nape recording - American Radio History

nape recording - American Radio History
NAPE RECORDING
USING A
SOUK:
SCREEN
RECOFN)ING
"STRAIGE TO
YOUR EARS"
USING LOW
IMPED!INCE
MICROPHONES
CAN YOU SELL
OFF- THE -AIR
RECORDINGS?
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TREAT ;:R
SOUND
ON TAPE
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new horizons in sound
captured with stark realism on
COOK
HE NAME of Emory Cook has become synonymous with dramatic
tt
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from original tape recording to lacquer master and final pressings.
Emory Cook uses Audiotape and Audiodiscs exclusively for original recording and processing. He has found that this AudiodiscAudiotape combination meets his exacting requirements for truly
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www.americanradiohistory.com
MAGNETIC FILM &
RECORDED TAPE OF
THE MONTH CLUB
TAPE RECORDING
RECOMMENDS THE
FOLLOWING TAPESEXCLUSIVE
VOL.
3
MAY -JUNE, 1956
No. 4
1
=124
Tchuikovsky's Symphony Pafhefique #123
Roy Rogers 8 Dale Evans
MARK MOONEY, JR.
HI -FI MASTER LIBRARY LIST
101 S
Musical
Book
103S
Mozart's Piano Concerto =17 in F Major
SaintSaens. Carnival of Animals
Scheherazade. Opus 35 and Tchaikovsky.
Romeo and Juliet
Verdi. La Traviata
Beethoven, -3 Eroica, and Tchaikovsky.
107S
HAD
IIID
115D
Notes from
Editor and Publisher
Tourist's Sketch
A
l9D
B 507S
Schubert. Symphony =8 Unfinished and
Saint- Saens, Plano Concerto in E Flat
Major
Ri,osky Korsakoff, Capriccio Espagnol
Winterthur Orchestra; Victor De Sarzens
Conductor. Mendelssohn. Part
Midsummer Nights Dream: Netherland
Philharmonic Orchestra. Part 2
Final's
Cave Overture
Zurich Tonhalle Orchestra: Otto Ackerman
Conductor.
Beethoven and Mozart German Dances
B501S
The Immortal
117D
-
-
- -
JAMES H. MILLS, SR.,
Art Director
Technical Consultant
ANTHONY
-
J. MORIN, JR.
National Advertising Manager
274 Madison Ave., New York 16, N. Y.
IN
Kern
Music For Cocktails
B 502S
105
I
Music Editor
ROBERT W. LAPHAM,
Voyevoda
I
SIGSBEE
CHARLES D.
JOHN L. ALLEN,
Circulation Manager
THIS ISSUE
Artistry in Flamenco
-IS
85125
113 -S
-
French and Spanish Folk Songs
American Folk Songs
Album
Cowboy Songs
Album =1
-
I16 -S
Original Dixieland
Charley Christian Jazz
Tage Parade of Hits
Seketin ns
1045
B510S
112-S
ri
USING
SOUND
A
THEATER SOUND ON TAPE
-
12
Slips. Fluffs, and Boners
105.2D
Alfred
110D
-
20
Mildred Stagg
24
Mort Goldberg
28
Bayha
32
George Chernoff
40
Sigsbee
6
Jerry L. Heisler
14
John J. Grady, Jr.
16
Popular
SOUND
8504S?
8505
O'Connell
Sheldon
SCREEN
IN
A
NEW
PACKAGE
S
B514D
B515D
Drake Reads the Rubaiyat and
Sohrab and Rustrum
Basil Rathbone reading Edgar Allen Poe's
USING LOW
Reading of Dylan Thomas
Judith Anderson reads from
CAN YOU SELL OFF- THE -AIR RECORDINGS?
Jack
IMPEDANCE MICROPHONES
The Raven
Edna St.
Vincent Millay
These tapes are also available at your local dealer
at 56.95 ea.
Charles
NEW
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TEEN
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Cover: Mark Dawson and Chorus Making Recording
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a mile of tape
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The tape recorder expert who really knows his
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Dupont Polyostor Film
FOR EVERY SOUND REASON
REEVES
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By Charles D. Sigsbee
NEW TAPES
ALL of the tapes in this issue were re-
viewed on a Viking stereophonic-monaural playback unit (Questionable were
reference -checked on Ampex equipment).
The Viking seems to be the poor man's
answer to the current stereophonic cost
problem. Playing, as it does, in -line and
staggered stereo tapes, as well as monaural
half track and full track tapes, it can well
be considered universal. And this for less
than $100 for the basic deck and heads.
It is an amazingly simple yet stable
unit that can easily be installed and main-
LIVINGSTON
1
AUDIOSPHERE 1
CONNOISSEUR
LARGEST
FASTEST GROWING
MOST DIVERSIFIED
CLASSICAL
( EMPIRICAL
OCEANIC
J RIVERSIDE
BOSTON
LIVINGSTON
TAPE CLUB
ATLANTIC
ESOTERIC
HACK SWAIN
powerhouse amplifiers and garage -sized
speaker housings. I have heard two small,
inexpensive amplifiers driving two eight inch speakers in small housings turn out
two -channel sound far superior to the best
monaural sound reproduced on rigs costing three times as much!
The idea is that you aren't trying to
ream out that hole in the wall anymore;
with stero you just remove the wall. Drop
into a local sound emporium and listen to
a demonstration: It'll open your mouth!
rained by anyone who can put together an
amplifier and /or speaker kit. Of course,
packaged units are available for those who
don't care to put together or maintain
anything.
Please understand, I am not comparing
it to the more expensive units but, rather
as an interim rig at low cost for those who
would like stereophonic sound right now.
Speaking of cost, did you know that
stereophonic sound can actually be cheaper
than monaural sound of comparable, or
better, quality? You no longer need those
LYRICHORD
TICO
OMEGATAPE #8002 (SERIE ELAN)
First off, a note about the titling above.
Designed to make available to YOU the finest in recorded
music at the lowest possible purchase price
MONAURAL...
STEREO!
and
AS A CLUB MEMBER, YOU SAVE
25%
ON FAMOUS TAPES
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WHY THE LIVINGSTON TAPE CLUB? Nobody questions the superiority of music
on tape. But everyone wishes the prices were lower. SO DO WE! Your repeated
requests for a club plan, plus the fact that a known membership reduces costs, makes
it possible to pass these savings on to YOU.
HOW THE CLUB OPERATES. 1) Mail coupon below with your membership fee.
2) You will receive new MASTER TAPE CATOLOG with over 130 titles to choose
from (al! available in dual track, many in full track and stereophonic). 3) You also
receive coupons entitling you to purchase 25 tapes at these special club prices:
5" dual track, (reg. $6), $4.50; 7" dual track (reg. $12), $9; 7" stereophonic, (reg.
$10), $7.50. And club membership includes a free subscription to TAPE RECORDING MAGAZINE, or a 1 year extension of present subscription!
f
SAVINGS
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Enclosed please find check or money
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THE BALLET
Delibes: Sylvia
Strauss, Johann: Le Beau Danube
Gounod: Faust Ballet Music
Weber: Spectre de la Rose (sic)
London Pro Musica Orchestra
Sheldon Burton, Conductor
C
order for Six Dollars as memCLUB. Please send Catalog,
Recording Magazine (please
Sub.
to the address below.
)
Between the Faust music and the Weber
should be inserted, Debussy: Prelude to
the Afternoon of a Faun. It appears there,
surprising but welcome, on my copy.
Following that is listed, Spectre de la
Rose, which is actually Invitation to the
Dance, which is the music for the ballet
sequence, Spectre de la Rose. in the movie
The Red Shoes. Just wanted to clear this
up before starting the review.
The tape, as the title implies, is a delightful hour -plus of music for classical
dancing, and I defy you to keep your own
feet still when listening to it. Here the
accent is on dance rather than musical
interpretation, although both are well represented.
Sheldon Burton appears to be a capable
conductor for this type of music and the
Pro Musica orchestra seems to be larger
on this recording than it has on others in
the past. Most notable is the almost
luminescent quality attained in Afternoon
of a Faun.
The tape itself, although well recorded,
could have been reproduced at a higher
level to preclude the possibility of equipment noise brought about by the necessity
of cranking up the volume control. As the
print is on the new thin tape, I imagine
it was reproduced at a lower level rather
than risk the danger of print-through.
A decidedly noticeable flaw exists at the
end of the reel, and track one, on the
review copy. The music begins to go
faster and faster like a turntable that has
been switched suddenly from 331/3 to
78 rpm. I trust that the Company has
caught the error by this time and recalled
the faulty copies. Hope so, a thing like
that could injure a dancer for life .
Remember what happened to Karen in
Anderson's fairy tale, The Red Shoes (unrelated to the second paragraph)?
Nome
MAIL
C O
U P
BRAHMS
Address
O N
TODAY!
City
Equipment used
6
Zone
....State
Concerto #I, in D minor for Piano and
Orchestra
Artur Rubinstein, Pianist
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Fritz Reiner, Conductor
RCA VICTOR CC -15
ST E R E 01
More than half a century ago Ruben stein performed this work at his first con art appearance. That was in 1898, and
was successful enough to launch him on
a :ong and brilliant career.
This recording, coming in his seventieth
year, could stand for all time as a legacy.
It is well nigh perfect in every respect;
w_ only hope that RCA recorded the
master stereophonically.
The composer, soloist and conductor
are here so much in rapport as at times to
seem empathic, particularly in the adagio
which is almost overwhelming in the
sheer force of its beauty. Truly a remarkable performance in every respect.
The care lavished on this recording by
the RCA engineers makes it not only a
must today but a collector's item of the
future. It is also gratifying to note that
RCA is releasing tapes that represent the
most current, and best recordings in their
catalogue.
mozart
FOUR CONCERTOS FOR FRENCH HORN
AND ORCHESTRA
Livingston continues to add to its library of classical masterworks on
stereophonic recorded tape with exciting new releases. From the Boston Tape Library, the four concertos for french horn of Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart, here brilliantly performed by James Stagliano and 'the
Zimbler Sinfonietta .
on dual -channel stereo tapes with the
flawless balance, range and fidelity that only Livingston -first in recorded
tape and first in stereo-has mastered. Album 1: Concertos #3. 1t2 (K.
447, 417), BO 7 -4 BN. Album 2: Concertos #4, #1 (K. 495, 412), BO 7 -5 BN.
7- reels at 71/2 IPS, each $10. Dual -track monaural, all four on one 7" reel,
.
BO
7 -3,
$12.
GREGORIAN CHANTS AND INTROITS
Roger Wagner Chorale
OMEGATAPE 8003
Pure Gregorian without embellishment
of any kind, sung by the male section of
the famous Wagner Chorale.
I feel that this, as well as it is done,
will have an interest limited to teachers,
students and a few collectors. Music in
this ancient mode loses much for modern
eats without the important accompanying
ritual of the Church.
However, for those interested in music
of the Gregorian period, this is as well
done as any. There is a slight residual
noise, but not enough to be bothersome
at the levels the tape will be played.
bill Thomson
most popular Ravel pieces presented in an
authoritative and vigorous manner by
Leibowitz. Except for Pavane and La Valse,
the music is Spanish in flavor with certain highly percussive sections that should
please the hi -fi people no end.
Bolero, as here presented, is not the
supercharged, juke box version so popular
some 25 years ago ( has it been that long ?) ,
but the original I- minute score.
All of it is dramatic music, dramatically
presented by both the orchestra and Phonotapes.
MUSIC IN MOTION, Vol.
LIVINGSTON
"CONNOISSEUR"
D-5-108
recording by the young first cellist of
the Chicago Orchestra of pieces by de
F:dla, Torroba, Granados. Albeniz, and
A
C:assado.
Starker was a concert
4c up a chair position.
it his technique, it is
ht re. The performance
artist before he
If there is a flaw
not in evidence
is
vigorous and
MUSIC IN MOTION, Vol. 2'
zy Rhythm, Just One of
!.,,Phose Things. Manhattan, Pagan Love Song and 6 others.
T- 1089 -BN. 7", 71/2 IPS, $10.
Dual -track monaural, 5", T -51089, $6.
('LIB
MEMBERS: You
may
order these new releases on the
club plan, of course. Please use
order blank below.
For information on hoe to joist the Livingston Tape Club and save -see ad on opposite page
LIVINGSTON ELECTRONIC CORP.
LIVINGSTON, N.
J
LIVINGSTON
To
order, take this coupon to your dealer or mail to:
Livingston Electronic Corp.. Livingston. N. J.
....
....
....
Leon Pommers at the piano
1-
Tea For Two, Rose of Washington Square, Lover Come
Back to Me, In the Still of the
Night and 6 others. T- 1088 -BN.
7", 7rß. IPS, $10. Dual -track
monaural. 5', T-5- 1088, $6,
T-5-1092, $6.
Enclosed find check or money order for
JANOS STARKER, Cello
Spanish Album
to
1090, $6.
BILL THOMSON GOES LATIN
several decades. including
Brazil, Poinciana, Carioca, Orchids in the Moonlight and 4
other favorites. T- 1091-BN, 7"
reel. 71/2 IPS, $10. Dual -track
monaural, 5" reel. T -5 -1091. $6.
BILL THOMSON PLAYS JEROME KERN -The immortal
favorites of Kern, in enduring
versions. in Intimate stereo.
T- 1092 -BN, 7" reel, 72 IPS. $10.
Dual -track monaural, 5" reel,
Espagnole
Orchestre Radio-Symphonique de Paris
Rene Leibowitz, Conductor
PHONOTAPES -SONORE PM 107
A highly satisfactory package of the
the land"
new albums of stereo
tape from the Inimitable Lenny
Herman -good news for tape
enthusiasts everywhere: Here
are popular standards with a
lasting appeal, yours for a lifetime on tape.
of
Valse
in
Two
-Outstanding Latin melodies
Alborado del Gracioso
Pavane for a Dead Princess
Rapsodie
"mightiest little band
BILL THOMSON IN A MAGIC
MOOD- Captivating versions of
Lotus Land, Harlem Nocturne,
Autumn Leaves, Street Scene,
Old Black Magic, Intermezzo,
Slaughter on 10th Ave. T -1090BN, 7' reel, 71/2 IPS. $10. Dual track monaural, 5" reel T -5-
RAVEL
Bolero
La
lenny herman
and his hammond
BO7-4BN
BO 7-5 BN
BO 7-3
T-1090-BN
T-1091-BN
.... T-1092-BN
....
....
.... for the following topes:
S
....
....
....
T-5-1090
T-5-1091
T-5-1092
.... T-1080-11N
....
T-1009-BN
.... T-5-1088
.... T-5-1089
When ordering stereo tapes, please specify: in -line
staggered E
I
am not a club member.
El
am a club member; purchase coupons are enclosed.
I am joining the Tape Club, application enclosed. Payment is made at Club price -please
retain one coupon for each lope ordered and send me the balance.
I
Name
Address
City
Zone
State
7
www.americanradiohistory.com
for every application...
exciting throughout, the Latin idiom seeming to come naturally to this Hungarian born artist.
The recording is clean and presents the
instrument in all of its coloration. The
sound is lifelike and balances well between
the two instruments.
-
most complete
most diversified
line in the world!
HARP RECITAL by EDWARD VITO
Ravel: Introduction and Allegro for Harp,
Flute, Clarinet and String Quartet.
Debussy: Danses Sacre et Profane for
Harp and String Quartet. Arabesque
Nos. I and 2
Selections by Saint- Seens, Faure, Salzedo,
Prokofieff and De Falla
Assisted by Arnold Eidus, Violin; and a
String Quartet. Flute and Clarinet
LIVINGSTON "CONNOISSEUR" D -106
Musically this is a quietly beautiful recording played by a man who has a great
once you've
heard the
3 -speed RT -75
tape recorder
you'll want to own it!
From a professional
boom
stand
to a
flexible goose neck to o tiny
-
fitting- whatever
your need in
mike stands and accessories
depend on it, ATLAS has it for
you. Designed and manufac-
deal of mastery over the instrument. Vito
was soloist with the Toscanini, NBC
Orchestra during its entire existence.
Although you have no doubt as to
ln,'s virtuosity throughout the tape, this
, largely music of substance seriously pre .ented, not showy music flamboyantly
presented, generally the plague of recording harpists.
Livingston has done a good job of re-
tured for highest stability,
quiet, ease of operation, dura-
bility. And backed
up 100%
by ATLAS -world leader in mike
stands, public address loudspeakers and accessories for 21
years.
Compare them all at your distributor -You'll make your next
mike stand an ATLAS.
production.
HIGH FIDELITY SHOWPIECES FOR ORCHESTRA (Volume one)
Gershwin: Rhapsody In Blue
Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody ?t2
Offenbach: Can Can
Rimsky- Korsakov: Hymn To The Sun
London Pro Musica Orchestra
Sheldon Burton, Conductor
you've seen it, you'll say: "That's
the tape recorder I want ". And no'
wonder, the RT -75's unmatched
versatility puts it out in front.
It's ideal for any recording assignment with its exclusive three it operates
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at 71/2 ips, 33/4 ips and 17/8 ips.
See and hear it noun.
full color literature No. 556
i,
1
,
Dargamyshsky:
eff
Sound Systems, Inc.
572 Marion Road,
A
Columbus 7, Ohio
subsidiary of Thompson Products,
mom.
Inc.
1
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/
//
AVOr
Export Office: 401 Broadway, New York City 13
In Canada:
CharlesW. Pointon, Ltd., 6 Alcina Ave., Toronto 10, Ont.
8
-
by
Charles G. Westsott
All the important facts in one book
I
Cossack Dance
Khachaturian: Sabre Dance
Brahms: Hungarian Dances #5 and
Gangelberger: Teddy Bear Dance
6
Tchaikowsky: Dance Of The Flutes
London Pro Musica Orchestra
Sheldon Burton, Conductor
OMEGATAPE 5012
This is more like it. These are high
.
"Tape Recorders
How They Work"
HIGH FIDELITY SHOWPIECES FOR ORCHESTRA (Volume two)
Polla: Dancing Tambourine
Grieg: Arabian Dance
IN
TAPE RECORDING
I
...
- - - --.
THIS IS THE BOOK
FOR EVERYONE INTERESTED
familiarly as Song Of India. No junior,
this is a concert version.
The second side, containing the Ilunzariau Rhapsody and Can Lan comes off
better as a high fidelity showpiece. Although Omega lavished their usually careful recording techniques on the tape, I feel
that the musical content is a trifle too
pedestrian to arouse much cheering. Of
Course,
could be wrong.
"right" tape recorder. Once
SOUND CORP.
39th Street. Brooklyn 18, New Yo,k
Co.odo A.o, R.d,o Corp I,d. rammt.. One
1408
OMEGATAPE 5011
A collection of short and somewhat unrelated pieces that are just about what the
title implies. The Rhapsody In Blue is a
shortened version that is very reminiscent
of the original Whiteman recording.
.
Iltm,, To The Sun is now known more
Yes, the RT -75 will put a stop
to your endless looking for the
Request
AT LAS
Now you can have an expert understanding of
tape recording. Explains magnetic recording
theory; describes characteristics of tape. Tells
how a recorder operates; discusses molorboard
mechanism, drive motors, volume indicators,
bias oscillators, equalization circuits, amplifiers and magnetic heads- includes diagrams,
photographs and schematics. Tells you how
to get hest frequency response with lowest
noise, how to avoid tape overload, how to
obtain best bias settings; includes procedures
for testing tape recorders and tape. The comprehensive book about Tape Recorders. 176
pages; 5% x 8 W; over 150 illustrations. Use
coupon below to order your copy today.
$2.75
Postpaid, only
HOWARD W. SAMS L CO., INC.
fidelity showpieces designed to exercise t 2201 E. 46th St., Dept. 18 -E6
most any rig. It contains all of the ele- I Indianapolis 5, Ind.
ments for hi -fi showing; much percussion I Send me your book: "Tape Recorders" ($2.75)
of various kinds, as well as unusual inName
strumentation and more than enough orAddress.
chestral tutti.
My musical favorite on this tape is the I City
Zane.. .State
(priced slightly higher outside U. S.
Teddy Bear Dance. a whimsical, infectious
L
J
.lttle bit for bass clarinet and orchestra,
performed here with an obvious sense of
humor.
Engineered to perfection, the tape is
highly recommended for those who feel
that their collection is in need of some
1)1 the
music "in between," and whose
iin't1
u7fttNf:
VERDI
La
Traviata
Margit Opawsky, soprano
HI -FI ON TAPE
Leo Larsen, tenor
Hank Driessen, bass
Jan Vroons, baritone
Catherine Hessels, Mezzo- soprano
Siemen Jorgama, bass
!Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra
5 inch
Walter Goehr, Conductor
71A?
IPS dual track
ALSO AVAILABLE Al Ob. and
RECORDED TAPE -OF -THE -MONTH CLUB
SELECTION # I I
This is not the complete opera. It is
a carefully edited version, designed to re-
30 minute programs
15 IPS)
I
JAY
WHITE
"The ariracle of e dream"
.."."110:3
Claire de Lune
Deep Purple
Harlem Nocturne
Estrellita
Over the Rainbow
Paris in the Spring
Sleepy Lagoon
RAC CHARLES
CHORUS
11/64.1 in far o0617
pinrr.r'
Far Away Places
Slow Boat to China
Foggy Day in London
It Happened in Monterey
Moon Over Manakoora
How High the Moon
April in Paris
Bewitched
Long Ago and Far Away
MONTT KELLY
''Color and Romance-
(
=1111)
- --n
Granada
Tropicana
Cubamba
Neopolitan Notes Mambo
Under Paris Skies
Three O'clock in the Morning
Glocca Morra
Bali Hai
Monte Carlo
Shangri la
The best of BILLY BUTTERFIELD
(
=$ol
)
- --
¡SILLY BUTTERPIELD
Bernie's Tune
Marching In
7
The Saints Come
Douglas Hop
4 40+
Deed I Do
West End Blues
tv
d-:
_WSYa
r_ ,
DEMONSTRATION TAPE of excerpts from all of the above
STRAUSS, RICHARD
Also Sprach Zarathustra
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Fritz Reiner, Conductor
RCA VICTOR ECS -I (in -line heads) ECSD(staggered heads)
IF NOT
AVAILABLE AT YOUR RECORD,
PHOTO
Bel Conta
1
The first RCA Victor stereophonic tape
that has been thrilling audio show follwers for some time. Thrilling as a monaural recording, it is now made doubly so
through the marvel of stereophonic reproduction.
As dramatic music is as necessary to
the initial introduction to two -channel
listening as it was to the introduction to
high fidelity itself, this music adequately
serves the purpose. Inspired by Nietzsche's
philosophical, superman promoting poem,
the work is as dramatic as music can get,
fr in) the great opening crescendo to the
quiet closing chords.
(
Laura -part I
Laura -part II
TossellPs Serenade
tain the essential parts without destroying
the whole. It succeeds rather well in its
purpose, although there are some parts
removed that I would rather hear than
some parts that were included.
The singing, for the most part is quite
satisfactory, in one case brilliant. The
soprano, Margit Opawsky, when she is in
control, makes an acceptable Violetta,
sounding appropriately healthy during her
third act death spasms. I get the impression that she gets better as the opera
proceeds, as if warming up to the demands
of that last act.
Larsen is an able tenor, at his best
during the duets. Come to think of it, he
no is at his best during the third act,
a hich would suggest that this portion of
the tape was recorded at a separate session
when everybody was feeling just right.
High spot of the entire presentation is
the magnificent, expressive voice of the
basso, Hank Driessen. The dramatic qualities of his delivery in the two second act
arias tingle the spine. What a Mephistopheles he would make!
The whole presentation is beautifully
paced by the conducting of Walter Goehr.
As in the case of the Eroica mentioned
earlier, this is a bargain tape, cost and
performance considered. The fidelity, while
not as good as it might have been, is still
of sufficient quality to maintain the standards set by this company.
Enclosed is
or HI-FI DEALER
....
WRITE DIRECT
...
$2
DD
IrDT27,
(Fill in coupon below)
MAGNETIC RECORDED TAPE
DEP1. TR 1856 W.
IEFf ERS[, BLVD. LOS ANGELES
¡Money Order
$
or
16,
CALIF.
Check.
Send me the following selections checked below 1$6.95 ea. Postpaidl
"Color and Romance"
The miracle of a dream"
MONTY KELLY
JAY WHITE
RAY CHARLES CHORUS
-
1
=101
( =103
"Moods in far away places"
i
r102í
The best of BILLY BUTTERFIELD (.501/
DEMONSTRATION TAPE of excerpts from all of the above 1$2.001 1= DT27l
Complete list of MONAURAL and STEREOPHONIC
tapes FREE,
hifi
NAME
(PLEASE PRINT)
ADDRESS
CITY
_._.
and ZONE_
__..
L
STnTE
J
9
www.americanradiohistory.com
RCA recommends that the speakers be
placed in corners of the room so that their
axes intersect at a point about three -
quarters of the room length. However,
listener tests over a considerable period
of time have caused us to adopt another
rule -of -thumb standard for optimum reproduction.
We have found that placing each
speaker one -third of the total room width
away from the corner, and flat against the
wall, results in the most lifelike reproduction under almost all conditions. We even
tried this system on a theater stage with
impressive results.
Ai
NE
a
`
\\s\111IIII
"41sy0/¢
Saue
TIME!
LABOR!
MONEY!
with the
Model MT -IM
MPiaci4 PRESTO SPLICER
acerare or paper
rspe. spl is cd to
.
SIBELIUS
in
seconds!
F 567
Origin of Fire
Song of My Heart
The
-
other
A heat weld
No cement
No adhesives
RCA now has issued several new stereo-
E
c.«c i
or themselves.
Also splices any type leader stock to any yrype
magnetic tape without adhe,ives. Endlos;
loop splicing no problem.
phonic tapes and I hope to be able to review them for you in the next issue.
t
i..-.
Now available for any type
Finlandia
Pohjola's Daughter
Helsinki University Chorus
Sulo Saarifs, Baritone
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
Thor Johnson, Conductor
AV- 508 ( Binaural)
Diagonal cut capable of withstanding 6
pound pull on mylar
Inaudible with playback amplifier gain at
maximum
Write for FREE Sample Splice & Brochure
I
THE
This tape is getting to be a hardy
perennial in these pages. This is the third
time in as many years that we have had
the opportunity to review it first as a
full track, monaural recording, then as
a dual track, monaural, and now as a
binaural offering.
It is at its best binaurally. In fact, it
is one of the more outstanding stereophonic recordings reviewed this far. We
shall use the terms "binaural" and - stereophonic" interchangeably here as there is
no appreciable difference when played
hack through an optimum living -room
speaker arrangement.)
The first selection, The Origin of Fire.
is a short, but dramatic, tone poem for
orchestra, baritone soloist and chorus. If
the two -channel system reproducing it is
well balanced, the baritone's voice will
seem to be coming from a point midwai
between the two speakers. A slight imbalance, however. will tend to move the
voice toward the speaker with the morn
volume. It is well to note that even this
is not a detriment to the enjoyment of
the music because of the obvious superiority of the two- channel reproduction.
Pohjola's Daughter is the most impressive selection to demonstrate the dimensional characteristics of stereophony because of Sibelius' use of the various orchestral sections to build his mood, and
this is the Sibelius of the First and Second
Symphonies. The music it at times moody
and brooding, at times beautiful and
sensuous, but always dramatic and intense.
hair -raising in its emotional impact when
heard stereophonically.
Dept. T.00
ARFSTaSFAL
3727 33rd st..Long Island City
CORP
1,N
Y.
(
The Citation, finest portable tape recorder in the
moderate -price field,
is as modern and handsome in design as it is
rich and clear in faithful
reproduction.
More important, the
Citation makes it possible
for you to afford professional levels of full
frequency and undistorted
with features
fidelity
usually found only in tape
recorders for professional
-
use.
Before you decide, see the
Citation. To be convinced,
hear the Citation.
Write for full information, or ask
your Mognecord dealer for a
demonstration. He's listed in the
classified telephone directory
under "Recorders."
fl1agn ecord, inc.
s(e,lve
KG4Yr'L ed 7
ar istryzer
1101 S. KILBOURN AVE.
CHICAGO 24. ILLINOIS
10
FOLK MUSIC
FRONTIER BALLADS
Sung by Pete Seeger with
5 string banjo
PHONOTAPES P7T F5003
The story of the great American frontier
told in its songs. It's all here: the gold rush.
the sod houses, the Cumberland Gap, the
LETTERS
REPORTS
SURVEYS
INTERVIEWS
RECORDS
INSTRUCTIONS
¡T,AKE A "RECORDER" and a
in your CAR
\5",w" CONVERTER
Don't leave your recorder Idle when you're "en the
Thousands of progressive salesmen,
lives, adjusters, lecturers, newscasters and others
working "in the field" find they can make more calls,
more ground, work more efficiently with a
RECORDER or DICTATING MACHINE in the r
Operated by a CARTER ROTARY CONVERTER from
your car battery, you can easily DOUBLE the usefulness of your recorder if you lake it along.
s, boots, planes,
Carter Converters are used in
supplying 110 v. AC from storage c battery power. Sold
by radio parts distributors everywhere. Mail Coupon
for full details and nearest distributor. Carter Meter
road."
Co., Chicago 47.
I-
Carter Motor Co.
2655 N. Maplewood Ave.
iyaQLL
Chicago 47. Illinois
full informaillustrated
and
circular
Please send
tion on Carter Converters.
Name
Address
City
State
J
Erie Canal, the wagon trains, the Indian
wars, the westward movement of the railroad, the fun, the sorrow, the accomplishment, the religious fervor. And to fill in
the spaces, a thirty -page booklet is included with the tape to explain the historical background of the songs and decorated with many woodcuts of the period.
Like the BALLADS OF THE CIVIL
WAR album reviewed in a previous issue,
chis album was taped by special arrangement with Folkways Records.
A better singer could not be found for
chis
monumental collection than Pete
Seeger. He sings in spirited, infectious
ityle that leaves not one shred of doubt as
to authenticity. He is a folk singer's folk
singer, having learned his repertoire the
hard way, walking through rural America
and living with the direct descendants
of the people who created them. Singing
for eats, he would swap ballad for ballad
until he built his vast collection. His
banjo playing he learned the same way;
from the people who played it in the evening for their own entertainment.
This is a collection that cannot be ignored by collectors of folk music, historians, or people just interested in a dog goned entertaining hour.
It is not high fidelity but then, why
Mould it be'
POPULAR AND JAZZ
BILLY
BUTTERFIELD
(THE BEST OF)
CANTO #501
Like the Dave Brubeck tapes reviewed
BEL
Vitality
Color
Realism
=min-
1
If you are attempting to maintain standards as high as those of motion
picture, TV, radio and professional recording studios
if you desire
recorded music that is alive with clarity and richness
if you require a
durable microphone that can be used for years without deviation from its
original standards
you need a SHURE Studio Microphone for your
recordings.
...
...
...
Model "333"
in the last issue, these selections were recorded on location at various colleges in
A slender, uni- directional microphone of amazing ruggedness
and striking design. It reduces random noise pickup by 73%,
the East.
Backing Billy are Cliff Leeman on
drums, Jerry Bruno on Bass, Mickey Crane
at piano, Nick Caiazza on tenor, and Al
Casamenti on guitar.
The jazz has plenty of drive and sponcanetity even though it is not the best
on tape. Billy gets closest to his best on
'Deed I Do," and "West End Blues," but
even this is not his verb best. As personal
caste and mood are always involved in
close decisions like this, I would advise you
to listen first.
Interesting social note: The crowds are
more noticeable at NYU and Princeton
than they are at Amherst and Rutgers.
almost completely eliminating the distracting background noises so
frequently encountered in making recordings outside a controlled
studio. The "333" provides a readily accessible multi -impedance switch that permits its use with all types of amplifiers
and varying lengths of cable. Other features include a Voice Music Switch, anti "Pff" filter screen, and a vibration -
isolation unit mounted in live rubber. The "333" provides
high- output and a smooth frequency response, with a production uniformity guaranteed to + 2,4 db, 30 to 15,000 cps.
Model "525"
An exceptionally fine probe microphone of broadcast quality.
The "525" is an omni- directional microphone with a frequency response of 40 to 15,000 cps, production uniformity
guaranteed to + 21/2 db. Other features include multi-impedance switch
high output
. and "Duracoustic"
diaphragm, specially designed to withstand moisture, heat,
cold, and physical shock. The "525" is furnished with a
swivel adaptor and a neck lavalier cord and belt clip assembly.
COLOR AND ROMANCE
Monty Kelly Conducts
BEL CANTO 101
Try this on your hi -fi set. A collection
of mostly Latin- flavored mood pieces by an
orchestra that could, at times, be mistaken
.
Model "300"
for Mantovani.
The tape on the whole seems to be
better engineered than any Mantovani re-
A bi- directional gradient microphone that reduces reverberation and the pickup of random noise energy by 66%! The
"300" can be placed at a 73% greater distance from the performer than is possible with omni -directional microphones,
providing greater freedom and allowing group recording. This
high fidelity microphone also features a readily accessible
Voice -Music Switch, multi -impedance switch, anti-" Pff"
filter screen, vibration -isolation unit mounted in live rubber
...frequency response with a production uniformity guaranteed to + 21/2 db, 40 to 15,000 cps.
cordings we have yet heard. Take the upper
register string technique, add the percussive attraction of a Latin- American rhythm
section, and a careful engineering job and
you have a recording that can't help but
be an instant hit.
Special note to hi -fi -fans: This has
everything on it but an organ. Try it.
THE MIRACLE OF A DREAM
Jay White
CANTO #103
you see this album displayed in your
'avorite emporium. I think it is only fair
ro tell you that Jay White is not the very
NOTE: Models
"333' and "525" multi -impedance
Model "300" multi- impedance switch
is
switch is for 50. 150 -250 ohms impedance.
for 50 -250 ohms and high impedance.
BEL
If
SHURE BROTHERS, INC.
212
HARTREY AVENUE
EVANSTON, ILLINOIS
pretty blonde displayed on the cover. He
is the very fine alto saxophonist heard on
the tape inside.
This is music that sets a mood, the kind
that you like to hear on that late night
radio program when you are wooing that
currently favorite miss. Maybe that's why
the blonde!
Suffice it to say that White blows a
mean reed and the engineers have captured it well. The selection "Laura" as
presented here would draw quite a few
nickels into the juke boxes, if it hasn't
already in the original record release.
RECORDED TAPE
We carry a full line of stereophonic and monaural tapes from
over thirty leading tape libraries.
For a complete and informative
FREE catalog, write
-
MAL'S RECORDING SERVICE
an instrumental background that enhances
the production.
PIANO HAVANA
Marco Rizo and His Rhythm
OMEGATAPE 5006
Another of the excellent Latin-American
tapes being turned out by Omega. This
one consists entirely of piano and rhythm
section in a cleanly balanced recording.
Have you heard Parade Of The Wooden
Soldiers, Manhattan and By Heck given a
Cuban beat? Here you will.
Dept. TR, Box 37, Rockaway Beach 94, N. Y.
MOODS IN FAR AWAY PLACES
Ray
Charles Chorus
WILBUR
Are You From Dixie
CANTO #102
A well-trained chorus sets a mighty
dreamy mood on this tape. The group you
have seen and heard many times on television, radio and Perry Como recordings.
The recording is excellent, as are all
of the current Bel Canto offerings, and
listens well at any level. Unlike some of
the recent choral efforts, this one includes
Yama, Yama
BEL
OMEGA TAPES
ALWAYS AVAILABLE AT
discount
record shop
1340 Connecticut Ave., N.W.
Washington, D. C.
No shipping charge on prepaid mail orders
JAZZTAPE
1000
1001
Herbie Harper
SCENE WEST:
&
t
4000
l
SERIES
- S"
$6.95
reel, dual track, 71/4ips.
4001 PATTERNS FOR TROMBONE
- Joe
Howard and his Orchestra
-
My Man's Gon Now, I'll B Around, L,ndr
,Insnvmental DANCE SERIES Volume 41
loue I Cover the Woterlronf. Spook tow, Tok M. in Your Arm,, Tenderly, Study War
--
Mor LArrangmnb by lorry FiIdingl
Frank Comstock and his Orchestra featuring Tony
4004 JAZZ LAB
Rizzi and Ted Nash
No
-
South of
Broil.
Passion
Girl, Taylor talks, Longuid Latin,
Mor Cement
4007 BOB KEENE and his Orchestra (Instrumental
Footloose. Starlight.
lea
lh Grabber,
Frontico- Laurel.
Sand and
DANCE SERIES Volume u
Me, Dancing Tombola
rene, Flyin' Home, Jug Stop- It Aln't Necessarily So, Easy to Rommb,, Dancing on eh
Coiling Arrangements by Billy May, Shorty Rogers, Bill Holman, Johnny Thompson,
Is,
t
It Romantic. Mimi, The Lady It a Tromp,
4008 NEW ORLEANS
4009
- Kid Ory's
Thy Didn't
BGr
Band with Lizzie Miles
Cried for Yov, Corelea lore. Basin Sheet, Dippermoulh Blu, High
Soddy, Savoy Bluet, Bal/in' the lack
THE SEXTET FROM HUNGER - Dorktown Strette,', Boll, That A- Plenty, Royal
Gorden Blue,, Harmony Rog, Everybody Loves My Baby, At Ih Jae, Bond Boll, Fidgety
Feet, Original Dixieland One Step. Bye Bye Bloc, When You Wore e Tulip
Ace In The Hole,
I
-
2
Bob Enevoldsen Quintet
Iron Work,, loaded with Bou. Topsy, Blues and Rhythm, Don't B That Way
4011 JAZZ LAB, Volume
demonstration tape
I
Send tree complete Catalog.
address
city
cone
s 2 I.00 postage
paid
Order from your nearest music or camero store.
II not available locally order directly from ...
J A Z Z TA P E
name
INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC
state
Mardi Gras Rag
Hof Lips
ATLANTIC TAPE LIBRARY AT
(BINAURAL)
BN
This stereophonic gem takes off on the
first note and doesn't come back down
again until it runs off the reel at the end.
It is as commercial as can be, but so well
recorded, so enthusiastically presented that
you can't help but go right along with it,
commercial or not.
This is the most clearly defined of the
binaural tapes reviewed this month. There
is no doubt, at any time, who is on the
left, the right, or in the middle. The re-
RECORDING CORPORATION
858 VINE STREET
-
HOLLYWOOD
THIS IS OUR COUNTRY
121 Color Slides plus 32 minute reel of
taped commentary.
MESTON'S TRAVELS
3801 N. Piedras, El Paso, Texas
This is quite an unusual combination for
a commercial product and from the review
reaction gained from this one, we know we
will be seeing more of them.
The set "This is Our Country" consists
of 121 color slides suitable for the regular
2 x 2 slide projectors. In addition there is
a reel of tape which describes the slides. A
"bong" from a small gong is recorded at
each spot on the tape where a slide should
be changed.
We tried this one on a small home audience where it met with enthusiastic reaction.
We also tried it out at the local school
where the fourth, fifth and sixth grades saw
and heard it. The teachers were very enthusiastic and are purchasing the set for the
school!
The 121 slides cover all parts of the
nation and the lucid and listenable commentary and background music are pleasant and
instructive. This wedding of slides and tape
will be of great value to the audio- visual
field.
NEW "Magi -Clip" for RECORDING TAPES
"I
Securely kern.
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and nlr anv
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el'.r
Lstaction
guarantee.
Ii'ed
NIBLACK THORNE CO.
1:,,, '
ll..ln t,
-,
2
7 -9
Bob Gordon Quintet
Burk It, Don /soon. Godchild, Story Fell on Alabama, Ring Porter Stomp
Alone Together, Skull Cop, Pick Yovrtell Up, limi Tune, Moe. Blue,, Babette. Sonny Boy.
Just George. Stow, Mood, Slow
Adio:. Don
Madagascar
March of the Charcoal Grey
cording is clear and sharp, recorded at a
high level, thereby reducing any hiss or
noise to inaudibility.
7" reel, dual track 7' zips. $9.95
SERIES
DE PARIS and his
"NEW" NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
"I
IIll.I tSII. Suive,
Martin Block's
Believe
Ballroom
Here's how recording tape made with "MYLAR"
solves
a
the lasting strength that "Mylar "*
polyester film gives to recording tape
solved a production headache for radio
personality Martin Block.
In the past, aging and temperature
changes weakened ordinary tapes on
which Mr. Block pre -recorded portions
of his popular program
sometimes
caused them to break on air time. He
solved the problem with tapes made
with Du Pont "Mylar ". They're virtually unbreakable, unaffected by changes
n temperature and humidity, can be
stored indefinitely.
Tapes made with Du Pont "Mylar"
offer you a combination of advantages
never before available in recording tapes.
Resides being unbreakable under normal operating conditions and requiring
...
problem for Martin Block
no special care in storing, tapes made
with "Mylar" mean longer playing time,
extra economy. With high -strength
"Mylar", tapes only two -thirds as thick
as most ordinary tape can be used, giving essentially a reel and a half of tape
on one reel.
All leading tape manufacturers now
have tapes made with "Mylar" in their
line. Most leading dealers are featuring
your favorite brand made with "Mylar ".
So -take advantage of all the important
extras found in tapes made with
"Mylar". Next time you see your dealer,
ask him for a reel or two of your favorite
brand of tape
made with "Mylar ".
E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. (Inc.),
Film Dept., Wilmington 98, Del.
...
."Mylar"
is Du Pont's registered trademark for its brand of potvester film.
Du Pont manufactures the base material "Mylar" -not finished magnetic recording tape
DU PONT
MYLAR'
POLYESTER FILM
oUIC_10
BETTER THINGS FOR BETTER LIVING
.THROUGH CHEMISTRY
13
0ot.: (
pCCUAE
"
TEEN TAPERS
'Q
pe
4
BY JERRY HEISLER,
Ç
National President
s
apt
ake y00
- 11011111
with
INVERTERS
for changing your storage battery current to
VeoudeidU
A.C.
ELECTRICITY
in your
own car!
LEM-ME will be upon us very
hardy and within several weeks the
schools will be out. This will afford many
of us the opportunity to devote more time
to our recorders. For me the summer will
provide time to fully organize our program
and to prepare for our "Grand opening," so
to speak, which will take place in September
with the beginning of the new school year.
My Booklet, "How to Organize a School
Tape Club," is now ready along with the
order forms for group subscriptions, membership cards, and charters. The club memS'
bers also will be able to subscribe to TAPE
RECORDING magazine at a special group rate.
The charters and cards haven't come from
the printer yet but will be mailed when
they arrive. You may obtain a booklet and
form by writing to me, c/o Teen-Tapers,
TAPE RECORDING magazine, Severna Park,
mounted
out of sight
under dash
or in trunk
comportment!
ATR INVERTERS
especially designed for operating
standard 110 volt A. C... TAPE RECORDERS
DICTATING MACHINES
WIRE RECORDERS
ELECTRIC
RAZORS
for
EXECUTIVES
OUTDOOR MEN
SALESMEN
REPORTERS
PUBLIC
See
POLICEMEN
DOCTORS
FIREMEN
LAWYERS, ETC.
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Auto Radio Vibrators
AMERICAN TELEVISION
t RADIO CO.
2w[uy Ps4ted Sioee /93/
SAINT PAUL
4
1,
MINNESOTA,
U.
S.
A.
Maryland. All of your letters receive a personal reply from me via tape or a letter, depending upon my time. Don't send me a
tape first, however, make it a letter but tell
me all of the facts about your recording
work.
Gloria Bush, of Indianapolis, Indiana,
wrote in telling of some of her work. She
and her dad ran a display at the Hobby Show
in Indianapolis not too long ago and were
written up in Tape Topics. the World Tape
Pal newspaper. Harry Matthews, head of
WTP, gave us a plug for which we are
grateful. Jim Greene of Tape Respondents
International sent us a copy of his new directory which gives us a lot of names of
teens who might want to join us. Jim has
been most gracious in offering to help get
us on our feet. Thanks to all of you for
your help.
Raymond W. Townsend of St. Albans,
New York, wants to start a club. He and
his friend. Gene Reilly, operate a company
known as Imperial Sound Service in which
they rent out their recorder and supply sound
for parties, etc. If any of you have any similar business, let me know. With summer
coming up there should he a great need for
sound services. You might check into the
possibilities of recording the many June
weddings sure to be coming up. A friend
and I are thinking of this. A good thing to
do would be to start clipping the wedding
announcements from the local paper and
get in touch with the prospective brides.
I have just come in contact with two
very excellent books on our favorite subject
and highly recommend them to you who
want to find out more about recording.
"Tape Recorders-How They Work" by
C. G. Westcott of the Minnesota Mining
and Manufacturing Company, and a very
good friend of Teen -Tapers, is a good book
on what's under the cover of your recorder.
Robert and Mary Marshall have written a
book called, "Your Tape Recorder," which
tells about the operations and uses of the
tape recorder. The Marshalls have done extensive research with many recorders and
have come up with some very good information. Neither of these books is technically
difficult-both are excellent.
Getting back to the early mention of
Summer almost being with us, we have the
chance to get our recorders out of doors
to capture some of the wonderful sounds
of nature and the many other sounds to be
found in abundance. Mobile recording offers a challenge to those of you who have
an inverter in your car. I am going to make
arrangements to obtain one in the near future and conduct a project in which I'll try
and gather as many different sounds as
possible and also see how many uses the recorder can be put to when used from a car.
I may report on this in the next issue if possible. I would like suggestions and reports
from any of you who have done anything
unusual outdoors with your recorder.
Over the summer too, it might be fun
to do some tape responding if you've never
done any before. The tape clubs have hi: re
lists of members willing to exchange tapes.
Their names may be found on the tape club
page of this issue. When our own club gets
fully organized we will have a directory of
our own for the benefit of clubs who want
to exchange tapes with one another.
We are planning on quite a program for
next year and you'll all want to be a part
of it. Start now to get a Teen -Tapers club
organized or at least plan on starting in the
fall. We will offer charters, cards, and information on all phases of recording, our
own column. and other services to our members. Most important is the fact that we
are interested in teen -age recordists and will
do all we can to help them. Anything that
you want to know we will find out for you.
We will have the help of the Magnetic Recording Industry Association, which is
composed of all of the recording equipment
manufacturers, and when things really start
buzzing we hope to have thousands of clubs
all over the country and perhaps the world.
It all depends on you. so let's have your
name and some information about yourself.
Write to me at Teen-Tapers, TAPE RECORDING Magazine, Severna Park, Mary land. and keep 'em spinning.
db RECORDED TAPES
Presenting
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/he
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Grooves ... calibrated scale for timing.
Cutting Head (Model R -56) with
Recording Response from 50 to 10,000
cycles.
Playback Arm (Model 160) for records up to 16"
with dual- sapphire
magnetic cartridge.
-
The new Rek -O -Kut Imperial is equipped with a Model
TR -12H Turntable driven by a hysteresis motor. Recording
and playback amplifier is built -in. Recordings can be made
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at
331/3 and 78 rpm (45 rpm optional) .
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New Model M-12S
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fits Rek -O -Kut Challenger Disc Recorders
available separately.
Imperial
complete with Cutting Head, 120 -line Leadscrew
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$59995
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See your sound dealer
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with 120 -line Leadscrew
and Timing Chart
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$15000*
Model R -56 Cutting Head
6000
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arailable on request)
or write to Dept. VE -24
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EXPORT: Morhan Exporting Corp., 458 Broadway, New York 13, N.Y
CANADA: Atlas Radio Corp., 50 Wingold Ave., Toronto 10, Ontario
I5
----'4fine171
-IMPORTS
TAPE IN EDUCATION
MANY SURPRISES
BY JOHN J. GRADY, JR.
HIGHEST FI
LOWEST PRICES
Angeles City Board of Education recently issued one requisition for the
Greatest number of tape recorders ever ordered in educational history. Two hundred
THE Los
irore
50
PC)
Blue Ribbon Studio -Type
Velocity Mike
professional velocity
microphone that outperA
forms mikes costing five
times its price. Sound engineers particularly like its
exceptional great sensitivity, clean, smooth tone,
low (1.3 mg) mass and novel
three -way "CLOSE TALK
MUSIC -OFF" switch. Im -.
pedance is 50 ohms. Frefluency range: 30-15,000
cps. w 21/2 db. Sensitivity:
"T" position -59 db; "M"
-55 db. Size: 73/4" x 1$5ií'
and weighs only 15 ounces.
Supplied with 20 feet of
shielded balanced cable
and connection to microphone.
-,
Hum
pick -up
level
n
113 dbm referred to 0.001
watt and fie cycle field of
0.001
gauss.
List Price
BIO
S89.95
Desk Stand
List Price
S
4.50
AND FOR MORE RUGGED
USE -THE TRIPLE BLAST
SCREENED:
Reslo
"Celeste"-
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50 ohms I Hid. Proper
impedance selected by
plugging In
cables
cable.. Wih
and muting switch.
Lot Price
589.95
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4
Reslo "Symphony "
250/600 ohms. Proper
Impedance selected by
plugging
proper
cales
tw
With two
(no muting switch).
cabl
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FREE!
1956 Werrtone Catalog. The above are only samples of
values in the new
terrific
many
the
1956 Fen -Tone Hi -Fi catalog includdecks, cartridges,
tape
ing mikes,
record changers, silent listening
devices, etc.
FENTON COMPANY
15
Moore Street, New York 4, N.Y.
Sold through better
Audio Distributors.
See
yours today!
West of Rockies.
prices slightly higher.
16
portable magnetic recorders were ordered
as a single purchase item for use in the
elementary schools of the metropolis.
Ordinarily, such an extensive purchase
nt equipment might be considered to be
the result of an exhaustive survey by a
master sales engineer with a complete
knowledge of electronic audio installations.
But it wasn't. In this case, as in most other
rases of lesser educational tape recording
Installations, practical administrators and
progressive faculty members were entirely
responsible for the adaptation of modern
instructional methods to the classroom
needs of today.
Most of the 20(1 new tape recorders will
replace well -worked older models, which
have served the schools for a considerable
period. The remainder of the big order
will be allotted to the numerous newlyerected elementary schools in the fast growing Southern California city. TAPE
IN EDUCATION is advised that the chief
usage of the TR's will not be in music,
hut will be for the development and correction of the reading technique of elementary students. It has been fully proved
in Los Angeles that PROSE RECORDING
is the finest method of teaching students
the mo :,t important fundamental of American education- reading and speaking our
language. In fact, the audio- visual division
of the Los Angeles City Board of Education derives revenue for the general fund
from royalties on recorded lessons in reading supplied to other schools throughout
the United States.
Ot course, tape recorders have a wide
variety of uses in Los Angeles schools. And
in many of the city's larger schools a battery of magnetics are in operation. A quota
system governs installations, and a staff of
technicians maintain all audio-visual equipment in excellent condition. As educators
expand usage of the versatile tape recorder,
the inventory of many hundreds of instruments will be increased. Experiments in
various curricular subjects -even arithmetic -are in the on trial category. And right
now, parents in Los Angeles can have a
demonstration of the progress of their
children, particularly in the important subject of reading. This is due to the functioning installations of tape recorders in
the 372 elementary schools, 83 high
schools, and 7 junior colleges in the Los
Angeles City educational system. The 25
adult education units in the city jurisdiction also have the advantage of tape recording as an instructional procedure. TAPE
IN EDUCATION salutes Los Angeles educators for their pioneer achievements in
magnetic tape recording.
It is a rare pleasure for TAPE IN
EDUCATION to relay information to
readers of TAPE RECORDING, that one
of the most famous institutions in our
country has adopted magnetic tape recording as an educational function.
Revered Cooper Union, of New York
City, through its Library, is in the process
of fulfilling a prediction of ours made
early in 1952. The prediction, verbatim,
which follows, is an explanatory prelude
to addenda we feel honored to present to
other educators.
UNDYING WORDS
After thousands of years, ELOCUTION, which predates written
history and is the first and greatest
of the arts of civilization, is receiving modern scientific treatment.
From now on, students of speech
have the opportunity-because of
practical inexpensive tape recording
secure, to possess, to have available for perpetuity, the exact reproductions of the voices of the great-
-to
orators, the greatest statesmen,
the most famous men and
women on earth. There will be a
est
and
library for
Never
UNDYING WORDS.
will momentous
again,
-
into mute oblivion
just printed words on a page of
paper.
Cooper Union, founded in 1859, is congratulated for the wisdom of age, in initispeeches pass
ating a library of UNDYING WORDS.
Now, the voices of the many distinguished
persons- authorities on the subjects they
discuss -who
are
sponsored
by
The
Cooper Union Forum, have attained
permanence. Each voice, which has been,
or will be, heard on Forum programs over
WNYC, the New York City Municipal
Radio Station, and is transmitted throughout America by the network of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters, will be known to posterity. For,
at Cooper Union Library, tape recorders
are utilized to preserve the living words of
great people-that they may be undying.
The purpose of the Cooper Union Library is best explained by Mr. Lawrence
J. Pauline, of the Audio -Visual staff of
the Library. "These tape recorded prograins are used by the instructors of our
institution as an aid to their teaching and
also by the general public who come to
our library to hear them. Recently we sent
out approximately 150 letters to Cooper
Union Forum lecturers asking their
permission to make available their recorded lectures for non -commercial purposes. It is our hope to issue a catalog of
Cooper Union tapes so that educational
and other groups may hear these distinguished speakers."
NEW PRODUCTS
rorvk.e,J
1:°1`%-'
..
IRISH TAPE
vaoces.
HIGH
FIDELITY
RECORDING
TAPE
ORRadio Industries, Inc. , 120 Marvyn
Road, Opelika, Alabama, has announced
that "Green Band," the popularly priced
tape in the Irish line, is now made by their
Ferro -Sheen process. This process, according
to the manufacturer, gives the tape the
smoothest, most firmly anchored and most
homogeneously bonded layer of magnetic
oxide ever produced on recording tape. It
is designed to end the danger of wearing
out or gumming up costly tape recorder
heads with the abrasive, easily shed oxide
coating of conventional tape, and it is
claimed that the oxide minimizes the pos-
The amazing new Ferrograph "66" Series is the answer to the
demand of discriminating music -lovers and audiophiles who
seek professional results from an instrument that can easily be
housed in an existing piece of furniture, or which can form
part of a custom Hi -Fi installation.
This unique design includes a self- contained amplification
without sacrificing even one of the many
system, so that
sound can be fed
outstanding features of the Ferrograph
directly into your own speaker. Or, the playback portion of the
built-in amplifier may be by- passed, and sound can be fed
through your own high fidelity system. The Ferrograph "66"
will easily fit into a desk, a console, a bookcase, or any piece
of contemporary or period furniture. All that is necessary is to
cut out an opening 1544," x 16 % "; if a drawer is used, it should
be at least 10" deep, or a pair of shallower drawers may be
converted for this purpose.
Most attractively finished in golden bronze with ivory knobs
and acessories, the entire ensemble will readily harmonize with
the most decorous or luxurious surroundings.
-
-
sibility of high frequency losses in recording
and of print -through on the recorded reel
during storage. This upgrading in quality
has been accomplished without any inof price to the consumer. Write to
ORRadio for additional information.
crease
MEC NOISERASER
Model 66N (3% & 7% ips)
$399.50 audiophile net
Model 66 (7% & 15 ips)
$425.00 audiophile net
Other Ferrograph
Professional Models
Minnesota Electronics Corporation, 133
Anita Ave., Burbank, Calif., is
marketing a device known as the MEC Magnetic Noiseraser, which operates through a
carefully engineered magnetic circuit, eliminates all signals and background noise, restores tape to a completely erased condition,
and permits indefinite useful life with minimum background noise. Operation of the
Noiseraser is very simple -an entire reel is
placed on a spindle, a switch is turned on,
and the reel is slowly rotated manually
through slightly more than one complete
revolution. The spindle is then removed and
the reel slowly drawn off the top surface
of the instrument. This gadget is fast becoming very popular in radio stations, recording studios and motion picture studios.
Write to manufacturer for complete details.
East Santa
(Continued on page 41)
WEARITE TAPE DECKS
PORTABLE MODELS
Model SA/N, 3 % -7 ips, built-in speaker $379.50
Model SA/NH, 7 % -16 ips, built -in speaker $425.00
3% -7% ¡pa; "A ".
...
y you- orders accepted by mail
day money hark guarantee.
If your local dealer cannot supp
10
...
2 heads
$195.00;
"B ", 8 heads
$225.00; "C ", for
simultaneous dual track operation... $250.00.
-
ERCONA CORPORATION
(Electronic Division)
New York 17, N. Y.
In Canada, write Astral Electric Company Limited, 44 Danforth Road, Toronto 13.
551
Fifth Ave., Dept.
F -5,
17
&rrdll
ih Sin and cos¿
QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
Questions tor this department may oe sent on tape er ov means of
a
postcard or letter.
Please address your queries to, "Questions and Answers," Film and TAPE RECORDING,
Severna Park,
Maryland. The most interesting and widely applicable questions will be
used in this department and all inquiries will receive
in
performance
fl-When
I connect my radio to the input
of my recorder and connect the output or
the recorder to an external 12" coaxial
speaker both speakers, the coax and the radio
speaker, interact to produce a much richer
tone. This is apart from the stereophonic
effect. Is this a matter of impedance? If I
added another speaker to the coax and connected both to my recorder would it be any
advantage? In that case would they both have
the same impedance or would a matching
transformer for the coax give better results?
-R.A.W..Brewley, Cal.
AWe feel that the effect you are getting
from the additional speakers is due to the
fact that three speakers cover the output frequency ranger more effectively than a single
speaker could.
-ttte care must he exercised in co tniect,peakers in multiple. although a slight
,aitneatch will cause little distortion. Rough!;. the output of most speaker arrangements
from three to eight ohms impedance termis
.
TAPE RECORDER
MICROPHONE
Here's a new standard for high fidelity
for the home or small
convenience
studio. Attractively styled, and available in matching colors, this sensational new lightweight champ delivers
a heavyweight performance throughout
the entire tone range. Omni -directional
pick-up pattern provides uniform fidelity when more than one performer or
participant is being recorded at one
time.
Versatility underscores the modern
functionalism of this new design. It
weighs only 2 ounces, only 3rfa x 21/4 x
can be easily
614. inches in size
handled and used by standing persons,
or it can be rested on a flat surface for
conference type pick-up such as conference recording.
Quality in construction means quality
in tonal reproduction. The microphone
element is shielded, with very low hum
pick -up. Model B -203, ceramic type,
and Model X -203, crystal type are both
available with RCA type or miniature
phone plugs.
For high fidelity sound that is reproduced to last, use American tape recorder microphones.
...
.
full vision ...
full sound...
where fidelity
Aspeaks for itself!
microphones
ELECTRONICS DIVISION
ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH CO.
370
18
South Fair Oaks, Pasadena, California
nations. Just remember that three speakers
of four ohms impedance connected in parallel will provide only one and one -third
ohms termination causing compression of
the low frequencies. Three four ohm speakers in series provide a sum termination of
12 ohms. causing some compression of the
high frequencies.
When playing back a program that I
have recorded I get a terrible distortion
at full bass tone, otherwise it plays good.
Also, when recording from the radio I get
other words, it sounds
a wow or flutter
W.,
sour. I hope you can help me out.
-in
-E.
N. J.
A!t is quite possible to overload both the
amplifier and /or speaker by maximum
bass emphasis. If you will avoid over-emphasis of the bass you will not have this
Passaic,
difficulty.
Wow or flutter is caused by faults in the
mechanical part of the recorder. We would
suggest that you check and clean the tape
transport mechanism, including the capstan,
pressure roller. Check the pressure roller
tension and also check for excessive takeup
reel drive or a dragging feed reel. Check
the pressure pads and renew if necessary
and examine drive rollers for worn spots
or flats.
Q
When using my recorder at a speed of
ì;b, ips 1 find that the reproduction has
far more bass or lower tone effect than the
actual voice. This is not so at the 71/2 ips
speed. I cannot correct this by raising the
bass- treble control as I always have this set
at maximum treble when recording or playing back at 3á. Could you tell me if this is
a fault with my tape recorder or with all
tape recorders ? -P. J. T., Toronto, Canada.
AThe difficulty is not a common one and
from your description we would say that
a
tape or letter reply.
the trouble lies in your equalization switch
uhich is an integral part of your speed
changing snitch. It is failing to put in the
necessary equalization at the low speed. It
would be well to have a competent technician check the switch. Your treble control
has no effect when recording, it is only on
playback that it is effective.
have purchased a 5" speaker and a 500
ohm to voice coil transformer to he used
as an extension speaker for my recorder. I
am using 20 feet of wire for the speaker.
However, I receive very little volume from
the speaker when the volume control is
turned all the way up. I also get distortion
from the speaker. The speaker in my recorder is a 5 -inch. Is there any remedy for this
B., Bronx, N. Y.
trouble ?
AThe model of recorder which you have
does not contain an output designed to
drive a loudspeaker out of the 500 ohm or
high impedance output. This output is designed to drive an external amplifier and
speaker. The level at which the current
leaves the machine to the amplifier that
should be used with it is in the neighborhood of 5 volts and would only produce
about 10 milliwatts. This is not enough
to drive a loudspeaker directly without an
amplifier. The distortion you are getting
from making a direct connection without
the use of an amplifier is due to over -driving
the amplifier to try to get enough volume in
the present system. Perhaps you would be
interested in getting an amplifier kit, such
as the Heathkit or a Tech -Master, and assemble it. The output of these units is about
10 watts and would have more than enough
power to work your speaker, or an extended
range or coaxial speaker which would give
you very fine results.
1
-W.
RECORDS FROM TOUR
TAPES
Meetings. concerts. training aids, etc
economically rerecorded on permanent hi- fidelity discs. Professional quality
speeds -any
overnight servire
-
-all
Quantity w4r!ef^, f ,rot ,Ids,.,nAPrires
RECORDED PUBLICATIONS LABS.
1556.1570 Pierce Ave., Camden S, N.J.
I: t"11
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Comp:u:,h1v re-
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Free 12pp. catalogue. National Tape hit,rnrs, '- -1 P St rect. \Cashin;;U,n. D. C.
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TAPE RENTALS
-now,
at lams you can enjoy a wide variety of
recordings for the cos, of one purchase:
-send us your requests. or write for fret
price list:
National RENT -A -TAPE Service
P. O. Drawer I, Winnetka, Illinois
TAPES TO THE EDITOR
When sending tapes to the editor please use the
3'
New PENTRON
reel and indicate the speed at which it was
recorded and whether it is dual or single track. We will listen to your tape, make notes from it for use
in this column and then reply on your tape. Please keep tapes reasonably brief.
If you do not own
a
recorder
a
letter will be acceptable. Address tapes or letters to: The Editor,
Film and TAPE RECORDING, Severna Park, Md.
hshtun
This letter is for informative purposes
especially in connection with the article in
the April issue on "Tape Splicing and
I-n the
Splicers" by Sam Chambliss.
Ordinarily we pay little attention to write ups of other splicers but since this article
puports to show all those now available,
we feel that we should point out that our
splicer, the Carson Tape Splicer, was the
first low .opt splicer in the field. We started
operation over six years ago and our splicer
has been a leading seller ever since.
The caption of the main photograph
states that "shown are all the splicers available today." This will, of course cause many
of our previous customers to think we are
not now in business.
We would appreciate very much some
sort of correction.
Robert H. Carson.
Magnecessories. Washington 20, D. C.
-
Herewith our apologies to Mr. Carson for
the oversight on our part.
To the Editor:
Was sorry to see that in your picture and
ciscussion of all the tape splicers currently
available you left out the "Edi-Tall" which
is made by Tech Laboratories, Palisades
lark, N.
Il'all Heider, Sheridan. Ore-
Y.-
:
9u.
Our apologies also to Tech Laboratories.
thanks to Mr. Heider.
And
To the Editor:
I am interested in your recommendation
is send tapes to shut -ins and blind people. I
am ships radio officer of a passenger ship
fcrryboating between N.Y.C., Panama Canal,
Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Chile, and can
give data on ship life, especially on radio
work. Anyone who wishes to start taping
with me would sometimes have to wait as
NOTICE
New price reductions on plastic tapes in
regular and long play have been announced. Also new thinner 1 mil and t
mil "super" mylar tapes are now available.
For full information send for our 1956
price sheet.
* USED TAPE, plastic
and sold.
and mylar bought
New empty plastic reels
in boxes. 3" 10c; 4"
22c; 5" 24c; 7 27c
ea.
101/2" fiberglass
Reel $1.49. EMPTY
BOXES: 3" 3c; 4" 5".
7" 5c ea.; 101/2 ", 25c
'Tape Recording" magazine, 35c (back issue
Available).
Audio
Devices
1956
TAPE
ECORDING DIRECTORY free.
Please Include Sufficient Postage.
'
COMMISSIONED
503
ELECTRONICS.
INC.
Champlain St. N.W., Washington 9,
D. C.
much as six weeks for my return; but, after
we get started, I can give specific dates so
they can get a tape to me in plenty of time.
use 3'i ips for tape letters, and a 3" reel.
I
would like to receive cheerful letters or
letters about technical subjects. My hobbies
are taping, 16mm movies, and slides, but
I can converse on many other topics. -Rat
E. Madden. Lodi, N. J.
,0-#'a/4e)
Tape Recorder
1
To the Editor:
I bought the second edition of your magazine over two years ago. I had a mild interest
in tape recording at that time, but reading
your magazine increased that interest tenfold. Six months ago I purchased my first
tape recorder and your magazine was the
help I needed in selecting the machine I
felt was best suited for my needs.
R.
Locock. Ontario. Canada.
with
Unimagic
Control
-
To the Editor:
Believe it or not, your TAPE RECORDING
magazine was a hobby, but today it has
led me to a very good and sound business
Hassan, Accra, Gold
in tape recording.
-J.
Coast. Africa.
To the Editor:
I consider it a lucky day when I picked
up my first copy of TAPE RECORDING magazine. My main dislike of most "audio"
magazines is they all seem to ignore the
persons in the $300 class. I can understand
your text, and most problems seem to he
with people like myself.
I work in a hospital, and I taped my
record library. I then jacked the record,,
into the hospital P.A. system and pl agc,i
them two hours each week for a period of
two years. This was all voluntary. 1 plan to
do some classical "airchecks" with a ne"
machine 1 am getting.
Crockett,
ford Hills, N. Y.
John
To the Editor:
My husband and I were in Yuba
Christmas when it was flooded. My husband
(:i
had every issue of TAPE RECORDING magazine, but he is lost now, as the flood took
everything. He is starting over again, but
the hack issues are hard to get. If you know
of anyone who has any back issues, please
have them send them to me if they can
Mrs. Michael
spare them. Thank you.
Golden, 7601/2 Turk St., San Francisco, Calif.
It "e have forwarded Mr. Golden all avail.
able issues. but our supply of Vol. 1, Nos.
2, 3, '1, 5 and 6 was exhausted. Any reader.
who base -spares- of these issues can contact
Mr. Golden.
-
- easier than
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Canada: Atlas Radio, Ltd., Toronto
19
Members of the original chorus from Rodgers and Hammerstein's broadway show, Me And Juliet, record for RCA Victor. Note the sound screens placed directly around the group to maintain balance. Screens in the background are covered with sound absorbing materials.
Using A Sound Screen
by Sheldon O'Connell
.... with an easily-made sound screen you can control the amount of "liveness" of your surroundings
when recording.
NTIL recently, studio acoustics have been of interest
U to broadcast stations only. They are vitally important
when striving for realism in dramatic shows or compelling informal radio talks.
Now that intimate quality can be duplicated by the
tape recordist without upending the furniture or draping
blankets from lamp to lamp.
How? By making yourself an inexpensive sound screen
such as the stations use. A visit to your local used fumi20
cure dealer will likely turn up a faded but serviceable
dressing screen, the kind mid -Victorian dandies would
take refuge behind on the approach of a rival. Even if the
screen itself is broken, a sturdy framework is all you will
need as it will be covered by other material.
A sound screen can be used either as a reflector or an
absorber of sound. As you probably know, sound waves
behave much as do light waves in regard to reflections.
They will reflect from hard, glossy surfaces and soft, pour-
ous surfaces absorb them. In much the same fashion, a
mirror will reflect light rays full strength but a dull black
surface will absorb them completely.
Because sound reflects differently from various surfaces
you can have a variety of sound patterns from your sound screen, depending upon the angle of the wings from the
sound source and, of course, the placement of the microphone.
If you are recording a dramatic skit with from one to
three performers, or a feature singer who will effect a
subdued, intimate quality, the screen can be used to advantage. In this case it should be placed as a wide "V" and
the sound directed into it from the baseline of the triangle
thus formed.
Ideally, your screen should be made reversible, with live,
reflective material on one side and dead, absorbing material on the other. With either side at your disposal you
will be able to compensate for adverse recording conditions in the home or average hall.
The modern broadcast studio, designed to handle any
number of shows, from audience participation and concert to a single talk or newscast, has long employed the
screen to minimize the chance of echo and create for one
or two speakers a realistic personal quality. They are also
used to highlight a soloist singing with an orchestra.
By screening off the soloist the subtle overtones of the
voice aren't lost in the cacophony of sound but are harbored
by the semi- enclosure of the sound -screen and record much
better. Many of the "washboard weepers" or "soap operas"
make use of an acoustically treated screen, usually a three
wing affair, so that not a tear drop escapes.
In the ordinary room, rugs, drapes, overstuffed furniture,
etc., are all sound absorbing. If you are recording in a
dead" room and want to have a "live" effect you can
compensate for the room's deadness by using the "live"
sound reflecting surfaces of your screen.
If the room is "live"-caused by sound reflecting surfaces such as enameled walls, polished floors and mirrors,
the sound will be bounced around like a pre -game warm -up
in baseball, from the mound to first, to third and home.
'
Abbreviated screening is used in
tack of the vocalists, during rehearsal of CBC's musical, "Chanson
oe l'Escadrille," which originates
Montreal and h featured on the
French network.
To compensate for this use the "dead" side of the screen.
There are times when you'll want either effect or a
blending of the two, depending upon the material you
are recording, the voices or instruments and the characteristics of the location. You can have fun and win practical knowledge as well by experimenting with screen
and microphone placement under your own recording conditions.
Now to the details on how to make your own screen.
You can choose any of the following materials for sound
absorbency or deadening- Celotex squares, acoustical tiles,
Fiberglas, or colored felt underpadding. The "live" side
of your screen can be covered with laminated plastic,
Arborite, plywood or similar materials with high sound
reflective qualities. Using an adhesive backing, these can
be applied directly to the original material of your screen.
A reconverted dressing screen, or hospital isolation
screen will fill the bill admirably; the latter, because of its
skeletal frame, will require a few fittings to secure the
material to the frame.
If you're not on speaking terms with a used furniture
dealer or hospital outfitter you can build your own screen
from scratch. The only materials needed for building your
own are: a screwdriver, four chrome -plated free -play
hinges and three firm sheets of plywood. If the plywood
is heavy enough you will not need an outside frame,
which can be made of I x 2 pine strips if light plywood is
used.
The lumber dealer can cut any of these materials to
size for you, thus saving you the bother of sawing through
a long sheet. Three pieces, three feet wide and six feet
long should give you ample space for the professional looking sound screen of your own.
When mounting the hinges, be sure to mount them
in such a way that the three panels will fold flat, one
against the other for convenient storage.
A "Standby" and "Record" green and red light might
be added as an optional accessory. Available in handsome
chrome mountings they lend a studio effect for those
special recording sessions.
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features no other tape recorder of comparable or even higher price has!
Balanced sound system with three speakers and omni -directional sound reproduce music with the thrilling effect of stereofonic dimensions.
Two motors maintain constant speeds at 71/2 and 334 ips. Two recording heads
permit instant change from one track
eliminate the nuisance of reel turnover
...
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Fast forward and rewind. Super- sensitive system. Multiple negative feedback circuits assume minimum distortion.
See your Webcor dealer soon for a demonstration of the Webcor ROYAL Coronet. Ask him too, about the Webcor Library of pre- recorded tapes, with their fine
musical selections.
All music sounds better on
a
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tape recorders
EASIEST OPERATION!
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The ROYAL is the most popular tape recorder in the world today.
The ideal tape recorder for all- purpose
recc 'ding. High fidelity reproduction. Two
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spee!d.No reel turnover. Input, output jacks.
Monitor switch. New Veedor Root Tape
Counter. Dual speeds at 711/2 and 334 ips.
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Two speeds: 71/2 and 33t
Monitor control. High fidelity sound system.
.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIII414tIIl
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Sheila Bond and Buddy Hackett kibitz in
a scene from the stage show, Lunatics and Lovers, directed by Sidney Kingsley. Musical and sound
effects for this Broadway show were supplied on tape by the Masque Sound & Recording Corp.
THEATER SOUND ON TAPE
by
1(111.(1
.... music and effects ou tape are used by
Tape has revolutionized musical and sound effects in the
theater just as effectively as it has changed the recording
industry. The authority for this statement is Sam Saltzman
of the Masque Sound & Recording Corp. "Masque" is the
concern that supplies a producing technician, a tape technician and special recording apparatus for practically every
show on Broadway including Midsummer Night's Dream
when it played the Metropolitan Opera House and Silk
Stockings, the latest Cole Porter musical hit.
The revolution has brought forth a new type of highly trained, well -remunerated sound technician. This tape
engineer replaces the harassed prop man of other days who
used to run wildly about backstage shooting off cap pistols
on cue, and producing other not necessarily authentic sound
effects to harmonize with the action of the play. In those
days, (BT, before tape,) a war play would have required
about thirty men, supplied with enough equipment to fill
cases to the ceiling in order to equal the sound effects that
a single trained technician has at his fingertips when he
24
Slaw.;
of ehr biggest B
luvt' shows- here's how.
uses a Masque tape outfit.
To simulate the noise of a plane, for instance, it required
a drum with two leather straps run by a motor to slap the
drum in evert tempo. Compare the space and equipment
this apparatus occupied with the few inches of tape that
can do the same job better, and more reliably.
The rape machines that perform backstage, however, are
not the same that music lovers and tape fans are accus-
tomed to seeing. They're Presto machines but they're
especially constructed for the job they have to do. Each
machine has two tapes running simultaneously and the
tapes themselves are duplicates. Although both are going
at the same time #1 will have the volume turned up while
ç2 runs without volume. Just in case anything should happen to #1, #2 will be ready to take up the sound at the
right place. To guard against the awful possibility of
wiping a tape clean by mistake, these Prestos have only the
playback equipment.
The entire machine is portable although it's about the
size of a small organ when it is set up. The tape machine
must go along on the road tour that usually readies a show
for its Broadway presentation so it can be dismantled in
:a
matter of minutes. When the show moves out of a
theater on tour the machine is packed up and goes with
the technician who handles it, just as the personal baggage
the actors accompanies them. It does go with the
scenery but the technician keeps it in his personal care.
He superintends its placing in the car, and its removal to
the theater at the next stop.
The machine itself is almost self- contained. It holds the
cue sheets and has a dim light that can illuminate the
shelf even when the play's action demands a blackout behind the scenes. The input is at the left, the output at
the right, and every part of the instrument is interchangeable with parts on its sister machines so it can always be kept running. Under the tape reels there is an
RCA amplifier on a shelf. In front of the main working
surface is a little shelf with splicing equipment for an
emergency. Another important bit of equipment on the
tape machine is a lead tape. From the center of the black
to the center of the next black part requires 1 second of
running time. From the center of the red takes a t;
second. All this information helps the technician to time
the sound effects for the show.
Sam Saltzman smiles happily when he recalls that before
tape a record lasted for exactly 14 playings in a Broadway
Show before it had to be replaced because of surface noises
it hadn't been broken by accident before then. Tape
seldom requires replacement.
The actual work on a show starts long before the technician takes over and the tape machine is dismantled to
go on tour. Work usually begins almost as soon as a pro iuction has been cast. The producer and director, one or
both, come to Masque to work out the needed sound effects.
:)f
-if
hew of upper shelf of Presto tape machines, which perform back .tage. Duplicate tapes are kept spinning all the time, with the volume
,f only one turned up. In the event of a mishap with one machine,
he other is ready for immediate use.
Dancer Sara Aman draws the attention of actors and audiences alike
a scene from Plain and Fancy, hit musical comedy, set in a small
Amish community in Pennsylvania. Each show presents its own special problems for the tape technicians.
in
They can choose from thousands of tapes made by Masque
itself, or that the company can secure from one of about
four firms with whom they deal.
The producer has probably made his business arrangements with the business man (Mac Landsman), of the trio
that makes up the Masque Sound & Recording Corp.
John Shearing is the partner whose job it is to put the
producer's theories into practice. He devises ways to disguise the speakers and other necessary sound equipment so
the audience isn't visually aware of the source of the sound.
Sam Saltzman goes on the road with the show. He breaks
in the technician who will handle the show after it has
been set up by a producing technician. He superintends
and sparks the necessary improvisation while the show is
being beaten into shape. New sound effects and music are
brought in constantly while others are eliminated. The
tapes are cut. New pieces are inserted. Tapes are spliced
again -and again -and again.
The volume is set, changed, reset, and changed back
again. The cue sheets grow longer and longer and more
and more confusing until only a trained technician could
possibly handle the tapes on cue without suffering a
nervous breakdown.
When the show is practically in its final form, Mr. Saltzman leaves for New York to work on the next show that
Masque is preparing. One of his great assets is an ability
to remember exactly where every show on the road is playing at a given date. He also knows where every trained
technician is working. Producers turn to him to learn if a
technician is available to take on a new show, and he
25
of the Masque Sound & Recording Corp. keeps notes on the time of
tape sequence in the company lab where
tapes are made. He is surrounded by a
Presto recorder two playback machines, and
two turntables for records that are to be
incorporated in the tape being made
Sam Saltzman
,
.
usually responds with information about a show that is due
to wind up its tour or Broadway run leaving a man free to
accept a new assignment. He is known by and knows every
producing technician in the business.
This group is almost as rare as a snow covered jungle.
There are probably no more than five in the entire industry. A producing technician never has to leave home
because there is more than enough work to keep him
permanently in New York. He works on the show from its
inception. He helps to prepare the tapes and the cue sheets.
But when the show is ready to roll out of town, the producing technician turns to another show. He leaves the
one that is already in form to a regular technician who
then remains with the play during its tryout period and
Broadway run.
Technicians, both producing and regular, usually start
out as assistant electricians with a travelling show, not as
tape or Hi Fi fans. They often become interested in the
sound effects machines because of the music and gadgets.
If an assistant electrician starts spending his free time
watching the technician, the technical man may give him a
chance to watch him work the tapes, and even help. If an
assistant appears to be good material for the job he may
be sent out on a show, as assistant to the technician. When
he is thoroughly trained he will belong to an exclusive
class known as tape technicians. If he should then show
talent for producing he may break into that handful of
virtuosos known as producing technicians. A regular technician commands a salary of 5250.00 a week while a producing technician ups that to S300.00.
The producing technician is usually glad to turn the
show over to a regular technician because the producer
gets his pleasure out of solving new problems and working
on new shows However a trained technician can hardly
become bored d.ring the run of a play, regardless of how
26
long the run may extend.
Certainly he couldn't become bored with a play that
requires a maximum of sound effects. "The Fragile Fox,"
starring Dane Clark was produced during the past season
and it boasted as complicated a routine of sound effects as
any play technician could ask. John H. Tolbutt, the technician in charge, first worked on taped sound effects while
he was with "This Is The Army."
Before the performance of "The Fragile Fox" began, he
explained that working a show with tape on the specially
built Masque machine was like driving a new car in comparison to the old gearshift type. With records he was
always on the alert. He worried about leaning on a record
and breaking it, about the needle's sharpness, etc.
The show started and Tolbutt proved that what may look
easy to a technician is incomprehensible to an onlooker.
He worked the machine with the skill of a Toscanini
conducting a symphony orchestra. Both his hands were
working at once while his head was turned away so he
couldn't even watch what he was doing. This was necessary in order for him to take the cues that were being given
by a flashlight waving up and down in the hands of the
assistant stage manager. John Tolbutt made the proverbial
one -armed paper hanger with the hives look like a statue
titled "Repose."
He started and stopped both tapes on cue, then immediately turned the tapes to the spot where they were ready
for the next cue. He said that each sound effect runs
longer than is actually required because an actor might
speak more slowly or applause may be unduly prolonged.
In addition to starting and stopping both tapes and advancing them to the next cue, he fed the sound into five
loud speakers in the theatre, placed at right and left of
stage and in the rear of the stage.
During the show he played about 5000 feet of tape in
Below is shown the cue sheet which is kept beside the recorders during the show. It gives the number of the tape to be played, the volume level, indicates fades and tells whether the sound should issue
from the right, center or left speakers. Both on stage and off stage
sounds are handled from the tape console.
afre
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performance, showing lead
tape for next cue. The machine holds cue sheets and has a dim light
that can illuminate the shelf even when the play's action demands
A closeup
a
of the tape machines used at
3ad
a
blackout behind the scenes.
All the tape used in theatrical productions is made
,1 run at 15" per second. He was also constantly adjusting the volume, trying to match it as closely as possible
a th the volume suggested on the cue sheet.
al
or
Even the tape serves as a cue to the technician. It repeats
for his benefit, "Curtain going up, going up, going up."
The assistant stage manager was perched on a high stool
w thin sight of the technician; and while he necessarily
has his back to the stage, the stage manager watches the
onstage action closely. He waves a flashlight up and down
to indicate when a cue is coming up, then he whispers
"Go Sound" when it's time to start.
Its fairly quiet backstage. The lights are dim and everyone is so busy doing his job in split second timing that
little conversation takes place. At one point in the action,
the technician warned this reporter to step aside so a hand
grenade could be thrown where she was standing. The
hand grenade was a flashbulb and the sound came from
the tape machine.
The realistic way that the sound of rifle fire, for instance, was switched from a loud speaker at rear to one
at left to indicate a change of direction in the action, was
m,kde even more genuine by the choice of a smaller
speaker for the sound of rifle fire than for the lower
register, louder sound of artillery.
Not all tape for theatre involves sound effects. Music is
also important. The current hit. "Silk Stockings," employs
a cull orchestra and you might wonder why rape should
play a vital part in a production like this. The entire
orc hestra appeared at a recording session at the RCA
studios in order to work out taped effects! The overture
appears to start backstage and to move forward gradually,
increasing in volume at is nears the orchestra pit.
Chis effect is possible only through the use of tape. The
m. jic actually does start backstage-on the Presto ma-
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chine manned by a Masque technician. The sound comes
from a speaker backstage, and the music of the full orchestra, on tape, is moved forward via a series of speakers
until it reaches the proscenium where the orchestra picks
up the music at the identical note and carries on while the
tape fades out.
Practically all the sound effects that Masque has in its
library were made from life, just like the music from
"Silk Stockings." When the sound of a plane taking off
was needed, a man took a portable Presto recorder to
Mitchel Field and recorded an actual take -off. And all
the library effects are for sale to professional theatrical
producers or amateur tape fans. A master and two copies
on tape are made of every effect. The master is filed permanently.
It's the lack of permanence however that whets the
interest of these theatre -wise tape specialists. The men of
Masque Sound & Recording Corp know that they will get
a good share of the crop of new Broadway shows, and
that no show will be a routine affair. Each will have its
special problems that must be solved. and nothing makes
these technicians happier than to figure our the solutions
and tape them!
27
Sound In A New Package
By Mort Goldberg, CBS Radio
.
.
.
.
the author, in collaboration with Jim Fassett, was responsible for the unusual recordings heard
on "Strange to Your Ears" over CBS. Here is how they tinkered with sound.
worry about making a mistake, we're taking it
on tape." "Erase that false start and well try again."
These and similar expressions constantly spoken in
broadcasting and recording studios is indicative of the way
tape recording has streamlined the process of sound reproduction. The ability to edit for the correction of mistakes,
to re- record over existing material, plus the ease of handling
and the economy of use, all contribute to its success as a
recording medium. These facts are commonly known and
accepted, but there are additional features inherent in the
tape recorder, which are not as apparent, but whose appliDON'T
cation when combined with the other advantages, results
in a different and fascinating treatment of sound.
The diversified use of the tape recorder led to two specific projects, which the author recorded and edited in collaboration with Jim Fassett, CBS Radio Director of Music.
The first was a series of experiments in altering the tonal
structure of familiar sounds, which was broadcast by Jim
Fassett as intermission features on New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra Sunday concerts. This series was released on Columbia LP under the title, "Strange To Your
Ears." The second and most recent project was the "Sym-
Lily Pons, noted operatic star, assists Jim Fasse+ +, CBS Radio Director of Music, during the recording of baby chicks for the "Strange To Your
Ears' series. By altering tonal structure, the chicks' small peeps sound like a lion's roar. Author is operating +ape machines in the background.
28
eft, Fig. I: Normal threading position on Ampex Model 200 recorder, with tape placement between capstan and rubber idler wheel. Right,
2: Mort Goldberg's method of tape threading on the same machine, with tape wrapped around rubber idler wheel before passing cap s'an, to accomplish unison backtiming.
fig.
phony of the Birds." This is a complete musical composition
Consisting of nothing but bird calls.
It is the author's intention in this article to review the
techniques involved in achieving these sound creations, so
that owners of tape recorders can be further enlightened to
,ound in a new package-all wrapped up in tape
How many times have you heard a sound which was unfamiliar, and in attempting to identify it you said, "It
sounds like
The pitch of that unfamiliar sound was
a leading factor in making the analogy to something familiar
in an attempt at identification. Frequency range, upon
which pitch is dependent, helps us to categorize what we
hear. Pitch changes were the basis of our experiments in
the "Strange To Your Ears" series, and these changes were
achieved by using a playback speed on the tape machine
ocher than the one used for recording. Before detailing the
specific operations involved, there is a significant fact about
the operating speed of tape recorders to which you may or
may not have paid particular attention, and that namely is
that they are equal multiples of each other, (33/4, 71/2, 15,
30 inches per second). In music, notes can also progress in
equal multiples of each other, and when they do, these multiples are "octaves." A musical note is made up of a certain
number of vibrations per second and these vibrations are
termed, "frequency." The frequency of vibrations is measured in cycles per second, (c.p.s.). The fundamental frequency of the note middle C is 256 c.p.s. If middle C was
recorded at 71/2 inches per second, (i.p.s.) , and played back
at 15 i.p.s., the frequency would then be 512 c.p.s. or one
octave higher. In contrast, middle C played back at 33/4 i.p.s.
would be 128 c.p.s., or one octave lower. By this very simple
means, the recording of a single musical note on tape, resulted in creating the fundamental note, the note an octave
higher, and an octave lower, expressly by changing the playback speeds of the tape recorder. Consequently, the tones,
pitches, timbres of countless every day sounds can be transformed to something completely new and apart from what
we're ordinarily accustomed to hearing.
In the "Strange To Your Ears" series, a number of common sounds were transformed from the real and familiar,
to the unreal and strange. A roar common to the depths of
the jungle was uttered from the throat of a baby chick. A
ruba and flute exchanged their playing ranges, and performed a duet in their inverted state. Vocal chords of a
baby emitted the sound of a woman sobbing. One of the
-.
-"!
many experiments involved, was the conversion of the piano
sound to that of an organ. This was achieved as a result of
the tape and the musical scoring being reversed.. Our first
step in this process, was to choose a musical selection to be
scored backwards. This meant that the last chord would be
played first, and continue in this fashion, until the first chord
was played last. The music chosen was the well known
melody, "America." We recorded this selection as the
pianist performed this upside down version. After completing the recording, the tape was reversed and played
backwards. It is apparent that if the music was played by
reversing the musical sequence of notes, and then the tape
played backwards, the end result would be the music sounding as originally composed. The melody "America" was immediately recognized, but the piano characteristic sound was
transformed to that of a small organ. The reason is that
when a piano is played, the initial note or chord is struck,
and the decay time or reverberation of that note is momentarily sustained and superimposed by the succeeding
note. This sequence of events is recognizable to the ear as
the sound of a piano. However, in the reverse playing of
the tape, the reverberation of each chord is heard before
it is initially played, hence the characteristic staccato sound
of a piano is converted to the more gliding quality of an
organ. The song "America" appeared to be performed on
two different instruments, only through the miracle of tape.
Also as part of the "Strange To Your Ears" series, we did
extensive experimenting with bird calls. All of us are naturally familiar with the beautiful and intricate sounds of
these calls. One section which I found extremely intriguing,
Figure 3: Mixing panel which accommodates four tape machines, two
turntables (record), and one microphone, with associated jack field
on right for the interconnection of equipment.
29
Top, Figure 4: Variable speed machine, with control panel on left.
A switch mounted on top of the box enables normal use of the machine, which is a converted Ampex 300, or variable speed use. Bottom, Figure 5: A closed loop for playback of a continuous sequence
of sound.
was the work we did with the singing household canary.
We set up a tape recorder and microphone next to a canary
cage, and recorded every sound uttered by the bird over a
given period of time. We discovered that the repertoire of
a canary is rather limited. It consists of the trill, two successive notes in an octave jump, and a peeping sound, which
turned out not to be a peep at all. Taking a particular part
of the call, the trill, we reduced the speed three times, and
were able to discern the individual notes comprising the
trill. In its original state, the trill is a rapid blur of high
frequency tones, but reduced in pitch three octaves, it became a series of individual tones in the middle whistling
range. By the same process, the "peep" became "owoo,"
with an upward inflection at the end.
Did you ever hear a canary sing a duet with a flute? I
doubt whether there is a canary alive, or a flutist for that
matter, who could be so compatible as to accomplish this.
Nevertheless, it was done by the following means. You recall one of the sounds of the canary mentioned was the two
notes comprising an octave jump. This octave jump, along
with the trill, was played for a flutist in its lowered range.
After listening, our flutist simulated these sounds in harmony, in the same overall tonal range as the altered canary
call. These flute sounds were recorded, synchronized, and
mixed with the canary call. After this combination was accomplished, the composite was re- recorded with a triple increase in speed. This resulted in the restoration of the original canary sound, along with the flute accompaniment.
30
The successful completion of the canary and flute experiments gave impetus to the next project, "The Symphony of
the Birds." All the experiments conducted prior to this were
performed exclusively with the use of equal multiple speed
changes, which resulted in only octave variations. In the
composition of music, numerous tonal variations are required ro accomplish melody, harmony and other accompanying sounds. The initial source of our notes came from
the Albert R. Brandt Bird Song Foundation of Cornell University, and through the cooperation of Professors Kellogg
and Allen, we were given access to copies of over fifty different recorded bird calls. Many hours were spent just
monitoring the bird calls, in search of selected ones which
rendered the nearest semblance to a sustained note. We
mentioned earlier in the case of the canary, how intricate
the sound pattern of a bird song can be, and so with the goal
of composing music from these sound patterns, the task resulted in the use of eleven birds out of the more than fifty
that mer our demands. Specific sections of the calls were
chosen to form background accompaniment, i.e. choral effects, while others were selected for melody, solos, etc.
The key factor in obtaining intermediate pitches to harmonize with existing notes of the calls was the use of the
"Variable Speed Machine;" pictured in Figure 4. This is a
standard Ampex Model 300, with the addition of a power
amplifier and oscillator connected to the capstan motor. The
capstan motor, being of the synchronous variety, is dependent on frequency for its speed regulation and in normal use,
the frequency is that of the line, sixty cycles. By varying the
frequency fed to the motor, we therefore vary its speed, and
so the oscillator supplies this frequency variation, and the
amplifier the necessary power requirements. This combination then results in a continuous speed variation in terms of
tape speed of from approximately 4 to 10 i.p.s. when set at
7% i.p.s., or from about 9 to 21 ips, when set at 15 i.p.s. A
switch mounted on the top of the control box in the illustration in Fig. 4 enables normal use of the machine in the
position to the right and in "variable," when switched to
the left. The meter on the left is a vibrating reed frequency
meter, which indicates the operating frequency in use, ( Approximately 56 to 66 cycles per second). The meter on the
right is a voltmeter indicating the line voltage. The use of
this device made possible the separation of selected pitches
to harmonize with each other, and hence form musical accompaniment to chosen extracted sections of the bird calls.
The first movement of the "symphony" contained five
birds, the Wilson Thrush, Baltimore Oriole, Field Sparrow,
Harris Sparrow, and the Winter Wren. The entire introduction to the movement consisted of a portion extracted
from the call of the Wilson Thrush. The musical pitch of
this section was chosen to be the result of the original recording played back at half speed. The fact that our standard recording and playback speed is 15 i.p.s., and all our
original recordings were at this speed, it was necessary to
re -dub the material used at half speed (71/2 ips) back to
15 ips. To accomplish harmony between two pitches, the
notes must be one third apart. Therefore, the tape speed
must also be one -third apart. By use of the "variable speed
machine," the pattern of notes of the Wilson Thrush call
was re- dubbed at 10 and 20 ips respectively, (one -third
above and below 15 ips) and formed into loops as pictured
in Figure 5, (one loop per machine). In this manner each
specific section was blended by mixing the output of two
loop loaded machines, (background accompaniment), with
the main theme from the third machine and recorded on
tf a fourth. This loop combination resulted in the main
tF eme being accompanied by two part harmony. As the
t.. nal structure of the first movement resolved from one sec ti rn to the next with excerpts from the calls of other birds,
&e operation was repeated by constructing new loops and
tf en blending and editing the individual sections together.
Tie panel shown in Figure 3, accommodates four tape macl ines, two record turntables, and a microphone, with the
asx dated jackfield on the right used to connect different
cc mbinations of inputs and outputs to the equipment to
complete the blending operations.
The problem of synchronizing solo parts to perform at
sF ecific points through the composition is more easily explained by describing the compilation of the second moven- ent, whose only performer was the Trumpeter Swan. The
call consists of three notes with an unmistakable resemblance to the sound of a trumpet, which obviously doesn't
render the title Trumpeter Swan a misnomer.
Utilizing the Variable Speed Machine, a complete scale
of different pitches was compiled from the three basic notes
of the Trumpeter Swan to form an original tune. The fact
that the pitches varied, caused a variance in the length of
each note, with the result that each had to be cut to size to
form a musical pattern. Blank tape was inserted between
each note to act as rests in establishing a specific tempo.
The next step was to muster a tuba accompaniment for our
newly formed trumpet solo. The bass tuba is about two
octaves lower than the trumpet in playing range. By a
double reduction in speed of the trumpet tones, we were
able to assemble a group of notes resembling those of the
bass tuba. Once again the "variable speed machine" came
into play to compile the desired pitches. The double reduction in speed also quadrupled the length of each note.
Etch note had to be cut down to comply with the length of
tl-e particular note of the trumpet solo to which it was to
accompany. These notes came at different locations throughout the melody, and paper leader was edited into the bass
note tape at points of exact length to the portions of the
rr lmpet solo where no accompaniment was used. For example, the third, fifth and ninth notes among others in the
trumpet solo were bass accompaniment points. After setting up the first bass note, ( on a separate reel) to the exact
length of the third trumpet note, paper leader of lengths
corresponding to the fourth, sixth, seventh, eighth, etc.
trumpet notes, ( where no accompaniment was required )
was edited into this bass reel. The bass notes were inserted
at intermediate points where accompaniment was required.
To insure accurate blending of the bass and trumpet
notes, a unison backtiming method was employed. In Figure
1 is shown the normal threading of the tape on the Ampex
machine. You will note the manner of threading the tape
in Figure 2. The difference is that the tape is wrapped
around the rubber idler wheel before passing the capstan
en route to the take -up reel. The capstan drive determines
the direction of the tape, and by wrapping the tape around
in the manner shown, the tape will play backwards at its
prescribed speed by operating the machine in the normal
playback way. The feed and take -up reels comply with this
procedure because either will absorb the tape in its direction
at any time. Returning to the task of synchronizing our
"Bird" trumpet and "Bird" bass tuba, the two reels were set
on their respective machines. The trumpet solo was set at
the playback head at the start of the third note, the point,
you will remember, where the first bass note was to hit. On
the bass reel, the first note was set at the playback head, and
then both tapes reversed around the capstan in the manner
described. Both machines were then started simultaneously
and backed up in unison to the starting point preceding the
first three trumpet notes and then stopped. Restoring the
tape to the proper threading position and recording on a
third machine, when started together again, the bass notes
blended perfectly at the prescribed notes of the trumpet
solo. There were about four different trumpet and bass tuba
tunes in the second movement. All of the preceding methods were applied to the third movement called "mysterioso,"
containing the calls of four different type thrushes.
A whole new world of sound has been opened to us via
this amazing recording medium, and this world of sound
definitely has been delivered to us in a new package,-all
wrapped up in rape.
NEW SOUNDCRAFT TAPE TIMING CHART
A new accessory item has been added to
the line of products of Reeves Soundcraft
Corp., 10 East 52nd Street, New York. It
is a useful timing chart, which enables
the user to determine at a glance the time
and length factors used in tape recording.
When preparing to record, a recordist can
now tell how much tape he will need to
re,ord for a certain period of time, or
how long a certain tape will last him at any
recording speed. The Soundcraft Timing
Chart will save him time, tape and
trouble, by enabling him to plan his tape
requirements ahead.
This handy, easy to use chart has two
separate working areas. The left side is
used when recordings are single track, and
the right side when double track. Tape
length from 1 -800 feet is determined on
the front side of the chart, and from 800 3í 00 feet on the back.
To determine how long a certain length
of tape will play, you simply set the length
where indicated, and the playing time can
Soundcraft Timing Chart gives
the lengths of tape needed for any time
and covers all thicknesses of tape. It works
like a slide rule.
The Reeves
be read opposite the four standard recording speeds listed. Also, to figure how
much tape you need to record for a certain time, you set the time opposite the
speed at which you are recording, and the
required number of feet of tape can be
read immediately.
Being semi -logarithmic, the chart is exceedingly accurate in determining the
length and time factors for short commercial and spot announcements. Professionals will find these advantages most
helpful in planning and programming recorded broadcasts.
One side of the chart also lists the average playing time for standard size records,
which will be helpful in -records-to-taperecord i ng.
Confusion which developed through the
introduction of long play and extra long
play recording tapes has made the need
for a chart such as this increasingly apparent. We believe all recorder owners
will find this gadget eliminates all the
guess work connected with how much you
can get on one tape, when to change reels
and other similar problems. It can be purchased at all Soundcraft dealers. and is
priced at 51.20.
31
DIAPHRAGM
MAGNET
DIAPHRAGM
IIlIIII
COI L
MAGNETS
4RYSTAL
RIBBON
IMPEDANCE
.
YL
HIGH IMPEDANCE
OR LOW
IIIIHI
ERY LOW IMPEDANC
IMPEDANCE
TRANSFORMER
TRANSFORMER
DYNAMIC
CRYSTAL OR
CERAMIC
LOW
IMP
VELOCITY (RIBBON)
TYPICAL MICROPNONEJ'
The crystal mike is so-called because it contains an actual crystal, usually of Rochelle salt. The flexing of the crystal produces a voltage. The
dynamic mike generates its current because a coil is moved in a magnetic field and the velocity or ribbon mike generations current through
the movement of a metallic ribbon within the magnet. The crystal is high impedance, the dynamic low and the ribbon very low. Transformers
are usually used with the dynamic and ribbon types and these are built right into the microphones.
Using Low Impedance Microphones
It,
.lack lLt %Ira
.
-
u/ty use
the an.strrr..
rt ¡me
intpetlnauv ntilre?
If
lutt will it ill'? How is il
of us hear people talk about low- impedance micro phones, and most of us wonder just what they are talking about, and why we should be concerned about the
matter. We hope in this article to answer both questions,
as well as give some of the more pertinent aspects of the
low- impedance mike as applied to tape recording, and particularly to your tape recorder.
Most tape recorders which are equipped by the manufacturer with a microphone, are provided with a high -impLL
50
OHMS
50 OHM5
r411111erletl if) it
tape recorder? F/eve net
pedance unit. This may be of crystal, ceramic, or dynamic
type. The crystal microphone and the ceramic microphone
are always of high -impedance type; dynamics of the type
supplied with tape recorders are also usually of high -impedance variety, although they could be of low- impedance
type.
Knowing how a microphone works may help us to understand our microphone better. A crystal microphone develops its signal by the flexing of a slice, or two, of Rochelle,
STEP -UP
NIGH IMPEDANCE
SHORT
&AF3LL
TO RECORDER
MIKE
CABLE
LOW IMPEDANCE
TRANSFORMER
PLUG
CONNECTION)
A low impedance microphone is bes+ where the cable has to be run a long distance to the recorder. Most recorders, however, have a high
impedance input for the microphone. To raise the impedance level a step -up transformer is used in the line before i+ reaches the recorder.
32
or Epsom Salt crystal. This flexing in the case of the common crystal microphone is caused by the motion of a diaphragm which is coupled to the crystal element. This type
of electric generator is called a piezo-electric element, a
substance generating electricity when flexed mechanically.
The ceramic microphone uses the same system, except the
element which is flexed is of Barium Titanate, converted
into a piezo -electric form by special curing, under high voltage and pressure during its manufacture. It has the advantage of being less subject to damage by heat and moisture
than the Rochelle Salt units.
The true dynamic microphone develops its voltage due to
the motion of a coil of wire, which is suspended from a
cone, in the middle of a strong magnetic field. It is by nature a low- impedance device, since the area for wire is quite
small, and to develop a high -impedance in a dynamic microphone requires considerable wire. The dynamic mike is
often provided with a built -in transformer, the output of
which may be high -impedance, as well as low, being controlled by a built -in switch.
Our high -impedance tape recorder microphone generally
serves us quite well, until we feel we want better fidelity,
and someone tells us we need a better microphone. We
are also apt to leave the high -impedance field because we
want to use long microphone cables, something not advisable with high -impedance mikes, due to hum and signal
loss. One way or another, we may find we want to go to
low impedance mikes.
Just what is a low- impedance mike, and how is it better,
or is it? How do we go about adapting it to the high impedance input circuit in our tape recorder?
The low- impedance microphone is usually of dynamic or
ribbon type, as applicable to the amateur field, the capacitor
or condenser mikes being rather expensive. Having two
types to select from, how do we make a selection? Under s-anding how each works will be a help.
L.
The Electro -Voice 502, a well shielded line transformer with
w de frequency response. Right: The Shure A -86 -A line transformer,
'ich matches low impedances to high impedance inputs.
WHAT IS IMPEDANCE AS APPLIED TO
MICROPHONES?
In the science of Electronics, Impedance is defined as resistance to the flow of alternating current. In the case of a
microphone, the term might best be explained by the use of
the following analogy which will serve to explain both impedance as applied to microphones and the action of a transformer with a microphone.
First, let us consider our microphone as the motor in our
auto, and the transformer as the transmission in the car.
It steps the motor speed up or down. In low gear we have
less speed, but more power available. Let us consider our
selected gear as impedance, our speed as voltage. As we move
to high gear, or high impedance, we have more speed or
voltage, but less power available. We can, of course, step
our speed down, and regain our power, the same applies to
impedance.
For the relative freedom of low impedance lines from
hum, etc., consider this to be similar to the effect of a slight
braking action when a lot of power is present, or the same
braking with little power present. The effect of the brake
would be much less with high power, just as external influences affect low impedances only slightly.
The low- impedance dynamic mike quite often contains a
transformer, just as the high -impedance type does since so
little space is available for wire, but it only steps the impedance up to 50 or 150 ohms in the low- impedance type.
The initial coil impedance of many dynamic units is too
low to be practical to transmit, since the voltage output is
so small. This is a good place to point out that our low impedance microphones develop very little voltage as a
rule. To step the voltage up to useful levels, transformers
are used. These transformers raise impedance, which raises
voltage output. A low- impedance mike will generally not
work with a high -impedance input because the output is
too low. How we step it up to useful levels will be explained later.
The output of our dynamic low- impedance mike goes
directly into our microphone cable at, say 50 ohms. It is
carried at this level until it reaches the tape recorder imput.
This low- impedance line is very free from hum disturbances and long lines may be run. Here it must either go
into the low -impedance input, available in a few tape recorders as a stock item, or it must be stepped -up to high
impedance for the conventional high impedance input. This
requires a line transformer. The Shure folks make the
Shure A -86 -A which will change 35, 50, 150, 250 ohms inputs to high -impedance. Electro-Voice makes the EV -502,
which will change 50, 250, or 500 ohm levels to high-impedance. These transformers are so -called "line transformers," in that they form a part of the cable or line going to
the tape recorder. The output end, the high -impedance end,
is always kept quite short, to avoid hum troubles.
Dynamic microphones are available in the full price
bracket, going from $20.00 to $250.00, the higher the price
the better the usual response and quality. The dynamic mike
is capable of excellent performance, and is very often used
for radio and TV broadcast work, not to mention high fidelity recording. All dynamic microphones come equipped
with literature advising output impedance, and both the
Shure and EV units give full directions for matching the
low- impedance to the tape recorder inputs.
The ribbon microphone is always of extremely low impedance at the source even lower than dynamic mikes, a
33
er professional mikes, this unit has a switch, making selection of several low- impedances possible.
Both the ribbon and dynamic mike of high quality exhibit most excellent frequency response, many being flat
within the customary few db from 30 to 15,000 cycles. There
are claims that the ribbon is apt to be of somewhat higher
sensitivity than the dynamic, due to its inherent low mass
of moving parts, but good quality dynamics are most amazing in their sensitivity. In general, the ribbon and dynamic
low- impedance microphones exhibit vastly improved response over the crystal microphone, or ceramic unit, although we hasten to advise, that some forms of crystal
microphone can be made into strong competitors. The objection to hum, and line loss with crystal mikes, is handled
by built-in impedance step -down transformers, which convert the high -impedance output to low- impedance for the
cables, the reverse being used to step it back up to a useful
impedance for our tape recorder input.
An examination of the instruction book for your tape
unit will show if you have a low- impedance input available, or if you must use an input transformer.
Another significant consideration in selecting a microphone is pick -up pattern. Generally mikes fall into three
groups, uni- directional, picking up sound from one direction
only, bi- directional, from two directions, and omni- directional, from all directions. There are variations of shape of
pattern, such as the "cardioid," etc., but these are of little
consequence.
What pattern is best for you depends on what type of
recording you will be doing. If you record at concerts, etc.,
where a crowd is present, and usually noisy, avoid the omnidirectional mike like the plague, and look twice before going for a bi- directional type. If this is your meat, stick to
the uni- directional mike, or the omni- directional capable of
Left: Fentone Blue Ribbon mike, a 50 ohm velocity unit, made by
Band and Olufsen in Denmark. Notice the tiny transformer below
the magnet, which raises the ribbon impedance to SO ohms. Right:
Shure 333 velocity microphone, a ribbon mike with uni- directional
pick -up pattern. This unit features three impedances, controlled by
built -in switch.
tissue thin ribbon of aluminum, which flexes with air velocity in a strong magnetic field, being all the wire for the
coil. It is also called "velocity" mike since it is controlled by
air velocity, not pressure. To the writer's knowledge, all
contain a transformer, needed to raise the level up to even
the common low -impedance levels of 50 or 150 ohms. The
ribbon mike has an impedance at the source, of a fraction
of an ohm. Most ribbon microphones are bi-directional,
that is they pick up sound from both sides of the mike, often
an advantage, but sometimes a disadvantage; it depends on
the particular recording situation. An exception to this rule
is the ingenious Shure iii, a professional ribbon mike featuring a uni-directional, or one -way pickup. Like many oth34
The Electro -Voice 664, a quality dynamic microphone. The author's
experience shows this microphone to come close in performance to
the best broadcast dynamics.
being used uni- directionally. This will help keep the crowd
noise to a usable level.
If you do home recording where you want to pick up
voices from all directions, the omni is fine. The bi- directional will also do a good job. For studio recording where
control can be had of the ambient noise level, use any type
you want, the type which does the best job for you is the
best one to use. We have six microphones in our "stable."
Each has its particular advantage. Since we do a lot of bi-taural recording, we have a pair of excellent dynamics, a
pair of ribbons, a uni-directional ribbon, and a low -im.3edance crystal with built -in transformer. Each type, we
-Ind, does a specific job best. When the noise is bad, we
.hy away from our ribbons, bi- directional type, and rely on
he dynamics (uni- directional ). For studio recording, we
ind our ribbons most adequate.
We are able to use our uni- directional ribbon for most
every type of pick -up, finding its performance most adequate. Whether one prefers this type of unit to a good dynamic is a matter of personal preference, since both have
the response, both the pattern. Our crystal unit makes a
good emergency mike, and is usually carried for just that
purpose.
LEAD WIRES FROM
RIBBON ELEMENT
MICROPHONE
/CARTRIDGE
CASE
GRILLE
ELECTRICAL
WIRING
Exploded view of Shure "Concert-Line' 333 broadcast unidirectional
microphone. The transformer for changing ribbon to line impedance
is located in the base of the microphone, the switch is at the back,
and is labeled "electrical wiring."
FIDELIPAC TAPE CARTRIDGE
new unit
half-hour,
Fidelipac
tape
will
he available
for quarter hour,
full hour playing tine.
and
cartridges
shown in the foreground play
A new long -playing tape cartridge designed for economical mass production,
has been developed by Sound Electronics
Laboratories, a division of G. H. Poulsen
& Co., under the direction of George H.
Eash, Chief Engineer.
Named the Fidelipac, this cartridge will
play a full hour at a speed of 71/2 inches
per second. It is just slightly larger than a
standard 1200 foot reel. Similarly, half hour and 15 minute cartridges of this design are comparable to G0() and 300 foot
reels. These cartridges store more easily
than reels.
The device uses a simple drive system,
standard t/" tape, and the conventional
continuous loop. It features a patented
method of reducing tape friction and static
bl its design. Tape tension is constant at
ai times, and pressure pads are not rewired to assure good tape to head contact.
Due to minimum exposure of tape to
dirt and dirt, and because static charges
15,
30
71/2
FPS.
and
60
minutes
which ordinarily attract these elements are
neutralized, the tape and head are virtually
free of these particles, thereby assuring
finer reproduction of sound.
The Fidelipac will be produced in an
attractively designed, modern plastic case.
To operate, it is simply inserted into a
playing device and automatically locked in
proper position. A push of the play button and the machine is running. The tape
itself is never touched or handled.
The tape cartridges are not adapted to
play on present day recorders which use
reels. Recorders and playbacks which will
accept the new cartridge will be designed,
however. A prototype of a tape player is
shown in the illustration above.
At the present time, it is anticipated
that the price of the player unit will be
less than $40, with player-recorder units
running somewhat higher. The cartridges
will be priced from 75 cents to a dollar
higher than comparable size open reels
at
of pre -recorded tape.
While the pre -recorded tape field is
anticipated as the chief market for Fidelipac, home users are expected to push immediate sales when it is released.
Other uses roo, such as factory- installed
or custom models in automobiles, suitable
for both pleasure and business; station
identification and commercials in radio and
television; applications relating to automation equipment; and the sounding of
alerts or warnings, are foreseen by Mr.
Eash for this unique product. The playing
time of one hour can be increased for
special applications. Mr. Eash believes that
this type of cartridge will eventually replace records in the field of talking books
and music.
These cartridges will be manufactured
by Sound Electronics Laboratories, 1702
Wayne Street, Toledo, Ohio. Complete information may be obtained by writing to
them at this address.
35
NEW PRODUCI REPORT
STAOK TED
Product: Bell RT -75
Three Speed Recorder
Manufacturer: Bell Sound Systems,
Inc., 555 Marion Road, Columbus,
7, Ohio.
Price: $219.95
DELL THREE -SPEED RECORDER
.... features speeds of
1
-1/8, 3 -3/4
and 1 -1/2 inches per
second. Simple controls, mixer built -in.
Bell RT-75 is a surprisingly versatile machine in the medium price
THE
class but without an imposing
amount of gadgets and an extra -fancy
finish. It simply has enough controls to
do the job and the case is pleasingly
finished.
This is a dual -track, three -speed machine with the second track made available through reel -turnover, as with most
recorders. The controls for the three
speeds, 1 %S, 33/4 and 71/2 inches per
second are straightforward and require
little effort to operate.
The amplifier, which we tested separately, as well as in combination with
the rest of the recorder, shows excellent
response characteristics from 75 to 15,000 cycles with an apparent rise of
about 1 db in the 1000 -2000 range.
Otherwise the response is flat.
The record -playback characteristics
of the unit we had for test at the 71/2
ips speed indicated less than 3 db variation from the 1000 cps response from
70 to 8000 cps in a fairly linear pat36
tern with a top of 11,000. The signal
to noise ratio at -20 db input was in
excess of 30 db.
At the 33/a ips speed the response
from 70 to 5000 cycles met the same
requirements and had a cutoff between
6000 and 7000 cps. At the 1743 ips speed
the response was good from 200 to 2000
cycles with a cutoff below 100 and beyond 3000 cycles.
The slowest speed is more than adequate for voice reproduction and with
the long recording time at this speed
(2 hours on one track of a 1200 foot
reel) should prove of value for long
conference recording and similar activi-
Unique on this recorder is the signal
input which has an arrangement of
three jacks providing for one microphone or a mixed microphone and
phono-input in a separate balanced arrangement. For measured mixing, an
external control should be used but mixing can be done just by using the two
jacks provided on the recorder.
The outputs are found on the back
of the case, one for an external speaker, with a rating of 3.2 ohms (any
speaker up to 16 ohms may be used)
and the second a high impedance output for an external amplifier. A terminal strip provided inside the case
gives a 500 ohm output for long line
transmission.
The modulation, or recording level
indicator, is the conventional neon type
and in addition there is an on -off pilot
ties.
The output through the 6 x 9 speaker
with which the unit is provided was
about 4 watts at less than 5% distortion and the wow and flutter was less
than 0.3% at the 71/2 ips speed.
The forward and rewind speeds are
approximately 11/2 minutes for a 1200
foot reel with the rewind slightly faster
of the two.
With the lid in place the recorder presents
this attractive appearance. The case is beige
with
a
gold grille and green trim.
Anew
The controls are all conveniently grouped in one place. At left is the speed
change lever and power on -off control. At right is the run -stop control. The
record button is at upper center. At lower left is the tone control which also
serves for fast rewind and right, volume control and fast wind.
light and a signal which goes on when
recording is being done. All controls
are interlocked so that accidental operation or erasure is not possible.
Monitoring of recordings may be
done by using high impedance headphones plugged into the high impedance output jack on the rear of the
recorder or using low impedance
phones plugged into the external speaker jack. If the impedance of the phones
is over 8 ohms, a 2 -watt 3 -ohm resistor
should be bridged across the phones.
To use the recorder as a PA system,
an external speaker is plugged in and
the recorder put in "record" position
with the reels removed.
The tone control operates on playback and when placed in the center of
its range the response is essentially flat.
As the control is rotated toward the
high position the emphasis is placed
'op: panel lights are on left side of recorder:
eft, power on light, center, recording light,
right, recording level neon light. Lower: input jacks for two microphones and a radio
or phono which may be mired with voice.
on the high frequency range. When
turned to the left the emphasis is on
the low frequency range. Ìn the center
of the range the bass rise is about 7 db
along with a drop of 6 db in the highs
to balance the acoustical response of
the loudspeaker and cabinet.
This recorder is one of the best ventilated machines we have seen. The bottom plate is large and may be removed
to get at tubes or motor. There is additional ventilation through the back of
the case and also in the wells at the
side of the top panel.
The bottom plate also provides access
to the 500 ohm connection for long
lines. This is marked on the terminal
strip with yellow paint.
The erase and bias is high frequency
AC ( 60,000 cycles).
While not a part of the recorder we
feel that Bell deserves a commendation
for the instruction brochure that is supplied with the machine. It is very lucidly presented and detailed. Drawings of
the possible connections ro the various
inputs and outputs will enable even
the newest novice to make the proper
connections to achieve the results he
wants.
To use fast forward or rewind the
stop -run switch is thrown to the stop
position and the proper button depressed. When the rewind button is
pressed, the control locks in and it will
continue to rewind. To stop it, the fast
forward button is depressed until the
reel comes to a stop. The fast foward
button must be held in manually until
the desired spot on the reel is reached.
We feel that the Bell RT-75 has much
to recommend it and is worthy of your
consideration if you are thinking of
buying a recorder in the medium price
range.
thrill
In
tape recording
with TURNER 95D
Dynamic Microphone
Remember how your first tape recording sounded? Remember the thrill of
hearing your own voice played back
for the first time? You may even have
thought, "Is that my voice ?" As time
passed, you began making better tapes.
You learned the many techniques that
make tape recording so much fun.
Now you're ready for another thrill
... The Turner 95D dynamic microphone. The Turner 95D makes sure
you'll get all the quality your playback
equipment can give, because the Turner
95D puts more quality on tape.
If you're at the point where true
fidelity tape recordings are what you
want -you want a Turner 95D microphone. A top performer for either
voice or music reproduction -priced
for practical use on all your tape
recordings.
CONDENSED SPECIFICATIONS
Frequency Responses 70 to 10,000 cps.
volt /dyne/
Output Level: 58 db below
1
sq. cm.
Impedances: Available in 50, 200, 500
ohms or high impedance.
Turner 95D, List Price
Turner 95D with slide switch
537.50
$41.00
COMPANY
THE
948 17th St. N. E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa
CANADA:
EXPORT:
Ad
Aurierna
89 Broad Si.
Inc.
Canadian Marconi Co.
N.Y.
Toronto
Oat., and Branches
BOOK REVIEW
TANDBERG 2
Tape Recorders and Tape Recording by
Harold D. I relier, 51/2" x 81/2", 190 pages,
index, illustrated u -ith drau'iugs and photo-
PORTABLE TAPE RECORDER
RECORDS PIANO MUSIC
AT
with ABSOLUTELY
inches sec.
17,à
NO AUDIBLE WOW
or FLUTTER.
j
graphs. Published by Radio Magazines, Inc.,
Mineola. N. Y. Paperbound, $2.95. Clothbound, $3.95.
This is the second volume to appear by
this author, the first being "High Fidelity
Simplified." It is written in the same easy
to read style and is aimed primarily at the
layman with little or no knowledge of tape
recording. However, it does assume that the
reader has had at least a nodding acquaint-
The quality of performance contradicts the entire concept that slow
speed
machines
can
only be used for voice
recordings.
HEAR IT
.
.
.
with recorders.
Its chapters include: Sound, Sound and
the Human Ear, Microphones and Tape Recording, Tape Recording and Room Acoustics, Recording with a Microphone, Microphone Techniques, Recording from Records,
Radio and TV, Tape Recorders-Theory and
Practice, Editing and Splicing, Sound Effects,
Tape Recorder Maintenance, Adding Sound
to Slides and Home Movies.
The greater part of the book is concerned
with actual recording, as can be seen from
the list of chapter titles. The information
contained in the volume is good, as are a
number of kinks and tricks for recording
from cracked records, making sound effects,
etc.
The hook concerns itself solely with the
tape recording and does not go into such
subjects as connections to a hi -fi system, etc.
which were covered in the former book
mentioned above. We believe that the tape
ill tind this book of interest.
recordist
ance
BELIEVE IT
'
Two speed
dual track
1,o inches sec.
2 db
3aá Inches sec. Response 60 to 7500 cycles
Flutter
Signal to Noise ratio: greater than 50 db
and Wow less than .2
at 1-v inches see.
Magic Eye level
indicator
Monitor output for head phone
Low level output to amplifier system.
Radio or Phono input
OTHER FEATURES INCLUDE:
a three position switch for playback thou
Its
Radio or phono Input can be mixed with microphone input
.
use as public address
own speaker or hi-fl speaker, or both
.
playback amplifier has 5 watts audio output .
.
.
25 feet mike cable .
fully
amplifier system .
. crystal mike with response of 50 to
10.000 cycles flat .
1200 ft.
. 1 hours playing time with
shielded heads . . - interlocked record switch prevents unwanted erasure .
reel of tape
.
.
instantaneous speed change while recording
tape retracts from heads in last forward
or rewind position
single lever control for start. stop, forward or rewind.
...
AN EXCEPTIONAL TAPE RECORDER HOUSED IN A FINE CRAIN WOOD CABINET AND
SUPPLIED WITH A LUGGAGE TYPE LOCKING LEATHER CASE FOR EASY PORTABILITY.
COMPLETE UNIT WEIGHS 27 LBS.
PRICE: COMPLETE WITH TRANSPORT CASE, MICROPHONE, INPUT CORD AND INSTRUCTION MANUAL
$249.50 NET
LIMITED DEALERSHIPS STILL OPEN.
REEVES EQUIPMENT CORP.
10 EAST 52 ST., NEW YORK 22,
N. Y.
PL
9
-7190
5N
AMPEX VIDEO TAPE RECORDER STUNS TV INDUSTRY
The announcement of a video tape recorder with the speed of only 15 inches per
second has set the TV world on its ear.
The Ampex Corporation developed the
new device and kept it as secret as the atomic
bomb project until it was unveiled to CBS
officials (who purchased three machines for
$225,000) and the rest of the TV world
at the national convention of the National
Association of Radio and Television Broadcasters in Chicago.
The first recorders will be in service by
August on CBS. 54,000,000 worth of orders
from nets and stations were written for the
new recorders at the show.
First use for the recorder will be to overcome the three -hour time differential between New York and the West Coast. Programs will be recorded as they come over
the transmission lines and retelecast in a
comparative time slot for West Coast audi
wave relay systems. Just as with the Ampex
audio tape recorders, the program can he
immediately replayed with no further
processing. Tape can also be reused time
and again.
Recording and playback is done merely
by pushing a button. The recorder must
record up to 4,000,000 cycles per second
regular audio recorders have a top of about
15,000 cps at 71 inches per second J. The
Ampex system runs at only 15 inches per
second permitting recording of a full hour
of material on a 14 inch reel. Other methods
still in development by other firms have
speeds up to 200 inches per second. In the
Ampex system a magnetic head assembly
ences.
The new Ampex VTR system records both
picture and sound on a single magnetic tape
two inches wide. Picture quality is considerably better than present day techniques
employing photographic film. The resolution -the measure of clarity of a picture
is far beyond the capability of the average
TV receiver. Thus when a tape is telecast
the signal will he better than the home set
-
can receive.
Programs can he recorded directly from
camera, from a TV receiver, from
television transmission lines or from micro-
a
38
TV
P. Ginsburg, senior
project engineer in charge
of video development, and
Charles
Phillip L. Gundy, manager
of the audio division, responsible for the project.
inspect the magnetic head
assembly in Ampex Corporation's new television tape
recorder.
rotates at high speed putting the signal on
the tape transversely instead of longitudinally as in audio recorders. The sound is recorded in the regular manner along one
edge of the tape.
The appearance of the VTR in commercial form is expected to raise some issues
among the various unions covering players,
technicians, etc. as film gradually disappears
from the TV picture. While this may not
happen overnight, it is quite probable that
future pictures for TV will be shot on tape
rather than film. This will greatly facilitate
the gathering of news pictures which can be
shown as soon as the camera crew returns
to the station.
TAPE CLUB NEWS
.
Madelyn K. Skarnes,
member.
T -R -I's
Tape -Respondents, International recently
welcomed its 1,000th member. The lucky
entrant is Miss Madelyn K. Skarnes of Min neapolis, who has received a free lifetime
membership in T-R -I, along with congratulatory tapes from fellow members
throughout the country.
Formerly, a radio operator with Northwest Airlines, Madelyn now teaches airline
t ommunication procedures at the Gale Institute, Inc., in Minneapolis.
Also a composer of sorts, Madelyn has
just finished her sixth popular number. She
says the main reason she joined T -R-I was
to find a good combo or quartette that would
like to experiment with a new song.
Voicespondent Albert Van Vliet of Amsterdam, New York, who is a buoy light
tender along 8 miles of the canalized Mohawk River, is preparing a tape history of
the old Erie Canal. He has recorded passages by his father, who used to be a canaller
in his youth, as well as interviews with old
residents along the Mohawk. Albert is collecting a running history of the operation
of the old canal and a discussion of the traditions and folklore that have grown up
along its banks. He is also investigating old
canal songs to include in the tape. When
completed, the tape is to be used to arouse
interest in a museum now in process of being completed, which deals with the Erie
Canal, and will be located not far from
Van Vliet's home.
Conceived as an
l'ape Pals, World
embarking upon
gram of collecting
`
integral part of World
Tapes for Education is
a comprehensive proexisting recordings and
;IBSON GIRL TAPE SPLICERS
splices in a wink!
NO SCISSORS'
NO RAZOR BLADES'
Oftagenei
^.,1
At Year Dealers
R
INS INDUSTRIES CORP.
s.,,m,
el
developing new recordings based upon suggestions and requests of classroom teachers and other professional personnel. Designed to stimulate and maintain interest
in classroom studies, these tapes include
such things as a recording of the eerie
music of Africa, sound pictures of Australian life, and tapes dealing with citizenship
in a democracy. Tapes are being formulated and developed which will be of
value to classes in music, science, literature, and social studies. Members of the
WTE committee are in the process of compiling an extensive collection, from which
portions are being carefully selected and
brought together with appropriate commentary. A fuller understanding of other
cultures can be achieved through use of
these recordings.
WTE committee members include
James H. Boren, Chairman, Richard W.
Morton, George Pappas, Kenneth De
Courcy Low, James Buchanan, Roy E.
Wenger, Lance Randall, Arend Wester veld, Vernon W. Smith, Dr. Finley Carpenter, Prof. Fernand L. Marty, Dr. Matthias Schmitz, and Dr. James Faulkner.
The efforts of these members, together
with the assistance of the parent organization, World Tape Pals, and its other subsidiary, Sound Library, have combined to
make the WTE program the success that
it is.
Clarence B. Jeffries of 3105 Duke Street,
Houston 5, Texas, would like to start a
tape club in Houston. Interested parties
may contact Clarence at the above address.
The United Recording Club is offering
families living in the
Chicago area who have someone in the
Armed Forces. It will arrange to record
correspondence, and playback replies for
the families, to and from the serviceman
or woman. Members of the club who know
of anyone in the service who has access
to a tape recorder may inform them of
this arrangement. Recordings are to be
made at Vtl or "1 _ its.
a special service to
JOIN A CLUB
TAPE RESPONDENTS INTERNATIONAL
Jim Greene, Secretary
O. Box 21, Dept. T., Little Rock, Ark.
THE VOICESPONDENCE CLUB
Charles Owen, Secretary
Noel, Virginia
WORLD TAPE PALS
Harry Matthews, Secretary
P. O. Box 9211, Dallas, Texas
INTERNATIONAL TAPE WORMS
Art Rubin, National Chairman
P. O. Box 215, Cedarhurst, L. I., N. Y.
AUSTRALIAN TAPE RECORDISTS
ASSOC.
Arthur W. Merriman, Federal President
Box 36, P. 0., Noble Park, Vic., Australia
UNITED RECORD CLUB
Richard L. Marshall, President
2516 S. Austin Boulevard
Chicago 50, Ill.
P.
NOW!
ße4hSlufìze
RECORDED
TAPES
Low-Priced
Introductory
Offer for
¡j
Music
Lovers
Does a thrilling adventure in recorded
music sound like a worthy objective?
Here is an opportunity you won't want
to miss. "Berkshire Highlights" is a
full 5" reel (600 ft.-over 1/2 hour
playing time) of pre-recorded tape (71/2
ips dual track) -containing excerpts
from the Berkshire catalog -by the
great masters-Mozart, Haydn, Bach,
Beethoven, Schubert, Tchaikowsky, etc.
HERE, THEN, ARE YOUR ORCHESTRAL AND OPERATIC FAVORITES
IN SUFFICIENT VARIETY TO ALLOW YOU TO CHOOSE THE
MUSIC YOU PREFER. Once you
have heard these exquisite hi -fi reproductions, you will want to obtain several complete 7" reel selections. (Priced
as low as $6.95!!!) ANYONE WHO
HAS BOUGHT TAPE WILL REALIZE THAT THE PRICE OF "BERKSHIRE HIGHLIGHTS," $1.50, POSTPAID, IS SO LOW, THAT IT COMES
TO YOU ALMOST AS A GIFT.
You can take advantage of this gateway to musical pleasure by sending
this coupon at once. Remember-good
music, well reproduced on tape, is
music rear cannot grow old.
BERKSHIRE
RECORDING
CORPORATION
150 WEST 90th ST.
NEW YORK 24, N. Y.
Dept. TF -5
Name
Address
City
Please
State
rush
my reel of
HIGHLIGHTS."
I
Zea*
....
"BERKSHIRE
enclose $1.50.
Please send free catalog, and the name
of my local dealer.
TF -5
39
Can You Sell Off -The -Air
Recordings?
By George Chernoff
Attorney
YoU'VE taken recordings off the air with your nice new
tape recorder. You've invested a considerable sum of
money in that recorder and would like to have it start
paying you back.
If that is in your mind, you'd better read this carefully.
It may keep you out of trouble.
Naturally, no one is going to stop you from sitting in
the privacy of your home and taking recordings off the air.
There's nothing illegal about that just as there's nothing
wrong with taking pictures of a program on your television
screen. But, the use you make of the recording is another
story. The courts have held squarely that a program is valuable property and that when you sell a recording taken off
the air you are appropriating and exploiting for your own
benefit the result of the expenditures, labor and skill of another and interfering with valuable rights of the owner of
the program.
In a monumental decision several years ago, the Supreme
Court of the State of New York decided that it was illegal
for a recording company to sell recordings of opera performances which it took off the air without permission.
The Metropolitan Opera Association had sold the exclusive right to make and sell records of its operatic performances to Columbia Records. In payment for these exclusive
rights the Metropolitan Opera Association was to receive
royalties on records sold. In addition, the Opera Associadon had sold the exclusive right to broadcast the operas
for a limited period to the American Broadcasting Company.
The defendant recorded these broadcast performances of
the operas and advertised and sold the recordings as records
of broadcasts of the Metropolitan Opera performances.
The Court noted that the quality of the defendant's records was inferior to that of Columbia Records and was so
low that Metropolitan Opera would not have approved the
release of the records as it had a right to do under its contract with Columbia. The Court also noted that by reason
of the negligible costs to defendant in producing its records
it was able to sell at a considerably lower price than those
of Columbia Records.
With this as the background of the case, the Court then
proceeded to brand the defendant's conduct as illegal, saying:
"That defendants' piratical conduct and practice have
injured and will continue to injure plaintiffs admits of
no serious challenge, and possible money damages furnished no adequate remedy. That such practices constitute unfair competition both with Metropolitan Opera
and Columbia Records is made abundantly clear by the
record. Plaintiff Metropolitan Opera derives income from
the performance of its operatic productions in the presence of an audience, from the broadcasting of those productions over the radio, and from the licensing to Columbia Records of the exclusive privilege of making and
selling records of its own performances. Columbia Rec40
ords derives income from the sale of the records which
it makes pursuant to the license granted to it by Metropolitan Opera. Without any payment to Metropolitan
Opera for the benefit of its extremely expensive performances, and without any cost comparable to that incurred
by Columbia Records in making its records, defendants
offer to the public recordings of Metropolitan Opera's
broadcast performances. This constitutes unfair competition."
The New York Court in reaching this decision followed
the principles established by previous cases.
In a case arising many years ago in the Federal Court the
plaintiff had engaged artists and made records of their
musical performances for sale to the public. The defendant
obtained some of these records, mechanically reproduced
them and sold copies in competition with the original records at much lower prices. The Court held that the sale of
such reproductions was illegal since the commercial value
of the imitation lies in the fact that it takes advantage of
and appropriates to itself the commercial qualities, reputation and salable properties of the original.
In another case the United States Supreme Court held
that one news service could not copy its news from bulletin
boards put out by another news service. Recognizing the
right of a purchaser of a newspaper to spread knowledge of
its contents gratuitously for any legitimate purpose, it said
that copying the news for transmission for commercial use
was an entirely different matter. The Court said:
"In doing this, defendant by its very act admits that it
is taking material that has been acquired by complainant
as a result of organization and the expenditure of labor,
skill and money, and which is salable by complainant for
money, and that defendant in appropriating it and selling
it as its own is endeavoring to reap where it has not sown,
and by disposing of it ro newspapers that are competitors
of complainant's members is appropriating to itself the
harvest of those who have sown."
Further analogy may be made to the cases involving photography. For example, the Courts have enjoined the sale
of motion pictures of athletic events taken by spectators. In
one of such cases Madison Square Garden was held entitled
to stop the sale of motion pictures of a boxing match where
exclusive rights to take such motion pictures had been
granted to another.
And, in another case, the Mutual Broadcasting System
was granted an injunction against Muzak against unauthorized broadcast of the World Series.
The Court in the Metropolitan Opera case made the following interesting comment about artistic performances:
"To refuse to the groups who expend time, effort, money
and great skill in producing these artistic performances
the protection of giving them a 'property right' in the
(Continued on page 3S )
(Continued from page 36)
resulting artistic creation would be
contrary to existing law, inequitable,
and repugnant to the public inter-
(
Continued from page 17)
PORTABLE DISC RECORDER
est."
Remember that the protection given
the court against the sale of unauthorized recordings of the opera is
separate and apart from the protection
given under the copyright law. That
1, ill be a subject for a future article.
However, it should be apparent to
our readers that there are very definite
I:gal restrictions against what one can
o with his tape recorder and the sale
of recordings taken off the air is clearI; taboo.
The Metropolitan Opera case was
ited as the basis for a similar injunction in February 1956 by a United
States District Court. In that case,
WGMS, the Good Music Station Incrorporated, was awarded an injunction
gainst a person who had made and
sold recordings of a broadcast of a National Symphony concert. In granting
preliminary injunction restraining
(:efendant from the further manufacture and distribution of unauthorized
tecords of "Carmina Burana" the
Court said that WGMS would suffer irteparable damage if the circulation of
the discs were permitted to continue.
' "he defendant argued that he intend d to sell the records only to members
(,f the Howard University Chorus who
participated in the performance, but
said he didn't know how the discs came
(I) be sold in a Washington record shop.
The Court held that the Metropolitan
Opera case is controlling in the matter
of unauthorized records made from
II
c
broadcasts.
It should, therefore, be apparent to
our readers that there are very definite
legal restrictions against what one can
do with his tape recorder and the sale
of recordings taken off the air is clearly
taboo.
Tape Splicer
F.
HEAV
DUTY
FAO'
REITER
COMPANY
3340 Booni Hill Driva
Hollywood 2B, California
CCUTTRYAUTOMATIC
CUTTER
FOR SALE
16" Hi -Fi Transcriptions
-
Big Catalog, 25c
Tape Mood Music 1/2 Hour Only $6.00
Sample Copy S2.75
TRANSCRIPTION SERVICE
166 Barkley Ave.
Clifton, N. J.
COMPLETE
Control Facilities !
FISHER
Master Audio Control
SERIES 80 -C
Rek -O -Kut Company has announced the
availability of the Imperial, a new portable
disc recorder and playback reproducer. It
features a newly designed overhead cutting
lathe with interchangeable leadscrews, and
with provision for making run -in and runoff gr(xlves; new cutting head with a recording range from 50 to 10,000 cycles; Rek -OKut 16(1 Tone Arm (for records up to 16 ")
is included; and the entire recorder and playhack unit is contained in a single carrying
case measuring 25" x 22" x 12 ", weighing
80 lbs. Recordings can be made on discs up
to 131 ," at 33 1/3 and 78 rpm with optional provision for 45 rpm. Price of the
new Imperial including the cutting head.
120 -line leadscrew and timing chart is
5599.50. For additional information, write
to Rek -O -Kut Company, 38 -01 Queens
Blvd., Lang Island City 1, N. Y.
Complete mixing and fading of any two, three. or
lour channels! A FISHER exclusive! Separate tape.
head playback preamplifier -equalizer. A FISHER
Seven inputs, including 2 Phono, Mio
exclusive)
Full record equalization facilities
and Tape.
Variable- crossover feedback -type Bass and Treble
Two cathode -follower outputs.
'Cone Controls.
Self- powered. with DC on all filaments: achieves
a bum level that is inaudible under tray conditions.
Inherent hum: ,,ononeasurable! On Phono 72 db
below output on I(Imv input signal, on high -level
IM
channels: better than 85 db below 2v output.
!Freand harmonic distortion: non -measurable!
quency response: uniform, 10 to 100.000 cycles.
Chassis Size: 121/4 x 71 x 41/4" high. Weight, 10 lbs.
.tlagog. or Blonde Cab,. $9.95
CAossis, $99.50
MIXER -FADER
50 -M
Eler ironic MIS log and
of any 2 signal sources. NO
insertion loss. Extremely lops
hum and noise level. $19.95
Write for Free Specification,
RADIO CORP.
FISHER
21 -27 44th
Driv,, LI.C.
1, N.Y
TANDBERG RECORDER
GIBSON GIRL JUNIOR SPLICER
Splices in
Seconds!
No Scissors!
No Razor Blades!
$4.88 postpaid
r
Standard Model $6.38
The Tandberg tape recorder 2, made in
Norway, is being distributed in this country
by Reeves Equipment Corp., 10 E. 52nd
Street, New York 22, N. Y. This machine
has tape speeds of 33/4 and 17,ít i.p.s.; frequency response plus or minus 2 db from
60 to 7500 cps, and 60 to 4000 cps for the
high and low tape speeds respectively; and
noise level 50 db below highest recording
level. It features separate erase and playback
heads; the tape is completely retracted away
from the heads for fast forward and fast rewind; microphone, and radio or phono can
he mixed. A switch on top of deck operates either its own speaker, or external hi fi
amplifier only, or both. Change of tape speed
can take place while the recorder is running.
The entire mechanism is housed in a beautifully grained walnut wood case that rests
in a portable carrying case. For additional
information and price, contact Reeves
Equipment Corp., above address.
-
Deluxe 58.63
RECORDED TAPE MUSIC
Write for Catalog
EFSCO SALES COMPANY
270 Concord Ave.
West Hempstead, N. Y.
WE
BUY -SELL -TRADE
NEW AND USED
TAPE
RECORDERS
MOST ALL MAKES
Also Hi -A Equipment
HIGHEST TRADE -IN ALLOWANCES
SAMPSON ELECTRONICS
Central City. Nebr.
41
LP's FOR rent. Elmer Purchase,
Montclair, N. J.
SHOP OR SWAP
Advert i.ing in tlus section is open to both amateur
and commercial ads. TAPE RECORDING does not
guarantee any otter advertised In this column and all
swatw, etc., are strictly between individuals.
RATES: Coaunercial ads, $.:l0 per word. Individual
ads, non- commercial, $.05 a word.
Remittances in full should accompany copy. Ads will
in nest available issue. Please print or
type your copy to avoid error. Address ad to: Shop
or Swap, Tape Recording Magazine. Severna Park, Md.
24 Wellesley,
FRAZIER MAY speakers. Folded horn woofer
with tweeter. Blond and Mahogany finishes. You
cannot buy a better speaker for this special price.
5100 -$145. Excellent tape recorder addition. Paul
Schulz, 6650 Del Norte, Dallas, Texas.
NOW YOU can make $100 weekly spare time
with your tape recorder. Send 25e refundable. LP
discs made from tapes. 24 hour service guaranteed.
10 inch-SO minutes, $4.25; 12 inch -45 minutes,
$5.75. Write for other speeds. Artistic Sound,
24110 Rensselaer, Oak Park, Michigan.
RADIO ANNOUNCING! Complete course on
tape, $10! Free details. Stone. Lunenburg 21, Mass.
FOR SALE: B-16H Rek -O-Kut professional, 3
speed 16" transcription turntable mounted on RekO-Kut C -7 console cabinet, $180. 30 w. Brociner
4L -1 amplifier, $70. Brociner pre -amp: equalizer
A -100 and control amplifier CA -2 in cabinet, $65.
All equipment excellent. Dr. Sid Saltzman. 228
So. Quince Street, Philadelphia 7. Pa.
WANTED: Walkie-Recordall, Model CC or CCB.
Also Magnemite 310 series. State price, age, condition. R. Seckel, 2101 North Point, San Francisco.
1014" REEL adapter, for any horizontal recorder.
Cost $30. First $12.50 gets equipment. Lange,
235 Joy, Los Angeles 42, Calif.
FOR. SALE: Magnecord PT6 -M auxiliary spooling
unit, new condition
Charles C. Vandervort,
-$80.
Laceyville, Pa.
VM -700 Hi -fi recorder, one year old. Cost.
$179.50; Sell, $119.50; completely checked by
factory dealer. Guaranteed perfect condition. Bob
Roach. Box 528, Oklahoma Ciry, Okla.
liltlllli
GUIDE
EDUCATORS GUIDE
TO FREE TAPES
SCRIPTS AND
TRANSCRIPTIONS
An
Educators
Progress Service
Publication
Second Annual Edition
page edition lists, classifies
and provides complete information
on sources, availability and contents
of 58 free tapes, 181 free scripts and
19 free transcriptions, a total of 258
items of value to educators and librarians.
This
161
$5.75
Webcor 2030, 3 speaker recorder,
excellent condition. Plus Grundig Majestic radio,
Model 2035, 4 speakers- walnut cabinet, 2 months
old. Plus 10 reels of tape, used. Must sell. $300
complete. Sidney Kaplan, 1771 Fulton Ave., Bronx
57, N. Y.
FOR. SALE:
TWO MAGNECORDERS, Model 814, continuous playing, 3.75 or 7.5, 8 hour reels, with amplifier, time clock, practically new- Win sacrifice below
wholesale, Caraway, 1455 Meadowbrook, Jackson,
Mississippi.
RECORDS FROM your apes. Professional quality
tape or disc transfers and reproductions. All speeds.
Lowest prices. Patmor Sound Systems, 92 Pinehurst
Ave., 3K, New York 33. N. Y.
TAPE
RECORDING
MAGAZINE
SEVERNA PARK, MD.
41
RADIO ANNOUNCING- Writing Professional
guidance in home -study course. Finest instruction
in spoken English obtainable. Placement service
for all competent graduates. Diploma. Special introductory offer. Pathfinder Radio Services, 737
11 St. N.W., Washington, D. C., Dept. T.
WANTED: Used Tapesonic 70B tape recorder.
State price, condition, etc. H. O. Brickson, Apt.
50, 2000 16 St., N.W., Washington, D. C.
PICTAPE: "A true picture fidelity" recording tape.
Broadcast- Telemetering. Computer quality, Sample
1800 ft. reel $5.75. Guaranteed. Pictape Products
Corporation, 152 West 42nd St., New York 36.
RECORDS FROM your tapes. Finest professional
equipment. Low prices. Free information. Valentine Sound, 4253 Farmdale, North Hollywood 2,
California.
PT900A PRESTO tape recorder and amplifier for
sale.
Some modifications. Electronically perfect,
mechanism fair condition. In daily use in broadcast
station. Highest check over $500 takes FOB.
WKDN, Camden 4, N. J.
WANTED: Used recording tape, any amount, any
condition, give full details and price. Write: R.
Lackner, 2029 Bradley. Chicago 18, Illinois.
FOR SALE: Grammes 10 watt hi -fi amplifier, $20.
Meissner 8CC FM tuner, $25. University 4401
tweeter with 4405 hi -pass filter, $11. Pickering
record compensator, $6. All units used, but in A -1
condition. Roland P. Harriston, 1210 Warren St.,
Roselle, New Jersey.
HI -FI equipment: Fisher FM80 tuner. cannot be
told from new, $98.00; Karlson enclosure with
G.E. speaker, $50.00; Atlas tweeter, horn and
crossover, $ 12.00; Altec 604C speaker, $119.50;
Fisher SOAZ amplifier, hardly used, $79.00; Concertone 20/20 tape recorder, spotless condition,
$350.00; G.E. "Golden Treasure" diamond pickup, $14.00. Philip Lance, Greenwich, N. J.
New
FM-I, already built,
Yours, $20.00. Mr.
St.. New York, N.
FOR. SALE:
"Heathkit -FM- Tuner," Model
works excellent. List, $24.50.
Lawrence Levy, 191 Broome
Y., SPring 7-7515.
WANTED: Ex Los Angeles resident wants good
tape recordings of KMA 367. Please contact Earl
W. Magoun, 320 Park Ave., Arlington 74, Mass.
PRESS CAMERA. New B. & J. 4" x 5" with
used prewar Kodak 4.5 lens. Trade for tape re-
corder with or without playback amplifier. Purchase, 24 Wellesley, Montclair, N. J.
D42 CONDENSER microphone ±1 db 0.10 KC,
Lo distortion. Hi sensitivity, rugged, $20. Write
for data, C. Tendick, 900 Glenway Dr., Inglewood, Calif.
LARGEST SELECTION. Tape recorders, accessories, tapes. Free price list. Hi -Fi Hobbies, 975T
East 178 St., New York 60, N. Y.
DISC RECORDINGS from your tape. Write for
details and price. Sterling Records, 27 Beacon
Bldg., Boston, Mass.
BRAND NEW 1956 Model Hi -Fi VM -700 tape
recorder, never used. Cost $ 179.95, yours for
$138.00. Jack Fives, 2916 Rockrose Avenue,
Baltimore 15, Maryland.
SPARE TIME earnings with your tape recorder.
Make $100 weekly. Instructions 25e, refundable.
Valentine Sound, 4253 Farmdale, North Hollywood 2, California.
SYNCHRONIZER HOOKUP: Make sound movies
with your tape recorder, $10.00. Anderson, 2424
Phelps Street, Stockton, Calif.
PRECISION MAGNETIC heads, Erase- RecordPlayback. Stancil- Hoffman Corporation, Hollywood
38, California.
DISCS FROM your tape, $1.00 up. Send stamped
envelope for free list of services. Sales Recording
Service, 3540 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago 24. ill.
TAPE RECORDERS, tapes and accessories, nationally advertised brands. Free catalog upon request. Satisfaction guaranteed. Messner. 69 -02 A,
174 St., Flushing 65, New York.
"END -OF- REEL" automatic shutoff control, only
$4.95 postpaid USA. Money back guarantee. Designed and produced by Le Roi Engineering, Box
251, Elmhurst, Illinois.
FOR SALE: Hi -fi phono network -Components.
120 classical 12" LP's, 20 jazz 12" LP's. Everything like new -Best offer over $600. Call KEarny
2 -0434 or Write Rocco Femano, 372 Davis Ave..
Kearny, N. J.
WANTED: Bing Crosby material: transcription,
V discs, sound track, broadcasts, telecasts, guest
shots, promotion discs, publicity discs, unissued
songs, anything unusual by Bing Crosby on pressings, disc or tape. Also want old records. Harold
Sunners, Box 13, Brooklyn 4, N. Y.
FIVE 7" reels of Scotch recording tape, new condition, $10.00 postpaid; Timex Magnetic disk recorder, $30.00. Marilyn Phillips, 311 Penfield,
Rockford, Ill.
DISCS FROM your tapes. Write for prices. H. A.
Stenbcrg, Rr. I Box SS. Audubon. Iowa.
DIFFERENTI
RECORDED fun -filled TAPES
BOOK DEPARTMENT
G -1 RECORDER -phono assembly for cutting and
playing discs. Use with any amplifier or radio.
Like new. Instructions included. 515.00 F.O.B.
Clifton Droke, 637 Alabama Street, Bristol. Tenn.
LEARN HYPNOTISM from tape. Complete course.
$4.00. Free information. Drawer 697, Ruidoso.
New Mexico.
be inserted
DO YOU BELIEVE in the future of tape recording? Leading, established manufacturer in magnetic
recording industry needs a man who does -an
experienced. enthusiastic salesman to cover the
Washington -Philadelphia territory. Excellent opportunity. All replys confidental. Box B, Tape
Recording Magazine Severna Park, Md.
recording tape. Yimpant brand. Stare make
of your recorder -receive free sample. Bob
Freund, 56.D Bennett Avenue, New York 33,
N. Y.
H1-E1
"SAMPLER," only 99c
(Dual track, 8 or 15 minutes, state speed/
Lowest prices! Free lists)
HOUSE OF STONE
LUNENBURG 9, MASS.
TAPE RECORDERS & TAPES
EXCLUSIVES!
Te
Io,
Packaged In Cns.
Y Empty Cans.
Stnrape Choate.
7.
Metal (Tata,
FREE CATALOGUE:
CARSTON COMPANY, 215
E.
88,
New York 28
...now that
Why
use
ordinary
tape...
FERRO -SHEEN
costs you no more?
Irish
GREEN BAND
is now made by the exclusive
FERRO -SHEEN
process!
irish
is the exclusive irish tape manufacturing process which astounded the audio world
FERRO -SHEEN
when it was introduced 18 months ago and has rendered ordinary tape old- fashioned, if not obsolete. Irish FERRO -SHEEN
process tape has by far the smoothest, most firmly anchored
and most homogeneously bonded magnetic oxide coating of any
recording tape ever made. It ends your worries about wearing
out or gumming up your costly tape recorder heads with the
abrasive, easily shed oxide coating of ordinary tape. It gives
you unprecedented fidelity because the uniformity of oxide coating minimizes the danger of high- frequency losses in recording
and of print-through on the recorded reel during storage. It is
simply the best-engineered tape in the world.
GREEN
BAND
1200 feet
$350
The Only Premium. Quality
Tape at the Standard Price
If not available at your favorite dealer, write directly to
ORRADIO INDUSTRIES, INC.
World's Largest Exclusive Magnetic Tape Manufacturer
OPELIKA, ALABAMA
Export Divisions Morhon Exporting Corp., N.
In Canada: Atlas Radio Corp., Toronto
Y. C.
Discs made from "SCOTCH" Magnetic Tape masters
earn Capitol's Full Dimensional Sound Seal!
Capitol Record's Full Dimensional Sound Review Committee. Left to ri.{ht: Bob .11yers; Roy Du Nann, Supervising Recording
Engineer; Ed Uecke, Chief Electronics Engineer; Bill Miller and Francis Scott of the Capitol Artists and Repertoire Deportment.
You can thank the critical judgment of the five men
pictured above for the wonderful tone and fidelity of the
Capitol records you buy. They have the responsibility
of listening to every Capitol Classical LP master recording before it is released to the public ... appraising each
disc's dynamic range, performance, background noisein fact, judging it on eight critical points. Only the
recordings which meet all of this Committee's rigid
standards receive Capitol Record's famous gold stamp the Full Dimensional Sound Seal.
of- quality
Capitol Record's Full Dimensional Sound Review
Committee is unique in the recording field. But the mag-
...
netic tape the company uses for its original recordings is
the same favored by all leading record firms -"Scorch"
Magnetic Recording Tape. Only "Scorch" Brand makes
its own magnetic coatings. This means all magnetic particles are alive,
active ready to record
even the faintest sound
with perfect fidelity. No
wonder it's the largest selling magnetic tape in
-
the world!
The term "SCOTCH" and the plaid design are registered trademarks for Magnetic Tape made in U.S.A. by MINNESOTA ,r
MINING AND MFG. CO., St. Paul 6, Minn. Export Sales Office: 99 Park Avenue, New York 16, N.Y. 7 3M Co., 1956. i
i
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