not allowed in
definition of named constant or variable
Check:
Complete the data declaration or change
the data name to a place holder.
40061: Routine declaration error
Task %.16s: Place holder for
parameter array dimensions not allowed
in definition of named routine
Check:
Complete the parameter declaration or
change the routine name to a place
holder.
40062: Name error
Task %.16s: Place holder for
parameter name not allowed in definition
of named routine
Check:
Complete the routine declaration or
change the routine name to a place
holder.
40063: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Place holder for
initial value expression not allowed in
definition of named persistent
Check:
Complete the data declaration or change
the data name to a place holder.
40064: Routine declaration error
Task %.16s: Place holder for
parameter not allowed in definition of
named routine
Check:
Complete the parameter declaration,
remove the place holder or change the
routine name to a place holder.
16-55
System and Error Messages
40065: Reference error
Task %.16s: Place holder for
type not allowed in definition of named
data, record component or routine
Check:
Complete the data or routine declaration
or change the data or routine name to a
place holder.
40066: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Place holder for
initial value expression not allowed in
definition of named variable
Check:
Complete the data declaration or change
the data name to a place holder.
40067: Type error
Task %.16s: Too few
components in record aggregate of type
%.18s
Check:
Make sure that the number of expressions
in the aggregate is the same as the
number of components in the record type.
40068: Type error
Task %.16s: Too many
components in record aggregate of type
%.18s
Check:
Make sure that the number of expressions
in the aggregate is the same as the
number of components in the record type.
40069: Reference error
Task %.16s: Data reference
%.16s is ambiguous
Check:
At least one other object sharing the
same name as the referred data is
visible from this program position. Make
sure that all object names fulfill the
naming rules regarding uniqueness.
16-56
40070: Reference error
Task %.16s: Function
reference %.16s is ambiguous
Check:
At least one other object sharing the
same name as the referred function is
visible from this program position. Make
sure that all object names fulfill the
naming rules regarding uniqueness.
40071: Reference error
Task %.16s: Label reference
%.16s is ambiguous
Check:
At least one other object sharing the
same name as the referred label is
visible from this program position. Make
sure that all object names fulfill the
naming rules regarding uniqueness.
40072: Reference error
Task %.16s: Procedure
reference %.16s is ambiguous
Check:
At least one other object sharing the
same name as the referred procedure is
visible from this program position. Make
sure that all object names fulfill the
naming rules regarding uniqueness.
40073: Reference error
Task %.16s: Trap reference
%.16s is ambiguous
Check:
At least one other object sharing the
same name as the referred trap is
visible from this program position. Make
sure that all object names fulfill the
naming rules regarding uniqueness.
40074: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not entire data reference
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than data. Check if the desired
data is hidden by some other object with
the same name.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40075: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not function reference
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than a function. Check if the
desired function is hidden by some other
object with the same name.
40080: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not required parameter reference
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than a required parameter. Change
the name to refer to a required
parameter.
40076: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not label reference
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than a label. Check if the desired
label is hidden by some other object
with the same name.
40081: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not trap reference
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than a trap. Check if the desired
trap is hidden by some other object with
the same name.
40077: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not optional parameter reference in
conditional argument value
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than an optional parameter. Change
the name to refer to an optional
parameter.
40082: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not type name
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than a type. Check if the desired
type is hidden by some other object with
the same name.
40078: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not optional parameter reference
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than an optional parameter. Change
the name to refer to an optional
parameter.
40079: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not procedure reference
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than a procedure. Check if the
desired procedure is hidden by some
other object with the same name.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40083: Type error
Task %.16s: %.16s
not value type
Check:
Only variables which lack initial value,
and ’VAR’ mode parameters may be of
semi-value or non-value type.
40086: Reference error
Task %.16s: Reference to
unknown label %.16s
Check:
The routine contains no label (or other
object) with the specified name.
40087: Reference error
Task %.16s: Reference to
unknown optional parameter
%.16s
Check:
The called routine contains no optional
parameter (or other object) with the
specified name.
16-57
System and Error Messages
40089: Reference error
Task %.16s: Reference to
unknown record component
%.16s
Check:
The record type contains no record
component with the specified name.
40090: Reference error
Task %.16s: Reference to
unknown required parameter
%.16s
Check:
The called routine contains no required
parameter (or other object) with the
specified name.
40092: Reference error
Task %.16s: Unknown type name
%.16s
Check:
No data type (or other object) with the
specified name is visible from this
program position.
40093: Instruction error
Task %.16s: Assignment target
is read only
Check:
The data to be assigned a value may not
be a constant, read only variable or
read only persistent.
40094: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Persistent
declaration not allowed in routine
Check:
Persistents may only be declared at
module level. Move the persistent
declaration from the routine.
40095: Instruction error
Task %.16s: RAISE without
expression only allowed in error handler
Check:
Add an error number expression to the
RAISE instruction.
16-58
40096: Instruction error
Task %.16s: RETRY only
allowed in error handler
Check:
The RETRY instruction may only be used
in error handlers. Remove it.
40097: Instruction error
Task %.16s: TRYNEXT only
allowed in error handler
Check:
The TRYNEXT instruction may only be used
in error handlers. Remove it.
40098: Parameter error
Task %.16s: ’switch’
parameter must have transfer mode IN
Check:
Remove the parameter transfer mode
specifier. If IN transfer mode is not
sufficient, change the data type of the
parameter.
40099: Parameter error
Task %.16s: ’switch’
parameter cannot be dimensioned
Check:
Remove the array dimension
specification, or change the data type
of the parameter.
40100: Parameter error
Task %.16s: ’switch’ only
allowed for optional parameter
Check:
Change the parameter into an optional
parameter, or change the data type of
the parameter. If the object is not a
parameter, change the data type.
40101: Type error
Task %.16s: Type mismatch of
expected type %.18s and
type %.18s
Check:
The expression is not of the expected
data type.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40102: Type error
Task %.16s: Type mismatch of
aggregate, expected type
%.18s
Check:
The aggregate does not match the
expected data type.
40103: Type error
Task %.16s: Persistent
%.18s %.16s type
mismatch
Check:
There is already a persistent data with
the same name but with another data
type. Rename the persistent, or change
its data type.
40104: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Cannot determine
array dimensions (circular constant
references ?)
Check:
Check that any referred constants are
correctly defined. If so, the program is
too complex. Try to rewrite the
declarations.
40105: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Cannot determine
type of constant value (circular
constant references ?)
Check:
Check that any referred constants are
correctly defined. If so, the program is
too complex. Try to rewrite the
declarations.
40106: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Cannot evaluate
constant value expression (circular
constant references ?)
Check:
Check that any referred constants are
correctly defined. If so, the program is
too complex. Try to rewrite the
declarations.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40107: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Cannot determine
type of variable value (circular
constant references?)
Check:
Check that any referred constants are
correctly defined. If so, the program is
too complex. Try to rewrite the
declarations.
40108: Type error
Task %.16s: Unknown aggregate
type
Check:
An aggregate may not be used in this
position since there is no expected data
type. Declare data with the desired data
type and aggregate value. Use the name
of the data instead of the aggregate.
40109: Type definition error
Task %.16s: Cannot determine
type of record component
%.16s
(circular type definitions?)
Check:
Check that the type of the component is
correctly defined. If so, it could be
a circular definition, the type of a
component could not refere to the its
own record type.
40110: Reference error
Task %.16s: Record name
%.16s is ambiguous
Check:
At least one other object sharing the
same name as the referred record name is
visible from this program position. Make
sure that all object names fulfill the
naming rules regarding uniqueness.
40111: Name error
Task %.16s: Global record
name %.16s ambiguous
Check:
Global type must have names that are
unique among all the global types, data,
global routines and modules in the
entire program. Rename the record
or change the conflicting name.
16-59
System and Error Messages
40112: Reference error
Task %.16s: Alias name
%.16s is ambiguous
Check:
At least one other object sharing the
same name as the referred alias name is
visible from this program position. Make
sure that all object names fulfill the
naming rules regarding uniqueness.
40113: Name error
Task %.16s: Global alias
name %.16s ambiguous
Check:
Global type must have names that are
unique among all the global types, data,
global routines and modules in the
entire program. Rename the alias
or change the conflicting name.
40114: Type definition error
Task %.16s: Type reference
of alias name %.16s
is an alias type
Check:
Check that the type of the component is
correctly defined. If so, it could be
a circular definition, the type of a
component could not refere to the its
own record type.
40115: Type definition error
Task %.16s: Cannot determine
type of alias %.16s
(circular type definitions?)
Check:
Check that the type of the alias is
correctly defined. If so, it could be
a circular definition, the type of an
alias could not refere to a record that
use this alias as a component.
40116: Reference error
Task %.16s:
Record component name
%.16s is ambiguous
Check:
At least one other object sharing the
same name as the referred component is
visible from this program position. Make
sure that all object names fulfill the
naming rules regarding uniqueness.
40117: Type definition error
Task %.16s: Place holder for
record component not allowed in
definition of named record
Check:
Complete the definition or change
the data name to a place holder.
40118: Not authorized
Task %.16s: The function:
User defined data types is not
installed in this system
Check:
Install the option Developer Functions
in the system.
40119: Reference error
Task %.16s:
Cannot use the semi-value type
%.16s for record components
40120: Reference error
Task %.16s: Illegal reference
to installed task object
%.16s from shared object
Check:
Install the referred object shared, or
install the referring ReaL object/
archive or RAPID module in each task
(not shared
40141: Argument error
Task %.16s: Argument for
’PERS’ parameter %.16s is not
persistent reference or is read only
Check:
Make sure the argument is just
a persistent or persistent parameter
reference and it is writeable.
Do not use () around the argument.
16-60
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40142: Argument error
Task %.16s: Argument for
’VAR’ parameter %.16s is not
variable reference or is read only
Check:
Make sure the argument is just
a variable or variable parameter
reference and it is writeable.
Do not use () around the argument.
40157: Instruction error
Task %.16s: Interrupt number
is not static variable reference, is
shared, or is read only
Check:
Make sure the interrupt number is just
a variable or variable parameter
reference. The variable must be
static and not shared. The variable may
not be read only.
40158: Value error
Task %.16s: Integer value
%G too large
Check:
The value of the expression must be an
integer value. The current value is
outside the integer range.
40159: Value error
Task %.16s: %G not
integer value
Check:
The value of the expression must be an
exact integer value. The current value
has a fraction part.
40165: Reference error
Task %.16s: Reference to
unknown entire data %.16s
Check:
No data (or other object) with the
specified name is visible from this
program position.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40166: Reference error
Task %.16s: Reference to
unknown function %.16s
Check:
No function (or other object) with the
specified name is visible from this
program position.
40168: Reference error
Task %.16s: Reference to
unknown procedure %.16s
Check:
No procedure (or other object) with the
specified name is visible from this
program position.
40170: Reference error
Task %.16s: Reference to
unknown trap %.16s
Check:
No trap (or other object) with the
specified name is visible from this
program position.
40191: Instruction error
Task %.16s: Variable and trap
routine already connected
Check:
It is not legal to connect a specific
variable with a specific trap routine
more than once.
40192: Argument error
Task %.16s: %.16s
is second present conditional argument
for excluding parameters
Check:
Arguments may not be present for more
than one parameter from a list of
parameters that exclude each other.
40193: Execution error
Task %.16s: Late binding
procedure call error %i
Check:
There is an error in the procedure call
instruction. See previous message for
the actual cause.
16-61
System and Error Messages
40194: Value error
Task %.16s: Division by zero
Check:
Cannot divide by 0. Rewrite the program
so that the divide operation is not
executed when the divisor is 0.
40195: Limit error
Task %.16s: Exceeded maximum
number %i of allowed RETRYs
Check:
The error correction performed before
the RETRY instruction is executed, is
probably not enough to cure the error.
Check the error handler.
40196: Instruction error
Task %.16s: Attempt to
execute place holder
Check:
Remove the place holder or the
instruction containing it, or make the
instruction complete. Then continue
execution.
40197: Execution error
Task %.16s: Function does not
return any value
Check:
The end of the function has been reached
without a RETURN instruction being
executed. Add a RETURN instruction
specifying a function return value.
40198: Value error
Task %.16s: Illegal
orientation value
%.40s
Check:
Attempt to use illegal orientation
(quaternion) value
40199: Value error
Task %.16s: Illegal error
number %i in RAISE
Check:
Only error numbers in the range 1-99 are
allowed in the RAISE instruction.
16-62
40200: Limit error
Task %.16s: No more interrupt
number available
Check:
There is a limited number of interrupt
numbers available. Rewrite the program
to use fewer interrupt numbers. This
message may also occur as a consequence
of a system error.
40201: Value error
Task %.16s: Negative operand
%i not allowed
Check:
The ’MOD’ operator only allows non
negative operands. Change the program
to make sure that the operator is not
applied to negative values.
40202: Type error
Task %.16s: Dimensions %i
and %i of conformant array
dimension number %i are incompatible
Check:
The array is not of the expected size.
Array assignment may only be performed
on arrays of identical size.
40203: Reference error
Task %.16s: Optional
parameter %.16s not present
Check:
The value of a non present optional
parameter may not be referred. Use the
predefined function ’Present’ to check
the presence of the parameter before
using its value.
40204: Value error
Task %.16s: Array index %i
for dimension number %i out of bounds
(1-%i)
Check:
The array index value is non-positive or
violates the declared size of the array.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40205: Value error
Task %.16s: String too long
Check:
String value exceeds the maximum
allowed
length. Rewrite the program to use
strings of lesser length.
40221: Execution error
Task %.16s: Execution aborted
Check:
Execution was aborted due to a fatal
error.
40222: Limit error
Task %.16s: Execution stack
overflow
Check:
The program is too complex to execute.
Probably the program contains recursive
routines.
40223: Execution error
Task %.16s: Fatal runtime
error
Check:
A fatal runtime error has occurred.
Fatal runtime errors causes immediate
termination of execution. See previous
message for the actual cause.
40224: Execution error
Task %.16s: Illegal return
code %i from ReaL routine
Check:
This is always caused by an internal
error in the ReaL routine.
40225: Execution error
Task %.16s: Execution could
not be restarted
Check:
Execution could not be continued after
power failure. Restart the program.
40226: Name error
Task %.16s: Procedure name
%.40s
is not a RAPID identifier excluding
reserved words
Check:
The procedure name, must be a legal
RAPID identifier not equal to any of
the reserved words of the RAPID
language. Change the name expression.
40227: Limit error
Task %.16s: Runtime stack
overflow
Check:
The program is too complex to execute.
Probably the program contains recursive
routines.
40228: Execution error
Task %.16s: Unhandled
non-fatal runtime error %i
Check:
A non-fatal runtime error has occurred
but was not handled by any ERROR
clause. See previous message for the
actual cause.
40229: Execution error
Task %.16s: Unhandled raise
error %i
Check:
An error was raised by a RAISE
instruction but was not handled by any
ERROR clause.
40230: Execution error
Task %.16s: Unhandled
non-fatal runtime error
Check:
A non-fatal runtime error has occurred
but was not handled by any ERROR
clause.
40241: Value error
Task %.16s: Array dimension
number %G out of range (1-%i)
Check:
The value of the ’DimNo’ parameter of
the ’Dim’ function must be an integer
value in the specified range.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
16-63
System and Error Messages
40242: Type error
Task %.16s: Data is not an
array
Check:
The ’DatObj’ parameter of the ’Dim’
function must be an array.
40243: Value error
Task %.16s: Unknown interrupt
number
Check:
Check that the specified interrupt
variable has been initialized by
CONNECT, and that the interrupt has
been
defined using the ISignalDI or other
interrupt definition instruction.
40244: Value error
Object %.16s is of non-value
type
Check:
Use expression or data object of value
or semivalue type.
40245: Parameter error
Parameters in %.16s and %.16s is not
matching (late binding)
Check:
Make sure that all procedures that are
called from the same late binding node
have matching parameters. I.e they
should be matching concerning base
type,
mode and required/optional parameters.
40251: Name error
Task %.16s: Ambiguous symbol
name %.16s
Check:
Installed objects must have names that
are unique. Rename the object or change
the conflicting name.
16-64
40252: Limit error
Task %.16s: Error %i when
creating sdb entry for %.16s
Check:
An error occurred when the persistent
was to be inserted into the shared
database. Probably the database is full.
40253: Type definition error
Task %.16s: Alias
%.16s of alias
%.16s not allowed
Check:
Is is not possible to define an alias
type equal to another alias type.
Instead, define two alias types equal to
the same atomic or record type.
40254: Symbol definition error
Task %.16s: ’ANYTYPE#’
parameter %.16s cannot be
dimensioned
Check:
Remove the dimension specification.
’ANYTYPE#’ includes array types.
40255: Symbol definition error
Task %.16s: ’ANYTYPE#’ only
allowed for parameter (not for
%.16s)
Check:
Use another type.
40256: Parameter error
Task %.16s: ’alt’ must not be
set for first optional parameter
%.16s in alternatives list
Check:
Make sure that only the second and
following in each list of excluding
optional parameters are marked as
alternatives.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40257: Parameter error
Task %.16s: REF mode
parameter %.16s cannot be
dimensioned
Check:
Remove the array dimension
specification, or change the mode of the
parameter.
40258: Parameter error
Task %.16s: ’switch’
parameter %.16s can not be
dimensioned
Check:
Remove the array dimension
specification, or change the data type
of the parameter.
40259: Parameter error
Task %.16s: ’switch’
parameter %.16s must have
transfer mode IN (specified value
%i)
Check:
Remove the parameter transfer mode
specifier. If IN transfer mode is not
sufficient, change the data type of the
parameter.
40260: Symbol definition error
Task %.16s: ’switch’ only
allowed for optional parameter
(not for %.16s)
Check:
Change the parameter into an optional
parameter, or change the data type of
the parameter. If the object is not a
parameter, change the data type.
40261: Type definition error
Task %.16s: Value type class
for %.16s must be one of
REAL_SYMVALTYP_VAL,
_SEMIVAL, _NONVAL or
_NONE (specified value %i)
Check:
Change the value type class.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40262: Data declaration error
Task %.16s: Too many array
dimensions for %.16s
(specified value %i)
Check:
An array may have at most 3 dimensions.
40263: Name error
Task %.16s: Symbol name
%.40s
is not a RAPID identifier excluding
reserved words
Check:
The names of installed objects,
including parameters and components,
must be legal RAPID identifiers not
equal to any of the reserved words of
the RAPID language. Change the name.
40264: Symbol definition error
Task %.16s: Missing C
function for %.16s
Check:
A C-function that executes the ReaL
function being defined, must be
specified.
40265: Symbol definition error
Task %.16s: Missing value
initialization function for
%.16s
Check:
A value initialization function must be
specified.
40266: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
is not a data type name (object
%.16s)
Check:
The specified name identifies an object
other than a type.
16-65
System and Error Messages
40267: Reference error
Task %.16s: %.16s
is not a value data type (object
%.16s)
Check:
Only record components, alias types,
variables and ’VAR’ mode parameters
may
be of semi-value or non-value type.
40268: Symbol definition error
Task %.16s: Missing value
conversion function for %.16s
Check:
A value conversion function must be
specified for a semi-value type.
40269: Symbol definition error
Task %.16s: Not enough
memory for value of data
%.16s
Check:
More memory required.
40270: Type definition error
Task %.16s: Private type
%.16s can only be semi-value
or non-value type (specified value
%i)
Check:
Change the value type class.
40271: Type definition error
Task %.16s: Private type
%.16s size must be multiple
of 4 (specified value %i)
Check:
All RAPID types must have a size that is
a multiple of four. Change the specified
type size.
40272: Type error
Task %.16s: Persistent type
mismatch for %.16s
Check:
There is already a persistent data with
the same name but with another data
type. Rename the persistent, or change
its data type.
16-66
40273: Reference error
Task %.16s: Unknown data type
name %.16s for
%.16s
Check:
There is no data type (or other object)
with the specified name.
40274: Parameter error
Task %.16s: Unknown parameter
transfer mode %i for
%.16s
Check:
The specified parameter transfer mode is
not one of IN, ’VAR’, ’PERS’, ’INOUT’ or
REF. Use corresponding
REAL_SYMPARMOD_x.
40275: Symbol definition error
Task %.16s: Unknown symbol
definition type %i
Check:
The symbol definition type tag does not
specify one of the allowed symbol
types (REAL_SYMDEF_x
40276: Symbol definition error
Task %.16s: Initialization
function may not be specified for shared
variable %.16s
with per task value
Check:
Remove initialization function, install
variable in all tasks, or make variable
value shared.
40301: I/O error
Task %.16s: Permission denied
(file name
%.39s)
40302: I/O error
Task %.16s: No such file or
directory (file name
%.39s)
40303: I/O error
Task %.16s: No space left on
device (file name
%.39s)
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40304: I/O error
Task %.16s: I/O error %!
(file name
%.39s)
Check:
One of:
Permission denied (write protected)
No such file or directory
No space left on device
40321: Load error
Task %.16s:
Module loaded with path
%.40s
is active
Check:
A module containing routines or data
that are still active cannot be erased.
40322: Load error
Task %.16s: RAPID syntax
error(s) in file
%.40s
Check:
The source file to be loaded contains
RAPID syntax errors. Correct the source
file. The syntax errors are logged in a
separate file.
40323: Load error
Task %.16s: Syntax error(s)
in header in file
%.40s
Check:
The source file to be loaded contains
syntax error in the file header. Correct
the source file. The syntax errors are
logged in a separate file.
40324: Load error
Task %.16s: Keywords not
defined in specified language (file
%.39s)
Check:
Cannot load RAPID source code in the
national language specified in the file
header.
40325: Load error
Task %.16s: Not enough heap
space
Check:
There is not enough free memory left.
40326: Load error
Task %.16s: Parser stack
full (file
%.39s)
Check:
The program is too complex to load.
40327: Load error
Task %.16s: Not current RAPID
version (file
%.39s)
Check:
Cannot load RAPID source code of the
version specified in the file header.
40351: Memory allocation error
Task %.16s: Failed to
allocate hash table, use linear list
40352: Memory allocation error
Task %.16s: Failed to
update persistent expression, keep old
one
40501: Timeout
%s
%s
40502: Digital input break
%s
%s
40503: Reference error
Device descriptor is
%s
40504: Parameter error
%s
40505: File access error
%s
%s
40506: System access error
%s
%s
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
16-67
System and Error Messages
40507: Limit error
%s
40508: Wrong orientation value
in %s
40509: Search warning
%s
Before performing next search,
make sure that TCP is moved back
to the start position of the
search path.
Check:
If no repositioning is done, before
restart of circular search, movement
that can cause damage might occur.
40510: Security warning
The move instruction can’t restart
due to security problem.
Try to move the PP
40511: Parameter error
The parameter %.16s
in %.16s is specified
with a negative value
Check:
The parameter must be set positive.
40512: Missing ext. axis value
Some active external axis have
incorrect or no order value.
Reprogram the position.
40513: Mechanical unit error
Not possible to activate or
deactivate mechanical unit.
40514: Execution error
Too far from path to perform
StartMove of the interrupted
movement.
Check:
Position the robot to the
interrupted position in the program.
40515: Type error
Task %s: Illegal data type
of argument for parameter %s
16-68
40516: Value error
Task %s: Illegal value of
argument for parameter %s
40517: Search error
%s
No search hit or more than 1 search
hit during stepwise forward execution.
The search instruction is ready and
next instruction can be executed.
Check:
Note that no position has been returned
from the search instruction.
40518: Type error
%s
40590: ParId error
%.40s
%.40s
Check:
%.40s
40591: Argument error
Unknown type of parameter
identification.
40592: ParId Program Stop
Any type of program stop during
load identification is not allowed.
Check:
Start the identification procedure from
beginning again.
40593: ParId Power Fail
Power Fail during load identification
results in faulty load result.
Check:
Restart the program execution again
with same run mode (without PP move)
for load identification from beginnig.
40594: ParId user error
Error resulting in raise of PP to the
beginning of the parameter
identification procedure.
Check:
Start the identification procedure from
beginning again.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40595: Argument error
Unknown type of load
identification.
40596: ParId Program Stop
Any type of program stop during
load identification is not allowed.
Check:
Restart the program execution again
for load identification from beginnig.
(From old PP pos. and with same run
mode
if try to move PP within program list
40597: ParId Speed Override
Speed override not 100 per cent.
Check:
Change the speed override to 100.
Restart the program execution again
for load identification from beginnig.
40600: Argument error
No WObj specified
for movement with stationary TCP.
Check:
Add argument WObj
for actual work object.
If not movement with stationary TCP,
change argument Tool to
"robot holds the tool
40601: Argument error
Undefined if robot holds the tool
or the work object.
Check:
Check if mismatch between
argument Tool and argument WObj
for data component robhold.
40602: Argument error
Argument %s has
at least one data component
with negative value.
Check:
Set all data components
in argument %s
to positive values.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40603: Argument error
Argument %s has a
not allowed negative value.
Check:
Set argument %s to positive.
40604: Argument error
Argument Tool has undefined
load of the tool.
Check:
Define the actual load of the tool
before use of the tool for jogging
or program movement.
40605: Argument error
Argument Tool has negative
load of the tool.
Check:
Define the correct load of the tool
before use of the tool for jogging
or program movement.
40606: Argument error
Argument Tool has at least
one inertia data component
with negative value.
Check:
Define all inertia data components
(ix, iy or iz) to actual
positive values.
40607: Execution error
Not allowed to change run mode
from forward to backward or vice versa
during running a circular movement.
Check:
If possible, select the original run
mode and press start to continue the
stopped circular movement. If not
possible, move robot and program pointer
for a new start.
40608: Argument error
Orientation definition error
in %s.
Check:
All used orientations must be normalized
i.e. the sum of the quaternion elements
squares must equal 1.
16-69
System and Error Messages
40609: Argument error
Argument WObj specifies a mechanical
unit with too long name.
Check:
Use max. 16 characters to specify the
name of a mechanical coordinated unit.
40615: Argument error
Argument %s
is not an integer value.
Check:
Digital group of output signals,
process identity or process selector
can only have an integer value.
40610: Argument error
Argument WObj specifies a mechanical
unit name, which is not activated
or unknown in the system.
Check:
The mechanical unit name defined in
WObj must correspond to the name
earlier defined in the system
parameters and must be activated.
40616: Argument error
Argument %s
is outside allowed limits.
Check:
Used group of digital output signals
can only be set within 0 to %s
according configuration in
the system parameters.
40611: Execution error
Not allowed to step backwards
with this move instruction.
Check:
Step backwards to a position
defined with another tool
or work object could result in
fualty path.
40617: Argument error
Argument %s
is outside allowed limits.
Check:
Used analog output signals can only be
set within %s to %s
according configuration in
the system parameters.
40612: Argument error
No argument programmed for
the name of the output signal.
Check:
Possible to set one position fix IO
such as digital, group of digitals
or analog output signal during the
robot movement.
40618: Argument error
Argument %s
contains an illegal interrupt number.
Check:
Input interrupt number is illegal
because it has not been allocated by
the instruction CONNECT.
CONNECT do allocation and connection of
interrupt number to trap routine.
40613: Argument error
Optional argument %s
can only be combined with
output signal argument %s.
40614: Argument error
Argument %s
is not 0 or 1.
Check:
Digital output signals can only be
set to 0 or 1.
40619: Argument error
Argument %s
contains an interrupt number, which
is already in use for other purpose.
Check:
Before reuse of an interrupt variable
again in the program, cancel old
interrupt generation and interrupt
number with instruction IDelete.
40622: Argument error
The value of argument Time in ITimer
is too low for cyclic interrupts.
16-70
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40623: Argument error
The value of argument Time in ITimer
is too low for single interrupts.
40631: Instruction error
Too many move instructions in
sequence with concurrent RAPID
program execution.
Check:
Edit the program to max. 5 MoveX
Conc
in sequence on the basic
execution level of the program.
40632: Instruction error
No move instructions with concurrent
RAPID program execution are allowed
within the StorePath-RestoPath part of
the program.
Check:
Edit the program so it does not
contain any MoveX Conc instructions
within the StorePath-RestoPath part of
the program.
40633: Reference error
Trigg parameter no %s reference to
undefined trigg data.
Check:
Define trigg data by executing
instruction TriggIO, TriggInt,
TriggEquip or TriggSpeed
before TriggL, TriggC or TriggJ.
40634: Reference error
Signal reference in parameter %s
contains unknown signal for the robot.
Check:
All signals should be defined in the
system parameters and should not be
defined in the RAPID program.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40635: Reference error
Argument reference
in parameter %.16s
is not a entire persistent variable.
Check:
Not possible to use record component or
array element in arg. %.16s.
Only possible to use entire persistent
variables for Tool, WObj or Load
in any motion instructions.
40636: Sensor error
No measurement from sensor.
Check:
Requested data is not available.
40637: Sensor error
Not ready yet.
Check:
Requested function is not ready yet.
40638: Sensor error
General error.
Check:
General error has occurred which is not
specifically connected to the requested
action. Read the block "Error log" if
the function is available.
40639: Sensor error
Sensor busy, try later.
Check:
The sensor is busy with an other
function.
40640: Sensor error
Unknown command.
Check:
The function requested from the sensor
is unknown.
40641: Sensor error
Illegal variable or block number.
Check:
Requested variable or block is not
defined in the sensor.
16-71
System and Error Messages
40642: Sensor error
External alarm.
Check:
Alarm from external equipment.
40643: Sensor error
Camera alarm.
Check:
Some error has been detected in
the camera. Run Camcheck to test if the
camera is OK.
40644: Sensor error
Temperature alarm.
Check:
The camera is overheated it needs more
cooling air or water.
40645: Sensor error
Value out of range.
Check:
The value of the data sent to the
sensor is out of range.
40646: Sensor error
Camera check failed.
Check:
The CAMCHECK function failed. The
camera is broken. Send it for repair.
40647: Sensor error
Communication time out.
Check:
Increase the time out time and check
the connections to the sensor.
40648: Search error
Not possible to do StorePath while
searching on basic path level.
Check:
If using program with robot movement
in TRAP, then such interrupt must be
deactivated during any searching.
E.g. ISleep - SearchL - IWatch
16-72
40649: Path limit error
%s already done.
Check:
Instruction %s must first be
executed, before a new %s can
be done.
40650: Wrong param combination
Optional parameters and switches are
not used in a correct combination.
Check:
No optional parameters and no switch
keeps the old coordinate system.
The switch Old has the same function.
RefPos or RefNum has to be defined with
Short, Fwd or Bwd.
40651: Use numeric input
Use numeric input for the position
instead of a robtarget.
Check:
The position can not be defined with
a robtarget for robot axes.
Use the optional parameter for numeric
input of the position.
40652: Axis is moving
A Robot axis, an external axis
or an independent axis is moving.
Check:
All Robot axes, external axes and
independent axes have to stand still.
E.g Use MoveL with Fine argument for
the Robot and ext. axes. And IndRMove
for the independent axes.
40653: Switch is missing
One of the switch parameters %s
or %s has to be defined.
40654: Axis is not active
The axis is not active
or it is not defined.
Check:
The mechanical unit has to be activated
and the axis has to be defined, before
this instruction is executed and before
a robtarget is saved.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40655: Axis is not independent
The axis is not in independent mode.
Check:
It is only possible to get the status
from an axis in independent mode.
40656: Execution error
Not possible to set a new scale
value for the AO signal.
Check:
The internal process, that control
the output of the AO signal,
are for some unknown reason "dead
40657: Execution error
The output of the AO signal are not
TCP-speed proportional any more.
The reason could be following:
Check:
- Use of MoveX between TriggX instr.
- No setup of TriggSpeed in the used
TriggX instr.
- The used ScaleLag is too small in
relation to actual robot servo lag.
40658: Parameter error
Parameter %s can only
be used, if parameter %s
is greater than zero.
Check:
Parameter %s has effect
only in the first TriggX, in a
sequence of several TriggX, that
controls the speed proportional
AO signal.
40659: Undefined load
WARNING: Argument %.16s has
undefined load (mass equal to 0 kg).
IMPORTANT TO DEFINE CORRECT
LOAD to
avoid mechanical damages of the robot
and to get good motion performance.
Check:
Define the actual load for the tool
or the grip load before program
movement or jogging.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40660: Undefined load
WARNING: Argument %.16s has
undefined load centre of gravity.
IMPORTANT TO DEFINE CORRECT
LOAD to
avoid mechanical damages of the robot
and to get good motion performance.
Check:
Define the actual centre of gravity
for the tool load or the grip load
before program movement or jogging
(cog.x, cog.y and cog.z can not be
0 mm at the same time
40661: Search error
The signal %.16s for the
SearchX instruction is already high
at the start of searching.
40662: Invalid worldzone type
The switch %.16s must be
associated with a %.16s
worldzone.
Check:
If use of switch Temp, the datatype
must be wztemporary in WorldZone.
If use of switch Stat, the datatype
must be wzstationary in WorldZone.
40663: World zone not in use
The ’%.16s’ argument of the
instruction %.16s must refer
to a worldzone that has been defined
and activated by a WZLimSup or WZDOSet
instruction.
40664: World zone already in use
The ’%.16s’ worldzone has
already been defined and activated.
A world zone can only be defined once.
Check:
Use a worldzone with another name.
40665: Too many world zones
It is not possible to add the world
zone %.16s.
The world zone table is full
Check:
16-73
System and Error Messages
40666: Illegal world zones
Worldzone ’%.16s’ is
defined locally in current routine
or in current module
Check:
Only a global entire world zone
argument can be used.
40667: Illegal world zones
Task %.16s:
WorldZone %.16s
is not entire data reference.
Check:
Only a global entire world zone
argument can be used.
40668: shapedata not in use
The ’%.16s’ argument of the
instruction %.16s must refer
to a defined shapedata.
Check:
A shapedata is used to store a volume
definition. It must have been defined
by WZBoxDef, WZSphDef or WZCylDef prior
to be used by WZLimSup or WZDOSet.
40669: Invalid volume definition
The shapedata defined by the
instruction %.16s doesn’t
define a valid volume.
Check:
Check previous volume definition
instruction.
40672: World zone already in use
It is not possible to add the world
zone %.16s. Another world
zone with the same name is already
defined in the system.
40673: I/O access error
The signal given in parameter
%s is write protected
for RAPID access.
Check:
Select other user signal or
change the access mode for the signal
40674: I/O access error
The signal given in parameter
%s is not write protected
for user access from TP or RAPID.
Check:
Change the access mode to system type
for the signal in the I/O
configuration.
40700: Syntax error
Task %s: Syntax error
%s
40701: Program memory full
The task %s, has only
%i free bytes in its
user space
Check:
Remove some other module and try
again.
40670: Invalid world zone
The index of the world zone argument
%.16s in %.16s
is not a valid index defined by
WZLimSup or WZDOSet.
40702: File not found
%.40s
The file path or the file name is wrong
or the file doesn’t exist.
40671: Illegal use of world zone
Task %.16s:
’%.16s’
argument for %.16s
must be a temporay world zone.
40703: Load error
%.40s
The program module couldn’t be loaded.
Check:
The program module have some errors.
16-74
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
40704: UnLoad error
%.40s
The program module couldn’t be
unloaded
The reason could be:
- Module not loaded with Load instr.
- Not same file path as used for Load
Check:
The program module must have been
loaded with the instruction Load.
The file path and name must be the same
in the UnLoad and Load instruction.
40705: Syntax error
Task %s: Syntax error
%s
Check:
More syntax errors will follow this
40706: Loaded error
The program module is already loaded
Check:
The module name in the head of the file
%.40s
already exists in the program memory
40707: I/O Unit name invalid
Task %s:
The unit name
%.40s
doesn’t exist or can’t be disabled.
Check:
The unit name is misspelled, not
defined or can’t be disabled.
40708: I/O unit is not enabled
Task %s:
I/O unit
%.40s
was not enabled.
Check:
The maximum period of waiting time was
too short. Increase the waiting time
or make a retry.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
40709: I/O unit is not disabled
Task %s:
I/O unit
%.40s
was not disabled.
Check:
The maximum period of waiting time was
too short. Increase the waiting time
or make a retry.
40710: Argument error
Task %.16s: Argument error
from %.16s !
The argument is expression value,
is not present or is of the type switch.
Check:
Change the parameter
(%.16s) to a
valid one.
40711: Alias type error
Task %s:
The data types for the arguments
FromSignal and ToSignal must be the
same and must be one of signalxx.
(signalai/ao, signaldi/do, signalgi/go)
Check:
Change the type
to a valid one.
40712: Event routine error
Task %s: Too many event routines
the routine %s, will not be
executed. Maximum 4 routines
could be specified for each event
Check:
Encapslulate the routine in one of
the others that are specified for
the save event.
40713: Alias define error
Task %s:
FromSignal must be defined in
the io-system. ToSignal must not be
defined in the io-system, it should
just be defined as a variable.
16-75
System and Error Messages
40714: Argument error
Orientation definition error
in %s.
Check:
This is probably an off-line generated
"dummy" position (undefined orientation), that needs to be MODPOS.
40715: IOEnable call interrupted
Task %s:
Call to I/O unit
%.40s
was inerrupted.
Check:
IOEnable or IODisable have been exec
from an other task. Make a retry.
40720: Alias IO installation
The task %s, could not
refresh all alias IO
40721: IO installation
The task %s, could not
refresh all IO
as RAPID symbols
Check:
Check the IO configuration.
40722: Mechanical units
The task %s, could not
refresh all mechanical
units as RAPID symbols
Check:
Check the Motion
configuration.
40900: Discr. App. System Error
%s
40901: Discr. App. Sys Message
WARNING: A new application or process
has been ordered
A warm start is required to install a
new configuration
16-76
40902: Discrete Application
Task %s:
Error from %.16s. Can’t
find the process %.16s.
Check:
Check the installed process(es
5 Motion error messages
50001: Serious motion error
Not possible to proceed motion control
Check:
Start up the system again
50021: Joint position error
Actual position of joint %s
is too far away from the ordered
position
Check:
Check trim parameters, external
forces or hardware.
50022: Too low DC-link voltage
Check:
Check voltage from Motor On contactors
Replace DC-link
50023: Stop-/Restart error
The stop was made when too many move
instructions were queued for execution.
Restart is not possible
Check:
Check the number of move instructions
with concurrency. Move the start point
and start a new movement.
50024: Corner path failure
A corner path was executed as stop point
due to some of the following reasons:
1 Time delay
2 Closely programmed points
3 System requires high CPU-load
Check:
1 Reduce the number of instructions
between consecutive move instructions
2 Reduce speed, use wider spaced
points, use /CONC option
3 Increase ipol_prefetch_time
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
50025: Restart too far from path
Check:
Move back to path.
50026: Singularity or Zone error
1 Robot too close to singularity
2 MoveL to MoveJ corner zone error
Check:
1 Use the joystick to move away from
the singularity or run a program in
joint coordinates
2 Use fine point or modify position
50027: Joint Out of Range
Joint %s is out of working range
Check:
Use the joystick to move the joint into
its working range
50028: Jog in wrong direction
Joint %s is out of working range
Check:
Use the joystick to move the joint in
opposite direction.
50029: Robot outside its limits
The robot has reached the configuration
limit for the parallelogram
transmission.
Check:
Use the joystick to move the involved
joint into the working range again.
50030: Robot outside its limits
Jogging was made in wrong direction
when
parallelogram was out of working range
Check:
Use the joystick to move the joint in
opposite direction.
50031: Command not allowed.
System parameters cannot be
changed in MOTORS ON state.
Check:
Change to MOTORS OFF.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
50032: Calibration command error
An attempt was made to calibrate while
in MOTORS ON state.
Check:
Change to MOTORS OFF.
50033: Commutation command error
An attempt was made to commutate the
motors in MOTORS ON state.
Check:
Change to MOTORS OFF.
50035: Synchronization error
An attempt was made to synchronize
in MOTORS ON state.
Check:
Change to MOTORS OFF.
50036: Correct regain impossible
Correct regain impossible. A stop
occurred with too many close points
with corner zones. At restart the robot
will move to a point farther forward in
the program.
Check:
Reduce the number of close points,
increase the distance between them or
reduce the speed.
50037: MOTORS ON order ignored
MOTORS ON order ignored since the
previous stop was not yet acknowledged.
Check:
Order MOTORS ON again.
50041: Robot in a singularity
The Robot is too close to a singularity.
Check:
During program execution, use SingArea
instruction or joint interpolation.
During jogging, use axis by axis.
50042: System error
Check:
Increase the distance between close
points and/or decrease speed and/or
change acceleration value.
16-77
System and Error Messages
50050: Position outside reach
Position for IRB joint %.f
is outside working area.
Check:
Check the work object.
Check the joint working range.
Move the joint in joint coordinates.
50052: Joint speed error
The speed of joint %s is too high
relative the ordered speed
Check:
1. Check the tune parameters, external
forces on the joint and hardware.
2. Reduce programmed speed.
50053: Revolution counter error
Too big difference between the counter
in the serial measurement board and
the expected value in the robot computer
for joint %s
Check:
Update the revolution counter
Replace serial measurement board
50055: Joint load error
Actual torque on joint %s too high
May be caused by incorrect load data,
too high acceleration, high external
process forces, low temperature or
hardware error
Check:
1. Check load data
2. Reduce acceleration or speed
3. Check hardware
50056: Joint collision error
Actual torque on joint %s is
higher than ordered while at low
or zero speed.
Check:
May be caused by jam error (the arm
has got stuck) or hardware error.
50057: Joint sync. error
The position of joint %s after
power down/failure is too far away
from the position before the power
down/failure.
Check:
Make a new update of the revolution counter.
16-78
50058: Tool coord. sys. error
The z-direction of the tool coordinate
system is almost parallel with the path
direction.
Check:
Change the tool coordinate system to
achieve at least 3 degrees deviation
between z-direction and path direction.
50059: Frame error
The definition of robot
fixed tool is not correct.
Check:
Check the tool and object data.
50060: Frame error
The definition of robot
fixed tool is not correct.
Check:
Check the tool and object data.
50061: Frame error
The definition of robot
fixed tool is not correct.
Check:
Check the tool and object data.
50062: Circle programming error
Start and end positions for the circle
are too close.
50063: Circle programming error
The circle position is too close to the
start or end position of the circle.
50065: Kinematics error
The destination of the movement is
outside the reach of the robot or too
close to a singularity.
Check:
Change the destination position.
50066: Robot not active
Attempt to coordinate motion or
calculate position of deactivated
robot %s.
Check:
Activate robot via the Motion Unit key,
then Jogging window, or program.
Check work object and program.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
50067: Unit not active
Attempt to coordinate motion or
calculate position of deactivated
single unit %s.
Check:
Activate unit via Motion Unit key,
then Jogging window, or program.
Check work object and program.
50076: Orientation def. error
Orientation is incorrectly defined.
Check:
Make an accurate normalization of
the quaternion elements.
50078: Too many close positions
Too many consecutive closely spaced
positions.
Check:
Increase the distance between
consecutive close positions.
50079: Wrist weaving
not possible.
Check:
Use smaller weaving amplitude or a
larger TCP.
50080: Position not compatible.
Position cannot be reached with the
given robot configuration
Check:
Modify the robot position
in the program.
50082: Deceleration limit
Calculation of joint deceleration time
exceeds internal limits for this motion.
Check:
You cannot proceed without removing the
cause(s) of this error (see Check).
Increase path resolution (sys param or
by PathResol for critical movements).
Reduce speed, use fine, increase AccSet,
increase Queue time, avoid singularity
(SingAreaWrist), inc. dynamic resol.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
50083: Speed lowered by system.
The speed has been lowered by the system
due to dynamic limitations.
Check:
Decrease speed and/or do not use close
positions at high speed and/or increase
acceleration (if below 100%
50085: Too many user frames.
For mech_unit %s more than one
user frame has been defined.
Check:
Take away one user frame or define
one more mech_unit.
50086: Singularity calc. error
Too close to wrist singularity with
respect to numerical resolution
for joint 4 of IRB.
Check:
Change destination position a few
increments.
50087: Singularity problems.
Too close to wrist singularity with
respect to numerical resolution
for joint 6 of IRB.
Check:
Change destination position a few
increments.
50088: Restart not possible.
It is not possible to restart the path
due to a previous error.
Check:
Move the program start point and start
a new movement.
50089: Weaving changed
The ordered weaving is not achieved due
to: high weaving frequency, not allowed
shift of weave method or that
SingArea/Wrist is used with wrist weave
Check:
Increase weave length or period time.
Don’t shift between arm and wrist weave.
Use SingArea/Off with wrist weave.
16-79
System and Error Messages
50091: Restart not possible.
Restart no longer possible. Change of
unit state made restart of program
impossible.
Check:
Move the program pointer and start
a new movement.
50092: Axis computer comm. error
Incorrect response from axis computer
Check:
Check motion configuration parameters.
Check axis computer hardware.
50094: ServoTune not possible.
Tuning is not implemented for the
specified Joint.
50095: Cannot access joint.
Cannot access external joint. Check
configuration and activation of
external Joints.
50096: ServoTune not allowed.
Tuning is not allowed for the
specified joint.
50100: Manipulator error
There are more configuration or
numerical errors in motion domain.
Check:
Correct previous ones and try again.
50101: Manipulator config. error
’%s’ is not free
for the param. ’%s’
in type ’%s’ named
’%s’.
Check:
Use another one.
For internal names, see moc_chk.log.
50102: Manipulator config. error
’%s’ used in the
parameter ’%s’ in
type ’%s’ named
’%s’ is not
defined.
Check:
Use another one that is defined or
define the used one.
For internal names, see moc_chk.log.
16-80
50103: Num. error in manipulator
The orientation defined by quaternions
including ’%s’ in
the type ’%s’ named
’%s’ is not
normalized.(SQRSUM =1)
Check:
Check the quaternions and/or recalculate
them.
For internal names, see moc_chk.log.
50104: Num. error in manipulator
The parameter ’%s’
in type ’%s’ named
’%s’ is not ’%s’.
Check:
Check the value.
For internal names, see moc_chk.log.
50128: Manipulator error
Terminating the topic check for
manipulator due to earlier errors.
Check:
Correct the reported errors and run
topic check again.
50130: Synchronization failed.
Synchronization failed for joint
%s.
Check:
Make a new synchronization.
Restart System.
50131: Calibration failed.
Calibration failed for joint
%s.
Check:
Make a new calibration.
Restart System.
50132: Commutation failed.
Commutation failed for joint
%s.
Check:
Make a new commutation.
Restart System.
50133: Test signal error.
No test signals are available
for the master robot.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
50134: Corr. vector warning
Sensor correction vector calculations
failed due to previous error.
50135: SoftAct not possible.
Soft servo is not possible to activate.
50137: Fine point inserted
Corner zone is changed to fine point
Too many consecutive Move instructions
without fine point
50138: Arm check point outside
The robot has reached the limit for arm
check point
Check:
Use the joystick to move the involved
joint into the working range again
50139: Arm check point outside
Jogging was made in wrong direction
when
arm check point was out of working range
Check:
Use the joystick to move the joint in
opposite direction.
50140: Payload too large
Heavy payload caused static torque
limit to be exceeded on joint %s
Check:
Check and reduce payload
for arm and/or wrist.
Reduce joint working range to decrease
static torque due to gravity.
50141: Jog or Speed error
1. Jogging error
2. High speed error
3. Robot too close to singularity
Check:
1. Jog with incremental movement
2. Reduce the programmed speed
50142: Manipulator config. error
Configuration of the manipulator failed.
Check:
Check the parameter values under
System parameters:Manipulator.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
50143: Robot axes config. error
Actual configuration is not the same
as ordered and/or reorientation of
joint 4/6 is too large.
Check:
Use SingArea_Wrist, ConfL_Off,
modify position or insert
intermediary point.
50144: Displ frame uncertain.
Calibration of displ frame uncertain
1. Wrong TCP
2. Ref. points inaccurate
3. Ref. points badly spaced
Check:
If estimated error is unacceptable:
1. Verify that correct TCP is used.
2. Try more than 3 ref. points.
3. Be careful when positioning robot
to ref. points.
50145: Kinematic limitation
Kinematic limitation, no solution found.
1. Long segment.
2. Position close to singularity.
3. Joint 1, 2 or 3 out of range.
4. Position outside reach.
Check:
1. Insert an intermediary point to
reduce the length of the segment.
2. Use MoveAbsJ.
3-4. Check working range.
50146: Restart limitation
Corner path executed as a stop point.
Power fail restart not possible near
the stop point.
Check:
Use finepoint in the Move-instr before
RestoPath, ActUnit, Wait or Stop-instr
to make power fail restart possible.
50147: Power fail restart failed
Re-creation of the path failed
Check:
Move the start point and start
a new movement.
16-81
System and Error Messages
50151: MOC_MAILBOX1_ERROR
The axis computer driver failed
to generate a new mailbox 1 interrupt
since the previous interrupt has
not been serviced properly.
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
50152: MOC_MAILBOX2_ERROR
The axis computer driver failed
to generate a new mailbox 2 interrupt
since the previous interrupt has
not been serviced properly.
Check:
Reload system
Replace robot computer board
50153: Command not allowed
The given instruction, or command, was
not allowed since the robot program was
executing in a hold state.
(%s %d %d)
Check:
Modify program or stop program execution
before issuing command.
50154: Command not allowed
SingAreaWrist mode interpolation is
not supported for the IRB6400C robot.
Check:
Replace SINGAREAWRIST instruction
with
SINGAREAOFF.
50155: Power fail restart failed
Not possible to restart the Move-instr
before RestoPath, ActUnit, Wait or
Stop-instr
Check:
Make program free from MOTION
WARNING
50146 Restart limitation, by changing
the Move-instr to finepoint
Move the start point and start
a new movement.
16-82
50156: Independent joint error
Joint %s is not configurated as an
independent joint.
Check:
Modify the program or configurate
the joint as an independent joint.
50157: Corr. vector warning
Sensor correction vector X calculations
failed due to previous error.
50158: Sensor process missing
Sensor process missing during
initialization.
Named sensor process %s
could not be found or initialized.
Check:
Check process name in motion and
process configuration files.
50159: No external process
Attempt to coordinate motion or
calculate position of single %s
without an external process.
Check:
Check process name in motion and
process configuration files.
50160: Cannot reach position
Programmed position of indep. joint
%s is outside working range and
thus cannot be reached.
Check:
Change the position.
Check the joint working area limits.
Check the used work object.
50161: Singularity area
Robot is close to a singularity.
Work area with kinematic limitations.
Check:
During jogging, use axis by axis.
During program execution,
use MoveAbsJ.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
50162: Internal position error
Error caused by internal
numerical limitation
Check:
Reset independant joint
Reduce work area if extended
Remove or separate close points
50163: External Pos adjustment
External Pos adjustment too large.
TCP speed, orientation speed, or
external position speed exceed
allowed robot performance.
Check:
1. Reduce programmed TCP and
orientation speeds
2. Modify the path
3. WaitWObj closer to sync
4. Run in AUTO
50164: Ind. deactivation error
Independent deactivation error
Deactivation of mechanical unit may not
be done while in independent mode.
50167: Warning: new sync
Warning: a new object sync signal has
arrived while conveyor is active and
program is running.
50168: New object sync
New object sync arrived while conveyor
was tracking the previous object.
Cannot track two objects simultaneously
Check:
Reduce speed of conveyor
Increase programmed speed
50170: Process missing
External control process missing during
initialization.
Named process %s
could not be found or initialized.
Check:
Check process name in motion and
process configuration files.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
50171: Speed too low
Numerical problem when interpolation
of long segments with low speed and
heavy external axes or
when interpolation close to singularity
Check:
Split segments with long interpolation
time (path_resolution * 4 minutes) or
change to joint interpolation or move
position away from singularity.
50172: MoveJ not allowed
MoveJ not allowed with work object
coordinated with external
position mechanical unit.
Check:
Change interpolation mode or
work object.
50173: Use fine point
Use fine point when changing tool
or work object coordination
when work object is coordinated with
external pos mechanical unit.
Check:
Create a fine point and
then change the tool.
50174: WObj not connected
The WObj is not connected to the
moving conveyor. Robot TCP cannot be
coordinated to work object.
Check:
Check for missing WaitWObj.
Check for DropWObj occuring before end
of coordination.
50175: Conveyor moving
Conveyor moving while attempt to
coordinate robot TCP to conveyor work
object while in prohibited mode.
Check:
It is not possible to coordinate to
conveyor while in Manual Reduced
Speed,
or stepping in Auto, and the conveyor
is moving.
16-83
System and Error Messages
50176: Conveyor not active
Conveyor mechanical unit was not active
when attempt to coordinate robot TCP to
conveyor work object.
Check:
Make sure conveyor mechanical unit is
active. Check for fine point for last
coordinated motion before DeactUnit.
50177: Unable to restart
Conveyor moving while attempting to
restart or before pressing
Stop or stepping through program
Check:
Make sure conveyor is standing still.
Move the program pointer.
50178: Non optimal movement
Non optimal movement
Required torque too high
Manual adjustment of acceleration or
speed is needed.
Check:
Reduce acceleration (AccSet 50 100) in
this movement, restore it afterwards
(AccSet 100 100). Optimize performance
by search for max acceleration 50-99
Alternatively, reduce speed.
50180: Corr. vector warning
Sensor correction vector calculations
failed due to previous error.
50181: Out of coupled range
Joint %s and %s are out of
coupled working range.
Check:
Use the joystick to move joints into
their coupled working range.
50182: Jog in wrong direction
Joint %s and %s are out of
coupled working range.
Check:
Use the joystick to move joints into
their coupled working range.
16-84
50183: Robot outside work area.
The robot has reached the
World Zone %s.
Check:
Check the reason of the World Zone.
Use the joystick to move the robot
out of the World Zone if needed.
50184: Corr. vector warning
Sensor correction vector calculations
failed due to previous error.
50185: Corr. vector warning
Sensor correction vector calculations
failed due to previous error.
50186: Coordination error.
Not possible to run robot %s
with coordinated base frame.
Function not installed in this system
Check:
Install the option Advanced Motion.
50187: Coordination error.
Not possible to coordinate user with
robot %s
Function not installed in this system
Check:
Install the option Advanced Motion.
50188: Non optimal movement
Non optimal movement
Required torque too high
Manual adjustment of weave frequency or
amplitude is needed.
Check:
Reduce weave frequency or
weave amplitude in
this movement
Alternatively, reduce speed.
50189: Relay signal not found
The signal %s for relay %s
is not found in the I/O configuration.
Check:
The mechanical unit using this relay is
ignored.
Check I/O signal definitions and System
Parameters definition of Manipulator,
Types: Relay.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
50190: Permanent ipol lock error
Scanned no of active joints not equal
expected no of joints.
Check:
Check configuration of unit using
general kinematics.
50191: Too many TCP speed’s
The number of TCP speedsinone’
segment is too large. Maximum number
of TCP speed’s is %d.
Check:
Check if one segment has too many
TCP speed’s set or if a sequence of
segments have increasing DipLag.
50192: Jogging error
Jogging is started too soon after
program stop.
Check:
Restart and try again.
50193: Joint sync. error
The speed of joint %s before
power down/failure was too high.
Check:
Make a new update of the
revolution counter.
50194: Internal position error.
Error caused by internal
numerical limitation.
Log. joint number %2.0f.
Check:
Dyn step 0 = %f
Dyn step 1 = %f
Dyn step 2 = %f
Axc step =
50195: Independent move error
Joint %s cannot be moved in
independent mode.
50198: Calibration error.
Internal error
Check:
Report the occurance.
50199: Calibration error.
External joints have been moved
during calibration.
Check:
Avoid moving external joints.
50200: Torque error.
Torque error due to
high speed.
Check:
1 Check load data.
2 Reduce speed.
50201: Orientation outside reach
The error of the programmed orientation
exceeds the acceptance limit.
Check:
1 Adjust robtarget orientation.
2 Adjust/check orientations of currently
used frames: tool frame, base frame,
user frame, object frame.
50202: No dc link configurated
The dc-link(%s) and
drive unit(%s) used
by joint: %s is not
connected to same serial link.
Check:
Select another dc-link.
Change serial link for drive unit.
Set the parameter ’-no_dc_link’
to TRUE.
50203: Measurement node used
The measurement node for joint
%s is already used.
Check:
Select another node.
50196: Calibration error.
Points 0 and 1 too close
50197: Calibration error.
Points 0, 1, 2 on a line or
point 2 too close to points 0 or 1
Check:
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
16-85
System and Error Messages
50204: Motion supervision
Motion supervision triggered
for joint %s.
Possible causes: collision,
incorrect load definition,
external process forces.
Check:
If load definition incorrect,
use load identification.
If external forces, use RAPID
command or system parameters
to raise supervision level.
50205: Data logger error:
%s
Check:
Solution:
50206: Probe warning
Probe buffer is full.
50207: Add intermediate point
Add intermediate point
not coordinated to external pos
mechanical unit.
when changing conveyor.
Check:
Create an intermediate point
then change the conveyor.
50208: Missing function
Friction Compensation can not be
activated for joint %s.
Check:
Install the option Advanced Motion.
50209: Kinematic limitation.
No accepted solution found.
Residual: %ld deg in orientation,
%ld mm in x,
%ld mm in y,
%ld mm in z.
Check:
Insert an intermediary point.
Check singularity.
Increase position and orient. tolerance.
Use MoveAbsJ.
Check working range.
16-86
50210: Load identification error.
Check:
Possible problem:
Load identification not allowed
for this robot.
Configuraion angle is too small.
50211: External Drive error.
External controlled drives can not
be used without the option
’External Drive’
50212: General kinematics
General kinematics can not
be used without the option
’General Kinematics’
50213: Frame rotation error.
Possibly due to unnormalized
quaternion
or position out of bounds.
Check:
Check the normalization of
input quaternions
or magnitude of input positions.
50214: Configuration error of work area.
Possibly the defined work area
are larger than max allowed area.
50215: Load identification error.
Axis %d will move outside
working range.
Check:
Move the axis to a position further from the
working range
limit.
6 Operator error messages
60001: %s missing.
Tool %s is not used in
current program.
Maybe because it has been deleted or
it is not defined.
Check:
Change to another tool using the
Jogging window.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
60002: %s missing.
Wobj %s is not used in
current program.
Maybe because it has been deleted or
it is not defined.
Check:
Change to another workobject using
the Jogging window.
60003: Directory not created!
The directory %s cannot be created.
Probably, because directory already
exists or the disk is write-protected.
Check:
Check if directory exists or if disk
is write-protected.
Check also if space on disk is enough.
60004: Robot Hold confusion!
The used tool and the used work object
cannot both, at the same time, be held
by robot or be stationary.
Check:
Check the robhold component of the
used tool and work object.
60005: %s missing!
The workobject %s contains
a coordinated mechanical unit which
cannot be found.
Check:
Check the mechanical unit component of
the workobject.
60006: %s Userframe!
The workobject %s contains
a coordinated mechanical unit which
has no defined userframe.
Check:
Check the mechanical unit component of
the workobject.
60007: Jogging not permitted!
Jogging cannot be done in this mode.
Check:
Release the joystick and enabling
device and repeat.
Check also active mechanical unit.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
60008: Tool mass undefined!
Jogging cannot be done if the used tool
has an undefined mass
Check:
Enter a value for the mass, into the
tooldata for the used tool.
60009: Unsynchronized robot!
The robot or external axis are
unsynchronized.
Check:
Synchronize robot or external axis.
60010: Orientation error!
Orientation in %s is unnormalized.
Check:
Check orientation value.
60011: Parameter faults!
Loading of parameters in
%s
cannot be fulfilled.
For reason, see
%s
Check:
Copy the file
%s
to a floppy and examine reasons
using an ordinary text editor!
60012: No Parameters loaded!
There are no parameters in
%s
Check:
Check the file
%s
using an ordinary text editor!
60013: Jogging not permitted!
Jogging of mechanical unit is
not possible.
Unit is not activated.
Check:
Activate the mechanical unit.
60014: Disk is full!
No info is saved in Change Log about
the parameter change because no space
available on disk.
Check:
Try to delete files or
reorganize your disk.
16-87
System and Error Messages
60015: PP cannot be set!
PP cannot be set to routine
’%s’ because it has parameters.
Check:
Make a routine which call ’%s’ or
remove the parameters.
60016: PP cannot be set!
PP cannot be set to routine
’%s’ because it resides in a
module which has NOSTEPIN as
module attribute.
Check:
Copy the routine ’%s’ to
another module or change the
module attribute.
60017: PGM_TELLBACK code %d
Check:
No more information available.
60018: RAPID syntax error!
The program cannot be loaded because
of
syntactical error(s).
Check:
A RAPID syntax check program for the
PC
or QuickTeach can be used to detect the
error(s). The file PGMCPL1.LOG on the
internal RAM disk contains information
about the error(s).
60019: Data input error!
The component ’%s’ in data
type ’%s’ is not correct.
The limits are
%s!
Check:
Check data and enter the correct
value.
60020: PP cannot be set!\
PP cannot be set to routine
’%s’ because it is defined as
a trap routine.
Check:
Change the definition for the
routine ’%s’
to ’Procedure’.
16-88
60021: Cannot show items!
The number of selected items exceeds the
current memory limit specified for this
configuration. The items can thus not
be shown.
Check:
Reduce the number of data or
change the configuration to a memory
board with more memory.
60022: Cannot show all items!
Only %d variables (out of %d)
will be listed.
All variables cannot be shown because
the current memory limit specified for
this configuration will be exceeded.
Check:
Reduce the number of data or
change the configuration to a memory
board with more memory.
60023: Limit ModPos!
You cannot modify this position because
limit modpos is activated with ABS.
ABS, absolute mode, means that the
original position should be saved.
This cannot be done while tuning.
Check:
If executing, stop the program. Modify
the position in the Program Window.
This will create an original position.
This position will thereafter allow
tuning. Limits are set by Limit Modpos.
60024: Outside Limits!
The change is either outside the
internal limit 10 mm or exceeds the
limit set by limit modpos parameter
Max Trans.
Check:
A single change cannot exceed 10 mm.
Do the change in smaller steps.
If Limit Modpos is set and the parameter
Max Trans is less than 10 mm this
parameter has to be changed.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
60025: Name not allowed!
The name already exist or is a
reserved word.
Check:
Please use an other name. See list of
reserved words in Rapid manual.
60026: Program memory soon full\
Save program or take other
appropriate actions.
60033: Cannot calc. object frame!
It is not possible to calculate an
object frame with the selected
approach points.
Check:
Select new approach points as accurate
as possible.
60034: Volume is not aviable !
60035: Can not save disk is full !
60027: Cannot calc. tool frame!
It is not possible to calculate the
tool frame with the selected approach
points.
Check:
Select new approach points as accurate
as possible.
60028: Cannot show all signals!
Only %d signals (out of %d)
will be listed.
60036: File not found !
60037: Cant open/create file !
No file descriptor aviable
60038: Invalid number of bytes !
60039: File already exists
60040: Illegal name !
60041: Can not delete root !
60029: Cannot show all units!
Only %d units (out of %d)
will be listed.
60030: Too many signals!
Too many signals are selected for the
Most Common list. Only the first %d
will be listed.
60042: Not file !
60043: Not directory !
60044: Not same volume !
60045: File/directory is read only !
60046: Root directory if full !
60031: Incompatible file!
The version of the configuration file
is not compatible with this system.
Check:
Check the version of the configuration
file.
60032: Cannot calc. user frame!
It is not possible to calculate a
user frame with the selected approach
points.
Check:
Select new approach points as accurate
as possible.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
60047: Directory is not empty !
60048: Bad disk !
60049: No lable !
60050: Invalid parameter !
60051: No contig space !
60052: Can not change root !
60053: File descriptor obsolete !
60054: Deleted !
16-89
System and Error Messages
60055: No block device !
60056: Bad seek !
60057: Internal error !
60058: File/directory write only !
60059: Disk changed !
60060: No disk in driver !
7 IO & Communication
error messages
71004: Invalid signal length
DescriptionReason:
- The length of the digital
signal %s must be 1
Check:
1.Change the length to 1 or remove
the statement.
71005: Filter time invalid
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: The passive filter time
should be 0 or %d - %d ms
Check:
1.Change the filter time
71000: Bus/Type incompatible
DescriptionReason:
- Unit %s has a type
that isn’t compatible with it’s bus
Check:
1. Change the bus for the unit
2. or change the unit type
71006: Filter time invalid
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: The active filter time
should be 0 or %d - %d ms
Check:
1.Change the filter time
71001: Duplicated address
DescriptionReason:
- Same address for unit %s and %s
Check:
1.Check the address
2.Check the bus
71007: Logic. value out of range
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: Logical Max is less or
equal to Logical Min
Check:
1.Correct the values to be max greater
than min
71002: Invalid unit type
DescriptionReason:
- Unit %s: has an unspecified
unit type named: %s.
Check:
1.Check the unit type against the one
specified for the unit
71008: Phys. value out of range
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: Physical Max is less or
equal to Physical Min
Check:
1.Correct the values to be max greater
than min
71003: Invalid unit
DescriptionReason:
- The unit specified for the signal %s
is not specified in the unit section
Check:
1.Change the name of the unit
2.Add a new unit to the unit list
71009: Type invalid
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: the type of signal
is invalid
Check:
1.Change the type
16-90
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
71010: Signal out of range
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: the physical signal
number + length -1 cannot exceed
max. physical signal number for
the unit. Maximum value = %d
Check:
1.Change the physical signal number.
2.Change the length.
3.Check the signal type.
71015: Digital Input overflow
DescriptionReason:
- Number of digital input channels
for board %s is greater
than %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number digital inputs
71016: Digital Output overflow
DescriptionReason:
- Number of digital output channels
for board %s is greater
than %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of digital outputs
71017: No activate signal
DescriptionReason:
- Missing activate signal for cross
Check:
1. One activate signal must be given
71018: Activate signal overflow
DescriptionReason:
-Number of activate signals for
cross too high
Check:
1. Only one activate signal must
be given
71019: Missing signal definition
DescriptionReason:
-The signal: %s, at cross is
not defined
Check:
1. Define the signal name
in signal section
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
71020: No result signal
DescriptionReason:
- Missing result signal
Check:
1. At least one result signal must
be given
71021: Duplicate cross signals
DescriptionReason:
- The signal: %s, appears both as FROM
and as TO.
Check:
1. The same signal can not be given for
both FROM and TO
71022: Physical max too high
DescriptionReason:
- Signal: %s
- The physical max value > %.3f
Check:
1. Change value in configuration
71023: Physical min too low
DescriptionReason:
- Signal: %s
- The physical min value < %.3f
Check:
1. Change value in configuration
71024: Physical value too high
DescriptionReason:
- Signal: %s
- Current value = %.1f >
- Maxvalue = %.1f
- Value set to Maxvalue
Check:
1. Change physical max value in
configuration
71025: Physical value too low
DescriptionReason:
- Signal: %s
- Current value = %.1f <
- Minvalue = %.1f
- Value set to Minvalue
Check:
1. Change physical min value in
configuration
16-91
System and Error Messages
71026: Logical value too high
DescriptionReason:
- Signal: %s
- Current value = %.1f - Maxvalue = %.1f >
- Value set to Maxvalue
Check:
1. Change logical max value in
configuration
71037: IO Cross connection fault
DescriptionReason:
- The signal %s appears on both
FROM and TO in the same chain
Check:
1. Correct the configuration for the
cross connections where the signal above
is connected.
71027: Logical value too low
DescriptionReason:
- Signal: %s
- Current value = %.1f <
- Minvalue = %.1f
- Value set to Minvalue
Check:
1. Change logical min value in
configuration
71038: IO Cross depth to high
DescriptionReason:
- The Cross connection in the same chain
- is too deep.
- First signal name: %s
Check:
1. Make the Cross connection less deep.
71033: Dig. input out of range
DescriptionReason:
- The number of digital inputs is
out of range at board address %d
max inputs are %d
Check:
1. Change the configuration for
the board
71034: Dig. output out of range
DescriptionReason:
- The number of digital outputs is
out of range at board address %d
max outputs are %d
Check:
1. Change the configuration for
the board
71036: Name out of range
DescriptionReason:
- The number of characters in
- name %s
- is greater than %d characters or
- the name is missing.
Check:
1. Give a new name that fits within
the limits.
16-92
71041: Analog output overflow
DescriptionReason:
- Number of analog output for
- board, %s is greater than %d.
Check:
1. Reduce the number of analog outputs.
71042: Analog inputs overflow
DescriptionReason:
- Number of analog inputs for
- board, %s is greater than %d.
Check:
1. Reduce the number of analog inputs.
71043: Signal type error
DescriptionReason:
- The type specified for signal %s
can’t be connected to specified board
Check:
1. Change to another type.
2. Change to another board.
71044: Physical signal overflow
DescriptionReason:
- The range of phsig, or length, or
phsig and length for signal %s is
greater than %d
Check:
1. Change the physical signal number
2. Change the length.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
71045: Filter specification err.
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s : No filter time can be
specified for this type of signal.
Check:
1. Set filter time to 0 or remove the
statement.
71046: Scaling error
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: No scaling can be done.
Check:
1. Remove the scaling statements.
71049: Parameter Invert error
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: This type of signal
can’t be inverted.
Check:
1. Only digital signals can be inverted.
71050: Cross signal not digital.
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: Is not a digital signal
Check:
1. Only digital signals can be cross.
connected.
71052: Cross table full.
DescriptionReason:
- The sum of different FROM signals
added with total sum of TO signals
must not exceed %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of signals.
71053: Connection to board down
DescriptionReason:
- Can’t access the board due to
communication is down
Check:
1. Check the communication cable to
the board
2. Check if the board is switched off
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
71054: Wrong signal type
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s:
The type of signal is wrong
Check:
1. Change the type
71055: Invalid signal name
DescriptionReason:
- Symbol %s: is not defined
Check:
1. Change the symbol name above
71056: Power fail restore full
DescriptionReason:
- Symbol %s: could not be setup for
power failure restore.
The table for power fail is full.
Check:
1. Increase the table size in
startup file.
2. Remove some other signal from restore
list.
71058: No contact with I/O unit
DescriptionReason:
- No contact with I/O unit: %s
on bus: %s
Check:
1. Check the addresses on all
I/O units connected to the bus
2. Change the address
71059: Error config. Can node
DescriptionReason:
- Error when configuring Can node
connected at node address %d
Check:
1. Correct the configuration for the
Can node at given address.
71061: I/O bus error
DescriptionReason:
- An abnormal rate of errors on
bus %s has been detected.
Check:
1. Check the bus.
2. Restart System.
16-93
System and Error Messages
71072: No save set on signal
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s
has not Set the Store attribute to YES
Check:
1. Set the Store attribute.
71073: Error on I/O Bus
DescriptionReason:
- An abnormal rate of errors on the
%s Bus has been detected.
The connector for External CAN I/O
has been switched off
Check:
1. Check bus terminators.
2. Check I/O bus for short-circuit.
3. Restart system.
71074: Config. out of range
DescriptionReason:
- The IBS starting quarter and rack
size is out of range for
board %s
Check:
1. For starting quarter 1 rack size
must be less than 5
71076: Comm error from rtp1
DescriptionReason:
- No response from the
serial line
Check:
1. Check the device or connection
71077: Comm error from rtp1
DescriptionReason:
- Not possible to deliver
the received message
Check:
1. Check the communication flow
71078: Comm error from rtp1
DescriptionReason:
- The response from the device
has a non valid frame sequence
Check:
1. Check for noise on the serial
line
16-94
71079: Pulsing group output
DescriptionReason:
- Pulsing group output not allowed.
Check:
71080: Unit type table full.
DescriptionReason:
- The number of unit types
must not exceed %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of unit types.
71081: Physical table full.
DescriptionReason:
- The number of physical signals
must not exceed %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of physical
signals.
71082: Signal table full.
DescriptionReason:
- The number of user defined signals
plus panel signals must not
exceed %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of signals.
71083: Symbol table full.
DescriptionReason:
- The number of symbols
must not exceed %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of symbols.
71084: Triggr table full.
DescriptionReason:
- The number of Subcribed signals
must not exceed %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of Subcribed
signals.
71085: Unit table full.
DescriptionReason:
- The number of boards
must not exceed %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of defined boards.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
71090: Invalid unit type.
DescriptionReason:
- The vendor id read from
unit %s doesn’t match
value in unit type configuration
Configuation: %d Actual: %d
Check:
1. Change vendor id in configuration.
2. or check module.
71091: Invalid unit type.
DescriptionReason:
- The profile read from
unit %s doesn’t match
value in unit type configuration.
Configuration: %d Actual: %d
Check:
1. Change profile in configuration.
2. Check that the type of board is
correct.
71092: Invalid unit type.
DescriptionReason:
- The product code read from
unit %s doesn’t match
value in unit type configuration.
Configuration: %d Actual: %d
Check:
1. Change product code in configuration.
2. or check module.
71093: Invalid unit type.
DescriptionReason:
- The major revision read from
unit %s doesn’t match
value in unit type configuration.
Configuration: %d Actual: %d
Check:
1. Change major revision.
2. or check module.
71094: Too many cross-actors def
DescriptionReason:
- The cross-connection has too
many "From" signals : %s
Check:
1. Check the cross configuration.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
71095: Too long cross-actor str
DescriptionReason:
- The "From" part in the cross-string
is too long : %s
Check:
1. Check the cross configuration.
71097: Parameter store error
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: This type of signal
can’t have store option.
Check:
1. Only digital output signals can
have store.
71098: NFS server lost
DescriptionReason:
- The contact with the NFS server
’%s’ was lost.
Check:
1. Check the NFS server.
2. Check the network connection.
3. Check the configuration.
71099: Trusted NFS server lost
DescriptionReason:
- The contact with the trusted
NFS server ’%s’
was lost.
Check:
1. Check the NFS server.
2. Check the network connection.
3. Check the configuration.
71100: Bus table full.
- The number of buses
must not exceed %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of buses.
2. Increase the number of buses
allowed.
71101: Unknown bus name.
DescriptionReason:
- Board %s: Unknown bus
name %s
Check:
1. Change the bus name for the board
at unit type configuration.
16-95
System and Error Messages
71102: DeviceNet incompatible
DescriptionReason:
- Node %d:
Internal info:
%s,%d
(%s)
Check:
1. Disconnect the node from bus
2. Contact ABB.
71103: Error on I/O Bus
DescriptionReason:
- An abnormal rate of errors on the
%s Bus has been detected.
The connector for Robot CAN I/O
has been switched off
Check:
1. Check bus terminators.
2. Check I/O bus for short-circuit.
3. Restart system.
71104: Error on I/O Bus
DescriptionReason:
- An abnormal rate of errors on the
%s Bus has been detected.
The connectors for External CAN I/O
and Robot CAN I/O has been switched
off
Check:
1. Check bus terminators.
2. Check I/O bus for short-circuit.
3. Restart system.
71107: InterBus-S bus failure
DescriptionReason:
- Lost contact at address %d.%d
Check:
1. Check InterBus-S bus
at the above address
2. Restart the system
71108: InterBus-S module failure
DescriptionReason:
- The unit %s at address %d.%d
reported internal unit error
Check:
1. Check the unit at
the above address
2. Restart the system
71109: InterBus-S module failure
DescriptionReason:
- Incompatible definition
of unit %s
at address %d.%d!
Check:
1. Check the I/O system parameters
2. Restart the system
71110: InterBus-S module failure
DescriptionReason:
- Illegal address "%s" on unit %s
Check:
1. Change the address in the system
parameters I/O unit configuration.
71105: Disable group failed
DescriptionReason:
- Failed to disable unit %s
at address %d.%d
Check:
1. Check I/O system parameters
2. Check unit
71111: Wrong product code.
DescriptionReason:
- The product code of unit %s
doesn’t compare to any known id code.
Check:
1. Change product code in configuration.
2. or check module.
71106: dsqc344 board failure
DescriptionReason:
- Faulty or re-started IBS board
Board internal error code: %d
Check:
1. Check above error, see IBS manual:
Firmware Service and Error Messages
2. Update board firmware
3. Replace InterBus-S board
71112: Unequal # of units.
DescriptionReason:
- Definied number of units is different
to the one binded to the board.
Check:
1. Change unit definition in
the configuration.
2. or check the modules.
16-96
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
71113: IBS user command failure
DescriptionReason:
- Warning due to: %d
Check:
1. Check the InterBus-S configuration
according to above error code.
71114: Invalid IP address
DescriptionReason:
’%s’ is not a valid IP address
Check:
1.Check the Communication configuration.
71115: Invalid subnet mask
DescriptionReason:
’%s’ is not a valid subnet mask
Check:
1. Check the Communication configuration
71116: Disable & Trust Level = 0
DescriptionReason:
Unit ’%s’ has been configured disabled
with Trust Level set to 0.
This is NOT allowed.
Check:
1. Change the configuration.
71117: Battery supervision res.
DescriptionReason:
The battery capacity = %d
71118: Battery supervision state
DescriptionReason:
The battery supervision is in wrong
state .
The state is = %s
71119: IO-unit table full.
DescriptionReason:
- Maximum number of IO-units
of type %s exceeded.
Max = %d
Check:
1. Reduce the number of IO-units.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
71120: RAP option not installed.
DescriptionReason:
- The RAP Communication option has to be
installed when configuring RAP or
using SCWrite.
Check:
1. Reboot and install the
RAP Communication option.
71121: RAP start-up failed.
DescriptionReason:
- The initialization of RAP failed.
Check:
1. Check internal log for decription.
71122: Incorrect IP address.
DescriptionReason:
- The address ’%s’
in protocol ’%s’
is not a correct IP address.
Check:
1. Change the address.
71123: No matching trans. prot.
DescriptionReason:
The transmission protocol ’%s’
given for application protocol ’%s’
could not be found.
Check:
1. Change the transmission protocol.
71124: Wrong trans prot. for NFS
DescriptionReason:
The transmission protocol for
the NFS protocol ’%s’ must be
TCP/IP.
Check:
1. Change the transmission protocol.
71125: Mount Permission denied
DescriptionReason:
Permission was denied to mount
the directory ’%s’
on the server ’%s’.
Check:
1. Change the User or Group ID.
16-97
System and Error Messages
71126: Directory not exported
DescriptionReason:
Mounting directory ’%s’
as ’%s’ failed
since it is not exported on the server
computer ’%s’,Protocol: ’%s’.
Check:
1. Export the directory on
the server computer.
71127: ID’s not the equal
DescriptionReason:
The User and Group ID’s has to have
the same value for all remote disks
Check:
71128: Ethernet option not inst.
DescriptionReason:
- The Ethernet Services option has to be
installed when remomte mounted disks
Check:
1. Reboot and install the Ethernet
Services option.
71129: Too many remote disks
DescriptionReason:
The maximum number of remote
mounted
disks is ’%d’.
Check:
1. Reduces the number of remote
mounted
disk.
71130: Too many remote servers
DescriptionReason:
The maximum number of servers for
remote mounted disks is ’%d’.
Check:
1. Reduces the number of servers
71131: Could not mount directory
DescriptionReason:
Mounting directory ’%s’
on the computer ’%s’ failed
Protocol: ’%s’.
Check:
1. Check the NFS server setup
16-98
71132: Battery supervision block
DescriptionReason:
The battery superviosion is blocked
becaurse a power off/on is made.
Will be released %s
Check:
71133: Battery not charged
DescriptionReason:
The battery is not charged after
the first charging state.
Check:
1. Check that the batlow signal is
connected to the DSQC347.
2. Check the battery connections
3. Check the battery.
71134: Parameter value not found
DescriptionReason:
Unit %s refers to values(%s)
that don’t exists.
Check:
1. Check unit configuration.
71135: Parameter defs. not found
DescriptionReason:
Unit type %s refers to
parameter definitions (%s)
that don’t exists.
Check:
1. Check unit type configuration.
71136: Parameter Error
DescriptionReason:
Parameter %s could not be
downloaded to unit %s
Check:
1. Check unit configuration.
2. Check precceding error messages
71137: Error code from unit
DescriptionReason:
The following error was returned:
%s
Check:
1. Check unit parameter configuration.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
71138: Unknown Parameter
DescriptionReason:
%s is not a valid parameter
for unit %s
Check:
1. Check unit parameter configuration.
71139: Access error from IO
DescriptionReason:
- Cannot Read or Write signal %s
due to communication down.
Check:
1. Check ’No contact with I/O unit’
report for reason.
71140: Parameter act high error
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: This type of signal
can’t be set to active high.
Check:
1. Only output signals can be
set to active high.
71141: Default out of range
DescriptionReason:
- The default value for
signal %s is out of range
Check:
1.Change the default value in
configuration.
71142: Parameter Default error
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s: This type of signal
can’t be assigned a default value
Check:
1. Only output signals can be assigned
default values.
71143: CTS/RTS not allowed
DescriptionReason:
- Serie channel %s:
can’t have option RTS/CTS.
Check:
1. Remove the option from configuration.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
71144: Enable group failed
DescriptionReason:
- Failed to enable unit %s
at address %d.%d
Check:
1. Check I/O system parameters
2. Check unit
71145: IBS bus deactivated
DescriptionReason:
- IBS bus changed into a none
running mode.
Check:
1. Check the bus and restart the system
71146: Subscribe error
DescriptionReason:
- The maxlimit is less then minlimit
maxlimit = %f minlimit = %f.
Check:
1. Make the correction and try again
71147: No response dsqc344
DescriptionReason:
- Access to the dsqc344 is denied
Check:
1. Check dsqc344 board
2. Check dsqc344 internal confiuration
3. Reduce cycle time on the slave unit
71148: No access to dsqc344
DescriptionReason:
- Access to the dsqc344 is denied
due to %d
Check:
1. The dsqc344 is faulty. Replace board
2. Check dsqc344 internal confiuration
71149: IBS command failure
DescriptionReason:
- Incompatible definition
due to %d!
Check:
1. Check the I/O system parameters
2. Restart the system
16-99
System and Error Messages
71150: The dsqc344 is busy
DescriptionReason:
- The response service capability
is limited due to IBS configuration
Check:
1. Check dsqc344 internal confiuration
2. Change cycle time on the slave unit
71152: InterBus-S bus failure
DescriptionReason:
- %s bus failure.
Lost contact at
address %d.%d
Check:
1. Check InterBus-S bus
at the above address
2. Restart the system
71153: Can’t access parameter
DescriptionReason:
- Unit %s has parameters
that can’t be edited from
the teach pendant.
Check:
1. Save the EIO configuration to
a file
2. Use a text editor to change
the parameters
71154: The unit has no power
DescriptionReason:
- Unit %s has no power connected
Check:
1. Attach power to the unit
71155: The unit is faulty
DescriptionReason:
- Unit %s has not been correctly
connected
Check:
1. Diagnose with CMD application
2. Modify the dsqc344 loacal start-up
procedure
3. Replace the dsqc344 firmware
16-100
71156: IPC queue full
DescriptionReason:
- The ipc queue %s was
full, when sending to trap routine.
Check:
1. Restart the system
71157: Invalid app type
DescriptionReason:
- Com Unit %s: has an unspecified
Com app type named: %s.
Check:
1.Check the Com app type against
the one specified for the Com app
71158: Address out of range
DescriptionReason:
- The address of unit %s is out of
range.
Check:
1.Change the address
2.Check the address syntax
71159: Signal Access illegal
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s:
The number of characters in
Access %s
is greater than %d or name missing.
Check:
1. Give a new Access that fits within
the limits.
71160: Access level illegal
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s:
Access level %s in
group %s is illegal.
- Legal choices all/man/auto/none.
Check:
1. Give a new access level for group
that fits.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
71161: Access name not found
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s
The Access name %s
not found in EIO_USER_ACCESS.
Check:
1. Define %s in EIO_USER_ACCESS
or change Access name.
71163: Signal on internal unit
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s is not allowed
to connect to %s
because the unit is internal
Check:
1. Connect the signal to another unit
71164: Internal signal in cross
DescriptionReason:
- Signal %s is not allowed
to be cross connected to
signal %s
Check:
1. Make sure that none of the signals
are internal.
71171: Illegal I/O Unit
DescriptionReason:
- The unit type %s used by unit
%s is a non ABB device
Check:
1. Make sure that the I/O Plus Option
is installed
8 Arcweld error messages
110004: Voltage supervision
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
110005: Current supervision
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
110006: Wirefeed supervision
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
110007: Wirestick supervision
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
110008: Arc ignition failed
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
110009: Schedule transfer error
Check:
Define a weld schedule strobe input
110010: Schedule transfer error
Check:
The schedule port was busy with previous
transfer.
110011: Process stopped
Check:
Process was stopped by digital input.
110012: Arc fill ignition failed
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
110001: Gas supervision
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
110013: Torch supervision
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
110002: Water supervision
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
110021: Gas supervision
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Check the welding equipment.
110003: Arc supervision
Check:
Check the welding equipment.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
16-101
System and Error Messages
110022: Water supervision
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Check the welding equipment.
110030: Arc fill ignition failed
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Check the welding equipment.
110023: Arc supervision
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Check the welding equipment.
110500: Arcitec welddata error
Loading or storing welddata failed.
Max allowed time for operation has
expired.
Check:
Check external equipment.
110024: Voltage supervision
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Check the welding equipment.
110025: Current supervision
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Check the welding equipment.
110026: Wirefeed supervision
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Check the welding equipment.
110027: Process stopped
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Process was stopped by digital input.
110028: Torch supervision
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Check the welding equipment.
110029: Arc ignition failed
Check:
Seam name: %.16s
Time from weld start: %.16s min
Check the welding equipment.
16-102
110501: Arcitec welddata error
Storing welddata failed.
Check:
Check file path and external equipment.
110502: Arcitec welddata error
Loading welddata failed.
Check:
Check file path and external equipment.
110503: Switch is missing
One of the switch parameters %s
or %s has to be defined.
Check:
Define one of the switch parameters.
110504: Value error
Argument %.16s must have an
integer value.
Check:
The value of the argument must be an
exact integer value. The current value
has a fraction part. Change value.
110505: Argument error
Argument %s has a
not allowed negative value.
Check:
Set argument %s to positive.
111000: Weave pattern error
Weave interpolation type error
[Geometric = 0, Rapid = 1]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
111001: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern shape error
[No shape = 0, Zig-zag shape = 1]
[V-shape = 2, Triangular shape = 3]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111002: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern cycle length error
(0 - 1) [m]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111003: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern cycle time error
(0 - 100) [s]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111004: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern width error
(0 - 1) [m]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111005: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern height error
(0 - 1) [m]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111006: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern left dwell error
(0 - 1) [m]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111007: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern center dwell error
(0 - 1) [m]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111008: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern right dwell error
(0 - 1) [m]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
111009: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern bias error
(-1 - 1) [m]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111010: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern direction angle error
(-PI/2 - PI/2) [rad]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111011: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern tilt angle error
(-PI/2 - PI/2) [rad]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111012: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern rotation angle error
(-PI/2 - PI/2) [rad]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111013: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern horizontal offset error
(-1 - 1) [m]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111014: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern vertical offset error
(-1 - 1) [m]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111015: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern sync condition left error
(0 - 100) [%]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111016: Weave pattern error
Weave pattern sync condition right error
(0 - 100) [%]
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
16-103
System and Error Messages
111017: Weave pattern error
Forbidden combination of bias and shape
Bias only allowed for Zig-zag shape
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111018: Weave pattern error
Forbidden combination of bias and width
Bias must be less than half the width
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
111019: Weave pattern error
Forbidden combination of dwells and
cycle length
Dwells must be less than cycle length
Ramp slope (amplitude/length) is limited
Check:
Adjust weave parameters
112000: Board eipaw error
Incorrect digital output length
Check:
Change digital output length to 1
112001: Board eipaw error
Incorrect schedule port length
Check:
Change shedule port length to %.16s
112003: Board eipaw error
Incorrect wirefeeder port length
Check:
Change length
112004: Board eipaw error
Schedule number zero is not allowed.
Previous number will still be active.
Check:
115000: Arcitec Data Error
Invalid parameter_id: %.16s
detected.
Check:
Check Arcitec configuration file or
Power Source external communication.
115001: Arcitec Data Error
Invalid unit_id: %.16s
detected.
Check:
Check Arcitec configuration file or
Power Source external communication.
115002: Arcitec Data Error
Invalid transmission length:
%.16s detected.
Check:
Check Arcitec configuration file or
Power Source external communication.
115003: Arcitec Data Error
Invalid selection_id: %.16s
detected.
Check:
Check Arcitec configuration file or
Power Source external communication.
115004: Arcitec Data Error
Arcitec systems with different units.
%.16s and %.16s.
Check:
Check Arcitec configuration file.
115005: Arcitec Data Error
Units not defined for Arcitec system.
Check:
Check Arcitec configuration file.
113000: Equipment config error
Check:
AW and EIO configurations do not
match
115006: Arcitec Data Error
Illegal number: %.16s
of tuning parameters.
Check:
Check Arcitec configuration file.
114000: Weldguide error
Check:
Check weldguide parameters
and equipment
116000: Track error
Check:
Check joint definition
16-104
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
116001: Track start error
Check:
Check joint definition
116002: Track max path corr error
Check:
Check joint definition
116003: Track communication error
Check:
Check hardware
117001: Welding equipment error
EPROM checksum error in Welddata Unit
detected at power up.
Check:
EPROM in Welddata Unit is faulty.
Running with this error gives
unpredictable result.
Exchange EPROM.
117002: Welding equipment error
Internal RAM read/write error in
Welddata Unit detected at power up.
Check:
At least one memory cell in internal
microprocessor memory failed in read
/write test. Running with this error
gives unpredictable result.
Replace Welddata Unit.
117003: Welding equipment error
External RAM read/write error in
Welddata Unit detected at power up.
Check:
At least one memory cell in external
microprocessor memory failed in read
/write test. Running with this error
gives unpredictable result.
Replace Welddata Unit.
117004: Welding equipment error
DC supply voltage for 5 Volt regulator
in Welddata Unit has been down.
Check:
Indicates that there is a problem in
power supply but the function is
probably not affected. Check incoming
power supply to Welddata Unit.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
117012: Welding equipment error
Welddata Unit CAN-controller for
internal bus is in WARNING state.
Check:
Change data several times or reset
welding equipment with power switch.
If the error do not disappear, check
bus connections and/or exchange
Welddata Unit.
117013: Welding equipment error
Welddata Unit CAN-controller for
external bus is in WARNING state.
Check:
Change data several times or reset
welding equipment with power switch.
If the error do not disappear, check
bus connections and/or exchange
Welddata Unit.
117014: Welding equipment error
Welddata Unit CAN-controller for
internal bus is in BUS-OFF state.
Check:
Reset welding equipment with power
switch. If the error do not disappear,
check bus connections and/or exchange
Welddata Unit.
117015: Welding equipment error
Welddata Unit has detected that a
received internal CAN message was lost
(Overwritten by a later message).
Check:
Reset welding equipment with power
switch.
117016: Welding equipment error
Welddata Unit has detected that a
received external CAN message was lost
(Overwritten by a later message).
Check:
Reset welding equipment with power
switch.
16-105
System and Error Messages
117017: Welding equipment error
Welddata Unit lost contact with
Wirefeed Unit.
Check:
Check connection cable between Welddata
Unit and wirefeed control board, check
power supply to wirefeed control board.
117018: Welding equipment error
Welddata Unit has lost contact with
Olivia Unit.
Check:
Check connection cable between
Welddata Unit and Olivia unit, check
power supply to Olivia Unit
117019: Welding equipment error
Non-volatile RAM data value failure
detected in Welddata Unit at power up.
Checksum error.
Check:
Probably caused by low memory backup
battery voltage. Welding equipment
will be reset to a default state. Data
in Welddata Unit will be lost.
Possible to run without limitations.
117020: Welding equipment error
Non-volatile RAM data value failure
detected in Welddata Unit at power up.
Non numeric setting parameter out of
range.
Check:
Welding equipment will be reset to a
default state. Data in Welddata Unit
will be lost. Possible to run without
limitations.
117021: Welding equipment error
Invalid combination of non-numeric
setting parameters in Welddata Unit
detected at power up.
Check:
Welding equipment will be reset to a
default state. Data in Welddata Unit
will be lost. Reset welding equipment
with power switch.
16-106
117022: Welding equipment error
CAN-bus (external) transmit buffer
overflow in Welddata Unit.
Check:
Welddata Unit are unable to transmit
data at the needed rate. Could be
caused by unnormal occupation on the
bus. Reset welding equipment with
power switch.
117023: Welding equipment error
CAN-bus (external) receive buffer
overflow in Welddata Unit.
Check:
Welddata Unit are unable to process
received messages at the needed rate.
Reset welding equipment with power
switch.
117024: Welding equipment error
Fragments not in number order when
Welddata Unit received a fragmented
message.
Check:
The parts of a fragmented message were
not received in proper order. A weld
data block transmission has been faulty
received. Reset welding equipment with
power switch.
117025: Welding equipment error
Incompatible format of weld data block.
Welddata Unit received data that is
stored in another program version with
other format version.
Check:
Find data with correct version or enter
new data.
117026: Welding equipment error
Program execution error.
Watch dog in Welddata Unit program
activated.
Check:
Reset welding equipment with
power switch.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
117027: Welding equipment error
Undocumented Welddata Unit error.
Check:
Request additional information from
ESAB/ABB.
117028: Welding equipment error
Undocumented Welddata Unit error.
Check:
Request additional information from
ESAB/ABB.
117029: Welding equipment error
Undocumented Welddata Unit error.
Check:
Request additional information from
ESAB/ABB.
117201: Welding equipment error
EPROM checksum error in Powersource
Control Unit.
Check:
EPROM in Powersource Control Unit is
faulty. Running with this error gives
unpredictable result.
Replace EPROM.
117202: Welding equipment error.
Internal RAM read/write error in
Powersource Control Unit detected at
power up.
Check:
At least one memory cell in internal
microprocessor memory failed in read
/write test. Running with this error
gives unpredictable result.
Replace Powersource Control Unit.
117204: Welding equipment error
DC supply voltage to 5 Volt regulator in
Powersource Control Unit has been
down.
Check:
Indicates that there is a problem in
power supply but the function is
probably not affected. Check incoming
power supply to Powersource Control
Unit
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
117205: Welding equipment error
High DC inverter bus voltage. Hardware
will shut down inverter till voltage
comes down to normal.
Check:
Might be caused by high mains impedance
or transients, possible to restart
welding as soon as voltage has dropped
below limit.
117206: Welding equipment error
Temperature in power source heatsink too
high. Inverter is shut down until
temperature switch is closed again.
Check:
Ensure that there is no obstacle that
reduces the cooling airflow that passes
through the heatsink of the powersource.
Wait until temperature switch is closed.
117207: Welding equipment error
High current in inverter circuit. Might
be caused by component failure.
Check:
Reset welding equipment with power
switch. Check that the power source does
not consume unnormal high current
without start command. If so: there is
a component failure.
117208: Welding equipment error
PCB supply voltage 15VC on Powersource
Control Unit to high or to low.
Check:
Replace Powersource Control Unit.
117209: Welding equipment error
PCB supply voltage -15V on Powersource
Control Unit to high or to low.
Check:
Replace Powersource Control Unit.
117210: Welding equipment error
PCB supply voltage 15VB on Powersource
Control Unit to high or to low.
Check:
Replace Powersource Control Unit.
16-107
System and Error Messages
117211: Welding equipment error
Long term difference between requested
and actual weld current value.
Check:
Hardware problem in current servo system
(Power source control board or inverter
block) or unnormal load conditions
(= bad welding
117212: Welding equipment error.
Internal CAN communication failure
CAN
circuits in Powersource Control Unit
is in WARNING state.
Check:
Change data several times or reset
welding equipment with power switch. If
the error do not disappear, check bus
connections and/or exchange Powersource
Control Unit.
117215: Welding equipment error
Powersource Control Unit has detected
that a received internal CAN message
was
lost (overwritten by a later message).
Check:
Reset welding equipment with power
switch.
117226: Welding equipment error
Program execution error.
Watch dog in Powersource Control Unit
program activated.
Check:
Reset welding equipment with
power switch.
117227: Welding equipment error
Undocumented Powersource Control
Unit
error.
Check:
Request additional information from
ESAB/ABB.
16-108
117228: Welding equipment error
Undocumented Powersource Control Unit
error.
Check:
Request additional information from
ESAB/ABB.
117229: Welding equipment error
Undocumented Powersource Control Unit
error.
Check:
Request additional information from
ESAB/ABB.
117301: Welding equipment error
EPROM checksum error in Wirefeed unit
detected at power up.
Check:
EPROM in Wirefeed unit is faulty.
Running with this error gives
unpredictable result.
Exchange EPROM.
117302: Welding equipment error
Internal RAM read/write error in
Wirefeed Unit detected at power up.
Check:
At least one memory cell in internal
microprocessor memory failed in read
/write test. Running with this error
gives unpredictable result.
Replace Wirefeed Unit.
117304: Welding equipment error
DC supply voltage for 5 Volt regulator
in Wirefeed Unit has been down.
Check:
Indicates that there is a problem in
power supply but the function is
probably not affected. Check incoming
power supply to Wirefeed Unit.
117308: Welding equipment error
PCB supply voltage 15V on Wirefeed Unit
to high or to low.
Check:
Replace Wirefeed Unit.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
117309: Welding equipment error
PCB supply voltage 24V on Wirefeed
Unit
to high or to low.
Check:
Replace Wirefeed Unit.
117311: Welding equipment error
Long term difference between requested
and actual wirefeed velocity.
Check:
Hardware problem in wirefeed servo
system or voltage drop in 42 V
AC supply.
117312: Welding equipment error
Internal CAN communication failure
CAN circuits in Wirefeed Unit is in
WARNING state.
Check:
Change wirefeed speed several times
or reset welding equipment with power
switch. If the error do not disappear,
check bus connections and/or exchange
Wirefeed Unit.
117315: Welding equipment error
Wirefeed Unit has detected that a
received internal CAN message was lost
(overwritten by a later message).
Check:
Reset welding equipment with power
switch.
117326: Welding equipment error
Program execution error.
Watch dog in Wirefeed Unit program
activated.
Check:
Reset welding equipment with
power switch.
117327: Welding equipment error
Undocumented Wirefeed Unit error.
Check:
Request additional information from
ESAB/ABB.
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
117328: Welding equipment error
Undocumented Wirefeed Unit error.
Check:
Request additional information from
ESAB/ABB.
117329: Welding equipment error
Undocumented Wirefeed Unit error.
Check:
Request additional information from
ESAB/ABB.
117500: File error
Failed open file.
File name unknown.
Check:
Check file name.
117501: File error
Failed writing to file.
Check:
Check file name.
117502: File error
Failed reading from file.
Check:
Check file name.
117503: Illegal schedule number
Schedule number %.16s
is not allowed.
Check:
Change schedule number.
117504: Communication error
Message header form Arcitec
power source unknown.
Check:
Check connection to power source.
Check Arcitec configuration file.
117505: Communication error
Arcitec power source is not responding.
Check:
Check connection to power source.
16-109
System and Error Messages
117506: Communication error
Messages from Arcitec power source are
not possible to evaluate.
Messages are too short.
Check:
Check connection to power source.
Check Arcitec configuration file.
118000: Ext CAN com failure
Too many requests without response
Check:
Check communication configuration
118500: Arcitec tuning error
There are no Arcitec system defined.
Check:
Define Arcitec system or do not write
towards Power Source.
118501: Arcitec tuning error
Parameter does not exist.
Check:
Change parameter identity.
118502: Arcitec tuning error
Parameter must be numerical.
Check:
Change parameter identity.
118503: Arcitec tuning error
Parameter value outside limits.
Check:
Change parameter value.
119000: Installation error
External axes are not allowed in this
type of robot configuration
Check:
Remove mechanical units
9 Spotweld error messages
120001: Spot weld system error
Spot weld proc not idle
Check:
Set the process state defined by SwInit
to idle
120003: SwStart Timeout negative
120004: SwInit Interrupt negative
120005: ProcId. The reason is either:
-ProcId does not correspond to the
value given from SwInit
-The spot weld process has been
cancelled
120006: Spot weld comm. error
Reason: %s
120007: Response slower than poll rate
120008: No more BOSCH connection
available
120010: Spot gun error
Reason:%s
120011: Spot gun bad config.
Reason: %s
120012: IO signal missing
Check:
1.Configure the mandatory
signals used
120013: PERS var missing
the swtimer.sys module doesn’t
fit with this kind of gun
Check:
2.Replace it
120014: Error Number %d
Check:
See Nc gun manual
120057: Gun jog. forbidden
Gun jogging is not allowed
when axis not synchronised
Check:
1.Axis calibration state
120058: Gun Calibration Ok
120002: Spot weld system error
Parameter %s
16-110
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
System and Error Messages
120060: Gun Position Error
Gun can’t reach the position
reference
Check:
1.The drive for power on
2.The encoder
3.Mechanical parts or stuck tips
120061: Gun refer. overrun
Swit timer can’t consume
the position reference received
Check:
1.Swit timer is welding and a move
instr. is executing concurrently
120062: Gun Force error
Gun can’t apply the force
reference
Check:
1.Make a gun init
2.Drive and force sensor calibration
120063: Gun Refer. underrun
Swit timer has no more
reference to consumme
Check:
1.Serial link and comm log error
120064: Gun Force sensor fault
force sensor out of
order
Check:
1.Force sensor wiring
2.Change sensor
120065: Gun motor overcurrent
motor current too great
Check:
1.Drive calibration
2.Mechanical unit or obstacle
120066: Gun reference fault
gap between references
too great
Check:
1.Robot or gun calibration
2.Gun position
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
120067: Gun command not allowed
Motion forbidden during
an action
Check:
1.Wait until the end of
the action before ordering new one
120070: Gun drive fault
fault detected by drive unit
Check:
1.drive unit leds
120075: Gun encoder error
Check:
1.Encoder wring
120084: Gun wrong pos computed
inconsystency between revolution
counter and encoder value
Check:
1.Drive and swit measurement bus
2.Make a gun first init
120085: Gun revol. counter error
Check:
1.Encoder wiring
120090: Gun not calibrated
No calibration done or lost
Check:
1.Make a gun first init
10 Paint error messages.
130001: Equipment error
Paint process and motion stopped.
Check:
Check the paint equipment.
130002: Equipment error
The argument is not a persistent
variable.
Check:
Change the argument to a persistent.
130003: Trig plane error
In PaintL %s: One trig plane, %s,
are defined outside the programmed
path.
Check:
Change eventdata or reprogram path.
16-111
System and Error Messages
130004: Trig plane error
Trig plane error
In PaintL %s: Two trig planes, %s
and %s, are defined outside the
programmed path.
Check:
Change eventdata or reprogram path.
130005: Trig plane error
In PaintL %s: Three trig planes, %s,
%s, and %s, are defined outside the
programmed path.
Check:
Change eventdata or reprogram path.
130006: Trig plane error
In PaintL %s: Four trig planes, %s,
%s, %s and %s, are defined outside the
programmed path.
Check:
Change eventdata or reprogram path.
131004: Brush table error.
Only brush table %s is allowed.
Check:
Change to allowed brush table.
131005: Brush number error.
Only brush numbers less than or
equal to %s is allowed.
Check:
Change to allowed brush number.
132000: Brush number error.
The brush number is outside the limits
for the activated brush table.
Check:
Change argument within limits.
132001: Brush table error.
There are no brush table activated.
Check:
Activate a brush table.
130007: Trig plane error
In PaintL %s: Four trig planes, %s,
%s, %s and %s and more are defined
outside the programmed path.
Check:
Change eventdata or reprogram path.
131000: Argument error.
The argument is not an integer.
Check:
Change the argument to an integer.
131001: Argument error.
The argument is not an array.
Check:
Change the argument to an array.
131002: Argument error.
The argument is not a persistent
variable.
Check:
Change the argument to a persistent.
131003: Argument error.
The array argument has too many
dimensions.
Check:
Change the array to one dimension.
16-112
User’s Guide/BaseWare OS 3.1
Program Examples
CONTENTS
Page
1 Simple Material Handling .............................................................................................. 3
1.1 What the robot does................................................................................................ 3
1.2 The main routine..................................................................................................... 3
1.3 Operating the gripper.............................................................................................. 3
1.4 Fetching a part from the In feeder .......................................................................... 4
1.5 Leaving the part in the machine ............................................................................. 4
1.6 Starting to process .................................................................................................. 5
1.7 Fetching the part from the machine........................................................................ 5
1.8 Leaving the part on the Out feeder ......................................................................... 5
2 Material Handling........................................................................................................... 7
2.1 What the robot does................................................................................................ 7
2.2 The main routine..................................................................................................... 7
2.3 Operating the gripper.............................................................................................. 8
2.4 Starting production ................................................................................................. 9
2.5 Fetching the part from the In feeder ....................................................................... 9
2.6 Leaving the part in the machine ............................................................................. 9
2.7 Updating operating statistics .................................................................................. 10
2.8 Stopping production for the day ............................................................................. 10
User’s Guide
17-1
Program Examples
17-2
User’s Guide
Program Examples
Simple Material Handling
1 Simple Material Handling
1.1 What the robot does
The robot takes parts to and from a machine, as in Figure 1.
Machine
In feeder
Out feeder
Figure 1 The robot gives a part to a machine which then processes it.
First, the robot fetches a part from the In feeder and places it in the machine where the
part is processed. Then, when this has been done, the robot takes the part and places it
on the Out feeder.
This work cycle is repeated until the operator stops production.
1.2 The main routine
The main routine is built up of a number of routine calls which reflect the robot work
cycle.
Routine main
Comments
fetch_part;
leave_machine;
process_part;
fetch_machine;
leave_part;
Fetch part from In feeder.
Leave the part in the machine.
Start the actual processing.
Fetch the part.
Leave the part on the Out feeder.
1.3 Operating the gripper
The robot is equipped with a gripper that handles parts. A tool, tool1, and its associated
tool centre point (TCP), is defined for this.
The tool is controlled by a digital output signal defined in the system parameters with
the name gripper. A high signal indicates that the gripper is holding the part, and a low
signal indicates that the part has been released.
User’s Guide
17-3
Simple Material Handling
Program Examples
In addition, a load data, load1, is defined which describes the load held by the gripper. The
best possible motion performance is achieved if the correct load is always specified.
As the gripper grips and releases parts several times during the course of the program, it
is best to set up separate routines for this which can be called by the program.
Routine grip
Comments
Set gripper;
WaitTime 0.3;
GripLoad load1;
Grip the part.
Wait 0.3 s.
Specify that there is a load in
the gripper.
Routine release
Comments
Reset gripper;
WaitTime 0.3;
GripLoad LOAD0;
Release the part.
Wait 0.3 s.
Specify that there is no load in
the gripper
1.4 Fetching a part from the In feeder
A part is fetched from the In feeder. As the robot cannot go straight from the previous
position (Out feeder), it performs a joint movement to the first position. Then, it uses
linear movement to achieve good path accuracy.
Routine fetch_part
Comments
MoveJ *, vmax, z50, tool1;
MoveL *, v1000, z30, tool1;
MoveL *, v200, fine, tool1;
grip;
MoveL *, v200, z30, tool1;
Go quickly to position near In feeder.
Go to position above part.
Go slowly to grip position.
Grip part.
Go to position above part.
1.5 Leaving the part in the machine
The robot leaves the part in the machine and then leaves that area so that the machine
can be started.
Routine leave_machine
Comments
MoveJ *, vmax, z50, tool1;
Go quickly to position outside
machine.
Go to machine.
Go to leave position.
Release part.
Go to position above part.
Go to position above machine.
MoveL *, v500, z10, tool1;
MoveL *, v200, fine, tool1;
release;
MoveL *, v200, z30, tool1;
MoveL *, v500, z30, tool1;
17-4
User’s Guide
Program Examples
Simple Material Handling
1.6 Starting to process
Processing starts when the robot pulses an output, do1. Then, using the input di1, the
machine informs the robot that the part has been processed and can be fetched.
Routine process_part
Comments
PulseDO do1;
WaitDI di1, 1;
Pulse output to start machine.
Wait for the ready signal.
1.7 Fetching the part from the machine
The robot fetches the part from the machine.
Routine fetch_machine
Comments
MoveL *, v500, z10, tool1;
MoveL *, v200, fine, tool1;
grip;
MoveL *, v200, z30, tool1;
MoveL *, v500, z30, tool1;
Go to machine.
Go to fetch position.
Grip part.
Go to position above part.
Go to position outside machine.
1.8 Leaving the part on the Out feeder
The robot leaves the part on the Out feeder.
Routine leave_part
Comments
MoveJ *, vmax, z30, tool1;
MoveL *, v500, z30, tool1;
MoveL *, v200, fine, tool1;
release;
MoveL *, v200, z30, tool1;
Go quickly to position near Out feeder.
Go to position above part.
Go slowly to leave position.
Release part.
Go to position above part.
User’s Guide
17-5
Simple Material Handling
17-6
Program Examples
User’s Guide
Program Examples
Material Handling
2 Material Handling
2.1 What the robot does
The robot takes parts to and from a machine, as in Figure 2.
Die casting machine
In feeder
Out feeder
Figure 2 The robot serves a machine.
First, the robot fetches a part from the In feeder and places it in the machine. When the
machine is ready, the robot grips the part and places it on the Out feeder.
The work cycle is repeated until the operator presses a push-button “Stop production”.
The robot then completes the cycle, but does not fetch any new part from the In feeder.
The robot keeps a record of production statistics; it displays the number of parts produced during the day on the teach pendant and also, at the end of the work day, stores
this information on a diskette that can be read using a PC.
2.2 The main routine
The main routine is built up of a number of routine calls which reflect the robot work cycle.
A digital input signal, prodstop, defined in the system parameters, is used to find out
if the button “Stop production” is depressed. The button remains depressed until someone presses it again.
User’s Guide
17-7
Material Handling
Program Examples
Routine main
Comments
start_production;
WHILE Dinput(prodstop) = 0 DO
Initialise production for the day.
Repeat the cycle until the button
is pressed.
Fetch the part from In feeder.
Leave part in the machine.
Start the actual processing.
Fetch the part.
Leave the part on Out feeder.
Update operating statistics.
fetch_part;
leave_machine;
process_part;
fetch_machine;
leave_part;
update_cycle;
ENDWHILE
stop_production;
Stop production for the day.
The routines process_part, fetch_machine and leave_part are not included in this
example.
2.3 Operating the gripper
A tool, gripper1, defines the TCP and the weight of the gripper. This tool data is
defined in the system module USER. In this way, the tool is always present in memory
irrespective of which program is loaded.
The gripper is controlled by electric, bistable air valves, which means that there is one
signal that controls the grip action and another that controls the release. The names of
the signals are defined in the system parameters as grip1 and release1. There is also a
signal, gripok, that is high if a part is held by the gripper. This signal is used to check
if the gripper has gripped a part correctly.
A load data, payload, is defined which describes the load held by the gripper. The best
possible motion performance is achieved if the correct load is always specified.
As the gripper grips and releases parts several times during the course of the program,
it is best to set up separate routines for this which can be called by the program. For
example:
Routine grip_part
Reset release1;
Set grip1;
WaitTime 0.5;
IF DInput(gripok)=0 THEN
TPWrite "ERROR: No part in the gripper";
EXIT;
ENDIF
GripLoad payload;
Comments
Grip the part.
Wait 0.5 s.
If error (no part in the gripper) ...
Write error message on teach pendant.
Exit program execution.
Specify that there is a load.
The routine release_part is not included in this example.
17-8
User’s Guide
Program Examples
Material Handling
2.4 Starting production
Before the actual production is started, the counter (reg1), which counts the number of
parts that are produced during the day, is set to zero. The robot also goes into a home
position.
Routine start_production
Comments
reg1 := 0;
MoveJ home, v500, fine, gripper1;
Reset the counter.
Go to home position.
In this example, all positions (e.g. home or p1) are named. They are stored as separate
position data and can thus be reused in subsequent instructions. However, it is often
just as easy to store the positions directly in the instructions (indicated by * in the
instruction).
2.5 Fetching the part from the In feeder
Before fetching a part, the robot must check if there is any part to fetch. It does this by
means of a photocell (via the feeder signal). This informs the robot if there is a part in
position or not. If there is no part, the operator is sent a message and must first correct
the error before starting program execution again.
Routine fetch_part
Comments
WHILE DInput(feeder) = 0 DO
Check if there is any part to fetch.
TPErase;
If not: Clear the teach pendant and
TPWrite "ERROR: No part on feeder";
write error message. Then wait until
TPWrite "";
the start signal is given by the operator.
TPReadFK reg2, "Put part on feeder and press start", "Start", "", "","","";
ENDWHILE
MoveJ p1, vmax, z50, gripper1;
Go quickly to position above part.
MoveL p2, v100, fine, gripper1;
Go to grip position.
grip_part;
Grip part.
MoveL p1, v200, z30, gripper1;
Go to position above part.
2.6 Leaving the part in the machine
The robot leaves the part in the machine and then leaves that area so that the machine
can be started. Often, the robot and the machine communicate with one another to
check such things as whether the machine is open. This check is not included in the
following example.
User’s Guide
17-9
Material Handling
Program Examples
Routine leave_machine
Comments
MoveJ p3, vmax, z50, gripper1;
Go quickly to position outside
machine.
Go in to machine.
Go to release position.
Release part.
Go to position above part.
Go to position outside machine.
MoveL p4, v500, z10, gripper1;
MoveL p5, v100, fine, gripper1;
release_part;
MoveL p4, v200, z30, gripper1;
MoveL p3, v500, z50, gripper1;
2.7 Updating operating statistics
The number of parts produced during the day is written on the teach pendant display.
Routine update_cycle
Comments
reg1 := reg1 +1;
Increment produced parts.
TPErase;
Clear the display.
TPWrite "";
A few blank lines.
TPWrite "";
TPWrite "No of produced parts = " \Num:=reg1;
The number of parts.
2.8 Stopping production for the day
If the operator presses “Stop production” and the robot has completed a work cycle, the
robot goes to home position. In addition, the production figures for the day (the day’s
date followed by the number of parts produced) are written on diskette.
Routine stop_production
Comments
MoveJ home, v500, fine, gripper1;
Go to home position.
Open "flp1:" \File:="logfile.doc", file\Append; Open the file for writing.
Write file, CDate() \Num:=reg1;
Write to the file.
Close file;
Close the file.
Stop;
Stop program execution.
Before a file can be opened, the data, file, must be created by the type iodev. The real
name of the file is logfile.doc.
17-10
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
CONTENTS
Page
1 The Jogging Window ...................................................................................................... 3
1.1 Window: Jogging.................................................................................................... 3
1.1.1 Menu: Special .............................................................................................. 3
2 The Inputs/Outputs Window ......................................................................................... 4
2.1 Window: Inputs/Outputs......................................................................................... 4
2.1.1 Menu: File .................................................................................................... 4
2.1.2 Menu: Edit.................................................................................................... 5
2.1.3 Menu: View.................................................................................................. 5
3 The Program Window .................................................................................................... 6
3.1 Moving between different parts of the program ..................................................... 6
3.2 General menus ........................................................................................................ 7
3.2.1 Menu: File .................................................................................................... 7
3.2.2 Menu: Edit.................................................................................................... 8
3.2.3 Menu: View.................................................................................................. 9
3.3 Window: Program Instr .......................................................................................... 10
3.3.1 Menu: IPL1 (shows different instruction pick lists) .................................... 10
3.3.2 Menu: IPL2 (shows different instruction pick lists) .................................... 10
3.4 Window: Program Routines ................................................................................... 11
3.4.1 Menu: Routine.............................................................................................. 12
3.4.2 Menu: Special .............................................................................................. 12
3.5 Window: Program Data .......................................................................................... 13
3.5.1 Menu: Data................................................................................................... 13
3.5.2 Menu: Special .............................................................................................. 14
3.6 Window: Program Data Types................................................................................ 15
3.6.1 Menu: Types................................................................................................. 15
3.7 Window: Program Test ........................................................................................... 16
3.7.1 Menu: Special .............................................................................................. 17
3.8 Window: Program Modules.................................................................................... 18
3.8.1 Menu: Module.............................................................................................. 18
4 The Production Window................................................................................................. 19
4.1 Window: Production............................................................................................... 19
4.1.1 Menu: File .................................................................................................... 19
4.1.2 Menu: Edit.................................................................................................... 19
4.1.3 Menu: View.................................................................................................. 20
5 The FileManager ............................................................................................................. 21
5.1 Window: FileManager ............................................................................................ 21
User’s Guide
18-1
Quick Reference
5.1.1 Menu: File....................................................................................................
5.1.2 Menu: Edit ...................................................................................................
5.1.3 Menu: View..................................................................................................
5.1.4 Menu: Options ...........................................................................................
6 The Service Window .......................................................................................................
6.1 General menus ........................................................................................................
6.1.1 Menu: File....................................................................................................
6.1.2 Menu: Edit ...................................................................................................
6.1.3 Menu: View..................................................................................................
6.2 Window Service Log ..............................................................................................
6.2.1 Menu: Special ..............................................................................................
6.3 Window Service Calibration ..................................................................................
6.3.1 Menu: Calib .................................................................................................
6.4 Window Service Commutation ..............................................................................
6.4.1 Menu: Com ..................................................................................................
7 The System Parameters ..................................................................................................
7.1 Window: System Parameters..................................................................................
7.1.1 Menu: File....................................................................................................
7.1.2 Menu: Edit ...................................................................................................
7.1.3 Menu: Topics ...............................................................................................
7.1.4 Menu: Types.................................................................................................
18-2
21
22
22
22
23
23
23
24
25
26
26
27
27
28
28
29
29
29
30
30
31
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Jogging Window
1 The Jogging Window
1.1 Window: Jogging
Special
Jogging
Current
motion
parameters
Robot pos:
Unit:
Motion:
Robot
Linear
Coord:
Tool:
Wobj:
Base
tool0...
wobj0...
x:
y:
z:
Q1:
Q2:
Q3:
Q4:
Joystick lock: None
Incremental: No
World
Base
Tool
1234.5
-244.9
12.8
0.7071
0.0000
0.0000
-0.7071
x z y
Wobj
Current
position
Motion
resulting from
different
joystick
deflections
1.1.1 Menu: Special
Special
1 Align...
2 Increments...
3 Motion Supervision
Command
Used to:
Align
Align the tool (see page 6-9)
Increments
Specify the sizes of the user defined increments
(see page 6-14)
Motion Supervision
Turn Motion Supervision on/off (see page 6-5)
User’s Guide
18-3
The Inputs/Outputs Window
Quick Reference
2 The Inputs/Outputs Window
2.1 Window: Inputs/Outputs
File
Name of
the I/O list
Edit
View
Inputs/Outputs
All signals
Name
Value
Type
di1
di2
grip1
grip2
grip3
grip4
progno
welderror
1
0
0
1
1
1
13
0
DI
DI
DO
DO
DO
DO
GO
DO
4(64)
I/O list
0
1
2.1.1 Menu: File
File
1 Print...
2 Preferences...
18-4
Command
Used to:
Print
print the current I/O list (see page 7-8)
Preferences
make preferences in the Inputs/Outputs window
(see page 7-4)
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Inputs/Outputs Window
2.1.2 Menu: Edit
Edit
1 Goto...
2 Goto Top
3 Goto Bottom
Command:
Used to:
Goto
go to a specific line in the list
Goto Top
go to the first line in the list
Goto Bottom
go to the last line in the list
2.1.3 Menu: View
View
1 Most Common
2 All Signals
3 Digital In
4 Digital Out
5 Analog
6 Groups
7 Safety
8 I/O Units
Command:
Used to view: (see page 7-4)
Most Common
the most common list
All Signals
all user signals
Digital In
all digital inputs
Digital Out
all digital outputs
Analog
all analog signals
Groups
all groups of digital signals
Safety
all safety signals
I/O Units
all I/O units
User’s Guide
18-5
The Program Window
Quick Reference
3 The Program Window
3.1 Moving between different parts of the program
Program memory
Program
View: Data
Program data
View: Main Routine
View: Routines
Current routine
Main
routine
View: Routine Data
Data
Subroutines
View: Instructions
Instructions
View: Error Handler
Error Handler
View: Modules
System modules
18-6
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Program Window
3.2 General menus
3.2.1 Menu: File
File
1
2
3
4
Open...
New...
Save Program
Save Program As...
5 Print...
6 Preferences...
7 Check Program
8 Close Program
9 Save Module
0 Save Module As...
Only shown in
the module window
Command:
Used to:
Open
read programs from mass storage (see page 8-7)
New
create new programs (see page 8-6)
Save Program
save programs on mass storage (see page 8-28)
Save Program As
save programs on mass storage with new names
(see page 8-28)
Print
print the program (see page 8-29)
Preferences
make preferences in the Program window
(see page 8-60)
Check Program
check that the program is correct (see page 8-21)
Close Program
erase the program from the program memory
Save Module
save a module on mass storage (see page 8-58)
Save Module As
save a module on mass storage with a new name
(see page 8-58)
User’s Guide
18-7
The Program Window
Quick Reference
3.2.2 Menu: Edit
Edit
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
18-8
Undo “Latest action”
Cut
Copy
Paste
Goto Top
Goto Bottom
Mark
Change Selected
Value
ModPos
Search...
Show/Hide IPL
Command
Used to:
Undo
perform an undo on the latest action possible to
undo in selected window (see page 8-36)
Cut
cut selected lines to the clipboard buffer (see page
8-21)
Copy
copy selected lines to the clipboard buffer (see
page 8-21)
Paste
paste the contents of the clipboard buffer into a
program (see page 8-21)
Goto Top
go to the first line (see page 8-30)
Goto Bottom
go to the last line (see page 8-30)
Mark
select several lines (see page 8-30)
Change Selected
change an instruction argument (see page 8-33)
Value
show the current value (for the selected argument)
(see page 8-50)
ModPos
modify a position (see page 8-31)
Search
search for/replace a specific argument (see page 837)
Show/Hide IPL
show/hide an instruction pick list (see page 8-15)
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Program Window
3.2.3 Menu: View
View
1
2
3
4
5
6
Instr.”<latest routine>”
Routines
Data ”<latest type>”
Data Types
Test
Modules
7 Main Routine
8 Selected Routine
9 Error Handler
Command
Used to view:
Instr.
instructions for the current routine – Program
Instruction window – (see page 8-12)
Routines
all routines – Program Routines window – (see
page 8-9)
Data
program data – Program Data window – (see page
8-45)
Data Types
all data types – Program Data Types window –
(see page 8-45)
Test
the Program Test window (see page 8-22)
Modules
all modules – Program Modules window –
(see page 8-55)
Main Routine
instructions for the main routine (see page 8-12)
Selected Routine
instructions for the selected routine (see page 812)
Error Handler
error handler of the current routine (see page 8-52)
User’s Guide
18-9
The Program Window
Quick Reference
3.3 Window: Program Instr
File
Edit
View
Program Instr
IPL1
IPL2
WELDPIPE/main
1(26)
!Init data
counter:=0;
!Go to start position
MoveL pstart,v500,fine,gripper;
WaitUntil di1=1;
!Start
Set startsignal;
open_gripper;
MoveJ *,v500,z10,gripper;
Instructions
Copy
Paste
OptArg (Modpos) Test
Go to the window Program Test
3.3.1 Menu: IPL1 (shows different instruction pick lists)
IPL1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
Common
Prog. Flow
Various
Motion Settings
Motion&Process
IO
Communicate
Interrupts
Error Recovery
System&Time
Mathematics
3.3.2 Menu: IPL2 (shows different instruction pick lists)
IPL2
1 Most Common 1
2 Most Common 2
3 Most Common 3
4
5
6
7
8
9
18-10
Motion Set Adv
Motion Adv
Ext. Computer
Multi Tasking
RAPID Support
Service
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Program Window
3.4 Window: Program Routines
File
Edit
View
Routine Special
Program Routines
Routines In Module
Name
Type
WELDPIPE/
4(6)
Routines
cleangun
errorout1
givedist
main
weldseq1
weldseq2
New...
Return value
of a function
num
Decl...
Dupl...
Data >
Test
Create a new routine
Duplicate
View routine data
Change the declaration
User’s Guide
18-11
The Program Window
Quick Reference
3.4.1 Menu: Routine
Routine
1 Routine Data
2 Instructions
(Error Handler)
(Backward Handler)
5 In Module
6 In System
7 Add Error Handler
8 Add Backward Handler
Command:
Used to:
Routine Data
create a new routine (see page 8-10)
Instructions
view the instructions of the selected routine
Error Handler
view the error handler of the selected routine
Backward Handler
view the backward handler of the selected
routine
In Module
view only the routines in the current module
(see page 8-57)
In System
view all routines in all modules (see page 8-57)
Add/Remove Error Handler
add/remove an error handler to the selected
routine (see page 8-53)
Add/Remove Backward Handler
add/remove a backward handler to the selected
routine (see RAPID Reference Manual Programming off-line)
3.4.2 Menu: Special
Special
Mirror...
18-12
Command:
Used to:
Mirror
mirror a routine or a module (see page 8-39)
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Program Window
3.5 Window: Program Data
File
Edit
View
Data
Program Data
Data type
Special
WELDPIPE/
tooldata In Module
Name
3(3)
Data
gripper
gun1
gun2
New...
Create new data
Decl...
Dupl...
Types
Duplicate
Change the declaration
Test
Go to the window Program Test
View all data types
3.5.1 Menu: Data
Data
1 Value
2 Types
3 In Module
4 In System
5 In Routine “routine name”
6 New Array
Command:
Used to:
Value
read or change the current value of selected data
(see page 8-50)
Types
call up the list with all data types (see page 8-45)
In Module
call up only the data in the current module
(see page 8-58)
In System
create new data (see page 8-47)
In Routine
call up all routine data
New Array
declare a new array data
User’s Guide
18-13
The Program Window
Quick Reference
3.5.2 Menu: Special
Special
1 Define Coord...
2 Go to selected position
18-14
Command:
Used to:
Define Coord
define a tool, work object or program displacement
(see Chapter 10, Calibration)
Go to selected position
go to a selected position
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Program Window
3.6 Window: Program Data Types
File
Edit
View
Types
Program Data Types
WELDPIPE/
5(6)
All data
bool
num
robtarget
tooldata
wobjdata
Data types
Data
All
3.6.1 Menu: Types
Types
1 Data
2 Used Types
3 All Types
Command:
Used to:
Data
call up all data of a selected type
Used Types
call up only those data types that are used
All Types
call up all data types (see page 8-45)
User’s Guide
18-15
The Program Window
Quick Reference
3.7 Window: Program Test
File
Test running
parameters
Program pointer
Instructions
Edit
Program Test
Speed:=
Running:=
View
Special
WELDPIPE/main
50%
Continuous
1(26)
!Init data
counter:=0;
!Go to start position
MoveL pstart,v100,FINE,gripper;
WaitUntil DInput(ready)=1;
!Start
Set startsignal;
open_gripper;
Start
FWD
BWD
(Modpos) Instr
Go to the Program Instr window
18-16
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Program Window
3.7.1 Menu: Special
Special
1 Move Cursor to PP
2 Move PP to Cursor
3 Move PP to Main
4 Move PP to Routine
5 Call Routine...
6 Call Service Routine...
7 Go to selected position...
8 Simulate...
Command:
Used to:
Move Cursor to PP
start from the latest stopped instruction (see page 825)
Move PP to Cursor
start from the selected instruction (see page 8-25)
Move PP to Main
start from the main routine (see page 8-25)
Move PP to Routine
start from any routine (see page 8-25)
Call Routine
start from any routine without loosing context (see
page 8-26)
Call Service Routine
execute configured service routine without loosing
context (see page 8-27)
Go to selected position
go to a selected position
Simulate
allow program execution in MOTORS OFF mode
User’s Guide
18-17
The Program Window
Quick Reference
3.8 Window: Program Modules
File
Edit
View
Module
Program Modules
WELDPIPE
Name
Type
Cadpositions
Mainmodule
System1
System2
Program Module
Program Module
System Module
System Module
2(4)
Modules
New...
Decl...
Data
View program data
Create a new module
Change the declaration
3.8.1 Menu: Module
Module
1 Data
2 Module List...
18-18
Command:
Used to:
Data
view program data
Module List
view the complete module in a list (see page 8-59)
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Production Window
4 The Production Window
4.1 Window: Production
File
Edit
Production Info
Routine
Status
View
CAR_LIN1
: main :
: Stopped
Speed:=
75
%
Running mode:=
Continuous
2(39)
MoveL p1, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p2, v500, z20, tool1;
MoveL p3, v500, z20, tool1;
Set do1;
Set do2;
Program pointer
Program list
Start
FWD
BWD
4.1.1 Menu: File
File
1 Load Program...
Command
Used to:
Load Program
load a program (see page 11-4)
4.1.2 Menu: Edit
Edit
1 Goto...
2 Start from Beginning
Command
Used to:
Goto
go to a specific instruction
Start from Beginning
go to the first instruction in the program (see page
11-7)
User’s Guide
18-19
The Production Window
Quick Reference
4.1.3 Menu: View
View
1 Info
2 Position
18-20
Command
Used to:
Info
display the program in the lower part of the
window
Position
tune a position (see page 11-8)
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The FileManager
5 The FileManager
5.1 Window: FileManager
File
Edit
View
Options
FileManager
flp1:/WELDINGS/TEST
Current unit
Name
Type
Current directory
Latest change
Date
2(12)
..
PROC1
PROC2
PROCFUNC
WDATA
WTOOLS
RESULTS
Files
Go Up One Level
Program
Program
Program Module
Program Module
Directory
Directory
..
1993-05-28
1993-05-09
1993-05-01
1993-05-01
1993-05-01
1993-06-01
Up
5.1.1 Menu: File
1
2
3
4
5
File
New Directory...
Rename...
Copy...
Move...
Print File...
Command:
Used to:
New Directory
create a new directory (see page 13-5)
Rename
change the name of a selected file (see page 13-5)
Copy
copy a selected file or directory to another mass
memory or directory (see page 13-6)
Move
move a selected file or directory to another mass
memory or directory (see page 13-7)
Print File
print a file on a printer
User’s Guide
18-21
The FileManager
Quick Reference
5.1.2 Menu: Edit
Edit
1 Goto...
2 Goto Top
3 Goto Bottom
Command:
Used to:
Goto
go to a specific line in a list
Goto Top
go to the first file in a list
Goto Bottom
go to the last file in a list
5.1.3 Menu: View
View
1 [ram1disk:]
2 [flp1:] Disc#12
Command:
Used to view:
ram1disk:
the files on the RAM disk (see page 13-4)
flp1:
the files on the diskette (see page 13-4)
5.1.4 Menu: Options
Options
1 Format...
2 Rapid Converters...
18-22
Command:
Used to:
Format
format a diskette (see page 13-7)
Rapid Converters
convert old program versions
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Service Window
6 The Service Window
6.1 General menus
6.1.1 Menu: File
File
1
2
3
4
Save logs as...
Save all logs as...
Backup...
Restore...
Restart...
Command
Used to:
Save logs as
save logs on a diskette or other mass memory (see
page 14-7)
Save all logs as
save all logs on a diskette or other mass memory
(see page 14-7)
Backup
perform a backup (see page 14-10)
Restore
perform a restore (see page 14-11)
Restart
restart the robot (see page 14-11)
User’s Guide
18-23
The Service Window
Quick Reference
6.1.2 Menu: Edit
1
2
3
4
18-24
Edit
Goto...
Goto Top
Goto Bottom
Info...
Command
Used to:
Goto
go to a specific line in a list
Goto Top
go to the first line in a list
Goto Bottom
go to the last line in a list
Info
view information about selected log messages (see
page 14-6)
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Service Window
6.1.3 Menu: View
View
1 Log
2 Date & Time
3
4
5
6
Calibration
Commutation
BaseFrame
Two Axes Definition
System Info
Command
Used to:
Log
display the different logs (see page 14-5)
Date & Time
set the date and time (see page 14-3)
Calibration
calibrate the robot (see page 14-8)
Commutation
commutate the motors (see The Product Manual/
Repairs)
BaseFrame
calibrate the base coordinate system (see Chapter
10, Calibration)
Two Axes Definition
calibrate the base coordinate system for a two axes
manipulator (see Chapter 10, Calibration)
System Info
display system information (see page 14-9)
User’s Guide
18-25
The Service Window
Quick Reference
6.2 Window Service Log
File
Edit
View
Special
No. of messages
Time of most recent
message
Service Log
Messages
Latest
#
Name
10
20
0
1
0
3
4
0
Common
Operational status
System
Hardware
Program
Motion
Operator
Process
Log list
4(9)
0810 20:30.32
0810 20:25.14
0810 20:30.32
0810 19:15.12
0809 12:30.00
Msg->
Displays the messages in selected log
6.2.1 Menu: Special
Special
1 Erase Log
2 Erase All Logs
3 Update log on Event
18-26
Command:
Used to:
Erase Log
erase contents in selected log (see page 14-6)
Erase All Logs
erase contents in all logs (see page 14-6)
Update log on Event
update the log directly when a message is sent – the
command is changed to “Update log on Command” when selected, which means that the log is
not updated until the function key Update is
pressed (see page 14-7)
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The Service Window
6.3 Window Service Calibration
File
Edit
View
Calib
Service Calibration
Unit
Status
Robot
Manip1
Manip2
Trackm
Synchronized
Synchronized
Synchronized
Synchronized
1(4)
Calibration
status
6.3.1 Menu: Calib
Calib
1 Rev.Counter Update...
2 Fine Calibrate...
Command:
Used to:
Rev.Counter Update
update the counter (see Chapter 10, Calibration)
Fine Calibrate
calibrate using the measurement system (see the
Product Manual/Repairs)
User’s Guide
18-27
The Service Window
Quick Reference
6.4 Window Service Commutation
File
Edit
View
Com
Service Commutation
Unit
Status
Robot
Manip1
Manip2
Trackm
Commutated
Commutated
Commutated
Commutated
1(4)
Status
6.4.1 Menu: Com
Com
1 Commutate...
18-28
Command:
Used to:
Commutate
commutate using the measurement
system (see the Product Manual/Repairs)
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The System Parameters
7 The System Parameters
7.1 Window: System Parameters
File
Parameter type
Edit
Topics
Types
System Parameters
User signals
Parameters
IO
Signal Name
Unit Name
Signal Type
Signal Number
Logical Max
Physical Max
Logical Min
Physical Min
do1
d327_11
DO
1
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000
0.000000
Parameter topic
Info
1(10)
Parameters
Cancel
OK
7.1.1 Menu: File
File
1
2
3
4
5
Load Saved Parameters...
Add New Parameters...
Save All As...
Save As...
Check Parameters
Restart...
Command:
Used to:
Load Saved Parameters
load parameters from mass storage (see page 12-7)
Add New Parameters
add parameters from mass storage (see page 12-7)
Save All As
save all parameters on mass storage (see page 12-6)
Save As
save parameters on mass storage (see page 12-6)
Check Parameters
check parameters before restart (see page 12-5)
Restart
restart the robot (see page 12-4)
User’s Guide
18-29
The System Parameters
Quick Reference
7.1.2 Menu: Edit
Edit
2 Goto Top
3 Goto Bottom
3 Goto...
4 Show Change Log...
5 Change Pass Codes...
Command:
Used to:
Goto Top
go to the first line in a list
Goto Bottom
go to the last line in a list
Goto
go to a specific line in a list
Show Change Log
view information about the latest modifications
made (see page 12-5)
Change Pass Codes
change pass codes (see page 12-46)
7.1.3 Menu: Topics
Topics
1
2
3
4
5
6
Controller
Communication
IO Signals
Manipulator
Arc Weld
Teach Pendant
All Topics
Command:
Used to view:
Controller
Communication
the parameter of the Controller topic (see page 12-37)
the parameter of the Communication topic (see page
12-31)
the parameters of the IO topic (see page 12-9)
the parameters of the Manipulator topic (see page 1253)
the parameters of the Arc Weld topic (see RAPID
ProcessWare - ArcWare)
the parameters of the Teach Pendant topic (see page
12-45)
all topics (see page 12-3)
IO Signals
Manipulator
Arc Weld
Teach Pendant
All Topics
18-30
User’s Guide
Quick Reference
The System Parameters
7.1.4 Menu: Types
Content showing the types connected to the chosen topic.
User’s Guide
18-31
The System Parameters
18-32
Quick Reference
User’s Guide
INDEX
A
Add 9-14
add an instruction 8-16
Add New Parameters 12-7
Add or Replace Parameters 12-7
Align 6-5, 6-9
All Topics 12-3
All Types 8-46
analog output
change manually 7-6
approach point 10-29
argument 8-13
add optional 8-34
change 8-33
arithmetic expression 8-18
Arm
parameters 12-54, 12-55, 12-56
Arm check pnt
parameters 12-58
Arm load
parameters 12-57
array data 8-48
assignment 9-14
authorization 12-46
automatic mode 9, 5-4
B
base coordinate system
define 12-61
jogging 6-6
BaseFrame 10-9, 10-13, 10-18, 10-20
BWD 8-23
C
Calibration 10-6
calibration offset 12-53, 12-54, 12-78, 1280, 12-81
calibration position
define 12-54
Call Routine 8-26
Call Service Routine 8-27
calling a subroutine 9-10
change
argument 8-33
data 8-50
User’s Guide
displacement frame 10-43, 10-44
instruction 8-29
optional argument 8-34
tool 10-29, 10-31
work object 10-37, 10-38
Change Pass Codes 12-47
Check Program 8-21
choose
routine 8-12
Clear 9-14
collision detection 6-5, 12-55
commutating 14-9
commutation offset 12-53, 12-54, 12-78, 1280, 12-81
Compact IF 9-11
confirmation
define 12-46
constant 8-45
Content 8-20
Controller
parameters 12-37
coordinate system 4-22
coordinated motion 12-63
Copy
File Manager 13-6
instruction 8-21
copy
data 8-50, 8-58
files 13-6
routine 8-11, 8-58
CPU Optimization 12-84
create
data 8-47
directory 13-5
displacement frame 10-43
module 8-56
program 8-6
routine 8-10
tool 10-28
work object 10-36
Cross Connections
define 12-15
C-Start 14-11
Cut
instruction 8-21
20-1
D
Data 8-45
data 8-45
change 8-50
create 8-47
declaration 8-51
delete 8-52
duplicate 8-50, 8-58
Data Types 8-46
Date & Time 14-3
Declaration
data 8-51
module 8-56
routine 8-35
Decr 9-14
define
tool 10-28
Define Coord
displacement frame 10-44
tool 10-31
work object 10-38
delete
data 8-52
file 13-6
instruction 8-36
module 8-57
routine 8-36
digital output
change manually 7-6
directory 13-3
create 13-5
delete 13-6
diskette 13-3
format 13-7
displacement 9-6
displacement frame
change 10-43, 10-44
Display 4-10
Duplicate
data 8-50, 8-58
routine 8-58
duplicate
routine 8-11
E
elongator point 10-29
ELSE 9-13
20-2
Emergency stop 4-9
emergency stop 5-6
Enabling device 4-10
enabling device 5-5
Erase All Logs 14-6
Erase Log 14-6
Error Handler 8-52
error log 14-4
error management 18-21
error recovery 8-52
Event Routines 12-38, 12-39, 12-40, 12-41,
12-42
execution mode 8-23
expression 8-18
external axes
defining 12-63
jogging 6-16
external manipulator 12-62
external unit
choose 6-16
F
Field 4-23
file 13-3
copy 13-6
delete 13-6
move 13-7
rename 13-5
File Extensions 12-45
file manager 13-3
file system 13-3
flp1 13-4
FOR
change structure 8-35
format diskette 13-7
function 8-9
FWD 8-23
G
Go to selected position 8-27
group of I/O
change manually 7-6
Groups
parameters 12-14
H
Hide IPL 8-15
User’s Guide
I
I/O
parameters 12-9
I/O list
define Most Common 7-4
IF 9-11
change structure 8-35
In All Modules 8-58
In Module 8-58
Incr 9-14
incremental jogging 4-21
incremental movement 6-14
Info
Service window 14-6
input signal
define 12-12
inputs/outputs
manual operation 7-3
Inputs/Outputs window 7-3
insert
instruction 8-16
instruction 8-13
add 8-16
change 8-29
copy 8-21
delete 8-36
move 8-21
instruction pick list 8-15
Most Common 8-60
Instructions 8-12
IO Boards 12-9
IPL1 8-15
IPL2 8-15
I-Start 14-11
J
jogging 6-3
Joints 12-66
joystick 4-10, 6-4
Joystick lock 6-5
L
Load
parameters 12-7
load
module 8-57
program 8-7, 11-4
User’s Guide
Load Program 11-4
Load Saved Parameter 12-7
locking of joystick axes 6-5
Log 14-5
log 14-4
logical expression 8-18
M
Main Routine 8-12
main routine 8-5
Manipulator
parameters 12-53
MANUAL FULL SPEED 4-9
manual mode 5-5
MANUAL REDUCED SPEED 4-9
Mark 8-30
Mirroring 8-39
modify
argument 8-33
data 8-50
instruction 8-29
position 8-31
ModPos 8-31
module 8-54
create 8-56
declaration 8-56
delete 8-57
open 8-57
read 8-55
save 8-58
Module List 8-59
Modules 8-55
Most Common
I/O list 7-4
instruction pick list 8-60
Motion Supervision 6-5, 12-55
Motor
parameters 12-53, 12-54, 12-79, 12-81
Motors off 5-5
Motors on 4-9, 5-5
Move
File Manager 13-7
move
files 13-7
instruction 8-21
Move cursor to PP 8-26
Move PP to cursor 8-26
Move PP to Main 8-26
20-3
Move PP to Routine 8-26
MoveC 9-3
MoveJ 9-3
MoveL 9-3
N
New 8-6
module 8-56
New Directory 13-5
new routine 8-10
O
object coordinate system
jogging 6-11
offset 9-6
Open
module 8-57
program 8-7
operating mode 5-4
operator dialogs 11-9
operator’s panel 5-4
OptArg 8-34
optional argument 8-13
add 8-34
Optional Package 12-45
output instruction 9-7
output signal
define 12-12
override speed 11-5
P
parameters 12-3, 12-9, 12-62
pass code
change 12-47
define 12-47
Paste 8-21
persistent 8-45
position
instruction 9-3
modify 8-31
read current 6-4
power failure 5-3
power supply 5-3
Preferences
I/O window 7-4
program window 8-60, 8-62
20-4
print
I/O-list 7-8
program 8-29
ProcCall 9-10
procedure 8-9
Production mode 4-9
Production window 11-3
program 8-5
create 8-6
load 8-7, 11-4
print 8-29
save 8-28
program data 8-5
Program Data Types window 8-46
Program Data window 8-45
program flow instructions 9-10
Program Instr window 8-12
program module 8-54
Program Modules window 8-55
Program Routines window 8-9
program running mode 11-5
Program Test window 8-22
program window 8-6
programming 8-5
Programming mode 4-9
P-Start 14-11
R
RAM disk 13-3
ram1disk 13-4
range of movement
limit 12-54
read
module 8-55, 8-57
parameters 12-7
program 11-4
Relays 12-68, 12-69
Rename
file 13-5
reorienting the tool 6-9
Replace 8-37
required argument 8-13
Reset 9-7
reset
emergency stop 5-6
restart 5-3, 12-4, 14-11
Rev.Counter Update 10-8
User’s Guide
Robot
parameters 12-60, 12-61, 12-75, 12-76,
12-83, 12-84, 12-85, 12-86, 1287
routine 8-5, 8-8
choose 8-12
create 8-10
declaration 8-35
delete 8-36
duplicate 8-11, 8-58
Routines 8-9
Running mode 12-51
running programs
production 11-3
testing programs 8-21
S
SafetyOpKey
parameter 12-37
SafetyRunChain
parameter 12-37
save
module 8-58
parameters 12-6
program 8-28
Save All As
parameters 12-6
Save As
module 8-59
parameters 12-6
Service window 14-7
Save Module 8-58
Save Module As 8-59
Save Program 8-28
Save Program As 8-28
ScreenViewer 15-15
ScreenViewer Window 15-15
Search 8-37
select several instructions 8-30
Selected Routine 8-12
service window 14-3
Set 9-7
SetAO 9-7
SetDO 9-7
SetGO 9-7
Show Change Log 12-5
Show IPL 8-15
User’s Guide
signal
define 12-12
signal values
changing manually 7-6
Simulate wait 8-27
Single Type 12-66
speed correction 8-22
Start from Beginning 11-7
start program 11-6
starting program execution 8-24
start-up 5-3, 18-21
stationary tool
jogging 6-13
stopping program execution 8-25, 11-7
storage of program 13-3
store
module 8-58
program 8-28
string 8-18
subroutine 8-5, 8-8
call 9-10
System Inputs
define 12-22
system module 8-6
System Outputs
define 12-24
system parameters 12-3
change log 12-5
load 12-7
save 12-6
T
TCP 10-28
Teach Pendant 4-10
parameters 12-45
teach pendant 5-7
TEST
change structure 8-35
Test 8-22
Testing mode 4-9
text 5-9
time setting 14-3
tool
change 10-29, 10-31
define 10-28
tool coordinate system
jogging 6-7
tool reorientation 6-9
20-5
Transmission 12-57, 12-66
trap routine 8-9
trimming
external axes 12-70, 12-71
typographic conventions 2-4
U
Unmark 8-30
Update log on Command 14-7
Update log on Event 14-7
User screen 15-15
user screen package 15-15
User Signals
parameters 12-12
V
variable 8-45
W
wait
a specific time 9-10
for an input 9-8
WaitDI 9-8
WaitTime 9-10
WaitUntil 9-8
warning message 18-22
welcome window 4-15
work object
change 10-37, 10-38
working space
limit 12-54
world coordinate system
define 12-61
jogging 6-13
20-6
User’s Guide
Glossary
Glossary
Argument
The parts of an instruction that can be changed, i.e.
everything except the name of the instruction.
Automatic mode
The applicable mode when the operating mode selector is
set to
.
Component
One part of a record.
Configuration
The position of the robot axes at a particular location.
Constant
Data that can only be changed manually.
Corner path
The path generated when passing a fly-by point.
Declaration
The part of a routine or data that defines its properties.
Dialog/Dialog box
Any dialog boxes appearing on the display of the teach pendant must always be terminated (usually by pressing OK or
Cancel) before they can be exited.
Error handler
A separate part of a routine where an error can be taken care
of. Normal execution can then be restarted automatically.
Expression
A sequence of data and associated operands; e.g. reg1+5 or
reg1>5.
Fly-by point
A point which the robot only passes in the vicinity of –
without stopping. The distance to that point depends on the
size of the programmed zone.
Function
A routine that returns a value.
Group of signals
A number of digital signals that are grouped together and
handled as one signal.
Interrupt
An event that temporarily interrupts program execution and
executes a trap routine.
I/O
Electrical inputs and outputs.
Main routine
The routine that usually starts when the Start key is pressed.
Manual mode
The applicable mode when the operating mode switch is set
to
.
Mechanical unit
A group of external axes.
Module
A group of routines and data, i.e. a part of the program.
Motors On/Off
The state of the robot, i.e. whether or not the power supply
to the motors is switched on.
Operator’s panel
The panel located on the front of the control system.
Orientation
The direction of an end effector, for example.
Parameter
The input data of a routine, sent with the routine call. It corresponds to the argument of an instruction.
Persistent
A variable, the value of which is persistent.
Procedure
A routine which, when called, can independently form an
instruction.
User’s Guide
20-7
Glossary
Program
The set of instructions and data which define the task of the
robot. Programs do not, however, contain system modules.
Program data
Data that can be accessed in a complete module or in the
complete program.
Program module
A module included in the robot’s program and which is
transferred when copying the program to a diskette, for
example.
Record
A compound data type.
Routine
A subprogram.
Routine data
Local data that can only be used in a routine.
Start point
The instruction that will be executed first when starting program execution.
Stop point
A point at which the robot stops before it continues on to the
next point.
System module
A module that is always present in the program memory.
When a new program is read, the system modules remain in
the program memory.
System parameters
The settings which define the robot equipment and properties; configuration data in other words.
Tool Centre Point (TCP) The point, generally at the tip of a tool, that moves along the
programmed path at the programmed velocity.
20-8
Trap routine
The routine that defines what is to be done when a specific
interrupt occurs.
Variable
Data that can be changed from within a program, but which
loses its value (returns to its initial value) when a program is
started from the beginning.
Window
The robot is programmed and operated by means of a
number of different windows, such as the Program window
and the Service window. A window can always be exited by
choosing another window.
Zone
The spherical space that surrounds a fly-by point. As soon
as the robot enters this zone, it starts to move to the next
position.
User’s Guide
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