PLAY BOOK - GMT Games
Living Play Book • December 2013
PLAY BOOK
Table of Contents
PB 1.0
PB 2.0
PB 3.0
PB 4.0
Optional Rules........................................................ 2
Game Setup............................................................ 4
Scenarios................................................................ 4
Designer Notes..................................................... 11
PB 5.0 Example of Play................................................... 13
PB 6.0 Historical Notes.................................................... 19
PB 7.0 Expanded Sequence of Play................................. 28
This is the “Living Play Book” document for the game. It includes errata and clarifications to the original rules. To aid readability, errata is indicated in blue text.
GMT Games, LLC • P.O. Box 1308, Hanford, CA 93232-1308
www.GMTGames.com
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Crown of Roses Play Book
Example: On Turn 3, March is the Senior York Heir, but
Rivers is currently not controlled by York; though York has
influence placed on him, as well as Warwick. As such, York
loses one Popular Support at the beginning of the King Phase
but the IPs placed on Warwick are subject to no negative
modifier. On Turn 4, assuming Rivers is still controlled by
York, York will have to place at least one (1) IP on Warwick
or lose him during the Parliament Phase (3 pro-York Roses
– 4 [Game Turn] equals negative 1).
PB 1.3 Distrustful Margaret Rule (Historical
Rule)
Queen Margaret was very distrustful of Henry Holland, the
Duke of Exeter (Exeter Block), especially early in the conflict,
as Exeter was Henry VI’s immediate Heir at the time. Because
of this mistrust (which turned out to be misplaced), Exeter cannot Lead any non-Office Blocks for Movement or Combat while
Margaret is In-Play in England (i.e., not in Exile).
PB 1.4 Shared Estates
PB 1.0 Optional Rules
Some Nobles/Heirs may treat Home Estates of some other
Nobles/Heirs as if they were their own Home Estate, in all
respects and for all game purposes. They may share Estates
according to the following list:
PB 1.1 Force Exhaustion
This rule simulates the possibility that both armies will be too
exhausted and/or too weak to continue with a Battle. If, during any Combat Round, both forces roll no hits, both sides are
considered to be “exhausted”. The Battle ends and the Attacker
must Retreat, if possible. If he cannot Retreat, the Defender may
Retreat if he has a valid Retreat path. If the Defender chooses
not to Retreat, then the Attacker moves all his Blocks to his
Undeclared Pool.
PB 1.2 Woodville Rule (Historical Rule)
While March is the Senior York Heir, at the beginning of
each King Phase (before resolving any actions of the King
Phase), the York Player must check to see if he controls the
Rivers Noble Block.
If York does not control Rivers, York loses one (1) Popular
Support.
If York does control Rivers, York suffers the following penalty: for each of the Warwick (blue background) Nobles, York
is considered to have a negative influence modifier equal to the
current Game Turn number.
When resolving the Gather Supporter’s Phase, check the net
bid amount for each Warwick Noble influenced OR controlled
by York (even if no IP Markers are placed on those Nobles – this
is different than in the normal rules!). If the net bid amount is
negative, York loses control of that Noble and places him next
to the game board as an Inactive Noble (obviously, if another
Player had successfully influenced the Noble, it would be placed
with that Player’s In-Play Nobles, instead).
• Henry VI and his Host Block, Margaret and her Host Block,
and Prince Edward (Lancaster Block) may share Estates (this
is in addition to being able to use the Red Rose Lancaster
Estates).
• Salisbury, Warwick, and Montague may share Estates if the
same Player controls the Blocks who are sharing.
This is in addition to any Nobles that share a shield icon on
their Blocks. Placement is still subject to the restrictions in the
normal rules (7.2.6).
PB 1.5 Team Games
It is possible for Players to play the game as teams. In a fourplayer game, there will be two teams of two. A three-player
game can also be used for team play, and this is especially
useful if one player is more experienced (the less experienced
players each play one half of one team). Teams can consist of
any two Houses (exception: Lancaster and York may never be
on the same team, and Buckingham and Warwick may never
be on the same team).
Team games use all of the standard rules, except as noted here:
• Each Player in a team functions as a separate entity, with
individual turns and separate hands. Each will have his own
pool of Influence Points.
• Team members cannot engage in combat against their partner.
They cannot Intercept, Evade, or otherwise avoid forces belonging to their partner (e.g., by Card play). Blocks belonging
to a Player’s partner are considered Friendly.
Remember: In a four-player game, Warwick Heirs cannot
be influenced at all.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Play Book
• Any Shire that is Friendly for either partner is considered
Friendly for both partners, except for the purposes of Influence and Military Victory. Each Player tracks his control of
Shires separately for Economic Victory and for determining
new IPs. Control is determined by whichever partner has
the most Blocks in the Shire, ties resolved per the normal tie
breaking rules (10.5.1).
• In Combat, each partner may contribute some forces to the
active Battle. One Player must contribute the Leader Block, as
he would with any Battle. Each Player decides which Blocks
he is willing to contribute separately, but the total number of
Blocks picked for the Main Force may not exceed the Command Rating of the Leader Block. Blocks in excess of this
value are placed in the Reserves, as normal. Reinforcements
arrive as normal, but from both partner’s forces.
• Retreats in combat are at the discretion of the House controlling the Leader Block, only. Each Player may Retreat to
a different location, as long as he has a valid Retreat path.
Remember: Blocks belonging to the Player’s partner are
considered Friendly.
• The decision to conduct a Battle Charge is at the discretion of
the House controlling the Leader Block (only), but is limited
to one (1) Heir, per the normal rules. The Leader Block may
select a partner’s Heir to Charge, but the partner may decline
to Charge if he desires.
• Each partner rolls the damage dice for his own Blocks. The
combined total is applied to the enemy force.
• Damage is distributed between the partners according to the
standard rules, with the House controlling the Leader Block
determining ties.
• In a joint combat force, each Player keeps his own Blocks in
front of himself.
• In team play, each partner’s Heirs function normally.
• Cards that affects combat can be played by either partner and
affect all Friendly or Enemy forces (i.e., all partner forces
are affected by any applicable Cards).
• In Parliament, each Player casts his Votes independently, but
may (obviously) cast his Votes for his partner by selec-tion of
his partner’s “Votes for” marker. Partners are free to discuss
supporting votes.
• Military Victory requires the indicated number of enemy Shires
(or all enemy Shires if less than total exists for the enemy side;
e.g. York alone in a 3P team game). In addition, Military Victory
requires that EACH team member hold the indicated number of
friendly Shires.
Each team can win a team victory. The Military Victory conditions requires that EACH team member hold the indicated
number of friendly Shires, but counts all enemy Shires held by
the team (sum the values for each partner). Military Victory still
requires the indicated number of enemy Shires depending on
the number of players or all enemy Shires if less than the total
exists for the enemy side (e.g. York alone in a 3P team game).
3
An Economic Victory counts all areas held by the team (sum
the values for each partner), but Automatic Victory is always
per the 2-player level (i.e. 14 VP’s). Political Victories require
one (1) additional Turn as King for the team (note: Turns with
either partner being King count) and count all Nobles controlled
by the team (sum the number for each partner).
Example: Lancaster and Buckingham are a team against York
in a 3-player game. For them to achieve a Military Victory,
they would need to control the six York-loyal Shires while
maintaining control of at least four Shires loyal to each of
Lancaster and Buckingham.
• Each Player in a team can also win an individual Military,
Economic or Political Victory if he meets the criteria as set
forth in the scenario instruction.
• Remember: In team play, Lancaster can never partner with
York, and Buckingham can never partner with Warwick.
PB 1.6 IP Collection/Usage
If you find that you want even more voting, deal making and
backstabbing among Players, make the following slight change
to how IPs are collected and used. In the Influence Phase, when
you calculate the number of IPs you are to gain, mark this with
your small cylinder as usual. However, do not collect these
new IPs at this point.
Next, calculate your total available votes and mark this total as
normal. Then, collect a number of IP Markers from your Unclaimed Pool equal to this total (important: keep these separate
from your Stock IPs!). Determine the King as normal, voting
based on your total votes recorded above.
After determining the new King, each Player uses these separate
IP Markers as “Votes” during the upcoming Office Phase to
bid on the various Offices. I.e., true IP Markers are now only
used for Influencing Nobles, while these “Votes” (temporarily
represented by IP Markers) are used to vote on Offices. At the
conclusion of the Office Phase, return all unused “Votes” (IP
Markers) to your Unclaimed Pool, and then collect your new,
true, IPs based on the small cylinder you marked previously.
Example: York determines that he has gained 18 IPs this turn,
so places his small white cylinder on the “18” square of the
Influence Track. He does not collect 18 points of IP Markers yet, however. Instead, play proceeds to the King Phase
where he calculates his total Votes—an astounding 24. York
collects 24 points of IP Markers from his Unclaimed Pool to
serve as “Votes”, and then casts his vote for the King (which
is worth 24 votes per normal). After winning the King, York
uses his 24 “Votes” to bid on various Offices… knowing that
these “Votes” are not saved, so either he needs to use them, or
lose them. Once Offices are all bid on, York has a single 1 IP
Marker left as a “Vote” and returns it to his Unclaimed Pool.
He then consults the Influence Track and takes 18 points of
IP Markers from his Unclaimed Pool and adds them to his
IP Stock. He’ll use these IP Markers to Influence Nobles in
the upcoming Turn(s).
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Play Book
PB 1.7 “Occupied” London
Immediately upon entering London with any Mercenary Block
(see 24.1.2), the Player controlling the Mercenary Block(s)
loses one (1) Popular Support for each Strength Point (20.5.3)
of these Blocks. The timing of “entering” is immediately after
Post-Battle Movement (20.7.2).
Example: Entering London with a full strength French Block
would cost three (3) Popular Support. If the Player also had
the full strength Burgundian Block in his force, he would lose
an additional two (2) points of Popular Support!
Place one of the small black wooden cylinders on the Game
Turn Track as specified in the scenario. Place a small wooden
cylinder of each Player’s color on the zero (0) space of the
“Turns as King” Track. Place a small black wooden cylinder on
the Draw Phase of the Sequence of Play Track. Place a small
black cylinder on the Impulse Track.
Begin the game with the Draw Phase of the first Turn of the
chosen scenario unless stated otherwise.
PB 3.0 Scenarios
PB 3.1 The Seeds of Dissent
PB 3.1.1 Game Length
Nine (9) Turns, starting on Turn 1 and ending at the end of
Turn 9
PB 3.1.2 Number of Players
PB 2.0 Game Setup
First, select a scenario from this Playbook and choose who will
play each House by any mutually agreeable method.
Shuffle the Operations Cards and place them face down near the
game board as the draw pile. Distribute all corresponding House
Cards to each Player (e.g., the Lancaster Cards to the Lancaster
Player, etc.). House Cards for a House not controlled by any
Player are placed back in the game box and will not be used.
Follow the set-up instructions for the selected scenario. All
Inactive Blocks are placed near the game board (this includes
all potential Heirs without boxes on the RoP, as well as Clarence, if their Heir Card is not listed as being set-up In-Play).
All Blocks listed for set-up begin In-Play at Full Strength unless
specified otherwise .
Vacant Office Cards are set aside at this point. Make sure to
mark Popular Support and Influence Points for the scenario
on their respective tracks on the game board, using a small
wooden cylinder of each House’s respective color. Mark the
starting Economic Points (if any) on the Influence Track using
the appropriate counter for each House.
Two-player: Lancaster and York
Three-player: Lancaster, York, and Buckingham
Four-player: Lancaster, York, Buckingham, and Warwick
PB 3.1.3 Victory Determination
Military: Per 6.1; otherwise,
Political: Win the vote for King five (5) times; or
Economic: Most Economic VP’s at the end of Game Turn
9 per regular rules.
Note: Lancaster starting with the King Office does not count
as one of the five votes needed to win.
PB 3.1.4 Starting Support
Each Player places one of his small colored cylinders on the
Popular Support Track on the value indicated below. This
cylinder will serve as a marker for the Support Track for the
rest of the game.
Two-player: 2 for Lancaster, 5 for York
Three-player: 2 for Lancaster, 4 for York, 3 for Buckingham
Four-player: 2 for Lancaster, 4 for York, 3 for Buckingham,
5 for Warwick
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Play Book
PB 3.1.5 Starting Influence
Each Player places the appropriate marker on the Influence
Track on the value indicated below. Each Player takes any
number of Influence Point (IP) Markers whose total sum equals
the value listed below for their House. Those IP Markers are
placed face down in front of them and constitute the Player’s
Stock. The remaining IP Markers for the Player make up that
Player’s Unclaimed Pool.
Two-player: 21 for Lancaster, 25 for York
Three-player: 15 for Lancaster, 16 for York, 16 for Buckingham
Four-player: 13 for Lancaster, 15 for York, 16 for Buckingham, 18 for Warwick
PB 3.1.6 Block Setup
Each Player takes the Blocks listed below and places them
aside. Blocks listed as “name + office” are Nobles holding a
Parliamentary Office at the start of play. When all Players have
taken their Blocks, they then perform a Wintering Phase as if
a Parliament had just ended. They do not perform any other
Phase prior to starting play. Block placement order is Lancaster
– York – Warwick – Buckingham (skip any Player not active in
the game). Blocks with specific entry Turns (i.e., Royal Heirs)
are Inactive and are set aside.
2 player games:
Lancaster: Audley, Beaumont, Buckingham + Lord
Chancellor, Clifford, Exeter + Lord Admiral, Henry VI,
Lancaster, Margaret, Northumberland + Lord Warden,
Ormonde, Oxford, Pembroke, Somerset, and Westmorland.
Henry VI and Queen Margaret must be assigned a Host
per the regular rules and are placed accordingly.
Note: The Lancaster Block is set aside awaiting its entry
Turn.
York: Clarence, Essex, Fauconberg, Gloucester, Herbert,
Kent, March, Montague, Norfolk + Lord Marshal, Rutland,
Salisbury, Scrope, Suffolk, Warwick + Capt. of Calais, and
York + Lord Lt. of Ireland and the Pale.
Note: The Clarence, Gloucester, March, and Rutland
Blocks are all set aside awaiting their entry Turns.
3 player games:
Lancaster: Beaumont, Clifford, Exeter + Lord Admiral,
Henry VI, Lancaster, Margaret, Northumberland + Lord
Warden, Pembroke, Somerset, and Westmorland.
Henry VI and Queen Margaret must be assigned a Host
per the regular rules and are placed accordingly.
Note: The Lancaster Block is set aside awaiting its entry
Turn.
York: Clarence, Essex, Gloucester, March, Montague,
Norfolk + Lord Marshal, Rutland, Salisbury, Suffolk,
Warwick + Capt. of Calais, and York + Lord Lt. of Ireland
and the Pale.
Note: The Clarence, Gloucester, March, and Rutland
Blocks are all set aside awaiting their entry Turns.
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Buckingham: Arundel, Audley, Buckingham + Lord Chancellor, de Ros, Devon, Hastings, Ormonde, Oxford, and
Stafford
Note: The Stafford Block is set aside awaiting its entry
Turn.
4 player games:
Lancaster: Beaumont, Clifford, Exeter + Lord Admiral,
Henry VI, Lancaster, Margaret, Northumberland + Lord
Warden, Pembroke, and Somerset.
Henry VI and Queen Margaret must be assigned a Host
per the regular rules and are placed accordingly.
Note: The Lancaster Block is set aside awaiting its entry
Turn.
York: Clarence, Essex, Gloucester, Kent, Lovel, March,
Norfolk + Lord Marshal, Rutland, Suffolk, and York + Lt.
of Ireland and the Pale.
Note: The Clarence, Gloucester, March, and Rutland
Blocks are all set aside awaiting their entry Turns.
Buckingham: Audley, Buckingham + Lord Chancellor, de
Ros, Devon, Hastings, Ormonde, Oxford, and Stafford.
Note: The Stafford Block is set aside awaiting its entry
Turn.
Warwick: Fauconberg, Herbert, Montague, Salisbury,
Scrope, and Warwick + Capt. of Calais.
(2-4 Players)
Shrewsbury is Unavailable on Game Turn 1; place his Block
face up on the Roll of Parliament. He cannot attend the
first Turn’s Parliament, but can be Influenced normally
otherwise.
All other Nobles are Inactive. Place them next to the game
board face up.
PB 3.1.7 Card Setup
Place the following Cards face up in front of the designated
Player. Ignore those for Houses not having a Player (e.g., don’t
set up the Warwick Cards in anything but a four-player game,
where they are given to the person playing House Warwick).
Lancaster: Henry Plantagenet, King Henry VI (Senior
Heir); and Queen Margaret d’Anjou, (House Card).
York: Richard, Duke of York (Senior Heir)
Buckingham: Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham
(Senior Heir). Place a “Senior Heir” marker on the Roll
of Parliament (RoP) Box for Buckingham.
Warwick: Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury (Senior Heir);
and Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick (Junior Heir). Place
a “Senior Heir” marker on the RoP Box for Salisbury and
an “Heir” marker on the RoP Box for Warwick.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Play Book
PB 3.1.8 Other Game Setup
Place the following Office Cards and counters as indicated
for the designated Player. Ignore those for Houses not having
a Player (e.g., don’t set up the Warwick Cards and counters
in anything but a four-player game, where they are given to
the person playing House Warwick). Do not adjust a Player’s
Popular Support Value when taking the below Offices.
Lancaster: Take the King Office Card and place the King
marker on the Henry VI Heir Card. Note that Henry VI
does not gain the King Block from the Office, and has
restricted powers for this Office (10.3.3). Take the Lord
Admiral Office Card and place the Lord Admiral marker
on the Exeter box on the RoP. Take the Lord Warden Office Card and place the Lord Warden marker on the Northumberland box on the RoP. In two-player games only,
take the Lord Chancellor Office Card and place the Lord
Chancellor marker on the Buckingham box on the RoP..
York: Take the Lt. of Ireland and the Pale Office Card and
place the Lt. of Ireland and the Pale marker on the York
Heir Card. Take the Lord Marshal Office Card and place
the Lord Marshal marker on the Norfolk box on the RoP.
In two- and three-player games only, take the Capt. of
Calais Office Card and place the Capt. of Calais marker
on the Warwick box on the RoP.
Buckingham: Take the Lord Chancellor Office Card and
place the Lord Chancellor marker on the Buckingham
Heir Card.
Warwick: Take the Capt. of Calais Office Card and place
the Capt. of Calais marker on the Warwick Heir Card.
Players from the start of the scenario, until he becomes
the York Senior Heir (10.3.5).
b) After any Engagement where a Player eliminates an
enemy Heir, that Player draws one (1) OPS Card and
adds it to his hand (even if they are not the Victor in
the Battle per 20.7.1).
c) Optional Rule: At the end of each Parliament Phase,
flip all unclaimed Noble Blocks face down and mix
them up. Each Player then draws one Block at random
in the order listed below. Each Player draws only one
Block, regardless of the number of Offices he holds. If
no Blocks remain when it is a Player’s turn to choose,
that Player simply draws nothing. Players who hold no
Offices draw first in the following order (remember;
skip Player Houses that have Offices or are not in the
game; they will draw a Block later if in the game):
Buckingham – Warwick – York – Lancaster
The order of the draw is:
1) None (Buckingham – Warwick – York – Lancaster)
2) Warden
3) Lieutenant
4) Captain
5) Admiral
6) Marshal
7) Treasurer
8) Chancellor
9) King
PB 3.1.9 Scenario Special Rules
1. Calais was raided just prior to the start of play, place a
Plundered marker in that Shire.
2. Salisbury, Warwick, and Montague are locked in a feud
against Northumberland. No Player may control Northumberland if he also controls Salisbury or Warwick or
Montague until after Game Turn 4.
3. Players may use any of the optional rules (PB 1.0)
4. Note that the following Inactive Blocks may not enter play
until their corresponding Heir Cards are played: Clarence,
Gloucester, Lancaster, March, Rutland, and Stafford.
5. Short Scenario option: Prior to starting, Players may opt
to end the game after Game Turn 5, instead of Game Turn
9. If necessary, calculate Economic Victory at this time.
6. Kingmaker variant: The following group of rules can be
used to play a more “free flowing” version of the game
and can be used alone, or in combination with any other
Special or Optional Rules.
a) The following Blocks are not In-Play until entered as
Heirs (by Card play): Gloucester, Lancaster, March,
Stafford, and Rutland. In this scenario, ignore entry
Turn restrictions on these Heir Cards—they may be
played at any time subject to the limit of two (2) active
Heirs at any time (10.3.2). Clarence is available to be
Influenced by all
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Play Book
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PB 3.2.6 Block Setup
Each Player takes the Blocks listed below and places them
aside. Blocks listed as “name+office” are Nobles holding a
Parliamentary Office at the start of play. When all Players have
taken their Blocks, they then perform a Wintering Phase as if a
Parliament had just ended. They do not perform any other Phase
prior to starting play. Block placement order is Lancaster, then
York. Blocks with specific entry turns (i.e., Royal Heirs) are
Inactive and are set aside.
PB 3.2 Tangled Branches
PB 3.2.1 Game Length
Four (4) Turns, starting on Turn 3 and ending at the end of
Turn 6.
PB 3.2.2 Number of Players
Two-player: Lancaster and York
PB 3.2.3 Victory Determination
Lancaster:
Military: Eliminate March and Rutland; otherwise
Political: Win the vote for King two (2) consecutive Turns; or
Economic: Most Economic VP’s at the end of Game Turn
6 per regular rules.
York:
Military: Eliminate Lancaster; otherwise
Political: Win the vote for King two (2) consecutive Turns; or
Economic: Most Economic VP’s at the end of Game Turn
6 per regular rules.
Note: York starting with the King Office does not count as one
of the two votes needed to win.
PB 3.2.4 Starting Support
Each Player places one of his small colored cylinders on the
Popular Support Track on the value indicated below. This
cylinder will serve as a marker for the Support Track for the
rest of the game.
3 for Lancaster
5 for York
PB 3.2.5 Starting Influence
Each Player places the appropriate marker on the Influence
Track on the value indicated below. Each Player takes any
number of Influence Point (IP) Markers whose total sum equals
the value listed below for their House. Those IP Markers are
placed face down in front of them and constitute the Player’s
Stock. The remaining IP Markers for the Player make up that
Player’s Unclaimed Pool.
Lancaster: Beaumont, Clifford, de Ros, Exeter + Lord
Admiral, Lancaster + Margaret, Northumberland + Lord
Warden, Oxford, Somerset, and Westmorland.
Note: Margaret must start with the Lancaster Block in this
scenario.
York: Clarence, Essex, Gloucester, Hastings, Herbert, Kent,
March + King, Montague, Norfolk + Lord Marshal, Suffolk, and Warwick + Capt. of Calais.
Note: The Clarence and Gloucester Blocks are set aside
awaiting their entry turn.
The following Nobles are Out of Play: Salisbury, Stafford,
and York. Place them face down on the Roll of Parliament
or remove from game if no they have no Parliament box.
They cannot be Influenced and will not be used in this
scenario.
All other Nobles are Inactive. Place them next to the game
board face up.
PB 3.2.7 Card Setup
Place the following Cards face up in front of the designated
Player.
Lancaster: Queen Margaret d’Anjou (House Card); and
Edward, Prince of Wales (Junior Heir)
York: Edward, Earl of March (Senior Heir)
PB 3.2.8 Other Game Setup
Place the following Office Cards and markers as indicated for
the designated Player. Do not adjust a Player’s Popular Support
Value when taking the below Offices.
Lancaster: Take the Lord Warden Office Card and place the
Lord Warden marker on the Northumberland box on the
Roll of Parliament (RoP). Take the Lord Admiral Office
Card and place the Lord Admiral marker on the Exeter
box on the RoP.
York: Take the King Office Card and place the King marker
on the March Card. Take the Capt. of Calais Office Card
and place the Capt. of Calais marker on the Warwick box
on the RoP. Take the Lord Marshal Office Card and place
the Lord Marshal marker on the Norfolk box on the RoP.
Remove the “Richard, Duke of York” (Y1) House Card
from the game.
15 for Lancaster
20 for York
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Play Book
PB 3.2.9 Scenario Special Rules
1. Henry VI is being held prisoner by the Yorkists. He cannot be released until March is dead or in Exile. He will be
executed in the Clean-Up Phase at the end of the scenario
unless released sooner. The Yorkists hold the Henry VI
Card and Block off-map while he is in captivity. On the
turn during which March is eliminated or proceeds to
Exile, the Henry VI Card and Block are returned to the
Lancaster Player and must be placed into play during that
Wintering Phase. Henry VI is considered “In-Play” while
being held prisoner but is not represented on the map by a
Block, does not attend Parliament, and does not get placed
during the Wintering Phase until as noted above. Since
Henry VI is the Lancaster Senior Heir, as an exception to
the requirement that only a Player with a Senior Heir that
attends Parliament may be elected King, the Lancaster
Player can have their Junior Heir elected King (technically
“Protector of England”) while Henry VI is captive.
2. Players may use any of the optional rules (PB 1.0).
3. Note that the following Inactive Blocks may not enter play
until their corresponding Heir Cards are played: Clarence
and Gloucester.
PB 3.3 The Bloodiest Thorn
PB 3.3.1 Game Length
Four (4) Turns, starting on Turn 6 and ending at the end of
Turn 9.
PB 3.3.2 Number of Players
Two-player: Lancaster and York
PB 3.3.3 Victory Determination
Lancaster:
Military: Eliminate Gloucester; otherwise
Political: Win the vote for King two (2) consecutive Turns; or
Economic: Most Economic VP’s at the end of Game Turn
9 per regular rules.
York:
Military: Eliminate Richmond; otherwise
Political: Win the vote for King two (2) consecutive Turns; or
Economic: Most Economic VP’s at the end of Game Turn
6 per regular rules.
Note: York starting with the King Office does not count as one
of the two votes needed to win.
PB 3.3.4 Starting Support
Each Player places one of his small colored cylinders on the
Popular Support Track on the value indicated below. This
cylinder will serve as a marker for the Support Track for the
rest of the game.
4 for Lancaster
3 for York
PB 3.3.5 Starting Influence
Each Player places the appropriate marker on the Influence
Track on the value indicated below. Each Player takes any
number of Influence Point (IP) Markers whose total sum equals
the value listed below for their House. Those IP Markers are
placed face down in front of them and constitute the Player’s
Stock. The remaining IP Markers for the Player make up that
Player’s Unclaimed Pool.
9 for Lancaster
13 for York
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Play Book
PB 3.3.6 Block Setup
Each Player takes the Blocks listed below and places them
aside. Blocks listed as “name+office” are Nobles holding a
Parliamentary Office at the start of play. When all Players have
taken their Blocks, they then perform a Wintering Phase as if a
Parliament had just ended. They do not perform any other Phase
prior to starting play. Block placement order is Lancaster, then
York. Blocks with specific entry turns (i.e., Royal Heirs) are
Inactive and are set aside.
Lancaster: Beaumont, de Ros, Devon, Oxford, Pembroke,
Richmond, and Westmorland
York: Essex, Gloucester + King, Lovel, Norfolk + Lord
Marshal + Lord Admiral, Northumberland + Lord Warden,
and Suffolk
The following Nobles and Heirs are Out of Play and will
not be used in this scenario: Audley, Buckingham, Clarence, Clifford, Exeter, Hastings, King Henry VI, Lancaster,
March, Montague, Ormonde, Queen Margaret, Rutland,
Salisbury, Somerset, Southwick, Stafford, Warwick, Wiltshire, Worcester and York. Place them face down on the
Roll of Parliament display or remove from the game if
they have no Parliament box. Remove the Scots, French,
and Burgundian Blocks from the game; their corresponding Cards may only be played for OPS in this scenario.
PB 3.3.7 Card Setup
Place the following Cards face up in front of the designated
Player.
Lancaster: Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond (Senior Heir);
and Sir Rhys ap Thomas (Ally Card). Place a “Senior
Heir” marker on the Roll of Parliament Box for Richmond.
York: Richard,Duke of Gloucester (Senior Heir); William,
Lord Catesby (Ally Card); and Sir Richard Ratcliffe (Ally
Card).
PB 3.3.8 Other Game Setup
Place the following Office Cards and counters as indicated for
the designated Player. Do not adjust a Player’s Popular Support
Value when taking the below Offices.
Lancaster: Remove the Welsh Archers Card (Card 56)
from the Operations Card deck and place it in with the
Lancaster Player’s House Cards. This Card is treated as
a House Card for the Lancaster Player for the duration
of this scenario, including removal from the game when
played for any reason (note: if played for the Event, removal occurs when the Welsh Block is removed from the
map—either upon being eliminated or at the start of the
King Phase (24.1.2)). Remove the “King Henry VI” (L1),
“Queen Margaret” (L2), “Edward, Prince of Wales” (L4)
and “Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter” (L5) House Cards
from the game.
York: Take the King Office Card and place the King marker
on the Gloucester Card. Take the Lord Admiral and the
Lord Marshal Office Cards and place the Lord Admiral
and Lord Marshal markers on the Norfolk box on the Roll
9
of Parliament (yes, both Offices). Take the Lord Warden
Office Card and place the Lord Warden marker on the
Northumberland box on the Roll of Parliament. Remove
the “Richard, Duke of York” (Y1), “George, Duke of Clarence” (Y2), “Rutland, Earl of Rutland” (Y5), and “Edward,
Earl of March” (Y7) House Cards from the game.
PB 3.3.9 Scenario Special Rules & Optional Rules
1. Northumberland is suffering from disaffection. Each
time the York Player activates him as a Leader, he must
roll a 4 or more on 1d6. If he fails, Northumberland stays
in place and ignores the order; he can’t be moved at all,
even as part of a stack. Because Northumberland’s loyalty
is in question, he cannot travel with Gloucester unless
Gloucester also has at least one other non-Office Block
with him. If Northumberland is the Defender in a Battle,
the York Player rolls 1d6. On a 4 or more, this rule effect
is canceled for the rest of the game.
2. Always Loyal: The following units can’t be turned by any
means, including Treachery Cards. The opposing Player
cannot place IPs on them or control them:
Only Lancaster may bid on or control: Oxford, Rivers,
Pembroke, ap Thomas (Ally card), and Welsh Archers.
Only York may bid on or control: Suffolk, Norfolk, Lovel,
Catesby (Ally card), and Ratcliffe (Ally card).
3. The Lancaster player may place Rivers In-Play during the
Wintering Phase of the second Game Turn (i.e., Turn 7),
even if not previously bid on.
4. Richmond and Oxford do not attend Parliament on the first
turn of the scenario (Turn 6). They had been declared outlaws and would be arrested and executed if they showed
up.
5. As noted above, the Scots, French, and Burgundian Cards
(Cards 49, 52 and 55) may only be played for OPS in this
scenario.
6. Optional What If: Assume that Henry Stafford (Stafford
Block) had escaped following his rebellion in 1483 to
join the Lancastrians. The Stafford Block is added to the
starting Lancaster forces and is available in the scenario
(including being influenced back to the Yorkist side) – use
the Buckingham box on the RoP.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Play Book
their Ranks (this includes any Nobles and/or Offices
in that Player’s Undeclared Pool). Once the Vote total
is recorded (including any bonus votes per 24.2.2),
increase any damaged Blocks by one (1) step, up to
their Full Combat Strength, and then return all Blocks
to hidden status. This is repeated for each Player.
Important Optional Rule (yes, an Optional rule to an
Optional rule!): At this time, before counting a Block’s
Rank for Votes, a Player may immediately send any
Heir at less than Full Combat Strength to any available Exile Box. Entry of an Exile Box at this point
generates the –1 Popular Support as if they moved
in during the Movement Phase, reduces the Block
to Retainer Strength (exceptions per 7.3.1-7.3.3).
PB 3.4 Quick Play Crown of Roses
PB 3.4.1 General Summary
For those Players interested in a quicker game of Crown of
Roses, we suggest the following rules. First, Players should
follow rules PB 3.1.1 to PB 3.1.8 for game length, victory
conditions and setup. Second, Players should utilize the
Scenario Special Rules, below.
[Note: Consider this option if you are concerned that
Heirs are dying too easily with the above rules, though
remember that both Players will get to move Blocks before
the first Battles of the next turn.]
PB 3.4.2 Scenario Special Rules and Optional Rules
Players are suggested to use all the following, but may leave
some of these rule changes out if desired.
1. After any Engagement where a Player eliminates an enemy
Heir, that Player draws one (1) OPS Card and adds it to
his hand (even if they are not the Victor in the Battle per
20.7.1).
2. The number of Impulses (13.0) in each Game Turn is fixed
at 5
3. A Player may use 1 OPS in an Action Step similar as in 13.3
and 15.1 to move an Undeclared Noble to In-Play status to
any Shire containing a Home Estate for that Noble. Treat
this movement exactly as a regular Move (16.1)) with the
Noble treated as a Leader (including the ability to lead additional Blocks out of the Undeclared Pool with him). The
moved Stack cannot move further (even via Forced March)
and such movement can be Evaded (16.5) or Intercepted
(16.6) as if it were a regular move into the Shire.
4. Use the “Where do you think you’re going?” Optional
Rule in 20.5.
5. In the Influence Phase, do not use the optional rule of +1
IP if in a Block’s Home Estate (23.1.2). Also, do not grant
IP’s for Unoccupied, but same SL Shires (23.1.1). Players
only gain IP’s for the Shires they occupy and any bonus
IP’s from Offices, Popular Support and discarded Ally
Cards (if used at this time).
6. In the King Phase, perform 24.1 as in the regular rules,
but 24.2 is modified as follows:
First (before picking up any Nobles from the map),
resolve the RoP as per 24.2.1. Any Noble that is gained
control of via this step is placed in the new controlling
Player’s Undeclared Pool, along with any attached Offices (note: attached Mercenary Blocks were removed
in 24.1 already).
Second, every controlled Noble not in Exile attends
Parliament, but does not get picked up. Instead, each
Player (one at a time, so as not to confuse who controls
which Nobles) turns his Blocks face-up and adds up
Third, Vote for King per 24.2.3, noting that a Player
must have a Senior Heir that “attended Parliament” (in
this case, that means “was In-Play or Undeclared and
not in Exile”).
7. The Victory check Phase is done per normal rules (25.0)
8. The Office Phase is modified as follows:
First, roll on the following table to determine which
Offices have expired (do not remove any Offices that
are not listed as having expired… the current Noble
continues to hold that Office at this time!).
1. Chancellor, Marshall, Lieutenant
2. Treasurer, Marshall, Warden
3. Chancellor, Marshall, Admiral,
4. Treasurer, Capt. Of Calais, Admiral,
5. Chancellor, Capt. Of Calais, Warden
6. Treasurer, Capt. Of Calais, Lieutenant
In addition to any Offices indicated above, all vacant
Offices are also available to be filled. Offices are filled
per the regular bidding rules (26.2). Note that 26.4
still holds for an unfilled Chancellor’s Office. Office
Blocks are placed in any friendly Shire subject to the
Stacking Limits and the ability of a Noble to hold the
Office (26.3). All Office Blocks should be rotated to be
at Full Combat Strength at this time (even those that
did not change owners).
9. There is no Wintering Phase (27.0), proceed directly
to Clean-up (28.). Yes, this means an Heir that goes
to Exile in the King Phase to escape being killed will
lose two Popular Support (–1 for entry and another
–1 for “wintering over” in Exile). Sometimes one
must make tough choices!
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Play Book
11
necessary, we generate troop strengths based on a “best-guess”
of how they would be received once they reached adulthood.
Heraldry
The graphic representation of the nobles presented a difficult
choice—we could have used the noble’s livery, or one of their
badges, or, as we ultimately chose, a form of their heraldry.
The original heraldry followed the true historical model,
with many “quarterings” (the shield is divided into quarters,
with images on each quarter panel). Unfortunately, at the scale
of the blocks, the quarterings were difficult to see and made
identification on sight that much harder. To that end, in some
cases, the historical heraldry was modified to improve the playability of the game.
How Many Players?
PB 4.0 Designer Notes
When I sat down to rebuild the AH classic Kingmaker, it was
my intention to simply update the game, with new graphics and
components, a larger map, fix some of the historical faux pas
present (which represented the prevailing views in academia
at the time the game was created), and perhaps clean up and
orga-nize the rules a little. What evolved was entirely something
else altogether. Crown of Roses is a distinctly different game
from Kingmaker, while still retaining the feel of the period,
and, I believe, the fun of the original game.
In Kingmaker, the players represent the various political
fac-tions, each with their own agenda. Such factions did exist,
and they were in some portion responsible for the Wars, but
after the Act of Accord, the conflict was a dynastic struggle.
Thus we decided that the players would represent the major
noble houses of Lancaster and York, instead of various cliques.
But we wanted to make it more than just a two-player game,
and opted to include two additional player houses - the House of
Buckingham (whose lineage descended from a son of Edward
III), and the House of Warwick, who was a distant cousin to
the House of Lancaster, being descended from Ralph Neville
and Joan Beaufort, a granddaughter of Edward III.
Why Blocks?
What about the minor Nobility?
We decided each block would have to be rated for several
factors: army quality and strength, leadership and command,
how quick they were to rush to battle, their influence in parliament, and some form of prestige or patronage. For the sake of
simplic-ity (and cleaner graphics), we determined that all of
the ratings would remain constant regardless of what side the
block was on, with the exception of troop quality and strength.
This then allowed us to minimize the values on the block and
concentrate on the ones that mattered.
Why have a Henry VI or Margaret block?
Since the nobility was so heavily invested in the conflict, we
elected to use the nobles as the basic units for Crown of Roses.
In addition, to add to the uncertainty of which exact nobles
were present at a battle, we determined that blocks were the
best choice—they allowed for a high degree of fog of war, and
also gave us a level of granularity with respect to troop quality
and strength.
Where did the Combat Factors come from?
The troop factors chosen for each block were derived from
each magnate’s individual wealth, his regular income, the value
of his lands, his political savvy and connections, as well as on
his personal charisma; all of these being things that would allow
him to recruit an army. Better connected, wealthier men were
able to hire better troops.
In some cases (like Rutland and Lancaster), the values are more
subjective, as these individuals never had the opportunity historically to grow on their own as members of the peerage. Where
Because we simply could not include a block for every family
that took part in the conflicts, we opted to place some of them
on cards that players can place into play and discard at their
leisure. Each one has one or more special abilities that can be
accessed through the discard process. Because they are on cards,
they will return over and over again, and represent those nobles
who sometimes were there and sometimes weren’t.
Henry VI and Margaret were central to the Lancastrian cause,
especially early on in the period. But Henry was not a good
sol-dier or leader, and giving him the powerful noble army size
and ability to function normally made little sense. He was, for
most of the period, a mere pawn of more willful persons, like
Queen Margaret. Instead his weak block is dependent on a
regular noble block for most game functions.
Margaret is represented as a special Lancastrian block, even
though she was not a part of the line of succession. She was
however a stronger leader than her husband, and was very determined to succeed. But she was not a true Noble in the sense
that she was personally leading men into battle, so while she
too has a Noble block; like Henry VI, she requires a regular
noble to operate normally.
Why do Nobles turn into Heirs later in the game?
Historically, some of the heirs on a house had not even been
born at the start of the period. Some entered much later, but the
title was still in use before they arrived. A perfect example is Hen-
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Play Book
ry Tudor, the Earl of Richmond, who emerges as the Lancaster
player’s final heir in the game. His block (Richmond) however
is available sooner because his father Edmund holds that title.
For such historical nobles, we went the route of making the
block become the heir once the corresponding card is played.
Other titles, which only existed for an heir, remain out of
play until the card hits the table. This strategy allowed for the
inclu-sion of historical forces without increasing the number
of blocks needed.
What’s “Bastard Feudalism”?
“Bastard Feudalism,” a term first coined in 1885 by historian
Charles Plummer, refers to the maintenance of retainers by the
nobility, and is often cited as a cause of the Wars of the Roses. The
retainers wore the noble’s livery (badge and colors), and fought
in battle for them, while the noble protected them and helped to
further the retainer’s interests. This allowed the creation of large
private armies that the nobles could call upon, armies who were
more loyal to their chosen magnate than to their king.
By the middle of the century, these nobles began to quarrel
openly with one another, quarrels which were often settled at the
point of a halberd. Because the landed gentry lacked confidence
in the law, which had become corrupt without the control of a firm
royal hand, it became more important for them to have a noble
protector. They fought their patron’s battles, eventually being
caught up in the larger quarrel between Lancaster and York. To
represent this uncontrolled retaining, we made the mustering of
new troops fairly fast and relatively easy to do. We did set some
limits however, so that a player can’t simply rotate blocks through
an area to gain a large number of troops repeatedly.
How do you handle the Feuds between Nobles?
We needed a way to represent the various blood feuds that
occurred during the period, like the Percy-Neville and Courtney-Bonville feuds. But we did not want them to be a presiding
issue for players to have to solve or defeat. Keeping it limited
to scenario specific rules simplified matters while still giving
players the right feel.
How does terrain factor in?
In Kingmaker terrain such as forests, rivers, and roads, were
accounted for with special movement costs. The primary means
of movement was along roads or cart-paths, and not through
the countryside. Rivers were fordable in many cases, or had
towns and bridges nearby. And while road travel is a key form
of movement in Kingmaker, in truth, there were roads (or some
semblance of them) almost everywhere in England, so we decided they would be abstracted into normal movement. Only
in the less settled regions like the mountains of Wales and the
Pennines or in the Fens would such roads not be present, and
these areas have a higher movement cost to represent this fact.
As a result, we elected to simplify the land border types into
“rough” and “clear”, and provide for two more for the sea (same
or adjacent sea zone). This allowed a very simple movement
cost scheme (1 vs 2), and still left room for special movement
rules like Safe Roads, the Wash, and the Fens.
The Operations Deck
The Operations Deck indirectly simulates the seemingly random events that took place in the period; and more directly, the
lack of a strong, effective government, in the form of foreign
raids and planned uprisings such as Robin of Redesdale’s rebellion. OPS points represent supplies and strategic planning on the
part of the houses and their immediate advisers. And because
the events are, by and large, under a player’s control, the player
bears more responsibility for what happens as a result, making
them more invested in the outcome.
Parliament and the Body Politic
As the design progressed, we found ourselves having fits over
the inclusion of Parliament. The system used in Kingmaker is
very good at generating the political chaos of the day simply
through player interaction. But I didn’t feel a clone of that
system would work, as it needed to be faster and simpler; but
while still retaining the right feel.
The voting for officers was one thing that needed to be present, but we simply didn’t have the room for all of the offices.
After several variations on a theme, we settled on a total of the
eight titles presented in Crown of Roses. This gave us a good
selection without overburdening the game.
We chose to use a bid system for collecting offices and nobles,
as this represented the real-world application of political favors
and lucrative merchant contracts. During testing however,
we found that using visible bids caused players to stop and
rethink their plans, and to play their bids more defensively (to
prevent offices from falling to the wrong player for example).
We found that the games would slow significantly, as players
literally played one IP more than the opposition, and this effect
see-sawed back and forth.
When we tried blind bidding, we discovered that the players
were a bit more cautious about playing bids, as the hidden bids
created a fog of war for Parliament and led to more players
looking to kill off opposing houses and supporters, leading to
more involved, faster games.
Pro-faction Leanings and Influence Thresholds
While it is true that many families that took part in the wars
switched sides or changed their political stance from time to
time, there were other families that refused to waver from their
chosen course and always gave support to their side. This led to
the idea of the pro-factions values in the noble boxes. A noble
with colored rose icons in their box are stronger supporters of
a particular side in the conflict.
Thresholds emerged around this time as well, as a sort of
“population control” for the nobles. There are certainly examples of nobles who were ready (and in fact some downright
anxious) to fight, but there are others that declined to don their
armor. The thresholds reflect that fact; they prevent the easy
recruiting of larger magnates, while still allowing a strong attempt to succeed in gaining that noble’s arms to your cause.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Play Book
13
(L) groans as he has three Blocks in that Shire: Somerset,
Henry VI, and Queen Margaret. Plague losses are equal to
the SV in the Plague Shire location, so (L) decides to have
both Somerset and Margaret suffer a Step Loss (the Blocks are
rotated 90 degrees to show this), and then places a Devastated
marker in the Shire (meaning (L) can’t perform any Mustering
there). Adjacent Shires also suffer some effects – (L) has Exeter
and the Admiral Block in Devon, which must lose one (1) Step
as adjacent Shires lose SV-1, minimum one Step (Lancaster applies the Step Loss to the Admiral Block). (W) has Montague
in Gloucester and (B) has Ormonde in Wiltshire, both lose one
(1) Step (the latter since there is always a minimum of one (1)
Step Loss).
PB 5.0 Example of Play
This example of play is intended to introduce Crown of Roses
to the players more rapidly.
In Medias Res: We will start in the middle of the first turn
of a four-player game. Players are abbreviated by House:
(B)=Buckingham, (L)=Lancaster, (W)=Warwick, (Y)=York.
Shire names are italicized to clearly distinguish from Noble
Blocks. While we will refer to Blocks by name, remember that
usually only the controlling Player will be able to see which
Blocks are which (at least until Combat resolution)!
Third Impulse (3 of 5):
Card Plays are: B-60 (Plague - 2 OPS Mandatory), L-42
(Desertions - 2 OPS Event), W-45 (Show of Solidarity - 2
OPS Event), & Y-30 (French Raid - 1 OPS Event).
(L), the current King, will decide the Player order of the three
Players tied at 2 OPS, and (Y) will go last in the Impulse due
to his 1 OPS Card. (L) decides that (B) will go first, followed
by (W) and then himself.
(B) draws for a Plague location and gets Somerset (SV = 2).
The Mandatory Event also gives (B) two (2) OPS Points to
use. He elects to spend the first OPS Point to move the now
reduced Ormonde from Wiltshire to Stafford. He first moves
into Oxford using 1 MP and pauses to allow (W) to decide
whether he wishes to Intercept or not—(W) declines. He then
spends a second MP to enter Warwick and a half of an MP to
enter Stafford using the Safe Roads rule (Stafford is Friendly
controlled by virtue of its yellow SL). With the second OPS
Point, he chooses to apply Political Influence to a Noble and
places two hidden IP Markers on Oxford’s box (a zero (0) IP
Marker and a three (3) IP Marker).
(W) goes next, playing
Show of Solidarity for the
Event—placing three Ally
Cards into play at the bottom of his House Mat.
None of the Ally Cards so
played generate OPS or
Event text upon entering,
so Warwick’s action is
complete (as he chooses to
not use any of their “discard” abilities).
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Play Book
(L) also chooses to use his
CC as the Event, and targets Pembroke, which contains a single Warwick
Block (Herbert). Lancaster
rolls a ‘4’, causing two (2)
Step Losses to Herbert,
who is reduced below Retainer Strength by the desertion of his army. Per the
Card text, Herbert is placed
into Warwick’s Undeclared
Pool and Pembroke becomes Lancaster controlled
again (due to the Red proLancaster SL color).
Last to play is (Y), who uses
his Card’s Event to generate a French Raid in Devon.
For Raids (or Planned Uprisings), any Player may
respond—though the
choice is made in Impulse
order (so Buckingham,
Warwick, Lancaster, York
in this Impulse). Each Officer with a Home Estate in
the designated Shire decides if he will respond
(which allows a free move
to the designated Shire).
The Warden and Captain
(controlled by Buckingham
and Warwick) decline to move, so the Admiral (Lancaster’s
Exeter) responds. Note that even if (Y) had the Devon Block
as an Officer (noting that Devon has a Home Estate in Devon),
since (L) when before (Y) in Impulse order, (L) would have
the first right to be the Responding Noble. Since the Block is
already present in Devon, there is no movement and the Raid
is resolved (Raids and Planned Uprisings are resolved immediately in the game instead of in the combat step). The Controlling Player is (Y), so he rolls three (3) blue dice (hit on 5+
each) for the French, with the results of 2, 2, & 4. All three (3)
dice miss and the Raid is over. (L) gains one (1) Point of
Popular Support from that adventure and places a Plundered
marker in Devon.
Card #22
(first)
Card #21
(second)
Card #55
(third)
Card #68 (fourth)
(B) plays his Ally Card (Lord Stourton) for the Event text,
placing it face up by his House Mat. The Card will remain
there until discarded. (B) also gains 1 OPS Point to spend immediately, per the Card text. He spends the 1 OPS to activate
the Buckingham Block in Stafford and move his stack (himself,
the Attached Chancellor Block, and Ormonde) to Nottingham
to face a single Warwick Block (Scope).
(Y) also plays his Card for the Event text, placing it face up
by his House Mat. Like (B), his Ally also grants 1 OPS, which
he uses to move his Suffolk Block from Suffolk into London
to join the York Block. Because both Essex and London are
York controlled, both of the borders crossed cost only one half
(1/2) of a MP.
Like the other Houses before him, (L) also plays his Card
for the Event text, Attaching the Scots Mercenary Block to the
Northumberland Block in Northumberland (who also has Attached the Warden Block).
Fourth Impulse (4 of 5):
Card Plays are: B-22 (Lord Stourton - 3 OPS Ally), L-55
(Scottish Clans - 2 OPS Persistent Event), W-68 (Stormy Seas
- 1 OPS Surprise), & Y-21 (Francesco dei Coppini - 3 OPS Ally)
The King decides that (B) will go first, followed by (Y), then
(because of the OPS values) himself and last (W).
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Since (W) played a
Surprise Card as
his Command Card
(CC), he must use
it solely for its OPS
Points. He does so
by spending the
one (1) OPS Point
to activate his Senior Heir, Salisbury, (in North Riding) with Fauconberg (not yet an
Heir), and send-ing
them to Nottingham to reinforce
Scrope.
There is one Battle this Impulse,
composed of one
Engagement, with
(W) being the
first Attacker (last
Blocks to enter the
Crown of Roses Play Book
Shire being Salisbury leading Fauconberg) against (B) as the
Defender. Scrope will be a Reinforcement for (W), entering on
the second Combat Round.
Round one sees a (B) Main Force of Buckingham (Leader
Block) with the Chancellor and the reduced strength Ormonde
versus a (W) Main Force led by Salisbury (the Leader during
the Land Movement into the Shire) and Fauconberg. While both
sides have Heirs, neither decides to conduct a Battle Charge
at this point. Since neither side has the Marshal or King (and,
hence, the ability to force a Noble to re-roll their combat dice),
all dice in Line Combat can be rolled together.
15
Round 2 (after Battle Charge)
Warwick
Main Force
Buckingham
Main Force
Warwick Reinforcements
(enter Round 2)
Warwick Main Force
Buckingham
Main Force
The attacker rolls first, though this is not required, as each
Engagement is simultaneous. (W) rolls one (1) red die, three (3)
blue dice, and one (1) green die, getting two (2) hits. (B) rolls
1/4/2 (red/blue/green) dice and only gets one (1) hit. For (B),
the Buckingham Block, which is the strongest Block, must take
the first Step Loss, but he can instead apply it to the Chancellor
Block, as that Block is Attached and in the Main Force. He does
so; but since the Buckingham Block is still the strongest Block,
it must also suffer the second Step Loss. (B) also applies this
to the Chancellor Block, removing that Block from play. (B)
still controls the Office, but simply lacks its troops. Salisbury,
being the sole three (3) Step Warwick Block is reduced by one
(1) Step. There is no Retreat on round one.
On round two, Scrope arrives as reinforcement, though Salisbury maintains command as Heirs always outrank non-Heirs
and Salisbury is the highest ranking Warwick Heir – H-#1). (W),
the attacker, chooses not to conduct a Battle Charge, but (B),
noting that Salisbury is wounded, decides to have his Buckingham Heir Block conduct a Battle Charge against Salisbury.
Buckingham rolls one (1) red and two (2) blue dice, all with a
+1 drm against Salisbury. (W) is lucky and (B) only rolls one
(1) hit. Salisbury returns fire with two (2) blue dice, scoring
one (1) hit, as well. Salisbury is reduced to Retainer Strength
and Buckingham is reduced by one (1) Step.
In Line Combat, (W) now has 1/3/1 (red/blue/green ) dice and
(B) has only 1/1 (blue/green) as the Buckingham Block does
not get to use Line Combat due to conducting a Battle Charge.
The dice are rolled and (B) gets lucky and somehow scores
two (2) more hits, while (W) scores an amazing four (4) hits!
For (W), Scrope or Fauconberg must take the first Step Loss as
both are at Strength = 2, (W) chooses Scrope for the first Step
Loss, noting that Fauconberg will have to take the second (as
both Scrope and Salisbury are now at their Retainer Strength
of one (1) die only). (B) has to take four (4) hits total. He must
take the first one on Buckingham (as he is the strongest Block),
and can take the next on either Buckingham or Ormonde, reducing either to Retainer Strength. He chooses Ormonde. The
third must then be taken on Buckingham (still at Strength = 2),
reducing him also to Retainer Strength. The last Step Loss will
eliminate one of his Blocks, and (B) choose Ormonde. At the
end of this combat round, (B) decides to retreat to Leicester.
(W) has no non-House 3 OPS Cards to discard to Pursue, and
lets him go (he could discard a 3 OPS House Card, but chooses
not to). Ormonde now rolls on the Elimination Chart, getting a
3, which Kills Ormonde—making his Block status Unavailable.
Ormonde is placed face-up on his RoP Box, indicating that he
cannot be Influenced and, if there had been any IP Markers
currently on his RoP Box, these would have been returned to
the controlling Player’s Unclaimed Pool(s). (W) currently has
three (3) Blocks, so decides to redistributed his Blocks via
Post-Battle Movement, moving Salisbury to West Riding to
avoid suffering any Attrition. (W) then increases his Popular
Support by one (1), due to being a Victor against an Enemy
Heir (Buckingham).
Fifth Impulse (5 of 5):
Card Plays are: B-68 (Stormy Seas - 1 OPS Surprise), L-54
(Influential Voice - 3 OPS Event), W-W7 (The Kingmaker– 3
OPS House Event), & Y-23 (Lord Dacre - 3 OPS Ally).
Everyone except (B) played a 3 OPS card, so (L) will decide
player order for the three tied Players and (B) (with 1 OPS)
will go last. (L) decides (Y) will go first, followed by (W) and
then himself.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
16
Crown of Roses Play Book
losing one (1) step. (W) decides to attempt both Evasion with
Salisbury and Interception with Fauconberg and Scrope (in
Nottingham).
Since Interceptions must be resolved before Evasions, (W)
checks for the Interception and succeeds—Fauconberg and
Scrope move into West Riding. (W) could choose to leave
Salisbury in West Riding, but decides that the one extra blue
die from Salisbury isn’t worth the risk. (W) rolls a 1, which
succeeds and Salisbury moves to Nottingham.
Card #23
(first)
Card #W7
(second)
Card #54
(third)
Card #68 (fourth)
Before anyone conducts their
actions, (B) plays the Surprise Card B a d R o a d s
(Card #63). This is a Persistent Event Card, so (B)
places it near the map board
so all Players will be reminded that Land Movement during the rest of the
Operations Phase will be +1
per Shire border crossed.
(B) draws a re-placement
Card as this Surprise Card
was played for its Event
text, not as a CC.
(Y) plays his Card for the Ally Event and Dacre enters play.
This Card has a ‘comes into play’ ability that gives (Y) one (1)
OPS Point to spend. He uses the OPS Point to do a Political
Influence Action, placing Influence on one (1) Noble in Parliament, selecting Arundel. He places a face-down three (3) IP
Marker on the Arundel space on the RoP.
(W) also uses his Card for the Event. He rolls a single die
and gets a five (5). He adds four (4) to this result (per the Card
text) and gets a total of nine (9) IPs from his Unclaimed Pool.
He then gets to place Influence on any one (1) Noble. He places
five (5) IPs on Norfolk, face down (using a two (2) and a three
(3) IP Marker). The Card is then removed from the game as it
is a non-persistent Event House Card—it will not appear again.
(L) uses his card for OPS, spending two (2) to place Influence
on two Nobles in Parliament. He places a face down two (2) IP
Marker on Northumberland, and two face down 1 IP Markers
(for a total of two (2) IPs) on Somerset. With the third OPS
Point, he activates Northumberland and moves his army south
towards West Riding. He moves via Durham (1+1 MP for Bad
Roads) and North Riding (1+1 MP for Bad Roads). (W) chooses
not to Intercept with his lone Salisbury Block in West Riding.
(L) then declares a Force March and moves his Moving Stack
one additional Shire, into West Riding. (L) rolls Attrition for
the Force March, which results in the Scots Mercenary Block
(L) then plays a Surprise Card - #73, Secret Plots and
chooses one of (Y)’s face-up Ally Cards; in this case Coppini,
Card #21). He takes the Coppini Ally Card and places it in front
of him. (Y) can not discard Coppini to prevent this, as the Surprise Card forbids such an action. (L) then draws a replacement
Card, getting #31 – French Raid.
Finally, (B) plays his Card for one (1) OPS Point, which he
uses for a Political Influence action to Influence his cousin,
the Earl of Wiltshire, by placing a zero (0) and a three (3) IP
Marker face-down in his RoP Box.
Combat is then resolved in West Riding. Round one has a (L)
Main Force comprising Northumberland and the two Attached
Blocks of the Warden and the Scots (the latter reduced by one
(1) Step). (W) has a Main Force of Fauconberg (at his 2 blue
dice Strength) and Scrope (at Retainer Strength). Before the
dice are rolled, (W) discards all his remaining Ally Cards to
gain a temporary bonus of three (3) green dice. Despite this, he
only gets one (1) hit, while (L) scores four (4). (L) applies his
Step Loss on the Scots via the association with Hosting Northumberland (since the Mercenary Block will vanish during the
King Phase, anyway). (W) loses both Fauconberg and Scrope,
who both must roll on the Elimination Chart. Fauconberg (not
currently an Heir) rolls a 5 and is only Wounded. His Block
becomes Inactive and is no longer controlled by (W). Scrope
rolls a 6 and Escapes; (W) places his Block into his Undeclared
Pool where he will still be available to attend Parliament. Since
no Enemy Heir was present, (L) does not gain any Popular
Support; and since the Stacking Limit in West Riding is 3 (SV
=2 +1), (L) cannot perform any Post-Battle Movement (as he
has only three (3) Blocks in the Shire).
Influence Phase
The Players now calculate their IPs gained for the Turn.
(B) gains 1 IP for Leicester and 3 IPs for Chester (the Devon
Block is there), plus 6 IPs for the loyal Shires that are unoccupied (Stafford, Wiltshire, Buckingham, Kent, Huntingdon,
and Cambridge). (B) also has the Chancellor, for an additional
3 IPs, and has a Popular Support level of six (6), giving him
another 4 IPs. Total IPs +17.
(L) gains 2 IPs from Devon (Exeter Block), 2 IPs from
Somerset (Somerset Block), and 3 IPs from West Riding (Northumberland Block, noting that West Riding is loyal to House
Lancaster, so (L) gains SV+1 IPs for controlling it during the
Influence Phase). Additionally, both Exeter and Somerset are
in one of their Home Estate Shires, gaining (L) an additional 1
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Play Book
17
IP each. (L) also gains 5 IPs for the 5 Shires that are loyal and
unoccupied. He also gains 1 for the Ally “Coppini” he stole from
(Y). Finally, he holds the King, the Admiral, and the Warden
for a total of 8 IPs more, and has a Popular Support level of 4
(for another 2 IPs). Total IPs +25.
As the King continues, each of the 3 remaining Ally cards
will see action – (L) to place one (1) IP on Richmond and one
(1) on Pembroke, (Y) to fight for Norfolk, and (B) to secure
Southwick and Hastings. All except Norfolk are unopposed and
the Influenced Nobles join the respective Houses.
(W) gains 1 IP from Nottingham, 2 IPs from Gloucester, and
1 IP from Hereford, plus 6 IPs for unoccupied loyal Shires. He
holds the Captain of Calais for +2 IPs, and his Popular Support
level is at 6, for another 4 IP. Total IPs +16.
Norfolk: During this turn (W) placed five (5) IPs on his
RoP box in two IP Markers. (Y) has an advantage of two (2)
Tendency Bonus for Norfolk, and, not knowing how much
Warwick spent, discards the Dacre Ally Card and places the two
(Y) gains 2 IPs from Essex and 4 IPs from London, plus 5
IPs for unoccupied loyal Shires (Leicester is Enemy held and
doesn’t count). He also gains 1 IP from Essex, who is in a Home
Estate. He holds the Marshal and the Lieutenant for another
3 IPs, plus a Popular Support level of 7, that gives him 5 IPs
more. Total +20.
(2) IP Points from Dacre on him. When the totals are revealed,
King Phase
At the start of the King’s Phase, each Player counts the number of Enemy Player Shires they control to gain “Economic
Victory Points”. For this turn there is only one (1) – (B) has
control of Leicester, which is a (Y) Shire.
Now, each Player removes all of his controlled Blocks from
the map except for those in Exile Boxes (none in this example).
Mercenary Blocks become Inactive and are placed aside for
use in subsequent Turns. Note that Fauconberg and Ormonde
remain on the RoP—as they are not controlled by any Player
at this point
Note: the Figure below is wrong and should have the Fauconberg Block also on the RoP, like Ormonde.
Then, supporters are gathered from the Roll of Parliament.
The King, (L), starts with any Noble of his choice—picking
Arundel in the upper left of Parliament, and then proceeds
through each Noble having IP Markers in their RoP Box.
* Arundel: (Y) placed a total of three (3) IPs here, and was the
sole Player to Influence Arundel, so Arundel declares for York
and his Block is placed with the other Blocks controlled by (Y).
York has four (4) while Warwick has five (5). Warwick has the
higher Influence this turn and as five (5) is above the threshold
of three (3), receives Norfolk into his army.
Now that all the Nobles have declared, the Votes for King
are counted.
““ (B) 10 from Nobles, 3 from Offices, 3 from Popular Support. 16 total.
““ (L) 17 from Nobles and 8 from Offices, 2 from Popular
Support. 27 total.
““ (W) 10 from Nobles and 1 from Officers, plus 3 from
Popular Support, for 14 total.
““ (Y) 9 from Nobles and 3 from Offices, plus another 3 for
Popular Support. 15 total.
(L), with 27 votes, will still need to make a deal in order to
keep the crown, unless each House only Votes for themselves
(divide and conquer?). But if the other three Players get together, then one of them will be King next turn. We’ll skip the
details of the negotiations, but in this case (L) manages to keep
the crown, with a promise to support (B) for Chancellor and
Captain of Calais.
Victory Check Phase
As this is an early turn, no one has won the game yet.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Play Book
Office Phase
Then the Officers are placed:
With the King determined, the Offices are all reas-signed.
Each Player temporarily changes their Popular Support level.
Lancaster (as King) will select one at random and place it up
for bidding. First up is the Treasurer. Each Player selects a
secret bid: (B) 0, (L) 1, (W) 2, (Y) 0. When the bids are revealed Warwick is appointed Treasurer. All the IPs spent (two
(2) from Warwick and one (1) from Lancaster) go back to their
respective Unclaimed Pools. (W) takes the Office Card, Office
marker and Office Block as his own and adjusts his Popular
Support level for the new Office.
““ Lord Warden of the North Marches (L-Northumberland)
in Northumberland.
This continues for all the Offices, with (L) keeping his campaign promise to (B). However, (W) doesn’t let the Captain go
easily and bids 10 IPs for it, which is more than (L) and (B) bid
when the Office came up. Warwick wins the Captain and both
(L) and (B) lost the IPs they spent bidding on it.
““ Gloucester.
Wintering Phase
With Offices re-allocated, Players now perform Wintering,
starting with the non-Officer Nobles. Because it is based on
votes received in the King Phase, (L) goes first. (Y) is next,
followed by (W), as they voted for themselves. (B) is last, as he
voted for (L) and had zero (0) votes for himself for King. Each
Player places one (1) Noble at a time, in the order recited above.
““ Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and the Pale (B-Ormonde)
in Ireland.
““ Lord Captain of Calais and the Pale (W-Salisbury) in
North Riding.
““ Lord High Admiral (Y-Arundel) in Flint.
““ Lord Earl Marshal (Y-York) in Shropshire.
““ Lord Treasurer of the Exchequer (W-Warwick) in
““ Lord Chancellor of England (B-Buckingham) in
Buckingham.
““ His Majesty the King of England (L-Henry VI, hosted by
Somerset) in London.
Finally, after the Officers are placed, (L) places the Queen
Margaret in London, hosted by Somerset.
(L) places Pembroke in Pembroke; (Y) Essex in Essex; (W)
Montague in Somerset; (B) Oxford in Cambridge; back to (L)
who places Richmond in Pembroke; (Y) Suffolk in Suffolk; (W)
Norfolk in Lincoln; (B) Devon in Devon; (L) again, who places
Exeter in Bedford; (Y) passes, as does (W); (B) places Hastings
in Leicester and then everyone passes or is done placing their
non-Officer Nobles.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Play Book
19
The Battle of Wakefield: York and Salisbury are killed.
Rutland is cut down while fleeing the field by Clifford,
who cries “As thy father did to mine, so shall I do to
thee” (or so legend says).
1461 The Battle of Mortimer’s Cross: Welsh Lancastrians
are defeated by Edward of March.
PB 6.0 Historical Notes
PB 6.1 Timeline
The Second Battle of St. Albans: Margaret’s army, with
the addition of Scottish troops, under Henry Beaufort
(2nd Duke Somerset) defeats Warwick. After the battle
the army retires northwards to allay the fears of the
London populace that Margaret’s army will pillage
the city.
Edward of March is accepted as King by Parliament
as a deterrent to Margaret’s army of Scotsmen.
The Battle of Towton: “England’s bloodiest day”.
The total number of combatants is in some estimates
50,000. The Lancastrians are plagued by bad weather
(which helps the Yorkist immensely), but are still able
to put up a good fight. After Yorkist reinforcements
arrive under the Duke of Norfolk, however, the day is
lost for the Lancastrians.
1462 Queen Margaret and Frenchman Pierre de Breze
attempt to land in Northumberland with an army
of French troops, but their fleet is wrecked and the
French troops are either drowned or scattered along
the shoreline and killed as they make it to the beach.
Margaret and Pierre escape to Berwick. Pierre returns
home from there.
1450
Jack Cade’s rebellion.
1452
Richard of York’s insurrection at Dartmouth.
1453
King Henry VI has his first bout with mental illness.
Queen Margaret gives birth to Prince Edward.
1454
York’s First Protectorate begins.
1455
York’s First Protectorate ends when Henry VI recovers
his senses.
First Battle of St. Albans: Somerset is killed, and York
captures the King, starting York’s Second Protectorate.
Edward IV secretly marries Elizabeth Woodville.
The Battle of Hexham.
1456
York’s Second Protectorate ends.
1465 Henry VI is captured and imprisoned in the Tower.
1458
Queen Margaret declares the Love Day.
1469 Robin of Redesdale rebellion. Battle of Edgecote Moor.
1459
The Battle of Blore Heath: Salisbury defeats Audley.
1470 Lincolnshire rebellion.
The Battle of Ludford Bridge: Yorkist forces are routed.
York flees to Ireland; Salisbury, Warwick, and March
to Calais.
Battle of Losecote Field, named for the act of the
Lancastrians removing their surcoats of arms during
the rout.
Margaret convenes the “Parliament of Devils” at Coventry. York and his supporters are Attainted (lands and
titles are revoked).
1460
The Battle of Northampton: Kent (Grey) switches
sides, allowing the Yorkists into the Lancastrian defenses. Buckingham and Northumberland are among
the fallen.
The Angers Agreement between Warwick and Margaret
of Anjou is signed in France. Warwick invades England
at the head of a Lancastrian Army. Edward IV flees to
the court of his sister the Duchess of Burgundy. Henry
VI is re-crowned as King (called the “Readaption”).
York openly claims the throne, and is declared Lord
Protector for Henry VI. The Act of Accord is signed,
disinheriting Prince Edward and naming York as heir.
1463 The last Lancastrian castle in the North surrenders.
The Lancastrians will recover them later in the year.
1464 The Battle of Hedgeley Moor.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Play Book
1471 Battle of Barnet. Edward IV returns to claim the throne.
Warwick and his brother Montague are both killed in
the battle.
Battle of Tewkesbury. After fleeing the loss at Barnet,
the Lancastrian Army (led by Margaret and the young
Prince Edward) attempts to cross into Wales, but is
caught at Tewkesbury. Prince Edward is either killed
in the ensuing battle or executed shortly afterwards,
sources differ on this point. Henry VI is executed in
the Tower shortly after the battle.
1483 Edward IV dies in his bed. This leaves his son Edward
V to assume the throne at the age of five. Edward V is
deposed by his uncle in short order, claiming the boy
and his brother are illegitimate due to the Butler precontract (wherein Edward was betrothed to an heiress
of the Butler (Ormonde) house, and thus negating the
legality of Edward IV’s marriage to Elizabeth Woodville) in the Titulus Regius. The Duke of Gloucester is
crowned Richard III, and the boys (the famous “Princes
in the Tower”) vanish under mysterious circumstances
after being made Richard’s “guests” in the Tower of
London. In 1674, two children’s skeletons were discovered buried beneath a stairwell in the White Tower, but
these have not been proven to be the missing Princes.
PB 6.2 Battles
Battle
1st St. Albans
Blore Heath
Rout at Ludford Bridge
Northampton
Wakefield
Mortimer’s Cross
2nd St. Albans
Ferrybridge (skirmish) Towton
Hedgeley Moor
Hexham Edgecote
osecoat Field
Barnet
Tewkesbury
Bosworth
Stoke Field
Buckingham’s rebellion. Henry Stafford (2nd Duke
Buckingham and a potential claimant to the throne),
attempts to raise a force to oppose Richard III. His
attempt fails. He is caught and executed shortly afterwards.
1485 The Battle of Bosworth. Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, returns from exile to claim his ancestral lands.
He is the last Lancastrian claimant for the throne, and
will move against Richard III. At Market Bosworth, the
two sides meet. Richard III has a slightly larger force,
but is also facing some disaffection in Henry Percy
and the Stanleys (William and Thomas). During the
fight, all three stay on the sidelines. When it appears
that Tudor may carry the day, the Stanleys swoop in
on his side and signal the end of Richard III’s rule.
Henry Tudor becomes King Henry VII.
1487 The Battle of Stoke. Pretender Lambert Simnel is captured, and the Earls of Kildare and of Lincoln (the latter
being the heir to Richard III) are killed. This battle is
traditionally used to mark the end of the Wars of the
Roses, though unrest against Henry VII continues for
some time.
1491 Perkin Warbeck, another pretender to the throne, causes
minor problems for Henry VII. Henry VII captures him
in 1497 and has a noose put around his neck in 1499.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Date
22 May 1455
23 Sept 1459
12 Oct 1469
10 July 1460
0 Dec 1460
2 Feb 1461
22 Feb 1461
28 Mar 1461
29 Mar 1461
25 Apr 1464
15 May 1464 26 July 1469
12 Mar 1470
14 Apr 1471
4 May 1471
22 Aug 1485
16 Jun 1487
Victor
York
York
Lancaster
York
Lancaster
York
Lancaster
Lancaster, but indecisive
York
York
York
Lancaster
York
York
York
Lancaster (Tudor)
Lancaster (Tudor)
21
Crown of Roses Play Book
PB 6.3 The Nobles
(Shire maps show corresponding Home Estate locations.)
Sir William Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel
The son-in–law of
the Earl of Salisbury,
William held several
posts including the
Constable of Dover
and both the Warden and Lieutenant of the Cinque Ports. A Yorkist
supporter, he fought at 2nd St.
Albans and at Towton.
Sir John Touchet, 6th Lord Audley
He fought for Lancaster at Blore Heath.
Turned by Warwick
in 1460, he fought for
Edward IV at Barnet
and Tewkesbury.
Sir Thomas de Ros (Roos)
Hexham.
Fought for Lancaster at 1st St. Albans,
Wakefield, 2nd St.
A l b a n s , To w t o n ,
Hedgeley Moor, and
Sirs Thomas Courtenay, 5th & 6th Earls of Devon
Fought for Lancaster at 1st St. Albans,
Wakefield, and Towton.
Sir William Beaumont, 2nd Viscount Beaumont
Sir Henry Bourchier, 1st Earl of Essex
Sir John Clifford, 9th Baron Clifford
Sir William Hastings
Fought for Lancaster
at Wakefield, 2nd St.
Albans, and Towton. Later went mad
and was placed into
the care of his friend the Earl of
Oxford.
Fought for Lancaster
at Wakefield and 2nd
St. Albans. Killed at
Ferrybridge. Known
as “Butcher” and
“Bloody” for his murder of the
Earl of Rutland.
Fought for the Yorkists at 1st St. Albans, Northampton,
2nd St. Albans, Towton, and Barnet.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Fought for the Yorkists at Mortimer’s
Cross, Towton, Barnet, and Tewkesbury.
Initially supported
Richard III, but was later executed
by him.
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Crown of Roses Play Book
Sir William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke
ingdon.
Fought for the Yorkists at Mortimer’s
Cross, Towton, Edgecote Moor. Later became Earl of Hunt-
Sir Edmund Grey of Ruthin, Earl of Kent
A Lancastrian in
the early years of
the wars, he commanded the van at
Northampton, where
he switched allegiance and allowed
Warwick’s men into the Lancastrian
camp. Under Edward IV, he would
become Lord Treasurer of the
Exchequer and would receive the
Earldom of Kent. He fought at Barnet and Tewkesbury,
and survived the wars.
Sir Francis Lovel, 13th Viscount Lovel
Personal friend of
Richard III. Fought
for the Yorkists at
Bosworth and Stoke
Field.
Sirs John Mowbray and Sir John Howard,
Dukes of Norfolk
Fought for the Yorkists at 2nd St. Albans, Towton, Barnet, Tewkesbury, and
Bosworth. Hereditary
Earl Marshal.
Sirs Henry Percy, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Earls
of Northumberland
Fought for Lancaster at 1st St. Albans,
Northampton, Wakefield, 2nd St. Albans
and Towton. Present
at Bosworth, but did not fight.
Fought for Lancaster at Stoke
Field.
Sir James Butler, 1st Earl of Wiltshire and 5th
Earl of Oxmonde
A favorite of Henry
VI and an enemy of
the Duke of York, he
was the Lord Treasurer of the Exchequer
and also the Lieutenant of Ireland
before the wars began. A Lancastrian, he fought at 1st St. Albans,
Mortimer’s Cross, and Towton.
Escaping the battle, he was later
captured by the Yorkists and executed.
Sir John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford
A Lancastrian, John
became Lord Constable of England
during the readaption period, where
he exacted justice from the 1st
Earl of Worcester for his father’s
execu-tion by that noble. He fought
at Barnet, and in the company of
Viscount Beaumont, seized St. Michael’s Mount, holding it for two months against a siege.
Imprisoned after his surrender, he escaped in 1484, fighting
for Henry Tudor at Bosworth and Stoke Field.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Play Book
Sirs John de la Pole, Dukes of Suffolk
Sirs Richard, Anthony, and Edward Woodville,
Earl Rivers
Fought for the Yorkists at 2nd St. Albans
and Towton. John the
younger was also Earl
of Lincoln and fought
at Bosworth and com-manded at
Stoke Field.
Fought for Lancaster
at 2nd St. Albans,
Towton, and Bosworth. Fought for the
Yorkists at Barnet.
Executed on orders from Richard
III.
Sir Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland
Sir John Scrope, 5th Lord Scrope of Bolton
A Wa r w i c k s u p porter, John fought
for the Yorkists at
N o r th amp to n an d
Towton, and Hexham. He took part in pro-Warwick
rebellions in 1469 and 1470, and
fought for Warwick at Barnet. Pardoned by Edward IV, he supported
Richard III against Buckingham’s
rebellion in 1483, and fought for Richard III at Bosworth.
In 1487, he attacked the city of York in support of a Yorkist
uprising, but the attack failed, and he was imprisoned.
The Raby line of
Nevilles were active
Lancastrians, fighting at Blore Heath,
Wakefield, 2nd St.
Albans, and Towton.
Sir John Tiptoft, 1st Earl of Worcester
Sirs John Talbot, 2nd & 3rd Earls of Shrewsbury
Fought for Lancaster
at Northampton and
2nd St. Albans.
Sir Thomas Stanley, Lord of Man
Present at Blore
Heath, but did not
engage. Fought
for Lancaster at
Northampton, but
switched sides afterwards. Present
at Bosworth but did not engage,
though his cousin William did.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Held numerous offices, including Constable of England under
Edward IV, where he
made many enemies.
24
Crown of Roses Play Book
King Henry VI, Son of Henry V
Sir Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke
Queen Margaret of Anjou
Sir Henry Tudor, 2nd Earl of Richmond
Prince Edward of Lancaster
Sirs Edmund and Henry Beaufort,
Dukes of Somerset
A weak and ineffective ruler. Present at 1st St. Albans,
Northampton, 2nd St.
Albans, Towton, and
Hexham. Murdered in the tower
after Tewkesbury.
Strong-willed and
determined, she was
a major figure on the
Lancastrian side. She
was an expert at getting foreign support, and led the
faction after Henry VI lost his
sanity. After Tewkesbury, she
remained in exile at her ancestral
home in France.
Son of Henry VI and
Q u e e n M a rg a r e t .
Present at 2nd St.
Albans, Towton, and
Tewkesbury, where
he was nominally in command.
Sir Henry Holland, 3rd Duke of Exeter
Sir Henry Holland,
3rd Duke of Exeter A
staunch Lancastrian,
he fought at Blore
Heath, Northampton,
Wakefield, 2nd St. Albans, Towton,
and Barnet; where he was badly
wounded. After submitting to Edward IV, he died at sea (drowned).
Half brother of Henry
VI. Fought at 1st St.
Albans, Mortimer’s
Cross, Tewkesbury,
Bosworth, and Stoke
Field. Later became Duke of Bedford.
Senior Lancastrian
heir after the death of
Henry VI and Prince
Edward, he secured
the crown only after
Bosworth and Stoke Field.
An illegitimate Lancastrian line and
bitter rivals to the
houses of York and
Warwick. Fought at
1st St. Albans, Wakefield, 2nd St.
Albans, Towton, Hedgeley Moor,
Hexham, and Tewkesbury.
Sir Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Led the Lancastrian
army at Northampton, where he was
killed.
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Crown of Roses Play Book
Sir Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham
Initially supported
Richard III, but later
turned against him
and was arrested and
executed.
Sir John Stafford, Earl of Wiltshire
Second son of Humphrey, 1st Duke of
Buckingham. Fought
for York at Towton,
Barnet, and Tewkesbury.
Sir Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick
One of the richest
and most influential
nobles in England, he
was known as “The
Kingmaker” for his
role in placing Edward IV on the
throne. He fought for York at 1st
St. Albans, Northampton, 2nd St.
Albans, Ferrybridge, and Towton.
Later he turned away from Edward
IV and allied himself with Margaret, and fought for Lancaster at Barnet, where he was killed.
Sir John Neville, Lord Montague
Fought for Yorkists at
Blore Heath, Wakefield, 2nd St. Albans,
Hedgeley Moor, and
Hexham. Switched
sides to support Lancaster and
fought at Barnet.
Sir Humphrey Stafford, Baron Southwick
Brother of Humphrey, 1st Duke of
Buckingham. Fought
for York at 2nd St.
Albans and at Towton. Later became Earl of Devon.
Sir William Neville, Lord Fauconberg
Fought for Yorkists
at 1st St. Albans,
Northampton, 2nd St.
Albans, Ferrybridge,
and Towton. A gifted
and experienced commander.
Sir Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury
Fought for Yorkists at
1st St. Albans, Blore
Heath, Northampton, and Wakefield.
His mother was a
Beaufort, thus giving him some
Lancastrian blood.
Sir Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Forced the issue
of succession with
the Act of Accord.
Fought at 1st St. Albans and Wakefield,
where he was killed. Descended
by blood from the second son of
Edward III, which actually gave
him a better claim on the crown
than Henry VI.
26
Crown of Roses Play Book
PB 6.4 The Offices
Sir Edward Plantagenet, 4th Duke of York
Fought at 1st St. Albans and Northampton. Commanded at
Mortimer ’s Cross,
Towton, Barnet, and
Tewkesbury. Became King Edward
IV. Married Elizabeth Woodville
(Rivers) in secret, causing tension
with the Earl of Warwick.
Sir Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of Rutland
Fought and died at
Wakefield, killed by
Lord Clifford while
fleeing the battle.
Sir George Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence
Joined Warwick in
rebellion against his
brother Edward IV,
but recanted before
Barnet. He fought at
Barnet and Tewkesbury. Arrested
and indicted for treason, legend
says he was drowned in a butt of
Malmsey for his execution.
Sir Richard Plantagenet, Duke of Gloucester
Fought at Barnet and
Te w k e s b u r y. D e posed his nephew to
become Richard III.
Killed at Bosworth.
King ~ OFFICE
The head of the government and seat of
ultimate power, the
position of King is a
prize coveted by many.
Chancellor ~ OFFICE
The Lord Chancellor is the officer responsible for keeping the Great Seal of
England, and is the
King’s right hand man, especially
in Parliament.
Treasurer ~ OFFICE
is spent.
Marshal ~ OFFICE
place.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
The man in charge of
the money, the Treasurer collects all the
tax revenue and has
some say in how it
Responsible for the
safety of the monarch, the Marshal
is the one that goes
to war in the King’s
27
Crown of Roses Play Book
Admiral ~ OFFICE
PB 6.5 Mercenaries
With England being an island nation,
Lord Admiral is an
important posting.
He handles all shipbuilding and naval activity.
Captain ~ OFFICE
Lieutenant ~ OFFICE
Warden ~ OFFICE
Burgundian ~ MERCENARY FORCE
After the Re-adaption
of Henry VI, Edward
IV fled to the continent, but returned
quickly with 1500
retainers and Burgundian mercenaries, landing in Yorkshire in
March 1471.
The Captain is responsible for all that
happens in the Town
of Calais, and the
Pale surrounding it.
Scots ~ MERCENARY FORCE
Acting as Viceroy
(king), the Lieutenant is ultimately responsible for everything that happens in
Ireland.
Welsh ~ MERCENARY FORCE
Responsible for
maintaining law and
order in the lands
bordering Scotland,
we have created this
pseudo-office out of the three historical Wardens (East, West, and
Middle March).
In 1461, Margaret
brought an army bolstered by a force of
Scottish troops into
England, defeating
Warwick at the 2nd battle of St.
Albans.
In 1485, a force of
some 4000 Welshmen, led by Rhys ap
Thomas, joined with
Henry Tudor’s forces
at Market Bosworth, where they
confronted the army of Richard III.
French ~ MERCENARY FORCE
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
In 1462, Margaret
prevailed on an old
family friend, Pierre
de Breze, for help in
reclaiming her kingdom. Pierre provided French troops
to aid Margaret’s attempt, but fierce
storms sank the transports and the
troops that did not drown were
killed as soon as they came ashore.
28
Crown of Roses Play Book
PB 7.0 Expanded Sequence of Play
Draw Phase (12.0)
a) Draw base hand. Each Player draws the base hand of five
(5), minus any held Cards from last Turn.
b) Draw Bonus Cards. Each Player checks for bonus Cards up
to maximum hand size of nine (9).
• +1 for being King; controlling London, Calais and/or Warwick Block (two or three Players only)
• +0 - +2 from Popular Support Track
Operations Phase (13.0) (this Phase repeats)
a) Command Step. Each Player selects and places one Card
face down in front of him. Revealed simultaneously.
b) Action Step. Players resolve their Actions in order from
highest to lowest OPS. Actions can be the Event -OR- OPS.
* OPS used for (15.0):
• Undeclared Heir (1 OPS/Heir) (15.1)
• Land Movement (1 OPS/”stack”, 4 MPs) (16.0)
• Sea Movement (3 OPS/”stack”) (17.0)
• Mustering (1 OPS/step, > 1 = Depleted) (18.0)
• Political Influence (1 OPS/Noble) (19.0)
c) Combat Step (20.0). After all Players have had an Action
Step, any Battles generated are resolved.
d) Stacking Check. Also, hide all revealed Blocks (21.0).
Influence Phase (23.0)
a) Shires. Total of: SV for each Friendly-controlled Shire with Blocks
(+1 if same SL), and one (1) for each unoccupied same SL Shire.
b) Add bonus Influence. Each Player checks for bonus Influence
for specific conditions.
• Block in a Home Estate (+1 IP) (23.1.2)
• Bonus IP’s from Office Cards (23.1.3)
• Ally Cards (if used now) (23.1.4)
• Bonus IP’s from Popular Support Track (23.1.5)
King Phase (24.0)
a) Accumulate Economic VPs.
1) Each controlled Shire loyal to another Player = 1 VP.
b) Remove Rebel markers and Mercenary Blocks.
c) Attend Parliament.
1) Remove all Blocks not in Exile (including those Undeclared)
and place in front of controlling Player.
2) Gather Supporters from the RoP (24.2.1).
• King selects a Noble that has IP Markers on it
• Reveal and compare IP totals (add Tendency Bonus, if nonzero bid, and any used Ally Cards)
• Compare Highest Effective Bid (only) to Threshold
• If higher, than that House gains control of Noble
• If control is gained, Noble is In-Play and is placed with rest
of that House’s Nobles
d) Calculate Votes. Each Player totals his votes from the Nobles
he currently has in Parliament, including those just gained
(24.2.2).
• Sum of Ranks of controlled Nobles at Parliament
• Officer and Popular Support Bonus Votes
• Ally Cards (if used now) (23.1.4)
e) Vote for King (24.2.3). Each Player votes (must be a Senior
Heir at Parliament). Ally Cards playable now, too.
f) Adjust Popular Support based on new King.
g) Adjust “Total Votes” markers to new order based on (e).
Victory Check Phase (25.0)
a) Military Victory (6.1) checked first.
b) Political Victory (6.2) checked second.
c) Economic Victory (6.3) only checked at end of game. End
game here if this is last Game Turn.
Office Phase (26.0)
a) End of Offices. Return all Office Cards.
b) New Officers: King randomly picks one Office Card.
c) Bid on Office. Players vote for Office using IPs from their
Stock. Highest non-zero bid wins.
• Only for House with Noble able to hold Office
• IPs spent are lost, even if Office not won
• Attach the Office Block to any appropriate Noble
d) Office Limits (26.3). Applies to current King, Chancellor
and Treasurer, Henry VI, and Margaret. Otherwise, maximum
number of Offices per Noble = CR of Noble.
e) Chancellor (if still Vacant). Awarded to Player with lowest
IPs gained this Turn who has a valid Noble to hold Office.
Wintering Phase (27.0)
a) Non-Officer Nobles placed first. All Players will place their
available non-Officer Nobles, one Block at a time.
• Nobles placed in order from highest to lowest votes received
for King (so King places first)
• First decide if any currently in Exile wish to stay
• Placed In-Play at full Combat strength into a valid Home
Estate (one per Player, alternating)
• If a Player Passes (only if no non-Officer Heirs left to place),
rest of non-Officer Nobles go to Undeclared Pool. Ends
when none left, or all Players have Passed
b) Officers Placed. Players place Officer Nobles starting from
Rank 8 and ending at Rank 1 (i.e., the King is last).
c) Henry VI and Margaret. Place if not previously done so,
per their placement requirements (27.4).
Clean Up Phase (28.0)
a) Adjust Markers and Blocks (28.1).
• Remove all Depleted markers
• Replace Plundered and Devastated with Depleted
• Unavailable Blocks (8.2) become Inactive (8.2)
• Turn over Margaret Card and any Office Cards
b) Decide on Held Cards (28.2).
1) Mandatory Cards must be held and count against limit.
c) Popular Support Adjustments (28.3)
• One or more Blocks in Exile = –1 Popular Support
• Held Mandatory Cards = – OPS value (unless Operations
Phase ended due to Affairs of State)
• No Junior Heir = –1 Popular Support (if Player was capable
of playing a Junior Heir that OPS Phase)
d) Advance the Turn. Move Turn marker to the next Game Turn.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
GMT Games, LLC
P.O. Box 1308
Hanford, CA 93232-1308
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