PMACPanel User Manual
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0
PMACPanel User Manual
By Delta Tau Data Systems, Inc.
Contents
Chapter 1 - Overview
1
Introduction................................................................................................................................................1
Manual Layout ..........................................................................................................................................1
Organization ..............................................................................................................................1
Conventions Used in This Manual.........................................................................................3
Use Caution When Running the Examples ..........................................................................................3
Safety Summary ........................................................................................................................................4
Motion Commands...................................................................................................................4
Keep Away From Live Circuits .............................................................................................4
Live Circuit Contact Procedures ............................................................................................4
Electrostatic Sensitive Devices...............................................................................................5
HW Interfaces............................................................................................................................5
Magnetic Media ........................................................................................................................5
Technical Support .....................................................................................................................................5
By Telephone.............................................................................................................................5
By FAX and E-Mail .................................................................................................................5
World Wide Web (WWW) .....................................................................................................5
Bulletin Board Service (BBS) ................................................................................................5
Chapter 2 - Getting Started
7
Unpacking and Inspection.......................................................................................................................7
PMAC Compatibility ...............................................................................................................................7
Customer-Furnished Hardware ..............................................................................................................7
Customer-Furnished Software ................................................................................................................8
Delta Tau Software ...................................................................................................................8
National Instruments Software ...............................................................................................8
Microsoft Software ...................................................................................................................9
PMAC Options for PMACPanel............................................................................................................9
Technical Documentation........................................................................................................................9
PMACPanel and Your Computer’s Display ......................................................................................10
Installing PMACPanel ...........................................................................................................................10
PMACPanel Software ............................................................................................................10
Configuring the Device Driver.............................................................................................................11
Testing the Device Driver .....................................................................................................................13
Configuring LabVIEW ..........................................................................................................................15
Installing the Release View...................................................................................................15
Creating Your Own View......................................................................................................16
Mass Compilation...................................................................................................................16
On-Line Help ...........................................................................................................................16
Configuring PMACPanel Communication.........................................................................................17
Testing PMACPanel Communication.................................................................................................18
PMAC Communication I-Variables ....................................................................................19
PComm32 Communication Buffers ....................................................................................20
Trouble Shooting PMACPanel Communication ...............................................................................20
Table of Contents
i
Chapter 3 - PMACPanel Basics
22
PMACPanel and PMAC as Client and Server...................................................................................22
Application Development Components..............................................................................................23
Pewin32 - PMAC Executive.................................................................................................24
PTalk - ActiveX Controls for Visual C++ and Visual Basic ..........................................24
PMACPanel - PMAC for LabVIEW 5.0 ............................................................................24
PMACPanel Interface to PComm32....................................................................................................25
Device Management...............................................................................................................26
Query/Response Communication.........................................................................................26
LabVIEW and PMAC Numeric Data..................................................................................27
Download Management.........................................................................................................27
DPR Binary Data Buffers ......................................................................................................28
PMACPanel Organization.....................................................................................................................28
Device Management and Communication .........................................................................29
Query/Response Interface .....................................................................................................29
Indicators, Controls, and VIs - ICVs ...................................................................................29
Motor ICVs ..............................................................................................................................30
Coordinate System ICVs .......................................................................................................30
Global ICVs .............................................................................................................................30
Accessory ICVs .......................................................................................................................30
Position Capture and Triggering ICVs ................................................................................30
Program Development and Encapsulation Tools ..............................................................31
Data Gathering and Graphical Tools ...................................................................................32
Code Interface Nodes and Dual Ported RAM....................................................................32
Sample Applications ..............................................................................................................32
Miscellaneous Utilities...........................................................................................................33
Documentation ........................................................................................................................33
Chapter 4 - Application Basics
34
Basics ........................................................................................................................................................34
LabVIEW Techniques for PMACPanel..............................................................................................34
PMACPanel Indicator and Control Clusters......................................................................37
Accessing PMACPanel VIs ..................................................................................................38
Clusters With an Associated Function VI ..........................................................................39
PMACPanel VI Terminal Conventions..............................................................................40
PMACPanel Tutorials ............................................................................................................................41
PMACPanel Communication Tutorial................................................................................................41
PmacTutor1- Accessing PComm32.....................................................................................42
PmacTutor2 - Sending Commands and Getting Responses ............................................44
PmacTutor2a - Communication Logging ...........................................................................47
PmacTutor3 - Sending Commands Using Buttons...........................................................50
PmacTutor4 - Button and Response VIs.............................................................................52
PmacTutor5 - Accessing PMAC Status..............................................................................55
PmacTutor6 - Accessing PMAC I-Variables .....................................................................57
PmacTutor6b - Accessing PMAC Memory .......................................................................61
PMACPanel ICVs ...................................................................................................................................65
On-line Commands.................................................................................................................65
PmacMotor ICVs ....................................................................................................................................68
PmacTutor7 - Position, Velocity, Error, and Jogging ......................................................68
PmacTutor8 - Motor Control with Status Monitoring......................................................73
PmacTutor9 - Motor I-Variable Configuration .................................................................78
PmacMotors ICVs ..................................................................................................................................81
PmacTutor10 - Requesting and Plotting Motor Motion...................................................81
PmacGlobal ICVs ...................................................................................................................................86
PmacTutor11 - Configuring PMAC’s Global State..........................................................86
PmacCoord ICVs ....................................................................................................................................90
ii
Table of Contents
PmacTutor12 - Using Coordinate System Definitions.....................................................91
PmacTutor13 - Configuring and Monitoring Coordinate Systems ................................94
PmacAcc ICVs ........................................................................................................................................97
PmacTutor14 – Machine Input and Output........................................................................97
PmacTutor15 – ACC16D Control Panel.............................................................................99
Chapter 5 - Development Tools
102
Basics ......................................................................................................................................................102
Tool Menus............................................................................................................................................103
Modifying the menu .............................................................................................................104
Modifying PmacTerminalMenu.........................................................................................104
Basic Tool VI Requirements...............................................................................................105
Basic Tool VI Configuration ..............................................................................................106
PmacTerminal.......................................................................................................................................107
Basic Terminal 101...............................................................................................................108
Basic Command Editing......................................................................................................109
Buffer Management..............................................................................................................109
Terminal Indicators ..............................................................................................................110
Terminal Controls .................................................................................................................110
Implementation Diagram.....................................................................................................111
PmacTerminalJog .................................................................................................................................114
PmacTerminalEdit ................................................................................................................................115
Encapsulating Motion Programs ........................................................................................117
PmacTerminalExecute .........................................................................................................................118
PmacTerminalMotors...........................................................................................................................122
PmacTerminalMotorX-Y ....................................................................................................................124
PmacTerminalGather ...........................................................................................................................126
Specifying Gather Addresses..............................................................................................131
Chapter 6 - Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
136
Basics ......................................................................................................................................................136
PmacProgSubVI....................................................................................................................................136
PmacPQMExamp ..................................................................................................................................139
PmacPQM Clusters ..............................................................................................................142
PmacPQM Conversions.......................................................................................................143
PmacPQM Datalogging.......................................................................................................144
Using Encapsulated Motion Programs ..............................................................................................146
PmacTestExamp ....................................................................................................................................147
Chapter 7 - Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
151
Basics ......................................................................................................................................................151
Position Basics ......................................................................................................................................152
Position-Capture....................................................................................................................................153
Trigger Condition .................................................................................................................153
Homing ...................................................................................................................................................153
Action on Trigger..................................................................................................................153
Home Complete ....................................................................................................................154
Home Position Offset...........................................................................................................154
Zero-Move Homing..............................................................................................................155
Homing Into a Limit Switch ...............................................................................................155
Homing from PLC and Motion Programs ........................................................................155
PmacHomeExamp ................................................................................................................................155
Configuring the Position Capture Trigger........................................................................157
Monitoring the Home Position Capture ............................................................................160
Home Position Transformations.........................................................................................162
Table of Contents
iii
Encapsulated PLC Programs ...............................................................................................................164
Chapter 8 - Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
166
Basics ......................................................................................................................................................166
PmacEncoderPositionExamp ..............................................................................................................166
Encoder Position Transformations.....................................................................................167
Position-Capture for Non-Homing Purposes ...................................................................................169
PLC Capture Flag Processing.............................................................................................169
PmacEncoderCaptureExamp ..............................................................................................................170
External Triggers for Position Capture .............................................................................172
PMAC Position Compare Operation .................................................................................................172
Required M -Variables..........................................................................................................173
Pre-loading the Compare Position .....................................................................................173
Triggering External Action .................................................................................................175
PLC Compare Handling ......................................................................................................175
PmacEncoderCompareExamp ............................................................................................................176
Method 1 - PLC Operation..................................................................................................179
Method 2 - One-Shot Operation.........................................................................................180
Method 3 - PMACPanel Interval Generation...................................................................180
PmacEncoder Registers .......................................................................................................................180
Encoder Register Access .....................................................................................................180
Chapter 9 - PMAC and NI-DAQ Interfacing
182
Basics ......................................................................................................................................................182
External PMAC Signals .......................................................................................................................182
Compare-Equals Outputs (JEQU)......................................................................................183
Servo Clock (JRS232)..........................................................................................................184
General Purpose Digital Inputs and Outputs....................................................................184
Synchronous M-Variables ...................................................................................................185
Position Capture FLA Gs .....................................................................................................187
DAQ Signals ..........................................................................................................................................188
Analog I/O Channels ............................................................................................................188
Trigger and Scan Clock Connections................................................................................188
PmacDAQMove....................................................................................................................................188
PMAC and AT-MI0-16 Signal Connections....................................................................189
Single Trigger DAQ.............................................................................................................................192
Multi-Trigger DAQ ..............................................................................................................................192
Multi-Trigger DAQ with Servo Clock Sampling............................................................................193
Further Sampling Options...................................................................................................................194
Other Interface Options .......................................................................................................................194
Chapter 10 - PComm32 Code Interface Nodes
195
Basics ......................................................................................................................................................195
LabVIEW Code Interface Node Basics ............................................................................................195
What is a CIN? ......................................................................................................................195
Using a CIN with PComm32..............................................................................................196
Setting up a PMACPanel CIN Configuration..................................................................................196
Adding PComm32 Include Path.........................................................................................196
Adding Pmac.lib to Project .................................................................................................197
Configuring the IDE.............................................................................................................197
The Easy Way to Add New Projects .................................................................................197
Multiple CIN Projects in a Workspace .............................................................................198
Creating a CIN C-Stub for PComm32 ..............................................................................199
Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported RAM
iv
200
Table of Contents
Basics ......................................................................................................................................................200
Required Background Understanding...............................................................................201
General Architecture Notes.................................................................................................201
PmacDPRRealTime ..............................................................................................................................202
PmacDPRRealTimeExample ..............................................................................................202
PmacDPRRealTimeVectorExample ..................................................................................210
PmacDPRFixedBack............................................................................................................................218
PmacDPRFixedBackExample ............................................................................................218
PmacDPRNumeric ................................................................................................................................221
DPR Addresses and Data Organization ............................................................................222
PmacDPRNumericExample ................................................................................................222
PmacDPRNumericClusterExample ...................................................................................228
PmacDPRNumericCINClusterExample ...........................................................................231
PmacDPRNumericSlaveExample ......................................................................................233
PmacDPRVarBack...............................................................................................................................235
PmacDPRVarBackExample ................................................................................................236
PmacDPRVarBackVectorExample ...................................................................................240
Chapter 12 - Interrupts
241
Basics ......................................................................................................................................................241
PmacInterruptExamp ............................................................................................................................241
Glossary of Terms
243
Index
245
Table of Contents
v
Chapter 1 - Overview
Introduction
Congratulations on your selection of PMAC and PMACPanel for National
Instruments LabVIEW, Delta Tau’s complete motion control and
instrumentation package. When you selected PMAC for the motion control
portion of your DAQ application you gained far more than a simple positioning
system. You get an integrated precision motion programming system with
incredible capabilities.
With PMACPanel an entirely new world of motion control applications and
capabilities opens. Motion that triggers acquisitions and responds to data
gathered by SCXI, VXI, and industrial automation networks such as Device Net
and Field Bus is now possible using LabVIEW’s very popular and powerful
graphical programming environment.
PMACPanel is an easily extensible set of more than 250 Virtual Instruments
(VIs), Indicators, and Controls that allow you to communicate with and control
PMAC from LabVIEW. It allows you to create a LabVIEW application that can
monitor and control everything PMAC is doing using LabVIEW while at the
same time preserving your understanding of the existing PMAC interface.
Manual Layout
This manual exp lains how to install and use PMACPanel to develop custom
applications. It assumes the system integrator and PMACPanel developer has a
basic understanding of the PMAC motion control board and LabVIEW. It does
not cover the hardware and electrical configuration of PMAC or the use of
Pewin32. If questions about a particular aspect of the installation arise, do not
attempt the task until a thorough understanding is gained. Feel free to contact
Delta Tau Data Systems, Inc., technical support at any time during installation.
Refer to the Technical Support paragraph below for information on contacting
our technical support department.
Organization
The manual is comprised of 13 chapters that take you through PMACPanel’s
many capabilities with installation instructions, architecture basic, tutorials,
Chapter 1 - Overview
1
terminal tools, motion program development, homing, capturing, triggering,
interfacing and DPR.
Many of the chapters contain figures of the VI panels and diagrams to illustrate
specific architectural approaches and VI implementations that you might need to
modify to suit your purposes. Not all VIs are covered in detail. Many of them
are complex and require in depth knowledge of PMAC’s internal memory map
that are way beyond a reasonable user manual. The last chapter contains detailed
descriptions of the every cluster and VI in PMACPanel – even those not detailed
in the previous chapters.
Chapter 1 – Overview
This chapter is an introduction to the PMACPanel features, manual layout,
important safety issues, and h ow to access technical support.
Chapter 2 – Getting Started
This chapter specifies HW and SW equipment requirements, installation of the
SW, configuration and testing of device drivers, and basic testing of
PMACPanel communication.
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
This chapter introduces the client/server architecture that PMACPanel is based
on and various issues involved in defining your application.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
This chapter covers a number of LabVIEW techniques that are used in
PMACPanel and may be new to you. This is followed by a set of tutorial
exercises that start with opening communication with PMAC and start you down
the path of developing your own PMAC enabled applications.
Chapter 5 – Development Tools
PMACPanel has numerous tools for developing and testing applications. These
tools not only ease your development task; they are a great source for
comp onents and ideas of your applications.
Chapter 6 – Motion Program Interfaces
This is where you really harness the motion computer powers of PMAC for your
applications. One of PMACPanel’s nicest features is that it can create a wrapper
VI around a native PMAC motion program that allows you to easily integrate
the program into your application.
Chapter 7 –Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture:
When you use PMAC in a test and measurement application, establishment of
an accurate home position is important. In this chapter we introduce VIs that
enable you to do this from your application and introduce PMAC’s HW position
capture capabilities.
Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
This chapter introduces PMAC’s ability to generate HW and SW triggers at
specific motor positions. This includes a suite of VIs to configure these
capabilities, and encapsulate PLC programs much like the wrappers introduced
in Chapter 6.
Chapter 9 – PMAC and NI-DAQ Interfacing
2
Chapter 1– Overview
In this chapter we show you how to tightly couple PMAC with standard NIDAQ boards to establish, triggering conditions and if required, sample-bysample registration of acquired data with motor positions.
Chapter 10 – PComm32 Code Interface Nodes
Accessing PMAC’s DPR in an efficient way requires the use of LabVIEW Code
Interface Nodes – CINs. CINs are compiled C code that a CIN calls when
executing. In this chapter we discuss some basic issues associated with using
Pcomm32 in CINs and develop an architecture for adding new CIN rapidly.
Chapter 11 – DPR - Dual Ported RAM
DPR allows PMAC to communicate with the host computer using memory in a
way that significantly increases the speed of communication. In addition PMAC
firmware has facilities that automatically copy predefined and user defined data
into DPR for access by the host. In this chapter we introduce the VIs that
support this interface.
Chapter 12 – Interrupts
PMAC supports the generation of interrupts from various sources. This chapter
introduces one mechanism for handling PMAC interrupts from LabVIEW.
Chapter 13 – VI Reference
This is an exhaustive alphabetical reference defining the operation of every
PMACPanel VI, control, and data type.
Conventions Used in This Manual
The following conventions are used throughout the manual:
<ENTER>
<CTRL+F4>
Italic text inside arrows is used to represent ke yboard
keys or key combinations.
Edit»Edit Control
OPEN PROGRAM
Dropdown menu selectio n or mouse operations.
PmacDevOpen
PMACPanel VI names
Bus Addresses
Dx7FA000
Arial bold text is used for dialog-box items.
Mono-spaced is used for code listings.
OCR text is used for dialog-box entries.
Information which, if n ot observed, may cause serious
injury or death.
Information which, if not observed, may cause damage
to equipment or software.
A note concerning special functions or information of
special interest.
Use Caution When Running the Examples
PMACPanel has many examples to introduce itself and verify things are
working properly. You need to be aware of a few issues before actually running
the examples.
•
Chapter 1 - Overview
PMACPanel will cause your PMAC to execute motion. Please be
careful.
3
•
PMACPanel may require some changes in your PMAC’s I-Variable
configuration. You may also inadvertently change an I-Variable during
the execution of some of the examples. If you have a currently
working system please use Pewin32 to save the configuration before
making changes to your PMAC.
PMACPanel will download programs and PLCs when some of its comp onents
run. If you currently have motion programs and PLCs that you value please use
Pewin32 to save them before executing those examples that utilize encapsulated
motion programs and PLCs. Otherwise, they will be replaced.
Safety Summary
The following are general safety precautions not related to any specific
procedures and therefore may not appear elsewhere in this publication. These
are recommended precautions that all personnel using PMAC must understand
and apply during different phases of operation and maintenance.
Motion Commands
Until proper HW
safeties have been
installed,
configured, and tested extreme
caution must be exercised when
moving motors to prevent
damage and possible injury!
PMAC moves motors. Sometimes very powerful motors driving sensitive
equipment. PMACPanel developers are responsible for making certain they
are thoroughly familiar with their mechanical setup, its capabilities, and
performance and movement limitations. Furthermore that motion commands
sent to PMAC do not cause damage or injury.
Keep Away From Live Circuits
Do not replace components or make adjustments inside equipment with power
applied. Under certain conditions, dangerous potentials may exist when power
has been turned off due to charges retained by capacitors. To avoid casualties,
always remove power and discharge and ground a circuit before touching it.
Live Circuit Contact Procedures
Never attempt to remove a person from a live circuit with your bare hands. To
do so is to risk sure and sudden death. If a person is connected to a live circuit,
the following steps should be taken:
4
•
Call for help immediately
•
De-energize the circuit, if possible.
•
Use a wood or fiberglass hot stick to pull the person free of the circuit.
•
Apply cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if the person has stopped
breathing or is in cardiac arrest.
•
Obtain immediate medical assistance.
Chapter 1– Overview
Electrostatic Sensitive Devices
Various circuit card assemblies and electronic components may be classified as
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) sensitive devices. Equipment manufacturers
recommend handling all such components in accordance with standard ESD
procedures. FAILURE TO DO SO MAY VOID YOUR WARRANTY.
HW Interfaces
When interfacing PMAC signals with any other data acquisition equipment be
extremely careful to avoid shorting signals to supply or ground potentials.
Furthermore, observe all signal load, voltage, and current limitations. FAILURE
TO DO SO MAY VOID YOUR WARRANTY.
Magnetic Media
Motors and amplifiers may generate strong magnetic fields. Do not place or
store magnetic media (tapes, discs, etc.) within ten feet of any magnetic field.
Technical Support
Delta Tau is happy to respond to any questions or concerns you have regarding
PMACPanel. You can contact the Delta Tau Technical Support Staff by the
following methods:
By Telephone
For immediate service, you can contact the Delta Tau Technical Support Staff
by telephone Monday through Friday. Our support line hours and telephone
numbers are listed below.
By FAX and E-Mail
You can FAX or E-Mail your request or problem to us overnight and we will
deal with it the following business day. Our FAX numbers and E-Mail
addresses are listed below. Please supply all pertinent equipment set-up
information.
World Wide Web (WWW)
Delta Tau maintains a complete website containing many manuals, product
updates, help files, application notes, and programming examples. We may be
contacted at www.deltatau.com
Bulletin Board Service (BBS)
You can also leave messages on one of our Bulletin Board Services (BBS). The
BBS is provided for our Customers, Distributors, Representatives, Integrators, et
Chapter 1 - Overview
5
al. We invite you to use this service. You can download & upload files and
read posted bulletins and Delta Tau newsletters. Messages may be left for
anyone who is a member/user of the Bulletin Board System(s). All you need is
a modem and ProComm-Plus or similar communications program. Many
Download-Upload Protocols such as Z-Modem are supported.
World Headquarters
Eastern U.S. Office
European Office
Delta Tau Data Systems, Inc.
Delta Tau Data Systems, Inc.
Delta Tau Data Systems International
21314 Lassen Street
10754 Decoursey Pike
Industrieweg 175, Suite 7
Chatsworth CA, 91311
Ryland Heights, KY 41015
3044 AS Rotterdam, Netherlands
Support Hot Line
Support Hot Line
Support Hot Line
Monday through Friday
Monday through Friday
Monday through Friday
8:30am to 4:30pm PST
8:30am to 4:30pm EST
8:00am to 4:00pm GMT
Voice: (818) 998-2095
Voice: (606) 356-0600
Voice: 31-10-462-7405
FAX:
(818) 998-7807
FAX:
(606) 356-9910
FAX:
31-10-245-0945
BBS:
(818) 407-4859
BBS:
(606) 356-6662
BBS:
TBD
E-Mail: [email protected]
E-Mail: [email protected]
BBS Settings:
E-Mail: [email protected] 4all.nl
Baud Rates: 1200 to 19.2
8 – data bits, 1 - stop bit, No Parity
6
Chapter 1– Overview
Chapter 2 - Getting Started
Unpacking and Inspection
After receiving and opening the PMACPanel package, compare the contents to
the packing list to ensure everything has been received. If anything shown on
the packing list is missing, contact Delta Tau immediately. Carefully inspect all
components for signs of physical damage.
PMACPanel consists of
•
PMACPanel CD containing VIs, on-line documentation, and Microsoft
Word 97’ version of documentation.
•
PMACPanel Technical Documentation Package
PMAC Compatibility
PMACPanel works with the following motion control boards
•
PMAC-PC 4 or 8 axis
•
PMAC-LITE 4-axis
•
PMAC2 - 4 or 8 axis
•
MiniPMAC
Installation and configuration of PMAC, amplifiers, and motors may have been
performed by your system integrator or must be performed by you. Refer to the
documentation provided by your integrator or with the purchase of your PMAC
for details.
PMACPanel supports PMAC-2 with the exception of certain encoder specific
capabilities such as encoder capture and compare.
Customer-Furnished Hardware
In order for the PMACPanel to operate, the following customer-furnished
hardware is required:
Chapter 2 – Getting Started
7
•
IBM or 100% compatible 486/66 MHz personal computer (PC).
Pentium® or equivalent recommended.
•
Minimum of 16MBof RAM. 32MB recommended
•
A minimum of 100MB of free hard disk space.
•
SVGA color monitor with minimum 1024x768 resolution.
In addition, the following optional National Instruments or third party data
acquisition equipment may exist:
•
Multi-function data acquisition I/O cards
•
Signal conditioning equipment
•
Image Acquisition
•
GPIB Instrument Control
•
Industrial Communication
Customer-Furnished Software
PMACPanel requires Microsoft Windows 95 or Windows NT 4.0 to operate.
Delta Tau Software
PMACPanel requires the existence of Delta Tau’s PMAC device drivers. There
are several possible options you may either have already installed or purchased
with PMACPanel. The following information will help you determine where
you are in the installation process and the steps needed to successfully install
and configure PMACPanel
•
You have PMAC Executive for Windows - Pewin32 installed and
tested. You can skip those installation steps involved with the
installation of the PComm32 device driver.
•
You have PComm32 installed and tested. You can skip those
installation steps involved with the installation of the PComm32 device
driver.
•
You have purchased and installed PTalk. You can skip those
installation steps involved with the installation of the PComm32 device
driver.
•
You have purchased none of the above options. You will be directed to
install a limited edition of the driver, configure it, and test it. Certain
PMACPanel capabilities may not be supported without PComm32.
National Instruments Software
PMACPanel was developed for LabVIEW 5.0. Previous versions of LabVIEW
are not supported by Delta Tau’s PMACPanel motion package. LabVIEW must
8
Chapter 2– Getting Started
be installed prior to installing PMACPanel. LabVIEW patch 5.0fix2, available
from National Instruments via FTP is highly recommended
You may have other SW from National Instruments or Third Party sources such
as NI-DAQ. There are no known conflicts with PMACPanel when using these
packages.
Microsoft Software
Certain PMACPanel capabilities are implemented with compiled C code. These
operate perfectly as is. Should you desire to modify them to suit your
requirements or add other CINs for specific reasons you need Microsoft Visual
C++ 5.0 or Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0. PMACPanel does not directly support
other compilers. However, a talented SW engineer can make the required
project modifications for other compilers in short order.
PMAC Options for PMACPanel
PMACPanel supports a wide range of PMAC’s capabilities. Some of these
require the purchase of additional Delta Tau hardware and software accessories.
These options include:
•
PMAC’s Dual Ported RAM – This is required to utilize the PmacDPR
collection of VIs.
•
PComm32 – Complete PMAC device driver. PMACPanel provides a
version of the complete driver with reduced capabilities. Tailoring of
some PMACPanel capabilities may require the complete Pcomm32
release.
•
Various PMAC I/O and accessory options
Technical Documentation
The PMACPanel User Manual included with this package is available in
electronic form on the CD. The Microsoft Word document is located in the
Documentation directory.
The PMAC User Manual and PMAC Software Reference Manual should have
been provided with your PMAC. These references are absolutely necessary for
any PMAC development effort.
If you will be modifying PMACPanel VIs that utilize DPR you need the
Pcomm32 Reference Manual.
In addition to the required SW manuals the following technical manuals are
required to successfully configure, installs and interface PMAC.
•
Hardware manual specific to your PMAC model
•
Manuals for PMAC options such as Dual Ported RAM
If any of these manuals are missing, please contact Delta Tau for a replacement
before attempting your development.
Chapter 2 – Getting Started
9
PMACPanel and Your Computer’s Display
PMACPanel’s indicators and controls are configured for display on a computer
with 1024x768 resolution or greater. You should set your display’s resolution to
at least this size to use them. PMACPanel VIs work at smaller display sizes but
the panels will not fit within your display area. You can choose to resize the
panel controls or change the size of your display.
Installing PMACPanel
Because of the number of SW drivers and steps in the communication process it
is extremely important that each step be done carefully and tested before
proceeding to the next. There are a few steps that must be taken prior to
installing PMACPanel.
•
Install, configure, and test LabVIEW 5.0 or greater and any patches.
•
Install, configure, and test any National Instruments boards
•
Install, configure, and test your systems’ PMAC hardware
Install, configure, and test PComm32, Pewin32, and/or PTalk if purchased. If
these options were not purchased you will install a limited edition of the
PComm32 device driver included with PMACPanel.
PMACPanel Software
Before installing PMACPanel, read the license agreement included in this
manual (behind title page). You should also check the release notes included
with the manual and located in the Documentation directory on the CD for last
minute changes. Installation of PMACPanel is done in two steps. First, the
drivers must be installed. Next, the PMACPanel SW must be installed.
Installation of the Driver
Skip this step if you have already installed and tested PeWin32, PComm32, or
PTalk. If you have not purchased one of the tools locate the directory
PMACPanel Drivers on the CD and run Setup. The installation program will
suggest a directory path where the program files should be copied. The
suggested directory location is c:\Program Files\Delta Tau\PMACPanel. This
will install the drivers and two applications - MotionExe and PMACTest.
Installation of PMACPanel
To install PMACPanel, locate the directory PMACPanel on the CD and run
Setup. If you have properly installed LabVIEW the installation program will
add several components to your LabVIEW installation. If Setup cannot locate
LabVIEW specify its location or exit the installation and install LabVIEW. The
primary PMACPanel component is the directory PMACPanel.lib in your
LabVIEW installation directory. The library directory contains numerous subdirectories to organize the VIs, utilities, and documentation.
10
Chapter 2– Getting Started
Configuring the Device Driver
You must configure and test the driver installation before running PMACPanel
for the first time. If you have purchased and installed Pewin32 or PComm32
this step has already been completed. Proceed to Configuring LabVIEW.
PMAC communication configuration has been centralized in your operating
system, making the setup of PMAC much like other devices in your computer
(i.e. video card, sound card etc.). All setup is done through the "MOTION
CONTROLS" applet accessible through your operating systems CONTROL
PANEL or the included configuration program MotionExe. Before running this
application it is important that all applications that use Delta Tau’s 32-bit
communication driver PComm32 be shut down. This includes Pewin32, NC for
Windows, or any applications developed with PComm32 or PTalk.
To configure PMAC communication, click on the Motion Control gear icon
or execute the program MotionExe created during the installation. The
following dialog box will appear
The Windows NT version of this dialog has extra buttons labeled “Unload”,
“Load”, and “Startup”. “Load” and “Unload” should only be used when trouble
shooting the PMAC installation. "Startup" may be used to tell Windows NT
how to load the PComm32 communication driver.
If this is your first time running the applet there will be no PMAC's listed in the
"Motion control devices" list box. This is because none have been "Added" to
your operating system yet. To add a PMAC press the "Add" button to get the
following dialog box:
Chapter 2 – Getting Started
11
This dialog box prompts you for a device number to associate with the PMAC
you are adding. Always start with your first PMAC as Device 0, the second
PMAC in your system as Device 1 and so on. The applet will handle the
enumerating for you. Press OK, to get the configuration dialog
This is where you specify how PMAC is connected to your system and the
resources used by PMAC. The configuration you define here must match the
hardware jumper settings on the PMAC itself and not conflict with those already
assigned by Windows 95 or Windows NT to other system devices or National
Instruments accessories. Serial port communication requires the use of a serial
cable.
When the configuration is properly specified click OK. If PMAC is
communicating with the driver properly the following dialog appears.
12
Chapter 2– Getting Started
If there is a problem with PMAC, the assigned resources, or the driver the
following dialog will appear.
To remedy the situation, check for resource conflicts with other devices in
inconsistent hardware jumpers. If the problem persists contact Delta Tau
Technical support.
The "Advanced" button is used to configure DPR settings typically used with
the Delta Tau NC for Windows software.
Testing the Device Driver
Initial testing of PMAC and the device driver are done with the program
PMACTest included with PMACPanel or Pcomm32 drivers. When PMACTest
executes, the following dialog appears requesting the preferred operational
mode.
Click “OK” and a terminal window will appear
Chapter 2 – Getting Started
13
Until proper HW
safeties have been
PMACTest is now in terminal emulation mode, allowing you to interact directly
with PMAC. Although it is tempting to move motors when communication is
installed, configured, AND tested first established in this step you should be thoroughly familiar with your
extreme caution must be
mechanical setup and be certain that commands executed from PMACTest will
exercised when moving motors to not cause damage or injury.
prevent damage and possible
injury!
Check to see if you get a response by typing I10<Enter>. PMAC should
respond with a six or seven digit number. Now type III<Enter> -- PMAC
should respond with a beep, signifying an unrecognized command. Next, satisfy
yourself that you can communicate with the PMAC card at a basic level. Type
P<Enter>. This requests a position. PMAC should respond with a number.
If your system contains a Now type <CONTROL-F>. You should get back eight numbers (one for each
PMAC-LITE, you will
axis) since <CONTROL-F> requests following errors from all eight motors;
still get back eight numbers when some or all may be zero. Please note that even with encoder counts as read-out
you type <CONTROL-F>.
(no scaling), PMAC's position is displayed with fractional counts.
If error dialogs appear or the responses are not as specified check PMACTest’s
help capability. It might help to revisit the previous section Configuring the
Driver. If the problem persists contact Delta Tau Technical support.
Congratulations! You have successfully installed PMAC and the PComm32
communication drivers on your system.
14
Chapter 2– Getting Started
Configuring LabVIEW
During the installation of PMACPanel the directory PMACPanel.lib containing
the PMACPanel distribution VIs was created in your LabVIEW directory. There
are three things that need to be done to seamlessly integrate PMACPanel into
your LabVIEW development environment
•
Create a view
•
Mass compile the VIs
•
Configure PMACPanel for your PMAC driver configuration
Installing the Release View
To facilitate your use of PMACPanel you should install the view contained in
the release or create your own view so that the PMACPanel VIs and controls are
easily accessible from the Controls and Functions palettes and do not clutter
your User.lib directory. The procedure for doing this is outlined here.
•
Run LabVIEW
•
Select Edit»Select Palette Set»PMACPanel. This view is a
modification of the default view. If no PMACPanel selection appears
check for a directory named PMACPanel in the directory
LabVIEW \Menus.
The Controls and Functions palettes will appear as
Access to the entire suite of PMACPanel controls and function VIs is now
available using the
Chapter 2 – Getting Started
15
icon and its sub-palettes. PMACPanel icons are text based and indicate the
PMACPanel.lib subdirectory they are located in and their specific function.
Creating Your Own View
If you did not install PMACPanel in PMACPanel.lib or you already have a
custom view to accommodate other LabVIEW packages refer to the LabVIEW
manuals or Online Reference under the topic Palettes Editor to add
PMACPanel to your palettes. This can be done by using Edit»Edit Control &
Function Palettes… option, creating a new view, inserting a Submenu, and
linking it to a directory - PMACPanel.lib (or your own name). The icon
\PmacDocument\PmacPanelIcon.bmp can be added during the palette editing
process.
Mass Compilation
This step compiles the entire PMACPanel release so that there are fewer
searches when loading VIs and confirms that everything can be found. Select
Edit»Mass Compile to display the file selection dialog while you have a VI,
any VI, open. Browse your way to the directory PMACPanel.lib and click
“Select Cur Dir”. LabVIEW will then begin loading and compiling the entire
PMACPanel release. When this is complete click “Cancel”.
If you have purchased
the PComm32 package
you have the ability to develop
LabVIEW Code Interface Nodes
that may require re-compilation
See Chapter 10 for details.
If the compilation process encounters problems note the error message. The
most common problem encountered will be its inability to locate the PComm32
driver extension Pmac.dll installed by the Pewin32, PComm32, PTalk, or
PMACPanel. This should be located in c:\Windows\System. If the file is not in
this directory try to locate it and determine where the file was placed. You can
copy the file into the correct directory and reattempt the compilation.
On-Line Help
PMACPanel has extensive on-line help in two forms. Extensive documentation
of every VI and its terminals is available using the standard LabVIEW
Help»Show Help option. There are also several standard Windows on-line help
files located in the LabVIEW\Help sub-directory. These include help versions
of the printed manuals and several PMAC manuals. This is useful when
examining the examples and tutorials. When LabVIEW starts the contents of
this directory are parsed and any help files located in the directory are added to
LabVIEW’s pull down help menu. The figure below shows both forms of help.
Note the entry in the pull down menu for On Line PMAC Reference. We will
add other on-line help files as called for. Many of these can be down loaded
from Delta Tau’s web site and copied into the LabVIEW\Help directory.
16
Chapter 2– Getting Started
Configuring PMACPanel Communication
PMACPanel communicates with PMAC using the PComm32 device driver
configured previously. To access the driver from PMACPanel the device
number and communication mode defined for the driver must be defined for
PMACPanel. PMACPanel’s primary device driver, PmacDevOpen, is
configured with the following procedure
Chapter 2 – Getting Started
•
Run LabVIEW
•
Open the VI PmacDevOpen. Select File»Open and navigate to:
PMACPanel.lib\PmacDevice\PmacDevOpen.vi . The following panel
should appear
17
Set the Device Number control - not the indicator in the white box - on the front
panel to the device number specified for your PMAC during the configuration of
the driver. The default Device Number in a new PMACPanel package is 0. If
this is your device no change is required. Otherwise, mo dify the control and
make the value permanent using the right mouse button and the Data
Operations»Make Current Value Default option then saving the VI.
The device driver manager allows you to select Serial Port or In PC Bus as the
desired communication mode. The same selection should appear in the
Communication Mode drop list on the front panel. The default mode specifies
the use of the Bus. If this is your mode no change is required. If the desired
communication mode is DPR the device driver control panel should specify In
PC Bus along with a valid DPR address. The Communication Mode in this panel
should display DPR. As with the device number this should be made permanent
by using the right mouse button and Data Operations»Make Current Value
Default option and saving the VI.
Testing PMACPanel Communication
The final step in the installation of PMACPanel is to test its ability to
communicate with the device driver. After configuring PmacDevOpen and
saving the default changes execute it using the run button on the menu bar. The
panel should change to reflect the Type, Rom Date, and Rom Version of your
PMAC as shown here.
18
Chapter 2– Getting Started
If you see something like this on your panel - Congratulations! You have
successfully installed PMAC and the PComm32 communication drivers on your
system. Proceed to Chapter 3.
PMAC Communication I-Variables
PComm32 supports communication with PMAC using UNICODE and standard
C/C++ ASCII strings. PMACPanel is configured to use C/C++ ASCII strings
not UNICODE due to the use of LabVIEW’s Call Library VI to interface
LabVIEW with PComm32.
PMAC uses I-Variables to define communication characteristics. These are
important to verify because the behavior of PMACPanel depends on their value.
If PMACPanel communication is not operating properly configure these values
using Pewin32 or the PMACTest application included with PMACPanel.
I1 - Serial Port Mode
This parameter specifies whether PMAC will use hardware flow control using
CS and whether a software card address is required with each command. At
present no software card address is required hence I1 should have a value of 0 or
1. If desired, a card address can be pre-pended to all communication with some
modifications to PmacCommSendStr, PmacCommGetStr, and
PmacCommRespStr.
I3 - I/O Handshake Control
This parameter determines what characters, if any, PMAC uses to delimit a
transmitted line, and whether PMAC issues an acknowledgment (handshake) in
response to a command. The preferred setting is I3 = 2.
I4 - Communication Integrity Mode
This parameter allows PMAC to compute checksums for the communication
bytes sent between PComm32 and PMAC. This value should be I4 = 0 because
PMACPanel does not currently add or strip a checksum.
Chapter 2 – Getting Started
19
I6 - Error Reporting Mode
This parameter specifies how PMAC reports command line errors. The
preferred setting is I6 = 1. In this mode PMAC errors are properly parsed by
PMACPanel and reported to the user with a pop-up dialog.
I58 - DPRAM ASCII Communication Enable
This parameter enables or disables the DPRAM ASCII communications
function. When I58 = 1 PMACPanel sends and receives communication
through DPRAM. When I58 = 0 communication is done via the Bus or Serial
Port. Enabling ASCII communication is not required to access DPRAM
available using other PMACPanel capabilities. Using DPRAM ASCII
communication modifies I3 and will effectively disable PMACPanel’s ability to
properly parse error messages. The preferred value is I58 = 0. This implies that
Bus or Serial is the preferred Communication Mode to be specified for
PmacDevOpen. This has little impact on overall performance and does not
preclude the use of DPRAM for memory mapped purposes.
PComm32 Communication Buffers
PMAC handles commands and responses in a very simple manner. PMAC
commands that generate responses place the responses in an internal buffer that
is transferred into the caller’s buffer. If the entire response does not fit in the
caller’s buffer the data is held in PMAC until the remainder of the buffer is
fetched. New commands sent to PMAC flush the response buffer prior to
executing the new command. Hence, responses that are not fully retrieved are
lost.
Communication with PMAC via PComm32 requires empty buffers into which
responses are placed. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT. The empty response
buffers for PmacCommGetStr and PmacCommRespStr are created as 128
byte buffers. If larger default buffers are desired the size of the buffer can be
increased to 256 - NO MORE. PComm32 internals cannot handle buffers larger
than this. PMACPanel handles larger response buffers internally using
PmacCommGetBuffer.
Trouble Shooting PMACPanel Communication
At this point it is assumed that the driver was successfully configured and tested
as outlined in Configuring the Device Driver and Testing the Device Driver. If
you skipped these steps revisit them. If you have Pewin32 or Pcomm32 and they
work the problem is with your configuration of PmacDevOpen or the
communication I-Variables.
20
•
In the event that LabVIEW crashes when running PmacDevOpen
reboot the computer to eliminate any damage to the driver and memory
caused by the crash.
•
Verify the correct operation of the device driver by checking the
configuration using MotionExe or the Control Panel Applet. When you
select “OK” from the setup dialog the driver attempts to contact PMAC
and reports the success or failure of the attempt.
•
Check the driver operation communication with PMACTest or
Pewin32.
Chapter 2– Getting Started
•
Revisit the driver configuration and make certain that the device
number and communication modes specified match those specified for
PmacDevOpen. Make changes to the VI and retest the communication
by running the VI again.
It is known that very early versions of Windows 95 do not work well with
LabVIEW and the PComm32 device driver. If the problem persists contact
Delta Tau Technical support. If the system continues to crash try to note any
error messages in detail.
Chapter 2 – Getting Started
21
Chapter 3 - PMACPanel Basics
PMACPanel and PMAC as Client and Server
PMACPanel is a powerful LabVIEW toolkit that allows you to develop GUI
based clients requiring precision multi-axis motion that integrate PMAC’s
unique capabilities with other LabVIEW devices.
PMACPanel is not intended to replace a thorough understanding of PMAC’s
powerful motion and PLC capabilities, its architecture, its command language,
or its programming language. PMACPanel is not a Graphical Motion Language
(GML) that allows you to write PMAC programs by stringing together a set of
motion description VIs.
The client/server architecture, illustrated below, works exceedingly well with
LabVIEW’s G-Code data flow execution model and matches the model used to
communicate with GPIB, Industrial Automation networks, etc. PMACPanel
applications place requests to PMAC to set motion characteristics, run motion
programs, and configure and monitor PMAC status. PMAC executes these
requests without the assistance of the client application as long as power is
applied. Using this model, PMACPanel applications can use data from other
LabVIEW devices to control the motion and coordinate control of those devices
with the execution of the motion.
PMACPanel
Indicators, Controls, and VIs
Requests for Service
Other LabVIEW
Applications, Utilites, and Drivers
Status and Results
PMAC
Digital
Triggers
LabVIEW Cards
Client Application
The figure below illustrates a set of Query/Response exchanges between the
PMACPanel client application and PMAC. Commands for service are sent by
the application in response to
22
•
button clicks
•
events such as measurements made by other instruments
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
•
polling requirements
In response to these requests PMAC responds with t he requested operation or
data. Because of this architecture, everything PMAC can do can be done under
control of and in coordination with client applications.
“Get Position Motor #1”
Display Position
“138645”
Cycle Start
Button Clicked
“Run Program 32 in
Coordinate System &3”
“Get Coordinate System
&3 Status”
Update Status
“Running, In Position, …”
PMAC
“Get Program 34
Program Counter”
Update Program
Window
“P34:23:X5Y30”
“Get Machine
Input $X:0034”
If Input = 00110101110010
Start GPIB Acquisition
Client Application
“00110101110011”
Application Development Components
Depending on your motion requirements, system integration requirements, and
performance needs there are three methods for developing your PMACPanel
applications. The following figure shows the three primary components
available from Delta Tau for your system development.
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
23
Developer/User
LabView
GUI
Data Analysis
Graphical Tools
Data Acquisition
Industrial Communication
Visual C++
Visual Basic
PMAC
Executive
PMACPanel
Custom devices
Custom drivers
Application packages
PTalk
Pcomm32
PMAC
Pewin32 - PMAC Executive
PMAC system setup and configuration operations such as motion program
development, motor tuning, limit and safety configuration, etc. are best
accomplished using the executive. Once a set of sample motion programs is
available a PMACPanel application can be developed. PMAC can still operate
as a standalone controller. When you wish to interact with PMAC your
PMACPanel applications are available to change the operation of PMAC.
PTalk - ActiveX Controls for Visual C++ and Visual
Basic
Applications with demanding computational needs can written in C++ and their
needs can be communicated to PMAC using PTalk. As an ActiveX control
PTalk can be used from within PMACPanel. It is also possible to compile this
code into a dynamic link library or as a LabVIEW Code Interface Node and use
it from your own custom VIs in a PMACPanel application.
PMACPanel - PMAC for LabVIEW 5.0
PMACPanel provides a complete suite of VIs to simplify and standardize your
application’s access to PMAC from LabVIEW. It is divided into 4 basic levels
or categories. At the very lowest level are VIs that provide an interface to
PComm32. Above this are two levels that provide collections of indicators,
controls, and VIs that you can use in your LabVIEW applications to control
PMAC and monitor its status. Finally, there is a level that provides program
development utilities that can be used to encapsulate PMAC motion and PLC
24
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
programs as VIs that are controlled by the application. In general, you will use
the top three levels for application development.
Your Logic
Your GUI
Development
& Encapsulation
Indicators
& Controls
Command
Generators
PComm32/LabView
Interface VIs
Pcomm32
PMAC
PMACPanel
Client Application
PMACPanel Interface to PComm32
PMACPanel’s lowest level provides a flexible set of capabilities through which
all command interactions with PMAC is conducted. To do this PMACPanel
wraps selected PComm32 functions with appropriate logic to provide a
transparent interface between your LabVIEW application and PMAC. It
provides three primary categories of access to PMAC. These are:
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
•
Device Management
•
Query/Response ASCII and Binary Communication
•
Download Management
25
Open/Close/Configure
Query/Response
Conversion To/From
LabView Datatypes
Device
Management
ASCII Commands
and Responses
Binary
Variable Access
Manage Programs
Download
Management
Highspeed Binary
Buffer Status/Data
DPR Binary
Data Buffers
Serial
Bus
DPR Comm
PMAC
Memory Map
PMACPanel
DPRAM
Pcomm32
MS Visual C++
Code Interface Nodes
Device Management
DPR is primarily
intended to pass realtime
data gathering buffers and binary
data for operations like i nversekinematics between PMAC and
the client. It is not required for
general Query/Response
interaction.
Access to the device driver is handled with the PmacDevOpen VI configured
earlier. It defines whether Query/ Response communication uses the Serial Port,
Bus, or DPR. Pcomm32 hides all details associated with a given mode from the
user. If your PMAC is inserted into your host computer Bus communication is a
sure bet. DPR, while slightly faster, is not required. If your PMAC is located
remotely, then you need to communicate with it using the serial port. If your
application does a lot of polling for status data you will see a marked decrease in
application execution performance.
Query/Response Communication
Query/Response communication is the most basic form of communication with
PMAC. This mechanism allows your application to use the entire set of
PMAC’s on-line Commands to interact with PMAC. The quickest way to build
a PMACPanel application to control and monitor PMAC is to locate the
functionality you desire in the PMAC User Manual and PMAC Software
Reference Manual. You can then test it with Pewin32 or the PmacTerminal
contained in PMACPanel. When you are certain you know what you want you,
build a LabVIEW VI and select an appropriate PMACPanel VI to send that
command and/or data to PMAC.
26
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
LabVIEW and PMAC Numeric Data
LabVIEW supports a wide range of native data types that need to be
communicated to PMAC. This data must be formatted for transmission to
PMAC and converted from PMAC responses into LabVIEW types. PMAC
returns numeric data as decimal or hexadecimal ASCII strings. The
query/response VIs convert this ASCII data into native LabVIEW numbers for
manipulation and display.
PMAC uses the Motorola 56K series of Digital Signal Processors for its
computational engine. The memory architecture is based on a 48-bit long word
comprised of two 24-bit words. This organization allows one to access the
entire 48-bit long word, or either of its two 24-bit words using the same address.
The long word at memory location $23F8 is accessed using D:$23F8 or
L:$23F8. The upper word is designated X:$23F8 and the lower word is
designated Y:$23F8.
PMAC’s firmware uses several data types depending on the quantity being
represented: 1 bit booleans, 8, 16, 24, 32, and 48 bit integers, and 24, 32, and 48
bit floating point numbers. Of these most integers are 24 or 48 bits. This
presents an immediate issue that must be understood when developing your
PMACPanel application. LabVIEW’s short integers are 16-bits - too short for
PMAC’s 24-bit integers. Its long integers are 32-bits - too short for PMAC’s
48-bit integers and too long for PMAC’s 24 bit integers. Furthermore,
LabVIEW does not support a 48-bit integer or 48-bit floating-point number.
Fortunately, because Query/Response communication is conducted with ASCII
strings the size of PMAC’s data is somewhat hidden.
To simplify the interface between LabVIEW and PMAC, PMACPanel supports
the conversion of PMAC data into one of six LabVIEW data types. Conversion
into unsigned representations is easily done using LabVIEW’s many conversion
VIs. The following table enumerates the representations and names supported in
each domain. The PMACPanel names Short, Ushort, Long, and ULong are used
in the names of many Query Interface VIs.
PMAC
LabVIEW
PMACPanel
1 bit binary
Boolean
Boolean or Bool
1, 8, 16 bit integers
16 bit integer (i16/u16)
Short (i16)/UShort (u16)
16, 24, 32 bit integers
32 bit integer (i32/u32)
Long (i32)/ULong (u32)
24 bit floating point, 48 bit
integers, 48 bit floating point
doubles
64 bit floating point doubles
Double or Dbl
There are some situations, depending on the value of I9, where PMAC’s ASCII
response strings are hexadecimal not decimal. The conversion of these ASCII
responses into equivalent native LabVIEW binary representations are handled
by classes of VIs that use PComm32’s binary variable access capabilities.
Download Management
Maintenance of PMAC programs is provided by a collection of VIs that directly
access PComm32’s download functions. These compile ASCII PMAC
programs and download them to PMAC for execution.
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
27
DPR Binary Data Buffers
PR represents a unique PMAC capability that rapidly transfers binary numerical
data between the host and PMAC. This communication mode eliminates the
string formatting and parsing required with ASCII communication. It is
however, not the best solution for all problems. Chapter 11 covers the use of
these mechanisms fully.
PMACPanel Organization
This brief explanation of PMACPanel’s organization will help you to get the
information you need quickly and painlessly as well as help you plan your
application’s architecture.
The PMACPanel library, contained in the directory PMACPanel.lib, is divided
into five basic categories as illustrated in the following figure. These categories
provide an increasing level of capability as you progress from the lower levels to
the higher levels.
PMACPanel Directory
Organization
DPR and
Other Tools
Sample Applications \PmacTest
\PmacTutor
\PmacDAQ
Program Development \PmacProgram Data Gathering
Encapsulation Tools \PmacPLC
Graphical Tools
\PmacPQM
\PmacFile
\PmacTerminal
Global ICVs
Accessory
ICVs
Coordinate
System ICVs
Miscellaneous
Utilities
\PmacSetup
\PmacUtility
\PmacDocument
\PmacAcc
Query
Interfaces
\PmacGather
\PmacAddress
\PmacPlot
Motor ICVs \PmacMotor
\PmacMotors
\PmacGlobal
\PmacCoord
\PmacCIN
\PmacDPR
\PmacInterrupt
\PmacSetup
\PmacSubVI
Position Capture- \PmacEncoder
Triggering ICVs \PmacHome
\PmacResponse
\PmacButton
Device Management
and Communication
\PmacDevice
\PmacComm
\PmacIVar
\PmacMemory
ICVs =
Indicators
Controls
VIs
PComm32
PMAC
28
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
Within each category are several sub-directories containing collections of
indicators, controls, and VIs (ICVs) that provide capabilities to make your
application development task easier. The VIs in each sub-directory follow a
naming convention that makes them easier to locate. For example, in the
directory \PmacCoord all VIs are named PmacCoord …. The names of VIs in
a given sub-directory may have shortened names to make them a little easier to
fit on screens and such. For example, VIs in \PmacResponse are shortened to
PmacResp…. The collections of VIs in each category implement most
commonly used capabilities and generally have examples to demonstrate their
use. The examples will have the word Examp or Example at the end of their
name. The remaining chapters cover numerous tutorial exercises and examples
to demo nstrate their use.
Device Management and Communication
At the lowest level of the architecture are VIs that configure and manage
PMACPanel communication with PMAC using PComm32.
\PmacDevice - Configure and manage access to PMAC using PComm32.
Configuration of this access must match the driver configuration set using the
control panel applet or MotionExe application.
\PmacComm - Provide the ability to send on-line ASCII command strings and
data to PMAC and receive ASCII responses from PMAC. Error handling and
the ability to buffer communication for analysis and future reference are
provided at this level.
\PmacIVar - Provide direct binary access to PMAC I-Variables. This collection
of VIs provides an easy to use architecture for accessing I-Variables and avoids
formatting problems that can arise when querying PMAC I-Variables that might
be returned as hexadecimal values.
\PmacMemory- Access to PMAC’s memory mapped variables and registers are
simplified with this group of VIs.
Query/Response Interface
PMAC’s client/server interaction model works by sending requests to PMAC
and awaiting responses. Interaction with PMAC at this level removes much of
the tedium involved in sending commands and formatting responses.
\PmacResponse - Send formatted command strings to PMAC and convert
ASCII response strings into numerical values for use in you PMACPanel
application.
\PmacButton - In most user interfaces queries are sent to PMAC as the result of
Boolean user actions and conditions. This group of VIs send command strings
to request responses when an associated LabVIEW Boolean condition is TRUE.
Indicators, Controls, and VIs - ICVs
This collection of directories and VIs provide an extensive set of indicators,
controls and VIs that will tremendously speed the development of PMACPanel
applications. Each of the 5 groups in this category provide prepackaged
indicators and controls to manipulate PMAC’s I-Variable setup, monitor
execution status, and send commands to PMAC using appealing clusters of
LabVIEW controls. Capabilities not implemented by these VIs can easily be
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
29
added by modifying the provided VIs. Numerous examples are provided to
demonstrate the capabilities of the collection and can used as is.
Motor ICVs
Interaction with individual and sets of motors is provided by these collections of
VIs. The collections contain VIs to request PMAC status and motor states and
display their data on pre-defined cluster indicators. In addition, controls to Jog
and control motors are provided to simplify testing and development of
programs.
\PmacMotor - Monitor and control individual motors. There are numerous
ICVs to get motor position, velocity, and following error, modify motor IVariables, process motor status, and jog motors.
\PmacMotors - Monitor and plot the motion of collections of motors in defined
coordinate systems. Plotting tools for selecting which motors and motion
variables to plot are available. Samples of real-time strip charts and XY charts
are provided.
Coordinate System ICVs
\PmacCoord - Monitor the execution of programs and definition of motor
coordinate systems. This information is required for the development of user
interfaces in which information is entered and displayed in coordinate system
units rather than encoder units.
Global ICVs
\PmacGlobal - General PMAC setup and configuration are provided by this
collection for VIs. These capabilities are used for the development of
supervisory VIs.
Accessory ICVs
\PmacAcc - PMAC has numerous accessories that are used to provide digital
I/O, analog I/O, and control capabilities. This includes the ACC16D front panel
and the alphanumeric display. This collection provides basic ICVs that access
the memory mapped data used by these accessories.
Position Capture and Triggering ICVs
PMAC has the ability to capture exact motion positions in response to external
triggers and generate triggers when specified positions are reached. This
capability can, in conjunction with National Instruments DAQ boards, be used
to capture a position or trigger instrument control in response to specified
positions.
\PmacHome – This collection of VIs provides access to the I-Variables and
memory variables required for defining homing criteria and determining home
position offset.
\PmacEncoder – This collection provides VIs to access and control the encoder
gate array for position capture and compare. There are also tools for developing
background PLC programs for generating Compare-Equal outputs.
30
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
Program Development and Encapsulation Tools
Developing PLC and motion programs that work seamlessly with PMACPanel
requires four major components.
•
Tools to edit and create programs
•
Tools to monitor the execution and debugging of programs
•
Tools to develop PMACPanel panels to communicate program
specific data between the program and user
•
Tools to encapsulate programs, their execution, and monitoring
into a single easy to use VI
The purpose of these collections is to allow the integration of motion programs
into a PMACPanel application. Either Pewin32 or the PMACPanel application
tools documented in Chapter 5 can be used for the development of the raw
motion programs.
\PmacTerminal - Terminal application tools for interactively creating,
controlling, and monitoring PMAC and your programs.
\PmacFile - Tools for maintaining ASCII program files, LabVIEW datalog files,
and downloading files to PMAC.
\PmacPQM - PMAC program execution is parametrically specified using P, Q,
and M variables. For example, the number of times a move is executed, the
increment of a move, or the radius of a circular move can all be specified using
Ps and Qs. Specific machine inputs and outputs, and internal registers are
accessible using M-variables. Mapping of these quantities to LabVIEW controls
is facilitated by the ICVs in this collection. In addition, the ability to log this
information to a LabVIEW datalog file and re-execute the motion at a later time
is provided.
\PmacPLC - PLC programs and their execution status can be edited and
controlled using the VIs in this collection.
\PmacProgram - This collection provides tools at a variety of levels to edit,
download, debug, monitor, and encapsulate motion programs. Encapsulated
programs
•
Load themselves when executed
•
Know their coordinate system and program number
•
Can be executed by the click of a button
•
Indicate the state of their execution
•
Can be modified, monitored, and debugged from a powerful front
panel
•
Accept P, Q, and M variant data types from the \PmacPQM tools.
\PmacSubVI – This directory contains the actual encapsulated program and
PLC wrapper template VIs.
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
31
Data Gathering and Graphical Tools
One of PMAC’s most intriguing capabilities is its ability to synchronously
gather a variety of motion data during the execution of a program or move. An
example is the gathering of actual and desired position in response to step
inputs. This data can be used to analyze the performance of a specific move or
machine configuration using LabVIEW’s powerful analysis suite.
\PmacGather - This collection of VI’s allow the user to select motion variables
to control the collection and conversion of data into standard LabVIEW analysis
formats. Collected data can be output to files in tab delimited format for export
to programs such as Matlab or Excel.
\PmacAddress - A collection of tools for specifying addresses, scale factors,
and descriptions for gathering. Variables not already accessible from
PMACPanel can easily be added to the tables.
\PmacPlot - A few generally useful plotting VIs for setting plot colors and
legends. An XY Chart buffer is available to make an XY plot into an XY strip
chart.
Code Interface Nodes and Dual Ported RAM
PMAC Dual Ported RAM (DPR) provides a high-speed binary data transfer
mechanism that greatly speeds access to certain types of motion data. To
facilitate this capability PMACPanel utilizes LabVIEW Code Interface Nodes
(CINs). This collection of VIs demonstrates how to use this capability.
\PmacCIN – A detailed description of the process required for configuring your
environment to use CINs with PMACPanel.
\PmacDPR – A large collection of VIs for configuring and operating the many
modes of DPR supported by PMAC. There are numerous examples
demo nstrating the use of DPR and how to modify the supplied collection to suit
your purposes.
\PmacInc – A directory of include files required to use CINs or modify
PmacDPR. This directory will be empty if you did not purchase the PComm32
package.
Sample Applications
This collection of VIs demonstrates a general PMACPanel application and a set
of tutorials to walk you through the correct use of PMACPanel capabilities.
\PmacTest - An all encompassing demonstration of program encapsulation and
monitoring with 4 different motion programs, their PQM configuration, and
real-time strip chart monitoring.
\PmacTutorial - A sequence of exercises covered in Chapter 4. These exercises
introduce you to the basic architecture and proper use of PMACPanel in your
own applications. All first time users of PMACPanel should read this chapter
and examine the tutorial VIs.
\PmacDAQ – This collection of VIs utilize standard LabVIEW analog input
DAQ example VIs and a PMACPanel motion VI to demonstrate a few of the
techniques you can use to integrate PMAC and NI-DAQ boards to develop
precision motion based data acquisition applications.
32
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
Miscellaneous Utilities
This collection provides many VIs used to implement PMACPanel without
regard to a specific category.
\PmacSetup – True maintenance of a deployable PMAC application requires
Pewin32. This collection of VIs is the start of set of VIs to download and
maintain the configuration of PMAC’s numerous P, Q, M, and I variables. For
the purpose of speed, the VIs are implemented using CINs.
\PmacUtility - This collection provide controls and VIs to modify file paths,
handle radio buttons, etc.
Documentation
PMACPanel has an extensive suite of documentation and help that can answer
most of your questions. This manual along with the various PMAC User and
Reference manuals contains thousands of pages of information on every aspect
of PMAC and PMACPanel. There a numerous help files available and more
being written all the time. Check the Delta Tau web site for documents and help
files for your system.
\PmacDocument - contains electronic copies of this document, miscellaneous
help items, and a few useful bitmaps.
Chapter 3 – PMACPanel Basics
33
Chapter 4 - Application Basics
Basics
This chapter contains several systematic exercises that guide you through the
hierarchy of PMACPanel to introduce the various concepts required to develop
your own applications. For detailed explanations of the individual VIs used in
each tutorial, consult the VI Reference. If you have not used PMACPanel
before this chapter must be read.
Although most PMACPanel VIs can be used as is, the developer is encouraged
to use them as templates that can be extended and customized to meet the
requirements of your own application. PMACPanel required over 1000 hours of
development time – time that you don’t have to expend to achieve rapid and
surprising results.
LabVIEW Techniques for PMACPanel
The following are general LabVIEW programming techniques not related to a
specific PMACPanel VI and therefore may not appear elsewhere in this manual.
PMACPanel assumes that you have had a basic course in the use of LabVIEW
or equivalent experience.
PMACPanel’s architecture was designed to hierarchically encapsulate common
operations into VIs that you can use to develop your own applications without
doing a lot of basic communication parsing and wiring. Depending on your
application’s requirements and your experience with LabVIEW, you will have
your own design patterns. The tutorial exercises that follow and the examples
contained in the release reflect different ways to architect your applications to
maximize the utility of PMACPanel. These techniques are used throughout
PMACPanel and can be applied in your own application. For an excellent
reference on LabVIEW techniques and application design issues see LabVIEW
Graphical Programming by Gary Johnson (McGraw Hill ISBN 0-07-032915-X).
Dataflow and Sequencing
In LabVIEW the order of VI, execution is not guaranteed. Some PMAC
operations require sequenced command execution. For example, a command to
start a motion program should be sent before you go waiting for it to complete!
In other situations, M-Variables must be defined before they can be used. Some
PMACPanel VIs anticipate the need for sequencing and provide an output to
enable this without using a LabVIEW sequence structure. In some instances,
you must use a s equence structure.
34
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Dataflow and Recurring Execution
LabVIEW loves to use while loops to execute VIs - again, and again, and again.
If you want to continually send a "Jog+" command to PMAC, use the following
example. It will send the command again, and again. This wastes PMAC's time
and slows your PMACPanel application. To prevent this you, as the developer,
must develop your program logic so that the commands are not repeatedly sent
to PMAC. Most of PMACPanel’s architecture is designed to simplify this for
you by encapsulating this logic at the lowest levels possible.
Giving Up Control
Make sure that your PMAC VI's using concurrent execution loops use a wait
timer to give the user interface and other VIs a fair shot at executing.
Otherwise, you just may lock up the user interface while your PMACPanel
program is waiting for a motion program to finish. Worse yet, other VI's that
use double buffering to acquire data can overflow with nasty results
Execution Speed
LabVIEW is pretty fast at doing certain types of things and a little slower at
others. Writing complex VI's such as the terminal is tough on LabVIEW
execution and the developer. Don't expect the response time of visual C++ or
Pewin32.
You should realize that applications that repeatedly poll PMAC can slow your
application. This is especially true of systems that use serial communication at
low baud rates. On the other extreme are busy applications that use the DPR
capabilities of PMACPanel for high-speed data transfers.
VI Reentrancy
In general, most VIs are reentrant. In LabVIEW terminology, this means that a
VI can be used simultaneously in multiple PMACPanel and application VIs with
its own separate copy of data. This has some benefits and some drawbacks. It
allows independent simultaneous execution of the reentrant VI. The drawback
is that it prevents each use of the VI from having a user accessible copy of the
panel. In the case of low level PMACPanel VIs this is not really an issue
because the VIs have no user interface value. It becomes more of an issue with
the ICV VIs.
Issues can also arise when sending commands to PMAC. If multiple VIs are
busy sending commands it is not only possible but also probable that expected
responses will not line up with the commands. We will cover this later in the
chapter.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
35
Persistent VI State
LabVIEW VIs maintain their state from execution to execution within a loop as
long as they are loaded in memory. Sometimes this is desirable, and in many
instances is used by PMACPanel VIs. Particularly those that are used to build
configuration tables or attempt to minimize repetitive queries for data that will
not change often. The following diagram demonstrates the use of this technique.
In this example the default value for Initialization State is FALSE. It is set to
this value every time the VI is loaded into memory. When executed the first
time, Initialization State is set to TRUE and will remain that way until it is reset
by an operation in this VI or the calling VI is closed thereby unloading this from
memory. Be aware that LabVIEW 5.0 has a bug handling this. National
Instruments plans to release a fix for this problem with 5.0.1. Until then,
PMACPanel 1.0 has added a few wires and local variables to fix this.
Mechanical Action
Most PMACPanel VIs requiring Boolean inputs or buttons have their
mechanical action set to “Latch When Pressed”. You can configure your
buttons as shown in t he figure below. Using this configuration, the button is
read once when pressed and reset to FALSE. This is useful for preventing
commands from being repeatedly sent to PMAC.
36
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PMACPanel Indicator and Control Clusters
PMACPanel makes extensive use of predefined indicator and control clusters to
make your development task easier. These clusters are easy to drop into your
application. You should understand what clusters are, how to edit them, and
how to access the individual controls and indicators they contain. An example
of a Motor Status Jog Cluster PmacMotorStatJog is shown here.
A lot of work went into developing indicator clusters with proper names and
item descriptions. You will find that when you have Help»Show Help enabled
extensive descriptions of PMACPanel cluster items can help you understand
what is displayed and what operations are performed by controls and indicators.
Cluster Item Access
The individual items of each PMACPanel cluster are named and given a Tab
Order. Within PMACPanel, they are generally unbundled without the name so
that the diagrams are a little easier to fit on a single page. The diagram below
demonstrates the two different techniques for accessing the individual items of a
cluster.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
37
Using the mouse on function VI terminals, you can easily create cluster
constants if you require them. These can then be filled with the appropriate
data.
Clusters Contain Controls or Indicators but not
Both
Clusters are wonderful for grouping commonly used items together to make
your life easier. A major limitation should be understood. In general, a cluster
should not contain both indicators and controls. This doesn’t work well with
LabVIEW’s data flow execution model - what happens if it sets an indicator
item before it reads it as a control value? This is especially true of PMACPanel
clusters that use Booleans configured with latched mechanical action.
LabVIEW will not let this possible race condition go and generate an error.
PMACPanel has made some concessions for this. The PmacMotorJogControl
control cluster shown below can be used to jog a motor. One would love to
have a motor position indicator in the cluster! Sorry, but we created a separate
position cluster.
Cluster Type Definitions
LabVIEW allows you to define cluster controls and indicators as strict types that
are linked to the root control definition. PMACPanel has chosen not to use this
capability. Clusters can be used and modified independent of the base
definition. This means that if you change cluster definitions the changes are not
propagated to the VIs using it. You must replace all instances of the control by
hand. You can always choose to define the *.ctl controls as strict types before
you use them. Then every new instance of the control in your application will
be linked to the raw control.
Accessing PMACPanel VIs
To use PMACPanel VIs select the PMACPanel control sub-palette attached to
the PMACPanel.lib directory. Depending on the view you installed something
like the following will appear.
38
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PMACPanel sub-palettes uses words rather than graphical icons to define their
functionality just as their naming in the directory structure does. To place a
PMACPanel Control on your panel the icon is selected from the palette and
placed on your VIs panel.
Clusters With an Associated Function VI
PMACPanel controls exist on VI Panels. To get the data for indicators or
generate commands from controls they need a PMACPanel function VI. To
make it easier to link the two together the name of the associated function VI is
the same as that of the control. We will say more about using these in the next
section.
The figure shown below shows the terminal for PmacMotorJogControl.ctl and
the function VI PmacMotorJogControl.vi . The similar names indicate that
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
39
they are paired together and the panel cluster is wired somewhere on the
function VI icon.
PMACPanel VI Terminal Conventions
PMACPanel has carefully chosen terminal names that are used consistently
throughout the library. Extensive terminal descriptions and their behavior are
available with LabVIEW’s Help»Show Help facility and in the VI Reference
chapter of the manual. To help you utilize the on-line help associated with
PMACPanel VIs there are terminal naming conventions to identify the name,
type, default value, and range of inputs and outputs. Most input terminals have
a default value. Those that have a range coerce inputs to the range. Most inputs
are required. A few are recommended. Their default action is fully defined.
40
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Cluster inputs and outputs are typically named for the wire type expected. The
following VI icon demonstrates these standards.
Range if any inserted here e.g. (1-8)
Required Terminal
Default Value
Recommended Terminal
PMACPanel Datatype
LabVIEW Datatype
PMACPanel Tutorials
If you understand the basic ideas covered in the previous section you can start
developing PMACPanel applications. The remainder of this chapter contains
exercises that start with opening communication with PMAC and work up to the
development of some very sophisticated capabilities. The contents of these
tutorials are necessary for all PMACPanel developers. The on-line Windows
Help version of this document is a great way to display the contents of the
tutorials and examples from within LabVIEW.
Tutorial VIs are located in the \PmacTutor directory. In this directory there are
two base VIs that are used as a starting place for developing all the exa mples
and PMACPanel VIs. These are
•
PmacTutorApp - Opens PMAC, has an execution while loop, and
a Stop button
•
PmacTutorSub - Has a predefined Device Number terminal
The tutorial VIs are named PmacTutor1, PmacTutor2, etc. These should be
opened, examined, and executed while working through the exercises. You can
save new copies of these and modify them as desired.
Depending on the exercise goals, various panels, diagrams, and sub-VI
descriptions are used to illustrate PMACPanel concepts. Numerous descriptions
are provided on the panels and in the diagrams.
Good wiring!
PMACPanel Communication Tutorial
The following exercises introduce those VIs used to send commands to PMAC
and access its data. This includes special collections of VIs for:
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
•
PComm32 access
•
Sending commands
41
•
Querying PMAC and processing responses
•
Accessing PMAC memory-mapped data and variables
•
Querying and Setting I-Variables
PmacTutor1- Accessing PComm32
PmacTutor1 covers the basic requirements for accessing PComm32. All
PMACPanel applications must open access to PComm32 using PmacDevOpen.
This exercise demonstrates three steps for all PMACPanel applications. Open
the device, do something, close the device. These VIs are
•
PmacDevOpen - Open communication to PMAC using the PComm32
device driver. Check type, ROM date, and ROM Version. Provide Device
Number for other VI's. You can select the mode of communication using
the Communication Mode drop down menu. To make the selection
permanent make your selection the default use the right mouse button and
Data Operations»Make Current Value Default option. This MUST be
done in conjunction with the options available on the PMAC control panel.
•
PmacDevClose - Close the PComm32 device driver. PMAC will continue
running as programmed as long as power is applied.
All basic PMACPanel application diagram will open PMAC and pass the device
number into a your application’s main loop where your primary logic is
executed. Structuring the main loop this way establishes a dependency between
the opening of the device and the execution of the rest of your application.
42
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Several techniques to ease the development process noted in the diagram
descriptions. These should not be relied upon in your final application.
If you have more than
one PMAC or wish to
access your PMAC in more than
one way it is easy to do.
PMACPanel was designed to be easy to use. To avoid having to provide
PmacDevOpen with a Device Number, Communication Mode, etc. every time
it is used the VI was configured with defaults for the Device Number and
Communication Mode in Chapter 3. If you have more than one PMAC or wish
to access the device using more than one mode you can use one of two equally
simple methods.
•
Make copies of PmacDevOpen and rename the copies something
like PmacDevOpenSerial or PmacDev0Open and
PmacDev1Open. Set the defaults for the Device Number and
Communication Mode as desired. Use these exactly as you would
PmacDevOpen.
•
Make a copy of PmacDevOpen and add input terminals for
Device Number and/or Communication Mode. When using this VI
provide the inputs and use the outputs exactly as you would
PmacDevOpen.
Multi-threading and PmacDevOpen
PMACPanel and PComm32 readily make use of LabVIEW’s multi-threaded
programming model. You can have multiple PMACPanel application VIs open
PMAC and execute simultaneously without problems.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
43
PmacTutor2 - Sending Commands and Getting
Responses
The most basic interaction with PMAC is done using one of three PmacComm
VIs
•
PmacCommGetStr - Check if PMAC has data available. When Response
Available is TRUE Response String contains all available data. When
Response Available is FALSE Response String is the empty string.
Responses are parsed for PMAC ERR codes and flagged with a modal
dialog.
•
PmacCommSendStr - Send Command String to PMAC. If Command
String is the empty string, nothing is sent. The output Device Number is a
copy of input Device Number to allow sequencing of commands to PMAC.
•
PmacCommRespStr - Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a
response. If Command String is the empty string, nothing is sent.
Response Available is TRUE when Response String contains response data.
When Response Available is FALSE Response String is the empty string.
Responses are parsed for PMAC ERR codes and flagged with a modal
dialog.
All the PMAC on-line commands described in the PMAC User Manual and
PMAC Software Reference Manual are valid commands. See the appropriate
manual for detailed command usage and syntax. PMAC will accept multiple
commands in a command string. Those commands that generate a response will
put the data into PMAC’s output buffer whether or not you retrieve it. If a
command generates a response, you should use PmacCommRespStr.
PMAC responses are generally single lines. The exceptions to this are
commands like
LIST PROG n
LIST GATHER
LabVIEW string
controls do not treat a
<CR> as
anything other than a <CR>. It
is possible to tie this keystroke to
a control on the panel. Check
the LabVIEW documentation on
44
which will generate long multi-line responses. LabVIEW strings are happy to
handle these. Depending on the size of the string indicator or control on your
panel these may not wrap correctly. This is a LabVIEW issue. If you execute
PmacTerminal and list a long gather buffer you will see this. There is also an
issue when entering strings using a control. The natural temptation is to expect
that hitting <CR> will cause the string to be sent. LabVIEW doesn't work this
way. Panel values are input using the <Enter> key.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Key Navigation Option for
Controls
The panel and diagram for this exercise demonstrate the use of these three
communication VIs. Execute the operations specified in step 1 through 4 on the
panel.
When you execute step 1 in this exercise, the following error dialog will appear
informing you of a problem with your command. If the dialog does not appear,
see the section PMAC Communication I-Variables in Chapter 2 to modify your
PMAC’s communication configuration as specified.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
45
Until proper HW
safeties have been
installed,
configured, and tested extreme
caution must be exercised when
moving motors to prevent
damage and possible injury! Do
not send a Jog command unless
you are certain your actions will
not damage your system or you!
The error dialog appears because the command string “#1j\” is unrecognizable
to PMAC. The correct syntax for the command is “#1j/”. When error dialogs
appear you have the choice of aborting your application or continuing.
Commands that generate errors are not executed by PMAC and cause no harm.
However, if your application logic continually attempts to send a bad command
to PMAC you may have no choice but to abort the application. Otherwise, you
may continue to get this dialog repeatedly. Your chances of halting the program
using the standard LabVIEW STOP button before your application attempts to
send the o ffending command again is unlikely. A
complete listing of PMAC error codes can be found in the PMAC User Manual
and PMAC Software Reference Manual.
The diagram for this tutorial demonstrates two basic things you must consider
when designing you application.
If you send commands to PMAC in response to an interface button click the
mechanical action of the button should be latched and the PMACPanel VI that
sends the command should be in a Case structure. Otherwise, the command will
be sent every iteration of the loop.
PmacCommRespStr and PmacCommGetStr indicate whether they received a
response using Response Available. Response String will be the Empty String if
nothing was received. It is generally good programming practice to test
Response Available before using Response String.
46
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Using these three basic VIs you could generate an entire, albeit complex,
PMACPanel application. The purpose of most of PMACPanel is to prevent you
from having to do this!
PMAC and PComm32 limit basic responses to 256 characters.
PmacCommRespStr and PmacCommGetStr handle this internally using the
VI PmacCommGetBuffer to retrieve longer responses. Your applications will
generally not make use of this VI.
•
PmacCommGetBuffer - Check if PMAC has data available. When
Response Available is TRUE Response String contains all available data.
When Response Available is FALSE Response String is the empty string.
Responses are not parsed for PMAC ERR codes.
Exercise PmacTutor3 shows how PMACPanel simplifies the sending of
commands in response to panel buttons and Boolean conditions.
PmacTutor2a - Communication Logging
This is a rather advanced topic, but one that we include here for completeness.
PMACPanel has the ability to log all communication between your application
and PMAC. You might use this to monitor what your users are doing or want to
log interesting sessions for later play back. PMACPanel maintains all
communication using the following VIs. Future versions of PMACPanel may
use this capability to implement a Graphical Motion Language.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
47
•
PmacCommGlobal - This VI is a global copy of the PmacCommGlobal
cluster used by several PmacComm VIs for error reporting and logging
purposes.
Pmac Communication Cluster This cluster maintains a
log of commu nication between PMACPanel and PMAC.
Command String Last on-line command sent to
PMAC
Response String Last response received from
PMAC
Communication Log String A multi-line buffer
of commands sent to PMAC and received from
PMAC.
Num Commands i32 The number of commands
sent to PMAC and logged in the Communication
Buffer.
Buffer Log Bool (F) When TRUE all
communication is appended and logged to the
Communication Log.
•
PmacCommBuffer - When Log Enable is TRUE communication logging
is enabled. Log Enabled Bool, Log String, and Num Commands reflect the
state of the log buffer when logging is enabled. Log String is the empty
string, Num Commands = -1, and Log Enabled is FALSE when logging is
disabled. When Log Empty is TRUE the log buffer is emptied.
•
PmacCommAppend - Copy Command String and Response String to the
Last Communication items in PmacCommGlobal. If Logging Enabled is
TRUE they are also appended to the Communication Log.
The panel for this exercise demonstrates how communication is logged. The VI
queries PMAC for the value of i123. When Good/Bad is clicked the incorrect
command -j is sent resulting in an error. You will see the log of this bad
command in the Command String and Response String items in the
PMAComunication Cluster on the right. You will also see the error dialog popup allowing you to continue or abort the application - click Continue.
48
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
If you click the button Buffer Enable all communication is appended to
Communication Log Buffer in the cluster. You can stop logging by clicking
Buffer Disable. This only stops the logging of communications. If you click the
Buffer Empty box and click Buffer Enable, the buffer is cleared before logging
is enabled.
The diagram for this exercise is shown here.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
49
If you desire to use logging in your application you need to develop logic to
save the Log Buffer to a file. You should also realize that the size of this buffer
could grow VERY large if your application uses status-monitoring ICVs and
you don’t save and empty the contents of the log buffer at reasonable intervals.
PmacTutor3 - Sending Commands Using Buttons
PMACPanel contains the PmacButton collection of VIs that send a command
string to PMAC when an input button state is TRUE. Your applications panels
will make constant use of these capabilities.
50
•
PmacButtGetStr - Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a
response when Button State is TRUE. When Response Available is TRUE
Response String contains the response. If Response Available is FALSE
Response String defaults to the empty string.
•
PmacButtSendStr - Send Command String to PMAC when Button State is
TRUE. Response Available is TRUE when PMAC has processed the
command.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
You should use PmacButtGetStr for commands that expect responses and
PmacButtSendStr for commands that do not expect responses.
PmacButtSendStr doesn’t return a response so the input Button State is passed
through to facilitate execution sequence dependencies.
The panel shown here demonstrates the use of these VIs, the conversion of
PMAC responses into numeric data for use in LabVIEW, and the use of nonlatched mechanical action to enable polled status for real-time.
You will note in the diagram for this VI that the sending of the command to
PMAC is simplified by the use of the PmacButtGetStr. The button is directly
supplied to the VI rather than wrapping the PmacCommRespStr VI in your
own case structure. Sending commands in response to buttons is so common
that this added capability makes application development significantly simpler.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
51
The second step in the diagram sends the command “#1p” to PMAC requesting
the position for motor #1 as long as the button is TRUE. The response string is
displayed both as a string and converted into a numerical value for display.
When sending any motor or coordinate system specific command to PMAC you
should include the motor or coordinate system number with the command to
prevent LabVIEW’s execution order from sending addresses and commands in
whatever order it desires.
The next exercise demonstrates how PMACPanel simplifies these operations
further.
PmacTutor4 - Button and Response VIs
The PmacResponse VIs send commands to PMAC and convert the ASCII
response string into LabVIEW numeric data types. This relieves you of having
to scatter string conversion VIs all over your application. There are more
members in the PmacButton collection introduced in PmacTutor3 that use the
PmacResponse VIs to convert ASCII string responses into numeric data.
PmacResponse
See LabVIEW and
PMAC Numeric Data
Types in Chapter 3.
PmacResponse consists of 6 VIs - one for each type of numeric response
conversion supported. If you have a data type you truly want to support, you can
easily add it by copying and modifying one of these.
When using these VIs, refer to the PMAC Software Reference Manual;
determine the size of the response, whether it will be signed or unsigned, and
whether you will be manipulating the bits of the response. PmacRespGetDbl is
used to introduce the collection.
•
52
PmacRespGetDbl - If Command String is not the empty string send it to
PMAC and wait for a response. If Response Available is TRUE Response
contains a valid response. Otherwise, Response is 0.0.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
The remaining five VIs operate the same and simply provide responses of the
appropriate type.
•
PmacRespGetBool
•
PmacRespGetShort
•
PmacRespGetUShort
•
PmacRespGetLong
•
PmacRespGetULong
PmacButton
PmacButton consists of six additional VIs beyond PmacButtGetStr and
PmacButtSendStr introduced in PmacTutor3. These six additional VIs
provide numerical responses. PmacButtGetDbl is used to introduce the
collection.
•
PmacButtGetDbl - Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a
response when Button State is TRUE. When Response Available is TRUE
Response Double contains the response. If Response Available is FALSE
Response Double defaults to 0.0.
The remaining five VIs operate the same and simply provide responses of the
appropriate type.
•
PmacButtGetBool
•
PmacButtGetShort
•
PmacButtGetUShort
•
PmacButtGetLong
•
PmacButtGetULong
Step 1 of the exercise demonstrates that some response data is a little more than
a numerical value. Step 2 demonstrates how a single PmacResponse VI can be
used to provide a useful piece of data for your panel. When coupled with the
button concept, PMAC data can be requested and converted using a single VI.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
53
Although the operations are more complex, the diagram is simpler. As we
progress through more exercises, the real power of PMACPanel will become
apparent.
54
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacTutor5 - Accessing PMAC Status
PmacTutor4 demonstrated the conversion of PMAC responses into numerical
LabVIEW data types. Several responses require conversions that are more
sophisticated. PMAC status is returned as 12 hexadecimal characters for a total
of two 24-bit status words. Because status is critical to successful integration of
PMAC with your LabVIEW application there are three VIs that request status
and convert it into two unsigned integers and two 24 element Boolean arrays.
The Boolean array representations allow you to select individual status bits for
your own use using LabVIEW index VIs. The unsigned integers can be used for
your own bit manipulation and testing using logical operators. These VIs are
PMAC supports up to 8
motors and coordinate
systems. If your PMAC has
fewer motors PMAC ignores
commands to them.
•
\PmacMotor\PmacMotorStat - Query PMAC for the status of Motor
Number. Report the two status words as arrays of Booleans and unsigned
32 bit integers.
•
\PmacCoord\PmacCoordStat - Query PMAC for the status of the CS
specified by Coord Number. Report the two status words as arrays of
Booleans and unsigned 32 bit integers.
•
\PmacGlobal\PmacGlobalStat - Query PMAC for PMAC's global status.
Report the two status words as arrays of Booleans and unsigned 32 bit
integers.
Global status does not require a motor number or coordinate system number.
The Motor Number and Coord Number inputs coerce the range to protect you
from mistakes. Status bit definitions can be found in the PMAC Software
Reference Manual. More status processing VIs are introduced in later exercises.
PMACPanel does not supply button versions of these VIs that fetch status when
the button input is TRUE. Status monitoring is generally not a user driven
operation.
The panel for this exercise demonstrates the use of PmacMotorStat. Use of the
coordinate system and global status VIs is identical. At the bottom of the panel
are the raw status Boolean arrays. You cannot specify Boolean text for
individual array elements hence they are left unlabeled. The contents of these
arrays can be indexed using standard LabVIEW array function VIs to select
specific bits for your needs. In this example, several common status bits are
used to drive indicators.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
55
Depending on your needs the extraction of individual status bits is a tedious
task. Later exercises introduce PMACPanel ICVs that extract and display the
most common status bits for you thereby eliminating the tedium. The diagram
for the example is shown here.
56
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacTutor6 - Accessing PMAC I-Variables
On PMAC, I-variables (Initialization, or Set-up, Variables) determine the
personality of the controller for a given application. In general, this is a
supervisory task. They are at fixed locations in memory and have pre-defined
meanings. Most are integer values, and their range varies depending on the
particular variable. There are 1024 I-Variables, from I0 to I1023, and they are
organized as follows:
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
I-Variable Range
Functional Group
I0 -- I75
General card setup (global)
I76 -- I99
Reserved for future use
57
I100 -- I186
Motor #1 setup
I187 -- I199
Coordinate System 1 setup
I200 -- I286
Motor #2 setup
I287 -- I299
Coordinate System 2 setup
I3xx, I4xx, …
Motor #3, Coordinate System 3, …
I800 -- I886
Motor #8 setup
I887 -- I899
Coordinate System 8 setup
I900 -- I979
Encoder 1 - 16 setup (in groups of 5)
I980 -- I1023
Reserved for future use
To support this organization and facilitate access PMACPanel provides a special
collection of VIs to manipulate and access them. Each type of I-Variable,
Boolean, Short, Long, etc. has three VIs. The VIs for accessing Long (i32) IVariables are used to illustrate the interface.
•
PmacIVarSetLong - Set the Long I-Variable specified by IVar Set Number
and I-Variable Number. The variable address is calculated as IVar Set
Number * 100 + I-Variable Number. IVar Set Number = 0 addresses global
I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8 address motors and coordinate
system I-Variables.
•
PmacIVarGetLong - Get the Long I-Variable specified by IVar Set
Number and I-Variable Number. The variable address is calculated as IVar
Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number. IVar Set Number = 0 addresses
global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8 address motors and
coordinate system I-Variables.
•
PmacIVarLong - If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Long I-Variable
specified by IVar Set Number and I-Variable Number. Response Available
will be TRUE to indicate Response contains the new value. If Set\Get is
TRUE set the Long I-Variable using Input Value. Response Available will
be FALSE and Response defaults to Input Value.
The variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable
Number. IVar Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set
Numbers from 1 - 8 address motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
58
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
The first two I-Variable operations are obvious. The Get/Set VIs exists because
when developing GUIs to configure I-Variables you want to get them for display
and set them for modification. Grouping these operations together in a single VI
simplifies your diagrams. Note that the Set\Get terminal is not required. If it is
not wired the default operation for the VI is to Get the I-Variable. This type of
Set/Get VI architecture is very common in PMACPanel.
Identical sets of VIs are provided for
•
PmacIVarDbl, PmacIVarGetDbl, PmacIVarSetDbl
•
PmacIVarBool, PmacIVarGetBool, PmacIVarSetBool
•
PmacIVarShort, PmacIVarGetShort, PmacIVarSetShort
There are no string I-Variables. Many of the I-Variables are bit-mapped. ICVs
for collecting I-Variables into functional groups and manipulating the bitmapped I-Variables are introduced as required later.
To access an I-Variable the I-Variable Set Number and I-Variable Number are
used to compute the number of the requested I-Variable as shown.
Using this approach, development of ICVs that manipulate collections of IVariables for a particular motor or coordinate system is easy. PMACPanel does
not check to see whether the I-Variable being addressed exists, its type, or its
range. You can find this information in the PMAC Software Reference Manual.
The I-Variable clusters introduced later perform this type of range checking
where appropriate.
In addition to the organizational architecture I-Variables are accessed differently
by PComm32. You can use the PmacResponse VIs introduced in PmacTutor4
to access them. The problem is that depending on value of I9 I-Variable queries
may be returned as decimal or hexadecimal values. PMACPanel VIs in the
PmacResponse collection do not support the conversion of hexadecimal
responses into numerical data types. If you use PmacRespGetLong to request
an I-Variable like Ix25 you will get a response of zero if I9 = 2 or 3 - not what
you want. If you use PmacIVarGetLong you get the proper binary
representation and you get the ability to organize your access into groups.
The panel for this exercise allows you to modify a few Motor PID loop IVariables. When creating your application’s VI panels you should limit the
range of controls to prevent potentially damaging data from being entered by the
user.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
59
The diagram for this VI demonstrates two ways of implementing I-Variable
access. As a general principle, I-Variables should be read when your application
begins and anytime you access a different group. In this example, when the user
changes the Motor Number the application logic generates a Boolean condition
indicating this and re-initializes the panel controls. When the user clicks an
update button, the values contained in the controls are sent to PMAC.
60
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
The use of PmacIVar… as opposed to the PmacIVarSet… and
PmacIVarGet… VIs groups the controls into sub-units that are a little more
manageable. They are used extensively in the ICVs introduced later.
PmacTutor6b - Accessing PMAC Memory
PMAC makes extensive use of the Motorola 56K memory mapped architecture.
This includes various encoder registers, DAC and ADC values, digital I/O ports,
etc. Details of PMAC’s memory organization can be found in the PMAC
Software Reference Manual and should be consulted when accessing memory.
The PmacMemory collection of VIs simplifies your access and manipulation of
this architecture and its binary representation. LabVIEW numerical controls and
indicators can be configured to display this information as either hex or decimal
data independent of the integer representation of the data. Data is actually
received from PMAC and sent to PMAC in this collection using ASCII
hexadecimal strings.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
61
When defining a PMAC address to access the Address Spec String input to the
following VIs can be in either hexadecimal or decimal form. Both strings below
access the same address
Y:$C000
Y:49152
Reading Memory Data
There are two VIs to read and manipulate memory data in various forms.
Remember that PMAC’s integers are 24-bit words.
•
PmacMemoryRead - Read a 24-bit quantity from the memory location
specified by Address Spec String. For example, X:$002B. The result is
output as both an i32 and a Boolean array.
•
PmacMemoryGet - Output Value is the value of the bit field defined by
Start Bit and Number of Bits at the specified memory address. Output the
field as both Output Value and Output Boolean Array.
The data retrieved from PMAC can be manipulated using the following VIs.
•
PmacMemoryGetBit - Bit Value is the bit at Bit Number in Input Value..
•
PmacMemoryGetBits - Fetch the field defined by Start Bit and Number of
Bits from Input Value. Return the field as Output Value i32, Output
Boolean Array, and Bit Number (same as Output Value). Bit Boolean Array
can be used with sets of radio buttons. If Output Value = 3 then Bit
Boolean Array is 0, 0, 0, 1.
Writing Memory Data
There are two VIs to directly manipulate memory data in various forms. The
data is first read from PMAC, modified, then rewritten.
•
62
PmacMemoryWrite - Write a 24 bit quantity (Input Value) to the memory
location specified by Address Spec String. For example, X:$002B. Pass
Input Value to Output Value and Output Boolean Array.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
•
PmacMemorySet - Write Input Value to a bit field defined by Start Bit and
Number of Bits at the specified memory address. Output Value and Output
Boolean Array are the value of the entire memory location with the new
field.
To implement these VIs the following two VIs are used to manipulate the data.
•
PmacMemorySetBit - Set Bit Number in Input Value using Bit Value.
The new word is Output Value.
•
PmacMemorySetBits - Insert Field Value into Input Value at the field
defined by Start Bit and Number of Bits. Output Value is Input Value with
Field Value inserted. Output Boolean Array is the Boolean representation of
Output Value.
Reading and Writing 48 Bit Memory Data
Double word (48-bit) memory data is handled differently than single word (24bit) data. PmacMemoryReadDbl and PmacMemoryWriteDbl provide two
representations of the data - native LabVIEW double and two i32 integers one
for the Hi X word and one for the Lo Y word. You should not attempt to access
bits using logical bitwise operations such as Value & 32 on the double
representation. You can test them using logical comparison operations such as
Value == 32. Bitwise operations on the Lo and Hi word are OK. Specifying
addresses for double words must be done using the following notation
L:$002b
Specifying the address as
D:$002b
is not recognized by PMAC.
•
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacMemoryReadDbl - Read a 48-bit quantity from the memory location
specified by Address Spec String. For example, L:$002B. The result is
output as both a double and a hi-word and lo-word.
63
•
PmacMemoryWriteDbl - Write a 48 bit quantity (Input Value) to the
memory location specified by Address Spec String. For example, L:$002B.
Input Value is copied to Output Value.
The panel for the exercise demonstrates the reading of a memory location
containing the standard Machine Input at Y:$FFC2 to the standard Machine
Output at Y:$FFC2. It also demonstrates accessing the 48-bit long word
L:$002B that is the Present Actual Position for motor 1.
The diagram for this exercis e demonstrates how the lower 8 bits of Y:$FFC2 are
written to the same memory location 8 bits higher.
64
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PMACPanel ICVs
The previous set of exercises introduced you to PMACPanel’s Device,
Communication, and Query/Response interfaces to PMAC. They handle the
details of sending commands and requests to PMAC and converting basic
responses into LabVIEW data formats. The exercises in this section introduce
another level of PMACPanel capabilities that provide indicators, controls, and
VIs for many of PMAC’s most common on-line commands. These VIs
•
Handle queries for motor, coordinate system, and global
commands
•
Define common indicator and control clusters for use on your
panels
•
Implement function VIs for the indicators and controls
Using these as is, and modifying those that you desire, allows you to create great
looking panels for your applications quickly. PMACPanel’s ICV collections are
organized into five categories.
•
PmacAcc
•
PmacMotor
•
PmacMotors
•
PmacCoord
•
PmacGlobal
Each of these categories has several exercises to introduce its capabilities. You
will also find similar examples in their respective sub-directories.
Each tutorial introduces an example and then selectively drills its way into
supporting VIs. In doing so you, as the developer, will get a deeper
understanding of PMACPanel internals so that you can address potential
limitations in your design and enhance its capabilities to suit your specific
requirements.
On-line Commands
PMAC provides a very large selection of on-line commands for monitoring and
control. Any of these commands can be sent to PMAC using the VIs already
introduced. Not every command is supported or used by the ICVs introduced
here. Some are rarely used. Some should really be used from Pewn32. Others
are potentially dangerous (O100 turns a motor on 100%!). Many would and
some should never be used in a user application. A complete listing of available
commands and their use can be found in the PMAC Software Reference Manual.
The PMAC on-line commands used by PMACPanel VIs are listed here.
Global Commands
Addressing mode commands
&
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Report currently addressed CS
65
Buffer control commands
CLOSE
Close an open program buffer
DELETE GATHER
Return gather buffer space
LIST PLC
List a PLC in memory
LIST PROG
List a program in memory
SIZE
Return available buffer space
Control-character commands
<CONTROL A>
Abort all programs and moves
<CONTROL D>
Disable all PLC programs
<CONTROL F>
Report following errors for all motors
<CONTROL K>
Kill all motors
<CONTROL P>
Report position of all motors
<CONTROL Q>
Quit all executing motion programs
<CONTROL R>
Begin execution of motion programs
in all coordinate systems
<CONTROL S>
Step working motion programs in all
coordinate systems
<CONTROL V>
Report velocity of all motors
General global commands
$$$
Full card reset
$$$***
Reinitialize PMAC to factory default
???
Report global status words
SAVE
Save current configuration to
NOVRAM
Global variable commands
I, P, Q, and M
Variable access in numerous ways.
PLC control commands
DISABLE PLC
Disable a PLC program
ENABLE PLC
Enable a PLC program
Register access commands
66
R[H]{address}
Read data from memory
W{address}
Write data to memory
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Coordinate System
Commands
Axis definition commands
#{constant}->
Query PMAC for motor definition in
CS
Buffer control commands
LIST PC, PE
List program at Program Execution
General CS commands
??
Report coordinate system status
words
Program control commands
A
Abort program
B
Begin program
H
Hold program
Q
Quit program
R
Run program
S`
Step program
Motor Commands
General motor commands
$
Reset motor
HOME
Home
HOMEZ
Zero move home
K
Kill output
Jogging commands
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
J+
Jog positive
J^{constant}
Jog relative to actual position
J/
Jog stop
J-
Jog negative
J={constant}
Jog to position
67
J=
Return to pre-jog
Reporting commands
P
Report addressed motor position
V
Report addressed motor velocity
F
Report addressed motor following
error
?
Report addressed motor status
PmacMotor ICVs
This series of exercises introduce the contents of the PmacMotor collection of
ICVs. These allow your applications to add configuration, control, and
monitoring for individual motors to your applications.
PmacTutor7 - Position, Velocity, Error, and
Jogging
The most basic motion operations involve controlling or jogging motors under
manual control and monitoring the position, velocity, and following error during
the move.
Requesting and Formatting P, V, and E
PmacMotor has three VIs that request and format motor position, velocity, and
following error for your use. These require a Coordinate Specify Cluster input.
This cluster is more of a data type than a cluster associated with a specific
control. It is often assembled from controls in your own application. It is
defined as
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate number to
use
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor Number to use
Convert Bool Apply a conversion for the specified
motor in the specified CS
The VIs are:
•
68
PmacMotorPosition - Query PMAC for Motor Number's position. PMAC
reports the value of the actual position register plus the position bias register
plus the compensation correction register, and if bit 16 of Ix05 is 1
(handwheel offset mode), minus the master position register.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to
convert motor position from encoder counts to CS units. If the motor is not
defined in the CS no conversion is applied. If the motor is defined and
Convert is TRUE Coord Defined is TRUE and position is scaled from
encoder counts to CS units. Coord Definition is a string specifying position
units as "Encoder" or the CS definition of the motor.
•
PmacMotorVelocity - Query PMAC for Motor Number's present actual
motor velocity, scaled in counts/servo cycle, rounded to the nearest tenth.
The raw response reports the contents of the motor actual velocity register
(divided by [Ix09*32]). This is converted to counts/msec by multiplying by
8,388,608 and dividing by the I10 default 3,713,707. If I10 is changed,
modify this value in the diagram.
•
PmacMotorError - Query PMAC for Motor Number's following error.
Following error is the difference between motor desired and measured
position at any instant. When the motor is open-loop (killed or enabled),
following error does not exist and PMAC reports a value of zero.
The implementations of these VIs rely on the PmacCoord collection to convert
values reported in mo tor encoder counts to coordinate system units. This
capability is a fundamental component of PMACPanel. You will get tired of
seeing the description of this process. The diagram for PmacMotorPosition
shows that these VIs format a command string to request the desired motor
position and let PmacCoordMotor2Coord process the response. The details of
this implementation are left until later and gets involved.
•
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacCoordMotor2Coord - Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor
within a CS and an attempt to convert Input Value from encoder counts to
CS units. If the motor is not defined in the CS, no conversion is applied. If
the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined is TRUE and
Output Value is scaled from encoder counts to CS units. Coord Definition
is a string specifying Output Value units as "Encoder" or the CS definition
of the motor.
69
PmacMotorPVE is an extension of the position, velocity, and following error
VIs that combine them into a single VI that can be used to drive the
PmacMotorPVE indicator. The use of these VIs is shown in the diagram
below.
•
PmacMotorPVE - Query PMAC for the position, velocity, and following
error for Motor Number operating in Coord Number. Assemble the
measurements into Motor PVE Cluster. If Convert is TRUE convert the
measurements to CS units. Otherwise, leave them in encoder counts. See
the documentation for PmacMotorPosition, PmacMotorVelocity, and
PmacMotorError for details on how these individual values are produced.
A Coordinate Specify Cluster is assembled from three controls on the panel.
Each of the individual Position, Velocity, and Error VIs receives the cluster.
The P, V, and E VI outputs are used to drive three individual numeric indicators.
In this example, the indicators have an attribute node to set their color. The
color for the text is provided by PmacCoordColor. The indicator color is
Orange if the reported value is in CS units and Blue if it is in encoder counts.
70
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
The panel for this exercise shows the indicators and the Boolean used to specify
the units for P, V, and E displays.
Generating On-Line Jog Commands
The front panel contains a cluster of controls defined by
PmacMotorJogControl to group the most commonly used jog operations into a
single panel item. This cluster must be used with its associated function VI to
generate jog commands for PMAC.
•
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacMotorJogControl - Generate PMAC on-line commands for
controlling jogging Motor Number. Command Executed Bool is TRUE
when any button is clicked in Motor Jog Cluster. The value in the numeric
control specifies the position Jog To and Jog Relative jog the motor to.
This value is interpreted as either Encoder Counts (Default) or Coordinate
Units in Coord Number as specified on the button. The button state is
provided as the output Convert To Coordinate. This VI builds a Coord
Specify Cluster using the various inputs to simplify the interface to
PmacMotorPVE and other PMACPanel ICVs.
71
When buttons in the cluster are clicked the appropriate on-line command is
assembled and sent to PMAC. The diagram for this VI illustrates the general
architecture PMACPanel uses to generate on-line commands from control
clusters.
If you generate Motor
or C.S. specific
commands always send
the
There are a few things to note about the organization of this VI. Unbundled
command buttons are used in conjunction with a string format VI and
PmacButtSendStr to create and send an appropriate command to PMAC. The
Motor or C.S. number along with position parameter required by some commands is converted into encoder units
the command.
if the actual control value is in C.S. units. Using this architecture eliminates
many case structures and allows you to add or delete commands as required.
Using PmacMotorJogControl and its cluster with PmacMotorPVE and its
cluster you can quickly add motor jogging and position monitoring on any
panel.
Control Clusters and Local Variables
It has already been noted that clusters should contain either indicators or
controls but not both. This is a generally bad idea in LabVIEW and because
PMACPanel uses latched Boolean controls in most of its control clusters an
extremely bad idea. When a VI reads the state of a latched Boolean control the
control is reset. Hence, if there were two users of the Boolean state the second
one to read the state would get the wrong answer. A corollary to this rule is that
you cannot use local variable copies of control clusters that contain latched
Boolean controls.
72
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacTutor8 - Motor Control with Status
Monitoring
This exercise introduces another PmacMotor control and several indicator
clusters for displaying motor status. As with the PmacMotorJogControl, status
clusters require an associated VI to query PMAC for the required information
and assemble it into a useful form.
This is the first exercise to actually generate an application you can really use to
exercise PMAC. The panel contains PmacMotorJogControl and
PmacMotorPVE already introduced. In addition, there is a
PmacMotorLimitControl and two new status clusters. The VIs for the new
panel are
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
•
PmacMotorLimitControl - Generate PMAC on-line commands for
controlling move limits and operation for Motor Number. Command
Executed Bool is TRUE when any button is clicked in Motor Limit Cluster.
•
PmacMotorStatJog - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacMotorStatJog indicator containing the status for Motor Number.
•
PmacMotorStatLimit - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacMotorStatLimit indicator containing the status for Motor Number.
73
This panel, captured while actually running, demonstrates how useful these new
capabilities are. The jog control indicates a move to a position of 23.4 defined in
Coordinate Units not motor encoder counts. The PVE indicator has an Orange
LED indicating that the displayed position, velocity, and following errors are in
CS units. Furthermore, because the Coord System dial is set to 1, that motor 1 is
defined as #1->1000X in CS 1. The status indicators show that Motor 1 is
Assigned to a CS, Enabled, and in Closed Loop mode. Furthermore, that it is
Not In Position and there is a Warning Following Error. You will note that the
position in the Jog Control is specified as 23.4 CS Units and the PVE indicator
shows an actual position of 24.6 CS Units. If you are actually running this
exercise turn on Help by selecting Help»Show Help. As your cursor moves
over the various indicator and control items in the clusters detailed help for each
panel item is displayed.
The diagram for this panel is very simple because PMACPanel handles all the
details for you. There are two control clusters, one PVE cluster, and two status
clusters each with its associated function VI. Add two dials and you've created
Jog application. You will note that the Coord Specify Cluster requires by
PmacMotorPVE is constructed by PmacMotorJog.
74
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Hierarchical Encapsulation
PMACPanel attempts to break panel clusters and function VIs into manageable
chunks that group functionality. Using this approach, you can piece together
those items you need to build your application. Each VI builds on top of the
capabilities provided by still lower levels until almost everything funnels
through PmacCommSendStr and PmacCommRespStr. In using proper
program design, the result is easier to maintain and modify for your own
purposes. The VI Hierarchy for this exercise is shown here to illustrate this
point.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
75
Accessing Status Bits
To illustrate how PMACPanel handles status information the diagram for
PmacMotorStatJog is shown here. The VI calls the PmacMotorStat VI
covered in PmacTutor5 and the Boolean array for each status word is indexed
to get the desired bit. The individual bits are assembled into a cluster for use by
the indicator. Notice that a string is created indicating the associated motor in
the status cluster. It automatically updates the indicator cluster so that you don’t
have to. If you don’t want this simply eliminate it from the cluster and modify
the panel cluster.
Motor Status VIs
For completeness, PMACPanel provides indicator/VI pairs to monitor all bits in
both motor status words. You can copy the individual cluster items into your
own clusters to avoid creating them from scratch. Each cluster LED has been
carefully constructed to include detailed help, labeling, and Boolean text. The
icons along with the panel clusters are
•
76
PmacMotorStat1 - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacMotorStat1 indicator containing the status for Motor Number.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
•
PmacMotorStat2 - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacMotorStat2 indicator containing the status for Motor Number.
These clusters are organized to reflect the 4-bit organization of the status words.
The first column is for the first four bits (23-20), the second column for the
second four (19-16), etc. You should note that some bits are not defined hence
they are Reserved or For Internal Use. Also, note that for motor status word 2
three bits are interpreted as the coordinate system to which the motor is
assigned.
A Word on Status Indicator Colors
Human factor considerations play a major role in how you assign colors to your
application’s status indicators. Is Green good? Is it TRUE? If Green is TRUE
and Red is FALSE then an Amplifier Fault is Green although it is probably not
good. Setting up your definitions can be very confusing.
In PMACPanel status indicators attempt to convey a generally useful meaning
by the LED’s color and text. To clarify this a few examples are covered in more
detail. You should feel free to change colors and text to reflect the intent within
your application.
•
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
Following Errors: These are Red when there is an error. For these status
bits that means the bit is TRUE. When the bit is FALSE the indicators are
Gray - there is no error. Gray can generally be interpreted as NOT TRUE
77
or not dangerous. The text in the indicator says what the indicator is “Warning Following Error” either way.
•
In Position: This indicator is Red when the motor is Not In Position - the
bit is FALSE. Its text says - “Not In Position”. The indicator is Green and
says “In Position” when the motor is in position - the bit is TRUE. Imagine
a situation where motor Not In Position means its moving, therefore your
program is running, and that is good. Do you now make the indicator
Green?
•
Home in Progress: This is Gray when there is no Home in Progress. This
doesn’t mean that the motor has been homed. When the motor is homing,
the indicator is Green. It may well be that you want this to be Red when the
motor is homing. The choice is yours.
PmacTutor9 - Motor I-Variable Configuration
In PmacTutor6, the general architecture for developing supervisory VIs for
modifying individual I-Variables was introduced. In this exercise four VIs to
encapsulate the most common motor I-Variables are introduced. This type of
hierarchical I-Variable architecture is used throughout PMACPanel.
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PmacMotorIVarPID - Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI
architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE the PID I-Variables for the specified
Motor Number are set. Otherwise they are fetched from PMAC and
provided by Output Motor I-PID Cluster with New Output TRUE. Set/Get
is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
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PmacMotorIVarMove - Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI
architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE the movement I-Variables for the
specified Motor Number are set. Otherwise they are fetched from PMAC
and provided by Output Motor I-Move Cluster with New Output TRUE.
Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
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PmacMotorIVarSafety - Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI
architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE the safety I-Variables for the specified
Motor Number are set. Otherwise they are fetched from PMAC and
provided by Output Motor I-Safety Cluster with New Output TRUE.
Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
•
PmacMotorIVarFlag - Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI
architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE the encoder flag I-Variable Ix25 for
the specified Coord Number are set. Otherwise they are fetched from
PMAC and provided by Output Coord I-Flag Cluster with New Output
TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
The panel for this exercise shows the three main PmacMotorIVar clusters.
PmacMotorIVarFlag is actually a sub-cluster in PmacMotorIVarSafety.
To change the I-Variables click the Change I-Vars button. Each item in the
cluster has a full description that is accessible using Help»Show Help. Because
we have defined each item in the clusters as referencing a specific I-Variable,
we have specified the item units and appropriate data ranges for each item
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79
The diagram for the exercise demonstrates why using these ICVs makes life
easier. The Boolean criteria for executing the case are the same as in
PmacTutor6. It is executed whenever Motor Number is changed or the button
is clicked. When the case is executed because of a change in Motor Number,
the VIs perform a get operation and refresh the cluster contents with the
configuration of the new motor.
The observant reader will note that the VI makes use of local copies of the panel
control/indicator clusters. Those clusters that contain Boolean controls like
PmacMotorIVarPID and PmacMotorIVarFlag have their Booleans set for
Pressed mechanical action not latched action. They are not used to initiate a
command or action. This doesn’t violate the basic caution on using local copies
of control clusters noted in this document in several places.
Grouping Multiple I-Variables
It should now be obvious why the PmacIVar… VIs require an I-Var Set
Number. It allows them to be grouped by motor and/or coordinate system. To
accomplish this it is only necessary to extend the concept to a slightly higher
level. The diagram for PmacMotorIVarSafety is shown here. You should note
that when one I-Variable is set they are all set whether or not they have changed.
Therefore, the contents of the cluster should be refreshed by a Get operation
prior to changing individual items and performing a Set operation. Controls and
indicators for your panels should have the appropriate type and range defined to
prevent inadvertent user inputs.
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Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacMotors ICVs
This series of exercises introduce the PmacMotors collection of ICVs. These
allow your applications to monitor and plot the motion of multiple motors.
PmacTutor10 - Requesting and Plotting Motor
Motion
This exercise introduces a number of indicators, controls, and VIs for requesting
the motion of all motors. The data can be displayed on a PMACPanel cluster
indicator, plotted in a strip chart, or analyzed using LabVIEW’s extensive
analysis capabilities. VIs for setting plot legends and selecting which motors to
plot can be used to create flexible interfaces.
The primary query VIs in the collection request PMAC position, velocity, and
following errors for all motors. They are not based on their counterparts in
PmacMotor. These are
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Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacMotorsPositions - Query PMAC for the positions for all motors.
PMAC reports the value of the actual position register plus the position bias
register plus the compensation correction register, and if bit 16 of Ix05 is 1
(handwheel offset mode), minus the master position register.
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Assemble the measurements into PmacMotorsPVE Cluster. If Convert To
Coord is TRUE convert the measurements to CS units for those motors
defined in the CS. Otherwise, leave them in encoder counts.
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PmacMotorsVelocities - Query PMAC for all motor's present actual motor
velocity, scaled in counts/servo cycle, rounded to the nearest tenth. The raw
response reports the contents of the motor actual velocity register (divided
by [Ix09*32]). This is converted to counts/msec by multiplying by
8,388,608 and dividing by the I10 default 3,713,707. If I10 is changed,
modify this value in the diagram.
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PmacMotorsErrors - Query PMAC for the following errors for all motors.
Following error is the difference between a motor's desired and measured
position at any instant. When a motor is open-loop (killed or enabled),
following error does not exist and PMAC reports a value of 0.
The diagram for PmacMotorsPositions shows that a command string is sent
requesting the position. This command is a control code and requires the proper
option be set for the string constant. The response will have as many positions
as there are motors in PMAC. The responses are converted into an array and
processed by PmacCoordMotors2Coord. Which assembles the results into a
cluster for display on a PmacMotorsPVE cluster. This is different from a
PmacMotorPVE cluster
The PmacMotorsPVE cluster is comprised of an array of values, a Boolean
array to indicate which motors have been converted to C.S. units, and a text
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label for the cluster indicating which C.S. the display is using for those motors
displayed in C.S. units.
Motors PVE Cluster The indicator cluster displays an array
of values for all PMAC motors. The array may be positions,
velocities, or following errors. The array of Boolean
indicators indicate which values are in CS units. The caption
specifies the displayed values as being in encoder counts or a
specific CS.
See the documentation for PmacMotor (s)Position,
PmacMotor(s)Velocity, and PmacMotor(s)Error for details on
how these individual values are produced.
Motor Value Array Array of numerics for
positions, velocities, or following errors for each
motor. See the documentation for PmacMotor(s)
Position, PmacMotor(s)Velocity, and
PmacMotor(s)Error for details on how these
individual values are produced.
C.S. Defined Array of Booleans indicating which
motors are displayed in CS Units.
C.S. Applied Caption indicating the currently
addressed coordinate system or that the displayed
values are in Encode Counts.
The conversion of motor states from encoder counts to CS Units operates similar
to PmacCoordMotorToCoord introduced in PmacTutor7. It is
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PmacCoordMotorsToCoord - Generate an indicator cluster for
PmacMotorsPVE. Input Value Double is an array of positions, velocities,
or following errors from VIs in the PmacMotors collection. If Convert To
Coord is TRUE fetch the CS definitions for the motors specified in Coord
Number and scale them to CS units. Motors not defined in Coord Number
are not scaled.
The panel for the exercise uses the familiar jog control with LabVIEW menu
rings for selecting the motor number and coordinate system number. The
PmacMotorsPVE cluster and a C.S. definition cluster display the motor
positions and motor definitions in the addressed CS. The plot is a standard strip
chart with Auto Scaling on the Y-Axis. To plot one or more motors click the
appropriate radio button. The colors for the plots and the legend are
automatically updated.
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83
You can use the motor and CS menu rings to select motors to jog and coordinate
system to convert positions to CS units. If there are motion programs running
on PMAC while this VI is executing the position data plotted and displayed by
this example will be from those motion programs. In either case, motor
positions are displayed in real-time in the PmacMotorsPVE cluster and the
strip chart.
To implement this exercise we use PmacMotorJogControl and
PmacMotorsPositions. The CS definitions are retrieved using PmacCoordDef
covered in a later exercise. The PmacMotorsPVE cluster generated by
PmacMotorsPositions is unbundled and the array of values is passed to the
PmacMotorsPlotSelect VI
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PmacMotorsPlotSelect - Motors Array contains positions, velocities, or
following errors for all motors on your PMAC. Select Bool Array defines
which motors are copied into Selected Motors Cluster for plotting on
LabVIEW strip charts. XY Point Cluster contains two values for X-Y
plotting. New Selection is TRUE when Select Bool changes and indicates
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
the Plot Attributes Array of Clusters and X-Y Plot Attribute Cluster contain
new information for updating plot legend attributes.
Setting the plot attributes is done in the case structure in the lower right of the
diagram below. Plot Attributes Array of Clusters contains an Active Plot index,
Plot Color, and Plot Name as supplied by PmacMotorsPlotSelect. When New
Selection is TRUE the case is executed and the array is auto-indexed. The
cluster of attributes is unbundled and used to set the three attributes for the plot.
One important thing to note is that Motor Number and Coord System are
specified using LabVIEW rings. These controls start their indexing from 0 not
1. Hence, to use them to specify legitimate motors and coordinate systems they
must be incremented by one. You can change the range on the ring from 0-7 to
1-8. However, this leaves item zero in the ring empty!
As you begin to develop your own applications, you will create your own simple
VIs to do common things for you. PmacMotorsClose is an example of this.
The VI and its diagram are shown here. If you find yourself repeatedly sending
PMAC simple commands in your application you should begin creating your
own set of useful VIs.
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PmacMotorsClose - Close all PMAC motor loops.
The important thing to note about this VI is that eight commands are executed
by PMAC. A <CR> separates the individual commands in the command string.
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85
PmacGlobal ICVs
This series of exercises introduce the PmacGlobal collection of ICVs. These
allow you to control, monitor, and configure PMAC’s global characteristics.
PmacTutor11 - Configuring PMAC’s Global State
This exercise introduces a number of indicators, controls, and VIs for
controlling and monitoring PMAC’s general operational characteristics. This is
done using status indicators, a simple control cluster for sending PMAC
commands, and a few clusters for configuring I-Variables. In general these
capabilities are used for supervisory purposes and not exposed to general users.
The architecture for PmacGlobal ICVs follows those already introduced. The
basics are introduced with these six VIs and their cousins.
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PmacGlobalBufferSize - Monitor and control PMAC buffer space during
system development. Buffers Open is TRUE if an open prog, open rotary,
or open PLC command has been executed and the corresponding buffer has
not been closed yet. Available Buffer Memory specifies how much buffer
space PMAC has left for gathering and programs. A define gather
command reserves all available buffer space. If Close Buffers is TRUE the
gather buffer is deleted and a close command is sent to PMAC.
•
PmacGlobalControl - Generate PMAC on-line commands for controlling
PMAC program execution and save state. Command Executed Bool is
TRUE when any button is clicked in Global Control Cluster.
•
PmacGlobalIVarComm - Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI
architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE the global communication I-Variables
are set. Otherwise they are fetched from PMAC and provided by Output
Global I-Comm Cluster with New Output TRUE. Set/Get is not required
and defaults to a Get operation.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
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PmacGlobalIVarMove - Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI
architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE the global movement I-Variables are
set. Otherwise they are fetched from PMAC and provided by Output
Global I-Move Cluster with New Output TRUE. Set/Get is not required
and defaults to a Get operation.
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PmacGlobalStatBuffer - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacGlobalStatBuffer indicator containing PMAC's global buffer status.
•
PmacGlobalStatGather - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacGlobalStatGather indicator containing PMAC's global gather status.
The panel for this exercise is the basis for one of PMACPanel’s terminal tools.
At the top is the PmacGlobalControl cluster. It enables you to generate global
commands for PLC and program control. During your development, you might
want to Abort All Motion. The Save, Reset, and Reinitialize buttons allow you
to save PMAC’s configuration to its onboard battery backed RAM or flash
memory. This way PMAC will always boot with the proper program and
configuration information for your application. The two status indicator clusters
might be useful during development as will the ability to monitor PMAC’s
available buffer space. The two I-Variable clusters are useful when you are
configuring communication or require specific program execution
characteristics. For example, later exercises execute multi-axis motion using
circular interpolation. This requires I13 > 0.
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87
The diagram for this exercise should begin looking familiar. Most of the work
is contained in the provided PMACPanel ICVs. The control cluster provides the
input for PmacGlobalControl. Status VIs process requests for PMAC global
status and create appropriate clusters. The architecture for configuring the IVariables is slightly different from that used to configure motors. There is no
Motor Number equivalent that can change. Instead, a shift register is initially
set to TRUE to force an I-Variable read and set FALSE for every other iteration.
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Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacGlobalBufferSize provides two capabilities. The VI queries PMAC for
available buffer size and parses the state of the buffers and their size. When
Close Buffers is TRUE PMAC executes a command to close the open buffers
and delete the gather buffer. Generally, an open gather buffer prevents the
download of any new program or modification of any existing program.
Global Status ICVs
In typical fashion, the PMACPanel global collection of ICVs provides a pair of
indicator clusters and associated VIs to monitor all global status bits. The
icons for the VIs and the indicator clusters are shown below. Unlike the
PmacMotor status word clusters these clusters have many status b its that are
reserved and for internal use.
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Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacGlobalStatWord1 - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacGlobalStat1 indicator containing PMAC's global status.
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PmacGlobalStatWord2 - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacGlobalStat2 indicator containing PMAC's global status.
PmacCoord ICVs
This series of exercises introduce the PmacCoord collection of ICVs.
Coordinate systems organize motors into familiar engineering measurement
systems in which motion programs execute. They define the scaling between
motor encoder counts and engineering units such as inches, centimeters,
degrees, or radians. They can also define coupling between multiple motors and
a single coordinate axis. You will not use these ICVs to configure your
coordinate systems. But you can use them to query the coordinate system
configuration so that motor motion can be specified in coordinate system units
rather than encoder counts. Generally, you will not work with these VIs at this
level. Their capabilities are integrated into other collections of VIs.
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Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacTutor12 - Using Coordinate System
Definitions
This exercise introduces ICVs for determining coordinate system definitions and
parsing these definitions into LabVIEW data types that can be used to convert
between encoder counts and coordinate system units and determining which
motors, if any, are defined in a given coordinate system.
The architecture for the following PmacCoord ICVs is a little different from
that used for status and other fundamental queries. A few of these VIs make use
of local state variables to keep track of queries for coordinate system definitions
so that these queries are not placed every time the VI is executed within your VI.
This reduces communication traffic and relieves the developer from having to
check for a new query. The fundamental assumption in this approach is that
after you create your application you will not constantly redefine the specified
coordinate system. When you've requested a coordinate system definition from
PMAC and change it, the new definition will not be reflected in your
application. To refresh the definition, temporarily request the definition for
another coordinate number or close your VI and reopen it.
The architecture for determining coordinate system definitions relies on the
following three VIs. They perform similar operations but return coordinate
system definitions for different purposes.
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PmacCoordMotorDef - Query PMAC for the definition of Motor Number
in Coord Number. If the motor is not defined in the specified CS Coord
Definition is "Encoder", Coord Scale = 1.0, and Coord Defined is FALSE.
If the motor is defined in the specified CS Coord Defined is TRUE, Coord
Scale is the encoder to CS unit scale factor, and Coord Definition is the
definition (e.g. "#1->16000X").
•
PmacCoordScale - Query PMAC for the motors defined in Coord Number.
The Coordinate System Scale Cluster (PmacCoordScale.ctl) contains three
arrays with the motor definition, scale factor, and whether or not the motor
is defined in Coord Number. The actual query is only placed if Coord
Number changes from a previous call.
•
PmacCoordDef - Fetch the motor scaling definitions for the specified
coordinate system and provide a cluster for the PmacCoordDef indicator.
There are a few limitations you should be aware of when querying coordinate
system definitions from PMACPanel. A motor is generally assigned to a single
coordinate axis as in the following definition
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91
&1
#1->1000X
This specifies motor #1 as belonging to coordinate system &1 and that 1 X unit
is 1000 encoder counts. The scale factor would thus be 1000.
The limitation arises when coordinate system axes are linear combinations of
several motors as in this example that rotates the coordinate system 30 degrees
from the mechanical axes of the motor
&1
#1->8660.25X-5000Y
#2->5000X+8660.25Y
There is no easy way to parse this information when returned by PMAC and
present it to you for use because there are so many possible ways of defining
coupled motor systems. Furthermore, the individual items in the PmacMotors
indicator clusters as defined would change definition every time you switch
from encoder counts to CS units. If your axes are coupled like this you should
study the VIs presented here and modify them for your own use or you can hard
code the scaling and motor state conversions into your application.
There are three VIs that use the scale factors provided by the previous VIs to
convert numerical inputs from encoder counts to coordinate units and back.
This can be done for individual motors or all motors in a coordinate system.
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PmacCoordMotorToEncoder - Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor
within a CS and an attempt to convert Input Value from CS units to encoder
counts. If the motor is not defined in the CS no conversions is applied. If
the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined is TRUE and
Output Value is scaled from CS units to encoder counts.
•
PmacCoordMotorToCoord - Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor
within a CS and an attempt to convert Input Value from encoder counts to
CS units. If the motor is not defined in the CS no conversion is applied. If
the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined is TRUE and
Output Value is scaled from encoder counts to CS units. Coord Definition
is a string specifying Output Value units as "Encoder" or the CS definition
of the motor.
•
PmacCoordMotorsToCoord - Generate an indicator cluster for
PmacMotorsPVE.ctl. Input Value Double is an array of positions,
velocities, or following errors from VIs in the PmacMotors collection. If
Convert To Coord is TRUE fetch the CS definitions for the motors
specified in Coord Number and scale them to CS units. Motors not defined
in Coord Number are not scaled.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
The panel shows two indicator clusters. The CS Scale Cluster contains the
definition of all motors in the specified coordinate system as a displayable
string, a numeric scale factor, and a Boolean indicating whether that motor is
defined in the coordinate system. In the example, motor #1 is defined in
coordinate system 1. The orange text color indicates that the CS defined in CS
Scale Cluster’s caption is being addressed. The CS Definition Cluster is a
derivative of the larger cluster and can be used in conjunction with
PmacMotorsPVE on your application panels.
The lower portion of the panel is a modified PmacCoordSpecify cluster used to
specify a mo tor, coordinate system, and conversion from encoder counts to
coordinate system units. The modifications were made by replacing individual
control items in the stock cluster with types that are more appropriate. The
Orange numeric position indicator and its caption indicate the motor definition
within the specified Coord Number.
The diagram for the query of coordinate system definitions is simple. The lower
portion of the diagram demonstrates how to use the conversion VIs to convert
and display the motor position data. The Coordinate Specify Cluster in this
example is made from Menu Rings whose index always starts at zero. Because
PMAC motors and coordinate systems start their number at one you must add
one to the selection index. This is not necessary if you use numeric controls in
your Coordinate Specify Cluster.
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93
The motor position is processed by PmacCoordMotorToCoord to produce
three outputs that can be used to enhance the display of the data.
PmacCoordColor sets the color of the numeric indicators. The Coordinate
Definition String is used to set the indicator’s caption after stripping the
terminating <CR>. The example shows the use of both named and unnamed
unbundles to get the data required for the operation. Again, you will most likely
not work with these VIs at this level.
PmacTutor13 - Configuring and Monitoring
Coordinate Systems
This exercise introduces ICVs for monitoring and configuring coordinate
systems and program execution within coordinate systems. These VIs follow
the same I-Variable and status architectures already introduced. The VI’s are
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PmacCoordIVar - Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI
architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE the I-Variables for the specified
Coord Number are set. Otherwise they are fetched from PMAC and
provided by Output Coord I-Var Cluster with New Output TRUE. Set/Get
is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
•
PmacCoordStat - Query PMAC for the status of the CS specified by Coord
Number. Report the two status words as arrays of Booleans and unsigned
32 bit integers.
•
PmacCoordStatProg - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacCoordStatProg indicator containing the status for Coord Number.
Monitoring the coordinate system status is a very common operation because
programs run in coordinate systems. If your coordinate system has Cartesian XY-Z axes and rotary U-V-W axes then your program executes its moves using
the motors assigned to those axes. The coordinate system status reflects the
state of the executing program and the combined state of all motors in the
system. If all motors are in-position then the coordinate system is in position. If
any motor has a warning following error then the coordinate system has a
warning error.
The diagram also has a familiar architecture.
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95
Coordinate System Status ICVs
There are, as expected, indicators for both coordinate system status words and a
few miscellaneous VIs that will be introduced in later exercises.
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PmacCoordStat1 - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacCoordStat1 indicator containing the status for Coord Number.
•
PmacCoordStat2 - Create a status indicator cluster for the
PmacCoordStat2 indicator containing the status for Coord Number.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
PmacAcc ICVs
This series of exercises introduce the PmacAcc collection of ICVs. These form
templates that combine PmacMemory’s direct access of memory with
PmacIVar’s Set/Get architecture that access PMAC’s memory mapped devices.
Using this approach, you can hide the bit field and address specifications in your
VIs.
This collection of VIs will grow as Delta Tau adds support for its numerous
accessories. At present, we will demonstrate the Machine Input/Output VIs and
a simple example of the ACC16D control panel.
PmacTutor14 – Machine Input and Output
This tutorial demonstrates two VIs. One that allows you to access the generalpurpose machine input port and one that accesses the output port. On the
demonstration box used for the development of PMACPanel, switches drive the
inputs and the outputs drive a set of LEDs. When running the example, the GP
Machine Input indicator directly reflects the operation of the physical switches.
The physical inputs are copied into the output port located in a different bit field
to drive the GP Machine Output array and the LEDs on the physical device. If
you check the Counter box a bit is rotated through a number and written the
physical port thereby driving the LEDs. This is shown on the diagram below.
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97
The two VIs that implement the example require a little discussion so that you
can comfortably develop or modify your own PmacAcc VIs.
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PmacAccMachineInput8 - If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the
Machine Input Port contents. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate
the Outputs contain the value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Machine Input
Port using Input Value. Response Available will be FALSE and the outputs
default to Input Value.
•
PmacAccMachineOutput8 - If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the
Machine Output Port contents. Response Available will be TRUE to
indicate the Outputs contain the value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Machine
Output Port using Input Value. Response Available will be FALSE and the
outputs default to Input Value.
The diagram for PmacAccMachineInput8 is shown here to make a point about
the PmacMemory VIs. The VI fetches the machine input port data located at
Y:$FFC2 bits 0-8 using PmacMemoryGet – simple enough. The issue you
need to watch involves the Set case using PmacMemorySet.
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Chapter 4 – Application Basics
This case illustrates an important behavior associated with PmacMemorySet.
This VI sets the contents of the bit field and provides as its output the entire 24bit word. This was done so that multiple copies of the VI can be chained
together to handle multiple bit fields. If you take the output of
PmacMemorySet and wire this to Output Value for PmacAccMachineInput8
Output Value will not be what you expect. This is obvious when running
PmacAccMachineOutput8. To remedy this you need to use the Input Value
that is used to set the field as Output Value.
PmacTutor15 – ACC16D Control Panel
This example fetches the contents of the several memory locations for the
Control Panel port at Y:$FFC0, Y:$FFC1, and Y:$FFC2. These registers allow
the ACC16D accessory to control the operation of motors and programs from an
operator control panel. The panel for the example responds to the physical panel
by mimicking the switch operation. If you have an ACC16D and run this
example you will see the various switches on this panel respond in kind.
Chapter 4 – Application Basics
99
The diagram shows that PMAC is queried for the contents of the three locations
and the converted into appropriate types for processing. The selector field is
extracted, as are the individual control/status bits. If you want to make this
panel control PMAC you can use the same control layout and generate the
appropriate commands by borrowing portions of PmacMotorJog, etc. We have
not done this here.
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Chapter 4 – Application Basics
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Chapter 5 - Development Tools
Basics
Serious PMAC configuration, tuning, and setup requires the use of Pewin32.
Once this step is completed, development of your PMACPanel application can
begin. PMACPanel supplies a number of tools and application VIs to aid in this
process and provides an architecture for adding more.
There are 10 standalone development tools covered in this chapter. They make
extensive use of the ICVs introduced in Chapter 4 and form an excellent
introduction to the PMACPanel integration ICVs introduced later in Chapter 6.
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PmacTerminal - A basic ASCII terminal with useful ICVs for
monitoring coordinate system and motor status. In addition, several
new ICVs for controlling programs and PLCs are introduced.
•
PmacTerminalEdit - A simple editor for program development
and downloading. The tool also supports the creation of
encapsulated motion and PLC program VI wrappers that hide the
details involved in controlling and monitoring PMAC motion and
PLC programs.
•
PmacTerminalExecute - An interactive debugger for monitoring
and controlling the execution of PMAC programs.
•
PmacTerminalJog - A simple tool for jogging and controlling
motors
•
PmacTerminalMotors - A graphical tool for monitoring and
plotting the motion of multiple motors in a real-time strip chart.
•
PmacTerminalMotorsX-Y - A tool for monitoring and plotting
the motion of motors in a real-time X-Y chart.
•
PmacTerminalGather - A tool for specifying and gathering
PMAC motion data and exporting it to Microsoft Excel.
•
PmacTerminalMotorIVars - A tool for configuring individual
motor I-Variables.
•
PmacTerminalCoordIVars - A tool for configuring coordinate
system I-Variables and monitoring coordinate systems
Chapter 5 – Development Tools
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PmacTerminalGlobal - A tool for monitoring PMAC’s state,
saving configurations, and configuring important global IVariables.
Tool Menus
The tools distributed with PMACPanel can be integrated into your own
application using LabVIEW 5.0’s new ability to edit and process menubar
selections. This allows your applications easy access to the development tools
and an easy way to add your own custom tools. The figure below shows the
panel for the PmacTerminalJog tool. The menu bar for the tool shows an entry
for PMACPanel that contains the menu items for the development tools.
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Modifying the menu
This is a custom menu named PmacTerminalMenu.rtm that is set as the
default for your application VIs run-time menu. To modify your application
VI’s menu or modify the existing one use the Edit»Edit Menu option from your
VIs panel to display to following dialog.
Select File»Open to display the selection box then double click on
\PmacTerminal\PmacTerminalMenu.rtm or click OK. This will change your
VIs run-time menu from the default or minimal options to custom. You will
note that the panel shows an Item Name as it appears in the menu and an Item
Tag that is used by PmacTerminalMenu.vi to decode your selection and
execute the desired tool. To add your own tools to the menu highlight an
existing menu item entry and select Edit»Insert User Item. Give the new entry
a name and a tag. Save the modifications. All existing PMACPanel tools using
the menu capabilities will now reflect your changes. If you’ve added a new tool,
you must make some additions for your new VI.
Modifying PmacTerminalMenu
To actually implement the new selection you need to add it to
PmacTerminalMenu. The diagram for the VI is shown here. The instructions
direct you to add a case for the Item Tag specified in the Edit Menu panel and to
copy the VIs to execute your VI into the new case. Once completed all tools can
access each other without needing any new configuration.
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There are a few limitations associated with using LabVIEW’s menubar
capabilities. The main one is that it noticeably slows applications that are doing
highspeed query/response updates of status and position indicators. To remedy
this the PmacTerminalMenu VI is configured to execute the actual checking of
the menu selection once every 32 calls. You can change this logic or add timers
to suit your own needs.
Basic Tool VI Requirements
PMACPanel’s use of the menubar selection VIs spawns the VI specified by the
selection as a separate concurrently executing task. This means the VI should be
organized much like the exercises. Open PMAC, run a while loop, use s Stop
button. The diagram for PmacTerminalJog is show here to illustrate this.
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The only modification is the addition of the PmacTerminalMenu VI that
actually spawns the new VI in response to a menu selection and the Current VIs
Menu function selected for the function palette.
•
PmacTerminalMenu - This VI uses the Current VI Menu supplied to it to
check for selections. Because you may have time critical operations where
you don’t want to check for selections, you can set Enable Menu Track
FALSE using a switch to disable the testing. This is done in the
PmacTerminalMotors tool because the delay causes a noticeable blip in
plotted position data.
Basic Tool VI Configuration
When a tool is spawned the Execution and Window options you define for the
VI Setup are important. The following panel shows the Execution Options used
for a PMACPanel tool. The panel should be shown when loaded otherwise
selecting the tool runs it without a panel - not very useful. If you call the VI
instead of spawn it then you want the Show Front Panel When Called and then
closed afterward. The problem with calling the VI rather than spawning it is
that it must complete before the caller’s panel becomes active again. Not a
flexible system but it maybe what you want.
Generally, the panel window should prevent users from doing too many things.
PMACPanel tools have a title bar, and auto-center. When in edit mode the
menu bar, run button, and abort button are shown. When running these
disappear and the user must use the menubar of the window you just installed.
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PmacTerminal
PmacTerminal is a poor-man’s command-line terminal tool like Pewin32. The
panel says a lot about its operation. As the tool is explained, we will cover
many tricks that you can use to build better PMACPanel applications.
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Basic Terminal 101
The black “screen” is a multi-line string with a scrollbar configured for normal
operation. Typed commands are sent to PMAC when you hit the <RET> key.
LabVIEW doesn’t do this automatically. To accomplish this there is a Boolean
button named OK hidden behind the string control that has its Key Navigation
set to capture the <RET> key. If you select Project»Find and locate “OK”
you’ll see it hidden there. Setting the Key Navigation this way means that when
you hit <RET> anytime your cursor is in the window the OK button is activated.
There is a lot of spaghetti diagram to keep track of the current line, character
position, and other book keeping that fetches the line just entered from the
multi-line string and sends it to PMAC using PmacCommRespStr. The
terminal indicates it is expecting a command with a “->” prompt on the screen.
This process puts the Key Focus on the OK button thereby removing your cursor
from the screen indicator. Focus is returned to the screen indicator by creating
an attribute node for the screen indicator, selecting Key Focus, and setting it
TRUE every time the OK case is executed.
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Another issue that arises in a terminal-like string control is LabVIEW’s use of
<TAB> to give Key Focus to other panel controls according to the Panel Order.
This can’t be disabled so understand that hitting <TAB> throws your cursor out
of the screen and onto the OK button, then the Stop button, etc. as defined by the
Panel Order. Control character sequences work but don’t display as you might
expect. If you type <Ctrl + A> only the “a” appears on the screen. Hitting
return does indeed send the “^a” command to PMAC and all program motion
will abort as expected.
Basic Command Editing
You can use the standard cut, copy, and paste control sequences to manipulate
text in the screen buffer. You can copy a previous command and paste it at the
end of the buffer and execute the command with a <RET>. You can also copy
PMAC responses to other applications or other LabVIEW string controls. You
cannot insert text into the middle of previously executed commands. The
spaghetti diagram doesn’t know where the insert took place and would require a
lot of work to track this type of operation.
If you enter lines that wrap to the next line on the screen, list programs with
lines that wrap, or lis t the gather buffer (guaranteed to wrap) the screen may
start to act a little strange. You can solve this by clearing the window using the
button below the screen.
Buffer Management
PMACPanel applications, especially their development, requires the
management of ASCII buffers containing command sequences, I-Variable
configuration information, and motion/PLC programs. To simplify this
PMACPanel has a simple VI and associated cluster control to handle ASCII text
buffers. The control is located below the screen. It is a copy of the
\PmacProgram\PmacProgEdit control shown below. The actual control on the
PmacTerminal panel doesn’t look like the raw control. We’ve moved things
around to look better. In fact, most of the packaged PMACPanel clusters have
been rearranged. Be very careful when moving items in a cluster: do NOT pull
them out of the cluster boundaries by mistake. This causes the remaining
controls in the cluster to reorder their Panel Order. The associated VI will not
work as you expect because what was control 4 is now control 5 etc.
The cluster and VI implement six operations using the screen buffer.
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Load - Load an ASCII file into the screen buffer.
•
Save - Save the contents of the screen buffer to the file specified in
the path control above the screen.
•
Save As - Save the buffer by selecting a new file.
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Clear Window - Dump the buffer and reset the display
bookkeeping.
•
Down Load - Save the screen to a temporary file, compile the file,
and down load it to PMAC. This means that the entire buffer must
contain legitimate on-line commands and/or a program. Buffers
with previous PMAC responses are not downloadable.
•
Show Log - When compiling the buffer PComm32 generates a log
file with standard compiler messages. If the download generates
an error, a dialog with the log file is displayed. You can use this
button to review the log file whether or not an error was generated.
Terminal Indicators
There are several indicators introduced in Chapter 4 on the panel that display the
status of the motor, coordinate system, and motor motions. These are simple
rearrangements of the stock clusters. The interesting thing about these clusters
is that they track the commands entered by you on the terminal. When you
address motor 3 by typing
#3
in the terminal screen, the motor clusters display the status for motor 3. When
you address coordinate system 2 by typing
&2
in the terminal screen, the coordinate system status clusters display the status for
coordinate system 2. We will discuss the simple implementation of this
capability a little later.
Terminal Controls
The PmacGlobalBufferSize VI is used to monitor and control PMAC’s buffer
status. Sometimes when using a terminal program its not obvious that a
download can’t succeed because you left a buffer open or forgot to delete the
gather buffer. The size indicator and the Close Buffer button make it easier to
monitor and deal with this problem.
There are three new control clusters and capabilities used to develop this tool.
We will cover their use in PmacTerminal a little. Operationally these VIs are
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PmacProgram\PmacProgSelect - This menu ring control with its VI query
PMAC for a list of currently loaded motion programs and display the data
in the ring. Using it, you can easily determine what programs are currently
loaded in PMAC.
•
PmacPLC\PmacPLCSelect - This cluster contains a menu ring control that
works with its VI to query PMAC for a list of currently loaded PLC
programs and their execution status: Enabled/Disabled. There is also a
button that toggles the Execution State of the selected PLC. If the menu
ring shows PLC 01 as Enabled the button allows you to disable it thereby
changing the text displayed in the menu ring.
•
PmacPLC\PmacPLCExecute - I5 controls the general execution of PMAC
PLCs. Bit 0 controls the execution state of PLC 0 (the foreground PLC)
and Bit 1 controls the execution state of PLCs 1 - 31 (the background
Chapter 5 – Development Tools
PLCs). This control and its VI maintain I5. When the button says
Background OFF the background PLCs are off. Clicking on the button
toggles them on and will now indicate Background On.
Implementation Diagram
The diagram for this tool illustrates some important concepts in the development
of tools and your own applications. We will not cover the spaghetti diagram in
the sequence frame at the top that handles the bookkeeping for the terminal
screen. The diagram is shown here
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The general framework should look familiar. There is an execution loop, a
PmacDevOpen, a Stop button, and the PmacTerminalMenu items. Several
bookkeeping local variables are initialized outside the loop.
Most of the status indicator VIs are located in the lower left. The currently
addressed motor and coordinate system are fetched by the VIs
•
PmacMotorCurrent - Query PMAC for the currently addressed motor. It
is most generally used in interactive development environments rather than
a custom VI where you want to address a specific motor.
•
PmacCoordCurrent - Query PMAC for the currently addressed coordinate
system. It is most generally used in interactive development environments
rather than a custom VI where you want to address a specific CS.
and provided to the six status VIs covered in Chapter 4. The Device Number
they require is passed through the terminal bookkeeping sequence frame thereby
causing these VIs to execute after terminal commands are processed. If this isn't
done, addressing commands from the terminal get uncoordinated with the
queries placed by the status VIs and the status displayed in the indicators might
not be for the motor or coordinate system expected.
The VIs and spaghetti diagrams on the lower right implement the
PmacProgEdit, PmacProgSelect, PmacPLCSelect, and PmacPLCExecute
operations. These utilize the update architecture used in many of the earlier
exercises. The VIs accept control clusters containing Booleans and generate
new output data for the controls when an output Boolean indicates it has new
data. Several of the clusters function as both controls and indicators using their
color and Boolean text. This manual does not cover the internal operation or
implementation of these VIs or members of these collections in detail. They are
involved and way beyond what most developers will want to know about
PMACPanel. Feel free to examine their contents and make changes as desired.
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PmacProgSelect - Query PMAC for a description of all loaded motion
programs by reading PMAC's internal buffers. If First Time is TRUE Menu
String Array contains a sorted list of all loaded programs by program
number. The VI maintains New Selection Index as a state from execution to
execution. Translation of Program Selection Index into Program Number
occurs when First Time Strings is TRUE or Program Selection Index is not
equal to New Selection Index. New Output TRUE indicates that Program
Number, New Selection Index, and Menu String Array contain new data.
•
PmacPLCSelect - Query PMAC for a description of all loaded PLC
programs by reading PMAC's internal buffers. If First Time is TRUE Menu
String Array contains a sorted list of all loaded PLC programs and their
Chapter 5 – Development Tools
execution state by PLC number for the menu ring in PLC Select Cluster.
Button String Array contains information to change the description of the
button in PLC Select Cluster so that it toggles the selected PLC's execution
state when clicked. The VI maintains New Selection Index as a state from
execution to execution. Translation of menu ring selections in PLC Select
Cluster into PLC Selected Cluster occurs when First Time Strings is TRUE
or either control in PLC Select Cluster changes. New Output TRUE
indicates that PLC Selected Cluster, Menu String Array, and Button String
Array contain new data.
•
PmacPLCExec - This VI controls the execution of foreground and
background PLC programs by modifying i5 using a PmacPLCExec control
as both an indicator and a control. When First Time is TRUE New Output
is TRUE and Output PLC Exec Cluster indicates the state of foreground and
background PLC program execution. When either button in Input PLC
Exec Cluster doesn't match the last Output PLC Exe c Cluster contents the
execution state of the foreground or background PLC programs is toggled.
•
PmacProgEdit - Manage common editing operations on Input Buffer
String as specified by Program Edit Cluster. Input File Path is the default
file path to use for Load, Save, or Save As operations. New Output Buffer
is TRUE when a Load or Clear Window operation puts new data in Output
Buffer. New Path is TRUE when a Load, Save, or Save As operation
modifies the file path.
Load - Load a file into Output Buffer.
Save - Save Input Buffer to Input File Path.
Save As - Query the user for a new file to save Input Buffer.
Clear Window - Put an empty string in Output Buffer.
Down Load - Compile and down load Input Buffer to PMAC.
Show Log - Display the contents of the compile log.
Using these descriptions, it is straightforward to use these VI’s powerful
capabilities. Place the appropriate control or controls on the panel. Where
required create a writeable local variable copy of the control or the required
items attribute node. If the menu ring requires an attribute node to display the
programs, or the button requires an attribute node to change its Boolean text,
create the node, and select the proper attribute. For the PLC Select cluster, you
need to go to the panel and create the attribute node for each item in the cluster not the cluster itself.
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PmacTerminalJog
This tool is a modified version of PmacMotorMoveExamp and PmacTutor7.
Its details won’t be covered here. Instead, it is an excellent example for
demo nstrating the behavior of multiply executing tools and application VIs.
One note of importance is the limits on the numeric slider in the
PmacMotorJogControl cluster. You should change these to reflect the limits
of your mechanical setup.
Start by opening and executing PmacTerminal. As you address motors and
coordinate systems, the captions in the terminal tool indicators change. If you
execute PmacTerminalJog by opening and running it or by selecting
PMACPanel»Jog from the VI menu, things start to behave strangely. Lets say
your last few PmacTerminal commands addressed motor #3 and coordinate
system &2. Everything looks fine on the indicator bars. When you run
PmacTerminalJog, the indicator bars suddenly reflect the status of motor #1
and coordinate system &1. Why? You never sent a terminal command to do
this - did you? The truth is you did. There is only one PMAC and any
commands that require a motor or coordinate system address change the
addressed item. Because PmacTerminal queries PMAC for the currently
addressed motor and coordinate system, it will use these values for its status
queries. If you replace these VIs with numeric controls, this will no longer be a
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problem for PmacTerminal. However, it will not be possible to automatically
have the indicators track the commands PmacTerminal sends to PMAC.
PmacTerminalEdit
If you strip out all the fancy stuff from PmacTerminal and leave a screen, edit
control, and program menu ring you get a program editor tool. The terminal like
interface is different in that there is no “OK” button to capture and process the
line just entered. Instead, hitting <RET> in the screen puts a <CR> in the
buffer. The <TAB> will still rotate you through the controls.
This tool should be used to develop programs rather than PmacTerminal.
Program development is detailed in the PMAC User Manual and PMAC
Software Reference Manual. There are some added features to PMACPanel’s
processing of motion and PLC programs developed using this tool. PMACPanel
parses the motion program buffer for the PLC or motion program number and
coordinate system prior to down loading. This allows you to write a PLC or
motion program and have PMACPanel keep track of this information without
you having to do it. It greatly simplifies your PMACPanel diagrams. The
program shown in the panel demonstrates what is required to do this.
The motion program coordinate system is specified by the comment line
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115
; USE CS &3
The down load compilation process ignores comments so this does not affect
normal PMAC operation. The comment can be any mix of upper and lower
case. For safety always use caps. The program number is parsed from the line
open prog 10
Again, this can be a mix of upper and lower case. When the program is down
loaded a cluster indicating the coordinate system to use, program number, and
Load State is created
This cluster is used by a number of PmacProgram VIs to do useful things for
you.
The diagram for the tool has a standard organization. Note the use of
PmacProgParse to parse the program window and generate the Program State
cluster. This cluster is hidden on the panel and not used in the tool.
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The next section discusses one of the most powerful features of PMACPanel the encapsulation of PMAC motion and PLC programs into a single easy to use
wrapper VI.
Encapsulating Motion Programs
The Create Prog VI and Create PLC VI case structures at the bottom pass the
program buffer to a very special VI that creates a VI wrapper for the program
being edited. The detailed use of your new motion or PLC program VIs will be
covered in Chapter 7, 8, and 9.
•
PmacProgSubVICreate - Prompt the user for a file to save Program Buffer
to. Make a copy of PmacProgSubVI VI changing the name to the same
base as the saved program. For example, if Program Buffer is saved to
PmacTest1.pmc a new VI named PmacTest1.vi is created from
PmacProgSubVI.
Using the example names above there are now two items with the same base
name. An ASCII program file PmacTest1.pmc and a VI
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PmacTest1.vi . The icon for the new VI based on PmacProgSubVI shown here
•
PmacProgSubVI - PmacProgSubVICreate makes a copy of this VI with a
new name that matches the name of a motion program. Because the motion
program has the same name (with a different extension) this VI knows how
to open, parse, load, and run a motion program without intervention or extra
inputs. It allows you to edit the associated program and interactively
execute the program. Details of its implementation are contained in the
manual.
The VI downloads the associated program when first loaded unless this
option is disabled in the diagram and defaults for Program Number and
Coord Number are provided for the Program VI State Cluster.
The interactive panel can be opened and used by setting Panel Show
(latched) TRUE. See the documentation for PmacTerminalEdit and
PmacTerminalExecute for details on interactive execution. The panel is
closed by clicking the Stop button on the panel
When the latched input Program Run is TRUE Input PQM Variant Array is
sent to PMAC to initialize a program's P, Q, or M variables. The program
is then started as long as there is no program executing in the associated CS.
When Program Running is TRUE this or another program is executing in
the associated CS.
PmacTerminalExecute
This tool is an interactive motion program debugger that queries PMAC for the
actual program and allows you to step through it in a variety of ways. Querying
PMAC for the program allows you to see whether your program is actually what
you think it is. If you down load a program without clearing the program buffer
first the down load contents are appended to the existing buffer. This is
probably not what you want. The indicators and their operation should be
obvious. Extensive on-line help is available for the panel controls using
LabVIEW’s Help»Show Help facility.
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To operate the tool, select a program using the menu ring and a coordinate
system to execute the program in using the knob. Only loaded programs are
shown in the ring. Clicking Begin and the Program Execute cluster loads the
program into the list buffer from PMAC. If you click Run, the program will
begin executing. You can watch the execution by clicking the cursor in the
screen. The currently executing program line will highlight and track the
program through its steps. This dynamic display only works when the cursor is
in the screen.
You should understand a few issues about PMAC program execution. PMAC
pre-computes moves several lines ahead of the currently executing motion to
allow motion blending. Because of this, the hi-lighted line may not reflect the
moves your machine is currently executing. For a detailed discussion of this, see
the PMAC User Manual.
The implementation of the tool uses two VIs to generate program execution
commands and monitor the currently executing program line. These VIs are,
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•
PmacProgExec - Interactively execute the program specified in Program
VI State Cluster in response to button clicks in Program Execute Control
Cluster. New Program is TRUE when Begin is clicked and Program List
Cluster contains a new listing. Command Executed is TRUE when any
button in Program Execute Control Cluster is clicked.
•
PmacProgDebug - Query PMAC for currently executing line in Coord
Number and output the response in Current Command. Determine the
scroll position and characters that delimit this line in List Buffer and create
Debug Location Cluster for setting selection attributes in a multi-line string
control for real-time display of Program Number's execution. This
information is obtained from PMAC using the LIST PE command.
The specification of the currently executing line in the program-listing buffer is
given by
Debug Location Cluster Cluster of information for string
control attributes. The items define the Scroll Position of the
string in the buffer, and the Start and End Character of the line
currently executing.
Selection Start and End character in List Buffer for
currently executing program line.
Character Start
Character End
Scroll Position Number of currently executing line
in List Buffer.
This information in this cluster is used in the diagram to set the selection and
scroll position attributes for the string control used to display the listing. You
can see this at the top of the diagram.
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The program controls implemented by the Program Exec cluster send on-line
program execution commands to PMAC. A brief description of the button
operations is given here. For detailed descriptions of PMAC’s implementation
of the command see the associated documentation in the PMAC Software
Reference Manual or the online help available through Help»Show Help.
Chapter 5 – Development Tools
•
Begin - Point PMAC to the coordinate system and program
number specified. Load the actual program from PMAC. The
command sent to PMAC is &*CS*b*PROG* where *CS* is the
specified coordinate system number and *PROG* is the current
program number.
•
Run - Execute the program from where it is. If you pointed to the
beginning with Begin then start there. If you abort or halt motion
using the associate buttons you can restart the program from its
current location. The command sent to PMAC is R.
•
Step - Execute a step to the next move or dwell in the program
performing all the intervening computations. The command sent to
PMAC is R.
•
Prog Hold - Bring the coordinate system velocity to zero thereby
holding moves where they are but allowing jogs. You can restart
the program with Run or Step. The command sent to PMAC is \.
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Jog - Pop a jog panel up to allow motor jogging after a Prog Hold.
The jog panel must be closed before the panel before you can
return to this panel to restart the program with Run or Step.
Closing the panel returns all jogged motors to their pre-jog position
with j=. Commands sent to PMAC are generated from the panel.
•
Feed Hold - Bring the coordinate system velocity to zero thereby
holding moves where they are. You cannot jog from this mode.
You can restart the program with Run or Step. The command sent
to PMAC is H.
•
Abort - Decelerate all motors immediately. You can restart the
program with Run or Step. The command sent to PMAC is A. See
the safety notes for the command in the PMAC Software Reference
Manual.
•
Halt “Q” - Quit the program at the end of the current move or any
already calculated moves. You can restart the program with Run
or Step. The command sent to PMAC is Q.
•
Halt “/” - Quit the program at the end of the currently executing
move. You can restart the program with Run or Step. The
command sent to PMAC is /.
PmacTerminalMotors
This tool is based on PmacTutor10 that introduced the PmacMotors ICVs. Its
purpose is to allow you to monitor selected motor motions from the terminal.
The arrays of indicators function as introduced in the earlier tutorial. You can
select a coordinate system and enable C.S. conversion for motors defined in the
specified coordinate system. Motors selected in Plot Select are displayed in the
real-time chart. The sampling rate is not uniform. It is a best-effort attempt to
query as fast as possible. For uniform sampling use PmacTerminalGather.
You can choose to display mo tor positions, velocities, or following errors. The
chart control palette allows you to pan and zoom the display. The Free
Run/Pause button allows you to pause the chart update. Clear will clear the
chart and restart the chart history buffer. The Save button will prompt you for a
file to save the chart data as a tab-delimited spreadsheet file. You can also select
File»Print Window from the menu bar to print the panel to the printer or a file
at any time. Servicing PmacTerminalMenu may cause noticeable glitches in
the plot data. It can be disabled by clicking the Disable Menu Track button.
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Depending on your requirements, you should alter chart operation using the
attributes available with the right mouse button. These include the length of the
history axis, auto scaling of the Y-axis (P, V, or E), plot style, and many other
items. If you want to change the range on the Y-Axis click the minimum or
maximum value on the axis, enter a new value, and disable the auto scaling.
Don’t forget to save these changes if you want them to be permanent.
The diagram has a case structure to allow selection of positions, velocities, and
following errors. If you wish to plot a mix of these, you should modify the
diagram. Pause is implemented with a case structure that prevents the update of
the chart. If you desire, the VIs for querying position, etc. and the
PmacMotorsPVE clusters can be moved into the pause case. This way the
indicator update will also pause. Save and Clear use the chart attribute nodes to
access the History data required to implement their operations. You will find
these pieces of the diagram useful in many other applications because their use
is not obvious in the LabVIEW documentation.
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123
PmacTerminalMotorX-Y
This tool is based on PmacTerminalMotors. Its purpose is to allow you to
monitor and plot selected motor motions executing in a 2-Axis Cartesian
coordinate system. Ninety-five percent of this tool functions as introduced in
PmacTerminalMotors. See the documentation for this tool. The difference is
that motors selected in Plot Select are displayed in the pseudo real-time X-Y
chart. To display 2-Axis data you must select two motors.
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The charting of 2-Axis motion uses a special chart buffer
PmacMotorsPlotXYChartBuffer to fool the standard LabVIEW X-Y plot
control into behaving like a real-time chart. This is required because
LabVIEW’s X-Y plot does not maintain a history buffer - it plots sets of points.
The slider on the right of the plot specifies the length of the history buffer for
PmacMotorsPlotXYChartBuffer. Like a standard real-time chart, 2-Axis
position history is displayed like a snake moving around the coordinate space.
The head is current position and the tail is the last position in the buffer. This
tool will definitely aid you in understanding what moves you are executing in a
2-Axis system.
The implementation of the X-Y charting is very similar to that used to
implement the standard chart in PmacTerminalMotors and PmacTutor10.
The main difference is that the chart has no history buffer. Hence, we have
created a hidden control for the data provided to the chart named XY Chart
Data.
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PmacPlotXYChartBuffer takes the two point X-Y cluster terminal from
PmacMotorsPlotSelect VI and buffers them to generate an array of clusters for
the X-Y Chart. To update the plot legend create an attribute node for the chart,
select the two items shown, and set them from the cluster provided by
PmacMotorsPlotSelect.
PmacTerminalGather
This tool is a general purpose tool for synchronously gathering and plotting
PMAC data and outputting the data to TAB delimited spreadsheet files for use
by Microsoft Excel, LabVIEW, Matlab, or other analysis and plotting
applications. It allows you to execute a step or an encapsulated motion program.
Encapsulated motion programs created by PmacTerminalEdit can easily be
installed in the tool by replacing the existing PmacProgSubVI with one of your
own.
The LabVIEW chart controls enable you to pan and zoom the plot. You can
select File»Print Window from the menu bar to print the panel to the printer or
a file at any time.
As with the PmacTerminalMotors and PmacTerminalMotorsXY tools you
can modify the plot attributes prior to running the tool to accommodate your
expected scale. PMACPanel has utilities to set the legend and plot colors to
reflect your gather selections. One issue you should consider when gathering
data is that the gathered variables can and will, as in the sample panel, have
widely varying ranges. You can choose to stack the plots if you desire.
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To select Address Items use the controls contained in the PmacGatherSelect
cluster on the bottom left. PMAC lets you select up to 24 Address Items. The
following section covers methods for extending the PmacAddress selection
VIs. The PmacGatherSelect VI builds an array of Address Items containing a
string description, an address, and a scale factor using the interactive commands
from the panel cluster.
•
PmacGatherSelect - Maintains a PmacGatherSelect Cluster and builds a
PmacGatherSpec cluster to define gather operations. You can build a list in
four ways. Select an item and Motor/CS number, P-Variable, Q-Variable,
or define a Custom Gather Specification. Click the associated -> button to
add the item to the list on the right. The gather sample rate is defined as a
number of Servo Cycles. All items are gathered at the same sample rate.
Items selected in the list can be deleted using the Remove button.
New Output is TRUE when an item is added to the list with a -> button or
removed from the list with Remove. New selection identifies the selected
item in the gather list. Gather Selection Items String Array define the
contents of the gather list. Gather Spec Cluster is an internal data type used
by other PmacGather VIs to setup PMAC and collect the gathered data.
There are four methods for specifying Address Items provided by this VI and its
control/indicator cluster.
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Chapter 5 – Development Tools
The top group of two Menu rings allows you to select one of 29
standard motor or CS variables and a motor or CS. Using the ->
button in this group you can add the selection to the Text ring on
the right.
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•
If you specify a P-Variable or Q-Variable number and click the
appropriate -> button the specified variable is added to the
selection list.
•
On the bottom is a Custom Gather Specification cluster that allows
you to enter a description, address, and scale factor. Clicking its
associated -> button adds this item to the selection list. Be aware
that the PComm32 library requires you to specify addresses as:
X:$****
Y:$****
DP:$****
If you want to write the gathered data to a spreadsheet file click the Write
Spreadsheet radio button before executing the gather. To actually gather the
data click Step or Program. Step executes a 250 mS step to 1000 counts and
back to 0 counts using the motor specified in the menu ring used to setup the
gather. Program executes the encapsulated motion program wired into the
diagram. During the gather, the Gathering indicator is green. After the gather,
the data is plotted and the indicator turns gray. If you selected Write
Spreadsheet, you will be prompted for a file name.
The diagram for implementing this tool is a great source of ideas for building
gathering into your own applications. Being a full application tool it requires a
bit more work – but it is not as bad as it looks – it fits on one page!
Outside the execution loop, all motor servo loops are closed by
PmacMotorsCloseLoop. To exit the loop the Stop button first sends a delete
gather command to PMAC to free the buffer space. Buffer space is monitored
using PmacGlobalBuffers and an indicator. We will discuss how a Gather
Selection list is built in the next section.
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Data is actually gathered in this tool when either the Gather Program or the
Gather Step buttons are clicked. They require the Gather Spec Cluster created
by your program or generated by PmacGatherSelect. The gather process
begins by executing in sequence the following five VIs. In the diagram, the
sequence of operations is located in a case structure.
•
PmacGatherSetup - Use the information in Input Gather Spec Cluster to
setup a gather operation on PMAC. Output Gather Spec Cluster should be
wired to PmacGatherStart, PmacGatherStop, and PmacGatherCollect to
sequence operations and so that they can get the information they require
for their operation.
Use the information in Input Gather Spec Cluster to setup a gather operation
on PMAC. Output Gather Spec Cluster should be wired to
PmacGatherStart, PmacGatherStop, and PmacGatherCollect to sequence
operations and so that they can get the information they require for their
operation.
The actual setup can also be done using Pewin32, PmacTerminal, or your
motion/PLC programs. This is not recommended if you intend to use
PmacGatherCollect to retrieve the gathered data. These methods require
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129
intimate knowledge of PMAC's internal architecture and are automatically
handled by this VI.
•
PmacGatherStart - Start a previously defined gather operation. You
should immediately start the desired motion after this VI executes. You can
eliminate this VI if you start gathering by using the PMAC program
command "define gather" in your program.
•
PmacGatherStep - This is only one of any possible motion or encapsulated
motion program.
•
PmacGatherStop - Stop an executing gather operation. You can eliminate
this VI if you stop gathering by using the PMAC program command "end
gather" in your program.
•
PmacGatherCollect - Collect the gather buffer and scale the data using
each items scale factor. The data in Gather Data Array is a two dimensional
array of doubles with Number of Items columns and Number of Samples
rows. In this format the data can be written to a spreadsheet or processed
by many different LabVIEW data analysis VIs.
The sequence frame in the middle of the case executes the step or an
encapsulated motion program. You can replace the motion program with your
own or modify the entire sequence to suit your needs.
There are two other operations performed within the main case structure. The
Gather Spec cluster is unbundled and used with PmacPlotColor to setup the
legend. Finally, after the data is collected it can be written to a spreadsheet if
the operation was enabled prior to the gather. This is done using
•
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PmacGatherSpreadsheet - Output a tab delimited spread sheet file for
import into other plotting and analysis applications. If Input Spreadsheet
File Path is empty of Not A Path a dialog prompts for a file name. The file
name used is provided to Output Spreadsheet File Path.
Chapter 5 – Development Tools
Specifying Gather Addresses
With PMAC you can gather data from any address. This requires an address to
gather from and a scale factor to apply to the data. The PmacGather tools use a
small collection of PmacAddress VIs to simplify the specification of PMAC
addresses for gathering. When you understand these tools, you can modify them
to suit your particular needs.
The purpose of the PmacAddress collection is to build arrays of Address Item
Clusters as shown here to define an Address Item’s text description, address,
scale factor, and type
Address Item Cluster Specify a description, address, and
scale factor for a Address Item
Address Item Description Text description of
Address Item
Address Item Address Address of Address Item
Address Item Scale Scale factor for Address Item
Address Item Type Enumerated type defining type
of raw data
The PmacAddress collection consists three VIs
Chapter 5 – Development Tools
•
PmacAddressMotors - This VI maintains a table defining 29 of the most
common Address Items. If Input Select String is the empty string the VI
produces Menu String Array describing the defined Address Items. This
should be used to set the items in a Menu or Text ring control. Selection
Index and Motor Number are provided by rings and define the desired item
and the motor number used to compute an address for the specified item.
The computed item is contained in Address Item Cluster. For a description
of this computation see the reference section and the memory map
contained in the PMAC Software Reference Manual.
•
PmacAddressAdd - Check to see if the item specified by Address Item
Cluster already exists in Input Address Item Array. If it already exists do
not add it. If it does not exis t add the cluster to Output Address Item Array.
131
•
PmacAddressDelete Locate and remove the Address Item Cluster specified
by Selection Index to Delete from the Input Address Item Array.
The PmacAddressMotors panel contains an array of clusters that define a
translation table. You can manually add items to this table and set them as the
defaults for the control transparently adding them to the menu ring in the
PmacGatherSelect control. A portion of the table provided with PMACPanel
is shown here.
Each cluster item in the array consists of five items. In order from left to right
these are:
Name Textual description of the item to be gathered. Used in
conjunction with a motor or CS number to build a unique
description for plot legends and spreadsheet files.
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Chapter 5 – Development Tools
Address A string defining the size and interpretation of the
data to be gathered. Legitimate designators are X:$, Y:$, and
DP:$.
Address Offset A hexadecimal string defining the offset
address of the data to be gathered.
Address Stride A hexadecimal numerical value that defines a
stride to be used in computing the final gather address. The
actual address is computed as (Motor Number - 1) * Address
Stride + Address Offset.
Scale Factor A scale factor to apply to the collected data.
Some entries in this table compute this value depending on the
item being gathered.
You should refer to the PMAC I/O and Memory Map in the PMAC Software
Reference Manual prior to modifying this table. You will note in the table that
Encoder Time Between Counts has an Address Stride of $4 and an Address
Offset of $C000, whereas most Address Strides are $3C. Using the values the
address for Motor 3 Encoder Time Between Counts is computed to be:
Y:$(C000 + (Motor Number - 1) * 4) = Y:$C008
As another example, the DAC Commanded Output for motor 2 is
X:$(0045 + (Motor Number - 1) * 3C = X:$0072
Scale Factors are a little more complex. Many Address Items in memory are
scaled by one and already have the proper scaling. The most interesting ones are
scaled by some combination of factors and I-Variables from internal units to
encoder or coordinate system units. For example, Present Actual Position
(DP:$002B) is reported in units of
1 / (Ix08 * 32) counts
To make your life easier PmacAddressMotors computes this scale factor when
building the Address Item Cluster. If you add items to the table remember to
make them the default for the table and save the VI. When you add the item,
you must add a little wiring to the diagram for PmacAddressMotors shown
here.
Chapter 5 – Development Tools
133
At the bottom of the diagram is a labeled case structure labeled “Compute Scale
Factors for each table entry”. It is reproduced here for clarity.
Select the last case in the structure using your mouse and add another case. The
default last case is 29 so add case 30 or whatever you require. If the scale factor
is fixed and specified in the table, wire the orange scale factor input tunnel from
the unbundled cluster to the output select tunnel on the right. Click through a
few of the cases and you’ll see what we mean. This will copy the scale factor in
the translation table into the scale factor item for the Address Item Cluster being
built. The case shown here depicts the scale factor computation for item 16 “Actual Velocity” at Address Offset X:$0033 with stride $3C. The units of the
gathered data, as documented in the PMAC Software Reference Manual Chapter
8, are:
1 / (Ix09 * 32) counts / (Ix60 + 1) servo interrupts
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Chapter 5 – Development Tools
The scale factor in the translation table is 1/32. Hence, this portion of the
diagram computes
ScaleFactor * (1 / Ix09) / (Ix60 + 1)
When modifying the tables make sure that you keep an original copy of the
PmacAddressMotors VI. If you happen to pull a control out of the cluster or
pull the cluster out of the array the table clears all entries.
Chapter 5 – Development Tools
135
Chapter 6 - Encapsulated Motion
Programs and PQMs
Basics
This chapter introduces a variety of VIs and tools to seamlessly integrate PMAC
motion programs into your PMACPanel application. In Chapter 5, we
introduced PmacTerminalEdit. This tool allows you to develop new motion or
PLC programs or modify existing programs and with the click of a button create
a VI wrapper for the program. In this chapter we cover the details of the
wrapper and introduce the PmacPQM collection of VIs. These provide an
interface to directly tie controls and indicators in your application panels to
motion program variables.
PmacProgSubVI
We introduced this VI in Chapter 5 but do so again because we’re going to
cover it in more detail.
•
PmacProgSubVI - PmacProgSubVICreate makes a copy of this VI with a
new name that matches the name of a motion program. Because the motion
program has the same name (with a different extension) this VI knows how
to open, parse, load, and run a motion program without intervention or extra
inputs. It allows you to edit the associated program and interactively
execute the program. Details of its implementation are contained in the
manual.
The VI downloads the associated program when first loaded unless this
option is disabled in the diagram and defaults for Program Number and
Coord Number are provided for the Program VI State Cluster.
The interactive panel can be opened and used by setting Panel Show
(latched) TRUE. See the documentation for PmacTerminalEdit and
PmacTerminalExecute for details on interactive execution. The panel is
closed by clicking the Stop button on the panel
When the latched input Program Run is TRUE Input PQM Variant Array is
sent to PMAC to initialize a program's P, Q, or M variables. The program
is then started as long as there is no program executing in the associated CS.
When Program Running is TRUE this or another program is executing in
the associated CS.
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Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
When PmacTerminalEdit saves your motion program to a file and makes a
copy of PmacProgSubVI with the same name as your motion program you
have encapsulated the program within a VI. You should edit the icon of your
new encapsulation or wrapper VI to represent your motion program. We will use
the terms encapsulation and wrapper interchangeably. Before we look at how to
use the encapsulation VI lets look at the new VIs panel and diagram.
If you open your new encapsulation VI you’ll note that the panel is a
combination of PmacTerminalEdit and PmacTerminalExecute with most of
their capabilities. The purpose of this panel is to allow you to edit the associated
motion program and monitor its execution. There is no need for buffer control
or for selecting a motion program or coordinate system because these are
already known by your encapsulation VI. Refer to their documentation in
Chapter 5 for details on using the capabilities of the two panel components.
Help»Show Help will also provide detailed descriptions of the buttons and
indicators.
The implementation of the VI is quite a bit different from most of those already
introduced. This VI is embedded in your application’s execution loop so that it
can continuously monitor the attached motion program. As such, it is not
wrapped in its own loop. It utilizes several VI control and server concepts found
in LabVIEW to control the display of the panel and selective execution of some
of its components so that it doesn’t consume a lot of execution time unless
required.
There are four major pieces of the diagram. On the far left is a case structure
that controls and monitors the actual execution of the attached motion program.
Below this is a small case structure that opens and displays the panel in response
Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
137
to the Boolean input Panel Show. The very large case structure on the right is
only executed when the program is not running. Within this case, there are two
major operations. The top case structure checks the Program VI State Cluster,
down loads the motion program the first time the VI is executed, and parses the
program for a program number and coordinate system. This is why you don’t
have to keep track of the program number of its CS. The large case structure
below executes only when the panel is "Open and Active" and enables status
monitoring, editing, and interactive execution from the panel.
To hide many nasty details from the user the VI maintains a Program VI State
Cluster. When the VI executes the first time the Program Loaded item in the
cluster is FALSE. Hence the program execution case on the left can’t execute,
the large case does, and the program is downloaded thereby updating the
Program VI State Cluster indicating that the program is loaded, the program
number, and associated coordinate system. At this point, the VI is knows
everything it needs to run and monitor the program.
If your application does not need to be downloaded every time your system is
turned on, changing the labeled Boolean constant on the top to TRUE with the
mouse will disable automatic down load. This prevents the down load but
doesn’t provide the program number or coordinate system number. To provide
this information set the constants in the case containing the Default Program #
and Default CS # and save the VI.
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Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
After the down load is complete, repeated executions of this VI embedded in
your application loop allow you to display the interactive panel or control and
monitor the execution of your motion program. The VI provides its Program VI
State Cluster as an output so you have access to this information for building
tools that are more sophisticated.
If your application provides a latched TRUE input to Panel Show the panel is
opened and activated. The sub-case within the large case can now execute and
update the panel’s display. This approach eliminates a fair amount of execution
overhead in maintaining a panel when not displayed. The structure of this part
of the diagram is obvious if you’ve followed the documentation so far. The one
difference is that the Stop button has no loop to halt. Instead it closes the panel
and allows continued execution of the other operations in the VI.
Once the program is loaded, the case on the far left can execute. This structure
performs two sequential operations. First, the PmacPQMArray VI is executed.
This will set specified PMAC P, Q, or M variables using Input PQM Variant
Array when Program Run is TRUE. If Program Run is FALSE, the specified P,
Q, or M variables are retrieved from PMAC and output in Output PQM Variant
Array with New Output TRUE. The second operation is to monitor the
associated motion program using PmacProgRun. If Program Run is TRUE the
program is running and can use the newly loaded P, Q, or M variables. The
Program Running output will be TRUE indicating that the program is running.
If Program Run is FALSE no program is executing and Program Running will
indicate whether another motion program is running in the associated coordinate
system. PmacProgRun is covered in detail here.
•
PmacProgRun - Control and monitor the execution of Program Number in
Coord Number. The specified program is started when Program Start is
TRUE and no program is currently running in Coord Number. Program
Running indicates that some program - maybe not Program Number - is
running in Coord Number. Output Program Start is a copy of Program Start
and can be used to sequence program execution with other operations.
PmacPQMExamp
The encapsulation of a motion program with a wrapper is a huge step toward
integrating PMAC with LabVIEW. The PmacPQM collection of VIs carry this
further by providing an architecture for tying controls and indicators to the P, Q,
and M variables used by your PMAC motion programs and PLCs. To illustrate
how to do this we’ll use PmacPQMExamp located in the directory
\PmacPQM.
To begin lets look at the sample motion program PmacPQMTest.pmc that we
want PMAC to run (.pmc is used by Delta Tau SW tools to indicate a motion
program). You should note the associated encapsulation VI PmacPQMTest.vi
created by PmacTerminalEdit.
; PmacPQMTest.pmc
; USE CS &1 ; Parsed by PMACPanel during download
Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
139
Close
&1
#1->1000x
; Always close any open buffers
; Define the CS
m1->*
; Redefine M1 as standard output port
m1->y:$ffc2,8,8,u
open prog 32
clear
; Parsed during download
; Otherwise appended to buffer!
linear
abs
; Set move modes
ta(P1)
ts250
tm1500
; Set move - Accel time is P1
m1 == 1
X(P2)
DELAY(P3)
; Show bit on port move X to P2
m1 == 2
X(P4)
; Update the port
; Move X to position P4
; Delay for P3 mS
DELAY1500
ta250
ts125
tm750
;
New move parameters
m1 == 4
x0
dwell 100
; Return home
m1 == 0
close
This program uses four P-Variables to define its execution and motion.
•
P1 - Acceleration time for first few moves
•
P2 - First X position
•
P3 - Delay time after move
•
P4 - Second X position
Because P, Q, and M variables are used to configure a motion or PLC program
PMACPanel provides a collection of VIs to take values from panel controls and
set associated P, Q, and M variables for use by your programs. You can then
start program execution. The panel for the example shows a familiar set of
indicators to monitor motor motions on the top left.
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Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
Below this are four PmacPQM Cluster controls associated with the four PVariables used by the program P1 - “Acceleration in mS”, P2 - “X Move 1 in
cm”, etc. Each cluster contains a control for the value of the variable and a string
control specifying which P, Q, or M variable. At the bottom of the panel is a
Cycle Read/Write button to begin execution of the encapsulated program and an
In Progress indicator to monitor the execution of the program. The Show
Program button will open the encapsulated program’s interactive panel thereby
allowing you to interactively modify the program and step through its execution.
PmacPQM provides the ability to log PQM variables to standard LabVIEW
datalog files. The logging process is controlled by the Datalog Control Cluster
and Datalog Display Cluster in the upper right and is sequenced with the Cycle
Read/Write button.
If you click the Create/Open button, you are prompted for the name of a datalog
file. You can select an existing file created using this example or provide the
name for a new file. There are two example files named datalog.dat and
datalog1.dat. New File closes an existing log file and allows you to select a
new one. This needs to be done prior to actually logging PQM data. The
Read/Append/Ignore radio buttons define what to do with the PQM data when
the Cycle Read/Write button is clicked.
Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
141
•
Read - It is assumed that you opened an existing data log file
created earlier. Use the record specified by Current Record to read
a PQM record, set the PQM variables in PMAC using the retrieved
record, then execute the encapsulated motion program. You will
see the values on the cluster controls change to those read from the
record when Cycle Read/Write is clicked. Using this you can
replay previously executed tests and configurations. The state of
the panel illustrates that a Read operation was performed during
the last cycle using record 1 (after the cycle Current Record was
incremented to 2). The note indicates that X1 = 12 and indeed P2
has a value of 12.
•
Append - Read the PQM cluster controls, append them to the
datalog file, send them to PMAC, and start the execution of the
encapsulated motion program. You can add a note to the record
prior to clicking the Cycle Read/Write button.
•
Ignore - Keep the datalog file but do not read or write anything.
Simply pass the PmacPQM clusters to PMAC.
PmacPQM Clusters
There are four standard PmacPQM clusters provided for use on your
applications panels. Defining these clusters binds the PQM variable’s name
with the actual numerical value to be used with the variable. These are based on
variations of the cluster definition for PmacPQMLong.
•
PmacPQMLong - Cluster for tying PQM variable definition with an i32
control/indicator. After inserting on your panel specify a PQM variable
name for the Variable Item and make it the default using Right Mouse
Button»Data Operations»Make Current Value Default. Replace
Control to reflect your requirements.
PQM Long Cluster Cluster for tying PQM variable definition
with an i32 control/indicator. After inserting on your panel
specify a PQM variable name for the Variable Item and make
it the default using RightMouseButton»Data
Operations»Make Current Value Default. Replace Control
to reflect your requirements.
Variable String defining PQM Variable name. e.g.
"P34"
Control Control for associated PQM Variable
PQM Type
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Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
•
PmacPQMBool
•
PmacPQMShort
•
PmacPQMDbl
When you insert these on your panel feel free to move the items around, replace
the actual control, change the format and range, color, Boolean text, etc.
Remember to keep the cluster order as indicated. When you define the name of
the Variable item in the cluster, it is a string (i.e. P34). You need to set this as
the default for each control in your panel and save the VI using the cluster – not
the original cluster itself!
PmacPQMVariant functions as a neutral or void type of PQM cluster.
•
PmacPQMVariant - Cluster for tying PQM variable definition with a
PQM type-neutral string. This cluster is generally not used on application
panels.
PmacPQM Conversions
There are three types of PQM VI for processing PQM clusters. The examples
given here are for the PmacPQMLong collection. Similar collections exist for
PmacPQMBool, PmacPQMShort, and PmacPQMDbl.
•
PmacPQMLong - If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Long PQM
Variable specified by PQM Variable String. Response Available will be
TRUE to indicate Response contains the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set
the Long PQM Variable using Input Value. Response Available will be
FALSE and Response defaults to Input Value.
Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
143
If you specify an M-Variable it must be defined using Pewin32,
PmacTerminal, or PmacCommSendString.
•
PmacPQMLong2Var - Convert the PQM Long Cluster to a type-neutral
PQM Variant Cluster.
•
PmacPQMVar2Long - Convert a type-neutral PQM Variant Cluster to a
PQM Long Cluster.
The purpose of the 2Var and Var2 VIs is to convert clusters of specific types to
and from neutral PmacPQMVariant types for building arrays that bundle PQM
cluster controls into a single item.
•
PmacPQMArray - Set or Get a collection PQM variables as defined by an
array of PmacPQMVariant clusters.
The use of arrays greatly simplifies the development of PQM configuration
panels for your applications. PmacProgSubVI VIs created by
PmacTerminalEdit accepts the arrays as inputs and provide them as outputs.
This allows you to update program PQM variables prior to actually executing
the program and monitor any PQM variable used by the program as it executes.
PmacPQM Datalogging
PMACPanel supports data logging of PmacPQM clusters using the VIs in the
PmacFile collection. These can be modified to support record attributes such as
time stamps in support of your particular needs.
•
PmacFileDatalog - Manage datalog operations for type-neutral
PmacPQMVariant Arrays.
Operations as specified by the radio buttons in Datalog Control Cluster are
performed when Append/Read is TRUE. A file must be selected prior to
executing the operation using the Create/Open button or New File button in
the cluster. The file is opened and closed on every transaction. After an
operation New Datalog Display is TRUE and Output Datalog Display
Cluster contains updated operation status for your application's cluster.
Append operations write Input PQM Variant Array to the end of the file
specified in Input Datalog Display Cluster and update Current Record and
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Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
Num Records in the output cluster. The contents of the Note window are
appended with the record.
Read operations read the record specified by Current Record in Input
Datalog Display Cluster from the specified file and generate a new Output
PQM Variant Array. The availability of new data is indicated by New
PQM Variant Array TRUE. Output Datalog Display Cluster increments
Current Record and displays the Note, if any, attached to the record. Read
operations cannot read past the end of the file and simply read the last
record in the file.
To change the data logged by this VI simply change Input and Output PQM
Variant Array to your own data type. Similar modifications to
PmacFileDatalogAppend, Create, and Read are also required.
•
PmacFileDatalogAppend - When Append Record is TRUE append Input
PQM Variant Array to the file specified in Input Datalog Display at the end
of the file. Update the Current Record and Num Records in Output Datalog
Display Cluster. Indicate the new data by setting new Datalog Display
TRUE.
•
PmacFileDatalogRead - When Read Record is TRUE read Output PQM
Variant Array from the file specified in Input Datalog Display using Current
Record. Update the increment Current Record in Output Datalog Display
Cluster and display the Note, if any, stored with the record. Indicate the
new data by setting new Datalog Display TRUE.
•
PmacFileDatalogCreate - Create or Open an existing datalog file to store
data of type Input PQM Variant Array along with notes. When Create/Open
is TRUE use the path in Input Datalog Cluster. If this path is empty or Not
A Path display a file selection dialog. When a file name is entered or an
existing file is selected the number of records in the file is determined. All
updated information is available in Output Datalog Display Cluster and
indicated by New Datalog Display TRUE.
Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
145
Using Encapsulated Motion Programs
We’ve already seen the panel for PmacPQMExamp. Lets look at how
PmacPQM ICVs can be combined with the custom PmacProgSubVI created
by PmacTerminalEdit to build great applications. The diagram for the
example is shown here.
The application has the standard execution loop with menu processing and a
Stop button. In the middle is the PmacProgSubVI VI created for the motion
program PmacPQMTest.pmc already introduced. When the Cycle Read/Write
button is clicked a sequence of operations begins. The PmacPQM clusters on
the panel are translated into PmacPQMVariant clusters and bundled into an
array. The array is passed to PmacFileDatalog, which appends the array to the
datalog file, ignores data logging, or ignores the current input and reads a record
from the specified data log file. The array is passed to the encapsulated motion
program VI along with a TRUE Boolean. The wrapper VI will down load the
variables to PMAC and start the program.
If PmacFileDatalog has new PQM array data due to because it read the data
from a datalog file or simply passed the input array through, the PQM clusters
are updated with the PQM array. This is done by the two case structures in the
lower right of the diagram that convert the array items to appropriate types,
unbundle them, and set the local variables for the clusters on the panel. If this is
the first execution of the VI the shift register will query PMAC for the current
PQM variables, and update the clusters.
This example program indicates its location in the program by setting bits of a
standard memory mapped machine output. The output is monitored by
PmacAccMachineOutput8 and used to drive an indicator on the panel. The
VIs and indicators in the upper right display the coordinate system definitions
and motor position. The coordinate system number for the VIs is obtained from
the encapsulated motion program VI.
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Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
PmacTestExamp
Development of your interactive application framework can get involved. If
you’ve followed everything up to this point, you understand how PMACPanel
cooperates with PMAC, how to use the various ICV’s in your applications, and
how to encapsulate motion programs using PMACPanel. This section discusses
one framework for controlling and configuring multiple motion programs.
The example PmacTestExamp, located in the \PmacTest directory, has four
encapsulated motion programs.
•
PmacTestPQM1.pmc in CS 1
•
PmacTestPQM2.pmc in CS 2
•
PmacTestCircle.pmc in CS 3
•
PmacTestCircles.pmc in CS 3
PmacProgSubVI's were created for each program by running
PmacTerminalEdit, loading the programs one at a time, and clicking the Create
Prog VI. This takes 2 minutes to do. PmacTestPQM1 and PmacTestPQM2
are similar to PmacPQMExamp and use P-Variables to configure their motion.
The panel for PmacTestExamp is shown above. The panel shows four sets of
controls – one for each program.
•
A button to start the program
•
A button to show the encapsulated motion program’s execution
panel
•
An LED to indicate the execution state of the program
Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
147
PQM 1 has an extra button that, when clicked, allows modification of its
associated P-Variables with the control panel shown below. The VI architecture
for doing this isn’t really a PMACPanel design issue, but it demonstrates an
approach for PQM configuration using pop-up panels in a larger application.
This application specific PQM configuration VI doesn’t actually send the
variables to PMAC. It creates a PmacPQMVariant array from the panel
clusters that can be used by the encapsulated motion program VI in the main
application. Update reads the current P-Variable values from PMAC and
updates the controls on the panel. You can close the panel using Cancel and
discard the new control values. If you click OK, the VI indicates there is a new
PQM Variant Array available. The disposition of the new data is up to the main
application VI. The description for the VI is given here.
•
PmacTestPQM1Panel - Group several PQM clusters together and
coordinate their operation with an encapsulated motion program VI. Panel
Show TRUE displays the panel. If you supply Input PQM Variant Array
and set Init w/ Input Variant Array TRUE the controls initialize themselves
using the array contents when the panel is displayed. If you do not use
these inputs you should first Update the controls from PMAC. Output PQM
Variant Array maintains any changes made using the controls from
execution to execution. If the user clicks OK New Output Bool reflects
this. Otherwise Output PQM Variant Array contains the current state of the
cluster controls.
The VI forms a basis for generating your own pop-up PQM panels. The
diagram is shown here and has pieces of PmacProgSubVI and
PmacPQMExamp in it.
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Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
As with PmacProgSubVI, there is no execution loop. If Panel Show is TRUE
the panel is opened by the case structure on the top left. If the panel is "Open
and Active" the large case structure is enabled and the controls on the panel are
active. The panel clusters are converted to variants and used to set Output PQM
Variant Array. Thus, Output PQM Variant Array always reflects the current
state of the controls. If Init w/Input Variant (latched) is TRUE or if the user
clicks Update the controls are updated using either the newly fetched data or the
Input PQM Variant Array. When Cancel or OK is clicked the panel is closed.
The state of the OK button is used to set New Output.
Incorporation of this pop-up VI into PmacTestExamp can be seen in the
example’s diagram.
Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
149
The handling of the Run, Show Panel, and In-Progress indicators for the
individual motion programs is very simple because of the encapsulation VIs. At
the bottom, the Show PQM1 Panel button is supplied to PmacTestPQM1Panel
to allow configuration of the PQM Variant Array supplied to the appropriate
encapsulation VI.
The implementation of the plots, charts, and other indicators is identical to that
covered already.
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Chapter 6 – Encapsulated Motion Programs and PQMs
Chapter 7 - Homing, Encoders,
and Position Capture
Basics
PMAC utilizes a custom gate array to interface motor encoders to PMAC and
perform a number of high-speed computations required to monitor motor
position. When writing PMAC programs you specify moves in coordinate
system units. Motor positions are specified in encoder counts. The gate array
uses another version of encoder counts to translate motor position into encoder
position.
In Chapter 4 we introduced the PmacMotor and PmacCoord collection of
ICVs that allow you to convert between motor position in encoder counts and
motor position in coordinate system units. In this chapter we complete the
picture by introducing the PmacEncoder and PmacHome collection of ICVs
that give you the ability to move freely between coordinate system, motor
position, and encoder position specifications. These are important if you want to
relate precise position information to actions in your system. Using the encoder
gate array, you can configure PMAC to
•
Capture positions in response to external or internal triggers
•
Generate triggers at pre-specified compare-equal encoder positions
The first operation required for precision position measurement of any sort is the
establishment of a zero or home position. On PMAC this is done using an
encoder capture operation that is triggered by a home position sensor. Homing
details are covered in detail in the PMAC User Manual. Some of this
information is repeated in this chapter.
In this Chapter we cover homing and position capture operations. In the next
chapter we will demonstrate how this same capability can be used to capture
motor positions in response to external events generated by another National
Instruments DAQ system or instrument. Compare operations will also be
covered in the next chapter and allow you to precisely synchronize data
acquisition with motion.
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
151
Position Basics
As shown below, PMAC takes position information from a 24-bit encoder
register pointed to by Ix03 and extends it in software to a 48-bit register for the
actual motor position. In the process of extension, it multiplies the encoder
value by the position scale factor Ix08. Because the register in the encoder
conversion table is in units of 1/32 of a count, the actual motor position register
is in units of 1/(Ix08*32) of a count.
The extended motor position registers are set to zero on power-up and reset
(unless there is an absolute position sensor), and again at the end of a homing
search move. The encoder position registers are only set to zero on power-up
and reset. Therefore, after a motor is homed, there is an offset between a
motor’s zero position and its encoder’s zero position.
You must understand this offset because you will be using the encoder registers
for position capture and compare not the motor registers. Depending on your
mechanical configuration, you may also have to handle the rollover of encoder
registers if they will be traveling more than the +/-8 million counts supported by
the 24-bit encoder register. The modulo (%) operator is useful for this. For
more details, refer to Synchronizing PMAC to External Events in the PMAC
User Manual.
Input
Signal
Quadrature,
Parallel,
Analog,
etc.
Encoder
Position
Motor
Position
Encoder
Position
Capture Position (Mx03)
Compare Position (Mx03)
Phase Position (Mx01)
Axis
Position
Act. Pos. Cmd., Target Pos.
"P", (Mx62)
(Mx61),(Mx63)
Extended
Count
Interpolated
Count
Integer
Count
Move End Pos.
(Mx65)
User
Units
(1/(Ix08 32)ct)
(fixed point)
(1/32 ct)
(floating point)
(PMATCH)
Decoder/
Counter
24 bits
Encoder 24 bits
Conversion
(e.g. 1/T)
Position
Extension
32
Done Always
Ix08
Done Always
Set to Zero on
Power-up/Reset
48 bits
Axis Coefficients
Done for
Activated Motor
Set to Zero on
Power-up/Reset
ACTUAL POSITION
48 bits
Axis
Scaling
Done for
Defined Axis
Set to Zero on
Power-up/Reset
and Home
Can be Offset
(Axis offset, PSET,
{axis}= )
COMMAND
POSITION
Motor position is always kept in terms of encoder counts. When a motor is
assigned to an axis through a Coordinate Definition statement as in
&1
#1->1000X
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Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
for use in a motion program, the scale factor in the statement determines the
units of the axis (usually inches, millimeters, degrees, etc.). As introduced in
Chapter 4, programmed moves for an axis are converted to motor positions
using the scale factors from the Coordinate Definition statements. It is
important to realize that this conversion is for commanded positions only, and
that the conversion normally goes only one way: from axis to motor. PMAC
never computes actual axis positions
Position-Capture
PMAC’s position-capture function latches the current encoder position into a
special register at the time of an external trigger. The operation is set up, and
later serviced, in software. The actual latching is executed in hardware, without
the need for software intervention. This means that the only delays in a position
capture are the hardware gate delays (less than 100 nsec) thereby providing a
very accurate capture function.
Trigger Condition
The position capture register can be used both "automatically", as in the
firmware homing routines that handle the register directly, and "manually",
where your program handles the register. Manual handling of the capture
register will be covered in Chapter 8.
During motor setup, Ix25 specifies which set of flags (associated with one of the
encoder counters) is used for that motor. It is important that the flag number
match the position encoder number for the motor. If you use ENC1 for positionloop feedback, you should use Flags1 (HMFL1, +/-LIM1, FAULT1), and CHC1
as the encoder index channel.
The trigger event that causes the position capture is determined by Encoder IVariables 2 and 3 (I902 and I903 for Encoder 1). Encoder I-Variable 2 defines
what combination of encoder third-channel (CHC Index channel) transition and
encoder flag transition trigger the capture. If Encoder I-Variable 2 specifies the
use of a flag, Encoder I-variable 3 determines which flag (usually the home flag
HMFLn). Once these have been configured, the on-line HOME command will
use the position-capture feature automatically.
Homing
Homing is a PMAC firmware function that automatically performs a number of
operations to establish a motor’s zero position. The homing search move can be
executed with the on-line HOME command, from a PLC program using
COMMAND"HOME", or a motion program HOME statement. However the
HOME command is issued, Ix23 specifies the move’s speed and direction. If
Ix23 is greater than zero, the homing search move will be positive. If it is less
than zero the move is negative. The acceleration for a homing search move is
controlled by the same parameters -- Ix19, Ix20, and Ix21 -- as jogging moves
Action on Trigger
During the homing search move, PMAC firmware waits for the hardware
trigger. When the trigger occurs PMAC reads the position at the time of
capture, usually the hardware capture register, and uses it and the Ix26 home
offset parameter to compute the associated motor’s new encoder zero position.
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
153
Motor positions will now be referenced to a new encoder zero position plus or
minus any axis offset in the axis definition statement. If the axis definition is
#1->10000X+3000
the home position will be reported as 3000 counts.
If software over travel limits are used (Ix13, Ix14 not equal to zero), they are reenabled at this time after having been disabled during the search for the trigger.
The trajectory to the new zero position is calculated using deceleration and
reversal if necessary. Note that if a software limit is too close to zero, the motor
may not be able to stop and reverse before it hits the limit. The motor will stop
under position control with its commanded position equal to the home position.
If there is a following error, the actual position will be different by the amount
of the following error.
Home Complete
If you are monitoring the motor from a PLC program or PMACPanel to see if it
has finished the homing move, it is best to look at the "home complete" and
"desired velocity zero" motor status bits. The "home complete" bit is set to
FALSE on power-up and reset; it is also set to FALSE at the beginning of a
homing search move, even if a previous homing search move was completed
successfully. It is set to TRUE as soon as the trigger is found in a homing
search move, before the motor has come to a stop.
The "home search in progress" bit is simply the inverse of the "home complete"
bit during the move: it is TRUE until the trigger is found, then FALSE
immediately after. Therefore the monitoring should also look for the "desired
velocity zero" status bit to become TRUE, which will indicate the end of the
move.
Home Position Offset
Prior to V1.14 firmware,
this value could be obtained by
using the PLC program
HOMOFFST.PMC, shown in
the Examples section of the
PMAC User Manual. Starting in
V1.14, PMAC stores this value
automatically.
PMAC automatically stores the encoder position captured during the homing
search move for the motor. This value is kept in the Motor Encoder Position
Offset Register [Y:$0815 (Motor 1), Y:$08D5 (Motor 2), etc.], which is set to
zero on power-up/reset for motors without absolute power-on positioning. If
Ix10>0 to specify an absolute power-on position read from a resolver so no
homing is necessary, this register holds the negative of the power-on resolver
position. In either case, it contains the difference between the encoder-counter
zero position (power-on position) and the motor zero (home) position, scaled
in counts.
There are two main uses for this register. First, it provides a reference for using
the encoder position-capture and position-compare registers. These registers are
referenced to the encoder zero position, which is the power-up position, not the
home (motor zero) position. This register holds the difference between the two
positions. This value should be subtracted from encoder position (usually from
position capture) to get motor position, or added to motor position to get encoder
position (usually for position compare).
To move an axis until a trigger is found, then convert the captured encoder
position to a motor position, you can use the following M-variable definitions:
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Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
M103->X:$C003,24,S
M117->X:$C000,17
M125->Y:$0815,24,S
; ENC1 position-capture register
; ENC1 position-capture flag
; #1 encoder pos offset register
Zero-Move Homing
If you have following
error when you give the HOMEZ
command, the reported actual
position after the HOMEZ
command will not be exactly
zero; it will be equal to the
negative of the following error.
If you wish to declare your current position the home position without
commanding any movement, you can use the HOMEZ (on-line) or HOMEZn
(motion program) command. These are like the HOME command, except that
they immediately take the current commanded position as the home position.
The Ix26 offset is not used with the HOMEZ command. This is not a reliable
home and the PMACPanel VIs introduced in this chapter and the next do not
handle this phantom home offset. You can, if desired, fake this by modifying
PmacEncoderOffset.
Homing Into a Limit Switch
The polarity of the limit
switches is the opposite of what
many people would expect. The LIMn input should be connected
to the limit switch at the positive
end of travel; the +LIMn input
should be connected to the limit
switch at the negative end of
travel.
It is possible to use a limit switch as a home switch. However, you must first
disable the limit function of the limit switch if you want the move to finish
normally; if you do not do this, the limit function will abort the homing search
move. Even so, the home position has been set; a J=0 command can then be
used to move the motor to the home position.
To disable the limit function of the switch, you must set bit 17 of variable Ix25
for the motor to 1. For example if I125 is normally $C000 (the default),
specifying the use of +/-LIM1 for motor 1, setting I125 to $2C000 disables the
limit function.
It is a good idea to use the home offset parameter Ix26 to bring your home
position out of the limit switch, so you can re-enable the limits immediately after
the homing search move, without being in the limit.
Homing from PLC and Motion Programs
The PMAC User Manual has an extensive section on homing techniques using
PLC and motion programs. These are not covered in this manual. However, the
programs for these are included in the PmacHome collection of ICVs.
PmacHomeExamp
Having covered the basics of position capture and homing from a purely PMAC
perspective we can now look at the ICVs available for use in your applications.
We’ll start by examining the panel for PmacHomeExamp shown below.
Many of the panel clusters should look familiar. There are three new indicator
clusters associated with homing and a few new ideas associated with PLC
program encapsulation. In the bottom left is a very large PmacHomeIVar
cluster that borrows extensively from PmacMotorIVarSafety and
PmacMotorIVarMove. It adds a new cluster for Encoder I-Vars 2 and 3. On
the far right is an indicator bar that directly displays eight encoder status bits.
Next to the Motor Number and Coord System knobs is a Home State Cluster.
This contains data from several I-Variables and memory registers that define
how motor position is transformed to encoder position. The cluster is updated
any time the Capture Encoder button is clicked. In the top right is a button that
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
155
will toggle the Execution State of the encapsulated PLC program that sets up
and executes a homing operation.
Before going into the individual pieces of this example lets look at the diagram
below. As usual, the execution loop has several motor ICVs and a standard IVariable architecture. The PmacEncoderStat VI and cluster monitor the
encoder status bits and PmacHomeComplete monitors the execution of homing
moves and retrieves the Home State Cluster. At the very bottom is the
encapsulated PLC program Sub VI.
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Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
Configuring the Position Capture Trigger
Earlier we discussed position capture and homing. Homing is a firmware
operation that uses the encoder hardware position capture capabilities to
establish the relationship between a motor’s zero position and the encoder’s zero
position. To perform a homing operation three things are required
1.
One of PMAC’s four HW trigger flags HOME, -LIM, +LIM, or
FAULT must be selected.
2.
A trigger condition specifying the rising or falling edge of the flag
possibly combined with the encoder index channel C must be
selected.
3.
If a FAULT or +/-LIM flag is used the limit or amplifier disable
capabilities must be disabled. If you are using these PMACPanel
can perform the necessary steps, but you must consult the PMAC
User Manual for details so that you really understand what you are
doing.
The PmacHomeIVar cluster on the example panel handles the configuration of
Ix25 and encoder I-Variables 2 and 3. PmacMotorIVarFlag controlling Ix25,
is detailed in Chapter 4. The PmacEncoderIVarCapture cluster and its two
sub controls are documented here.
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
157
•
PmacEncoderIVarCapture
"Encoder I-Variable 2" Position Capture Control This parameter
determines which signal or combination of signals (and which polarity)
triggers a position capture of the counter for encoder n. If a flag input
(home, limit, or fault) is used, I903 (etc.) determines which flag. Proper
setup of this variable is essential for a successful home search, which
depends on the position-capture function. The following settings may be
used:
Setting
Meaning
0
Software Control
1
Rising edge of CHCn (third channel)
2
Rising edge of Flag n (as set by Flag Select)
3
Rising edge of [CHCn AND Flag n]
4
Software Control
5
Falling edge of CHCn (third channel)
6
Rising edge of Flag n (as set by Flag Select)
7
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND Flag n]
8
Software Control
9
Rising edge of CHCn (third channel)
10
Falling edge of Flag n (as set by Flag Select)
11
Rising edge of [CHCn AND Flag n/]
12
Software Control
13
Falling edge of CHCn (third channel)
14
Falling edge of Flag n (as set by Flag Select)
15
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND Flag n/]
Note that several of these values are redundant. To do a software-controlled
position capture, preset this parameter to 0 or 4; when the parameter is then
changed to 8 or 12, the capture is triggered (this is not of much practical
use).
Encoder I-Variable 3" Capture Flag This parameter determines which of
the "Flag" inputs will be used for position capture (if one is used -- see I902
etc.):
Setting
158
Meaning
0
HMFLn (Home Flag n)
1
-LIMn (Negative Limit Signal n)
2
+LIMn (Positive Limit Signal n)
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
3
FAULTn (Amplifier Fault Signal n)
This parameter is typically set to zero, because in actual use, the +/-LIMn
and FAULTn flags create other effects that usually interfere with what is
trying to be accomplished by the position capture. If you wish to capture on
the +/-LIMn or FAULTn flags, you must either disable their normal
functions with Ix25, or use a channel n where none of the flags is used for
the normal axis functions.
The VI for the cluster is
•
PmacEncoderIVarCapture - Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI
architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE the Encoder I-Variables for the
specified Encoder Number are set. Otherwise they are fetched from PMAC
and provided by Output Encoder I-Capture Cluster with New Output
TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
As noted if you use the +/ -LIM or FAULT flags steps must be taken to modify
their normal operation. These are safety limits that as a rule stop motion and
disable the amplifier – not useful when you are trying to home the motor or set
you limits. You can modify this behavior using the PmacMotorIVarFlag
cluster covered in Chapter 4.
•
PmacMotorIVarFlag
By disabling the Position Limits and/or Amp Enable you can home into a +/LIM or FAULT flag. Make absolutely certain you have read the PMAC User
Manual section on these topics and understand what you are doing. As an
example of potential problems, consider this. When homing into a Limit switch
you must start the move on the proper side of the switch and move toward it.
Otherwise, you will move away from the switch and might hit a mechanical
stop.
Generally, we have assumed that your PMAC is configured so that Motor N
uses Encoder N and Flag N. If this is not the case you must create your own VIs
using the pieces provided with PMACPanel or craft your own. In either
situation, the architecture and examples presented here will make your life a lot
easier.
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
159
When you have configured your capture trigger conditions and move direction,
velocity, acceleration, etc. set these in PMAC using the “Configure I-Vars”
button on the example panel.
Monitoring the Home Position Capture
Homing is a firmware operation that uses the position capture and homing move
characteristics just configured. By clicking the Home button in the
PmacMotorLimitControl cluster, you actually start the movement and
monitoring of the encoder status bits. When the movement starts the Home
Complete flag for the motor is set to FALSE and the Home In Progress flag is
set TRUE. You can see this in the PmacMotorStatLimit cluster on the
example panel.
•
PmacMotorStatLimit
At a fundamental level, you can monitor the encoder’s operation using the
PmacEncoderStatFlags cluster and VI. The five indicators on the bottom of
the cluster simply reflect the state of their associated inputs. Position Captured
indicates that the configured trigger condition, whether used for homing or some
other purpose, has occurred. Count Error is used internally by PMAC.
Compare-Equal will be covered in the next chapter. A detailed description of
these status bits, along with their standard PMAC M-Variable definitions follow.
•
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PmacEncoderStatFlags
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
Compare-Equal
M116->X:$C000,16,1
; Compare-equals flag for encoder 1
This compare-equal signal is always copied into the compare-equal flag
(M116 here) that is available for PMAC internal use. If you are using this
flag internally, make sure that the signal is latched (M111=1), or you will
probably miss it. For interrupting the host (edge-triggered), you will
probably want the signal transparent.
Position Captured
M103->X:$C003,0,24,S
; Encoder 1 24-bit position capture register
M117->X:$C000,17
; Encoder 1 position-capture flag
This bit goes TRUE when the trigger condition has gone TRUE; it goes
FALSE when the capture register is read (when M103 is used in an
expression). As long as the bit is true, the capture function is disabled; you
must read the capture register to re-enable the capture function.
Count Error
M118->X:$C000,18,1
; Count error flag for encoder 1
If an illegal encoder transition (both channels changing on the same SCLK
cycle) does get through -- or around, if bypassed -- the delay filter, and to
the decoder, a count-error flag (M118 here) is set, noting a loss of position
information.
C Channel Status
Quadrature encoders provide an index channel to indicate revolutions of the
encoder. This flag is TRUE when the channel is TRUE.
Home Flag
A home switch may be normally open or normally closed; open is high (1 =
TRUE), and closed is low (0 = FALSE). The polarity of the edge that
causes the home position capture is programmable with Encoder I-Variables
2 and 3 (I902 and I903 for HMFL1).
+/-Limit Flags
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
161
When assigned for the dedicated uses, these signals provide important
safety and accuracy functions. +LIMn and -LIMn are direction-sensitive
over-travel limits, that must be actively held low (sourcing current from the
pins to ground) to permit motion in their direction.
The direction sense of +LIMn and -LIMn is the opposite of what many
people would consider intuitive. That is, +LIMn should be placed at the
negative end of travel, and -LIMn should be placed at the positive end of
travel.
Fault Flag
This flag takes a signal from the amplifier so PMAC knows when the
amplifier is having problems, and can shut down action. The polarity is
programmable with I-variable Ix25 (I125 for motor #1) and the return signal
is analog ground (AGND). FAULT1 is pin 49. With the default setup, this
signal must actively be pulled low for a fault condition. In this setup, if
nothing is wired into this input, PMAC will consider the motor not to be in
a fault condition.
As the homing move proceeds and triggers the physical switch, the encoder
will signal this using these status bits. When the configured position
capture trigger condition occurs the Position Capture bit will become
TRUE.
Home Position Transformations
Monitoring the homing operation is already done in PMAC firmware. When the
home move completes, the motor’s zero position and its corresponding
encoder’s zero position will most probably not match. PmacHomeComplete
monitors the home operation and reports a number of I-Variables and memory
registers that both demonstrate what is going on and are used for capture and
compare-equal operations in the next chapter.
•
PmacHomeComplete - Create a PmacHomeStateCluster containing IVariables and memory registers for the specified Motor/Encoder number.
The VI monitors the Home In Progress, Home Complete, and Desired
Velocity Zero status bits for the motor to determine when to query PMAC
for the required data. A query can also be forced if Capture Home State is
TRUE.
This assumes Motor N uses Encoder N.
The contents of the Home State Cluster are discussed in detail here. Again, if
you are developing PMACPanel application that uses PMAC’s capture or
compare-equal capabilities you should understand these quantities.
•
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PmacHomeState
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
Present Encoder Position 0xC002 i32
The encoder Servo position register is 2 * Encoder counts with the LSB the
direction bit. This output value is en actual encoder position referenced to a
power-up/reset position of zero.
Present Commanded Motor Position 0x0028 Dbl
This is the motor's present commanded position in units of 1 / (32 * Ix08)
encoder counts referenced to the motor's home position.
Present Actual Motor Position 0x002B Dbl
This is the motor's present actual position in units of 1 / (32 * Ix08) encoder
counts referenced to the motor's home position.
Encoder Home Position Offset 0x0815 i32
This is the encoder's home offset position in encoder counts. It represents
the difference between the encoder's power-up/reset zero position and the
position when a home operation completes.
Motor Pos Bias 0x0813 i32
This is the position bias of the motor and represents the coordinate system
translation in motor position encoder counts.
Position Scaling Factor Ix08 i32
This parameter controls how the position encoder counter is extended into
the full-length register. For most purposes, this is transparent to the user
and does not need to be changed from the default.
There are two reasons that the user might want to change this from the
default value. First, because it is involved in the "gear ratio" of the position
following function -- the ratio is Ix07/Ix08 -- this might be changed
(usually raised) to get a more precise ratio.
The second reason to change this para meter (usually lowering it) is to
prevent internal saturation at very high gains or count rates (velocity).
PMAC's filter will saturate when the velocity in counts/sec multiplied by
Ix08 exceeds 256M (268,435,456). This only happens in very rare
applications -- the count rate must exceed 2.8 million counts per second
before the default value of Ix08 gives a problem.
When changing this parameter, make sure the motor is killed (disabled).
Otherwise, a sudden jump will occur, because the internal position registers
will have changed. This means that this parameter should not be changed in
the middle of an application. If a real-time change in the position-following
"gear ratio" is desired, Ix07 should be changed.
In most practical cases, Ix08 should not be set above 1000 because higher
values can make the servo filter saturate too easily. If Ix08 is changed, Ix30
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
163
should be changed inversely to keep the same servo performance (e.g. if
Ix08 is doubled, Ix30 should be halved).
Motor Home Offset Ix26 i32
This is the relative position of the end of the homing cycle to the position at
which the home trigger was made. That is, the motor will command a stop
at this distance from where it found the home flag(s), and call this
commanded location as motor position zero.
This register permits the motor zero position to be different from the home
trigger position. It is particularly useful when using over-travel limits for a
home flag (offsetting out of the limit before re-enabling the flag as a limit).
If large enough (greater than 1/2 times home speed times accel time) it
permits a homing move without any reversal of direction.
The units of this parameter are 1/16 of a count, so the value should be 16
times the number of counts between the trigger position and the home zero
position.
Example:
If you wish your motor zero position to be 500 counts in the negative
direction from the home trigger position, you would set Ix26 to -500 * 16 =
-8000.
Encapsulated PLC Programs
In Chapter 6 we introduced VI wrappers that encapsulated motion programs and
their operation into a single VI. PMACPanel also encapsulates PLC programs.
The discussion of this topic was deferred until here because we now have a good
example of their use – homing from a PLC program. The following PLC
program, PmacHomePLC1.pmc, taken from the PMAC User Manual and uses
the +LIM flag to establish a home position for motor 1.
; PLC Set-up Variables (to be saved)
CLOSE
M133->X:$003D,13,1
M145->Y:$0814,10,1
; Desired Velocity Zero bit
; Home complete bit
; PLC program to execute routine
OPEN PLC 10 CLEAR
I123=-10
; Home speed 10 cts/msec negative
;I125=$C000 ; Use Flags1 for Motor 1 (limits enabled)
I126=32000 ; Home offset of +2000 counts
; (enough to take you out of the limit)
I902=3
; Capture on rising flag and rising index
I903=2
; Use +LIM1 as flag (negative end switch)
I125=$2C000 ; Disable +/-LIM as limits
CMD"#1HM"
; Home #1 into limit and offset out of it
WHILE (M145=1)
ENDWHILE
164
; Waits for Home Search to start
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
WHILE (M133=0)
ENDWHILE
; Waits for Home motion to complete
I125=$C000 ; Re-enable +/-LIM as limits
DIS PLC10
; Disables PLC once Home is found
CLOSE ; End of PLC
Using PmacTerminalEdit you can load this program and click the “Create PLC
VI” to create an encapsulated PLC Sub VI for this PLC. This has already been
done for this homing PLC, PmacHomePLC1.vi, and the other PLC and motion
homing programs documented in the PMAC User Manual. The raw
encapsulated PLC Sub VI is shown here
•
PmacPLCSubVI - PmacPLCSubVICreate makes a copy of this VI with a
new name that matches the name of a PLC program. Because the PLC
program has the same name (with a different extension) this VI knows how
to open, parse, load, and run a PLC program without intervention or extra
inputs. It allows you to interactively monitor and change the PLC
program's execution state. Details of its implementation are contained in
the manual.
The VI downloads the associated PLC program when first loaded unless
this option is disabled in the diagram and a default for PLC Number are
provided for the PLC VI State Cluster.
The VI queries PMAC for the PLC's execution state every execution. This
is done whether the program is executing or not. New Output is TRUE any
time PLC Enable is TRUE.
Using this new wrapper VI it is easy to create PLC programs and use them in
your PMACPanel applications. The indicator on the example panel displays the
Execute State of the properly loaded PLC program every iteration of the VI.
The button “Home PLC 1 Toggle” on the example panel changes the state of the
PLC when clicked. For the purposes of this example, if you click the button, the
PLC begins executing and the sequence of operations in PLC 10 begin executing
thereby configuring and executing the specified home operation.
There is one important point to note about this example. M133 and M145 are
defined outside the actual definition of the PLC. When the VI is first executed
the entire program buffer, including these statements, is compiled and down
loaded to PMAC. If you also happen to set certain I-Variable and memory
locations before the OPEN PLC statement these are executed when the program
is downloaded. Not every time the PLC is enabled.
We will see a few more examples of encapsulated PLC’s in the following
chapters.
Chapter 7 – Homing, Encoders, and Position Capture
165
Chapter 8 - Encoder Capture
and Compare Operation
Basics
PMAC provides sophisticated and precise motion capabilities that can be easily
accessed from PMACPanel applications. When coupled with National
Instruments data acquisition boards, PMAC and PMACPanel can be used to
build highly integrated and precise motion based data acquisition systems using
GPIB, SCXI, VXI, or DAQ boards. The degree of integration is directly related
to your particular system and performance requirements.
Loosely coupled systems with slow event or clock rates that can be handled by
LabVIEW can be integrated primarily with PMACPanel VIs and PMAC
PLC/motion programs. Tightly coupled systems with fast clock rates or tightly
synchronized motion and data acquisition requirements are easily handled using
a few terminal blocks and wires to couple the HW systems.
In this Chapter, we will introduce a set of VIs for converting between encoder
position and motor position. This is followed by an example extending the
position capture capabilities introduced in Chapter 7 demonstrating how you can
capture positions in response to NI-DAQ signals, mechanical HW triggers, and
clocks and use the captured positions in your application. Finally, we will
introduce PMAC’s compare-equal capabilities and demonstrate several
approaches for generating SW and HW triggers at specific positions while
PMAC is in motion. PMAC generated position triggers and clocks can then be
used by your NI-DAQ boards to control and synchronize acquisition. In all
cases, PMACPanel simplifies the required tasks by allowing you to work in CS
units, motor position, or raw encoder units.
In the Chapter 9 we show how to couple standard NI-DAQ boards to PMAC to
synchronously trigger data acquisition at specified positions, and even use
PMAC’s servo clock as your DAQ sampling clock.
PmacEncoderPositionExamp
This example demonstrates how PMACPanel handles encoder positions. This is
important for transforming captured positions into motor position and translating
compare positions specified in motor or CS units into encoder position.
The panel, shown below, Motor/Encoder and Coord System knobs, Motor PVE,
and a Jog cluster. At the top right of the panel are two indicators that display the
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Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
encoder position as the raw encoder position and the encoder position converted
into motor position or CS units using VIs in the PmacEncoder collection.
Before you run this VI, you should home the motors you are working with. You
can do this with the example covered in Chapter 7 or execute a home command
from PmacTerminal.
Encoder Position Transformations
When you execute this example the position indicator in the PVE cluster will
display the current motor position. The current encoder position is displayed in
the indicator labeled Raw Encoder Pos. Expect these two values to be different
as they are in the panel.
The most basic requirement for converting between encoder position and motor
position and/or CS units is the determination of the offset between a motor’s
zero position and the encoder’s zero position. The homing operation will
generate the necessary data internally to PMAC. The following VI fetches this
data and computes an offset to transform between encoder position and motor
position.
•
PmacEncoderOffset - Query PMAC for the encoder to motor offset
captured during a home operation for Encoder/Motor Number. This
assumes that encoder one is defined for motor 1, etc.
Encoder-Motor Offset provides a reference for using the encoder positioncapture and position-compare registers. These registers are referenced to
the encoder zero position, which is the power-up position, not the home
(motor zero) position. This value is the difference between the two
positions and the home offset Ix26.
This value should be subtracted from encoder position (usually from
position capture) to get motor position, or added to motor position to get
encoder position (usually for position compare).
Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
167
The trick in using this VI is to know when to query PMAC for the Home offset
information. You need to do this after you home the motor.
If you click the Capture Home Offset button in the panel, the offsets and biases
for the specified motor/encoder number are retrieved. The indicator labeled
Xformed Encoder Pos now displays motor position as computed directly from
encoder position. There will be a very slight difference between the position in
the PVE cluster and the Xformed Encoder Pos value due to the sub-count
interpolation used internally by PMAC to compute motor position.
If you click the Encoder Counts button in the Jog cluster, the PVE cluster and
the Xformed Encoder Pos indicator will both display motor position in CS units.
Again, the accuracy is subject to the interpolation performed by PMAC for its
own internal use.
The transformation in both cases is implemented by combining
PmacEncoderOffset and PmacCoordMotorToCoord to build the following
VI that converts a raw encoder position (either Capture or Compare) to motor
position or CS units. This VI is most often used to convert a captured encoder
position into motor position or CS units.
•
PmacEncoderToCoord - This VI converts Input Value (Servo Position or
Capture Position) from absolute encoder position to either CS units or
motor position in encoder counts.
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to
convert Input Value from encoder position to CS units. If the motor is not
defined in the CS Output Value is motor position in encoder counts. If the
motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined is TRUE and Output
Value is in CS units. Coord Definition is a string specifying Output Value
units as "Encoder" or the CS definition of the motor.
To use this VI you must supply an optional Capture Offset that will fetch and
compute the proper offsets. Once the offset is captured and computed, it is
maintained by the VI’s internal state.
PmacEncoderToCoord has a companion that takes positions specified in CS
units or motor position and converts them to encoder position. This VI is most
often used to take a motor position in encoder counts or CS units to encoder
position for compare-equal operations.
•
PmacEncoderToEncoder - This VI converts Input Value in either CS
units or motor position in encoder counts to an absolute encoder position for
compare-equal operations.
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to
convert Input Value from CS units to encoder position. If the motor is not
defined in the CS Input Value is assumed to be motor position in encoder
counts and Output Value is encoder position. If the motor is defined and
Convert is TRUE Coord Defined is TRUE and Output Value is scaled from
CS units to encoder position.
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Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
The diagram fetches and processes the encoder position two VIs that implement
the position transformations just discussed. PmacEncoderRegServo, covered
later, fetches the encoder position, not capture positions, directly from the
encoder, and displays it on the panel. PmacEncoderToCoord uses the
transformations discussed above to compute Xformed Encoder Pos directly from
this encoder position.
Position-Capture for Non-Homing Purposes
Chapter 7 introduced the encoder architecture and its use for homing operations.
Homing is a firmware command and therefore does not require you to monitor
the capture flags, access the capture register, or do anything with the value. To
use the position capture function for operations other than homing in your own
program you need to
•
Configure the capture condition
•
Monitor the capture flag
•
Process the capture register
•
You can do this using a PLC or using PMACPanel directly.
PLC Capture Flag Processing
If you use a PLC to handle the capture operation you need to monitor the
position-captured flag bit -- bit 17 of the encoder control/status register using
M117->X:$C000,17,1
and the captured position using the M-Variable
Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
169
M103->X:$C003,0,24,S
This status bit turns TRUE when the trigger condition turns TRUE. It returns to
a non-triggered FALSE state when the capture register (M103) is read. As long
as the status bit is TRUE, the capture function is disabled; you must read the
capture register to re-enable the capture function. The example program
MOVTRIG.PMC in the PMAC User Manual shows how this capability can be
used for precision registration.
In the example that follows, we will show precisely how PMACPanel can be
used to add capture capability to your application. We will not cover an
example of position capture handling using a PLC. This is only required if
multiple captures occur faster than PMACPanel can service them or your motion
program is using them directly.
PmacEncoderCaptureExamp
This example demonstrates how PMACPanel handles encoder capture
operations. This is important when you want to determine the position of a
motor when a trigger occurs in your system.
The panel, shown below, has Motor/Encoder and Coord System knobs, a Motor
PVE indicator, and a Jog cluster. At the top right of the panel is an LED that
turns Green when an externally triggered capture trigger occurs and a position
indicator whose value is the position captured when the trigger occurs.
Before you run this VI, you should home the motors you are working with. You
can do this with the example covered in Chapter 7 or execute a home command
from PmacTerminal.
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Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
As with homing position capture the trigger condition must be configured prior
to use. This is done using the already introduced PmacEncoderIVarCapture
cluster. The PmacHomeIVar cluster is not required because the motor has
been homed and the moves we will be executing are not homing moves.
After selecting the capture trigger condition, the Configure Capture button sets
the configuration in PMAC. Once this is done, the encoder is armed and waiting
for the specified capture trigger.
The simplicity of the diagram demonstrates how the application is organized.
At the top are the VIs to handle the jog and PVE clusters. At the bottom is the
logic to handle the configuration of the capture condition. The encoder capture
trigger condition is configured whenever the motor number changes or you click
the Configure Capture button.
Once the capture condition is configured, PmacEncoderTrigger is used to
monitor the encoder flags. When a trigger occurs the VI reads the capture
register and transforms the captured position into motor position or CS units.
The VI does a lot of bookkeeping to make your job easier. To use it for capture
operations leave the Enable Compare and Input Compare Position terminals
unwired. In the next section on Compare operations, we will see how this VI
also handles compare triggers.
•
PmacEncoderTrigger - This VI maintains Encoder Number's compareequal and capture operations and monitors the encoder's status register.
Home offsets are removed or added during the processing of compare-equal
and capture register data. Limitations associated with 24 bit rollover are not
handled by this VI.
When Enable Compare is TRUE Encoder Number's compare-equal function
is reset and the compare-equal register is set using Input Compare Position.
This value is interpreted as being in CS units if Covert is TRUE and Motor
Number is defined in Coord Number. Otherwise this value is interpreted as
being motor position in encoder counts. Output Compare Position is a
persis tent copy of Input Compare Position when Enable Compare was
TRUE. The occurrence of the compare-equal condition is indicated by
Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
171
Compare-Equal Bool being TRUE. This does not reset the latched
condition.
When Encoder Number captures a position, Position Captured is TRUE,
and the encoder's capture register is queried and converted into Capture
Position in motor position encoder counts or Coord Number CS units. If
Motor Number is not defined in Coord Number or Convert Bool is FALSE
the Capture Position is mo tor position in encoder counts . If Convert Bool
is TRUE and Motor Number is defined in Coord Number the value is in CS
units.
External Triggers for Position Capture
Using the HOME, +/-LIM, or FAULT flags for other than their obvious purpose
is very common on PMAC. It requires you to build a simple interface circuit to
disconnect the physical limit or flag switches and connect the trigger signal of
your choice. For example, your system may have a proximity switch with TTL
output to define HOME. When you want to use the HMFL input for your own
position capture operations, a TTL MUX or other form of digital selector can be
used to connect the trigger signal you desire. Realize that you do not home the
motor using this new trigger signal. You will be using it for position capture for
registration or some other purpose.
In the system used to develop and demonstrate PMACPanel’s capture
capabilities a TTL signal generator was used to drive a reed relay at 5 Hz and
trigger the home flag. Using this configuration the Pos Captured LED flashes
on and off dutifully signaling the capture of the position. When the capture
condition occurs PMACPanel reads the capture register and converts it into
motor position or CS units depending on whether the Encoder Counts button in
the Jog cluster is activated. When the motor is jogging the numeric updates with
every tick of the HOME trigger signal.
PMAC Position Compare Operation
PMAC’s encoder position-compare function is essentially the opposite of the
position-capture function. Instead of capturing the encoder position when an
external signal changes, compare operations generate a signal when the encoder
reaches a specified position. In fact, the encoder register into which the captured
position is written is used to store the position for compare operation. Using
this capability, you can configure trigger events that occur at specified encoder
positions in your system. Because the triggering is implemented in hardware, it
is very fast and accurate. In Chapter 9, we show how to use external TTL level
signals to trigger data acquisition on NI-DAQ boards.
Compare operations require three steps
172
1.
Enable and configure the operation using the encoder control
register
2.
Load the compare position into the encoder register
Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
3.
Monitor the compare-equal flag in the encoder status register and
repeat these steps as required
These steps may be performed in a PLC or a PMACPanel program.
Required M-Variables
To utilize this feature from a PLC, you must access the encoder control/status
register and the position compare-equal register. For Encoder 1, the standard MVariable declarations are
M103->X:$C003,0,24,S
M111->X:$C000,11,1
M112->X:$C000,12,1
M113->X:$C000,13,1
M116->X:$C000,16,1
;24-bit pos compare register
; Compare flag latch control
; Compare output-enable bit
; Compare output invert bit
; Compare-equals flag
Similar sets of registers and M-Variables are defined for the other encoder
registers.
Pre-loading the Compare Position
To pre-load a compare position, assign an encoder position value to M103, such
as M103=1250. This value must be between -8,388,608 and +8,388,607. You
cannot read this value back; reading from the same address gives you the
position-capture register. The command can be given from a PMAC motion
program, a PMAC PLC program, from the host, or using the PMACPanel VIs
introduced in the following example. This is the encoder position; if you want
to reference it to motor zero position, you must know the homing offset. This
translation is handled transparently by the PMACPanel ICVs in the
PmacEncoder collection.
Encoder Control Bits
Three control bits configure the format of operation of the compare feature.
These are SW status bits and, if enabled, external HW signals available on
various PMAC cables. The flag-latch control bit (M111) controls whether the
compare-equal signal is
•
Transparent -- TRUE only when the positions are actually equal
•
Latched -- TRUE until actively reset by a handler
The signal is transparent if this control bit is zero, and latched if the control bit is
one. To clear a latched flag, take the control bit to zero then back to one.
The compare-equal signal is always copied into the compare-equal flag (M116).
If you are monitoring this flag from a PLC or PMACPanel application, make
sure that the signal is latched (M111=1), or you will probably miss it. To
interrupt the host (edge-triggered), you will probably want the signal
transparent. PMACPanel doesn’t currently support an interrupt driven interface.
Look for this in a future release.
The output-enable bit (M112) determines whether the compare-equal flag will
be output on the PMAC EQU line (1 enables). This must be set if you want to
use the signal to interrupt the host or to trigger an external event. The outputChapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
173
invert bit (M113) determines whether the EQU output is high-true or low-true (1
inverts -- low-true). For host-interrupt purposes, this must be configured hightrue.
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Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
Triggering External Action
To trigger external actions from a PMAC-PC, you should put a connector on the
E-points (E53-E65) that normally jumper these signals to the interrupt
controller. An IDC 26-pin connector works nicely. These signals must be
buffered; the TTL drivers for these outputs on PMAC-PC are very weak. You
can obtain an application note on techniques for accessing these signals by
contacting Delta Tau technical support.
On the PMAC-Lite, PMAC-VME and PMAC-STD, a JEQU connector provides
direct access to the Compare-Equals signals . The outputs are open-collector
(sinking) outputs, rated to 24V and 100 mA. The user may replace the existing
driver IC with a sourcing driver IC (UDN2981A).
To use these HW signals, and several others, you must refer to the PMAC User
Manual. We will cover their use as far as NI-DAQ boards are concerned in
Chapter 9.
PLC Compare Handling
The PLC programs PmacPosCompSetup.pmc and PmacPosCompGen.pmc
located in \PmacEncoder demonstrate the use of a PLC to generate a very rapid
series of "equals" pulses at specified position intervals. PLC’s are an excellent
way to handle compare operations that require fast servicing. You will find
these documented in the PMAC User Manual, PMAC application notes, and in
the Introduction to PMAC tutorial notes. PmacPosCompSetup configures the
capability by fetching the current encoder position, adding the interval, and
initializing the encoder registers. This PLC is executed once to configure the
operation. After configuring the operation it starts PmacPosCompGen. This
PLC monitors the encoder’s compare-equal flag. When the specified position is
reached, it clears the flag, loads the next compare position, and calculates the
next position to be used.
PmacPosCompSetup.pmc
close
; Define encoder registers
m101->x:$c001,0,24,s ; Actual position
m103->x:$c003,0,24,s ; Compare register
m105->x:$07f0,0,24,s ; Scratch register for rollover
; Define encoder compare-equal register control bits
m111->x:$c000,11,1
m112->x:$c000,12,1
m113->x:$c000,13,1
m116->x:$c000,16,1
;
;
;
;
Compare
Compare
Compare
Compare
equal
equal
equal
equal
latch/control
output enable
output invert
flag
p101 = 50
; Count intecrement
; Configure the compare pulse
open plc 18
clear
Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
175
; -- Setup compare-equal
m105
m103
m105
m113
=
=
=
=
m101+p101 ; Save Increment + actual position
m105
; Copy next pos into compare reg
m105 + p101
; Update next compare position
0
; No invert on output bit
enable plc 19
disable plc 18
close
PmacPosCompGen.pmc
close
; - Service routine to service encoder register
open plc 19
clear
if (m116
m103 =
m105 =
m111 =
m111 =
endif
close
= 1)
m105
; Update next compare position
m105 + p101
0
; Reset control bit
1
The PLCs can be downloaded and executed using PmacTerminalEdit and
PmacTerminal or, as we will show in a moment, encapsulated with a wrapper
VI and controlled from an application panel.
PmacEncoderCompareExamp
This example demonstrates three methods for using PMACPanel to handle
encoder compare operation. These are extremely useful for synchronizing data
acquisition operations with complex motion. The three methods are
•
Using encapsulated versions of the PmacPosCompSetup and
PmacPosComGen PLC’s to generate position interval clocks.
•
Directly setting an encoder compare position from your application
for a one-time position-compare trigger.
•
By servicing the control, status, and position registers directly from
PMACPanel. This is a poor-man’s approach to using the PLCs.
The panel, shown below, has Motor/Encoder and Coord System knobs, a Motor
PVE indicator, and a Jog control cluster. At the top left of the panel is an LED
that flashes green when a compare-equal condition occurs. Below this is a
cluster of three buttons that allow you to configure the encoder control bits.
When these are properly set clicking the Configure Compare button sets the
encoder bits.
The remaining controls are divided into three groups. One for each method
demonstrated in the example.
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Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
•
On the bottom left are LEDs indicating the Execution State of the
two PLCs used to service the encoder and a button to disable the
PLC handler.
•
To the right is a numeric control used to specify a compare
position and a button to configure the encoder for one-time
compare operation.
•
To the right of this is a checkbox that enables encoder servicing
directly from PMACPanel – not the PLC. The LED indicates
when a new compare position is being loaded into the encoder
after a compare-equal trigger occurs.
On the very bottom is a slider that specifies the interval between generated
triggers. This interval is used by the PLCs and by the SW interval generation.
Before you run this VI, you should home the motors you are working with. You
can do this with the example covered in Chapter 7 or execute a home command
from PmacTerminal.
Detailed descriptions for operating the three encoder-handling methods are
covered later. At the top of the diagram are VIs to handle the Jog control and
PVE indicator. Below this, PmacEncoderCompareConfig configures the
encoder’s compare control bits when the Configure Compare button on the
panel is clicked. Configuration can be done by the PLC.
•
PmacEncoderCompareConfig - Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable
VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE the Input Compare Control bits for
Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
177
the specified Encoder Number are set. Otherwise they are fetched from
PMAC and provided by Output Compare Control Cluster with New Output
TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
At the bottom of the diagram is logic to service the panel’s P101 slider when it
changes. Changes in the value update P101 and enable the encapsulated PLC
PmacPosCompSetup covered earlier. Above this is the wrapper VI for
PmacPosCompGen. The panel button Disable Comp Pulse can be used to turn
the PLC on and off as desired. When this PLC is not executing, a compare
trigger occurs, and SW increments is TRUE the case to the right executes and
computes the next Compare Value. The final piece of the example is
PmacEncoderTrigger also covered earlier. In this example the Enable
Compare input is TRUE whenever Enable Compare or SW Update are TRUE.
This updates the encoder registers thereby arming the compare operation.
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Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
We’ve already noted that PmacEncoderTrigger handles the configuration of
compare operations and monitoring of capture and compare flags. The
implementation of the VI is complex so it is not covered here. However, one of
its pieces may be of use in your application. The following VI is used by
PmacEncoderTrigger to enable and configure compare operations.
•
PmacEncoderCompare - This VI reset Encoder Number's compare-equal
function and set the position register using Input Compare Position when
Enable Compare is TRUE. This value is interpreted as being in CS units if
Covert is TRUE and Motor Number is defined in Coord Number.
Otherwise this value is interpreted as being motor position in encoder
counts. Home offsets are removed prior to setting the encoders actual
register value.
Limitations associated with 24 bit rollover are not handled by this VI
Output Compare Position is a persistent copy of Input Compare Position
when Enable Compare was TRUE.
One last word on the use of PmacEncoderTrigger is needed. If your
application uses PLCs to handle the capture or compare triggers you should not
service them with your PMACPanel application. The chance of getting into
trouble having two sets of handlers for a capture or compare operation is pretty
large. This does not prevent you configuring the operations using PMACPanel
and servicing them with a PLC. You should simply be aware of who is
responsible for handling the encoder.
Method 1 - PLC Operation
The P101 slider specifies the interval the PLCs will use to generate compareequal triggers. Changing this value sets P101 in PMAC and enables
PmacPosCompSetup discussed earlier. This PLC captures the current encoder
position, adds the interval to the position, sets the compare-equal register, and
resets the compare-equal control bits. The PLC enables the PmacPosCompGen
PLC and disables itself. Thus, when you change P101 the Comp -Setup LED
briefly turns Green to indicate that the setup PLC is executing. When it enables
PmacPosCompGen the Comp -Pulse LED turns Green to indicate that it is
active, then the Comp -Setup LED turns Red to indicate that it has disabled itself.
This is all done using the encapsulated PLC Sub VIs.
If you now jog the motor, the PmacPosCompGen PLC will generate compareequal pulses every P101 encoder counts. It does this by monitoring the encoder
Compare-Equal flag for the TRUE condition, setting the next position, adding
the increment for the next position, and resetting the encoder’s compare-equal
control bits. Because the PLC handles the flags PMACPanel never (almost
never) sees the compare-equal condition because the PLC services the trigger so
quickly. Even if PmacEncoderTrigger sees the trigger condition, it does not
service it.
You can bring the trigger to the external world by clicking the Output on EQU
Line button and then clicking Configure Compare. You should do this before
starting the Jog or enabling PmacPosCompSetup so that you don’t interfere
with PmacPosCompGen’s handling of the encoder flags. If you configure the
Chapter 8 – Encoder Capture and Compare Operation
179
external EQU signal you can connect an oscilloscope to the appropriate pins on
JEQU or the E-Point jumpers documented in the PMAC Users Manual and see
the generation of the interval pulses. In Chapter 9, we will demonstrate how to
use these pulses to synchronize your DAQ systems with your system’s motion.
As you increase P101 the time between the pulses increases. When you stop the
jog, the pulse interval increases as the motor slows and eventually ceases
because the motor stops. When y ou begin a jog, the pulse interval decreases
until the motor reaches a steady state velocity.
Method 2 - One-Shot Operation
If you disable the PmacPosCompGen PLC by clicking the Disable Comp Pulse
PLC button, the corresponding indicator turns RED. You can now manually
configure compare-equal operations by entering a position in the numeric
control above the Enable/Reset Compare button. The value you enter, in motor
position or CS units as specified by the Encoder Counts button in the Jog
cluster, is used to configure a one-time compare-trigger.
Select the conditions for the operation using the buttons in the configuration
cluster. You will most probably want the operation latched. You can send the
trigger to the external world using Output on EQU Line and configure whether
the condition is TRUE High or TRUE-Low. When you’ve done this click
Configure Compare then Enable/Reset Compare. This will configure the flags
and the compare-equal value. When you jog the motor, the Compare-Equal
indicator will turn Green when the condition occurs. You cannot read the
compare-equal register so you need to keep track of the last value you set.
Fortunately, PmacEncoderTrigger does this for you.
Method 3 - PMACPanel Interval Generation
You can perform the same interval generation done by the PLC’s using
PMACPanel. This works only when the interval rate is long relative to
LabVIEW’s service rate. If you miss an interval and the motor is already
beyond the next interval position, the compare condition never occurs and you
stop generating pulses.
If you disable the PmacPosCompGen PLC and check the SW Compare Interval
box the trigger is handled by the 3-input AND case. Be careful that you don’t
enable the PLC’s by changing P101 before you get the SW version of the
interval generation running.
PmacEncoder Registers
Incorporating compare and capture capabilities into your own applications is
facilitated by the PmacEncoder collection of ICVs. These fall into three
categories. Basic encoder register access and control, conversion of encoder
positions into motor position or CS units and back, and ICVs to facilitate your
application. These are all documented here.
Encoder Register Access
VIs to access the encoder registers are provided but are generally not used in
your applications. They are, however, very useful when beginning to work with
the encoders. The most important of these are
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•
PmacEncoderRegStat - Fetch the encoder control/status word for Encoder
Number and parse it into its pieces. Encoder Status/Control i32 is the
integer representation of the register. Position Capture Control can be used
with PmacEncoderCaptureControl. Capture Flag Control can be used with
PmacEncoderCaptureFlag. Encoder Status Control Cluster can used with
PmacEncoderStatControl. Encoder Status Flag Cluster can be used with
PmacEncoderStatFlags.
•
PmacEncoderRegServo - Query PMAC for the two position registers
containing commutation phase and servo position. Servo Position is actual
encoder position in counts referenced to a power-up/reset position of zero.
Encoder Phase is used internally for commutation.
•
PmacEncoderRegisters - Query PMAC for all registers for Encoder
Number. Assemble the values into a PmacEncoderRegisters Cluster.
The remaining members of this collection will not generally be used in your
application but are provided for completeness. These are
•
PmacEncoderRegTime
•
PmacEncoderRegDAC
•
PmacEncoderRegCapture
•
PmacEncoderRegADC
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Chapter 9 - PMAC and NI-DAQ
Interfacing
Basics
In Chapters 7 and 8 we introduced PMAC’s position capture and compare
capabilities. PMACPanel provides a number of ICVs to configure, monitor, and
operate these capabilities. When coupled with National Instrument's data
acquisition boards, PMAC and PMACPanel can be used to build highly
integrated and precise motion based data acquisition systems using GPIB, SCXI,
VXI, or DAQ boards.
In this chapter we will demonstrate how to couple standard NI-DAQ boards to
PMAC to synchronously trigger data acquisition at specified positions, and even
use PMAC’s servo clock as your DAQ sampling clock. The examples presented
here in no way limit the wide array of possibilities or approaches you can use to
trigger, synchronize, and organize your motion based DAQ applications. Your
experience and requirements will define the approaches that best meet your
needs.
The examples of PMAC-DAQ interfacing assume that you have a basic
understanding of LabVIEW’s data acquisition capabilities and the acquisition
boards you will be using. Similarly, you must have some understanding of
PMAC’s external connectors and their configuration. You will be making
connections between thes e boards. If you are not certain of your abilities,
precisely which signals you need, where to locate them, or what to connect them
to do not attempt to connect them. You can easily damage the boards, the host
computers, and many other items. Make certain you have thoroughly studied
the information presented in this chapter and the HW manuals provided for your
model of PMAC and your DAQ boards. Contact Delta Tau or National
Instruments Technical Support if you have any questions prior to proceeding.
External PMAC Signals
PMAC provides a number of HW interfaces that can easily be used to
synchronize PMAC with most NI-DAQ boards and systems. Depending on
your needs PMAC also supports a number of I/O accessories. PMACPanel
doesn’t support all of these with ICVs. It is way beyond the scope of this manual
to detail all possible approaches to accessing the interfaces on these boards.
You can easily create your own ICVs for these accessories using PmacAcc and
PmacMemory ICVs.
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We will consider three primary PMAC signals here. Position Capture was
discussed in Chapter 7 and will not be repeated here. When interfacing these
signals to DAQ boards we will demonstrate how to use these signals to trigger
acquisitions and provide the sample scan clock. Before actually using these HW
signals you must consult the PMAC User Manual and the HW manual for your
particular PMAC model. The signals are:
•
EQU signals
•
Servo Clock
•
General Purpose Machine I/O
•
Position Capture Flags
We will not consider PMAC’s encoder clock or ADC clocks. If you wish to use
these consult the PMAC User Manual, the HW manual for your particular
PMAC model, or contact Delta-Tau technical support.
The following sections are reproduced from various portions of the PMAC User
Manual and describe the signals , how to access them, and potential limitations
in their use.
Compare-Equals Outputs (JEQU)
The compare-equals (EQU) outputs provide a signal edge when an encoder
position reaches a pre-loaded value.
PMAC-PC
PMAC-PC doesn’t have a dedicated connector for the EQU outputs. Instead,
the signals may be accessed using a 26-pin IDC connector over E-point pairs
E53-E65. The outputs are TTL-level with very low drive capability; they must
be buffered externally before they can drive any real devices. ACC-27,
normally used as an I/O buffer for the thumbwheel multiplexer port, can be used
to drive several of these EQU lines. The 26-pin cable provided with the ACC27 fits over the 13 jumper pairs E53-E65. Contact Delta Tau technical support
for details.
PMAC-VME
On PMAC-VME, these signals are brought out on connector J7 (JEQU),
referenced to digital ground (GND). As shipped from the factory, they are
open-collector (sinking) outputs, with a ULN2803A driver IC, rated to 24V and
100mA each. They may be changed to open-emitter (sourcing) drivers by
replacing this chip in U28 with a UDN2981A driver IC and changing jumpers
E93 and E94.
PMAC-Lite
On PMAC-Lite, these signals are brought out on connector J8 (JEQU), optically
isolated from the digital circuitry, referenced either to analog ground (AGND) or
an external flag supply ground. As shipped from the factory, they are opencollector (sinking) outputs, with a ULN2803A driver IC, rated to 24V and
100mA each. They may be changed to open-emitter (sourcing) drivers by
replacing this chip in U54 with a UDN2981A driver IC and changing jumpers
E101 and E102.
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183
PMAC-STD
On PMAC-STD, these signals are brought out on connector J6 (JEQU) on each
of the piggyback boards. They are open-collector (sinking) outputs with internal
1-kΩ pull-up resistors, rated to 5V.
On PMAC-STD1.5, these signals are brought out on connector J8 (JEQU),
optically isolated from the digital circuitry, referenced either to analog ground
(AGND) or an external flag supply ground. As shipped from the factory, they
are open-collector (sinking) outputs, with a ULN2803A driver IC, rated to 24V
and 100mA each. They may be changed to open-emitter (sourcing) drivers by
replacing this chip in U54 with a UDN2981A driver IC and changing jumpers
E101 and E102.
Servo Clock (JRS232)
PMAC’s servo clock defines the rate at which servo loops are updated and
background computations are performed. Using this clock for other timing is an
excellent way to synchronize PMAC’s movement with externally gathered data.
PMAC allows multiple cards to share a common servo clock over spare lines on
the serial connector J4. The servo clock on J4 (JRS232) is located on pin 8 and
is referenced to ground on pin 9. If multiple PMACs are being used the clock
signals can be shared simply by tying identical pins on the PMACs together.
Accessory 3D or 3L cables with extra PMAC connectors (one Accessory 3E for
each extra PMAC) can be used to share the clock signals in either bus or serial
communications applications (and of course, for actual serial communications).
In a standalone or bus-communications application, there is no need for a host
drop on the cable. As is the case for the communications lines, you cannot tie
the clock lines from the RS-422 port of a PMAC-PC to the RS-232 port of a
PMAC-Lite. With the RS-422 option on the PMAC-Lite (Opt. 9L), connection
to a PMAC-PC is possible, but the connector pinouts are different.
If serial communication is not being used, but the serial data lines are connected
with the clock signals, it may be desirable to deactivate the serial port to prevent
noise on the lines from creating input command characters to PMAC. On
PMAC-PC, PMAC-Lite, and PMAC-VME, this is done by setting jumpers E44E47 ON; on PMAC-STD, by making DIP switches SW1-5 to SW1-8 all OFF.
Be aware of the fact that J4 has +5 VDC on pin 10.
General Purpose Digital Inputs and Outputs
The PMAC JOPTO connector (J5 on PMAC-PC, -Lite, and -VME) provides
eight general-purpose digital inputs and eight general-purpose digital outputs.
Each input and each output has its own corresponding ground pin in the opposite
row. The 34-pin connector was designed for easy interface to OPTO-22 or
equivalent optically isolated I/O modules. Delta Tau's Accessory 21F is a sixfoot cable for this purpose.
The PMAC-STD has a different form of this connector from the other versions
of PMAC. Its JOPT connector (J4 on the baseboard) has 24 I/O, individually
selectable in software as inputs or outputs. The rest of this discussion does not
pertain to the PMAC-STD port, unless specifically mentioned. Refer to the
PMAC-STD Hardware Reference for details on its JOPT port.
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Standard Sinking Outputs
Having Jumpers E1 and
E2 set wrong can damage the IC.
Do not connect these
outputs directly to the supply
voltage, or damage to the PMAC
will result from excessive current
draw.
PMAC is shipped standard with a ULN2803A sinking (open-collector) output
IC for the eight outputs. These outputs can sink up to 100 mA, but must have
a pull-up resistor to go high.
The user can provide a high-side voltage (+5 to +24V) into Pin 33 of the
JOPTO connector, and allow this to pull up the outputs by connecting pins 1
and 2 of Jumper E1. Jumper E2 must also connect pins 1 and 2 for a
ULN2803A sinking output.
Option for Sourcing Outputs
Having Jumpers E1 and
E2 set wrong can damage the IC.
It is possible for these outputs to be sourcing drivers by substituting a
UDN2981A IC for the ULN2803A. This IC (U3 on the PMAC-PC, U26 on
the PMAC-Lite, U33 on the PMAC-VME) is socketed, and so may easily be
replaced. For this driver, pull-down resistors should be used. With a
UDN2981A driver IC, Jumper E1 must connect pins 2 and 3, and Jumper E2
must connect pins 2 and 3.
Input Source/Sink Control
Jumper E7 controls the configuration of the eight inputs. If it connects pins 1
and 2 (the default setting), the inputs are biased to +5V for the "OFF" state, and
they must be pulled low for the "ON" state. If E7 connects pins 2 and 3, the
inputs are biased to ground for the "OFF" state, and must be pulled high for the
"ON" state. In either case, a high voltage is interpreted as a '0' by the PMAC
software, and a low voltage is interpreted as a '1'.
Memory Mapped Access to I/O
These inputs and outputs are typically accessed with M-variables. In the
suggested set of M -variable definitions, variables M1 through M8 are used to
access outputs 1 through 8, respectively, and M11 through M18 to access inputs
1 through 8, respectively. This port maps into PMAC memory space at Y
address $FFC2. You can also find a collection of VIs to access these in
PmacAcc.
Synchronous M-Variables
In a motion program, when PMAC is blending or splining moves together, it
must be calculating in the program ahead of the actual point of movement. This
is necessary in order to be able to blend moves together, and to be able to do
reasonable velocity and acceleration limiting. Depending on the mode of
movement, calculations can be one, two, or three moves ahead of the actual
movement.
Why Synchronous M-Variables are Needed
When assigning values to variables is part of the calculation, the variables will
get their new values ahead of their place in the program when looking at actual
move execution. For P and Q-variables, this is generally not a problem, because
they exist only to aid further motion calculations. However, for M-variables,
particularly outputs, this can be a problem, because with a normal variable value
Chapter 9 – PMAC and NI-DAQ Interfacing
185
assignment statement, the action will take place sooner than is expected, looking
at the statement's place in the program.
For example, in the program segment
X10
M1=1
X20
; Move X-axis to 10
; Turn on Output 1
; Move X-axis to 20
you might expect that Output 1 would be turned on at the time the X-axis
reached position 10. Because PMAC is calculating ahead, at the beginning of
the move to X10, it will have already calculated through the program to the next
move, working through all program statements in between, including M1=1,
which turns on the output. Therefore, using this technique, the output will be
turned on sooner than desired.
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Chapter 9 – PMAC and NI-DAQ Interfacing
How They Work
Synchronous M-variable assignment statements were implemented as a
solution to this problem. When one of these statements is encountered in the
With synchronous
assignment, the actual assignment program, it is not executed immediately; rather, the action is put on a stack for
execution at the start of the actual execution of the next move in the program.
is performed where the blending
to the new move begins, which is This makes the output action properly synchronous with the motion action.
generally ahead of the
In the modified program segment
programmed point. In LINEAR
X10
; Move X-axis to 10
and CIRCLE mode moves, this
blending occurs V*TA/2 distance M1==1 ; Turn on Output 1 synchronously
ahead of the specified
; Move X-axis to 20
intermediate point, where V is the X20
commanded velocity of the axis,
the statement M1==1 (the double-equals indicates synchronous assignment) is
and TA is the acceleration
encountered at the beginning of the move to X10, but the action is not actually
(blending) time.
performed until the start of blending into the next move (X20).
Synchronous M-variables
after the last move or DWELL in
the program do not execute when
the program ends or temp orarily
stops. Use a DWELL as the last
statement of the program to
execute these statements.
Also, notice that the assignment is synchronous with the commanded position,
not necessarily the actual position. It is the responsibility of the servo loop to
make the commanded and actual positions match closely
In applications where PMAC is executing segmented moves (I13>0), the
synchronous M -variables are executed at the start of the first I13 spline
segment after the start of blending into the programmed move.
Syntax
There are four forms of synchronous M-variable assignment statements:
M{constant}=={expr}
M{constant}&={expr}
M{constant}|={expr}
M{constant}^={expr}
;Straight equals assignment
; AND-equals assignment
; OR-equals assignment
; XOR-equals assignment
In all of these forms, the expression on the right side of the statement is
evaluated when the line is encountered in the program, ahead of the execution of
the move. The value of the expression, the variable number, and the operator
are placed on a stack for execution at the proper time.
Position Capture FLAGs
Interfacing to the FLAG inputs required for position capture was covered in
detail in Chapter 7 and 8. Because these inputs are so closely associates with
HW limit switches you should refer to your PMAC HW and PMAC User
Manual as well as any manuals supplied by your system integrator. Many
PMAC based systems, for example X-Y tables, have already defined the
operation of the limit switches and FLAG inputs. Hence, your use of these
inputs must be coordinated with the system manufacturer’s usage.
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187
DAQ Signals
This manual in can no way cover the wide selection of NI-DAQ boards or their
signal sets. For the purposes of this chapter we will consider a few general
signals found in some form on most National Instruments DAQ boards that can
be used to trigger acquisitions and define the DAQ sample rates. More detailed
information can be found in the LabVIEW DAQ examples and tutorials and the
manual for your DAQ board. All of the examples in this Chapter use the
standard LabVIEW examples.
Connections to the DAQ board are best done using one of National Instruments’
many terminal blocks or breadboards. The terminals are well labeled and the
chances for shorts are limited.
Analog I/O Channels
You may or may not wish to connect PMAC output signals to the analog input
channels on your DAQ board. In several of the examples that follow, we
connected the servo clock and JEQU signals to Channel 0 and 1 for the purposes
of demonstrating what the clocks look like. To configure, test, and operate these
inputs refer to the appropriate National Instruments manual.
Trigger and Scan Clock Connections
You can trigger acquisitions from PMAC in many ways. You can use the JEQU
signal to start or stop acquisition at a precise position, or you can use generalpurpose digital outputs and synchronous M -Variables. The servo clock and/or
the JEQU signal can also be used for the scan clock thereby synchronizing the
DAQ sample rate with PMAC’s primary timekeeper.
E series boards: Connect your start trigger to PFI0/TRIG1, your stop trigger to
PFI1/TRIG2, and your scan clock to PFI7/STARTSCAN.
Legacy MIO boards: Connect your start trigger to STARTRIG*, your stop
trigger to STOPTRIG, and your scan clock to OUT2. NOTE: You must scan
two or more channels when specifying an external scan clock.
Legacy MIO-16X, MIO-16F-5, and MIO-64F-5: The start and stop trigger pin
is EXTTRIG*. Connect your scan clock to OUT2. NOTE: You must scan two
or more channels when specifying an external scan clock.
Lab/1200 series boards: Connect your start or stop trigger to EXTTRIG.
Hardware pre-triggering (start & stop) is not supported. Connect your scan
clock to OUTB1.
For triggers and scan clocks on PC-LPM-16, DAQCard-500, and DAQCard-700
you should refer to the appropriate LabVIEW manual. To find the actual pin
numbers, refer to your hardware user manual.
PmacDAQMove
There are dozens of approaches to configuring your particular PMAC/DAQ
application. You might consider placing status and position monitoring VIs
inside your main DAQ polling loop. This requires you to properly organize the
configuration and maintenance of PMAC and DAQ device polling. For the
purposes of this Chapter, we selected a multi-threaded model consisting of a
main VI to control PMAC and self contained DAQ VIs found in the LabVIEW
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Chapter 9 – PMAC and NI-DAQ Interfacing
examples. We made a few modifications to the DAQ examples such as defining
defaults for the sample rates and channel configuration to demo nstrate the
sampling of the Compare-Equal output, Servo clock, and a simple analog signal.
This allowed us to create the examples quickly and validate the operation of
PMAC in a more demanding execution environment.
PMAC and AT-MI0-16 Signal Connections
The following examples were built using a PMAC-Lite and a National
Instruments’ AT-MIO-16. The MIO card signals were accessed using a SC2070 termination card. The various PMAC signals were accessed using various
terminal blocks of the proper sizes. See the Hardware Reference Manual for
your PMAC for a list of mating connectors.
In our examples, the DAQ triggers are driven by ENC1. There is no reason
other encoders or combinations of signals from multiple motors can’t be used
with simple modifications.
PMAC Signals
JRS232 (10 pin connector)
Pin 8 - Servo clock (SERVO)
Pin 9 - Common
JEQU (10 pin connector)
Pin 1 - ENC1 Compare Equal Output (EQU1)
Pin 10 - Common
JMACH1 (60 pin connector)
Pin 55 - ENC1 Home Flag Input (HMFL1) – Connected to External
TTL Clock
Pin 58 – Common
ATMIO Signals
OUT2 – Scan clock – Wired to PMAC SERVO
EXT TRIG* - Start trigger – Wired to PMAC EQU1
CH0 – Wired to signal generator
CH1 – Wired to PMAC EQU1
CH2 – Wired to PMAC SERVO
Commons/Grounds – ATMIO DGND, ATMIO AGND, JEQU and
JRS232 commons all wired together
The panel for PmacDAQMove is shown below. This VI is comprised of pieces
from several of the previous examples. It allows you to home motors, Jog them,
configure capture and compare operations, and initiate three different DAQ
operations. We will discuss these in a moment.
If you have connected your system in the manner described above or something
similar you can begin testing the system by connecting EQU1 to an oscilloscope
or by running the VI and using your DAQ board.
When you start the VI select the capture flag configuration and click Configure
Capture. Then home the motor. When this has been completed you can set
Chapter 9 – PMAC and NI-DAQ Interfacing
189
Compare configuration cluster booleans as shown below and click Configure
Compare.
This VI uses the encapsulated PLC covered in Chapter 8 to monitor and update
the compare-equal operation. The value 500 in the numeric control specifies the
pulse generation interval. You can change this if you desire and click
Enable/Reset Compare. The Green LED indicates the PLC is running. When
you Jog the motor using the jog controls you should see the PVE display update
and a pulse train on the scope. You should probably use level triggering on the
scope. If you are doing this, the pulse train will have stable intervals with jitter
in the actual pulse widths. This is because a background PLC services the
encoder. If you need a more stable pulse width, change PLC 19 to PLC 0 in
PmacPosCompGen.pmc and the reference to PLC 19 in
PmacPosCompSetup.pmc to PLC 0. The foreground PLC will be serviced
more regularly thereby resetting the output in a more deterministic manner.
If you are not using an oscilloscope, you can use the DAQ card to do the same
thing. On the far right below the two selector knobs on the panel is a menu ring
that allows you to select three different DAQ VIs. Clicking the Run DAQ
button starts the selected VI as a separate application thread. These VIs are
slightly modified versions of standard LabView examples located in the
Examples\Daq\Anlogin library supplied with LabVIEW .
The diagram uses the expected pieces from previous examples. The
encapsulated PLC that generates the pulses is enabled by the setup PLC and can
be disabled by the Disable button. The Run DAQ button uses the Server VI to
start the selected PmacDAQ VI as a separate thread.
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Chapter 9 – PMAC and NI-DAQ Interfacing
The three VIs, as named in \PmacDAQ, are described below. The name of the
original VI in the LabVIEW example library is included in parentheses. We will
discuss the DAQ VIs briefly in the following sections with a view to
understanding PMAC’s signals and their use by the DAQ board.
•
PmacDAQTrigger – (Cont Acq&Graph (buffered) D-Trig.vi)
This VI continuously acquires data from one or more analog input channels
when a digital start trigger occurs. This is a timed acquisition, meaning that
a hardware clock is used to control the acquisition rate for fast and accurate
timing. It is a buffered acquisition, meaning that the data are stored in an
intermediate memory buffer after they are acquired from the DAQ board.
Data are retrieved from that buffer and displayed on the graph.
•
PmacDAQSync – (Acquire N - Multi-Digital Trig.vi)
This VI retrieves the specified amount of data from one or more analog
input channels each time a digital start trigger, digital stop trigger, or digital
start and stop trigger, occur. It shows how to trigger an acquisition multiple
times while avoiding the overhead of configuration and buffer allocation
each time. This is a timed acquisition, meaning that a hardware clock is
used to control the acquisition rate for fast and accurate timing. It is a
buffered acquisition, meaning that the data are stored in an intermediate
memory buffer after they are acquired from the DAQ board.
•
PmacDAQSyncServo – (Cont Acq&Graph ExtScanClk D-Trig.vi)
This VI retrieves the specified amount of data from one or more analog
input channels when a digital start trigger, digital stop trigger, or digital
start and stop trigger, occur. This VI uses an external scan clock to
continually retrieve data from one or more analog input channels. This VI
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191
will only work on devices where you can externally connect a scan clock
signal. It is a buffered acquisition, meaning that the data are stored in an
intermediate memory buffer after they are acquired from the DAQ board.
Single Trigger DAQ
PmacDAQTrigger is a LabVIEW example that waits for the external trigger
supplied by EQU1 to begin asynchronous acquisition at the specified sample
rate. In our version of the example, channels 0, 1, and 2 are sampled at 10KHz.
The waveform chart in the panel below shows a triangle signal, the EQU trigger
pulse, and the servo clock. You can run this VI by selecting Simple DAQ in the
menu ring, and clicking the Run DAQ button on PmacDAQMove AFTER the
PLC is configured and enabled AND the motor is jogging. If the motor is not
jogging, the VI will wait 5 seconds for the trigger and then time-out. Good luck
starting this VI then starting the motor.
The default servo clock has a 442µS (2262 Hz) update rate. As can be seen in
the chart the EQU signal is active LOW. If you check the PmacDAQMove
panel shown above, you will see that indeed the operation is configured for EQU
Low – TRUE. Hence, the initial trigger that started this acquisition started on
the falling edge or leading edge of this pulse.
Multi-Trigger DAQ
PmacDAQSync is a LabVIEW example that performs repeated acquisitions
synchronized by the external trigger supplied by EQU1 at the specified sample
rate. In our default version of the example, channels 0, 1, and 2 are sampled at
20KHz. The waveform chart in the panel below shows a triangle signal, the
EQU trigger pulse, and the servo clock. You can run the run this VI selecting
Trigger Only in the menu ring, and clicking the Run DAQ button on
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Chapter 9 – PMAC and NI-DAQ Interfacing
PmacDAQMove AFTER the PLC is configured and enabled AND the motor is
jogging. If the motor is not jogging, the VI will wait 5 seconds for the trigger
and then time-out.
The EQU signal is configured to be active LOW. Hence, the first EQU pulse on
the far-left starts with the falling edge of the signal. The default motor Jog rate
configured by Ix22 is 32 counts/mS. With a position interval of 500 counts as
configured by PmacDAQMove this results in a pulse every 15.625 mS. Sure
enough, the next pulse occurs right around 15 mS in the chart.
Multi-Trigger DAQ with Servo Clock Sampling
PmacDAQSyncServo is a LabVIEW example that performs repeated
acquis itions synchronized by the external trigger supplied by EQU1 using
PMAC’s servo clock as the scan clock. In our default version of the example
channels 0, 1, and 2 will be sampled at PMAC’s default servo clock of 2262 Hz.
The waveform chart in the panel below shows a triangle signal, the EQU trigger
pulse, and the servo clock. You can run this VI by selecting Trigger/Servo in the
menu ring, and clicking the Run DAQ button on PmacDAQMove AFTER the
PLC is configured and enabled AND the motor is jogging. If the motor is not
jogging, the VI will wait 5 seconds for the trigger and then time-out.
The EQU signal is configured to be active LOW. You can see the jitter in the
EQU signal more clearly in this example. The analog signal is now sampled
synchronously with the servo clock. You will note that the servo clock trace in
the chart is even caught once on CH2.
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193
Further Sampling Options
The three examples presented here demonstrate that you have many options for
triggering and controlling the sampling of your data.
•
If you sample the servo clock or the EQU signals along with your
data, you have in essence a time code synchronized with your data.
•
If you perform a gather on one of PMAC’s position or velocity
registers while using position compare intervals you can relate
your sampled data with precise cycle by cycle motor positions or
other motion characteristic.
Using these approaches, you can achieve servo accurate positions for every
sample of your data. With LabVIEW’s analysis tools you can perform detailed
data reductions relating position, velocity, and physical measurements.
Other Interface Options
There is no reason you can’t use your DAQ boards DIO to control PMAC’s
MIO inputs and vice versa. Multipurpose DAQ boards having timers can be
used to generate position capture triggers as can the board’s D/A capabilities.
Other possibilities include the use of the timers to generate time-base control for
PMAC.
Although not covered here you can use the sample PMAC generated clocks and
signals to trigger and clock bench instruments that you communicate with using
GPIB.
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Chapter 10 - PComm32 Code
Interface Nodes
Basics
This Chapter documents a basic framework for developing LabVIEW Code
Interface Nodes (CINs) using Microsoft Visual C++. This topic is important if
you
•
Desire more sophisticated control over a VIs implementation
•
Intend to understand and modify the PmacDPR collection of VIs
for accessing Dual Ported RAM
•
Use PMAC’s interrupt capabilities
PMACPanel primarily interfaces to PComm32 using LabVIEW Call Library
VIs to access specific PComm32 functions. In some instances, your need for
increased speed, sophisticated manipulation of PMAC, or the number of calls to
PComm32 begins to create a nasty mess of Call Library VIs that becomes
unmanageable.
In this Chapter, we introduce a basic PmacCIN VI comprised of a VI, C/C++
source file, Microsoft Visual C++ workspace, and project file. We show how to
create the C file, modify the existing workspace and project file, compile the
source file, and load the object file into the VI’s Code Interface Node.
LabVIEW 5.0 makes the process very easy - IF - you follow some simple
procedures.
In the Chapter 11 we make extensive use of CINs to handle PMAC’s DPR. So
if you intend to really understand what can be done and how to do it then this
chapter is important to you.
LabVIEW Code Interface Node Basics
What is a CIN?
Code Interface Nodes are VIs that call code written in C, directly from a block
diagram. Many LabVIEW aficionados dislike CINs. However, there are
instances where the logic required to implement an operation is much simp ler to
Chapter 10 – PComm32 Code Interface Nodes
195
specify in C than LabVIEW’s G. Furthermore, there are instances where the
need for efficiency and speed suggest the use of CINs. Accessing PMAC DPR
has both requirements. CINs can accept any LabVIEW data type including
clusters and arrays as an input or output. The following illustration shows a CIN
in a simple diagram.
LabVIEW provides several routines that make working with G data types easier.
These routines support memory allocation, file manipulation, and data type
conversion. Detailed documentation on these topics can be found in the
LabVIEW Code Interface Reference Manual.
Using a CIN with PComm32
Appendix A contains an application note available from www.natinst.com fully
defining the process for creating a CIN and configuring Microsoft Visual C++ to
edit, compile, and link the source code. It’s a bit involved but important
information. The next section details the configuration information required to
add PComm32 support to the basic CIN described in the appendix.
Setting up a PMACPanel CIN Configuration
There are two ways to create a project file for the CIN source code created by
the LabVIEW. The information presented next is of general importance and
leads to a much easier way to develop CINs for PMACPanel.
Adding PComm32 Include Path
To access PComm32 you need to add the following directories to the Visual
C++ development environment by selecting Tools»Options to display a tab
dialog. Click the Directories tab and select Include files in the Select directories
for drop down menu. If you double click the outlined box in the directory list a
dialog box appears allowing you to select a directory for the include path. The
dialog shown below already includes the directory
D:LabView\PMACPanel.lib\PmacInc
If you happen to have PComm32 installed you can use this directory. The result
should look something like the following.
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Adding Pmac.lib to Project
To link the CIN to produce the lsb code resource you need to include Pmac.lib
located in PMACPanel.lib\PmacInc or your PComm32 installation directory.
You can do by selecting ‘Project>>Add To Project>>Files’ and selecting
Pmac.lib in the locations noted. You can also add the file and add the path to
the Library files selection in the Tool options the same way you added the
include path.
Configuring the IDE
Appendix A has detailed instructions one the steps required to configure a
project so that it will successfully compile a C file into a loadable code resource
for the CIN. This is a bothersome process if you do it a number of times. It
may be necessary for you to do this the first time you create and compile a CIN.
After that you can use the techniques detailed next to duplicate the project file.
The Easy Way to Add New Projects
The easy way to create new CIN projects is to create a copy of the
PmacCIN.dsp project file and workspace PmacCIN.dsw located in \PmacCIN
and modify them using notepad or Microsoft Word. Microsoft doesn’t
recommend this but it saves a lot of configuring when you create a new CIN. If
you have 10 or 12 CINs you will get very tired of configuring and managing all
the project files.
The project file has the keyword PmacCINBase used 21 times in it. The
workspace has the keyword PmacCINBase used once. Copy the files to a new
directory, give them new names such as PmacMyCustomCIN.dsp and
PmacMyCustomCIN.dsw, and replace all references to PmacCINBase with
PmacMyCustomCIN. You can then open the new workspace in Visual C++
Chapter 10 – PComm32 Code Interface Nodes
197
and compile your project using the LabVIEW created C source file named
PmacMyCustomCIN.c.
If your installation is different from that contained in PmacCIN, try to edit the
dsp or dsw files. If there are too many changes, create a Microsoft Visual C++
environment from scratch as outlined in Appendix A, add the paths and libraries
for PMAC, and get one project to work. From this point on you can copy your
dsp, edit it, and insert it into an existing workspace. It takes a little work the
first time, but adding new CINs is very easy after that.
Multiple CIN Projects in a Workspace
Managing multiple CIN projects gets troublesome quickly if each CIN has its
own project and workspace. If you navigate your way to the PmacDPR
directory and open the Microsoft Visual C++ workspace named PmacDPR.dsw,
you will see that the workspace, shown below, has 12 projects in it.
PmacDPRVarBack is the currently active project and will be compiled when
the Build command is selected. This figure is also instructive in that the project
PmacDPRFixedBackVectors is open. It shows that any LabVIEW CIN project
requires cin.obj, labview.lib, lvsb.lib, and lvsbmain.def. For PMACPanel
Pmac.lib is also required. The file PmacDPRFixedBackVectors.c is the C
source file created by LabVIEW for the CIN node and contains the actual code
to accomplish the desired task.
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Creating a CIN C-Stub for PComm32
After placing the CIN VI in your diagram, wiring your inputs, and creating the
C-source file you get to edit the source. The following code was created for the
Code Interface Node in the VI PmacCIN.
/* CIN source file */
#include "extcode.h"
CIN MgErr CINRun(int32 *Device_Number_i32_0_,
LVBoolean *Enable_Bool,
int32 *Enable_Motor_Numbers_i32_1_8_1_,
int32 *Servo_Period_i32_1_);
CIN MgErr CINRun(int32 *Device_Number_i32_0_,
LVBoolean *Enable_Bool,
int32 *Enable_Motor_Numbers_i32_1_8_1_,
int32 *Servo_Period_i32_1_) {
/* ENTER YOUR CODE HERE */
return noErr;
}
To access PComm32 capabilities you need to add the line
#include <pmacu.h>
You can then utilize all of PComm32’s capabilities. In the Chapter that follows
we make extensive use of CINs for the implementation of VIs to access
PMAC’s DPR.
Chapter 10 – PComm32 Code Interface Nodes
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Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported
RAM
Basics
Every collection of VIs presented so far uses ASCII command strings to
communicate between PMAC and the host. This is independent of whether the
actual transfer between the host and PMAC takes place over a serial port, the
bus, or DPR. The parsing, formatting, handling, and interpretation of the
commands is responsible for most of the time required for communication –
even communication that takes place using Dual Ported RAM (DPR).
Dual Ported RAM provides seven other mechanisms for the transfer of limited
and specific sets of numeric data between the host and PMAC that requires far
less handling. This results in much faster transfers that may be advantageous in
your application.
These mechanisms are:
1.
Fixed Real Time Data Buffer – Automatic copying of limited
servo data to the host at a specified servo rate
2.
Fixed background Data Buffer – Automatic copying of limited
motion program data to the host on an as-requested basis
3.
Variable Background Data Buffer – Automatic copying of user
specified data to the host
4.
General Numeric Access – Bi-directional transfer of numeric data
between the host and PMAC using any DPR addresses not
dedicated to another operation
5.
Control Panel – Emulation of PMAC’s HW control panel
6.
Binary Rotary Buffer – Execution of motion programs loaded by
the host on an as -requested basis
7.
Real Time Data Gathering – Automatic copying of user specified
data to the host
Of these seven mechanisms 1 through 4 are completely supported by the
PmacDPR collection of VIs. Mechanism 5 is not really required in that the
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same capabilities, albeit slightly slower, are provided using the existing VIs.
Mechanism 6 is way beyond the requirements of anything a developer should
attempt with PMACPanel. PMAC users generally do not use mechanism 7.
In this Chapter we introduce four collections of VIs in PmacDPR that provide
the capabilities required for mechanisms 1-4. These are:
•
PmacDPRFixedBack – Fixed Background data buffer
•
PmacDPRNumeric – General numeric access to unallocated DPR
memory
•
PmacDPRRealTime – Fixed Real Time data buffer
•
PmacDPRVarBack – Variable Background data buffer
In each of the four collections contains
•
A configuration VI to enable and configure the operation
•
VIs to read or write the data using convenient clusters and types
•
VIs to buffer multiple data samples into vectors for charting and
analysis.
•
Examples of all capabilities
Several indicators and controls are provided to handle the data in easy to use
clusters. In many instances, previously introduced concepts and clusters are
used in ways that tightly integrate the new capabilities available through DPR
into PMACPanel’s familiar architecture.
We are not going to cover the CINs for all of the VIs in these collections. Once
the structure of a configuration, fetch, and vector VI are understood for one of
the collections the others will be readily duplicated. You may well find that
your applications require a slightly different architecture than that presented
here. If so, you can modify the existing CINs to suit your particular needs.
Required Background Understanding
Before reading this material, you must have some familiarity with PMAC’s DPR
capabilities. This can be found in the PMAC User Manual, PMAC Software
Reference Manual, and PMAC Dual Ported RAM manual. The architecture of
the CINs to support the VIs is heavily influenced by the PComm32 DPR API so
having that manual available is also necessary. In particular the Chapter
PComm32 DPR Features should be read before proceeding.
General Architecture Notes
PMACPanel’s DPR support is designed to be simple and extensible. There is
not a lot of error checking. The basic assumption is that you have a DPR card
with your PMAC. PmacDPR doesn’t automatically check for this nor does it
automatically enable or disable itself. As you inspect the examples, you will see
that each mechanism has a configuration VI. As you develop your applications
you might want to move these into your PmacDevOpen VI so that opening
PMAC also enables DPR the way you desire.
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PmacDPRRealTime
PMAC’s Real Time data buffer mechanism automatically copies 27 selected
Motor Calculation Registers from their native PMAC locations to DPR locations
at a specified servo-cycle sample rate. PComm32 supplies a set of routines to
read these values from DPR and convert them into legitimate Intel formats. This
process requires some handshaking between PMAC and the host to avoid
collisions when accessing DPR from the host.
To minimize your work and simplify the interface, the PmacDPRRealTime
collection bundles the 23 most useful items them into clusters. This ensures that
all data items are gathered during the same servo cycle. It also prevents you
from having to wire 27 VIs.
PmacDPRRealTimeExample
The following example demonstrates three PmacDPRRealTime VIs. One to
configure and enable the operation of Real Time data buffering and two to fetch
the data. PmacDPRRealTimeMotor collects the data for a single motor.
PmacDPRRealTimeMotors collects the data for a set of motors. Grouping the
fetch of data for multiple motors into a single VI ensures that the data for each
motor will be from the same servo cycle.
The panel for the example is shown below. The panel demonstrates the
operation for a single motor on the top and multiple motors on the bottom. On
the right are two clusters for displaying the data fetched from DPR. On the right
are controls for selecting which motor or motors and controlling the fetch from
DPR. On the left in between the two is a small block of controls to enable DPR
Real Time data buffering.
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To execute the example you should select how many motors you want PMAC to
copy to DPR using the knob labeled Enable Motor Numbers. Sample Period is
the number of servo cycles between copies to DPR. The default value of five
indicates that PMAC will update the Real Time data buffer every five servo
cycles. With a default servo rate of 2.2 kHz, this corresponds to a 400 Hz
sample rate. If you click Enable, PMAC’s Real Time data buffer will be
enabled. You should immediately see updates taking place in the DPR Real
Time Motor Cluster and DPR Real Time Servo Cluster on top. Most noticeably,
you will see the Servo Timer increment rapidly reflecting the servo time the
sample was taken. If you enabled four motors, you can use the Motor Number
knob in the Single Motor box to fetch and display the data for the corresponding
motor.
You will note the familiar PmacMotorPVE cluster on the top left displays the
PVE as a subset of the data contained in the DPR Real Time Motor Cluster. If
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you check the Convert to CS box the same conversion to coordinate system
units covered in several earlier chapters is applied to the PVE data gathered
from DPR.
Below this collection of controls is an indicator labeled Iteration Timer that
display the time in mS for each loop iteration. On average the fetch and display
update of DPR Real Time data for a single motor takes 1-2mS.
You will notice the Green LED in the Single Motor box flickering on and off.
When PMAC copies data to DPR, it sets a ‘Busy Bit’ indicating that it is
accessing DPR. During this time, the host, running this VI, cannot access DPR.
To avoid possible problems the VI simply indicates that it did not perform a
successful fetch. If you check the box labeled ‘Wait For Valid', the VI will
continue placing calls to the associated CIN until it performs a successful read.
The demonstration on the bottom of the panel is for multiple motors. To fetch
the data for multiple motors you supply an array of motor numbers and enable
the fetch. The VI then fetches the data for the specified motors and returns an
array of clusters. The time required for this multiple motor fetch is on the order
of 1-2 mS. In this example, you can select a Motor Index for display. As shown
a Motor Index of 1 displays the data for Motor 2.
The diagram for the example requires three VIs. One to configure the operation,
one to fetch the data for a single motor and one to fetch the data for multiple
motors. Case statements are used to control the update of the display clusters.
The architecture of the PmacDPR VIs is a little different from most of those
already introduced. Whereas almost all other collections operate in a query
response mode that is always enabled these VIs require the enabling of specific
capabilities by a configuration VI. Hence, most PmacDPR VIs have an enable
input that prevents them from querying DPR until it is enabled.
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On the top left the PmacDPRRealTimeConfig VI requires a Sample Period,
Enable Boolean, and an integer indicating how many motors to copy. The
enable input is not latched. When it is TRUE the Real Time data buffer is
enabled. When it is FALSE the operation is disabled.
•
PmacDPRRealTimeConfig - DPR Real Time Fixed buffer is configured to
update motor information every Servo Period for all motor between 1 and
Enable Motor Numbers when Enable is TRUE. Operation is disabled when
Enable is FALSE. Output Enable is TRUE when operation is enabled. The
state is maintained by the VI. Operation of DPR Real Time buffers
overlaps with DPR Fixed Background operation in that the number of
motors enabled must be the same.
PmacDPRRealTimeMotor fetches DPR data for a single motor. This has an
optional enable signal, in this case provided by the configuration VI. It also has
an optional Wait For Valid input and a Coord Specify Cluster that is used to
specify the Motor Number, and standard Coordinate System conversions for the
production of the PVE cluster.
•
PmacDPRRealTimeMotor - Query PMAC DPR for the Real Time Fixed
buffer Motor and Servo data. When Enabled is TRUE (the Default state)
the data for Motor Number is fetched and used to build DPR Real Time
Motor Cluster and DPR Real Time Servo Cluster. Motor PVE Cluster
contains data in encoder counts or coordinate system units depending on the
state of Coord Specify Cluster. See PmacMotorPVE for details on how this
is done.
A successful query of PMAC's DPR depends on whether PMAC is
accessing the memory. If Wait For Valid is TRUE the VI places queries to
PMAC until a successful read at which time New Output is TRUE
indicating valid output data. If Wait For Valid is FALSE the query may or
may not succeed. If the query fails New Output is FALSE and the output
clusters contain the data fetched during the last read.
The fetching of multiple motor data by PmacDPRRealTimeMotors requires an
array of motors and produces an array of clusters. This VI differs from
PmacDPRRealTimeMotor in that it does not provide Coordinate System
conversions. This is not provided because it would require you to assemble an
array of Coord Specify Clusters. If you require the Coordinate System
conversion of Real Time data for multiple motors you can use the
PmacDPRRealTimePVE and apply the transformation to the individual cluster
elements in the output arrays.
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Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported RAM • 205
•
PmacDPRRealTimeMotors - Query PMAC DPR Real Time Fixed buffer
Motor and Servo data for the list of motors specified in Motor Number
Array. When Enabled is TRUE (the Default state) the data for the specified
motors is fetched and used to build an array of DPR Real Time Motor
Clusters and DPR Real Time Servo Clusters.
A successful query of PMAC's DPR depends on whether PMAC is
accessing the memory. If Wait For Valid is TRUE the VI places queries to
PMAC until a successful read at which time New Output is TRUE
indicating valid output data. If Wait For Valid is FALSE the query may or
may not succeed. If the query fails New Output is FALSE and the output
clusters contain the data fetched during the last read.
•
PmacDPRRealTimePVE - Extract position, velocity, and following error
from DPR Real Time Motor Cluster assuming Motor Number operating in
Coord Number. Assemble the measurements into Motor PVE Cluster. If
Convert is TRUE convert the measurements to CS units. Otherwise leave
them in encoder counts.
PmacDPRRealTimeConfig CIN
We are not going to cover all PmacDPR CINs in the same detail we do here.
Once you understand the basics of these, your understanding of the other
collections will follow.
The very simple diagram for PmacDPRRealTimeConfig is shown below. You
will note that the Device Number, Enable Motor Numbers, and Servo Period are
all passed to the CIN. Even the Enable is passed. The CIN returns an Output
Enable signal that indicates whether the configuration and enable operation
succeeded. The only unique characteristic of this VI is the compare operation
between the Output Enable and Input Enable. When these values are not equal,
the TRUE case executes enabling or disabling the operation as defined by the
input Enable.
Many things can be done with a CIN. You should have a copy of the LabVIEW
CIN Reference Manual when working with these until you get familiar with how
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LabVIEW passes parameters. This is especially true for clusters and arrays.
Things get more interesting when looking at the actual C code that implements
this CIN. This is shown below.
/* * CIN source file */
#include "extcode.h"
#include <pmacu.h>
#include <dprrealt.h>
/* stubs for advanced CIN functions */
UseDefaultCINInit
UseDefaultCINDispose
UseDefaultCINAbort
//UseDefaultCINLoad
UseDefaultCINUnload
UseDefaultCINSave
// -- This a GLOBAL variable!
BOOLEAN Enabled = FALSE;
// -CIN MgErr CINRun(int32 *Device_Number_i32_0_,
LVBoolean *Enable_Bool_T_,
int32 *Enable_Motor_Numbers_i32_1_8_1_,
int32 *Servo_Period_i32_1_);
CIN MgErr CINRun(int32 *Device_Number_i32_0_,
LVBoolean *Enable_Bool_T_,
int32 *Enable_Motor_Numbers_i32_1_8_1_,
int32 *Servo_Period_i32_1_) {
/* -- When not currently enabled and Enable_Bool_T_ == LVTRUE
enable the Fixed buffer for the specified number of motors -- */
if (!Enabled && *Enable_Bool_T_ == LVTRUE) {
PmacDPRSetMotors(*Device_Number_i32_0_,
*Enable_Motor_Numbers_i32_1_8_1_);
PmacDPRRealTime(*Device_Number_i32_0_,
*Servo_Period_i32_1_,
1);
Enabled = TRUE;
}
/* -- When currently enabled and Enable_Bool_T_ == LVFALSE
disable ALL background operations. -- */
else if (Enabled && *Enable_Bool_T_ == LVFALSE) {
PmacDPRRealTime(*Device_Number_i32_0_,
*Servo_Period_i32_1_,
0);
Enabled = FALSE;
}
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*Enable_Bool_T_ = Enabled;
return noErr;
}
// When first loaded make sure Enable flag is FALSE
CIN MgErr CINLoad(RsrcFile rf)
{
Enabled = FALSE;
// Indicate DPR Fixed Real Time disabled
return noErr;
}
This particular CIN has two functions CINLoad and CINRun. LabVIEW
creates the function and data type declarations such as clusters and arrays
required by CINRun. The function CINRun is called when the VI containing
the CIN is executed. CINLoad is executed when the VI is first loaded.
In this sample, you will note that two functions from PComm32 are used.
PmacDPRRealTime enables and disables the DPR Real Time data buffer and
PmacDPRSetMotors sets the number of motors to copy. The logic of the if
statement uses the current enable state of the operation and the desired state
passed in by *Enable_Bool_T_ to turn the DPR Real Time data buffer on or off.
Notice the type of the Boolean and that most parameters are passed as pointers
to data.
PmacDPRRealTimeMotor CIN
The diagram for PmacDPRRealTimeMotor is shown below. You will note
that the Device Number, Motor Number, and a FALSE Boolean constant are
passed to the CIN. The CIN returns two clusters and a Boolean indicating
whether the fetch operation succeeded. The CIN is only executed when the
input Enabled is TRUE. If Wait For Valid is TRUE, the while loop will
execute the CIN until New Output is TRUE thereby waiting until the fetch from
DPR succeeds. Repeated requests for DPR data is done by the diagram rather
than the CIN code. If the C-code waited in a while loop that was never satisfied
you couldn't abort your application.
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This VI’s CIN code has a simple structure but places many calls to PComm32.
This is the reason we selected to implement this VI with a CIN rather than 20 or
30 Call Library Function VIs. To simplify the code we have removed several
lines from the actual source to demonstrate the basic ideas.
/* * CIN source file */
#include "extcode.h"
#include <pmacu.h>
#include <dprrealt.h>
// Types defined by LabVIEW when the stub was created
typedef struct {
int32 ServoTimer_i32;
float64 Comm_d_Pos_Dbl;
float64 Position_Dbl;
float64 Velocity_Dbl;
float64 Follow_Error_Dbl;
float64 Master_Pos_Dbl;
float64 Comp_Pos_Dbl;
int32 DAC_i32;
int32 Move_Time_i32;
uInt16 Motor_Motion_u16;
LVBoolean Motor_Activated;
LVBoolean Open_Loop;
LVBoolean Neg_Limit_Exceeded;
LVBoolean Pos_Limit_Exceeded;
} TD1;
typedef struct {
LVBoolean Home_In_Progress;
LVBoolean Block_Request;
LVBoolean Desired_Velocity_Zero;
LVBoolean Data_Block_Error;
LVBoolean Dwell_In_Progress;
LVBoolean Integration_Mode;
LVBoolean Running_Move;
LVBoolean Open_Loop;
LVBoolean Phased_Motor;
LVBoolean Hand_Wheel_Enabled;
LVBoolean Neg_Limit_Exceeded;
LVBoolean Pos_Limit_Exceeded;
LVBoolean Motor_Activated;
} TD2;
// -CIN MgErr CINRun(int32 *Device_Number_i32_0_, int32 *Motor_Number_i32_1_8_1_,
TD1 *DPR_Real_Time_Motor_Cluster,
TD2 *DPR_Real_Time_Servo_Cluster
LVBoolean *ValidData){
int32 DevNum = *Device_Number_i32_0_; // Shorter dereferenced name
int32 MNum = *Motor_Number_i32_1_8_1_ - 1;
SERVOSTATUS ServoStatus;
// --
Tell PMAC we're doing our thing
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PmacDPRSetHostBusyBit(DevNum, 1);
// -- Check if PMAC is busy doing its thing
if (!PmacDPRGetPmacBusyBit(DevNum)) {
// -- Fetch all of the available data
DPR_Real_Time_Motor_Cluster->ServoTimer_i32 =
PmacDPRGetServoTimer(DevNum);
…
DPR_Real_Time_Motor_Cluster->Motor_Activated =
PmacDPRMotorEnabled(DevNum, MNum) == 0 ? LVFALSE : LVTRUE;
// -- ServoStatus – Fetch cluster and then individual items
ServoStatus = PmacDPRMotorServoStatus(DevNum, MNum);
DPR_Real_Time_Servo_Cluster->Home_In_Progress =
ServoStatus.home_search == 0 ? LVFALSE : LVTRUE;
…
// -*ValidData = LVTRUE;
// New data for caller
*ValidData = LVFALSE;
// Sorry - no new data
}
else {
}
PmacDPRSetHostBusyBit(DevNum, 0);// PMAC can do its thing
return noErr;
}
If you check the PComm32 Reference Manual you will see that the checking
and setting of the DPR Busy Bit is required by PMAC. When the unfilled CIN
node stub was created LabVIEW generously declared the CINRun parameter
order, names, and data types. CINRun’s job is to fetch DPR data from PMAC
using the PComm32 functions and fill the LabVIEW data types passed by the
caller with the data. It is actually very simple. The parameters
DPR_Real_Time_Servo_Cluster and DPR_Real_Time_Motor_Cluster are
pointers to the data types provided by LabVIEW. Calls are placed to PComm32
and data of the proper type is assigned to the members of the data types. There
is one catch here. You will note that Booleans returned by PComm32 are
converted to LVTRUE and LVFALSE before being assigned to the members of
the clusters. This is precaution that avoids possible mismatches in data types.
PmacDPRRealTimeVectorExample
The following example demonstrates a very powerful PmacDPR technique that
takes multiple samples over time. This is done by placing repeated CIN that
build vectors for the desired items. This creates a simpler and faster VI diagram
because building the vector is done by the CIN and the data is returned by the
CIN only when a vector of a specified length is built.
The panel for the example is shown below. The panel demonstrates the fetching
of vectors for the purposes of driving a real-time chart. On the top left is a knob
for selecting a motor and specifying the number of samples to accumulate before
updating the chart. On the bottom the same operations are performed but motor
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items such as Position, Velocity, and Following Error are converted to CS units
in the standard manner defined for PmacMotors. On the left between the two
sets of controls is a small block of controls to enable DPR Real Time data
buffering.
To execute the example you should select how many motors you want PMAC to
copy to DPR using the knob labeled Enable Motor Numbers. Sample Period
defines the servo-sampling interval. You can then click Enable to start the DPR
Real Time data buffer. As with PmacDPRRealTimeExamp, you can s elect a
motor to fetch and check the Enable box for the top or bottom chart.
The PmacDPRRealTimeVectors VI that actually processes the request for a
fetch does a little more book keeping and buffers the data in arrays prior to
passing it back to the caller. It returns a PmacDPRRealTimeVectors cluster
from which the desired items can be selected and plotted as shown here. This
cluster differs from PmacDPRRealTimeMotor and
PmacDPRRealTimeServo. Many of the items in the clusters would not
generally be of interest in a time-vector. If you desire these, you can modify
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors to support them.
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The demonstration on the bottom panel is different from that on top in that it has
a longer buffer (256 samples vs. 128 samples) and a CS transformation can be
applied.
•
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors - Query PMAC DPR for the Real Time Fixed
buffer Motor and Servo data. When Enabled is TRUE (the Default state)
the data for Motor Number is fetched and used to build DPR Real Time
Motor Cluster and DPR Real Time Servo Cluster. Motor PVE Cluster
contains data in encoder counts or coordinate system units depending on the
state of Coord Specify Cluster. See PmacMotorPVE for details on how this
is done.
A successful query of PMAC's DPR depends on whether PMAC is
accessing the memory. If Wait For Valid is TRUE the VI places queries to
PMAC until a successful read at which time New Output is TRUE
indicating valid output data. If Wait For Valid is FALSE the query may or
may not succeed. If the query fails New Output is FALSE and the output
clusters contain the data fetched during the last read.
If you enable both portions of the example, you should insure that each requests
the data for a different motor. We will discuss the reasons for this in the next
section.
Servo Accurate Sampling
There is an important issue regarding the PmacDPR Vector VIs that must be
understood to avoid misconceptions. PMAC is a very fast real-time controller
that generates more data than could possibly be used in any given application.
In Chapter 5, we discussed the PmacGather collection of ICVs that utilized
PMAC’s data gathering capabilities. The gather facility gathers and buffers a
specified set of items at a specified servo rate using PMAC memory. The
gathered data can be transferred to the host later for decoding and use. The
PmacDPR Vector VI collects the data in host memory on an as-it-gets-there
basis. Samples will be missed when your application is busy with other
operations. This can be seen in the example’s Red chart strip of the Servo Timer
difference. This strip chart is the difference between successive Servo Timer
samples and reflects the jitter in the sampling. Most samples are taken every
five servo cycles in this example. When a complete buffer is accumulated,
passed back to the VI, and then used to update the chart the sampling interval
experiences a blip of approximately 75 mS. You will even notice 5 and 10 mS
blips in between the major buffer updates.
From a practical point of view, the Servo Timer vector definitively identifies the
time each sample was taken. This can be used to resample the other data
vectors, or handled however you choose. Until Delta Tau includes DPR data
gathering in PComm32 you should use regular data gathering if you absolutely
require servo accurate sampling. This form of gathering does not support strip
charting on a continuous basis.
As can be seen in this panel, the interval required to process both fetches is
between two and four mS without the update of the charts. When the vector(s)
have been accumulated the updating of the charts requires between 75 and 100
mS.
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The diagram for the example is very similar to that of
PmacDPRRealTimeExamp. The configuration VI is the same. The Vector VI
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors is similar to PmacDPRRealTimeMotors in that
it takes an Enable input. It also has a Buffer Length input. Rather than a Coord
Specify Cluster, you simply provide a Motor Number. The decision to do this is
based on the view that whereas single Servo sample data for a motor might be
used to drive a PVE type of panel cluster this is not true for a Vector operation.
You should note that the update of the chart is wrapped in a case structure. DO
NOT use the cluster of arrays unless Valid Output is TRUE. The arrays should
have zero length but this may cause problems.
The vector fetch in the bottom half of the diagram unbundles the returned cluster
of vectors and performs a CS conversion on the elements of the selected vectors
using PmacDPRMotorVecToCoord. This is a vector version of the standard
PmacCoord VIs.
•
PmacDPRMotorVecToCoord - Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor
within a CS and an attempt to convert Input Array from encoder counts to
CS units. If the motor is not defined in the CS no conversion is applied. If
the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined is TRUE and
Output Array is scaled from encoder counts to CS units. Coord Definition
is a string specifying Output Value units as "Encoder" or the CS definition
of the motor.
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PmacDPRRealTimeVectors CIN
The diagram for PmacDPRRealTimeVectors is shown below. You will note
that the Device Number, Motor Number, and Buffer Length are all passed to the
CIN when Enable is TRUE. The CIN fetches the DPR samples and builds the
vectors on every execution of the CIN. 99% of the time the CIN returns a
FALSE value for New Output because it still has more samples to accumulate.
When it has accumulated Buffer Length of samples it copies them to DPR Real
Time Vector Cluster and returns a TRUE for New Output.
The CIN code for this type of VI is a bit more complex than those presented
already. It requires a data buffer for storing the accumulated samples and it
requires some manipulation of the vectors in the returned cluster. As defined
the data buffers are global thereby making them accessible to any reentrant copy
of the VI. The topic of handling arrays in CINs is thoroughly covered in the
LabVIEW CIN Reference Manual. To simplify the code, several lines have been
removed from the source to demonstrate the basic ideas.
/* * CIN source file */
STANDARD INCLUDES and DEFINITIONS – See actual Source File
// -- i32 vector
typedef struct {
int32 dimSize;
int32 Value[1];
} TD2;
typedef TD2 **TD2Hdl;
// -- float64 vector
typedef struct {
int32 dimSize;
float64 Value[1];
} TD3;
typedef TD3 **TD3Hdl;
// -- Cluster of arrays
typedef struct {
TD2Hdl Servo_Timer_i32;
TD3Hdl Position_Dbl;
TD3Hdl Velocity_Dbl;
TD3Hdl Commanded_Pos_Dbl;
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TD3Hdl
TD3Hdl
TD3Hdl
TD2Hdl
TD2Hdl
Following_Error_Dbl;
Master_Position_Dbl;
Comp_Pos_Dbl;
DAC_i32;
Move_Time_i32;
} TD1;
// -- GLOBAL buffers for handling motor data
#define MOTOR_MAX 8
#define BUFFER_MAX 512
int32
int32
int32
int32
BufferCount[MOTOR_MAX];
ServoTimer[MOTOR_MAX][BUFFER_MAX];
DAC[MOTOR_MAX][BUFFER_MAX];
Move_Time[MOTOR_MAX][BUFFER_MAX];
float64
float64
float64
float64
float64
float64
Commanded_Position[MOTOR_MAX][BUFFER_MAX];
Position[MOTOR_MAX][BUFFER_MAX];
Velocity[MOTOR_MAX][BUFFER_MAX];
Following_Error[MOTOR_MAX][BUFFER_MAX];
Master_Position[MOTOR_MAX][BUFFER_MAX];
Compensation_Position[MOTOR_MAX][BUFFER_MAX];
// -CIN MgErr CINRun(int32 *Device_Number_i32_0_,
int32 *Motor_Number_i32_1_8_1_,
int32 *Buffer_Length_i32_128_,
TD1 *DPR_Real_Time_Vector_Cluster,
LVBoolean *ValidData) {
int32 DevNum = *Device_Number_i32_0_;
int32 MNum = *Motor_Number_i32_1_8_1_ - 1;
int BCount = BufferCount[MNum];
int SizeL, SizeD;
// --
Tell PMAC we're doing our thing
PmacDPRSetHostBusyBit(DevNum, 1);
// -- Check if PMAC is busy doing its thing
if (!PmacDPRGetPmacBusyBit(DevNum)) {
// -- Get Servo timer
ServoTimer[MNum][BCount] = PmacDPRGetServoTimer(DevNum);
/* -- If this is the first element of a new buffer - OR its not the first element of a buffer - AND the current servo timer value is not equal to last measurement
THEN - fetch the DPR data into the proper buffer elements. -- */
if ((BCount == 0) || ((BCount > 0) &&
(ServoTimer[MNum][BCount-1] != ServoTimer[MNum][BCount]))){
Commanded_Position[MNum][BCount] =
PmacDPRGetCommandedPos(DevNum, MNum, 1.0);
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Position[MNum][BCount] =
PmacDPRPosition(DevNum, MNum, 1.0);
…
BufferCount[MNum]++;
}
}
// -- Check for full buffer then copy to LabVIEW data structs
if (BufferCount[MNum] == *Buffer_Length_i32_128_) {
BCount = BufferCount[MNum];
// -- Resize the arrays in the structure
NumericArrayResize(iL, 1,
(UHandle *) &(DPR_Real_Time_Vector_Cluster>Servo_Timer_i32), BCount);
(*DPR_Real_Time_Vector_Cluster->Servo_Timer_i32)->dimSize =
BCount;
…
// -SizeL = BCount * sizeof(int32);
SizeD = BCount * sizeof(float64);
memcpy((*DPR_Real_Time_Vector_Cluster->Servo_Timer_i32)->Value,
ServoTimer[MNum], SizeL);
memcpy((*DPR_Real_Time_Vector_Cluster->Position_Dbl)->Value,
Position[MNum], SizeD);
…
// -- Indicate a valid buffer to caller and reset buffer counter
BufferCount[MNum] = 0;
*ValidData = LVTRUE;
}
else {
*ValidData = LVFALSE;
// -- No valid buffer
}
PmacDPRSetHostBusyBit(DevNum, 0);
return noErr;
// PMAC can do its thing
}
CIN MgErr CINLoad(RsrcFile rf)
{
int i;
// -- Reset the buffer counters
for (i = 0; i < MOTOR_MAX; i++) {
BufferCount[i] = 0;
}
return noErr;
}
It’s a bit longer than PmacDPRRealTimeMotor but has much the same
structure. The PMAC Busy Bit is processed as before. Instead of assigning the
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fetched data directly to the items of the cluster, it is stored in a set of global
arrays. The BufferCount array keeps track of the next array location to be
written when valid data is available for storage. There is a cryptic if clause
involving the ServoTimer data and BufferCount. The actual storage of fetched
data in the temporary arrays requires that the ServoTimer not be the same as that
of the last sample. Otherwise, the array would contain multiple samples of the
data.
After the temporary arrays are updated the CIN check the current buffer count
against the desired buffer size. If there are enough samples in the temporary
array, the data will be copied from the temporary arrays into the cluster of arrays
passed back to the VI. This requires you to resize each array in the cluster using
LabVIEW’s NumericArrayResize and then copy the data from the temporary
array into the data buffer that will be returned to the VI. Once you get the basics
of this requirement clusters and arrays are very easy to handle in your CIN.
There are some conditions associated with this approach. The temporary storage
arrays have a fixed size defined by MOTOR_MAX and BUFFER_MAX. They
have a native 2 dimensional C organization. As compiled you cannot ask for a
Motor Number larger than MOTOR_MAX or gather more samples than
BUFFER_MAX. The CIN does not check this condition. If you wish to resize
these because of memory limitations or you want larger buffers you need to
change these values, recompile the CIN, and reload it into the CIN in
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors.
It is possible to allocate these buffers dynamically using various CIN utilities.
However, this introduces more complexity to the process such as allocating the
buffers in the function CINLoad and deleting the buffers in CINUnLoad. For
this release of PMACPanel, this approach was not utilized.
A Note About Vector CINs
To avoid unnecessary complication we have not provided bullet proof
PmacDPR VIs with error diagnosis and such. You should be aware of the fact
PComm32 handles a lot of book keeping issues associated with DPR. As an
example, the order in which you configure and enable DPR operations is
important. If you enable a Variable Background buffer after you enable a Fixed
Background buffer then disable the Fixed Background buffer the Variable
Background buffer may move. Hence, those VIs accessing it will not return the
correct data.
A similar issue arises when using the Vector VIs. Once you have enabled a
particular Vector buffer for a specific number of samples DO NOT change the
length. If you do you should unload the VIs that use the Vector VIs and reload
them so that the buffer management can be reinitialized. Otherwise, it is highly
probable that buffer bookkeeping will become garbled and strange things will
happen.
A Note About Vector CIN Reentrancy
Many of the PmacDPR VIs that use CINs are reentrant. This is generally not a
problem unless you are not careful how you use them. If you have two Vector
VIs buffering servo data for the same motor you will get strange results.
Sometimes one of the VIs will update the BufferCount and sometimes the other
VI will update the count. Eventually, one of the two VIs completes the
acquisition and gets the vector data leaving the other one without an acquisition.
Generally this is a mistake in your application logic and can be remedied by
handling the distribution of the acquired vectors in your diagram. One should
use one Vector VI per motor thereby guaranteeing no need for mutexs to control
access to the temporary data buffers.
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PmacDPRFixedBack
PMAC’s Fixed Background data buffer mechanism automatically copies 34
selected Motor Calculation Registers, Coordinate System Control Registers, and
Program Execution Registers from their native PMAC locations to DPR
locations when requested. Whereas the Fixed Real Time data buffer is motor
specific the Fixed Background data is Motor and CS specific, therefore, program
specific. PComm32 supplies a set of routines to read these from DPR and
convert them into legitimate Intel formats. This process hides the required
handshaking between PMAC and the host to avoid collisions when accessing
DPR. Update of a particular item is not synchronized with a specific servo
cycle.
To minimize your work as a developer and simplify the interface the
PmacDPRFixedBack collection of VIs has three VIs that collect the 28 most
useful items and bundle them into LabVIEW clusters. The gathering of Fixed
Background data is not controlled by the servo clock therefore the data items
might indeed be taken at slightly different servo times.
PmacDPRFixedBackExample
The following example demonstrates all three PmacDPRFixedBack VIs. One
to configure and enable the operation of Fixed Background data buffering, one
to fetch the data for a specific Motor/CS, and one to buffer a set of vectors.
PmacDPRFixedBack collects the data for a single motor operating in a CS.
PmacDPRFixedBackVectors buffers the data exactly as
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors does.
The panel for the example is shown below. The panel demonstrates the fetching
of Fixed Background data for a single Motor/CS on top and the fetching of
vectors for charting on the bottom. On the left are controls for selecting which
motor and CS to use for the fetch and enabling the fetch from DPR. The
example is different from PmacDPRRealTimeExample in that because the
Fixed Background data buffer handles motor, CS, and program information it
has an encapsulated motion program that can be configured and run using the
box of buttons in the middle.
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To execute the example select how many motors you want PMAC to copy to
DPR using the knob labeled Enable Motor Numbers and click the Enable button.
You can enable the operation of the display clusters by checking the box labeled
Enable on the top left. There are two clusters provided by
PmacDPRFixedBack. A DPR Fixed Motor Cluster for the specified motor and
a DPR Fixed Coordinate Cluster for the specified CS. If you click the Run
button, the data in the clusters will update.
•
PmacDPRFixedBack - Once DPR Fixed Background buffer operation is
enabled this VI can be used to fetch the data for a specific Motor Number
and Coord Number. The input Enabled can be used to enable and disable
the actual fetch. The Default, un-wired, condition is TRUE. Coord Axis
Char is a string (X, Y, Z, A, B, C, U, V, W) indicating which axis in Coord
Number Comm'd Pos will represent. When New Output is TRUE DPR
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Fixed Motor Cluster and DPR Fixed Coordinate Cluster contain the most
recent background data. When Enabled is FALSE the two output clusters
contain the last valid data even though New Output is FALSE.
You will notice that there is a CS knob and a Coordinate Axis string. The
values in the Coordinate cluster are for all motors in the CS while the
Commanded Pos (Comm’d Pos) is for a specific Axis in the CS. In the example
the ‘X’ axis is specified. If you change the axis to ‘Y’ and click Run again you
will notice that the Comm’d Pos does NOT update because the ‘Y’ axis is not
defined in CS 1.
The operation of the example is a little different when you enable the Vector
operation by checking its Enable box. Nothing happens until you run the
program. This is due to the organization of the example not the associated
Vector VI. When you enable the Vector portion of the example, and click Run
the chart will begin updating. You should disable the top portion so that it
doesn’t steal samples from the Vector operation. Yo u will immediately notice
that the displayed data is more quantized because of the DPR data is updated in
the background. Fixed Background data is program related and therefore
computed at a slower rate and updated only when requested. The other thing
you should note is that the velocity for Fixed Background operation is in
encoder counts per minute whereas Real Time motor velocity is in scaled Ix09
counts per servo cycle.
The diagram for the example shows three VIs. One to configure the operation,
one to fetch the data for a single motor and one to fetch the vector data. In
addition, there is a small diagram to handle the encapsulated motion program. A
Case structure is used to control the update of the display clusters. The
PmacDPRFixedBackConfig and PmacDPRFixedBack VI operate similarly to
their PmacDPRRealTime versions in that the Enable terminals operate the
same way.
•
PmacDPRFixedBackConfig - DPR Fixed Background buffer is configured
to update motor information for all motor between 1 and Enable Motor
Numbers when Enable is TRUE. Operation is disabled when Enable is
FALSE. Output Enable is TRUE when operation is enabled. The state is
maintained by the VI. Operation of DPR Fixed Background buffers
overlaps with DPR Real Time operation in that the number of motors
enabled must be the same.
You will note that the PmacDPRFixedBack vector VI is wrapped in a Case
structure that is only executed when the configuration VI is enabled, the
program is executing, and the proper Enable on the panel is checked. Hence,
when the program is started the gathering of the vectors can begin. The samples
are accumulated as fast as possible because the actual Vector VI is buried in a
While structure that executes until the entire vector is accumulated and then the
rest of the system gets a chance to run. This structure is not required but
demonstrates another way to organize a gather.
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•
PmacDPRFixedBackVectors - Once DPR Fixed Background buffer
operation is enabled this VI can be used to fetch the data for a specific
Motor Number and Coord Number. The input Enabled can be used to
enable and disable the actual fetch. The Default, un-wired, condition is
TRUE. Coord Axis Char is a string (X, Y, Z, A, B, C, U, V, W) indicating
which axis in Coord Number Comm'd Pos will represent. When New
Output is TRUE DPR Fixed Motor Cluster and DPR Fixed Coordinate
Cluster contain the most recent background data. When Enabled is FALSE
the two output clusters contain the last valid data even though New Output
is FALSE.
We will not discuss the details of the CINs associated with each VI. They are
very similar to those presented for their cousins in the PmacDPRRealTime
collection. Specific details are contained in source code comments.
PmacDPRNumeric
PMAC’s architecture permits access to any unused DPR memory for whatever
purposes you desire using M -Variables. These may be scratch registers or, in
the case of DPR, registers through which you can pass data between the host and
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PMAC. By avoiding the translation involved in standard ACSII communication
you can move data between the host and PMAC much more quickly and it does
not utilize precious P or Q Variables. The process requires no explicit
handshaking between PMAC and the host to avoid collisions when accessing
DPR.
The PmacDPRNumeric collection consists of a numb er of VIs that use Call
Library Function VIs to access DPR. The simplicity of the interface doesn’t
require CINs. We show how to access individual memory locations as doubles,
long (i32) and short (i16) integers, bit fields, and booleans. The examples use
encapsulated PLCs and motion programs to generate and process the data
transferred between the example PMACPanel applications and PMAC. If you
use DPR for this purpose, the examples are very useful.
DPR Addresses and Data Organization
The mapping of memory addresses between the host computer on one side and
PMAC’s address space on the other side is simple. To PMAC, DPRAM appears
as standard memory in the range $D000 - $DFFF, which can be thought of as
4K of long (48-bit) words or 8K of single (24-bit) X/Y words. This memory is
accessed using M -Variables mapped to this address range. Depending on the
DPR mechanisms used (Real Time, Fixed Background, Variable Background,
etc.); the lower portions of this memory space are automatically allocated.
Hence, you can use anything above the end of this space up to $DFFF for any
purpose. There is no easy way to automatically allocate and addresses for DPR
Numeric access until you have allocated all other automatic features. In the next
section on DPR Variable Background buffers, we will tell you how to determine
the end of this allocated space. For now assume that we will be working with
DPR memory between &DE00 and &DFFF
To the host computer DPR appears as 8K 16-bit words of memory. Each 24 bit
PMAC X or Y word thus takes two 16-bit memory addresses. A PMAC long or
float (48-bits) thus takes four memory addresses. Fortunately, PComm32
handles the host computer memory mapping and PMAC handles the required bit
and byte manipulations to map Motorola 56K data formats to Intel data formats.
PmacDPRNumericExample
The following example demonstrates the use of DPR for communicating
numeric data between the host and PMAC. PMAC executes a PLC that
generates and responds to the register data accessed using M -Variables that are
mapped to DPR. The data is also accessed using the PQM collection of VIs to
demonstrate the differences in access speed, and bypass the mechanisms that
field access introduces.
Unlike the previous PmacDPR examples that required a configuration step prior
to accessing the data, PmacDPRNumeric requires no configuration other than
assignment of memory addresses.
The panel for the example is shown below. On the left is a box containing
controls/indicators that access M444 – M448 using PmacDPRNumeric VIs. On
the right are several controls that access the same data using the ASCII PQM
collection of VIs. Each of the M-Variables can be accessed using either method.
From the top down are M444 an integer, M445 a double, M446 a bit field in a Y
address, M447a single bit in an X address, and M448, another bit in a Y address.
Access to the M -Variable data using DPR requires an address, bit number, or
field specifier. These are also shown on the left portion of the panel.
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At the very bottom are a few controls to enable and monitor an encapsulated
PLC that generates M-Variable data that is simultaneously available to the host
and PMAC because it exists in DPR. If you check the box labeled Enable then
click the button labeled PLC Enable, the PLC program will begin executing.
The indicators for each of the M-Variables will immediately begin updating
with the data being generated in PMAC’s PLC. If you check the box labeled
PQM Disabled on the right these indicators will also begin updating with a
noticeable increase in the interval timer. This is because of the large overhead
required to process the required ASCII commands.
M-Variables and VI Address Specification
Before getting into the example deeper lets look at the PLC M-Variable
definitions shown below. These specify the addresses where PMAC will place
the data during its writes to M-Variables and fetch the data when it reads an MVariable. The address modifier DP defines a 32 bit long integer in DPR handled
as the lower 16 bits of both X and Y addresses. The F modifier defines a 32 bit
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floating point value in DPR also handled as the lower 16 bits of both X and Y
addresses. PMAC firmware and PComm32 handle the required bit and byte
manipulations to convert the raw representation into Intel and Motorola formats.
M447 and M448 are single bits defined in simple 24-bit X/Y words.
M444->DP:$DE00
M445->F:$DE01
M446->DP:$DE02
M447->X:$DE03,8,1
M448->Y:$DE04,8,1
To access these variables with the PmacDPRNumeric collection of VIs a
truncated version of the memo ry address is required. A PMAC M-Variable
defined at $DE45 become 0xE45 to PMACPanel. PComm32 handles the
absolute memory mapping while the PmacDPRNumeric VIs compute the
address offset required by PComm32. For M-Variables defined as F and DP,
nothing more is required. For M-Variables defined as X, Y, or specific bit
fields, a cluster defining the base address, modifier, and field or bit number is
required. When looking at the panel only the address is required for M444 and
M445. M446, M447, and M448 require the cluster. These are covered in detail
later.
The diagram for the example has a section at the bottom for handling the PQM
controls and a case statement at the top for handling the encapsulated PLC. The
PLC encapsulation VI is wrapped inside the case statement so that it can be
disabled and the impact of its execution on timing can be seen. The PQM
approach can be used to validate the results of bit field manipulation that are
masked by the DPR mechanism.
The five VIs in the middle handle the transfer of data between the host and
PMAC using the same read/write architecture used for PmacIVar,
PmacMemory, etc. All that is required is the address for DWord or Double
memory or a DPR Numeric Spec cluster for field and bit access.
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PmacDPRNumeric VIs are discussed in two groups. The first group covers
word, double word, and floating point DPR M-Variables. The second group
covers the bit and bit-field VIs. In a later example, we will demonstrate an
approach for grouping collections of DPR M-Variables into a cluster that can be
handled using a CIN.
•
PmacDPRNumericDWord - This VI is used to Set or Get PMAC long MVariable's defined in DPR as M447->DP:$DE03. PMAC handles the
translation of PMAC's representation into Intel format when the DP
specification is used.
When Set/Get is FALSE - default state - Response Available is TRUE and
Output Value is the value in DPR located at Offset. When Set/Get is TRUE
Output Value = Input Value, Response Available is FALSE and the
specified DPR location is set.
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The mapping of PMAC addresses to PC addresses is involved and requires
a bit of work to understand. In general, each 24-bit PMAC word requires
one 32-bit PC word. For PMAC longs specified as.
M447->DP:$DE03
this offset should be $E03.
•
PmacDPRNumericDbl - This VI is used to Set or Get PMAC double MVariable's defined in DPR as M447->F:$DE03. PMAC handles the
translation of PMAC's representation into Intel format when the F
specification is used.
•
PmacDPRNumericWord - This VI is used to Set or Get PMAC long MVariable's defined in DPR as M447->DP:$DE03 where the equivalent intel
representation is 16 bits. PMAC handles the translation of PMAC's
representation into Intel format when the DP specification is used.
The implementation of these VIs closely follows that used by PmacMemory
and PmacIVar. The VI will Get the specified value unless the Set\Get input is
TRUE in which case it does a set operation. The diagram shown below
demo nstrates how this is done using a Call Library VI using the
PmacDPRSetDWord function in PComm32. The FALSE case (Get operation)
uses the PmacDPRGetDWord function. Note that the offset supplied by your
diagram is multiplied by 4 to get the actual memory offset of the M-Variable in
DPR as seen from the host.
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DPR Bits and Bit Fields
The three VIs presented above only require the offset to determine the address
of the desired data. When accessing bits and bit fields the information contained
in the PmacDPRNumericSpec cluster is required.
DPR Numeric Spec Cluster A cluster of items required to
describe a DPR mapped PMAC M-Variable for bit and field
access.
Address i32 Hexadecimal integer specifying DPR
address offset. For example, PMAC Addresses such
as:
M445->F:$DE01
M446->DP:$DE02
M447->X:$DE03,8,1
Become
E01, E02, and E03 respectively.M446->DP:$DE02
X/Y String A single character string (X or Y)
defining the type of data. Not for L or DP.
Mask/Bit i32 A hexadecimal value used to define a
bit number for single bit operations or a multi digit
hexadecimal number defining a mask for multi-bit
operations.
The VI PmacDPRNumericSpec is embedded in the bit and bit field VIs
covered next, and converts the address specification into an actual DPR memory
offset. You can look at the actual diagram for this VI if you wish to understand
how this is done. Generally, although these are named as DWord operators the
individual bits are defined in a 24-bit X/Y word. The bit VIs are
•
PmacDPRNumericDWordBitTest - This VI queries the DPR DWord bit
specified by DPR Numeric Spec Cluster and returns the value in Bit Value.
•
PmacDPRNumericDWordBit - This VI operates on the DPR DWord bit
specified by DPR Numeric Spec Cluster.
When Set/Get is FALSE - the default state - the value of the bit is queried
and returned by Bit Value with Response Available TRUE. When Set/Get
is TRUE the specified bit is set to the value of Bit State - either TRUE or
FALSE.
Bit field operations are a little more complex. The following VI allows you to
specify an entire X/Y word and set or clear multiple bits in a single operation
depending on the control input.
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•
PmacDPRNumericDWordSetMask - This VI operates on the DPR
DWord bit field specified by DPR Numeric Spec Cluster.
When Set/Get is FALSE - the default state - the Mask specified by DPR
Numeric Spec Cluster is AND'd with the specified address to produce the
output Bit Field Value. Response Available is TRUE.
When Set/Get is TRUE the Mask is either OR'd or XOR'd with the contents
of the field at the specified address. If XOR/OR is FALSE the mask is
OR'd with the contents of the field at the specified address thereby setting
bits specified by the mask. If XOR/OR is TRUE the mask is XOR'd with
the contents of the field at the specified address thereby clearing the bits
specified in the mask.
PmacDPRNumericClusterExample
This example extends the previous example by defining a cluster containing a
set of DPR numeric data. The purpose of doing this is to hide the addresses
inside the VI and get ready for another example that will use a CIN to access the
DPR numeric data.
The example operates the same as the previous one except that a large number
of controls for defining the M-Variables have been reduced to a single cluster as
shown in the panel.
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The handling of the five VIs in the earlier example diagram is reduced to a
single VI.
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported RAM • 229
The diagram for the DPR Numeric Cluster VI is shown below. You can copy
this and modify it to support your own requirements. Note that the addresses are
specified by cluster constants. These can be created using the right mouse
button and selecting Create Constant.
230 • Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported RAM
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PmacDPRNumericCINClusterExample
This example takes the previous example a little further and implements the
actual handling of DPR data using a CIN. This can be useful if you have many
data being transferred or have trouble maintaining dozens of
PmacDPRNumeric VIs or have special data handling requirements that benefit
from a CIN.
The diagram handling the 5 M-Variables in the example above are reduced to a
single CIN VI that will handle the reading and writing of the data with direct
PComm32 calls. To simplify development of these CINs, PmacDPR defines a
set of macros that make life very easy.
The code for the CIN is shown here. To use the macros include the file
PmacDPRNumericCINCluster.h located in PmacDPR.
#include "extcode.h"
// -- PmacDPRNumeric Macros -#include “PmacDPRNumericCINCluster.h"
#include <pmacu.h>
#include <dprrealt.h>
/* typedefs */
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Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported RAM • 231
typedef struct {
int32 M444_i32;
float64 M445_Dbl;
int32 M446_Mask_i32;
LVBoolean M446_XOR_OR;
LVBoolean M447_Bit;
LVBoolean M448_Bit;
} TD1;
typedef struct {
int32 M444_i32;
float64 M445_Dbl;
int32 M446_Bit_Field;
LVBoolean M447_Bit;
LVBoolean M448_Bit;
} TD2;
CIN MgErr CINRun(int32 *Device_Number_i32_0_, LVBoolean
*Set_Get_Bool_F_,
LVBoolean *Response_Available_Bool_F_,
TD1 *Input_DPR_Numeric_Cluster,
TD2 *Output_DPR_Numeric_Cluster) {
int32 DevNum = *Device_Number_i32_0_;
// -- Using the macros
PmacDPRNumericDWord (*Set_Get_Bool_F_,
0xE00,
Input_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M444_i32,
Output_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M444_i32);
PmacDPRNumericDouble(*Set_Get_Bool_F_,
0xE01,
Input_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M445_Dbl,
Output_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M445_Dbl);
PmacDPRNumericDWordMask(*Set_Get_Bool_F_,
0xE02,
Input_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M446_Mask_i32,
Input_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M446_XOR_OR,
Output_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M446_Bit_Field);
PmacDPRNumericDWordBit (*Set_Get_Bool_F_,
0xE03, 'X', 8,
Input_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M447_Bit,
Output_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M447_Bit);
PmacDPRNumericDWordBitTest (0xE04, 'Y', 8,
Output_DPR_Numeric_Cluster->M448_Bit);
PmacDPRNumericResponse(*Response_Available_Bool_F_,
*Set_Get_Bool_F_);
// -return noErr;
}
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As with all CIN nodes, LabVIEW writes the function declaration and defines the
parameter types. The macros require the device number be defined DevNum
whatever it is in your parameter list. The macros perform a conditional test for
read/write operations, address calculations, and PComm32 operations.
Generally the macros require an address and a pointer to the input and output
elements of the cluster. Bit operations require the bit number and Mask or Bit
Field operations require the mask, field mask, and XOR/OR operator. The
actual C-code for the example contains the macros and their actual Ccounterparts to illustrate the operations performed. If you’ve followed the
examples so far, the operation of the macros will be obvious.
PmacDPRNumericSlaveExample
This example uses PmacDPRNumeric and PmacDPRRealTime capabilities to
build an application that allows the user to move a 2-axis X-Y table with the
mouse. To accomplish this the motion program shown below uses DPR mapped
M501 and M502 to define the target position for motors 3 and 4. M500 is a
Boolean used to control a loop that breaks the target position into a set of
smaller moves. The program is encapsulated in a VI for easy use.
; USE CS &3
&3
#3->10x
#4->10y
; -- These are DPRAM mapped target coordinates
M501->F:$DE06
M502->F:$DE07
; X coordinate
; Y coordinate
; -- RUN BOOL
M500->Y:$DE05,8,1
; -open prog 61 clear
;hm1..4
i13 = 100
P209 = 1000
P211 = 10000
; Vector distance per increment
; Starting positions
M501 = 10000
P212 = 10000
M502 = 10000
tm10
; -- Move tracking
while (M500=1)
P221 = M501 - P211
P222 = M502 - P212
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
; Cartesian distance to go
Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported RAM • 233
P200 = sqrt(P221 * P221 + P222 * P222)
if (P200 > P209)
; If longer than increment
P200 = P209 / P200
; Fraction of distance
P211 = P211 + P221 * P200
P212 = P212 + P222 * P200
else
P211 = M501
P212 = M502
endif
x(P211) y(P212)
endwhile
close
The panel for the example is shown below. When the VI is running, and Enable
Track is checked, the values in DPR Numeric Slave Cluster - M500, M501, and
M502 - are continuously written to memory for use by the motion program.
Checking Enable Poll sets M500 TRUE so that clicking the Program Run button
enables the program loop. If you don’t check the box prior to starting the
motion program, the loop in the motion program will not execute. The Close
Loop button is provided to close the servo loops if they are not closed or the
initial rapid move to home results in a fatal following error.
The indicators on the middle left of the panel display the actual X/Y motor
positions as retrieved by PmacDPRRealTimeMotors. The Yellow cursor in
the plot is the target position for the move and determines the values of M501
and M502. When you click the Yellow cursor and drag it to a new position the
target position for the move is set and executed by the motion program. The
Green worm will begin moving toward the Yellow cursor with the Red cursor
bringing up the rear.
The diagram for the example is similar to those already discussed. The motion
program wrapper VI on top handles the program execution. Below this is the VI
handling the DPR Numeric cluster containing M500-M502.
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The query for motor positions used to update the plot is provided by
PmacDPRRealTimeMotors. The configuration of this capability is done
outside the execution loop. When the motor positions are fetched, array is
indexed, the position are unbundled, converted to CS units (multiplied by 0.1),
used to update the panel indicators, and bundled into and X-Y point for the X-Y
Chart buffer. Remember that PmacDPRRealTimeMotors does not perform CS
conversions. We can also use the PmacDPRFixedBack VIs to obtain the motor
position in CS units.
Target position generation for the move is handled by retrieving the position of
Cursor 0 from a chart attribute node, and updating the values in the DPR
Numeric Slave Cluster. These values will be written by
PmacDPRNumericSlaveCluster as long as Enable Track is TRUE.
PmacDPRVarBack
PMAC’s Variable Background data buffer mechanism allows you to specify 128
memory addresses to copy from their native PMAC locations to DPR locations
when requested. Whereas the Fixed Background data buffer allows access to
predefined registers and locations, the Variable Background mechanism allows
to you to access anything. PComm32 supplies a set of routines to read the
copied data from DPR and convert them into legitimate Intel formats. This
process hides the required handshaking between PMAC and the host to avoid
collisions when accessing DPR. PComm32 supports a limited ability to write to
DPR from the host and copy this data to its native location.
PmacDPRVarBack provides hooks for this interface but does not currently
implement this capability.
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported RAM • 235
To minimize your work as a developer and simplify the interface the
PmacDPRVarBack collection of VIs provides three VIs. One to configure one
or more Variable Background buffers, one to fetch its contents, and one to
buffer the data into vectors. To aid you in specifying items the configuration VI
uses the PmacGatherSpec cluster that forms the heart of the PmacAddress and
PmacGather collections.
The gathering of Variable Background data is not controlled by the servo clock
therefore the data items might be taken at slightly different servo times.
PMAC’s Variable Background mechanism is very sophisticated and an integral
part of PMAC. We will cover some specific issues you will encounter and must
be aware of when using it.
PmacDPRVarBackExample
The following example demonstrates the configuration of two Variable
Background data buffers. This allows you to build buffers that support your
specific requirements. For instance, you can declare one buffer for each motor
and coordinate system in your system. You can then declare another one for
each I/O device, and one to monitor a collection of miscellaneous items. You
can gather some of them as vectors, some for indicator clusters, and some for
background computations. The only limitation is that you don’t declare more
than 128 items between all of them.
The panel for the example, shown below, allows you to define two independent
buffers. The support clusters and such are collected into boxes in the bottom left
quadrant. Each buffer has a VBGB Status Cluster containing information about
the individual buffer, it location in DPR, and the entire pool of buffers. To the
right of this are an Input Array and an Output Array. The Output Array contains
the data for the specified buffer. The Input Array is provided but, as noted, not
supported. Below these items is a Write check box (not supported), an Enabled
check box, and to indicators. On the far right are a few collections of buttons to
control the associated PLC and motion program. You have encountered these
several times.
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To run the example you need to specify a set of items to gather. This is done
using the PmacGatherSelect cluster on the top left. The operation of this is
detailed in the section on PmacTerminalGather. As shown in the example,
there are three items defined. To create a Variable Background buffer, select the
items you want in the buffer and check an Enabled box. In the example, the
upper set was created to handle these three items. The lower set was created to
handle P44 and P45 that are generated by the PLC program.
The VBGB Status Cluster maintains information about the individual buffers
and the entire pool. Refer the VI Reference for details of each item. Here we
will discuss what these clusters show. The top status cluster item VBGDB
indicates that it is buffer 2 whereas the bottom cluster indicates it is buffer 1.
Buffers are assigned in the order created. Num Entries indicates that the top
buffer has three items (as defined by the Gather Spec) and the bottom buffer has
2 items. When the first buffer was created the Total number of entries was 2.
After the second buffer is created, the Total number of entries is 5. Start
Address indicates the start of the buffer in DPR. This is the last location
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Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported RAM • 237
reserved by DPR. The Start Address of the first buffer created indicates the first
address you can use for DPR Numeric access.
Notes on the use of PmacDPRVarBack
Variable Background buffers should be created AFTER all other DPR
mechanisms have been enabled. PComm32 might and sometimes does moves
things around when you start reconfiguring DPR. If you create more than one
buffer DO NOT delete a previously created buffer. Again, PComm32 will shift
things around and it is very likely that your remaining buffers will contain
garbage. If you do delete a buffer you should delete and recreate the remaining
buffers. You are encouraged to try this using the example. If you un-check the
Enabled box that buffer is deleted. Chances are VERY HIGH that the remaining
buffer will give you garbage data. Un-check the remaining buffers and then recheck them. Things will now behave as expected.
The diagram for this example demonstrates how easy it is to create and access a
buffer. At the top left is the VI to handle the Gather Select Cluster. Check the
section on PmacTerminalGather if you have questions. On the top right are the
PLC and motion program handlers.
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There are two almost identical configurations to handle the two buffers. Each
consists of a configuration VI PmacDPRVarBackConfig and
PmacDPRVarBack to actually fetch the data. The configuration VI requires a
Gather Spec Cluster and produces a VBGB Specification Cluster for the handler.
The VBGB Status Cluster is not required by other VIs but serves a useful
diagnostic purpose.
•
PmacDPRVarBackConfig - This VI creates a set of Address Items
specified by Gather Spec Cluster using the DPR Variable Background when
Enable is TRUE. The VI produces a VBGB Status Cluster with relevant
information about this buffer and a VBGB Specification Cluster containing
information required to actually fetch the data using PmacDPRVarBack and
PmacDPRVarBackVectors.
Operation is disabled when Enable is FALSE. Output Enable is TRUE
when operation is enabled. The state is maintained by the VI. This VI can
be used multiple times to create sets of VBGB Address Items. See the
documentation for limitations on how many sets can be created and their
size.
Variable Background buffers allow you to gather the contents of any memory
location, X, Y, DP, etc. To handle all data types the data fetched from DPR is
all treated as a double. This allows PmacDPRVarBack to treat the fetched
items as an array rather than have VIs to handle each type or implement a
complex typing mechanism. If you need to access bits from a particular item,
index the array, convert it to an integer, and use it as you wish. The Input Array
and R/W inputs are not supported yet.
•
PmacDPRVarBack - DPR Variable Background buffer operation is
enabled this VI can be used to fetch the data specified during the
configuration. The input Enabled can be used to enable and disable the
actual fetch. The Default, un-wired, condition is TRUE. When New
Output is TRUE Output Value Array contains the most recent background
data. When Enabled is FALSE Output Value Array contains the last valid
data even though New Output is FALSE.
The Write/Read and Input Value Array inputs are not currently functional.
Future releases may implement this capability.
Note on Supporting PmacDPRVarBack CINs
The CINs to support this collection of VIs are significantly more involved than
the previous collections. We will not cover these in the manual. If you
understand those presented earlier and understand the information covered here,
you can examine the C-code for yourself. The comments provide enough
information if you desire to tackle changes yourself.
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
Chapter 11 - DPR - Dual Ported RAM • 239
PmacDPRVarBackVectorExample
This example replaces PmacDPRVarBack with PmacDPRVarBackVectors.
It use is almost identical to PmacDPRVarBackExample. The only difference
is that the bottom buffer has a PmacGatherSpec cluster defined as constant
containing entries for P44 and P45. Therefore, you do not have to specify the
Address Items. Simply check its Enabled box. The diagram is not presented for
the same reasons.
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Chapter 12 - Interrupts
Basics
This Chapter documents an emerging interface to PMAC’s interrupt system. The
information presented here is preliminary and not supported yet.
PmacInterruptExamp
To run this example check the Enable box. Interrupt Mask defines which sources are
enabled. The default value of zero enables all sources. The In Position flag
generates an interrupt and is a good test. When an interrupt occurs the Interrupt
Occurred LED is on and the count and source update.
ALWAYS disable interrupts when you application halts.
•
PmacInterruptConfig - When Enable is TRUE enable interrupts. Indicate the
availability of a handler by the output Enabled. When FALSE disable
interrupts. ALWAYS disable interrupts when you application is not executing.
Interrupt Occurred is TRUE whenever this VI checks the handler and
determines an interrupt has occurred. Interrupt Count indicates the number of
interrupts since the last service. Interrupt Source specifies which source. See
PMAC User Manuals for details.
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Chapter 12 - Interrupts • 241
242 • Chapter 12 - Interrupts
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
Glossary of Terms
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
Glossary of Terms • 243
Index
Special options for serial · 43
Digital Inputs and Outputs
Input Source/Sink Control · 185
Optio n for Sourcing Outputs · 185
Software Access · 185
Standard Sinking Outputs · 185
Display
Resolution · 10
DPR
Data Buffers · 28
Requirements · 9
VIs to access · 32
E
.
Position Capture Control "Encoder I-Variable 2" for Encoder
n (I902; I907 · 153
Flag Select Control "Encoder I-Variable 3" for Encoder n
(I903; I908 · 153
Encoder/Flag I-variables · 153
Encoders · 30
Error
Automatic handling · 46
Dialog box · 46
H
Buffer length · 44
limitations · 47
Help facilities
LabVIEW On -line help · 16
Home Command · 153
Home Flag · 153
Home Speed for Motor x (Ix23) · 153
Homing · 30
Homing from a PLC Program · 155
Homing Into a Limit Switch · 155
Homing Search Move · 152, 153
Action on Trigger · 153
Home Command · 153
Homing from a PLC Program · 155
Homing Into a Limit Switch · 155
Storing the Home Position · 154
Zero -Move Homing · 155
Homing Speed · 153
C
I
Clusters
Limits and types · 59
Code Interface Nodes · 32
Communication Buffers
Maximum length · 20
Compare Control Bits · 173
Connecting PMAC
Digital Inputs and Outputs · 184
CONTROL-F Command · 14, 16, 26, 43, 44, 52, 55, 72
Input/Output
Compare -Equals Outputs · 183
Installation
Configuring PMACPanel · 17
Driver Configuration · 11
LabVIEW Configuration · 15
Required Steps · 10
I-Variable
Numeric types · 58
Organization · 57
I-Variables · 153
Communication configuration · 45
Required Communication Configuration · 19
Specific
Ix03 · 152
Ix05 · 68, 81
A
Addressing
Coordinate Systems · 52
Motors · 52
Applications
Sample · 32
Axis Definition Statements · 152, 153
B
D
Data gathering · 32
Development Tools · 31
Device configuration
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
Index • 245
Ix07 · 163
Ix08 · 133, 152, 163
Ix09 · 69, 82, 134, 135, 220
Ix10 · 154
Ix13 · 154
Ix14 · 154
Ix19 · 153
Ix20 · 153
Ix21 · 153
Ix22 · 193
Ix23 · 153
Ix25 · 59, 79, 153, 155, 157, 159, 162
Ix26 · 153, 155, 164, 167
Ix30 · 163
Ix60 · 134, 135
VIs to access · 29
J
Jogging and Homing Accele ration Time for Motor x (Ix20) ·
153
Jogging and Homing S-Curve Time for Motor x (Ix21) · 153
Jogging Moves · 153
JOPTO Port · 184
L
LabVIEW
Clusters · 37
Dataflow · 34
General Techniques · 34
Installing PMACPanel View · 15
Persistent VI State · 36
Reentra ncy · 35
Sequences · 34, 35
Supported versions · 24
Switch action · 36
M
Manual Layout · 1
Maximum Permitted Motor Jog Acceleration for Motor x
(Ix19) · 153
Memory
VIs to access · 29
Microsoft
Visual C++ 5.0 · 9
Multi-threading · 43
M -Variable Definitions · 185
M -Variables · 173, 185
N
Naming Conventions · 39
NI-DAQ · 32
Numeric conversions
246 • Index
VIs to support · 52
Numeric Data Types · 27, 29
P
P (Report Motor Position) · 14
PComm32 · 10, 32
PMACPanel Interfaces · See PMACPanel Organization
Pewin32 · 23
PLC
VIs to access · 31
Plotting
VIs to access · 32
PmacAcc · 30
PmacAccMachineInput8 · 98, 99
PmacAccMachineOutput8 · 98, 99, 146
PmacAccMachineInput8 · 98
PmacAddress · 32, 127, 131, 236
PmacAddressAdd · 131
PmacAddressDelete · 132
PmacAddressMotors · 131, 132, 133, 135
PmacButt
PmacButtGetBool · 53
PmacButtGetDbl · 53
PmacButtGetLong · 53
PmacButtGetShort · 53
PmacButtGetStr · 50, 51, 53
PmacButtGetULong · 53
PmacButtGetUShort · 53
PmacButtSendStr · 50, 51, 53, 72
PmacButton · 50, 53
PmacButtons · 29
PmacCIN · 32
PmacCINBase · 197
PmacComm · 29, 44
PmacCommAppend · 48
PmacCommBuffer · 48
PmacCommGetBuffer · 20, 47
PmacCommGetStr · 19, 20, 44, 47
PmacCommGlobal · 48
PmacCommRespStr · 19, 20, 44, 46, 47, 51, 75, 108
PmacCommSendStr · 19, 44, 75
PmacCommGetStr · 46
PmacCoord · 30
PmacCoordColor · 70, 94
PmacCoordCurrent · 112
PmacCoordDef · 84, 91
PmacCoordIVar · 94
PmacCoordMotor2Coord · 69
PmacCoordMotorDef · 91
PmacCoordMotorsToCoord · 83, 92
PmacCoordMotorToCoord · 83, 92, 94, 168
PmacCoordMotorToEncoder · 92
PmacCoordScale · 91
PmacCoordSpecify · 93
PmacCoordStat · 55, 95
PmacCoordStatProg · 95
PmacDAQ · 32
PmacDAQMove · 188, 189, 192, 193
PmacDAQSync · 191, 192
PmacDAQSyncServo · 191, 193
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
PmacDAQTrigger · 191, 192
PmacPosCompGen · 190
PmacDevice · 29
PmacDevClose · 42
PmacDevOpen · 17, 18, 20, 21, 26, 42, 43, 112, 201
PmacDocument · 33
PmacDPR
PmacDPR · 32
PmacDPRVarBack · 198
PmacDPRFixedBack · 201, 218, 219, 220, 235
PmacDPRFixedBackConfig · 220
PmacDPRFixedBackVectors · 198, 218, 221
PmacDPRMotorVecToCoord · 213
PmacDPRNumericCINCluster · 231
PmacDPRNumericDbl · 226
PmacDPRNumericDWord · 225
PmacDPRNumericDWordBit · 227
PmacDPRNumericDWordBitTest · 227
PmacDPRNumericDWordSetMask · 228
PmacDPRNumericSlaveCluster · 235
PmacDPRNumericSpec · 227
PmacDPRNumericWord · 226
PmacDPRRealTimeConfig · 205, 206
PmacDPRRealTimeExamp · 211, 213
PmacDPRRealTimeMotor · 202, 205, 208, 211, 216
PmacDPRRealTimeMotors · 202, 205, 206, 213, 234, 235
PmacDPRRealTimePVE · 205, 206
PmacDPRRealTimeServo · 211
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors · 211, 212, 213, 214, 217, 218
PmacDPRVarBack · 201, 235, 236, 238, 239, 240
PmacDPRVarBackConfig · 239
PmacDPRVarBackVectors · 240
PmacEncode
PmacPosCompSetup · 175
PmacEncoder · 30
PmacEncoderCaptureExamp · 170
PmacEncoderCompare · 179
PmacEncoderCompareConfig · 177
PmacEncoderCompareExamp · 176
PmacEncoderIVarCapture · 157, 158, 159, 171
PmacEncoderOffset · 155, 167, 168
PmacEncoderPositionExamp · 166
PmacEncoderRegADC · 181
PmacEncoderRegCapture · 181
PmacEncoderRegDAC · 181
PmacEncoderRegisters · 181
PmacEncoderRegServo · 169, 181
PmacEncoderRegStat · 181
PmacEncoderRegTime · 181
PmacEncoderStatFlags · 160
PmacEncoderToCoord · 168, 169
PmacEncoderToEncoder · 168
PmacEncoderTrigger · 171, 178, 179, 180
PmacPosCompGen · 175, 176, 178, 179, 180
PmacPosCompSetup · 175, 176, 178, 179
PmacFile · 31
PmacFileDatalog · 144, 146
PmacFileDatalogAppend · 145
PmacFileDatalogCreate · 145
PmacFileDatalogRead · 145
PmacGather · 32
PmacGatherCollect · 130
PmacGatherSelect · 127, 129, 132, 237
PmacGatherSetup · 129
PmacGatherSp ec · 236, 240
PmacGatherSpreadsheet · 130
PmacGatherStart · 130
PmacGatherStep · 130
PmacGatherStop · 130
PmacGlobal · 30
PmacGlobalBufferSize · 86, 89, 110
PmacGlobalControl · 86, 87, 88
PmacGlobalIVarComm · 86
PmacGlobalIVarMove · 87
PmacGlobalStat · 55
PmacGlobalStatBuffer · 87
PmacGlobalStatGather · 87
PmacGlobalStatWord1 · 89
PmacGlobalStatWord2 · 90
PmacHome · 30
PmacHomeComplete · 156, 162
PmacHomeExamp · 155
PmacHomeIVar · 155, 157, 171
PmacHomePLC1 · 164, 165
PmacHomeState · 162
PmacInc · 32
PmacIn terrupt
PmacInterruptConfig · 241
PmacInterruptExamp · 241
PmacIVar · 29
PmacIVar
PmacIVarGetLong · 59
PmacIVarBool · 59
PmacIVarDbl · 59
PmacIVarGetBool · 59
PmacIVarGetDbl · 59
PmacIVarGetLong · 58
PmacIVarGetShort · 59
PmacIVarLong · 58
PmacIVarSetBool · 59
PmacIVarSetDbl · 59
PmacIVarSetLong · 58
PmacIVarSetShort · 59
PmacIVarShort · 59
PmacMemory · 29
PmacMemoryGet · 62, 98
PmacMemoryGetBit · 62
PmacMemoryGetBits · 62
PmacMemoryRead · 62
PmacMemoryReadDbl · 63
PmacMemorySet · 63, 98, 99
PmacMemorySetBit · 63
PmacMemorySetBits · 63
PmacMemoryWrite · 62
PmacMemoryWriteDbl · 63, 64
PmacMotor · 30, 68, 73, 81, 89, 151
PmacMotorCurrent · 112
PmacMotorError · 69
PmacMotorIVarFlag · 79, 80, 157, 159
PmacMotorIVarMove · 78, 155
PmacMotorIVarPID · 78, 80
PmacMotorIVarSafety · 78, 79, 80, 155
PmacMotorJog · 74
PmacMotorJogControl · 38, 39, 71, 72, 73, 84, 114
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
Index • 247
PmacMotorLimitControl · 73, 160
PmacMotorPosition · 68
PmacMotorPVE · 70, 72, 73, 74, 82, 203
PmacMotorStat · 55, 76
PmacMotorStatJog · 37, 73, 76
PmacMotorStatLimit · 73, 160
PmacMotorVelocity · 69
PmacMotors · 30
PmacMotorPosition · 69
PmacMotorsCloseLoop · 128
PmacMotorsErrors · 82
PmacMotorsPlotSelect · 84, 85
PmacMotorsPositions · 81, 82, 84
PmacMotorsPVE · 82, 83, 84, 93
PmacMotorsVelocities · 82
PmacMotorsPlotSelect · 126
PMACPanel
Documentation · 33
Panel and VI pairs · 38
PMACPanel Organization · 28
Communication · 29
Device Management · 26, 29
Indicators, Controls, and VIs (ICVs) · 29
Program Compilation and Download · 27
Query/Response · 26, 29
PmacPLC · 31
PmacPLCExec · 113
PmacPLCSelect · 110, 112
PmacPlot · 32
PmacPlotXYChartBuffer · 126
PmacPQM · 31
PmacPQMArray · 139, 144
PmacPQMBool · 143
PmacPQMDbl · 143
PmacPQMExamp · 139, 146, 147, 148
PmacPQMLong · 142, 143
PmacPQMLong2Var · 144
PmacPQMShort · 143
PmacPQMVar2Long · 144
PmacPQMVariant · 143, 144, 146, 148
PmacProg
PmacProgDebug · 120
PmacProgEdit · 109, 112, 113
PmacProgExec · 120
PmacProgParse · 116
PmacProgRun · 139
PmacProgSelect · 110, 112
PmacProgram · 31
PmacProgSubVI · 136
PmacResp · 52
PmacRespGetBool · 53
PmacRespGetDbl · 52
PmacRespGetLong · 53, 59
PmacRespGetShort · 53
PmacRespGetULong · 53
PmacRespGetUShort · 53
PmacResponse · 29, 53, 59
PmacSetup · 33
PmacSubVI · 31
PmacPLCSubVI · 165
PmacProgSubVI · 118, 126, 136, 137, 144, 146, 148, 149
PmacProgSubVICreate · 117
248 • Index
PmacTerminal
PmacTerminal · 26, 31, 44, 102, 107, 109, 110, 114, 115,
167, 170, 176, 177
PmacTerminalCoordIVars · 102
PmacTerminalEdit · 102, 115, 118, 126, 136, 137, 139,
144, 146, 147, 165, 176
PmacTerminalExecute · 102, 118, 137
PmacTerminalGather · 102, 122, 126, 237, 238
PmacTerminalGlobal · 103
PmacTerminalJog · 102, 103, 105, 114
PmacTerminalMenu · 104, 105, 106, 112, 122
PmacTerminalMotorIVars · 102
PmacTerminalMotors · 102, 122, 124, 125, 126
PmacTerminalMotorsX-Y · 102
PmacTest · 32
PmacTestCircle · 147
PmacTestCircles · 147
PmacTestExamp · 147, 149
PmacTestPQM1 · 147
PmacTestPQM1Panel · 148, 150
PmacTestPQM2 · 147
PmacTutor
PmacTutor
10 · 125
6 · 78
7 · 83, 114
PmacTutor1 · 42
PmacTutor10 · 81, 122
PmacTutor11 · 86
PmacTutor12 · 91
PmacTutor13 · 94
PmacTutor14 · 97
PmacTutor15 · 99
PmacTutor2 · 44
PmacTutor2a · 47
PmacTutor3 · 47, 50, 52, 53
PmacTutor4 · 52, 55, 59
PmacTutor5 · 55, 76
PmacTutor6 · 57
PmacTutor6b · 61
PmacTutor7 · 68
PmacTutor8 · 73
PmacTutor9 · 78
PmacTutor1 · 41
PmacTutor2 · 41
PmacTutorApp · 41
PmacTutorial · 32
PmacTutorSub · 41
PmacUtility · 33
Position
Querying · 52
Position Capture · 30
Position Extension in Software · 151
Position Loop Feedback Address for Motor x (Ix03) · 152
Position Proces sing
Software Position Extension · 151
Position Scale Factor for Motor x (Ix08) · 152
Position-Capture Function · 153, 155, 164, 169
Setting the Trigger Condition · 153
Using for Homing · 153
Using in User Program · 169
Position-Compare Function
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
Compare Co ntrol Bits · 173
Directly Triggering External Action · 175
Preloading the Compare Position · 173
Required M -Variables · 173
Position-Compare Outputs
PMAC-Lite · 183
PMAC-PC · 183
PMAC-STD · 184
PMAC-VME · 183
PQM Variables
VIs to access · 31
Preloading the Compare Position · 173
Programs
VIs to access · 31
PTalk · 23
PTalk Active X · 24
Querying · 53
VI Compilation · 16
Z
Homing · 155
Zero -Move Homing · 155
S
Safety
Electrical · 4
Motor Movement · 4
Program download · 3
Serial communication · 43
Servo Interrupt Time Variable (I10) · 14
Sinking Inputs · 185
Sinking Outputs · 185
Sourcing Inputs · 185
Sourcing Outputs · 185
Status
Querying · 55
Storing the Home Position · 154
Supported PMAC Models · 7
Synchronizing To External Events
Position-Capture · 153
Position-Compare · 172
Synchronous M -Variable Assignment · 185
T
Technical Support · 5
Terminal Conventions · 40
Triggering · 30
Triggering External Action · 175
Trouble Shooting
Driver Communication · 20
Tutorials · 32, 41
Accessing PMAC · 42
Communicaiton logging · 47
I-Variable access · 57
Numeric responses · 52
Query/Response · 44
Sending Commands · 50, 52
Status · 55
V
Velocity
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0 PMACPanel User Manual
Index • 249
PMAC Motion Control for LabVIEW 5.0
PMACPanel VI Reference
By Delta Tau Data Systems, Inc.
Contents
Chapter 13 - VI Reference
3
Basics ..........................................................................................................................................................3
PmacAcc.....................................................................................................................................................4
VIs ...............................................................................................................................................5
PmacAddress .............................................................................................................................................6
VIs ...............................................................................................................................................6
Indicator and Control Clusters................................................................................................8
PmacButton................................................................................................................................................8
VIs ...............................................................................................................................................8
PmacCIN..................................................................................................................................................12
PmacComm..............................................................................................................................................12
VIs .............................................................................................................................................12
Indicator and Control Clusters..............................................................................................15
PmacCoord...............................................................................................................................................16
VIs .............................................................................................................................................16
Indicator and Control Clusters..............................................................................................22
PmacDAQ................................................................................................................................................36
PmacDevice .............................................................................................................................................36
VIs .............................................................................................................................................36
PmacDPR.................................................................................................................................................37
VIs .............................................................................................................................................37
Indicator and Control Clusters..............................................................................................54
PmacEncoder...........................................................................................................................................67
VIs .............................................................................................................................................67
Indicator and Control Clusters..............................................................................................77
PmacFile ...................................................................................................................................................86
VIs .............................................................................................................................................87
Indicator and Control Clusters..............................................................................................92
PmacGather..............................................................................................................................................93
VIs .............................................................................................................................................93
Indicator and Control Clusters..............................................................................................97
PmacGlobal..............................................................................................................................................99
VIs .............................................................................................................................................99
Indicator and Control Clusters............................................................................................102
PmacHome .............................................................................................................................................117
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................117
Indicator and Control Clusters............................................................................................119
PmacIVar................................................................................................................................................133
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................133
PmacMemory ........................................................................................................................................139
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................139
PmacMotor.............................................................................................................................................143
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................143
Indicator and Control Clusters............................................................................................151
PmacMotors...........................................................................................................................................178
PMACPanel VI Reference
Contents • i
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................178
Indicator and Control Clusters............................................................................................181
PmacPLC................................................................................................................................................182
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................182
Indicator and Control Clusters............................................................................................187
PmacPlot.................................................................................................................................................188
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................188
PmacPQM ..............................................................................................................................................189
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................189
Indicator and Control Clusters............................................................................................195
PmacProgram ........................................................................................................................................197
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................198
Indicator and Control Clusters............................................................................................204
PmacResponse.......................................................................................................................................210
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................210
PmacSubVI ............................................................................................................................................212
VIs ...........................................................................................................................................212
Appendix A - Compiling CINs Using Microsoft Visual C++
215
Introduction............................................................................................................................................215
How do I Compile a Code Interface Node (CIN) using Visual C++ 5.0? ..................................215
ii • Contents
Glossary of Terms
219
Index
220
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference
Basics
This brief explanation of PMACPanel’s organization will help you to get the
information you need quickly and painlessly as well as help you plan your
application’s architecture.
The PMACPanel library, contained in the directory PMACPanel.lib, is divided into
five basic categories as illustrated in the following figure. These categories provide
an increasing level of capability as you progress from the lower levels to the higher
levels.
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 3
PMACPanel Directory
Organization
DPR and
Other Tools
Sample Applications \PmacTest
\PmacTutor
\PmacDAQ
Program Development \PmacProgram Data Gathering
Encapsulation Tools \PmacPLC
Graphical Tools
\PmacPQM
\PmacFile
\PmacTerminal
Global ICVs
Accessory
ICVs
Coordinate
System ICVs
Miscellaneous
Utilities
\PmacSetup
\PmacUtility
\PmacDocument
\PmacAcc
Query
Interfaces
\PmacGather
\PmacAddress
\PmacPlot
Motor ICVs \PmacMotor
\PmacMotors
\PmacGlobal
\PmacCoord
\PmacCIN
\PmacDPR
\PmacInterrupt
\PmacSetup
\PmacSubVI
Position Capture- \PmacEncoder
Triggering ICVs \PmacHome
\PmacResponse
\PmacButton
Device Management
and Communication
\PmacDevice
\PmacComm
\PmacIVar
\PmacMemory
ICVs =
Indicators
Controls
VIs
PComm32
PMAC
Within each category are several sub-directories containing collections of indicators,
controls, and VIs (ICVs) that provide capabilities to make your application
development task easier. The VIs in each sub-directory follow a naming convention
that makes them easier to locate. For example, in the directory \PmacCoord all VIs
are named PmacCoord …. The names of VIs in a given sub-directory may have
shortened names to make them a little easier to fit on screens and such. For example,
VIs in \PmacResponse are shortened to PmacResp…. The collections of VIs in
each category implement most commonly used capabilities and generally have
examples to demonstrate their use. The examples will have the word Examp or
Example at the end of their name. The remaining chapters cover numerous tutorial
exercises and examples to demo nstrate their use.
PmacAcc
\PmacAcc - PMAC has numerous accessories that are used to provide digital I/O,
analog I/O, and control capabilities. This includes the ACC16D front panel and the
4 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
alphanumeric display. This collection provides basic ICVs that access the memory
mapped data used by these accessories.
VIs
PmacAccMachineInput8
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Machine Input Port contents. Response
Available will be TRUE to indicate the Outputs contain the value. If Set\Get is
TRUE set the Machine Input Port using Input Value. Response Available will be
FALSE and the outputs default to Input Value.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Value u8 (0) Input Value for Set operation
Set/Get Bool (F) Set Machine Input Port when TRUE. Get
Machine Input Port when FALSE or unwired.
Output Value u8 (0) Value of Machine Input Port during Get
or Set operation.
Output Bool Array 8 Boolean Array representation of
Machine Input Port during Get or Set operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
PmacAccMachineOutput8
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Machine Output Port contents. Response
Available will be TRUE to indicate the Outputs contain the value. If Set\Get is
TRUE set the Machine Output Port using Input Value. Response Available will be
FALSE and the outputs default to Input Value.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Value i32 Input Value for Set operation
Set/Get Bool (F) Set Machine Output Port when TRUE. Get
Machine Output Port when FALSE or unwired.
Output Bool Array 8 Boolean Array representation of
Machine Output Port during Get or Set operation.
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 5
Machine Output Port during Get or Set operation.
Output Value u8 (0) Value of Machine Output Port during
Get or Set operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
PmacAddress
\PmacAddress - A collection of tools for specifying addresses, scale factors, and
descriptions for gathering. Variables not already accessible from PMACPanel can
easily be added to the tables.
VIs
PmacAddressAdd
Check to see if the item specified by Address Item Cluster already exists in Input
Address Item Array. If it already exists do not add it. If it does not exist add the
cluster to Output Address Item Array.
Input Address Item Array Array of Address Item clusters to
add Address Item to.
Address Item Cluster Specify a description,
address, and scale factor for a Address Item
Address Item Cluster Specify a description, address, and
scale factor for a Address Item
Address Item Description Text description of
Address Item
Address Item Address Address of Address Item
Address Item Scale Scale factor for Address Item
Output Address Item Array Array of Address Item clusters
Address Item is added to if it doesn't already exist.
Address Item Cluster Specify a description,
address, and scale factor for a Address Item
6 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
PmacAddressDelete
Locate and remove the Address Item Cluster specified by Selection Index to Delete
from the Input Address Item Array.
Selection Index to Delete i32 Ring selection index for to
delete from table
Input Address Item Array Array of Address Item clusters to
delete Address Item indexed by Selection Index to Delete
from.
Address Item Cluster Specify a description,
address, and scale factor for a Address Item
Output Address Item Array Array of Address Item clusters
after indexed Address Item is deleted.
Address Item Cluster Specify a description,
address, and scale factor for a Address Item
PmacAddressMotors
This VI maintains a table defining 29 of the most common Address Items. If Input
Select String is the empty string the VI produces Menu String Array describing the
defined Address Items. This should be used to set the items in a Menu or Text ring
control. Selection Index and Motor Number are provided by rings and define the
desired item and the motor number used to compute an address for the specified
item. The computed item is contained in Address Item Cluster. For a description of
this computation see the reference section and the memory map contained in the
PMAC Software Reference Manual.
Input Select String String to select entry in Translation Table
Selection Index i32 Ring selection index for Translation
Table
Motor Number i32 Used to address a specific motor for
translating address
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Menu String Array String array for setting menu or text
rings with Translation Table items
Selection Found Bool TRUE when a selection is found and
Gather Address Cluster can be used
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 7
Address Item Cluster Specify a description, address, and
scale factor for the selected Address Item
Address Item Description Text description of
Address Item
Address Item Address Address of Address Item
Address Item Scale Scale factor for Address Item
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacAddressItem
This cluster is used to define a Address Item's text description, address, and scale
factor.
Address Item Cluster Specify a description, address, and
scale factor for a Address Item
Address Item Description Text description of
Address Item
Address Item Address Address of Address Item
Address Item Scale Scale factor for Address Item
Address Item Type Enumerated type defining type
of raw data
PmacButton
\PmacButton - In most user interfaces queries are sent to PMAC as the result of
Boolean user actions and conditions. This group of VIs send command strings to
request responses when an associated LabVIEW Boolean condition is TRUE.
VIs
PmacButtGetBool
Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a response when Button State is
TRUE. When Response Available is TRUE Response Bool contains the response.
If Response Available is FALSE Response Bool defaults to FALSE.
8 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
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Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Button State Bool Command String is sent when TRUE
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when an output response
to Command String is valid
Response Bool (F) Formatted response to Command String
when Button State is TRUE
PmacButtGetDbl
Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a response when Button State is
TRUE. When Response Available is TRUE Response Double contains the response.
If Response Available is FALSE Response Double defaults to 0.0.
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Button State Bool Command String is sent when TRUE
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when an output response
to Command String is valid
Response Double (0.00) Formatted response to Command
String when Button State is TRUE
PmacButtGetLong
Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a response when Button State is
TRUE. When Response Available is TRUE Response i32 contains the response. If
Response Available is FALSE Response i32 defaults to 0.
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 9
Button State Bool Command String is sent when TRUE
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when an output response
to Command String is valid
Response i32 (0) Formatted response to Command String
when Button State is TRUE
PmacButtGetShort
Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a response when Button State is
TRUE. When Response Available is TRUE Response i16 contains the response. If
Response Available is FALSE Response i16 defaults to 0.
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Button State Bool Command String is sent when TRUE
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when an output response
to Command String is valid
Response i16 (0) Formatted response to Command String
when Button State is TRUE
PmacButtGetStr
Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a response when Button State is
TRUE. When Response Available is TRUE Response String contains the response.
If Response Available is FALSE Response String defaults to the empty string.
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Button State Bool Command String is sent when TRUE
Response String ("") Formatted response to Command
String when Button State is TRUE
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when an output response
to Command String is valid
10 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
PmacButtGetULong
Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a response when Button State is
TRUE. When Response Available is TRUE Response u32 contains the response. If
Response Available is FALSE Response u32 defaults to 0.
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Button State Bool Command String is sent when TRUE
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when an output response
to Command String is valid
Response u32 (0) Formatted response to Command String
when Button State is TRUE
PmacButtGetUShort
Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a response when Button State is
TRUE. When Response Available is TRUE Response u16 contains the response. If
Response Available is FALSE Response u16 defaults to 0.
Command String Command String
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Button State Bool Button State
Response Available Bool (F) Output Valid
Response u16 (0) Double Output Value
PmacButtSendStr
Send Command String to PMAC when Button State is TRUE. Response Available
is TRUE when PMAC has processed the command.
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 11
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Button State Bool Command String is sent when TRUE
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Command String
is sent to PMAC
PmacCIN
The VIs in this collection are templates for Code Interface Node development. See
Chapter 10 for details.
PmacComm
\PmacComm - Provide the ability to send on-line ASCII command strings and data
to PMAC and receive ASCII responses from PMAC. Error handling and the ability
to buffer communication for analysis and future reference are provided at this level.
VIs
PmacCommAppend
Copy Command String and Response String to the last communication items in
PmacCommGlobal. If Logging Enabled is TRUE they are also appended to the
Communication Log.
Command String Last on-line Command String sent to
PMAC by PmacCommSendString or PmacCommRespStr.
Response String Last response received from PMAC in
response to Command String.
PmacCommBuffer
When Log Enable is TRUE communication logging is enabled. Log Enabled Bool,
Log String, and Num Commands reflect the state of the log buffer when logging is
enabled. Log String is the empty string, Num Commands = -1, and Log Enabled is
FALSE when logging is disabled. When Log Empty is TRUE the log is emptied.
Log Enable Bool Enable logging.
Log Empty Bool Empty the log buffer
Log String ("") Contents of the Log Buffer when Log
Enabled is TRUE. Empty string otherwise.
12 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Enabled is TRUE. Empty string otherwise.
Num Commands i32 (-1) Number of commands in the Log
buffer when Log Enabled is TRUE. -1 otherwise.
Log Enabled Bool (F) TRUE when Logging is enabled
PmacCommError
Parse Input String for PMAC ERR codes. This requires proper communication IVariable configuration - see the PMACPanel manual. If an ERR code is found it is
decoded and a modal dialog is displayed telling you the command that caused the
error, a description of the error, and possible remedies. The user can decide to Abort
execution of the application VI or ignore the error and Continue. With or without
errors Output String is a copy of Input String after parsing.
If an error is found Error Bool is TRUE. Error Number and Error Message contain
the error code and text description of the error. If no error is found Error Bool is
FALSE. Error Number = -1 and Error Message is "No Error".
Input String PMAC response strings to parse for ERR codes
Output String Input String after parsing for ERR codes
Error Message String ("") ERR description for found errors
Error Number i32 PMAC ERR code if error is found. -1 if
no error.
Error Bool (F) TRUE when an ERR code is found in Input
String
PmacCommGetBuffer
Check if PMAC has data available. When Response Available is TRUE Response
String contains all available data. When Response Available is FALSE Response
String is the empty string. Responses are not parsed for PMAC ERR codes.
This VI is used by PmacCommGetResponse and PmacCommGetStr to retrieve very
large response buffers. These two VIs are limited by PComm32 to responses of 256
characters whereas this VI is not. You will not generally use this VI.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Response String ("") Extended response buffer retrieved
from PMAC
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 13
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when to Response String
is valid
PmacCommGetStr
Check if PMAC has data available. When Response Available is TRUE Response
String contains all available data. When Response Available is FALSE Response
String is the empty string. Responses are parsed for PMAC ERR codes and flagged
with a modal dialog.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Response String ("") Unsolicited PMAC data
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when to Response String
is valid
PmacCommRespStr
Send Command String to PMAC and wait for a response. If Command String is the
empty string nothing is sent. Response Available is TRUE when Response String
contains response data. When Response Available is FALSE Response String is the
empty string. Responses are parsed for PMAC ERR codes and flagged with a modal
dialog.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Response String ("") PMAC response to Command String
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when to Response String
is valid
PmacCommSendStr
Send Command String to PMAC. If Command String is the empty string nothing is
sent. The output Device Number is a copy of input Device Number to allow
sequencing of commands to PMAC.
Command String Command String
14 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Device Number i32 (0) Passed from input Device Number
after Command String is processed
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacCommGlobal
This cluster maintains the last communication with PMAC and logging capability
Pmac Communication Cluster This cluster maintains a log
of communication between PMACPanel and PMAC.
Command String Last on-line command sent to
PMAC
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 15
Response String Last response received from
PMAC
Communication Log String A multi-line buffer of
commands sent to PMAC and received from PMAC.
Num Commands i32 The number of commands sent
to PMAC and logged in the Communication Buffer.
Buffer Log Bool (F) When TRUE all
communication is appended and logged to the
Communication Log.
PmacCommLast
This cluster maintains a copy of the last communication with PMAC. It is used to
aid in error handling.
Last Pmac Communication Cluster This cluster maintains
a copy of the last on-line command sent to PMAC and
response received from PMAC.
Command String Last on-line command sent to
PMAC
Response String Last response received from
PMAC
PmacCoord
\PmacCoord - Monitor the execution of programs and definition of motor
coordinate systems. This information is required for the development of user
interfaces in which information is entered and displayed in coordinate system units
rather than encoder units.
VIs
PmacCoordColor
Output a color constant for coloring Numeric or Text controls in PMACPanel
indicator clusters for position, velocity, and following errors. The color is Orange
when Coordinate Define is TRUE and Blue when FALSE. It should be tied to an
attribute node for the desired control.
Coord Defined Bool The desired CS is defined.
Text Color u32 Color for setting attributes on controls and
indicators.
16 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
PmacCoordCurrent
Query PMAC for the currently addressed coordinate system. It is most generally
used in interactive development environments rather than a custom VI where you
want to address a specific CS.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Currently addressed coordinate
system in PMAC.
PmacCoordDef
Fetch the motor scaling definitions for the specified coordinate system and provide a
cluster for the PmacCoordDef indicator.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) CS Number to fetch the
definition for.
Coordinate System Definition Cluster
Definition Array Array of strings for Coordinate
System definitions
C.S. Defined Indicator specifying which CS is
defined
PmacCoordIVar
Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the I-Variables for the specified Coord Number are set. Otherwise they are fetched
from PMAC and provided by Output Coord I-Var Cluster with New Output TRUE.
Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
Coord Number i32 (1) Coordinate system number whose IVariables are addressed
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 17
Input Coord I-Var Cluster Input PmacCoordIVar cluster for
most common CS I-Variables
Set\Get Bool (F) When TRUE PMAC is set using Input
Coord I-Var Cluster. When FALSE Output Coord I-Var
Cluster contains the current PMAC definitions.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Coord I-Var
Cluster contains new data.
Output Coord I-Var Cluster Output PmacCoordIVar cluster
for most common CS I-Variables
PmacCoordMotorDef
Query PMAC for the definition of Motor Number in Coord Number. If the motor is
not defined in the specified CS Coord Definition is "Encoder", Coord Scale = 1.0,
and Coord Defined is FALSE. If the motor is defined in the specified CS Coord
Defined is TRUE, Coord Scale is the encoder to CS unit scale factor, and Coord
Definition is the definition (e.g. "#1->16000X").
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate system number we
expect the Motor Number to be assigned to.
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor number whose coordinate
system definition we are trying to determine.
Coord Defined Bool (F) TRUE if the specified motor is
defined in the specified CS.
Coord Definition String String defining the motor's
definition in the CS or "Encoder" if not defined.
Coord Scale Dbl (1.0) Encoder to CS unit scale factor for
motor. 1.0 if motor is not defined in CS.
PmacCoordMotorsToCoord
Generate an indicator cluster for PmacMotorsPVE.ctl. Input Value Double is an
array of positions, velocities, or following errors from VIs in the PmacMotors
collection. If Convert To Coord is TRUE fetch the CS definitions for the motors
specified in Coord Number and scale them to CS units. Motors not defined in Coord
Number are not scaled.
18 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Input Value Double Array Array of motor positions,
velocities, or following errors given in encoder counts by VIs
in PmacMotors to possibly convert to CS units.
Convert To Coord Bool Convert states for motors defined in
the specified CS to CS units.
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate number to use when
converting the array of motor states to CS units.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motors PVE Cluster The indicator cluster displays an array
of values for all PMAC motors. The array may be positions,
velocities, or following errors. The array of Boolean
indicators indicate which values are in CS units. The caption
specifies the displayed values as being in encoder counts or a
specific CS.
PmacCoordMotorToCoord
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to convert Input
Value from encoder counts to CS units. If the motor is not defined in the CS no
conversion is applied. If the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined
is TRUE and Output Value is scaled from encoder counts to CS units. Coord
Definition is a string specifying Output Value units as "Encoder" or the CS definition
of the motor.
Input Value Double Motor position, velocity, of following
error from PmacMotor VIs to possibly convert to CS units
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Output Value Double Input value in encoder units converted
to CS units if the motor is defined in the CS. Otherwise equal
to Input Value.
Coord Defined Bool If Motor Number is defined in Coord
Number and Convert Bool is TRUE this is TRUE.
Coord Definition String String defining the motor within the
CS. "Encoder" if not defined.
PmacCoordMotorToEncoder
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to convert Input
Value from CS units to encoder counts. If the motor is not defined in the CS no
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 19
conversions is applied. If the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined
is TRUE and Output Value is scaled from CS units to encoder counts.
Input Value Double Motor position, velocity, or following
error from PmacMotor VIs to possibly convert to encoder
units
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Output Value Double Input value in CS units converted to
encoder counts if the motor is defined in the CS. Otherwise
equal to Input Value.
Coord Defined Bool If Motor Number is defined in Coord
Number and Convert Bool is TRUE this is TRUE.
PmacCoordRunning
Determine whether there is a program running in Coord Number.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate system to check for
a running program
Program Running Bool (F) When TRUE there is a program
running in Coord Number.
PmacCoordScale
Query PMAC for the motors defined in Coord Number. The Coordinate System
Scale Cluster (PmacCoordScale.ctl) contains three arrays with the motor definition,
scale factor, and whether or not the motor is defined in Coord Number. The actual
query is only placed if Coord Number changes from a previous call.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) CS to fetch the definitions for
Coordinate System Scale Cluster
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PmacCoordStat
Query PMAC for the status of the CS specified by Coord Number. Report the two
status words as arrays of Booleans and unsigned 32 bit integers.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) CS to obtain status for
First Word 24 Element Bool Array 24 element Boolean
array containing first status word
Second Word 24 Element Bool Array 24 element Boolean
array containing second status word
First Word Binary Status u32 integer representation of first
word status
Second Word Binary Status u32 integer representation of
second word status
PmacCoordStatProg
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacCoordStatProg indicator containing the
status for Coord Number.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Coord Number i32 (1) CS to obtain status for
Coordinate System Status Program Cluster Cluster for
PmacCoordStatProg
PmacCoordStatWord1
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacCoordStat1 indicator containing the
status for Coord Number.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Number i32 (1) CS to obtain status for
Coordinate System Status Word 1 Cluster Cluster for
PmacCoordStat1
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 21
PmacCoordStat1
PmacCoordStatWord2
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacCoordStat2 indicator containing the
status for Coord Number.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Number i32 (1) CS to obtain status for
Coordinate System Status Word 2 Cluster Cluster for
PmacCoordStat2
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacCoordDef
Definitions for motor scaling in a given coordinate system are shown in this
indicator. The indicator accepts the cluster provided by the PmacCoordDef VI.
Coordinate System Definition Cluster
Definition Array Array of strings for Coordinate
System definitions
C.S. Defined Indicator specifying which CS is
defined
PmacCoordIVar
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying the most common
coordinate system I-Variables.
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Coordinate System I-Var Cluster Cluster for most common
CS I-Variables
ix87: Default t-A (mS) This parameter sets the
default time for commanded acceleration for
programmed blended LINEAR and CIRCLE mode
moves in coordinate system x. It also provides the
default segment time for SPLINE mode moves. The
first use of a TA statement in a program overrides
this value.
Even though this parameter makes is possible not to
specify acceleration time in the motion program, you
are strongly encouraged to use TA in the program
and not rely on this parameter, unless you must keep
to a syntax standard that does not support this (e.g.
RS-274 "G-Codes"). Specifying acceleration time in
the program along with speed and move modes
makes it much easier for later debugging.
If the specified S-curve time (see Ix88, below) is
greater than half the specified acceleration time, the
time used for commanded acceleration in blended
moves will be twice the specified S-curve time.
The acceleration time is also the minimum time for a
blended move; if the distance on a feedrate-specified
(F) move is so short that the calculated move time is
less than the acceleration time, or the time of a timespecified (TM) move is less than the acceleration
time, the move will be done in the acceleration time
instead. This will slow down the move
The acceleration time will be extended automatically
when any motor in the coordinate system is asked to
exceed its maximum acceleration rate (Ix17) for a
programmed LINEAR-mode move with I13=0 (no
move segmentation).
Make sure that the specified acceleration time (Ix87
or 2*Ix88) is greater than zero, even if you are
planning to rely on the maximum acceleration rate
parameters. A specified acceleration time of zero
will cause a divide-by-zero error. The minimum
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 23
specified time should be Ix87=1, Ix88-0.
ix88: Default t-S Curve (mS) This parameter set the
default time in each "half" of the "S" in S-curve
acceleration for programmed blended LINEAR and
CIRCLE mode moves in coordinate system x. It
does not affect SPLINE, PVT, or RAPID mode
moves. The first use of a TS statement in a program
overrides this value.
Even though this parameter makes is possible not to
specify acceleration time in the motion program, you
are strongly encouraged to use TS in the program and
not rely on this parameter, unless you must keep to a
syntax standard that does not support this (e.g. RS274 "G-Codes"). Specifying acceleration time in the
program along with speed and move modes makes it
much easier for later debugging.
If Ix88 is zero, the acceleration is constant
throughout the Ix87 time and the velocity profile is
trapezoidal. If Ix88 is greater than zero, the
acceleration will start at zero and linearly increase
through Ix88 time, the stay constant (for time TC)
until Ix87-Ix88 time, and linearly decrease to zero at
Ix87 time (that is Ix87=2Ix88 - TC). If Ix88 is equal
to Ix87/2, the entire acceleration will be spec in Scurve form (Ix88 values greater than Ix87/2 override
the Ix87 value; total acceleration time will be
2*Ix88).
The acceleration time will be extended automatically
when any motor in the coordinate system is asked to
exceed its maximum acceleration rate (Ix17) for a
programmed LINEAR-mode move with I13=0 (no
move segmentation).
Make sure the specified acceleration time (TA or
2*TS) is greater than zero, even if you are planning
to rely on the maximum acceleration rate parameters
(Ix17). A specified acceleration time of zero will
cause a divide-by-zero error. The minimum
specified time should be TA1 TS0.
ix89: Default Feedrate/t-M (see doc) This
parameter sets the default feedrate (commanded
speed) for programmed LINEAR and CIRCLE mode
moves in coordinate system x. The first use of an F
or TM statement in a motion program overrides this
value. The velocity units are defined by the position
and time units, as defined by axis definition
statements and Ix90.
You are strongly encouraged not to rely on this
parameter and to declare your feedrate in the
program. This will keep your move parameters with
your mo ve commands, lessening the chances of
future errors, and making debugging easier.
ix90: Feedrate Time Units (see doc) This parameter
defines the time units used in commanded velocities
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(feedrates) in motion programs executed by
coordinate system x. Velocity units are comprised of
length units divided by time units. The length units
are determined in the axis definition statements for
the coordinate system. Ix90 sets the time units. Ix90
itself has units of milliseconds, so if Ix90 is 60,000,
the time units are 60,000 milliseconds, or minutes.
The default value of Ix90 is 1000 msec, specifying
velocity time units of seconds.
This affects two type of motion program values: F
values (feedrate) for LINEAR- and CIRCLE-mode
moves; and the velocities in the actual move
commands for PVT-mode moves.
Examples
If position units have been set as centimeters by the
axis definition statements, and it is desired that
feedrate values be specified in cm/sec, this parameter
would be set to 1000.0 (time units = sec).
If position units have been set as degrees by the axis
definition statements, and it is desired that feedrate
values be specified in deg/min, this parameter would
be set to 60,000.0 (time units = minutes).
If a spindle is rotating at 4800 rpm, with a linear axis
specified in inches, and it is desired that linear speed
be specified in inches per spindle revolution, Ix90
would be set to 12.5 ([1 min/4800 rev] * [60,000
msec/ min] = 12.5 msec/rev).
ix95: Feedhold Decel (see doc) This parameter
controls the rate at which the axes of the coordinate
system stop if a feed hold command (H) is given, and
the rate at which they start up again on a succeeding
run command (R or S). A feed hold command is
equivalent to a %0 command except that it uses Ix95
for its slew rate instead of Ix94. Having separate
slew parameters for normal time-base control and for
feed hold commands allows both responsive ongoing
time-base control (Ix94 relatively high) and wellcontrolled holds (Ix95 relatively low).
The default Ix95 value of 1644, when used on a card
set up with the default servo cycle time of 442 m sec,
provides a transition time between %100 and %0
(feed hold) of one second.
ix96: Circle Error Limit (see doc) In a circular arc
move, a move distance that is more than twice the
specified radius will cause a computation error
because a proper path cannot be found. Sometimes,
due to round-off errors, a distance slightly larger than
twice the radius is given (for a half-circle move), and
it is desired that this not create an error condition.
This parameter allows the user to set an error limit on
the amount the move distance is greater than twice
the radius. If the move distance is greater than 2R,
but by less than this limit, the move is done in a
spiral fashion to the endpoint, and no error condition
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 25
is generated. If the distance error is greater than this
limit, a run-time error will be generated, and the
program will stop
Examples
Given the program segment
INC CIRCLE1 F2
X7.072 Y7.072 R5
technically no circular arc path can be found, because
the distance is SQRT(7.0722+7.0722) = 10.003,
which is greater than twice the radius of 5. However
as long as Ix96 is greater than 0.003, PMAC will
create a near-circular path to the end point.
ix91: Default Program Number This parameter
tells PMAC which motion program to run in this
coordinate system when commanded to run from the
control-panel input (START/ or STEP/ line taken
low). It performs the same function for a hardware
"run" command as the B command does for a
software "run" command (R). It is intended
primarily for stand-alone PMAC applications. The
first use of a B command from a host computer for
this coordinate system overrides this parameter.
ix92: Move Blend Disable If this parameter set to 0,
programmed blended moves -- LINEAR- and
CIRCLE-mode -- are blended together with no
intervening stop. Upcoming moves are calculated
during the current moves. If this parameter is set to
1, there is a brief stop in between each programmed
move (it effectively adds a DWELL 0 command),
during which the next move is calculated. The
calculation time for the next move is determined by
I11.
PmacCoordScale
This cluster contains three arrays of information about motor definitions in the
addressed CS. The arrays are Definition String, Scale Factor, and Defined.
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Coordinate System Scale Cluster Cluster containing
information about the motor definitions in the addressed CS.
Definition String Motor definition string in the
addressed CS.
Scale Factor Array of encoder to CS Unit scale
factors for each motor. 1.0 if the motor is not defined
in the addressed CS.
Defined Array of Booleans. Element is TRUE if the
motor is defined in the CS.
Coordinate System Addressed CS.
PmacCoordSpecify
Cluster defining the motor, CS, and conversion state to be applied
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate number to
use
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor Number to use
Convert Bool Apply a conversion for the specified
motor in the specified CS
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 27
PmacCoordStatProg
This is an indicator cluster for the most common bits of CS status. It contains a label
to display which CS the status is for.
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Run-Time Error' is Red when TRUE and gray otherwise.
Coordinate System Status Program Cluster This is an
indicator cluster for the most common coordinate system
program status bits
In Position Status Bit 17 Word 2 - In Position: Green
when all motors in the coordinate system are "in
position". Three conditions must apply for this to be
true: the desired velocity must be zero for all motors,
the coordinate system cannot be in any timed move
(even zero distance) or DWELL, and all motors must
have a following error smaller than their respective
Ix28 in-position bands. Red otherwise.
Program Running Status Bit 0 Word 1- Running
Program: Green if the coordinate system is currently
executing a motion program. Red if the C.S. is not
currently executing a motion program. Note that it
becomes Red as soon as it has calculated the last
move and reached the final RETURN statement in
the program, even if the motors are still executing the
last move or two that have been calculated. Compare
to the motor Running Program status bit.
Program Hold Status Bit 23 Word 2 - Gray when
there is no Program Hold Stop Green when there is a
Program Hold Stop.
Single Step Status Bit 1 Word 1 - Single-Step Mode:
Green if the motion program currently executing in
this coordinate system has been told to "step" one
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move or block of moves, or if it has been given a Q
(Quit) command. Gray if the motion program is
executing a program by a R (run) command, or if it is
not executing a motion program at all.
Pre-Jog Move Status Bit 8 Word 2 - Pre-jog Move
Flag: Green when any motor in the coordinate system
is executing a jog move to "pre-jog" position (J=
command). Gray otherwise.
End of Block Stop Status Bit 14 Word 2 - End of
Block Stop: Green when a motion program running
in the currently addressed Coordinate System is
stopped using the '/' command from a segmented
move (Linear or Circular mode with I13 > 0). Gray
otherwise.
Continuous Motion Req Status Bit 2 Word 1 Continuous Motion Request: Green if the coordinate
system has requested of it a continuous set of moves
(e.g. with an R command). Gray if this is not the
case (e.g. not running program, Ix92=1, or running
under an S command).
Continuous Motion Mode Status Bit 2 Word 1 Continuous Motion Mode: Green if the coordinate
system is in a sequence of moves that it is blending
together without stops in between. Gray if it is not
currently in such a sequence, for whatever reason.
Run-Time Error Status Bit 22 Word 2 - Run-Time
Error: Green when the coordinate system has stopped
a motion program due to an error encountered while
executing the program (e.g. jump to non-existent
label, insufficient calculation time, etc.). Gray
otherwise.
Amplifier Fault Status Bit 20 Word 2 - Amplifier
Fault Error: Red when any motor in the coordinate
system has been killed due to receiving an amplifier
fault signal. Green at other times, changing from Red
to Gray when the offending motor is re-enabled.
Warning Following Error Status Bit 18 Word 2 Warning Following Error: Red when any motor in
the coordinate system has exceeded its warning
following error limit (Ix12). It stays Red if a motor
has been killed due to fatal following error limit.
Grey at all other times. The change from Red to
Grey occurs when the offending motor's following
error is reduced to under the limit, or if killed on fatal
following error as well, when it is re-enabled.
Fatal Following Error Status Bit 19 Word 2 - Fatal
Following Error: Red when any motor in the
coordinate system has been killed due to exceeding
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 29
its fatal following error limit (Ix11). Grey at other
times. The change from Red to Green occurs when
the offending motor is re-enabled.
C.S. Description of currently addressed Coordinate
System.
PmacCoordStatWord1
This is an indicator cluster for the first status word of a CS
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Program Running' is Green when TRUE and grey
otherwise.
Coordinate System Status Word 1 Cluster This is an
indicator cluster for the first status word of a CS
Program Running Status Bit 0 Word 1 - Running
Program: This bit is 1 if the coordinate system is
currently executing a motion program. It is 0 if the
C.S. is not currently executing a motion program.
Note that it becomes 0 as soon as it has calculated the
last move and reached the final RETURN statement
in the program, even if the motors are still executing
the last move or two that have been calculated.
Compare to the motor Running Program status bit.
Single Step Status Bit 1 Word 1 - Single-Step Mode:
This bit is 1 if the motion program currently
executing in this coordinate system has been told to
"step" one move or block of moves, or if it has been
given a Q (Quit) command. It is 0 if the motion
program is executing a program by a R (run)
command, or if it is not executing a motion program
at all.
Continuous Motion Mode Status Bit 2 Word 1 Continuous Motion Mode: This bit is 1 if the
coordinate system is in a sequence of moves that it is
blending together without stops in between. It is 0 if
it is not currently in such a sequence, for whatever
reason.
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Move Specified By Time Status Bit 3 Word 1 Move-Specified-by-Time Mode: This bit is 1 if
programmed moves in this coordinate system are
currently specified by time (TM or TA), and the
move speed is derived. It is 0 if programmed moves
in this coordinate system are currently specified by
feedrate (speed; F) and the move time is derived.
Continuous Motion Req Status Bit 4 Word 1 Continuous Motion Request: This bit is 1 if the
coordinate system has requested of it a continuous set
of moves (e.g. with an R command). It is 0 if this is
not the case (e.g. not running program, Ix92=1, or
running under an S command).
Radius Vector Increment Mode Status Bit 5 Word
1 - Radius Vector Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if
circle move radius vectors are specified
incrementally (i.e. from the move start point to the
arc center). It is 0 if circle move radius vectors are
specified absolutely (i.e. from the XYZ origin to the
arc center). See the INC(R) and ABS(R) commands.
A-Axis Incremental Mode Status Bit 6 Word 1 - AAxis Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if this axis is in
incremental mode -- moves specified by distance
from the last programmed point. It is 0 if this axis is
in absolute mode -- moves specified by end position,
not distance. See the INC and ABS commands.
A-Axis Used in Feedrate Status Bit 7 Word 1 - AAxis Used in Feedrate Calculations: This bit is 1 if
this axis is used in the vector feedrate calculations for
F-based moves in the coordinate system; it is 0 if this
axis is not used. See the FRAX command.
B-Axis Incremental Mode Status Bit 8 Word 1 - BAxis Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if this axis is in
incremental mode -- moves specified by distance
from the last programmed point. It is 0 if this axis is
in absolute mode -- moves specified by end position,
not distance. See the INC and ABS commands.
B-Axis Used in Feedrate Status Bit 9 Word 1 - BAxis Used in Feedrate Calculations: This bit is 1 if
this axis is used in the vector feedrate calculations for
F-based moves in the coordinate system; it is 0 if this
axis is not used. See the FRAX command.
C-Axis Incremental Mode Status Bit 10 Word 1 C-Axis Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if this axis is
in incremental mode -- moves specified by distance
from the last programmed point. It is 0 if this axis is
in absolute mode -- moves specified by end position,
not distance. See the INC and ABS commands.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 31
C-Axis Used in Feedrate Status Bit 11 Word 1 - CAxis Used in Feedrate Calculations: This bit is 1 if
this axis is used in the vector feedrate calculations for
F-based moves in the coordinate system; it is 0 if this
axis is not used. See the FRAX command.
U-Axis Incremental Mode Status Bit 12 Word 1 U-Axis Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if this axis is
in incremental mode -- moves specified by distance
from the last programmed point. It is 0 if this axis is
in absolute mode -- moves specified by end position,
not distance. See the INC and ABS commands.
U-Axis Used in Feedrate Status Bit 13 Word 1 - UAxis Used in Feedrate Calculations: This bit is 1 if
this axis is used in the vector feedrate calculations for
F-based moves in the coordinate system; it is 0 if this
axis is not used. See the FRAX command.
V-Axis Incremental Mode Status Bit 14 Word 1 V-Axis Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if this axis is
in incremental mode -- moves specified by distance
from the last programmed point. It is 0 if this axis is
in absolute mode -- moves specified by end position,
not distance. See the INC and ABS commands.
V-Axis Used in Feedrate Status Bit 15 Word 1 - VAxis Used in Feedrate Calculations: This bit is 1 if
this axis is used in the vector feedrate calculations for
F-based moves in the coordinate system; it is 0 if this
axis is not used. See the FRAX command.
W-Axis Incremental Mode Status Bit 16 Word 1 W-Axis Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if this axis is
in incremental mode -- moves specified by distance
from the last programmed point. It is 0 if this axis is
in absolute mode -- moves specified by end position,
not distance. See the INC and ABS commands.
W-Axis Used in Feedrate Status Bit 17 Word 1 - WAxis Used in Feedrate Calculations: This bit is 1 if
this axis is used in the vector feedrate calculations for
F-based moves in the coordinate system; it is 0 if this
axis is not used. See the FRAX command.
X-Axis Incremental Mode Status Bit 18 Word 1 X-Axis Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if this axis is
in incremental mode -- moves specified by distance
from the last programmed point. It is 0 if this axis is
in absolute mode -- moves specified by end position,
not distance. See the INC and ABS commands.
X-Axis Used in Feedrate Status Bit 19 Word 1 - XAxis Used in Feedrate Calculations: This bit is 1 if
this axis is used in the vector feedrate calculations for
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F-based moves in the coordinate system; it is 0 if this
axis is not used. See the FRAX command.
Y-Axis Incremental Mode Status Bit 20 Word 1 Y-Axis Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if this axis is
in incremental mode -- moves specified by distance
from the last programmed point. It is 0 if this axis is
in absolute mode -- moves specified by end position,
not distance. See the INC and ABS commands.
Y-Axis Used in Feedrate Status Bit 21 Word 1 - YAxis Used in Feedrate Calculations: This bit is 1 if
this axis is used in the vector feedrate calculations for
F-based moves in the coordinate system; it is 0 if this
axis is not used. See the FRAX command.
Z-Axis Incremental Mode Status Bit 22 Word 1 - ZAxis Incremental Mode: This bit is 1 if this axis is in
incremental mode -- moves specified by distance
from the last programmed point. It is 0 if this axis is
in absolute mode -- moves specified by end position,
not distance. See the INC and ABS commands.
Z-Axis Used in Feedrate Status Bit 23 Word 1 - ZAxis Used in Feedrate Calculations: This bit is 1 if
this axis is used in the vector feedrate calculations for
F-based moves in the coordinate system; it is 0 if this
axis is not used. See the FRAX command.
PmacCoordStatWord2
This is an indicator cluster for the second status word of a CS
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Run-Time Error' is Red when TRUE and grey otherwise.
Coordinate System Status Word 2 Cluster This is an
indicator cluster for the second status word of a CS
Circle/Spline Move Mode Status Bit 0 Word 2 CIRCLE/SPLINE Move Mode: This bit is 1 if the
coordinate system is in either CIRCLE or SPLINE
move mode. (If bit 4 of this word is 0, this means
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 33
CIRCLE mode; if bit 4 is 1, this means SPLINE
mode.) This bit is 0 if the coordinate system is in a
different move mode (LINEAR, PVT, or RAPID.)
CCW Circle/Rapid Mode Status Bit 1 Word 2 CCW Circle Mode: This bit is 1 if the coordinate
system is in CIRCLE2 (counterclockwise arc) move
mode. It is 0 if the coordinate system is not in a
CIRCLE mode, or if it is in CIRCLE1 mode
(clockwise arc).
Cutter Comp On Status Bit 2 Word 2 - Cutter
Compensation On: This bit is 1 if the coordinate
system has cutter compensation on. It is 0 if cutter
compensation if off.
Cutter Comp Left Status Bit 3 Word 2 - Cutter
Compensation Left: This bit is 1 if the coordinate
system has cutter compensation on, and the
compensation is to the left when looking in the
direction of motion. It is 0 if compensation is to the
right, or if cutter compensation is off.
PVT/Spline Move Mode Status Bit 4 Word 2 PVT/SPLINE Move Mode: This bit is 1 if this
coordinate system is in either PVT move mo de or
SPLINE move mode. (If bit 0 of this word is 0, this
means PVT mode; if bit 0 is 1, this means SPLINE
mode.) This bit is 0 if the coordinate system is in a
different move mode (LINEAR, CIRCLE, or
RAPID).
Segmented Move Stop Request Status Bit 5 Word 2
- Segmented Move Stop Request: This bit is 1 when
the coordinate system is executing motion program
move in segmentation mode (I13>0) and it is
decelerating to a stop. It is 0 otherwise. This is
primarily for internal use.
Segmented Move Acceleration Status Bit 6 Word 2
- Segmented Move Acceleration: This bit is 1 when
the coordinate system is executing motion program
moves in segmentation mode (I13>0) and
accelerating from a stop. It is 0 otherwise. This is
primarily for internal use.
Segmented Move In Progress Status Bit 7 Word 2 Segmented Move in Progress: This bit is 1 when the
coordinate system is executing motion program
moves in segmentation mode (I13>0). It is 0
otherwise. This is primarily for internal use.
Pre-Jog Move Flag Status Bit 8 Word 2 - Pre-jog
Move Flag: This bit is 1 when any motor in the
coordinate system is executing a jog move to "prejog" position (J= command). It is 0 otherwise.
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Cutter Comp Move Buffered Status Bit 9 Word 2 Cutter Comp Move Buffered: This bit is 1 when the
coordinate system is executing moves with cutter
compensation enabled, and the next move has been
calculated and buffered. This is primarily for internal
use.
Cutter Comp Move Stop Request Status Bit 10
Word 2 - Cutter Comp Move Stop Request: This bit
is 1 when the coordinate system is executing moves
with cutter compensation enabled, and has been
asked to stop move execution. This is primarily for
internal use.
Cutter Comp Outside Corner
Dwell Move Buffered
Sync M-Variable One-Shot
End of Block Stop
Delayed Calculation
Rotary Buffer Request Status Bit 16 Word 2 Rotary Buffer Full: This bit is 1 when a rotary buffer
exists for the coordinate system and enough program
lines have been sent to it so that the buffer contains
more than I16 lines ahead of what has been
calculated.
In-Position Status Bit 17 Word 2 - In Position: This
bit is 1 when all motors in the coordinate system are
"in position". Three conditions must apply for this to
be true: the desired velocity must be zero for all
motors, the coordinate system cannot be in any timed
move (even zero distance) or DWELL, and all
motors must have a following error smaller than their
respective Ix28 in-position bands.
Warning Following Error Status Bit 18 Word 2 Warning Following Error: This bit is 1 when any
motor in the coordinate system has exceeded its
warning following error limit (Ix12). It stays at 1 if a
motor has been killed due to fatal following error
limit. It is 0 at all other times. The change from 1 to
0 occurs when the offending motor's following error
is reduced to under the limit, or if killed on fatal
following error as well, when it is re-enabled.
Fatal Following Error Status Bit 19 Word 2 - Fatal
Following Error: This bit is 1 when any motor in the
coordinate system has been killed due to exceeding
its fatal following error limit (Ix11). It is 0 at other
times. The change from 1 to 0 occurs when the
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 35
offending motor is re-enabled.
Amplifier Fault Error Status Bit 20 Word 2 Amplifier Fault Error: This bit is 1 when any motor
in the coordinate system has been killed due to
receiving an amplifier fault signal. It is 0 at other
times, changing from 1 to 0 when the offending
motor is re-enabled.
Circle Radius Error Status Bit 21 Word 2 - Circle
Radius Error: This bit is 1 when a motion program
has been stopped because it was asked to do an arc
move whose distance was more than twice the radius
(by an amount greater than Ix97).
Run-Time Error Status Bit 22 Word 2 - Run-Time
Error: This bit is 1 when the coordinate system has
stopped a motion program due to an error
encountered while executing the program (e.g. jump
to non-existent label, insufficient calculation time,
etc.)
Program Hold Stop Status Bit 23 Word 2 - Program
Trace Active: This bit is 1 when the motion program
trace feature is executing (after a TRACE command).
It is 0 when the feature is not executing. The change
from 1 to 0 occurs when an ENDTRACE command
is received, or when the trace buffer fills up.
PmacDAQ
The VIs in this collection are PMACPanel examples or slightly modified versions of
standard LabVIEW examples. See Chapter 9 for details.
PmacDevice
\PmacDevice - Configure and manage access to PMAC using PComm32.
Configuration of this access must match the driver configuration set using the control
panel applet or MotionExe application.
VIs
PmacDevClose
Close the PComm32 device driver. PMAC will continue running as programmed as
long as power is applied.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
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PmacDevOpen
Open communication to PMAC using the PComm32 device driver. Check type,
ROM date, and ROM Version. Provide Device Number for other VI's. You can
select the mode of communication using the Communication Mode drop down
menu. To make the selection permanent make your selection the default use the
right mouse button and "Data Operations » Make Current Value Default" option.
This SHOULD be done in conjunction with the options available on the PMAC
control panel.
If PMACPanel communication doesn't appear to be working correctly see the
manual. Specifically, check the section on PMAC Communication I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) ID to provide access to PComm32
and PMAC.
PmacDevSerial
Allows the configuration of serial port communication. This SHOULD really be
done in conjunction with PmacDevOpen and the PMAC control panel.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
PmacDPR
\PmacDPR – A large collection of VIs for configuring and operating the many
modes of DPR supported by PMAC. There are numerous examples demo nstrating
the use of DPR and how to modify the supplied collection to suit your purposes.
VIs
PmacDPRFixedBack
Once DPR Fixed Background buffer operation is enabled this VI can be used to fetch
the data for a specific Motor Number and Coord Number. The input Enabled can be
used to enable and disable the actual fetch. The Default, un-wired, condition is
TRUE. Coord Axis Char is a string (X, Y, Z, A, B, C, U, V, W) indicating which
axis in Coord Number Comm'd Pos will represent. When New Output is TRUE
DPR Fixed Motor Cluster and DPR Fixed Coordinate Cluster contain the most recent
background data. When Enabled is FALSE the two output clusters contain the last
valid data even though New Output is FALSE.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 37
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor Number to fetch DPR
Fixed Background data for
Enabled Bool (T) When TRUE query PMAC for the DPR
Fixed Background buffer data for Motor Number and Coord
Number. The VI maintains the enabled state. When FALSE
do not place the query. Default is TRUE.
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate System Number to
fetch DPR Fixed Background data for
Coord Axis Char Single character string (X, Y, Z, A, B, C,
U, V, W) defining which axis within Coord Number to use
when presenting Comm'd Pos in DPR Fixed Coordinate
Cluster.
New Output Bool TRUE when DPR Fixed Motor Cluster and
DPR Fixed Coordinate Cluster contain new data.
DPR Fixed Motor Cluster
DPR Fixed Coordinate Cluster
PmacDPRFixedBackConfig
DPR Fixed Background buffer is configured to update motor information for all
motor between 1 and Enable Motor Numbers when Enable is TRUE. Operation is
disabled when Enable is FALSE. Output Enable is TRUE when operation is
enabled. The state is maintained by the VI. Operation of DPR Fixed Background
buffers overlaps with DPR Real Time operation in that the number of motors enabled
must be the same.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Enable Bool (T) When TRUE configure the DPR Fixed
Background buffer to fetch the number of motors specified by
Enable Motor Numbers. The VI maintains the enabled state.
When FALSE disable all background operations including
Variable Background operations. Default is TRUE.
Enable Motor Numbers i32 (1-8) (1) The number of motors
for DPR Fixed Background operations.
Output Enable Bool TRUE when DPR Fixed Background
operation is enabled. The output state is maintained by the
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operation is enabled. The output state is maintained by the
VI.
PmacDPRFixedBackVectors
Once DPR Fixed Background buffer operation is enabled this VI can be used to fetch
the data for a specific Motor Number and Coord Number. The input Enabled can be
used to enable and disable the actual fetch. The Default, un-wired, condition is
TRUE. Coord Axis Char is a string (X, Y, Z, A, B, C, U, V, W) indicating which
axis in Coord Number Comm'd Pos will represent. When New Output is TRUE
DPR Fixed Motor Cluster and DPR Fixed Coordinate Cluster contain the most recent
background data. When Enabled is FALSE the two output clusters contain the last
valid data even though New Output is FALSE.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor Number to fetch DPR
Fixed Background data for
Enabled Bool (T) When TRUE query PMAC for the DPR
Fixed Background buffer data for Motor Number and Coord
Number. The VI maintains the enabled state. When FALSE
do not place the query. Default is TRUE.
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate System Number to
fetch DPR Fixed Background data for
Coord Axis Char Single character string (X, Y, Z, A, B, C,
U, V, W) defining which axis within Coord Number to use
when presenting Comm'd Pos in DPR Fixed Coordinate
Vector Cluster.
Buffer Length i32 (32) Number of DPR Fixed Background
samples to buffer when building vectors. The Default value is
32.
New Output Bool TRUE when DPR Fixed Motor Vector
Cluster and DPR Fixed Coordinate Vector Cluster contain
new data.
DPR Fixed Motor Vector Cluster Cluster of vectors
containing DPR Fixed Background buffer data for the
specified motor number.
DPR Fixed Coordinate Vector Cluster Cluster of vectors
containing DPR Fixed Background buffer data for the
specified coordinate system.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 39
PmacDPRMotorVecToCoord
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to convert Input
Array from encoder counts to CS units. If the motor is not defined in the CS no
conversion is applied. If the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined
is TRUE and Output Array is scaled from encoder counts to CS units. Coord
Definition is a string specifying Output Value units as "Encoder" or the CS definition
of the motor.
Input Array Double Array of values provided by
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors, PmacDPRFixedVectors, or
PmacDPRVarBackVectors that is to be converted to coodinate
system units.
Value Motor position, velocity, of following error
from PmacMotor VIs to possibly convert to CS units
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Output Array Double Array of values in motor encoder units
or coordinate system units.
Value Motor position, velocity, of following error
from PmacMotor VIs to possibly convert to CS units
Coord Defined Bool If Motor Number is defined in Coord
Number and Convert Bool is TRUE this is TRUE.
Coord Definition String String defining the motor within the
CS. "Encoder" if not defined.
PmacDPRNumericCINCluster
This VI is used to Set or Get a collection of M-Variable's defined in DPR. It serves
as a base VI from which you can create your own custom VIs. To use this VI you
should make a copy of it, customize the Input and Output Clusters, and modify the
contents of the diagram.
This VI functions identically to PmacDPRNumericCluster but is implemented with a
CIN Node. It is slightly faster but provides more control over how the data is
processed if speed or flexibility is an issue.
When Set/Get is FALSE - default state - Response Available is TRUE and Output
DPR Numeric Cluster contains the fetched data. When Set/Get is TRUE Output
DPR Numeric Cluster = Input DPR Numeric Cluster, Response Available is FALSE
and the specified DPR locations are set.
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Input DPR Numeric Cluster Input cluster of data for writing
to DPR M-Variables during Set operations.
Set\Get Bool (F) Set the DPR contents using Input DPR
Numeric Cluster when TRUE. Get the data for Output DPR
Numeric Cluster when FALSE or unwired.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Output DPR Numeric Cluster Custom data cluster read
from DPR M-Variables during Get operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces a valid Output DPR Numeric Cluster
PmacDPRNumericCluster
This VI is used to Set or Get a collection of M-Variable's defined in DPR. It serves
as a base VI from which you can create your own custom VIs. To use this VI you
should make a copy of it, customize the Input and Output Clusters, and modify the
contents of the diagram.
When Set/Get is FALSE - default state - Response Available is TRUE and Output
DPR Numeric Cluster contains the fetched data. When Set/Get is TRUE Output
DPR Numeric Cluster = Input DPR Numeric Cluster, Response Available is FALSE
and the specified DPR locations are set.
Input DPR Numeric Cluster Input cluster of data for writing
to DPR M-Variables during Set operations.
Set\Get Bool (F) Set the DPR contents using Input DPR
Numeric Cluster when TRUE. Get the data for Output DPR
Numeric Cluster when FALSE or unwired.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Output DPR Numeric Cluster Custom data cluster read
from DPR M-Variables during Get operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces a valid Output DPR Numeric Cluster
PmacDPRNumericDbl
This VI is used to Set or Get PMAC double M-Variable's defined in DPR as M447>F:$DE03. PMAC handles the translation of PMAC's representation into Intel
format when the F specification is used.
When Set/Get is FALSE - default state - Response Available is TRUE and Output
Value is the value in DPR located at Offset. When Set/Get is TRUE Output Value =
Input Value, Response Available is FALSE and the specified DPR location is set.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 41
The mapping of PMAC addresses to PC addresses is involved and requires a bit of
work to understand. In general, each 24 bit PMAC word requires one 32 bit PC
word. For PMAC doubles specified as.
M447->F:$DE03
this offset should be $E03.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Input Value Dbl Value to use for Set operation.
Set\Get Bool (F) Set the DPR Double at Offset using Input
Value when TRUE. Get Output Value when FALSE or
unwired.
Offset Offset of PMAC DPR M-Variable address.
The mapping of PMAC addresses to PC addresses is involved
and requires a bit of work to understand. In general, each 24
bit PMAC word requires one 32 bit PC word. For PMAC
doubles specified as.
M447->F:$DE03
this offset should be $E03.
Output Value Dbl Double representation of DPR value at
Offset. If the response is not valid Output Value = Input
Value.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces a valid Output Value
PmacDPRNumericDWord
This VI is used to Set or Get PMAC long M-Variable's defined in DPR as M447>DP:$DE03. PMAC handles the translation of PMAC's representation into Intel
format when the DP specification is used.
When Set/Get is FALSE - default state - Response Available is TRUE and Output
Value is the value in DPR located at Offset. When Set/Get is TRUE Output Value =
Input Value, Response Available is FALSE and the specified DPR location is set.
The mapping of PMAC addresses to PC addresses is involved and requires a bit of
work to understand. In general, each 24 bit PMAC word requires one 32 bit PC
word. For PMAC longs specified as.
M447->DP:$DE03
this offset should be $E03.
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Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Input Value i32 Value to use for Set operation.
Set\Get Bool (F) Set the DPR DWord (i32) at Offset using
Input Value when TRUE. Get Output Value when FALSE or
unwired.
Offset Offset of PMAC DPR M-Variable address.
The mapping of PMAC addresses to PC addresses is involved
and requires a bit of work to understand. In general, each 24
bit PMAC word requires one 32 bit PC word. For PMAC
longs specified as.
M447->DP:$DE03
this offset should be $E03.
Output Value i32 i32 representation of DPR value at Offset.
If the response is not valid Output Value = Input Value.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces a valid Output Value
PmacDPRNumericDWordBit
This VI operates on the DPR DWord bit specified by DPR Numeric Spec Cluster.
When Set/Get is FALSE - the default state - the value of the bit is queried and
returned by Bit Value with Response Available TRUE. When Set/Get is TRUE the
specified bit is set to the value of Bit State - either TRUE or FALSE.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Set\Get Bool (F) Set the specified bit using Bit State when
TRUE. Get the bit state when FALSE or unwired.
Bit State Bool Bit State used during Set operation.
DPR Numeric Spec Cluster A cluster of items required to
describe a DPR mapped PMAC M-Variable for bit and field
access.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces a valid Bit Value
Bit Value Bool Value of specified bit during Get operations.
New value of specified bit as defined by Bit State during Set
operations.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 43
PmacDPRNumericDWordBitTest
This VI queries the DPR DWord bit specified by DPR Numeric Spec Cluster and
returns the value in Bit Value.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
DPR Numeric Spec Cluster A cluster of items required to
describe a DPR mapped PMAC M-Variable for bit and field
access.
Bit Value Bool Value of specfiied bit for Boolean testing
purposes.
PmacDPRNumericDWordSetMask
This VI operates on the DPR DWord bit field specified by DPR Numeric Spec
Cluster.
When Set/Get is FALSE - the default state - the Mask specified by DPR Numeric
Spec Cluster is AND'd with the specified address to produce the output Bit Field
Value. Response Available is TRUE.
When Set/Get is TRUE the Mask is either OR'd or XOR'd with the contents of the
field at the specified address. If XOR/OR is FALSE the mask is OR'd with the
contents of the field at the specified address thereby setting bits specified by the
mask. If XOR/OR is TRUE the mask is XOR'd with the contents of the field at the
specified address thereby clearing the bits specified in the mask.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Set\Get Bool (F) Set the specified bit field using the specified
XOR/OR operation when TRUE. Get the bit field state and
mask it using an AND operation when FALSE or unwired.
XOR/AND Bool (F) This defines the operation ro be applied
to the contents of the specified bit field during Set/Get
operations.
During Get operations the Mask specified by DPR Numeric
Spec Cluster is AND'd with the specified address and bit field
to produce the output Bit Field Value.
During Set operations the Mask is OR'd with the contents of
the field at the specified address if this input is TRUE. If this
input is FALSE the Mask is XOR'd with the contents of the
field at the specified address. In both cases the output Bit
Field is the result of the specified bit field AND the mask.
DPR Numeric Spec Cluster A cluster of items required to
describe a DPR mapped PMAC M-Variable for bit and field
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describe a DPR mapped PMAC M-Variable for bit and field
access.
Bit Field Value i32 Specified DPR bit field AND'd with the
mask during Get operations.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces a valid Bit Field Value
Bit Field Bool Array A Boolean Array representation of the
numerical value in Bit Field Value.
PmacDPRNumericSpec
This VI takes a DPR Numeric Spec Cluster defining a DPR address, variable type,
and bit number of bit field and computes the numeric offset address of the item
(Offset) and bit number of bit field (Bit Number).
The mapping of PMAC addresses to PC addresses is involved and requires a bit of
work to understand. In general, each 24 bit PMAC word requires one 32 bit PC
word. Hence, X:$DE03 and Y:$DE03 have different offsets in DPR.
For example, a PMAC Address such as:
M447->X:$DE03,8,1
M448->Y:$DE03,8,8
respectively have offsets of
$380E and $3810
in the PC.
DPR Numeric Spec Cluster A cluster of items required to
describe a DPR mapped PMAC M-Variable for bit and field
access.
Offset u32 The numeric offset in DPR as computed from the
DPR Numeric Spec Cluster.
Bit Number u32 The bit number of field specifier for DPR bit
and field operations.
PmacDPRNumericWord
This VI is used to Set or Get PMAC long M-Variable's defined in DPR as M447>DP:$DE03 where the equivalent intel representation is 16 bits. PMAC handles the
translation of PMAC's representation into Intel format when the DP specification is
used.
When Set/Get is FALSE - default state - Response Available is TRUE and Output
Value is the value in DPR located at Offset. When Set/Get is TRUE Output Value =
Input Value, Response Available is FALSE and the specified DPR location is set.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 45
The mapping of PMAC addresses to PC addresses is involved and requires a bit of
work to understand. In general, each 24 bit PMAC word requires one 32 bit PC
word. For PMAC longs specified as.
M447->DP:$DE03
this offset should be $E03.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Input Value i16 Value to use for Set operation.
Set\Get Bool (F) Set the DPR Word (i16) at Offset using
Input Value when TRUE. Get Output Value when FALSE or
unwired.
Offset Offset of PMAC DPR M-Variable address.
The mapping of PMAC addresses to PC addresses is involved
and requires a bit of work to understand. In general, each 24
bit PMAC word requires one 32 bit PC word. For PMAC
longs where the lower 16 bit are used specified as.
M447->DP:$DE03
this offset should be $E03.
Output Value i16 i16 representation of DPR value at Offset.
If the response is not valid Output Value = Input Value.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces a valid Output Value
PmacDPRRealTimeConfig
DPR Real Time Fixed buffer is configured to update motor information every Servo
Period for all motor between 1 and Enable Motor Numbers when Enable is TRUE.
Operation is disabled when Enable is FALSE. Output Enable is TRUE when
operation is enabled. The state is maintained by the VI. Operation of DPR Real
Time buffers overlaps with DPR Fixed Background operation in that the number of
motors enabled must be the same.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Enable Bool (T) When TRUE configure the DPR Fixed Real
Time buffer to fetch the number of motors specified by Enable
Motor Numbers. The VI maintains the enabled state. When
FALSE disable all Real Time operations. Default is TRUE.
Enable Motor Numbers i32 (1-8) (1) The number of motors
for DPR Fixed Real Time operations.
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for DPR Fixed Real Time operations.
Servo Period i32 (1) Servo interval for sampling Real Time
Motor servo data.
Output Enable Bool TRUE when DPR Fixed Real Time
operation is enabled. The output state is maintained by the
VI.
PmacDPRRealTimeMotor
Query PMAC DPR for the Real Time Fixed buffer Motor and Servo data. When
Enabled is TRUE (the Default state) the data for Motor Number is fetched and used
to build DPR Real Time Motor Cluster and DPR Real Time Servo Cluster. Motor
PVE Cluster contains data in encoder counts or coordinate system units depending
on the state of Coord Specify Cluster. See PmacMotorPVE for details on how this is
done.
A successful query of PMAC's DPR depends on whether PMAC is accessing the
memory. If Wait For Valid is TRUE the VI places queries to PMAC until a
successful read at which time New Output is TRUE indicating valid output data. If
Wait For Valid is FALSE the query may or may not succeed. If the query fails New
Output is FALSE and the output clusters contain the data fetched during the last
read.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Enabled Bool (T) When TRUE query PMAC for the DPR
Real Time buffer data for Motor Number. The VI maintains
the enabled state. When FALSE do not place the query.
Default is TRUE.
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied in the creation of Motor PVE
Cluster
Wait For Valid Bool (T) When TRUE requery PMAC for
DPR Real Time buffer data until the data is available.
Otherwise fresh data is not returned and the outputs will
contain the last available data.
New Output Bool TRUE when DPR Real Time Motor
Cluster, DPR Real Time Servo Status Cluster, and Motor PVE
Cluster contain new data. Otherwise the outputs contain the
last available data.
DPR Real Time Motor Cluster Cluster containing motor
servo values as sampled by the DPR Real Time facility.
DPR Real Time Servo Cluster Cluster containing motor
servo status as sampled by the DPR Real Time facility.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 47
Motor PVE Cluster Cluster for PmacMotorPVE.ctl
PmacDPRRealTimeMotors
Query PMAC DPR Real Time Fixed buffer Motor and Servo data for the list of
motors specified in Motor Number Array. When Enabled is TRUE (the Default
state) the data for the specified motors is fetched and used to build an array of DPR
Real Time Motor Clusters and DPR Real Time Servo Clusters.
A successful query of PMAC's DPR depends on whether PMAC is accessing the
memory. If Wait For Valid is TRUE the VI places queries to PMAC until a
successful read at which time New Output is TRUE indicating valid output data. If
Wait For Valid is FALSE the query may or may not succeed. If the query fails New
Output is FALSE and the output clusters contain the data fetched during the last
read.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Enabled Bool (T) When TRUE query PMAC for the DPR
Real Time buffer data for motors specified in Motor Number
Array. The VI maintains the enabled state. When FALSE do
not place the query. Default is TRUE.
Motor Number Array i32 (1-8) (1 An array of Motor
Numbers to fetch DPR Real Time buffer data for.
Wait For Valid Bool (T) When TRUE requery PMAC for
DPR Real Time buffer data until the data is available.
Otherwise fresh data is not returned and the outputs will
contain the last available data.
New Output Bool TRUE when DPR Real Time Motor
Cluster Array and DPR Real Time Servo Cluster Array
contain new data. Otherwise the outputs contain the last
available data.
DPR Real Time Motor Cluster Array An array of clusters
containing motor servo values as sampled by the DPR Real
Time facility.
DPR Real Time Motor Cluster Cluster containing
motor servo values as sampled by the DPR Real
Time facility.
DPR Real Time Servo Cluster Array An array of clusters
containing motor servo status as sampled by the DPR Real
Time facility.
DPR Real Time Servo Cluster Cluster containing
motor servo status as sampled by the DPR Real Time
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facility.
PmacDPRRealTimePVE
Extract position, velocity, and following error from DPR Real TIme Motor Cluster
assuming Motor Number operating in Coord Number. Assemble the measurements
into Motor PVE Cluster. If Convert is TRUE convert the measurements to CS units.
Otherwise leave them in encoder counts.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
DPR Real Time Motor Cluster Cluster containing motor
servo values as sampled by the DPR Real Time facility.
Motor PVE Cluster Cluster for PmacMotorPVE.ctl
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors
Query PMAC DPR for the Real Time Fixed buffer Motor and Servo data. When
Enabled is TRUE (the Default state) the data for Motor Number is fetched and used
to build DPR Real Time Motor Cluster and DPR Real Time Servo Cluster. Motor
PVE Cluster contains data in encoder counts or coordinate system units depending
on the state of Coord Specify Cluster. See PmacMotorPVE for details on how this is
done.
A successful query of PMAC's DPR depends on whether PMAC is accessing the
memory. If Wait For Valid is TRUE the VI places queries to PMAC until a
successful read at which time New Output is TRUE indicating valid output data. If
Wait For Valid is FALSE the query may or may not succeed. If the query fails New
Output is FALSE and the output clusters contain the data fetched during the last
read.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Enabled Bool (T) When TRUE query PMAC for the DPR
Real Time buffer data for Motor Number. The VI maintains
the enabled state. When FALSE do not place the query.
Default is TRUE.
Buffer Length i32 (128) Number of DPR Real Time samples
to buffer when building vectors. The Default value is 128.
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor Number to fetch the DPR
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 49
Real Time data for.
New Output Bool TRUE when DPR Real Time Vector
Cluster contains new data. Otherwise the DPR Real Time
Vector Cluster should NOT be used.
DPR Real Time Vector Cluster Cluster of vectors containing
DPR Real Time buffer data for the specified motor number.
PmacDPRServoDelta
This diagnostic VI is used to take a time-sampled vector of servo timer values - or
any other time sampled vector - and compute ST(k) - ST(k-1). Its primary purpose is
to understand and analyze jitter in the sampling process.
Servo Timer A vector of servo times gathered by
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors or
some other means.
Servo Timer Delta A vector of input Servo Timer sample
differences computed by taking
ST(k) - ST(k-1).
PmacDPRVarBack
Once DPR Variable Background buffer operation is enabled this VI can be used to
fetch the data specified during the configuration. The input Enabled can be used to
enable and disable the actual fetch. The Default, un-wired, condition is TRUE.
When New Output is TRUE Output Value Array contains the most recent
background data. When Enabled is FALSE Output Value Array contains the last
valid data even though New Output is FALSE.
The Write/Read and Input Value Array inputs are not currently functional. Future
releases may implement this capability.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
VBGB Specification Cluster Cluster containing information
required to collect and convert DPR Variable Background
items.
Input Value Array An array of doubles to be written using
the DPR Variable Background buffer
Write(T)/Read(F) Bool The default case (F) reads the DPR
Variable Background specified in the VBGB Specification
Cluster. The Write case (T) is available but not implemented.
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Cluster. The Write case (T) is available but not implemented.
Enabled Bool (T) When TRUE query PMAC for the DPR
Variable Background buffer data configured by
PmacDPRVarBackConfig and specified in VBGB
Specification Cluster. The VI maintains the enabled state.
When FALSE do not place the query. Default is TRUE.
New Output Bool TRUE when DPR Output Value Array
contains new data as the result of a read.
Output Value Array An array of doubles fetched from the
DPR Variable Background buffer.
PmacDPRVarBackConfig
This VI creates a set of Address Items specified by Gather Spec Cluster using the
DPR Variable Background when Enable is TRUE. The VI produces a VBGB Status
Cluster with relevant information about this buffer and a VBGB Specification
Cluster containging information required to actually fetch the data using
PmacdPRVarBack and PmacDPRVarBackVectors.
Operation is disabled when Enable is FALSE. Output Enable is TRUE when
operation is enabled. The state is maintained by the VI. This VI can be used multiple
times to create sets of VBGB Address Items. See the documentation for limitations
on how many sets can be created and their size.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
Enable Bool (T) When TRUE configure the DPR Variable
Background buffer to fetch the items specified by Gather Spec
Cluster. The VI maintains the enabled state. When FALSE
disable VBGB specified. Default is TRUE.
Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo sample rate
and array of clusters of Address Items describing item,
address, and scale factor.
Diable All Bool (F) When TRUE configure the DPR Variable
Background buffer to fetch the items specified by Gather Spec
Cluster. The VI maintains the enabled state. When FALSE
disable VBGB specified. Default is TRUE.
Output Enable Bool TRUE when DPR Variable Background
operation is enabled. The output state is maintained by the
VI.
VBGB Status Cluster A collection of information about the
DPR Variable Background buffer created by the execution of
PmacDPRVarBackConfig. Most of this information is not of
use to the general PMACPanel user.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 51
VBGB Specification Cluster Cluster containing information
required to collect and convert DPR Variable Background
items.
PmacDPRVarBackgroundxLate
This VI converts an array of strings representing the gather addresses. For example:
DP:$0028
X:$0026
and converts them to an array of numeric addresses specifying DPR Variable
Background items to collect.
PMAC addresses are specified using an array of long integers. The most significant
word of each long (upper 16 bits) specifies the word type. A value of 0, 1, 2 and 4
corresponds to Y, Long, X, and SPECIAL respectively. For Y, Long and X entries
the least significant word specifies the actual PMAC address to be copied.
Take for example the following define statements and the initialization of a long
integer array.
#define MTR1_ACTULPOS
0x00010028 /* PMAC Address D:$0028 */
#define MTR1_ACTULVEL
0x00020033 /* PMAC Address X:$0033 */
#define MTR1_DACOUT
0x00020045 /* PMAC Address X:$0045 */
#define FB_10
0x0004000A /* PMAC function block #10 */
long myaddrarr[3]={MTR1_DACOUT,MTR1_ACTULPOS,MTR1_ACTULVEL};
Input Address Array An array of strings representing the
addresss to gather. For example:
DP:$0028
X:$0026
Output Address Array Array of numeric addresses
specifying DPR Variable Background items to collect.
PMAC addresses are specified using an array of long integers.
The most significant word of each long (upper 16 bits)
specifies the word type. A value of 0, 1, 2 and 4 corresponds
to Y, Long, X, and SPECIAL respectively. For Y, Long and
X entries the least significant word specifies the actual PMAC
address to be copied.
Take for example the following define statements and the
initialization of a long integer array.
#define MTR1_ACTULPOS
0x00010028 /* PMAC
Address D:$0028 */
#define MTR1_ACTULVEL
0x00020033 /* PMAC
Address X:$0033 */
#define MTR1_DACOUT
0x00020045 /* PMAC
Address X:$0045 */
#define FB_10
0x0004000A /* PMAC
function block #10 */
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long
myaddrarr[3]={MTR1_DACOUT,MTR1_ACTULPOS,MTR
1_ACTULVEL};
PmacDPRVarBackReset
Once DPR Variable Background buffer operation is enabled this VI can be used to
fetch the data specified during the configuration. The input Enabled can be used to
enable and disable the actual fetch. The Default, un-wired, condition is TRUE.
When New Output is TRUE Output Value Array contains the most recent
background data. When Enabled is FALSE Output Value Array contains the last
valid data even though New Output is FALSE.
The Write/Read and Input Value Array inputs are not currently functional. Future
releases may implement this capability.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
VBGB Specification Cluster Cluster containing information
required to collect and convert DPR Variable Background
items.
Reset Bool (F) When TRUE Stop all DPR Variable
Background and Fixed Background operation.
New Output Bool TRUE when DPR Variable Background
and Fixed Background operation is halted.
PmacDPRVarBackVectors
Query PMAC DPR for the Variable Background buffer data specified by VBGB
Specification Cluster. When Enabled is TRUE (the Default state) the data is fetched
and used to build Output Value 2D Array. When the number of samples equals
Buffer Length New Output is TRUE and Output Value 2D Array contains the
buffered data. If New Output is FALSE DO NOT use Output Value 2D Array.
The implementation of this VI relies on pre-allocated buffers into which the gathered
data is temporarily stored. The current buffers have the following limitations:
A maximum of 8 buffers. These are created by individual calls to PmacDPR
VarBackConfig.
A maximum of 8 items per buffer.
A maximum of 128 samples per item.
See the documentation for information on changing these defaults.
Device Number i32 (0) Device Number
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VBGB Specification Cluster Cluster containing information
required to collect and convert DPR Variable Background
items. Required by PmacDPRVarBack VIs.
Enabled Bool (T) When TRUE query PMAC for the DPR
Variable Background buffer data specified by VBGB
Specification Clusterr. The VI maintains the enabled state.
When FALSE do not place the query. Default is TRUE.
Buffer Length i32 Number of DPR Variable Background
samples to buffer when building vectors. The Default value is
32.
New Output Bool TRUE when Output Value 2D Array
contains new data. Otherwise Output Value 2D Array
should NOT be used.
Output Value 2D Array Dbl A two dimensional array
containing the time sampled vectors of DPR Variable
Background buffer data. The first index for each gathered
item. The second index is the sample number for the specified
item.
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacDPRVarBackStat
A collection of information about the DPR Variable Background buffer created by
the execution of PmacDPRVarBackConfig. Most of this information is not of use to
the general PMACPanel user.
VBGB Status Cluster A collection of information about the
DPR Variable Background buffer created by the execution of
PmacDPRVarBackConfig. Most of this information is not of
use to the general PMACPanel user.
VBGDB u32 The index of this DPR Variable
Background buffer.
Last Buffer Enum This enumerated type identifies
which buffer is the last variable sized buffer in DPR.
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Use this type to decide which buffer (either a binary
rotary or the variable background data buffer) can be
initialized or removed. The sequence for the binary
rotary and variable background data buffers is like a
last in first out stack. The order of initialization must
be: 1. Binary rotary buffer 0, 2. Binary rotary buffer
1, 3. Variable background data buffer.
Num entries i32 The number of items being updated
in the buffer by the calling application.
Total entries The number of items being updated in
the buffer by all applications. Should never exceed
128.
Data Offset u32 The offset, in bytes, from the
beginning of DPR that the data for this VBGDB
begins.
Add Offset u32 The offset, in bytes, from the
beginning of DPR that the address array for this
VBGDB begins. Divide by 4 to get the PMAC offset
(from beginning of DPR 0xD000).
Start Address u32 The PMAC address of the start of
the variable data buffer. This address also indicates
the end of the free user memory.
PmacDPRVarBackSpec
Cluster containing information required to collect and convert DPR Variable
Background items. Required by PmacDPRVarBack VIs.
VBGB Specification Cluster Cluster containing information
required to collect and convert DPR Variable Background
items. Required by PmacDPRVarBack VIs.
VBGDB u32 The index of this DPR Variable
Background buffer.
Output Address Array Array of numeric addresses
specifying DPR Variable Background items to
collect.
PMAC addresses are specified using an array of
long integers. The most significant word of each
long (upper 16 bits) specifies the word type. A
value of 0, 1, 2 and 4 corresponds to Y, Long, X,
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 55
and SPECIAL respectively. For Y, Long and X
entries the least significant word specifies the actual
PMAC address to be copied.
Take for example the following define statements
and the initialization of a long integer array.
#define MTR1_ACTULPOS
0x00010028 /*
PMAC Address D:$0028 */
#define MTR1_ACTULVEL
0x00020033 /*
PMAC Address X:$0033 */
#define MTR1_DACOUT
0x00020045 /*
PMAC Address X:$0045 */
#define FB_10
0x0004000A /*
PMAC function block #10 */
long
myaddrarr[3]={MTR1_DACOUT,MTR1_ACTULP
OS,MTR1_ACTULVEL};
Data Specification An array of VBGDG Spec
Clusters for the configured collection of DPR
Variable Background items.
VBGDG Spec Cluster VBGDG Spec
Cluster containing a scale factor and type
for the specified item.
Scale Factor Scale Factor to apply
to the data read from the DPR
Variable Background buffer.
Address Item Type Enumerated
type defining type of raw data
PmacDPRRealTimeVector
Cluster of vectors containing DPR Real Time buffer data for the specified motor
number.
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DPR Real Time Vector Cluster Cluster of vectors containing
DPR Real Time buffer data for the specified motor number.
Servo Timer i32 PMAC's servo counter located at
PMAC address 0.
Position Dbl Actual motor position in encoder
counts
Velocity Dbl Motor velocity in units of 1/(Ix09 * 32)
counts per servo cycle.
Commanded Pos Dbl Commanded motor position
in encoder counts.
Following Error Dbl Following error in encoder
counts
Master Position Dbl Master position of the motor in
encoder counts
Comp Pos Dbl Compensation position in encoder
counts.
DAC i32 Output DAC value of the previous servo
cycle.
Move Time i32 Time in mS left in the currently
executing move.
PmacDPRRealTimeServo
Cluster containing motor servo status as sampled by the DPR Real Time facility.
DPR Real Time Servo Cluster Cluster containing motor
servo status as sampled by the DPR Real Time facility.
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Home In Progress Status Bit 10 Word 1- Home
Search in Progress: Green while the motor is
searching for its home trigger -- it becomes Green as
soon as the calculations for the move have started,
and becomes Grey again as soon as it has found the
trigger (which is before it has finished the entire
move). This is not a good bit to observe to see if the
homing move is complete. Use the Home Complete
bit instead.
Block Request Status Bit 11 Word 1 - Block
Request: This bit is 1 when the motor has just entered
a new move section, and is requesting that the
upcoming section be calculated. It is 0 otherwise. It
is primarily for internal use.
Desired Velocity Zero Status Bit 13 Word 1 Desired Velocity Zero: This bit is 1 if the motor is in
closed-loop control and the commanded velocity is
zero (i.e. it is trying to hold position). It is zero either
if the motor is in closed-loop mode with non-zero
commanded velocity, or if it is in open-loop mode.
Data Block Error Status Bit 14 Word 1 - Data
Block Error: This bit is 1 when move execution has
been aborted because the data for the next move
section was not ready in time. This is due to
insufficient calculation time. It is 0 otherwise. It
changes from 1 to 0 when another move sequence is
started.
Dwell In Progress Status Bit 15 Word 1 - Dwell in
Progress: This bit is 1 when the motor's coordinate
system is executing a DWELL instruction. It is 0
otherwise.
Integration Mode Status Bit 16 Word 1 - Integration
Mode: This bit is 1 when Ix34 is 1 and the servo loop
integrator is only active when desired velocity is
zero. It is 0 when Ix34 is 0 and the servo loop
integrator is always active.
Running Move Status Bit 17 Word 1 - Running
Definite-Time Move: This bit is 1 when the motor is
executing any move with a predefined end-point and
end-time. This includes any motion program move
dwell or delay, any jog-to-position move, and the
portion of a homing search move after the trigger has
been found. It is 0 otherwise. It changes from 1 to 0
when execution of the commanded move finishes.
Open Loop Status Bit 18 Word 1 - Open Loop
Mode: Red when the servo loop for the motor is
open, either with outputs enabled or disabled (killed).
(Refer to Amplifier Enabled status bit to distinguish
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between the two cases.) Green when the servo loop
is closed (under position control, always with outputs
enabled).
Phased Motor Status Bit 19 Word 1 - Phased Motor:
This bit is 1 when Ix01 is 1 and this motor is being
commutated by PMAC; it is 0 when Ix01 is 0 and
this motor is not being commutated by PMAC.
Hand Wheel Enabled Status Bit 20 Word 1 Handwheel Enabled: This bit is 1 when Ix06 is 1 and
position following for this axis is enabled; it is 0
when Ix06 is 0 and position following is disabled.
Neg Limit Exceeded Status Bit 22 Word 1- Negative
End Limit Set: Red when motor actual position is
less than the software negative position limit (Ix14),
or when the hardware limit on this end (+LIMn -note!) has been tripped; Grey otherwise.
Pos Limit Exceeded Status Bit 21 Word 1- Positive
End Limit Set: Red when motor actual position is
greater than the software positive position limit
(Ix13), or when the hardware limit on this end (LIMn -- note!) has been tripped; Grey otherwis e.
Motor Activated Status Bit 23 Word 1 - Motor
Activated: Green when Ix00 is 1 and the motor
calculations are active; Red when Ix00 is 0 and motor
calculations are deactivated.
PmacDPRRealTimeMotor
Cluster containing motor servo values as sampled by the DPR Real Time facility.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 59
DPR Real Time Motor Cluster Cluster containing motor
servo values as sampled by the DPR Real Time facility.
ServoTimer i32 PMAC's servo counter located at
PMAC address 0.
Comm'd Pos Dbl Commanded motor position in
encoder counts.
Position Dbl Actual motor position in encoder
counts
Velocity Dbl Motor velocity in units of 1/(Ix09 * 32)
counts per servo cycle.
Follow Error Dbl Following error in encoder counts
Master Pos Dbl Master position of the motor in
encoder counts
Comp Pos Dbl Compensation position in encoder
counts.
DAC i32 Output DAC value of the previous servo
cycle.
Move Time i32 Time in mS left in the currently
executing move.
Motor Motion u16 Enumerated type defining the
current motion state of the motor. The possibilities
are:
In Position,
Jog
Running
Homing
Handle
Open Loop
Disabled
Motor Activated Status Bit 23 Word 1 - Motor
Activated: Green when Ix00 is 1 and the motor
calculations are active; Red when Ix00 is 0 and motor
calculations are deactivated.
Open Loop Status Bit 18 Word 1 - Open Loop
Mode: Red when the servo loop for the motor is
open, either with outputs enabled or disabled (killed).
(Refer to Amplifier Enabled status bit to distinguish
between the two cases.) Green when the servo loop
is closed (under position control, always with outputs
enabled).
Neg Limit Exceeded Status Bit 22 Word 1- Negative
End Limit Set: Red when motor actual position is
less than the software negative position limit (Ix14),
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or when the hardware limit on this end (+LIMn -note!) has been tripped; Grey otherwise.
Pos Limit Exceeded Status Bit 21 Word 1- Positive
End Limit Set: Red when motor actual position is
greater than the software positive position limit
(Ix13), or when the hardware limit on this end (LIMn -- note!) has been tripped; Grey otherwise.
PmacDPRNumericSpec
A cluster of items required to describe a DPR mapped PMAC M-Variable for bit and
field access.
DPR Numeric Spec Cluster A cluster of items required to
describe a DPR mapped PMAC M-Variable for bit and field
access.
Address i32 Hexadecimal integer specifying DPR
address offset. For example,
PMAC Addresses such as:
M445->F:$DE01
M446->DP:$DE02
M447->X:$DE03,8,1
Become
E01, E02, and E03 respectively.M446->DP:$DE02
X/Y String A single character string (X or Y)
defining the type of data. Not for L or DP.
Mask/Bit i32 A hexadecimal value used to define a
bit number for single bit operations or a multi digit
hexadecimal number defining a mask for multi-bit
operations.
PmacDPRFixedBackMotorVector
Cluster of vectors containing DPR Fixed Background buffer data for the specified
motor number.
DPR Fixed Motor Vector Cluster Cluster of vectors
containing DPR Fixed Background buffer data for the
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 61
specified motor number.
Target Pos Dbl Vector of Target positions for the
motor in encoder counts.
Bias Pos Db Vector of Bias positions for the motor
in encoder counts
Velocity Dbl Vector of Velocities for the motor in
encoder counts per minute.
PmacDPRFixedBackMotor
Cluster for DPR Fixed Background buffer defining the state of a motor operating
within a coordinate system.
DPR Fixed Motor Cluster Cluster for DPR Fixed
Background buffer defining the state of a motor operating
within a coordinate system.
Target Pos Dbl Target position of the motor in
encoder counts.
Bias Pos Dbl Bias position of the motor in encoder
counts
Velocity Dbl Velocity of the motor in encoder counts
per minute.
Amplifier Enabled Status Bit 14 Word 2 - Amplifier
Enabled: Green when the outputs for this motor's
amplifier are enabled, either in open-loop or closedloop mode (refer to Open-Loop Mode status bit to
distinguish between the two cases). Red when the
outputs are disabled (killed).
Amp Fault Status Bit 3 Word 2 - Amplifier Fault
Error: Red if this motor has been disabled because of
an amplifier fault error, even if the amplifier fault
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signal has gone away. Grey at all other times,
becoming Grey again when the motor is re-enabled.
Warning Following Error Status Bit 1 Word 2 Warning Following Error: Red if the following error
for the motor exceeds its warning following error
limit (Ix12). It stays at Red if the motor is killed due
to fatal following error. Grey at all other times,
changing from Red to Grey when the motor's
following error reduces to under the limit, or if killed,
is re-enabled.
Fatal Following Error Status Bit 2 Word 2 - Fatal
Following Error: Red if this motor has been disabled
because it exceeded its fatal following error limit
(Ix11). Grey at all other times, becoming Grey again
when the motor is re-enabled.
Stopped on Limit Status Bit 11 Word 2 - Stopped on
Position Limit: Red if this motor has stopped
because of either a software or a hardware position
(overtravel) limit, even if the condition that caused
the stop has gone away. Green at all other times,
even when into a limit but moving out of it.
Home Complete Status Bit 10 Word 2 - Home
Complete: Red on power-up or reset, becomes Green
when a homing search move is successfully
completed. If a second homing move is done, this bit
is set to Red at the beginning of the move, and only
becomes Green again if that homing search move is
successfully completed.
In Position Status Bit 0 Word 2 - In Position: Green
when three conditions are satisfied: the desired
velocity zero bit is 1 (which requires closed-loop
control and no commanded move); the program timer
is off (not currently executing any move, DWELL, or
DELAY), and the magnitude of the following error is
smaller than Ix28. Red otherwise.
Motor Motion Enumerated type defining the current
motion state of the motor. The possibilities are:
In Position,
Jog
Running
Homing
Handle
Open Loop
Disabled
PmacDPRFixedBackCoordVector
Cluster of vectors containing DPR Fixed Background buffer data for the specified
coordinate system.
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DPR Fixed Coordinate Vector Cluster Cluster of vectors
containing DPR Fixed Background buffer data for the
specified coordinate system.
Comm'd Pos Dbl Vector of Commanded motor
positions for the specified axis in the specified
coordinate system in the units specified for that axis.
Time Move i32 Vector of Time in mS remaining in
move for the specified coordinate system. It includes
acceleration, steady state, and decleration times.
Time Accel i32 Vector of Time in mS remaining in
acceleration/deceleration when I13 > 0.
PmacDPRFixedBackCoord
Cluster for DPR Fixed Background buffer defining the state of a program executing
within a coordinate system
DPR Fixed Coordinate Cluster Cluster for DPR Fixed
Background buffer defining the state of a program executing
within a coordinate system
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Comm'd Pos Dbl Commanded motor position for
the specified axis in the specified coordinate system
in the units specified for that axis.
Time Move i32 Time in mS remaining in move for
the specified coordinate system. It include
acceleration, steady state, and decleration times.
Time Accel i32 Time in mS remaining in
acceleration/deceleration when I13 > 0.
Prog Remain i32 Number of program lines
remaining for the specified coordinate system. Same
as 'PR' command.
Prog Exec i32 Current Program execution counter.
In Position Status Bit 0 Word 2 - In Position: Green
when three conditions are satisfied: the desired
velocity zero bit is 1 (which requires closed-loop
control and no commanded move); the program timer
is off (not currently executing any move, DWELL, or
DELAY), and the magnitude of the following error is
smaller than Ix28. Red otherwise.
Warning Following Error Status Bit 18 Word 2 Warning Following Error: This bit is 1 when any
motor in the coordinate system has exceeded its
warning following error limit (Ix12). It stays at 1 if a
motor has been killed due to fatal following error
limit. It is 0 at all other times. The change from 1 to
0 occurs when the offending motor's following error
is reduced to under the limit, or if killed on fatal
following error as well, when it is re-enabled.
Fatal Following Error Status Bit 19 Word 2 - Fatal
Following Error: This bit is 1 when any motor in the
coordinate system has been killed due to exceeding
its fatal following error limit (Ix11). It is 0 at other
times. The change from 1 to 0 occurs when the
offending motor is re-enabled.
Run-Time Error Status Bit 22 Word 2 - Run-Time
Error: This bit is 1 when the coordinate system has
stopped a motion program due to an error
encountered while executing the program (e.g. jump
to non-existent label, insufficient calculation time,
etc.)
Circle Radius Error Status Bit 21 Word 2 - Circle
Radius Error: This bit is 1 when a motion program
has been stopped because it was asked to do an arc
move whose distance was more than twice the radius
(by an amount greater than Ix97).
Amplifier Fault Error Status Bit 20 Word 2 Amplifier Fault Error: This bit is 1 when any motor
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Amplifier Fault Error: This bit is 1 when any motor
in the coordinate system has been killed due to
receiving an amplifier fault signal. It is 0 at other
times, changing from 1 to 0 when the offending
motor is re-enabled.
Program Running Status Bit 0 Word 1 - Running
Program: This bit is 1 if the coordinate system is
currently executing a motion program. It is 0 if the
C.S. is not currently executing a motion program.
Note that it becomes 0 as soon as it has calculated the
last move and reached the final RETURN statement
in the program, even if the motors are still executing
the last move or two that have been calculated.
Compare to the motor Running Program status bit.
Single Step Status Bit 1 Word 1 - Single-Step Mode:
This bit is 1 if the motion program currently
executing in this coordinate system has been told to
"step" one move or block of moves, or if it has been
given a Q (Quit) command. It is 0 if the motion
program is executing a program by a R (run)
command, or if it is not executing a motion program
at all.
Continuous Motion Mode Status Bit 2 Word 1 Continuous Motion Mode: This bit is 1 if the
coordinate system is in a sequence of moves that it is
blending together without stops in between. It is 0 if
it is not currently in such a sequence, for whatever
reason.
Continuous Motion Req Status Bit 4 Word 1 Continuous Motion Request: This bit is 1 if the
coordinate system has requested of it a continuous set
of moves (e.g. with an R command). It is 0 if this is
not the case (e.g. not running program, Ix92=1, or
running under an S command).
Motion Mode Enumerated type defining the current
motion mode of the coordinate system. The
possibilities are:
Linear
Rapid
Circular CW
Circular CCW
Spline
PVT
Prog Mode Enumerated type defining the current
program mode of the coordinate system. The
possibilities are:
Stop
Run
Step
Hold
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Jog Hold
Jog Stop
PmacEncoder
\PmacEncoder – This collection provides VIs to access and control the encoder gate
array for position capture and compare. There are also tools for developing
background PLC programs for generating Compare-Equal outputs.
VIs
PmacEncoderTrigger
This VI maintains Encoder Number's compare-equal and capture operations and
monitors the encoder's status register. Home offsets are removed or added during the
processing of compare-equal and capture register data. Limitations associated with
24 bit rollowver are not handled by this VI.
When Enable Compare is TRUE Encoder Number's compare-equal function is reset
and the compare-equal register is set using Input Compare Position. This value is
interpreted as being in CS units if Covert is TRUE and Motor Number is defined in
Coord Number. Otherwise this value is interpreted as being motor position in
encoder counts. Output Compare Position is a persistent copy of Input Compare
Position when Enable Compare was TRUE. The occurance of the compare-equal
condition is indicated by Compare-Equal Bool being TRUE. This does not reset the
latched condition.
When Encoder Number's captures a position Position Captured is TRUE and the
encoder's capture register is queried and converted into Capture Position in motor
position encoder counts or Coord Number CS units. If Motor Number is not defined
in Coord Number or Convert Bool is FALSE the Capture Position is motor position
in encoder counts . If Convert Bool is TRUE and Motor Number is defined in Coord
Number the value is in CS units.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to fetch capture
position register or reset the compare-equal function for.
Enable Compare Bool (F) When TRUE New Output is
TRUE and the encoder's compare-equal register is computed
and set based on Input Compare Position. If Convert is
FALSE or Motor Number is not defined in Coord Number
Input Compare Position is interpreted as motor position in
encoder counts. If Convert is TRUE Input Compare Position
is interpreted in CS units. In all cases the encoder's compareequal functions are reset and enabled. Furthermore, because
the compare-equal register cannot be read once written,
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Output Compare Position maintains a persistent copy of the
last written value.
Input Compare Position Dbl Used to set Encoder Number's
compare-equal register. This value is interpreted as being in
CS units if Covert is TRUE and Motor Number is defined in
Coord Number. Otherwise this value is interpreted as being
motoro position in encoder counts. Home offsets are removed
prior to setting the encoders actual register value.
Limitations associated with 24 bit rollowver are not handled
by this VI.
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state applied when resetting a compare-equal
operation of when converting a capture position.
Position Captured Bool (F) This is Encoder Number's
capture status flag. When TRUE a capture has been
performed and Capture Position contains the capture position
in motor position encoder counts or CS units. The reading of
the encoder capture register by this VI resets the capture status
flag.
Capture Position Dbl In all cases this value is the encoder
Capture Position from the last call with Get Capture TRUE.
All HOME offsets are removed subject to the roll-over
limitations of a 24 bit capture register.
If Motor Number is not defined in Coord Number or Convert
Bool is FALSE the value is motor position in encoder counts .
If Convert Bool is TRUE and Motor Number is defined in
Coord Number the value is in CS units.
Compare-Equal Bool (F) This is Encoder Number's
compare-equal status flag. When TRUE a latched compareequal condition occured and Output Compare Position
contains the value of Input Compare Position set by the VI
when Enable Compare was TRUE.
Output Compare Position Dbl This is a persistent copy of
Input Compare Position.
PmacEncoderToEncoder
This VI converts Input Value in either CS units or motor position in encoder counts
to an absolute encoder position for compare-equal operations.
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to convert Input
Value from CS units to encoder position. If the motor is not defined in the CS Input
Value is assumed to be motor position in encoder counts and Output Value is
encoder position. If the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined is
TRUE and Output Value is scaled from CS units to encoder position.
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Input Value Double Motor position in encoder counts or
possibly CS units convert to compare-equal encoder position.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Capture Offset Bool (F) Force a capture of the encoder to
motor position offset. This should be done after a home
operation.
Output Value Double Input value in CS units converted to
encoder position if the motor is defined in the CS. Otherwise
Input Value is assumed to be motor position in encoder counts
and this value is encoder position.
Coord Defined Bool If Motor Number is defined in Coord
Number and Convert Bool is TRUE this is TRUE.
PmacEncoderToCoord
This VI converts Input Value (Servo Position or Capture Postion) from absolute
encoder position to either CS units or motor position in encoder counts.
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to convert Input
Value from encoder position to CS units. If the motor is not defined in the CS
Output Value is motor position in encoder counts. If the motor is defined and
Convert is TRUE Coord Defined is TRUE and Output Value is in CS units. Coord
Definition is a string specifying Output Value units as "Encoder" or the CS definition
of the motor.
Input Value Double Position Capture encoder value or servo
position to convert to motor position and possibly convert to
CS units
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Capture Offset Bool (F) Force a capture of the encoder to
motor position offset. This should be done after a home
operation.
Output Value Double Input value in encoder position
converted to CS units if the motor is defined in the CS.
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Otherwise this value is motor position in encoder counts.
Coord Defined Bool If Motor Number is defined in Coord
Number and Convert Bool is TRUE this is TRUE.
Coord Definition String String defining the motor within the
CS. "Encoder" if not defined.
PmacEncoderRegTime
Query PMAC for the two interpolation timers for 1/T sub-count resolution for
Encoder Number.
There are two optional methods on PMAC for achieving sub-count resolution with
incremental feedback. The first is called 1/T decoding. Each encoder channel has
two timer registers associated with it. The first register, Time Between Last 2
Counts, holds the time between the last two encoder transitions. Velocity is estimated as being inversely proportional to this time -- a very accurate estimation,
particularly at low speeds.
The second timer, Time Since Las Count, holds the time since the last transition.
Fractional distance traveled since the last transition is estimated as the value of the
second timer divided by the value of the first timer. This interpolation provides
added smoothness to low speed moves, but it does not provide accurate interpolation
at rest.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to fetch the current
encoder count timer interpolation values for.
Time Since Last Count i32 This value is the encoder's time
since the last transition. Fractional distance traveled since the
last transition is estimated as this value divided by the value of
theTime Between Last 2 Counts. This interpolation provides
added smoothness to low speed moves, but it does not provide
accurate interpolation at rest.
Time Between Last 2 Counts i32 This is the time between
the last two encoder transitions. Velocity is estimated as
being inversely proportional to this time -- a very accurate
estimation, particularly at low speeds.
PmacEncoderRegStat
Fetch the encoder control/status word for Encoder Number and parse it into its
pieces. Encoder Status/Control i32 is the integer representation of the register.
Position Capture Control can be used with PmacEncoderCaptureControl. Capture
Flag Control can be used with PmacEncoderCaptureFlag. Encoder Status Control
Cluster can used with PmacEncoderStatControl. Encoder Status Flag Cluster can be
used with PmacEncoderStatFlags.
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Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to fetch the current
encoder status for.
Encoder Status/Control i32 i32 representation of encoder
status word.
Encoder Status Flags Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying encoder status bits that indicate the status of
encoder flags and compare-equal and capture conditions.
Encoder Status Control Cluster This cluster contains items
for displaying and modifying encoder control bits that tell
PMAC how to handle the compare-equal function and several
encoder configuration options.
Capture Flag Control This parameter determines which of
the "Flag" inputs will be used for position capture (if one is
used -- see I902 etc.):
Setting Meaning
0
HMFLn (Home Flag n)
1
-LIMn (Negative Limit Signal n)
2
+LIMn (Positive Limit Signal n)
3
FAULTn (Amplifier Fault Signal n)
This parameter is typically set to zero, because in actual use,
the +/-LIMn and FAULTn flags create other effects that
usually interfere with what is trying to be accomplished by the
position capture. If you wish to capture on the +/-LIMn or
FAULTn flags, you must either disable their normal functions
with Ix25, or use a channel n where none of the flags is used
for the normal axis functions.
Position Capture Control This parameter determines which
signal or combination of signals (and which polarity) triggers
a position capture of the counter for encoder n. If a flag input
(home, limit, or fault) is used, I903 (etc.) determines which
flag. Proper setup of this variable is essential for a successful
home search, which depends on the position-capture function.
The following settings may be used:
Setting Meaning
0
Software Control
1
Rising edge of CHCn (third channel)
2
Rising edge of Flag n (as set by Flag
Select)
3
Rising edge of [CHCn AND Flag n]
4
Software Control
5
Falling edge of CHCn (third channel)
6
Rising edge of Flag n (as set by Flag
Select)
7
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND Flag n]
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 71
8
Software Control
9
Rising edge of CHCn (third channel)
10
Falling edge of Flag n (as set by Flag
Select)
11
Rising edge of [CHCn AND Flag n/]
12
Software Control
13
Falling edge of CHCn (third channel)
14
Falling edge of Flag n (as set by Flag
Select)
15
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND Flag n/]
Note that several of these values are redundant. To do a
software-controlled position capture, preset this parameter to 0
or 4; when the parameter is then changed to 8 or 12, the
capture is triggered (this is not of much practical use).
PmacEncoderRegServo
Query PMAC for the two position registers containing commutation phase and servo
position. Servo Position is actual encoder position in counts referenced to a powerup/reset position of zero. Encoder Phase is used internally for commutation.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to fetch the current
encoder counts for.
Servo Position i32 The encoder Servo position register is 2 *
Encoder counts with the LSB the direction bit. This output
value is en actual encoder position referenced to a powerup/reset position of zero.
Encoder Phase i32 PMAC provides sophisticated
commutation capabilities that require the use of this register.
PmacEncoderRegisters
Query PMAC for all registers for Encoder Number. Assemble the values into a
PmacEncoderRegisters Cluster.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to fetch the various
register for.
Encoder Registers Cluster This cluster contains the values of
the various encoder registers for use in your application.
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PmacEncoderRegDAC
Query PMAC for the current value of the DAC associated with Encoder Number.
The raw register uses the upper 16 bits of the 24 bit register. DAC Value shifts the
16 bit value down 8 bits.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to fetch DAC value
for.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
DAC Value i32 Current value of the DAC associated with the
specified encoder. The raw register uses the upper 16 bits of
the 24 bit register. This output value shifts the 16 bit value
down 8 bits.
PmacEncoderRegCapture
Query PMAC for the Capture Position register. Capture Position is actual encoder
position at the time of the capture trigger in encoder counts referenced to a powerup/reset position of zero.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to fetch capture
position register for.
Capture Position i32 Actual encoder position at the time of
the capture trigger in encoder counts referenced to a powerup/reset position of zero.
PmacEncoderRegADC
Query PMAC for the current value of the ADC associated with Encoder Number.
The raw register uses the upper 16 bits of the 24 bit register. ADC Value shifts the
16 bit value down 8 bits.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to fetch ADC value
for.
ADC Value i32 Current value of the ADC associated with
specified encoder. The raw register uses the upper 16 bits of
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 73
the 24 bit register. This output value shifts the 16 bit value
down 8 bits.
PmacEncoderOffset
Query PMAC for the encoder to motor offset captured during a home operation for
Encoder/Motor Number. This assumes that encoder 1 is defined for motor 1, etc.
Encoder-Motor Offset provides a reference for using the encoder position-capture
and position-compare registers. These registers are referenced to the encoder zero
position, which is the power-up position, not the home (motor zero) position. This
value is the difference between the two positions plus the home offset Ix26.
This value should be subtracted from encoder position (usually from position
capture) to get motor position, or added to motor position to get encoder position
(usually for position compare).
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor/Encoder Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor/Encoder
number whose encoder to motor position offset is fetched.
This assumes that encoder 1 is defined for motor 1, etc.
Capture Offset Bool (F) Force a capture of the encoder to
motor position offset. This should be done after a home
operation.
Encoder - Motor Offset Double This value provides a
reference for using the encoder position-capture and positioncompare registers. These registers are referenced to the
encoder zero position, which is the power-up position, not the
home (motor zero) position. This value is the difference
between the two positions plus the home offset Ix26.
This value should be subtracted from encoder position
(usually from position capture) to get motor position, or added
to motor position to get encoder position (usually for position
compare).
PmacEncoderIVarCapture
Follow PMACView's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the Encoder I-Variables for the specified Encoder Number are set. Otherwise they
are fetched from PMAC and provided by Output Encoder I-Capture Cluster with
New Output TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
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Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder number whose IVariables are addressed. This may or may not correspond to a
motor.
Set/Get Bool (F) When TRUE PMAC is set using Input
Encoder I-Capture Cluster. When FALSE Output Encoder ICapture Cluster contains the current PMAC definitions.
Input Encoder I-Capture Cluster This cluster contains
items for displaying and modifying an encoder's position
capture trigger I-Variables.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Encoder I-Capture
Cluster contains new data.
Output Encoder I-Capture Cluster This cluster contains
items for displaying and modifying an encoder's position
capture trigger I-Variables.
PmacEncoderCompareConfig
Follow PMACView's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the Input Compare Control bits for the specified Encoder Number are set. Otherwise
they are fetched from PMAC and provided by Output Compare Control Cluster with
New Output TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Input Compare Control Cluster This cluster contains items
for displaying and modifying encoder control bits that tell
PMAC how to handle the compare-equal function.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder number whose
compare-equal control bits will be set by Encoder Compare
Control Cluster This may or may not correspond to a motor.
Set/Get Bool (F) When TRUE Encoder Number is set using
Input Compare Control Cluster. When FALSE Output
Compare Control Cluster contains the current PMAC
definitions.
Output Compare Control Cluste This cluster contains items
for displaying and modifying encoder control bits that tell
PMAC how to handle the compare-equal function.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Compare Control
Cluster contains new data.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 75
PmacEncoderCompare
This VI reset Encoder Number's compare-equal function and set the position register
using Input Compare Position when Enable Compare is TRUE. This value is
interpreted as being in CS units if Covert is TRUE and Motor Number is defined in
Coord Number. Otherwise this value is interpreted as being motor position in
encoder counts. Home offsets are removed prior to setting the encoders actual
register value.
Limitations associated with 24 bit rollowver are not handled by this VI.
Output Compare Position is a persistent copy of Input Compare Position when
Enable Compare was TRUE.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to set compare-equal
position register for.
Input Compare Position Dbl Used to set Encoder Number's compareequal register. This value is interpreted as being in CS units if Covert
is TRUE and Motor Number is defined in Coord Number. Otherwise
this value is interpreted as being motor position in encoder counts.
Home offsets are removed prior to setting the encoders actual register
value.
Limitations associated with 24 bit roll-over are not handled by this VI.
Enable Compare Bool (F) When TRUE New Output is TRUE and the
encoder's compare-equal register is computed and set based on Input
Compare Position. If Convert is FALSE or Motor Number is not
defined in Coord Number Input Compare Position is interpreted as
motor position in encoder counts. If Convert is TRUE Input Compare
Position is interpreted in CS units. In all cases the encoder's compareequal functions are reset and enabled. Furthermore, because the
compare-equal register cannot be read once written, Output Compare
Position maintains a persistent copy of the last written value.
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and conversion
state to be applied to Input Compare Value when producing a properly
referenced compare-equal value for the encoder.
Output Compare Position Dbl This is a persistent copy of Input
Compare Position
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Compare Value contains
new data.
PmacEncoderCapture
This VI queries and converts Encoder Number's Capture Position into motor position
encoder counts or Coord Number CS units when Get Capture is TRUE. If Motor
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Number is not defined in Coord Number or Convert Bool is FALSE the Capture
Position is motor position in encoder counts . If Convert Bool is TRUE and Motor
Number is defined in Coord Number the value is in CS units.
When Get Capture is TRUE and a new Capture Position is produced New Output is
TRUE. In all cases this value is the encoder Capture Position from the last call with
Get Capture TRUE. All HOME offsets are removed subject to the roll-over
limitations of a 24 bit capture register.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Encoder Number i32 (1-16) (1) Encoder to fetch capture
position register for.
Get Capture Bool (F) When TRUE the New Output is TRUE
and encoder capture register is read and converted to Capture
Position in motor position encoder units or CS units.
Otherwise the last value read is persistently maintained by
Capture Position.
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied to encoder register value to
produce Capture Position.
Capture Position Dbl In all cases this value is the encoder
Capture Position from the last call with Get Capture TRUE.
All HOME offsets are removed subject to the roll-over
limitations of a 24 bit capture register.
If Motor Number is not defined in Coord Number or Convert
Bool is FALSE the value is motor position in encoder counts .
If Convert Bool is TRUE and Motor Number is defined in
Coord Number the value is in CS units.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Capture Position contains
new data.
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacEncoderStatFlags
This cluster contains items for displaying encoder status bits that indicate the status
of encoder flags and compare-equal and capture conditions.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 77
Encoder Status Flags Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying encoder status bits that indicate the status of
encoder flags and compare-equal and capture conditions.
Compare-Equal M116->X:$C000,16,1
;
Compare-equals flag for encoder 1
This compare-equal signal is always copied into the
compare-equal flag (M116 here) that is available for
PMAC internal use. If you are using this flag
internally, make sure that the signal is latched
(M111=1), or you will probably miss it. For
interrupting the host (edge-triggered), you will
probably want the signal transparent.
Position Captured M103->X:$C003,0,24,S
;
Encoder 1 24-bit position capture register
M117->X:$C000,17
; Encoder 1 positioncapture flag
This bit goes TRUE when the trigger condition has
gone TRUE; it goes FALSE when the capture
register is read (when M103 is used in an
expression). As long as the bit is true, the capture
function is disabled; you must read the capture
register to re-enable the capture function.
Count Error M118->X:$C000,18,1
; Count
error flag for encoder 1
If an illegal encoder transition (both channels
changing on the same SCLK cycle) does get through
-- or around, if bypassed -- the delay filter, and to the
decoder, a count-error flag (M118 here) is set, noting
a loss of position information.
C Channel Status Quadrature encoders provide an
index channel to indicate revolutions of the encoder.
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This flag is TRUE when the channel is TRUE.
Home Flag A home switch may be normally open or
normally closed; open is high (1 = TRUE), and
closed is low (0 = FALSE). The polarity of the edge
that causes the home position capture is
programmable with Encoder I-Variables 2 and 3
(I902 and I903 for HMFL1).
Limit- Flag When assigned for the dedicated uses,
these signals provide important safety and accuracy
functions. +LIMn and -LIMn are direction-sensitive
over-travel limits, that must be actively held low
(sourcing current from the pins to ground) to permit
motion in their direction.
The direction sense of +LIMn and -LIMn is the
opposite of what many peo-ple would consider
intuitive. That is, +LIMn should be placed at the
nega-tive end of travel, and -LIMn should be placed
at the positive end of travel.
Limit+ Flag When assigned for the dedicated uses,
these signals provide important safety and accuracy
functions. +LIMn and -LIMn are direction-sensitive
over-travel limits, that must be actively held low
(sourcing current from the pins to ground) to permit
motion in their direction.
The direction sense of +LIMn and -LIMn is the
opposite of what many peo-ple would consider
intuitive. That is, +LIMn should be placed at the
nega-tive end of travel, and -LIMn should be placed
at the positive end of travel.
Fault Flag This flag takes a signal from the amplifier
so PMAC knows when the amplifier is having
problems, and can shut down action. The polarity is
programmable with I-variable Ix25 (I125 for motor
#1) and the return signal is analog ground (AGND).
FAULT1 is pin 49. With the default setup, this
signal must actively be pulled low for a fault
condition. In this setup , if nothing is wired into this
input, PMAC will consider the motor not to be in a
fault condition.
PmacEncoderStatControl
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying encoder control bits that tell
PMAC how to handle the compare-equal function and several encoder configuration
options.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 79
Encoder Status Control Cluster This cluster contains items
for displaying and modifying encoder control bits that tell
PMAC how to handle the compare-equal function and several
encoder configuration options.
Count Write Enable For internal PMAC use.
Compare Latch M111->X:$C000,11,1
;
Compare flag latch control bit for encoder 1
The flag-latch control bit (M111 here) controls
whether the compare-equal signal is transparent -TRUE only when the positions are actually equal -or latched -- TRUE until actively reset. The signal is
transparent if this control bit is FALSE, and latched
if the control bit is TRUE. To clear a latched flag,
take the control bit to FALSE, then back to TRUE.
Compare Output M112->X:$C000,12,1
;
Compare output-enable bit for encoder 1
The output-enable bit (M112 here) determines
whether the compare-equal flag will be output on the
EQU line (TRUE enables). This must be set if you
want to use the signal either to interrupt your host or
to trigger an external event directly.
EQU Output Invert M113->X:$C000,13,1
; Compare output invert control bit for
encoder 1
The output-invert bit (M113 here) determines
whether the EQUn output is high-TRUE or lowTRUE (TRUE inverts -- low-true). For host-interrupt
pur-poses, you would want this high-TRUE.
AENAn Most amplifiers have an enable/disable
input that permits complete shut-down of the
amplifier regardless of the voltage of the command
signal. PMAC's AENA line is meant for this
purpose. This control bit enables this line.
If you are not using a direc-tion and magnitude
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amplifier or voltage-to-frequency converter, you can
use this pin to enable and disable your amplifier
(wired to the enable line).
Delay Filter Disable Each encoder has a digital
delay filter consisting of three cascaded D-flip-flops
on each line, with a best two-of-three voting scheme
on the outputs of the flip-flops. The flip-flops are
clocked by the SCLK signal. This filter does not
pass through a state change that only lasts for one
SCLK cycle; any change this narrow should be a
noise spike. In doing this, the filter delays actual
transitions by two SCLK cycles -- a trivial delay in
most systems.
This delay filter may be bypassed by setting the
Encoder I-Variable 1 (I901, I906, etc.) to 1. This IVariable maps to this encoder control bit. Bypassing
this filter will probably only be done by those users
with parallel sub-count interpolation, for which the
delay could cause transition errors.
PmacEncoderRegisters
This cluster contains the values of the various encoder registers for use in your
application.
Encoder Registers Cluster This cluster contains the values of
the various encoder registers for use in your application.
X:$Cxxx - Status/Control i32 i32 representation of
encoder status word.
Y:$Cxxx - Time Between Last Counts i32 This is
the time between the last two encoder transitions.
Velocity is estimated as being inversely proportional
to this time -- a very accurate estimation, particularly
at low speeds.
Y:$Cxxx - Time Since Last Count i32 This value is
the encoder's time since the last transition. Fractional
distance traveled since the last transition is estimated
as this value divided by the value of theTime
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 81
Between Last 2 Counts. This interpolation provides
added smoothness to low speed moves, but it does
not provide accurate interpolation at rest.
X:$Cxxx - Phase Position i32 PMAC provides
sophisticated commutation capabilities that require
the use of this register.
X:$Cxxx - Servo Position i32 The encoder Servo
position register is 2 * Encoder counts with the LSB
the direction bit. This output value is en actual
encoder position referenced to a power-up/reset
position of zero.
Y:$Cxxx - DAC Output i32 Current value of the
DAC associated with the specified encoder. The raw
register uses the upper 16 bits of the 24 bit register.
This output value shifts the 16 bit value down 8 bits.
Y:$Cxxx - ADC Input i32 Current value of the
ADC associated with specified encoder. The raw
register uses the upper 16 bits of the 24 bit register.
This output value shifts the 16 bit value down 8 bits.
X:$Cxxx - Capture Position i32 Actual encoder
position at the time of the capture trigger in encoder
counts referenced to a power-up/reset position of
zero.
PmacEncoderIVarCapture
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying Encoder I-Variables 2 and
3. These parameters tell PMAC what trigger conditions and flags to use for position
capture.
Encoder I-Capture Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying and modifying Encoder I-Variables 2 and 3. These
parameter tell PMAC what trigger conditions and flags to use
for position capture.
"Encoder I-Variable 2" Position Capture Control
This parameter determines which signal or
comb ination of signals (and which polarity) triggers a
position capture of the counter for encoder n. If a
flag input (home, limit, or fault) is used, I903 (etc.)
determines which flag. Proper setup of this variable
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is essential for a successful home search, which
depends on the position-capture function. The
following settings may be used:
Setting Meaning
0
Software Control
1
Rising edge of CHCn (third channel)
2
Rising edge of Flag n (as set
by Flag Select)
3
Rising edge of [CHCn AND
Flag n]
4
Software Control
5
Falling edge of CHCn (third
channel)
6
Rising edge of Flag n (as set
by Flag Select)
7
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND
Flag n]
8
Software Control
9
Rising edge of CHCn (third
channel)
10
Falling edge of Flag n (as set
by Flag Select)
11
Rising edge of [CHCn AND
Flag n/]
12
Software Control
13
Falling edge of CHCn (third
channel)
14
Falling edge of Flag n (as set
by Flag Select)
15
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND
Flag n/]
Note that several of these values are redundant. To
do a software-controlled position capture, preset this
parameter to 0 or 4; when the parameter is then
changed to 8 or 12, the capture is triggered (this is
not of mu ch practical use).
"Encoder I-Variable 3" Capture Flag This
parameter determines which of the "Flag" inputs will
be used for position capture (if one is used -- see I902
etc.):
Setting Meaning
0
HMFLn (Home Flag n)
1
-LIMn (Negative Limit Signal n)
2
+LIMn (Positive Limit Signal n)
3
FAULTn (Amplifier Fault Signal n)
This parameter is typically set to zero, because in
actual use, the +/-LIMn and FAULTn flags create
other effects that usually interfere with what is trying
to be accomplished by the position capture. If you
wish to capture on the +/-LIMn or FAULTn flags,
you must either disable their normal functions with
Ix25, or use a channel n where none of the flags is
used for the normal axis functions.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 83
PmacEncoderCompareConfig
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying encoder control bits that tell
PMAC how to handle the compare-equal function.
Encoder Compare Control Cluster This cluster contains
items for displaying and modifying encoder control bits that
tell PMAC how to handle the compare-equal function.
Compare Latch M111->X:$C000,11,1
;
Compare flag latch control bit for encoder 1
The flag-latch control bit (M111 here) controls
whether the compare-equal signal is transparent -TRUE only when the positions are actually equal -or latched -- TRUE until actively reset. The signal is
transparent if this control bit is FALSE, and latched
if the control bit is TRUE. To clear a latched flag,
take the control bit to FALSE, then back to TRUE.
Compare Output M112->X:$C000,12,1
;
Compare output-enable bit for encoder 1
The output-enable bit (M112 here) determines
whether the compare-equal flag will be output on the
EQU line (TRUE enables). This must be set if you
want to use the signal either to interrupt your host or
to trigger an external event directly.
EQU Output Invert M113->X:$C000,13,1
; Compare output invert control bit for
encoder 1
The output-invert bit (M113 here) determines
whether the EQUn output is high-TRUE or lowTRUE (TRUE inverts -- low-true). For host-interrupt
pur-poses, you would want this high-TRUE.
PmacEncoderCaptureFlag
This parameter determines which of the "Flag" inputs will be used for position
capture (if one is used -- see I902 etc.):
Setting
84 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
Meaning
0
HMFLn (Home Flag n)
1
-LIMn (Negative Limit Signal n)
2
+LIMn (Positive Limit Signal n)
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
3
FAULTn (Amplifier Fault Signal n)
This parameter is typically set to zero, because in actual use, the +/-LIMn and
FAULTn flags create other effects that usually interfere with what is trying to be
accomplished by the position capture. If you wish to capture on the +/-LIMn or
FAULTn flags, you must either disable their normal functions with Ix25, or use a
channel n where none of the flags is used for the normal axis functions.
Capture Flag Control This parameter determines which of
the "Flag" inputs will be used for position capture (if one is
used -- see I902 etc.):
Setting Meaning
0
HMFLn (Home Flag n)
1
-LIMn (Negative Limit Signal n)
2
+LIMn (Positive Limit Signal n)
3
FAULTn (Amplifier Fault Signal n)
This parameter is typically set to zero, because in actual use,
the +/-LIMn and FAULTn flags create other effects that
usually interfere with what is trying to be accomplished by the
position capture. If you wish to capture on the +/-LIMn or
FAULTn flags, you must either disable their normal functions
with Ix25, or use a channel n where none of the flags is used
for the normal axis functions.
PmacEncoderCaptureControl
This parameter determines which signal or combination of signals (and which
polarity) triggers a position capture of the counter for encoder n. If a flag input
(home, limit, or fault) is used, I903 (etc.) determines which flag. Proper setup of this
variable is essential for a successful home search, which depends on the positioncapture function. The following settings may be used:
Setting
Meaning
0
Software Control
1
Rising edge of CHCn (third channel)
2
Rising edge of Flag n (as set by Flag Select)
3
Rising edge of [CHCn AND Flag n]
4
Software Control
5
Falling edge of CHCn (third channel)
6
Rising edge of Flag n (as set by Flag Select)
7
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND Flag n]
8
Software Control
9
Rising edge of CHCn (third channel)
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 85
10
Falling edge of Flag n (as set by Flag Select)
11
Rising edge of [CHCn AND Flag n/]
12
Software Control
13
Falling edge of CHCn (third channel)
14
Falling edge of Flag n (as set by Flag Select)
15
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND Flag n/]
Note that several of these values are redundant. To do a software-controlled position
capture, preset this parameter to 0 or 4; when the parameter is then changed to 8 or
12, the capture is triggered (this is not of much practical use).
Position Capture Control This parameter determines which
signal or combination of signals (and which polarity) triggers
a position capture of the counter for encoder n. If a flag input
(home, limit, or fault) is used, I903 (etc.) determines which
flag. Proper setup of this variable is essential for a successful
home search, which depends on the position-capture function.
The following settings may be used:
Setting Meaning
0
Software Control
1
Rising edge of CHCn (third channel)
2
Rising edge of Flag n (as set by Flag
Select)
3
Rising edge of [CHCn AND Flag n]
4
Software Control
5
Falling edge of CHCn (third channel)
6
Rising edge of Flag n (as set by Flag
Select)
7
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND Flag n]
8
Software Control
9
Rising edge of CHCn (third channel)
10
Falling edge of Flag n (as set by Flag
Select)
11
Rising edge of [CHCn AND Flag n/]
12
Software Control
13
Falling edge of CHCn (third channel)
14
Falling edge of Flag n (as set by Flag
Select)
15
Rising edge of [CHCn/ AND Flag n/]
Note that several of these values are redundant. To do a
software-controlled position capture, preset this parameter to 0
or 4; when the parameter is then changed to 8 or 12, the
capture is triggered (this is not of much practical use).
PmacFile
\PmacFile - Tools for maintaining ASCII program files, LabVIEW datalog files, and
downloading files to PMAC.
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VIs
PmacFileDatalog
Manage datalog operations for type-neutral PmacPQMVariant Arrays.
Operations as specified by the radio buttons in Datalog Control Cluster are
performed when Append/Read is TRUE. A file must be selected prior to executing
the operation using the Create/Open button or New File button in the cluster. The
file is opened and closed on every transaction. After an operation New Datalog
Display is TRUE and Output Datalog Display Cluster contains updated operation
status for your application's cluster.
Append operations write Input PQM Variant Array to the end of the file specified in
Input Datalog Display Cluster and update Current Record and Num Records in the
output cluster. The contents of the Note window are appended with the record.
Read operations read the record specified by Current Record in Input Datalog
Display Cluster from the specified file and generate a new Output PQM Variant
Array. The availability of new data is indicated by New PQM Variant Array TRUE.
Output Datalog Display Cluster increments Current Record and displays the Note, if
any, attached to the record. Read operations cannot read past the end of the file and
simply read the last record in the file.
To change the data logged by this VI simply change Input and Output PQM Variant
Array to your own data type. similar modifications to PmacFileDatalogAppend,
Create, and Read are also required.
Input PQM Variant Array Array of PmacPQMVariants to
write/append to the specified datalog file.
Datalog Control Cluster PmacFileDatalogControl specifies
what operations this VI will perform during its next execution.
Input Datalog Display Cluster Input Datalog Display
Cluster contains information about the record to be written or
read during the next read or write to a datalog file.
Append/Read Bool (F) Execute the specified Read, Append,
or Ignore operation when TRUE.
Output PQM Variant Array Array of PmacPQMVariants
read during the last datalog read.
New PQM Variant Array Bool (F) Output PQM Variant
Cluster contains new PQM data.
Output Datalog Display Cluster Output Datalog Display
Cluster contains information about the record to be written or
read during the next read or write to a datalog file.
New Datalog Display Bool (F) Output Datalog Display
Cluster contains new information about a datalog file path,
record just read or written, and notes that may have been read.
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record just read or written, and notes that may have been read.
PmacFileDatalogAppend
When Append Record is TRUE append Input PQM Variant Array to the file
specified in Input Datalog Display at the end of the file. Update the Current Record
and Num Records in Output Datalog Display Cluster. Indicate the new data by
setting new Datalog Display TRUE.
Input PQM Variant Array Array of PmacPQMVariants to
append to the datalog file.
Input Datalog Display Cluster Input Datalog Display
Cluster contains information about the record to be written
during the next append to a datalog file.
Append Record Bool Execute an append operation when
TRUE.
Output Datalog Display Cluster Output Datalog Display
Cluster contains information about the next record to be
written during the next write to a datalog file.
New Datalog Display Bool (F) TRUE when a record was
written to the datalog file and Output Datalog Display Cluster
indicates the next record to be written
PmacFileDatalogCreate
Create or Open an existing datalog file to store data of type Input PQM Variant
Array along with notes. When Create/Open is TRUE use the path in Input Datalog
Cluster. If this path is empty or Not A Path display a file selection dialog. When a
file name is entered or an existing file is selected the number of records in the file is
determined. All updated information is available in Output Datalog Display Cluster
and indicated by New Datalog Display TRUE.
Input PQM Variant Array Input PQM Variant Array
defines the type of user data that will be stored in the datalog
file. The actual record is a cluster containing this array, notes,
and other information you might add such as data, time, user
name, etc.
Create/Open Bool When TRUE Create a new datalog file to
store PmacPQMVariant arrays or Open an existing datalog
file containing PmacPQMVariant arrays.
Input Datalog Display Cluster Input Datalog Display
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Cluster contains the file path of the datalog file to be created
or opened. If the file path is empty or Not A Path a dialog to
locate or name a file is displayed.
Output Datalog Display Cluster Output Datalog Display
Cluster contains the path of the file to be read or written
during the next datalog operation.
New Datalog Display Bool (F) Output Datalog Display
Cluster contains new information about the datalog file path
and the number of records contained in the file.
PmacFileDatalogRead
When Read Record is TRUE read Output PQM Variant Array from the file specified
in Input Datalog Display using Current Record. Update the increment Current
Record in Output Datalog Display Cluster and display the Note, if any, stored with
the record. Indicate the new data by setting new Datalog Display TRUE.
Input Datalog Display Cluster Input Datalog Display
Cluster contains information about the record to be read
during the next read from a datalog file.
Read Record Bool Execute the a read record operation when
TRUE.
Output PQM Variant Array When New Record is TRUE
this array contains type-neutral PmacPQMVariants read from
the datalog file.
Output Datalog Display Cluster Output Datalog Display
Cluster contains information about the record just read from
the datalog file.
New Record Bool (F) TRUE when a record was read from
the datalog file and Output Datalog Display Cluster displays
any notes associated with the record and Current Record
indicates the next record to be read
PmacFileDownLoad
Compile the ASCII motion or PLC program specified by Down Load File Path and
down load the compiled code to PMAC. If there is a compile error Down Load Error
is TRUE. Down Load Log File Path specifies the path to the compile log file.
Example
If Down Load File Path is PmacTest1.pmc this path is PmacTest1.log. If there is a
compile error a pop-up panel displaying the log file appears to detail compile and
down load errors.
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Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Down Load File Path Path of existing ASCII motion or PLC
program to down load to PMAC.
There is no ability to browse for a down file to down load.
Down Load Log File Path Path to the down load compile
log. If the Down Load File Path is
PmacTest1.pmc this path is PmacTest1.log
Down Load Error Bool (F) TRUE if the file doesn't exist or
there was an error compiling the program.
PmacFileDownLoadLog
Load the down load compile log file generated by PmacFileDownLoad and display
the contents. This panel automatically appears if an error occurs during the down
load process. The modal panel must be closed before continuing.
Log File Path Name of Down Load compile log file to
display.
PmacFileLoad
Input Path is the file path of an ASCII file to read into Buffer String. If Input Path is
empty (default value) or is Not A Path, the VI displays a File dialog box from which
you can select a file. Output Path is the file path that was loaded and contained in
Buffer String. Output Path is NotAPath if the user canceled the operation.
Error 43 occurs if the user cancels the dialog.
Input Path (dialog if empty) Input Path is the path name of
an ASCII file to load. If file path is empty (default value) or is
Not A Path, the VI displays a File dialog box from which you
can select a file.
Output Path (NotAPath if canceled) Output Path is the path
of the file from which Buffer String is loaded. You can use
this output to determine the path of a file that you opened
using dialog. Output Path returns Not A Path if the user
selects Cancel from the dialog box.
Buffer String ASCII data read from the file.
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PmacFileSave
Input Path is the file path of an ASCII file to write Buffer String to. If Input Path is
empty (default value) or is Not A Path, the VI displays a File dialog box from which
you can select a file. Output Path is the file path of the file where Buffer String was
saved. Output Path is NotAPath if the user canceled the operation.
Error 43 occurs if the user cancels the dialog.
Input Path (dialog if empty) The path name of the file to
save Buffer String to. If Input Path is empty (default value) or
is Not A Path, the VI displays a File dialog box from which
you can select a file. Error 43 occurs if the user cancels the
dialog.
Buffer String Buffer String is the data the VI writes to the
file.
Output Path (Not A Path if canceled) Output Path is the
path of the file to which the VI wrote Buffer String. You can
use this output to determine the path of a file that you open
using dialog. new file path returns Not A Path if the user
selects Cancel from the dialog box.
PmacFileSpreadsheet
Write Data Array to a spreadsheet file specified by Input File Path. If this path is
empty or Not A Path a selection dialog is displayed. Output File Path is the path to
the file actually written. The spreadsheet file will contain a column for each element
in Data Array. The first row in each column is the tab-delimited text description
contained in Column Header. Each successive row has an assumed sample interval
of 1.
Input File Path Path to spreadsheet file to write Data Array
to. If this is empty or Not A Path a dialog is displayed.
Data Array Double Data Array to be written to spreadsheet
file.
Column Header String Optional tab-delimited column
header strings
Output File Path Actual file path where Data Array was
written.
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Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacFileDatalogControl
This cluster defines how PmacFileDatalog will handle requests for service. Read
will read a record, Append writes a record, and Ignore take no action. Create/Open
allows the user to select an existing file for reading or to append new records to.
New file selects a new file for Read or Append operations.
Datalog Control Cluster This cluster defines how
PmacFileDatalog will handle requests for service.
Create/Open Create or Open a datalog file for
reading or appending. If the File path in the
corresponding Datalog Display Cluster is empty or
Not A Path a File Dialog is displayed to select a file.
If a new file name is entered a file is created. If an
existing file is selected it is opened.
New File Create or Open a new datalog file for
reading or appending. A File Dialog is displayed to
select a file. If a new file name is entered a file is
created. If an existing file is selected it is opened.
Append/Read Operation Select a datalog file
operation to be executed during the Read/Append
operation. Read will record specified by Current
Record on the next operation. Append will write the
record to the end of the specified file. Ignore will
neither read nor append a record.
PmacFileDatalogDisplay
This cluster works with PmacFileDatalog to specify which datalog file to work with.
When a record is appended to a datalog file Current Record reflects the record that
will be written. The contents of Note will be written with the record.
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Datalog Display Cluster This cluster contains information
about the record to be written or read during the next read or
write to a datalog file by PmacFileDatalog.
Datalog Path (dialog if empty) Full path name for
the datalog file. Only required when creating a new
file (Mode = Create).
Current Record Number of datalog record to be
read or record just written.
Num Records Number of records in datalog file.
Note Text note to be written with record to datalog
file
PmacGather
\PmacGather - This collection of VI’s allow the user to select motion variables to
control the collection and conversion of data into standard LabVIEW analysis
formats. Collected data can be output to files in tab delimited format for export to
programs such as Matlab or Excel.
VIs
PmacGatherCollect
Collect the gather buffer and scale the data using each items scale factor. The data in
Gather Data Array is a two dimensional array of doubles with Number of Items
columns and Number of Samples rows. In this format the data can be written to a
spreadsheet or processed by many different LabVIEW data analysis VIs.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
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Input Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo sample
rate and array of clusters of Address Items describing item,
address, and scale factor.
Number Of Samples i32 Number of samples gathered
Number Of Items i32 Number of source items gathered.
Gather Data Array Double Two dimensional array of
gathered data. There are Number of Sources columns and
Number of Samples rows. The data for each source item is
scaled using the scale factor for that item.
Servo Cycles i32 Sample rate in Servo Cycles.
PmacGatherSelect
Maintains a PmacGatherSelect Cluster and builds a PmacGatherSpec cluster to
define gather operations. You can builds a list in four ways. Select an item and
Motor/CS number, P-Variable, Q-Variable, of define a Custom Gather Specification.
Click the associated -> button to add the item to the list on the right. The gather
sample rate is defined as a number of Servo Cycles. All items are gathered at the
same sample rate. Items selected in the list can be deleted using the Remove button.
New Output is TRUE when an item is added to the list with a -> button or removed
from the list with Remove. New selection identifies the selected item in the gather
list. Gather Selection Items String Array define the contents of the gather list.
Gather Spec Cluster is an internal data type used by other PmacGather VIs to setup
PMAC and collect the gathered data.
Gather Select Cluster Build a list of Address Items to be
gathered.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when any -> or Remove button
in Gather Select Cluster is clicked. This indicates that New
Selection, Gather Selection Items, and Gather Spec Cluster all
contain new data.
Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo sample rate
and array of clusters of Address Items describing item,
address, and scale factor.
Gather Selection Items String Array Array of strings for
items in Gather Selection Items ring.
New Selection i32 Index of currently selected it in Gather
Selection Items ring.
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PmacGatherSetup
Use the information in Input Gather Spec Cluster to setup a gather operation on
PMAC. Output Gather Spec Cluster should be wired to PmacGatherStart,
PmacGatherStop, and PmacGatherCollect to sequence operations and so that they
can get the information they require for their operation.
The actual setup can also be done using Pewin32, PmacTerminal, or your
motion/PLC programs. This is not recommended if you intend to use
PmacGatherCollect to retrieve the gathered data. These methods require intimate
knowledge of PMAC's internal architecture and are automatically handled by this VI.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo sample
rate and array of clusters of Address Items describing item,
address, and scale factor.
Output Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo
sample rate and array of clusters of Address Items describing
item, address, and scale factor.
PmacGatherSpreadsheet
Write Gather Data Array to spreadsheet file specified by Input File Path. If this path
is empty or Not A Path a selection dialog is displayed. Output File Path is the path
to the file actually written. The spreadsheet file will contain a column for each item
gathered. The first row in each column is a text description of the gathered item.
Each successive row has an assumed sample interval of Servo Cycles.
Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo sample rate
and array of clusters of Address Items describing item,
address, and scale factor.
Input File Path Path to spreadsheet file to write Gather Data
Array to. If this is empty or Not A Path a dialog is displayed.
Gather Data Array Double Gather Data Array to be written
to spreadsheet file.
Output File Path Actual file path where Gather Data Array
was written.
PmacGatherStart
Start a previously defined gather operation. You should immediately start the
desired motion after this VI executes. You can eliminate this VI if you start
gathering by using the PMAC program command "define gather" in your program.
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Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo sample
rate and array of clusters of Address Items describing item,
address, and scale factor.
Output Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo
sample rate and array of clusters of Address Items describing
item, address, and scale factor.
PmacGatherStep
This VI forces Motor Number to immediately have a desired encoder position of
Step To. This is done by scaling Step To by Ix08 and writing the value to an internal
PMAC register and results in a closed loop step response. The VI waits for Wait
Time before continuing by setting Done TRUE.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Step To Motor position to step to in encoder counts.
Wait Time (mS) Time in mS to wait after executing step.
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor Number to Step
Step Bool (F) Move Motor Number to the position specified
by Step To when this is TRUE. Wait for Wait Time before
continuing.
Done Bool (F) TRUE when a step was executed and
completes Wait Time.
Output Device Number i32 (0) Copy of Device Number for
sequencing.
PmacGatherStop
Stop an executing gather operation. You can eliminate this VI if you stop gathering
by using the PMAC program command "end gather" in your program.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
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Input Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo sample
rate and array of clusters of Address Items describing item,
address, and scale factor.
Output Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo
sample rate and array of clusters of Address Items describing
item, address, and scale factor.
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacGatherSelect
This cluster allows the user to build a list of Address Items. You can builds a list in
four ways. Select an item and Motor/CS number, P-Variable, Q-Variable, of define
a Custom Gather Specification. Click the associated -> button to add the item to the
list on the right. The gather sample rate is defined as a number of Servo Cycles. All
items are gathered at the same sample rate. Items selected in the list can be deleted
using the Remove button.
Gather Select Cluster Build a list of Address Items to be
gathered.
Motor/CS Number Select a Motor/CS for Address
Item
Motor/CS Item Description Allow selection of
motor/CS states defined in PmacAddressMotors
Gather Selection Items Description list of items to
be gathered. Can select up to 24 items.
Add Motor/CS Item Add a Motor/CS item
Remove Remove the item selected in the list box
above
Servo Cycles Define how many servo cycles
between gather samples.
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Custom Gather Specification Specify a description,
address, and scale factor for a custom Address Item
Address Item Description Text description
of Address Item
Address Item Address Address of Address
Item
Address Item Scale Scale factor for
Address Item
Add Custom Add a custom Address Item
Add P-Var Add a P-Variable
P-Variable P-Variable to gather
Add Q-Var Add a Q-Variable
Q-Variable Q-Variable to gather
PmacGatherSpec
Cluster containing servo sample rate and array of clusters of Address Items
describing item, address, and scale factor.
Gather Spec Cluster Cluster containing servo sample rate
and array of clusters of Address Items describing item,
address, and scale factor.
Servo Cycles Define how many servo cycles
between gather samples.
Address Item Array Array of Address Item clusters
Address Item Cluster Specify a
description, address, and scale factor for a
Address Item
Address Item Description Text
description of Address Item
Address Item Address Address of
Address Item
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Address Item Scale Scale factor
for Address Item
PmacGlobal
\PmacGlobal - General PMAC setup and configuration are provided by this
collection for VIs. These capabilities are used for the development of supervisory
VIs.
VIs
PmacGlobalBufferClose
Delete any open gather buffer and close any open program, PLC, or rotary buffers.
The output Device Number can be used to sequence operations.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Device Number i32 (0) Passed from input Device Number
after buffers are closed
PmacGlobalBufferSize
Monitor and control PMAC buffer space during system development. Buffers Open
is TRUE if an open prog, open rotary, or open PLC command has been executed and
the corresponding buffer has not been closed yet. Available Buffer Memory
specifies how much buffer space PMAC has left for gathering and programs. A
define gather command reserves all available buffer space. If Close Buffers is
TRUE the gather buffer is deleted and a close command is sent to PMAC.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Close Buffers Bool (F) Send commands to PMAC to close
any open buffers.
Available Buffer Memory i32 Amount of available PMAC
buffer space.
Buffers Open Bool TRUE if there are any open program,
PLC, or rotary buffers open.
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PmacGlobalControl
Generate PMAC on-line commands for controlling PMAC program execution and
save state. Command Executed Bool is TRUE when any button is clicked in Global
Control Cluster.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Global Control Cluster PmacGlobalControl Cluster of
latched buttons to control PMAC program execution and save
state
Command Executed Bool (F) TRUE when any Global
Control Cluster button is clicked
PmacGlobalIVarComm
Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the global communication I-Variables are set. Otherwise they are fetched from
PMAC and provided by Output Global I-Comm Cluster with New Output TRUE.
Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Global I-Comm Cluster Input PmacGlobalIVarComm
cluster for communication I-Variables
Set\Get Bool (F) When TRUE PMAC is set using Input
Global I-Comm Cluster. When FALSE Output Motor IComm Cluster contains the current PMAC definitions.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Global I-Comm
Cluster contains new data.
Output Global I-Comm Cluster Output
PmacGlobalIVa rComm cluster for communication I-Variables
PmacGlobalIVarMove
Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the global movement I-Variables are set. Otherwise they are fetched from PMAC
and provided by Output Global I-Move Cluster with New Output TRUE. Set/Get is
not required and defaults to a Get operation.
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Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Global I-Move Cluster Input PmacGlobalIVarMove
cluster for move I-Variables
Set\Get Bool (F) When TRUE PMAC is set using Input
Global I-Move Cluster. When FALSE Output Motor I-Move
Cluster contains the current PMAC definitions.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Global I-Move
Cluster contains new data.
Output Global I-Move Cluster Output
PmacGlobalIVa rMove cluster for move I-Variables
PmacGlobalStat
Query PMAC for PMAC's global status. Report the two status words as arrays of
Booleans and unsigned 32 bit integers.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
First Word 24 Element Bool Array 24 element Boolean
array containing first status word
Second Word 24 Element Bool Array 24 element Boolean
array containing second status word
First Word Binary Status u32 integer representation of first
word status
Second Word Binary Status u32 integer representation of
second word status
PmacGlobalStatBuffer
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacGlobalStatBuffer indicator containing
PMAC's global buffer status.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Global Buffer Status Cluster Cluster for
PmacGlobalStatBuffer
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PmacGlobalStatGather
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacGlobalStatGather indicator containing
PMAC's global gather status.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Global Gather Status Cluster Cluster for
PmacGlobalStatGather
PmacGlobalStatWord1
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacGlobalStat1 indicator containing
PMAC's global status.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Global Status Word 1 Cluster Cluster for PmacGlobalStat1
PmacGlobalStatWord2
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacGlobalStat2 indicator containing
PMAC's global status.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Global Status Word 2 Cluster Cluster for PmacGlobalStat2
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacGlobalControl
Cluster of latched buttons to control PMAC program execution and save state
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Global Control Cluster Cluster of latched buttons to control
PMAC program execution and save state
Start Motion Programs The command sent to
PMAC is ^R.
This command is the equivalent of issuing the R
(run) command to all coordinate systems in PMAC.
Each active coordinate system (i.e. one that has at
least one motor assigned to it) that is to run a
program must already be pointing to a motion
program (initially this is done with a B{prog num}
command).
For multiple cards on a single serial daisy-chain, this
command affects all cards on the chain, regardless of
the current software addressing.
Enable PLC Programs The command sent to
PMAC is ENABLE PLC 0..31.
This command causes PMAC to enable (start
executing) the specified PLC program or programs.
PLC programs are specified by number, and may be
used singularly in this command, in a list (separated
by commas), or in a range of consecutively numbered
programs.
If a motion or PLC program buffer is open when this
command is sent to PMAC, the command will be
entered into that buffer for later execution.
I-variable I5 must be in the proper state to allow the
PLC program(s) specified in this command to
execute.
Disable PLC Programs The command sent to
PMAC is ^D.
This command causes all PLC programs to be
disabled (i.e. stop executing). This is the equivalent
of DISABLE PLC 0..31. It is especially useful if a
CMD or SEND statement in a PLC has run amok.
For multiple cards on a single serial daisy-chain, this
command affects all cards on the chain, regardless of
the current software addressing.
Kill Motion Programs The command sent to PMAC
is ^Q.
This command causes any and all motion programs
running in any coordinate system to stop executing
after the moves that have already been calculated are
finished. Program execution may be resumed from
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finished. Program execution may be resumed from
this point with the R (run) or S (step) commands.
For multiple cards on a single serial daisy-chain, this
command affects all cards on the chain, regardless of
the current software addressing.
Abort The command sent to PMAC is ^A.
This command aborts all motion programs and stops
all non-program moves on the card. It also brings
any disabled or open-loop motors to an enabled zerovelocity closed-loop state. Each motor will
decelerate at a rate defined by its own motor Ivariable Ix15. However, a multi-axis system may not
stay on its programmed path during this deceleration.
A <CTRL-A> stop to a program is not meant to be
recovered from gracefully, because the axes will in
general not stop at a programmed point. The next
programmed move will not behave properly unless a
PMATCH command is given or I14 is set to 1 (these
cause PMAC to use the aborted position as the move
start position). Alternately, an on-line J= command
may be issued to each motor to cause it to move to
the end point that was programmed when the abort
occurred. Then the program(s) can be resumed with
an R (run) command.
To stop a motion sequence in a manner that can be
recovered from easily, use instead the Quit (Q or
<CTRL-Q>) or the Hold (H or <CTRL-O>)
command.
When PMAC is set up to power on with all motors
killed (Ix80 = 0), this command can be used to
enable all of the motors (provided that they are not
commutated by PMAC -- in that case, each motor
should be enabled with the $ command).
For multiple cards on a single serial daisy-chain, this
command affects all cards on the chain, regardless of
the current software addressing.
Kill Motors The command sent to PMAC is ^K.
This command kills all motor outputs by opening the
servo loop, commanding zero output, and taking the
amplifier enable signal (AENAn) false (polarity is
determined by jumper E17) for all motors on the
card. If any motion programs are running, they will
automatically be aborted. (For the motor-specific K
(kill) command, if the motor is in a coordinate
system that is executing a motion program, the
program execution must be stopped with either an A
(abort) or Q (quit) command before PMAC will
accept the K command.)
For multiple cards on a single serial daisy-chain, this
command affects all cards on the chain, regardless of
the current software addressing.
Save Pmac The command sent to PMAC is SAVE.
This command causes PMAC to save its basic setup
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parameters into the non-volatile EAROM memory.
These setup parameters include all I-variables, the
encoder conversion table, and memory locations
containing VME and/or dual-ported RAM addressing
information. At the next power-on/reset cycle, this
information will be copied back into RAM (provided
jumper E51 is in its default state -- OFF for PMACPC, -Lite, and -VME; ON for PMAC-STD).
The SAVE command is the only time PMAC will
write to the EAROM. Jumper E50 must be on for the
SAVE command to operate.
PMAC does not provide the acknowledging
handshake character to the SAVE command until it
has finished the saving operation, a significant
fraction of a second later. The host program should
be prepared to wait much longer for this character
than is necessary on most commands. For this
reason, it is usually not a good idea to include the
SAVE command as part of a "dump" download of a
large file.
If this command is given from the PMAC Executive
Program terminal mode while continuously polling
windows (such as a position window) are open, the
Executive Program may be temporarily confused by
the delay and place information in the wrong
window.
Reset Pmac The command sent to PMAC is $$$.
This command causes PMAC to do a full card reset.
The effect of $$$ is equivalent to that of cycling
power on PMAC, or taking the INIT/ line low, then
high.
With jumper E51 in its default state (OFF for
PMAC-PC, -Lite, -VME, ON for PMAC-STD), this
command does a standard reset of the PMAC. Ivariable values, conversion-table settings, and
DPRAM and VMEbus addresses stored in permanent
memory (EAROM) by the last SAVE command are
reloaded into active memory (RAM).
With jumper E51 in non-default state (ON for
PMAC-PC, -Lite, -VME, OFF for PMAC-STD), this
command does a reset and re-initialization of the
PMAC. Factory default I-variable values,
conversion-table settings, and DPRAM and VMEbus
addresses stored in the firmware (EPROM) are
copied into active memory (RAM). (Values stored in
EAROM are not lost; they are simply not used.)
Because this command immediately cause PMAC to
enter its power-up/rest cycle, there is no
acknowledging character (<ACK> or <LF>) returned
to the host.
Reinitialize Pmac The command sent to PMAC is
$$$***.
This command performs a full reset of the card and
reinitializes the memory. All programs and other
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buffers are erased. All I-variables, encoder
conversion table entries, and VME and DPRAM
addressing parameters are returned to their factory
defaults. (Previously SAVEd values for these
parameters are still held in EAROM, and can be
brought into active memory with a subsequent $$$
command).
M-variable definitions, P-variable values, Q-variable
values, and axis definitions are not affected by this
command. They can be cleared by separate
commands (e.g. M0..1023->*, P0..1023=0,
Q0..1023=0, UNDEFINE ALL).
This command is particularly useful if the program
buffers have become corrupted. It clears the buffers
and buffer pointers so the files can be re-sent to
PMAC. Regular backup of parameters and programs
to the disk of a host computer is strongly encouraged
so this type of recovery is possible. The PMAC
Executive program has "Save Full PMAC
Configuration" and "Restore Full PMAC
Configuration" functions to make this process easy.
PmacGlobalIVarComm
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying PMAC's communication IVariables.
Global Comm I-Var Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying and modifying PMAC's communication IVariables.
i2: Serial Port Mode
i3: Comm Handshake Mode This parameter
controls what characters, if any, are used by PMAC
to delimit a transmitted line, and whether PMAC
issues an acknowledgment (handshake) of a
command.
Note: With checksum enabled (I4=1), checksum
bytes are added after the handshake character bytes.
Valid values of I3 and the modes they represent are:
0: PMAC does not acknowledge receipt of a valid
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command. It returns a <BELL> character on receipt
of an invalid command. Messages are sent without
beginning or terminating <LF> (line feed); simply as
DATA <CR> (carriage return).
1: PMAC acknowledges receipt of a valid <CR>terminated command with a <LF>; of an invalid
command with a <BELL> character. Messages are
sent as <LF> DATA <CR> [ <LF> DATA <CR> ... ]
<LF>. (The final <LF> is the acknowledgment of
the host command; it does not get sent with a
message initiated from a PMAC program [SEND or
CMD]). This setting is good for communicating with
terminal display programs, such as the PMAC
Executive program.
2: PMAC acknowledges receipt of a valid <CR>terminated command with an <ACK>; of an invalid
command with a <BELL> character. Messages are
sent as DATA <CR> [ DATA <CR> ... ] <ACK>.
(The final <ACK> is the acknowledgment of the host
command; it does not get sent with a message
initiated from a PMAC program [SEND or CMD]).
This is probably the best setting for fast
communications with a host program without
terminal display.
3: PMAC acknowledges receipt of a valid <CR>terminated command with an <ACK>; of an invalid
command with a <BELL> character. Messages are
sent as <LF> DATA <CR> [ <LF> DATA <CR> ... ]
<ACK>. (The final <ACK> is the acknowledgment
of the host command; it does not get sent with a
message initiated from a PMAC program [SEND or
CMD]).
i4: Comm Integrity Mode This parameter permits
PMAC to compute checksums of the
communications bytes (characters) sent either way
between the host and PMAC, and also controls how
PMAC reacts to serial character errors (parity and
framing), if found. Parity checking is only enabled if
jumper E49 is removed.
The possible settings of I4 are:
Setting Meaning
0
Checksum disabled, serial errors reported
immediately
1
Checksum enabled, serial errors reported
immediately
2
Checksum disabled, serial errors reported at
end of line
3
Checksum enabled, serial errors reported at
end of line
Communications Checksum: With I4=1 or 3, PMAC
computes the checksum for communications in either
direction and sends the checksum to the host. It is up
to the host to do the comparison between PMAC's
checksum and the checksum it comp uted itself.
PMAC does not do this comparison. The host should
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 107
never send a checksum byte to PMAC.
Host-to-PMAC Checksum: PMAC will compute the
checksum of a communications line sent from the
host to PMAC. The checksum does not include any
control characters sent (not even the final CarriageReturn). The checksum is sent to the host
immediately following the acknowledging handshake
character (<LF> or <ACK>), if any. Note that this
acknowledging and handshake comes after any data
response to the command (and its checksum!). If
PMAC detects an error in the line through its normal
syntax checking, it will respond with the <BELL>
character, but will not follow this with a checksum
byte.
PMAC-to-Host Checksum: PMAC will compute the
checksum of any communications line it sends to the
host. This checksum includes control characters sent
with the line, including the final <carriage-return>.
The checksum is sent immediately following this
<carriage-return>. On a multiple-line response, one
checksum is sent for each line. Note that this
checksum is sent before the checksum of the
command line that caused the response.
For more details on checksum, refer to the Writing a
Host Communications Program section of the
manual.
Serial character errors: If PMAC detects a serial
character error, it will set a flag so that the entire
command line will be rejected as having a syntax
error after the <CR> is sent. With I4=0 or 1, it will
also send a <BELL> character to the host
immediately on detecting the character error. Note
that this mode will catch a character error on the
<CR> as well, whereas in the I4=2 or 3 mode, the
host would have to catch an error on the <CR>
character by the fact that PMAC would not respond
(because it never saw a <CR>).
i6: Error Reporting Mode This parameter reports
how PMAC reports errors in command lines. When
I6 is set to 0 or 2, PMAC reports any error only with
a <BELL> character. When I6 is 0, the <BELL>
character is given for invalid commands issued both
from the host and from PMAC programs (using
CMD"{command}"). When I6 is 2, the <BELL>
character is given only for invalid commands from
the host; there is no response to invalid commands
issued from PMAC programs. (In no mode is there a
response to valid commands issued from PMAC
programs.
When I6 is set to 1 or 3, an error number message
can be reported along with the <BELL> character.
The message comes in the form of ERRnnn<CR>,
where nnn represents the three-digit error number. If
I3 is set to 1 or 3, there is a <LF> character in front
of the message.
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When I6 is set to 1, the form of the error message is
<BELL>{error message}. This setting is the best for
interfacing with host-computer driver routines.
When I6 is set to 3, the form of the error message is
<BELL><CR>{error message}. This setting is
appropriate for use with the PMAC Executive
Program in terminal mode.
i9: Program Listing Form Setting Meaning
0
Short form, decimal address I-variable
return
1
Long form, decimal address I-variable
return
2
Short form, hex address I-variable return
3
Long form, hex address I-variable return
When this parameter is 0 or 2, programs are sent
back in abbreviated form for maximum compactness,
and when I-variable values or M-variable definitions
are requested, only the values or definitions are
returned, not the full statements. When this
parameter is 1 or 3, programs are sent back in full
form for maximum readability. Also, I-variable
values and M-variable definitions are returned as full
command statements, which is useful for archiving
and later downloading.
When this parameter is 0 or 1, I-variable values that
specify PMAC addresses are returned in decimal
form. When it is 2 or 3, these values are returned in
hexadecimal form (with the '$' prefix). You are
always free to send any I-variable values to PMAC
either in hex or decimal, regardless of the I9 setting.
i56: DPRAM ASCII Comm Interrupt Enable
i58: DPRAM ASCII Comm Enable
i62: Internal Message <CR> Suppressed
PmacGlobalIVarMove
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying PMAC's movement IVariables.
Global Move I-Var Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying and modifying PMAC's movement I-Variables.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 109
i11: Programmed Move Calc Time (mS) This
parameter controls the delay from when the run
signal is taken (or the move sent if executing
immediately) and when the first programmed move
starts. If several PMAC’s need to be run
synchronously, I11 should be set the same on all of
the cards. If I11 is set to zero, the first programmed
move starts as soon as the calculation is complete.
This calculation time delay is also used after any
break in the continuous motion of a motion program :
a DWELL, a PSET, a WAIT, or each move if Ix92=1
(a DELAY is technically a zero-distance move, and
so does not constitute a break).
The actual delay time varies with the time base (e.g.
at a % value of 50, the actual delay time will be twice
the number defined here), which keeps it as a fixed
distance of the master in an external time base
application. If it is desired to have the slave
coordinate system start up immediately with the
master, I11 should be set to zero, and the program
commanded to run before the master starts to move.
If I11 is greater than zero, defining a definite time for
calculations, and PMAC cannot complete the
calculations for the first move by the end of the I11
time, PMAC will terminate the running of the
program with a run-time error.
i12: Jog-to-Position Calc Time (mS) This
parameter controls how much time is allotted to
calculate any jog move to a final position (J=,
J={constant}, J/, J^{constant}, J:{constant}, or a
motion program RAPID move). If a motor is
currently jogging, it will continue on its present
course during that time. If it is currently sitting still,
it will continue to sit for this time.
This parameter should rarely need to be changed
from the default. It should not be set to 0 for any
reason, or PMAC will not be able to perform any of
these types of moves. The minimum practical value
for this parameter is 2 or 3.
i13: Programmed Move Segment Time (mS) When
greater than zero, this parameter puts PMAC into a
mode where all moves are done as a continuous cubic
spline in which the move segments are of the time
length specified by the parameter in this variable
(this is not the same thing as SPLINE mode moves).
This mode is required for applications using CIRCLE
mode moves. In this mode, all programs are sliced
into even segments of I13 milliseconds, and the best
cubic fit is applied for that segment, even across a
move and/or dwell boundary.
Typical values of I13 are 5 to 10 msec. The smaller
the value, the tighter the fit to the true curve, but the
more computation is required for the moves, and the
less is available for background tasks. If I13 is set
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too low, PMAC will not be able to do all of its move
calculations in the time allotted, and it will stop the
motion program with a run-time error.
When I13=0, moves are done without this ongoing
spline technique, and CIRCLE mode moves are done
as LINEAR mode moves.
i14: Auto Position Match on Run This parameter,
when set to 1, performs an automatic re-matching of
motor and axis starting position registers to current
motor commanded positions whenever a motion
program is started. A mismatch can occur whenever
a motor move (jog, open-loop, abort, or limit)
changes the motor's target position without letting the
axis position "know" of the change, or on power-up
when an absolute position sensor starts up with a
position other than zero.
With I14=1, PMAC will execute the PMATCH
function on any Run or Step command to make sure
that the axes in the motion program have the proper
starting-position information. The only users who
would not want this function, setting I14 to 0, are
those who cannot afford the extra millisecond
(approximately) of calculation time this requires.
With I14=0, PMAC uses the last motion program
target position as the starting point for the
calculations of the next move, even if these do not
match the positions currently commanded for the
motors assigned to the axes.
i50: Rapid Move Mode This parameter determines
which variables are used for speed of RAPID mode
moves. When I50 is set to 0, the jog parameter for
each motor (Ix22) is used. When I50 is set to 1, the
maximum velocity parameter for each motor (Ix16)
is used instead. Regardless of the setting of I50, the
jog acceleration parameters Ix19-Ix21 control the
acceleration.
PmacGlobalStatBuffer
This is an indicator cluster for the global buffer status bits.
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Prog Buffer Open' is Red when TRUE and grey
otherwise.
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Global Buffer Status Cluster This is an indicator cluster for
the global buffer status bits
Program Buffer Open Status Bit 19 - Word 2 Motion Buffer Open: Red if any motion program
buffer (PROG or ROT) is open for entry. Grey if
none of these buffers is open.
Rotary Buffer Open Status Bit 18 Word 2 - Rotary
Buffer Open: Red if the rotary motion program
buffer(s) (ROT) is (are) open for entry. Grey if this
is (these are) closed.
PLC Buffer Open Status Bit 17 Word 2 - PLC
Buffer Open: Red if a PLC program buffer is open
for entry. Grey if none of these buffers is open.
PLC CMD Executing Status Bit 16 Word 2 - PLC
Command: Green if PMAC is processing a command
issued from a PLC program. Grey otherwise. It is
primarily for internal use.
PmacGlobalStatGather
This is an indicator cluster for the global gather status bits.
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Gather Off' is Green when TRUE and grey otherwise.
Global Gather Status Cluster This is an indicator cluster for
the global gather status bits
Gather On Status Bit 19 Word 1 - Data Gathering
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Function On: Green when the data gathering
function is active; Grey when the function is not
active.
Gather Start on Servo Status Bit 18 Word 1 - Data
Gather to Start on Servo: Green when the data
gathering function is set up to start on the next servo
cycle. Grey otherwise. It changes from Green to
Grey as soon as the gathering function actually starts.
Gather Start on Trigger Status Bit 17 Word 1 Data Gather to Start on Trigger: Green when the data
gathering function is set up to start on the rising edge
of Machine Input 2. Grey otherwise. It changes from
Green to Grey as soon as the gathering function
actually starts.
PmacGlobalStatWord1
This is an indicator cluster for the first global status word.
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Servo Error' is Red when TRUE and grey otherwise.
'Data Gather Function On' is Green when TRUE and grey when FALSE.
Global Status Word 1 Cluster This is an indicator cluster for
the first global status word
This Card Addressed
All Cards Addressed
Reserved Bit 2 (Reserved for Future Use)
Reserve Bit 3 (Reserved for Future Use)
Reserved Bit 4 (Reserved for Future Use)
MACRO Auxiliary Communication Error
TWS Variable Parity Error
Internal Use Bit 7 (Internal Use)
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Internal Use Bit 8 (Internal Use)
Internal Use Bit 9 (Internal Use)
EAROM Error
DPRAM Error
PROM Checksum Error PROM Checksum Error:
This bit is 1 if a firmware checksum error has been
detected in PMAC's memory. It is 0 if a user
program checksum error has been detected, or if no
memory checksum error has been detected. Bit 13
distinguishes between these two cases.
Any Memory Checksum Error Status Bit 13 Word
1 - Any Memory Checksum Error: This bit is 1 if a
checksum error has been detected for either the
PMAC firmware or the user program buffer space.
Bit 12 of this word distinguishes between the two
cases.
Leadscrew Comp On Status Bit 14 Word 1 Leadscrew Compensation On: This bit is 1 if
leadscrew compensation is currently active in
PMAC. It is 0 if the compensation is not active
Reserved Bit 15 Status Bit 15 Word 1 - Stimulus
Function Active: This bit is 1 if the stimulus function
is currently active in PMAC. It is 0 otherwise.
Reserved Bit 16 Status Bit 16 Word 1 - Stimulus
Table Entered: This bit is 1 if a stimulus table has
been entered into PMAC. It is 0 if there is no
stimulus table in PMAC.
Data Gather Start on Trigger Status Bit 17 Word 1
- Data Gather to Start on Trigger: This bit is 1 when
the data gathering function is set up to start on the
rising edge of Machine Input 2. It is 0 otherwise. It
changes from 1 to 0 as soon as the gathering function
actually starts.
Data Gather Start on Servo Status Bit 17 Word 1 Data Gather to Start on Servo: This bit is 1 when the
data gathering function is set up to start on the next
servo cycle. It is 0 otherwise. It changes from 1 to 0
as soon as the gathering function actually starts.
Data Gather Function On Status Bit 19 Word 1 Data Gathering Function On: This bit is 1 when the
data gathering function is active; it is 0 when the
function is not active.
Servo Error Status Bit 20 Word 1 - Servo Error:
This bit is 1 if PMAC could not properly complete its
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This bit is 1 if PMAC could not properly complete its
servo routines. This is a serious error condition. It is
0 if the servo operations have been completing
properly.
Servo Active Status Bit 21 Word 1 - Servo Active:
This bit is 1 if PMAC is currently executing servo
update operations. It is 0 if PMAC is executing other
operations. Note that communications can only
happen outside of the servo update, so polling this bit
will always return a value of 0. This bit is for
internal use.
Real-Time Interrupt Re -entry Status Bit 22 Word 1
- Real-Time Interrupt Re-entry: This bit is 1 if a realtime interrupt task has taken long enough so that it
was still executing when the next real-time interrupt
came (I8+1 servo cycles later). It stays at 1 until the
card is reset, or until this bit is manually changed to
0.
Real-Time Interrupt Active Status Bit 23 Word 1 Real-Time Interrupt Active: This bit is 1 if PMAC is
currently executing a real-time interrupt task (PLC 0
or motion program move planning). It is 0 if PMAC
is executing some other task. Note: Communications
can only happen outside of the real-time interrupt, so
polling this bit will always return a value of 0. This
bit is for internal use.
PmacGlobalStatWord2
This is an indicator cluster for the second global status word.
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Motion Buffer Open' is Red when TRUE and grey
otherwise. 'PLC Command' is Green when TRUE and grey when FALSE.
Global Status Word 2 Cluster This is an indicator cluster for
the second global status word
Reserved Bit 0 (Reserved for future use)
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Reserved Bit 1 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 2 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 3 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 4 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 5 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 6 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 7 (Reserved for future use)
Internal Use Bit 8 (Internal Use)
Internal Use Bit 9 (Internal Use)
Internal Use Bit 10 (Internal Use)
Fixed Buffer Full Status Bit 11 Word 2 - Fixed
Buffer Full: This bit is 1 when no fixed motion
(PROG) or PLC buffers are open, or when one is
open but there are less than I18 words available. It is
0 when one of these buffers is open and there are
more than I18 words available.
Internal Use Bit 12 (Internal Use)
Internal Use Bit 13 (Internal Use)
Internal Use Bit 14 (Internal Use)
VME Communication Mode Status Bit 15 Word 2 VME Communication Mode: This bit is 1 when
PMAC is prepared to send its communications over
the VME bus "mailbox" port. It is 0 when PMAC is
prepared to send its communications over the "host
port" (PC bus or STD bus) or the serial port. It
changes from 0 to 1 when it receives an
alphanumeric command over the VME bus mailbox
port. It changes from 1 to 0 when it receives a
<CTRL-Z> over the serial port.
PLC Command Status Bit 16 Word 2 - PLC
Command: This bit is 1 if PMAC is processing a
command issued from a PLC program. It is 0
otherwise. It is primarily for internal use.
PLC Buffer Open Status Bit 17 Word 2 - PLC
Buffer Open: This bit is 1 if a PLC program buffer is
open for entry. It is 0 if none of these buffers is
open.
Rotary Buffer Open Status Bit 18 Word 2 - Rotary
Buffer Open: This bit is 1 if the rotary motion
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Buffer Open: This bit is 1 if the rotary motion
program buffer(s) (ROT) is (are) open for entry. It is
0 if this is (these are) closed.
Motion Buffer Open Status Bit 19 Word 2 - Motion
Buffer Open: This bit is 1 if any motion program
buffer (PROG or ROT) is open for entry. It is 0 if
none of these buffers is open.
Internal Use Bit 20 (Internal Use)
Internal Use Bit 21 (Internal Use)
Host Communication Mode Status Bit 22 Word 2 Host Communication Mode: This bit is 1 when
PMAC is prepared to send its communications over
the "host port" (PC bus or STD bus). It is 0 when
PMAC is prepared to send its communications over
the VMEbus or the serial port. It changes from 0 to 1
when it receives an alphanumeric command over the
host port. It changes from 1 to 0 when it receives a
<CTRL-Z> over the serial port.
Internal Use Bit 23 (Internal Use)
PmacHome
\PmacHome – This collection of VIs provides access to the I-Variables and memory
variables required for defining homing criteria and determining home position offset.
VIs
PmacHomeState
Query PMAC for important quantities used to determine the transformation of motor
position encoder counts to actual encoder counts. These are presented as a Home
State Cluster.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor/Encoder Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor to obtain home
state information for. This assumes Motor 1 uses Encoder 1.
Get Home State Bool (F) When TRUE Home State Cluster
contains the a variety of PMAC definitions definining the
home state of the encoder and motor.
Home State Cluster This cluster contains several quantities
used to determine the transformation of motor position
encoder counts to actual encoder counts.
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encoder counts to actual encoder counts.
PmacHomeIVar
Follow PMACView's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the Home I-Variables for the specified Motor Encoder Number are set. Otherwise
they are fetched from PMAC and provided by Output Home I-Var Cluster with New
Output TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
Motor/Encoder Number i32 (1) Motor/Encoder number
whose I-Variables are addressed. This assumes that encoder 1
is defined for motor 1, etc.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Home I-Var Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying and modifying a motor/ encoder's home search
motion and position capture trigger I-Variables.
Set\Get Bool (F) When TRUE PMAC is set using Input
Home I-Var Cluster. When FALSE Output Home I-Var
Cluster contains the current PMAC definitions.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Home I-Var
Cluster contains new data.
Output Home I-Var Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying and modifying a motor/ encoder's home search
motion and position capture trigger I-Variables.
PmacHomeComplete
Create a PmacHomeState cluster containing I-Variables and memory registers for the
specified Motor/Encoder number. The VI monitors the Home In Progress, Home
Complete, and Desired Velocity Zero status bits for the motor to determine when to
query PMAC for the required data. A query can also be forced if Capture Home
State is TRUE.
This assumes Motor N uses Encoder N.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor/Encoder Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor to obtain home
state information for. This assumes Motor 1 uses Encoder 1.
Capture Home State Bool (F) When TRUE force the
retrieval of the data for Home State Cluster.
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retrieval of the data for Home State Cluster.
Home State Cluster This cluster contains several quantities
used to determine the transformation of motor position
encoder counts to actual encoder counts.
Home Complete Bool (F) Monitor Motor Number's status
and process the Home status flags. When Home In-Progress
is TRUE wait for Home Complete AND Desired Velocity
Zero to be TRUE. Fetch the motor's Home State when these
conditions are met.
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacHomeState
This cluster contains several quantities used to determine the transformation of motor
position encoder counts to actual encoder counts.
Home State Cluster This cluster contains several quantities
used to determine the transformation of motor position
encoder counts to actual encoder counts.
Present Encoder Position 0xC002 i32 The encoder
Servo position register is 2 * Encoder counts with the
LSB the direction bit. This output value is the actual
encoder position referenced to a power-up/reset
position of zero.
Present Commanded Motor Position 0x0028 Dbl
This is the motor's present commanded position in
units of 1 / (32 * Ix08) encoder counts referenced to
the motor’s home position.
Present Actual Motor Position 0x002B Dbl This is
the motor's present actual position in units of 1 / (32
* Ix08) encoder counts referenced to the motor’s
home position.
Encoder Home Position Offset 0x0815 i32 This is
the encoder's home offset position in encoder counts.
It represents the difference between the encoder's
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power-up/reset zero position and the position when a
home operation completes.
Motor Pos Bias 0x0813 i32 This is the motor's
position bias and represent the coordinate system
translation in motor position encoder counts.
Position Scaling Factor Ix08 i32 This parameter
controls how the position encoder counter gets
extended into the full-length register. For most
purposes, this is transparent to the user and does not
need to be changed from the default.
There are two reasons that the user might want to
change this from the default value. First, because it
is involved in the "gear ratio" of the position
following function -- the ratio is Ix07/Ix08 -- this
might be changed (usually raised) to get a more
precise ratio.
The second reason to change this parameter (usually
lowering it) is to prevent internal saturation at very
high gains or count rates (velocity). PMAC's filter
will saturate when the velocity in counts/sec
multiplied by Ix08 exceeds 256M (268,435,456).
This only happens in very rare applications -- the
count rate must exceed 2.8 million counts per second
before the default value of Ix08 gives a problem.
When changing this parameter, make sure the motor
is killed (disabled). Otherwise, a sudden jump will
occur, because the internal position registers will
have changed. This means that this parameter should
not be changed in the middle of an application. If a
real-time change in the position-following "gear
ratio" is desired, Ix07 should be changed.
In most practical cases, Ix08 should not be set above
1000 because higher values can make the servo filter
saturate too easily. If Ix08 is changed, Ix30 should
be changed inversely to keep the same servo
performance (e.g. if Ix08 is doubled, Ix30 should be
halved).
Motor Home Offset Ix26 i32 This is the relative
position of the end of the homing cycle to the
position at which the home trigger was made. That
is, the motor will command a stop at this distance
from where it found the home flag(s), and call this
commanded location as motor position zero.
This permits the motor zero position to be at a
different location from the home trigger position,
particularly useful when using an overtravel limit as
a home flag (offsetting out of the limit before reenabling the limit input as a limit). If large enough
(greater than 1/2 times home speed times accel time)
it permits a homing move without any reversal of
direction.
The units of this parameter are 1/16 of a count, so the
value should be 16 times the number of counts
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between the trigger position and the home zero
position.
Example:
If you wish your motor zero position to be 500
counts in the negative direction from the home
trigger position, you would set Ix26 to -500 * 16 = 8000.
PmacHomeIVar
This cluster contains items and cluster for displaying and modifying a motors
homing search and position capture trigger I-Variables.
Home I-Var Cluster This cluster contains items and cluster
for displaying and modifying a motors homing search and
position capture trigger I-Variables.
Motor Home Search I-Var Cluster This cluster
contains items for displaying and modifying the
most common motor homing search I-Variables.
ix11: Fatal Follow Err (1/16 Ct) This
parameter sets the magnitude of the
following error for motor x at which
operation will shut down. When the
magnitude of the following error exceeds
Ix11, motor x is disabled (killed). If the
motor's coordinate system is executing a
program at the time, the program is
aborted. It is optional whether other
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 121
PMAC motors are disabled when this
motor exceeds its following error limit; bits
21 and 22 of Ix25 control what happens to
the other motor (the default is that all
PMAC motors are disabled).
A status bit for the motor, and one for the
coordinate system (if the motor is in one)
are set. If this coordinate system is
hardware-selected on JPAN (with I2=0), or
software-addressed by the host (with I2=1),
the ERLD/ output on JPAN, and the EROR
input to the interrupt controller (except for
PMAC-VME) are triggered.
Setting Ix11 to zero disables the fatal
following error limit for the motor. This
may be desirable during initial
development work, but it is strongly
discouraged in an actual application. A
fatal following error limit is a very
important protection against various types
of faults, such as loss of feedback, that
cannot be detected directly, and that can
cause severe damage to people and
equipment.
The units of Ix11 are 1/16 of a count.
Therefore this parameter must hold a value
16 times larger than the number of counts
at which the limit will occur. For example,
if the limit is to be 1000 counts, Ix11
should be set to 16,000.
ix12: Warn Follow Err (1/16 Ct) This
parameter sets the magnitude of the
following error for motor x at which a
warning flag goes true. If this limit is
exceeded, status bits are set for the motor
and the motor's coordinate system (if any).
The coordinate system status bit is the
logical OR of the status bits of all the
motors in the coordinate system.
Setting this parameter to zero disables the
warning following error limit function. If
this parameter is set greater than the fatal
following error limit (Ix11), the warning
status bit will never go true, because the
fatal limit will disable the motor first.
At any given time, one coordinate system's
status bit can be output to several places;
which system depends on what coordinate
system is hardware-selected on the panel
input port if I2=0, or what coordinate
system is software-addressed from the host
(&n) if I2=1. The outputs that work in this
way are F1LD/ (pin 23 on connector J2),
F1ER (line IR3 into the programmable
interrupt controller (PIC) on PMAC-PC,
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line IR6 into the PIC on PMAC-STD) and,
if E28 connects pins 1 and 2, FEFCO/ (on
the JMACH connectors).
The units of Ix12 are 1/16 of a count.
Therefore this parameter must hold a value
16 times larger than the number of counts
at which the limit will occur. For example,
if the limit is to be 1000 counts, Ix11
should be set to 16,000.
ix13 Pos SW Lim (Ct) This parameter sets
the position for motor x which if exceeded
in the positive direction causes a
deceleration to a stop (controlled by Ix15)
and allows no further positive position
increments or positive output commands as
long as the limit is exceeded. If this value
is set to zero, there is no positive software
limit (if you want 0 as a limit, use 1). This
limit is automatically de-activated during
homing search moves.
This limit is referenced to the most recent
power-up zero position or homing move
zero position. The physical position at
which this limit occurs is not affected by
axis offset commands (e.g. PSET, X=),
although these commands will change the
reported position value at which the limit
occurs.
ix14: Neg SW Lim (Ct) This parameter
sets the position for motor x which if
exceeded in the negative direction causes a
deceleration to a stop (controlled by Ix15)
and allows no further negative position
increments or negative output commands
as long as the limit is exceeded. If this
value is set to zero, there is no negative
software limit (if you want 0 as a limit, use
-1). This limit is automatically deactivated during homing search moves.
This limit is referenced to the most recent
power-up zero position or homing move
zero position. The physical position at
which this limit occurs is not affected by
axis offset commands (e.g. PSET, X=),
although these commands will change the
reported position value at which the limit
occurs.
ix15: Decel Pos Lim (Ct/mS^2) This
parameter sets the rate of deceleration that
motor x will use if it exceeds a hardware or
software limit, or has its motion aborted by
command (A or <CONTROL-A>). This
value should usually be set to a value near
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 123
the maximum physical capability of the
motor. It is not a good idea to set this
value past the capability of the motor,
because doing so increases the likelihood
of exceeding the following error limit,
which stops the braking action, and could
allow the axis to coast into a hard stop.
Do not set this parameter to zero, or the
motor will continue indefinitely after an
abort or limit.
Suppose your motor had 125 encoder lines
(500 counts) per millimeter, and you
wished it to decelerate at 4000 mm/sec2.
You would set Ix15 to 4000 mm/sec2 *500
cts/mm * sec2/1,000,000 msec2 = 2
cts/msec2.
ix16: Max Prog Vel (Ct/mS) This
parameter sets a limit to the allowed
velocity for LINEAR mode programmed
moves for motor x, provided I13 equals
zero (no move segmentation). If a blended
move command in a motion program
requests a higher velocity of this motor, all
motors in the coordinate system are slowed
down proportionately so that motor x will
not exceed this parameter, yet the path will
not be changed. This limit does not affect
transition-point, circular, or splined moves.
The calculation does not take into account
any feedrate override (% value other than
100).
If PMAC's circular interpolation function
is used at all, then I13 must be greater than
zero, and Ix16 will no be active as a
velocity limit.
This parameter also sets the speed of a
programmed RAPID mode move for the
motor, provided that variable I50 is set to 1
(if I50 is set to 0, jog speed parameter Ix22
is used instead). This happens regardless
of the setting of I13.
ix17 Max Prog Accel (Ct/mS^2) This
parameter sets a limit to the allowed
acceleration in LINEAR-mode blended
programmed moves for motor x, provided
I13 equals zero (no move segmentation).
If a LINEAR move command in a motion
program requests a higher acceleration of
this motor given its TA and TS time
settings, the acceleration for all motors in
the coordinate system is stretched out
proportionately so that motor x will not
exceed this parameter, yet the path will not
be changed.
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It is possible to have this limit govern the
acceleration for all LINEAR-mode moves
by setting very low TA and TS times. Do
not set both the TA and TS times to zero,
or a division-by-zero error will occur in the
move calculations, possibly causing erratic
movement. The minimum acceleration
time settings that should be used are TA1
with TS0.
The default limit of 0.015625
counts/msec2 is quite low and will
probably limit acceleration to a lower value
than is desired in most systems; most users
will eventually raise this limit This low
default was used for safety reasons
When moves are broken into small pieces
and blended together, this limit can affect
the velocity, because it limits the calculated
deceleration for each piece, even if that
deceleration is never executed, because it
blends into the next piece.
This limit does not affect PVT, CIRCLE,
RAPID, or SPLINE moves. The
calculation does not take into account any
feedrate override (% value other than 100).
If PMAC's circular interpolation function
is used at all, then I13 must be greater than
zero, and Ix17 will no be active as an
acceleration limit.
ix19:Max Jog/Home Accel (Ct/mS^2)
This parameter sets a limit to the
commanded acceleration magnitude for jog
and home moves, and for RAPID-mode
programmed moves, of motor x. If the
acceleration times in force at the time (Ix20
and Ix21) request a higher rate of
acceleration, this rate of acceleration will
be used instead. The calculation does not
take into account any feedrate override (%
value other than 100).
Since jogging moves are usually not
coordinated between motors, many people
prefer to specify jog acceleration by rate,
not time. To do this, simply set Ix20 and
Ix21 low enough that the Ix19 limit is
always used. Do not set both Ix20 and
Ix21 to 0; or a division-by-zero error will
result in the move calculations, possibly
causing erratic operations. The minimum
acceleration time settings that should be
used are Ix20=1 and Ix21=0.
The default limit of 0.015625
counts/msec2 is quite low and will
probably limit acceleration to a lower value
than is desired in most systems; most users
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 125
will eventually raise this limit This low
default was used for safety reasons.
Examples
With Ix20 (accel time) at 100 msec, Ix21
(S-curve time) at 0, and Ix22 (jog speed) at
50 counts/msec, a jog command from stop
would request an acceleration of (50
cts/msec) / 100 msec, or 0.5 cts/msec2. If
Ix19 were set to 0.25, the acceleration
would be done in 200 msec, not 100 msec.
With the same parameters in force, an onthe-fly reversal from positive to negative
jog would request an acceleration of (50-(50) cts/msec) / 100 msec, or 1.0 cts/msec2.
The limit would extend this acceleration by
a factor of 4, to 400 msec.
ix20: Jog/Home t-Accel (mS) This
parameter establishes the time spent in
acceleration in a jogging, homing, or
programmed RAPID-mode move (starting,
stopping, and changing speeds). However,
if Ix21 (jog/home S-curve time) is greater
than half this parameter, the total time
spent in acceleration will be 2 times Ix21.
Therefore, if Ix20 is set to 0, Ix21 alone
controls the acceleration time in "pure" Scurve form. In addition, if the maximum
acceleration rate set by these times exceeds
what is permitted for the motor (Ix19), the
time will be increased so that Ix19 is not
exceeded.
Do not set both Ix20 and Ix21 to 0
simultaneously, even if you are relying on
Ix19 to limit your acceleration, or a
division-by-zero error will occur in the jog
move calculations, possibly resulting in
erratic motion.
A change in this parameter will not take
effect until the next move command. For
instance, if you wanted a different
deceleration time from acceleration time in
a jog move, you would specify the
acceleration time, command the jog,
change the deceleration time, then
command the jog move again (e.g. J=), or
at least the end of the jog (J/).
ix21: Jog/Home t-S Curve (mS) This
parameter establishes the time spent in
each "half" of the "S" for S-curve
acceleration in a jogging, homing, or
RAPID-mode move (starting, stopping,
and changing speeds). If this parameter is
more than half of Ix20, the total
acceleration time will be 2 times Ix21, and
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the acceleration time will be "pure" Scurve (no constant acceleration portion). If
the maximum acceleration rate set by Ix20
and Ix21 exceeds what is permitted for the
motor (Ix19), the time will be increased so
that Ix19 is not exceeded.
Do not set both Ix20 and Ix21 to 0
simultaneously, even if you are relying on
Ix19 to limit your acceleration, or a
division-by-zero error will occur in the jog
move calculations, possibly resulting in
erratic motion.
A change in this parameter will not take
effect until the next move command. For
instance, if you wanted a different
deceleration time from acceleration time in
a jog move, you would specify the
acceleration time, command the jog,
change the deceleration time, then
command the jog move again (e.g. J=), or
at least the end of the jog (J/)
ix22: Jog Vel (Ct/mS) This parameter
establishes the commanded speed of a jog
move, or a programmed RAPID-mode
move (if I50=0) for motor x. Direction of
the jog move is controlled by the jog
command.
A change in this parameter will not take
effect until the next move command. For
instance, if you wanted to change the jog
speed on the fly, you would start the jog
move, change this parameter, then issue a
new jog command.
ix23: Home Vel/Dir (Ct/mS) This
parameter establishes the commanded
speed and d irection of a homing-search
move for motor x. Changing the sign
reverses the direction of the homing move - a negative value specifies a home search
in the negative direction; a positive value
specifies the positive direction.
ix26: Home Offset (1/16 Ct) This is the
relative position of the end of the homing
cycle to the position at which the home
trigger was made. That is, the motor will
command a stop at this distance from
where it found the home flag(s), and call
this commanded location as motor position
zero.
This permits the motor zero position to be
at a different location from the home
trigger position, particularly useful when
using an overtravel limit as a home flag
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 127
(offsetting out of the limit before reenabling the limit input as a limit). If large
enough (greater than 1/2 times home speed
times accel time) it permits a homing move
without any reversal of direction.
ix28: In-Pos Band (1/16 Ct) This is the
magnitude of the maximum following error
at which motor x will be considered "in
position" when not performing a move.
Several things happen when the motor is
"in-position". First, a status bit in the
motor status word is set. Second, if all
other motors in the same coordinate system
are also "in-position", a status bit in the
coordinate system status word is set.
Third, for the hardware-selected (FPD0/FPD3/) coordinate system -- if I2=0 -- or
for the software addressed (&n) coordinate
system -- if I2=1 -- outputs to the control
panel port and to the interrupt controller
are set.
Technically, four conditions must be met
for a motor to be considered "in-position":
1.) the motor must be in closed-loop
control
2.) the desired velocity must be zero;
3.) the magnitude of the following error
must be less than this parameter;
4.) the move timer must not be active.
The move timer is active during any
programmed or non-programmed move,
including DWELLs and DELAYs in a
program -- if you wish this bit to come true
during a program, you must do an
indefinite wait between some moves by
keeping the program trapped in a WHILE
loop that has no moves or DWELLs. More
sophisticated in-position functions (for
instance, ones that require several
consecutive scans within the band) can be
implemented using PLC programs. See the
program examples section.
The units of this parameter are 1/16 of a
count, so the value should be 16 times the
number of counts in the in-position band.
Motor Flag I-Var Cluster This cluster contains
items for displaying and modifying the ix25 - motor
encoder flag I-Variables. This parameter tells
PMAC what set of inputs it will look to for motor
x's overtravel limit switches, home flag, amplifierfault flag, and amplifier-enable output. Typically,
these are the flags associated with an encoder input;
specifically, those of the position feedback encoder
for the motor.
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Use Amplifier Enable Amplifier Enable
Use Bit: With bit 16 equal to zero -- the
normal case -- the AENAn/DIRn output is
used as an amplifier-enable line: off when
the motor is "killed", on when it is enabled.
Voltage polarity is determined by
jumper(s) E17.
If bit 16 (value $10000, or 65536) is set to
one (e.g. I125=$1C000), this output is not
used as an amplifier-enable line. This
permits use of the line as a direction bit for
applications requiring magnitude-and
direction outputs, such as driving steppers
through
voltage-to-frequency converters. (Setting
bit 16 of Ix02 to 1 enables use of this
output as a direction bit.) General-purpose
use of this output is also possible by
assigning an M-variable to it.
Enable Position Limits Overtravel Limit
Use Bit: With bit 17 equal to zero -- the
normal case -- the +/-LIMn inputs must be
held low to permit commanded motion in
the appropriate direction. If there are not
actual (normally closed or normally
conducting) limit switches, the inputs must
be hardwired to ground.
The direction sense of the limit inputs is
the opposite of what many people consider
intuitive. That is, the +LIMn input, when
taken high (opened), stops commanded
motion in the negative direction; the -LIMn
input, when taken high, stops commanded
motion in the positive direction. It is
important to confirm the direction sense of
your limit inputs in actual operation.
If bit 17 (value $20000, or 131072) is set to
one (e.g. I125=$2C000), motor x does not
use these inputs as overtravel limits. This
can be done temporarily, as when using a
limit as a homing flag. If the limit function
is not used at all, these inputs can be used
as general-purpose inputs by assigning Mvariables to them.
Enable Amplifier Fault Amplifier Fault
Use Bit: If bit 20 of Ix25 is 0, the
amplifier-fault input function through the
FAULTn input is enabled. If bit 20 (value
$100000, or 1,048,576) is 1 (e.g.
I125=$10C000), this function is disabled.
General-purpose use of this input is then
possible by assigning an M-variable to the
input.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 129
Fault Input Level Amplifier-Fault
Polarity Bit: Bit 23 (value 8,388,608) of
Ix25 controls the polarity of the amplifier
fault input. A zero in this bit means a lowtrue input (low means fault); a one means
high-true (high means fault). The input is
pulled high internally, so if no line is
attached to the input, and bit 20 of Ix25 is
zero (enabling the fault function), bit 23 of
Ix25 must be zero to permit operation of
the motor.
On Fault Action-on-Fault Bits: Bits 21
(value $200000, or 2,097,152) and 22
(value $400000, or 4,194,344) of Ix25
control what action is taken on an amplifier
fault for the motor, or on exceeding the
fatal following error limit (Ix11) for the
motor:
Bit 22 Bit 21 Functions
Bit 22=0 Bit 21=0:
Kill all PMAC
motors
Bit 22=0 Bit 21=1:
Kill all motors
in same coordinate system
Bit 22=1 Bit 21=0:
Kill only this
motor
Bit 22=1 Bit 21=1:
Kill only this
motor
Regardless of the setting of these bits, a
program running in the coordinate system
of the offending motor will be halted on an
amplifier fault or the exceeding of a fatal
following error limit.
Flag Address Variable
Hex
Decimal Limit and Flag set
I125
$C000 (49152) (LIM1,
HMFL1...)
I225
$C004 (49156) (LIM2,
HMFL2...)
I325
$C008 (49160) (LIM3,
HMFL3...)
I425
$C00C (49164) (LIM4,
HMFL4...)
I525
$C010 (49168) (LIM5,
HMFL5...)
I625
$C014 (49172) (LIM6,
HMFL6...)
I725
$C018 (49176) (LIM7,
HMFL7...)
I825
$C01C (49180) (LIM8,
HMFL8...)
The addresses for the first eight sets of
inputs are given in the default table, above.
The addresses for input sets 9 through 16,
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which are on the Accessory 24 Axis
Expansion Board, are given below:
Limit and Flag set
Hex
Decimal
LIM9, HMFL9
$C020 (49184)
LIM10, HMFL10 $C024 (49188)
LIM11, HMFL11 $C028 (49192)
LIM12, HMFL12 $C02C (49196)
LIM13, HMFL13 $C030 (49200)
LIM14, HMFL14 $C034 (49204)
LIM15, HMFL15 $C038 (49208)
LIM16, HMFL16 $C03C (49212)
The overtravel-limit inputs specified by
this parameter must be held low in order
for motor x to be able to command
movement. The polarity of the amplifierfault input is determined by a high-order
bit of this parameter (see below). The
polarity of the home-flag input is
determined by the Encoder/Flag IVariables 2 and 3 for the specified encoder.
The polarity of the amplifier-enable output
is determined by Jumper E17.
Extended Addressing: The source address
of the flag information occupies bits 0 to
15 of Ix25 (range $0000 to $FFFF, or 0 to
65535). If this is all that is specified -- that
is, all higher bits are zero -- then all of the
flags are used, and used in the "normal"
mode (low-true FAULT, disabling all
motors). If higher bits are set to one, some
of the flags are not used, or used in an
alternate manner, as documented below.
ix25: Flags (Hex) This is the hex value of
Ix25.
This parameter tells PMAC what set of
inputs it will look to for motor x's
overtravel limit switches, home flag,
amplifier-fault flag, and amplifier-enable
output. Typically, these are the flags
associated with an encoder input;
specifically, those of the position feedback
encoder for the motor.
Encoder Capture I-Var Cluster This cluster
contains items for displaying and modifying
Encoder I-Variables 2 and 3. These parameters tell
PMAC what trigger conditions and flags to use for
position capture.
"Encoder I-Variable 2" Position
Capture Control This parameter
determines which signal or combination of
signals (and which polarity) triggers a
position capture of the counter for encoder
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 131
n. If a flag input (home, limit, or fault) is
used, I903 (etc.) determines which flag.
Proper setup of this variable is essential for
a successful home search, which depends
on the position-capture function. The
following settings may be used:
Setting Meaning
0
Software Control
1
Rising edge of CHCn (third
channel)
2
Rising edge of Flag
n (as set by Flag Select)
3
Rising edge of
[CHCn AND Flag n]
4
Software Control
5
Falling edge of
CHCn (third channel)
6
Rising edge of Flag
n (as set by Flag Select)
7
Rising edge of
[CHCn/ AND Flag n]
8
Software Control
9
Rising edge of
CHCn (third channel)
10
Falling edge of Flag
n (as set by Flag Select)
11
Rising edge of
[CHCn AND Flag n/]
12
Software Control
13
Falling edge of
CHCn (third channel)
14
Falling edge of Flag
n (as set by Flag Select)
15
Rising edge of
[CHCn/ AND Flag n/]
Note that several of these values are
redundant. To do a software-controlled
position capture, preset this parameter to 0
or 4; when the parameter is then changed
to 8 or 12, the capture is triggered (this is
not of much practical use).
"Encoder I-Variable 3" Capture Flag
This parameter determines which of the
"Flag" inputs will be used for position
capture (if one is used -- see I902 etc.):
Setting Meaning
0
HMFLn (Home Flag n)
1
-LIMn (Negative Limit
Signal n)
2
+LIMn (Positive Limit
Signal n)
3
FAULTn (Amplifier Fault
Signal n)
This parameter is typically set to zero,
because in actual use, the +/-LIMn and
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FAULTn flags create other effects that
usually interfere with what is trying to be
accomplished by the position capture. If
you wish to capture on the +/-LIMn or
FAULTn flags, you must either disable
their normal functions with Ix25, or use a
channel n where none of the flags is used
for the normal axis functions.
PmacIVar
\PmacIVar - Provide direct binary access to PMAC I-Variables. This collection of
VIs provides an easy to use architecture for accessing I-Variables and avoids
formatting problems that can arise when querying PMAC I-Variables that might be
returned as hexadecimal values.
VIs
PmacIVarBool
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Boolean I-Variable specified by IVar Set
Number and I-Variable Number. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate
Response contains the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Boolean I-Variable
using Input Value. Response Available will be FALSE and Response defaults to
Input Value.
The variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number.
IVar Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8
address motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) DeviceNumber
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Input Value Bool (F) Input Value for Set operation
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0 ) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
Set\Get Bool (F) Set I-Variable when TRUE. Get I-Variable
when FALSE or unwired.
Response Bool Value of I-Variable for Get operation. Input
Value for Set Operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 133
PmacIVarDbl
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Double I-Variable specified by IVar Set
Number and I-Variable Number. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate
Response contains the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Double I-Variable
using Input Value. Response Available will be FALSE and Response defaults to
Input Value.
The variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number.
IVar Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8
address motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Input Value Double (0.0) Input Value for Set operation
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
Set\Get Bool (F) Set I-Variable when TRUE. Get I-Variable
when FALSE or unwired.
Response Double Value of I-Variable for Get operation.
Input Value for Set Operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
PmacIVarGetBool
Get the Boolean I-Variable specified by IVar Set Number and I-Variable Number.
The variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number.
IVar Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8
address motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Default Bool (F) Default value
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IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
Response Bool I-Variable value
PmacIVarGetDbl
Get the Double I-Variable specified by IVar Set Number and I-Variable Number.
The variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number.
IVar Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8
address motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Default Double (0.0) Default
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
Response Double I-Variable value
PmacIVarGetLong
Get the Long I-Variable specified by IVar Set Number and I-Variable Number. The
variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number. IVar
Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8 address
motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Default i32 (0) Default value
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
Response i32 I-Variable value
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 135
PmacIVarGetShort
Get the Short I-Variable specified by IVar Set Number and I-Variable Number. The
variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number. IVar
Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8 address
motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Default i16 (0) Default value
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
Response i16 I-Variable value
PmacIVarLong
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Long I-Variable specified by IVar Set
Number and I-Variable Number. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate
Response contains the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Long I-Variable using
Input Value. Response Available will be FALSE and Response defaults to Input
Value.
The variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number.
IVar Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8
address motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Input Value i32 (0) Input Value for Set operation
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
Set\Get Bool (F) Set I-Variable when TRUE. Get I-Variable
when FALSE or unwired.
Response i32 Value of I-Variable for Get operation. Input
Value for Set Operation.
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Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
PmacIVarSetBool
Set the Boolean I-Variable specified by IVar Set Number and I-Variable Number.
The variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number.
IVar Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8
address motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Input Value Bool (F) Input Value for specified I-Variable
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0 ) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
PmacIVarSetDbl
Set the Double I-Variable specified by IVar Set Number and I-Variable Number.
The variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number.
IVar Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8
address motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) DeviceNumber
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Input Value Double (0.0) Input Value for specified IVariable
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
PmacIVarSetLong
Set the Long I-Variable specified by IVar Set Number and I-Variable Number. The
variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number. IVar
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 137
Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8 address
motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Input Value i32 (0) Input Value for specified I-Variable
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
PmacIVarSetShort
Set the Short I-Variable specified by IVar Set Number and I-Variable Number. The
variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number. IVar
Set Number = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8 address
motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Input Value i16 (0) Input Value for specified I-Variable
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
PmacIVarShort
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Short I-Variable specified by IVar Set
Number and I-Variable Number. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate
Response contains the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Short I-Variable using
Input Value. Response Available will be FALSE and Response defaults to Input
Value.
The variable address is calculated as IVar Set Number * 100 + I-Variable Number.
IVar Set Numb er = 0 addresses global I-Variables. IVar Set Numbers from 1 - 8
address motors and coordinate system I-Variables.
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Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
I-Variable Number i32 (0-99) (0) I-Variable offset within
IVar Set
Input Value i16 (0) Input Value for Set operation
IVar Set Number i32 (0-9) (0) 100's value of I-Variable to
access
Set\Get Bool (F) Set I-Variable when TRUE. Get I-Variable
when FALSE or unwired.
Response i16 Value of I-Variable for Get operation. Input
Value for Set Operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
PmacMemory
\PmacMemory- Access to PMAC’s memory mapped variables and registers are
simplified with this group of VIs.
VIs
PmacMemoryGet
Output Value is the value of the bit field defined by Start Bit and Number of Bits at
the specified memory address. Output the field as both Output Value and Output
Boolean Array.
Address Spec String Address to access. e.g. X:$002B
Start Bit i32 Start of bit field
Number of Bits i32 Number of bits in bit field
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Output Value i32 Value of bits in field
Output Boolean Array Boolean array representation of bit
field
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 139
field
PmacMemoryGetBit
Bit Value is the bit at Bit Number in Input Value.
Input Value i32 Word to read a bit from
Bit Number i32 Bit number to be read
Bit Value Bool Bit value from Input Value
PmacMemoryGetBits
Fetch the field defined by Start Bit and Number of Bits from Input Value. Return the
field as Output Value i32, Output Boolean Array, and Bit Number (same as Output
Value). Bit Boolean Array can be used with sets of radio buttons. If Output Value =
3 then Bit Boolean Array is 0, 0, 0, 1.
Number of Bits i32 Number of bits in field
Start Bit i32 Start bit of field to fetch
Input Value i32 Word to read a bit field from
Output Value i32 Value of bit field
Output Boolean Array Boolean array representation of bit
field
Bit Number i32 Same as Output Value.
Bit Boolean Array 2^n Boolean array representation of field.
If field value is 3 this
array is 0, 0, 0, 1.
PmacMemoryRead
Read a 24 bit quantity from the memory location specified by Address Spec String.
For example, X:$002B. The result is output as both an i32 and a Boolean array.
Address Spec String Address to access. e.g. X:$002B
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Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Output Value i32 Value read from memory
Output Boolean Array Boolean array representation of data
read from memory.
PmacMemoryReadDbl
Read a 48 bit quantity from the memory location specified by Address Spec String.
For example, L:$002B. The result is output as both a double and a hi-word and loword.
Address Spec String Address to access. e.g. X:$002B
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Output Value i32 48 bit data read from memory
Output Hi Word i32 hi-word of 48 bits read from memory
Output Lo Word i32 lo-word of 48 bit data read from
memory
PmacMemorySet
Write Input Value to a bit field defined by Start Bit and Number of Bits at the
specified memory address. Output Value and Output Boolean Array are the value of
the entire memory location with the new field.
Number of Bits i32 Number of bits in bit field
Input Value i32 Value to write to bit field
Start Bit i32 Start of bit field
Address Spec String Address to access. e.g. X:$002B
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Output Boolean Array Boolean array representation of bit
field
Output Value i32 Value of bits in field
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 141
PmacMemorySetBit
Set Bit Number in Input Value using Bit Value. The new word is Output Value.
Bit Value Bool Value of bit
Input Value i32 Word in which to set bit value
Bit Number i32 Bit number to set
Output Value i32
PmacMemorySetBits
Insert Field Value into Input Value at the field defined by Start Bit and Number of
Bits. Output Value is Input Value with Field Value inserted. Output Boolean Array
is the Boolean representation of Output Value.
Number of Bits i32 Number of bits in field
Start Bit i32 Start bit of field
Field Value i32 Value to insert into field
Input Value i32 Word in which field will be set
Output Value i32 Input Value with Field Value inserted
Boolean Array Boolean array representation of Input Value
with Field Value inserted.
PmacMemoryWrite
Write a 24 bit quantity (Input Value) to the memory location specified by Address
Spec String. For example, X:$002B. Pass Input Value to Output Value and Output
Boolean Array.
Input Value i32 integer value to write to the specified
address
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Address Spec String Address to access. e.g. X:$002B
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Output Boolean Array Boolean array representation of
Input Value written to memory
Output Value i32 Copy of Input Value written to memory
PmacMemoryWriteDbl
Write a 48 bit quantity (Input Value) to the memory location specified by Address
Spec String. For example, L:$002B. Input Value is copied to Output Value.
Input Value Dbl double value to write to the specified
address
Address Spec String Address to access. e.g. X:$002B
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Hi Word i32 hi-word to build 48 bit word to write
Input Lo Word i32 low word to build 48 bit word to write
Output Value Dbl Copy of Input Value written to memory
Output Hi Word i32 hi-word of 48 bit data written to
memory
Output Lo Word i32 lo-word of 48 bit data written to
memory
PmacMotor
\PmacMotor - Monitor and control individual motors. There are numerous ICVs to
get motor position, velocity, and following error, modify motor I-Variables, process
motor status, and jog motors.
VIs
PmacMotorCurrent
Query PMAC for the currently addressed motor. It is most generally used in
interactive development environments rather than a custom VI where you want to
address a specific motor.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 143
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Currently addressed motor
number in PMAC
PmacMotorError
Query PMAC for Motor Number's following error. Following error is the difference
between motor desired and measured position at any instant. When the motor is
open-loop (killed or enabled), following error does not exist and PMAC reports a
value of 0.
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to convert motor
following error from encoder counts to CS units. If the motor is not defined in the
CS no conversion is applied. If the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord
Defined is TRUE and following error is scaled from encoder counts to CS units.
Coord Definition is a string specifying following error units as "Encoder" or the CS
definition of the motor.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Coord Defined Bool If Motor Number is defined in Coord
Number and Convert Bool is TRUE this is TRUE.
Coord Definition String String defining the motor within the
CS. "Encoder" if not defined.
Following Error Double This value is the difference between
motor desired and measured position at any instant. When the
motor is open-loop (killed or enabled), following error does
not exist and PMAC reports a value of 0
Following Error is in CS units if Convert is TRUE and the
motor is defined in the CS. Otherwise motor following error
in encoder counts..
PmacMotorIVarFlag
Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the encoder flag I-Variable Ix25 for the specified Coord Number are set. Otherwise
they are fetched from PMAC and provided by Output Coord I-Flag Cluster with New
Output TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
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Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor number whose IVariables are addressed
Set/Get Bool (F) When TRUE PMAC is set using Input
Motor I-Flag Cluster. When FALSE Output Motor I-Flag
Cluster contains the current PMAC definitions.
Input Motor I-Flag Cluster Input PmacMotorIVarFlag
cluster for I-Variable Ix25 motor encoder flags
current state
Output Motor I-Flag Cluster Output PmacMotorIVarFlag
cluster for I-Variable Ix25 motor encoder flags
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Motor I-Flag
Cluster contains new data.
PmacMotorIVarMove
Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the movement I-Variables for the specified Motor Number are set. Otherwise they
are fetched from PMAC and provided by Output Motor I-Move Cluster with New
Output TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
Motor Number i32 (1) Motor number whose I-Variables are
addressed
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Motor I-Move Cluster Input PmacMotorIVarMove
cluster for motor move I-Variables
Set\Get Bool (F) When TRUE PMAC is set using Input
Motor I-Move Cluster. When FALSE Output Motor I-Move
Cluster contains the current PMAC definitions.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Motor I-Move
Cluster contains new data.
Output Motor I-Move Cluster Output PmacMotorIVarMove
cluster for motor move I-Variables
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 145
PmacMotorIVarPID
Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the PID I-Variables for the specified Motor Number are set. Otherwise they are
fetched from PMAC and provided by Output Motor I-PID Cluster with New Output
TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
Motor Number i32 (1) Motor number whose I-Variables are
addressed
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Motor I-PID Cluster Input PmacMotorIVarPID
cluster for motor PID I-Variables
Set\Get Bool (F) When TRUE PMAC is set using Input
Motor I-PID Cluster. When FALSE Output Motor I-PID
Cluster contains the current PMAC definitions.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Motor I-PID
Cluster contains new data.
Output Motor I-PID Cluster Output PmacMotorIVarPID
cluster for motor PID I-Variables
PmacMotorIVarSafety
Follow PMACPanel's standard I-Variable VI architecture. When Set/Get is TRUE
the safety I-Variables for the specified Motor Number are set. Otherwise they are
fetched from PMAC and provided by Output Motor I-Safety Cluster with New
Output TRUE. Set/Get is not required and defaults to a Get operation.
Motor Number i32 (1) Motor number whose I-Variables are
addressed
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Motor I-Safety Cluster Input PmacMotorIVarSafety
cluster for motor safety I-Variables
Set\Get Bool (F) When TRUE PMAC is set using Input
Motor I-Safety Cluster. When FALSE Output Motor I-Safety
Cluster contains the current PMAC definitions.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output Motor I-Safety
Cluster contains new data.
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Output Motor I-Safety Cluster Output
PmacMotorIVa rSafety cluster for motor safety I-Variables
PmacMotorJogControl
Generate PMAC on-line commands for controlling jogging Motor Number.
Command Executed Bool is TRUE when any button is clicked in Motor Jog Cluster.
The value in the numeric control specifies the position Jog To and Jog Relative jog
the motor to. This value is interpreted as either Encoder Counts (Default) or
Coordinate Units in Coord Number as specified on the button. The button state is
provided as the output Convert To Coordinate. This VI builds a Coord Specify
Cluster using the various inputs to simplify the interface to PmacMotorPVE and
other PMACPanel ICVs .
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor number to jog
Motor Jog Control Cluster PmacMotorJogControl Cluster of
latched buttons to control motor jogging
Coordinate System i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate System number
to interpret jog positions in
Convert To Coordinate Bool Copy of the Encoder Counts
button to indicate whether motor should be represented in CS
units.
Command Executed Bool (F) TRUE when any Motor Jog
Cluster button is clicked
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state applied
PmacMotorLimitControl
Generate PMAC on-line commands for controlling move limits and operation for
Motor Number. Command Executed Bool is TRUE when any button is clicked in
Motor Limit Cluster.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor number to control
Motor Limit Cluster PmacMotorLimitControl Cluster of
latched buttons to contro l motor homing and activation state
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 147
latched buttons to contro l motor homing and activation state
Command Executed Bool (F) TRUE when any Motor Limit
Cluster button is clicked
PmacMotorPosition
Query PMAC for Motor Number's position. PMAC reports the value of the actual
position register plus the position bias register plus the compensation correction
register, and if bit 16 of Ix05 is 1 (handwheel offset mode), minus the master
position register.
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to convert motor
position from encoder counts to CS units. If the motor is not defined in the CS no
conversion is applied. If the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord Defined
is TRUE and position is scaled from encoder counts to CS units. Coord Definition is
a string specifying position units as "Encoder" or the CS definition of the motor.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Coord Defined Bool If Motor Number is defined in Coord
Number and Convert Bool is TRUE this is TRUE.
Coord Definition String String defining the motor within the
CS. "Encoder" if not defined.
Position Double This value is the actual position register plus
the position bias register plus the compensation correction
register, and if bit 16 of Ix05 is 1 (handwheel offset mode),
minus the master position register. The value is in CS units if
Convert is TRUE and the motor is defined in the CS.
Otherwise the value is in encoder counts.
PmacMotorPVE
Query PMAC for the position, velocity, and following error for Motor Number
operating in Coord Number. Assemble the measurements into Motor PVE Cluster.
If Convert is TRUE convert the measurements to CS units. Otherwise leave them in
encoder counts. See the documentation for PmacMotorPosition,
PmacMotorVelocity, and PmacMotorError for details on how these individual values
are produced.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
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conversion state to be applied
Motor PVE Cluster Cluster for PmacMotorPVE.ctl
PmacMotorStat
Query PMAC for the status of Motor Number. Report the two status words as arrays
of Booleans and unsigned 32 bit integers.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor to obtain status for
First Word 24 Element Bool Array 24 element Boolean
array containing first status word
Second Word 24 Element Bool Array 24 element Boolean
array containing second status word
First Word Binary Status u32 integer representation of first
word status
Second Word Binary Status u32 integer representation of
second word status
PmacMotorStatJog
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacMotorStatJog indicator containing the
status for Motor Number.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor to obtain status for
Motor Status Jog Cluster Cluster for PmacMotorStatJog
PmacMotorStatLimit
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacMotorStatLimit indicator containing the
status for Motor Number.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 149
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor to obtain status for
Motor Limit Status Cluster Cluster for PmacMotorStatLimit
PmacMotorStatWord1
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacMotorStat1 indicator containing the
status for Motor Number.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor to obtain status for
Motor Status Word 1 Cluster Cluster for PmacMotorStat1
PmacMotorStatWord2
Create a status indicator cluster for the PmacMotorStat2 indicator containing the
status for Motor Number.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Motor Number i32 (1-8) (1) Motor to obtain status for
Motor Status Word 2 Cluster for PmacMotorStat2
PmacMotorVelocity
Query PMAC for Motor Number's present actual motor velocity, scaled in
counts/servo cycle, rounded to the nearest tenth. The raw response reports the
contents of the motor actual velocity register (divided by [Ix09*32]). This is
converted to counts/msec by multiplying by 8,388,608 and dividing by the I10
default 3,713,707. If I10 is changed modify this value in the diagram.
Coord Specify Cluster specifies a motor within a CS and an attempt to convert motor
velocity from encoder counts/mS to CS units/mS. If the motor is not defined in the
CS no conversion is applied. If the motor is defined and Convert is TRUE Coord
Defined is TRUE and velocity is scaled from encoder counts/mS to CS units/mS.
Coord Definition is a string specifying velocity units as "Encoder" or the CS
definition of the motor.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
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Coord Specify Cluster Cluster defining the motor, CS, and
conversion state to be applied
Coord Defined Bool If Motor Number is defined in Coord
Number and Convert Bool is TRUE this is TRUE.
Coord Definition String String defining the motor within the
CS. "Encoder" if not defined.
Velocity Double This value is the Present Actual Velocity
scaled to encoder counts/mS. Motor velocity is in CS
units/mS if Convert is TRUE and the motor is defined in the
CS. Otherwise motor velocity in encoder counts/mS.
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacMotorIVarFlag
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying the ix25 - motor encoder
flag I-Variables. This parameter tells PMAC what set of inputs it will look to for
motor X’s over-travel limit switches, home flag, amplifier-fault flag, and amplifierenable output. Typically, these are the flags associated with an encoder input;
specifically, those of the position feedback encoder for the motor.
Motor Flag I-Flag Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying and modifying the ix25 - motor encoder flag IVariables. This parameter tells PMAC what set of inputs it
will look to for motor X’s over-travel limit switches, home
flag, amplifier-fault flag, and amplifier-enable output.
Typically, these are the flags associated with an encoder input;
specifically, those of the position feedback encoder for the
motor.
Use Amplifier Enable Amplifier Enable Use Bit:
With bit 16 equal to zero -- the normal case -- the
AENAn/DIRn output is used as an amplifier-enable
line: off when the motor is "killed", on when it is
enabled. Voltage polarity is determined by jumper(s)
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 151
E17.
If bit 16 (value $10000, or 65536) is set to one (e.g.
I125=$1C000), this output is not used as an
amplifier-enable line. This permits use of the line as
a direction bit for applications requiring magnitudeand direction outputs, such as driving steppers
through
voltage-to-frequency converters. (Setting bit 16 of
Ix02 to 1 enables use of this output as a direction bit.)
General-purpose use of this output is also possible by
assigning an M-variable to it.
Enable Position Limits Over-travel Limit Use Bit:
With bit 17 equal to zero -- the normal case -- the +/LIMn inputs must be held low to permit commanded
motion in the appropriate direction. If there are not
actual (normally closed or normally conducting) limit
switches, the inputs must be hardwired to ground.
The direction sense of the limit inputs is the opposite
of what many people consider intuitive. That is, the
+LIMn input, when taken high (opened), stops
commanded motion in the negative direction; the LIMn input, when taken high, stops commanded
motion in the positive direction. It is important to
confirm the direction sense of your limit inputs in
actual operation.
If bit 17 (value $20000, or 131072) is set to one (e.g.
I125=$2C000), motor x does not use these inputs as
over-travel limits. This can be done temporarily, as
when using a limit as a homing flag. If the limit
function is not used at all, these inputs can be used as
general-purpose inputs by assigning M -variables to
them.
Enable Amplifier Fault Amplifier Fault Use Bit: If
bit 20 of Ix25 is 0, the amplifier-fault input function
through the FAULTn input is enabled. If bit 20
(value $100000, or 1,048,576) is 1 (e.g.
I125=$10C000), this function is disabled. Generalpurpose use of this input is then possible by
assigning an M-variable to the input.
Fault Input Level Amplifier-Fault Polarity Bit: Bit
23 (value 8,388,608) of Ix25 controls the polarity of
the amplifier fault input. A zero in this bit means a
low-true input (low means fault); a one means hightrue (high means fault). The input is pulled high
internally, so if no line is attached to the input, and
bit 20 of Ix25 is zero (enabling the fault function), bit
23 of Ix25 must be zero to permit operation of the
motor.
On Fault Action-on-Fault Bits: Bits 21 (value
$200000, or 2,097,152) and 22 (value $400000, or
4,194,344) of Ix25 control what action is taken on an
amplifier fault for the motor, or on exceeding the
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fatal following error limit (Ix11) for the motor:
Bit 22
Bit 21
Functions
Bit 22=0 Bit 21=0: Kill all PMAC motors
Bit 22=0 Bit 21=1: Kill all motors in same CS
Bit 22=1 Bit 21=0: Kill only this motor
Bit 22=1 Bit 21=1: Kill only this motor
Regardless of the setting of these bits, a program
running in the coordinate system of the offending
motor will be halted on an amplifier fault or the
exceeding of a fatal following error limit.
Flag Address Variable
Hex
Decimal Limit
and Flag set
I125
$C000 (49152) (LIM1, HMFL1...)
I225
$C004 (49156) (LIM2, HMFL2...)
I325
$C008 (49160) (LIM3, HMFL3...)
I425
$C00C (49164) (LIM4, HMFL4...)
I525
$C010 (49168) (LIM5, HMFL5...)
I625
$C014 (49172) (LIM6, HMFL6...)
I725
$C018 (49176) (LIM7, HMFL7...)
I825
$C01C (49180) (LIM8, HMFL8...)
The addresses for the first eight sets of inputs are
given in the default table, above. The addresses for
input sets 9 through 16, which are on the Accessory
24 Axis Expansion Board, are given below:
Limit and Flag set Hex
Decimal
LIM9, HMFL9
$C020
(49184)
LIM10, HMFL10
$C024
(49188)
LIM11, HMFL11
$C028
(49192)
LIM12, HMFL12
$C02C
(49196)
LIM13, HMFL13
$C030
(49200)
LIM14, HMFL14
$C034
(49204)
LIM15, HMFL15
$C038
(49208)
LIM16, HMFL16
$C03C
(49212)
The over-travel-limit inputs specified by this
parameter must be held low in order for motor x to be
able to command movement. The polarity of the
amplifier-fault input is determined by a high-order bit
of this parameter (see below). The polarity of the
home-flag input is determined by the Encoder/Flag IVariables 2 and 3 for the specified encoder. The
polarity of the amplifier-enable output is determined
by Jumper E17.
Extended Addressing: The source address of the flag
information occupies bits 0 to 15 of Ix25 (range
$0000 to $FFFF, or 0 to 65535). If this is all that is
specified -- that is, all higher bits are zero -- then all
of the flags are used, and used in the "normal" mode
(low-true FAULT, disabling all motors). If higher
bits are set to one, some of the flags are not used, or
used in an alternate manner, as documented below.
ix25: Flags (Hex) This is the hex value of Ix25.
This parameter tells PMAC what set of inputs it will
look to for motor X’s over-travel limit switches,
home flag, amplifier-fault flag, and amplifier-enable
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 153
output. Typically, these are the flags associated with
an encoder input; specifically, those of the position
feedback encoder for the motor.
PmacMotorIVarMove
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying the most common motor
movement I-Variables.
Motor Move I-Var Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying and modifying the most common motor movement
I-Variables.
ix20: Jog/Home t-Accel (mS) This parameter
establishes the time spent in acceleration in a
jogging, homing, or programmed RAPID-mode
move (starting, stopping, and changing speeds).
However, if Ix21 (jog/home S-curve time) is greater
than half this parameter, the total time spent in
acceleration will be 2 times Ix21. Therefore, if Ix20
is set to 0, Ix21 alone controls the acceleration time
in "pure" S-curve form. In addition, if the maximum
acceleration rate set by these times exceeds what is
permitted for the motor (Ix19), the time will be
increased so that Ix19 is not exceeded.
Do not set both Ix20 and Ix21 to 0 simultaneously,
even if you are relying on Ix19 to limit your
acceleration, or a division-by-zero error will occur in
the jog move calculations, possibly resulting in
erratic motion.
A change in this parameter will not take effect until
the next move command. For instance, if you wanted
a different deceleration time from acceleration time
in a jog move, you would specify the acceleration
time, command the jog, change the deceleration time,
then command the jog move again (e.g. J=), or at
least the end of the jog (J/).
ix21: Jog/Home t-S Curve (mS) This parameter
establishes the time spent in each "half" of the "S" for
S-curve acceleration in a jogging, homing, or
RAPID-mode move (starting, stopping, and changing
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speeds). If this parameter is more than half of Ix20,
the total acceleration time will be 2 times Ix21, and
the acceleration time will be "pure" S-curve (no
constant acceleration portion). If the maximum
acceleration rate set by Ix20 and Ix21 exceeds what
is permitted for the motor (Ix19), the time will be
increased so that Ix19 is not exceeded.
Do not set both Ix20 and Ix21 to 0 simultaneously,
even if you are relying on Ix19 to limit your
acceleration, or a division-by-zero error will occur in
the jog move calculations, possibly resulting in
erratic motion.
A change in this parameter will not take effect until
the next move command. For instance, if you wanted
a different deceleration time from acceleration time
in a jog move, you would specify the acceleration
time, command the jog, change the deceleration time,
then command the jog move again (e.g. J=), or at
least the end of the jog (J/)
ix22: Jog Vel (Ct/mS) This parameter establishes the
commanded speed of a jog move, or a programmed
RAPID-mode move (if I50=0) for motor x.
Direction of the jog move is controlled by the jog
command.
A change in this parameter will not take effect until
the next move command. For instance, if you wanted
to change the jog speed on the fly, you would start
the jog move, change this parameter, then issue a
new jog command.
ix23: Home Vel/Dir (Ct/mS) This parameter
establishes the commanded speed and direction of a
homing-search move for motor x. Changing the sign
reverses the direction of the homing move -- a
negative value specifies a home search in the
negative direction; a positive value specifies the
positive direction.
ix26: Home Offset (1/16 Ct) This is the relative
position of the end of the homing cycle to the
position at which the home trigger was made. That
is, the motor will command a stop at this distance
from where it found the home flag(s), and call this
commanded location as motor position zero.
This permits the motor zero position to be at a
different location from the home trigger position,
particularly useful when using an over-travel limit as
a home flag (offsetting out of the limit before reenabling the limit input as a limit). If large enough
(greater than 1/2 times home speed times accel time)
it permits a homing move without any reversal of
direction.
ix28: In-POs Band (1/16 Ct) This is the magnitude
of the maximum following error at which motor x
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 155
will be considered "in position" when not performing
a move. Several things happen when the motor is
"in-position". First, a status bit in the motor status
word is set. Second, if all other motors in the same
coordinate system are also "in-position", a status bit
in the coordinate system status word is set. Third, for
the hardware-selected (FPD0/-FPD3/) coordinate
system -- if I2=0 -- or for the software addressed
(&n) coordinate system -- if I2=1 -- outputs to the
control panel port and to the interrupt controller are
set.
Technically, four conditions must be met for a motor
to be considered "in-position":
1. the motor must be in closed-loop control
2. the desired velocity must be zero;
3. the magnitude of the following error must be less
than this parameter;
4. the move timer must not be active.
The move timer is active during any programmed or
non-programmed move, including DWELLs and
DELAYs in a program -- if you wish this bit to come
true during a program, you must do an indefinite wait
between some moves by keeping the program
trapped in a WHILE loop that has no moves or
DWELLs. More sophisticated in-position functions
(for instance, ones that require several consecutive
scans within the band) can be implemented using
PLC programs. See the program examples section.
The units of this parameter are 1/16 of a count, so the
value should be 16 times the number of counts in the
in-position band.
PmacMotorIVarPID
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying the most common motor
PID I-Variables.
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PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Motor PID I-Var Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying and modifying the most common motor PID IVariables.
ix30: Prop Gain (219/Ix08) DAC bits/Encoder count
This term provides a control output proportional to
the position error (commanded position minus actual
position) of motor x. It acts effectively as an
electronic spring. The higher Ix30 is, the stiffer the
"spring" is.
The default value of 2000 for this parameter is
exceedingly "weak" for most systems (all but the
highest resolution velocity-loop systems), causing
sluggish motion and/or following error failure. Most
users will immediately want to raise this parameter
significantly even before starting serious tuning.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program. It
may be changed on the fly at any time to create types
of adaptive control.
If the servo update time is changed, Ix30 will have
the same effect for the same numerical value.
However, smaller update times (faster update rates)
should permit higher values of Ix30 (stiffer systems)
without instability problems.
ix31: Deriv Gain 226/(Ix30*Ix09) DAC
bits/(Counts/cycle)
This term subtracts an amount from the control
output proportional to the measured velocity of motor
x. It acts effectively as an electronic damper. The
higher Ix31 is, the heavier the damping effect is.
If the motor is driving a properly tuned tachometerloop (velocity) amplifier, the amplifier will provide
sufficient damping, and Ix31 should be set to zero. If
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 157
the motor is driving a current-loop (torque) amplifier,
the amplifier will provide no damping, and Ix31 must
be greater than zero to provide damping for stability.
On a typical system with a current-loop amplifier and
PMAC's default servo update time (~440 msec), an
Ix31 value of 2000 to 3000 will provide a critically
damped step response.
If the servo update time is changed, Ix31 must be
changed proportionately in the opposite direction to
keep the same damping effect. For instance, if the
servo update time is cut in half, from 440 msec to
220 msec, Ix31 must be doubled to keep the same
effect.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program. It
may be changed on the fly at any time to create types
of adaptive control.
ix33: Integ Gain 242/(Ix30*Ix08) DAC
bits/(counts*cycles)
This term adds an amount to the control output
proportional to the time integral of the position error
for motor x. The magnitude of this integrated error is
limited by Ix63. With Ix63 at a value of zero, the
contribution of the integrator to the output is zero,
regardless of the value of Ix33.
No further errors are added to the integrator if the
output saturates (if output equals Ix69), and, if
Ix34=1, when a move is being commanded (when
desired velocity is not zero). In both of these cases,
the contribution of the integrator to the output
remains constant.
If the servo update time is changed, Ix33 must be
changed proportionately in the same direction to keep
the same effect. For instance, if the servo update
time is cut in half, from 440 msec to 220 msec, Ix33
must be cut in half to keep the same effect.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program. It
may be changed on the fly at any time to create types
of adaptive control.
ix32: Vel Fwd Gain 226/(Ix30*Ix08) DAC
bits/(counts/cycle)
This term adds an amount to the control output
proportional to the desired velocity of motor x. It is
intended to reduce tracking error due to the damping
introduced by Ix31, analog tachometer feedback, or
physical damping effects.
If the motor is driving a current-loop (torque)
amplifier, Ix32 will usually be equal to (or slightly
greater than) Ix31 to minimize tracking error. If the
motor is driving a tachometer-loop (velocity)
amplifier, Ix32 will typically be substantially greater
than Ix31 to minimize tracking error.
If the servo update time is changed, Ix32 must be
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changed proportionately in the opposite direction to
keep the same effect. For instance, if the servo
update time is cut in half, from 440 msec to 220
msec, Ix32 must be doubled to keep the same effect.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program. It
may be changed on the fly at any time to create types
of adaptive control.
ix35: Accel Fwd Gain 226/(Ix30*Ix08) DAC
bits/(counts/cycle2)
This term adds an amount to the control output
proportional to the desired acceleration for motor x.
It is intended to reduce tracking error due to inertial
lag.
If the servo update time is changed, Ix35 must be
changed by the inverse square to keep the same
effect. For instance, if the servo update time is cut in
half, from 440 msec to 220 msec, Ix35 must be
quadrupled to keep the same effect.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program. It
may be changed on the fly at any time to create types
of adaptive control.
ix36: Notch N1 This term, along with Ix37-Ix39, is
part of the notch filter for motor x, whose purpose is
to damp out a resonant mode in the system. This
parameter can be set according to instructions in the
Servo Loop Features section of the manual.
The notch filter parameters Ix36-Ix39 are 24-bit
variables, with 1 sign bit, 1 integer bit, and 22
fractional bits, providing a range of -2.0 to +2.0.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program. It
may be changed on the fly at any time to create types
of adaptive control.
ix37: Notch N2 This term, along with Ix36-Ix39, is
part of the notch filter for motor x, whose purpose is
to damp out a resonant mode in the system. This
parameter can be set according to instructions in the
Servo Loop Features section of the manual.
The notch filter parameters Ix36-Ix39 are 24-bit
variables, with 1 sign bit, 1 integer bit, and 22
fractional bits, providing a range of -2.0 to +2.0.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program. It
may be changed on the fly at any time to create types
of adaptive control.
ix38: Notch D1 This term, along with Ix36-Ix39, is
part of the notch filter for motor x, whose purpose is
to damp out a resonant mode in the system. This
parameter can be set according to instructions in the
Servo Loop Features section of the manual.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 159
The notch filter parameters Ix36-Ix39 are 24-bit
variables, with 1 sign bit, 1 integer bit, and 22
fractional bits, providing a range of -2.0 to +2.0.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program. It
may be changed on the fly at any time to create types
of adaptive control.
ix39: Notch D2 This term, along with Ix36-Ix39, is
part of the notch filter for motor x, whose purpose is
to damp out a resonant mode in the system. This
parameter can be set according to instructions in the
Servo Loop Features section of the manual.
The notch filter parameters Ix36-Ix39 are 24-bit
variables, with 1 sign bit, 1 integer bit, and 22
fractional bits, providing a range of -2.0 to +2.0.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program. It
may be changed on the fly at any time to create types
of adaptive control.
ix34: Integration Mode This parameter controls
when the position-error integrator is turned on. If it
is 1, position error integration is performed only
when PMAC is not commanding a move (when
desired velocity is zero). If it is 0, position error
integration is performed all the time.
If Ix34 is 1, it is the input to the integrator that is
turned off during a commanded move, which means
the output control effort of the integrator is kept
constant during this period (but is generally not zero).
This same action takes place whenever the total
control output saturates at the Ix69 value.
This parameter is usually set initially using the
Tuning utility in the PMAC Executive Program.
When performing the feedforward tuning part of that
utility, it is important to set Ix34 to 1 so the dynamic
behavior of the system may be observed without
integrator action. Ix34 may be changed on the fly at
any time to create types of adaptive control.
ix29: DAC Offset (Bits) This parameter is the digital
equivalent of an offset potentiometer on the analog
output. It can be used to correct for differences in
zero-reference between PMAC's analog output and
the amplifier's analog input. This offset is active in
both closed-loop and open-loop modes, even when
the motor is killed.
For a motor not commutated by PMAC (Ix01=0),
this is the value that is added onto the output of the
servo algorithm or the open loop output value
(including the zero output when the motor is killed)
before it is sent to the DAC.
If the analog output is unidirectional (bit 16 of Ix02
is 1), this bias term is added before the absolute value
function is performed. It is used if there is a
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directional bias on the motor. In this type of motor,
Ix79 (offset after absolute value) is used to control
output deadband or d ithering.
For a PMAC-commutated motor (Ix01=1), this is the
value that is added onto the first-phase output of the
commutation algorithm (Ix79 is added onto the
second phase). In addition to the primary use of
compensating for analog offsets, it can be used in
certain phasing search or phasing direction
algorithms for permanent-magnet brushless motors,
because it drives the motor like a stepper motor.
PmacMotorIVarSafety
This cluster contains items for displaying and modifying the most common motor
safety I-Variables.
Motor Safety I-Var Cluster This cluster contains items for
displaying and modifying the most common motor safety IVariables.
ix11: Fatal Follow Err (1/16 Ct) This parameter
sets the magnitude of the following error for motor x
at which operation will shut down. When the
magnitude of the following error exceeds Ix11, motor
x is disabled (killed). If the motor's coordinate
system is executing a program at the time, the
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 161
program is aborted. It is optional whether other
PMAC motors are disabled when this motor exceeds
its following error limit; bits 21 and 22 of Ix25
control what happens to the other motor (the default
is that all PMAC motors are disabled).
A status bit for the motor, and one for the coordinate
system (if the motor is in one) are set. If this
coordinate system is hardware-selected on JPAN
(with I2=0), or software-addressed by the host (with
I2=1), the ERLD/ output on JPAN, and the EROR
input to the interrupt controller (except for PMACVME) are triggered.
Setting Ix11 to zero disables the fatal following error
limit for the motor. This may be desirable during
initial development work, but it is strongly
discouraged in an actual application. A fatal
following error limit is a very important protection
against various types of faults, such as loss of
feedback, that cannot be detected directly, and that
can cause s evere damage to people and equipment.
The units of Ix11 are 1/16 of a count. Therefore this
parameter must hold a value 16 times larger than the
number of counts at which the limit will occur. For
example, if the limit is to be 1000 counts, Ix11
should be set to 16,000.
ix12: Warn Follow Err (1/16 Ct) This parameter
sets the magnitude of the following error for motor x
at which a warning flag goes true. If this limit is
exceeded, status bits are set for the motor and the
motor's coordinate system (if any). The coordinate
system status bit is the logical OR of the status bits of
all the motors in the coordinate system.
Setting this parameter to zero disables the warning
following error limit function. If this parameter is set
greater than the fatal following error limit (Ix11), the
warning status bit will never go true, because the
fatal limit will disable the motor first.
At any given time, one coordinate system's status bit
can be output to several places; which system
depends on what coordinate system is hardwareselected on the panel input port if I2=0, or what
coordinate system is software-addressed from the
host (&n) if I2=1. The outputs that work in this way
are F1LD/ (pin 23 on connector J2), F1ER (line IR3
into the programmable interrupt controller (PIC) on
PMAC-PC, line IR6 into the PIC on PMAC-STD)
and, if E28 connects pins 1 and 2, FEFCO/ (on the
JMACH connectors).
The units of Ix12 are 1/16 of a count. Therefore this
parameter must hold a value 16 times larger than the
number of counts at which the limit will occur. For
example, if the limit is to be 1000 counts, Ix11
should be set to 16,000.
ix13 Pos SW Lim (Ct) This parameter sets the
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position for motor x which if exceeded in the positive
direction causes a deceleration to a stop (controlled
by Ix15) and allows no further positive position
increments or positive output commands as long as
the limit is exceeded. If this value is set to zero,
there is no positive software limit (if you want 0 as a
limit, use 1). This limit is automatically de-activated
during homing search moves.
This limit is referenced to the most recent power-up
zero position or homing move zero position. The
physical position at which this limit occurs is not
affected by axis offset commands (e.g. PSET, X=),
although these commands will change the reported
position value at which the limit occurs.
ix14: Neg SW Lim (Ct) This parameter sets the
position for motor x which if exceeded in the
negative direction causes a deceleration to a stop
(controlled by Ix15) and allows no further negative
position increments or negative output commands as
long as the limit is exceeded. If this value is set to
zero, there is no negative software limit (if you want
0 as a limit, use -1). This limit is automatically deactivated during homing search moves.
This limit is referenced to the most recent power-up
zero position or homing move zero position. The
physical position at which this limit occurs is not
affected by axis offset commands (e.g. PSET, X=),
although these commands will change the reported
position value at which the limit occurs.
ix15: Decel Pos Lim (Ct/mS^2) This parameter sets
the rate of deceleration that motor x will use if it
exceeds a hardware or software limit, or has its
motion aborted by command (A or <CONTROLA>). This value should usually be set to a value near
the maximum physical capability of the motor. It is
not a good idea to set this value past the capability of
the motor, because doing so increases the likelihood
of exceeding the following error limit, which stops
the braking action, and could allow the axis to coast
into a hard stop.
Do not set this parameter to zero, or the motor will
continue indefinitely after an abort or limit.
Suppose your motor had 125 encoder lines (500
counts) per millimeter, and you wished it to
decelerate at 4000 mm/sec2. You would set Ix15 to
4000 mm/sec2 *500 cts/mm * sec2/1,000,000 msec2
= 2 cts/msec2.
ix16: Max Prog Vel (Ct/mS) This parameter sets a
limit to the allowed velocity for LINEAR mode
programmed moves for motor x, provided I13 equals
zero (no move segmentation). If a blended move
command in a motion program requests a higher
velocity of this motor, all motors in the coordinate
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 163
system are slowed down proportionately so that
motor x will not exceed this parameter, yet the path
will not be changed. This limit does not affect
transition-point, circular, or splined moves. The
calculation does not take into account any feedrate
override (% value other than 100).
If PMAC's circular interpolation function is used at
all, then I13 must be greater than zero, and Ix16 will
no be active as a velocity limit.
This parameter also sets the speed of a programmed
RAPID mode move for the motor, provided that
variable I50 is set to 1 (if I50 is set to 0, jog speed
parameter Ix22 is used instead). This happens
regardless of the setting of I13.
ix19:Max Jog/Home Accel (Ct/mS^2) This
parameter sets a limit to the commanded acceleration
magnitude for jog and home mo ves, and for RAPIDmode programmed moves, of motor x. If the
acceleration times in force at the time (Ix20 and
Ix21) request a higher rate of acceleration, this rate of
acceleration will be used instead. The calculation
does not take into account any feedrate override (%
value other than 100).
Since jogging moves are usually not coordinated
between motors, many people prefer to specify jog
acceleration by rate, not time. To do this, simply set
Ix20 and Ix21 low enough that the Ix19 limit is
always used. Do not set both Ix20 and Ix21 to 0; or a
Division-by-zero error will result in the move
calculations, possibly causing erratic operations. The
minimum acceleration time settings that should be
used are Ix20=1 and Ix21=0.
The default limit of 0.015625 counts/msec2 is quite
low and will probably limit acceleration to a lower
value than is desired in most systems; most users will
eventually raise this limit This low default was used
for safety reasons.
Examples
With Ix20 (accel time) at 100 msec, Ix21 (S-curve
time) at 0, and Ix22 (jog speed) at 50 counts/msec, a
jog command from stop would request an
acceleration of (50 cts/msec) / 100 msec, or 0.5
cts/msec2. If Ix19 were set to 0.25, the acceleration
would be done in 200 msec, not 100 msec.
With the same parameters in force, an on-the-fly
reversal from positive to negative jog would request
an acceleration of (50-(-50) cts/msec) / 100 msec, or
1.0 cts/msec2. The limit would extend this
acceleration by a factor of 4, to 400 msec.
ix17 Max Prog Accel (Ct/mS^2) This parameter
sets a limit to the allowed acceleration in LINEARmode blended programmed moves for motor x,
provided I13 equals zero (no move segmentation). If
a LINEAR move command in a motion program
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requests a higher acceleration of this motor given its
TA and TS time settings, the acceleration for all
motors in the coordinate system is stretched out
proportionately so that motor x will not exceed this
parameter, yet the path will not be changed.
It is possible to have this limit govern the
acceleration for all LINEAR-mode moves by setting
very low TA and TS times. Do not set both the TA
and TS times to zero, or a Division-by-zero error will
occur in the move calculations, possibly causing
erratic movement. The minimum acceleration time
settings that should be used are TA1 with TS0.
The default limit of 0.015625 counts/msec2 is quite
low and will probably limit acceleration to a lower
value than is desired in most systems; most users will
eventually raise this limit This low default was used
for safety reasons
When moves are broken into small pieces and
blended together, this limit can affect the velocity,
because it limits the calculated deceleration for each
piece, even if that deceleration is never executed,
because it blends into the next piece.
This limit does not affect PVT, CIRCLE, RAPID, or
SPLINE moves. The calculation does not take into
account any feedrate override (% value other than
100).
If PMAC's circular interpolation function is used at
all, then I13 must be greater than zero, and Ix17 will
no be active as an acceleration limit.
Motor Flag I-Flag Cluster This cluster contains
items for displaying and modifying the ix25 - motor
encoder flag I-Variables. This parameter tells PMAC
what set of inputs it will look to for motor X’s overtravel limit switches, home flag, amplifier-fault flag,
and amplifier-enable output. Typically, these are the
flags associated with an encoder input; specifically,
those of the position feedback encoder for the motor.
PmacMotorJogControl
Cluster of latched buttons to control motor jogging
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 165
Motor Jog Control Cluster Cluster of latched buttons to
control motor jogging
Jog - The command sent to PMAC is J-.
This command causes the addressed motor to jog in
the negative direction indefinitely. Jogging
acceleration and velocity are determined by the
values of Ix19-Ix22 in force at the time of this
command.
PMAC will reject this command if the motor is in a
coordinate system that is currently running a motion
program (reporting ERR001 if I6 is 1 or 3).
Jog Stop The command sent to PMAC is J/.
This command causes the addressed motor to stop
jogging. It also restores position control if the
motor's servo loop has been opened (enabled or
killed), with the new commanded position set equal
to the actual position at the time of the J/ command.
Jogging deceleration is determined by the values of
Ix19-Ix21 in force at the time of this command.
PMAC will reject this command if the motor is in a
coordinate system that is currently running a motion
program (reporting ERR001 if I6 is 1 or 3).
Jog + The command sent to PMAC is J+.
This command causes the addressed motor to jog in
the positive direction indefinitely. Jogging
acceleration and velocity are determined by the
values of Ix19-Ix22 in force at the time of this
command.
PMAC will reject this command if the motor is in a
coordinate system that is currently running a motion
program (reporting ERR001 if I6 is 1 or 3).
Pre Jog The command sent to PMAC is J=.
This command causes the addressed motor to jog to
the last pre-jog and pre-handwheel-move position
(the most recent programmed position). Jogging
acceleration and velocity are determined by the
values of Ix19-Ix22 in force at the time of this
command.
The register containing this position information for
the motor is called the target position register
(D:$080B for Motor 1, D:$08CB for Motor 2, etc.).
Suggested M-variable definitions M163, M263, etc.
can be used in programs to give access to these
registers. It is possible to write to this register, then
issue a J= command, to provide a variable jog-toposition capability. If you do this, make sure that the
PMATCH function is executed before the next
motion program is run (usually done by setting I14 to
1).
The J= command can also be useful if a program has
been aborted in the middle of a move, because it will
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move the motor to the programmed move end
position, so the program may be resumed properly
from that point.
PMAC will reject this command if the motor is in a
coordinate system that is currently running a motion
program (reporting ERR001 if I6 is 1 or 3).
Jog To The command sent to PMAC is J={position}.
This command causes the addressed motor to jog to
the position specified by {position}. {position} is
determined using the value in the associated numeric
control. {position} will be in encoder counts if the
neighboring button says Encoder Counts and in CS
units if the button says Coordinate Units and the
motor is defined in the currently address CS.
Jogging acceleration and velocity are determined by
the values of Ix19-Ix22 in force at the time of this
command.
PMAC will reject this command if the motor is in a
coordinate system that is currently running a motion
program (reporting ERR001 if I6 is 1 or 3).
Jog Relative The command sent to PMAC is
J:{position}.
This command causes a motor to jog the distance
specified by {position} relative to the present
commanded position. {position} is determined using
the value in the associated numeric control.
{position} will be in encoder counts if the
neighboring button says Encoder Counts and in CS
units if the button says Coordinate Units and the
motor is defined in the currently address CS.
Jogging acceleration and velocity are determined by
the values of Ix19-Ix22 in force at the time of this
command. Compare to J^{position}, which is a jog
relative to the present actual position.
PMAC will reject this command if the motor is in a
coordinate system that is currently running a motion
program (reporting ERR001 if I6 is 1 or 3).
Make Pre Jog The command sent to PMAC is
J=={position}.
This command causes the addressed motor to jog to
the position specified by {position}. {position} is
determined using the value in the associated numeric
control. {position} will be in encoder counts if the
neighboring button says Encoder Counts and in CS
units if the button says Coordinate Units and the
motor is defined in the currently address CS.
Jogging acceleration and velocity are determined by
the values of Ix19-Ix22 in force at the time of this
command.
After jogging to {position} this position becomes the
pre-jog position for all subsequent Pre Jog (J=)
commands.
PMAC will reject this command if the motor is in a
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coordinate system that is currently running a motion
program (reporting ERR001 if I6 is 1 or 3).
Jog Position Specify a Jog To, Jog Relative, or Make
Pre Jog position. When the neighboring button says
Encoder Counts this value is interpreted as encoder
counts. If the button says Coordinate Units this value
will be interpreted as a position in CS Units if the
motor is defined in the currently addressed CS.
Convert To Coordinate When this button says
Encoder Counts interpret the value of the numeric
control in CS units when executing Jog To, Jog
Relative, and Make Pre Jog commands. When the
button says Coordinate Units interpret the value as
CS Units if the motor is in the currently addressed
CS.
PmacMotorLimitControl
Cluster of latched buttons to control motor homing and activation state
Motor Limit Control Cluster Cluster of latched buttons to
control motor homing and activation state
Home The command sent to PMAC is HOME.
This command causes the addressed motor to
perform a homing search routine. The characteristics
of the homing search move are controlled by motor Ivariables Ix03 and Ix19-Ix26, plus encoder Ivariables 2 and 3 for that motor's position encoder.
The on-line home command simply starts the homing
search routine. PMAC provides no automatic
indication that the search has completed (although
the In-Position interrupt could be used for this
purpose) or whether the move completed
successfully. Polling, or a combination of polling
and interrupts, is generally used to determine
completion and success.
By contrast, when a homing search move is given in
a motion program (e.g. HOME1,2), the motion
program will keep track of completion by itself as
part of its sequencing algorithms.
If there is an axis offset in the axis -definition
statement for the motor, the reported position at the
end of the homing search move will be equal to the
axis offset, not to zero.
Home Zero The command sent to PMAC is
HOMEZ.
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This command causes the addressed motor to
perform a zero-move homing search. Instead of
jogging until it finds a pre-defined trigger, and
calling its position at the trigger the home position,
with this command, the motor calls wherever it is
(actual position) at the time of the command the
home position.
If there is following error due to offsets when this
command is issued, there can be movement of the
magnitude of the following error, because it takes the
actual position at the time of the command and
makes it the commanded position. Offsets can then
push the actual position away. A stable system with
integral gain will not have this problem.
If there is an axis offset in the axis -definition
statement for the motor, the reported position at the
end of the homing search move will be equal to the
axis offset, not to zero.
Reset The command sent to PMAC is $.
This command causes PMAC to initialize the
addressed motor, performing any required
commutation phasing and full reading of an absolute
position sensor, leaving the motor in a closed-loop
zero-velocity state. (For a non-commutated motor
with an incremental encoder, the J/ command may
also be used.)
This command is necessary to initialize a PMACcommutated motor after power-up/reset if Ix80 for
the motor is set to 0. If Ix80 is 1, the initialization
will be done automatically during the power-up/reset
cycle.
This command will not be accepted if the mo tor is
executing a move.
Kill The command sent to PMAC is K.
This command causes PMAC to "kill" the outputs for
the addressed motor. The servo loop is disabled, the
DAC outputs are set to zero (Ix29 and/or Ix79 offsets
are still in effect), and the AENA output for the
motor is taken to the disable state (polarity is
determined by E17).
Closed-loop control of this motor can be resumed
with a J/ command. The A command will re-establish
closed-loop control for all motors in the addressed
coordinate system, and the <CTRL-A> command
will do so for all motors on PMAC.
The action on a K command is equivalent to what
PMAC does automatically to the motor on an
amplifier fault or a fatal following error fault.
PMAC will reject this command if the motor is in a
coordinate system that is currently running a motion
program (reporting ERR001 if I6 is 1 or 3). The
program must be stopped first, usually with an A
command. However, the global <CTRL-K>
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command will kill all motors immediately, regardless
of whether any are running motion programs.
PmacMotorPVE
The indicator accepts the cluster provided by the PmacMotorPVE VI. The values
are displayed in encoder counts to the nearest tenth or CS units as defined by the
coordinate system. The LED indicator is Orange and a text indicator shows the CS
definition for the motor if the display is in CS units. Otherwise the indicator is OFF
and the text indicator specifies Encoder Counts.
See the documentation for PmacMotorPosition, PmacMotorVelocity, and
PmacMotorError for details on how these individual values are produced.
Motor PVE Cluster The indicator cluster displays a motor's
position, velocity, and following error. An Orange LED
indicates that the displayed values are in CS units. The
caption specifies the displayed values as in encoder counts or
the actual motor definition in the CS.
See the documentation for PmacMotorPosition,
PmacMotorVelocity, and PmacMotorError for details on how
these individual values are produced.
Motor Positions Array of numerics for displaying
Position, Velocity, and Following Error.
See the documentation for PmacMotorPosition,
PmacMotorVelocity, and PmacMotorError for details
on how these individual values are produced.
Coord Defined When this LED is Orange there
values in the indicators are displayed in CS units.
Unit Label Text item specifying whether the
position, velocity, and following error for this motor
are in encoder counts or CS units. If they are in CS
units the item displays the motor definition.
PmacMotorStatJog
This is an indicator cluster for the most common motor movement and jog status
bits. It contains a label to display which motor the status is for.
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Motor Disabled' is Red when TRUE and grey otherwise.
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Motor Status Jog Cluster This is an indicator cluster for the
most common motor jog status bits
Motor Activated Status Bit 23 Word 1 - Motor
Activated: Green when Ix00 is 1 and the motor
calculations are active; Red when Ix00 is 0 and motor
calculations are deactivated.
Assigned to CS Status Bit 23 Word 2 - Assigned to
C.S.: Green when the motor has been assigned to an
axis in any coordinate system through an axis
definition statement. Grey when the motor is not
assigned to an axis in any coordinate system.
Open Loop Status Bit 18 Word 1 - Open Loop
Mode: Red when the servo loop for the motor is
open, either with outputs enabled or disabled (killed).
(Refer to Amplifier Enabled status bit to distinguish
between the two cases.) Green when the servo loop
is closed (under position control, always with outputs
enabled).
In Position Status Bit 0 Word 2 - In Position: Green
when three conditions are satisfied: the desired
velocity zero bit is 1 (which requires closed-loop
control and no commanded move); the program timer
is off (not currently executing any move, DWELL, or
DELAY), and the magnitude of the following error is
smaller than Ix28. Red otherwise.
Running Move Status Bit 17 Word 1 - Running
Definite-Time Move: Green when the motor is
executing any move with a predefined end-point and
end-time. This includes any motion program move
dwell or delay, any jog-to-position move, and the
portion of a homing search move after the trigger has
been found. Grey otherwise. It changes from Red to
Grey when execution of the commanded move
finishes.
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Dwell In Progress Status Bit 15 Word 1 - Dwell in
Progress: Green when the motor's coordinate system
is executing a DWELL instruction. Grey otherwise.
Warning Following Error Status Bit 1 Word 2 Warning Following Error: Red if the following error
for the motor exceeds its warning following error
limit (Ix12). It stays at Red if the motor is killed due
to fatal following error. Grey at all other times,
changing from Red to Grey when the motor's
following error reduces to under the limit, or if killed,
is re-enabled.
Fatal Following Error Status Bit 2 Word 2 - Fatal
Following Error: Red if this motor has been disabled
because it exceeded its fatal following error limit
(Ix11). Grey at all other times, becoming Grey again
when the motor is re-enabled.
Amplifier Enabled Status Bit 14 Word 2 - Amplifier
Enabled: Green when the outputs for this motor's
amplifier are enabled, either in open-loop or closedloop mode (refer to Open-Loop Mode status bit to
distinguish between the two cases). Red when the
outputs are disabled (killed).
Amp Fault Status Bit 3 Word 2 - Amplifier Fault
Error: Red if this motor has been disabled because of
an amplifier fault error, even if the amplifier fault
signal has gone away. Grey at all other times,
becoming Grey again when the motor is re-enabled.
C.S. Text description of the motor number this status
cluster is displaying.
PmacMotorStatLimit
This is an indicator cluster for motor limit and homing status bits.
The colors of the indicator LEDs are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Negative Limit Exceeded' is Red when TRUE and gray
otherwise. Whereas, 'Home Not Complete' is Red when FALSE and Green when
TRUE. Furthermore, the text displayed when TRUE is 'Home Complete'.
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Motor Status Limit Cluster This is an indicator cluster for
the five motor status bits related to limits and homing
Neg Limit Exceeded Status Bit 22 Word 1- Negative
End Limit Set: Red when motor actual position is
less than the software negative position limit (Ix14),
or when the hardware limit on this end (+LIMn -note!) has been tripped; Grey otherwise.
Stopped on Limit Status Bit 11 Word 2 - Stopped on
Position Limit: Red if this motor has stopped
because of either a software or a hardware position
(over-travel) limit, even if the condition that caused
the stop has gone away. Green at all other times,
even when into a limit but moving out of it.
Pos Limit Exceeded Status Bit 21 Word 1- Positive
End Limit Set: Red when motor actual position is
greater than the software positive position limit
(Ix13), or when the hardware limit on this end (LIMn -- note!) has been tripped; Grey otherwise.
Home In Progress Status Bit 10 Word 1- Home
Search in Progress: Green while the motor is
searching for its home trigger -- it becomes Green as
soon as the calculations for the move have started,
and becomes Grey again as soon as it has found the
trigger (which is before it has finished the entire
move). This is not a good bit to observe to see if the
homing move is complete. Use the Home Complete
bit instead.
Home Complete Status Bit 10 Word 2 - Home
Complete: Red on power-up or reset, becomes Green
when a homing search move is successfully
completed. If a second homing move is done, this bit
is set to Red at the beginning of the move, and only
becomes Green again if that homing search move is
successfully completed.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 173
PmacMotorStatWord1
This is an indicator cluster for the first status word of a motor
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Negative Limit Exceeded' is Red when TRUE and grey
otherwise. 'Motor Disabled' is Red when FALSE and Green when TRUE.
Furthermore, the text displayed when TRUE is 'Motor Enabled'.
The layout of the indicators represents the location of the bit in the status word.
Missing indicators represent status bits that are not defined or for internal use.
Motor Status Word 1 Cluster This is an indicator cluster for
the first status word of a motor
Internal Use Bit 0 (Internal use)
Internal Use Bit 1 (Internal use)
Internal Use Bit 2 (Internal use)
Internal Use Bit 3 (Internal use)
Internal Use Bit 4 (Internal use)
Internal Use Bit 5 (Internal use)
Internal Use Bit 6 (Internal use)
Internal Use Bit 7 (Internal use)
Internal Use Bit 8 (Internal use)
Internal Use Bit 9 (Internal use)
Home In Progress Status Bit 10 Word 1 - Home
Search in Progress: This bit is 1 while the mo tor is
searching for its home trigger -- it becomes 1 as soon
as the calculations for the move have started, and
becomes 0 again as soon as it has found the trigger
(which is before it has finished the entire move).
This is not a good bit to observe to see if the homing
move is complete. Use the Home Complete bit
instead.
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Block Request Status Bit 11 Word 1 - Block
Request: This bit is 1 when the motor has just entered
a new move section, and is requesting that the
upcoming section be calculated. It is 0 otherwise. It
is primarily for internal use.
Abort Deceleration Status Bit 12 Word 1 - Abort
Deceleration: This bit is 1 if the motor is decelerating
due to an Abort command, or due to hitting hardware
or software position (over-travel) limits. It is 0
otherwise. It changes from 1 to 0 when the
commanded deceleration to zero velocity finishes.
Desired Velocity Zero Status Bit 13 Word 1 Desired Velocity Zero: This bit is 1 if the motor is in
closed-loop control and the commanded velocity is
zero (i.e. it is trying to hold position). It is zero either
if the motor is in closed-loop mode with non-zero
commanded velocity, or if it is in open-loop mode.
Data Block Error Status Bit 14 Word 1 - Data
Block Error: This bit is 1 when move execution has
been aborted because the data for the next move
section was not ready in time. This is due to
insufficient calculation time. It is 0 otherwise. It
changes from 1 to 0 when another move sequence is
started.
Dwell In Progress Status Bit 15 Word 1 - Dwell in
Progress: This bit is 1 when the motor's coordinate
system is executing a DWELL instruction. It is 0
otherwise.
Integration Mode Status Bit 16 Word 1 - Integration
Mode: This bit is 1 when Ix34 is 1 and the servo loop
integrator is only active when desired velocity is
zero. It is 0 when Ix34 is 0 and the servo loop
integrator is always active.
Running Move Status Bit 17 Word 1 - Running
Definite-Time Move: This bit is 1 when the motor is
executing any move with a predefined end-point and
end-time. This includes any motion program move
dwell or delay, any jog-to-position move, and the
portion of a homing search move after the trigger has
been found. It is 0 otherwise. It changes from 1 to 0
when execution of the commanded move finishes.
Open Loop Status Bit 18 Word 1 - Open Loop
Mode: This bit is 1 when the servo loop for the motor
is open, either with outputs enabled or disabled
(killed). (Refer to Amplifier Enabled status bit to
distinguish between the two cases.) It is 0 when the
servo loop is closed (under position control, always
with outputs enabled).
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Phased Motor Status Bit 19 Word 1 - Phased Motor:
This bit is 1 when Ix01 is 1 and this motor is being
commutated by PMAC; it is 0 when Ix01 is 0 and
this motor is not being commutated by PMAC.
Hand Wheel Enabled Status Bit 20 Word 1 Handwheel Enabled: This bit is 1 when Ix06 is 1 and
position following for this axis is enabled; it is 0
when Ix06 is 0 and position following is disabled.
Pos Limit Exceeded Status Bit 21 Word 1 - Positive
End Limit Set: This bit is 1 when motor actual
position is greater than the software positive position
limit (Ix13), or when the hardware limit on this end (LIMn -- note!) has been tripped; it is 0 otherwise.
Neg Limit Exceeded Status Bit 22 Word 1 Negative End Limit Set: This bit is 1 when motor
actual position is less than the software negative
position limit (Ix14), or when the hardware limit on
this end (+LIMn -- note!) has been tripped; it is 0
otherwise.
Motor Activated Status Bit 23 Word 1 - Motor
Activated: This bit is 1 when Ix00 is 1 and the motor
calculations are active; it is 0 when Ix00 is 0 and
motor calculations are deactivated.
PmacMotorStatWord2
This is an indicator cluster for the second status word of a motor.
The colors of the indicators are indicative of the information conveyed by the
particular bit. For example 'Negative Limit Exceeded' is Red when TRUE and grey
otherwise. 'Not In Position' is Red when FALSE and Green when TRUE.
Furthermore, the text displayed when TRUE is 'In Position'.
Motor Status Word 2 Cluster This is an indicator cluster for
the second status word of a motor
In Position Status Bit 0 Word 2 - In Position: This
bit is 1 when three conditions are satisfied: the
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desired velocity zero bit is 1 (which requires closedloop control and no commanded move); the program
timer is off (not currently executing any move,
DWELL, or DELAY), and the magnitude of the
following error is smaller than Ix28.
Fatal Following Error Status Bit 1 Word 2 Warning Following Error: This bit is 1 if the
following error for the motor exceeds its warning
following error limit (Ix12). It stays at 1 if the motor
is killed due to fatal following error. It is 0 at all
other times, changing from 1 to 0 when the motor's
following error reduces to under the limit, or if killed,
is re-enabled.
Warning Following Error Status Bit 2 Word 2 Fatal Following Error: This bit is 1 if this motor has
been disabled because it exceeded its fatal following
error limit (Ix11). It is 0 at all other times, becoming
0 again when the motor is re-enabled.
Amplifier Fault Status bit 3 Word 2 - Amplifier
Fault Error: This bit is 1 if this motor has been
disabled because of an amplifier fault error, even if
the amplifier fault signal has gone away. It is 0 at all
other times, becoming 0 again when the motor is reenabled.
Backlash Direction
I2T Amplifier Fault Error
Integrated Fault Error
Trigger Move
Phasing Search Error
Reserved Bit 9 (Reserved for future use)
Home Complete Status bit 10 Word 2 - Home
Complete: This bit, set to 0 on power-up or reset,
becomes 1 when a homing search move is
successfully completed. If a second homing move is
done, this bit is set to 0 at the beginning of the move,
and only becomes 1 again if that homing search
move is successfully completed.
Stopped on Limit Status Bit 11 Word 2 - Stopped on
Position Limit: This bit is 1 if this motor has stopped
because of either a software or a hardware position
(over-travel) limit, even if the condition that caused
the stop has gone away. It is 0 at all other times,
even when into a limit but moving out of it.
Reserved Bit 12 (Reserved for future use)
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Reserved Bit 13 (Reserved for future use)
Motor Activated Status Bit 14 Word 2 - Amplifier
Enabled: This bit is 1 when the outputs for this
motor's amplifier are enabled, either in open-loop or
closed-loop mode (refer to Open-Loop Mode status
bit to distinguish between the two cases). It is 0
when the outputs are disabled (killed).
Reserved Bit 15 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 16 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 17 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 18 (Reserved for future use)
Reserved Bit 19 (Reserved for future use)
C.S. Status Bits 20 - 22 Word 2 - (C.S. - 1) Number:
These three bits together hold a value equal to the
(Coordinate System number minus one) to which the
motor is assigned. Bit 22 is the MSB, and bit 20 is
the LSB. For instance, if the motor is assigned to an
axis in C. S. 6, these bits would hold a value of 5: bit
22 =1, bit 21 = 0, and bit 20 = 1.
Coordinate System Assigned Status Bit 23 Word 2 Assigned to C.S.: This bit is 1 when the motor has
been assigned to an axis in any coordinate system
through an axis definition statement. It is 0 when the
motor is not assigned to an axis in any coordinate
system.
PmacMotors
\PmacMotors - Monitor and plot the motion of collections of motors in defined
coordinate systems. Plotting tools for selecting which motors and motion variables to
plot are available. Samples of real-time strip charts and XY charts are provided.
VIs
PmacMotorsCloseLoop
Close all PMAC motor loops
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
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Device Number i32 (0) Passed from input Device Number
after motor loops are closed
PmacMotorsErrors
Query PMAC for the following errors for all motors. Following error is the
difference between a motor's desired and measured position at any instant. When a
motor is open-loop (killed or enabled), following error does not exist and PMAC
reports a value of 0.
Assemble the measurements into PmacMotorsPVE Cluster. If Convert To Coord is
TRUE convert the measurements to CS units for those motors defined in the CS.
Otherwise leave them in encoder counts.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Convert To Coord Bool Convert PMAC responses from
encoder counts to CS units for motors in Coord Number
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate number to use
Motor Error Cluster Cluster for PmacMotorsPVE.ctl to
display all motor following errors.
PmacMotorsPlotSelect
Motors Array contains positions, velocities, or following errors for all motors on
your PMAC. Select Bool Array defines which motors are copied into Selected
Motors Cluster for plotting on LabVIEW strip charts. XY Point Cluster contains two
values for X-Y plotting. New Selection is TRUE when Select Bool changes and
indicates the Plot Attributes Array of Clusters and X-Y Plot Attribute Cluster contain
new information for updating plot legend attributes.
Motors Array Array of motor positions, velocities, or
following errors from PmacMotorsPositions,
PmacMotorsVelocities, PmacMotorsErrors
to be selected.
Select Bool Array Array of Booleans from
PmacMotorsSelect specifying which motors to select from
Motors Array
Selected Motors Cluster Cluster of doubles containing
values for selected motors
XY Point Cluster Cluster containing two selected motors for
X-Y plotting
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X-Y plotting
Plot Attributes Array of Clusters Cluster for setting
attributes of Plot based on selected motors.
Plot Attribute Cluster Cluster defining Active Plot,
Plot Color, and Plot Name.
Active Plot Active Plot for Plot attribute
node
Plot Color Plot Color for Plot attribute node
Plot Name Plot Name for Plot attribute
node
New Selection Bool (F) TRUE when Select Bool Array
changes. Indicates Plot Attributes Array of Clusters and X-Y
Plot Attribute Cluster contain new values for plot legends
X-Y Plot Attribute Cluster Cluster for setting attributes of
X-Y Plot based on selected motors.
Active Plot Active Plot for Plot attribute node
Plot Name Plot Name for Plot attribute node
PmacMotorsPositions
Query PMAC for the positions for all motors. PMAC reports the value of the actual
position register plus the position bias register plus the compensation correction
register, and if bit 16 of Ix05 is 1 (handwheel offset mode), minus the master
position register.
Assemble the measurements into PmacMotorsPVE Cluster. If Convert To Coord is
TRUE convert the measurements to CS units for those motors defined in the CS.
Otherwise leave them in encoder counts.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Convert To Coord Bool Convert PMAC responses from
encoder counts to CS units for motors in Coord Number
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate number to use
Motors Position Cluster Cluster for PmacMotorsPVE.ctl to
display all motor positions.
PmacMotorsVelocities
Query PMAC for all motor's present actual motor velocity, scaled in counts/servo
cycle, rounded to the nearest tenth. The raw response reports the contents of the
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motor actual velocity register (divided by [Ix09*32]). This is converted to
counts/msec by multiplying by 8,388,608 and dividing by the I10 default 3,713,707.
If I10 is changed modify this value in the diagram.
Assemble the measurements into PmacMotorsPVE Cluster. If Convert To Coord is
TRUE convert the measurements to CS units/mS for those motors defined in the CS.
Otherwise leave them in encoder counts/mS.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Convert To Coord Bool Convert PMAC responses from
encoder counts to CS units for motors in Coord Number
Coord Number i32 (1-8) (1) Coordinate number to use
Motors Velocity Cluster Cluster for PmacMotorsPVE.ctl to
display all motor velocities.
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacMotorsPlotSelect
Array of Boolean controls for selecting motors from PmacMotorsPositions,
PmacMotorsVelocities, PmacMotorsErrors.
Motors Plot Select Cluster Array of Booleans for selecting
motors from PmacMotorsPositions, PmacMotorsVelocities,
PmacMotorsErrors.
PmacMotorsPVE
This indicator contains an array of indicators to display the positions, velocities,
an/or following errors for all motors. An array of Boolean indicators indicate which
motors have been translated from encoder units to CS units. When displaying CS
units the caption specifies the currently addressed CS. The arrays can be resized by
dragging the corner of the array to display the number of motors in your system.
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See the documentation for PmacMotor (s)Position, PmacMotor(s)Velocity, and
PmacMotor(s)Error for details on how these individual values are produced.
Motors PVE Cluster The indicator cluster displays an array
of values for all PMAC motors. The array may be positions,
velocities, or following errors. The array of Boolean
indicators indicate which values are in CS units. The caption
specifies the displayed values as being in encoder counts or a
specific CS.
See the documentation for PmacMotor (s)Position,
PmacMotor(s)Velocity, and PmacMotor(s)Error for details on
how these individual values are produced.
Motor Value Array Array of numerics for
positions, velocities, or following errors for each
motor. See the documentation for PmacMotor
(s)Position, PmacMotor(s)Velocity, and
PmacMotor(s)Error for details on how these
individual values are produced.
C.S. Defined Array of Booleans indicating which
motors are displayed in CS Units.
C.S. Applied Caption indicating the currently
addressed coordinate system or that the displayed
values are in Encode Counts.
PmacPLC
\PmacPLC - PLC programs and their execution status can be edited and controlled
using the VIs in this collection.
VIs
PmacPLCBuffer
PMAC maintains a list of PLC program buffers in memory. This organization is a
little different from motion program buffer lists. The list identifies the PLC number,
start address of the PLC program, and its enable state. This VI builds an array of
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PLC Buffer Info clusters for each PLC program loaded in PMAC. The cluster
contains Execute State indicating whether the PLC is enabled, PLC Number, and the
size of the program in words. Menu String Array contains a string for each loaded
PLC and its current enable state.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
PLC Buffer State Array Array of PLC Buffer Info Clusters
for all PLC programs
PLC Buffer Info Cluster containing Size and Run
State information about PLC Number
Execute State Bool TRUE indicates that
PLC Number is enabled.
PLC Number i32 PLC Number this cluster
refers to.
Size i32 Size of PLC program in words
Menu String Array Array of strings for loaded PLCs. Also
contains information about whether the PLC is enabled or
disabled.
PmacPLCDownLoadBuffer
Write Program Buffer to a temporary file then compile and download to PMAC.
Down Load File Path and Down Load Log File Path specify the temporary file's
name and compile log. If a compile error occurs a modal pop-up panel containing the
log is displayed. PLC VI State Cluster contains identifies PLC Loaded, its PLC
Number, and Execute State.
Program Buffer String Program buffer to down load and
parse for PLC Number.
DeviceNumber i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Down Load File Path Path of temporary file used to down
load Program Buffer.
Down Load Log File Path Path of file containing down load
compile log.
PLC VI State Cluster Cluster defining currently selected
PLC and it execution state.
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PmacPLCEnable
Check PLC Number for its enable state. When the specified PLC is enabled Output
Enable State is TRUE. When Toggle Execute State is TRUE toggle the PLC's
enable state from enabled to disabled or disabled to enabled.
PLC Number i32 PLC Number whose execution state is to be
toggled.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Toggle Execute State Bool When TRUE toggle the execution
state of PLC Number. If the PLC was off turn it on. If it was
off turn it on.
Output Enable State Bool This flag always reflects the
enable state of PLC Number. TRUE indicates that PLC
Number is enabled.
PmacPLCExec
This VI controls the execution of foreground and background PLC programs by
modifying i5 using a PmacPLCExec control as both an indicator and a control.
When First Time is TRUE New Output is TRUE and Output PLC Exec Cluster
indicates the state of foreground and background PLC program execution. When
either button in Input PLC Exec Cluster doesn't match the last Output PLC Exec
Cluster contents the execution state of the foreground or background PLC programs
is toggled.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input PLC Exec Cluster This cluster changes the execution
state of foreground and background PLC programs by
modifying i5.
First Time Bool (F) When TRUE this VI determines the
enable state of foreground and background PLC programs and
sets Output PLC Exec State Cluster to reflect that state.
Output PLC Exec Cluster Display the current execution
state of foreground and background PLC programs.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when First Time is TRUE or
either button in Input PLC Exec State Cluster changes.
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PmacPLCList
This VI lists the contents of Pmac program buffers and parses the program into an
array with the indices of line ends.
Device Number i32 (0)
Program Info
Program Loaded
Program Number i32
Program Buffer
PmacPLCParse
Parse Program Buffer for PLC Number. Provide the information in PLC VI State
Cluster. The program load state is not determined by this operation.
Program Buffer String PLC Program buffer to parse for
PLC Number.
PLC VI State Cluster Cluster defining currently selected
PLC and it execution state.
PmacPLCSelect
Query PMAC for a description of all loaded PLC programs by reading PMAC's
internal buffers. If First Time is TRUE Menu String Array contains a sorted list of
all loaded PLC programs and their execution state by PLC number for the menu ring
in PLC Select Cluster. Button String Array contains information to change the
description of the button in PLC Select Cluster so that it toggles the selected PLC's
execution state when clicked. The VI maintains New Selection Index as a state from
execution to execution. Translation of menu ring selections in PLC Select Cluster
into PLC Selected Cluster occurs when First Time Strings is TRUE or either control
in PLC Select Cluster changes. New Output TRUE indicates that PLC Selected
Cluster, Menu String Array, and Button String Array contain new data.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
PLC Select Cluster Display loaded PLC programs and their
execution state. The execution state can be toggled using the
button.
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button.
PLC Select Menu Ring This is the currently
selected PLC program and its execution state.
PLC Execute State Bool Toggle the execution state
of the currently selected PLC program
First Time Bool (F) When TRUE this VI builds Menu String
Array identifying PLC programs loaded in PMAC and their
execution state. Button String Array changes the Boolean text
in a panel's PLC Select Cluster so that clicking the button will
toggle the execution state of the PLC.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when the menu item or button
in PLC Select Cluster change or First Time is TRUE. Menu
String Array and Button String Array contain updated data for
the application PLC Select Cluster item attribute nodes.
Menu String Array Array of strings identifying PLC
programs loaded in PMAC memory and their execution state.
Can be used to set Menu Ring attributes.
New Selection Index i32 Last Selection Index State
Button String Array Array of strings for PLC Execute State
button in PLC Select Cluster.
PLC Selected Cluster Cluster defining currently selected
PLC and it execution state.
Execute State Bool TRUE indicates that PLC
Number is enabled.
PLC Number i32 PLC Number this cluster refers to.
PmacPLCState
Query PMAC for the load state and enable state of PLC Number. If the PLC is
loaded set Loaded TRUE. If the PLC is enmabled set Enabled TRUE.
PLC Number i32 PLC Number whose load and enable state
is to be queried.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen.
Enabled Bool When TRUE the specified PLC Number is
enabled.
Loaded Bool TRUE indicates that the specified PLC number
is properly loaded in PMAC.
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Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacPLCExec
This cluster enables the execution of foreground and background PLC programs by
modifying i5.
PLC Exec Cluster This cluster enables the execution of
foreground and background PLC programs by modifying i5.
Foreground Enable or Disable (toggle) foreground
PLC program execution.
Foreground copy Enable or Disable (toggle)
background PLC program execution.
PmacPLCSelect
This cluster displays loaded PLC programs and their execution state. The execution
state can be toggled using the button.
PLC Select Cluster Display loaded PLC programs and their
execution state. The execution state can be toggled using the
button.
PLC Select Menu Ring This is the currently
selected PLC program and its execution state.
PLC Execute State Bool Toggle the execution state
of the currently selected PLC program
PmacPLCVIState
Cluster defining PLC and it execution state.
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PLC VI State Cluster Cluster defining PLC and it execution
state.
PLC Loaded TRUE when PLC Number is loaded in
PMAC memory
Execute State Bool TRUE indicates that PLC
Number is enabled.
PLC Number i32 PLC Number this cluster refers to.
PmacPlot
\PmacPlot - A few generally useful plotting VIs for setting plot colors and legends.
An XY Chart buffer is available to make an XY plot into an XY strip chart.
VIs
PmacPlotColors
This VI maintains an array of standard colors for plots that are indexed by Color
Index. When Color/Black is TRUE Plot Color is the indexed color. Otherwise Plot
Color is Black.
Color/Black Bool When TRUE select the color specified for
Color Index. Plot Color is Black otherwise.
Color Index i32 Index of standard color to use
Plot Color u32 Color for setting colors in charts and plots
PmacPlotXYChartBuffer
This VI uses an XY graph to mimic the behavior of an XY chart, in that it plots a
stipulated amount of the most recently acquired data points. The chart data is stored
in a static local variable of the XY Chart Data Cluster Array.
Because the VI has been marked reentrant (in VI setup), you can make multiple
parallel calls to the VI without confusing the memory. Use the New XY Point
Cluster Array input to supply multiple points at once, or leave the array unwired
(empty) and use the New XY Point Cluster input to supply one point at a time. If the
locally stored chart array is not equal to chart length, it is expanded to that length by
replicating the most recently acquired point. Data in excess of the history length is
discarded. Set Clear First to clear the chart history before processing the new points.
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Buffer Length (points) i32 Defines size of the circular buffer
used to remember points in the chart. Default is 100.
Clear First Bool (no:F) If TRUE, this VI first resets all of the
points in the circular buffer to the default value before adding
new values from new point or new points.
New XY Point Cluster New point to be added to circular
buffer. This control will be used only if the new points array
is empty.
x
y
New XY Point Cluster Array New points to be appended to
circular buffer. Use this control/input only if adding more
than one point at a time. If this array is empty, New XY Point
is appended to the buffer.
XY Point
x
y
XY Chart Data Cluster Array The current contents of the
circular buffer to be passed to the XY chart.
XY Point
x
y
PmacPQM
\PmacPQM - PMAC program execution is parametrically specified using P, Q, and
M variables. For example, the number of times a move is executed, the increment of
a move, or the radius of a circular move can all be specified using Ps and Qs.
Specific machine inputs and outputs, and internal registers are accessible using Mvariables. Mapping of these quantities to LabVIEW controls is facilitated by the
ICVs in this collection. In addition, the ability to log this information to a LabVIEW
datalog file and re-execute the motion at a later time is provided.
VIs
PmacPQMArray
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the array of PQM Variables specified by Input
Variant Array. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate Output Variant Array
contains the new values. If Set\Get is TRUE set the array of PQM Variables using
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Input Variant Array. Response Available will be FALSE and Output Variant Array
defaults to Input Variant Array.
If you specify an M-Variable it must be defined usingPewin32, PmacTerminal, or
PmacCommSendString.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Set/Get Bool (F) Set array of PQM Variables when TRUE.
Get array of PQM Variables when FALSE or unwired.
Input Variant Array Array of Variant Clusters to use for Set
operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Output Variant Array.
Output Variant Array Specified array of type-neutral PQM
Variant Clusters for Get operation. Input Variant Array for
Set operation.
PmacPQMBool
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Boolean PQM Variable specified by PQM
Variable String. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate Response contains
the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Boolean PQM Variable using Input Value.
Response Available will be FALSE and Response defaults to Input Value.
If you specify an M-Variable it must be defined usingPewin32, PmacTerminal, or
PmacCommSendString.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
PQM Variable String PQM Variable name. e.g. "P34"
Input Value Bool Value to use for Set operation.
Set/Get Bool (F) Set PQM Variable when TRUE. Get PQM
Variable when FALSE or unwired.
Response Bool Specified PQM Variable for Get operation.
Input Value for Set operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
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PmacPQMBool2Var
Convert the PQM Bool Cluster to a type-neutral PQM Variant Cluster.
PQM Bool Cluster PQM cluster from control or other
operation.
PQM Variant Cluster Type-neutral cluster PQM Bool
Cluster is converted to.
PmacPQMDbl
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Double PQM Variable specified by PQM
Variable String. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate Response contains
the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Double PQM Variable using Input Value.
Response Available will be FALSE and Response defaults to Input Value.
If you specify an M-Variable it must be defined usingPewin32, PmacTerminal, or
PmacCommSendString.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
PQM Variable String PQM Variable name. e.g. "P34"
Input Value Double Value to use for Set operation.
Set/Get Bool (F) Set PQM Variable when TRUE. Get PQM
Variable when FALSE or unwired.
Response Double Specified PQM Variable for Get operation.
Input Value for Set operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
PmacPQMDbl2Var
Convert the PQM Double Cluster to a type-neutral PQM Variant Cluster.
PQM Double Cluster PQM cluster from control or other
operation.
PQM Variant Cluster Type-neutral cluster PQM Double
Cluster is converted to.
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PmacPQMLong
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Long PQM Variable specified by PQM
Variable String. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate Response contains
the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Long PQM Variable using Input Value.
Response Available will be FALSE and Response defaults to Input Value.
If you specify an M-Variable it must be defined usingPewin32, PmacTerminal, or
PmacCommSendString.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
PQM Variable String PQM Variable name. e.g. "P34"
Input Value i32 Value to use for Set operation.
Set/Get Bool (F) Set PQM Variable when TRUE. Get PQM
Variable when FALSE or unwired.
Response i32 Specified PQM Variable for Get operation.
Input Value for Set operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
PmacPQMLong2Var
Convert the PQM Long Cluster to a type-neutral PQM Variant Cluster.
PQM Long Cluster PQM cluster from control or other
operation.
PQM Variant Cluster Type-neutral cluster PQM Long
Cluster is converted to.
PmacPQMShort
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the Short PQM Variable specified by PQM
Variable String. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate Response contains
the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the Short PQM Variable using Input Value.
Response Available will be FALSE and Response defaults to Input Value.
If you specify an M-Variable it must be defined usingPewin32, PmacTerminal, or
PmacCommSendString.
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Device Number i32 (0) DeviceNumber
PQM Variable String PQM Variable name. e.g. "P34"
Input Value i16 Value to use for Set operation.
Set/Get Bool (F) Set PQM Variable when TRUE. Get PQM
Variable when FALSE or unwired.
Response i16 Specified PQM Variable for Get operation.
Input Value for Set operation.
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
PmacPQMShort2Var
Convert the PQM Short Cluster to a type-neutral PQM Variant Cluster.
PQM Short Cluster PQM cluster from control or other
operation.
PQM Variant Cluster Type-neutral cluster PQM Short
Cluster is converted to.
PmacPQMVar2Bool
Convert a type-neutral PQM Variant Cluster to a PQM Bool Cluster.
PQM Variant Cluster Type-neutral cluster to be converted to
PQM Bool Cluster.
PQM Bool Cluster PQM cluster for indicator or other
operation.
PmacPQMVar2Dbl
Convert a type-neutral PQM Variant Cluster to a PQM Double Cluster.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 193
PQM Variant Cluster Type-neutral cluster to be converted to
PQM Double Cluster.
PQM Double Cluster PQM cluster for indicator or other
operation.
PmacPQMVar2Long
Convert a type-neutral PQM Variant Cluster to a PQM Long Cluster.
PQM Variant Cluster Type-neutral cluster to be converted to
PQM Long Cluster.
PQM Long Cluster PQM cluster for indicator or other
operation.
PmacPQMVar2Short
Convert a type-neutral PQM Variant Cluster to a PQM Short Cluster.
PQM Variant Cluster Type-neutral cluster to be converted to
PQM Short Cluster.
PQM Short Cluster PQM cluster for indicator or other
operation.
PmacPQMVariant
If Set\Get is FALSE or not wired get the variant PQM Variable specified by PQM
Variable String. Response Available will be TRUE to indicate Response contains
the new value. If Set\Get is TRUE set the variant PQM Variable using Input Value.
Response Available will be FALSE and Response defaults to Input Value.
If you specify an M-Variable it must be defined usingPewin32, PmacTerminal, or
PmacCommSendString.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Input Variant Cluster Variant Cluster to use for Set
operation.
Set/Get Bool (F) Set PQM Variable when TRUE. Get PQM
Variable when FALSE or unwired.
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Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Get operation
produces valid Response
Response Variant Cluster Specified type-neutral PQM
Variant Cluster for Get operation. Input Variant Cluster for
Set operation.
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacPQMBool
Cluster for tying PQM variable definition with a Boolean control/indicator. After
inserting on your panel specify a PQM variable name for the Variable Item and make
it the default using RightMouseButton»Data Operations»Make Current Value
Default. Replace Control to reflect your requirements.
PQM Bool Cluster Cluster for tying PQM variable definition
with a Boolean control/indicator. After inserting on your
panel specify a PQM variable name for the Variable Item and
make it the default using RightMouseButton»Data
Operations»Make Current Value Default. Replace Control to
reflect your requirements.
Variable String defining PQM Variable name. e.g.
"P34"
Control Control for associated PQM Variable
PQM Type
PmacPQMDbl
Cluster for tying PQM variable definition with a double control/indicator. After
inserting on your panel specify a PQM variable name for the Variable Item and make
it the default using RightMouseButton»Data Operations»Make Current Value
Default. Replace Control to reflect your requirements.
PQM Double Cluster Cluster for tying PQM variable
definition with a double control/indicator. After inserting on
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definition with a double control/indicator. After inserting on
your panel specify a PQM variable name for the Variable Item
and make it the default using RightMouseButton»Data
Operations»Make Current Value Default. Replace Control to
reflect your requirements.
Variable String defining PQM Variable name. e.g.
"P34"
Control Control for associated PQM Variable
PQM Type
PmacPQMLong
Cluster for tying PQM variable definition with an i32 control/indicator. After
inserting on your panel specify a PQM variable name for the Variable Item and make
it the default using RightMouseButton»Data Operations»Make Current Value
Default. Replace Control to reflect your requirements.
PQM Long Cluster Cluster for tying PQM variable definition
with an i32 control/indicator. After inserting on your panel
specify a PQM variable name for the Variable Item and make
it the default using RightMouseButton»Data
Operations»Make Current Value Default. Replace Control to
reflect your requirements.
Variable String defining PQM Variable name. e.g.
"P34"
Control Control for associated PQM Variable
PQM Type
PmacPQMShort
Cluster for tying PQM variable definition with an i16 control/indicator. After
inserting on your panel specify a PQM variable name for the Variable Item and make
it the default using RightMouseButton»Data Operations»Make Current Value
Default. Replace Control to reflect your requirements.
PQM Short Cluster Cluster for tying PQM variable
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definition with an i16 control/indicator. After inserting on
your panel specify a PQM variable name for the Variable Item
and make it the default using RightMouseButton»Data
Operations»Make Current Value Default. Replace Control to
reflect your requirements.
Variable String defining PQM Variable name. e.g.
"P34"
Control Control for associated PQM Variable
PQM Type
PmacPQMType
Enumerated type defining supported PMACPanel types. Defined values are Bool,
Short, Long, Double.
PQM Type Enumerated type defining supported PMACPanel
types. Defined values are Bool, Short, Long, Double.
PmacPQMVariant
Cluster for tying PQM variable definition with a PQM types-neutral string. This
cluster is generally not used on application panels.
PQM Variant Cluster Cluster for tying PQM variable
definition with a PQM types-neutral string. This cluster is
generally not used on application panels.
Variable String defining PQM Variable name. e.g.
"P34"
Control Type-neutral string containing PQM name
and control/indicator value.
PQM Type
PmacProgram
\PmacProgram - This collection provides tools at a variety of levels to edit,
download, debug, monitor, and encapsulate motion programs. Encapsulated
programs
•
Load themselves when executed
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•
Know their coordinate system and program number
•
Can be executed by the click of a button
•
Indicate the state of their execution
•
Can be modified, monitored, and debugged from a powerful front panel
•
Accept P, Q, and M variant data types from the \PmacPQM tools.
VIs
PmacProgBuffer
PMAC maintains a list of program buffers in memory. The list identifies the
program number and start address of the program. Buffer Number is the program
buffer entry queried for program existence. If Program Loaded is TRUE the buffer
points to Program Number, of Size words, located at Start Address. If Program
Loaded is FALSE the buffer does not point to a motion program.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Buffer Number i32 (0-255) Program buffer between 0 and
255 to fetch information for.
Start Address i32 Start address of program buffer in PMAC
memory
Size i32 Size of program buffer.
Program Loaded Bool (F) TRUE when Buffer Number
contains a program.
Program Number i32 Program Number contained in Buffer
Number
PmacProgDebug
Query PMAC for currently executing line in Coord Number and output the response
in Current Command. Determine the scroll position and characters that delimit this
line in List Buffer and create Debug Location Cluster for setting selection attributes
in a multi-line string control for real-time display of Program Number's execution.
This information is obtained from PMAC using the LIST PE command.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Program List Cluster Cluster specifying a Program Number,
Coord Number, Program Load state, Program Listing, Index
of line indexes, and a Boolean indicating the existence of
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of line indexes, and a Boolean indicating the existence of
Program Listing.
List Buffer String Program Listing of loaded
program
Line Selection Index Array Array indicating which
character in Program List String new lines begin on.
Program Listed Bool TRUE when listed.
Program VI State Cluster This cluster identifies
whether Program Number is loaded in PMAC and
which Coord Number to run Program Number in.
Debug Location Cluster Cluster of information for string
control attributes. The items define the Scroll Position of the
string in the buffer, and the Start and End Character of the line
currently executing.
Selection Start and End character in List Buffer for
currently executing program line.
Character Start
Character End
Scroll Position Number of currently executing line
in List Buffer.
Current Command String PMAC response to query for
currently executing program line in Coord Number.
PmacProgDownLoadBuffer
Write Program Buffer to a temporary file then compile and download to PMAC.
Down Load File Path and Down Load Log File Path specify the temporary file's
name and compile log. If a compile error occurs a modal pop-up panel containing the
log is displayed. Program VI State Cluster contains identifies Program Loaded, its
Program Number, and Coord Number to run the program in.
Program Buffer String Program buffer to down load and
parse for Program Number and Coord Number to run the
program in.
DeviceNumber i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Down Load File Path Path of temporary file used to down
load Program Buffer.
Down Load Log File Path Path of file containing down load
compile log.
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compile log.
Program VI State Cluster This cluster identifies whether
Program Number is loaded in PMAC and which Coord
Number to run Program Number in.
PmacProgEdit
Manage common editing operations on Input Buffer String as specified by Program
Edit Cluster. Input File Path is the default file path to use for Load, Save, or Save As
operations. New Output Buffer is TRUE when a Load or Clear Window operation
puts new data in Output Buffer. New Path is TRUE when a Load, Save, or Save As
operation modifies the file path.
Load - Load a file into Output Buffer.
Save - Save Input Buffer to Input File Path.
Save As - Query the user for a new file to save Input Buffer to.
Clear Window - Put an empty string in Output Buffer.
Down Load - Compile and down load Input Buffer to PMAC.
Show Log - Display the contents of the compile log.
Program Edit Control Cluster of latched buttons to specify
buffer operations performed by PmacProgEdit.
Input Buffer String Text buffer to apply edit operations to.
Input File Path File path for edit operations.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Output Buffer String New buffer data as the result of Clear
Window or Load operations.
New Buffer Bool (F) When TRUE this indicates that Output
Buffer contains new data as the result of a Load operation or
Clear Window.
Output File Path New Output File Path as the result of a
Load, Save, or Save As operation.
New Path Bool (F) When TRUE this indicates that Output
File Path contains new data as the result of a Load, Save, or
Save As operation.
PmacProgExec
Interactively execute the program specified in Program VI State Cluster in response
to button clicks in Program Execute Control Cluster. New Program is TRUE when
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Begin is clicked and Program List Cluster contains a new listing. Command
Executed is TRUE when any button in Program Execute Control Cluster is clicked.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Program Execute Control Cluster Cluster of latched buttons
to interactively control the execution of motion programs.
Program VI State Cluster This cluster identifies whether
Program Number is loaded in PMAC and which Coord
Number to run Program Number in.
New Program Bool (F) TRUE when a new Program List
Cluster is generated in response to clicking Begin in Program
Execute Cluster.
Command Executed Bool TRUE when any Program Execute
Control Cluster button is clicked
Program List Cluster Cluster specifying a Program Number,
Coord Number, Program Load state, Program Listing, Index
of line indexes, and a Boolean indicating the existence of
Program Listing.
PmacProgJog
This is a modal pop-up dialog that allows Jogging in the current coordinate system.
It executes a return to the pre-jog position when Stop is clicked.
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PmacProgList
Query PMAC for a listing of Program Number contained in Program VI State
Cluster. Parse the listing to locate line starts in the listing. Bundle all of this
information in Program List Cluster.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Program VI State Cluster This cluster identifies whether
Program Number is loaded in PMAC and which Coord
Number to run Program Number in.
Program List Cluster Cluster specifying a Program Number,
Coord Number, Program Load state, Program Listing, Index
of line indexes, and a Boolean indicating the existence of
Program Listing.
PmacProgParse
Parse Program Buffer to Program Number and Coord Number to run the program in.
Provide the information in Program VI State Cluster. The program load state is not
determined by this operation.
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Program Buffer String Program buffer to parse for Program
Number and Coord Number to run the program in.
Program VI State Cluster This cluster identifies whether
Program Number is loaded in PMAC and which Coord
Number to run Program Number in.
PmacProgRun
Control and monitor the execution of Program Number in Coord Number. The
specified program is started when Program Start is TRUE and no program is
currently running in Coord Number. Program Running indicates that some program
- maybe not Program Number - is running in Coord Number. Output Program Start
is a copy of Program Start and can be used to sequence program execution with other
operations.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Coord Number i32 CS to run the program in.
Program Number i32 Program Number to run.
Program Start Bool (F) Start Program Number in Coord
Number when TRUE as long a there is no program executing
in Coord Number.
Program Running Bool (F) TRUE when ANY program is
running Coord Number.
Output Program Start Bool (F) Copy of Program Start. Can
be used to sequence o perations.
PmacProgSelect
Query PMAC for a description of all loaded motion programs by reading PMAC's
internal buffers. If First Time is TRUE Menu String Array contains a sorted list of
all loaded programs by program number. The VI maintains New Selection Index as a
state from execution to execution. Translation of Program Selection Index into
Program Number occurs when First Time Strings is TRUE or Program Selection
Index is not equal to New Selection Index. New Output TRUE indicates that
Program Number, New Selection Index, and Menu String Array contain new data.
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Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Program Selection Index Index into Menu String Array and
corresponds to a program buffer. This is translated into
Program Number.
First Time Bool (F) When TRUE this VI builds Menu String
Array identifying motion programs loaded in PMAC.
Menu String Array Array of strings identifying motion
programs loaded into PMAC memo ry. Can be used to set
Menu Ring attributes.
New Selection Index i32 Copy of Program Selection Index
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Program Selection Index
changes from the last execution or First Time is TRUE.
Program Number is the translated index, New Selection is a
copy of Program Selection Ring, and Menu String Array
contains an updated listing of programs in memory.
Program Number i32 Program Number translated from
Program Selection Index.
Indicator and Control Clusters
PmacProgEdit
Cluster of latched buttons to specify buffer operations performed by PmacProgEdit.
Program Edit Control Cluster of latched buttons to specify
buffer operations performed by PmacProgEdit.
Load Load program buffer from a file
Save Save program buffer to a file
Save As Save a program buffer to a file
Clear Window Clear a program buffer
Down Load Write program buffer to a temp file,
compile the contents, and down load to PMAC.
Compile errors display a log file.
Show Log Display the compile log for the down
load.
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load.
PmacProgExec
Cluster of latched buttons to interactively control the execution of motion programs.
Program Execute Control Cluster Cluster of latched buttons
to interactively control the execution of motion programs.
Begin The command sent to PMAC is
&*CS*b*PROG* where *CS* is the specified
coordinate system number and *PROG* is the
current program number.
This command causes PMAC to set the program
counter of the addressed coordinate system to the
specified motion program and location. It is usually
used to set the program counter to the Beginning of a
motion program. The next R or S command will start
execution at this point.
If {constant} is an integer, the program counter will
point to the beginning of the program whose number
matches {constant}. Fixed motion program buffers
(PROG) can have numbers from 1 to 32,767. The
rotary motion program carries program number 0 for
the purpose of this command.
If {constant} is not an integer, the fractional part of
the number represents the line label (N or O) in the
program to which to point. The fractional value
multiplied by 100,000 determines the number of the
line label to which to point (it fills the fraction to 5
decimal places with zeros).
If a motion program buffer (including ROTARY) is
open when this command is sent to PMAC, the
command is entered into the buffer for later
execution, to be interpreted as a B-axis move
command.
Run The command sent to PMAC is R.
This command causes the addressed PMAC
coordinate system to start continuous execution of
the motion program addressed by the coordinate
system's program counter from the location of the
program counter. Addressing of the program counter
is done initially using the B{constant} command.
The coordinate system must be in a proper condition
in order for PMAC to accept this command.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 205
Otherwise PMAC will reject this command with an
error; if I6 is 1 or 3, it will report the error numb er.
The following conditions can cause PMAC to reject
this command (also listed are the remedies):
-Both limits set for a motor in coordinate system
(ERR010); clear limits
-Another move in progress (ERR011); stop move
(e.g. with J/)
-Open-loop motor in coordinate system (ERR012);
close loop with J/ or A
-Inactivated motor in coordinate system (ERR013);
change Ix00 to 1 or remove motor from coordinate
system
-No motors in the coordinate system (ERR014); put
at least 1 motor in C.S.
-Fixed motion program buffer open (ERR015); close
buffer and point to program
-No program pointed to (ERR015); point to program
with B command
Step The command sent to PMAC is S.
This command causes the addressed PMAC
coordinate system to start single-step execution of the
motion program addressed by the coordinate system's
program counter from the location of the program
counter. Addressing of the program counter is done
initially using the B{constant} command.
Single-step execution processes all lines down to and
including the next move command, DWELL,
DELAY; or if a BLOCKSTART statement is
encountered in the program, all lines down to and
including the next BLOCKSTOP statement.
If the coordinate system is already executing a
motion program when this command is sent, the
command puts the program in single-step mode, so
execution will stop at the end of the currently
executing move. In this case, its action is the
equivalent of the Q command.
The coordinate system must be in a proper condition
in order for PMAC to accept this command.
Otherwise PMAC will reject this command with an
error; if I6 is 1 or 3, it will report the error number.
The same conditions that cause PMAC to reject an R
command will cause to reject an S command; refer to
those conditions under the R command specification:
Program Hold The command sent to PMAC is \.
This command causes PMAC to do a program hold
of the currently addressed coordinate system in a
manner that permits jogging of the motor in the
coordinate system while in hold mode, provided
PMAC is in segmented mode (LINEAR or CIRCLE
mode with I13 > 0). If PMAC is in segmentation
mode (I13 = 0, or other move mode), the \ command
has the same effect as the H command, bringing the
motors to a stop in the same way, but not permitting
206 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
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any moves while in feed hold mode.
The rate of deceleration to a stop in feed hold mode,
and from a stop on the subsequent R command, is
controlled by I52. This is a global I-variable that
controls the rate for all coordinate systems.
Once halted in hold mode, program execution can be
resumed by the R command. In the meantime, the
individual motor may be jogged away from this
point, but they must be returned to this point using
the J= command before program execution may be
resumed. An attempt to resume program execution
from a different point will result in an error (ERR017
reported if I6 = 1 or 3). If resumption of this
program from this point is not desired, the A (Abort)
command should be issued before other programs are
run.
Feed Hold The command sent to PMAC is H.
This causes the currently addressed coordinate
system to suspend execution of the program starting
immediately by bringing its time base value to zero,
decelerating along its path at a rate defined by the
coordinate system I-variable Ix95. Technically the
program is still executing after an H command, but at
zero speed.
The H command is very similar in effect to a %0
command, except that deceleration is controlled by
Ix95, not Ix94, and execution can be resumed with an
R or an S command, instead of a %100 command. In
addition, H works under external time base, whereas
a %0 command does not
Full speed execution along the path will commence
again on an R or S command. The ramp up to full
speed will also take place at a rate determined by
Ix95 (full time-base value, either internally or
externally set). Once the full speed is reached, Ix94
determines any time-base changes.
Abort The command sent to PMAC is A.
This command causes all axes defined in the current
coordinate system to begin immediately to decelerate
to a stop, aborting the currently running motion
program (if any). It also brings any disabled (killed)
or open-loop motors (defined in the current
coordinate system) to an enabled zero-velocity
closed-loop state.
If moving, each motor will decelerate its commanded
profile at a rate defined by its own motor I-variable
Ix15. If there is significant following error when the
A command is issued, it may take a long time for the
actual motion to stop. Although the command
trajectory is brought to a stop at a definite rate, the
actual position will continue to "catch up" to the
commanded position for a longer time.
Note that a multi-axis system may not stay on its
programmed path during this deceleration.
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 207
Abort commands are not meant to be recovered from
gracefully. If you wish to resume easily, us the H or
Q command instead.
Motion program execution may resume (if a motion
program was in fact aborted) by issuing either an R
or S command, but two factors must be considered.
First, the starting positions for calculating the next
move will be the original end positions of the aborted
move unless the PMATCH command is issued or
I14=1. Second, the move from the aborted position
to the next move end position may not be possible or
desirable. The J= command may be used to jog each
motor in the coordinate system to the original end
position of the aborted move, provided I13 is 0 (no
segmentation mode).
Halt "Q" The command sent to PMAC is Q.
This causes the currently addressed coordinate
system to cease execution of the program at the end
of the currently executing move or the next move if
that has already been calculated. The program
counter is set to the next line in the program, so
execution may be resumed at that point with an R or
S command..
Halt "/" The command sent to PMAC is /.
This command causes PMAC to halt the execution of
the motion program running in the currently
addressed coordinate system at the end of the
currently executing move, provided PMAC is in
segmentation mode (I13 > 0). If PMAC is not in
segmentation mode (I13 = 0), the / command has the
same effect as the Q command, halting execution at
the end of the latest calculated move, which can be 1
or 2 moves past the currently executing move.
Once halted at the end of the move, program
execution can be resumed with the R command. In
the meantime, the individual motors may be jogged
away from this point, but they must all be returned to
this point using the J= command before program
execution may be resumed. As attempt to resume
program execution for a different point will result in
an error (ERR017 reported if I6 = 1 or 3). If
resumption of the program from this point is not
desired, the A (Abort) command should be issued
before other programs are run.
Jog Dialog Pop a jog panel up to allow motor
jogging after a Prog Hold. The jog panel must be
closed before the panel before you can return to this
panel to restart the program with Run or Step.
Closing the panel returns all jogged motors to their
pre-jog position with j=. Commands sent to PMAC
are generated from the panel.
208 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
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PmacProgList
Cluster specifying a Program Number, Coord Number, Program Load state, Program
Listing, Index of line indexes, and a Boolean indicating the existence of Program
Listing.
Program List Cluster specifying a Program Number, Coord
Number, Program Load state, Program Listing, Index of line
indexes, and a Boolean indicating the existence of Program
Listing.
List Buffer String Program Listing of loaded
program
Line Selection Index Array indicating which
character in Program List String new lines begin on.
Program Listed Bool TRUE when List Buffer
contains a program listing.
Program VI State Cluster This cluster identifies
whether Program Number is loaded in PMAC and
which Coord Number to run Program Number in.
PmacProgVIState
This cluster identifies whether Program Number is loaded in PMAC and which
Coord Number to run Program Number in.
Program VI State Cluster This cluster identifies whether
Program Number is loaded in PMAC and which Coord
Number to run Program Number in.
Program Loaded TRUE when Program Number is
loaded in PMAC memory
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 209
Program Number i32 Identifies a program number
loaded whose load state is identified by Program
Loaded.
Coord Number i32 CS to run Program Number in.
PmacResponse
\PmacResponse - Send formatted command strings to PMAC and convert ASCII
response strings into numerical values for use in you PMACPanel application.
VIs
PmacRespGetBool
If Command String is not the empty string send it to PMAC and wait for a response.
If Response Available is TRUE Response contains a valid response. Otherwise
Response is FALSE.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Response Available Bool (F)) TRUE when Response is valid
Response Bool (F) Boolean response to Command String. If
the response is not valid Response = FALSE.
PmacRespGetDbl
If Command String is not the empty string send it to PMAC and wait for a response.
If Response Available is TRUE Response contains a valid response. Otherwise
Response is 0.0.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Response is valid
Response Double (0.0) Double response to Command String.
If the response is not valid Response = 0.0.
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PmacRespGetLong
If Command String is not the empty string send it to PMAC and wait for a response.
If Response Available is TRUE Response contains a valid response. Otherwise
Response is 0.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Response is valid
Response i32 (0) Long response to Command String. If the
response is not valid Response = 0.
PmacRespGetShort
If Command String is not the empty string send it to PMAC and wait for a response.
If Response Available is TRUE Response contains a valid response. Otherwise
Response is 0.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Response is valid
Response i16 (0) Short response to Command String. If the
response is not valid Response = 0.
PmacRespGetULong
If Command String is not the empty string send it to PMAC and wait for a response.
If Response Available is TRUE Response contains a valid response. Otherwise
Response is 0.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
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Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 211
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Response is valid
Response u32 (0) ULong response to Command String. If the
response is not valid Response = 0.
PmacRespGetUShort
If Command String is not the empty string send it to PMAC and wait for a response.
If Response Available is TRUE Response contains a valid response. Otherwise
Response is 0.
Device Number i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Command String PMAC on-line command string to send to
PMAC
Response Available Bool (F) TRUE when Response is valid
Response u16 (0) Ushort response to Command String. If the
response is not valid Response = 0.
PmacSubVI
\PmacSubVI - This collection provides support to PmacProg and PmacPLC.
VIs
PmacPLCSubVI
PmacPLCSubVICreate makes a copy of this VI with a new name that matches the
name of a PLC program. Because the PLC program has the same name (with a
different extension) this VI knows how to open, parse, load, and run a PLC program
without intervention or extra inputs. It allows you to interactively monitor and
change the PLC program's execution state. Details of its implementation are
contained in the manual.
The VI downloads the associated PLC program when first loaded unless this option
is disabled in the diagram and a default for PLC Number are provided for the PLC
VI State Cluster.
The VI queries PMAC for the PLC's execution state every execution. This is done
whether the program is executing or not. New Output is TRUE any time PLC
Enable is TRUE.
DeviceNumber i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
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PLC Enable Bool (F) Toggle the PLC program execution
state specifed in PLC VI State Cluster.
PLC VI State Cluster This cluster contains the PLC VI State
information parsed from the program file during initial down
load or defined by the VI defaults.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output PQM Variant
Array contains new data.
Execute State Bool TRUE indicates that PLC Number is
enabled.
PmacPLCSubVICreate
Prompt the user for a file to save Program Buffer to. Make a copy of
PmacPLCSubVI.vi changing the name to the same base as the saved program. For
example, if Program Buffer is saved to PmacTestPLC1.pmc a new VI named
PmacTestPLC1.vi is created from PmacPLCSubVI.
Program Buffer String Program buffer to create
encapsulated motion program VI from.
PLC Selected Cluster Cluster defining currently selected
PLC and it execution state.
PmacProgSubVI
PmacProgSubVICreate makes a copy of this VI with a new name that matches the
name of a motion program. Because the motion program has the same name (with a
different extension) this VI knows how to open, parse, load, and run a motion
program without intervention or extra inputs. It allows you to edit the associated
program and interactively excute the program. Details of its implementation are
contained in the manual.
The VI downloads the associated program when first loaded unless this option is
disabled in the diagram and defaults for Program Number and Coord Number are
provided for the Program VI State Cluster.
The interactive panel can be opened and used by setting Panel Show (latched)
TRUE. See the documentation for PmacTerminalEdit and PmacTerminalExecute for
details on interactive execution. The panel is closed by clicking the Stop button on
the panel.
When the latched input Program Run is TRUE Input PQM Variant Array is sent to
PMAC to initialize a program's P, Q, or M variables. The program is then started as
long as there is no program executing in the associated CS. When Program Running
is TRUE this or another program is executing in the associated CS.
The VI queries PMAC for Output PQM Variant Array data every execution to allow
monitoring of these variables by your program. This is done whether the program is
executing or not. New Output is TRUE when this data is valid.
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Chapter 13 - VI Reference • 213
DeviceNumber i32 (0) Provided by PmacDevOpen
Program Run Bool (F) Start the program specied in
Panel Show Bool (F) During normal operation the panel for
this VI is not displayed. When this input is TRUE the panel is
opened and displayed.
Input PQM Variant Array The contents of this PQM
Variant Array are written to PMAC when Program Run is
TRUE prior to actually starting the associated motion
program.
Program Running Bool (F) TRUE when the associated
PMAC motion program is running in the associated
coordinate system.
Program VI State Cluster This cluster contains the Program
VI State information parsed from the program file during
initial down load or defined by the VI defaults.
New Output Bool (F) TRUE when Output PQM Variant
Array contains new data.
Output PQM Variant Array This output contains the current
values of the PQM values specified by Input PQM Variant
Array when New Output is TRUE.
PmacProgSubVICreate
Prompt the user for a file to save Program Buffer to. Make a copy of
PmacProgSubVI.vi changing the name to the same base as the saved program. For
example, if Program Buffer is saved to PmacTest1.pmc a new VI named
PmacTest1.vi is created from PmacProgSubVI.
Program Buffer String Program buffer to create
encapsulated motion program VI from.
Program VI State Cluster This cluster identifies whether
Program Number is loaded in PMAC and which Coord
Number to run Program Number in.
214 • Chapter 13 - VI Reference
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Appendix A - Compiling CINs
Using Microsoft Visual C++
Introduction
The following application note on the use of Microsoft Visual C++ for CIN
development is available from www.natinst.com. To locate the document, navigate
your way through the site by selecting the following links.
Technical Support
Knowledge Base
You can then search for the keyword “CIN” and select the document from the search
response.
How do I Compile a Code Interface Node (CIN) using
Visual C++ 5.0?
Product Group: LV Software
Product Name: LV-Win95
(Ver / Rev.): 4.1
Problem: How can I compile a code interface node (CIN) from LabVIEW 4.x or 5.x
using Visual C++ version 5.0 for Windows 95/NT?
Solution: First a quick overview. When you load a VI in LabVIEW, it automatically
takes the G (graphical) source code and compiles it into machine code (assembly
language) so that when you press the white Run Arrow you are ready to execute a
COMPILED program. Labview.exe was written in C, but the VIs you create NEVER
involve a C layer: you compose in G, and that G source code is compiled for you
directly and automatically into assembly code. This is why LabVIEW is so fast.
When you create a CIN, LabVIEW is actually absorbing the object code (.lsb) of the
C program and assimilating it directly into the existing machine code. What we are
doing here is tricking the native C compiler into thinking it's creating a C executable
from a .mak file, when in fact we're getting it to create object code that LabVIEW
can directly import and incorporate into the vi's own machine code. One fundamental
difference between using a CIN in LabVIEW and making a DLL call from the Call
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Appendix A - Compiling CINs Using Microsoft Visual C++ • 215
Library Function is that the CIN will operate WITHIN LabVIEW's memory space
(which is DYNAMIC), while a DLL call from LabVIEW will operate in it's own
STATIC memory space external to LabVIEW's. This is why you can successfully
pass static pointers back and forth between LabVIEW and DLLs, but NOT between
LabVIEW and CINs.
Here is a step-by-step instructions of how to create a CIN from Visual C++ 5.0:
1.
Open a new VI in LabVIEW. Insert the Code Interface Node function
from the "Advanced" Sub-palette of the Functions Palette onto your
block
diagram.
2.
Let's say you want to write a CIN for a simple operation such as A * B
= C, you need two inputs and one output. Resize your Code Interface
Node function to have three inputs and outputs. Create two digital
controls (labels A,B) and wire to the first two inputs (white blocks on
the left side of the Code Interface Node function). Create a digital
indicator(label C) and wire it to the third output (the third white block
on the right side of the Code Interface Node Function). Notice how
these blocks changes to show the appropriate data type.
3.
Now right-click on the CIN in your block diagram and choose "Create
.c File...". This will pop up a window asking you where to save this .c
file. Give it a name "mult.c" and save it in a known directory. Now,
launch Visual C++ 5.0 and goto File >> New. From the Projects tab in
the window that pops up, select Win32 Console Application. Also give
a name to the project & the location in the spaces given at the right of
the window. When you say OK, it creates a new workspace. On the left
side you should see an explorer like window which will have your
"ProjectName classes". At the bottom of that window you will see three
tabs - Class View, Files View, Info View. Select "Files View". Now
you will see "ProjectName Files". Right click on the "ProjectName
files" and select add projects to the file. Now select the mult.c file
which was created by LabVIEW. This will add mult.c to your project.
4.
Open the mult.c by double-clicking on its name under the Files View in
the Workspace window. You will notice that LabVIEW has generated a
C code with all the required headers. Add your code in the area where it
says "/* ENTER YOUR CODE HERE */". Type *C = *A * *B; which
will multiply A & B and assign it to C. Go ahead and save your project.
5.
The next step is to create a Make file. The .mak file will convince the C
compiler to create Labview object code (.lsb) from the C source code
you just finished. Open Notepad on your machine and create a new text
file. Type the following in that file:
name=mult (This would be the name of your .c file)
IDE = VC
type=CIN
cinlibraries = Kernel32.lib
CINTOOLSDIR = C:\LabVIEW\cintools (Here you need to provide
the path to the cintools directory which is present under you LabVIEW
directory)
!include <$(CINTOOLSDIR)\ntlvsb.mak>
216 • Appendix A - Compiling CINs Using Microsoft Visual C++
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Save this file as Mult.mak file, preferably in the same directory as your
mult.c file.
NOTE 1: In the first line, you should provide the name of your .c code
NOTE 2: In the fifth line, " CINTOOLSDIR = C:\LabVIEW \cintools",
you should give the path to the "cintools" directory on your computer.
It might be different than what is shown here. "cintools" directory is
available under your LabVIEW directory. Let's say, if the actual path is
C:\Program Files\National Instuments\LabVIEW \cintools, you should
type C:\Progra~1\Nation~1\LabVIEW \cintools. This is the DOS
convention for any names that has white spaces in it. In this case
Program Files and National Instruments has white spaces. Therefore,
according to the convention, you type the first 6 characters followed by
~1. This is a very important step.
NOTE 3: While creating the .mak file, please stick to the uppercase
and lowercase as shown above.
6
Now go back to Visual C++ environment and add this make file to your
project. You can add this make file by right-clicking on the
"ProjectName files" in the "File View" and selecting "Add files to
project".
NOTE: You might run into two dialog boxes when you try to load in
the mult.mak file. First, MS Vis C/C++ will complain that "This
makefile was not generated by Developer Studio". Answer "YES" to
"Do you want to continue?", then in the second pop-up dialog agree
that Win32 is the Platform you wish to operate on.
Once you add the make file to the project, you should have the .c file
and the .mak file in your project. Now goto to the Build menu >>
Select "Build ProjectName.exe". This should compile your file
successfully. You will get the following message in the Error Window
if the executable is combined successfully:
--------------------Configuration: mult_ex - Win32 Debug------------------Microsoft (R) Program Maintenance Utility Version 1.62.7022
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corp 1988-1997. All rights reserved.
mult.c
Microsoft (R) 32-Bit Incremental Linker Version 5.00.7022
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corp 1992-1997. All rights reserved.
LabVIEW resource file, type 'CIN ', name 'mult.lsb', created properly.
mult.exe - 0 error(s), 0 warning(s)
NOTE 1: You might run into different errors like "fatal error U1073",
"fatal error: C1083 - cannot include extcode.h file", "LNK 2001, LNK
2100 - unresolved external symbol - main". Most of the times these
errors happen because the Visual C++ is not able to find a specific
Header (.h) file or an Object (.obj) file. Error window will tell you the
name of the file it could not find or where the error happened. GO
AHEAD A DO A SEARCH FOR THAT FILE IN YOUR
COMPUTER AND ADD THAT FILE TO YOUR PROJECT AS
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Appendix A - Compiling CINs Using Microsoft Visual C++ • 217
DISCUSSED IN PREVIOUS STEPS. Alternatively, you can add the
path of the directory in which you find this file to your project. To do
this, go to Tools menu >> Options... >>Select "Directories" tab. Let's
say, you want to add the path to the extcode.h file. First you do a search
for that file in your computer. You will find this file at C:\Program
Files\National Instruments\LabVIEW \cintools \extcode.h. So under the
"Directories" tab, double-click on the dotted box at the bottom of the
list. This allow you to browse and select the directory. You should
include only the path ie., C:\Program Files\National
Instruments\LabVIEW \cintools. Do the same for any other files that
needs to be included. This will create the search path and Visual C++
will know where to look for those missing files.
7.
Now that you've got the object code (mult.lsb), go back to your
LabVIEW VI and you would notice that VI is ready to run (The run
arrow on top is not broken anymore). If you created your .lsb file
before actually building your LabVIEW code, then right-click on the
CIN in your block diagram, and choose "Load Code Resource...". Now
choose "mult.lsb" from the your file list . You should get a white run
arrow, and you can test the VI by multiplying two numbers.
218 • Appendix A - Compiling CINs Using Microsoft Visual C++
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Glossary of Terms
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Glossary of Terms • 219
Index
Ix22 · 111, 124, 125, 127, 155, 163, 164
Ix23 · 127, 155
Ix25 · 71, 79, 83, 85, 121, 129, 130, 131, 132, 144, 145,
152, 153, 161
Ix26 · 74, 120, 127, 155
Ix28 · 28, 35, 63, 65, 128, 155, 171, 176
Ix29 · 160, 169
Ix30 · 120, 157, 158, 159
Ix31 · 157, 158
Ix32 · 158
Ix33 · 158
Ix34 · 58, 158, 160, 175
Ix35 · 159
Ix36 · 159
Ix37 · 159
Ix38 · 159
Ix39 · 160
Ix63 · 158
Ix69 · 158, 160
Ix79 · 160, 169
Ix80 · 104, 169
Ix87 · 23, 24
Ix88 · 23, 24
Ix89 · 24
Ix90 · 24
Ix91 · 26
Ix92 · 26, 29, 31, 66, 110
Ix94 · 25, 207
Ix95 · 25, 207
Ix96 · 25
Ix97 · 36, 65
VIs to access · 133
D
Development Tools · 86
DPR
VIs to access · 37
E
Encoders · 67
H
Homing · 117
I
I-Variables
Specific
Ix01 ·
Ix02 ·
Ix03 ·
Ix05 ·
Ix06 ·
Ix07 ·
Ix08 ·
Ix09 ·
Ix11 ·
177
Ix12 ·
Ix13 ·
Ix14 ·
Ix15 ·
Ix16 ·
Ix17 ·
Ix19 ·
Ix20 ·
Ix21 ·
59, 160, 176
129, 151, 160
168
148, 180
59, 176
120
96, 119, 120, 157, 158, 159
57, 60, 150, 157, 181
29, 35, 63, 65, 121, 122, 130, 152, 161, 162, 172,
29, 35, 63, 65, 122, 162, 172, 177
59, 61, 173, 176
59, 60, 123, 163, 173, 176
104, 123, 162, 163, 207
111, 124, 163
23, 24, 124, 164
125, 126, 154, 164
125, 126, 154, 164
125, 126, 154, 164
220 • Index
M
Memory
VIs to access · 139
N
Numeric Data Types · 210
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
P
PLC
VIs to access · 182
Plotting
VIs to access · 188
PmacAcc · 4
PmacAccMachineInput8 · 5
PmacAccMachineOutput8 · 5
PmacAddress · 6
PmacAddressAdd · 6
PmacAddressDelete · 7
PmacAddressItem · 8
PmacAddressMotors · 7
PmacButton
PmacButtGetBool · 8
PmacButtGetDbl · 9
PmacButtGetLong · 9
PmacButtGetShort · 10
PmacButtGetStr · 10
PmacButtGetULong · 11
PmacButtGetUShort · 11
PmacButtSendStr · 11
PmacButtons · 8
PmacComm
PmacCommA ppend · 12
PmacCommBuffer · 12
PmacCommError · 13
PmacCommGetBuffer · 13
PmacCommGetStr · 14
PmacCommGlobal · 15
PmacCommLast · 16
PmacCommRespStr · 14
PmacCommSendStr · 14
PmacCoord · 16
PmacCoordColor · 16
PmacCoordCurrent · 17
PmacCoordDef · 17, 22
PmacCoordIVar · 17, 22
PmacCoordMotorDef · 18
PmacCoordMotorsToCoord · 18
PmacCoordMotorToCoord · 19
PmacCoordMotorToEncoder · 19
PmacCoordRunning · 20
PmacCoordScale · 20, 26
PmacCoordSpecify · 27
PmacCoordStat · 21
PmacCoordStatProg · 21, 28
PmacCoordStatWord1 · 21, 30
PmacCoordStatWord2 · 22, 33
PmacDevice · 36
PmacDevClose · 36
PmacDevSerial · 37
PmacDPR
PmacDPR · 37
PmacDPRFixedBack · 37
PmacDPRFixedBackConfig · 38
PmacDPRFixedBackCoord · 64
PmacDPRFixedBackCoordVector · 63
PmacDPRFixedBackMotorVector · 61
PmacDPRFixedBackVectors · 39
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
PmacDPRMotorVecToCoord · 40
PmacDPRNumericCINCluster · 40
PmacDPRNumericCluster · 41
PmacDPRNumericDbl · 41
PmacDPRNumericDWord · 42
PmacDPRNumericDWordBit · 43
PmacDPRNumericDWordBitTest · 44
PmacDPRNumericDWordSetMask · 44
PmacDPRNumericSpec · 45, 61
PmacDPRNumericWord · 45
PmacDPRRealTimeConfig · 46
PmacDPRRealTimeMotor · 47, 59
PmacDPRRealTimeMotors · 48
PmacDPRRealTimePVE · 49
PmacDPRRealTimeServo · 57
PmacDPRRealTimeVector · 56
PmacDPRRealTimeVectors · 49
PmacDPRServoDelt a · 50
PmacDPRVarBack · 50
PmacDPRVarBackConfig · 51
PmacDPRVarBackgroundxLate · 52
PmacDPRVarBackReset · 53
PmacDPRVarBackSpec · 55
PmacDPRVarBackStat · 54
PmacDPRVarBackVectors · 53
PmacDPRFixedBackMotor · 62
PmacEncoder · 67
PmacEncoderCapture · 76
PmacEncoderCaptureControl · 85
PmacEncoderCaptureFlag · 84
PmacEncoderCompare · 76
PmacEncoderCompareConfig · 75, 84
PmacEncoderIVarCapture · 74, 82
PmacEncoderOffset · 74
PmacEncoderRegADC · 73
PmacEncoderRegCapture · 73
PmacEncoderRegDAC · 73
PmacEncoderRegisters · 72, 81
PmacEncoderRegServo · 72
PmacEncoderRegStat · 70
PmacEncoderRegTime · 70
PmacEncoderStatControl · 79
PmacEncoderStatFlags · 77
PmacEncoderToCoord · 69
PmacEncoderToEncoder · 68
PmacEncoderTrigger · 67
PmacFile · 86
PmacFileDatalog · 87
PmacFileDatalogAppend · 88
PmacFileDatalogControl · 92
PmacFileDatalogCreate · 88
PmacFileDatalogDisplay · 92
PmacFileDatalogRead · 89
PmacFileDownLoad · 89
PmacFileDownLoadLog · 90
PmacFileLoad · 90
PmacFileSave · 91
PmacFileSpreadsheet · 91
PmacGather · 93
PmacGatherCollect · 93
PmacGatherSelect · 94, 97
PmacGatherSetup · 95
Index • 221
PmacGatherSpec · 98
PmacGatherSpreadsheet · 95
PmacGatherStart · 95
PmacGatherStep · 96
PmacGatherStop · 96
PmacGlobal · 99
PmacGlobalBufferClose · 99
PmacGlobalBufferSize · 99
PmacGlobalControl · 100, 102
PmacGlobalIVarComm · 100, 106
PmacGlobalIVarMove · 100, 109
PmacGlobalStat · 101
PmacGlobalStatBuffer · 101, 111
PmacGlobalStatGather · 102, 112
PmacGlobalStatWord1 · 102, 113
PmacGlobalStatWord2 · 102, 115
PmacHome · 117
PmacHomeComplete · 118
PmacHomeIVar · 118
PmacHomeState · 117, 119
PmacHomeIVar · 121
PmacIVar
PmacIVarBool · 133
PmacIVarDbl · 134
PmacIVarGetBool · 134
PmacIVarGetDbl · 135
PmacIVarGetLong · 135
PmacIVarGetShort · 136
PmacIVarLong · 136
PmacIVarSetBool · 137
PmacIVarSetDbl · 137
PmacIVarSetLong · 137
PmacIVarSetShort · 138
PmacIVarShort · 138
PmacMemory · 139
PmacMemoryGet · 139
PmacMemoryGetBit · 140
PmacMemoryGetBits · 140
PmacMemoryRead · 140
PmacMemoryReadDbl · 141
PmacMemorySet · 141
PmacMemorySetBit · 142
PmacMemorySetBits · 142
PmacMemoryWrite · 142
PmacMemoryWriteDbl · 143
PmacMotor · 143
PmacMotorCurrent · 143
PmacMotorError · 144
PmacMotorIVarFlag · 144, 151
PmacMotorIVarMove · 145, 154
PmacMotorIVarPID · 146, 156
PmacMotorIVarSafety · 146, 161
PmacMotorJogControl · 147, 165
PmacMotorLimitControl · 147, 168
PmacMotorPosition · 148
PmacMotorPVE · 148, 170
PmacMotorStat · 149
PmacMotorStatJog · 149, 170
PmacMotorStatLimit · 149, 172
PmacMotorStatWord1 · 150, 174
PmacMotorStatWord2 · 150, 176
PmacMotorVelocity · 150
222 • Index
PmacMotors · 178
PmacMotorsCloseLoop · 178
PmacMotorsErrors · 179
PmacMotorsPlotSelect · 179, 181
PmacMotorsPositions · 180
PmacMotorsPVE · 181
PmacMotorsVelocities · 180
PMACPanel Organization
Device Management · 36
PmacPLC · 182
PmacPLCBuffer · 182
PmacPLCDownLoadBuffer · 183
PmacPLCEnable · 184
PmacPLCExec · 184, 187
PmacPLCList · 185
PmacPLCParse · 185
PmacPLCSelect · 185, 187
PmacPLCState · 186
PmacPLCVIState · 187
PmacPlot · 188
PmacPlotColors · 188
PmacPlotXYChartBuffer · 188
PmacPQM · 189
PmacPQMArray · 189
PmacPQMBool · 190, 195
PmacPQMBool2Var · 191
PmacPQMDbl · 191, 195
PmacPQMDbl2Var · 191
PmacPQMLong · 192, 196
PmacPQMLong2Var · 192
PmacPQMShort · 192, 196
PmacPQMShort2Var · 193
PmacPQMType · 197
PmacPQMVar2Bool · 193
PmacPQMVar2Dbl · 193
PmacPQMVar2Long · 194
PmacPQMVar2Short · 194
PmacPQMVariant · 194, 197
PmacProgram · 197
PmacProgBuffer · 198
PmacProgDebug · 198
PmacProgDownLoadBuffer · 199
PmacProgEdit · 200, 204
PmacProgExec · 200, 205
PmacProgJog · 201
PmacProgList · 202, 209
PmacProgPars e · 202
PmacProgRun · 203
PmacProgSelect · 203
PmacProgVIState · 209
PmacResponse · 210
PmacRespGetBool · 210
PmacRespGetDbl · 210
PmacRespGetLong · 211
PmacRespGetShort · 211
PmacRespGetULong · 211
PmacRespGetUShort · 212
PmacSubVI · 212
PmacPLCSubVI · 212
PmacPLCSubVICreate · 213
PmacProgSubVI · 213
PmacProgSubVICreate · 214
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
PQM Variables
VIs to access · 189
PMACPanel VI Reference PMACPanel VI Reference
Programs
VIs to access · 197, 212
Index • 223
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