Webroot Spy Sweeper User Guide

Webroot Spy Sweeper User Guide
AntiVirus with Spy Sweeper
2011
User Guide
Webroot Software, Inc.
PO Box 19816
Boulder, CO 80308
www.webroot.com
Version 7.0.9
Webroot AntiVirus with Spy Sweeper User Guide
Version 7.0.9; March 31, 2011
© 2003 – 2011 Webroot Software, Inc. All rights reserved. Webroot, Spy Sweeper, Webroot AntiVirus with
AntiSpyware, and the Webroot and Spy Sweeper icons are trademarks or registered trademarks of Webroot Software,
Inc.
Included antivirus software © 2000 – 2011 Sophos Group. All rights reserved. Sophos and Sophos Anti-Virus are
registered trademarks of Sophos Plc and Sophos Group.
All other product and company names mentioned may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective
owners.
Contents
1: Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Creating a Webroot account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Signing in to your Webroot account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Using the main interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Using the Webroot system tray menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Viewing protection status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Responding to alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Responding to pop-up alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Responding to balloon alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Responding to notifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Using My Webroot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
2: Security Scans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Scanning for threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Viewing scan details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Customizing scan options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Creating a scan schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
3: Quarantine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Viewing quarantined items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Deleting quarantined items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Restoring quarantined items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
4: Shields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Setting real-time active protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Setting browser protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Setting network protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
5: My Account Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Viewing account details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Editing your contact information and password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Managing licenses and additional products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Creating Webroot support tickets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
6: Program Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Managing the schedule for scans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Viewing the system history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Managing updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Setting Gamer mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Using a proxy server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Changing the language setting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
A: Webroot Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
B: Uninstalling the program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
iii
C: Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Threat protection FAQs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
What is malware and how does it get in my computer? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
How do I know if my computer is infected? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Why does the Windows Security Center say that the Webroot software is turned off? . . . . .61
Scan and Quarantine FAQs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
How do I know if the System Scanner found any threats? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
How does Webroot know the difference between malware and legitimate programs?. . . . . .61
Can I work on my computer during a scan? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Can I quickly scan a USB or CD? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Are there times when I should run a scan myself? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
What should I do with items in Quarantine? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
What are cookies and why does it find so many? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Shield FAQs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
How do I know if I should block or allow a download? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
A Windows dialog says it found spyware, but no Webroot alert appeared. What do I do? . . .63
Do I need shields if a firewall is running? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
MyAccount FAQs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Can I install the Webroot software on another computer? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
What should I do if I forget my account password?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
How do I find my keycode? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Can other users access my online account?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Can multiple users access the Webroot software from one computer? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
iv
1: Getting Started
This guide describes how to use the Webroot® AntiVirus with Spy Sweeper® (WAVSS) software.
This Webroot software combines the #1 antispyware technology with industry-leading antivirus
protection for complete security.
To get started using the Webroot software, see the following topics:
•
“Creating a Webroot account” on page 2
•
“Signing in to your Webroot account” on page 4
•
“Using the main interface” on page 5
•
“Using the Webroot system tray menu” on page 6
•
“Viewing protection status” on page 7
•
“Responding to alerts” on page 8
•
“Responding to notifications” on page 10
•
“Using My Webroot” on page 11
1: Getting Started
1
Creating a Webroot account
Your Webroot account includes your software license status and provides access to certain tasks,
such as upgrading your software and installing it on another computer (if you purchased a multiuser license). The account is available online through My Webroot, which is your personalized
Web site available 24 hours a day, every day of the year.
To create a Webroot account:
1. Make sure you are connected to the Internet.
2. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
3. From the taskbar at bottom of the Home panel, click My Account.
The My Account panel opens and shows your keycode, version number, and other
information about your subscription.
4. Click the Manage My Account button at the bottom of the panel.
If you have not previously created an account, an account creation dialog opens, as shown
in the following example. (If you have previously created an account, the My Webroot site
opens in a browser and you do not need to follow these instructions.)
2
1: Getting Started
5. Click the Create account button and follow the on-screen instructions.
Note
The Webroot software blocks certain terms in user names, such as obscene words.
If you use a term on our “blocked” list, your account creation may be rejected. If
you experience problems creating an account, contact Webroot Support.
When you complete the account creation process, your account information is provided
online through My Webroot, which is your personalized Web site available 24 hours a day,
every day of the year.
6. To access My Webroot, you can click the Manage My Account button again. You can
also open a Web browser and enter https://www.webroot.com/mywebroot in the address
bar. When the Sign In dialog opens, enter your user name and password.
Note
If you did not complete all the steps above or if you did not enter a valid email
address, account creation will fail. If this happens, you can complete the process by
following steps 1-4 above. When a dialog opens that says your account has not
been activated, click the Activate account button and follow the on-screen
instructions that open in your Web browser.
1: Getting Started
3
Signing in to your Webroot account
You can log in to your Webroot account to access software license information and perform
certain tasks, such as upgrading your software and installing it on another computer (if you
purchased a multi-user license). The account is available online 24 hours a day, every day of the
year from My Webroot (see “Using My Webroot” on page 11).
If you have not yet created an account, see “Creating a Webroot account” on page 2.
To sign in to your Webroot account:
1. Right-click the Webroot icon
menu.
in the system tray and click Sign In from the pop-up
The Sign In dialog opens.
2. Enter your user name (your email address) and password, then click the Sign In button.
You can now access your online account (see “Using My Webroot” on page 11).
Note
If you cannot remember your account password, click Forgot Your Password?. In
the dialog that opens, enter your email address and click Send Email. Webroot
sends a message to your email address with instructions for resetting your
password.
4
1: Getting Started
Using the main interface
If you want to check on system status or change some settings, you can open the Webroot
software’s main interface by doing either of the following:
•
Double-click the Webroot icon
in the system tray. The system tray is located in the
lower right corner of your computer screen desktop.
•
Open the Windows Start menu, click All Programs (or Programs), click Webroot, then
click the name of your Webroot software version.
•
Double-click the Webroot icon on your Windows desktop:
The main interface opens and displays the Home panel, which provides access to all functions and
notifications for the Webroot software.
Home panel
Status color
(green, yellow, or red)
Green: Your computer is secure.
Yellow: A message requires your attention.
Red: A critical item requires your intervention.
See how button
Opens another panel that shows a status of your computer’s security.
Scan now button
Launches the System Scanner. See “Scanning for threats” on page 14.
Edit settings button
Opens another panel where you can change settings for scans. See
“Customizing scan options” on page 19.
1: Getting Started
5
Home panel (continued)
Help
Opens the main Help file.
My Account
Opens the My Account panel, where you can view subscription
information and access a link for managing your account in My
Webroot. See Chapter 5, “My Account Management” on page 39.
Settings
Opens the Settings panel, where you can modify scanning schedules,
view the system history, set program update options, set Gamer mode,
and specify settings for a proxy server. See Chapter 6, “Program
Settings” on page 45.
Support
Opens the Support panel, which provides Webroot Technical numbers
and links.
Notifications
Opens the Notifications panel, which provides a list of status alerts. See
“Responding to notifications” on page 10.
Using the Webroot system tray menu
After you install the Webroot software, a Webroot icon opens in the Windows system tray, located
in the bottom right of your computer desktop. This icon provides access to Webroot’s system tray
menu and some common Webroot functions.
To open the system tray menu, right-click on the Webroot icon
.
The menu provides the following selections:
System Tray Menu
Home
Launches the main interface.
Scan Now
Launches the System Scanner. The icon changes to a Busy state
“Scanning for threats” on page 14.
Turn ON/OFF
Gamer Mode
Turns Gamer mode on or off. See “Setting Gamer mode” on page 50.
Help
Launches the main Help file.
. See
Launch My Account Launches an Internet browser and opens My Webroot. See “Using My
Webroot” on page 11.
6
1: Getting Started
System Tray Menu (continued)
Sign In/Sign Out
If you are not signed in to your Webroot account, this selection displays
“Sign In” and launches a dialog window for you to enter your name and
password to access your account.
If you are signed in already, this selection displays “Sign Out” and logs out
of your account.
Close
Closes the Webroot software main interface.
Note: Selecting “Close” does not stop currently active or scheduled tasks,
such as scans.
Viewing protection status
To show your computer’s overall protection status, areas of the Webroot user interface change
colors, as follows:
Main Interface Color
Icon
Description
Green
Your computer is secure.
Yellow
One or more messages require your attention.
Red
One or more critical items require your intervention.
To view protection status:
1. Open the Home panel of the Webroot software’s main interface by double-clicking the
Webroot icon
in the system tray.
2. From the Home panel, you can read a short description about the issue.
The panel may also provide buttons for how to fix the issue or how to view more detailed
information:
•
Fix it now. The Webroot software will resolve the situation. The action it takes depends
on the issue. For example, if you turned off an important shield, it will turn it back on.
•
View Details. The Webroot software opens a panel where you can view more information
and fix the issue.
1: Getting Started
7
Responding to alerts
If the Webroot software needs to inform you about an important system status, it opens a pop-up
alert in the middle of your computer screen or a balloon alert from the system tray, as follows:
Alert methods
Pop-up alerts
Appear in the middle of the
computer screen and require
immediate action.
See “Responding to pop-up
alerts” after this table.
Balloon alerts
Open from the system tray and
may be informational or require
action.
See “Responding to balloon
alerts” on page 9.
Responding to pop-up alerts
The Webroot software opens a pop-up alert when it detects an item trying to download to your
computer and it cannot determine whether this item is a threat or a legitimate program. For
example, the Webroot Shields may open an alert if you are downloading a new toolbar for your
browser. Toolbars are classified as Browser Helper Objects (BHOs), and although most BHOs are
legitimate, some are part of spyware that can download without your knowledge. Because
Webroot cannot determine if you want this toolbar, you need to respond by selecting Allow or
Block. If you do not respond within the allotted time shown in the alert counter (usually 60
seconds), the Webroot Shields automatically block the activity.
Note
If a pop-up alert opens and you aren’t certain whether to allow or block the detected
item, your safest action is to block it. The name of the file trying to download is
displayed in the alert box. Click Show Details for more information or contact
Webroot Support.
To respond to pop-up alerts:
1. Read the alert text to determine what type of program is attempting to download to your
computer. You can click the arrow next to Show Details to view the name, file name,
company, and copyright of the program.
The following example shows an alert detected by the Webroot Shields.
8
1: Getting Started
2. Click the Block button if you do not recognize the program and were not trying to
download anything as you viewed pages on the Internet.
or
Click the Allow button if you do recognize the program and you are purposely
downloading it.
Note
Some alerts provide an Always perform the selected action checkbox. If Webroot
frequently detects the same item, you can select this checkbox so Webroot will
always allow or block the item in the future.
Responding to balloon alerts
If the Webroot software needs to report important system status or an issue that requires your
attention, it opens a balloon alert near the Webroot icon
in the system tray. These alerts are
only visible for a short time (maximum 30 seconds) depending on the level of importance:
•
Information only: Appears for 10 seconds and provides status information. You do not
need to take action.
•
Action: Appears for 15 seconds and provides a link for you to click and view more
information. These alerts require you to take action to resolve an issue.
•
Critical action: Appears for 20 to 30 seconds and provides a link for you to click and
view more information. These alerts require you to take action to resolve a critical issue.
To respond to balloon alerts:
1. If you notice a link in the balloon alert, such as View Notifications, click the link.
The Webroot software’s main interface opens with the Notifications panel displayed.
2. Take action for each alert displayed in the Notifications panel. For further instructions, see
“Responding to notifications” on page 10.
Note
If the alert disappears before you can click on the link, open the main interface
(double-click the Webroot icon
in the system tray), then click Notifications at
the bottom taskbar. The Notifications panel shows all alerts that require your
attention.
1: Getting Started
9
Responding to notifications
The Notifications panel shows alerts that may require you to take an action. Depending on the
issue, the notification includes instructions and buttons that guide you to managing and resolving
the issue.
To respond to notifications:
1. Open the Notifications panel by doing either of the following:
•
From the system tray, click the View Notifications link from an alert balloon.
-or •
From the main interface’s Home panel, click Notifications in the bottom taskbar.
The Notifications panel opens.
2. Click on an item in the Summary pane to display more information at the right.
3. Read the details description and respond by clicking links or buttons for your desired
action.
10
1: Getting Started
For some types of notifications, you can select the checkbox for Always perform the
selected action, so you do not need to respond to the same alert again.
Once you respond to a notification, it no longer appears in the Notifications panel and is
moved to the History panel (under Settings). See “Viewing the system history” on
page 47.
Using My Webroot
My Webroot is your personalized Webroot Web site that is available 24 hours a day, every day of
the year. From My Webroot, you can log in to your Webroot account to access your software
license status and certain tasks, such as upgrading your software and installing it on another
computer (if you purchased a multi-user license). You can access My Webroot from any computer.
Note
You must create an account to access My Webroot. If you have not yet created an
account, see “Creating a Webroot account” on page 2.
You can open My Webroot by doing either of the following:
•
Open your browser and enter https://www.webroot.com/mywebroot.
•
Open the main interface (double-click the Webroot icon
in the system tray). From the
taskbar at bottom of the Home panel, click My Account. When the My Account panel
opens, click the Manage My Account button.
If you are not signed in already, My Webroot opens with a Sign In panel on the right, as shown
below. Enter your user name (email address) and password, then click the Sign in button.
If you are signed in, Webroot bypasses this screen and goes directly to your account.
1: Getting Started
11
The following table describes the pages available in My Webroot.
My Webroot pages
Home
Serves as the main dashboard to all My Webroot functions available with
your subscription and license.
MyAccount
Shows your account details and software license information. See Chapter
5, “My Account Management” on page 39.
Note
If you install a new browser later (after installing the Webroot program), the
Webroot toolbar will not appear in that browser until the next program update. If
you want to install the Webroot toolbar right away, close your browser, then go to
the Windows Start menu, select All Programs (or Programs), Webroot, Tools,
Install Webroot Toolbar. Webroot will download and install the toolbar.
12
1: Getting Started
2: Security Scans
The System Scanner searches all areas of your computer where potential threats can hide,
including drives, files, the Windows registry, and system memory. It looks for any files or other
items that match our security definitions (a set of fingerprints that characterize potential threats).
When it detects items, it takes one of the following actions:
•
For definite threats (positive matches with security definitions), the System Scanner
removes the items from their current locations and sends them to a holding area, called
Quarantine, where they are rendered inoperable and cannot cause any harm.
•
For programs that are classified as “potentially unwanted applications,” the System
Scanner opens a notification about what it found. You can decide whether to send the item
to Quarantine or ignore it.
•
For viruses, the System Scanner removes the infected portions of the file during a cleaning
process. It keeps the cleaned file in its original location and sends a copy of the corrupted
file to Quarantine.
The System Scanner is preconfigured to scan your computer automatically at optimal times,
without disrupting your work. You can also disable automated scanning and run the System
Scanner manually.
To use the System Scanner, see the following topics:
•
“Scanning for threats” on page 14
•
“Viewing scan details” on page 16
•
“Customizing scan options” on page 19
•
“Creating a scan schedule” on page 21
2: Security Scans
13
Scanning for threats
Although the System Scanner is preconfigured for automated scanning, you can run an immediate
scan yourself at any time. You can start a scan from the Webroot software’s main interface, from
the system tray menu, or from Windows Explorer.
Methods for launching a manual scan
Main interface
To run a scan from the main interface:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by doubleclicking the Webroot icon
in the system tray.
2. Click the Scan now button in the PC Security
panel.
To view its progress or to stop the scan:
The Scan in Progress panel opens. You can stop or
pause the scan by selecting either the Stop Scan or
Pause Scan buttons.
System tray
menu
To run a scan from the system tray:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by doubleclicking the Webroot icon
in the system tray.
2. Click Scan Now.
The Webroot icon displays a turning dial to
indicate it’s busy scanning: .
During the scan, the system tray menu provides
additional options for pausing or stopping the
scan.
If you want to see scan details, click Home. The
Scan in Progress panel opens (see the illustration
below this table).
14
2: Security Scans
Methods for launching a manual scan (continued)
Windows
Explorer
To run a scan from Windows Explorer:
1. Open Windows Explorer.
2. Right-click the file, folder, or drive you want to
scan.
From the pop-up menu, select Perform Secure
Scan. The system tray icon displays a turning dial
to indicate it's busy scanning: .
During the scan, the system tray menu provides
additional options for pausing or stopping the
scan.
If you want to see scan details, click Home. The
Scan in Progress panel opens (see the illustration
below this table).
The Scan in Progress panel shows the items as they are detected.
When the scan completes, the Webroot software takes one of the following actions:
•
For definite threats (positive matches with security definitions), the System Scanner
removes the items from their current locations and sends them to a holding area, called
Quarantine, where they are rendered inoperable and cannot cause any harm. The Status
changes to “Quarantined.” For more information, see Chapter 3, “Quarantine” on page 23.
•
For viruses, the System Scanner removes the infected portions of the file during a cleaning
process. It keeps the cleaned file in its original location and sends a copy of the corrupted
file to Quarantine. The status changes to “Cleaned.”
•
For programs that are classified as “potentially unwanted applications,” the System
Scanner does not automatically quarantine the items. Instead, it marks the status as
“Suspect,” as shown in the following example. You must take action yourself by selecting
the item in the panel and choosing either the Quarantine selected items or Ignore
selected items button.
2: Security Scans
15
After the Webroot software manages the items, it opens a notification in the system tray. You can
click View Details to see more information about what items were quarantined. (If the alert closes
before you have a chance to click the link, point your mouse to the PC Security panel, click the
Edit settings button, then click View scan details in the Scan tab.)
See the next section, “Viewing scan details,” for more information.
Viewing scan details
You can view results of the last scan from the Scan panel.
To view scan details:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the Home panel, click the Edit settings button under PC Security.
The PC Security panel opens.
3. Make sure the Scan tab is selected.
16
2: Security Scans
4. Under Last scan, click View scan details.
Another panel opens and provides details about detected items.
See the following table for a description of the Scan Complete panel.
Scan details
What we found
Name and description of the item. You can click the plus sign to the left of the
item to view the directory where it was found.
Risk
The red-orange bars show the risk level of the selected item. Multiple bars
indicate a higher risk, as follows:
(low)
(moderate)
(high)
(very high)
(critical)
2: Security Scans
17
Scan details (continued)
18
Status
This column shows how the System Scanner managed the item:
• Quarantined. The item was moved to Quarantine, where it was rendered
inoperable and cannot harm your computer. For more information, see
Chapter 3, “Quarantine” on page 23.
If you see a “Quarantined Error” status, contact Webroot Support.
• Suspect. The item is classified as a “potentially unwanted application” and
was not moved to Quarantine. You can decide to quarantine the item or keep
it. If the scan launched while the main interface was closed, Webroot opens a
notification that it completed the scan and found a potentially unwanted
application. In this case, go to the Notifications panel to quarantine or keep the
item. See “Responding to notifications” on page 10.
• Removed. The item was deleted before the System Scanner quarantined it.
This might happen if you are running another security program that removed it
or if you manually deleted the file yourself during the scan. Any removed
items are no longer a threat to your computer.
• Cleaned. The item was managed by a virus-cleaning process that removed
infected portions of the file and restored the cleaned file to your computer in
its original location. A copy of the corrupted file is now in Quarantine. The
cleaned file is safe to use; the file in Quarantine is not safe to use.
In addition, the following status types can also appear if you managed an item
yourself:
• Deleted. You deleted the item from the Quarantine panel. See “Deleting
quarantined items” on page 25.
• Restored. You restored the item from the Quarantine panel. See “Restoring
quarantined items” on page 26.
• Ignored. You ignored a “Suspect” item in the Scan Complete panel. See
“Scanning for threats” on page 14.
Details
If you don’t recognize an item and want to know more about it, click View
details to the right for a pop-up description.
2: Security Scans
Customizing scan options
You can change the scan settings to customize the locations where the System Scanner searches
for threats and the types of threats it locates.
To customize scan settings:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the Home panel, click the Edit settings button under PC Security.
The PC Security panel opens.
3. Make sure the Scan tab is selected.
4. Select the Use custom scan settings checkbox and click Edit.
The Advanced Scan Settings panel opens. Items with a checkmark are enabled and
included in the next scan.
2: Security Scans
19
5. Select or deselect options by clicking the checkboxes.
The following table describes each setting.
6. When you’re done, click Save.
The System Scanner uses these settings for all future scans.
Advanced scan settings
Scan registry items
Scans the computer’s registry, where spyware and other unwanted programs
commonly create entries.
Scan memory
Scans the computer’s random access memory (RAM), where spyware and
other unwanted programs commonly load into memory.
Scan cookies
Scans for third-party cookies that are included in the security definitions.
Scan files
Scans specific drives, directories, or files. Click the Choose button to open a
pop-up dialog where you can specify areas to scan or ignore. Click in the
checkboxes to deselect areas you don’t want to scan. Items with a checkmark
are included in the scan; items without a checkmark are ignored. Click OK
when you’re done.
Only new files or files that Scans only the files that are new or modified from the last scan. Enabling this
have been changed
option decreases scan time significantly.
Include compressed files
Scans compressed files such as .zip, .rar, .lzh, and .cab files, where malware
can hide. You may want to use this option after you have found spyware
programs and you want to be sure that you have removed them.
Enabling this option increases scan time significantly. (After the first scan
with this option, the System Scanner skips compressed files that have not
changed, thereby saving time.) If you download a compressed file in the
future, you can scan just that file from Windows Explorer by right-clicking on
the file and selecting Perform Secure Scan from the pop-up menu.
Skip file types
Scans specified file types only. Enter the extensions of file types you want the
scan to ignore. For multiple entries, use a comma or semicolon to separate
entries (for example: .mp3, .wma).
Do not skip .dll, .exe, or .com file types, because malware typically hides in
these types of files.
Enable direct disk
Scans for strains of spyware that hide themselves from the Windows
scanning including rootkits operating system.
20
2: Security Scans
Creating a scan schedule
The System Scanner is preconfigured to run a scan at optimal times. If desired, you can disable
automated scanning and set your own schedule.
To create your own scan schedule:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the bottom of the Home panel, click Settings in the taskbar.
The Settings panel opens.
3. Click Scheduling.
4. Turn off scheduled scans by clicking the ON/OFF button, so the button changes to OFF.
5. In the drop-down box, make sure Scan is displayed, then click the Add action button.
The Scheduling panel opens.
2: Security Scans
21
6. Under Perform action every, determine the scan schedule as follows:
•
In the first field, click the drop-down arrow to select hour, day, week, month, or when
you log in.
•
Click in the checkboxes to select one or more days of the week.
•
In the At field, click the drop-down arrow to select a time of day.
7. Under Options, you can select a radio button to keep the Webroot recommended settings
or choose custom settings. For a description of the custom settings, see “Customizing scan
options” on page 19.
8. Click the Schedule button.
The panel shows details of your scheduled scan.
9. If desired, you can edit, delete, or run the schedules from the Scheduling panel by clicking
either Edit, Run Now, or Delete.
22
2: Security Scans
3: Quarantine
The Webroot Quarantine is a holding area for potential threats. Items in Quarantine are rendered
inoperable and cannot harm your computer.
In the quarantine process, the System Scanner removes all traces and items associated with threats
from their current locations. It then disables their operation by scrambling and compressing all
associated items, so the threats can no longer harm your computer or steal your information. Once
the items are rendered inoperable, the System Scanner moves them to Quarantine. If the System
Scanner detects a virus, it removes infected portions of a file during a virus cleaning process. If the
System Scanner can remove the virus successfully, it restores the cleaned file to your computer in
its original location and places a copy of the corrupted file in Quarantine. The cleaned file is safe
to use; the file in Quarantine is not safe to use.
Once items are moved to Quarantine, your safest action is to simply keep them there. Items in
Quarantine are disabled and cannot harm your computer. Keeping items in Quarantine also allows
you to test your computer and determine if all your programs still work properly. If you discover
that some legitimate programs cannot function after an item was moved to Quarantine, Webroot
allows you to restore it.
To manage the Quarantine, see the following topics:
•
“Viewing quarantined items” on page 24
•
“Deleting quarantined items” on page 25
•
“Restoring quarantined items” on page 26
3: Quarantine
23
Viewing quarantined items
Once items are quarantined, you can view more information about them in the Quarantine panel.
To view quarantined items:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the Home panel, click the Edit settings button under PC Security.
The PC Security panel opens.
3. Click the Quarantine tab.
The Quarantine panel displays items that were previously detected during scans and
moved to Quarantine.
You can select an item to see more details in the right pane. The following table describes
the item details.
Item Details
Name
Name of the item currently selected in the list.
Category
Type of item currently selected in the list. For more information about
types of threats, see the “Glossary” on page 67.
Risk rating
The red-orange bars show the risk level of the selected item. The more
bars shown, the higher the risk.
Description
Description of the item.
You can view more information about a selected item by clicking View more details
online. (You must be connected to the Internet.)
Once items are stored in Quarantine, you can keep them there (the recommended action) or do one
of the following:
24
•
Delete quarantined items permanently. If the Quarantine area gets too full, Webroot
alerts you to remove some items. You can permanently delete an item if you’re sure it’s
unwanted spyware or another type of threat. For instructions, see the next section,
“Deleting quarantined items.”
•
Restore quarantined items. If you discover that a legitimate program won’t work
properly when an item was moved to Quarantine, you can restore that item to its original
location on the computer. For instructions, see “Restoring quarantined items” on page 26.
3: Quarantine
Deleting quarantined items
If desired, you can permanently delete items in Quarantine. Be aware that once you delete an item,
it cannot be restored.
Note
Before deleting items in Quarantine, we recommend that you test your computer by
opening and closing all your programs and performing a few tasks. In rare cases,
programs classified as “spyware” may be an integral part of a legitimate
application.
To permanently delete quarantined items:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the Home panel, click the Edit settings button under PC Security.
The PC Security panel opens.
3. Click the Quarantine tab.
The Quarantine panel opens with a list of quarantined items.
4. Select each item that you want to permanently delete or click Select All at the bottom of
the panel.
A checkmark next to the item shows that it is selected and will be deleted.
5. Click the Delete selected items button.
3: Quarantine
25
The item is removed from the Quarantine panel. If you check the last scan details (see
“Viewing scan details” on page 16), the item is still listed, but with “Deleted” as its status.
Restoring quarantined items
You may need to restore a quarantined item if you discover that a program is not working correctly
without it. In rare cases, a piece of spyware is an integral part of a legitimate program and is
required to run that program. (Some components with copy protection may not restore from
Quarantine properly. You must reinstall these programs from the original media or installation
file.)
Note
Never restore a file with a detected virus. If the Webroot software was able to clean
the file (remove the virus safely), it keeps the cleaned file in its original location
and places a copy of the corrupted file in Quarantine. The cleaned file is safe to use;
the file in Quarantine is not safe to use.
To restore quarantined items:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the Home panel, click the Edit settings button under PC Security.
26
3: Quarantine
The PC Security panel opens.
3. Click the Quarantine tab.
The Quarantine panel opens with a list of quarantined items.
4. Select each item that you want to restore.
A checkmark next to the item shows that it is selected and will be restored.
5. Click the Restore selected items button.
The Webroot software restores the selected items to their original locations and shows the
restore status at the bottom of the panel.
Note
If a selected item is part of an email attachment, the Webroot software saves it to
the location specified in the Always save to option of the Email Attachments shield
or prompts you to select the location to restore the attachment (if you selected the
Ask me where to save every file option).
The item is removed from the Quarantine panel. If you check the last scan details (see
“Viewing scan details” on page 16), the item is still listed, but with “Restored” as its
status.
3: Quarantine
27
28
3: Quarantine
4: Shields
Webroot Shields monitor functions related to your Web browser settings, network
communications between your computer and the Internet, Windows system settings, Windows
Startup programs, and email attachments. If a suspicious item tries downloading or running on
your computer, Webroot Shields automatically block and quarantine the item. For some types of
shields, an alert asks if you want to continue the download or block it. If you don’t respond to the
alert within one minute, Webroot Shields automatically block the download.
Webroot has already preconfigured the Webroot Shields for you, based on our recommended
settings. You do not need to do anything. However, if you would like to modify the type of
protection shields provide, you can change the settings as described in this chapter.
To manage shield settings, see the following topics:
4: Shields
•
“Setting real-time active protection” on page 30
•
“Setting browser protection” on page 33
•
“Setting network protection” on page 35
29
Setting real-time active protection
The Real-time Active Protection shields monitor your computer settings and activity. If these
shields detect malware or viruses attempting to launch, they block these threats before they can
damage your system.
To set Real-time Active Protection shields:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the Home panel, click the Edit settings button under PC Security.
The PC Security panel opens.
3. Click the Shields tab.
4. Click Let me set my options.
5. Point your mouse to Real-time active protection and make sure the box to the left is
checked.
The Options pane displays the shield settings. Items with a checkmark are enabled.
6. If you want to change a shield setting, select the checkbox next to the shield name to
disable (uncheck) or activate (check) an option.
The following table describes the function of each Real-time Active Protection shield.
30
4: Shields
Real-time Active Protection shield options
File System shield
If this shield detects a threat attempting to launch during write and read
operations, it sends the item to Quarantine.
Note: For read operations, the Webroot software can detect most, but not
all file types.
Execution shield
If this shield detects a suspicious file trying to install or start, it sends the
item to Quarantine.
Startup Items shield
If this shield detects malware or a virus attempting to add itself to the
Windows startup list, it opens an alert where you can block or allow the
file. (See “Responding to pop-up alerts” on page 8.)
If you want to change the list of programs that start with Windows, click
Edit options.
The following dialog opens.
To see more information about a program, click the executable name. (Not
all programs provide additional details.) If you do not want a program to
start with Windows, deselect its checkbox and click OK.
Caution: Editing Startup Items is for advanced users. Windows and other
programs may require some listed items, and if you remove them, your
computer may not start properly.
4: Shields
ActiveX shield
If this shield detects ActiveX controls attempting to install on your
computer, it opens an alert where you can block or allow the installation.
(See “Responding to pop-up alerts” on page 8.)
ADS shield
If this shield detects programs or viruses that attempt to start from an
Alternate Data Stream (ADS), it opens an alert where you can block or
allow the installation.
(See “Responding to pop-up alerts” on page 8.)
31
Real-time Active Protection shield options (continued)
BHO shield
If a Browser Helper Object (BHO) tries to install itself, it opens an alert
where you can block or allow the installation. (See “Responding to pop-up
alerts” on page 8.)
If you want to change the BHOs that start with Internet Explorer, click
Edit options.
A dialog opens and shows a list of the installed BHOs. Items with a
checkmark start whenever Internet Explorer starts.
To see more information about an item, click the executable name. (Not all
programs provide additional details.) Deselect any BHOs you do not want
to start, then click OK.
Caution: Editing BHOs is for advanced users. Deselecting BHOs could
cause your browser to not work properly or cause your computer to be
unstable.
Do not attempt to disable the Webroot toolbar. This may result in
unexpected behavior and will disable access to some Webroot software
functionality.
32
4: Shields
Setting browser protection
Browser Protection shields guard your default Home page, list of favorites, and other settings
related to your Web browser.
To set Browser Protection shields:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the Home panel, click the Edit settings button under PC Security.
The PC Security panel opens.
3. Click the Shields tab.
4. Click Let me set my options.
5. Point your mouse to Browser protection and make sure the box to the left is checked.
The Options pane displays the shield settings. Items with a checkmark are enabled.
6. If you want to change a shield setting, select the checkbox next to the shield name to
disable (uncheck) or activate (check) an option.
The following table describes the function of each Browser Protection shield.
4: Shields
33
Browser Protection shield options
IE Hijack shield
If this shield detects a spyware program trying to change the default pages
that open in Internet Explorer, such as your set Home page, it opens an
alert where you can allow or block the change.
To check or change the default pages for Internet Explorer, click Edit
options. The following dialog opens.
You can edit the following addresses:
• IE Home Page shield: In the field, you can enter a new Web site
address for your Home page. The address must be in the following
format: http://www.webroot.com.
• IE Search Page shield: In the field, you can enter a new Web address
for the informational page that opens when you attempt to access a nonexistent Web site. The address must be in the following format:
http://www.microsoft.com.
If you want to return to the Internet Explorer default pages, select the
Reset IE page settings to defaults button.
34
IE Security shield
If a program tries to change your Internet Explorer security settings, this
shield opens an alert where you can allow or block the change.
Favorites shield
If a spyware program tries to change your Internet Explorer or Firefox list
of favorite Web sites, this shield opens an alert where you can allow or
block the change.
Tracking Cookies
shield
If third-party cookies attempt to download to your computer, this shield
blocks them.
4: Shields
Setting network protection
Network Protection shields guard your Hosts file, stop unexpected Web sites from loading, and
monitor email attachments.
To set Network Protection shields:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the Home panel, click the Edit settings button under PC Security.
The PC Security panel opens.
3. Click the Shields tab.
4. Click Let me set my options.
5. Point your mouse to Network protection and make sure the box to the left is checked.
The Options pane displays the shield settings. Items with a checkmark are enabled.
6. If you want to change a shield setting, select the checkbox next to the shield name to
disable (uncheck) or activate (check) an option.
The following table describes the function of each Network Protection shield.
4: Shields
35
Network Protection shield options
Hosts File shield
If this shield detects spyware programs attempting to add or change the IP
address for a Web site in the Hosts file, it opens an alert where you can
block or allow the changes. (See “Responding to pop-up alerts” on
page 8.)
The Hosts file is a Windows file that helps direct your computer to a Web
site using Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. Your Web browser uses the IP
address to actually connect to a site. When you enter a Web address in a
browser, your computer first looks in the Hosts file to see if it already
knows where to go. If the domain is listed (for example, webroot.com),
your computer goes directly to the IP address.
If the domain is not listed, your computer looks up the information from
the Internet, which is a slightly slower process.
If you suspect that spyware tampered with the entries in your Hosts file,
click Edit options. The Hosts File Shield Options dialog shows entries
that you, your IT department, or potential spyware programs have added to
your Hosts file.
If any entries appear to be spyware related, select the checkbox next to the
address and click Remove selected. If you aren’t sure whether the entries
are valid, contact Webroot Support.
Caution: Editing the Hosts file is for advanced users.
Internet
Communication
shield
36
This shield monitors communication from your computer to known Web
sites that are related to spyware or potential threats. Webroot includes a list
of known sites with its security definitions. If the shield detects an attempt
to communicate with a site on the list, it opens an alert. (See “Responding
to pop-up alerts” on page 8.)
4: Shields
Network Protection shield options (continued)
Email Attachments
shield
(Does not support
email clients that use
SSL)
This shield monitors file attachments for incoming email (through POP3
protocol) and outgoing email (through SMTP protocol). If it detects that an
attachment or its contents match a security definition, it replaces the
content of the attachment with an alert message that describes what it
found. This shield then moves the original attachment to Quarantine,
where you can decide whether to save it to your computer or delete it. You
can also direct the shield to always restore quarantined email attachments
to a specific directory.
By default, Webroot monitors port 110 (POP3) for incoming mail and port
25 (SMTP) for outgoing mail, but you can change the port numbers in the
Email Attachments settings, if necessary.
Note: Some firewall configurations might prevent the Email Attachments
shield from monitoring email. For more information, see the note on
page 38.
For Email Attachments Shield options, click Edit options. The following
dialog opens:
Set the options as follows:
• Restoring attachments: Select Ask me where to save every file if you
want to be prompted when it restores quarantined attachments. Select
Always save to if you want to create a default location for restored
email attachments. You can enter a file location in the field or click
Select location to browse directories from Windows Explorer.
• Email port settings: Enter the POP3 port number for incoming mail
and the SMTP port number for outgoing mail. This dialog automatically
displays port numbers that most computers use for email
communications. If necessary, change the port numbers or contact your
ISP (Internet Service Provider) for the port numbers.
4: Shields
37
Note
Communication errors with the Email Attachments shield:
Some firewall applications from other vendors might prevent the Webroot software
from intercepting email traffic. If this is the case, Webroot opens an alert every
time an email is sent or received. If an alert appears because a firewall application
is blocking the Webroot software, you need to configure your firewall application
to allow the program to monitor the port traffic. For more information about
resolving communication issues between your firewall application and the Webroot
software, you can contact Webroot Support or enter the following address into your
browser for instructions:
http://www.webroot.com/land/
personal_firewall_config.php?pc=64150&rc=1&oc=110&mjv=5&mnv=5&la
ng=en&loc=USA&opi=2&omj=5&omn=1
If the alert appears only once or just periodically, the problem may be due to an
inactive network configuration or a non-responsive SMTP or POP server at the ISP
(Internet Service Provider). This is a temporary situation. The Email Attachments
shield should be able to function normally once communication is restored. If the
message appears frequently when these types of communication errors occur, you
can select Do not show this message again.
38
4: Shields
5: My Account Management
Your Webroot account allows you to access some helpful information about your software
licenses and other details. Your account information is available from My Webroot, an online Web
area that is accessible at any time. For more information, see “Using My Webroot” on page 11.
If you have not created an account, see “Creating a Webroot account” on page 2.
To manage your Webroot account, see the following topics:
•
“Viewing account details” on page 40
•
“Editing your contact information and password” on page 41
•
“Managing licenses and additional products” on page 42
•
“Creating Webroot support tickets” on page 43
5: My Account Management
39
Viewing account details
Your account details are available from the My Account panel in the main interface and in My
Webroot. These details show your expiration date and your keycode.
To view account details from the main interface:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the taskbar at bottom of the Home panel, click My Account.
The My Account panel opens and shows your keycode, version number, and other
information about your subscription.
3. To modify account details from My Webroot, click the Manage My Account button.
To view account details from My Webroot:
1. Open your browser and enter https://www.webroot.com/mywebroot. In the Sign In panel,
enter your user name (email address) and password, then click the Sign in button.
2. When My Webroot opens with your account information, select MyAccount from the top
panel.
The MyAccount page opens. It includes all your account information and available tasks.
For more information, see the following sections:
40
•
“Editing your contact information and password” on page 41
•
“Managing licenses and additional products” on page 42
•
“Creating Webroot support tickets” on page 43
5: My Account Management
Editing your contact information and password
From the Contact Information tab, you can enter or change your personal contact information so
Webroot can contact you for product update announcements. You can also change your Webroot
master password from this tab.
Note
If you cannot remember your account password, open the Sign in screen and click
Forgot Your Password?. In the dialog that opens, enter your email address and
click Send Email. Webroot sends a message to your email address with
instructions for resetting your password.
To edit contact information or change your password:
1. Open your browser and enter https://www.webroot.com/mywebroot. In the Sign In panel,
enter your user name (email address) and password, then click the Sign in button. (If you
are already signed in, this button displays Sign Out.)
2. When My Webroot opens with your account information, select MyAccount from the top
panel.
3. Click the Contact Information tab.
4. Enter your personal information in the fields. If you want to change your password, click
the Edit Password link and follow the on-screen instructions.
5. When you’re done, click Update info.
5: My Account Management
41
Managing licenses and additional products
You can view your Webroot license information for the status of any Webroot products you have
purchased. The license information includes the product name, the keycode, where the software is
installed (which computer), and when your subscription expires. You can also use this page to reinstall your licensed software, install it onto another computer, or renew your subscription.
To view your current licenses and upgrade your Webroot products:
1. Open your browser and enter https://www.webroot.com/mywebroot. In the Sign In panel,
enter your user name (email address) and password, then click the Sign in button. (If you
are already signed in, this button displays Sign Out.)
2. When My Webroot opens with your account information, select MyAccount from the top
panel.
3. Click the Licenses & Products tab.
Your license information opens, similar to the example below.
From this page, you can:
42
•
Click Install to re-install your software or install it onto another computer if you have
a multi-licensed version.
•
Click Renew to update your subscription.
5: My Account Management
Creating Webroot support tickets
If you have questions or problems, you can create a support ticket to send to Webroot or view past
tickets.
To create a support ticket:
1. Open your browser and enter https://www.webroot.com/mywebroot. In the Sign In panel,
enter your user name (email address) and password, then click the Sign in button. (If you
are already signed in, this button displays Sign Out.)
2. When My Webroot opens with your account information, select MyAccount from the top
panel.
Your Webroot account information opens.
3. Click the Support tab.
4. If you would like to contact Support via email, click the Submit a support ticket button.
A form opens in your browser that you can fill out and submit to Webroot.
5: My Account Management
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44
5: My Account Management
6: Program Settings
The Webroot software includes options that allow you to control sweep schedules, view history
logs, and other items related to program activity.
To manage program settings, see the following topics:
•
“Managing the schedule for scans” on page 46
•
“Viewing the system history” on page 47
•
“Managing updates” on page 48
•
“Setting Gamer mode” on page 50
•
“Using a proxy server” on page 52
6: Program Settings
45
Managing the schedule for scans
If you have previously created a schedule for scans, you can edit, delete, or run the schedules from
the Scheduling panel.
Note
To create a schedule for scans, see “Creating a scan schedule” on page 21.
To manage schedules:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the taskbar at the bottom of the Home panel, click Settings.
The Settings panel opens.
3. Click Scheduling.
4. In the row for your scheduled event, click either Edit, Run Now, or Delete.
5.
46
Click the Close button at the top right to close the panel.
6: Program Settings
Viewing the system history
The History panel displays past Webroot software actions, such as:
•
Scans (automated, scheduled, and manual)
•
Quarantine actions
•
Individual shield events
•
Definition updates
•
Product updates
To view the detection history:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the taskbar at the bottom of the Home panel, click Settings.
The Settings panel opens.
3. Click History.
The System History panel shows a summary of events and the dates on which they
occurred, similar to the example below.
4. To display all activity, click the All radio button. To display only the activity for the last 30
days, click the Last 30 Days radio button.
5. To clear the contents of this panel, click the Clear history button.
6. Click the Close button at the top right to close the panel.
6: Program Settings
47
Managing updates
The Webroot software is preconfigured to check for updates once a day. When available, the
following items download during updates:
•
Product updates, which include new versions of the Webroot program.
•
Protection updates, which include the latest security definitions used to determine if any
items found on your computer match spyware, viruses, or other threats.
You must be connected to the Internet for update checks to be successful.
Note
Microsoft Silverlight is installed along with your Webroot software. On occasion,
you may receive notifications from Microsoft about updating Silverlight.
To check for updates immediately or to change settings for automatic updates:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the taskbar at the bottom of the Home panel, click Settings.
The Settings panel opens.
3. Click Updates.
The Updates panel opens.
4. You can click the Check for updates now button to download and install any available
updates immediately or you can change the selections for automatic updates, which are
described in the following table. To change an option, click the radio button next to the
selection.
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6: Program Settings
Product update options
Automatically download and
install product updates
(recommended)
If selected, updates to the Webroot software download and install to
your computer automatically (if available) when your computer is
connected to the Internet.
Notify me before downloading If selected, updates do not download and install to your computer
and installing product updates automatically. Instead, a notification panel opens and allows you to
determine if you want to download and install updates to the
Webroot software (when available).
Protection update options
Automatically download and
install security protection
updates (recommended)
If selected, updates to the security definitions download and install
to your computer automatically (if available) when your computer is
connected to the Internet.
Notify me before downloading If selected, updates do not download and install to your computer
and installing security
automatically. Instead, a notification panel opens and allows you to
determine if you want to download and install updates to the security
protection updates
definitions (when available).
WARN (Webroot Automated Research Network) program
Allow malware data to be sent
to Webroot anonymously
6: Program Settings
If selected, allows the software to gather information during scans
and shielding activities, including spyware, viruses, and potential
threats that are not yet classified, then send the data to Webroot.
WARN is a global community of individuals and businesses who
provide Webroot with sample items detected on their computer to
help us identify and fight emerging threats.
Note: The Webroot software does not gather personal information
with the WARN program.
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Setting Gamer mode
If the Webroot software’s communications over the Internet interfere when you play online games
or view movies, you can set the program to a silent Gamer mode. While in this mode, the program
does not perform the following activities:
•
Scheduled scans. The software does not run scheduled scans when Gamer mode is on.
When you return the Webroot software to regular operations (Gamer mode is switched
off), it may open an alert that indicates a scheduled scan was missed. The missed event
does not run automatically.
•
Shield functions. All shields will be turned off, except for the Execution shield, which
stops executable programs from launching a suspicious process on your computer. If the
Execution shield detects a potential threat, it moves the item to Quarantine without
alerting you.
•
Balloon alerts in the system tray.
•
Communications with the Webroot server to check for updates.
To set Gamer mode:
Do either of the following:
•
From the system tray, right-click on the Webroot icon
ON.
and select Turn Gamer Mode
- or •
From the main interface, click Settings in the bottom taskbar, click the Gamer Mode tab,
then click the button next to Gamer Mode so it displays “ON.”
By default, Gamer mode automatically turns off after four hours, but you can change that
amount of time in the Options settings.
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6: Program Settings
To manually turn off Gamer mode:
Do either of the following:
•
From the system tray, right-click on the Webroot icon
OFF.
and select Turn Gamer Mode
- or •
From the main interface, click Settings in the bottom taskbar, click the Gamer Mode tab,
then click the button next to Gamer Mode so it displays “OFF.”
All program activities are re-enabled, including the previously set shields. The Webroot
software also contacts the Webroot server and checks for any updates.
Note
If you shut down and restart the Webroot software, it disables Gamer mode on startup.
To change Gamer mode options:
1. From the main interface, click Settings in the bottom taskbar, then click Gamer Mode.
The Gamer mode options appear in the middle panel.
You can set the following options:
•
Turn Execution Shield OFF when entering Gamer Mode. When you set the
program to Gamer mode, all shields are turned off except for the Execution shield.
(The Execution shield is important because it can stop potentially harmful executable
files from launching on your computer.) If desired, you can specify that the Execution
shield is turned off along with all other shields.
•
Automatically turn Gamer Mode OFF after ... You can specify how long you want
to run the program in Gamer mode before it automatically switches back to regular
operations.
2. Enter the number of hours you want to use Gamer mode before it turns off and switches to
regular program operations. If you do not want Gamer mode to automatically switch off,
deselect the checkbox.
6: Program Settings
51
Using a proxy server
If you use a proxy server to connect to the Internet, you must specify information about the proxy
connection; otherwise, Webroot cannot send updates to your computer. (A proxy server is a
computer system or router that acts as a relay between your computer and another server.)
By default, the Webroot software is set to communicate directly with your computer (and not use a
proxy server).
To specify proxy server settings:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the taskbar at the bottom of the Home panel, click Settings.
The Settings panel opens.
3. Click Proxy Settings.
The Proxy Settings panel opens.
4. Select the radio button next to Use custom proxy settings.
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6: Program Settings
5. Define custom settings using one of the following methods.
Methods for defining proxy settings
Use Internet Explorer
settings
If you want to use values already defined in Internet Explorer, click the
Import from Internet Explorer button.
Use your own settings
You can enter the proxy information, as follows:
• Proxy server: Enter the fully qualified domain name of the server (for
example, proxy.company.com).
• Port: Enter the port number the server uses.
• Username and Password: Enter the username and password for the
server, if used.
• Basic authentication: If the server uses another form of authentication
besides basic Windows authentication, deselect the checkbox.
Note: For further information about your proxy environment, contact your
proxy server’s administrator.
6. When you’re done, click the Save button.
6: Program Settings
53
Changing the language setting
When you install the Webroot software, it automatically detects the language of your operating
system and will use the same language for its own interface. If desired, you can change the
language of the Webroot interface.
To change the language setting:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the taskbar at the bottom of the Home panel, click Settings.
The Settings panel opens.
3. Click Languages.
4. Click the radio button for the desired language and click the Apply button.
The program begins updating to the new language, a process that may take a few minutes.
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6: Program Settings
A: Webroot Support
Webroot provides the following technical support services:
•
Web Site. To submit a trouble ticket to our service representatives, access the Support
Web site at support.webroot.com.
We make every effort to respond to your request on the same day you send it in, but please
allow up to 48 hours.
•
Phone. For contact information, access the Support Web site at support.webroot.com.
To access technical support options:
1. Open the Webroot main interface by double-clicking the Webroot icon
tray.
in the system
2. From the taskbar in the bottom of the Home panel, click Support.
3. Click the Visit now button to open the Webroot Support site in your browser. (You must
be connected to the Internet.) Or call the number listed to speak to a representative.
A: Webroot Support
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56
A: Webroot Support
B: Uninstalling the program
To uninstall the Webroot software:
1. From the Start menu (click Start in the system tray), point to All Programs, then
Webroot, then Tools, then Uninstall Webroot AntiVirus with Spy Sweeper.
A Webroot dialog opens and begins removing the Webroot software files.
2. When the final dialog opens, click Finish to restart your computer.
B: Uninstalling the program
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58
B: Uninstalling the program
C: Frequently Asked Questions
This appendix provides a list of frequently asked questions (FAQs), which are organized by the
following topics:
•
“Threat protection FAQs” on page 60
•
“Scan and Quarantine FAQs” on page 61
•
“Shield FAQs” on page 63
•
“MyAccount FAQs” on page 64
C: Frequently Asked Questions
59
Threat protection FAQs
What is malware and how does it get in my computer?
Malware is malicious software that is designed to harm your computer or compromise your
privacy. If you do not have the Webroot software actively protecting your computer, malware can
enter your computer through Internet connections, open computer ports, compromised disks, and
email attachments. Internet connections are the primary source of entry. Whenever you connect to
the Internet, you could provide the outside world with access to your computer and potentially
allow in snoops, thieves, and virus outbreaks. Fortunately, Webroot blocks any threats before they
can enter.
Note
The Webroot software acts like a personal security guard for your computer,
blocking bad guys from entry and searching the premises for any others that may
have slipped through the cracks. If it finds threats, it disables them and ejects them
into Quarantine before they cause any harm.
The first time the System Scanner searches your computer, it may locate and quarantine many
different types of threats that were previously running on your computer, probably without your
knowledge. For detailed descriptions of the various types of malware, see the Glossary.
How do I know if my computer is infected?
The Webroot software actively protects your computer from malware infections at all times.
However, even with the best security protection, you can accidentally allow malware to gain
access to your computer. This could happen if you clicked Allow in an alert screen for a program
that you didn’t realize was associated with malware.
If you notice any of the behaviors listed below, run a scan immediately (see “Scanning for threats”
on page 14).
60
•
If you see pornographic images or advertisements unexpectedly appear on your screen,
you probably have a malware infection. Certain Web sites contain traps that take control
of your browser and cause pornographic or advertising sites to open when you try to exit.
•
Your computer is slow to boot, slow to process, crashes frequently, or behaves in erratic
ways.
•
You hear your hard disk actively working when you are not touching your computer.
•
Numerous pop-up ads open even when you are not connected to the Internet.
•
A different home page loads in your browser or strange entries appear in your Favorites
and History.
•
Strange results appear when you perform an Internet search.
•
You can’t access certain drives, programs, Web sites, or the printer.
•
Strange messages or images open on your screen or music plays that you did not
download.
•
Strange icons appear on your desktop or strange programs appear in your start-up list.
C: Frequently Asked Questions
Why does the Windows Security Center say that the Webroot software is
turned off?
When you start your computer, you may see a pop-up alert from the Windows Security Center that
says your computer is at risk and the Webroot software is turned off, similar to the example below.
Typically, this alert appears at Windows startup (and occasionally on shutdown) due to an
overtaxed processor, low available system memory, or a high number of other startup items present
on the system. Once the Webroot software has notified the Windows Security Center that it is up
and running on your system, this alert should automatically close and you can ignore it. If the
message persists longer than a few minutes, contact Webroot Support.
Scan and Quarantine FAQs
How do I know if the System Scanner found any threats?
In most cases, the Webroot software automatically manages threats for you by disabling them and
moving them to Quarantine, where they can no longer harm your computer. You can view the
Quarantine by opening the main interface, clicking Edit settings in the PC Security panel, and
clicking the Quarantine tab.
If the software detects an item that it classifies as a potential threat or it does not recognize, it
opens a pop-up alert and asks whether you want to accept the item or prevent it from installing on
your computer.
You can also access a summary of Webroot software activity by clicking the arrow
how on the Home panel.
next to See
How does Webroot know the difference between malware and legitimate
programs?
When the System Scanner searches your computer, it checks installed programs and other items it
finds against our database of security definitions. These definitions are a set of fingerprints that
characterize viruses, spyware, adware, and other types of unwanted items. The Webroot Threat
Research team constantly updates these definitions to protect your computer from ever-changing
spyware and other potential threats. Webroot automatically downloads these definitions to your
computer so you are always protected.
Can I work on my computer during a scan?
Yes, the System Scanner runs in the background without disrupting your work. If automated
scanning is enabled, the System Scanner runs only when your computer is inactive. If you start
working on your computer while a scan is in progress, it pauses and waits until the computer has
been inactive again for 15 minutes, then resumes scanning where it left off.
C: Frequently Asked Questions
61
Can I quickly scan a USB or CD?
Yes, even though the Webroot software is configured to automatically scan all areas of the
computer, you can run a quick scan yourself for a selected area, such as a USB drive or CD. You
can run a quick scan by doing either of the following:
•
Targeting a specific file or folder in Windows Explorer. Right-click on the file or folder to
open the pop-up menu, then select Perform Secure Scan. This is the quickest method.
•
Customizing the scan options to search specific drives or file types. See “Customizing
scan options” on page 19.
Are there times when I should run a scan myself?
In most cases, you should not need to launch a scan because the Webroot software is configured to
run scans automatically and to actively block threats with shields. However, you may want to run a
scan yourself in the following circumstances:
•
Even if you don’t surf high-risk sites, keep in mind that connecting to the Internet is like
opening the front door to your computer. In most situations no one will walk through, but
if you are not protected with the Webroot software, you are leaving your computer
vulnerable to bad guys who might enter unannounced, snoop around your files, and wreck
havoc on your applications.
•
After you have surfed networking sites, adult-entertainment sites, free lyrics and music
download sites, and other high-traffic sites. Malware writers are constantly re-engineering
methods to infect computers. They commonly target popular Web sites by creating pop-up
ads that can trick you into clicking on a link or by targeting you for a “drive-by
download,” where an infection will attempt to silently install on your computer as you
view pages.
•
If you accidentally clicked on a suspicious looking pop-up advertisement. Malware
writers use all kinds of tricks to lure you into clicking a link and launching their spyware
application.
•
If you frequently download screen savers, music, games, movies, or pictures. Any time
you download items on your computer, even legitimate ones, you could download
malware along with it. Spyware commonly piggybacks on downloads and can install on
your computer without your knowledge.
For scanning instructions, see “Scanning for threats” on page 14.
What should I do with items in Quarantine?
Once items are moved to Quarantine, your safest action is to simply keep them there. Items in
Quarantine are disabled and cannot harm your computer. Keeping items in Quarantine also allows
you to test your computer and determine if all your programs still work properly after the scan. If
you discover that some legitimate programs cannot function after an item was moved to
Quarantine, Webroot allows you to restore it.
What are cookies and why does it find so many?
Every time you access an Internet site, the server for that site may place small bits of text called
cookies on your computer to store information about your interaction with it. If you have accessed
many different sites, the System Scanner locates many different cookies. You should not be
alarmed if the System Scanner finds a large number of cookies. Cookies do not pose a high risk for
your computer’s security, because they cannot harm your computer or steal information. However,
while some cookies can be helpful to your Internet browsing experience, some third-party cookies
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C: Frequently Asked Questions
can be a privacy concern because they are placed on your computer by a different Web site other
than the one you accessed. Usually associated with on-line advertising, third-party cookies can be
used to track your movements as you surf the Internet and to create a profile of your viewing
habits.
Note
For Internet Explorer, cookies are stored as separate files. For Firefox, cookies are
stored in one file.
Cookies are simple text files that store information about a Web site you visited. They do not
create pop-up ads, nor can they launch viruses. In most cases, cookie files do not contain any
private information such as credit card numbers.
The System Scanner mainly sweeps for third-party cookies associated with advertising, not the
helpful first-party cookies that store your personal preferences for a particular Web site, such as
login information and shopping cart items. If you want the System Scanner to ignore all cookies
during scans, see “Customizing scan options” on page 19.
Shield FAQs
How do I know if I should block or allow a download?
If the Webroot Shields detect a potential threat, an alert opens and asks whether you want to allow
the file to launch or block the file from launching. Information about the item is shown in the alert
dialog. If you recognize the file name and you are purposely downloading it (for example, you
were in the process of downloading a new toolbar for your browser), click Allow to continue.
However, we recommend that you run an on-demand scan after downloading even legitimate
items, since malware can piggy-back on any type of download. See “Scanning for threats” on
page 14.
If you were not trying to download anything and were just viewing pages on the Internet, you
should block the file. As you surf Internet sites, you could be targeted for a drive-by download,
where an unwanted program launches and silently installs on your computer as you view pages.
A Windows dialog says it found spyware, but no Webroot alert appeared.
What do I do?
Don’t click on it. Unfortunately, pop-up windows from an Internet site can be designed to look like
legitimate messages from Windows with the sole purpose of trying to trick you. They display
scary messages, such as “Warning! A Virus was Found on your Computer! Buy SomeSoftware
now!” and have buttons and icons that look like actual Windows graphics.
Some of these fake messages are trying to lure you to another Web site where they will ask for
your credit card number or other personal information. Others are advertisements designed to look
like fake Windows dialogs (look for grayed-out text that says “advertisement” displayed in a
bottom corner). The most evil aspect of these fake messages is that if you click anywhere in the
dialog box, even on the No or Close button, you will execute its intended actions, such as
launching malware or sending you to a rogue Internet site. The best way to remove a fake message
from your screen is to press Alt-F4 (hold down the Alt button while pressing the F4 key).
C: Frequently Asked Questions
63
But rest assured, even if you accidentally click on a fake dialog, the Webroot software blocks any
malware, disables it, and sends it to Quarantine.
Do I need shields if a firewall is running?
Yes, you should keep both the firewall and the Webroot Shields enabled, since they are using
different methods to locate different types of threats. The firewall looks for unrecognized
communications over the computer ports, such as activity that may indicate hacking attempts.
Shields look for specific programs and files that match Webroot’s threat definitions, such as
spyware and viruses, and stop them before they launch.
MyAccount FAQs
Can I install the Webroot software on another computer?
You can only install the Webroot software on another computer if you purchased a multi-user
license. For more information, see “Managing licenses and additional products” on page 42.
Keep in mind that if you install the Webroot software on additional computers, these installations
will all share a single Webroot account in My Webroot. This means that anyone using the other
computers can sign in to your online account at http://www.webroot.com/mywebroot. If you
have personal information that you do not want to share in your online account, do not provide
others with your user name and master password.
What should I do if I forget my account password?
If you forget your original password, you can create a new one. To reset your password, right-click
the Webroot icon
in the system tray and click Sign In from the pop-up menu. Click the link for
Forgot Your Password?. (You must be connected to the Internet.)
When the Reset Password page appears, enter your email address and click Send Email. Webroot
sends you an email with instructions for resetting your password.
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C: Frequently Asked Questions
How do I find my keycode?
To view the keycode for your software license, open the Webroot main interface by doubleclicking the Webroot icon
in the system tray. From the taskbar at bottom of the Home panel,
click My Account.
The My Account panel opens and shows your keycode to the right.
Can other users access my online account?
No one can access your account unless they know your Webroot master password. However, if
you installed the Webroot software on additional computers, these installations will all share a
single Webroot account. This means that anyone using these other computers can sign in to your
online account if they know your user name and password. If you have personal information in
your account that you do not want to share, do not provide other members in your household with
your user name and master password.
Can multiple users access the Webroot software from one computer?
Yes, if your computer is configured for multiple Windows user accounts (each person logs in with
a unique name and password), the Webroot software is available to all those users. Each user with
administrative privileges has full access to all areas of the Webroot software, while other users
have limited access. The Webroot software continues its threat protection activities, no matter
which user is logged into the computer.
C: Frequently Asked Questions
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C: Frequently Asked Questions
Glossary
ActiveX
ActiveX technology was developed by Microsoft to allow Web browsers to download and
execute programs on your computer. ActiveX controls have many legitimate uses, such as
running animations, triggering sounds, or downloading Microsoft updates. However, many
spyware programs also use ActiveX to install themselves on your computer. If you see an
ActiveX alert, you should block it from running, unless you trust the source of the ActiveX
technology.
adware
Adware is a type of software that may display advertisements on your system. Some adware
may also hijack Web searches, meaning it may reroute your Web searches through its own
Web page. It may change your default home page to a specific Web site. Adware generally
propagates itself using dialog boxes, various social engineering methods, or through scripting
errors.
Alternate Data Stream (ADS)
An Alternate Data Stream is a highly technical way to hide images, data, or code in a file and can
be used to hide malicious code. The hidden content is impossible to detect using regularly
available tools, such as Windows Explorer.Browser Helper Objects (BHOs)
Browser Helper Objects are add-on programs that work with Internet Explorer. BHOs have
many legitimate uses, such as allowing you to display a PDF file within your browser or to
install a search box for your toolbar. However, many spyware programs also use BHOs to
display ads, track your Internet activity, or hijack your home page. If a BHO alert opens while
you are intentionally downloading a new toolbar or other plug-in, you can allow the
installation. Otherwise, block it.
cookies
Cookies are small text files generated by a Web server and then stored on your computer for
future use. (For Internet Explorer, cookies are stored as separate files. For Firefox, cookies are
stored in one file.) Cookies can contain everything from tracking information about sites you
visited to your personal preferences. Cookies cannot steal information off your machine, but
some do store personal information that you may not want outside parties to gather. The
System Scanner only searches for third-party cookies associated with advertising sites that
may be gathering information about your surfing habits.
definitions
A security definition is a set of fingerprints that characterize viruses, spyware, adware, or other
types of unwanted items. Webroot regularly updates these definitions to provide better
protection against the latest versions of these security threats.
dialer
Dialers are software packages that connect your computer to the Internet via a modem hooked
to a phone jack. Malicious dialers may disconnect your computer from your Internet Service
Glossary
67
Provider (ISP) and reconnect you to the Internet using an expensive toll or international phone
number. They can accrue significant phone charges and can run in the background, hiding their
presence. They generally propagate themselves using dialog boxes, various social engineering
methods, through scripting errors, or may be delivered with a Trojan horse.
firewall
A firewall monitors data traffic traveling in and out of your computer’s ports. It can eliminate
unauthorized access to your computer at home, at the office, or on the road. Using a multilayered approach to defense, Webroot's firewall can block malware, hacking attempts, and
other online threats before they can enter and cause damage to your system.
host name
A host name identifies a device connected in the Internet. Computers on the Internet are often
named WWW. Computers on a network are usually single names that describe the computer,
such as “accounting1.” Host names can be part of a fully qualified domain name (FQDN). For
example, in “www.webroot.com,” the “www” is the host name and “webroot.com” is the
domain name.
hosts file
The Hosts file is a Windows file that helps direct your computer to a Web site using Internet
Protocol (IP) addresses. Your Web browser uses the IP address to actually connect to a site.
When you enter a Web address in a browser, your computer first looks in the Hosts file to see
if it already knows where to go. If the domain is listed (for example, webroot.com), your
computer goes directly to the IP address. If the domain is not listed, your computer looks up
the information from the Internet (a slightly slower process).
HTML
HyperText Markup Language is a method used to display content in Web pages.
HTTP
Hyper Text Transfer Protocol is a set of rules for transferring files (text, graphics, sound, etc.)
on the World Wide Web. As soon as you open a Web browser, you are indirectly using HTTP.
IP address
An Internet Protocol address identifies a machine (computer or server) on the Internet. The
address is a series of four numbers separated by periods (for example, 64.78.182.210). Your
own computer’s IP address may be the same address during every Internet connection (called
a static IP, used in most T1/DSL connections) or it may change for each Internet connection
(called a dynamic IP, used in most cable/dial-up connections).
keylogger
A keylogger is a type of system monitor that has the ability to record all keystrokes on your
computer. It may monitor keystrokes, emails, chat room dialogue, instant message dialogue,
Web sites visited, usernames, passwords, programs run, and any other typed material. They
have the ability to run in the background, hiding their presence. Keyloggers and system
monitors may be used for legitimate purposes, but can also be installed by a user to record
sensitive information for malicious purposes.
malware
Malware is short for “malicious software,” which is designed to destroy or harm your
computer system, such as a virus.
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Glossary
POP3
Post Office Protocol 3 is a standard protocol that allows you to receive email and store it in an
Internet server. Most email applications use POP3.
ports
Ports are numbers that identify the entry and exit points of your computer. Computers divide
one physical port connection into thousands of virtual port connections, most of which are
never used. All communications protocols have designated entrance ports to your computer.
For example, traffic sent using HTTP for Web pages generally travels through port 80. Your
computer’s ports are either open or closed. An open port allows any information to flow
through it and can make your computer vulnerable to hackers. A closed port blocks incoming
traffic.
proxy server
A proxy server is a computer system or router that acts as a relay between a client and server.
Proxy servers are used to help prevent an attacker from invading the private network and are
often used in building a firewall.
Quarantine
Quarantine is a holding area for spyware, viruses, and other potentially unwanted applications
during a sweep. The quarantine process does not delete items from your computer. Rather, it
renders them inoperable and stores them in a safe place where they cannot cause any harm to
your computer. Items in quarantine can be deleted or restored to their original locations.
random access memory (RAM)
RAM is the main memory that acts as the computer’s workspace for running programs.
Spyware and other unwanted programs can steal the computer’s memory resources, which can
lead to system crashes, slower performance, or instability.
registry
A registry is a database of hardware and software settings about your computer’s
configuration, such as the types of programs that are installed. Spyware can create entries in
the Windows registry, which can ultimately slow down your computer and cause problems in
your system.
rootkit
A rootkit is a collection of tools that enable administrator-level access to a computer or
network. By using file-obfuscation techniques, rootkits can hide logins, processes, files and
logs, and may include software to capture information from desktops or a network. Spyware
developers often use rootkits to avoid detection and removal.
scan
A scan is the process of searching for potential threats on your computer, such as spyware and
viruses, then moving those items to Quarantine.
shields
Webroot shields continuously monitor activity related to your Web browser settings, network
communications between your computer and Web sites, Windows system settings, Windows
Startup programs, and email attachments. If the shields detect spyware or any other potential
threats attempting to download, they will either move the item to quarantine or open an alert
message that asks you to take action.
Glossary
69
SMTP
Simple Mail Transport Protocol is a method used for sending text-based information (email).
Because SMTP is limited in its receiving functions, it is often used with two other protocols,
POP3 or IMAP. These protocols let you save messages in a server mailbox and download them
periodically from the server.
spam
Spam is unsolicited junk mail sent to your email address. Its sole purpose is to lure you into
buying their product or service. The term “spam” originated with a Monty Python sketch and
song, the lyrics of which kept repeating the words, “SPAM, SPAM, SPAM...”, much like
endless, unwanted email.
spy cookie
A spy cookie is a Webroot term for a third-party cookie associated with advertising sites that
may be gathering information about your surfing habits.
spyware
Spyware is a program that may either monitor your online activities or possibly install
programs without your consent. Information about online activities may be subsequently sent
to a third party for malicious purposes without your knowledge. Spyware may arrive bundled
with freeware or shareware, through email or instant messenger, may propagate itself using
dialog boxes, various social engineering methods, scripting errors, or by someone with access
to your computer.
system monitors
System monitors, typically non-commercial, may monitor and capture your computer activity,
including recording all keystrokes, emails, chat room dialogue, instant message dialogue, Web
sites visited, usernames, passwords, and programs run. These programs are capable of taking
screen shots of your desktop at scheduled intervals and storing the information on your
computer in an encrypted log file for later retrieval. A system monitor can run in the
background, hiding its presence. These programs typically install via other threats, such as
music downloads and Trojan downloaders.
traces
Traces are individual elements that make up the security definition database. The more traces
found and put into the definitions, the more complete the removal of the potential threats.
Trojan horses
A Trojan horse may take control of your computer files by using a program manager that
allows a hacker to install, execute, open, or close programs. It can run in the background,
hiding its presence. A Trojan is usually disguised as a harmless software program and may
also be distributed as an email attachment. Opening the program or attachment may cause an
auto-installation process that loads the downloader onto your computer and download thirdparty programs on your computer, resulting in the installation of unwanted programs without
your knowledge or consent. Trojans can also open a port on your computer that enable a
hacker to gain remote control of your computer.
URL
Uniform Resource Locator (URL) is the unique address for a file that is accessible on the
Internet. To access the home page of a Web site, you can enter the URL of the home page (for
example: http://www.webroot.com) in the browser’s address line. You can also access specific
70
Glossary
files using URLs (for example: ftp://www.webroot.com/sample.txt). The URL contains the
name of the protocol to be used to access the file resource, a domain name that identifies a
specific computer on the Internet, and a pathname for a specific file.
virus
A virus is a self-replicating program that can infest computer code, documents, or
applications. While some viruses are purposefully malignant, others are more of a nuisance,
replicating uncontrollably and inhibiting system performance.
virus cleaning
Virus cleaning is a Webroot procedure that removes infected portions of a file, when a virus is
detected during a sweep. If the Webroot software can remove the virus successfully, it restores
the cleaned file to your computer in its original location and places a copy of the corrupted file
in Quarantine. The cleaned file is safe to use; the file in Quarantine is not safe to use.
Glossary
71
72
Glossary
Index
A
account
changing password 41
creating 2
launching in browser 6
other users accessing 65
problems creating 3
resetting email address 3
signing in 4
viewing 40
viewing keycode 42
viewing subscription information 42
ActiveX shield 31
ADS shield 31
Advanced Scan Settings panel 19
alerts
Always perform the selected action 9
blocking or allowing items 9
determining how to respond 8
pop-up in the middle of your screen 8
pop-up in the system tray 9
responding to 8
stopping with Gamer mode 50
viewing more details after it closes 9
viewing more details in pop-up alerts 8
automated scans
about 13
turning off 21
B
BHO shield 32
Browser Helper Objects 32
Browser Protection shields 33
C
Cleaned status (virus cleaning) 18
colors on home panel 5, 7
compressed files, scanning 20
cookies
scanning for 20
shield for 34
why it detects so many 62
creating your account 2
D
definitions updates 49
Detected status during scans 15
drives, scanning 20
Index
E
email address, resetting for account 3
Email Attachments shield 37
Execution shield 31
F
fake dialogs 63
FAQs 59
Favorites shield 34
File System shield 31
Forgot Your Password? dialog 4
G
Gamer mode
changing timer 51
enabling from system tray 6
turning on and off 50
H
Help
launching from Home panel 6
launching from system tray 6
history, viewing 47
home panel
description 5
opening 5
protection status 7
Hosts File shield 36
I
IE Hijack shield 34
IE Security shield 34
Ignore selected items 15
installing the software on another computer 42, 64
Internet Communication shield 36
K
keycode, viewing 40, 42, 65
L
language, changing for interface 54
Licenses and Products 42
M
main interface
description 5
opening 5
protection status 7
malware
73
how it gets on your computer 60
scanning for 14
shields for 29
signs of infection 60
memory, scanning 20
multiple installations 64
My Account
changing password 41
creating support tickets 43
editing contact information 41
managing 39
viewing details 40
My Account creation dialog 3
My Webroot
creating a Webroot account 2
description of pages 12
launching in browser 6
opening 11
signing in 4
N
Network Protection shields 35
notifications
removing from panel 11
responding to 10
viewing more information 10
P
password
changing Webroot master password 41
creating Webroot master password 2
forgotten Webroot master password 4
Perform Secure Scan 15
proxy server, settings 52
Q
Quarantine 23
about the process 23
deleting items from 25
determining what to do with items 23
restoring items to original locations 26
viewing items stored in 24
what to do with items 62
Quarantine selected items 15
Quarantined status 18
R
real-time active protection shields 30
registry items, scanning 20
Removed status 18
renewing your subscription 42
risk levels in scans 17
rootkits, scanning for 20
74
S
Scan in Progress panel 15
scanning 13
actions against threats 15
creating schedule 21
customizing 19
description of process 13
launching from home panel 14
launching from system tray 14
launching from Windows 15
malware vs. legitimate programs 61
only new or changed files 20
operation in background 61
risk levels of items found 17
skipping file types 20
turning off automated 21
USB or CD 62
viewing automated results 61
viewing details 16
when to run an immediate scan 62
schedules
for scans 21
stopping with Gamer mode 50
security definitions
about 61
updates 49
See how button 5
shields 29
ActiveX shield 31
ADS shield 31
BHO shield 32
Browser Protection shields 33
description of shield protection 29
determining whether to block or allow 63
Email Attachments shield 37
Execution shield 31
Favorites shield 34
File System shield 31
Hosts file shield 36
IE Hijack shield 34
IE Security shield 34
Internet Communication shield 36
Network Protection shield 35
real-time active protection 30
responding to alerts 8
Startup Items shield 31
stopping with Gamer mode 50
Tracking Cookies shield 34
using with a firewall 64
Sign In dialog 4
signing in to your account 4
Silverlight updates 48
software updates 49
Index
Startup Items shield 31
status indicator in system tray 7
subscription expiration 40, 42
Support 55
Support tickets, creating 43
Suspect status 18
sweeps 13
system history, viewing 47
System Scanner 13
actions against threats 15
creating scan schedule 21
customizing scans 19
description of scan process 13
launching from home panel 14
launching from system tray 14
launching from Windows 15
risk levels of items found 17
turning off automated scans 21
viewing details of scan 16
system tray menu 6
T
Technical Support 55
third-party cookies 63
threats
scanning for 14
shields for 29
signs of infection 60
Index
Tracking Cookies shield 34
tray menu 6
U
uninstalling the program 57
updates
changing update preferences 48
stopping with Gamer mode 50
Use custom scan settings 19
V
View scan details 17
viruses
scanning for 14
shields for 29
signs of infection 60
vulnerable status 7
W
WARN program 49
Webroot account
creating 2
launching in browser 6
problems creating 3
signing in 4
Webroot master password, creating 2
Webroot Shields 29
Webroot support 55
Windows Security Center message 61
75
76
Index
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