IBM i: SQL call level interface

IBM i: SQL call level interface
IBM i
Version 7.2
Database
SQL call level interface
IBM
IBM i
Version 7.2
Database
SQL call level interface
IBM
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page 323.
This document may contain references to Licensed Internal Code. Licensed Internal Code is Machine Code and is
licensed to you under the terms of the IBM License Agreement for Machine Code.
© Copyright IBM Corporation 1999, 2013.
US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.
Contents
SQL call level interface . . . . . . . . 1
|
What's new for IBM i 7.2 . . . . . . . . . . 1
PDF file for SQL call level interface . . . . . . . 2
Getting started with Db2 for i CLI . . . . . . . 2
Differences between Db2 for i CLI and embedded
SQL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Advantages of using Db2 for i CLI instead of
embedded SQL . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Deciding between Db2 for i CLI, dynamic SQL,
and static SQL . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Writing a Db2 for i CLI application . . . . . . . 6
Initialization and termination tasks in a Db2 for i
CLI application . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Example: Initialization and connection in a Db2
for i CLI application . . . . . . . . . . 9
Transaction processing task in a Db2 for i CLI
application . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Allocating statement handles in a Db2 for i
CLI application . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Preparing and processing tasks in a Db2 for i
CLI application . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Processing results in a Db2 for i CLI
application . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Processing SELECT statements in a Db2 for
i CLI application . . . . . . . . . 14
Processing UPDATE, DELETE, MERGE,
and INSERT statements in a Db2 for i CLI
application . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Processing other SQL statements in a Db2
for i CLI application . . . . . . . . 15
Freeing statement handles in a Db2 for i CLI
application . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Committing or rolling back in a Db2 for i CLI
application . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
When to call SQLTransact() in a Db2 for i
CLI application . . . . . . . . . . 16
Effects of calling SQLTransact() in a Db2 for
i CLI application . . . . . . . . . 16
Diagnostics in a Db2 for i CLI application . . . 16
Return codes from a Db2 for i CLI application 16
Db2 for i CLI SQLSTATE values . . . . . 17
Data types and data conversion in Db2 for i CLI
functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Other C data types in Db2 for i CLI functions 18
Data conversion in Db2 for i CLI functions . . 19
Working with the XML data type . . . . . . 19
Working with Extended Timestamp Precision . . 21
Working with string arguments in Db2 for i CLI
functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Length of string arguments in Db2 for i CLI
functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
String truncation in Db2 for i CLI functions . 23
Interpretation of strings in Db2 for i CLI
functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Db2 for i CLI functions . . . . . . . . . . 23
Categories of Db2 for i CLI functions . . . . . 24
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999, 2013
SQLAllocConnect - Allocate connection handle
27
SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle . . 30
SQLAllocHandle - Allocate handle. . . . . . 33
SQLAllocStmt - Allocate a statement handle . . 34
SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application
variable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
SQLBindFileToCol - Bind LOB file reference to
LOB column . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
SQLBindFileToParam - Bind LOB file reference to
LOB parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
SQLBindParam - Bind a buffer to a parameter
marker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
SQLBindParameter - Bind a parameter marker to
a buffer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
SQLCancel - Cancel statement . . . . . . . 61
SQLCloseCursor - Close cursor statement . . . 62
SQLColAttribute - Return a column attribute . . 63
SQLColAttributes - Obtain column attributes . . 69
SQLColumnPrivileges - Get privileges associated
with the columns of a table . . . . . . . . 70
SQLColumns - Get column information for a
table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
SQLConnect - Connect to a data source . . . . 77
SQLCopyDesc - Copy description statement . . 80
SQLDataSources - Get list of data sources . . . 81
SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes . . 85
SQLDescribeParam - Return description of a
parameter marker . . . . . . . . . . . 89
SQLDisconnect - Disconnect from a data source
91
SQLDriverConnect - Connect to a data source . . 93
SQLEndTran - Commit or roll back a transaction 97
SQLError - Retrieve error information . . . . 99
SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly
102
SQLExecute - Execute a statement . . . . . 104
SQLExtendedFetch - Fetch array of rows . . . 106
SQLFetch - Fetch next row . . . . . . . . 108
SQLFetchScroll - Fetch from a scrollable cursor 114
SQLForeignKeys - Get the list of foreign key
columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
SQLFreeConnect - Free connection handle . . . 121
SQLFreeEnv - Free environment handle . . . 122
SQLFreeHandle - Free a handle . . . . . . 123
SQLFreeStmt - Free (or reset) a statement handle 124
SQLGetCol - Retrieve one column of a row of
the result set . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
SQLGetConnectAttr - Get the value of a
connection attribute . . . . . . . . . . 132
SQLGetConnectOption - Return current setting
of a connect option . . . . . . . . . . 133
SQLGetCursorName - Get cursor name. . . . 135
SQLGetData - Get data from a column . . . . 139
SQLGetDescField - Get descriptor field . . . . 140
SQLGetDescRec - Get descriptor record . . . 143
SQLGetDiagField - Return diagnostic
information (extensible) . . . . . . . . . 145
iii
SQLGetDiagRec - Return diagnostic information
(concise) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLGetEnvAttr - Return current setting of an
environment attribute . . . . . . . . .
SQLGetFunctions - Get functions . . . . . .
SQLGetInfo - Get general information . . . .
SQLGetLength - Retrieve length of a string
value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLGetPosition - Return starting position of
string . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLGetStmtAttr - Get the value of a statement
attribute . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLGetStmtOption - Return current setting of a
statement option . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLGetSubString - Retrieve portion of a string
value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLGetTypeInfo - Get data type information
SQLLanguages - Get SQL dialect or
conformance information . . . . . . . .
SQLMoreResults - Determine whether there are
more result sets . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLNativeSql - Get native SQL text . . . . .
SQLNextResult - Process the next result set . .
SQLNumParams - Get number of parameters in
an SQL statement . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLNumResultCols - Get number of result
columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLParamData - Get next parameter for which
a data value is needed . . . . . . . . .
SQLParamOptions - Specify an input array for a
parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement . . . . .
SQLPrimaryKeys - Get primary key columns of
a table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLProcedureColumns - Get input/output
parameter information for a procedure . . . .
SQLProcedures - Get list of procedure names
SQLPutData - Pass data value for a parameter
SQLReleaseEnv - Release all environment
resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iv
IBM i: SQL call level interface
148
151
152
155
167
169
172
174
176
179
184
186
188
190
192
194
196
198
200
204
206
212
215
217
SQLRowCount - Get row count . . . . . .
SQLSetConnectAttr - Set a connection attribute
SQLSetConnectOption - Set connection option
SQLSetCursorName - Set cursor name . . . .
SQLSetDescField - Set a descriptor field . . .
SQLSetDescRec - Set a descriptor record . . .
SQLSetEnvAttr - Set environment attribute . .
SQLSetParam - Set parameter . . . . . . .
SQLSetStmtAttr - Set a statement attribute. . .
SQLSetStmtOption - Set statement option . . .
SQLSpecialColumns - Get special (row
identifier) columns . . . . . . . . . .
SQLStatistics - Get index and statistics
information for a base table . . . . . . .
SQLTablePrivileges - Get privileges associated
with a table . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SQLTables - Get table information . . . . .
SQLTransact - Commit or roll back a transaction
Db2 for i CLI include file . . . . . . . . .
Running Db2 for i CLI in server mode . . . . .
Starting Db2 for i CLI in SQL server mode . .
Restrictions for running Db2 for i CLI in server
mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unicode in Db2 for i CLI . . . . . . . . .
Examples: Db2 for i CLI applications . . . . .
Example: Embedded SQL and the equivalent
Db2 for i CLI function calls. . . . . . . .
Example: Using the CLI XA transaction
connection attributes . . . . . . . . . .
Example: Interactive SQL and the equivalent
Db2 for i CLI function calls. . . . . . . .
218
220
233
235
237
239
241
246
247
253
255
259
263
266
269
270
305
305
306
307
308
308
311
314
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Programming interface information .
Trademarks . . . . . . . . .
Terms and conditions. . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 325
. 325
. 325
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
SQL call level interface
Db2® for i call level interface (CLI) is a callable Structured Query Language (SQL) programming interface
that is supported in all DB2® environments.
A callable SQL interface is a programming interface (API) for database access that uses function calls to run
dynamic SQL statements.
Db2 for i CLI is an alternative to embedded dynamic SQL. The important difference between embedded
dynamic SQL and Db2 for i CLI is how the SQL statements are run. On the IBM® i operating system, this
interface is available to any of the Integrated Language Environment® (ILE) languages.
Db2 for i CLI also provides full Level 1 Microsoft Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) support, plus
many Level 2 functions. For the most part, ODBC is a superset of the American National Standards
Institute (ANSI) and ISO SQL CLI standard.
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
What's new for IBM i 7.2
Read about new or significantly changed information for the SQL CLI topic collection.
v Support for Extended Timestamp Precision. See the SQLSetConnectAttr() function
SQL_ATTR_TIMESTAMP_PREC attribute for more information on how the new connection attribute
can be used to tailor the behavior of CLI applications that use Timestamps. For more information on
using extended timestamp precision, see “Working with Extended Timestamp Precision” on page 21.
v SQL MetaData API changes.
– SQLProcedureColumns. As part of the support for specifying default values for function and
procedure parameters, the SQLProcedureColumns function has changed the attributes of the
COLUMN_DEF result set column from a VARCHAR(3) to a DBCLOB(65535). Prior to this release,
defaults for parameters were not supported so the COLUMN_DEF column was a VARCHAR(3) with
a value of NULL for all parameters. In addition, the result set column REMARKS on the
SQLProcedureColumns function was changed to a NVARCHAR(2000) to reflect new length limits in
the underlying, metadata catalogs in Db2 for i.
– SQLColumnAttribute. The SQLColumnAttribute function has changed the attributes of the REMARKS
result set column to NVARCHAR(2000).
How to see what's new or changed
To help you see where technical changes have been made, this information uses:
v The
image to mark where new or changed information begins.
v The
image to mark where new or changed information ends.
In PDF files, you might see revision bars (|) in the left margin of new and changed information.
To find other information about what's new or changed this release, see the Memo to users.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999, 2013
1
SQL CLI
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Getting started with Db2 for i CLI
To get started with Db2 for i CLI , you must know the basics of Db2 for i CLI, how it compares to
embedded SQL, and how to select the best interface for your programming needs.
It is important to understand what Db2 for i CLI, or any callable SQL interface, is based on, and compare
it with existing interfaces.
ISO standard 9075:1999 – Database Language SQL Part 3: Call-Level Interface provides the standard
definition of CLI. The goal of this interface is to increase the portability of applications by enabling them
to become independent of any one database server.
ODBC provides a Driver Manager for Windows, which offers a central point of control for each ODBC
driver (a dynamic link library (DLL) that implements ODBC function calls and interacts with a specific
Database Management System (DBMS)).
Where to find answers to additional Db2 for i CLI questions
An FAQ, which elaborates on some items discussed in this topic collection, is available on the Db2 for i
Web site
.
Differences between Db2 for i CLI and embedded SQL
Db2 for i CLI and embedded SQL differ in many ways.
An application that uses an embedded SQL interface requires a precompiler to convert the SQL
statements into code. Code is compiled, bound to the database, and processed. In contrast, a Db2 for i
CLI application does not require precompilation or binding, but instead uses a standard set of functions
to run SQL statements and related services at run time.
This difference is important because, traditionally, precompilers have been specific to a database product,
which effectively ties your applications to that product. Db2 for i CLI enables you to write portable
applications that are independent of any particular database product. This independence means that a
Db2 for i CLI application does not need to be recompiled or rebound to access-different database
products. An application selects the appropriate database products at run time.
2
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
Db2 for i CLI and embedded SQL also differ in the following ways:
v Db2 for i CLI does not require the explicit declaration of cursors. Db2 for i CLI generates them as
needed. The application can then use the generated cursor in the normal cursor fetch model for
multiple row SELECT statements and positioned UPDATE and DELETE statements.
v The OPEN statement is not necessary in Db2 for i CLI. Instead, the processing of a SELECT automatically
causes a cursor to be opened.
v Unlike embedded SQL, Db2 for i CLI allows the use of parameter markers on the equivalent of the
EXECUTE IMMEDIATE statement (the SQLExecDirect() function).
v A COMMIT or ROLLBACK in Db2 for i CLI is issued through the SQLTransact() or SQLEndTran() function
call rather than by passing it as an SQL statement.
v For some statements, a corresponding connection attribute is provided as a different means of
accomplishing the same function as running the statement would. For example, CLI provides a
connection attribute that can be used to free locators allocated in the CLI application. This connection
attribute is more convenient to use that the statement because it allows for an array of locators to be
passed on the SQLSetConnectAttr() API call.
v Db2 for i CLI manages statement-related information on behalf of the application, and provides a
statement handle to refer to it as an abstract object. This handle avoids the need for the application to
use product-specific data structures.
v Similar to the statement handle, the environment handle and connection handle provide a means to refer
to all global variables and connection specific information.
v Db2 for i CLI uses the SQLSTATE values defined by the X/Open SQL CAE specification. Although the
format and many of the values are consistent with values that are used by the IBM relational database
products, there are differences.
v CLI uses the SQLSTATE values defined by the X/Open SQL CAE specification. Although the format
and many of the values are consistent with values that are used by the IBM relational database
products, there are differences.
Despite these differences, there is an important common concept between embedded SQL and Db2 for i
CLI:
v Db2 for i CLI can process any SQL statement that can be prepared dynamically in embedded SQL. This
is guaranteed because Db2 for i CLI does not actually process the SQL statement itself, but passes it to
the Database Management System (DBMS) for dynamic processing.
Table 1 lists each SQL statement, and whether it can be processed using Db2 for i CLI.
Table 1. SQL statements
SQL statement
Dyn
1
CLI
3
ALLOCATE CURSOR
ALLOCATE DESCRIPTOR
ASSOCIATE LOCATORS
ALTER PROCEDURE
X
ALTER SEQUENCE
X
ALTER TABLE
BEGIN DECLARE SECTION
CALL
X
X
X
X
2
CLOSE
SQLFreeStmt()
COMMENT ON
X
X
COMMIT
X
SQLTransact(), SQLEndTran()
CONNECT (Type 1)
SQLConnect()
SQL call level interface
3
SQL CLI
Table 1. SQL statements (continued)
SQL statement
Dyn
CONNECT (Type 2)
1
CLI
3
SQLConnect()
CREATE ALIAS
X
CREATE FUNCTION
X
CREATE INDEX
X
CREATE PROCEDURE
X
CREATE SCHEMA
X
CREATE SEQUENCE
X
CREATE TABLE
X
CREATE TRIGGER
X
CREATE TYPE
X
CREATE VARIABLE
X
X
CREATE VIEW
X
X
X
X
DEALLOCATE DESCRIPTOR
DECLARE CURSOR
b
SQLAllocStmt()
DECLARE GLOBAL TEMPORARY TABLE
X
DELETE
X
DESCRIBE
X
SQLDescribeCol(), SQLColAttribute()
DESCRIBE CURSOR
DESCRIBE PROCEDURE
DISCONNECT
SQLDisconnect()
DROP
X
END DECLARE SECTION
X
b
EXECUTE
SQLExecute()
EXECUTE IMMEDIATE
SQLExecDirect()
FETCH
SQLFetch()
FREE LOCATOR
X
SQLSetConnectAttr()
X
X
GET DESCRIPTOR
GET DIAGNOSTICS
GRANT
HOLD LOCATOR
INCLUDE
X
b
INSERT
X
X
LABEL
X
LOCK TABLE
X
X
MERGE
X
X
OPEN
SQLExecute(), SQLExecDirect()
PREPARE
SQLPrepare()
REFRESH TABLE
X
RELEASE
RELEASE SAVEPOINT
4
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLDisconnect()
X
SQL CLI
Table 1. SQL statements (continued)
1
CLI
3
SQL statement
Dyn
RENAME
X
REVOKE
X
X
ROLLBACK
X
SQLTransact(), SQLEndTran()
SAVEPOINT
X
SELECT
X
X
SET CONNECTION
SET CURRENT DEBUG MODE
X
SET CURRENT DEGREE
X
SET CURRENT IMPLICIT XMLPARSE OPTION
X
SQLSetConnectAttr()
SET DESCRIPTOR
SET ENCRYPTION PASSWORD
X
SET PATH
X
SET SCHEMA
X
SET SESSION AUTHORIZATION
X
SET RESULT SETS
SET TRANSACTION
X
SIGNAL
UPDATE
X
VALUES INTO
WHENEVER
X
X
2
Notes:
1
Dyn stands for dynamic. All statements in this list can be coded as static SQL, but only those marked with
X can be coded as dynamic SQL.
2
This is a non-executable statement.
3
An X indicates that this statement can be processed using either SQLExecDirect() or SQLPrepare() and
SQLExecute(). If there is an equivalent Db2 for i CLI function, the function name is listed.
Each DBMS might have additional statements that can be dynamically prepared, in which case Db2 for i
CLI passes them to the DBMS. There is one exception, COMMIT and ROLLBACK can be dynamically
prepared by some DBMSs but are not passed. Instead, the SQLTransact() or SQLEndTran() should be used
to specify either COMMIT or ROLLBACK.
Advantages of using Db2 for i CLI instead of embedded SQL
The Db2 for i CLI has several key advantages over embedded SQL.
v It is ideally suited for a client-server environment, in which the target database is not known when the
application is built. It provides a consistent interface for executing SQL statements, regardless of which
database server to which the application is connected.
v It increases the portability of applications by removing the dependence on precompilers. Applications
are distributed not as compiled applications or runtime libraries but as source code that is
preprocessed for each database product.
v Db2 for i CLI applications do not need to be bound to each database to which they connect.
v Db2 for i CLI applications can connect to multiple databases simultaneously.
SQL call level interface
5
SQL CLI
v Db2 for i CLI applications are not responsible for controlling global data areas, such as the SQL
Diagnostics Area and SQL descriptors, as they are with embedded SQL applications. Instead, Db2 for i
CLI allocates and controls the necessary data structures, and provides a handle for the application to
refer to them.
Deciding between Db2 for i CLI, dynamic SQL, and static SQL
Which interfaces you choose depends on your application.
Db2 for i CLI is ideally suited for query-based applications that require portability but not require the
APIs or utilities offered by a particular Database Management System (DBMS) (for example, catalog
database, backup, restore). This does not mean that using Db2 for i CLI calls DBMS-specific APIs from an
application. It means that the application is no longer portable.
Another important consideration is the performance comparison between dynamic and static SQL.
Dynamic SQL is prepared at run time, while static SQL is prepared at the precompile stage. Because
preparing statements requires additional processing time, static SQL might be more efficient. If you
choose static over dynamic SQL, then Db2 for i CLI is not an option.
In most cases the choice between either interface is open to personal preference. Your previous experience
might make one alternative seem more intuitive than the other.
Writing a Db2 for i CLI application
A Db2 for i CLI application consists of a set of tasks; each task consists of a set of discrete steps. Other
tasks might occur throughout the application when it runs. The application calls one or more Db2 for i
CLI functions to carry out each of these tasks.
Every Db2 for i CLI application contains the three main tasks that are shown in the following figure. If
the functions are not called in the sequence that is shown in the figure, an error results.
Figure 1. Conceptual view of a Db2 for i CLI application
The initialization task allocates and initializes resources in preparation for the main Transaction Processing
task.
The transaction processing task, the main task of the application, passes queries and modifications to the
SQL to Db2 for i CLI.
The termination task frees allocated resources. The resources generally consist of data areas that are
identified by unique handles. After freeing the resources, other tasks can use these handles.
6
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
In addition to the three central tasks that control a Db2 for i CLI application, there are numerous general
tasks, such as diagnostic message handlers, throughout an application.
See “Categories of Db2 for i CLI functions” on page 24 for an overview of how the CLI functions fit into
these key task areas.
Related concepts:
“Db2 for i CLI functions” on page 23
These Db2 for i call level interface APIs are available for database access on the IBM i operating system.
Each of the Db2 for i CLI function descriptions is presented in a consistent format.
Initialization and termination tasks in a Db2 for i CLI application
The initialization task allocates and initializes environment handles and connection handles.
The following figure shows the function call sequences for both the initialization and termination tasks.
The transaction processing task in the middle of the diagram is shown in “Transaction processing task in
a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 10.
SQL call level interface
7
SQL CLI
Figure 2. Conceptual view of initialization and termination tasks
The termination task frees handles. A handle is a variable that refers to a data object that is controlled by
CLI. . Using handles frees the application from having to allocate and manage global variables or data
structures, such as descriptor areas, or the SQL Diagnostic Area used in embedded SQL interfaces for
IBM Database Management Systems (DBMSs). An application then passes the appropriate handle when it
calls other Db2 for i CLI functions. Here are the types of handles:
Environment handle
The environment handle refers to the data object that contains global information regarding the
state of the application. This handle is allocated by calling SQLAllocEnv(), and freed by calling
SQLFreeEnv(). An environment handle must be allocated before a connection handle can be
allocated. Only one environment handle can be allocated per application.
8
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
Connection handle
A connection handle refers to a data object that contains information that is associated with a
connection that is managed by Db2 for i CLI. This includes general status information,
transaction status, and diagnostic information. Each connection handle is allocated by calling
SQLAllocConnect() and freed by calling SQLFreeConnect(). An application must allocate a
connection handle for each connection to a database server.
Statement handle
Statement handles are discussed in “Transaction processing task in a Db2 for i CLI application”
on page 10.
Descriptor handle
A descriptor handle is available for applications that want to use certain CLI functions for
reading and modifying individual bound parameter attributes on a API call basis for statements
that have parameters or result sets associated with them. These functions can be used as
alternatives to SQLBindCol() and SQLBindParameter() functions. See SQLGetDescField(),
SQLGetDescRec(), SQLSetDescField(), and SQLSetDescRec() functions for more information.
Example: Initialization and connection in a Db2 for i CLI application
This example shows how initialization and connection work in a Db2 for iCLI application.
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*******************************************************
** file = basiccon.c
**
- demonstrate basic connection to two datasources.
**
- error handling ignored for simplicity
**
** Functions used:
**
**
SQLAllocConnect SQLDisconnect
**
SQLAllocEnv
SQLFreeConnect
**
SQLConnect
SQLFreeEnv
**
**
********************************************************/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "sqlcli.h"
int
connect(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC * hdbc);
#define
#define
#define
#define
MAX_DSN_LENGTH
MAX_UID_LENGTH
MAX_PWD_LENGTH
MAX_CONNECTIONS
int
main()
{
SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
18
10
10
5
henv;
hdbc[MAX_CONNECTIONS];
/* allocate an environment handle
SQLAllocEnv(&henv);
*/
/* Connect to first data source */
connect(henv, &hdbc[0]);
/* Connect to second data source */
connect(henv, &hdbc[1]);
SQL call level interface
9
SQL CLI
/********* Start Processing Step *************************/
/* allocate statement handle, execute statement, and so forth
/********* End Processing Step ***************************/
printf("\nDisconnecting .....\n");
SQLDisconnect(hdbc[0]);
/* disconnect first connection
SQLDisconnect(hdbc[1]);
/* disconnect second connection
SQLFreeConnect(hdbc[0]);
/* free first connection handle
SQLFreeConnect(hdbc[1]);
/* free second connection handle
SQLFreeEnv(henv);
/* free environment handle
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
return (SQL_SUCCESS);
}
/********************************************************************
**
connect - Prompt for connect options and connect
**
********************************************************************/
int
connect(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC * hdbc)
{
SQLRETURN
rc;
SQLCHAR
server[MAX_DSN_LENGTH + 1], uid[MAX_UID_LENGTH + 1],
pwd[MAX_PWD_LENGTH
+ 1];
SQLCHAR
buffer[255];
SQLSMALLINT
outlen;
printf("Enter
gets((char *)
printf("Enter
gets((char *)
printf("Enter
gets((char *)
Server Name:\n");
server);
User Name:\n");
uid);
Password Name:\n");
pwd);
SQLAllocConnect(henv, hdbc);/* allocate a connection handle
*/
rc = SQLConnect(*hdbc, server, SQL_NTS, uid, SQL_NTS, pwd, SQL_NTS);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS) {
printf("Error while connecting to database\n");
return (SQL_ERROR);
} else {
printf("Successful Connect\n");
return (SQL_SUCCESS);
}
}
Transaction processing task in a Db2 for i CLI application
The figure shows the typical order of function calls in a Db2 for i CLI application. The figure does not
show all functions or possible paths.
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Figure 3. Transaction processing
The figure shows the steps and the Db2 for i CLI functions in the transaction processing task. This task
contains these steps:
1. “Allocating statement handles in a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 12
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SQL CLI
2. “Preparing and processing tasks in a Db2 for i CLI application”
3. “Processing results in a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 13
4. “Freeing statement handles in a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 15
5. “Committing or rolling back in a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 15
The SQLAllocStmt() or SQLAllocHandle()function is needed to obtain a statement handle that is used to
process the SQL statement. There are two methods of statement processing that can be used. By using
SQLPrepare()and SQLExecute() , the program can break the process into two steps. The
SQLBindParameter()function is used to bind program addresses to host variables used in the prepared
SQL statement. The second method is the direct processing method in which SQLPrepare()and
SQLExecute() are replaced by a single call toSQLExecDirect()
As soon as the statement is processed, the remaining processing depends on the type of SQL statement.
For SELECT statements, the program uses functions like SQLNumResultCols(), SQLDescribeCol(),
SQLBindCol(), SQLFetch(), and SQLCloseCursor() to process the result set. For statements that update
data, SQLRowCount()can be used to determine the number of affected rows. For other types of SQL
statements, the processing is complete after the statement is processed. SQLFreeStmt()is then used in all
cases to indicate that the handle is no longer needed.
Allocating statement handles in a Db2 for i CLI application
SQLAllocStmt() allocates a statement handle. A statement handle refers to the data object that contains
information about an SQL statement that is managed by Db2 for i call level interface (CLI).
The information about an SQL statement that is managed by Db2 for i CLI includes dynamic arguments,
cursor information, bindings for dynamic arguments and columns, result values, and status information
(these are discussed later). Each statement handle is associated with a connection handle.
Allocate a statement handle to run a statement. You can concurrently allocate up to 160 000 handles. This
applies to all types of handles, including descriptor handles that are implicitly allocated by the
implementation code.
Preparing and processing tasks in a Db2 for i CLI application
After a statement handle has been allocated, there are two methods of specifying and running SQL
statements.
1. Prepare, and then execute:
a. Call SQLPrepare() with an SQL statement as an argument.
b. Call SQLBindParameter(), if the SQL statement contains parameter markers.
c. Call SQLExecute().
2. Execute direct:
a. Call SQLBindParameter(), if the SQL statement contains parameter markers.
b. Call SQLExecDirect() with an SQL statement as an argument.
The first method splits the preparation of the statement from the processing. This method is used when:
v The statement is processed repeatedly (typically with different parameter values). This avoids having
to prepare the same statement more than once.
v The application requires information about the columns in the result set before statement processing.
The second method combines the preparation step and the processing step into one. This method is used
when:
v The statement is processed once. This avoids having to call two functions to process the statement.
v The application does not require information about the columns in the result set before the statement is
processed.
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Binding parameters in SQL statements in a Db2 for i call level interface (CLI) application
Both processing methods allow the use of parameter markers in place of an expression (or host variable in
embedded SQL) in an SQL statement.
Parameter markers are represented by the '?' character and indicate the position in the SQL statement
where the contents of application variables are to be substituted when the statement is processed. The
markers are referenced sequentially, from left to right, starting at 1.
When an application variable is associated with a parameter marker, it is bound to the parameter marker.
Binding is carried out by calling the SQLBindParameter() function with:
v The number of the parameter marker
v A pointer to the application variable
v The SQL type of the parameter
v The data type and length of the variable
The application variable is called a deferred argument because only the pointer is passed when
SQLBindParameter() is called. No data is read from the variable until the statement is processed. This
applies to both buffer arguments and arguments that indicate the length of the data in the buffer.
Deferred arguments allow the application to modify the contents of the bound parameter variables, and
repeat the processing of the statement with the new values.
When calling SQLBindParameter(), it is possible to bind a variable of a different type from that required
by the SQL statement. In this case Db2 for i CLI converts the contents of the bound variable to the correct
type. For example, the SQL statement might require an integer value, but your application has a string
representation of an integer. The string can be bound to the parameter, and Db2 for i CLI converts the
string to an integer when you process the statement.
If the SQL statement uses parameter markers instead of expressions (or host variables in embedded SQL),
you must bind the application variable to the parameter marker.
Related concepts:
“Data types and data conversion in Db2 for i CLI functions” on page 17
The table shows all of the supported SQL types and their corresponding symbolic names. The symbolic
names are used in SQLBindParam() , SQLBindParameter(), SQLSetParam(), SQLBindCol(), and
SQLGetData() to indicate the data types of the arguments.
Related reference:
“SQLBindParameter - Bind a parameter marker to a buffer” on page 52
SQLBindParameter() is used to associate (bind) parameter markers in an SQL statement to application
variables. Data is transferred from the application to the Database Management System (DBMS) when
SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect() is called. Data conversion might occur when the data is transferred.
“SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
SQLPrepare() associates an SQL statement with the input statement handle and sends the statement to
the DBMS to be prepared. The application can reference this prepared statement by passing the statement
handle to other functions.
“SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
SQLExecute() runs a statement that was successfully prepared using SQLPrepare() once or multiple times.
The statement is processed with the current values of any application variables that were bound to
parameter markers by SQLBindParam().
“SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
SQLExecDirect() directly runs the specified SQL statement. The statement can only be processed once.
Also, the connected database server must be able to prepare the statement.
Processing results in a Db2 for i CLI application
The next step after the statement has been processed depends on the type of SQL statement.
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Processing SELECT statements in a Db2 for i CLI application:
If the statement is SELECT, these steps are generally needed to retrieve each row of the result set.
1. Establish the structure of the result set, number of columns, column types and lengths.
2. Bind application variables to columns in order to receive the data.
3. Repeatedly fetch the next row of data, and receive it into the bound application variables.
Columns that were not previously bound can be retrieved by calling SQLGetData() after each
successful fetch.
Note: Each of the above steps requires some diagnostic checks.
The first step requires analyzing the processed or prepared statement. If the SQL statement is generated
by the application, this step is not necessary. This is because the application knows the structure of the
result set and the data types of each column. If the SQL statement is generated (for example, entered by a
user) at run time, the application needs to query:
v The number of columns
v The type of each column
v The names of each column in the result set
This information can be obtained by calling SQLNumResultCols() and SQLDescribeCol() (or
SQLColAttribute()) after preparing the statement or after executing the statement.
The second step allows the application to retrieve column data directly into an application variable on the
next call to SQLFetch(). For each column to be retrieved, the application calls SQLBindCol() to bind an
application variable to a column in the result set. Similar to variables bound to parameter markers using
SQLSetParam(), columns are bound using deferred arguments. This time the variables are output
arguments, and data is written to them when SQLFetch() is called. SQLGetData() can also be used to
retrieve data, so calling SQLBindCol() is optional.
The third step is to call SQLFetch() to fetch the first or next row of the result set. If any columns have
been bound, the application variable is updated. If any data conversion is indicated by the data types
specified on the call to SQLBindCol, the conversion occurs when SQLFetch() is called.
The last (optional) step is to call SQLGetData() to retrieve any columns that were not previously bound.
All columns can be retrieved this way, provided they were not bound, or a combination of both methods
can be used. SQLGetData() is also useful for retrieving variable length columns in smaller pieces, which
cannot be done with bound columns. Data conversion can also be indicated here, as in SQLBindCol().
Related concepts:
“Data types and data conversion in Db2 for i CLI functions” on page 17
The table shows all of the supported SQL types and their corresponding symbolic names. The symbolic
names are used in SQLBindParam() , SQLBindParameter(), SQLSetParam(), SQLBindCol(), and
SQLGetData() to indicate the data types of the arguments.
Related reference:
“SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
SQLBindCol() is used to associate (bind) columns in a result set to application variables (storage buffers)
for all data types. Data is transferred from the Database Management System (DBMS) to the application
when SQLFetch() is called.
“SQLColAttribute - Return a column attribute” on page 63
SQLColAttribute() obtains an attribute for a column of the result set, and is also used to determine the
number of columns. SQLColAttribute() is a more extensible alternative to the SQLDescribeCol() function.
“SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes” on page 85
SQLDescribeCol() returns the result descriptor information (column name, type, precision) for the
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indicated column in the result set generated by a SELECT statement.
“SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
SQLFetch() advances the cursor to the next row of the result set, and retrieves any bound columns.
“SQLGetData - Get data from a column” on page 139
SQLGetData() retrieves data for a single column in the current row of the result set. This is an alternative
to SQLBindCol(), which transfers data directly into application variables on a call to SQLFetch().
SQLGetData() can also be used to retrieve large character-based data in pieces.
“SQLNumResultCols - Get number of result columns” on page 194
SQLNumResultCols() returns the number of columns in the result set associated with the input statement
handle.
Processing UPDATE, DELETE, MERGE, and INSERT statements in a Db2 for i CLI application:
If the statement modifies data (UPDATE, DELETE, MERGE, or INSERT), no action is required other than
the normal check for diagnostic messages. In this case, SQLRowCount() can be used to obtain the number
of rows affected by the SQL statement.
If the SQL statement is a Positioned UPDATE or DELETE, it is necessary to use a cursor. A cursor is a
moveable pointer to a row in the result table of a SELECT statement. In embedded SQL, cursors are used
to retrieve, update or delete rows. When using Db2 for i CLI, it is not necessary to define a cursor,
because one is generated automatically.
In the case of Positioned UPDATE or DELETE statements, you need to specify the name of the cursor
within the SQL statement. You can either define your own cursor name using SQLSetCursorName(), or
query the name of the generated cursor using SQLGetCursorName(). It is best to use the generated name,
because all error messages refer to this name, and not the one defined by SQLSetCursorName().
Related reference:
“SQLNumResultCols - Get number of result columns” on page 194
SQLNumResultCols() returns the number of columns in the result set associated with the input statement
handle.
Processing other SQL statements in a Db2 for i CLI application:
If the statement neither queries nor modifies data, there is no further action other than the normal check
for diagnostic messages.
Freeing statement handles in a Db2 for i CLI application
SQLFreeStmt() ends processing for a particular statement handle.
This function can be used to do one or more of the following tasks:
v Unbind all columns
v Unbind all parameters
v Close any cursors and discard the results
v Drop the statement handle, and release all associated resources
The statement handle can be reused provided it is not dropped.
Committing or rolling back in a Db2 for i CLI application
The last step for the transaction processing task is to either commit or roll back the transaction using
SQLTransact().
A transaction is a recoverable unit of work, or a group of SQL statements that can be treated as one
atomic operation. This means that all the operations within the group are to be completed (committed) or
undone (rolled back), as if they were a single operation.
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When using Db2 for i call level interface (CLI), transactions are started implicitly with the first access to
the database using SQLPrepare(), SQLExecDirect(), or SQLGetTypeInfo(). The transaction ends when you
use SQLTransact() to either roll back or commit the transaction. This means that any SQL statements
processed between these are treated as one unit of work.
When to call SQLTransact() in a Db2 for i CLI application:
If you want to decide when to end a transaction, consider this information.
v You can only commit or roll back the current transaction, so keep dependent statements within the
same transaction.
v Various locks are held while you have an outstanding transaction. Ending the transaction releases the
locks, and allows access to the data by other users. This is the case for all SQL statements, including
SELECT statements.
v As soon as a transaction has successfully been committed or rolled back, it is fully recoverable from the
system logs (this depends on the Database Management System (DBMS)). Open transactions are not
recoverable.
Effects of calling SQLTransact() in a Db2 for i CLI application:
Here are some effects of calling SQLTransact() in a Db2 for i call level interface (CLI) application.
When a transaction ends:
v All statements must be prepared before they can be used again.
v Cursor names, bound parameters, and column bindings are maintained from one transaction to the
next.
v All open cursors are closed.
Related reference:
“SQLTransact - Commit or roll back a transaction” on page 269
SQLTransact() commits or rolls back the current transaction in the connection.
Diagnostics in a Db2 for i CLI application
There are two levels of diagnostics for Db2 for i call level interface (CLI) functions.
v Return codes from a Db2 for i CLI application
v DB2 CLI SQLSTATEs (diagnostic messages)
Return codes from a Db2 for i CLI application
Possible return codes for Db2 for i call level interface (CLI) functions include SQL_SUCCESS,
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO, SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND, SQL_ERROR, and SQL_INVALID_HANDLE.
Each function description in “Db2 for i CLI functions” on page 23 lists the possible codes returned for
each function.
Table 2. Db2 for i CLI function return codes
Return code
Value
Explanation
SQL_SUCCESS
0
The function is completed successfully, no additional SQLSTATE information
available.
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO 1
The function is completed successfully, with a warning or other information. Call
SQLError() to receive the SQLSTATE and any other error information. The
SQLSTATE has a class of 01.
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
100
The function returned successfully, but no relevant data is found.
SQL_ERROR
-1
The function fails. Call SQLError() to receive the SQLSTATE and any other error
information.
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Table 2. Db2 for i CLI function return codes (continued)
Return code
Value
Explanation
SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
-2
The function fails because an input handle is not valid (environment, connection or
statement handle).
SQL_NEED_DATA
99
The application tries to run an SQL statement, but Db2 for i CLI lacks parameter
data that the application indicates will be passed at run time.
Db2 for i CLI SQLSTATE values
Because different database servers often have different diagnostic message codes, Db2 for i call level
interface (CLI) provides a standard set of SQLSTATE values that are defined by the X/Open SQL CAE
specification. This allows consistent message handling across different database servers.
SQLSTATE values are alphanumeric strings of 5 characters (bytes) with a format of ccsss, where cc
indicates class and sss indicates subclass. Any SQLSTATE that has a class of:
v 01, is a warning.
v HY, is generated by the CLI driver (either Db2 for i CLI or ODBC).
The SQLError() function also returns an error code if the code is generated by the system. When the
application is connected to an IBM database server, the error code is SQLCODE. If the code is generated
by Db2 for i CLI instead of on the system, the error code is set to -99999.
Db2 for i CLI SQLSTATE values include both additional IBM-defined SQLSTATE values that are returned
by the database server, and Db2 for i CLI-defined SQLSTATE values for conditions that are not defined in
the X/Open specification. This allows for the maximum amount of diagnostic information to be returned.
When applications are run in Windows using ODBC, it is also possible to receive ODBC-defined
SQLSTATE values.
Follow these guidelines for using SQLSTATE values within your application:
v Always check the function return code before calling SQLError() to determine if diagnostic information
is available.
v Use the SQLSTATE values rather than the error code.
v To increase your application's portability, build dependencies only on the subset of Db2 for i CLI
SQLSTATE values that are defined by the X/Open specification, and return the additional Db2 for i
CLI SQLSTATE values as information only. (Dependencies refers to the application making logic flow
decisions based on specific SQLSTATE values.)
v For maximum diagnostic information, return the text message along with the SQLSTATE (if applicable,
the text message includes the IBM-defined SQLSTATE). It is also useful for the application to print out
the name of the function that returned the error.
Data types and data conversion in Db2 for i CLI functions
The table shows all of the supported SQL types and their corresponding symbolic names. The symbolic
names are used in SQLBindParam() , SQLBindParameter(), SQLSetParam(), SQLBindCol(), and
SQLGetData() to indicate the data types of the arguments.
Each column is described as follows:
SQL type
This column contains the SQL data type as it appears in an SQL statement. The SQL data types
are dependent on the Database Management System (DBMS).
SQL symbolic
This column contains an SQL symbolic name that is defined (in sqlcli.h) as an integer value.
This value is used by various functions to identify an SQL data type in the first column.
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SQL CLI
Table 3. SQL data types and SQL symbolic names
SQL type
SQL symbolic
BIGINT
SQL_BIGINT
BINARY
SQL_BINARY
BLOB
SQL_BLOB
CHAR
SQL_CHAR, SQL_WCHAR1
CLOB
SQL_CLOB
DATE
SQL_DATE
DBCLOB
SQL_DBCLOB
2
DECFLOAT(7)
SQL_DECFLOAT
DECFLOAT(16)
SQL_DECFLOAT
DECFLOAT(34)
SQL_DECFLOAT
DECIMAL
SQL_DECIMAL
DOUBLE
SQL_DOUBLE
FLOAT
SQL_FLOAT
GRAPHIC
SQL_GRAPHIC
INTEGER
SQL_INTEGER
NUMERIC
SQL_NUMERIC
REAL
SQL_REAL
SMALLINT
SQL_SMALLINT
TIME
SQL_TIME
TIMESTAMP
SQL_TIMESTAMP
VARBINARY
SQL_VARBINARY
VARCHAR
SQL_VARCHAR, SQL_WVARCHAR1
VARGRAPHIC
SQL_VARGRAPHIC
XML
SQL_XML
1
SQL_WCHAR and SQL_WVARCHAR can be used to indicate Unicode data.
2
Note that there is no DECFLOAT(7) data type. However, DB2 will accept this data type from applications.
Other C data types in Db2 for i CLI functions
As well as the data types that map to SQL data types, there are also C symbolic types used for other
function arguments, such as pointers and handles.
Table 4. Generic data types and actual C data types
Symbolic type
Actual C type
Typical usage
SQLHDBC
long int
Handle referencing database connection information.
SQLHENV
long int
Handle referencing environment information.
SQLHSTMT
long int
Handle referencing statement information.
SQLPOINTER
void *
Pointers to storage for data and parameters.
SQLRETURN
long int
Return code from Db2 for i CLI functions.
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Data conversion in Db2 for i CLI functions
Db2 for i call level interface (CLI) manages the transfer and any required conversion of data between the
application and the Database Management System (DBMS).
Before the data transfer actually takes place, the source, target or both data types are indicated when
calling SQLBindParam(), SQLBindParameter(), SQLSetParam(), SQLBindCol() or SQLGetData(). These
functions use the symbolic type names shown in Table 3 on page 18, to identify the data types involved.
See “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108, or “SQLGetCol - Retrieve one column of a row of the
result set” on page 126 for examples of the functions that use the symbolic data types.
For a list of supported data type conversions in Db2 for i CLI, see the data type compatibility table in
Assignments and comparisons. Other conversions can be achieved by using SQL scalar functions or the
SQL CAST function in the SQL syntax of the statement being processed.
The functions mentioned in the previous paragraph can be used to convert data to other types. Not all
data conversions are supported or make sense.
Whenever truncation that is rounding or data type incompatibilities occur on a function call, either
SQL_ERROR or SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO is returned. Further information is then indicated by the
SQLSTATE value and other information returned by SQLError().
Working with the XML data type
These conventions can help you handle various aspects of using the XML data type in Db2 for i CLI
functions.
XML data handling in CLI applications
DB2 CLI applications can retrieve and store XML data using the SQL_XML data type. This data type
corresponds to the native XML data type of the Db2 for i database, which is used to define columns that
store well-formed XML documents. The SQL_XML type can be bound to the following C types:
SQL_C_BINARY, SQL_VARBINARY, SQL_C_CHAR, SQL_VARCHAR, SQL_C_WCHAR, and
SQL_WVARCHAR. Using binary types, however, instead of character types, is recommended to avoid
possible data loss or corruption resulting from CCSID conversion when character types are used. To store
XML data in an XML column, bind a binary (SQL_C_BINARY or SQL_VARBINARY) or character
(SQL_C_CHAR, SQL_VARCHAR, SQL_C_WCHAR, or SQL_WVARCHAR) buffer that contains the XML
value to the SQL_XML SQL type and execute the INSERT or UPDATE SQL statements. To retrieve XML
data from the database, bind the result set to a binary (SQL_C_BINARY or SQL_VARBINARY) or
character (SQL_C_CHAR, SQL_VARCHAR, SQL_C_WCHAR, or SQL_WVARCHAR) type. Character
types should be used with caution because of encoding issues. When an XML value is retrieved into an
application data buffer, the DB2 server performs an implicit serialization on the XML value to convert it
from its internal form to the serialized string form. For character typed buffers, the XML value is
implicitly serialized to the application CCSID associated with the character type. By default, an XML
declaration is included in the output serialized string. This default behavior can be changed by setting
the SQL_ATTR_XML_DECLARATION connection attribute.
XML column inserts and updates in CLI applications
When you update or insert data into XML columns of a table, the input data must be in the serialized
string format. For XML data, when you use SQLBindParameter() to bind parameter markers to input data
buffers, you can specify the data type of the input data buffer as SQL_C_BINARY, SQL_VARBINARY,
SQL_C_CHAR, SQL_VARCHAR_, SQL_C_WCHAR, SQL_BLOB, SQL_CLOB, SQL_BLOB_LOCATOR,
SQL_CLOB_LOCATOR or SQL_VARCHAR. When you bind a data buffer that contains XML data as
SQL_C_BINARY or SQL_VARBINARY, Db2 for i CLI processes the XML data as internally encoded data.
This is the preferred method because it avoids the overhead and potential data loss of character
SQL call level interface
19
SQL CLI
conversion when character types are used. When you bind a data buffer that contains XML data as
SQL_C_CHAR, SQL_VARCHAR, SQL_C_WCHAR, or SQL_WVARCHAR, DB2 CLI processes the XML
data as externally encoded data.
Db2 for i CLI determines the encoding of the data as follows:
v If the C type is SQL_C_WCHAR or SQL_WVARCHAR, CLI assumes that the data is encoded as
UCS-2.
v If the C type is SQL_C_CHAR or SQL_C_VARCHAR, CLI assumes that the data is encoded in the job
CCSID.
The following example shows how to update XML data in an XML column using the recommended
SQL_C_BINARY type.
char xmlBuffer[10240];
integer length;
// Assume a table named dept has been created with the following statement:
// CREATE TABLE dept (id CHAR(8), deptdoc XML)
// xmlBuffer contains an internally encoded XML document that is to replace
// the existing XML document
length = strlen (xmlBuffer);
SQLPrepare (hStmt, "UPDATE dept SET deptdoc = ? WHERE id = ’001’", SQL_NTS);
SQLBindParameter (hStmt, 1, SQL_PARAM_INPUT, SQL_C_BINARY, SQL_XML, 0, 0,
xmlBuffer, 10240, &length); SQLExecute (hStmt);
XML data retrieval in CLI applications
When you select data from XML columns in a table, the output data is in the serialized string format. For
XML data, when you use SQLBindCol() API to bind columns in a query result set to application variables,
you can specify the data type of the application variables as SQL_C_BINARY, SQL_VARBINARY,
SQL_C_CHAR, SQL_VARCHAR, SQL_C_WCHAR, SQL_BLOB, SQL_CLOB, SQL_BLOB_LOCATOR,
SQL_CLOB_LOCATOR or SQL_WVARCHAR. When retrieving a result set from an XML column, it is
recommended that you bind your application variable to the SQL_C_BINARY or SQL_VARBINARY type.
Binding to character types can result in possible data loss resulting from code page conversion. Data loss
can occur when characters in the source code page cannot be represented in the target code page. Binding
your variable to the binary types avoids these issues. XML data is returned to the application as
internally encoded data.
CLI determines the encoding of the data as follows:
v If the C type is SQL_C_BINARY or SQL_VARBINARY, Db2 for i CLI returns the data in the encoding
of the column.
v If the C type is SQL_C_CHAR or SQL_VARCHAR, Db2 for i CLI returns the data in job CCSID.
v If the C type is SQL_C_WCHAR or SQL_WVARCHAR, Db2 for i CLI returns the data in the UCS-2
encoding scheme.
The database server performs an implicit serialization of the data before returning it to the application.
You can explicitly serialize the XML data to a specific data type by calling the XMLSERIALIZE function.
Implicit serialization is recommended, however, because explicitly serializing to character types with
XMLSERIALIZE can introduce encoding issues.
The following example shows how to retrieve XML data from an XML column into a binary application
variable.
char xmlBuffer[10240];
// xmlBuffer is used to hold the retrieved XML document
integer length;
// Assume a table named dept has been created with the following statement:
// CREATE TABLE dept (id CHAR(8), deptdoc XML)
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length = sizeof (xmlBuffer);
SQLExecute (hStmt, "SELECT deptdoc FROM dept WHERE id=’001’", SQL_NTS);
SQLBindCol (hStmt, 1, SQL_C_BINARY, xmlBuffer, &length, NULL);
SQLFetch (hStmt);
SQLCloseCursor (hStmt);
// xmlBuffer now contains a valid XML document encoded in UTF-8
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Working with Extended Timestamp Precision
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Provides information on using the Timestamp data type with extended timestamp precision, which is
available in release 7.2 and later, with the Db2 for i CLI functions.
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Extended Timestamp Precision in CLI applications
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In Db2 for i, timestamps now have increased and variable precision, with timestamp precision having a
range of 0-12. To accommodate this change, CLI has been updated to allow the user to specify and
retrieve the precision for timestamp parameters and columns. These changes include a means to preserve
the existing behavior, since there can be unexpected side effects to your CLI applications if they are not
coded to take advantage of this new support. To preserve existing behavior, use the
SQL_ATTR_TIMESTAMP_PREC connection attribute.
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Using the new SQL_ATTR_TIMESTAMP_PREC connection attribute
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Since changing applications to take advantage of the increased timestamp precision can take a long time
to implement and test, there is a new connection attribute, SQL_ATTR_TIMESTAMP_PREC, which can be
set to SQL_TRUE to cause APIs to revert to the prior release behavior for timestamp types. This is meant
as a temporary measure to allow existing applications to run with minimal modification on IBM i 7.2 ,
until they can be updated to comply with the new behavior. With this attribute set, timestamps are
always treated as a 26 byte, fixed length value with a precision of 6. Applications using this attribute will
be unable to insert timestamps with a precision greater than 6 using parameter markers and any
timestamp columns fetched with greater than 6 precision will be truncated (and any column with less
than 6 precision will be padded with zeroes).
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Examples of necessary changes for Existing CLI Applications
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If you do not set the new SQL_ATTR_TIMESTAMP_PREC connection attribute to SQL_TRUE, then an
existing application may see these side effects when running against a Db2 for i database in a 7.2 release
or later, if that application binds parameters using the SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP type.
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For example, an application calling SQLBindParameter may have passed the value 0 for the ColumnSize
parameter, since it was ignored for timestamps in earlier releases:
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Perhaps instead, the timestamp was stored in a large buffer and the size of the buffer was passed in:
:
char *ts = "1970-01-01 12:34:56.123456";
SQLBindParameter(hstmt, 1, SQL_PARAM_INPUT, SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP, SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP, 0, 6, ts, 0, &ind);
SQLExecute(hstmt);
:
// If a timestamp that is bound as shown above is then passed on the SQLExecute call, it will fail with
// SQLCODE -303 "Variable *N not compatible or value too long", because of the ColumnSize parameter being 0.
// To correct this problem, bind the parameter as follows, with a ColumnSize parameter of 26 :
:
char *ts = "1970-01-01 12:34:56.123456";
SQLBindParameter(hstmt, 1, SQL_PARAM_INPUT, SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP, SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP,26, 6, ts, 0, &ind);
SQLExecute(hstmt);
:
:
char buffer[50] = "1970-01-01 12:34:56.123456";
SQLBindParameter(hstmt, 1, SQL_PARAM_INPUT, SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP, SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP, sizeof(buffer), 6, buffer, 0, &ind);
SQL call level interface
21
SQL CLI
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
SQLExecute(hstmt);
:
// If a timestamp that is bound as shown above is then passed on the SQLExecute call, it will fail with
// SQLCODE -180 ""Syntax of date, time, or timestamp value not valid.", because of the ColumnSize parameter being
// sizeof(buffer), or 50.
// To correct this problem, bind the parameter as follows, with a ColumnSize parameter of 26 :
:
char buffer[50] = "1970-01-01 12:34:56.123456";
SQLBindParameter(hstmt, 1, SQL_PARAM_INPUT, SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP, SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP,26, 6, ts, 0, &ind);
SQLExecute(hstmt);
:
| Note that the same problem occurs when binding timestamp types on Db2 for i CLI SQLBindParam and
| SQLBindCol functions.
|
|
|
|
To fix the problems described in the examples above, use either the corrective action shown in the
example or something similar to insure the ColumnSize parameter is set properly. Here are the details on
the changes for the parameters for the SQLBindParameter, SQLBindParam, and the SQLBindCol
functions:
| v SQLBindParameter, ColumnSize must be between 19 and 32 and DecimalDigits must be between 0 and
|
12.
| v SQLBindParam, cbParamDef must be between 19 and 32 and ibScale must be between 0 and 12.
| v SQLBindCol, cbValueMax must be greater than or equal to 19.
| The easiest way to always ensure these values are correct is to use the information retrieved using
| SQLDescribeParam for parameter markers and SQLDescribeCol or SQLColAttribute for columns.
Working with string arguments in Db2 for i CLI functions
These conventions can help you handle various aspects of string arguments in Db2 for i call level
interface (CLI) functions.
Length of string arguments in Db2 for i CLI functions
Input string arguments have an associated length argument.
The length argument indicates to Db2 for i call level interface (CLI) either the length of the allocated
buffer (not including the null byte terminator) or the special value SQL_NTS. If SQL_NTS is passed, Db2
for i CLI determines the length of the string by locating the null terminating character.
Output string arguments have two associated length arguments, one to specify the length of the allocated
buffer and one to return the length of the string returned by Db2 for i CLI. The returned length value is
the total length of the string available for return, whether it fits in the buffer or not.
For SQL column data, if the output is an empty string, SQL_NULL_DATA is returned in the length
argument.
If a function is called with a null pointer for an output length argument, Db2 for i CLI does not return a
length. This might be useful when it is known that the buffers are large enough for all possible results. If
Db2 for i CLI attempts to return the SQL_NULL_DATA value to indicate a column contains null data and
the output length argument is a null pointer, the function call fails.
Every character string that Db2 for i CLI returns is terminated with a null terminating character
(hexadecimal 00), except for strings that are returned from graphic data types. This requires that all
buffers allocate enough space for the maximum number that is expected, plus one for the
null-terminating character.
22
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
String truncation in Db2 for i CLI functions
If an output string does not fit into a buffer, Db2 for i call level interface (CLI) truncates the string to a
length that is one less than the size of the buffer, and writes the null terminator.
If truncation occurs, the function returns SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO and an SQLSTATE by indicating
truncation. The application can then compare the buffer length to the output length to determine which
string is truncated.
For example, if SQLFetch() returns SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO, and an SQLSTATE of 01004, at least one
of the buffers bound to a column is too small to hold the data. For each buffer that is bound to a column,
the application can compare the buffer length with the output length and determine which column is
truncated.
Interpretation of strings in Db2 for i CLI functions
Db2 for i call level interface (CLI) ignores case and removes leading and trailing blanks for all string
input arguments, such as column names and cursor names.
There are also some exceptions for this rule:
v Any database data
v Delimited identifiers that are enclosed in double quotation marks)
v Password arguments
Db2 for i CLI functions
These Db2 for i call level interface APIs are available for database access on the IBM i operating system.
Each of the Db2 for i CLI function descriptions is presented in a consistent format.
See Categories of Db2 for i CLIs for a categorical listing of the functions.
How the CLI functions are described
The following table shows the type of information that is described in each section of the function
description.
Type
Description
Purpose
This section gives a brief overview of what the function does. It also indicates if any
functions should be called before and after calling the function being described.
Syntax
This section contains the C language prototype for the IBM i environment.
Arguments
This section lists each function argument, along with its data type, a description and
whether it is an input or output argument.
Each Db2 for i CLI argument is either an input or output argument. With the exception
of SQLGetInfo(), Db2 for i CLI only modifies arguments that are indicated as output.
Some functions contain input or output arguments which are known as deferred or bound
arguments. These arguments are pointers to buffers allocated by the application. These
arguments are associated with (or bound to) either a parameter in an SQL statement, or
a column in a result set. The data areas specified by the function are accessed by Db2 for
i CLI at a later time. It is important that these deferred data areas are still valid at the
time Db2 for i CLI accesses them.
Usage
This section provides information about how to use the function, and any special
considerations. Possible error conditions are not discussed here, but are listed in the
diagnostics section instead.
SQL call level interface
23
SQL CLI
Type
Description
Return codes
This section lists all the possible function return codes. When SQL_ERROR or
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO is returned, error information can be obtained by calling
SQLError().
Refer to “Diagnostics in a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 16 for more information
about return codes.
Diagnostics
This section contains a table that lists the SQLSTATEs explicitly returned by Db2 for i
CLI (SQLSTATEs generated by the Database Management System (DBMS) might also be
returned) and indicates the cause of the error. These values are obtained by calling
SQLError() after the function returns SQL_ERROR or SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.
An * in the first column indicates that the SQLSTATE is returned only by Db2 for i CLI,
and is not returned by other ODBC drivers.
Refer to “Diagnostics in a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 16 for more information
about diagnostics.
Restrictions
This section indicates any differences or limitations between Db2 for i CLI and ODBC
that might affect an application.
Example
This section is a code fragment demonstrating the use of the function. The complete
source used for all code fragments is listed in “Examples: Db2 for i CLI applications” on
page 308.
References
This section lists related Db2 for i CLI functions.
Categories of Db2 for i CLI functions
The list shows the Db2 for i CLI functions by category.
v Connecting
– “SQLConnect - Connect to a data source” on page 77
– “SQLDataSources - Get list of data sources” on page 81
– “SQLDisconnect - Disconnect from a data source” on page 91
– “SQLDriverConnect - Connect to a data source” on page 93
v Diagnostics
– “SQLError - Retrieve error information” on page 99
– “SQLGetDiagField - Return diagnostic information (extensible)” on page 145
– “SQLGetDiagRec - Return diagnostic information (concise)” on page 148
v MetaData
– “SQLColumns - Get column information for a table” on page 73
– “SQLColumnPrivileges - Get privileges associated with the columns of a table” on page 70
– “SQLForeignKeys - Get the list of foreign key columns” on page 116
– “SQLGetInfo - Get general information” on page 155
– “SQLGetTypeInfo - Get data type information” on page 179
– “SQLLanguages - Get SQL dialect or conformance information” on page 184
– “SQLPrimaryKeys - Get primary key columns of a table” on page 204
– “SQLProcedureColumns - Get input/output parameter information for a procedure” on page 206
– “SQLProcedures - Get list of procedure names” on page 212
– “SQLSpecialColumns - Get special (row identifier) columns” on page 255
– “SQLStatistics - Get index and statistics information for a base table” on page 259
– “SQLTablePrivileges - Get privileges associated with a table” on page 263
– “SQLTables - Get table information” on page 266
24
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
v Processing SQL statements
– “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
– “SQLBindFileToCol - Bind LOB file reference to LOB column” on page 41
– “SQLBindFileToParam - Bind LOB file reference to LOB parameter” on page 44
– “SQLBindParam - Bind a buffer to a parameter marker” on page 47
– “SQLBindParameter - Bind a parameter marker to a buffer” on page 52
– “SQLCancel - Cancel statement” on page 61
– “SQLCloseCursor - Close cursor statement” on page 62
– “SQLColAttributes - Obtain column attributes” on page 69
– “SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes” on page 85
– “SQLDescribeParam - Return description of a parameter marker” on page 89
– “SQLEndTran - Commit or roll back a transaction” on page 97
– “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
– “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
– “SQLExtendedFetch - Fetch array of rows” on page 106
– “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
– “SQLFetchScroll - Fetch from a scrollable cursor” on page 114
– “SQLGetCursorName - Get cursor name” on page 135
– “SQLGetData - Get data from a column” on page 139
– “SQLGetDescField - Get descriptor field” on page 140
– “SQLGetDescRec - Get descriptor record” on page 143
– “SQLMoreResults - Determine whether there are more result sets” on page 186
– “SQLNativeSql - Get native SQL text” on page 188
– “SQLNextResult - Process the next result set” on page 190
– “SQLNumParams - Get number of parameters in an SQL statement” on page 192
– “SQLNumResultCols - Get number of result columns” on page 194
– “SQLParamData - Get next parameter for which a data value is needed” on page 196
– “SQLParamOptions - Specify an input array for a parameter” on page 198
– “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
– “SQLPutData - Pass data value for a parameter” on page 215
– “SQLRowCount - Get row count” on page 218
– “SQLSetCursorName - Set cursor name” on page 235
– “SQLTransact - Commit or roll back a transaction” on page 269
v Working with attributes
– “SQLGetCol - Retrieve one column of a row of the result set” on page 126
– “SQLGetConnectAttr - Get the value of a connection attribute” on page 132
– “SQLGetConnectOption - Return current setting of a connect option” on page 133
– “SQLGetCursorName - Get cursor name” on page 135
– “SQLGetData - Get data from a column” on page 139
– “SQLGetDescField - Get descriptor field” on page 140
– “SQLGetDescRec - Get descriptor record” on page 143
– “SQLGetEnvAttr - Return current setting of an environment attribute” on page 151
– “SQLGetFunctions - Get functions” on page 152
– “SQLGetInfo - Get general information” on page 155
– “SQLGetLength - Retrieve length of a string value” on page 167
SQL call level interface
25
SQL CLI
– “SQLGetPosition - Return starting position of string” on page 169
– “SQLGetStmtAttr - Get the value of a statement attribute” on page 172
– “SQLGetStmtOption - Return current setting of a statement option” on page 174
– “SQLGetSubString - Retrieve portion of a string value” on page 176
– “SQLGetTypeInfo - Get data type information” on page 179
– “SQLSetConnectAttr - Set a connection attribute” on page 220
– “SQLSetConnectOption - Set connection option” on page 233
– “SQLSetCursorName - Set cursor name” on page 235
– “SQLSetDescField - Set a descriptor field” on page 237
– “SQLSetDescRec - Set a descriptor record” on page 239
– “SQLSetEnvAttr - Set environment attribute” on page 241
– “SQLSetParam - Set parameter” on page 246
– “SQLSetStmtAttr - Set a statement attribute” on page 247
– “SQLSetStmtOption - Set statement option” on page 253
v Working with handles
– “SQLAllocConnect - Allocate connection handle” on page 27
– “SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle” on page 30
– “SQLAllocHandle - Allocate handle” on page 33
– “SQLAllocStmt - Allocate a statement handle” on page 34
– “SQLCopyDesc - Copy description statement” on page 80
– “SQLFreeConnect - Free connection handle” on page 121
– “SQLFreeEnv - Free environment handle” on page 122
– “SQLFreeHandle - Free a handle” on page 123
– “SQLFreeStmt - Free (or reset) a statement handle” on page 124
– “SQLReleaseEnv - Release all environment resources” on page 217
26
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLAllocConnect
SQLAllocConnect - Allocate connection handle
SQLAllocConnect() allocates a connection handle and associated resources within the environment that is
identified by the input environment handle. Call SQLGetInfo() with fInfoType set to
SQL_ACTIVE_CONNECTIONS to query the number of connections that can be allocated at any one time.
SQLAllocEnv() must be called before calling this function.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLAllocConnect (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
henv,
*phdbc);
Function arguments
Table 5. SQLAllocConnect arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHENV
henv
Input
Environment handle
SQLHDBC *
phdbc
Output
Pointer to connection handle
Usage
The output connection handle is used by Db2 for i CLI to reference all information related to the
connection, including general status information, transaction state, and error information.
If the pointer to the connection handle (phdbc) points to a valid connection handle allocated by
SQLAllocConnect(), the original value is overwritten as a result of this call. This is an application
programming error and is not detected by Db2 for i CLI
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
If SQL_ERROR is returned, the phdbc argument is set to SQL_NULL_HDBC. The application should call
SQLError() with the environment handle (henv), with hdbc set to SQL_NULL_HDBC, and with hstmt set
to SQL_NULL_HSTMT.
Diagnostics
Table 6. SQLAllocConnect SQLSTATEs
CLI SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
phdbc is a null pointer.
Example
The following example shows how to obtain diagnostic information for the connection and the
environment. For more examples of using SQLError(), refer to “Example: Interactive SQL and the
equivalent Db2 for i CLI function calls” on page 314 for a complete listing of typical.c.
SQL call level interface
27
SQLAllocConnect
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*******************************************************************
** initialize
** - allocate environment handle
** - allocate connection handle
** - prompt for server, user id, & password
** - connect to server
*******************************************************************/
int initialize(SQLHENV *henv,
SQLHDBC *hdbc)
{
SQLCHAR
server[SQL_MAX_DSN_LENGTH],
uid[30],
pwd[30];
SQLRETURN rc;
SQLAllocEnv (henv);
/* allocate an environment handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv, *hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
*/
SQLAllocConnect (*henv, hdbc); /* allocate a connection handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv, *hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
*/
printf("Enter Server Name:\n");
gets(server);
printf("Enter User Name:\n");
gets(uid);
printf("Enter Password Name:\n");
gets(pwd);
if (uid[0] == ’\0’)
{ rc = SQLConnect (*hdbc,
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv,
}
else
{ rc = SQLConnect (*hdbc,
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv,
}
}/* end initialize */
server, SQL_NTS, NULL, SQL_NTS, NULL, SQL_NTS);
*hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
server, SQL_NTS, uid, SQL_NTS, pwd, SQL_NTS);
*hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
/*******************************************************************/
int check_error (SQLHENV
henv,
SQLHDBC
hdbc,
SQLHSTMT hstmt,
SQLRETURN frc)
{
SQLRETURN rc;
print_error(henv, hdbc, hstmt);
switch (frc){
case SQL_SUCCESS : break;
case SQL_ERROR :
case SQL_INVALID_HANDLE:
printf("\n ** FATAL ERROR, Attempting to rollback transaction **\n");
rc = SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_ROLLBACK);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS)
printf("Rollback Failed, Exiting application\n");
else
printf("Rollback Successful, Exiting application\n");
28
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLAllocConnect
terminate(henv, hdbc);
exit(frc);
break;
case SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO :
printf("\n ** Warning Message, application continuing\n");
break;
case SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND :
printf("\n ** No Data Found ** \n");
break;
default :
printf("\n ** Invalid Return Code ** \n");
printf(" ** Attempting to rollback transaction **\n");
SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_ROLLBACK);
terminate(henv, hdbc);
exit(frc);
break;
}
return(SQL_SUCCESS);
}
References
v “SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle” on page 30
v “SQLConnect - Connect to a data source” on page 77
v “SQLDisconnect - Disconnect from a data source” on page 91
v “SQLFreeConnect - Free connection handle” on page 121
v “SQLGetConnectAttr - Get the value of a connection attribute” on page 132
v “SQLSetConnectOption - Set connection option” on page 233
SQL call level interface
29
SQLAllocEnv
SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle
SQLAllocEnv() allocates an environment handle and associated resources.
An application must call this function before SQLAllocConnect() or any other Db2 for i CLI functions.
The henv value is passed in all later function calls that require an environment handle as input.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLAllocEnv (SQLHENV
*phenv);
Function arguments
Table 7. SQLAllocEnv arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHENV *
phenv
Output
Pointer to environment handle
Usage
There can be only one active environment at any one time per application. Any later call to
SQLAllocEnv() returns the existing environment handle.
By default, the first successful call to SQLFreeEnv() releases the resources associated with the handle. This
occurs no matter how many times SQLAllocEnv() is successfully called. If the environment attribute
SQL_ATTR_ENVHNDL_COUNTER is set to SQL_TRUE, SQLFreeEnv() must be called once for each
successful SQLAllocEnv() call before the resources associated with the handle are released.
To ensure that all Db2 for i CLI resources are kept active, the program that calls SQLAllocEnv() should
not stop or leave the stack. Otherwise, the application loses open cursors, statement handles, and other
resources it has allocated.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
If SQL_ERROR is returned and phenv is equal to SQL_NULL_HENV, then SQLError() cannot be called
because there is no handle with which to associate additional diagnostic information.
If the return code is SQL_ERROR and the pointer to the environment handle is not equal to
SQL_NULL_HENV, then the handle is a restricted handle. This means the handle can only be used in a call
to SQLError() to obtain more error information, or to SQLFreeEnv().
Diagnostics
Table 8. SQLAllocEnv SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*******************************************************
** file = basiccon.c
**
- demonstrate basic connection to two datasources.
30
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLAllocEnv
**
- error handling ignored for simplicity
**
** Functions used:
**
**
SQLAllocConnect SQLDisconnect
**
SQLAllocEnv
SQLFreeConnect
**
SQLConnect
SQLFreeEnv
**
**
********************************************************/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "sqlcli.h"
int
connect(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC * hdbc);
#define
#define
#define
#define
MAX_DSN_LENGTH
MAX_UID_LENGTH
MAX_PWD_LENGTH
MAX_CONNECTIONS
int
main()
{
SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
18
10
10
5
henv;
hdbc[MAX_CONNECTIONS];
/* allocate an environment handle
SQLAllocEnv(&henv);
*/
/* Connect to first data source */
connect(henv, &hdbc[0];);
/* Connect to second data source */
connect(henv, &hdbc[1];);
/********* Start Processing Step *************************/
/* allocate statement handle, execute statement, and so on
/********* End Processing Step ***************************/
*/
printf("\nDisconnecting .....\n");
SQLFreeConnect(hdbc[0]);
/* free first connection handle */
SQLFreeConnect(hdbc[1]);
/* free second connection handle */
SQLFreeEnv(henv);
/* free environment handle
*/
return (SQL_SUCCESS);
}
/********************************************************************
** connect - Prompt for connect options and connect
**
********************************************************************/
int
connect(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC * hdbc)
{
SQLRETURN
rc;
SQLCHAR
server[MAX_DSN_LENGTH + 1], uid[MAX_UID_LENGTH + 1],
pwd[MAX_PWD_LENGTH
+ 1];
SQLCHAR
buffer[255];
SQLSMALLINT
outlen;
printf("Enter Server Name:\n");
SQL call level interface
31
SQLAllocEnv
gets((char *)
printf("Enter
gets((char *)
printf("Enter
gets((char *)
server);
User Name:\n");
uid);
Password Name:\n");
pwd);
SQLAllocConnect(henv, hdbc);/* allocate a connection handle
*/
rc = SQLConnect(*hdbc, server, SQL_NTS, uid, SQL_NTS, pwd, SQL_NTS);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS) {
printf("Error while connecting to database\n");
return (SQL_ERROR);
} else {
printf("Successful Connect\n");
return (SQL_SUCCESS);
}
}
References
v “SQLAllocConnect - Allocate connection handle” on page 27
v “SQLFreeEnv - Free environment handle” on page 122
v “SQLAllocStmt - Allocate a statement handle” on page 34
32
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLAllocHandle
SQLAllocHandle - Allocate handle
SQLAllocHandle() allocates any type of handle.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLAllocHandle (SQLSMALLINT htype,
SQLINTEGER ihandle,
SQLINTEGER *handle);
Function arguments
Table 9. SQLAllocHandle arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
htype
Input
Type of handle to allocate. Must be either
SQL_HANDLE_ENV, SQL_HANDLE_DBC,
SQL_HANDLE_DESC, or
SQL_HANDLE_STMT.
SQLINTEGER
ihandle
Input
The handle that describes the context in
which the new handle is allocated; however,
if htype is SQL_HANDLE_ENV, this is
SQL_NULL_HANDLE.
SQLINTEGER *
handle
Output
Pointer to the handle.
Usage
This function is an alternative to the functions SQLAllocEnv(), SQLAllocConnect(), and SQLAllocStmt().
In addition, it can be used to allocate a descriptor handle.
If htype is SQL_HANDLE_ENV, ihandle must be SQL_NULL_HANDLE. If htype is SQL_HANDLE_DBC,
ihandle must be a valid environment handle. If htype is either SQL_HANDLE_DESC or
SQL_HANDLE_STMT, ihandle must be a valid connection handle.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
SQL_ERROR is returned if the argument handle is a null pointer.
Table 10. SQLAllocHandle SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY014
Too many handles
The maximum number of handles has been allocated.
References
v “SQLAllocConnect - Allocate connection handle” on page 27
v “SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle” on page 30
v “SQLAllocStmt - Allocate a statement handle” on page 34
SQL call level interface
33
SQLAllocStmt
SQLAllocStmt - Allocate a statement handle
SQLAllocStmt() allocates a new statement handle and associates it with the connection specified by the
connection handle. There is no defined limit to the number of statement handles that can be allocated at
any one time.
SQLConnect() must be called before calling this function.
This function must be called before SQLBindParam(), SQLPrepare(), SQLExecute(), SQLExecDirect(), or
any other function that has a statement handle as one of its input arguments.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLAllocStmt (SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
hdbc,
*phstmt);
Function arguments
Table 11. SQLAllocStmt arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Connection handle
SQLHSTMT *
phstmt
Output
Pointer to statement handle
Usage
Db2 for i CLI uses each statement handle to relate all the descriptors, result values, cursor information,
and status information to the SQL statement processed. Although each SQL statement must have a
statement handle, you can reuse the handles for different statements.
A call to this function requires that hdbc references an active database connection.
To process a positioned UPDATE or DELETE statement, the application must use different statement
handles for the SELECT statement and the UPDATE or DELETE statement.
If the input pointer to the statement handle (phstmt) points to a valid statement handle allocated by a
previous call to SQLAllocStmt(), then the original value is overwritten as a result of this call. This is an
application programming error and is not detected by Db2 for i CLI.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
If SQL_ERROR is returned, the phstmt argument is set to SQL_NULL_HSTMT. The application should call
SQLError() with the same hdbc argument and with the hstmt argument set to SQL_NULL_HSTMT.
Diagnostics
Table 12. SQLAllocStmt SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
08003
Connection not open
The connection specified by the hdbc argument is not
open. The connection must be established successfully
(and the connection must be open) for the driver to
allocate an hstmt.
34
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLAllocStmt
Table 12. SQLAllocStmt SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
phstmt is a null pointer.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108.
References
v “SQLConnect - Connect to a data source” on page 77
v “SQLFreeStmt - Free (or reset) a statement handle” on page 124
v “SQLGetStmtOption - Return current setting of a statement option” on page 174
v “SQLSetStmtOption - Set statement option” on page 253
SQL call level interface
35
SQLBindCol
SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable
SQLBindCol() is used to associate (bind) columns in a result set to application variables (storage buffers)
for all data types. Data is transferred from the Database Management System (DBMS) to the application
when SQLFetch() is called.
This function is also used to specify any data conversion that is required. It is called once for each
column in the result set that the application needs to retrieve.
SQLPrepare() or SQLExecDirect() is typically called before this function. It might also be necessary to call
SQLDescribeCol() or SQLColAttribute() to get the attributes of the corresponding result set column.
SQLBindCol() must be called before SQLFetch() to transfer data to the storage buffers that are specified by
this call.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLBindCol (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
icol,
fCType,
rgbValue,
cbValueMax,
*pcbValue);
Function arguments
Table 13. SQLBindCol arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
icol
Input
Number identifying the column. Columns
are numbered sequentially, from left to right,
starting at 1.
36
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindCol
Table 13. SQLBindCol arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
fCType
Input
Application data type for column number
icol in the result set. The following types are
supported:
v SQL_C_BIGINT
v SQL_C_BINARY
v SQL_C_BLOB
v SQL_C_BLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_C_CHAR
v SQL_C_CLOB
v SQL_C_CLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_C_DATE
v SQL_TYPE_DATE
v SQL_C_DATETIME
v SQL_C_DBCHAR
v SQL_C_DBCLOB
v SQL_C_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_C_DECFLOAT128
v SQL_C_DECFLOAT64
v SQL_C_DECFLOAT32
v SQL_C_DOUBLE
v SQL_C_FLOAT
v SQL_C_LONG
v SQL_C_SLONG
v SQL_C_REAL
v SQL_C_SHORT
v SQL_C_TIME
v SQL_C_TIMESTAMP
v SQL_C_STINYINT
v SQL_C_UTINYINT
v SQL_TYPE_TIME
v SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP
v SQL_C_WCHAR
Specifying SQL_DEFAULT causes data to be
transferred to its default data type; refer to
Table 3 on page 18 for more information.
The SQL data type constants , such as
SQL_DECIMAL, may also be used for the
application data type in many cases.
SQLPOINTER
rgbValue
Output (deferred)
Pointer to buffer where Db2 for i CLI is to
store the column data when the fetch occurs.
If rgbValue is null, the column is unbound.
SQL call level interface
37
SQLBindCol
Table 13. SQLBindCol arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLINTEGER
cbValueMax
Input
Size of rgbValue buffer in bytes available to
store the column data.
If fCType is either SQL_CHAR or
SQL_DEFAULT, then cbValueMax must be >
0 otherwise an error is returned.
If fCType is either SQL_DECIMAL or
SQL_NUMERIC, cbValueMax must actually
be a precision and scale. The method to
specify both values is to use (precision * 256)
+ scale. This is also the value returned as the
LENGTH of these data types when using
SQLColAttribute().
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
If fCType is either SQL_C_TIMESTAMP or
SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP, the precision will
be based on the value of cbValueMax. When
cbValueMax is between 20 and 32, the
precision will be cbValueMax - 20. When
cbValueMax is less than 20, the precision will
be 0. When cbValueMax is greater than 32,
the precision will be 12.
If fcType specifies any form of double-byte
character data, then cbValueMax must be the
number of double-byte characters, not the
number of bytes.
SQLINTEGER *
pcbValue
Output (deferred)
Pointer to value which indicates the number
of bytes Db2 for i CLI has available to return
in the rgbValue buffer.
SQLFetch() returns SQL_NULL_DATA in this
argument if the data value of the column is
null. SQL_NTS is returned in this argument
if the data value of the column is returned as
a null-terminated string.
Note:
For this function, both rgbValue and pcbValue are deferred outputs, meaning that the storage locations
these pointers point to are not updated until SQLFetch() is called. The locations referred to by these
pointers must remain valid until SQLFetch() is called.
Usage
The application calls SQLBindCol() once for each column in the result set that it wants to retrieve. When
SQLFetch() is called, the data in each of these bound columns is placed in the assigned location (given by
the pointers rgbValue and pcbValue).
The application can query the attributes (such as data type and length) of the column by first calling
SQLDescribeCol() or SQLColAttribute(). This information can then be used to specify the correct data
type of the storage locations, or to indicate data conversion to other data types. Refer to “Data types and
data conversion in Db2 for i CLI functions” on page 17 for more information.
38
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindCol
For subsequent Fetch requests, the application can change the binding of these columns or bind unbound
columns by calling FSQLBindCol(). The new binding does not apply to data fetched, it is used when the
next SQLFetch() is called. To unbind a single column, call SQLBindCol() with rgbValue set to NULL. To
unbind all the columns, the application should call SQLFreeStmt() with the fOption input set to
SQL_UNBIND.
Columns are identified by a number, assigned sequentially from left to right as they appear in the result
set, starting at 1. The number of columns in the result set can be determined by calling
SQLNumResultCols() or SQLColAttribute() with the FieldIdentifier argument set to SQL_DESC_COUNT.
All character data is treated as the default job coded character set identifier (CCSID) if the
SQL_ATTR_UTF8 environment attribute is not set to SQL_TRUE.
An application can choose to bind anywhere from zero columns to all columns. The data in the unbound
columns (and only the unbound columns) can be retrieved using SQLGetData() after SQLFetch() has been
called. SQLBindCol() is more efficient than SQLGetData(), and should be used whenever possible.
The application must ensure enough storage is allocated for the data to be retrieved. If the buffer is to
contain variable length data, the application must allocate as much storage as the maximum length of the
bound column requires; otherwise, the data might be truncated.
The default is null termination for output character strings. To change this you must set the
SQLSetEnvAttr() attribute SQL_ATTR_OUTPUT_NTS to SQL_FALSE. The output values for pcbValue after
a call to SQLFetch() behave in the following way for character data types:
v If the SQL_ATTR_OUTPUT_NTS attribute is set to SQL_TRUE (the default), then SQL_NTS is returned
in the pcbValue.
v If the SQL_ATTR_OUTPUT_NTS attribute is set to SQL_FALSE, then the value of cbValueMax, which is
the maximum bytes available, is returned in pcbValue.
v If truncation occurs, then the value of cbValueMax, which is the actual bytes available, is returned in
pcbValue.
If truncation occurs and the SQLSetEnvAttr() attribute SQL_ATTR_TRUNCATION_RTNC is set to
SQL_FALSE (which is the default), then SQL_SUCCESS is returned in the SQLFetch() return code. If
truncation occurs and the attribute is SQL_TRUE, then SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO is returned.
SQL_SUCCESS is returned in both cases if no truncation occurs.
Truncation occurs when argument cbValueMax does not allocate space for the amount of fetched data. If
the environment is set to run with null terminated strings, make sure to allocate space for the additional
byte in cbValueMax. For additional truncation information, refer to “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page
108.
Db2 for i CLI differs from DB2 CLI for Linux, UNIX, and Windows in the way it returns length
information in the pcbValue argument. After a fetch for an SQL_VARCHAR column, Db2 for i CLI returns
the bytes that are fetched in the first 2 bytes of the VARCHAR structure that is bound. Db2 for i CLI does
not return the length in pcbValue as it does for SQL_CHAR. This is different from DB2 CLI for Linux,
UNIX, and Windows, which have no representation of C VARCHAR and include the length information
in the pcbValue buffer when the application binds to the SQL_CHAR column.
For decimal floating point data types, a precision of 32, 64, or 128 can be specified by using the default
symbolic C data type constants. For example, to specify a decimal floating point data type with a
precision of 128 bytes, fCType can be set to SQL_C_DECIMAL128.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
SQL call level interface
39
SQLBindCol
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 14. SQLBindCol SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY002
Column number that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument icol is 0.
HY003
Program type out of range
fCType is not a valid data type.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
rgbValue is a null pointer.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY014
Too many handles
The maximum number of handles has been allocated,
and use of this function requires an additional descriptor
handle.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The driver recognizes, but does not support the data
type specified in the argument fCType (see also HY003).
The value specified for the argument icol exceeded the
maximum number of columns supported by the data
source.
The value specified for the argument cbValueMax is less
than 1, and the argument fCType is either SQL_CHAR or
SQL_DEFAULT.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108.
References
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
40
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindFileToCol
SQLBindFileToCol - Bind LOB file reference to LOB column
SQLBindFileToCol() is used to associate (bind) a LOB column in a result set to a file reference or an array
of file references. In this way, data in the LOB column can be transferred directly into a file when each
row is fetched for the statement handle.
The LOB file reference arguments (file name, file name length, file reference options) refer to a file within
the application's environment (on the client). Before fetching each row, the application must make sure
that these variables contain the name of a file, the length of the file name, and a file option
(new/overwrite/append). These values can be changed between each fetch.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLBindFileToCol (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
StatementHandle,
ColumnNumber,
*FileName,
*FileNameLength,
*FileOptions,
MaxFileNameLength,
*StringLength,
*IndicatorValue);
Function arguments
Table 15. SQLBindFileToCol arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
ColumnNumber
Input
Number identifying the column. Columns are
numbered sequentially, from left to right, starting at
1.
SQLCHAR *
FileName
Input
(deferred)
Pointer to the location that contains the file name or
an array of file names at the time of the next fetch
using the StatementHandle. This is either the complete
path name of the file(s) or a relative file name(s). If
relative file name(s) are provided, they are appended
to the current path of the running application. This
pointer cannot be NULL.
SQLSMALLINT *
FileNameLength
Input
(deferred)
Pointer to the location that contains the length of the
file name (or an array of lengths) at the time the next
fetch using the StatementHandle. If this pointer is
NULL, then a length of SQL_NTS is assumed.
The maximum value of the file name length is 255.
SQL call level interface
41
SQLBindFileToCol
Table 15. SQLBindFileToCol arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLINTEGER *
FileOptions
Input
(deferred)
Pointer to the location that contains the file option to
be used when writing the file at the time of the next
fetch using the StatementHandle. The following
FileOptions are supported:
SQL_FILE_CREATE
Create a new file. If a file by this name
already exists, SQL_ERROR is returned.
SQL_FILE_OVERWRITE
If the file already exists, overwrite it.
Otherwise, create a new file.
SQL_FILE_APPEND
If the file already exists, append the data to
it. Otherwise, create a new file.
Only one option can be chosen per file, there is no
default.
SQLSMALLINT
MaxFileNameLength
Input
This specifies the length of the FileName buffer.
SQLINTEGER *
StringLength
Output
(deferred)
Pointer to the location that contains the length in
bytes of the LOB data that is returned. If this pointer
is NULL, nothing is returned.
SQLINTEGER *
IndicatorValue
Output
(deferred)
Pointer to the location that contains an indicator
value.
Usage
The application calls SQLBindFileToCol() once for each column that should be transferred directly to a
file when a row is fetched. LOB data is written directly to the file without any data conversion, and
without appending null-terminators.
FileName, FileNameLength, and FileOptions must be set before each fetch. When SQLFetch() or
SQLFetchScroll() is called, the data for any column which has been bound to a LOB file reference is
written to the file or files pointed to by that file reference. Errors associated with the deferred input
argument values of SQLBindFileToCol() are reported at fetch time. The LOB file reference, and the
deferred StringLength and IndicatorValue output arguments are updated between fetch operations.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 16. SQLBindFileToCol SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
58004
Unexpected system failure
Unrecoverable system error.
42
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindFileToCol
Table 16. SQLBindFileToCol SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY002
Column number that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument icol is less than 1.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
FileName, StringLength, or FileOptions is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called while in a data-at-processing
(SQLParamData(), SQLPutData()) operation.
The value specified for the argument icol exceeded the
maximum number of columns supported by the data
source.
The function is called while within a BEGIN
COMPOUND and END COMPOUND SQL operation.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
HY090
String or buffer length that
is not valid
The value specified for the argument MaxFileNameLength
is less than 0.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The application is currently connected to a data source
that does not support large objects.
Restrictions
This function is not available when connected to DB2 servers that do not support Large Object data
types.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
v “SQLBindFileToParam - Bind LOB file reference to LOB parameter” on page 44
SQL call level interface
43
SQLBindFileToParam
SQLBindFileToParam - Bind LOB file reference to LOB parameter
SQLBindFileToParam() is used to associate (bind) a parameter marker in an SQL statement to a file
reference or an array of file references. In this way, data from the file can be transferred directly into a
LOB column when that statement is subsequently processed.
The LOB file reference arguments (file name, file name length, file reference options) refer to a file within
the application's environment (on the client). Before calling SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect(), the
application must make sure that this information is available in the deferred input buffers. These values
can be changed between SQLExecute() calls.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLBindFileToParam (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
StatementHandle,
ParameterNumber,
DataType,
*FileName,
*FileNameLength,
*FileOptions,
MaxFileNameLength,
*IndicatorValue);
Function arguments
Table 17. SQLBindFileToParam arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
ParameterNumber
Input
Parameter marker number. Parameters are numbered
sequentially, from left to right, starting at 1.
SQLSMALLINT
DataType
Input
SQL data type of the column. The data type must be
one of:
v SQL_BLOB
v SQL_CLOB
v SQL_DBCLOB
SQLCHAR *
FileName
Input
(deferred)
Pointer to the location that contains the file name or
an array of file names when the statement
(StatementHandle) is processed. This is either the
complete path name of the file or a relative file
name. If a relative file name is provided, it is
appended to the current path of the client process.
This argument cannot be NULL.
SQLSMALLINT *
FileNameLength
Input
(deferred)
Pointer to the location that contains the length of the
file name (or an array of lengths) at the time the next
SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect() function is run
using the StatementHandle.
If this pointer is NULL, then a length of SQL_NTS is
assumed.
The maximum value of the file name length is 255.
44
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindFileToParam
Table 17. SQLBindFileToParam arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLINTEGER *
FileOptions
Input
(deferred)
Pointer to the location that contains the file option
(or an array of file options) to be used when reading
the file. The location is accessed when the statement
(StatementHandle) is processed. Only one option is
supported (and it must be specified):
SQL_FILE_READ
A regular file that can be opened, read and
closed. (The length is computed when the
file is opened)
This pointer cannot be NULL.
SQLSMALLINT
MaxFileNameLength
Input
This specifies the length of the FileName buffer. If the
application calls SQLParamOptions() to specify
multiple values for each parameter, this is the length
of each element in the FileName array.
SQLINTEGER *
IndicatorValue
Input
(deferred),
output
(deferred)
Pointer to the location that contains an indicator
value (or array of values), which is set to
SQL_NULL_DATA if the data value of the parameter
is to be null. It must be set to 0 (or the pointer can
be set to null) when the data value is not null.
Usage
The application calls SQLBindFileToParam() once for each parameter marker whose value should be
obtained directly from a file when a statement is processed. Before the statement is processed, FileName,
FileNameLength, and FileOptions values must be set. When the statement is processed, the data for any
parameter that has been bound with SQLBindFileToParam() is read from the referenced file and passed to
the data source.
A LOB parameter marker can be associated with (bound to) an input file using SQLBindFileToParam(), or
with a stored buffer using SQLBindParameter(). The most recent bind parameter function call determines
the type of binding that is in effect.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 18. SQLBindFileToParam SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
58004
Unexpected system failure
Unrecoverable system error.
HY004
SQL data type out of range
The value specified for DataType is not a valid SQL type for this
function call.
HY009
Argument value that is not valid FileName, FileOptions, or FileNameLength is a null pointer.
SQL call level interface
45
SQLBindFileToParam
Table 18. SQLBindFileToParam SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called while in a data-at-processing
(SQLParamData()or SQLPutData()) operation.
The function is called while within a BEGIN COMPOUND and
END COMPOUND SQL operation.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HY090
String or buffer length that is not The value specified for the input argument MaxFileNameLength is
valid
less than 0.
HY093
Parameter number that is not
valid
The value specified for ParameterNumber is either less than 1 or
greater than the maximum number of parameters supported.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The data source does not support large object data types.
Restrictions
This function is not available when the application is connected to DB2 servers that do not support large
object data types.
References
v “SQLBindParam - Bind a buffer to a parameter marker” on page 47
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLParamOptions - Specify an input array for a parameter” on page 198
46
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindParam
SQLBindParam - Bind a buffer to a parameter marker
SQLBindParam() has been deprecated and replaced by SQLBindParameter(). Although this version of Db2
for i CLI continues to support SQLBindParam(), it is recommended that you begin using
SQLBindParameter() in your Db2 for i CLI programs so that they conform to the latest standards.
SQLBindParam() binds an application variable to a parameter marker in an SQL statement. This function
can also be used to bind an application variable to a parameter of a stored procedure CALL statement
where the parameter can be input or output.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLBindParam (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
ipar,
fCType,
fSqlType,
cbParamDef,
ibScale,
rgbValue,
*pcbValue);
Function arguments
Table 19. SQLBindParam arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
ipar
Input
Parameter marker number, ordered
sequentially left to right, starting at 1.
SQL call level interface
47
SQLBindParam
Table 19. SQLBindParam arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
fCType
Input
Application data type of the parameter. The
following types are supported:
v SQL_BIGINT
v SQL_BINARY
v SQL_BLOB
v SQL_BLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_CHAR
v SQL_CLOB
v SQL_CLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_DATETIME
v SQL_DBCLOB
v SQL_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_DECFLOAT
v SQL_DECIMAL
v SQL_DOUBLE
v SQL_FLOAT
v SQL_GRAPHIC
v SQL_INTEGER
v SQL_NUMERIC
v SQL_REAL
v SQL_SMALLINT
v SQL_TYPE_DATE
v SQL_TYPE_TIME
v SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP
v SQL_VARBINARY
v SQL_VARCHAR
v SQL_VARGRAPHIC
v SQL_WCHAR
v SQL_WVARCHAR
Specifying SQL_DEFAULT causes data to be
transferred from its default application data
type to the type indicated in fSqlType.
48
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindParam
Table 19. SQLBindParam arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
fSqlType
Input
SQL data type of the parameter. The
supported types are:
v SQL_BIGINT
v SQL_BINARY
v SQL_BLOB
v SQL_BLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_CHAR
v SQL_CLOB
v SQL_CLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_DATETIME
v SQL_DBCLOB
v SQL_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_DECFLOAT
v SQL_DECIMAL
v SQL_DOUBLE
v SQL_FLOAT
v SQL_GRAPHIC
v SQL_INTEGER
v SQL_NUMERIC
v SQL_REAL
v SQL_SMALLINT
v SQL_TYPE_DATE
v SQL_TYPE_TIME
v SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP
v SQL_VARBINARY
v SQL_VARCHAR
v SQL_VARGRAPHIC
v SQL_WCHAR
v SQL_WVARCHAR
SQLINTEGER
cbParamDef
Input
Precision of the corresponding parameter
marker.
v
If fCType denotes a single-byte character
string (for example, SQL_CHAR), this is
the maximum length in bytes sent for this
parameter. This length includes the
null-termination character.
v If fCType denotes a double-byte character
string (for example, SQL_GRAPHIC), this
is the maximum length in double-byte
characters for this parameter.
v If fCType denotes SQL_DECIMAL or
SQL_NUMERIC, this is the maximum
decimal precision.
|
|
|
v If fCType denotes SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP,
this is the maximum length in bytes sent
for this parameter.
v
Otherwise, this argument is unused.
SQL call level interface
49
SQLBindParam
Table 19. SQLBindParam arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
ibScale
Input
Scale of the corresponding parameter if
fSqlType is SQL_DECIMAL or
SQL_NUMERIC. If fSqlType is
SQL_TIMESTAMP, this is the number of
digits to the right of the decimal point in the
character representation of a timestamp (for
example, the scale of yyyy-mm-dd
hh:mm:ss.fff is 3).
Other than for the fSqlType values mentioned
here, ibScale is unused.
SQLPOINTER
rgbValue
Input (deferred)
or
output (deferred)
At processing time, if pcbValue does not
contain SQL_NULL_DATA or
SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC, then rgbValue points
to a buffer that contains the actual data for
the parameter.
If pcbValue contains SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC,
then rgbValue is an application-defined 32-bit
value that is associated with this parameter.
This 32-bit value is returned to the
application through a later SQLParamData()
call.
SQLINTEGER *
pcbValue
Input (deferred), or
output (deferred), or
both
A variable whose value is interpreted when
the statement is processed:
v If a null value is used as the parameter,
pcbValue must contain the value
SQL_NULL_DATA.
v If the dynamic argument is supplied at
execute-time by calling ParamData() and
PutData(), pcbValue must contain the value
SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC.
v If fcType is SQL_CHAR and the data in
rgbValue contains a null-terminated string,
pcbValue must either contain the length of
the data in rgbValue or contain the value
SQL_NTS.
v If fcType is SQL_CHAR and the data in
rgbValue is not null-terminated, pcbValue
must contain the length of the data in
rgbValue.
v If fcType is a LOB type, pcbValue must
contain the length of the data in rgbValue.
This length value must be specified in
bytes, not the number of double byte
characters.
v Otherwise, pcbValue must be zero.
Usage
When SQLBindParam() is used to bind an application variable to an output parameter for a stored
procedure, Db2 for i CLI provides some performance enhancement if the rgbValue buffer is placed
consecutively in memory after the pcbValue buffer.
50
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindParam
For decimal floating point data types, a precision of 32, 64, or 128 can be specified by using the default
symbolic C data type constants. For example, to specify a decimal floating point data type with a
precision of 128 bytes, fCType can be set to SQL_C_DECIMAL128.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 20. SQLBindParam SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
07006
Restricted data type
attribute violation
Same as SQLSetParam().
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY003
Program type out of range
Same as SQLSetParam().
HY004
SQL data type out of range
Same as SQLSetParam().
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
Both rgbValue and pcbValue are null pointers, or ipar is
less than one.
HY010
Function sequence error
Function is called after SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect()
has returned SQL_NEED_DATA, but data has not been
sent for all data-at-execution parameters.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY014
Too many handles
The maximum number of handles has been allocated.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
References
“SQLBindParameter - Bind a parameter marker to a buffer” on page 52
SQL call level interface
51
SQLBindParameter
SQLBindParameter - Bind a parameter marker to a buffer
SQLBindParameter() is used to associate (bind) parameter markers in an SQL statement to application
variables. Data is transferred from the application to the Database Management System (DBMS) when
SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect() is called. Data conversion might occur when the data is transferred.
This function must also be used to bind application storage to a parameter of a stored procedure where
the parameter can be input, output, or both.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLBindParameter(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
StatementHandle,
ParameterNumber,
InputOutputType,
ValueType,
ParameterType,
ColumnSize,
DecimalDigits,
ParameterValuePtr,
BufferLength,
*StrLen_or_IndPtr);
Function arguments
Table 21. SQLBindParameter arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
ParameterNumber
Input
Parameter marker number, ordered sequentially
left to right, starting at 1.
52
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindParameter
Table 21. SQLBindParameter arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
InputOutputType
Input
The type of parameter. The value of the
SQL_DESC_PARAMETER_TYPE field of the
implementation parameter descriptor is also set
to this argument. The supported types are:
v SQL_PARAM_INPUT: The parameter marker
is associated with an SQL statement that is
not a stored procedure CALL; or, it marks an
input parameter of a stored procedure.
When the statement is processed, the actual
data value for the parameter is sent to the
data source: the ParameterValuePtr buffer must
contain valid input data values; the
StrLen_or_IndPtr buffer must contain the
corresponding length value or SQL_NTS,
SQL_NULL_DATA, or (if the value should be
sent via SQLParamData() and SQLPutData())
SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC.
v SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT: The
parameter marker is associated with an
input/output parameter of a stored
procedure.
When the statement is processed, actual data
value for the parameter is sent to the data
source: the ParameterValuePtr buffer must
contain valid input data values; the
StrLen_or_IndPtr buffer must contain the
corresponding length value or SQL_NTS,
SQL_NULL_DATA, or (if the value should be
sent via SQLParamData() and SQLPutData())
SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC.
v SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT: The parameter
marker is associated with an output
parameter of a stored procedure.
After the statement is processed, data for the
output parameter is returned to the
application buffer specified by
ParameterValuePtr and StrLen_or_IndPtr,
unless both are NULL pointers, in which case
the output data is discarded. If an output
parameter does not have a return value then
StrLen_or_IndPtr is set to SQL_NULL_DATA.
SQL call level interface
53
SQLBindParameter
Table 21. SQLBindParameter arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
ValueType
Input
C data type of the parameter. The following
types are supported:
v SQL_BIGINT
v SQL_BINARY
v SQL_BLOB
v SQL_BLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_CHAR
v SQL_CLOB
v SQL_CLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_DATETIME
v SQL_DBCLOB
v SQL_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_DECFLOAT
v SQL_DECIMAL
v SQL_DOUBLE
v SQL_FLOAT
v SQL_GRAPHIC
v SQL_INTEGER
v SQL_NUMERIC
v SQL_REAL
v SQL_SMALLINT
v SQL_TYPE_DATE
v SQL_TYPE_TIME
v SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP
v SQL_VARBINARY
v SQL_VARCHAR
v SQL_VARGRAPHIC
v SQL_WCHAR
v SQL_WVARCHAR
Specifying SQL_C_DEFAULT causes data to be
transferred from its default C data type to the
type indicated in ParameterType.
54
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindParameter
Table 21. SQLBindParameter arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
ParameterType
Input
SQL data type of the parameter. The supported
types are:
v SQL_BIGINT
v SQL_BINARY
v SQL_BLOB
v SQL_BLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_CHAR
v SQL_CLOB
v SQL_CLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_DATETIME
v SQL_DBCLOB
v SQL_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_DECFLOAT
v SQL_DECIMAL
v SQL_DOUBLE
v SQL_FLOAT
v SQL_GRAPHIC
v SQL_INTEGER
v SQL_NUMERIC
v SQL_REAL
v SQL_SMALLINT
v SQL_TYPE_DATE
v SQL_TYPE_TIME
v SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP
v SQL_VARBINARY
v SQL_VARCHAR
v SQL_VARGRAPHIC
v SQL_WCHAR
v SQL_WVARCHAR
v SQL_XML
SQLINTEGER
ColumnSize
Input
Precision of the corresponding parameter
marker.
|
v If ValueType denotes a binary or single-byte
character string (for example, SQL_CHAR),
this is the maximum length in bytes for this
parameter marker.
|
v If ValueType denotes a double-byte character
string (for example, SQL_GRAPHIC), this is
the maximum length in double-byte
characters for this parameter.
|
v If ValueType denotes SQL_DECIMAL or
SQL_NUMERIC, this is the maximum
decimal precision.
|
|
|
v If ValueType denotes SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP,
this is the maximum length in bytes sent for
this parameter.
v Otherwise, this argument is ignored.
SQL call level interface
55
SQLBindParameter
Table 21. SQLBindParameter arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
DecimalDigits
Input
Scale of the corresponding parameter if
ParameterType is SQL_DECIMAL or
SQL_NUMERIC. If ParameterType is
SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP, this is the number of
digits to the right of the decimal point in the
character representation of a timestamp (for
example, the scale of yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.fff
is 3).
Other than for the ParameterType values
mentioned here, DecimalDigits is ignored.
SQLPOINTER
ParameterValuePtr
Input
(deferred),
or output
(deferred),
or both
v On input (InputOutputType set to
SQL_PARAM_INPUT, or
SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT), the
following situations are true:
At processing time, if StrLen_or_IndPtr does
not contain SQL_NULL_DATA or
SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC, then ParameterValuePtr
points to a buffer that contains the actual
data for the parameter.
If StrLen_or_IndPtr contains
SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC, then ParameterValuePtr
is an application-defined 32-bit value that is
associated with this parameter. This 32-bit
value is returned to the application via a
subsequent SQLParamData() call.
If SQLParamOptions() is called to specify
multiple values for the parameter, then
ParameterValuePtr is a pointer to an input
buffer array of BufferLength bytes.
v On output (InputOutputType set to
SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT, or
SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT), the
following situations are true:
ParameterValuePtr points to the buffer where
the output parameter value of the stored
procedure is stored.
If InputOutputType is set to
SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT, and both
ParameterValuePtr and StrLen_or_IndPtr are
NULL pointers, then the output parameter
value or the return value from the stored
procedure call is discarded.
SQLINTEGER
56
BufferLength
IBM i: SQL call level interface
Input
Not used.
SQLBindParameter
Table 21. SQLBindParameter arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLINTEGER *
StrLen_or_IndPtr
Input
(deferred),
output
(deferred)
If this is an input or input/output parameter,
this is the pointer to the location that contains
(when the statement is processed) the length of
the parameter marker value stored at
ParameterValuePtr.
To specify a null value for a parameter marker,
this storage location must contain
SQL_NULL_DATA.
To specify an extended indicator value for a
parameter marker, this storage location must
contain SQL_UNASSIGNED or
SQL_DEFAULT_PARAM. The
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_INDICATORS
connection attribute must be set to SQL_TRUE
for either of these values to be honored.
If ValueType is SQL_C_CHAR, this storage
location must contain either the exact length of
the data stored at ParameterValuePtr, or
SQL_NTS if the content at ParameterValuePtr is
null-terminated.
For all values of ParameterValuePtr, if ValueType
indicates LOB data, this storage location must
contain the length of the data stored at
ParameterValuePtr. This length value must be
specified in bytes, not the number of
double-byte characters.
If ValueType indicates character data (explicitly,
or implicitly using SQL_C_DEFAULT), and this
pointer is set to NULL, it is assumed that the
application always provides a null-terminated
string in ParameterValuePtr. This also implies
that this parameter marker never has a null
value.
If ValueType specifies any form of double-byte
character data, then StrLen_or_IndPtr must be
the number of double-byte characters, not the
number of bytes.
When SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect() is
called, and StrLen_or_IndPtr points to a value of
SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC, the data for the
parameter is sent with SQLPutData(). This
parameter is referred to as a data-at-execution
parameter.
Usage
A parameter marker is represented by a "?" character in an SQL statement and is used to indicate a
position in the statement where an application supplied value is to be substituted when the statement is
processed. This value is obtained from an application variable.
SQL call level interface
57
SQLBindParameter
The application must bind a variable to each parameter marker in the SQL statement before executing the
SQL statement. For this function, ParameterValuePtr and StrLen_or_IndPtr are deferred arguments; the
storage locations must be valid and contain input data values when the statement is processed. This
means either keeping the SQLExecDirect() or SQLExecute() call in the same procedure scope as the
SQLBindParameter() calls, or these storage locations must be dynamically allocated or declared statically
or globally.
Parameter markers are referred to by number (ParameterNumber) and are numbered sequentially from left
to right as the corresponding ? appears in the statement text, starting at 1.
All parameters bound by this function remain in effect until SQLFreeStmt() is called with either the
SQL_DROP or SQL_RESET_PARAMS option, or until SQLBindParameter() is called again for the same
parameter ParameterNumber number.
After the SQL statement and the results have been processed, the application might want to reuse the
statement handle to process a different SQL statement. If the parameter marker specifications are different
(number of parameters, length or type), then SQLFreeStmt() should be called with SQL_RESET_PARAMS
to reset or clear the parameter bindings.
The C buffer data type that is given by ValueType must be compatible with the SQL data type that is
indicated by ParameterType, or an error occurs.
Because the data in the variables referenced by ParameterValuePtr and StrLen_or_IndPtr is not verified
until the statement is processed, data content or format errors are not detected or reported until
SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect() is called.
SQLBindParameter() essentially extends the capability of the SQLSetParam() function by providing a
method of specifying whether a parameter is input, input and output, or output. This information is
necessary for the proper handling of parameters for stored procedures.
The InputOutputType argument specifies the type of the parameter. All parameters in the SQL statements
that do not call procedures are input parameters. Parameters in stored procedure calls can be input,
input/output, or output parameters. Even though the DB2 stored procedure argument convention
typically implies that all procedure arguments are input/output, the application programmer can still
choose to specify more exactly the input or output nature on the SQLBindParameter() to follow a more
rigorous coding style. Also, note that these types should be consistent with the parameter types specified
when the stored procedure is registered with the SQL CREATE PROCEDURE statement.
v If an application cannot determine the type of a parameter in a procedure call, set InputOutputType to
SQL_PARAM_INPUT; if the data source returns a value for the parameter, Db2 for i CLI discards it.
v If an application has marked a parameter as SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT or
SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT and the data source does not return a value, Db2 for i CLI sets the
StrLen_or_IndPtr buffer to SQL_NULL_DATA.
v If an application marks a parameter as SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT, data for the parameter is returned to
the application after the CALL statement has been processed. If the ParameterValuePtr and
StrLen_or_IndPtr arguments are both null pointers, Db2 for i CLI discards the output value. If the data
source does not return a value for an output parameter, Db2 for i CLI sets the StrLen_or_IndPtr buffer
to SQL_NULL_DATA.
v For this function, both ParameterValuePtr and StrLen_or_IndPtr are deferred arguments. In the case
where InputOutputType is set to SQL_PARAM_INPUT or SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT, the storage
locations must be valid and contain input data values when the statement is processed. This means
either keeping the SQLExecDirect() or SQLExecute() call in the same procedure scope as the
SQLBindParameter() calls, or, these storage locations must be dynamically allocated or statically /
globally declared.
58
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLBindParameter
Similarly, if InputOutputType is set to SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT or SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT, the
ParameterValuePtr and StrLen_or_IndPtr buffer locations must remain valid until the CALL statement
has been processed.
When SQLBindParameter() is used to bind an application variable to an output parameter for a stored
procedure, Db2 for i CLI can provide some performance enhancement if the ParameterValuePtr buffer is
placed consecutively in memory after the StrLen_or_IndPtr buffer. For example:
struct { SQLINTEGER StrLen_or_IndPtr;
SQLCHAR
ParameterValuePtr[MAX_BUFFER];
} column;
For decimal floating point data types, a precision of 32, 64, or 128 can be specified by using the default
symbolic C data type constants. For example, to specify a decimal floating point data type with a
precision of 128 bytes, ValueType can be set to SQL_C_DECIMAL128.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 22. SQLBindParameter SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
07006
Conversion not valid
The conversion from the data value identified by the ValueType
argument to the data type identified by the ParameterType
argument is not a meaningful conversion. (For example,
conversion from SQL_C_DATE to SQL_DOUBLE.)
40003 08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between the application and data source
fails before the function is completed.
58004
Unexpected system failure
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY003
Program type out of range
The value specified by the argument ParameterNumber not a valid
data type or SQL_C_DEFAULT.
HY004
SQL data type out of range
The value specified for the argument ParameterType is not a valid
SQL data type.
HY009
Argument value not valid
The argument ParameterValuePtr is a null pointer and the
argument StrLen_or_IndPtr is a null pointer, and InputOutputType
is not SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT.
HY010
Function sequence error
Function is called after SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect() has
returned SQL_NEED_DATA, but data has not been sent for all
data-at-execution parameters.
HY013
Unexpected memory handling
error
Db2 for i CLI is unable to access memory required to support the
processing or completion of the function.
HY014
Too many handles
The maximum number of handles has been allocated.
HY021
Inconsistent descriptor
information
The descriptor information checked during a consistency check is
not consistent.
HY090
String or buffer length not valid
The value specified for the BufferLength argument is less than 0.
SQL call level interface
59
SQLBindParameter
Table 22. SQLBindParameter SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY093
Parameter number not valid
The value specified for the ValueType argument is less than 1 or
greater than the maximum number of parameters supported by
the data source.
HY094
Scale value not valid
The value specified for ParameterType is either SQL_DECIMAL or
SQL_NUMERIC and the value specified for DecimalDigits is less
than 0 or greater than the value for the argument ParamDef
(precision).
The value specified for ParameterType is SQL_C_TIMESTAMP and
the value for ParameterType is either SQL_CHAR or
SQL_VARCHAR and the value for DecimalDigits is less than 0 or
greater than 12.
HY104
Precision value not valid
The value specified for ParameterType is either SQL_DECIMAL or
SQL_NUMERIC and the value specified for ParamDef is less than
1.
HY105
Parameter type not valid
InputOutputType is not one of SQL_PARAM_INPUT,
SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT, or SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT.
HYC00
Driver not capable
Db2 for i CLI or data source does not support the conversion
specified by the combination of the value specified for the
argument ValueType and the value specified for the argument
ParameterType.
The value specified for the argument ParameterType is not
supported by either Db2 for i CLI or the data source.
References
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLParamData - Get next parameter for which a data value is needed” on page 196
v “SQLPutData - Pass data value for a parameter” on page 215
60
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLCancel
SQLCancel - Cancel statement
SQLCancel() is used to end the processing of an SQL statement operation that is running synchronously.
To cancel the function, the application calls SQLCancel() with the same statement handle that is used by
the target function, but on a different thread. How the function is canceled depends on the operating
system.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLCancel (SQLHSTMT
hstmt);
Function arguments
Table 23. SQLCancel arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle
Usage
A successful return code indicates that the implementation has accepted the cancel request; it does not
ensure that the processing is canceled.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_ERROR
Diagnostics
Table 24. SQLCancel SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009 *
Argument value that is not
valid
hstmt is not a statement handle.
Restrictions
Db2 for i CLI does not support asynchronous statement processing.
SQL call level interface
61
SQLCloseCursor
SQLCloseCursor - Close cursor statement
SQLCloseCursor() closes the open cursor on a statement handle.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLCloseCursor (SQLHSTMT
hstmt);
Function arguments
Table 25. SQLCloseCursor arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle
Usage
Calling SQLCloseCursor() closes any cursor associated with the statement handle and discards any
pending results. If no open cursor is associated with the statement handle, the function has no effect.
If the statement handle references a stored procedure that has multiple result sets, the SQLCloseCursor()
closes only the current result set. Any additional result sets remain open and usable.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_ERROR
Diagnostics
Table 26. SQLCloseCursor SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
08003 *
Connection not open
The connection for hstmt is not established.
HY009 *
Argument value that is not
valid
hstmt is not a statement handle.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
62
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLColAttribute
SQLColAttribute - Return a column attribute
SQLColAttribute() obtains an attribute for a column of the result set, and is also used to determine the
number of columns. SQLColAttribute() is a more extensible alternative to the SQLDescribeCol() function.
Either SQLPrepare() or SQLExecDirect() must be called before calling this function.
This function (or SQLDescribeCol()) must be called before SQLBindCol(), if the application does not know
the various attributes (such as data type and length) of the column.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLColAttributeW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLColAttribute (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
StatementHandle,
ColumnNumber,
FieldIdentifier,
CharacterAttributePtr,
BufferLength,
*StringLengthPtr,
NumericAttributePtr);
Function arguments
Table 27. SQLColAttribute arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
ColumnNumber
Input
The number of the record in the IRD from
which the field value is to be retrieved. This
argument corresponds to the column number
of result data, ordered sequentially from left
to right, starting at 1. Columns can be
described in any order.
Column 0 can be specified in this argument,
but all values except SQL_DESC_TYPE and
SQL_DESC_OCTET_LENGTH will return
undefined values.
SQLSMALLINT
FieldIdentifier
Input
The field in row ColumnNumber of the IRD
that is to be returned Table 28 on page 64.
SQLPOINTER
CharacterAttributePtr
Output
Pointer to a buffer in which to return the
value in the FieldIdentifier field of the
ColumnNumber row of the IRD, if the field
is a character string. Otherwise, the field is
unused.
SQLSMALLINT
BufferLength
Input
Number of SQLCHAR elements (or
SQLWCHAR elements for the Unicode
variant of this function) needed to store the
*CharacterAttributePtr buffer, if the field is a
character string. Otherwise, the field is
ignored.
SQL call level interface
63
SQLColAttribute
Table 27. SQLColAttribute arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT *
StringLengthPtr
Output
Pointer to a buffer in which to return the
total number of bytes (excluding the byte
count of the null termination character for
character data) available to return in
*CharacterAttributePtr.
For character data, if the number of bytes
available to return is greater than or equal to
BufferLength, the descriptor information in
*CharacterAttributePtr is truncated to
BufferLength minus the length of a null
termination character and is null-terminated
by DB2 CLI.
For all other types of data, the value of
BufferLength is ignored and DB2 CLI
assumes the size of *CharacterAttributePtr is
32 bits.
SQLPOINTER
NumericAttributePtr
Output
Pointer to a buffer in which to return the
value in the FieldIdentifier field of the
ColumnNumber row of the IRD, if the field
is a numeric descriptor type, such as
SQL_DESC_COLUMN_LENGTH. Otherwise,
the field is unused.
Table 28. Field Identifier descriptor types
Descriptor
Type
Description
SQL_DESC_AUTO_INCREMENT
INTEGER
This is SQL_TRUE if the column can be incremented
automatically upon insertion of a new row to the
table. SQL_FALSE if the column cannot be
incremented automatically.
SQL_DESC_BASE_COLUMN
CHAR(128)
The name of the actual column in the underlying
table over which this column is built.
For this attribute to be retrieved, the attribute
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_COL_INFO must have
been set to SQL_TRUE for either the statement
handle or the connection handle.
SQL_DESC_BASE_SCHEMA
CHAR(128)
The schema name of the underlying table over
which this column is built.
For this attribute to be retrieved, the attribute
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_COL_INFO must have
been set to SQL_TRUE for either the statement
handle or the connection handle.
SQL_DESC_BASE_TABLE
CHAR(128)
The name of the underlying table over which this
column is built.
For this attribute to be retrieved, the attribute
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_COL_INFO must have
been set to SQL_TRUE for either the statement
handle or the connection handle.
64
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLColAttribute
Table 28. Field Identifier descriptor types (continued)
Descriptor
Type
Description
SQL_DESC_COLUMN_CCSID
INTEGER
The CCSID of the column identified in
ColumnNumber is returned in NumericAttributePtr.
This is the CCSID of the result set column data as it
is known to the database before the column is
bound out to the application, and may not contain
the CCSID of the data returned for the column to
the application. For instance, for a result set column
consisting simply of a base table's column, this field
will contain the CCSID of the column - the same
CCSID value as shown in the CCSID column of the
SYSCOLUMNS view. On the other hand, the CCSID
for a derived result set column, such as one that
contains an expression, will be set based on the
expression and the job environment in which the
statement is run. For data types where the CCSID is
not applicable, a value of 0 is returned.
SQL_DESC_COUNT
INTEGER
The number of columns in the result set is returned
in NumericAttributePtr.
SQL_DESC_DISPLAY_SIZE
SMALLINT
The maximum number of bytes needed to display
the data in character form is returned in
NumericAttributePtr.
SQL_DESC_LABEL
CHAR(128)
The label for this column, if one exists. Otherwise, a
zero-length string.
For this attribute to be retrieved, the attribute
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_COL_INFO must have
been set to SQL_TRUE for either the statement
handle or the connection handle.
SQL_DESC_LENGTH
INTEGER
The number of bytes of data associated with the
column is returned in NumericAttributePtr.
If the column identified in ColumnNumber is
character based, for example, SQL_CHAR,
SQL_VARCHAR, or SQL_LONG_VARCHAR, the
actual length or maximum length is returned.
If the column type is SQL_DECIMAL or
SQL_NUMERIC, SQL_DESC_LENGTH is (precision *
256) + scale. This is returned so that the same value
can be passed as input on SQLBindCol(). The
precision and scale can also be obtained as separate
values for these data types by using
SQL_DESC_PRECISION and SQL_DESC_SCALE.
SQL_DESC_NAME
CHAR(128)
The name of the column ColumnNumber is returned
in CharacterAttributePtr. If the column is an
expression, then the result returned is product
specific.
SQL_DESC_NULLABLE
SMALLINT
If the column identified by ColumnNumber can
contain nulls, then SQL_NULLABLE is returned in
NumericAttributePtr.
If the column is constrained not to accept nulls, then
SQL_NO_NULLS is returned in NumericAttributePtr.
SQL_DESC_PRECISION
SMALLINT
The precision attribute of the column is returned.
SQL_DESC_SCALE
SMALLINT
The scale attribute of the column is returned.
SQL call level interface
65
SQLColAttribute
Table 28. Field Identifier descriptor types (continued)
Descriptor
Type
Description
SQL_DESC_SEARCHABLE
INTEGER
This is SQL_UNSEARCHABLE if the column cannot
be used in a WHERE clause.
This is SQL_LIKE_ONLY if the column can be used
in a WHERE clause only with the LIKE predicate.
This is SQL_ALL_EXCEPT_LIKE if the column can
be used in a WHERE clause with all comparison
operators except LIKE.
This is SQL_SEARCHABLE if the column can be
used in a WHERE clause with any comparison
operator.
For this attribute to be retrieved, the attribute
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_COL_INFO must have
been set to SQL_TRUE for either the statement
handle or the connection handle.
SQL_DESC_TYPE_NAME
CHAR(128)
The character representation of the SQL data type of
the column identified in ColumnNumber. This is
returned in CharacterAttributePtr. The possible values
for the SQL data type are listed inTable 3 on page
18. In addition, user-defined type (UDT) information
is also returned. The format for the UDT is <schema
name qualifier><job's current separator><UDT
name>.
SQL_DESC_TYPE
SMALLINT
The SQL data type of the column identified in
ColumnNumber is returned in NumericAttributePtr.
The possible values for pfSqlType are listed in Table 3
on page 18.
SQL_DESC_UNNAMED
SMALLINT
This is SQL_NAMED if the NAME field is an actual
name, or SQL_UNNAMED if the NAME field is an
implementation-generated name.
SQL_DESC_UPDATABLE
INTEGER
Column is described by the values for the defined
constants:
SQL_ATTR_READONLY
SQL_ATTR_WRITE
SQL_ATTR_READWRITE_UNKNOWN
SQL_COLUMN_UPDATABLE describes the
updatability of the column in the result set. Whether
a column can be updated can be based on the data
type, user privileges, and the definition of the result
set itself. If it is unclear whether a column can be
updated, SQL_ATTR_READWRITE_UNKNOWN
should be returned.
For this attribute to be retrieved, the attribute
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_COL_INFO must have
been set to SQL_TRUE for either the statement
handle or the connection handle.
66
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLColAttribute
Usage
Instead of returning a specific set of arguments like SQLDescribeCol(), SQLColAttribute() can be used to
specify which attribute you want to receive for a specific column. If the required information is a string,
it is returned in CharacterAttributePtr. If the required information is a number, it is returned in
NumericAttributePtr.
Although SQLColAttribute() allows for future extensions, it requires more calls to receive the same
information than SQLDescribeCol() for each column.
If a FieldIdentifier descriptor type does not apply to the database server, an empty string is returned in
CharacterAttributePtr or zero is returned in NumericAttributePtr, depending on the expected result of the
descriptor.
Columns are identified by a number (numbered sequentially from left to right starting with 1) and can be
described in any order.
Calling SQLColAttribute() with FieldIdentifier set to SQL_DESC_COUNT is an alternative to calling
SQLNumResultCols() to determine whether any columns can be returned.
Call SQLNumResultCols() before calling SQLColAttribute() to determine whether a result set exists.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
Diagnostics
Table 29. SQLColAttribute SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The requested information is returned as a
null-terminated string and its length exceeded the length
of the application buffer as specified in cbInfoValueMax.
The argument pcbInfoValue contains the actual (not
truncated) length of the requested information.
07009
Column number that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument ColumnNumber is
less than 1.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument FieldIdentifier is not
equal to a value specified in Table 27 on page 63.
The argument CharacterAttributePtr, StringLengthPtr, or
NumericAttributePtr is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called before calling SQLPrepare() or
SQLExecDirect() for the StatementHandle.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The SQL data type returned by the database server for
column ColumnNumber is not recognized by Db2 for i
CLI.
SQL call level interface
67
SQLColAttribute
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes” on page 85
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
68
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLColAttributes
SQLColAttributes - Obtain column attributes
SQLColAttributes() has been deprecated and replaced by SQLColAttribute().
Although this release version of DB2 CLI continues to support SQLColAttributes(), it is recommended
that you begin using SQLColAttribute() in your DB2 CLI programs so that they conform to the latest
standards.”
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLColAttributesW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
SQLRETURN SQLColAttributes (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
StatementHandle,
ColumnNumber,
FieldIdentifier,
*CharacterAttributePtr,
BufferLength,
*StringLengthPtr,
*NumericAttributePtr);
Note: Refer to “SQLColAttribute - Return a column attribute” on page 63 for a description of the
applicable sections.
SQL call level interface
69
SQLColumnPrivileges
SQLColumnPrivileges - Get privileges associated with the columns of
a table
SQLColumnPrivileges() returns a list of columns and associated privileges for the specified table. The
information is returned in an SQL result set, which can be retrieved with the same functions that are used
to process a result set generated from a query.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLColumnPrivilegesW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support forDb2 for i CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLColumnPrivileges (
SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
*CatalogName,
NameLength1,
*SchemaName,
NameLength2,
*TableName
NameLength3,
*ColumnName,
NameLength4);
Function arguments
Table 30. SQLColumnPrivileges arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
CatalogName
Input
Catalog qualifier of a 3 part table name. This
must be a NULL pointer or a zero length
string.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength1
Input
Length of CatalogName. This must be set to 0.
SQLCHAR *
SchemaName
Input
Schema qualifier of table name.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength2
Input
Length of SchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
TableName
Input
Table Name.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength3
Input
Length of TableName.
SQLCHAR *
ColumnName
Input
Buffer that can contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by column name.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength4
Input
Length of ColumnName.
Usage
The results are returned as a standard result set containing the columns listed in Table 31 on page 71. The
result set is ordered by TABLE_CAT, TABLE_SCHEM, TABLE_NAME, COLUMN_NAME, and
PRIVILEGE. If multiple privileges are associated with any given column, each privilege is returned as a
separate row. A typical application might want to call this function after a call to SQLColumns() to
determine column privilege information. The application should use the character strings returned in the
TABLE_SCHEM, TABLE_NAME, COLUMN_NAME columns of the SQLColumns() result set as input
arguments to this function
Because calls to SQLColumnPrivileges() in many cases map to a complex and thus expensive query
against the system catalog, they should be used sparingly, and the results saved rather than repeating the
calls.
70
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLColumnPrivileges
The VARCHAR columns of the catalog-functions result set have been declared with a maximum length
attribute of 128 to be consistent with SQL92 limits. Because Db2 for i names are always 128 characters or
less in length, the application can choose to always set aside 128 characters (plus the null-terminator) for
the output buffer, or alternatively, call SQLGetInfo() with SQL_MAX_CATALOG_NAME_LEN,
SQL_MAX_SCHEMA_NAME_LEN, SQL_MAX_TABLE_NAME_LEN, and
SQL_MAX_COLUMN_NAME_LEN. The SQL_MAX_CATALOG_NAME_LEN value determines the actual
length of the TABLE_CAT supported by the connected Database Management System (DBMS). The
SQL_MAX_SCHEMA_NAME_LEN value determines the actual length of the TABLE_SCHEM supported
by the connected DBMS. The SQL_MAX_TABLE_NAME_LEN value determines the actual length of the
TABLE_NAME supported by the connected DBMS. The SQL_MAX_COLUMN_NAME_LEN value
determines the actual length of the COLUMN_NAME supported by the connected DBMS.
Note that the ColumnName argument accepts a search pattern.
Table 31. Columns returned by SQLColumnPrivileges
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 TABLE_CAT
VARCHAR(128)
This is always NULL.
2 TABLE_SCHEM
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the schema containing
TABLE_NAME.
3 TABLE_NAME
VARCHAR(128) not NULL
Name of the table or view.
4 COLUMN_NAME
VARCHAR(128) not NULL
Name of the column of the specified
table or view.
5 GRANTOR
VARCHAR(128)
Authorization ID of the user who
granted the privilege.
6 GRANTEE
VARCHAR(128)
Authorization ID of the user to whom
the privilege is granted.
7 PRIVILEGE
VARCHAR(128)
The column privilege. This can be:
v INSERT
v REFERENCES
v SELECT
v UPDATE
8 IS_GRANTABLE
VARCHAR(3)
This indicates whether the grantee is
permitted to grant the privilege to
other users.
Either YES or NO.
Note: The column names used by Db2 for i CLI follow the X/Open CLI CAE specification style. The
column types, contents and order are identical to those defined for the SQLColumnPrivileges() result set
in ODBC.
If there is more than one privilege associated with a column, then each privilege is returned as a separate
row in the result set.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
SQL call level interface
71
SQLColumnPrivileges
Diagnostics
Table 32. SQLColumnPrivileges SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate
memory required to support the
processing or completion of the
function.
HY009
String or buffer length that is not
valid
The value of one of the name length
arguments is less than 0, but not
equal to SQL_NTS.
HY010
Function sequence error
There is an open cursor for this
statement handle, or there is no
connection for this statement handle.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be
addressed or allocated, or it contains
a value that is not valid.
Restrictions
None.
Example
/* From the CLI sample TBINFO.C */
/* ... */
/* call SQLColumnPrivileges */
printf("\n Call SQLColumnPrivileges for:\n");
printf(" tbSchema = %s\n", tbSchema);
printf(" tbName = %s\n", tbName);
sqlrc = SQLColumnPrivileges( hstmt, NULL, 0,
tbSchema, SQL_NTS,
tbName, SQL_NTS,
colNamePattern, SQL_NTS);
References
v “SQLColumns - Get column information for a table” on page 73
v “SQLTables - Get table information” on page 266
72
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLColumns
SQLColumns - Get column information for a table
SQLColumns() returns a list of columns in the specified tables. The information is returned in an query
result set, which can be retrieved with the same functions that are used to fetch a result set generated by
a SELECT statement.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLColumnsW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307 for
more information about Unicode support for Db2 for i CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLColumns (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szCatalogName,
cbCatalogName,
*szSchemaName,
cbSchemaName,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
*szColumnName,
cbColumnName);
Function arguments
Table 33. SQLColumns arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
szCatalogName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set. Catalog is the first part
of a three-part table name.
This must be a NULL pointer or a zero
length string.
SQLSMALLINT
cbCatalogName
Input
Length of szCatalogName. This must be set to
0.
SQLCHAR *
szSchemaName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by schema name.
SQLSMALLINT
cbSchemaName
Input
Length of szSchemaName
SQLCHAR *
szTableName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by table name.
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableName
Input
Length of szTableName
SQLCHAR *
szColumnName
Input
Buffer that can contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by column name.
SQLSMALLINT
cbColumnName
Input
Length of szColumnName
Usage
This function retrieves information about the columns of a table or a list of tables.
SQLColumns() returns a standard result set. Table 34 on page 74 lists the columns in the result set.
The szCatalogName, szSchemaName, szTableName, and szColumnName arguments accept search patterns. An
escape character can be specified in conjunction with a wildcard character to allow that actual character
to be used in the search pattern. The escape character is specified on the SQL_ATTR_ESCAPE_CHAR
environment attribute.
SQL call level interface
73
SQLColumns
This function does not return information about the columns in a result set, which is retrieved by
SQLDescribeCol() or SQLColAttribute(). If an application wants to obtain column information for a result
set, it should always call SQLDescribeCol() or SQLColAttribute() for efficiency. SQLColumns() maps to a
complex query against the system catalogs, and can require a large amount of system resources.
Table 34. Columns returned by SQLColumns
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 TABLE_CAT
VARCHAR(128)
The current server.
2 TABLE_SCHEM
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the schema containing
TABLE_NAME.
3 TABLE_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
Name of the table, view or alias.
4 COLUMN_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
Column identifier. The name of the column of
the specified view, table, or table's column the
alias is built for.
5 DATA_TYPE
SMALLINT not NULL
DATA_TYPE identifies the SQL data type of the
column.
6 TYPE_NAME
VARCHAR(128) not NULL
TYPE_NAME is a character string representing
the name of the data type corresponding to
DATA_TYPE. If the data type is FOR BIT DATA,
then the corresponding string FOR BIT DATA is
appended to the data type, for example, CHAR
() FOR BIT DATA.
7 COLUMN_SIZE
INTEGER
If DATA_TYPE is an approximate numeric data
type, this column contains the number of bits of
mantissa precision of the column. For exact
numeric data types, this column contains the
total number of decimal digit allowed in the
column. For time and timestamp data types, this
column contains the number of digits of
precision of the fractional seconds component;
otherwise, this column is NULL.
Note: The ODBC definition of precision is
typically the number of digits to store the data
type.
8 BUFFER_LENGTH
INTEGER
The maximum number of bytes to store data
from this column if SQL_DEFAULT were
specified on the SQLBindCol() , SQLGetData()and
SQLBindParam() calls.
9 DECIMAL_DIGITS
SMALLINT
The scale of the column. NULL is returned for
data types where scale is not applicable.
74
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLColumns
Table 34. Columns returned by SQLColumns (continued)
Column number/name
Data type
Description
10 NUM_PREC_RADIX
SMALLINT
The value is 10, 2, or NULL. If DATA_TYPE is
an approximate numeric data type, this column
contains the value 2; then the
LENGTH_PRECISION column contains the
number of bits allowed in the column.
If DATA_TYPE is an exact numeric data type,
this column contains the value 10 and the
LENGTH_PRECISION and NUM_SCALE
columns contain the number of decimal digits
allowed for the column.
For numeric data types, the Database
Management System (DBMS) can return a
NUM_PREC_RADIX of either 10 or 2.
NULL is returned for data types where radix is
not applicable.
11 NULLABLE
SMALLINT not NULL
SQL_NO_NULLS if the column does not accept
NULL values.
SQL_NULLABLE if the column accepts NULL
values.
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|
12 REMARKS
NVARCHAR(2000)
Contains descriptive information about the
column.
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13 COLUMN_DEF
NVARCHAR(2000)
The column's default value. If the default value
is a numeric literal, then this column contains the
character representation of the numeric literal
with no enclosing single quotation marks. If the
default value is a character string, then this
column is that string enclosed in single quotation
marks. If the default value a pseudo-literal, such
as for DATE, TIME, and TIMESTAMP columns,
then this column contains the keyword of the
pseudo-literal (for example, CURRENT DATE)
with no enclosing quotation marks.
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If NULL is specified as the default value, then
this column returns the word NULL, not
enclosed in quotation marks. If the default value
cannot be represented without truncation, then
this column contains TRUNCATED with no
enclosing single quotation marks. If no default
value is specified, then this column is NULL.
14 SQL_DATA_TYPE
SMALLINT not NULL
DATA_TYPE identifies the SQL data type of the
column.
15 SQL_DATETIME_SUB
SMALLINT
The subtype code for date and time data types:
v SQL_DATE
v SQL_TIME
v SQL_TIMESTAMP
For all other data types, this column returns
NULL.
SQL call level interface
75
SQLColumns
Table 34. Columns returned by SQLColumns (continued)
Column number/name
Data type
Description
16 CHAR_OCTET_LENGTH
INTEGER
This contains the maximum length in octets for a
character data type column. For single byte
character sets, this is the same as
LENGTH_PRECISION. For all other data types,
it is NULL.
17 ORDINAL_POSITION
INTEGER not NULL
The ordinal position of the column in the table.
The first column in the table is number 1.
VARCHAR(3)
Contains the string 'NO' if the column is known
to be not nullable; and 'YES' otherwise.
| 18 IS_NULLABLE
|
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 35. SQLColumns SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate
memory required to support the
processing or completion of the
function.
HY009
String or buffer length that is not
valid
The value of one of the name length
arguments is less than 0, but not
equal SQL_NTS.
HY010
Function sequence error
There is an open cursor for this
statement handle, or there is no
connection for this statement handle.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be
addressed or allocated, or it contains
a value that is not valid.
76
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLConnect
SQLConnect - Connect to a data source
SQLConnect() establishes a connection to the target database. The application can optionally supply a
target SQL database, an authorization name, and an authentication string.
SQLAllocConnect() must be called before calling this function.
This function must be called before calling SQLAllocStmt().
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLConnectW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307 for
more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLConnect (SQLHDBC
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hdbc,
*szDSN,
cbDSN,
*szUID,
cbUID,
*szAuthStr,
cbAuthStr);
Function arguments
Table 36. SQLConnect arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Connection handle.
SQLCHAR *
szDSN
Input
Data source: name or alias name of the
database.
SQLSMALLINT
cbDSN
Input
Length of contents of szDSN argument.
SQLCHAR *
szUID
Input
Authorization name (user identifier).
SQLSMALLINT
cbUID
Input
Length of contents of szUID argument.
SQLCHAR *
szAuthStr
Input
Authentication string (password).
SQLSMALLINT
cbAuthStr
Input
Length of contents of szAuthStr argument.
Usage
You can define various connection characteristics (options) in the application using
SQLSetConnectOption().
|
|
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The input length arguments to SQLConnect() (cbDSN, cbUID, cbAuthStr) can be set to the actual length of
their associated data - this does not include any null-terminating character - or to SQL_NTS to indicate
that the associated data is null-terminated.
Leading and trailing blanks in the szDSN and szUID argument values are stripped before processing
unless they are enclosed in quotation marks.
Input arguments szUID and szAuthStr are treated as case sensitive.
When running in server mode, both szUID and szAuthStr must be passed in order for the connection to
run on behalf of a user ID other than the current user. If either parameter is NULL or both are NULL, the
connection is started using the user ID that is in effect for the current job running the CLI program.
SQL call level interface
77
SQLConnect
The data source must already be defined on the system for the connect function to work. On the IBM i
platform, you can use the Work with Relational Database Directory Entries (WRKRDBDIRE) command to
determine which data sources have been defined, and to optionally define additional data sources.
If the application does not supply a target database (szDSN), the CLI uses the local database as the
default.
|
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|
Non-server mode connections to the *LOCAL relational database must specify for the connecting szUID
either NULL or the current user. In this case, the password is not validated. When a non-server mode
connection is used, the application should not obtain the connecting szUID as input from the user, since
SQLConnect will not validate the password associated with the connection.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 37. SQLConnect SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
08001
Unable to connect to data
source
The driver is unable to establish a connection with the
data source (server).
08002
Connection in use
The specified hdbc has been used to establish a
connection with a data source and the connection is still
open.
08004
Data source rejected
establishment of connection
The data source (server) rejected the establishment of the
connection.
28000
Authorization specification
that is not valid
The value specified for the argument szUID or the value
specified for the argument szAuthStr violated restrictions
defined by the data source.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The value specified for argument cbDSN is less than 0,
but not equal to SQL_NTS and the argument szDSN is
not a null pointer.
The value specified for argument cbUID is less than 0,
but not equal to SQL_NTS and the argument szUID is
not a null pointer.
The value specified for argument cbAuthStr is less than 0,
but not equal to SQL_NTS and the argument szAuthStr is
not a null pointer.
A nonmatching double quotation mark (") is found in
either the szDSN, szUID, or szAuthStr argument.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
HY501 *
Data source name that is not A data source name that is not valid is specified in
valid
argument szDSN.
78
IBM i: SQL call level interface
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
SQLConnect
Restrictions
The implicit connection (or default database) option for IBM DBMSs is not supported. SQLConnect() must
be called before any SQL statements can be processed. Db2 for i does not support multiple simultaneous
connections to the same data source in a single job.
When you are using Db2 for i CLI on a newer release, SQLConnect() can encounter an SQL0144 message.
This indicates that the data source (the server) has obsolete SQL packages that must be deleted. To delete
these packages, run the following command on the data source:
DLTSQLPKG SQLPKG(QGPL/QSQCLI*)
The next SQLConnect() creates a new SQL package.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle” on page 30.
References
v “SQLAllocConnect - Allocate connection handle” on page 27
v “SQLAllocStmt - Allocate a statement handle” on page 34
SQL call level interface
79
SQLCopyDesc
SQLCopyDesc - Copy description statement
SQLCopyDesc() copies the fields of the data structure associated with the source handle to the data
structure associated with the target handle.
Any existing data in the data structure associated with the target handle is overwritten, except that the
ALLOC_TYPE field is not changed.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLCopyDesc (SQLHDESC
(SQLHDESC
sDesc)
tDesc);
Function arguments
Table 38. SQLCopyDesc arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDESC
sDesc
Input
Source descriptor handle
SQLHDESC
tDesc
Input
Target descriptor handle
Usage
Handles for the automatically-generated row and parameter descriptors of a statement can be obtained
by calling GetStmtAttr().
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_ERROR
80
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLDataSources
SQLDataSources - Get list of data sources
SQLDataSources() returns a list of target databases available, one at a time. A database must be cataloged
to be available.
For more information about cataloging, refer to the usage notes for SQLConnect() or see the online help
for the Work with Relational Database (RDB) Directory Entries (WRKRDBDIRE) command.
SQLDataSources() is typically called before a connection is made, to determine the databases that are
available to connect to.
If you are running Db2 for i CLI in SQL server mode, some restrictions apply when you use
SQLDataSources().
For more information about running in server mode refer to the “Restrictions for running Db2 for i CLI
in server mode” on page 306.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLDataSourcesW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLDataSources
(SQLHENV
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
EnvironmentHandle,
Direction,
*ServerName,
BufferLength1,
*NameLength1Ptr,
*Description,
BufferLength2,
*NameLength2Ptr);
Function arguments
Table 39. SQLDataSources arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHENV
EnvironmentHandle
Input
Environment handle.
SQLSMALLINT
Direction
Input
This is used by application to request the first data
source name in the list or the next one in the list.
Direction can take on only the following values:
v SQL_FETCH_FIRST
v SQL_FETCH_NEXT
SQLCHAR *
ServerName
Output
Pointer to buffer to hold the data source name
retrieved.
SQLSMALLINT
BufferLength1
Input
Maximum length in characters of the buffer pointed
to by ServerName. This should be less than or equal
to SQL_MAX_DSN_LENGTH + 1.
SQLSMALLINT *
NameLength1Ptr
Output
Pointer to location where the maximum number of
characters available to return in the ServerName is
stored.
SQLCHAR *
Description
Output
Pointer to buffer where the description of the data
source is returned. Db2 for i CLI returns the
Comment field associated with the database
catalogued to the Database Management System
(DBMS).
SQL call level interface
81
SQLDataSources
Table 39. SQLDataSources arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
BufferLength2
Input
Maximum length in characters of the Description
buffer.
SQLSMALLINT *
NameLength2Ptr
Output
Pointer to location where the function returns the
actual number of characters available to return for
the description of the data source.
Usage
The application can call this function any time by setting Direction to either SQL_FETCH_FIRST or
SQL_FETCH_NEXT.
If SQL_FETCH_FIRST is specified, the first database in the list is always returned.
If SQL_FETCH_NEXT is specified:
v Directly following the SQL_FETCH_FIRST call, the second database in the list is returned
v Before any other SQLDataSources() call, the first database in the list is returned
v When there are no more databases in the list, SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND is returned. If the function is
called again, the first database is returned.
v Any other time, the next database in the list is returned.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
Error conditions
Table 40. SQLDataSources SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The data source name returned in the argument ServerName is
longer than the value specified in the argument BufferLength1. The
argument NameLength1Ptr contains the length of the full data
source name. (Function returns SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.)
The data source name returned in the argument Description is
longer than the value specified in the argument BufferLength2. The
argument NameLength2Ptr contains the length of the full data
source description. (Function returns
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.)
58004
Unexpected system failure
Unrecoverable system error.
HY000
General error
An error occurred for which there is no specific SQLSTATE and
for which no specific SQLSTATE is defined. The error message
returned by SQLError() in the argument ErrorMsg describes the
error and its cause.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
82
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLDataSources
Table 40. SQLDataSources SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009
Argument value that is not valid The argument ServerName, NameLength1Ptr, Description, or
NameLength2Ptr is a null pointer.
Value for the direction that is not valid.
HY013
Unexpected memory handling
error
Db2 for i CLI is unable to access memory required to support the
processing or completion of the function.
HY103
Direction option out of range
The value specified for the argument Direction is not equal to
SQL_FETCH_FIRST or SQL_FETCH_NEXT.
Authorization
None.
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/* From CLI sample datasour.c */
/* ... */
#include
#include
#include
#include
<stdio.h>
<stdlib.h>
<sqlcli1.h>
"samputil.h"
/* Header file for CLI sample code */
/* ... */
/*******************************************************************
** main
** - initialize
** - terminate
*******************************************************************/
int main() {
SQLHANDLE henv ;
SQLRETURN rc ;
SQLCHAR source[SQL_MAX_DSN_LENGTH + 1], description[255] ;
SQLSMALLINT buffl, desl ;
/* ... */
/* allocate an environment handle */
rc = SQLAllocHandle( SQL_HANDLE_ENV, SQL_NULL_HANDLE, &henv ) ;
if ( rc != SQL_SUCCESS ) return( terminate( henv, rc ) ) ;
/* list
printf(
printf(
printf(
the available data sources (servers) */
"The following data sources are available:\n" ) ;
"ALIAS NAME
Comment(Description)\n" ) ;
"----------------------------------------------------\n" ) ;
while ( ( rc = SQLDataSources( henv,
SQL_FETCH_NEXT,
source,
SQL_MAX_DSN_LENGTH + 1,
&buffl,
description,
255,
&desl
)
SQL call level interface
83
SQLDataSources
) != SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
) printf( "%-30s %s\n", source, description ) ;
rc = SQLFreeHandle( SQL_HANDLE_ENV, henv ) ;
if ( rc != SQL_SUCCESS ) return( terminate( henv, rc ) ) ;
return( SQL_SUCCESS ) ;
}
84
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLDescribeCol
SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes
SQLDescribeCol() returns the result descriptor information (column name, type, precision) for the
indicated column in the result set generated by a SELECT statement.
If the application needs only one attribute of the descriptor information, the SQLColAttribute() function
can be used in place of SQLDescribeCol().
Either SQLPrepare() or SQLExecDirect() must be called before calling this function.
This function (or SQLColAttribute()) is typically called before SQLBindCol().
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLDescribeColW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLDescribeCol (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
icol,
*szColName,
cbColNameMax,
*pcbColName,
*pfSqlType,
*pcbColDef,
*pibScale,
*pfNullable);
Function arguments
Table 41. SQLDescribeCol arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
icol
Input
Column number to be described.
SQLCHAR *
szColName
Output
Pointer to column name buffer.
SQLSMALLINT
cbColNameMax
Input
Size of szColName buffer.
SQLSMALLINT *
pcbColName
Output
Bytes available to return for szColName
argument. Truncation of column name
(szColName) to cbColNameMax - 1 bytes
occurs if pcbColName is greater than or equal
to cbColNameMax. If pfSqlType denotes a
graphic SQL data type, this variable indicates
the maximum number of double-byte
characters the column can hold.
SQLSMALLINT *
pfSqlType
Output
SQL data type of column.
SQLINTEGER *
pcbColDef
Output
Precision of column as defined in the
database.
If fSqlType denotes a graphic SQL data type,
then this variable indicates the maximum
number of double-byte characters the column
can hold.
SQLSMALLINT *
pibScale
Output
Scale of column as defined in the database
(only applies to SQL_DECIMAL,
SQL_NUMERIC, SQL_TIMESTAMP).
SQL call level interface
85
SQLDescribeCol
Table 41. SQLDescribeCol arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT *
pfNullable
Output
This indicates whether NULLS are allowed
for this column
v SQL_NO_NULLS.
v SQL_NULLABLE.
Usage
Columns are identified by a number and are numbered sequentially from left to right starting with 1, and
can be described in any order.
A valid pointer and buffer space must be made available for the szColName argument. If a null pointer is
specified for any of the remaining pointer arguments, Db2 for i CLI assumes that the information is not
needed by the application and nothing is returned.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
If SQLDescribeCol() returns either SQL_ERROR, or SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO, one of the following
SQLSTATEs can be obtained by calling the SQLError() function.
Table 42. SQLDescribeCol SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The column name returned in the argument szColName is
longer than the value specified in the argument
cbColNameMax. The argument pcbColName contains the
length of the full column name. (Function returns
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.)
07005 *
Not a SELECT statement
The statement associated with the hstmt did not return a
result set. There were no columns to describe. (Call
SQLNumResultCols() first to determine if there are any
rows in the result set.)
07009
Column number that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument icol is less than 1.
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The length specified in argument cbColNameMax is less
than 1.
The value specified for the argument icol is greater than
the number of columns in the result set.
The argument szColName or pcbColName is a null pointer.
86
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLDescribeCol
Table 42. SQLDescribeCol SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called before calling SQLPrepare() or
SQLExecDirect() for the hstmt.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The SQL data type of column icol is not recognized by
Db2 for i CLI.
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*******************************************************************
** file = typical.c
...
/*******************************************************************
** display_results
**
** - for each column
**
- get column name
**
- bind column
** - display column headings
** - fetch each row
**
- if value truncated, build error message
**
- if column null, set value to "NULL"
**
- display row
**
- print truncation message
** - free local storage
*******************************************************************/
display_results(SQLHSTMT hstmt,
SQLSMALLINT nresultcols)
{
SQLCHAR
colname[32];
SQLSMALLINT
coltype;
SQLSMALLINT
colnamelen;
SQLSMALLINT
nullable;
SQLINTEGER
collen[MAXCOLS];
SQLSMALLINT
scale;
SQLINTEGER
outlen[MAXCOLS];
SQLCHAR *
data[MAXCOLS];
SQLCHAR
errmsg[256];
SQLRETURN
rc;
SQLINTEGER
i;
SQLINTEGER
displaysize;
for (i = 0; i < nresultcols; i++)
{
SQLDescribeCol (hstmt, i+1, colname, sizeof (colname),
&colnamelen, &coltype, &collen[i], &scale, &nullable);
/* get display length for column */
SQLColAttribute (StatementHandle, i+1, SQL_COLUMN_DISPLAY_SIZE, NULL, 0,
NULL, &displaysize);
/* set column length to max of display length, and column name
length. Plus one byte for null terminator
*/
collen[i] = max(displaysize, strlen((char *) colname) ) + 1;
/* allocate memory to bind column
data[i] = (SQLCHAR *) malloc (collen[i]);
*/
SQL call level interface
87
SQLDescribeCol
/* bind columns to program vars, converting all types to CHAR */
SQLBindCol (hstmt, i+1, SQL_CHAR, data[i], collen[i],
&outlen[i]);
}
printf("\n");
/* display result rows
*/
while ((rc = SQLFetch (hstmt)) != SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND)
{
errmsg[0] = ’\0’;
for (i = 0; i < nresultcols; i++)
{
/* Build a truncation message for any columns truncated */
if (outlen[i] >= collen[i])
{
sprintf ((char *) errmsg + strlen ((char *) errmsg),
"%d chars truncated, col %d\n",
outlen[i]-collen[i]+1, i+1);
}
if (outlen[i] == SQL_NULL_DATA)
else
} /* for all columns in this row */
printf ("\n%s", errmsg);
} /* while rows to fetch */
/* print any truncation messages
/* free data buffers
for (i = 0; i < nresultcols; i++)
{
free (data[i]);
}
}/* end display_results
References
v “SQLColAttribute - Return a column attribute” on page 63
v “SQLColAttributes - Obtain column attributes” on page 69
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLNumResultCols - Get number of result columns” on page 194
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
88
IBM i: SQL call level interface
*/
*/
SQLDescribeParam
SQLDescribeParam - Return description of a parameter marker
SQLDescribeParam() returns the description of a parameter marker associated with a prepared SQL
statement. This information is also available in the fields of the implementation parameter descriptor.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLDescribeParam (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
ParameterNumber,
*DataTypePtr,
*ParameterSizePtr,
*DecimalDigitsPtr,
*NullablePtr);
Function arguments
Table 43. SQLDescribeParam arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
ParameterNumber
Input
Parameter marker number ordered sequentially in
increasing parameter order, starting at 1.
SQLSMALLINT *
DataTypePtr
Output
Pointer to a buffer in which to return the SQL data
type of the parameter.
SQLINTEGER *
ParameterSizePtr
Output
Pointer to a buffer in which to return the size of the
column or expression of the corresponding
parameter marker as defined by the data source.
SQLSMALLINT *
DecimalDigitsPtr
Output
Pointer to a buffer in which to return the number of
decimal digits of the column or expression of the
corresponding parameter as defined by the data
source.
SQLSMALLINT *
NullablePtr
Output
Pointer to a buffer in which to return a value that
indicates whether the parameter allows NULL
values. This value is read from the
SQL_DESC_NULLABLE field of the implementation
parameter descriptor.
v SQL_NO_NULLS – The parameter does not allow
NULL values (this is the default value).
v SQL_NULLABLE – The parameter allows NULL
values.
v SQL_NULLABLE_UNKNOWN – Cannot
determine if the parameter allows NULL values.
Usage
Parameter markers are numbered in increasing parameter order, starting with 1, in the order they appear
in the SQL statement.
SQLDescribeParam() does not return the type (input, output, or both input and output) of a parameter in
an SQL statement. Except in calls to procedures, all parameters in SQL statements are input parameters.
To determine the type of each parameter in a call to a procedure, an application calls
SQLProcedureColumns().
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
SQL call level interface
89
SQLDescribeParam
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 44. SQLDescribeParam SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01000
Warning
Informational message. (Function returns
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.)
07009
Descriptor index that is not valid The value specified for the argument
ParameterNumber less than 1.
The value specified for the argument
ParameterNumber is greater than the number of
parameters in the associated SQL statement.
The parameter marker is part of a non-DML
statement.
The parameter marker is part of a SELECT
list.
08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between Db2 for i
CLI and the data source to which it is
connected fails before the function completes
processing.
21S01
Insert value list does not match
column list
The number of parameters in the INSERT
statement does not match the number of
columns in the table named in the statement.
HY000
General error
HY001
Memory allocation failure
HY008
Operation canceled.
HY009
Argument value that is not valid
The argument DataTypePtr, ParameterSizePtr,
DecimalDigitsPtr, or NullablePtr is a null
pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called before calling
SQLPrepare() or SQLExecDirect() for the
StatementHandle.
HY013
Unexpected memory handling
error
The function call cannot be processed because
the underlying memory objects can not be
accessed, possibly because of low memory
conditions.
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory
required to support the processing or
completion of the function.
Restrictions
None.
References
v “SQLBindParam - Bind a buffer to a parameter marker” on page 47
v “SQLCancel - Cancel statement” on page 61
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
90
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLDisconnect
SQLDisconnect - Disconnect from a data source
SQLDisconnect() ends the connection associated with the database connection handle.
After calling this function, either call SQLConnect() to connect to another database, or call
SQLFreeConnect().
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLDisconnect (SQLHDBC
hdbc);
Function arguments
Table 45. SQLDisconnect arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Connection handle
Usage
If an application calls SQLDisconnect before it has freed all the statement handles associated with the
connection, Db2 for i CLI frees them after it successfully disconnects from the database.
If SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO is returned, it implies that even though the disconnect from the database
is successful, additional error or implementation specific information is available. For example:
v A problem is encountered on the clean up after the disconnect, or,
v If there is no current connection because of an event that occurred independently of the application
(such as communication failure).
After a successful SQLDisconnect() call, the application can re-use hdbc to make another SQLConnect()
request.
If the hdbc is participating in a DUOW two-phase commit connection, the disconnect might not occur
immediately. The actual disconnect occurs at the next commit issued for the distributed transaction.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 46. SQLDisconnect SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01002
Disconnect error
An error occurred during the disconnect. However, the
disconnect succeeded. (Function returns
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.)
08003
Connection not open
The connection specified in the argument hdbc is not
open.
25000
Transaction state that is not
valid
There is a transaction in process on the connection
specified by the argument hdbc. The transaction remains
active, and the connection cannot be disconnected.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
SQL call level interface
91
SQLDisconnect
Table 46. SQLDisconnect SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle” on page 30.
References
v “SQLAllocConnect - Allocate connection handle” on page 27
v “SQLConnect - Connect to a data source” on page 77
v “SQLTransact - Commit or roll back a transaction” on page 269
92
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLDriverConnect
SQLDriverConnect - Connect to a data source
SQLDriverConnect() is an alternative to SQLConnect(). Both functions establish a connection to the target
database, but SQLDriverConnect() uses a connection string to determine the data source name, user ID,
and password. The functions are the same; both are supported for compatibility purposes.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLDriverConnectW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLDriverConnect (SQLHDBC
SQLPOINTER
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
ConnectionHandle,
WindowHandle,
*InConnectionString,
StringLength1,
*OutConnectionString,
BufferLength,
*StringLength2Ptr,
DriverCompletion);
Function arguments
Table 47. SQLDriverConnect arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
ConnectionHandle
Input
Connection handle.
SQLPOINTER
WindowHandle
Input
For DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows, this is the
parent handle. On Db2 for i, it is ignored.
SQLCHAR *
InConnectionString
Input
A full, partial, or empty (null pointer) connection
string.
SQLSMALLINT
StringLength1
Input
Length of InConnectionString.
SQLCHAR *
OutConnectionString
Output
Pointer to buffer for the completed connection string.
If the connection is established successfully, this
buffer contains the completed connection string.
SQLSMALLINT
BufferLength
Input
Maximum size of the buffer pointed to by
OutConnectionString.
SQLSMALLINT *
StringLength2Ptr
Output
Pointer to the number of bytes available to return in
the OutConnectionString buffer.
If the value of StringLength2Ptr is greater than or
equal to BufferLength, the completed connection
string in OutConnectionString is truncated to
BufferLength - 1 bytes.
SQLSMALLINT
DriverCompletion
Input
This indicates when Db2 for i CLI should prompt
the user for more information.
Possible values:
v SQL_DRIVER_COMPLETE
v SQL_DRIVER_COMPLETE_REQUIRED
v SQL_DRIVER_NOPROMPT
SQL call level interface
93
SQLDriverConnect
Usage
The connection string is used to pass one or more values that are needed to complete a connection. The
contents of the connection string and the value of DriverCompletion determine how the connection should
be established.
;
►► ▼
Connection string syntax
= attribute
►◄
Connection string syntax
DSN
UID
PWD
DB2 CLI-defined-keyword
Each of the previous keywords has an attribute that is equal to:
DSN
Data source name. The name or alias-name of the database. The data source name is required if
DriverCompletion is equal to SQL_DRIVER_NOPROMPT.
UID
Authorization-name (user identifier).
PWD
The password that corresponds to the authorization name. If there is no password for the user
ID, empty is specified (PWD=;).
The IBM i platform currently has no Db2 for i CLI-defined keywords.
Input user ID and password strings passed in argument InConnectionString are treated as case sensitive.
The value of DriverCompletion is verified to be valid, but all result in the same behavior. A connection is
attempted with the information that is contained in the connection string. If there is not enough
information, SQL_ERROR is returned.
As soon as a connection is established, the complete connection string is returned. Applications that need
to set up multiple connections to the same database for a given user ID should store this output
connection string. This string can then be used as the input connection string value on future
SQLDriverConnect() calls.
Non-server mode connections to the *LOCAL relational database do not lead to validation of the
connecting userid and password. The *CURUSR value will be used for the connection processing.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_ERROR
Error conditions
All of the diagnostics that are generated by SQLConnect() can be returned here as well. The following
table shows the additional diagnostics that can be returned.
94
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLDriverConnect
Table 48. SQLDriverConnect SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The buffer szConnstrOut is not large enough to hold the entire
connection string. The argument StringLength2Ptr contains the
actual length of the connection string available for return.
(Function returns SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO)
01S00
Connection string attribute that
is not valid
A keyword or attribute value that is not valid is specified in the
input connection string, but the connection to the data source is
successful anyway because one of the following situations occurs:
v The unrecognized keyword is ignored.
v The attribute value that is not valid is ignored, the default
value is used instead.
(Function returns SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO)
HY009
Argument value that is not valid The argument InConnectionString, OutConnectionString, or
StringLength2PTR is a null pointer.
The argument DriverCompletion is not equal to 1.
HY090
String or buffer length that is not The value specified for StringLength1 is less than 0, but not equal
valid
to SQL_NTS.
The value specified for BufferLength is less than 0.
HY110
Driver completion that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument DriverCompletion is not equal
to one of the valid values.
Restrictions
None.
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/* From CLI sample drivrcon.c */
/* ... */
/********************************************************************
** drv_connect - Prompt for connect options and connect
********************************************************************/
int
drv_connect(SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLCHAR
{
SQLRETURN
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
printf("Enter
gets((char *)
printf("Enter
gets((char *)
printf("Enter
gets((char *)
**
henv,
* hdbc,
con_type)
rc;
server[SQL_MAX_DSN_LENGTH + 1];
uid[MAX_UID_LENGTH + 1];
pwd[MAX_PWD_LENGTH + 1];
con_str[255];
buffer[255];
outlen;
Server Name:\n");
server);
User Name:\n");
uid);
Password Name:\n");
pwd);
SQL call level interface
95
SQLDriverConnect
/* Allocate a connection handle */
SQLAllocHandle( SQL_HANDLE_DBC,
henv,
hdbc
);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_DBC, *hdbc, rc);
sprintf((char *)con_str, "DSN=%s;UID=%s;PWD=%s;",
server, uid, pwd);
rc = SQLDriverConnect(*hdbc,
(SQLPOINTER) NULL,
con_str,
SQL_NTS,
buffer, 255, &outlen,
SQL_DRIVER_NOPROMPT);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS) {
printf("Error while connecting to database, RC= %ld\n", rc);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_NULL_HENV, *hdbc, rc);
return (SQL_ERROR);
} else {
printf("Successful Connect\n");
return (SQL_SUCCESS);
}
}
References
“SQLConnect - Connect to a data source” on page 77
96
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLEndTran
SQLEndTran - Commit or roll back a transaction
SQLEndTran() commits or rolls back the current transaction in the connection.
All changes to the database that have been made on the connection since connect time or the previous
call to SQLEndTran(), whichever is the most recent, are committed or rolled back.
If a transaction is active on a connection, the application must call SQLEndTran() before it can disconnect
from the database.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLEndTran (SQLSMALLINT
SQLHENV
SQLSMALLINT
hType,
handle,
fType);
Function arguments
Table 49. SQLEndTran arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
hType
Input
Type of handle. It must contain
SQL_HANDLE_ENV or SQL_HANDLE_DBC.
SQLHENV
handle
Input
Handle to use when performing the COMMIT or
ROLLBACK.
SQLSMALLINT
fType
Input
Wanted action for the transaction. The value for this
argument must be one of:
v SQL_COMMIT
v SQL_ROLLBACK
v SQL_COMMIT_HOLD
v SQL_ROLLBACK_HOLD
v SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_ROLLBACK
v SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_RELEASE
Usage
Completing a transaction with SQL_COMMIT or SQL_ROLLBACK has the following effects:
v
Statement handles are still valid after a call to SQLEndTran().
v Cursor names, bound parameters, and column bindings survive transactions.
v Open cursors are closed, and any result sets that are pending retrieval are discarded.
Completing the transaction with SQL_COMMIT_HOLD or SQL_ROLLBACK_HOLD still commits or rolls
back the database changes, but does not cause cursors to be closed.
If no transaction is currently active on the connection, calling SQLEndTran() has no effect on the database
server and returns SQL_SUCCESS.
SQLEndTran() might fail while executing the COMMIT or ROLLBACK due to a loss of connection. In this
case the application might be unable to determine whether the COMMIT or ROLLBACK has been
processed, and a database administrator's help might be required. Refer to the Database Management
System (DBMS) product information for more information about transaction logs and other transaction
management tasks.
When using either SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_ROLLBACK or SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_RELEASE, you
must already have set the savepoint name using SQLSetConnectAttr.
SQL call level interface
97
SQLEndTran
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 50. SQLEndTran SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
08003
Connection not open
The hdbc is not in a connected state.
08007
Connection failure during
transaction
The connection associated with the hdbc fails during the
processing of the function during the processing of the
function and it cannot be determined whether the requested
COMMIT or ROLLBACK occurs before the failure.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY010
Function sequence error
SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_ROLLBACK or
SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_RELEASE is used, but the
savepoint name is not established by calling
SQLSetConnectAttr() for attribute
SQL_ATTR_SAVEPOINT_NAME.
HY012
Transaction operation state The value specified for the argument fType is neither
that is not valid
SQL_COMMIT nor SQL_ROLLBACK.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
98
IBM i: SQL call level interface
The driver is unable to access memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
SQLError
SQLError - Retrieve error information
SQLError() returns the diagnostic information associated with the most recently called Db2 for i CLI
function for a particular statement, connection, or environment handle.
The information consists of a standardized SQLSTATE, an error code, and a text message. Refer to
“Diagnostics in a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 16 for more information.
Call SQLError() after receiving a return code of SQL_ERROR or SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO from
another function call.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLErrorW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307 for
more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLError (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt,
*szSqlState,
*pfNativeError,
*szErrorMsg,
cbErrorMsgMax,
*pcbErrorMsg);
Function arguments
Table 51. SQLError arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHENV
henv
Input
Environment handle. To obtain diagnostic
information associated with an environment,
pass a valid environment handle. Set hdbc to
SQL_NULL_HDBC. Set hstmt to
SQL_NULL_HSTMT.
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Database connection handle. To obtain
diagnostic information associated with a
connection, pass a valid database connection
handle, and set hstmt to SQL_NULL_HSTMT.
The henv argument is ignored.
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle. To obtain diagnostic
information associated with a statement, pass
a valid statement handle. The henv and hdbc
arguments are ignored.
SQLCHAR *
szSqlState
Output
SQLSTATE as a string of 5 characters
terminated by a null character. The first 2
characters indicate error class; the next 3
indicate subclass. The values correspond
directly to SQLSTATE values defined in the
X/Open SQL CAE specification and the
ODBC specification, augmented with IBM
specific and product specific SQLSTATE
values.
SQL call level interface
99
SQLError
Table 51. SQLError arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLINTEGER *
pfNativeError
Output
Native error code. In Db2 for i CLI, the
pfNativeError argument contains the
SQLCODE value returned by the Database
Management System (DBMS). If the error is
generated by Db2 for i CLI and not the
DBMS, this field is set to -99999.
SQLCHAR *
szErrorMsg
Output
Pointer to buffer to contain the
implementation defined message text. In Db2
for i CLI, only the DBMS generated messages
is returned; Db2 for i CLI itself does not
return any message text describing the
problem.
SQLSMALLINT
cbErrorMsgMax
Input
Maximum (that is, the allocated) length of
the buffer szErrorMsg. The recommended
length to allocate is
SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1.
SQLSMALLINT *
pcbErrorMsg
Output
Pointer to total number of bytes available to
return to the szErrorMsg buffer.
Usage
The SQLSTATEs are those defined by the X/OPEN SQL CAE and the X/Open SQL CLI snapshot,
augmented with IBM specific and product specific SQLSTATE values.
v To obtain diagnostic information associated with an environment, pass a valid environment handle. Set
hdbc to SQL_NULL_HDBC. Set hstmt to SQL_NULL_HSTMT.
v To obtain diagnostic information associated with a connection, pass a valid database connection handle,
and set hstmt to SQL_NULL_HSTMT. The henv argument is ignored.
v To obtain diagnostic information associated with a statement, pass a valid statement handle. The henv
and hdbc arguments are ignored.
If diagnostic information generated by one Db2 for i CLI function is not retrieved before a function other
than SQLError() is called with the same handle, the information for the previous function call is lost. This
is true whether diagnostic information is generated for the second Db2 for i CLI function call.
To avoid truncation of the first level error message, declare a buffer length of
SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1. To avoid truncation of the second level error message, set the size
of the buffer to a value greater than SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH.
Return codes
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
v SQL_SUCCESS
Diagnostics
SQLSTATEs are not defined because SQLError() does not generate diagnostic information for itself.
SQL_ERROR is returned if argument szSqlState, pfNativeError, szErrorMsg, or pcbErrorMsg is a null
pointer.
Example
100
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLError
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*************************************************************************
** file = typical.c
************************************************************************/
int print_error (SQLHENV
henv,
SQLHDBC
hdbc,
SQLHSTMT hstmt)
{
SQLCHAR
buffer[SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1];
SQLCHAR
sqlstate[SQL_SQLSTATE_SIZE + 1];
SQLINTEGER sqlcode;
SQLSMALLINT length;
while ( SQLError(henv, hdbc, hstmt, sqlstate, &sqlcode, buffer,
SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1, &length) == SQL_SUCCESS )
{
printf("\n **** ERROR *****\n");
printf("
SQLSTATE: %s\n", sqlstate);
printf("Native Error Code: %ld\n", sqlcode);
printf("%s \n", buffer);
};
return (0);
}
SQL call level interface
101
SQLExecDirect
SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly
SQLExecDirect() directly runs the specified SQL statement. The statement can only be processed once.
Also, the connected database server must be able to prepare the statement.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLExecDirectW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLExecDirect (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
*szSqlStr,
cbSqlStr);
Function arguments
Table 52. SQLExecDirect arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle. There must not be an
open cursor associated with hstmt. See
“SQLFreeStmt - Free (or reset) a statement
handle” on page 124 for more information.
SQLCHAR *
szSqlStr
Input
SQL statement string. The connected
database server must be able to prepare the
statement.
SQLINTEGER
cbSqlStr
Input
Length of contents of szSqlStr argument. The
length must be set to either the exact length
of the statement, or if the statement is
null-terminated, set to SQL_NTS.
Usage
The SQL statement cannot be a COMMIT or ROLLBACK. Instead, SQLTransact() must be called to issue
COMMIT or ROLLBACK. For more information about supported SQL statements refer to Table 1 on page
3.
The SQL statement string might contain parameter markers. A parameter marker is represented by a "?"
character, and indicates a position in the statement where the value of an application variable is to be
substituted, when SQLExecDirect() is called. SQLBindParam() binds (or associates) an application variable
to each parameter marker, to indicate if any data conversion should be performed at the time the data is
transferred. All parameters must be bound before calling SQLExecDirect().
If the SQL statement is a SELECT, SQLExecDirect() generates a cursor name, and open the cursor. If the
application has used SQLSetCursorName() to associate a cursor name with the statement handle, Db2 for i
CLI associates the application generated cursor name with the internally generated one.
To retrieve a row from the result set generated by a SELECT statement, call SQLFetch() after
SQLExecDirect() returns successfully.
If the SQL statement is a Positioned DELETE or a Positioned UPDATE, the cursor referenced by the
statement must be positioned on a row. Additionally the SQL statement must be defined on a separate
statement handle under the same connection handle.
There must not be an open cursor on the statement handle.
102
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLExecDirect
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND is returned if the SQL statement is a Searched UPDATE or Searched DELETE
and no rows satisfy the search condition.
Diagnostics
Table 53. SQLExecDirect SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value
The argument szSqlStr is a null pointer.
The argument cbSqlStr is less than 1, but not equal to
SQL_NTS.
HY010
Function sequence error
Either no connection or there is an open cursor for this
statement handle.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY021
Internal descriptor
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
Note: There are many other SQLSTATE values that can be generated by the Database Management System (DBMS),
on processing of the statement.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108.
References
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
v “SQLSetParam - Set parameter” on page 246
SQL call level interface
103
SQLExecute
SQLExecute - Execute a statement
SQLExecute() runs a statement that was successfully prepared using SQLPrepare() once or multiple times.
The statement is processed with the current values of any application variables that were bound to
parameter markers by SQLBindParam().
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLExecute (SQLHSTMT
hstmt);
Function arguments
Table 54. SQLExecute arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle. There must not be an
open cursor associated with hstmt, see
“SQLFreeStmt - Free (or reset) a statement
handle” on page 124 for more information.
Usage
The SQL statement string might contain parameter markers. A parameter marker is represented by a "?"
character, and indicates a position in the statement where the value of an application variable is to be
substituted, when SQLExecute() is called. SQLBindParam() is used to bind (or associate) an application
variable to each parameter marker, and to indicate if any data conversion should be performed at the
time the data is transferred. All parameters must be bound before calling SQLExecute().
As soon as the application has processed the results from the SQLExecute() call, it can process the
statement again with new (or the same) values in the application variables.
A statement processed by SQLExecDirect() cannot be reprocessed by calling SQLExecute(); SQLPrepare()
must be called first.
If the prepared SQL statement is a SELECT, SQLExecute() generates a cursor name, and opens the cursor.
If the application has used SQLSetCursorName() to associate a cursor name with the statement handle,
Db2 for i CLI associates the application generated cursor name with the internally generated cursor
name.
To process a SELECT statement more than once, the application must close the cursor by calling call
SQLFreeStmt() with the SQL_CLOSE option. There must not be an open cursor on the statement handle
when calling SQLExecute().
To retrieve a row from the result set generated by a SELECT statement, call SQLFetch() after
SQLExecute() returns successfully.
If the SQL statement is a positioned DELETE or a positioned UPDATE statement, the cursor referenced
by the statement must be positioned on a row at the time SQLExecute() is called, and must be defined on
a separate statement handle under the same connection handle.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
104
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLExecute
v SQL_NEED_DATA
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND is returned if the SQL statement is a Searched UPDATE or Searched DELETE
and no rows satisfy the search condition.
Diagnostics
The SQLSTATEs for SQLExecute() include all those for SQLExecDirect() (see Table 53 on page 103) except
for HY009, and with the addition of the SQLSTATEs in the following table.
Table 55. SQLExecute SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009
Statement option is not
valid
Attributes associated with the statement being executed
are not valid.
HY010
Function sequence error
The specified hstmt is not in prepared state. SQLExecute()
is called without first calling SQLPrepare.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
Note: There are many other SQLSTATE values that can be generated by the Database Management System (DBMS),
on processing of the statement.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
References
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
v “SQLSetParam - Set parameter” on page 246
SQL call level interface
105
SQLExtendedFetch
SQLExtendedFetch - Fetch array of rows
SQLExtendedFetch() extends the function of SQLFetch() by returning a block of data that contains
multiple rows (called a rowset) in the form of an array, for each bound column. The size of the rowset is
determined by the SQL_ROWSET_SIZE attribute on an SQLSetStmtAttr() call.
To fetch one row of data at a time, an application should call SQLFetch().
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLExtendedFetch (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
FetchOrientation,
FetchOffset,
*RowCountPtr,
*RowStatusArray);
Function arguments
Table 56. SQLExtendedFetch arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
FetchOrientation
Input
Fetch orientation. See Table 61 on page 114 for
possible values.
SQLINTEGER
FetchOffset
Input
Row offset for relative positioning.
SQLINTEGER *
RowCountPtr
Output
Number of the rows actually fetched. If an error
occurs during processing, RowCountPtr points to the
ordinal position of the row (in the rowset) that
precedes the row where the error occurred. If an
error occurs retrieving the first row RowCountPtr
points to the value 0.
SQLSMALLINT *
RowStatusArray
Output
An array of status values. The number of elements
must equal the number of rows in the rowset (as
defined by the SQL_ROWSET_SIZE attribute). A
status value for each row fetched is returned:
v SQL_ROW_SUCCESS
If the number of rows fetched is less than the
number of elements in the status array (that is, less
than the rowset size), the remaining status elements
are set to SQL_ROW_NOROW.
Db2 for i CLI cannot detect whether a row has been
updated or deleted since the start of the fetch.
Therefore, the following ODBC defined status values
are not reported:
v SQL_ROW_DELETED
v SQL_ROW_UPDATED
Usage
SQLExtendedFetch() is used to perform an array fetch of a set of rows. An application specifies the size of
the array by calling SQLSetStmtAttr() with the SQL_ROWSET_SIZE attribute.
Before SQLExtendedFetch() is called the first time, the cursor is positioned before the first row. After
SQLExtendedFetch() is called, the cursor is positioned on the row in the result set corresponding to the
last row element in the rowset just retrieved.
106
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLExtendedFetch
For any columns in the result set that have been bound by the SQLBindCol() function, Db2 for i CLI
converts the data for the bound columns as necessary and stores it in the locations bound to these
columns. The result set must be bound in a row-wise fashion. This means that the values for all the
columns of the first row are contiguous, followed by the values of the second row, and so on. Also, if
indicator variables are used, they are all returned in one contiguous storage location.
When using this procedure to retrieve multiple rows, all columns must be bound, and the storage must
be contiguous. When using this function to retrieve rows from an SQL procedure result set, only the
SQL_FETCH_NEXT orientation is supported. The user is responsible for allocating enough storage for the
number of rows that are specified in SQL_ROWSET_SIZE.
The cursor must be a scrollable cursor for SQLExtendedFetch() to use any orientation other than
SQL_FETCH_NEXT. See “SQLSetStmtAttr - Set a statement attribute” on page 247 for information about
setting the SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_SCROLLABLE attribute.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
Error conditions
Table 57. SQLExtendedFetch SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
HY009
Argument value that is not valid
Explanation
The argument value RowCountPtr or RowStatusArray is a null
pointer.
The value specified for the argument FetchOrientation is not
recognized.
HY010
Function sequence error
SQLExtendedFetch() is called for an StatementHandle after
SQLFetch() is called and before SQLFreeStmt() has been called
with the SQL_CLOSE option.
The function is called before calling SQLPrepare() or
SQLExecDirect() for the StatementHandle.
The function is called while in a data-at-processing
(SQLParamData(), SQLPutData()) operation.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
Restrictions
None.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
SQL call level interface
107
SQLFetch
SQLFetch - Fetch next row
SQLFetch() advances the cursor to the next row of the result set, and retrieves any bound columns.
SQLFetch() can be used to receive the data directly into variables that you specify with SQLBindCol(), or
the columns can be received individually after the fetch by calling SQLGetData(). Data conversion is also
performed when SQLFetch() is called, if conversion is indicated when the column is bound.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLFetch (SQLHSTMT
hstmt);
Function arguments
Table 58. SQLFetch arguments
Data type
argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle
Usage
SQLFetch() can only be called if the most recently processed statement on hstmt is a SELECT.
The number of application variables bound with SQLBindCol() must not exceed the number of columns
in the result set; otherwise SQLFetch() fails.
If SQLBindCol() has not been called to bind any columns, then SQLFetch() does not return data to the
application, but just advances the cursor. In this case SQLGetData() can then be called to obtain all of the
columns individually. Data in unbound columns is discarded when SQLFetch() advances the cursor to the
next row.
If any bound variables are not large enough to hold the data returned by SQLFetch(), the data is
truncated. If character data is truncated, and the SQLSetEnvAttr() attribute
SQL_ATTR_TRUNCATION_RTNC is set to SQL_TRUE, then the CLI return code
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO is returned, along with an SQLSTATE that indicates truncation. Note that
the default is SQL_FALSE for SQL_ATTR_TRUNCATION_RTNC. Also, in the case of character data
truncation, the SQLBindCol() deferred output argument pcbValue contains the actual length of the column
data retrieved from the data source. The application should compare the output length to the input
length (pcbValue and cbValueMax arguments from SQLBindCol()) to determine which character columns
have been truncated.
Truncation of numeric data types is not reported if the truncation involves digits to the right of the
decimal point. If truncation occurs to the left of the decimal point, an error is returned (refer to the
diagnostics section).
Truncation of graphic data types is treated the same as character data types. Except the rgbValue buffer is
filled to the nearest multiple of two bytes that is still less than or equal to the cbValueMax specified in
SQLBindCol(). Graphic data transferred between Db2 for i CLI and the application is never
null-terminated.
When all the rows have been retrieved from the result set, or the remaining rows are not needed,
SQLFreeStmt() should be called to close the cursor and discard the remaining data and associated
resources.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
108
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLFetch
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND is returned if there are no rows in the result set, or previous SQLFetch() calls
have fetched all the rows from the result set.
Diagnostics
Table 59. SQLFetch SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The data returned for one or more columns is truncated.
String values are right truncated.
(SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO is returned if no error
occurred.)
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY010
Function sequence error
The specified hstmt is not in an processed state. The
function is called without first calling SQLExecute or
SQLExecDirect.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*************************************************************************
** file = fetch.c
**
** Example of executing an SQL statement.
** SQLBindCol & SQLFetch is used to retrieve data from the result set
** directly into application storage.
**
** Functions used:
**
**
SQLAllocConnect
SQLFreeConnect
**
SQLAllocEnv
SQLFreeEnv
**
SQLAllocStmt
SQLFreeStmt
**
SQLConnect
SQLDisconnect
**
**
SQLBindCol
SQLFetch
**
SQLTransact
SQLExecDirect
**
SQLError
**
**************************************************************************/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "sqlcli.h"
#define MAX_STMT_LEN 255
int initialize(SQLHENV *henv,
SQLHDBC *hdbc);
SQL call level interface
109
SQLFetch
int terminate(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC hdbc);
int print_error (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt);
int check_error (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
SQLRETURN
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt,
frc);
/*******************************************************************
** main
** - initialize
** - terminate
*******************************************************************/
int main()
{
SQLHENV
henv;
SQLHDBC
hdbc;
SQLCHAR
sqlstmt[MAX_STMT_LEN + 1]="";
SQLRETURN
rc;
rc = initialize(&henv, &hdbc);
if (rc == SQL_ERROR) return(terminate(henv, hdbc));
{SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
hstmt;
sqlstmt[]="SELECT deptname, location from org where division = ’Eastern’";
deptname[15],
location[14];
SQLINTEGER rlength;
rc = SQLAllocStmt(hdbc, &hstmt);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
rc = SQLExecDirect(hstmt, sqlstmt, SQL_NTS);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 1, SQL_CHAR,
&rlength);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt,
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 2, SQL_CHAR,
&rlength);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt,
(SQLPOINTER) deptname, 15,
rc);
(SQLPOINTER) location, 14,
rc);
printf("Departments in Eastern division:\n");
printf("DEPTNAME
Location\n");
printf("-------------- -------------\n");
while ((rc = SQLFetch(hstmt)) == SQL_SUCCESS)
{
printf("%-14.14s %-13.13s \n", deptname, location);
}
if (rc != SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
rc = SQLFreeStmt(hstmt, SQL_DROP);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
}
110
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLFetch
rc = SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_COMMIT);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
terminate(henv, hdbc);
return (0);
}/* end main */
/*******************************************************************
** initialize
** - allocate environment handle
** - allocate connection handle
** - prompt for server, user id, & password
** - connect to server
*******************************************************************/
int initialize(SQLHENV *henv,
SQLHDBC *hdbc)
{
SQLCHAR
server[SQL_MAX_DSN_LENGTH],
uid[30],
pwd[30];
SQLRETURN rc;
rc = SQLAllocEnv (henv);
/* allocate an environment handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv, *hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
rc = SQLAllocConnect (*henv, hdbc); /* allocate a connection handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv, *hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
*/
*/
printf("Enter Server Name:\n");
gets(server);
printf("Enter User Name:\n");
gets(uid);
printf("Enter Password Name:\n");
gets(pwd);
if (uid[0] == ’\0’)
{ rc = SQLConnect (*hdbc,
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv,
}
else
{ rc = SQLConnect (*hdbc,
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv,
}
server, SQL_NTS, NULL, SQL_NTS, NULL, SQL_NTS);
*hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
server, SQL_NTS, uid, SQL_NTS, pwd, SQL_NTS);
*hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
return(SQL_SUCCESS);
}/* end initialize */
/*******************************************************************
** terminate
** - disconnect
** - free connection handle
** - free environment handle
*******************************************************************/
int terminate(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC hdbc)
{
SQLRETURN rc;
rc = SQLDisconnect (hdbc);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
/* disconnect from database
*/
SQL call level interface
111
SQLFetch
print_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT);
rc = SQLFreeConnect (hdbc);
/* free connection handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
print_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT);
rc = SQLFreeEnv (henv);
/* free environment handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
print_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT);
*/
*/
return(rc);
}/* end terminate */
/*******************************************************************
** - print_error - call SQLError(), display SQLSTATE and message
*******************************************************************/
int print_error (SQLHENV
henv,
SQLHDBC
hdbc,
SQLHSTMT hstmt)
{
SQLCHAR
buffer[SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1];
SQLCHAR
sqlstate[SQL_SQLSTATE_SIZE + 1];
SQLINTEGER sqlcode;
SQLSMALLINT length;
while ( SQLError(henv, hdbc, hstmt, sqlstate, &sqlcode, buffer,
SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1, &length) == SQL_SUCCESS )
{
printf("\n **** ERROR *****\n");
printf("
SQLSTATE: %s\n", sqlstate);
printf("Native Error Code: %ld\n", sqlcode);
printf("%s \n", buffer);
};
return ( SQL_ERROR);
} /* end print_error */
/*******************************************************************
** - check_error - call print_error(), checks severity of return code
*******************************************************************/
int check_error (SQLHENV
henv,
SQLHDBC
hdbc,
SQLHSTMT hstmt,
SQLRETURN frc)
{
SQLRETURN rc;
print_error(henv, hdbc, hstmt);
switch (frc){
case SQL_SUCCESS : break;
case SQL_ERROR :
case SQL_INVALID_HANDLE:
printf("\n ** FATAL ERROR, Attempting to rollback transaction **\n");
rc = SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_ROLLBACK);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS)
printf("Rollback Failed, Exiting application\n");
else
printf("Rollback Successful, Exiting application\n");
terminate(henv, hdbc);
exit(frc);
break;
case SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO :
printf("\n ** Warning Message, application continuing\n");
break;
case SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND :
printf("\n ** No Data Found ** \n");
112
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLFetch
break;
default :
printf("\n ** Invalid Return Code ** \n");
printf(" ** Attempting to rollback transaction **\n");
SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_ROLLBACK);
terminate(henv, hdbc);
exit(frc);
break;
}
return(SQL_SUCCESS);
} /* end check_error */
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLGetCol - Retrieve one column of a row of the result set” on page 126
v “SQLFetchScroll - Fetch from a scrollable cursor” on page 114
SQL call level interface
113
SQLFetchScroll
SQLFetchScroll - Fetch from a scrollable cursor
SQLFetchScroll() positions the cursor based on the requested orientation and then retrieves any bound
columns.
SQLFetchScroll() can be used to receive the data directly into variables that you specify with
SQLBindCol(), or the columns can be received individually after the fetch by calling SQLGetData(). Data
conversion is also performed when SQLFetchScroll() is called, if conversion is indicated when the
column is bound.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLFetchScroll (SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
SQLSMALLINT fOrient,
SQLINTEGER fOffset);
Function arguments
Table 60. SQLFetchScroll arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
fOrient
Input
Fetch orientation. See Table 61 for possible
values.
SQLINTEGER
fOffset
Input
Row offset for relative positioning.
Usage
SQLFetchScroll() can only be called if the most recently processed statement on hstmt is a SELECT.
SQLFetchScroll() acts like SQLFetch(), except the fOrient parameter positions the cursor before any data
is retrieved. The cursor must be a scrollable cursor for SQLFetchScroll() to use any orientation other
than SQL_FETCH_NEXT.
When using this function to retrieve rows from an SQL procedure result set, only the SQL_FETCH_NEXT
orientation is supported.
SQLFetchScroll() supports array fetch, an alternative to the array fetch support provided by
SQLExtendedFetch(). See the SQLExtendedFetch() topic for details on array fetch.
The information returned in the RowCountPtr and RowStatusArray parameters of SQLExtendedFetch() are
handled by SQLFetchScroll() as follows:
v RowCountPtr: SQLFetchScroll() returns the number of rows fetched in the buffer pointed to by the
SQL_ATTR_ROWS_FETCHED_PTR statement attribute.
v RowStatusArray: SQLFetchScroll() returns the array of statuses for each row in the buffer pointed to by
the SQL_ATTR_ROW_STATUS_PTR statement attribute.
Table 61. Statement attributes
fOrient
Description
SQL_FETCH_ABSOLUTE
Move to the result set row specified by the fOffset
argument.
SQL_FETCH_FIRST
Move to the first row of the result set.
SQL_FETCH_LAST
Move to the last row of the result set.
SQL_FETCH_NEXT
Move to the row following the current cursor position.
SQL_FETCH_PRIOR
Move to the row preceding the current cursor position.
114
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLFetchScroll
Table 61. Statement attributes (continued)
fOrient
Description
SQL_FETCH_RELATIVE
If fOffset is:
v Positive, advance the cursor that number of rows.
v Negative, back up the cursor that number of rows.
v Zero, do not move the cursor.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
Diagnostics
Table 62. SQLFetchScroll SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The data returned for one or more columns is truncated.
String values are right truncated.
(SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO is returned if no error
occurred.)
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
Orientation that is not valid.
HY010
Function sequence error
The specified hstmt is not in an processed state. The
function is called without first calling SQLExecute or
SQLExecDirect.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExtendedFetch - Fetch array of rows” on page 106
v “SQLGetCol - Retrieve one column of a row of the result set” on page 126
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
v “SQLSetStmtAttr - Set a statement attribute” on page 247
SQL call level interface
115
SQLForeignKeys
SQLForeignKeys - Get the list of foreign key columns
SQLForeignKeys() returns information about foreign keys for the specified table. The information is
returned in an SQL result set, which can be processed with the same functions that are used to retrieve a
result that is generated by a query.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLForeignKeysW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLForeignKeys
(SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
*PKCatalogName,
NameLength1,
*PKSchemaName,
NameLength2,
*PKTableName,
NameLength3,
*FKCatalogName,
NameLength4,
*FKSchemaName,
NameLength5,
*FKTableName,
NameLength6);
Function arguments
Table 63. SQLForeignKeys arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
PKCatalogName
Input
Catalog qualifier of the primary key table. This must
be a NULL pointer or a zero length string.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength1
Input
Length of PKCatalogName. This must be set to 0.
SQLCHAR *
PKSchemaName
Input
Schema qualifier of the primary key table.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength2
Input
Length of PKSchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
PKTableName
Input
Name of the table name containing the primary key.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength3
Input
Length of PKTableName.
SQLCHAR *
FKCatalogName
Input
Catalog qualifier of the table containing the foreign
key. This must be a NULL pointer or a zero length
string.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength4
Input
Length of FKCatalogName. This must be set to 0.
SQLCHAR *
FKSchemaName
Input
Schema qualifier of the table containing the foreign
key.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength5
Input
Length of FKSchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
FKTableName
Input
Name of the table containing the foreign key.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength6
Input
Length of FKTableName.
Usage
If PKTableName contains a table name, and FKTableName is an empty string, SQLForeignKeys() returns a
result set that contains the primary key of the specified table and all of the foreign keys (in other tables)
that refer to it.
116
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLForeignKeys
If FKTableName contains a table name, and PKTableName is an empty string, SQLForeignKeys() returns a
result set that contains all of the foreign keys in the specified table and the primary keys (in other tables)
to which they refer.
If both PKTableName and FKTableName contain table names, SQLForeignKeys() returns the foreign keys in
the table specified in FKTableName that refer to the primary key of the table specified in PKTableName.
This should be one key at the most.
If the schema qualifier argument that is associated with a table name is not specified, then for the schema
name the default is the one currently in effect for the current connection.
Table 64 lists the columns of the result set generated by the SQLForeignKeys() call. If the foreign keys that
are associated with a primary key are requested, the result set is ordered by FKTABLE_CAT,
FKTABLE_SCHEM, FKTABLE_NAME, and ORDINAL_POSITION. If the primary keys that are associated
with a foreign key are requested, the result set is ordered by PKTABLE_CAT, PKTABLE_SCHEM,
PKTABLE_NAME, and ORDINAL_POSITION.
Although new columns might be added and the names of the existing columns might be changed in
future releases, the position of the current columns does not change.
Table 64. Columns returned by SQLForeignKeys
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 PKTABLE_CAT
VARCHAR(128)
The current server.
2 PKTABLE_SCHEM
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the schema containing PKTABLE_NAME.
3 PKTABLE_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
not NULL
Name of the table containing the primary key.
4 PKCOLUMN_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
not NULL
Primary key column name.
5 FKTABLE_CAT
VARCHAR(128)
The current server.
6 FKTABLE_SCHEM
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the schema containing FKTABLE_NAME.
7 FKTABLE_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
not NULL
The name of the table containing the Foreign key.
8 FKCOLUMN_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
not NULL
Foreign key column name.
9 KEY_SEQ
SMALLINT not
NULL
The ordinal position of the column in the key, starting at 1.
10 UPDATE_RULE
SMALLINT
Action to be applied to the foreign key when the SQL operation is
UPDATE:
v SQL_RESTRICT
v SQL_NO_ACTION
The update rule for IBM DB2 DBMSs is always either RESTRICT or
SQL_NO_ACTION. However, ODBC applications might encounter
the following UPDATE_RULE values when connected to non-IBM
RDBMSs:
v SQL_CASCADE
v SQL_SET_NULL
SQL call level interface
117
SQLForeignKeys
Table 64. Columns returned by SQLForeignKeys (continued)
Column number/name
Data type
Description
11 DELETE_RULE
SMALLINT
Action to be applied to the foreign key when the SQL operation is
DELETE:
v SQL_CASCADE
v SQL_NO_ACTION
v SQL_RESTRICT
v SQL_SET_DEFAULT
v SQL_SET_NULL
12 FK_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
Foreign key identifier. NULL if not applicable to the data source.
13 PK_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
Primary key identifier. NULL if not applicable to the data source.
14 DEFERRABILITY
SMALLINT
One of:
v SQL_INITIALLY_DEFERRED
v SQL_INITIALLY_IMMEDIATE
v SQL_NOT_DEFERRABLE
Note: The column names used by Db2 for i CLI follow the X/Open CLI CAE specification style. The column types,
contents and order are identical to those defined for the SQLForeignKeys() result set in ODBC.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 65. SQLForeignKeys SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
24000
Cursor state that is not valid
A cursor is already opened on the statement handle.
40003 08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between the application and data source
fails before the function is completed.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not valid The arguments PKTableName and FKTableName were both NULL
pointers.
HY010
Function sequence error
HY014
No more handles
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate a handle due to internal
resources.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HY090
String or buffer length that is not The value of one of the name length arguments is less than 0, but
valid
not equal to SQL_NTS.
The length of the table or owner name is greater than the
maximum length supported by the data source. Refer to
“SQLGetInfo - Get general information” on page 155.
HYC00
118
Driver not capable
IBM i: SQL call level interface
Db2 for i CLI does not support catalog as a qualifier for table
name.
SQLForeignKeys
Table 65. SQLForeignKeys SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
HYT00
Timeout expired
Explanation
Restrictions
None.
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/* From CLI sample browser.c */
/* ... */
SQLRETURN list_foreign_keys( SQLHANDLE hstmt,
SQLCHAR * schema,
SQLCHAR * tablename
) {
/* ... */
rc = SQLForeignKeys(hstmt, NULL, 0,
schema, SQL_NTS, tablename, SQL_NTS,
NULL, 0,
NULL, SQL_NTS, NULL, SQL_NTS);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 2, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) pktable_schem.s, 129,
&pktable_schem.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 3, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) pktable_name.s, 129,
&pktable_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 4, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) pkcolumn_name.s, 129,
&pkcolumn_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 6, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) fktable_schem.s, 129,
&fktable_schem.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 7, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) fktable_name.s, 129,
&fktable_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 8, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) fkcolumn_name.s, 129,
&fkcolumn_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 10, SQL_C_SHORT, (SQLPOINTER) &update_rule,
0, &update_ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 11, SQL_C_SHORT, (SQLPOINTER) &delete_rule,
0, &delete_ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 12, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) fkey_name.s, 129,
&fkey_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
SQL call level interface
119
SQLForeignKeys
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 13, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) pkey_name.s, 129,
&pkey_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
printf("Primary Key and Foreign Keys for %s.%s\n", schema, tablename);
/* Fetch each row, and display */
while ((rc = SQLFetch(hstmt)) == SQL_SUCCESS) {
printf(" %s %s.%s.%s\n
Update Rule ",
pkcolumn_name.s, fktable_schem.s, fktable_name.s, fkcolumn_name.s);
if (update_rule == SQL_RESTRICT) {
printf("RESTRICT "); /* always for IBM DBMSs */
} else {
if (update_rule == SQL_CASCADE) {
printf("CASCADE "); /* non-IBM only */
} else {
printf("SET NULL ");
}
}
printf(", Delete Rule: ");
if (delete_rule== SQL_RESTRICT) {
printf("RESTRICT "); /* always for IBM DBMSs */
} else {
if (delete_rule == SQL_CASCADE) {
printf("CASCADE "); /* non-IBM only */
} else {
if (delete_rule == SQL_NO_ACTION) {
printf("NO ACTION "); /* non-IBM only */
} else {
printf("SET NULL ");
}
}
}
printf("\n");
if (pkey_name.ind > 0 ) {
printf("
Primary Key Name: %s\n", pkey_name.s);
}
if (fkey_name.ind > 0 ) {
printf("
Foreign Key Name: %s\n", fkey_name.s);
}
}
References
v “SQLPrimaryKeys - Get primary key columns of a table” on page 204
v “SQLStatistics - Get index and statistics information for a base table” on page 259
120
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLFreeConnect
SQLFreeConnect - Free connection handle
SQLFreeConnect() invalidates and frees the connection handle. All Db2 for i CLI resources associated with
the connection handle are freed.
SQLDisconnect() must be called before calling this function.
Either SQLFreeEnv() is called next to continue ending the application, or SQLAllocHandle() is called to
allocate a new connection handle.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLFreeConnect (SQLHDBC
hdbc);
Function arguments
Table 66. SQLFreeConnect arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Connection handle
Usage
If this function is called when a connection still exists, SQL_ERROR is returned, and the connection
handle remains valid.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 67. SQLFreeConnect SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called before SQLDisconnect() for the
hdbc.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle” on page 30.
References
v “SQLDisconnect - Disconnect from a data source” on page 91
v “SQLFreeEnv - Free environment handle” on page 122
SQL call level interface
121
SQLFreeEnv
SQLFreeEnv - Free environment handle
SQLFreeEnv() invalidates and frees the environment handle. All Db2 for i CLI resources associated with
the environment handle are freed.
SQLFreeConnect() must be called before calling this function.
This function is the last Db2 for i CLI step that an application needs before it ends.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLFreeEnv (SQLHENV
henv);
Function arguments
Table 68. SQLFreeEnv arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHENV
henv
Input
Environment handle
Usage
If this function is called when there is still a valid connection handle, SQL_ERROR is returned, and the
environment handle remains valid.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 69. SQLFreeEnv SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY010
Function sequence error
There is an hdbc which is in allocated or connected state.
Call SQLDisconnect and SQLFreeConnect for the hdbc
before calling SQLFreeEnv.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle” on page 30.
References
“SQLFreeConnect - Free connection handle” on page 121
122
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLFreeHandle
SQLFreeHandle - Free a handle
SQLFreeHandle() invalidates and frees a handle.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLFreeHandle (SQLSMALLINT htype,
SQLINTEGER handle);
Function arguments
Table 70. SQLFreeHandle arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
hType
Input
Handle type that must be
SQL_HANDLE_ENV, SQL_HANDLE_DBC,
SQL_HANDLE_STMT, or
SQL_HANDLE_DESC.
SQLINTEGER
handle
Input
The handle to be freed.
Usage
SQLFreeHandle() combines the function of SQLFreeEnv(), SQLFreeConnect(), and SQLFreeStmt().
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 71. SQLFreeHandle SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY010
Function sequence error
There is an hdbc which is in allocated or connected state.
Call SQLDisconnect and SQLFreeConnect for the hdbc
before calling SQLFreeHandle.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
References
v “SQLFreeConnect - Free connection handle” on page 121
v “SQLFreeEnv - Free environment handle” on page 122
v “SQLFreeStmt - Free (or reset) a statement handle” on page 124
SQL call level interface
123
SQLFreeStmt
SQLFreeStmt - Free (or reset) a statement handle
SQLFreeStmt() ends processing on the statement that is referenced by the statement handle.
You can use this function to complete the following tasks:
v Close a cursor.
v Reset parameters.
v Unbind columns from variables.
v Drop the statement handle and free the Db2 for i CLI resources associated with the statement handle.
SQLFreeStmt() is called after executing an SQL statement and processing the results.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLFreeStmt (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
fOption);
Function arguments
Table 72. SQLFreeStmt arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle
SQLSMALLINT
fOption
Input
Option specifying the manner of freeing the
statement handle. The option must have one
of the following values:
v SQL_CLOSE
v SQL_DROP
v SQL_UNBIND
v SQL_RESET_PARAMS
Usage
SQLFreeStmt() can be called with the following options:
v SQL_CLOSE
The cursor (if any) associated with the statement handle (hstmt) is closed and all pending results are
discarded. The application can reopen the cursor by calling SQLExecute() with the same or different
values in the application variables (if any) that are bound to hstmt. The cursor name is retained until
the statement handle is dropped or the next successful SQLSetCursorName() call. If no cursor has been
associated with the statement handle, this option has no effect (no warning or error is generated).
v SQL_DROP
Db2 for i CLI resources associated with the input statement handle are freed, and the handle is
invalidated. The open cursor, if any, is closed and all pending results are discarded.
v SQL_UNBIND
All the columns bound by previous SQLBindCol() calls on this statement handle are released (the
association between application variables or file references and result set columns is broken).
v SQL_RESET_PARAMS
All the parameters set by previous SQLBindParam() calls on this statement handle are released. The
association between application variables or file references and parameter markers in the SQL
statement of the statement handle is broken.
To reuse a statement handle to run a different statement and if the previous statement:
v Was a SELECT, you must close the cursor.
124
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLFreeStmt
v Used a different number or type of parameters, the parameters must be reset.
v Used a different number or type of column bindings, the columns must be unbound.
Alternatively you can drop the statement handle and allocate a new one.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_IN_HANDLE
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO is not returned if fOption is set to SQL_DROP, because there is no statement
handle to use when SQLError() is called.
Diagnostics
Table 73. SQLFreeStmt SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument fOption is not
SQL_CLOSE, SQL_DROP, SQL_UNBIND, or
SQL_RESET_PARAMS.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108.
References
v “SQLAllocStmt - Allocate a statement handle” on page 34
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
v “SQLFreeConnect - Free connection handle” on page 121
v “SQLSetParam - Set parameter” on page 246
SQL call level interface
125
SQLGetCol
SQLGetCol - Retrieve one column of a row of the result set
SQLGetCol() retrieves data for a single column in the current row of the result set. This is an alternative
to SQLBindCol(), which transfers data directly into application variables on a call to SQLFetch().
SQLGetCol() is also used to retrieve large character-based data in pieces.
SQLFetch() must be called before SQLGetCol().
After calling SQLGetCol() for each column, SQLFetch() is called to retrieve the next row.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetColW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307 for
more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetCol
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
icol,
fCType,
rgbValue,
cbValueMax,
*pcbValue);
Function arguments
Table 74. SQLGetCol arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
icol
Input
Column number for which the data retrieval
is requested.
SQLSMALLINT
fCType
Input
Application data type of the column
identified by icol. The following types are
supported:
v SQL_BIGINT
v SQL_BINARY
v SQL_BLOB
v SQL_CHAR
v SQL_CLOB
v SQL_DATETIME
v SQL_DBCLOB
v SQL_DECFLOAT
v SQL_DECIMAL
v SQL_DOUBLE
v SQL_FLOAT
v SQL_GRAPHIC
v SQL_INTEGER
v SQL_NUMERIC
v SQL_REAL
v SQL_SMALLINT
v SQL_TYPE_DATE
v SQL_TYPE_TIME
v SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP
v SQL_VARBINARY
v SQL_VARGRAPHIC
126
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetCol
Table 74. SQLGetCol arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLPOINTER
rgbValue
Output
Pointer to buffer where the retrieved column
data is to be stored.
SQLINTEGER
cbValueMax
Input
Maximum size of the buffer pointed to by
rgbValue. If fcType is either SQL_DECIMAL or
SQL_NUMERIC, cbValueMax must be a
precision and scale. The method to specify
both values is to use (precision * 256) +
scale. This is also the value returned as the
LENGTH of these data types when using
SQLColAttribute().
SQLINTEGER *
pcbValue
Output
Pointer to the value that indicates the
number of bytes Db2 for i CLI has available
to return in the rgbValue buffer. If the data is
being retrieved in pieces, this contains the
number of bytes still remaining, excluding
any bytes of the column's data that has been
obtained from previous calls to SQLGetCol().
The value is SQL_NULL_DATA if the data
value of the column is null. If this pointer is
NULL and SQLFetch() has obtained a
column containing null data, then this
function fails because it has no means of
reporting this.
If SQLFetch() has fetched a column
containing graphic data, then the pointer to
pcbValue must not be NULL or this function
fails because it has no means of informing
the application about the length of the data
retrieved in the rgbValue buffer.
Usage
SQLGetCol() can be used with SQLBindCol() for the same row, as long as the value of icol does not specify
a column that has been bound. The general steps are:
1. SQLFetch() - advances cursor to first row, retrieves first row, transfers data for bound columns.
2. SQLGetCol() - transfers data for specified (unbound) column.
3. Repeat step 2 for each column needed.
4. SQLFetch() - advances cursor to next row, retrieves next row, transfers data for bound columns.
5. Repeat steps 2, 3 and 4 for each row in the result set, or until the result set is no longer needed.
SQLGetCol() retrieves long columns if the C data type (fCType) is SQL_CHAR or if fCType is
SQL_DEFAULT and the column type is CHAR or VARCHAR.
On each SQLGetCol() call, if the data available for return is greater than or equal to cbValueMax,
truncation occurs. A function return code of SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO that is coupled with an
SQLSTATE that denotes data truncation indicates truncation. The application can call SQLGetCol() again,
with the same icol value, to obtain later data from the same unbound column starting at the point of
truncation. To obtain the entire column, the application repeats such calls until the function returns
SQL_SUCCESS. The next call to SQLGetCol() returns SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND.
SQL call level interface
127
SQLGetCol
To discard the column data part way through the retrieval, the application can call SQLGetCol() with icol
set to the next column position of interest. To discard unretrieved data for the entire row, the application
should call SQLFetch() to advance the cursor to the next row; or, if it is not interested in any more data
from the result set, call SQLFreeStmt() to close the cursor.
The fCType input argument determines the type of data conversion (if any) needed before the column
data is placed into the storage area pointed to by rgbValue.
The contents returned in rgbValue is always null-terminated unless SQLSetEnvAttr() is used to change
the SQL_ATTR_OUTPUT_NTS attribute or if the application is retrieving the data in multiple chunks. If
the application is retrieving the data in multiple chunks, the null-terminating byte is only added to the
last portion of data.
Truncation of numeric data types is not reported if the truncation involves digits to the right of the
decimal point. If truncation occurs to the left of the decimal point, an error is returned (refer to the
diagnostics section).
For decimal floating point data types, a precision of 32, 64, or 128 can be specified by using the default
symbolic C data type constants. For example, to specify a decimal floating point data type with a
precision of 128 bytes, ValueType can be set to SQL_C_DECIMAL128.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND is returned when the preceding SQLGetCol() call has retrieved all of the data
for this column.
SQL_SUCCESS is returned if a zero-length string is retrieved by SQLGetCol(). If this is the case, pcbValue
contains 0, and rgbValue contains a null terminator.
If the preceding call to SQLFetch() fails, SQLGetCol() should not be called because the result is undefined.
Diagnostics
Table 75. SQLGetCol SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
07006
Restricted data type
attribute violation
The data value cannot be converted to the C data type
specified by the argument fCType.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The value of the argument cbValueMax is less than 1 and
the argument fCType is SQL_CHAR.
The specified column number is not valid.
The argument rgbValue or pcbValue is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
The specified hstmt is not in a cursor positioned state.
The function is called without first calling SQLFetch().
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
128
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetCol
Table 75. SQLGetCol SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The SQL data type for the specified data type is
recognized but not supported by the driver.
The requested conversion from the SQL data type to the
application data fCType cannot be performed by the
driver or the data source.
Restrictions
ODBC requires that icol not specify a column of a lower number than the column last retrieved by
SQLGetCol() for the same row on the same statement handle. ODBC also does not permit the use of
SQLGetCol() to retrieve data for a column that resides before the last bound column, (if any columns in
the row have been bound).
Db2 for i CLI has relaxed both of these rules by allowing the value of icol to be specified in any order
and before a bound column, provided that icol does not specify a bound column.
Example
Refer to the example in the “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108 for a comparison between using
bound columns and using SQLGetCol().
Refer to “Example: Interactive SQL and the equivalent Db2 for i CLI function calls” on page 314 for a
listing of the check_error, initialize, and terminate functions used in the following example.
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*************************************************************************
** file = getcol.c
**
** Example of directly executing an SQL statement.
** Getcol is used to retrieve information from the result set.
** Compare to fetch.c
**
** Functions used:
**
**
SQLAllocConnect
SQLFreeConnect
**
SQLAllocEnv
SQLFreeEnv
**
SQLAllocStmt
SQLFreeStmt
**
SQLConnect
SQLDisconnect
**
**
SQLBindCol
SQLFetch
**
SQLTransact
SQLError
**
SQLExecDirect
SQLGetCursor
**************************************************************************/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "sqlcli.h"
#define MAX_STMT_LEN 255
int initialize(SQLHENV *henv,
SQLHDBC *hdbc);
SQL call level interface
129
SQLGetCol
int terminate(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC hdbc);
int print_error (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt);
int check_error (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
SQLRETURN
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt,
frc);
/*******************************************************************
** main
** - initialize
** - terminate
*******************************************************************/
int main()
{
SQLHENV
henv;
SQLHDBC
hdbc;
SQLCHAR
sqlstmt[MAX_STMT_LEN + 1]="";
SQLRETURN
rc;
rc = initialize(&henv, &hdbc);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS) return(terminate(henv, hdbc));
{SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
hstmt;
sqlstmt[]="SELECT deptname, location from org where division = ’Eastern’";
deptname[15],
location[14];
SQLINTEGER rlength;
rc = SQLAllocStmt(hdbc, &hstmt);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
rc = SQLExecDirect(hstmt, sqlstmt, SQL_NTS);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
printf("Departments in Eastern division:\n");
printf("DEPTNAME
Location\n");
printf("-------------- -------------\n");
while ((rc = SQLFetch(hstmt)) == SQL_SUCCESS)
{
rc = SQLGetCol(hstmt, 1, SQL_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) deptname, 15, &rlength);
rc = SQLGetCol(hstmt, 2, SQL_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) location, 14, &rlength);
printf("%-14.14s %-13.13s \n", deptname, location);
}
if (rc != SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
}
rc = SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_COMMIT);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
terminate(henv, hdbc);
return (SQL_SUCCESS);
}/* end main */
130
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetCol
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
SQL call level interface
131
SQLGetConnectAttr
SQLGetConnectAttr - Get the value of a connection attribute
SQLGetConnectAttr() returns the current settings for the specified connection option.
These options are set using the SQLSetConnectAttr() function.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetConnectAttrW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetConnectAttr(
SQLHDBC
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hdbc,
fAttr,
pvParam),;
bLen,
*sLen);
Function arguments
Table 76. SQLGetConnectAttr arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Connection handle.
SQLINTEGER
fAttr
Input
Attribute to retrieve. See
“SQLSetConnectAttr - Set a connection
attribute” on page 220 for a description of
the connect options.
SQLPOINTER
pvParam
Output
Value associated with fAttr Depending on
the value of fAttr. This can be a 32-bit
integer value, or a pointer to a null
terminated character string.
SQLINTEGER
bLen
Input
Maximum number of bytes to store in
pvParm, if the value is a character string;
otherwise, unused.
SQLINTEGER *
sLen
Output
Length of the output data, if the attribute is
a character string; otherwise, unused.
Usage
Statement options settings cannot be retrieved through SQLGetConnectAttr().
Diagnostics
Table 77. SQLGetConnectAttr SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
08003
Connection not open
An fAttr value that requires an open connection is
specified .
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Attribute type out of range
An fAttr value that is not valid is specified.
The argument pvParam is a null pointer.
HYC00
132
Driver not capable
IBM i: SQL call level interface
The fAttr argument is recognized, but is not supported.
SQLGetConnectOption
SQLGetConnectOption - Return current setting of a connect option
SQLGetConnectOption() has been deprecated and replaced with SQLGetConnectAttr(). Although this
version of Db2 for i CLI continues to support SQLGetConnectOption(), it is recommended that you begin
using SQLGetConnectAttr() in your Db2 for i CLI programs so that they conform to the latest standards.
SQLGetConnectOption() returns the current settings for the specified connection option.
These options are set using the SQLSetConnectOption() function.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetConnectOptionW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetConnectOption( HDBC
hdbc,
SQLSMALLINT fOption,
SQLPOINTER pvParam);
Function arguments
Table 78. SQLGetConnectOption arguments
Data type
argument
Use
Description
HDBC
hdbc
Input
Connection handle.
SQLSMALLINT
fOption
Input
Option to retrieve. Refer to Table 146 on page 220 for
more information.
SQLPOINTER
pvParam
Output
Value associated with fOption Depending on the value of
fOption, this can be a 32-bit integer value, or a pointer to
a null terminated character string. The maximum length
of any character string returned is
SQL_MAX_OPTION_STRING_LENGTH bytes (excluding
the null-terminating byte).
Usage
SQLGetConnectOption() provides the same function as SQLGetConnectAttr(). Both functions are supported
for compatibility reasons.
Statement options settings cannot be retrieved through SQLGetConnectOption().
Diagnostics
Table 79. SQLGetConnectOption SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
08003
Connection not open
An fOption value that requires an open connection is
specified .
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Option type out of range
An fOption value that is not valid is specified.
The argument pvParam is a null pointer.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The fOption argument is recognized, but is not
supported.
SQL call level interface
133
SQLGetConnectOption
References
“SQLGetConnectAttr - Get the value of a connection attribute” on page 132
134
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetCursorName
SQLGetCursorName - Get cursor name
SQLGetCursorName() returns the cursor name associated with the input statement handle. If a cursor name
is explicitly set by calling SQLSetCursorName(), this name is returned; otherwise, an internally generated
name is returned.
Internally generated cursor names are always 18 bytes in length.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetCursorNameW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetCursorName (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szCursor,
cbCursorMax,
*pcbCursor);
Function arguments
Table 80. SQLGetCursorName arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle
SQLCHAR *
szCursor
Output
Cursor name
SQLSMALLINT
cbCursorMax
Input
Length of buffer szCursor
SQLSMALLINT *
pcbCursor
Output
Amount of bytes available to return for
szCursor
Usage
SQLGetCursorName() returns a cursor name if a name is set using SQLSetCursorName() or if a SELECT
statement is processed on the statement handle. If neither of these is true, then calling SQLGetCusorName()
results in an error.
If a name is set explicitly using SQLSetCursorName(), this name is returned until the statement is dropped,
or until another explicit name is set.
If an explicit name is not set, an implicit name is generated when a SELECT statement is processed, and
this name is returned. Implicit cursor names always begin with SQLCUR.
The generated cursor names of ODBC start with SQL_CUR and X/Open CLI generated cursor names
begin with SQLCUR. Db2 for i CLI uses SQLCUR.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
SQL call level interface
135
SQLGetCursorName
Diagnostics
Table 81. SQLGetCursorName SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The cursor name returned in szCursor is longer than the
value in cbCursorMax, and is truncated to cbCursorMax 1 bytes. The argument pcbCursor contains the length of
the full cursor name available for return. The function
returns SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The argument szCursor or pcbCursor is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
The statement hstmt is not in execute state. Call
SQLExecute(), SQLExecDirect() or SQLSetCursorName()
before calling SQLGetCursorName().
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY015
No cursor name available.
There is no open cursor on the hstmt and no cursor name
has been set with SQLSetCursorName(). The statement
associated with hstmt does not support the use of a
cursor.
The value specified for the argument cbCursorMax is less
than 1.
Example
Refer to “Example: Interactive SQL and the equivalent Db2 for i CLI function calls” on page 314 for a
listing of the check_error, initialize, and terminate functions used in the following example.
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*************************************************************************
** file = getcurs.c
**
** Example of directly executing a SELECT and positioned UPDATE SQL statement.
** Two statement handles are used, and SQLGetCursor is used to retrieve the
** generated cursor name.
**
** Functions used:
**
**
SQLAllocConnect
SQLFreeConnect
**
SQLAllocEnv
SQLFreeEnv
**
SQLAllocStmt
SQLFreeStmt
**
SQLConnect
SQLDisconnect
**
**
SQLBindCol
SQLFetch
**
SQLTransact
SQLError
**
SQLExecDirect
SQLGetCursorName
**************************************************************************/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "sqlcli.h"
136
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetCursorName
#define MAX_STMT_LEN 255
int initialize(SQLHENV *henv,
SQLHDBC *hdbc);
int terminate(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC hdbc);
int print_error (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt);
int check_error (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
SQLRETURN
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt,
frc);
/*******************************************************************
** main
** - initialize
** - terminate
*******************************************************************/
int main()
{
SQLHENV
henv;
SQLHDBC
hdbc;
SQLRETURN
rc,
rc2;
rc = initialize(&henv, &hdbc);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS) return(terminate(henv, hdbc));
{SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt1,
hstmt2;
sqlstmt[]="SELECT name, job from staff for update of job";
updstmt[MAX_STMT_LEN + 1];
name[10],
job[6],
newjob[6],
cursor[19];
rlength, attr;
clength;
rc = SQLAllocStmt(hdbc, &hstmt1);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
/* make sure the statement is update-capable */
attr = SQL_FALSE;
rc = SQLSetStmtAttr(hstmt1,SQL_ATTR_FOR_FETCH_ONLY, &attr, 0);
/* allocate second statement handle for update statement */
rc2 = SQLAllocStmt(hdbc, &hstmt2);
if (rc2 != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
rc = SQLExecDirect(hstmt1, sqlstmt, SQL_NTS);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt1, rc);
/* Get Cursor of the SELECT statement’s handle */
rc = SQLGetCursorName(hstmt1, cursor, 19, &clength);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt1, rc);
SQL call level interface
137
SQLGetCursorName
/* bind name to first column in the result set */
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt1, 1, SQL_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) name, 10,
&rlength);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt1, rc);
/* bind job to second column in the result set */
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt1, 2, SQL_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) job, 6,
&rlength);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt1, rc);
printf("Job Change for all clerks\n");
while ((rc = SQLFetch(hstmt1)) == SQL_SUCCESS)
{
printf("Name: %-9.9s Job: %-5.5s \n", name, job);
printf("Enter new job or return to continue\n");
gets(newjob);
if (newjob[0] != ’\0’)
{
sprintf( updstmt,
"UPDATE staff set job = ’%s’ where current of %s",
newjob, cursor);
rc2 = SQLExecDirect(hstmt2, updstmt, SQL_NTS);
if (rc2 != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt2, rc);
}
}
if (rc != SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt1, rc);
SQLFreeStmt(hstmt1, SQL_CLOSE);
}
printf("Commiting Transaction\n");
rc = SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_COMMIT);
if (rc != SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
terminate(henv, hdbc);
return (0);
}/* end main */
References
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLSetCursorName - Set cursor name” on page 235
138
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetData
SQLGetData - Get data from a column
SQLGetData() retrieves data for a single column in the current row of the result set. This is an alternative
to SQLBindCol(), which transfers data directly into application variables on a call to SQLFetch().
SQLGetData() can also be used to retrieve large character-based data in pieces.
SQLFetch() must be called before SQLGetData().
After calling SQLGetData() for each column, SQLFetch() is called to retrieve the next row.
SQLGetData() is identical to SQLGetCol(). Both functions are supported for compatibility reasons.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetData (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
icol,
fCType,
rgbValue,
cbValueMax,
*pcbValue);
Note: Refer to “SQLGetCol - Retrieve one column of a row of the result set” on page 126 for a
description of the applicable sections.
SQL call level interface
139
SQLGetDescField
SQLGetDescField - Get descriptor field
SQLGetDescField() obtains a value from a descriptor. SQLGetDescField() is a more extensible alternative
to the SQLGetDescRec() function.
This function is similar to that of SQLDescribeCol(), but SQLGetDescField() can retrieve data from
parameter descriptors as well as row descriptors.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetDescFieldW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetDescField (SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hdesc,
irec,
fDescType,
rgbDesc,
bLen,
*sLen);
Function arguments
Table 82. SQLGetDescField arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDESC
hdesc
Input
Descriptor handle.
SQLSMALLINT
irec
Input
Indicates the descriptor record from which
the application seeks information. Descriptor
records are numbered from 1, with the
record number 1 being the first item in the
descriptor. If the fDescType argument
indicates a field of the descriptor header
record ( SQL_DESC_ALLOC_TYPE or
SQL_DESC_COUNT), irec must be 0.
SQLSMALLINT
fDescType
Input
Indicates the field of the descriptor whose
value is to be returned. See Table 83.
SQLPOINTER
rgbDesc
Output
Pointer to buffer.
SQLINTEGER
bLen
Input
Length of descriptor buffer (rgbDesc).
SQLINTEGER *
sLen
Output
Actual number of bytes in the descriptor to
return. If this argument contains a value
equal to or higher than the length rgbDesc
buffer, truncation occurs.
Table 83. fDescType descriptor types
Descriptor
Type
Description
SQL_DESC_ALLOC_TYPE
SMALLINT
Either SQL_DESC_ALLOC_USER if
the application explicitly allocated
the descriptor, or
SQL_DESC_ALLOC_AUTO if the
implementation automatically
allocated the descriptor.
SQL_DESC_COUNT
SMALLINT
The number of records in the
descriptor is returned in rgbDesc.
SQL_DESC_DATA_PTR
SQLPOINTER
Retrieve the data pointer field for
irec.
140
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetDescField
Table 83. fDescType descriptor types (continued)
|
Descriptor
Type
Description
SQL_DESC_DATETIME_INTERVAL_CODE
SMALLINT
Retrieve the interval code for records
with a type of SQL_DATETIME. The
interval code further defines the
SQL_DATETIME data type. The code
values are SQL_CODE_DATE,
SQL_CODE_TIME, and
SQL_CODE_TIMESTAMP.
SQL_DESC_INDICATOR_PTR
SQLPOINTER
Retrieve the indicator pointer field
for irec.
SQL_DESC_LENGTH_PTR
SQLPOINTER
Retrieve the length pointer field for
irec.
SQL_DESC_LENGTH
INTEGER
Retrieve the LENGTH field of irec.
SQL_DESC_NAME
CHAR(128)
Retrieve the NAME field of irec.
SQL_DESC_NULLABLE
SMALLINT
If irec can contain nulls, then
SQL_NULLABLE is returned in
rgbDesc. Otherwise,
SQL_NO_NULLS is returned in
rgbDesc.
SQL_DESC_PRECISION
SMALLINT
Retrieve the PRECISION field of irec.
SQL_DESC_SCALE
SMALLINT
Retrieve the SCALE field of irec.
SQL_DESC_TYPE
SMALLINT
Retrieve the TYPE field of irec.
SQL_DESC_UNNAMED
SMALLINT
This is SQL_NAMED if the NAME
field is an actual name, or
SQL_UNNAMED if the NAME field
is an implementation-generated
name.
SQL_DESC_CCSID
INTEGER
Retrieve the CCSID value of irec
Usage
The number of records in the descriptor corresponds to the number of columns in the result set, if the
descriptor is row descriptor, or the number of parameters, for a parameter descriptor.
Calling SQLGetDescField() with fDescType set to SQL_DESC_COUNT is an alternative to calling
SQLNumResultCols() to determine whether any columns can be returned.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
SQL call level interface
141
SQLGetDescField
Diagnostics
Table 84. SQLGetDescField SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument fDescType or irec is
not valid.
The argument rgbDesc or sLen is a null pointer.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access the memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes” on page 85
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
142
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetDescRec
SQLGetDescRec - Get descriptor record
SQLGetDescRec() obtains an entire record from a descriptor. SQLGetDescRec() is a more concise alternative
to the SQLGetDescField() function.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetDescRecW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetDescRec
(SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hdesc,
irec,
*rgbDesc,
cbDescMax,
*pcbDesc,
*type,
*subtype,
*length,
*prec,
*scale,
*nullable);
Function arguments
Table 85. SQLGetDescRec arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDESC
hdesc
Input
Descriptor handle.
SQLSMALLINT
irec
Input
Indicates the descriptor record from which
the application seeks information. Descriptor
records are numbered from 1, with the
record number 1 being the first item in the
descriptor. If the fDescType argument
indicates a field of the descriptor header
record ( SQL_DESC_ALLOC_TYPE or
SQL_DESC_COUNT), irec must be 0.
SQLCHAR *
rgbDesc
Output
NAME field for the record.
SQLSMALLINT
cbDescMax
Input
Maximum number of bytes to store in
rgbDesc.
SQLSMALLINT *
pcbDesc
Output
Total length of the output data.
SQLSMALLINT *
type
Output
TYPE field for the record.
SQLSMALLINT *
subtype
Output
DATETIME_INTERVAL_CODE, for records
whose TYPE is SQL_DATETIME.
SQLINTEGER *
length
Output
LENGTH field for the record.
SQLSMALLINT *
prec
Output
PRECISION field for the record.
SQLSMALLINT *
scale
Output
SCALE field for the record.
SQLSMALLINT *
nullable
Output
NULLABLE field for the record.
Usage
Calling SQLGetDescRec() retrieves all the data from a descriptor record in one call. It might still be
necessary to call SQLGetDescField() with SQL_DESC_COUNT to determine the number of records in the
descriptor.
SQL call level interface
143
SQLGetDescRec
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
Diagnostics
Table 86. SQLGetDescRec SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument irec is not valid.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
The argument rgbDesc, pcbDesc, type, subtype, length, prec,
scale or nullable is a null pointer.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes” on page 85
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
144
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetDiagField
SQLGetDiagField - Return diagnostic information (extensible)
SQLGetDiagField() returns the diagnostic information associated with the most recently called Db2 for i
CLI function for a particular statement, connection, or environment handle.
The information consists of a standardized SQLSTATE, an error code, and a text message. Refer to
“Diagnostics in a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 16 for more information.
Call SQLGetDiagField() after receiving a return code of SQL_ERROR or SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
from another function call.
Note: Some database servers might provide product-specific diagnostic information after returning
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND from the processing of a statement.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetDiagFieldW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetDiagField (SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
htype,
handle,
recNum,
diagId,
diagInfo,
bLen,
*sLen);
Function arguments
Table 87. SQLGetDiagField arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
hType
Input
Handle type.
SQLINTEGER
handle
Input
Handle for which the diagnostic information
is wanted.
SQLSMALLINT
recNum
Input
If there are multiple errors, this indicates
which one should be retrieved. If header
information is requested, this must be 0. The
first error record is number 1.
SQLSMALLINT
diagId
Input
See Table 88.
SQLPOINTER
diagInfo
Output
Buffer for diagnostic information.
SQLSMALLINT
bLen
Input
Length of diagInfo, if requested data is a
character string; otherwise, unused.
SQLSMALLINT *
sLen
Output
Length of complete diagnostic information, If
the requested data is a character string;
otherwise, unused.
Table 88. diagId types
Descriptor
Type
Description
SQL_DIAG_MESSAGE_TEXT
CHAR(254)
The implementation-defined message
text relating to the diagnostic record.
SQL_DIAG_NATIVE
INTEGER
The implementation-defined error code
relating to the diagnostic record.
Portable applications should not base
their behavior on this value.
SQL call level interface
145
SQLGetDiagField
Table 88. diagId types (continued)
Descriptor
Type
Description
SQL_DIAG_NUMBER
INTEGER
The number of diagnostic records
available for the specified handle.
SQL_DIAG_RETURNCODE
SMALLINT
Return code of the underlying function.
Can be SQL_SUCCESS,
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO,
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND, or
SQL_ERROR.
SQL_DIAG_ROW_COUNT
INTEGER
The number of rows for the specified
handle, if the handle is a statement
handle.
SQL_DIAG_SERVER_NAME
CHAR(128)
The server name that the diagnostic
record relates to, as it is supplied on
the SQLConnect() statement that
establishes the connection.
SQL_DIAG_SQLSTATE
CHAR(5)
The 5-character SQLSTATE code
relating to the diagnostic record. The
SQLSTATE code provides a portable
diagnostic indication.
Usage
The SQLSTATEs are those defined by the X/OPEN SQL CAE and the X/Open SQL CLI snapshot,
augmented with SQLSTATE values.
If diagnostic information generated by one Db2 for i CLI function is not retrieved before a function other
than SQLGetDiagField() is called with the same handle, the information for the previous function call is
lost. This is true whether diagnostic information is generated for the second Db2 for i CLI function call.
Multiple diagnostic messages might be available after a given Db2 for i CLI function call. These messages
can be retrieved one at a time by repeatedly calling SQLGetDiagField(). When there are no more
messages to retrieve, SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND is returned.
Diagnostic information stored under a given handle is cleared when a call is made to SQLGetDiagField()
with that handle, or when another Db2 for i CLI function call is made with that handle. However,
information associated with a given handle type is not cleared by a call to SQLGetDiagField() with an
associated but different handle type. For example, a call to SQLGetDiagField() with a connection handle
input does not clear errors associated with any statement handles under that connection.
SQL_SUCCESS is returned even if the buffer for the error message (szDiagFieldMsg) is too short. This is
because the application is not able to retrieve the same error message by calling SQLGetDiagField() again.
The actual length of the message text is returned in the pcbDiagFieldMsg.
To avoid truncation of the first level error message, declare a buffer length of
SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1. To avoid truncation of the second level error message, set the size
of the buffer to a value greater than SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
146
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetDiagField
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND is returned if no diagnostic information is available for the input handle, or if
all of the messages have been retrieved through calls to SQLGetDiagField().
SQL_ERROR is returned if the argument diagInfo or sLen is a null pointer.
Diagnostics
SQLSTATEs are not defined, because SQLGetDiagField() does not generate diagnostic information for
itself.
Restrictions
Although ODBC also returns X/Open SQL CAE SQLSTATEs, only Db2 for i CLI returns the additional
IBM defined SQLSTATEs. The ODBC Driver Manager also returns SQLSTATE values in addition to the
standard ones. For more information about ODBC specific SQLSTATEs refer to Microsoft ODBC
Programmer's Reference.
Because of this, you should only build dependencies on the standard SQLSTATEs. This means any
branching logic in the application should only rely on the standard SQLSTATEs. The augmented
SQLSTATEs are most useful for debugging purposes.
SQL call level interface
147
SQLGetDiagRec
SQLGetDiagRec - Return diagnostic information (concise)
SQLGetDiagRec() returns the diagnostic information associated with the most recently called Db2 for i CLI
function for a particular statement, connection, or environment handle.
The information consists of a standardized SQLSTATE, the error code, and a text message. See
“Diagnostics in a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 16 for more information.
Call SQLGetDiagRec() after receiving a return code of SQL_ERROR or SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO from
another function call.
Note: Some database servers might provide product-specific diagnostic information after returning
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND from the processing of a statement.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetDiagRecW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetDiagRec (SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hType,
handle,
recNum,
*szSqlState,
*pfNativeError,
*szErrorMsg,
cbErrorMsgMax,
*pcbErrorMsg);
Function arguments
Table 89. SQLGetDiagRec arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
hType
Input
Handle type.
SQLINTEGER
handle
Input
Handle for which the diagnostic information
is wanted.
SQLSMALLINT
recNum
Input
If there are multiple errors, this indicates
which one should be retrieved. If header
information is requested, this must be 0. The
first error record is number 1.
SQLCHAR *
szSqlState
Output
SQLSTATE as a string of 5 characters
terminated by a null character. The first 2
characters indicate error class; the next 3
indicate subclass. The values correspond
directly to SQLSTATE values defined in the
X/Open SQL CAE specification and the
ODBC specification, augmented with IBM
specific and product specific SQLSTATE
values.
SQLINTEGER *
pfNativeError
Output
Error code. In Db2 for i CLI, the pfNativeError
argument contains the SQLCODE value
returned by the Database Management
System (DBMS). If the error is generated by
Db2 for i CLI and not the DBMS, then this
field is set to -99999.
148
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetDiagRec
Table 89. SQLGetDiagRec arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLCHAR *
szErrorMsg
Output
Pointer to buffer to contain the
implementation defined message text. In Db2
for i CLI, only the DBMS generated messages
are returned; Db2 for i CLI itself does not
return any message text describing the
problem.
SQLSMALLINT
cbErrorMsgMax
Input
Maximum (that is, the allocated) length of
the buffer szErrorMsg. The recommended
length to allocate is
SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1.
SQLSMALLINT *
pcbErrorMsg
Output
Pointer to total number of bytes available to
return to the szErrorMsg buffer. This does not
include the null termination character.
Usage
The SQLSTATEs are those defined by the X/OPEN SQL CAE and the X/Open SQL CLI snapshot,
augmented with IBM specific and product specific SQLSTATE values.
If diagnostic information generated by one Db2 for i CLI function is not retrieved before a function other
than SQLGetDiagRec() is called with the same handle, the information for the previous function call is
lost. This is true whether diagnostic information is generated for the second Db2 for i CLI function call.
Multiple diagnostic messages might be available after a given Db2 for i CLI function call. These messages
can be retrieved one at a time by repeatedly calling SQLGetDiagRec(). When there are no more messages
to retrieve, SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND is returned, the SQLSTATE is set to "00000", pfNativeError is set to 0,
and pcbErrorMsg and szErrorMsg are undefined.
Diagnostic information stored under a given handle is cleared when a call is made to SQLGetDiagRec()
with that handle, or when another Db2 for i CLI function call is made with that handle. However,
information associated with a given handle type is not cleared by a call to SQLGetDiagRec() with an
associated but different handle type. For example, a call to SQLGetDiagRec() with a connection handle
input does not clear errors associated with any statement handles under that connection.
SQL_SUCCESS is returned even if the buffer for the error message (szErrorMsg) is too short, because the
application is not able to retrieve the same error message by calling SQLGetDiagRec() again. The actual
length of the message text is returned in the pcbErrorMsg.
To avoid truncation of the first level error message, declare a buffer length of
SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1. To avoid truncation of the second level error message, set the size
of the buffer to a value greater than SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND is returned if no diagnostic information is available for the input handle, or if
all of the messages have been retrieved through calls to SQLGetDiagRec().
SQL call level interface
149
SQLGetDiagRec
SQL_ERROR is returned if the argument szSqlState, pfNativeError, szErrorMsg , or pcbErrorMsg is a
null pointer.
Diagnostics
SQLSTATEs are not defined because SQLGetDiagRec() does not generate diagnostic information for itself.
Restrictions
Although ODBC also returns X/Open SQL CAE SQLSTATEs, only Db2 for i CLI returns the additional
IBM defined SQLSTATEs. The ODBC Driver Manager also returns SQLSTATE values in addition to the
standard ones. For more information about ODBC specific SQLSTATEs refer to Microsoft ODBC
Programmer's Reference.
Because of this, you should only build dependencies on the standard SQLSTATEs. This means any
branching logic in the application should only rely on the standard SQLSTATEs. The augmented
SQLSTATEs are most useful for debugging purposes.
References
“SQLGetDiagField - Return diagnostic information (extensible)” on page 145
150
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetEnvAttr
SQLGetEnvAttr - Return current setting of an environment attribute
SQLGetEnvAttr() returns the current settings for the specified environment attribute.
These options are set using the SQLSetEnvAttr() function.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetEnvAttr (SQLHENV
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
henv,
Attribute,
Value,
BufferLength,
*StringLength);
Function arguments
Table 90. SQLGetEnvAttr arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHENV
henv
Input
Environment handle.
SQLINTEGER
Attribute
Input
Attribute to retrieve. Refer to Table 158 on
page 241 for more information.
SQLPOINTER
Value
Output
Current value associated with Attribute. The
type of the value returned depends on
Attribute.
SQLINTEGER
BufferLength
Input
Maximum size of buffer pointed to by Value,
if the attribute value is a character string;
otherwise, unused.
SQLINTEGER *
StringLength
Output
Length in bytes of the output data if the
attribute value is a character string;
otherwise, unused.
If Attribute does not denote a string, then Db2 for i CLI ignores BufferLength and does not set
StringLength.
Usage
SQLGetEnvAttr() can be called at any time between the allocation and freeing of the environment handle.
It obtains the current value of the environment attribute.
Diagnostics
Table 91. SQLGetEnvAttr SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Attribute out of range
An Attribute value that is not valid is specified.
The argument Value or StringLength is a null pointer.
SQL call level interface
151
SQLGetFunctions
SQLGetFunctions - Get functions
SQLGetFunctions() queries whether a specific function is supported. This allows applications to adapt to
varying levels of support when using different drivers.
SQLConnect() must be called, and a connection to the data source (database server) must exist before
calling this function.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetFunctions (SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hdbc,
fFunction,
*pfSupported);
Function arguments
Table 92. SQLGetFunctions arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Database connection handle.
SQLSMALLINT
fFunction
Input
Function being queried.
SQLSMALLINT *
pfSupported
Output
Pointer to location where this function
returns SQL_TRUE or SQL_FALSE
depending on whether the function being
queried is supported.
Usage
The following list shows the valid value for the fFunction argument and whether the corresponding
function is supported.
SQL_API_ALLOCCONNECT
SQL_API_ALLOCENV
SQL_API_ALLOCHANDLE
SQL_API_ALLOCSTMT
SQL_API_BINDCOL
SQL_API_BINDFILETOCOL
SQL_API_BINDFILETOPARAM
SQL_API_BINDPARAM
SQL_API_BINDPARAMETER
SQL_API_CANCEL
SQL_API_CLOSECURSOR
SQL_API_COLATTRIBUTE
SQL_API_COLATTRIBUTEW
SQL_API_COLATTRIBUTES
SQL_API_COLATTRIBUTESW
SQL_API_COLUMNS
SQL_API_COLUMNSW
SQL_API_CONNECT
SQL_API_CONNECTW
SQL_API_COPYDESC
SQL_API_DATASOURCES
SQL_API_DATASOURCESW
SQL_API_DESCRIBECOL
SQL_API_DESCRIBECOLW
SQL_API_DESCRIBEPARAM
SQL_API_DISCONNECT
SQL_API_DRIVERCONNECT
SQL_API_DRIVERCONNECTW
SQL_API_ENDTRAN
SQL_API_ERROR
SQL_API_ERRORW
SQL_API_EXECDIRECT
152
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetFunctions
SQL_API_EXECDIRECTW
SQL_API_EXECUTE
SQL_API_EXTENDEDFETCH
SQL_API_FETCH
SQL_API_FOREIGNKEYS
SQL_API_FOREIGNKEYSW
SQL_API_FREECONNECT
SQL_API_FREEENV
SQL_API_FREEHANDLE
SQL_API_FREESTMT
SQL_API_GETCOL
SQL_API_GETCONNECTATTR
SQL_API_GETCONNECTATTRW
SQL_API_GETCONNECTOPTION
SQL_API_GETCONNECTOPTIONW
SQL_API_GETCURSORNAME
SQL_API_GETCURSORNAMEW
SQL_API_GETDATA
SQL_API_GETDESCFIELD
SQL_API_GETDESCFIELDW
SQL_API_GETDESCREC
SQL_API_GETDESCRECW
SQL_API_GETDIAGFIELD
SQL_API_GETDIAGFIELDW
SQL_API_GETDIAGREC
SQL_API_GETDIAGRECW
SQL_API_GETENVATTR
SQL_API_GETFUNCTIONS
SQL_API_GETINFO
SQL_API_GETINFOW
SQL_API_GETLENGTH
SQL_API_GETPOSITION
SQL_API_GETPOSITIONW
SQL_API_GETSTMTATTR
SQL_API_GETSTMTATTRW
SQL_API_GETSTMTOPTION
SQL_API_GETSTMTOPTIONW
SQL_API_GETSUBSTRING
SQL_API_GETSUBSTRINGW
SQL_API_GETTYPEINFO
SQL_API_GETTYPEINFOW
SQL_API_LANGUAGES
SQL_API_MORERESULTS
SQL_API_NATIVESQL
SQL_API_NATIVESQLW
SQL_API_NUMPARAMS
SQL_API_NUMRESULTCOLS
SQL_API_PARAMDATA
SQL_API_PARAMOPTIONS
SQL_API_PREPARE
SQL_API_PREPAREW
SQL_API_PRIMARYKEYS
SQL_API_PRIMARYKEYSW
SQL_API_PROCEDURECOLUMNS
SQL_API_PROCEDURECOLUMNSW
SQL_API_PROCEDURES
SQL_API_PROCEDURESW
SQL_API_PUTDATA
SQL_API_RELEASEENV
SQL_API_ROWCOUNT
SQL_API_SETCONNECTATTR
SQL_API_SETCONNECTATTRW
SQL_API_SETCONNECTOPTION
SQL_API_SETCONNECTOPTIONW
SQL_API_SETCURSORNAME
SQL_API_SETCURSORNAMEW
SQL_API_SETDESCFIELD
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
SQL call level interface
153
SQLGetFunctions
SQL_API_SETDESCFIELDW
SQL_API_SETDESCREC
SQL_API_SETENVATTR
SQL_API_SETPARAM
SQL_API_SETSTMTATTR
SQL_API_SETSTMTATTRW
SQL_API_SETSTMTOPTION
SQL_API_SETSTMTOPTIONW
SQL_API_SPECIALCOLUMNS
SQL_API_SPECIALCOLUMNSW
SQL_API_STATISTICS
SQL_API_STATISTICSW
SQL_API_TABLES
SQL_API_TABLESW
SQL_API_TRANSACT
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
TRUE
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 93. SQLGetFunctions SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid.
The argument pfSupported is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error.
Connection handles must
not be allocated yet.
SQLGetFunctions is called before SQLConnect.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
154
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetInfo
SQLGetInfo - Get general information
SQLGetInfo() returns general information (including supported data conversions) about the Database
Management System (DBMS) that the application is currently connected to.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetInfoW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307 for
more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetInfo (SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hdbc,
fInfoType,
rgbInfoValue,
cbInfoValueMax,
*pcbInfoValue);
Function arguments
Table 94. SQLGetInfo arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Database connection handle.
SQLSMALLINT
fInfoType
Input
Type of the required information.
SQLPOINTER
rgbInfoValue
Output (also
input)
Pointer to buffer where this function stores
the required information. Depending on the
type of information being retrieved, four
types of information can be returned:
v 16-bit integer value
v 32-bit integer value
v 32-bit binary value
v Null-terminated character string
SQLSMALLINT
cbInfoValueMax
Input
The maximum length of the buffer pointed
by rgbInfoValue pointer.
SQLSMALLINT *
pcbInfoValue
Output
Pointer to location where this function
returns the total number of bytes available to
return the required information.
If the value in the location pointed to by
pcbInfoValue is greater than the size of the
rgbInfoValue buffer as specified in
cbInfoValueMax, then the string output
information is truncated to cbInfoValueMax - 1
bytes and the function returns with
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.
Usage
Table 95 on page 156 lists the possible values of fInfoType and a description of the information that
SQLGetInfo() returns for that value.
SQL call level interface
155
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_ACTIVE_CONNECTIONS
Short int
The maximum number of active connections
supported per application.
Zero is returned, indicating that the limit is
dependent on system resources.
SQL_ACTIVE_STATEMENTS
Short int
The maximum number of active statements per
connection.
Zero is returned, indicating that the limit is
dependent on system resources.
SQL_AGGREGATE_FUNCTIONS
32-bit mask
A bit mask enumerating support for aggregation
functions:
v SQL_AF_ALL
v SQL_AF_AVG
v SQL_AF_COUNT
v SQL_AF_DISTINCT
v SQL_AF_MAX
v SQL_AF_MIN
v SQL_AF_SUM
SQL_CATALOG_NAME
String
A character string of Y indicates that the data
source supports catalog names. N indicates that
catalog names are not supported.
SQL_COLUMN_ALIAS
String
Whether the connection supports column aliases.
The value Y is returned if the connection supports
the concept of a column alias.
SQL_CONNECTION_JOB_NAME
String
When in server mode, this is a character string
that contains the complete job name associated
with the connection. When not in server mode, a
function sequence error is returned.
156
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_CONVERT_BIGINT
SQL_CONVERT_BINARY
SQL_CONVERT_BLOB
SQL_CONVERT_CHAR
SQL_CONVERT_CLOB
SQL_CONVERT_DATE
SQL_CONVERT_DBCLOB
SQL_CONVERT_DECIMAL
SQL_CONVERT_DOUBLE
SQL_CONVERT_FLOAT
SQL_CONVERT_INTEGER
SQL_CONVERT_LONGVARBINARY
SQL_CONVERT_LONGVARCHAR
SQL_CONVERT_NUMERIC
SQL_CONVERT_REAL
SQL_CONVERT_SMALLINT
SQL_CONVERT_TIME
SQL_CONVERT_TIMESTAMP
SQL_CONVERT_VARBINARY
SQL_CONVERT_VARCHAR
SQL_CONVERT_WCHAR
SQL_CONVERT_WLONGVARCHAR
SQL_CONVERT_WVARCHAR
32-bit mask
This indicates the conversions supported by the
data source with the CONVERT scalar function
for data of the type named in the infoType. If the
bit mask equals zero, the data source does not
support any conversions for the data of the
named type, including conversions to the same
data type.
SQL_CONVERT_FUNCTIONS
32 bit mask
For example, to find out if a data source supports
the conversion of SQL_INTEGER data to the
SQL_DECIMAL data type, an application calls
SQLGetInfo() with finfoType of
SQL_CONVERT_INTEGER. The application then
ANDs the returned bit mask with
SQL_CVT_DECIMAL. If the resulting value is
nonzero, then the conversion is supported. The
following bit masks are used to determine which
conversions are supported:
v SQL_CONVERT_BLOB
v SQL_CONVERT_CLOB
v SQL_CONVERT_DBCLOB
v SQL_CONVERT_SMALLINT
v SQL_CONVERT_TIME
v SQL_CONVERT_TIMESTAMP
v SQL_CONVERT_VARBINARY
v SQL_CONVERT_VARCHAR
v SQL_CONVERT_WCHAR
v SQL_CONVERT_WLONGVARCHAR
v SQL_CONVERT_WVARCHAR
v SQL_CVT_BIGINT
v SQL_CVT_BINARY
v SQL_CVT_CHAR
v SQL_CVT_DATE
v SQL_CVT_DECIMAL
v SQL_CVT_DOUBLE
v SQL_CVT_FLOAT
v SQL_CVT_INTEGER
v SQL_CVT_LONGVARBINARY
v SQL_CVT_LONGVARCHAR
v SQL_CVT_NUMERIC
v SQL_CVT_REAL
This indicates the scalar conversion functions
supported by the driver and associated data
source:
v SQL_FN_CVT_CONVERT is used to determine
which conversion functions are supported.
v SQL_FN_CVT_CAST is used to determine
which cast functions are supported.
SQL call level interface
157
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_CORRELATION_NAME
Short int
This indicates the degree of correlation name
support by the system:
v SQL_CN_ANY – Correlation name is supported
and can be any valid user-defined name.
v SQL_CN_NONE – Correlation name is not
supported.
v SQL_CN_DIFFERENT – Correlation name is
supported but it must be different from the
name of the table that it represents.
SQL_CURSOR_COMMIT_BEHAVIOR
16-bit integer
This indicates how a COMMIT operation affects
cursors:
v SQL_CB_DELETE destroys cursors and drops
access plans for dynamic SQL statements.
v SQL_CB_CLOSE destroys cursors, but retains
access plans for dynamic SQL statements
(including nonquery statements).
v SQL_CB_PRESERVE retains cursors and access
plans for dynamic statements (including
nonquery statements). Applications can
continue to fetch data, or close the cursor and
reprocess the query without preparing the
statement again.
Note: After the COMMIT operation, a FETCH
must be issued to reposition the cursor before
actions such as positioned updates or deletes can
be taken.
SQL_CURSOR_ROLLBACK_BEHAVIOR
16-bit integer
This indicates how a ROLLBACK operation
affects cursors:
v SQL_CB_DELETE destroys cursors and drops
access plans for dynamic SQL statements.
v SQL_CB_CLOSE destroys cursors, but retains
access plans for dynamic SQL statements
(including nonquery statements)
v SQL_CB_PRESERVE retains cursors and access
plans for dynamic statements (including
nonquery statements). Applications can
continue to fetch data, or close the cursor and
run the query again without preparing the
statement again.
Note: DB2 servers do not have the
SQL_CB_PRESERVE property.
SQL_DATA_SOURCE_NAME
String
Name of the connected data source for the
connection handle.
SQL_DATA_SOURCE_READ_ONLY
String
A character string of Y indicates that the database
is set to READ ONLY mode; an N indicates that it
is not set to READ ONLY mode.
SQL_DATABASE_NAME
String
Name of the current database in use. This string is
the same as that returned by the SELECT
CURRENT SERVER SQL statement.
158
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_DBMS_NAME
String
Name of the Distributed Relational Database
Architecture™ (DRDA) Service Name being
accessed.
For example:
v AS for Db2 for i
v DB2/xxx for DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and
Windows
v DB2 for DB2 for z/OS®
SQL_DBMS_VER
String
Version of the DBMS product accessed.
SQL_DEFAULT_TXN_ISOLATION
32-bit mask
The default transaction-isolation level supported.
One of the following masks are returned:
v SQL_TXN_READ_UNCOMMITTED – Changes
are immediately perceived by all transactions
(dirty read, non-repeatable read, and phantoms
are possible).
This is equivalent to UR level.
v SQL_TXN_READ_COMMITTED – Row read by
transaction 1 can be altered and committed by
transaction 2 (non-repeatable read and
phantoms are possible).
This is equivalent to CS level.
v SQL_TXN_REPEATABLE_READ – A
transaction can add or remove rows matching
the search condition or a pending transaction
(repeatable read, but phantoms are possible).
This is equivalent to RS level.
v SQL_TXN_SERIALIZABLE – Data affected by
pending transaction is not available to other
transactions (repeatable read, phantoms are not
possible).
This is equivalent to RR level.
v SQL_TXN_VERSIONING – Not applicable to
IBM DBMSs.
v SQL_TXN_NOCOMMIT – Any changes are
effectively committed at the end of a successful
operation; no explicit commit or rollback
operation is allowed.
This is a DB2 isolation level.
In IBM terminology,
v SQL_TXN_READ_UNCOMMITTED is
uncommitted read.
v SQL_TXN_READ_COMMITTED is cursor
stability.
v SQL_TXN_REPEATABLE_READ is read
stability.
v SQL_TXN_SERIALIZABLE is repeatable read.
SQL_DESCRIBE_PARAMETER
String
Y if parameters can be described; N if not.
SQL call level interface
159
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_DRIVER_NAME
String
File name of the driver used to access the data
source.
SQL_DRIVER_ODBC_VER
String
The version number of ODBC that the driver
supports. DB2 ODBC returns 2.1.
SQL_GROUP_BY
16-bit integer
This indicates the degree of support for the
GROUP BY clause by the data source:
v SQL_GB_NO_RELATION means there is no
relationship between the columns in the
GROUP BY and in the SELECT list.
v SQL_GB_NOT_SUPPORTED – GROUP BY is
not supported.
v SQL_GB_GROUP_BY_EQUALS_SELECT –
GROUP BY must include all nonaggregated
columns in the select list.
v SQL_GB_GROUP_BY_CONTAINS_SELECT –
GROUP BY clause must contain all
nonaggregated columns in the SELECT list.
SQL_IDENTIFIER_CASE
16-bit integer
This indicates case sensitivity of object names
(such as table-name).
v SQL_IC_UPPER – Identifier names are stored in
uppercase in the system catalog.
v SQL_IC_LOWER – Identifier names are stored
in lowercase in the system catalog.
v SQL_IC_SENSITIVE – Identifier names are case
sensitive, and are stored in mixed case in the
system catalog.
v SQL_IC_MIXED – Identifier names are not case
sensitive, and are stored in mixed case in the
system catalog.
Note: Identifier names in IBM DBMSs are not
case sensitive.
SQL_IDENTIFIER_QUOTE_CHAR
String
Character used as the delimiter of a quoted string.
SQL_KEYWORDS
String
A character string containing a comma-separated
list of all data source-specific keywords. This is a
list of all reserved keywords. Interoperable
applications should not use these keywords in
object names. This list does not contain keywords
specific to ODBC or keywords used by both the
data source and ODBC.
SQL_LIKE_ESCAPE_CLAUSE
String
A character string that indicates whether an
escape character is supported for the
metacharacters percent and underscore in a LIKE
predicate.
SQL_MAX_CATALOG_NAME_LEN
16-bit integer
The maximum length of a catalog qualifier name;
first part of a three-part table name (in bytes).
SQL_MAX_COLUMN_NAME_LEN
Short int
The maximum length of a column name.
SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_GROUP_BY
Short int
The maximum number of columns in a GROUP
BY clause.
SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_INDEX
Short int
The maximum number of columns in an SQL
index.
160
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_ORDER_BY
Short int
Maximum number of columns in an ORDER BY
clause.
SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_SELECT
Short int
The maximum number of columns in a SELECT
statement.
SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_TABLE
Short int
The maximum number of columns in an SQL
table.
SQL_MAX_CURSOR_NAME_LEN
Short int
The maximum length of a cursor name.
SQL_MAX_OWNER_NAME_LEN
Short int
The maximum length of an owner name.
SQL_MAX_ROW_SIZE
32–bit unsigned
integer
The maximum length in bytes that the data source
supports in a single row of a base table. It is zero
if there is no limit.
SQL_MAX_SCHEMA_NAME_LEN
Int
The maximum length of a schema name.
SQL_MAX_STATEMENT_LEN
32–bit unsigned
integer
This indicates the maximum length of an SQL
statement string in bytes, including the number of
white spaces in the statement.
SQL_MAX_TABLE_NAME
Short int
The maximum length of a table name.
SQL_MAX_TABLES_IN_SELECT
Short int
The maximum number of tables in a SELECT
statement.
SQL_MULTIPLE_ACTIVE_TXN
String
The character string Y indicates that active
transactions on multiple connections are allowed.
N indicates that only one connection at a time can
have an active transaction.
SQL_NON_NULLABLE_COLUMNS
16-bit integer
This indicates whether non-nullable columns are
supported:
v SQL_NNC_NON_NULL – columns can be
defined as NOT NULL.
v SQL_NNC_NULL – columns cannot be defined
as NOT NULL.
SQL call level interface
161
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_NUMERIC_FUNCTIONS
32-bit mask
The scalar numeric functions supported.
The following bit masks are used to determine
which numeric functions are supported:
v SQL_FN_NUM_ABS
v SQL_FN_NUM_ACOS
v SQL_FN_NUM_ASIN
v SQL_FN_NUM_ATAN
v SQL_FN_NUM_ATAN2
v SQL_FN_NUM_CEILING
v SQL_FN_NUM_COS
v SQL_FN_NUM_COT
v SQL_FN_NUM_DEGREES
v SQL_FN_NUM_EXP
v SQL_FN_NUM_FLOOR
v SQL_FN_NUM_LOG
v SQL_FN_NUM_LOG10
v SQL_FN_NUM_MOD
v SQL_FN_NUM_PI
v SQL_FN_NUM_POWER
v SQL_FN_NUM_RADIANS
v SQL_FN_NUM_RAND
v SQL_FN_NUM_ROUND
v SQL_FN_NUM_SIGN
v SQL_FN_NUM_SIN
v SQL_FN_NUM_SQRT
v SQL_FN_NUM_TAN
v SQL_FN_NUM_TRUNCATE
SQL_ODBC_API_CONFORMANCE
16-bit integer
The level of ODBC conformance:
v SQL_OAC_NONE
v SQL_OAC_LEVEL1
v SQL_OAC_LEVEL2
SQL_ODBC_SQL_CONFORMANCE
16-bit integer
A value of:
v SQL_OSC_MINIMUM means minimum ODBC
SQL grammar supported
v SQL_OSC_CORE means core ODBC SQL
grammar supported
v SQL_OSC_EXTENDED means extended ODBC
SQL grammar supported
For the definition of the previous types of ODBC
SQL grammar, see Microsoft ODBC 3.0 Software
Development Kit and Programmer's Reference.
SQL_ORDER_BY_COLUMNS_IN_SELECT
String
Set to Y if columns in the ORDER BY clauses
must be in the select list; otherwise set to N.
SQL_OUTER_JOINS
String
The character string:
v Y indicates that outer joins are supported, and
DB2 ODBC supports the ODBC outer join
request syntax.
v N indicated that outer joins are not supported.
SQL_OWNER_TERM or
SQL_SCHEMA_TERM
162
IBM i: SQL call level interface
String
The database vendor terminology for a schema
(owner).
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_OWNER_USAGE or
SQL_SCHEMA_USAGE
32-bit mask
This indicates the type of SQL statements that
have schema (owners) associated with them when
these statements are processed. Schema qualifiers
(owners) are as follows:
v SQL_OU_DML_STATEMENTS is supported in
all DML statements.
v SQL_OU_PROCEDURE_INVOCATION is
supported in the procedure invocation
statement.
v SQL_OU_TABLE_DEFINITION is supported in
all table definition statements.
v SQL_OU_INDEX_DEFINITION is supported in
all index definition statements.
v SQL_OU_PRIVILEGE_DEFINITION is
supported in all privilege definition statements
(that is, grant and revoke statements).
SQL_POSITIONED_STATEMENTS
32-bit mask
This indicates the degree of support for
positioned UPDATE and positioned DELETE
statements:
v SQL_PS_POSITIONED_DELETE
v SQL_PS_POSITIONED_UPDATE
v SQL_PS_SELECT_FOR_UPDATE
SQL_PS_SELECT_FOR_UPDATE indicates
whether the data source requires the FOR
UPDATE clause to be specified on a <query
expression> for a column to be updated with
the cursor.
SQL_PROCEDURE_TERM
String
Data source name for a procedure.
SQL_PROCEDURES
String
Whether the current server supports SQL
procedures. The value Y is returned if the
connection supports SQL procedures.
SQL_QUALIFIER_LOCATION or
SQL_CATALOG_LOCATION
16-bit integer
A 16-bit integer value indicated the position of the
qualifier in a qualified table name. Zero indicates
that qualified names are not supported.
SQL_QUALIFIER_NAME_SEPARATOR or
SQL_CATALOG_NAME_SEPARATOR
String
The characters used as a separator between a
catalog name and the qualified name element that
follows it.
SQL_QUALIFIER_TERM or
SQL_CATALOG_TERM
String
The database vendor terminology for a qualifier.
This is the name that the vendor uses for the
high-order part of a 3-part name.
Because DB2 ODBC does not support 3-part
names, a zero-length string is returned.
For non-ODBC applications, the
SQL_CATALOG_TERM symbolic name should be
used instead of SQL_QUALIFIER_NAME.
SQL_QUALIFIER_USAGE or
SQL_CATALOG_USAGE
32-bit mask
This is similar to SQL_OWNER_USAGE except
that this is used for catalog.
SQL call level interface
163
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_QUOTED_IDENTIFIER_CASE
16-bit integer
v SQL_IC_UPPER – Quoted identifiers in SQL are
case insensitive and stored in uppercase in the
system catalog.
v SQL_IC_LOWER – Quoted identifiers in SQL
are case insensitive and are stored in lowercase
in the system catalog.
v SQL_IC_SENSITIVE – Quoted identifiers
(delimited identifiers) in SQL are case sensitive
and are stored in mixed case in the system
catalog.
v SQL_IC_MIXED – Quoted identifiers in SQL are
case insensitive and are stored in mixed case in
the system catalog.
This should be contrasted with the
SQL_IDENTIFIER_CASE fInfoType, which is used
to determine how (unquoted) identifiers are
stored in the system catalog.
SQL_SEARCH_PATTERN_ESCAPE
String
Used to specify what the driver supports as an
escape character for catalog functions, such as
SQLTables() and SQLColumns().
SQL_SQL92_PREDICATES
32-bit mask
This indicates the predicates supported in a
SELECT statement that SQL-92 defines.
v SQL_SP_BETWEEN
v SQL_SP_COMPARISON
v SQL_SP_EXISTS
v SQL_SP_IN
v SQL_SP_ISNOTNULL
v SQL_SP_ISNULL
v SQL_SP_LIKE
v SQL_SP_MATCH_FULL
v SQL_SP_MATCH_PARTIAL
v SQL_SP_MATCH_UNIQUE_FULL
v SQL_SP_MATCH_UNIQUE_PARTIAL
v SQL_SP_OVERLAPS
v SQL_SP_QUANTIFIED_COMPARISON
v SQL_SP_UNIQUE
SQL_SQL92_VALUE_EXPRESSIONS
32-bit mask
This indicates the value expressions supported
that SQL-92 defines.
v SQL_SVE_CASE
v SQL_SVE_CAST
v SQL_SVE_COALESCE
v SQL_SVE_NULLIF
164
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_STRING_FUNCTIONS
32-bit bit mask
This indicates which string functions are
supported.
The following bit masks are used to determine
which string functions are supported:
v SQL_FN_STR_ASCII
v SQL_FN_STR_CHAR
v SQL_FN_STR_CONCAT
v SQL_FN_STR_DIFFERENCE
v SQL_FN_STR_INSERT
v SQL_FN_STR_LCASE
v SQL_FN_STR_LEFT
v SQL_FN_STR_LENGTH
v SQL_FN_STR_LOCATE
v SQL_FN_STR_LOCATE_2
v SQL_FN_STR_LTRIM
v SQL_FN_STR_REPEAT
v SQL_FN_STR_REPLACE
v SQL_FN_STR_RIGHT
v SQL_FN_STR_RTRIM
v SQL_FN_STR_SOUNDEX
v SQL_FN_STR_SPACE
v SQL_FN_STR_SUBSTRING
v SQL_FN_STR_UCASE
If an application can call the LOCATE scalar
function with the string1, string2, and start
arguments, the SQL_FN_STR_LOCATE bit mask
is returned. If an application can only call the
LOCATE scalar function with the string1 and
string2, the SQL_FN_STR_LOCATE_2 bit mask is
returned. If the LOCATE scalar function is fully
supported, both bit masks are returned.
SQL_TIMEDATE_FUNCTIONS
32-bit mask
This indicates which time and date functions are
supported.
The following bit masks are used to determine
which date functions are supported:
v SQL_FN_TD_CURDATE
v SQL_FN_TD_CURTIME
v SQL_FN_TD_DAYNAME
v SQL_FN_TD_DAYOFMONTH
v SQL_FN_TD_DAYOFWEEK
v SQL_FN_TD_DAYOFYEAR
v SQL_FN_TD_HOUR
v SQL_FN_TD_JULIAN_DAY
v SQL_FN_TD_MINUTE
v SQL_FN_TD_MONTH
v SQL_FN_TD_MONTHNAME
v SQL_FN_TD_NOW
v SQL_FN_TD_QUARTER
v SQL_FN_TD_SECOND
v SQL_FN_TD_SECONDS_SINCE_MIDNIGHT
v SQL_FN_TD_TIMESTAMPADD
v SQL_FN_TD_TIMESTAMPDIFF
v SQL_FN_TD_WEEK
v SQL_FN_TD_YEAR
SQL call level interface
165
SQLGetInfo
Table 95. Information returned by SQLGetInfo (continued)
fInfoType
Format
Description and notes
SQL_TXN_CAPABLE
Short int
This indicates whether transactions can contain
DDL or DML or both:
v SQL_TC_NONE – Transactions are not
supported.
v SQL_TC_DML – Transactions can only contain
DML statements (SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE,
DELETE, and so on). DDL statements (CREATE
TABLE, DROP INDEX, and so on) encountered
in a transaction cause an error.
v SQL_TC_DDL_COMMIT – Transactions can
only contain DML statements. DDL statements
encountered in a transaction cause the
transaction to be committed.
v SQL_TC_DDL_IGNORE – Transactions can only
contain DML statements. DDL statements
encountered in a transaction are ignored.
v SQL_TC_ALL – Transactions can contain DDL
and DML statements in any order.
SQL_USER_NAME
String
User name used in a particular database.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 96. SQLGetInfo SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The requested information is returned as a
null-terminated string and its length exceeded the length
of the application buffer as specified in cbInfoValueMax.
The argument pcbInfoValue contains the actual (not
truncated) length of the requested information.
08003
Connection not open
The type of information requested in fInfoType requires
an open connection. Only SQL_ODBC_VER does not
require an open connection.
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The argument rgbInfoValue is a null pointer
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY013 *
166
IBM i: SQL call level interface
An fInfoType that is not valid is specified.
SQLGetLength
SQLGetLength - Retrieve length of a string value
SQLGetLength() is used to retrieve the length of a large object value referenced by a large object locator.
The large object locator has been returned from the data source (as a result of a fetch or an
SQLGetSubString() call) during the current transaction.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLGetLength
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
StatementHandle,
LocatorCType,
Locator,
*StringLength,
*IndicatorValue);
Function arguments
Table 97. SQLGetLength arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle. This can be any statement handle
which has been allocated but which does not
currently have a prepared statement assigned to it.
SQLSMALLINT
LocatorCType
Input
The C type of the source LOB locator.
v SQL_C_BLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_C_CLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_C_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
SQLINTEGER
Locator
Input
Must be set to the LOB locator value.
SQLINTEGER *
StringLength
Output
The length of the specified locator.1
If the pointer is set to NULL then the SQLSTATE
HY009 is returned.
SQLINTEGER *
IndicatorValue
Output
Always set to zero.
1. This is in bytes even for DBCLOB data.
Usage
SQLGetLength() can be used to determine the length of the data value represented by a LOB locator. It is
used by applications to determine the overall length of the referenced LOB value so that the appropriate
strategy to obtain some or all of the LOB value can be chosen.
The Locator argument can contain any valid LOB locator which has not been explicitly freed using a
FREE LOCATOR statement nor implicitly freed because the transaction during which it is created has
terminated.
The statement handle must not have been associated with any prepared statements or catalog function
calls.
Db2 for i restricts the use of LOB locators when running with no isolation level.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
SQL call level interface
167
SQLGetLength
Error conditions
Table 98. SQLGetLength SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
07006
Conversion that is not valid
The combination of the argumentLocatorCType and Locator is not
valid.
0F001
LOB variable that is not valid
The value specified for the argument Locator has not been
associated with a LOB locator.
58004
Unexpected system failure
Unrecoverable system error.
HY003
Program type out of range
The argument LocatorCType is not one of
SQL_C_CLOB_LOCATOR, SQL_C_BLOB_LOCATOR, or
SQL_C_DBCLOB_LOCATOR.
HY009
Argument value that is not valid The argument StringLength or IndicatorValue is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
The specified argument StatementHandle is not in an allocated state.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The application is currently connected to a data source that does
not support large objects.
Restrictions
This function is not available when connected to a DB2 server that does not support Large Objects.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
v “SQLGetPosition - Return starting position of string” on page 169
v “SQLGetSubString - Retrieve portion of a string value” on page 176
168
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetPosition
SQLGetPosition - Return starting position of string
SQLGetPosition() is used to return the starting position of one string within a LOB value (the source).
The source value must be a LOB locator; the search string can be a LOB locator or a literal string.
The source and search LOB locators can be any that have been returned from the database from a fetch
or an SQLGetSubString() call during the current transaction.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetPositionW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLGetPosition
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
StatementHandle,
LocatorCType,
SourceLocator,
SearchLocator,
*SearchLiteral,
SearchLiteralLength,
FromPosition,
*LocatedAt,
*IndicatorValue);
Function arguments
Table 99. SQLGetPosition arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle. This can be any statement
handle which has been allocated but which does
not currently have a prepared statement assigned
to it.
SQLSMALLINT
LocatorCType
Input
The C type of the source LOB locator. This can be:
v SQL_C_BLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_C_CLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_C_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
SQLINTEGER
SourceLocator
Input
SourceLocator must be set to the source LOB
locator.
SQLINTEGER
SearchLocator
Input
If the SearchLiteral pointer is NULL and if
SearchLiteralLength is set to 0, then SearchLocator
must be set to the LOB locator associated with the
search string; otherwise, this argument is ignored.
The lob locator type for the SearchLocator must be
the same as the locator type used by the
SourceLocator. This locator type is set for
argument LocatorCType.
SQLCHAR *
SearchLiteral
Input
This argument points to the area of storage that
contains the search string literal.
If SearchLiteralLength is 0, this pointer must be
NULL. If the LocatorCType is set to
SQL_C_DBCLOB_LOCATOR, and the call to
SQLGetPositionW was made, then the string literal
is assumed to be double byte data. If a call to the
non Wide API was made, then this string literal is
assumed to be single byte data
SQL call level interface
169
SQLGetPosition
Table 99. SQLGetPosition arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLINTEGER
SearchLiteralLength
Input
The length of the string in SearchLiteral(in bytes).1
If this argument value is 0, then the argument
SearchLocator is meaningful.
SQLINTEGER
FromPosition
Input
For BLOBs and CLOBs, this is the position of the
first byte within the source string at which the
search is to start. to be returned by the function.
For DBCLOBs, this is the first character. The start
byte or character is numbered 1.
SQLINTEGER *
LocatedAt
Output
For BLOBs and CLOBs, this is the byte position at
which the string is located or, if not located, the
value zero. For DBCLOBs, this is the character
position.
If the length of the source string is zero, the value
1 is returned.
IndicatorValue
SQLINTEGER *
Output
Always set to zero.
1. This is in double byte characters for a call to the SQLGetPositionW API, but in bytes for a call to the
SQLGetPosition API for DBCLOB data.
Usage
SQLGetPosition() is used in conjunction with SQLGetSubString() in order to obtain any portion of a
string in a random manner. In order to use SQLGetSubString(), the location of the substring within the
overall string must be known in advance. In situations where the start of that substring can be found by
a search string, SQLGetPosition() can be used to obtain the starting position of that substring.
The Locator and SearchLocator (if used) arguments can contain any valid LOB locator which has not been
explicitly freed using a FREE LOCATOR statement or implicitly freed because the transaction during
which it is created has terminated.
The Locator and SearchLocator must have the same LOB locator type.
The statement handle must not have been associated with any prepared statements or catalog function
calls.
If a remote connection has been made, the CCSID of the CLOB data (SourceLocator) must be compatible
with the CCSID of the job executing the SQLGetSubString API, otherwise translation problems will occur.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 100. SQLGetPosition SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
07006
Conversion that is not valid
The combination of the LocatorCType argument and either of the
LOB locator values is not valid.
170
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetPosition
Table 100. SQLGetPosition SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
0F001
LOB variable that is not valid
The value specified for argument Locator or SearchLocator is not
currently a LOB locator.
22522
CCSID not valid.
The specified LocatorCType argument does not match the actual
LOB type of the input locator.
42818
Length that is not valid
The length of the pattern is too long.
58004
Unexpected system failure
Unrecoverable system error.
HY009
Argument value that is not valid The argument LocatedAt or IndicatorValue is a null pointer.
The argument value for FromPosition is not greater than 0.
LocatorCType is not one of SQL_C_CLOB_LOCATOR,
SQL_C_BLOB_LOCATOR, or SQL_C_DBCLOB_LOCATOR.
HY010
Function sequence error
The specified StatementHandle argument is not in an allocated state.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HY090
String or buffer length that is not The value of SearchLiteralLength is less than 1, and not SQL_NTS.
valid
HYC00
Driver not capable
The application is currently connected to a data source that does
not support large objects.
Restrictions
This function is not available when connected to a DB2 server that does not support Large Objects.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLExtendedFetch - Fetch array of rows” on page 106
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
v “SQLGetLength - Retrieve length of a string value” on page 167
v “SQLGetSubString - Retrieve portion of a string value” on page 176
SQL call level interface
171
SQLGetStmtAttr
SQLGetStmtAttr - Get the value of a statement attribute
SQLGetStmtAttr() returns the current settings of the specified statement attribute.
These options are set using the SQLSetStmtAttr() function. This function is similar to
SQLGetStmtOption(). Both functions are supported for compatibility reasons.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetStmtAttrW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetStmtAttr( SQLHSTMT
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
fAttr,
pvParam,
bLen,
*sLen);
Function arguments
Table 101. SQLGetStmtAttr arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLINTEGER
fAttr
Input
Attribute to retrieve. Refer to Table 102 for more
information.
SQLPOINTER
pvParam
Output
Pointer to buffer for requested attribute.
SQLINTEGER
bLen
Input
Maximum number of bytes to store in pvParam, if
the attribute is a character string; otherwise,
unused.
SQLINTEGER *
sLen
Output
Length of output data if the attribute is a
character string; otherwise, unused.
Usage
Table 102. Statement attributes
fAttr
Data type
Contents
SQL_ATTR_APP_PARAM_DESC
Integer
The descriptor handle used by the application to provide parameter values for this statement
handle.
SQL_ATTR_APP_ROW_DESC
Integer
The descriptor handle for the application to retrieve row data using the statement handle.
SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_SCROLLABLE Integer
A 32-bit integer value that specifies if cursors opened for this statement handle should be
scrollable.
v SQL_FALSE – Cursors are not scrollable, and SQLFetchScroll() cannot be used against them.
v SQL_TRUE – Cursors are scrollable. SQLFetchScroll() can be used to retrieve data from
these cursors.
SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_TYPE
Integer
A 32-bit integer value that specifies the behavior of cursors opened for this statement handle.
v SQL_CURSOR_FORWARD_ONLY – Cursors are not scrollable, and SQLFetchScroll() cannot
be used against them.
v SQL_DYNAMIC – Cursors are scrollable. SQLFetchScroll() can be used to retrieve data from
these cursors.
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SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_SENSITIVITY
Integer
The cursor sensitivity.
v SQL_UNSPECIFIED – Cursors on the statement handle might make visible none, some, or all
such changes depending on the cursor type.
v SQL_INSENSITIVE – All valid cursors on the statement handle show the result set without
reflecting any changes made to it by any other cursor.
v SQL_SENSITIVE – All valid cursors on the statement handle make visible all changes made
to a result by another cursor.
172
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetStmtAttr
Table 102. Statement attributes (continued)
fAttr
Data type
Contents
SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_HOLD
Integer
Returns the HOLDABILITY for the cursor for the statement.
v SQL_FALSE – Cursor position is not held across transaction boundaries.
v SQL_TRUE – Cursor position is held across transaction boundaries.
SQL_ATTR_FOR_FETCH_ONLY
Integer
This indicates if cursors opened for this statement handle should be read-only.
v SQL_FALSE - Cursors can be used for positioned updates and deletes. This is the default.
v SQL_TRUE - Cursors are read-only and cannot be used for positioned updates or deletes.
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SQL_ATTR_IMP_PARAM_DESC
Integer
The descriptor handle used by the CLI implementation to provide parameter values for this
statement handle.
SQL_ATTR_IMP_ROW_DESC
Integer
The descriptor handle used by the CLI implementation to retrieve row data using this statement
handle.
SQL_ATTR_ROWSET_SIZE
Integer
A 32–bit integer value that specifies the number of rows in the rowset. This is the number of
rows returned by each call to SQLExtendedFetch(). The default value is 1.
SQL_ATTR_PARAM_BIND_TYPE
Integer
The binding used for the parameters.
v SQL_BIND_BY_ROW - Binding is row-wise. This is the default. When using row-wise
binding for a multiple row statements, all of the data for each row must be contiguous
storage, followed by the data for the next row, and so on.
v SQL_BIND_BY_COLUMN - Binding is column-wise. When using column-wise binding for a
multiple row statements, all of the data for each column is in contiguous storage. A different
address is provided by the user for each column in the statement, and it is the responsibility
of the user to ensure that each address has space for all the parameter data to be passed to
the database.
SQL_ATTR_ROW_BIND_TYPE
Integer
The binding used for rows.
v SQL_BIND_BY_ROW - Binding is row-wise. When using row-wise binding for a multiple
row fetch, all of the data for a row is returned in contiguous storage, followed by the data for
the next row, and so on.
v SQL_BIND_BY_COLUMN - Binding is column-wise. When using column-wise binding for a
multiple row fetch, all of the data for each column is returned in contiguous storage. The
storage for each column need not be contiguous. A different address is provided by the user
for each column in the result set, and it is the responsibility of the user to ensure that each
address has space for all the data to be retrieved.
SQL_ATTR_PARAMSET_SIZE
Integer
Returns the number of rows for each multiple row statement. These include INSERT, MERGE,
and UPDATE statements.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA
Diagnostics
Table 103. SQLGetStmtAttr SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The argument pvParam is a null pointer.
Driver not capable
Db2 for i CLI recognizes the option but does not support
it.
HYC00
An fAttr that is not valid value is specified.
SQL call level interface
173
SQLGetStmtOption
SQLGetStmtOption - Return current setting of a statement option
SQLGetStmtOption() has been deprecated and replaced with SQLGetStmtAttr(). Although this version of
Db2 for i CLI continues to support SQLGetStmtOption(), it is recommended that you begin using
SQLGetStmtAttr() in your Db2 for i CLI programs so that they conform to the latest standards.
SQLGetStmtOption() returns the current settings of the specified statement option.
These options are set using the SQLSetStmtOption() function.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetStmtOptionW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLGetStmtOption( SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
hstmt,
fOption,
pvParam);
Function arguments
Table 104. SQLStmtOption arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Connection handle.
SQLSMALLINT
fOption
Input
Option to retrieve. See Table 102 on page 172 for more
information.
SQLPOINTER
pvParam
Output
Value of the option. Depending on the value of fOption
this can be a 32-bit integer value, or a pointer to a null
terminated character string.
Usage
SQLGetStmtOption() provides the same function as SQLGetStmtAttr(), both functions are supported for
compatibility reasons.
See Table 102 on page 172 for a list of statement options.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 105. SQLStmtOption SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The argument pvParam is a null pointer.
174
IBM i: SQL call level interface
A fOption that is not valid value is specified.
SQLGetStmtOption
Table 105. SQLStmtOption SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HYC00
Driver not capable
Db2 for i CLI recognizes the option but does not support
it.
References
“SQLGetStmtAttr - Get the value of a statement attribute” on page 172
SQL call level interface
175
SQLGetSubString
SQLGetSubString - Retrieve portion of a string value
SQLGetSubString() is used to retrieve a portion of a large object value referenced by a large object locator.
The large object locator has been returned from the data source (returned by a fetch or a previous
SQLGetSubString() call) during the current transaction.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetSubStringW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLGetSubString (
SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
StatementHandle,
LocatorCType,
SourceLocator,
FromPosition,
ForLength,
TargetCType,
DataPtr,
BufferLength,
*StringLength,
*IndicatorValue);
Function arguments
Table 106. SQLGetSubString arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
input
Statement handle. This can be any statement
handle which has been allocated but which
does not currently have a prepared statement
assigned to it.
SQLSMALLINT
LocatorCType
input
The C type of the source LOB locator. This can
be:
v SQL_C_BLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_C_CLOB_LOCATOR
v SQL_C_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
SQLINTEGER
SourceLocator
input
SourceLocator must be set to the source LOB
locator value.
SQLINTEGER
FromPosition
input
For BLOBs and CLOBs, this is the position of
the first byte to be returned by the function.
For DBCLOBs, this is the first character. The
start byte or character is numbered 1.
SQLINTEGER
ForLength
input
This is the length of the string to be returned
by the function. For BLOBs and CLOBs, this is
the length in bytes. For DBCLOBs, this is the
length in characters.
If FromPosition is less than the length of the
source string but FromPosition + ForLength - 1
extends beyond the end of the source string,
the result is padded on the right with the
necessary number of characters (X'00' for
BLOBs, single byte blank character for CLOBs,
and double byte blank character for
DBCLOBs).
176
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetSubString
Table 106. SQLGetSubString arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
TargetCType
input
The C data type of the DataPtr. The target
must be a C string variable (SQL_C_CHAR,
SQL_C_WCHAR, SQL_C_BINARY, or
SQL_C_DBCHAR).
SQLPOINTER
DataPtr
output
Pointer to the buffer where the retrieved string
value or a LOB locator is to be stored.
SQLINTEGER
BufferLength
input
Maximum size of the buffer pointed to by
DataPtr in bytes.
SQLINTEGER *
StringLength
output
The length of the returned information in
DataPtr in bytesa if the target C buffer type is
intended for a binary or character string
variable and not a locator value.
If the pointer is set to NULL, nothing is
returned.
SQLINTEGER *
IndicatorValue
output
Always set to zero.
Note: 1. This is in bytes even for DBCLOB data.
Usage
SQLGetSubString() is used to obtain any portion of the string that is represented by the LOB locator.
There are two choices for the target:
v The target can be an appropriate C string variable.
v A new LOB value can be created on the server and the LOB locator for that value can be assigned to a
target application variable on the client.
SQLGetSubString() can be used as an alternative to SQLGetData() for getting data in pieces. In this case a
column is first bound to a LOB locator, which is then used to fetch the LOB as a whole or in pieces.
The Locator argument can contain any valid LOB locator which has not been explicitly freed using a
FREE LOCATOR statement nor implicitly freed because the transaction during which it is created has
terminated.
The statement handle must not have been associated with any prepared statements or catalog function
calls.
If a locator entry exists in the locator table but has no data, SQLGetSubString() will return an
SQL_NO_DATA return code.
If a remote connection has been made, the CCSID of the CLOB data (SourceLocator) must be compatible
with the CCSID of the job executing the SQLGetSubString API, otherwise translation problems will occur.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA
SQL call level interface
177
SQLGetSubString
Error conditions
Table 107. SQLGetSubString SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The amount of data to be returned is longer than BufferLength.
Actual length available for return is stored in StringLength.
07006
Conversion that is not valid
The value specified for TargetCType is not SQL_C_CHAR,
SQL_C_BINARY, SQL_C_DBCHAR, or a LOB locator.
The value specified for TargetCType is inappropriate for the source
(for example SQL_C_DBCHAR for a BLOB column).
22011
Substring error occurred
FromPosition is greater than the length of the source string.
58004
Unexpected system failure
Unrecoverable system error.
HY003
Program type out of range
LocatorCType is not one of SQL_C_CLOB_LOCATOR,
SQL_C_BLOB_LOCATOR, or SQL_C_DBCLOB_LOCATOR.
HY009
Argument value that is not valid The value specified for FromPosition or ForLength is not a positive
integer.
The argument DataPtr, StringLength, or IndicatorValue is a null
pointer
HY010
Function sequence error
The specified StatementHandle is not in an allocated state.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HY090
String or buffer length that is not The value of BufferLength is less than 0.
valid
HYC00
Driver not capable
The application is currently connected to a data source that does
not support large objects.
0F001
No locator currently assigned
The value specified for Locator is not currently a LOB locator.
Restrictions
This function is not available when connected to a DB2 server that does not support Large Objects.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
v “SQLGetData - Get data from a column” on page 139
v “SQLGetLength - Retrieve length of a string value” on page 167
v “SQLGetPosition - Return starting position of string” on page 169
178
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetTypeInfo
SQLGetTypeInfo - Get data type information
SQLGetTypeInfo() returns information about the data types that are supported by the Database
Management Systems (DBMSs) associated with Db2 for i CLI. The information is returned in an SQL
result set. The columns can be received using the same functions that are used to process a query.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLGetTypeInfoW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLGetTypeInfo
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
DataType);
Function arguments
Table 108. SQLGetTypeInfo arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle
SQLSMALLINT
DataType
Input
The SQL data type being queried. The supported
types are:
v SQL_ALL_TYPES
v SQL_BIGINT
v SQL_BINARY
v SQL_BLOB
v SQL_CHAR
v SQL_CLOB
v SQL_DATE
v SQL_DBCLOB
v SQL_DECFLOAT
v SQL_DECIMAL
v SQL_DOUBLE
v SQL_FLOAT
v SQL_GRAPHIC
v SQL_INTEGER
v SQL_NUMERIC
v SQL_REAL
v SQL_SMALLINT
v SQL_TIME
v SQL_TIMESTAMP
v SQL_VARBINARY
v SQL_VARCHAR
v SQL_VARGRAPHIC
If SQL_ALL_TYPES is specified, information about
all supported data types is returned in ascending
order by TYPE_NAME. All unsupported data types
are absent from the result set.
SQL call level interface
179
SQLGetTypeInfo
Usage
Because SQLGetTypeInfo() generates a result set and is equivalent to executing a query, it generates a
cursor and begins a transaction. To prepare and process another statement on this statement handle, the
cursor must be closed.
If SQLGetTypeInfo() is called with a DataType that is not valid, an empty result set is returned.
The columns of the result set that is generated by this function are described below.
Although new columns might be added and the names of the existing columns might be changed in
future releases, the position of the current columns does not change. The data types that are returned are
those that can be used in a CREATE TABLE, ALTER TABLE, DDL statement. Nonpersistent data types
are not part of the returned result set. User-defined data types are not returned either.
Table 109. Columns returned by SQLGetTypeInfo
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 TYPE_NAME
VARCHAR(128) NOT NULL Character representation of the SQL data type name
(for example, VARCHAR, DATE, INTEGER)
2 DATA_TYPE
SMALLINT NOT NULL
SQL data type define values (for example,
SQL_VARCHAR, SQL_DATE, SQL_INTEGER)
3 COLUMN_SIZE
INTEGER
If the data type is a character or binary string, then
this column contains the maximum length in bytes; if
it is a graphic (DBCS) string, this is the number of
double byte characters for the column.
For date, time, timestamp data types, this is the total
number of characters required to display the value
when converted to character.
For numeric data types, this is the total number of
digits.
4 LITERAL_PREFIX
VARCHAR(128)
Character that DB2 recognizes as a prefix for a literal
of this data type. This column is null for data types
where a literal prefix is not applicable.
5 LITERAL_SUFFIX
VARCHAR(128)
Character that DB2 recognizes as a suffix for a literal of
this data type. This column is null for data types
where a literal prefix is not applicable.
6 CREATE_PARAMS
VARCHAR(128)
The text of this column contains a list of keywords,
separated by commas, corresponding to each
parameter the application might specify in parenthesis
when using the name in the TYPE_NAME column as a
data type in SQL. The keywords in the list can be:
LENGTH, PRECISION, SCALE. They appear in the
order that the SQL syntax requires that they be used.
A NULL indicator is returned if there are no
parameters for the data type definition, (such as
INTEGER).
Note: The intent of CREATE_PARAMS is to enable an
application to customize the interface for a DDL
builder. An application should expect, using this, only
to be able to determine the number of arguments
required to define the data type and to have localized
text that can be used to label an edit control.
180
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetTypeInfo
Table 109. Columns returned by SQLGetTypeInfo (continued)
Column number/name
Data type
Description
7 NULLABLE
SMALLINT NOT NULL
This indicates whether the data type accepts a NULL
value
v Set to SQL_NO_NULLS if NULL values are
disallowed.
v Set to SQL_NULLABLE if NULL values are allowed.
v Set to SQL_NULLABLE_UNKNOWN if it is not
known whether NULL values are allowed or not.
8 CASE_SENSITIVE
SMALLINT NOT NULL
This indicates whether the data type can be treated as
case sensitive for collation purposes; valid values are
SQL_TRUE and SQL_FALSE.
9 SEARCHABLE
SMALLINT NOT NULL
This indicates how the data type is used in a WHERE
clause. Valid values are:
v SQL_UNSEARCHABLE – if the data type cannot be
used in a WHERE clause.
v SQL_LIKE_ONLY – if the data type can be used in a
WHERE clause only with the LIKE predicate.
v SQL_ALL_EXCEPT_LIKE – if the data type can be
used in a WHERE clause with all comparison
operators except LIKE.
v SQL_SEARCHABLE – if the data type can be used
in a WHERE clause with any comparison operator.
10 UNSIGNED_ATTRIBUTE
SMALLINT
This indicates where the data type is unsigned. The
valid values are: SQL_TRUE, SQL_FALSE or NULL. A
NULL indicator is returned if this attribute is not
applicable to the data type.
11 FIXED_PREC_SCALE
SMALLINT NOT NULL
This contains the value SQL_TRUE if the data type is
exact numeric and always has the same precision and
scale; otherwise, it contains SQL_FALSE.
12 AUTO_UNIQUE_VAL
SMALLINT
This contains SQL_TRUE if a column of this data type
is automatically set to a unique value when a row is
inserted; otherwise, contains SQL_FALSE.
13 LOCAL_TYPE_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
This column contains any localized name for the data
type that is different from the regular name of the data
type. If there is no localized name, this column is
NULL.
This column is intended for display only. The character
set of the string is locale-dependent and is typically the
default character set of the database.
14 MINIMUM_SCALE
INTEGER
The minimum scale of the SQL data type. If a data
type has a fixed scale, the MINIMUM_SCALE and
MAXIMUM_SCALE columns both contain the same
value. NULL is returned where scale is not applicable.
15 MAXIMUM_SCALE
INTEGER
The maximum scale of the SQL data type. NULL is
returned where scale is not applicable. If the maximum
scale is not defined separately in the DBMS, but is
defined instead to be the same as the maximum length
of the column, then this column contains the same
value as the COLUMN_SIZE column.
SQL call level interface
181
SQLGetTypeInfo
Table 109. Columns returned by SQLGetTypeInfo (continued)
Column number/name
Data type
Description
16 SQL_DATA_TYPE
SMALLINT NOT NULL
The value of the SQL data type as it appears in the
SQL_DESC_TYPE field of the descriptor. This column
is the same as the DATA_TYPE column (except for
interval and datetime data types which Db2 for i CLI
does not support).
17 SQL_DATETIME_SUB
SMALLINT
This field is always NULL (Db2 for i CLI does not
support interval and datetime data types).
18 NUM_PREC_RADIX
INTEGER
If the data type is an approximate numeric type, this
column contains the value 2 to indicate that
COLUMN_SIZE specifies a number of bits. For exact
numeric types, this column contains the value 10 to
indicate that COLUMN_SIZE specifies a number of
decimal digits. Otherwise, this column is NULL.
19 INTERVAL_PRECISION
SMALLINT
This field is always NULL (Db2 for i CLI does not
support interval data types).
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 110. SQLGetTypeInfo SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
24000
Cursor state that is not valid
A cursor is already opened on the statement handle.
StatementHandle has not been closed.
40003 08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between the application and data source
fails before the function is completed.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY004
SQL data type out of range
A DataType that is not valid is specified.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called while in a data-at-processing
(SQLParamData(), SQLPutData()) operation.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HYT00
Timeout expired
Restrictions
The following ODBC specified SQL data types (and their corresponding DataType define values) are not
supported by any IBM RDBMS.
Data type
DataType
TINY INT
SQL_TINYINT
BIT
SQL_BIT
182
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLGetTypeInfo
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/* From CLI sample typeinfo.c */
/* ... */
rc = SQLGetTypeInfo(hstmt, SQL_ALL_TYPES);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 1, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) typename.s, 128, &typename.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 2, SQL_C_DEFAULT, (SQLPOINTER) & datatype,
sizeof(datatype), &datatype_ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 3, SQL_C_DEFAULT, (SQLPOINTER) & precision,
sizeof(precision), &precision_ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 7, SQL_C_DEFAULT, (SQLPOINTER) & nullable,
sizeof(nullable), &nullable_ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 8, SQL_C_DEFAULT, (SQLPOINTER) & casesens,
sizeof(casesens), &casesens_ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
printf("Datatype
Datatype Precision Nullable Case\n");
printf("Typename
(int)
Sensitive\n");
printf("------------------------- -------- ---------- -------- ---------\n");
/* LONG VARCHAR FOR BIT DATA
99 2147483647 FALSE
FALSE */
/* Fetch each row, and display */
while ((rc = SQLFetch(hstmt)) == SQL_SUCCESS) {
printf("%-25s ", typename.s);
printf("%8d ", datatype);
printf("%10ld ", precision);
printf("%-8s ", truefalse[nullable]);
printf("%-9s\n", truefalse[casesens]);
}
/* endwhile */
if ( rc != SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND )
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLGetInfo - Get general information” on page 155
SQL call level interface
183
SQLLanguages
SQLLanguages - Get SQL dialect or conformance information
SQLLanguages() returns SQL dialect or conformance information. The information is returned in an SQL
result set, which can be retrieved using the same functions that are used to fetch a result set generated by
a SELECT statement.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLLanguages
(SQLHSTMT
hstmt);
Function arguments
Table 111. SQLLanguages arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle
Usage
The function returns dialect and conformance information, in the form of a result set on StatementHandle.
This contains a row for every conformance claim the SQL product makes (including subsets defined for
ISO and vendor-specific versions). For a product that claims to comply with this specification, the result
set thus contains at least one row.
Rows defining ISO standard and vendor-specific languages can exist in the same table. Each row has at
least these columns and, if it makes an X/Open SQL conformance claim, the columns contains these
values.
Table 112. Columns returned by SQLLanguages
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 SOURCE
VARCHAR(254), NOT NULL
The organization that defined this
SQL version.
2 SOURCE_YEAR
VARCHAR(254)
The year the relevant source
document is approved.
3 CONFORMANCE
VARCHAR(254)
The conformance level to the relevant
document that the implementation
claims.
4 INTEGRITY
VARCHAR(254)
An indication of whether the
implementation supports the Integrity
Enhancement Feature (IEF).
5 IMPLEMENTATION
VARCHAR(254)
A character string, defined by the
vendor, that uniquely identifies the
vendor's SQL product.
6 BINDING_SYTLE
VARCHAR(254)
Either 'EMBEDDED', 'DIRECT', OR
'CLI'.
7 PROGRAMMING_LANG
VARCHAR(254)
The host language for which the
binding style is supported.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
184
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLLanguages
Diagnostics
Table 113. SQLLanguages SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
24000
Cursor state that is not valid Cursor related information is requested, but no cursor is
open.
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
String or buffer length that
is not valid
The value of one of the name length arguments is less
than 0, but not equal SQL_NTS.
HYC00
Driver not capable
Db2 for i CLI does not support catalog as a qualifier for
table name.
SQL call level interface
185
SQLMoreResults
SQLMoreResults - Determine whether there are more result sets
SQLMoreResults() determines whether there is more information available on the statement handle that
has been associated with a stored procedure that is returning result sets.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLMoreResults
(SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle);
Function arguments
Table 114. SQLMoreResults arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
input
Statement handle
Usage
This function is used to return multiple results that are set in a sequential manner upon the processing of
a stored procedure that contains SQL queries. The cursors have been left open so that the result sets
remain accessible when the stored procedure has finished processing.
After completely processing the first result set, the application can call SQLMoreResults() to determine if
another result set is available. If the current result set has unfetched rows, SQLMoreResults() discards
them by closing the cursor and, if another result set is available, returns SQL_SUCCESS.
If all the result sets have been processed, SQLMoreResults() returns SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND.
If SQLFreeStmt() is called with the SQL_CLOSE or SQL_DROP option, all pending result sets on this
statement handle are discarded.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
Error conditions
Table 115. SQLMoreResults SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between the application and data source
fails before the function is completed.
58004
Unexpected system failure
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called while in a data-at-processing
(SQLParamData(), SQLPutData()) operation.
HY013
Unexpected memory handling
error
Db2 for i CLI is unable to access memory required to support the
processing or completion of the function.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HYT00
Timeout expired
186
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLMoreResults
In addition SQLMoreResults() can return the SQLSTATEs associated with SQLExecute().
Restrictions
The ODBC specification of SQLMoreResults() also allow counts associated with the processing of
parameterized INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE statements with arrays of input parameter values to be
returned. However, Db2 for i CLI does not support the return of such count information.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLBindParameter - Bind a parameter marker to a buffer” on page 52
SQL call level interface
187
SQLNativeSql
SQLNativeSql - Get native SQL text
SQLNativeSql() is used to show how Db2 for i CLI interprets vendor escape clauses. If the original SQL
string that is passed by the application contains vendor escape clause sequences, Db2 for i CLI returns
the transformed SQL string that is seen by the data source (with vendor escape clauses either converted
or discarded as appropriate).
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLNativeSqlW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLNativeSql
(SQLHDBC
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
ConnectionHandle,
*InStatementText,
TextLength1,
*OutStatementText,
BufferLength,
*TextLength2Ptr);
Function arguments
Table 116. SQLNativeSql arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
ConnectionHandle
Input
Connection handle.
SQLCHAR *
InStatementText
Input
Input SQL string.
SQLINTEGER
TextLength1
Input
Length of InStatementText.
SQLCHAR *
OutStatementText
Output
Pointer to buffer for the transformed output
string.
SQLINTEGER
BufferLength
Input
Size of buffer pointed by OutStatementText.
SQLINTEGER *
TextLength2Ptr
Output
The total number of bytes available to return
in OutStatementText. If the number of bytes
available to return is greater than or equal to
BufferLength, the output SQL string in
OutStatementText is truncated to BufferLength 1 bytes. The value SQL_NULL_DATA is
returned if no output string is generated.
Usage
This function is called when the application wants to examine or display the transformed SQL string that
is passed to the data source by Db2 for i CLI. Translation (mapping) only occurs if the input SQL
statement string contains vendor escape clause sequences.
There are no vendor escape sequences on the IBM i operating system; this function is provided for
compatibility purposes. Also, note that this function can be used to evaluate an SQL string for syntax
errors.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
188
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLNativeSql
Error conditions
Table 117. SQLNativeSql SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
01004
Data truncated
The buffer OutStatementText is not large enough to contain the
entire SQL string, so truncation occurred. The argument
TextLength2Ptr contains the total length of the untruncated SQL
string. (Function returns with SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.)
08003
Connection is closed
The ConnectionHandle does not reference an open database
connection.
37000
SQL syntax that is not valid
The input SQL string in InStatementText contained a syntax error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not valid The argument InStatementText, OutStatementText, or TextLength2Ptr
is a null pointer.
HY090
String or buffer length that is not The argument TextLength1 is less than 0, but not equal to
valid
SQL_NTS.
The argument BufferLength is less than 0.
Restrictions
None.
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/* From CLI sample native.c */
/* ... */
SQLCHAR in_stmt[1024], out_stmt[1024] ;
SQLSMALLINT pcPar ;
SQLINTEGER indicator ;
/* ... */
/* Prompt for a statement to prepare */
printf("Enter an SQL statement: \n");
gets((char *)in_stmt);
/* prepare the statement */
rc = SQLPrepare(hstmt, in_stmt, SQL_NTS);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
SQLNumParams(hstmt, &pcPar);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
SQLNativeSql(hstmt, in_stmt, SQL_NTS, out_stmt, 1024, &indicator);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
if ( indicator == SQL_NULL_DATA ) printf( "Invalid statement\n" ) ;
else {
printf( "Input Statement: \n %s \n", in_stmt ) ;
printf( "Output Statement: \n %s \n", in_stmt ) ;
printf( "Number of Parameter Markers = %d\n", pcPar ) ;
}
rc = SQLFreeHandle( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt ) ;
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
SQL call level interface
189
SQLNextResult
SQLNextResult - Process the next result set
SQLNextResult() determines whether there is more information available on the statement handle that
has been associated with a stored procedure that is returning result sets.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLNextResult
(SQLHSTMT
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle,
NextResultHandle);
Function arguments
Table 118. SQLNextResult arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLHSTMT
NextResultHandle
Input
Statement handle for next result set.
Usage
This function is used to associate the next result set from StatementHandle with NextResultHandle. This
differs from SQLMoreResults() because it allows both statement handles to process their result sets
simultaneously.
If all the result sets have been processed, SQLNextResult() returns SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND.
If SQLFreeStmt() is called with the SQL_CLOSE or SQL_DROP option, all pending result sets on this
statement handle are discarded.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
Error conditions
Table 119. SQLNextResult SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between the application and data source
fails before the function is completed.
58004
Unexpected system failure
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called while in a data-at-processing
(SQLParamData(), SQLPutData()) operation.
HY013
Unexpected memory handling
error
Db2 for i CLI is unable to access memory required to support the
processing or completion of the function.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HYT00
Timeout expired
190
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLNextResult
References
“SQLMoreResults - Determine whether there are more result sets” on page 186
SQL call level interface
191
SQLNumParams
SQLNumParams - Get number of parameters in an SQL statement
SQLNumParams() returns the number of parameter markers in an SQL statement.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLNumParams
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
*ParameterCountPtr);
Function arguments
Table 120. SQLNumParams arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT *
ParameterCountPtr
Output
Number of parameters in the statement.
Usage
This function can only be called after the statement that is associated with StatementHandle has been
prepared. If the statement does not contain any parameter markers, ParameterCountPtr is set to 0.
An application can call this function to determine how many SQLBindParameter() calls are necessary for
the SQL statement associated with the statement handle.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 121. SQLNumParams SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between the application and data source
fails before the function is completed.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY008
Operation canceled
HY009
Argument value that is not valid ParameterCountPtr is null.
HY010
Function sequence error
This function is called before SQLPrepare() is called for the
specified StatementHandle
The function is called while in a data-at-processing
(SQLParamData(), SQLPutData()) operation.
HY013
Unexpected memory handling
error
HYT00
Timeout expired
192
IBM i: SQL call level interface
Db2 for i CLI is unable to access memory required to support the
processing or completion of the function.
SQLNumParams
Restrictions
None.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLNativeSql - Get native SQL text” on page 188.
References
v “SQLBindParam - Bind a buffer to a parameter marker” on page 47
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
SQL call level interface
193
SQLNumResultCols
SQLNumResultCols - Get number of result columns
SQLNumResultCols() returns the number of columns in the result set associated with the input statement
handle.
SQLPrepare() or SQLExecDirect() must be called before calling this function.
After calling this function, you can call SQLDescribeCol(), SQLColAttribute(), SQLBindCol(), or
SQLGetData().
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLNumResultCols (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*pccol);
Function arguments
Table 122. SQLNumResultCols arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT *
pccol
Output
Number of columns in the result set.
Usage
The function sets the output argument to zero if the last statement processed on the input statement
handle is not a SELECT.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 123. SQLNumResultCols SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
pcbCol is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called before calling SQLPrepare or
SQLExecDirect for the hstmt.
S1013 *
Memory management
problem.
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLColAttributes - Obtain column attributes” on page 69
v “SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes” on page 85
194
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLNumResultCols
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLGetCol - Retrieve one column of a row of the result set” on page 126
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
SQL call level interface
195
SQLParamData
SQLParamData - Get next parameter for which a data value is needed
SQLParamData() is used with SQLPutData() to send long data in pieces. It can also be used to send
fixed-length data.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLParamData
(SQLHSTMT
SQLPOINTER
hstmt,
*prgbValue);
Function arguments
Table 124. SQLParamData arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLPOINTER *
prgbValue
Output
Pointer to the value of the rgbValue
argument specified on the SQLSetParam
call.
Usage
SQLParamData() returns SQL_NEED_DATA if there is at least one SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC parameter for
which data still has not been assigned. This function returns an application defined value in prgbValue
supplied by the application during the previous SQLBindParam() call. SQLPutData() is called one or more
times to send the parameter data. SQLParamData() is called to signal that all the data has been sent for the
current parameter and to advance to the next SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC parameter. SQL_SUCCESS is
returned when all the parameters have been assigned data values and the associated statement has been
processed successfully. If any errors occur during or before actual statement processing, SQL_ERROR is
returned.
If SQLParamData() returns SQL_NEED_DATA, then only SQLPutData() or SQLCancel() calls can be made.
All other function calls using this statement handle fail. In addition, all function calls referencing the
parent hdbc of hstmt fail if they involve changing any attribute or state of that connection. Those
following function calls on the parent hdbc are also not permitted:
v SQLAllocConnect()
v SQLAllocHandle()
v SQLAllocStmt()
v SQLSetConnectOption()
Should they be called during an SQL_NEED_DATA sequence, these functions return SQL_ERROR with
SQLSTATE of HY010 and the processing of the SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC parameters is not affected.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
v SQL_NEED_DATA
Diagnostics
SQLParamData() can return any SQLSTATE returned by the SQLExecDirect() and SQLExecute() functions.
In addition, the following diagnostics can also be generated:
196
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLParamData
Table 125. SQLParamData SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The argument prgbValue is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
SQLParamData() is called out of sequence. This call is
only valid after an SQLExecDirect() or an SQLExecute(),
or after an SQLPutData() call.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
HYDE0
No data at processing
values pending
Even though this function is called after an
SQLExecDirect() or an SQLExecute() call, there are no
SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC parameters (remaining) to
process.
SQL call level interface
197
SQLParamOptions
SQLParamOptions - Specify an input array for a parameter
SQLParamOptions() provides the ability to set multiple values for each parameter set by
SQLBindParameter(). This allows the application to run INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, and MERGE
statements providing multiple sets of arguments on a single call to SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect().
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLParamOptions (SQLHSTMT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
StatementHandle,
Crow,
*FetchOffsetPtr);
Function arguments
Table 126. SQLParamOptions arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLINTEGER
Crow
Input
Number of values for each parameter. If this is
greater than 1, then the rgbValue argument in
SQLBindParameter() points to an array of
parameter values, and pcbValue points to an
array of lengths.
SQLINTEGER *
FetchOffsetPtr
Output
(deferred)
Not currently used.
Usage
This function can be used with SQLBindParameter() to set up a multiple-row INSERT statement, or to
process UPDATE, DELETE, and MERGE statements with multiple sets of parameter values. It is assumed
that the storage containing the data which represents the parameters is allocated and available to CLI.
This data can be organized in a either a row-wise or a column-wise fashion. Row-wise binding is the
term used for the case where all the data for the first row is contiguous, followed by all the data for the
next row, and so on. Column-wise binding is used to describe the case where the data for each individual
parameter marker is contiguous. For this case, each parameter marker's data can be provided in an array
that does not need to be contiguous with data for the other parameter markers. The SQLBindParameter()
function should be used to bind all of the input parameter types and lengths.
Here is an example of the set up necessary for a multiple-row statement with row-wise binding. In this
case, the addresses provided on SQLBindParameter() are used to reference the first row of data. All
subsequent rows of data are referenced by incrementing those addresses by the length of the entire
row.For instance, the application intends to insert 100 rows of data into a table, and each row contains a
4-byte integer value, followed by a 10-byte character value. To do this, the application allocates 1400 bytes
of storage, and fills each 14-byte piece of storage with the appropriate data for the row.
Also, the indicator pointer passed on the SQLBindParameter() must reference an 800-byte piece of storage
(100 rows x 2 columns x 4 bytes for each indicator). The indicator array is used to pass in NULL values
for the corresponding parameter marker and row. This storage is also row-wise, so the first 8 bytes are
the 2 indicators for the first row, followed by the 2 indicators for the next row, and so on. The
SQLParamOptions() function is used by the application to specify how many rows of pararmeter values
are provided.
The maximum number of database rows that can be specified in a multiple-row insert operation is 32,000.
Therefore, SQLParamOptions allows only 32,767 rows to be specified at a time. Any additional rows need
to be rebound and re-executed.
198
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLParamOptions
SQLSetStmtAttr () provides an alternative means of setting the number of rows for a multiple-row
statement using the SQL_ATTR_PARAMSET_SIZE option.
Return codes
v
v
v
v
SQL_SUCCESS
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
SQL_ERROR
SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 127. SQLParamOptions SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009
Argument value that is not valid The value in the argument Crow is less than 1.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called while in a data-at-processing
(SQLParamData(), SQLPutData()) operation.
Restrictions
None.
References
v “SQLBindParam - Bind a buffer to a parameter marker” on page 47
v “SQLMoreResults - Determine whether there are more result sets” on page 186
SQL call level interface
199
SQLPrepare
SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement
SQLPrepare() associates an SQL statement with the input statement handle and sends the statement to
the DBMS to be prepared. The application can reference this prepared statement by passing the statement
handle to other functions.
If the statement handle has been used with a SELECT statement, SQLFreeStmt() must be called to close
the cursor, before calling SQLPrepare().
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLPrepareW() . Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307 for
more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLPrepare (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
*szSqlStr,
cbSqlStr);
Function arguments
Table 128. SQLPrepare arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle. There must not be an
open cursor associated with hstmt.
SQLCHAR *
szSqlStr
Input
SQL statement string.
SQLINTEGER
cbSqlStr
Input
Length of contents of szSqlStr argument.
This must be set to either the exact length of
the SQL statement in szSqlstr, or to SQL_NTS
if the statement text is null-terminated.
Usage
As soon as a statement has been prepared using SQLPrepare(), the application can request information
about the format of the result set (if it is a SELECT statement) by calling:
v SQLNumResultCols()
v SQLDescribeCol()
v SQLColAttribute()
A prepared statement can be processed once, or multiple times by calling SQLExecute(). The SQL
statement remains associated with the statement handle until the handle is used with another
SQLPrepare(), SQLExecDirect(), SQLColumns(), SQLSpecialColumns(), SQLStatistics(), or SQLTables().
The SQL statement string might contain parameter markers. A parameter marker is represented by a "?"
character, and indicates a position in the statement where the value of an application variable is to be
substituted, when SQLExecute() is called. SQLBindParam() is used to bind (or associate) an application
variable to each parameter marker, and to indicate if any data conversion should be performed at the
time the data is transferred.
The SQL statement cannot be a COMMIT or ROLLBACK. SQLTransact() must be called to issue
COMMIT or ROLLBACK.
If the SQL statement is a positioned DELETE or a Positioned UPDATE, the cursor referenced by the
statement must be defined on a separate statement handle under the same connection handle.
200
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLPrepare
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 129. SQLPrepare SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
24000
Cursor state that is not valid There is an open cursor on the specified hstmt.
37xxx
Syntax error or access
violation
szSqlStr contained one or more of the following
statements:
v A COMMIT
v A ROLLBACK
v An SQL statement that the connected database server
cannot prepare
v A statement containing a syntax error
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
szSqlStr is a null pointer.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
The argument cbSqlStr is less than 1, but not equal to
SQL_NTS.
Note: Not all Database Management Systems (DBMSs) report all of the above diagnostic messages at
prepare time. Therefore an application must also be able to handle these conditions when calling
SQLExecute().
Example
Refer to “Example: Interactive SQL and the equivalent Db2 for i CLI function calls” on page 314 for a
listing of the check_error, initialize, and terminate functions used in the following example.
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*************************************************************************
** file = prepare.c
**
** Example of preparing then repeatedly executing an SQL statement.
**
** Functions used:
**
**
SQLAllocConnect
SQLFreeConnect
**
SQLAllocEnv
SQLFreeEnv
**
SQLAllocStmt
SQLFreeStmt
**
SQLConnect
SQLDisconnect
**
**
SQLBindCol
SQLFetch
**
SQLTransact
SQLError
SQL call level interface
201
SQLPrepare
**
SQLPrepare
SQLSetParam
**
SQLExecute
**************************************************************************/
#include
#include
#include
#include
<stdio.h>
<string.h>
<stdlib.h>
"sqlcli.h"
#define MAX_STMT_LEN 255
int initialize(SQLHENV *henv,
SQLHDBC *hdbc);
int terminate(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC hdbc);
int print_error (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt);
int check_error (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
SQLRETURN
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt,
rc);
/*******************************************************************
** main
** - initialize
** - terminate
*******************************************************************/
int main()
{
SQLHENV
henv;
SQLHDBC
hdbc;
SQLCHAR
sqlstmt[MAX_STMT_LEN + 1]="";
SQLRETURN
rc;
rc = initialize(&henv, &hdbc);
if (rc == SQL_ERROR) return(terminate(henv, hdbc));
{SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
hstmt;
sqlstmt[]="SELECT deptname, location from org where division = ?";
deptname[15],
location[14],
division[11];
SQLINTEGER rlength,
plength;
rc = SQLAllocStmt(hdbc, &hstmt);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
/* prepare statement for multiple use */
rc = SQLPrepare(hstmt, sqlstmt, SQL_NTS);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
/* bind division to parameter marker in sqlstmt */
rc = SQLSetParam(hstmt, 1, SQL_CHAR, SQL_CHAR, 10, 10, division,
&plength);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
/* bind deptname to first column in the result set */
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 1, SQL_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) deptname, 15,
202
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLPrepare
&rlength);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 2, SQL_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) location, 14,
&rlength);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
printf("\nEnter Division Name or ’q’ to quit:\n");
printf("(Eastern, Western, Midwest, Corporate)\n");
gets(division);
plength = SQL_NTS;
while(division[0] != ’q’)
{
rc = SQLExecute(hstmt);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
printf("Departments in %s Division:\n", division);
printf("DEPTNAME
Location\n");
printf("-------------- -------------\n");
while ((rc = SQLFetch(hstmt)) == SQL_SUCCESS)
{
printf("%-14.14s %-13.13s \n", deptname, location);
}
if (rc != SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND )
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
SQLFreeStmt(hstmt, SQL_CLOSE);
printf("\nEnter Division Name or ’q’ to quit:\n");
printf("(Eastern, Western, Midwest, Corporate)\n");
gets(division);
}
}
rc = SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_ROLLBACK);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
terminate(henv, hdbc);
return (0);
}/* end main */
References
v “SQLColAttributes - Obtain column attributes” on page 69
v “SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes” on page 85
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLNumResultCols - Get number of result columns” on page 194
SQL call level interface
203
SQLPrimaryKeys
SQLPrimaryKeys - Get primary key columns of a table
SQLPrimaryKeys() returns a list of column names that comprise the primary key for a table. The
information is returned in an SQL result set, which can be retrieved using the same functions that are
used to process a result set that is generated by a query.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLPrimaryKeysW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLPrimaryKeys
(SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
*CatalogName,
NameLength1,
*SchemaName,
NameLength2,
*TableName,
NameLength3);
Function arguments
Table 130. SQLPrimaryKeys arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
CatalogName
Input
Catalog qualifier of a 3 part table name.
This must be a NULL pointer or a zero length
string.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength1
Input
Length of CatalogName.
SQLCHAR *
SchemaName
Input
Schema qualifier of table name.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength2
Input
Length of SchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
TableName
Input
Table name.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength3
Input
Length of TableName.
Usage
SQLPrimaryKeys() returns the primary key columns from a single table. Search patterns cannot be used to
specify the schema qualifier or the table name.
The result set contains the columns that are listed in Table 131, ordered by TABLE_CAT, TABLE_SCHEM,
TABLE_NAME, and ORDINAL_POSITION.
Because calls to SQLPrimaryKeys() in many cases map to a complex and, thus, expensive query against
the system catalog, they should be used sparingly, and the results saved rather than repeating calls.
Although new columns might be added and the names of the existing columns might be changed in
future releases, the position of the current columns does not change.
Table 131. Columns returned by SQLPrimaryKeys
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 TABLE_CAT
VARCHAR (128)
The current server.
2 TABLE_SCHEM
VARCHAR (128)
The name of the schema containing TABLE_NAME.
204
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLPrimaryKeys
Table 131. Columns returned by SQLPrimaryKeys (continued)
Column number/name
Data type
Description
3 TABLE_NAME
VARCHAR (128) not
NULL
Name of the specified table.
4 COLUMN_NAME
VARCHAR (128) not
NULL
Primary Key column name.
5 KEY_SEQ
SMALLINT not NULL Column sequence number in the primary key, starting with 1.
6 PK_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
Primary key identifier. NULL if not applicable to the data source.
Note: The column names used by Db2 for i CLI follow the X/Open CLI CAE specification style. The column types,
contents and order are identical to those defined for the SQLPrimaryKeys() result set in ODBC.
If the specified table does not contain a primary key, an empty result set is returned.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 132. SQLPrimaryKeys SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
24000
Cursor state that is not valid
A cursor is already opened on the statement handle.
40003 08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between the application and data source
fails before the function is completed.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY008
Operation canceled
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called while in a data-at-processing
(SQLParamData(), SQLPutData()) operation.
HY014
No more handles
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate a handle due to internal
resources.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid .
HY090
String or buffer length that is not The value of one of the name length arguments is less than 0, but
valid
not equal to SQL_NTS.
HYC00
Driver not capable
HYT00
Timeout expired
Db2 for i CLI does not support catalog as a qualifier for table
name.
Restrictions
None.
References
v “SQLForeignKeys - Get the list of foreign key columns” on page 116
v “SQLStatistics - Get index and statistics information for a base table” on page 259
SQL call level interface
205
SQLProcedureColumns
SQLProcedureColumns - Get input/output parameter information for a
procedure
SQLProcedureColumns() returns a list of input and output parameters associated with a procedure. The
information is returned in an SQL result set, which can be retrieved using the same functions that are
used to process a result set that is generated by a query.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLProcedureColumnsW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on
page 307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLProcedureColumns(SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
*CatalogName,
NameLength1,
*SchemaName,
NameLength2,
*ProcName,
NameLength3,
*ColumnName,
NameLength4);
Function arguments
Table 133. SQLProcedureColumns arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
CatalogName
Input
Catalog qualifier of a 3 part procedure name.
This must be a NULL pointer or a zero length
string.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength1
Input
Length of CatalogName. This must be set to 0.
SQLCHAR *
SchemaName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by schema name.
For DB2 for z/OS and OS/390® V 4.1, all the
stored procedures are in one schema; the only
acceptable value for the SchemaName argument
is a null pointer. For DB2, SchemaName can
contain a valid pattern value.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength2
Input
Length of SchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
ProcName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by procedure name.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength3
Input
Length of ProcName.
SQLCHAR *
ColumnName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by parameter name. This
argument is to be used to further qualify the
result set already restricted by specifying a
non-empty value for ProcName or
SchemaName.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength4
Input
Length of ColumnName.
206
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLProcedureColumns
Usage
Db2 for i CLI returns information about the input, input and output, and output parameters associated
with the stored procedure, but cannot return information about the descriptor for any result sets
returned.
SQLProcedureColumns() returns the information in a result set, ordered by PROCEDURE_CAT,
PROCEDURE_SCHEM, PROCEDURE_NAME, and COLUMN_TYPE. Table 134 lists the columns in the
result set. Applications should be aware that columns beyond the last column might be defined in future
releases.
Because calls to SQLProcedureColumns() in many cases map to a complex and thus expensive query
against the system catalog, they should be used sparingly, and the results saved rather than repeating
calls.
Special support was added to handle a keyword "*LIBL" in the SchemaName argument. Specifying this
keyword will tell SQLStatistics to use the schema's on the library list to qualify the search criteria for
retrieving index information for tables. The highest library on the library list hierarchy that matches the
search criteria will be used. Also, system naming must be in effect for this support to be honored. The
following behavior will occur when different connections are used:
v When SQL Server Mode is used, the SQLProcedureColumns() API will use the library list of the initial
thread within the associated QSQSRVR job when processing the '*LIBL' request.
v When SQL Server Mode is not used, the SQLProcedureColumns() API will use the library list of the
current thread when processing the '*LIBL' request.
Table 134. Columns returned by SQLProcedureColumns
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 PROCEDURE_CAT
VARCHAR(128)
The current server.
2 PROCEDURE_SCHEM
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the schema containing
PROCEDURE_NAME.
3 PROCEDURE_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
Name of the procedure.
4 COLUMN_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
Name of the parameter.
5 COLUMN_TYPE
SMALLINT not NULL
This identifies the type information associated with
this row. The values can be:
v SQL_PARAM_TYPE_UNKNOWN – the parameter
type is unknown.
Note: This is not returned.
v SQL_PARAM_INPUT – this parameter is an input
parameter.
v SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT – this parameter is
an input / output parameter.
v SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT – this parameter is an
output parameter.
v SQL_RETURN_VALUE – the procedure column is
the return value of the procedure.
Note: This is not returned.
v SQL_RESULT_COL – this parameter is actually a
column in the result set.
Note: This is not returned.
|
6 DATA_TYPE
INTEGER not NULL
SQL data type.
7 TYPE_NAME
VARCHAR(128) not NULL
Character string representing the name of the data
type corresponding to DATA_TYPE.
SQL call level interface
207
SQLProcedureColumns
Table 134. Columns returned by SQLProcedureColumns (continued)
Column number/name
Data type
Description
8 COLUMN_SIZE
INTEGER
If the DATA_TYPE column value denotes a character
or binary string, then this column contains the
maximum length in bytes; if it is a graphic (DBCS)
string, this is the number of double byte characters
for the parameter.
For date, time, timestamp data types, this is the total
number of bytes required to display the value when
converted to character.
For numeric data types, this is either the total number
of digits, or the total number of bits allowed in the
column, depending on the value in the
NUM_PREC_RADIX column in the result set.
9 BUFFER_LENGTH
INTEGER
The maximum number of bytes for the associated C
buffer to store data from this parameter if
SQL_C_DEFAULT were specified on the
SQLBindCol(), SQLGetData() and SQLBindParameter()
calls. This length excludes any null-terminator. For
exact numeric data types, the length accounts for the
decimal and the sign.
10 DECIMAL_DIGITS
SMALLINT
The scale of the parameter. NULL is returned for data
types where scale is not applicable.
11 NUM_PREC_RADIX
SMALLINT
Either 10 or 2 or NULL. If DATA_TYPE is an
approximate numeric data type, this column contains
the value 2, then the COLUMN_SIZE column
contains the number of bits allowed in the parameter.
If DATA_TYPE is an exact numeric data type, this
column contains the value 10 and the
COLUMN_SIZE and DECIMAL_DIGITS columns
contain the number of decimal digits allowed for the
parameter.
For numeric data types, the Database Management
System (DBMS) can return a NUM_PREC_RADIX of
either 10 or 2.
NULL is returned for data types where radix is not
applicable.
12 NULLABLE
SMALLINT not NULL
'SQL_NO_NULLS' if the parameter does not accept
NULL values.
'SQL_NULLABLE' if the parameter accepts NULL
values.
| 13 REMARKS
208
NVARCHAR(2000)
IBM i: SQL call level interface
Contains descriptive information about the parameter.
SQLProcedureColumns
Table 134. Columns returned by SQLProcedureColumns (continued)
|
Column number/name
Data type
Description
14 COLUMN_DEF
DBCLOB(64K)
The default value of the column.
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
If NULL is specified as the default value, then this
column is the word NULL, not enclosed in quotation
marks. If the default value cannot be represented
without truncation, then this column contains
TRUNCATED, with no enclosing single quotation
marks. If no default value is specified, then this
column is NULL.
|
|
|
The value of COLUMN_DEF can be used in
generating a new column definition, except when it
contains the value TRUNCATED.
15 SQL_DATA_TYPE
SMALLINT not NULL
The value of the SQL data type as it appears in the
SQL_DESC_TYPE field of the descriptor. This column
is the same as the DATA_TYPE column except for
datetime data types (Db2 for i CLI does not support
interval data types).
For datetime data types, the SQL_DATA_TYPE field
in the result set is SQL_DATETIME, and the
SQL_DATETIME_SUB field returns the subcode for
the specific datetime data type (SQL_CODE_DATE,
SQL_CODE_TIME or SQL_CODE_TIMESTAMP).
||
|
|
16 SQL_DATETIME_SUB
SMALLINT
The subtype code for datetime data types. For all
other data types this column returns a NULL
(including interval data types which Db2 for i CLI
does not support).
17 CHAR_OCTET_LENGTH
INTEGER
The maximum length in bytes of a character data
type column. For all other data types, this column
returns a NULL.
18 ORDINAL_POSITION
INTEGER not NULL
This contains the ordinal position of the parameter
given by COLUMN_NAME in this result set. This is
the ordinal position of the argument to be provided
on the CALL statement. The leftmost argument has
an ordinal position of 1.
19 IS_NULLABLE
VARCHAR(3)
v “NO” if the column does not include NULLs.
v “YES” if the column can include NULLs.
v zero-length string if nullability is unknown.
|
ISO rules are followed to determine nullability.
|
|
An ISO SQL-compliant DBMS cannot return an
empty string.
|
|
|
The value returned for this column is different than
the value returned for the NULLABLE column. (See
the description of the NULLABLE column.)
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
SQL call level interface
209
SQLProcedureColumns
Error conditions
Table 135. SQLProcedureColumns SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
24000
Cursor state that is not valid
A cursor is already opened on the statement handle.
40003 08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between the application and data source
fails before the function is completed.
42601
PARMLIST syntax error
The PARMLIST value in the stored procedures catalog table
contains a syntax error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY008
Operation canceled
HY010
Function sequence error
HY014
No more handles
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate a handle due to internal
resources.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HY090
String or buffer length that is not The value of one of the name length arguments is less than 0, but
valid
not equal SQL_NTS.
HYC00
Driver not capable
Db2 for i CLI does not support catalog as a qualifier for procedure
name.
The connected data source does not support schema as a qualifier
for a procedure name.
Timeout expired
HYT00
Restrictions
SQLProcedureColumns() does not return information about the attributes of result sets that can be
returned from stored procedures.
If an application is connected to a DB2 server that does not provide support for a stored procedure
catalog, or does not provide support for stored procedures, SQLProcedureColumns() returns an empty
result set.
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/* From CLI sample proccols.c */
/* ... */
printf("Enter Procedure Schema Name Search Pattern:\n");
gets((char *)proc_schem.s);
printf("Enter Procedure Name Search Pattern:\n");
gets((char *)proc_name.s);
rc = SQLProcedureColumns(hstmt, NULL, 0, proc_schem.s, SQL_NTS,
proc_name.s, SQL_NTS, (SQLCHAR *)"%", SQL_NTS);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 2, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) proc_schem.s, 129,
&proc_schem.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
210
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLProcedureColumns
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 3, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) proc_name.s, 129,
&proc_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 4, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) column_name.s, 129,
&column_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 5, SQL_C_SHORT, (SQLPOINTER) &arg_type,
0, &arg_type_ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 7, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) type_name.s, 129,
&type_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 8, SQL_C_LONG, (SQLPOINTER) & length,
0, &length_ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 10, SQL_C_SHORT, (SQLPOINTER) &scale,
0, &scale_ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 13, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) remarks.s, 255,
&remarks.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
/* Fetch each row, and display */
while ((rc = SQLFetch(hstmt)) == SQL_SUCCESS) {
sprintf((char *)cur_name, "%s.%s", proc_schem.s, proc_name.s);
if (strcmp((char *)cur_name, (char *)pre_name) != 0) {
printf("\n%s\n", cur_name);
}
strcpy((char *)pre_name, (char *)cur_name);
printf("
%s", column_name.s);
switch (arg_type)
{ case SQL_PARAM_INPUT : printf(", Input"); break;
case SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT : printf(", Output"); break;
case SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT : printf(", Input_Output"); break;
}
printf(", %s", type_name.s);
printf(" (%ld", length);
if (scale_ind != SQL_NULL_DATA) {
printf(", %d)\n", scale);
} else {
printf(")\n");
}
if (remarks.ind > 0 ) {
printf("(remarks), %s)\n", remarks.s);
}
}
/* endwhile */
References
“SQLProcedures - Get list of procedure names” on page 212
SQL call level interface
211
SQLProcedures
SQLProcedures - Get list of procedure names
SQLProcedures() returns a list of procedure names that have been registered on the system and match the
specified search pattern.
The information is returned in an SQL result set, which can be retrieved using the same functions that are
used to process a result set that is generated by a query.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLProceduresW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN
SQLProcedures
(SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
*CatalogName,
NameLength1,
*SchemaName,
NameLength2,
*ProcName,
NameLength3);
Function arguments
Table 136. SQLProcedures arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
CatalogName
Input
Catalog qualifier of a 3 part procedure name.
This must be a NULL pointer or a zero length string.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength1
Input
Length of CatalogName. This must be set to 0.
SQLCHAR *
SchemaName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to qualify
the result set by schema name.
For DB2 for z/OS and OS/390 V 4.1, all the stored
procedures are in one schema; the only acceptable
value for the SchemaName argument is a null pointer.
For DB2, SchemaName can contain a valid pattern
value.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength2
Input
Length of SchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
ProcName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to qualify
the result set by procedure name.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength3
Input
Length of ProcName.
Usage
The result set returned by SQLProcedures() contains the columns listed in Table 137 on page 213 in the
order given. The rows are ordered by PROCEDURE_CAT, PROCEDURE_SCHEMA, and
PROCEDURE_NAME.
Because calls to SQLProcedures() in many cases map to a complex and thus expensive query against the
system catalog, use them sparingly, and save the results rather than repeating calls.
Although new columns might be added and the names of the existing columns might be changed in
future releases, the position of the current columns does not change.
212
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLProcedures
Table 137. Columns returned by SQLProcedures
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 PROCEDURE_CAT
VARCHAR(128)
The current server.
2 PROCEDURE_SCHEM
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the schema containing PROCEDURE_NAME.
3 PROCEDURE_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
NOT NULL
The name of the procedure.
4 NUM_INPUT_PARAMS
INTEGER not
NULL
Number of input parameters.
5 NUM_OUTPUT_PARAMS
INTEGER not
NULL
Number of output parameters.
6 NUM_RESULT_SETS
INTEGER not
NULL
Number of result sets returned by the procedure.
7 REMARKS
VARCHAR(254)
This contains the descriptive information about the
procedure.
8 PROCEDURE_TYPE
SMALLINT
Defines the procedure type:
v SQL_PT_UNKNOWN: It cannot be determined whether
the procedure returns a value.
v SQL_PT_PROCEDURE: The returned object is a
procedure; that is, it does not have a return value.
v SQL_PT_FUNCTION: The returned object is a function;
that is, it has a return value.
DB2 CLI always returns SQL_PT_PROCEDURE.
Note: The column names used by Db2 for i CLI follow the X/Open CLI CAE specification style. The column types,
contents and order are identical to those defined for the SQLProcedures() result set in ODBC.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Error conditions
Table 138. SQLProcedures SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
24000
Cursor state that is not valid
A cursor is already opened on the statement handle.
40003 08S01
Communication link failure
The communication link between the application and data source
fails before the function is completed.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate memory required to support
the processing or completion of the function.
HY008
Operation canceled
HY010
Function sequence error
HY014
No more handles
Db2 for i CLI is unable to allocate a handle due to internal
resources.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is not
valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated, or it
contains a value that is not valid.
HY090
String or buffer length that is not The value of one of the name length arguments is less than 0, but
valid
not equal to SQL_NTS.
SQL call level interface
213
SQLProcedures
Table 138. SQLProcedures SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HYC00
Driver not capable
Db2 for i CLI does not support catalog as a qualifier for procedure
name.
The connected data source does not support schema as a qualifier
for a procedure name.
Timeout expired
HYT00
Restrictions
If an application is connected to a DB2 server that does not provide support for a stored procedure
catalog, or does not provide support for stored procedures, SQLProcedureColumns() returns an empty
result set.
Example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/* From CLI sample procs.c */
/* ... */
printf("Enter Procedure Schema Name Search Pattern:\n");
gets((char *)proc_schem.s);
rc = SQLProcedures(hstmt, NULL, 0, proc_schem.s, SQL_NTS, (SQLCHAR *)"%", SQL_NTS);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 2, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) proc_schem.s, 129,
&proc_schem.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 3, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) proc_name.s, 129,
&proc_name.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
rc = SQLBindCol(hstmt, 7, SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) remarks.s, 255,
&remarks.ind);
CHECK_HANDLE( SQL_HANDLE_STMT, hstmt, rc ) ;
printf("PROCEDURE SCHEMA
PROCEDURE NAME
\n");
printf("------------------------- ------------------------- \n");
/* Fetch each row, and display */
while ((rc = SQLFetch(hstmt)) == SQL_SUCCESS) {
printf("%-25s %-25s\n", proc_schem.s, proc_name.s);
if (remarks.ind != SQL_NULL_DATA) {
printf(" (Remarks) %s\n", remarks.s);
}
}
/* endwhile */
References
“SQLProcedureColumns - Get input/output parameter information for a procedure” on page 206
214
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLPutData
SQLPutData - Pass data value for a parameter
SQLPutData() is called following an SQLParamData() call returning SQL_NEED_DATA to supply
parameter data values. This function can be used to send large parameter values in pieces.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLPutData (SQLHSTMT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
rgbValue,
cbValue);
Function arguments
Table 139. SQLPutData arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLPOINTER
rgbValue
Input
Pointer to the actual data, or portion of data,
for a parameter. The data must be in the
form specified in the SQLBindParam() call
that the application used when specifying
the parameter.
SQLINTEGER
cbValue
Input
Length of rgbValue. This specifies the amount
of data sent in a call to SQLPutData().
|
|
|
|
The amount of data can vary with each call
for a given parameter. The application can
also specify SQL_NTS or SQL_NULL_DATA
for cbValue.
cbValue is ignored for date and time data
types, except SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP, and
all numeric data types except
SQL_NUMERIC and SQL_DECIMAL.
For cases where the C buffer type is
SQL_CHAR or SQL_BINARY, or if
SQL_DEFAULT is specified as the C buffer
type and the C buffer type default is
SQL_CHAR or SQL_BINARY, this is the
number of bytes of data in the rgbValue
buffer.
Usage
The application calls SQLPutData() after calling SQLParamData() on a statement in the SQL_NEED_DATA
state to supply the data values for an SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC parameter. Long data can be sent in pieces
through repeated calls to SQLPutData(). After all the pieces of data for the parameter have been sent, the
application again calls SQLParamData(). SQLParamData(). proceeds to the next SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC
parameter, or, if all parameters have data values, executes the statement.
SQLPutData() cannot be called more than once for a fixed length parameter.
After an SQLPutData() call, the only legal function calls are SQLParamData(), SQLCancel(), or another
SQLPutData() if the input data is character or binary data. As with SQLParamData(), all other function calls
using this statement handle fail. In addition, all function calls referencing the parent hdbc of hstmt fail if
they involve changing any attribute or state of that connection. For a list of these functions, see the Usage
section for “SQLParamData - Get next parameter for which a data value is needed” on page 196.
SQL call level interface
215
SQLPutData
If one or more calls to SQLPutData() for a single parameter result in SQL_SUCCESS, attempting to call
SQLPutData() with cbValue set to SQL_NULL_DATA for the same parameter results in an error with
SQLSTATE of HY011. This error does not result in a change of state; the statement handle is still in a Need
Data state and the application can continue sending parameter data.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Some of the following diagnostics conditions might be reported on the final SQLParamData() call rather
than at the time the SQLPutData() is called.
Table 140. SQLPutData SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
22001
Too much data
The size of the data supplied to the current parameter by
SQLPutData() exceeds the size of the parameter. The data
supplied by the last call to SQLPutData() is ignored.
01004
Data truncated
The data sent for a numeric parameter is truncated
without the loss of significant digits.
Timestamp data sent for a date or time column is
truncated.
Function returns with SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The argument rgbValue is a null pointer.
Function sequence error
The statement handle hstmt must be in a need data state
and must have been positioned on an
SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC parameter through a previous
SQLParamData() call.
HY010
216
IBM i: SQL call level interface
The argument rgbValue is not a NULL pointer and the
argument cbValue is less than 0, but not equal to
SQL_NTS or SQL_NULL_DATA.
SQLReleaseEnv
SQLReleaseEnv - Release all environment resources
SQLReleaseEnv() invalidates and frees the environment handle. All Db2 for i CLI resources associated
with the environment handle are freed.
SQLFreeConnect() must be called before calling this function.
This function is the last Db2 for i CLI step that an application needs to do before it ends.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLReleaseEnv (SQLHENV
henv);
Function arguments
Table 141. SQLReleaseEnv arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHENV
henv
Input
Environment handle.
Usage
If this function is called when there is still a valid connection handle, SQL_ERROR is returned, and the
environment handle remains valid.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 142. SQLReleaseEnv SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY010
Function sequence error
There is an hdbc which is in allocated or connected state.
Call SQLDisconnect and SQLFreeConnect for the hdbc
before calling SQLReleaseEnv.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
Example
Refer to the example in the “SQLAllocEnv - Allocate environment handle” on page 30.
References
“SQLFreeConnect - Free connection handle” on page 121
SQL call level interface
217
SQLRowCount
SQLRowCount - Get row count
SQLRowCount() returns the number of rows in a table affected by an UPDATE, INSERT, MERGE, SELECT
from INSERT, or DELETE statement processed against the table, or a view based on the table.
SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect() must be called before calling this function.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLRowCount (SQLHSTMT
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
*pcrow);
Function arguments
Table 143. SQLRowCount arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLINTEGER *
pcrow
Output
Pointer to location where the number of
rows affected is stored.
Usage
If the last processed statement referenced by the input statement handle is not an SELECT from INSERT,
UPDATE, INSERT, MERGE, or DELETE statement, or if it is not processed successfully, then the function
sets the contents of pcrow to 0.
Any rows in other tables that might have been affected by the statement (for example, cascading deletes)
are not included in the count.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 144. SQLRowCount SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
pcrow is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called before calling SQLExecute or
SQLExecDirect for the hstmt.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
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IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLRowCount
References
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLNumResultCols - Get number of result columns” on page 194
SQL call level interface
219
SQLSetConnectAttr
SQLSetConnectAttr - Set a connection attribute
SQLSetConnectAttr() sets connection attributes for a particular connection.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLSetConnectAttrW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support for Db2 for iCLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLSetConnectAttr (SQLHDBC
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hdbc,
fAttr,
vParam,
sLen);
Function arguments
Table 145. SQLSetConnectAttr arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Connection handle.
SQLINTEGER
fAttr
Input
Connect attribute to set, refer to Table 146 for
more information.
SQLPOINTER
vParam
Input
Value associated with fAttr. Depending on
the option, this can be a pointer to a 32-bit
integer value, or a character string.
SQLINTEGER
sLen
Input
Length of input value, if it is a character
string; otherwise, unused.
Usage
All connection and statement options set through the SQLSetConnectAttr() persist until SQLFreeConnect()
is called or the next SQLSetConnectAttr() call.
The format of information set through vParam depends on the specified fAttr. The option information can
be either a 32-bit integer or a pointer to a null-terminated character string.
Table 146. Connect options
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_2ND_LEVEL_TEXT
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Error text obtained by calling SQLError()
contains the complete text description of the error.
v SQL_FALSE – Error text obtained by calling SQLError()
contains the first-level description of the error only.
This is the default.
SQL_ATTR_AUTOCOMMIT
A 32-bit value that sets the commit behavior for the
connection. These are the possible values:
v SQL_TRUE – Each SQL statement is automatically
committed as it is processed.
v SQL_FALSE – The SQL statements are not
automatically committed. If running with commitment
control, changes must be explicitly committed or rolled
back using either SQLEndTran() or SQLTransact(). This
is the default.
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SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_CONCURRENT_ACCESS_RESOLUTION
A 32-bit integer value that specifies the concurrent access
resolution to use at the statement level. This attribute
only applies to the transaction isolation level of Cursor
Stability or Read Stability, otherwise, it is ignored. These
are the possible values :
v SQL_USE_CURRENTLY_COMMITTED -- Use currently
committed semantics.Db2 for iCLI flows "currently
committed" on every prepare, which means that the
database manager can use the currently committed
version of the data for applicable scans when the data
is in the process of being updated or deleted. Rows in
the process of being inserted that have not been
committed are skipped.
v SQL_WAIT_FOR_OUTCOME -- Wait for outcome. Db2
for iCLI flows "wait for outcome" on every prepare,
which causes the application to wait for conflicting row
locks held by other users to be released when
encountering rows in the process of being updated.
Rows in the process of being inserted or deleted rows
are not skipped.
v SQL_SKIP_LOCKED_DATA -- Skip locked data. Rather
than waiting for conflicting row locks to be released,
Db2 for i skips those rows which have conflicting locks
held by another user. As a result, skipped rows are not
returned in the result set returned to CLI.
CLI flows "skip locked data" on every prepare.
SQL_ATTR_CONN_SORT_SEQUENCE
A 32-bit integer value that specifies the sort sequence to
use with the connection. The possible values are:
v SQL_HEX_SORT_SEQUENCE – use *HEX sort
sequence.
v SQL_JOB_SORT_SEQUENCE – Extract sort sequence
from the job in which the CLI API requests are being
made and use that sort sequence.
v SQL_JOBRUN_SORT_SEQUENCE – Extract sort
sequence from the job in which the database access is
done and use that sort sequence.
The distinction between SQL_JOB_SORT_SEQUENCE and
SQL_JOBRUN_SORT_SEQUENCE will only be seen when
running in server-mode. In that case, the
SQL_JOBRUN_SORT_SEQUENCE will cause the effective
sort sequence of the server-mode job to be used, rather
the front-end job where the CLI is being executed.
SQL call level interface
221
SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_COMMIT
or
SQL_TXN_ISOLATION
A 32-bit value that sets the transaction-isolation level for
the current connection referenced by hdbc. The following
values are accepted by Db2 for i CLI, but each data
source might only support some of these isolation levels:
v SQL_TXN_NO_COMMIT – Commitment control is not
used.
v SQL_TXN_READ_UNCOMMITTED – Dirty reads,
nonrepeatable reads, and phantoms are possible. This is
the default isolation level.
v SQL_TXN_READ_COMMITTED – Dirty reads are not
possible. Non-repeatable reads and phantoms are
possible.
v SQL_TXN_REPEATABLE_READ – Dirty reads and
nonrepeatable reads are not possible. Phantoms are
possible.
v SQL_TXN_SERIALIZABLE – Transactions are
serializable. Dirty reads, non-repeatable reads, and
phantoms are not possible.
In IBM terminology,
v SQL_TXN_READ_UNCOMMITTED is uncommitted
read
v SQL_TXN_READ_COMMITTED is cursor stability
v SQL_TXN_REPEATABLE_READ is read stability
v SQL_TXN_SERIALIZABLE is repeatable read
For a detailed explanation of isolation levels, refer to the
Db2 for i SQL Reference.
SQL_ATTR_CURRENT_IMPLICIT_XMLPARSE_OPTION
A null-terminated character string that is the string
constant used to set the CURRENT IMPLICIT
XMLPARSE OPTION special register.
Setting this attribute causes the SET CURRENT IMPLICIT
XMLPARSE OPTION SQL statement to be issued. If this
attribute is set before a connection has been established,
the SET CURRENT IMPLICIT XMLPARSE OPTION SQL
statement will be issued when the connection is made.
The valid values include:
v STRIP WHITESPACE In the XML Standard, whitespace
is space characters (U+0020), carriage returns
(U+000D), line feeds (U+000A), or tabs (U+0009) that
are in the document to improve readability. Boundary
whitespace is whitespace characters that appear
between elements. The STRIP WHITESPACE option
removes whitespace.
v PRESERVE WHITESPACE Whitespace is not removed.
The default value of the CURRENT IMPLICIT
XMLPARSE OPTION special register is 'STRIP
WHITESPACE'.
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SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_DATE_FMT
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_FMT_ISO – The International Organization for
Standardization (ISO) date format yyyy-mm-dd is used.
This is the default.
v SQL_FMT_USA – The United States date format
mm/dd/yyyy is used.
v SQL_FMT_EUR – The European date format
dd.mm.yyyy is used.
v SQL_FMT_JIS – The Japanese Industrial Standard date
format yyyy-mm-dd is used.
v SQL_FMT_MDY – The date format mm/dd/yy is used.
v SQL_FMT_DMY – The date format dd/mm/yy is used.
v SQL_FMT_YMD – The date format yy/mm/dd is used.
v SQL_FMT_JUL – The Julian date format yy/ddd is
used.
v SQL_FMT_JOB – The job default is used.
SQL_ATTR_DATE_SEP
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_SEP_SLASH – A slash ( / ) is used as the date
separator. This is the default.
v SQL_SEP_DASH – A dash ( - ) is used as the date
separator.
v SQL_SEP_PERIOD – A period ( . ) is used as the date
separator.
v SQL_SEP_COMMA – A comma ( , ) is used as the date
separator.
v SQL_SEP_BLANK – A blank is used as the date
separator.
v SQL_SEP_JOB – The job default is used.
Separators only apply to the following
SQL_ATTR_DATE_FMT attribute types:
v SQL_FMT_MDY
v SQL_FMT_DMY
v SQL_FMT_YMD
v SQL_FMT_JUL
SQL_ATTR_DBC_DEFAULT_LIB
A character value that indicates the default library that is
used for resolving unqualified file references.
SQL_ATTR_DBC_SYS_NAMING
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Db2 for i CLI uses the IBM i system
naming mode. Files are qualified using the slash (/)
delimiter. Unqualified files are resolved using the
library list for the job.
v SQL_FALSE – Db2 for i CLI uses the default naming
mode, which is SQL naming. Files are qualified using
the period (.) delimiter. Unqualified files are resolved
using either the default library or the current user ID.
SQL call level interface
223
SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_DECFLOAT_ROUNDING_MODE
A 32-bit integer value:
v ROUND_CEILING
v ROUND_DOWN
v ROUND_FLOOR
v ROUND_HALF_DOWN
v ROUND_HALF_EVEN - This is the default.
v ROUND_HALF_UP
v ROUND_UP
Specifying this attribute causes the decimal floating point
rounding mode to be set in the following manner:
v For a local non-server mode connection, the local job
will use the specified rounding mode.
v For a local server mode connection, the server job will
use the specified rounding mode.
v For a remote connection, the application requestor's job
will use the rounding mode specified on the connection
attribute. Additionally, a SET CURRENT DECFLOAT
ROUNDING MODE statement will be sent to the
application server to set the initial rounding mode
there.
Applications should avoid setting the rounding mode
using an SQL statement. Using the SET CURRENT
DECFLOAT ROUNDING MODE statement will have no
effect on the current connection if a local connection has
been made. Executing the SQL statement for a remote
connection will change the rounding mode for the
application server, but will not affect the rounding mode
in the application requestor job.
SQL_ATTR_DECIMAL_SEP
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_SEP_PERIOD – A period ( . ) is used as the
decimal separator. This is the default.
v SQL_SEP_COMMA – A comma ( , ) is used as the
decimal separator.
v SQL_SEP_JOB – The job default is used.
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_COL_INFO
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Statement handles allocated against this
connection handle can be used on SQLColAttribute()
to retrieve extended column information, such as base
table, base schema, base column, and label.
v SQL_FALSE – Statement handles allocated against this
connection handle cannot be used on the
SQLColAttribute() function to retrieve extended
column information. This is the default.
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_INDICATORS
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Extended indicator support will be
enabled. The user will be able to specify values to
signify UNASSIGNED and DEFAULT on the
SQLBindParameter API.
v SQL_FALSE – Extended indicator support is not
enabled. This is the default.
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SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_FREE_LOCATORS
A pointer to an array of 32-bit integer values containing
the locator handles to be freed. The sLen parameter
indicates the number of locators to be freed.
A special value of '-99' for the sLen parameter indicates
that all locators and locator storage that has been
allocated up to that point in the connection should be
freed. A non-null pointer to the array of locator handles
must still be passed, though it is not used.
SQL_ATTR_HEX_LITERALS
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_HEX_IS_CHAR – Hexadecimal constants are
treated as character data. This is the default.
v SQL_HEX_IS_BINARY – Hexadecimal constants are
treated as binary data.
SQL_ATTR_INFO_ACCTSTR
A character value used to identify the client accounting
string that is sent to the host database server at connect
time. Db2 for i servers support a length of up to 255
characters.
When the value is being set, some servers might not
handle the entire length provided and might truncate the
value.
To ensure that the data is converted correctly when
transmitted to a host system, use only the characters A to
Z, 0 to 9, and the underscore (_) or period (.).
SQL_ATTR_INFO_APPLNAME
A character value used to identify the client application
name that is sent to the host database server at connect
time.Db2 for i servers support a length of up to 255
characters.
When the value is being set, some servers might not
handle the entire length provided and might truncate the
value.
To ensure that the data is converted correctly when
transmitted to a host system, use only the characters A to
Z, 0 to 9, and the underscore (_) or period (.).
SQL_ATTR_INFO_PROGRAMID
A character value used to identify the client program
name that is sent to the host database server at connect
time.Db2 for i servers support a length of up to 255
characters.
When the value is being set, some servers might not
handle the entire length provided and might truncate the
value.
To ensure that the data is converted correctly when
transmitted to a host system, use only the characters A to
Z, 0 to 9, and the underscore (_) or period (.).
SQL call level interface
225
SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_INFO_USERID
A character value used to identify the client user-id that
is sent to the host database server at connect time.Db2 for
i servers support a length of up to 255 characters.
When the value is being set, some servers might not
handle the entire length provided and might truncate the
value.
This user-id is not to be confused with the authentication
user-id. This user-id is for identification purposes only
and is not used for any authorization.
To ensure that the data is converted correctly when
transmitted to a host system, use only the characters A to
Z, 0 to 9, and the underscore (_) or period (.).
SQL_ATTR_INFO_WRKSTNNAME
A character value used to identify the client workstation
name that is sent to the host database server at connect
time. Db2 for i servers support a length of up to 255
characters.
When the value is being set, some servers might not
handle the entire length provided and might truncate the
value.
To ensure that the data is converted correctly when
transmitted to a host system, use only the characters A to
Z, 0 to 9, and the underscore (_) or period (.).
SQL_ATTR_MAX_PRECISION
An integer constant that is the maximum precision
(length) that should be returned for the result data types.
The value can be 31 or 63.
SQL_ATTR_MAX_SCALE
An integer constant that is the maximum scale (number
of decimal positions to the right of the decimal point) that
should be returned for the result data types. The value
can range from 0 to the maximum precision.
SQL_ATTR_MIN_DIVIDE_SCALE
Specify the minimum divide scale (number of decimal
positions to the right of the decimal point) that should be
returned for the result data types resulting from a divide
operation. The value can range from 0 to 9, not to exceed
the maximum scale. If 0 is specified, minimum divide
scale is not used.
SQL_ATTR_OLD_MTADTA_BEHAVIOR
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Run with the internal implementation for
meta-data APIs as defined before V6R1M0.
Compatibility with other DB2 CLI meta-data APIs is
not guaranteed if this option is set. This is not
recommended.
v SQL_FALSE – Run with the new internal
implementation for meta-data APIs. This is the default.
Meta-data APIs are functions that query the DB2 catalogs
such as SQLTables, SQLColumns(), and SQLStatistics().
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SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
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A 32-bit integer value:
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SQL_ATTR_NULLT_OUTPUT_PARMS
v SQL_TRUE – DB2 CLI uses null termination to indicate
the length of output character string columns in array
result set data.
v SQL_FALSE – DB2 CLI does not null terminate output
character string columns in array result set data. This is
the default.
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – DB2 CLI uses null termination to indicate
the length of SQL CALL statement output character
string parameters.
v SQL_FALSE – DB2 CLI does not null terminate string
output parameters of SQL CALL statement . This is the
default.
SQL_ATTR_QUERY_OPTIMIZE_GOAL
A 32-bit integer value that tells the optimizer to behave in
a specified way when processing a query:
v SQL_FIRST_IO – All queries are optimized with the
goal of returning the first page of output as fast as
possible. This goal works well when the output is
controlled by a user who is most likely to cancel the
query after viewing the first page of output data.
Queries coded with an OPTIMIZE FOR nnn ROWS
clause honor the goal specified by the clause.
v SQL_ALL_IO – All queries are optimized with the goal
of running the entire query to completion in the
shortest amount of elapsed time. This is a good option
when the output of a query is being written to a file or
report, or the interface is queuing the output data.
Queries coded with an OPTIMIZE FOR nnn ROWS
clause honor the goal specified by the clause. This is
the default.
SQL_ATTR_SAVEPOINT_NAME
A character value that indicates the savepoint name to be
used by SQLEndTran() on the functions
SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_ROLLBACK or
SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_RELEASE.
SQL_ATTR_SERVERMODE_SUBSYSTEM
A null terminated character string that is used to specify
the subsystem in which the associated QSQSRVR jobs
will run. The default behavior is to have the jobs run in
the QSYSWRK subsystem. If the value *SAME is used,
then the QSQSRVR jobs will run in the same subsystem
as the job using the CLI API.
SQL_ATTR_TIME_FMT
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_FMT_ISO – The International Organization for
Standardization (ISO) time format hh.mm.ss is used.
This is the default.
v SQL_FMT_USA – The United States time format
hh:mmxx is used, where xx is AM or PM.
v SQL_FMT_EUR – The European time format hh.mm.ss
is used.
v SQL_FMT_JIS – The Japanese Industrial Standard time
format hh:mm:ss is used.
v SQL_FMT_HMS – The hh:mm:ss format is used.
SQL call level interface
227
SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_TIME_SEP
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_SEP_COLON – A colon ( : ) is used as the time
separator. This is the default.
v SQL_SEP_PERIOD – A period ( . ) is used as the time
separator.
v SQL_SEP_COMMA – A comma ( , ) is used as the time
separator.
v SQL_SEP_BLANK – A blank is used as the time
separator.
v SQL_SEP_JOB – The job default is used.
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IBM i: SQL call level interface
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Timestamps are treated as fixed length
types with a length of 26 and precision of 6. The
following functions are affected :
– SQLBindCol - cbValueMax is ignored and always
treated as 26.
– SQLBindParam - cbParamDef is ignored and always
treated as 26. ibScale is ignored and always treated
as 6.
– SQLBindParameter -ColumnSize is ignored and
always treated as 26. DecimalDigits is ignored and
always treated as 6.
– SQLColAttribute - SQL_DESC_LENGTH is always
26, SQL_DESC_PRECISION is always 26,
SQL_DESC_SCALE is always 6, and
SQL_DESC_DISPLAY_SIZE is either 26 or 27,
depending on whether connection attribute
SQL_ATTR_INCLUDE_NULL_IN_LEN has been set.
– SQLColAttributes - SQL_DESC_LENGTH is always
26, SQL_DESC_PRECISION is always 26,
SQL_DESC_SCALE is always 6, and
SQL_DESC_DISPLAY_SIZE is either 26 or 27,
depending on whether connection attribute
SQL_ATTR_INCLUDE_NULL_IN_LEN has been set.
– SQLDescribeCol - pcbColDef is always 26 and pibScale
is always 6.
– SQLDescribeParam - ParameterSizePtr is always 26
and DecimalDigitsPtr is always 6.
– SQLGetDescRec - prec is always 26 and scale is
always 6.
– SQLPutData - cbValue is ignored and treated as 26.
v SQL_FALSE - Timestamps are treated as varying length
types with a length between 19 and 32 and a
corresponding precision between 0 and 12. SQL_FALSE
is the default.
SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_TXN_EXTERNAL
A 32-bit integer value that must be SQL_TRUE to enable
the use of XA transaction setting in the CLI connection.
SQL_ATTR_TXN_EXTERNAL must be set to SQL_TRUE
to use the XA transaction options by the
SQL_ATTR_TXN_INFO connection attribute.
The default is SQL_FALSE, which is not to enable XA
transaction support. However, as soon as transaction
support is enabled for the connection, it cannot be
disabled. (Attempting to set
SQL_ATTR_TXN_EXTERNAL to SQL_FALSE results in a
CLI error.)
Further information as well as an example of use of the
SQL_ATTR_TXN_EXTERNAL connection attribute can be
found in “Example: Using the CLI XA transaction
connection attributes” on page 311.
SQL call level interface
229
SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_TXN_INFO
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TXN_CREATE – Create and start a transaction.
This parallels the xa_start(TMNOFLAGS) XA option.
v
SQL_TXN_END – End the specified transaction. The
user is responsible to commit or roll back the work.
This parallels the xa_end(TMSUCCESS) XA option.
v SQL_TXN_END_FAIL – End the specified transaction
and mark the transaction as rollback required. This
parallels the xa_end(TMFAIL) XA option.
v SQL_TXN_CLEAR – Suspend the transaction to work
on a different transaction. This parallels the
xa_end(TMSUSPEND) XA option.
v SQL_TXN_FIND – Find, retrieve, and use the
nonsuspended transaction specified in vParam for the
current connection. This allows work to continue on
the open cursors for the previously nonsuspended
transaction. This parallels the xa_start(TMJOIN) XA
option.
v SQL_TXN_RESUME – Find, retrieve, and use the
suspended transaction specified in vParam for the
current connection. This allows work to continue on
the open cursors for the previously suspended
transaction. This parallels the xa_start(TMRESUME) XA
option.
Use of this connection attribute requires the user to be
running in server mode. Keep in mind, a user cannot
toggle between a non-server mode and server mode
environment.
The input argument vParam must point to a
TXN_STRUCT object. This structure can be found in the
header file QSYSINC/h.SQLCLI.
The xa_info argument for the xa_open XA API must
include the THDCTL=C keyword and value when using
SQLSetConnectAttr()API instead of xa_start and xa_end
to start and end XA transaction branch associations.
See XA transaction support for commitment control in the
Commitment control topic for more information about
XA transactions.
See XA APIs for more information.
See “Example: Using the CLI XA transaction connection
attributes” on page 311 for more information and an
example that shows how you can use the
SQL_ATTR_TXN_INFO connection attribute.
When running XA calls through CLI, the return codes
from CLI reflect the XA return code specifications. These
values can be found in the XA specification
documentation, as well as in the XA.h include file. Note
that the return code values that are listed in the XA
include file take precedence over the CLI return code
values when calling XA through this connection attribute.
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SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 146. Connect options (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_UCS2
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – When using statement handles allocated
against this connection handle for SQLPrepare() and
SQLExecDirect() functions, the statement text is passed
in the UCS-2 (Unicode) coded character set identifier
(CCSID).
v SQL_FALSE – When using statement handles allocated
against this connection handle for SQLPrepare() and
SQLExecDirect() functions, the statement text is passed
in the job's CCSID. This is the default.
SQL_ATTR_XML_DECLARATION
A 32-bit unsigned integer that specifies which elements of
an XML declaration are added to XML data when it is
implicitly serialized. This attribute does not affect the
result of the XMLSERIALIZE function. Set this attribute
to the sum of each component required:
v 0: No declarations or byte order marks (BOMs) are
added to the output buffer.
v 1: A byte order mark (BOM) in the appropriate
endianness is prepended to the output buffer if the
target encoding is UTF-16 (Although a UTF-8 BOM
exists, DB2 does not generate it, even if the target
encoding is UTF-8.)
v 2: A minimal XML declaration is generated, containing
only the XML version.
v 4: An encoding attribute that identifies the target
encoding is added to any generated XML declaration.
Therefore, this setting only has effect when the setting
of 2 is also included when computing the value of this
attribute.
Attempts to set any other value using
SQLSetConnectAttr() or SQLSetConnectOption()will result
in a CLI0191E (SQLSTATE HY024) error, and the value
will remain unchanged. The default setting is 7, which
indicates that a BOM and an XML declaration containing
the XML version and encoding attribute are generated
during implicit serialization. This setting affects any
statement handles allocated after the value is changed.
Existing statement handles retain their original values..
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 147. SQLSetConnectAttr SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
SQL call level interface
231
SQLSetConnectAttr
Table 147. SQLSetConnectAttr SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
Given the fAttr value, a value that is not valid is
specified for the argument vParam.
An fAttr that is not valid value is specified.
References
v “SQLSetConnectOption - Set connection option” on page 233
v “SQLSetStmtOption - Set statement option” on page 253
232
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSetConnectOption
SQLSetConnectOption - Set connection option
SQLSetConnectOption() has been deprecated and replaced with SQLSetConnectAttr(). Although this
version of Db2 for i CLI continues to support SQLSetConnectOption(), it is recommended that you begin
using SQLSetConnectAttr() in your Db2 for i CLI programs so that they conform to the latest standards.
SQLSetConnectOption() sets connection attributes for a particular connection.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLSetConnectOptionW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on
page 307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLSetConnectOption (SQLHDBC hdbc,
SQLSMALLINT fOption,
SQLPOINTER vParam);
Function arguments
Table 148. SQLSetConnectOption arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Connection handle.
SQLSMALLINT
fOption
Input
Connect option to set, refer to Table 146 on
page 220 for more information.
SQLPOINTER
vParam
Input
Value associated with fOption. Depending on
the option, this can be a pointer to a 32-bit
integer value, or a character string.
Usage
The SQLSetConnectOption() provides many of the same attribute functions as SQLSetConnectAttr() before
V5R3. However, SQLSetConnectOption() has since been deprecated, and support for all new attribute
functions has gone into SQLSetConnectAttr(). Users should migrate to the nondeprecated interface.
All connection and statement options set through the SQLSetConnectOption() persist until
SQLFreeConnect() is called or the next SQLSetConnectOption() call.
The format of information set through vParam depends on the specified fOption. The option information
can be either a 32-bit integer or a pointer to a null-terminated character string.
Refer to Table 146 on page 220 for the appropriate connect options.
Note: Because SQLSetConnectOption() has been deprecated, not all the options listed in the table are
supported.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
SQL call level interface
233
SQLSetConnectOption
Diagnostics
Table 149. SQLSetConnectOption SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
Given the fOption value, a value that is not valid is
specified for the argument vParam.
A fOption value that is not valid is specified.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The specified fOption is not supported by Db2 for i CLI
or the data source.
Given the specified fOptionvalue, the value specified for
the argument vParam is not supported.
References
“SQLSetConnectAttr - Set a connection attribute” on page 220
234
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSetCursorName
SQLSetCursorName - Set cursor name
SQLSetCursorName() associates a cursor name with the statement handle. This function is optional because
Db2 for i CLI implicitly generates a cursor name when needed.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLSetCursorNameW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for Db2 for i CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLSetCursorName (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szCursor,
cbCursor);
Function arguments
Table 150. SQLSetCursorName arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
szCursor
Input
Cursor name.
SQLSMALLINT
cbCursor
Input
Length of contents of szCursor argument.
Usage
Db2 for i CLI always generates and uses an internally generated cursor name when a SELECT statement
is prepared or executed directly. SQLSetCursorName() allows an application-defined cursor name to be
used in an SQL statement (a Positioned UPDATE or DELETE). Db2 for i CLI maps this name to an
internal name. SQLSetCursorName() must be called before an internal name is generated. The name
remains associated with the statement handle, until the handle is dropped. The name also remains after
the transaction has ended, but at this point SQLSetCursorName() can be called to set a different name for
this statement handle.
Cursor names must follow the following rules:
v All cursor names within the connection must be unique.
v Each cursor name must be less than or equal to 128 characters in length. Any attempt to set a cursor
name longer than 128 characters results in an SQL0504 error.
v Because a cursor name is considered an identifier in SQL, it must begin with an English letter (a-z,
A-Z) followed by any combination of digits (0-9), English letters or the underscore character (_).
v Unless the input cursor name is enclosed in double quotation marks, all leading and trailing blanks
from the input cursor name string are removed.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
SQL call level interface
235
SQLSetCursorName
Diagnostics
Table 151. SQLSetCursorName SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
34000
Cursor name that is not
valid
The cursor name specified by the argument szCursor is
not valid. The cursor name either begins with "SQLCUR"
or "SQL_CUR" or violates either the driver or the data
source cursor naming rules (Must begin with a-z or A-Z
followed by any combination of English letters, digits, or
the '_' character.
The cursor name specified by the argument szCursor
exists.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
szCursor is a null pointer.
Function sequence error
The statement handle is not in allocated state.
HY010
The argument cbCursor is less than 1, but not equal to
SQL_NTS.
SQLPrepare() or SQLExecDirect() is called before
SQLSetCursorName().
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
References
“SQLGetCursorName - Get cursor name” on page 135
236
IBM i: SQL call level interface
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
SQLSetDescField
SQLSetDescField - Set a descriptor field
SQLSetDescField() sets a field in a descriptor. SQLSetDescField() is a more extensible alternative to the
SQLSetDescRec() function.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLSetDescFieldW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLSetDescField (SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hdesc,
irec,
fDescType,
rgbDesc,
bLen);
Function arguments
Table 152. SQLSetDescField arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHDESC
hdesc
Input
Descriptor handle.
SQLSMALLINT
irec
Input
Record number from which the specified
field is to be retrieved.
SQLSMALLINT
fDescType
Input
See Table 153.
SQLPOINTER
rgbDesc
Input
Pointer to buffer.
SQLINTEGER
bLen
Input
Length of descriptor buffer (rgbDesc).
Table 153. fDescType descriptor types
Descriptor
Type
Description
SQL_DESC_COUNT
SMALLINT
Set the number of records in
the descriptor. irec is ignored.
SQL_DESC_DATA_PTR
SQLPOINTER
Set the data pointer field for
irec.
SQL_DESC_DATETIME_INTERVAL_CODE
SMALLINT
Set the interval code for records
with a type of SQL_DATETIME
SQL_DESC_INDICATOR_PTR
SQLPOINTER
Set the indicator pointer field
for irec.
SQL_DESC_LENGTH_PTR
SQLPOINTER
Set the length pointer field for
irec.
SQL_DESC_LENGTH
INTEGER
Set the length field of irec.
SQL_DESC_PRECISION
SMALLINT
Set the precision field of irec.
SQL_DESC_SCALE
SMALLINT
Set the scale field of irec.
SQL_DESC_TYPE
SMALLINT
Set the type field of irec.
Usage
Instead of requiring an entire set of arguments like SQLSetDescRec(), SQLSetDescField() specifies which
attribute you want to set for a specific descriptor record.
Although SQLSetDescField() allows for future extensions, it requires more calls to set the same
information than SQLSetDescRec() for each descriptor record.
SQL call level interface
237
SQLSetDescField
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 154. SQLGetDescField SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument fDescType or irec is
not valid.
The argument rgbValue is a null pointer.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes” on page 85
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
238
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSetDescRec
SQLSetDescRec - Set a descriptor record
SQLSetDescRec() sets all the attributes for a descriptor record. SQLSetDescRec() is a more concise
alternative to the SQLSetDescField() function.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLSetDescRec (SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hdesc,
irec,
type,
subtype,
length,
prec,
scale,
data,
*sLen,
*indic);
Function arguments
Table 155. SQLSetDescRec arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLDESC
hdesc
Input
Descriptor handle.
SQLSMALLINT
irec
Input
Record number within the descriptor.
SQLSMALLINT
type
Input
TYPE field for the record.
SQLSMALLINT
subtype
Input
DATETIME_INTERVAL_CODE field for
records whose TYPE is SQL_DATETIME.
SQLINTEGER
length
Input
LENGTH field for the record.
SQLSMALLINT
prec
Input
PRECISION field for the record.
SQLSMALLINT
scale
Input
SCALE field for the record.
SQLPOINTER
data
Input (deferred)
DATA_PTR field for the record.
SQLINTEGER *
sLen
Input (deferred)
LENGTH_PTR field for the record.
SQLINTEGER *
indic
Input (deferred)
INDICATOR_PTR field for the record.
Usage
Calling SQLSetDescRec() sets all the fields in a descriptor record in one call.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 156. SQLSetDescRec SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
The value specified for the argument irec is less than 1.
A value that is not valid for another argument is
specified.
SQL call level interface
239
SQLSetDescRec
Table 156. SQLSetDescRec SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY016
Descriptor that is not valid
The descriptor handle referred to an implementation row
descriptor.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
References
v “SQLBindCol - Bind a column to an application variable” on page 36
v “SQLDescribeCol - Describe column attributes” on page 85
v “SQLExecDirect - Execute a statement directly” on page 102
v “SQLExecute - Execute a statement” on page 104
v “SQLPrepare - Prepare a statement” on page 200
240
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSetEnvAttr
SQLSetEnvAttr - Set environment attribute
SQLSetEnvAttr() sets an environment attribute for the current environment.
Syntax
An environment attribute cannot be set if a connection handle has been allocated. In order for the
attribute to apply to the entire CLI environment, the environment attributes must be in place before this
initial connection is made. An HY010 error code is returned otherwise.
SQLRETURN SQLSetEnvAttr (SQLHENV
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
henv,
Attribute,
Value,
StringLength);
Function arguments
Table 157. SQLSetEnvAttr arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHEN
henv
Input
Environment handle.
SQLINTEGER
Attribute
Input
Environment attribute to set. Refer to
Table 158 for more information.
SQLPOINTER
Value
Input
Appropriate value for Attribute.
SQLINTEGER
StringLength
Input
Length of Value in bytes if the attribute value
is a character string; if Attribute does not
denote a string, then Db2 for i CLI ignores
StringLength.
Usage
In environments where the current application may exist in the same job as other applications using CLI,
connections attributes should be used instead of environment attributes. Otherwise, setting environment
attributes may cause the other application to behave unexpectedly. Ideally, the only environment
attributes that should be used are SQL_ATTR_ENVHNDL_COUNTER and SQL_ATTR_SERVER_MODE.
Table 158. Environment attributes
Attribute
Contents
SQL_ATTR_DATE_FMT
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_FMT_ISO – The International Organization for
Standardization (ISO) date format yyyy-mm-dd is used.
This is the default.
v SQL_FMT_USA – The United States date format
mm/dd/yyyy is used.
v SQL_FMT_EUR – The European date format
dd.mm.yyyy is used.
v SQL_FMT_JIS – The Japanese Industrial Standard date
format yyyy-mm-dd is used.
v SQL_FMT_MDY – The date format mm/dd/yy is used.
v SQL_FMT_DMY – The date format dd/mm/yy is used.
v SQL_FMT_YMD – The date format yy/mm/dd is used.
v SQL_FMT_JUL – The Julian date format yy/ddd is
used.
v SQL_FMT_JOB – The job default is used.
SQL call level interface
241
SQLSetEnvAttr
Table 158. Environment attributes (continued)
Attribute
Contents
SQL_ATTR_DATE_SEP
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_SEP_SLASH – A slash ( / ) is used as the date
separator. This is the default.
v SQL_SEP_DASH – A dash ( - ) is used as the date
separator.
v SQL_SEP_PERIOD – A period ( . ) is used as the date
separator.
v SQL_SEP_COMMA – A comma ( , ) is used as the date
separator.
v SQL_SEP_BLANK – A blank is used as the date
separator.
v SQL_SEP_JOB – The job default is used.
Separators only apply to the following
SQL_ATTR_DATE_FMT attribute types:
v SQL_FMT_MDY
v SQL_FMT_DMY
v SQL_FMT_YMD
v SQL_FMT_JUL
SQL_ATTR_DECIMAL_SEP
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_SEP_PERIOD – A period ( . ) is used as the
decimal separator. This is the default.
v SQL_SEP_COMMA – A comma ( , ) is used as the
decimal separator.
v SQL_SEP_JOB – The job default is used.
SQL_ATTR_DEFAULT_LIB
A character value that indicates the default library that is
used for resolving unqualified file references.
SQL_ATTR_ENVHNDL_COUNTER
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_FALSE – Db2 for i CLI does not count the number
of times the environment handle is allocated. Therefore,
the first call to free the environment handle and all
associated resources.
v SQL_TRUE – Db2 for i CLI keeps a counter of the
number of times the environment handle is allocated.
Each time the environment handle is freed, the counter
is decremented. Only when the counter reaches zero
does the Db2 for i CLI actually free the handle and all
associated resources. This allows nested calls to
programs using the CLI that allocate and free the CLI
environment handle.
SQL_ATTR_ESCAPE_CHAR
A character value that indicates the escape character to be
used when specifying a search pattern in either
SQLColumns( ) or SQLTables( ).
SQL_ATTR_ESCAPE_CHAR is only honored if the
connection attribute
SQL_ATTR_OLD_MTADTA_BEHAVIOR is set to
SQL_TRUE.
242
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSetEnvAttr
Table 158. Environment attributes (continued)
Attribute
Contents
SQL_ATTR_FOR_FETCH_ONLY
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Cursors are read-only and cannot be used
for positioned update or delete operations. This is the
default.
v SQL_FALSE – Cursors can be used for positioned
updates or delete operations.
The attribute SQL_ATTR_FOR_FETCH_ONLY can also be
set for individual statements using SQLSetStmtAttr().
SQL_ATTR_INCLUDE_NULL_IN_LEN
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – If a null terminator exists, it will be
included in the length value that is returned for output
character information. To include the null terminator in
the actual output string, the environment attribute
SQL_ATTR_OUTPUT_NTS must be set to SQL_TRUE.
This is the default.
v SQL_FALSE – The null terminator, even if it exists, will
not be included in the length value that is returned for
output character information.
SQL_ATTR_JOB_SORT_SEQUENCE
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Db2 for i CLI uses the sort sequence that
has been set for the job.
v SQL_FALSE – Db2 for i CLI uses the default sort
sequence, which is *HEX.
SQL_ATTR_NON_HEXCCSID
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Db2 for i CLI set the job CCSID to the job
default CCSID if the job CCSID is set to 65535.
v SQL_FALSE – Db2 for i CLI does not change the job
CCSID. This is the default.
SQL_ATTR_OUTPUT_NTS
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Db2 for i CLI uses null termination to
indicate the length of output character strings. This is
the default.
v SQL_FALSE – Db2 for i CLI does not use null
termination.
The CLI functions affected by this attribute are all
functions called for the environment (and for any
connections allocated under the environment) that have
character string parameters.
SQL_ATTR_REQUIRE_PROFILE
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – If in server mode, then a profile and
password are required when running SQLConnect() and
SQLDriverConnect() functions.
v SQL_FALSE – If profile is omitted on the SQLConnect()
or SQLDriverConnect() function, then connection is
made using current user profile. This is the default.
SQL call level interface
243
SQLSetEnvAttr
Table 158. Environment attributes (continued)
Attribute
Contents
SQL_ATTR_SERVER_MODE
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_FALSE – Db2 for i CLI processes the SQL
statements of all connections within the same job. All
changes compose a single transaction. This is the
default mode of processing.
v SQL_TRUE – Db2 for i CLI processes the SQL
statements of each connection in a separate job. This
allows multiple connections to the same data source,
possibly with different user IDs for each connection. It
also separates the changes made under each connection
handle into its own transaction. This allows each
connection handle to be committed or rolled back,
without impacting pending changes made under other
connection handles. See “Running Db2 for i CLI in
server mode” on page 305 for more information.
SQL_ATTR_SYS_NAMING
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – Db2 for i CLI uses the IBM i system
naming mode. Files are qualified using the slash (/)
delimiter. Unqualified files are resolved using the
library list for the job.
v SQL_FALSE – Db2 for i CLI uses the default naming
mode, which is SQL naming. Files are qualified using
the period (.) delimiter. Unqualified files are resolved
using either the default library or the current user ID.
SQL_ATTR_TIME_FMT
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_FMT_ISO – The International Organization for
Standardization (ISO) time format hh.mm.ss is used.
This is the default.
v SQL_FMT_USA – The United States time format
hh:mmxx is used, where xx is a.m. or p.m.
v SQL_FMT_EUR – The European time format hh.mm.ss
is used.
v SQL_FMT_JIS – The Japanese Industrial Standard time
format hh:mm:ss is used.
v SQL_FMT_HMS – The hh:mm:ss format is used.
SQL_ATTR_TIME_SEP
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_SEP_COLON – A colon ( : ) is used as the time
separator. This is the default.
v SQL_SEP_PERIOD – A period ( . ) is used as the time
separator.
v SQL_SEP_COMMA – A comma ( , ) is used as the time
separator.
v SQL_SEP_BLANK – A blank is used as the time
separator.
v SQL_SEP_JOB – The job default is used.
244
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSetEnvAttr
Table 158. Environment attributes (continued)
Attribute
Contents
SQL_ATTR_TRUNCATION_RTNC
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_TRUE – CLI returns SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
in the SQLFetch(),SQLExtendedFetch(), and
SQLFetchScroll() return codes if truncation occurs.
v SQL_FALSE – CLI does not return
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO in the SQLFetch(),
SQLExtendedFetch() , and SQLFetchScroll() return
codes if truncation occurs. This is the default.
SQL_ATTR_UTF8
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_FALSE – Character data is treated as being in the
default job coded character set identifier (CCSID). This
is the default.
v SQL_TRUE – Character data is treated as being in the
UTF–8 CCSID (1208).
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 159. SQLSetEnvAttr SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY009
Parameter value that is not
valid
The specified Attribute is not supported by Db2 for i CLI.
Given specified Attributevalue, the value specified for the
argument Value is not supported.
The argument pValue is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
Connection handles are already allocated.
SQL call level interface
245
SQLSetParam
SQLSetParam - Set parameter
SQLSetParam() has been deprecated and replaced by SQLBindParameter(). Although this version of Db2
for i CLI continues to support SQLSetParam(), it is recommended that you begin using
SQLBindParameter() in your Db2 for i CLI programs so that they conform to the latest standards.
SQLSetParam() associates (binds) an application variable to a parameter marker in an SQL statement.
When the statement is processed, the contents of the bound variables are sent to the database server. This
function is also used to specify any required data conversion.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLSetParam (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
ipar,
fCType,
fSqlType,
cbParamDef,
ibScale,
rgbValue,
*pcbValue);
References
“SQLBindParameter - Bind a parameter marker to a buffer” on page 52
246
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSetStmtAttr
SQLSetStmtAttr - Set a statement attribute
SQLSetStmtAttr() sets an attribute of a specific statement handle. To set an option for all statement
handles associated with a connection handle, the application can call SQLSetConnectOption().
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLSetStmtAttrW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLSetStmtAttr (SQLHSTMT
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
fAttr,
vParam,
sLen);
Function arguments
Table 160. SQLSetStmtAttr arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLINTEGER
fAttr
Input
Attribute to set. Refer to Table 161 for the list
of settable statement attributes.
SQLPOINTER
vParam
Input
Value associated with fAttr. vParam can be a
32-bit integer value or a character string.
SQLINTEGER
sLen
Input
Length of data if data is a character string;
otherwise, unused.
Usage
Statement options for an hstmt remain in effect until they are changed by another call to
SQLSetStmtAttr() or the hstmt is dropped by calling SQLFreeStmt() with the SQL_DROP option. Calling
SQLFreeStmt() with the SQL_CLOSE, SQL_UNBIND, or SQL_RESET_PARAMS options does not reset the
statement options.
The format of information set through vParam depends on the specified fOption. The format of each is
noted in Table 161.
Table 161. Statement attributes
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_APP_PARAM_DESC
VParam must be a descriptor handle. The specified
descriptor serves as the application parameter descriptor
for later calls to SQLExecute() and SQLExecDirect() on
the statement handle.
SQL_ATTR_APP_ROW_DESC
VParam must be a descriptor handle. The specified
descriptor serves as the application row descriptor for
later calls to SQLFetch() on the statement handle.
SQL call level interface
247
SQLSetStmtAttr
Table 161. Statement attributes (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_BIND_TYPE
This specifies whether row-wise or column-wise binding
is used.
v SQL_BIND_BY_ROW – Binding is row-wise. This is the
default.
When using row-wise binding for a multiple row fetch,
all of the data for a row is returned in contiguous
storage, followed by the data for the next row, and so
on.
v SQL_BIND_BY_COLUMN – Binding is column-wise.
When using column-wise binding for a multiple row
fetch, all of the data for each column is returned in
contiguous storage. The storage for each row need not
be contiguous. A different address is provided by the
user for each column in the result set, and it is the
responsibility of the user to ensure that each address
has space for all the data to be retrieved.
SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_HOLD
A 32-bit integer value that specifies if cursors opened for
this statement handle should be held.
v SQL_FALSE – An open cursor for this statement handle
is closed on a commit or rollback operation. This is the
default.
v SQL_TRUE – An open cursor for this statement handle
is not closed on a commit or rollback operation.
SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_SCROLLABLE
A 32-bit integer value that specifies if cursors opened for
this statement handle should be scrollable.
v SQL_FALSE – Cursors are not scrollable, and
SQLFetchScroll() cannot be used against them. This is
the default.
v SQL_TRUE – Cursors are scrollable. SQLFetchScroll()
can be used to retrieve data from these cursors.
SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_SENSITIVITY
A 32-bit integer value that specifies whether cursors
opened for this statement handle make visible the
changes made to the result set by another cursor. See
DECLARE CURSOR for a more precise definition of the
following options:
v SQL_UNSPECIFIED – Cursors on the statement handle
might make visible none, some, or all such changes
depending on the cursor type. This is the default.
v SQL_INSENSITIVE – All valid cursors on the statement
handle show the result set without reflecting any
changes made to it by any other cursor.
v SQL_SENSITIVE – All valid cursors on the statement
handle make visible all changes made to a result by
another cursor.
248
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSetStmtAttr
Table 161. Statement attributes (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_TYPE
A 32-bit integer value that specifies the behavior of
cursors opened for this statement handle.
v SQL_CURSOR_FORWARD_ONLY – Cursors are not
scrollable, and the SQLFetchScroll() function cannot be
used against them. This is the default.
v SQL_CURSOR_DYNAMIC – Cursors are scrollable
except for insensitive cursor sensitivity. The
SQLFetchScroll() function can be used to retrieve data
from these cursors.
v SQL_CURSOR_STATIC – Cursors are scrollable except
for sensitive cursor sensitivity. The SQLFetchScroll()
function can be used to retrieve data from these
cursors.
SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_COL_INFO
A 32-bit integer value that specifies if cursors opened for
this statement handle should provide extended column
information.
v SQL_FALSE – This statement handle cannot be used on
the SQLColAttribute() function to retrieve extended
column information. This is the default. Setting this
attribute at the statement level overrides the connection
level setting of the attribute.
v SQL_TRUE – This statement handle can be used on the
SQLColAttribute() function to retrieve extended
column information, such as base table, base schema,
base column, and label.
SQL_ATTR_FOR_FETCH_ONLY
A 32-bit integer value that specifies whether cursors
opened for this statement handle should be read only:
v SQL_TRUE – Cursors are read-only and cannot be used
for positioned update or delete operations. This is the
default unless SQL_ATTR_FOR_FETCH_ONLY
environment has been set to SQL_FALSE.
v SQL_FALSE – Cursors can be used for positioned
update or delete operations.
SQL_ATTR_FULL_OPEN
A 32-bit integer value that specifies if cursors opened for
this statement handle should be full open operations.
v SQL_FALSE – Opening a cursor for this statement
handle might use a cached cursor for performance
reasons. This is the default.
v SQL_TRUE – Opening a cursor for this statement
handle always forces a full open operation of a new
cursor.
SQL_ATTR_NUMBER_RESULTSET_ROWS_PTR
A 32-bit integer * value the points to a buffer which
contains the total number of rows available from the
result set. This attribute will only return a valid result if
the cursor sensitivity is insensitive and the cursor type is
static. Without these settings, the returned result will be
zero. This value is set after a successful call to
SQLExecute() or SQLExecDirect().
SQL call level interface
249
SQLSetStmtAttr
Table 161. Statement attributes (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_PARAM_BIND_TYPE
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_BIND_BY_ROW - Binding is row-wise. This is the
default. When using row-wise binding for a multiple
row statements, all of the data for each row must be
contiguous storage, followed by the data for the next
row, and so on.
v SQL_BIND_BY_COLUMN - Binding is column-wise.
When using column-wise binding for a multiple row
statements, all of the data for each column is in
contiguous storage. A different address is provided by
the user for each column in the statement, and it is the
responsibility of the user to ensure that each address
has space for all the parameter data to be passed to the
database.
SQL_ATTR_PARAM_STATUS_PTR
A 32-bit integer * value that points to an array of values
containing status information for each row of parameter
values. The status values are set after a call to
SQLExecDirect() or SQLExecute(). This field is used only
if SQL_ATTR_PARAMSET_SIZE is greater than 1. The
following status values can be returned.
v SQL_PARAM_SUCCESS: The SQL statement was
successfully executed for this set of parameters.
v SQL_PARAM_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO: The SQL
statement was successfully executed for this set of
parameters; however, warning information was
returned.
v SQL_PARAM_ERROR: There was an error in
processing this set of parameters.
v SQL_PARAM_UNUSED: The parameter that was set is
unused. This can occur if a previously set parameter
caused an error which aborted further processing.
v SQL_PARAM_DIAG_UNAVAILABLE: This is not
currently set by DB2 CLI.
This statement attribute can be set to a null pointer, in
which case DB2 CLI does not return parameter status
values.
SQL_ATTR_PARAMS_PROCESSED_PTR
A 32-bit integer * value that points to the current row
number. As each row of parameters is processed this is
set to the number of that row. If the call to
SQLExecDirect() or SQLExecute() that fills in the
SQLINTEGER buffer pointed to by this attribute does not
return SQL_SUCCESS or SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO,
the contents of the buffer are undefined.
This statement attribute can be set to a null pointer, in
which case DB2 CLI does not return the row number.
SQL_ATTR_PARAMSET_SIZE
250
IBM i: SQL call level interface
A 32-bit integer value that specifies the number of values
to be associated with each parameter marker. If this is
greater that 1, the rgbValue argument
in SQLBindParameter() points to an array of parameter
values, and pcbValue points to an array of lengths. This is
an alternative to setting a value size through the
SQLParamOptions() API.
SQLSetStmtAttr
Table 161. Statement attributes (continued)
fAttr
Contents
SQL_ATTR_ROW_BIND_TYPE
A 32-bit integer value:
v SQL_BIND_BY_ROW - Binding is row-wise. This is the
default. When using row-wise binding for a multiple
row fetch, all of the data for a row is returned in
contiguous storage, followed by the data for the next
row, and so on.
v SQL_BIND_BY_COLUMN - Binding is column-wise.
When using column-wise binding for a multiple row
fetch, all the data for each column is returned in
contiguous storage. The storage for each column need
not be contiguous. A different address is provided by
the user for each column in the result set, and it is the
responsibility of the user to ensure that each address
has space for all the data to be retrieved.
SQL_ATTR_ROW_STATUS_PTR
A 16-bit SMALLINT * value that points to an array of
status values at SQLFetchScroll(). The number of
elements must equal the number of rows in the row set
(as defined by the SQL_ROWSET_SIZE attribute). A
status value SQL_ROW_SUCCESS for each row fetched is
returned.
If the number of rows fetched is less than the number of
elements in the status array (that is, less than the row set
size), the remaining status elements are set to
SQL_ROW_NOROW. The number of rows fetched is
returned in the output pointer. This can be set by the
SQLSetStmtAttr attribute
SQL_ATTR_ROWS_FETCHED_PTR.
Db2 for i CLI cannot detect whether a row has been
updated or deleted since the start of the fetch. Therefore,
the following ODBC defined status values are not
reported:
v SQL_ROW_DELETED.
v SQL_ROW_UPDATED.
SQL_ATTR_ROWS_FETCHED_PTR
A 32-bit integer * value that points to a buffer that
contains the number of rows actually fetched by
SQLFetchScroll(). If an error occurs during processing,
the pointer points to the ordinal position of the row (in
the row set) that precedes the row where the error
occurred. If an error occurs retrieving the first row, the
pointer points to the value 0.
SQL_ATTR_ROWSET_SIZE
A 32-bit integer value that specifies the number of rows
in the row set. This is the number of rows returned by
each call to SQLExtendedFetch(). The maximum value is
32767. The default value is 1.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
SQL call level interface
251
SQLSetStmtAttr
Diagnostics
Table 162. SQLStmtAttr SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
HY000
General error
An error occurred for which there is no specific
SQLSTATE and for which no implementation defined
SQLSTATE is defined. The error message returned by
SQLError in the argument szErrorMsg describes the error
and its cause.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value that is not
valid
Given the specified fAttr value, a value that is not valid
is specified for the argument vParam.
An fAttr value that is not valid is specified.
The argument vParam is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence error
The function is called out of sequence.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The driver or the data sources does not support the
specified option.
References
v “SQLFetchScroll - Fetch from a scrollable cursor” on page 114
v “SQLSetStmtOption - Set statement option” on page 253
252
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSetStmtOption
SQLSetStmtOption - Set statement option
SQLSetStmtOption() has been deprecated and replaced with SQLSetStmtAttr(). Although this version of
Db2 for i CLI continues to support SQLSetStmtOption(), it is recommended that you begin using
SQLSetStmtAttr() in your Db2 for i CLI programs so that they conform to the latest standards.
SQLSetStmtOption() sets an attribute of a specific statement handle. To set an option for all statement
handles associated with a connection handle, the application can call SQLSetConnectAttr(). See
“SQLSetConnectAttr - Set a connection attribute” on page 220 for additional details.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLSetStmtOptionW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLSetStmtOption (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
hstmt,
fOption,
vParam);
Function arguments
Table 163. SQLSetStmtOption arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
fOption
Input
Option to set. Refer to Table 161 on page 247 for the list
of settable statement options.
SQLPOINTER
vParam
Input
Value associated with fOption. vParam can be a pointer
to a 32-bit integer value or a character string.
Usage
The SQLSetStmtOption() provides many of the same attribute functions as SQLSetStmtAttr() before V5R3.
However, it has since been deprecated, and support for all new attribute functions has gone into
SQLSetStmtAttr(). Users should migrate to the nondeprecated interface.
Statement options for an hstmt remain in effect until they are changed by another call to
SQLSetStmtOption() or the hstmt is dropped by calling SQLFreeStmt() with the SQL_DROP option.
Calling SQLFreeStmt() with the SQL_CLOSE, SQL_UNBIND, or SQL_RESET_PARAMS options does not
reset statement options.
The format of information set through vParam depends on the specified fOption. The format of each is
noted in Table 161 on page 247.
Refer to Table 161 on page 247 for the proper statement options.
Note: Because the SQLSetStmtOption() function has been deprecated, not all the options listed in the
table are supported."
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
SQL call level interface
253
SQLSetStmtOption
Diagnostics
Table 164. SQLStmtOption SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
40003 *
Statement
completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data source fails before the function
completes processing.
HY000
General error
An error occurred for which there is no specific SQLSTATE and for which no
implementation defined SQLSTATE is defined. The error message returned by SQLError
in the argument szErrorMsg describes the error and its cause.
HY001
Memory allocation The driver is unable to allocate memory required to support the processing or
failure
completion of the function.
HY009
Argument value
that is not valid
Given the specified fOption value, a value that is not valid is specified for the argument
vParam.
A fOption that is not valid value is specified.
The argument szSchemaName or szTableName is a null pointer.
HY010
Function sequence
error
The function is called out of sequence.
HYC00
Driver not capable The driver or the data sources does not support the specified option.
References
v “SQLSetConnectAttr - Set a connection attribute” on page 220
v “SQLSetStmtAttr - Set a statement attribute” on page 247
254
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSpecialColumns
SQLSpecialColumns - Get special (row identifier) columns
SQLSpecialColumns() returns unique row identifier information (primary key or unique index) for a table.
For example, unique index or primary key information. The information is returned in an SQL result set,
which can be retrieved using the same functions that are used to fetch a result set generated by a
SELECT statement.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLSpecialColumnsW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLSpecialColumns (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
fColType,
*szCatalogName,
cbCatalogName,
*szSchemaName,
cbSchemaName,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
fScope,
fNullable);
Function arguments
Table 165. SQLSpecialColumns arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLSMALLINT
fColType
Input
Reserved for future use to support additional
types of special columns.
This data type is currently ignored.
SQLCHAR *
szCatalogName
Input
Catalog qualifier of a three-part table name.
This must be a null pointer or a zero length
string.
SQLSMALLINT
cbCatalogName
Input
Length of szCatalogName. This must be a set
to 0.
SQLCHAR *
szSchemaName
Input
Schema qualifier of the specified table.
SQLSMALLINT
cbSchemaName
Input
Length of szSchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
szTableName
Input
Table name.
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableName
Input
Length of cbTableName.
SQL call level interface
255
SQLSpecialColumns
Table 165. SQLSpecialColumns arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLSMALLINT
fScope
Input
Minimum required duration for which the
unique row identifier is valid.
fScope must be one of the following values:
v SQL_SCOPE_CURROW - The row
identifier is guaranteed to be valid only
while positioned on that row. A later
reselect using the same row identifier
values might not return a row if the row is
updated or deleted by another transaction.
v SQL_SCOPE_TRANSACTION - The row
identifier is guaranteed to be valid for the
duration of the current transaction.
v SQL_SCOPE_SESSION - The row
identifier is guaranteed to be valid for the
duration of the connection.
The duration over which a row identifier
value is guaranteed to be valid depends on
the current transaction isolation level. For
information and scenarios involving isolation
levels, refer to the IBM DB2 SQL reference.
SQLSMALLINT
fNullable
Input
This determines whether to return special
columns that can have a NULL value.
Must be one of the following values:
v SQL_NO_NULLS
The row identifier column set returned
cannot have any NULL values.
v SQL_NULLABLE
The row identifier column set returned
can include columns where NULL values
are permitted.
Usage
If multiple ways exist to uniquely identify any row in a table (for example, if there are multiple unique
indexes on the specified table), then Db2 for i CLI returns the best set of row identifier columns based on
its internal criterion.
If there is no column set that allows any row in the table to be uniquely identified, an empty result set is
returned.
The unique row identifier information is returned in the form of a result set where each column of the
row identifier is represented by one row in the result set. The result set returned by SQLSpecialColumns()
has the following columns in the following order:
256
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLSpecialColumns
Table 166. Columns returned by SQLSpecialColumns
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 SCOPE
SMALLINT not NULL
Actual scope of the rowid. This
contains one of the following values:
v SQL_SCOPE_CURROW
v SQL_SCOPE_TRANSACTION
v SQL_SCOPE_SESSION
Refer to fScope in Table 165 on page
255 for a description of each value.
2 COLUMN_NAME
VARCHAR(128) not NULL
Name of the row identifier column.
3 DATA_TYPE
SMALLINT not NULL
SQL data type of the column.
4 TYPE_NAME
VARCHAR(128) not NULL
Database Management System
(DBMS) character string represented
of the name associated with
DATA_TYPE column value.
5 COLUMN_SIZE
INTEGER
The precision of the column. NULL is
returned for data types where
precision is not applicable.
6 BUFFER_LENGTH
INTEGER
The length, in bytes, of the data
returned in the default C type. For
CHAR data types, this is the same as
the value in the
LENGTH_PRECISION column.
7 DECIMAL_DIGITS
SMALLINT
The scale of the column. NULL is
returned for data types where scale is
not applicable.
8 PSEUDO_COLUMN
SMALLINT
This indicates whether the column is
a pseudo-column; Db2 for i CLI only
returns:
v SQL_PC_NOT_PSEUDO
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 167. SQLSpecialColumns SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
24000
Cursor state that is not valid Cursor related information is requested, but no cursor is
open.
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument length that is not
valid
The value of one of the length arguments is less than 0,
but not equal to SQL_NTS.
SQL call level interface
257
SQLSpecialColumns
Table 167. SQLSpecialColumns SQLSTATEs (continued)
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The data source does not support the catalog portion
(first part) of a three-part table name.
258
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLStatistics
SQLStatistics - Get index and statistics information for a base table
SQLStatistics() retrieves index information for a given table. It also returns the cardinality and the
number of pages associated with the table and the indexes on the table. The information is returned in a
result set, which can be retrieved using the same functions that are used to fetch a result set generated by
a SELECT statement.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLStatisticsW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307
for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLStatistics (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szCatalogName,
cbCatalogName,
*szSchemaName,
cbSchemaName,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
fUnique,
fAccuracy);
Function arguments
Table 168. SQLStatistics arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
szCatalogName
Input
Catalog qualifier of a three-part table name. This
must be a null pointer or a zero length string.
SQLSMALLINT
cbCatalogName
Input
Length of cbCatalogName. This must be set to 0.
SQLCHAR *
szSchemaName
Input
Schema qualifier of the specified table.
SQLSMALLINT
cbSchemaName
Input
Length of szSchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
szTableName
Input
Table name.
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableName
Input
Length of cbTableName.
SQLSMALLINT
fUnique
Input
Type of index information to return:
v SQL_INDEX_UNIQUE
Only unique indexes are returned.
v SQL_INDEX_ALL
All indexes are returned.
SQLSMALLINT
fAccuracy
Input
Not currently used, must be set to 0.
Usage
SQLStatistics() returns the following types of information:
v Statistics information for the table (if available):
– When the TYPE column in the following table is set to SQL_TABLE_STAT, the number of rows in
the table and the number of pages used to store the table.
– When the TYPE column indicates an index, the number of unique values in the index, and the
number of pages used to store the indexes.
SQL call level interface
259
SQLStatistics
– Information about each index, where each index column is represented by one row of the result set.
The result set columns are given in the following table in the order shown; the rows in the result set
are ordered by NON_UNIQUE, TYPE, INDEX_QUALIFIER, INDEX_QUALIFIER, INDEX_NAME
and ORDINAL_POSITION.
Table 169. Columns returned by SQLStatistics
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 TABLE_CAT
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the catalog containing
TABLE_SCHEM. This is set to NULL.
2 TABLE_SCHEM
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the schema containing
TABLE_NAME.
3 TABLE_NAME
VARCHAR(128) not NULL
Name of the table.
4 NON_UNIQUE
SMALLINT
This indicates whether the index
prohibits duplicate values:
v TRUE if the index allows duplicate
values.
v FALSE if the index values must be
unique.
v NULL is returned if the TYPE
column indicates that this row is
SQL_TABLE_STAT (statistics
information about the table itself).
5 INDEX_QUALIFIER
VARCHAR(128)
The identifier used to qualify the
index name. This is NULL if the
TYPE column indicates
SQL_TABLE_STAT.
6 INDEX_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the index. If the TYPE
column has the value
SQL_TABLE_STAT, this column has
the value NULL.
7 TYPE
SMALLINT not NULL
This indicates the type of information
contained in this row of the result set:
v SQL_TABLE_STAT
This indicates this row contains
statistics information about the
table itself.
v SQL_INDEX_CLUSTERED
This indicates this row contains
information about an index, and
the index type is a clustered index.
v SQL_INDEX_HASHED
This indicates this row contains
information about an index, and
the index type is a hashed index.
v SQL_INDEX_OTHER
This indicates this row contains
information about an index, and
the index type is other than
clustered or hashed.
Note: Currently,
SQL_INDEX_OTHER is the only
possible type.
260
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLStatistics
Table 169. Columns returned by SQLStatistics (continued)
Column number/name
Data type
Description
8 ORDINAL_POSITION
SMALLINT
Ordinal position of the column within
the index whose name is given in the
INDEX_NAME column. A NULL
value is returned for this column if
the TYPE column has the value of
SQL_TABLE_STAT.
9 COLUMN_NAME
VARCHAR(2000)
Name of the column in the index.
10 ASC_OR_DESC
CHAR(1)
Sort sequence for the column; "A" for
ascending, "D" for descending. NULL
value is returned if the value in the
TYPE column is SQL_TABLE_STAT.
11 CARDINALITY
INTEGER
v If the TYPE column contains the
value SQL_TABLE_STAT, this
column contains the number of
rows in the table.
v If the TYPE column value is not
SQL_TABLE_STAT, this column
contains the number of unique
values in the index.
v A NULL value is returned if
information is not available from
the Database Management System
(DBMS).
12 PAGES
INTEGER
v If the TYPE column contains the
value SQL_TABLE_STAT, this
column contains the number of
pages used to store the table.
v If the TYPE column value is not
SQL_TABLE_STAT, this column
contains the number of pages used
to store the indexes.
v A NULL value is returned if
information is not available from
the DBMS.
13 FILTER_CONDITION
VARCHAR(128)
If the index is a filtered index, this is
the filter condition. Since DB2 servers
do not support filtered indexes,
NULL is always returned. NULL is
also returned if TYPE is
SQL_TABLE_STAT.
For the row in the result set that contains table statistics (TYPE is set to SQL_TABLE_STAT), the columns
values of NON_UNIQUE, INDEX_QUALIFIER, INDEX_NAME, ORDINAL_POSITION,
COLUMN_NAME, and COLLATION are set to NULL. If the CARDINALITY or PAGES information
cannot be determined, then NULL is returned for those columns.
If argument szSchemaName is not specified, the schema name qualifier defaults to the one currently in
effect for the current connection.
Passing a NULL pointer for argument szTableName will result in an error.
SQL call level interface
261
SQLStatistics
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 170. SQLStatistics SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
24000
Cursor state that is not valid Cursor related information is requested, but no cursor is
open.
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument or buffer length
that is not valid
The value of one of the name length arguments is less
than 0, but not equal to SQL_NTS.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The catalog part (the first part) of a three-part table name
is not supported by the data source.
262
IBM i: SQL call level interface
Explanation
SQLTablePrivileges
SQLTablePrivileges - Get privileges associated with a table
SQLTablePrivileges() returns a list of tables and associated privileges for each table. The information is
returned in an SQL result set, which can be retrieved using the same functions that are used to process a
result set generated by a query.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLTablePrivilegesW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page
307 for more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLTablePrivileges (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
StatementHandle,
*CatalogName,
NameLength1,
*SchemaName,
NameLength2,
*TableName,
NameLength3);
Function arguments
Table 171. SQLTablePrivileges arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
StatementHandle
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
szTableQualifier
Input
Catalog qualifier of a 3 part table name. This
must be a null pointer or a zero length
string.
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableQualifier
Input
Length of CatalogName. This must be set to 0.
SQLCHAR *
SchemaName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by schema name.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength2
Input
Length of SchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
TableName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by table name.
SQLSMALLINT
NameLength3
Input
Length of TableName.
Usage
The results are returned as a standard result set containing the columns listed in the following table. The
result set is ordered by TABLE_CAT, TABLE_SCHEM, TABLE_NAME, and PRIVILEGE. If multiple
privileges are associated with any given table, each privilege is returned as a separate row.
The granularity of each privilege reported here might or might not apply at the column level; for
example, for some data sources, if a table can be updated, every column in that table can also be
updated. For other data sources, the application must call SQLColumnPrivileges() to discover if the
individual columns have the same table privileges.
Because calls to SQLColumnPrivileges() in many cases map to a complex and thus expensive query
against the system catalog, they should be used sparingly, and the results saved rather than repeating
calls.
The VARCHAR columns of the catalog functions result set have been declared with a maximum length
attribute of 128 to be consistent with SQL92 limits. Because DB2 names are always 128 characters or less ,
the application may choose to always set aside 128 characters (plus the null-terminator) for the output
buffer, or alternatively, call SQLGetInfo() with SQL_MAX_CATALOG_NAME_LEN,
SQL call level interface
263
SQLTablePrivileges
SQL_MAX_SCHEMA_NAME_LEN, SQL_MAX_TABLE_NAME_LEN, and
SQL_MAX_COLUMN_NAME_LEN. The SQL_MAX_CATALOG_NAME_LEN value determines the actual
length of the TABLE_CAT supported by the connected DBMS. The SQL_MAX_SCHEMA_NAME_LEN
value determines the actual length of the TABLE_SCHEM supported by the connected Database
Management System (DBMS). The SQL_MAX_TABLE_NAME_LEN value determines the actual length of
the TABLE_NAME supported by the connected DBMS. The SQL_MAX_COLUMN_NAME_LEN value
determines the actual length of the COLUMN_NAME supported by the connected DBMS.
Although new columns can be added and the names of the existing columns changed in future releases,
the position of the current columns does not change.
Table 172. Columns returned by SQLTablePrivileges
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 TABLE_CAT
VARCHAR(128)
This is always null.
2 TABLE_SCHEM
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the schema containing
TABLE_NAME.
3 TABLE_NAME
VARCHAR(128) not NULL
The name of the table.
4 GRANTOR
VARCHAR(128)
Authorization ID of the user who
granted the privilege.
5 GRANTEE
VARCHAR(128)
Authorization ID of the user to whom
the privilege is granted.
6 PRIVILEGE
VARCHAR(128)
The table privilege. This can be one of
the following strings:
v ALTER
v CONTROL
v INDEX
v DELETE
v INSERT
v REFERENCES
v SELECT
v UPDATE
7 IS_GRANTABLE
VARCHAR(3)
This indicates whether the grantee is
permitted to grant the privilege to
other users.
This can be "YES", "NO" or "NULL".
Note: The column names used by Db2 for i CLI follow the X/Open CLI CAE specification style. The
column types, contents and order are identical to those defined for the SQLProcedures() result set in
ODBC.
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
264
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLTablePrivileges
Diagnostics
Table 173. SQLTablePrivileges SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
String or buffer length that
is not valid
The value of one of the name length arguments is less
than 0, but not equal SQL_NTS.
HY010
Function sequence error
There is an open cursor for this statement handle, or
there is no connection for this statement handle.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
Restrictions
None.
Example
/* From the CLI sample TBINFO.C */
/* ... */
/* call SQLTablePrivileges */
printf("\n
Call SQLTablePrivileges for:\n");
printf("
tbSchemaPattern = %s\n", tbSchemaPattern);
printf("
tbNamePattern = %s\n", tbNamePattern);
sqlrc = SQLTablePrivileges( hstmt, NULL, 0,
tbSchemaPattern, SQL_NTS,
tbNamePattern, SQL_NTS);
STMT_HANDLE_CHECK( hstmt, sqlrc);
SQL call level interface
265
SQLTables
SQLTables - Get table information
SQLTables() returns a list of table names and associated information stored in the system catalogs of the
connected data source. The list of table names is returned as a result set, which can be retrieved using the
same functions that are used to retrieve a result set generated by a SELECT statement.
Unicode (UTF-16) equivalent: This function can also be used with the Unicode (UTF-16) character set. The
corresponding Unicode function is SQLTablesW(). Refer to “Unicode in Db2 for i CLI” on page 307 for
more information about Unicode support for DB2 CLI.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLTables
(SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szCatalogName,
cbCatalogName,
*szSchemaName,
cbSchemaName,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
*szTableType,
cbTableType);
Function arguments
Table 174. SQLTables arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHSTMT
hstmt
Input
Statement handle.
SQLCHAR *
szCatalogName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set. Catalog is the first part
of a three-part table name.
This must be a NULL pointer or a zero
length string.
SQLSMALLINT
cbCatalogName
Input
Length of szCatalogName. This must be set to
0.
SQLCHAR *
szSchemaName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by schema name.
SQLSMALLINT
cbSchemaName
Input
Length of szSchemaName.
SQLCHAR *
szTableName
Input
Buffer that might contain a pattern-value to
qualify the result set by table name.
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableName
Input
Length of szTableName.
266
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQLTables
Table 174. SQLTables arguments (continued)
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLCHAR *
szTableType
Input
Buffer that might contain a value list to
qualify the result set by table type.
The value list is a list of values separated by
commas for the types of interest. Valid table
type identifiers might include: ALL, ALIAS,
BASE TABLE, MATERIALIZED QUERY
TABLE, SYSTEM TABLE, TABLE, VIEW. If
szTableType argument is a NULL pointer or a
zero length string, then this is equivalent to
specifying all of the possibilities for the table
type identifier.
If SYSTEM TABLE is specified, then both
system tables and system views (if there are
any) are returned.
The table types can be specified with or
without quotation marks.
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableType
Size of szTableType
Input
Note: The szCatalogName, szSchemaName, and szTableName arguments accept search patterns.
An escape character can be specified in conjunction with a wildcard character to allow that actual
character to be used in the search pattern. The escape character is specified on the
SQL_ATTR_ESCAPE_CHAR environment attribute. Use of SQL_ATTR_ESCAPE_CHAR will be
deprecated in a future release. Support for the SQL_ATTR_ESCAPE_CHAR value is only honored if the
connection attribute SQL_ATTR_OLD_MTADTA_BEHAVIOR is set to SQL_TRUE.
Usage
Table information is returned in a result set where each table is represented by one row of the result set.
To support obtaining just a list of schemas, the following special semantics for the szSchemaName
argument can be applied: if szSchemaName is a string containing a single percent (%) character, and
cbCatalogName, szTableName, and szTableType are empty strings, then the result set contains a list of
non-duplicate schemas in the data source.
The result set returned by SQLTables() contains the columns listed in the following table in the order
given.
Table 175. Columns returned by SQLTables
Column number/name
Data type
Description
1 TABLE_CAT
VARCHAR(128)
The current server.
2 TABLE_SCHEM
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the schema containing TABLE_NAME.
3 TABLE_NAME
VARCHAR(128)
The name of the table, view, alias, or synonym.
4 TABLE_TYPE
VARCHAR(128)
This identifies the type given by the name in the
TABLE_NAME column. It can have the string values
ALIAS, BASE TABLE, MATERIALIZED QUERY TABLE,
SYSTEM TABLE, TABLE, or VIEW.
5 REMARKS
VARCHAR(254)
This contains the descriptive information about the table.
SQL call level interface
267
SQLTables
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 176. SQLTables SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
24000
Cursor state that is not valid Cursor-related information is requested, but no cursor is
open.
40003 *
Statement completion
unknown
The communication link between the CLI and the data
source fails before the function completes processing.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY009
Argument or buffer length
that is not valid
The value of one of the name length arguments is less
than 0, but not equal to SQL_NTS.
HY021
Internal descriptor that is
not valid
The internal descriptor cannot be addressed or allocated,
or it contains a value that is not valid.
HYC00
Driver not capable
The catalog part (the first part) of a three-part table name
is not supported by the data source.
268
IBM i: SQL call level interface
Explanation
SQLTransact
SQLTransact - Commit or roll back a transaction
SQLTransact() commits or rolls back the current transaction in the connection.
All changes to the database that have been made on the connection since connect time or the previous
call to SQLTransact() (whichever is the most recent) are committed or rolled back.
If a transaction is active on a connection, the application must call SQLTransact() before it can be
disconnected from the database.
Syntax
SQLRETURN SQLTransact (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
henv,
hdbc,
fType);
Function arguments
Table 177. SQLTransact arguments
Data type
Argument
Use
Description
SQLHENV
henv
Input
Environment handle.
If hdbc is a valid connection handle, henv is
ignored.
SQLHDBC
hdbc
Input
Database connection handle.
If hdbc is set to SQL_NULL_HDBC, then henv
must contain the environment handle that
the connection is associated with.
SQLSMALLINT
fType
Input
The wanted action for the transaction. The
value for this argument must be one of:
v SQL_COMMIT
v SQL_ROLLBACK
v SQL_COMMIT_HOLD
v SQL_ROLLBACK_HOLD
Usage
Completing a transaction with SQL_COMMIT or SQL_ROLLBACK has the following effects:
v Statement handles are still valid after a call to SQLTransact().
v Cursor names, bound parameters, and column bindings survive transactions.
v Open cursors are closed, and any result sets that are pending retrieval are discarded.
Completing the transaction with SQL_COMMIT_HOLD or SQL_ROLLBACK_HOLD still commits or rolls
back the database changes, but does not cause cursors to be closed.
If no transaction is currently active on the connection, calling SQLTransact() has no effect on the database
server and returns SQL_SUCCESS.
SQLTransact() might fail while executing the COMMIT or ROLLBACK due to a loss of connection. In
this case the application might be unable to determine whether the COMMIT or ROLLBACK has been
processed, and a database administrator's help might be required. Refer to the DBMS product information
for more information about transaction logs and other transaction management tasks.
SQL call level interface
269
SQLTransact
Return codes
v SQL_SUCCESS
v SQL_ERROR
v SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
Diagnostics
Table 178. SQLTransact SQLSTATEs
SQLSTATE
Description
Explanation
08003
Connection not open
The hdbc is not in a connected state.
08007
Connection failure during
transaction
The connection associated with the hdbc fails during the
processing of the function during the processing of the
function and it cannot be determined whether the
requested COMMIT or ROLLBACK occurs before the
failure.
58004
System error
Unrecoverable system error.
HY001
Memory allocation failure
The driver is unable to allocate memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
HY012
Transaction operation state
that is not valid
The value specified for the argument fType is neither
SQL_COMMIT nor SQL_ROLLBACK.
HY013 *
Memory management
problem
The driver is unable to access memory required to
support the processing or completion of the function.
Example
Refer to the example in “SQLFetch - Fetch next row” on page 108
Db2 for i CLI include file
The only include file used in Db2 for i call level interface (CLI) is sqlcli.h.
/*** START HEADER FILE SPECIFICATIONS *****************************/
/*
*/
/* Header File Name: SQLCLI
*/
/*
*/
/* Product(s):
*/
/*
5716-SS1
*/
/*
5761-SS1
*/
/*
*/
/* (C)Copyright IBM Corp. 1995, 2008
*/
/*
*/
/* All rights reserved.
*/
/* US Government Users Restricted Rights */
/* Use, duplication or disclosure restricted
*/
/* by GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
*/
/*
*/
/* Licensed Materials-Property of IBM
*/
/*
*/
/* Header File Name: SQLCLI
*/
/*
*/
/* Descriptive Name: Structured Query Language (SQL) Call Level */
/*
Interface.
*/
/*
*/
/* Description: The SQL Call Level Interface provides access to */
/*
most SQL functions, without the need for a
*/
/*
precompiler.
*/
/*
*/
/* Header Files Included: SQLCLI
*/
270
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
/*
/* Function Prototype List: SQLAllocConnect
/*
SQLAllocEnv
/*
SQLAllocHandle
/*
SQLAllocStmt
/*
SQLBindCol
/*
SQLBindFileToCol
/*
SQLBindFileToParam
/*
SQLBindParam
/*
SQLBindParameter
/*
SQLCancel
/*
SQLCloseCursor
/*
SQLColAttribute
/*
SQLColAttributeW
/*
SQLColAttributes
/*
SQLColAttributesW
/*
SQLColumnPrivileges
/*
SQLColumnPrivilegesW
/*
SQLColumns
/*
SQLColumnsW
/*
SQLConnect
/*
SQLConnectW
/*
SQLCopyDesc
/*
SQLDataSources
/*
SQLDataSourcesW
/*
SQLDescribeCol
/*
SQLDescribeColW
/*
SQLDescribeParam
/*
SQLDisconnect
/*
SQLDriverConnect
/*
SQLDriverConnectW
/*
SQLEndTran
/*
SQLError
/*
SQLErrorW
/*
SQLExecDirect
/*
SQLExecDirectW
/*
SQLExecute
/*
SQLExtendedFetch
/*
SQLFetch
/*
SQLFetchScroll
/*
SQLForeignKeys
/*
SQLForeignKeysW
/*
SQLFreeConnect
/*
SQLFreeEnv
/*
SQLFreeHandle
/*
SQLFreeStmt
/*
SQLGetCol
/*
SQLGetConnectOption
/*
SQLGetConnectOptionW
/*
SQLGetCursorName
/*
SQLGetCursorNameW
/*
SQLGetConnectAttr
/*
SQLGetConnectAttrW
/*
SQLGetData
/*
SQLGetDescField
/*
SQLGetDescFieldW
/*
SQLGetDescRec
/*
SQLGetDescRecW
/*
SQLGetDiagField
/*
SQLGetDiagFieldW
/*
SQLGetDiagRec
/*
SQLGetDiagRecW
/*
SQLGetEnvAttr
/*
SQLGetFunctions
/*
SQLGetInfo
/*
SQLGetInfoW
/*
SQLGetLength
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
SQL call level interface
271
SQL CLI
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
272
SQLGetPosition
SQLGetPositionW
SQLGetStmtAttr
SQLGetStmtAttrW
SQLGetStmtOption
SQLGetStmtOptionW
SQLGetSubString
SQLGetSubStringW
SQLGetTypeInfo
SQLGetTypeInfoW
SQLLanguages
SQLMoreResults
SQLNativeSql
SQLNativeSqlW
SQLNextResult
SQLNumParams
SQLNumResultCols
SQLParamData
SQLParamOptions
SQLPrepare
SQLPrepareW
SQLPrimaryKeys
SQLPrimaryKeysW
SQLProcedureColumns
SQLProcedureColumnsW
SQLProcedures
SQLProceduresW
SQLPutData
SQLReleaseEnv
SQLRowCount
SQLSetConnectAttr
SQLSetConnectAttrW
SQLSetConnectOption
SQLSetConnectOptionW
SQLSetCursorName
SQLSetCursorNameW
SQLSetDescField
SQLSetDescFieldW
SQLSetDescRec
SQLSetEnvAttr
SQLSetParam
SQLSetStmtAttr
SQLSetStmtAttrW
SQLSetStmtOption
SQLSetStmtOptionW
SQLSpecialColumns
SQLSpecialColumnsW
SQLStartTran
SQLStatistics
SQLStatisticsW
SQLTablePrivileges
SQLTablePrivilegesW
SQLTables
SQLTablesW
SQLTransact
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
Change Activity:
*/
*/
CFD List:
*/
*/
FLAG REASON
LEVEL DATE
PGMR
CHANGE DESCRIPTION
*/
---- ------------ ----- ------ --------- ----------------------*/
$A0= D91823
3D60 941206 MEGERIAN New Include
*/
$A1= D94881
4D20 960816 MEGERIAN V4R2M0 enhancements */
$A2= D95600
4D30 970910 MEGERIAN V4R3M0 enhancements */
$A3= P3682850
4D40 981030 MEGERIAN V4R4M0 enhancements */
$A4= D97596
4D50 990326 LJAMESON V4R5M0 enhancements */
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
/* $A5= P9924900
5D10 000512 MEGERIAN V5R1M0 enhancements */
/* $C1= D98562
5D20 010107 MBAILEY
V5R2M0 enhancements */
/* $C2= D9856201
5D20 010506 MBAILEY
More enhancements
*/
/* $D1= P9A42663
5D30 031103 AJSLOMA
V5R3M0 enhancements */
/* $D2= P9A51843
5Q30 040102 ROCH
Larger Decimal support*/
/* $D3= P9A61758
5D40 050517 AJSLOMA
V5R4M0 enhancements */
/* $D4= P9A72391
5P30 040622 ROCH
Formatting
*/
/* $D5= D99859
5D40 041104 HUEBERT
XA over DRDA
*/
/* $E1= D93586
5D50 060908 ROCH
Wide API support
*/
/* $E2= D93586
5D50 070320 ROCH
V6R1m0 enhancements */
/* $E3= DXXXXX
6P10 090601 ROCH
TINYINT Support
*/
/* $F1= D92300
7D10 090108 ROCH
Adding XML data type */
/* $F2= D92213
7D10 090202 ROCH
Currently committed
*/
/*
*/
/* End CFD List.
*/
/*
*/
/* Additional notes about the Change Activity
*/
/* End Change Activity.
*/
/*** END HEADER FILE SPECIFICATIONS *******************************/
#ifndef SQL_H_SQLCLI
#define SQL_H_SQLCLI
/* Permit duplicate Includes */
#if (__OS400_TGTVRM__>=510) /* @B1A*/
#pragma datamodel(P128)
/* @B1A*/
#endif
/* @B1A*/
#ifdef __ILEC400__
#pragma checkout(suspend)
#pragma nomargins nosequence
#else
#pragma info(none)
#endif
#ifndef __SQL_EXTERN
#ifdef __ILEC400__
#define SQL_EXTERN extern
#else
#ifdef __cplusplus
#ifdef __TOS_OS400__
#define SQL_EXTERN extern "C nowiden"
#else
#define SQL_EXTERN extern "C"
#endif
#else
#define SQL_EXTERN extern
#endif /* __cplusplus */
#endif /* __ILEC_400__ */
#define __SQL_EXTERN
#endif
#ifdef __ILEC400__
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
#pragma argument
(SQLAllocConnect
(SQLAllocEnv
(SQLAllocHandle
(SQLAllocStmt
(SQLBindCol
(SQLBindFileToCol
(SQLBindFileToParam
(SQLBindParam
(SQLBindParameter
(SQLCancel
(SQLCloseCursor
(SQLColAttribute
(SQLColAttributeW
(SQLColAttributes
(SQLColAttributesW
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
nowiden)
SQL call level interface
273
SQL CLI
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
274
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
(SQLColumnPrivileges
(SQLColumnPrivilegesW
(SQLColumns
(SQLColumnsW
(SQLConnect
(SQLConnectW
(SQLCopyDesc
(SQLDataSources
(SQLDataSourcesW
(SQLDescribeCol
(SQLDescribeColW
(SQLDescribeParam
(SQLDisconnect
(SQLDriverConnect
(SQLDriverConnectW
(SQLEndTran
(SQLError
(SQLErrorW
(SQLExecDirect
(SQLExecDirectW
(SQLExecute
(SQLExecuteW
(SQLExtendedFetch
(SQLFetch
(SQLFetchScroll
(SQLForeignKeys
(SQLForeignKeysW
(SQLFreeConnect
(SQLFreeEnv
(SQLFreeHandle
(SQLFreeStmt
(SQLGetCol
(SQLGetColW
(SQLGetConnectOption
(SQLGetConnectOptionW
(SQLGetCursorName
(SQLGetCursorNameW
(SQLGetConnectAttr
(SQLGetConnectAttrW
(SQLGetData
(SQLGetDescField
(SQLGetDescFieldW
(SQLGetDescRec
(SQLGetDescRecW
(SQLGetDiagField
(SQLGetDiagFieldW
(SQLGetDiagRec
(SQLGetDiagRecW
(SQLGetEnvAttr
(SQLGetFunctions
(SQLGetInfo
(SQLGetInfoW
(SQLGetLength
(SQLGetPosition
(SQLGetPositionW
(SQLGetStmtAttr
(SQLGetStmtAttrW
(SQLGetStmtOption
(SQLGetStmtOptionW
(SQLGetSubString
(SQLGetSubStringW
(SQLGetTypeInfo
(SQLGetTypeInfoW
(SQLLanguages
(SQLMoreResults
(SQLNativeSql
(SQLNativeSqlW
IBM i: SQL call level interface
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
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,
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SQL CLI
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#pragma
#endif
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
argument
(SQLNextResult
(SQLNumParams
(SQLNumResultCols
(SQLParamData
(SQLParamOptions
(SQLPrepare
(SQLPrepareW
(SQLPrimaryKeys
(SQLPrimaryKeysW
(SQLProcedureColumns
(SQLProcedureColumnsW
(SQLProcedures
(SQLProceduresW
(SQLPutData
(SQLReleaseEnv
(SQLRowCount
(SQLSetConnectAttr
(SQLSetConnectAttrW
(SQLSetConnectOption
(SQLSetConnectOptionW
(SQLSetCursorName
(SQLSetCursorNameW
(SQLSetDescField
(SQLSetDescFieldW
(SQLSetDescRec
(SQLSetEnvAttr
(SQLSetParam
(SQLSetStmtAttr
(SQLSetStmtAttrW
(SQLSetStmtOption
(SQLSetStmtOptionW
(SQLSpecialColumns
(SQLSpecialColumnsW
(SQLStartTran
(SQLStatistics
(SQLStatisticsW
(SQLTablePrivileges
(SQLTablePrivilegesW
(SQLTables
(SQLTablesW
(SQLTransact
,
,
,
,
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,
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/* generally useful constants */
#define SQL_FALSE
#define SQL_TRUE
#define SQL_NTS
#define SQL_SQLSTATE_SIZE
0
1
-3 /* NTS = Null Terminated String
*/
5 /* size of SQLSTATE, not including
null terminating byte
*/
#define SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH
512
#define SQL_MAX_OPTION_STRING_LENGTH 128
/* RETCODE values
*/
/* Note: The return codes will reflect the XA return code specifications,
when using CLI to execute XA transactions (use of the
SQLSetConnectAttr - SQL_ATTR_TXN_INFO attribute).
The XA return codes can be found in the XA.h include file.
@D3A*/
#define SQL_SUCCESS
0
#define SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
1
#define SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
100
#define SQL_NEED_DATA
99
#define SQL_NO_DATA
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND
#define SQL_ERROR
-1
#define SQL_INVALID_HANDLE
-2
#define SQL_STILL_EXECUTING
2
/* SQLFreeStmt option values */
SQL call level interface
275
SQL CLI
#define
#define
#define
#define
SQL_CLOSE
SQL_DROP
SQL_UNBIND
SQL_RESET_PARAMS
/* SQLSetParam defines
#define SQL_C_DEFAULT
0
1
2
3
*/
99
/* SQLEndTran option values */
#define SQL_COMMIT
0
#define SQL_ROLLBACK
1
#define SQL_COMMIT_HOLD
2
#define SQL_ROLLBACK_HOLD
3
#define SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_RELEASE 4
#define SQL_SAVEPOINT_NAME_ROLLBACK 5
/* SQLDriverConnect option values */
#define SQL_DRIVER_COMPLETE
#define SQL_DRIVER_COMPLETE_REQUIRED
#define SQL_DRIVER_NOPROMPT
#define SQL_DRIVER_PROMPT
1
1
1
0
/* Valid option codes for GetInfo procedure
#define SQL_ACTIVE_CONNECTIONS
0
#define SQL_MAX_DRIVER_CONNECTIONS 0
#define SQL_MAX_CONCURRENT_ACTIVITIES 1
#define SQL_ACTIVE_STATEMENTS
1
#define SQL_PROCEDURES
2
#define SQL_DRIVER_NAME
6
#define SQL_ODBC_API_CONFORMANCE 9
#define SQL_ODBC_SQL_CONFORMANCE 10
#define SQL_DBMS_NAME
17
#define SQL_DBMS_VER
18
#define SQL_DRIVER_VER
18
#define SQL_IDENTIFIER_CASE
28
#define SQL_IDENTIFIER_QUOTE_CHAR 29
#define SQL_MAX_COLUMN_NAME_LEN
30
#define SQL_MAX_CURSOR_NAME_LEN
31
#define SQL_MAX_OWNER_NAME_LEN
32
#define SQL_MAX_SCHEMA_NAME_LEN
33
#define SQL_MAX_TABLE_NAME_LEN
35
#define SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_GROUP_BY 36
#define SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_ORDER_BY 37
#define SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_SELECT
38
#define SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_TABLE
39
#define SQL_MAX_TABLES_IN_SELECT
40
#define SQL_COLUMN_ALIAS
41
#define SQL_DATA_SOURCE_NAME
42
#define SQL_DATASOURCE_NAME
42
#define SQL_MAX_COLUMNS_IN_INDEX
43
#define SQL_PROCEDURE_TERM
44
#define SQL_QUALIFIER_TERM
45
#define SQL_TXN_CAPABLE
46
#define SQL_OWNER_TERM
47
#define SQL_DATA_SOURCE_READ_ONLY
48
#define SQL_DEFAULT_TXN_ISOLATION
49
#define SQL_MULTIPLE_ACTIVE_TXN
55
#define SQL_QUALIFIER_NAME_SEPARATOR 65
#define SQL_CORRELATION_NAME
74
#define SQL_NON_NULLABLE_COLUMNS
75
#define SQL_DRIVER_ODBC_VER
77
#define SQL_GROUP_BY
88
#define SQL_ORDER_BY_COLUMNS_IN_SELECT 90
#define SQL_OWNER_USAGE
91
#define SQL_QUALIFIER_USAGE
92
#define SQL_QUOTED_IDENTIFIER_CASE
93
#define SQL_MAX_ROW_SIZE
104
276
IBM i: SQL call level interface
*/
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C2A*/
@C2A*/
@C2A*/
@C2A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
SQL CLI
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
SQL_QUALIFIER_LOCATION
114
SQL_MAX_CATALOG_NAME_LEN
115
SQL_MAX_STATEMENT_LEN
116
SQL_SEARCH_PATTERN_ESCAPE
117
SQL_OUTER_JOINS
118
SQL_LIKE_ESCAPE_CLAUSE
119
SQL_CATALOG_NAME
120
SQL_DESCRIBE_PARAMETER
121
SQL_STRING_FUNCTIONS
50
SQL_NUMERIC_FUNCTIONS
51
SQL_CONVERT_FUNCTIONS
52
SQL_TIMEDATE_FUNCTIONS
53
SQL_SQL92_PREDICATES
160
SQL_SQL92_VALUE_EXPRESSIONS
165
SQL_AGGREGATE_FUNCTIONS
169
SQL_SQL_CONFORMANCE
170
SQL_CONVERT_CHAR
171
SQL_CONVERT_NUMERIC
172
SQL_CONVERT_DECIMAL
173
SQL_CONVERT_INTEGER
174
SQL_CONVERT_SMALLINT
175
SQL_CONVERT_FLOAT
176
SQL_CONVERT_REAL
177
SQL_CONVERT_DOUBLE
178
SQL_CONVERT_VARCHAR
179
SQL_CONVERT_LONGVARCHAR
180
SQL_CONVERT_BINARY
181
SQL_CONVERT_VARBINARY
182
SQL_CONVERT_BIT
183
SQL_CONVERT_TINYINT
184
SQL_CONVERT_BIGINT
185
SQL_CONVERT_DATE
186
SQL_CONVERT_TIME
187
SQL_CONVERT_TIMESTAMP
188
SQL_CONVERT_LONGVARBINARY
189
SQL_CONVERT_INTERVAL_YEAR_MONTH 190
SQL_CONVERT_INTERVAL_DAY_TIME 191
SQL_CONVERT_WCHAR
192
SQL_CONVERT_WLONGVARCHAR
193
SQL_CONVERT_WVARCHAR
194
SQL_CONVERT_BLOB
195
SQL_CONVERT_CLOB
196
SQL_CONVERT_DBCLOB
197
SQL_CURSOR_COMMIT_BEHAVIOR
198
SQL_CURSOR_ROLLBACK_BEHAVIOR
199
SQL_POSITIONED_STATEMENTS
200
SQL_KEYWORDS
201
SQL_CONNECTION_JOB_NAME
202
SQL_USER_NAME
203
SQL_DATABASE_NAME
204
SQL_CONVERT_DECFLOAT7
205
SQL_CONVERT_DECFLOAT16
206
SQL_CONVERT_DECFLOAT34
207
/* Unsupported codes for SQLGetInfo
#define SQL_CB_DELETE
#define SQL_CB_CLOSE
#define SQL_CB_PRESERVE
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
@D3A*/
@D3A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
*/
#define SQL_LOCK_TYPES
#define SQL_POS_OPERATIONS
/* Output values for cursor behavior
/* @C1A*/
-1
-1
*/
1
2
3
SQL call level interface
277
SQL CLI
/* Aliased option codes (ODBC 3.0)
@C1A*/
#define SQL_SCHEMA_TERM
SQL_OWNER_TERM
/* @C1A*/
#define SQL_SCHEMA_USAGE
SQL_OWNER_USAGE
/* @C1A*/
#define SQL_CATALOG_LOCATION SQL_QUALIFIER_LOCATION /*@C1A*/
#define SQL_CATALOG_TERM
SQL_QUALIFIER_TERM
/* @C1A*/
#define SQL_CATALOG_USAGE
SQL_QUALIFIER_USAGE
/* @C1A*/
#define SQL_CATALOG_NAME_SEPARATOR SQL_QUALIFIER_NAME_SEPARATOR
/* @C2A*/
/*
* Output values for SQL_ODBC_API_CONFORMANCE
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_OAC_NONE
0
#define SQL_OAC_LEVEL1
1
#define SQL_OAC_LEVEL2
2
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/*
* Output values for SQL_ODBC_SQL_CONFORMANCE
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_OSC_MINIMUM
0
#define SQL_OSC_CORE
1
#define SQL_OSC_EXTENDED
2
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/*
* Output values for SQL_QUALIFIER_USAGE
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_QU_NOT_SUPPORTED
0x00000000
#define SQL_QU_DML_STATEMENTS
0x00000001
#define SQL_QU_PROCEDURE_INVOCATION
0x00000002
#define SQL_QU_TABLE_DEFINITION
0x00000004
#define SQL_QU_INDEX_DEFINITION
0x00000008
#define SQL_QU_PRIVILEGE_DEFINITION
0x00000010
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
* Output values for SQL_QUALIFIER_LOCATION
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_QL_START
1
#define SQL_QL_END
2
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/*
* Output values for SQL_OWNER_USAGE
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_OU_DML_STATEMENTS
#define SQL_OU_PROCEDURE_INVOCATION
#define SQL_OU_TABLE_DEFINITION
#define SQL_OU_INDEX_DEFINITION
#define SQL_OU_PRIVILEGE_DEFINITION
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
0x00000001
0x00000002
0x00000004
0x00000008
0x00000010
/*
* Output values for SQL_TXN_CAPABLE
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_TC_NONE
0
#define SQL_TC_DML
1
#define SQL_TC_ALL
2
#define SQL_TC_DDL_COMMIT
3
#define SQL_TC_DDL_IGNORE
4
/*
* Output values for SQL_DEFAULT_TXN_ISOLATION
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
278
IBM i: SQL call level interface
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
SQL CLI
#define
#define
#define
#define
SQL_TXN_READ_UNCOMMITTED_MASK
SQL_TXN_READ_COMMITTED_MASK
SQL_TXN_REPEATABLE_READ_MASK
SQL_TXN_SERIALIZABLE_MASK
0x00000001
0x00000002
0x00000004
0x00000008
/*
/*
/*
/*
@C2A*/
@C2A*/
@C2A*/
@C2A*/
/*
* Output values for SQL_STRING_FUNCTIONS
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_FN_STR_CONCAT
0x00000001
#define SQL_FN_STR_UCASE
0x00000002
#define SQL_FN_STR_LCASE
0x00000004
#define SQL_FN_STR_SUBSTRING
0x00000008
#define SQL_FN_STR_LENGTH
0x00000010
#define SQL_FN_STR_POSITION
0x00000020
#define SQL_FN_STR_LTRIM
0x00000040
#define SQL_FN_STR_RTRIM
0x00000080
/*
* Output values for SQL_POS_OPERATIONS
* info type in SQLGetInfo (not currently supported)
*/
#define SQL_POS_POSITION
0x00000001
#define SQL_POS_REFRESH
0x00000002
#define SQL_POS_UPDATE
0x00000004
#define SQL_POS_DELETE
0x00000008
#define SQL_POS_ADD
0x00000010
/*
* Output values for SQL_NUMERIC_FUNCTIONS
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_FN_NUM_ABS
#define SQL_FN_NUM_ACOS
#define SQL_FN_NUM_ASIN
#define SQL_FN_NUM_ATAN
#define SQL_FN_NUM_ATAN2
#define SQL_FN_NUM_CEILING
#define SQL_FN_NUM_COS
#define SQL_FN_NUM_COT
#define SQL_FN_NUM_EXP
#define SQL_FN_NUM_FLOOR
#define SQL_FN_NUM_LOG
#define SQL_FN_NUM_MOD
#define SQL_FN_NUM_SIGN
#define SQL_FN_NUM_SIN
#define SQL_FN_NUM_SQRT
#define SQL_FN_NUM_TAN
#define SQL_FN_NUM_PI
#define SQL_FN_NUM_RAND
#define SQL_FN_NUM_DEGREES
#define SQL_FN_NUM_LOG10
#define SQL_FN_NUM_POWER
#define SQL_FN_NUM_RADIANS
#define SQL_FN_NUM_ROUND
#define SQL_FN_NUM_TRUNCATE
0x00000001
0x00000002
0x00000004
0x00000008
0x00000010
0x00000020
0x00000040
0x00000080
0x00000100
0x00000200
0x00000400
0x00000800
0x00001000
0x00002000
0x00004000
0x00008000
0x00010000
0x00020000
0x00040000
0x00080000
0x00100000
0x00200000
0x00400000
0x00800000
/* SQL_SQL92_VALUE_EXPRESSIONS bitmasks */
#define SQL_SVE_CASE
0x00000001
#define SQL_SVE_CAST
0x00000002
#define SQL_SVE_COALESCE
0x00000004
#define SQL_SVE_NULLIF
0x00000008
/* SQL_SQL92_PREDICATES bitmasks */
#define SQL_SP_EXISTS
0x00000001
SQL call level interface
279
SQL CLI
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
SQL_SP_ISNOTNULL
SQL_SP_ISNULL
SQL_SP_MATCH_FULL 0x00000008
SQL_SP_MATCH_PARTIAL
SQL_SP_MATCH_UNIQUE_FULL
SQL_SP_MATCH_UNIQUE_PARTIAL
SQL_SP_OVERLAPS
SQL_SP_UNIQUE
SQL_SP_LIKE
SQL_SP_IN
SQL_SP_BETWEEN
SQL_SP_COMPARISON
SQL_SP_QUANTIFIED_COMPARISON
0x00000002
0x00000004
0x00000010
0x00000020
0x00000040
0x00000080
0x00000100
0x00000200
0x00000400
0x00000800
0x00001000
0x00002000
/* SQL_AGGREGATE_FUNCTIONS bitmasks */
#define SQL_AF_AVG
0x00000001
#define SQL_AF_COUNT
0x00000002
#define SQL_AF_MAX
0x00000004
#define SQL_AF_MIN
0x00000008
#define SQL_AF_SUM
0x00000010
#define SQL_AF_DISTINCT
0x00000020
#define SQL_AF_ALL
0x00000040
/* SQL_SQL_CONFORMANCE bitmasks */
#define SQL_SC_SQL92_ENTRY
#define SQL_SC_FIPS127_2_TRANSITIONAL
#define SQL_SC_SQL92_INTERMEDIATE
#define SQL_SC_SQL92_FULL
0x00000001
0x00000002
0x00000004
0x00000008
/* SQL_CONVERT_FUNCTIONS functions */
#define SQL_FN_CVT_CONVERT
#define SQL_FN_CVT_CAST
0x00000001
0x00000002
/* SQL_POSITIONED_STATEMENTS bitmasks */
#define SQL_PS_POSITIONED_DELETE
0x00000001
#define SQL_PS_POSITIONED_UPDATE
0x00000002
#define SQL_PS_SELECT_FOR_UPDATE
0x00000004
/* SQL supported conversion bitmasks */
#define SQL_CVT_CHAR
#define SQL_CVT_NUMERIC
#define SQL_CVT_DECIMAL
#define SQL_CVT_INTEGER
#define SQL_CVT_SMALLINT
#define SQL_CVT_FLOAT
#define SQL_CVT_REAL
#define SQL_CVT_DOUBLE
#define SQL_CVT_VARCHAR
#define SQL_CVT_LONGVARCHAR
#define SQL_CVT_BINARY
#define SQL_CVT_VARBINARY
#define SQL_CVT_BIT
#define SQL_CVT_TINYINT
#define SQL_CVT_BIGINT
#define SQL_CVT_DATE
#define SQL_CVT_TIME
#define SQL_CVT_TIMESTAMP
#define SQL_CVT_LONGVARBINARY
#define SQL_CVT_INTERVAL_YEAR_MONTH
#define SQL_CVT_INTERVAL_DAY_TIME
#define SQL_CVT_WCHAR
#define SQL_CVT_WLONGVARCHAR
#define SQL_CVT_WVARCHAR
#define SQL_CVT_BLOB
#define SQL_CVT_CLOB
#define SQL_CVT_DBCLOB
#define SQL_CVT_DECFLOAT7
280
IBM i: SQL call level interface
0x00000001
0x00000002
0x00000004
0x00000008
0x00000010
0x00000020
0x00000040
0x00000080
0x00000100
0x00000200
0x00000400
0x00000800
0x00001000
0x00002000
0x00004000
0x00008000
0x00010000
0x00020000
0x00040000
0x00080000
0x00100000
0x00200000
0x00400000
0x00800000
0x01000000
0x02000000
0x04000000
0x08000000 /* @E2A*/
SQL CLI
#define SQL_CVT_DECFLOAT16
#define SQL_CVT_DECFLOAT34
0x10000000 /* @E2A*/
0x20000000 /* @E2A*/
/* SQL_TIMEDATE_FUNCTIONS bitmasks */
#define SQL_FN_TD_NOW
#define SQL_FN_TD_CURDATE
#define SQL_FN_TD_DAYOFMONTH
#define SQL_FN_TD_DAYOFWEEK
#define SQL_FN_TD_DAYOFYEAR
#define SQL_FN_TD_MONTH
#define SQL_FN_TD_QUARTER
#define SQL_FN_TD_WEEK
#define SQL_FN_TD_YEAR
#define SQL_FN_TD_CURTIME
#define SQL_FN_TD_HOUR
#define SQL_FN_TD_MINUTE
#define SQL_FN_TD_SECOND
#define SQL_FN_TD_TIMESTAMPADD
#define SQL_FN_TD_TIMESTAMPDIFF
#define SQL_FN_TD_DAYNAME
#define SQL_FN_TD_MONTHNAME
#define SQL_FN_TD_CURRENT_DATE
#define SQL_FN_TD_CURRENT_TIME
#define SQL_FN_TD_CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
#define SQL_FN_TD_EXTRACT
0x00000001
0x00000002
0x00000004
0x00000008
0x00000010
0x00000020
0x00000040
0x00000080
0x00000100
0x00000200
0x00000400
0x00000800
0x00001000
0x00002000
0x00004000
0x00008000
0x00010000
0x00020000
0x00040000
0x00080000
0x00100000
/*
* Output values for SQL_CORRELATION_NAME
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_CN_NONE
0
#define SQL_CN_DIFFERENT
1
#define SQL_CN_ANY
2
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/*
* Output values for SQL_IDENTIFIER_CASE
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_IC_UPPER
1
#define SQL_IC_LOWER
2
#define SQL_IC_SENSITIVE
3
#define SQL_IC_MIXED
4
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
* Output values for SQL_NON_NULLABLE_COLUMNS
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_NNC_NULL
0
#define SQL_NNC_NON_NULL
1
/* @C1A*/
/* @C1A*/
/*
* Output values for SQL_GROUP_BY
* info type in SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_GB_NO_RELATION
#define SQL_GB_NOT_SUPPORTED
#define SQL_GB_GROUP_BY_EQUALS_SELECT
#define SQL_GB_GROUP_BY_CONTAINS_SELECT
/*
/*
/*
/*
/* Standard SQL data types */
#define SQL_CHAR
#define SQL_NUMERIC
#define SQL_DECIMAL
#define SQL_INTEGER
#define SQL_SMALLINT
#define SQL_FLOAT
#define SQL_REAL
0
1
2
3
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
@C1A*/
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
SQL call level interface
281
SQL CLI
#define SQL_DOUBLE
#define SQL_DATETIME
#define SQL_VARCHAR
#define SQL_BLOB
#define SQL_CLOB
#define SQL_DBCLOB
#define SQL_DATALINK
#define SQL_WCHAR
#define SQL_WVARCHAR
#define SQL_BIGINT
#define SQL_BLOB_LOCATOR
#define SQL_CLOB_LOCATOR
#define SQL_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
#define SQL_UTF8_CHAR
#define SQL_WLONGVARCHAR
#define SQL_LONGVARCHAR
#define SQL_GRAPHIC
#define SQL_VARGRAPHIC
#define SQL_LONGVARGRAPHIC
#define SQL_BINARY
#define SQL_VARBINARY
#define SQL_LONGVARBINARY
#define SQL_DATE
#define SQL_TYPE_DATE
#define SQL_TIME
#define SQL_TYPE_TIME
#define SQL_TIMESTAMP
#define SQL_TYPE_TIMESTAMP
#define SQL_CODE_DATE
#define SQL_CODE_TIME
#define SQL_CODE_TIMESTAMP
#define SQL_ALL_TYPES
#define SQL_DECFLOAT
#define SQL_XML
/* Handle types */
#define SQL_UNUSED
#define SQL_HANDLE_ENV
#define SQL_HANDLE_DBC
#define SQL_HANDLE_STMT
#define SQL_HANDLE_DESC
#define SQL_NULL_HANDLE
8
9
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
/* @D1A*/
SQL_WVARCHAR
SQL_VARCHAR
95
96
SQL_VARGRAPHIC
-2
-3
SQL_VARBINARY
91
91
92
92
93
93
1
2
3
0
-360
/* @E2A*/
-370
/* @F1A*/
0
1
2
3
4
0
#define SQL_HANDLE_DBC_UNICODE
100
/*
* NULL status defines; these are used in SQLColAttributes, SQLDescribeCol,
* to describe the nullability of a column in a table.
*/
#define SQL_NO_NULLS
0
#define SQL_NULLABLE
1
#define SQL_NULLABLE_UNKNOWN 2
/* Special length values */
#define SQL_NO_TOTAL
#define SQL_NULL_DATA
#define SQL_DATA_AT_EXEC
#define SQL_BIGINT_PREC
#define SQL_INTEGER_PREC
#define SQL_SMALLINT_PREC
0
-1
-2
19
10
5
/* SQLBindParam and SQLBindParameter Extended Indicator values
#define SQL_DEFAULT_PARAM -5
#define SQL_UNASSIGNED
-7
/* SQLColAttributes defines */
#define SQL_ATTR_READONLY
#define SQL_ATTR_WRITE
282
IBM i: SQL call level interface
0
1
@E2A*/
SQL CLI
#define SQL_ATTR_READWRITE_UNKNOWN
2
/* Valid
#define
#define
#define
#define
0
1
3
4
concurrency values */
SQL_CONCUR_LOCK
SQL_CONCUR_READ_ONLY
SQL_CONCUR_ROWVER
SQL_CONCUR_VALUES
/* Valid environment attributes
#define SQL_ATTR_OUTPUT_NTS
#define SQL_ATTR_SYS_NAMING
#define SQL_ATTR_DEFAULT_LIB
#define SQL_ATTR_SERVER_MODE
#define SQL_ATTR_JOB_SORT_SEQUENCE
#define SQL_ATTR_ENVHNDL_COUNTER
#define SQL_ATTR_ESCAPE_CHAR
#define SQL_ATTR_INCLUDE_NULL_IN_LEN
#define SQL_ATTR_UTF8
#define SQL_ATTR_SYSCAP
#define SQL_ATTR_REQUIRE_PROFILE
#define SQL_ATTR_TRUNCATION_RTNC
*/
10001
10002
10003
10004
10005
10009
10010
10031
10032
10033
10034
10036
/* @D1A*/
/* Valid environment/connection attributes
*/
#define SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_COL_INFO
10019
#define SQL_ATTR_DATE_FMT
10020
#define SQL_ATTR_DATE_SEP
10021
#define SQL_ATTR_TIME_FMT
10022
#define SQL_ATTR_TIME_SEP
10023
#define SQL_ATTR_DECIMAL_SEP
10024
#define SQL_ATTR_TXN_INFO
10025
#define SQL_ATTR_TXN_EXTERNAL
10026
#define SQL_ATTR_2ND_LEVEL_TEXT
10027
#define SQL_ATTR_SAVEPOINT_NAME
10028
#define SQL_ATTR_TRACE
10029
#define SQL_ATTR_UCS2
10035
#define SQL_ATTR_MAX_PRECISION
10040
#define SQL_ATTR_MAX_SCALE
10041
#define SQL_ATTR_MIN_DIVIDE_SCALE
10042
#define SQL_ATTR_HEX_LITERALS
10043
#define SQL_ATTR_CORRELATOR
10044
/* @D1A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_QUERY_OPTIMIZE_GOAL 10045
/* @D3A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_CONN_SORT_SEQUENCE 10046
/* @EDA*/
#define SQL_ATTR_PREFETCH
10100
/* @E1A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_CLOSEONEOF
10101
/* @E1A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_ANSI_APP
10102
/* @E1A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_INFO_USERID
10103
/* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_INFO_WRKSTNNAME
10104
/* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_INFO_APPLNAME
10105
/* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_INFO_ACCTSTR
10106
/* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_INFO_PROGRAMID
10107
/* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_DECFLOAT_ROUNDING_MODE 10112 /* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_OLD_MTADTA_BEHAVIOR 10113
/* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_NULL_REQUIRED
10114
/* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_FREE_LOCATORS
10115
/* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_EXTENDED_INDICATORS 10116
/* @E2A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_CONN_OUTPUT_NTS
10200
/* @E3A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_CONN_TRUNCATION_RTNC 10202
/* @E3A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_SERVERMODE_SUBSYSTEM 10204
/* @E3A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_XML_DECLARATION
2552
/* @F1A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_CURRENT_IMPLICIT_XMLPARSE_OPTION
2553 /* @F1A*/
#define SQL_ATTR_CONCURRENT_ACCESS_RESOLUTION 2595 /*@F2A*/
/* Valid transaction info operations
/* Start Options
#define SQL_TXN_FIND
1
/* TMJOIN
#define SQL_TXN_CREATE
2
/* TMNOFLAGS
#define SQL_TXN_RESUME
7
/* TMRESUME
*/
*/
*/
*/
@D5A*/
SQL call level interface
283
SQL CLI
/* End Options
#define SQL_TXN_CLEAR
#define SQL_TXN_END
3
4
#define SQL_TXN_HOLD
5
#define SQL_TXN_END_FAIL 6
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
TMSUSPEND
TMSUCCESS
w/o HOLD
TMSUCCESS
w/HOLD
TMFAIL
/* Valid environment/connection values
#define SQL_FMT_ISO
1
#define SQL_FMT_USA
2
#define SQL_FMT_EUR
3
#define SQL_FMT_JIS
4
#define SQL_FMT_MDY
5
#define SQL_FMT_DMY
6
#define SQL_FMT_YMD
7
#define SQL_FMT_JUL
8
#define SQL_FMT_HMS
9
#define SQL_FMT_JOB
10
#define SQL_SEP_SLASH
1
#define SQL_SEP_DASH
2
#define SQL_SEP_PERIOD
3
#define SQL_SEP_COMMA
4
#define SQL_SEP_BLANK
5
#define SQL_SEP_COLON
6
#define SQL_SEP_JOB
7
#define SQL_HEX_IS_CHAR
1
#define SQL_HEX_IS_BINARY
2
#define SQL_FIRST_IO
1
#define SQL_ALL_IO
2
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
@D1A*/
@D5A*/
*/
/*
* Options for Rounding Modes. These numeric values can
* be set with SQLSetConnectAttr() API for the attribute
* SQL_ATTR_DECFLOAT_ROUNDING_MODE. The SQLGetConnectAttr()
* API will return these values for the
* SQL_ATTR_DECFLOAT_ROUNDING_MODE attribute.
#define ROUND_HALF_EVEN 0
/* @E2A*/
#define ROUND_HALF_UP 1
/* @E2A*/
#define ROUND_DOWN 2
/* @E2A*/
#define ROUND_CEILING 3
/* @E2A*/
#define ROUND_FLOOR 4
/* @E2A*/
#define ROUND_HALF_DOWN 5
/* @E2A*/
#define ROUND_UP 6
/* @E2A*/
/* Valid values for type in GetCol
#define SQL_DEFAULT
99
#define SQL_ARD_TYPE
-99
/* Valid values for UPDATE_RULE
#define SQL_CASCADE
#define SQL_RESTRICT
#define SQL_NO_ACTION
#define SQL_SET_NULL
#define SQL_SET_DEFAULT
/* @D3A*/
/* @D3A*/
@E2A*/
*/
and DELETE_RULE in SQLForeignKeys */
1
2
3
4
5
/* Valid values for result set column DEFERRABILITY in
SQLForeignKeys */
#define SQL_INITIALLY_DEFERRED
5
#define SQL_INITIALLY_IMMEDIATE
6
#define SQL_NOT_DEFERRABLE
7
/* @E2A*/
/* @E2A*/
/* @E2A*/
/* Valid values for result set column PROCEDURE_TYPE in
SQLProcedures
*/
#define SQL_PT_UNKNOWN
0
#define SQL_PT_PROCEDURE
1
#define SQL_PT_FUNCTION
2
/* @E2A*/
/* @E2A*/
/* @E2A*/
284
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
/* Valid values for COLUMN_TYPE in SQLProcedureColumns */
#define SQL_PARAM_INPUT
1
#define SQL_PARAM_OUTPUT
2
#define SQL_PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT
3
/* statement attributes */
#define SQL_ATTR_APP_ROW_DESC
10010
#define SQL_ATTR_APP_PARAM_DESC
10011
#define SQL_ATTR_IMP_ROW_DESC
10012
#define SQL_ATTR_IMP_PARAM_DESC
10013
#define SQL_ATTR_FOR_FETCH_ONLY
10014
#define SQL_ATTR_CONCURRENCY
10014
#define SQL_CONCURRENCY
10014
#define SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_SCROLLABLE 10015
#define SQL_ATTR_ROWSET_SIZE
10016
#define SQL_ROWSET_SIZE
10016
#define SQL_ATTR_ROW_ARRAY_SIZE
10016
#define SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_HOLD
10017
#define SQL_ATTR_FULL_OPEN
10018
#define SQL_ATTR_BIND_TYPE
10049
#define SQL_BIND_TYPE
10049
#define SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_TYPE
10050
#define SQL_CURSOR_TYPE
10050
#define SQL_ATTR_CURSOR_SENSITIVITY 10051
#define SQL_CURSOR_SENSITIVE
10051
#define SQL_ATTR_ROW_STATUS_PTR
10052
#define SQL_ATTR_ROWS_FETCHED_PTR 10053
#define SQL_ATTR_ROW_BIND_TYPE
10056
#define SQL_ATTR_PARAM_BIND_TYPE
10057
#define SQL_ATTR_PARAMSET_SIZE
10058
#define SQL_ATTR_PARAM_STATUS_PTR 10059
#define SQL_ATTR_PARAMS_PROCESSED_PTR 10060
#define SQL_ATTR_NUMBER_RESULTSET_ROWS_PTR 10061
/* values for setting statement
#define SQL_BIND_BY_ROW
#define SQL_BIND_BY_COLUMN
#define SQL_CURSOR_FORWARD_ONLY
#define SQL_CURSOR_STATIC
#define SQL_CURSOR_DYNAMIC
#define SQL_CURSOR_KEYSET_DRIVEN
#define SQL_UNSPECIFIED
#define SQL_INSENSITIVE
#define SQL_SENSITIVE
attributes
0
1
0
1
2
3
0
1
2
/* Codes used in FetchScroll
#define SQL_FETCH_NEXT
#define SQL_FETCH_FIRST
#define SQL_FETCH_LAST
#define SQL_FETCH_PRIOR
#define SQL_FETCH_ABSOLUTE
#define SQL_FETCH_RELATIVE
1
2
3
4
5
6
/* SQLColAttributes defines */
#define SQL_DESC_COUNT
#define SQL_DESC_TYPE
#define SQL_DESC_LENGTH
#define SQL_DESC_LENGTH_PTR
#define SQL_DESC_PRECISION
#define SQL_DESC_SCALE
#define SQL_DESC_DATETIME_INTERVAL_CODE
#define SQL_DESC_NULLABLE
#define SQL_DESC_INDICATOR_PTR
#define SQL_DESC_DATA_PTR
#define SQL_DESC_NAME
#define SQL_DESC_UNNAMED
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
@D1A*/
@D1A*/
@D3A*/
@D3A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
*/
/* @D1A*/
/* @D1A*/
/* @D1A*/
*/
SQL call level interface
285
SQL CLI
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
SQL_DESC_DISPLAY_SIZE
SQL_DESC_AUTO_INCREMENT
SQL_DESC_SEARCHABLE
SQL_DESC_UPDATABLE
SQL_DESC_BASE_COLUMN
SQL_DESC_BASE_TABLE
SQL_DESC_BASE_SCHEMA
SQL_DESC_LABEL
SQL_DESC_MONEY
SQL_DESC_TYPE_NAME
SQL_DESC_ALLOC_TYPE
SQL_DESC_ALLOC_AUTO
SQL_DESC_ALLOC_USER
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
23
99
1
2
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
SQL_COLUMN_COUNT
SQL_COLUMN_TYPE
SQL_COLUMN_LENGTH
SQL_COLUMN_LENGTH_PTR
SQL_COLUMN_PRECISION
SQL_COLUMN_SCALE
SQL_COLUMN_DATETIME_INTERVAL_CODE
SQL_COLUMN_NULLABLE
SQL_COLUMN_INDICATOR_PTR
SQL_COLUMN_DATA_PTR
SQL_COLUMN_NAME
SQL_COLUMN_UNNAMED
SQL_COLUMN_DISPLAY_SIZE
SQL_COLUMN_AUTO_INCREMENT
SQL_COLUMN_SEARCHABLE
SQL_COLUMN_UPDATABLE
SQL_COLUMN_BASE_COLUMN
SQL_COLUMN_BASE_TABLE
SQL_COLUMN_BASE_SCHEMA
SQL_COLUMN_LABEL
SQL_COLUMN_MONEY
SQL_COLUMN_ALLOC_TYPE
SQL_COLUMN_ALLOC_AUTO
SQL_COLUMN_ALLOC_USER
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
99
1
2
/* Valid codes for SpecialColumns procedure
#define SQL_SCOPE_CURROW
0
#define SQL_SCOPE_TRANSACTION
1
#define SQL_SCOPE_SESSION
2
#define SQL_PC_UNKNOWN
0
#define SQL_PC_NOT_PSEUDO
1
#define SQL_PC_PSEUDO
2
/* Valid values for connect attribute
#define SQL_ATTR_AUTO_IPD
10001
#define SQL_ATTR_ACCESS_MODE
10002
#define SQL_ACCESS_MODE
10002
#define SQL_ATTR_AUTOCOMMIT
10003
#define SQL_AUTOCOMMIT
10003
#define SQL_ATTR_DBC_SYS_NAMING 10004
#define SQL_ATTR_DBC_DEFAULT_LIB 10005
#define SQL_ATTR_ADOPT_OWNER_AUTH 10006
#define SQL_ATTR_SYSBAS_CMT
10007
#define SQL_ATTR_SET_SSA
10008
#define SQL_ATTR_COMMIT
0
#define SQL_MODE_READ_ONLY
0
#define SQL_MODE_READ_WRITE
1
#define SQL_MODE_DEFAULT
1
#define SQL_AUTOCOMMIT_OFF
0
#define SQL_AUTOCOMMIT_ON
1
#define SQL_TXN_ISOLATION
0
#define SQL_ATTR_TXN_ISOLATION
0
#define SQL_COMMIT_NONE
1
286
IBM i: SQL call level interface
/* @D3A*/
*/
*/
/* @D3A*/
SQL CLI
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
SQL_TXN_NO_COMMIT
SQL_TXN_NOCOMMIT
SQL_COMMIT_CHG
SQL_COMMIT_UR
SQL_TXN_READ_UNCOMMITTED
SQL_COMMIT_CS
SQL_TXN_READ_COMMITTED
SQL_COMMIT_ALL
SQL_COMMIT_RS
SQL_TXN_REPEATABLE_READ
SQL_COMMIT_RR
SQL_TXN_SERIALIZABLE
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
/* Valid index flags
#define SQL_INDEX_UNIQUE
#define SQL_INDEX_ALL
#define SQL_INDEX_OTHER
#define SQL_TABLE_STAT
#define SQL_ENSURE
#define SQL_QUICK
/* Valid trace values
#define SQL_ATTR_TRACE_CLI
#define SQL_ATTR_TRACE_DBMON
#define SQL_ATTR_TRACE_DEBUG
#define SQL_ATTR_TRACE_JOBLOG
#define SQL_ATTR_TRACE_STRTRC
/* Valid File Options
#define SQL_FILE_READ
#define SQL_FILE_CREATE
#define SQL_FILE_OVERWRITE
#define SQL_FILE_APPEND
*/
0
1
3
0
1
0
*/
1
2
4
8
16
*/
2
8
16
32
/* Valid types for GetDiagField
#define SQL_DIAG_RETURNCODE
#define SQL_DIAG_NUMBER
#define SQL_DIAG_ROW_COUNT
#define SQL_DIAG_SQLSTATE
#define SQL_DIAG_NATIVE
#define SQL_DIAG_MESSAGE_TEXT
#define SQL_DIAG_DYNAMIC_FUNCTION
#define SQL_DIAG_CLASS_ORIGIN
#define SQL_DIAG_SUBCLASS_ORIGIN
#define SQL_DIAG_CONNECTION_NAME
#define SQL_DIAG_SERVER_NAME
#define SQL_DIAG_MESSAGE_TOKENS
#define SQL_DIAG_AUTOGEN_KEY
/*
* SQLColAttributes defines
* These are also used by SQLGetInfo
*/
#define SQL_UNSEARCHABLE
#define SQL_LIKE_ONLY
#define SQL_ALL_EXCEPT_LIKE
#define SQL_SEARCHABLE
/* GetFunctions() values to identify
#define SQL_API_SQLALLOCCONNECT
#define SQL_API_SQLALLOCENV
#define SQL_API_SQLALLOCHANDLE
#define SQL_API_SQLALLOCSTMT
#define SQL_API_SQLBINDCOL
#define SQL_API_SQLBINDFILETOCOL
#define SQL_API_SQLBINDFILETOPARAM
#define SQL_API_SQLBINDPARAM
*/
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
0
1
2
3
CLI functions
1
2
1001
3
4
2002
2003
1002
*/
SQL call level interface
287
SQL CLI
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
288
SQL_API_SQLBINDPARAMETER
1023
SQL_API_SQLCANCEL
5
SQL_API_SQLCLOSECURSOR
1003
SQL_API_SQLCOLATTRIBUTE
6
SQL_API_SQLCOLATTRIBUTEW
3001
SQL_API_SQLCOLATTRIBUTES
11006
SQL_API_SQLCOLATTRIBUTESW
3002
SQL_API_SQLCOLUMNPRIVILEGES 2010
SQL_API_SQLCOLUMNPRIVILEGESW 3003
SQL_API_SQLCOLUMNS
40
SQL_API_SQLCOLUMNSW
3004
SQL_API_SQLCONNECT
7
SQL_API_SQLCONNECTW
3005
SQL_API_SQLCOPYDESC
1004
SQL_API_SQLDATASOURCES
57
SQL_API_SQLDATASOURCESW
3006
SQL_API_SQLDESCRIBECOL
8
SQL_API_SQLDESCRIBECOLW
3007
SQL_API_SQLDESCRIBEPARAM
58
SQL_API_SQLDISCONNECT
9
SQL_API_SQLDRIVERCONNECT
68
SQL_API_SQLENDTRAN
1005
SQL_API_SQLERROR
10
SQL_API_SQLERRORW
10010
SQL_API_SQLEXECDIRECT
11
SQL_API_SQLEXECDIRECTW
3008
SQL_API_SQLEXECUTE
12
SQL_API_SQLEXTENDEDFETCH
1022
SQL_API_SQLFETCH
13
SQL_API_SQLFETCHSCROLL
1021
SQL_API_SQLFOREIGNKEYS
60
SQL_API_SQLFOREIGNKEYSW
3009
SQL_API_SQLFREECONNECT
14
SQL_API_SQLFREEENV
15
SQL_API_SQLFREEHANDLE
1006
SQL_API_SQLFREESTMT
16
SQL_API_SQLGETCOL
43
SQL_API_SQLGETCONNECTATTR
1007
SQL_API_SQLGETCONNECTATTRW 3010
SQL_API_SQLGETCONNECTOPTION 42
SQL_API_SQLGETCONNECTOPTIONW 3011
SQL_API_SQLGETCURSORNAME
17
SQL_API_SQLGETCURSORNAMEW
3012
SQL_API_SQLGETDATA
43
SQL_API_SQLGETDESCFIELD
1008
SQL_API_SQLGETDESCFIELDW
3013
SQL_API_SQLGETDESCREC
1009
SQL_API_SQLGETDESCRECW
3014
SQL_API_SQLGETDIAGFIELD
1010
SQL_API_SQLGETDIAGFIELDW
3015
SQL_API_SQLGETDIAGREC
1011
SQL_API_SQLGETDIAGRECW
3016
SQL_API_SQLGETENVATTR
1012
SQL_API_SQLGETFUNCTIONS
44
SQL_API_SQLGETINFO
45
SQL_API_SQLGETINFOW
3017
SQL_API_SQLGETLENGTH
2004
SQL_API_SQLGETPOSITION
2005
SQL_API_SQLGETPOSITIONW
3018
SQL_API_SQLGETSTMTATTR
1014
SQL_API_SQLGETSTMTATTRW
3019
SQL_API_SQLGETSTMTOPTION
46
SQL_API_SQLGETSTMTOPTIONW
3020
SQL_API_SQLGETSUBSTRING
2006
SQL_API_SQLGETSUBSTRINGW
3021
SQL_API_SQLGETTYPEINFO
47
SQL_API_SQLGETTYPEINFOW
3022
IBM i: SQL call level interface
/* Add back in. @E1A*/
SQL CLI
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
SQL_API_SQLLANGUAGES
2001
SQL_API_SQLMORERESULTS
61
SQL_API_SQLNATIVESQL
62
SQL_API_SQLNATIVESQLW
3023
SQL_API_SQLNEXTRESULT
2009
SQL_API_SQLNUMPARAMS
63
SQL_API_SQLNUMRESULTCOLS
18
SQL_API_SQLPARAMDATA
48
SQL_API_SQLPARAMOPTIONS
2007
SQL_API_SQLPREPARE
19
SQL_API_SQLPREPAREW
3024
SQL_API_SQLPRIMARYKEYS
65
SQL_API_SQLPRIMARYKEYSW
3025
SQL_API_SQLPROCEDURECOLUMNS 66
SQL_API_SQLPROCEDURECOLUMNSW 3026
SQL_API_SQLPROCEDURES
67
SQL_API_SQLPROCEDURESW
3027
SQL_API_SQLPUTDATA
49
SQL_API_SQLRELEASEENV
1015
SQL_API_SQLROWCOUNT
20
SQL_API_SQLSETCONNECTATTR
1016
SQL_API_SQLSETCONNECTATTRW 3028
SQL_API_SQLSETCONNECTOPTION 50
SQL_API_SQLSETCONNECTOPTIONW 3029
SQL_API_SQLSETCURSORNAME
21
SQL_API_SQLSETCURSORNAMEW
3030
SQL_API_SQLSETDESCFIELD
1017
SQL_API_SQLSETDESCFIELDW
3031
SQL_API_SQLSETDESCREC
1018
SQL_API_SQLSETENVATTR
1019
SQL_API_SQLSETPARAM
22
SQL_API_SQLSETSTMTATTR
1020
SQL_API_SQLSETSTMTATTRW
3032
SQL_API_SQLSETSTMTOPTION
51
SQL_API_SQLSETSTMTOPTIONW
3033
SQL_API_SQLSPECIALCOLUMNS
52
SQL_API_SQLSPECIALCOLUMNSW 3034
SQL_API_SQLSTARTTRAN
2008
SQL_API_SQLSTATISTICS
53
SQL_API_SQLSTATISTICSW
3035
SQL_API_SQLTABLEPRIVILEGES 2011
SQL_API_SQLTABLEPRIVILEGESW 3036
SQL_API_SQLTABLES
54
SQL_API_SQLTABLESW
3037
SQL_API_SQLTRANSACT
23
/* unsupported APIs
*/
#define SQL_API_SQLSETPOS
/* NULL handle defines
#ifdef __64BIT__
#define SQL_NULL_HENV
#define SQL_NULL_HDBC
#define SQL_NULL_HSTMT
#else
#define SQL_NULL_HENV
#define SQL_NULL_HDBC
#define SQL_NULL_HSTMT
#endif
#ifdef __64BIT__
#if !defined(SDWORD)
typedef int
#endif
#if !defined(UDWORD)
typedef unsigned int
#endif
-1
*/
0
0
0
0L
0L
0L
SDWORD;
UDWORD;
SQL call level interface
289
SQL CLI
#else
#if !defined(SDWORD)
typedef long int
#endif
#if !defined(UDWORD)
typedef unsigned long int
#endif
#endif
#if !defined(UWORD)
typedef unsigned short int
#endif
#if !defined(SWORD)
typedef signed short int
#endif
SDWORD;
UDWORD;
UWORD;
SWORD;
#include "sql.h"
/* SQL definitions
@E1M*/
/* This should be temporary until math.h makes the typedef’s below permanent,
without the need of STDC_WANT_DEC_FP or IBM_DFP declaration. Without this
fix QCPIMPRT.c fails b/c it includes math.h w/out these declares
set.
@E2A*/
#include "math.h"
typedef
typedef
typedef
typedef
typedef
typedef
typedef
char
wchar_t
short
int
UWORD
UDWORD
double
float
typedef void *
typedef PTR
#ifdef __64BIT__
typedef int
typedef int
typedef int
typedef int
typedef int
typedef int
#else
typedef long
int
typedef long
typedef long
typedef long
typedef long
typedef long
#endif
typedef
typedef
typedef
typedef
HENV
HDBC
HSTMT
HDESC
/* Decimal floating point types
SQLCHAR;
SQLWCHAR;
/* W-API constant.
SQLSMALLINT;
SQLUSMALLINT;
SQLUINTEGER;
SQLDOUBLE;
SQLREAL;
PTR;
SQLPOINTER;
SQLINTEGER;
HENV;
HDBC;
HSTMT;
HDESC;
SQLHANDLE;
SQLINTEGER;
HENV;
HDBC;
HSTMT;
HDESC;
SQLHANDLE;
SQLHENV;
SQLHDBC;
SQLHSTMT;
SQLHDESC;
typedef SQLINTEGER
typedef RETCODE
RETCODE;
SQLRETURN;
typedef float
SFLOAT;
typedef SQLPOINTER
SQLHWND;
/*
* DATE, TIME, and TIMESTAMP structures. These are for compatibility
290
IBM i: SQL call level interface
@E2A*/
@E1A*/
SQL CLI
* purposes only. When actually specifying or retrieving DATE, TIME,
* and TIMESTAMP values, character strings must be used.
*/
typedef struct DATE_STRUCT
{
SQLSMALLINT year;
SQLSMALLINT month;
SQLSMALLINT day;
} DATE_STRUCT;
typedef struct TIME_STRUCT
{
SQLSMALLINT hour;
SQLSMALLINT minute;
SQLSMALLINT second;
} TIME_STRUCT;
typedef struct TIMESTAMP_STRUCT
{
SQLSMALLINT year;
SQLSMALLINT month;
SQLSMALLINT day;
SQLSMALLINT hour;
SQLSMALLINT minute;
SQLSMALLINT second;
SQLINTEGER
fraction;
/* fraction of a second */
} TIMESTAMP_STRUCT;
/* Transaction info structure
typedef struct TXN_STRUCT {
SQLINTEGER operation;
SQLCHAR
tminfo[10];
SQLCHAR
reserved1[2];
void
*XID;
SQLINTEGER timeoutval;
SQLINTEGER locktimeout;
SQLCHAR
reserved2[8];
} TXN_STRUCT;
*/
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLAllocConnect (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLAllocEnv
(SQLHENV
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLAllocHandle (SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
henv,
*phdbc);
*phenv);
htype,
ihnd,
*ohnd);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLAllocStmt
(SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
hdbc,
*phstmt);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLBindCol
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
icol,
iType,
rgbValue,
cbValueMax,
*pcbValue);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLBindFileToCol (SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
SQL call level interface
291
SQL CLI
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
icol,
*fName,
*fNameLen,
*fOptions,
fValueMax,
*sLen,
*pcbValue);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLBindFileToParam (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
ipar,
iType,
*fName,
*fNameLen,
*fOptions,
fValueMax,
*pcbValue);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLBindParam
hstmt,
iparm,
iType,
pType,
pLen,
pScale,
pData,
*pcbValue);
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLBindParameter (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
ipar,
fParamType,
fCType,
fSQLType,
pLen,
pScale,
pData,
cbValueMax,
*pcbValue);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLCancel
(SQLHSTMT
hstmt);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLCloseCursor
(SQLHSTMT
hstmt);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLColAttribute (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
icol,
SQLSMALLINT
fDescType,
SQLPOINTER
rgbDesc,
SQLSMALLINT
cbDescMax,
SQLSMALLINT
*pcbDesc,
SQLPOINTER
pfDesc);
hstmt,
/* @E1C*/
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLColAttributeW (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
icol,
SQLSMALLINT
fDescType,
SQLPOINTER
rgbDesc,
SQLSMALLINT
cbDescMax,
SQLSMALLINT
*pcbDesc,
SQLPOINTER
pfDesc);
hstmt,
/* @E1C*/
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLColAttributes (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
292
IBM i: SQL call level interface
hstmt,
icol,
fDescType,
*rgbDesc,
cbDescMax,
*pcbDesc,
*pfDesc);
SQL CLI
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLColAttributesW (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
icol,
fDescType,
*rgbDesc,
cbDescMax,
*pcbDesc,
*pfDesc);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN
SQLColumnPrivileges (SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
SQLCHAR
*szTableQualifier,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableQualifier,
SQLCHAR
*szTableOwner,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableOwner,
SQLCHAR
*szTableName,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableName,
SQLCHAR
*szColumnName,
SQLSMALLINT
cbColumnName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN
SQLColumnPrivilegesW (SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
SQLWCHAR
*szTableQualifier,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableQualifier,
SQLWCHAR
*szTableOwner,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableOwner,
SQLWCHAR
*szTableName,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableName,
SQLWCHAR
*szColumnName,
SQLSMALLINT
cbColumnName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN
SQLColumns
(SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szTableQualifier,
cbTableQualifier,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
*szColumnName,
cbColumnName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN
SQLColumnsW
(SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szTableQualifier,
cbTableQualifier,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
*szColumnName,
cbColumnName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLConnect
(SQLHDBC
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hdbc,
*szDSN,
cbDSN,
*szUID,
cbUID,
*szAuthStr,
cbAuthStr);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLConnectW
(SQLHDBC
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hdbc,
*szDSN,
cbDSN,
*szUID,
cbUID,
*szAuthStr,
cbAuthStr);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLCopyDesc
(SQLHDESC
sDesc,
SQLHDESC tDesc);
SQL call level interface
293
SQL CLI
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLDataSources (SQLHENV
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
henv,
fDirection,
*szDSN,
cbDSNMax,
*pcbDSN,
*szDescription,
cbDescriptionMax,
*pcbDescription);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLDataSourcesW (SQLHENV
henv,
SQLSMALLINT fDirection,
SQLWCHAR
*szDSN,
SQLSMALLINT cbDSNMax,
SQLSMALLINT *pcbDSN,
SQLWCHAR
*szDescription,
SQLSMALLINT cbDescriptionMax,
SQLSMALLINT *pcbDescription);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLDescribeCol (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
icol,
*szColName,
cbColNameMax,
*pcbColName,
*pfSqlType,
*pcbColDef,
*pibScale,
*pfNullable);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLDescribeColW (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
icol,
*szColName,
cbColNameMax,
*pcbColName,
*pfSqlType,
*pcbColDef,
*pibScale,
*pfNullable);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLDescribeParam (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
ipar,
*pfSqlType,
*pcbColDef,
*pibScale,
*pfNullable);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLDisconnect
(SQLHDBC
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLDriverConnect (SQLHDBC
SQLPOINTER
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT fDriverCompletion);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLDriverConnectW (SQLHDBC
SQLPOINTER
hwnd,
SQLWCHAR
*szConnStrIn,
SQLSMALLINT cbConnStrin,
SQLWCHAR
*szConnStrOut,
SQLSMALLINT cbConnStrOutMax,
SQLSMALLINT *pcbConnStrOut,
SQLSMALLINT fDriverCompletion);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLEndTran
294
IBM i: SQL call level interface
(SQLSMALLINT
hdbc);
hdbc,
hwnd,
*szConnStrIn,
cbConnStrin,
*szConnStrOut,
cbConnStrOutMax,
*pcbConnStrOut,
hdbc,
htype,
SQL CLI
SQLHENV
SQLSMALLINT
henv,
ctype);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLError
(SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt,
*szSqlState,
*pfNativeError,
*szErrorMsg,
cbErrorMsgMax,
*pcbErrorMsg);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLErrorW
(SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt,
*szSqlState,
*pfNativeError,
*szErrorMsg,
cbErrorMsgMax,
*pcbErrorMsg);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLExecDirect (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
*szSqlStr,
cbSqlStr);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLExecDirectW (SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
*szSqlStr,
cbSqlStr);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLExecute
(SQLHSTMT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLExtendedFetch (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLFetch
(SQLHSTMT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLFetchScroll (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLForeignKeys (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLForeignKeysW (SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt);
hstmt,
fOrient,
fOffset,
*pcrow,
*rgfRowStatus);
hstmt);
hstmt,
fOrient,
fOffset);
hstmt,
*szPkTableQualifier,
cbPkTableQualifier,
*szPkTableOwner,
cbPkTableOwner,
*szPkTableName,
cbPkTableName,
*szFkTableQualifier,
cbFkTableQualifier,
*szFkTableOwner,
cbFkTableOwner,
*szFkTableName,
cbFkTableName);
hstmt,
*szPkTableQualifier,
cbPkTableQualifier,
*szPkTableOwner,
cbPkTableOwner,
*szPkTableName,
cbPkTableName,
*szFkTableQualifier,
cbFkTableQualifier,
SQL call level interface
295
SQL CLI
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
*szFkTableOwner,
cbFkTableOwner,
*szFkTableName,
cbFkTableName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLFreeConnect (SQLHDBC
hdbc);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLFreeEnv
henv);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLFreeStmt
(SQLHENV
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLFreeHandle (SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
fOption);
htype,
hndl);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetCol
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
icol,
itype,
tval,
blen,
*olen);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetColW
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
icol,
itype,
tval,
blen,
*olen);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetConnectAttr (SQLHDBC
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hdbc,
attr,
oval,
ilen,
*olen);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetConnectAttrW (SQLHDBC
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hdbc,
attr,
oval,
ilen,
*olen);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetConnectOption (SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
hdbc,
iopt,
oval);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetConnectOptionW (SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
hdbc,
iopt,
oval);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetCursorName (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szCursor,
cbCursorMax,
*pcbCursor);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetCursorNameW (SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szCursor,
cbCursorMax,
*pcbCursor);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetData
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetDescField (SQLHDESC
296
IBM i: SQL call level interface
hstmt,
icol,
fCType,
rgbValue,
cbValueMax,
*pcbValue);
hdesc,
SQL CLI
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
rcdNum,
fieldID,
fValue,
fLength,
*stLength);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetDescFieldW (SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hdesc,
rcdNum,
fieldID,
fValue,
fLength,
*stLength);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetDescRec
hdesc,
rcdNum,
*fname,
bufLen,
*sLength,
*sType,
*sbType,
*fLength,
*fprec,
*fscale,
*fnull);
(SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetDescRecW (SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hdesc,
rcdNum,
*fname,
bufLen,
*sLength,
*sType,
*sbType,
*fLength,
*fprec,
*fscale,
*fnull);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetDiagField (SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hType,
hndl,
rcdNum,
diagID,
dValue,
bLength,
*sLength);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetDiagFieldW (SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hType,
hndl,
rcdNum,
diagID,
dValue,
bLength,
*sLength);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetDiagRec
(SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hType,
hndl,
rcdNum,
*SQLstate,
*SQLcode,
*msgText,
bLength,
*SLength);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetDiagRecW (SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLINTEGER
hType,
hndl,
rcdNum,
*SQLstate,
*SQLcode,
SQL call level interface
297
SQL CLI
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
*msgText,
bLength,
*SLength);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetEnvAttr (SQLHENV
hEnv,
SQLINTEGER fAttribute,
SQLPOINTER pParam,
SQLINTEGER cbParamMax,
SQLINTEGER * pcbParam);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetFunctions (SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hdbc,
fFunction,
*pfExists);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetInfo
(SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hdbc,
fInfoType,
rgbInfoValue,
cbInfoValueMax,
*pcbInfoValue);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetInfoW
(SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hdbc,
fInfoType,
rgbInfoValue,
cbInfoValueMax,
*pcbInfoValue);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetLength (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
locType,
locator,
*sLength,
*ind);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetPosition (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
locType,
srceLocator,
srchLocator,
*srchLiteral,
srchLiteralLen,
fPosition,
*located,
*ind);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetPositionW (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLWCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
locType,
srceLocator,
srchLocator,
*srchLiteral,
srchLiteralLen,
fPosition,
*located,
*ind);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetStmtAttr
hstmt,
fAttr,
pvParam,
bLength,
*SLength);
(SQLHSTMT
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetStmtAttrW (SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
SQLINTEGER
fAttr,
SQLPOINTER
pvParam,
SQLINTEGER
bLength,
SQLINTEGER
*SLength);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetStmtOption (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
298
IBM i: SQL call level interface
hstmt,
fOption,
pvParam);
SQL CLI
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetStmtOptionW (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
hstmt,
fOption,
pvParam);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetSubString (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
locType,
srceLocator,
fPosition,
length,
tType,
rgbValue,
cbValueMax,
*StringLength,
*ind);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetSubStringW (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
locType,
srceLocator,
fPosition,
length,
tType,
rgbValue,
cbValueMax,
*StringLength,
*ind);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetTypeInfo
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLGetTypeInfoW (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLLanguages
hstmt,
fSqlType);
hstmt,
fSqlType);
(SQLHSTMT
hstmt);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLMoreResults (SQLHSTMT
hstmt);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLNativeSql
(SQLHDBC
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hdbc,
*szSqlStrIn,
cbSqlStrIn,
*szSqlStr,
cbSqlStrMax,
*pcbSqlStr);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLNativeSqlW
(SQLHDBC
SQLWCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLWCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hdbc,
*szSqlStrIn,
cbSqlStrIn,
*szSqlStr,
cbSqlStrMax,
*pcbSqlStr);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLNextResult (SQLHSTMT
SQLHSTMT
hstmt2);
hstmt,
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLNumParams (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*pcpar);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLNumResultCols (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*pccol);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLParamData
(SQLHSTMT
SQLPOINTER
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLParamOptions (SQLHSTMT
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
*Value);
hstmt,
crow,
*pirow);
SQL call level interface
299
SQL CLI
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLPrepare
(SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szSqlStr,
cbSqlStr);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLPrepareW
(SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szSqlStr,
cbSqlStr);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLPrimaryKeys (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLPrimaryKeysW (SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szTableQualifier,
cbTableQualifier,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName);
hstmt,
*szTableQualifier,
cbTableQualifier,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLProcedureColumns (SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
SQLCHAR
*szProcQualifier,
SQLSMALLINT
cbProcQualifier,
SQLCHAR
*szProcOwner,
SQLSMALLINT
cbProcOwner,
SQLCHAR
*szProcName,
SQLSMALLINT
cbProcName,
SQLCHAR
*szColumnName,
SQLSMALLINT
cbColumnName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLProcedureColumnsW (SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
SQLWCHAR
*szProcQualifier,
SQLSMALLINT
cbProcQualifier,
SQLWCHAR
*szProcOwner,
SQLSMALLINT
cbProcOwner,
SQLWCHAR
*szProcName,
SQLSMALLINT
cbProcName,
SQLWCHAR
*szColumnName,
SQLSMALLINT
cbColumnName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLProcedures (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLProceduresW (SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLPutData
(SQLHSTMT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLReleaseEnv
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLRowCount
300
IBM i: SQL call level interface
(SQLHENV
(SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
*szProcQualifier,
cbProcQualifier,
*szProcOwner,
cbProcOwner,
*szProcName,
cbProcName);
hstmt,
*szProcQualifier,
cbProcQualifier,
*szProcOwner,
cbProcOwner,
*szProcName,
cbProcName);
hstmt,
Data,
SLen);
henv);
hstmt,
SQL CLI
SQLINTEGER
*pcrow);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetConnectAttr (SQLHDBC
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hdbc,
attrib,
vParam,
inlen);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetConnectAttrW (SQLHDBC
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hdbc,
attrib,
vParam,
inlen);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetConnectOption (SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
hdbc,
fOption,
vParam);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetConnectOptionW (SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
hdbc,
fOption,
vParam);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetCursorName (SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szCursor,
cbCursor);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetCursorNameW (SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szCursor,
cbCursor);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetDescField (SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hdesc,
rcdNum,
fID,
Value,
buffLen);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetDescFieldW (SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
hdesc,
rcdNum,
fID,
Value,
buffLen);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetDescRec
(SQLHDESC
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
hdesc,
rcdNum,
Type,
subType,
fLength,
fPrec,
fScale,
Value,
*sLength,
*indic);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetEnvAttr( SQLHENV hEnv,
SQLINTEGER fAttribute,
SQLPOINTER pParam,
SQLINTEGER cbParam);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetParam
(SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetStmtAttr (SQLHSTMT
SQLINTEGER
hstmt,
ipar,
fCType,
fSqlType,
cbColDef,
ibScale,
rgbValue,
*pcbValue);
hstmt,
fAttr,
SQL call level interface
301
SQL CLI
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetStmtAttrW (SQLHSTMT
SQLINTEGER
SQLPOINTER
SQLINTEGER
pParam,
vParam);
hstmt,
fAttr,
pParam,
vParam);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetStmtOption (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
hstmt,
fOption,
vParam);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSetStmtOptionW (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLPOINTER
fOption,
vParam);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSpecialColumns (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
fColType,
*szTableQual,
cbTableQual,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
fScope,
fNullable);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLSpecialColumnsW (SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
fColType,
*szTableQual,
cbTableQual,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
fScope,
fNullable);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLStartTran
SQLHENV
henv,
SQLINTEGER
mode,
SQLINTEGER
clevel);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLStatistics
SQLSMALLINT
(SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
htype,
(SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szTableQualifier,
cbTableQualifier,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
fUnique,
(SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szTableQualifier,
cbTableQualifier,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
fUnique,
fres);
fres);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLStatisticsW
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLTablePrivileges (SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
SQLCHAR
*szTableQualifier,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableQualifier,
SQLCHAR
*szTableOwner,
302
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLTablePrivilegesW (SQLHSTMT
hstmt,
SQLWCHAR
*szTableQualifier,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableQualifier,
SQLWCHAR
*szTableOwner,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableOwner,
SQLWCHAR
*szTableName,
SQLSMALLINT
cbTableName);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLTables
(SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szTableQualifier,
cbTableQualifier,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
*szTableType,
cbTableType);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLTablesW
(SQLHSTMT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
SQLWCHAR
SQLSMALLINT
hstmt,
*szTableQualifier,
cbTableQualifier,
*szTableOwner,
cbTableOwner,
*szTableName,
cbTableName,
*szTableType,
cbTableType);
(SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLSMALLINT
henv,
hdbc,
fType);
SQL_EXTERN SQLRETURN SQLTransact
#define FAR
#define SQL_SQLSTATE_SIZE
5
#define SQL_MAX_DSN_LENGTH
#define SQL_MAX_ID_LENGTH
e.g. cursor names
#define SQL_MAXLSTR
#define SQL_LVCHAROH
18
18
255
26
#define SQL_LOBCHAROH
312
/* size of SQLSTATE, not including
null terminating byte
/* maximum data source name size
/* maximum identifier name size,
*/
/* Maximum length of an LSTRING
/* Overhead for LONG VARCHAR in
/* record
/* Overhead for LOB in record
/* Moved SQLWCHAR constant
/* SQL extended data types (negative means unsupported) */
#define SQL_TINYINT
-6
#define SQL_BIT
-7
#define SQL_UNSIGNED_OFFSET
-22
/*
#define SQL_SIGNED_OFFSET
-20
/*
/* C data type to SQL data type mapping
#define SQL_C_CHAR
SQL_CHAR
#define SQL_C_LONG
SQL_INTEGER
#define SQL_C_SLONG
SQL_INTEGER
#define SQL_C_SHORT
SQL_SMALLINT
#define SQL_C_FLOAT
SQL_REAL
#define SQL_C_DOUBLE
SQL_DOUBLE
#define SQL_C_DATE
SQL_DATE
#define SQL_C_TIME
SQL_TIME
#define SQL_C_TIMESTAMP SQL_TIMESTAMP
#define SQL_C_BINARY
SQL_BINARY
*/
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
@E1M*/
@E3A*/
@E3A*/
CHAR, VARCHAR, DECIMAL, NUMERIC */
INTEGER
*/
INTEGER
*/
SMALLINT
*/
REAL
*/
FLOAT, DOUBLE
*/
DATE
*/
TIME
*/
TIMESTAMP
*/
BINARY, VARBINARY
*/
SQL call level interface
303
SQL CLI
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
SQL_C_BIT
SQL_BIT
SQL_C_TINYINT
SQL_TINYINT
SQL_C_BIGINT
SQL_BIGINT
SQL_C_DBCHAR
SQL_DBCLOB
SQL_C_WCHAR
SQL_WCHAR
/* UNICODE
SQL_C_DATETIME SQL_DATETIME /* DATETIME
SQL_C_BLOB
SQL_BLOB
SQL_C_CLOB
SQL_CLOB
SQL_C_DBCLOB
SQL_DBCLOB
SQL_C_BLOB_LOCATOR SQL_BLOB_LOCATOR
SQL_C_CLOB_LOCATOR SQL_CLOB_LOCATOR
SQL_C_DBCLOB_LOCATOR SQL_DBCLOB_LOCATOR
SQL_C_DECIMAL128 -361
/* 128 byte decimal floating point
SQL_C_DECIMAL64 SQL_DECFLOAT /* 64 byte decimal floating point
SQL_C_DECIMAL32 -362
/* 32 byte decimal floating point
SQL_C_UTINYINT (SQL_TINYINT + SQL_UNSIGNED_OFFSET)
/* Unsigned TINYINT type (-28)
#define SQL_C_STINYINT (SQL_TINYINT + SQL_SIGNED_OFFSET)
/* Signed TINYINT type (-26)
/* Additional decimal floating point constants and structures
#define SQL_DECIMAL64_COEFFICIENT_LEN 8
#define SQL_DECIMAL128_COEFFICIENT_LEN 16
*/
*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E3A*/
@E3A*/
@E2A*/
/* @E2A*/
/* @E2A*/
typedef struct tagSQLDECIMAL64 {
union {
SQLDOUBLE dummy;
/* Dummy member for alignment @E2A*/
SQLCHAR dec64[SQL_DECIMAL64_COEFFICIENT_LEN];
#if defined(__STDC_WANT_DEC_FP__) && \
(__OS400_TGTVRM__ >= 550) && defined(__IBM_DFP__)
_Decimal64 decfloat64;
/* Native DECFLOAT(16) type
@E2A*/
#endif
} udec64;
} SQLDECIMAL64;
/*
@E2A*/
typedef struct tagSQLDECIMAL128 {
union {
SQLDOUBLE dummy;
/* Dummy member for alignment @E2A*/
SQLCHAR dec128[SQL_DECIMAL128_COEFFICIENT_LEN];
#if defined(__STDC_WANT_DEC_FP__) && \
(__OS400_TGTVRM__ >= 550) && defined(__IBM_DFP__)
_Decimal128 decfloat128; /* Native DECFLOAT(16) type
@E2A*/
#endif
} udec128;
} SQLDECIMAL128;
/*
@E2A*/
/* miscellaneous constants and unsupported functions */
#define SQL_ADD
-1
#define SQL_DELETE
-1
#define SQL_KEYSET_SIZE
-1
#define SQL_LCK_NO_CHANGE
-1
#define SQL_LOCK_NO_CHANGE
-1
#define SQL_LOCK_EXCLUSIVE
-1
#define SQL_LOCK_UNLOCK
-1
#define SQL_METH_D
-1
#define SQL_POSITION
-1
#define SQL_QUERY_TIMEOUT
-1
#define SQL_ROW_ADDED
-1
#define SQL_ROW_NOROW
1
#define SQL_ROW_ERROR
-1
#define SQL_ROW_SUCCESS
0
#define SQL_ROW_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
-1
#define SQL_SC_TRY_UNIQUE
-1
#define SQL_SIMULATE_CURSOR
-1
#define SQL_UNKNOWN_TYPE
-1
#define SQL_UPDATE
-1
#define SQL_UNIC_DATA
99
304
IBM i: SQL call level interface
/* @D3C*/
/* @D3A*/
SQL CLI
/* Constants used for block array insert
#define SQL_PARAM_SUCCESS
#define SQL_PARAM_DIAG_UNAVAILABLE
#define SQL_PARAM_ERROR
#define SQL_PARAM_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO
#define SQL_PARAM_UNUSED
#define SQL_WARN_VAL_TRUNC
support */
0
1
5
6
7
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
@E2A*/
"01004"
#if (__OS400_TGTVRM__>=510) /* @B1A*/
#pragma datamodel(pop)
/* @B1A*/
#endif
/* @B1A*/
#ifndef __ILEC400__
#pragma info(restore)
#endif
#endif /* SQL_H_SQLCLI */
Running Db2 for i CLI in server mode
The reason for running in SQL server mode is that many applications need to act as database servers.
This means that a single job performs SQL requests on behalf of multiple users.
Without using SQL server mode, applications might encounter one or more of the following limitations:
v A single job can have only one commit transaction per activation group.
v A single job can be connected to a relational database (RDB) only once.
v All SQL statements run under the user profile of the job, regardless of the user ID passed on the
connection.
SQL server mode circumvents these limitations by routing all SQL statements to separate jobs. Each
connection runs in its own job. The system uses prestart jobs named QSQSRVR in the QSYSWRK
subsystem or a selected subsystem to minimize the startup time for each connection. Because each call to
SQLConnect() can accept a different user profile, each job also has its own commit transaction. As soon as
the SQLDisconnect() has been performed, the job is reset and put back in the pool of available jobs.
Starting Db2 for i CLI in SQL server mode
There are two ways to place a job into SQL server mode.
v The most used method is using the call level interface (CLI) function, SQLSetEnvAttr(). The SQL server
mode is best suited to CLI applications because they already use the concept of multiple connections
handles. Set this mode immediately after allocating the CLI environment. If server mode is not set
immediately following the allocation of the CLI environment then the mode will not be changed to
server mode, and SQL continues to run inline.
EXAMPLE.
.
SQLAllocEnv(&henv);
long attr;
attr = SQL_TRUE
SQLSetEnvAttr(henv,SQL_ATTR_SERVER_MODE,&attr,0);
SQLAllocConnect(henv,&hdbc);
.
.
v The second way to set the server mode is using the Change Job (QWTCHGJB) API.
SQL call level interface
305
SQL CLI
As soon as SQL server mode has been set, all SQL connections and SQL statements run in server mode.
There is no switching back and forth. The job, when in server mode, cannot start commitment control,
and cannot use Interactive SQL.
Related information:
Application programming interfaces
Restrictions for running Db2 for i CLI in server mode
Here are the restrictions when you run Db2 for i CLI in server mode.
v A job must set the server mode at the very beginning of processing before doing anything else. For
jobs that are strictly CLI users, they must use the SQLSetEnvAttr call to turn on server mode.
Remember to do this right after SQLAllocEnv but before any other calls. As soon as the server mode is
on, it cannot be turned off.
v All the SQL functions run in the prestart jobs and commitment control. Do not start commitment
control in the originating job either before or after entering server mode.
v Because the SQL is processed in the prestart job, there is no sensitivity to certain changes in the
originating job. This includes changes to library list, job priority, message logging, and so forth. The
prestart is sensitive to a change of the coded character set identifier (CCSID) value in the originating
job, because this can affect the way data is mapped back to the program of the user.
v When running server mode, the application must use SQL commits and rollbacks, either embedded or
by the SQL CLI. They cannot use the CL commands, because there is no commitment control that is
running in the originating job. The job must issue a COMMIT statement before disconnecting;
otherwise an implicit ROLLBACK occurs.
v It is not possible to use interactive SQL from a job in server mode. Use of STRSQL when in server
mode results in an SQL6141 message.
v It is also not possible to perform SQL compilation in server mode. Server mode can be used when
running compiled SQL programs, but must not be on for the compiles. The compiles fail if the job is in
server mode.
v Function SQLDataSources() is unique in that it does not require a connection handle to run. When in
server mode, the program must already have done a connection to the local database before using
SQLDataSources(). Because SQLDataSources() is used to find the name of the RDB for connection, IBM
supports passing a NULL pointer for the RDB name on SQLConnect() to obtain a local connection. This
makes it possible to write a generic program, when there is no prior knowledge of the system names.
v When doing commits and rollbacks through the CLI, the calls to SQLEndTran() and SQLTransact()
must include a connection handle. When not running in server mode, one can omit the connection
handle to commit everything. However, this is not supported in server mode, because each connection
(or thread) has its own transaction scoping.
v It is not recommended to share connection handles across threads, when running in SQL server mode.
This is because one thread can overwrite return data or error information that another thread has yet
to process.
v Before V6R1, running CLI applications and Native JDBC applications in the same job will lead to
unpredictable behavior. In most cases it will lead to errors. In V6R1 it is possible to run Native JDBC
and CLI applications in the same job provided each interface runs in server mode and the CLI
applications do not set any CLI environment attributes. CLI attributes can be specified at the
connection and statement levels instead.
v Within a single job, CLI allows for a one time switch from non-server mode to server mode. As
discussed earlier, it does not allow an application to switch from running in server mode to non-server
mode.
Related reference:
“SQLDataSources - Get list of data sources” on page 81
SQLDataSources() returns a list of target databases available, one at a time. A database must be cataloged
to be available.
306
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
Unicode in Db2 for i CLI
Db2 for i CLI provides several ways for applications to take advantage of Unicode in their applications.
This support is available for two different Unicode encodings, UTF-8 and UTF-16. Additional support
exists for specifying a UCS-2 encoded character string only when preparing an SQL statement.
UTF-16 encoding support
Support for UTF-16 encoded character data is provided through a set of API's called the "Wide" API's.
These API's accept as input and return as output UTF-16 data. This allows applications to run with a
Unicode coded character set identifier (CCSID) of 1200, instead of being dependent upon the default
CCSID of the job running the Db2 for i CLI work. In most cases the default CCSID of the job is an
EBCDIC CCSID. Since the UTF-16 encoded character set is a superset of the UCS-2 encoded character set
(CCSID 13488), applications can encode their character data in UCS-2 as well. CLI API functions have
suffixes to indicate the format of their string arguments: those that accept Unicode end in W, and those
that accept EBCDIC have no suffix. The following is a list of functions that are available in Db2 for i CLI
which have both EBCDIC and Unicode versions:
Table 179. List of functions with both EBCIDIC and Unicode versions
Functions
Functions (continued)
Functions (continued)
SQLColAttributeW
SQLColAttributesW
SQLColumnPrivilegesW
SQLColumnsW
SQLConnectW
SQLDataSourcesW
SQLDescribeColW
SQLDriverConnectW
SQLErrorW
SQLExecDirectW
SQLForeignKeysW
SQLGetConnectAttrW
SQLGetConnectOptionW
SQLGetCursorNameW
SQLGetDescFieldW
SQLGetDescRecW
SQLGetDiagFieldW
SQLGetDiagRecW
SQLGetInfoW
SQLGetPositionW
SQLGetStmtAttrW
SQLGetStmtOptionW
SQLGetSubStringW
SQLGetTypeInfoW
SQLNativeSQLW
SQLPrepareW
SQLPrimaryKeysW
SQLProcedureColumnsW
SQLProceduresW
SQLSetConnectAttrW
SQLSetConnectOptionW
SQLSetCursorNameW
SQLSetDescFieldW
SQLSetStmtAttrW
SQLSetStmtOptionW
SQLSpecialColumnsW
SQLStatisticsW
SQLTablePrivilegesW
SQLTablesW
The syntax for a Db2 for i CLI Wide function is the same as the syntax for its corresponding EBCDIC
function, except that SQLCHAR parameters are defined as SQLWCHAR. Character buffers defined as
SQLPOINTER in the EBCDIC syntax can be defined as either SQLCHAR or SQLWCHAR in the Unicode
function. Refer to the EBCDIC version of the CLI Unicode functions for EBCDIC syntax details.
The SQL types SQL_WCHAR and SQL_WVARCHAR can be used to specify a buffer that contains
Unicode data. So, to specify a particular column or parameter marker containing Unicode data the
application can bind as SQL_WCHAR for fixed length character data or bind as SQL_WVARCHAR for
varying length character data. Since UTF-16 data is double byte character data the input and output
lengths must take this into account. Unicode functions that have arguments which are always character
strings interpret these arguments as the number of double byte characters. When the length might refer
to string or non-string data, the length will be interpreted as the number of bytes needed to store the
data. For example, the SQLGetInfoW()SQLGetInfoW() API accepts the input length as the number of bytes,
while SQLPrepareW() accepts the number of double byte character's.
SQL call level interface
307
SQL CLI
Db2 for i CLI allows for the mixing of the Wide character API's and non-Wide character API's.
Applications must take into account that Unicode data can only be specified for the Wide API calls, and
not the non-Wide API calls. Most applications will probably want to commit to either running with
Unicode encoding or will choose to run with a non-Unicode character encoding since most data will be in
a consistent encoding. However, support does exist for mixing Unicode and non-Unicode calls in the
same CLI environment. Db2 for i CLI does restrict the mixing of Wide character API's and an
environment with UTF-8 support enabled. Enabling UTF-8 support is discussed in the next section.
UTF-8 encoding support
Support for UTF-8 encoded character data is provided through the setting of an environment or
connection attribute, SQL_ATTR_UTF8. Setting the attribute to SQL_TRUE will indicate that all input and
output data is to be treated as Unicode character data. This support allows applications to run with a
Unicode coded character set identifier (CCSID) of 1208, instead of being dependent upon the default
CCSID of the job running the Db2 for i CLI work. The UTF-8 support does not require any new data type
bindings by the application. When binding, applications can continue to use SQL_CHAR for fixed length
character data and SQL_VARCHAR can be used for varying length character data. When an application
binds as any character SQL type, Db2 for i CLI will take care of tagging the data with the UTF-8 CCSID,
so Db2 for i will translate the data properly. UTF-8 data is handled on every Db2 for i CLI API that takes
character data as input and returns character data as output. Each of the API's which has a matching
wide character version also supports UTF-8 character data. See the list of API's in the previous section to
identify which functions support both UTF-16 and UTF-8 Unicode character data. Functions that accept
both a UTF-8 string and a length expect the length to be in bytes, not in characters. This is in contrast to
the Wide API's which expect the length to be in the number of double byte characters in most cases. As
was discussed in the previous section, mixing a UTF-8 environment with calls to the Wide character API's
is restricted. Additionally, unlike the Wide character API's, which allow alternating calls between Unicode
and non-Unicode supported API's, once the UTF-8 environment is setup, all input and output character
data is expected to be in the UTF-8 encoding by Db2 for i CLI.
UCS-2 encoding support
Db2 for i CLI provides some specific support for UCS-2 encoded character strings. This support was
added before the Wide API support, and therefore is not a complete solution for applications wanting to
enable full Unicode support in Db2 for i CLI. Since the UTF-16 encoded character set is a superset of the
UCS-2 character set, applications can get full UCS-2 support through the use of the Wide API's discussed
earlier in the "Unicode in Db2 for i CLI" section. To enable this limited UCS-2 support, set the connection
attribute SQL_ATTR_UCS2 to SQL_TRUE. This will tell Db2 for i CLI to treat input strings as UCS-2
character data at prepare time. SQL statements can be prepared using either the SQLPrepare() or
SQLExecDirect() API's. This support does not allow for UCS-2 character strings on input or output for
any other Db2 for i CLI API's.
Examples: Db2 for i CLI applications
These examples have been drawn from the applications provided in the SQL call level interface topic
collection. Detailed error checking has not been implemented in the examples.
Example: Embedded SQL and the equivalent Db2 for i CLI function
calls
This example shows embedded statements in comments and the equivalent Db2 for i CLI function calls.
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*************************************************************************
** file = embedded.c
**
308
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
** Example of executing an SQL statement using CLI.
** The equivalent embedded SQL statements are shown in comments.
**
** Functions used:
**
**
SQLAllocConnect
SQLFreeConnect
**
SQLAllocEnv
SQLFreeEnv
**
SQLAllocStmt
SQLFreeStmt
**
SQLConnect
SQLDisconnect
**
**
SQLBindCol
SQLFetch
**
SQLSetParam
SQLTransact
**
SQLError
SQLExecDirect
**
**************************************************************************/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include "sqlcli.h"
#ifndef NULL
#define NULL
#endif
0
int print_err (SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
int main ()
{
SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
hdbc,
hstmt);
henv;
hdbc;
hstmt;
server[] = "sample";
uid[30];
pwd[30];
id;
name[51];
namelen, intlen;
scale;
scale = 0;
/* EXEC SQL CONNECT TO :server USER :uid USING :authentication_string; */
SQLAllocEnv (&henv);
/* allocate an environment handle */
SQLAllocConnect (henv, &hdbc);
/* allocate a connection handle
*/
/* Connect to database indicated by "server" variable with
/*
authorization-name given in "uid", authentication-string given
/*
in "pwd". Note server, uid, and pwd contain null-terminated
/*
strings, as indicated by the 3 input lengths set to SQL_NTS
if (SQLConnect (hdbc, server, SQL_NTS, NULL, SQL_NTS, NULL, SQL_NTS)
!= SQL_SUCCESS)
return (print_err (hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT));
*/
*/
*/
*/
SQLAllocStmt (hdbc, &hstmt);
*/
/* allocate a statement handle
/* EXEC SQL CREATE TABLE NAMEID (ID integer, NAME varchar(50));
*/
{
SQLCHAR create[] = "CREATE TABLE NAMEID (ID integer, NAME varchar(50))";
/* execute the sql statement
if (SQLExecDirect (hstmt, create, SQL_NTS) != SQL_SUCCESS)
*/
SQL call level interface
309
SQL CLI
return (print_err (hdbc, hstmt));
}
/* EXEC SQL COMMIT WORK;
SQLTransact (henv, hdbc, SQL_COMMIT);
*/
/* commit create table */
/* EXEC SQL INSERT INTO NAMEID VALUES ( :id, :name
{
SQLCHAR insert[] = "INSERT INTO NAMEID VALUES (?, ?)";
*/
/* show the use of SQLPrepare/SQLExecute method
/* prepare the insert
*/
*/
if (SQLPrepare (hstmt, insert, SQL_NTS) != SQL_SUCCESS)
return (print_err (hdbc, hstmt));
/* Set up the first input parameter "id"
intlen = sizeof (SQLINTEGER);
SQLSetParam (hstmt, 1,
SQL_C_LONG, SQL_INTEGER,
(SQLINTEGER) sizeof (SQLINTEGER),
scale, (SQLPOINTER) &id,
(SQLINTEGER *) &intlen);
*/
namelen = SQL_NTS;
/* Set up the second input parameter "name"
SQLSetParam (hstmt, 2,
SQL_C_CHAR, SQL_VARCHAR,
50,
scale, (SQLPOINTER) name,
(SQLINTEGER *) &namelen);
*/
/* now assign parameter values and execute the insert
id=500;
strcpy (name, "Babbage");
*/
if (SQLExecute (hstmt) != SQL_SUCCESS)
return (print_err (hdbc, hstmt));
}
/* EXEC SQL COMMIT WORK;
SQLTransact (henv, hdbc, SQL_COMMIT);
/* commit inserts
/* EXEC SQL DECLARE c1 CURSOR FOR SELECT ID, NAME FROM NAMEID;
/* EXEC SQL OPEN c1;
/* The application doesn’t specify "declare c1 cursor for"
{
SQLCHAR select[] = "select ID, NAME from NAMEID";
if (SQLExecDirect (hstmt, select, SQL_NTS) != SQL_SUCCESS)
return (print_err (hdbc, hstmt));
}
/* EXEC SQL FETCH c1 INTO :id, :name;
/* Binding first column to output variable "id"
SQLBindCol (hstmt, 1,
SQL_C_LONG, (SQLPOINTER) &id,
(SQLINTEGER) sizeof (SQLINTEGER),
(SQLINTEGER *) &intlen);
/* Binding second column to output variable "name"
SQLBindCol (hstmt, 2,
310
IBM i: SQL call level interface
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
SQL CLI
SQL_C_CHAR, (SQLPOINTER) name,
(SQLINTEGER) sizeof (name),
&namelen);
SQLFetch (hstmt);
/* now execute the fetch
printf("Result of Select: id = %ld name = %s\n", id, name);
*/
/* finally, we should commit, discard hstmt, disconnect
/* EXEC SQL COMMIT WORK;
SQLTransact (henv, hdbc, SQL_COMMIT); /* commit the transaction
*/
*/
*/
/* EXEC SQL CLOSE c1;
SQLFreeStmt (hstmt, SQL_DROP);
/* free the statement handle
*/
*/
/* EXEC SQL DISCONNECT;
SQLDisconnect (hdbc);
*/
/* disconnect from the database */
SQLFreeConnect (hdbc);
SQLFreeEnv (henv);
/* free the connection handle
/* free the environment handle
*/
*/
return (0);
}
int print_err (SQLHDBC
hdbc,
SQLHSTMT hstmt)
{
SQLCHAR
buffer[SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1];
SQLCHAR
sqlstate[SQL_SQLSTATE_SIZE + 1];
SQLINTEGER
sqlcode;
SQLSMALLINT
length;
while ( SQLError(SQL_NULL_HENV, hdbc, hstmt,
sqlstate,
&sqlcode,
buffer,
SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1,
&length) == SQL_SUCCESS )
{
printf("SQLSTATE: %s Native Error Code: %ld\n",
sqlstate, sqlcode);
printf("%s \n", buffer);
printf("----------------------------- \n");
};
return(SQL_ERROR);
}
Example: Using the CLI XA transaction connection attributes
This example shows how to use the call level interface (CLI) XA transaction connection attributes.
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
/*************************************************************************
** file = CLIXAEXMP1.c
**
** Example of a typical flow of work in an XA transaction using the CLI.
**
** XA Functions used:
**
**
xa_open()
-- Open an XA resource for use in a transaction
**
xa_prepare() -- Prepare for commitment of work in the transaction
**
xa_commit() -- Commit work done in the transaction
**
SQL call level interface
311
SQL CLI
** CLI Functions used:
**
**
SQLAllocHanle
SQLBindParameter
SQLDisconnect
**
SQLError
SQLExecute
SQLFreeHandle
**
SQLPrepare
SQLSetConnectAttr
SQLSetEnvAttr
**
** This example will:
** - Open the XA transaction manager
** - Open a CLI connection and start a transaction for it using SQL_TXN_CREATE
** - Do some commitable CLI work under this transaction
** - End the transaction on the first connection using SQL_TXN_END
** - Close the first CLI connection and open a second connection
** - Use the SQL_TXN_FIND option to find the previous transaction
** - Do more commitable work on this transaction and end the transaction
** - Use the XA APIs to prepare and commit the work
************************************************************************************/
#define _XA_PROTOTYPES
#define _MULTI_THREADED
#include <xa.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sqlcli.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
void genXid(XID *xid) {
time_t
t;
memset(xid, 0, sizeof(xid));
xid->formatID = 69;
xid->gtrid_length = 4;
xid->bqual_length = 4;
/* xid->data must be a globally unique naming identifier
when taking gtrid and bqual together - the example below
is most likely not unique */
/* gtrid contents */
xid->data[0] = 0xFA;
xid->data[1] = 0xED;
xid->data[2] = 0xFA;
xid->data[3] = 0xED;
time(&t);
/* bqual contents */
xid->data[4] = (((int)t) >> 24) & 0xFF;
xid->data[5] = (((int)t) >> 16) & 0xFF;
xid->data[6] = (((int)t) >> 8) & 0xFF;
xid->data[7] = (((int)t) >> 0) & 0xFF;
}
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
/***************************************************/
/* Declarations Section
*/
/***************************************************/
SQLHENV henv;
SQLHDBC hdbc;
SQLHSTMT hstmt;
SQLRETURN rtnc;
SQLINTEGER attr;
SQLINTEGER int_buffer;
SQLINTEGER rlength;
SQLINTEGER buffint;
SQLINTEGER ilen;
SQLCHAR s[80];
SQLCHAR state[10];
SQLCHAR buffer[600];
SQLCHAR sqlstr[600];
SQLINTEGER natErr;
SQLSMALLINT len;
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IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
/* Declare local XA variables */
struct TXN_STRUCT new;
XID
xid;
char
xaOpenFormat[128];
int
mainRmid = 1;
int
xaRc;
/* Initialize the XA structure variable’s (defined in sqlcli.h) */
strcpy(new.tminfo,"MYPRODUCT");
strcpy(new.reserved1,"");
new.timeoutval = 0;
new.locktimeout = 0;
strcpy(new.reserved2,"");
genXid(&xid);
new.XID = &xid;
/* Use the XA APIs to start the transaction manager */
/* The xa_info argument for xa_open MUST include the THDCTL=C keyword
and value when using using CLI with XA transactions */
sprintf(xaOpenFormat, "RDBNAME=*LOCAL THDCTL=C");
xaRc = xa_open(xaOpenFormat, mainRmid, TMNOFLAGS);
printf("xa_open(%s, %d, TMNOFLAGS) = %d\n",
xaOpenFormat, mainRmid, xaRc);
/* Setup the CLI resources */
attr=SQL_TRUE;
rtnc=SQLAllocHandle(SQL_HANDLE_ENV,SQL_NULL_HANDLE,&henv);
rtnc=SQLSetEnvAttr(henv,SQL_ATTR_SERVER_MODE,&attr,0); /* set server mode */
rtnc=SQLAllocHandle(SQL_HANDLE_DBC,henv,&hdbc);
/* Mark the connection as an external transaction and connect */
rtnc=SQLSetConnectAttr(hdbc,SQL_ATTR_TXN_EXTERNAL,&attr,0);
rtnc=SQLConnect(hdbc,NULL,0,NULL,0,NULL,0);
/* Start the transaction */
new.operation = SQL_TXN_CREATE;
rtnc=SQLSetConnectAttr(hdbc,SQL_ATTR_TXN_INFO,&new,0);
/* Do some CLI work */
rtnc=SQLAllocHandle(SQL_HANDLE_STMT,hdbc,&hstmt);
strcpy(sqlstr,"insert into tab values(?)");
rtnc=SQLPrepare(hstmt,sqlstr,SQL_NTS);
rtnc=
SQLBindParameter(hstmt,1,1,SQL_INTEGER,SQL_INTEGER,10,2,&buffint,0,&ilen);
buffint=10; /* set the integer value to insert */
rtnc=SQLExecute(hstmt);
if (rtnc!=SQL_SUCCESS)
{
printf("SQLExecute failed with return code: %i \n", rtnc);
rtnc=SQLError(0, 0,hstmt, state, &natErr, buffer, 600, &len);
printf("%i is the SQLCODE\n",natErr);
printf("%i is the length of error text\n",len);
printf("%s is the state\n",state );
printf("%s \n",buffer);
}
else
printf("SQLExecute succeeded, value %i inserted \n", buffint);
/* End the transaction */
new.operation = SQL_TXN_END;
rtnc=SQLSetConnectAttr(hdbc,SQL_ATTR_TXN_INFO,&new,0);
/* Cleanup and disconnect from the first connection */
rtnc=SQLFreeHandle(SQL_HANDLE_STMT,hstmt);
rtnc=SQLDisconnect(hdbc);
SQL call level interface
313
SQL CLI
/* Mark the second connection as an external transaction and connect */
attr=SQL_TRUE;
rtnc=SQLSetConnectAttr(hdbc,SQL_ATTR_TXN_EXTERNAL,&attr,0);
rtnc=SQLConnect(hdbc,NULL,0,NULL,0,NULL,0);
/* Find the open transaction from the first connection */
new.operation = SQL_TXN_FIND;
rtnc=SQLSetConnectAttr(hdbc,SQL_ATTR_TXN_INFO,&new,0);
/* Do some CLI work on the second connection */
rtnc=SQLAllocHandle(SQL_HANDLE_STMT,hdbc,&hstmt);
strcpy(sqlstr,"insert into tab values(?)");
rtnc=SQLPrepare(hstmt,sqlstr,SQL_NTS);
rtnc=
SQLBindParameter(hstmt,1,1,SQL_INTEGER,SQL_INTEGER,10,2,&buffint,0,&ilen);
buffint=15; /* set the integer value to insert */
rtnc=SQLExecute(hstmt);
if (rtnc!=SQL_SUCCESS)
{
printf("SQLExecute failed with return code: %i \n", rtnc);
rtnc=SQLError(0, 0,hstmt, state, &natErr, buffer, 600, &len);
printf("%i is the SQLCODE\n",natErr);
printf("%i is the length of error text\n",len);
printf("%s is the state\n",state );
printf("%s \n",buffer);
}
else
printf("Second SQLExecute succeeded, value %i inserted \n", buffint);
/* End the transaction */
new.operation = SQL_TXN_END;
rtnc=SQLSetConnectAttr(hdbc,SQL_ATTR_TXN_INFO,&new,0);
/* Now, use XA to prepare/commit transaction */
/* Prepare to commit */
xaRc = xa_prepare(&xid, mainRmid, TMNOFLAGS);
printf("xa_prepare(xid, %d, TMNOFLAGS) = %d\n",mainRmid, xaRc);
/* Commit */
if (xaRc != XA_RDONLY) {
xaRc = xa_commit(&xid, mainRmid, TMNOFLAGS);
printf("xa_commit(xid, %d, TMNOFLAGS) = %d\n", mainRmid, xaRc);
}
else {
printf("xa_commit() skipped for read only TX\n");
}
/* Cleanup the CLI resources */
rtnc=SQLFreeHandle(SQL_HANDLE_STMT,hstmt);
rtnc=SQLDisconnect(hdbc);
rtnc=SQLFreeHandle(SQL_HANDLE_DBC,hdbc);
rtnc=SQLFreeHandle(SQL_HANDLE_ENV,henv);
return 0;
}
Example: Interactive SQL and the equivalent Db2 for i CLI function
calls
This example shows the processing of interactive SQL statements.
This example follows the flow described in “Writing a Db2 for i CLI application” on page 6.
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 321.
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SQL CLI
/*************************************************************************
** file = typical.c
**
** Example of executing interactive SQL statements, displaying result sets
** and simple transaction management.
**
** Functions used:
**
**
SQLAllocConnect
SQLFreeConnect
**
SQLAllocEnv
SQLFreeEnv
**
SQLAllocStmt
SQLFreeStmt
**
SQLConnect
SQLDisconnect
**
**
SQLBindCol
SQLFetch
**
SQLDescribeCol
SQLNumResultCols
**
SQLError
SQLRowCount
**
SQLExecDirect
SQLTransact
**
**************************************************************************/
#include
#include
#include
#include
<stdlib.h>
<stdio.h>
<string.h>
"sqlcli.h"
#define MAX_STMT_LEN 255
#define MAXCOLS 100
#define max(a,b) (a > b ? a : b)
int initialize(SQLHENV *henv,
SQLHDBC *hdbc);
int process_stmt(SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLCHAR
henv,
hdbc,
*sqlstr);
int terminate(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC hdbc);
int print_error(SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt);
int check_error(SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLHSTMT
SQLRETURN
henv,
hdbc,
hstmt,
frc);
void display_results(SQLHSTMT hstmt,
SQLSMALLINT nresultcols);
/*******************************************************************
** main
** - initialize
** - start a transaction
** - get statement
** - another statement?
** - COMMIT or ROLLBACK
** - another transaction?
** - terminate
*******************************************************************/
int main()
{
SQLHENV
henv;
SQLHDBC
hdbc;
SQLCHAR
sqlstmt[MAX_STMT_LEN + 1]="";
SQL call level interface
315
SQL CLI
SQLCHAR
SQLRETURN
sqltrans[sizeof("ROLLBACK")];
rc;
rc = initialize(&henv, &hdbc);
if (rc == SQL_ERROR) return(terminate(henv, hdbc));
printf("Enter an SQL statement to start a transaction(or ’q’ to Quit):\n");
gets(sqlstmt);
while (sqlstmt[0] !=’q’)
{
while (sqlstmt[0] != ’q’)
{ rc = process_stmt(henv, hdbc, sqlstmt);
if (rc == SQL_ERROR) return(SQL_ERROR);
printf("Enter an SQL statement(or ’q’ to Quit):\n");
gets(sqlstmt);
}
printf("Enter ’c’ to COMMIT or ’r’ to ROLLBACK the transaction\n");
fgets(sqltrans, sizeof("ROLLBACK"), stdin);
if (sqltrans[0] == ’c’)
{
rc = SQLTransact (henv, hdbc, SQL_COMMIT);
if (rc == SQL_SUCCESS)
printf ("Transaction commit was successful\n");
else
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
}
if (sqltrans[0] == ’r’)
{
rc = SQLTransact (henv, hdbc, SQL_ROLLBACK);
if (rc == SQL_SUCCESS)
printf ("Transaction roll back was successful\n");
else
check_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
}
printf("Enter an SQL statement to start a transaction or ’q’ to quit\n");
gets(sqlstmt);
}
terminate(henv, hdbc);
return (SQL_SUCCESS);
}/* end main */
/*******************************************************************
** process_stmt
** - allocates a statement handle
** - executes the statement
** - determines the type of statement
**
- if there are no result columns, therefore non-select statement
**
- if rowcount > 0, assume statement was UPDATE, INSERT, DELETE
**
else
**
- assume a DDL, or Grant/Revoke statement
**
else
**
- must be a select statement.
**
- display results
** - frees the statement handle
*******************************************************************/
int process_stmt (SQLHENV
SQLHDBC
SQLCHAR
{
316
henv,
hdbc,
*sqlstr)
IBM i: SQL call level interface
SQL CLI
SQLHSTMT
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLRETURN
hstmt;
nresultcols;
rowcount;
rc;
SQLAllocStmt (hdbc, &hstmt);
/* allocate a statement handle */
/* execute the SQL statement in "sqlstr"
*/
rc = SQLExecDirect (hstmt, sqlstr, SQL_NTS);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS)
if (rc == SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND) {
printf("\nStatement executed without error, however,\n");
printf("no data was found or modified\n");
return (SQL_SUCCESS);
}
else
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
SQLRowCount (hstmt, &rowcount);
rc = SQLNumResultCols (hstmt, &nresultcols);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS)
check_error (henv, hdbc, hstmt, rc);
/* determine statement type */
if (nresultcols == 0) /* statement is not a select statement */
{
if (rowcount > 0 ) /* assume statement is UPDATE, INSERT, DELETE */
{
printf ("Statement executed, %ld rows affected\n", rowcount);
}
else /* assume statement is GRANT, REVOKE or a DLL statement */
{
printf ("Statement completed successful\n");
}
}
else /* display the result set */
{
display_results(hstmt, nresultcols);
} /* end determine statement type */
SQLFreeStmt (hstmt, SQL_DROP );
/* free statement handle */
return (0);
}/* end process_stmt */
/*******************************************************************
** initialize
** - allocate environment handle
** - allocate connection handle
** - prompt for server, user id, & password
** - connect to server
*******************************************************************/
int initialize(SQLHENV *henv,
SQLHDBC *hdbc)
{
SQLCHAR
server[18],
uid[10],
pwd[10];
SQLRETURN rc;
rc = SQLAllocEnv (henv);
/* allocate an environment handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv, *hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
*/
SQL call level interface
317
SQL CLI
rc = SQLAllocConnect (*henv, hdbc); /* allocate a connection handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv, *hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
*/
printf("Enter Server Name:\n");
gets(server);
printf("Enter User Name:\n");
gets(uid);
printf("Enter Password Name:\n");
gets(pwd);
if (uid[0] == ’\0’)
{ rc = SQLConnect (*hdbc,
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv,
}
else
{ rc = SQLConnect (*hdbc,
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
check_error (*henv,
}
}/* end initialize */
server, SQL_NTS, NULL, SQL_NTS, NULL, SQL_NTS);
*hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
server, SQL_NTS, uid, SQL_NTS, pwd, SQL_NTS);
*hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT, rc);
/*******************************************************************
** terminate
** - disconnect
** - free connection handle
** - free environment handle
*******************************************************************/
int terminate(SQLHENV henv,
SQLHDBC hdbc)
{
SQLRETURN rc;
rc = SQLDisconnect (hdbc);
/* disconnect from database
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
print_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT);
rc = SQLFreeConnect (hdbc);
/* free connection handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
print_error (henv, hdbc, SQL_NULL_HSTMT);
rc = SQLFreeEnv (henv);
/* free environment handle
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS )
print_error (henv, SQL_NULL_HDBC, SQL_NULL_HSTMT);
}/* end terminate */
/*******************************************************************
** display_results - displays the selected character fields
**
** - for each column
**
- get column name
**
- bind column
** - display column headings
** - fetch each row
**
- if value truncated, build error message
**
- if column null, set value to "NULL"
**
- display row
**
- print truncation message
** - free local storage
**
*******************************************************************/
void display_results(SQLHSTMT hstmt,
SQLSMALLINT nresultcols)
{
SQLCHAR
colname[32];
SQLSMALLINT
coltype[MAXCOLS];
SQLSMALLINT
colnamelen;
318
IBM i: SQL call level interface
*/
*/
*/
SQL CLI
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLSMALLINT
SQLINTEGER
SQLCHAR *
SQLCHAR
SQLRETURN
SQLINTEGER
SQLINTEGER
nullable;
collen[MAXCOLS];
scale;
outlen[MAXCOLS];
data[MAXCOLS];
errmsg[256];
rc;
i;
displaysize;
for (i = 0; i < nresultcols; i++)
{
SQLDescribeCol (hstmt, i+1, colname, sizeof (colname),
&colnamelen, &coltype[i], &collen[i], &scale, &nullable);
/* get display length for column */
SQLColAttributes (hstmt, i+1, SQL_DESC_PRECISION, NULL, 0
NULL, &displaysize);
,
/* set column length to max of display length, and column name
length. Plus one byte for null terminator
*/
collen[i] = max(displaysize, collen[i]);
collen[i] = max(collen[i], strlen((char *) colname) ) + 1;
printf ("%-*.*s", collen[i], collen[i], colname);
/* allocate memory to bind column
data[i] = (SQLCHAR *) malloc (collen[i]);
*/
/* bind columns to program vars, converting all types to CHAR */
SQLBindCol (hstmt, i+1, SQL_C_CHAR, data[i], collen[i], &outlen[i]);
}
printf("\n");
/* display result rows
*/
while ((rc = SQLFetch (hstmt)) != SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND)
{
errmsg[0] = ’\0’;
for (i = 0; i < nresultcols; i++)
{
/* Build a truncation message for any columns truncated */
if (outlen[i] >= collen[i])
{
sprintf ((char *) errmsg + strlen ((char *) errmsg),
"%d chars truncated, col %d\n",
outlen[i]-collen[i]+1, i+1);
}
if (outlen[i] == SQL_NULL_DATA)
printf ("%-*.*s", collen[i], collen[i], "NULL");
else
printf ("%-*.*s", collen[i], collen[i], data[i]);
} /* for all columns in this row */
printf ("\n%s", errmsg);
} /* while rows to fetch */
/* print any truncation messages
/* free data buffers
for (i = 0; i < nresultcols; i++)
{
free (data[i]);
}
*/
*/
}/* end display_results
/*******************************************************************
** SUPPORT FUNCTIONS
** - print_error
- call SQLError(), display SQLSTATE and message
** - check_error
- call print_error
SQL call level interface
319
SQL CLI
**
- check severity of Return Code
**
- rollback & exit if error, continue if warning
*******************************************************************/
/*******************************************************************/
int print_error (SQLHENV
henv,
SQLHDBC
hdbc,
SQLHSTMT hstmt)
{
SQLCHAR
buffer[SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1];
SQLCHAR
sqlstate[SQL_SQLSTATE_SIZE + 1];
SQLINTEGER sqlcode;
SQLSMALLINT length;
while ( SQLError(henv, hdbc, hstmt, sqlstate, &sqlcode, buffer,
SQL_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH + 1, &length) == SQL_SUCCESS )
{
printf("\n **** ERROR *****\n");
printf("
SQLSTATE: %s\n", sqlstate);
printf("Native Error Code: %ld\n", sqlcode);
printf("%s \n", buffer);
};
return;
}
/*******************************************************************/
int check_error (SQLHENV
henv,
SQLHDBC
hdbc,
SQLHSTMT hstmt,
SQLRETURN frc)
{
SQLRETURN rc;
print_error(henv, hdbc, hstmt);
switch (frc){
case SQL_SUCCESS : break;
case SQL_ERROR :
case SQL_INVALID_HANDLE:
printf("\n ** FATAL ERROR, Attempting to rollback transaction **\n");
rc = SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_ROLLBACK);
if (rc != SQL_SUCCESS)
printf("Rollback Failed, Exiting application\n");
else
printf("Rollback Successful, Exiting application\n");
terminate(henv, hdbc);
exit(frc);
break;
case SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO :
printf("\n ** Warning Message, application continuing\n");
break;
case SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND :
printf("\n ** No Data Found ** \n");
break;
default :
printf("\n ** Invalid Return Code ** \n");
printf(" ** Attempting to rollback transaction **\n");
SQLTransact(henv, hdbc, SQL_ROLLBACK);
terminate(henv, hdbc);
exit(frc);
break;
}
return(SQL_SUCCESS);
}
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Code license and disclaimer information
IBM grants you a nonexclusive copyright license to use all programming code examples from which you
can generate similar function tailored to your own specific needs.
SUBJECT TO ANY STATUTORY WARRANTIES WHICH CANNOT BE EXCLUDED, IBM, ITS
PROGRAM DEVELOPERS AND SUPPLIERS MAKE NO WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS EITHER
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OR
CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND
NON-INFRINGEMENT, REGARDING THE PROGRAM OR TECHNICAL SUPPORT, IF ANY.
UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES IS IBM, ITS PROGRAM DEVELOPERS OR SUPPLIERS LIABLE FOR
ANY OF THE FOLLOWING, EVEN IF INFORMED OF THEIR POSSIBILITY:
1. LOSS OF, OR DAMAGE TO, DATA;
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SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF DIRECT,
INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO SOME OR ALL OF THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS
OR EXCLUSIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
SQL call level interface
321
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IBM i: SQL call level interface
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999, 2013
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IBM i: SQL call level interface
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Programming interface information
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Notices
325
326
IBM i: SQL call level interface
Index
A
allocate
allocate handle, function 33
allocated handle, function 33
connection handle, function 27, 29
environment handle, function 30, 32
statement handle, function 34, 35
allocate handle
allocate, function 33
application
example 308
sample 308
tasks 6
Assign File Reference, function 44
B
Bind A Buffer To A Parameter Marker,
function 51, 52, 60
Bind Column, function 36, 40
Bind File Reference, function 41
BindFileToParam, function 46
binding
columns 14
parameter markers 13
Binds A Buffer To A Parameter Marker,
function 47
D
data conversion
C data types
6
G
embedded SQL 308
End Transaction Management,
function 97
environment handle 3
allocate, function 30
allocating 8
Free, function 122, 123, 217
freeing 8
Error Information, retrieval 99, 101
example application 308
execute direct 12
execute statement 12
Execute statement Directly, function 102,
103
Execute statement, function 104, 105
Extended Fetch, function 106
Get Col, function 131
Get Column Names for a Table,
function 72, 76
Get Connection Attribute, function 132
Get Connection Option, function 133,
134
Get cursor name, function 135, 138
Get Data Sources, function 81, 84
Get Data, function 139
Get Description Field, function 140, 142
Get descriptor record, function 143
Get Descriptor Record, function 144
Get Dialect or Conformance Information,
function 185
Get Environment Attribute, function 151
Get Functions, function 152, 154
Get Index and Statistics Information for a
Table, function 259, 262
Get Info, function 155, 166
Get List of Procedure Names 212
Get List of Procedure Names,
function 214
Get Number of Result Columns 194
Get Parameters for a Procedure,
function 211
Get privileges associated with a
table 263
Get privileges associated with the
columns of a table, function 70
Get row count, function 219
Get Row Count, function 218
Get special (Row identifier) columns,
function 258
Get Special Column Names,
function 255
Get Statement Attribute, function 172,
173
Get Statement Option, function 174, 175
Get Table Information, function 266, 268
Get Type Information, function 179
GetCol, function 126
F
H
Fetch, function 108, 113
FetchScroll, function 114, 115
Foreign key column names, function 120
Foreign Keys Columns, function 116
Free
Connection handle, function 121
environment handle, function 122,
123, 217
handle, function 123
release environment, function 217
statement handle, function 124, 125
handle
connection handle 3, 8
environment handle 3, 8
Free, function 123
statement handle 3
header files 270
E
C
Cancel statement, function 61
case sensitivity 23
character strings 22, 23
CLI
writing a Db2 for i CLI application
CLI function
SQLSetEnvAttr 305
CLI XA transaction 311
CloseCursor statement, function 62
Column Attribute, function 63, 68
Column Attributes, function 69, 265
Column Information, function 73
Column Privileges, function 51
ColumnPrivileges, function 72
commit 15
Connect, function 77, 79, 96
connection handle 3
allocate, function 27
allocating 9
freeing 9
Connection handle
Free, function 121
CopyDesc statement, function 80
cursor 3, 15
data conversion (continued)
data types 17
default data types 17
description 19
SQL data types 17
data types
C 17, 18
generic 18
ODBC 18
SQL 17
deferred arguments 13
definition
restricted handle 30
Describe Column Attributes,
function 85, 88
Diagnostic Field Information, return 147
Diagnostic Information, return 145, 148
Diagnostic Record Information,
return 150
diagnostics 16
Disconnect, function 91, 92
DriverConnect, function 93
dynamic SQL 6
I
include files 270
initialization 6, 7
INVALID_HANDLE 16
ISO standard 9075–3:1999
2
17
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999, 2013
327
L
Language Information, function
184
M
More Result Sets, function
186, 187
N
Native SQL Text, function 188, 189
Next Result Set, function 190
Next Result Sets, function 191
null-terminated strings 22
Number of Parameters, function 192,
193
Number of Result Columns,
function 194, 195
O
ODBC
cursor names 135
precision 74
SQLSTATES 17
P
Parameter Data, function 196, 197
parameter markers 3
parameter markers, binding 13
Parameter Options, function 198
portability 5
prepare statement 12
Prepare statement, function 200, 203
Primary Key Columns, function 204, 206
Procedure Parameter Information,
function 206
Put Data for a Parameter, function 215,
216
R
release environment
ReleaseEnv, function 217
restricted handle, definition 30
Retrieve Length of String Value,
function 167
Retrieve Portion of A String Value,
function 176
return codes 16
Return Starting Position of String,
function 169
rollback 15
S
sample application 308
SELECT 14
server mode
restrictions 306
starting 305
Set a connection attribute, function 232
Set a Connection Attribute, function 220
Set a Statement Attribute, function 247
328
IBM i: SQL call level interface
Set connection option, function 234
Set Connection Option, function 233
Set cursor name, function 236
Set Cursor Name, function 235
Set Descriptor Field, function 237, 238
Set Descriptor Record, function 239, 240
Set Environment Attribute, function 241,
245
Set Parameter, function 246
Set Statement Option, function 253, 254
SQL
dynamic 6
dynamically prepared 3
parameter markers 13
preparing and executing
statements 12
statements
DELETE 15
SELECT 14
UPDATE 15
static 6
SQL_ERROR 16
SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND 16
SQL_NTS 22
SQL_SUCCESS 16
SQL_SUCCESS_WITH_INFO 16
SQLAllocConnect, function
description 27, 29
overview 7
SQLAllocEnv, function
description 30, 32, 33
overview 7
SQLAllocHandle, function
description 33
SQLAllocStmt, function
description 34, 35
overview 11
SQLBindCol, function
description 36, 40
overview 11, 14
SQLBindFileToCol, function
description 41
SQLBindFileToParam, function
description 44, 46
SQLBindParam, function
description 47, 51
SQLBindParameter, function
description 52, 60
overview 12
SQLCancel, function
description 61
SQLCloseCursor, function
description 62
SQLColAttribute, function
description 63, 68
overview 14
SQLColAttributes, function
description 69, 265
overview 11
SQLColumnPrivileges, function
description 51, 70, 72
SQLColumns, function
description 72, 73, 76
SQLConnect, function
description 77, 79, 96
overview 7
SQLCopyDesc, function
description 80
SQLDataSources, function
description 81, 84
overview 11, 14
SQLDescribeCol, function
description 85, 88
overview 11, 14
SQLDescribeParam, function
description 89
SQLDisconnect, function
description 91, 92
overview 7
SQLDriverConnect, function
description 93
SQLEndTran, function
description 97
SQLError, function
description 99, 101
SQLExecDirect, function
description 102, 103
overview 11, 12
SQLExecute, function
description 104, 105
overview 11, 12
SQLExtendedFetch, function
description 106
SQLFetch, function
description 108, 113
overview 11, 14
SQLFetchScroll, function
description 114, 115
SQLForeignKeys, function
description 116, 120
SQLFreeConnect, function
description 121
Description 121
overview 7
SQLFreeEnv, function
description 122
overview 7
SQLFreeHandle, function
description 123
SQLFreeStmt, function
description 124, 125
overview 11
SQLGetCol, function
description 126, 131
SQLGetConnectAttr, function
description 132
SQLGetConnectOption, function
description 133, 134
SQLGetCursorName, function
description 135, 138
SQLGetData, function
description 139
overview 11, 14
SQLGetDescField, function
description 140, 142
SQLGetDescRec, function
description 143, 144
SQLGetDiagField, function
description 145, 147
SQLGetDiagRec, function
description 148, 150
SQLGetEnvAttr, function
description 151
SQLGetFunctions, function
description 152, 154
SQLGetInfo, function
description 155, 166
SQLGetLength, function
description 167
SQLGetPosition, function
description 169
SQLGetStmtAttr, function
description 172, 173
SQLGetStmtOption, function
description 174, 175
SQLGetSubString, function
description 176
SQLGetTypeInfo, function
description 179, 183
SQLLanguages, function
description 184, 185
SQLMoreResults, function
description 186, 187
SQLNativeSql, function
description 188, 189
SQLNextResult, function
description 190, 191
SQLNumParams, function
description 192, 193
SQLNumResultCols, function
description 194, 195
overview 11, 14
SQLParamData, function
description 196, 197
SQLParamOptions, function
description 198
SQLPrepare, function
description 200, 203
overview 11, 12, 14
SQLPrimaryKeys, function
description 204, 206
SQLProcedureColumns, function
description 206, 211
SQLProcedures, function
description 212, 214
SQLPutData, function
description 215, 216
SQLReleaseEnv, function
description 217
SQLRowCount, function
description 218, 219
overview 11
SQLSetConnectAttr, function
description 220, 232
SQLSetConnectOption, function
description 233, 234
SQLSetCursorName, function
description 235, 236
SQLSetDescField, function
description 237, 238
SQLSetDescRec, function
description 239, 240
SQLSetEnvAttr, function
description 241, 245
SQLSetParam, function
description 246
overview 11, 14
SQLSetStmtAttr, function
description 247, 252
Set Statement Attribute, function
SQLSetStmtOption, function
description 253, 254
SQLSpecialColumns, function
description 255, 258
SQLSTATE 3
SQLSTATE, format of 17
SQLSTATEs 17
SQLStatistics, function
description 259, 262
SQLTablePrivileges, function
description 263
SQLTables, function
description 266, 268
SQLTransact, function
description 269
overview 11, 14, 15
statement handle 3
allocate, function 34
allocating 12
Free, function 124, 125
freeing 15
maximum number of 12
static SQL 6
string arguments 22, 23
T
termination 6, 7
transaction management 15
Transaction Management, function
transaction processing 6
truncation 23
269
U
UCS-2 307
unicode 307
UTF-16 307
UTF-8 307
W
writing
6
252
Index
329
330
IBM i: SQL call level interface
IBM®
Product Number: 5770-SS1
Printed in USA
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