1761-6.3, MicroLogix 1000 Programmable Controllers, User Manual

1761-6.3, MicroLogix 1000 Programmable Controllers, User Manual
Allen-Bradley
MicroLogix 1000
Programmable
Controllers
(Bulletin 1761 Controllers)
User
Manual
Important User Information
Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this publication, those
responsible for the application and use of this control equipment must satisfy
themselves that all necessary steps have been taken to assure that each application
and use meets all performance and safety requirements, including any applicable
laws, regulations, codes, and standards.
The illustrations, charts, sample programs and layout examples shown in this guide
are intended solely for purposes of example. Since there are many variables and
requirements associated with any particular installation, Allen-Bradley does not
assume responsibility or liability (to include intellectual property liability) for actual
use based on the examples shown in this publication.
Allen-Bradley publication SGI-1.1, Safety Guidelines for the Application,
Installation, and Maintenance of Solid-State Control (available from your local
Allen-Bradley office), describes some important differences between solid-state
equipment and electromechanical devices that should be taken into consideration
when applying products such as those described in this publication.
Reproduction of the contents of this copyrighted publication, in whole or in part,
without written permission of Allen-Bradley Company, Inc., is prohibited.
Throughout this manual, we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations:
Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to
personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss.
Attention statements help you to:
•
•
•
Note
identify a hazard
avoid the hazard
recognize the consequences
Identifies information that is critical for successful application and
understanding of the product.
SLC 500, SLC 5/01, SLC 5/02, SLC 5/03, SLC 5/04, MicroLogix, DTAM, DTAM Micro, PanelView, RediPANEL, Dataliner, DH+, and
Data Highway Plus are trademarks of Rockwell Automation.
PLC-2, PLC-5 are registered trademarks of Rockwell Automation.
A.I. Series and WINtelligent LINX are trademarks of Rockwell Software Inc.
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P–1
Who Should Use this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P–2
Purpose of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P–2
Common Techniques Used in this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P–6
Allen-Bradley Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P–6
Hardware
1
Installing Your Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–1
Compliance to European Union Directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–2
Hardware Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3
Master Control Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–4
Using Surge Suppressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8
Safety Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–11
Power Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–12
Preventing Excessive Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–13
Controller Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–14
Mounting the Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–14
2
Wiring Your Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–1
Grounding Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–2
Sinking and Sourcing Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–3
Wiring Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–4
Wiring Diagrams, Discrete Input and Output Voltage Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–7
Analog Cable Recommendation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–21
Minimizing Electrical Noise on Analog Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–21
Wiring Your Analog Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–22
Analog Voltage and Current Input and Output Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–23
Wiring Your Controller for High–Speed Counter Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–24
3
Connecting the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–1
Connecting the DF1 Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–2
Connecting to a DH-485 Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5
Connecting the AIC+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–9
toc–i
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Establishing Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–17
DeviceNet Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–18
Programming
4
Programming Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1
Principles of Machine Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–2
Understanding File Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–4
Understanding How Processor Files are Stored and Accessed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–6
Addressing Data Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–10
Applying Ladder Logics to Your Schematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14
Developing Your Logic Program – A Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–15
5
Using Analog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1
I/O Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–2
I/O Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3
Input Filter and Update Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3
Converting Analog Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–5
6
Using Basic Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–1
About the Basic Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–2
Bit Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–3
Examine if Closed (XIC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–4
Examine if Open (XIO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–4
Output Energize (OTE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5
Output Latch (OTL) and Output Unlatch (OTU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5
One-Shot Rising (OSR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–7
Timer Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–8
Timer On-Delay (TON) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11
Timer Off-Delay (TOF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–12
Retentive Timer (RTO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–14
Counter Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–15
Count Up (CTU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–18
Count Down (CTD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–19
Reset (RES) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–20
Basic Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–21
7
Using Comparison Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–1
About the Comparison Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–2
Comparison Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–2
toc–ii
Table of Contents
Equal (EQU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Not Equal (NEQ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less Than (LES) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less Than or Equal (LEQ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Greater Than (GRT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Greater Than or Equal (GEQ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Masked Comparison for Equal (MEQ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Limit Test (LIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comparison Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine Application Example . . . . . . . . .
7–3
7–3
7–3
7–4
7–4
7–4
7–5
7–6
7–8
8
Using Math Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–1
About the Math Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–2
Math Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–2
Add (ADD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–4
Subtract (SUB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–5
32-Bit Addition and Subtraction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–6
Multiply (MUL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–8
Divide (DIV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–9
Double Divide (DDV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–10
Clear (CLR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–11
Square Root (SQR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–11
Scale Data (SCL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–12
Math Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–14
9
Using Data Handling Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–1
About the Data Handling Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–2
Convert to BCD (TOD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–3
Convert from BCD (FRD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–5
Decode 4 to 1 of 16 (DCD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–8
Encode 1 of 16 to 4 (ENC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–9
Copy File (COP) and Fill File (FLL) Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–10
Move and Logical Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–13
Move (MOV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–15
Masked Move (MVM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–16
And (AND) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–18
Or (OR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–19
Exclusive Or (XOR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–20
Not (NOT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–21
Negate (NEG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–22
FIFO and LIFO Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–23
FIFO Load (FFL) and FIFO Unload (FFU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–25
LIFO Load (LFL) and LIFO Unload (LFU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–26
toc–iii
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Data Handling Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine Application Example . . . . . . 9–28
10
Using Program Flow Control Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–1
About the Program Flow Control Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–2
Jump (JMP) and Label (LBL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–2
Jump to Subroutine (JSR), Subroutine (SBR), and Return (RET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–4
Master Control Reset (MCR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–7
Temporary End (TND) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–8
Suspend (SUS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–8
Immediate Input with Mask (IIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–9
Immediate Output with Mask (IOM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–9
Program Flow Control Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine
Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–10
11
Using Application Specific Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–1
About the Application Specific Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–2
Bit Shift Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–3
Bit Shift Left (BSL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–5
Bit Shift Right (BSR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–6
Sequencer Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–7
Sequencer Output (SQO) and Sequencer Compare (SQC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–7
Sequencer Load (SQL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-13
Selectable Timed Interrupt (STI) Function Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–15
Selectable Timed Disable (STD) and Enable (STE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–18
Selectable Timed Start (STS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–20
Interrupt Subroutine (INT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–20
Application Specific Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine
Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–21
12
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–1
About the High-Speed Counter Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–2
High-Speed Counter Instructions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–3
High-Speed Counter (HSC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–6
High-Speed Counter Load (HSL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-18
High-Speed Counter Reset (RES) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–21
High-Speed Counter Reset Accumulator (RAC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–22
High-Speed Counter Interrupt Enable (HSE) and Disable (HSD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–23
Update High-Speed Counter Image Accumulator (OTE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–24
What Happens to the HSC When Going to REM Run Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–25
High-Speed Counter Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine
Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–29
toc–iv
Table of Contents
13
Using the Message Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–1
Types of Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–2
Message Instruction (MSG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–3
Timing Diagram for a Successful MSG Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–8
MSG Instruction Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–10
Application Examples that Use the MSG Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–12
Troubleshooting
14
Troubleshooting Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–1
Understanding the Controller LED Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–2
Controller Error Recovery Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–5
Identifying Controller Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–6
Calling Allen-Bradley for Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–10
Reference
A
Hardware Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–1
Controller Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–2
Controller Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–9
Replacement Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–10
B
Programming Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–1
Controller Status File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–1
Instruction Execution Times and Memory Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–21
C
Valid Addressing Modes and File Types for Instruction Parameters . . . . . . . . C–1
Available File Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C–2
Available Addressing Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C–3
D
Understanding the Communication Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–1
RS-232 Communication Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–2
DF1 Full-Duplex Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–3
DF1 Half-Duplex Slave Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–5
DH-485 Communication Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–11
toc–v
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
E
Application Example Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–1
Paper Drilling Machine Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–2
Time Driven Sequencer Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–17
Event Driven Sequencer Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–19
Bottle Line Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–21
Pick and Place Machine Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–24
RPM Calculation Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–28
On/Off Circuit Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–34
Spray Booth Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–36
Adjustable Timer Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–41
F
Optional Analog Input Software Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–1
Calibrating an Analog Input Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–2
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–1
toc–vi
Summary of Changes
Summary of Changes
The information below summarizes the changes to this manual since the last
printing as Publication 1761-6.3 — December 1997.
To help you find new information and updated information in this release of the
manual, we have included change bars as shown to the right of this paragraph.
New Information
The table below lists sections that document new features and additional
information about existing features, and shows where to find this new information.
For This New Information
See
Power supply inrush
page 1–13
Updated Information
Changes from the previous release of this manual that require you to reference
information differently are as follows:
•
•
•
•
The DeviceNet communications information has been updated; see chapter 3,
Connecting the System.
For updated information on automatic protocol switching, see chapter 3,
Connecting the System.
The MicroLogix 1000 programmable controllers’ VA ratings and power supply
inrush specifications have been updated; see appendix A, Hardware Reference.
The DF1 Full-Duplex and DH-485 configuration parameters have been updated;
see appendix D, Understanding Communication Protocols.
soc–i
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Notes:
soc–ii
Preface
Preface
Read this preface to familiarize yourself with the rest of the manual. It provides
information concerning:
•
•
•
•
who should use this manual
the purpose of this manual
conventions used in this manual
Allen-Bradley support
P–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Who Should Use this Manual
Use this manual if you are responsible for designing, installing, programming, or
troubleshooting control systems that use MicroLogix 1000 controllers.
You should have a basic understanding of electrical circuitry and familiarity with
relay logic. If you do not, obtain the proper training before using this product.
Purpose of this Manual
This manual is a reference guide for MicroLogix 1000 controllers. It describes the
procedures you use to install, wire, program, and troubleshoot your controller. This
manual:
•
•
•
•
explains how to install and wire your controllers
gives you an overview of the MicroLogix 1000 controller system
provides the MicroLogix 1000 controllers’ instruction set
contains application examples to show the instruction set in use
See your programming software user manual for information on programming your
MicroLogix 1000 controller. For information on using the Hand-Held Programmer
with the MicroLogix 1000 controllers, see the MicroLogix 1000 with Hand-Held
Programmer (HHP) User Manual, Publication 1761-6.2.
P–2
Preface
Contents of this Manual
Tab
Hardware
Programming
Troubleshooting
Chapter
Title
Contents
Preface
Describes the purpose, background, and scope
of this manual. Also specifies the audience for
whom this manual is intended.
1
Installing Your
Controller
Provides controller installation procedures and
system safety considerations.
2
Wiring Your Controller
Provides wiring guidelines and diagrams.
3
Connecting the System
Gives information on wiring your controller
system for the DF1 protocol or DH-485 network.
4
Programming Overview
Provides an overview of principles of machine
control, a section on file organization and
addressing, and a program development model.
5
Using Analog
Provides information on I/O image file format,
I/O configuration, input filter and update times,
and conversion of analog data.
6
Using Basic Instructions
Describes how to use ladder logic instructions
for relay replacement functions, counting, and
timing.
7
Using Comparison
Instructions
Describes how to use the instructions to
compare values of data in your ladder logic
program.
8
Using Math Instructions
Describes how to use the ladder logic
instructions that perform basic math functions.
9
Using Data Handling
Instructions
Describes how to perform data handling
instructions, including move and logical
instructions and FIFO and LIFO instructions.
10
Using Program Flow
Control Instructions
Describes the ladder logic instructions that affect
program flow and execution.
11
Using Application
Specific Instructions
Describes the bit shift, sequencer and STI
related instructions.
12
Using High-Speed
Counter Instructions
Describes the four modes of the high-speed
counter and its related instructions.
13
Using the Message
Instruction
Provides a general overview of the types of
communication, and explains how to establish
network communication using the message
instruction.
14
Troubleshooting Your
System
Explains how to interpret and correct problems
with your MicroLogix 1000 controller system.
P–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Tab
Chapter
Contents
Appendix A
Hardware Reference
Provides physical, electrical, environmental, and
functional specifications.
Appendix B
Programming
Reference
Explains the system status file and provides
instruction execution times.
Appendix C
Valid Addressing Modes
and File Types for
Instruction Parameters
Provides a listing of the instructions along with
their parameters and valid file types.
Appendix D
Understanding the
Communication
Protocols
Contains descriptions of the DF1 protocol and
DH-485 network.
Appendix E
Application Example
Programs
Provides advanced application examples for the
high-speed counter, sequencer, bit shift, and
message instructions.
Appendix F
Optional Analog Input
Software Calibration
Explains how to calibrate your controller using
software offsets.
Glossary
Contains definitions for terms and abbreviations
that are specific to this product.
Reference
R
f
c
P–4
Title
Preface
Related Documentation
The following documents contain additional information concerning Allen-Bradley
products. To obtain a copy, contact your local Allen-Bradley office or distributor.
For
A procedural manual for technical personnel
who use the Allen-Bradley Hand-Held
Programmer (HHP) to monitor and develop
control logic programs for the MicroLogix 1000
controller.
Read this Document
Document
Number
MicroLogix 1000 with Hand-Held
Programmer (HHP) User Manual
1761-6.2
MicroLogix 1000 Programmable
Controllers Installation Instructions
1761-5.1.2
MicroLogix 1000 (Analog)
Programmable Controllers Installation
Instructions
1761-5.1.3
The procedures necessary to install and
connect the AIC+ and DNI
Advanced Interface Converter (AIC+)
and DeviceNet Interface (DNI)
Installation Instructions
1761-5.11
A description on how to install and connect an
AIC+. This manual also contains information
on network wiring.
Advanced Interface Converter (AIC+)
User Manual
1761-6.4
Information on how to install, configure, and
commission a DNI
DeviceNet Interface User Manual
1761-6.5
In-depth information on grounding and wiring
Allen-Bradley programmable controllers
Allen-Bradley Programmable Controller
Grounding and Wiring Guidelines
1770-4.1
A description of important differences between
solid-state programmable controller products
and hard-wired electromechanical devices
Application Considerations for
Solid-State Controls
SGI-1.1
An article on wire sizes and types for
grounding electrical equipment
National Electrical Code
Published by
the National
Fire Protection
Association of
Boston, MA.
A complete listing of current documentation,
including ordering instructions. Also indicates
whether the documents are available on
CD-ROM or in multi-languages.
Allen-Bradley Publication Index
SD499
A glossary of industrial automation terms and
abbreviations
Allen-Bradley Industrial Automation
Glossary
AG-7.1
Information on understanding and applying
MicroLogix 1000 controllers
MicroMentor
1761-MMB
Information on mounting and wiring the
c
000 ccontrollers, including
c
MicroLogix
1000
a
mounting template for easy installation
P–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Common Techniques Used in this Manual
The following conventions are used throughout this manual:
Bulleted lists such as this one provide information, not procedural steps.
•
•
•
Numbered lists provide sequential steps or hierarchical information.
Italic type is used for emphasis.
Allen-Bradley Support
Allen-Bradley offers support services worldwide, with over 75 Sales/Support
Offices, 512 authorized Distributors and 260 authorized Systems Integrators located
throughout the United States alone, plus Allen-Bradley representatives in every
major country in the world.
Local Product Support
Contact your local Allen-Bradley representative for:
• sales and order support
•
•
•
product technical training
warranty support
support service agreements
Technical Product Assistance
If you need to contact Allen-Bradley for technical assistance, please review the
information in the Troubleshooting chapter first. Then call your local Allen-Bradley
representative.
Your Questions or Comments on this Manual
If you find a problem with this manual, or you have any suggestions for how this
manual could be made more useful to you, please contact us at the address below:
Allen-Bradley Company, Inc.
Control and Information Group
Technical Communication, Dept. 602V, T122
P.O. Box 2086
Milwaukee, WI 53201-2086
or visit our internet page at:
http://www.ab.com/micrologix
P–6
Installing Your Controller
This chapter shows you how to install your controller system. The only tools you
require are a Flat head or Phillips head screwdriver and drill. Topics include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
compliance to European Union Directives
hardware overview
master control relay
surge suppressors
safety considerations
power considerations
preventing excessive heat
controller spacing
mounting the controller
1–1
Hardware
1 Installing Your Controller
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Compliance to European Union Directives
If this product has the CE mark it is approved for installation within the European
Union and EEA regions. It has been designed and tested to meet the following
directives.
EMC Directive
This product is tested to meet Council Directive 89/336/EEC Electromagnetic
Compatibility (EMC) and the following standards, in whole or in part, documented
in a technical construction file:
•
•
EN 50081-2
EMC – Generic Emission Standard, Part 2 – Industrial Environment
EN 50082-2
EMC – Generic Immunity Standard, Part 2 – Industrial Environment
This product is intended for use in an industrial environment.
1–2
Installing Your Controller
The MicroLogix 1000 programmable controller is a packaged controller containing
a power supply, input circuits, output circuits, and a processor. The controller is
available in 10 I/O, 16 I/O and 32 I/O configurations, as well as an analog version
with 20 discrete I/O and 5 analog I/O.
The catalog number for the controller is composed of the following:
1761-L20AWA-5A
Bulletin Number
Analog I/O
Analog Circuits:
Inputs = 4
Outputs = 1
Base Unit
Unit I/O Count: 20
Input Signal:
A = 120V ac
B = 24V dc
Power Supply:
A = 120/240V ac
B = 24V dc
Output Type:
W = Relay
B = MOSFET
A = Triac
The hardware features of the controller are:
1
2
3
1
2
4
5
6
IN
POWER
RUN
FAULT
FORCE
3
Input terminals
dc output terminals (or not used)
Mounting hole
4
Input LEDs
5
Status LEDs
6
RS-232 communication channel
7
Output LEDs
8
Power supply line power
9
Ground screw
10
Output terminals
OUT
7
8
9
10
3
20142
1–3
Hardware
Hardware Overview
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Master Control Relay
A hard-wired master control relay (MCR) provides a reliable means for emergency
controller shutdown. Since the master control relay allows the placement of several
emergency-stop switches in different locations, its installation is important from a
safety standpoint. Overtravel limit switches or mushroom head push buttons are
wired in series so that when any of them opens, the master control relay is
de-energized. This removes power to input and output device circuits. Refer to the
figure on page 1–6.
Never alter these circuits to defeat their function, since serious injury and/or
machine damage could result.
Note
If you are using an external dc output power supply, interrupt the dc output side
rather than the ac line side of the supply to avoid the additional delay of power
supply turn-off.
The external ac line of the dc output power supply should be fused.
Connect a set of master control relays in series with the dc power supplying the
input and output circuits.
Place the main power disconnect switch where operators and maintenance personnel
have quick and easy access to it. If you mount a disconnect switch inside the
controller enclosure, place the switch operating handle on the outside of the
enclosure, so that you can disconnect power without opening the enclosure.
Whenever any of the emergency-stop switches are opened, power to input and
output devices should be removed.
When you use the master control relay to remove power from the external I/O
circuits, power continues to be provided to the controller’s power supply so that
diagnostic indicators on the processor can still be observed.
The master control relay is not a substitute for a disconnect to the controller. It is
intended for any situation where the operator must quickly de-energize I/O devices
only. When inspecting or installing terminal connections, replacing output fuses, or
working on equipment within the enclosure, use the disconnect to shut off power to
the rest of the system.
Note
1–4
Do not control the master control relay with the controller. Provide the operator
with the safety of a direct connection between an emergency-stop switch and the
master control relay.
Installing Your Controller
Using Emergency-Stop Switches
When using emergency-stop switches, adhere to the following points:
•
•
•
Do not program emergency-stop switches in the controller program. Any
emergency-stop switch should turn off all machine power by turning off the
master control relay.
Hardware
•
Observe all applicable local codes concerning the placement and labeling of
emergency-stop switches.
Install emergency-stop switches and the master control relay in your system.
Make certain that relay contacts have a sufficient rating for your application.
Emergency-stop switches must be easy to reach.
In the following illustration, input and output circuits are shown with MCR
protection. However, in most applications, only output circuits require MCR
protection.
1–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
The following illustrations show the Master Control Relay wired in a grounded
system.
Note
The illustrations only show output circuits with MCR protection. In most
applications input circuits do not require MCR protection; however, if you need to
remove power from all field devices, you must include MCR contacts in series with
input power wiring.
Schematic (Using IEC Symbols)
L1
L2
230V ac
Disconnect
Fuse
MCR
230V ac
I/O Circuits
Operation of either of these contacts will
remove power from the adapter external I/O
circuits, stopping machine motion.
Isolation
Transformer
X1
230V ac
Master Control Relay (MCR)
Cat. No. 700-PK400A1
Suppressor
Cat. No. 700-N24
X2
Emergency-Stop
Push Button
Fuse
Start
Overtravel
Limit Switch
Stop
MCR
Suppr.
MCR
MCR
230V ac
I/O Circuits
dc Power Supply.
Use IEC 950/EN 60950
—
(Lo)
MCR
(Hi)
Line Terminals: Connect to 230V ac
terminals of Power Supply.
1–6
+
Line terminals: Connect to 24V dc
terminals of Power Supply.
24V dc
I/O Circuits
Installing Your Controller
Schematic (Using ANSI/CSA Symbols)
L1
L2
230V ac
Fuse
MCR
230V ac
Output
Circuits
Operation of either of these contacts will
remove power from the adapter external I/O
circuits, stopping machine motion.
Isolation
Transformer
X1
115V ac
Fuse
X2
Emergency-Stop
Push Button
Overtravel
Limit Switch
Stop
Start
Master Control Relay (MCR)
Cat. No. 700-PK400A1
Suppressor
Cat. No. 700-N24
MCR
Suppr.
MCR
MCR
115V ac
Output
Circuits
dc Power Supply.
Use N.E.C. Class 2
for UL Listing.
+
—
(Lo)
MCR
24V dc
Output
Circuits
(Hi)
Line Terminals: Connect to 115V ac
terminals of Power Supply.
Line terminals: Connect to 24V dc
terminals of Power Supply.
1–7
Hardware
Disconnect
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Using Surge Suppressors
Inductive load devices such as motor starters and solenoids require the use of some
type of surge suppression to protect the controller output contacts. Switching
inductive loads without surge suppression can significantly reduce the lifetime of
relay contacts. By adding a suppression device directly across the coil of an
inductive device, you will prolong the life of the switch contacts. You will also
reduce the effects of voltage transients caused by interrupting the current to that
inductive device, and will prevent electrical noise from radiating into system wiring.
The following diagram shows an output with a suppression device. We recommend
that you locate the suppression device as close as possible to the load device.
+ dc or L1
VAC/VDC
Snubber
OUT 0
OUT 1
OUT 2
ac or dc
Outputs
OUT 3
OUT 4
OUT 5
OUT 6
OUT 7
dc COM or L2
COM
If you connect a micro controller FET output to an inductive load, we recommend
that you use an 1N4004 diode for surge suppression, as shown in the illustration that
follows.
+24V dc
VAC/VDC
OUT 0
OUT 1
OUT 2
Relay or Solid State
dc Outputs
OUT 3
OUT 4
IN4004 Diode
OUT 5
OUT 6
OUT 7
COM
1–8
24V dc common
Installing Your Controller
Hardware
Suitable surge suppression methods for inductive ac load devices include a varistor,
an RC network, or an Allen-Bradley surge suppressor, all shown below. These
components must be appropriately rated to suppress the switching transient
characteristic of the particular inductive device. See the table on page 1–10 for
recommended suppressors.
Surge Suppression for Inductive ac Load Devices
Output Device
Output Device
Output Device
Surge
Suppressor
RC Network
Varistor
If you connect a micro controller triac output to control an inductive load, we
recommend that you use varistors to suppress noise. Choose a varistor that is
appropriate for the application. The suppressors we recommend for triac outputs
when switching 120V ac inductive loads are a Harris MOV, part number V175
LA10A, or an Allen-Bradley MOV, catalog number 599-K04 or 599-KA04.
Consult the varistor manufacturer’s data sheet when selecting a varistor for your
application.
For inductive dc load devices, a diode is suitable. An 1N4004 diode is acceptable
for most applications. A surge suppressor can also be used. See the table on
page 1–10 for recommended suppressors.
As shown in the illustration below, these surge suppression circuits connect directly
across the load device. This reduces arcing of the output contacts. (High transient
can cause arcing that occurs when switching off an inductive device.)
Surge Suppression for Inductive dc Load Devices
+
—
Output Device
Diode
(A surge suppressor can also be used.)
1–9
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Recommended Surge Suppressors
We recommend the Allen-Bradley surge suppressors shown in the following table
for use with Allen-Bradley relays, contactors, and starters.
Device
1–10
Coil Voltage
Suppressor Catalog
Number
Bulletin 509 Motor Starter
Bulletin 509 Motor Starter
120V ac
240V ac
599-K04
599-KA04
Bulletin 100 Contactor
Bulletin 100 Contactor
120V ac
240V ac
199-FSMA1
199-FSMA2
Bulletin 709 Motor Starter
120V ac
1401-N10
Bulletin 700 Type R, RM Relays
ac coil
None Required
Bulletin 700 Type R Relay
Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay
12V dc
12V dc
700-N22
700-N28
Bulletin 700 Type R Relay
Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay
24V dc
24V dc
700-N10
700-N13
Bulletin 700 Type R Relay
Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay
48V dc
48V dc
700-N16
700-N17
Bulletin 700 Type R Relay
Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay
115-125V dc
115-125V dc
700-N11
700-N14
Bulletin 700 Type R Relay
Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay
230-250V dc
230-250V dc
700-N12
700-N15
Bulletin 700 Type N, P, or PK Relay
150V max, ac or DC
700-N24
Miscellaneous electromagnetic devices
limited to 35 sealed VA
150V max, ac or DC
700-N24
Installing Your Controller
Safety considerations are an important element of proper system installation.
Actively thinking about the safety of yourself and others, as well as the condition of
your equipment, is of primary importance. We recommend reviewing the following
safety considerations.
Disconnecting Main Power
Explosion Hazard — Do not replace components or disconnect equipment
unless power has been switched off and the area is known to be
non-hazardous.
The main power disconnect switch should be located where operators and
maintenance personnel have quick and easy access to it. In addition to
disconnecting electrical power, all other sources of power (pneumatic and hydraulic)
should be de-energized before working on a machine or process controlled by a
controller.
Safety Circuits
Explosion Hazard — Do not connect or disconnect connectors while circuit is
live unless area is known to be non-hazardous.
Circuits installed on the machine for safety reasons, like overtravel limit switches,
stop push buttons, and interlocks, should always be hard-wired directly to the master
control relay. These devices must be wired in series so that when any one device
opens, the master control relay is de-energized thereby removing power to the
machine. Never alter these circuits to defeat their function. Serious injury or
machine damage could result.
1–11
Hardware
Safety Considerations
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Power Distribution
There are some points about power distribution that you should know:
•
•
The master control relay must be able to inhibit all machine motion by
removing power to the machine I/O devices when the relay is de-energized.
If you are using a dc power supply, interrupt the load side rather than the ac line
power. This avoids the additional delay of power supply turn-off. The dc
power supply should be powered directly from the fused secondary of the
transformer. Power to the dc input and output circuits is connected through a
set of master control relay contacts.
Periodic Tests of Master Control Relay Circuit
Any part can fail, including the switches in a master control relay circuit. The
failure of one of these switches would most likely cause an open circuit, which
would be a safe power-off failure. However, if one of these switches shorts out, it
no longer provides any safety protection. These switches should be tested
periodically to assure they will stop machine motion when needed.
1–12
Installing Your Controller
Power Considerations
The following explains power considerations for the micro controllers.
Isolation Transformers
You may want to use an isolation transformer in the ac line to the controller. This
type of transformer provides isolation from your power distribution system and is
often used as a step down transformer to reduce line voltage. Any transformer used
with the controller must have a sufficient power rating for its load. The power
rating is expressed in volt-amperes (VA).
Power Supply Inrush
The MicroLogix power supply does not require or need a high inrush current.
However, if the power source can supply a high inrush current, the MicroLogix
power supply will accept it. There is a high level of inrush current when a large
capacitor on the input of the MicroLogix is charged up quickly.
If the power source cannot supply high inrush current, the only effect is that the
MicroLogix input capacitor charges up more slowly. The following considerations
determine whether the power source needs to supply a high inrush current:
•
•
•
power-up sequence of devices in system
power source sag if it cannot source inrush current
the effect of the voltage sag on other equipment
If the power source cannot provide high inrush current when the entire system in an
application is powered, the MicroLogix powers-up more slowly. If part of an
application’s system is already powered and operating when the MicroLogix is
powered, the source voltage may sag while the MicroLogix input capacitor is
charging. A power source voltage sag can affect other equipment connected to the
same power source. For example, a voltage sag may reset a computer connected to
the same power source.
1–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
The power supply is designed to withstand brief power losses without affecting the
operation of the system. The time the system is operational during power loss is
called “program scan hold-up time after loss of power.” The duration of the power
supply hold-up time depends on the type and state of the I/O, but is typically
between 20 milliseconds and 3 seconds. When the duration of power loss reaches
this limit, the power supply signals the processor that it can no longer provide
adequate dc power to the system. This is referred to as a power supply shutdown.
Input States on Power Down
The power supply hold-up time as described above is generally longer than the
turn-on and turn-off times of the inputs. Because of this, the input state change from
“On” to “Off” that occurs when power is removed may be recorded by the processor
before the power supply shuts down the system. Understanding this concept is
important. The user program should be written to take this effect into account.
Other Types of Line Conditions
Occasionally the power source to the system can be temporarily interrupted. It is
also possible that the voltage level may drop substantially below the normal line
voltage range for a period of time. Both of these conditions are considered to be a
loss of power for the system.
1–14
Hardware
Loss of Power Source
Installing Your Controller
Preventing Excessive Heat
For most applications, normal convective cooling keeps the controller within the
specified operating range. Ensure that the specified operating range is maintained.
Proper spacing of components within an enclosure is usually sufficient for heat
dissipation.
In some applications, a substantial amount of heat is produced by other equipment
inside or outside the enclosure. In this case, place blower fans inside the enclosure
to assist in air circulation and to reduce “hot spots” near the controller.
Additional cooling provisions might be necessary when high ambient temperatures
are encountered.
Note
Do not bring in unfiltered outside air. Place the controller in an enclosure to protect
it from a corrosive atmosphere. Harmful contaminants or dirt could cause improper
operation or damage to components. In extreme cases, you may need to use air
conditioning to protect against heat build-up within the enclosure.
1–15
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Controller Spacing
The following figure shows the recommended minimum spacing for the controller.
(Refer to appendix A for controller dimensions.)
Explosion Hazard — For Class I, Division 2 applications, this product must be
installed in an enclosure. All cables connected to the product must remain in
the enclosure or be protected by conduit or other means.
Top
B
A. Greater than or equal to 50.8 mm (2 in.).
Side
Side
A
A
Bottom
B. Greater than or equal to 50.8 mm (2 in.).
B
20142
Mounting the Controller
This equipment is suitable for Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D or
non-hazardous locations only, when product or packaging is marked.
Explosion Hazard:
• Substitution of components may impair suitability for Class I, Division 2.
• Be careful of metal chips when drilling mounting holes for your controller.
Drilled fragments that fall into the controller could cause damage. Do not
drill holes above a mounted controller if the protective wrap is removed.
The controller should be mounted horizontally within an enclosure, using a DIN rail
or mounting screws.
1–16
Installing Your Controller
Using a DIN Rail
Use 35 mm (1.38 in.) DIN rails, such as item number 199-DR1 or 1492-DR5 from
Bulletin 1492.
1. Mount your DIN rail. (Make sure that the
placement of the controller on the DIN rail
meets the recommended spacing
requirements. Refer to controller
dimensions in appendix A.)
2. Hook the top slot over the DIN rail.
3. While pressing the controller against the
rail, snap the controller into position.
4. Leave the protective wrap attached until you
are finished wiring the controller.
B
Side View
Protective Wrap
DIN
Rail
Mounting
Template
20146
Call-out
A
DIN
Rail
C
A
B
C
Dimension
84 mm (3.3 in.)
33 mm (1.3 in.)
16 mm (.63 in.)
To remove your controller from the DIN rail:
1. Place a screwdriver in the DIN rail latch at
the bottom of the controller.
2. Holding the controller, pry downward on
the latch until the controller is released
from the DIN rail.
Side View
DIN
Rail
20147
1–17
Hardware
To install your controller on the DIN rail:
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Using Mounting Screws
To install your controller using mounting screws:
Note Leave the protective wrap attached
until you are finished wiring the
controller.
Mounting
Template
1. Use the mounting template from
the MicroLogix 1000
Programmable Controllers
Installation Instructions,
publication 1761-5.1.2 or
MicroLogix 1000 (Analog)
Programmable Controllers
Installation Instructions,
publication 1761-5.1.3, that was
shipped with your controller.
2. Secure the template to the mounting
surface. (Make sure your controller
is spaced properly.)
3. Drill holes through the template.
4. Remove the mounting template.
5. Mount the controller.
Protective Wrap
(remove after wiring)
Mounting Your Controller Vertically
Your controller can also be mounted vertically within an enclosure using mounting
screws or a DIN rail. To insure the stability of your controller, we recommend using
mounting screws.
To insure the controller’s reliability, the following environmental specifications
must not be exceeded.
Top
A
Side
Side
A
A
Bottom
A
A. Greater than or equal
to 50.8 mm (2 in.).
Description:
Specification:
Operating
Temperature
Discrete: 0°C to +45°C (+32°F to +113°F)➀
Analog: 0°C to +40°C (+32°F to +113°F)➀
Operating Shock
(Panel mounted)
9.0g peak acceleration (11±1 ms duration)
3 times each direction, each axis
Operating Shock
(DIN rail mounted)
7.0g peak acceleration (11±1 ms duration)
3 times each direction, each axis
➀
DC input voltage derated linearly from +30°C (30V to 26.4V).
Note: When mounting your controller vertically, the nameplate should be facing
downward.
1–18
Wiring Your Controller
Hardware
2 Wiring Your Controller
This chapter describes how to wire your controller. Topics include:
•
•
•
•
grounding guidelines
sinking and sourcing circuits
wiring recommendations
wiring diagrams, input voltage ranges, and output voltage ranges
2–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Grounding Guidelines
In solid-state control systems, grounding helps limit the effects of noise due to
electromagnetic interference (EMI). Use the heaviest wire gauge listed for wiring
your controller with a maximum length of 152.4 mm (6 in.). Run the ground
connection from the ground screw of the controller (third screw from left on output
terminal rung) to the ground bus.
Note
This symbol denotes a functional earth ground terminal which provides a low
impedance path between electrical circuits and earth for non-safety purposes, such
as noise immunity improvement.
Protective
Wrap (remove after wiring)
All devices that connect to the user 24V power supply or to the RS-232 channel
must be referenced to chassis ground or floating. Failure to follow this
procedure may result in property damage or personal injury.
Chassis ground, user 24V ground, and RS-232 ground are internally
connected. You must connect the chassis ground terminal screw to chassis
ground prior to connecting any devices.
On the 1761-L10BWB, 1761-L16BWB, 1761-L16BBB, 1761-L20BWB-5A,
1761-L32BBB, and 1761-L32BWB controllers, the user supply 24 V dc IN and
chassis ground are internally connected.
You must also provide an acceptable grounding path for each device in your
application. For more information on proper grounding guidelines, see the
Industrial Automation Wiring and Grounding Guidelines publication 1770-4.1.
Remove the protective wrap before applying power to the controller. Failure
to remove the wrap may cause the controller to overheat.
2–2
Wiring Your Controller
Sinking and Sourcing Circuits
Any of the MicroLogix 1000 DC inputs can be configured as sinking or sourcing
depending on how the DC COM is wired on the MicroLogix.
Type
Definition
Sinking Input
The input energizes when high-level voltage is applied to the input terminal
(active high). Connect the power supply VDC (–) to the MicroLogix DC COM
terminal.
Sourcing Input
The input energizes when low-level voltage is applied to the input terminal
(active low). Connect the power supply VDC (+) to the MicroLogix DC COM
terminal.
Sinking and Sourcing Wiring Examples
1761-L32BWA (Wiring diagrams also apply to 1761-L20BWA-5A,
-L16BWA, -L10BWA.)
Sinking Inputs
Sourcing Inputs
14–30 VDC
VDC (+) for Sourcing
VDC (–) for Sourcing
VDC (+) for Sinking
VDC (–)
for Sinking
+ 24V –
DC OUT
DC
COM
I/0
I/1
I/2
I/3
DC
COM
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
I/11
I/12
I/13
I/14
I/15
I/16
I/17
I/18
I/19
Sinking Inputs
Sourcing Inputs
14–30 VDC
VDC (+)
VDC (–) for Sinking
for Sinking
VDC (–) for Sourcing
VDC (+)
for Sourcing
+ 24V –
DC OUT
DC
COM
I/0
I/1
I/2
I/3
DC
COM
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
I/11
I/12
I/13
I/14
I/15
I/16
I/17
I/18
I/19
2–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
1761-L32BWB, -L32BBB (Wiring Diagrams also apply to 1761-L20BWB-5A,
-L16BWB, -L10BWB, -L16BBB.)
Sinking Inputs
VDC (–) for Sinking
NOT
NOT DC
USED USED COM
14–30 VDC
VDC (+) for Sinking
I/0
I/1
I/2
I/3
Sourcing Inputs
14–30 VDC
VDC (–) for Sourcing
VDC (+) for Sourcing
DC
COM
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
14–30 VDC
NOT
NOT DC
USED USED COM
I/0
I/2
I/12
I/13
I/14
I/15
I/16
I/17
I/3
VDC (–) for Sinking
DC
COM
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
I/11
I/12
I/13
I/14
I/15
I/16
I/17
Before you install and wire any device, disconnect power to the controller
system.
The following are general recommendations for wiring your controller system.
Each wire terminal accepts 2 wires of the size listed below:
Wire Type
Wire Size (2 wire maximum per terminal screw)
Solid
#14 to #22 AWG
Stranded
#16 to #22 AWG
Refer to page 2–24 for wiring your high-speed counter.
2–4
I/19
VDC (+) for Sinking
Wiring Recommendations
•
I/18
14–30 VDC
VDC (–) for Sourcing
I/1
I/11
Sinking Inputs
Sourcing Inputs
VDC (+) for Sourcing
I/10
I/18
I/19
Wiring Your Controller
The diameter of the terminal screw heads is 5.5 mm (0.220 in.). The input and
output terminals of the micro controller are designed for the following spade lugs:
Call-out
C
E
L
W
X
C+X
Dimension
6.35 mm (0.250 in.)
10.95 mm (0.431 in.) maximum
14.63 mm (0.576 in.) maximum
6.35 mm (0.250 in.)
3.56 mm (0.140 in.)
9.91 mm (0.390 in.) maximum
Hardware
Note
We recommend using either of the following AMP spade lugs: part number
53120-1, if using 22–16 AWG, or part number 53123-1, if using 16–14 AWG.
Note
If you use wires without lugs, make sure the wires are securely captured by the
pressure plate. This is particularly important at the four end terminal positions
where the pressure plate does not touch the outside wall.
20148i
Be careful when stripping wires. Wire fragments that fall into the
controller could cause damage. Do not strip wires above a mounted
controller if the protective wrap is removed.
Protective
Wrap (remove after wiring)
2–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Calculate the maximum possible current in each power and common wire.
Observe all electrical codes dictating the maximum current allowable for
each wire size. Current above the maximum ratings may cause wiring to
overheat, which can cause damage.
United States Only: If the controller is installed within a potentially
hazardous environment, all wiring must comply with the requirements
stated in the National Electrical Code 501-4 (b).
•
•
Note
Route incoming power to the controller by a path separate from the device
wiring. Where paths must cross, their intersection should be perpendicular.
Do not run signal or communications wiring and power wiring in the same
conduit. Wires with different signal characteristics should be routed by separate
paths.
•
•
•
2–6
Allow for at least 50 mm (2 in.) between I/O wiring ducts or terminal strips and
the controller.
Separate wiring by signal type. Bundle wiring with similar electrical
characteristics together.
Separate input wiring from output wiring.
Label wiring to all devices in the system. Use tape, shrink-tubing, or other
dependable means for labeling purposes. In addition to labeling, use colored
insulation to identify wiring based on signal characteristics. For example, you
may use blue for dc wiring and red for ac wiring.
Hardware
Remove the protective wrap before applying power to the controller.
Failure to remove the wrap may cause the controller to overheat.
Wiring Your Controller
Wiring Diagrams, Discrete Input and Output Voltage
Ranges
The following pages show the wiring diagrams, discrete input voltage ranges, and
discrete output voltage ranges. Controllers with dc inputs can be wired as either
sinking or sourcing configurations. (Sinking and sourcing does not apply to ac
inputs.)
Note
This symbol denotes a functional earth ground terminal which provides a low
impedance path between electrical circuits and earth for non-safety purposes, such
as noise immunity improvement.
The 24V dc sensor power source should not be used to power output
circuits. It should only be used to power input devices (e.g. sensors,
switches). Refer to page 1–4 for information on MCR wiring in output
circuits.
1761-L16AWA Wiring Diagram
79–132V ac
79–132V ac
L2/N
NOT
NOT AC
USED USED COM
L1
I/0
I/1
VAC
VDC
O/0 VDC
L2/N
I/2
I/3
AC
COM
O/1
VAC
VDC
L1
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
O/4
O/5
CR
CR
85–264 VAC
L1
L2/N
VAC
VAC
VAC
O/2 VDC
O/3 VDC
CR
CR
VAC 2
VDC 1
VAC 2
COM
VAC 1
VAC 1
COM
VDC 2
VDC 1
COM
VDC 3
VDC 2
COM
VDC 3
COM
1761-L16AWA Input Voltage Range
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉ
0V ac
20V ac
Off
132V ac
79V ac
?
On
1761-L16AWA Output Voltage Range
0V ac 5V ac
0V dc 5V dc
?
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
2–7
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
1761-L32AWA Wiring Diagram
79–132V ac
79–132V ac
L2/N
NOT
NOT AC
USED USED COM
L1
I/0
I/1
I/2
VAC
VDC
O/0 VDC
L2/N
L1
I/3
AC
COM
I/4
I/5
O/1
VAC
VDC
O/2
O/3 VDC
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
O/4
O/5
O/6
CR
CR
CR
I/11
I/12
I/13
I/14
I/15
O/7 VDC
O/8
O/9
O/10 O/11
CR
CR
CR
I/16
I/17
I/18
I/19
85–264 VAC
L1
L2/N
VAC
CR
CR
VAC 2
VDC 1
VAC 2
COM
VAC 1
VAC
VAC
VDC 2
CR
CR
VDC 3
VDC 1
COM
VDC 2
COM
VDC 3
COM
VAC 1
COM
1761-L32AWA Input Voltage Range
0V ac
Off
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
132V ac
79V ac
20V ac
?
On
1761-L32AWA Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉ
0V ac
0V dc
5V ac
5V dc
?
2–8
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
Wiring Your Controller
1761-L10BWA Wiring Diagram (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–3 for additional configuration options.
VDC +
Hardware
14–30V dc
VDC VDC +
Com
VDC
Com
+ 24V –
DC OUT
DC
COM
I/0
I/1
I/2
I/3
DC
COM
I/4
O/1
VAC
VDC
O/2 VDC
I/5
NOT NOT NOT NOT
USED USED USED USED
85–264 VAC
L1
L2/N
VAC
VDC
VAC
O/0 VDC
VAC
CR
NOT
CR
VAC 2
VDC 1
VAC 2
COM
VAC 1
VDC 2
VDC 1
COM
NOT
NOT
O/3 USED USED USED
CR
CR
VDC 3
VDC 2
COM
VDC 3
COM
VAC 1
COM
1761-L10BWA Input Voltage Range
0V dc
0V dc
5V dc
5V dc
Off
14V dc
14V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
30V dc @ 30° C (86° F)
On
1761-L10BWA Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉ
0V ac 5V ac
0V dc 5V dc
?
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
2–9
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
1761-L16BWA Wiring Diagrams (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–3 for additional configuration options.
14–30V dc
VDC +
VDC
Com
VDC +
+ 24V –
DC OUT
DC
COM
I/0
I/1
I/2
I/3
DC
COM
I/4
VAC
VDC
VAC
VAC
O/1
O/2 VDC
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
O/3 VDC
O/4
O/5
CR
CR
CR
Hardware
VDC
Com
85–264 VAC
L1
L2/N
VAC
VDC
VAC
O/0 VDC
CR
VAC 2
VDC 1
VAC 2
COM
VAC 1
VDC 2
VDC 1
COM
VDC 3
VDC 2
COM
VDC 3
COM
VAC 1
COM
1761-L16BWA Input Voltage Range
0V dc
0V dc
5V dc
5V dc
Off
14V dc
14V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
30V dc @ 30° C (86° F)
On
1761-L16BWA Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉ
0V ac 5V ac
0V dc 5V dc
?
2–10
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
Wiring Your Controller
1761-L32BWA Wiring Diagram (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–3 for additional configuration options.
14-30 V dc
VDC +
VDC
Com
VDC +
+ 24V –
DC
COM
DC OUT
I/0
I/1
I/2
I/3
DC
COM
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
I/11
I/12
I/13
I/14
I/15
I/16
I/17
I/18
Hardware
VDC
Com
I/19
85–264 VAC
L1
VAC
VDC
L2/N
VAC
O/0 VDC
O/1
VAC
VDC
VAC
O/2
CR
VAC 2
O/4
O/5
O/6
O/7 VDC
CR
CR
CR
CR
CR
VDC 1
VAC 2
COM
VAC 1
VAC
O/3 VDC
VDC 2
O/8
O/9
CR
CR
O/10 O/11
CR
CR
VDC 3
VDC 1
COM
VDC 2
COM
VDC 3
COM
VAC 1
COM
1761-L32BWA Input Voltage Range
0V dc
0V dc
14V dc
14V dc
5V dc
5V dc
Off
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
30V dc @ 30° C (86° F)
On
1761-L32BWA Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉ
0V ac 5V ac
0V dc 5V dc
?
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
2–11
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
1761-L10BWB Wiring Diagram (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–4 for additional configuration options.
14–30 VDC
NOT
NOT DC
USED USED COM
DC IN
+ 24V –
I/0
VAC
VDC
14–30 VDC
VDC +
I/1
I/2
VDC VDC +
Com
DC
COM
I/3
VAC
O/0 VDC
VAC
VDC
O/1
I/4
I/5 NOT
USED
NOT NOT NOT
USED USED USED
NOT
VAC
O/2 VDC
Hardware
VDC
Com
NOT
NOT
O/3 USED USED USED
CR
CR
VAC 1
VDC 2
VAC 1
COM
VDC 1
VDC 3
VDC 2
COM
VDC 3
COM
VDC 1
COM
1761-L10BWB Input Voltage Range
0V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
5V dc
Off
14V dc
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
On
1761-L10BWB Output Voltage Range
0V ac
0V dc
5V ac
5V dc
ÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉ
?
2–12
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
Wiring Your Controller
1761-L16BWB Wiring Diagram (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–4 for additional configuration options.
14–30V dc
14–30V dc
NOT
NOT DC
USED USED COM
DC IN
+ 24V –
VDC +
I/0
I/1
I/2
VAC
VDC
O/0 VDC
VDC
Com
I/3
DC
COM
O/1
VAC
VDC
VAC
VDC +
I/4
I/5
VAC 1
I/8
I/9
VAC
VAC
O/3 VDC
O/4
O/5
CR
CR
CR
VDC 2
VAC 1
COM
I/7
O/2 VDC
CR
VDC 1
I/6
VDC 3
VDC 2
COM
Hardware
VDC
Com
VDC 4
VDC 3
COM
VDC 4
COM
VDC 1
COM
1761-L16BWB Input Voltage Range
0V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
5V dc
Off
14V dc
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
On
1761-L16BWB Output Voltage Range
0V ac
0V dc
5V ac
5V dc
ÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉ
?
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
2–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
1761-L32BWB Wiring Diagram (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–4 for additional configuration options.
Sinking Configuration
Sourcing Configuration
14–30V dc
14–30V dc
NOT
NOT DC
USED USED COM
DC IN
+ 24V –
VDC +
VDC +
I/0
I/1
I/2
VAC
VDC
O/0 VDC
I/3
DC
COM
I/4
I/5
O/1
VAC
VDC
O/2
VAC
VAC 1
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
O/3 VDC
O/4
O/5
O/6
O/7 VDC
CR
CR
CR
CR
CR
I/6
VAC
CR
VDC 2
VAC 1
COM
VDC 1
VDC
Com
I/11
I/12
I/13
I/14
I/15
O/8
O/9
O/10 O/11
CR
CR
I/16
I/17
I/18
I/19
VAC
VDC 3
CR
CR
VDC 4
VDC 2
COM
VDC 3
COM
VDC 4
COM
VDC 1
COM
1761-L32BWB Input Voltage Range
0V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
5V dc
Off
14V dc
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
On
1761-L32BWB Output Voltage Range
0V ac
0V dc
5V ac
5V dc
ÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉ
?
2–14
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
Hardware
VDC
Com
Wiring Your Controller
1761-L32AAA Wiring Diagram
79–132V ac
L2/N
NOT
NOT AC
USED USED COM
79–132V ac
L1
I/0
I/1
I/2
VAC
VDC
O/0 VDC
L2/N
L1
I/3
AC
COM
I/4
I/5
O/1
VAC
O/2
O/3 VAC
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
I/11
I/12
I/13
I/14
O/4
O/5
O/6
O/7 VAC
O/8
O/9
O/10 O/11
CR
CR
CR
CR
CR
CR
I/15
I/16
I/17
I/18
I/19
85–264 VAC
L1
L2/N
VAC
CR
CR
VAC 1
VAC 2
VAC 1
COM
VAC 0
VAC 3
VAC 2
COM
CR
CR
VAC 4
VAC 3
COM
VAC 4
COM
VAC 0
COM
1761-L32AAA Input Voltage Range
0V ac
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
20V ac
Off
132V ac
79V ac
?
On
1761-L32AAA Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
0V ac
85V ac
?
264V ac
Operating Range
2–15
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
1761-L16BBB Wiring Diagrams (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–4 for additional configuration options.
14–30V dc
NOT
NOT DC
USED USED COM
14–30V dc
VDC +
I/0
I/1
I/2
O/0
VAC
VDC
VDC
Com
I/3
DC
COM
O/1
DC
24V+
VDC +
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
O/5
DC
24V–
NOT
USED
Hardware
VDC
Com
Sourcing Outputs
DC IN
+ 24V –
VAC
VDC
O/2
O/3
O/4
CR
VAC 1
VAC 2
VAC 1
COM
VDC 1
VDC 2
VAC 2
COM
VDC 2
COM
VDC 1
COM
1761-L16BBB Input Voltage Range
0V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
5V dc
Off
14V dc
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
On
1761-L16BBB Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
0V dc
20.4V dc
?
2–16
26.4V dc
Operating Range
Wiring Your Controller
1761-L32BBB Wiring Diagram (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–4 for additional configuration options.
Sinking Configuration
Sourcing Configuration
14–30V dc
14–30V dc
VDC
Com
NOT
NOT DC
USED USED COM
VDC +
VDC +
I/0
I/1
I/2
O/0
VAC
VDC
I/3
DC
COM
O/1
DC
24V+
VDC
Com
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
I/11
I/12
I/13
I/14
I/15
O/8
O/9
O/10 O/11 24V–
DC
NOT
USED
I/16
I/17
I/18
I/19
Sourcing Outputs
DC IN
+ 24V –
VAC
VDC
O/2
O/3
O/4
O/5
O/6
O/7
CR
VAC 1
VAC 2
VAC 1
COM
VDC 1
VDC 2
VAC 2
COM
VDC 2
COM
VDC 1
COM
1761-L32BBB Input Voltage Range
0V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
14V dc
5V dc
Off
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
On
1761-L32BBB Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
0V dc
20.4V dc
?
26.4V dc
Operating Range
2–17
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
1761-L20AWA-5A Wiring Diagram
Note: Refer to pages 2–21 through 2–23 for additional information on analog
wiring.
79–132V ac
NOT
NOT AC
USED USED COM
L1
I/0
I/1
Analog
Channels
79–132V ac
L2/N
I/2
L2/N
I/3
AC
COM
L1
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
I/11
IA
SHD
IA/0
V (+)
IA/1
V (+)
IA
(–)
IA
SHD
IA/2
I (+)
IA/3
I (+)
IA
(–)
85–264 VAC
L1
L2/N
VAC
VDC
VAC
O/0 VDC
O/1
VAC
VDC
CR
VAC
O/2
NOT
O/3 VDC
CR
OA
O/4
O/5
O/6
O/7 USED SHD
CR
CR
CR
CR
OA/0
V (+)
OA/0
I (+)
OA
(–)
Analog
Channel
VAC 2
VDC 1
VAC 2
COM
VAC 1
VDC 2
VDC 1
COM
VDC 2
COM
VAC 1
COM
1761-L20AWA-5A Input Voltage Range
0V ac
Off
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
132V ac
79V ac
20V ac
?
On
1761-L20AWA-5A Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉ
0V ac
0V dc
5V ac
5V dc
?
2–18
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
Wiring Your Controller
1761-L20BWA-5A Wiring Diagram (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–3 for additional discrete configuration options.
Refer to pages 2–21 through 2–23 for additional information on analog
wiring.
Analog
Channels
14–30V dc
VDC (–)
VDC (+)
VDC (+)
VDC (–)
+ 24V –
DC
COM
DC OUT
I/0
I/1
I/2
I/3
DC
COM
I/4
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/8
I/9
I/10
I/11
IA
SHD
IA/1
V (+)
IA/0
V (+)
IA
(–)
IA
SHD
IA/2
I (+)
IA/3
I (+)
IA
(–)
85–264 VAC
L1
VAC
VDC
L2/N
VAC
O/0 VDC
O/1
VAC
VDC
CR
VAC
O/2
NOT
OA
O/3 VDC
O/4
O/5
O/6
O/7 USED SHD
CR
CR
CR
CR
CR
OA/0
V (+)
OA/0
I (+)
OA
(–)
Analog
Channel
VAC 2
VDC 1
VDC 1
COM
VAC 2
COM
VAC 1
VDC 2
VDC 2
COM
VAC 1
COM
1761-L20BWA-5A Discrete Input Voltage Range
0V dc
0V dc
5V dc
5V dc
Off
14V dc
14V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
30V dc @ 30° C (86° F)
On
1761-L20BWA-5A Relay Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉ
0V ac 5V ac
0V dc 5V dc
?
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
2–19
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
1761-L20BWB-5A Wiring Diagram (Sinking Input Configuration)
Note: Refer to page 2–4 for additional discrete configuration options.
Refer to pages 2–21 through 2–23 for additional information on analog
wiring.
14–30V dc
VDC (–)
NOT
NOT DC
USED USED COM
I/0
DC IN
+ 24V –
VAC
VDC
I/1
Analog
Channels
14–30V dc
VDC (–)
VDC +
I/2
I/3
DC
COM
VAC
O/0 VDC
O/1
VDC (+)
I/4
VAC
VDC
CR
I/5
I/6
I/7
I/9
I/8
I/10
VAC
O/2
I/11
NOT
IA
SHD
OA
O/3 VDC
O/4
O/5
O/6
O/7 USED SHD
CR
CR
CR
CR
CR
IA/0
V (+)
IA/1
V (+)
OA/0
V (+)
OA/0
I (+)
IA
(–)
IA
SHD
IA/2
I (+)
IA/3
I (+)
IA
(–)
OA
(–)
Analog
Channel
VAC 1
VDC 2
VAC 1
COM
VDC 1
VDC 3
VDC 2
COM
VDC 3
COM
VDC 1
COM
1761-L20BWB-5A Discrete Input Voltage Range
0V dc
5V dc
Off
14V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
?
26.4V dc @ 55° C (131° F)
On
1761-L20BWB-5A Relay Output Voltage Range
ÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉ
0V ac 5V ac
0V dc 5V dc
?
2–20
264V ac
125V dc
Operating Range
Wiring Your Controller
Minimizing Electrical Noise on Analog Controllers
Inputs on analog employ digital high frequency filters that significantly reduce the
effects of electrical noise on input signals. However, because of the variety of
applications and environments where analog controllers are installed and operating,
it is impossible to ensure that all environmental noise will be removed by the input
filters.
Several specific steps can be taken to help reduce the effects of environmental noise
on analog signals:
• install the MicroLogix 1000 system in a properly rated (i.e., NEMA) enclosure.
Make sure that the MicroLogix 1000 system is properly grounded.
• use Belden cable #8761 for wiring the analog channels making sure that the
drain wire and foil shield are properly earth grounded at one end of the cable.
• route the Belden cable separate from any other wiring. Additional noise
immunity can be obtained by routing the cables in grounded conduit.
A system may malfunction due to a change in the operating environment after a
period of time. We recommend periodically checking system operation, particularly
when new machinery or other noise sources are installed near the MicroLogix 1000
system.
Grounding Your Analog Cable
Use shielded communication cable (Belden #8761). The Belden cable has two
signal wires (black and clear), one drain wire and a foil shield. The drain wire and
foil shield must be grounded at one end of the cable. Do not earth ground the drain
wire and foil shield at both ends of the cable.
Foil Shield
Insulation
Black Wire
Clear Wire
Drain Wire
2–21
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Wiring Your Analog Channels
Analog input circuits can monitor current and voltage signals and convert
them to serial digital data. The analog output can support either a voltage or
a current function.
Sensor 2
Sensor 3
(V) Voltage
(I) Current
Sensor 1
Sensor 4
(I) Current
(V) Voltage
Jumper
unused
inputs.
I/10
I/11
IA
SHD
IA/0
V (+)
VAC
VDC
O/4
O/5
O/6
IA/1
V (+)
IA
(–)
IA
SHD
IA/2
I (+)
IA/3
I (+)
IA
(–)
NOT
OA
OA/0
V (+)
OA/0
I (+)
OA
(–)
O/7 USED SHD
– OR –
You can configure either voltage
or current output operation.
meter
For increased noise immunity, connect a ground wire directly from the
shield terminals to chassis ground.
Important: The controller does not provide loop power for analog inputs.
Use a power supply that matches the transmitter specifications.
2-Wire Transmitter
Power
Supply
+
–
3-Wire Transmitter
Power
Supply
2–22
+
–
+
–
Controller
IA/0 – 3 (+)
IA (–)
Transmitter
Supply
Signal
GND
+
–
4-Wire Transmitter
Power
Supply
Transmitter
Transmitter
Supply
Signal
+
–
+
–
Controller
IA/0 – 3 (+)
IA (–)
Controller
IA/0 – 3 (+)
IA (–)
Wiring Your Controller
Analog Voltage and Current Input and Output Ranges
Analog Voltage Input Range
–10.5V dc
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
–24V dc
Underrange
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
10.5V dc
Operating Range
24V dc
Overrange
Analog Current Input Range
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
–21 mA
–50 mA
Underrange
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
21 mA
50 mA
Overrange
Operating Range
The analog voltage inputs are protected to withstand the application of 24V dc
without damage to the controller. The analog current inputs are protected to
withstand the application of 50 mA without damage.
Note
Analog Voltage Output Range
0V dc
10V dc
Operating Range
Analog Current Output Range
20 mA
4 mA
Operating Range
Note
The analog outputs are protected to withstand the short circuiting of the voltage or
current outputs without damage to the controller.
For information on analog signal and data word values using the nominal
transfer function formula, see page 5–5.
2–23
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
To wire the controller for high-speed counter applications use input terminals I/0,
I/1, I/2, and I/3. Refer to chapter 12 for information on using the high-speed
counter.
Shielded cable is required for high-speed input signals 0–3 when the filter setting is
set to either 0.10 ms or 0.075 ms. We recommend Belden #9503 or equivalent for
lengths up to 305 m (1000 ft). Shields should be grounded only at the signal source
end of the cable. Ground the shield to the case of the signal source, so energy
coupled to the shield will not be delivered to signal source’s electronics.
2–24
Hardware
Wiring Your Controller for High-Speed Counter
Applications
Connecting the System
This chapter describes how to wire your controller system. The method you use and
cabling required to connect your controller depends on what type of system you are
employing. This chapter also describes how the controller establishes
communication with the appropriate network.
For information on:
See page:
DF1 protocol connections
3–2
DH-485 network connections
3–5
Establishing communication
3–17
3–1
Hardware
3 Connecting the System
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Connecting the DF1 Protocol
There are two ways to connect the MicroLogix 1000 programmable controller to
your personal computer using the DF1 protocol: using an isolated point-to-point
connection, or using a modem. Descriptions of these methods follow.
Chassis ground, user 24V ground, and RS-232 ground are internally
connected. You must connect the chassis ground terminal screw to chassis
ground prior to connecting any devices. It is important that you understand
your personal computer’s grounding system before connecting to the
controller. An optical isolator is recommended between the controller and
your personal computer.
Making an Isolated Point-to-Point Connection
You can connect the MicroLogix 1000 programmable controller to your personal
computer using a serial cable from your personal computer’s serial port to the micro
controller.
Optical Isolator➀
(recommended)
Micro Controller
1761-CBL-PM02
Personal Computer
➀ We recommend using an AIC+, catalog number 1761-NET-AIC, as your optical isolator. See page 3–11 for
specific AIC+ cabling information.
3–2
Connecting the System
1761-CBL-PM02 Series B Cable
Hardware
5
4
3
2
1
9
8
7
6
8-pin Mini Din
9-pin D-shell
6 78
3
4
5
12
Programming Device
9-Pin
RI
9
Controller
8-Pin
24V
1
8
CTS
GND
2
7
RTS
RTS
3
6
DSR
RXD
4
5
GND
DCD
5
4
DTR
CTS
6
TXD
TXD
7
2
RXD
GND
8
1
DCD
3
20187
Using a Modem
You can also use modems to connect a personal computer to one MicroLogix 1000
controller (using DF1 full-duplex protocol) or to multiple controllers (using DF1
half-duplex protocol), as shown in the illustration that follows. Do not attempt to
use DH-485 protocol through modems under any circumstance. (For information on
types of modems you can use with the micro controllers, see page D–9.)
3–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Modem
Cable
Personal Computer
Modem
DF1 full-duplex protocol (to 1 controller)
DF1 half-duplex master protocol (to multiple controllers)
Optical Isolator➀
(recommended)
Micro Controller
1761-CBL-PM02
Modem
DF1 full-duplex protocol or
DF1 half-duplex slave protocol
Programming
Device
Modem Cable
Modem
1761-CBL-PM02 Cable
Modem
Null Modem Optical Isolator➀ 9-pin
8-pin Mini Din
Controller
➀ We recommend using an AIC+, catalog number 1761-NET-AIC, as your optical isolator. See page 3–11 for
specific AIC+ cabling information.
Constructing Your Own Null Modem Cable
If you construct your own null modem cable, the maximum cable length is 15.24 m
(50 ft) with a 25-pin or 9-pin connector. Refer to the following typical pinout:
Optical Isolator
9-Pin
TXD
TXD
2
3
2
RXD
RXD
3
2
5
GND
GND
7
5
1
CD
CD
8
1
4
DTR
DTR
20
4
6
DSR
DSR
6
6
8
CTS
CTS
5
8
RTS
RTS
4
7
7
3–4
Modem
25-Pin
9-Pin
3
Connecting the System
Connecting to a DH-485 Network
Note
Only Series C or later MicroLogix 1000 discrete controllers and all MicroLogix
1000 analog controllers support DH-485 network connections.
Hardware
PC
MicroLogix 1000 (Series C or later
discrete or MicroLogix 1000 analog)
APS
1761-CBL-AM00
or
1761-CBLHM02
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
PC to port 1
or port 2
connection from
port 1 or port 2
to MicroLogix
1761-CBL-AP00
or
1761-CBL-PM02
1761-CBL-AP00
or
1761-CBL-PM02
24V dc
(user supply needed if not connected
to a MicroLogix 1000 controller)
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
24V dc
(user supplied)
MicroLogix DH-485 Network
1747-CP3
or
1761-CBL-AC00
DB-9 RS-232 port
mini-DIN 8 RS-232 port
DH-485 port
Recommended Tools
To connect a DH-485 network, you need tools to strip the shielded cable and to
attach the cable and terminators to the AIC+ Advanced Interface Converter. We
recommend the following equipment (or equivalent):
Description
Part Number
Manufacturer
Shielded Twisted Pair Cable
#3106A or #9842
Belden
Stripping Tool
45-164
Ideal Industries
1/8 ” Slotted Screwdriver
Not Applicable
Not Applicable
3–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
DH-485 Communication Cable
The suggested DH-485 communication cable is either Belden #3106A or #9842.
The cable is jacketed and shielded with one or two twisted wire pairs and a drain
wire.
One pair provides a balanced signal line, and one additional wire is used for a
common reference line between all nodes on the network. The shield reduces the
effect of electrostatic noise from the industrial environment on network
communication.
The communication cable consists of a number of cable segments daisy-chained
together. The total length of the cable segments cannot exceed 1219 m (4000 ft).
When cutting cable segments, make them long enough to route them from one AIC+
to the next with sufficient slack to prevent strain on the connector. Allow enough
extra cable to prevent chafing and kinking in the cable.
Use these instructions for wiring the Belden #3106A or #9842 cable. (If you are
using standard Allen-Bradley cables, see the Cable Selection Guide on page 3–12.)
3–6
Connecting the System
Connecting the Communication Cable to the DH-485 Connector
A daisy-chained network is recommended. We do not recommend the following:
Belden
#3106A or
#9842
Belden
#3106A or
#9842
Belden
#3106A or
#9842
Hardware
Note
Connector
Connector
Connector
Incorrect
Single Cable Connection
Orange with White Stripes
White with Orange Stripes
Shrink Tubing
Recommended
Blue (#3106A) or
Blue with White Stripes (#9842)
6 Termination
5
A
4
B
3 Common
2 Shield
1 Chassis Ground
Drain Wire
Multiple Cable Connection
to Previous Device
to Successive Device
3–7
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
The table below shows connections for Belden #3106A.
For this Wire/Pair
Connect this Wire
To this Terminal
Shield/Drain
Non-jacketed
Terminal 2 – Shield
Blue
Blue
Terminal 3 – (Common)
White with Orange Stripe
Terminal 4 – (Data B)
Orange with White Stripe
Terminal 5 – (Data A)
White/Orange
The table below shows connections for Belden #9842.
For this Wire/Pair
Shield/Drain
Connect this Wire
To this Terminal
Non-jacketed
Terminal 2 – Shield
White with Blue Stripe
Cut back – no connection➀
Blue with White Stripe
Terminal 3 – (Common)
White with Orange Stripe
Terminal 4 – (Data B)
Orange with White Stripe
Terminal 5 – (Data A)
Blue/White
White/Orange
➀ To prevent confusion when installing the communication cable, cut back the white with blue stripe wire
immediately after the the insulation jacket is removed. This wire is not used by DH-485.
Grounding and Terminating the DH-485 Network
Only one connector at the end of the link must have Terminals 1 and 2 jumpered
together. This provides an earth ground connection for the shield of the
communication cable.
Both ends of the network must have Terminals 5 and 6 jumpered together. This
connects the termination impedance (of 120Ω) that is built into each AIC+ as
required by the DH-485 specification.
End-of-Line Termination
Jumper
Jumper
Belden #3106A or #9842 Cable
1219 m (4000 ft) Maximum
Jumper
3–8
Connecting the System
Connecting the AIC+
Only Series C or later MicroLogix 1000 discrete controllers and all MicroLogix
1000 analog controllers support DH-485 connections with the AIC+.
You can connect an unpowered AIC+, catalog number 1761-NET-AIC, to the
network without disrupting network activity. In addition, if a MicroLogix 1000
controller powers an AIC+ that is connected to the network, network activity will
not be disrupted should the MicroLogix 1000 controller be removed from the AIC+.
The figure that follows shows the external wiring connections and specifications of
the AIC+.
AIC+ Advanced Interface Converter
(1761-NET-AIC)
Item
Description
Port 1 – DB-9 RS-232, DTE
Port 2 – mini-DIN 8 RS-232
Port 3 – DH-485 Phoenix plug
DC Power Source selector switch
(cable = port 2 power source, external = external power source connected to item 5)
Terminals for external 24V dc power supply and chassis ground
For additional information on connecting the AIC+, see the Advanced Interface
Converter (AIC+) and DeviceNet Interface (DNI) Installation Instructions,
Publication 1761-5.11.
3–9
Hardware
Note
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
DF1 Isolated Point-to-Point Connection
1761-CBL-AM00
or
1761-CBL-HM02
MicroLogix 1000
PC
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
Selection Switch Up
24V dc
(Not needed in this
configuration since the
MicroLogix 1000 provides
power to the AIC+ via port 2.)
1747-CP3 or 1761-CBL-AC00
DH-485 Network Connection
PC
MicroLogix 1000 (Series C or later discrete and all analog)
APS
1761-CBL-AM00
or
1761-CBLHM02
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
PC to port 1
or port 2
connection from
port 1 or port 2
to MicroLogix
1761-CBL-AP00
or
1761-CBL-PM02
1761-CBL-AP00
or
1761-CBL-PM02
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
24V dc
(user supply needed if not connected
to a MicroLogix 1000 controller)
MicroLogix DH-485 Network
DB-9 RS-232 port
mini-DIN 8 RS-232 port
DH-485 port
3–10
24V dc
(user supplied)
1747-CP3
or
1761-CBL-AC00
Connecting the System
DF1 Isolated Modem Connection
1761-CBL-AM00
or
1761-CBL-HM02
MicroLogix 1000
Modem
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
Selection Switch Up
24V dc
(Not needed in this configuration
since the MicroLogix 1000 provides
power to the AIC+ via port 2.)
User supplied modem cable
For additional information on connections using the AIC+, see the Advanced
Interface Converter (AIC+) and DeviceNet Interface (DNI) Installation Instructions,
Publication 1761-5.11.
Constructing Your Own Modem Cable
If you construct your own modem cable, the maximum cable length is 15.24 m (50
ft) with a 25-pin or 9-pin connector. Refer to the following typical pinout:
AIC+
Optical Isolator
Modem
25-Pin
9-Pin
9-Pin
3
TXD
TXD
2
3
2
RXD
RXD
3
2
5
GND
GND
7
5
1
CD
CD
8
1
4
DTR
DTR
20
4
6
DSR
DSR
6
6
8
CTS
CTS
5
8
RTS
RTS
4
7
7
3–11
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Cable Selection Guide
1747-CP3
Cable
to AIC+
External
Power Supply
Required➁
SLC 5/03 or SLC 5/04 processor, channel 0
port 1
yes
external
PC COM port
port 1
yes
external
PanelView 550 through NULL modem adapter
port 1
yes
external
DTAM Plus / DTAM Micro
port 1
yes
external
Port 1 on another AIC+
port 1
yes
external
to AIC+
External
Power Supply
Required➀
SLC 500 Fixed,
SLC 5/01, SLC 5/02, and SLC 5/03 processors
port 3
yes
external
PanelView 550 RJ45 port
port 3
yes
external
to AIC+
External
Power Supply
Required
MicroLogix 1000
port 2
no
cable
to port 2 on another AIC+
port 2
yes
external
Length
1747-CP3
7 7C
1761-CBL-AC00
76 C
C00➀
Connections from
3m (9.8
9 ft)
f
45 cm
c (17.7
7 7 in)
Power Selection
Switch Setting➁
1761-CBL-AS09
1761-CBL-AS03
Cable
1761-CBL-AS03
1761-CBL-AS09
Length
Connections from
3m (9.8 ft)
9.5m (31.17 ft)
Power Selection
Switch Setting➀
➁
1761-CBL-HM02
1761-CBL-AM00
Cable
1761-CBL-AM00
76 C
00
1761-CBL-HM02➁
3–12
Length
Connections from
45 cm
c (17.7
7 7 in)
2 (6.5
2m
6 ft)
f
Power Selection
Switch Setting
➀
External power supply required unless the AIC+ is powered by the device connected to port 2, then
the selection switch should be set to cable.
➁
Series B or higher cables are required for hardware handshaking.
Hardware
1761-CBL-AC00
Connecting the System
➁
1761-CBL-AP00
Cable
1761-CBL-AP00
76 C
00
1761-CBL-PM02➁
1761-CBL-PM02
Length
Connections from
45 cm
c (17.7
7 7 in)
2 (6.5
2m
6 ft)
f
to AIC+
SLC 5/03 or SLC 5/04 processors, channel 0
port 2
MicroLogix 1000
PanelView 550 through NULL modem adapter
DTAM Plus / DTAM Micro
PC COM port
External
Power Supply
Required
Power Selection
Switch Setting
port 1
yes
yes➀
external
external➀
port 2
yes
external
port 2
yes
external
port 2
yes
external
to AIC+
External
Power Supply
Required
port 1
yes➀
user supplied cable
Cable
straight 9–25 pin
Length
––
Connections from
modem or other communication device
Power Selection
Switch Setting
external➀
➀
External power supply required unless the AIC+ is powered by the device connected to port 2, then
the selection switch should be set to cable.
➁
Series B or higher cables are required for hardware handshaking.
3–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Recommended User-Supplied Components
These components can be purchased from your local electronics supplier.
Recommended Model
power supply rated for 20.4–28.8V dc
NULL modem adapter
standard AT
straight 9–25 pin RS-232 cable
see table below for port information if making own cables
DB-9 RS-232 Port 1
DH-485 connector Port 3
1761-CBL-AP00 or 1761-CBL-PM02
cable straight D connector
Port 2➀
(1761-CBL-PM02 cable)
Port 1
DB-9 RS-232
Pin
Hardware
Component
external power supply and chassis
ground
Port 3
DH-485 Connector
received line signal detector (DCD)
same state as port 1’s DCD signal
chassis ground
received data (RxD)
received data (RxD)
cable shield
transmitted data (TxD)
transmitted data (TxD)
signal ground
DTE ready (DTR)➁
DTE ready (DTR)➂
DH-485 data B
signal common (GRD)
signal common (GRD)
DH-485 data A
DCE ready (DSR)➁
DCE ready (DSR)➂
termination
request to send (RTS)
request to send (RTS)
not applicable
clear to send (CTS)
clear to send (CTS)
not applicable
not applicable
not applicable
not applicable
➀
An 8-pin mini DIN connector is used for making connections to port 2. This connector is not
commercially available. If you are making a cable to connect to port 2, you must configure your
cable to connect to the Allen-Bradley cable shown above.
➁ On port 1, pin 4 is electronically jumpered to pin 6. Whenever the AIC+ is powered on, pin 4 will
match the state of pin 6.
➂ In the 1761-CBL-PM02 cable, pins 4 and 6 are jumpered together within the DB-9 connector.
3–14
Connecting the System
Powering the AIC+
If you use an external power supply, it must be 24V dc. Permanent damage
will result if miswired with the wrong power source.
Set the DC Power Source selector switch to EXTERNAL before connecting the
power supply to the AIC+.
Bottom View
24VDC
DC
NEUT
CHS
GND
Always connect the CHS GND (chassis ground) terminal to the nearest earth
ground. This connection must be made whether or not an external 24V dc
supply is used.
In normal operation with the MicroLogix 1000 programmable controller connected
to port 2 of the AIC+, the controller powers the AIC+. Any AIC+ not connected to
a controller requires a 24V dc power supply. The AIC+ requires 104 mA at 24V dc.
If both the controller and external power are connected to the AIC+, the power
selection switch determines what device powers the AIC+.
3–15
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Power Options
•
•
Use the 24V dc user power supply (200 mA maximum) built into the
MicroLogix controller. The AIC+ is powered through a hard-wired connection
using a communication cable (1761-CBL-HM02, or equivalent) connected to
port 2.
Use an external DC power supply with the following specifications:
–
–
–
operating voltage: 24V dc +20% / –15%
output current: 200 mA maximum
rated NEC
Make a hard-wired connection from the external supply to the screw terminals
on the bottom of the AIC+.
If you use an external power supply, it must be 24V dc. Permanent damage
will result if miswired with the wrong power source.
Installing and Attaching the AIC+
3–16
1.
Take care when installing the AIC+ in an enclosure so that the cable connecting
the MicroLogix 1000 controller to the AIC+ does not interfere with the
enclosure door.
2.
Carefully plug the terminal block into the DH-485 port on the AIC+ you are
putting on the network. Allow enough cable slack to prevent stress on the plug.
3.
Provide strain relief for the Belden cable after it is wired to the terminal block.
This guards against breakage of the Belden cable wires.
Hardware
Below are two options for powering the AIC+:
Connecting the System
Establishing Communication
When you connect a MicroLogix 1000 controller to a network, it automatically
finds which protocol is active (DF1 or DH-485), and establishes communication
accordingly. Therefore, no special configuration is required to connect to either
network.
However, to shorten the connection time, you can specify which protocol the
controller should attempt to establish communication with first. This is done using
the Primary Protocol bit, S:0/10. The default setting for this bit is DF1 (0). If the
primary protocol bit is set to DF1, the MicroLogix 1000 controller will attempt to
connect using the configured DF1 protocol; either full-duplex or half-duplex slave.
To have the controller first attempt DH-485 communication, set this bit to 1.
For DH-485 networks that will only contain MicroLogix controllers, at least one
controller must have its primary protocol bit set to 1 so that the network can be
initialized.
Automatic Protocol Switching
The MicroLogix 1000 Series D or later discrete and all MicroLogix 1000 analog
controllers perform automatic protocol switching between DH-485 and the
configured DF1 protocol. (The controller cannot automatically switch between DF1
full-duplex and DF1 half-duplex slave.) This feature allows you to switch from
active communication on a DF1 half-duplex network to the DH-485 protocol to
make program changes.
Simply disconnect the MicroLogix controller from the DF1 half-duplex network and
connect it to your personal computer. The controller recognizes the computer is
attempting to communicate using the DH-485 protocol and automatically switches
to it. When your program changes are complete, you can disconnect your computer,
reconnect the modem, and the controller automatically switches back to the
configured DF1 protocol. For example, if you are using the DH-485 protocol to
make program changes and you connect an HHP, you can switch to active
communication on a DF1 full-duplex network.
The following baud rate limitations affect autoswitching:
If the configured DH-485 baud rate is 19200, the configured DF1 baud rate
must be 4800 or greater.
•
•
If the configured DH-485 baud rate is 9600, the configured DF1 baud rate must
be 2400 or greater.
3–17
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
You can also connect a MicroLogix to a DeviceNet network using the DeviceNet
Interface (DNI), catalog number 1761-NET-DNI. For additional information on
connecting the DNI, see the Advanced Interface Converter (AIC+) and DeviceNet
Interface (DNI) Installation Instructions, Publication 1761-5.11. For information on
how to configure and commission a DNI, see the DeviceNet Interface User Manual,
Publication 1761-6.5.
The figure that follows identifies the ports of the DNI.
DNI DeviceNet Interface
(1761-NET-DNI)
V–
CAN_L
NET
SHIEL
D CAN_H
V+
Use this write–on
area to mark the
DeviceNet node
Address.
MOD
DeviceNet
(Port 1)
(Replacement
connector part no.
1761–RPL–0000)
–
NODE
DANGER
TX/RX
GND
RS–232
(Port 2)
Cable Selection Guide
1761-CBL-HM02
1761-CBL-AM00
Cable
1761-CBL-AM00
76 C
00
1761-CBL-HM02➀
Length
45 cm
c (17.7
7 7 in)
2 (6.5
2m
6 ft)
f
Connections from
MicroLogix 1000 (all series)
port 2
MicroLogix 1000 (all series)
port 2
1761-CBL-PM02
1761-CBL-AP00
Cable
Length
1761-CBL-APM00
76 C
00
1761-CBL-PM02➀
45 cm
c (17.7
7 7 in)
2 (6.5
6 ft)
f
2m
Connections from
to DNI
SLC 5/03 or SLC 5/04 processors, channel 0
port 2
PC COM port
port 2
➀ Series B cables or higher are required for hardware handshaking.
3–18
to DNI
Hardware
DeviceNet Communications
Programming Overview
4 Programming Overview
This chapter explains how to program the MicroLogix 1000 programmable
controller. Read this chapter for basic information about:
principles of machine control
understanding file organization and addressing
understanding how processor files are stored and accessed
Programming
•
•
•
•
•
applying ladder logic to your schematics
a model for developing your program
4–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Principles of Machine Control
The controller consists of a built-in power supply, central processing unit (CPU),
inputs, which you wire to input devices (such as pushbuttons, proximity sensors,
limit switches), and outputs, which you wire to output devices (such as motor
starters, solid-state relays, and indicator lights).
Programming
Device
User Input Devices
User Output Devices
Inputs
Memory
(Programs and Data)
Outputs
CPU
Processor
Power Supply
MicroLogix 1000 Programmable Controller
4–2
CR
Programming Overview
With the logic program entered into the controller, placing the controller in the
Run mode initiates an operating cycle. The controller’s operating cycle consists of a
series of operations performed sequentially and repeatedly, unless altered by your
program logic.
overhead
input
scan
service
comms
program
scan
Programming
Operating Cycle
output
scan
input scan – the time required for the controller to scan and read all input data;
typically accomplished within µseconds.
program scan – the time required for the processor to execute the instructions in the
program. The program scan time varies depending on the instructions used and
each instruction’s status during the scan time.
Note
Subroutine and interrupt instructions within your logic program may cause
deviations in the way the operating cycle is sequenced.
output scan – the time required for the controller to scan and write all output data;
typically accomplished within µseconds.
service communications – the part of the operating cycle in which communication
takes place with other devices, such as an HHP or personal computer.
housekeeping and overhead – time spent on memory management and updating
timers and internal registers.
You enter a logic program into the controller using a programming device. The
logic program is based on your electrical relay print diagrams. It contains
instructions that direct control of your application.
4–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Understanding File Organization
The processor provides control through the use of a program you create, called a
processor file. This file contains other files that break your program down into
more manageable parts.
Processor File Overview
Most of the operations you perform with the programming device involve the
processor file and the two components created with it: program files and data files.
Processor File
Program Files
(14 Maximum)
Data Files
(8 Maximum)
The programming device stores processor files on hard disk (or floppy disk).
Monitoring and editing of processor files is done in the workspace of the computer.
After you select a file from disk and edit it, you then save the file hard to disk,
replacing the original disk version with the edited version. The hard disk is the
recommended location for a processor file.
PROGRAMMING DEVICE
Workspace
01
Hard Disk
01
02
03
04
Uniquely named
processor files
Processor files are created in the offline mode using the programming device.
These files are then restored (downloaded), to the processor for online operation.
4–4
Programming Overview
Program Files
Program files contain controller information, the main ladder program, interrupt
subroutines, and any subroutine programs. These files are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
System Program (file 0) – This file contains various system related
information and user-programmed information such as processor type, I/O
configuration, processor file name, and password.
Reserved (file 1) – This file is reserved.
Main Ladder Program (file 2) – This file contains user-programmed
instructions defining how the controller is to operate.
User Error Fault Routine (file 3) – This file is executed when a recoverable
fault occurs.
High-Speed Counter Interrupt (file 4) – This file is executed when an HSC
interrupt occurs. It can also be used for a subroutine ladder program.
Selectable Timed Interrupt (file 5) – This file is executed when an STI occurs.
It can also be used for a subroutine ladder program.
Subroutine Ladder Program (files 6 – 15) – These are used according to
subroutine instructions residing in the main ladder program file or other
subroutine files.
Data Files
Data files contain the status information associated with external I/O and all other
instructions you use in your main and subroutine ladder program files. In addition,
these files store information concerning processor operation. You can also use the
files to store “recipes” and look-up tables if needed.
These files are organized by the type of data they contain. The data file types are:
•
•
•
•
•
Output (file 0) – This file stores the state of the output terminals for the
controller.
Input (file 1) – This file stores the status of the input terminals for the
controller.
Status (file 2) – This file stores controller operation information. This file is
useful for troubleshooting controller and program operation.
Bit (file 3) – This file is used for internal relay logic storage.
Timer (file 4) – This file stores the timer accumulator and preset values and
status bits.
4–5
Programming
•
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
•
•
•
Counter (file 5) – This file stores the counter accumulator and preset values
and the status bits.
Control (file 6) – This file stores the length, pointer position, and status bits for
specific instructions such as shift registers and sequencers.
Integer (file 7) – This file is used to store numeric values or bit information.
Understanding How Processor Files are Stored and
Accessed
The MicroLogix 1000 programmable controller uses two devices for storing
processor files: RAM and EEPROM. The RAM provides easy access storage
(i.e., its data is lost on a power down), while the EEPROM provides long-term
storage (i.e., its data is not lost on a power down). The diagram below shows how
the memory is allocated in the micro controller’s processor.
RAM
EEPROM
CPU Workspace
Retentive Data
Program Files
Backup Data
Retentive Data
Program Files
CPU
The memory device that is used depends on the operation being performed. This
section describes how memory is stored and accessed during the following
operations:
•
•
•
•
4–6
download
normal operation
power down
power up
Programming Overview
Download
When the processor file is downloaded to the micro controller, it is first stored in the
volatile RAM. It is then transferred to the non-volatile EEPROM, where it is stored
as both backup data and retentive data.
RAM
EEPROM
CPU
Note
Programming Device
If you want to ensure that the backup data is the same for every micro controller you
are using, save the program to disk before downloading it to a micro controller.
Normal Operation
During normal operation, both the micro controller and your programming device
can access the processor files stored in the RAM. Any changes to retentive data that
occur due to program execution or programming commands affect only the retentive
data in the RAM.
The program files are never modified during normal operation. However, both the
CPU and your programming device can read the program files stored in RAM.
EEPROM
RAM
Backup Data
Retentive Data
Program Files
CPU Workspace
Retentive Data
Program Files
CPU
Programming Device
4–7
Programming
CPU Workspace
Retentive Data
Program Files
Backup Data
Retentive Data
Program Files
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Power Down
When a power down occurs, only the retentive data is transferred from the RAM to
the EEPROM. (The program files do not need to be saved to the EEPROM since
they cannot be modified during normal operation.) If for some reason power is lost
before all of the retentive data is saved to the EEPROM, the retentive data is lost.
This may occur due to an unexpected reset or a hardware problem.
RAM
EEPROM
CPU Workspace
Retentive Data
Program Files
Backup Data
Retentive Data
Program Files
CPU
Programming Device
Power Up
During power up, the micro controller transfers the program files from the
EEPROM to the RAM. The retentive data is also transferred to the RAM, provided
it was not lost on power down, and normal operation begins.
RAM
EEPROM
CPU Workspace
Retentive Data
Program Files
Backup Data
Retentive Data
Program Files
CPU
4–8
Programming Device
Programming Overview
If retentive data was lost on power down, the backup data from the EEPROM is
transferred to the RAM and used as the retentive data. In addition, status file bit
S2:5/8 (retentive data lost) is set and a recoverable major error occurs when going to
run.
RAM
EEPROM
CPU Workspace
Retentive Data
Program Files
CPU
Programming Device
Programming
Backup Data
Retentive Data
Program Files
4–9
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Addressing Data Files
For the purposes of addressing, each data file type is identified by a letter
(identifier) and a file number.
File
Type
Identifier
File
Number
Output
Input
Status
Bit
Timer
Counter
Control
Integer
O
I
S
B
T
C
R
N
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
The addresses are made up of alphanumeric characters separated by delimiters.
Delimiters include the colon, slash, and period.
Specifying Logical Addresses
The format of a logical address, xf:e, corresponds directly to the location in data
storage.
4–10
Where:
Is the:
x
File type: O—output
I—input
S—status
B—binary
T—timer
C—counter
R—control
N—integer
f
File #:
4—timer
5—counter
6—control
7—integer
:
File delimiter: Colon or semicolon delimiter separates file and structure/word numbers.
e
Element number: 0 to: 0—output
1—input
32—status
31—binary
0—output
1—input
2—status
3—binary
39—timer
31—counter
15—control
104—integer
Programming Overview
You assign logical addresses to instructions from the highest level (element) to the
lowest level (bit). Addressing examples are shown in the table below.
To specify the
address of a:
Use these parameters:➀
Word within an integer file
N
7
:
2
File Type
File Number
File Delimiter
Word Number
T 4 : 7 . ACC
File Type
File Number
File Delimiter
Structure Number
Delimiter
Word
Bit within an integer file
N 7 : 2 /
5
File Type
File Number
File Delimiter
Word Number
Bit Delimiter
Bit Number
B 3
Bit within a bit file
/ 31
File Type
File Number
Bit Delimiter
Bit Number
Bit files are bit stream continuous files, and therefore you can
address them in two ways: by word and bit, or by bit alone.
Bit within a structure file
(e.g., a control file)
➀
R 6 : 7
/ DN
File Type
File Number
File Delimiter
Structure Number
Delimiter
Mnemonic
Some programming devices support short addressing. This allows you to eliminate the file number and file
delimiter from addresses. (For example: N7:2=N2, T4:12.ACC=T12.ACC, B3:2/12=B2/12) Consult your
programming device’s user manual for information on addressing capabilities.
4–11
Programming
Word within a structure file
(e.g., a timer file)
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
You can also address at the bit level using mnemonics for timer, counter, or control
data types. The available mnemonics depend on the type of data. See chapters 6
through 13 for more information.
Specifying Indexed Addresses
The indexed address symbol is the # character. Place the # character immediately
before the file-type identifier in a logical address. You can use more than one
indexed address in your ladder program.
Enter the offset value in word 24 of the status file (S:24). All indexed instructions
use the same word S:24 to store the offset value. The processor starts operation at
the base address plus the offset. You can manipulate the offset value in your ladder
logic before each indexed address operation.
When you specify indexed addresses, follow these guidelines:
•
•
•
Make sure the index value (positive or negative) does not cause the indexed
address to exceed the file type boundary.
When an instruction uses more than two indexed addresses, the processor uses
the same index value for each indexed address.
Set the index word to the offset value you want immediately before enabling an
instruction that uses an indexed address.
Instructions with a # sign in an address manipulate the offset value stored at
S:24. Make sure you monitor or load the offset value you want prior to using
an indexed address. Otherwise unpredictable machine operation could occur
with possible damage to equipment and/or injury to personnel.
Example of Indexed Addressing
The following Masked Move (MVM) example uses an indexed address in the
source and destination addresses. If the offset value is 10 (stored in S:24), the
processor manipulates the data stored at the base address plus the offset.
MVM
MASKED MOVE
Source
#N7:10
0
Mask
0033
Dest
4–12
#N7:50
0
Programming Overview
In this example, the processor uses the following addresses:
Value:
Base Address:
Offset Value in S:24
Offset Address:
Source
N7:10
10
N7:20
Destination
N7:50
10
N7:60
Addressing File Instructions – Using the File Indicator (#)
COP
FLL
BSL
BSR
FFL
FFU
Copy File
Fill File
Bit Shift Left
Bit Shift Right
(FIFO Load)
(FIFO Unload)
LFL
LFU
SQO
SQC
SQL
Programming
The file instructions below manipulate data table files. These files are addressed
with the # sign. They store an offset value in word S:24 (index register), just as with
indexed addressing discussed in the last section.
(LIFO Load)
(LIFO Unload)
Sequencer Output
Sequencer Compare
Sequencer Load
If you are using file instructions and also indexed addressing, make sure that
you monitor and/or load the correct offset value prior to using an indexed
address. Otherwise, unpredictable operation could occur, resulting in possible
personal injury and/or damage to equipment.
Numeric Constants
You can enter numeric constants directly into many of the instructions you program.
The range of values for most instructions is –32,768 through +32,767. These values
can be displayed or entered in several radixes. The radixes that can be displayed
are:
•
•
•
•
Integer
Binary
ASCII
Hexadecimal
4–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
When entering values into an instruction or data table element, you can specify the
radix of your entry using the “&” special operator. The radixes that can be used to
enter data into an instruction or data table element are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Integer (&N)
Binary (&B)
ASCII (&A)
Hexadecimal (&H)
BCD (&D)
Octal (&O)
Numeric constants are used in place of data file elements. They cannot be
manipulated by the user program. You must enter the offline program editor to
change the value of a constant.
Applying Ladder Logics to Your Schematics
The logic you enter into the micro controller makes up a ladder program. A ladder
program consists of a set of instructions used to control a machine or a process.
Ladder logic is a graphical programming language based on electrical relay
diagrams. Instead of having electrical rung continuity, ladder logic is looking for
logical rung continuity. A ladder diagram identifies each of the elements in an
electromechanical circuit and represents them graphically. This allows you to see
how your control circuit operates before you actually start the physical operation of
your system.
I
I
][
]/[
1
0
input instructions
O
( )
1
output instruction
In a ladder diagram each of the input devices are represented in series or parallel
combinations across the rung of the ladder. The last element on the rung is the
output that receives the action as a result of the conditional state of the inputs on the
rung.
Each output instruction is executed by the controller when the rung is scanned and
the conditions on the rung are true. When the rung is not scanned or the logic
conditions on the rung do not create a true logic path, the output is not executed.
4–14
Programming Overview
The programming device allows you to enter a ladder logic program into the micro
controller.
In the following illustration, the electromechanical circuit shows PB1 and PB2, two
pushbuttons, wired in series with an alarm horn. PB1 is a normally open
pushbutton, and PB2 is normally closed. This same circuit is shown in ladder logic
by two contacts wired in series with an output. Contact I/0 and I/1 are
examine-if-closed instructions.➀ (For more information on this instruction, refer to
page 6–4.)
PB1
Ladder Logic Program
Alarm
Horn
PB2
I
][
I
][
0
➀
O
( )
1
1
Contact I1 would be an examine-if-open instruction ( ]/[ ) if PB2 was a normally open electromechanical circuit.
The table below shows how these circuits operate. The table shows all possible
conditions for the electromechanical circuit, the equivalent state of the ladder logic
instructions, and the resulting output state.
If PB1 is:
I/0 state is:
And PB2 is:
I/1 state is:
not pushed
0
not pushed
1
Then the Alarm Horn (O/1) is:
silent
not pushed
0
pushed
0
silent
pushed
1
not pushed
1
alarm
pushed
1
pushed
0
silent
Developing Your Logic Program – A Model
The following diagram can help you develop your application program. Each
process block represents one phase of program development. Use the checklist at
the right of the process block to help you identify the tasks involved with each
process.
4–15
Programming
Electromechanical Circuit
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Program Development
Process
Design
Functional Specification
Perform
Detailed Analysis
Determine if Special
Programming
Features are Needed
Create Logic
Program
Confirm I/O
Addresses
Enter/Edit
Program
Check for
Completeness
Monitor/Troubleshoot
Program
Accept
Program
Run program.
4–16
Program Development
Checklist
❏ Prepare a general description of how you want your
automated process to operate.
❏ Identify the hardware requirements.
❏ Match inputs and outputs with actions of the process.
❏ Add these actions to the functional specifications.
❏
❏
❏
❏
Do you need:
Special interrupt routines?
High-speed counting features?
Sequencing Operations?
FIFO or LIFO stack operations?
❏ Use worksheets if necessary to create program.
❏ Make sure I/O addresses match correct input and
output devices.
❏ Enter program using the programming device.
❏ Review your functional specification and detailed
analysis for missing or incomplete information.
❏ Monitor and, if necessary, troubleshoot the
program that you entered.
❏ Resulting programs should match functional
specifications.
Using Analog
5 Using Analog
This chapter describes the operation of the MicroLogix 1000 analog controllers.
Topics include:
I/O Image
I/O Configuration
Input Filter and Update Times
Converting Analog Data
Programming
•
•
•
•
5–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
I/O Image
The input and output image files of the MicroLogix 1000 analog controllers have
the following format:
Address
Input Image
Output Image
Address
I:0.0
Discrete Input Word 0
Discrete Output Word 0
O:0.0
I:0.1
Discrete Input Word 1
Reserved
O:0.1
I:0.2
Reserved
Reserved
O:0.2
I:0.3
Reserved
Reserved
O:0.3
I:0.4
Analog Input 0 (Voltage)
Analog Output 0 (Voltage or
Current)
O:0.4
I:0.5
Analog Input 1 (Voltage)
I:0.6
Analog Input 2 (Current)
I:0.7
Analog Input 3 (Current)
Input words 0 and 1 contain discrete input data. Unused inputs in the discrete inputs
image space are reset during each input scan. Input words 2 and 3 are reserved and
are not updated by the controller. These inputs have no direct effect on controller
operation, but they can be modified like other data bits.
Input words 4–7 contain the status of the four analog input channels respectively.
Analog input image words are cleared at Going To Run (GTR). For enabled
channels, the analog input image is updated on a cyclical basis.
Output word 0 contains discrete output data. Output words 1–3 are reserved output
image space. Unused outputs in both the discrete output image space and the
reserved output image space have no direct effect on controller operation. But these
outputs can be modified like other data bits. Output word 4 holds the value of the
analog output channel.
5–2
Using Analog
I/O Configuration
The analog input channels are single-ended (unipolar) circuits and can be
individually enabled or disabled. The default is all input channels enabled. The two
voltage inputs accept"10.5V dc, and the two current inputs accept "21 mA.
The analog output channel is also a single-ended circuit. You can configure either
voltage (0V dc to +10V dc) or current (+4 to +20 mA) output operation. The
default is voltage output.
The output must be configured for either voltage or current, not both. This is
determined by the output configuration. When in the Run mode and the output is
configured for voltage, the voltage output terminal is active and the current output
terminal is inactive. Similarly, when in the Run mode and the output is configured
for current, the current output terminal is active and the voltage output terminal is
inactive. When the system is not in Run mode, both the voltage and current outputs
are inactive.
Input Filter and Update Times
The MicroLogix analog input filter is programmable. The slower the filter setting,
the more immune the analog inputs are to electrical noise. The more immune the
analog inputs are to electrical noise, the slower the inputs will be to update.
Similarly, the faster the filter setting, the less immune the analog inputs are to
electrical noise. The less immune the analog inputs are to electrical noise, the faster
the inputs will be to update.
Programmable Filter Characteristics
1st Notch Freq
(Hz)
Filter
Bandwidth
(-3 dB Freq Hz)
Update Time
(mSec)
Settling Time
(mSec)
Resolution
(Bits)
10
2.62
100.00
400.00
16
50
13.10
20.00
80.00
16
60➀
15.72
16.67
66.67
16
250
65.50
4.00
16.00
15
➀
60 Hz is the default setting.
5–3
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Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
The total update time for each channel is a combination of the Update Time and the
Settling Time. When more than one analog input channel is enabled, the maximum
update for each channel is equal to one ladder scan time plus the channel’s Update
Time plus Settling Time. When only one analog input channel is enabled, the
maximum update for the channel is equal to the Update Time plus one ladder scan
time.
Update Examples
Example 1 – All (4) channels enabled with 60 Hz filter selected (default settings).
Maximum Update Time = (4) x ladder scan time
+ (4) x 16.67 ms
+ (4) x 66.67 ms
= 333.36 ms + (4) x ladder scan times
(Each channel will be updated approximately three times per second.)
Example 2 – 1 channel enabled with 250 Hz filter selected.
Maximum Update Time = ladder scan time + 4 ms
Input Channel Filtering
The analog input channels incorporate on-board signal conditioning. The purpose
of this conditioning is to reject the AC power line noise that can couple into an
analog input signal while passing the normal variations of the input signal.
Frequency components of the input signal at the filter frequency are rejected.
Frequency components below the filter bandwidth (–3 dB frequency) are passed
with under 3 dB of attenuation. This pass band allows the normal variation of
sensor inputs such as temperature, pressure and flow transducers to be input data to
the processor.
Noise signals coupled in at frequencies above the pass band are sharply rejected.
An area of particular concern is the 50/60 Hz region, where pick-up from power
lines can occur.
5–4
Using Analog
Converting Analog Data
The analog input circuits are able to monitor current and voltage signals and convert
them to digital data. There are six terminals assigned to the input channels that
provide two voltage inputs, two current inputs and two return signals (commons).
The analog outputs can support either a current or voltage function. There are three
terminals assigned to the output channels that provide one voltage output, one
current output and a common (shared) terminal.
The following table shows sample Analog Signal and Data Word values using the
nominal transfer function formula:
N=Iin x 32767/21
where Iin (analog signal) is in milliamperes (mA)
N=Vin x 32767/10.5
where Vin (analog signal) is in volts (V)
N=(Iout – 4 mA) x 32767/16 mA
milliamperes (mA)
N=Vout x 32767/10V
where Iout (analog signal) is in
where Vout (analog signal) is in volts (V)
Analog Signal
Data Word
Input
Output
0V
0
0
5V
15603
16384
10V
31207
32767
4 mA
6241
0
11 mA
17164
14336
20 mA
31207
32767
Converting Analog Input Data
Analog inputs convert current and voltage signals into 16-bit two’s complement
binary values. To determine an approximate voltage that an input value represents,
use one of the equations shown on the following page.
5–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
10.5V
32,767
input value➀ = input voltage(V)
➀The Input Value is the decimal value of the word in the
input image for the corresponding analog input.
For example, if an input value of 16,021 is in the input image,
the calculated value is:
10.5V
32,767
16,201 = 5.1915(V)
It should be noted that the actual value may vary within the
accuracy limitations of the module.
To determine an approximate current that an input value represents, you can use the
following equation:
21 mA
32,767
input value➁ = input current (mA)
➁The Input Value is the decimal value of the word in the
input image for the corresponding analog input.
For example, if an input value of 4096 is in the input image,
the calculated value is:
21 mA
4096 = 2.625 (mA)
32,767
It should be noted that the actual value may vary within
the accuracy limitations of the module.
Converting Analog Output Data
Use the following equation to determine the decimal value for the current output:
32,767
16 mA
[Desired Current Output (mA) – 4 mA] = Output Decimal Value
For example, if an output value of 8 mA is desired, the value to be put in the
corresponding word in the output image can be calculated as follows:
32,767
16 mA
(8 mA – 4 mA) = 8192
Use the following equation to determine the decimal value for the voltage output:
32,767
10V dc
Desired Voltage Output (V dc) = Output Decimal Value
For example, if an output value of 1V dc is desired, the value to be put in the
corresponding word in the output image can be calculated as follows:
32,767
10V dc
5–6
1V dc = 3277
Using Basic Instructions
6 Using Basic Instructions
This chapter contains general information about the basic instructions and explains
how they function in your application program. Each of the basic instructions
includes information on:
•
•
•
what the instruction symbol looks like
typical execution time for the instruction
Programming
how to use the instruction
In addition, the last section contains an application example for a paper drilling
machine that shows the basic instructions in use.
Bit Instructions
Instruction
Mnemonic
Purpose
Name
Page
XIC
Examine if Closed
Examines a bit for an On condition.
6–4
XIO
Examine if Open
Examines a bit for an Off condition.
6–4
OTE
Output Energize
Turns a bit On or Off.
6–5
OTL and
OTU
Output Latch and
Output Unlatch
OTL turns a bit on when the rung is executed, and
this bit retains its state when the rung is not
executed or a power cycle occurs. OTU turns a bit
off when the rung is executed, and this bit retains its
state when the rung is not executed or when power
cycle occurs.
6–5
OSR
One-Shot Rising
Triggers a one time event.
6–7
6–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Timer/Counter Instructions
Instruction
Mnemonic
Purpose
Name
Page
TON
Timer On-Delay
Counts timebase intervals when the instruction is
true.
6–11
TOF
Timer Off-Delay
Counts timebase intervals when the instruction is
false.
6–12
RTO
Retentive Timer
Counts timebase intervals when the instruction is
true and retains the accumulated value when the
instruction goes false or when power cycle occurs.
6–14
CTU
Count Up
Increments the accumulated value at each false-totrue transition and retains the accumulated value
when the instruction goes false or when power cycle
occurs.
6–18
CTD
Count Down
Decrements the accumulate value at each false-totrue transition and retains the accumulated value
when the instruction goes false or when power cycle
occurs.
6–19
RES
Reset
Resets the accumulated value and status bits of a
timer or counter. Do not use with TOF timers.
6–20
About the Basic Instructions
These instructions, when used in ladder programs represent hardwired logic circuits
used for the control of a machine or equipment.
The basic instructions are separated into three groups: bit, timer, and counter.
Before you learn about the instructions in each of these groups, we suggest that you
read the overview that precedes the group:
•
•
•
6–2
Bit Instructions Overview
Timer Instructions Overview
Counter Instructions Overview
Using Basic Instructions
Bit Instructions Overview
These instructions operate on a single bit of data. During operation, the controller
may set or reset the bit, based on the logical continuity of ladder rungs. You can
address a bit as many times as your program requires.
Using the same address with multiple output instructions is not recommended.
Bit instructions are used with the following data files:
•
•
•
•
•
Output and input data files. These represent external outputs and inputs.
The status data file (file 2).
The bit data file (B3:). These are the internal coils used in your program.
Programming
Note
Timer, counter, and control data files (T4:, C5:, and R6:). These instructions
use various control bits.
The integer data file (N7:). Use these addresses (at the bit level) as your
program requires.
6–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Examine if Closed (XIC)
] [
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
Use the XIC instruction in your ladder program to determine if a bit is On. When
the instruction is executed, if the bit addressed is on (1), then the instruction is
evaluated as true. When the instruction is executed, if the bit addressed is off (0),
then the instruction is evaluated as false.
Bit Address State
False
1.54
1.72
XIC Instruction
0
False
1
True
Examples of devices that turn on or off include:
•
•
•
a push button wired to an input (addressed as I1:0/4)
an output wired to a pilot light (addressed as O0:0/2)
a timer controlling a light (addressed as T4:3/DN)
Examine if Open (XIO)
]/[
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
1.54
Use an XIO instruction in your ladder program to determine if a bit is Off. When
the instruction is executed, if the bit addressed is off (0), then the instruction is
evaluated as true. When the instruction is executed, if the bit addressed is on (1),
then the instruction is evaluated as false.
Bit Address State
1.72
XIO Instruction
0
True
1
False
Examples of devices that turn on or off include:
•
•
•
6–4
motor overload normally closed (N.C.) wired to an input (I1:0/10)
an output wired to a pilot light (addressed as O0:0/4)
a timer controlling a light (addressed as T4:3/DN)
Using Basic Instructions
Output Energize (OTE)
Use an OTE instruction in your ladder program to turn On a bit when rung
conditions are evaluated as true.
( )
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
4.43
OTE instructions are reset when:
•
•
Note
You enter or return to the REM Run or REM Test mode or power is restored.
The OTE is programmed within an inactive or false Master Control Reset
(MCR) zone.
A bit that is set within a subroutine using an OTE instruction remains set until the
subroutine is scanned again.
Output Latch (OTL) and Output Unlatch (OTU)
OTL and OTU are retentive output instructions. OTL can only turn on a bit, while
OTU can only turn off a bit. These instructions are usually used in pairs, with both
instructions addressing the same bit.
(L)
(U)
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
OTL 4.97
OTU 4.97
Your program can examine a bit controlled by OTL and OTU instructions as often
as necessary.
3.16
3.16
Under fatal error conditions, physical outputs are turned off. Once the error
conditions are cleared, the controller resumes operation using the data table
value of the operand.
6–5
Programming
4.43
An example of a device that turns on or off is an output wired to a pilot light
(addressed as O0:0/4).
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Using OTL
When you assign an address to the OTL instruction that corresponds to the address
of a physical output, the output device wired to this screw terminal is energized
when the bit is set (turned on or enabled).
When rung conditions become false (after being true), the bit remains set and the
corresponding output device remains energized.
When enabled, the latch instruction tells the controller to turn on the addressed bit.
Thereafter, the bit remains on, regardless of the rung condition, until the bit is turned
off (typically by a OTU instruction in another rung).
Using OTU
When you assign an address to the OTU instruction that corresponds to the address
of a physical output, the output device wired to this screw terminal is de-energized
when the bit is cleared (turned off or disabled).
The unlatch instruction tells the controller to turn off the addressed bit. Thereafter,
the bit remains off, regardless of the rung condition, until it is turned on (typically
by a OTL instruction in another rung).
6–6
Using Basic Instructions
One-Shot Rising (OSR)
[OSR]
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
13.02
11.48
The OSR instruction is a retentive input instruction that triggers an event to occur
one time. Use the OSR instruction when an event must start based on the change of
state of the rung from false to true.
When the rung conditions preceding the OSR instruction go from false to true, the
OSR instruction will be true for one scan. After one scan is complete, the OSR
instruction becomes false, even if the rung conditions preceding it remain true. The
OSR instruction will only become true again if the rung conditions preceding it
transition from false to true.
Entering Parameters
The address assigned to the OSR instruction is not the one-shot address referenced
by your program, nor does it indicate the state of the OSR instruction. This address
allows the OSR instruction to remember its previous rung state.
Use a bit address from either the bit or integer data file. The addressed bit is set (1)
for one scan when rung conditions preceding the OSR instruction are true (even if
the OSR instruction becomes false); the bit is reset (0) when rung conditions
preceding the OSR instruction are false.
Note
The bit address you use for this instruction must be unique. Do not use it elsewhere
in the program.
Do not use an input or output address to program the address parameter of the OSR
instruction.
Example Rung
I:1.0
] [
0
B3
]/[
1
B3
[OSR]
0
O:3
( )
0
B3
] [
2
B3
[OSR]
3
O:3
( )
1
6–7
Programming
The controller allows you to use one OSR instruction per output in a rung.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Timer Instructions Overview
Each timer address is made of a 3-word element. Word 0 is the control word, word 1
stores the preset value, and word 2 stores the accumulated value.
15 14 13
Word 0
EN TT DN
Word 1
Preset Value
Word 2
Accumulator Value
Internal Use
EN = Timer Enable Bit
TT = Timer Timing Bit
DN = Timer Done Bit
Entering Parameters
Accumulator Value (ACC)
This is the time elapsed since the timer was last reset. When enabled, the timer
updates this continually.
Preset Value (PRE)
Specifies the value which the timer must reach before the controller sets the done
bit. When the accumulated value becomes equal to or greater than the preset value,
the done bit is set. You can use this bit to control an output device.
Preset and accumulated values for timers range from 0 to +32,767. If a timer preset
or accumulated value is a negative number, a runtime error occurs.
Timebase
The timebase determines the duration of each timebase interval. The timebase is
selectable as 0.01 (10 ms) second or 1.0 second.
6–8
Using Basic Instructions
Timer Accuracy
Timer accuracy refers to the length of time between the moment a timer instruction
is enabled and the moment the timed interval is complete.
Note
Timing could be inaccurate if Jump (JMP), Label (LBL), Jump to Subroutine (JSR),
or Subroutine (SBR) instructions skip over the rung containing a timer instruction
while the timer is timing. If the skip duration is within 2.5 seconds, no time will be
lost; if the skip duration exceeds 2.5 seconds, an undetectable timing error occurs.
When using subroutines, a timer must be executed at least every 2.5 seconds to
prevent a timing error.
Addressing Structure
Address bits and words using the format Tf:e.s/b
Format
Explanation
T
Timer file
f
File number. The only valid file number is 4.
:
Element delimiter
e
Element
number
Tf:e
.
Word element
s
subelement
/
Delimiter
b
bit
Ranges from 0 – 39. These are 3-word elements. See figure on
page 6–8.
6–9
Programming
Timing accuracy is –0.01 to +0 seconds, with a program scan of up to 2.5 seconds.
The 1-second timer maintains accuracy with a program scan of up to 1.5 seconds. If
your programs can exceed 1.5 or 2.5 seconds, repeat the timer instruction rung so
that the rung is scanned within these limits.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Addressing Examples
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
6–10
T4:0/15 or T4:0/EN Enable bit
T4:0/14 or T4:0/TT Timer timing bit
T4:0/13 or T4:0/DN Done bit
T4:0.1 or T4:0.PRE Preset value of the timer
T4:0.2 or T4:0.ACC Accumulator value of the timer
T4:0.1/0 or T4:0.PRE/0 Bit 0 of the preset value
T4:0.2/0 or T4:0.ACC/0 Bit 0 of the accumulated value
Using Basic Instructions
Timer On-Delay (TON)
TON
TIMER ON DELAY
Timer
Time Base
Preset
Accum
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
(DN)
Use the TON instruction to delay the turning on or off of an output. The TON
instruction begins to count timebase intervals when rung conditions become true.
As long as rung conditions remain true, the timer increments its accumulated value
(ACC) each scan until it reaches the preset value (PRE). The accumulated value is
reset when rung conditions go false, regardless of whether the timer has timed out.
30.38
Using Status Bits
This Bit
And Remains Set Until One
of the Following
Is Set When
Timer Done Bit DN (bit 13)
accumulated value is equal
to or greater than the preset
value
rung conditions go false
Timer Enable Bit EN (bit 14)
rung conditions are true
rung conditions go false
Timer Timing Bit TT (bit 15)
rung conditions are true and
the accumulated value is less
than the preset value
rung conditions go false or
when the done bit is set
When the controller changes from the REM Run or REM Test mode to the
REM Program mode or user power is lost while the instruction is timing but has not
reached its preset value, the following occurs:
•
•
•
Timer Enable (EN) bit remains set.
Timer Timing (TT) bit remains set.
Accumulated value (ACC) remains the same.
On returning to the REM Run or REM Test mode, the following can happen:
Condition
Result
If the rung is true:
EN bit remains set.
TT bit remains set.
ACC value is reset.
If the rung is false:
EN bit is reset.
TT bit is reset.
ACC value is reset.
6–11
Programming
38.34
(EN)
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Timer Off-Delay (TOF)
TOF
TIMER OFF DELAY
Timer
Time Base
Preset
Accum
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
39.42
31.65
(EN)
(DN)
Use the TOF instruction to delay turning on or off an output. The TOF instruction
begins to count timebase intervals when the rung makes a true-to-false transition.
As long as rung conditions remain false, the timer increments its accumulated value
(ACC) each scan until it reaches the preset value (PRE). The controller resets the
accumulated value when rung conditions go true regardless of whether the timer has
timed out.
Using Status Bits
This Bit
Is Set When
And Remains Set Until One
of the Following
Timer Done Bit DN (bit 13)
rung conditions are true
rung conditions go false and
the accumulated value is
greater than or equal to the
preset value
Timer Timing Bit TT (bit 14)
rung conditions are false and
the accumulated value is less
than the preset value
rung conditions go true or
when the done bit is reset
Timer Enable Bit EN (bit 15)
rung conditions are true
rung conditions go false
When the controller changes from the REM Run or REM Test mode to the
REM Program mode, or user power is lost while a timer off-delay instruction is
timing but has not reached its preset value, the following occurs:
•
•
•
•
6–12
Timer Enable (EN) bit remains set.
Timer Timing (TT) bit remains set.
Timer Done (DN) bit remains set.
Accumulated value (ACC) remains the same.
Using Basic Instructions
On returning to the REM Run or REM Test mode, the following can happen:
Result
If the rung is true:
TT bit is reset.
DN bit remains set.
EN bit is set.
ACC value is reset.
If the rung is false:
TT bit is reset.
DN bit is reset.
EN bit is reset.
ACC value is set equal to the preset value.
The Reset (RES) instruction cannot be used with the TOF instruction because
RES always clears the status bits as well as the accumulated value. (See page
6–20.)
Note
The TOF times inside an inactive MCR Pair.
6–13
Programming
Condition
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Retentive Timer (RTO)
RTO
RETENTIVE TIMER ON
Timer
Time Base
Preset
Accum
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
38.34
27.49
(EN)
(DN)
Use the RTO instruction to turn an output on or off after its timer has been on for a
preset time interval. The RTO instruction is a retentive instruction that lets the timer
stop and start without resetting the accumulated value (ACC).
The RTO instruction retains its accumulated value when any of the following
occurs:
•
•
•
•
Rung conditions become false.
You change controller operation from the REM Run or REM Test mode to the
REM Program mode.
The controller loses power.
A fault occurs.
Using Status Bits
This Bit
Note
Is Set When
And Remains Set Until One
of the Following
Timer Done Bit DN (bit 13)
accumulated value is equal
to or greater than the preset
value
the appropriate RES
instruction is enabled
Timer Timing Bit TT (bit 14)
rung conditions are true and
the accumulated value is less
than the preset value
rung conditions go false or
when the done bit is set
Timer Enable Bit EN (bit 15)
rung conditions are true
rung conditions go false
To reset the retentive timer’s accumulated value and status bits after the RTO rung
goes false, you must program a reset (RES) instruction with the same address in
another rung.
When the controller changes from the REM Run or REM Test mode to the
REM Program or REM Fault mode, or user power is lost while the timer is timing
but not yet at the preset value, the following occurs:
•
•
•
6–14
Timer Enable (EN) bit remains set.
Timer Timing (TT) bit remains set.
Accumulated value (ACC) remains the same.
Using Basic Instructions
On returning to the REM Run or REM Test mode or when power is restored, the
following can happen:
Result
If the rung is true:
TT bit remains set.
EN bit remains set.
ACC value remains the same and resumes incrementing.
If the rung is false:
TT bit is reset.
DN bit remains in its last state.
EN bit is reset.
ACC value remains in its last state.
Counter Instructions Overview
Each Counter address is made of a 3-word data file element. Word 0 is the control
word, containing the status bits of the instruction. Word 1 is the preset value. Word
2 is the accumulated value.
The control word for counter instructions includes six status bits, as indicated below.
15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Word 0
CU CD DN OV UN UA
Word 1
Preset Value
Word 2
Accumulator Value
CU
CD
DN
OV
UN
UA
=
=
=
=
=
=
Not Used
Counter up enable bit
Counter down enable bit
Done bit
Overflow bit
Underflow bit
Update accumulator (HSC only)
For high-speed counter instruction information, see chapter 12.
6–15
Programming
Condition
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Entering Parameters
Accumulator Value (ACC)
This is the number of false-to-true transitions that have occurred since the counter
was last reset.
Preset Value (PRE)
Specifies the value which the counter must reach before the controller sets the done
bit. When the accumulator value becomes equal to or greater than the preset value,
the done status bit is set. You can use this bit to control an output device.
Preset and accumulated values for counters range from –32,768 to +32,767, and are
stored as signed integers. Negative values are stored in two’s complement form.
Addressing Structure
Address bits and words using the format Cf:e.s/b
Format
Explanation
Cf:e
Note
6–16
C
Counter file
f
File number. The only valid file number is 5.
:
Element delimiter
e
Element
number
.
Word
element
s
subelement
/
Delimiter
b
bit
Ranges from 0 – 39. These are 3-word elements. See figure
on page 6–15.
If assigned to a high-speed counter instruction, C5:0 is not available as an address
for any other counter instructions. For more information on high-speed counter
instructions, see chapter 12.
Using Basic Instructions
Addressing Examples
•
•
•
•
C5:0/15 or C5:0/CU Count up enable bit
C5:0/14 or C5:0/CD Count down enable bit
C5:0/13 or C5:0/DN Done bit
C5:0/12 or C5:0/OV Overflow bit
C5:0/11 or C5:0/UN Underflow bit
C5:0/10 or C5:0/UA Update accumulator bit
C5:0.1 or C5:0.PRE Preset value of the counter
C5:0.2 or C5:0.ACC Accumulator value of the counter
Programming
•
•
•
•
•
•
C5:0.1/0 or C5:0.PRE/0 Bit 0 of the preset value
C5:0.2/0 or C5:0.ACC/0 Bit 0 of the accumulated value
How Counters Work
The figure below demonstrates how a counter works. The count value must remain
in the range of –32,768 to +32,767. If the count value goes above +32,767 or below
–32,768, a counter status overflow (OV) or underflow (UN) bit is set.
A counter can be reset to zero using the reset (RES) instruction. (See
page 6–20.)
–32,768
(CTU)
0
+32,767
Count Up
Counter Accumulator Value
Count Down
(CTD)
Underflow
Overflow
6–17
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Count Up (CTU)
CTU
COUNT UP
Counter
Preset
Accum
(CU)
(DN)
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
29.84
Note
26.67
The CTU is an instruction that counts false-to-true rung transitions. Rung
transitions can be caused by events occurring in the program (from internal logic or
by external field devices) such as parts traveling past a detector or actuating a limit
switch.
When rung conditions for a CTU instruction have made a false-to-true transition,
the accumulated value is incremented by one count, provided that the rung
containing the CTU instruction is evaluated between these transitions. The ability
of the counter to detect false-to-true transitions depends on the speed (frequency) of
the incoming signal.
The on and off duration of an incoming signal must not be faster than the scan time
2x (assuming a 50% duty cycle).
The accumulated value is retained when the rung conditions again become false.
The accumulated count is retained until cleared by a reset (RES) instruction that has
the same address as the counter reset.
Using Status Bits
This Bit
Is Set When
And Remains Set Until One
of the Following
Count Up Overflow Bit OV (bit
12)
accumulated value wraps
around to –32,768 (from
+32,767) and continues
counting up from there
a RES instruction having the
same address as the CTU
instruction is executed OR
the count is decremented
less than or equal to +32,767
with a CTD instruction
Done Bit DN (bit 13)
accumulated value is equal
to or greater than the preset
value
the accumulated value
becomes less than the preset
Count Up Enable Bit CU
(bit 15)
rung conditions are true
rung conditions go false OR
a RES instruction having the
same address as the CTU
instruction is enabled
The accumulated value is retained after the CTU instruction goes false, or when
power is removed from and then restored to the controller. Also, the on or off status
of counter done, overflow, and underflow bits is retentive. The accumulated value
and control bits are reset when the appropriate RES instruction is enabled. The CU
bits are always set prior to entering the REM Run or REM Test modes.
6–18
Using Basic Instructions
Count Down (CTD)
CTD
COUNT DOWN
Counter
Preset
Accum
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
32.19
(CD)
(DN)
The CTD is a retentive output instruction that counts false-to-true rung transitions.
Rung transitions can be caused by events occurring in the program such as parts
traveling past a detector or actuating a limit switch.
When rung conditions for a CTD instruction have made a false-to-true transition,
the accumulated value is decremented by one count, provided that the rung
containing the CTD instruction is evaluated between these transitions.
27.22
Using Status Bits
This Bit
Is Set When
And Remains Set Until One
of the Following
Count Down Underflow Bit UN
(bit 11)
accumulated value wraps
around to +32,768 (from
–32,767) and continues
counting down from there
a RES instruction having the
same address as the CTD
instruction is enabled. OR
the count is incremented
greater than or equal to
+32,767 with a CTU
instruction
Done Bit DN (bit 13)
accumulated value is equal
to or greater than the preset
value
the accumulated value
becomes less than the preset
Count Down Enable Bit CD
(bit 14)
rung conditions are true
rung conditions go false OR
a RES instruction having the
same address as the CTD
instruction is enabled
The accumulated value is retained after the CTD instruction goes false, or when
power is removed from and then restored to the controller. Also, the on or off status
of counter done, overflow, and underflow bits is retentive. The accumulated value
and control bits are reset when the appropriate RES instruction is executed. The CD
bits are always set prior to entering the REM Run or REM Test modes.
6–19
Programming
The accumulated counts are retained when the rung conditions again become false.
The accumulated count is retained until cleared by a reset (RES) instruction that has
the same address as the counter reset.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Reset (RES)
(RES)
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
15.19
4.25
Note
Use a RES instruction to reset a timer or counter. When the RES instruction is
executed, it resets the data having the same address as the RES instruction.
Using a RES instruction for a:
The controller resets the:
Timer
(Do not use a RES instruction
with a TOF.)
ACC value to 0
DN bit
TT bit
EN bit
Counter
ACC value to 0
OV bit
UN bit
DN bit
CU bit
CD bit
Control
POS value to 0
EN bit
EU bit
DN bit
EM bit
ER bit
UL bit
IN and FD go to last state
If using this instruction to reset the HSC accumulator, see page 12–21.
When resetting a counter, if the RES instruction is enabled and the counter rung is
enabled, the CU or CD bit is reset.
If the counter preset value is negative, the RES instruction sets the accumulated
value to zero. This in turn causes the done bit to be set by a count down or count up
instruction.
Because the RES instruction resets the accumulated value, and the done,
timing, and enabled bits, do not use the RES instruction to reset a timer
address used in a TOF instruction. Otherwise, unpredictable machine
operation or injury to personnel may occur.
6–20
Using Basic Instructions
Basic Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine
Application Example
This section provides ladder rungs to demonstrate the use of basic instructions. The
rungs are part of the paper drilling machine application example described in
appendix E. You will be adding the main program in file 2 and adding a subroutine
to file 6.
The rungs shown on the following page are referred to as the program’s “start-up”
logic. They determine the conditions necessary to start the machine in motion by
monitoring the start and stop push buttons. When the start push button is pressed, it
enables the conveyor to move and starts spinning the drill bit. When the stop push
button is pressed, it disables the conveyor motion and turns off the drill motor.
The start-up logic also checks to make sure that the drill is fully retracted (in the
home position) before allowing the conveyor to move.
Drill Home
I/5
Drill On/Off O/1
Manuals with
Drilled Holes
Conveyor Belt
6–21
Programming
Adding File 2
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 2:3➀
Starts the conveyor in motion when the start button is pressed.
However, another condition must also be met before we start the
conveyor: the drill must be in its fully retracted position (home).
This rung also stops the conveyor when the stop button is pressed.
|
START
|Drill
STOP
Machine
|
|
Button
|Home LS
Button
RUN
|
|
Latch
|
|
I:0
I:0
I:0
B3
|
|–+––––] [––––––––][––––––+–––]/[––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
| |
6
5
|
7
0
|
| | Machine
|
|
| |
RUN
|
|
| | Latch
|
|
| |
B3
|
|
| +––––] [––––––––––––––––+
|
|
0
|
Rung 2:4
Applies the above start logic to the conveyor and drill motor.
| Machine
Drill
|Conveyor
|
|
RUN
Home LS
|Enable
|
| Latch
|
|
B3
I:0
O:0
|
|––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+–|
|
0
|
5
5
| |
|
|
Drill
| |
|
|
Motor ON
| |
|
|
O:0
| |
|
+–––––––––––––––( )–––––+ |
|
1
|
➀
6–22
Rungs 2:0 through 2:2 will be added in chapter 12.
Using Basic Instructions
Adding File 6
This subroutine controls the up and down motion of the drill for the paper drilling
machine.
Drill Home
I/5
Drill On/Off O/1
Drill Retract O/2
Drill Forward O/3
Rung 6:0
This section of ladder logic controls the up/down motion of the drill
for the book drilling machine. When the conveyor positions the book
under the drill, the DRILL SEQUENCE START bit is set. This rung uses
that bit to begin the drilling operation. Because the bit is set for
the entire drilling operation, the OSR is required to be able to turn
off the forward signal so the drill can retract.
| Drill
|Drill Subr|
Drill
|
| Sequence |
OSR
|
Forward
|
| Start
|
|
|
B3
B3
O:0
|
[–––] [––––––––[OSR]––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(L)––––––|
|
32
48
3
|
Rung 6:1
When the drill has drilled through the book, the body of the drill
actuates the DRILL DEPTH limit switch. When this happens, the DRILL
FORWARD signal is turned off and the DRILL RETRACT signal is turned
on. The drill is also retracted automatically on power up if it is
not actuating the DRILL HOME limit switch.
|
Drill
Drill
|
|
Depth LS
Forward
|
|
I:0
O:0
|
|–+––––] [––––––––––––––––+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––––(U)–––––+–|
| |
4
|
|
3
| |
| | 1’st
|Drill
|
| Drill
| |
| | Pass
|Home LS
|
| Retract
| |
| |
S:1
I:0
|
|
O:0
| |
| +––––] [––––––––]/[–––––+
+––––(L)–––––+ |
|
15
5
2
|
6–23
Programming
Drill Depth
I/4
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 6:2
When the drill is retracting (after
drill actuates the DRILL HOME limit
DRILL RETRACT signal is turned off,
turned off to indicate the drilling
conveyor is restarted.
drilling a hole), the body of the
switch. When this happens the
the DRILL SEQUENCE START bit is
process is complete, and the
| Drill
|Drill
Drill
|
| Home LS
|Retract
Retract
|
|
I:0
O:0
O:0
|
|––––] [––––––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––––(U)–––––+–|
|
5
2
|
2
| |
|
| Drill
| |
|
| Sequence
| |
|
| Start
| |
|
|
B3
| |
|
+––––(U)–––––+ |
|
|
32
| |
|
| Conveyor
| |
|
| Start/Stop | |
|
|
| |
|
|
O:0
| |
|
+––––(L)–––––+ |
|
0
|
Rung 6.3
|
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
6–24
Using Comparison Instructions
7 Using Comparison Instructions
This chapter contains general information about comparison instructions and
explains how they function in your application program. Each of the comparison
instructions includes information on:
what the instruction symbol looks like
typical execution time for the instruction
how to use the instruction
Programming
•
•
•
In addition, the last section contains an application example for a paper drilling
machine that shows the comparison instructions in use.
Comparison Instructions
Instruction
Mnemonic
Name
Purpose
Page
EQU
Equal
Test whether two values are equal.
7–3
NEQ
Not Equal
Test whether one value is not equal to a second value.
7–3
LES
Less Than
Test whether one value is less than a second value.
7–3
LEQ
Less Than or Equal Test whether one value is less than or equal to a second value.
7–4
GRT
Greater Than
Test whether one value is greater than another.
7–4
GEQ
Greater Than or
Equal
Test whether one value is greater than or equal to a
second value.
7–4
MEQ
Masked
Comparison for
Equal
Test portions of two values to see whether they are
equal. Compares 16-bit data of a source address to
16-bit data at a reference address through a mask.
7–5
LIM
Limit Test
Test whether one value is within the limit range of two
other values.
7–6
7–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
About the Comparison Instructions
Comparison instructions are used to test pairs of values to condition the logical
continuity of a rung. As an example, suppose a LES instruction is presented with
two values. If the first value is less than the second, then the comparison instruction
is true.
To learn more about the compare instructions, we suggest that you read the
Compare Instructions Overview that follows.
Comparison Instructions Overview
The following general information applies to comparison instructions.
Indexed Word Addresses
When using comparison instructions, you have the option of using indexed word
addresses for instruction parameters specifying word addresses. Indexed addressing
is discussed in chapter 5.
7–2
Using Comparison Instructions
Equal (EQU)
EQU
EQUAL
Source A
Use the EQU instruction to test whether two values are equal. If source A and
source B are equal, the instruction is logically true. If these values are not equal, the
instruction is logically false.
Source B
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
6.60
Not Equal (NEQ)
NEQ
NOT EQUAL
Source A
Use the NEQ instruction to test whether two values are not equal. If source A and
source B are not equal, the instruction is logically true. If the two values are equal,
the instruction is logically false.
Source B
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
21.52
Source A must be a word address. Source B can be either a constant or word
address. Negative integers are stored in two’s complement form.
6.60
Less Than (LES)
LES
LESS THAN
Source A
Use the LES instruction to test whether one value (source A) is less than another
(source B). If the value at source A is less than the value of source B the instruction
is logically true. If the value at source A is greater than or equal to the value of
source B, the instruction is logically false.
Source B
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
23.60
6.60
Source A must be a word address. Source B can be either a constant or word
address. Negative integers are stored in two’s complement form.
7–3
Programming
21.52
Source A must be a word address. Source B can be either a constant or word
address. Negative integers are stored in two’s complement form.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Less Than or Equal (LEQ)
LEQ
LESS THAN OR EQUAL
Source A
Source B
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
23.60
6.60
Use the LEQ instruction to test whether one value (source A) is less than or equal to
another (source B). If the value at source A is less than or equal to the value of
source B, the instruction is logically true. If the value at source A is greater than the
value of source B, the instruction is logically false.
Source A must be a word address. Source B can be either a constant or word
address. Negative integers are stored in two’s complement form.
Greater Than (GRT)
Use the GRT instruction to test whether one value (source A) is greater than another
(source B). If the value at source A is greater than the value of source B, the
instruction is logically true. If the value at source A is less than or equal to the value
of source B, the instruction is logically false.
GRT
GREATER THAN
Source A
Source B
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
23.60
6.60
Source A must be a word address. Source B can be either a constant or word
address. Negative integers are stored in two’s complement form.
Greater Than or Equal (GEQ)
GEQ
GRTR THAN OR EQUAL
Source A
Source B
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
23.60
6.60
7–4
Use the GEQ instruction to test whether one value (source A) is greater than or
equal to another (source B). If the value at source A is greater than or equal to the
value of source B, the instruction is logically true. If the value at source A is less
than the value of source B, the instruction is logically false.
Source A must be a word address. Source B can be either a constant or word
address. Negative integers are stored in two’s complement form.
Using Comparison Instructions
Masked Comparison for Equal (MEQ)
MEQ
MASKED EQUAL
Source
Mask
Compare
Use the MEQ instruction to compare data of a source address with data of a
reference address. Use of this instruction allows portions of the data to be masked
by a separate word.
True
False
28.39
7.69
Entering Parameters
•
•
•
Source is the address of the value you want to compare.
Mask is the address of the mask through which the instruction moves data. The
mask can be a hexadecimal value (constant).
Compare is an integer value or the address of the reference.
If the 16 bits of data at the source address are equal to the 16 bits of data at the
compare address (less masked bits), the instruction is true. The instruction becomes
false as soon as it detects a mismatch. Bits in the mask word mask data when reset;
they pass data when set.
7–5
Programming
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Limit Test (LIM)
LIM
LIMIT TEST
Low Lim
Use the LIM instruction to test for values within or outside a specified range,
depending on how you set the limits.
Test
High Lim
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
36.93
7.69
Entering Parameters
The Low Limit, Test, and High Limit values can be word addresses or constants,
restricted to the following combinations:
•
•
If the Test parameter is a constant, both the Low Limit and High Limit
parameters must be word addresses.
If the Test parameter is a word address, the Low Limit and High Limit
parameters can be either a constant or a word address.
True/False Status of the Instruction
If the Low Limit has a value equal to or less than the High Limit, the instruction is
true when the Test value is between the limits or is equal to either limit. If the Test
value is outside the limits, the instruction is false, as shown below.
False
–32,768
True
Low Limit
False
High Limit
+ 32,767
Example, low limit less than high limit:
7–6
Low
Limit
High
Limit
Instruction is True
when Test value is
Instruction is False
when Test value is
5
8
5 through 8
–32,768 through 4 and 9 through 32,767
Using Comparison Instructions
If the Low Limit has a value greater than the High Limit, the instruction is false
when the Test value is between the limits. If the Test value is equal to either limit or
outside the limits, the instruction is true, as shown below.
True
–32,768
False
High Limit
True
Low Limit
+ 32,767
Example, low limit greater than high limit:
High
Limit
8
5
Instruction is True
when Test value is
–32,768 through 5 and 8 through 32,767
Instruction is False
when Test value is
6 and 7
Programming
Low
Limit
7–7
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Comparison Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine
Application Example
This section provides ladder rungs to demonstrate the use of comparison
instructions. The rungs are part of the paper drilling machine application example
described in appendix E. You will be adding an instruction to file 2 and beginning a
subroutine in file 7.
Adding to File 2
To begin you will need to return to the rungs first entered in chapter 6. One more
instruction needs to be added to the first rung to keep track of the drill life. This
rung is indicated below by the shading. Notice that text has also been added to the
rung comment.
Note
Do not add this instruction if you are using a 16 I/O controller. Address O:0/6 is
only valid for 32 I/O controllers.
Rung 2:3
Starts the conveyor in motion when the start button is pressed.
However, there are other conditions that must also be met before we
start the conveyor. The are: the drill must be in its fully
retracted position (home); the drill bit must not be past its maximum
useful life. This rung also stops the conveyor when the stop button
is pressed or when the drill life is exceeded.
|
START
|Drill
STOP
|change
|
Machine
|
|
Button
|Home LS
Button
|drill bit |
RUN
|
|
|NOW
|
Latch
|
|
I:0
I:0
I:0
O:0
B3
|
|–+––––] [––––––––][–––––+––––]/[––––––––]/[––––––––––––––––––( )––––|
| |
6
5
|
7
6
0
|
| | Machine
|
|
| |
RUN
|
|
| | Latch
|
|
| |
B3
|
|
| +––––] [––––––––––––––––+
|
|
0
|
7–8
Using Comparison Instructions
Beginning a Subroutine in File 7
This section of ladder keeps track of the total inches of paper the current drill bit has
drilled through. As the current bit wears out, a light illuminates on the operator
panel, below, to warn the operator to change the drill bit.
For 32 I/O controllers: If the operator ignores this warning too long, this ladder
shuts the machine down until the operator changes the bit.
Start I/6
Stop I/7
Thumbwheel for
Thickness in 1/4”
Change Tool Soon
O/4
Change Tool Now
O/6
5 Hole
Tool Change Reset
3 Hole
I/11–I/14
(Keyswitch)
I/8
Programming
OPERATOR PANEL
7 Hole
I/9–I/10
Rung 7:0➀
Examines the number of 1/4 in. thousands that have accumulated over
the life of the current drill bit. If the bit has drilled between
100,000–101,999 1/4 in. increments of paper, the ”change drill” light
illuminates steadily. When the value is between 102,000–103,999, the
”change drill” light flashes at a 1.28 second rate. When the value
reaches 105,000, the ”change drill” light flashes, and the ”change
drill now” light illuminates.
|
1/4 in.
100,000
|
|
Thousands
1/4 in.
|
|
increments
|
|
have
|
|
occurred
|
|
+GEQ–––––––––––––––+
B3
|
|–––+–+GRTR THAN OR EQUAL+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––+–|
|
| |Source A
N7:11|
16
| |
|
| |
0|
| |
|
| |Source B
100|
| |
|
| |
|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
7–9
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
|
|
1/4 in.
102,000
|
|
|
Thousands
1/4 in.
|
|
|
increments |
|
|
have
|
|
|
occurred
|
|
| +GEQ–––––––––––––––+
B3
|
|
+–+GRTR THAN OR EQUAL+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––+
|
| |Source A
N7:11|
17
|
|
| |
0|
|
|
| |Source B
102|
|
|
| |
|
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
|
1/4 in.
change
|
|
|
Thousands
drill bit |
|
|
NOW
|
|
| +GEQ–––––––––––––––+
O:0
|
➁
|
+–+GRTR THAN OR EQUAL+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––+
|
| |Source A
N7:11|
6
|
|
| |
0|
|
|
| |Source B
105|
|
|
| |
|
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
|
100,000
|102,000
change
|
|
|
1/4 in.
|1/4 in.
drill
|
|
|
increments|increments
bit
|
|
|
have
|have
soon
|
|
|
occurred |occurred
|
|
|
B3
B3
O:0
|
|
+–+––––––––––––––––––––] [––––––––]/[–––––––––––––––+––( )–––––+
|
|
16
17
|
4
|
|
100,000
|102,000
|1.28
|
|
|
1/4 in.
|1/4 in.
|second
|
|
|
increments|increments|free
|
|
|
have
|have
|running
|
|
|
occurred |occurred |clock bit |
|
|
B3
B3
S:4
|
|
+–––––––––––––––––––] [––––––––] [––––––––] [–––––+
|
16
17
7
7–10
➀
More rungs are added to this subroutine at the end of chapters 8 and 9.
➁
This branch accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Therefore, do not include this branch if you are
using a 16 I/O controller.
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
Using Math Instructions
8 Using Math Instructions
This chapter contains general information about math instructions and explains how
they function in your logic program. Each of the math instructions includes
information on:
•
•
•
what the instruction symbol looks like
typical execution time for the instruction
Programming
how to use the instruction
In addition, the last section contains an application example for a paper drilling
machine that shows the math instructions in use.
Math Instructions
Instruction
Mnemonic
Name
Purpose
Page
ADD
Add
Adds source A to source B and stores the result in
the destination.
8–4
SUB
Subtract
Subtracts source B from source A and stores the
result in the destination.
8–5
MUL
Multiply
Multiplies source A by source B and stores the
result in the destination.
8–8
DIV
Divide
Divides source A by source B and stores the result
in the destination and the math register.
8–9
DDV
Double Divide
Divides the contents of the math register by the
source and stores the result in the destination and
the math register.
8–10
CLR
Clear
Sets all bits of a word to zero.
8–11
SQR
Square Root
Calculates the square root of the source and places
the integer result in the destination.
8–11
SCL
Scale Data
Multiplies the source by a specified rate, adds to an
offset value, and stores the result in the destination.
8–12
8–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
About the Math Instructions
These instructions perform the familiar four function math operations. The majority
of the instructions take two input values, perform the specified arithmetic function,
and output the result to an assigned memory location.
For example, both the ADD and SUB instructions take a pair of input values, add or
subtract them, and place the result in the specified destination. If the result of the
operation exceeds the allowable value, an overflow or underflow bit is set.
To learn more about the math instructions, we suggest that you read the Math
Instructions Overview that follows.
Math Instructions Overview
The following general information applies to math instructions.
Using Indexed Word Addresses
You have the option of using indexed word addresses for instruction parameters
specifying word addresses. Indexed addressing is discussed in chapter 5.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
The arithmetic status bits are found in Word 0, bits 0–3 in the controller status file.
After an instruction is executed, the arithmetic status bits in the status file are
updated:
With this Bit:
8–2
S:0/0
Carry (C)
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
S:0/3
Sign (S)
The Controller:
sets if carry is generated; otherwise cleared.
indicates that the actual result of a math instruction does not fit
in the designated destination.
indicates a 0 value after a math, move, or logic instruction.
indicates a negative (less than 0) value after a math, move, or
logic instruction.
Using Math Instructions
Overflow Trap Bit, S:5/0
Minor error bit (S:5/0) is set upon detection of a mathematical overflow or division
by zero. If this bit is set upon execution of an END statement or a Temporary End
(TND) instruction, the recoverable major error code 0020 is declared.
In applications where a math overflow or divide by zero occurs, you can avoid a
controller fault by using an unlatch (OTU) instruction with address S:5/0 in your
program. The rung must be between the overflow point and the END or TND
statement.
Status word S:13 contains the least significant word of the 32-bit values of the MUL
and DDV instructions. It contains the remainder for DIV and DDV instructions. It
also contains the first four BCD digits for the Convert from BCD (FRD) and
Convert to BCD (TOD) instructions.
Status word S:14 contains the most significant word of the 32-bit values of the MUL
and DDV instructions. It contains the unrounded quotient for DIV and DDV
instructions. It also contains the most significant digit (digit 5) for TOD and FRD
instructions.
8–3
Programming
Changes to the Math Register, S:13 and S:14
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Add (ADD)
ADD
ADD
Source A
Use the ADD instruction to add one value (source A) to another value (source B)
and place the result in the destination. Source A and B can either be a word address
or constant.
Source B
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
33.09
6.78
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
S:0/0
8–4
Carry (C)
The Controller:
sets if carry is generated; otherwise resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if overflow is detected at destination; otherwise resets.
On overflow, the minor error flag is also set. The value
–32,768 or 32,767 is placed in the destination. If S:2/14 (math
overflow selection bit) is set, then the unsigned, truncated
overflow remains in the destination.
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative; otherwise resets.
Using Math Instructions
Subtract (SUB)
Use the SUB instruction to subtract one value (Source B) from another (source A)
and place the result in the destination. Source A and B can either be a word address
or constant.
SUB
SUBTRACT
Source A
Source B
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
6.78
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
The Controller:
sets if borrow is generated; otherwise resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if underflow; otherwise reset. On underflow, the minor
error flag is also set. The value –32,768 or 32,767 is placed in
the destination. If S:2/14 (math overflow selection bit) is set,
then the unsigned, truncated overflow remains in the
destination.
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative; otherwise resets.
8–5
Programming
33.52
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
32-Bit Addition and Subtraction
You have the option of performing 16-bit or 32-bit signed integer addition and
subtraction. This is facilitated by status file bit S:2/14 (math overflow selection bit).
Math Overflow Selection Bit S:2/14
Set this bit when you intend to use 32-bit addition and subtraction. When S:2/14 is
set, and the result of an ADD, SUB, MUL, DIV, or NEG instruction cannot be
represented in the destination address (due to math underflow or overflow):
•
•
•
The overflow bit S:0/1 is set.
The overflow trap bit S:5/0 is set.
The destination address contains the unsigned truncated least significant 16 bits
of the result.
When S:2/14 is reset (default condition), and the result of an ADD, SUB, MUL,
DIV, or NEG instruction cannot be represented in the destination address (due to
math underflow or overflow):
•
•
•
The overflow bit S:0/1 is set.
The overflow trap bit S:5/0 is set.
The destination address contains 32767 if the result is positive or –32768 if the
result is negative.
Note that the status of bit S:2/14 has no effect on the DDV instruction. Also, it has
no effect on the math register content when using MUL and DIV instructions.
Example of 32-bit Addition
The following example shows how a 16-bit signed integer is added to a 32-bit
signed integer. Remember that S:2/14 must be set for 32-bit addition.
Note that the value of the most significant 16 bits (B3:3) of the 32-bit number is
increased by 1 if the carry bit S:0/0 is set and it is decreased by 1 if the number
being added (B3:1) is negative.
To avoid a major error from occurring at the end of the scan, you must unlatch
overflow trap bit S:5/0 as shown.
8–6
Using Math Instructions
Add 16–bit value B3:1 to 32–bit value B3:3 B3:2
Add Operation
Binary
Hex
Decimal➀
Addend B3:3 B3:2
Addend
B3:1
0000 0000 0000 0011 0001 1001 0100 0000 0003 1940
55A8
0101 0101 1010 1000
203,072
21,928
Sum B3:3 B3:2
0000 0000 0000 0011 0110 1110 1110 1000 0003 6EE8
225,000
➀ The programming device displays 16-bit decimal values only. The decimal value of a 32-bit integer is derived
B3
] [
ADD
B3
[OSR]
1
0
ADD
Source A
B3:1
0101010110101000
Source B
B3:2
0001100101000000
Dest
B3:2
0001100101000000
ADD
S:0
] [
0
ADD
Source A
1
When the rung goes
true for a single scan,
B3:1 is added to B3:2.
The result is placed in
B3:2.
If a carry is generated
(S:0/0 set), 1 is added
to B3:3.
Source B
B3:3
0000000000000011
Dest
B3:3
0000000000000011
B3
] [
31
SUB
SUBTRACT
Source A
B3:3
0000000000000011
Source B
1
If B3:1 is negative
(B3/31 set), 1 is
subtracted from B3:3.
Dest
B3:3
0000000000000011
S:5
(U)
0
END
Overflow trap bit
S:5/0 is unlatched to
prevent a major error
from occurring at the
end of the scan.
8–7
Programming
from the displayed binary or hex value. For example, 0003 1940 Hex is 164x3 + 163x1 + 162x9 + 161x4 + 160x0
= 203,072.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Multiply (MUL)
MUL
MULTIPLY
Source A
Use the MUL instruction to multiply one value (source A) by another (source B)
and place the result in the destination. Source A and B can either be a word address
or constant.
Source B
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
57.96
If the result is larger than +32,767 or smaller than –32,767 (16-bits), the 32-bit
result is placed in the math register.
6.78
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
The Controller:
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if overflow is detected at destination; otherwise resets.
On overflow, the minor error flag is also set. The value
–32,768 or 32,767 is placed in the destination. If S:2/14 (math
overflow selection bit) is set, then the unsigned, truncated
overflow remains in the destination.
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative; otherwise resets.
Changes to the Math Register
The math register contains the 32-bit signed integer result of the multiply operation.
This result is valid at overflow.
8–8
Using Math Instructions
Divide (DIV)
Use the DIV instruction to divide one value (source A) by another (source B), and
place the rounded quotient in the destination. If the remainder is 0.5 or greater, the
destination is rounded up.
DIV
DIVIDE
Source A
Source B
Dest
True
False
147.87
6.78
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
S:0/3
Sign (S)
The Controller:
always resets.
sets if division by zero or overflow is detected; otherwise
resets. On overflow, the minor error flag is also set. The value
32,767 is placed in the destination. If S:2/14 (math overflow
selection bit) is set, then the unsigned, truncated overflow
remains in the destination.
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets; undefined if overflow is
set.
sets if result is negative; otherwise resets; undefined if
overflow is set.
Changes to the Math Register
The unrounded quotient is placed in the most significant word, the remainder is
placed in the least significant word.
8–9
Programming
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Double Divide (DDV)
DDV
DOUBLE DIVIDE
Source
The 32-bit content of the math register is divided by the 16-bit source value and the
rounded quotient is placed in the destination. If the remainder is 0.5 or greater, the
destination is rounded up.
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
157.06
6.78
This instruction typically follows a MUL instruction that creates a 32-bit result.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
sets if division by zero or if result is greater than 32,767 or less
than –32,768; otherwise resets. On overflow, the minor error
flag is also set. The value 32,767 is placed in the destination.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative; otherwise resets; undefined if
overflow is set.
Changes to the Math Register
Initially contains the dividend of the DDV operation. Upon instruction execution
the unrounded quotient is placed in the most significant word of the math register.
The remainder is placed in the least significant word of the math register.
8–10
Using Math Instructions
Clear (CLR)
CLR
CLEAR
Dest
Use the CLR instruction to set the destination to zero. All of the bits reset.
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
20.80
4.25
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
The Controller:
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
always resets.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
always sets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
always resets.
Programming
With this Bit:
S:0/0
Square Root (SQR)
SQR
SQUARE ROOT
Source
When this instruction is evaluated as true, the square root of the absolute value of
the source is calculated and the rounded integer result is placed in the destination.
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
71.25
6.78
The instruction calculates the square root of a negative number without overflow or
faults. In applications where the source value may be negative, use a comparison
instruction to evaluate the source value to determine if the destination may be
invalid.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
sets if the source is negative; otherwise cleared.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
always resets.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets when destination value is zero.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
always resets.
8–11
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Scale Data (SCL)
SCL
SCALE
Source
When this instruction is true, the value at the source address is multiplied by the rate
value. The rounded result is added to the offset value and placed in the destination.
Rate [/10000]
Offset
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
169.18
Note
6.78
Anytime an underflow or overflow occurs in the destination file, minor error bit
S:5/0 must be reset. This must occur before the end of the current scan to prevent
major error code 0020 from being declared. This instruction can overflow before
the offset is added.
Entering Parameters
The value for the following parameters is between –32,768 to 32,767.
•
•
•
Source can either be a constant or a word address.
Rate is the positive or negative value you enter divided by 10,000. It can be a
constant or a word address.
Offset can either be a constant or a word address.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
S:0/0
➀
8–12
Carry (C)
The Controller:
is reserved.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if an overflow is detected; otherwise resets. On overflow,
minor error bit S:5/0 is also set and the value –32,768 or
32,767 is placed in the destination. The presence of an
overflow is checked before and after the offset value is
applied.➀
sets when destination value is zero.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if the destination value is negative; otherwise resets.
If the result of the Source times the Rate, divided by 10000 is greater than 32767, the SCL instruction overflows,
causing error 0020 (Minor Error Bit), and places 32767 in the Destination. This occurs regardless of the current
offset.
Using Math Instructions
The following example takes a 0V to 10V analog input from a MicroLogix 1000
analog controller and scales the raw input data to a value between 0 and 100%. The
input value range is 0V to 10V which corresponds to 0 to 31,207 counts. The scaled
value range is 0 to 100 percent.
Application Example – Convert Voltage Input to Percent
100
(Scaled Max.)
Scaled Value
(percent)
(Scaled Min.)
0
0V
(Input Min.)
31,207 10V
(Input Max.)
Input Value
Calculating the Linear Relationship
Use the following equations to calculate the scaled units:
Scaled value = (input value x rate) + offset
Rate = (scaled max. – scaled min.) / (input max. – input min.)
= (100 – 0) / (31,207 – 0)
= .00320 (or 32/10000)
Offset = scaled min. – (input min. x rate)
= 0 − (0 × .00320) = 0
8–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Math Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine
Application Example
This section provides ladder rungs to demonstrate the use of math instructions. The
rungs are part of the paper drilling machine application example described in
appendix E. You will be adding to the subroutine in file 7 that was started in
chapter 7.
| drill change
1/4 in.
|
| reset keyswitch
Thousands
|
|
I:0
+CLR–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+CLEAR
+–+–|
|
8
| |Dest
N7:11| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
1/4 in.
| |
|
|
increments
| |
|
|
| |
|
| +CLR–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+CLEAR
+–+ |
|
|Dest
N7:10|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 7:5➀
Keeps a running total of how many inches of paper have been drilled
with the current drill bit. Every time a hole is drilled, the
thickness (in 1/4 ins) is added to the running total (kept in 1/4
ins). The OSR is necessary because the ADD executes every time the
rung is true, and the drill body would actuate the DRILL DEPTH limit
switch for more than 1 program scan. Integer N7:12 is the
integer-converted value of the BCD thumbwheel on inputs I:0/11 –
I:0/14.
| Drill
|Drill Wear
1/4 in.
|
| Depth LS | OSR 1
increments
|
|
|
|
I:0
B3
+ADD–––––––––––––––+ |
|––––] [–––––––[OSR]––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+ADD
+–|
|
4
24
|Source A
N7:12| |
|
|
0| |
|
|Source B
N7:10| |
|
|
0| |
|
|Dest
N7:10| |
|
|
0| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
➀
8–14
Rungs 7:2 through 7:4 are added at the end of Chapter 9.
Programming
Rung 7:1
Resets the number of 1/4 in. increments and the 1/4 in. thousands when
the ”drill change reset” keyswitch is energized. This should occur
following each drill bit change.
Using Math Instructions
Rung 7:6
When the number of 1/4 in. increments surpasses 1000, finds out how
many increments are past 1000 and stores in N7:20. Add 1 to the total
of 1000 1/4 in. increments, and re-initializes the 1/4 in. increments
accumulator to how many increments were beyond 1000.
|
1/4 in.
|
|
increments
|
|
|
| +GEQ–––––––––––––––+
+SUB–––––––––––––––+
|
|–+GRTR THAN OR EQUAL+––––––––––––––––––––––+–+SUBTRACT
+–+–|
| |Source A
N7:10|
| |Source A
N7:10| | |
| |
0|
| |
0| | |
| |Source B
1000|
| |Source B
1000| | |
| |
|
| |
| | |
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |Dest
N7:20| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
1/4 in.
| |
|
|
Thousands
| |
|
| +ADD–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+ADD
+–+ |
|
| |Source A
1| | |
|
| |
| | |
|
| |Source B
N7:11| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| |Dest
N7:11| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
1/4 in.
| |
|
|
increments
| |
|
|
| |
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+MOVE
+–+ |
|
|Source
N7:20|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
|Dest
N7:10|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 7:7
|
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
8–15
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Notes:
8–16
Using Data Handling Instructions
9 Using Data Handling Instructions
This chapter contains general information about the data handling instructions and
explains how they function in your application program. Each of the instructions
includes information on:
what the instruction symbol looks like
typical execution time for the instruction
how to use the instruction
Programming
•
•
•
In addition, the last section contains an application example for a paper drilling
machine that shows the data handling instructions in use.
Data Handling Instructions
Instruction
Mnemonic
Name
Purpose
Page
TOD
Convert to BCD
Converts the integer source value to BCD format
and stores it in the destination.
9–3
FRD
Convert from BCD
Converts the BCD source value to an integer and
stores it in the destination.
9–5
DCD
Decode 4 to 1 of 16
Decodes a 4-bit value (0 to 15), turning on the
corresponding bit in the 16-bit destination.
9–8
ENC
Encode 1 of 16 to 4
Encodes a 16-bit source to a 4-bit value.
Searches the source from the lowest to the
highest bit, and looks for the first set bit. The
corresponding bit position is written to the
destination as an integer.
9–9
COP and
FLL
Copy File and
Fill File
The COP instruction copies data from the source
file to the destination file The FLL instruction
loads a source value into each position in the
destination file.
9–10
Continued on the next page.
9–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Instruction
Mnemonic
Purpose
Name
Page
MOV
Move
Moves the source value to the destination.
9–15
MVM
Masked Move
Moves data from a source location to a selected
portion of the destination.
9–16
AND
And
Performs a bitwise AND operation.
9–18
OR
Or
Performs a bitwise inclusive OR operation.
9–19
XOR
Exclusive Or
Performs a bitwise Exclusive OR operation.
9–20
NOT
Not
Performs a NOT operation.
9–21
NEG
Negate
Changes the sign of the source and stores it in the
destination.
9–22
FFL and
FFU
FIFO Load and
FIFO Unload
The FFL instruction loads a word into a FIFO stack
on successive false-to-true transitions. The FFU
unloads a word from the stack on successive falsetrue transitions. The first word loaded is the first to
be unloaded.
9–25
LFL and
LFU
LIFO Load and
LIFO Unload
The LFL instruction loads a word into a LIFO stack
on successive false-to-true transitions. The LFU
unloads a word from the stack on successive falseto-true transitions. The last word loaded is the first
to be unloaded.
9–26
About the Data Handling Instructions
Use these instructions to convert information, manipulate data in the controller, and
perform logic operations.
In this chapter you will find a general overview preceding groups of instructions.
Before you learn about the instructions in each of these groups, we suggest that you
read the overview. This chapter contains the following overviews:
•
•
9–2
Move and Logical Instructions Overview
FIFO and LIFO Instructions Overview
Using Data Handling Instructions
Convert to BCD (TOD)
TOD
TO BCD
Source
Use this instruction to convert 16-bit integers into BCD values.
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
49.64
6.78
The source must be a word address. The destination parameter can be a word
address in a data file, or it can be the math register, S:13 and S:14.
If the integer value you enter is negative, the sign is ignored and the conversion
occurs as if the number was positive.
With this Bit:
Programming
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if the BCD result is larger than 9999. On overflow, the
minor error flag is also set.
sets if destination value is zero.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if the source word is negative; otherwise resets.
Changes to the Math Register
Contains the 5-digit BCD result of the conversion. This result is valid at overflow.
Note
To convert numbers larger than 9999 decimal, the destination must be the Math
Register (S:13). You must reset the Minor Error Bit (S:5/0) to prevent an error.
9–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Example
The integer value 9760 stored at N7:3 is converted to BCD and the BCD equivalent
is stored in N7:0. The maximum BCD value is 9999.
TOD
TO BCD
Source
N7:3
9760
N7:0
9760
Dest
MPS displays the destination value in
BCD format.
MSB
9–4
9
7
6
0
N7:3 Decimal
9
7
6
0
N7:0 4-digit BCD
LSB
0010 0110 0010 0000
1001 0111 0110 0000
Using Data Handling Instructions
Convert from BCD (FRD)
FRD
FROM BCD
Source
Use this instruction to convert BCD values to integer values.
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
56.88
The source parameter can be a word address in a data file, or it can be the math
register, S:13. The destination must be a word address.
5.52
With this Bit:
Note
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
sets if non-BCD value is contained at the source or the value
to be converted is greater than 32,767; otherwise reset. On
overflow, the minor error flag is also set.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if destination value is zero.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
always resets.
Always provide ladder logic filtering of all BCD input devices prior to performing
the FRD instruction. The slightest difference in point-to-point input filter delay can
cause the FRD instruction to overflow due to the conversion of a non-BCD digit.
S:1
]/[
15
EQU
EQUAL
Source A
FRD
N7:1
0
FROM BCD
Source
Dest
Source B
I:0.0
0
I:0.0
0000
N7:2
0
MOV
MOVE
Source
Dest
I:0.0
0
N7:1
0
The two rungs shown cause the controller to verify that the value I:0 remains the
same for two consecutive scans before it will execute the FRD. This prevents the
FRD from converting a non-BCD value during an input value change.
9–5
Programming
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Note
To convert numbers larger than 9999 BCD, the source must be the Math Register
(S:13). You must reset the Minor Error Bit (S:5.0) to prevent an error.
Example
The BCD value 32,760 in the math register is converted and stored in N7:0. The
maximum source value is 32767, BCD.
FRD
FROM BCD
Source
Dest
S:13
00032760
N7:0
32760
S:14
MPS displays S:13
and S:14 in BCD.
S:13
0000 0000 0000 0011
0
0
0
3
0010 0111 0110 0000
2
7
6
0
5–digit BCD
3 2 7 6 0
N7:0 0111 1111 1111 1000 Decimal
You should convert BCD values to integer before you manipulate them in your
ladder program. If you do not convert the values, the controller manipulates them as
integers and their value may be lost.
Note
9–6
If the math register (S:13 and S:14) is used as the source for the FRD instruction
and the BCD value does not exceed 4 digits, be sure to clear word S:14 before
executing the FRD instruction. If S:14 is not cleared and a value is contained in
this word from another math instruction located elsewhere in the program, an
incorrect decimal value will be placed in the destination word.
Using Data Handling Instructions
Clearing S:14 before executing the FRD instruction is shown below:
MOV
I:0
] [
1
MOVE
Source
Dest
N7:2
4660
S:13
4660
0001 0010 0011 0100
CLR
CLEAR
Dest
S:14
0
Dest
S:13
00001234
N7:0
1234
MPS displays S:13
and S:14 in BCD.
0000 0100 1101 0010
When the input condition I:0/1 is set (1), a BCD value (transferred from a 4-digit
thumbwheel switch for example) is moved from word N7:2 into the math register.
Status word S:14 is then cleared to make certain that unwanted data is not present
when the FRD instruction is executed.
9–7
Programming
FRD
FROM BCD
Source
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Decode 4 to 1 of 16 (DCD)
DCD
DECODE 4 to 1 of 16
Source
When executed, this instruction sets one bit of the destination word. The particular
bit that is turned On depends on the value of the first four bits of the source word.
See the table below.
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
27.67
Use this instruction to multiplex data in applications such as rotary switches,
keypads, and bank switching.
6.78
Source
Bit
Destination
15–04 03 02 01 00
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Entering Parameters
•
•
Source is the address that contains the information to be decoded. Only the
first four bits (0–3) are used by the DCD instruction. The remaining bits may
be used for other application specific needs.
Destination is the address of the word where the decoded data is to be stored.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
Unaffected.
9–8
Using Data Handling Instructions
Encode 1 of 16 to 4 (ENC)
ENC
ENCODE 1 of 16 to 4
Source
When the rung is true, this output instruction searches the source from the lowest to
the highest bit, and looks for the first set bit. The corresponding bit position is
written to the destination as an integer as shown in the table below.
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
6.78
Source
Bit
Destination
15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
x
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
x
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
x
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
x
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
x
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
15–04 03 02 01 00
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
Entering Parameters
•
•
Source is the address of the word to be encoded. Only one bit of this word
should be on at any one time. If more than one bit in the source is set, the
destination bits will be set based on the least significant bit that is set. If a
source of zero is used, all of the destination bits will be reset and the zero bit
will be set.
Destination is the address that contains the bit encode information. Bits 4–15
of the destination are reset by the ENC instruction.
9–9
Programming
54.80
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
The arithmetic status bits are found in Word 0, bits 0–3 in the controller status file.
After an instruction is executed, the arithmetic status bits in the status file are
updated:
With this Bit:
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if more than one bit in the source is set; otherwise reset.
The math overflow bit (S:5/0) is not set.
sets if destination value is zero.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
always resets.
Copy File (COP) and Fill File (FLL) Instructions
COP
COPY FILE
Source
Dest
Length
FLL
FILL FILE
Source
Dest
Length
The destination file type determines the number of words that an instruction
transfers. For example, if the destination file type is a counter and the source file
type is an integer, three integer words are transferred for each element in the
counter-type file.
After a COP or FLL instruction is executed, index register S:24 is cleared to zero.
Execution Times (µsec) when:
True
False
COP 2731+5.06/word
FLL 26.86+3.62/word
9–10
7
7
Using Data Handling Instructions
Using COP
This instruction copies blocks of data from one location into another. It uses no
status bits. If you need an enable bit, program an output instruction (OTE) in
parallel using an internal bit as the output address. The following figure shows how
file instruction data is manipulated.
Source
Destination
Entering Parameters
Enter the following parameters when programming this instruction:
•
•
•
Source is the address of the first word in the file to be copied. You must use the
file indicator (#) in the address.
Destination is the address of the first word in the file where the data is to be
stored. You must use the file indicator (#) in the address.
Length is the number of words or elements in the file to be copied. See the
table on the next page.
Iff thee des
destination
na on ffile
le type
ype iss aa(n):
n:
Note
then you can specify a maximum length of:
Discrete
Analog
Output
1
5
Input
2
8
Status
33
33
Bit
32
32
Timer
40
40
Counter
32
32
Control
16
16
Integer
105
105
The maximum lengths apply when the source is of the same file type.
All elements are copied from the source file into the destination file each time the
instruction is executed. Elements are copied in ascending order.
If your destination file type is a timer, counter, or control file, be sure the source
words corresponding to the status elements of your destination file contain zeros.
9–11
Programming
File to File
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Using FLL
The following figure shows how file instruction data is manipulated. The
instruction fills the words of a file with a source value. It uses no status bits. If you
need an enable bit, program a parallel output that uses a storage address.
Destination
Source
Word to File
Entering Parameters
Enter the following parameters when programming this instruction:
•
•
•
Source is a constant or element address. The file indicator (#) is not required
for an element address.
Destination is the starting address of the file you want to fill. You must use the
file indicator (#) in the address.
Length is the number of words or elements in the file to be filled.
na on ffile
le type
ype iss a:
Iff thee des
destination
Output
then you can specify a maximum length of:
Discrete
Analog
1
5
Input
2
8
Status
33
33
Bit
32
32
Timer
40
40
Counter
32
32
Control
16
16
Integer
105
105
All elements are filled from the source value (typically a constant) into the specified
destination file each scan the rung is true. Elements are filled in ascending order.
9–12
Using Data Handling Instructions
Move and Logical Instructions Overview
The following general information applies to move and logical instructions.
Entering Parameters
•
Source is the address of the value on which the logical or move operation is to
be performed. It can be a word address or a constant. If the instruction has two
source operands, it will not accept constants in both operands.
Destination is the address where the resulting data is stored. It must be a word
address.
Programming
•
Using Indexed Word Addresses
You have the option of using indexed word addresses for instruction parameters
specifying word addresses. Indexed addressing is discussed in chapter 4.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
The arithmetic status bits are found in Word 0, bits 0–3 in the controller status file.
After an instruction is executed, the arithmetic status bits in the status file are
updated:
Bit
Name
Description
S:0/0
Carry (C)
Set if a carry is generated; otherwise cleared.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
Indicates that the actual result of a math instruction
does not fit in the designated destination.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
Indicates a 0 value after a math, move, or logic
instruction.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
Indicates a negative (less than 0) value after a
math, move, or logic instruction.
9–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Overflow Trap Bit, S:5/0
Minor error bit (S:5/0) is set upon detection of a mathematical overflow or division
by zero. If this bit is set upon execution of an END statement, or a TND instruction,
a major error occurs.
In applications where a math overflow or divide by zero occurs, you can avoid a
controller fault by using an unlatch (OTU) instruction with address S:5/0 in your
program. The rung must be between the overflow point and the END or TND
statement.
Changes to the Math Register, S:13 and S:14
Move and logical instructions do not affect the math register.
9–14
Using Data Handling Instructions
Move (MOV)
MOV
MOVE
Source
This output instruction moves the source data to the destination location. As long as
the rung remains true, the instruction moves the data each scan.
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
25.05
6.78
Enter the following parameters when programming this instruction:
•
•
Source is the address or constant of the data you want to move.
Destination is the address where the instruction moves the data.
If you wish to move one word of data without affecting the math flags, use a copy
(COP) instruction with a length of 1 word instead of the MOV instruction.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
always resets.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative (most significant bit is set); otherwise
resets.
9–15
Programming
Entering Parameters
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Masked Move (MVM)
The MVM instruction is a word instruction that moves data from a source location
to a destination, and allows portions of the destination data to be masked by a
separate word. As long as the rung remains true, the instruction moves the data each
scan.
MVM
MASKED MOVE
Source
Mask
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
33.28
6.78
Entering Parameters
Enter the following parameters when programming this instruction:
•
•
•
Source is the address of the data you want to move.
Mask is the address of the mask through which the instruction moves data; the
mask can be a hex value (constant).
Destination is the address where the instruction moves the data.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
9–16
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
always resets.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative; otherwise resets.
Using Data Handling Instructions
Operation
When the rung containing this instruction is true, data at the source address passes
through the mask to the destination address. See the following figure.
MVM
MASKED MOVE
Source
B3:0
Mask
F0F0
Dest
B3:2
Programming
B3:2 before move
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
source B3:0
0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1
Mask F0F0
1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
B3:2 after move
0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1
Mask data by setting bits in the mask to zero; pass data by setting bits in the mask to
one. The mask can be a constant value, or you can vary the mask by assigning a
direct address. Bits in the destination that correspond to zeros in the mask are not
altered.
9–17
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
And (AND)
The value at source A is ANDed bit by bit with the value at source B and then
stored in the destination.
AND
BITWISE AND
Source A
Source B
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
34.00
6.78
Truth Table
Dest = A AND B
A
0
1
0
1
B
0
0
1
1
Dest
0
0
0
1
Source A and B can either be a word address or a constant; however, both sources
cannot be a constant. The destination must be a word address.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
9–18
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
always resets.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if most significant bit is set; otherwise resets.
Using Data Handling Instructions
Or (OR)
OR
BITWISE INCLUS OR
Source A
Source B
The value at source A is ORed bit by bit with the value at source B and then stored
in the destination.
Dest
33.68
6.78
Truth Table
Dest = A OR B
A
0
1
0
1
B
0
0
1
1
Dest
0
1
1
1
Source A and B can either be a word address or a constant; however, both sources
cannot be a constant. The destination must be a word address.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
always resets.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative (most significant bit is set) otherwise
resets.
9–19
Programming
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Exclusive Or (XOR)
XOR
BITWISE EXCLUS OR
Source A
The value at source A is Exclusive ORed bit by bit with the value at source B and
then stored in the destination.
Source B
Dest
Truth Table
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
33.64
6.92
Dest = A XOR B
A
0
1
0
1
B
0
0
1
1
Dest
0
1
1
0
Source A and B can either be a word address or a constant; however, both sources
cannot be a constant. The destination must be a word address.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
9–20
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
always resets.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative (most significant bit is set); otherwise
resets.
Using Data Handling Instructions
Not (NOT)
NOT
NOT
Source
The source value is NOTed bit by bit and then stored in the destination (one’s
complement).
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
28.21
6.92
Truth Table
Dest = NOT A
A
0
1
Dest
1
0
Programming
Dest
The source and destination must be word addresses.
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
The Controller:
S:0/0
Carry (C)
always resets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
always resets.
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative (most significant bit is set); otherwise
resets.
9–21
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Negate (NEG)
NEG
NEGATE
Source
Use the NEG instruction to change the sign of a value. If you negate a negative
value, the result is a positive; if you negate a positive value, the result is a negative.
The destination contains the two’s complement of the source.
Dest
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
29.48
The source and destination must be word addresses.
6.78
Updates to Arithmetic Status Bits
With this Bit:
S:0/0
9–22
Carry (C)
The Controller:
clears if 0 or overflow, otherwise sets.
S:0/1
Overflow (V)
S:0/2
Zero (Z)
sets if overflow, otherwise reset. Overflow occurs only if
–32,768 is the source. On overflow, the minor error flag is also
set. The value 32,767 is placed in the destination. If S:2/14 is
set, then the unsigned, truncated overflow remains in the
destination.
sets if result is zero; otherwise resets.
S:0/3
Sign (S)
sets if result is negative; otherwise resets.
Using Data Handling Instructions
FIFO and LIFO Instructions Overview
FIFO instructions load words into a file and unload them in the same order as they
were loaded. The first word in is the first word out.
LIFO instructions load words into a file and unload them in the opposite order as
they were loaded. The last word in is the first word out.
Entering Parameters
•
•
Source is a word address or constant (–32,768 to 32,767) that becomes the next
value in the stack.
Destination (Dest) is a word address that stores the value that exits from the
stack.
This Instruction:
•
•
•
Unloads the Value from:
FIFO’s FFU
First word
LIFO’s LFU
The last word entered
FIFO/LIFO is the address of the stack. It must be an indexed word address in
the bit, input, output, or integer file. Use the same FIFO address for the
associated FFL and FFU instructions; use the same LIFO address for the
associated LFL and LFU instructions.
Length specifies the maximum number of words in the stack. Address the
length value by mnemonic (LEN).
Position is the next available location where the instruction loads data into the
stack. This value changes after each load or unload operation. Address the
position value by mnemonic (POS).
9–23
Programming
Enter the following parameters when programming these instructions:
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
•
Control is the address of the control structure. The control structure stores the
status bits, the stack length, and the position value. Do not use the control file
address for any other instruction.
Status bits of the control structure are addressed by mnemonic. These include:
– Empty Bit EM (bit 12) is set by the controller to indicate the stack is
empty.
– Done Bit DN (bit 13) is set by the controller to indicate the stack is full.
This inhibits loading the stack.
– FFU/LFU Enable Bit EU (bit 14) is set on a false-to-true transition of the
FFU/LFU rung and is reset on a true-to-false transition.
– FFL/LFL Enable Bit EN (bit 15) is set on a false-to-true transition of the
FFL/LFL rung and is reset on a true-to-false transition.
Effects on Index Register S:24
The value present in S:24 is overwritten with the position value when a false-to-true
transition of the FFL/FFU or LFL/LFU rung occurs. For the FFL/LFL, the position
value determined at instruction entry is placed in S:24. For the FFU/LFU, the
position value determined at instruction exit is placed in S:24.
When the DN bit is set, a false-to-true transition of the FFL/LFL rung does not
change the position value or the index register value. When the EM bit is set, a
false-to-true transition of the FFU/LFU rung does not change the position value or
the index register value.
9–24
Using Data Handling Instructions
FIFO Load (FFL) and FIFO Unload (FFU)
FFL and FFU instructions are used in pairs. The FFL instruction loads words into a
user-created file called a FIFO stack. The FFU instruction unloads words from the
FIFO stack in the same order as they were entered.
Operation
FFL
FIFO LOAD
Source
FIFO
Control
Length
Position
N7:10
#N7:12
R6:0
34
9
FFU
FIFO UNLOAD
FIFO
Dest
Control
Length
Position
#N7:12
N7:11
R6:0
34
9
FFL–FFU Instruction Pair
(EN)
(DN)
(EM)
(EU)
(DN)
(EM)
Destination
N7:11
FFU instruction unloads data
from stack #N7:12 at position 0,
N7:12.
N7:12
N7:13
N7:14
Source
N7:10
FFL instruction loads data into
stack #N7:12 at the next available
position, 9 in this case.
N7:45
Position
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
34 words are allocated
for FIFO stack starting at
N7:12, ending at N7:45.
33
Loading and Unloading of Stack #N7:12
FFL Instruction
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
When rung conditions change from false-to-true, the controller sets the FFL enable
bit (EN). This loads the contents of the Source, N7:10, into the stack structure
indicated by the Position number, 9. The position value then increments.
61.13 33.67
The FFL instruction loads an element at each false-to-true transition of the rung,
until the stack is filled (34 elements). The controller then sets the done bit (DN),
inhibiting further loading.
9–25
Programming
Instruction parameters have been programmed in the FFL – FFU instruction pair
shown below.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
FFU Instruction
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
73.78+
4.34/word
When rung conditions change from false-to-true, the controller sets the FFU enable
bit (EU). This unloads the contents of the element at stack position 0 into the
Destination, N7:11. All data in the stack is shifted one element toward position
zero, and the highest numbered element is zeroed. The position value then
decrements.
34.90
The FFU instruction unloads an element at each false-to-true transition of the rung,
until the stack is empty. The controller then sets the empty bit (EM).
LIFO Load (LFL) and LIFO Unload (LFU)
LFL and LFU instructions are used in pairs. The LFL instruction loads words into a
user-created file called a LIFO stack. The LFU instruction unloads words from the
LIFO stack in the opposite order as they were entered.
Operation
Instruction parameters have been programmed in the LFL – LFU instruction pair
shown below.
LFL
LIFO LOAD
Source
LIFO
Control
Length
Position
LFU
LIFO UNLOAD
LIFO
Dest
Control
Length
Position
LFU instruction unloads data
from stack #N7:12 at position
8.
N7:10
#N7:12
R6:0
34
9
#N7:12
N7:11
R6:0
34
9
(EN)
(DN)
(EM)
(EU)
(DN)
(EM)
N7:11
N7:12
Destination
N7:13
N7:14
LFL instruction loads data into
stack #N7:12 at the next
available position, 9 in this
case.
N7:10
Source
N7:45
LFL–LFU Instruction Pair
Loading and Unloading of Stack #N7:12
9–26
Position
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
33
34 words are allocated
for LIFO stack starting at
N7:12, ending at N7:45.
Using Data Handling Instructions
LFL Instruction
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
When rung conditions change from false-to-true, the controller sets the LFL enable
bit (EN). This loads the contents of the Source, N7:10, into the stack element
indicated by the Position number, 9. The position value then increments.
61.13 33.67
The LFL instruction loads an element at each false-to-true transition of the rung,
until the stack is filled (34 elements). The controller sets the done bit (DN),
inhibiting further loading.
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
64.20
35.08
When rung conditions change from false-to-true, the controller sets the LFU enable
bit (EU). This unloads data from the last element loaded into the stack (at the
position value minus 1), placing it in the Destination, N7:11. The position value
then decrements.
The LFU instruction unloads one element at each false-to-true transition of the rung,
until the stack is empty. The controller then sets the empty bit (EM).
9–27
Programming
LFU Instruction
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Data Handling Instructions in the Paper Drilling Machine
Application Example
This section provides ladder rungs to demonstrate the use of data handling
instructions. The rungs are part of the paper drilling machine application example
described in appendix E. You will be adding to the subroutine in file 7 that was
started in chapter 7.
Rung 7:2➀
Moves the single digit BCD thumbwheel value into an internal integer
register. This is done to properly align the four BCD input signals
prior to executing the BCD to Integer instruction (FRD). The
thumbwheel is used to allow the operator to enter the thickness of the
paper that is to be drilled. The thickness is entered in 1/4 in.
increments. This provides a range of 1/4 in. to 2.25 in.
|
BCD bit 0 |FRD bit 0
|
|
I:0
N7:14
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+–|
|
|
11
0
| |
|
| BCD bit 1 |FRD bit 1 | |
|
|
I:0
N7:14
| |
|
+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+ |
|
|
12
1
| |
|
| BCD bit 2 |FRD bit 2 | |
|
|
I:0
N7:14
| |
|
+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+ |
|
|
13
2
| |
|
| BCD bit 3 |FRD bit 3 | |
|
|
I:0
N7:14
| |
|
+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+ |
|
14
3
|
9–28
Using Data Handling Instructions
| 1’st
previous
debounced
|
| pass
scan’s
BCD value
|
| bit
BCD input
|
|
value
|
|
S:1
+EQU–––––––––––––––+
+FRD–––––––––––––––+
|
|–+––]/[––––––+EQUAL
+–+–––––––+FROM BCD
+–+––+–|
| |
15
|Source A
N7:13| |
|Source
N7:14| | | |
| |
|
0| |
|
0000| | | |
| |
|Source B
N7:14| |
|Dest
N7:12| | | |
| |
|
0| |
|
0| | | |
| |
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
+––––––––––––––––––+ | | |
| |
| Math
Math
| | |
| |
| Overflow
Error
| | |
| |
| Bit
Bit
| | |
| |
|
S:0
S:5
| | |
| |
+––––] [–––––––––(U)–––––––––+ | |
| |
1
0
| |
| |
this
| |
| |
scan’s
| |
| |
BCD input
| |
| |
value
| |
| |
+MOV–––––––––––––––+ | |
| +–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+MOVE
+–+ |
|
|Source
N7:14|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
|Dest
N7:13|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
➀
This rung accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Therefore, do not include this rung if you are using
a 16 I/O controller.
9–29
Programming
Rung 7:3
Converts the BCD thumbwheel value from BCD to integer. This is done
because the controller operates upon integer values. This rung also
”debounces” the thumbwheel to ensure that the conversion only occurs
on valid BCD values. Note that invalid BCD values can occur while the
operator is changing the BCD thumbwheel. This is due to input filter
propagation delay differences between the 4 input circuits that
provide the BCD input value.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 7:4
Ensures that the operator cannot select a paper thickness of 0. If
this were allowed, the drill bit life calculation could be defeated
resulting in poor quality holes due to a dull drill bit. Therefore
the minimum paper thickness used to calculate drill bit wear is 1/4
in.
|
debounced
debounced
|
|
BCD
BCD
|
|
value
value
|
| +EQU–––––––––––––––+
+MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
|–+EQUAL
+––––––––––––––––––––––––––+MOVE
+–|
| |Source A
N7:12|
|Source
1| |
| |
0|
|
| |
| |Source B
0|
|Dest
N7:12| |
| |
|
|
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
9–30
Using Program Flow Control Instructions
10
Using Program Flow Control
Instructions
This chapter contains general information about the program flow instructions and
explains how they function in your application program. Each of the instructions
includes information on:
•
•
•
Programming
what the instruction symbol looks like
typical execution time for the instruction
how to use the instruction
In addition, the last section contains an application example for a paper drilling
machine that shows the program flow control instructions in use.
Program Flow Control Instructions
Instruction
Mnemonic
Name
Purpose
Page
JMP and
LBL
Jump to Label and
Label
Jump forward or backward to the specified label
instruction.
10–2
JSR, SBR,
and RET
Jump to
Subroutine,
Subroutine, and
Return from
Subroutine
Jump to a designated subroutine and return.
10–4
MCR
Master Control
Reset
Turn off all non-retentive outputs in a section of
ladder program.
10–7
TND
Temporary End
Mark a temporary end that halts program execution.
10–8
SUS
Suspend
Identifies specific conditions for program debugging
and system troubleshooting.
10–8
IIM
Immediate Input
with Mask
Program an Immediate Input with Mask.
10–9
IOM
Immediate Output
with Mask
Program an Immediate Output with Mask.
10–9
10–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
About the Program Flow Control Instructions
Use these instructions to control the sequence in which your program is executed.
Jump (JMP) and Label (LBL)
Use these instructions in pairs to skip portions of the ladder program.
(JMP)
If the Rung Containing the
Jump Instruction is:
True
]LBL[
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
JMP
LBL
9.04
1.45
False
Then the Program:
Skips from the rung containing the JMP instruction to the rung
containing the designated LBL instruction and continues
executing. You can jump forward or backward.
Does not execute the JMP instruction.
6.78
0.99
Jumping forward to a label saves program scan time by omitting a program segment
until needed. Jumping backward lets the controller execute program segments
repeatedly.
Note
Be careful not to jump backwards an excessive number of times. The watchdog
timer could time out and fault the controller. Use a counter, timer, or the “program
scan” register (system status register, word S:3, bits 0–7) to limit the amount of time
you spend looping inside of JMP/LBL instructions.
Entering Parameters
Enter a decimal label number from 0 to 999. You can place up to 1,000 labels in
each subroutine file.
Using JMP
The JMP instruction causes the controller to skip rungs. You can jump to the same
label from one or more JMP instruction.
10–2
Using Program Flow Control Instructions
Using LBL
This input instruction is the target of JMP instructions having the same label
number. You must program this instruction as the first instruction of a rung. This
instruction has no control bits.
You can program multiple jumps to the same label by assigning the same label
number to multiple JMP instructions. However, label numbers must be unique.
Do not jump (JMP) into an MCR zone. Instructions that are programmed within the
MCR zone starting at the LBL instruction and ending at the ‘END MCR’ instruction
will always be evaluated as though the MCR zone is true, regardless of the true state
of the “Start MCR” instruction.
Programming
Note
10–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Jump to Subroutine (JSR), Subroutine (SBR), and
Return (RET)
The JSR, SBR, and RET instructions are used to direct the controller to execute a
separate subroutine file within the ladder program and return to the instruction
following the JSR instruction.
JSR
JUMP TO SUBROUTINE
SBR file number
...
SBR
SUBROUTINE
RET
RETURN
Execution Times (µsec) when:
True
False
JSR 22.24
SBR 1.45
RET 31.11
4.25
0.99
3.16
Note
If you use the SBR instruction, the SBR instruction must be the first instruction on
the first rung in the program file that contains the subroutine.
Use a subroutine to store recurring sections of program logic that must be executed
from several points within your application program. A subroutine saves memory
because you program it only once.
Update critical I/O within subroutines using immediate input and/or output
instructions (IIM, IOM), especially if your application calls for nested or relatively
long subroutines. Otherwise, the controller does not update I/O until it reaches the
end of the main program (after executing all subroutines).
Outputs controlled within a subroutine remain in their last state until the
subroutine is executed again.
10–4
Using Program Flow Control Instructions
Nesting Subroutine Files
Nesting subroutines allows you to direct program flow from the main program to a
subroutine and then on to another subroutine.
You can nest up to eight levels of subroutines. If you are using an STI subroutine,
HSC interrupt subroutine, or user fault routine, you can nest subroutines up to three
levels from each subroutine.
The following figure illustrates how subroutines may be nested.
6
JSR
Level 1
Subroutine File 6
SBR
Level 2
Subroutine File 7
SBR
Level 3
Subroutine File 8
SBR
7
JSR
8
JSR
RET
RET
Programming
Main
Program
RET
Example of Nesting Subroutines to Level 3
An error occurs if more than the allowable levels of subroutines are called
(subroutine stack overflow) or if more returns are executed than there are call levels
(subroutine stack underflow).
Using JSR
When the JSR instruction is executed, the controller jumps to the subroutine
instruction (SBR) at the beginning of the target subroutine file and resumes
execution at that point. You cannot jump into any part of a subroutine except the
first instruction in that file.
You must program each subroutine in its own program file by assigning a unique
file number (4–15).
10–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Using SBR
The target subroutine is identified by the file number that you entered in the JSR
instruction. This instruction serves as a label or identifier for a program file as a
regular subroutine file.
This instruction has no control bits. It is always evaluated as true. The instruction
must be programmed as the first instruction of the first rung of a subroutine. Use of
this instruction is optional; however, we recommend using it for clarity.
Using RET
This output instruction marks the end of subroutine execution or the end of the
subroutine file. It causes the controller to resume execution at the instruction
following the JSR instruction.
The rung containing the RET instruction may be conditional if this rung precedes
the end of the subroutine. In this way, the controller omits the balance of a
subroutine only if its rung condition is true.
Without an RET instruction, the END instruction (always present in the subroutine)
automatically returns program execution to the instruction following the JSR
instruction in your calling ladder file.
10–6
Using Program Flow Control Instructions
Master Control Reset (MCR)
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
3.98
Use MCR instructions in pairs to create program zones that turn off all the
non-retentive outputs in the zone. Rungs within the MCR zone are still scanned, but
scan time is reduced due to the false state of non-retentive outputs. Non-retentive
outputs are reset when their rung goes false.
4.07
If the MCR Rung that Starts the
Zone is:
True
False
Then the Controller:
Executes the rungs in the MCR zone based on each rung’s
individual input condition (as if the zone did not exist).
Resets all non-retentive output instructions in the MCR zone
regardless of each rung’s individual input conditions.
MCR zones let you enable or inhibit segments of your program, such as for recipe
applications.
When you program MCR instructions, note that:
•
•
•
Note
You must end the zone with an unconditional MCR instruction.
You cannot nest one MCR zone within another.
Do not jump into an MCR zone. If the zone is false, jumping into it activates
the zone.
The MCR instruction is not a substitute for a hard-wired master control relay that
provides emergency stop capability. You still must install a hard-wired master
control relay to provide emergency I/O power shutdown.
If you start instructions such as timers or counters in an MCR zone,
instruction operation ceases when the zone is disabled. Re-program critical
operations outside the zone if necessary.
10–7
Programming
(MCR)
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Temporary End (TND)
(TND)
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
7.78
3.16
Note
This instruction, when its rung is true, stops the controller from scanning the rest of
the program file, updates the I/O, and resumes scanning at rung 0 of the main
program (file 2). If this instruction’s rung is false, the controller continues the scan
until the next TND instruction or the END statement. Use this instruction to
progressively debug a program, or conditionally omit the balance of your current
program file or subroutines.
If you use this instruction inside a nested subroutine, execution of all nested
subroutines is terminated.
Do not execute this instruction from the user error fault routine (file 3), high-speed
counter interrupt routine (file 4), or selectable timed interrupt routine (file 5)
because a fault will occur.
Suspend (SUS)
SUS
SUSPEND
Suspend ID
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
10.85
7.87
When this instruction is executed, it causes the controller to enter the Suspend Idle
mode and stores the Suspend ID in word 7 (S:7) at the status file. All outputs are
de-energized.
Use this instruction to trap and identify specific conditions for program debugging
and system troubleshooting.
Entering Parameters
Enter a suspend ID number from –32,768 to +32,767 when you program the
instruction.
10–8
Using Program Flow Control Instructions
Immediate Input with Mask (IIM)
IIM
IMMEDIATE INPUT w MASK
Slot
Mask
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
35.72
6.78
This instruction allows you to update data prior to the normal input scan. Data from
a specified input is transferred through a mask to the input data file, making the data
available to instructions following the IIM instruction in the ladder program.
For the mask, a 1 in an input’s bit position passes data from the source to the
destination. A 0 inhibits data from passing from the source to the destination.
For all micro controllers specify I1:0.0. For 16 I/O controllers, I1:0/0–9 are valid
and I1:0/10–15 are considered unused inputs. (They do not physically exist.) For
32 I/O controllers, I1:0/0–15 and I1:1/0–3 are valid. Specify I1:1 if you want to
immediately update the last four input bits.
Mask – Specify a Hex constant or register address.
Immediate Output with Mask (IOM)
IOM
IMMEDIATE OUT w MASK
Slot
Mask
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
41.59
6.78
This instruction allows you to update the outputs prior to the normal output scan.
Data from the output image is transferred through a mask to the specified outputs.
The program scan then resumes.
Entering Parameters
For all micro controllers specify O0:0.0. For 16 I/O controllers, O0:0/0–5 are valid
and O0:0/6–15 are considered unused outputs. (They do not physically exist.) For
32 I/O controllers, O0:0/0–11 are valid and O0:0/12–15 are considered unused
outputs.
Mask – Specify a Hex constant or register address.
10–9
Programming
Entering Parameters
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Program Flow Control Instructions in the Paper Drilling
Machine Application Example
This section provides ladder rungs to demonstrate the use of program flow control
instructions. The rungs are part of the paper drilling machine application example
described in appendix E. You will be adding to the main program in file 2. The
new rungs are needed to call the other subroutines containing the logic necessary to
run the machine.
Rung 2:5
Calls the drill sequence subroutine. This subroutine manages the
operation of a drilling sequence and restarts the conveyor upon
completion of the drilling sequence
|
+JSR–––––––––––––––+ |
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+JUMP TO SUBROUTINE+–|
|
|SBR file number 6| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:6
Calls the subroutine that tracks the amount of wear on the current
drill bit.
|
+JSR–––––––––––––––+ |
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+JUMP TO SUBROUTINE+–|
|
|SBR file number 7| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:7
|
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
10–10
Using Application Specific Instructions
11
Using Application Specific
Instructions
This chapter contains general information about the application specific instructions
and explains how they function in your application program. Each of the
instructions includes information on:
what the instruction symbol looks like
Programming
•
•
•
typical execution time for the instruction
how to use the instruction
In addition, the last section contains an application example for a paper drilling
machine that shows the application specific instructions in use.
Application Specific Instructions
Instruction
Mnemonic
Name
Purpose
Page
BSL and
BSR
Bit Shift Left and
Bit Shift Right
Loads a bit of data into a bit array, shifts the pattern
of data through the array, and unloads the last bit of
data in the array. The BSL shifts data to the left and
the BSR shifts data to the right.
11–5
SQO and
SQC
Sequencer Output
and Sequencer
Compare
Control sequential machine operations by transferring 16-bit data through a mask to image addresses.
11–7
SQL
Sequencer Load
Capture referenced conditions by manually stepping
the machine through its operating sequences.
11–13
STD and
STE
Selectable Timer
Interrupt Disable
and Enable
Output instructions, associated with the Selectable
Timed Interrupt function. STD and STE are used to
prevent an STI from occurring during a portion of
the program.
11–18
Continued on the next page.
11–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Instruction
Mnemonic
Purpose
Name
Page
STS
Selectable Timer
Interrupt Start
Initiates a Selectable Timed Interrupt.
11–20
INT
Interrupt
Subroutine
Associated with Selectable Timed Interrupts or HSC
Interrupts.
11–20
About the Application Specific Instructions
These instructions simplify your ladder program by allowing you to use a single
instruction or pair of instructions to perform common complex operations.
In this chapter you will find a general overview preceding groups of instructions.
Before you learn about the instructions in each of these groups, we suggest that you
read the overview. This chapter contains the following overviews:
•
•
•
11–2
Bit Shift Instructions Overview
Sequencer Instructions Overview
Selectable Timed Interrupt (STI) Function Overview
Using Application Specific Instructions
Bit Shift Instructions Overview
The following general information applies to bit shift instructions.
Entering Parameters
Enter the following parameters when programming these instructions:
•
File is the address of the bit array you want to manipulate. You must use the
file indicator (#) in the bit array address.
Control is the address of the control element that stores the status byte of the
instruction, the size of the array (in number of bits). Note that the control
address should not be used for any other instruction.
The control element is shown below.
15
13
11 10
00
Word 0
EN
DN
ER UL
Word 1
Size of bit array (number of bits)
Word 2
Reserved
Not used
Status bits of the control element may be addressed by mnemonic. They
include:
– Unload Bit UL (bit 10) is the instruction’s output.
– Error Bit ER (bit 11), when set, indicates the instruction detected an error
such as entering a negative number for the length or position. Avoid using
the unload bit when this bit is set.
– Done Bit DN (bit 13), when set, indicates the bit array shifted one
position.
– Enable Bit EN (bit 15) is set on a false-to-true transition of the rung and
indicates the instruction is enabled.
When the register shifts and input conditions go false, the enable, done, and
error bits are reset.
11–3
Programming
•
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
•
•
Bit Address is the address of the source bit. The status of this bit is inserted in
either the first (lowest) bit position (BSL) or last (highest) bit position (BSR).
Length (size of bit array) is the number of bits in the bit array, up to 1680 bits.
A length value of 0 causes the input bit to be transferred to the UL bit.
A length value that points past the end of the programmed file causes a major
error to occur. If you alter a length value with your ladder program, make
certain that the altered value is valid.
The instruction invalidates all bits beyond the last bit in the array (as defined by
the length) up to the next word boundary.
Effects on Index Register S:24
The shift operation clears the index register S:24 to zero.
11–4
Using Application Specific Instructions
Bit Shift Left (BSL)
BSL
BIT SHIFT LEFT
File
Control
Bit Address
Length
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
53.71+ 19.80
5.24/word
(EN)
(DN)
When the rung goes from false-to-true, the controller sets the enable bit (EN bit 15)
and the data block is shifted to the left (to a higher bit number) one bit position. The
specified bit at the bit address is shifted into the first bit position. The last bit is
shifted out of the array and stored in the unload bit (UL bit 10). The shift is
completed immediately.
For wraparound operation, set the bit address to the last bit of the array or to the UL
bit.
Programming
Operation
The following figure shows the operation of the BSL instruction shown above.
Source Bit
I:0/05
Data block is shifted one bit at a
time from bit B3/16 to bit B3/73.
31 30 29 28 27 26 25
47 46 45 44 43 42 41
63 62 61 60 59 58 57
73
RESERVED
24
40
56
72
23
39
55
71
22
38
54
70
21
37
53
69
20
36
52
68
19
35
51
67
18
34
50
66
17
33
49
65
16
32
48
64
58 Bit Array #B3:1
Unload Bit
(R6:03/10)
If you wish to shift more than one bit per scan, you must create a loop in your
application using the JMP, LBL, and CTU instructions.
11–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Bit Shift Right (BSR)
BSR
BIT SHIFT RIGHT
File
Control
Bit Address
Length
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
53.34+ 19.80
3.98/word
(EN)
(DN)
When the rung goes from false-to-true, the controller sets the enable bit (EN bit 15)
and the data block is shifted to the right (to a lower bit number) one bit position. The
specified bit at the bit address is shifted into the last bit position. The first bit is
shifted out of the array and stored in the unload bit (UL bit 10). The shift is
completed immediately.
For wraparound operation, set the bit address to the first bit of the array or to the UL
bit.
Operation
The following figure shows the operation of the BSR instruction shown above.
Unload Bit
(R6:04/10)
47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32
63 62 61 60 59 58 57 56 55 54 53 52 51 50 49 48
69 68 67 66 65 64
RESERVED
38 Bit Array
#B3:2
Data block is shifted one bit at a
time from bit B3/69 to bit B3/32.
Source Bit
I:0/06
If you wish to shift more than one bit per scan, you must create a loop in your
application using the JMP, LBL, and CTU instructions.
11–6
Using Application Specific Instructions
Sequencer Instructions Overview
The following general information applies to sequencer instructions.
Effects on Index Register S:24
Sequencer Output (SQO) and Sequencer Compare (SQC)
SQO
SEQUENCER OUTPUT
File
Mask
Dest
Control
Length
Position
SQC
SEQUENCER COMPARE
File
Mask
Source
Control
Length
Position
(EN)
(DN)
These instructions transfer 16-bit data to word addresses for the control of
sequential machine operations.
(EN)
(DN)
(FD)
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
SQO 60.52
SQC 60.52
27.40
27.40
11–7
Programming
The value present in the index register S:24 is overwritten when the sequencer
instruction is true. The index register value will equal the position value of the
instruction.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Entering Parameters
Enter the following parameters when programming these instructions:
•
File is the address of the sequencer file. You must use the file indicator (#) for
this address.
Sequencer file data is used as follows:
Instruction
•
Sequencer File Stores
SQO
Data for controlling outputs
SQC
Reference data for monitoring inputs
Mask (SQO, SQC) is a hexadecimal code or the address of the mask word or
file through which the instruction moves data. Set mask bits to pass data and
clear mask bits to prevent the instruction from operating on corresponding
destination bits. Use a mask word or file if you want to change the mask
according to application requirements.
If the mask is a file, its length will be equal to the length of the sequencer file.
The two files track automatically.
•
•
Note
•
11–8
Source is the address of the input word or file for a SQC from which the
instruction obtains data for comparison to its sequencer file.
Destination is the address of the output word or file for a SQO to which the
instruction moves data from its sequencer file.
You can address the mask, source, or destination of a sequencer instruction as a
word or file. If you address it as a file (using file indicator #), the instruction
automatically steps through the source, mask, or destination file.
Control (SQO, SQC) is the control structure that stores the status byte of the
instruction, the length of the sequencer file, and the current position in the file.
You should not use the control address for any other instruction.
15
13
11
08
Word 0
EN
DN
ER
FD
Word 1
Length of sequencer file
Word 2
Position
00
Using Application Specific Instructions
Status bits of the control structure include:
– Found Bit FD (bit 08) – SQC only. When the status of all non-masked
bits in the source address match those of the corresponding reference word,
the FD bit is set. This bit is assessed each time the SQC instruction is
evaluated while the rung is true.
– Error Bit ER (bit 11) is set when the controller detects a negative
position value, or a negative or zero length value. When the ER bit is set,
the minor error bit (S5:2) is also set. Both bits must be cleared.
– Done Bit DN (bit 13) is set by the SQO or SQC instruction after it has
– Enable EN (bit 15) is set by a false-to-true rung transition and indicates
the SQO or SQC instruction is enabled.
•
•
Length is the number of steps of the sequencer file starting at position 1. The
maximum number you can enter is 104 words. Position 0 is the startup position.
The instruction resets (wraps) to position 1 at each cycle completion.
Position is the word location or step in the sequencer file from/to which the
instruction moves data.
You may use the RES instruction to reset a sequencer. All control bits (except FD)
will be reset to zero. The Position will also be set to zero. Program the address of
your control register in the RES (e.g., R6:0).
11–9
Programming
operated on the last word in the sequencer file. It is reset on the next
false-to-true rung transition after the rung goes false.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Using SQO
This output instruction steps through the sequencer file whose bits have been set to
control various output devices.
When the rung goes from false-to-true, the instruction increments to the next step
(word) in the sequencer file. Data stored there is transferred through a mask to the
destination address specified in the instruction. Data is written to the destination
word every time the instruction is executed.
The done bit is set when the last word of the sequencer file is transferred. On the
next false-to-true rung transition, the instruction resets the position to step one.
If the position is equal to zero at startup, when you switch the controller from the
program mode to the run mode instruction operation depends on whether the rung is
true or false on the first scan.
•
•
If true, the instruction transfers the value in step zero.
If false, the instruction waits for the first rung transition from false-to-true and
transfers the value in step one.
The bits mask data when reset and pass data when set. The instruction will not
change the value in the destination word unless you set mask bits.
The mask can be fixed or variable. It will be fixed if you enter a hexadecimal code.
It will be variable if you enter an element address or a file address for changing the
mask with each step.
11–10
Using Application Specific Instructions
The following figure indicates how the SQO instruction works.
SQO
SEQUENCER OUTPUT
File
#B3:1
Mask
0F0F
Dest
O:0
Control
R6:05
Length
4
Position
2
(EN)
(DN)
Destination O:0.0
8
0101
7
0000
External Outputs
Associated with O:0
0
1010
Mask Value 0F0F
15
0000
8
1111
7
0000
0
1111
Sequencer Output File #B3:1
Word
Step
B3:1 0000 0000 0000 0000 0
2 1010 0010 1111 0101 1
3 1111 0101 0100 1010 2
4 0101 0101 0101 0101 3
5 0000 1111 0000 1111 4
Current Step
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
ON
Programming
15
0000
ON
ON
ON
Using SQC
When the status of all non-masked bits in the source word match those of the
corresponding reference word, the instruction sets the found bit (FD) in the control
word. Otherwise, the found bit (FD) is cleared.
The bits mask data when reset and pass data when set.
The mask can be fixed or variable. If you enter a hexadecimal code, it is fixed. If
you enter an element address or a file address for changing the mask with each step,
it is variable.
When the rung goes from false-to-true, the instruction increments to the next step
(word) in the sequencer file. Data stored there is transferred through a mask and
compared against the source for equality. While the rung remains true, the source is
compared against the reference data for every scan. If equal, the FD bit is set in the
SQCs control counter.
11–11
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Applications of the SQC instruction include machine diagnostics. The following
figure explains how the SQC instruction works.
SQC
SEQUENCER COMPARE
File
#B3:8
Mask
FFF0
Source
I:0
Control
R6:3
Length
4
Position
2
(EN)
(DN)
(FD)
Input Word I:0
0010
0100
1001
1101
Mask Value FFF0
1111
1111
1111
0000
Sequencer Ref File #B3:8
Word
Step
B3:8
0
9
1
10 0010 0100 1001 1010 2
11
3
12
4
The SQC FD bit is set when the instruction detects that an input
word matches (thru mask) its corresponding reference word.
The FD bit R6:3/FD is set in this example, since the input word
matches the sequencer reference value using the mask value.
11–12
Using Application Specific Instructions
Sequencer Load (SQL)
SQL
SEQUENCER LOAD
File
Source
Control
Length
Position
(EN)
(DN)
The SQL instruction stores 16-bit data into a sequencer load file at each step of
sequencer operation. The source of this data can be an I/O or internal word address,
a file address, or a constant.
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
53.41 28.12
Enter the following parameters when programming this instruction:
•
•
File is the address of the sequencer file. You must use the file indicator (#) for
this address.
Source can be a word address, file address, or a constant (–32768 to 32767).
If the source is a file address, the file length equals the length of the sequencer
load file. The two files step automatically, according to the position value.
•
•
•
Length is the number of steps of the sequencer load file (and also of the source
if the source is a file address), starting at position 1. The maximum number you
can enter is 104 words. Position 0 is the startup position. The instruction resets
(wraps) to position 1 at each cycle completion.
Position is the word location or step in the sequencer file to which data is
moved.
Control is a control file address. The status bits, length value, and position
value are stored in this element. Do not use the control file address for any
other instruction.
The control element is shown below:
15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Word 0
EN
Word 1
Length
DN
Word 2
Position
ER
11–13
Programming
Entering Parameters
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Status bits of the control structure include:
– Error Bit ER (bit 11) is set when the controller detects a negative
position value, or a negative or zero length value. When the ER bit is set,
the minor error bit (S5:2) is also set. Both bits must be cleared.
– Done Bit DN (bit 13) is set after the instruction has operated on the last
word in the sequencer load file. It is reset on the next false-to-true rung
transition after the rung goes false.
– Enable Bit EN (bit 15) is set on a false-to-true transition of the SQL rung
and reset on a true-to-false transition.
Operation
Instruction parameters have been programmed in the SQL instruction shown below.
Input word I:0.0 is the source. Data in this word is loaded into integer file #N7:30
by the sequencer load instruction.
SQL
SEQUENCER LOAD
File
#N7:30
Source
I:0.0
Control
R6:4
Length
4
Position
2
(EN)
(DN)
External Inputs
Associated with I:0.0
Source I:0.0
15
0000
8
0101
7
0000
0
1010
Sequencer Load File #N7:30
Step
Word
N7:30 0000 0000 0000 0000 0
31 1010 0010 1111 0101 1
32 0000 0101 0000 1010 2
33 0000 0000 0000 0000 3
34 0000 0000 0000 0000 4
Current Step
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
ON
ON
ON
ON
When rung conditions change from false-to-true, the SQL enable bit (EN) is set.
The control element R6:4 increments to the next position in the sequencer file, and
loads the contents of source I:0.0 into the corresponding location in the file. The
SQL instruction continues to load the current data into this location each scan that
the rung remains true. When the rung goes false, the enable bit (EN) is reset.
11–14
Using Application Specific Instructions
The instruction loads data into a new file element at each false-to-true transition of
the rung. When step 4 is completed, the done bit (DN) is set. Operation cycles to
position 1 at the next false-to-true transition of the rung after position 4.
If the source were a file address such as #N7:40, files #N7:40 and #N7:30 would
both have a length of 5 (0–4) and would track through the steps together per the
position value.
The Selectable Timed Interrupt (STI) function allows you to interrupt the scan of the
application program automatically, on a periodic basis, to scan a subroutine file.
Afterwards the controller resumes executing the application program from the point
where it was interrupted.
Basic Programming Procedure for the STI Function
To use the STI function in your application file:
Note
1.
Enter the desired ladder rungs in File 5. (File 5 is designated for the STI
subroutine.)
2.
Enter the setpoint (the time between successive interrupts) in word S:30 of the
status file. The range is 10–2550 ms (entered in10 ms increments). A setpoint
of zero disables the STI function.
The setpoint value must be a longer time than the execution time of the STI
subroutine file, or a minor error bit is set.
Operation
After you restore your program and enter the REM Run or REM Test mode, the STI
begins operation as follows:
1.
The STI timer begins timing.
2.
When the STI interval expires, the program scan is interrupted and the STI
subroutine file is scanned; the STI timer is reset.
3.
If while executing the STI (file 5), another STI interrupt occurs the STI pending
bit (S:2/0) is set.
11–15
Programming
Selectable Timed Interrupt (STI) Function Overview
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
4.
If while an STI is pending, the STI timer expires, the STI lost bit (S:5/10) is set.
5.
When the STI subroutine scan is completed, scanning of the program resumes at
the point where it left off, unless an STI is pending. In this case the subroutine
is immediately scanned again.
6.
The cycle repeats.
For identification of your STI subroutine, include an INT instruction as the first
instruction on the first rung of the file.
STI Subroutine Content
The STI subroutine contains the rungs of your application logic. You can program
any instruction inside the STI subroutine except a TND instruction. IIM or IOM
instructions are needed in an STI subroutine if your application requires immediate
update of input or output points. End the STI subroutine with an RET instruction.
JSR stack depth is limited to 3. You may call other subroutines to a level 3 deep
from an STI subroutine.
Interrupt Latency and Interrupt Occurrences
Interrupt latency is the interval between the STI timeout and the start of the interrupt
subroutine. STI interrupts can occur at any point in your program, but not
necessarily at the same point on successive interrupts. The table below shows the
interaction between an interrupt and the controller operating cycle.
STI
Input Scan
Program Scan
Between instruction updates
Output Scan
Communication
Controller Overhead
Events in the processor operating cycle
11–16
Between communication packets
At start and end
Using Application Specific Instructions
Note that STI execution time adds directly to the overall scan time. During the
latency period, the controller is performing operations that cannot be disturbed by
the STI interrupt function.
Interrupt Priorities
1.
User Fault Routine
2.
High-Speed Counter
3.
Selectable Timed Interrupt
An executing interrupt can only be interrupted by an interrupt having a higher
priority.
Status File Data Saved
Data in the following words is saved on entry to the STI subroutine and re-written
upon exiting the STI subroutine.
•
•
•
S:0 Arithmetic flags
S:13 and S:14 Math register
S:24 Index register
11–17
Programming
Interrupt priorities are as follows:
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Selectable Timed Disable (STD) and Enable (STE)
STD
SELECTABLE TIMED DISABLE
These instructions are generally used in pairs. The purpose is to create zones in
which STI interrupts cannot occur.
STE
SELECTABLE TIMED ENABLE
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
STD 6.69
STE 10.13
3.16
3.16
Using STD
When true, this instruction resets the STI enable bit and prevents the STI subroutine
from executing. When the rung goes false, the STI enable bit remains reset until a
true STS or STE instruction is executed. The STI timer continues to operate while
the enable bit is reset.
Using STE
This instruction sets the STI enable bit and allows execution of the STI subroutine.
When the rung goes false, the STI enable bit remains set until a true STD instruction
is executed. This instruction has no effect on the operation of the STI timer or
setpoint. When the enable bit is set, the first execution of the STI subroutine can
occur at any point up to the full STI interval.
STD/STE Zone Example
In the program that follows, the STI function is in effect. The STD and STE
instructions in rungs 6 and 12 are included in the ladder program to avoid having
STI subroutine execution at any point in rungs 7 through 11.
The STD instruction (rung 6) resets the STI enable bit and the STE instruction (rung
12) sets the enable bit again. The STI timer increments and may time out in the
STD zone, setting the pending bit S:2/0 and lost bit S:5/10.
The first pass bit S:1/15 and the STE instruction in rung 0 are included to insure that
the STI function is initialized following a power cycle. You should include this
rung any time your program contains an STD/STE zone or an STD instruction.
11–18
Using Application Specific Instructions
Program File 3
0
S:1
] [
15
1
] [
STE
SELECTABLE TIMED ENABLE
( )
] [
2
3
4
5
STD
STI interrupt
execution will
not occur
between STD
and STE.
7
] [
] [
( )
] [
] [
( )
Programming
SELECTABLE TIMED DISABLE
6
8
9
10
11
STE
SELECTABLE TIMED ENABLE
12
13
] [
( )
] [
14
15
16
17
END
11–19
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Selectable Timed Start (STS)
STS
SELECTABLE TIMED START
File
Time
[x 10ms]
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
24.59
6.78
Use the STS instruction to condition the start of the STI timer upon entering the
REM Run mode – rather than starting automatically. You can also use it to set up or
change setpoint/frequency of the STI routine that will be executed when the STI
timer expires.
This instruction is not required to configure a basic STI interrupt application.
The STS instruction requires you to enter the parameter for the STI setpoint. Upon
a true execution of the rung, this instruction enters the setpoint in the status file
(S:30), overwriting the existing data. At the same time, the STI timer is reset and
begins timing; at timeout, the STI subroutine execution occurs. When the rung goes
false, the STI function remains enabled at the setpoint you’ve entered in the STS
instruction.
Interrupt Subroutine (INT)
INT
INTERRUPT SUBROUTINE
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
1.45
11–20
0.99
This instruction serves as a label or identifier of a program file as an interrupt
subroutine (INT label) versus a regular subroutine (SBR label).
This instruction has no control bits and is always evaluated as true. The instruction
must be programmed as the first instruction of the first rung of the subroutine. Use
of this instruction is optional; however, we recommend using it.
Using Application Specific Instructions
Application Specific Instructions in the Paper Drilling
Machine Application Example
This section provides ladder rungs to demonstrate the use of application specific
instructions. The rungs are part of the paper drilling machine application example
described in appendix E. You will begin a subroutine in file 4.
Note
Address I:0/10 is only valid for 32 I/O controllers. If you use a 16 I/O controller,
only the 5 hole drill pattern can be used.
OPERATOR PANEL
Start I/6
Stop I/7
Thumbwheel for
Thickness in 1/4”
Change Drill Soon
O/4
Change Drill Now
O/6
5 Hole
Drill Change Reset
3 Hole
I/11–I/14
(Keyswitch)
I/8
Hole Selector
Switch
7 Hole
I/9–I/10
Drill
Drilled Holes
11–21
Programming
This portion of the subroutine tells the conveyor where to stop to allow a hole to be
drilled. The stop positions will be different for each hole pattern (3 hole, 5 hole, 7
hole), so separate sequencers are used to store and access each of the three hole
patterns.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 4:0
Resets the hole count sequencers each time that the low preset is
reached. The low preset has been set to zero to cause an interrupt to
occur each time that a reset occurs. The low preset is reached
anytime that a reset C5:0 or hardware reset occurs. This ensures that
the first preset value is loaded into the HSC at each entry into the
REM Run mode and each time that the external reset signal is
activated.
|
interrupt
3 hole
|
|
occurred
preset
|
|
due to
sequencer
|
|
low preset
|
|
reached
|
| +INT––––––––––––––––––––+
C5:0
R6:4
|
|–+INTERRUPT SUBROUTINE
+––––] [––––––––––––––––––––+–––(RES)––––+–|
| +–––––––––––––––––––––––+
IL
|
| |
|
| 5 hole
| |
|
| preset
| |
|
| sequencer | |
|
|
R6:5
| |
|
+–––(RES)––––+ |
|
|
| |
|
| 7 hole
| |
|
| preset
| |
|
| sequencer | |
|
|
R6:6
| |
|
+–––(RES)––––+ |
|
|
11–22
Using Application Specific Instructions
| hole
|hole
3 hole
|
| selector |selector
preset
|
| switch
|switch
sequencer
|
| bit 0
|bit 1
|
|
I:0
I:0
+SQO–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––]/[––––––––] [––––––––––––––––––––+–+SEQUENCER OUTPUT +–(EN)–+–|
|
9
10
| |File
#N7:50+–(DN) | |
|
| |Mask
FFFF|
| |
|
| |Dest
N7:7|
| |
|
| |Control
R6:4|
| |
|
| |Length
5|
| |
|
| |Position
0|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
|
| |
|
| force the
| |
|
| sequencer
| |
|
| to increment
| |
|
| on next scan
| |
|
|
R6:4
| |
|
+––––(U)––––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
EN
|
➀
This rung accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Do not include this rung if you are using a 16 I/O
controller.
11–23
Programming
Rung 4:1➀
Keeps track of the hole number that is being drilled and loads the
correct HSC preset based on the hole count. This rung is only active
when the ”hole selector switch” is in the ”3-hole” position. The
sequencer uses step 0 as a null step upon reset. It uses the last
step as a ”go forever” in anticipation of the ”end of manual” hard
wired external reset.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 4:2
Is identical to the previous rung except that it is only active when
the ”hole selector switch” is in the ”5-hole” position.
| hole
|hole
5 hole
|
| selector |selector
preset
|
| switch
|switch
sequencer
|
| bit 0
|bit 1➀
|
|
I:0
I:0
+SQO–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [––––––––]/[––––––––––––––––––––+–+SEQUENCER OUTPUT +–(EN)–+–|
|
9
10
| |File
#N7:55+–(DN) | |
|
| |Mask
FFFF|
| |
|
| |Dest
N7:7|
| |
|
| |Control
R6:5|
| |
|
| |Length
7|
| |
|
| |Position
0|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
| force the
| |
|
| sequencer
| |
|
| to increment
| |
|
| on the next
| |
|
| scan
| |
|
|
R6:5
| |
|
+––––(U)––––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
EN
|
➀
11–24
This instruction accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Do not include this instruction if you are using
a 16 I/O controller.
Using Application Specific Instructions
Rung 4:3➀➁
Is identical to the 2 previous rungs except that it is only active
when the ”hole selector switch” is in the ”7-hole” position.
| hole
|hole
7 hole
|
| selector |selector
preset
|
| switch
|switch
sequencer
|
| bit 0
|bit 1
|
|
I:0
I:0
+SQO–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [––––––––] [––––––––––––––––––––+–+SEQUENCER OUTPUT +–(EN)–+–|
|
9
10
| |File
#N7:62+–(DN) | |
|
| |Mask
FFFF|
| |
|
| |Dest
N7:7|
| |
|
| |Control
R6:6|
| |
|
| |Length
9|
| |
|
| |Position
0|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
| force the
| |
|
| sequencer
| |
|
| to increment
| |
|
| on the next
| |
|
| scan
| |
|
|
R6:6
| |
|
+––––(U)––––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
EN
|
➀
This rung accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Do not include this rung if you are using a 16 I/O
controller.
➁ More rungs will be added to this subroutine at the end of chapter 12.
11–25
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Notes:
11–26
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
12
Using High-Speed Counter
Instructions
This chapter contains general information about the high-speed counter instructions
and explains how they function in your application program. Each of the
instructions includes information on:
what the instruction symbol looks like
Programming
•
•
•
typical execution time for the instruction
how to use the instruction
In addition, the last section contains an application example for a paper drilling
machine that shows the high-speed counter instructions in use.
High-Speed Counter Instructions
Instruction
Mnemonic
Name
Purpose
Page
12–6
HSC
High-Speed Counter
Applies configuration to the high-speed
counter hardware, updates the image
accumulator, enables counting when the HSC
is true, and disables counting when the HSC
rung is false.
HSL
High-Speed Counter
Load
Configures the low and high presets, the
output patterns, and mask bit patterns.
12–18
RES
High-Speed Counter
Reset
Writes a zero to the hardware accumulator
and image accumulator.
12–21
RAC
High-Speed Counter
Reset Accumulator
Writes the value specified to the hardware
accumulator and image accumulator.
12–22
HSE
High-Speed Counter
Interrupt Enable
High-Speed Counter
Interrupt Disable
Enables or disables execution of the
high-speed counter interrupt subroutine when
a high preset, low preset, overflow, or
underflow is reached.
12–23
Update High-Speed
Counter Image
Accumulator
Provides you with real-time access to the
hardware accumulator value by updating the
image accumulator.
12–24
HSD
OTE
12–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
About the High-Speed Counter Instructions
The high-speed counter instructions used in your ladder program configure, control,
and monitor the controllers’ hardware counter. The hardware counter’s accumulator
increments or decrements in response to external input signals. When the
high-speed counter is enabled, data table counter C5:0 is used by the ladder program
for monitoring the high-speed counter accumulator and status. The high-speed
counter operates independent of the controller scan.
When using the high-speed counter, make sure you adjust your input filters
accordingly. See page A–7 for more information on input filters.
Before you learn about these instructions, read the overview that follows on the next
page. Refer to page 2–24 for information on wiring your controller for high-speed
counter applications.
12–2
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
High-Speed Counter Instructions Overview
Use the high-speed counter to detect and store narrow (fast) pulses, and its
specialized instructions to initiate other control operations based on counts reaching
preset values. These control operations include the automatic and immediate
execution of the high-speed counter interrupt routine (file 4) and the immediate
update of outputs based on a source and mask pattern you set.
The high-speed counter instructions reference counter C5:0. The HSC instruction is
fixed at C5:0. It is comprised of three words. Word 0 is the status word, containing
15 status bits. Word 1 is the preset value. Word 2 is the accumulated value. Once
assigned to the HSC instruction, C5:0 is not available as an address for any other
counter instructions.
15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Word 0
CU CD DN OV UN UA HP LP IV IN IH IL PE LS IE
Word 1
Preset Value
Word 2
Accumulator Value
CU
CD
DN
OV
UN
UA
HP
LP
IV
IN
IH
IL
PE
LS
IE
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
Status
Word
Counter Up Enable Bit
Counter Down Enable Bit
High Preset Reached Bit
Overflow Occurred Bit
Underflow Occurred Bit
Update High-Speed Counter Accumulator Bit
Accumulator ≥ High Preset Bit
Accumulator ≤ Low Preset Bit
Overflow Caused High-Speed Counter Interrupt Bit
Underflow Caused High-Speed Counter Interrupt Bit
High Preset Reached Caused Interrupt Bit
Low Preset Reached Caused Interrupt Bit
High-Speed Counter Interrupt Pending Bit
High-Speed Counter Interrupt Lost Bit
High-Speed Counter Interrupt Enable Bit
Counter preset and accumulated values are stored as signed integers.
Using Status Bits
The high-speed counter status bits are retentive. When the high-speed counter is
first configured, bits 3–7, 14, and 15 are reset and bit 1 (IE) is set.
12–3
Programming
Counter Data File Elements
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
•
•
•
Counter Up Enable Bit CU (bit 15) is used with all of the high-speed counter
types. If the HSC instruction is true, the CU bit is set to one. If the HSC
instruction is false, the CU bit is set to zero. Do not write to this bit.
Counter Down Enable Bit CD (bit 14) is used with the Bidirectional
Counters (modes 3–8). If the HSC instruction is true, the CD bit is set to one.
If the HSC instruction is false, the CD bit is set to zero. Do not write to this bit.
High Preset Reached Bit DN (bit 13) For the Up Counters (modes 1 and 2),
this bit is an edge triggered latch bit. This bit is set when the high preset is
reached. You can reset this bit with an OTU instruction or by executing an
RAC or RES instruction.
The DN bit is a reserved bit for all other Counter options (modes 3–8).
•
Overflow Occurred Bit OV (bit 12) For the Up Counters (modes 1 and 2),
this bit is set by the controller when the high preset is reached if the DN bit is
set.
For the Bidirectional Counters (modes 3–8), the OV bit is set by the controller
after the hardware accumulator transitions from 32,767 to –32,768. You can
reset this bit with an OTU instruction or by executing an RAC or RES
instruction for both the up and bidirectional counters.
Tip
•
Underflow Occurred Bit UN (bit 11) is a reserved bit for the Up Counters
(modes 1 and 2). Do not write to this bit.
For the Bidirectional Counters (modes 3–8), the UN bit is set by the controller
when the hardware accumulator transitions from –32,768 to +32,767. You can
reset this bit with an OTU instruction or by executing an RAC or RES
instruction.
Tip
•
•
Update High-Speed Counter Accumulator Bit UA (bit 10) is used with an
OTE instruction to update the instruction image accumulator value with the
hardware accumulator value. (The HSC instruction also performs this operation
each time the rung with the HSC instruction is evaluated as true.)
Accumulator ≥ High Preset Bit HP (bit 9) is a reserved bit for all Up
Counters(modes 1 and 2).
For the Bidirectional Counters (modes 3–8), if the hardware accumulator
becomes greater than or equal to the high preset, the HP bit is set. If the
hardware accumulator becomes less than the high preset, the HP bit is reset by
the controller. Do not write to this bit. (Exception – you can set or reset this bit
during the initial configuration of the HSC instruction. See page 12–6 for
more information.)
12–4
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
•
Accumulator ≤ Low Preset Bit LP (bit 8) is a reserved bit for all Up
Counters.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Overflow Caused High-Speed Counter Interrupt Bit IV (bit 7) is set to
identify an overflow as the cause for the execution of the high-speed counter
interrupt routine. The IN, IH, and IL bits are reset by the controller when the IV
bit is set. Examine this bit at the start of the high-speed counter interrupt
routine (file 4) to determine why the interrupt occurred.
Underflow caused User Interrupt Bit IN (bit 6) is set to identify an
underflow as the cause for the execution of the high-speed counter interrupt
routine. The IV, IH, and IL bits are reset by the controller when the IN bit is set.
Examine this bit at the start of the high-speed counter interrupt routine (file 4)
to determine why the interrupt occurred.
High Preset Reached Caused User Interrupt Bit IH (bit 5) is set to identify
a high preset reached as the cause for the execution of the high-speed counter
interrupt routine. The IV, IN, and IL bits are reset by the controller when the IH
bit is set. Examine this bit at the start of the high-speed counter interrupt
routine (file 4) to determine why the interrupt occurred.
Low Preset Reached Caused High-Speed Counter Interrupt Bit IL (bit 4)
is set to identify a low preset reached as the cause for the execution of the
high-speed counter interrupt routine. The IV, IN, and IH bits are reset by the
controller when the IL bit is set. Examine this bit at the start of the high-speed
counter interrupt routine (file 4) to determine why the interrupt occurred.
High-Speed Counter Interrupt Pending Bit PE (bit 3) is set to indicate that
a high-speed counter interrupt is waiting for execution. This bit is cleared by
the controller when the high-speed counter interrupt routine begins executing.
This bit is reset if an RAC or RES instruction is executed. Do not write to this
bit.
High-Speed Counter Interrupt Lost Bit LS (bit 2) is set if a high-speed
counter interrupt occurs while the PE bit is set. You can reset this bit with an
OTU instruction or by executing an RAC or RES instruction.
High-Speed Counter Interrupt Enable Bit IE (bit 1) is set when the
high-speed counter interrupt is enabled to run when a high-speed counter
interrupt condition occurs. It is reset when the interrupt is disabled. This bit is
also set when the high-speed counter is first configured. Do not write to this
bit.
12–5
Programming
For the Bidirectional Counters, if the hardware accumulator becomes less than
or equal to the low preset, the LP bit is set by the controller. If the hardware
accumulator becomes greater than the low preset, the LP bit is reset by the
controller. Do not write to this bit. (Exception – you can set or reset this bit
during the initial configuration of the HSC instruction. See page 12–6 for
more information.)
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
High-Speed Counter (HSC)
HSC
HIGH SPEED COUNTER
Type
Counter
C5:0
High Preset
0
Accum
0
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
21.00
21.00
(CU)
(CD)
(DN)
Use this instruction to configure the high-speed counter. Only one HSC instruction
can be used in a program. The high-speed counter is not operational until the first
true execution of the HSC instruction. When the HSC rung is false, the high-speed
counter is disabled from counting, but all other HSC features are operational.
The Counter address of the HSC instruction is fixed at C5:0.
After the HSC is configured, the image accumulator (C5:0.ACC) is updated with the
current hardware accumulator value every time the HSC instruction is evaluated as
true or false.
Entering Parameters
Enter the following parameters when programming this instruction:
•
•
•
Type indicates the counter selected. Refer to page 12–7 for making your
high-speed counter selection. Each type is available with reset and hold
functionality.
High Preset is the accumulated value that triggers a user-specified action such
as updating outputs or generating a high-speed counter interrupt.
Accumulator is the number of accumulated counts.
The following terminology is used in the following table to indicate the status of
counting:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
12–6
Up↑ – increments by 1 when the input energizes (edge).
Down↑ – decrements by 1 when the input energizes (edge).
Reset↑ – resets the accumulator to zero when the input energizes (edge).
Hold – disables the high-speed counter from counting while the input is
energized (level).
Count – increments or decrements by 1 when the input energizes (edge).
Direction – allows up counts when the input is de-energized and down counts
while the input is energized (level).
A – input pulse in an incremental (quadrature) encoder (edge/level).
B – input pulse in an incremental (quadrature) encoder (edge/level).
Z – reset pulse in an incremental (quadrature) encoder (edge/level).
↑ – the signal is active on the rising edge only (off to on).
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
The table below lists the function key you press to choose the type of high-speed
counter you want.
H g -Speed Counter
High-Speed
Coun er Functionality
Func onal y
I/0
Input Terminal Used
I/1
I/2
I/3
[F1] Up
Up Counter operation uses a single-ended
input.
Up↑
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
[F2] Up
(with reset and hold)
Up Counter operation uses a single input
with external reset and hold inputs.
Up↑
Not Used
Reset↑
Hold
[F3] Pulse and direction
Bidirectional operation uses both pulse
and direction inputs.
Count↑
Direction
Not Used
Not Used
[F4] Pulse and direction
(with external reset and hold)
Bidirectional operation uses both pulse
and direction inputs with external reset and
hold inputs.
Count↑
Direction
Reset↑
Hold
[F5] Up and down
Bidirectional operation uses both up and
down direction inputs.
Up↑
Down↑
Not Used
Not Used
[F6] Up and down
(with external reset and hold)
Bidirectional operation uses both up and
down pulse inputs with external reset and
hold inputs.
Up↑
Down↑
Reset↑
Hold
[F7] Encoder
Bidirectional operation uses quadrature
encoder inputs.
A
B
Not Used
Not Used
[F8] Encoder
(with external reset and hold)
Bidirectional operation uses both
quadrature encoder inputs with external
reset and hold inputs.
A
B
Z
Hold
One difference between Up Counters and Bidirectional Counters is that for
Bidirectional Counters the accumulator and preset values are not changed by the
high-speed counter when the presets are reached. The RAC and HSL instructions
must be used for this function. The Up Counters clear the accumulator and re-load
the high preset values whenever the preset is reached.
12–7
Programming
High-Speed Counter Type
and Function Key
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Using the Up Counter and the Up Counter with Reset and Hold
Up counters are used when the parameter being measured is uni-directional, such as
material being fed into a machine or as a tachometer recording the number of pulses
over a given time period.
Both types of Up Counters operate identically, except that the Up Counter with reset
and hold uses external inputs 2 and 3.
For the Up Counter, each Off-to-On state change of input I:0/0 adds 1 to the
accumulator until the high preset is reached. The accumulator is then automatically
reset to zero. The Up Counter operates in the 0 to +32,767 range inclusive and can
be reset to zero using the Reset (RES) instruction.
When the HSC instruction is first executed true, the:
•
•
Accumulator C5:0:0.ACC is loaded to the hardware accumulator.
High preset C5:0:0.PRE is loaded to the hardware high preset.
Operation
If you move data to the high preset without using the RAC instruction (with a
MOV) after the high-speed counter has been configured, the data is loaded to the
instruction image but is not loaded to the hardware. The modified high preset value
is not loaded to the hardware until the existing hardware high preset is reached, or
an RAC or RES instruction is executed.
The high preset value loaded to the hardware must be between 1 and 32,767
inclusive or an error INVALID PRESETs LOADED TO HIGH SPEED COUNTER
(37H) occurs. Any value between –32,768 and +32,767 inclusive can be loaded to
the hardware accumulator.
The Following Condition
A high preset is reached
12–8
Occurs when
either the hardware accumulator transitions from the hardware high
preset –1 to the hardware high preset, or
the hardware accumulator is loaded with a value greater than or
equal to the hardware high preset, or
the hardware high preset is loaded with a value that is less than or
equal to the hardware accumulator.
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
When a high preset is reached, no counts are lost.
•
•
•
Hardware and instruction accumulators are reset.
Instruction high preset is loaded to the hardware high preset.
If the DN bit is not set, the DN bit is set. The IH bit is also set and the IL, IV,
and IN bits are reset.
•
If the DN bit is already set, the OV bit is set. The IV bit is also set and the IL,
IV and IN bits are reset.
•
The following tables summarize what the input state must be for the corresponding
high-speed counter action to occur:
Up Counter
Input State
Input
Direction
(I/1)
Input Count
(I/O)
Input Reset
(I/2)
Input Hold
(I/3)
HSC Rung
High-Speed
H g -Speed
Counter Action
Turning
Off-to-On
NA
NA
NA
True
Count Up
NA
NA
NA
NA
False
Hold Count
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
NA
Hold Count
NA (Not Applicable)
12–9
Programming
High-speed counter interrupt file (program file 4) is executed if the interrupt is
enabled.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Up Counter with Reset and Hold
Input state
Input
Direction
(I/1)
Input Count
(I/O)
Input Reset
(I/2)
Input Hold
(I/3)
HSC Rung
High-Speed
H g -Speed
Counter Action
Turning
Off-to-On
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Off
True
Count Up
NA
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
On
NA
Hold Count
NA
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
False
Hold Count
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
NA
Hold Count
NA
NA
Turning On
NA
NA
Reset to 0
NA (Not Applicable)
Using the Bidirectional Counter and the Bidirectional Counter with Reset
and Hold
Bidirectional counters are used when the parameter being measured can either
increment or decrement. For example, a package entering and leaving a storage bin
is counted to regulate flow through the area.
The Bidirectional Counters operate identically except for the operation of inputs 1
and 0. For the Pulse and Direction type, input 0 provides the pulse and input 1
provides the direction. For the Up and Down type, input 0 provides the Up count
and input 1 provides the Down count. Both types are available with and without
reset and hold. Refer to page 12–7 for more information regarding Bidirectional
Counter types.
For the Bidirectional Counters, both high and low presets are used. The low preset
value must be less than the high preset value or an error INVALID PRESETs
LOADED TO HIGH SPEED COUNTER (37H) occurs.
Bidirectional Counters operate in the –32,768 to +32,767 range inclusive and can be
reset to zero using the Reset (RES) instruction.
12–10
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
Operation
When the HSC instruction is first executed true, the:
•
•
Instruction accumulator is loaded to the hardware accumulator.
Instruction high preset is loaded to the hardware high preset.
After the first true HSC instruction execution, data can only be transferred to the
hardware accumulator via an RES or RAC instruction, or to the hardware high and
low presets via the HSL instruction.
The Following Condition
A high preset is reached
Occurs when
either the hardware accumulator transitions from the hardware high
preset –1 to the hardware high preset, or
the hardware accumulator is loaded with a value greater than or
equal to the hardware high preset, or
the hardware high preset is loaded with a value that is less than or
equal to the hardware accumulator.
When a high preset is reached, the:
•
•
HP bit is set.
High-speed counter interrupt file (program file 4) is executed if the interrupt is
enabled. The IH bit is set and the IL, IV, and IN bits are reset.
Unlike the Up Counters, the accumulator value does not get reset and the high preset
value does not get loaded from the image to the hardware high preset register.
The Following Condition
A low preset is reached
Occurs when
either the hardware accumulator transitions from the hardware low
preset +1 to the hardware low preset, or
the hardware accumulator is loaded with a value less than or equal
to the hardware low preset, or
the hardware low preset is loaded with a value that is greater than
or equal to the hardware accumulator.
12–11
Programming
Any instruction accumulator value between –32,768 and +32,767 inclusive can be
loaded to the hardware.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
When the low preset is reached, the:
•
•
LP bit is set.
High-speed counter interrupt file (program file 4) is executed if the interrupt is
enabled. The IL bit is set and the IH, IV, and IN bits are reset.
An overflow occurs when the hardware accumulator transitions from +32,767 to
–32,768. When an overflow occurs, the:
•
•
OV bit is set.
High-speed counter interrupt file (program file 4) is executed if the interrupt is
enabled. The IV bit is set and the IH, IL, and IN bits are reset.
An underflow occurs when the hardware accumulator transitions from –32,768 to
+32,767. When an underflow occurs, the:
•
•
UN bit is set.
High-speed counter interrupt file (program file 4) is executed if the interrupt is
enabled. The IN bit is set and the IH, IL, and IV bits are reset.
The following tables summarize what the input state must be for the corresponding
high-speed counter action to occur:
Bidirectional Counter (Pulse/direction)
Input State
Input
Direction
(I/1)
Input Count
(I/0)
Input Hold
(I/3)
HSC Rung
High-Speed
H g -Speed
Counter Action
Turning
Off-to-On
Off
NA
NA
True
Count Up
Turning
Off-to-On
On
NA
NA
True
Count Down
NA
NA
NA
NA
False
Hold Count
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
NA
NA
NA
Hold Count
NA (Not Applicable)
12–12
Input Reset
(I/2)
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
Bidirectional Counter with Reset and Hold (Pulse/direction)
Input State
Input
Direction
(I/1)
Input Count
(I/0)
Input Reset
(I/2)
Input Hold
(I/3)
HSC Rung
High-Speed
H g -Speed
Counter Action
Off
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Off
True
Count Up
Turning
Off-to-On
On
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Off
True
Count Down
NA
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
False
Hold Count
NA
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
On
NA
Hold Count
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
NA
Hold Count
NA
NA
Turning On
NA
NA
Reset to 0
Programming
Turning
Off-to-On
NA (Not Applicable)
Bidirectional Counter (Up/down count)
Input Up
Count
(I/0)
Input State
Input Down
Count
(I/1)
HSC Rung
High-Speed
H g -Speed
Counter Action
Turning
Off-to-On
Off, On, or
Turning Off
True
Count Up
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Turning
Off-to-On
True
Count Down
NA
NA
False
Hold Count
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
Hold Count
NA (Not Applicable)
12–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Bidirectional Counter with Reset and Hold (Up/down count)
Input State
Input Up
Count
(I/0)
High-Speed
H g -Speed
Counter Action
Input Down
Count
(I/1)
Input Reset
(I/2)
Turning
Off-to-On
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Off
True
Count Up
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Turning
Off-to-On
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Off
True
Count Down
NA
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
False
Hold Count
NA
NA
Off, On, or
Turning Off
On
NA
Hold Count
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Off, On, or
Turning Off
Off, On, or
Turning Off
NA
NA
Hold Count
NA
NA
Turning On
NA
NA
Reset to 0
Input Hold
(I/3)
HSC Rung
NA (Not Applicable)
When up and down input pulses occur simultaneously, the high-speed counter
counts up, then down.
Using the Bidirectional Counter with Reset and Hold with a Quadrature
Encoder
The Quadrature Encoder is used for determining direction of rotation and position
for rotating, such as a lathe. The Bidirectional Counter counts the rotation of the
Quadrature Encoder.
Bidirectional Counters operate in the –32,768 to +32,767 range inclusive and can be
reset to zero using the reset (RES) instruction. The following figure shows a
quadrature encoder connected to inputs 0, 1, and 2. The count direction is
determined by the phase angle between A and B. If A leads B, the counter
increments. If B leads A, the counter decrements.
The counter can be reset using the Z input. The Z outputs from the encoders
typically provide one pulse per revolution.
12–14
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
A
B
Quadrature Encoder
Z
(Reset input)
Input 0
Input 1
Input 2
Forward Rotation
Reverse Rotation
A
1
2
3
2
Programming
B
1
Count
Operation
For the Bidirectional Counters, both high and low presets are used. The low preset
value must be less than the high preset value or an error INVALID PRESETs
LOADED TO HIGH SPEED COUNTER (37H) occurs.
When the HSC instruction is first executed true, the:
•
•
Instruction accumulator is loaded to the hardware accumulator.
Instruction high preset is loaded to the hardware high preset.
Any instruction accumulator value between –32,768 and +32,767 inclusive can be
loaded to the hardware.
After the first true HSC instruction execution, data can only be transferred to the
hardware accumulator via an RES or RAC instruction, or to the hardware high and
low presets via the HSL instruction.
The Following Condition
A high preset is reached
Occurs when
either the hardware accumulator transitions from the hardware high
preset –1 to the hardware high preset, or
the hardware accumulator is loaded with a value greater than or
equal to the hardware high preset, or
the hardware high preset is loaded with a value that is less than or
equal to the hardware accumulator.
12–15
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
When a high preset is reached, the:
•
•
HP bit is set.
High-speed counter interrupt file (program file 4) is executed if the interrupt is
enabled. The IH bit is set and the IL, IN, and IV bits are reset.
Unlike the Up Counters, the accumulator value does not reset and the high preset
value does not get loaded from the image to the hardware high preset register.
The Following Condition
A low preset is reached
Occurs when
either the hardware accumulator transitions from the hardware low
preset +1 to the hardware low preset, or
the hardware accumulator is loaded with a value less than or equal
to the hardware low preset, or
the hardware low preset is loaded with a value that is greater than
or equal to the hardware accumulator.
When a low preset is reached, the:
•
•
LP bit is set.
High-speed counter interrupt file (program file 4) is executed if the interrupt is
enabled. The IL bit is set and the IH, IN, and IV bits are reset.
An overflow occurs when the hardware accumulator transitions from +32,767 to
–32,768. When an overflow occurs, the:
•
•
12–16
OV bit is set.
High-speed counter interrupt file (program file 4) is executed if the interrupt is
enabled. The IV bit is set and the IH, IL, and IN bits are reset.
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
An underflow occurs when the hardware accumulator transitions from –32,768 to
+32,767. When an underflow occurs, the:
•
•
UN bit is set.
High-speed counter interrupt file (program file 4) is executed if the interrupt is
enabled. The IN bit is set and the IH, IL, and IV bits are reset.
The following tables summarize what the input state must be for the corresponding
high-speed counter action to occur:
Bidirectional Counter (Encoder)
HSC Rung
H g -Speed
High-Speed
Counter Action
Turning On
Off
True
Count Up
Turning Off
Off
True
Count Down
NA
On
NA
Hold Count
NA
NA
False
Hold Count
Off or On
NA
NA
Hold Count
Programming
Input A
(I/0)
Input State
Input B
(I/1)
NA (Not Applicable)
Bidirectional Counter with Reset and Hold (Encoder)
Input A
(I/0)
Input B
(I/1)
Input State
Input Z
(I/2)
Input Hold
(I/3)
HSC Rung
H g -Speed
High-Speed
Counter Action
Turning On
Off
Off
Off
True
Count Up
Turning Off
Off
Off
Off
True
Count Down
Off or On
NA
Off
NA
NA
Hold Count
NA
On
Off
NA
NA
Hold Count
NA
NA
Off
NA
False
Hold Count
NA
NA
Off
On
NA
Hold Count
Off
On➀
NA
NA
Reset to 0
Off
NA (Not Applicable)
➀
The optional hardware high-speed counter reset is the logical coincidence of A x B x Z.
12–17
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
High-Speed Counter Load (HSL)
HSL
HSC LOAD
Counter
Source
Length
C5:0
(CU)
5
(DN)
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
66.00
7.00
This instruction allows you to set the low and high presets, low and high output
source, and the output mask. When either a high or low preset is reached, you can
instantly update selected outputs.
If you are using the HSL instruction with the Up Counter, the high preset must be
≥ 1 and ≤ +32,767 or an error INVALID PRESETs LOADED TO HIGH SPEED
COUNTER (37H) occurs. For the bidirectional counters, the high preset must be
greater than the low preset or an error INVALID PRESETs LOADED TO HIGH
SPEED COUNTER (37H) occurs.
The Counter referenced by this instruction has the same address as the HSC
instruction counter and is fixed at C5:0.
Entering Parameters
Enter the following parameters when programming this instruction:
•
•
Source is an address that identifies the first of five data words used by the HSL.
The source can be either an integer or binary file element.
Length is the number of elements starting from the source. This number is
always 5.
Operation
The HSL instruction allows you to configure the high-speed counter to
instantaneously and automatically update external outputs whenever a high or low
preset is reached. The physical outputs are automatically updated in less than 30 µs.
(The physical turn-on time of the outputs is not included in this amount.) The
output image is then automatically updated at the next poll for user interrupts or
IOM instruction, whichever occurs first.
With this instruction, you can change the high preset for the up counters or both the
high and low presets for Bidirectional Counters during run. You can also modify
the output mask configuration during run.
The source address is either an integer or binary file element. For example, if N7:5
is selected as the source address, the additional parameters for the execution of this
instruction would appear as shown in the following table.
12–18
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
Up Counter
Only
Bidirectional
Counters
Description
N7:5
Output Mask
Output Mask
Identifies which group of four bits in the output
file (word 0) are controlled.
000F=bits 3–0
00F0=bits 7–4
0003=bits 0 and 1
00FF= bits 7–0
N7:6
Output
Source
Output High
Source
(Up count.) The status of bits in this word are
written “through” the mask to the actual outputs.
N7:7
High Preset
High Preset
(Up count.) When the accumulator reaches this
value, the output source are written through the
output mask to the actual outputs, and the HSC
subroutine (file 4) will be scanned.
N7:8
Reserved
Output Low
Source
(Down count.) The status of bits in this word are
written “through” the mask to the actual outputs.
Low Preset
(Down count.) When the accumulator reaches
this value, the output source are written through
the output mask to the actual outputs, and the
HSC subroutine (file 4) will be scanned.
N7:9
Reserved
The bits in the output mask directly correspond to the physical outputs. If a bit is set
to 1, the corresponding output can be changed by the high-speed counter. If a bit is
set to 0, the corresponding output cannot be changed by the high-speed counter.
The bits in the high and low sources also directly correspond to the physical outputs.
The high source is applied when the high preset is reached. The low source is
applied when the low preset is reached. The final output states are determined by
applying the output source over the mask and updating only the unmasked outputs
(those with a 1 in the mask bit pattern).
You can always change the state of the outputs via the user program or
programming device regardless of the output mask. The high-speed counter only
modifies selected outputs and output image bits based on source and mask bit
patterns when the presets are reached. The last device that changes the output image
(i.e., user program or high-speed counter) determines the actual output pattern.
Forces override any output control from either the high-speed counter or from
the output image. Forces may also be applied to the high-speed counter
inputs. Forced inputs are recognized by the high-speed counter (e.g., a forced
count input off and on increments the high-speed accumulator).
12–19
Programming
Parameter
Image
Location
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
The high-speed counter hardware is updated immediately when the HSL instruction
is executed regardless of high-speed counter type (Up Counter or Bidirectional
Counter). For the Up Counters, the last two registers are ignored since the low
preset does not apply.
If a fault occurs due to the HSL instruction, the HSL parameters are not loaded to
the high-speed counter hardware. You can use more than one HSL instruction in
your program. The HSL instructions can have different image locations for the
additional parameters.
Do not change a preset value and an output mask/source with the same HSL
instruction as the accumulator is approaching the old preset value.
If the high-speed counter is enabled and the HSL instruction is evaluated true,
the high-speed counter parameters in the HSL instruction are applied
immediately without stopping the operation of the high-speed counter. If the
same HSL instruction is being used to change the high-speed counter
controlled mask/source and the preset, the mask/source is changed first and
the preset second. (The preset is changed within 40µs after the mask/source.)
If the original preset is reached after the new mask/source is applied but
before the new preset is applied, the new outputs are applied immediately.
12–20
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
High-Speed Counter Reset (RES)
C5:0
RES)
)
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
51.00
The RES instruction allows you to write a zero to the hardware accumulator and
image accumulator.
The Counter referenced by this instruction has the same address as the HSC
instruction counter and is entered as C5:0.
6.00
Execution of this instruction immediately:
•
•
•
•
•
removes pending high-speed counter interrupts
resets the hardware and instruction accumulators
reset the PE, LS, OV, UN, and DN status bits
loads the instruction high preset to the hardware high preset (if the high-speed
counter is configured as an up counter)
resets the IL, IH, IN, or IV status bits
You can have more than one RES instruction in your program.
12–21
Programming
Operation
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
High-Speed Counter Reset Accumulator (RAC)
RAC
RESET TO ACCUM VALUE
Counter
C5:0
Source
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
56.00
This instruction allows you to write a specific value to the hardware accumulator
and image accumulator.
The Counter referenced by this instruction has the same address as the HSC
instruction counter and is fixed at C5:0.
6.00
Entering Parameters
Enter the following parameter when programming this instruction:
•
Source represents the value that is loaded to the accumulator. The source can
be a constant or an address.
Operation
Execution of the RAC:
•
•
•
•
•
removes pending high-speed counter interrupts
resets the PE, LS, OV, UN, and DN status bits
loads a new accumulator value to the hardware and instruction image
loads the instruction high preset to the hardware high preset (if the high-speed
counter is configured as an Up Counter)
resets the IL, IH, IN, or IV status bits
The source can be a constant or any integer element in files 0–7. The hardware and
instruction accumulators are updated with the new accumulator value immediately
upon instruction execution.
You can have more than one RAC instruction per program referencing the same
source or different sources.
12–22
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
High-Speed Counter Interrupt Enable (HSE)
and Disable (HSD)
HSE
HSC INTERRUPT ENABLE
COUNTER
C5:0
HSD
HSC INTERRUPT DISABLE
COUNTER
C5:0
These instructions enable or disable a high-speed counter interrupt when a high
preset, low preset, overflow, or underflow is reached. Use the HSD and HSE in
pairs to provide accurate execution for your application.
The Counter referenced by these instructions have the same address as the HSC
instruction counter and is fixed at C5:0.
HSE 10.00
HSD 8.00
Programming
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
7.00
7.00
Using HSE
Operation
When the high-speed counter interrupt is enabled, user subroutine (program file 4)
is executed when:
•
•
A high or low preset is reached.
An overflow or underflow occurs.
When in Test Single Scan mode and in an idle condition, the high-speed counter
interrupt is held off until the next scan trigger is received from the programming
device. The high-speed counter accumulator counts while idle.
If the HSE is subsequently executed after the pending bit is set, the interrupt is
executed immediately.
The default state of the high-speed counter interrupt is enabled (the IE bit is set
to 1).
12–23
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
If the high-speed counter interrupt routine is executing and another high-speed
counter interrupt occurs, the second high-speed counter interrupt is saved but is
considered pending. (The PE bit is set.) The second interrupt is executed
immediately after the first one is finished executing. If a high-speed counter
interrupt occurs while a high-speed counter interrupt is pending, the most recent
high-speed counter interrupt is lost and the LS bit is set.
Using HSD
Operation
The HSD instruction disables the high-speed counter interrupt, preventing the
interrupt subroutine from being executed.
If the HSE is subsequently executed after the pending bit is set, the interrupt is
executed immediately.
This HSD instruction does not cancel an interrupt, but results in the pending bit
(C5:0/3) being set when:
•
•
A high or low preset is reached.
An overflow or underflow occurs.
Update High-Speed Counter Image Accumulator (OTE)
C5:0
( )
UA
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True
False
12.00
7.00
When an OUT bit instruction is addressed for the high-speed counter (C5:0) UA bit,
the value in the hardware accumulator is written to the value in the image
accumulator (C5:0.ACC). This provides you with real-time access to the hardware
accumulator value. This is in addition to the automatic transfer from the hardware
accumulator to the image accumulator that occurs each time the HSC instruction is
evaluated.
Operation
This instruction transfers the hardware accumulator to the instruction accumulator.
When the OTE/UA instruction is executed true, the hardware accumulator is loaded
to the instruction image accumulator (C5:0.ACC).
12–24
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
What Happens to the HSC When Going to REM Run
Mode
At the first true HSL instruction execution after going-to-run, the Low Preset is
initialized to –32,768 and the output mask and high and low output patterns are
initialized to zero. Use the HSL instruction during the first pass to restore any
values necessary for your application.
You can modify the behavior of the high-speed counter at REM Run mode entry by
adjusting the HSC parameters prior to the first true execution of the HSC
instruction. The following example ladder rungs demonstrate different ways to
adjust the HSC parameters.
12–25
Programming
Once initialized, the HSC instruction retains its previous state when going through a
mode change or power cycle. This means that the HSC Accumulator (C5:0.ACC)
and High Preset values are retained. Outputs under the direct control of the HSC
also retain their previous state. The Low Preset Reached and High Preset Reached
bits (C0/LP and C0/HP) are also retained. They are examined by the HSC
instruction during the high-speed counter’s first true evaluation in the REM Run
mode to differentiate a retentive REM Run mode entry from an external or initial
Accumulator (C5:0.ACC) modification.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Example 1
To enter the REM Run mode and have the HSC Outputs, ACC, and Interrupt
Subroutine resume their previous state, apply the following:
(Rung 2:0)
No action required. (Remember that all OUT instructions are zeroed
when entering the REM Run mode. Use SET/RST instructions in place of
OUT instructions in your conditional logic requiring retention.)
| S:1
+HSL–––––––––––––––+ |
|––][–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HSC LOAD
+–|
|
15
|Counter
C5:0| |
|
|Source
N7:0| |
|
|Length
5| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:1
|
+HSC––––––––––––––––––––+
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HIGH SPEED COUNTER
+–(CU)–|
|
|Type Encoder(Res,Hld) +–(CD) |
|
|Counter
C5:0+–(DN) |
|
|High Preset
1000|
|
|
|Accum
0|
|
|
+–––––––––––––––––––––––+
|
12–26
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
Example 2
To enter the REM Run mode and retain the HSC ACC value while having the HSC
Outputs and Interrupt Subroutine reassert themselves, apply the following:
Rung 2:0
Unlatch the C5:0/HP and C5:0/LP bits during the first scan BEFORE the
HSC instruction is executed for the first time.
|
|
|
|
|
|
Rung 2:1
| S:1
C5:0
|
|––][–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–(U)––+|––|
|
15
|
HP | |
|
| C5:0 | |
|
+––(U)––+ |
|
LP
|
Rung 2:2
|
+HSC––––––––––––––––––––+
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HIGH SPEED COUNTER
+–(CU)–|
|
|Type Encoder (Res,Hld)+–(CD) |
|
|Counter
C5:0+–(DN) |
|
|High Preset
1000|
|
|
|Accum
0|
|
|
+–––––––––––––––––––––––+
|
12–27
Programming
| S:1
+HSL–––––––––––––––+
|––][––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HSC LOAD
+–
|
15
|Counter
C5:0|
|
|Source
N7:0|
|
|Length
5|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Example 3
To enter the REM Run mode and have the HSC ACC and Interrupt Subroutine
resume their previous state, while externally initializing the HSC outputs, apply the
following:
Rung 2:0
Unlatch or Latch the output bits under HSC control during the first
scan after the HSC instruction is executed for the first time. (Note,
you could place this rung before the HSC instruction; however, this is
not recommended.)
| S:1
+HSL–––––––––––––––+ |
|––][–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HSC LOAD
+–|
|
15
|Counter
C5:0| |
|
|Source
N7:0| |
|
|Length
5| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:1
|
+HSC––––––––––––––––––––+
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HIGH SPEED COUNTER
+–(CU)–|
|
|Type Encoder (Res,Hld)+–(CD) |
|
|Counter
C5:0+–(DN) |
|
|High Preset
1000|
|
|
|Accum
0|
|
|
+–––––––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:2
This rung is programmed with the knowledge of an HSL mask of 0007
(Outputs
0–2 are used) and initializes the HSC outputs each REM Run mode entry.
Outputs O/0 and O/1 are off, while Output O/2 is on.
| S:1
O:0
|
|––][––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––(U)––+|––|
|
15
|
0
| |
|
| O:0
| |
|
+––(U)–––+ |
|
|
1
| |
|
| O:0
| |
|
+––(L)–––+ |
|
2
|
12–28
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
High-Speed Counter Instructions in the Paper Drilling
Machine Application Example
The ladder rungs in this section demonstrate the use of the HSC instruction in the
paper drilling machine application example started in chapter 6. Refer to
appendix E for the complete paper drilling machine application example.
Drilled
Holes
Drill Depth
I/4
Quadrature A-B Encoder and Drive
I/0 I/1
Drill On/Off O/1
Drill Retract O/2
Drill Forward O/3
Photo-Eye Reset I/2
Counter Hold I/3
Programming
Drill Home
I/5
Photo-Eye
Reflector
Conveyor Enable wired in series to the Drive O/5
Conveyor Drive Start/Stop wired in series to the Drive O/0
20226
The main program file (file 2) initializes the HSC instruction, monitors the machine
start and stop buttons, and calls other subroutines necessary to run the machine.
Refer to the comments preceding each rung for additional information.
Rung 2:0
Initializes the high-speed counter each time the REM Run mode is
entered. The high-speed counter data area (N7:5 – N7:9) corresponds
with the starting address (source address) of the HSL instruction. The
HSC instruction is disabled each entry into the REM run mode until the
first time that it is executed as true. (The high preset was ”pegged”
on initialization to prevent a high preset interrupt from occurring
during the initialization process.)
| 1’st
Output Mask
|
| Pass
(only use bit 0
|
|
ie. O:0/0)
|
|
S:1
+MOV–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+MOVE
+–+–|
|
15
| |Source
1| | |
|
| |
| | |
|
| |Dest
N7:5| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
12–29
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
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12–30
| High Output Pattern |
|
(turn off O:0/0)
|
|
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
+–+MOVE
+–+
| |Source
0| |
| |
| |
| |Dest
N7:6| |
| |
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+ |
| High Preset Value
|
| (counts to next hole)|
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
+–+MOVE
+–+
| |Source
32767| |
| |
| |
| |Dest
N7:7| |
| |
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+ |
| Low output pattern |
|
(turn on O:0/0
|
|
each reset)
|
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
+–+MOVE
+–+
| |Source
1| |
| |
| |
| |Dest
N7:8| |
| |
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+ |
| Low preset value
|
| (cause low preset
|
|
int at reset)
|
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
+–+MOVE
+–+
| |Source
0| |
| |
| |
| |Dest
N7:9| |
| |
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
|
|
|
| High Speed Counter |
|
|
| +HSL–––––––––––––––+ |
+ –+HSC LOAD
+–+
|Counter
C5:0|
|Source
N7:5|
|Length
5|
+––––––––––––––––––+
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Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
Rungs 2.0 and 2.2 are required to write several parameters to the high-speed counter
data file area. These two rungs are conditioned by the first pass bit during one scan
when the controller is going from REM program to REM Run mode.
|
High Speed Counter
|
|
+HSC––––––––––––––––––––+
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HIGH SPEED COUNTER
+–(CU)–|
|
|Type Encoder (Res,Hld)+–(CD) |
|
|Counter
C5:0+–(DN) |
|
|High Preset
1250|
|
|
|Accum
1|
|
|
+–––––––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:2
Forces a high-speed counter low preset interrupt to occur each REM Run
mode entry. An interrupt can only occur on the transition of the
high-speed counter accum to a preset value (accum reset to 1, then 0).
This is done to allow the high-speed counter interrupt subroutine
sequencers to initialize. The order of high-speed counter
initialization is: (1)load high-speed counter parameters (2)execute
HSL instruction (3)execute true HSC instruction (4)(optional) force
high-speed counter interrupt to occur.
| 1’st
High Speed Counter
|
| Pass
|
|
S:1
+RAC––––––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+RESET TO ACCUM VALUE +–+–|
|
15
| |Counter
C5:0| | |
|
| |Source
1| | |
|
| |
| | |
|
| +–––––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
High Speed
| |
|
|
Counter
| |
|
|
C5:0
| |
|
+–––(RES)–––––––––––––––––+ |
12–31
Programming
Rung 2:1
This HSC instruction is not placed in the high-speed counter interrupt
subroutine. If this instruction were placed in the interrupt
subroutine, the high-speed counter could never be started or
initialized (because an interrupt must first occur in order to scan the
high-speed counter interrupt subroutine).
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
The high-speed counter is used to control the conveyer position. The high-speed
counter counts pulses supplied by the conveyer’s encoder via hardware inputs I:0/0
and I:0/1. Hardware inputs I:0/2 (reset) and I:0/3 (hold) are connected to a
photo-switch ensuring the HSC instruction only counts encoder pulses when a
manual is in front of the drill and that the high-speed counter is reset at the leading
edge of each manual.
The high-speed counter clears the conveyer drive output bit (O:0/0) each time a high
preset is reached. As a result, the drive decelerates and stops the conveyer motor.
The high-speed counter clears the output within microseconds ensuring accuracy
and repeatability.
The high-speed counter sets the conveyer drive output bit (O:0/0) each time a low
preset is reached. As a result, the drive accelerates and maintains the conveyer
motor.
When the manual has travelled the specified distance set by the high-speed counter
high preset value, the high-speed counter interrupt subroutine signals the main
program to perform the drilling sequence. For more information regarding the
interrupt subroutine used in this program, refer to the application example in
chapter 11.
This example uses the Quadrature Encoder with reset and hold instruction. The
high-speed counter accumulator increments and decrements based on the quadrature
relationship of the encoder’s A and B inputs (I:0/0 and I:0/1). The accumulator is
cleared to zero when the reset is activated or when the RES instruction is executed.
All presets are entered as a relative offset to the leading edge of a manual. The
presets for the hole patterns are stored in the SQO instructions. (Refer to chapter 11
for the SQO instruction.) The high-speed counter external reset input (I:0/2) and the
external hold input (I:0/3) are wired in parallel to prevent the high-speed counter
from counting while the reset is active.
The input filter delays for both the high-speed counter A and B inputs (I:0/0 and
I:0/1) as well as the high-speed counter reset and hold inputs (I:0/2 and I:0/3) can be
adjusted. Refer to page A–7 for more information on adjusting filters.
12–32
Using High-Speed Counter Instructions
Rung 4:5
Interrupt occurred due to low preset reached.
| C5:0
+RET–––––––––––––––+–|
|––––][––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+RETURN
+ |
|
IL
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
| interrupt occurred
|
Drill Sequence Start |
| due to high preset reached |
|
|
C5:0
B3
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(L)–––––|
|
IH
32
|
Rung 4:7
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
12–33
Programming
Rung 4:6
Signals the main program (file 2) to initiate a drilling sequence. The
high-speed counter has already stopped the conveyor at the correct
position using its high preset output pattern data (clear O:0/0). This
occurred within microseconds of the high preset being reached (just
prior to entering this high-speed counter interrupt subroutine). The
drill sequence subroutine resets the drill sequence start bit and sets
the conveyor drive bit (O:0/0) upon completion of the drilling
sequence.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Notes:
12–34
Using the Message Instruction
13
Using the Message Instruction
This chapter contains information about communications and the message (MSG)
instruction. Specifically, this chapter contains information on:
Note
types of communication
what the MSG instruction symbol looks like
typical execution time for the MSG instruction
how to use the MSG instruction
application examples and timing diagrams
Only Series C or later MicroLogix 1000 discrete controllers and all MicroLogix
1000 analog controllers support the MSG instruction.
Message Instruction
Instruction
Mnemonic
MSG
Name
Message
Read/Write
Purpose
This instruction transfers data from one node to
another via the communication port. When the
instruction is enabled, the message is sent to a
communication buffer. Replies are processed at the
end of scan.
Page
13–3
13–1
Programming
•
•
•
•
•
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
Types of Communication
Communication is the ability of a device to send data or status to other devices.
This capability typically falls into one of two categories: initiator (master) or
responder (slave). Each of these are described below:
Initiator (Master) Communication
Initiator products can begin communication processes, which includes requesting
information from other devices (reading) or sending information to other products
(writing). In addition, initiator products are usually capable of replying to other
devices when they make requests to read information. The Series C or later
MicroLogix 1000 discrete controllers and all MicroLogix 1000 analog controllers
are in this class.
Initiator products can begin communication processes with other initiator products
(peer-to-peer communication) or with responder (slave) products
(initiator-to-responder communication).
Responder (Slave) Communication
Responder products can only reply to other products. These devices are not capable
of initiating an exchange of data; they only reply to requests made from initiator
products. The Series A and B MicroLogix 1000 discrete controllers are in this class.
13–2
Using the Message Instruction
Message Instruction (MSG)
(EN)
(DN)
(ER)
7
Execution Times
(µsec) when:
True False
180➀
The MSG is an output instruction that allows the controller to initiate an exchange
of data with other devices. The relationship with the other devices can be either
peer-to-peer communication or master-to-slave communication. The type of
communication required by a particular application determines the programming
configuration requirements of the MSG instruction.
➀ This only includes the amount of time needed to set up the operation requested. It does not include the time it
takes to service the actual communication, as this time varies with each network configuration. As an example,
144ms is the actual communication service time for the following configuration: 3 nodes on DH-485
(2=MicroLogix 1000 programmable controllers and 1=PLC-500 A.I. Series programming software), running at
19.2K baud, with 2 words per transfer.
48
Entering Parameters
After you place the MSG instruction on a rung, specify whether the message is to be
a read or write. Then specify the target device and the control block for the MSG
instruction.
•
•
Read/Write – read indicates that the local processor (processor in which the
instruction is located) is receiving data; write indicates that the processor is
sending data.
Target Device – identifies the type of command used to establish
communication. The target device can be a MicroLogix 1000 controller or SLC
family processor using SLC commands, or a common interface file by selecting
the CIF format. Valid options are:
– SLC500/ML1000 – Allows communication between a MicroLogix 1000
–
controller and any other MicroLogix 1000 controller or SLC 500 family
processor.
485CIF – (common interface file) Allows communication between a
MicroLogix 1000 controller and a non-MicroLogix 1000/SLC 500 device.
The CIF data is automatically delivered to integer file 9 in SLC 500
processors or file 7 in MicroLogix 1000 controllers. The 485CIF protocol
is also used for PLC-2 type messages to PLC-5 processors.
13–3
Programming
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/write
Target Device
Control Block
Control Block Length
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
•
•
Note
Control Block Address – an integer file address that you select. It consists of 7
integer words, containing the status bits, target file address, and other data
associated with the MSG instruction.
Control Block Length – fixed at seven elements. This field cannot be altered.
When running a MicroLogix 1000 program on an SLC 5/03 or SLC 5/04
processor, or on channel 0 of an SLC 5/05 processor, the MSG control block
length increases from 7 to 14 words. If you plan to run a MicroLogix 1000
program with one of these processors, make sure that the program has at least 7
unused words following each MSG control block.
The table that follows illustrates combinations of message types and target devices
and their valid file types.
Command Type
Message
Type
Initiating
Device
Valid File
Types
Target
Device➀➁➂
SLC500/ML1000
Write
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
SLC500/ML1000
Read
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
CIF
Write
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
MicroLogix 1000
N7
CIF
Read
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
MicroLogix 1000
N7
SLC500/ML1000
Write
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
SLC 500
O➃,I➃,S,B,T,C,R,N
SLC500/ML1000
Read
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
SLC 500
O➃,I➃,S,B,T,C,R,N
CIF
Write
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
SLC 500
N9
CIF
Read
MicroLogix 1000
O,I,S,B,T,C,R,N
SLC 500
N9
➀
➁
Valid File Types
The DF1 Full-Duplex protocol can be used if the target device supports it. Such devices include MicroLogix 1000
controllers (any series), SLC 5/03, SLC 5/04 and SLC 5/05 processors, and PLC-5 processors (CIF command
type only).
The DH-485 protocol can be used if the target device supports it. Such devices include MicroLogix 1000
controllers (except for Series A and B discrete controllers) and SLC 500, SLC 5/01, SLC 5/02, SLC 5/03, SLC
5/04 or SLC 5/05 processors.
➂ The DF1 Half-Duplex protocol can also be used with Series D or later discrete and all analog MicroLogix 1000
controllers, but a master is required, such as an SLC 5/03, SLC 5/04 or SLC 5/05 processor.
➃ SLC 500, SLC 5/01, and SLC 5/02 processors do not support O or I file access from a MSG instruction.
SLC 5/03, SLC 5/04 and SLC 5/05 processors do support O and I file access, but only when unprotected.
13–4
Using the Message Instruction
Control Block Layout
The control block layouts shown below illustrate SLC500/ML1000 type messages.
Control Block Layout – SLC500/ML1000
EN ST DN ER
EW NR TO
Word
Error Code
0
Node Number
1
Reserved for length (in elements)
2
File Number
3
File Type (O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N)
4
Element Number
5
Subelement Number
6
Programming
15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Control Block Layout – 485CIF
15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
EN ST DN ER
EW NR TO
Word
Error Code
0
Node Number
1
Reserved for Length (in elements)
2
Offset Bytes
3
Not used
4
Not used
5
Not used
6
13–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
Using Status Bits
Read/Write:
READ
Target Device:
SLC500/ML1000
Control Block:
N7:0
Local Destination File Address:
***
Target Node:
0
Target File Address:
***
Message Length in elements
***
ignore if timed out:
to be retried:
awaiting execution:
0
0
0
TO
NR
EW
error:
message done:
message transmitting:
message enabled:
0
0
0
0
ER
DN
ST
EN
control bit address:
N7:0/8
ERROR CODE: 0
Error Code Desc:
MSG Instruction Status Bits
The right column in the display above lists the various MSG instruction status bits.
These are explained below:
•
•
•
Note
Negative Response Bit NR (bit 09) is set if the target processor is responding
to your message, but can not process the message at the present time. The NR
bit is reset at the next false-to-true MSG rung transition that has a transmit
buffer available. It is used to determine when to send retries. The ER bit is also
set at this time. Use this feedback to initiate a retry of your message at a later
time. This bit is used with DH-485 protocol only.
Enabled and Waiting Bit EW (bit 10) is set on any false-to-true MSG rung
transition. This bit is reset when an ACK or NAK (no acknowledge) is
received, or on any true-to-false MSG rung transition.
The operation of the EW bit has changed since Series C.
•
•
13–6
Time Out Bit TO (bit 08) Temporarily set this bit (1) to error out (error code
37) an existing MSG instruction. This bit has no effect unless the ST bit has
first been set due to receiving an ACK (an acknowlege). Your application must
supply its own timer whose preset value is the MSG timeout value. This bit is
reset on any false-to-true MSG rung transition.
Error Bit ER (bit 12) is set when message transmission has failed. The ER
bit is reset the next time the MSG rung goes from false to true.
Done Bit DN (bit 13) is set when the message is transmitted successfully. The
DN bit is reset (cleared) the next time the MSG rung goes from false to true.
Using the Message Instruction
•
Start Bit ST (bit 14) is set when the processor receives acknowledgement
from the target device. This identifies that the target device has started to
process the MSG request. The ST bit is reset when the DN, ER, or TO bit is set
or on a false-to-true MSG rung transition.
•
Note
Enable Bit EN (bit 15) is set only if the transmit buffer is available. If the
transmit buffer is not available, the EN flag remains false. When the transmit
buffer becomes available, the EN flag goes true. It remains set until the next
false rung execution after the MSG completes (DN bit set) or an error occurs
(ER bit set).
The operation of the EN bit has changed since Series C.
Controller Communication Status Bit
When using the MSG instruction, you should also use the following controller
communication status bit:
Active Protocol Bit (S:0/11) – This is a read only bit that indicates which
communication protocol is currently enabled or functioning; where 0 = DF1
(default) and 1 = DH-485. Use this bit in your program to restrict message
operation to the specific protocol in use.
13–7
Programming
The operation associated with a message read or write instruction is sent when you
enable the instruction. Replies are processed at the end of the scan.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
Timing Diagram for a Successful MSG Instruction
The following section illustrates a successful timing diagram for a Series D or later
MicroLogix 1000 discrete controller, or a MicroLogix 1000 analog controller, MSG
instruction.
Target node
Rung goes True. receives packet.
Control Block Status Bits
Target node processes packet
Target node successfully and returns data
sent reply. (read) or writes data (success).
1
Bit 10 EW 0
Enabled and Waiting
1
Bit 15 EN 0
Enabled
1
Bit 14 ST 0
Start
1
Bit 13 DN 0
Done
1
Bit 12 ER 0
Error
1
Bit 9 NR 0
Negative Response
1
Bit 8 TO 0
Time Out
The EW bit is set (1) and the ST, DN, NR, and TO flags are cleared. If the
transmit buffer is not available, the EN flag remains false (0).
When rung conditions go true and the transmit buffer becomes available, the
EN flag goes true (1). The EN bit remains set until either the DN, ER, or TO
bit is set. The TO bit has no effect unless the ST bit has first been set.
13–8
Using the Message Instruction
If the Target Node successfully receives the MSG packet, it sends back an ACK
(an acknowledge). The ACK causes the processor to clear bit S:2/7. (Bit S:2/7
is valid for Series C discrete only). Note that the Target Node has not yet
examined the MSG packet to see if it understands your request. It is replying to
the initial connection.
Note
If the Target Node faults or power cycles during the time frame after the ST bit is
set and before the reply is returned, you will never receive a reply. No other
MSG instructions will be able to be serviced unless this MSG is terminated in
error using the TO bit. This is why it is recommended you use a timer in
conjunction with the TO bit to clear any pending instructions. (When the TO bit
is set [1] it clears pending messages.) Typically message transactions are
completed within a couple of seconds. It is up to the programmer to determine
how long to wait before clearing the buffer and then re-transmitting.
Step 4 is not shown in the timing diagram.
If you do not receive an ACK, step 3 does not occur. Instead a NAK (no
acknowledge) or no response at all is received. When this happens, the ST bit
remains clear. A NAK indicates:
•
•
the Target Node is too busy, or
it received a MSG packet with a bad checksum.
No response indicates:
•
•
either the Target Node is not there, or
it does not respond because the MSG packet was corrupted in transmission.
When a NAK occurs, the EW bit is cleared at the next end of scan. (Note that
the NR bit will only be set for DH-485 and NAK conditions. An error code
02H, Target Node is busy, is received which causes the NR bit to be set.) The
ER bit is also set which indicates that the MSG instruction failed.
Monitor the NR bit. If it is set, indicating that the Target Node is busy, you may
want to initiate some other process (e.g., an alarm or a retry later). The NR bit
is cleared when the rung logic preceding the MSG changes from false to true.
When an ACK occurs, the Target Node sends one of three responses shown in
Step 6.
13–9
Programming
At the next end of scan, the EW bit is cleared (0) and the ST bit is set (1). Once
the ST bit is set, the processor will wait indefinitely for a reply from the Target
Node. The Target Node is not required to respond within any given time frame.
During this time, no other MSG instruction will be serviced.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
Following the successful receipt of the packet, the Target Node sends a reply
packet. The reply packet will contain one of the following responses:
•
•
•
I have successfully performed your write request.
I have successfully performed your read request, and here is your data.
I have not performed your request because of an error.
At the next end of scan, following the Target Node’s reply, the MicroLogix 1000
controller examines the MSG packet from the target device. If the reply
contains “I have successfully performed your write request,” the DN bit is set
and the ST bit is cleared. The MSG instruction is complete. If the MSG rung is
false, the EN bit is cleared the next time the MSG instruction is scanned.
If the reply contains “I have successfully performed your read request, and here
is your data,” the data is written to the appropriate data table, the DN bit is set,
and the ST bit is cleared. The MSG instruction function is complete. If the
MSG rung is false, the EN bit is cleared the next time the MSG instruction is
scanned.
If the reply contains “I have not performed your request, because of an error,”
the ER bit is set and the ST bit is cleared. The MSG instruction function is
complete. If the MSG rung is false, the EN bit is cleared the next time the MSG
instruction is scanned.
MSG Instruction Error Codes
Note
Any MSG instruction that is in progress during a network protocol switch will not be
processed and will be discarded. For more information on network protocol
switching, see page 3–17.
When an error condition occurs, the error code is stored in the lower byte of the first
control word assigned to the MSG instruction.
13–10
Using the Message Instruction
Error
Code
02H
Target node is busy.
03H
Target node cannot respond because message is too large.
06H
Target node cannot respond because requested function is not available.
07H
Target node does not respond.
08H
Target node cannot respond.
09H
Local modem connection has been lost.
0AH
Buffer unavailable to receive SRD reply.
0BH
Target node does not accept this type of MSG instruction.
0CH
Received a master link reset.
15H
Target node cannot respond because of incorrect command parameters or unsupported
command.
Local channel configuration parameter error exists.
18H
Broadcast (Node Address 255) is not supported.
1AH➀
Target node cannot respond because another node is file owner (has sole file access).
1BH➀
37H
Target node cannot respond because another node is program owner (has sole access to
all files).
Message timed out in local processor.
39H
Message was discarded due to a communication protocol switch.
3AH
Reply from target is invalid.
50H
Target node is out of memory.
60H
Target node cannot respond because file is protected.
E7H
Target node cannot respond because length requested is too large.
EBH
Target node cannot respond because target node denies access.
ECH
Target node cannot respond because requested function is currently unavailable.
FAH
Target node cannot respond because another node is file owner (has sole file access).
FBH
Target node cannot respond because another node is program owner (has sole access to
all files).
10H
Note
Error codes 1A and 1B valid for Series C discrete only.
For 1770–6.5.16 DF1 Protocol and Command Set users:
The MSG error code reflects the STS field of the reply to your MSG instruction.
Codes E0 – EF represent EXT STS codes
0 – F. Codes F0 – FC represent EXT STS codes 10 – 1C.
13–11
Programming
05H
Target node cannot respond because it does not understand the command parameters OR
the control block may have been inadvertently modified.
Local processor is offline (possible duplicate node situation).
04H
➀
Description of Error Condition
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
Application Examples that Use the MSG Instruction
Example 1
Application example 1 shows how you can implement continuous operation of a
message instruction.
0
1
S:0 S:1
] [ ] [
11
7
B3
] [
1
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/write
WRITE
Target Device SLC500/ML1000
Control Block
N7:0
Control Block Length
7
(EN)
(DN)
(ER)
N7:0
(U)
15*
N7:0
] [
13*
N7:0
] [
12*
END
2
* MSG instruction
status bits:
12 = ER
13 = DN
15 = EN
Operation Notes
Bit S:0/11 ensures that the MSG instruction will only be processed when
the active protocol is DH-485. Bit S:1/7 ensures that DH-485 is
communicating before sending the MSG. Bit B3/1 enables the MSG
instruction. When the MSG instruction done bit (N7:0/13) is set, it unlatches
the MSG enable bit (N7:0/15) so that the MSG instruction will be
re-enabled in the next scan. This provides continuous operation.
The MSG error bit will also unlatch the enable bit. This provides continuous
operation even if an error occurs.
13–12
Using the Message Instruction
Example 2
Application example 2 involves a MicroLogix 1000 controller transmitting its first
input word to another MicroLogix 1000 controller. This is commonly referred to as
“change of state” or “report on exception” messaging. Using this type of logic
significantly reduces network traffic, which in turn significantly improves network
throughput.
This is the message control rung. The logic preceding the MSG instruction on this rung dictates when the MSG instruction
is processed. In this example, the MSG instruction will only be processed when the active protocol is DH-485 and when
there is no other communication. Once the MSG instruction is enabled, it locks itself into operation regardless of the
preceding logic on the rung.
If the input status has
changed, enable the MSG
NEQ
Not Equal
Source A
Source B
I:1.0
0
N7:10
0
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/write
READ
Target Device SLC500/ML1000
Control Block
N7:50
Control Block Length
7
(EN)
(DN)
(ER)
This rung controls when the MSG instruction is unlatched or reset. The MSG instruction must be reset before it can
re-transmit new information. Either of the following two conditions will reset the MSG instruction: 1) when communication
to the target device have been completed successfully, or 2) when an error is detected in the communication sequence
(occurs after all retries have been exhausted). Using the error bit to reset the MSG is primarily used to stop the MSG
instruction from being totally locked out.
2.1
MSG Done
N7:50
] [
13
MSG Enabled
N7:50
( )
15
MSG Error
N7:50
] [
12
This rung is used to setup the “report by exception” operation. This move command updates N7:10, by making it identical
to I:1.0. When the processor starts a new scan sequence (when rung 2.0 is scanned,) it updates (reads) the input image.
If an input has changed from the previous scan, the NEQ instruction will be true and MSG will be processed. The MSG
Enabled bit ensures that the MOV will not be processed until after the MSG is successfully completed. This minimizes the
chances that input changes are missed during MSG operation.
2.2
DH-485
Active
S:0
] [
11
Comms
Active
S:1
]/[
7
MSG
Enabled
N7:50
]/[
15
MOV
MOVE
Move
Dest
2.3
I:1.0
0
N7:10
0
END
13–13
Programming
2.0
DH-485
Comms
Active
Active
S:0
S:1
]/[
] [
11
7
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
Example 3
Application example 3 involves a MicroLogix 1000 controller and an SLC 5/01
processor communicating on a DH-485 network. Interlocking is provided to verify
data transfer and to shut down both processors if communication fails.
A temperature-sensing device, connected as an input to the MicroLogix 1000
controller, controls the on-off operation of a cooling fan, connected as an output to
the SLC 5/01 processor. The MicroLogix 1000 and SLC 5/01 ladder programs are
explained on the following pages.
13–14
Using the Message Instruction
0
I:1.0
] [
5
N7:0
( )
1
1
S:1
] [
15
T4:0
(RES)
Temperature-sensing
Input Device
N7:0
(L)
0
First Pass Bit
B3
(U)
0
Bit 1 of the message
word. Used for fan
control.
Bit 0 of the
message word.
This is the interlock
bit.
TON
TIMER ON DELAY
Timer
T4:0
Time Base
0.01
Preset
400
Accum
0
2
First Pass Bit
3
DH-485 Active
Protocol Bit
S:0
] [
11
S:1
] [
15
S:4
] [
6
4
DH-485 Active
Protocol Bit
Message Write
Done Bit
S:0
] [
11
N7:10
] [
13*
(EN)
(DN)
(ER)
B3
(L)
0
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/write
READ
Target Device SLC500/ML1000
Control Block
N7:21
Control Block Length
7
(EN)
(DN)
(ER)
B3
(L)
10
5
T4:0
] [
DN
6
N7:21 N7:0
] [
]/[
13*
0
4-second Timer
(DN)
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/write
WRITE
Target Device SLC500/ML1000
Control Block
N7:10
Control Block Length
7
B3
] [
0
1280 ms Clock Bit
(EN)
T4:0
(RES)
N7:0
(U)
0
Message Read
Done Bit
B3
(U)
0
N7:21
(U)
15*
Write message
instruction. The source
and target file addresses
are N7:0
Target node: 3
Message length: 1 word.
Read message
instruction. The
destination and target file
addresses are N7:0
Target node: 3
Message length: 1 word.
Latch – This alarm
instruction notifies the
application if the
interlock bit N7:0/0
remains set for more
than 4 seconds.
* MSG instruction
status bits:
13 = DN
15 = EN
N7:10
(U)
15*
7
END
Operation notes appear on the following page.
13–15
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
Program File 2 of SLC 5/01 Processor at Node 3
0
N7:0
(U)
0
S:1
] [
15
First Pass Bit
Bit 0 of the message
word. This is the
interlock bit.
T4:0
(RES)
TON
TIMER ON DELAY
Timer
T4:0
Time Base
0.01
Preset
400
Accum
0
1
Bit 1 of the message
word. Used for fan
control.
2
T4:0
] [
DN
3
N7:0
] [
0
4
B3
] [
1
(EN)
(DN)
B3
(L)
10
B3
( )
1
B3
[OSR]
0
4-second Timer
Latch Instruction –
This alarm notifies the
application if the interlock
bit N7:0/0 is not set after
4 seconds.
N7:0
(U)
0
T4:0
(RES)
5
O:1.0
( )
0
N7:0
] [
1
6
O:1/0 energizes
cooling fan.
END
Operation Notes, MicroLogix 1000 and SLC 5/01 programs
Message instruction parameters: N7:0 is the message word. It
is the target file address (SLC 5/01 processor) and the local
source and destination addresses (MicroLogix 1000 controller)
in the message instructions.
N7:0/0 of the message word is the interlock bit; it is written to
the 5/01 processor as a 1 (set) and read from the SLC 5/01
processor as a 0 (reset).
N7:0/1 of the message word controls cooling fan operation; it is
written to the SLC 5/01 processor as a 1 (set) if cooling is
required or as a 0 (reset) if cooling is not required. It is read
from the SLC 5/01 processor as either 1 or 0.
Word N7:0 should have a value of 1 or 3 during the message
write execution. N7:0 should have a value of 0 or 2 during the
message read execution.
Program initialization: The first pass bit S:1/15 initializes the
ladder programs on run mode entry.
13–16
MicroLogix 1000 controller: N7:0/0 is latched; timer T4:0 is
reset; B3/0 is unlatched (rung 1), then latched (rung 3).
SLC 5/01 processor: N7:0/0 is unlatched; timer T4:0 is reset.
Message instruction operation: The message write instruction in
the MicroLogix 1000 controller is initiated every 1280 ms by
clock bit S:4/6. The done bit of the message write instruction
initiates the message read instruction.
B3/0 latches the message write instruction. B3/0 is unlatched
when the message read instruction done bit is set, provided that
the interlock bit N7:0/0 is reset.
Communication failure: In the MicroLogix 1000 controller, bit
B3/10 becomes set if interlock bit N7:0/0 remains set (1) for
more than 4 seconds. In the SLC 5/01 processor, bit B3/10
becomes set if interlock bit N7:0/0 remains set (1) for more than
4 seconds. Your application can detect this event, take
appropriate action, then unlatch bit B3/10.
Using the Message Instruction
Example 4
Application example 4 shows you how to use the timeout bit to disable an active
message instruction. In this example, an output is energized after five unsuccessful
attempts (two seconds duration) to transmit a message.
S:0
] [
11
1
B3
] [
1
2
T4:0
] [
DN
DH-485 Active
Protocol Bit
B3/1 is latched
(external to this
example) to initiate the
message instruction.
B3
] [
1
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/write
WRITE
Target Device SLC500/ML1000
Control Block
N7:0
Control Block Length
7
(EN)
(DN)
(ER)
TON
N7:0
] [
14
TIMER ON DELAY
Timer
T4:0
Time Base
0.01
Preset
200
Accum
0
(EN)
(DN)
2-second timer. Each
attempt at transmission
has a 2-second duration.
(CU)
Counter allows 5
attempts.
CTU
COUNT UP
Counter
Preset
Accum
N7:0
] [
12
C5:0
5
0
(DN)
3
N7:0
] [
8*
4
T4:0
] [
DN
N7:0
(L)
8
N7:0/8* is the message
instruction timeout bit.
5
C5:0
] [
DN
O:1.0
(L)
0
B3
(U)
1
The fifth attempt latches
O0:1/0 and unlatches the
initiate message
instruction bit.
6
N7:0
] [
13*
N7:0
(U)
15
After timeout error,
unlatch the MSG EN bit to
retrigger for another
attempt.
C5:0
(RES)
O:1.0
(U)
0
B3
(U)
1
7
* MSG instruction
status bits:
8 = TO
12 = ER
13 = DN
END
Operation Notes
The timeout bit is latched (rung 4) after a period of 2 seconds.
This clears the message instruction from processor control on
the next scan. The message instruction is then re-enabled for a
second attempt at transmission. After 5 attempts, O:1/0 is
latched and B3/1 is unlatched.
A successful attempt at transmission resets the counter, unlatches
O:1/0, and unlatches B3/1.
13–17
Programming
0
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
Example 5
Application example 5 shows you how to link message instructions together to
transmit serially, one after another. In this example a MSG Write is followed by a
MSG Read which causes the serial transmission.
13–18
Using the Message Instruction
This rung starts messaging each REM Run or RUN mode entry by clearing the EN bit of the first MSG instruction.
2.0
N7:0
(U)
15
S:1
] [
15
This rung sets the timeout value. (When using a SLC 5/03 or SLC 5/04 processor, this rung and rung 2:2 are not
required because you can enter the value 6 into the Timeout value field in the MSG instruction block.)
2.1
N7:0
] [
15
N7:0
]/[
12
TON
N7:0
]/[
13
(EN)
(DN)
TIMER ON DELAY
Timer
T4:0
Time Base
0.01
Preset
600
Accum
0
T4:0
] [
DN
N7:0
(L)
8
Same as above rung.
2.2
N7:20
] [
15
N7:20
]/[
12
TON
N7:20
]/[
13
T4:1
] [
DN
2.3
(EN)
(DN)
TIMER ON DELAY
Timer
T4:1
Time Base
0.01
Preset
600
Accum
0
N7:20
(L)
8
The MSG instruction energizes upon entry into the REM Run or RUN mode. No input conditions are required.
S:0
MSG
(EN)
] [
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/write
WRITE
11
(DN)
Target Device SLC500/ML1000
(ER)
Control Block
N7:0
Control Block Length
7
2.4
The MSG instruction is energized when the previous MSG instruction completes.
S:0
N7:0
MSG
] [
] [
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/write
11
12
READ
Target Device SLC500/ML1000
Control Block
N7:20
Control Block Length
7
N7:0
] [
13
(EN)
(DN)
(ER)
This rung resets all MSG instructions when the last MSG instruction has completed.
2.5
2.6
N7:20
] [
12
N7:0
(U)
15
N7:20
] [
13
N7:20
(U)
15
END
13–19
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controller User Manual
Notes:
13–20
Troubleshooting Your System
14
Troubleshooting Your System
This chapter describes how to troubleshoot your controller. Topics include:
understanding the controller LED status
controller error recovery model
identifying controller faults
calling Allen-Bradley for assistance
Troubleshooting
•
•
•
•
14–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Understanding the Controller LED Status
Between the time you apply power to the controller and the time it has to establish
communication with a connected programming device, the only form of
communication between you and the controller is through the LEDs.
When Operating Normally
When power is applied, only the power LED turns on and remains on. This is part
of the normal powerup sequence.
When the controller is placed in REM Run mode, the run LED also turns on and
remains on, as shown on the right in the figure below. If a force exists, the force
LED is on as well.
When powered up:
Refer to the following key to determine
the status of the LED indicators:
Indicates the LED is OFF.
Indicates the LED is ON.
Indicates the LED is FLASHING.
Status of LED does not matter.
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
14–2
When placed in RRUN:
POWER
POWER
RUN
RUN
FAULT
FORCE
É
FAULT
FORCE
Troubleshooting Your System
When an Error Exists
If an error exists within the controller, the controller LEDs operate as described in
the following tables.
If the LEDs indicate:
The
Following
Error Exists
Probable Cause
POWER
RUN
FAULT
FORCE
No input
power or
power supply
error
Recommended Action
No Line Power
Verify proper line voltage and connections to the
controller.
Power Supply
Overloaded
This problem can occur intermittently if power
supply is overloaded when output loading and
temperature varies.
ÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉ
The
Following
Error Exists
POWER
RUN
FAULT
FORCE
Hardware
f
faulted
Probable Cause
Troubleshooting
If the LEDs indicate:
Recommended Action
Processor Memory
Error
Cycle power. Contact your local Allen-Bradley
representative if the error persists.
Loose Wiring
Verify connections to the controller.
14–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
If the LEDs indicate:
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
The
Following
Error Exists
Probable Cause
POWER
RUN
ÉÉ
FAULT
FORCE
Application
fault
Refer to the following key to determine the status
of the LED indicators:
Indicates the LED is OFF.
Indicates the LED is ON.
Indicates the LED is FLASHING.
ÉÉ
14–4
Status of LED does not matter.
Hardware/Software
Major Fault Detected
Recommended Action
1. Monitor Status File Word S:6 for major
error code.
2. Remove hardware/software condition
causing fault.
3. Press F10 to clear the fault.
4. Attempt a controller REM Run mode entry.
If unsuccessful, repeat recommended action
steps above or contact your local
Allen-Bradley distributor.
Troubleshooting Your System
Controller Error Recovery Model
Use the following error recovery model to help you diagnose software and hardware
problems in the micro controller. The model provides common questions you might
ask to help troubleshoot your system. Refer to the recommended pages within the
model and to S:6 of the status file on page B–14 for further help.
Identify the error code
and description.
No
Start
Is the error hardware
related?
Yes
Clear fault using either
function key F9 or F10.
No
Are the wire
connections tight?
Yes
Correct the condition
causing the fault.
Does the
No
controller have power
supplied?
No
Is the Power
LED On?
Place the controller in
REM PROGram mode.
Tighten wire
connections.
Yes
Yes
Is the Run LED On
constantly?
Check power.
Troubleshooting
Refer to appendix B for
probable cause and
recommended action.
Refer to page 14–3
for probable cause and
recommended action.
No
Yes
Return controller to
REM RUN or any of
the REM Test modes.
Is the Fault LED On?
Yes
Test and verify system
operation.
Refer to page 14–3
for probable cause and
recommended action.
No
Is an input or
No
output LED showing
proper status?
Yes
Refer to page 14–4
for probable cause and
recommended action.
14–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Identifying Controller Faults
While a program is executing, a fault may occur within the operating system or your
program. When a fault occurs, you have various options to determine what the fault
is and how to correct it. This section describes how to clear faults and provides a
list of possible advisory messages with recommended corrective actions.
Automatically Clearing Faults
You can automatically clear a fault when cycling power to the controller by setting
either one or both of the following status bits in the status file:
•
•
Fault Override at Powerup bit (S:1/8)
Run Always bit (S:1/12)
Clearing a fault using the Run Always bit (S:1/12) causes the controller to
immediately enter the REM Run mode. Make sure you fully understand the
use of this bit before incorporating it into your program. Refer to page B–6
for more information.
Refer to appendix B for more information on status bits.
Note
You can declare your own application-specific major fault by writing your own
unique value to S:6 and then setting bit S:1/13 to prevent reusing system defined
codes. The recommended values for user defined faults is FF00 to FF0F.
Manually Clearing Faults Using the Fault Routine
The occurrence of recoverable or non-recoverable user faults causes file 3 to be
executed. If the fault is recoverable, the subroutine can be used to correct the
problem and clear the fault bit S:1/13. The controller then continues in the REM
Run mode.
The subroutine does not execute for non-user faults. The user-fault routine is
discussed in chapter 4.
14–6
Troubleshooting Your System
Fault Messages
This section contains fault messages that can occur during operation of the
MicroLogix 1000 programmable controllers. Each table lists the error code
description, the probable cause, and the recommended corrective action.
Advisory
Message
Description
Recommended Action
0001
DEFAULT
PROGRAM
LOADED
The default program is loaded to the controller
memory. This occurs:
• on power up if the power down occurred in
the middle of a download
• if the user program is corrupt at power up,
the default program is loaded.
• Re-download the program and enter
the REM Run mode.
• Contact your local Allen-Bradley
representative if the error persists.
0002
UNEXPECTED
RESET
The controller was unexpectedly reset due to
a noisy environment or internal hardware
failure. If the user program downloaded to the
controller is valid, the initial data downloaded
with the program is used. The Retentive Data
Lost Bit (S:5/8) is set. If the user program is
invalid, the default program is loaded.
• Refer to proper grounding guidelines
in chapter 2.
• Contact your local Allen-Bradley
representative if the error persists.
0003
EEPROM
MEMORY IS
CORRUPT
While power cycling to your controller, a noise
problem may have occurred. Your program
may be valid, but retentive data will be lost.
• Try cycling power again.
• Contact your local Allen-Bradley
representative if the error persists.
0004
RUNTIME
MEMORY
INTEGRITY
ERROR
While the controller was in the RUN mode or
any test mode, the ROM or RAM became
corrupt. If the user program is valid, the
program and initial data downloaded to the
controller is used and the Retentive Data Lost
Bit (S:5/8) is set. If the user program is invalid,
error 0003 occurs.
• Cycle power on your unit.
• Download your program and
re-initialize any necessary data.
• Start up your system.
• Contact your local Allen-Bradley
representative if the error persists.
0005
RETENTIVE DATA
HAS BEEN LOST
The data files (input, output, timer, counter,
integer, binary, control, and status) are corrupt.
• Cycle power on your unit.
• Download your program and
re-initialize any necessary data.
• Start up your system.
• Contact your local Allen-Bradley
representative if the error persists.
0008
FATAL INTERNAL
SOFTWARE
ERROR
The controller software has detected an invalid
condition within the hardware or software after
completing power-up processing (after the first
2 seconds of operation).
• Cycle power on your unit.
• Download your program and
re-initialize any necessary data.
• Start up your system.
• Contact your local Allen-Bradley
representative if the error persists.
14–7
Troubleshooting
Error Code
(Hex)
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Error Code
(Hex)
Advisory
Message
Description
0009
FATAL INTERNAL
HARDWARE
ERROR
The controller software has detected an invalid
condition within the hardware during power-up
processing (within the first 2 seconds of
operation).
• Cycle power on your unit.
• Download your program and
re-initialize any necessary data.
• Start up your system.
• Contact your local Allen-Bradley
representative if the error persists.
0010
INCOMPATIBLE
PROCESSOR
The downloaded program is not configured for
a micro controller.
If you want to use a micro controller with
the program, reconfigure your controller
with your programming software (choose
Bul. 1761).
0016
STARTUP
PROTECTION
AFTER
POWERLOSS;
S:1/9 IS SET
The system has powered up in the REM Run
mode. Bit S:1/13 is set and the user-fault
routine is run before beginning the first scan of
the program.
• Either reset bit S:1/9 if this is
consistent with your application
requirements, and change the mode
back to REM Run, or
• clear S:1/13, the major fault bit.
0018
USER PROGRAM
IS
INCOMPATIBLE
WITH
OPERATING
SYSTEM
An incompatible program was downloaded.
Either the program does not have the correct
number of files or it does not have the correct
size data files. The default program is loaded.
• Check the configuration and make
sure the correct processor is selected.
• If you want to use a micro controller
with the program, reconfigure your
controller with your programming
software (choose Bul. 1761).
0020
MINOR ERROR
AT END OF
SCAN, SEE S:5
A minor fault bit (bits 0-7) in S:5 was set at the
end of scan.
• Enter the status file display and clear
the fault.
• Return to the REM Run mode.
0022
WATCHDOG
TIMER EXPIRED,
SEE S:3
The program scan time exceeded the
watchdog timeout value (S:3H).
• Verify if the program is caught in a
loop and correct the problem.
• Increase the watchdog timeout value
in the status file.
0024
INVALID STI
INTERRUPT
SETPOINT, SEE
S:30
An invalid STI interval exists (not between 0
and 255).
Set the STI interval between the values
of 0 and 255.
0025
TOO MANY JSRs
IN STI
SUBROUTINE
There are more than 3 subroutines nested in
the STI subroutine (file 5).
• Correct the user program to meet the
requirements and restrictions for the
JSR instruction.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
0027
TOO MANY JSRs
IN FAULT
SUBROUTINE
There are more than 3 subroutines nested in
the fault routine (file 3).
• Correct the user program to meet the
requirements and restrictions for the
JSR instruction.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
002A
INDEXED
ADDRESS TOO
LARGE FOR FILE
The program is referencing through indexed
addressing an element beyond a file boundary.
Correct the user program to not go
beyond file boundaries.
14–8
Recommended Action
Troubleshooting Your System
Advisory
Message
Description
Recommended Action
002B
TOO MANY JSRs
IN HSC
There are more than 3 subroutines nested in
the high-speed counter routine (file 4).
• Correct the user program to meet the
requirements and restrictions for the
JSR instruction.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
0030
SUBROUTINE
NESTING
EXCEEDS LIMIT
OF 8
There are more than 8 subroutines nested in
the main program file (file 2).
• Correct the user program to meet the
requirements and restrictions for the
main program file.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
0031
UNSUPPORTED
INSTRUCTION
DETECTED
The program contains an instruction(s) that is
not supported by the micro controller. For
example SVC or PID.
• Modify the program so that all
instructions are supported by the
controller.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
0032
SQO/SQC
CROSSED DATA
FILE
BOUNDARIES
A sequencer instruction length/position
parameter points past the end of a data file.
• Correct the program to ensure that
the length and position parameters do
not point past the data file.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
0033
BSL/BSR/FFL/FF
U/LFL/LFU
CROSSED DATA
FILE
BOUNDARIES
The length parameter of a BSL, BSR, FFL,
FFU, LFL, or LFU instruction points past the
end of a data file.
• Correct the program to ensure that
the length parameter does not point
past the data file.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
0034
NEGATIVE
VALUE IN TIMER
PRESET OR
ACCUMULATOR
A negative value was loaded to a timer preset
or accumulator.
• If the program is moving values to the
accumulated or preset word of a
timer, make certain these values are
not negative.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
0035
ILLEGAL
INSTRUCTION
(TND) IN
INTERRUPT FILE
The program contains a Temporary End (TND)
instruction in file 3, 4, or 5 when it is being
used as an interrupt subroutine.
• Correct the program.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
0037
INVALID
PRESETS
LOADED TO
HIGH-SPEED
COUNTER
Either a zero (0) or a negative high preset was
loaded to counter (C5:0) when the HSC was an
Up counter or the high preset was lower than
or equal to the low preset when the HSC was a
Bidirectional counter.
• Check to make sure the presets are
valid.
• Correct the program, reload, and
enter the REM Run mode.
0038
SUBROUTINE
RETURN
INSTRUCTION
(RET) IN
PROGRAM FILE 2
A RET instruction is in the main program file
(file 2).
• Remove the RET instruction.
• Reload the program and enter the
REM Run mode.
14–9
Troubleshooting
Error Code
(Hex)
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Error Code
(Hex)
Advisory
Message
Description
Recommended Action
0040
OUTPUT VERIFY
WRITE FAILURE
When outputs were written and read back by
the controller, the read failed. This may have
been caused by noise.
• Refer to proper grounding guidelines
in chapter 2.
• Start up your system.
• Contact your local Allen-Bradley
representative if the error persists.
0041➀
EXTRA OUTPUT
BIT(S) TURNED
ON
An extra output bit was set when the Extra
Output Select (S:0/8) bit in the status file was
reset. For 16-point controllers this includes bits
6–15. For 32-point controllers this includes bits
12–15.
• Set S:0/8 or change your application
to prevent these bits from being
turned on.
• Correct the program, reload, and
enter the REM Run mode.
➀
Valid for Series A – C discrete only.
Calling Allen-Bradley for Assistance
If you need to contact Allen-Bradley or local distributor for assistance, it is helpful
to obtain the following (prior to calling):
•
•
•
14–10
controller type, series letter, firmware (FRN) number (on controller’s side label)
controller LED status
controller error codes (found in S:6 of status file)
Hardware Reference
Hardware Reference
This appendix lists the controller:
•
•
•
specifications
dimensions
replacement parts
For AIC+ specifications, see the Advanced Interface Converter (AIC+) and
DeviceNet Interface (DNI) Installation Instructions, Publication 1761-5.11.
Reference
A
A–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Controller Specifications
Controller Types
Catalog Number
10 pt. ac input, 6 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
1761-L32AWA
20 pt. ac input, 12 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
1761-L10BWA
12 pt. ac input, 4 pt. analog input, 8 pt. relay output, 1 pt. analog output, ac
power supply controller
6 pt. dc input, 4 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
1761-L16BWA
10 pt. dc input, 6 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
1761-L20AWA-5A
1761-L32BWA
12 pt. dc input, 4 pt. analog input, 8 pt. relay output, 1 pt. analog output, ac
power supply controller
20 pt. dc input, 12 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
1761-L10BWB
6 pt. dc input, 4 pt. relay output, dc power supply controller
1761-L16BWB
10 pt. dc input, 6 pt. relay output, dc power supply controller
1761-L20BWA-5A
1761-L32BWB
12 pt. dc input, 4 pt. analog input, 8 pt. relay output, 1 pt. analog output, dc
power supply controller
20 pt. dc input, 12 pt. relay output, dc power supply controller
1761-L16BBB
10 pt. dc input, 4 pt. FET and 2 pt. relay outputs, dc power supply controller
1761-L32BBB
20 pt. dc input, 10 pt. FET and 2 pt. relay outputs, dc power supply controller
1761-L32AAA
20 pt. ac input, 10 pt. triac and 2 pt. relay outputs, ac power supply controller
1761-L20BWB-5A
A–2
Description
1761-L16AWA
Hardware Reference
General Specifications
Description:
escr p on:
Specification: 1761-L
16AWA 20AWA-5A
32AWA
10BWA
16BWA
20BWA-5A
32BWA
Memory Size/Type
1 K EEPROM (approximately 737 instruction words: 437 data words)
Power Supply
Voltage
85–264V ac, 47-63 Hz
Power
Supply
Usage
32AAA
16BBB
10BWB
16BWB
20BWB-5A
32BWB
32BBB
20.4–26.4V dc
Not Applicable
120V ac
15 VA
20 VA
19 VA
24 VA
26 VA
30 VA
29 VA
16 VA
240V ac
21 VA
27 VA
25 VA
32 VA
33 VA
38 VA
36 VA
22 VA
24V dc
Not Applicable
5W
10W
7W
Power Supply Max.
➀
Inrush Current
30A for 8 ms
30A for 4 ms
50A for
4 ms
30A for 4 ms
24V dc Sensor
Power (V dc at mA)
Not Applicable
Not Applicable
200 mA
200 µF
Max Capacitive
Load (User 24V dc)
Power Cycles
50,000 minimum
Operating Temp.
Horizontal mounting: 0°C to +55°C (+32°F to +131°F) for horizontal mounting
➁
Vertical mounting : 0°C to +45°C (+32°F to +113°F) for discrete; 0°C to +40°C (+32°F to +113°F) for analog
Storage Temp.
–40°C to +85°C (–40°F to +185°F)
Operating Humidity
5 to 95% noncondensing
Vibration
Operating: 5 Hz to 2k Hz, 0.381 mm (0.015 in.) peak to peak/2.5g panel mounted, 1hr per axis
Non-operating: 5 Hz to 2k Hz, 0.762 mm (0.030 in.) peak to peak/5g, 1hr per axis
➄
Shock
Operating: 10g peak acceleration (7.5g DIN rail mounted) (11±1 ms duration) 3 times each direction, each axis
Non-operating: 20g peak acceleration (11±1 ms duration), 3 times each direction, each axis
Agency Certification
(when product or
packaging is
marked)
• C-UL Class I, Division 2 Groups A, B, C, D certified
• UL listed (Class I, Division 2 Groups A, B, C, D certified)
• CE marked for all applicable directives
Terminal Screw
Torque
0.9 N-m maximum (8.0 in.-lbs)
Electrostatic
Discharge
IEC801-2 @ 8K V Discrete I/O
4K V Contact, 8K V Air for Analog I/O
Radiated
Susceptibility
IEC801-3 @ 10 V/m, 27 MHz – 1000 MHz except for
3V/m, 87 MHz – 108 MHz, 174 MHz – 230 MHz, and 470 MHz – 790 MHz
Fast Transient
IEC801-4 @ 2K V Power Supply, I/O; 1K V Comms
Isolation
1500V ac
Reference
➃
➂
➀ Refer to page 1–13 for additional information on power supply inrush.
➁ DC input voltage derated linearly from 30°C (30V to 26.4V).
➂ DIN rail mounted controller is 1g.
➃ Refer to page 1–18 for vertical mounting specifications.
➄ Relays are derated an additional 2.5g on 32 pt. controllers.
A–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Input Specifications
escr p on
Description
➀
Specification
100-120V ac Controllers
24V dc Controllers
Voltage
Range
79 to132V ac
47 to 63 Hz
14 to 30V dc
On Voltage
79V ac min.
132V ac max.
14V dc min.
24V dc nominal
26.4V dc max. @ 55°C (131°F)
30.0V dc max. @ 30°C (86°F)
Off Voltage
20V ac
5V dc
On Current
5.0 mA min. @ 79V ac 47 Hz
12.0 mA nominal @ 120V ac 60 Hz
16.0 mA max. @ 132V ac 63 Hz
2.5 mA min. @ 14V dc
8.0 mA nominal @ 24V dc
12.0 mA max. @ 30V dc
Off Current
2.5 mA max.
1.5 mA max.
Nominal
Impedance
12K ohms @ 50 Hz
10K ohms @ 60 Hz
3K ohms
Inrush
Maximum
250 mA max.➀
Not Applicable
To reduce the inrush maximum to 35 mA, apply a 6.8K ohm, 5w resistor in series with the input.
The on-state voltage increases to 92V ac as a result.
dc Input Derating Graph
30
25
V dc
Reference
20
15
10
5
0
A–4
0
10
20
30
(32°)
(50°)
(68°)
(86°)
Temperature °C (°F)
40
(104°)
50
60
(122°)
(140°)
Hardware Reference
General Output Specifications
Type
Relay
Voltage
See Wiring Diagrams, p. 2–7.
Maximum
Load
Current
Refer to the Relay
Contact Rating
Table.
1.0A per point @ 55° C (131° F)
1.5A per point @ 30° C (86° F)
0.5A per point @ 55° C (131° F)
1.0A per point @ 30° C (86° F)
Minimum
Load
Current
10.0 mA
1 mA
10.0 mA
Current per
Controller
Current per
Common
Maximum
Off State
Leakage
Current
Off to On
Response
On to Off
Response
Surge
Current per
Point
MOSFET
Triac
3A for L16BBB
6A for L32BBB
3A for L16BBB
6A for L32BBB
1440 VA
8.0A
1440 VA
Not Applicable
0 mA
1 mA
2 mA @ 132V ac
4.5 mA @ 264V ac
10 ms max.
0.1 ms
8.8 ms @ 60 Hz
10.6 ms @ 50 Hz
10 ms max.
1 ms
11.0 ms
Not Applicable
4A for 10 ms➀
10A for 25 ms➀
➀
Repeatability is once every 2 seconds at 55° C (131° F).
Relay Contact Rating Table (applies to all Bulletin 1761 controllers)
Maximum
Volts
ol s
➀
Amperes
Make
Break
240V ac
7.5A
0.75A
120V ac
15A
1.5A
125V dc
24V dc
Amperes Continuous per Point
Voltamperes
Make
Break
2.5A
1800 VA
180 VA
0.22A➀
1.0A
28 VA
1.2A➀
2.0A
28 VA
For dc voltage applications, the make/break ampere rating for relay contacts can be determined by
dividing 28 VA by the applied dc voltage. For example, 28 VA ÷ 48V dc = 0.58A. For dc voltage
applications less than 48V, the make/break ratings for relay contacts cannot exceed 2A. For dc
voltage applications greater than 48V, the make/break ratings for relay contacts cannot exceed 1A.
A–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Analog Input Specifications
Description
Specification
Voltage Input Range
–10.5 to +10.5V dc – 1LSB
Current Input Range
–21 to +21 mA – 1LSB
Type of Data
16-bit signed integer
Input Coding –21 to +21 mA – 1LSB, –10.5 to +10.5V dc –
1LSB
–32,768 to +32,767
Voltage Input Impedance
210K W
Current Input Impedance
160W
Input Resolution➀
16 bit
Non-linearity
t0.002%
Overall Accuracy 0°C to +55°C
Overall Accuracy at +25°C (+77°F) (max.)
±0.7% of full scale
±0.176%
±0.525%
Voltage Input Overvoltage Protection
24V dc
Current Input Overcurrent Protection
±50 mA
Overall Accuracy Drift 0°C to +55°C (max.)
Input to Output Isolation
Field Wiring to Logic Isolation
➀
30V
0V rated working/500V
00V test 60 Hz/1s
H
The analog input update rate and input resolution are a function of the input filter selection. For
additional information, see page 5–3.
Analog Output Specifications
Description
A–6
Specification
Voltage Output Range
0 to 10V dc –1LSB
Current Output Range
4 to 20 mA – 1LSB
Type of Data
16-bit signed integer
Non-linearity
0.02%
Step Response
2.5 ms (at 95%)
Load Range – Voltage Output
1K W to 1W
Load Range – Current Output
0 to 500 W
Output Coding 4 to 20 mA – 1 LSB, 0 to 10Vdc – 1LSB
0 to 32,767
Voltage Output Miswiring
can withstand short circuit
Current Output Miswiring
can withstand short circuit
Output Resolution
15 bit
Analog Output Settling Time
3 msec (maximum)
Overall Accuracy 0°C to +55°C
Overall Accuracy Drift 0°C to +55°C (max.)
±1.0% of full scale
±0.28%
Overall Accuracy at +25°C (+77°F) (max.) – Current Output
0.2%
Field Wiring to Logic Isolation
30V rated working/500V isolation
Hardware Reference
Input Filter Response Times (Discrete)
The input filter response time is the time from when the external input voltage
reaches an on or off state to when the micro controller recognizes that change of
state. The higher you set the response time, the longer it takes for the input state
change to reach the micro controller. However, setting higher response times also
provides better filtering of high frequency noise.
You can apply a unique input filter setting to each of the three input groups:
•
•
•
0 and 1
2 and 3
4 to x; where x=9 for 16 I/O point controllers, and x=19 for 32 I/O point
controllers
The minimum and maximum response times associated with each input filter setting
can be found in the tables that follow.
Response Times for High-Speed dc Inputs 0 to 3 (applies to 1761-L10BWA, 1761-L16BWA,
-L20BWA-5A, -L32BWA, -L10BWB, -L16BWB, -L20BWB-5A, -L32BWB, -L16BBB, and
-L32BBB controllers)
Nominal Filter
Setting (ms)
Maximum ON
Delay (ms)
Maximum OFF
Delay (ms)
6.600
0.075
0.075
0.075
5.000
0.100
0.100
0.100
2.000
0.250
0.250
0.250
1.000
0.500
0.500
0.500
0.500
1.000
1.000
1.000
0.200
2.000
2.000
2.000
0.125
4.000
4.000
4.000
0.062
8.000➀
8.000
8.000
0.031
16.000
16.000
16.000
➀
Reference
Maximum High-Speed Counter
Frequency @ 50% Duty Cycle
(Khz)
This is the default setting.
A–7
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Response Times for dc Inputs 4 and Above (applies to 1761-L10BWA, 1761-L16BWA,
-L20BWA-5A, -L32BWA, -L10BWB, -L16BWB, -L20BWB-5A, -L32BWB, -L16BBB, and
-L32BBB controllers)
Nominal Filter
Setting (ms)
➀
Maximum ON
Delay (ms)
Maximum OFF
Delay (ms)
0.50
0.500
0.500
1.00
1.00
1.000
2.00
2.000
2.000
4.00
4.000
4.000
8.00➀
8.000
8.000
16.00
16.000
16.000
This is the default setting.
Response Times for ac Inputs (applies to 1761-L16AWA, -L20AWA-5A, -L32AWA, and
-L32AAA controllers)
Nominal Filter
Setting (ms)➀
8.0
➀
A–8
Maximum ON
Delay (ms)
20.0
Maximum OFF
Delay (ms)
20.0
There is only one filter setting available for the ac inputs. If you make another selection the
controller changes it to the ac setting and sets the input filter modified bit (S:5/13).
Hardware Reference
Controller Dimensions
Refer to the following table for the controller dimensions.
Controller: 1761-
Length: mm (in.)
L10BWA
120 (4.72)
L16AWA
133 (5.24)
L16BWA
120 (4.72)
Depth: mm (in.)➀
Height: mm (in.)
L20AWA-5A
7 (2.87)
73
2 7
L20BWA-5A
L32AWA
200 (7.87)
7 7
L32BWA
800 (3.15)
L32AAA
L10BWB
L16BBB
120
20 (4.72)
72
L16BWB
400 (1.57)
7
L20BWB-5A
L32BBB
200 (7.87)
7 7
L32BWB
➀
Add approximately 13 mm (0.51 in.) when using the 1761-CBL-PM02 or 1761-CBL-HM02
communication cables.
For a template to help you install your controller, see the MicroLogix 1000
Programmable Controllers Installation Instructions, publication 1761-5.1.2 or the
MicroLogix 1000 (Analog) Programmable Controllers Installation Instructions,
publication 1761-5.1.3 that were shipped with your controller.
A–9
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Replacement Parts
10 pt. ac input, 6 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
12 pt. ac and 4 pt. analog inputs, 8 pt. relay and 1 pt. analog outputs, ac
power supply controller
20 pt. ac input, 12 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
1761-L16AWA
1761-L20AWA-5A
1761-L32AWA
6 pt. dc input, 4 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
1761-L10BWA
10 pt. dc input, 6 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
1761-L16BWA
12 pt. dc and 4 pt. analog inputs, 8 pt. relay and 1 pt. analog outputs, ac
power supply controller
20 pt. dc input, 12 pt. relay output, ac power supply controller
1761-L20BWA-5A
1761-L32BWA
6 pt. dc input, 4 pt. relay output, dc power supply controller
1761-L10BWB
10 pt. dc input, 6 pt. relay output, dc power supply controller
1761-L16BWB
12 pt. dc and 4 pt. analog inputs, 8 pt. relay and 1 pt. analog outputs, dc
power supply controller
20 pt. dc input, 12 pt. relay output, dc power supply controller
10 pt. dc input, 4 pt. FET and 2 pt. relay outputs, dc power supply
controller
20 pt. dc input, 10 pt. FET and 2 pt. relay outputs, dc power supply
controller
20 pt. ac input, 10 pt. triac and 2 pt. relay outputs, ac power supply
controller
Terminal doors for -L16AWA (2 doors per package)
Terminal doors for -L16BWA (2 doors per package)
Terminal doors for -L32AWA, -L32BWA, or -L32AAA (2 doors per
package)
Communications door (1 door per package)
DIN rail latches (2 per package)
2.00 m (6.56 ft) cable (DIN-to-DIN) for use with the MicroLogix 1000
HHP
Hand-Held Programmer (includes 1761-CBL-HM02 communication
cable)
Memory module for 1761-HHP-B30 (stores 1 program)
A–10
Catalog Number
1761-L20BWB-5A
1761-L32BWB
1761-L16BBB
1761-L32BBB
1761-L32AAA
1761-RPL-T16A
1761-RPL-T16B
1761-RPL-T32X
1761-RPL-COM
1761-RPL-DIN
1761-CBL-HM02
1761-HHP-B30
1761-HHM-K08
Memory module for 1761-HHP-B30 (stores 8 programs)
1761-HHM-K64
Memory module door for 1761-HHP-B30 (1 door per package)
1761-RPL-TRM
Reference
Description
Programming Reference
B
Programming Reference
This appendix lists the:
•
•
controller status file
instruction execution times and instruction memory usage
Controller Status File
The status file lets you monitor how your operating system works and lets you direct
how you want it to work. This is done by using the status file to set up control bits
and monitor both hardware and programming device faults and other status
information.
Do not write to reserved words in the status file. If you intend writing to status file
data, it is imperative that you first understand the function fully.
Reference
Note
B–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
The status file S: contains the following words:
Word
B–2
Function
Page
S:0
Arithmetic Flags
B–3
S:1L (low byte)
Controller Mode Status/Control (low)
B–5
S:1H (high byte)
Controller Mode Status/Control (Hi)
B–5
S:2L (low byte)
Controller Alternate Mode Status/Control (low)
B–8
S:2H (high byte)
Controller Alternate Mode Status/Control (Hi)
B–8
S:3L (low byte)
Current Scan Time
B–11
S:3H (high byte)
Watchdog Scan Time
B–11
S:4
Timebase
B–12
S:5
Minor Error Bits
B–12
S:6
Major Error Code
B–14
S:7
Suspend Code
B–18
S:8 to S:12
Reserved
B–18
S:13, S:14
Math Register
B–18
S:15L (low byte)
DF1 Full or Half-Duplex Node Address
B–18
S:15H (high byte)
DF1 Full or Half-Duplex Baud Rate
B–19
S:16L (low byte)
DH-485 Node Address
B–19
S:16H (high byte)
DH-485 Baud Rate
B–19
S:17 to S:21
Reserved
B–19
S:22
Maximum Observed Scan Time
B–19
S:23
Reserved
B–20
S:24
Index Register
B–20
S:25 to S:29
Reserved
B–20
S:30
STI Setpoint
B–20
S:31 and S:32
Reserved
B–20
Programming Reference
Status File Descriptions
The following tables describe the status file functions, beginning at address S:0 and
ending at address S:32.
Each status bit is classified as one of the following:
•
Status — Use these words, bytes, or bits to monitor controller operation or
controller status information. The information is seldom written to by the user
program or programming device (unless you want to reset or clear a function
such as a monitor bit).
Dynamic Configuration — Use these words, bytes, or bits to select controller
options while online with the controller.
•
Static Configuration — Use these words, bytes, or bits to select controller
options while in the offline program mode, prior to downloading the user
program.
Address
Bit
Classification
S:0
Arithmetic and
Scan Status
Flags
S:0/0
Carry
Status
S:0/1
Overflow
Status
Description
The arithmetic flags are assessed by the
controller following the execution of certain
math and data handling instructions. The state
of these bits remain in effect until certain math
or data handling instructions in the program
are executed.
This bit is set by the controller if a
mathematical carry or borrow is generated.
Otherwise the bit remains cleared. This bit is
assessed as if a function of unsigned math.
When a STI, high-speed counter, or Fault
Routine interrupts normal execution of your
program, the original value of S:0/0 is restored
when execution resumes.
This bit is set by the controller when the result
of a mathematical operation does not fit in its
destination. Otherwise the bit remains cleared.
Whenever this bit is set, the overflow trap bit
S:5/0 is also set except for the ENC bit. Refer
to S:5/0. When a STI, high-speed counter, or
Fault Routine interrupts normal execution of
your program, the original value of S:0/1 is
restored when execution resumes.
B–3
Reference
•
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Address
➀
B–4
Bit
Classification
Description
S:0/2
Zero
Status
This bit is set by the controller when the result
of certain math or data handling instructions is
zero. Otherwise the bit remains cleared.
When a STI, high-speed counter, or Fault
Routine interrupts normal execution of your
program, the original value of S:0/2 is restored
when execution resumes.
S:0/3
Sign
Status
This bit is set by the controller when the result
of certain math or data handling instructions is
negative. Otherwise the bit remains cleared.
When a STI, high-speed counter, or Fault
Routine interrupts normal execution of your
program, the original value of S:0/3 is restored
when execution resumes.
S:0/4 to
S:0/7
S:0/8➀
Reserved
NA
NA
Extend I/O
Configuration
Static
Configuration
This bit must be set by the user when unused
outputs are written to. If reset and unused
outputs are turned on the controller will fault
(41H).
S:0/9
Reserved
NA
NA
S:0/10
Primary
Protocol
Static
Configuration
S:0/11
Active
Protocol
Status
This bit defines the protocol that the controller
will initially use when attempting to establish
communication, where:
0 = DF1 (default setting)
1 = DH-485
This bit is updated by the controller during a
protocol switch. It indicates which protocol is
currently being used for communication,
where:
0 = DF1
1 = DH-485
S:0/12
Selected DF1
Protocol
Status
This bit allows the user to determine which
DF1 protocol is configured, where:
0 = DF1 Full-Duplex (default setting)
1 = DF1 Half-Duplex Slave
S:0/13 to
S:0/15
Reserved
NA
NA
Valid for Series A–C discrete only.
Programming Reference
Address
S:1/0 to
S:1/4
Bit
Controller
Mode Status/
C
Control
Classification
Status
Description
Bits 0–4 function as follows:
0 0000 = (0) Remote Download in progress
0 000
0001 = (1) R
Remote Program mode
0 0011 = (3) Suspend Idle (operation halted by
SUS instruction
execution)
c
c
0 0 = (6)
6 Remote
R
R mode
0 0110
Run
0 0111
0 = (7)
7 Remote
R
Test continuous
c
mode
0 1000 = (8) Remote Test single scan mode
S:1/5
Forces
Enabled
Forces
Installed
Comms Active
Status
This bit is set by the controller (1) to indicate
that forces are always enabled.
This bit is set by the controller to indicate that
forces have been set by the user.
This bit is set when the controller receives valid
data from the communication port. For DF1
protocols, the bit is reset if the controller does
not receive valid data from the programming
port for 10 seconds.
S:1/6
S:1/7
Status
Status
Note: In DF1 half-duplex mode, simple polls
by the DF1 master or replies to received
messages will not reset the timer. A poll with a
command is required to reset the timer.
For DH-485, the bit is reset as soon as the
DH-485 link layer determines that no other
devices are active on the link.
S:1/8
Fault Override
at Powerup
Static
Configuration
When set, this bit causes the controller to clear
the Major Error Halted bit S:1/13 and Minor
error bits S:5/0 to S:5/7 on power up if the
processor had previously been in the REM Run
mode and had faulted. The controller then
attempts to enter the REM Run mode. Set this
bit offline only.
B–5
Reference
Application Note: For DF1 half-duplex, you
can use this bit to enable a timer (via an XIO
instruction) to sense whether the DF1 master is
actively communicating to the slave. The
preset of the timer is determined by the total
network timing.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Address
S:1/9
S:1/10 to
S:1/11
S:1/12
Bit
Startup
Protection
Fault
Classification
Static
Configuration
Reserved
NA
Run Always
Static
Configuration
Description
When this bit is set and power is cycled while
the controller is in the REM Run mode, the
controller executes the user-fault routine prior
to the execution of the first scan of your
program. You have the option of clearing the
Major Error Halted bit S:1/13 to resume
operation in the REM Run mode. If the
user-fault routine does not reset bit S:1/13, the
fault mode results.
Program the user-fault routine logic
accordingly. When executing the startup
protection fault routine, S:6 (major error fault
code) will contain the value 0016H.
NA
When set, this bit causes the controller to clear
S:1/13 before attempting to enter RUN mode
when power is applied or if an unexpected
reset occurs. If this bit is not set, the controller
powers up in the previous mode it was in
before losing power, unless the controller was
in REM test mode. If the controller was in
REM test mode when power was removed, the
controller enters REM program mode when
power is applied.
This bit overrides any faults existing at power
down.
!
B–6
Setting the Run Always bit
causes the controller to enter
the REM Run mode if an
unexpected reset occurs,
regardless of the mode that the
controller is in before the reset
occurred. Unexpected resets
may occur due to
electromagnetic noise, improper
grounding, or an internal
controller hardware failure. Make
sure your application is designed
to safely handle this situation.
Programming Reference
Bit
Major Error
Halted
Classification
Dynamic
Configuration
Description
This bit is set by the controller any time a major
error is encountered. The controller enters a
fault condition. Word S:6, the Fault Code will
contain a code that can be used to diagnose
the fault condition. Any time bit S:1/13 is set,
the controller:
•
either places all outputs in a safe state
(outputs are off) and energizes the fault
LED,
• or enters the user-fault routine with
outputs active (if in REM Run mode),
allowing the fault routine ladder logic to
attempt recovery from the fault condition.
If the user-fault routine determines that
recovery is required, clear S:1/13 using
ladder logic prior to exiting the fault
routine. If the fault routine ladder logic
does not understand the fault code, or if
the routine determines that it is not
desirable to continue operation, the
controller exits the fault routine with bit
S:1/13 set. The outputs are placed in a
safe state and the FAULT LED is
energized.
When you clear bit S:1/13 using a
programming device, the controller mode
changes from fault to Remote Program. You
can move a value to S:6, then set S:1/13 in
your ladder program to generate an application
specific major error. All application generated
faults are recoverable regardless of the value
used.
Note: Once a major fault state exists, you
must correct the condition causing the fault,
and you must also clear this bit in order for the
controller to accept a mode change attempt
(into REM Run or REM Test). Also, clear S:6
to avoid the confusion of having an error code
but no fault condition.
Note: Do not re-use error codes that are
defined later in this appendix as application
specific error codes. Instead, create your own
unique codes. This prevents you from
confusing application errors with system errors.
We recommend using error codes FFOO to
FFOF to indicate application specific major
errors.
B–7
Reference
Address
S:1/13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
B–8
Address
S:1/14
Bit
OEM Lock
Classification
Static
Configuration
C
f
Description
S:1/15
First Pass
Status
S:2/0
STI Pending
Status
When set, this bit indicates that the STI timer
has timed out and the STI routine is waiting to
be executed. This bit is cleared upon starting
the STI routine, ladder program, exit of the
REM Run or Test mode, or execution of a true
STS instruction.
S:2/1
STI Enabled
Status and
Static
Configuration
S:2/2
STI Executing
Status
S:2/3 to
S:2/4
Reserved
NA
This bit may be set or reset using the STS,
STE, or STD instruction. If set, it allows
execution of the STI if the STI setpoint S:30 is
non-zero. If clear, when an interrupt occurs,
the STI subroutine does not execute and the
STI Pending bit is set. The STI Timer
continues to run when this bit is disabled. The
STD instruction clears this bit.
If this bit is set or reset editing the status file
online, the STI is not affected. If this bit is set,
the bit allows execution of the STI. If this bit is
reset editing the status file offline, the bit
disallows execution of the STI.
When set, this bit indicates that the STI timer
has timed out and the STI subroutine is
currently being executed. This bit is cleared
upon completion of the STI routine, ladder
program, or REM Run or Test mode.
NA
Using this bit you can control access to a
controller file.
To program this feature, select “Future Access
Disallow” when saving your program.
When this bit is cleared, it indicates that any
compatible programming device can access
the ladder program (provided that password
conditions are satisfied).
Use this bit to initialize your program as the
application requires. When this bit is set by the
controller, it indicates that the first scan of the
user program is in progress (following power
up in the RUN mode or entry into a REM Run
or REM Test mode). The controller clears this
bit following the first scan.
This bit is set during execution of the startup
protection fault routine. Refer to S:1/9 for more
information.
Programming Reference
Address
Classification
Description
Incoming
Command
Pending Bit
Status
This bit is set when the processor determines
that another node on the network has
requested information or supplied a command
to it. This bit can be set at any time. This bit is
cleared when the processor services the
request (or command).
S:2/6➀
Message
Reply
Pending Bit
Status
This bit is set when another node on the
network has supplied the information you
requested in the MSG instruction of your
processor. This bit is cleared when the
processor stores the information and updates
your MSG instruction.
S:2/7➀
Outgoing
Message
Command
Pending Bit
Status
S:2/8 to
S:2/13
Reserved
NA
This bit is set when one or more messages in
your program are enabled and waiting, but no
message is being transmitted at the time. As
soon as transmission of a message begins, the
bit is cleared. After transmission, the bit is set
again if there are further messages waiting. It
remains cleared if there are no further
messages waiting.
NA
Valid for Series C discrete only.
Reference
➀
Bit
S:2/5➀
B–9
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Address
S:2/14
Bit
Math Overflow
Selection
Classification
Dynamic
Configuration
Description
Set this bit when you intend to use 32-bit
addition and subtraction. When S:2/14 is set,
and the result of an ADD, SUB, MUL, or DIV
instruction cannot be represented in the
destination address (underflow or overflow),
•
•
•
the overflow bit S:0/1 is set,
the overflow trap bit S:5/0 is set,
and the destination address contains the
unsigned truncated least significant 16 bits
of the result.
The default condition of S:2/14 is reset (0).
When S:2/14 is reset, and the result of an
ADD, SUB, MUL, or DIV instruction cannot be
represented in the destination address
(underflow or overflow),
•
•
•
S:2/15
B–10
Reserved
NA
the overflow bit S:0/1 is set,
the overflow trap bit S:5/0 is set,
and the destination address contains
32767 if the result is positive or – 32768 if
the result is negative.
Note, the status of bit S:2/14 has no effect on
the DDV instruction. Also, it has no effect on
the math register content when using MUL and
DIV instructions.
To provide protection from inadvertent
alteration of your selection, program an
unconditional OTL instruction at address
S:2/14 to ensure the new math overflow
operation. Program an unconditional OTU
instruction at address S:2/14 to ensure the
original math overflow operation.
NA
Programming Reference
Address
S:3L
Bit
Current Scan
Time
Classification
Status
Description
The value of this byte tells you how much time
elapses in a program cycle. A program cycle
includes:
•
•
•
•
scanning the ladder program,
housekeeping,
scanning the I/O,
servicing of the communication channel.
The byte value is zeroed by the controller each
scan, immediately preceding the execution of
rung 0 of program file 2 (main program file).
The byte is incremented every 10 ms
thereafter, and indicates, in 10 ms increments,
the amount of time elapsed in each scan. If
this value ever equals the value in S:3H
Watchdog, a user watchdog major error will be
declared (code 0022).
Watchdog
Scan Time
Dynamic
Configuration
Reference
S:3H
The resolution of the scan time value is +0 to
90 ms (–10 ms). Example: The value 9
indicates that 80–90 ms has elapsed since the
start of the program cycle.
This byte value contains the number of 10 ms
ticks allowed to occur during a program cycle.
The default value is 10 (100 ms), but you can
increase this to 255 (2.55 seconds) or
decrease it to 1, as your application requires.
If the program scan S:3L value equals the
watchdog value, a watchdog major error will be
declared (code 0022).
B–11
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
S:4
Timebase
Status
All 16 bits of this word are assessed by the
controller. The value of this word is zeroed
upon power up in the REM Run mode or entry
into the REM Run or REM Test mode. It is
incremented every 10 ms thereafter.
Application note: You can write any value to
S:4. It will begin incrementing from this value.
You can use any individual bit of this word in
your user program as a 50% duty cycle clock
bit. Clock rates for S:4/0 to S:4/15 are:
20, 40, 80, 160, 320, 640, 1280, 2560, 5120,
10240, 20480, 40960, 81920, 163840, 327680,
and 655360 ms.
The application using the bit must be evaluated
at a rate more than two times faster than the
clock rate of the bit. In the example below, bit
S:4/3 toggles every 80 ms, producing a 160 ms
clock rate. To maintain accuracy of this bit in
your application, the instruction using bit S:4/3
(O:1/0 in this case) must be evaluated at least
once every 79.999 ms
160 ms
B–12
S:5
Minor Error
Bits
S:5/0
Overflow Trap
S:4
] [
3
O:1
( )
0
Both S:4/3 and
S:4/3 cycles in 160 ms Output O:1/0 toggle
every 80 ms. O:1/0
must be evaluated
at least once every
79.999 ms.
The bits of this word are set by the controller to
indicate that a minor error has occurred in your
ladder program. Minor errors, bits 0 to 7,
revert to major error 0020H if any bit is
detected as being set at the end of the scan.
These bits are automatically cleared on a
power cycle.
Dynamic
Configuration
When this bit is set by the controller, it
indicates that a mathematical overflow has
occurred in the ladder program. See S:0/1 for
more information.
If this bit is ever set upon execution of the END
or TND instruction, major error (0020) is
declared. To avoid this type of major error from
occurring, examine the state of this bit
following a math instruction (ADD, SUB, MUL,
DIV, DDV, NEG, SCL, TOD, or FRD), take
appropriate action, and then clear bit S:5/0
using an OTU instruction with S:5/0.
Programming Reference
S:5/1
S:5/2
Reserved
Control
Register Error
NA
Dynamic
Configuration
NA
S:5/3
Major Error
Detected
While
Executing
user-fault
routine
Dynamic
Configuration
S:5/4 to
S:5/7
S:5/8
Reserved
NA
NA
Retentive
Data Lost
Status
This bit is set whenever retentive data is lost.
This bit remains set until you clear it. While
set, this bit causes the controller to fault prior to
the first true scan of the program.
S:5/9
Reserved
NA
NA
S:5/10
STI Lost
Status
This bit is set whenever the STI timer expires
while the STI routine is either executing or
disabled and the pending bit (s:2/0) is already
set.
S:5/11 to
S:5/12
S:5/13
Reserved
NA
NA
Input Filter
Selection
Modified
Status
This bit is set whenever the discrete input filter
selection in the controller is made compatible
with the hardware. Refer to page A–7 for more
information.
S:5/14 to
S:5/15
Reserved
NA
NA
Reference
The LFU, LFL, FFU, FFL, BSL, BSR, SQO,
SQC, and SQL instructions are capable of
generating this error. When bit S:5/2 is set, it
indicates that the error bit of a control word
used by the instruction has been set.
If this bit is ever set upon execution of the END
or TND instruction, major error (0020) is
declared. To avoid this type of major error from
occurring, examine the state of this bit
following a control register instruction, take
appropriate action, and then clear bit S:5/2
using an OTU instruction with S:5/2.
When set, the major error code (S:6)
represents the major error that occurred while
processing the fault routine due to another
major error.
NA = Not Applicable
B–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
S:6
Major Error
Code
Status
A hexadecimal code is entered in this word by
the controller when a major error is declared.
Refer to S:1/13. The code defines the type of
fault, as indicated on the following pages. This
word is not cleared by the controller.
Error codes are presented, stored, and
displayed in a hexadecimal format.
If you enter a fault code as a parameter in an
instruction in your ladder program, you must
convert the code to decimal.
Application note: You can declare your own
application specific major fault by writing a
unique value to S:6 and then setting bit S:1/13.
Interrogate the value of S:6 in the user-fault
routine to determine the type of fault that
occurred.
Fault Classifications: Faults are classified as
Non-User, Non-Recoverable, and Recoverable.
Error code descriptions and classifications are
listed on the following pages. Categories are:
•
•
•
•
powerup errors
going-to-run errors
run errors
download errors
NA = Not Applicable
Each fault is classified as one of the following:
•
•
•
Non-User — A fault caused by various conditions that cease ladder program
execution. The user-fault routine is not run when this fault occurs.
Non-Recoverable — A fault caused by the user that cannot be recovered from.
The user-fault routine is run when this fault occurs. However, the fault cannot
be cleared.
Recoverable — A fault caused by the user that can be recovered from in the
user-fault routine by resetting major error halted bit (S:1/13). The user-fault
routine is run when this fault occurs.
Refer to chapter 14, Troubleshooting, for more information regarding programming
device advisory messages.
B–14
Programming Reference
Fault Classification
User
Address
Error
Code
(Hex)
S:6
0001
The default program was
loaded.
X
0002
Unexpected reset occurred.
X
0003
EEPROM memory is corrupt.
X
0008
A fatal internal programming
device error occurred.
X
0009
A fatal internal hardware
error occurred.
X
Powerup Errors
Non-User
NonRecoverable
Recoverable
Fault Classification
User
Error
Code
(Hex)
S:6
0005
Retentive data is lost.
0010
The downloaded program is
not a controller program.
0016
Startup protection after
power loss, S:1/9 is set. The
user must check for a
retentive data lost condition if
the user-fault routine was
executed with startup
protection.
➀
Going-to-Run (GTR) Errors➀
Non-User
NonRecoverable
Recoverable
X
X
X
Reference
Address
Going-to-Run errors occur when the controller is going from any mode to REM Run mode or from any
non-Run mode (PRG, SUS) to Test mode.
B–15
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Fault Classification
User
Address
S:6
Error
Code
(Hex)
Non-User
0004
A runtime memory integrity
error occurred.
X
0020
A minor error at the end of
the scan. Refer to S:5.
0022
The watchdog timer expired.
Refer to S:3H.
X
0024
Invalid STI interrupt setpoint.
Refer to S:30.
X
0025
There are excessive JSRs in
the STI subroutine (file 5).
X
0027
There are excessive JSRs in
the fault subroutine (file 3).
X
002A
The indexed address is too
large for the file.
X
002B
There are excessive JSRs in
the high-speed counter subroutine (file 4).
X
0030
The subroutine nesting
exceeds a limit of 8 (file 2).
X
0031
An unsupported instruction
was detected.
0032
An SQO/SQC instruction
crossed data file boundaries.
X
0033
The LFU, LFL, FFU, FFL,
BSL, or BSR instruction
crossed data file boundaries.
X
A negative value for a timer
accumulator or preset value
was detected.
X
0034
B–16
NonRecoverable
Run Errors
0035
An illegal instruction (TND)
occurred in the interrupt file.
0037
Invalid presets were loaded
to the high-speed counter.
0038
A RET instruction was
detected in program file 2.
Recoverable
X
X
X
X
X
Programming Reference
Fault Classification
User
Address
S:6
➀
Error
Code
(Hex)
Run Errors
Non-User
NonRecoverable
0040
An output verify write
occurred.
X
0041➀
Extra output bit(s) turned on.
X
Recoverable
Valid for Series A–C discrete only.
Fault Classification
User
S:6
0018
Download Errors
Non-User
The user program is incompatible with the operating
system.
X
NonRecoverable
Recoverable
Reference
Address
Error
Code
(Hex)
B–17
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Address
S:7
Bit
Suspend
Code
Classification
Status
S:8 to S:12
S:13 and
S:14
Reserved
Math
Register
NA
Status
S:15L
B–18
DF1 Node
Address
Status
Description
When a non-zero value appears in S:7, it
indicates that the SUS instruction identified by
this value has been evaluated as true, and the
Suspend Idle mode is in effect. This pinpoints
the conditions in the application that caused the
Suspend Idle mode. This value is not cleared by
the controller.
Use the SUS instruction with startup
troubleshooting, or as runtime diagnostics for
detection of system errors.
NA
Use this double register to produce 32-bit signed
divide and multiply operations, precision divide or
double divide operations, and 5-digit BCD
conversions.
These two words are used in conjunction with the
MUL, DIV, DDV, FRD, and TOD math
instructions. The math register value is assessed
upon execution of the instruction and remains
valid until the next MUL, DIV, DDV, FRD, or TOD
instruction is executed in the user program.
An explanation of how the math register operates
is included with the instruction definitions.
If you store 32-bit signed data values, you must
manage this data type without the aid of an
assigned 32-bit data type. For example, combine
B3:0 and B3:1 to create a 32-bit signed data
value. We recommend that you start all 32-bit
values on an even or odd word boundary for
ease of application and viewing. Also, we
recommend that you design, document, and view
the contents of 32-bit signed data in either the
hexadecimal or binary radix.
When an STI, high-speed counter, or Fault
Routine interrupts normal execution of your
program, the original value of the math register is
restored when execution resumes.
This byte value contains the node address of
your processor on the DF1 link. It is used when
executing Message (MSG) instructions over the
DF1 link. The default node address of a
processor is 1. Valid node addresses are 0–254.
To change a processor node address you must
use a programming device.
Programming Reference
Bit
Classification
Description
S:15H
DF1 Baud
Rate
Status
This byte value contains a code used to select
the baud rate of the processor on the DF1 link.
The controller baud rate options are:
• 300
• 600
• 1200
• 2400
• 4800
• 9600 (default)
• 19200
• 38400
To change the baud rate from the default value
you must use a programming device.
S:16L
DH-485
Node
Address
Status
This byte value contains the node address of
your processor on the DH-485 link. Each device
on the DH-485 link must have a unique address
between the decimal values 1–31. To change a
processor node address, you must use a
programming device.
S:16H
DH-485
Baud Rate
Status
This byte value contains the baud rate of the
processor on the DH-485 link.
The controller baud rate options are:
• 9600
• 19200 (default)
S:17 to
S:21
S:22
Reserved
NA
Maximum
Observed
b
c Time
Scan
Dynamic
Configuration
C
f
To change the baud rate from the default value,
you must use a programming device.
NA
This word indicates the maximum observed
interval between consecutive program cycles.
This value indicates, in 10 ms increments, the
time elapsed in the longest program cycle of the
controller. Refer to S:3L for more information
regarding the program cycle. The controller
compares each last scan value to the value
contained in S:22. If the controller determines
that the last scan value is larger than the value
stored at S:22, the last scan value is written to
S:22.
Resolution of the maximum observed scan time
value is +0 to −10 ms. For example, the value 9
indicates that 80–90 ms was observed as the
longest program cycle.
Interrogate this value if you need to determine or
verify the longest scan time of your program.
B–19
Reference
Address
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Address
Classification
S:23
S:24
Reserved
Index
Register
R
NA
Status
S:25 to
S:29
S:30
Reserved
NA
STI
Setpoint
Dynamic
Configuration
S:31 to
S:32
B–20
Bit
Reserved
NA
Description
NA
This word indicates the element offset used in
indexed addressing.
When an STI, high-speed counter, or Fault
Routine interrupts normal execution of your
program, the original value of this register is
restored when execution resumes.
NA
You enter the timebase to be used in the
selectable timed interrupt (STI). The time can
range from 10 to 2550 ms. (This is in 10ms
increments, so valid values are from 0–255.)
Your STI routine executes per the value you
enter. Write a zero value to disable the STI.
To provide protection from inadvertent alteration
of your selection, program an unconditional MOV
instruction containing the setpoint value of your
STI to S:30, or program a CLR instruction at S:30
to prevent STI operation.
If the STI is initiated while in the REM Run mode
by loading the status registers, the interrupt starts
timing from the end of the program scan in which
the status registers were loaded.
NA
Programming Reference
Instruction Execution Times and Memory Usage
The table below lists the execution times and memory usage for the controller
instructions. Any instruction that takes longer than 15 µs (true or false execution
time) to execute performs a poll for user interrupts.
False Execution
Time (approx.
µseconds)
True Execution
Time (approx.
µseconds)
Memory Usage
(user words)
Name
Instruction Type
ADD
6.78
33.09
1.50
Add
Math
AND
6.78
34.00
1.50
And
Data Handling
BSL
19.80
53.71 + 5.24 x
position value
2.00
Bit Shift Left
Application
Specific
BSR
19.80
53.34 + 3.98 x
position value
2.00
Bit Shift Right
Application
Specific
CLR
4.25
20.80
1.00
Clear
Math
COP
6.60
27.31 + 5.06/word
1.50
File Copy
Data Handling
CTD
27.22
32.19
1.00
Count Down
Basic
CTU
26.67
29.84
1.00
Count Up
Basic
DCD
6.78
27.67
1.50
Decode 4 to 1 of
16
Data Handling
DDV
6.78
157.06
1.00
Double Divide
Math
DIV
6.78
147.87
1.50
Divide
Math
ENC
6.78
54.80
1.50
Encode 1 of 16 to
4
Data Handling
EQU
6.60
21.52
1.50
Equal
Comparison
FFL
33.67
61.13
1.50
FIFO Load
Data Handling
FFU
34.90
73.78 + 4.34 x
position value
1.50
FIFO Unload
Data Handling
FLL
6.60
26.86 + 3.62/word
1.50
Fill File
Data Handling
FRD
5.52
56.88
1.00
Convert from BCD
Data Handling
GEQ
6.60
23.60
1.50
Greater Than or
Equal
Comparison
GRT
6.60
23.60
1.50
Greater Than
Comparison
HSC
21.00
21.00
1.00
High-Speed
Counter
High-Speed
Counter
B–21
Reference
Mnemonic
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Mnemonic
False Execution
Time (approx.
µseconds)
True Execution
Time (approx.
µseconds)
Memory Usage
(user words)
Name
Instruction Type
HSD
7.00
8.00
1.25
High-Speed
Counter Interrupt
Disable
High-Speed
Counter
HSE
7.00
10.00
1.25
High-Speed
Counter Interrupt.
Enable
High-Speed
Counter
HSL
7.00
66.00
1.50
High-Speed
Counter Load
High-Speed
Counter
IIM
6.78
35.72
1.50
Immediate Input
with Mask
Program Flow
Control
INT
0.99
1.45
0.50
Interrupt
Subroutine
Application
Specific
IOM
6.78
41.59
1.50
Immediate Output
with Mask
Program Flow
Control
JMP
6.78
9.04
1.00
Jump to Label
Program Flow
Control
JSR
4.25
22.24
1.00
Jump to
Subroutine
Program Flow
Control
LBL
0.99
1.45
0.50
Label
Program Flow
Control
LEQ
6.60
23.60
1.50
Less Than or
Equal
Comparison
LES
6.60
23.60
1.50
Less Than
Comparison
LIM
7.69
36.93
1.50
Limit Test
Comparison
LFL
33.67
61.13
1.50
LIFO Load
Data Handling
LFU
35.08
64.20
1.50
LIFO Unload
Data Handling
MCR
4.07
3.98
0.50
Master Control
Reset
Program Flow
Control
MEQ
7.69
28.39
1.50
Masked
Comparison for
Equal
Comparison
MOV
6.78
25.05
1.50
Move
Data Handling
B–22
Programming Reference
True Execution
Time (approx.
µseconds)
Memory Usage
(user words)
Name
Instruction Type
MSG
26
180➀➁
34.75
Message
Communication
MUL
6.78
57.96
1.50
Multiply
Math
MVM
6.78
33.28
1.50
Masked Move
Data Handling
NEG
6.78
29.48
1.50
Negate
Data Handling
NEQ
6.60
21.52
1.50
Not Equal
Comparison
NOT
6.78
28.21
1.00
Not
Data Handling
OR
6.78
33.68
1.50
Or
Data Handling
OSR
11.48
13.02
1.00
One-Shot Rising
Basic
OTE
4.43
4.43
0.75
Output Energize
Basic
OTE (high-speed
counter)
7.00
12.00
0.75
Update
High-Speed
Counter Image
Accumulator
High-Speed
Counter
OTL
3.16
4.97
0.75
Output Latch
Basic
OTU
3.16
4.97
0.75
Output Unlatch
Basic
RAC
6.00
56.00
1.00
High-Speed
Counter Reset
Accumulator
High-Speed
Counter
RES
(timer/counter)
4.25
15.19
1.00
Reset
Basic
RES (high-speed
counter)
6.00
51.00
1.00
High-Speed
Counter Reset
High-Speed
Counter
RET
3.16
31.11
0.50
Return from
Subroutine
Program Flow
Control
RTO
27.49
38.34
1.00
Retentive Timer
Basic
SBR
0.99
1.45
0.50
Subroutine
Program Flow
Control
SCL
6.78
169.18
1.75
Scale Data
Math
SQC
27.40
60.52
2.00
Sequencer
Compare
Application
Specific
➀ This only includes the amount of time needed to set up the operation requested. It does not include the time it takes to
service the actual communication, as this time varies with each network configuration. As an example, 144ms is the actual
communication service time for the following configuration: 3 nodes on DH-485 (2=MicroLogix 1000 programmable
controllers and 1=PLC-500 A.I. Series programming software), running at 19.2K baud, with 2 words per transfer.
➁ Add 7.3 µseconds per word for MSG instructions that perform writes.
B–23
Reference
False Execution
Time (approx.
µseconds)
Mnemonic
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Mnemonic
False Execution
Time (approx.
µseconds)
True Execution
Time (approx.
µseconds)
Memory Usage
(user words)
Name
Instruction Type
SQL
28.12
53.41
2.00
Sequencer Load
Application
Specific
SQO
27.40
60.52
2.00
Sequencer Output
Application
Specific
SQR
6.78
71.25
1.25
Square Root
Math
STD
3.16
6.69
0.50
Selectable Timer
Interrupt Disable
Application
Specific
STE
3.16
10.13
0.50
Selectable Timer
Interrupt Enable
Application
Specific
STS
6.78
24.59
1.25
Selectable Timer
Interrupt Start
Application
Specific
SUB
6.78
33.52
1.50
Subtract
Math
SUS
7.87
10.85
1.50
Suspend
Program Flow
Control
TND
3.16
7.78
0.50
Temporary End
Program Flow
Control
TOD
6.78
49.64
1.00
Convert to BCD
Data Handling
TOF
31.65
39.42
1.00
Timer Off-Delay
Basic
TON
30.38
38.34
1.00
Timer On-Delay
Basic
XIC
1.72
1.54
0.75
Examine If Closed
Basic
XIO
1.72
1.54
0.75
Examine If Open
Basic
XOR
6.92
33.64
1.50
Exclusive Or
Data Handling
User Interrupt Latency
The user interrupt latency is the maximum time from when an interrupt condition
occurs (e.g., STI expires or HSC preset is reached) to when the user interrupt
subroutine begins executing (assumes that there are no other interrupt conditions
present).
If you are communicating with the controller, the maximum user interrupt latency is
872 µs. If you are not communicating with the controller, the maximum user
interrupt latency is 838 µs.
B–24
Programming Reference
Estimating Memory Usage for Your Control System
Use the following to calculate memory usage for your control system.
1.
Determine the total instruction words used by the
instructions in your program and enter the result.
Refer to the table on page B–21.
2.
Multiply the total number of rungs by 0.75 and
enter the result. Do not count the END rungs in
each file.
177
3.
To account for controller overhead, use 177.
110
4.
To account for application data, use 110.
5.
Total steps 1 through 4. This is the estimated total
memory usage of your application system.
Remember, this is an estimate, actual compiled
programs may differ by ±12%.
6.
To determine the estimated amount of memory
remaining in the controller you have selected, do
the following:
Total Memory Usage:
Total Memory
Remaining:
Note
1024
Subtract the total memory usage from 1024.
-
The result of this calculation will be the estimated
total memory remaining in your selected
controller.
Reference
Total Memory Usage
(from above):
The calculated memory usage may vary from the
actual compiled program by ±12%.
B–25
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Execution Time Worksheet
Use this worksheet to calculate your execution time for ladder program.
Procedure
1.
Input scan time, output scan time, housekeeping time, and forcing.
2.
3.
4.
210
µs (discrete)
330
µs with forcing (analog)
250
µs without forcing (analog)
_______
Estimate your program scan time:
A.
Count the number of program rungs in your logic program and multiply by 6.
B.
Add up your program execution times when all instructions are true. Include interrupt
routines in this calculation.➀
________
________ µs
Estimate your controller scan time:
A.
Without communications, add sections 1 and 2
________ µs
B.
With communications, add sections 1 and 2 and multiply by 1.05
________ µs
To determine your maximum scan time in ms, divide your controller scan time by 1000.
➀
B–26
Maximum Scan Time
________ ms
If a subroutine executes more than once per scan, include each subroutine execution scan time.
Valid Addressing Modes and File Types for Instruction Parameters
Valid Addressing Modes and File
Types for Instruction Parameters
This appendix lists all of the available programming instructions along with their
parameters, valid addressing modes, and file types.
Reference
C
C–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Available File Types
The following file types are available:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
O
Output
I
Input
S
Status
B
Binary
T
Timer
C
Counter
R
Control
N
Integer
All file types are word addresses, unless otherwise specified.
C–2
Valid Addressing Modes and File Types for Instruction Parameters
Available Addressing Modes
The following addressing modes are available:
•
•
•
immediate
direct
indirect
Immediate Addressing
Indicates that a constant is a valid file type.
Direct Addressing
The data stored in the specified address is used in the instruction. For example:
N7:0
ST20:5
T4:8.ACC
Indexed Direct Addressing
You may specify an address as being indexed by placing the “#” character in front of
the address. When an address of this form is encountered in the program, the
processor takes the element number of the address and adds to it the value contained
in the Index Register S:24, then uses the result as the actual address. For example:
Reference
#N7:10 where S:24 = 15
The actual address used by the instruction is N7:25.
C–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Instruction
ADD
AND
BSL
BSR
Description
Add
Logical AND
Bit Shift Left
Bit Shift Right
Instruction
Parameters
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
Valid Value
Ranges
source A
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source A
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
file
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, N
Not Applicable
control
direct
R (element level)
Not Applicable
bit address
direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
(bit level)
Not Applicable
length
(contained in the
control register)
file
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, N
Not Applicable
control
direct
R (element level)
Not Applicable
bit address
direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
(bit level)
Not Applicable
length
(contained in the
control register)
0–2048
0–2048
CLR
Clear
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
COP
Copy File
source
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
destination
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
length
immediate
C–4
1–128; 1–42
when destination
is T,C,R
Valid Addressing Modes and File Types for Instruction Parameters
CTD
CTU
DCD
DDV
DIV
ENC
EQU
Description
Count Down
Count Up
Decode 4 to 1 of 16
Double Divide
Divide
Encode 1 of 16 to 4
Equal
Instruction
Parameters
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
C (element level)
Valid Value
Ranges
counter
direct
preset
(contained in the
counter register)
–32,768–32,767
accum
(contained in the
counter register)
–32,768–32,767
counter
direct
preset
(contained in the
counter register)
–32,768–32,767
accum
(contained in the
counter register)
–32,768–32,767
source
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source A
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source A
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
C (element level)
Not Applicable
Not Applicable
C–5
Reference
Instruction
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Instruction
FFL
FFU
FLL
FRD
GEQ
GRT
Description
FIFO Load
FIFO Unload
Fill File
Convert from BCD
Greater Than or Equal
Greater Than
Instruction
Parameters
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
Valid Value
Ranges
source
direct, indexed direct➀
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
FIFO array
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, N
Not Applicable
FIFO control
direct
R (element level)
Not Applicable
length
(contained in the
control register)
1–128
position
(contained in the
control register)
0–127
FIFO array
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, N
Not Applicable
destination
direct, indexed direct➀
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
FIFO control
direct
R (element level)
Not Applicable
length
(contained in the
control register)
1–128
position
(contained in the
control register)
0–127
source
direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
destination
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
(element level)
Not Applicable
length
immediate
source
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source A
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
source A
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
1–128; 1–42
when destination
is T,C,R
➀ Indexed addressing is not allowed when using T, C, or R addresses.
C–6
Valid Addressing Modes and File Types for Instruction Parameters
HSC
Description
High-Speed Counter
Instruction
Parameter
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
Valid Value
Ranges
type
immediate
0–7, where:
0=up
1=up&reset/hold
2=pulse/direction
3=pule/direction
& reset/hold
4=up/down
5=up/down &
reset/hold
6=encoder
7=encoder &
reset/hold
counter
direct
preset
(contained in the
counter register)
–32,768–32,767
accum
(contained in the
counter register)
–32,768–32,767
C5:0. C5:1
(element level)
Not Applicable
HSD
HSC Interrupt Disable
counter
direct
C
Not Applicable
HSE
HSC Interrupt Enable
counter
direct
C
Not Applicable
HSL
HSC Load
counter
direct
C
Not Applicable
source
direct
B, N
Not Applicable
length
IIM
INT
Immediate Input with
Mask
Interrupt Subroutine
always 5
slot
direct
I
Not Applicable
mask
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
length
immediate
1–10
Not Applicable
C–7
Reference
Instruction
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Instruction
IOM
Description
Immediate Output with
Mask
Instruction
Parameter
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
Valid Value
Ranges
slot
direct
O
Not Applicable
mask
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
length
immediate
1–32
JMP
Jump
label number
immediate
0–999
JSR
Jump to Subroutine
subroutine file
number
immediate
3–255
LBL
Label
label number
immediate
0–999
LEQ
Less Than or Equal To
source A
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
source A
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
source
immediate, direct,
indexed direct➀
O, I, S, B, T, C, R,
N➀
–32,768–32,767
LIFO array
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, N
Not Applicable
LIFO control
direct
R (element level)
Not Applicable
length
(contained in the
control register)
1–128
position
(contained in the
control register)
0–127
LIFO array
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, N
Not Applicable
destination
direct, indexed direct➀
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
LIFO control
direct
R (element level)
Not Applicable
length
(contained in the
control register)
1–128
position
(contained in the
control register)
0–127
LES
LFL
LFU
Less Than
LIFO Load
LIFO Unload
➀ Indexed addressing is not allowed when using T, C, or R addresses.
C–8
Valid Addressing Modes and File Types for Instruction Parameters
LIM
Description
Limit Test
MCR
Master Control Reset
MEQ
Mask Comparison for
Equal
MOV
MSG
Move
Message
Instruction
Parameter
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
Valid Value
Ranges
low limit
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
test
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
high limit
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
Not Applicable
source
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source mask
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
compare
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
source
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
read/write
immediate
0=read,1=write
target device
immediate
2=500CPU,
4=485CIF
control block
direct
control block
length
immediate
local address
direct
target node
(contained in the
control register)
target address
direct
message length
N
Not Applicable
7
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
0–254 for DF1;
0–31 for DH-485
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
0–255
T, C, R
1–13
I, O, S, B, N
1–41
C–9
Reference
Instruction
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Instruction
MUL
MVM
NEG
NEQ
NOT
OR
Description
Multiply
Masked Move
Negate
Not Equal
Logical NOT
Logical OR
Instruction
Parameter
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
Valid Value
Ranges
source A
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source mask
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source A
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
source
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
source A
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
source B
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
OSR
One–Shot Rising
bit address
direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
OTE
Output Energize
bit address
direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
OTL
Output Latch
bit address
direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
OTU
Output Unlatch
bit address
direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
RAC
HSC Reset
Accumulator
counter
direct
C
Not Applicable
source
immediate, direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
C–10
Valid Addressing Modes and File Types for Instruction Parameters
Description
Instruction
Parameter
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
Valid Value
Ranges
RES
Timer/Counter Reset
structure
direct
T, C, R
(element level)
Not Applicable
RES
High-Speed Counter
Reset
structure
direct
T, C, R
(element level)
Not Applicable
RET
Return
RTO
Retentive Timer
SBR
Subroutine
SCL
Scale
SQC
Not Applicable
timer
direct
T (element level)
Not Applicable
time base
immediate
0.01 or 1.00
preset
(contained in the
timer register)
0–32,767
accum
(contained in the
timer register)
0–32,767
Not Applicable
Sequencer Compare
source
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
rate
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
offset
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
file
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, N
Not Applicable
mask
immediate, direct,
indexed direct➀
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
source
direct, indexed direct➀
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
control
direct
R (element level)
Not Applicable
length
(contained in the
control register)
1–255
position
(contained in the
control register)
0–255
➀ Indexed addressing is not allowed when using T, C, or R addresses.
C–11
Reference
Instruction
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Instruction
SQL
SQO
SQR
Description
Sequencer Load
Sequencer Output
Square Root
Instruction
Parameter
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
Valid Value
Ranges
file
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, N
Not Applicable
source
direct, indexed direct➀
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
control
direct
R (element level)
Not Applicable
length
(contained in the
control register)
1–255
position
(contained in the
control register)
0–255
file
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, N
Not Applicable
mask
direct, indexed direct➀
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
destination
direct, indexed direct➀
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
control
direct
R (element level)
Not Applicable
length
1–255
position
0–255
source
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
STD
Selectable Timed
Disable
Not Applicable
STE
Selectable Timed
Enable
Not Applicable
STS
Selectable Timed Start
SUB
Subtract
file
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
always equal 5
time
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
0–255
source A
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,76
f-min–f-max
source B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
f-min–f-max
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
➀ Indexed addressing is not allowed when using T, C, or R addresses.
C–12
Valid Addressing Modes and File Types for Instruction Parameters
Description
SUS
Suspend
TND
Temporary End
TOD
Convert to BCD
TOF
TON
Timer Off-Delay
Timer On-Delay
Instruction
Parameter
suspend ID
Valid Addressing
Mode(s)
Valid File Types
immediate,
Valid Value
Ranges
–32,768–32,767
Not Applicable
source
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
destination
direct
O, I. S. B. T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
timer
direct
T (element level)
Not Applicable
time base
immediate
0.01 or 1.00
preset
(contained in the
timer register)
0–32,767
accum
(contained in the
timer register)
0–32,767
timer
direct
time base
immediate
0.01 or 1.00
preset
(contained in the
timer register)
0–32,767
accum
(contained in the
timer register)
0–32,767
T (element level)
Not Applicable
XIC
Examine if Closed
source bit
direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
(bit level)
Not Applicable
XIO
Examine if Open
source bit
direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
(bit level)
Not Applicable
XOR
Exclusive OR
address A
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
address B
immediate, direct,
indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
–32,768–32,767
destination
direct, indexed direct
O, I, S, B, T, C, R, N
Not Applicable
C–13
Reference
Instruction
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Notes:
C–14
Understanding the Communication Protocols
Understanding the Communication
Protocols
Use the information in this appendix to understand the differences in
communication protocols. The following protocols are supported from the RS-232
communication channel:
•
DF1 Full-Duplex and DF1 Half-Duplex Slave
All MicroLogix 1000 controllers support the DF1 full-duplex protocol. Series
D or later discrete and all MicroLogix 1000 analog controllers also support DF1
half-duplex slave protocol.
•
DH-485
Series C or later discrete and all MicroLogix 1000 analog controllers can
communicate on DH-485 networks using an AIC+ Advanced Interface
Converter.
For information about required network connecting equipment, see chapter 3,
Connecting the System.
Reference
D
D–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
RS-232 Communication Interface
RS-232 is an Electronics Industries Association (EIA) standard that specifies the
electrical, mechanical, and functional characteristics for serial binary
communication. It provides you with a variety of system configuration possibilities.
(RS-232 is a definition of electrical characteristics; it is not a protocol.)
One of the biggest benefits of the RS-232 interface is that it lets you integrate
telephone and radio modems into your control system (using the appropriate DF1
protocol only; not DH-485 protocol). The distance over which you are able to
communicate with certain system devices is virtually limitless.
D–2
Understanding the Communication Protocols
DF1 Full-Duplex Protocol
DF1 Full-Duplex communication protocol combines data transparency (ANSI —
American National Standards Institute — specification subcategory D1) and 2-way
simultaneous transmission with embedded responses (subcategory F1).
The MicroLogix 1000 controllers support the DF1 Full-Duplex protocol via RS-232
connection to external devices, such as computers, the Hand-Held Programmer
(catalog number 1761-HHP-B30), or other MicroLogix 1000 controllers. (For
information on connecting to the Hand-Held Programmer, see its user manual,
publication 1761-6.2).
DF1 Full-Duplex Operation
DF1 Full-Duplex protocol (also referred to as DF1 point-to-point protocol) is useful
where RS-232 point-to-point communication is required. This type of protocol supports
simultaneous transmissions between two devices in both directions. DF1 protocol
controls message flow, detects and signals errors, and retries if errors are detected.
DF1 Full-Duplex Configuration Parameters
When the system mode driver is DF1 Full-Duplex, the following parameters can be
changed:
Parameter
Options
Parity
Stop Bits
Error Detection
Toggles between the communication rate of 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800➀,
9600, 19200, and 38400➀.
Valid range is 0–254 decimal for MicroLogix 1000 Series C and later
discrete and all MicroLogix 1000 analog. Not configurable for MicroLogix
1000 Series A and B discrete.
None
None
None
DLE NAK retries
None
DLE ENQ retries
None
ACK Timeout
Duplicate Packet Detection
Control Line
Embedded Responses
None
None
None
None
Baud Rate
Node Address
➀
➁
➂
Default
9600➁
1
No Parity
1
CRC
N retries③
N retries③
1s
Enabled
No Handshaking
Enabled
Applicable only to MicroLogix 1000 Series D or later discrete and all MicroLogix 1000 analog controllers.
If retentive communication data is lost, default is 1200 for MicroLogix 1000 Series A, B, or C discrete only. For MicroLogix 1000
Series D or later discrete and all MicroLogix 1000 analog, if retentive communication data is lost, baud rate defaults to 9600.
N=255 for MicroLogix 1000 Series A and B discrete. N=6 for MicroLogix 1000 Series C and later discrete and all MicroLogix
1000 analog.
D–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Example DF1 Full-Duplex Connections
For information about required network connecting equipment, see chapter 3,
Connecting the System.
Micro Controller
Optical Isolator➀
(recommended)
1761-CBL-PM02
Personal Computer
Modem
Cable
Personal Computer
Modem
Optical Isolator➀
(recommended)
Modem
Micro Controller
1761-CBL-PM02
Reference
➀ We recommend using an AIC+, catalog number 1761-NET-AIC, as your optical isolator. See page 3–12 for
specific AIC+ cabling information.
D–4
Understanding the Communication Protocols
DF1 Half-Duplex Slave Protocol
DF1 half-duplex slave protocol provides a multi-drop single master/multiple slave
network. In contrast to DF1 full-duplex, communication takes place in one
direction at a time. You can use the RS-232 port on the MicroLogix as both a
half-duplex programming port, as well as a half-duplex peer-to-peer messaging port.
The master device initiates all communication by “polling” each slave device. The
slave device may only transmit message packets when it is polled by the master. It
is the master’s responsibility to poll each slave on a regular and sequential basis to
allow slaves to send message packets back to the master. During a polling sequence,
the master polls a slave either repeatedly until the slave indicates that it has no more
message packets to transmit or just one time per polling sequence, depending on
how the master is configured.
An additional feature of the DF1 half-duplex protocol is that it is possible for a slave
device to enable a MSG instruction in its ladder program to send or request data
to/from another slave. When the initiating slave is polled, the MSG instruction
command packet is sent to the master. The master recognizes that the command
packet is not intended for it but for another slave, so the master immediately
rebroadcasts the command packet to the intended slave. When the intended slave is
polled, it sends a reply packet to the master with the data the first slave requested.
The master again recognizes that the reply packet is intended for another slave, so
the master immediately rebroadcasts the reply packet to that slave. This
slave-to-slave transfer is a function of the master device and is also used by
programming software to upload and download programs to processors on the DF1
half-duplex link.
Several Allen-Bradley products support DF1 half-duplex master protocol. They
include the SLC 5/03, SLC 5/04,and SLC 5/05, and enhanced PLC-5®
processors. Rockwell Software WINtelligent LINX and RSLinx (version 2.x and
higher) also support DF1 half-duplex master protocol.
Typically, the master maintains an active node table that indicates which slaves are
active (slaves that responded the last time they were polled) and which slaves are
inactive (slaves that did not respond the last time they were polled). The active
slaves are polled on a regular basis. The inactive slaves are only polled occasionally
to check if any have come back online.
DF1 half-duplex supports up to 255 devices (address 0 to 254) with address 255
reserved for master broadcasts. The MicroLogix supports broadcast reception but
cannot initiate a broadcast command. The MicroLogix supports half-duplex
modems using Request-To-Send/Clear-To-Send (RTS/CTS) hardware handshaking.
D–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
DF1 Half-Duplex Slave Configuration Parameters
When the system mode driver is DF1 half-duplex slave the following parameters
can be viewed and changed only when the programming software is online with the
processor. The DF1 half-duplex slave parameters are not stored as part of the
controller downloadable image (with the exception of the baud rate and node
address). If a failed MicroLogix 1000 controller is replaced and the backed-up
controller image is downloaded to the replacement controller, these parameters will
remain at default until manually changed. Therefore, be sure to fully document any
non-default settings to the DF1 half-duplex slave configuration parameters.
Parameter
Node Address
Description
Toggles between the communication rate of 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19,200,
and 38.4K.
Valid range is 0–254 decimal.
Control Line
Toggles between No Handshaking and Half-Duplex Modem.
Duplicate
Packet
Detection
Error Detection
Detects and eliminates duplicate responses to a message. Duplicate packets may be
sent under “noisy” communication conditions when the sender’s retries are not set to 0.
Toggles between Enabled and Disabled.
Toggles between CRC and BCC.
Specifies the delay time between when the last serial character is sent to the modem
and when RTS will be deactivated. Gives modem extra time to transmit the last
character of a packet. The valid range is 0–255 and can be set in increments of 5 ms.
Specifies the time delay between setting RTS (request to send) until checking for the
CTS (clear to send) response. For use with modems that are not ready to respond
with CTS immediately upon receipt of RTS. The valid range is 0–255 and can be set in
increments of 5 ms.
Poll Timeout only applies when a slave device initiates a MSG instruction. It is the
amount of time that the slave device will wait for a poll from the master device. If the
slave device does not receive a poll within the Poll Timeout, a MSG instruction error
will be generated, and the ladder program will need to requeue the MSG instruction.
The valid range is 0–65535 and can be set in increments of 20 ms. If you are using a
MSG instruction, it is recommended that a Poll Timeout value of zero not be used. Poll
Timeout is disabled if set to zero.
Delay time before transmission. Required for 1761-NET-AIC physical half-duplex
networks. The 1761-NET-AIC needs delay time to change from transmit to receive
mode. The valid range is 0–255 and can be set in increments of 5 ms.
Specifies the number of times a slave device will attempt to resend a message packet
when it does not receive an ACK from the master device. For use in noisy
environments where message packets may become corrupted in transmission. The
valid range is 0–255.
Slave does not respond when polled if no message is queued. Saves modem
transmission power when there is no message to transmit. Toggles between Yes and
No.
Baud Rate
RTS Off Delay
RTS Send Delay
Poll Timeout
Pre-send Time
Delay
Message
Retries
EOT
Suppression
D–6
Default
9600
1
No Handshaking
Enabled
CRC
0
0
3000 (60s)
0
3
No
Understanding the Communication Protocols
RS-232
(DF1 Protocol)
Modem
Modem
MicroLogix 1000
Programmable
Controller (Series D)
SLC 5/03 Processor
Modular Controller
Rockwell Software WINtelligent LINX, RSLinx 2.0 (or higher),
SLC 5/03, SLC 5/04 and SLC 5/05, or PLC-5 processors
configured for DF1 Half-Duplex Master
Modem
Modem
MicroLogix 1000
Programmable
Controller (Series D)
Modem
MicroLogix 1000
Programmable
Controller (Series D)
Modem
SLC 500
Fixed I/O Controller
with 1747-KE
Interface Module
Considerations When Communicating as a DF1 Slave on a Multi-drop Link
When communication is between either your programming software and a
MicroLogix 1000 Programmable Controller or between two MicroLogix
Programmable Controllers via a slave-to-slave connection on a larger multi-drop
link, the devices depend on a DF1 Master to give each of them polling permission to
transmit in a timely manner. As the number of slaves increases on the link (up to
254), the time between when your programming software or the MicroLogix
Controller is polled also increases. This increase in time may become larger if you
are using low baud rates.
As these time periods grow, the following values may need to be changed to avoid
loss of communication:
•
•
programming software - increase poll timeout and reply timeout values
MicroLogix Programmable Controller - increase poll timeout
D–7
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Ownership Timeout
When a program download sequence is started by a software package to download a
ladder logic program to a MicroLogix controller, the software takes “file ownership”
of the processor. File ownership prevents other devices from reading from or
writing to the processor while the download is in process. If the controller were to
respond to a device’s read commands during the download, the processor could
respond with incorrect information. Similarly, if the controller were to accept
information from other devices, the information could be lost because the program
download sequence could immediately overwrite the information. Once the
download is completed, the programming software returns the file ownership to the
controller, so other devices can communicate with it again.
With the addition of DF1 half-duplex slave protocol, the controller clears the file
ownership if no supported commands are received from the owner within the
timeout period. If the file ownership were not cleared after a download sequence
interruption, the processor would not accept commands from any other devices
because it would assume another device still had file ownership.
If a download sequence is interrupted, due to noise caused by electromagnetic
interference, discontinue communications to the controller for the ownership
timeout period and restart the program download. The ownership timeout period is
set to 60 seconds as a default for all protocols. However, if you are using DF1
half-duplex, and the poll timeout value is set to greater than 60 seconds, the poll
timeout value will be used instead of the ownership timeout. After the timeout, you
can re-establish communications with the processor and try the program download
again. The only other way to clear file ownership is to cycle power on the
processor.
D–8
Understanding the Communication Protocols
Using Modems with MicroLogix 1000 Programmable Controllers
The types of modems that you can use with MicroLogix 1000 controllers include
dial-up phone modems, leased-line modems, radio modems and line drivers. For
point-to-point full-duplex modem connections that do not require any modem
handshaking signals to operate, use DF1 full-duplex protocol. For
point-to-multipoint modem connections, or for point-to-point modem connections
that require Request-to-Send/Clear-To-Send (RTS/CTS) handshaking, use DF1
half-duplex slave protocol. In this case, one (and only one) of the other devices
must be configured for DF1 half-duplex master protocol. Do not attempt to use
DH-485 protocol through modems under any circumstance.
Note
Only Series D or later MicroLogix 1000 discrete controllers and all MicroLogix
1000 analog controllers support RTS/CTS modem handshaking and only when
configured for DF1 half-duplex slave protocol with the control line parameter set to
“Half-Duplex Modem”. No other modem handshaking lines (i.e. Data Set Ready,
Carrier Detect and Data Terminal Ready) are supported by any MicroLogix 1000
controllers.
Dial-Up Phone Modems
Dial-up phone line modems support point-to-point full-duplex communications.
Normally a MicroLogix 1000 controller, on the receiving end of the dial-up
connection, will be configured for DF1 full-duplex protocol. The modem connected
to the MicroLogix 1000 controller must support auto-answer and must not require
any modem handshaking signals from the MicroLogix 1000 (i.e., DTR or RTS) in
order to operate. The MicroLogix 1000 has no means to cause its modem to initiate
or disconnect a phone call, so this must be done from the site of the remote modem.
Leased-Line Modems
Leased-line modems are used with dedicated phone lines that are typically leased
from the local phone company. The dedicated lines may be in a point-to-point
topology supporting full-duplex communications between two modems or in a
point-to-multipoint topology supporting half-duplex communications between three
or more modems. In the point-to-point topology, configure the MicroLogix 1000
controllers for DF1 full-duplex protocol (as long as the modems used do not require
DTR or RTS to be high in order to operate). In the point-to-multipoint topology,
configure the MicroLogix 1000 controllers for DF1 half-duplex slave protocol with
the control line parameter set to “Half-Duplex Modem”.
D–9
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Radio Modems
Radio modems may be implemented in a point-to-point topology supporting either
half-duplex or full-duplex communications, or in a point-to-multipoint topology
supporting half-duplex communications between three or more modems. In the
point-to-point topology using full-duplex radio modems, configure the MicroLogix
1000 controllers for DF1 full-duplex protocol (as long as the modems used do not
require DTR or RTS to be high in order to operate). In the point-to-point topology
using half-duplex radio modems, or point-to-multipoint topology using half-duplex
radio modems, configure the MicroLogix 1000 controllers for DF1 half-duplex
slave protocol. If these radio modems require RTS/CTS handshaking, configure the
control line parameter to “Half-Duplex Modem”.
Line Drivers
Line drivers, also called short-haul “modems”, do not actually modulate the serial
data, but rather condition the electrical signals to operate reliably over long
transmission distances (up to several miles). Allen-Bradley’s AIC+ Advanced
Interface Converter is a line driver that converts an RS-232 electrical signal into an
RS-485 electrical signal, increasing the signal transmission distance from 50 to 4000
feet. In a point-to-point line driver topology, configure the MicroLogix 1000
controller for DF1 full-duplex protocol (as long as the line drivers do not require
DTR or RTS to be high in order to operate). In a point-to-multipoint line driver
topology, configure the MicroLgoix 1000 controllers for DF1 half-duplex slave
protocol. If these line drivers require RTS/CTS handshaking, configure the control
line parameter to “Half-Duplex Modem”.
D–10
Understanding the Communication Protocols
DH-485 Communication Protocol
The information in this section describes the DH-485 network functions, network
architecture, and performance characteristics. It will also help you plan and operate
the MicroLogix 1000 on a DH-485 network.
Note
Only Series C or later MicroLogix 1000 discrete controllers and all MicroLogix
1000 analog controllers support the DH-485 network.
DH-485 Network Description
The DH-485 protocol defines the communication between multiple devices that
co-exist on a single pair of wires. This protocol uses RS-485 half-duplex as its
physical interface. (RS-485 is a definition of electrical characteristics; it is not a
protocol.) RS-485 uses devices that are capable of co-existing on a common data
circuit, thus allowing data to be easily shared between devices.
The DH-485 network offers:
•
•
•
•
•
interconnection of 32 devices
multi-master capability
token passing access control
the ability to add or remove nodes without disrupting the network
maximum network length of 1219 m (4000 ft)
The DH-485 protocol supports two classes of devices: initiators and responders.
All initiators on the network get a chance to initiate message transfers. To
determine which initiator has the right to transmit, a token passing algorithm is used.
The following section describes the protocol used to control message transfers on
the DH-485 network.
D–11
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
DH-485 Token Rotation
A node holding the token can send any valid packet onto the network. Each node is
allowed only one transmission (plus two retries) each time it receives the token.
After a node sends one message packet, it attempts to give the token to its successor
by sending a “token pass” packet to its successor.
If no network activity occurs, the initiator sends the token pass packet again. After
two retries (a total of three tries) the initiator will attempt to find a new successor.
The allowable range of the node address of an initiator is 0 to 31. The allowable
address range for all responders is 1 to 31. There must be at least one initiator on
the network.
DH-485 Configuration Parameters
When the system mode driver is DH-485 Master, the following parameters can be
changed:
Parameter
Baud Rate
Node Address
Max Node
Address
Token Hold
Factor
D–12
Description
Toggles between the communication rate of 9600 and 19200.
This is the node address of the processor on the DH-485 network.
The valid range is 1–31.
This is the maximum node address of an active processor (fixed at
31). Set the node addresses of the devices on the network to low,
sequential numbers for best performance.
Determines the number of transactions allowed to make each
DH-485 token rotation. (fixed at 1)
Default
19200
1
31
1
Understanding the Communication Protocols
DH-485 Network Initialization
Network initialization begins when a period of inactivity exceeding the time of a
link dead timeout is detected by an initiator on the network. When the time for a
link dead timeout is exceeded, usually the initiator with the lowest address claims
the token. When an initiator has the token it will begin to build the network. The
network requires at least one initiator to initialize it.
Building a network begins when the initiator that claimed the token tries to pass the
token to the successor node. If the attempt to pass the token fails, or if the initiator
has no established successor (for example, when it powers up), it begins a linear
search for a successor starting with the node above it in the addressing.
When the initiator finds another active initiator, it passes the token to that node,
which repeats the process until the token is passed all the way around the network to
the first node. At this point, the network is in a state of normal operation.
Devices that use the DH-485 Network
In addition to the Series C or later MicroLogix 1000 discrete controllers and all
MicroLogix 1000 analog controllers, the devices shown in the following table also
support the DH-485 network.
You cannot connect the Hand-Held Programmer, 1761-HHP-B30, to the AIC+.
Reference
Note
D–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Catalog
Number
1747-L511,
-L514,
-L524,
-L531, -L532
-L541,
-L542, -L543
-L551, -L552
-L553
1746-BAS
1785-KA5
D–14
Description
SLC 500
Processors
BASIC Module
DH+/DH-485
Gateway
Installation
Requirement
Function
Publication
SLC Chassis
These processors support a
variety of I/O requirements and
functionality.
1747-6.2
SLC Chassis
Provides an interface for
SLC 500 devices to foreign
devices. Program in BASIC to
interface the 3 channels (2
RS232 and 1 DH-485) to
printers, modems, or the
DH-485 network for data
collection.
1746-6.1
1746-6.2
1746-6.3
(1771) PLC
Chassis
Provides communication
between stations on the
PLC-5
(DH+) and SLC 500
(DH-485) networks. Enables
communication and data
transfer from PLC
to SLC 500
on DH-485 network. Also
enables programming software
programming or data
acquisition across DH+ to
DH-485.
1785-6.5.5
1785-1.21
2760-ND001
2760-RB
Flexible Interface
Module
(1771) PLC
Chassis
Provides an interface for
SLC 500 (using protocol
cartridge 2760-SFC3) to other
A-B PLCs and devices. Three
configurable channels are
available to interface with Bar
Code, Vision, RF, Dataliner,
and PLC systems.
1784-KTX,
-KTXD
PC DH-485 IM
IBM XT/AT
Computer Bus
Provides DH-485 using RSLinx
1784-6.5.22
1784-PCMK
PCMCIA IM
PCMCIA slot in
computer and
Interchange
Provides DH-485 using RSLinx
1784-6.5.19
Understanding the Communication Protocols
Catalog
Number
Description
Installation
Requirement
Function
Publication
1747-PT1
Hand-Held
Terminal
NA
Provides hand-held
programming, monitoring,
configuring, and
troubleshooting capabilities for
SLC 500 processors.
1747-DTAM,
2707-L8P1,
-L8P2, -L40P1,
-L40P2,
-V40P1,
-V40P2,
-V40P2N,
-M232P3, and
-M485P3
DTAM,
DTAM Plus, and
DTAM Micro
Operator
Interfaces
Panel Mount
Provides electronic operator
interface for SLC 500
processors.
1747-ND013
2707-800,
2707-803
2711-K5A2,
-B5A2, -K5A5,
-B5A5, -K5A1,
-B5A1, -K9A2,
-T9A2, -K9A5,
-T9A5, -K9A1,
and -T9A1
PanelView 550
and PanelView
900 Operator
Terminals
Panel Mount
Provides electronic operator
interface for SLC 500
processors.
2711-802,
2711-816
1747-NP002
Reference
NA = Not Applicable
D–15
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Important DH-485 Network Planning Considerations
Carefully plan your network configuration before installing any hardware. Listed
below are some of the factors that can affect system performance:
•
•
•
•
•
•
amount of electrical noise, temperature, and humidity in the network
environment
number of devices on the network
connection and grounding quality in installation
amount of communication traffic on the network
type of process being controlled
network configuration
The major hardware and software issues you need to resolve before installing a
network are discussed in the following sections.
Hardware Considerations
You need to decide the length of the communication cable, where you route it, and
how to protect it from the environment where it will be installed.
When the communication cable is installed, you need to know how many devices
are to be connected during installation and how many devices will be added in the
future. The following sections will help you understand and plan the network.
Number of Devices and Length of Communication Cable
You must install an AIC+ Advanced Interface Converter, catalog number
1761-NET-AIC, for each node on the network. If you plan to add nodes later,
provide additional advanced interface converters during the initial installation to
avoid recabling after the network is in operation.
The maximum length of the communication cable is 1219 m (4000 ft). This is the
total cable distance from the first node to the last node on the network.
D–16
Understanding the Communication Protocols
Planning Cable Routes
Follow these guidelines to help protect the communication cable from electrical
interference:
•
•
•
•
Keep the communication cable at least 1.52 m (5 ft) from any electric motors,
transformers, rectifiers, generators, arc welders, induction furnaces, or sources
of microwave radiation.
If you must run the cable across power feed lines, run the cable at right angles
to the lines.
If you do not run the cable through a contiguous metallic wireway or conduit,
keep the communication cable at least 0.15 m (6 in.) from ac power lines of less
than 20A, 0.30 m (1 ft) from lines greater than 20A, but only up to 100k VA,
and 0.60 m (2 ft) from lines of 100k VA or more.
If you run the cable through a contiguous metallic wireway or conduit, keep the
communication cable at least 0.08 m (3 in.) from ac power lines of less than
20A, 0.15 m (6 in.) from lines greater than 20A, but only up to 100k VA, and
0.30 m (1 ft) from lines of 100k VA or more.
Running the communication cable through conduit provides extra protection
from physical damage and electrical interference. If you route the cable through
conduit, follow these additional recommendations:
– Use ferromagnetic conduit near critical sources of electrical interference.
You can use aluminum conduit in non-critical areas.
– Use plastic connectors to couple between aluminum and ferromagnetic
conduit. Make an electrical connection around the plastic connector (use
pipe clamps and the heavy gauge wire or wire braid) to hold both sections
at the same potential.
–
–
–
ground.
Do not let the conduit touch the plug on the cable.
Arrange the cables loosely within the conduit. The conduit should contain
only serial communication cables.
Install the conduit so that it meets all applicable codes and environmental
specifications.
For more information on planning cable routes, see Industrial Automation Wiring
and Grounding Guidelines, Publication Number 1770-4.1.
D–17
Reference
– Ground the entire length of conduit by attaching it to the building earth
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Software Considerations
Software considerations include the configuration of the network and the parameters
that can be set to the specific requirements of the network. The following are major
configuration factors that have a significant effect on network performance:
•
•
•
number of nodes on the network
addresses of those nodes
baud rate
The following sections explain network considerations and describe ways to select
parameters for optimum network performance (speed). See your programming
software’s user manual for more information.
Number of Nodes
The number of nodes on the network directly affects the data transfer time between
nodes. Unnecessary nodes (such as a second programming terminal that is not
being used) slow the data transfer rate. The maximum number of nodes on the
network is 32.
Setting Node Addresses
The best network performance occurs when node addresses are assigned in
sequential order. Initiators, such as personal computers, should be assigned the
lowest numbered addresses to minimize the time required to initialize the network.
The valid range for the MicroLogix 1000 controllers is 1–31 (controllers cannot be
node 0). The default setting is 1. The node address is stored in the controller status
file (S:16L).
Setting Controller Baud Rate
The best network performance occurs at the highest baud rate, which is 19200. This
is the default baud rate for a MicroLogix 1000 device on the DH-485 network. All
devices must be at the same baud rate. This rate is stored in the controller status file
(S:16H).
D–18
Understanding the Communication Protocols
Example DH-485 Connections
The following network diagrams provide examples of how to connect Series C or
later MicroLogix 1000 discrete and all MicroLogix 1000 analog controllers to the
DH-485 network using the AIC+. For more information on the AIC+, see the
Advanced Interface Converter and DeviceNet Interface Installation Instructions,
Publication 1761-5.11.
DH-485 Network with a MicroLogix 1000 Controller
PC
MicroLogix 1000 (Series C or later discrete or all analog)
APS
1761-CBL-AM00
or
1761-CBLHM02
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
PC to port 1
or port 2
connection from
port 1 or port 2
to MicroLogix
1761-CBL-AP00
or
1761-CBL-PM02
1761-CBL-AP00
or
1761-CBL-PM02
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
MicroLogix DH-485 Network
24V dc
(user supplied)
1747-CP3
or
1761-CBL-AC00
Reference
24V dc
(user supply needed if not connected
to a MicroLogix 1000 controller)
D–19
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Typical 3-Node Network
PanelView 550
MicroLogix 1000
(Series C or later discrete or all analog)
RJ45 port
1761-CBL-AS09
or
1761-CBL-AS03
1761-CBL-AM00
or
1761-CBLHM02
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
PC
APS
Selection Switch Up
3-Node Network
(not expandable)
DB-9 RS-232 port
mini-DIN 8 RS-232 port
DH-485/DF1 port
D–20
24V dc
(Not needed in this
configuration since the
MicroLogix 1000 provides
power to the AIC+ via port 2.)
1747-CP3 or 1761-CBL-AC00
Understanding the Communication Protocols
Networked Operator Interface Device and MicroLogix Controller
PanelView 550
PC
APS
PC to port 1
or port 2
RS-232 port
NULL modem adapter
connection from NULL modem
adapter to port 1 or port 2
1761-CBL-AP00
or
1761-CBL-PM02
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
24V dc
(user supplied)
24V dc
(user supplied)
1747-CP3
or
1761-CBL-AC00
1747-AIC
DH-485 Network
AIC+
(1761-NET-AIC)
Selection
Switch Up
1761-CBL-AM00
or
1761-CBL-HM02
24V dc
(Not needed in this
configuration since the
MicroLogix 1000
provides power to the
AIC+ via port 2.)
MicroLogix 1000
(Series C or later discrete or all analog)
SLC 5/03 processor
DB-9 RS-232 port
mini-DIN 8 RS-232 port
DH-485/DF1 port
D–21
Reference
1761-CBL-AP00
or
1761-CBL-PM02
1747-CP3
or
1761-CBL-AC00
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
MicroLogix Remote Packet Support
Series D MicroLogix controllers and all MicroLogix analog controllers can respond
to communication packets (or commands) that do not originate on the local DH-485
network. This is useful in installations where communication is needed between the
DH-485 and DH+ networks.
The example below shows how to send messages from a PLC device or a PC on the
DH+ network to a MicroLogix 1000 controller on the DH-485 network. This
method uses an SLC 5/04 processor bridge connection.
When using this method:
•
•
•
•
PLC-5 devices can send read and write commands to MicroLogix controllers.
MicroLogix 1000 controllers can respond to MSG instructions received. The
MicroLogix controllers cannot initiate MSG instructions to devices on the DH+
network.
PC can send read and write commands to MicroLogix controllers.
PC can do remote programming of MicroLogix controllers.
PLC-5
PLC-5
DH+ Network
SLC 5/04
Modular I/O Controller
MicroLogix 1000
Programmable
Controller
DH-485 Network
SLC 5/03 System
D–22
MicroLogix 1000
Programmable
Controller
MicroLogix 1000
Programmable
Controller
Application Example Programs
Application Example Programs
This appendix is designed to illustrate various instructions described previously in
this manual. Application example programs include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
paper drilling machine using most of the software instructions
time driven sequencer using TON and SQO instructions
event driven sequencer using SQC and SQO instructions
bottle line example using the HSC instruction (Up/down counter)
pick and place machine example using the HSC instruction (Quadrature
Encoder with reset and hold)
RPM calculation using HSC, RTO, timer, and math instructions
on/off circuit using basic, program flow, and application specific instructions
spray booth using bit shift and FIFO instructions
adjustable time delay example using timer instructions
Because of the variety of uses for this information, the user of and those responsible
for applying this information must satisfy themselves as to the acceptability of each
application and use of the program. In no event will Allen-Bradley Company be
responsible or liable for indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use of
application of this information.
The illustrations, charts, and examples shown in this appendix are intended solely to
illustrate the principles of the controller and some of the methods used to apply
them. Particularly because of the many requirements associated with any particular
installation, Allen-Bradley Company cannot assume responsibility or liability for
actual use based upon the illustrative uses and applications.
E–1
Reference
E
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Paper Drilling Machine Application Example
For a detailed explanation of:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
E–2
XIC, XIO, OTE, RES, OTU, OTL, and OSR instructions, see chapter 6.
EQU and GEQ instructions, see chapter 7.
CLR, ADD, and SUB instructions, see chapter 8.
MOV and FRD instructions, see chapter 9.
JSR and RET instructions, see chapter 10.
INT and SQO instructions, see chapter 11.
HSC, HSL, and RAC instructions, see chapter 12.
Application Example Programs
This machine can drill 3 different hole patterns into bound manuals. The program
tracks drill wear and signals the operator that the bit needs replacement. The
machine shuts down if the signal is ignored by the operator.
OPERATOR PANEL
Stop I/7
Thumbwheel for
Thickness in 1/4 in.
Change Drill Soon
O/4
Change Drill Now
O/6
5 Hole
Drill Change Reset
3 Hole
I/11–I/14
(Keyswitch)
I/8
Drill Home
I/5
Drilled
Holes
7 Hole
I/9–I/10
Drill On/Off O/1
Drill Retract O/2
Drill Forward O/3
Drill Depth
I/4
Quadrature A-B Encoder and Drive
I/0 I/1
Photo-Eye Reset I/2
Counter Hold I/3
Photo-Eye
Reflector
Conveyor Enable wired in series to the Drive O/5
Conveyor Drive Start/Stop wired in series to the Drive O/0
20226
Paper Drilling Machine Operation Overview
Undrilled books are placed onto a conveyor taking them to a single spindle drill.
Each book moves down the conveyor until it reaches the first drilling position. The
conveyor stops moving and the drill lowers and drills the first hole. The drill then
retracts and the conveyor moves the same book to the second drilling position. The
drilling process is repeated until there are the desired holes per book.
E–3
Reference
Start I/6
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Drill Mechanism Operation
When the operator presses the start button, the drill motor turns on. After the book
is in the first drilling position, the conveyor subroutine sets a drill sequence start bit,
and the drill moves toward the book. When the drill has drilled through the book,
the drill body hits a limit switch and causes the drill to retract up out of the book.
When the drill body is fully retracted, the drill body hits another limit switch
indicating that it is in the home position. Hitting the second limit switch unlatches
the drill sequence start bit and causes the conveyor to move the book to the next
drilling position.
Conveyor Operation
When the start button is pressed, the conveyor moves the books forward. As the
first book moves close to the drill, the book trips a photo-eye sensor. This tells the
machine where the leading edge of the book is. Based on the position of the selector
switch, the conveyor moves the book until it reaches the first drilling position. The
drill sequence start bit is set and the first hole is drilled. The drill sequence start bit
is now unlatched and the conveyor moves the same book to the second drilling
position. The drilling process is repeated until there are the desired holes per book.
The machine then looks for another book to break the photo-eye beam and the
process is repeated. The operator can change the number of drilled holes by
changing the selector switch.
Drill Calculation and Warning
The program tracks the number of holes drilled and the number of inches of material
that have been drilled through using a thumbwheel. The thumbwheel is set to the
thickness of the book per 1/4 inch. (If the book is 1 1/2 inches thick, the operator
would set the thumbwheel to 6.) When 25,000 inches have been drilled, the Change
Drill Soon pilot light turns on. When 25,500 inches have been drilled, the Change
Drill Soon pilot light flashes. When 26,000 inches have been drilled, the Change
Drill Now pilot light turns on and the machine turns off. The operator changes drill
bits and then resets the internal drill wear counter by turning the Drill Change Reset
keyswitch.
E–4
Application Example Programs
Paper Drilling Machine Ladder Program
| 1’st
Output Mask
|
| Pass
(only use bit 0
|
|
ie. O:0/0)
|
|
S:1
+MOV–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+MOVE
+–+–|
|
15
| |Source
1| | |
|
| |
| | |
|
| |Dest
N7:5| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
| High Output Pattern | |
|
|
(turn off O:0/0)
| |
|
|
| |
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+MOVE
+–+ |
|
| |Source
0| | |
|
| |
| | |
|
| |Dest
N7:6| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
| High Preset Value
| |
|
| (counts to next hole)| |
|
| |
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+MOVE
+–+ |
|
| |Source
32767| | |
|
| |
| | |
|
| |Dest
N7:7| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
| Low output pattern | |
|
|
(turn on O:0/0
| |
|
|
each reset)
| |
|
| |
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+MOVE
+–+ |
|
| |Source
1| | |
|
| |
| | |
|
| |Dest
N7:8| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
E–5
Reference
Rung 2:0
Initializes the high-speed counter each time the REM Run mode is
entered. The high-speed counter data area (N7:5 – N7:9) corresponds
with the starting address (source address) of the HSL instruction. The
HSC instruction is disabled each entry into the REM run mode until the
first time that it is executed as true. (The high preset was ”pegged”
on initialization to prevent a high preset interrupt from occurring
during the initialization process.)
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| Low preset value
|
| (cause low preset
|
|
int at reset)
|
|
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
+–+MOVE
+–+
| |Source
0| |
| |
| |
| |Dest
N7:9| |
| |
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
|
|
|
| High Speed Counter |
|
|
| +HSL–––––––––––––––+ |
+ –+HSC LOAD
+–+
|Counter
C5:0|
|Source
N7:5|
|Length
5|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
Rung 2:1
This HSC instruction is not placed in the high-speed counter interrupt
subroutine. If this instruction were placed in the interrupt
subroutine, the high-speed counter could never be started or
initialized (because an interrupt must first occur in order to scan the
high-speed counter interrupt subroutine).
|
High Speed Counter
|
|
+HSC––––––––––––––––––––+
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HIGH SPEED COUNTER
+–(CU)–|
|
|Type Encoder (Res,Hld)+–(CD) |
|
|Counter
C5:0+–(DN) |
|
|High Preset
1250|
|
|
|Accum
1|
|
|
+–––––––––––––––––––––––+
|
E–6
Application Example Programs
Rung 2:2
Forces a high-speed counter low preset interrupt to occur each REM Run
mode entry. An interrupt can only occur on the transition of the
high-speed counter accum to a preset value (accum reset to 1, then 0).
This is done to allow the high-speed counter interrupt subroutine
sequencers to initialize. The order of high-speed counter
initialization is: (1)load high-speed counter parameters (2)execute
HSL instruction (3)execute true HSC instruction (4)(optional) force
high-speed counter interrupt to occur.
| 1’st
High Speed Counter
|
| Pass
|
|
S:1
+RAC––––––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+RESET TO ACCUM VALUE +–+–|
|
15
| |Counter
C5:0| | |
|
| |Source
1| | |
|
| |
| | |
|
| +–––––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
High Speed
| |
|
|
Counter
| |
|
|
C5:0
| |
|
+–––(RES)–––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:3
Starts the conveyor in motion when the start button is pressed.
However, another condition must also be met before we start the
conveyor: the drill bit must be in its fully retracted position
(home). This rung also stops the conveyor when the stop button is
pressed.
Rung 2:4
Applies the above start logic to the conveyor and drill motor.
| Machine
Drill |Conveyor
|
|
RUN
Home LS
|Enable
|
| Latch
|
|
B3
I:0
O:0
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+–|
|
0
|
5
5
| |
|
|
Drill
| |
|
|
Motor ON
| |
|
|
O:0
| |
|
+–––––––––––––––( )–––––+ |
|
1
|
➀
This instruction accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Do not include this instruction if you are using
a 16 I/O controller.
E–7
Reference
|
START
|Drill
STOP
|change
|
Machine
|
|
Button
|Home LS
Button
|drill bit |
RUN
|
|
|NOW
|
Latch
|
|
I:0
I:0
I:0
O:0
B3
|
|–+––––] [––––––––][–––––+––––]/[––––––––]/[––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
| |
6
5
|
7
6➀
0
|
| | Machine
|
|
| |
RUN
|
|
| | Latch
|
|
| |
B3
|
|
| +––––] [––––––––––––––––+
|
|
0
|
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 2:5
Calls the drill sequence subroutine. This subroutine manages the
operation of a drilling sequence and restarts the conveyor upon
completion of the drilling sequence
|
+JSR–––––––––––––––+ |
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+JUMP TO SUBROUTINE+–|
|
|SBR file number 6| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:6
Calls the subroutine that tracks the amount of wear on the current
drill bit.
|
+JSR–––––––––––––––+ |
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+JUMP TO SUBROUTINE+–|
|
|SBR file number 7| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:7
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
Rung 4:0
Resets the hole count sequencers each time that the low preset is
reached. The low preset has been set to zero to cause an interrupt to
occur each time that a reset occurs. The low preset is reached anytime
that a reset C5:0 or hardware reset occurs. This ensures that the
first preset value is loaded into the high-speed counter at each entry
into the REM Run mode and each time that the external reset signal is
activated.
|
interrupt
3 hole
|
|
occurred
preset
|
|
due to
sequencer
|
|
low preset
|
|
reached
|
| +INT––––––––––––––––––––+
C5:0
R6:4
|
|–+INTERRUPT SUBROUTINE
+––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––+–––(RES)––––+–|
| +–––––––––––––––––––––––+
IL
|
| |
|
| 5 hole
| |
|
| preset
| |
|
| sequencer | |
|
|
R6:5
| |
|
+–––(RES)––––+ |
|
|
| |
|
| 7 hole
| |
|
| preset
| |
|
| sequencer | |
|
|
R6:6
| |
|
+–––(RES)––––+ |
E–8
Application Example Programs
Rung 4:1➀
Keeps track of the hole number that is being drilled and loads the
correct high-speed counter preset based on the hole count. This rung
is only active when the ”hole selector switch” is in the ”3-hole”
position. The sequencer uses step 0 as a null step upon reset. It
uses the last step as a ”go forever” in anticipation of the ”end of
manual” hard wired external reset.
| hole
|hole
3 hole
|
| selector |selector
preset
|
| switch
|switch
sequencer
|
| bit 0
|bit 1
|
|
I:0
I:0
+SQO–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––]/[––––––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––+–+SEQUENCER OUTPUT +–(EN)–+–|
|
9
10
| |File
#N7:50+–(DN) | |
|
| |Mask
FFFF|
| |
|
| |Dest
N7:7|
| |
|
| |Control
R6:4|
| |
|
| |Length
5|
| |
|
| |Position
0|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
|
| |
|
| force the
| |
|
| sequencer
| |
|
| to increment
| |
|
| on next scan
| |
|
|
R6:4
| |
|
+––––(U)––––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
EN
|
| hole
|hole
5 hole
|
| selector |selector
preset
|
| switch
|switch
sequencer
|
| bit 0
|bit 1➁
|
|
I:0
I:0
+SQO–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [––––––––]/[–––––––––––––––––––––+–+SEQUENCER OUTPUT +–(EN)–+–|
|
9
10
| |File
#N7:55+–(DN) | |
|
| |Mask
FFFF|
| |
|
| |Dest
N7:7|
| |
|
| |Control
R6:5|
| |
|
| |Length
7|
| |
|
| |Position
0|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
| force the
| |
|
| sequencer
| |
|
| to increment
| |
|
| on the next
| |
|
| scan
| |
|
|
R6:5
| |
|
+––––(U)––––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
EN
|
➀
This rung accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Do not include it if you are using a 16 I/O controller.
➁
This instruction accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Do not include it if you are using a 16 I/O
controller.
E–9
Reference
Rung 4:2
Is identical to the previous rung except that it is only active when
the ”hole selector switch” is in the ”5-hole” position.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 4:3➀
Is identical to the 2 previous rungs except that it is only active when
the ”hole selector switch” is in the ”7-hole” position.
| hole
|hole
7 hole
|
| selector |selector
preset
|
| switch
|switch
sequencer
|
| bit 0
|bit 1
|
|
I:0
I:0
+SQO–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [––––––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––+–+SEQUENCER OUTPUT +–(EN)–+–|
|
9
10
| |File
#N7:62+–(DN) | |
|
| |Mask
FFFF|
| |
|
| |Dest
N7:7|
| |
|
| |Control
R6:6|
| |
|
| |Length
9|
| |
|
| |Position
0|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
| force the
| |
|
| sequencer
| |
|
| to increment
| |
|
| on the next
| |
|
| scan
| |
|
|
R6:6
| |
|
+––––(U)––––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
EN
|
Rung 4:4
Ensures that the high-speed counter preset value (N7:7) is immediately
applied to the HSC instruction.
|
High Speed Counter |
|
+HSL–––––––––––––––+ |
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HSC LOAD
+–|
|
|Counter
C5:0| |
|
|Source
N7:5| |
|
|Length
5| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 4:5
Interrupt occurred due to low preset reached.
| C5:0
+RET–––––––––––––––+–|
|––––][––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+RETURN
+ |
|
IL
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
➀
E–10
This rung accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Do not include this rung if you are using a 16 I/O
controller.
Application Example Programs
Rung 4:6
Signals the main program (file 2) to initiate a drilling sequence. The
high-speed counter has already stopped the conveyor at the correct
position using its high preset output pattern data (clear O:0/0). This
occurred within microseconds of the high preset being reached (just
prior to entering this high-speed counter interrupt subroutine). The
drill sequence subroutine resets the drill sequence start bit and sets
the conveyor drive bit (O:0/0) upon completion of the drilling
sequence.
| interrupt occurred
|
Drill Sequence Start |
| due to high preset reached |
|
|
C5:0
B3
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(L)–––––|
|
IH
32
|
Rung 4:7
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
Rung 6:0
This section of ladder logic controls the up/down motion of the drill
for the book drilling machine. When the conveyor positions the book
under the drill, the DRILL SEQUENCE START bit is set. This rung uses
that bit to begin the drilling operation. Because the bit is set for
the entire drilling operation, the OSR is required to be able to turn
off the forward signal so the drill can retract.
| Drill
|Drill Subr|
Drill
|
| Sequence |
OSR
|
Forward
|
| Start
|
|
|
B3
B3
O:0
|
[–––] [––––––––[OSR]–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(L)––––––|
|
32
48
3
|
|
Drill
Drill
|
|
Depth LS
Forward
|
|
I:0
O:0
|
|–+––––] [––––––––––––––––+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––––(U)–––––+–|
| |
4
|
|
3
| |
| | 1’st
|Drill
|
| Drill
| |
| | Pass
|Home LS
|
| Retract
| |
| |
S:1
I:0
|
|
O:0
| |
| +––––] [––––––––]/[–––––+
+––––(L)–––––+ |
|
15
5
2
|
E–11
Reference
Rung 6:1
When the drill has drilled through the book, the body of the drill
actuates the DRILL DEPTH limit switch. When this happens, the DRILL
FORWARD signal is turned off and the DRILL RETRACT signal is turned on.
The drill is also retracted automatically on power up if it is not
actuating the DRILL HOME limit switch.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 6:2
When the drill is retracting (after
drill actuates the DRILL HOME limit
DRILL RETRACT signal is turned off,
turned off to indicate the drilling
conveyor is restarted.
drilling a hole), the body of the
switch. When this happens the
the DRILL SEQUENCE START bit is
process is complete, and the
| Drill
|Drill
Drill
|
| Home LS
|Retract
Retract
|
|
I:0
O:0
O:0
|
|––––] [––––––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––––(U)–––––+–|
|
5
2
|
2
| |
|
| Drill
| |
|
| Sequence
| |
|
| Start
| |
|
|
B3
| |
|
+––––(U)–––––+ |
|
|
32
| |
|
| Conveyor
| |
|
| Start/Stop | |
|
|
| |
|
|
O:0
| |
|
+––––(L)–––––+ |
|
0
|
Rung 6.3
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
Rung 7:0
Examines the number of 1/4 in. thousands that have accumulated over the
life of the current drill bit. If the bit has drilled between
100,000–101,999 1/4 in. increments of paper, the ”change drill” light
illuminates steadily. When the value is between 102,000–103,999, the
”change drill” light flashes at a 1.28 second rate. When the value
reaches 105,000, the ”change drill” light flashes, and the ”change
drill now” light illuminates.
|
1/4 in.
100,000
|
|
Thousands
1/4 in.
|
|
increments
|
|
have
|
|
occurred
|
|
+GEQ–––––––––––––––+
B3
|
|–––+–+GRTR THAN OR EQUAL+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––+–|
|
| |Source A
N7:11|
16
| |
|
| |
0|
| |
|
| |Source B
100|
| |
|
| |
|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
E–12
Application Example Programs
|
|
1/4 in.
102,000
|
|
|
Thousands
1/4 in.
|
|
|
increments |
|
|
have
|
|
|
occurred
|
|
| +GEQ–––––––––––––––+
B3
|
|
+–+GRTR THAN OR EQUAL+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––+
|
| |Source A
N7:11|
17
|
|
| |
0|
|
|
| |Source B
102|
|
|
| |
|
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
|
1/4 in.
change
|
|
|
Thousands
drill bit |
|
|
NOW
|
| ➀ | +GEQ–––––––––––––––+
O:0
|
|
+–+GRTR THAN OR EQUAL+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––+
|
| |Source A
N7:11|
6
|
|
| |
0|
|
|
| |Source B
105|
|
|
| |
|
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
|
100,000
|102,000
change
|
|
|
1/4 in.
|1/4 in.
drill
|
|
|
increments|increments
bit
|
|
|
have
|have
soon
|
|
|
occurred |occurred
|
|
|
B3
B3
O:0
|
|
+–+––––––––––––––––––––] [––––––––]/[––––––––––––––––+––( )–––––+
|
|
16
17
|
4
|
|
100,000
|102,000
|1.28
|
|
|
1/4 in.
|1/4 in.
|second
|
|
|
increments|increments|free
|
|
|
have
|have
|running
|
|
|
occurred |occurred |clock bit |
|
|
B3
B3
S:4
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––––] [––––––––] [––––––––] [–––––+
|
16
17
7
This branch accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Do not include this branch if you are using a 16
I/O controller.
Reference
➀
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
E–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 7:1
Resets the number of 1/4 in. increments and the 1/4 in. thousands when
the ”drill change reset” keyswitch is energized. This should occur
following each drill bit change.
| drill change
1/4 in.
|
| reset keyswitch
Thousands
|
|
I:0
+CLR–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+CLEAR
+–+–|
|
8
| |Dest
N7:11| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
1/4 in.
| |
|
|
increments
| |
|
|
| |
|
| +CLR–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+CLEAR
+–+ |
|
|Dest
N7:10|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 7:2➀
Moves the single digit BCD thumbwheel value into an internal integer
register. This is done to properly align the four BCD input signals
prior to executing the BCD to Integer instruction (FRD). The
thumbwheel is used to allow the operator to enter the thickness of the
paper that is to be drilled. The thickness is entered in 1/4 in.
increments. This provides a range of 1/4 in. to 2.25 in.
|
BCD bit 0 |FRD bit 0
|
|
I:0
N7:14
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+–|
|
|
11
0
| |
|
| BCD bit 1 |FRD bit 1 | |
|
|
I:0
N7:14
| |
|
+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+ |
|
|
12
1
| |
|
| BCD bit 2 |FRD bit 2 | |
|
|
I:0
N7:14
| |
|
+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+ |
|
|
13
2
| |
|
| BCD bit 3 |FRD bit 3 | |
|
|
I:0
N7:14
| |
|
+––––] [––––––––( )–––––+ |
|
14
3
|
➀
E–14
This rung accesses I/O only available with 32 I/O controllers. Do not include this rung if you are using a 16 I/O
controller.
Application Example Programs
Rung 7:3
Converts the BCD thumbwheel value from BCD to integer. This is done
because the controller operates upon integer values. This rung also
”debounces” the thumbwheel to ensure that the conversion only occurs on
valid BCD values. Note that invalid BCD values can occur while the
operator is changing the BCD thumbwheel. This is due to input filter
propagation delay differences between the 4 input circuits that provide
the BCD input value.
| 1’st
previous
debounced
|
| pass
scan’s
BCD value
|
| bit
BCD input
|
|
value
|
|
S:1
+EQU–––––––––––––––+
+FRD–––––––––––––––+
|
|–+––]/[–––––––+EQUAL
+–+–––––––+FROM BCD
+–+––+–|
| |
15
|Source A
N7:13| |
|Source
N7:14| | | |
| |
|
0| |
|
0000| | | |
| |
|Source B
N7:14| |
|Dest
N7:12| | | |
| |
|
0| |
|
0| | | |
| |
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
+––––––––––––––––––+ | | |
| |
| Math
Math
| | |
| |
| Overflow
Error
| | |
| |
| Bit
Bit
| | |
| |
|
S:0
S:5
| | |
| |
+––––] [–––––––––(U)–––––––––+ | |
| |
1
0
| |
| |
this
| |
| |
scan’s
| |
| |
BCD input
| |
| |
value
| |
| |
+MOV–––––––––––––––+ | |
| +––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+MOVE
+–+ |
|
|Source
N7:14|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
|Dest
N7:13|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
debounced
debounced
|
|
BCD
BCD
|
|
value
value
|
| +EQU–––––––––––––––+
+MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
|–+EQUAL
+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––+MOVE
+–|
| |Source A
N7:12|
|Source
1| |
| |
0|
|
| |
| |Source B
0|
|Dest
N7:12| |
| |
|
|
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
E–15
Reference
Rung 7:4
Ensures that the operator cannot select a paper thickness of 0. If this
were allowed, the drill bit life calculation could be defeated
resulting in poor quality holes due to a dull drill bit. Therefore the
minimum paper thickness used to calculate drill bit wear is 1/4 in.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 7:5
Keeps a running total of how many inches of paper have been drilled
with the current drill bit. Every time a hole is drilled, adds the
thickness (in 1/4 ins) to the running total (kept in 1/4 ins). The OSR
is necessary because the ADD executes every time the rung is true, and
the drill body would actuate the DRILL DEPTH limit switch for more than
1 program scan. Integer N7:12 is the integer-converted value of the
BCD thumbwheel on inputs I:0/11 – I:0/14.
| Drill
|Drill Wear
1/4 in.
|
| Depth LS | OSR 1
increments
|
|
|
|
I:0
B3
+ADD–––––––––––––––+ |
|––––] [–––––––[OSR]–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+ADD
+–|
|
4
24
|Source A
N7:12| |
|
|
0| |
|
|Source B
N7:10| |
|
|
0| |
|
|Dest
N7:10| |
|
|
0| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 7:6
When the number of 1/4 in. increments surpasses 1000, finds out now
many increments are past 1000 and stores in N7:20. Add 1 to the total
of ’1000 1/4 in.’ increments, and re-initializes the 1/4 in. increments
accumulator to how many increments were beyond 1000.
|
1/4 in.
|
|
increments
|
|
|
| +GEQ–––––––––––––––+
+SUB–––––––––––––––+
|
|–+GRTR THAN OR EQUAL+–––––––––––––––––––––––+–+SUBTRACT
+–+–|
| |Source A
N7:10|
| |Source A
N7:10| | |
| |
0|
| |
0| | |
| |Source B
1000|
| |Source B
1000| | |
| |
|
| |
| | |
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |Dest
N7:20| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
1/4 in.
| |
|
|
Thousands
| |
|
| +ADD–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+ADD
+–+ |
|
| |Source A
1| | |
|
| |
| | |
|
| |Source B
N7:11| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| |Dest
N7:11| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
E–16
Application Example Programs
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
1/4 in.
|
|
increments
|
|
|
| +MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
+–+MOVE
+–+
|Source
N7:20|
|
0|
|Dest
N7:10|
|
0|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
Rung 7:7
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
Time Driven Sequencer Application Example
The following application example illustrates the use of the TON and SQO
instructions in a traffic signal at an intersection. The timing requirements are:
•
•
•
Red light – 30 seconds
Yellow light – 15 seconds
Green light – 60 seconds
The timer, when it reaches its preset, steps the sequencer that in turn controls which
traffic signal is illuminated. For a detailed explanation of:
XIC, XIO, and TON instructions, see chapter 6.
SQO and SQC instructions, see chapter 11.
Reference
•
•
E–17
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Time Driven Sequencer Ladder Program
Rung 2:0
The function of this rung is called a regenerative timer. Every time
the timer reaches its preset, the DONE bit is set for one scan – this
causes this rung to become FALSE for one scan and resets the timer. On
the following scan, when this rung becomes TRUE again, the timer begins
timing.
| Timer
Timer
|
| Enable
|
| T4:0
+TON–––––––––––––––+
|
|–––]/[–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+TIMER ON DELAY
+–(EN)–|
|
DN
|Timer
T4:0+–(DN) |
|
|Time Base
0.01|
|
|
|Preset
1|
|
|
|Accum
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:1
Controls the RED, GREEN, and YELLOW lights wired to outputs O:0/0 –
O:0/2, and controls how long the regenerative timer times between each
step. When this rung goes from false-to-true (by the timer reaching
its preset), the first sequencer changes which traffic light is
illuminated, and the second sequencer changes the preset of the timer
to determine how long this next light is illuminated.
|
RED, GREEN, and
|
|
YELLOW lights
|
| T4:0
+SQO–––––––––––––––+
|
|––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+SEQUENCER OUTPUT +–(EN)–+–|
|
DN
| |File
#N7:0+–(DN) | |
|
| |Mask
0007+
| |
|
| |Dest
O:0.0|
| |
|
| |Control
R6:0|
| |
|
| |Length
3|
| |
|
| |Position
0|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
|
Timer Presets
| |
|
|
for each lights
| |
|
| +SQO–––––––––––––––+
| |
|
+–+SEQUENCER OUTPUT +–(EN)–+ |
|
|File
#N7:5+–(DN)
|
|
|Mask
FFFF|
|
|
|Dest
T4:0.PRE|
|
|
|Control
R6:1|
|
|
|Length
3|
|
|
|Position
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2.2
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
E–18
Application Example Programs
Data Files
Address
N7:0
N7:1
N7:2
N7:3
15
0000
0000
0000
0000
Data
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
Address
Data
(Radix=Decimal)
N7:0
0
2
0
0000
0100
0010
0001
Data Table
4
1
0
0
6000
1500
3000
Event Driven Sequencer Application Example
The following application example illustrates how the FD (found) bit on an SQC
instruction can be used to advance an SQO to the next step (position). This
application program is used when a specific order of events is required to occur
repeatedly. By using this combination, you can eliminate using the XIO, XIC, and
other instructions. For a detailed explanation of:
•
•
XIC, XIO, and RES instructions, see chapter 6.
SQO and SQC instructions, see chapter 11.
Event Driven Sequencer Ladder Program
Eliminate this rung for retentive operation.
| S:1
R6:0
|
|––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(RES)––––|
|
15
|
|
|
E–19
Reference
Rung 2:0
Ensures that the SQO always resets to step (position) 1 each REM Run
mode entry. (This rung actually resets the control register’s position
and EN enable bit to 0. Due to this the following rung sees a false to
true transition and asserts step (position) 1 on the first scan.)
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 2:1
The SQC instruction and SQO instruction share the same Control
Register. This is acceptable due to the careful planning of the
rungstate condition. You could cascade (branch) many more SQO
instructions below the SQO if you desired, all using the same Control
Register (R6:0 in this case). Notice that we are only comparing Inputs
0–3 and are only asserting Outputs 0–3 (per our Mask value).
| R6:0
+SQC–––––––––––––––+
|
|––]/[––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–––––––+SEQUENCER COMPARE +–(EN)–+–|
|
FD
|
|File
#N7:0+–(DN) | |
|
|
|Mask
000F+–(FD) | |
|
|
|Source
I:0.0|
| |
|
|
|Control
R6:0|
| |
|
|
|Length
9|
| |
|
|
|Position
2|
| |
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
| R6:0 +SQO–––––––––––––––+
| |
|
+––]/[––+SEQUENCER OUTPUT +–(EN)–+ |
|
FD |File
#N7:10+–(DN)
|
|
|Mask
000F|
|
|
|Dest
O:0.0|
|
|
|Control
R6:0|
|
|
|Length
9|
|
|
|Position
2|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2.2
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
The following displays the FILE DATA for both sequencers. The SQC
compare data starts at N7:0 and ends at N7:9. While the SQO output
data starts at N7:10 and ends at N7:19. Please note that step 0 of the
SQO is never active. The reset rung combined with the rung logic of
sequencers guarantees that the sequencers always start at step 1. Both
sequencers also ”roll over” to step 1. ”Roll Over” to step 1 is
integral to all sequencer instructions.
SQC Compare Data
Addresses
N7:0
0
N7:10
0
E–20
Data
1
2
0
1
(Radix=Decimal)
3
4
5
6
7
2
3
4
5
6
8
7
9
8
Application Example Programs
Bottle Line Example
The following application example illustrates how the controller high-speed counter
is configured for an Up/down counter. For a detailed explanation of:
•
•
•
XIC, OTL, OTU and OTE instructions, see chapter 6.
GRT, LES, and GEQ instruction, see chapter 7.
HSC and HSL instructions, see chapter 12.
Sensor IN I:0/0
Conveyor
Bottle Fill and
Cap Machine
Conveyor
Sensor OUT I:0/1
Holding Area
Conveyor
Stop Fill O:0/0
Slow Fill O:0/1
Packing Machine
Slow Pack O:0/2
This section is controlled separately from the two
machines.
Bottle Line Operation Overview
A conveyor feeds filled bottles past a proximity sensor (IN) to a holding area. The
proximity sensor is wired to the I/0 terminal (up count) of the conveyor controller.
The bottles are then sent on another conveyor past a proximity switch (OUT) to the
packing machine. This proximity switch is wired to the I/1 terminal (down count)
on the same controller.
E–21
Reference
The controller on the conveyor, within the specified area above, regulates the speeds
of the bottle fill and packing machines. Each machine is connected to a separate
controller that communicates with the conveyor controller. The following ladder
program is for the conveyor controller.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Bottle Line Ladder Program
Rung 2:0
Loads the high-speed counter with the following parameters:
N7:0 – 0001h Output Mask – Effect only O:0/0
N7:1 – 0001h Output Pattern for High Preset – Energize O:0/0 upon high
preset
N7:2 – 350d High Preset – Maximum numbers of bottles for the holding
area
N7:3 – 0000h Output Pattern for Low Preset – not used
N7:4 – 0d Low Preset – not used
| First Pass
|
|
Bit
|
|
S:1
+HSL–––––––––––––––+ |
|––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HSC LOAD
+–|
|
15
|Counter
C5:0| |
|
|Source
N7:0| |
|
|Length
5| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:1
Starts up the high-speed counter with the above parameters. Each time
the rung is evaluated, the hardware accumulator is written to C5:0.ACC.
|
+HSC–––––––––––––––+
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HIGH SPEED COUNTER+–(CU)–|
|
|Type
Up/Down+–(CD) |
|
|Counter
C5:0+–(DN) |
|
|Preset
350|
|
|
|Accum
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:2
Packing machine running too fast for the filling machine. Slow down
the packing machine to allow the filler to catch up.
|
Slow Pack |
| +LES–––––––––––––––+
O:0
|
|–+LESS THAN
+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(L)–––––|
| |Source A C5:0.ACC|
2
|
| |
0|
|
| |Source B
100|
|
| |
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:3
If the packer was slowed down to allow the filler to catch up, wait
until the holding area is approximately 2/3 full before allowing the
packer to run at full speed again.
|
Slow Pack |
Slow Pack |
| +GRT–––––––––––––––+
O:0
O:0
|
|–+GREATER THAN
+––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(U)–––––|
| |Source A C5:0.ACC|
2
2
|
| |
0|
|
| |Source B
200|
|
| |
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
E–22
Application Example Programs
Rung 2:4
Filling machine running too fast for the packing machine. Slow down
the filling machine to allow the packer to catch up.
|
Slow Fill |
| +GRT–––––––––––––––+
O:0
|
|–+GREATER THAN
+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(L)–––––|
| |Source A C5:0.ACC|
1
|
| |
0|
|
| |Source B
250|
|
| |
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:6
If the high-speed counter reached its high preset of 350 (indicates
that the holding area reached maximum capacity), it would energize
O:0/0, shutting down the filling operation. Before re-starting the
filler, allow the packer to empty the holding area until it is about
1/3 full.
| HSC Interr
Fill Stop
|
| due to
|
| High Prest
|
|
|
|
C5:0
+LES–––––––––––––––+
O:0
|
|––––] [–––––+LESS THAN
+––––––––––––––––––––––+––––(U)–––––+–|
|
IH
|Source A C5:0.ACC|
|
0
| |
|
|
0|
|
| |
|
|Source B
150|
|
| |
|
|
|
|
| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
| |
|
| HSC Interr | |
|
| due to
| |
|
| High Prest | |
|
|
| |
|
|
C5:0
| |
|
+––––(U)–––––+ |
|
IH
|
Rung 2:7
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
Data Table
Addresses Data
N7:0
(Radix=Decimal)
1
1
350 0
0
E–23
Reference
Rung 2:5
If the filler was slowed down to allow the packer to catch up, wait
until the holding area is approximately 1/3 full before allowing the
filler to run at full speed again.
|
Slow Fill |
Slow Fill |
| +LES–––––––––––––––+
O:0
O:0
|
|–+LESS THAN
+––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(U)–––––|
| |Source A C5:0.ACC|
1
1
|
| |
0|
|
| |Source B
150|
|
| |
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Pick and Place Machine Example
The following application example illustrates how the controller high-speed counter
is configured for the up and down counter using an encoder with reset and hold. For
a detailed explanation of:
•
•
•
•
XIC, XIO, OTE, RES, OTU, OTL, and TON instructions, see chapter 6.
GRT and NEQ instructions, see chapter 7.
MOV instruction, see chapter 9.
HSC and HSL instructions, see chapter 12.
Storage Bins
H
G
F
E
D
C
B
A
Conveyor
Gripper O:0/0
Rail
Home Position
Encoder
A – I:0/0
B – I:0/1
C – I:0/2
Master PLC Outputs
Wired to Inputs:
I:0/5
I:0/6
I:0/7
Pick and Place Machine Operation Overview
A pick and place machine takes parts from a conveyor and drops them into the
appropriate bins. When the pick and place head is positioned over the conveyor
with a gripped part, the master PLC communicates to the controller controlling the
gripper which bin to drop the part into. This information is communicated by
energizing three outputs that are wired to the controller’s inputs. Once the controller
has this information, it grabs the part and moves down the rail. When the gripper
reaches the appropriate bin, it opens and the part falls into the bin. The gripper then
returns to the conveyor to retrieve another part.
The position of the pick and place head is read by the controller via a 1000 line
quadrature encoder wired to the controller’s high-speed counter inputs. When the
gripper is in the home position, the Z pulse from the encoder resets the high-speed
counter. The number of pulses the head needs to travel to reach each bin location is
stored in a data table starting at address N7:10 and ending at N7:17. The controller
uses indexed addressing to locate the correct encoder count from the data table and
load the information into the high preset of the high-speed counter.
E–24
Application Example Programs
Pick and Place Machine Ladder Program
Rung 2:0
The following 3 rungs take information from the other programmable
controller and load it into the INDEX REGISTER. This will be used to
select the proper bin location from the table starting at N7:10.
| Output
|
|
| from
|
|
| barcode
|
Index Reg |
|
I:0
S:24
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
|
5
0
|
Rung 2:1
| Output
|
|
| from
|
|
| barcode
|
Index Reg |
|
I:0
S:24
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
|
6
1
|
Rung 2:2
| Output
|
|
| from
|
|
| barcode
|
Index Reg |
|
I:0
S:24
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
|
7
2
|
Reference
Rung 2:3
Indexes into the table of bin locations and places the correct number
of encoder counts into the high preset of the high-speed counter.
|
+MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+MOVE
+–|
|
|Source
#N7:10| |
|
|
100| |
|
|Dest
N7:2| |
|
|
100| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
E–25
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 2:4
Loads the high-speed counter with the following parameters:
N7:0 – 0001h – Output Mask – high-speed counter control only O:0/0
(gripper)
N7:1 – 0000h – Output Pattern for High Preset – turn OFF gripper
(release part)
N7:2 – 100d – High Preset – loaded from table in the rung above
N7:3 – 0001h – Output Pattern for Low Preset – turn ON gripper
(grab part)
N7:4 –
0d – Low Preset – home position when encoder triggers Z-reset
|
Home
|
|
Position
|
|
Reached
|
|
C5:0
+HSL–––––––––––––––+ |
|–+––––] [–––––+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HSC LOAD
+–|
| |
LP
|
|Counter
C5:0| |
| |
|
|Source
N7:0| |
| |
|
|Length
5| |
| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
| | First Pass |
|
| |
Bit
|
|
| |
S:1
|
|
| +––––] [–––––+
|
|
15
|
Rung 2:5
Start up the high-speed counter with the above parameters. Each time
this rung is evaluated the hardware accumulator is written to C5:0.ACC.
|
+HSC––––––––––––––––––––+
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HIGH SPEED COUNTER
+–(CU)–|
|
|Type Encoder (Res,Hld)+–(CD) |
|
|Counter
C5:0+–(DN) |
|
|Preset
100|
|
|
|Accum
–2|
|
|
+–––––––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:6
When the pick and place head reaches either its home position to pick
up a part or its destination bin to drop off a part, start up a dwell
timer. The purpose of this is to keep the head stationary long enough
for the gripper to either grab or release the part.
|
Bin
|
|
Location
Dwell Timr
|
|
Reached
|
|
C5:0
+TON–––––––––––––––+
|
|–+––––] [–––––+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+TIMER ON DELAY
+–(EN)–|
| |
HP
|
|Timer
T4:0+–(DN) |
| |
|
|Time Base
0.01|
|
| |
|
|Preset
100|
|
| |
|
|Accum
100|
|
| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
| | Home
|
|
| | Position
|
|
| | Reached
|
|
| |
C5:0
|
|
| +––––] [–––––+
|
|
LP
|
E–26
Application Example Programs
Rung 2:7
When the pick and place head is positioned over the proper bin, turn
off the forward motor. At the same time the high-speed counter will
tell the gripper to release the part and start the dwell timer. After
the dwell time has expired, start up the reverse motor to send the head
back to its home position to pick up another part.
| Bin
Motor
|
| Location
FORWARD
|
| Reached
|
|
C5:0
O:0
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–––––––––––––––(U)–––––+–|
|
HP
|
1
| |
|
| Dwell
|Motor
| |
|
| Done
|REVERSE
| |
|
|
T4:0
O:0
| |
|
+––––] [––––––––(L)–––––+ |
|
DN
2
|
Rung 2:8
When the pick and place head is positioned at its home position, turn
off the reverse motor. At the same time the high-speed counter will
tell the gripper to grab the next part and start the dwell timer.
After the dwell time has expired, start up the forward motor to send
the head out to its drop off bin.
| Home
Motor
|
| Position
REVERSE
|
| Reached
|
|
C5:0
O:0
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–––––––––––––––(U)–––––+–|
|
LP
|
2
| |
|
| Dwell
|Motor
| |
|
| Done
|FORWARD
| |
|
|
T4:0
O:0
| |
|
+––––] [––––––––(L)–––––+ |
|
DN
1
|
Rung 2:9
|
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
Data Table
0
0
Reference
Addresses Data
(Radix=Decimal)
N7:0
1
0
100 1
0
0
0
0
0
N7:10
100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 0
E–27
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
RPM Calculation Application Example
The following application example illustrates how to calculate the frequency and
RPM of a device (such as an encoder) connected to a high-speed counter. The
calculated values are only valid when counting up. For a detailed explanation of:
•
•
•
•
XIC, XIO, CTU and TON instructions, see chapter 6.
LES instruction, see chapter 7.
CLR, MUL, DIV, DDV, ADD, and SUB instructions, see chapter 8.
MOV instruction, see chapter 9.
RPM Calculation Operation Overview
This is done by manipulating the number of counts that have occurred in the
high-speed counter accumulator (C0.ACC) over time. To determine this you must
provide the following application specific information:
•
•
E–28
N7:2 – Counts per Revolution. (i.e., the number of encoder pulses per
revolution i.e., the number of pulses until reset). This value is entered in whole
counts. For example, you would enter the value 1000 into N7:2 for a 1000
count A/B/Z encoder.
T4:0.PRE– The Rate Measurement Period (i.e., the amount of time in which to
sample the accumulation of counts). This value is entered in .01 second
intervals. For example, enter the value 10 into T4:0.PRE for a .1 second rate
measurement period . For an accurate frequency and RPM calculation to occur,
the value entered must divide evenly into 100. For example valid=20,10,5,4,2,1
and invalid=11,9,8,7,6,3.
Application Example Programs
Once you have entered these 2 values the following information is provided:
•
•
N7:1 – Counts per last Rate Measurement Period. This value is updated each
end of Rate Measurement Period with the number of counts that have elapsed.
Use this value if your application requires high-speed calculations such as
velocity.
N7:4 – Frequency. This value is updated once per second with the number of
pulses that occurred in the last second. This value (frequency) is calculated:
Frequency (Hz) =
•
# pulses
1 second
N7:5 – RPM. This value is calculated once per second using the frequency
value N7:4 together with the counts per revolution value N7:2. For example, if
N7:4 contained the value 2000 (indicates 2000 Hz) and you had specified a
1000 count encoder in N7:2, the RPM calculation for N7:5 would be 120. This
equates to 2 encoder revolutions per second. Refer to the following calculation:
RPM =
120 RPM =
1 revolution
x
# pulses
60 seconds
1 minute
1 revolution
2000 pulses
x
x
1000 pulses
1 second
60 seconds
1 minute
# pulses
1 second
x
Reference
To maintain validity, you must ensure that you cannot accumulate more pulses per
rate period than counts per revolution. For example, if you have selected a 1000
pulse encoder, you cannot have more than 999 counts occur in any 1 rate
measurement period. If you determine that you exceed this rule, simply lower your
Rate Measurement Period T4:0.PRE.
E–29
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
RPM Calculation Ladder Program
Rung 2:0
Ensures that the measurement value is initialized each REM Run mode
entry.
|
Last timeout
|
|
First
value storage
|
|
Pass
register
|
|
S:1
+MOV–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+MOVE
+–+–|
|
15
| |Source
C5:0.ACC| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| |Dest
N7:0| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
Frequency
| |
|
|
determination
| |
|
|
counter
| |
|
|
C5:0
| |
|
+–––––(RES)––––––––––––+ |
|
|
| |
|
|
Counts last rate
| |
|
|
measurement
| |
|
|
period
| |
|
| +CLR–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+CLEAR
+–+–|
|
| |Dest
N7:1| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
Frequency in
| |
|
|
Hertz period
| |
|
| +CLR–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+CLEAR
+–+–|
|
| |Dest
N7:4| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
RPM based on
| |
|
|
counts per turn
| |
|
|
register N7:2
| |
|
| +CLR–––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+CLEAR
+–+–|
|
|Dest
N7:5|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
E–30
Application Example Programs
Rung 2:1
Sets the rate measurement period. In this case we are calculating a new
rate value once every 100ms. Value N7:1 is updated once every 100ms with
the number of counts that have occurred in the last 100ms period. Note
that the preset value must divide evenly into 100 in order to accurately
determine frequency and RPM (determined later in this program).
| Rate Period |
|
| Expiration |
Rate measurement
|
| Bit
|
period
|
|
T4:0
+TON–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––]/[––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+TIMER ON DELAY
+–(EN)–|
|
DN
|Timer
T4:0+–(DN) |
|
|Time Base
0.01|
|
|
|Preset
10|
|
|
|Accum
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
| Rate Period
Counts last rate
|
| Expiration Bit
measurement period
|
|
|
| T4:0
+SUB–––––––––––––––+
|
|––] [––––+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+SUBTRACT
+––––––+–|
|
DN |
|Source A C5:0.ACC|
| |
|
|
|
0|
| |
|
|
|Source B
N7:0|
| |
|
|
|
0|
| |
|
|
|Dest
N7:1|
| |
|
|
|
0|
| |
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
| If
Counts last rate
Counts last rate
| |
|
| negative
measurement period
measurement period
| |
|
| math flag
| |
|
| S:0
+LES–––––––––––––––+ +ADD–––––––––––––––+
| |
|
+––] [––––––+LESS THAN
+––+ADD
+––––––+ |
|
|
3
|Source A
N7:1| |Source A
N7:2|
| |
|
|
|
0| |
1000|
| |
|
|
|Source B
–10| |Source B
N7:1|
| |
|
|
|
| |
0|
| |
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |Dest
N7:1|
| |
|
|
|
0|
| |
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
| |
E–31
Reference
Rung 2:2
Calculates and stores the number of counts that have occurred since the
last time that it was executed as true in N7:1 (last time=last rate
measurement timer (T4:0) expiration). The LES instruction allows for 10
counts of backlash to occur (you can adjust as needed). The add
instruction is configured for a 1000 count encoder using N7:2. (Change
this register to match the number of counts generated each Z reset.)
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
|
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E–32
|
Last timeout value
|
|
storage register
|
|
+MOV–––––––––––––––+
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+MOVE
+––––––+
|
|Source
C5:0.ACC|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
|Dest
N7:0|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
Determine 1 second
|
|
count. ie: # of
|
|
rate periods
|
|
+DIV–––––––––––––––+
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+DIVIDE
+––––––+
|
|Source A
100|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|Source B T4:0.PRE|
|
|
|
10|
|
|
|Dest
C5:1.PRE|
|
|
|
10|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
Frequency
|
|
determination
|
|
counter
|
|
+CTU–––––––––––––––+
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+COUNT UP
+–(CU)–+
|
|Counter
C5:1+–(DN) |
|
|Preset
10|
|
|
|Accum
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
Frequency
|
|
calculation
|
|
register
|
|
+ADD–––––––––––––––+
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+ADD
+––––––+
|
|Source A
N7:1|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
|Source B
N7:3|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
|Dest
N7:3|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
| 1 second
Frequency
|
| has now
in Hertz
|
| elapsed
|
| C5:1
+MOV–––––––––––––––+
|
+–––] [–––+––+MOVE
+–+–––––––––––––––––––––––––+
DN | |Source
N7:3| |
| |
0| |
| |Dest
N7:4| |
| |
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
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|
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Application Example Programs
|
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|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
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|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| Frequency
|
| calculation
|
| register
|
| +CLR–––––––––––––––+ |
+––+CLEAR
+–+
| |Dest
N7:3| |
| |
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+ |
| Frequency
|
| determination
|
| counter
|
|
C5:1
|
+–––––––––(RES)–––––––––+
| Temporary reg.
|
| (math reg is real
|
| destination
|
| +MUL–––––––––––––––+ |
+––+MULTIPLY
+–+
| |Source A
N7:4| |
| |
0| |
| |Source B
60| |
| |
| |
| |Dest
N7:6| |
| |
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+ |
| RPM based on
|
| counts per turn
|
| register N7:2
|
| +DDV–––––––––––––––+ |
+––+DOUBLE DIVIDE
+–+
| |Source
N7:2| |
| |
1000| |
| |Dest
N7:5| |
| |
0| |
| +––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
Math overflow
|
|
error bit
|
|
S:5
|
+–––––––––(U)–––––––––––+
0
|
|
|
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|
|
|
|
|
+HSC–––––––––––––––+
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+HIGH SPEED COUNTER+–(CU)–|
|
|Type
Up (Res,Hld)+–(CD)|
|
|Counter
C5:0+–(DN) |
|
|High Preset
1000|
|
|
|Accum
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:4
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
E–33
Reference
Rung 2:3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
On/Off Circuit Application Example
The following application example illustrates how to use an input to toggle an
output either on or off. For a detailed explanation of:
•
•
XIC, XIO, OTE, OTU, OTL, and OSR instructions, see chapter 6.
JMP and LBL instructions, see chapter 10.
If the output is off when the input is energized, the output is turned on. If the output
is on when the input is energized, the output is turned off.
On/Off Circuit Ladder Program
Rung 2:0
Does a one-shot from the input push button to an internal bit – the
internal bit is true for only one scan. This prevent toggling of the
physical output in case the push button is held ”ON” for more than one
scan (always the case).
| push button|OSR #1
|
push button |
|
Input |
|
false-to|
|
|
true
|
|
I:0
B3
B3
|
|––––] [–––––––[OSR]––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
|
0
1
0
|
Rung 2:1
If the push button input has gone from false-to-true and the output is
presently OFF, turn the output ON and jump over the following rung to
the rest of the programs. If the JMP instruction was missing, the
following rung would be true and would turn the output back OFF.
|push button|Toggling
Toggling
|
| false-to- |Output
Output
|
| true
|
|
|
B3
O:0
O:0
|
|––––] [––––––––]/[––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+––––(L)–––––+–|
|
0
0
|
0
| |
|
| Go to rest | |
|
| of program | |
|
|
| |
|
|
1
| |
|
+–––(JMP)––––+ |
|
|
E–34
Application Example Programs
Rung 2:2
If the push button input has gone from false-to-true and the output is
presently ON, turns the output OFF.
|push button|Toggling |
Toggling
|
| false-to- |Output
|
Output
|
| true
|
|
|
B3
O:0
O:0
|
|––––] [––––––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(U)–––––|
|
0
0
0
|
Rung 2:3
Contains the label corresponding to the jump instruction in rung 1.
The remainder of your actual program would be placed below this rung.
| Go to rest|
Dummy Bit |
| of program|
|
|
|
|
|
1
B3
|
|–––[LBL]–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
|
2
|
Rung 2:4
Reference
|
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
E–35
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Spray Booth Application Example
The following application example illustrates the use of bit shift and FIFO
instructions in an automated paint spraying operation. For a detailed explanation of:
•
•
•
•
XIC and OTE instructions, see chapter 6.
EQU and LIM instructions, see chapter 7.
FFU and FFL instructions, see chapter 9.
BSL instruction, see chapter 11.
Paint Spray Booth
Position
2
3
1
Bar Code Reader
I:0/2,3,4
Bit Shift
FIFO
E–36
4
Input
Proximity
Switch I:0/1
B3/0
B3/1
B3/2
B3/3
0
1
0
1
N7:3
N7:2
N7:1
N7:0
Blue
Red
Blue
Blue
Paint Sprayer Signals
Spray Enable
O:0/3
Blue Paint Gun
O:0/0
Yellow Paint Gun
O:0/1
Red Paint Gun
O:0/2
Application Example Programs
Spray Booth Operation Overview
An overhead conveyor with part carriers (hooks) carries parts from a previous
operation to the spray booth. Before the part enters the spray booth, 2 items are
checked on the conveyor. The first check is for part presence and the second check
is for the needed color. This information is stored and accessed later when the part
carrier is in the paint spraying area. A proximity switch is used to check for the
presence of a part on the carrier and a barcode reader is used to determine color
choice. When the part carrier reaches the spraying area, the previously stored
information is accessed. If there is a part on the carrier, it is painted according to its
bar code and if the carrier is free, paint is not dispensed.
The bit shift and FIFO instructions store the part presence and color information
before each carrier enters the spray booth. Both of these instructions place data into
their data structures every time a part carrier actuates the shift limit switch.
If the proximity switch senses a part on the carrier, a 1 is shifted into the shift
register. If the carrier is free as it passes the shift limit switch, a 0 is shifted into the
shift register. The shift register tracks the part carriers approaching the spraying
area.
The FIFO does the same type of shifting, except rather than shifting one bit at a
time, the FIFO shifts an entire word at a time. Just before the part carrier actuates
the SHIFT limit switch, the barcode reader reads the barcode on the part to
determine what color the part should be painted. The barcode reader has three
outputs that it sets according to what color the part should be. These outputs are:
•
•
wired to the controller as inputs I:0/2, I:0/3, and I:0/4
combined together to form an integer which is decoded later in the program
Reference
This integer is then shifted into the FIFO when the carrier actuates the SHIFT limit
switch.
E–37
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Once the presence and color data is loaded into the shift register and FIFO, they are
shifted to new memory locations each time another part carrier actuates the SHIFT
limit switch. After three additional shifts, the first part carrier is in front of the spray
guns, ready for its part to be painted. At this point the part presence data has been
shifted into B3/3 and the color data has been shifted into N7:0. The program now
checks B3/3 – if there is a “1” in this location, that means that there is a part hanging
on the part carrier and the SPRAY ENABLE output is energized. The program also
checks N7:0 to determine which color to paint the part. As the program is checking
the shift register for the presence of a part at the spray guns, it is also decoding the
color information at N7:0 and energizing the appropriate spray guns. Since we are
only using three colors, the only valid color codes are 1, 2, and 3. If any other
number is in N7:0 when a part is ready to be painted, the color defaults to BLUE.
Since our program accesses the data while it is still in the two data structures, after
the part has been painted, the presence and color information for that part is shifted
out of the data structures and lost.
Spray Booth Ladder Program
Rung 2:0
These three rungs read the color information coming from the barcode
decoder outputs and load this into integer N7:4. This color is loaded
into the FIFO when the part carrier actuates the SHIFT LIMIT SWITCH.
| Low Bit
|
Color
|
| from Bar
|
Select
|
| Code
|
Word
|
| Decoder
|
|
|
I:0
N7:4
|
|––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )––––––|
|
2
0
|
Rung 2:1
| Middle Bit |
Color
|
| from Bar
|
Select
|
| Code
|
Word
|
| Decoder
|
|
|
I:0
N7:4
|
|––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )––––––|
|
3
1
|
Rung 2:2
| High Bit
|
Color
|
| from Bar
|
Select
|
| Code
|
Word
|
| Decoder
|
|
|
I:0
N7:4
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
|
4
2
|
E–38
Application Example Programs
Rung 2:3
When the part carrier actuates the SHIFT LIMIT SWITCH, three things
happen in this rung: (1) the color of the previously painted part is
unloaded from the FIFO to make room for the color of the new part, (2)
the color of the new part is loaded into the FIFO, (3) the presence or
absence of a part on the part carrier is shifted into the Shift
Register.
Rung 2:4
If there is a part on the part carrier now entering the spraying area,
energize the paint sprayer. If there is not a part on the part
carrier, do not energize the sprayer so you can save paint.
| BSL
Spray
|
| position 4
Enable
|
|
|
|
B3
O:0
|
|–––[ ]–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––––|
|
3
3
|
E–39
Reference
| Shift
Unload color
|
| Limit
of previously
|
| Switch
painted part
|
|
|
|
I:0
+FFU–––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+FIFO UNLOAD
+–(EU)–+–|
|
0
| |FIFO
#N7:0+–(DN) | |
|
| |Dest
N7:10+–(EM) | |
|
| |Control
R6:0|
| |
|
| |Length
4|
| |
|
| |Position
4|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
|
Load color of
| |
|
|
new part
| |
|
| +FFL–––––––––––––––+
| |
|
+–+FIFO LOAD
+–(EU)–+ |
|
| |Source
N7:4+–(DN) | |
|
| |FIFO
#N7:0+–(EM) | |
|
| |Control
R6:0|
| |
|
| |Length
4|
| |
|
| |Position
4|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
|
Load the presence
| |
|
|
of the new part
| |
|
|
| |
|
| +BSL–––––––––––––––+
| |
|
+–+BIT SHIFT LEFT
+–(EU)–+ |
|
|File
#B3:0+–(DN)
|
|
|Control
R6:1|
|
|
|Bit Address I:0/1|
|
|
|Length
4|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 2:5
Decodes color select word. If N7:0=1 then energize the blue paint gun.
Or if N7:0= an invalid color selection, default the color of the part
to blue and energize the blue paint gun.
|
Blue Gun
|
|
+EQU–––––––––––––––+
O:0
|
|–+–+EQUAL
+–+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
| | |Source A
N7:0| |
0
|
| | |
0| |
|
| | |Source B
1| |
|
| | |
| |
|
| | +––––––––––––––––––+ |
|
| |
|
|
| | +LIM–––––––––––––––+ |
|
| +–+LIMIT TEST
+–+
|
|
|Low Limit
4|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|Test
N7:0|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
|High Lim
1|
|
|
|
|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:6
Decodes color select word.
gun.
If N7:0=2 then energize the yellow paint
|
Yellow Gun
|
| +EQU–––––––––––––––+
O:0
|
|–+EQUAL
+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
| |Source A
N7:0|
1
|
| |
0|
|
| |Source B
2|
|
| |
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:7
Decodes color select word.
If N7:0=3 then energize the red paint gun.
|
Red Gun
|
| +EQU–––––––––––––––+
O:0
|
|–+EQUAL
+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–––––|
| |Source A
N7:0|
2
|
| |
0|
|
| |Source B
3|
|
| |
|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:8
|
|
|––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
|
|
E–40
Application Example Programs
Adjustable Timer Application Example
The following application example illustrates the use of timers to adjust the drill
dwell time at the end of the machines downstroke. For a detailed explanation of:
•
•
•
XIC, TON, and OSR instructions, see chapter 6.
LES and GRT instructions, see chapter 7.
ADD and SUB instructions, see chapter 8.
Valid dwell times are 5.0 seconds to 120.0 seconds. Adjustments are made in 2.5
second intervals.
Each time I/8 or I/9 is depressed, the timer preset or delay is adjusted up or down
accordingly. By altering the value of N7:0 the amount of change can be increased
or decreased. The constants in the LES and GRT instructions, and in the source and
destination of the ADD and SUB instructions, could be changed easily to integers
for even greater flexibility.
Adjustable Timer Ladder Program
| Increment
|
| Timer preset
|
| I:0
+LES–––––––––––––––+
B3
+ADD–––––––––––––––+
|
|––] [––––––+LESS THAN
+––––––[OSR]–––+ADD
+––––|
|
8
|Source A T4:0.PRE|
0 |Source A T4:0.PRE|
|
|
|
500|
|
500|
|
|
|Source B
11750|
|Source B
N7:0|
|
|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|Dest
T4:0.PRE|
|
|
|
500|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
E–41
Reference
Rung 2:0
Adds 2.5 seconds to Timer delay each time the increment push button is
depressed. Do not exceed 120.0 seconds delay. Note that N7:0=250.
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Rung 2:1
Subtracts 2.5 seconds from Timer delay each time the decrement push
button is depressed. Do not go below 5.0 seconds delay.
| Decrement
|
| Timer preset
|
| I:0
+GRT–––––––––––––––+
B3
+SUB–––––––––––––––+
|
|––] [––––––+GREATER THAN
+––––––[OSR]–––+SUBTRACT
+––––|
|
9
|Source A T4:0.PRE|
1 |Source A T4:0.PRE|
|
|
|
500|
|
500|
|
|
|Source B
750|
|Source B
N7:0|
|
|
|
|
|
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|Dest
T4:0.PRE|
|
|
|
500|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
Rung 2:2
|
|
|
|
|
+TON–––––––––––––––+
|
|––] [–––Input conditions to allow––––––––––––+TIMER ON DELAY
+––––|
|
dwell time on the drill.
|Timer
T4:0|
|
|
|Timebase
0.01|
|
|
|Preset
500|
|
|
|Accum
0|
|
|
+––––––––––––––––––+
|
E–42
Optional Analog Input Software Calibration
Optional Analog Input Software
Calibration
This appendix helps you calibrate an analog input channel using software offsets to
increase the expected accuracy of an analog input circuit. Examples of equations
and a ladder diagram are provided for your reference. Software calibration reduces
the error at a given temperature by scaling the values read at calibration time.
Reference
F
F–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Calibrating an Analog Input Channel
The following procedure can be adapted to all analog inputs; current or voltage.
For this example, the 1761-L20BWA-5A with a 4 mA to 20 mA input is used. The
overall error for the MicroLogix 1000 is guaranteed to be not more than ± 0.525 at
25C.
The overall error of ± 0.525% at 20 mA equates to ± 164 LSB of error, or a code
range of 31043 to 31371. Any value in this range is returned by an analog input
channel at 20 mA. The expected nominal value at 20 mA is 31207. After
performing a software calibration, the overall error is reduced to 5 LSB (0.018%), or
a code range of 31202 to 31212.
The graph shown below shows the linear relationship between the input value and
the resulting scaled value. The values in this graph are from the example program.
20 mA = 31207
(scale Hi)
Scaled
Value
4 mA = 6241
(scale low)
6292
Low Value from card
31352
Hi Value from card
Input Value
Scaled Value vs. Input Value
F–2
Optional Analog Input Software Calibration
Calculating the Software Calibration
Use the following equation to perform the software calibration:
Scaled Value = (input value x slope) + offset
Slope = (scaled max. – scaled min.) / (input max. – input min.)
Offset = Scaled min. – (input min. x slope)
Calibration Procedure
1.
Heat up / cool down your MicroLogix 1000 system to the temperature in which
it will normally be operating.
2.
Determine the scaled high and low values you wish to use in your application.
In this example, scaled high value (which corresponds to 20 mA) is 31207 and
scaled low value (which corresponds to 4 mA) is 6241.
3.
Using an analog calibration source connected to the analog input channel or
your system’s input device placed at the 4 mA position, capture the low value
by setting and then resetting the CAL_LO_ENABLE bit. Ensure that your low
value lies within the conversion range of your analog input.
4.
Using an analog calibration source connected to the analog input channel or
your system’s input device placed at the 20 mA position, capture the high value
by setting and then resetting the CAL_HI_ENABLE bit. Ensure that your high
value lies within the conversion range of your analog input.
5.
Set and then reset the CALIBRATE bit. This causes the MicroLogix to
calculate the slope and offset values used to perform the error correction to the
analog input.
The analog channel is now calibrated to ± 5 LSB at the calibration temperature.
The recommended calibration period is once every 6 months. If an application has a
wide range of operating temperatures, a software calibration should be performed
every 3 to 4 months.
F–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
Example Ladder Diagram
The following ladder diagram uses 3 internal bits to perform the calibration
procedure. CAL_LO_ENABLE causes the ladder to capture the 4 mA calibration
value and CAL_HI_ENABLE causes the ladder to capture the 20 mA calibration
value. CALIBRATE causes the ladder diagram to scale the hi and low values to the
nominal values, which provides the slope and offset values used to calibrate the
analog input channel.
Once the calibration procedure is complete, set the CONVERSION ENABLE bit to
a “1”. The calibration numbers can then be used to scale the raw analog data. The
corrected analog input data will be placed in memory location
ANALOG_SCALED.
The following symbols are used in this example:
F–4
CAL_LO_ENABLE
= B3/500
CAL_HI_ENABLE
= B3/501
CALIBRATE
= B3/502
CONVERSION ENABLE
= B3/503
ANALOG_IN
= I:0.4
LO_CAL_VALUE
= N7:90
HI_CAL_VALUE
= N7:91
CAL_SPAN
= N7:92
SCALE_HI
= N7:93
SCALE_LOW
= N7:94
SCALE_SPAN
= N7:95
SLOPE_X10K
= N7:97
OFFSET
= N7:100
ANALOG_SCALED
= N7:101
Optional Analog Input Software Calibration
Rung 2:0
| CAL_LO_ENABLE
|
|
B3/504
+MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
|––––] [––––––[OSR]–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+MOVE
+–|
|
|Source
ANALOG_IN| |
|
|
?| |
|
|Dest LO_CAL_VALUE| |
|
|
?| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:1
| CAL_HI_ENABLE
|
|
B3/505
+MOV–––––––––––––––+ |
|––––] [––––––[OSR]–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+MOVE
+–|
|
|Source
ANALOG_IN| |
|
|
?| |
|
|Dest HI_CAL_VALUE| |
|
|
?| |
|
+––––––––––––––––––+ |
Rung 2:2
| CALIBRATE
|
|
B3/506
+SUB––––––––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [––––––[OSR]––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+SUBTRACT
+–+–|
|
| |Source A
HI_CAL_VALUE| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| |Source B
LO_CAL_VALUE| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| |Dest
CAL_SPAN| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +–––––––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
| +SUB–––––––––––––––+
| |
|
+–+SUBTRACT
+––––––+ |
|
| |Source A SCALE_HI|
| |
|
| |
0|
| |
|
| |Source B SCALE_LO|
| |
|
| |
0|
| |
|
| |Dest
SCALE_SPAN|
| |
|
| |
0|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
|
| +MUL––––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
+–+MULTIPLY
+–+ |
|
| |Source A
SCALE_SPAN| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| |Source B
10000| | |
|
| |
10000| | |
|
| |Dest
N7:96| | |
|
| |
0| | |
|
| +–––––––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
| +DDV–––––––––––––––+
| |
|
+–+DOUBLE DIVIDE
+––––––+ |
|
| |Source
CAL_SPAN|
| |
|
| |
0|
| |
|
| |Dest
SLOPE_X10K|
| |
|
| |
0|
| |
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
| |
Ladder logic continued on the next page.
F–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| +MUL––––––––––––––––––––+ |
+–+MULTIPLY
+–+
| |Source A
LO_CAL_VALUE| |
| |
0| |
| |Source B
SLOPE_X10K| |
| |
0| |
| |Dest
N7:98| |
| |
0| |
| +–––––––––––––––––––––––+ |
| +DDV–––––––––––––––+
|
+–+DOUBLE DIVIDE
+––––––+
| |Source
10000|
|
| |
10000|
|
| |Dest
N7:99|
|
| |
0|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
| +SUB–––––––––––––––+
|
+–+SUBTRACT
+––––––+
| |Source A SCALE_LOW|
|
| |
0|
|
| |Source B
N7:99|
|
| |
0|
|
| |Dest
OFFSET|
|
| |
0|
|
| +––––––––––––––––––+
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
Trap
| |
|
S2:5/0 | |
+–––––––––––––––––––(U)–––––+ |
|
Overflow| |
Rung 2:3
|
|
|
|
| CONVERSION_ENABLE
+SCL––––––––––––––––––––+
|
|––––] [–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+–+SCALE
+–+–|
|
| |Source A
ANALOG_IN| | |
|
| |
?| | |
|
| |Rate[/10000] SLOPE_X10K| | |
|
| |
?| | |
|
| |Offset
OFFSET| | |
|
| |
?| | |
|
| |Dest
ANALOG_SCALED| | |
|
| +–––––––––––––––––––––––+ | |
|
|
|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––+END+––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––|
F–6
Glossary
Glossary
The following terms are used throughout this manual. Refer to the Allen-Bradley
Industrial Automation Glossary, Publication Number AG-7.1, for a complete guide
to Allen-Bradley technical terms.
address: A character string that uniquely identifies a memory location. For
example, I:1/0 is the memory address for the data located in the Input file location
word1, bit 0.
AIC+ Advanced Interface Converter: a device that provides a communication
link between various networked devices. (Catalog Number 1761-NET-AIC.)
application: 1) A machine or process monitored and controlled by a controller.
2) The use of computer- or processor-based routines for specific purposes.
backup data: Data downloaded with the program.
baud rate: The speed of communication between devices on a network. All
devices must communicate at the same baud rate.
bit: The smallest storage location in memory that contains either a 1 (ON) or a 0
(OFF).
block diagrams: A schematic drawing.
Boolean operators: Logical operators such as AND, OR, NAND, NOR, NOT, and
Exclusive-OR that can be used singularly or in combination to form logic statements
or circuits. Can have an output response be true or false.
branch: A parallel logic path within a rung of a ladder program.
channel: Refers to the analog signals available on the controller’s terminal block.
Each channel is configured for connection to a voltage or current source input
device, and has its own data and diagnostic status words.
communication scan: A part of the controller’s operating cycle. Communication
with other devices, such as software running on a personal computer, takes place.
controller: A device, such as a programmable controller, used to monitor input
devices and control output devices.
controller overhead: An internal portion of the operating cycle used for
housekeeping and set-up purposes.
G–1
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
control profile: The means by which a controller determines which outputs turn on
under what conditions.
counter: 1) An electro-mechanical relay-type device that counts the occurrence of
some event. May be pulses developed from operations such as switch closures,
interruptions of light beams, or other discrete events.
2) In controllers a software counter eliminates the need for hardware counters. The
software counter can be given a preset count value to count up or down whenever
the counted event occurs.
CPU (Central Processing Unit): The decision-making and data storage section of
a programmable controller.
data table: The part of the processor memory that contains I/O values and files
where data is monitored, manipulated, and changed for control purposes.
DIN rail: Manufactured according to Deutsche Industrie Normenausshus (DIN)
standards, a metal railing designed to ease installation and mounting of your
controller.
download: Data is transferred from a programming or storage device to another
device.
DTE (Data Terminal Equipment): Equipment that is attached to a network to
send or receive data, or both.
EMI: Electromagnetic interference.
encoder: 1) A rotary device that transmits position information. 2) A device that
transmits a fixed number of pulses for each revolution.
false: The status of an instruction that does not provide a continuous logical path on
a ladder rung.
FIFO (First-In–First-Out): The order that data is entered into and retrieved from
a file.
file: A collection of information organized into one group.
full-duplex: A bidirectional mode of communication where data may be
transmitted and received simultaneously (contrast with half-duplex).
half-duplex: A communication link in which data transmission is limited to one
direction at a time.
hard disk: A storage area in a personal computer that may be used to save
processor files and reports for future use.
high byte: Bits 8–15 of a word.
G–2
Glossary
input device: A device, such as a push button or a switch, that supplies signals
through input circuits to the controller.
inrush current: The temporary surge current produced when a device or circuit is
initially energized.
instruction: A mnemonic and data address defining an operation to be performed
by the processor. A rung in a program consists of a set of input and output
instructions. The input instructions are evaluated by the controller as being true or
false. In turn, the controller sets the output instructions to true or false.
instruction set: The set of general purpose instructions available with a given
controller.
I/O (Inputs and Outputs): Consists of input and output devices that provide
and/or receive data from the controller.
jump: Change in normal sequence of program execution, by executing an
instruction that alters the program counter (sometimes called a branch). In ladder
programs a JUMP (JMP) instruction causes execution to jump to a labeled rung.
ladder logic: A program written in a format resembling a ladder-like diagram. The
program is used by a programmable controller to control devices.
lease significant bit (LSB): The digit (or bit) in a binary word (code) that carries
the smallest value of weight. For the analog controllers, 16-bit two’s complement
binary codes are used in the I/O image in the card.
LED (Light Emitting Diode): Used as status indicator for processor functions and
inputs and outputs.
LIFO (Last-In–First-Out): The order that data is entered into and retrieved from a
file.
low byte: Bits 0–7 of a word.
logic: A process of solving complex problems through the repeated use of simple
functions that can be either true or false. General term for digital circuits and
programmed instructions to perform required decision making and computational
functions.
Master Control Relay (MCR): A mandatory hardwired relay that can be
de-energized by any series-connected emergency stop switch. Whenever the MCR
is de-energized, its contacts open to de-energize all application I/O devices.
mnemonic: A simple and easy to remember term that is used to represent a
complex or lengthy set of information.
G–3
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
modem: Modulator/demodulator. Equipment that connects data terminal
equipment to a communication line.
modes: Selected methods of operation. Example: run, test, or program.
negative logic: The use of binary logic in such a way that “0” represents the
voltage level normally associated with logic 1 (for example, 0 = +5V, 1 = 0V).
Positive is more conventional (for example, 1 = +5V, 0 = 0V).
network: A series of stations (nodes) connected by some type of communication
medium. A network may be made up of a single link or multiple links.
nominal input current: The current at nominal input voltage.
normally closed: Contacts on a relay or switch that are closed when the relay is
de-energized or the switch is de-activated; they are open when the relay is energized
or the switch is activated. In ladder programming, a symbol that will allow logic
continuity (flow) if the referenced input is logic “0” when evaluated.
normally open: Contacts on a relay or switch that are open when the relay is
de-energized or the switch is de-activated. (They are closed when the relay is
energized or the switch is activated.) In ladder programming, a symbol that will
allow logic continuity (flow) if the referenced input is logic “1” when evaluated.
offset: The steady-state deviation of a controlled variable from a fixed point.
offline: Describes devices not under direct communication. For example, when
programming in APS.
one-shot: A programming technique that sets a bit for only one program scan.
online: Describes devices under direct communication. For example, when APS is
monitoring the program file in a controller.
operating voltage: For inputs, the voltage range needed for the input to be in the
On state. For outputs, the allowable range of user-supplied voltage.
output device: A device, such as a pilot light or a motor starter coil, that receives
data from the controller.
overall accuracy: The worst case deviation of the output voltage or current from
the ideal over the full output range is the overall accuracy. For inputs, the worst
case deviation of the digital representation of the input signal from the ideal over the
full input range is the overall accuracy. This is expressed in percent of full scale.
processor: A Central Processing Unit. (See CPU.)
processor file: The set of program and data files used by the controller to control
output devices. Only one processor file may be stored in the controller at a time.
G–4
Glossary
program file: The area within a processor file that contains the ladder logic
program.
program mode: When the controller is not executing the processor file and all
outputs are de-energized.
program scan: A part of the controller’s operating cycle. During the scan the
ladder program is executed and the Output data file is updated based on the program
and the Input data file.
programming device: Executable programming package used to develop ladder
diagrams.
protocol: The packaging of information that is transmitted across a network.
read: To acquire data from a storage place. For example, the processor READs
information from the input data file to solve the ladder program.
relay: An electrically operated device that mechanically switches electrical circuits.
relay logic: A representation of the program or other logic in a form normally used
for relays.
REM Run mode: REMote run mode during which the processor scans or executes
the ladder program, monitors input devices, energizes output devices, and acts on
enabled I/O forces.
restore: To download (transfer) a program from a personal computer to a
controller.
reserved bit: A status file location that the user should not read or write to.
retentive data: Information associated with data files (timers, counters, inputs, and
outputs) in a program that is preserved through power cycles. Program files 2–15
are not effected by retentive data.
RS-232: An EIA standard that specifies electrical, mechanical, and functional
characteristics for serial binary communication circuits. A single-ended serial
communication interface.
run mode: When the processor file in the controller is being executed, inputs are
read, the program is scanned, and outputs are energized and de-energized.
rung: Ladder logic is comprised of a set of rungs. A rung contains input and
output instructions. During Run mode, the inputs on a rung are evaluated to be true
or false. If a path of true logic exists, the outputs are made true. If all paths are
false, the outputs are made false.
G–5
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
save: To upload (transfer) a program stored in memory from a controller to a
personal computer; OR to save a program to a computer hard disk.
scan time: The time required for the controller to execute the instructions in the
program. The scan time may vary depending on the instructions and each
instruction’s status during the scan.
sinking: A term used to describe current flow between an I/O device and controller
I/O circuit — typically, a sinking device or circuit provides a path to ground, low, or
negative side of power supply.
sourcing: A term used to describe current flow between an I/O device and
controller I/O circuit — typically, a sourcing device or circuit provides a path to the
source, high, or positive side of power supply.
status: The condition of a circuit or system, represented as logic 0 (OFF) or 1
(ON).
terminal: A point on an I/O module that external I/O devices, such as a push button
or pilot light, are wired to.
throughput: The time between when an input turns on and the corresponding
output turns on.
true: The status of an instruction that provides a continuous logical path on a ladder
rung.
update time: For analog inputs, the time between updates to the meory of the
analog controller of the digital value representing the analog input signal.
For analog outputs, the time from the digital code being received at the analog
controller to the analog output signal of the digital code being output at the
terminals of the ouput channel.
upload: Data is transferred to a programming or storage device from another
device.
user interrupt poll: While executing the user program, the controller firmware
checks for user interrupts that need servicing.
watchdog timer: A timer that monitors a cyclical process and is cleared at the
conclusion of each cycle. If the watchdog runs past its programmed time period, it
will cause a fault.
workspace: The main storage available for programs and data and allocated for
working storage.
write: To copy data to a storage device. For example, the processor WRITEs the
information from the output data file to the output modules.
G–6
Index
Numbers
1761L10BWA
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-9
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-9
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-9
1761L10BWB
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-12
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-12
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-12
1761L16AWA
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-7
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-7
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
troubleshooting, 14-2
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-7
1761L16BBB
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-16
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-16
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
troubleshooting, 14-2
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-16
1761L16BWA
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-10
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-10
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
troubleshooting, 14-2
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-10
1761L16BWB
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-13
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-13
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
troubleshooting, 14-2
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-13
1761L20AWA5A
features, 1-3
input voltage range, 2-18
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-18
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
type, 1-3
wiring diagram, 2-18
1761L20BWA5A
features, 1-3
input voltage range, 2-19
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-19
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
type, 1-3
I–7
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
wiring diagram, 2-19
1761L20BWB5A
features, 1-3
input voltage range, 2-20
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-20
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
type, 1-3
wiring diagram, 2-20
1761L32AAA
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-15
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-15
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
troubleshooting, 14-2
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-15
1761L32AWA
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-8
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-8
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
troubleshooting, 14-2
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-8
1761L32BBB
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-17
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-17
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
troubleshooting, 14-2
type, 1-3
I–8
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-17
1761L32BWA
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-11
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-11
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
troubleshooting, 14-2
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-11
1761L32BWB
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
input voltage range, 2-14
mounting, 1-14
output voltage range, 2-14
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
spacing, 1-14
troubleshooting, 14-2
type, 1-3
wiring, 2-4
wiring diagram, 2-14
32bit addition and subtraction, 8-6
example, 8-6
math overflow selection bit S:2/14, 8-6
A
accessing processor files
normal operation, 4-7
power up, 4-8
Add (ADD), 8-4
execution times, 8-4
instruction parameters, C-4
updates to arithmetic status bits, 8-4
valid addressing modes, C-4
valid file types, C-4
ADD, Add, 8-4
addressing
data files, 4-10
Index
indexed, 4-12
logical, 4-10
using mnemonics, 4-12
addressing modes, C-3
direct addressing, C-3
immediate addressing, C-3
indexed addressing, C-3
AIC+
applying power to, 3-15
attaching to the network, 3-16
connecting, 3-9
isolated modem, 3-11
network, 3-10
pointtopoint, 3-10
installing, 3-16
recommended user supplied components,
3-14
selecting cable, 3-12
AllenBradley, contacting for assistance, P-6,
14-10
AllenBradley Support, P-6
analog
I/O configuration, 5-3
I/O image, 5-2
input current range, 2-23
input filter and update times, 5-3
input software calibration, F-1
input voltage range, 2-23
output current range, 2-23
output voltage range, 2-23
voltage and current ranges, 2-23
analog , wiring, 2-21
analog cable recommendation, 2-21
analog channels, wiring, 2-22
analog controllers, 1-3
minimizing electrical noise, 2-21
analog data, converting, 5-5
analog input specifications, A-6
analog output specifications, A-6
And (AND), 9-18
execution times, 9-18
instruction parameters, C-4
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-18
valid addressing modes, C-4
valid file types, C-4
AND, And, 9-18
application example programs
adjustable timer, E-41
bottle line, E-21
conveyor line, E-24
event driven sequencer, E-19
on/off circuit, E-34
paper drilling machine, E-2
RPM calculation, E-28
spray booth, E-36
time driven sequencer, E-17
using the MSG instruction, 13-12
application specific instructions, 11-2
about, 11-2
bit shift instructions, overview, 11-3
Bit Shift Left (BSL), 11-5
Bit Shift Right (BSR), 11-6
in the paper drilling machine application
example, 11-21
Selectable Timed Interrupt (STI) function,
overview, 11-15
sequencer instructions, overview, 11-7
applying ladder logic to your schematics, 4-14
automatic protocol switching, 3-17
B
basic instructions, 6-2
about, 6-2
bit instructions, overview, 6-3
counter instructions, overview, 6-15
in the paper drilling machine application
example, 6-21
timer instructions, overview, 6-8
baud rate
DF1, B-19
I–9
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
DH-485, B-19
limitations for autoswitching, 3-17
bidirectional counter
operation, 12-11
overview, 12-7
bidirectional counter with quadrature encoder
operation, 12-15
overview, 12-7
bidirectional counter with reset and hold
operation, 12-11
overview, 12-7
bidirectional counter with reset and hold with
quadrature encoder
operation, 12-15
overview, 12-7
bit file (B3:), 4-5
bit instructions
Examine if Closed (XIC), 6-4
Examine if Open (XIO), 6-4
OneShot Rising (OSR), 6-7
Output Energize (OTE), 6-5
Output Latch (OTL), 6-5
Output Unlatch (OTU), 6-5
overview, 6-3
bit shift instructions, overview, 11-3
effects on index register S:24, 11-3
Bit Shift Left (BSL), 11-5
effect on index register S:24, 11-4
entering parameters, 11-3
execution times, 11-5, 11-6
instruction parameters, C-4
using, operation, 11-5
valid file types, C-4
Bit Shift Right (BSR), 11-6
effects on index register S:24, 11-4
entering parameters, 11-3
execution times, 11-5, 11-6
instruction parameters, C-4
using, operation, 11-6
valid addressing modes, C-4
valid file types, C-4
I–10
BSL, Bit Shift Left, 11-5
BSR, Bit Shift Right, 11-6
C
cables
planning routes for DH485 connections,
D-17
selection guide for the AIC+, 3-12
calibating an analog input channel, F-2
CE mark, 1-2
channel configuration
DF1 full-duplex, D-3
DF1 half-duplex, D-6
Clear (CLR), 8-11
execution times, 8-11
instruction parameters, C-4
updates to arithmetic status bits, 8-11
valid addressing modes, C-4
valid file types, C-4
clearing faults, 14-6
CLR, Clear, 8-11
Common Techniques Used in this Manual,
P-6
communication
DeviceNet, 3-18
establishing with controller, 3-17
types of, 13-2
communication protocols
DF1 fullduplex, D-3
DF1 halfduplex, D-5
DH485, D-11
comparison instructions, 7-1, 7-2
about, 7-2
Equal (EQU), 7-3
Greater Than (GRT), 7-4
Greater Than or Equal (GEQ), 7-4
Less Than (LES), 7-3
Less Than or Equal (LEQ), 7-4
Limit Test (LIM), 7-6
Index
Masked Comparison for Equal (MEQ),
7-5
Not Equal (NEQ), 7-3
overview, 7-2
indexed word addresses, 7-2
connecting the system, 3-1
AIC+, 3-9
DF1 fullduplex protocol, 3-2
DH485 network, 3-5
Convert from BCD (FRD), 9-5
example, 9-6
execution times, 9-5
instruction parameters, C-6
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-5
valid addressing modes, C-6
valid file types, C-6
contactors (bulletin 100), surge suppressors
for, 1-10
Convert to BCD (TOD), 9-3
changes to the math register, 9-3
example, 9-4
execution times, 9-3
instruction parameters, C-13
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-3
valid addressing modes, C-13
valid file types, C-13
Contents of this Manual, P-3
converting analog data, 5-5
control file (R6:), 4-6
Converting Analog Input Data, 5-5, 5-6
contact protection methods, 1-8
contacting AllenBradley for assistance, P-6
controller
determining faults, 14-2
dimensions, A-9
fault messages, 14-7
features, 1-3
grounding, 2-2
installation, 1-1
mounting, 1-14
mounting template, A-9
operating cycle, 4-3
replacement parts, A-10
spacing, 1-14
specifications, A-2
status file, B-1
troubleshooting, 14-2
types, 1-3, A-2
16 I/O, 1-3
32 I/O, 1-3
wiring
for highspeed counter operation, 2-24
recommendations, 2-4
wire type, 2-4
controller faults, 14-2
controller operation, normal, 14-2
controllers, analog, 1-3
COP, Copy File, 9-10
Copy File (COP), 9-10
execution times, 9-10
instruction parameters, C-4
using, 9-11
entering parameters, 9-11
valid addressing modes, C-4
valid file types, C-4
Count Down (CTD), 6-19
execution times, 6-19
instruction parameters, C-5
using status bits, 6-19
valid addressing modes, C-5
valid file types, C-5
Count Up (CTU), 6-18
execution times, 6-18
instruction parameters, C-5
using status bits, 6-18
valid addressing modes, C-5
valid file types, C-5
counter file (C5:), 4-6
counter instructions
Count Down (CTD), 6-19
Count Up (CTU), 6-18
in the paper drilling machine application
example, 7-8
I–11
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
overview, 6-15
addressing structure, 6-16
entering parameters, 6-16
how counters work, 6-17
Reset (RES), 6-20
CTD, Count Down, 6-19
CTU, Count Up, 6-18
D
data files, 4-5
addressing, 4-10
organization, 4-5
types, 4-10
file indicator (#), 4-13
data handling instructions, 9-2
about, 9-2
Convert from BCD (FRD), 9-5
Convert to BCD (TOD), 9-3
Copy File (COP), 9-10
Decode 4 to 1 of 16 (DCD), 9-8
Encode 1 of 16 to 4 (ENC), 9-9
FIFO and LIFO instructions, overview,
9-23
Fill File (FLL), 9-10
in the paper drilling machine application
example, 9-28
move and logical instructions, overview,
9-13
DCD, Decode 4 to 1 of 16, 9-8
DDV, Double Divide, 8-10
Decode 4 to 1 of 16 (DCD), 9-8
entering parameters, 9-8
execution times, 9-8
instruction parameters, C-5
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-8
valid addressing modes, C-5
valid file types, C-5
developing your logic program-a model,
4-15
DeviceNet Communications, 3-18
I–12
DF1 fullduplex protocol
configuration parameters, D-3
connecting, 3-2
description, D-3
example system configuration, D-4
using a modem, 3-3, D-9
DF1 halfduplex protocol
configuration parameters, D-6
description, D-5
DH-485 communication protocol,
configuration parameters, D-12
DH485 network
configuration parameters, D-18
connecting, 3-5
description, D-11
devices that use the network, D-13
example system configuration, D-19
initialization, D-13
installation, 3-5
planning considerations, D-16
protocol, D-11
token rotation, D-12
dimensions, controller, A-9
DIN rail, 1-15
mounting dimensions, 1-15
diode, 1N4004, 1-9
direct addressing, C-3
displaying values, 4-13
DIV, Divide, 8-9
Divide (DIV), 8-9
changes to the math register, 8-9
execution times, 8-9
instruction parameters, C-5
updates to arithmetic status bits, 8-9
valid addressing modes, C-5
valid file types, C-5
Double Divide (DDV), 8-10
changes to the math register, 8-10
execution times, 8-10
instruction parameters, C-5
updates to arithmetic status bits, 8-10
valid addressing modes, C-5
Index
valid file types, C-5
E
Electronics Industries Association (EIA),
D-2
EMC Directive, 1-2
emergencystop switches, 1-5
ENC, Encode 1 of 16 to 4, 9-9
Encode 1 of 16 to 4 (ENC), 9-9
entering parameters, 9-9
execution times, 9-9
instruction parameters, C-5
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-10
valid addressing modes, C-5
valid file types, C-5
entering
numeric constants, 4-13
values, 4-14
EQU, Equal, 7-3
Equal (EQU), 7-3
execution times, 7-3
instruction parameters, C-5
valid addressing modes, C-5
valid file types, C-5
error recovery model, 14-5
errors, 14-3
download, B-17
going-to-run, B-14
hardware, 14-3
identifying, 14-6
MSG instruction, 13-10
powerup, B-14
run, B-16, B-17
establishing communication, 3-17
European Union Directive compliance, 1-2
Examine if Closed (XIC), 6-4
execution times, 6-4
instruction parameters, C-13
valid addressing modes, C-13
valid file types, C-13
Examine if Open (XIO), 6-4
execution times, 6-4
instruction parameters, C-13
valid addressing modes, C-13
valid file types, C-13
example programs
adjustable timer, E-41
bottle line, E-21
conveyor line, E-24
event driven sequencer, E-19
on/off circuit, E-34
paper drilling machine, E-2
RPM calculation, E-28
spray booth, E-36
time driven sequencer, E-17
using the MSG instruction, 13-12
Exclusive Or (XOR), 9-20
execution times, 9-20
instruction parameters, C-13
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-20
valid addressing modes, C-13
valid file types, C-13
execution times
listing, B-1
worksheet, B-26
F
fault messages, 14-7
fault recovery procedure, 14-6
fault routine, 14-6
FFL, FIFO Load, 9-25
FFU, FIFO Unload, 9-25
FIFO and LIFO instructions
FIFO Load (FFL), 9-25
FIFO Unload (FFU), 9-25
LIFO Load (LFL), 9-26
LIFO Unload (LFU), 9-26
overview, 9-23
effects on index register S:24, 9-24
I–13
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
entering parameters, 9-23
valid file types, C-6
FIFO Load (FFL), 9-25
execution times, 9-25
instruction parameters, C-6
operation, 9-25
valid addressing modes, C-6
valid file types, C-6
Greater Than or Equal (GEQ), 7-4
execution times, 7-4
instruction parameters, C-6
valid addressing modes, C-6
valid file types, C-6
FIFO Unload (FFU), 9-25
execution times, 9-26
instruction parameters, C-6
operation, 9-25
valid addressing modes, C-6
valid file types, C-6
GRT, Greater Than, 7-4
file indicator (#), 4-13
heat protection, 1-13
file organization
data files, 4-5
program files, 4-4
highspeed counter, wiring, 2-24, 12-7
file types, C-2
Fill File (FLL), 9-10
execution times, 9-10
instruction parameters, C-6
using, 9-12
entering parameters, 9-12
valid addressing modes, C-6
valid file types, C-6
filter, input, 5-3
filter response times, A-7
filtering, input channel, 5-4
FLL, Fill File, 9-10
FRD, Convert from BCD, 9-5
G
general specifications, A-3
GEQ, Greater Than or Equal, 7-4
Greater Than (GRT), 7-4
execution times, 7-4
instruction parameters, C-6
valid addressing modes, C-6
I–14
grounding the controller, 2-2
H
hardware, features, 1-3
HighSpeed Counter (HSC), 12-6
entering parameters, 12-6
execution times, 12-6
instruction parameters, C-7
types of, 12-7
bidirectional counter, 12-10
bidirectional counter with reset and hold,
12-10
bidirectional counter with reset and hold
with a quadrature encoder, 12-14
up counter, 12-8
up counter with reset and hold, 12-8
valid addressing modes, C-7
valid file types, C-7
what happens when going to REM Run,
12-25
highspeed counter instructions, 12-2
about, 12-2
HighSpeed Counter (HSC), 12-6
HighSpeed Counter Interrupt Disable
(HSD), 12-23
HighSpeed Counter Interrupt Enable
(HSE), 12-23
HighSpeed Counter Load (HSL), 12-18
HighSpeed Counter Reset Accumulator
(RAC), 12-22
in the paper drilling machine application
example, 12-29
overview, 12-3
Index
HighSpeed Counter Interrupt Disable
(HSD), 12-23
execution times, 12-23
instruction parameters, C-7
using HSD, 12-24
operation, 12-24
valid addressing modes, C-7
valid file types, C-7
HighSpeed Counter Interrupt Enable (HSE),
12-23
execution times, 12-23
instruction parameters, C-7
using HSE, 12-23
operation, 12-23
valid addressing modes, C-7
valid file types, C-7
HighSpeed Counter Load (HSL), 12-18
entering parameters, 12-18
execution times, 12-18
instruction parameters, C-7
operation, 12-18
valid addressing modes, C-7
valid file types, C-7
HighSpeed Counter Reset Accumulator
(RAC), 12-22
entering parameters, 12-22
execution times, 12-22
instruction parameters, C-10
operation, 12-22
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
HSC, HighSpeed Counter, 12-6
HSD, HighSpeed Counter Interrupt Disable,
12-23
HSE, HighSpeed Counter Interrupt Enable,
12-23
HSL, HighSpeed Counter Load, 12-18
I
I/O configuration, analog, 5-3
I/O image, analog, 5-2
identifying controller faults, 14-6
IIM, Immediate Input with Mask, 10-9
Immediate Input with Mask (IIM), 10-9
entering parameters, 10-9
execution times, 10-9
instruction parameters, C-7
valid addressing modes, C-7
valid file types, C-7
Immediate Output with Mask (IOM), 10-9
entering parameters, 10-9
execution times, 10-9
instruction parameters, C-8
valid addressing modes, C-8
valid file types, C-8
indexed addressing, 4-12, C-3
example, 4-12
specifying, 4-12
Input Channel Filtering, 5-4
input current range, analog, 2-23
input file (I:), 4-5
Input Filter, analog, 5-3
input filter settings, A-7
input specifications, A-4
Input States on Power Down, 1-13
input voltage ranges
1761L10BWA, 2-9
1761L10BWB, 2-12
1761L16AWA, 2-7
1761L16BBB, 2-16
1761L16BWA, 2-10
1761L16BWB, 2-13
1761L20AWA5A, 2-18
1761L20BWA5A, 2-19
1761L20BWB5A, 2-20
1761L32AAA, 2-15
1761L32AWA, 2-8
1761L32BBB, 2-17
1761L32BWA, 2-11
1761L32BWB, 2-14
analog, 2-23
I–15
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
installing, the micro controller, 1-1
instruction execution time, worksheet, B-26
instruction execution times, listing, B-21
instruction memory usage
listing, B-21
worksheet, B-25
instruction set, C-1
INT, Interrupt Subroutine, 11-20
integer file (N7:), 4-6
interrupt latency
STI, 11-16
user, B-24
interrupt priorities, 11-17
Interrupt Subroutine (INT), 11-20
execution times, 11-20
instruction parameters, C-7
valid addressing modes, C-7
valid file types, C-7
IOM, Immediate Output with Mask, 10-9
isolated link coupler, installing, 3-6
J
JMP, Jump, 10-2
JSR, Jump to Subroutine, 10-4
Jump (JMP), 10-2
entering parameters, 10-2
execution times, 10-2
instruction parameters, C-8
using, 10-2
valid addressing modes, C-8
valid file types, C-8
Jump to Subroutine (JSR), 10-4
execution times, 10-4
instruction parameters, C-8
nesting subroutine files, 10-5
using, 10-5
valid addressing modes, C-8
valid file types, C-8
I–16
L
Label (LBL), 10-2
entering parameters, 10-2
execution times, 10-2
instruction parameters, C-8
using, 10-3
valid addressing modes, C-8
valid file types, C-8
ladder logic
applying to your schematics, 4-14
developing your logic program, 4-15
LBL, Label, 10-2
LEDs, 14-2
error with controller, 14-3
normal controller operation, 14-2
LEQ, Less Than or Equal, 7-4
LES, Less Than, 7-3
Less Than (LES), 7-3
execution times, 7-3
instruction parameters, C-8
valid addressing modes, C-8
valid file types, C-8
Less Than or Equal (LEQ), 7-4
execution times, 7-4
instruction parameters, C-8
valid addressing modes, C-8
valid file types, C-8
LFL, LIFO Load, 9-26
LFU, LIFO Unload, 9-26
LIFO Load (LFL), 9-26
execution times, 9-27
instruction parameters, C-8
operation, 9-26
valid addressing modes, C-8
valid file types, C-8
LIFO Unload (LFU), 9-26
execution times, 9-27
instruction parameters, C-8
operation, 9-26
valid addressing modes, C-8
Index
valid file types, C-8
LIM, Limit Test, 7-6
Limit Test (LIM), 7-6
entering parameters, 7-6
execution times, 7-6
instruction parameters, C-9
valid addressing modes, C-9
valid file types, C-9
logical address, 4-10
logical addresses, specifying, using
mnemonics, 4-12
M
machine control, principles of, 4-2
manuals, related, P-5
Masked Comparison for Equal (MEQ), 7-5
entering parameters, 7-5
execution times, 7-5
instruction parameters, C-9
valid addressing modes, C-9
valid file types, C-9
Masked Move (MVM), 9-16
entering parameters, 9-16
execution times, 9-16
instruction parameters, C-10
operation, 9-17
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-16
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
Master Control Relay, 1-4
Master Control Reset (MCR), 10-7
execution times, 10-7
instruction parameters, C-9
valid addressing modes, C-9
valid file types, C-9
master/sender communication, 13-2
math instructions, 8-2
32bit addition and subtraction, 8-6
about, 8-2
Add (ADD), 8-4
Clear (CLR), 8-11
Divide (DIV), 8-9
Double Divide (DDV), 8-10
in the paper drilling machine application
example, 8-14
Multiply (MUL), 8-8
overview, 8-2
changes to the math register, S:13 and
S:14, 8-3
overflow trap bit, S:5/0, 8-3
updates to arithmetic status bits, 8-2
using indexed word addresses, 8-2
Scale Data (SCL), 8-12
Square Root (SQR), 8-11
Subtract (SUB), 8-5
using arithmetic status bits, 9-10
MCR, Master Control Reset, 10-7
MEQ, Masked Comparison for Equal, 7-5
Message (MSG), 13-1
application examples, 13-12
control block layout, 13-5
entering parameters, 13-3
error codes, 13-10
execution times, 13-3
instruction parameters, C-9
timing diagram, 13-8
using status bits, 13-6
valid addressing modes, C-9
valid file types, C-9
mnemonic, using, in logical addresses, 4-12
model for developing a logic program, 4-15
modem cable, constructing your own, 3-11
modems
dialup phone , D-9
leasedline, D-9
line drivers, D-10
radio, D-10
using with MicroLogix controllers, D-9
monitoring, controller operation, fault
recovery procedure, 14-6
motor starters (bulletin 509), surge
suppressors, 1-10
I–17
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
motor starters (bulletin 709), surge
suppressors, 1-10
N
mounting template, A-9
NEG, Negate, 9-22
mounting the controller
using a DIN rail, 1-15
using mounting screws, 1-16
vertically, 1-16
Negate (NEG)
instruction parameters, C-10
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
MOV, Move, 9-15
Move (MOV), 9-15
entering parameters, 9-15
execution times, 9-15
instruction parameters, C-9
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-15
valid addressing modes, C-9
valid file types, C-9
move and logical instructions
And (AND), 9-18
Exclusive Or (XOR), 9-20
Masked Move (MVM), 9-16
Move (MOV), 9-15
Negate (NEG), 9-22
Not (NOT), 9-21
Or (OR), 9-19
overview, 9-13
changes to the math register, S:13 and
S:14, 9-14
entering parameters, 9-13
overflow trap bit, S:5/0, 9-14
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-13
using indexed word addresses, 9-13
MSG, Message, 13-1
MUL, Multiply, 8-8
Multiply (MUL), 8-8
changes to the math register, 8-8
execution times, 8-8
instruction parameters, C-10
updates to arithmetic status bits, 8-8
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
MVM, Masked Move, 9-16
I–18
Negate (NEG), 9-22
execution times, 9-22
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-22
NEQ, Not Equal, 7-3
nesting subroutine files, 10-5
node address (S:15L), B-18, B-19
nominal transfer function, 5-5
Not (NOT), 9-21
execution times, 9-21
instruction parameters, C-10
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-21
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
Not Equal (NEQ), 7-3
execution times, 7-3
instruction parameters, C-10
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
NOT, Not, 9-21
null modem cable, 3-4
number systems, 4-13
radices used, 4-13
numeric constants, 4-13
O
OneShot Rising (OSR), 6-7
entering parameters, 6-7
example rung, 6-7
execution times, 6-7
instruction parameters, C-10
valid addressing modes, C-10
Index
valid file types, C-10
operating cycle, controller's, 4-3
Or (OR), 9-19
execution times, 9-19
instruction parameters, C-10
updates to arithmetic status bits, 9-19
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
OR, Or, 9-19
OSR, OneShot Rising, 6-7
OTE, Output Energize, 6-5
OTL, Output Latch, 6-5
OTU, Output Unlatch, 6-5
output contact protection, selecting, 1-8
output current range, analog, 2-23
Output Energize (OTE), 6-5
execution times, 6-5, 12-24
instruction parameters, C-10
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
output file (O:), 4-5
Output Latch (OTL), 6-5
execution times, 6-5
instruction parameters, C-10
using, 6-6
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
output specifications, A-5
Output Unlatch (OTU), 6-5
execution times, 6-5
instruction parameters, C-10
using, 6-6
valid addressing modes, C-10
valid file types, C-10
output voltage ranges
1761L10BWA, 2-9
1761L10BWB, 2-12
1761L16AWA, 2-7
1761L16BBB, 2-16
1761L16BWA, 2-10
1761L16BWB, 2-13
1761L20AWA5A, 2-18
1761L20BWA5A, 2-19
1761L20BWB5A, 2-20
1761L32AAA, 2-15
1761L32AWA, 2-8
1761L32BBB, 2-17
1761L32BWA, 2-11
1761L32BWB, 2-14
analog, 2-23
overflow trap bit, S:5/0, 8-3
overview
bit instructions, 6-3
comparison instructions, 7-2
counter instructions, 6-15
FIFO and LIFO instructions, 9-23
highspeed counter instructions, 12-3
math instructions, 8-2
move and logical instructions, 9-13
Selectable Timed Interrupt (STI) function,
11-15
timer instructions, 6-8
ownership timeout, D-8
P
planning considerations for a network, D-16
Power Considerations
Input States on Power Down, 1-13
Isolation Transformers, 1-12
Loss of Power Source, 1-12
other line conditions, 1-13
overview, 1-12
Power Distribution, 1-11
preventing excessive heat, 1-13
principles of machine control, 4-2
processor files
organization, 4-4
overview, 4-4
data files, 4-5
program files, 4-5
I–19
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
storing and accessing, 4-6
download, 4-7
normal operation, 4-7
power down, 4-8
power up, 4-8
related publications, P-5
relay contact rating table, A-5
relays, surge suppressors for, 1-10
remote packet support, D-22
program constants, 4-13
replacement parts, controller, A-10
program development model, 4-15
RES, Reset, 6-20
program faults, determining, 14-2
Reset (RES), 6-20
execution times, 6-20
instruction parameters, C-11
resetting the high-speed counter
accumulator
instruction parameters, C-11
valid addressing modes, C-11
valid file types, C-11
resetting the highspeed counter
accumulator, 12-21
execution times, 12-21
operation, 12-21
valid addressing modes, C-11
valid file types, C-11
program files, 4-4, 4-5
program flow control instructions, 10-2
about, 10-2
Immediate Input with Mask (IIM), 10-9
Immediate Output with Mask (IOM), 10-9
in the paper drilling machine application
example, 10-10
Jump (JMP), 10-2
Jump to Subroutine (JSR), 10-4
Label (LBL), 10-2
Master Control Reset (MCR), 10-7
Return (RET), 10-4
Subroutine (SBR), 10-4
Suspend (SUS), 10-8
Temporary End (TND), 10-8
programming overview, 4-1
protection methods for contacts, 1-8
protocol switching, automatic, 3-17
publications, related, P-5
Purpose of this Manual, P-2
Q
quadrature encoder input, 12-14
R
RAC, HighSpeed Counter Reset
Accumulator, 12-22
RC network, example, 1-9
I–20
RET, Return, 10-4
Retentive Timer (RTO), 6-14
execution times, 6-14
instruction parameters, C-11
using status bits, 6-14
valid addressing modes, C-11
valid file types, C-11
Return (RET), 10-4
execution times, 10-4
instruction parameters, C-11
nesting subroutine files, 10-5
using, 10-6
valid addressing modes, C-11
valid file types, C-11
RS232 communication interface, D-2
RTO, Retentive Timer, 6-14
S
Safety Considerations
Disconnecting Main Power, 1-11
Index
overview, 1-11
Periodic Tests of Master Control Relay
Circuit, 1-12
Power Distribution, 1-11
Safety Circuits, 1-11
SBR, Subroutine, 10-4
Scale (SCL)
instruction parameters, C-11
valid addressing modes, C-11
valid file types, C-11
Scale Data (SCL), 8-12
application example, 8-13
entering parameters, 8-12
execution times, 8-12
updates to arithmetic status bits, 8-12
SCL, Scale Data, 8-12
Selectable Timed Disable (STD), 11-18
example, 11-18
execution times, 11-18
instruction parameters, C-12
using, 11-18
valid addressing modes, C-12
valid file types, C-12
Selectable Timed Enable (STE), 11-18
example, 11-18
execution times, 11-18
instruction parameters, C-12
using, 11-18
valid addressing modes, C-12
valid file types, C-12
Selectable Timed Interrupt (STI) function
basic programming procedure, 11-15
Interrupt Subroutine (INT), 11-20
operation, 11-15
interrupt latency and interrupt
occurrences, 11-16
interrupt priorities, 11-17
status file data saved, 11-17
subroutine content, 11-16
overview, 11-15
Selectable Timed Disable (STD), 11-18
Selectable Timed Enable (STE), 11-18
Selectable Timed Start (STS), 11-20
STD/STE zone example, 11-18
Selectable Timed Start (STS), 11-20
execution times, 11-20
instruction parameters, C-12
valid addressing modes, C-12
valid file types, C-12
selected DF1 protocol bit, S:0/12, B-4
Selecting Surge Suppressors, 1-8
Sequencer Compare (SQC), 11-7
entering parameters, 11-8
execution times, 11-7
instruction parameters, C-11
using, 11-11
valid addressing modes, C-11
valid file types, C-11
sequencer instructions
overview, 11-7
effects on index register S:24, 11-7
Sequencer Compare (SQC), 11-7
Sequencer Load (SQL), 11-13
Sequencer Output (SQO), 11-7
Sequencer Load (SQL), 11-13
entering parameters, 11-13
execution times, 11-13
instruction parameters, C-12
operation, 11-14
valid addressing modes, C-12
valid file types, C-12
Sequencer Output (SQO), 11-7
entering parameters, 11-8
execution times, 11-7
instruction parameters, C-12
using, 11-10
valid addressing modes, C-12
valid file types, C-12
sinking and sourcing circuits
overview, 2-3
wiring examples, 2-3
slave/receiver communication, 13-2
spacing the controller, 1-14
specifications
analog input, A-6
I–21
MicroLogix
Preface1000 Programmable Controllers User Manual
analog output, A-6
general, A-3
general output, A-5
input, A-4
input filter response times, A-7
relay contact rating, A-5
instruction parameters, C-12
updates to arithmetic status bits, 8-5
valid addressing modes, C-12
valid file types, C-12
SQO, Sequencer Output, 11-7
surge suppressors, 1-8
example, 1-9
for contactor, 1-10
for motor starters, 1-10
for relays, 1-10
recommended, 1-10
SQR, Square Root, 8-11
SUS, Suspend, 10-8
Square Root (SQR), 8-11
execution times, 8-11
instruction parameters, C-12
updates to arithmetic status bits, 8-11
valid addressing modes, C-12
valid file types, C-12
Suspend (SUS), 10-8
entering parameters, 10-8
execution times, 10-8
instruction parameters, C-13
valid addressing modes, C-13
valid file types, C-13
status data file (S2:), 4-5
system configuration, DH485 connection
examples, D-19
SQC, Sequencer Compare, 11-7
SQL, Sequencer Load, 11-13
status file
descriptions, B-3
overview, B-1
STD, Selectable Timed Disable, 11-18
STE, Selectable Timed Enable, 11-18
STI, Selectable Timed Interrupt, 11-15
interrupt latency, 11-15
storing processor files
download, 4-7
power down, 4-8
power up, 4-8
STS, Selectable Timed Start, 11-20
SUB, Subtract, 8-5
Subroutine (SBR), 10-4
execution times, 10-4
instruction parameters, C-11
nesting subroutine files, 10-5
using, 10-6
valid addressing modes, C-11
valid file types, C-11
Subtract (SUB), 8-5
execution times, 8-5
I–22
system connection, 3-1
T
Temporary End (TND), 10-8
execution times, 10-8
instruction parameters, C-13
valid addressing modes, C-13
valid file types, C-13
timer file (T4:), 4-5
timer instructions
overview
addressing structure, 6-9
entering parameters, 6-8
Retentive Timer (RTO), 6-14
Timer OffDelay (TOF), 6-12
Timer OnDelay (TON), 6-11
Timer OffDelay (TOF), 6-12
execution times, 6-12
instruction parameters, C-13
using status bits, 6-12
valid addressing modes, C-13
valid file types, C-13
Index
Timer OnDelay (TON), 6-11
execution times, 6-11
instruction parameters, C-13
using status bits, 6-11
valid addressing modes, C-13
valid file types, C-13
timing diagram, message instruction, 13-8
user interrupt latency, B-24
V
valid addressing modes, C-1
TOD, Convert to BCD, 9-3
varistors
example, 1-9
recommended, 1-9
TOF, Timer OffDelay, 6-12
voltage ranges, discrete, 2-7
TND, Temporary End, 10-8
TON, Timer OnDelay, 6-11
troubleshooting
automatically clearing faults, 14-6
contacting AllenBradley for assistance,
P-6, 14-10
controller error recovery model, 14-5
determining controller faults, 14-2
identifying controller faults, 14-6
manually clearing faults, 14-6
understanding the controller LED status,
14-2
using the fault routine, 14-6
U
understanding file organization, 4-4
addressing data files, 4-10
numeric constants, 4-13
processor file overview, 4-4
specifying indexed addresses, 4-12
specifying logical addresses, 4-10
using the file indicator (#), 4-13
up counter
operation, 12-8
overview, 12-7
up counter with reset and hold
operation, 12-8
overview, 12-7
update times, analog inputs, 5-3
updating the highspeed counter accumulator,
12-24
W
wire types, 2-4
wiring
analog, 2-21
analog channels, 2-22
wiring diagrams, 2-7
1761L10BWA, 2-9
1761L10BWB, 2-12
1761L16AWA, 2-7
1761L16BBB, 2-16
1761L16BWA, 2-10
1761L16BWB, 2-13
1761L20AWA5A, 2-18
1761L20BWA5A, 2-19
1761L20BWB5A, 2-20
1761L32AAA, 2-15
1761L32AWA, 2-8
1761L32BBB, 2-17
1761L32BWA, 2-11
1761L32BWB, 2-14
wiring recommendations, 2-4
X
XIC, Examine if Closed, 6-4
XIO, Examine if Open, 6-4
XOR, Exclusive Or, 9-20
I–23
Allen-Bradley, a Rockwell Automation Business, has been helping its customers improve
productivity and quality for more than 90 years. We design, manufacture and support a broad range
of automation products worldwide. They include logic processors, power and motion control
devices, operator interfaces, sensors and a variety of software. Rockwell is one of the world’s
leading technology companies.
Worldwide representation.
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Allen-Bradley Headquarters, 1201 South Second Street, Milwaukee, WI 53204 USA, Tel: (1) 414 382-2000 Fax: (1) 414 382-4444
Publication 1761-6.3 – July 1998
Supersedes Publication 1761-6.3 – December 1997
PN 955133-63
Copyright 1998 Rockwell International Corporation Printed in USA
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